Page 1

Polish Market  ::  11/2011

15 years PUBLISHED since 1996 No. 11 (183) 2011  ::  www.polishmarket.com.pl

Ecology Energy Green Building Amber Toga – ranking of law firms

Luxury Brand of the Year

Professor

Henryk

Skarżyński

Winner of the 1st edition of Polish Market Honorary Pearls in the category of science


WARSAW TRAMS friendly to people and the city


Contents

11/2011 Column 

Małgorzata Zaleska, Member of the Board of the National Bank of Poland: The segmentation of Europe # 34

 Manufacturing Companies 

From The President’s Press Office  # 6

From The Government Information Centre  # 7

  Our Guest  

Waldemar Pawlak, Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of the Economy  # 8

Stanisław Dąbrowski, First President of the Supreme Court: The society lacks the underlying foundations of respect for the law # 22

Ranking of manufacturing, exctraction and energy companies # 35

Invest in Poland  # 38

  Łódź Region 

Bogdan Sadecki: The promised land – the dynamicallydeveloping Łódź Region # 39

Ranking of companies in Łódzkie province # 41

Tomasz Sadzyński, President of Lodz Special Economic Zone: Lodz Special Economic Zone – a Fashion Zone # 44

  From the cover  Prof. Henryk Skarżyński, the first to be awarded the Honorary Pearl by Polish Market magazine: Not only a distinguished scientist, but an ingenious manager as well # 12

 Pharmacy 

A unique year for Polpharma’s development # 18

The Best of Polish Market # 20

Łódź – “The Promised Land”  # 46

 Mining Industry 

Roman Łój, President of Katowice Coal Holding SA (KHW Katowice): We consistently strive to achieve our strategic goals, which are to secure the operation of our mine over the next few decades # 50

Barbórka – Miners’ Day # 52

Polski Koks – the largest coke exporter in the world # 54

 Amber Toga  

AMBER TOGA 2011 awards received # 24

Aleksander Maziarz, PhD in Law: The way to legal professions in Poland # 29

 Real Estate / green building / Ecology 

Maja Sujkowska: A lawyer in Poland # 30

Commercial real estate market in Upper Silesia # 56

Przemysław Konopka, Vice-President of Gras Savoye Polska: Freelance professions – without a contract of employment but with insurance coverage # 32

Andrzej Skowroński, President of SABE Investments Ltd (SABE Investments Sp. z o.o.): In Warsaw and on the Baltic Sea… # 58

2  ::  polish market  :: 11/2011


Contents

Patryk Mirecki: Green, eco-friendly # 60

Marian Pigan, Director General of the State Forests; Polish forests – our common, national good! # 66

Agnes Vorbrodt, Founder CEO and VP of PLGBC: The popularity of green buildings globally exceeds any expectations # 68

Bogdan Sadecki: Effective waste management # 69

  Polish Export Hits    # 81 Mikołaj Oniszczuk: You may count on our exports # 82

 Investments in Warsaw  

Jerzy Bojanowicz: Warsaw under construction # 84

The construction of the second metro line is a huge undertaking # 86

 Regions  

  ecology / energy  

Bogdan Sadecki: The need for renewable energy # 72

Jerzy Bojanowicz: Innovations for the environment  # 76

Janusz Korzeń, Director of the Regional Bureau of Spatial Planning in Wrocław Urbanist: The Sudeten Mountains are still attractive to tourists and businessmen # 88

 Presentations   Events 

The Day of Builders – awards for industry leaders # 75

The meeting of the “Teraz Polska” club # 90

The 1st European Congress of Small and Medium Enterprises # 91

The Luxury Brand of the Year 2011 Awards # 94

NataliaGold # 98

  Cultural Monitor 

Cultural Monitor # 100

Painful story # 102

Prof. Henryk Wojnarowski, Director of the Warsaw Philharmonic Choir: Continuous exposure to new pieces, as well as to creative and performing personalities  # 104

“Yout Money” Fair, palace of Culture and Science, Warsaw # 112

Piotr Salaber, Composer, conductor, and pianist: So that emotions go beyond the footlights # 106

 Telecommunication  EXATEL supports entrepreneurs # 80

Polish Market :: 11/2011

15 YEARS PUBLISHED SINCE 1996 No. 11 (183) 2011 :: www.polishmarket.com.pl

ecology energy Green building amber toga – ranking of law firms

luxury brand of the year

Professor

Henryk

SŻŃ

Winner of the 1st edition of Polish market honorary Pearls in the category of science

4  ::  polish market  :: 11/2011

Publisher: Oficyna Wydawnicza RYNEK POLSKI Sp. z o.o. (RYNEK POLSKI Publishers Co. Ltd.) President: Krystyna Woźniak-Trzosek Vice-Presidents: Błażej Grabowski, Grażyna Jaskuła Managing Director: Jacek Szczęsny Address: ul. Elektoralna 13, 00-137 Warsaw, Poland Phone (+48 22) 620 31 42, 652 95 77 Fax (+48 22) 620 31 37 E-mail: info@polishmarket.com.pl Editor-in-Chief: Rita Schultz rita.schultz@polishmarket.com.pl Editorial board: Jerzy Bojanowicz, Ewelina Janczylik, Janusz Korzeń, Maciej Proliński, Jan Sosna, Magdalena Szwed, Janusz Turakiewicz, Sandra Wierzbicka, Elżbieta Wojnicka.

Art in the service of the motherland # 110

English Editor: Sylwia Wesołowska-Betkier, Mikołaj Karabanow Translators: Maciej Bańkowski, Sylwia Wesołowska-Betkier, Sandra Wierzbicka Photographers: Jan Balana, Łukasz Giersz Polish Market Online Editor-in-Chief: Wiktoria Grabowska Sales: Phone (+48 22) 620 38 34, 654 95 77 Robert Gołaszewski – Sales Director r.golaszewski@polishmarket.com.pl Natalia Suhoveeva natalia.s@polishmarket.com.pl Ewelina Surma e.surma@polishmarket.com.pl Marek Ślugaj m.slugaj@polishmarket.com.pl PR: Joanna Fijałkowska j_fijalkowska@polishmarket.com.pl

Design and DTP: Foxrabbit Designers Printing: Zakłady Graficzne TAURUS – Stanisław Roszkowski, www.drukarniataurus.pl Basic circulation: 8,000 Oficyna Wydawnicza RYNEK POLSKI Sp. z o.o. Nr KRS 0000080385, Sąd Rejonowy dla m.st. Warszawy XII Wydział Gospodarczy Kapitał zakładowy 80.000,- zł. REGON 011915685, NIP 526-11-62-572 Published articles represent the authors’ personal views only. The Editor and Publisher disclaim any responsibility or liability for their contents. Unsolicited material will not be returned. The editors reserve the right to edit the material for length and content. The editors accept no responsibility whatsoever for the content of advertising material. Reproduction of any material from this magazine requires prior written permission from the Publisher.


Editorial

Fifteen years ago, when I decided to establish “Polish Market” magazine, the market for economic journals had just started to germinate. I began to issue the magazine in times when the active transition and development of Poland were just under way. I had no intention to copy foreign economic magazines; I rather felt like creating something new and exceptional. My teacher’s soul spoke up and I felt it was high time to build up an export product, which would be a vehicle for proclaiming the achievements related to the Polish economy, culture, managers and products. I wanted the whole world to realise why we merited admiration, visits and investment. Right from the start the magazine was meant as an English-language publication, so that it would reach foreign readers. For 15 years we have managed to create the best possible package for the best possible content. This year’s title of the Luxury Brand of the Year, awarded to “Polish Market,” is recognition of our effort. For 15 years we have developed a number of ratings, and we have organised a number of meetings and conferences, including the most prominent event, referred to as the Pearl of the Polish Economy Gala, organised for the 10th time this year. This ranking of top enterprises operating in Poland is one of a kind on the Polish market. Every year the patronage of this event is taken by the Polish Academy of Sciences and by the Minister of the Economy. This is a truly prestigious event and the crowning achievement for my mission to promote our country. Furthermore, we do not forget about people and institutions, as their actions bring glory to Poland. This was exactly the idea behind granting the Honourable Pearls, which are awarded to prominent figures, in the field of culture, art, science and the economy. We search for the most precious “Pearls”, whose activities and attitude are worthy of being promoted worldwide. This issue of “Polish Market” has been prepared specially for the Pearl of the Polish Economy Gala, during which we will also celebrate the 15th anniversary of our publication. Dear readers, thank you for your loyalty to our magazine, and I cordially invite you to read this issue and the subsequent editions. Krystyna Woźniak-Trzosek President Rynek Polski Publishers Co. Ltd.

Due to the 15th Anniversary of its existence, “Polish Market” has undergone certain transitions in the last twelve months. This was to convince our readers that the magazine keeps up with the times that we touch upon the essential issues, and we prepare up-to-date reports, opinion polls and rankings. We actively participate in the economic, cultural and social life of Poland. We provide content framed in a beautiful graphic design. The characters on our covers are la crème de la crème – managers and leaders who set a great example to follow. Each time, we interview charismatic people who are leading experts in their respective fields. On our cover appears Professor Henryk Skarżyński, a prominent scientist, but also a recognised manager. He has also fought his way into our opinion poll – The Best of Polish Market, along with such respected business figures as Rafał Brzoska (InPost), Ryszard Kunicki (Ciech), Ewa Małyszko (PTE PKO Bankowy), Maciej Owczarek (ENEA) and Maciej Witucki (Grupa TP). As the opinion poll was based on the opinions of managers, it is worth stressing that the Professor was noticed and appreciated by the business world itself. We further present a ranking of law firms – Amber Toga 2011, developed by the editorial board of “Polish Market,” in cooperation with the College of Law at the Koźmiński University. The law firm Wierciński, Kwieciński, Baehr Sp.k was rated in the first place. By developing this ranking, we intended to show the extent to which law firms are involved in the studies, education and training of lawyers. Therefore, the categories concerning publications and hiring employees with scientific qualifications were considered the most significant. Finally, in this issue you will also find the hot topics that everyone is talking about, such as energy security, CO2 and ecology, in both the energy industry and waste management, as well as the issues of green building. Have a good read and draw constructive conclusions. Rita Schultz Editor-in-Chief

11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  5


Academic year inauguration With the opening of the new academic year, President Bronisław Komorowski took part in the inauguration celebrations at several universities. “Polish institutions of higher education, from the Jagiellonian University to the higher school in Zamość, need to search for new opportunities and respond to new challenges if they wish to be effective competitors,” Bronisław Komorowski said. He also emphasised that in order to strive for being the best, every university must leave behind certain limitations and conventions.::

The Heads of State of Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary met in Budapest and participated in a conference entitled “The Economic Potential and Prospects for Central Europe” at the University in Budapest. During the discussion, it was concluded that the ongoing crisis has its origin in the EU-15 countries. On accession to the European Union, the acceding countries were assured that this was the best way towards a very high quality of life. “But the crisis has effectively dashed our hopes of a carefree life,” Polish President Bronisław Komorowski said, “Still our States have this something that is of special value - the experience of going through the greatest crisis, not only the transformation, but also the bankruptcy of the previous economic system. Today, we can be proud to share with the whole of Europe solutions resulting from our courageous decisions, which have saved our economies better than the economies of the old EU countries,” he added. “In the negotiations concerning the new budget perspective, we should all opt for solidarity in Europe. It is important to maintain the rules functioning so far, the cohesion policy and the creation of the same fundamentals of support for farmers in the Community countries,” Bronisław Komorowski said. The Presidents also discussed nuclear power. The Visegrad Group comprises Poland, the Czech Republic, Hungary, and Slovakia. It is not an institutional cooperation, but one based on conferences in the form of cyclical meetings on various political levels, including mainly Presidents, Prime ministers, and Ministers of Foreign Affairs. ::

The occupational activity of the elderly Within the public debate forum entitled “A More Cohesive Society, Secure Family,” a conference was organised concerning the econ0mic activity of elderly people. It was devoted to the problem of raising economic activity rates in the ageing population. “We have to find a solution which, based on intergenerational solidarity, will minimise the negative influence of the ageing population phenomenon. We have to think

6  ::  polish market  :: 11/2011

together how to make this solidarity one of the fundamentals of Polish families. The ageing population is not only a problem, but also a challenge, and the opportunity to make better use of experienced people. It also creates favourable circumstances for raising economic activity rates among elderly people in Poland,” the President said in his speech, which was broadcast at the beginning of the conference.::

© wspol.edu.pl

Summit of the Presidents of the Visegrad Group countries

Visiting the Police Academy in Szczytno While paying a visit to the Police Academy in Szczytno, President Bronisław Komorowski thanked the uniformed corps for their difficult service and expressed a belief that criminal offences and excesses will be effectively combated on behalf of the authority of the Polish State. “Just as we went through the tragedy and the effective struggle with the flood, a shattering experience for the whole country, bearing in mind the respect and recognition inspired by the actions of the fire service and other services engaged in protecting Poland against flood hazards, I believe that the events in Zielona Góra should constitute an important point of reference for saying it straight: it is our common task, not only of the politicians, but also of the people having influence upon civic and social attitudes, as well as of those who train people exposed to crisis situations, to inspire respect for the State itself, as well as the authority of State officials,” the President said in Szczytno. The President also stressed the fact that the police plays a significant role in tackling frequent crisis situations, but, above all, their role is to maintain the respect for the State and for the law. “I’d like to thank the Academy, the Vice-Chancellor, the entire personnel, and all students, for your ability to prove, with your hard work and knowledge, that it is possible to go beyond the established patterns, to take a completely new direction and succeed together,” the President emphasised. ::


Meeting with entrepreneurs Prime Minister Donald Tusk has met with representatives of the Association of Wronged Entrepreneurs. Other participants included Jacek Rostowski, the Minister of Finance, Zbigniew Derdziuk, the President of the Social Insurance Institution (ZUS), and Michał Boni, a member of the Council of Ministers. The Government decided that the situation of people doing outwork

needs a thorough analysis and legal interpretation, so that it does not burden the people running business activities with unpaid contributions and accrued interest when these people act with the best of intentions. Minister Michał Boni, together with the President of the Social Insurance Institution, are to work out the appropriate solutions to this problem. ::

The Corps of Veterans of the Struggle for Polish Independence The Council of Ministers has established guidelines for an amendment to the law on veterans and the victims of war and post-war repression, which aim at increased State aid for those the law covers. The Corps of Veterans of the Struggle for Polish Independence will be created, and those who were granted veteran status in recognition of their struggle for Polish independence in the years 19141963 will be its members. Additionally, the 1st of September has been established as the National

Day of the Veteran of the Struggle for Polish Independence. Furthermore, the amendment provides for a change in the regulations concerning benefits for veterans living abroad who have not applied for their due benefits so far because of the impediments in the payment of benefits. It is provided that the benefits to which veterans are entitled will be paid, e.g. together with retirement pay and pensions, directly to their bank account abroad.::

The Prime Minister at the Visegrad Group Summit As well as President Bronisław Komorowski, Prime Minister Donald Tusk also took part in the Visegrad Group Summit. Among the main issues covered during the meeting was the EU long-term budget. “The crisis in the euro zone may spread across all of Europe, and even the entire world. That is why, not only Slovakia, but also the three remaining countries, although we do not belong to the euro zone, will engage in activities aimed at making quick and responsible decisions by the whole of Europe,” the Prime Minister stated. This issue has been brought up because the Visegrad Group may actually play an important role for the energy security of the Community. Donald Tusk said: “We have come to an agreement on the

strategic priorities with reference to particular energy branches, routes, transport and the future of nuclear power.” The Eastern Partnership policy was also discussed. “We also covered the issue of Eastern Partnership policy, and I’d like to praise very highly the efforts of Poland and Hungary for the Eastern Partnership development during their Presidencies. We have agreed that we support the pro-western policy of Ukraine,” the Prime Minister of the Czech Republic, Petr Nečas emphasised. Donald Tusk added that as long as Yulia Tymoshenko is imprisoned it is hard to talk about respect for human and civil rights and dignity, or for the fundamentals of the democratic State, which are the underlying values of the European Union. ::

Support for the poorest countries in the world By a decision of the Council of Ministers, Poland will continue to provide its financial support to the countries with the lowest income in the world within the Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative. Money in cash will be transferred to the International Development Association (IDA). The Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative for the poorest countries was created in 2006 pursuant to the resolution of the IDA Board of Governors. Poland has been a member of the Board since it was created.::

The Parliamentary elections On 9 October, the parliamentary elections were held in Poland. Civic Platform (PO), the current ruling party, attained the biggest number of votes. It is most probable that the party of the Prime Minister of the Republic of Poland will again form a coalition with the Polish People’s Party (PSL) led by Waldemar Pawlak, the Deputy Prime Minister and the Minister of the Economy in Donald Tusk’s Government. The Prime Minister emphasised that together with the leader of PSL they wish to continue the POPSL coalition. The idea of the re-creation of the majority coalition has been recognised by President Bronisław Komorowski as an opportunity to form a new Government. ”The first session will probably be held on 7 or 8 November, which means that the new cabinet will be presented on 22 November at the latest,” the head of the Government stated. It will enable the efficient preparation of work connected with bringing the Presidency to a conclusion. Minister Ewa Kopacz will probably not be a member of the new Government, since she has exchanged her ministerial position for the post of Speaker of the Sejm. Other changes in the composition of the government are yet unannounced.:: 11/2011  ::  polish market  ::  7


Our Guest Construction

The power industry and shale gas

“The European Union’s energy policy should take into consideration three objectives – competitiveness, sustainable development and reliability of supply,” said Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of the Economy Waldemar Pawlak in a meeting of the Economic Committee chairpersons of the EU Member States. The debate on “The needs and funding opportunities for EU energy policy until 2020” was held on 12 September 2011 in the Polish Senate. The Deputy Prime Minister pointed out that financing the process of the transition to low-emission energy will be based on instruments developed by the European Commission under the

8  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

EU budget. “We have at our disposal the Structural Funds, the Cohesion Fund and the resources for the development of scientific research from the Seventh Framework Programme,” said the Deputy Prime Minister. He stressed that the European Investment Bank and the World Bank will also play an important role in co-financing the objectives of the European energy policy. “However, we should remember that most of the transition costs will be borne by the economies of the Member States, and their fuel and energy consumers,” he added. The Deputy Prime Minister stressed that climate protection is a global issue and the support of non-EU

Waldemar Pawlak, Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of the Economy

partners is also needed. “Without the involvement of countries such as China, India, the United States and Brazil, we will fail to effectively reduce CO2 emissions, and, by setting toohigh goals for reducing emissions, we can significantly diminish the competitiveness of the EU economies,” he noted. The Minister of the Economy drew attention to the question of energy efficiency. “It is the cheapest solution for reducing emissions and enhancing energy security,” he said. “Smart energy networks and demand-management measures, central heating and cooling and the popularising of electric vehicles, are technologies which contribute to improving the efficiency of the entire energy chain,” he added. According to the Deputy Prime Minister, we should strive to quickly adopt a directive on energy efficiency containing a wide range of support instruments. On September 8, 2011, for the first time in Poland, gas was extracted from shale deposits. “The borehole near Łabień in Western Pomerania seems to be very promising,” said Deputy Prime Minister Waldemar Pawlak during the conference on the Eastern Partnership in the 21st Economic Forum in Krynica-Zdrój. As the Deputy Prime Minister pointed out, the preliminary evaluation of the conducted borehole tests was very positive. “Currently, service works are being conducted and they will facilitate the evaluation of the potential for mining. The first impression suggests that the deposit can be very productive,” he argued. According to estimates by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Poland may have 5.3 trillion cubic metres of shale gas, more than any other European country in which such research was conducted. This amount can satisfy gas demand in Poland for the next 300 years. “The extraction of gas from shale could significantly affect our country’s energy potential and the energy security of the entire region of Central and Eastern Europe,“ said Deputy Prime Minister Waldemar Pawlak.::


EUROPEAN POWER MARKET OUR FUTURE The amendment of the Energy Law was an ignition point stimulating the dynamic development of the exchange segment on the energy market in Poland. Liquidity improved significantly which contributes to POLPX becoming an equal partner in building a common European energy market.

Poland’s contribution to the development of the common and transparent energy market in Europe. This step is particularly important in the light of the regulation on energy market integrity and transparency (REMIT), recently adopted by the European Parliament. The trading volume on POLPX energy markets has been increasing regularly, which allowed launching the market coupling mechanism in December last year, i.e. the merger of energy markets of Poland and Sweden. Preliminary work on other connections is in progress. These activities are inspired by the recommendations of the European Commission, according to which a common European energy market is to be created by 2014. The POLPX activities, supported by the Transmission System Operator and the Energy Regulatory Office, have opened for Poland the possibility to enter this mechanism even earlier – the country will become a part of the Northern Westester European pilot project, to be implemented in 2012.

Grzegorz Onichimowski CEO of the Management Board of POLPX

We have witnessed numerous changes in the Polish energy sector within the last few years. A crucial impact on these changes had the introduction of the mandatory electricity sale performed by generators through the power exchange market in 2010 (so called exchange obligation) as a part of the regulations amending the Energy Law act. In August 2011 a year has passed since the introduction of that requirement and it is now considered to be a success as the producers sold five times more energy through the Exchange than the statutory limit. It proves the

10  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

maturity of the Polish energy market and its commitment to operate in line with the rules of the transparent competition. It is also an accomplishment of the POLPX corporate group. We have provided our members with a trade-friendly marketplace, which is quick, effective and inexpensive. The establishment of the Warsaw Commodity Clearing House and the implementation of their procedures significantly lowered costs of collaterals at the same time improving the security of financial transactions. Securing the liquidity on the Exchange was a great step towards

There is still much work to be done in the power sector, e.g. further liberalization of energy, gas and fossil fuels markets, which will enable to increase the investments in new production capacities. According to the POLPX strategic development plans, we could soon offer a modern trading platform for transactions on gas, biomass and coal markets. We are a company, that is changing and developing dynamically in order to provide the best service to our participants and have a crucial impact on the development of the European energy community. ::


From the cover

Not only a distinguished scientist, but an ingenious manager as well Rita Schultz interviews Prof. Henryk Skarżyński, the first to be awarded the Honorary Pearl by “Polish Market” magazine.

You’re known not only as an eminent scientist, but also as an appreciated manager. Where did your management skills come from? Are they acquired, innate, or enforced by circumstances? I find it very difficult to assess myself. True, life has given me the chance to prove myself in various situations. The basis for all was the scientific

12  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

achievements which allowed me, after 10 years of collecting experiences, to perform surgery on the world’s first patient with partial deafness, following the first successful restoration of hearing in a deaf person in Poland in 1992. That was a historic event, both in scientific and medical terms, although only few could understand its true significance just then. We managed to step

ahead of the world for at least a decade. And this answer to your question I’m sending now from the Asia Pacific Symposium, which is taking place in Daegu, South Korea. This is where the best of the best from all continents gather. During several speeches my partners and I are going to present our experiences spanning almost a decade, which have brought results long-lasting in time and quality. They no longer evoke disbelief as to their treatment methods, but rather to the excellence of their results. Several centres across the world, in Europe, the USA, Australia, and Japan, are starting to provide this therapy to treat partial deafness – a condition afflicting millions of people, and almost every senior. In this ageing society of ours the number of candidates for this treatment will be rising, rather than falling. Coming back to your question – in the meantime, throughout my various activities, I was the initiator and organiser of the second European Cochlear Implant Centre in 1993, the departmental Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing in 1996, the International Centre for Hearing and Speech in Kajetany near Warsaw in 2003, the Bioimaging Research Centre in 2009, and the National Telemedicine Network in 2010, the first of its kind in the world. Currently, we are preparing to launch the World Hearing Centre. I think I was fortunate when it came to the people I met and the times I worked in. In the mid-1970’s, after starting my studies, I had the opportunity to spend a few holiday seasons abroad, working, e.g. in the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm where I could see how the Western world functioned. By the advent of the Third Republic of Poland I was a freshman Assistant Professor. Upon becoming a titular Professor in 1995, I achieved academic and professional independence – devoting myself to my passion for work – I could finally fulfil my dreams. I received regular education - primary and secondary schools followed


From the cover

by university studies. They all turned out to be very good, with demanding and devoted teachers who successfully prepared me for life. At the same time, they aroused my interest in science and inventiveness. Do I have any special talents? I don’t know - as a child I did make various toys, even a guitar in secondary school. I’m fond of drawing and since secondary school I’ve been writing poems on various occasions for my friends and relatives. I guess there are some manual skills in me, innate and developed, that have determined the success of the microsurgery operations I have carried out. As an active and hard-working person, I have never been scared of challenges, and, as already mentioned, I had my dreams – probably with the imagination to create or organise something new, in this country or abroad. Can you learn such skills? Yes, probably. I know that from the stacks of books I devoured in my childhood. Impressed by Sienkiewicz’s “Trilogy”, which I read towards the end of first grade of primary school, I fell in love with history, especially the period of the First Republic of Poland. At that time, history was to become my future profession. Later, other passions and interests followed, encompassing biology, chemistry, and physics. So far, my whole life has been that of an active man who likes working very much. Are the roles of scientist and manager difficult? Don’t you sometimes feel like taking rest from the hardships of management ? If we look at it from the perspective of these two areas, I guess it’s hard to be both, especially if we want to implement our tasks at high or the highest level of quality. In my case, managerial duties are very closely connected with science and medicine. Generally speaking, I supervise scientific procedures concerning designed or implemented clinical processes. In my opinion, to be skilful in science, you have to be able to plan the implementation of specific research activities, and define their time limits, scope, financial outlay, and involvement of co-workers or co-operators. If these criteria are not met, neither the scientific nor clinical success are likely. The role of the manager in this sphere is best visible in the preparation of a good article for a recognised journal.

14  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

But if you cannot plan and implement specific research studies, and then publish them, not only you, but also your ideas, regardless of how novel and interesting they are, won’t gain recognition. The situation is somewhat different when there is a large team to lead, or several teams for that matter, particularly if a number of co-operators from the country or abroad participate. And this is true in my case, as I am the Director of the departmental Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing. But in many scientific projects I serve as their leader, searching for new solutions, and implementing them in my daily clinical practice. Combining these two tasks and expectations, both from academic circles and, perhaps more importantly, from patients, is by no means easy. Here, however, combining my two functions allowed me to significantly shorten the internal decision-making period, as well as have a direct voice in making preliminary, risky decisions, and implementing further tasks. This is especially relevant when we undertake challenges for which no ready models or similar programmes are available in this country, and often abroad. I believe many achievements would not have been possible if I had not taken on various roles, including that of a research worker who seeks specific, innovative solutions necessary to document certain phenomena and of the person responsible for their implementation in regular clinical practice, thanks to which they could eventually come out. Do I feel like taking a rest? To reiterate, work is my passion, so I don’t treat it as a mere duty. From this passion I derive pleasure and would like to devote to it as much time as possible. The nature of my involvement is gradually changing, as during peak moments of our numerous projects I tend to work in my top gear. Other projects are well handled by my co-workers. Hence, I can say that I do rest more often. A popular belief is that every distinguished personality should develop his or her successors. Is it hard to find people who could equal you in your temperament, knowledge, and skills? That’s how it should work. If our teachers hadn’t noticed us and given

us a chance, many would have not achieved anything in science. Progress is measured, inter alia, by the body of written works, and successors who should be better than you. Is it possible? Yes, it is, although not everyone wants to, or is able to repeat the arduous, painstaking work of those before them. Personally, I try to set a good example, to provide the proper conditions and a sense of security. And today, looking at what many of my young assistants are capable of, I’m assured about that. They easily perform surgeries which in other corners of the world are reserved for the top Professors. This means that the first stages of clinical schooling are long past us. Now it is time to develop Polish research schools in a specific medicinal discipline. Summing up all my publications and presentations I have given during all the continental and global congresses, I’m justified in saying that such a school is already there. This involves the development of its concept, conducting world’s first surgeries to treat partial deafness in children and adults, and collecting the world’s largest clinical material in this field. Will my successors share my temperament and enthusiasm for work? I don’t know. But perhaps, with such excellent conditions, they will find new traits and abilities in themselves to surpass me. I truly wish it for them. I wish that they will be able to take a broader perspective, encompassing not only science and medicine, but also the rest of the surrounding world. You are the most active promoter of children’s hearing tests. Does your work bring the desired effect? Have you managed to draw public attention to this problem? That’s true. For 20 years now I’ve been trying to interest various milieux in this issue. In the early 1990’s our team prepared the relevant foundations and was the largest stakeholder and signatory in the European Consensus on Neonatal Hearing Screening (1995-98). Since 1999, we have been expanding the coverage of such tests for pre-school and school children, and we have organised large-scale epidemiological examinations for adults. By examining the biggest groups of patients in the world, we have shown that problems with hearing afflict one


From the cover

in five children and three quarters of people aged over 70. Recently, just this year, we have received very important international support from all EU Member States and European organisations for the programme of early detection of hearing, vision, and speech disorders in 6 and 7 –year olds. At the same time, it was a great backup for the priority we proposed within the Polish Presidency of the EU. The fact that all Ministers of Health from the Member States have backed our activities is undoubtedly a remarkable success. And how are these activities received in society? In my view, more and more favourably. I’m observing an increase in positive attitudes towards keeping the ambient noise down, and healthpromoting outlooks in general. The current situation was to some extent reflected by the excellent campaign organised by Programme 3 of Polish Radio, and run under my auspices as the National Consultant. It showed that adolescent music enthusiasts are indeed very much interested in having normal hearing. That informational campaign, which was not one-off, but lasted nearly all the summer holidays, as well as numerous initiatives of Local Governments, suggest that we are starting to care about hearing more, as a foundation for the development of a modern society based on mutual communication. In the nearest future there is a chance that screening programmes will no longer be single actions, but will even be as far-flung as the hearing tests among the Polish population of 7-year olds from all villages and small towns, which we organised

16  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

together with KRUS. There is a chance they will acquire the status of permanent programmes implemented in all schools regularly, every year, covering all children in Poland aged 7 and 12. But for the broad assistance from various Governmental and Local-Governmental levels, and basic support from society, we could have never achieved so much in this field where many people, including me, are active. W hat does the Honorary Pearl, awarded by “Polish Market” in 2006, mean to you? I feel very honoured by this award and it has always been a great challenge and obligation to continued active work in the fields of science and medicine. I received it during the first edition in the excellent company of great Poles. The value of this distinction is all the more significant, as I received it from a community I wasn’t strongly associated with, from people who are very good observers of the workings of contemporary society in various areas of its activity. In addition, this was a huge promotion of the problems which my team and me have been dealing with for a long time, and our achievements are often better known on the international arena than on the domestic one. Recognition in my country brings a lot of joy and serves as an encouragement, as I already mentioned, to do more and to continue doing the things that bring good results. Research plans for the nearest future. There are plenty. They are related to a whole range of issues in the fields of science and medicine, related to the use

of the most recent advanced innovative solutions in the fields of material nanotechnology and nanoinformatics. They are related to the civilisation problems of our society. This is connected with the development and implementation of entirely new solutions in the areas of diagnosis and therapy of sensory systems disorders, not only hearing but also vision, feeling, smell and balance. This is connected to the creation of a network of interdisciplinary teams with domestic and foreign members on all continents. I’ve never acted in hiding and always tried to announce our research plans for the nearest future, so let me just say that in the nearest future our main concentration will be on taking advantage of the results we obtain after conducting a functional magnetic resonance, which could revolutionise many fields of medicine, as well as on the pronounced improvement in speech comprehension and the early development of speech in persons with hearing and speech disorders. Management plans for the nearest future. In 2 months we’ll be able to put into use a science and medical facility unique on an international scale, and one of a kind – the World Hearing Centre. This will mean that we will launch many programmes with the world’s top researchers in Poland. It is here that the best researchers will come, as they will have advanced equipment and such vast, rare and scarcely-found research material. This will be an opportunity for new discoveries, new inventions, new implementations and new, constantly-increasing chances for our patients. They will be the final and the most important beneficiaries of what we are about to finish building in Kajetany, near Warsaw. Apart from the opportunity to obtain means for further development from international research grants it will also be a great opportunity to utilise the huge research potential of the Poles who work in many centres in our country. The World Hearing Centre is our response to the plans of the European Commission, which intends to significantly increase the amount of resources for the development of new advanced technologies. We will have the place and the people to prepare for that challenge in the next dozen or so years. :: Photos: Łukasz Giersz


I won’t go off track Interview with Artur Woźniak, President of Polish Pharmaceutical Holding SA by Jan Wilk

B ut the employees are fighting against the sale of the factories. As regards Polfa Pabianice, the Treasury has received a considerable amount of money, more than PLN300 million. And you contributed to this. How in turn do you assess the transaction from the perspective of the fate of the plant? It is developing wonderfully. The new owners, Mr. and Mrs. Adamkiewicz, are moving production to Pabianice, and introducing new products. This will be followed by an increase in employment and revenue.

You have sold Polfa Pabianice, and Polfa Warszawa is practically already in the hands of Jerzy Starak. Only Tarchomin is left, although dozens of investors have received an invitation to purchase. The offers we have received so far have been very unsatisfactory. The enormous, approximately 75-hectare, and attractive - which means expensive – area which belongs to Polfa Tarchomin turned out to be too much of a strain for them. So there will be a change in strategy? That’s right. We are currently working on it. In general - we are going to move the production plant out from Tarchomin. Where to? We have several ideas, but this is not the time to speak about them yet. We are going to divide the area into lots. On the eight-hectare section already marked out, a Galeria Białołęka is going to be erected. For a couple of months we have been preparing the lot bordered by Modlińska, Płochocińska and Ekspresowa Streets for sale; we are conducting legal and geodesic works. How much do you want to sell this area for? (laughs) We want to obtain a satisfactory price. We are definitely going to invite tenders. There should be no shortage of those eager to buy a real property for the construction of a shopping and leisure centre. Galeria would serve not only residents of Białołęka, but also localities within 50km from Warsaw, which means more than 300 thousand people. Most of all, the lot is very well located, approximately 500 m from the Modlińska junction. Transport in that part of Warsaw is already pretty good, and in the near prospect the

Jerzy Starak promises to invest considerable amounts within the next few years as well. And he has a chance, by combining his Polpharma with Polfa Warszawa, to create a strong company, which in a few years will reach approximately a billion euro revenue and become a significant player on the global market.

North Bridge Route will connect Białołęka with left-bank districts, Bielany and Bemowo. Is the sale of this property going to start before the end of the year? How advanced are the preparations for sale? Enough for the first decisions to be made by the end of December at the latest. W hat about the other 60 hectares? We want to sell them, probably not as a whole. We will divide them into smaller lots. Probably housing estates will be built over there. W hat about the factory? Is it going to be sold after the move? Yes. This company will bring in income to the tune of EUR 100 mln. The Treasury and minority shareholders are going to profit from the privatisation of the plant. Plus there will be money from land sales - a few dozen million euro.

