Page 1

Peter
O’Daniel
 
 2/11/2010
 
 










 
 
 Full
Story
Treatment
on
“The
Dream
 
 It’s
Friday
night
in
Los
Angeles,
California.
The
Lakers
are
hosting
the
San
Antonio
 Spurs
for
the
season
opener
in
the
Staples
Center.
The
music
fills
the
stadium
air,
as
 does
the
smell
of
delicious
popcorn
as
the
fans
pile
in
the
stadium
to
take
their
seats
 for
the
start
of
the
game.
The
lights
dim
as
the
shade
of
the
sparkly
floor
evaporates
 into
the
darkness.
“Joooshh
Miller,”
the
announcer
shouts
as
a
six‐foot
skinny
white
 man
bursts
onto
the
court
as
if
this
is
nothing
new
to
him.
The
ball
is
tipped,
 grabbed
by
Josh,
and
the
first
three
pointer
of
the
game
is
made.
“Jossshhh
Miller,”
 the
announcer
shouts
again
as
Lakers
fans
jump
out
of
their
seats
to
give
a
round
of
 applause
to
a
man
that
has
given
all
he
had
to
reach
a
dream
that
most
people
 cannot
imagine:
The
dream
of
becoming
an
NBA
superstar.




 
 Many
NBA
superstars
start
out
with
a
tremendous
amount
of
talent
and
work
with
it
 to
make
themselves
an
unstoppable
force
in
the
game
of
basketball.
Josh
Miller,
 however,
was
not
one
of
these
people.
It
all
started
in
southern
Indiana
on
an
 outdoor
gravel
playground
when
Josh
was
just
starting
the
sixth
grade.
Josh
and
his
 father,
Mark,
would
start
every
morning
the
same
way.
They
would
climb
out
of
bed
 at
around
5:30
am.
Josh
would
put
on
his
baggy
Jordan
basketball
shorts
and
sag
 them
a
little
lower
as
if
they
weren’t
baggy
enough,
put
on
his
black
and
white
 Jordan
sneakers
and
cut‐off
t
shirt
that
dropped
down
to
his
knees,
and
top
it
off
 with
a
hooded
sweatshirt
for
the
chilly
weather.
Josh’s
father
would
be
standing
in
 the
kitchen
toasting
Pop
Tarts
right
before
they
took
off
to
start
their
day.
They
 would
arrive
at
the
playground
at
about
6
am.
They
would
start
their
morning
with
 a
quick
jog,
then
Josh
would
proceed
to
attempt
shots
at
the
basket
while
his
father
 rebounded.
The
shots
would
appear
to
be
going
in
right
before
the
ball
dropped
 down
and
clunked
as
it
hit
the
rim.
After
about
20
missed
shots,
Josh
would
chuck
 the
ball
as
far
as
he
could,
then
sit
down
Indian
style
with
his
head
in
his
lap
and
cry
 to
himself.
 
 One
evening
Josh’s
father
decided
to
take
him
to
a
movie.
After
the
movie,
while
Josh
 and
his
father
walked
back
to
the
car,
Josh
asked
his
father
why
he
wasn’t
as
good
as
 the
other
kids
at
basketball.
His
father
responded
by
telling
him
that
he
wasn’t
born
 with
the
same
abilities,
but
that
if
he
worked
harder
than
everybody
else
he
could
 eventually
be
just
as
good
as
them.
From
this
point
on,
everyday,
when
Josh
got
out
 of
school
Josh’s
father
would
park
in
front
of
the
tall
white
pillars
that
guarded
the
 entrance
to
Oak
Hill
Middle
School
and
Josh
would
be
waiting.
Josh’s
father
would
 then
drop
him
off
at
Tri‐State
Athletic
Club,
the
local
gym,
and
not
pick
him
up
until
 four
hours
later.
Josh
started
to
get
really
tired
of
this,
telling
his
father
that
none
of
 the
other
kids
would
let
him
play
because
he
wasn’t
good
enough,
so
Josh’s
father
 would
get
him
a
personal
basketball
trainer.

