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THE POCKLINGTONIAN 2011/2012


THE POCKLINGTONIAN 2011/2012 Editor:

Miss Louise A Lamb: lambl@pocklingtonschool.com

Editor's Assistant:

Mrs Bryony Marshall

Editorial Committee:

Hannah Hutchinson, Tom Hartle, Emma Adesile and Scott Dyson

Design:

Martin Malarkey: bryarystudio@btconnect.com

Printer:

Linden Richardson: lindenrichardson@aol.com

The editorial committee would be delighted to hear your views on this year's publication. To contact us, please e-mail the editor.


A

nother year, another brand new Pocklingtonian. Along with the usual sporting successes, various CCF outings and multiple dramatic and musical productions, this year’s Magazine is rather trip orientated and, whilst compiling and editing the articles, many of us have felt at least a twinge of envy, writes Hannah Hutchinson (U6). This year’s new editorial team has spent hours endlessly slaving away over articles, painstakingly editing, correcting and hacking them (where necessary), as well as having extremely difficult ‘lunch meetings’ in Pocklington’s Deli, all in order to produce this year’s masterpiece. Of course, none of this would have run quite so smoothly without the guidance and help of Miss Lamb, our editor-in-chief, and Mrs Marshall. I would like to think that as the more experienced pupil representative, I have taught the ‘newbies’ (Emma Adesile, Tom Hartle and Scott Dyson (L6)) a thing or two, but in all honesty they didn’t need any teaching. They have been a most beneficial addition to this year’s Committee, being sources of both knowledge and humour, and the Magazine would not have had certain additions and specials if it weren’t for them. However, it must be said that the most exciting part of Magazine Committee is yet to come; that feeling of satisfaction when you’re holding a copy hot-off-the-press that you personally have helped to create. Our trip to Carcanet Press in Manchester during Lent Term was as informative as last year, with the added bonus of having a tour around the marketing sector and an introduction to online sales strategies in the publishing industry. Although this is my last year at Pocklington, I leave knowing I have been a part of a school rich in extra-curricular activities and opportunities, about which we have tried to collate as many articles as possible. As exciting as September promises to be, it’s comforting to know that I was a part of the Pocklingtonian Committee and that it is being left in safe hands. However, I do still maintain that certain changes may be worthwhile… perhaps a holographic pop-up or two? Ahem! Did we discuss this?! Ed.

THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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HEADMASTER

‘‘

‘I cannot thank you enough for everything you have done for me for the last five years I’ve been boarding in Fenwick-Smith and School House. These years have been the best years in my life and you have made this a time I will never forget. I know I may not be one of the best pupils in this school according to behaviour and the stupid stuff I have done, but you have stuck by us every minute of every day. Your consideration for helping others is unbelievable and I cannot put into words how much I’m going to miss you and Fenwick-Smith; these are the times I will never forget.’

T

hough this is well-deserved praise for Trevor Loten, who retires from boarding after twelve years as Housemaster of School House and then Fenwick-Smith, it is also a reflection of the support that pupils receive within our school. Boarding is integral to the spirit which we cherish at Pocklington. While it will never replace family life, we are committed to supporting Pocklingtonians for whom the school is home during term time.

‘‘

As a whole school community, one of the remarkable features of Pocklington is the Biannual School Walk. The 17 mile hike takes us through a landscape that has achieved national recognition through the artwork of David Hockney. Unfortunately this year we had to abort the walk due to flooding. The way pupils and staff responded to the challenging conditions was remarkable and testimony to the relationships that are nurtured over time. We will still seek to collect the sponsorship to support those who are not as fortunate as we are. I do appreciate the work of the Charity Committee: a successful collaboration of students and teachers. I am grateful to Emma Adesile (L6) for taking a lead in developing our support and connection with the Army Benevolent Fund. The second ‘Pocktoberfest’ event, to be held this October in the Sports Hall, will be seeking to raise money for Help for Heroes and we are already in contact with the Round Table to ensure that the school can support this important fundraising organisation. Appreciation of Pocklington School was most vivid when Fiona and I hosted over 50 people at a reception in Hong Kong in April this year. We were fortunate to meet many parents of current Pocklingtonians and I was struck by their warmth towards the school in spite of the 6,000 miles that separate us, not to mention the 30 degree difference in temperature! I remain impressed by the endeavours of our students. There is always a danger in referring to just a few examples as this will obviously exclude many other personal achievements: too many indeed to record in this letter. However, I do want to acknowledge the courage of George Hetherton (U6) who endured a desperate and very serious leg injury in a rugby fixture nearly two years ago. He has continued to come to school despite the pain that he has so often suffered. I wish him and all those who leave us this summer every success. Signing distinction cards is always an inspiring and enlightening task and one I enjoy immensely as it provides me with an insight into some of the remarkable intellectual work undertaken by Pocklingtonians. Sarah Jackson (1HUT) impressed me greatly with her comparison of form and function between Bauhaus and the Apple iPhone. I also enjoyed a conversation with James Reckitt (U6) and Alex Howard (U6) about the presentation of female characters and the contrast between Bathsheba in Far From The Madding Crowd and Nurse Ratched in One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest. School communities, like families, are never perfect, but it is through the daily interactions of pupils, teachers and support staff that we grow and strengthen our relationships which, in turn, build the strong bonds of co-operation which are key to school days.

MER

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HEADS OF SCHOOL

T

he very first moment I realised the challenges my new role was going to bring took place during the memorable prefect trip to the Lake District. As I shielded myself from millions of midges happily attacking my face and reached new levels of physical exhaustion from the ‘short’ walk, everything became clear. This was going to be a very demanding year and even my new shiny badge could not save me, writes Aggie Jakubowska (U6). Michaelmas Term brought many responsibilities and the rollercoaster ride started. Guy and I had to sort out the duty rota, conduct Wednesday assemblies and arrange weekly meetings with Mr Ronan. Although those tasks might seem reasonably straightforward, they were more strenuous than first anticipated by our novice selves. It took us about half a year to realise the actual order of the assemblies (it turns out the hymn comes before the prayer) and to restore some form of friendship without the risk of murdering each other. Over the next few months, we settled into the routine faced by Heads of School and managed to maintain the somewhat fragile illusion of order and schedule. Our efforts were rewarded with delicious cakes from Mrs Ronan (which in hindsight I can see were subtly applied as positive reinforcement). Having to stand in front of our peers on weekly basis, which frequently ended in awkward pauses, and discussing possible alterations to the school life (involving the lack of biscuits in the Sixth form centre) started to become much easier. As the year progressed, I have definitely acquired a set of skills which will assist me in the future. One of those is the ability to keep tuck shop riots under control, consisting of Fifth formers exercising their right to a separate queue and obtaining the ‘to-die-for’ daily bacon butty. However, all joking aside, in my opinion the key to being Head Girl is the ability to combine selfconfidence with criticism, and find new ways of solving problems by listening to different people’s suggestions and views, whilst maintaining some sense of authority. Although at times you might feel confused and panicked, it is important to remain selfassured. Having spent five years at Pocklington, I can safely say that its traditions and values have had a huge impact on me. It wasn’t until last year that I began fully to appreciate the safe atmosphere and high standards offered here, which cannot easily be found elsewhere. All I can do is hope that I have had some impact in promoting those ideals and managed to give back at least a fraction of what has been given to me.

A

s with all new leaders following a successful coup, my first days of power were spent cutting back-room deals to divide responsibility between my various comrades. Various factions were to be carefully handled; Jonathan Chu and Tom Burke were to be kept busy at all times to minimise the risk of a Brutus-esque betrayal, a complex web of deceit had to be weaved to insure that at no point Aggie thought I had spare time for her to ‘organise’ and, perhaps most importantly, Mr Ronan was to be persuaded that I hadn’t made a hash of it (already) in week one, writes Guy Harland (U6). With the duty rota implemented and weekly meetings organised with the Headmaster, I began to settle into my role as Head Boy; the stage fright of the first few Wednesday morning assemblies had been replaced with a buoyant smile and an overwhelming sense of optimism that disgusted most of the Sixth form, who were merely trying to sleep through the notices. Numerous pupils and staff informed me that there was absolutely no need to be that happy, that early in the morning. The year continued in a similar fashion, in regard to duties, experiencing only one minor excitement in the shape of a Fifth form protest at tuck shop. In a surprising moment of spontaneous and cohesive action, the boys boycotted tuck shop, declaring they would continue to protest until they received their own queue, or were allowed into the Sixth form one. The unrest, however, lacked the conviction of the Tarhir Square protests that had inspired it, and quickly dissipated when the effects of bacon sandwich deprivation began to be felt. I feel that it says something about the pupils and ethos of Pocklington that even our protests are acted out with smiles on the faces of both sides. Cheerfulness in the face of adversity: a very Pocklingtonian thing. This last year at Pocklington has not all been success, however; my attempts to graze a goat on the school fields were barred by numerous Health and Safety laws, and, despite my clearly stated right to ‘grow a beard’, my efforts to get Ned Donnan to be allowed to grow it for me never bore fruit. These minor discrepancies will, of course, not diminish in my mind the enjoyment and rewards that the role has delivered to me over the year. I hope that next year’s Heads can enjoy this privileged duty as much as I have, and lead on, with smiles across their faces, into the future.

THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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APPOINTMENTS 2011/2012 Head Boy Head Girl Deputy Head Boy Deputy Head Girl

Guy Harland Agnieszka Jakubowska Tom Burke Ellie McCabe

Heads of House (Boarding) Faircote Sophie Duncan Fenwick-Smith Ray Tang

Dolman Gruggen Hutton Wilberforce

Heads of House (Day) Juliet May, Chris Pratt Georgina Beevers, Joe Bedford Bex Knight, Ryan Phillips Imogen Henderson, David Dickinson

Jonathan Chu Jake Dale Ned Donnan Sophie Duncan Sophia Eggleston Harry Hetherton Alex Howard Hannah Hutchinson

School Prefects Amy Kendall Alex Lyon John Micklem-Cooper Charlotte Prescott James Reckitt Ray Tang Sarah Veitch Anna Wilkinson

ARRIVALS Bobby Moore

I

’m from Victoria British Columbia, on the west coast of Canada. I’ve just graduated from high school and am 18. I enjoy History and PE and am currently thinking about becoming a teacher or tradesman. Before coming to Pock, I’ve only really travelled to the west coast, Vancouver, Washington state, Hawaii and California so this was a big change. I’ve played high level hockey for most my life and that’s really what I’ve done in the spectrum of sport as well as some baseball. I am also looking forward to travelling and learning a little about what it means to be a part of the Pocklington community.

After a term in Dolman Boarding House, Bobby returned to Canada to resume his studies. We wish him all the very best for the future. Ed

Olivia Morris

I

studied at Pocklington School for 7 years and was one of the first girls to join Pocklington in 1st year. I spent many hours in the Art department, experimenting and becoming inspired by the arts around me. It’s strange being back in the same department as a Teacher! In my years after leaving Pocklington School, I attended DeMontfort University and graduated with a degree in Fashion and Textiles, which led to a successful career as a fashion designer, working Worldwide with stores such as H&M, Miss Selfridge and New Look. 4

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I then went on to teach fashion at Leicester College, before moving back to Pocklington three years ago after the birth of my daughter. I joined the Art and Design department at Bishop Burton College, teaching 3-D Art, Design and Fashion, working on projects such as The Bridal Buyer awards. I love to travel and spent 2 years living and working in America. My other passions include cooking, making clothes, listening to music and spending time with my daughter, who loves living in the area and has just started school.

Richard Valentine

I

have taught in a variety of institutions, from Hull College to a bi-lingual school in Holland. I currently live in Beverley and spent a year working at Beverley High School before completing my PGCE at the University of Hull. My degree in Biology specialised in delights such as parasitology and infection control, which means I have a passion for the horrible side of science. I have worked for Europe’s largest motorcycling retailer and was featured in one of their television commercials but with all the gear on, so you wouldn’t know it’s me! I am a motorcycling and camping enthusiast in my spare time. Weather does not get in my way so long as there’s a hill to walk up and some firewood to gather. Strangely, my wife doesn’t feel the same… I am teaching Lower School Science and Middle School Biology, mostly based in Biology Lab 1 where my students enjoy a fantastic range of classroom pets. I am currently organising a joint classroom project with my Dutch colleagues to promote international links and use web technologies in science. I am also looking forward to running an astronomy evening this winter with the boarders once it gets sufficiently cold and dark.

Sam Cheadle

I

knew that filling Rob Peel’s shoes within the Biology Department would be a huge, if not impossible task. However, I have had the best possible start thanks in most part to the support and guidance of Martin Butcher and the rest of the Biology team. In addition to my teaching duties, I am Resident House Tutor in Orchard. It has been a hectic first term and I must thank Jan Midwinter and all of the girls for teaching me the ropes. I graduated with an Honours degree in Zoology from Newcastle University and went on to make the most of my knowledge and experience by working and volunteering within various conservation projects around the world. After returning from an expedition that was initially planned to last one year (but in actual fact ended up lasting three) I was determined to pursue my passion for Biology and so completed my teacher training at the University of Cumbria. Growing up on the Lancashire coast, I have always been a fan of the great outdoors, whether it be exploring our local countryside, on the side line of Sale Sharks rugby pitch or in the stands at Old Trafford cricket ground. I am now making the most of my free time by discovering the beautiful Yorkshire countryside around Pocklington. I would like to thank Pock’s community for welcoming me so warmly.


Tristan Hymers

I

was born in Hanover, Germany, and spent many years moving from place to place while my father served as an Officer in the British Army. At the age of nine, I was sent to board at Barnard Castle, where I developed a passion for sports and outdoor pursuits. Though Rugby and team sports are high on the agenda for all students at ‘Barny’, I excelled most in Athletics and Swimming, competing respectively for a number of years at County and National level. I graduated from DMU, Bedford with a BSc in Sports Science, and after a year of working in the Fitness industry, undertook a PGCE in Secondary PE at Christ Church, Canterbury in order to become a PE teacher. In my first placement at College I met my future wife ‘Miss McIntyre’, and in July 2008 we got married in the US State of Hawaii. Since qualifying as a teacher I have spent the past ten years living and working as a PE teacher, working in various schools in the Kent and North Yorkshire area. Outside of school my interests are predominantly sportsbased but much of my free time is now spent Surfing in Yorkshire or Northumberland. In addition to this, I have an active interest in various marine conservation projects.

DEPARTURES Helen Scott

H

elen joined us in 2010, following a career in finance in a variety of exotic worldwide locations. She settled with ease into the equally cosmopolitan surroundings of Faircote House, and quickly established herself with the girls and staff. She excelled herself in the Mathematics department, proving an invaluable source of new ideas and resources which she championed in meetings and in the classroom. Her talents were snapped up by the CCF, by the Charity Committee, and in a variety of sporting areas, including horse riding. She has been a valued colleague and highly valued also by those she taught. She moves on to Marlborough College and goes with our very best wishes for the future. JFC

James Playford

J

ames has been a breath of fresh air in the department. Over the last two years he has managed to maintain many of the historical strengths of the department whilst introducing new teaching tools, for example the iPads and re-emphasising the design content of the curriculum. On a more personal level I have learnt a number of very important requirements for the running of a successful department; the need to spread the word about the fantastic work that pupils produce in all of the year groups, the need to have a pack of tame wolves for the removal of the evidence and always having chocolate biscuits on hand at breaks. As a colleague moving away to a new school, I know that James will be taking away a far greater insight into tractors than he probably ever wanted to possess and I can only hope that this newly acquired knowledge will help to further enrich his teaching in his new post. It only remains for me to wish him well and, even though he is moving a long way away, to hope that we can maintain our successful collaboration in developing projects through the wonders of technology.