T he media have been spoiling you a lot recently. Wprost and Forbes, Dziennik Gazeta Prawna and Rzeczpospolita, Puls Biznesu and Wyborcza - all the newspapers have appreciated the effect of the privatisation of Polfas you have been conducting. But isn’t the toughest part still lying ahead? You’re returning to Tarchomin. I won’t go off track. There will be a lot of work, but I think that the result will not be worse than those we’ve already achieved. After all I have a good, experienced team, which is led by Mirosława Dawidziuk, our proxy and Privatisation Director. We’ll succeed.::


A unique year for Polpharma’s development Year 2011 has been unique for the development of the largest Polish pharmaceutical company, due to several successful acquisitions completed in Central and Eastern Europe, and in Central Asia. Polpharma Group now includes the Kazakhstan-based Chimpharm, and Cenovapharma from Turkey. The company also purchased 70% of the shares in the Russian Akrihin company, its former strategic partner. It also signed an agreement with Polski Holding Farmaceutyczny concerning the acquisition of Polfa Warszawa and is awaiting the green light from the Polish Office of Competition and Consumer Protection to complete it. Polpharma is the largest Polish producer of drugs and active pharmaceutical ingredients. It is an

unchallenged market leader in the generic drugs sector in Poland, both in terms of sales volume and value. It specializes in the production of cardiologic, gastrointestinal and neurological prescription drugs and medications used in inpatient treatment. It also manufactures a broad range of OTC drugs. Dynamic international expansion is an important element of Polpharma’s strategy, as the company seeks to secure a leading position in the region. Chimpharm, which was incorporated into Polpharma Group in September, is a leader among Kazakh drug manufacturers, with a 50% share in the local market. Its product portfolio includes around 200 products from 24 therapeutic classes. Up-to-date

Polpharma’s commercial operations in Kazakhstan will be integrated with the activities of Chimpharm, which will operate on the market as Santo Member of Polpharma Group. Akrihin, in turn, is a leading Russian pharmaceutical company producing over 150 preparations, including socially important anti-tuberculosis, cardiologic and anti-diabetic medicines. The company owns a production facility in Staraya Kupavna, in the Moscow Oblast, where it manufactures pills, capsules, ointments, gels and syrups. Cenovapharma, which was also purchased this year, is a sales and marketing company based in Istanbul. Turkey is currently one of the largest and fastest-growing pharmaceutical


markets in the world, with an overall value of almost 12 billion dollars in 2010. The acquisition of Cenovapharma will not only enable Polpharma to be present on the very promising Turkish market, but it will also pave the way for its possible future expansion into the Middle East, Africa and the Caspian Sea Region. Besides international acquisitions, Polpharma is also developing its network of representative offices. The company now operates such offices in Lithuania, Belarus, Ukraine, Azerbaijan and Uzbekistan. The biotechnological drugs sector provides new development opportunities for Polpharma. To gain a foothold in the industry, the company has established the Polpharma Biologics Special Business Unit and is creating a new, state-of-the-art biotech laboratory in the Gdansk Science and Technology Park. It is planning to use the facility to conduct research into innovative drugs, as well as bio-similars and bio-betters. Polpharma is constantly looking for new innovative solutions in all of the areas of its activity. It invests considerable amounts in research and development projects. It introduces process and technological innovations, which make its drugs more patient-friendly and its manufacturing processes more efficient and greener. In the 2011 ranking prepared by the Institute of Economics of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Polpharma was hailed as the most innovative company in Poland. It scored top marks in all categories, including market and process innovativeness, innovation spending, patents and European contracts. Polpharma also received the 2011 Innowator statuette, having won a ranking prepared by Wprost weekly. Products manufactured by Polpharma meet the stringent Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) criteria. As a consequence, they are always produced in the same way adhering to

the highest quality standards. The company’s fully hermetic production process helps to protect its drugs from possible contaminants and its employees from coming into contact with chemical substances. Polpharma’s drug production facilities are inspected on a regular basis, including checks carried out by the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Throughout the process, right from the product development stage, the company operates in an environmental-friendly way. Thanks to the Green Process policy, Polpharma devises production technologies that ensure that both the manufacturing process and product packaging are harmless to the environment. Environmental protection is not the only token of Polpharma’s corporate social responsibility. The company is involved in numerous educational programmes, supports the Polish blood donation programme and popularises preventive care principles. In

2011, Polpharma topped the ranking of Polish socially-responsible companies prepared by Dziennik Gazeta Prawna daily, under the auspices of the Responsible Business Forum. With the development of Polish science in mind, the company established the Polpharma Scientific Foundation (Naukowa Fundacja Polpharmy) in 2001. The Foundation aims to support Polish scientists by means of providing research grants and Ph.D. scholarships. Nine competitions have been held to date, with research grants being disbursed to 55 research teams. The foundation is also involved in activities propagating patient compliance. In brief, the year 2011, which is not over yet, already deserves to be called an exceptionally rich one, abounding with awards in recognition of the company’s activities in many areas, as well as with events which will provide a driving force for Polpharma’s development in the upcoming years.::


the best of polish market

The Best of Polish Market We are launching a series of presentations of the best Polish managers selected by their colleagues. Each voter was to indicate those in the management sector who, in his or her opinion, are the most versatile and worth following, and would do equally well in any industry.

In this issue we present ten managers from the list of TOP 50 – The Best of Polish Market. It is not about making some kind of ranking here, but rather showing those fifty best of the best, who are there on our market, contributing their knowledge, skills, and experience, which allow them to brilliantly manage their companies, develop them, make them more efficient, introduce them to new markets, list them on the stock exchange, expand their share of the market, take over other companies, build strong brands, and care about the future of these entities. We start with the personalities presented in our magazine this year.

Rafał Brzoska (InPost) The founder and c­ o-owner of the Integer.pl, InPost, and InPost Finanse companies, which he has developed since they started business. During that period he built an all-Polish network of addressed and unaddressed distribution, making Integer a leader on the delivery market. InPost, established 2 years ago, successfully competes with the monopolist Poczta Polska. Rafał Brzoska is an experienced manager, specialising in emerging markets with high growth potential. From 1999 to 2001, while holding the position of commercial director, he was also the co-owner and manager of Seniornet s.c., a company providing online services. In 1999 Brzoska became the proxy and co-owner of Integer s.c., and in June 2001 joined the board of that company which, since 2002, has been operating as Integer.pl. On 12 April he took the position of President of InPost Sp. z o.o. and in 2007 set up Integer.pl SA, eventually bringing it to the Warsaw Stock Exchange on 30 October 2007.

Ryszard Florek (Fakro) Ryszard Florek is the founder of the Fakro company, a producer of roof windows known all over the world. Fakro boasts a 17-percent share of the global market, manufacturing half a million roof windows a year, 70% of which is exported. Their products are bought by clients from Europe, the USA,

20  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, as well as many Asian and African countries. The company’s plants can be found in Poland, Russia, Ukraine, and China.

Andrzej Kawiński (Kłos Nowoczesne Technologie Bankowe) Andrzej Kawiński graduated from the Warsaw University of Technology, majoring in the automation of technological processes. In 2005 he completed Executive MBA studies in the Gdańsk Foundation for Management Development, in cooperation with the Rotterdam School of Management and the University of Gdańsk. In the years 1992–1999 he worked for Siemens Nixdorf, a period during which one of his most notable successes was the successful promotion of the Siemens Nixdorf brand in the Polish banking sector, and placing the company among the market’s top three providers of banking systems. As the President of the Board of Wincor Nixdorf he built from scratch a company which took the leadership of the Polish market in the field of innovative technologies and IT solutions, becoming a model for rivals. Since December 2009, Kawiński has been a Member of the Board and President at Impaq, a company specialising in the development of IT systems supporting business processes for financial services, telecommunications, and retail trade industries in Poland, Germany, Switzerland, the USA, and Great Britain. In June 2011, he was selected President of Kłos Nowoczesne Technologie Bankowe Sp. z o.o. Andrzej Kawiński is also the chairman of the Bank Technologies Forum in the Polish Bank Association, serving as an ambassador and builder

of a cooperation platform between banks and companies which provide innovative technological solutions, concerning the automation of cash and non-cash transactions.

Andrzej Krzemiński (EFL) A graduate of the Foreign Trade faculty at the Warsaw School of Economics. Associated with the financial sector for over 20 years. His professional career started at Bank Inicjatyw Gospodarczych (Economic Initiatives Bank). In the following years he held management positions at Bank Millenium, TFI Bank Handlowy, Handlobank, and, worked as a Managing Director at Citibank. In 2002 he was promoted to the position of Vice-President of the Board at Lukas Bank, and three years later became engaged in the European Leasing Fund, first as its VicePresident, and since May 2006 as President of the Board. Krzemiński is also the Vice-President of the Polish Confederation of Private Employers Lewiatan (PKPP Lewiatan), Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Polish Leasing Association, and member of the board of Leaseurope.

The following people took part in the vote comprising the entire list of managers, of which we picked the TOP50 – the Best of Polish Market: Mariusz Apelski (April Ogb), Paweł Bochniarz (PricewaterhouseC oopers), Mavciej Brysławski (Superfund TFI), Paweł Dangel (Allianz), Jarosław Dąbrowski (Dąbrowski Finance), Magdalena Dulczewska (FM Bank), Anna Horsecka (PTE Polsat), Grażyna Jaskuła (Oficyna Wydawnicza Rynek Polski), Krzysztof Kalicki, PhD (Deutsche Bank Polska), Ada Kostrz-Kostecka, PhD, Mirosław Kowalski (Limra Europe), Zbigniew Kowalski (Zbigniew Kowalski&Partnerzy), Andrzej Krzemiński (EFL), Daniel Lewczuk (Executive Network), Jerzy Lisiecki, PhD (IRCA), Piotr Majcherkiewicz (Gruper.pl), Ewa Małyszko (PKO BP Bankowy PTE), Adam Mokrysz (Mokate), Agnieszka Nogajczyk-Simeonow (PTE Allianz), Krzysztof Przybył (Teraz Polska), Romana Rucińska (TFI), Anna Rulkiewicz (Lux Med), Krzysztof Rybiński, PhD (Vistula University), Marek Skała, PhD, Anna Streżyńska (Urząd Komunikacji Elektronicznej), Elżbieta Wanat-Połeć (Ubezpieczeniowy Fundusz Gwarancyjny), and Alicja Wiecka (SAS Institute).


the best of polish market

Ryszard Kunicki (Ciech) The President of Ciech S.A. since 19 August 2008. In the years 1991-2007 the President and Vice-President of the board and Commercial Director at Hydro Poland Sp. z o.o. (which changed its name to Yara Poland). Between 1975 and 1991 the chief expert, Deputy Production Director, and company director at Przedsiębiorstwo Rolniczo-Przemysłowe (Agricultural and Industrial Company) in Człuchów. Ryszard Kunicki gained immense professional experience while working at Yara International ASA, which is one of the world’s largest concerns in the chemical industry. He has been frequently appointed a member of Yara’s work teams from Oslo, Brussels, and Dülmen, working, i.a., in the team for strategy and cooperation among EU Member States.

Ewa Małyszko (PKO BP Bankowy PTE) Associated with the capital market since 1994. An economist by education, she also completed Postgraduate Studies in Social Insurance and Postgraduate Studies in the Management of Pension Plans at the Warsaw School of Economics. From the very beginning of her professional career, Małyszko has been connected with the financial market. She won her spurs at Financial Services Sp. z o.o., as the leader of the Acquisition and Amortisation Team, and as the Head Manager of the Operational Department at OFI Sp. z o.o., where she co-organised the company’s structure. The next stage of her career was to work at Skarbiec Towarzystwo Funduszy Powierniczych SA – starting from the design stage, up to the position of the Accounting and Funds Administration Director. In March 1998, Małyszko took on the duties of Vice-President of the Board at ABB TFB SA, a company transformed into SEB TFI SA, at which she was the President of the Board from November 2001 to June 2008.

Maciej Owczarek (Enea) Graduated from the Warsaw University of Technology and completed MBA studies at the University of Warsaw, in collaboration with the University of Illinois. For many years associated with

Telekomunikacja Polska Group, performing such functions as the Manager of the Customer Technical Service Department and the Managing Director of TP PubliTel. In the years 1992-1995 employed at Levi Strauss Poland Sp. z o.o. as Marketing Director and Sales Director. Since 2009, the President of Enea.

Prof. Henryk Skarżyński (The International Centre of Hearing and Speech in Kajetany) He graduated from the Faculty of Medicine of the then Warsaw Medical Academy in 1979, in 1983 he was granted a PhD degree in medical science, and in 1989 a postdoctoral degree. In 1993 he became Associate Professor at the Warsaw Medical Academy, and in 1995 the title of Professor of Medical Science was conferred upon him. In 1993 he founded the Diagnostic Medical Rehabilitation Centre for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing “The Cochlear Centre,” which was the second establishment of its type in Europe. Based on his scientific, organisational, and educational achievements, he developed the concept and programme of the ministerial Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, established in 1996, of which he has been the Director ever since. Since July 2006 he has been a member of the Scientific Council of the Ministry of Health. Since 2002 he has headed the Chair of Audiology and Phoniatrics at the Fryderyk Chopin University of Music in Warsaw. At the same time Prof. Henryk Skarżyński co-founded new NGOs which supported numerous initiatives in the Polish healthcare system – the Medicine Development Foundation, in which he is the Head of the Council, and the Association of Friends of the Deaf and Hearing Impaired “Man to Man.” Between 1994 and 2001 he was the National Consultant in the field of audiology and then audiology and phoniatrics. In 1992 Prof. H. Skarżyński developed – and implemented as the first in Poland –a programme of deafness treatment with the use of cochlear implants, in 1998 a programme for treating deafness and neoplastic lesions with brainstem implants, in 1998, a programme for the early detection of hearing impairment in newborns and infants, and in 1999 a programme of hearing, speech, and sight examination via the internet unique on the global scale. In 2002 he developed and implemented the first programme in

the world for treating partial deafness in adults, and in 2004 he operated on the first child with this kind of hearing impairment. In 2003 he introduced middle ear implants and several dozen other new clinical procedures to Poland. He was the initiator and main organiser of the International Centre of Hearing and Speech (2003), where he is performing the largest number of hearing-improvement operations in the world.

Maciej Witucki (Grupa TP) In November 2006 he took the position of President of the Board of Grupa TP. In March 2009 the Supervisory Board of Telekomunikacja Polska appointed him for another term of three years. From April 2005 he was the President of the Board of Lukas Bank, owned by the French Crédit Agricole group, and previously Vice-President of the Board responsible for the segment of consumer loans. He began his professional career at Bank Cetelem (Paribas Group) – at first in France – where he co-created the business plan for the expansion onto the Polish market of the daughter company, and then in Poland, where he worked in the Board of Cetelem Polska. He graduated from the Faculty of Electronics of the Poznań University of Technology. He specialised in logistics and decision support systems. He also completed postgraduate studies in management at the Ecole Centrale in Paris. He is the Head of the Programme Board of Polskie Forum Obywatelskie, which initiates discussions about the directions of development of Poland in the fields of the Polish economy, politics, science, education, and identity.

Józef Wojciechowski ( JW. Construction Holding) The Owner and President of the Supervisory Board of J.W. Construction Holding S.A., President of the Board of WB Holding S.A., EHT S.A. and also Famhold S.A. For 14 years he conducted economic activities in the construction and development industry in the US. He studied at the Higher School of Economics in Sopot, the Florida Real Estate Academy and –State Construction College Florida.  :: 11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  21


Our Guest Construction

Society lacks the underlying foundations of respect for the law Stanisław Dąbrowski, First President of the Supreme Court

Photographer: Krzysztof Michałowski – member of the Press Team of the Supreme Court

For over 30 years you have adjudicated on civil cases. The law has transformed over the years, there is no doubt about that, but have citizens’ attitudes towards the justice system changed? I have adjudicated on civil cases for 39 years, but it is not simple to answer the question of whether during this time citizens’ attitudes towards the judicature have changed. The problem may be perceived in various ways. It seems that the matter of the greatest importance is the ability to make use of the justice system, related to the level of legal awareness, as well as the problem of social confidence in the courts. The multiple increase in the number of judiciary Acts and legal cases over the last twenty years has surely not been caused by a rise in our society’s legal awareness. The growth in the number of lawsuits in the courts has other causes, resulting from social and political changes. In legislation, the excessive, even extreme, tendency to control all aspects of life can be observed. This leads to the

22  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

over-proliferation of laws; as a result it is much harder to cope with law than before. Besides, the freedom of action in many spheres, as well as in economic relations, is subject to strict limitations. The variety of regulations, their complication level and their changeability, hinder the understanding of the law, which can shape social opinion on the ambiguity of the law. It is also caused by the dishonest actions of some entrepreneurs, who make use of ignorance of the law, especially in customer’s case. On the other hand, society is certainly much more aware of the possibility of obtaining legal aid, for instance from the Polish Ombudsman or consumer advocates. Undoubtedly, however, the scope of this aid is limited. Poland’s non-judicial legal aid system is not as developed as in Western European countries. The measure of the citizens’ stance on the judicial system is the degree of social trust enjoyed by the courts. At this point, I would like to explain certain inaccuracy in the terminology. In various surveys questions are posed concerning social confidence in the justice system. In the surveys, the term of the justice system is understood, although contrary to the Constitution, as one including the Police or the Public Prosecutor’s Office. Pursuant to Art. 175 par. 1 of the Constitution, the justice system is implemented by the Supreme Court, common courts, administrative courts and courts martial. The question of social confidence in the system of justice in fact concerns trust in the courts. It appears to me, and I must emphasise that I am not acquainted with the authoritative sociological studies results, that since the so-called political transformation the extent of this trust has decreased, unfortunately. The reasons for this state of affairs are complex. Due to the growth in the number of cases taken

to Polish courts from about 2 million in 1989 to over 12 million in 2010, the efficiency of the proceedings has suffered. The independent media tend to take a delight in criticising the authorities, not always justly, while keeping silent about successes which seem to be too trivial and too unexciting to devote them any time. That also applies to the courts. The deprecation of the courts and the judiciary in the media, which, except for the last three or four years, looked like a negative campaign, has led to the dissemination of a false picture of the Polish judiciary as corrupted and not providing a guarantee of the independence of the judiciary. How do you evaluate the plan for introducing the rudiments of law to schools? The idea of legal education at schools is well-directed and worth supporting. I believe, though, that the establishment of a separate subject named “Rudiments of Law” or similar would not be necessary. The present educational model and the fact that young people are burdened, if not overburdened, with other subjects, should be taken into account. The introduction of the essentials of the law as a separate subject into the curriculum would cause additional problems, related for example to the establishment of the curriculum (determination of what the essentials of the law are) and qualified teaching staff (who is to teach this subject: teacherstheorists after graduation, or judgespractitioners, solicitors or legal counsellors, who are overloaded with work anyway?). There are simply no suitable teachers, whereas thousands of them will be needed. Undoubtedly, knowledge of law and philosophy should be broadened within the scope of other related subjects. Law can be taught when talking about literature, for example “The Apology of


Our Guest Construction Socrates” or, to introduce Radbruch’s concept of “statutory lawlessness” during history courses about Nazi Germany. The basic weakness of this idea lies in the instrumental treatment of the law. Taking as a goal the practical learning of law in terms of its rules is wrong. It shouldn’t be about teaching young people how to use such an instrument as the law, because it seems to be impossible to attempt during courses; we should focus on improving the legal awareness of society. For example, we shouldn’t teach students how to write a petition to the court, but make them realise the purpose, necessity and consequences related to preparing and filing a motion. I know, from my own experience, that even a badly written petition will be adjudicated by the court, if the one who wrote it is supported by right and justice. The citizen doesn’t need to know that there is a fine amounting to PLN500 for dumping litter on a square, road, garden or pavement. Simply, he or she should know that doing that is forbidden. The problem is not the inability of putting law into practice, but the matter of the legal awareness of society. Inspiring the right attitudes towards the law based on the rule of law, and the morality and dignity of the human being, are more important than putting the law into practice. Current affairs that happen in the world in connection with the hooligan behaviour of the young indicate the lack of a fundamental basis of respect for the law.

First of all, the attitude of respect for the law and its values is formed by the home and the closest environment, not only by the school. I would rather see here a bigger role for the family, church and elites of our society, in popularising the right and aware attitude to law. The quality of Polish law is getting worse and worse. What are the weakest points in our national legislation and what can we do to make the situation better? I can confirm that the quality of Polish law is getting worse and worse. Many problems with interpretation, which come to the Supreme Court, are the result of careless and unclear legal regulations. We should search for the reason for this state of affairs in the problem of the overproliferation of law discussed above. In legislative activity, little attention is paid to linguistic accuracy. The language of Acts of law is very specific and cannot be compared to the language of comments or judgements. When creating the law, precision in regulations is as equally important as the right solution itself. A law written poorly can kill the best ideas. An additional difficulty the Polish legislative system will be facing is the matter of the implementation of European Union law. The process of adjusting European Union law to Polish law meets a barrier in the legal language mentioned above. The literal translation of foreign legal language is often misleading. In order to improve this situation, what should be probably dealt with first

is changing the attitudes of politicians active in the government and the parliament, for whom the number of bills passed constitutes the measure of their success. It should be understood that the legislative procedure is a complicated task, requiring the engagement of the most distinguished specialists. It is also a complex process, which takes some time. Please explain how it is possible that when dealing with identical facts in cases, judges pass different judgements. Such cases are frequently heard of, which arouses a sense of injustice. I don’t perceive the fact that there are some diversities in judicial decisions in terms of injustice. These differences are subject to the independence of the judiciary. When administering justice, judges are law- and conscience-bound. Judicial conscience is a factor individualising the content of a given judgement. These diversities are inherent in the judiciary, which is endowed with independence. Obviously, they should not overstep reasonable limits. Laws are sometimes unclear, complicated and very often ambiguous. It is when different assessments of such a law may appear. They are eliminated by the Supreme Court, the role of which, through decisions of cassation and giving answers to legal questions, is to aim at the standardisation of judicial decisions. Interviewer: Ewelina Janczylik ADVERTISEMENT

Przyjazna Firma Ubezpieczeniowa 2011 Już w listopadzie podczas uroczystej gali nagrodzimy Przyjazną Firmę Ubezpieczeniową 2011 Nagrody przyznamy w kategoriach: • Dział I Ubezpieczeń na życie • Dział II Ubezpieczeń majątkowych Sprawdź zwycięzcę w grudniowym wydaniu Gazety Bankowej. Sponsor główny

Partner merytoryczny

PRZYJAZNA FIRMA

2011 UBEZPIECZENIOWA

MIESIĘCZNIKA

tel. 58 768 33 11 e-mail: reklama@gb.pl 11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  23 www.gb.pl


AMBER TOGA

Amber Toga 2011 The ranking of the best law firms in Poland The editorial team of the “Polish Market” monthly and the College of Law at the Kozminski University have compiled a ranking of law firms in Poland. The winner is Wierciński, Kwieciński, Baehr Sp.k.

The ranking was compiled on the basis of questionnaires filled by law firms. Of the 240 law firms surveyed, 61 were included in the ranking. The following criteria were taken into account: :: Number of solicitors/barristers employed in 2011(as on July 31, 2011) :: Number of legal advisers employed in 2011 (as on July 31, 2011) :: Number of solicitor/barrister trainees in 2011 (as on July 31, 2011) :: Number of legal adviser trainees in 2011 (as on July 31, 2011) :: Number of trainees on placement in the firm in 2011 (as on July 31, 2011) :: Number of law school graduates (other than legal trainees) in 2011 (as on July 31, 2011) :: Number of staff members with a doctoral or higher degree in law in 2011 (as on July 31, 2011) :: Number of articles published by staff members in newspapers and academic journals over the past 12 months Law firms received points depending on the respective numbers they provided in their responses. Law firms could score from 0.5 to 1.5 points for the solicitors/barristers and

legal advisers criterion; from 0.5 to 0.75 points for solicitor/barrister trainees and legal adviser trainees; and from 0.2 to 0.5 points for trainees on placement in the firm and law school graduates. The largest number of points – from 2 to 3 – was assigned for the number of staff members with a doctoral or higher degree in law and the number of articles published by staff members in newspapers and academic journals over the past 12 months. The highest possible score a law firm could get was 11.5 points. The winning law firm – Wierciński, Kwieciński, Baehr Sp. k. – scored 10.7 points. Three law firms scored more than 9 points: Gide Loyrette Nouel – Tokarczuk, Jędrzejczyk i Wspólnicy Kancelaria Prawna GLN Sp. k., Chmaj i Wspólnicy Kancelaria Radcowska Sp. k. and KKG Kubas Kos Gaertner – Adwokaci Sp. p. Sp. k. By means of the ranking, we also wanted to show the extent to which law firms are involved in education and staff training. This is why the highest number of points was assigned to two criteria – publications and staff members with doctoral or higher degrees in law. Additionally, we singled out laws firms with the highest number of publications

Winners First place :: Wierciński, Kwieciński, Baehr Sp. k.

Second place :: Gide Loyrette Nouel – Tokarczuk, Jędrzejczyk i Wspólnicy Kancelaria Prawna GLN Sp. k.

Third place :: Chmaj i Wspólnicy Kancelaria Radcowska Sp. k. :: KKG Kubas Kos Gaertner – Adwokaci Sp. p. Sp. k.

Additional awards Law firms with the highest number of publications: :: Chałas i Wspólnicy Kancelaria Prawna :: BSO Prawo & Podatki Bramorski Szermach i Wspólnicy Kancelaria Prawna Sp. k.

Law firms committed to training young lawyers: :: Koksztys Kancelaria Prawa Gospodarczego Spółka Komandytowa :: CWW S. Cetera, M. Węgrzyn-Wysocka i Wspólnicy Kancelaria Radców Prawnych i Adwokatów Spółka Komandytowa :: KKG Kubas Kos Gaertner – Adwokaci Sp. p. Sp. k.

- Chałas i Wspólnicy Kancelaria Prawna and BSO Prawo & Podatki Bramorski Szermach i Wspólnicy Kancelaria Prawna Sp. k. – and law firms committed to training young lawyers.::

Letters in the table indicate A: Number of solicitors/barristers employed in 2011(as on July 31, 2011)

(Points from 0.5 do 1.5)

B: Number of legal advisers employed in 2011 (as on July 31, 2011)

(Points from 0.5 to 1.5)

C: Number of solicitor/barrister trainees in 2011 (as on July 31, 2011)

(Points from 0.5 to 0.75)

D: Number of legal adviser trainees in 2011 (as on July 31, 2011)

(Points from 0.5 to 0.75)

E: Number of trainees on placement in the firm in 2011 (as on July 31, 2011)

(Points from 0.2 do 0.5)

F: Number of law school graduates (other than legal trainees) in 2011 (as on July 31, 2011)

(Points from 0.2 to 0.5)

G: Number of staff members with a doctoral or higher degree in law in 2011 (as on July 31, 2011)

(Points from 2 to 3)

H: Number of articles published by staff members in newspapers and academic journals over the past 12 months

24  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

(Points from 2 to 3)


AMBER TOGA No.

Name of law firm

City

C

D

E

G

H

Total score

1

Wierciński, Kwieciński, Baehr Sp.k.

Warsaw

9 (1)

13 (1.1)

7 (0.0)

5 (0.0)

6 (0.0)

16 (0.0)

6 (3)

54 (3)

10.10

2

Gide Loyrette Nouel – Tokarczuk, Jędrzejczyk i Wspólnicy Kancelaria Prawna GLN Sp.k.

Warsaw

6 (1)

11 (1.1)

5 (0.0)

5 (0.0)

15 (0.0)

7 (0.0)

2 (2)

143 (3)

9.9 9.9

Chmaj i Wspólnicy Kancelaria Radcowska Sp.k.

Warsaw

KKG Kubas Kos Gaertner – Adwokaci Sp. p. Sp. k

Warsaw/Kraków

4

Chałas i Wspólnicy Kancelaria Prawna

Warsaw

5

Sójka & Maciak Adwokaci Sp. k.

Poznań/Warsaw

6

Bird & Bird Maciej Gawronski Sp. k.

Warsaw

7

Kancelaria Adwokatów i Radców Prawnych P.J. Sowisło & Topolewski Sp. k.

8

B

F

2 (0.5)

14 (1.1)

5 (0.0)

10 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

16 (3)

120 (3)

13 (1.1)

3 (0.0)

10 (0.0)

5 (0.0)

16 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

5 (3)

22 (2)

9.9

4 (0.0)

21 (1.1)

0

5 (0.0)

5 (0.0)

14 (0.0)

2 (2)

570 (3)

8.8

6 (1)

6 (1)

6 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

6 (0.0)

6 (3)

>10 (2)

8.8

2 (0.0)

7 (1)

3 (0.0)

7 (0.0)

6 (0.0)

13 (0.0)

1 (2)

60 (3)

8.8

Poznań

8 (1)

13 (1.1)

10 (0.0)

9 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

7 (0.0)

1 (2)

7 (2)

8.8

Trusiewicz Siwko Kancelaria Prawna Radców Prawnych Sp.p.

Warsaw

8 (1)

9 (1)

0

6 (0.0)

5 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

1 (2)

80 (3)

8.8

9

Barylski T., Olszewski A., Brzozowski A. Kancelaria Prawnicza Spółka Komandytowa

Warsaw

2 (0.0)

8 (1)

3 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

2 (2)

40 (3)

7.7

10

Budzowska Fiutowski i Partnerzy. Radcowie Prawni

Kraków

0

5 (1)

1 (0.0)

11 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

1 (2)

38 (3)

7.7

10

Kwaśnicki, Wróbel & Partnerzy - Radcowie Prawni Spółka Partnerska

Warsaw

2 (0.0)

8 (1)

0

5 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

1 (2)

41 (3)

7.7

11

Koksztys Kancelaria Prawa Gospodarczego Spółka Komandytowa

Wrocław

13 (1.1)

20 (1.1)

4 (0.0)

14 (0.0)

36 (0.0)

33 (0.0)

0

3 (2)

7.7

12

Krawczyk i Wspólnicy Spółka Komandytowa

Warsaw

1 (0.0)

9 (1)

3 (0.0)

7 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

1 (2)

10 (2)

7.7

10 (1.1)

15 (1.1)

8 (0.0)

6 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

9 (0.0)

0

11 (2)

6.6

4 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

8 (0.0)

2 (2)

3 (2)

6.6

13

Ślązak, Zapiór & Wspólnicy Kancelaria Adwokatów i Radców Prawnych

Katowice

13

Masiota i Wspólnicy Adwokacka Spółka Partnerska

Poznań

13

Kancelaria Prawna Schampera, Dubis, Zając i Wspólnicy Sp. k.

Wrocław

2 (0.0)

11 (1.1)

0

2 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

3 (2)

12 (2)

6.6

13

BSO Prawo & Podatki Bramorski Szermach i Wspólnicy Kancelaria Prawna Sp.k.

Wrocław

1 (0.0)

5 (1)

0

0

2 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

1 (2)

178 (3)

6.6

1 (0.0)

7 (1)

1 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

1 (2)

2 (2)

6.6

0

13 (1.1)

2 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

0

1 (0.0)

1 (2)

2 (2)

6.6

13

Kancelaria Prawna Jatczak i Wspólnicy Spółka Komandytowa

Poznań

14

M. Mazurek i Partnerzy Prawnicza Spółka Komandytowa

Warsaw

15

Kancelaria Prawna Piszcz, Norek i Wspólnicy Sp.k.

Poznań

1 (0.0)

17 (1.1)

1 (0.0)

10 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

0

42 (3)

6.6

15

Kancelaria Radców Prawnych Andrzej Drozd Andrzej Stankiewicz Adam Własów Spółka Partnerska

Gdańsk

0

13 (1.1)

0

11 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

2 (2)

12 (2)

6.6

15

Brzezińska Narolski Mariański Adwokaci Spółka Cywilna

5 (0.0)

0

3 (0.0)

0

2 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

2 (2)

48 (3)

16

Dewey & LeBoeuf Grzesiak

Warsaw

7 (1)

27 (1.1)

8 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

6 (0.0)

13 (0.0)

3 (2)

17

Leśnodorski, Ślusarek i Wspólnicy Sp. k.

Warszawa

18

Bukowski i Wspólnicy Kancelaria Prawna Sp.k.

Kraków

19

Malinowski, Płachta i Wspólnicy Radcowie Prawni

Warszawa

20

Kancelaria Prawna Renata Urowska i Wspólnicy

6.6 6.6

7 (1)

17 (1.1)

7 (0.0)

10 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

6 (0.0)

0

30 (2)

6.6

3 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

0

3 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

0

1 (2)

8 (2)

6.6

0

3 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

1 (2)

11 (2)

6.6

Poznań

2 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

0

2 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

0

2 (2)

3 (2)

5.5

1 (0.0)

8 (1)

1 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

5 (0.0)

0

60 (3)

5.5

0

8 (1)

0

4 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

1 (2)

3 (2)

5.5

21

Kancelaria Radców Prawnych Stopczyk & Mikulski Spółka Komandytowa

Warsaw

21

GFKK Grzybczyk, Kałuża, Kamiński i Partnerzy Radcy Prawni Spółka Partnerska

Katowice

21

Siwek Gaczyński & Partners Spółka Komandytowa

Warsaw

9 (1)

10 (1.1)

2 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

30 (2)

5.5

22

CWW S. Cetera, M. Węgrzyn-Wysocka i Wspólnicy Kancelaria Radców Prawnych i Adwokatów Spółka Komandytowa

Wrocław

3 (0.0)

17 (1.1)

9 (0.0)

0

20 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

1 (2)

0

5.5

23

KPWW Kancelaria Prawnicza Pasierbiak, Wasilewski i Wspólnicy Spółka Komandytowa

Warsaw

2 (0.0)

11 (1.1)

2 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

0

12 (2)

5.5

23

Porwisz i Partnerzy – Adwokaci i Radcowie Prawni

Kraków

7 (1)

3 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

8 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

0

7 (2)

5.5

24

Kancelaria Prawna Filipek & Kamiński Sp.k.

Lublin/Warsaw

1 (0.0)

7 (1)

1 (0.0)

12 (0.0)

5 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

0

11 (2)

5.5

25

Kancelaria Adwokatów i Radców Prawnych Baczańska Szarata Spółka Partnerska

Zielona Góra

1 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

0

1 (2)

4.4

26

Kancelaria Prawna Frączyk & Frączyk Spółka Jawna

Kraków

0

5 (1)

0

7 (0.0)

15 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

0

16 (2)

4.4

26

Mikulski & Wspólnicy Kancelaria Radców Prawnych

Kraków

0

4 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

14 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

0

13 (2)

4.4

26

Kancelaria Prawna Klepacz Wąsik Wójcik Radcowie Prawni s.c.

Łódź

1 (0.0)

5 (1)

0

8 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

0

0

3 (2)

4.4

27

OBLIGO Sieczkowski i Spółka Kancelaria Adwokacka Sp. k.

Łódź

4 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

0

7 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

5 (0.0)

0

30 (2)

4.4

28

Europejskie Centrum Konsultacji Prawnych Sp. z o.o. Sp. k.

Warsaw/Kraków

4 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

0

5 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

0

8 (2)

4.4

28

Kancelaria Adwokatów A. Dudkowiak, T. Kopeć Sp.j. (Dudkowiak & Kopeć Business Lawyers)

Zielona Góra/ Poznań/Warsaw

3 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

0

4 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

0

2 (2)

4.4

29

Kancelaria Prawna Wiewiórski (Kancelaria Radcy Prawnego Marek Maciej Wiewiórski)

Wrocław

0

5 (1)

0

2 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

0

2 (2)

3.3

30

Marek Musioł Kancelaria Prawnicza

Warsaw

0

5 (1)

0

2 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

0

0

3 (2)

3.3

31

Kancelaria Prawna dr Marek Jarzyński & Kornel Novak

Poznań

0

4 (0.0)

0

1 (0.0)

0

1 (0.0)

1 (2)

0

32

Matczuk Wieczorek i Wspólnicy Kancelaria Adwokatów i Radców Prawnych Sp.j.

Warsaw

3 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

6 (0.0)

5 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

33

Kuczek-Maruta Kancelaria Radców Prawnych

Kraków

0

2 (0.0)

0

5 (0.0)

0

0

0

29

3.3

34

Gorazda, Świstuń, Wątroba i Wspólnicy Adwokaci i Radcowie Prawni Spółka Komandytowa

Kraków

3 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

12 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

0

0

3.3

35

Strażeccy, Jaliński i Wspólnicy Spółka Komandytowa Adwokatów, Radców Prawnych i Doradców

Katowice

3 (0.0)

6 (1)

1 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

6 (0.0)

0

0

3.3

3.3 3.3

36

LTA Doradztwo Prawne Dopierala, Oliwa i Wspólnicy Spółka Komandytowa

Warsaw

3 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

5 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

5 (0.0)

0

0

3.3

37

Jaworski Pogoda Gładki Adwokaci i Radcowie Prawni Sp.k.

Kraków

2 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

0

0

2.2

38

Kancelaria Radców Prawnych M.Wojciechowska-Szac, G.Kotarba s.c.

Warsaw

2 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

0

6 (0.0)

3

0

0

0

2.2

39

Kancelaria Radców Prawnych Joanna Połetek-Żygas i Krzysztof Łączkowski s.c.

Bydgoszcz

0

7 (1)

5 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

0

0

2.2

40

Kancelaria Prawna I. Korczyńska i Wspólnicy Spółka Komandytowa

Wrocław

0

6 (1)

0

4 (0.0)

0

12 (0.0)

0

0

2

41

Kancelaria Adwokacka Adw. Adam Ufnal

Warsaw

1 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

4 (0.0)

0

0

1 (0.0)

0

0

1.1

42

Talarczyk i Roessler Spółka Partnerska Radców Prawnych

Tychy

0

3 (0.0)

0

4 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

0

0

1.1

42

Kancelaria Adwokacka Adw. Elżbieta Fidzińska Adw. Tomasz Fidziński

Kraków

2 (0.0)

0

5 (0.0)

0

2 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

0

0

1.1

42

Estudio Juridico Serrano Internacional

Warsaw

2 (0.0)

3 (0.0)

0

0

1 (0.0)

1 (0.0)

0

0

1.1

43

Kancelaria Adwokacka Grzegorz Podlasiewicz

Warsaw

0

1 (0.0)

0

4 (0.0)

8 (0.0)

2 (0.0)

0

44

Kancelaria Radców Prawnych AKCES K. Jabłońska, N. Mielczarek-Iwanowska, A. Zajęcka, M. Witulski Spółka Partnerska

Katowice

0

4 (0.0)

0

2 (0.0)

0

0

0

0

1.1

45

Kancelaria Radców Prawnych Nawrocki & Czerwiński Spółka Partnerska

Toruń

0

4 (0.0)

0

0

2 (0.0)

0

0

0

0.0

1.1

11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  25

Source: Law firms

3 3

A


AMBER TOGA

Amber Toga 2011 awards received

This year, on 26 October in the Kozminski University, Amber Toga 2011 was held. The event was organised by the “Polish Market” monthly and the to announce the ranking of law firms. We were honoured by the presence of: Piotr Kluza of the Ministry of Education; Prof. Witold Bielecki, rector of the Kozminski University, and lawyer Krzysztof Stefanowicz, a member of the Polish Association of Legal Employers. The official part also included a lecture by Prof. Czesław Szmidt on “Human Resource Management in Law Firms”. Monika Całkiewicz, PhD, Director of the Collage of Law at the Kozminski University said: “We have succeeded in developing a ranking in which the key criteria comprise involvement in the education of young lawyers and a contribution to the teaching process. It seems that the choice of such criteria was accurate, as they distinguish Amber Toga among other rankings of law firms. The fact that so many law firms took part in the rankings is also a reason to be satisfied. It means that lawyers – practitioners understand the need to educate young generations and notice the significance of the teaching process for the practice. The winners’ awards were provided by Natalia Gold, Józef Czerniejewski and the C.H. Beck publishing house. The sponsors of the event included Gras Savoye – the largest insurance broker in Poland, the Kresowiak Restaurant and Mokasirs / Monse.

