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#SPP2017 @ p o l o n i u m _ o rg

3 - 4 N OV E M B E R 2 0 1 7 CAMBRIDGE, UK

s c i e n c e p o l i s h p e rs p e c t i ve s . o rg / s p p 2 0 1 7


COVER IMAGE: adapted from: Neurons differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells Magdalena Kurek | Karolinska Institutet


“Science used to be considered something set apart, a unique type of activity completely neutral with respect to human considerations. However, since Thomas Kuhn’s consideration of the social impact of science, we have been aware that it is in many ways a human activity like any other. The personal aspects of research, and the interactions of those involved can be just as important for the resultant intellectual value as the what and how. With this realisation in mind, conferences such as this - where the scientists group together according to cultural and not just purely scientific criteria - are an exciting complement to the more usual academic conference crowds.” — Marcin Suskiewicz about Science: Polish Perspectives, Nature Scitable 2013


ORGANISER

HONORARY PARTNERS

Projekt współfinansowany w ramach funduszy polonijnych Ministerstwa Spraw Zagranicznych Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej. Projekt jest realizowany we współpracy z Ambasadą RP w Londynie.

STRATEGIC PARTNERS

Konferencja „Science: Polish Perspectives”: Zadanie finansowane w ramach umowy 865/P-DUN/2017 ze środków Ministra Nauki i Szkolnictwa Wyższego przeznaczonych na działalność upowszechniającą naukę


SUPPORTING PARTNERS


AGENDA DAY 1: FRIDAY, 3.11.2017 8:00

9:00

Registration + coffee | St. John’s College, Fisher Building

9:00

12:00

WORKSHOPS running in parralel Applying for grants in Poland - why and how | Foundation for Polish Science Business case study: Sustainability of modern cities | The Boston Consulting Group Public speaking for scientists | Jon Torrens Development and commercialisation of technology | Black Pearls VC

12:15

13:00

CONFERENCE OPENING Welcome speech by Ambassador of the RP in London Welcome speech by representative of the Ministry of Science and Higher Education RP Polonium Foundation Presentation

13:00

14:00

Lunch | St. John’s College Great Hall S P EAK E RS SE SSI ON I

14:05

14:50

KEYNOTE TALK Illuminating Genome Organization through integrated Microscopy and Sequencing Magda Bieńko | Karolinska Institutet

14:50

15:05

Can you lose weight eating cake? Ola Kołodziejczyk | Weizmann Institute of Science

15:05

15:20

Undercovered translation. Hidden secrets of the ribosomes. Agata Starosta | Newcastle University / Centre for Bacterial Cell Biology

15:20

15:35

How to break a nucleus - a cellular compartment built to last Natalia Wesołowska | European Molecular Biology Laboratory Heidelberg

15:35

16:50

POSTER SESSION I + coffee

16:50

17:50

PANEL DISCUSSION Ustawa 2.0 - what can we learn from the consitution for science

17:50

18:00

First day closing Evening gathering | Baroosh Cambridge

19:00

DAY 2: SATURDAY, 4.11.2017 8:00

9:00

Registration + coffee S P EA KE RS SE SSI ON I I

9:00

9:45

KEYNOTE TALK Using mouse genetics to understand human Down Syndrome Victor Tybulewicz | Francis Crick Institute & Imperial College London

9:45

10:00

Twist and turn - the hydrodynamics of bacterial locomotion Maciej Lisicki | University of Cambridge


10:00

10:15

Feeding a Supermassive Black Hole - analysis of gas behaviour at the heart of Virgo Cluster Asia Piotrowska | University of Cambridge

10:15

10:30

Small super strong foams - novel three dimensional structures made of graphene Tomasz Cebo | University of Cambridge

10:30

10:45

Presentation by the BCG in Poland S P EAK E RS SE SSI ON I I I

10:45

11:30

KEYNOTE TALK The Jagiellonians: New Perspectives on Polish & European History Natalia Nowakowska | University of Oxford

11:30

11:45

Eighteenth-Century Poland Through the Eyes of a Noblewoman: Wirydianna Fiszerowa and her Memoirs Katarzyna Brzezińska | University of Cambridge

11:45

12:00

Sex, gluten rock’nroll. What is Loesje talking about? Joanna Łaszcz | University of Gdańsk

12:00

12:15

Make fMRI research great again! Wiktor Olszowy | University of Cambridge

12:15

13:15

Lunch | St. John’s College Great Hall S P EAK E RS SE SSI ON I V

13:15

14:00

KEYNOTE TALK When to trust a robot… Marta Kwiatkowska | University of Oxford

14:00

14:15

Blowing in the Wind Paulina Rowińska | Imperial College

14:15

14:30

A-mazing mice: a glowing example of how the brain can maintain its memory Michał Milczarek | Cardiff University

14:30

14:45

Navigating through data in Virtual Reality environment Sławomir Tadeja | University of Cambridge

14:45

16:00

POSTER SESSION II + coffee

16:00

16:15

Polish Development Fund presentation | Eliza Kruczkowska

16:15

17:15

PANEL DISCUSSION Driving Polish innovation - perspectives on bridging science with business

17:15

17:45

Conference closing

19:00

21:00

Formal dinner | Fitzwilliam College

21:30

1:00

Evening gathering | Baroosh Cambridge


GETTING AROUND Cambridge is a small town and with good weather it is best to get around on foot. All venues and places of interests are located in the town centre. However, it is possible to take city buses:

WWW.CAMBRIDGESHIRE.GOV.UK/TRANSPORT/AROUND/ BUSES/ In order to easily localise all venues and places of interest, we recommend Google Maps and official online map of Cambridge University

WWW.MAP.CAM.AC.UK


MAIN CONFERENCE VENUE

University of Cambridge, St John’s College, Fisher Building 26-27 Magdalene St, Cambridge CB3 0AF

LUNCH ON FRIDAY AND SATURDAY St. John’s College Great Hall


EVENING GATHERING ON FRIDAY

Baroosh Cambridge, 8 Market Passage, Cambridge, CB2 3PF


FORMAL DINNER ON SATURDAY Dress code We encourage lounge suits and cocktail dresses. Black tie is welcome but not obligatory. University of Cambridge, Fitzwilliam College, Storey's Way, Cambridge CB3 0DG


EVENING GATHERING ON SATURDAY (AFTER FORMAL DINNER) Baroosh Cambridge, 8 Market Passage, Cambridge, CB2 3PF


WORKSHOPS

APPLYING FOR GRANTS IN POLAND - WHY AND HOW?

Foundation for Polish Science

This workshop, led by a representative of the Foundation for Polish Science, the largest non-governmental source of science funding in the country, will provide you with an overview of options you will have at your disposal when planning your research career in Poland. We will present the current FNP grant offer as a point of departure, providing you with a road map of Polish funding opportunities and illustrating this structured presentation with a talk by one of our grantees, whose first-hand experience should equip you with real-life, practical knowledge about the benefits and challenges of doing science in Poland today. An interactive Q&A session at the end of the workshop will give you an opportunity to ask any additional questions you may have. Facilitators: Tomasz Poprawka, Monika Biłas-Henne | Foundation for Polish Science Małgorzata Jacobs | National Science Centre Anna Plater - Zyberk, Ewa Kuśmierczyk | Polish Academy of Science Przemysław Malinowski | FNP grantee

B U S I N E S S C A S E S T U DY: S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y O F M O D E R N C I T I E S

The Boston Consulting Group

Have you ever wondered what challenges are there in front of cities in the world of tomorrow? In this unique workshop led by BCG Consultants from the Warsaw office, you will become part of a strategy team responsible for development of public infrastructure. Come and see if you will be able to optimize city’s investment plan, as it struggles to provide one of the most critical resources to its citizens. Fantastic prizes from BCG Poland are waiting for the best teams! Facilitators: Michał Tykarski | Consultant Kinga Pławik | Senior Associate


PUBL IC SPEAKING FOR SCIENTISTS

Jon Torrens

Giving effective presentations that engage your audience’s interest is a valuable skill. In this session, Communication Coach Jon Torrens will show you some techniques based on his stand-up comedy experience: Characters – creating interest and playing to your strengths Storytelling and structure – creating rich, engaging information Conciseness – making the experience easier for your audience and for yourself How to use PowerPoint – best practise, tips and tricks First impression – putting the audience at ease Physical movement – creating interest and engaging your audience Timing – eliminating waffle and keeping to the schedule Handling nerves – mental and physical exercises for speaking confidence Adaptability – creating a little magic; dealing with worst-case scenarios

DEVELOPMENT AND COMMERCIALISATION OF TECHNOLOGY

WORKSHOPS

Black Pearls VC

Black Pearls VC is a venture capital firm focusing on Life Quality Technologies to improve the quality of human life, by addressing most pressing social changes, particularly within the scope of demographics, labour and business. The workshop will provide participants with practical knowledge covering the most important issues of building a global business based on development and commercialization of technology. The workshop will be lead by Marcin Zagórski, Partner at Black Pearls VC. Prior to joining Black Pearls VC, Marcin oversaw the creation and development of Amazon’s presence in Poland. Before that, he was a CFO at IVONA Software (text-to-speech technology currently fueling Amazon Echo), where he played a crucial role in IVONA’s sale to Amazon - one of the most prominent takeovers in the Polish tech scene. We look for the best entrepreneurs and scientists who develop and commercialize world-class deep tech & enterprise software, digital healthcare and ITS solutions. We back entrepreneurs across various stages of development. We usually invest at the seed and early growth level, but we are also interested in exceptional projects in their R&D phase. Our sweet spot are investments between € 100k and € 1m. Our Team members take part in the US-based Kauffman Fellows programme and we meet Invest Europe standards, being a member of the organization since 2016. Facilitator: Marcin Zagórski | Partner at Black Pearls VC


