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mindgames


POINT OF SIMPLICITY ISSUE#7.MINDGAMES International e-magazine about fine art photography

ISSN | to be issued PUBLISHER | TEYA SAVELEVA EDITOR IN CHIEF | TEYA SAVELEVA EDITORIAL ASSISTANT | ANNA LUGOVAYA COPY EDITORS | JOSH NALIM, AMBER BROWN DESIGN & PRODUCTION | TEYA SAVELEVA

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The team of POINT OF SIMPLICITY e-magazine would like to express its gratitude to all of you, who helped us put this issue together; to all members of #Ode-to-simplicity group and its affiliates on DeviantArt, for you have been the ultimate source of inspiration; to all of you, who have shown your kind support for our project; to all photographers and contributors, who kindly provided their works for publication. Thank you!

WEB-SITE | WWW.POINTOFSIMPLICITY.ORG E-MAIL | SIMPLICITY.PDF@GMAIL.COM

PUBLICATION TERMS & CONDITIONS DOWNLOADS 

Point of simplicity (ISSN to be issued) publishes bimonthly, except when combined issues counting as two issues are published, and when an additional issue may be published. Point of simplicity e-magazine is published digitally in the Russian Federation and distributed worldwide via the Internet. Copyright © 2012 POINT OF SIMPLICITY


CONTRIBUTING AUTHORS FLORIAN SCHMIDT CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS MARYANNE GOBBLE ROBBY CAVANAUGH CHRISTOFFER RELANDER HENRIQUE FRAZÃO LILIYA RODNIKOVA KRUPINA ELIZAVETA COVER “DESPERATE” BY ACHMAD KURNIAWAN

GRAHAM PAUL SAYELL EMILY WHITE ACHMAD KURNIAWAN UNA WISHNEVAYA TOM WATERHOUSE EULALIE VARENNE AG ADIBUDOJO CHRISTIANE SCHEINBAR ELLY CRAWFORD HANNE WARLOE OLIVIER "DAARAM" JOLLANT YANNG DEBORA SCHMIDT LIUTAURAS PAROJUS NIKOLAI GORSKY TOMASZ CICHOREK PAWEL KOYFMAN LENKA VIDMOCHOVÁ SONIA FIRLEJ JULIAN "EINSILBIG" SCHULZE DZHAHIYA LEVAN GEORGE VISAN YANINA BOLDYREVA


MAITRE OF PHOTOGRAPHY |

MARYANNE GOBBLE 8 GUEST FEATURE |

ROBBY CAVANAUGH 26

THE MULTILAYERED WORLDS OF CHRISTOFFER RELANDER 44

THE MATE OF A FLOR SCHM 56


10 MINDBENDING PHOTOGRAPHY TRICKS 90

DEASSORTED ERIALIZATION FEATURE ARTWORK BY 68 RIAN MIDT

SPECIAL FEATURE |

YANINA BOLDYREVA 112


6 POINT OF SIMPLICITY| EDITORIAL

MINDGAMES POINT OF SIMPLICITY #7

Here it is — the 7th issue of “Point of

Gobble. Maryanne’s works possesses a

Simplicity”, a free e-magazine about fine

distinctive feminine style — flowing lines,

art photography.

floral patterns, scrupulous details. Enjoy

It has been a while since our previous release, but months of silence did not

her works with a cup of coffee, and then head out for a walk with your camera!

pass in vain. In fact we used this time to

Next we feature an interview with

freshen up, polish our layout and resolve

Robby Cavanaugh, a brilliant storyteller

some administrative issues, such as

and a master of creating piercing works,

registering

that resonate with viewers’ most surreal

and

dreams. Robby uses powerful symbols to

applying for an ISSN (it is like ISBN, but for

create impressive images of brooding

periodicals).

melancholy.

a

domain

www.pointofsimplicity.org

name —

In this issue — MINDGAMES — we

Our next guest is Christoffer Relander,

take a close look at both, conceptual

a young photographer from Finland.

photography and optical illusions.