From left: Kamil Zawicki, Michał Paprocki and Józef Czerniejewski (Natalia Gold)

Prof. Witold Bielecki

Krystyna Woźniak-Trzosek and Krystyna Pociej-Gościmska Piotr Kluz, Agnieszka Fedor (Wierciński, Kwieciński, Baehr) and Rita Schultz

26  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011


AMBER TOGA

Anna Bajerska (Chałas i Wspólnicy)

Rita Schultz and prof. Witold Bielecki

Amadeusz Krawczyk (Koksztys Kancelaria Prawa Gospodarczego)

Michał Paprocki and Mariusz Bidziński (Chmaj i Wspólnicy)

Prof. Czesław Szmidt

From left: Ewelina Janczylik-Foryś (Polish Market), Agnieszka Fedor (Wierciński, Kwieciński, Baehr), Dariusz Tokarczuk (Gide Loyrette Nouel – Tokarczuk, Jędrzejczyk i Wspólnicy), Monika Całkiewicz (Kozmiński University), Piotr Kluz (Undersecretary of State at the Ministry of Justice) and Rita Schultz

Kamil Zawicki (KKG –Kubas Kos Gaertner)

Krzysztof Bromorski (BSO Law & Taxes)

11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  27


Photos: Łukasz Giersz

AMBER TOGA

Laureats

Piotr Kluz, Undersecretary of State at the Ministry of Justice. What do you think of rankings such as the one developed by Polish Market? Rankings certainly encourage the striving for perfection. I believe that rankings such as the one prepared by Polish Market monthly and Kozminski University constitute a twofold motivation, not only to the firms that have been awarded. Those that have, will certainly consider it a matter of honour to maintain their high position in the ranking. Those that haven’t are, on the other hand, sharpening their knives in order to be more successful the following year. Your ranking is also a wonderful help to the entrepreneurs looking for legal assistance. When looking for decent a law firm they most often ask among their acquaintances and base their decision on other people’s experiences. Your ranking is a guide showing who you can be sure your business is secure with. Undoubtedly, rankings also influence the choice of young students

28  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

of law who want to learn and work under the tutelage and supervision of the best tutors.

number of law firms specialises in a specific branch of the law. This improves the quality of their services.

And how would you comment on the fact that the number of lawyers is growing? Isn’t it reflected in the lower quality of legal services? The data we have show that the number of lawyers in Poland is still lower than in the countries of the socalled “Old EU”. It means that the Polish legal profession is still an emerging market in which young lawyers can definitely find their place. Their number is growing year by year. Consequently, competition is increasing – a healthy thing, as measured by the market. It is obvious that if an entrepreneur makes use of legal services and is not satisfied with them, he would not entrust the lawyer with his or her business matters any more. The competition causes law firms to improve themselves. An increasing

We mentioned the issue of legal awareness in Poland earlier. Why do we wait so long to use a qualified and professional lawyer? In Poland everyone knows everything about politics, football and the law. But answering this issue seriously, the subjective legal awareness of the public is low. As a practitioner I know that, unfortunately, people do not cope very well in courts. The law is rather specific and complex. Dealing with the tangle of legal regulations constitutes a considerable challenge for an even experienced lawyer. Unfortunately, people in Poland need to realise that a lawyer is necessary. Maybe it is not the best comparison, but they need a lawyer just as they need a primary-care physician. I hope that in a few years’ time this state of affairs will change and we will reach a

stage at which using a lawyer is completely normal. And we will not look for a lawyer only when our problems are really serious. This is why the Ministry of Justice has decided to launch, among other projects, a legal education programme. All this is being done so that the Poles put ‘hindsight-is-always-better-than-foresight’ wisdom into practice. ::


AMBER TOGA

The way to legal professions in Poland “Move Your Imagination” is the slogan with which the Polish Tourist Organization (POT) will promote Poland in the coming years. The slogan will debut at the ITB Travel Trade Show in Berlin held from 8 to 13 March 2011. The president of the Polish Tourist Organization – Rafał Szmytke, Under Secretary of State in the Ministry of Sport and Tourism – Katarzyna Sobierajska and Tomasz Bagiński – president of Platige Image (the architect of Poland’s promotional campaign for the Fair) discuss the promotion details. Aleksander Maziarz, PhD in Law During the last ten years, a change in the way of practising the legal professions can be observed. This happened via the departure from the typically “legal” professions such as legal adviser, solicitor, judge, or notary public. Now, more and more law students want to become patent agents or tax consultants. It is partly a result of the transformations in the area of legal professions’ availability and partly of the change in the market of services, the aftermath of the economic changes in Poland. Currently, a lawyer is required to possess not only the knowledge obtained during studies or legal training but also knowledge of the fundamentals of economics, management or even psychology. That is why it is so important to enable students to take part in lessons extending their knowledge in the scope of mentioned fields, as well as from core legal subjects. In fact, the labour markets will require such preparation from the law department graduates. Obviously, not all law graduates see their future in the typically legal professions, but those who decide to turn to traditional professions will have to complete legal training organised by a professional association of attorneys, solicitors or notaries public, or take up education in the Polish National School of Judiciary and Public Prosecution. Entry to attorney, solicitor, notary, and bailiff training is preceded by an examination in the form of a 150-question test. The issues the

test covers will be available on the Ministry of Justice website over six months before the examination. A candidate has to obtain at least 100 points, and in the case of bailiff training 90 points, to pass the examination and achieve a positive result, which enables the launching of legal training. A candidate receives 1 point for each correct answer, which requirement is stipulated in the Acts on attorneyship, solicitors, notaries public, and bailiffs. The general legal training entrance exam has a different form. In this case, pursuant to the Act on the Polish National School of Judiciary and Public Prosecution, the exam comprises two parts, one of which is a test of knowledge of particular areas of law. The second part is a written task, in which the candidate has to display the ability to use legal argumentation, as well as the principles of the interpretation of the law, and interpretation of the actual state of affairs. It is the Minister of Justice who determines the minimum number of points that have to be obtained from the test part in order to be permitted to take the second part of the examination. Legal training, the organisation of which is taken up by a professional body, is of a practical nature. It consists of working within a law firm and obtaining knowledge via preparing court letters, projects of legal acts and via appearing before a court and taking part in mandatory training. The legal training ends

with an examination, which consists of taking a test and preparing projects of court letters. The duration of the indicated legal training is not always the same. Attorney and solicitor training begins on the 1st January of each year and it takes 3 years to complete, while the period of completion of the notary training period is 2 years and 6 months. In the case of the notaries public, it is also required to complete at least a 2-year assessorship. Bailiff training lasts 2 years. All the above-mentioned legal trainings are chargeable. The Polish National School of Judiciary and Public Prosecution’s activity covers training future judges, prosecutors, and court referendaries. The first year of training covers the general apprenticeship, shared by all the profession groups. On completion of the first year and obtaining positive results, both from the theoretical tests and practical training underwent during the year, a candidate can continue education in the field of the selected profession. However, in order to do that, a candidate needs to have a reasonably high position on the ranking list. On completion of the general legal training, the candidate may work as a referendary. The trainees who have obtained the required amount of points may be admitted to the judge’s or the prosecutor’s legal training, which take 54 and 30 months respectively. During the judge’s training, trainees first attend the 30-month legal training course in the Polish National School of Judiciary and Public Prosecution, and for the next 24 months they receive training as judge’s assistants, and then court referendaries. Pursuant to the Act, on the 30th month of the judge’s training, trainees take the judge’s exam, which consists of a written and an oral part. The written part comprises practical tasks, while during the oral one candidates have to solve particular cases. During the prosecutor’s apprenticeship, trainees attend classes 11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  29


AMBER TOGA in the Polish National School and they undergo practical training provided in the legal training curriculum. The prosecutor’s exam is to be taken on the last month of the apprenticeship. Receiving a job offer as assessor of the organisational unit of the public prosecution office or of the military organisational unit of the prosecution office of the Minister of Justice depends on the candidate’s position on the list of the trainees who have taken the exam. The legal training courses in the National School are free. The trainees undergoing general, judge’s,

and prosecutor’s legal training may apply to the director of the National School for a scholarship for the period of training. The judges’ trainees receive remuneration during training in the amount of the basic salary of a referendary. It is worth noting that the way to the traditional legal profession is not a short one. In fact, it demands a lot of effort from a law graduate, apart from the energy they have already devoted to completing law studies. In addition, after the accessibility of the legal-professions reform, the

number of trainees undergoing legal training within the professional bodies has grown significantly, stimulating at the same time competitiveness among the lawyers, solicitors, and attorneys. Therefore, it seems that in the current situation a lawyer, even one who performs one of the traditional professions, should be distinguished by additional specialist knowledge in the field of one of the branches of law or, as was mentioned before in the fields of economics, sociology, or management.::

A lawyer in Poland For several years significant changes have been taking place on the Polish market for legal services. These changes have been forced by market situation, and by reforms in the education system gradually being introduced. Maja Sujkowska

The author is the founder the first Telephone Legal Advice in Poland. The European Centre for Legal Consultations

There is a great deal of competition on the legal services market, as well as on other services markets. Both legal advisers and legal counsels not affiliated with corporations, solicitors/barristers, notaries and bailiffs, all compete for customers. Although solicitors/barristers, notaries and bailiffs do not have the legal right to advertise their services and thus the possibility to win new clients, the spirit of rivalry is noticeable and clients often choose a particular lawyer within a group of representatives of a given profession. Because of the rules of their profession, solicitors/ barristers, notaries and bailiffs have limited access to winning clients independently. It does not mean however that among them one cannot identify those who have more and better-paying jobs. What counts is commitment, efficacy, promptness of action, the amount of time a lawyer can devote to his/her client and the ability to negotiate the prices of services. The greatest changes have been seen in the situation of legal advisers, who from the beginning of 2008 can advertise their services. Such a privilege is not yet available to notaries and solicitors/barristers, but it is possible that this privilege will be granted to the

30  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

latter as early as in the autumn of this year at the Congress of the Supreme Bar Council. Currently, only legal counsels enjoy freedom as far as advertising and winning customers are concerned. However, people performing this job do not have the right to take all actions on behalf of their client. In principle, their field of activity does not include conducting court cases. Although the legal situation of legal counsels, people who begin to practice immediately after graduation without legal training, has not been regulated by acts of law so far, there is a clear tendency towards constituting a new legal profession regulated by the law. In addition, a large number of professions performed in recent years by lawyers, such as arbitrator, mediator, administrator, receiver, liquidator, and probation officer, do not have to involve the need of having a degree in law. Higher education in another field may be sufficient in this respect. Although these phenomena may seem mutually contradictory, the following trends can be noticed: - More and more frequently, both lawyers and clients are coming to the conclusion that being merely a lawyer

is not enough. A growing number of lawyers affiliated with corporations and non-associated lawyers are taking further education in fields other than law. Thus, lawyers start studying management, finance, psychology or computer science. All this to become a business partner for one’s clients, and not just a specialist in reading regulations and writing letters, isolated from the specific situation in a given field. So the trend towards specialising in certain fields is becoming apparent. On the other hand, a growing number of lawyers are starting to deal with various cases in a comprehensive manner. Thus, a growing number of affiliated lawyers and those after graduation are taking up new jobs, such as mediator, arbitrator, receiver, administrator or probation officer. The conditions I described certainly are contributing to the strengthening and evolution of the profession of legal counsel that can be performed on one’s own account immediately after graduating without giving up one’s primary profession. Lawyers, competing for the client, agree to conduct nearly every type of case. Large international law firms, which are primarily focused on serving corporate clients, have totally different rules governing their operation. In recent years, small, “traditional” law firms, often against their will, had to work primarily for individual clients and micro-entrepreneurs.


AMBER TOGA The era of the unavailable lawyer sitting behind an oak desk, who chooses a “better” client, has long come to an end! The reason is both an increase in the number of people actively engaged in this profession and clients’ market awareness. Therefore, lawyers have to meet the needs of their potential customers halfway. The best evidence to this are visible changes in the setting of fees, as more and more lawyers are deciding to withdraw from hourly rate towards success fee or a fixed fee. It certainly creates the necessity to train their skills in conducting cases in such a way as to ensure that they are the least expensive and time-consuming. Legal services are available not only during direct meetings with the client, but also through modern communication methods. On-line or telephone legal advice is breaking popularity records. In addition, their cost is much lower than the price of traditional services. Basic and schematic legal knowledge is slowly ceasing to be profitable, because it is often available free of charge on the Internet.

The system of education in Poland is conducive to the market conditions described above. With the introduction of extramural (weekend) law studies, shortening the legal training time and opening access and harmonisation of the recruitment and examination rules for legal adviser and salicitor/barrister training, the group of people interested in this “lucrative and prestigious” job, as seen by the public, has been rapidly increasing from year to year. Unfortunately, as a consequence of recruiting a large number of trainees, the traditional system of patronage is no longer efficient. Trainees face a serious problem with finding a job for the training period. Moreover, additional “difficulties” they face are certainly discouraging. In the case of large firms working as a corporation these difficulties usually include the amount of time one needs to spend on performing one’s duties. Salaries are not abnormally low, but until acquiring formal qualifications, the trainee can say ‘goodbye’ to private life. The possibility of the comprehensive development of one’s professional skills does not look optimistic either.

Corporations usually require strict specialisation from trainees. In exchange for the sacrifices described the reward is probably working among the best of the best. On the other hand, in small law firms one is able to combine work with private life, but in this situation one may not earn sufficient money for the work done. Here, the reward is real substantial care of the patron and complex, comprehensive preparation to perform the job in the future. To sum up these reflections, it should be noted that the legal services market in Poland is developing dynamically, although not as fast as the market requires. A division into basic services and highly-specialised services has become noticeable. This division certainly is contributing to the strengthening and evaluation of the legal counsel profession, which can be performed on one’s own account immediately after graduation in the field of basic services. On the other hand, basic services will fall in value because of their increasingly widespread and chargefree availability on the Internet. :: ADVERTISEMENT

„A drop of happiness” for “our children” Foundation

The “Our Children” Foundation was found in December 2005. Among the founders there are parents whose children underwent oncological treatment, and those who suffered from cancer themselves in childhood. Currently, the Foundation collaborates with a group of about thirty volunteers. The president of the foundation is an actress Ewa Gorzelak–Dziduch whose son was treated

for cancer in 2003-2005. Eve willingly shares her experiences with other parents, bringing hope of returning to normal life. The Foundation’s objective is to help children treated at the Clinic of Oncology in the Institute “Pomnik-Centrum Zdrowia Dziecka”. The main goal is to introduce moments of joy and create a substitute of a normal life. For this purpose, the Foundation helps with urgent expenses to allow parents to stay at their children’s bedsides during treatment, organizes many events and activities (artistic Saturdays, birthday surprises, special events, meetings with famous people, going out from hospital, etc.). The calendar project called „A drop of happiness” is created on the initiative of the photographer Bartek Wardziak. The Name of the project is created by Anna Manowska. The photographer decided that all photos will be taken under water. Underwater photography presents a different, mysterious world. It moves the viewer in the area that is not highly exposed in contemporary photography and it allows onlooker to create a climate on the borderline of sleep.

Many people were invited to cooperate in creating the calendar. Famous Polish actresses, such as Małgorzata Kożuchowska, Małgorzata Socha, Ewa Gorzelak, Edyta Olszówka, Iza Kuna, Agata Buzek, Magdalena Kumorek, Jolanta Fraszyńska, Tamara Arciuch, Magdalena Lamparska, impersonate underwater fairies. The calendar promotion will take place during the gala at Radisson Blu Sobieski Hotel in Warsaw n 21.11.2011 ::

11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  31


AMBER TOGA

Freelance professions

– without a contract of employment but with insurance coverage Interview with Przemysław Konopka, Vice-President of Gras Savoye Polska

I hear that the Gras Savoye Group, besides institutional insurance, has been developing individual coverage. Is this true? We have recently started cooperation with Lloyd’s, a coverholder on the London insurance market. I’m very happy with that, as we can now provide the insurance products of this exceptionally stable and consistently high-quality entity, which are innovative in Poland. Did you know that in over 300 years Lloyd’s has never refused to pay damages for a recognised loss? An effective insurance product is one that ensures the successful claims handling and leads to the payment of damages, obviously if the event covered by the policy occurs. Considering the well-developed Polish insurance market, are there any products for individual clients that are still lacking? Yes, as there are still areas with not enough coverage or coverage that fails to provide a satisfactory standard of service in the event of damage. Think of the freelance professions – barristers, notaries public, attorneys, self-employed people. These are usually upper-middle class individuals, often providing for a family of several members. Running their own business, they have no financial security against a long-term loss of ability to perform their work, such as the Social Insurance Institution (ZUS) provides for those on employment contracts. This insurance, with the working name LOI (Loss of Income), protects them and their relatives against the loss of ability to perform their current work. The lawyer has three insurance components to choose from, in any configuration: :: insurance against temporary incapacity for work :: insurance against permanent incapacity for work :: accident insurance – death resulting from an accident While the last of these components is a relatively traditional way of financially protecting relatives in the event of the insured person dying in an accident, the two previous

32  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

with ZUS coverage. When taking out an insurance against temporary incapacity for work you can insure up to 80% of your regular income. In calculating the insurance amount, you should take into consideration the net income (average for the previous 2 years). The coverage against temporary incapacity for work, in the case of your own profession, guarantees 3 years of benefits of up to 80% of your monthly earnings. If you additionally insure against permanent incapacity for work, when there is a basis for an insurance claim, there will be a onetime payment of damages, up to PLN5 million.

components until now were almost exclusively available to individuals on contracts of employment, as part of ZUS’s coverage. That’s where we’re breaking new ground. You said that an individual must be incapable of performing their current work to obtain the benefits. This means that the insurer can’t dismiss a lawyer by telling him that after all he’s capable of physical work, if he has lost some of his intellectual abilities. Yes, this is an important aspect of the temporary and permanent incapacity insurance. The protection works when you are incapable of performing your own current profession, not any profession. It is a very important provision – you don’t need to be incapable of any work to obtain the benefits. Benefits due to incapacity for any work appear in the form of extensions of life insurance policies, but in fact a person has to be in a vegetative state to get them. This means that a lawyer without a contract of employment can have the same kind of coverage as a person with such a contract and ZUS benefits? The amount and nature of benefits are similar to that provided on employment contracts

Where can I take out this kind of insurance? Contact a GS employee, or visit us online on www.gsdirect.pl or www.ceu.com.pl. The website provides a tool to quickly calculate your insurance contribution, take out insurance and make payment. Your portfolio also includes home insurance, but almost any given insurance company would sell that. What makes Lloyd’s product unique? The coverage is more extensive, especially when it comes to furnishings and valuable items stored at home, including artworks and jewellery. It is a tailor-made solution, closely matching the condition and type of insured property. It provides very high insurance limits (up to PLN20 million standard), guaranteeing protection, even when the insured property is away from the place of residence, e.g. when it’s taken on a journey. What’s more, it covers such risks as civil liability in private life, liability for your actions and for those of your family, even your animals, affecting third parties. The insurance also covers lost profits. If your flat generates income, and the repairs after damage make it temporarily impossible to rent, the insurer will provide you with the profits lost due to refurbishment. The high standards of the claims handling is vital in this product, as providing comfort and effective support in difficult moments is the essential aspect of insurance. ::


Opinion

The segmentation of Europe The events of the last few months, linked to the deepening crisis in the economies of many EU states, have highlighted the scale of disparities and the division present inside the EU. Europe is becoming more and more segmented and hierarchical. New countries - “stars” - are shooting across various skies, but we are all well aware that the dominant position, with a tendency to rule inside the EU, has been taken by Germany and France. Their political edge may be measured by their involvement and economic and financial influences on the international scene, including Europe. Prof. Małgorzata Zaleska

The author is a Member of the Board of the National Bank of Poland, a Professor at the Department of Banking of the Warsaw School of Economics, and a Member of the Presidium of The Committee on Financial Sciences of the Polish Academy of Sciences.

The division in the EU has become visible – into euro-zone countries and those outside, with a further split within the euro zone. This could mean that a Europe of at least two different meanings and powers is emerging before our eyes. In fact, the situation is even more complex, as it is possible to distinguish a number of groups and velocities within a single Europe. To use a metaphor from the world of football, European countries may be divided into the Champions League, the Europa League, and the National League. The Champions League would be the very core of the euro zone (with Germany, France, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, and Austria, among others), countries which as yet do not intend to adopt the euro but would be important countries within it (Denmark, Sweden, the UK), and the richest countries outside the EU, i.e. Switzerland, Norway, and Lichtenstein. The Europa League would refer to the peripheral countries of the euro zone, those who aspire to it, and those intending to accede to the EU (Croatia and Iceland). The Europa League would consist of at least two groups, according to the scale of their macroeconomic problems. The National League, finally, would be composed of Albania, Moldova, and Ukraine. The segmentation of Europe will become even more apparent when the so-called six-pack regulations, with 1 directive and 5 resolutions, come into force. Up until now only the Maastricht criteria specified the requirements for joining the euro zone. On a side note, most of the euro-zone countries come short of those

34  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

requirements, and perhaps it is high time to launch an honest debate on the legitimacy of maintaining them in their present form, and the introduction of potential changes. At present, though, EU countries may be divided into those few that fulfil the criteria, and those more numerous which fail to. The six pack will introduce new, additional measures, based on the criteria of excessive imbalance (so-called balance indicators). This raises the following question: Will a country that meets the Maastricht criteria, but fails to achieve satisfactory balance indicators, be good enough to enter the euro zone? Formally, yes, it would appear. However, on factual terms it is questionable, to say the least. The introduction of balance indicators will further split the EU countries into subgroups. This stratification of Europe is not going to be solved by the establishment of an economic government for the euro zone, either. This idea, like any other, has its pros and cons. The argument, at times theoretical in nature, for the establishment of the economic government, may be the need to: :: ensure stability and continuity of decisions – currently they are made during (usually extraordinary) summits of euro zone leaders, :: guarantee efficiency and coordination in the spending of common funds, :: create a counterbalance for the ECB (while monetary policy is now coherent and run by a single body, fiscal policy is uncoordinated),

:: have a coherent and shared (single) voice in contacts with third countries and within international organisations, :: consider the idea of a common government and extra-economic integration. The arguments against the establishment of an economic government for the euro zone are as follows: ::  insufficient budget when set against national budgets and the needs, :: the lack of consensus among countries on the matter of transferring economic powers onto the supranational level, :: the risk of a far-reaching restriction on the autonomy of individual countries, :: potential problems in providing opportunities for working out joint decisions, :: problems regarding democratic control from individual countries, :: unreasonable proliferation of new institutions, which generate additional costs and lack a clearlyspecified scope of powers and liability. Against this background, it is apparent that Europe is far from homogenous and time will tell if it can unite. We shall see whether European leaders, supported or hindered by national politicians, will pass the difficult test of containing a crisis which extends beyond individual states. ::


Manufacturing Companies

Polish companies generate higher incomes The value of investment projects carried out by Polish manufacturing, extraction and energy companies was at a low level in 2010. And since the investment revival was weak, there was little interest in funding offered by banks. It was mainly the largest companies present on the market that could afford to carry out the projects they had planned. In the first half of 2010 the output of Polish companies increased by 10.6% year on year, with the highest increase recorded in the manufacturing sector – 12.6%. Magdalena Szwed In 2010, the situation of manufacturing, extraction and energy companies in Poland was much more favourable than elsewhere in Europe. Growth in industrial output slowed in 2008 as the situation on global markets deteriorated. As a comparison, industrial output increased by 10.7% in 2007 and a mere 3.6% in 2008. The rate of decrease slowed at the end of 2009 and since the fourth quarter of that year growth in output has been accelerating. In the first half of 2010, output rose by 10.6%. In 2009, EU countries recorded significant drops in industrial output. The downward trend continued into the third quarter. Poland’s industrial output decreased in 2009 by 3.5% but other countries saw double-digit drops. In Estonia, output plunged by 25.9%, in Finland by 21.2% and in Italy by 18.4%. The value of Poland’s industrial output in current prices amounted in 2009 to PLN912.7 billion and was close to the level recorded in 2007. At the end of 2010, growth in output was by 6.2 pct. points higher than in the fourth quarter of 2009. The fastest growth, by 66.2%, was in the production of computers and electronics products. The production of paper products and motor vehicles increased respectively by 21.6% and 20.4%. Producers of transport equipment and furniture noted the sharpest drops in output. The unfavourable changes which took place in 2010 included low demand, growing labour costs, increasingly strong competition and increasingly difficult access to cheaper raw materials. Producers will be forced to look for effective solutions to achieve a competitive edge in the long run. This will be taking place in a changed demographic reality and will be coupled with the need to adjust to the requirements of environmental protection.

Trends in individual sectors As the economic situation improved in many countries, oil prices went up to reach

USD70-80 per barrel at the beginning of 2010. According to the Ministry of the Economy, developing countries were the driving force behind this increase. They contributed to a rise in demand by up to 20%. Demand is projected to grow further, especially in developing countries. Prices on the petroleum market depend on the size of demand from buyers. In the longer term, oil prices will depend on prices of alternative resources, like for example natural gas and coal. Exploration for new deposits will have a major influence on prices. In 2009 the coal mining sector was affected by a downturn, which was reflected in a drop in demand for Polish coal. The output of coal decreased in 2009 by 7.3%, with the output of boiler coal going down by 3.5% and coking coal down by 29%. As demand for coal decreased so did its prices. In 2009 coal sales dropped by 12.3%, with a 14.5% drop recorded on the domestic market. In 2010 situation in the coal mining sector started to improve. In the first quarter coal sales went up by 2.5%. The share of coking coal output and sales also increased. In the first quarter of 2010 the output of raw steel was by 26.8% higher than a year earlier and amounted to 1.8 million tonnes. Carbon dioxide emissions rights will influence the development of the steel sector in terms of both production and technology.

Ranking of manufacturing, ­extraction and energy companies Companies operating in the fuel and energy sector top the ranking of manufacturing, extraction and energy companies. They are always trying to expand their operations by undertaking exploration and extraction activities. PKN Orlen Group, Poland’s leading petroleum company, occupies the first place in the league table. PKN Orlen has one of the most modern refinery and petrochemical complexes in Europe. The group

owns refineries located in Poland, Lithuania and the Czech Republic. In 2010 the refineries in Lithuania and the Czech Republic recorded the highest increases in output – by 7% and 6% respectively. 2010 was a good year for the group. Its revenues amounted to PLN83.5 billion and were higher by 23% than a year earlier. At the end of 2010 PKN Orlen had stakes in 34 companies. The retail sales of fuels increased in 2010 by 4.6% in yearon-year terms and reached a record level of 7,000 tonnes. Fuel sales at PKN Orlen’s petrol stations in Poland also reached a record level – 4,300 tonnes. At the end of the year the PKN Orlen group employed over 22,000 people, of which 4,500 worked for the parent company. PGNiG Group, the largest Polish operator in the natural gas exploration and extraction sector, ranks second in the league table in terms of revenue in 2010. At the end of 2009 PGNiG had 81 licences for oil and natural gas exploration. PGNiG is also the main importer of natural gas to Poland, holds a concession to store gaseous fuels and owns all underground gas storage facilities in Poland. Apart from the PGNiG company, the group also includes 37 other companies involved in production and service activities. In 2010 the combined revenues of the companies making up the PGNiG group amounted to PLN21.28 billion while their net profit reached PLN2.4 billion. Employment at the PGNiG group has been growing every year. Last year the group provided employment to 32,400 people compared to 31,300 in 2009. The PGE energy group ranks third, with PLN20.4 billion in revenue in 2010, of which 97% came from the domestic market and 3% from EU markets. The revenue generated outside Poland amounted to PLN572.1 million and was by 25% higher than a year earlier. The revenue generated on the domestic market dropped by 6%. The cost of goods sold rose by 30% while the balance on financial operations was down by PLN72.3 million. In 2010 PGE employed 45,700 people, or by 642 less than in 2009. KGHM Polska Miedź is in fourth place in the table. In 2010 there were 49 companies, 16 more than in 2009, operating within the copper conglomerate. The group’s consolidated revenue amounted to PLN17.3 billion and was by over 40% higher than in 2009 while operating expenses increased by 18.7%. Income from the sales of noble metals, copper and metallurgical by-products accounted for 91% of the group’s revenue. :: 11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  35


RANKING

Ranking of manufacturing, exctraction and energy companies

Name of company

Head of company

Based in

1 PKN ORLEN SA GK

Dariusz Jacek Krawiec

Płock

2 PGNIG SA GK

Michał Szubski

3 PGE SA GK

Tomasz Zadroga

4 KGHM POLSKA MIEDŹ SA

Herbert Wirth

5 TAURON POLSKA ENERGIA SA GK

Dariusz Lubera

6 ARCELORMITTAL POLAND SA 7 KOMPANIA WĘGLOWA SA GK

Sales revenue in PLN thousands

Net profit/ loss in PLN thousands

Gross profit/ loss in PLN thousands

Operating income in PLN thousands

Employment

2010 83547432

2455467

3070167

3122649

22261

Warsaw

21281161

2457184

2936099

2886689

32716

Warsaw

20476465

3627087

4276250

na

45715

Lubin

17292590

4714863

5777550

5545338

30928

Katowice

15428879

991383

1257314

1399259

28480

Sanjay Samaddar

Dąbrowa Górnicza

12023422

230900

283029

na

12226

Zbigniew Madej

Katowice

10131298

30917

50536

na

59955

8 ENERGA SA GK

Mirosław Bieliński

Gdańsk

9114000

625000

na

na

na

9 JASTRZĘBSKA SPÓŁKA WĘGLOWA SA GK

Jarosław Zagórowski

Jastrzębie-Zdrój

8111045

1440330

na

na

26628

10 ENEA SA GK

Maciej Owczarek

Poznań

8087940

639381

813216

711964

10233

11 GLAXOSMITHKLINE PHARMACEUTICALS

Jerzy Toczyski

Poznań

5059898

na

na

na

1750

12 CIECH SA GK

Ryszard Kunicki

Warsaw

3960316

20603

54479

146853

na

13 SYNTHOS SA

Tomasz Kalwat

Oświęcim

3860697

476856

586564

565656

na

14 KATOWICKI HOLDING WĘGLOWY SA

Roman Łój

Katowice

3767136

42000

na

na

19240

15 ŻYWIEC SA GK

Xavier Belison

Żywiec

3631089

398858

424858

461119

5593

16 GRUPA CAN PACK

Wiesław Smulski

Kraków

3589735

310654

398871

451518

3542

17 BORYSZEW SA

Małgorzata Iwanejko

Warsaw

3145555

126371

147351

188066

5657

18 GRUPA ANWIL SA

Remigiusz Paszkiewicz

Włocławek

2525090

46031

56024

30478

3 241 4920

19 MASPEX WADOWICE SA GK

Krzysztof Pawiński

Wadowice

2518350

na

85386

na

20 IMPEXMETAL SA

Piotr Szeliga

Warsaw

2417585

73218

96055

10752

1910

21 KOPEX SA

Marian Kostempski

Katowice

2365194

41197

56156

100087

6759

22 ARCTIC PAPER SA GK

Michał Jarczyński

Poznań

2287731

28817

7350

na

1596

23 MONDI ŚWIECIE SA GK

Maciej Kunda

Świecie

2263674

249317

263690

330724

1022

24 ZAKŁADY AZOTOWE PUŁAWY

Paweł Jarczewski

Puławy

2236500

187000

236000

184100

3300

25 ZAKŁADY CHEMICZNE POLICE

Krzysztof Jałosiński

Police

2022636

26302

5178

5431

3378

26 ZAKŁADY AZOTOWE W TARNOWIE MOŚCICACH SA

Jerzy Marciniak

Tarnów

1901784

400758

417007

422206

6141

27 FIRMA OPONIARSKA DĘBICA SA

Jacek Pryczek

Dębica

1793351

81686

101848

110320

2819

28 ZAK SA

Jerzy Marciniak

Kędzierzyn-Koźle

1759420

30317

40561

56857

1640

29 STALPRODUKT SA

Piotr Janeczek

Bochnia

1732272

145627

182222

177767

2858

30 CERSANIT SA GK

Piotr Mrowiec

Kielce

1531462

103170

128547

142032

6174

31 KRAJOWA SPÓŁKA CUKROWA SA

Marcin Kulicki

Toruń

1517402

188286

267446

na

1648

32 PKM DUDA SA GK

Maciej Duda

Warsaw

1455295

32393

38713

57794

2200

33 PFEIDERER GRAJEWO

Wojciech Gątkiewicz

Grajewo

1390388

-30431

-34770

47100

1618

34 LUBELSKI WĘGIEL BOGDANKA SA

Mirosław Taras

Bogdanka

1230447

230122

288229

276472

na

35 GRUPA KĘTY SA

Dariusz Mańko

Kęty

1210519

89708

112279

117961

819

36 KONSORCJUM STALI SA

Robert Wojdyna

Warsaw

1132874

25452

32201

34673

435

37 FAKRO

Ryszard Florek

Nowy Sącz

1080000

na

na

na

3300

38 ZESPÓŁ ELEKTROWNI WROCŁAWSKICH KOGENERACJA SA

Philippe Gagneux

Wrocław

1022156

140572

171053

186724

na

39 RONAL POLSKA SP.Z O.O.

Krzysztof Brosig

Wałbrzych

903561

52650

50688

58503

1218

40 FABRYKA MASZYN FAMUR SA

Waldemar Łaski

Katowice

885819

80024

na

94130

3110 1414

41 SITECH SP. Z O.O.

Gerhard Schäfer

Polkowice

875532

64334

56366

55333

42 FAGORMASTERCOOK SA

Ireneusz Bartnikowski

Wrocław

863009

na

na

na

na

43 RONAL-POLSKA SP. Z O.O.

Krzysztof Brosig

Wałbrzych

845377

34267

48719

48189

1192

44 HUTMEN SA

Jan Ziaja

Wrocław

747406

-16695

-12093

-4474

1029

45 ALCHEMIA SA GK

Karina Wściubiak-Hankó

Warsaw

670609

14754

73481

22263

1442

46 ALUMETAL SA

Krzysztof Błasiak

Kęty

652581

44125

49297

na

377

47 ELEKTROCIEPŁOWNIE WYBRZEŻE SA

Henryk Dworakowski

Gdańsk

641615

84617

98345

79372

813

48 ZELMER SA

Janusz Płocica

Rzeszów

640022

37781

47544

49205

1902

49 STALPROFIL SA GK

Jerzy Bernhard

Dąbrowa Górnicza

630751

30050

36912

42771

448

50 JUTRZENKA HOLDING SA GK

Jan Kolański

Opatówek

621591

31238

35348

35377

1557

36  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011


Ranking of manufacturing, exctraction and energy companies – cont

Name of company

Head of company

Based in

Sales revenue in PLN thousands

51 BARLINEK SA GK

Paweł Wrona

Kielce

588108

Net profit/ loss in PLN thousands

Gross profit/ loss in PLN thousands

RANKING

Operating income in PLN thousands

Employment

2010 2327

8164

30519

3321 258

52 PRUSZYŃSKI SP. Z O.O.

Krzysztof Pruszyński

Komorów

582049

20338

24811

28494

53 ADVADIS SA

Adam Brodowski

Kraków

568733

-48794

-46882

-44468

na

54 KOELNER SA GK

Radosław Koelner

Wrocław

559631

871

3116

18216

1726

55 ŚNIEŻKA SA GK

Piotr Mikrut

Lubzina

531699

47516

58669

62226

1367

56 GRAAL SA GK

Bogusław Kowalski

Wejherowo

492104

6614

9976

20425

na

57 ICN POLFA RZESZÓW SA

Mariusz Gajowniczek

Rzeszów

478160

115181

140622

130226

826

58 STOMIL SANOK SA

Marek Łęcki

Sanok

470861

27167

37454

39645

2309

59 FABRYKA MEBLI FORTE SA GK

Maciej Formanowicz

Ostrów Mazowiecka

468888

29319

38087

24786

2063

60 GRUPA APATOR SA

Janusz Niedźwiecki

Toruń

409213

50050

62199

45419

1746

61 KRAKCHEMIA SA

Jerzy Mazgaj

Kraków

390441

5118

6484

7383

na

62 BIOTON SA GK

Sławomir Ziegert

Warsaw

378595

110726

85986

77331

987

63 WAWEL SA GK

Dariusz Orłowski

Kraków

355649

47739

59153

56963

700

64 TFP SP. Z O.O.

Lucjana Kuźnicka-Tylenda

Dziećmierowo

347991

21375

26554

26657

540 2831

65 PAGED SA GK

Daniel Mzyk

Warsaw

346346

15916

16919

15703

66 ORZEŁ BIAŁY SA GK

Zbigniew Rybakiewicz

Bytom

332246

38483

48077

47833

393

67 ZPUE SA

Andrzej Grzybek

Włoszczowa

310296

14474

18313

19735

1272

68 ARMATURA KRAKÓW SA

Konrad Hernik

Kraków

284679

14121

15350

18536

na

69 ZM ROPCZYCE SA

Józef Siwiec

Ropczyce

265363

-12345

-6537

-8660

756

70 DECORA SA GK

Waldemar Osuch

Środa Wielkopolska

263270

4343

3684

8846

856

71 HARPER HYGIENICS SA GK

Robert Neymann

Warsaw

200879

13440

14698

21373

803

72 ZETKAMA SA GK

Leszek Jurasz

Ścinawka Średnia

196422

5515

7354

10314

838

73 BAKALLAND SA

Marian Bogdan Owerko

Warsaw

194468

9326

10126

13116

232

74 LUVENA SA

Kazimierz Zagozda

Luboń

187926

4592

5368

5452

251

75 ENERGOINSTAL SA

Michał Więcek

Katowice

185987

-8323

-9359

-9856

1022

76 AUTOPART SA

Monika Bąk

Mielec

182136

1972

2416

4231

70

77 CERAMIKA NOWA GALA SA

Waldemar Piotrowski

Końskie

177158

5307

na

6753

na

78 YAWAL SA GK

Edmund Mzyk

Herby

168532

-5538

-4876

-3272

420

79 DROZAPOL- PROFIL SA

Wojciech Rybka

Bydgoszcz

166103

4393

4413

5213

258

80 FERRO SA

Aneta Raczek

Skawina

165575

10208

12444

13035

116

81 ES-SYSTEM SA

Bogusław Pilszczek

Kraków

162303

10984

13911

13108

na

82 ELEKTROCIEPŁOWNIA BĘDZIN SA GK

Paweł Orlof

Będzin

158311

12276

14968

15348

162 556

83 FASING SA GK

Zdzisław Bik

Katowice

151151

1918

3039

5.597

84 MAKARONY POLSKIE SA GK

Paweł Nowakowski

Rzeszów

149969

-4971

3170

2628

na

85 INTER GROCLIN AUTO SA GK

Zbigniew Drzymała

Wolsztyn

141218

516

1337

3885

1566

86 IZOSTAL SA

Marek Mazurek

Zawadzkie

138329

7438

8538

11131

120

87 MARBET SP. Z O.O.

Andrzej Zgierski

Bielsko-Biała

132488

4009

4015

4659

392

88 COMPLEX SA GK

Michał Nowacki

Łódź

120877

2416

2936

6136

525

89 GRUPA ATM

Andrzej Muszyński

Bielany Wrocławskie

113357

3469

3469

4857

na

90 RADPOL SA GK

Andrzej Sielski

Człuchów

112394

14124

16844

17494

545

91 NOVITUS SA

Bogusław Łatka

Nowy Sącz

109782

11276

14140

13963

550

92 LENA LIGHTING SA GK

Włodzimierz Lesiński

Środa Wielkopolska

104510

1241

1037

2911

124

93 ZREMB CHOJNICE SA GK

Krzysztof KosiorekSobolewski

Chojnice

102337

-8986

-10145

-9185

na

94 CHEMOSERVIS-DWORY SA

Wojciech Mazur

Oświęcim

100248

682

643

428

826

95 BSC DRUKARNIA OPAKOWAŃ SA

Janusz Schwark

Poznań

100130

14659

17506

18964

na

96 PPS PEPEES SA

Wojciech Faszczewski

Łomża

93910

1330

1356

2418

286

97 RELPOL SA

Rafał Gulka

Żary

89198

-8002

-6550

-6565

na

98 RAFAMET SA GK

E. Longin Wons

Kuźnia Raciborska

86780

1889

2712

6050

647

Wacław Kropinski

Tuchola

72054

4216

5257

5586

756

Kamila Yamasaki

Kobierzyce Bielany Wrocławskie

71485

5653

7225

7326

na

99 HYDROTOR SA GK 100 BLACK POINT SA

Source: Companies

11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  37


Investment in success In 2007-2010 the inflow of direct investment into Poland was positive. Despite the global crisis, Poland remained one of the most attractive locations for foreign investment and, according to UNCTAD, improved its position among the largest EU countries receiving FDI; from 11th place in 2007 it advanced to 8th place in 2010. Concerning the structure of the FDI inflow in 2007-2010, reinvested earnings were negative only in 2008. As a result of the economic crisis, foreign companies did not reinvest their earnings in their enterprises in Poland but rather used them to save their mother firms, operating on those markets which were more affected by the crisis than Poland. In 2009 the situation returned to the state from before the economic instability - reinvested earnings constituted 42% of the total inflow (40% in 2007). Recently, the National Bank of Poland has once again noticed a trend towards transferring profit generated by investors to foreign markets. The Polish Information and Foreign Investment Agency PAIiIZ has not, however, recorded any decrease in investment projects. In the first nine months of 2011 the Agency completed 45 projects with a total value of over EUR 1 billion, which will generate nearly 9 000 new jobs. The value of new projects exceeded the total for 2010. Within the last 3 years 131 foreign companies served by PAIiIZ decided to invest, in total, EUR 2.6 billion, and to employ over 28,000 people. Among the investors, the largest groups were from USA, Sweden and France. The most popular sectors were modern services and the R&D sector, the automotive sector, and the machinery sector. 24.5% of the investments implemented by PAIiIZ went to the Dolnośląskie Province, 14.5% to the Mazowieckie Province, and 10% to the Wielkopolskie Province. Over a third of the total number of investors located their projects in special economic zones. PAIiIZ had a 14% share in the implementation of investment projects in Poland in 2009-2011. The Agency is currently handling 150 investment projects with a total value of EUR 5.9 billion and the number of new jobs exceeding 45,800. Most investors come from USA, UK and China, the dominant sectors being the automotive and machinery sectors.

