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The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018 • 37

Mounta in Times Volume 47, Number 7

Your community free press — really, it’s FREE!

Feb. 14-20, 2018

Courtesy of Rutland Rec & Parks Department

Kids at a previous Winter Fest enjoyed activities like pond hockey, night sledding, and snow sculpture decorating. The same activities — and many more —return this year .

Rutland Winter Fest to span nine days of outdoor activities

Feb. 16-24—RUTLAND—Rutland Winter Fest returns this year, featuring a week-and-a-half of activities to get the community involved in indoor and outdoor fun in the snow, and out of the winter blues. Events will span nearly every day, Feb. 16-24. The fun kicks off Friday, Feb. 16 with a free community skate night from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Giorgetti Arena, 2 Oak St. Extension, Rutland. It will be an evening of skating and activities including free rentals, snacks, and a hot cocoa bar. Saturday, Feb. 17 sees a day in Rutland’s Main Street Park for the Snow Sculpture Contest and a Chili Cookoff. From 10 a.m.-2 p.m., teams will be carving 4-feet by 8-feet blocks of snow/ice, developing their masterpieces. Spectators are encouraged to come watch. At the end of the day, the teams competing will be judged and the winning group will be announced at 2:30 p.m. For those not competing, Wonderfeet Children’s Museum will be on hand helping kids of all ages to decorate and create snow creatures; or toast marshmallows with the folks from the Boys and Girls Club. Don’t forget the skating rink will be back for broomball or ice skating (make sure to bring skates and a helmet). From 12-3 p.m., the Chili Cookoff will be taking place, when professionals, organizations,

living

. E . D . A

and amateurs will be vying for cash prizes for best chili. Tasting is free to the public, to warm everyone up! On Sunday Feb. 18, the fun moves back to Giorgetti Arena for Go Play Day and the Teddy Bear Carry, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The day is totally free, and features snowshoeing and hiking in Pine Hill Park; ice skating; fat bike demos; food and drinks; marshmallow roasting by the fire pit; sledding (bring your own sled); raffles, and the Teddy Bear Carry competition. Monday, Feb. 19, Rutland Country Club is home to the Frosty Feet 5k Run/Walk for Autism Awareness. Registration begins at 10:15 a.m.; the race begins at 11 a.m. The course is a loop, allowing for 2.5k or 5k racing. Proper footwear is encouraged, as the course is not plowed or paved. All ages are welcome. The cost is $5 pre-race day, or $10 on the day of. Tuesday evening brings the fun to Center Street for night sledding from 7-9 p.m. Center Street is closed to traffic and turned into a sledding hill, complete with music and hot cocoa. It’s a free event. Wednesday sees no activities, the but the fun returns on Thursday, Feb. 22 for the Winter Olympics at Vermont Sport & Fitness, from 12-4 p.m., for indoor games includ-

ing pickleball, mini tennis, curling, bowling, figure skating, and big ball hockey. Outdoor games include a snowshoe race and sledding challenges. All events are free. Rutland Regional Medical Center is home to winter fun from 4-8 p.m. with indoor and outdoor family-friendly activities: a teddy bear clinic, cookie decorating, puppet shows, photo booths, arts and crafts, a DJ dance party, hayrides, snow sculptures, games and prizes, giveaways, pizza and hot chocolate. Once again, all events are free. The event ends Saturday, Feb. 24, with a Center Street Story Walk from 10 a.m.-3 p.m., when participating businesses will be a part of a scavenger hunt around the book “The Mitten.” Read the pages of “The Mitten” through the windows of 14 total locations and complete the walk at Wonderfeet Kids’ Museum, where kids receive a free book if they complete the scavenger hunt. See participating locations at rutlandrec.com. Later that evening, the Real Rutland Feud will be presented at Paramount Theatre at 7 p.m., based on the TV show, “Family Feud.” Audience participation will be a part of the evening, with “Minute to Win It.” Tickets are $20. For more information or tickets to any of the events, visit rutlandrec.com.

living A.D.E. =

arts, dining and entertainment This weekly section features a variety of activities, events and entertainment options for visitors and locals alike. Are you hosting an event? Anniversary party? Kick-off? Benefit? Community gathering? Share it with the Mountain Times. Email editor@mountaintimes.info. With a weekly readership of 20,000+ your event is sure to be a success!


38 • The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018

LIVING A.D.E.

Lausanne Allen calls at Tinmouth Contra Dance Friday, Feb. 16, 8 p.m.—TINMOUTH—Bring friends and family to the Tinmouth Contra Dance at the Tinmouth Community Center, and dance to the splendid tunes of The Cold River Band with Lausanne Allen calling on Friday, Feb. 16 from 8-11 p.m. All dances are taught, and guests do not need a partner. Beginners should come right at 8 p.m. for a beginner’s lesson to learn the moves. There will be live music, enthusiastic swinging and dancing, refreshments and a fun night for all. The Tinmouth Community Center is located at 573 Route 140 in the center of Tinmouth, five miles west of Wallingford. Bring clean, non-marring shoes. Admission is $10-$12, $8 for teens and free for children age 12 and under. For more information, visit tinmouthcontradance. org. Submitted

Get your dancing shoes on and head to Tinmouth for a fun night of contra dancing.

Mother Up! Day at the State House slated for Thursday Thursday, Feb. 15, 12 p.m.—MONTlies, by growing a strong community PELIER—There will be an upcoming of parents dedicated to climate action, Mother Up! “climate action” day at and by fostering the next generation of the State House on Thursday, Feb. activists. 15. This is an opportunity for parents Monthly meet-ups in Brattleboro, and families throughout Vermont to Montpelier, and Burlington bring come together to let state legislators families together for open discussion know that not only is climate change of stories and concerns about the a top priority, but also that now is the climate, for planning and organiztime to lead the way with bold ing meaningful actions, and climate solutions. for learning opportunities The day includes an 11 about the underpinnings a.m. meeting with Lt. Gov. of the climate crisis. David Zuckerman, a 12 Every meet-up inp.m. presentation to the cludes childcare and a Climate Solutions Caucus, homemade vegetarian and being recognized on meal, as well as tips for the House floor at 1 p.m. All self-care to prevent activare welcome to join. ist burnout. Mother Up! By creatFamilies Rise ing familyPARENTS ARE POWERFUL Up for Clifriendly VOICES IN FIGHTING FOR THE mate Action organizing is a project of spaces for HEALTH AND SAFETY OF OUR 350Vermont parents and COLLECTIVE FUTURE. that engages children to parents to share stories take action in both their own commuwith one another and to find ways to nities and those most affected by the take action, Mother Up! helps to grow fossil fuel industry. Parents are powera stronger and more diverse commuful voices in fighting for the health and nity of climate activists. safety of our collective future. Mother For more information, contact Abby Up! builds community resilience by Mnookin, Mother Up! Coordinator, at creating connections between famiabby@350vt.org or 802-490-6393.

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Set a new table... Tables

Fair Haven Free Library features craft program with local artist

Doors Mirrors Custom Work by Hugh Pennell

Vietnam and Thailand. Today, this technique has made its way into American’s crafty hearts. This is a simple method that participants will be able to repeat again and again to make durable, long lasting gifts. Attendees will also get a list of instructions. Helm said that there is no special talent or experience needed to have a great time and be

FEB.

The art of living well.

Visit us in our newly renovated historic Country Store on Rt 103 between Chester and Ludlow

Saturday, Feb. 17, 9 a.m.—FAIR HAVEN— The Friends of the Fair Haven Free Library invite community members to come make a bowl from coiled magazine paper with local artist Caren Helm. The program will take place on Saturday, Feb. 17 from 9 a.m. until noon in the library. This craft originated with the women of

Thursday ~ Sunday 10 - 5 802 875 3109

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creative. Each person needs to bring a small bottle of tacky glue (Elmer’s is not suitable for this project); the rest will be provided. This craft day will be similar to a quilting bee: fun, chatter and amazing results! Space is limited to 20 people, so don’t delay! For more information or to reserve your spot, call the library at 802265-8011. The Fair Haven Free Library is located at 107 N. Main Street in Fair Haven, Vt.


The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018 • 39

LIVING A.D.E.

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Courtesy of Billings Farm & Museum

Visitors to Billings Farm & Museum enjoy a horse-drawn sleigh ride in deep snow around the fields of the farm.

Sleigh Ride Weeks featured at Billings Farm & Museum

Feb. 10-25—WOODSTOCK—Billings Farm & Museum’s Sleigh Ride Weeks are scheduled for Feb. 10-25, from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and will feature horse-drawn sleigh rides, tours of the dairy farm and farmhouse, and a variety of family-centered activities each day. Climb aboard the Billings Farm sleigh for a ride through the frosty farm fields; sample a cookie and enjoy a cup of hot spiced cider. In commemoration of President’s Day, hands-on activities will include presidential trivia and crafts. In the barns, discover Vermont

dairying — past and present — and learn about the development of the Billings Farm, still one of the best Jersey farms in America. The horse barn, calf nursery, milk room, cow barn, and sheep barn are stops along the self-guided tour. Up-close programs with the livestock will be offered including “An Introduction to Milking” and “Milking the Herd” programs at 3:15 p.m. each day. The restored and furnished 1890 Farm House will be open for touring, featuring the farm office, family living quarters, creamery, and ice house. Sleigh Ride Weeks admission in-

cludes sleigh or wagon rides, weatherpermitting, the farm, farm house, and activities, plus “A Place in the Land,” an Academy Award® nominee film. Admission is adults: $14; age 62 and over: $13; children age 5-15: $8; age 3-4: $4; age 2 and under are admitted free.  The Billings Farm & Museum is owned and operated by The Woodstock Foundation, Inc., a charitable non-profit institution. It is located one-half mile north of the Woodstock village green on Vt. Rte. 12. For further information, call 802-457-2355 or visit billingsfarm.org.

made you look. imagine what space can do for you.

MOUNTA IN TIMES

802.422.2399 • mountaintimes.info

Submitted

It’s Mardi Gras season, and Pickle Barrel Nightclub welcomes Richard James’ Krewe Orleans with the spirit of New Orleans.