 



On
Josh’s
first
day
meeting
his
trainer
he
was
really
shy.
He
walked
into
Tri‐State
 that
day
and
as
his
trainer
introduced
himself,
Josh
responded
looking
at
the
ground
 saying,
“My
names
Josh
and
I’m
not
very
good
at
basketball.”
Josh’s
trainer,
Troy,
 then
smiled
responding,
“You’re
fine.
Lets
get
you
some
game.”
Josh
smiled
back
and
 followed
him
to
the
basketball
court
where
he
would
start
out
shooting
free
throws
 and
missing
most
of
them
as
they
hit
the
front
of
the
rim
just
like
on
the
playground.

 Josh
trained
with
Troy
everyday.
He
would
wake
up
early,
shoot
with
his
father,
go
 to
school,
and
then
head
to
Tri‐State.
Everyday
would
be
a
struggle
but
everyday
 Josh
would
watch
himself
get
better.
Then
it
came
time
for
school
basketball
tryouts.
 Josh
walked
into
try‐outs
looking
at
the
ground
with
an
unconfident
posture
not
 believing
in
his
abilities
at
all.
The
next
day,
Josh
would
go
to
the
coach’s
office
 glance
at
the
roster
only
to
see
that
he
wasn’t
on
it.
Josh
then
proceeded
to
put
his
 head
down,
and
walk
to
his
father’s
car
to
go
to
Tri‐State
to
work
on
his
game.
Not
 making
this
team
would
in
turn
only
make
Josh
work
harder.
Another
year
passed
 by
and
he
was
cut
once
again,
but
this
would
not
faze
Josh.
He
went
to
the
front
of
 the
school,
hopped
his
father’s
car,
and
walked
right
back
into
Tri‐State
to
meet
 Troy.
The
next
year,
same
thing,
Josh
got
cut
but
only
worked
harder.
Then
it
came
 time
for
high
school.
 
 At
this
time,
Josh’s
father
even
doubted
whether
Josh
would
ever
be
any
good.
 However,
the
table’s
had
turned
and
Josh
wouldn’t
give
up
for
anybody.
Josh
walked
 into
try‐outs
his
freshman
year,
dusted
off
the
bottoms
of
his
Nike’s,
walked
onto
the
 shiny
basketball
court,
grabbed
a
ball
off
the
rack,
and
walked
onto
the
court
as
if
he
 owned
it.
As
soon
as
the
coach
blew
the
whistle,
all
of
the
kids
trying
out
rushed
to
 the
baseline
to
start
sprints.
Josh
won
every
race.
The
coach
once
again
blew
the
 whistle.
Now
it
was
time
to
play.
Josh
grabbed
the
ball,
checked
it
up
with
the
 opposing
team,
and
started
to
battle.
First
shot,
Josh
swishes
a
3.
Second
shot,
Josh
 drives
the
lain
for
an
aggressive
layup.
Some
of
his
teammates
then
score,
and
the
 game
is
over.
Josh’s
team
wins.
Try‐outs
then
end
and
everybody
goes
home.

 
 The
next
day
at
school,
all
of
the
kids
that
tried
out
rush
to
the
coach’s
office
to
check
 whether
they
made
the
team.
Josh,
walking
towards
the
office
as
if
he
already
made
 the
team,
looks
at
the
roster
and
notices
that
his
name
was
left
off
of
it.
Josh
then
 makes
his
way
to
a
nearby
bleacher,
with
his
hand
in
his
lap,
and
begins
to
cry.
He
 stays
seated
on
this
bleacher
all
day
as
he
misses
every
class.
When
he
returns
home
 for
the
day
he
throws
a
dinner
plate
at
the
wall
with
tears
streaming
down
his
face
 saying,
“Hard
work
doesn’t
do
shit.”
He
then
goes
to
his
room
and
falls
asleep.

 
 The
next
day,
Josh
doesn’t
eat
and
doesn’t
go
to
school.
He
does,
however,
go
back
to
 Tri‐State.
He
gets
to
Tri‐State
and
starts
running
suicides
while
panting
and
 sweating
excessively.
Josh
grabs
a
ball
and
shoots
over
and
over
as
the
hours
of
the
 day
pass
by.
He
then
goes
to
Troy’s
office
and
tells
him
that
he
wants
to
train
twice
a
 day.
Then
goes
home
to
eat
dinner
and
goes
to
bed.

