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Feb/March 2014 | podtalkmag.com

SPECIAL EDITION

Nathaniel

Roberts

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~2014~


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CELEBRATING THE BIRTHDAY OF MARTIN LUTHER KING JR AND BLACK HISTORY MONTH THIS EPISODE FEATURES PUBLIC ENEMY | XCLAN | PHAROAH MONCH | YASIIN BEY | DONNY HATHAWAY. EACH TRACK WAS HAND PICKED TO REFLECT ON THE POSITIVE SIDE OF HIP HOP . TUNE IN VIA STITCHER RADIO APP, OUR WEBSITE, PODOMATIC AND MORE

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National Archive Photo

50th Anniversary

March on Washington


50th Anniversary

he historical “March on Washington� represented a coalition of several civil rights organizations who expressed different views but came together under one cause. That cause was to take a peaceful approach towards the passing of meaningful

March on Washington

civil rights legislation; the elimination of racial segregation in public schools; protection for demonstrators against police brutality; programs to provide jobs; laws that prohibit racial discrimination in public and private places. The demonstration also gained much notoriety by speeches delivered by noteworthy speakers, John Lewis and Martin Luther Kin Jr.

National Archive Photo


EDITORIAL Feb/March 2014 Special Edition

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t’s a new year and we have undergone a few minor changes. Hopefully with the changes we will create a bigger, better and brighter future for our publication by delivering entertaining, informative and qualitative product to our readers. In efforts to celebrate Black History month, we have created a special edition publication that highlights the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington through various historical photos integrated into the layout of the magazine. We are looking forward to a great year and have a great read…..

Publisher YB Entertainment LLC Creative | Editorial Director Y. Burns Contributors D. Byrd, C. Fountain, V. Whitmore, A. Troy Photographs National Archive Photos Marnie Joyce TL Photography Sales | Marketing C. Fountain Inquiries | Advertising podtalkmag@gmail.com Visit us: www.podtalkmag.com

Copyright © 2014 YB Entertainment LLC | All rights reserved | Printed in USA THE VIEWS EXPRESSED HEREIN ARE THOSE OF INDIVIDUALS AND ARE NOT NECESSARILY SHARED BY PODTALk MAGAZINE


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Public Enemy WORDS Y. BURNS IMAGE MARNIE JOYCE

Public Enemy became a very significant part of the rap culture in the late 80’s and early 90’s. During this time period, gangster rap was on the rise and stirring up a lot of uproar with politicians and freedom of speech. Rap artist during that time period was expressing the anger that they had about youth concerns of the inner city. Although media did not see it that way but gangster rap was painting the true reality of what young black Americans were facing in the 80’s and early 90’s. While most people viewed gangster music as “garbage music” that filled the minds of our youth with negativity, there were groups that were doing the opposite. One group in particular was Public Enemy. Public Enemy was formed in 1982 and headed by Chuck D. The group formed merely to address the issues of the Reagan era where inner city neighborhoods were landscaped with boarded up houses, storefronts and communities flooded with crack-cocaine. While gangster rap put gang culture on the map, Chuck D was urging people to “Fight the Power” and take a stand in efforts to regain control and clean up our neighborhoods. Public enemy dealt with topics that dove into the political challenges that the African American faced in the 80’s and early 90’s. “Fight the Power” became a highly significant piece that expressed the abuse of political power and the empowerment of the black communities. PODTALk. MAGAZINE | 07


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y definition Black History Month, also known as African-American History Month in America is an annual observance in the United States, Canada and United Kingdom for remembrance of important people and events that only had an impact on the lives of our ancestors but also helped improved the lives of future African-Americans. Black History Month is a time for reflecting on what the past has brought us and how those who fought over years to see justice and equality for all and the various obstacles that one had to take. As we know it in history, the journey wasn’t at all an easy journey for Black’s in America but we continue to strive for a better tomorrow knowing that there is a lot to do and the journey hasn’t ended. Who would have thought that we would ever see the day that an African-American would be appointed into office as the President of the United States. That day came in 2008 when Barack Obama won the election. Since his historical election, we have seen more progress in our communities as he put into place the Affordable Health Care Act and increased funding for Historical Black Colleges and Universities.

What do our children know about Black History? Are they being properly educated?