Christoffer has created beautiful multiple-

This issue includes works of 30 photographers. First and foremost, you will discover beautiful and touching conceptual work by a Californian photographer Maryanne

exposure series, and was one of the first young DSLR photographers to breath life and bring sophisticated edge to this classical technique once again. In this issue you will also find an interesting article “The de-materialization


7 POINT OF SIMPLICITY| EDITORIAL

of artwork” by Florian Schmidt (better known as ^dpressedsoul at DeviantArt, a founder of #WhoNeedsColour group and a Community Volunteer for “Abstract and Surreal

Photography”),

that

explores

“abstraction and optical illusions as a stylistic device” used in conceptual photography. From this issue you will learn about ten mind-bending techniques of applying visual illusion

and

optical

trickery

to

your

photographs. We take a look at the use of reflection, contradiction, distortion, multiple exposure and many others. Check it out to see the full list. And at last you will enjoy ephemeral photographic works by Yanina Boldyreva, a young photographer who works with various artistic media. This time we feature her project “Glass” and talk a little bit about “Light achieve” project. Dear readers, I hope you will enjoy this issue. We have not yet made decision on a theme for the next one, but you can help us by casting your vote here. Teya Saveleva August 2012


8 MAITRE OF PHOTOGRAPHY | MARYANNE GOBBLE

www.neweyedea.com


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Maryanne Gobble was shaped by the Oregon Coast and currently resides in Northern California. Maryanne is just beginning to discover her voice through imagery often using herself as subject. Her moving works let us into her private world where Maryanne strives to be transparent, honest, delighted, vulnerable, and alive.


10 MAITRE OF PHOTOGRAPHY | MARYANNE GOBBLE


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12 MAITRE OF PHOTOGRAPHY | MARYANNE GOBBLE


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14 MAITRE OF PHOTOGRAPHY | MARYANNE GOBBLE


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16 MAITRE OF PHOTOGRAPHY | MARYANNE GOBBLE


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18 MAITRE OF PHOTOGRAPHY | MARYANNE GOBBLE


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20 MAITRE OF PHOTOGRAPHY | MARYANNE GOBBLE


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22 MAITRE OF PHOTOGRAPHY | MARYANNE GOBBLE


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24 MAITRE OF PHOTOGRAPHY | MARYANNE GOBBLE


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26 GUEST FEATURE | ROBBY CAVANAUGH

www.robbycavanaugh.com


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Robby Cavanaugh is a self taught photographer based in Southern California. His fine-art based work began in 2010 and has already been recognized internationally, being featured in numerous media worldwide. During the past year, his emerging work has won him numerous international awards and publications. He strives to create works that transcend the reality we all see, to a reality we can all feel. Robby’s vision for his photography lies on the edge of dreams, where the surreal meets the material.


28 GUEST FEATURE | ROBBY CAVANAUGH


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“I began to focus less on creating a photo that would be interesting and focus more on creating what defines myself.�


30 GUEST FEATURE | ROBBY CAVANAUGH


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PS: Rob, thank you for joining us for the interview. We are excited and honored to have the finest DeviantArt magician with us today. RC: The finest? Wow, you are far too kind.. PS: Rob, you registered on DeviantArt 7 years ago. Since then you tried a variety of eclectic styles and worked with many different subjects, but it was not until 2011, when you finally found your own photographic “voice” and attracted everyone’s love and admiration as one of the wittiest conceptual photographers on the Internet. What pushed you towards conceptual photography? RC: I began to focus less on creating a photo that would be interesting and focus more on creating what defines myself. I had a lot of stories to tell others and it seemed the best way possible was to create it through photography; which has realistic qualities but looked otherworldly. PS: Rob, your photographs are all very different, each standing on its own and channeling its unique concept, but still all of your recent works can be viewed as a whole – they are interconnected with color palette, layers, contradictions and that lonely person