 
 Josh
starts
the
days
ahead
the
same
way.
He
wakes
up
early,
shoots
at
the
park,
goes
 to
school,
plays
basketball,
does
some
homework,
and
goes
to
bed.
It’s
time
for



sophomore
try‐outs.
When
Josh
arrives
at
school
this
day
he
walks
to
his
classes,
 then
hustles
down
the
long
hallway
to
the
gym.
When
he
arrives
he
laces
up
his
Nike
 basketball
shoes,
steps
onto
the
court,
and
doesn’t
miss
a
shot.
The
first
play,
Josh
 steels
the
ball
on
a
break
away,
runs
towards
the
basket,
jumps
into
flight,
and
 dunks
on
the
best
player
on
the
team.
After
try‐outs
the
coach
tells
him
that
he’s
on
 the
team.

 
 Now
that
Josh
is
on
the
team,
he
only
works
harder.
He
gets
to
the
school
gym
 before
school,
shoots
with
the
team
manager
for
about
an
hour,
goes
to
classes,
and
 goes
to
practice.
When
Josh
gets
to
practice
he
makes
sure
to
stretch
his
legs
out,
 sprints
up
and
down
the
court
a
few
times,
and
practices
his
shot
as
he
focuses
his
 form.

 
 When
the
first
game
comes,
Josh
is
more
ready
than
he’s
ever
been.
He’s
got
his
 shoes
laced
tight
and
his
uniform
tucked
in
he
leads
the
team
out
onto
the
court
to
 get
into
layup
lines.
Josh
puts
in
a
couple
of
dunks
then
takes
his
place
on
the
court
 for
the
tip.
The
ball
is
then
tipped
as
Josh
grabs
it
from
midair.
He
dribbles
down
the
 court
and
assists
his
teammate
with
an
alley‐oop
for
the
slam‐dunk.
Josh
makes
a
 couple
more
shots
and
his
team
wins
65‐42.
Everyday
Josh
is
hustling
into
huddles
 to
communicate
with
his
teammates,
giving
his
best
effort
to
compete,
and
playing
 as
a
team.
This
continues
throughout
Josh’s
junior
year.
By
Josh’s
senior
year
he
is
 unstoppable.
His
first
game
he
comes
out
in
a
sparkling
white
jersey,
dribbling
 through
his
legs
as
he
attempts
to
drive
the
lain
on
Larry
Bird,
the
next
best
player
 in
southern
Indiana,
and
before
Larry
can
even
see
him
make
a
move
Josh
is
already
 at
the
rim
and
it’s
a
dunk
for
the
win.
Josh’s
next
game
doesn’t
go
so
smoothly.
In
the
 middle
of
the
game
vs.
St.
Charles
High
Josh
goes
up
for
a
rebound,
and
comes
down
 on
his
knees
as
he
gets
tripped
by
an
opponent.
Josh
is
out
for
good.

To
everyone’s
 surprise,
however,
Josh
is
back
for
the
next
game.
He
comes
out
limping
terribly
as
 he
can’t
even
get
off
of
the
ground
for
his
first
jump
shot.
Then
something
 magnificent
happens.
Josh
gets
a
steal
on
defense,
hustles
as
hard
as
he
can
as
if
 nothing
matters
but
scoring
the
ball.
Josh
then
jumps
into
the
air
and
scores
his
 second
game
winning
dunk
for
the
season.
The
season
continues
until
Josh
meets
 with
Larry’s
team
for
the
state
championship.

 
 It’s
Conseco
Field
House
in
Indianapolis
for
the
men’s
high
school
basketball
state
 championship.
All
of
the
biggest
college
and
NBA
recruits
are
in
the
stands
to
watch
 exactly
how
far
Josh
can
take
his
game.
The
ball
is
tipped.
Josh
steals
it
from
the
 other
team
and
the
mayhem
starts.
A
couple
of
dunks
and
3
point
shots
from
Josh
go
 by,
but
Larry’s
team
is
holding
on.
This
all
ends
in
the
second
half,
however,
when
 Josh
takes
off
and
shows
the
recruits
what
they
came
to
see.
Josh
get
steal
after
steal
 and
shot
after
shot.
Southern
High
wins
by
15.