Richard James’ Krewe Orleans brings a slice of Mardi Gras to Killington

Thursday, Feb. 15, 8 p.m.—KILLINGTON—On Thursday, Feb. 15, Killington gets a big taste of New Orleans, as Richard James’ Krewe Orleans: A Mardi Gras Experience fills the Pickle Barrel Nightclub with the music and the spirit of The Big Easy. The show is open to anyone 21 years of age and older.  Pink Talking Fish keyboard player Richard James has assembled a stellar cast of musicians from bands such as Giant Country Horns, moe., Trey Anastasio Band, Turkuaz and more. This 10-piece New Orleans tribute will feature the music of The Meters, Dr. John, Allen Toussaint, Professor Longhair, The Neville Brothers, Jon Cleary, and Little Feat, among others. Following this limited run of only

five shows, Richard James will resume his winter tour with Pink Talking Fish, a hybrid tribute fusion act featuring the music of Pink Floyd, The Talking Heads and Phish.  (Pink Talking Fish has its own date at the Pickle Barrel on Thursday, March 22.) Tickets for Richard James’ Krewe Orleans: A Mardi Gras Experience may be purchased online, at JAX Food & Games, or at the Pickle Barrel during business hours. Tickets will also be available at the door on the night of the performance. Doors open at 8 p.m. The Pickle Barrel is located midway on the Killington Road. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit picklebarrelnightclub.com or call 802-422-3035. 

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40 • The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018

LIVING A.D.E.

Courtesy of Castleton University

“Man in Red Bandana” is about Welles Remy Crowther, who selflessly helped to save many lives in the 9-11 attack onthe World Trade Center, before losing his own life.

Castleton men’s lacrosse to co-sponsor Vermont premier of documentary

Thursday, Feb. 15, 7 p.m.—CASTLETON—The Castleton University men’s lacrosse team, along with the Doug Mackenzie Lacrosse Fund, is proud to sponsor the Vermont premiere of the documentary film “Man in Red Bandana” on Thursday, Feb. 15 at 7 p.m. in the Casella Theater. The film chronicles the actions of Welles Remy Crowther, a former lacrosse player at Boston College who worked on the 104th floor of the South Tower within the World Trade Center in New York City. On Sept. 11, 2001, Crowther saved many lives after the terrorist attacks on the buildings before losing

his own life. Several months later, the discovery of his red bandana led those who knew him, as well as those who encountered him on that fateful day, to credit Crowther with numerous heroic acts. ESPN soon put together a feature story on Crowther’s actions, which is played every year on September 11. In addition, Boston College dedicates one home football game every season to his memory. Now, with permission from his family, a full-length documentary has been created about Crowther, written and directed by Matthew

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Weiss. Gwyneth Paltrow serves as the film’s narrator, and Lyle Lovett performs an original song produced specifically for the film. Along with the Spartan men’s lacrosse team, the Doug Mackenzie Lacrosse Fund is sponsoring the free showing of this film, its first playing within the state of Vermont. The fund is a recognized 501(c)3 charity established in 2013 by the friends of Doug Mackenzie after his untimely death in 2013. So far, the fund has donated more than $25,000 to the Castleton men’s lacrosse team. For more information about the film, including a trailer, visit maninredbandana.com. Castleton University is located at 62 Alumni Drive, Castleton.

Naked and cooking, “Chefs!” takes to Paramount stage Friday, Feb. 16, 8 p.m.— RUTLAND—Feast your eyes on “Chefs!” at the Paramount Theatre for a girls-night-out on Friday,

Feb. 16 at 8 p.m. These hilarious (and delicious) hunks give audiences a peek behind the apron as they slice, dice, and spice things up in the kitchen through a series of escalating culinary challenges where the stakes are high: if they lose a challenge, they lose their shirt. Literally. “Chefs!” is a fully interactive experience where the audience will vote for the winner and may even join the boiling hot chefs on-stage for uproarious cooking demonstrations. Outrageously bold and hysterically funny, CHEFS is “too hot for TV,” making it the perfect night out! Tickets are $34. Paramount Theatre is located at 30 Center St., Rutland.

For tickets and more information, visit paramountvt.org. Check out the chefs at thecheftour. com.

Courtesy of Paramount Theatre

Last year, the Paramount saw naked magicians. This year, it’ll be chefs without clothes.

BE HEARD.

MOUNTA IN TIMES mountaintimes.info


The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018 • 41

LIVING A.D.E.

Demo splitboards at Pico Hiko Splitfest

VINS welcomes families to seek owls

Friday, Feb. 16, 9 a.m.—KILLINGTON—Interested in splitboarding? Looking for a perfect match? From first-timers to seasoned split vets, organizers of Pico Hiko Splitfest want to help find the ideal setup. Catch the event at Pico Mountain on Friday, Feb. 16, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Jones Snowboards, Never Summer Industries, Rome Snowboards and Burton Snowboards are providing complete splitboard demos, with everything from boards with Spark & Karakoram bindings, to poles, packs and skins available to test.  Tickets to the event are $25, and registration is available at picohiko18.eventbrite.com/. A Killington/Pico Uphill Travel Pass is required for this event. Learn more at killington.com/uphilltravel.

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FOLA fundraises with “Sound of Music” sing-along Thursday, Feb. 22, 6:30 p.m.—LUDLOW—Looking for something to do on a cold February evening? Join FOLA for an evening of fun, and at the same time support a really good cause — the Black River Good Neighbor’s food shelf. Enjoy the classic movie “Sound of Music” on Thursday, Feb. 22, from 6:30-9:30 p.m. — and sing along. The show will be presented at the FOLA Theater, 37 Depot St., Ludlow. The theater is on the second

floor, above the Ludlow town offices, and is handicapped accessible. Bring the whole family. Great singing voices are not required, as there will be plenty of voices to blend with. The show is presented by Friends of Ludlow Auditorium to benefit Black River Good Neighbor Services. There is no admission fee, but a $5 per person donation to the food shelf is requested. For more information visit brgn.org.

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JONES DONUTS “Jones Donuts and Bakery is a must stop if you reside or simply come to visit Rutland. They have been an institution in the community and are simply the best.” OPEN WED. - SUN. 5 TO CLOSED MON. + TUES.

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23 West St, Rutland 802-773-7810

Friday, Feb. 16, 6:30 p.m.—QUECHEE—Vermont Institute of Natural Science welcomes all to its annual Family Owl Prowl, Friday, Feb. 16, from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Discover “Hooo’s” out there making raucous noises in the nighttime forest and learn about the secret life of one of New England’s most elusive nocturnal residents. Weather permitting, visitors will explore this wintry world on snowshoes and then warm up with a cup of hot cocoa. Pre-register by Feb. 12 at vinsweb.org. Please dress warmly. A headlamp is recommended. A limited number of snowshoes are available at the VINS Nature Store. Admission $16 for the general public and $12.50 for VINS members. VINS is located at 6565 Woodstock Road in Quechee, Vt. For more information, call 802-359-5000.

Courtesy of VINS

Bring a headlamp and an open ear to track down the elusive owl during VINS Family Owl Prowl.

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42 • The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018

LIVING A.D.E.

Library and conservation group explore animal sounds Tuesday, Feb. 20, 10 a.m.—FAIR HAVEN— The Fair Haven Free Library will be hosting a presentation by the One World Conservation Center on Tuesday, Feb. 20, at 10 a.m. Explore the world of animal sounds! Discover the importance of vibrations

MAR.

and why animals make sounds, get up close and personal with a certain chirping insect, and learn all about baby bird communication. The Fair Haven Free Library is located at 107 N. Main St., Fair Haven. For more information, call 802-265-8011.

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Freelance Family Singers start spring concert rehearsals in Woodstock Tuesday, Feb. 20, 7 p.m.—WOODSTOCK—Freelance Family Singers, Woodstock’s community chorus directed by Ellen Satterthwaite, will begin rehearsing for the spring concerts on Tuesday, Feb. 20, from 7-9 p.m. Rehearsals take place in the First Congregational Church of Woodstock located on Elm Street. No auditions are required. There is a participation fee of $15 for adults and $10 for children. Scholarships are available to cover these fees. The concert dates are Saturday, May 5 at 7 p.m. and Sunday, May 6 at 3 p.m. For more information, contact Ellen Satterthwaite at 802-457-3980.

Bishop of Vt. celebrates Holy Communion at Mission Farm Sunday, Feb. 18, 9:30 a.m.—KILLINGTON—The Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Ely, Tenth Episcopal Bishop of Vermont will be celebrating a service of Holy Communion on Sunday, Feb. 18 at 9:30 a.m. at Church of Our Saviour at Mission Farm (across from the Skyeship Gondola in Killington). The service is in the parish hall. After the service, Bishop Ely will meet to talk about a wide variety of subjects, including how the church serves the community and how community and church can tackle current-day issues, such as the opioid crisis. Bishop Ely has been head of the 45-congregation Episcopal Church in Vermont since 2001. He is active in Vermont Interfaith Action, Vermont Ecumenical Council, Kids4Peace (a group that brings together teens from Jewish, Christian and Muslim backgrounds for a week in Vermont), and Foundation Cristosal (in El Salvador). Ministry areas of special interest and expertise include ministry development, regional ministry, environmental justice, youth ministry, camp and conference center ministry, and youth suicide prevention. All are welcome to attend — come as you are, even in ski clothes! Please note that during the winter months, there is no running water at the church.

Submitted

Since 2009, Vermont holds a spring snow goose hunt to control the population of these geese.

