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Instituto Universitario Politécnico “Santiago Mariño” Extensión San Cristóbal

Emely Polentino 26068177 Ecxary Rubio 26607939 1


Present perfect tense

T

he presents perfect describes an action or emotion which began in the past and which continues in the present. It is formed by using the auxiliary "to have" with the participle.

(+) Subj+ have/has+ verb(p.p)+ c (-) Subj+ haven’t /hasn’t+ verb(p.p.)+ c (?) Have/has+ subj+ verb(p.p.)+ c Has not = hasn’t / have not= haven’t

p

resent perfect continuous: We use the present perfect continuous to talk about a finished activity in the recent past. Using the present perfect continuous focuses on the activity.

(+) Subj+ have/has+ BEEN+ verb(ing)+ c (-) Subj+ haven´t/hasn’t+ BEEN+ verb(ing)+ c (?) Have/has+ subj+ BEEN+ verb(ing)+ c? Has not= hasn’t / have not= haven’t

examples (+) I have talked to Peter

present perfect

(-) I haven´t talked to Peter (?) Have you talked to Peter?

perfect tense present perfect continuous

(+) They have been playing all day

(-) They haven't been playing all day (?) Have they been playing all day?

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Future tense Examples

T

he simple future uses the modal "will" followed by the infinitive (dropping the preposition " to"). It serves to express actions which will take place at a specified time, or to signal the beginning of an action.

I

YOU

HE

WE

THEY

IT

FUTURE SIMPLE (+) SUBJ+ WILL+ VEB+ C (-) SUBJ + WON´T + VERB + C (?) WILL + SUBJ+ VERB+ C? NOTE: WON´T = WILL NOT 3

SHE


FUTURE CONTINUOUS

T

his tense is used for an action that will be in progress at a point of time in the future. It will start before that point of time and will continue after it. The point in time can be given by a time expression or by another action in the future simple (will). This usage is very similar to the past continuous in this aspect.

Future continuous

(+) subj+ WILL BE+ verb(ing)+ c Subj+ verb aux (TO BE) + GOING TO BE + verb (ing)+ c (-) subj+ will+ NOT+ be + verb(ing) + c Subj + verb aux (TO BE) + NOT + GOING TO BE + verb(ing) + c (?) WILL + subj + BE + verb(ing) + c? Verb aux (TO BE) + subj+ GOING TO BE + verb(ing) + c?

Para formar el futuro continuo se usan “WILL BE” o “BE GOING TO” y el verbo con ing.

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Will vs. Going to When to use WLL

In other cases, where there is no implicit or explicit connection to the present, use WILL: 1. For things that we decide to do now. (Rapid Decisions)  This is when you make a decision at that moment, in a spontaneous way.  I'll buy one for you too.  I think I'll try one of those. (I just decided this right now) 2. When we think or believe something about the future. (Prediction)  My team will not win the league this season.  I think it will rain later so take an umbrella with you. Note: You can use both Will and Going to for making future predictions. 3. To make an offer, a promise or a threat.  I'll give you a discount if you buy it right now.  I promise I will behave next time.  I'll take you to the movies if you'd like. 4. You use WON'T when someone refuses to do something.  I told him to take out the trash but he won't do it.  My kids won't listen to anything I say.  My car won't start.

When to use GOING TO

The structure BE GOING TO is normally used to indicate the future but with some type of connection to the present. We use it in the following situations: 1. When we have already decided or we INTEND to do something in the future. (Prior Plan)  The decision has been made before the moment of speaking.  They're going to retire to the beach - in fact they have already bought a little beach house.  I'm going to accept the job offer. 2. When there are definite signs that something is going to happen. (Evidence)  Something is likely to happen based on the evidence or experience you have.  I think it is going to rain - I just felt a drop.  I don't feel well. I think I'm going to throw up. (throw up = vomit) 3. When something is about to happen:  Get back! The bomb is going to explode.

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present perfect and future tense  
present perfect and future tense  
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