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t appears that our children know very little about Black History. Is it that they don’t want to learn or they aren’t being educated enough on the subject? I am not by any means categorizing our young people but to some it appears that they are heavily influenced by the media. The media paints pictures of how to get money good or bad but doesn’t paint more positive pictures as to how entertainers made it to where they are today. Those that were able to skip the school process

WHAT DOES BLACK HISTORY MONTH MEAN? to become successful go back to school in their later years to either earn their High School diplomas or earn their degrees. This part is not being talked about. From experience dealing with young people in a work environment, when some were asked about what do they know about slavery? Or who is Martin Luther King Jr.? Their response is amazingly, “what is slavery, who is Martin Luther King.” Granted, these are kids that have been categorized as “bad kids” of society. Only one can assume that they do not want to know or don’t care to know. In my opinion and from what I see working around such kids is that they care not to know. Sometimes I shake my head in sadness for the fact that this information defines character. If they take the time to learn their history then they will understand that imposing pain and robbing from your own kind brings us back to square one of the fight and struggle but the difference is, we are doing it to one another. Also, African-Americans are bringing back that same mentality that our ancestors fought against and that is the separation of the light skinned and dark skinned. No matter what color your skin maybe, the color spectrum says one thing and that is you are “Black.” Should we place full blame on the school system for not educating our young people on their history? No, the blame can also fall on the parents and the children themselves. For the parents, it should be common practice to shed some light on their history on a daily basis. For the children, picking up

a book and reading all that you can help you more than being taught this information in a school setting. School is designed to provide enough information to meet your requirement as a student earning the required credits to pass to the next grade but should it stop you from learning more? No. Let’s stop blaming the school system and continue the learning process at home.

Is it being too commercialized?

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ome would say that it has become too commercialized over the years. Black History Month is now part of a marketing ploy for organizations to advertise and sale product to a certain demographic other than its true intent as to being a month to reflect, remember and evaluate. Now that media has taken on an active role as to delivering the message, the media began to downplay its true intent by glamorizing black entertainers and their talents as opposed to what type of role they played in history and or offering trivia in regards to facts of Black Historians.

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NEW TUNES

AMP FIDDLER Basementality 2

fter a long hiatus, Detroit based soul/funk musician Amp Fiddler returns with “Basementality 2.” The album consists of 6-tracks of electric soul filled with all of the emotions of a Motor City native. The album also features a duet with Raphael Saadiq and a Daniel Crawford remix. “More Than” is the closing song that speaks about everything that is love. The album is a good listen.

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Emmavie

L+VEHATER

+VEHATER is clearly a great introduction of material released by a young female singer/songwriter/producer coming out of London. Emmavie creatively infuses the electronic genre with R&B to create her own unique sound. When you listen to the album you will fill every emotion that she had put into the creation of this work of art. Each track has a story to tell, whether it’s her own story or yours. You will without a doubt reminisce on some of the things you may have gone through in your past or present relationship. The album start out with “Jealous, Jealous, Jealous,” I am sure we all can relate to this. Next you have “Don’t Run Away,” and then it goes into “Getting Nothing” a track that addresses the issue of a “booty” call, the female start to wizen up and decide to cut the sex off. Towards the end of the album you will begin to realize that you are still “Missing One Thing.” Her debut EP is available for free download on bandcamp. Get it while the getting is good.

EPOCH Alfa Mist X Emmavie http://ae-music.co.uk/


NEW TUNES

EMILY KING Distance

ot new to the industry, Emily King gained notoriety with her Grammy nominated debut album “East Side Story” released under the direction of Clive Davis and the J Records imprint. In 2008, Emily King parted ways from her label to set out independently. In 2011 Emily King released her follow up album “Seven” an album she recorded in the comforts of her home. Now Emily King has hit us again with another great recording entitled “Distance.” When I first heard the tune it reminded me of Elton John’s “Bennie and the Jets.” Not to say that the song itself reminds me of it but how the song and the beat grabs you after the intro. This release is surely an extension of the “Seven” EP that was full of energy and collectable tunes. Lyrically this song paints the picture of distant lovers fighting to exist as one. The entire song is catchy and you will without a doubt have it on repeat. “Don’t wait, “Download it now!

The Seven EP Emily King

http://emilyking.bandcamp.com

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MORE REVIEWS The Ruff Pack Without You

In 2010, The Ruff Pack had blessed us with the introduction of their reinvented sound to dropping their fourth release; The Ruff Pack comes back with another masterpiece “Without You.” This album showcases the expansion of their style, sound and brand of music that they have been cultivating over the years. Band members Daru, Steph and Matt created a whole new experience for those who love the hip hop and jazz culture fusing it with soul. You can hear all of those elements incorporated into each track. Their music is simply everything that you would want in one package deal. The chemistry these guys have made it possible for the band to create something that can very well be an addition to your music library. I am looking forward to hearing more from this band.

Salaam Remi One: In the Chamber

Twenty-plus years in the game, Salaam Remi present to us “One: In the Chamber.” The album itself is a banger. The album showcases his talent and versatility. This album has a variety. You will hear great R&B tracks and hip hop jazzed out tunes like his remake to Keni Burke’s “Keep Risin’ to the Top.” Another stand out on this album features the soft voice of Ne Yo “ Everything I Need” that almost take you back to the time when you were maybe at home jamming and listening to a Michael Jackson song.