Jonathan Sykes ‘Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.’ W B Yeats

J

onathan has illuminated many areas of school life since he joined the Geography Department as an NQT. He was educated at Woodhouse Grove which laid the foundations of the well-rounded person that he is. In Geography he has been innovative in his teaching methods and materials but not averse to ‘colouring in’. He has converted his skills as a rugby player into coaching, with considerable success at a number of levels, most recently with the U15s. His contributions pastorally, as a resident boarding tutor and as a day Housemaster, have been impressive. He is able to combine care, common sense, energy and high expectations which have made him liked and respected by staff, parents and pupils alike. He will be missed by many people as he moves to Bermuda, where he will further develop his experience and career. There is little doubt that the gap he leaves is large, but he will not be forgotten because of his friendliness and contribution in so many areas. We hope that the fire he lit in Pocklington will illuminate Bermuda like a ‘nuee ardente’. IMcD

Jonathan Webb

T

he most daunting thing about joining Pocklington in 2009 was not the typical nerves of a new job, new faces and new - unfathomable routines. No, what was most daunting was the task of taking over the History Department from Jonathan Webb. Jonathan had transformed the department, overhauling everything possible from schemes of work to the fundamental philosophies of teaching which underpinned it. It was through his own blood, sweat and tears that the department grew in size and stature and became so very popular with our students. It was he who introduced HISTORIA (the now worldwide phenomena) and the BIG TRIP, plus the majestic beach cricket tournament at Scarborough. My job has been simple: keep quiet and just keep the ship sailing – I have a great deal to thank Jonathan for. It is, in fact, a bit of the school's history which is now broken too. Not only has the Webb-Taylor-Fell triumvirate finally been broken but so has the last link to the famous history department of yesteryear: Rumbelow-PeelSolomon. The world keeps turning but we shall never forget. On a personal level, I am truly saddened to see Jonathan depart. He has been a great companion on the history 'tours' the last three years and I can sum his qualities up thus: vodka in Russia, London Pride in...erm, London, frankly any beer in New York and same again in Washington DC and of course the Duvel in Ypres. On a serious note, these trips are a keystone in what the department, both Jonathan's and my version, has strived to achieve in inspiring and educating our students beyond the classroom. I know that there can be very few schools to have run these trips with such verve, humour and passion as we have these last years and Jonathan must take much of the credit for this. In his most recent post as Director of Teaching and Learning, the staff will unite with me in our appreciation of the Sparkle magazine: who will ever forget Peter Edwards being inspired by Jonathan's lesson starter ideas? Anybody else want to try and mime Prawn Cocktail... Jonathan has literally rewritten the school's academic plans and policies in his time in this position and has achieved his promotion to Deputy Head at Durham School because of his success. We wish him all the very best. However, Jonathan. Let me be frank: I can never forgive you for leaving me alone to put up with the duo of destruction: Hall and Long... GJH

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SCHOOL

Rachel Spencer

W

hat an inspired piece of recruitment it was two years ago when Miss Spencer was taken on full-time to fulfil a myriad of roles across the Foundation. Prior to that, she had been snapped up by the School as a part-time sports coach but really came into her own as a member of staff at both Pocklington and Lyndhurst. Her contribution to the Foundation has been varied and intricate; PE and Games teacher in both schools (including Mother Goose for the reception classes in Lyndhurst), Head of Tennis, Swimming and Cross Country, striking and effective in uniform for the CCF, theory teacher for GCSE and A Level PE, Hutton tutor and, latterly, Faircote Boarding Assistant.

STAFF NEWS

I

n boarding, Trevor Loten leaves Fenwick-Smith after twelve memorable years as Housemaster. He is replaced by Patrick and Rachel Dare and family, who moved in over the summer and take charge from September. We wish outgoing and incoming staff all the very best for the new academic year.

All these titles aside, we shall remember her more for her inexhaustible energy levels, boundless enthusiasm and dedication to the teaching of her pupils – something we sometimes lose sight of. AET

Richard Valentine

R

ichard joined us as a PGCE student in the academic year 2010-2011. He was employed as an NQT from September 2011 to cover Dr Clow’s maternity leave. He has thrown himself into the work of the department since the ‘off’ and has become a very successful and well-liked member of the department. His ICT skills have enabled the department to move forward in this area and his expertise will be missed. Richard ran both junior science clubs, which have gone from strength to strength under his stewardship. He has also proved to be a very popular third year tutor. We were delighted when Richard was appointed by Beverley Boys’ Grammar, as a science teacher – their gain is definitely our loss. MJB

Sarah Wass

S

arah has been an outstanding teacher and a very good friend for the last eight years. She arrived in September 2004, having completed her PGCE at King’s College, London the previous year. After university, she spent a year teaching English in Japan before deciding to turn her hand to teaching in the UK. Sarah has brought a great deal to the school during her time here, both as subject teacher and, later on, as subject leader of Spanish. Since the birth of her son, Isaac, in February 2011, she has worked part time in the MFL department. As well as inspiring many pupils in the classroom, Sarah was also in charge of Oxbridge entries until 2010, having attended Oxford University herself as a student. Each year, she took a group of Oxbridge applicants down to the two university cities to give them an insight into what life is like there as a student as well as being tireless in her support for students during the application process. Sarah also arranged a number of Spanish trips and exchanges and accompanied various French and Classics trips during her time at the school. She spent most of her time as a 6th form tutor and really enjoyed working with this age group. Sarah also worked as a non-resident tutor in Orchard boarding house for a number of years, showing kindness and compassion to the younger girls. Thanks to her cheerful and gentle manner, she has always been a muchloved teacher at Pocklington and we will miss her hugely. We wish her all the best as she moves on to pastures new with her family. SAM/CJP 6

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Pocklington bid farewell to a ‘magnificent seven’ academic staff members at the end of Summer Term. We wish all leavers every success for their new positions and challenges. Fuller testimonials are provided in these pages. Dave Galloway was our ‘Olympian’ this year in his position as Assistant Representative for his delegated team – Swaziland! Arriving in London in late July, while carrying out a range of duties to support his country, Herr G also took in the superb Opening Ceremony and enjoyed watching a range of events. Read his report of his experience in this Magazine. There were wedding bells this summer for Miss McNelly, now Mrs Biggin! Many congratulations to Hannah and Mark. Ed Long and his fiancée Teresa also tied the knot over the long vacation. Our best wishes to you both. Congratulations to Kirsten Clow and husband Jules following the safe arrival in December 2011 of their first child, Skye, and to Gareth and Rachel Hughes on the birth of Claudia at the beginning of this year.


“THANK YOU.” “YOU’RE WELCOME!”

M

ost of us are party to this exchange seven, eight times a day – more, if you board. If this is so, just imagine how often our superb crossing staff hear it. It is polite; but we are really just intent on reaching our next destination. If you are a pupil, you might be inventing an excuse for a missed prep; if you are a member of staff, you are probably inventing your next lesson. Guilty! Ed. Thank you on behalf of all at school for the wonderful work you do, in all weathers!

SCHOOL FABRIC

C

lassroom reshuffling and creation has left the campus looking rather different this year. To the casual observer, nothing much has changed; but anyone familiar with the geography of academic subjects in the recent past will notice some of the following movements on a tour of the school. As shown on this page, Latin now sits opposite Religious Studies, next door to the relative tranquility of the Headmaster’s garden. Mr Andrews and Miss McNelly enjoy the luxury of a gigantic office and an outside facility. The old downstairs Drama studio has now been converted into a colourful Middle School Common Room, shown on this page. The History Department is also on the move, now living next to the Sixth Form Centre, directly above reception. As English mourns the ‘History Boys’’ departure, the Psychology Department arrives to ease the pain somewhat. The room formerly known as ‘101’ is now the new Cookery suite. Finally, the Staff Annexe has been converted into a new bag store, open from Michaelmas Term 2012.

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SCHOOL

MICKLE IS THY MIGHT, O MYSTERY PLAYS! OLYMPIC GAMESMAKER

M O

ver the summer holidays, I was heavily involved with the 2012 York Mystery Plays. After making a single phone call to one of the directors, and attending an interview, I was given the parts of a bright orange dancing angel in Act 1, and the speaking part of “Mary 3” in Act 2. The rehearsals ran through the whole of the summer term, and the performances ran from 2nd to 27th August. Despite the fact that I have the dance skills of a penguin (!), I thoroughly enjoyed every second of the production, and have made so many new friends along the way. I am really hoping to get more involved in theatre in the future. HMY

y love affair with the Olympic Games goes all the way back to the 1970s – I remember the excitement in the Galloway household in Aberdeen when we got our first colour TV for the Münich Olympics, and then 4 years later we watched enthralled as David Wilkie won Gold in a world record time in Montreal! So when pupils came round all the classrooms on 6 July 2005 to announce that London had won the right to host the Games in 2012, I was delighted and excited, and started to think about getting involved. In 2008 I appeared in a TV quiz show called Sports Mastermind, where Des Lynam asked the questions, and I chose as my specialist subject the 1936 Olympics! How could I top that? Well. In early 2011 I saw an advert somewhere for ‘Olympic Gamesmakers’, whatever they were! I applied and before I knew it, I was asked to attend an interview in Manchester at Easter 2011, and in October 2011 they told me I had been accepted and they wanted me to be a NOC Assistant! From February 2012, I embarked on a training programme which took me to London on a regular basis – thanks to the school for allowing me time off when needed – and in our final session in Hackney at the end of May, I found out the NOC for whom I would employ my skills, including my language abilities…SWAZILAND! After an interview, an orientation at Wembley hosted by Jonathan Edwards and Eddie Izzard, six role-specific training sessions, two driving sessions, a uniform fitting and accreditation collection and a venue visit to see the Olympic Village, I was ready to embark on an amazing adventure. To be honest, “amazing” isn’t adequate, and if I tried to sum up my experiences I would run out of superlatives. Suffice to say, a brief article in The

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Other highlights include:

Pocklingtonian can only give a snapshot (though a darn fine one at that! Ed), so if you want to find out more, come to the assemblies I’ll be giving for the next few years, to pay back my colleagues for all their support and good wishes when I was off training!

an urgent phone call from our Chef de Mission, asking me to run and present a Swaziland Olympic pin to Venus Williams

chatting to the GB Gold medal winning rower Kath Grainger

seeing the Queen and Prince Philip in the Village

showing my wife and very excitable grandchildren round the Village and introducing them to the Swazi athletes

marching into the stadium as an “athlete” at the Opening Ceremony rehearsal, and sharing that with my wife via Skype! I “competed” for Djibouti!

helping Muriel, the Swazi NOC Secretary-General, pick skirts and blouses for the women in the team for the Opening Ceremony at the last minute

watching Mo Farah and Usain Bolt doing each other’s celebrations after winning Gold medals and watching my Iphone videos of their races

marching with our team to the edge of the stadium for the Opening Ceremony past thousands of cheering schoolchildren

We assistants felt we were the luckiest Gamesmakers in that we were privileged to be based in the Village and dealt directly with the athletes. In effect we were gophers and helpers, so we were there to sort out any problems, and make sure they could concentrate on producing their best performances. We drove them around, organised tickets, went shopping for them and with them, showed guests round the Village, got them organised for opening and closing ceremonies, helped them arrive and depart, collected post and messages, made sure they turned up for doping controls meetings, interviews and meetings with royalty (!),showed them the sights, entertained visitors and benefactors, took them for drinks in cocktail bars, took them clubbing (!), showed them the Emirates Stadium, distributed Swazi pins…and so much more! As our role often involved taking athletes, coaches and officials to venues, our accreditation afforded us access to all venues, and when we weren’t officially on duty and our Chef de Mission allowed us, we had chances to catch some of the action. I managed to see tennis at Wimbledon, some diving and swimming, and most excitingly for me, athletics in the stadium! When people talk about Usain Bolt winning the 100 metres, or Mo Farah winning Gold, or Jess Ennis competing in the Pentathlon, or Jamaica breaking the world record in the sprint relay, I can say, I was there! DAG

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ACTIVITIES

CHARITY WEEK

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his year was the Charity Week under the new leadership of Miss Scott and Mr Hutchings. Event organisation, planning and promotion were all ably led by a team of willing Sixth formers in both years. We had several new events to add to our calendar of classics, reports Nathan Waddell (U6).

On Monday there was a dodgeball tournament held for senior and junior years. A competition to see who could eat a Cadbury’s Creme Egg the quickest also took place throughout the week. Tuesday saw the Middle School Fair, in which all the forms from third to fifth year created a buzz around the school, as did the Musical Chairs event which was thoroughly enjoyed by all! The final day of voting for Staff Gunging took place on Wednesday, hand in hand with the Lower School Fair. Lots of noise emanated from St Nicholas’ Quad as Lower School pupils rounded up visitors to their stalls whilst members of staff nominated for gunging attempted to pay their way out (Mr Valentine, the guilty party!) by donating large chunks of money to vote for their colleagues instead. The final event was the Gunging itself. Four ‘lucky’ members of staff were put into the bath: Miss Cheadle, new to the Biology department this year; Miss Postlethwaite, who had managed to avoid gunging every year since she joined the school; Miss Spencer, in her final year at Pocklington and Mr Webb, who also left in July. After such a successful week, the Charity Committee would like to thank all the pupils and staff for their kind donations to events this year. We managed to raise £2700 from the week alone - a fantastic achievement.

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SCHOOL WALK

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t was a great disappointment after so much planning that the ‘English Summer’ decided to target the School Walk.

For the first time in more than 20 years, the 24k hike had to be aborted after approximately four miles had been covered and that meant that everyone had to do another four miles back to base, along the same route, in pouring rain and driving wind. The packed lunches were already on their way, the walkers were cold and wet and the 5th and 6th form markers of the route were decidedly damp when the decision was made to abort. Almost the whole school found itself in one of those awful situations where some thought we should continue and others felt that enough was enough. Once the decision to turn round had been made, everyone responded with genuine Pocklingtonian stoicism and completed the return walk as positively as possible. The response from the students to such adverse conditions was so positive that they were encouraged to collect their sponsorship despite the distance covered. Behind the scenes, often in thick fog and driving rain, staff were ferrying way-markers, lunches and drinks. Nurses covered great distances in order to be at the right place at the right time. Minibus drivers were transporting the youngest pupils and delivering them back to school. Checkpoint staff took up new positions around the course to keep the students safe during the return through Pocklington. All the while, reception dealt calmly with messages flying to and fro about the developing situation. Those dealing with sponsor forms and absentee lists had to work extra quickly to be ready for the imminent return of more than 400 students. Some staff suddenly had to plan for the afternoon session and parents had to be contacted. Once the walkers had returned, the cleaners had a real job on their hands because of the mud which had been brought back. The boarding staff and parents suddenly had a mountain of kit and clothing to wash! The school and its systems were truly tested on 21 June 2012 and yet at the time of going to press, close to £2000 has been raised, with much more to come! The money was raised for the three charities: Cecily’s Fund, Andrea’s Gift and Survive. If you have the time to Google the websites for any of these charities you will have no doubt that all the extra effort was very worthwhile: thank you to those who supported us so willingly. We hope to be walking once again in 2014. This time we intend to complete the route and hope to be able to see the Yorkshire Wolds, in all their glory, for a full 24 km! SCN

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ACTIVITIES

HOLME HALL

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ach year, it is my privilege to take a new group of L6 pupils to visit the residents of Holme Hall. We go every Thursday afternoon as part of the Community Action Programme. The home is a place where people with degenerative diseases and sufferers of brain damage live. Their conditions range from considerable to severe. During the car journey to the home on the very first visit, the anxiety among the pupils is palpable. It is a leap into the unknown and quite who they will meet when we arrive cannot be imagined. The car journey home on the first visit is a totally different affair. The

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he atmosphere at Holme Hall is always very friendly and welcoming, so I didn’t feel as nervous or uncomfortable when I first started going as I thought I would, writes Izzy El-Jassar (L6). I would definitely recommend visiting Holme Hall to anyone in the upcoming years as a choice for their activity. It is not only a valuable opportunity to develop confidence, it also allows you to help others in a very different setting from normal school life.

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n my first visit to Sue Ryder, I felt shocked deep inside. It was difficult to engage with residents’ complex physical and mental problems. I could not allow myself to form any relationships with these residents, whoever and wherever they were, remembers Cybil Blythe (L6). Many weeks of Thursday afternoons saw my gradual development, as residents became more comfortable with me. I found that many of them were originally from the local area which gave me a common starting point for conversation; they could speak about the past quite lucidly. They would always greet me warmly with a smile on their faces, knowing that our arrival meant activities. We played bingo and listened to residents singing their favourite songs, such as ‘We’ll meet again’ and ‘Cockles and Mussels’. From the nervous, worried and quiet person introduced to Holme Hall at the beginning of the school year, I feel I have become much more confident and rounded. I have realised that when I had believed I was adding to the residents’ life, in fact, it was mutual. They have allowed me grow and understand this particularly misunderstood part of our society. Thank you to all at Holme Hall.

isiting Holme Hall has become the high point of my week. Although the interaction was initially difficult, forming relationships with the residents and liaising with the staff, it swiftly became clear that each character was unique, intriguing and often highly surprising, writes Elizabeth Hallam (L6).

Sometimes it takes a while to build up enough confidence to tell Suzanne that you love her but she readily tells us that she loves us. Sometimes it is hard to not back away from Nick as he thrusts his books and papers under your nose and tells you a spelling rule that you will hear many, many times again. Sometimes it is hard not to cry when you see the beautiful photo of a young Rowena as a model when you look at the bedridden lady who loves to watch DVDs.

Beryl cheats at bingo and John can sneakily avoid all contact with glue during crafts; a talent which has left me with sticky fingers. Nick is a Scrabble genius but constantly repeats bizarre topics and narratives. Heidi is one of the most enthusiastic residents and yet she is furious if we are ‘late’ or miss a visit during holidays or exams. We are never late.

Our young people can manage these situations so brilliantly now and many more besides. I am extremely proud of them. LD

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pupils discuss and share their feelings and experiences with animated chatter. They have broken the ice. Here begins a developmental journey which nurtures our young people into mature, confident, caring beings. They interact on a personal level with vulnerable people who delight in being visited by our school.

THE POCKLINGTONIAN

Some of the conditions which have brought the residents to Holme Hall are harrowing and yet it is such a happy, productive, optimistic place. It is a privilege to have spent time with these wonderful people.


ARMY BENEVOLENT FUND Have you heard of The Soldiers’ Charity? Otherwise known as the Army Benevolent Fund (ABF), the charity provides financial and practical support to soldiers, former soldiers and their families whenever they are in need. The charity has seen a 30% rise over the past two years in applications from soldiers who have been involved in past and present conflicts. To support this demand, the charity currently raises £7 million per year, writes Emma Adesile (L6). In September, we presented a cheque for £2120 to Major General Christopher Callow (Chairman, East Riding ABF) and hope that this will mark the beginning of a rewarding relationship with the charity. We also hope to continue with fundraising for the ABF next year. Unfortunately, I can’t name every person for their hard work and thank them in this report, as there isn’t enough room, but thank you all so much! However, I would like to take this opportunity to thank Miss Lamb for all her work with the fundraising for the ABF. From the moment we first talked about the possibility of doing something to raise money for the ABF back in the Michaelmas term, she has been so positive and helpful. None of this would have been able to happen if it hadn’t been for Miss Lamb’s support. Thank you so much. If anyone has any ideas on how we can raise even more money for the charity, then please let us know. You can do something individually or as a group, so don’t hesitate to get in touch!