32 GUEST FEATURE | ROBBY CAVANAUGH

in the frame. What is the story you are trying to tell? What is your main source of inspiration? RC: I am passionate about creating photographs that define one as a person. Everyone has a story personal to them, it is their own. Why not photograph that and share it with the world? I see my photographs as a timeline of my life, each photograph is kind of like a marker in that timeline. The photos are extensions of who I am. That is my inspiration, it is within myself and how I view the world we live in. PS: Many of your works defy gravity. What is your fascination with this lightness of being? RC: I simply enjoy movement. I enjoy creating photos that people do not normally see, yet can still relate to. PS: How do you come with titles for your works? RC: Well, sometimes I have a title in my head before I shoot, which helps. Other times I shape my title's around my concepts. Much like a thesis to an essay.


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34 GUEST FEATURE | ROBBY CAVANAUGH


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“Don't be afraid to fail. That is what separates us from others. Those who push through the fear can succeed.�


36 GUEST FEATURE | ROBBY CAVANAUGH


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PS: Rob, what do you like best – creating and shooting complex, fantastic scenes in real life or letting your imagination run free in the darkroom? RC: Definitely the imagination part! Going from concepts to shooting is stressful sometimes, mainly because there is so much room for error. Once I download the images, I start editing them as closely as I see the image in my mind. PS: Rob, many of your works feature water, fire, gusts of wind frozen in time… What is your favorite “working” element that helps you create surreal feeling of your photographs? RC: It really just depends on the concept. Although I am partial to water. PS: Rob, in your opinion, what are the staples of conceptual photography? And what is the key of making a breathtaking conceptual shot? RC: I think the key to making a successful

conceptual

photograph

is

making a photograph that you are passionate about telling others. If you are passionate about the idea or concept you wish to tell, the photo will be


38 GUEST FEATURE | ROBBY CAVANAUGH

“I see my photographs as a timeline of my life, each photograph is kind of like a marker in that timeline. The photos are extensions of who I am.”


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40 GUEST FEATURE | ROBBY CAVANAUGH

strong. Try and stay away from mainstream ideas and be true to yourself as an artist. PS: Are there any modern digital photographers that you look up to? RC: Yes! I do have some I look up to. One is Akif hakan Celebi Photography and Oleg Oprisco. Mainly because they stay true to themselves as artists and are incredibly innovative with their work. PS: Rob, thank you for your time. It was a pleasure to have you. Do you have any final shout out for our readers? RC: Of course and thank you! When doing creative work, don't be afraid to fail. That is what separates us from others. Those who push through the fear can succeed. â—?


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42 GUEST FEATURE | ROBBY CAVANAUGH


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www.christofferrelander.co


om


46 SPOTLIGHT | MULTILAYERED WORLDS OF CHRISTOFFER RELANDER


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“Why won’t modern photographers experiment with multiple exposures since it’s such an interesting and fun feature?”


48 SPOTLIGHT | MULTILAYERED WORLDS OF CHRISTOFFER RELANDER


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PS: Christoffer, how long ago did you take up photography? How did it happen? Did someone pull you in? CR: Well, I haven’t been photographing for that long actually. It all started in 2006 while I studied graphic design and had a two-week-long basic photography course. I didn’t fall for it right then, but I still thought it was interesting. In 2008 I joined the marines. Since I was the closest they could get to a photographer they gave me a bunch of assignments for their magazine “Fanbäraren”. In 2009 I finished my duty and left the marines. It felt empty without a camera, so I went to a camera store and bought myself a DSLR. One year later I started getting

more and

more photography assignments, and the next year I launched www.christofferrelander.com. PS: Christoffer, your photographs from the “We are nature” project have taken over the Internet. I think. You even started a trend in the online photographic community. Were you prepared to such reaction and instant popularity, when you conceived the series? CR: No. I was genuinely surprised about the reaction they received. Ever since I started doing photography I’ve been asking myself – why won’t more modern photographers experiment with multiple exposures since it’s such an interesting and fun feature? I thought it didn’t interest people that much.