 
 After
high
school
Josh
would
go
on
to
become
the
20th
draft
pick
in
the
1978
NBA
 Draft
along
with
Larry
Bird.
His
first
game
in
the
NBA,
Josh
would
have
35
points
 and
break
the
record
for
a
rookies
first
game
in
the
NBA.

 



1



 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Ext.
North
Side
Basketball
Park
–
Morning

 
 
 
 1
 
 JOSH
MILLER
looking
at
the
ground,
and
hiding
behind
his
father,
MARK,
 because
he
is
shy,
walks
out
to
the
basketball
court
to
shoot.
When
he
picks
 up
the
ball
he
dribbles
it
off
of
his
foot
His
father
then
runs
after
the
ball
to
 save
it
from
hitting
a
puddle.
Mark
then
bounce
passes
it
back
to
Josh.
Josh
 then
raises
his
elbows
to
shoot,
with
a
chicken
wing
look,
and
throws
the
ball
 towards
the
basket
and
air
balls
it
terribly.
He
then
runs
over
towards
the
 fence
putting
his
head
in
his
lap
with
tears
streaming
down
his
cheeks.

 
 
 
 
 
 JOSH
MILLER
 But
dad
I
don’t
want
to
go
out
here.
The
other
kids
will
make
fun
of
 me.
They
think
I
suck
at
basketball.
 
 
 
 
 MARK
MILLER
 Well
if
you
never
come
out
here
how
are
you
going
to
get
any
better
at
 basketball?
 
 
 
 
 JOSH
MILLER
 I
don’t
care
about
being
better
right
now.
I
just
want
to
go
to
school.

 
 
 
 
 MARK
MILLER
 Come
on
Josh
let’s
shoot
a
little
bit.
If
you
practice
your
shot
and
get
 better
the
kids
will
stop
making
fun
of
you.

 
 
 
 
 JOSH
MILLER
 Yeah
I
guess
that’s
true.
Pass
me
the
ball
(Josh
starts
to
dribble
 bouncing
it
off
of
his
foot).
See
I
told
you
I’m
not
good.
I
want
to
leave.

 
 MARK
MILLER
 Let’s
try
some
shooting.
I
think
that’s
your
strong
suit
(Father
passes
 ball
to
Josh
and
he
air
balls
it).

 
 
 
 
 JOSH
MILLER
 I’m
never
going
to
be
any
good
(crying).
I
suck
so
bad
and
I
have
no
 friends.

 
 



2



 


Ext.
Showplace
Cinemas
Parking
Lot
–
Evening
 
 
 
 










2
 
 JOSH
MILLER
is
walking
out
of
the
movie
theatre
with
his
father
in
the
dark,
 musky
evening.
Josh
begins
to
look
very
emotional
before
tears
stream
down
 his
face
and
asks
his
dad
why
he
isn’t
as
good
at
basketball
as
everybody
else
 in
school.
Josh’s
father
hugs
him
letting
his
son
know
that
it
takes
hard
work
 to
be
good
at
something
and
all
one’s
effort
to
be
great.



JOSH
MILLER
 Why
can’t
I
be
as
good
at
basketball
like
everybody
else
at
school?
 
 
 
 
 MARK
MILLER
 Everybody
is
blessed
with
different
things
Josh.
You
were
born
with
a
 loving
family
and
a
nice
home
to
live
in.
Other
people
are
blessed
with
 tremendous
athletic
ability.

 
 
 
 
 JOSH
MILLER
 Yeah
but
dad
all
I
want
in
life
is
to
be
the
best
basketball
player.

 
 
 
 
 MARK
MILLER
 You
say
that
now,
but
when
your
older
you
will
value
other
things
like
 your
family
and
your
children.
There’s
a
lot
more
to
life
than
 basketball
and
you
will
learn
that
as
you
get
older.