The Danes in Szczecin One hundred new jobs and PLN 12 billion of investment outlays - these are the main parameters of another Danish investment project in the Zachodniopomorskie Province. The Eltwin A/S company has launched its activity in Szczecin. Eltwin is going to produce electronics and metal components for ventilation equipment. During the first two years of its activity the company will operate in a rented facility, where 50 employees will be working. After completion of their own workshop, with a total area of 1 300 m2, the number of employees will double. The project is handled

38  ::  polish market  :: 11/2011

by the West Pomeranian Service Centre for Investors and Exporters. The Chairman of the Zachodniopomorskie Province, Olgierd Geblewicz, has announced that another Danish investment project is to be located in the region.

Shale gas is already flowing Shale gas has flowed for the first time from a well drilled by a Polish company in Lubocino near the northern town of Wejherowo. A flare is constantly burning at the Lubocino-1 well, under the Wejherowo concession held by PGNiG. This blazes the trail for further work, which may result in launching the commercial extraction of shale gas and confirming that the forecasts concerning the large resources of this gas in Poland are well grounded. PGNiG is currently preparing for horizontal drilling and other fracking activities in Wejherowo. These works are going to take at least several months. After their completion it will be possible to launch commercial extraction - PGNiG predicts that the trial operation may take place in the second half of 2013 and commercial production will start in 2014. PGNiG SA currently holds 15 out of 103 exploration concessions for shale gas in Poland, along the line from Pomerania, through Mazovia and Lublin region, up to Podkarpacie.

The Second Pilkington Automotive factory in Poland Pilkington Automotive Polska is planning to double its production in Poland by 2014. It will be possible thanks to a new factory, whose planned output will amount to 7 million pieces of car glass per annum. The Pilkington Automotive factory, producing car windscreens, will be located in Chmielowo, on a plot with an area of 13.5 ha, located on the premises of the Special Economic Zone in Tarnobrzeg, 30 km from the company’s factory in Sandomierz. Pilkington Automotive, an affiliate of the Japanese NSG Group, is going to be the biggest investor in the Tarnobrzeg subzone. The total cost of the project will amount to about PLN 450 million. By 2014 the investor is going to create about 500 new jobs. In addition, 150 jobs may be created in association with the project.


Łódź Region

The promised land

– the dynamically-developing Łódź Region Apart from its strategic location, and industrial background, the Łódź Region exhibits great potential. It is situated in the centre of Poland and of Europe. It is a place where the most important transport and tourist routes meet, transport infrastructure is developing, and the number of well-educated professionals is growing. Bogdan Sadecki

Helsinki

Oslo

Tallin

Moscow Vilnius Minsk

Dublin Amsterdam

Łódź

London

Warsaw

Kiev

Prague

Brussels

As concerns its administrative division, the Province comprises 174 communes located in 21 counties and 3 cities with county rights. Its territory encompasses 42 cities or towns and 5,234 smaller localities. The cities with county rights include Łódź, Piotrków Trybunalski and Skierniewice. Łódź, as the second largest city in Poland, is also the administrative seat of the Province. The Province has 2,587,702 residents, which constitutes approximately 6.8% of Poland’s population. There are 1,674,900 people living in urban areas and approximately 912,800 in rural areas. The Region is densely populated, as there are 142 citizens per square kilometre (higher than the country’s average of 122 persons). In terms of the number of inhabitants, the Łódzkie Province takes 6th place among Polish regions.

Berlin

Paris

Bratislava Vienna

Bern

Budapest Bucharest

Belgrade Sarajevo

Sofia

The influx of foreign direct investments into Polish provinces between 2007 and 2010 (annual average in EUR millions)

Rome Madryt

Province

Lisbon Athens

Source: www.biznes.lodzkie.pl

The Łódzkie Province occupies an area of 18,219,000 square kilometres, which constitutes 5.8% of the total area of Poland. Its significance lies in its location in the centre of Poland and Europe, at the intersection of car and train routes. Łódź is located within 200 kilometres of most of Poland’s major cities, and within 1,500 km of almost all the European capital cities. Over two centuries ago, it took two generations for the industrialists from all over Europe to build this important industrial centre. It is surrounded by six provinces, including Mazowiec­ kie, Śląskie, Świętokrzyskie, Opols­kie,

Wielkopolskie and Kujawsko-Pomorskie. The Region is a transit area and, at the same time, the core of the country’s spatial infrastructure. This is reflected in the course of the main transport routes and utility infrastructure (pipelines and power lines), and in the arrangement of current and potential nodes. The Łódź Region aims at developing air connections using the airports in Łódź (Lublinek), and in Łask, through adjusting part of the military airfield to the needs of cargo transport, and, in the future, also to the transport of passengers.

EUR millions

Mazowieckie

4 696

Śląskie

1 029

Dolnośląskie

1 001

Wielkopolskie

912

Małopolskie

675

Pomorskie

654

Zachodniopomorskie

507

Łódzkie

370

Lubuskie

250

Kujawsko-Pomorskie

233

Podkarpackie

209

Opolskie

171

Lubelskie

133

Podlaskie

106

Warmińsko-Mazurskie

104

Świętokrzyskie

94

Source: BIEC, data from the Central Statistical Office (GUS) and the National Bank of Poland (NBP)

11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  39


Łódź Region Transport linkages in the region have determined its development. It is but one aspect, though. Natural resources and utility infrastructure have played a significant role in the development of the province, and will continue to do so in the future. The most significant of its mineral resources include lignite, with the largest brown coal mine in Europe being in Bełchatów; rocks (limestone, marlstone, sand, gravel stone, and clay), and mineral waters (Upper Cretaceous). 70% of the country’s textiles, manufactured on the basis of natural and artificial raw materials, is produced in the region, and over 60% of household cleaning equipment have their source here, which gives the region first place in the country.

Entrepreneurship in the Łódź Region Industry in the Łódź Region is focussed mainly in the Łódź conurbation, comprising the cities of Łódź, Zgierz and Pabianice. The largest cluster of household appliance plants in Europe was created in Łódź. It is also a place where new technologies, modern financial institutions and shopping centres are developing. The Łódź Special Economic Zone, with its 22 sub-zones with an area of 511 ha, located in 12 towns within the Province, is one of the fastest developing economic areas in Poland. It offers both attractive vacant land for greenfield projects and buildings for development. The implementation of the city’s strategy for economic growth, and the creation and development of the special economic zone, produce tangible benefits in the form of attracting other investments, including those within the sectors that are crucial for the city. The Gdańsk Institute for Market Economics has rated the Łódź sub-region as the most investment-friendly area in the country with regard to the service sector. The region also takes second place as to investments in new technologies, and it is third in respect of industry. According to KPMG, the Łódź Special Economic Zone is viewed by investors as the best in Poland, and 11th in the world. Investors there are provided with assistance in the form of tax

40  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

exemptions and the stability of tax reliefs, once granted, guaranteed by the State. The Zone is situated in the subzones of Łódź, Zgierz, Ozorków and in the Ksawerów Commune, and outside the Łódź urban areas in the cities of Tomaszów Mazowiecki, Rawa Mazowiecka, Radomsko, Kutno and Łęczyca. There are approximately 200,000 businesses operating within the Province. They produce 6.2% of Poland’s GDP. Over 90% of the companies are in private hands. The remaining state-owned businesses are currently undergoing restructuring or commercialisation processes. What is noteworthy is the considerable resourcefulness of the Region’s residents, visible in the large number of enterprises run by natural persons and private partnerships. Over one third of all companies operating in the Łódzkie Province is engaged in commerce. Nearly 16% of them are manufacturing enterprises, and over 10% of all the companies operate in real-estate services. The above-mentioned three sectors gather over 63% of companies registered in the Region. Further down the list are construction and (road) transport industries. Manufacturing enterprises and companies are engaged mainly in the production of clothing, fabrics, food products, drinks, furniture and ready-made metal products, as well as leather dressing and dyeing.

The Province’s leading products include tiles (approx. 70% of the domestic production), hosiery (approx. 65%), lignite (approx. 60%), architectural glass (approx. 50%), building paper (approx. 45%), textiles (approx.

Łódź Region Economic Award Laureates 2011 For the eighth time in general, and for the second time together, the Łódź Province Governor and the Łódzkie Province Chairman granted the Łódź Region Economic Awards. Nearly 60 businesses competed in 5 categories. Below is the list of Łódź Economic Award Laureates in 2011 in a range of categories: Large Enterprise category CERAMIKA PARADYŻ sp. z o.o. in Opoczno Medium-sized Enterprise category CEBAL – TUBA sp. z o.o. in Łódź Small Enterprise category TECHNITEL POLSKA spółka jawna in Łódź Microenterprise category Grupa Producentów Owoców i Warzyw AURA sp. z o.o. in Dobrzelin Agricultural Holding category Private Agricultural Farm Iwona and Andrzej Olejniczak in Dąbkowice, Strzelce Commune This year, two companies won the Special Award The Bridge Works Company MOSTY-ŁÓDŹ S.A. in Łódź, and the biotechnological company MABION S.A. in Kutno. Source: www.lodz.uw.gov.pl


Łódź Region

Ranking of companies in Łódzkie province Name of company

Head of company

Based in

1 POLSKA GRUPA FARMACEUTYCZNA SA GK Jacek Szwajcowski 2 UNIQA TU SA

Andrzej Jarczyk

Sales revenue (in PLN thousands)

Net profit/ loss (in PLN thousands)

Gross profit/ loss (in PLN thousands)

Operating income (in PLN thousands)

Ownership capital

Q1 2011

Q1 2011

Q1 2011

Q1 2011

Q1 2011

1 679 024

17 036

23 593

30 289

na

Łódź

282 217

-1 289

-1 168

na

na 125 407

3 PAMAPOL SA

Krzysztof Półgrabia

Rusiec

155 268

1 453

1 700

4 930

4 UNIQA TU na Życie SA

Andrzej Jarczyk

Łódź

151 746

146

188

na

na

5 WIELTON SA

Jarosław Andrzej Szczepek

Wieluń

91 663

-1 405

-982

916

140 914

6 REDAN SA GK

Bogusz Kruszyński

Łódź

76 610

-2 099

-2 337

-2 760

na

7 RAINBOW TOURS SA GK

Grzegorz Baszczyński

Łódź

53 529

376

666

684

na

8 MIRBUD SA GK

Halina Mirgos

Skierniewice

44 283

4 976

6 100

7 587

na

9 SFINKS POLSKA SA GK

Sylwester Cacek

Łódź

41 017

-2 621

-2 621

-818

-67 078

10 COMPLEX SA GK

Michał Nowacki

Łódź

39 809

1 283

1618

1 423

na

11 MONNARI TRADE SA

Mirosław Misztal

Łódź

28 033

-2 440

-2 440

-2 533

55 857

12 SUWARY SA

Walter Tymon Kuskowski

Pabianice

19 296

490

602

666

42 863

13 MAGELLAN SA

Krzysztof Kawalec

Łódź

19 288

7 039

8 835

8 759

na

14 BUDVAR CENTRUM SA

Marek Trzciński

Zduńska Wola

11 088

-1 962

1028

-1 834

na

15 POLLENA EWA SA

Marcin Łątkowski

Łódź

6 784

-151

-158

-117

na

16 MILKPOL SA

Wiesław Niedziałek

Czarnocin

5 962

236

298

293

6 747

17 PRÓCHNIK SA

Krzysztof Grabowski

Łódź

5 363

39

39

37

na

18 LSI SOFTWARE SA

Grzegorz Siewiera

Łódź

4 943

351

354

433

na

19 DYWILAN SA

Piotr Jakubiak

Łódź

3 252

-143

-143

-89

5 788

20 HURTIMEX SA

Jarosław Kopeć

Łódź

2 975

-473

-477

-487

2 050 Source: Companies ADVERTISEMENT

11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  41


Łódź Region

40%), electricity (approx. 20%), and clothing (approx. 16%). During the last five years, over 30,000 new jobs have been created in Łódź. It is a result of market transformations and changes in the city’s policy. Business service centres, logistics, the electronic industry, and the production of household appliances, are the new industries that show dynamic growth in the Łódź Region. The city’s economic growth is based primarily on the development of entrepreneurship and the increase in the city’s appeal. Beneficial changes in Łódź are reflected by the statistics: unemployment was at the level of 20% in 2005, and in 2010 has decreased by over half to 9.9%. The number of investments in the area of business services has been steadily growing, and during the four years following 2004 increased by over 20%. Approximately 6,000 new jobs have been created within the last four years in the BPO and IT industries alone. Service companies available in the city have chiefly catered for the domestic market (this was the case until 2005). After the implementation of a strategy designed in cooperation with McKinsey, these companies also became involved in activities on the international markets. The service market of the Region calls for more and more sophisticated services, including knowledge of foreign languages other than English. It is becoming increasingly popular for international

42  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

corporations to transfer their accounting, financila and servicing process precisely here. BPO and IT companies operating in the Łódzkie Province include Accenture, TomTom, Fujitsu Technology Solutions, Infosys, SouthWestern, CERI, ACS A Xerox Company, and Ericpol. In 2010 Nordea set up a financial and accounting centre for 250 people in Łódź. BSS (Business Support Solutions), a daughter company of PGF, provides accounting services here. The number of investors in the production sector has grown significantly. During the last few years Łódź has welcomed such companies as Dell, Hutchinson and P&G. In addition, product-based companies like Philips, GE Power Controls, Indesit or BSH, invest here (in modern services). A programme called “Łódź - centre of opportunities” has been running for a year with the aim of promoting the image of Łódź as an investmentfriendly city, especially in the area of BPO and shared services centres. This year, activities supporting the development of IT companies are to be undertaken.

Agriculture Agricultural land constitutes 69% of the Province’s total area. The average size of a farm is almost 6 ha. Private homesteads take 98% of total arable land in the Łódzkie Province. The most favourable natural conditions are characteristic of the northern parts of the Province, specifically

along the Łęczyca – Kutno – Łowicz belt. This area is a perfect supply base for the agricultural and food industry operating in the Region. The land is rich in chernozem, which facilitates highly-productive fruit and vegetable farming. This, in turn, constitutes a base for agricultural and food processing, the production of canned vegetables/meat and vegetables, juices and beverages. Wellknown companies operating in the Region include Agros Nova with their plants in Łowicz; Jogo, Polpain, Dakri, Pamapol, Pamso, Mo­tyl, Star Foods, and Browary Łódzkie.

Pharmaceutical industry A category that is particularly prominent in comparison to other sectors in the region is the pharmaceutical industry, and the related wholesale trade. Leading companies in the business are Polfa Pabianice, Polfa Kutno, Polfa Łódź and Terpol Sieradz, as well as pharmaceutical factories situated in Pabianice, Kutno and Ksawerów, and the producers of herbal medicines - Herbapol Łódź and Agropharm Tuszyn. Recently, factories of the Slovenian company Lek Pharmaceutical Company have been opened in Stryków. The Łódź conurbation is also a prominent academic centre. Nearly 100,000 students study here at 20 universities, including 6 state-run units, which takes the Province to the forefront of Polish cities with great intellectual potential. ::

Photos courtesy of Łódź City Hall Archive.


A Q I N U siness

u b t s e b e Th Par tner!


Lodz Special Economic Zone – a Fashion Zone our professional team. Our outcomes are some of the best in Poland: in 14 years of operation of Lodz Zone entrepreneurs have invested over PLN 12 billion and created over 23 thousand new workplaces. For many years LSEZ has been in the lead in almost all the prestigious rankings: since 2008, the KPMG reports summarising the operations of special economic zones in Poland have placed Lodz SEZ, depending on the category, in the top three positions. In “Financial Times” LSEZ has been ranked 11th among 700 economic zones in the world and 1st in CentralEastern Europe.

Tomasz Sadzyński, President of Lodz Special Economic Zone What are the factors that make Lodz Special Economic Zone so attractive? Our priority is to attract investors and create new workplaces. Specific strategic objectives include attracting investors who implement innovative solutions and apply new technologies. At the moment we are also starting new investments – the revitalisation of the main complex of Lodz Special Economic Zone. This project will enable us to increase income and introduce new services. Our priority is also to maintain the highest quality of services provided to the entrepreneurs operating in the Zone through the work of

The Zone is attracting more and more companies – we can see a robust growth in investment. How does it affect the economic development of the region? The major advantage of the Lodz Region and Lodz, as its capital, is the intersection of highways, which will soon become a reality. From the standpoint of logistics and transportation this is an excellent location for investments. Lodz is a large academic centre. This translates into young and educated staff. In addition, we offer low labour costs. There are many global brands present in LSEZ. Our advantages have been appreciated by such investors as Dell, , Bosch-Siemens, PG, Hutchinson, Gillette, Indesit, Amcor and ABB. It works like a magnet. What kind of activities attract most investors? We focus on innovative companies, the leaders in modern technologies. However, every company with potential is welcome. LSEZ has been dominated by manufacturers of household appliances, so-called white goods, as well as construction chemicals and packaging. There have been more and more pharmacy-related companies. We also focus on the BPO sector, which has

been recently rapidly expanding, especially in Lodz. Apart from strictly business activities, Lodz Special Economic Zone inspires many initiatives, including cultural ones. Corporate social responsibility is not an empty slogan for us. We are not a “trendy area” only in the context of good investments in rankings, or in the opinion of investors. Since this autumn we have become a partner of FashionPhilosophy Fashion Week Poland for the next three editions. The halls of Lodz SEZ will host the cream of world fashion. This is the most prestigious fashion event in the country. Thanks to the festival’s brand we will reach potential investors even more effectively. This is not the only area of our operations. The post-factory complex Priest’s Mill has regained its splendour. This year, the revitalisation of the 19th Century factory of the former Grohman’s empire will begin. It will become the headquarters of the Zone, and part of the surface area will be rented. In addition, the building of the Hydrophone, which is a new cultural space in Lodz, has been renovated. Inside the building, institutions organise exhibitions, performances and seminars. Our Art Zone was given an award in the prestigious “Punkt dla Łodzi” (Point to Łódź) competition this year. Under the “Strefa Dzieciom” (The Zone for Children) programme LSEZ, together with CARITAS, investors and business partners, organises events on the occasion of Children’s Day and Christmas. Lodz SEZ has also joined the “Jonatan” campaign carried out by Indesit Company Polska and the “Jaś i Małgosia” (Hansel and Gretel) Foundation. We are also implementing the “Strefa Edukacji” (Education Zone) project. To improve the situation on the regional labour market, we support and promote vocational education in the province. ::


Łódź Region

Łódź – “The Promised Land” Łódź is a city primarily associated with industry. It was granted town privileges in July 1423. At first, Łódź was considered an agricultural area, but with the influx of new residents, merchants and artisans it took a more municipal character. In the 19th century Łódź became the centre of textile industry. In connection with the development of the industry, Łódź became one of Polish factory towns. The influx of people caused it to become a real bustling town. The growth of factories with their owners becoming richer contrasted with the poverty of workers and caused strikes. The development of the town was hampered by World War I. The situation of the city, industry and above all its inhabitants deteriorated due to WWII. Although the town did not suffer large losses associated with the destruction of buildings, it did due to the takeover of industrial machinery

46  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

and primarily because Łódź inhabitants were exterminated. In 1940 a Jewish ghetto was established, from which only 900 people were saved and some 300,000 died. During the occupation of Łódź 120,000 Poles lost their lives as well. Luckily, the town and its inhabitants managed to pick themselves up after this tragedy. Its reconstruction restarted, along with investments in the industry; cultural and educational centres continue to be created. The development of culture in Łódź is undoubtedly inextricably linked with the Film School, which has been educating the most outstanding Polish film directors. The main street of Łódź – Piotrkowska Street - has become the walk of fame. The first plate to be put in was the one dedicated to Andrzej Seweryn. Those, who wish to explore the main street in Łódź and at the same time rest, may

take advantage of a rickshaw and enjoy the beautiful houses built by the former factory owners. Travelling in a rickshaw, you can have a look at sculptures of Arthur Rubinstein’s Piano, Władysław Reymont’s chest, Julian Tuwim’s bench, the monuments to Tadeusz Kościuszko and to the Three Factory Owners. You should start your trip to Łódź from the Old Town. As part of it was inhabited by Jews, it was the heart of the ghetto during WWII. It was destroyed during the war and restored afterwards. A significant place is Juliusz Heinzel’s palace built in the 19th century. Today it houses the City Hall. And in the palace of Karol Scheibler, one of the industrialists, the Cinematography Museum is located. Its existence is an obvious consequence of the success of the Film School and the Feature Film Production Company. The museum exhibits archival film equipment,


WE SUPPLY CLEAN ENERGY • high service standards • security • reliable gas supply • environmental care • effectiveness

www.msgaz.pl


Łódź Region

items associated with filmmaking and its functioning, posters and stage set pieces. It may be a particular attraction for families, as the Museum was named a “kids-friendly location.” Moreover, the Museum organizes the annual Film Festival. Each edition of the Festival is devoted to one author or composer. Another major festival is the Łódź of Four Cultures Festival. Its aim is to commemorate and celebrate the ethnic groups once living in Łódź – Poles, Jews, Germans and Russians. The festival features exhibitions, performances, panel discussions and various authors, because after all, art does unite. In your spare time you can relax strolling in the parks. Then you must visit the Botanical Garden, which was established in 1946. At present, the garden covers an area of over 64 hectares. There you can marvel at several thousands of plant species, which have been diligently classified by the garden employees. Moreover, the garden is home to some 75 bird and invertebrate species. While visiting the garden, you can learn about keeping

48  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

house plants, designing and maintaining a beautiful garden. It would be a sin to walk by the Zoo, located not far from the Botanical Garden. The Łódź Zoo attracts visitors with its predators, aquarium fish, elephants and giraffes. It is located on over 17 hectares and should be entertaining for those interested in various animal species.

Photos courtesy of Łódź City Hall Archive.

To connoisseurs of art, Łódź offers numerous theatre performances and film screenings. The stages of theatres: Wielki, Powszechny and Muzyczny bring a variety of shows each month. You should also visit the Philharmonic with 100 years of history. It has hosted celebrities from around the world performing classical, jazz and contemporary music. The Łódź Philharmonic also carries out music projects including Music Discoverers for children, and Baby Boom Bum for infants. In summer a special bus line, Artbus, runs in the town. It joins theatres, festival and concert venues with the city centre. Another must-see is the former I. K. Poznański’s factory – today’s Manufaktura. It is more than a shopping and service centre. It is one of the most alluring places in Łódź. Sport fans, not only Łódź residents, are familiar with the Atlas Arena. It is here that the largest sport events, like football, basketball and volleyball tournaments, take place. For those who do sports and like to actively spend their time, Łódź has several proposals. These include indoor and outdoor swimming pools, tennis courts, golf courses and climbing walls. If you are interested in visiting Łódź, you may use the Tourist Information Centre where you can get all the information about tourist attractions and accommodation. ::


Gas technician Secondary technical school (4 years, middle school graduates)

Extramural secondary technical school (3 years, vocational school graduates)

Extramural college

(2 years, grammar and secondary vocational school graduates)

Patronage:

Zespół Szkół Ponadgimnazjalnych nr 3 w Łodzi (Post-Middle School Complex No. 3 in Łódź) 159/163 Kilińskiego Str., 90-315 Łódź Phone: 42 674 02 75, 42 278 72 89 Mobile: 662 078 983 E-mail: zsp3@szkoly.lodz.pl

Secretariat open: 8: 00 a.m. – 4: 00 p.m. workdays except Wednesdays, www.zsp3.com


Photo: Arkadiusz Gola

We consistently strive to achieve our strategic goals, which are to secure the operation of our mine over the next few decades Roman Łój of President of KATOWICE COAL HOLDING SA (KHW KATOWICE) talks to Polish Market

Photo: Arkadiusz Gola

President of KATOWICE COAL HOLDING SA (KHW KATOWICE) Roman Łój

W hat, in your opinion, are the prospects ahead of Europe’s, and especially Poland’s mining industry in light of the EU’s energy and climate package? As we’ve been saying over the past months, this is a difficult situation. The EU has put extra fees on coal energy, bringing it to the brink of profitability. We would understand that if there really did exist alternative and safe energy sources. As it is, the proposed solutions are much more expensive, they also reduce our competitiveness against countries not subject to EU directives. Also, these solutions take a long time to introduce. This is why I believe coal industry will have to modernize, cut production costs and raise effectiveness in order to adjust to the increasingly difficult conditions on the energy market. Here, too, we have a doublesided situation as on the one hand the share of coal in the so-called “energy mix” will be gradually falling, but the rising demand for energy will keep up

a relatively steady demand for coal for decades to come. The Katowice Coal Holding (Katowicki Holding Węglowy SA, KHW) was founded in 1993 from a merger of eleven mines and is today one of the biggest coal companies in Poland. Is KWH a modern enterprise? Yes, the Katowice Coal Holding is a modern company and currently in the course of an intensive upgrade programme covering production as well as organization and management. As in the case of most enterprises, our modernization plans occasionally come up against difficulties resulting either from the specifics of our branch or human aversion to change. Nonetheless we are determined to complete the modernization scheme as thanks to it our mines will have work for several decades to come. By all indications we’ll manage to complete the programme, which will allow us to produce around 15 million


W hat other hindrances to you come up against? These are of a twofold nature. First, there is human resistance to change, the fear that change will make things worse. This is rather typical. First people complain about their conditions and demand change, but any proposed change immediately evokes protests out of fear that something will be different than it used to be. This is why we frequently talk about the changes with our crew and the trade unions, to whom we explain what we’re doing and why. This isn’t easy, partly because today’s situation in the mining branch forces us to introduce economicallyfeasible solutions fast. In effect, we won’t be able to afford certain outlays demanded by some of our employees. Regarding opinions about us, I will say that financial institutions and the movements between them play a part here. I am basing this on certain opinions which have leaked to the media, and which also quite clearly indicate which financial institution they came from. This is something new for

us but it’s evidently a part of our reality – and this despite the fact that we’re not a stock market company yet. How are your stock market and privatization plans progressing? For us the stock market is not an aim in itself and we’ve not set any deadlines yet. Until now we’ve always had reservations about certain external conditions, also the economic reality around us is changing very quickly, sometimes even too quickly for us to follow. Of course the stock exchange is still one of our strategic goals. All considered, our entry could be possible in the first half of 2013. It must be kept in mind, though, that privatization through the stock market is difficult in times of crisis and a slumping market. Right now our main task ahead is securing funds to further modernize the company, which will enable us to keep up our production levels over the next 10, 20 years. Mining is very expensive and does not yield fast returns. This is why we plan to issue stock with a five-year maturity deadline. We hope the first earnings on them will

come in still this year. Also, we don’t intend to issue a single million-złoty tranche, the size of the issues will depend on the costs. Are you active in any non-mining fields? We are but we plan to stop. Mining companies traditionally run housing areas, schools, kindergartens, community centres, clinics, public transportation, shops, power units, etc. Today, however, we’re pulling out of this because we have to focus on our main business, which is coal extraction. So we’re gradually selling off everything that is not directly connected with mining. We do, however, have some ties with the local community. We sponsor sporting and cultural events, we also aid local development projects. We regard this as an obvious duty towards the environment in which we work and which is inhabited by people who work for us. What is today called “corporate social responsibility” has always been strongly present in the mining branch, although no one there ever bothered to invent complicated names for it. ::

Photo: Arkadiusz Gola

Does this include the “megamine” project? Yes. Whereby I must clear up a misunderstanding about this. We do not plan to “build” a megamine and open it on “day X” – it will rather be a result of the reform scheme we’re carrying through in our present pits, which foresees the merger of the Mysłowice-Wesoła, MurckiStaszic and Wieczorek mines into one organism. In doing this we’ll have to bear in mind that the Wieczorek pit’s coalbeds are nearly exhausted and in a few years’ time we’ll have to see how to re-adapt the mine. Then there’s the social costs, which should be as low as possible for our staff, their families and the human settlements which have appeared around the mine over the years and are still closely tied to it. We’re striving to adapt to the changes around us. Sometimes I think to myself that the easiest part of our modernization scheme are the purely technical upgrades like deepening shafts, exchanging air-conditioning systems or linking underground passageways. Bar the unexpected, they are easiest to calculate.

Photo: Arkadiusz Gola

tons of coal annually with employment at about 15,000.


Mining Industry

Barbórka – Miners’ Day

The feast begins with a Holy Mass near a statue of St. Barbara. Then a miner’s brass band marches through the miners’ housing estates and plays its anthem. Miners’ feasts follow. On 4 December miners organise pageants, meetings, and parties. A tradition of this holiday is the so-called “beer hall.” These are parties for miners (both experienced and young) who sit at two tables (called boards). The national anthem is sung, and the celebrations begin. Apprentice miners are accepted on this day, during the so-called “jump over the leather apron” initiation rite. Each candidate says his name, surname, place of birth, and nationality, raises a hand, and recites the vows. During the ceremony novices gird themselves in leather and jump over it as the miners’ tradition prescribes. The leather apron was the most important accoutrement of a miner. Miners used it to protect their knees when they had to work in a kneeling position, covered themselves with it when water poured from above, and sat on it at meals. The “leather” has come to be the symbol of becoming a miner. On this special day all miners don their festive uniforms. This is most often associated with the so-called “czako” – a hat with feathers. The feathers symbolise the broom of bird feathers, used by miners to clear fine debris from inside blast holes, and worn on the cap. Today the colours of the feathers have various meanings – green stands for supervisors, white foremen, black – regular miners, and red –a miners’ brass band member. Stripes with buttons fitted on both sides of the miner’s jacket are reminders of special pockets once used to hold sulphur matches. The miners’ emblem is composed of the maul (the miner’s hammer) and the iron (a short pick). The miners’ colours are black and green, the former symbolising the darkness of the underground passages, and the latter the feelings of a miner at work, yearning for nature and light. A figurine and painting of St. Barbara can be found in every mine and in most mining families. ::

52  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

Photos: AGH University of Science and Technology

Barbórka is the traditional holiday of Polish miners – Miners’ Day – which is celebrated on 4 December on the day of St. Barbara, the patron saint of miners. Barbara was a rich man’s daughter. Unfortunately, her father, who refused to convert to Christianity, killed her with a sword, for which he was struck dead by a bolt of lightning.


Polski Koks

– the largest coke exporter in the world Polski Koks SA is a trading company founded in 1996, currently part of the Jastrzębska Spółka Węglowa SA (JSW SA) capital group. The main object of the Company’s business activity is coke and coal trading, including a comprehensive shipping service for the deliveries made.

The company has been building its globally recognisable brand for 15 years, by supplying high-quality coke produced in Polish coking plants with professional trade service from highlyqualified personnel. The consistent care for the client, the quality of goods and services offered bear fruit in the form of constant and long-standing cooperation with the biggest producers of steel, both European and world-wide. Apart from the steel industry Polski Koks SA also supplies clients in the non-ferrous metals production trade and the chemical industry. The company provides services in the field of coke sales, mainly from coking plants belonging from JSW Group, in particular Koksownia Przyjaźń Sp. z o.o. in Dąbrowa Górnicza. Moreover, the JSW SA capital group was joined

in 2011 by Kombinat Koksochemiczny Zabrze SA and Wałbrzyskie Zakłady Koksownicze Victoria SA. Thereby the assortment of coke supplied was extended not only by additional amounts of blast-furnace coke but also foundry coke. Polski Koks SA also provides coke from the ArcelorMittal Poland SA Zdzieszowice Division coke plant. Polski Koks SA is constantly increasing its share of the market - most of all the European, on which it generates more than 80% of its sales volume. Simultaneously, the company maintains trade contacts with overseas consignees, such as the United States and India, which constitute markets complementing its sales in the case of coke surplus or a worsened economic situation on the traditional markets. Poland is the largest coke-exporting country in the world, and the exports by Polski Koks SA, amounting to 3 mln tonnes in 2010, constituted half the total national coke exports and almost 25% of European exports. On the global coke market the company had a 12% share in that period, confirming its unquestionable position of the leader in global coke exports. The incorporation of another two coke plants into JSW Group - KK Zabrze and WZK Victoria - will increase the share of the Group to 30% of the European and 15% of global coke exports.