PANEL DISCUSSIONS USTAWA 2 .0 - WHAT CAN WE LEAR N FROM T HE CONSTITUTIO N FOR SCIENCE Lead by: Bartosz Paszcza | Polonium Foundation, University of Southampton Panellists: Aleksander Dańda | Ministry of Science and Higher Education RP Anna Plater-Zyberk | Polish Academy of Sciences Jonathan Heddle | Malopolska Centre of Biotechnology (MBC) Anna Kola | Obywatele Nauki

DRIVI NG POLISH INN OVATION - P ERSPECTIVES O N BRIDG ING SCIE NCE WITH BUSINESS Lead by: Sławomir Olejnik | Poland Innovative Panellists: Marcin Zagórski | Black Pearls VC Eliza Kruczkowska | Polish Development Fund TBC | The Boston Consulting Group Dominik Diak | Entrepreneur First


KEYNOTE TALK CELL BIOLOGY

SPEAKERS SESSION I

ILLUMINATING GENOME ORGANIZATION THROUGH INTEGRATED MICROSCOPY AND SEQUENCING MAGDA BIEĹƒKO, PHD

Karolinska Institutet | Sweden

Magda Bienko is a biotechnologist by training and obtained her Master degree from the Jagiellonian University in Cracow in 2005. She joined the lab of Ivan Dikic at the Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany for the PhD, which she defended in 2010. Afterwards she moved to the US and conducted her postdoctoral research at MIT in the lab of Alexander van Oudenaarden as a Human Frontier Science Program Fellow. In 2013, she moved with Alexander’s Lab to the Hubrecht Institute in the Netherlands where she concluded her postdoc training. In 2015,she became an Assistant Professor at Karolinska Institutet and one of 16 Research Fellows at the Science for Life Laboratory. Her research interest lies in chromosome organization and its influence on gene expression. Her interdisciplinary group is developing and applying state-of-the-art methods to visualize hundreds of genomic locations while simultaneously monitoring their activity in hundreds of single cells. In 2016 she was awarded the ERC Starting grant in the field of Life Sciences as well as the Career Development Award from the HFSP program.


GENOMICS | IMMUNOLOGY

CAN YOU LOSE WEIGHT EATING CAKE? OLA KOŁODZIEJCZYK,PHD

Weizmann Institute of Science | Israel

Our bodies are colonized by microorganisms, including more than 1000 species of bacteria. The interactions between this microbial ecosystem and the human host is vital for health and it’s role was already implicated in several autoimmune disorders such as allergies, as well as atherosclerosis or Parkinson’s disease. I aim to understand the relationship between gastrointestinal tract microbiome harbors one of the highest densities of microorganisms and diseases such as obesity or diabetes. In this study for a month we constantly measured blood glucose of people eating different foods and we characterised the composition of bacteria in the gut using bacterial DNA sequencing. The current method to predict amount of blood glucose is to estimate glycemic index (GI). Glycemic index reflects amount of sugar in 100g of particular food, so cookies have high GI, while broccoli low GI. People with metabolic diseases, most importantly with diabetes and obesity, are prescribed diets including many low GI foods and avoiding high GI foods. Interestingly, we observe that GI is not a good measure to predict blood sugar. Some participants had high blood sugar in response to some low GI foods, while moderate response to high GI foods. How we respond to food depends on digestion and absorption of nutrients from food. Food is digested by enzymes secreted by human glands and the intestine, but also by bacteria in the gut. Each species of bacteria has different enzymes, so the composition and abundance of bacteria affects the digestion process. Moreover, bacteria modulate functioning of human cells by many different mechanisms. By measuring composition of gut microbiome and using computational methods we are able to predict which foods are going to lead to peak in blood glucose and design personalised diet. Such diet will include some of commonly known as „unhealthy” foods such as ice cream or pizza, leading to higher compliance to diet and weight loss.


BIOCHEMISTRY / MICROBIOLOGY

UNDERCOVERED TRANSLATION. HIDDEN SECRETS OF THE RIBOSOMES. AGATA STAROSTA, PHD

Newcastle University/Centre for Bacterial Cell Biology |UK Ribosome are a centre of every living cell. For decades, they were seen as homogeneous macromolecules carrying a constant set of ribosomal RNAs and proteins. Consequently, they were not considered to actively participate in the regulatory role of gene expression. The hypothesis of specialized ribosomes assumes the existence of a subpopulation of ribosomes carrying unique structural properties allowing fast and precise response to environmental stimuli throughout selectivity for distinct mRNAs. I use sporulation process in Bacillus subtilis bacteria as a model to study regulation of gene expression on the translational level. Using combination of ribosome profiling (a powerful method following exact position of the ribosome on the translated mRNA), genetics, biochemistry and microscopy, I aim to identify factors modulating translation and accounting for ribosomal selectivity towards mRNAs. Initial data shows massive global rearrangements in proteins synthesis profile and unveils interesting events, like expression of previously unannotated open reading frames, occurrence of paralogues of ribosomal proteins or rearrangements in the ribosomal structure. All of which may lead to discovery of distinct sub-sets of ribosomes. Spores are widely found in soil, on fruits and vegetable, on any surfaces esp. in food containers. Since spore can survive most of the processes used for sterilisation of bacteria, including heat, radiation, chemical treatment, high pressure, they are an increasing burden in food processing and in hospitals. This work will shed more light on how translation contributes to the gene expression regulation during sporulation. Finding specialised ribosomes will add a new level of regulation of gene expression with a ribosome as an active element. Moreover, within the result, I may identify critical elements suitable for the rational design of new drugs, leading to discovery of novel potential targets for antimicrobials.


NUCLEAR ENVELOPE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

HOW TO BREAK A NUC LEU S - A C ELLULAR CO MPARTMEN T BU ILT TO LAST NATAL IA WESOĹ OWSKA, PHD

European Molecular Biology Laboratory | Germany In most Eukaryotes genetic material is contained behind the walls of the nuclear envelope - a barrier which regulates protein access to the chromosomes. During cell division, in order to break this tight-knit barrier, composed of lipid membranes and an underlying rigid structural scaffold, the cell requires physical force. The aim of my project is to understand how the cell's force-generating machinery i.e. cytoskeleton manages this destructive task in a very rapid but controlled way. The best way to see membranes and cellular structures at highest resolution is by using electron microscopy (EM), which does not require chemicals known to disrupt lipids. However, the best way to see and identify molecular machinery composed of proteins is by light microscopy (LM), which nonetheless requires permeabilization, i.e. partial dissolving of membranes. In my project, to show how nuclear envelope membranes are altered at exact spots of interaction with the cellular protein machinery required to break them I needed to be able to combine both. Correlative electron microscopy (CLEM), allows for LM images to be taken on the same sample as EM images and observe how the cytoskeleton pushes on weakened membranes leading to breaks. Thanks to the combination of methodology we use, we are able to view an event which remained quite enigmatic so far in cellular biology. Our data for the first time provide detailed characterization of the dramatic reshaping of the nuclear envelope during its breakdown. The project nicely illustrates how the cytoskeleton, a cell scaffold which is well known to shape and move the cell, thanks to its ability to generate force can also reshape compartments within the cell. Moreover, nuclear breakdown is crucial to the subsequent equal segregation of chromosomes into daughter cells. Thus it contributes to the success of a very basic biological process which allows us to become multi-cellular organisms and to generate healthy progeny.


KEYNOTE TALK IMMUNOLOGY

SPEAKERS SESSION II

USING MOUSE GENETICS TO UNDERSTAND HUMAN DOWN SYNDROME PROF. VICTOR TYBULEWICZ

Francis Crick Institute & Imperial College London | UK Victor Tybulewicz obtained his PhD at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, working with John Walker on ATP synthases. He then carried out postdoctoral research at the Whitehead Institute, MIT with Richard Mulligan, developing methods for gene targeting in mice. In 1991 he moved to the MRC National Institute for Medical Research, London where he runs an independent research group working in two main areas. Firstly he studies signal transduction in lymphocytes, exploring the roles of signaling molecules in B and T cell development, activation and survival. Secondly, in collaboration with Elizabeth Fisher, he is using mouse genetics to understand the pathology of Down Syndrome. Together they generated the first ever transchromosmic mouse strain, Tc1, which carries a freely-segregating copy of human chromosome 21, and shows phenotypes resembling the human condition. He has published over 160 papers in peer-reviewed journals. In addition to running his own research group, he was Head of the Division of Immune Cell Biology and Head of the Immunity Supergroup at the MRC National Institute for Medical Research. On 1st April 2015 the MRC NIMR became part of the Francis Crick Institute where Victor Tybulewicz is now a Senior Group Leader. He is a Member of the European Molecular Biology Organization and a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.


SOFT MATTER PHYSICS / FLUID DYNAMICS

TWIST AND TURN - THE HYDRODYNAMICS OF BACTERIAL LOCOMOTION MACIEJ LISICKI, PHD

University of Cambridge | UK

Bacteria outnumber any living organisms on Earth and their life is inherently related to the ability to produce motion. Propulsion relies on the nonisotropic nature of hydrodynamic friction and the coupling between the bacterium and the surrounding fluid. We analyse the underlying physical mechanisms in the interactions of bacteria with their viscous fluid environment and mutual interactions mediated by the fluid to understand the dynamics of their individual and collective motion. The flow of water in microscale is dominated by the effects of viscosity. For swimming bacteria, their environment resembles a honey-like medium with very high friction damping the motion. Thus they present a completely different swimming behaviour in aqueous solutions than fish and bigger swimming mammals. We analyse mathematically and numerically model micro-swimmers to analyse the mechanisms of their propulsion, reorientation, and streaming the surrounding fluid. In the theoretical framework of creeping flows, we identify the key properties of bacteria that enable effective propulsion, such as the drag anisotropy introduced by the presence of flagella and the surface slip velocity generated by ciliated organisms. Life is motion. Many medical conditions and laboratory diagnostic applications involve the motility of microorganisms suspended in the fluid, such as sperm cells in reproductive tracts or complex gut flora causing inflammatory diseases. Underneath the physiological aspect of these conditions lie physical mechanisms by which the organisms propel and interact with their environment. To analyse them in detail, we have devised theoretical models that grasp the essential physics, allowing to understand the role of the fluid in the individual motion of cells and bacteria. By analysing interactions between swimmers, we are able to explore complex collective phenomena such as clustering and hydrodynamic synchronisation of ciliary beating patterns.