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owever, due to current operations, it is predicted that the need for assistance will rise. The Soldiers’ Charity has set an aim of raising £14 million per year by 2015. This is lots of money and Miss Lamb and I thought we’d be able to do something to contribute to this goal. On the evening of Monday 19 March, we held a 6th form boarders’ social in the Music School Hall, for which everyone had to wear an item of red. Faircote L6 decorated the Music Hall with red and white bunting and balloons, raffle prizes, sweets jar, merchandise, drinks, food and music equipment. Jim Duffy, a representative from the ABF, was our special guest and he started the evening with a short presentation on how The Soldiers’ Charity has helped, and hopes to help, lots of soldiers. The ABF reaches out to as many soldiers as they can but they really do need as much help as possible to reach their targets.

We were all very lucky to listen to a variety of live music from a handful of talented pupils in our school: Fin Henderson, Paddy Russell and the group Perk Culture. Everyone enjoyed their music and we were really grateful for their help…thank you! The raffle draw and ‘guess the number of jelly beans in the jar’ were a huge success, even though Mr Tomaszewski won most of the raffle prizes. (It was rigged! Ed) Overall, it was an enjoyable evening and a great opportunity to socialise both with each other and the staff. There are so many of us in boarding who have parents in the Army and it felt right to raise awareness of this significant charity. In April, we held a non-uniform day, with everyone wearing an item of red. There were some funny red wigs and morph suits around school that day! As well as this, we sold wristbands to pupils, parents and staff throughout the Lent term at sports fixtures and the School play. We are very grateful to all those who bought merchandise and all those who gave generous donations towards the charity. So, what’s the grand total? After all our fundraising so far, we’ve managed to raise over £2000. This is so much more than we originally expected! In May, Tui Kama and Miss Lamb attended a meeting with the East Riding ABF Committee. The ABF were over the moon when they found out that we had raised so much.

BONE CANCER RESEARCH TRUST

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n July 2011, George (5HUT) and Harry Rainforth (4HUT) along with their father walked the Wolds Way to raise money for the Bone Cancer Research Trust, a charity close to their hearts. They raised a total of £8,580. The accompanying picture shows them receiving a certificate from the charity (BCRT) in acknowledgement of their donation. It's taken a long time to get the boys to the BCRT head office for the photo, which is why it seems ages ago since the walk! For further information, the charity’s link is www.bcrt.org.uk. Maria Rainforth

THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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ACTIVITIES

STRICTLY POCK DANCING

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t was James Reckitt who first came up with the exciting idea of organising ‘Strictly Pock Dancing’ to raise money for charities chosen by the Charity Committee. On Wednesday 30 November, the TST was full of hilarity as some teachers took to the stage to show the pupils, parents and rest of the staff their ‘moves’, remembers Emma Adesile (L6).

To start the night, a short film, created by The Video Club, was shown of the staff preparing their dances for this special night. James Reckitt, Olivia Turner and Nathan Waddell were the hosts for the evening. They welcomed everyone in the audience, shared a few ‘jokes’ and introduced the four judges: Mr Hall, Mr Dawes, Miss Scott and Mrs Wilson. After much anticipation, the seven couples made their way to the stage: Mrs Bond and Mr Tomaszewski, Mr Dare and Miss Spencer, Miss McNelly and Mr Taylor, Mr Ronan and Dr McNamee, Mr Binks and Miss Postlethwaite, and Mr Sykes and Miss Whatford. Mrs Bond and Mr Tomaszewski were first to take to the floor, dancing the Modern Jive. Next, Rev Roberts and Miss Gray treated the audience to a passionate Paso Doble. Miss McNelly and Mr Binks danced a heart-felt Waltz; and who can possibly forget Mr Ronan and Dr McNamee dancing…disco?! Mr Taylor and Miss Postlethwaite performed a superb Charleston, while Mr Dare and Miss Spencer danced a rhythmic Salsa. And last, but by no means least, Mr Sykes and Mrs Scott-Somers did the Jive. Their routine was choreographed using their own inventive moves and their enthusiasm showed throughout. After all these exceptional performances, it was time for the judges to collaborate and decide who to crown the winner of Strictly Pock Dancing. Everyone in the audience voted for which couple they wanted to win. But we were still in for a treat when several talented musical acts took to the stage to entertain us while the judges were away. Two groups of first years sang songs originally by Adelle, both of which had beautiful piano accompaniments. Charlie Procter touched the audience with ‘Skinny Love’. Glee Club demonstrated their singing and dancing skills. Alex Riddell sang powerfully, while Paddy Russell brought with him to the stage his unique voice and guitar. Olivia Turner definitely sent shivers up our spines with her fantastic Opera voice. Palms13 (Fin Henderson and Billy Risso-Gill)

wowed the audience…and here it should be mentioned that they reached the Top Five of a competition run by Jamie Cullum and Pizza Express this year. All of the musical acts on the evening were amazing and thoroughly enjoyed by everyone. With the judges having chosen their winner, all the couples and the audiences waited for the result. And the winning couple was…Mr Sykes and Mrs Scott-Somers! They were very pleased and certainly thrilled to repeat their dance. The Charity Committee hoped to have raised a huge £1500 from the evening alone. ‘Strictly Pock Dancing’ was such a success and gave entertainment to those who were taking part and watching. There isn’t enough room to give special thanks because there were so many people who gave up their time to help with the running of the event, but thank you everyone, your help was much appreciated. And remember…Keep Dancing!

YOUNG ENTERPRISE

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oung Enterprise is an opportunity for students to have a feel for what it is like to work as part of a real business. It allows students to develop a product, market it and sell it, writes Oliver Dawson (L6). Last year the Young Enterprise company was named Premia and we dealt with creating customizable IPhone 4 and IPhone 4S phone cases. Our idea consisted of using clear casings and making unique ‘inserts’ to go between the clear casing and the phone. This would then give the customer an opportunity to have a phone case that was individual to them. This was not always our first idea though; until Christmas we were going to try and sell rain ponchos with certain customizations such as Hull FC tiger to the shops at Hull’s football ground. However we decided it would be too risky an option as most people would either bring waterproof clothing. Thus we developed new ideas finally deciding upon the IPhone cases, so our marketing director set to work. We conducted market research to find out which was the most common phone or IPod makes for us to make into our target market. We found that the IPhone 4 and 4S were most common and that people were most likely to buy the cases if the cost £5 or less. Once we had gathered significant market research we decided to order some cases from the Internet. We decided to bulk buy in order to reduce economies of scale. We found a batch of 50 cases from an online supplier for a price at which we could afford with the money we had gathered by selling shares of our company. Whilst we were waiting for our cases to be delivered we began to develop ideas for inserts in case people wanted some designs without having to think of their own designs. Our operations director began to try and utilise the laser cutting machines in DT, this would make cutting the inserts and the camera holes very efficient however this plan backfired as he was unable to do so and as a result we lost two months of the project waiting for this issue to be solved. After we had a restructure of managerial power involving a change in operations manager it was Easter and with exams fast approaching we decided to take a break. This now meant we were rushed for time as we had to break even within three weeks. Thus we needed to sell 30 cases with inserts in those short weeks at £5 for the combination of both the case and three inserts – selling them at every available opportunity including a gaming convention and also within school. By the end of the term we had managed to break even and managed to make a small profit or around £3, so at least we can return the investment to our shareholders. The lessons we have learned about business from this experience will be worth a lot more in the coming years!

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THE POCKLINGTONIAN


DUKE OF EDINBURGH

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hen you hear that someone is ‘doing their D of E’, the general assumption is that all it involves is a little bit of camping, but this isn't strictly true, writes Emma Hutchinson (5GRU).

We began the process doing three sections (volunteering, physical and a skill) for our set time period. This in itself is a challenge as it requires dedication and a lot of advanced planning, which in turn put our organisational abilities to the test. The next stage was planning our expedition which consisted of a practice and a final. The practice expedition was set in the North York Moors and although there were some stunning views it was generally considered by all to be some hard walking. I can’t speak for the boys’ team, but some of the girls found it a particularly challenging route, yet all of this was cancelled out by the sense of accomplishment we felt as we boarded the bus at the end. Three weeks later, feeling slightly more prepared, we planned for our final expedition; two nights camping in New Galloway Forest. Inevitably it rained there most days (!), but nonetheless we pushed on, remaining oddly optimistic throughout. Our time away was certainly a valuable experience, and the lack of basic comforts such as a mattress or running water definitely made us more grateful for the luxuries we have in our everyday lives. On the journey back I can honestly say we had never been so happy to see a service station; it was proof that civilisation still existed, despite our absence! All in all I can say the Duke of Edinburgh Award is a truly valuable experience, and I would encourage anyone to participate. It pushes you to your limits and you come out stronger for it, learning valuable lessons from it, such as teamwork. It’s not easy, but the struggle you go through inspires determination and dedication. I can’t wait to start my Gold award next year!

THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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ACTIVITIES

ARCHERY JUDO

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’ve never been the sportiest of people. However, in Lent Term of 3rd year, Mrs Newhouse compelled me to try judo, as all the badminton slots were full. For this, I am eternally grateful, as from that single games lesson my enthusiasm for the sport began, remembers Hannah Hutchinson (U6). Every week, in the rather secluded location of the squash courts, a group of us meet to practise judo, hone our skills and have fun. Great credit must go to our instructor, sensei Jon, for persevering each week and teaching us new throws and groundwork, while at all times exuding a particularly cool aura (often when showing off aerial kicks). If you’re interested in keeping fit, his version of circuit training and break falls will keep you both toned and amused!

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e meet behind the Pavilion after school on Thursdays, when it’s dry. Mr Ellis and Dr Farah gear us up with gloves, protective kit, arrows and bows. We then head out to prepare the targets. Once they are set up, we begin to shoot, writes Issy Knight (1HUT). I find it strangely fun to set up an arrow on a bow; it makes me feel excited and happy. It takes me a while to aim right. Since I’m a left handed archer, I close my right eye and position my arrow just above the middle, so that I aim high in case I fall short. I pull back on my bow string, so that my arm is past my shoulder, and stick out my elbows, to make my position better. I then let go and drop my bow to see where my arrow leads my eyes. I usually get rewarded by a nice hit on the target! I always smile after I shoot an arrow. Hopefully, I’ll improve enough to participate in House Archery. I’ll aim for the Olympics next!

If such stunts involving flying through the air interest you, look no further than Billy Ibbotson, our newest member this year, who was recently launched airborne by an orange belt student, landing in a rather bemused, adrenaline-filled heap. There are certainly some unmissable parts of this club: bulldog, with its definitive judo twist; the belt game (where opponents have to grapple to get a tied-up belt back to their own corners); and my personal favourite, the river game. This needs no description – it’s that amazing! For all of your fashionistas, how could you ignore the chance to wear your own gi?! This is a thick uniform which martial artists wear for added protection. This season’s collection comes in a stunning range of colours, including the traditional black and white, as well as the more daring bright blue and red varieties. Judo is for everyone. We currently have members across the school, with a mixture of boys and girls. Belt gradings occur at the end of every half-term, making the climb to black belt an awful lot faster. Come and try it for yourself!

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onfidence. Perseverance. Achievement. That's what Judo gives you, writes Olivia Gallen (2HUT).

It gives you the confidence that you know that you are always safe, that you can believe in yourself and know that you can travel where you want and enjoy your life not having to think, "what if." It gives you the freedom to do what you want. It gives you a sense of achievement as you can see what you can do, and be able to say "I can" both in and out of the judo class. An art that inspires an ancient culture makes its mark in the modern day. You can explore a new language and get a sense of a new culture and way of life, without physically being there. Judo gives you a sense of perseverance, as you may not get something the first time, but you must never give up, no matter how hard something may be, because I know that once you have learnt something for yourself, you remember it for life. In addition, judo is a great chance to make new friends and meet new people, both in and out of your own year group, making it more enjoyable, as you can engage in a new sport with your friends in a safe, cheerful and fun environment. So don't be the one to miss out on this amazing experience – join in now!

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SIXTH FORM SOCIETY

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have taken great joy in running Sixth Form Society this year. We encourage members to give lectures on a subject of their choice, whether it’s academic, or a recreational interest, writes Oliver Robinson (L6).

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his year witnessed the launch of the ‘Entrepreneurs’ Club’, a series of four presentations given by parents and OPs to members of the Sixth Form with an interest in business.

The inaugural presentation was given in Michaelmas Term by Mr Nick Baines on the topic of ‘Business Decisions – Science or Art?’, a topic central to the core of A2 Business Studies. Students were introduced to the factors that a business considers when making a decision and then showed examples of both good and bad decision making. It was clear that whilst in some cases it can be a Science, there are many factors beyond the control of a business, so much so that it may actually be an Art! The second lecture was given by Group Captain Warren James MBE on a topic that he was more than qualified to present, namely, ‘Management and Leadership’. He clearly explained the difference between these two concepts but the quotation from Grace Hopper, Admiral, US Navy (retired) seemed to sum things up succinctly: “You cannot manage men into battle. You manage things; you lead people”. The nature of the topic lent itself to a forum type of approach with students able to discuss whether they thought certain people such as Steve Jobs were leaders or managers; but it was evident at the end, that whilst the concepts are different, individuals may be both.

We have had a number of interesting talks so far, beginning with my own on the realistic and scientific possibilities of a zombie apocalypse occurring, and the best ways to survive the zombie attack. We then heard a fantastic talk from Will Winlow, covering the basics and technicalities of creating modern, electronic music, complete with samples of his own work, which he was able to share with us. Lastly, Marabel Reismeier gave a fascinating talk on Socrates, covering his ideas, life and overall message. Well done to all who spoke this year. I look forward to future presentations, as they will no doubt be just as informative, and even more entertaining and original.

CHESS The school’s Chess Club continued its exploits this year, with great games being played all round, writes Tom Hartle (L6).

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he club, run by Dr Dyson on a largely informal basis, has something of a low profile, but nevertheless manages to attract a range of players, mainly from the Lower and Middle school. This year we began our internal knockout tournament, now an annual tradition, during the Michaelmas Term, with the finals being postponed until after Christmas.

In Lent Term, we welcomed Sophie Brown (OP) of the private equity firm ‘Bridgepoint’ to discuss the development of Leeds Bradford Airport. The presentation centred on what changes were being made at the airport and how they, as investors, were hoping to guarantee success. This focused upon the culture of the company in terms of its vision and values and how these are embedded within the business, as well the clear leadership from the executive team.

Round one saw plenty of exciting matches, with Alex Dowding and Charlie Procter narrowly losing to Owain Philips and Bohan Waldron. Also qualifying were Ben Carlile after his victory over Harry Heywood, and myself following Alex Laing’s bad luck in our match.

Finally, we were fortunate to have a presentation on the Unit 4 exam core theme of Takeovers and Mergers from experts in the field, namely the Chair of Governors, Mr Christopher Oughtred, and his brother Angus. They recalled their experiences of the Jackson’s Sainsbury merger in 2004, focusing upon six topic areas: motives for, problems of, factors affecting, impact upon performance, impact upon stakeholders and Government involvement in Mergers and Takeovers. The Sixth Form students thoroughly enjoyed the opportunity to be so close to the action and gain a unique insight into this business venture.

Round two saw Bohan vs Ben and Owain vs me. Ben once more emerged victorious and Owain put up a good fight but was unfortunate to lose in the last of the qualifier games, leaving the final between Ben and myself. This proved to be the toughest round yet with the best of three matches to win. I managed to secure the first match, but the second proved a real challenge, with Ben’s daring queen offensive keeping me constantly on my toes. After a very close fought game, time was against us, and I managed to come through to win the trophy, even though it has taken me till the 6th form!

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Special mention, however, must go to our resident grand-master, Cameron Blair who was asked to stand aside for this year’s tournament, on account of being well-nigh undefeatable. This 4th year student has progressed to the district finals for the British Land UK Chess Challenge on more than one occasion, and regularly competes, and succeeds, at an adult level. It’s a shame the York Schools’ League, in which we used to have great fun competing, is no longer running, as I’m sure Cameron would have proved a real asset. The club is lucky to have such a gifted player, who is willing to share his experience and expertise, even if it is by thoroughly beating all comers, Doc included! Their weekly match is always an event not to be missed. Many thanks must go to Dr Dyson from all the boys in the chess club for keeping this long tradition alive and running.

THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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ACTIVITIES

ANNAND PLATOON

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here are many misconceptions about Annand Platoon; what we are and what we do. To some, we may appear to be fanatics running around with wooden rifles, but there’s a lot more to it than meets the eye, believe Georgina Lloyd (5HUT) and Emma Hutchinson (5GRU). Selection was tough but several ‘zombie’ attacks later, we soon realised teamwork was the key to survival. Admittedly nerves and inexperience affected our performance, but Mr Hall wasn't looking for perfection; he was looking for potential... The first week of training arrived, and eager to impress, we assembled for parade immaculately turned out. Although we were ignorant as to what lay ahead, we were impatient to get started, and after a reassuring pep-talk from Mr Hall, the training began. Our first term consisted of learning new fieldcraft skills, getting to know our team mates and earning our allimportant nicknames; essential for adding to the team dynamic. Despite returning home physically exhausted and plastered in mud (!), we keenly anticipated the arrival of next week’s training.