Polski Koks SA participates in the most important events in the coal, coke and steel sectors in this country and worldwide, takes part in numerous conferences, sits on national and international trade and industry associations and is the author of numerous industry presentations and publications. Since 2009 Polski Koks has been actively participating in the implementation of the ”Smart coke plant ” research and science project, being a response to the needs indicated by the coke producers in the area of the modernisation of technologies and management methods used in the production of coke. The project aims to improve the competitiveness of coke production and the social acceptance of the industry through the development of a set of tools, procedures, and products, which will also reduce the negative impact of coking plants on the environment. The concentration of scientific personnel and practitioners in creative research teams realising the conceptual and experimental as well as innovative idea of the ”Smart Coke Plant,” as a result of which new procedures, knowhow packages, programmes and services will be developed, will enable the efficient functioning of cokemaking in the changing conditions of coal procurement and steel production and the growing national and European requirements in relation to environmental protection. By taking part in the ”Smart Coke Plant” project Polski Koks SA fulfils its role in the development of the modern theory and practice of cokemaking to secure the constant economic development of this trade. ::


Real estate

Commercial real estate market in Upper Silesia Experts from the global real estate services firm Cushman & Wakefield present the office, retail and industrial property market in Upper Silesia.

Retail property market The modern retail property market in Silesia is focused on the Katowice Conurbation and other locations such as Częstochowa, Bielsko-Biała and Rybnik. The total modern retail space stock in Silesia stands at 1.7 million sqm available in shopping centres, standalone hypermarkets and large non-food stores, retail parks, wholesales and factory outlet centres. The Katowice Conurbation accounts for over 65% of Silesia’s total modern retail space provision. The

largest prime schemes are located in its major cities and include Silesia City Centre in Katowice, Plejada Sosnowiec, Forum Gliwice, Platan Zabrze, Plejada Bytom, Pogoria Dąbrowa Górnicza and M1 Czeladź. Despite this large number of retail properties, the Katowice Conurbation continues to attract developers’ interest. Schemes under construction include Neinver’s Galeria Katowicka and Helical’s Europa Centralna Park in Gliwice, while Supersam Katowice and Gemini Tychy are at an advanced planning stage.

Silesia’s other areas of modern retail space concentration include Częstochowa (Galeria Juraj­ s ka), Bielsko-Biała (Sfera) and Rybnik (Plaza and Focus). Each larger city of this heavily industrialized region also has its own retail scheme. The Silesian retail market is mature and features all types of retail schemes: downtown shopping centres (Agora Bytom), large shopping and entertainment centres (Silesia City Centre), out-of-town retail complexes (M1 Czeladź), as well as freestanding ADVERTISEMENT

11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  55


Real estate

hypermarkets with small shopping arcades (Auchan Katowice) and factory outlet centres (Fashion House Sosnowiec). Demand for modern retail space in Silesia is highly selective. Most tenants favour prime retail facilities in areas with consumers having the highest purchasing power. Virtually all the major Polish and international retailers are present in more than one location in this region. In the first half of 2011, Silesia’s vacancy rate stood at around 3% with vacant space recorded only in secondary schemes in unsuccessful locations or with a commercial concept mismatching the location. Rents also vary very strongly, depending on the city and quality of the retail scheme. The highest rents are recorded in the Katowice Conurbation, where the rent for fashion premises of 100-150 sqm in prime shopping centres stands at EUR 45-47 per sqm/month. Rents in smaller towns are much lower and reach EUR 25-27 per sqm/month.

Office market in Katowice Krzysztof Misiak, Senior Negotiator, Office Department, Cushman & Wakefield: In Katowice, the largest city of the Silesian Conurbation, prime office properties for lease were delivered in the years 2009-2010 and included: Katowice Business Point (Ghelamco), Atrium (CGI) and Centrum Biu­rowe Francuska (GTC). Other key office schemes are Chorzowska 50, Altus, Green Park (phase III) and Millenium Plaza. Additionally, there is a considerable number of revitalised buildings, including former industrial buildings, and tenement houses in the city centre. The lowest standard is offered by buildings from the 1970s and 1980s. Modern office buildings are located near Ziętka Roundabout, in Chorzowska and Roździeńskiego Streets, Korfantego Avenue, and Francuska Street, near the motorway. These are central locations in the vicinity of the region’s major transport routes offering very easy access and excellent exposure. In the first half of 2011 only one office building was delivered in Katowice: Opal’s Steel Office totalling

56  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

4,000 sqm. At present, 13,670 sqm is under construction in four schemes, around 46% of which is to be completed by the end of 2011. This limited supply is due to very high vacancy rates since the onset of the economic crisis. Demand was weak until 2011. Building permits have already been issued for Silesia Business Park I (Skanska Property Poland), Brynów Center (Holdimex) and Piaskowa Business Center (Secus Property SA). These schemes will provide around 33,500 sqm in total. The limited supply and increased demand pushed the vacancy rate down for the first time in two years from the level of 17.3% in December 2010 to 15.2% at the end of June 2011. This was mainly due to a considerable recovery in take-up in the first half of 2011. However, the vacancy rate is higher only in Łódź, where it stands at 19.7%. Transaction volume in the first half of 2011 totalled around 23,790 sqm, of which new agreements and renewals accounted for around 40% each. The biggest deal was Capgemini’s lease renewal for 5,700 sqm in Altus. The vacancy rate is likely to continue to decline further in the next 12 months, at least until projects in the development pipeline are completed. The high vacancy rate kept developers back from starting new developments. Since the gross take-up in Katowice in mid-2011 was over 25% up on 2010’s total, several developers are likely to start new projects later in the year or in early 2012. The development pipeline includes 300,000 sq m of office space. However, most developers have put development projects on hold waiting for an upturn in the market. Due to the tight credit market, a large number of projects have been delayed or redesigned. To minimise the risk, the number of development phases was generally increased to reduce the volume of space coming onto the market at the same time. Only schemes in prime locations by large and experienced office space developers stand a chance of being completed. In the past years demand for office space came mainly from financial, insurance, telecommunications and service companies opening new

branches. Office space developers’ hopes for the BPO/SSC market have materialised this year, because more and more companies are interested in opening shared service centres as well as offshoring and outsourcing centres in Katowice. Local companies which now occupy very low standard offices and might be willing to improve their working environment quality are expected to have an increasing share in take-up in forthcoming years. Rents remained relatively stable in Katowice in the first six months of 2011 at EUR 12-15 per sqm/month. Service charges which are largely calculated in the Polish currency were around PLN 15 per sqm/month. Headline rents are unlikely to rise in the next year. This situation may change when the vacancy rate falls below 10%.

Industrial property market Malwina Kierebińska, Industrial Department, Cushman & Wakefield: Upper Silesia is the most important industrial region in southern Poland and its road infrastructure guarantees easy access to and from other regions of Poland and Europe. It has been very popular with tenants for years, particularly with those interested in manufacturing space or large spaces for supraregional logistics centres. Upper Silesia is the second-largest warehouse market in Poland. At the end of June 2011 stock was 1.234 million sqm. The only scheme delivered in the first half of 2011 was a 9,800 sqm small unit park, SEGRO Business Park Gliwice. Around 81,000 sqm of warehouse space was under construction, around 86% of which was pre-let. The largest schemes currently under construction include SEGRO Industrial Park Tychy (36,500 sqm) and phase I of Panattoni Park Gliwice (11,160 sqm). In the first half of 2011 transaction volume reached 164,000 sqm. Upper Silesia reported vacant warehouse space of 101,500 sq m, or 8.2% of its total stock. Headline and effective rents remained at December 2010’s level, but are expected­ to rise slightly by the end of 2011. ::

Katarzyna Michnikowska, Senior Analyst, Advisory & Valuation, Cushman & Wakefield


In Warsaw and on the Baltic Sea… “We haven’t felt the crisis yet because we’ve adopted a policy of caution and try to asses our potential and the market well in advance. We have purchased some well-sited plots but we don’t plan on launching several projects at once. For us quality comes first so we don’t start a project before we’re sure of its financing. Thanks to our pool of satisfied customers we’ve managed to survive successfully in the rather difficult development branch for a whole twelve years”, Andrzej Skowroński, President of SABE Investments Sp. z o.o. tells “Polish Market’s” Jerzy Bojanowicz.

making money is not everything, we also try to help promote the community in which we pursue our business. To date we have built almost 630 flats in Warsaw. All have been sold and we still manage the properties today. We believe a good developer should also manage his buildings and in fact we have special teams who do everything in this respect from collecting rent and accounting to security and maintenance work. We’ve managed the Sonata estate right from its completion, which shows that its occupants trust us. We’ve put in some greenery and other leisure facilities, we also take care to keep the buildings in good shape, so I think the clients are pleased with us. Also, thanks to good management these buildings haven’t lost practically any value.

Can you tell us about the Sonata Housing Estate and Saska Residential Complex? The Sonata Estate with 326 flats was completed in 2002 and was our first project. It’s sited on post-industrial terrain close to Kamion­kowskie Lake in the Praga district of Warsaw and I’ll flatter myself by saying that it has improved the local skyline. In 2007 we completed two apartment projects: the Saska Residential Complex with 161 flats in Warsaw’s Saska Kępa district, and the Sienna Residential Complex with 136 flats in central Warsaw. Sienna has also improved the general look of its local area. In front of its guardhouse there are four sculptures of knights which passers-by often stop to look at. In fact, those four knights have become something of a local attraction. We’re a team who believe that

And Aquamarina, your flagship project in Międzyzdroje? The good thing about Aquamarina is that it’s connected to a magnificent, sandy and kilometer-long beach by a passage we built which leads over a picturesque wooded sandy hill. Aquamarine stands close to the hill, a 15-minute’s walk away from the centre of Miedzyzdroje and its renowned pier. The estate also borders on Wolin National Park. Aqua­marina is a guarded complex of six 5-storey buildings with flats ranging from 37 do 82 m². Inside there’s also a children’s playground and a volleyball court. We completed the first construction phase in June, 2010. Completed then were 267 flats, almost 70% of which have already found buyers. Here, unlike in Warsaw, we introduced some extra attractions for buyers: the flats were fully inhabitable, with flooring, doors and completely furnished bathrooms and kitchens.

But tastes vary, don’t they? Yes, and what we offer is also varied. Flat buyers have a choice of two wooden flooring variants, the tiling and terracotta come in four colour versions, the kitchen furniture in six. Miedzyzdroje is a holiday resort and our customers are largely vacationers from all over Poland, so we decided that we’ll also offer furniture. We sealed contracts with two big companies, VOX and Agata Meble, who furnished the flats our customers purchased. More still, they also provided curtains, blinds, lighting, and occasionally even bedclothes, tableware and cutlery. In effect, Aquamarina owners can come when they like to find everything in full working order. These flats are holiday quarters and some were bought with the purpose of renting them out to vacationers. To meet this halfway we offered to oversee and manage the rentals. This proved a good idea. This year, despite a rather slow summer season, 90% of our flats were inhabited. Now we’re preparing for the second phase of the Aquamarina project, which will be a leisure complex with an indoor pool, a spa, conference rooms and catering. We haven’t decided yet whether to add a hotel with about 50 rooms. We realize that conference delegates have to sleep somewhere but even if we don’t put up the hotel this will be no problem as we’ve been offered rented quarters from Aquamarina landlords. This leisure centre should make Aquamarina still more attractive and we hope it helps encourage the owners to spend longer periods of time in the complex. We also hope it will draw people all the year round and not just over summer as this would also boost our flat rentals in off-season periods. Our regular clients will be offered preferential prices in


the leisure centre but it will be open for all. Similar rules apply on the passageway from Aquamarina to the adjacent beach. Was it a good idea to locate your latest Warsaw estate in the rather run-down district of Wola? True enough, that area has been rather neglected and it’s a good thing the city authorities and the development market have decided to do something about it. On the other hand, why search about somewhere on the city’s outskirts when when Wola is so close to the city centre? The Symfonia estate is only a 15-minute’s ride away from the Palace of Culture. Wola is a really good location, especially for young and active people. In late April we began building a mini-estate of four buildings on a one-hectare plot at 1/29 Jana Kazimierza Street. All four building are going up simultaneously in a singlephase plan. They will have from 7 to 10 floors. We’ve already completed 30% of the project and it should open in the first quarter of 2013. For sale will be 247 functional flats in several sizes: 2 rooms (36 m2), 3 rooms (from 56 m2), 4 rooms (from 75 m2) and 5 rooms (from 123 m2). The biggest flat in the complex measures 163 m2. We do a lot to meet our customers’ wishes halfway. We take great care to design and plan our flats to accommodate all kinds of tastes. Our sales policy is also customer-geared, we have an open ear for any extra requirements. Customers can report their specific demands to us already in the construction phase. This estate will be guarded and fully-developed, with roads, pathways, greenery and a children’s playground. It will also have an underground garage with space for 274 vehicles. All flats will be sold together with a

parking space, those above 100 m2 will be entitled to two. There are shops on the ground floor of buildings with a street side, the one on Jana Kazimierza Street has floorage with mezzanines excellently suited for small offices or shops. I’ll add that we began selling flats on this estate under so-called reservation contracts, something we’ve never practiced before. In effect, we sold still unbuilt floorage to clients prepared to forward us some advance trust. More than fifty flats were sold this way. How do you see your company’s future? For quite some time now SABE Investments has fulfilled all the norms imposed by

the Good Practices Code issued by the Polish Union of Developers and a recently-passed Development Act which protects flat buyer rights. We work with good, reliable and wellproven builders like Warbud or Budimex.The latter helped us build the Aquamarine estate and, more recently, the Symfonia estate. These firms guarantee punctuality and quality, best proof of which are the recent awards in the Construction of the Year 2010 contest, in which Budimex had seven entries. All seven were distinguished and Aquamarina got a First Class Award. Modesty aside, I must say that we have a big part in this prestigious award because we authored its functional design. Another reason for our success is our highly-skilled personnel. To ensure that our projects run smoothly and according to deadline we founded Sabe Service, which oversees our undertakings. We also have a highly competent sales staff, many of whom have excellent references from previous employers. In the nearest future we will begin a holiday apartment project in Świnoujście, 300-400 metres away from the sea. The western Baltic coast has a better climate than the area around Gdańsk Bay and the sea is warmer as well. There are also kilometers of sandy beaches. I must admit I have a liking for this area. Our next project there will be in Szczecin. We also have attractive construction sites in Warsaw and plan to build flats in the suburb Białołeka. We hope they will find buyers after the opening of the Northern Bridge, which will considerably cut travelling time to the city centre. Thank you.


Green Building / Ecology

Green, eco-friendly Green building, which for many years has been successfully developing in a number of Western countries, including the US and Western Europe, is still cutting its teeth in Poland. It may be assumed that this segment accounts for only a fraction of a percent of the buildings (both residential and commercial) constructed annually. And yet our country also holds prospects for “green building,” if only for Poland’s EU membership. Patryk Mirecki Specialists claim that the stricter regulations in EU Member States will probably within 10 years make sustainable building a commonly-recognised standard in the construction and redevelopment of buildings. With its Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD) of 2002 the EU introduced more restrictive standards in the field of energy efficiency for new and redeveloped buildings. As a result of the amended EPBD, probably from 2021, only the construction of energy-saving buildings will be allowed.

Costs are decisive One of the specialist portals (www. budnet.pl) observes that a significant obstacle to green building, particularly in our country, is the relatively high cost of implementation, though compensated by various savings during use. Hence, the owner of a green building should take into account the investment outlays against the background of the entire life of the real property - not just those incurred during construction. When seen from this perspective, the overall costs over the entire life cycle of a green building are actually lower than those required for traditional technologies. According to

the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), the higher costs of construction are usually overestimated. This discourages investors and developers, especially the smaller ones, from projects which, in fact, bring profits - although not immediately. It is assumed that the return on investment for green buildings comes after more than ten years, while most investors consider only those projects which are expected to pay off before the end of the planned (remaining) period of real property ownership. Therefore, the longerthan-usual time horizon for the investment remains an obstacle for many investors and slows down the development of green building.

The big can do more This means that individual investors are much less likely to go for green building. After all, the purchase or construction of a house is usually the biggest investment in the life of the average family. The use of eco-friendly technologies adds to costs, and, despite the future savings from the use of green installations, the initial price is a major discouragement. That is why green building is usually implemented

Buildings are responsible for the consumption of great amounts of natural resources, contributing to the growing heaps of waste in landfills. It is estimated that 50% of global natural resources consumption is attributable to them. According to the US Green Building Council (USGBC), a sister organisation of PLGBC, buildings produce over 136 million tonnes of construction waste in the USA, which translates into 40% of waste in landfills. (Source: Worldwatch Institute). Buildings are the greatest consumers of energy – the building sector is responsible for the consumption of 45% of world energy (based on data for Europe and the USA), and 74% of electrical energy in the USA. It contributes to nearly 50% of greenhouse-gas emissions – as much as industry and transSource: PLGBC (the Polish Green Building Council) portation combined.

60  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

by government agencies, major corporations, and real-property owners/users. Those entities prefer a longer time span for the investment and are able to wait for the financial gain that comes only after many years of using a sustainable building.

It’s bound to be better In spite of that, eco-friendly solutions in construction have been known (and used) in Poland since the 1990s, at least. It was back then that small and medium-sized construction enterprises appeared, eagerly participating in numerous construction fairs (including the largest – Poznań’s Budma), popularising wooden construction, with the use of logs, sawdust, etc., and turn-key buildings. Apart from ecofriendly materials being used to erect walls and ceilings, or roofs, buildings were (and still are) equipped with various energy-saving devices and technologies, depending on the needs and financial situation of clients. For example, the second Wrocław Green and Energy-Efficient Building fair BUDECO 2011, will feature designers of passive and low-energy houses, and producers of energy-saving carpentry, thermal insulation, heating technologies, solar solutions, such as solar collectors, and innovative water-conditioning systems. Exhibitors, besides presenting their products and ideas on energy efficiency and sustainability, will also suggest effective ways of investing in renewable energy sources and managing waste.

Of straw and clay One of the companies providing turnkey green houses (Biobudownictwo J.S.) suggests building them of clay, using the straw-bale method, based on the simple procedure of laying straw cubes and covering them with clay on both sides. There are reputedly thousands of such houses made of pressed straw and clay, and meeting all the contemporary housing standards – in the USA, Germany, Sweden, Canada, Australia, and many other eco-friendly countries. The company also boasts low construction costs – for turn-key


Green Building / Ecology

commissioned buildings, construction costs are estimated to range from PLN1,700 to 2,000 per sq m of area or more – depending on the contract and the scope of work, e.g. artistic finishing. Interestingly, beaten-clay walls made with the same technology are present in the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw.

Green and public utility Other assets of buildings – this time public-utility buildings – constructed using green technologies – are detailed by W.P.I.P. from Poznań. According to the estimates of this company, the costs of using buildings with the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certificate are 8-9% lower than in the case of traditional buildings. The smaller amount of waste and reduced reliance on depleting resources and fossil fuels, which are growing more and more expensive, leads to a reduction in the costs of use. Moreover, the work environment is enhanced thanks to the higher-quality

air and the greater availability of natural light. This, in turn, translates into better work efficiency, higher attendance and improved health among employees. Eco-friendly measures, particularly if certified (LEED, BREEAM) further boost the image of the company among clients, building goodwill. The Jones Lang LaSalle real estate services company company, employing accredited consultants on LEED certification, provided its estimates of savings to be obtained in commercial buildings seeking this kind of certificate. An eligible building should contribute to a 30-50% reduction in energy consumption, produce 35% lower carbon dioxide emissions, use 40% less water, and generate 70% less solid waste. Lower energy consumption means lower pollution and reduced ecological footprint.

Green = energy-efficient Agnieszka Michalak of the “Inwestor” magazine points out that “green” is largely equivalent to

“energy-efficient.” Buildings should maximise the use of natural-energy sources while minimising their consumption for heating. “Traditional construction principles also hold true for green design. This relates to such aspects as the location and shape of the building, which should provide enough daylight. The concept of the interior is also significant (...) the use of buffer space, collector walls, and walls to store the solar energy obtained. Already at the design stage energy demand should be anticipated with precision, and solutions should be proposed accordingly, achieving a near-zero value in the building’s thermal balance,” writes Michalak. Piotr Pawlak of Rockwool Polska notes that a proper insulation layer can effectively protect a house from losing heat. The best moment to change the material or thickness of the insulation is at the design stage. A thicker insulation layer may bring savings of about PLN 9,000, which amounts to nearly 2% of total construction costs. Using ADVERTISEMENT

THERMAL IMAGING CAMERAS Buildings can quickly and thoroughly be scanned using a FLIR thermal imaging camera, identifying problem areas that can not be seen by the naked eye. This ensures the integrity of both structural and environmental systems for building inspection, repair verification and insurance related purposes. Thermal imaging can facilitate repairs quickly, easily and safely and much more cost effective than other conventional methods. A thermal imaging camera minimizes the need for building disassembly – saves time and labour by minimizing down time, repair time, labour costs and disturbance of habitants, as well as verification of a job well done. Przedstawicielstwo Handlowe Paweł Rutkowski Tel.: +48 (22) 849 71 90; Fax: +48 (22) 849 70 01 e-mail: rutkowski@kameryir.com.pl www.kameryir.com.pl

11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  61


Green Building / Ecology an economically-justified insulation thickness will allow savings of PLN 45,000 over 30 years for coal heating, and PLN 80,000 for gas heating. Hence, according to Pawlak, return on investment may be expected after 7.5 years.

Poland has LEED too In Central and Eastern Europe there are only a handful of buildings to have been granted LEED certification. These include the US Embassy in Sofia (Bulgaria) and the CSOB headquarters in Prague (Czech Republic). On the Polish market buildings registered for LEED certification include the second stage of the construction of the American School of Warsaw. Soon the U.S. Green Building Council will extend its certification system with a LEED category for commercial buildings. The Zebra Tower, an office building located near Rondo Jazdy Polskiej in Warsaw, will be the first office design in this city to receive LEED. Izabella Kieler, Head of Leasing & Marketing Manager at S+B Gruppe, emphasises that the LEED certificate confirms that the Zebra Tower will use state-of-the-art technologies to provide lessees with a user-friendly work environment.

Water-free urinals The Green Horizon office building currently under construction in Łódź by Skanska Property Poland has obtained LEED precertification at the Gold level. Additionally, thanks to innovative and green solutions providing 25% lower energy consumption than set out in national standards, Green Horizon will be a candidate for the EU Green Building certificate. Innovative solutions used in this office complex will include: :: free cooling (using the cold outside air to cool office areas);

:: adiabatic air humidification (a system that humidifies the air using water vapour with cheaper thermal energy, the production of which has a smaller impact on the natural environment than electrical energy); :: using warm air from offices to heat the garage; an energy-efficient lighting system (energy-saving lamps, an optimal energy-use management system within the complex, motion detectors regulating lighting in the shared parts of the office buildings); :: using local materials, which makes it possible to reduce the impact of transportation on the environment, water-free urinals, waterefficient fittings and toilets; :: using plants which require no watering in the open-air green areas around the building.

Queuing up for LEED The Eurocentrum Office Complex, an A+ class office building located on Jerozolimskie Ave. in Warsaw, should soon receive the LEED CS 2009 certificate at the Gold level. The facility has already been pre-certified in the system. This will be the largest certified office building in Poland. The investor is the Capital Park Group. It will feature changing rooms, shower facilities, bicycle stands, and electriccar-charging points. Due to the use of cutting-edge, energy-efficient solutions, including the use of rainwater as another source of utility water, the building will have significantlyreduced running costs. LEED CS Gold pre-certificates were also granted to two buildings which are to become the Poleczki Business Park. Among the elements to improve employee health and efficiency there will be high air quality inside the building, full access to daylight, healthy and energy-efficient interior lighting, convenient public transport, and bicycle trails, as well as the proximity of basic services.

Polish motorways go green Construction that respects the environment is slowly penetrating into Polish roads, too. The new ones, at least. The recently completed sections of

62  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

the A1 motorway (Gdańsk-Toruń) cut through Natura 2000 areas and the migration paths of numerous animal species. The Vistula and the Drwęca, over which bridges were built, feature precious fish species, with protected animals having its habitats and feeding grounds nearby. Visitors to the construction site included common toads, grass snakes, foxes, and elk. One of the bridges over the Vistula became home for a beaver. With animals in mind, numerous passes and culverts were built under the surface of motorways, while bridge spans were equipped with special baskets where swallows could build their nests. In 2010 a by-pass on the Struga Toruńska (also known as the Bacha) was constructed. The old riverbed near one of the bridges (MA117) had to be reinforced. For the safety of animals wandering along the river’s course the reinforced bank was covered with earth and hydrophilic plants.

Energy management in publicutility buildings Recently the Ministry of the Environment announced that Poland has made nearly EUR130 million on AAU trade (assigned amount units - one metric tonne of carbon dioxide equivalents). Funds from the sales of AAU will go to the so-called Climate Account of the National Fund for Environmental Protection and Water Management (NFOŚIGW). They will be allocated to the co-financing of programmes and projects that lead to the reduction of greenhouse-gas emissions. This time the goal is energy management in public-utility buildings. This includes investments such as preparing the thermal insulation of walls and roofs, replacing the doors and windows with energy-efficient fixtures, changing the ventilation system, and providing an energy-efficient lighting system. The contracts assume co-financing in the form of subsidies amounting to 30%, and additionally applicants may seek preferential loans from NFOŚIGW to the value of 60% of eligible costs. 50% advance payments are planned. Based on the Ministry’s estimates the contracts will the thermal improvements on over 150 buildings and a 110 thousand MWh/year reduction in energy consumption by those buildings. The selection of projects to be covered by the programme will be based on calls for tenders. ::


Masz to coś albo nie Masz nic. Poczuj w sobie moc. weź udział w

1.4 T–JeT 160 KM

1.4 Turbo MulTiair 180 KM

1.4 T–JeT 160 KM

Maksymalny moment obrotowy: 230 Nm przy 3000 obr./min

Maksymalny moment obrotowy: 270 Nm przy 2500 obr./min

Maksymalny moment obrotowy: 230 Nm przy 3000 obr./min

Przyspieszenie (0–100 km/h) w 7,4 sek.

Przyspieszenie (0–100 km/h) w 7,5 sek.

Przyspieszenie (0–100 km/h) w 7,6 sek.

Emisja CO2: 155 g/km Zużycie paliwa: 6,5 l/100 km (cykl mieszany)

Emisja CO2: 142 g/km Zużycie paliwa: 6,9 l/100 km (cykl mieszany)

Emisja CO2: 151 g/km Zużycie paliwa: 6,5 l/100 km (cykl mieszany)

www.abarTh–driviNg.Pl

Zapraszamy do salonów Abartha: CARSERWIS Warszawa ul. Połczyńska 33 tel. (22) 532 02 82

POL-CAR Poznań ul. Gorzysława 9 tel. (61) 873 21 01

VIAMOT Kraków ul. Zakopiańska 288 tel. (12) 269 12 26


We build for the most demanding

Marian Dejneka Owner of TRASKO – INWEST Ltd.

Ladies and Gentlemen, We are a construction company on the market since 1999, specializing in general and industrial projects in Poland and abroad (i. a. Russia, Ukraine, Belarus). We oversee every project phase, from concept and design to planning and the actual construction work, thanks to which our customers receive fully completed turnkey objects. We also take over all the project risks, which allows customers to pursue their own business unhampered. Among our clients are the Auchan supermarket chain, Kronospan Grupa Polska, Classen and the Poznań International Fair exhibition organizer. Our customers demand professionalism and with this in mind we have been building up a professional working team. This, combined with our vast business experience, allows us to undertake even the most complex construction projects.


Reliability and a stable financial situation make us a credible company offering top-standard services and capable of competing against other leaders in our branch. In appreciation of our services we have received the following distinctions: :: Fair Play Enterprise 2010 :: Quality of the Year 2010 :: Hit 2010 title :: Trademark Leaders :: Fair Play Enterprise 2009 :: Quality of the Year 2009 :: Polish Construction Eagles 2009 competition (1st) :: Poland Now competition (winner) :: Solid Enterprise certificate :: Award nominee (growth category) :: Polish Construction Eagles 2008 competition (3rd) :: Hit 2008 title :: Forbes Diamond (Wielkopolska province) :: Pillars of Polish Economy 2008 plebiscite (winner) :: Polish Construction Eagles 2007 competition (2nd) :: Among top ten most dynamic construction firms in a 2007 ranking by the daily Rzeczpospolita :: Highest Construction Quality certificate :: Mister Construction :: Modernization of the Year 2006. Our company’s chief aim is pleasing our customers, which we strive to achieve by providing complex, ontime, high-quality and technologically advanced construction services. Work with us!

w w w.trasko.pl


Polish forests

– our common, national good! There are a number of reasons to cherish the year 2011, named the International Year of Forests by the General Assembly of the United Nations. This year’s slogan is “Celebrating Forests for People.” The UN estimates that the living conditions of 1.6 billion people in the world are dependent on the forests. Poland has one of the largest forest areas in Europe, with forests taking up 29% of the country’s total area - 9.1 million ha. The vast majority of the forests are stateowned, 7.6 million ha of which are managed by the National Forest Holding State Forests. “Forests are our common national good. Inherited from our ancestors, entrusted to us, they should be kept rich and in good condition, the way they are or even better, so that they can serve future generations well. Forests are the greatest natural asset of our country, with their diverse functions, above all that of protection and environment-forming,” Marian Pigan, the Director General of the State Forests says.

State Forests, the biggest forest management organisation belonging to the State Treasury in the EU, adds substance to the slogan “Celebrating Forests for People.” And not only on rare occasions! First of all, the majority of our forests are widely available at all times, contrary to Western European forests. “This stems from the ownership structure, as Polish forests still belong to the nation as a whole. The National Forest Holding State Forests manages over 80% of Polish forests. This is nearly one-third of the area of Poland, a part which is particularly valuable. Importantly, due to foresters’ efforts, it is steadily growing, and there are more and more forests in Poland. This mode of forest ownership is praised by both Polish and EU experts. Due to such an ownership structure, investments so often located within forest areas can floursh in Poland. Why? Because there is only one owner,” Ma­ rian Pigan emphasises. Each day, over 25 thousand State Forests employees engage in activities aiming at the development of Polish forests. The organisation of State Forests is based on self financing. Forest units operate at the national, regional, and local levels. The management model of State Forests is based on a three-tier system:

the Director General appointed by the Minister of the Environment; Regional Directorates (17), and Forest Districts (430). “We encourage all the people seeking to relax in a forest to choose from our rich tourism package. We are concerned to sustain the biological diversity of the forests, and we preserve them against numerous hazards, such as natural disasters, plagues of insects, and tree diseases. We also put in a great deal of effort to make sure that forestry, which provides wood, the universal organic resource, is managed in compliance with the rules of sustainable development, bearing in mind all the functions that forests perform. This is confirmed by international certificates possessed by the regional directorates of State Forests,” Director Pigan says. State Forests also launches its own initiatives to preserve biological diversity and reinstate endangered species of flora and fauna, such as “the Programme for the Preservation of Forest Genetic Resources,” “the Programme for the Restitution of Fir in the West Sudety Mountains,” “the Programme for the Restitution of Yew,” and “the Programme for the Reintroduction of the Capercaillie,” as well as a lot of other, similar projects. It is not a coincidence that the majority of the areas

of the European Natura 2000 ecological network, which Poland has committed to implement after its accession to the European Union, have been assigned within forest areas. Of course, the protection of the forest environment is a priority here. “The objective of the project, called in short ‘the Small Scale Water Retention in Lowland Areas’ is to stop or slow down the outflow of surface water in the vicinity of small catchment areas and to support the development of the natural landscape. Project implementation will thus contribute to improved water balance and enhanced biodiversity in forest and forest-related ecosystems. The other project is aimed at the environmental revitalisation of post-military areas, the restoration of near-natural vegetation cover there, and the preservation of the flora and fauna species living in the area. The projects realised by the foresters are implemented by the Coordination Centre for Environmental Projects (CKPŚ), an organisational unit of State Forests, which is national in scope. The Centre’s activities include funds absorbing and operating, which helps potential beneficiaries. It also receives and examines applications, and then monitors project implementation,” Director Pigan says. Forest assets include wood. State Forests steadily increases the supplies of this resource for the economy: in 1990, it acquired 16 million m3, in 2010–33.7 million m3. At the same time, due to sustainable economy (units of


State Forests hold international FSC and PEFC certificates), wood resources in Polish forests are still growing. At the moment, they amount to 250 m3 on average for each ha of the forest, and they are among the biggest in Europe. “In my opinion, there still have to be more market mechanisms applied to State Forests. State Forests sells wood using two methods. Half the resource is designated to the limited tender for companies; the other half is sold through open tenders via the internet. There is also a portion that foresters sell in the retail-sales system, for example to local people. State Forests does not possess information on how many companies purchasing wood are intermediaries. We have a market economy. Where someone purchases a product in compliance with all the regulations, the decision on what to do with it next is up to them,” the Director of State Forests declares. Many people may associate forests with a strongly conservative, not to say, cabaretlike image of a “woodman with a pipe” and a double-barrelled shotgun. However, this picture has nothing in common with the modern management of natural resources. So how is innovation defined in State Forests? Informatisation and education are the most significant tracks. “The implementation of the

State Forests Information System (1992) and of the forest numerical map standard at the level of the Forest District (2001) undoubtedly constitute very important steps in the process of State Forests’ informatisation. Today, we have 7.5 million ha covered by digital maps. Thanks to them, we have access to current information on the condition of forest areas. Terrestrial Laser Scanning, one of the latest technologies, has been used in Poland for the first time on a large scale in the research project ‘The forest inventory method based on the integration of various different geomatics techniques’ commissioned by the Directorate General of State Forests to the Faculty of Forestry at the Warsaw University of Life Sciences, with a delivery note for the years 2006-2008. Each year, we spend about PLN30 million on scientific research. We are introducing state of the art forest machines, measuring and monitoring equipment, and other working tools, that ensure safety, speed, and effectiveness of our activities. Another of our priorities is the forest education of society. Our educational package is addressed to children, young people, and adults. All this is aimed at making knowledge of forest environment and sustainable forest management widespread. Forest Districts have prepared

forest educational centres and educational shelters. Each Forest District has a ‘Programme for forest education of the society in the forest district.’ Foresters are especially eager to invite children and teenagers onto the project, bearing in mind that the future of our forests depends on them. Educational activity via the internet is more and more important. We promote environmental knowledge on the website www.lasy.gov.pl. The vortal created in cooperation with the National Fund for Environmental Protection and Water Management (NFOŚiGW) ‘Las Rysia eRysia’ has turned out to be a real hit,” Director Marian Pigan concludes.::


The popularity of green buildings globally exceeds any expectations

Poleczki Business Park rendering and design by UBM Polska, LEED consulting by VvS | Architects & Consultants

During the first week of October, in Toronto, the US Green Building Council (USGBC) organized its annual conference and expo, which brought over 25 thousand attendees from 115 countries. “I’m absolutely optimistic about the opportunities we have ahead of us. There is so much collective growth and support for our movement and what we are all trying to do,” said Rick Fedrizzi, the Founder, CEO and Founding Chairman of the USGBC and the newly elected Chairman of the World Green Building Council during the USGBC International Summit Closing Plenary. This event gathered almost one thousand participants who came to see presentations by the LEED International Roundtable members. A PLGBC representative was also amongst the presenters, discussing the progress of the green building movement in Poland. Agnes Vorbrodt, Founder, CEO and VP of PLGBC The LEED International Roundtable is a one-year-old group of executives from 20 countries, working closely on making LEED a global system. PLGBC has been amongst the first members of the Roundtable, and currently participates in its work as well as the efforts of 2 Working Groups: IEQ and Comfort as well as the Worker Safety.

Green makes (financial) sense As the LEED rating system is becoming more global, it aims to maintain comparability among the certified buildings. This has been a challenge for the Roundtable Members, who jointly address issues like varying stringency of building codes, differences in standards, and multiple languages and climate zones. There is one major trend however in the international green building movement – the proven profitability of sustainable structures. The most recent report, by the University of Western Sydney Australia and the University of Maastricht Netherlands, “Building Better Returns”, presented large premiums in property values (around 10%) for the buildings certified

according to one of the 2 major schemes in Australia (Green Star and NABERS) at higher rating levels, while the buildings not certified or obtaining lower ratings faced significant discounts. Although the Australian market is more mature in the realm of green building, this trend is noticeable in other countries as well. In general, obtaining a certificate for the building brings a real benefit. That’s why more and more developers on the Polish market decide to pursue LEED or BREEAM. The successful examples include Skanska, with projects precertified at platinum level or Poleczki Business Park precertified at gold level – both companies using the LEED-CS rating system. According to the research of Alfonso Ponce, a Board Member of the UNEP-SBCI, formerly with the FrenchGBC, now with Deloitte in Paris, LEED is by far the most popular scheme. The analysis he presented in Toronto, during the Greenbuild Master Series on LEED International, looked at the number of certified projects outside of the country of origin (LEED outside of the USA, BREEAM outside of the UK, DGNB outside of Germany), and

confirmed that LEED is leading in the global market place. During the PLGBC Symposium, Mr Ponce will be presenting an interesting new phenomenon – a building in Paris with multiple green building certifications.