Special snow goose harvest opportunity approaching in Vermont

Vermont’s spring snow goose hunt will be held from March 11 through April 27. Since 2009, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has annually issued a “Conservation Order” to allow the reduction of the population of migrating greater and lesser snow geese as well as Ross’ geese. The numbers of these geese have grown so high that they are destroying habitat for themselves and other species. Eight states in the Atlantic Flyway (Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Vermont) will hold a similar Spring Snow Goose Conservation Order in 2018. The Vermont 2018 Spring Snow Goose Conservation Order will occur statewide. The daily bag limit is 15 snow geese, and there is no possession limit. Waterfowl hunting regulations in effect last fall will apply during the 2018 Spring Snow Goose Conservation Order with the exception that unplugged shotguns and electronic calls may be used, and shooting hours will be extended until one half hour after sunset. A 2018 Spring Snow Goose Harvest

Permit is required and is available at no charge on the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department’s website (vtfishandwildlife.com) under “HuntWaterfowl-Spring Snow Goose Hunt.” Hunters may also call the Essex Junction Office (802-878-1564) to request a permit. Hunters will also need a 2018 Vermont hunting license (residents $26, nonresident small game $50), a 2018 Harvest Information Program (HIP) number, a 2017 federal migratory hunting stamp ($25), and a 2018 Vermont migratory waterfowl stamp ($7.50).  Hunters can register with the Harvest Information Program by going to the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department website or by calling toll free 1-877-306-7091. Hunters who obtain a permit will be required to complete an online survey after April 27 and prior to May 16, 2018, whether they hunted or not. Hunters without access to the internet may obtain a copy of the survey by calling 802-878-1564. “The breeding population of greater snow geese has grown from approximately 50,000 birds in the

mid-1960s to 747,000 birds today,” said David Sausville, Vermont’s waterfowl project biologist. “This increase has resulted in damage to agricultural crops and marsh vegetation in staging and wintering areas from Quebec to North Carolina. The Atlantic Flyway has established a goal of 500,000 greater snow geese to bring populations in balance with their habitat and reduce crop depredation.” During spring migration, snow geese typically move through the Champlain Valley in late March and early April. They usually pass through Vermont fairly quickly in route to their spring staging areas along the St. Lawrence River Valley. They remain there for about a month before moving on to their nesting areas in the Eastern Canadian Arctic. Since 1986, waterfowl hunters have raised $4.4 million for conservation projects in Vermont through their purchases of Vermont duck stamps, prints and resulting interest earned on the funds. To date, 92 wetland projects totaling 12,000 acres have been conserved, acquired, or enhanced for wildlife and the citizens of Vermont.

Congratulations to Merisa Sherman ... our Patient of the Month! “For me, skiing comes first, so having a physical therapy practice at Killington Resort meant that I could be inspired by skiers on Superstar while doing my exercises. My recovery has been awesome, especially with my therapist, Shannon, helping me every step of the way. I thoroughly credit Shannon as the key to my recovery. After four short months, I got a big smile and pat on the back from my orthopedist ... and I’m back outside AND on skis! I recommend VSMC and Shannon to everyone. As a physical therapist and snowboarder, she is an excellent asset to the community!”

Groovin’ the pasta & the salads & the lasagnas & mussels & the garlic bread & ...since the ‘70s Rte 4 Killington 422-3004 pastapotvt.com Open Daily 5 to 10 p.m. Closed Tuesdays

Photo: Shannon McBride, DPT and Merisa Sherman

NEED PHYSICAL THERAPY?

Celebrate winter with us at Rutland WinterFest www.rutlandrec.com/winterfest

“Putting Education, Experience and Research into Practice” Maureen Gibeault, PT - Clinical Director 3902 Killington Road

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W nderfeet Kids’ Museum a Rutland Creative Economy Initiative

Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10am-4pm, Sun 1-4pm; Closed Mon & Wed Admission $5 per person Memberships available

802-282-2678

11 Center St., Downtown Rutland

www.wonderfeetkidsmuseum.org


The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018 • 43

LIVING A.D.E.

By Rick Russell

Sculptures that have been created in past Vermont Flurry competitions have been utterly amazing to see. These are not amateur, folks!

Vermont Flurry on schedule to begin carving, Feb. 16

By Everett Marshall

A Downy Woodpecker is seen at a bird feeder during a previous Christmas Bird Count.

Join the Great Backyard Bird Count with area establishments

Feb. 16-19—Rutland County Audubon invites you to participate for at least 15 minutes on one or more days of the Great Backyard Bird Count, Feb. 16-19. Count from any location, anywhere in the world, for at least the minimum time slots of 15 minutes each, or as long as is wished! This is the perfect birdwatching citizen science project for kids, families and new birders. More information and count instructions are available at

birdcount.org VINS also participates in the Great Backyard Bird Count, Feb. 17-19. Enjoy watching birds at the feeders? Want to learn more about helping the birds in the community? Then put those bird watching skills to work at VINS in Quechee as they celebrate the Great Backyard Bird Count with activities for all ages and ways to improve birding skills. Participation is included in VINS admission. For more information, visit vinsweb.org.

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Friday-Sunday, Feb. 1618—WOODSTOCK—Pentangle Arts and ArtisTree Community Arts Center jointly present the Vermont Flurry: Woodstock Snow Sculpture Festival currently scheduled for President’s Day weekend, Feb. 16-18. The sculptures will come to life on the Village Green in Woodstock. Please note: This event is weather-dependent and may be rescheduled on short notice.

Over President’s Day weekend, the Woodstock Village Green is transformed into a celebration of winter and the visual arts. Cheer on professional snow sculpting teams as they compete to create large, stunning sculptures, and be amazed as these works of art come to life over a three-day period. The snow starts out as huge blocks of icy snow, set up to be carved into phenomenal sculptures.

Get involved by voting for a favorite “Peoples’ Choice” pick, to be announced Sunday, Feb. 18 at 12:30 p.m. Voting ends on Sunday at 12:15 p.m. The event is free and open to the public, and is part of Vermont Arts 2018, a celebration of the stunning array of arts events — concerts, festivals, exhibits, and openings — that take place all across the state. For more information, visit pentanglearts.org.

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44 • The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018

LIVING A.D.E.

Courtesy of Barn Opera

Puccini’s timeless and romantic tragedy “Madama Butterfly” will be performed by a new group, Barn Opera.

Barn Opera set to perform Puccini’s “Madama Butterfly” in Brandon

Saturday, Feb. 17, 7 p.m.—BRANDON—As a new exciting offering from the Compass Music and Arts Foundation, Barn Opera is ecstatic to announce its arrival and assimilation into the already incredibly rich cultural fabric of Vermont. Barn Opera will be making its debut by presenting Puccini’s timeless and tragically romantic “Madama Butterfly” in the intimate venue of Brandon Music, with professional singers and piano, on Saturday, Feb. 17 at 7:30 p.m. This performance and all subsequent performances of Barn Opera will be for the benefit of the Compass Music and Arts Foundation, and will seek to provide opportunities for local and regional talent to be featured, as well as raise funds to enable costfree arts education to the families and residents of Vermont. This initial event will feature a principal cast of all professional artists that all currently reside in Vermont, including: soprano Helen Lyons, who returns home from her professional operatic career throughout Germany; tenor Joshua Collier, who has recently relocated to Vermont from Boston, and has been seen locally with the Opera Company of Middlebury and Southern Vermont Lyric Theatre; baritone Cailin Marcel Manson, who sings throughout the region in opera and oratorio, and leads the Bennington Choral Society; mezzo-soprano Julie Olssen, who has been featured with Operaworks and regional companies throughout New England; Maestro Ken Olssen, who leads the ensemble from the piano, has been on music staff at Tri-Cities

opera and others, and along with his wife Julie, are the founders of the Southern Vermont Lyric Theatre; tenor Cameron Steinmetz and soprano Allison Devery, who have been seen in soloists and in choral performances throughout the state including Opera Company of Middlebury and Burlington Choral Society. The evening’s event will begin at 7 p.m. when guests will be invited to the cash bar where local beer and wine will be available. At 7:30 p.m. the evening’s performance will begin, with 10-minute intermissions in between act. At approximately 10 p.m. a complimentary glass of Prosecco will be offered to toast the performers, at which point the performers will be available to talk and greet the public. Brandon Music is located at 62 Country Club Road, Brandon. Invitations to attend the performance will be delivered electronically to any person who makes a donation of $50 or more to the Foundation. There are no specific tickets available to the public and there is extremely limited seating available as only the first 50 donors of $50 will be able to attend. Donations to be invited can be made until Feb. 16, and can be made online via Paypal at goo.gl/C2YD2F or by calling 802-247-4295. Net proceeds from this benefit event will be used to support the goal of the Compass Music and Arts Foundation’s to provide opportunities for the youth of Vermont to achieve artistic development without socio-economic division. For more information, email barnopera@brandon-music.net call 802247-4295.

FEB.

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If this is overwhelming to look at, some help with modern devices may be in order.

Get I.T. help at Thompson Senior Center Tuesday, Feb. 20, 12:45 p.m.—WOODSTOCK— Norman Williams Public Library Director of Technology Meg Brazill is offering individual help to people desiring assistance with laptops, tablets, and mobile devices on Tuesday, Feb.

20, 12:45-3:45 p.m. Contact the Thompson Senior Center to sign up for a 45-minute slot of time. Bring the device along and Brazill will work with participants to straighten things out and learn some tools and tricks. This event

is jointly sponsored by the Thompson Senior Center and the Norman Williams Public Library. Thompson Senior Center is located at 99 Senior Lane in Woodstock, Vt. Sign up for a slot by calling 802-4573277.


The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018 • 45

WINDSOR CENTRAL UNIFIED DISTRICT WINDSOR CENTRAL UNIFIED DISTRICT BOARD BARNARD

Pamela Fraser Bryce Sammel

pfraser@wcsu.net bsammel@wcsu.net

BRIDGEWATER

Justin Shipman Perrin Worrell

jshipman@wcsu.net pworrell@wcsu.net

KILLINGTON

Jim Haff Jennifer Iannantuoni

jhaff@wcsu.net jiannantuoni@wcsu.net

PLYMOUTH

Susan Mordecai Rebecca Geary

smordecai6@gmail.com rgeary4@gmail.com

POMFRET

Patti Kuzmickas Bob Coates

pkuzmickas@wcsu.net bcoates@wcsu.net

READING

Nina Salvatore Tim Bishop

thesalvatores@comcast.net tbishop@wcsu.net

WOODSTOCK

Jessica Stout Matt Stover Louis Piconi Sam DiNatale Paige Hiller Malena Agin

jstout@wcsu.net mstover@wcsu.net lpiconi@wcsu.net sdinatale@wcsu.net philler@wcsu.net magin@wcsu.net

Windsor Central Supervisory Union Administrative Office 70 Amsden Way Woodstock, VT 05091 802-457-1213 Website: www.wcsu.net Mary Beth Banios, Superintendent of Schools

WARNING FOR ANNUAL MEETING OF THE WINDSOR CENTRAL MODIFIED UNIFIED UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT The legal voters of the Windsor Central Modified Unified Union District (the “District”), comprising the voters of the Towns of Bridgewater, Killington, Plymouth, Pomfret, Reading, and Woodstock (all Grades PK-12), and the Town of Barnard (Grades 7-12), are hereby warned and notified to meet at the Woodstock High School/Middle School Teagle Library, located in Woodstock, Vermont, on Monday, March 12, 2018, at 7:00 P.M. for the purpose of transacting business not involving voting by Australian ballot. The legal voters of the Windsor Central Modified Unified Union District are hereby further warned and notified to meet at their respective polling places hereinafter named for the above-referenced towns on Tuesday, March 6, 2018, during the polling hours noted herein, for the purpose of transacting during that time voting by Australian ballot. Article 1: To elect a Moderator who shall assume office immediately and serve a one year term or until the election and qualification of a successor. Article 2: To elect a Clerk who shall assume office on July 1, 2018, and serve a one year term or until the election and qualification of a successor. Article 3: To elect a Treasurer who shall assume office immediately and serve a term ending on June 30, 2019, or until the election and qualification of a successor. Article 4: To determine and approve compensation, if any, to be paid District officers. Article 5: Shall the voters of the Windsor Central Modified Unified Union School District authorize the board of directors under 16 V.S.A. 562 (9) to borrow money by issuance of bonds or notes not in excess of anticipated revenue for the school year? Article 6: To determine and approve compensation, if any, to be paid to School Board Directors. Article 7: To transact any other school business thought proper when met.