50 SPOTLIGHT | MULTILAYERED WORLDS OF CHRISTOFFER RELANDER

PS: Please, tell us what is your inspiration behind the project? Was it a pure experiment with multiple exposure, or you knew what were you getting in the end? CR: There are a few photographers out there that also been experimenting with multiple exposures, some of them have, of course, inspired me. But that’s mostly the technical part. Sometimes I’m trying to capture a certain feeling – might be from a song I heard, a dream or an artwork I saw. Nature itself gives me a lot of inspiration. When I did my first multiple exposure works in 2010 I didn’t really know how it would turn out while I was shooting. Today I can proudly say that I feel comfortable doing multiple exposures. PS: What equipment and what technique do you use – is a double exposure, triple exposure or multiple exposure? CR: I shoot with a reliable Nikon D700 that has a multiple exposure feature that allows me to combine up to nine images. I use two or three for portraits and up to nine for landscapes. I love shooting with primes – 28mm, 50mm and 85mm that is my favorite one. I usually start with the model then I go for the texture shot. PS: Christoffer, can you take us through the basic stages of your workflow? If it’s not a trade secret, of course.


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52 SPOTLIGHT | MULTILAYERED WORLDS OF CHRISTOFFER RELANDER


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CR: Sure. I like shooting in soft natural light usually in a place where I’m surrounded with nature. Since my backgrounds are overexposed I have to shoot against the light source with at least one of the exposures. I use Lightroom to finalize my images – which is contrast adjustments and a b&w toning. Sometimes I also need to overexpose parts of the background that wasn’t 100% white. PS: Christoffer, do you have any other bold photographic projects coming up? CR: I’m working on a third album of multiple exposures, and besides that I’ve been working on some assignments and collaborations that I’m excited to share. PS: Christoffer, thank you very much for your time. It was a pleasure to talk to you. CR: Thank you for the invite, it’s an honor being featured in your magazine. ●


56 INSIGHT | THE DE-MATERIALIZATION OF ARTWORK

CHRISTIANE SCHEINBAR “DON’T PLAY WITH THE CARS”


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THE DE-MATERIALIZATION OF ARTWORK

FLORIAN SCHMIDT


58 INSIGHT | THE DE-MATERIALIZATION OF ARTWORK

It is necessary to point out first of all, that this article is not about landscape or portrait photography at all. Their main subject does not provide much room for interpretation because it is designed to appeal to aesthetical senses. It also is not about spontaneous snapshots – in which the photographer has to give up much of his or her control about what appears in their viewfinder. And, it’s also not about photography that is created just for the purpose of decoration and therefore usually does not have such a conceptual depth as the work which this article explores. It’s about photographs which are provoking a certain thought process and are alive in the mind of the viewer. It explores photographs in which abstraction and optical illusions are used as a stylistic device and which are challenging the viewer to play “Mind Games”. Achieving such an impact requires that the artist is driven by something which goes beyond depicting a subject. At the very beginning of the creative process the artists needs a concept or rather an (abstract) idea, which has to be treated as equivalent to the future result.

Elly Crawford “UNDERWORLD”


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60 INSIGHT | THE DE-MATERIALIZATION OF ARTWORK


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There’s more behind such a photograph than choosing a subject or arranging the equipment for the “perfect capture” – the theoretical and the actual way of processing are equally important. Classical “photography rules” are often playing a tangential role or are rather being ignored and technical aspects like camera settings or postprocessing

are

as

well

considered

as

less

important than in other disciplines of photography – what would be considered as “low quality” there is often used intentionally here. The

involvement

with

the

theoretical

components of a photograph and its possible ways of perception by the viewer also matters more than technical details because the artist usually wants to cause a response which goes further than “I like” or “I dislike”. That is why familiar points of view, conceptions and connections have to be liberated of their ordinary context and to be put on a meta-level, which makes it possible to discover

brand

new

significations

and

connotations. The artwork itself has to be similarly “de-materialized” to find its complete expression not just on the level of visual perception anymore, but to be further developed in the thoughts of the viewer. Hanne Warloe “JUST WAIT”