Green or Greenwash? With the sustainable design gaining rapid popularity, more and more manufacturers are trying to get on the green bandwagon, even with their not-so-green products. Globally, there are over 380 green labels, number of them related to building materials; however none of them is looking specifically at the sustainability of materials available on the Polish market. PLGBC is working on finalizing its green materials certification. As a leader in this realm on the international market, PLGBC looks to help the product manufacturers prepare their products to successfully compete in the new green economy. Currently 10 manufacturers from among the Council membership are undergoing a stringent pilot phase – PLGBC plans to present the details of the certification during its Symposium in November. ::


Green Building / Ecology

Effective waste management Each new project in the waste management sector in Poland still divides society into different camps and is a matter of controversy. The locals are usually against the location of a new landfill site in their neighbourhood, while the authorities support it. The current status of waste management is a source of concern over whether it is possible to discharge the responsibilities imposed by EU legislation. Thermal waste-treatment plants will constitute a necessary element in a new municipal waste management system in Poland. Bogdan Sadecki The term waste describes any unnecessary substances and objects that their owner disposes of or intends to dispose of, or is obliged to dispose of. The increasing volume of waste has become a substantial environmental, social and economic issue. It has become a growing problem due to the increase in the amount produced every year both in Europe and in Poland. In the European Union, Poland is the sixth-leading producer of waste. The main method of waste management is by storage. In 2009 over 78% of the produced municipal waste volume was deposited on landfills, 14% was recycled, 7% was composted or otherwise processed, and only 1% underwent thermal processing based on incineration with energy recovery. The major challenge, so to speak, among the EU requirements that Poland has to satisfy, is to reduce the volume of

biodegradable municipal waste delivered to landfills to no more than 50% of the waste volume produced in 1995 by 2013 and to no more than 35% by 2020. Reaching the level of 50% in recycling and in processing aimed at reusing paper, metals, plastics and glass, is considered to be a really essential aim. Poland will also have to reduce the number of municipal waste landfills to 200 by 2014. The largest amount of waste per capita is produced in Japan (one person produces 1000kg of household waste a year). It is followed by the USA with 864kg per citizen. One resident in the European Union produces on average over 300kg of municipal waste a year (according to Eurostat data for the last few years). Germany holds the lead with 460kg per capita. The French and the Italians produce about 300–330kg per person.

Municipal waste is a potential source of energy to be used in Poland. Basic facts on waste:

Will Poland manage the waste issue?

:: The waste with the highest calorific value is plastic. Its calorific value is comparable to the value of heating oil, :: It takes up to 500 years for a plastic bottle stored in a landfill to decompose, :: From one plastic bag you can recover the energy required for a 60-watt light bulb to give light for 10 minutes, :: The energy recovered from 7 billion plastic bags used by the Poles each year could light 60-watt light bulbs in 7 billion houses for ten minutes; :: You need 20 bins of rubbish to warm a 60-m2 apartment for 24h to a temperature of 19oC, while the temperature outside is -15oC;

:: The residents of Warsaw produce 800,000 tonnes of waste each year, which would be enough to cover about 10% of the city’s demand for heating, :: The average calorific value of 1kg of municipal waste varies between 9 and 14 MJ/kg (similar to the calorific value of the lignite available in Poland), :: On a landfill, waste loses 10% of its calorific value per year, :: Methane produced by landfills influences the greenhouse effect 20 times more than CO2. ::

Source: Fortum

Although the figure for Poland is lower (a little over 300kg per capita), we still produce 12 million tonnes of waste a year. Most of it goes to landfills. In 2008 (according to the Central Statistical Office) 114.9 million tonnes of non-municipal waste was produced in Poland, 74.9% of which was recycled, and about 21.7% was neutralised. Irrational resource management is viewed as the main reason for producing excessive amounts of waste. The greatest amounts are reported in the south-western part of the country. The waste stored in landfills can be to a large extent used as recyclable materials, the value of which is estimated at several hundred million dollars, 25% of it coming from coal, 35% from zinc, lead, iron and other metals, and 40% from components such as ash, slag, stone debris, broken stone and other. Landfills receive each year about 10 thousand tonnes of solid municipal waste and between 10 and 15 million m3 of liquid waste. However, in our country a lot of waste discharged by households and industry is still not stored properly, and there is a shortage of companies using modern technologies. According to EU directives, Poland has to reach adequate levels of recycling and reduce waste storage and production. What it means is that the requirements for Polish companies will become more stringent and will generate higher costs. Effective waste management becomes more and more advanced and it requires increasingly greater financial contributions. Increases in the world’s consumption put a greater strain on ecosystems and waste-management infrastructure. It is common to use different waste-collection and recycling points for various types of waste. The standards for storage and incineration, however, are becoming increasingly rigorous. The volume of waste is still on the rise, which indicates inefficiencies in production, distribution and consumption processes, and, consequently, financial damage. Dangerous waste constitutes a public health issue. It is worth realising that active waste is one of the main sources 11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  69


Green Building / Ecology

Major challenges for and identified problems within the area of waste management in Poland :: As much as 78% of the collected municipal waste is deposited on landfills and only 14% recycled (data for 2009); :: Insufficient progress in the selective collection of municipal waste, including dangerous waste being included in the stream of mixed municipal waste, :: Insufficient number and output of modern infrastructure for thermal processing (ZTPOK) and of the mechanical biological treatment (MBT) of waste, :: Nearly 300 municipal waste landfills must be shut down by 2014, mainly due to the failure to comply with technical and legal requirements. A solution is needed for waste management in the so-called transitional period, that is the period between shutting down the landfills and launching waste-management facilities, : The system does not involve all residents – according to the National Waste Management Plan 2014 (KPGO 2014) only 78% of Polish citizens were involved in organised waste management in 2008,

of methane, which has a high globalwarming potential. Inside the EU the correlation between economic growth and waste production seems to be becoming less apparent. In 2000 a stabilisation in the production of municipal waste per capita was achieved in EU-27, whereas GDP for the years 2000-2007 recorded an increase of 16%. Serious problems on the waste management market have been noted by the Polski System Recyklingu Organizacja Odzysku SA (PSR) which has observed a number of pathologies the authorities cannot handle. In confrontation with updated and increasingly stringent legislation, our delay in waste management, the volume of pathologies and slow legislation processes pose a significant threat to our compliance with EU requirements, which can result in serious penalties amounting to hundreds of millions of zlotys annually.

70  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

:: The system is not watertight - in most communes there is the problem of illegal landfills (92% of the communes inspected by the NIK- Supreme Chamber of Control, April 2010); it is expected that even as much as 30% of waste might be exposed due to transferring responsibility for waste to the communes, :: The lack of legislation on the requirements for mechanical biological treatment (MBT) of mixed municipal waste, :; The lack of a system for collecting medicines past their expiry date from households.::

Source: survey: Deloitte Poland, Fortum, 4P Research Mix. Will Poland manage the waste issue? Presenting the findings of the survey on waste management in the largest cities in Poland, 2011.

Municipal waste management will, in the light of Poland having to meet EU requirements, constitute a considerable challenge for local authorities in the next few years. “Establishing the commune’s budget and the tariff for waste management will be the main goals. From the moment the Act comes into force, individual provinces will have only 6 months to adopt an updated waste-management plan. The subsequent 6 months is the time for passing relevant resolutions concerning, among other things, fees, and specifying tender requirements for the providers of services connected with collecting and transporting waste, and developing procedures for controlling against any breaches in the concluded agreements,” said Jarosław Dąbrowski, the Head of the Financial Advisory Department at Deloitte. “Time is short, especially in the

case of larger cities, if we consider the number of obligations undertaken by the local governments and of the challenges connected with achieving the objectives in waste management Poland has agreed upon,” he stressed. The current state of waste management in Poland is a source of concern over whether it is possible to discharge the responsibilities imposed by EU legislation in this regard. This concern comes particularly from the issue of meeting the requirements of the so-called “Landfill Directive” aimed at reducing the volume of stored bio­ degradable waste. Fulfilling these obligations requires building a sufficient number of new facilities for waste management and directing the municipal waste stream there. Preventing waste production influences and involves many parties. It benefits from the involvement of local authorities and from national goals, but essentially it is subject to a change in attitude and behaviour in the households and companies, and to new patterns being followed in industrial processes and product design. The list of individual projects within the POIiŚ (updated February 2011) includes the construction of 9 wasteincineration plants which have applied for EU financing. In addition, at the beginning of the year the expansion of a small incineration plant in the Targówek district in Warsaw, the only one that is currently functioning, was planned. The total output of these facilities is to reach 2,095 thousand Mg per year, and the projected cost, partially covered from EU funds, will amount to PLN 7,647 million. ::


Our values are the only thing that never changes For us, success means satisfied customers. We appreciate our employees. Our performance is based on quality and professionalism. We use technology as a means to become a leading company in our field. As a corporation – we behave responsibly. Joseph C. Wilson, Xerox founder, 1961

Xerox offers highest quality products and services so that you could simply focus on running your company.

xerox.com

© 2011 XEROX CORPORATION. Xerox Corporation. All rights reserved. Xerox®, Xerox and Design® and Ready For Real Business are trademarks by Xerox Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.


Ecology / Energy

The need for renewable energy The global resources of fossil fuels in solid, liquid and gas forms are gradually being depleted. Therefore, it is important to pursue a policy of using them with consideration of the needs of future generations (sustainable development). It is necessary to restructure the Polish power industry, which should be above all energy-efficient, and to fully utilise the potential of the heating industry, as well as of cities and communes. Bogdan Sadecki Poland’s primary energy resources have an adverse structure. In the majority they are composed of solid fuels, which are the least efficient of the three forms, and at the same time are the source of the greatest environmental pollution. Very important among renewable energy sources, both nationally and globally, is hydropower. Such sources of renewable and alternative energy as heat and electricity from industrial and municipal waste, and geothermal and solar energy, are going to become more significant in the future, according to forecasts. The Polish economy is highly energyconsuming - a large role in this is taken by heavy industry and the excessive consumption of materials by industrial production.

The percentage share of electriccity generated from renewable energy sources (RES) in total gross domestic electricity consumption, according to the objectives set out in the document entitled “National Renewable Energy Action Plan” Year

Share of electricity from RES [%]

2010

7.53

2011

8.85

2012

10.19

2013

11.13

2014

12.19

2015

13.00

2016

13.85

2017

14.68

2018

15.64

2019

16.78

Source: Ministry of the Economy – a report on goals concerning the share of electricity produced from renewable energy sources present in Poland in domestic electricity consumption for 2010-2019.

72  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

We also observe excessive energy consumption in municipal and residential services. An important cause of such a high energy intensity of the Polish economy is the prevailing share of solid fuels in the primary energy-consumption structure. What mainly influenced the structure of primary energy acquisition in Poland was the long-term policy of promoting coal as the fuel which was to ensure the energy selfsufficiency of the country. Moreover, access to oil, limited in every aspect, and neglecting the search for indigenous deposits of natural gas, advanced the coal monoculture even further.

Renewable energy – what is it? Pursuant to Energy Law, renewable energy sources are sources using wind, solar, geothermal, wave, tidal, and river flow energy, and energy derived from biomass, and landfill biogas, as well as from biogas resulting from sewerage processes or the decomposition of plant residues and animal remains. Only energy produced using one of the above methods allows the use of the support mechanisms specified by Energy Law and other relevant regulations. The obligation to purchase energy from renewable sources in Poland was imposed pursuant to the Ordinance by the Minister of the Economy of 19 December 2005. This ordinance sets values for the growth in the share of renewable energy from 2.65% in 2003 to 9% in 2010. In 2006 a new amendment to the law was issued, establishing the new level of 10.4% in 2010. Measurable benefits for investors and the State, considering the EU requirements concerning the share of energy acquired from renewable sources, can be derived from investing in wind turbines. In this context, off-shore wind farms seems to be an interesting opportunity.

An alternative to coal – distributed generation Distributed generation may turn out to be a Polish alternative to coal-fired. The Polish energy sector is still based on large coal plants concentrated mainly in the south. The electricity produced there has for decades been transmitted through outdated power grids. There is a risk of blackouts in large areas, which results from the combination of the outdated network and unfavourable weather conditions (long-lasting extremely low air pressure and high temperatures). Due to the necessity to discontinue the operation of ineffective power units (overall, Energa, PGE, and Tauron Polska will turn off 3200 MW by the end of 2020), the additional question of a decreased amount of energy arises. An alternative to massive conventional power plants and a chance to increase the share of renewable energy in the national energy balance, as well as to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, is constructing a large number of small generation units in the whole country. The development of distributed generation based on renewable energy sources will contribute to creating a pro-environmental image of Poland, which will result in increased interest from potential investors. If we wish to avoid shortages in electricity supply in the future, we should put into operation 1500 MW of new power every year. Meanwhile, in the last five years not a single generation unit significant for the National Energy System has has started to be built (according to the report „Funding energy projects in Poland” drawn up by PricewaterhouseCoopers and ING Bank Śląski).

Microgeneration The biggest advantages of microgeneration (power reaching several kilowatts), as well as distributed generation (power reaching several megawatts) are smaller investment risk, short construction time, high efficiency and easiness of operation. Indeed, building a distributed generation network would be a source of growth and innovation for our country. The structural reconstruction of the power grid would also be a spur to the economy and a strategy directed towards achieving a competitive advantage. The proximity of the consumer reduces expenses connected with the supply and distribution of energy. The quality of energy delivered to consumers would also improve. Distributed generation might solve the


Ecology / Energy

The amount of electricity produced using different renewable energy technologies in 2005–2009 [GWh] 2005

2006

2007

2008

Hydro plants

Type of source

2176

2030

2253

2153

2009 2376

Biomass

1345

1818

2343

3267

4888

Biogas

105

117

162

221

295

Wind turbines

135

257

472

806

1035

3761

4222

5230

6447

8594

Total

Source: Ministry of the Economy – a report on goals concerning the share of electricity produced from renewable energy sources present in Poland in national electricity consumption for 2010-2019.

problem of energy source shortage in nonurbanised areas.

Solar collectors, micro wind turbines, heat pumps, photovoltaic cells, microbiogas plants and electric cars are all parts of the modern industry of distributed generation equipment. The prosumer, as both consumer and producer of energy for its own purposes and for selling surplus energy to the network, stimulates local business initiatives, which entails effective resource management on the regional scale. Distributed generation is also becoming a noteworthy topic for large energy groups such as Energa, which conducts research aiming at developing integrated technologies for producing fuels and energy derived from biomass and agricultural waste. Within its project, Energa aims to construct home micro-biogas plants with power outputs of 10-20 kWe, installations for biomass gasification in solid deposit with the power of c.a. 500 kW and other installations with combustion or gas engines for biofuel combustion, with efficient electricity and heat generation in Pomerania. Energa undertook activities concerning connecting to the power grids and constructing low-voltage networks, so that such installations can also be cost-effective. In Poland investors wanting to build small energy sources still encounter many barriers. There is a need for regulations that would not only permit electricity and heat generation for household purposes, but also, in the case of having amassed an excess of energy, selling it to the networks, voluntarily or at the operator’s request. A person interested in investing in a very small power unit next to his/her house is treated as an investor building a large unit with power output of tens of megawatts and must, among other things, register his/her business activity. A source with a power output of 1 kW would have to operate for 50 to

74  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

130 hours per day to merely cover social security fees and to make such an investment profitable. There are still no simple solutions that would support small and individual energy producers (e.g. feed-in tariff and net settlement). The problem concerning this sector is the lack of publicly-accessible long-term projections and information on energy prices, which make the preparation of a business plan difficult. Together with the development and commercialisation of RES (low-scale) technologies, the liberation of the citizen’s activity and strengthening the position of Local Government in energy, may give Poland the best and quickest benefits. Maintaining the present system, which is unadjusted to the challenges, will give the opposite effects - deepening technological underdevelopment and costs. The National Renewable Energy Institute projects that the renewable-energy market will show a dynamic growth in the future. It estimates the value of turnover to be achieved in this sector by 2020 to about PLN6.6 billion. The Polish Wind Energy Association, in its report, projects that throughout the next 9 years the total capacity of wind turbines in Poland will exceed 12 thousand MW, and by 2020 the number of jobs in this sector will increase from 2 thousand to about 66 thousand.

Pursuant to EU regulations, Poland’s share of the final RES energy balance in 2020 will amount to 15%. The Polish Wind Energy Association presumes that wind will provide almost 75% of total energy from renewable sources in the coming years. According to data from the European Wind Energy Association, at the end of last year the wind energy sector in Europe employed 192 thousand workers. As pointed out in a WWF report, at the turn of 2008 the European wind energy sector employed ca. 160 thousand workers. The European Wind Energy Association estimates that by 2020 the European branch of wind energy will have established 250 thousand new jobs. Krzysztof Telega, Vice-President of Bank Ochrony Środowiska (BOŚ), during III International Renewable Energy Congress Green Power 2011, said that in order to achieve the EU goals regarding renewable energy by 2020 it will be necessary to invest ca. PLN4 billion a year. In 2010 the expenditure on environmental protection was about PLN10.9 billion, of which 10% was investment in renewable energy sources. As the Vice-President of BOŚ said, although it is a great challenge, investors will surely be aided by Polish banks. “Considering how much we have spent till now, and how much we have to spend in order to fulfil our obligations towards the EU, it is truly a big challenge for businesses and for the whole Polish economy. Aid, as well as from EU funds, will be granted by Polish banks, which survived the crisis with no severe consequences and are good partners for businesses which want to invest in RES. Despite the crisis, the banking sector has retained good credit accessibility for entrepreneurs,” explained Krzysztof Telega. Banks are going to meet the needs of RES investors by creating packages of financial instruments, such as credits and loans dedicated to specific sectors; they will also develop their own network of professional consulting services. ::

In April 2011, a report issued by Worldwatch Institute said that 2010 had been the first in world history when the amount of energy derived from renewable sources (wind turbines, solar energy plants, small hydro plants and biomass plants) exceeded that produced by nuclear power plants. It also confirmed the information issued by the US Energy Information Administration. In the first quarter of 2011 in the US the amount of energy acquired from renewable sources exceeded the energy generated by American nuclear power plants, which means that the changes in the energy-supply market are becoming visible and significant. The price of solar energy reached an amount close to the price of nuclear energy (according to the Worldwatch Institute report). The constant reduction in the price of electricity from renewable sources is a real fact, but the prices of nuclear energy are slowly but steadily increasing. It is a matter of, possibly, a short time before these two sources become comparable, at least regarding their prices. ::


Events

The Day of Builders

– awards for industry leaders On 27 September the Porczyński Museum-Gallery in Warsaw hosted the Great Gala of the Day of Builders in 2011. The guests were greeted by the President of the Polish Association of Construction Industry Employers Marek Michałowski. The gala was attended by the Deputy Speaker of the Sejm Ewa Kierzkowska, the State Secretary at the Chancellery of the President of the Republic of Poland Olgierd Dziekoński, the Undersecretary of State at the Ministry of Infrastructure Piotr Styczeń, MP Janusz Piechociński, Head Inspector of the National Labour Inspectorate Anna Tomczyk and Rev. Dariusz Dębiński of the Pastoral Council of Construction Communities. In a letter to the Polish Association of Construction Industry Employers, the Minister of Infrastructure Cezary Grabarczyk wrote: “We are grateful for your commitment to implementing investment tasks, your professional attitude and dedication to construction issues. As direct participants in the construction process, you are the ones who shape and develop solutions for the entire sector.” Undersecretary of State Piotr Styczeń awarded national and departmental distinctions to 72 people. The “2010 Personality of the Year in Construction” was granted to the Mayor of Wrocław Rafał Dutkiewicz for his contributions to the development of the market economy, entrepreneurship and Polish enterprises in the construction industry. Also this year, the 14th “Employer of the Year” contest recognised 10 best presidents of construction and development companies, and the “Developer Certificates” of the 29th and 30th editions were granted. A concert by the students of the Karol Szymanowski Complex of State Music Schools in Warsaw added splendour to the Gala. ::

President of the Polish Association of Construction Industry Employers (PZPB) – Marek Michałowski

Olgierd Dziekoński – Secretary of State in the Office of the President of the Republic of Poland

From right: Krzysztof Dmitrowski – PZPB Vice-President, Józef Zubelewicz - PZPB Vice-President, Paweł Miodek – President of Doka Polska Sp. z o.o., Father Dariusz Dębiński, Marek Michałowski – President of PZPB From right: Janusz Zaleski – PZPB VicePresident, Ewa Kierzkowska – Deputy Speaker of the Parliament of the Republic of Poland, Ogierd Dziekoński – Secretary of State in the Office of the President of the Republic of Poland, Rafał Dudkiewicz – Mayor of the City of Wrocław, awarded with the title “Personality of the Year 2010 in Construction” granted by PZPB, Zbigniew Janowski – Chairman of ZZ Budowlani, Anna Tomczyk – Chief Labour Inspector, Robert Dziwiński – Chief Inspector of Building Supervision, Paweł Ziemski – Deputy Chief Inspector of Building Supervision, Marek Kaproń – Direcotr of the Institue of Construction Technology

Developers

Winners of the “Employer of the Year 2010 in Construction”

11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  75


Ecology

Innovations for the environment Innovation is important for the IT industry, so at TP SA they are looking for new functional solutions for clients, as well as technologies which may be eco-efficient and save not only time, but also natural resources, ones that would allow the current monitoring of environmental indicators, e.g. as in INDICIA. That special CSR application, shared by the France Telecom Group, in a semi-annual cycle, reports 122 indicators concerning, i.a., the produced waste, and the consumption of electric energy, water, paper, fuel, and cooling systems. Jerzy Bojanowicz

Recycle your phone

Within the framework of its Green Initiative, TP SA engaged in the DSLAM Power Savings project and prepared the GreenBox application, which introduces a new logic of management in broadband networks, e.g. automatically shuts down unused ports on DSLAMs (Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer, a device on the operator’s side, directing traffic from the operator’s network directly to the clients), which reduces the consumption of energy used to power access devices and reduces heat emission, and therefore costs of air conditioning. Because the pilot launch of the application proved its huge potential, in 2009 it was implemented in the whole network which belongs to Grupa TP. Since December 2010 GreenBox has been permanently involved in TP network management systems and processes. Until March 2011 on almost 16,000 DSLAM devices it has been installed on, GreenBox automatically switched off 290 thousand active ports taking energy, but not providing services. This constitutes 7% of all ports.

E-invoice The propagation of an e-invoice program in Grupa TP started from the building of eco-awareness of the employees, while for the clients an advertising and educational campaign was prepared, a prize competition was organised and the www.naturatp.pl website and the naturatp profile on

76  ::  polish market  :: 

Telecreator competition, TP’s «inhouse refurbishment services» has been a total success. The benefits of having the refurbishment services “in-housed” are mainly found in four areas which are; savings, quality control, environmental and the future potential for TP. In the savings aspect, there was a notable cost reduction, due to the refurbishment becoming “in-housed” instead of outsourcing the production services. Savings were achieved in all parts of the process and amounted to a 35% decrease in total expenses. The project is a good example of the implementation of the 3R rule: Reuse, Reduce, Recycle, and the company benefits economically: a 86% reduction of costs of a “recovered” device introduced onto the market (since 2005).

11  /2011

Facebook were launched. These actions were complemented with the commencement of a tree-planting project, conducted together with volunteers on a 3-hectare area of post-mining damage in Knurów, Silesia. Fundacja Aeris Futuro was a partner in this action. Owing to the 1,800 thousand e-invoices generated, the company annually saves 21.6 million envelopes and sheets of paper with a mass of a minimum 216 tonnes, protecting 2448 trees from being felled. In 2011 under the banner of “with e-invoices you profit more,” through special bonuses and prizes in competitions, clients are encouraged to change their habits and switch from paper to electronic invoices.

Refurbishment Many devices (decoders, modems) owned by TP are returned by the clients.Therefore since 2007 the used products returned from the end customers or own stores are being tested, re-conditioned and re-packaged - all of that in order to leave the facility in “as good as new” condition. Since that time almost 1,200,000 such products have not been put in a bin, and ca. 80% of devices returned by clients (in 2008 44%) are back on the market. In 2010 the in-house refurbishment project was started. Awarded internally as the most innovative project of the year, in the Telecom Polska

Each phone thrown on a rubbish dump is a danger to the environment. Heavy metals contained in telephones and their accessories (lead, mercury) can contaminate up to 400 l of water or 1 m3 of soil. Therefore in 2011 the Orange Recycling programme has been initiated - the purchase of used mobile phones of all networks and brands via www.orangerecykling.pl website.

Green education of employees In 2008 the Environmental Protection News Bulletin available to all employees of TP was launched, containing information on the undertaken environmental actions. Within the framework of the conducted eco-campaigns, particular emphasis was laid on waste sorting. Since November 2008, as part of the “paper’s second life,” the employees of two key facilities in Warsaw have been provided with containers for documents and waste paper, preventing documents from being taken out by unauthorised persons. In 2010 such containers were also placed in 21 locations across Poland, with containers for used batteries in 6 main TP buildings in Warsaw. The introduction of the system of monitoring for printouts in 2010 reduced the number of pages printed in comparison to 2009 by over 8 million, which saved ca. 700 trees from being felled. In 2008 a competition for the most interesting environmental idea for the company was first announced. In the


Ecology first edition the employees of Grupa TP submitted 255, in the second 75 ideas in three categories: organisational improvements, the image of the company, and inspiring proenvironmental attitudes among employees. One of them was the “Bicycle to work” project, owing to which in 2009, in the headquarters of TP SA on Twarda Street, bicycle racks, as well as a shower and a place to change, have been created for those coming to work by bicycle. In 2010 bicycle racks were placed in 17 locations, and in some of these bathrooms with showers were also built. The project is still being developed. Since 2009 the company has been participating in the action organised by the WWF Foundation with the name “Earth Hour.” With each subsequent year the number of buildings included in the action of turning off lights increases. Employees are reminded about the Sustainable Transport Week and the European Car-Free Day. In 2011 the “Eco-driving Academy of Grupa TP” was launched, the purpose of which was to educate employees in the field of green travelling by car. In order to engage the employees of Grupa TP in a dialogue on the subject of the environment a contact box has been made available, to which all questions and suggestions in relation to environmental protection and green initiatives in our company can be sent.

E-documents in our work

of paper, and in 2010–77,292. Simultaneously the time for the acceptance of delegations, and the payment of per diems and settlements have been significantly reduced. E-documents are also used in relation with suppliers, who can process orders with the aid of an EDI electronic system. The same applies to invoices, which are delivered in electronic form. In the 6 months of the functioning of the system 4,900 orders have been placed and 6,500 invoices have been processed without them being printed. In the company there is also compulsory electronic archiving of invoices, which in this form do not occupy vast storage space. In the years 2007-2010 the use of paper was decreased by 45%. Furthermore, since 2008 all the companies providing paper materials for TP need to have an FSC certificate, i.e. good forest management, proving that the material has been obtained from forests in which care is taken for the planting of new trees and no predatory exploitation is being conducted. Handhelds have also been introduced - electronic confirmation of courier deliveries. In 2010 in Grupa TP came an application facilitating the conducting of a high-quality sound and image conference and joint work on a presentation – Telepresence. Through its use in 2010, 108 videoconferences were organised (27,700 official teleconference connections were conducted in the years 2007-2010).

Green IT It is estimated that the IT sector consumes 3-4% of electrical energy in Europe. This is why in 2009 in Grupa TP the Green IT project was started, the purpose of which was to increase efficiency in three key areas of IT (IT infrastructure, technical environment in server rooms and in the office) with the simultaneous reduction of pollution of the environment and the reduction in the consumption of natural resources. Green IT is a good example of combining economy with ecology. Benefits for the environment are the reduction in CO2 emissions by over 6 thousand tonnes per annum; reduction in water consumption per annum in the Data Processing Centre of Grupa TP by ca. 1.5 million litres; reduction in the number of printed pages, and replacement of over 70 million pages of paper documents by documents in electronic form. Benefits for the company are energy bills lower by ca. PLN1 mln per annum, owing to the optimisation of climate parameters in server rooms ca. PLN1 million savings per annum by way of energy consumption at the Data Processing Centre; ca. PLN450 thousand savings per annum by way of renegotiations of agreements with the energy provider as a result of the decrease in the consumption of energy at the DPC and ca. PLN600 thousand savings per annum through the consumption of energy at DPC after the release of the unused IT infrastructure.::

E-documents mean the shortening of the circulation time, the reduction of correspondence, the streamlining of the process of acceptation for internal documents and the facilitation of access to archival materials. And so Optidoc is an application for business trips (applications for delegations and organisation of business trips), e-holiday - holiday application (reminds you of the coming holiday time, and allows you to change its date, which is electronically accepted by our manager), and e-deklaracje is for the settlement of PIT Tax Returns (an electronic form of tax returns goes to the Tax Office). 29 thousand PITs have been sent with the use of this solution (58 thousand pages of paper have not been printed). In turn the implementation of the Optidoc application in 2009 saved 30,057 sheets 11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  77


Business philosophy We asked Marek Opiński, the Managing Director of Opek - one of the leading courier companies on the market - about setting goals and achieving success in business.

delivery services. Therefore, we strive to be flexible as far as our sales and logistics package are concerned. Our horizontal management structure allows OPEK to immediately cater for the needs of our clients, while we are also introducing new services, improving the operation of procedures in logistics, and investing in our IT department. Customer satisfaction is our priority, thus all new solutions and investments are designed to improve the quality of our services. What current business endeavours do you take the most pride in? The key to achieving success in business is the ability to choose your employees well and to create optimal working conditions by ensuring the proper motivation and working environment. This, together with an honest and fair attitude towards each person you employ, can result in a fully operational company. Due to such a philosophy, we have managed, after many years of hard work, to create a company that can go into competition with international concerns operating in Poland. People who work and cooperate with OPEK - couriers and employees - are my pride and joy, the most significant of my professional accomplishments. Because of their work we can meet the expectations of our partners. Kind words from OPEK’s clients are the best reward for the many years of my hard work.

OPEK is a delivery company which has provided top-quality courier services since 1999. How are you managing to maintain the leading position on the market? The key to achieving success is to set ambitious goals and work towards them. Our position on the market is the result of our painstaking and systematic work. We do not become complacent about ourselves, though, and we wish to continue to expand and to provide top-quality services to an even greater number of clients. We pursue these aims mainly by extending our product range and improving our current work in logistics. This year we have launched, for example, the OPEK Paczka (Parcel) service which is addressed to individuals as well as companies who are interested in using delivery services without the need to enter into any sort of contract. Already there are 60 postal points where you can send your package

and we expect there will be 100 of them by the end of the year. In addition, this year we have launched a new, fully-automated sorter in the Łomianki transshipment centre. This way, our company’s output has doubled. We have enlarged our storage area by building a transshipment hub near Łódź covering an area of 7600 sq. m and comprising 50 docks. All our projects are intended to contribute to achieving our primary goal - maintaining the high quality of our services. It is precisely the high quality ratios that distinguish our company from market competitors and allow us to enjoy the trust of a wide range of clients. What kinds of action are you taking in order to establish a strong position among shipping companies? Competition on the market is fierce. At the same time, however, we notice that there is a need to find new solutions for the users of

Your company is of 100% Polish capital. Do you plan to enter the Stock Market in the future? I try to never say “never.” From the business point of view entering the Stock Market is a potentially good move as additional funds could facilitate and accelerate the development of our company. Nevertheless, we are going to consider this issue in the twoor even three-years’ term. Currently, we are trying to achieve our business goals using our own financial means, and, because it produces satisfactory results in this area, at this moment we are opting for this policy in the company’s development. D o you plan to launch your services abroad? Currently, we do not have such plans, although it would be possible via logistical platforms in use in the Western Europe. Our strategic goal is to further develop and extend our services on the Polish market. In Poland OPEK has 41 offices, 3 agencies and 3 sorting facilities: in Łomianki, in Łódź, and in Katowice. We employ 1182 people and twice as many couriers. All of them are required to care for our clients because they are our priority. Compiled by Joanna Fijałkowska


OPEK. PRIMA SORT! Presenting the most advanced sorter in Poland. Now our clients can proudly say, only we have it. Basic technical data: Surface 1,000 m2 700 m length 12 scanners 84 photocells

7,200 gravity rolls 1,300 pins and leading strips Speed of the main line – up to 3 m/s High capacity – up to 7,000 packs per hour 100% sorting precision

Info-line for land lines: 801 002 800 Info-line for mobile phones: 22 211 80 00


Telecommunication

EXATEL supports entrepreneurs It’s hard to imagine doing business in the modern world without modern telecommunications. Secure and reliable communication not only allows you to quickly obtain the necessary information, but also facilitates management and carrying out operations. This is especially true of corporations with complex structures, operating on the supra-regional and global scales.