MARCH 6, 2018 AUSTRALIAN BALLOT QUESTION Article 8: Shall the voters of the Windsor Central Modified Unified Union School District approve the Board of Directors to expend seventeen million, nine hundred fifty six thousand, eight hundred six dollars ($17,956,806) which is the amount the Board has determined to be necessary for the 2018-2019 fiscal year? It is estimated that this proposed budget, if approved, will result in education spending of $17,455 per equalized pupil. The legal voters of Windsor Central Modified Unified Union School District are further warned and notified that an Informational Meeting will be held at the Woodstock Union Middle School gymnasium in the Town of Woodstock on Tuesday, February 27, 2018, commencing at 7:00 P.M., for the purpose of explaining the 20182019 proposed budget. POLLING PLACES The voters residing in each member district will cast their ballots in the polling places designated for their town as follows: Barnard

Barnard Town Hall

7 am – 7 pm

Bridgewater

Bridgewater Town Clerk’s Office

7 am – 7 pm

Killington

Killington Town Hall

7 am – 7 pm

Plymouth

Plymouth Municipal Building

10 am – 7 pm

Pomfret

Pomfret Town Hall

9 am – 7 pm

Reading

Reading Town Hall

7 am – 7 pm

Woodstock

Woodstock Town Hall

7 am – 7 pm


46 • The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018

WINDSOR CENTRAL MODIFIED UNIFIED UNION SCHOOL DISTRIT FY2019 REVENUE BUDGET - PROPOSED

WCMUUSD CHAIR REPORT

I am Paige Hiller, the chair of your new Windsor Central Modified Unified Union School District. I am a School Board Member as well as the parent of 9th and 11th grade daughters who are fortunate enough to attend Woodstock Union High School. This is an exciting year for our District. Last year six towns voted to join together to form a single School District. The towns of BridgewaFY18B FY19P Change ter, Killington, Plymouth, Pomfret, Reading, and Woodstock all now Local Revenue have seats on a single board charged with operating the schools in our Tuition From Other LEA’s 2,256,683 1,750,000 (506,683) District. Barnard also has representation on the Board, as it supports the Woodstock Union High School/Middle School (WUHSMS). Tuition By Parent/Patron - Pre School 32,356 32,000 (356) It is the sincere hope and clear intention of these member towns to Interest Earned 54,025 54,000 (25) find financial and operational efficiencies by working together and Interest On Investments to raise the quality of the academic experience for all of our students. Additionally, this past July our District welcomed Mary Beth Banios Rental Income 162,000 162,000 as our new Superintendent. She brings a wealth of experience from Donations 34,000 34,000 her years in school administration in Massachusetts to us here at the Miscellaneous Local Revenues 900 (900) WCMUUSD. Her record is stellar in providing truly world-class educational experiences to her students while doing so at a cost-per-pupil WCSU Rental Income 12,000 (12,000) well below state averages. We have already been impressed by her Prior Year Surplus Applied 453,157 300,000 (153,157) innovative thinking and creative problem solving and look forward to 3,005,121 2,332,000 (673,121) all that we can do for the students and taxpayers of our district with Superintendent Banios at the helm. State and Local Revenue The schools in our District act as models for others in the State Education Spending Grant 14,070,761 14,279,181 208,420 in many different areas, and our District can take pride in them as Ed Fund Paymt to Tech Ctr 107,224 107,000 (224) among their greatest assets. We know that there is always room for improvement and our newly formed Board, along with our new Small Schools Grant 279,455 310,439 30,984 Superintendent, is focused on the opportunities ahead as well as the State Transportation Reimb 218,386 218,386 areas in which we can improve. As we all know, it costs a lot of money Driver’s Education Reimb 5,800 5,800 to operate any school in the State of Vermont and I would like to take the time that I have to explain to you how we arrived at our proposed Vocational Ed Transportation 25,000 25,000 budget. High School Completion Revenue I would like to remind you that the budget we are presenting to Place Based NPS Grant 30,000 30,000 you this year is a very different budget than you are used to seeing. We have not broken out individual elementary school budgets, but Capital Debt Hold Harmless Aid instead are presenting them as one because we are now a single board Lease Land Revenue operating multiple campuses. The total number of students in the Title I Subgrant WCMUUSD is used in calculating our cost per pupil spending and shared Merged Equalized Homestead Rate. Each town will, however, 14,736,626 14,975,806 239,180 have varying tax rates depending on that town’s Common Level of Appraisal. Special Education As part of the Act 46 consolidation legislation, a few financial incentives were tied to the process. First, the towns in the new Special Ed Excess Cost Revenue 557,825 300,000 (257,825) WCMUUSD were able to retain their Small Schools Grants (totalSpecial Ed Block Grant ing approximately $310,000 for FY19). Additionally, there is a tax Special Ed Expenditures Reimbursement 1,598,216 (1,598,216) incentive resulting in 8-cents off the FY19 tax rate. It is important to note that while this 8-cent tax incentive benefited our tax rate, the Tuition from VT LEAs 8,000 (8,000) State reduced the Homestead Property Yield that caused a 9-cent tax Title I Subgrant 96,951 85,000 (11,951) increase. There is no local control of this Yield; it is recommended by Early Essential Education Grant 20,290 (20,290) the Tax Commissioner by December and finalized by the Governor later in the year. We are subject to it by law. 2,281,282 385,000 (1,896,282) I would like to bring certain parts of the budgeting process to your attention so that you might better understand what decisions we made Food Service to arrive at this proposed budget and so that you might also understand how the State calculations and budgeting process impact our tax Food Service Revenue 264,000 264,000 rate. Annual State Match - LUNCH 3,000 (3,000) 375180144) We have estimated a raise for our teachers and staff Annual State Match - BRKFST 524 (524) of approximately one step (which equals approximately 2.1-2.5%), subject to negotiations. We are moving, for the first time, to a single (500) State Addt’l Breakfast 500 unified contract with a common pay scale. We are working to blend Federal School Lunch 83,000 (83,000) the various employee groups into this common pay scale and to do so, Federal Special Milk some employees will see the full benefit of a step increase and others will be worked into the scale as is appropriate. Federal Sch Brkfst/Start Up 20,650 (20,650) 375180145) I am sure that you noticed that Special Education 371,674 264,000 (107,674) expense in the budget decreased substantially from last year. That is because of a 2015 state law requiring Supervisory Unions to consolidate all special education costs in an effort to streamline efforts Grand Total 20,394,703 17,956,806 (2,437,897) and spending. So, in other words, our Direct Instructional Special Education spending has been taken out of our local and elementary 1122 1138 or HS/MS budgets and put into our Supervisory Union budget. Until this year, there were a few line items relating to Special Education that 1110 were still directly paid by the individual towns, namely all Special Ed1122as the new Superinten- 1138 As I finish my first six months the organization. 1077 ucation para-professionals. As of this budget, all the special education dent of the Windsor Central Supervisory Union, 1110I feel very1138Clarity of Goals and Vision 1122 para-professionals will be included in the WCSU budget. Control of fortunate to have landed in an educational community Across the district there are numerous dedicated Special Education costs continue to be challenging but as a result of 1077 1110 that cares so deeply for its children and is so invested in individuals and teams excited about building high level 1046 1020 this further consolidation of services, and strong management, we are providing outstanding learning experiences for its youngest learning experiences 1077 for the students of the Windsor 1003confident that we can see efficiencies and cost containment. 1122 1138 1000 citizens. I spent the first few months in my role engaged Central Supervisory Union. Much like our individual 1046 1020 375180146) The health insurance premiums, set by the Vermont 986 982 988 in an entry study that was focused on getting to know the schools, these groups have the potential to be much more 1110 School Boards Insurance Trust, will increase by 10% for FY19. The impactful if they are able to be organized1020 behind a clear 1003 schools and the communities that make up our union. 1000 1046 1077 encouraging news is that we have finally reached an agreement I have visited classrooms in all of our schools, met with vision and to act in concert with one another to achieve 986 982 the employees of the SU and 988 the Board that1000 for FY19, the 1003between all town, board, school, and community officials, studied the goals of the District. teachers and staff will pay 15% and the Board will pay 85% of health 986 982 988 student performance data, participated in parent and comBuild and Enhance Foundational 1046 Systems 1020 insurance premiums. Prior to this agreement, boards in the district munity forums, held one-on-one meetings, and attended The district enjoys talented and dedicated staff who put have paid anywhere from 100% to 86% of the cost of the1000 premiums. student events. forth exemplary effort in order to be sure that the district 1003 This is a huge step forward and we can be proud to have accomplished 986 982 988 functions effectively. However, there are numerous situThe results of this entry study pointed to four key areas the benchmark that Gov. Scott set last summer. of development for our new unified district: ations in which strong systems are not in place. This has 375180147) Next I would like to comment on our revenues. We Opportunity to Move from Good to Great resulted in numerous inefficiencies across our buildings, plan on receiving $1,750,000 from other towns that tuition their stuThe Windsor Central Supervisory Union has “good” with basic tasks taking much longer than needed and dents to WCMUUSD schools next year. This tuition is paid on behalf slowing down progress towards identified goals. The Act schools; however, there are indicators that it is not yet opof students who are not residents of the WCMUUSD towns but who = Student Count erating at its full potential. Our collective communities also 46 merger transition is a real opportunity to address some live in towns with school choice. These students are essential to the have resources and a mindset that can position the district of the deficits around strong foundational systems. continued success of our schools but please understand that the State = Student Count to be an educational leader both at state and national levels. I am excited to work on addressing these key areas of of Vermont does NOT allow us to count tuition students into our Move from Silos to a Unified K-12 System development within our Supervisory Union. This is an exEqualized Pupil Count. Tuition students make up approximately 10% = Student Count Each individual school has its own unique character citing time for all of our district schools and I look forward of WCMUUSD students this year. and resources to offer its students. The challenge ahead is to partnering with all of our community members as we The tuition that we have set this upcoming year for the elementary integrating each of these distinctive communities into a continue to work together in service of our children. schools is $15,000 and the MSHS is $17,500. Note also that the towns = Student Count well-functioning system while still maintaining the qualthat send us students pay both tuition and ALL special education costs ities that makes each building a special place for students Warm Regards, associated with those students. and families. To have an effective system, it is also critical Mary Beth Banios to have all contributors be clear around their function in Superintendent, Windsor Central Supervisory Union Continues on next page