62 INSIGHT | THE DE-MATERIALIZATION OF ARTWORK

The main concern is the visualization of an (abstract) idea. Who wouldn’t agree that ideas often exist undetermined or rather vague and “blurry” in our mind? So it’s just consistent to visualize such an idea through an intentionally blurry or underexposed photograph, or to move the camera during a long-time exposure with the intention of capturing an abstract impression instead of another “frozen moment”. Taking photos of seemingly unperfected reflections (e. g. on water surfaces, window panes or mirrors) is as well suitable for uncovering this intangible theoretical world of thoughts. Other artists are creating fascinating new sights by depicting deteriorated or weathered everyday items like road markings, peeled off paint or rusty pieces of metal. The artist is able to steer the direction of the viewer’s “mind games” by reducing the picture to its key elements or by choosing an unusual close-up view on a detail of an everyday item, if desired. Choosing an appropriate title also plays a crucial role in this context. All of this

Olivier "Daaram" Jollant “A bit warmer than hell”


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64 INSIGHT | THE DE-MATERIALIZATION OF ARTWORK


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together will make an artwork a visual and a mental stimulus for the viewer, an invitation for getting involved and starting a conversation. The approach of the photo itself is still being illustrative, but obviously shape- and patternoriented – the photographer conveys a creative view on things which are otherwise overlooked or recognized as “trivial”. This creates a notionally reality in the mind of the viewer, detached from the context of the pictured subject. The viewer is hereby accompanying the artist on a search for visual traces and will discover a brand new world of details, angles and points of view. This kind of photography surely challenges the viewers skills of perception and interpretation – but once the viewer has found the right approach to it, he or she will probably consider this different view on lots of “trivial” things as a benefit. RECOMMENDED ARTISTS:

Alvin Langdon Coburn One of the pioneers of abstract photography. His “vortographs” were inspired by cubism and they deliberated photography from its dependency on “visible reality” by using excessive pushing-up of light and shadow. YannG “HomeSweetH”


66 INSIGHT | THE DE-MATERIALIZATION OF ARTWORK

Jan Dibbets He’s ranked amongst the most important conceptual artists in Europe. Dibbets is interested in phenomena of perception, misperception and illusion. His photographs are equally figurative and abstract (sic!): they look like cut-outs of an abstract painting while they represent industrial goods, their colors and their light reflections at the same time.

Klaudia Dietewich She prefers to depict traces of human activities on roads and places. Dietewich reduces her work to a level which takes it to a different level of abstraction – the conceptual connotations contained in her work are an “aesthetic of the imperfect world” or the connection between the disappearance of the depicted traces and the fleetingness of human existence.

Hiroshi Sugimoto The master. Period. On a side note: he’s still using photographic plates to create his incredible series of black and white longexposures.

Michael Wesely Wesely is well known for extremely long exposures, capturing the withering of flowers or the edification of a building. ●

SOURCES:

Gesellschaft für abstrakte Fotografie (Germany) Wikipedia

Debora Schmidt “12 Februar 2011”


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68 ASSORTED FEATURE | INSPIRING SHOTS


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70 ASSORTED FEATURE | INSPIRING SHOTS


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Liutauras Parojus “TREE AND FRUIT”


72 ASSORTED FEATURE | INSPIRING SHOTS

Nikolai Gorsky “CATOMETRY”


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74 ASSORTED FEATURE | INSPIRING SHOTS


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Tomasz Cichorek “***”


76 ASSORTED FEATURE | INSPIRING SHOTS

Pawel Koyfman “CLEAR VIEW”


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78 ASSORTED FEATURE | INSPIRING SHOTS

Lenka Vidmochová “FREE HUG”


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80 ASSORTED FEATURE | INSPIRING SHOTS


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Sonia Firlej “Krainie”


82 ASSORTED FEATURE | INSPIRING SHOTS

Julian "Einsilbig" Schulze “CROSSROADS”


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84 ASSORTED FEATURE | INSPIRING SHOTS


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LevAni “Lives Only in the Light “


86 ASSORTED FEATURE | INSPIRING SHOTS

George Visan “Mirrors and wings”


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TAKE A LOOK AT OUR


R PREVIOUS ISSUES!