 
 
 
 
 JOSH
MILLER
 Yeah
but
that’s
all
I
care
about
right
now
and
I
don’t
know
how
to
get
 better.
I
feel
like
I
work
hard
in
my
leagues.

 
 
 
 
 MARK
MILLER
 To
be
really
good
at
something
you
have
to
practice
everyday.
If
you
 practiced
basketball
everyday
I
bet
you
would
be
just
as
good
as
all
 your
friends.
If
all
you
do
is
practice
for
your
teams
your
never
going
 to
get
any
better
because
that
is
what
everybody
is
doing.

 
 
 
 
 JOSH
MILLER
 Everyday?
That’s
unrealistic.

 
 
 
 
 MARK
MILLER
 Not
if
you
want
to
be
a
great
basketball
player.
That’s
what
it
takes.
All
 of
the
great
players
not
only
worked
at
their
game
everyday,
but
they
 had
a
ton
of
natural
talent,
which
you
do
not.

 
 JOSH
MILLER
 OK,
I’ll
go
to
the
gym
more
often.




3
 



 
 
 
 


Int.
Southern
High
School
Basketball
Gym
–
Day
 













3







The
shiny
basketball
court
sits
alone
right
before
the
bell
rings
and
all
 of
the
jocks
awaiting
tryouts
finally
get
their
chance
to
be
apart
of
the
 Southern
High
basketball
team.
Everybody
runs
into
the
locker
room
 to
put
on
their
shorts
and
lace
up
their
shoes
in
hope
to
make
such
a
 great
basketball
team.
When
the
players
arrive
on
the
court
the
coach
 immediately
blows
the
whistle
and
directs
the
players
to
the
baseline
 to
run
sprint.
JOSH
MILLER
is
the
first
one
to
finish
the
last
lap,
and
 doesn’t
stop
his
effort
as
they
start
to
play
a
basketball
game.
Josh
 runs
up
and
down
the
court
stealing
pass
after
pass
making
basket
 after
basket.

 
 



 



 
 JOSH
MILLER
 So
I
heard
these
a
lot
of
people
are
trying
out
this
year?



 
 JOHNNY
BONES
(another
kid
trying
out)
 Yeah
I’m
not
sweating
it.
I
made
it
last
year
and
I
haven’t
gotten
 any
worse.
Why?
You
worried?
 
 
 
 
 JOSH
MILLER
 Not
really.
I’ve
been
working
my
ass
off.
I’m
not
like
I
was
back
 in
middle
school.
You’ll
see.



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



 
 JOHNNY
BONES
 Well
I
guess
we’ll
see.
I
did
here
that
you’ve
been
practicing
at
 Tri‐State
like
everyday.

 
 
 JOSH
MILLER
 Well
I’m
going
out
to
the
court
to
shoot
around
a
little
bit.
See
 you
out
there.

 
 
 COACH
MAVERICH

 Alright,
listen
up
everybody.
It’s
time
to
get
the
show
on
the
 road.
Get
on
the
baseline
and
run
a
couple
suicides.
 
 
 JOHNNY
BONES
 This
is
going
to
suck
man.
 
 
 JOSH
MILLER
 Quit
being
a
pussy
bro.




4
 



 
 
 



 
 


Int.
Conseco
Fieldhouse
‐
Evening
 













4


The
Southern
High
School
bus
pulls
up
to
Conseco
Fieldhouse
with
all
 of
the
players
pumping
each
other
up
for
the
first
state
championship
 any
of
them
had
ever
played
for.
The
player’s
walks
off
the
bus
with
 they’re
warm
up
uniforms
swaying
in
the
wind
and
smiles
of
winners.

 When
they
get
into
the
stadium
they
start
to
warm
up
then
it’s
time
to
 play.
The
tip
goes
up,
and
the
other
team
grabs
the
ball.
Josh
then
 comes
in
with
the
steal
and
finishes
with
a
spectacular
slam‐dunk.
The
 dunking
continues
and
the
shooting
takes
over.
Southern
High
School
 wins
by
15.
 
 
 
 
 
 MARK
MILLER
 What
ever
you
do
tonight
son
don’t
give
up.
There
are
a
lot
of
 scouts
out
there
that
think
you
are
a
great
player.
Everyday
of
 sweat
and
blood
that
you
have
given
up
was
given
up
for
this
 night.
This
is
your
chance
to
shine.