PHYSICS / ASTROPHYSICS

FEEDING A SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE - ANALYSIS OF GAS BEHAVIOUR AT THE HEART OF VIRGO CLUSTER ASIA PIOTROWSKA

University of Cambridge | UK

At the centre of each active galaxy resides a Supermassive Black Hole (SMBH), which devours matter and converts the potential energy into powerful radiation. The fuelling mechanism of these extreme objects has not yet been investigated in detail, due to observational constraints. Taking a close look into the SMBH’s radius of gravitational influence in M87 galaxy, we provide unprecedented evidence of the non-symmetric character of this process, long sought in the scientific community. We use X-ray data from the Chandra Space Telescope to analyse gas distribution and properties around the SMBH. Proximity of M87 allows resolution of complex structures at scales smaller than the galactic nucleus, enabling detailed investigation of the central region of interest. However, due to its brightness, the active nucleus in M87 has always dominated crucial parts of the image, preventing meaningful analysis. Our data set provides an unprecedented view of the troublesome central region due to custom short frame-time observations of substantial total exposure time. Having enough photon counts, we conduct a meaningful analysis divided into 3 radial sectors of M87, to show non-uniform gas properties, which has never been done before. Violently accreting SMBH in M87 may seem irrelevant to us, given its unimaginable distance of 70m light years and mass of 10^10 Solar Masses. However, if put into more familiar perspective, it is a grape-sized object having profound influence on a host of the size of the Earth. It lies at the heart of the process, which influenced our Galaxy, gave birth to our Sun and finally shut itself down to leave a quiescent Nucleus we can observe. Understanding the SMBH accretion and emission mechanism is crucial for decoding the complex galactic evolution, which brought humanity where it finds itself now, at timescales beyond imagination. Apart from philosophical load, this investigation provides astounding images, which are definitely worth a look!


SMALL SUPER STRONG FOAMS - NOVEL THREE DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURES MADE OF GRAPHENE TOMASZ CEBO

University of Cambridge | UK

NANOTECHNOLOGY

Super-thin 2D materials have received a lot of attention since the 2010 Nobel Prize award for the discovery of graphene. Graphene, a single layer of carbon, due to its unique properties allowed for new technologies ranging from flexible displays, batteries to quantum computing. My research deals with a novel technique, where those 2D materials are wrapped around 3D foams. These porous foams can be used to make high-capacity, fast-charging energy storage devices like batteries and supercapacitors. Throughout my research, I developed 3D graphene foams with a sexy name - Freestanding Graphene Gyroids. My foams are porous and the pores are pretty small - the smallest ever made in high quality graphene, a thousandth of a human hair. Wrapping the 2D material around the 3D foam happens in a red hot oven, as hot as 700C. These extreme conditions can melt and collapse the foam. To prevent this, I developed an unusual trick which will be described in detail. My foams can be imaged with a powerful microscope - operated at a voltage thousand times higher than our wall sockets. In the images, you will see the geometry of the foams and how small the pores are. I will also show that the foams are surprisingly strong and conduct electricity well. In modern, fast moving world the demand for eco-friendly, quickly charging, high-capacity batteries is higher than ever. Laptops, phones, electric cars and planes all need them and need them urgently. Yet, the standard technology lags behind. To solve those challenges we can turn to nanotechnology - a science of manipulating materials on a very small scale. Modern battery should be made of a strong material with big surface area and good electric conductivity. All these qualities are present in my foams - the porosity ensures huge surface area and the usage of graphene - good conductivity and strength. Also, the trick for foam stabilisation can be used with other foams made of various materials, opening a new branch in battery engineering.


KEYNOTE TALK HISTORY

SPEAKERS SESSION III

THE JAGIELLONIANS: NEW PERSPECTIVES ON POLISH & EUROPEAN HISTORY NATALIA NOWAKOWSKA, PHD

University of Oxford | UK

Natalia Nowakowska has been an Associate Professor in History at Somerville College, University of Oxford since 2007, and before that was a post-doc at Oxford and the University of London. She has published on many aspects of Polish medieval and Renaissance history in their European context. She is currently Principal Investigator of the ERC-funded project, Jagiellonians: Dynasty, Memory and Identity in Central Europe.


SLAVONIC STUDIES / POLISH HISTORY

EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY POLAND THROUGH THE EYES OF A NOBLEWOMAN: WIRYDIANNA FISZEROWA AND HER MEMOIRS KATARZYNA BRZEZIŃSKA

University of Cambridge | UK

My research is on an eighteenth-century noblewoman called Wirydianna Fiszerowa and the memoirs that she wrote at the end of her life. Fiszerowa witnessed and participated in some of the most significant events of her time, mingled with members of the European elite, and maintained a close friendship with Tadeusz Kościuszko. She was well-known to her contemporaries, yet her name has been largely forgotten today, and my project aims to write her back into the European historical narrative. Wirydianna Fiszerowa’s‚ Dzieje moje własne i osób postronnych’ are the central source for my research. Written in French, the original memoirs were destroyed during WWII. Most scholars have therefore relied on the Polish translation of the original which was published in the 1970s. However, I recently discovered the only existing copy of the French text which has enabled me to compare the two versions for the first time. I also analyse Fiszerowa’s other writing, including her private correspondence with family members, letters from Kościuszko, and memorials to Kościuszko which she published in Warsaw and Paris shortly after his death. Alongside these I also use other primary sources from the period, such as diaries and letters. Fiszerowa’s memoirs intertwine critical commentary of significant political events with mischievous portraits of important historical figures and intimate descriptions of the seemingly mundane familial life of a Polish noblewoman. They provide an insightful and personal analysis of the period from the Bar Confederation of 1768 to the establishment of the Congress Kingdom in 1815 from an unconventional perspective. She was an exceptional woman; she mingled with the King of France and wrote speeches for family members and friends during the Four Year Sejm. Yet her story reveals the many roles that a noblewoman could play in eighteenth-century Poland and her strikingly honest narrative renders her remarkably relatable to the modern reader.


PHILOLOGY / LINGUISTICS

SEX GLUTEN ROCK’N’ROLL. WHAT IS LOESJE TALKING ABOUT? JOANNA ŁASZCZ

University of Gdańsk | Poland

Loesje is an international foundation which was set up in the 1980s in the Netherlands to reduce social pressures by making unusual posters in creative thinking workshops. The posters include interesting texts which are created by using language play and cultural associations in a surprising way. The aim of my presentation is to explain specificity of these texts by description a linguistic worldview in international Loesje posters which were published in 2017 on the official Loesje website. Using a textual analysis, I would like to search keywords in every text (e.g., „Sex gluten rock’n’roll”) to make a lexical-thematic classification of the selected posters which were published from January to July this year in English. Through this classification I will be able to present Loesje way thinking about surrounding reality. Moreover, because of connections with non-linguistic context (include e.g., cross-cultural communication, social factors or geopolitical conditions), the textual analysis enables us to understand a background of these posters in greater depth. According to the information from the official website, Loesje activity focuses on five main subjects (human rights and democracy; international peace, tolerance and the fight against racism and xenophobia; environmental protection and climate change; international development; personal development and daily life) to promote freedom of speech around the world (for more than 30 years, Loesje groups have developed in at least 25 countries, especially in Poland). However, there is no research which are dedicated to the analysis of sociolinguistic aspects of the Loesje texts. Because of that, the Loesje project research I conduct is an innovative and also a very important study of ways of communication and social reactions fixed in the posters.


NEUROSCIENCES / STATISTICS

MAKE FMRI RESEARCH GREAT AGAIN! WIKTOR OLSZOWY

University of Cambridge | UK

Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is a brain imaging modality which gives insight into the way the brain works. It is non-invasive, safe and relatively cheap. However, because of a lot of noise in the data, the results from fMRI studies depend heavily on the employed software and on the many assumptions made by the user in the analysis pipelines. Because of several recent validation studies showing low robustness of some of the fMRI methods, the entire fMRI field came under fire. My work is on validating the existing methods and possibly improving them. In the talk I will speak about fMRI research, as well as about method validation studies in neuroimaging. At last, I will present some of my current results related (1) to the modelling of the experimental design and (2) to the modelling of the blood flows in brain in time.


KEYNOTE TALK COMPUTER SCIENCE

SPEAKERS SESSION IV

WHEN TO TRUST A ROBOT... PROF. MARTA KWIATKOWSKA

University of Oxford | UK

Marta Kwiatkowska is Professor of Computing Systems and Fellow of Trinity College, University of Oxford. Prior to this she was Professor in the School of Computer Science at the University of Birmingham, Lecturer at the University of Leicester and Assistant Professor at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow, Poland. Kwiatkowska has made fundamental contributions to the theory and practice of model checking for probabilistic systems, focusing on automated techniques for verification and synthesis from quantitative specifications. She led the development of the PRISM model checker (www.prismmodelchecker. org), the leading software tool in the area and winner of the HVC Award 2016. Probabilistic model checking has been adopted in many diverse fields, including distributed computing, wireless networks, security, robotics, game theory, systems biology, DNA computing and nanotechnology, with genuine flaws found and corrected in real-world protocols. Kwiatkowska awarded an honorary doctorate from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm in 2014 and the Royal Society Milner Medal in 2018. Her recent work was supported by the ERC Advanced Grant VERIWARE „From software verification to ‘everyware’ verification” and the EPSRC Programme Granton Mobile Autonomy. She is a Fellow of ACM and Member of Academia Europea.