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t ended the way it began – a FIBUA based exercise, aching muscles and the greatest sense of achievement only hard work and dedication can buy, remembers Emily Grieve (5GRU).

I think back to one of the first few weeks of training when we doing FIBUA in the squash courts, soon to become a platoon favourite, and for some reason I never understood, I volunteered to command a clearance of the building. Having no idea what to do, I panicked, but I’ll always remember the instant support I got from the other members of the platoon; each and every one of them could be relied on without question. Fast forward to the last few weeks of training. I had just volunteered to be IC for another exercise – an overnight clear and control of enemy forces across the entire school ground followed by regular fighting patrols based at the CCF compound. This time, I knew exactly why I’d volunteered, because I knew that however badly things went wrong, I had a team of dedicated cadets, all having received the same outstanding training from Mr Hall as I had. Also, on a more selfish note, I wanted to have the glory of taking on the most prestigious role available in the entire year of training – or I was the only one crazy enough to want it?! To anyone interested in being part of Annand Platoon, I can barely begin to describe to you what condensing a whole year’s worth of training into 12 hours of a dark, adrenaline-fuelled attack on an ex-Annand-led enemy in the main building and the TST felt like. I guess, if you’re lucky enough, you’ll find out.

Throughout the year we have a covered a variety of different activities; from team building exercises such as assault courses and ballroom dancing, to clearing buildings and taking participating teachers hostage! Clearly the best bit…! Ed. However, it isn’t just these things that make Annand: it is learning to work with other year groups that you would never normally encounter and coping under pressure in alien situations where you aren’t expected to get everything right. It is learning from your mistakes and always trying your best. The final challenge was this year’s overnight exercise: Operation Outright Fear. This involved holding down our base while fighting off an enemy of greater number, but nevertheless we pulled through, overcoming unexpected difficulties – such as the capture of our commander – along the way. Overall, Annand has taught us many valuable lessons this year – from strategy to personal endeavour. Most importantly, we are now prepared for an inevitable zombie apocalypse!

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LIBRARY

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or the past two years, every Friday at 1.30 pm the Library has been closed for Story Time. Any age group is welcome, but we seem to be predominantly 1st and 2nd years. Mrs Edwards and sometimes other members of staff read for half an hour, while the pupils kick off their shoes and snuggle into beanbags or just lie on the floor. We have serialised Treasure Island and Shadowmancer, and we are now more than half way through the first Harry Potter, the intention being to read the whole series. As the new Archive Room is now nearly ready, we have moved in there for our sessions, so pupils can now lie down on a beautiful Persian rug as an alternative to the beanbags. This has also meant that the Library no longer has to close to other pupils. It really is a lovely way to relax at the end of the week.

ENGLISH

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nevitably, happily, we are biased. The English Department, in all its blood, sweat and tears (often bursting out in fire and glory) has had an exciting year…

2010 Heads of School, Becky Sedcole and Richard Skowronek.

2011 Heads of School, Hugh Stubbins and Miranda Bond.

To celebrate the forthcoming Olympics, Mrs Ward and some of our 6th form prefects have produced a brilliant display, and we have purchased lots of books about the Olympics – not only topical but a great resource for our A Level PE students. We are busy all day with classes coming in to research as well as 6th formers on Private Study periods, so there is never a dull moment in the Library. Our fiction section is full at the seams, with plenty of new purchases this year. A select band of avid readers is once again reading each of the eight shortlisted novels for the Carnegie Award, and sharing their views on the wiki we have set up. AJE

1st form pupils enjoying Story Time.

A brilliant showcase for senior talent, our annual Lectern Society, organised and directed by Mrs Hallam, delivered a superb show in Michaelmas Term; as winner Ned Donnan outlines in his accompanying report, this is undoubtedly one of the most pressurised and demanding stages in school. Those who dare, do. And what a competition. As a preparation for the rigours of university interview and beyond, it has no equal. The Department delighted in inter-class letter writing this year, from the sublime to the frankly ridiculous. Lower school sets revelled in the epistolary ‘war’ which could possibly erupt along the English corridor. Letting loose 4th form sets on Valentine’s Day, we all concluded that their love-lorn verses left rather too much to be desired… June brought magic. June brought Narnia. Stepping into the wardrobe, through the furs, out into the snow – in the wonderful world of Room 9 ¾ (aka Room 6; the artist formerly known as Room 101), we saw it, we did it. We jest not. Those who experienced it (it spanned the age range – Room 7 heard the squeals) were truly privileged. Sadly, the combustible material lasted but a day. Let us hope that the magic will last much longer. Operating beyond the confines of the syllabus has long been our greatest delight. Thus the importance of bottles, liquids, ‘Diagon Alley’ recreated, jam jars, acres of paper (tissue, crepe, sugar), stencils, trees – these last being vital – these, and many, many more oddities. Lastly, The Pocklingtonian is delighted to inform readers that rival publications - The Understudy and a new Sixth Form newsletter - are currently in circulation. Watch this space for more! Anon THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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ACTIVITIES

LECTERN SOCIETY

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orget exams – Lectern Society was one of the hardest things I did all year. The combination of an audience of academics, a set subject title and very stiff competition from the school’s best debaters, all topped off with the Society’s proud history, made me very nervous, recalls Ned Donnan (U6). Mrs Hallam’s instructions seemed simple: to speak for five minutes on Sandhurst’s famous motto, ‘Serve to Lead’. We were allowed to interpret it as we wanted; and in the end I framed my speech around the best and worst military mottos. Others talked on the influence of media or politics and some even on magic, but all were related to the title in some way. When finally the day came, all were frantically rehearsing as we gathered for drinks and nibbles with our chosen guests. Then the talks began, each being assessed by a panel of judges which comprised Mr Webb, Mrs Marshall and Miss Lamb. The standard was very high, with all competitors delivering well-presented and intriguing talks on vastly different subjects. Overall, the evening was a great success. I was fortunate enough to receive first prize; but it was hard-fought, my speech closely followed by those of Marabel Reismeier (amazingly, competing in her second language) and Jake Galley. Well done to all who participated and a special thank you to Mrs Hallam, whose energy and commitment are highly prized by all who work with her in Lectern Society and Senior Debating.

BIOLOGY SNAKES

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s many of you may know, at lunchtime I can often be found in the back of Biology 2, home to the school’s resident reptiles. As well as a bearded dragon and two leopard geckos, we also have my favourites, a pair of corn snakes, and mid-February an exciting discovery was made. Our female snake, Bruce (?! Confused! Ed), had laid a clutch of eggs, and on 15 April, thirteen baby snakes hatched, writes Alex Howard (U6). Corn snakes are a favourite choice for firsttime pet owners; they are a very docile breed and never bite (unless you are a mouse). They come in many different colours. Bruce is amelanistic, which means that she does not have any black pigments in her skin, which is why her eyes are red. Eric, our male, is ‘buf’, which means that his red colour is darker than a typical wild cornsnake’s. As such, we have six babies that are amelanistic like their mother and seven that are buf like their father. The young buf snakes look very dark, almost black, but as they grow they will become more orange. The adult snakes need to be fed one mouse a week, which we have to do separately to prevent them fighting over food (which they did once, a close call which left all of us a little shaky!). We take Bruce out of the main ‘vivarium’, the fancy name for a reptile tank, and place her in a plastic carrier to feed her. Once she has finished we hold up the carrier to the vivarium and she will leave herself, as it is best not to handle snakes after they have eaten to reduce the risk of regurgitation. The babies are fed on baby mice, known as ‘pinkies’, although at the time of writing, only about half have been convinced to eat. We are not worried, though, as they are full of the nutrients from the egg at this stage, and reptiles like snakes can last a long time without eating.

Caring for the baby snakes takes time and work. Each of the babies has to be handled for a few minutes every day. They are kept in their own separate plastic containers, lined with wood chippings. Unfortunately, the babies like to bury themselves in the chippings, so often knock over their water bowls. It takes a good hour to handle and clean every single one of the babies. Unlike their adult counterparts, young snakes are notoriously ‘snappy’. Even so, nearly all our babies have quickly got used to being handled, and have even developed little personality traits – such as No 5 who likes to wrap his tail around your finger! The appropriately named No 13 is the feistiest of the bunch, and the only one to have bitten, but at this age their teeth are so tiny you can barely feel it. I think No 13 is one of the babies we will keep, but many of the others have already been adopted by good homes. Meanwhile, they remain in Biology until they are old enough to leave, which I don’t mind, because it means I get to play with them at lunchtime!

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BOARDING

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BOARDING

ORCHARD

I’m eleven years old and have been boarding for one and half terms, writes Phoebe Witty (6). My first term was tough but luckily I had Mrs Midwinter, Miss Burn, Mrs Smith, Miss Sengouryachangh, Miss Gray and Miss Cheadle there to help me. We go on lots of fun trips such as cinema, shopping in York, bowling and Water World. I loved making my own pizzas recently in our Saturday activity, Ready Steady Cook. They were delicious! It’s going to be exciting moving up to the senior school next year. I’m very sad that I’m leaving Lyndhurst, though, especially my form tutor, Mr Tyrrell, as he knows me so well. It will be like a whole new fresh start in September. I wonder if I will find my way through the giant school?

I’ve only been in Orchard for a year, but to be honest, it has been the best year of my life (so far!), writes Katherine Fuller (1HUT). All of the girls help each other and the house staff are brilliant, especially Mrs Midwinter, who helped me calm down and settle in at first. One of the best things about boarding is our Gap students – they have both made my year complete!

We go on lots of outings such as skiing and shopping, which are all really interesting, writes Emma Falkingham (6). I am excited about going up to the senior school in September!

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When I first joined Pocklington I was a little scared but then I started to settle in and make new friends, remembers Caitlin Kearney (1HUT). In Orchard, we go on outings every weekend, which are great fun. The best one was the first trip to Lightwater Valley, which I loved!


I have enjoyed boarding this year particularly, since we have even more freedom and the chance to go out to see school events like House Music. I love seeing my friends all the time and meeting new friends as they arrive in Orchard. Finally, it’s great to be able to sunbathe outside – or make a snowman, depending on the weather! Rebecca Witty (2WIL)

Of course, boarding staff do have to deal with rule-breakers, so we do occasionally get ‘gated’ or told to go to bed early…but not that often, writes Suzanna Hammersley (2WIL). In general, the staff make a huge effort to be like friends and sisters to us, welcoming chats about everything from boys to personal troubles. They are amazing listeners – like a second family. On my first day, I was full of anxiety about performing in activities; now, I love dancing in front of the whole house and would probably sing a solo for them!

Here at Orchard, my introduction to boarding has gone really well! We always have a super fun activity organised by our housemistress, Mrs Midwinter; even if it is a simple game such as hide and seek, we all enjoy it because everyone takes part. Plus: we are allowed iPods in bed, so it’s not as strict as you may think! Billy Cheney (2GRU)

When you start boarding, you do think it’s going to be big and scary, but it isn’t, writes a relieved Rachel Bellis (2WIL). When you get back from school, the staff are in the office, ready to chat about your day and whatever you’ve been up to. If I am ever homesick, I soon feel better again after all the activities we do in house.

This year’s boarding was like last year’s, but it was also different in interesting ways. Many people came and went, everyone started changing little by little and even if you didn’t realise it, you had changed as well! This is now my fourth year in boarding. I have so many memories which will stay with me forever. I have had five Gap Assistants: Miss Burg, Miss Mott, Miss Scott, Miss Parsons and, finally, Miss Burn. They have all played such a big part in Orchard life, participating in many activities and helping out around the house and school. Overall, boarding is an amazing experience. You create memories and friends for life. Georgia Covell (2DOL)

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DOLMAN

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he newly restructured Dolman House opened its doors in Michaelmas Term – a house of two halves but one family nevertheless. Dolman Lower is home to our youngest boy boarders – from Lyndhurst through to 2nd form – whilst Dolman Upper provides accommodation for our Middle School boys. There is no uncrossable divide between the two sections, just a couple of doors and separate common rooms and kitchen areas. Bedrooms are clearly worked out too which has enabled us to stagger bedtimes throughout the evening, allowing our oldest boys the chance to keep their lights on a little bit longer! We have wanted Dolman to function as one big family, with older and younger boys supporting and spending time with one another. With such a wide age range, though, it has been a useful feature to run two evening routines of tea, prep and activity times. This has proved very effective and has given the House structure and consistency, qualities which have provided stability and security for all our Dolman Boarders.

several times each week for cooking extravaganzas and craft sessions. Mr Wright has not needed too much encouragement to begin building the Dolman House Model Railway in the hallway…built from scratch in N gauge. A number of the Lower boys showed great enthusiasm for its creation and development…there have been opportunities for rolling stock operators, scenery designers and electrical wizards as plans steam ahead for digitalisation of the layout. Our amazingly talented Day Matron, Mrs Angie Woodcock, has inspired us all by her passion for growing things from seeds! In the spring the new foyer was full of sunflowers, peas, beans, pumpkins, tomatoes, strawberries, lettuce, sweet peas, herbs and radishes. All of these and more are now out in the newly created Dolman Garden just to the right of the Dolman drive. Mr Partis built us two beautiful raised vegetable beds and we already have our first crop of radishes. Our very grateful thanks go to Angie and her partner John for their generosity. The shrubs and flowers are beautiful. We hope to be able to carve Jack o’ Lanterns this autumn from our own pumpkins!

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A huge amount of fun and activity

We all enjoyed a whole House trip to the Ice Factor just before Christmas – the open air rink at the York Outlet. Dolman House has some very talented skaters! Despite the rain, we had a great Christmas treat, followed by pizzas back at Dolman and Secret Santa. We had to say goodbye to Ricard Brandi at Christmas when he returned to Spain – we loved having him with us and hope he might come back to visit some time. We have enjoyed a great myriad of new activities in Dolman this year, both for Lower and Upper boys. The Wrights’ own kitchen has been used

Of course, the weekly Sunday programme has kept us busy throughout the year and plans are already afoot for a brand new programme of events starting in September. This year we have enjoyed, amongst other things, the cinema, swimming, skiing, gokarting, Aerial Extreme, Ten pin Bowling, Magma Science Centre and a Boarders’ Sports’ Day.

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We love our brand new entrance hall, added over the summer holidays. What a difference it has made to the House. It is a place where the whole House gathers before mealtimes and trips out – the signing out boards are here and all our communal notice boards, including the vital daily whiteboard which contains all up to the minute announcements and guidelines for the day ahead. The boys will also find here an ‘interesting fact of the day’ –a bite of history to inspire and motivate. We have made very good use of the high beamed ceiling of the entrance hall – excellent at Christmas time for fairy lights and sparkly decorations. There is a scaled model of the Solar System hanging from the wooden roof beams and a totally awesome working model of Big Ben himself, along with a very glamorous life size model of Her Majesty the Queen – Dolman’s humble gesture of celebration for the Diamond Jubilee. We enjoyed our own lovely ‘street party’ in the entrance hall too, a treat for Mums, Dads, Grandparents and friends as they came to collect boys for the May half-term holiday.

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We enjoyed our own 'street party' in the entrance hall!

The piano has been a welcome and much loved addition to the House this year with boys enjoying both serious practice and tinkering for fun. We have even had a regular visitor from Fenwick-Smith who has come down to practice his exam pieces and filled our House with beautiful rhythms and harmonies each week. We have greatly benefitted from the weekly visits from Rev Roberts – he has come in just to chat with the boys about life, school and the universe – and from Mrs Lyon at Lyndhurst who has popped in to listen to our youngest boys read. The Dolman Lower BookSoc began in the springtime and we are so grateful to Mrs Edwards for her support and encouragement. We have read a number of books together and enjoyed yummy cakes and drinks whilst discussing our findings and opinions. How great it has been to encourage our boys to read more. In all, this first year of the restructured Dolman House has been a huge amount of fun and activity; a period of transition for all of us but also one of togetherness and growth with a number of new boys joining us regularly. We will have to say our goodbyes to Kaiser, Edwin, Charlie, Samson and Tom this summer as they move up to Fenwick-Smith in September. Thank you to all our boys for such a great year! IDW & WW

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’ve never been in a book club before and I didn’t know what to expect at all. This has been quite good fun really and we get to eat loads of cakes and stuff too. The older boys chose a really gory book but I could choose my own book which was good. I stood up and suggested it. Sometimes boys read their own books and talk about them too. The sunflower competition got really serious! Everyone was really protective of their plants. The foyer was full of them and they grew quite tall. The Easter weather wasn’t terribly good for them and some of them died during the holiday but Angie has planted a new seed for each one of us out in the garden. I think they’ll look really good once they all come up. Big Ben is amazing – you must come and see it. Everyone wants to borrow it! And it really works as a clock too. No one looks at the wall clock anymore when they sign out – they look at Big Ben instead! My favourite Sunday activity has been the skiing at Xscape – I had never skied before and I managed to stay on my feet all afternoon. The Go-Karting was such good fun. I think the boys were a bit overcompetitive though! The ice skating at the York Outlet at Christmas was a really nice evening. It was raining quite heavily but that didn’t really matter. Several of us fell over! Mr Moore was so good – much better than any of us. Kaiser was pretty awesome too. He helped Mrs Wright! Mrs Wright had ordered pizzas afterwards and we ate them in the Common Room in our pyjamas because we were all soaked! Then we had Secret Santa. Thanks must go to Mr Sykes for the Nerf Gun Challenge each week. That has been so fun….we have to capture things from behind the sofa and we get points for our teams. We all look really funny in our safety glasses though!