WCSU Opening Enrollment: 10-Year Comparison (Pre-K to 12)

WCSU Opening Enrollment: 10-Year Comparison (Pre-K to 12) 1250 WCSU Opening Enrollment: 10-Year Comparison (Pre-K to 12) 1250 1200 1250 WCSU Opening Enrollment: 10-Year Comparison (Pre-K to 12) 1200 1150 1250 1200 SUPERINTENDENT’S MESSAGE 1150 1100 1200 1150 1100 1050 1100 1150 1050 1000 1050 1100 1000 950 1000 1050 950 900 950 1000 900 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 900 950 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 900 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

2017 2017 2017 2017


The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018 • 47

WINDSOR CENTRAL MODIFIED UNIFIED UNION SCHOOL DISTRIT FY2019 REVENUE BUDGET - PROPOSED Local Revenue Tuition From Other LEA’s Tuition By Parent/Patron - Pre School Interest Earned Interest On Investments Rental Income Donations Miscellaneous Local Revenues WCSU Rental Income Prior Year Surplus Applied State and Local Revenue Education Spending Grant Ed Fund Paymt to Tech Ctr Small Schools Grant State Transportation Reimb Driver’s Education Reimb Vocational Ed Transportation High School Completion Revenue Place Based NPS Grant Capital Debt Hold Harmless Aid Lease Land Revenue Title I Subgrant Special Education Special Ed Excess Cost Revenue Special Ed Block Grant Special Ed Expenditures Reimbursement Tuition from VT LEAs Title I Subgrant Early Essential Education Grant Food Service Food Service Revenue Annual State Match - LUNCH Annual State Match - BRKFST State Addt’l Breakfast Federal School Lunch Federal Special Milk Federal Sch Brkfst/Start Up Grand Total

FY18B

FY19P

Change

2,256,683 32,356 54,025 162,000 34,000 900 12,000 453,157 3,005,121

1,750,000 32,000 54,000 162,000 34,000 300,000 2,332,000

(506,683) (356) (25) (900) (12,000) (153,157) (673,121)

14,070,761 107,224 279,455 218,386 5,800 25,000 30,000 14,736,626

14,279,181 107,000 310,439 218,386 5,800 25,000 30,000 14,975,806

208,420 (224) 30,984 239,180

557,825 1,598,216 8,000 96,951 20,290 2,281,282

300,000 85,000 385,000

(257,825) (1,598,216) (8,000) (11,951) (20,290) (1,896,282)

264,000 3,000 524 500 83,000 20,650 371,674

264,000 264,000

(3,000) (524) (500) (83,000) (20,650) (107,674)

20,394,703

17,956,806

(2,437,897)

SUPERINTENDENT’S MESSAGE As I finish my first six months as the new Superintendent of the Windsor Central Supervisory Union, I feel very fortunate to have landed in an educational community that cares so deeply for its children and is so invested in providing outstanding learning experiences for its youngest citizens. I spent the first few months in my role engaged in an entry study that was focused on getting to know the schools and the communities that make up our union. I have visited classrooms in all of our schools, met with town, board, school, and community officials, studied student performance data, participated in parent and community forums, held one-on-one meetings, and attended student events. The results of this entry study pointed to four key areas of development for our new unified district: Opportunity to Move from Good to Great The Windsor Central Supervisory Union has “good” schools; however, there are indicators that it is not yet operating at its full potential. Our collective communities also have resources and a mindset that can position the district to be an educational leader both at state and national levels. Move from Silos to a Unified K-12 System Each individual school has its own unique character and resources to offer its students. The challenge ahead is integrating each of these distinctive communities into a well-functioning system while still maintaining the qualities that makes each building a special place for students and families. To have an effective system, it is also critical to have all contributors be clear around their function in

the organization. Clarity of Goals and Vision Across the district there are numerous dedicated individuals and teams excited about building high level learning experiences for the students of the Windsor Central Supervisory Union. Much like our individual schools, these groups have the potential to be much more impactful if they are able to be organized behind a clear vision and to act in concert with one another to achieve the goals of the District. Build and Enhance Foundational Systems The district enjoys talented and dedicated staff who put forth exemplary effort in order to be sure that the district functions effectively. However, there are numerous situations in which strong systems are not in place. This has resulted in numerous inefficiencies across our buildings, with basic tasks taking much longer than needed and slowing down progress towards identified goals. The Act 46 merger transition is a real opportunity to address some of the deficits around strong foundational systems. I am excited to work on addressing these key areas of development within our Supervisory Union. This is an exciting time for all of our district schools and I look forward to partnering with all of our community members as we continue to work together in service of our children. Warm Regards, Mary Beth Banios Superintendent, Windsor Central Supervisory Union

WCMUUSD CHAIR REPORT I am Paige Hiller, the chair of your new Windsor Central Modified Unified Union School District. I am a School Board Member as well as the parent of 9th and 11th grade daughters who are fortunate enough to attend Woodstock Union High School. This is an exciting year for our District. Last year six towns voted to join together to form a single School District. The towns of Bridgewater, Killington, Plymouth, Pomfret, Reading, and Woodstock all now have seats on a single board charged with operating the schools in our District. Barnard also has representation on the Board, as it supports the Woodstock Union High School/Middle School (WUHSMS). It is the sincere hope and clear intention of these member towns to find financial and operational efficiencies by working together and to raise the quality of the academic experience for all of our students. Additionally, this past July our District welcomed Mary Beth Banios as our new Superintendent. She brings a wealth of experience from her years in school administration in Massachusetts to us here at the WCMUUSD. Her record is stellar in providing truly world-class educational experiences to her students while doing so at a cost-per-pupil well below state averages. We have already been impressed by her innovative thinking and creative problem solving and look forward to all that we can do for the students and taxpayers of our district with Superintendent Banios at the helm. The schools in our District act as models for others in the State in many different areas, and our District can take pride in them as among their greatest assets. We know that there is always room for improvement and our newly formed Board, along with our new Superintendent, is focused on the opportunities ahead as well as the areas in which we can improve. As we all know, it costs a lot of money to operate any school in the State of Vermont and I would like to take the time that I have to explain to you how we arrived at our proposed budget. I would like to remind you that the budget we are presenting to you this year is a very different budget than you are used to seeing. We have not broken out individual elementary school budgets, but instead are presenting them as one because we are now a single board operating multiple campuses. The total number of students in the WCMUUSD is used in calculating our cost per pupil spending and shared Merged Equalized Homestead Rate. Each town will, however, have varying tax rates depending on that town’s Common Level of Appraisal. As part of the Act 46 consolidation legislation, a few financial incentives were tied to the process. First, the towns in the new WCMUUSD were able to retain their Small Schools Grants (totaling approximately $310,000 for FY19). Additionally, there is a tax incentive resulting in 8-cents off the FY19 tax rate. It is important to note that while this 8-cent tax incentive benefited our tax rate, the State reduced the Homestead Property Yield that caused a 9-cent tax increase. There is no local control of this Yield; it is recommended by the Tax Commissioner by December and finalized by the Governor later in the year. We are subject to it by law. I would like to bring certain parts of the budgeting process to your attention so that you might better understand what decisions we made to arrive at this proposed budget and so that you might also understand how the State calculations and budgeting process impact our tax rate. 375180144) We have estimated a raise for our teachers and staff of approximately one step (which equals approximately 2.1-2.5%), subject to negotiations. We are moving, for the first time, to a single unified contract with a common pay scale. We are working to blend the various employee groups into this common pay scale and to do so, some employees will see the full benefit of a step increase and others will be worked into the scale as is appropriate. 375180145) I am sure that you noticed that Special Education expense in the budget decreased substantially from last year. That is because of a 2015 state law requiring Supervisory Unions to consolidate all special education costs in an effort to streamline efforts and spending. So, in other words, our Direct Instructional Special Education spending has been taken out of our local and elementary or HS/MS budgets and put into our Supervisory Union budget. Until this year, there were a few line items relating to Special Education that were still directly paid by the individual towns, namely all Special Education para-professionals. As of this budget, all the special education para-professionals will be included in the WCSU budget. Control of Special Education costs continue to be challenging but as a result of this further consolidation of services, and strong management, we are confident that we can see efficiencies and cost containment. 375180146) The health insurance premiums, set by the Vermont School Boards Insurance Trust, will increase by 10% for FY19. The encouraging news is that we have finally reached an agreement between all the employees of the SU and the Board that for FY19, the teachers and staff will pay 15% and the Board will pay 85% of health insurance premiums. Prior to this agreement, boards in the district have paid anywhere from 100% to 86% of the cost of the premiums. This is a huge step forward and we can be proud to have accomplished the benchmark that Gov. Scott set last summer. 375180147) Next I would like to comment on our revenues. We plan on receiving $1,750,000 from other towns that tuition their students to WCMUUSD schools next year. This tuition is paid on behalf of students who are not residents of the WCMUUSD towns but who live in towns with school choice. These students are essential to the continued success of our schools but please understand that the State of Vermont does NOT allow us to count tuition students into our Equalized Pupil Count. Tuition students make up approximately 10% of WCMUUSD students this year. The tuition that we have set this upcoming year for the elementary schools is $15,000 and the MSHS is $17,500. Note also that the towns that send us students pay both tuition and ALL special education costs associated with those students. Continues on next page


48 • The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018

WINDSOR CENTRAL MODIFIED UNIFIED UNION SCHOOL DISTRIT FY2019 EXPENSE BUDGET - PROPOSED

AUDITOR’S STATEMENT The financial records are being audited by RHR Smith & Company for the year ending June 30, 2017. Copies of the completed audit, when available, may be requested by calling the Finance Director of the Windsor Central Supervisory Union at 802-457-1213, extension 1089. An itemized Windsor Central Unified District budget can be found at www.wcsu.net.