Our experience of nearly 20 years shows that with the development of the telecommunications market there have been growing expectations of clients for new technologies that not only provide the required quality of service parameters, but are also adjusted to individual needs, making it possible to optimise operating costs. In addition, security plays a crucial role, taking into account the fact that in the world there are more and more sophisticated methods of data attacks, theft and extortion, most of which is directed against corporate systems. For EXATEL’s Clients, who mainly include large corporations operating in various sectors of the economy, secure communication is especially important. Therefore, we offer security services to protect network

80  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

infrastructure, clients’data transfer, access to business systems. For this purpose EXATEL has also implemented an information-security management system and has received the ISO/ IEC 27001: 2005 Certificate. Thanks to our expertise and long-term experience in handling the most demanding clients we are also a strategic business partner of the military sector and the public administration. EXATEL, as one of few Polish ICT companies, signed an agreement with NC3A (the NATO Consultation, Command and Control Agency) allowing participation in the purchasing procedures for the benefit of NATO. An example of a comprehensive range of services and products of EX­ATEL that reduces client’s operat­ ing costs is VPN data transmission ser­v ices, provided on the modern MPLS technology. It is currently the most widely-used technology in the creation of corporate networks in Poland. This technology allows to connect clients’ local networks that are distant from one another into one structured and separate corporate network guaranteeing fast and secure communication between all branches. Its advantages are: flexibility, scalability, ability to define the criteria of priority for the transmitted data. Communication takes place in the virtual backbone tunnels, which excludes the risk of attack and thus prevents the loss, exchange or capture of data. EXATEL was the forerunner of VPN services on the Polish market, especially using the latest MPLS technology. To this day, the company has successfully completed over 160 VPN implementations for large enterprises

and projects for the public administration sector. With a combination of several solutions, the client receives an integrated package of services, including data transmission, access to the Internet and advanced IP telephony services. Simultaneously, based on VPN MPLS, it is possible to implement many technologically-advanced services related to access to business applications and video conferences. This is facilitated by EXATEL’s modern fibre-optic network, with a length of about 20 thousand km and a throughput of 40 Gb/s, which has interconnection points with domestic and foreign operators, enabling data transfer, voice termination and transit passing through Central Europe. EXATEL has built several large data networks in Poland, involving several hundred locations each. One of these is the network for the Ministry of Justice, which connects 432 units of the Ministry. Similar networks have been built for the Agency for the Restructuring and Modernisation of Agriculture, Raiffeisen Bank Polska SA and the CIECH Group’s companies. Thanks to partnership agreements with foreign operators, including British Telecom, AT&T, TeliaSonera, T-Systems and Verizon, EXATEL is able to offer data transmission services with an unlimited range. EXATEL is Poland’s first partner in the “BT Alliance” programme, which allows to provide services both to companies operating in Poland and planning to expand its range beyond the borders of our country, as well as for large corporations abroad that increase their activity in Europe or other continents. On that purpose, the Foreign Sales Office has been established in the company, with the main task of providing comprehensive preparation and implementation of a range of services for “global VPN” adapted to the needs and profile of the client’s business. Zdzislaw Nowak, President of the Board of EXATEL SA


Polish Export Hits

You may count on our exports There are indications that this year is going to be a good year for Polish foreign trade, with chances of getting even better. As exports reflect the overall condition of the economy, it is expected to be good as well. Such are the conclusions from the data published by the Ministry of the Economy in midSeptember. It is the Ministry that “has its finger on the pulse,” monitoring and analysing the situation on an ongoing basis in a competent and reliable way. This data shows some of the most characteristic phenomena and trends. Mikołaj Oniszczuk Firstly, a fairly high level of overall trade with foreign countries has been maintained, because in the first 7 months of this year it reached the value of EUR162.4 billion. Secondly, the pace of growth in imports was faster than in exports, although to a relatively small extent. In the period analysed imports increased by 14.1%, and exports by 13.0%. Thirdly, two trends are noticeable, i.e. a slowdown in exports to EU markets - especially to the euro zone, outside the German market to 12.2%, and a significant increase - over 30% - to the CIS markets, including Russia. Fourthly, a slowdown in exports growth, mainly caused by the crisis and recession in the markets of our partners, means that the trade surplus has increased to EUR8.2 billion. And finally, in the industry and product structure of exports, the supplies of agricultural and food products have maintained a strong position. Here, the trade surplus is over EUR1.1 billion. Hats off! Other segments also show good results. More generally, exports have remained the driving force behind the Polish economy, with a 4% increase in GDP. Fluctuations in exchange rates in relation to the zloty are within limits acceptable by exporters, because they compensate for the negative effects (in volumes) of reduced demand

82  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

and sales on the markets influenced by the crisis, although not in all cases. The year is drawing to a close. So what are the forecasts in this regard? According to the analyses and assessments of the Ministry of the Economy, and to the opinions of many exporters, Poland’s overall trade will increase to the level of EUR283.3 billion; exports will be 10.5% higher despite the impact of the crisis, reaching EUR133 billion; imports will increase by about 12% to the level of EUR150.3 billion. This would be a good outcome constituting a solid basis for the subsequent undertaking of more demanding tasks in 2012. However, the fourth quarter will determine the final outcomes. Numbers and indicators are one thing, but the outcomes are achieved by producers and exporters, or, as all parties unanimously said in the election campaign, the people! However, for the sake of truth, whole group of internal and external circumstances, in which they will operate, has to be added to this. Here, it is not only the intentions themselves that matter, but specific factors which favour or hinder operations. There are no perfect “beings,” only those which are better or worse. The above issues will be the subject of the 9th Congress of Polish Exporters, which on the initiative of the Association of Polish Exporters is held on 24 November this year at

the Marriott Hotel in Warsaw. During this meeting, attended by several hundred people, the situation and the annual outcomes are going to be assessed by experts and high-level representatives of the State and administrative and government structures, including the Ministry of the Economy. In addition, by way of a direct exchange of ideas and opinions, new tasks to be faced by Polish exporters in the near future will be defined, taking into account the need to meet the developmental challenges of the country. A constructive confrontation of the real sector of the economy with the representatives of the central authorities and government structures has been increasingly conducive to creating a better and broader area of cooperation between both structures. Therefore, it can be expected, with a reasonable degree of conviction, that good initiatives and proposals for tasks to be taken will be presented during the Congress, and will be covered by the post-election platform of the government from the perspective of the system and operations. The directional assumptions of the implemented “Strategy for the pro-exports development of the Polish economy” will remain valid, including long-term policy, taking into account the geographical and industry priorities of exports, as well as an entire set of instruments for their support and promotion.::


Investments in Warsaw

Warsaw under construction Investment projects in Warsaw may be divided into those carried out by the city itself and those run by other entities, including private ones. Certainly, the project that catches the eye is the National Stadium, one of the football stadiums being prepared for the UEFA Euro 2012 tournament. It is managed by the Treasury-owned Narodowe Centrum Sportu (National Sports Centre), a company established by the Ministry of Sport and Tourism. The construction is scheduled to end in November 2011. Jerzy Bojanowicz

Copernicus Science Centre

“I am a very happy president, with a pretty stadium and decent infrastructure behind me. After seeing four stadiums, four airports, and the infrastructure, I can say that the tournament will go well. I would like to thank the Polish State, the Host Cities, the Polish Football Association, and particularly those who worked at those stadiums,” said Michel Platini, the President of UEFA, whose delegation inspected the progress of preparations for UEFA Euro 2012 in Poland and visited all four Polish Host Cities – Gdańsk, Wrocław, Poznań, and Warsaw. Although the stadium, built for PLN1.9 billion by the Alpine-Hydrobudowa-PBG Consortium, will be handed over on 30 November, as early as in May of this year the first unique cultural event took place there – a theatre performance “Nine Functional

84  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

Levels according to Witkacy” directed by Andrzej Dziuk. On Sunday, 2 October, during the Great Open Day, it was visited by over 140 thousand people – 2.5 times more than there are seats! Unfortunately, seeking further profits, the German company Schlaich Bergmann und Partner, which, inspired by the bicycle wheel, created the concept of the roof for the National Stadium made an identical roof over the renovated stadium in Vancouver! The roof structure is a system of steel ropes extending between a ring placed on pylons over the grandstands and a spire placed centrally over the pitch – the roof needs 20 minutes to unfold. It may be a comfort that the Canadians paid the equivalent of about PLN1.7 billion for the roof alone. On the other bank of the Vistula, almost opposite the National Stadium,

the Copernicus Science Centre has been open since November 2010. Its shape fits in nicely with the embankment. The construction of the Centre resulted from the Multi-Year Programme of the Copernicus Science Centre Exhibition, which was passed by the Council of Ministers in May 2006. In 2009, thanks to an agreement between the Capital City of Warsaw and the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage, the PLN364.8 million project was granted PLN207 million in funding from the Infrastructure and Environment Operational Programme. This May the Copernicus Science Centre hosted the prestigious international conference of ECSITE - The European Network of Science Centres and Museums. In June another of the Centre’s facilities was handed over – the “Heavens of Copernicus” planetarium, which, thanks to its equipment, quality of presentation and construction, became one of the most cuttingedge and original planetaria in Europe. The fact that Warsaw is one of the Host Cities of UEFA Euro 2012 resulted in the implementation of many projects important to its residents, though most of them will have to wait until after the tournament. The flagship project is the construction of the second line of the underground, the City Office being the investor. “The Second line of the underground in Warsaw – preparatory works, design, and construction of the central section, along with the purchase of rolling stock” is co-financed by the European Union from the Cohesion Fund within the framework of the Infrastructure and Environment Programme. The entire route is to be 31 km long, with the central 6-km-long section being constructed at present (7 stations). The contractor is an Italian-Turkish-Polish consortium that has taken up the implementation of the task for PLN4.1 billion. Even though the project is being carried out underground, it has caused some hindrances on the surface. Still, this is worth going through until 2014, when the central section of the underground is going to be ready. It is also worth going through the traffic difficulties resulting from road projects, such as the 4.3-kmlong route with a bridge (the North


Investments in Warsaw

Bridge), connecting Białołęka with Bielany. The project, started in May 2009 by the Municipal Road Investments Authority (the city’s budgetary entity subordinate to the Mayor of Warsaw), will take 32 months to complete. The construction cost is PLN976.6 million. The plan is for the North Bridge to connect the NS route and the Eastern ring road of Warsaw. The same Authority is also the investor in the safe three-level intersection of Jerozolimskie Avenue and Łopuszańska Street, set to be opened in November. Built for PLN160 million, it will be a new exit route from Warsaw in the direction of Kraków and Katowice. Near that intersection, the General Directorate for National Roads and Motorways (GDDKiA) is constructing the S-8 route Salomea – Wolica (urban section). At present, the Warsaw division of GDDKiA is building a 45-kilometre section of the A-2 motorway from the boundary of the Mazowieckie Province to the Konotopa Junction, and nearly 30 km of the Warsaw ring road – sections S-2 Konotopa – Airport, S-2/S79 Puławska – Lotnisko – Marynarska and S-8 Modlińska – Marki. Also a municipal company, the 125-year-old Municipal Water and Sewerage Company in Warsaw (in the 19th Century one of the best specialists in the field - William Heerlein Lindley led the construction of new waterways) is carrying out the renovation and extension of the “Czajka” Wastewater Treatment Plant. Once back in operation, it will also accept wastewater from the central and northern districts of the leftbank part of Warsaw, with the flow capacity increased from 240,000 m3/ day to 435,300 m3/day. By a decision of the EC, the project, estimated at EUR405 million, received support in the amount of 62.5% of the eligible costs, i.e. over EUR248 million. The remaining 37.5% of costs will be covered from the Company’s own funds and loans. The Municipal Water and Sewerage Company is also the main sponsor of the fountain park in Podzamcze (PLN11.5 million). A state-of-the-art multimedia fountain is composed of

367 jets ejecting water to a height of up to 25 m (30 million m3 of water/ min). For several months the waterlight-sound shows have been seen by nearly 500 thousand people. Writing of Warsaw’s projects, we have to mention the revitalisation of selected areas of the city by the City Office. A good example is the revitalisation of Chłodna (one of the most beautiful streets in Warsaw before the war) and Elekcyjna Streets, which cost ca. PLN13 million. The scope of work included the redevelopment of streets made of historic cobble (18thCentury cobblestones) and tarmac with a total area of 13,000 m2, and sidewalks with an area of 6,000 m2, as well as the redevelopment of squares on both sides of the church and the relocation of old tramway tracks. “It is one of many revitalisation projects carried out in Warsaw, if only to mention Krakowskie Przedmieście, Ujazdowskie Avenue and the Francuska and Paryska Streets. Today this constellation of spectacular Warsaw streets is joined by Chłodna,” enthused Jacek Wojciechowicz, Deputy Mayor of Warsaw, at the official opening on 1 October. Private projects are also changing the face of Warsaw, especially those which are the most visible, such as the Złota 44 skyscraper – a prestigious project by the Orco Property Group. It is a luxury 192-metre-high building (54 storeys and 251 apartments), which has already reached 160 metres. It was designed by Daniel Libeskind, the world-famous architect of Polish descent. To remain

in the heart of Warsaw, there is also the new Jabłkowski Brothers Department Store, the Wolf Bracka Department Store built only several hundred metres away (the last of such expressive works by Stefan Kuryłowicz, who died in an air crash this year), and the modern office building “Mokotowska Square.” “It is my dream to make Warsaw the very heart of 21st-Century Central Europe. This dream of mine is gradually becoming reality. The Capital of Poland regularly gets good positions in rankings presenting the most attractive places for business. More and more companies wish to do their business here. Mokotowska is a confirmation that investing in Poland pays off. I’m glad that the former Metalexport office building will now be filled with life and people,” declared the Mayor of Warsaw Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz during the opening. Her dreams may be speeded up by the results of the “European Cities Monitor” ranking, prepared by the Cushman & Wakefield consulting company. In the list of the 36 most attractive cities for business in Europe, Warsaw was placed 21st, achieving a better result than Vienna and Prague. “Our standing is certainly satisfying, as it shows that we are the most open city in the entire region. Not only are we better than our long-time rivals, such as Prague and Budapest, but also other cites – including Berlin. This ranking adds legitimacy to our investment policy,” commented Jarosław Kochaniak, Deputy Mayor of Warsaw.::

Planetarium at the Copernicus Science Centre

11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  85


The construction of the second  Starting from the night of 14 to 15 October the intersection of Aleja Solidarności and Targowa Street in Warsaw will be closed for about two years. It is another, and also the last, place which has been undergoing such considerable changes in connection with the construction of the central section of the second metro line. A huge engineering project will be created on the section from

Białostocka to 11 Listopada Streets, providing advanced functionality and primarily serving to integrate various means of transportation. There will be underground passages leading to tram and bus stops, to the Warszawa Wileńska railway station, and finally the entry to the metro platform. This station will have approximately 130 metres in length, and on its northern side almost 400 metres

long turning tracks will be constructed. It will be built at the depth of 13 metres and will be 20 metres wide. The construction work will be performed using the open-cast method, hence the need to occupy such a large area. The tunnels between stations will be excavated by three TBM cutting shields, weighing about 800 tonnes each, with a length of nearly 100 m and a diameter of 6.3 m. They

Length: 6 km Number of stations: 7 Chamber for turning

Chamber for turning

Connector between line I and II

Cross station between line I and II

Tunnel under Vistula River

Station “Stadium”


metro line is a huge undertaking must bore over 6 km of the tunnel, including a 800-metre-long section at a depth of 8 m under the Vistula. There will be 7 stations along this section. Following the custom, the shields were given women’s names: Maria, Anna and Wisła (Vistula). Upon completion of the work new trains will run on the tracks. The Siemens-Newag consortium won the tender for their production. The Warsaw metro will have 20 trains available for the central section, and 15 trains to support the first line. The trains will provide a completely new standard – state of the art, single-car and compliant with stringent environmental requirements. They will be delivered progressively from the end of 2012. In addition to technological factors, elements associated with standard passenger-compartment equipment played a very important role in choosing their supplier. Efficient ventilation, special places for people with disabilities, so called “hot buttons”, and the communication system with the service, will help to improve the comfort of travelling. The last deliveries are expected before the end of the construction of the central section. The value of the construction of the central section of the second metro line is PLN 4.117 500 billion. The cost of purchasing rolling stock is about PLN1 billion 305 million. The investor in the construction is the Capital City of Warsaw, with support from an EU grant of up to PLN2,516,918,620.

The purchase of rolling stock is to a large extent financed from the own resources of the metro and a loan taken by the company from the European Investment Bank. The remaining amounts come from EU funding in the amount of PLN254,910,000. A credit agreement with the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development was also signed. The signing of the latter, significant agreement was possible largely due to the fact that the EBRD has recognised the environmental value of the new rolling stock. Investments in the construction of the metro and its rolling stock are a qualitative leap in the field of public transport technology. ::

Metro Warszawskie Sp. z o.o.

2nd underground line, central section

The project “2nd underground line in Warsaw – preparatory work, design and construction of the central section with the purchase of rolling stock” is co-financed by the European Union from the Cohesion Fund within the framework of Infrastructure and Environment Programme


Regions

The Sudeten Mountains are still attractive to tourists and businessmen Janusz Korzeń

Author is a director of the Regional Bureau of Spatial Planning in Wrocław. Urbanist and regionalist, publicist, author of planning and identification studies for Lower Silesia.

This one of the oldest mountain massifs in Europe and one of the main tourism and leisure regions in Poland - a place of active processes of modernisation and development, the rate and scope of which distinguish it on the map of the country, similar to the growth dynamics of the whole of Lower Silesia. They are particularly intensive in the area of the main Sudeten towns: Jelenia Góra and Kłodzko, Świdnica, such spas as Karpacz or Szklarska Poręba and in the entire health-resort complex in the Jeleniogórska and Kłodzka Valleys. New, interesting prospects for development are starting to appear for Wałbrzych – the biggest town in the region, still weighed down by the ballast of consequences of the decision of over 20 years ago concerning the liquidation of the coal mines, which have until recently been the main driving force in its development. The nature of the basic tourism and leisure functions of the Sudeten Mountains area is mainly determined by its outstanding natural-environment values, which means that it constitutes in its entirety almost a single, huge complex of protected areas, closely connected to the same areas on the Czech side. It is also determined by the presence of high-class complexes of monuments, which

88  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

in five cases have either been included on the UNESCO World Heritage List (these are the Churches of Peace in Jawor and Świdnica) or on the register of historic monuments in Poland (these are the cloister complex in Krzeszów, the Silver Mountain Fortress and the complex of residences in Jelenia Góra’s Valley of Palaces and Gardens recently added to the register). In practice, making these treasures available translates to a rich accommodation and system of services functioning here, which accounts for nearly 5% of the entire national stock. Over a period of a year the same percentage of domestic tourists and a not much lower percentage of foreign tourists find their way here. The main towns of Sudeten are also buoyant centres of the development of production and services, among which Wałbrzych is particularly distinguished, with its one of the strongest Special Economic Zones in the country, specialising in production for the needs of the automotive industry. These are also developing academic centres, which complement the functioning of a big centre of science and higher education in Wrocław, the fourth in the

country. Finally, these are locations important to many facilities providing services to the residents of this region, who despite the processes of population ageing and reduction occurring here, constitute its basic human capital. One more aspect of the development of the Sudeten Mountains has to be mentioned, related to the very significant improvement in their accessibility. The recently-completed construction of the connections to the A4 motorway – the main transport axis of Lower Silesia with the system of German motorways – has brought this region closer to the West of Europe, accompanied by the far-flung process of the modernisation and extension of the internal system of its road and rail connections, especially with Wrocław and the communication systems of this country and the nearby Czech Republic. I hope that in the near future this region will be connected to Scandinavia and the south of Europe by the S3 express road built from Szczecin to the south and before long also the concepts for the building of a High-Speed Railway through the Sudeten Mountains, from Warsaw via Wrocław to Prague will be determined. ::


Wałbrzych Reloaded

Janusz Moniatowicz Invest – Park – Poland’s best Special Economic Zone in Wałbrzych. Several factories in Wałbrzych will be soon joined by the Korean Mango and the German Ronal Companies.

The downfall of the coal industry, the labour market disaster, bootleg mining, which is the only practice of its kind in Europe, and finally, the embarrassing political corruption. The image of Wałbrzych was shattered. However, the record-breaking turn-out at the repeated Local-Government election may imply that since August, this town has started to believe in itself again. Especially with the energetic Mayor Roman Szełemej at its head.

The conviction that Wałbrzych has collapsed in political, social, and economic terms is a stereotype difficult to combat. Wałbrzych came out of the war almost unscathed, so “as a punishment,” its infrastructure was neglected for half a century. In the 1990s it got a terrible shock as all mines were closed down, with 20 thousand workplaces liquidated. In the aftermath, massive unemployment and the illegal coal exploitation craze began. To make matters worse, the chance for EU funds for cities with district rights was lost, because Wałbrzych had been deprived of such status, contrary to commonsense and out of a purely political calculation. Wałbrzych has fallen prey to short-sightedness, ill will, and bad luck. However, it is still the second largest city in Lower Silesia, with its favourable location in the mountains and huge development capacities. Behind the

depressing stereotypes, the best economic zone in Poland with a huge Toyota factory, still thrives. The breathtaking Książ castle is visited by 300 thousand people each year. The mountains within the town’s borders offer 172 km of cycle routes and 50 km of tourist trails. The new, original, Galeria Victoria is one of the biggest shopping centres within 70 kilometres. The Old Town is starting to shine again. Also the opening of a big sports centre with a sports hall, an aqua park, and a hotel, is planned for spring... The analysis by experts in The Society of Polish Town Planners indicates that Wałbrzych, although crisis-stricken, is not a fallen town. And it surely will not accept colonial treatment by the Government, which closed down the mines, forgetting about the people, and which is not willing to restore district rights to the city or to take on the construction of the bypass road, abandoned two years ago.

And yet, Mayor Szełemej’s determination leaves Warsaw with no room for manoeuvre. In Wałbrzych, the failure limit has been exhausted. Instead of being a ball and chain, this city has to set an example of a successful and ambitious development. R. Szełemej sees the future of the town from the perspective of the communication network modernisation on local and regional levels. He wants to pursue the economic zone, which would be open to the social needs of the city, and the development of its recreational potential using the natural mountain assets. Finally, he demands more involvement from the bodies of the State Treasury, concerning the reform of infrastructure delays. The speed and extent of the current cooperation with the authorities on the national, provincial, and neighbouring communes’ levels constitute the novum of Wałbrzych. During the 1st Wałbrzych Agglomeration Forum, which was organised very quickly, the Local Governments united under a common initiative, namely the launching of the Special Operational Programme - the Wałbrzych Agglomeration Development. The stimulated engine of economic growth is to be based on five priority axes - the infrastructure, the revitalisation of housing resources, an innovative economy, sports and tourism open to the neighbouring Czech Repubic, and excellent hospitals and health resorts prospering near Wałbrzych. ::


Events

The meeting of the “Teraz Polska” club

From left: Jarek Jachimowski, Michał Lipiński and Beata Piontek

On 20 September 2011 in the St. Antonio Restaurant in Warsaw a meeting of the “Teraz Polska” (Poland Now) Club took place. It was the first meeting of this year’s winners with those from previous years. The “Teraz Polska” Club is an organisation of the best entrepreneurs, featuring the Winners of the Emblem, members of the Jury, Donors, and Partners of the Polish Promotional Programme

From left: President of FPGP Krzysztof Przybył, general director FPGP Andrzej Czernek and Michał Lipiński

“Teraz Polska.” The Club members meet to exchange experiences and opinions on effective ways of doing business. During the meeting President Krzysztof Przybył presented Certificates confirming the right to use the Teraz Polska emblem to representatives of 75 companies. The winners of this year’s contest also presented the specificity of their activities. ::

“Teraz Polska” for the 22nd time The “Teraz Polska” Polish Promotional Emblem Foundation has begun accepting applications for the upcoming 22nd edition of the most known economic competition in Poland. Companies and districts wishing to apply for the “Teraz Polska” emblem have time till 16 January 2012 to submit their applications. The idea of rewarding the best companies in their sector was born in the early 1990s. Since then the competition has been enjoying unflagging popularity. Over the past 20 years, almost 500 participants were awarded the emblem from some 4,500 applicants. This great interest in the competition stems out from one important fact – the “Teraz Polska” promotional emblem remains the most recognizable and the most significant promotional award in Poland, and winning it guarantees the increase of a company’s prestige and trust among its business partners.

90  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

All accepted applications will be passed to the Commission of Experts and subjected to a rigorous evaluation. The highest rated entries will be nominated for the “Teraz Polska” Emblem. From among them, the Chapter will select the Competition Winners in April, and the ceremonial Gala will take place in May 2012. All awarded companies will receive the right to use the “Teraz Polska” emblem symbolizing the highest quality on their products and services, as well as use the promotional package offered by the Teraz Polska Promotional Emblem Foundation. To enter the competition: • Send the completed registration questionnaire and a proof of payment of the PLN500 entry fee to the Foundation; submit the completed verification survey (competition application) with attachments to the Competition Bureau till 16 January 2012 • Make the verification payment

Join the best! More information at w w w.te ra z pol s ka . p l


Events

The 1st European Congress of Small and Medium Enterprises Donald Tusk, the Prime Minister of Poland, Jerzy Buzek, the President of the European Parliament, Waldemar Pawlak, the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of the Economy, and Elżbieta Bieńkowska, the Minister of Regional Development, participated in the 1st European Congress of Small and Medium Enterprises in Katowice. This event constituted one of the most prominent business meetings addressed to the SME sector in Central and Eastern Europe. Over 2,500 guests from Poland and abroad took part in 30 panel discussions, debates, and other events within the Congress.

Jerzy Buzek, the President of the European Parliament, stated that “small and medium-sized businesses amount to nearly 99% of all enterprises in the EU and employ over 74 million people. They generate about 60% of the EU’s GDP and create nearly 70% of the jobs in the whole EU, fostering innovation, entrepreneurship and economic growth.” Prime Minister Donald Tusk emphasised that it is the SMEs that constitute the foundation of the national and European economy. The Prime Minister addressed entrepreneurs directly saying: “You are the salt of the earth, and I’m saying this not only because it is the right thing to say at a Congress of this kind about the people who take their lives in their own hands, and, perhaps most importantly, provide a decent life to all the people they employ.” The main topics covered during the Congress were issues connected with the analysis of the current condition of SMEs in Poland and other EU states, considering all kinds of barriers and limits faced by entrepreneurs. Businessmen participating in the Congress could set out their suggestions to people of influence on the situation of SMEs, such as Henri Malosse, the President of the Employers’ Group in the European Economic and Social Committee, Dariusz Bogdan and Marcin Korolec, Under-Secretaries of State at the Ministry of the Economy, Bożena Lublińska-Kasprzak,

the President of the Polish Agency for Enterprise Development (PARP), and Andrzej Arendarski, the President of the Polish Chamber of Commerce. The latest information on the European Commission’s projects for the next financial perspective concerning SMEs, reported by Elżbieta Bieńkowska, the Minister of Regional Development, also enjoyed quite a lot of interest during the Congress. The organisers also emphasised the importance of family-owned enterprises by scheduling this particular panel discussion for the first day of the Congress. The panel touched upon issues connected with the management of family enterprises, the success of such businesses, and the role of women in the functioning of family enterprises. People who are familiar with the notion of family entrepreneurship and who successfully run family businesses were invited to participate in the discussion, among them Krystyna Woźniak-Trzosek, the President of the Board, Oficyna Wydawnicza Rynek Polski Sp. z o.o. (“Polish Market”), the Editorial Board of “Polish Market”, Sonia Draga, the President and Editor-in-Chief of the “Sonia Draga” publishing company, Agnieszka Kostempska, the owner of the “Investia” company, and Aleksander Stuglik, lawyer, KBZ Żuradzka&Wspólnicy Adwokaci i Radcy Prawni Sp. k. The publisher of the “Polish Market” magazine, Krystyna WoźniakTrzosek, touched upon the issue of the family enterprise itself, but she also stressed women’s role in such companies. “I established my company 15 years ago. It is a publishing company, the flagship product of which has been “Polish Market,” an English-language magazine promoting the Polish economy, culture, and science abroad. When I was setting up this company, I didn’t know that it would be a family business. Only after a few years, I used the support of my husband, who became a company consultant, especially in legal and financial matters. My children were 11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  91


Events

growing up, so my daughter undertook work in the company; and now my son-in-law has become a member of the board, for which he is qualified, since he has completed studies in management. Now I can say, that the Company has entered middle age. As statistics say, middle age for a family business in Poland is 14 years, so mine has been there longer.” “I have been asked to share my thoughts with you considering women’s role in family companies’ management,” she continued, “I completely agree with what the previous speaker, Prof. Blikle, said - that family businesses have started to be talked about only just recently. It is true to say, however, that the family enterprise is as old as the market economy. In a society where the family constitutes a fundamental unit, a family business becomes a natural entrepreneurship incubator. And the features usually ascribed to the family, such as respect, loyalty, engagement, mutual support, honesty and so on, may be transferred to the family enterprise. And although it is absolutely natural, it makes us consider a family business from a different perspective.” “Paweł Śpiewak, one of the most prominent Polish sociologists, expressed his opinion with reference to Polish entrepreneurship, that the level of economic optimism in Europe is directly proportional to the level of trust towards other people, and in the case of Poland it is just the other way round.” “Why do I mention this? Because I think that women are more trusting and open to the world, and in a time of cultural transformations, when new kinds of entrepreneurship are developing, especially in the hard times of the financial crisis, new challenges have to be taken on. In my view, women possess these ‘soft’ character traits that make dealing with these challenges easier for them. That is to say, women are open, they establish new contacts easily, and they find it easy to negotiate. It is often said that in times of general insecurity in making decisions, a woman’s intuition is more valuable than a man’s self-confidence. The experience of my company is yet another proof for this.” “Opening the SME Congress, Professor Buzek said that in crisis

92  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

conditions, companies managed by women find it easier to survive. And probably you have all also noticed the phenomenon, that in difficult times, women are given managerial posts more often. In the time when more understanding and negotiating, as well as better contact with outside society, are needed, it is women who are appointed more often.” “And what do women themselves think about it? As a press publisher, and a practising journalist, I talk with ladies managing even big companies, such as Solange Olszewska, who runs the Solaris company, and Teresa Mokrysz of Mokate. The majority of them share the opinion that ‘familiness’ constitutes both the biggest advantage and the biggest disadvantage of family businesses. It is understandable that it is not just the good things that are transferred to the company, but naturally, also crises and conflicts. Of course, every owner tries to avoid such situations, but they still can happen. It does happen that owners overestimate their own leadership and management abilities. In a ‘normal’ company, the reaction of hiring the specialist from the outside very quickly appears, which, in the case of the family business, is rather difficult. Thus, when running a family company, apart from the advantages, also these kinds of hazards have to be taken into account, to make the company survive. I do hope my company will survive, because apart from the generation already working there, another one is growing. My grandson is 5 years old and maybe he will become another link one day,” concluded Krystyna Woźniak-Trzosek. Honorary Patronage of the Congress was taken by the President of the Republic of Poland, Bronisław Komorowski. The event was also held under the patronage of the Polish Presidency of the Council of the European Union. The Congress, raising manifold issues connected with the functioning of SMEs, has become one of the biggest business meetings directed at SMEs in the CEE. It has created an opportunity for a thorough diagnosis of the current state of SMEs and the marking out of new directions for their development.  ::


Presentations

Arcus – a strong brand Interview with Michał Czeredys, President of Arcus SA

What changes did Arcus undergo over the 25 years since its inception? In the first years since it started operations Arcus was perceived on the market as a supplier of printers, photocopiers, shredders and other office equipment. In late 2006 and early 2007, one year before entering the Warsaw Stock Exchange, we changed the company’s strategy and profile – we turned from a distributor to integrator of document and mail management systems. The new structure of our product and service line enabled us to offer solutions with a great value added for customers. However, this required making investments affecting revenue over a long period of time because they involve long-term contracts lasting from 36 to 60 months – lease and outsourcing of printing and copying solutions, and Pitney Bowes systems for mail management. This year Docusoft, a company developing document management software, has become a member of Arcus Group. As a result, we are now able to offer our own complete document management system intended for organisations of various sizes. In the past four years we developed one of the largest centres of competence for telematics and telemetry, including intelligent networks, on the Polish market. Together with our foreign partner, ADD Grup, we prepared solutions which have attracted the interest of Polish electricity distributors. The solutions are innovative on the Polish market. The changes were complemented by the establishment of Arcus Systemy Informatyczne, a division dealing with ICT integration. It is located in the central city of Łódź. Who are the company’s main partners and customers? Among our clients are retail buyers, small and medium businesses, banks, insurers, telecom companies, postal and logistics operators, and the public sector. Our main goal is to ensure that every client, large or small, is satisfied with the services we provide. Savings achieved by customers thanks to our solutions are an important objective at a time of economic slowdown and crisis. How are you involved in corporate social responsibility?

Corporate social responsibility is part of Arcus’ strategy. We are aware that management in line with these principles requires meeting the expectations of our staff, customers, suppliers, social partners and shareholders. We are persistently building dialogue with these communities, relying on our well-thought-out strategy, consistence and awareness. Given the scale of undertakings in today’s business, one can easily forget that business is done by people and for people. We are trying to remember about it at every stage of our activity. Our strong reputation obliges us not only to raise efficiency and earn a profit but also to undertake socially important initiatives. We eagerly become involved in activities supporting culture and sports, and in philanthropic activities. W hat has been the impact of the crisis on Arcus? Is interest in its services and products smaller now? The present economic situation means that organizations are forced to streamline operating costs, including costs of printing, mail management and the circulation of information.

Our customers are increasingly looking at expenses associated with the production of documents in their organizations. These days, when businesses have to cut costs, they are interested not so much in the initial purchase price of a product as in the overall operating costs. Customers are increasingly interested in additional functionalities, print security and management, and new forms of access to systems and devices, including lease and outsourcing. This is why the sales results of the Kyocera company, which we represent in Poland, are so strong. Businesses which want to achieve outstanding productivity and encourage their staff to communicate more effectively and faster are also adopting new IT solutions, which improve communication within an organisation. Cooperation with market leaders, like for example Microsoft, enables us to develop modern solutions in the area of telework, training, call centres, and remote meetings with customers. Another part of Arcus’ service line that meets customers’ needs in the time of crisis is made up of telematic solutions, like for example those for fleet and machine management, including construction machine management. :: 11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  93


Events

The Luxury Brand of the Y Polish Market Economic Magazine has been awarded Luxury Brand of the Year. Other winners included Gosia Baczyńska, Bożena Batycka, Janusz Piwowar, and Karol Okrasa. Companies awarded were Hawker Beechcraft, Krasicki Hotel, Neuroradiosurgery Centre Allenort, Pleasure & Spa, Gras Savoye, Na Zielnej Restaurant, Pure Sky Club, Maciejów Honey, and Auction House Abbey House. On 9th October this year the Luxury Brand of the Year Gala took place at the InterContinental hotel in Warsaw. The event was organised by Mariusz Puj­ szo and Kurka Wodna Productions. At the ceremony, awards were presented to companies which introduce the most luxurious products into the market, provide services of the highest quality and thereby constitute “a guide to the luxury.” Mariusz Pujszo, who is the creator of the event, presented the gala together with actress Aleksandra Szwed. Special guests, such as Alicja Węgorzewska, Roma Gąsiorowska, Wojciech Fibak, Jerzy Gruza, Karol Strasburger, Tadeusz Ross, Kasa, Skiba, Michał Żurawski, and Małgorzata Potocka also added splendour to the event. The guests of Luxury Brand of the Year for 2011 Gala were entertained by performances by Izabela Trojanowska, Pati Sokół, and the “Szafa Gra” band. Additional highlights at the event were the fashion show of a well-known actress Roma Gąsiorowska and a documentary from the “Luxury and Beauty” Gala organised by Mariusz Pujszo during this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Guests had the opportunity to taste delicious dishes served by the chef of InterContinental Hotel and enjoyed drinks from all corners of the world. Accompanied by great music, the event continued into the early hours. ::

Aleksandra Szwed and Mariusz Pujszo

94  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

Anna Osiadacz (Pleasure & Spa)

Alicja Węgorzewska

Mirosław Kalisiewicz (Zdrowit)

Gosia Baczyńska

Bożena Batycka

From right: Wojciech Fibak, Olga Fibak, Mariusz Pujszo, Agata Neugebauer and Wiktor Markowicz Krystyna Pociej-Gościmska and Krystyna Woźniak-Trzosek

Laureats

Janusz Piwowar. President of Piwowar sp. z o.o.

Roma Gąsiorowska Fashion show


Events

 Year 2011 Awards

Dominik Nowak and Anna Katarzyna Nietyksza

Izabela Trojanowska

Agata Kubica Tuzinkiewicz and Hanna Kubica (Sakana Sushi Bar)

Krzysztof Kasa Kasowski Mariusz Pujszo cuts the cake from Marta Grycan

Laura Łącz and Krzysztof Skiba

Jan Zesewitz, Kornelia Zięba, Sebastian Litwiński (Hawker Beechcraft)

Piotr Adamczuk, Ewa Plucińska, Katrzyna Kalicińska, Mariusz Pujszo

Mariusz Pujszo and John Vella (InterContinental Malta) Mariusz Majewski (Gościniec Ojcowizna)

Vito Casetti

11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  95


Events Grażyna Jaskuła (Polish Market)

Pati Sokół

Jarosław Hendzel Krystyna Woźniak-Trzosek, President of Polish Market Economic Magazine

Aleksandra Szwed, Bożena Batycka and Mariusz Pujszo Karol Strasburger and Jolanta Maciejewska

Piotr Büchner, Małgorzata Potocka and Jerzy Gruza

96  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

Aleksandra Szwed

Roma Gąsiorowska and Michał Żurawski


Dishes made with Polish products in Kresowiak restaurant in Warsaw Duck Clean the breast of fibres. Season it with salt and pepper, and fry skin–down. Then roast for about 7 minutes at 180˚C (356˚F). Serve on potato-bean noodles with dried plum sauce.

Zander Cook the dry buckwheat groats. Fry the zander only from the side of the skin. Take the zander out of the pan and put it onto the buckwheat groats. For better taste pour cream, add butter, horseradish (freshly grated), pour the resultant sauce onto the zander, and roast the whole dish for about 6-7 minutes. Serve with lemon.

Tartare Clean the loin of fibres, and mince it thinly. Chop the onion and cucumber finely, then add them to the minced loin, and add salt or pepper to taste. Serve with fresh bread, butter, pickled plums, and with horseradish and yolk - separately. Always serve freshly minced.

www.kresowiak.com.pl 9 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  97


Presentations

While admiring this beautiful luxury jewellery, it is good to remember that hidden under the name “Natalia Gold” is a recognised Polish company which for over 30 years has been run by Józef Czerniejewski, master of artistic craftsmanship.