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BOARDING

FAIRCOTE

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lick clack click click. I’ve put the code in so now, please step in. Welcome to Faircote!

This is where I have lived for two terms. Two terms, filled with stuff but going by far too quickly, writes Ella Angioni (L6). The first day was overwhelming – so many new faces; so many different doors and corridors. Yes, it was a lot to remember! But all the girls and staff in Faircote were always there for me; in whatever situation! Together we had an amazing time ranging from ‘loud-and-fun-days’ to ‘Ican’t–be-bothered-days’, including chatting, going out together, sitting in the office, just watching TV and sometimes being what can be described as a tiny little crazy. For this time I want to thank you all girls! Our time together was better than words could say it! Stay the way you are, guys, you are mint! I will miss you soo much!

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fter experiencing my fair share of boarding houses, good and bad, it’s safe to say that Faircote is truly exceptional. From the wide variety of rooms, all shapes, sizes and colours, to our fantastic houseparents, Mrs Alexander and Mr Hymers, every single day, we are made to feel valued as an individual and a worthy member of the boarding house, writes Emily Grieve (5GRU). From the moment you step through the front door, you’re instantly welcomed by a cheery and relaxed atmosphere, which is just what you need after a long school day of typical 5th form work. You’ll find many of the girls curled up on the sofas and armchairs in the office after school, particularly on the duty nights of our wonderful Assistant Housemistress Miss Lamb (aka Lamb chop, Lamby Lou, Lambkin and various other sheep-related names), forever ready for an entertaining chat or whinge session. Upon wandering around the building, you’ll find the comfortingly familiar sights such as the mismatched array of paintings, photographs and posters the walls have obtained over the years. Who could forget the Jesus drawing or the infamous Blue Baby who likes to appear in various odd places around the house, surprising anyone who is unfortunate enough to come across it. I personally enjoyed pointing out to visitors of the house that a certain poster on one of our corridors was an exact copy of the one found on the wall above the TV in Friends. In the Junior common room, normally accompanied with the smell of burnt toast and coffee, you can count on us to always be watching good classy television like ‘Geordie Shore’ and ‘One Born Every Minute’ – we love it all (‘classy’?! Ed). This year, I always liked walking into my room after school and being greeted by my lovely long term roommates Faye McFarlane and Amy Maskell, dumping my schoolbag on the floor and sharing funny stories from the days’ lessons. Everyone knows everyone well enough at least to say hello when they see each other and to ask if you’re okay when you’re down. That’s what really makes Faircote a home from home.

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hat a year and how it’s flown! And oh how at times the wind has blown We've all survived rain, snow and sun And my we have had lots of fun! As we say goodbye to our senior girls We send them off with these few pearls Of wisdom, or maybe just advice, That may just make you all think twice. Be a good sport in all you do; Try not to ever become too blue Remember your happy days at your Faircote home And don’t leave us here too long alone Come back and visit from time to time, But we are sure you will all be just fine! And to the girls that stay on next year We’d like to give you all a big cheer! We shall see you all as September comes When the Orchard is full of apples and plums! Enjoy the summer every one of you. Have happy days through and through! HTA/TH

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he life here in the boarding house is a special experience – but special in a good way. From the beginning everybody made me feel welcome and looked after, the people in my year and the girls from the years above were absolutely friendly and introduced me to everything so it was easy to settle in. Although I was very nervous when I first came here, I loved being a part of the community here and I would stay much longer if I could, writes Johanna Dobernecker (4DOL). Every girl is different but we like each other and always have a lot of fun together, so I will have a lot of memories of these three months. A good point about having so many people around is also that there is always someone to talk to if you have any problems or you are just in the mood to have a little chat, either the housemates or the staff. There are also a lot of things which you can do here: work out in the fitness suite, cook in the kitchen or relax in the common room, and at the weekend there are different trips, so you will never get bored. All in all I have really liked it here and I think almost everyone else does too. I couldn’t imagine making a better choice!

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n June 2011 we were appointed as Housemistress and Housemaster of Faircote to commence some duties over the summer and start our exciting new roles in September.

Our first year in post has been a wonderful experience, with lots of laughter, chats and a few tears along the way! The boarding community in Pocklington and Lyndhurst is essentially one big family, when the day school goes home at 5pm, the school site is a different place to be, quiet and informal whilst productive with a vast amount of great work done within each of the houses. We have especially enjoyed setting up the new activity program in Faircote. We are extremely proud of our own Fitness Suite, Mrs White’s highly successful Textiles classes, cooking and baking and not forgetting the extremely popular Lost re-watch! It has been a lovely year for us, getting to know the Faircote boarders individually and learning about their interests, sense of humour and fear of ghosts! The other boarding staff have been so supportive to us, everyone from Mrs Midwinter in Orchard to Reverend Roberts and Dr Dyson. But in particular, Miss Lamb has made our transition into the house as new boarders ourselves so easy, always happy to share her wealth of expertise! HTA/TH THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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FENWICK-SMITH

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e left Fenwick-Smith for Hull in high spirits. The game opened with a crunching hit from Westwood and ended with a try from Tomkins. A win for England! It was an electric atmosphere and an awesome game. My highlight of the year, without a doubt! My favourite Fenwick experience by far is the end of year barbeque. It is great to be part of a big family, all enjoying ourselves and relaxing together. The Christmas Dinner was delicious and the disco afterwards was great fun! It’s the only time when the boarding community really comes together – a fun-filled evening, thoroughly enjoyed by all.

I remember how all the teachers and pupils got on as though there were no roles involved; no Heads of House or juniors. I came dressed up with bow tie, cane and top hat – it was amazing! Olly Dawson (L6)

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Kieran Walker (L6)

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It is great to be part of a big family

Mr Loten’s final Christmas Dinner was fantastic – a very enjoyable evening, with an after party going on well into the middle of the night! Archie Williams (L6)

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We have a great Housemaster

Sunbathing and relaxing out on the fields was certainly one of my highlights of the year. I will remember playing ‘Heads and Volleys’ during the heatwave – everyone was too tired to even kick the ball into the air! Callum Grant (L6)

This has been my first year in Fenwick as an overseas boarder. I love all the events here: we have a great Housemaster and fellow boarders. Pico Man (L6)

I could never have imagined that my first year as a boarder in Fenwick would have been so interesting, writes Anson Lo (L6). Here the teachers and boarders are really nice and I have been through a great transition, adapting to this novel environment. The boarding community has events such as the Christmas Quiz, snooker league and Sports Day, all of which are fun. I remember in December, our matron, Mrs Dowson, putting decorations ALL OVER the house! It really gave me a sense of ‘home’. This is a heart-warming community and it has been lovely spending a year here…although I’ve been caught out and reminded to sleep after ‘lights out’, every now and again!

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BOARDERS' CHRISTMAS DINNER

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oarders’ Christmas Dinner is traditionally held on the last night of the Michaelmas Term. It’s looked forward to by all boarders and boarding staff at Pock. The usual format of the night is dinner, speeches, awards, videos in the TST and a disco in the Music School, writes Emma Adesile (L6). Heads and deputies of Faircote and Fenwick-Smith (Sophie Duncan, Sarah Veitch, Ryan Phillips and Ray Tang) had planned the evening down to the finest detail. The girls had been agonising about their outfits for weeks in advance… Our speaker, Mr Butcher, kept us all laughing with his fabulous linguistic skills. Miss Parsons, from New Zealand (Gap Assistant), gave her farewell speech and had most of Orchard in tears. The food was delicious. We all had a visit from Santa and one of his elves (Rob Arnold and Sarah Veitch), too! Soon it was time to head to the TST to watch the junior boarders’ videos. Both were very entertaining and it was clear that a lot of time and effort went into making them. After this, the disco – the part of the evening everyone looks forward to the most! Archie Williams (L6) was DJ for the night and we had the pleasure of listening to a couple of bands from Fenwick, too. It was great entertainment. Last but definitely not least, Christmas Dinner was the chance for T-Lo (Mr Loten) to say goodbye to boarding and all his boys in Fenwick. He will be much missed by all boarders.

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HOUSE MUSIC The House Music Festival took place over two evenings, with packed audiences in the TST. With the leadership and organisation of all items undertaken by Sixth form pupils, the standard was encouragingly high, and significant improvements were made over the two evenings.

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horal items were a major strength for all of the houses, all opting to offer two choral pieces in their programme. Hutton, accompanied by Georgina Lloyd on piano, performed a gentle arrangement of ‘Sound of Silence’, as well as the challenging ‘Pie Jesu’ by Andrew Lloyd Webber. Gruggen sang two a cappella arrangements, showing great dynamic range in their performance of ‘The Lion Sleeps Tonight’.

Dolman produced two pieces which were wildly differing; ‘A Gaelic Blessing’ with voices blending in powerful five-part harmony, as well as ‘Higher and Higher’ in a superb arrangement. Wilberforce’s stand-out choral item was ‘Bring Him Home’ from Les Misérables; effectively performed a cappella on the first evening, but made all the more emotional and powerful by the addition of Fin Henderson on piano on the second evening. The performance was spine-tingling. The quality of instrumental work was encouraging – and we were treated to a diverse range of pieces. Wilberforce arranged a large-scale wind band to perform highlights from ‘Gladiator’, flanked by armed guards, and all in costume! Their brass section made a tremendous sound. Gruggen imported various percussion instruments, including tabla, to perform ‘Misirloua’, whilst Hutton and Dolman opted for improvised arrangements of pop songs. Each house concluded with their special item. Again I would like to congratulate the bands who accompanied each house; they showed a tremendous level of musicianship, and the balance between instrumentalists and singers continues to improve, although my regular moan of ‘songs in the wrong keys’ did affect one of the houses. Hutton attempted the ambitious ‘Mr Blue Sky’, a song which is beyond the working range of most young voices, but was held together by a string

sense of ensemble from the band. Wilberforce presented ‘Shout!’ with Charlie Proctor commanding the performance. Gruggen gave a strong performance of ‘Dance with me tonight’, superbly choreographed, and confidently sung, as also was Dolman’s ‘Reet Petite’. After the first night’s performance the adjudicators were able to complement each house on the standard of their work, and give some pertinent advice as to how things could be improved for the second night’s performance. Consequently Wednesday’s performances were significantly improved. After last year’s adjudication, a request was made for an additional award, for the best individual item over the two nights. The inaugural winners of this cup were Dolman for their performance of Rutter’s ‘A Gaelic Blessing’ but after careful and lengthy deliberation, the overall trophy was awarded to Wilberforce; a well-received decision. MK

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ilberforce is genuinely excited to have averted the trend of Dolman’s dominance in House Music in recent years, and that we can finally be the ‘winning’ house again! This year, we witnessed the fruit of intense recruitment in a much better turnout, which then created much more volume, energy and fun! In particular, we are proud to say that our choral items consisted of 37 boys and girls. It has been truly a team effort throughout the house and the glory is shared by everyone equally, without a shadow of the doubt, writes Jonathan Chu (U6). ‘Brown Eyed Girl’ was a lively and cheerful start to Wilber's performance. The rhythm initially posed a challenge as an a cappella in the early days, which we were glad to have overcome. ‘Bring Him Home’ sounded emotional and angelic. On a personal note, I never thought that I would ever ‘conduct’ a choir ever in my life! (If that frantic movement of the arms can even vaguely resemble the art of conducting.) May I also take the chance to thank Fin Henderson for his accompaniment for the choral items, and George Hetherton for his direction at choral practices and his help with all other items. ‘Highlights from Gladiator’ were noisy, boisterous, masculine, and meaty – as exhibited by the bare, fake-tanned skin of our instrumentalists. The performance certainly did raise the roof and the audience’s heartbeat. Well done to Sam Berridge and George Luck for their organisation! ‘Shout’ as a finale proved to be a clever song choice. The men’s bowties and women’s skate dresses rebuilt the atmosphere of the 60s disco, coupled with the energetic dance moves designed by our Sixth form girls, including Imogen Henderson, Hatty Lord and Anna Wilkinson. Last but not least, I think our little star in Wilber – Charlie Procter – deserves another round of applause!

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his year, with a few fresh faces added to the mix, we performed Mozart’s Requiem with the addition of a Kyrie in D Minor, Ave Verum Corpus and Olivia Turner’s truly enchanting rendition of the ‘Alleluia’ from Exultate Jubilate, writes Hannah Hutchinson (U6).

Alongside the singing experience, I learnt something new: during the composition of the Requiem, Mozart Amadeus Wolfgang died, thus leaving it incomplete. Scared of losing the commission of the piece his wife, Constanze, gave it to Joseph Ebler who completed the sections Mozart had already started. However, to complete the piece as a whole, more sections needed to be composed; in order to maintain the feel of Mozart’s work, his student, Franz Süssmayr, composed the remaining sections. I shall never forget Mr Kettlewell repeating, with his eyes glistening with tears: “These are the last ever notes that Mozart wrote!” Although the piece is less famous amongst the general public than last year’s Carmina Burana, the church was full to overflowing with people eager to listen to us. The sound was fantastic. Back in Pocklington’s All Saint’s Church, with its fantastic acoustics, the beautiful and delicate ‘Kyries’ drifted around the space, whilst the strong

MUSIC SOCIETY

and powerful ‘Dies Irae’ thundered to the rafters. The audience certainly felt the anger of the gods, even if the words were in Latin! Throughout the Requiem there are sections for solo performers and the four who sang that Saturday night were spell-binding. The soprano soloist, Julia Ledger, soared through the high notes and Rowena Burton, the alto soloist, was just as amazing. The tenor soloist chosen was our very own Mr Peel (or Bio Bob as he may be known to many pupils) who retired from the teaching staff last year. Finally, the bass soloist with notes that rumbled low and deep was John Micklem-Cooper. As always, with Mr Kettlewell at the helm directing us, the choir was in safe hands. He coaxed out incredible sounds and created a fantastic piece of music from a group of people, the majority of whom have never sung professionally. In July, I shall be saying goodbye to Pocklington and heading off towards the big bad world of university and, although I have only participated in two Music Society events, it is one of the things I will miss the most. Getting to sing like a professional choir is such a musical confidence booster and the social aspect of mingling with people you’ve never met before is a lovely experience. Who knows, perhaps I will follow the example of Miranda Bond and Robert Harris (two of last year’s leavers) and return for next year’s event!

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MUSIC

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udiences at this annual concert featuring staff, pupils and parents have become accustomed to a tradition of fine performances. This year’s concert lived up to all expectations as a 120-voice choir, accompanied by a magnificent-sounding orchestra, undertook performances of some of Mozart’s later choral works. The concert began with the little known Kyrie in D minor, composed when Mozart was merely 16 years old. The sinister sonorities of D minor immediately created a somber mood, perfectly developed through the precise choral singing. That this large choir could then be tamed and controlled was evident in a beautifully tender performance of Ave Verum Corpus, composed during Mozart’s final year. Now accompanied by organist Tom Taylor and strings, the choir sounded warm and well-balanced, this miniature providing a beautiful contrast to the dark tones of the preceding piece. Then time for vocal fireworks. The ‘Alleluia’ from Exultate Jubilate is well known as a coloratura piece, and our own Sixth form soprano Olivia Turner achieved Mozart’s athletic leaps and rapid passagework with aplomb. Finally, we were treated to the performance of Mozart’s Requiem. The work is amongst his most well-known and best-loved pieces and therefore one approaches the performance from a position of knowledge and perhaps a more critical ear. However, the audience was soon to realise that this was no typical school performance. The sombre opening bars set the tone of a piece which is dark and full of Masonic symbology. After the ‘Introitus’ the piece moves swiftly into the first of the fugal passages. No concession here for the complexity of the choral and orchestral textures, the conductor insisting on nothing less than a vigorous allegro. If the audience felt that this was exciting, the rapid ‘Dies Irae’ took the mood of the evening to a whole new level, the basses confidently articulating ‘quantus tremor est futurus’ whilst the strings, led by John Cullen, bowed as though their very lives depended upon it. Of the solo movements that followed, John Micklem Cooper’s opening of the ‘Tuba Mirum’ was confident and assured, and moved fluently into the delicate ‘Recordare’ where the four soloists combined quite beautifully. Perhaps the highlights of the evening came in Mozart’s cleverly juxtaposed ‘Confutatis’ and ‘Lacrimosa’. The sheer power of the men’s voices accompanied by cellos and basses seemed to want to shake the church to its very foundations, only to be quelled by the delicate higher voices, ‘voca me cum benedictis’. With the tender opening of ‘Lacrimosa’, the audience follows the final musical uttering of the tragic Mozart; the final bars penned by his hand reach an almighty imperfect cadence. Thereafter the music flowed effortlessly towards its final conclusion, as Mozart’s pupil Franz Süssmayer completed the work, echoing his master’s opening. The final fugue enthralled the audience, in what was a perfect end to a wonderful evening’s music. This was a masterful performance, which left the audience keenly anticipating the 2012 concert. MK

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SWING BAND

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t has been another exciting year for Swing Band! Following our tour to Berlin last July, we said goodbye to a few members, but of course we replaced them with new ones. Tom Baarda (trumpet) and Jordan Smith (electric guitar) are two of the new recruits, who have provided us with magnificent solos, writes Alice Boyes (L6).