Continued from previous page Furthermore, it is important to understand that although we cannot count non-residents as equalized pupils in calculating our per-pupil cost, many of the costs to maintain the quality of this school would remain the same, with or without the tuition students. In every way, the tuition students are a HUGE benefit to our schools. 375180148) The Board voted at our January WCUUSD meeting to allow school choice within our District. This means that all students living in the towns of Bridgewater, Killington, Reading, Plymouth, Pomfret, and Woodstock will have choice about which elementary school in the district they will attend. There will be parameters on this choice and this will not affect the HS/MS in any way. We are very excited about this new initiative because we believe this will help inform the new Board as to where the population of our District lives and where they want to go to school. This new program will help us to understand the many demographic factors at play in the District and how we might make smart choices about the placement of classrooms around our District. It is an exciting time for our District. This type of outof-the-box thinking is exactly what will keep our District relevant and appealing to new families looking to move to the area. 6) As an important part of our Board unification process we have reassessed our collective food service program. In doing this assessment we were alarmed to see that, in the aggregate, our district is among the most expensive food service programs in the State of Vermont. We have made a commitment in this first year of our Unified District to cut costs in our food service program by at least $200,000 with a goal of cutting costs by an additional $100,000 next year. We are going to find a solution that allows us to continue providing healthy, high quality, locally sourced food to our students in a more cost effective manner. We understand how much many of our community members value the food service experience in our schools but we also understand that we must be fiscally responsible to all taxpayers. 7) Finally, we have moved to a 7-12th organizational model at WUHS/MS. This move to a single administration has allowed us to find some administrative efficiencies, and we will be able to reduce our administrative needs by 2.0 FTE and professional staff 3.2 FTE due to enrollment trends. Superintendent Banios started in July, and per State statute we were only able to start meeting as a Unified Board in September. In four months we have made some big changes that we believe will benefit student learning and will save money. We have much work to do. As Mary Beth is known to say, “We are a good District, but we can be a GREAT one”. I am excited about the opportunities that lie ahead. We have a big job, but fortunately we have Board members who are inspired to make meaningful changes that move our District forward. I encourage you to join us at our meetings. All voices are welcome, and the more engaged our community the better off our schools and students will be. To conclude, thank YOU for your support. Jennifer Iannantuoni, Jim Haff, Matt Stover, Superintendent Mary Beth Banios, Finance Director Richard Seaman, and I have worked hard to prepare a proposed budget to present to you that accurately reflects our efforts to contain our costs, increase our revenue, and work within the constraints imposed by the State. Please know that our main focus when we meet each week and each month is to maintain the standards of academic excellence that this district is known for while managing our constant concern to exercise fiscal responsibility. We know that it is your money we are spending when we craft this budget and we do not take our responsibility lightly. We budget your money as if it is our own…because it is. We own homes and businesses here. We understand what an increase in this budget means to you. I would like to thank you, the taxpayers of Barnard, Bridgewater, Killington, Reading, Plymouth, Pomfret and Woodstock, as a Board Member and as a parent, for supporting our schools and for helping us to create and maintain an environment that yields such remarkable achievement in our students. Our children truly reap the benefits of being educated in a place where the teachers and staff take such pride in their work and where a community supports and recognizes their success. Thank you. Respectfully yours, Paige Hiller, Chair Windsor Central Modified Unified Union School District

INFORMATIONAL MEETING An INFORMATIONAL MEETING will be held Tuesday, February 27, 2018, at the Woodstock Union Middle School Gymnasium at 7:00 P.M. This meeting is scheduled so the public may ask questions about the budget before Town Meeting Day. PLEASE JOIN US FOR THIS INFORMATIVE MEETING.


The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018 • 49

LIVING A.D.E.

DO WHAT TASTES RIGHT.

Courtesy of Chandler Center for the Arts

Area youth will sing, dance, and share a plethora of other special talents during the Mini Mud Variety Show. Auditions are Feb. 21.

Mud season auditions seek to draw area talent to Chandler Feb. 17-18, 21—RANacts from various busisecond decade, will be DOLPH—Mud season is coming right up, and Chandler Music Hall is getting ready for its annual variety shows — for youth and adults — with auditions for its Mud Season Variety Show and Mini Mud, the youth version of the former. The beloved Mud Season Variety Show is returning to Chandler Music Hall on Saturday, April 7 at 7:30 p.m. This season, organizers are hoping to present group

nesses in the Randolph area. Solo acts are also strongly encouraged. Mud Season Variety Show auditions will be held on the Chandler MainStage on Saturday, Feb. 17, beginning at 10 a.m., and on Sunday, Feb. 18, starting at 12 noon. To sign up, contact Janet Watton at janet@ chandler-arts.org or 802728-9402. Auditions for the annual Mini Mud youth variety show, now in its

held Wednesday, Feb. 21. Kids ages 7-18 are invited to bring a vocal or instrumental music offering, dance, skit, magic trick, juggling, special drama piece, or any other special talent to share. For more info or to sign up for an audition time contact Janet Watton at 802-728-9402 or president@chandler-arts.org Chandler Center for the Arts is located at 7173 Main St., Randolph. Visit chandler-arts.org.

2384 KILLINGTON ROAD ONTHEROCSLOUNGE.COM | 802-422-ROCS

T I F E N E B R O I R R WA

DEB’S

Wilson

Poplawskifor Debra

SILENT AUCTION FOOD • BAR LIVE MUSIC

DID YOU SAY YES TO “WILL YOU?”

AT

RICK REDINGTON & THE LUV DUANE CARLETON JENNY PORTER BAND & MORE!

The Summit Lodge IN KILLINGTON

If you can imagine it, we can create it. • Weddings • Rehearsal Dinners • Bridal Showers Custom menus, attentive staff, affordable and private Restaurant open Thursday-Monday, 5:30-9 pm Reservations: 802.775.2290 www.redcloverinn.com innkeepers@redcloverinn.com 7 Woodward Road, Mendon, VT Just off Route 4 in the heart of the Killington Valley

Sunday, Feb. 25th 3-10 PM Sponsored By:

MASSAGE BY HEATHER

AND MORE!


50 • The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018

LIVING A.D.E.

R utland R egion C hambeR of C ommeRCe pResents ...

b enefit foR the R egional m aRketing i nitiative

VS

S aturday , F ebruary 24 Plus "Minute to Win It” audience games sponsored by Four Seasons Sotheby’s International Realty.

PARAMOUNT $20

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7 pm

THEATRE

alSo Facing oFF: heRitage family CRedit union vs. vseCu, Rutland Regional mediCal CenteR vs. Community health CenteRs of the Rutland Region, and pRoCtoR gas vs. maRCell's oil Company.

TICKETS: www.paramountvt.org MORE INFO: www.rutlandvermont.com

HoSt tom Huebner

Higher SHRED-ucation

FEB.

21

Courtesy of Pickle Barrel Nightclub

BRANDON NIEDERAUER

Earn your degree in the Green Mountains of Vermont. College of St. Joseph offers Associate, Bachelor and Master degree programs on our beautiful campus just minutes from Killington and Pico resorts. CSJ has no classes on Wednesdays, which means more time for your favorite extra-curricular activities. Areas of Study Include: • • • •

Business Administration Criminal Justice Golf Course Management Health Science

• Psychology & Human Services • Sports Management • Liberal Studies, and more

Learn more about earning your degree in the heart of ski country. Apply for free today at www.csj.edu/ski.

CSJ.EDU/SKI

Broadway sensation Brandon “Taz” Niederauer to perform at the Pickle Wednesday, Feb. 21, 8 p.m.—KILLINGTON—Fourteen-year-old Broadway sensation Brandon Niederauer will appear live on Wednesday, Feb. 21 at the Pickle Barrel Nightclub in Killington.  The show is open to anyone 18 years of age and older, with those under 18 admitted with parent or guardian. The young guitarist and vocalist with the nickname “Taz” has built up a solid reputation in the music world and played alongside some of the most prominent musicians of our time. Inspired by his father’s record collection, he took up guitar at the age of eight. Just four years later he was cast as the principle role of guitarist Zack Mooneyham in the Tony Awardnominated Broadway musical, “School of Rock.” Living in New York City has opened

the door for Brandon to play with some of his most idolized musicians. He’s played with members of the Allman Brothers Band, Buddy Guy, Stevie Nicks, Lady Gaga, Slash, Jon Batiste, and many others. Niederauer appeared in Killington with Joey Leone back in 2014, then a 10-year old talent, and returned last February for a performance with Leone at The Foundry. Tickets for Brandon Niederauer may be purchased online, at JAX Food & Games, or at the Pickle Barrel during business hours. Tickets will also be available at the door on the night of the performance. Doors open at 8 p.m. The Pickle Barrel is located midway on the Killington Road.  For more information or to purchase tickets, visit picklebarrelnightclub.com or call 802-422-3035. 


The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018 • 51

LIVING A.D.E.