The Natalia Gold company was established in 1979 in Piaseczno near Warsaw. Its activity significantly contributes to the local trade and industry sector, showing what a Polish modern company with a big future can be. The founder and owner of the company is Józef Czerniejewski - craftsman-artist-manager - who has won numerous awards for his work. “Natalia Gold specialises in designing, making and selling jewellery. The company offers its clients, including those less affluent ones, an array of choice of gold and silver accessories. The majority of designs are unique, original and individually designed, there are also pieces produced serially, but this is done in limited series (1020 pieces). I try not to make the latter standardised, but rather exceptional. The products of our company combine interesting pattern-design and excellent quality. Nowadays a lot of goldsmithing companies pursue the “many shops” policy. I am not an advocate of

98  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

such a company development strategy. It is hard to talk about artistic jewellery if someone owns over 100 stores. I own two and still claim that I have one too many. Admittedly, I wanted to open shops in New York and Paris a short time ago. However, I thought it over and postponed those plans to the future. It is not a problem to become popular there but you have to answer the question - is it good business today? For the producers and designers of luxury goods, the current economic situation in the world has a significant influence on their development strategy. This is not a good time for luxury goods. Moreover, in the era of globalisation we often forget about beautiful things, goods are produced on a large scale, and I have always disdained set patterns. The customer can easily get acquainted with our product line, not only in our stores in Piaseczno but also at home through the Internet. I have published a rich catalogue with photos of our jewellery on our website:


Presentations

www.nataliagold.pl”, Józef Czerniejewski says. What has been the most popular with buyers in recent years? “Women most often buy gold combined with gemstones. The arrangement of emeralds and sapphires in combination with diamonds definitely sells the best of all. Red coral and amber remain all the time in the sphere of interest,” Józef Czerniejewski says. Natalia Gold is one of the Polish jewellery makers winning the largest number of awards. It already has over 130 prestigious awards and distinctions in artistic and business competitions, among them the very prestigious Polish President’s Economic Award, three-times the main award Leader’s Chair in the Mazovian Quality Mark competition, the title of Leader of Leaders, the Golden Eagle in the Mazovian Company of the Year competition in the category of Artistic Craftsmanship, the award in the Leader of Human Resources Management competition and Cent for Future – a prestigious award granted by the “Polish Market” monthly magazine. Józef Czerniejewski has a high regard for the title of the Master of Artistic Craftsmanship granted by the Minister of Culture. ”Of course, such

awards bring prestige to the company, create its image, highlight its importance. They are a visible sign to the client that we are trustworthy and our products are appreciated by specialists. However, I have reservations about many of the prizes. For example, in 2004 one dishonest company from Kraków awarded me with a “Certificate of the Highest Quality”, and recently they requested PLN70,000 for using this certificate!,” Józef Czerniejewski says. Many Polish jewellers, artists-craftsmen, inherited their profession from their fathers or grandfathers. And what was Mr. Czarniejewski’s story? What was his “road to success?” He claims that his life is an example of a romantic success story – “from rags to riches.” “I come from a poor, large family. There were five kids in my home. My siblings and I were raised in very poor conditions. I must admit it was a very hard time for me. However, I never envied others, it is the worst trait. Envy, greed or rapacity – these traits of character can be totally eradicated in large families. One day I felt the need to prove to everybody that, no matter the conditions, every man is the architect of his own fortune. In my profession, I learned a lot from a famous master – J. Grondalski from Wrocław. Thanks o him, I also adopted the idea that every

human being should be judged individually. And it turned out to be really useful when running my own company. The proof for that is the success of the whole of Natalia Gold – in my team there is a repairer who has worked in my company from the very beginning, that is for 32 years. Many others have worked for 8, 10 years,” Józef Czerniejewski stresses. When asked about his (and his company’s) wishes for the future, he answers: “Health, I have already achieved everything else”. :: Photos: Natalia Gold

11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  99


Cultural Monitor

Compiled by Maciej Proliński

Clever Polish cinema on DVD! “Erratum” by Marek Lechki has already won multiple awards at international festivals, including, among others, the Chicago, Thessaloniki and Pusan film festivals. In Poland, too, the movie has won awards, for example, at the 35th Polish Film Festival in Gdynia, and the 26th Warsaw Film Festival. However, it did not attract a distributor for a long time. Why? It seems that it "does not fit” into the so-called culture in liquid modernity,” though its message might well be valid in a hundred years’ time! It is to be released on DVD in October 2011 by Best Film. It tells the story of Michał, who is unexpectedly sent on a business trip to his home town. He goes there unwillingly and when he finally arrives, his plans to leave are immediately thwarted. Wandering around the town he meets the people he used to be close with, and visits familiar places. The trip changes into an emotional journey towards the life he no longer remembered. In this slow-paced, small-scale and not too wordy movie, all elements fit: the story, the direction, the acting of Tomasz Kot (as Michał) and Ryszard Kotys (as Michał’s father), and the soundtrack. It also features one of the most beautiful endings I recall. After all, Tarkowski’s “Solaris” ends in a “similar way.” It is worth remembering the name and believing that Polish cinematography (precisely the mainstream) will be just like this one day! ::

Different timbres of the guitar The 14th Wrocław Guitar Festival “Guitar 2011” will take place from 18 to 27 November. It is one of the most attractive events in Poland. Its uniqueness lies in the extraordinary diversity of styles of the guitar music presented, stretching from guitar classics to Latin music with its temperament and jazz. This year’s festival will feature plenty of flamenco, Latin music and African and oriental influences. The festival will start and end with special concerts of flamenco music. On 27 November in the Centennial Hall, maestro Paco de Lucia with his band will perform, and the festival will be opened by Carlos Pinana with his show "Body & Soul.” A repertoire rooted in Latin-American culture will also be present in the performances of the Stefan Grasse Trio and Antonio Fercione. A particularly interesting event in the festival’s programme is the concert by Preston Reed - a phenomenal guitarist using the fingerstyle technique. The festival organisers have also taken into account the fans of classical guitar music, the latter to be catered for with the concert of Javier Garcia Moreno and the project "Guitar & Passion” by the duo Michael Langer and Sabine Ramusch. ::

Father and daughter in the only museum of its kind In the Museum of Caricature in Warsaw the outstanding exhibition "Eryk and Zuzanna” is on display. The groundwork of the part dedicated to Eryk Lipiński, one of the leading representatives and fathers of the Polish School of Poster and Caricature Art, is an exhibition of nearly 40 posters he authored. The second section of the exhibition presents a collection of unique drawings filled with personal dedications (to Eryk’s daughter Zuzanna) created by prominent artists around the world. They include Jean Effel and Roland Topor, as well as leading Polish artists led by Szymon Kobyliński. This exhibition is a testament to the close relationship between father and daughter and their mutual inspiration, and consequently an overview of the history of world drawing and caricature spanning the last 50 years! ::

New Polish films hit cinemas The latest productions by Jerzy Hoffman and Marek Koterski have been released in Poland. “Battle of Warsaw 1920” by Jerzy Hoffman - the first Polish movie shot in 3D is an epic story set in the second year after Poland’s successful struggle for independence and, at the same time, the third year of the Russian Civil War. The storyline revolves around the young characters played by Natasza Urbańska and Borys Szyc. The movie features a stellar cast including Daniel Olbrychski as Marshal Józef Piłsudski, Marian Dziędziel as General Tadeusz Rozwadowski, Bogusław Linda as Colonel Bolesław Wieniawski, also featuring Ewa Wiśniewska, Stanisława Celińska and Adam Ferency. Over three thousand extras were involved in making the movie. The film crew of “Battle...” comprised, among others, Sławomir Idziak (director of photography; an accomplished Polish cinematographer of international renown who worked, on Ridley Scott’s “Black Hawk Down”), Magdalena Tesławska (costume

100  ::  polish market  :: 11/2011

designer; who worked with Hoffman on “The Deluge” and “With Fire and Sword,” and Krzesimir Dębski (music composer; worked with Hoffman on “With Fire and Sword” and “The Old Fairy Tale”). The movie, directed by the father of Polish historical productions, is also to be released in Great Britain in October. Cooltura Films Ltd will be responsible for distribution. “Baby są jakieś inne” (Women are somewhat different) is a long-anticipated film by the director of the excellent “Day of the Wacko.” Marek Koterski comes back to the issue of male-female relationships and challenges stereotypes about the roles of both sexes. As in the case of Koterski’s previous productions, cinema-goers can expect from “Baby...” to be a work full of passion and...lots (hundreds!) of obscenities... Its characters are extreme examples of lonely people who take an aggressive stand against the world. In their world, full of insecurities and fluctuations, they keep engaging in a painful conflict with the environment and constantly goad it. The lead roles in this “male skirmish with female domination” are played adorably by Robert Więckiewicz and Adam Woronowicz. ::


Cultural Monitor Different shades of film The 19th PLUS CAMERIMAGE will be held from 26 November to 3 December in Bydgoszcz. It is the largest and the most world-renowned festival dedicated to the art of film photography. Apart from viewings within the competition, Camerimage also features special viewings, premieres, overviews of student études, a retrospective of the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award, workshops, seminars, presentations of equipment and technologies for filmmaking, the Camerimage Market, the Camerimage Forum, and photographic and painting exhibitions. The festival has welcomed many film stars, such as Carlos Saura, Peter Weir, Roman Polański, Giuseppe Rotunno, and Jeremy Irons. This year’s Lifetime Achievement Award will go to the Australian John Sale - acknowledged as one of the most eminent film photographers on the globe, and Andrzej Wajda - the living legend of the Polish school of cinematography. Albert Maysles, whom The New York Times called the “dean of documentary filmmakers,” will receive the Outstanding Achievements in Documentary Award. Maysles will also host a master class, featuring selections from his unsurpassed body of work, which spans over 55 years of filmmaking. ::

Sputnik or man and the universe The screenings of the latest Russian films, and also debates, concerts and exhibitions are all included in the programme of the 5th Sputnik Russian Film Festival to be held from 17 to 27 November in Warsaw, Poland. The main part of the festival will be held in the Kultura and Kinoteka cinemas in Warsaw. Later, the movies will be available for viewing between November 2011 and February 2012 in 50 other cities. “The aim of the festival is to familiarise the audience with the best contemporary Russian productions, whose hallmark is simplic-

Russian science fiction classics and

ity and sincerity, as well as reflectiv-

movies showing public reaction to-

ity and depth of message,” declares

wards the first successes in space.

Małgorzata Szlagowska-Skulska, Fes-

This part will include, among oth-

tival Director. Apart from the above-

ers, “Solaris” by Andrei Tarkovsky

mentioned new releases, the festival

and “Paper Soldier” by Aleksei Ger-

will feature a retrospective of An-

man. The planetarium in the Coperni-

drei Konchalovsky’s films. In con-

cus Science Centre will host a debate

nection with the 50th anniversary

with the cosmonauts Mirosław Her-

of the first human journey into out-

maszewski, Yuri Baturin, and Alek-

er space, there will be screenings of

sei Leonov.

::

An autumn of jazz! A new festival has emerged onto the jazz landscape of Warsaw. In November Nove Kino Praha in Warsaw will host the Jazzarium Fest. On 7 November two Polish bands will perform - the Masecki/Tymański/Moreti Trio, and High Definition; on 8 November - Steve Coleman & Reflex; and on 24 November - Henry Threadgill & Zooid. “Steve Coleman and Henry Threadgill are giants and

Steve Coleman 

© Agencja Akwarium

magicians of sound. It is, among other things, thanks to their compositions that contemporary creative music sounds the way it does. It is an honour to welcome them to Warsaw, and we are proud that they accepted our invitation. We are particularly looking forward to the Polish Day during the Jazzarium Fest which will feature a new trio of Marcin Masecki, and High Definition, who won the first prize at the Jazz Hoeilaart Festival just a few weeks ago,” writes Mariusz Adamiak, the Festival Organiser. The line-up of the 9th Jazz Autumn in Bielsko-Biała, a festival created by Tomasz Stańko, a legend of Polish jazz is looking as good as ever. The main star of the festival, which will take place from 16 to 20 November, will be Cecil Taylor, an 80-year-old pianist and composer, one of the creators of avant-garde in jazz, performing in a duo with the drummer Tony Oxley. Another icon of world jazz, composer and saxophonist Pharaoh Sanders, will reveal the secret of his musical and spiritual immortality. New projects in Bielsko-Biała will be presented by trumpeter Tom Harrell, bassist Michael Formanek and pianist Craig Taborn. The latter of the three will also perform with Tomasz Stańko, who

Dianne Reeves

© Era Jazzu

will show a new, more aggressive and strong groove on the stage. Dianne Reeves, one of the most engaging voices of contemporary jazz, and an artist who has received the most prestigious awards and prizes, will visit the Christmas Jazz Era Gala. The premiere of her latest album, “Christmas Time Is Here,” will take place on 7 December in the National Philharmonic Hall in Warsaw. :: 11/2011  ::  polish market  ::  101


Cultural Monitor

Painful story “Halka” by Stanisław Moniuszko is a classic in the repertoire of every Polish opera theatre. It is one of the pearls of 19th-century Polish music, equal to works of the most popular composers of that period. The latest version of the great and tragic love story will be staged by a young Polish director - Natalia Korczakowska at Teatr Wielki-Opera Narodowa. The premiere is on 23 December 2011. The event is part of the National Cultural Programme for Polish Presidency in the EU Council. Maciej Proliński T he l ibretto w r itten by Włodzimierz Wolski (the author of poem “Halszka”) is a psychological drama with a timeless meaning. The new staging of “Halka” aims to restore its social relevance. The creators hope that the fate of Halka and Janusz will simply move and make the audience care. That we will understand them deeper.

No other opera staged in Poland has ever gained such popularity as Mo­n iuszko’s “Halka.” It is estimated that only in Teatr Wielki it was performed some 2,000 times. The most famous personifications of Halka were Maria Fołtyn and Barbara Zagórzanka. The opera was also staged in such exotic locations as Havana and Osaka. Already the first performance of “Halka” in 1858 in Warsaw was a great success and with years the success of Moniuszko’s work became continuously greater. This opera owes its exceptional significance for Polish music not only to its high artistic value eclipsing anything that had been created earlier, but also to its social message. Stanisław Moniuszko, the founder of Polish opera, raises issues of social division between the folk “peasant” sphere and the noble “gentry.” And it is the people who are considered the carrier of eternal truths and timeless values. And folk, apart from a purely illustrative function, is given an ideological role as never before. The most famous Polish opera is set in Podhale, Poland’s mountain region, in the end of the 18th century. The heroine (Halka) is a county girl seduced and betrayed by a rich young heir Janusz. Halka arrives at his wedding planning to set fire to the church, but gives up this idea. She leaves her baby in a roadside chapel and commits suicide throwing herself into a river. The story of a tragic love triangle of Halka, Janusz and Jontek, dramatic action, passionate love scenes are

102  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

poignantly expressed by Moniuszko’s music – lyrical arias, dramatic duets and group dances revealing the great Polish melodies and dances. Many well-known arias like “Gdyby rannym słonkiem” (“If by the Morning Sun”) and “Szumią jodły na gór szczy­ cie” (“The Fir Trees Sigh on Mountain Peaks”) come from Halka. The first one was sung by Halka, and the latter by Jontek.

Natalia Korczakowska, courtesy of Teatr Wielki – Opera Narodowa

Natalia Korczakowska belongs to the generation of young artists who are changing the face of Polish theatre. She started on the progressive stage TR Warszawa under the guidance of Grzegorz Jarzyna. In the past season she debuted as an opera director in Teatr Wielki with the intimate version of “Jakob Lentz” by Wolfgang Rihm. The performance gained broad critical acclaim. “Halka” features: Wioletta Chodowicz (Halka), Artur Ruciński (Janusz), Rafał Bartmiński (Jontek), Adam Zdunikowski (Wieśniak). The soloists, the Choir and Orchestra of the National Opera will be led by Marc Minkowski. “‘Halka’ is the Polish ‘Madame Butterfly,’ deeply set in our performance tradition. It has played its historical role of restoring the sense of community to Poles. We wanted to do something universal thus formulating a proposal for global theatres. Marc Minkowski conducts, and Natalia looks at it from the perspective of the young generation. She charmed me with her attachment to the world of past values, which however, do not enslave her,” says Waldemar Dąbrowski, director of the Warsaw opera. ::


Cultural Monitor

Continuous exposure to new pieces, as well as to creative and performing personalities Interview with Prof. Henryk Wojnarowski, Director of the Warsaw Philharmonic Choir

The Warsaw Philharmonic Choir, one of the most prominent vocal ensembles in Poland, will soon be celebrating 60 years of its existence – so many concerts, so many recordings­... Our choir launched its professional activity in 1953 under Zbigniew Soja. The subsequent choirmasters were Roman Kuklewicz, Józef Bok, and Antoni Szaliński. I have been the Director of the Choir since 1978. Indeed, there’s been a great many concerts, programmes, and recordings. We are a professional ensemble, nearly all of the members having completed higher musical education. The singers appreciate the institution in which they work and are really attached to their profession, which gives them a lot of satisfaction and is marked by considerable social prestige. We give about 30 concerts annually, which is a really great body of work. We sing the biggest contemporary pieces as well as those left by the human genius of previous centuries. We cooperate with practically all symphonic orchestras in Poland. During all these years, we have recorded a large number of albums. That is because our activity is multifaceted. The main component of the artistic activity of our ensemble is participation in symphonic and oratorio concerts

104  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

with the National Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra and a capella recitals on the stage of the Warsaw Philharmonic. The choir performs here a number of times during each season. Apart from that, it permanently cooperates with other orchestras in the country, most often where other choirs are, unable to perform a piece because, among other reasons, they do not have enongh voices. The choir regularly takes part in the International Festival of Contemporary Music “Warsaw Autumn” and in the “Wratislavia Cantans” Festival. And let’s stop for a while here. The Warsaw Philharmonic is invariably highly praised for its albums. In the September issue of the prestigious musical magazine published in Luxembourg, “Pizzicato,” there was information on the favourable reception of a DVD of Szymanow­ ski’s Symphonies Nos. 3 and 4. Polish music has a special place in our ensemble’s repertoire. So far, we have received 6 nominations for the Grammy Award for Karol Szymanow­ ski’s and Krzysztof Penderecki’s music. All the recordings have been made for the prestigious music label, NAXOS, conducted by Antoni Wit. In April 2009, the first album with Masses by Stanisław

Moniuszko won the Fryderyk award, a prestigious award of the Polish music industry in the category “Album of the Year - Choir and Oratorio Music”. As a curiosity, I’d also like to mention that we received an award from the French for... “supporting native artistic activity”. In December 2009, the second Moniuszko album appeared on the market, an album which in May 2010 was awarded the “Golden Orpheus – Arturo Toscanini” by the French L’Academie du Disque Lyrique for the best phonographic initiative – the promotion of Moniuszko’s works. Both albums constitute the only recording of all Masses by this composer on the global market. And will this ending year bear fruit in the form of new recordings? I really want to record the Polish songs which have been forgotten and are thus not performed. And which should be remembered, because they should not fade away. I’m thinking about the recordings of Józef Elsner’s - Chopin’s teacher – music. He left a great number of sacral pieces. However, in the social awareness, this music doesn’t exist! Because there are no recordings, no notes. There are only photocopies stored in the National Library of Poland and using a magnifying glass,


Cultural Monitor

these scripts have to be read and then copied. I’m trying to bring these notes to life, but they still need to be recorded. And this is where things get tricky... Additional funds are needed. I knock here and there, it’s difficult. But I do not doubt that these scripts just have to be reconstructed. Recently, we have recorded, together with the Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra conducted by Łukasz Borowicz, “The Legend of the Baltic,” Feliks Nowowiejski’s first opera, the premiere of which took place in Poznań in 1924. The piece enjoyed great popularity at that time, and during one season it was performed over 50 times. After the war, it was forgotten, and revived only few times, most recently in Gdańsk in 1974. The Warsaw Philharmonic Choir currently runs very intense concert activity on the international arena. In your opinion, does Polish music have its place in the concert programmes of the world? Polish music has a very significant place in the world, especially in Europe. We are constantly represented on the international arena. In these circles, good Polish ensembles, good Polish vocalists, and above all, great Polish composers such as Krzysztof Penderecki, Witold Lutosławski, and Wojciech Kilar are present. We have given concerts with the Choir in the whole of Europe. We have been abroad over 90 times. We’ve performed three times in La Scala in Milan, we’ve sung on the stages of the opera theatres of Vienna, Paris, and Palermo. Everywhere we enjoyed fantastic, warm welcomes. Professor, and what can the Warsaw Philharmonic be in the “times of culture in the liquid modernity”? In the culture where everyone sings, everyone dances, everyone has a Facebook account, where everyone is an artist and a juror at the same time. In my opinion, the Philharmonic may constitute a great backbone... and putting things back in proportion­. Nowadays, if you’re not on TV, you do not exist at all... TV has replaced everything else. Recently I’ve read that currently there are 34 TV series produced in Warsaw. Thus, huge disproportions arise, and more and more issues in culture are becoming liquid. I do regret

Henryk Wojnarowski Director of the Warsaw Philharmonic Choir. He graduated in symphonic and operatic conducting in Stanisław Wisłocki’s class at the State Higher School of Music in Warsaw. From 1960 to 1978 he was conductor and Director of the Grand Theatre Choir in Warsaw; he prepared about eighty new opera productions there. With the Warsaw Philharmonic Choir, he has for many years given highly-successful performances in prestigious philharmonic centres in Poland and abroad. He has collaborated with the most prominent contemporary conductors, such as Lorin Maazel, Zubin Mehta, Seiji Ozawa, Helmuth Rilling, Bohdan Wodiczko, Jan Krenz, Jerzy Maksymiuk, Krzysztof Penderecki, Kazimierz Kord, Jerzy Semkow, and Antoni Wit. He has prepared, inter alia, all the oratorio and a capella pieces of Krzysztof Penderecki with the Warsaw Philharmonic Choir. He has received six nominations for the most prestigious music industry prize - the Grammy Award. Additionally, he has many first performances on his record, both at the national and international level. In 1962-2002, Henryk Wojnarowski was an academic teacher. He has been made full Professor by the Polish State.

that. Obviously, he scope of Philharmonic’s activity is many times smaller than the scope of such an organism as TV. I live in Warsaw, at Plac Teatralny, and here very loud mass events with music, which maybe is lighter, but very noisy at the same time, take place practically every weekend. I do not say, that they should be done away with completely. It’s just that it would be good to keep certain proportions, also when it comes to financing events. Sometimes we are unable to do some useful work for lack of several thousand zlotys, while a few million goes for a show – noisy, shallow and less useful. Listening to a symphonic concert demands preparation, asking yourself questions: What is the point of this? What is it all about? Who wrote it, and finally – how was it written? It is not a song. There has to be effort put into participation in this kind of an event. And it is not only about “climbing into a white shirt and a black suit”. Our big concert hall has over 1100 seats. Warsaw with its adjacent area has 2 million residents. The number of those interested in our activity is about 12–15 thousand people who come to us at least 3 times a year. What percentage is that? And the next question arises: How important is this percentage? The Warsaw Philharmonic is an elite institution, but not one which is fenced off. Everyone is welcome to come and listen. This interview is for the magazine, which shows that the distance between the economy and culture shouldn’t be too far... During the “Gala commemorating 15 years of

Polish Market” in the Polish National Opera you will receive the Honorary Pearl in the Field of Culture. What does this honourable citation mean to you? There’s no escaping the fact that the first philharmonic ensembles are always orchestras. Choirs are of secondary importance here. Noticing, listening to the ensemble, which is somehow in the background, is very precious to us. It gives us the sense that what we are doing is socially accepted. The fact that the jury with its president, Prof. Jerzy Buzek, gives us this honourable citation is a great honour, satisfaction, and joy to us. And what would you say to make us understand this precious effort of the everyday work of Director of the choir... Being Director of the Warsaw Philharmonic Choir is an important experience and a great undertaking. Absolutely for the whole time. Someone has to be the engine of this complicated and multifaceted operation. And for sure to work using this, not-so-frequent method “from here to there”... Continuous exposure to great world literature, new artistic pieces, as well as to creative and performing personalities. Really interesting, and even fascinating. I always say, that these 70 years have to be spent somehow in an interesting way, and if it’s possible to do it even longer, surely it’s not right to get bored! Thank you for the interview Maciek Proliński 11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  105


Cultural Monitor

So that emotions go beyond the footlights Interview with Piotr Salaber Maciej Proliński Olsztyn, Lublin, Kraków, Gdańsk – you’ve been working with the theatres far from the centre for many seasons. I suspect that Varsovians’ image of the Polish theatre is slightly distorted just because they see it from the angle of the capital, and the trends of this capital. What does the Polish theatre outside Warsaw look like in your opinion? I am lucky to be working in practically the whole of Poland. In the Ateneum theatre in Warsaw the play “The

106  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

little Judas” can be seen, starring Jadwiga Jankowska-Cieślak (I invited one of the most remarkable trumpet players in the world, Markus Stockhausen to the recordings for this play), and in the Ochota Theatre to one of a few plays to which I composed the music, Marek Koterski’s “The three of us”, which has been performed there for over 12 years. But theatre is teamwork. That is to say, if the whole group of people - director, stage designer, actors, composer, manage to create a team, then a piece like Wiesław Myśliwski’s “Horizon”, directed by Bogdan Tosza, can come into being. Today it already is a cult play, created on the basis of one of the most

interesting Polish novels of the 20th Century, which brought Myśliwski his first Nike Award. And this walk “towards the horizon” is first of all, searching for yourself. The key to success is, first, to find new means, sounds, instruments, and then, to create good conditions for work for the already artisticallyunited group of people, who are focused on what they want to do. And then it turns out that it is possible to also do it in smaller centres. Working in the theatre allows to make use of the ability to move from one style or epoch to another. Theatre is an oasis of a kind, where it is possible to be really free, a


Cultural Monitor place where very subjective and very authentic expression is allowed, the kind of expression which is more and more difficult to be found in movies or on television. But, as I said, it has to be done in a united team. Only in such a case may we talk about full, both measurable and immeasurable, success. In the recent years you have worked both in Poland and abroad, for theatres in France and Canada, most recently in Russia and Hungary. This probably gives you yet another angle from which to look at the Polish theatre? I have the impression that every time we deal with an interesting literary work, and this whole machine that “will work”, we have an opportunity to create something absolutely special. This season looks promising. At the moment, I am writing music for the Russian premiere of the play “On Foot” by Sławomir Mrożek, in the Tovstonogov Bolshoi Drama Theatre in St. Petersburg. The play will be directed by Andrzej Bubień, the Polish director, who has been artistic director at the Theatre on Vasilievsky Island in St. Petersburg and a winner of a number of prestigious Russian awards. The remaining producers, stage designer Eduard Kochergin, and choreographer Juri Vasilkov, are great figures in Russian theatre. The premiere will take place on 26 November 2011. The play published by Sławomir Mrożek in 1980 in a realistic manner depicts a turning point in Polish history, that is to say the last moments of the Second World War and the first days of the new communist reality. The abilities of the actors at this theatre are just unbelievable. I have to admit I do have the jitters about this premiere. We work using the method of trying on, then trying out, recording and then correcting. We are still designing this musical space. At the same time I’m also working in Hungary. I’ve launched rehearsals of Alexander Ostrovsky’s play directed by Andrzej Bubień “A horse has four legs, but still stumbles”, in the Csokonai Theatre in Debrecen. It is a 19th-century play by a Russian playwright, seemingly light and funny, but essentially saying a lot about painful truths about people who pursue their professional careers at all costs. The premiere of the play is scheduled for December 2011. I’m also

working on the new music to “Yvonne, Princess of Burgundy“ by Witold Gombrowicz, in Lublin. All this certainly gives an interesting perspective. I’d also like to emphasise that from my point of view, these places do not differ so much. It obviously gives an interesting cross-section, but the way of perceiving, the perception of the audience, are quite similar everywhere. Of course, at the moment we reach them in order to convey something important, we are more than satisfied. In the theatre, we often say that this message has to go beyond the footlights. Emotions are the most important. For me, the biggest experience was the premiere which took place some 2 years ago in St. Petersburg, after which there was complete darkness and not a single clap was heard long after the curtain was lowered. The only thing that could be heard were people crying. Which play was that? “Treatment” by Jacek Głębski. A modern Polish play made for TV theatre, directed by Wojtek Smarzow­ ski, but that time produced absolutely exceptionally with Russian actors at that theatre. And do these all your travels translate into sound material, somehow, for example “world music” sounds?

Piotr Salaber Composer, conductor, and pianist; graduated from the Academy of Music in Bydgoszcz, first in the Choir Conducting and Musical Education Department, and then in the Composition and Theory of Music Department. He has a PhD in music as a conductor. (2005). He also studied composition with Karlheinz Stockhausen in master classes in Kuerten near Cologne (1998-2002), and with Elżbieta Sikora and Alain Savouret (IV International Course for Composers, Gdańsk 2000) Since the academic year 2006/07 P ­ iotr Salaber has been giving monographic lectures entitled “Film Music” in the Institute of Audiovisual Arts at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, and since 2010 he has also been a lecturer at the Academy of Music in Bydgoszcz. ::

The fact that I travel a lot does not mean I don’t work at the same time. I write my ideas down on a lot of things, including train tickets. Everything I have, including the voice recorder in my mobile phone, is full of melodies and rhythms. I’ve learnt that developing earlier ideas, orchestrations, may be done later, actually at any time. However, the moment of the appearance of the idea should be immediately written down. And these ideas very often come during the travels I mentioned. As far as inspirations resulting from travelling are concerned, it is since the time I worked on “The Brothers Karamazov”, where I recorded among others, the singing of Siberian shamans, that I’ve more often happened to search for new solutions in the musical oeuvre

11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  107


Cultural Monitor save emotions which have to be saved, with all technical limitations resulting from the discipline in a studio, a ticking metronome or the time limiting the development of the theme in a particular scene.

of other cultures. These searches seem to me to contribute to the development of my musical skills. Each of this cultures teaches something different, rhythmic structure, harmony or melodic pattern. However, now in “On Foot” I’m trying to reach the roots of the Polish sounds. This is something we are trying to capture. We have parts written for an ethnic choir, sounding as if it was recorded in one of the tiny villages in eastern Poland, forgotten by the world, the hurdy gurdy on one side, and the virtuosic Katarzyna Duda’s violin on the other. And what might be published some day... Each year on the Polish publishing market there is bigger interest in film and theatre music. Indeed, a bigger interest in the genre has appeared. I try not to fall behind, and that’s why a few weeks ago my book came out “Conductor in the studio, microphone instead of the audience in 7 questions and answers. The specificity of the conducting work during studio recordings of film and theatre music”. Distribution and sales of this publication, which also includes a CD with my film and theatre music, is handled by Wydawnictwo Naukowe Uniwersytetu Mikołaja Kopernika in Toruń. The book touched upon how to

108  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

For many years, together with Marek Czekała’s Orchestra, you have accompanied young people from the Pro Omnibus foundation during The Song Festival for Disabled Youth in Ciechocinek. What do these meetings give? This festival accumulates a huge amount of positive, high energy from the contest participants, and also from the people connected with the undertaking. I have the impression that we are like one huge family, and I’m saying it not going into raptures. These young people are very often more professional than the so-called “able-bodied performers”. What’s interesting, they often choose a very difficult repertoire, which definitely proves their emotional maturity and sensitivity, and which also stems from the problems they face on a daily basis. And how did you discover Majka Babyszka? One of the musicians from Marek Czekała’s orchestra called me. He said he had listened to a very talented girl, a pianist, and that she should be helped somehow. He also said that her parents have very reasonable attitude, they care about her development. One day, when I was in Byd­goszcz, where I go rather rarely these days, I went to Mr and Mrs Babyszka, and when I heard Majka singing, I was absolutely bewildered. She was 11 years old. And the fact that she sang classics was not so much of a surprise, but she improvised and she sang jazz in English, which was an absolute rarity. Chris Aiken, a Canadian producer and sound engineer, with whom I have worked for years, told me later that this was the talent absolutely beyond anything he had heard in Poland in her age group. She makes real music, the one between the notes, as Rubinstein once wrote in his journals. I thought that it is really worth introducing her to bigger audience. Whenever I can, I will do it! This music between the notes may be also sensed in your latest concert dedicated to Tuwim and children.

The concert “Locomotive and Other Songs for Children” at the latest edition of the “Łódź of Four Cultures” festival was a great experience for me. I had been thinking for years about performing the material from my album “Locomotive” in Łódź, on Julian Tuwim’s birthday. Together with actors and the orchestra of the Stanisław Moniuszko Musical Schools Complex in Łódź, conducted by me, we performed musical interpretations of poems such as “Trąbalski the Elephant” and “Mr Tralaliński”. What intrigued me most in Tuwim’s poems for children was their rhythmicality and melodiousness. While reading these poems, I noticed notes skilfully hidden between the verses, I could hear the rhythm of rattling carriage wheels or decorative trills by Mr Tralaliński’s singers. This interview is for the magazine which shows that the distance between business and culture shouldn’t be too far... How does the situation in Poland in 2011 look in this respect, from the point of view of a composer, of an artist? Culture is something that forms us, something that makes us want to be better. I admit that while working on each performance I strongly believe in it. I appreciate the economic aspect, but I wouldn’t like to underestimate the issues connected with culture. I would definitely put an equals sign here. I believe that Polish culture and Polish artists constitute our best showcase in the whole world. What can we expect from your performance at the Gala commemorating 15 years of the “Polish Market” magazine in the National Opera House? I do feel that this is the prestigious place and event. “Polish Market” is an economic magazine which doesn’t forget art, and manages to combine these elements just splendidly. During the concert, my first meeting with Marcin Bronikowski, and another with Marek Torzewski will take place. Also children from the Pro-Omnibus Foundation, Angela Wawrzyk and Szymon Borkowski, will sing. I do invite everyone to come! Thank you for the interview.


Cultural Monitor

Watch out, a talent! “The man who knows where he’s going gets the furthest,” said Napoleon Bonaparte. These words fully reflect the road to success of 12-year-old pianist Majka Babyszka from Bydgoszcz. Majka’s imagination, emotions and amazing prudence together with her and her parents’ - daily workload make me perceive her numerous performances and recordings as a significant sign that she can make her mark in Polish classical, jazz or pop music in the future. Watch out, a talent! But I should just add that this observation has nothing to do with the ubiquitous television declarations “I have talent” or “the battle of the voices”. Maciej Proliński Majka Babyszka is one of the most promising pianists and vocalists of the younger generation. She plays classical music with great passion, but she is also fascinated by jazz and rock. She is a student of the Arthur Rubinstein National Music School in Bydgoszcz. She learns classical music with Adam Zok, MA, and jazz with Prof. Karol Szymanowski of the Academy of Music in Bydgoszcz. As she pointed out: “I prefer playing and singing to saying anything about my playing or singing”. She started playing the piano when she was six years old. “First, my dad taught me, and I liked it so much that I went to a music school. There I was assigned to the violin, but I immediately chose the piano. And everything started from family singing; I sang a lot with my grandparents, I listened to a lot of various tapes with musical fairy tales, and then I sang them at once. My parents soon heard my singing, so they thought about music school,

but they didn’t want to force me to do anything,” says the young artist. Classical music, jazz and songs are the main areas of her interest. While in the classics one can learn a lot at such an early age, yet in jazz something more counts - something one cannot learn. This thing is for sure included between the notes and in the skill of listening to colleagues. An improvising child is really rare! Majka is probably the youngest solo performer of this genre of music in our country and abroad. “My parents have never listened to jazz. And what fascinates me in jazz is that it is difficult and I can do something new all the time, and improvisations are different every time. I also listen to a lot of jazz, jazz standards and maestros such as Diana Krall, Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Armstrong, Herbie Hancock, or recently Amy Winehouse,” lists Majka. The young pianist has had many successful performances in various competitions and festivals,

including participation in the rock concert Perfect with the Symphony Orchestra at the Opera Nova in Bydgoszcz, participation in the 7th Special Concert Dedicated to the Memory of Grzegorz Ciechowski in Toruń in 2008, the concert at the Polish Boogie Festival in 2010, the concert at the Toruń Blues Meeting 2010, and the performance at the Chopin concert “The Longest Birthday” in Warsaw in 2010, as well as concerts in three Finals of Jurek Owsiak’s Great Orchestra of Christmas Charity. Recently, in the club “Od Nowa” in Toruń, Majka played memorable worldwide jazz standards in her feature-length, two-hour concert. She also sang them and played with the accompaniment of Robert Robaszkiewicz’s band. In summer this year she also participated in the international jazz workshops in Chodzież. It is worth noting that Majka was the youngest participant in the entire, 40-year history of these workshops! “And then I had great stage fright, not so much of the audience, but of the first jam session with professionals,” she admits. What are all of these performances for? Why is this necessary? “The answer is simple. To gain the experience to overcome stress, to facilitate Majka’s artistic development, maybe in the future also abroad. But she is not forced to do it. If Majka did not like giving concerts, she wouldn’t be in all those places. All these performances are obviously the result of our involvement, including financial, just for a proverbial... “thank you”. It’s a huge financial burden, but we somehow deal with this,” emphasises Adam, Majka’s father. Music in Majka Babyszka’s life seems to be an unwavering enthusiasm. And is there still time to do something else? “Music is the most important, but I also have many other interests. I like drawing. I like nature; I grow plants and raise stick insects. I love sports, summersaults and stars.” adds Majka. ::

11 /2011  ::  polish market  ::  109


Cultural Monitor

ART IN THE SERVICE 

OF THE MOTHERLAND Art is a very powerful tool. “Poland First to Fight” is one of the most recognisable war posters. Its style is described as art in the service of the motherland. The poster made a huge impression on the Londoners in the times of World War II. Its potency and clear message showed that despite the suppression of the Polish State, Poles were able to stand up, redeploy and continue their struggle. But can an artist take part in war, does an artist have a weapon to fight with? Poets have their pens, musicians their scores, and painters their brushes. As sensitive entities, artists have the power to revive the national spirit, sometimes even the fighting spirit, defined by the ancient Chinese strategists as chi. The fighting spirit inspired and raised by artistry can hugely influence the surrounding reality. Marek Żuławski, the poster’s creator, would probably never suspect that, 70 years after World War II, his “Poland First to Fight” would feature in the most recent poster of the social campaign “The Independence Rock,” only instead of the tree, there is an electric guitar, and instead of fighting, there is the joy of freedom regained. It turns out that the past can connect with the modern times in a very beautiful way. ::

110  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011


Events

“Your Money” Fair, Palace of Culture and Science, Warsaw Another “Your Money” Fair was held in midOctober in Warsaw. It included a number of panel discussions, including a debate on the following subjects: “Different forms of investments – standard or non-standard? How to achieve financial success during the time of financial crisis?” led by Rita Schultz, Editor-in-Chief of the “Polish Market” economic magazine. Among the participants of the discussions were Krzysztof Borowski, PhD (Chair of Banking, Warsaw School of Economics), Maciej Kossowski (Wealth Solutions), Marcin Piwecki (Wine Advisors), Krzysztof Prasał (Xelion) and Remigiusz Stanisławek (Investor’s Guardian). The audience, gathered in great numbers, listened to discussions about such topics as the changing trends on the investment market, why investing in wine is safe, which properties guarantee a decent pension and if it is worth investing in gold.

Maciej Kossowski and Krzysztof Borowski

Marcin Piwecki

Remigiusz Stanisławek

112  ::  polish market  :: 

11  /2011

Krzysztof Prasał


Polish Market No. 11 (183) 2011  

“Polish Market” is a prestigious English-language magazine published since 1996. In its pages, it promotes the Polish economy, businesses, r...

Polish Market No. 11 (183) 2011  

“Polish Market” is a prestigious English-language magazine published since 1996. In its pages, it promotes the Polish economy, businesses, r...

Advertisement