As a band, we have had numerous events this year, performing in the Winter and Spring Concerts and playing for a fundraiser for Breast Cancer in Lund. Perhaps the most prestigious event for us was when we were asked to play at the York Racecourse, for the Chamber of Commerce. It was an honour to participate in such an occasion and I’m sure it is an experience which we won’t forget for a long time. Despite the poor weather, Swing Band brought out the sun at Burnby Hall Gardens in Pocklington in June. We performed to an audience of a wide age range, playing both old favourites and modern pieces. This was made all the more special when two OPs, Charlie Lambert and Steph Room, joined the tenor saxophones once again, creating a wonderful sound! Finally, we finished off our year by performing at Party at Pock, where we joined by not two but three OPs! As a band, we felt that this was the most amazing performance and finished off our year with a bang. As the next school year approaches, we look forward once again to the challenges ahead and in particular our forthcoming tour. Thank you to all staff members who give up their time to perform in the band, and in particular, Mr Kettlewell for his direction, dedication and commitment to us all.

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MUSIC

CHAMBER CHOIR Chamber Choir started the school year singing Stanford’s ‘Te Deum’ in B flat, in the Commemoration service. This broke the norm of a cappella anthems for ‘Commem’, and the excellent performance set the standard for the year ahead.

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he Winter Concert saw a reprise of the Stanford anthem, combined with Bob Chilcott’s arrangement of ‘All Through the Night‘. The choir next took part in two Christmas carol services; firstly, performing for the Macmillan Cancer Support Carol Concert in Beverley Minster, then three days later singing in our own service in Pocklington. The service is always a highlight of the school calendar and this year the choir performed some carols which were new to them: Howells’ ‘Here is the little door’ as well as the favourite, ‘Whence is that goodly fragrance flowing’, bringing a tear to the eye of many an audience member and performer alike. Lent Term tends to be a time when the choir concentrate on secular music, and they prepared two lovely arrangements for the Spring Concert; ‘Shoshone Love Song’ and ‘Wayfaring Stranger’. The choir are about to go through a significant rebuilding process, with many of the bass section leaving school, after many years of loyal service. Their devotion and musicianship will be missed come September, and we will look to a new generation of singers to rise to the challenge. MK

SENIOR STRINGS

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his year has brought with it many new recruits, who have vastly increased our numbers and given us a new confidence in our sound, writes Rachel Allison (L6).

We started off the year with the Winter Concert, where we played ‘Adagio’ by Barber, a slow but challenging piece, followed by Pachelbel’s ‘Canon’. Our next concert was the Spring Concert where we performed ‘Rondo in G’ by Mozart. Finally, to finish the year off, we performed Corelli’s ‘Vivace’ and ‘Allegretto’ by Kabelevsky in the Summer Concert. We have also joined Concert Band to create a full orchestra this year, which performed in the Summer Concert, performing ‘Memory’ from Cats and themes from Gladiator. This was a great for the senior strings as this is the first opportunity for many of us to play as an orchestra. We are all very grateful to Mrs Kneeshaw for all the time and effort she puts in and are looking forward to next year.

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BRASS ENSEMBLE

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his summer is a sad time for the Brass Ensemble, with two most influential members of the team leaving the school. Max Galley has led the group for a number of years with his confident trumpet playing and Sam Berridge has been a fundamental presence on French Horn throughout his time here. Our recent Summer Concert piece, an arrangement of Mumford & Sons’s ‘Winter Winds’, featured both these performers and was a soulful moment in the group’s year. Back in November, the group performed at the Winter Concert, opening the show with Banchieri’s ‘Echo Fantasia’. There was plenty of fine, individual, assured playing from the members of the group as we tackled the piece’s tricky Baroque counterpoint and pseudo-antiphonal echo section. This was followed by Gervaise’s ‘Dances’ which showed off the tight and rhythmic ensemble that we have developed over the last few years. With a packed Spring Term, we fell back on a stock classic to get the concert underway with a lively and declamatory performance of Jeremiah Clarke’s ‘Prince of Denmark’s March’. (Of course you know it: the ‘trumpet voluntary’!) The members of the brass ensemble have worked hard over the year to create a high quality to their playing and professionalism to their demeanour. As well as Max and Sam, John Pearson has been a very able 2nd trumpet player, not afraid of his ‘solo’ moments; Seb Williman has been versatile in his contribution, trekking over from Lyndhurst to rehearse with us on Monday lunchtime; and Henry Burr has joined, with his euphonium adding depth to the bass part. These lads will form the basis of next year’s group, when we will be looking forward to the school’s 500th birthday, hoping to prepare our own tribute for the celebrations… TEWT

CONCERT BAND

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t has been a diverse year of music from the Concert Band, from arrangements of classical ‘pops’, through songs from the shows, to incidental film music.

We started in November with a piece that featured highlights of ClaudeMichel’s music from the show Les Misérables; plenty of well-known toetapping and lyrical songs arranged cleverly for the resources of the Band. In Lent Term we appeared at the Spring Concert with a couple of classical arrangements: the majestic and spritely ‘Kijé’s Wedding’ by Prokofiev and Khachaturian’s lively and rousing ‘Sabre Dance’. Summer Term saw us join forces with the Senior Strings to produce the finale to the end of term concert: a serene arrangement of Lloyd Webber’s ‘Memory’ and a revisiting of one of Wilberforce House’s winning pieces from the House Music Festival, ‘Highlights from Gladiator’. This time the instrumentalists chose not to dress up as Roman warriors! Overall, the band has continued to flourish with some secure and effective ensemble playing and a real sense of occasion, pulling out the stops for the concerts with some adrenalin-fired music-making. TEWT

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MUSIC

JUNIOR CHOIR GLEE CLUB he newly-formed Glee Club was created following a request made through Student Council that the Music Department arranged a group based on the TV series. The main aim of the group is to allow singers and dancers to develop confidence in performing. There is an open door policy for entry - anyone who enjoys singing or dancing is welcome to attend. Initially all the songs were arranged by Mr Kettlewell, then members of the group suggested songs which they wanted to perform.

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The first performance by the group was at the Winter Concert where they performed two songs made famous in the American TV series: ‘Forget You’ and ‘Don’t Stop Believin’’. Initially, the nerves of singing and dancing in a formal concert restricted the exuberance of the group, but this was soon overcome when they gave their second performance on the ‘Strictly Pock Dancing’ evening. Placing confident 4th and 5th formers on the front row of the ensemble gave the whole group much more confidence, and the whole performance lifted. An exciting diversion for the group in November was to work with the Destiny Children’s Choir from Kampala, Uganda. This touring choir came to Pocklington to give a concert, and we shared an amazing lunchtime rehearsal, where our Glee Club sang ‘Forget You’, and then joined in with one of the African choir’s songs. The sheer excitement of this performance made a huge impact on the group. Their next performance, in the Spring Concert, featured two songs which the group had chosen themselves, ‘Set Fire to the Rain’, and the brilliantly choreographed ‘Lazy Song’. Due to the numbers of pupils involved in the Lower School Play, the club stopped meeting at the May half term, but we look forward to commencing rehearsals again in September, with Alex Riddell and Megan Smith at the helm. MK

SOLOISTS’ CONCERT The Soloists’ Concert is always an enjoyable event as it allows pupils of varying experience a chance to perform to a supportive audience, and this year’s event was no exception.

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he first half was dominated by pupils from the 1st to 4th form and the standard of performance showed much of the potential on offer in these young musicians. Special mention must go to the confident tenor saxophone playing of Martha Cullen, and the flair demonstrated by pianist Fenella Scutt. Violin playing was also of the highest standard, with Sara Eggleston and Emma Norgate both performing challenging pieces with aplomb.

In the second half, more experienced soloists took to the floor in a variety of styles. Tom Burke sang Schubert’s ‘Du Bist die Ruh’, whilst Katy Peel took on the challenging ‘A l’espagnole’ by Dubois. However, perhaps the highlight of the evening’s performances was the flamboyant saxophone playing by Alice Boyes; Phil Woods’s ‘Sonata No 1’ sounding quite superb. MK 38

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he Junior Choir have rehearsed weekly on Wednesday lunchtimes, performing at three Music Department concerts, the Carol Service and as part of a choir showcase at Pocklington Arts Centre.

Numbers in the group have been as high as forty and now remain stable at around thirty first year children. They have worked hard to improve their breath control, diction and projection. They sing comfortably in two and three parts and we have some versatile choristers who are required to swap parts in order to balance the ensemble properly. They always perform from memory and have tried hard to watch their conductor throughout their songs. They have sung a varied repertoire including songs from Les Miserables, ‘Swing Low, Sweet Chariot’, ‘Hallelujah’ and ‘Climbin' up the Mountain’. Pupils have willingly attended the extra rehearsals that have been scheduled before performances to ensure that the ‘team’ is at its best. The students have enjoyed their singing this year and this has been noticeable in their smiling faces during performance! We look forward to some new first years joining the choir and to learning some exciting new songs. The Junior Orchestra has been well attended this year. There are three first violins, five seconds, five flutes, two clarinets, a saxophone, two trumpets, one French horn, one trombone, one euphonium and three enthusiastic percussionists! We have played ‘Rock around the Clock’, ‘Winter Wonderland’, ‘Oom pah pah’ from Oliver, ‘Land of Hope and Glory’ (to celebrate the Jubilee) and ‘Jurassic Park’. Some of this music has challenged the pupils but over the year they have worked hard to learn their individual parts and then listened carefully in rehearsals to fit in with the others in the ensemble. The musicians have been positive, committed and good humoured and should be justly proud of their three performances. HK

SHOWTIME CONCERT

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s an opportunity to give singers a chance to perform before a small but appreciative audience, the Showtime Concert was arranged by Mrs Krystina Meinardi, singing teacher at Pocklington.

Sixteen singers, ranging from pupils in Year 3 at Lyndhurst to those in the Upper Sixth, were given the chance to perform in a range of musical styles. The youngest singers, Olivia Cartwright-Taylor and Eleanor Hutchinson, sang quite beautifully from memory, both dressed appropriately for an evening soirée. The evening continued with singers in the Lower School performing confidently. Ruby Addy took on the challenging ‘O Cessate de Piagarmi’ and produced a lovely performance, with confident singing in Italian. To contrast, George Jibson swaggered on stage as ‘Burlington Bertie’ to give an assured performance of the Music Hall classic. Of the more experienced singers performing, perhaps the highlights were Tom Burke’s powerful rendition of ‘Sea Fever’ by John Ireland, his voice amply filling the Music School as the song reached its climax. Similarly Olivia Turner, no stranger to performing solos, was able to span the contrasting moods required for William Walton’s ‘Daphne’ and Puccini’s aria ‘Quando m’en Vo’. The evening was a tremendous success; great credit to performers and their teacher alike. MK


LA SERVA PADRONA

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his year saw a charming performance in school of the comic opera La Serva Padrona, composed by Giovanni Battista Pergolesi. The piece was designed as an Intermezzo in two scenes, to be performed between the acts of his Opera Seria Il Prigonier Superbo in August 1733, in front of the Empress of Austria. Needless to say, the serious opera disappeared into the mists of time, but the little Intermezzo became a runaway success. It helped the rise of the Italian Opera Buffa which was to dominate the stage in the 18th century, even stimulating the birth of the Opera Comique in Paris. Our wonderful singers were Olivia Turner, John Micklem-Cooper and George Jibson. Olivia gave an enchanting account of Serpina’s role as the plotting maidservant, John played the bamboozled master Uberto and George showed consummate mime and clowning abilities as the mute servant Vespone. All three worked extremely hard to deliver such a superb performance in the middle of a demanding term. Well done indeed – and thank you! KM

OPERA

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ach year, the Music Department arranges a trip to the Grand Theatre, Leeds, to give senior pupils a chance to see a professional opera company producing one of the famous works from the repertoire. This year, the opera selected was Puccini’s Madama Butterfly. This famous love story of a Japanese girl who falls in love with an American Naval Officer tends to have profound impact on its audience, and this production did not disappoint. Vocally the company were superb, Ciocio-san (Butterfly) warming into her role as the opera progressed, and Pinkerton (the US officer) immediately capturing the loathsome character which is required of this two-timer! Musical highlights perhaps were the rousing strains of ‘The Star Spangled Banner’, used as a leitmotif for the character of Pinkerton, and Butterfly’s beautiful love song, ‘Un bel di’. The 15 students who came along enjoyed a superb evening’s entertainment.

As a bonus this year, the Music Department at Pocklington forged a link with the Royal Opera House in London. This enables us to apply to take groups of students to see a schools’ matinee performance at Covent Garden. We were elated to be allocated tickets to see Puccini’s La Boheme in April. Travelling down by train, then shopping in the Covent Garden area, prior to seeing the opera, set the scene for a special day. The opera production certainly did not disappoint. Anyone who saw the TV series Maestro at the Opera will have seen the opulent set for Act 2 of the opera. To see the mechanics behind how this scene change is achieved was a treat in itself, let alone the stunning singing of some of Europe’s finest soloists. The day was brought to a successful close with a Thai banquet before we returned to York on a late train. A magnificent, memorable day – and hopefully one which can be repeated in 2013. MK

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ART

ART

Chair, Imogen Henderson U6

Picasso, Ellie Walker L6

Picasso, Imogen Henderson U6

Graffiti, Emily Wride L6 Face, Ray Tang U6

Face, Georgie Lucas U6

Dog, Ray Tang U6 40

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Munch, John Chatterton L6 Picasso, John Chatterton U6

Monkey, Ray Tang U6

Father, Sophie Stuart U6

Glass, Georgie Lucas U6

Ripper, Vicky Hodgson U6

Queen, Ray Tang U6

Self, Vicky Hodgson U6 THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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DESIGN

DESIGN

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t Pocklington, we want to provide our students with the most authentic and challenging design opportunities that allow them to develop their skills, philosophy and style whilst developing a deep understanding of design tradition. We were able to develop a link with a local high-end furniture store that specialises in noteworthy design, including items from the Vitra collection. Our L6 students visited the store for inspiration and were challenged to design and make a flat-pack chair inspired by the products on sale. The students pursued a broad range of design and manufacturer strategies in a range of materials to produce a divergent collection of flat pack chairs. We are very proud of the outcomes and of the journey the students have been on. JEP

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WRITING

ORIGINAL WRITING

‘Escape’ He blundered blindly through bushes With lethal dagger in hand. His one objective To escape this terrible land. His old shirt glistened red with blood, His face was drenched with sweat, But the ghastly deed he had done, Was one he would never forget.

‘Spell’

It was going to haunt him forever, Would be a recurring dream. But he was intent on escaping To a place he could never been seen. James Laudage (2WIL)

One ground beetroot, quinze a foot Six old turnips, a bag of soot; Remove all beauty, reveal the inner – Inside lies a very sinner. Possle tail, venom sail, Orange and lime, hair of swine; These words affect, do you reject. Swelter sweat, like a boar, Your voice transformed to lion’s roar; Teeth are not so squeaky clean, Seems they’ve lost that quirky sheen. One ground beetroot, quinze a foot Six old turnips, a bag of soot; Remove all beauty, reveal the inner – Inside lies a very sinner. Suzanna Hammersley (2WIL)

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‘Reveal’ Soft silence falls, and each eye turns to the red curtain; not a murmur is heard – we all expect our anticipation to be founded on the base of the rumour. Text, black on white, praise for his act. Praise, and criticism. The crimson wave across the stage quivers. Ladies, in their long, rustling skirts, raise their brass binoculars. They wait. We wait. Rustles die, and final snippets of conversation break like shattered glass, or maybe mirror. I am here to review. To scrutinise and report and relay my findings to the editor. The soft click of my pen, as I poise it over the page, does not carry; the curtains, the crowd prevent it. And on cue, the fabric halves, and the stage is exposed. He stands in the centre, poised, prepared. He allows the audience to drink in his appearance, statuesque. His fingers are curled around a wooden neck, pressed against the strings of a violin, the colour of caramel. His waistcoat is red and all but his necktie black, the latter currently pristine white, as if he has snow coiled upon his breastbone. Deftly, slowly, he draws his bow down, and across. The sweet note breaks the stagnant air, and is drawn out, until bow and arm end. Again, he pauses, then passes the length of wood behind his back. When it returns to our line of sight, it is no longer wooden, no longer a bow; he holds a silver flute. Collectively, there is a gasp – a mutual sound that even my lips fail to contain. As if in continuation of his audience, his flute sighs while it sings – its melancholy song must be for my ears. Surely nobody else comprehends the weighty importance of such music – High music. No more does the air hold the breath of a choir of maidens. A piccolo, now. Crisp, sharp, staccato. Happy. It embellishes my heart with warmth, and inside, I am dancing. Lonely. Angry. Lethargic. Recycle, replace, reveal. I didn’t need to know how long it lasted, to be disappointed when it did end. The sensation of drifting through the undulating threads of his music was so preferable to those of life. And when the world reappeared, still my pen was poised above the paper, and still the paper was blank. Emily Hallam (4DOL)

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SARAH JACKSON

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ccasionally, we are privileged to see a pupil’s work far exceeding his or her age’s average ability. The Design Department encountered just such a case in Sarah Jackson (1HUT) this year. Her project on the Bauhaus and its treatment by the Nazis is documented in file format here. The quality contained reaches far beyond expectation and promises very fine things for the future. Congratulations to Sarah on an exciting beginning to her school career.