Slum Village Evolution

A group that has been around since the 90’s still having a lot to offer. Having gone through changes and major loss of friends and members of the group, the group is still pushing forward with its 2013 release “Evolution,” a normal high energy record. 14 | PODTALk. MAGAZINE

Atu

Pictures on Silence Produced by a young man from Malawi who made his way to the states to study economics at the University of Michigan released this beautiful work of instrumentation influenced by 90’s R&B. This album was produced in efforts to help an ongoing crisis in Malawi. Proceeds from this album is going to EveryChild, a non profit orginization that is fighting against child labour in Malawi.This album can be found on bandcamp.

Chris Dave The Drumhedz Mixtape

Handz on ur Drum almost seem like the albums anthem song that very well describes Chris Dave as a prolific drummer. Chris Dave offers up his Drumhedz mixtape album as he describes it. It’s not your average mixtape that you may get off of the streets. The term mixtape in this case is a mixture of drumming techniques and style that you will here throughout the entire album. You will hear elements of rock, jazz, hip hop and more. If you are a true music connoisseur this album is a must for your collection.

IAMNOBODI Elevated

Based out of Germany, producer IAMNOBODI releases yet another banger. “Elevated” delivers a plate full of energetic instrumentals. The title track “Elevated” has a mixture of hip hop, funky base lines and soulful groove’s to set the mood. Then he slows it down with “Bubble Bath Dreams.” You would think you are listening to a dance album until you listen to this track or “Lawd She Bad.” This is clearly an album for the late nights with your significant other.

REFINED The Stuyvesants

Some say that good music has fallen below the waste side but it hasn’t, it’s not getting the recognition it deserves. When you listen to what’s being produced today, the hits being played on your local radio station appears to have the same sound. When you here a track on the radio, you would probably here it again from another “ground breaking” artist. I have always been a big fan of the 70’s music. The 70’s sound promoted love, peace and happiness as opposed to the music that is being produced today. The 60’s and 70’s music didn’t invoke the feeling of aggression. It has appeared that “The Stuyvesants” duo Allan Cole and Darien Victor are working hard to refine that 70’s sound and introducing it back with a hip hop flare but maintaining its true composition with each sample taken from such gems found digging through the crates. You can tell that these guys have an extensive collection. There instrumentation can be heard via the internet and incorporated into promotional videos circulating YouTube. For more on these guys and their products visit their website thestuyvesants. com.


WORDS Y. BURNS IMAGE TL PHOTOGRAPHY

The Art | History Behind Turntablism

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urntables became a tool of use when rap became another musical art form in the late 70’s. The popularity grew behind the Sugar Hill Gang “Rappers Delight” of 1979. Before that you had the Grand Wizard Theodore, Kool Herc, Grandmaster Flash and Africa Bambaataa who were later identified as the turntable forefathers. Over the years it was Grand Master Flash who stood out becoming a brand of his own as being the pioneer of “scratching” alike records together creating a continues beat patterns. He is also accredited for the cutting and back spinning techniques. It wasn’t until his protégé Grand Wizard Theodore who cultivated what Grand Master Flash started birthed the “scratching” technique that has become very popular till this day. Kool Herc was also a significant player during the 70’s. Kool Herc originated break beat Djing.

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He would take the most danceable parts of a record called the “breaks” and repeat that pattern, which is noted as the beginning practices of modern day hip hop. Africa Bambaataa is credited for taking hip hop classics and fusing it with techno-pop music, a genre that was pioneered by German group Kraftwerk. In the 80’s scratching became a notable technique used by emerging turntablist. In most hip hop and some R&B records you will hear artist incorporate the “scratching” to fill out the overall sound of the record.

In the early 90’s Djs began to take the art form to new heights. Scratching became more technical and innovative. Dj Jazzy Jeff was one of those pioneers of the late 80’s and early 90’s. He pioneered the “transformer” and “chirp” scratch technique. He was able to make the record sound robotic and like a bird with the chirping effect. As hip hop became more popular as the days go by, the Dj behind it all is gaining that same popularity and the art form has become more notable than it has in its beginning. Now you can see Djs as a part of a full band and not as a “back drop.” With new technology, turntablism continues to evolve and is recognized as a creative instrument.


50th Anniversary March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Martin Luther King Jr. and Joachim Prinz, 1963

National Archive Photo

March on Washington


George Washington Carver

Madam C. J. Walker

Garret Augustus Morgan

Jack Johnson

African American Inventors


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