8th annual Downhill for Diabetes ski and snowboard event coming to Pico Saturday, Feb. 24— KILLINGTON—The eighth annual Downhill for Diabetes ski and snowboard event will return to Pico Mountain Resort in Killington on Saturday, Feb. 24. Participants will raise money to ski or snowboard — similar to a donation walk — but in Vermont style! The purpose of this event is to raise money to continue funding research and ultimately come up with a cure for this disease. One hundred percent of the proceeds from this event will be donated to JDRF (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation). Get involved with the event and form a business team, or come out and join as a single skier/boarder or even a non-skier. Win some great prizes and merchandise, as well. Pre-register online at donationsfordiabetes.

org/p/sponsor.html to be eligible for all discounts or free tickets and merchandise. Businesses can also be a sponsor for the event or donate a product for the raffle or race prize. Organizer of this event, Lynn Pratt, is a Vermonter living in Pawlet. Her 11-year-old daughter, Ashley, is a Type 1 Diabetic and Pratt and her husband run a non-profit charity organization, Donations for Diabetes, to raise money to help find a cure for this disease. The family has held this downhill event for the past seven years and it has been a huge success. They have raised well over $120,000. Help raise that number. For more information, visit donationsfordiabetes.org or visit them on Facebook at facebook. com/donationsfordiabetes.

FEB.

24

Castleton’s unique ArtisTree offers OlympicBank Gallery space themed activities during highlights local artists President’s week Feb. 20-21—SOUTH POMFRET—The 2018 Winter Olympics are in South Korea. ArtisTree gets creative and celebrates the athletes, sports, and nations of this year’s winter games with morning and afternoon art sessions for ages 5-8 and 9-12. On Tuesday, Feb. 20, kids ages 5-8 can join Olympic Bling! from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Celebrate the most exciting worldwide athletic events by getting decked out in Olympic bling. Create bangles, banners, t-shirts, and medals to wear when cheering on your favorite athletes. For kids ages 9-12, there will be Year of the Dog: Dog Portraits during the same time, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Celebrate the Korean Year of the Dog by creating big portraits of canine friends. Participants will make large-scale images based on photographs using a variety of materials. Bring in a photo, or use one provided. From 1-4 p.m., kids ages 5-8 can join Olympic Sled Making, and ages 9-12 can join Olympians in Action. On Wednesday, Feb. 21, ages 5-8 can explore the culture and the arts of

Korea through traditional Hahoe masks from 9 a.m.12 p.m. Campers will create their own masks in celebration of the opening and closing of the winter games. Ages 9-12 can join Go Team USA from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Kids will Create the logo and uniform for the USA Winter Olympics team. They will look at past uniforms and logos and, using basic design principles, create a complete outfit, or outfits, drawn in full color. From 1-4 p.m., ages 5-8 can join Sports Buddies, when they will create a mascot to help cheer on an Olympic team. Ages 9-12 can join Korean Decorative Arts & Crafts, making decorative lanterns, fans, norigae (traditional Korean hanging tassels), and more. The events will continue into the next week. Visit artistreevt.org for the full schedule. ArtisTree is located at 2095 Pomfret Road, South Pomfret.

Stafford Technical Center Open House

Billings Farm & Museum

e

Gateway to Vermont’s Rural Heritage

Thursday, March 1st 2018 | 6:00 to 8:00 pm

Experience the Stafford “Road Show” - 5:30 p.m. Join us for a Barbeque! - 6:15 p.m. STC Program Area Tours - 6:45 – 8:00 p.m.

Sleigh Ride Week February 10 - 25, 2018

8

RUTLAND—Nestled between the busy intersection of Merchants Row and Center Street in Rutland sits the large windows of the Castleton University Bank Gallery, giving passers-by an intimate peek into the University’s newest artistic space. Previously used as an operational bank site since 1911, Castleton has transformed the location into a functioning art gallery which showcases the works of local artists from around New England each month. “The architecture is really spectacular, from the Italian marble teller line and intricate plaster ceiling to the original walk-in safe. The space is unique with a lot of personality and visual interest, not to mention at a very central and visible location perfect for a gallery space,” said Castleton University Gallery Assistant Jennifer Field. Located at 104 Merchants Row, the Castleton University Bank Gallery is open to the public Thursday through Saturday with hours of operation from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. Hosting the art of more than a dozen new artists a year, the gallery has featured a variety of exhibitions including painting, sculpture, mixed media, sound and photography displays. In addition to presenting regular art shows, the gallery is also home to monthly artist receptions and other special events. “Rutland happens to be a hub between major cities and has great potential to become a vibrant and lively place where the arts flourish,” explained Field, “A place where the creative veins of nearby communities unite.” For more on information, visit castleton.edu/galleries.

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Students and families of all ages are welcome, including adult students. *Rutland City Public Schools staff and current Stafford Tech Center students are ineligible to enter

Horse-Drawn Sleigh Rides

s

Operating Dairy Farm • Farm House Hands-on programs & activities

For more information contact Sue Dodge at

Presidential cookie favorites Rte. 12 • Woodstock, VT • 802-457-2355

es

802-770-1050 staffordonline.org

Make It Sew

T

g

GROCERY MEATS AND SEAFOOD

beer and wine DELICATESSEN BAKERY

PIZZA

CATERING

Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner To Go www.killingtonmarket.com Hours: Open 7 days a week 6:30 am - 9:30 pm. 2023 KILLINGTON ROAD 802-422-7736 • Deli 422-7594 • ATM

Prom Dress Alterations Serving Breakfast & lunch 7am-2pm daily Breakfast all day, lunch after 11am Come to our sugarhouse for the best breakfast around! After breakfast check out our giftshop for all your souvenier, gift, and maple syrup needs. We look forward to your visit! Sugar & Spice Restaurant & Gift Shop Rt. 4 Mendon, VT 802-773-7832 www.vtsugarandspice.com

69 Center Street Rutland

802-775-8200 Open Tuesday - Friday 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. - 6 p.m. Closed 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Saturday 12 p.m. - 4 p.m.


52 • The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018


The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018 • 53

FOOD MATTERS 506 Bistro

The 506 Bistro serves a simple, seasonal menu featuring Vermont highlights. Set in the open bar and lounge, the atmosphere is casual and warm. Your are likely to be served a yankee pot roast, a great organic burger from a nearby farm or fresh strawberry shortcake with Vermont berries. Local, simple, home cooked is what we are all about.  (802) 457-5000

506 506 Back Country Café

The Back Country Café is a hot spot for delicious breakfast foods. Choose from farm fresh eggs, multiple kinds of pancakes and waffles, omelet’s or daily specials to make your breakfast one of a kind. Just the right heat Bloody Marys, Mimosas, Bellini, VT Craft Brews, Coffee and hot chocolate drinks. Maple Syrup and VT products for sale Check our Facebook for daily specials. (802) 422-4411

506 Bistro and Bar

Serving a seasonal menu featuring VT highlights Birch Ridge


506 Bistro and Baralike since 1998, dinner at the Birch Ridge Inn is a delicious way to complete your day in Serving locals and visitors

Killington. Featuring Vermont inspired New American cuisine in the inns dining room and Great Room Lounge, you will Serving a seasonal menu featuring VT highlights also find a nicely stocked bar, hand crafted cocktails, fine wines, seafood and vegetarian options, and wonderful house 802.475.5000 | ontheriverwoodstock.com made desserts. www.birchridge.com. (802) 422-4293

Located in On The River Inn, Woodstock VT A short scenic drive from Killington Bridgewater Corners

802.475.5000 | ontheriverwoodstock.com Pop on in to the Bridgewater Corners Country Store for a quick and delicious breakfast on the go. Local favorites

Located in On Theinclude Riverthe Inn, Woodstock VT and freshly baked doughnuts, muffins, bagels and English muffins. Or try one of breakfast burrito or wrap A short scenictheir drive fromsandwiches. KillingtonYou can also call ahead to avoid the wait. www.bridgewatercornerstore.com signature (802) 672-6241

Choices Restaurant and Rotisserie

Chef-owned, Choices Restaurant and Rotisserie was named 2012 ski magazines favorite restaurant. Choices may be the name of the restaurant but it is also what you get. Soup of the day, shrimp cockatil, steak, hamburgers, pan seared chicken, a variety of salads and pastas, scallops, sole, lamb and more await you. An extensive wine list and in house made desserts are also available. www.choices-restaurant.com (802) 422-4030

Clear River Tavern


Our fantastic American tavern menu featuring burgers, pizza, salads, steak and more is now being handcrafted by our new Executive Chef Tim Galvin. Nestled on 10 acres directly on the VAST snowmobile trails and only 8 miles from the Killington Road. Our live music schedule will keep you entertained, and we never charge a cover. We’re sure you’ll agree that “When You’re Here, You’re in the Clear”.   www.clearrivertavern.com  (802) 746-8999

Inn at Long Trail

Inn at

L ng Trail

Looking for something a little different? Hit up McGrath’s Irish Pub for a perfectly poured pint of Guinness, live music on the weekends and delicious food. Guinness not your favorite? They also have Vermont’s largest Irish Whiskey selection. Reservations are appreciated. innatlongtrail.com/Home.html (802) 775-7181

OLYMPIC COVERAGE

Eat great all winter long lettuce help

POOL TABLES • DARTS • SHUFFLEBOARD BEST BBQ RIBS • BURGERS • SALADS • GYROS

BEST GAME ROOM IN KILLINGTON FRIDAY, 9 PM DJ DAVE

New Owners, Clean & Delicious!

INGTO N DINER KILL

16 DRAFT BEERS • WE’VE GOT YOUR GAME

NOW SERVING BREAKFAST ALL DAY LUNCH AT 11AM - OPEN TIL’ 3PM 802.422.8422 802.422.8422 •• 2841 2841 Killington Killington Rd. Rd. (Old (Old Ppeppers) Ppeppers)

SATURDAY, 9 PM SUPPLY AND DEMAND SUNDAY, 8 PM JOSH JAM

DINE

I N O R G RA B & G O


54 • The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018

FOOD Foundry

Enjoy an intimate dining menu or tavern specials at Killington’s only waterside dining that also has live entertainment every Friday and Saturday. Appetizers include crab cakes, buffalo drumsticks and a cheese slate while the entrees include chicken Marsala, meat loaf, steamed lobster and more. The tavern menu features nachos, fried fish sandwich, teriyaki steak sandwich and others. www.foundrykillington.com (802) 422-5335

Highline Lodge HIGHLINE LODGE KILLINGTON VERMONT

Visit the Highline lodge. Join us in our newly renovated fireplace lounge featuring craft cocktails, local brews, small plates and lively conversation. Our in-house restaurant offers fresh, seasonal local fare with a menu changing monthly. The intimate dining room and outside patio are the perfect spots for private events, conferences and weddings. Contact Kristen Anderson at kristen@highlinelodge.com.