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HOUSE DRAMA This year Dolman performed an edited version of the 15th century morality play, ‘Everyman’, telling the story of how mankind is called to judgement and must find a companion to help him plead his case, writes Tom Burke (U6).

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he first week of school saw the auditions, with a great turnout even on the first day back, especially from the Lower School. The second week saw rehearsals begin proper, with Chris Pratt, Rosie Hull and Juliet May riding sidecar, helping to direct and generally keeping me sane! The scenes started coming together in week three, but the realisation of how many of the cast were involved in sports fixtures (one entire rehearsal being eclipsed by two girls’ hockey fixtures) began to kick in, causing ‘mild stress’ for Chris and me. Despite this, by the end of week four we were confident the play would work well, calmly facing the following week’s performances. Nerves began on Monday, after a shaky dress rehearsal, with frantic rewrites of the script and the rapid addition of a narrator. Credit must go to the cast for how they calmly accepted this change, not batting an eyelid as scenes were adjusted on Tuesday, the day before the first performance. With lighting cues quickly sorted on Wednesday lunchtime (innumerable thanks to Steph Ryan, Matthew Springett and the lighting team) we began rehearsals for the first performance that evening. It went well, with all four houses putting on strong shows. Tensions were high, with no-one quite sure who would take the trophy the next day. With a few pointers from Mr Heaven and the drama department, we began rehearsing on Thursday in preparation for the final.

Dolman’s crowning performance was absolutely superb, and special mention must go to Joshua Baines for his incredible performance of the lead, Everyman. After lengthy deliberation, Dolman won best play, with Tom Burke receiving the prize for Creative Contribution and Alice Boyes, Antonia Selvey and Emily Hallam (with Charlie Procter from Wilberforce) the joint winners for Best Actor for their performance as Death. My experience of house drama this year was incredible. The dedication and commitment of the cast from 1st year to U6 was superb, and I can see a bright future in school drama, if not beyond, for every one of them. Roll on House Music!

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DRAMA

GRUGGEN

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his year Gruggen put forward an interpretation of ‘Who’s Afraid of the Brothers Grimm?’ As director, the question I was most frequently asked was “What is it?”, remembers Hannah Hutchinson (U6). ‘Who’s Afraid of the Brothers Grimm?’ is a play of three parts. One, the Brothers Grimm themselves lamenting over how their fairy tale characters have abandoned the true meaning of their original tales in order to go off and make money. Two, a TV adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s ‘The Nightingale and the Rose’ which the Brothers Grimm watch to cheer themselves up. Three, the TV advertisements involving those very same fairy tale characters – by far the most amusing part!

I watched it with my assistant director, Lizzie Oughtred, at the 2009 Edinburgh Fringe Festival and loved it. However, there is no official script and it is originally one hour long: things one may call a slight disadvantage from the offset! I managed to write a script from memory (even if a lot of it was tailored to my liking), ready for the auditions. After three weeks of hard work the finished product was truly astounding. To see something turn from a fleeting idea to a fantastically acted performance was mindblowing.

The first night was what I like to think of as ‘the second dress rehearsal’. After a rigorous and rapid technical rehearsal on Thursday, we were all prepared for the final evening. I must say, I have never been prouder of my cast than when watching them act with perfect technical effects (thanks go to Joshua Palmer and Freddie Cole). I was standing in the wings doing little happy dances with a massive smile on my face every time a scene started and finished; they were just amazing! In the end, our Judge, Norma Jennings, gave special mentions to Caitlin Bond and Lucy Snowden, who played the Student and the Red Rose Bush respectively. Similarly, high praise went to Sam Hird and Tom Benthall for their ‘sponsored by’ scenes. Tom’s aloofness as Humpty Dumpty went down a treat with the audience and Sam’s comic timing was perfection itself. Sam was also praised for his role as Alexander the Meerkat, along with his side-kick Sergei (Daniel Pearse) who went to see Cinderella (Beth Smart) with a gift for her because she used comparethemarket.com to insure the pumpkin carriage. The audience were in stitches. Although we didn’t win, it was a very close contest and all Gruggeners did me proud! After all, Gruggen’s motto has always been, ‘It’s not the winning; it’s the taking part that counts!’ Never has a truer word been spoken.

HUTTON

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t is a truth universally acknowledged that Hutton are somewhat lacking in dramatic talent, believes director Becki Knight (U6). After a few days of sheer panic, we realised that as a house we’ve never taken ourselves too seriously, so we were going to have as much fun as possible! Liam Corbally (no idea how to spell his last name – sorry! Couldn’t have done it better myself. Ed) came up with the idea of ‘The Gruffalo’, which was perfect. After adding some extra characters and coming up with my own rhymes (‘grass’ with ‘badger madras’ was me at my very best), we started to put it all together. I can honestly say that although it was stressful at times, we were all so proud of both performances. It really brought us closer together as Sixth formers. We may not have won but we certainly did Hutton proud!

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WILBERFORCE

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oarse acting is a fine art, in which actors make deliberate humorous errors, whilst maintaining gravitas themselves. Wilberforce took on this challenge with our performance of Michael Green’s ‘Henry X, Part VII’, writes Sam Elcock (U6). It was great fun working with Freddie Wride to direct this piece. We had to think things through pretty deeply, for although the play is intended to mock bad acting and making mistakes is part of the piece, we wanted to succeed in this without succumbing to it. As rehearsals began, we encountered all sorts of problems, not least the claims of competing activities. (I never imagined chess club could be so formidable an opponent!) The first night was exceptional: we performed the best we ever had. The audience was in hysterics and even applauded after individual scenes. Thursday evening was even better, as we improved on some of the errors Mr Heaven had spotted in his feedback session. We were delighted that Charlie Procter, our brilliant Herald, won Best Actor overall. His use of stunts, comic timing and his pint sized stature made him the perfect fit for the role. The Judge, Norma Jennings, also mentioned Billy Ibbotson, whose portrayal of Lord Uxbridge’s campness had everyone in stitches. Audience members also enjoyed Fin Henderson’s King and I personally loved directing Tom Baarda, who worked so hard to implement new ideas. Other memorable actors included Eva Bennett, whose diva Queen proved endlessly versatile. Finally, thanks to stage hands Jonny Chu and Ed Chappelow and our costumiers Immy Henderson and Anna Wilkinson. Freddie and I thoroughly enjoyed directing the play. It couldn’t have gone any better and was a fitting way to end our association with House Drama!

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DRAMA

A VISIT

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his radical reworking of Durrenmatt’s 1950s German original relocates the action to a town in recession in 1979, dominated by the church. The slogan Morality, Simplicity, Community dictates the behaviour and expectations of the poverty-stricken society while the tension between church and town council only increases its misery. Into this comes Saffron (Alice Boyes) and her crew of disco-dancing groovers: Rafe the DJ and god of love (Riley Anderson), Moon, Star, Ardelle and Varquette the dancers (Eva Bennett, Lucy Snowden, Lucy Peel, Beth Smart) along with a damaged group of circus refugees – Marvo the Magician (Josh Baines), Sequin the singer (Lucinda Rix) and a pair of blind, tortured clowns (Fred Weeks, James Thompson) – all victims of Saffron’s revenge. She is back to bring evil and corruption to her old home town. Taking on the Mayor (Sam Elcock) and the Reverend himself (Paddy Russell), Saffron makes a simple offer: £50 million for the town on condition that the man who made her pregnant is killed. With this moral problem, the temptation of money and the allure of music and pleasure,

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the town has to make a decision. Should they kill Alfred (Freddie Wride) or not? With terrific a capella harmony from the beggars (Freddie Hetherton, Tom Burke, Alex Riddell, Flo Taylor) to open the show, this was a frantic and fast-paced ensemble production. Groups of actors moved into poses with speed and precision; the disco explosion happened with energy and vibrant colour, helped by Mrs White’s terrific costumes; and Mr Ryan’s set burst into multi-coloured life. Mrs Bond’s live band (herself, Rufus Watson, Jordan Smith and Mr Newhouse) was a super showcase for her music, too. Every actor threw him or herself into the style of the play, giving real energy, fun and some nasty surprises to the evening. Most unpleasant was probably the Reverend’s capture and torture from which he re-emerged a twitching, drooling and blood-soaked clown. The comedy, the music and the confidence of the performers made the whole experience gripping and entertaining. Congratulations to all involved in this production. It was a great show. AWJH


HORTON HEARS A WHO

Tom Baarda (2WIL) and Sam Hird (2GRU) discuss their roles with Mrs Marshall. Q: Tell me about your character. Tom: I’m the Mayor of Whoville, the town Horton finds on the speck. I try to persuade the citizens to take my fears seriously. Q: What does he need to be afraid of? Sam: He needs to be afraid of the dangers in the sky; his world is a tiny speck in the jungle of Nool and the dangers include a psychotic kangaroo and a bird with anger management problems. Q: What do you like best about your character? Tom: I like showing the progression of my character as he battles within himself to prove his strength as a leader. Sam: Horton is so eccentric – he reminds me of myself! He tries so hard and never gives up. Q: What would you say is the overall mood of the play? Sam: It’s a strange imaginary world – but a play containing universal truths: a person’s a person, no matter how small! Tom: It’s animated and over the top, but there are people like the characters in this play. And it’s a lot of fun. Sam: Oh yes!

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he week of the Horton performances arrived. Due to the allday rehearsal on the Monday, we were all very tired but also prepared to show what we could do, write Tom Baarda (2WIL) and Sam Hird (2GRU).

After Horton Hears a Who, Sam and Tom are looking forward to participating in the Shakespeare Schools’ Festival in October this year. FBM

On Tuesday, after a rushed lunch, we “suited up” and made some last minute adjustments to tails, ears and Mayoral Chains! It was time…. For a first show, it went very well, and the audience of assorted local schools and Lyndhurst certainly thought so. We were now excited for the second show, but knew we had to “perform our socks off” (as Mrs Girling would say) to build on our first afternoon’s success. So the day came for our second performance of Horton. This also went well, in fact even better. The audience thought the set and costumes were fantastic, and they were thoroughly entertained. If we thought it couldn’t go any better on the third (and final) show, we were mistaken. The audience were reduced to tears with laughter, and it was a great end to a great week. We would just like to thank Mrs Girling and Mrs Marshall for writing the script, directing and organising the whole thing, Mr Ryan and Mrs White for the set and costumes, and everyone else who helped backstage and front-of-house.

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DRAMA

A LEVEL

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his year’s A level Drama gave us Messiah, by Steven Berkoff; Alice’s Adventures Underground, by Christopher Hampton; and Calzoni’s, devised by the actors. Three very different productions which showed to the highest standards the remarkable breadth of style and theatre the school delivers. All three scored the highest band; many of the actors scored full marks. Again, truly outstanding work was shown.

Calzoni’s was based on commedia dell’Arte and scripted and performed by an unusually small A Level set of two: Freddie Wride and Sam Elcock. Taking the simple scenario of a failing restaurant run by an old man who offers his useless son 48 hours to make it a success or he will sell it to the greedy corporate entrepreneur, the two actors multi-roled a cast of a dozen. The audience – who were seated at tables, served drinks and all uncomfortably close to the furious physical action – watched the pace go faster and faster as objects flew over the set to be caught on stage, Freddie hurled himself in a swan dive across a sofa, both actors ran, jumped and tumbled with impressive co-ordination and the play increased in manic energy. By the end the set was awash with bread and props and the actors received the applause they so clearly deserved, as exhausted by doing it as the audience was watching. Alice’s Adventures was another multi-roling piece but with a different style entirely. This AS show focused on using themselves, props and set in unusual and imaginative ways. A lampshade became the White Queen’s crown; Tom Benthall became a plum pudding, a flamingo, a leg of mutton as well as a caterpillar and Lewis Carroll. The tone here was comical, gentle, moving and utterly believable. Laura Arnott, Lucy Peel, Olivia Turner and Elli Herbert as Alice completed the cast, each of them showing depth of emotion and precise, rigorously rehearsed use of their environment to tell a selection of moments from the two Alice books. It was a powerful experience and touched a chord of wonder. Messiah used the more familiar style of Berkoff: a black set, aggressive postures and a vigorous, mime-based method. Directed by Antonia Selvey, this was a masterclass in the style. It told the story of the last days of Jesus as if he were a man, a rebel, someone who understood what he had to do and why. The humanity sat well alongside a religious intensity. Stand-out moments were Riley Anderson’s Satan and Paddy Russell’s comic turn as a centurion, but the whole cast produced beautiful ensemble moments. Congratulations to Alice Boyes, Holly Chidley and Joe Paulson as well as those above for a fantastic show which, like Alice, went well beyond A Level standards and thrilled all who were lucky enough to be present. AWJH

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HUGH STUBBINS

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n a recent Cambridge University production, Hugh Stubbins (OP and Head Boy 2010/11) received this review, which we now print in extracted form:

A Clear Road ADC Lateshow, 11pm, until Sat 5th May. A set of generally strong performances was led by the wonderful Hugh Stubbins as Peter and Olivia Stocker as Jean. Stubbins in particular gave a controlled but nuanced portrayal, allowing enough insight into his bitterness and disillusionment without allowing the frequent changes of emotional pitch to become melodramatic. It was this sibling relationship which for me made the play a success, as their dialogue explored familial strains and resentments without drowning in schmaltz or angst. Overall, this was a well-constructed and adeptly performed piece. Whilst the imagery of Peter and Jean's search for a 'clear road' may have been a little obvious, Baker's script did an impressive job of exploring subtle emotional tensions whilst maintaining a strong plot arc, something which is often lacking in student writing: unlike other new dramas which sometimes come to the stage here, this was not only thoughtful and poignant, but also told a structured and entertaining story, making for a refreshing and enjoyable new work. Many congratulations to Hugh on his continued dramatic success! Ed.

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1ST XV

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n a tough term plagued with injuries and inconsistency, this inexperienced side has progressed as the season has worn on. Serious lessons were learnt from heavy losses to bigger and more athletic opposition (Woodhouse Grove and Barnard Castle), and a great forward effort versus St Peter’s was let down by na ve back play.

RUGBY

There were great performances against Hymers and Ampleforth with plenty of endeavour, but an inability to close out the game ultimately cost the team deserved wins. A strong, gutsy effort saw the boys finish the season strongly against Driffield RFC, grinding out a 19-7 win. Special mentions must go to George Wagstaff, who has been consistently our best player throughout the season (winning him the Vergette Trophy), and massive improvements from Jacob Sherwood and Harry Lawton, who have excelled and grown in confidence as the season has gone on. Thanks to Jeremy Deas for his leadership in a difficult year.

Overall:

Played 17

Won 2

Lost 15

SAH

1ST VII

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he sevens season has been one of discovery. A lack of selfbelief and crucial errors at key moments has seen the team lose games they could well have won comfortably. Tough pools at the Northern Schools’ tournament and Fylde National Sevens did not help, but meant the boys have learnt much by playing against some of the strongest schools in the country. All this changed at the Hymers Super Sevens tournament, where the boys played some outstanding rugby to win the plate for the 2nd year in a row. The fabulous comeback win against a strong Birkdale side in the semi-final 28-26 and the dismantling of Hymers in the final 50-7 were games I won’t forget for a long time. Players of note include Tom Hitchenor, who has the ability to beat any player on his day; the meteoric rise of the ‘defensive beast’ Jake Sherwood; and the outstanding player of the season who consistently shone as a class act, our captain George Wagstaff.

Overall:

Played 16

Won 6

Lost 10

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2ND XV

U16 XV

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he 2nd XV have enjoyed a successful season; in fact, when taking into consideration the number of injuries, illnesses and unavailabilities that they have had to contend with, it has been quite remarkably successful. Despite losing our first match, away at Woodhouse Grove, great promise was shown and this was born out by three subsequent victories against Ashville, Hull and Trent before a depleted side produced a brave performance in adversity but still lost, away at Barnard Castle. The rest of the season was frustrating as injuries, illness and the weather combined with heavy traffic and late arrival at some fixtures to deprive us of the degree of success that the players’ ability and hard work deserved. I have thoroughly enjoyed this season in the company of an outstanding group of young men, all of whom wanted to improve their game and who showed great energy, enthusiasm, commitment and pride in playing for each other and their school. They can, in my opinion, be proud of their achievements, which perfectly illustrated all that is best about Pocklington. The team was ably led by Oliver Norgate, Freddie Wride and Jake Dale (injuries, illness and calls to the 1st XV permitting) and they were fervently supported by all of those who were selected. I would like to thank them all for their efforts and companionship during an excellent season.