90 KNOW-HOW | 10 MIND-BENDING PHOTOGRAPHY TRICKS


1. FORCED PERSPECTIVE Forced

perspective

may be

the

most

popular and the most fiercely hated visual trick in the world. It haunts wedding albums and holiday shots from Pisa, social networks are littered with shots of people trying to devour, kiss or make other unspeakable things to the Sun. But clever use—not plain abuse—of this simple optic illusion can help you implement unusual and striking artistic ideas.

Henrique Frazão “CLOSED”

many


2. REFLECTION Reflection is a beloved by many way of introducing

mystery

and

a

hint

of

transcendence to a photograph. This trick is widely used by fashion and portrait photographers. Setting sun, city lights and colorful show-window designs can be used as beautiful props to create fragile, pensive mood.

Liliya Rodnikova “BIRD IN CAGE�


3. DISTORTION Distortion is a great way to create surreal, psychedelic imagery and mess with brains of your viewers. Use bottles and glasses filled with water, (may be even add a sprinkle of ink), distorting mirrors or objects with reflective, but flawed surfaces to study this trick. It takes time before you find the perfect angle that makes your idea look its best.

Krupina Elizaveta “woman in glass v.3�


4. TILT-SHIFT Tilt-shift is a technique used to make large object from the everyday life look miniature. Usually this requires a special tilt-shift lens, such lenses focus on a narrow part of the scenery and blur the outer edges of the shot. The distorted focus tricks the eye and creates an optical illusion, or a “toy effect”. Not everyone can afford tilt-shift equipment, but luckily digital darkroom and a couple of special filters can help you create your own miniature worlds.

Graham Paul Sayell “Small World - Ha Long Ba”


5. ANTI-GRAVITY Anti-gravity

and

levitation

captivate

viewer’s attention and make them wonder about

the

dark

secrets

behind

your

trickery. Both are not purely photographic techniques, but if you give it a little bit of thought and try different view points, photography can make usual objects look as if they are out of this world and need not obey the laws of physics.

Emily White “Above the sound of crashing”


6. UNDERWATER Although with a little help from technology humans can swim like a fish and fly like a bird, they were born to walk. Putting a human being into a usual setting and then relocating

this

setting

underwater

is

unusual. Just like anti-gravity. Water is a very powerful, beautiful substance, that can be put to a great use by a skilled photographer.

Achmad Kurniawan “DESPERATE�


7. MULTIPLE EXPOSURE Multiple exposure is an “ancient” craft that produced haunting imagery long before the digital cameras or digital darkroom were born. Experimenting with multiple exposure and learning its secrets is challenging, but very rewarding. Luckily, as more and more young photographers study the depths of manual mode, the multiple-exposure is set to a glorious comeback. It looks like its already a trend within the community.

Una Wishnevaya “W”


8. BIRD-EYE VIEW This is not even a trick, it is just a point of view. Photographers have to pay attention to things that happen around them. Watch people, watch patterns, watch colors, watch shapes. Don’t forget to look under your feet, and most importantly do not forget to view a picture as a whole. The world will unfold before your eyes. Sometimes usual things take new shape if you are willing enough to give them such an opportunity.

Tom Waterhouse “Their Combination Is Spectacular”


9. CONTRADICTION Some things do not go well together, and some things never happen in real life. At least to some people. But you are a photographer, you make things happen. Conflict grabs attention, it arouses feelings and colors

provokes and

thoughts.

patterns

Contradicting

create

tension.

Contradicting ideas make you stop and think: “Wait a minute! I’ve never seen anything like this before.”