MATHEMATICS / STATISTICS

BLOWING IN THE WIND PAULINA ROWIĹƒSKA

Imperial College | UK

We can help tackle climate change by a more effective use of renewables, which are weather-dependant and thus notoriously unreliable. I am developing a new mathematical model of electricity prices and studying how they are influenced by wind energy generation. The goal of my research is to quantify risk and uncertainty of renewables in a more reliable way to encourage new investments in green energy. I am interested in prices of electricity contracts: spot (traded one day before delivery) and futures. I assume that the spot price is a sum of three components: seasonal as well as short- and long-term random factors, which we can’t predict exactly. Random components include so-called Levy processes, which can mimic complex behaviour of electricity prices, such as jumps or spikes. My main contribution to this model is studying how wind energy production influences the short-term factor. Why short-term? Think about the quality of weather forecasts: predicting the wind speed for November 2018 would not give us any valuable information today. Having estimated spot prices, I can find their expectation to get futures prices. How much did you pay for your last electricity bill? Too much, I bet. The good news is that the way to lower electricity prices is literally blowing in the wind, as I inferred from my data. However, the more we depend on cheap, but weather-dependant and therefore variable wind energy, the harder it is to predict prices of electricity contracts. This is why without a good mathematical model for electricity prices and knowledge about their dependence on the wind we cannot expect investments in renewables. And this would mean high electricity prices - both for your wallet and the environment. Because we will not be able to stop climate change if we still rely on burning fossil fuels.


A-MAZING MICE: A GLOWING EXAMPLE OF HOW THE BRAIN CAN MAINTAIN ITS MEMORY MICHAĹ MILCZAREK

Cardiff University | UK

NEUROSCIENCE

How does the brain store memory? What is memory, anyway? Can it be thought of as a pattern of neuronal activity? The current study explores these questions in mice learning a navigational task while tracking changes in the activity of their brain cells. We asked if learning over a long period would create unique patterns of activity in the retrosplenial cortex - a part of the brain believed to be vital for remembering events and environments. The mice were trained on a modified version of the radial-arm maze task for nineteen days and their performance was tested again after a short delay of six days and a long delay of twenty-four days. The animals learnt rapidly and achieved a plateau of fewer than one mistake per session by the final day of training but displayed forgetting on retrieval sessions. The neuronal activity level between training and retrieval was similar while activity was low following a period in the dark and higher after exposure to a novel environment. Learning also promoted the overlap between active cell populations such that mice which exhibited best performance on retrieval sessions also showed the highest levels of overlap between retrieval and training. The current study demonstrates the link between the acquisition of memory and long-lasting changes in the brain. It is, of course, not a novel concept, however, our methods demonstrate this link at the level of individual neurons that were tracked for weeks. We show that the retrosplenial cortex (RSC) participates in the formation of spatial memory engrams, that is, patterns of neuronal activity which constitute memory in the biological sense. A further development of the methods used in this study could help devise a way of simultaneously assessing the effect of memory-loss therapies on brain activity and its behavioural output, making it a powerful tool to rival other techniques which have so far failed to deliver a cure for dementia.


HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION INFORMATION VISUALISATION

NAVIGATING THROUGH DATA IN VIRTUAL REALITY ENVIRONMENT SĹ AWOMIR TADEJA

University of Cambridge | UK

Recently major tech companies, including Microsoft, Facebook and Google have started to heavily invest into state of the art VR technologies. These devices have the potential to affect the way people visualise and understand information which is especially important when dealing with large, complex volumes of data that is difficult to represent in 2D space. The aim of this research is to investigate the opportunities afforded by a third dimension in data visualisation to improve understanding. Navigating through visual representation of complex dataset using typical input/output devices such as computer monitor, mouse and keyboard can surprisingly be challenging even when dealing with two dimensions. Additionally, when working with VR head-mounted displays (HMDs), due to user’s level of detachment with outside world, new techniques of interaction with data such as gaze and movement tracking, oral commands in combination with gamepad controllers have to be used. This in turn, in some sense, both simultaneously limits and vastly extends design space of possible visualisation and interaction techniques. Some of these methods and tools to visualise and explore datasets with the help of VR will be presented. Recent, rapidly growing interest and progress in VR technology, together with newest development in gesture and voice operated intelligent interfaces present one of the biggest trends in human-computer interaction (HCI) and human-data interaction (HDI). Moreover, nowadays we encounter large volumes of data in all shapes and flavours not only in almost all branches of science and technology but in our daily life as well. Thus, it maybe be very beneficial to develop VR-based visualisation tools to engage and interact with these massive volumes of data. Very frequently, such datasets contain highly dimensional and hierarchical information that is difficult to portray in only one or two dimensions.


POSTER PRESENTERS

SIMPLE (SEMI)AUTOMATIC MEASURE OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS PROGRESS HANNA NOWICKA

NEUROIMAGING

University of Oxford | UK

In diagnosis and clinical trials for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) the progress of the disease is measured with the amount of pathological change newly appearing between two MRI scans of the brain. Currently, this assessment is based on manual labelling of the pathologies (lesions) on two scans and comparing these. However, it is time consuming and prone to bias . I propose the method for semiautomatic change detection in brain white matter in MS, which can be used in so needed drug clinical trials To compare the change of the white matter structure in the patient’s brain over time, the simplest idea can be to subtract one scan from another and quantify what is left. However, two scans always differ - similarly as two photos of the same person taken in different times - it is due to scale, position, ageing, etc. To prevent these changes from being detected as MS-related I introduce a custom non-linear registration method to align the scans before subtraction, as well as a machine learning classifier that discards the false positives. The method proved to be reliable and much more robust than a previous one described in the literature (Battaglini, 2014, JRMI). Multiple Sclerosis is the most common neurological cause of disability among young people. Sadly, there is no cure for MS, despite extensive clinical trials taking place around the globe. Presented method is simple, semi-automatic and reliable, hence has a potential to accelerate MS clinical trials, while reducing their cost.


CANCER RESEARCH / IMMUNOONCOLOGY

CO-EXPRESSION OF IMMUNE CHECKPOINT MRNAS AND MIRNAS IN BLADDER CANCER FUTURE OF IMMUNOTHERAPY? PAULA DOBOSZ, PHD

Tel Aviv University | Israel

The complex immunological synapse between T lymphocytes and cancer or APCs contains several checkpoint proteins that serve to modulate the signal transmitted to T lymphocytes. Despite the antineoplastic activity of immune checkpoint inhibitors in many malignancies, the majority of bladder cancer patients do not respond to this type of treatment. miRNAs from the miR-15/16 family were shown to target PD-L1 in ovarian cancer, but in bladder cancer this remains unknown. Expression analysis of mRNA and miRNA from 403 bladder cancer samples from the TCGA, also RNA obtained from 12 human bladder carcinoma cell lines. The expression of genes was analysed using qRT-PCR. The expression of 6 mRNAs is highly positively correlated to any of the other five mRNAs: they encode 3 co-stimulatory proteins (CD86, TNFSF4, TNFSF9) and 3 co-inhibitory proteins (PD-L1, PD-L2, galectin-9 (LGALS9)). Also, bioinformatic analysis shows that the expression of miR-15b is negatively correlated with 5 of analysed mRNAs: CD80, CD86, PD-L2, CD40 and OX40L. Most of the results were confirmed experimentally, however the experimental validation showed negative correlation between the expression of miR-15b and TNFSF18. Our results suggest a joint transcriptional regulation of co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory mRNAs on the cancer side of the synapse and suggest that the expression of the co-inhibitory checkpoint mRNA galectin-9 is highly associated with the expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2. Gene-gene interactions in the synapse might be very complex and if altered, the immunogenicity of the cancer may be compromised. mir-15b may negatively regulate the expression of checkpoint genes at the synapse, potentially serving as a post-transcriptional regulator of checkpoint expression. Our results, if further expanded, may eventually point to novel methods of enhancing the immunogenicity of bladder cancer and may potentially highlight novel targets.


INVE STIGATION OF RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PAIN CATASTROPHISING AND ANXIETY IN A NON-CLINICAL POPULATION MARCIN ZAWISZA

Queen Margaret University | UK

PSYCHOLOGY

The primary research aim was to investigate whether there is a relationship between pain catastrophizing and anxiety in a normal population when experiencing pain in non-clinical population. Three questionnaires used in the study: The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) (Spielberger, Gorsuch, Lushene, Vagg, & Jacobs, 1983), The Pain Catastrophizing Scale (Sullivan, 1995) and the Glasgow Pain Questionnaire (GPQ) (Thomas, McEwan & Asbury, 1996).The study was carried out online using Bristol Online Survey. The study was advertised on Facebook and Queen Margaret University research recruitment digest.lected, the quantitative statistical analysis was used to calculate the results. Statistically significant moderate positive correlations were found between GPQ and PCS, between GPQ and SAI and between SAI and PCS. The correlations shared from 29% up to 35% of the variance. High levels of PCS were with high anxiety. Study’ss results have a potential to increase our knowledge of the pain catastrophising and its relationship with anxiety in a non-clinical population which has never been studied before. This study could help in understanding the nature of pain and how catastrophising influences the degree of pain. The findings could provide the basis for a change of intervention in regards to pain in clinical settings. Future research could explore whether anxiety causes pain catastrophising or vice versa.


GEOTECHNICAL & CIVIL ENGINEERING

MECHANICAL CHARACTERISATION OF TIME AND STRESS-DEPENDENT PROPERTIES OF PUTTY CHALK GRZEGORZ BIAŁOWAS

University of Bristol | UK

While nearly all occurrence of putty/remoulded chalk can be problematic for geotechnical engineers because of the degraded strength and stiffness characteristics, laboratory studies of its mechanical properties remains infrequent. The results of an extensive laboratory campaign aiming to provide an advanced mechanical characterization, from small strain stiffness to large strain strength and deformation properties of reconstituted samples from crushed chalk (i.e. putty chalk). Using non-destructive wave velocity propagation measurements by bender elements, a full characterization of the small strain shear stiffness (G0) for a range of stress levels and over-consolidation ratios is provided for the first time. By aging fully saturated reconstituted chalk samples under different isotropic stresses (period up to 72 days), the age related small-strain and strength gains have also been investigated. While strength increases were found to be negligible, a consistent increase of the soil shear stiffness with time was recorded by wave propagation measurements. Such increase appears to be mostly related with secondary (creep) deformation. The main focus of this research was to characterise and clarify some fundamental aspects of the mechanical behavior of reconstituted chalk for civil engineering purposed. The project’s objectives have been pursued by carrying out an extensive experimental investigation on reconstituted chalk samples from slurry. The emphasis of this research was directed to explore the influence of the stress levels, stress history and ageing on the evolution of the principal mechanical properties, such as strength and stiffness, during the samples’ consolidation and shearing. This parameters are commonly used in everyday engineering practice.