JAX

At Killington’s hometown bar, you’re bound to have a good time with good food. Starters, burgers, sandwiches, wraps and salads are all available. With live entertainment seven days a week, they’re always serving food until last call. www.supportinglocalmusic.com (802) 422-5334

Jones’ Donuts

Offering donuts and a bakery, with a community reputation as being the best! Closed Monday and Tuesday. 23 West Street, Rutland. See what’s on special at Facebook.com/JonesDonuts/. Call (802) 773-7810

Killingon Diner

WOK-INS WELCOME!

Looking for an ALL DAY Breakfast Spot? How about a ‘GRAB and GO’ egg sandwich on your way up the hill? We’ve got you covered with local eggs, bacon and coffee. Come check out our cool DINER vibe, grab a Bloody Mary and enjoy some classic comfort food. Serving lunch too! 802.422.8422

Killington Market

Take breakfast, lunch or dinner on the go at Killington Market, Killington’s on-mountain grocery store for the last 30 years. Choose from breakfast sandwiches, hand carved dinners, pizza, daily fresh hot panini, roast chicken, salad and specialty sandwiches. Vermont products, maple syrup, fresh meat and produce along with wine and beer are also for sale. www.killingtonmarket.com (802) 422-7736 or (802) 422-7594

Lake Bomoseen Lodge and Taproom

The Taproom at Lake Bomoseen Lodge, Vermont’s newest lakeside resort & restaurant. Delicious Chef prepared, family friendly, pub fare; appetizers, salads, burgers, pizzas, entrees, kid’s menu, a great craft brew selection & more.  Newly renovated restaurant, lodge & condos. www.lakebomoseenlodge.com (802) 468-5251

Mid-way up Killington Access Rd. Sun - Thurs 11:30 a.m. - 10 p.m. • Fri & Sat 11:30 a.m. - 11:00 p.m. vermontsushi.com • 802.422.4241

HIBACHI | SUSHI | ASIAN

Liquid Art


Forget about the polar vortex for a while and relax in the warm atmosphere at Liquid Art. Look for artfully served lattes from their La Marzocco espresso machine, or if you want something stronger, try their signature cocktails. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner, they focus on healthy fare and provide you with a delicious meal different than anything else on the mountain. LiquidartVT.com (802) 422-2787.

Lookout Tavern

With a free shuttle, take away and call ahead seating, Lookout Tavern is a solid choice. Nachos, quesadillas, sweet potato fries, salads, soups, sandwiches and dinner options are always a good selection and happy hour is from 3 p.m. until 6 p.m. Open daily at noon and serving until midnight. on Friday. www.lookoutvt.com (802) 422-5665 Voted the best ribs and burger in Killington, Moguls is a great place for the whole family. Soups, onion rings, mozzarella sticks, chicken fingers, buckets of chicken wings, salads, subs and pasta are just some of the food that’s on the menu. Free shuttle and take away and delivery options are available. (802) 422-4777 Classic Italian Cuisine Old World Tradition

fresh. simple. delicious! 1/2 price appetizers & flaTbreads DAILY from 4-5 p.m. OPEN DAILY AT 4 P.M.

Mountain Top Inn & Resort

Whether staying overnight or visiting for the day, Mountain Top’s Dining Room & Tavern serve delicious cuisine amidst one of Vermont’s best views. A mix of locally inspired and International cuisine – including salads, seafood, poultry and a new steakhouse menu - your taste buds are sure to be satisfied. Choose from 12 Vermont craft brews on tap.Warm up by the terrace fire pit after dinner! Just a short drive from Killington. www.mountaintopinn.com  802-483-2311

Killington Burger Bar

Burgrs On the ROCS is a modern Burger Bar modeled in quintessential style. The walls remind us of a time where a spirit was forbidden and a password was needed at the door. In the kitchen, the chef is preparing divine mouthwatering delights certain to satisfy even the most mature palette. The mood is too tempting to resist. Come experience the best hand crafted food on the Killington access road. Enjoy the freshest local ingredients and savory dishes that will leave you completely satisfied. 2384 Killington Road, Killington, VT 05751 | 802.422.ROCS (7627)

Peppinos


Chef-owned since 1992, Peppino’s offers Neapolitan cuisine at its finest: pasta, veal, chicken, seafood, steak, and flatbreads. If you want it, Peppino’s has it! Aprés-hour daily features half price appetizers and flatbreads. For reservations, call 802-422-3293. www.peppinosvt.com.

Pickle Barrel

Being Killington’s largest and most exciting venue, you’re bound to have a good time in here. Party the night away and feed yourself on delicious food such as chicken wings, onion rings, French fries or even a bowl of bacon. If that doesn’t interest you, you’re able to make your own pizza, by the slice or the whole pie. www.picklebarrelnightclub. com (802) 422-3035

SUNDAY DINNER specials

Vermont Inspired New-American Cuisine served from 6:00 PM Nightly during Presidents Week

Choose any Entree from sunday dinner menu plus soup or salad and includes 2 meatballs per person 4-6 p.m. sunday only $20 each adult; $10 each child

Reservations Welcomed

pasta | veal | Chicken seafood | steak | flatbreads For reservations call:

422-3293

First on the Killington RoaD

At the Covered Carriageway 37 Butler Road, Killington birchridge.com • 802.422.4293

Host your Private Party at the Birch Ridge Inn


The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018 • 55

MATTERS Red Clover

Farm to Table Vermont Food and Drinks. Thursday night Live Jazz. Monday night Chef Specials. Open Thursday to Monday, 5:30 to 9:00 p.m. 7 Woodward Road, Mendon, VT. 802-775-2290, redcloverinn.com

Rosemary’s

Rosemary’s was built around an indoor boulder,features an illuminated garden view, and photographs capturing the Inn’s history. Chef Daniel Molina, who comes to us from from Salubre Trattoria and the Canoe Club in Hanover, blends the flavors of Ireland with those of countryside New England created with a host of fresh local Vermont and New England seafood products. We take pride in serving you only the best quality, and supporting the local farmers. innatlongtrail.com 802-775-7181

Seward’s Dairy

If you’re looking for something truly unique and Vermont, check out Seward Dairy Bar. Serving classic homemade food including hamburgers, steaks, chicken, sandwiches and seafood. Craving something a little sweeter? Check out their own homemade 39 flavors of ice cream. Vermont products also sold. (802) 773-2738.

Sugar and Spice

Stop on by to Sugar and Spice for a home style breakfast or lunch served up right. Try six different kinds of pancakes and/or waffles or order up some eggs and home fries. For lunch they offer a Filmore salad, grilled roast beef, burgers and sandwiches. Take away and deck dining available. www.vtsugarandspice.com (802) 773-7832

O’Dwyers Public House

O’Dwyers Public House at the Summit Lodge welcomes you to enjoy traditional Irish fare including Guinness Stew, Seafood Pie and Bangers and Mash, in a warm and inviting atmosphere. Irish and local brews are on tap, and we have live music every weekend! (802) 422-3535.

Pasta Pot

Chef owned, the Pasta Pot has 40 years of authentic Italian cuisine under its belt. Whether you’re in the mood for ante pasta, pasta, pizza or homemade entrees, you’ll be satisfied. All menu entrees and pasta are available in half orders and don’t forget to ask about seasonal dishes. (802) 422-3004

Sushi Yoshi


Sushi Yoshi is Killington’s true culinary adventure. With Hibachi, Sushi, Chinese and Japanese, we have something for every age and palate. Private Tatame rooms and large party seating available. We boast a full bar with 20 craft beers on draft. Lunch and dinner available seven days a week. We are chef-owned and operated. Delivery or take away option available. Now open year round. www.vermontsushi.com (802) 422-4241

Vermont Butcher Shop

As Vermont’s only sustainable whole animal butcher, we are passionate about our craft and delivering the highest quality meats. Each cut of meat you select comes from a partner that shares our commitment of respect for the environment, the animals and our customers. We are here to ensure that you know where your food comes from and guarantee that you’ll be able to see and taste the difference. (802) 776-4005

February cooking class is Sweets and Savories

“ “

“ “

Submitted

Salads are especially tasty when topped with something sweet and salty, like berries and nuts.

Wednesday, Feb. 21, 11:30 a.m.—RUTLAND—Join Grace Davy from “Everyday Chef,” the program on PEGTV, for a February food workshop: Sweets and Savories, on Wednesday, Feb. 21, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. In this workshop participants will make a hearty winter salad with nuts and fruit and follow it up with a chocolatey and nutty, no bake cookie. All participants will chop veggies and make the cookies together. The cost is $5 per adult; seniors over age 55 and kids age 12 and under are free. Wednesday, February 21, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. The monthly events are held at Godnick Adult Center, 1 Deer St., Rutland. For more information, visit rutlandrec.com.

Culinary Institute of America Alum

“You are about to have the best food you’ve eaten, no ifs, ands, or buts.” -The Rutland Herald

• A Farm to Table Restaurant • Handcut Steaks, Filets & Fish • All Baking Done on Premises

• Over 20 wines by the glass • Great Bar Dining • Freshly made pasta

All entrées include two sides and soup or salad

506 506 Bistro and Bar

Serving a seasonal menu featuring VT highlights 802.475.5000 | ontheriverwoodstock.com Located in On The River Inn, Woodstock VT A short scenic drive from Killington

Sun. - Wed. 5-9 p.m., Thurs. 5-10 p.m., Fri. - Sat. 5-11 p.m.

~ Sunday Brunch 11 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. ~ “The locally favored spot for consistently good, unpretentious fare.” -N.Y. Times, 2008

422-4030 • 2820 KILLINGTON RD. WWW.CHOICES-RESTAURANT.COM


56 • The Mountain Times • Feb. 14-20, 2018

FUN for all. An adrenaline rush for the whole family, the Killington Tubing Park is sure to please. Warm up and dine with us at the Killingon House of Pizza, serving specialty pies and appetizers as well as hot drinks, cocktails and craft beers. Located across from The Killington Grand Hotel. There are many other ways to fill your winter days, too. Check out Snowshoe Tours, the Beast Mountain Coaster, Ski Biking, Scenic Gondola Rides, Snowmobile Tours and Snowcat-Drawn Sleigh Rides. killington.com/activities

February 14, 2018 section two  
February 14, 2018 section two  
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