 
 
 
 
 
 JOSH
MILLER
 Well
thanks
dad.
You’ve
always
been
there
for
me.
From
the
 playground
where
I
couldn’t
make
a
lay
up
to
Conseco
where
 I’ll
be
dunking
on
some
of
the
best
players
in
the
game
you’ve
 been
more
than
my
father
but
my
best
friend.

 
 
 
 
 MARK
MILLER
 I
just
want
you
to
go
out
there
and
have
fun.
That’s
what
you’ve
 always
done
and
that’s
what
got
you
here.
 
 
 
 
 COACH
MAVERICH
 Alright
boy’s,
tonight
is
the
night
we’ve
all
been
working
so
 damn
hard.
We’ve
done
well
until
this
point.
Let’s
not
fuck
 anything
up.

 
 ANNOUNCER
 Ladies
and
gentlemen,
for
the
start
of
the
game
number
44
 Jooossshhhhh
Milller!!!!
 
 
 
 
 JOSH
MILLER
 I’ve
waited
all
my
life
for
this
I
can’t
believe
the
time
has
finally
 came.
 
 
 



 
 
 Good
luck
son
 
 


COACH
MAVERICH



5
 


Int.
Staples
Center
–
Evening



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


It’s
Friday
night
in
Los
Angeles,
California.
The
Lakers
are
hosting
the
 San
Antonio
Spurs
for
the
season
opener
in
the
Staples
Center.
The
 music
fills
the
stadium
air,
as
does
the
smell
of
delicious
popcorn
as
 the
fans
pile
in
the
stadium
to
take
their
seats
for
the
start
of
the
 game.
The
lights
dim
as
the
shade
of
the
sparkly
floor
evaporates
into
 the
darkness.
“Joooshh
Miller,”
the
announcer
shouts
as
a
six‐foot
 skinny
white
man
bursts
onto
the
court
as
if
this
is
nothing
new
to
 him.
The
ball
is
tipped,
grabbed
by
Josh,
and
the
first
three
pointer
of
 the
game
is
made.
“Jossshhh
Miller,”
the
announcer
shouts
again
as
 Lakers
fans
jump
out
of
their
seats
to
give
a
round
of
applause
to
a
 man
that
has
given
all
he
had
to
reach
a
dream
that
most
people
 cannot
imagine:
The
dream
of
becoming
an
NBA
superstar.




 
 
 
 
 JOSH
MILLER
 Wow
this
is
a
lot
different
from
high
school.
There
are
so
many
people
 out
there.
 
 
 
 
 KAREEM
ABDUL‐JABAR


 Yeah
you
get
used
to
it.
It
shouldn’t
be
to
hard
for
you.
You’re
a
fun
 player
to
watch.
Just
go
out
there
and
did
what
you
did
in
high
school.

 
 
 
 
 JOSH
MILLER
 Thanks
a
lot
Kareem.
That
means
a
lot
coming
from
you.




 
 
 
 



 
 
 COACH
JERRY
WEST
 Hurry
up
Josh.
Warm
up
a
little
bit.
It’s
Showtime!!
 
 
 
 
 JOSH
MILLER
 I
can’t
believe
I
finally
made
it
to
the
NBA.
This
is
crazy.




 
 
 KAREEM
ABDUL‐JABAR
 It’s
a
really
lucky
opportunity
that
most
people
that
work
extremely
 hard
will
never
reach.
You’re
a
lucky
kid.

 
 
 
 
 JOSH
MILLER
 Well
let’s
put
on
a
show.




 
 



 
 
 
 
 



 













5



Postmortem/Reflection
on
“The
Dream”
 


When
creating
this
story
I
first
wanted
to
write
about
something
that
I
could


relate
to.
Basketball,
having
been
one
of
my
passions
since
my
father
introduced
it
 to
me
in
the
sixth
grade,
was
something
that
was
always
way
more
than
a
game
to
 me.
It
became
a
goal
of
mine
to
become
the
best
basketball
player
I
could
possibly
 be.
The
NBA
was
always
the
highest
goal.
It
was
a
goal
that
was
so
far
for
me,
but
it
 seemed
so
close
when
I
worked
at
it
everyday.
I
truly
believed
that
if
I
practiced
 enough
I
could
make
it
to
the
most
elite
league
in
the
sport
of
basketball.