AT THE TABLE OR ON THE MENU? IMPACT OF EUROZONE MEMBERSHIP ON NEGOTIATIONS IN THE EU COUNCIL JAN CHROMIEC

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Hertie School of Governance | Germany

The primary research aim was to investigate whether there is a relationship Are Eurozone members more influential in EU negotiations? Anecdotal evidence and conceptual literature suggest: yes, because they lack access to exclusive decision-making institutions such as the Eurogroup. However, so far we have lacked systematic empirical analyses of this relationship. In my PhD project I am studying an original dataset of Council negotiations from the years 1999-2017 to evaluate this claim. The most innovative part is how I built the dataset. Assessing ‚negotiation success’ is methodologically notoriously difficult. To overcome difficulties I have applied a new method of semi-automatic analysis of 50.000 Council documents. I capture positions of member states in the early stage of negotiations and compare them with positions in the final, voting stage. As a result I can observe which member states managed to achieve what they wanted. A major advantage of the method, besides validity and reliability, is replicability: the dataset can be easily extended with new documents, thereby allowing us to analyze negotiation dynamics in the Council over long periods. The project addresses key academic controversies of EU studies: what are political consequences of ‚differentiated integration’? What is the conflict structure in the Council? What explains negotiation success? Moreover, it addresses the policy-relevant question of political costs and benefits of Eurozone membership. Some EU members (including Poland) face debates on Eurozone accession. Others debate leaving the common currency. Both groups could benefit from the insights of this project, since it analyses political costs and benefits of being at the Eurozone ‚table’.


THE CITIZENS OF ACADEMIA AS POLISH FORM OF ACADEMIC (R)EVOLUTION ANNA KOLA, PHD

Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń | Poland

EDUCATION

The aim is to show how strategies of resistance of the university can be built, which will result in effective and sustainable conversion of thinking about the university as an institution in shaping and creating an elite, as well as developing mechanisms of pro-quality, taking into account social factors. To reveal this way of thinking and show possibilities of taking action, I describe the main Polish initiatives that can change the university world in every field. The goal of such ethnographically inspired research is diagnosis of a specific engaged academic community. The aim of the pilot study, carried out as part of the wider project Academic Social Movements in Poland among representatives of this social movement, is diagnosis of academic initiatives involved in the affairs of the university and its development, including determining what solution should be taken to change this institution, using the enthusiasm of youth, creativity and sometimes even anger of the Citizens of Academia. The important objectives of the paper are to provide practical recommendations for policymakers, academic communities, research institutions and university administration, as well as answers to the question about possibilities of using the intellectual potential of young, talented, rebel and open scholars, to became a catalyst for desired change of the university, as well as development of personal careers of Polish academicians.


PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION

SUSTAINING THE COLLABORATIVE LEARNING IN THE PROCESS TRANSFORMING A F2FE TO ONLINE COMMUNITY JOANNA JESIONKOWSKA

University of Liege | Belgium

This project is a study of the development of a scientific community of practice in an online environment. The community is changing from face to face to online environment. The aim of the study is to define the conditions that would allow to sustain the collaborative learning in a scientific community - the production and sharing of knowledge between scientists in the context of the training program in the area of analytical chemistry. A multi-method approach was used combining qualitative and quantitative methods. The analytical approach was sequential data analysis - results from one method were used to develop and inform the other method. The integration of the qualitative and quantitative findings took place during the analysis and interpretative stages of the research. At beginning qualitative methods were used (observations and interviews) for exploratory purposes which was then followed by the use of a quantitative method (questionnaire) sampling a large population. In a first step, a general exploration was performed to identify the variables to be studied, and then subsequently investigate those variables. The studied community is undergoing a significant transformation from face to face to an online community. The environment is evolving and the community must adapt to stay alive and active. Developing an online community of practice between the members of the community could be an answer to the learning needs, improve the culture of knowledge sharing and collaboration. The online community has to comply with the learning needs of scientists. Only then it will be accepted and collaborative learning in this community will be sustained. The model of the community and the set of recommendations can be used for other scientific communities.


BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

ENGINEERING MUSICAL GENES MONIKA ZBYTNIEWSKA

Imperial College London | UK

Have you realized that all the „cloud” information on internet is physically stored on hard drives in massive data centers? Global digital archive is growing exponentially and the current silicon-based storage technology is not enough. It’s time for the society to reach out to what we all have - DNA. My project aims at storing information in the form of musical notes into the DNA of a living yeast without altering its natural functions. Does it mean future with flowers instead of flash drives? In the first part of the project an efficient algorithm was developed in order to alter the yeast DNA sequence without changing its functions. This was done by interchanging the base triplets of the yeast genes with its synonymous codons, keeping the same amino acids and hence the same proteins. The synthetic DNA composed using the algorithm was then externally produced. Secondly, CRISPR-Cas9 - innovative gene editing technique, was used to replace the original yeast genes with the synthetic ones in a process called transformation. The experiments results show that some of the synthetic genes were successfully accepted by the yeast cells. Future work requires repeating the transformation experiments for further assessment of the method. An efficient algorithm for music data storage in DNA was developed. The program algorithm takes the original genes as its input and successfully alters them by synonymous mutations only. Therefore, the functions of the yeast are not altered by the DNA transformation. The algorithm used can be easily adapted to store any type of information. The main advantages of the algorithm are its simple encoding instructions and usage of a codon-based technique, which brings the genome’s storage method to its maximum potential. This project thus differentiates itself from previous work by attempting a combination of both an in vivo storage method and an innovative algorithm with an improved encoding efficiency, especially compared to binary based ones.


THE COMMON ITCH: ROLE O F EMOTION REGULATION AND ATTACHMENT SECURITY IN SKIN PICKING DISORDER MARTA ISIBOR

Queen Margaret University | UK

PSYCHOLOGY

Skin picking disorder (SPD) causes significant damage and distress. Despite significant prevalence, awareness and treatment are limited. SPD is poorly understood, however emotion regulation seems to be involved. No study has yet investigated this in the context of attachment, crucial in mental health; hence a novel perspective. The research aim was to investigate whether there is a relationship between SPD and adult attachment, and whether this relationship is mediated by emotion regulation. Cross-sectional design. Measures of attachment style, emotion regulation, and skin picking severity, taken via anonymous online questionnaires. Completed by 186 adult participants with SPD. The sample comprised members of online SPD-dedicated support groups. The data was analysed using multiple regression and mediation analyses. The study found small-to-moderate positive correlations between skin picking severity, insecure attachment, and maladaptive emotion regulation. Moreover, avoidant attachment and maladaptive emotion regulation accounted for 21% of variance in SPD severity; a solid medium effect. Finally, maladaptive emotion regulation partially mediated the relationship between avoidant attachment and skin picking severity. Demonstrating a novel relationship between SPD and insecure attachment provides much needed aetiology clues, opens new research avenues, and offers support for psychological treatments of SPD addressing emotion regulation and attachment. This constitutes an alternative to prevailing symptomatological focus and behaviourally orientated psychotherapies. Introducing relational constructs such as attachment into the therapy offers more in-depth and holistic approach, considering person’s ways of relating to self and others, as opposed to the sole focus on overt behaviour and on „here and now”, which results in high relapse. In turn, therapeutic outcomes can be better and more sustainable, ultimately improving people’s wellbeing.


THEORETICAL PHYSICS / NEUROSCIENCE

HOT BRAIN AND COLD MIND: MATHEMATICAL INVESTIGATION OF TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF NEURAL DYNAMICS DOMINIK KUFEL

University College London | UK

Previous research suggests that brain’s dynamics is strongly dependent on its temperature. Here, I aim to construct the mathematical model of the temperature dependence of neural dynamics on different levels of brain modeling. The model could link studies conducted in-vitro and in-vivo (carried out at different temperatures). Moreover, the temperature-dependent neural model could revolutionize the research of various temperature-sensitive neurological disorders including autism and epilepsy. To find an analytical function describing AMPA synapse, I introduce an approximation of uncoupling for the set of differential equations describing synapse dynamics, illustrated by the simple economic analogy. We may approximate bi-directional relation between the seller and the market as onedirectional(single seller has little influence on the huge market). Similarly, by assuming one-directional information flow between differential equations we may effectively uncouple them. The proposed analytical method based on uncoupling assumption is at least 10000% faster than previous Monte Carlo simulation. Additionally, the model is able to accurately capture the experimentally observed dynamics of AMPA synapse under different brain temperatures. On basis of the model proposed here, it is possible to construct computational models of temperature-sensitive neurological disorders including epilepsy, autism or transient global amnesia. This may be the crux of a better understanding of the mechanism of these neurological disorders and may lead to the minimization of brain damage associated with temperature. Additionally, the model provides the mathematical framework to link neurobiological studies conducted in-vitro and in-vivo. Preliminary research suggests that the model explains paradoxical temperature effects on the level of multi-neuron field recordings in neurobiology. This shows that model may be not only important in neuroinformatics but also in medicine and neurobiology.