Eulalie Varenne “A portée de mains”


10. INTERACTION Interaction is the key to a good artwork, and not just in a sense of “artist-viewer” interaction. Look for interesting angles and situations, combine the incompatible and create

a

harmonious

world

in

your

photograph. A photograph is a window to your very own Neverland. It may be bizarre and extravagant, but you’re the boss and you set up (or even bend) the rules. ●

Ag Adibudojo “living on the water”


112 SPECIAL | YANINA BOLDYREVA

http://yaninaboldyreva.blogspot.com/


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118 SPECIAL | YANINA BOLDYREVA

PS: Yanina, what does photography

blocks, your materials at hand. And,

mean to you?

finally, photography is a dialogue, your

YB: Well, photography is the easiest and the most interesting way of inter-

picture is the highway to channel your feelings and thoughts.

acting with the world. You can say it is

PS: Yanina, your “Glass” series looks

some kind of fusion. It is a process of

very beautiful, feminine and surreal…

creating something fresh and unex-

just like a mesmerizing fairy tale. How

pected. It is a way of expressing your-

did you come up with the idea for this

self. It is a way to escape reality, but at

series?

the same time it is the way to work with this reality. Photography is a pass to places no one has ever gone before. It is like a new world you created by yourself from the things that already exist, but you used them as building

YB: I don’t think that I remember now when I first started using glass filters and reflections to take pictures. I loved it for a long, long time. At first I liked the pictures I got, that pictures were like a magical dusting on a window of


119

everyday reality. Then I felt, that this style had become more of a view point. A philosophy that everything in this world is

“A photograph is like a new world you created by yourself from the things that already exist.”

transparent, everything is interlinked, objects of this world are reflected in one another. It’s the way the life flows, it’s continuous and spontaneous. I think those reflections and distorted objects in my photographs are the way I feel the world around. I feel that it’s an impulsive living being. Subjective and objective realities go hand in hand, it’s a dialogue between them. PS: What about the “Light achieve” series? Was it an improvisation?


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124 SPECIAL | YANINA BOLDYREVA

YB: Well, once upon a time I went to

PS: Yanina, what do you think makes a

the country and there was that green-

good photograph?

house. I fell in love with its poetic and beautiful nature. So the next day I dragged a model to that greenhouse. The model’s name, by the way, was Dasha Bakhareva. She’s a painter. So she got that greenhouse at an instant. That shoot was like a jigsaw with pieces falling into place. I was lucky to have a right place, a right model, a right weather. They just ticked. I was afraid that something might go wrong, because, when you plan a photo shoot – things tend to go wrong very so often.

YB:

Everyone has their one under-

standing of a “good photograph”. If you exclude such things as technical aspects, composition and color, then all that is left of a photograph are things that are important to us in our everyday life. The right question is “What are you looking for in a photograph?”. I am looking for a mixture of irrationality, contrast, a dialogue, a game, compatibility of incompatible, uniqueness, brevity of expression, wonder, a search for new things, harmony and conflict at


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the same time.

I’d like to try. ●

PS: Do you have any exhibitions or new projects coming up? YB: I have a lot coming up, but I’d like not to announce anything in case it fails. I would like to take up a few big projects and put a lot of planning and thought into this work. I would like to combine several types of art techniques, to create a fusion. I would like to overlay wall paintings and photography, and see how it goes. I am also interested in making motion pictures… I wish I had time for all the things that

“Subjective and objective realities go hand in hand, it’s a dialogue between them.”


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130 THE END | THANK YOU!

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131 THE END | THANK YOU!

COMING SOON! POINT OF SIMPLICITY, ISSUE#8 OCTOBER 2012 The downloadable version of ISSUE#7.MINDGAMES will be available on our web-site after August 20, 2012.

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Simplicity is the ultimate form of beauty. Š

POINT OF SIMPLICITY ISSUE#7.MINDGAMES  

This time we take a close look at both, conceptual photography and optical illusions. On the pages of this issue we feature works of such am...

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