 When
I
wrote
this
story
I
wanted
to
capture
every
level
of
basketball
and
 how
competitive
Josh
was
at
each
level,
and
also
the
struggles
at
each
level.
I
began
 the
story
with
a
glimpse
to
the
future
where
Josh
had
reached
his
highest
goal,
and
 was
at
the
happiest
point
of
his
basketball
career.
Then
I
flashed
back
to
the
 beginning
of
his
basketball
career
when
he
was
the
worst
and
didn’t
know
what
it
 took
to
get
better.
I
then
took
the
audience
through
the
different
parts
of
Josh’s
 basketball
life.
As
Josh
got
better
I
wanted
the
audience
to
feel
more
excited,
but
 when
Josh
failed
I
wanted
to
the
audience
to
feel
sorry
for
him.
This
story
is
 supposed
to
be
an
emotional
rollercoaster.

 When
Josh
starts
to
train
with
Troy
I
wanted
the
audience
to
feel
how
hard
 he
was
training
to
be
that
much
better
at
basketball,
and
as
he
went
to
tryouts
I
 wanted
the
audience
to
see
how
the
training
was
paying
off.
There
were
a
lot
of
 obstacles,
but
no
matter
what
Josh
kept
fighting
to
be
the
best.

 When
Josh’s
father,
Mark,
talked
to
him
I
wanted
the
audience
to
feel
the
 emotion
between
Josh
and
his
father
and
how
his
father
only
wanted
the
best
for



him.
No
matter
what
Josh’s
father
was
always
behind
him
whether
he
it
was
during
 his
toughest
times
when
he
wanted
to
give
up
the
game
of
basketball
or
his
happiest
 times
when
he
eventually
made
it
to
the
highest
level
of
basketball.
Through
thick
 and
through
thin
Josh’s
dad
was
always
there
for
him.

 


When
Josh
got
to
high
school
and
walked
onto
the
court
as
if
“he
owned
the


gym”
I
wanted
the
audience
to
get
a
sense
of
his
swagger
or
cockiness
as
he
got
 better
with
training.
Since
he
was
young
and
still
childish
he
didn’t
make
the
team
 his
freshman
year.
As
time
went
on,
however,
Josh
matured
and
with
maturity
Josh
 became
a
better
and
smarter
player.
He
slowly
climbed
the
ladder
of
the
team
until
 he
was
the
leader
and
when
he
was
the
leader
he
lead
his
team
to
the
state
 championship
for
the
first
time
in
his
school’s
history.

 


When
Josh
arrived
at
Conseco
for
the
state
championship
I
tried
to
show
his


happiness
from
achieving
a
goal
that
at
one
time
may
have
seemed
impossible,
but
I
 still
leave
room
for
the
passion
that
he
has
for
the
game
when
he
makes
it
to
the
 NBA.
I
also
wanted
to
give
a
glimpse
of
the
hard
work
and
hustle
that
Josh
shows
in
 the
state
championship
as
he
fights
towards
a
win
with
every
possession
of
the
 basketball
game.

 


In
the
end,
I
wanted
to
show
once
again
the
ultimate
victory,
which
was
Josh


making
to
his
ultimate
goal,
the
NBA.
I
wanted
the
audience
to
feel
the
excitement
of
 being
in
an
NBA
stadium
as
a
player
for
the
first
time.

 


Ultimately,
this
is
a
story
about
a
young
boy
with
a
dream
who,
through
hard


work
and
determination
and
the
help
of
family
and
friends,
conquers
his
ultimate
 goal.
This
story
shows
that
nothing
great
comes
to
anybody
who
doesn’t
work
hard



for
it,
and
that
achieving
one’s
ultimate
goal
is
the
greatest
feeling
a
person
can
 have.
 


The Dream  

First "Big" Assignment

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