SYSTEM & AEROSPACE ENGINEERING

HOW TO BECOME PART OF SPACE INDUSTRY - TRUE STORY JĘDRZEJ GÓRSKI

Wroclaw University of Science and Technology | Poland FREDE 2015 experiment aims at providing a better understanding of how chlorofluorocarbon compounds (CFCs’ - a group of refrigerants commonly known as Freons) disintegrate in contact with UV radiation present in Earth’s atmosphere under high and low altitude conditions, especially with the test compound brought to altitudes that range up to 28 km above Polar Circle. Fresh perspective in the area of ozone depletion process, climate change, and stratospheric in-situ measurements is a project goal. Selected compound (CFC-12) mixed with inert gas was contained in a separate 4 airtight gas bag which served as a reservoir for the CFC samples exposed to atmospheric conditions. The experiment required for each bag to be connected with a measurement chamber through a dedicated pneumatic system. In the measurement chamber an array of sensors (f.i. Electron Capture Detector) monitored the CFC’s concentration level as well as the temperature and the pressure for each test sample. The collected set of information was stored in the memory of the on-board computer while a backup copy was sent to the ground station. To prevent an undesired air contamination the test sample was cleaned in Zeolite Filter. All of this creates „flying laboratory”. Depletion of the Earth’s ozone layer (O3) and the increase in the greenhouse effect is well known fact related to CFCs’ emissions. FREDE Experiment was successfully launched on board of BEXUS-21 mission from cosmodrome in Esrange on 7th of October 2015. All of this was possible thanks to cooperation with Education Office of European Space Agency and REXUS-BEXUS program.


MOLECULAR & CELLULAR BIOLOGY

CAN GENETIC TESTING HELP ELIMINATE DISEASES IN LIVESTOCK? DALIA GALA

Glasgow University/Neogen GeneSeek | UK

Did you know that you can look into the animals’ genes and predict diseases which they could suffer from? Even better – with the modern technologies, researchers can try to eliminate these diseases by selective breeding. I was curious how science can help the farmers make informed breeding decisions. I analyzed cattle samples from 10 years ago and from the present day. The aim of my work was to see if over time science helps minimize the amount of genes causing cattle to die at an early age. Two random groups of cattle were selected for the experiment: one from the time when genetic testing of livestock has just become available, and a modern one, from around 10 years later. The cattle DNA was analysed using innovative methods on Next Generation Sequencing platforms to detect if they carry genetic diseases: ‘curly calf’, ‘fawn calf’ and ‘water brain’. The results showed that these diseases were much more common before it was possible to glance into the cow’s genes. Genetic testing minimised the frequency with which the defects occur in cattle, and now they are much rarer; in some cases up to 10% more of the animals is free from the disease. The results also showed that there were less carriers of the disease each passing year. If cows can mate randomly, genetic diseases which are neither good for the cattle nor for the breeders can happen. Selective breeding helps eliminate these diseases. The advancements of science can help the breeders make better decisions, and stops the animals from suffering. Many people did not believe such planning would ever be possible, or doubted the success and purpose of genetic testing. My results show that it actually works, because over such a short period of time since testing is available there is already so much less of the diseases cows! Research like mine shows farmers and breeders that genetics is not scary at all, and explains why they should trust science and get their animals tested.


APPLIED MATHEMATICS MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

HOW CAN MATHEMATICIANS MAKE YOUR VACUUM CLEANER LESS NOISY? ANDRZEJ JAESCHKE

Łódź University of Technology | Poland

The answer is: by automatic shape optimization. Compressor, which is the heart of every vacuum cleaner, is a machine in which the gas flowing through is changing its density. Although numerical simulation of such flows is an easy way to evaluate the performance of a given design (how loud is a vacuum cleaner with parts of a given shape), it is still a relatively demanding task in terms of computational costs. Our goal is to reduce amount of costly evaluations needed to find the optimal designs. For this we need to wisely choose the parametrization of shape, this is the description of the geometry with possibly few meaningful numbers. We also have to define the function to quantify the performance of a given shape. The next step is to perform so-called gradient optimization, which in every step „goes” towards optimal solution. To determine the direction of the step it requires a vector of quantities (called gradient) describing the dependency of the fitness of the current design on every parameter describing the shape. Evaluation of this vector is the most challenging part of the process. Standard methods require a significant amount of mentioned costly simulations. The core of this research is to possibly reduce this number. Despite the goal that can seem abstract, this research has a broad range of applications that will indirectly influence our everyday life. Compressors, not even mentioning other large groups of flow machines, are the crucial parts of many production lines, vehicles, household equipment and many others. The automatic shape optimization is a response to growing demand concerning optimality of the designs. At the same time it is very important to share the state of the art in numerical mathematics with researchers and engineers from other disciplines - it is them, for whom we, mathematicians, develop our tools.


HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMISTRY

EXPLORING GOLD AND ITS RELATIONSHIPS COUPLING CHEMISTRY PAULINA GENZELS

University of Bristol & Cardiff University | UK

Exploration of the homogeneous catalysis with the use of gold, which is a relatively new area. Gold is capable of amazing transformations that are unlike any other transition metals. With the help of hypervalent iodine oxidants, can produce new synthetic protocols for making of many industrially relevant chemicals, including drugs, via coupling of arenes, eg naphthalene. Making primary building blocks that possess chirality in one-step by gold catalysis would definitely be ground-breaking. Screening mostly by the means of NMR, Polarimetry (rotation of the plane polarised light), GC-MS, MS. In a later stage of the research, it would be amazing to be able to use some of the synchrotron techniques to screen active gold complexes. Substrates like naphthalenes are used, due to being the most relevant in terms of the synthetic and pharmaceutical field. Compounds like BINOL are major building blocks of MOST drugs. Gold (in homogeneous chemistry) is non-toxic and bio comparing to many transition metals via which most drugs and industrially relevant chemicals are made. Palladium is the metal used most widely, it gives great results but also is highly toxic, needs very expensive ligands and sometimes suffers from selectivity issues. Gold can be tuned easier and its synthesis is also considerably easier. It’s air and moisture stable. It has higher functional group tolerance. Coupled with iodine oxidants we could develop protocols in which chirality is introduced in the catalytic step, which would save millions of pounds in chiral resolution steps. This is very important research as gold has never been explored much in the homogeneous field.


MOLECULAR BIOLOGY / COMPUTATIONAL REGULATORY GENOMICS

HOW CELLS CONTROL THEIR GENES WHEN THEY DIVIDE SUPER FAST? A LESS ON FROM EARLY EMBRYOGENESIS PIOTR BALWIERZ, PHD

Imperial College London & London Institute of Medical Sciences | UK

Early stages of zebrafish embryo development are characterised by rapid cell divisions (15 min vs many hours in somatic cells) putting high pressure on the maintenance of cellular information outside DNA - epigenetic memory. An important part of epigenetic memory is the chemical modification of one of histone proteins (H3K27me3). In the gametes it marks developmental genes preventing them from expression. We are interested if this modification is preserved during the rapid cell divisions. By using a method for recognising regions containing H3K27me3 we have found that this modification is maintained throughout embryonic rapid cell cycles. However, about 1000 H3K27me3 domains loose signal at their ends but maintain it at their core regions, a phenomenon unobserved before. These shrunk domains expand in later stages of development (hatching embryo) roughly to the same extent as in gametes. The shrinking and non-shrinking domains are distributed differently in the genome and mark functionally different genes. Moreover, there are DNA sequence features correlated with the extent of broad and narrow domain forms. We show direct evidence of inheritance of epigenetic marks in vertebrates - a much recently speculated phenomenon. Namely, that at least part of the information outside of DNA sequence acquired during organisms lifetime and passed from gametes to the embryo is preserved in the embryo. Given that embryogenesis is a well conserved process it is very likely that a similar mechanism is active in humans. We don’t know yet if shrinking (and subsequent expansion) of the domains has a role in development, but our characterisation of the maintained vs shrinking regions can be used to predict H3K27me3 spans in adult human tissues.


STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING

CUSTOMIZE, OPTIMIZE, FABRICATE: SMART USE OF CONCRETE WITH THE 3 D PRINTED FORMWORK PAWEĹ BARAN

TU Delft | Netherlands

The aim of the presented work is to investigate the applicability of large-scale 3D printing with thermoplastics in the construction industry, particularly as formwork for concrete. Traditionally waste-productive and labour-expensive, the process of concrete casting is expected to benefit a lot from digital fabrication. However, to let the breakthrough happen, the mechanics of moulds produced with 3D printers needs to be understood, documented and verified - this is what is this project about. The research process has been divided in three stages. First, laboratory tests were done to determine cross-sectional properties of a generic 3D printed plastic wall as well as its behaviour under the concrete pressure. The experimental output has been used to build and calibrate the numerical model. In order to accommodate material’s unique structural characteristics, a custom, triple-layer shell element with dynamically adjusted parameters has been introduced. At the end, practical applicability of the method has been proven with a series of small-scale concrete elements. Cast in the moulds engineered with the use of the model, they reached the expected geometry after hardening. As one of the first such attempts in the world, this research lays foundation for the future work on modelling of structural behaviour of the 3D printed formwork. The latter technology allows to fabricate concrete elements of complex shapes, bringing freedom of form and customization possibilities virtually unachievable for traditional construction methods. Besides supplying the architects with a spectrum of new opportunities, such improvement could have significant impact on the environment: with around 5% of greenhouse gases being produced by the cement industry alone, optimization of the concrete use would be a big step towards saving our planet.


PSYCHOLOGY / LINGUISTICS

HOW POLISH CHILDREN IN THE UK CAN STAY POLISH (A LINGUISTIC PERSPECTIVE) AGATA DYMARSKA

University of Reading & Lancaster University | UK

We studied acquisition of Polish grammar in children who are heritage speakers of Polish (raised in the UK by Polish parents). We wanted to find out which aspects of their environment or schooling contributed to better language skills. We also aimed to explore what can be expected from children raised outside of Poland, compared to monolingual Polish children. The knowledge will help parents keep children motivated to maintain the language, and thus strengthen their links with the home country. Polish 5-8-year-olds living in south England completed a language task, consisting mainly of describing real and made-up objects. Their performance was correlated with other measures: parental reports of Polish language interactions the child has regularly, Polish vocabulary, and IQ test results. Parents reported difficulties in maintaining the home language once the child entered English school. Because of that, most children were behind monolinguals on using correct gender to describe nouns, and unsurprisingly, those who heard and spoke more Polish at home, performed better. Importantly, it was found that their pattern of language acquisition is similar to monolinguals, which means that they can catch up with the right amount of support. Learning Polish can be difficult for children living in the UK, especially when they start attending English schools, and much of their motivation and success is down to their parents. If we support them (and parents of other nationalities) in raising bilingual children, by providing knowledge and raising public awareness, they will benefit from more than better memory and a wider perspective on the world (as bilinguals do). In the future, Polish children living in the UK will feel connected to Poland, and will be able to put their language skills to good use: proudly represent Poland abroad, create personal and business ties with Poland, study and work in Poland, and continue the Science: Polish Perspectives tradition for decades to come.


NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY / MEDICINE

THE EFFECTS OF RESTRICTED FEEDING ON THE LEVELS OF STRESS HORMONE AND ITS PRODUCTION IN THE ADRENAL VIOLETTA PYĆ

University of Bristol | UK

Glucocorticoids (GCs) are vital hormones that are released in response to stress to regulate a number of physiological functions, including metabolism and cardiovascular activity. The literature provides evidence suggesting that fasting can affect GC secretion both by increasing hormone synthesis in the adrenal gland and by increasing GC half-life. This project aimed to further elucidate the mechanisms underlying the observed changes in GC secretion. An automated blood sampling system was used to collect blood samples over a period of 24hrs from rats that were allocated to one of the three experimental groups: ad libitum, fasted and restricted fed group. The blood plasma was further analysed by a radioimmune assay to quantify the corticosterone levels. By using reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction, gene expression was measured in the adrenal gland from rats subjected to the three experimental conditions. This study established that, compared to ad libitum fed animals, fasting increases basal corticosterone levels, while feeding reduces them. Neither condition affects the hormone response to a mild stressor. Moreover, the increased GC secretion in fasted rats was paralleled by a decrease of the inhibitory protein DAX-1 that is known to be crucial for the expression of key steroidogenic genes in the adrenal. A change of only one steroidogenic factor suggests a more complex adrenal response to fasting, possibly involving other metabolites acting on the gland.


HIGH-THROUGHPUT HAPLOID GENETIC SCREEN FOR FACTORS ESSENTIAL FOR HIV LATENCY MATEUSZ STOSZKO

HIV LATENCY

Erasmus Medical Center | Netherlands

Despite being easily suppressed, HIV infection cannot be cured. Persistence of the HIV in the body originates from the ability of the virus to integrate into host genome. Integrated pro-viruses are hidden from immune clearance and combinatorial antiretroviral treatment (cART), and constitute a reservoir of latently infected resting CD4+ T cells. It is believed that HIV can be eradicated from the body by so called „shock and kill” strategy where latency is reversed by targeting host proteins We applied insertional mutagenesis of nearly haploid KBM7 cells (of a myeloid origin). Firstly, KBM7 cells were infected at low MOI with single infectious cycle HIV-derived virus (LTR-GFP). From a pool of infected cells we sorted latently infected cells (Hap-Lats). Hap-lat cells were mutagenised by gene trap virus, which preferentially integrates into active genes leading to a block in their expression. Double positive cells (GFP+/mChery+) and negative cells were sorted and subjected to deep sequencing in order to identify non-essential host factors contributing to HIV latency. This approach will allow us to identify non-essential host factors involved in HIV latency in an unbiased fashion. Our understanding of HIV latency as well as gene regulation of a human genome will improve. Discovered proteins could be a promising new targets for „shock and kill” approach, and eventually lead to a HIV eradication from the body.


ORGANISING TEAM

PROJECT MANAGER ALEK SANDRA KRÓLIK

ANATOMICAL 3D PRINTING

European Molecular Biology Laboratory | Germany Designer-turned-science passionate. After spending her whole adult life in the UK, she has recently brexited herself to the beautiful Heidelberg. She now designs at EMBL, to which her biggest contribution is so far setting up a twoperson Karaoke Club. Ola likes watering plants and fixing things. She also tries not to miss EMBL Choir rehearsals. In her spare time, she writes articles on UX design and looks at CT & MRI scans so she can then 3D print anatomical models for doctors to help them prepare for surgeries. Needless to say, having to write a completely different bio for the SPP booklet each year since 2014, makes her rethink her life choices even more. As an SPP veteran and one of the founders of Polonium Foundation, she couldn’t be more happy to see the SPP Family growing so fast. She hopes she’s been taking good care of the amazing team she’s got a chance to work and laugh with.


NEUROSCIENCE

MARKETING & MEDIA JAKUB LEWICKI

Karolinska Institutet | Sweden Jakub is a Ph.D. student at the department of Neuroscience at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. He is working with 3D bioprinting technology, trying to create live models of the human brain. A scientist by day and a graphic designer by night, Jakub decided to join SPP team to be a part of this exciting event that combines research with his other passion - science popularization. Before, he was involved in many popular science projects including international FameLab competition. He sees his involvement in SPP as a great opportunity to create a unique community of people who inspire each other to do better science. When he is not 3D printing any brains, Jakub loves to tinker making everything - from small robots to leather wallets. Besides arts and crafts, he enjoys playing video games.


MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

PARTNERSHIPS AGATA MISIASZEK

University of Edinburgh | UK Uppsala University | Sweden Agata is passionate about the smallest things in biology. Recently, during her year abroad in Sweden she picked up computational biology on top of her long lasting love for structural biology. Now she tries to combine those two things, hopefully together with drug development in sight. Seeing the importance of science popularisation and creation of scientific networks Agata became involved in SPP couple years ago. Now she hopes to employ her experience to help make this year’s conference better than ever. While taking care of sponsors and partners she will ensure that the conference is buzzing with interesting people of all backgrounds. In her mythical free time, Agata enjoys travelling and scuba diving. But on a quiet evening, a good fantasy book or making jewellery also become her ways to rewind.


PSYCHOLOGY

REGISTRATION & COMMUNICATION MARTA TOPOR

University of Surrey | UK

Marta studies the wonderful science of human behaviour in Guildford - a lovely town near London. She is looking to specialise in children’s neurodevelopment and direct her career towards research. She also works with adolescents with acute mental health conditions. After attending SPP 2016, Marta felt very inspired and decided that she would love to be involved in the organisation of such a fantastic event. She is very passionate about science, research and innovation and she feels that SPP is the right place to be. Marta’s unusual obsession with spreadsheets and databases deemed useful and she became a part of the team. Marta enjoys hiking and discovering new places. She is a member of a mountaineering club and strives to master her climbing skills. In her spare time, she likes to read, cross-stitch and crochet.


BIOTECHNOLOGY

SCIENCE & BUSINESS EWA WARCHOŁ, PHD

Crescendo Biologics | UK Ewa’s motto is “less talk, more play”, which perfectly summarizes her passion for lab-based research. Ewa obtained MSc in biotechnology from University of Lodz and University of Chicago and finished her PhD in biochemistry at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich. After that, she has decided to switch from academia to industry and is now working for an innovative biotech startup in Cambridge, focusing on the development of novel cancer therapeutics. With an interest in bringing together business, science and innovation, Ewa joined the SPP2017 team to help build ties between Polish scientific community and business partners and hopes to create fantastic networking opportunities to enable growth of the Polish diaspora. Ewa is a keen traveller and loves exploring new cultures. Between trips, you can find her mastering yoga, dancing salsa, biking, or simply enjoying a sunny afternoon at the river Cam. Most recently, Ewa took on gardening and is a proud vegetable grower.


SCIENTIFIC CONTENT TOMEK WĹ ODARSKI, PHD

BIOPHYSICS

UCL & University of Cambridge | UK Tomek uses a computer as a microscope to gain insight into the amazing world of biomolecules present in our cells. He graduated from Jagiellonian University (MSc in Biophysics) and University of Warsaw (Phd in Biophysics) and now he works as a Research Associate at UCL (EMBO post-doctoral fellow). During his scientific journey he spent short time working in US, Austria and Croatia. In his recent project Tomek is using computer simulations to understand how proteins are synthesized in cells. After attending couple of SPP conferences in the past, he decided to join SPP team, where he will be responsible for scientific content of the conference. Tomek thinks that SPP is amazing platform to bring together Polish scientists with different scientific background from all around the World and discuss their work, life and future of Polish Science. In his free time he enjoys traveling and hiking, which he tries to combine with amateur photography. Besides these outdoor activities he enjoys playing volleyball.


CELL BIOLOGY

LOGI STICS LIDIA WRĂ“BEL, PHD

Cambridge Institute for Medical Research | UK Lidia’s scientific interest is focused on the cell biology research. She started her scientific adventure by exploring mitochondrial biology during her PhD at the International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology in Warsaw. Currently, she is an EMBO post-doctoral fellow at the Cambridge Institute for Medical Research. Her project focuses on the biology of diseases associated with protein misfolding and effective strategies to prevent neurodegeneration process. She joined SPP as she is certain that it is the best way to stay in touch with Polish scientists working around the Europe and a great opportunity to build relationships. On SPP2017 she is going to be a logistic-master, taking care that you do not get lost, have a bed to sleep and most importantly that you have a great time. In her spare time, she enjoys horse riding at the Cambridgeshire countryside or just a walk along the river Cam.


We are connecting Polish researchers all around the world to build a community that fosters collaboration, exchange of ideas and knowledge COMMUNITY BUILDING - SPP EVENTS Science: Polish Perspectives (SPP) is a series of events connecting Polish scientific diaspora all over the world. By bringing SPP events to this community, we are hoping to better undersand it, connect its members and give them a platform for discussion with academia, policy makers and industry in Poland. All SPP events promote interdisciplinarity and encourage best outreach practices. Our annual SPP Conference happens since 2012 every autumn in Oxford or Cambridge, and the more local satellite events called SPP Meetups are being organised in different forms all over the world.

RESEARCHING POLISH SCIENTIFIC DIASPORA Over the last several decades, Poland has experienced a large-scale brain drain. Many of the brightest young scientists decided to go into exile. We are trying to connect such people. We believe that the first step to do that is to better understand who they are. To this end, we are conducting a large research study. In 2016 we carried out three focus group interviews in Berlin, Oxford and London. This autumn we are launching a questionnaire study. Using the questionnaire, we aim to reach a group of several hundred Polish researchers living and working


abroad. We will ask them about their social and professional networks, both in their host country and in Poland. We will ask them how they perceive research in Poland and what they think about going back. Finally, we will ask how Polonium Foundation can help and support them. Obtaining answers to these questions is the first step towards building a strong and sustainable Polish scientific diaspora worldwide. If you would like to be a part of the study go to www.poloniumfoundation.org/questionnaire

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT We come to engage and promote the community, support the goals of its members in their career plans in science or industry and help them communicate their research findings. We believe that work of Polish researchers abroad needs to reach a wider audience in our homeland. We have connected many great scientists with Polish media including, Business Insider Polska, Focus, Gazeta Wyborcza, Polish Press Agency among others! On an international arena we supported Poles taking part in FameLab and 3 Minute Thesis competitions. We also collaborate with Getty Science on popular science publications. We are also actively engaged in outreach activities. This year we co-organised a Science Day: Poland’s Contrbution. A few hundred people took part in lectures, workshops and hands-on activities run by Polish scientists for the local community as a part of the British Science Week.

We are always on the lookout for volunteers and fresh ideas! Are you a science lover looking for a new challenge? Would you like to join one of our projects? Or perhaps you’ve got an idea on what else we could do? Don’t be shy! Come talk to as at Polonium’s stand, or email us at contact@poloniumfoundation.org

POLONIUMFOUNDATION.ORG


PARTNERS

THE FOUNDATION FOR POLISH SCIENCE (FNP)

Supporting the best, so that they can become even better The Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) was founded in 1991 as an independent, non-governmental, non-profit organization. Our mission is to help outstanding scientists – regardless of their nationality or career stage - to pursue world-class R&D programmes with their research teams, while hosted in Polish institutions. Our impact lies in selecting and supporting original, ground-breaking projects and aiding the commercialisation of scientific discoveries and inventions, so that they have a real chance of reaching the general public. We are the largest NGO funding science in Poland, built on a profound commitment to the following principles: • • •

Support is provided directly to scientists and research teams; All our grants, prizes and stipends are awarded through competitions and assessed through peer-review; Our leading criterion in awarding support is scientific excellence,


Since 2015, our line-up of programmes financed from EU funds includes: Grants for early-stage researchers up to 9 years after obtaining their PhD, terms and conditions applying depending on the particular programme: HOMING: a mobility programme open to talented researchers from all over the world POWROTY/REINTEGRATION: a programme enabling reintegration after a career break from R&D FIRST TEAM: help in launching your first research teams, a capacity-building scheme with approximately EUR 500,000 of funding available. Grants for senior scientists which offer positions for young researchers In addition, senior PIs awarded FNP grants in the programmes listed below have positions available within their research teams. These positions are open to undergraduate students, PhD candidates and postdocs. All competitions are advertised internationally, via FNP’s homepage or via EURAXESS. Research programmes will vary from grant to grant, however research quality will always be high: these are some of the best people to work with and best places to do that work at. You can find out more about each programme at www.fnp.org.pl TEAM TEAM-TECH TEAM-TECH CORE FACILITY / TEAM TECH CORE FACILITY PLUS INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH AGENDAS http://www.fnp.org.pl/en/


BUILDING IMPACT. CONNECTING ASPITATIONS. GROWING LEADERS. APPLY TODAY. #BCGinPoland


CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY POLISH SOCIETY The Cambridge University Polish Society brings together over 400 Polish students and people interested in Poland, afďŹ liated with the University of Cambridge. It forms an active community promoting Polish culture through a variety of events including talks, lectures, formal halls and celebrations of national holidays. It aims to popularise Polish science, employment opportunities in Poland, and to inspire future students of Cambridge. We have successfully organised two editions of NEXT STEP: Poland, a career conference in Cambridge, and co-hosted Science: Polish Perspectives four times. Last year our society had the pleasure of organising the 10th Congress of Polish Student Societies in the UK. The objectives of the Congress are integration, exchange of experiences, shaping of future leaders, and promotion of Polish culture abroad. We had the pleasure of hosting, amongst others: director Jan Komasa, art critic Anda Rottenberg, the former Marshall of Sejm Radek Sikorski, and the Deputy Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki, as well as celebrating the 10th anniversary at the Masquerade Ball. This year, we will be hosting the third edition of NEXT STEP: Poland, so join us in Cambridge for what promises to be a fantastic careers conference!

Cambridge University Polish Society @cupolsoc

(c) Izabela Kujawiak


Cambridge, 27th January 2018

www.nextsteppoland.org

NEXT STEP: POLAND is a student-led ini7a7ve, which aims to promote career and internship opportuni7es in Poland. The event’s main goal is to 7ghten collabora7on between Polish students in the UK and employers in Poland.

Workshops Networking Formal dinner Discussion panels Keynote speeches


Oxford University Polish Society

Oxford University Polish Society is one of the biggest national societies at University of Oxford and the oldest Polish student society in the United Kingdom. Established in 1955/1956, the Society served as an important platform for the Polish political activism during the Cold War, uniting Polish academics and providing them with a platform to develop without political constraints. Nowadays boasting around 200 members the Society keeps on integrating the ever-growing Polish community at Oxford and through its events it promotes Polish culture and history. Oxford University Polish Society has been operating under the official patronage of Prof. Leszek Kołakowski, Prof. Zbigniew Pełczyński (current Patron of the Society) and minister Radosław Sikorski. The activities of the society have also been supported by Prof. Timothy Garton Ash, Prof. Norman Davies and Prof. Jan Zielonka.


Fundacja Project Access Polska, założona przez grupę polskich studentów Oksfordu, działa od 2016 roku. Obecnie w skład zespołu fundacji wchodzi 17 osób studiujących 13 różnych kierunków na Cambridge, Yale i Oksfordzie. Fundacja jest częścią międzynarodowej organizacji Project Access. Polska gałąź zachowuje pełną autonomię i jest najbardziej aktywnym spośród ponad 15 państw. Celem fundacji jest działanie na rzecz poszerzania wiedzy polskich licealistów na temat możliwości studiowania na najlepszych uczelniach w Wielkiej Brytanii i USA oraz pomoc aplikantom przy procesie rekrutacyjnym. Działania fundacji oparte są na trzech filarach. Po pierwsze staramy się dotrzeć do licealistów. Często zdarza się, że to od nas po raz pierwszy polscy uczniowie dowiadują się o możliwości studiowania na prestiżowych uczelniach za granicą. Kluczowym wydarzeniem w tym zakresie były zorganizowane przez nas w grudniu warsztaty w szkołach, które pozwoliły nam dotrzeć do 2500 uczniów

Po drugie, wykorzystując sieć kontaktów na uczelniach, docieramy do studentów, którzy chcą za darmo pomagać zdolnym uczniom z Polski.

Po trzecie, łączymy studentów z aplikantami poprzez internetową platformę mentoringową. Licealiście, który zgłosi się do nas przydzielany jest mentor studiujący jego wymarzony kierunek na wymarzonej uczelni. Aplikant otrzymuje od mentora darmową pomoc podczas rekrutacji.

Flagowym wydarzeniem 2017 roku był Bootcamp Project Access - trzydniowy obóz, w czasie którego 30 licealistów było szkolonych w zakresie rekrutacji na Oksford i Cambridge przez 15 studentów i 5 wykładowców tych uczelni. Udział w obozie był darmowy, a uczestnicy wyłonieni zostali spośród 210 chętnych na drodze konkursu obejmującego ich osiągnięcia oraz sytuację społeczno-ekonomiczną. Znaczenie fundacji jest duże z kilku powodów. Wielu polskich uczniów ma wiedzę i umiejętności, które mogą być dla nich przepustką na Oksford czy Harvard. Nieznajomość systemu sprawia, że nie są oni w stanie odnieść sukcesu. Po drugie, wielu zdolnych uczniów nie zdaje sobie sprawy z możliwości studiowania na najlepszych uczelniach na świecie. Po trzecie, w Polsce działają prywatne firmy, które oferują pomoc przy rekrutacji za kwoty sięgające nawet stu tysięcy złotych. My chcemy wyrównać szanse Polaków na studia na najlepszych uczelniach.

Project Access Polska

Project Access w liczbach:
 • • •

ponad 200 aplikantów

150 mentorów

ponad 20 udanych aplikacji na Oksford i Cambridge

Kontakt i informacje: • • •

poland@projectaccess.co

www.facebook.com/ ProjectAccessPoland/

https://projectaccess.co

2017


11th International Invention and Innovation Show INTARG ® 2018 June 20th -21st 2018 International Conference Center Katowice, Poland www.intarg.haller.pl International Patronage: IFIA, WIIPA INNOVATIONS AND TECHNICAL SOLUTIONS: • INDUSTRY, • ENVIRONMENT, • HEALTH AND MEDICINE, • EVERYDAY LIFE Our mission is to promote innovative products, technologies and services from different branches in order to transfer them into the world of industry. INTARG is a platform for a direct contact for science and business representatives as well as for any supporting and financing entities. AIMS: • Technology transfer • Promotion of scientific research • Commercialization of inventions and innovations EXHIBITORS from more than 20 countries: • universities, institutes, high schools, innovative enterprises • start-ups, young inventors • inventors’ associations, foundations, embassies • financial institutions, entities supporting or cooperating with science VISITORS: Science and business representatives as well as individuals interested in science and technology. INTARG® Invention Contest: evaluation of inventions and innovations by international jury. PRIZES: Grand Prix, Platinum Awards, Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals, Special Prizes and others. PATRONAGES: INTARG® is supported by leading Polish and international institutions and organizations as well as by media. ORGANIZER: EUROBUSINESS-HALLER & HALLER PRO INVENTIO FOUNDATION Obroki 133, 40-833 Katowice, Poland e-mail: intarg@haller.pl; phone: +48 32 355 38 00


#SPP2017 /polishperspectives /poloniumfoundation @polonium_org

Science: Polish Perspectives 2017 Booklet  
Science: Polish Perspectives 2017 Booklet  
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