Overall:

Played 11

Won 6

Lost 5

RPB

he U16 team made a fantastic start to the season, and in their first match against Woodhouse Grove, a team which had regularly beaten them easily, they managed to stage a glorious comeback, running out 19-15 winners against huge opposition. The following week saw the team travel to Trent College, where a committed and tactically astute performance resulted in a 26-11 victory against good opposition. Further wins followed against Prince Henry’s, Otley, Hill House and Worksop College. Sadly, some winnable fixtures did not take place, through the opposition’s inability to field a team! Defeats against St Peter’s and Barnard Castle were marred by serious injuries to Tom Slater and Johnny Bird respectively, but the margins against two of the best teams on the circuit were encouraging. Unfortunately, injuries played a role in this season; up to five first-choice players were missing at one time, and we were thus unable to play the same team two weeks running. The final two games pre-Christmas saw us bow to Hymers in a difficult away fixture, and then to Ampleforth, although the second half performance in this latter game, when we outplayed a strong home side, was great to watch. The forwards have generally been on top in the tight, and once they improve their support running and get a little fitter and stronger, they will become a real force. The backs have suffered from not having a settled line-up, but when at their best, they have looked very dangerous. In nine matches, over 20 players have started and nearly all squad members played a part. They have given their all in training and are getting better all the time. IMD/DAG

3RD XV

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he 3rd XV is a strange beast, made up as it is of willing and unwilling players, boys completely new to the game and in some cases from foreign climes and players who think they should be playing at a higher level. There is never a settled team, they suffer from call ups to the 2nd XV (sometimes hours before the match) and they stoically endure the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune in all their attempts to be taken seriously as a Pocklington rugby force. Having said all this, they are a fine body of men who always give their all to the cause and make their coach proud to be associated with them even under the most taxing and frustrating of circumstances. This season was particularly rewarding as three notable scalps were taken and the players available always gave one hundred per cent. There was a degree of skill on show (previously hidden in recent seasons!) and several players improved dramatically, unfortunately getting moved to higher teams where they then flourished. Simon Hodgson was an abrasive and team-building captain who led by example from No 8, Will Winlow was our most potent attacker and Pico Man our most improved player. Credit must be given to every boy who pulled on the 3rd XV jersey (old 1st team jerseys, actually!) and battled manfully against some very strong opposition including two 1st XV sides. It is also important to note that three players from last year’s squad were outstanding all season for Mr Houltham’s 1st XV. A big well done you all. My thanks is now recorded for posterity!

Overall:

Played 7

DW

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Won 3

Lost 4

U15 XV

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hat a term of rugby from a very talented group of boys! The team has not only progressed on the pitch but have developed an excellent attitude towards training and prematch preparation. Since half-term the team has gone from strength to strength and the win against an unbeaten Worksop College was a clear highlight. The forwards have come together and shown real aggression at the break-down, providing the backs with quick ball which they have torn teams apart with. A special mention must go to Jim Hanley who has controlled each and every game with great maturity. A very enjoyable term of rugby. Well done lads! JS


SAXONS 2012 – A RIDDLE, WRAPPED IN A MYSTERY, INSIDE AN ENIGMA “We are all inventors, each sailing out on a voyage of discovery, guided each by a private chart, of which there is no duplicate. The world is all gates, all opportunities. This, gentlemen is our opportunity.” Stephen Huddlestone – Training Session One

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uch words of inspiration set the tone for the season and were only the first of many great speeches by this master motivator – he deserved his monikor as Archduke: SaXon royalty.

2012 raised the bar again, set the target of a 40% winning ratio the SaXons blew this away ending with a 65% ratio. The season began with the squad in stunning form: the first five games were all won, including the team’s first ever entry into the Daily Mail Cup – the victory that shocked the world – Scarborough defeated. Other notable victories were the defeats of Woodhouse Grove, Ashville, Trent and Hymers College. Unfortunately, our strength then became our weakness. This SaXon team were free-flowing, high scoring and exciting to watch… unfortunately they found defensive work a little less appealing. The season suddenly shifted and we struggled against the likes of Barnard Castle and St Peter’s. It was in these dark and challenging days that a hero was needed to give us our belief back. It was on one drizzly Wednesday afternoon when training had been a little below par and spirits were low. Our captain, Mikey Curtis, stopped the session and gathered the troops. With a barely audible whisper, yet one which carried more intent than any ferocious roar, he nodded toward that man again: “It’s time, Stephen.” Huddlestone closed his eyes and stepped forward: “I don't know what to say really. Three days to the biggest battle of our professional lives. Either we heal as a team or we are going to crumble. Inch by inch, play by play till we're finished. We are in hell right now, gentlemen, believe me…and we can stay here or we can fight our way back into the light. We can climb out of

hell. One inch, at a time. Now I can't make you do it. You gotta look at the guy next to you. Look into his eyes. Now I think you are going to see a guy who will go that inch with you. You are going to see a guy who will sacrifice himself for this team because he knows when it comes down to it, you are gonna do the same thing for him. That's a team, gentlemen and either we heal now, as a team, or we will die as individuals. That's rugby guys. That's all it is. Now, whattaya gonna do?” By this time, Jack Wainwright was in tears. The season was back on! Absolute highlights, individually, were the high scoring escapades of Joe Laudage, the superb handling skills of Ben Byas and the destruction of the forward pack from the likes of Tom Lynch, Max Barnett and Cole Chapman. The Curtis twins led us valiantly and the foreign imports of Ricard Brandi and Dom Fildes were revelations. Overall, then, a season of high emotion – enjoyed by all. Most improved player: Dom Fildes

Man of Steel: Tom Lynch.

IMPACT player award: Ricard Brandi

Forward award: Max Barnett

Back award: Ben Byas

Top Scorer: Joe Laudage

GJH

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U14A XV

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n spite of the lack of victories, this has been a most enjoyable season. The improvements in each and every player have been marked, and there is now a nucleus of players who will go on to play senior rugby in years to come. Alex Varley, Will Hampshire and Bradley Wilson have consistently performed to the highest level, especially in the nail-biting 26-22 victory over Worksop College, while captain Sam Bunce has had a superb ‘never say die’ attitude. Defensive frailties have been the team’s downfall, but as they mature physically in seasons to come this will be less of an issue.

U13B XV

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he U13B team had an exceptional season, comprehensively beating all opposition. Time and again 50 points were passed and only at St Olave’s did the team meet any resistance; the end result was never in doubt even there though, and not even the presence of a flock of geese on the pitch could stop tries being scored by our backs.

Coaching them has never been less than an absolute pleasure.

Overall:

Played 12

Won 2

Lost 10

GB

U13A XV

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ur first game was against Woodhouse Grove with Pocklington grinding out the win in a narrowly contested game. We then beat Ashville comfortably before playing an away match at Trent.

It was a highly contested game; both teams came out firing knowing about each other’s unbeaten run. Pocklington scored first, with some great rucking by the forwards giving the backs a secure platform from which to play. Callum Stubbs went on to score the try. Trent soon hit back, though, leaving the score at the break 7-5 to Pocklington. In the second half it was an even contest, though five minutes into the second half after some pressure on Trent’s line, Callum burst through the defence again to make the lead 12-5. Again Trent replied, with a controversial try by their big number 8 which was then converted to make the scores level at 12-12. Unfortunately, the game had to be abandoned midway through the second half when Pocklington had a penalty because of a spinal injury. Our other big game was away at St Olave’s. After an inspiring team talk from Mr Spruyt, Pocklington started brilliantly, scoring three great tries with no reply. The next try came from a clearance kick which bounced straight into the hands of Jack Garvin, who went on to score. The next try came from some fine work from the front row; the ball was then popped to Jonty Atkinson who went on to finish in the corner. The final score was 45-17: a great win over Olave’s! We also went on to win matches against Ranby, Terrington, Hymers, Barnard Castle, South Hunsley and Mount St Mary’s, making it a very successful season for the U13s. SS

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The team’s strengths were spread across the pitch. The forwards were too much for any other pack and ate up any loose ball. Jacob Brown’s fierce tackling and his speed to the breakdown were outstanding at this level, and backed up by strong support from the likes of Will Baines and Joe Stables. Captain Harry Isenstein would pounce on any loose ball and be running straight and hard…too much for more ponderous opposition forwards! Equally, though, quick ball from the forwards, distributed sweetly by Oliver Beckett, would see the backs away for try after try. So many were capable of scoring, but Jack Newton-Taylor’s jinky runs at 13 were particularly effective. And then there was Sam! Barely a player at all in 1st form, Sam Ryan drifted across to us one day in training and never looked back! Far too powerful a runner for any opposition, he put fear into his opposite number’s heart! Definitely one for the future. This was undoubtedly the best U13B team that I have had the pleasure to watch in my time at Pocklington. Well done to all the squad!

Overall: IJA

Played 9

Won 9


U12A XV

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first weekend drubbing by Woodhouse Grove suggested that this could be a rocky season for the U12As, but as it turned out it was anything but. A very successful Lyndhurst team has listened in every session and the result has been fine driving forward play with penetrative running from the inside backs. The two most important facets of the season have been the early settling on the inside backs and the developing formidability of Ben Carlile. At least three of the inside backs wanted to play fly half and though Rory Stephenson finally got the nod (super kicker and reader of the game), the overall team success was more to do with the hard working distribution skills of Charlie Foster at flyhalf and Kieran Wilde’s hard running line breaks. No one was harder running than Man Mountain Ben (he’s nearly too big for the photograph!) who may have forty tries this season and has the potential to go far. Here Kieran outlines the path to success in our Sevens Season: We played three tournaments throughout the whole campaign: St Olave’s where we were victorious and came out plate winners; Hymers where we came second in our group out of six and also our home tournament at Pocklington where we were semi-finalists. The particular highlights were beating St Martin’s Ampleforth 5 tries to 1 in the plate final at St Olave’s, producing a much improved performance against local rivals St Olave’s, sadly still losing to them at Hymers and reaching the semi-final against RGS Newcastle at our own tournament. Special praise is due to Ben Carlile – it’s great watching him break tackles, charge up the pitch and score many tries. (Too many to count!) Also a huge well done to the whole squad for playing excellent 7s in each tournament. We have played well for each other and have laid down a firm foundation for improving next year. Will Parker outlines some high points of the season in the full game: We have had great performances by individuals and all round team performances, working well together in passing technique and a solid defensive and offensive back line. The pack of forwards acted as a team, winning everything they could for the backs to supply and go. There have been some amazing individual performances by some of the players, in the pack Ben Carlile with the determination to run through lines of opponents and not stop, going through the toughest of people with no fear, just strength. He has been an

excellent asset. Others in the heart of the back line: Rory Stephenson, with accurate, precise kicking ability from anywhere on the pitch, helped by being at the core of the moves and in defence. Next to him, Kieran Wilde (the inside centre), also helping with the moves and in defence; he runs at opponents, eager to get past them, creating gaps. I would add that two of the highlights of the season have been in the Sevens when we have lost matches to amazingly talented sides (St Olave’s and RGS Newcastle) but given them such a battle as to leave them limping home in admiration and respect for our tenacity. Keep enjoying your rugby and remember we never lose, we just run out of time. AET

U12B XV

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promising season that crescendoed to an almighty victory away at Yarm, although by a closer margin than Yarm deserved. The Bs developed into an excellent attacking team, with a number of strong runners, particularly at 9, 10 and 12. Less comfortable in defence, this allowed a number of teams to score soft tries and led to some lost games, Aysgarth being a notable example. A sizeable defeat to Barnard Castle will not be remembered fondly, but a stirring performance against Hymers showed the team’s capabilities. Overall, a promising season, and hopefully the team can build on this next year. Men of the season: Harry Heywood and Seb El Jassar. Thanks to the latter and Ed Dare for excellent captaincy throughout. Most improved player – Owain Phillips. EGL

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U12 SEVENS

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his season, Pocklington’s U12 sevens squad won the St Olave’s Plate competition.

The tournament involves two groups of 5 teams who all play each other. The top two in each group go through to the knock-out cup competition while the third and fourth teams compete to win the plate. Though they finished third in their group, the boys lost narrowly to the two teams that battled out the cup final and were perhaps the third best team in the tournament, playing the best sevens of any side I’ve seen in their first competition. Certainly the highlight was the 5 tries to 1 demolition of Ampleforth in the final, where every player looked to stay out of contact, hit gaps and keep the ball moving. Other schools taking part were St Olave’s (cup winners), Terrington (cup runners up), Ampleforth (plate finalists), Yarm, Barnard Castle, Easingwold and Merchiston Castle. AET

RUGBY HIGHLIGHTS Sevens Trophies/Plates: 1st VII – Winners, Hymers Plate (2nd year in a row) U16 – Winners, Pocklington Plate U13 – Runners up, Terrington Competition U12 – Winners, St Olave’s Plate East Yorkshire Representatives: U13 W Nicholson J Iveson C Stubbs T Loten J Medforth J Atkinson (Selected for Yorkshire CB Development) U14 A Varley W Hampshire U15 J Hanley (Selected for Yorkshire U15 squad) J Soanes C Sleigh S Garvey U16 J Thompson J Baines J Pavlou P Axup M Springett T Slater & L Hessay (North Yorkshire representatives)

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his season has been successful through and through. Having a similar team to the season before meant that it didn’t take long for everyone to settle and feel at ease within the team.

GIRLS’ HOCKEY

With Ruby Anderson, Millie Atkinson and Liddy Ford being our newest recruits, they excelled with some outstanding pieces of hockey, and with their young legs they set the pace for the old timers. If their forthcoming seasons are anything like their debut, there is a bright future for Pocklington hockey, write Ruth Tyrrell and Sophia Eggleston (U6). The season started quickly with our first match against a Chilean touring team. It was a successful start the hockey season, winning 1-0. The Chileans proved to be a challenge for our post-holiday fitness. But as the season progressed, gruelling sessions with Miss Metcalfe – we still haven’t forgiven you! – paid off.

1ST XI

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he season can only be summarised in one way – reaching the North of England finals and being placed third overall! This was an absolutely fantastic achievement which could only have come about through hard work and commitment from every single player in the team. A further highlight was beating Barnard Castle on flicks, sending them out of the competition, and some superb performances against Hymers and Queen Margaret’s. Ruth Tyrrell has been an excellent captain and with support from Sophia Eggleston, Emma Hessay and Amy Kendall, has made it a thoroughly enjoyable season. Well done! SAM

A particular highlight for us was getting to the North of England finals and missing out of the Nationals on flicks. The girls really stepped up to the mark and played brilliant hockey, working as a solid team throughout. Emma Hessay and Kate Pratt were strong in attack and Liddy shrugged off the ‘little Liddy’ nickname as she took down some top class players, making incredible saves in goal – a proud moment for all, and after a welldeserved Maccy D’s on the way home, we were one happy team. Most valuable player has got to go to Kate Pratt, who showed tremendous skill in attack and was the stuff of nightmares for our oppositions defence! A great asset to the team, on and off the pitch. Ruth Tyrrell (c), Caitlin Bond and Maggie Bean all made a solid defensive line and you would have had more success trying to run through a brick wall than get through them in their prime. It was a great way to say goodbye to our leavers: Sophia Eggleston, Amy Kendall, Emma Hessay and Ruth Tyrrell. One thing is for sure, school will save a lot of money on first aid kits once Bambi-on-ice (Emma) is gone! This has been an unforgettable season. A huge thank you to everyone who was involved in making it such a success.

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U18 XI

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ocklington’s U18 hockey team travelled to Leeds in December to compete in the U18 North of England Hockey finals.

We had a slow start against Kirkham Grammar from Blackpool, as the team was caught napping early on and allowed Kirkham to take an early lead. A flick was awarded shortly after, followed by two well-worked short corners – 4-0 was not the best start! Some tough words followed and Pocklington went into their next match against Sedbergh feeling confident. We played some superb hockey and won the game 1-0. Ruth Tyrrell and Caitlin Bond were excellent in defence and Lydia Ford in goal made some great saves. The attack didn't let us down – Alice Wilton won a short corner which was deflected in at the back post by Millie Atkinson. Pocklington then faced Durham – a must-win game in order to qualify for the play-off stages on the day. Tired legs were evident and we had to change our strategy in order to monopolise the game. Durham made it difficult, though perseverance persisted and deep into the second half, Kate Pratt picked up the ball just inside the half way, dribbled past four Durham players and beat the goal-keeper! Another 1-0 win guaranteed Pocklington a place in the next stage of the day. Pocklington then had to play the winners of Group B, Stockport College, a very strong team from Manchester. We had nothing to lose and went into the game ready to make a mark. Unfortunately, a mistake in defence allowed Stockport to take an early lead; however, the girls did not let their heads drop and through some well worked attacks up the right, Pocklington won a short corner which was converted by Emma Hessay – a super goal! The game suddenly intensified with both teams desperate to avoid taking it to penalty flicks, but the deadlock couldn’t be broken and the game was taken to flicks after full time. Unfortunately, Stockport were too strong and Pocklington were knocked out at the final stage of the day. We finished third in the North of England, behind Kirkham Grammar and Stockport – an absolutely outstanding achievement. It was a fantastic day of hockey which capped off a superb season. Well done to all the girls involved. SAM

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2ND XI

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his has been another successful season for the 2nd XI as we continued our unbeaten record from last year. In fact, we only lost one game all season, against Hill House 1st XI (1-0), recalls team captain Laura Reeson (U6). The commitment from the whole squad has resulted in great team spirit and some fantastic play. We began the season in great style with convincing victories over GSAL (4-0), Barnard Castle (3-0) and Hymers (9-0); success continued throughout the season including winning the Hymers 2nd VIIs tournament. Our final match of the season against St Peters proved to be a very closely contested game with both teams wanting to finish the season on a high. Every squad member gave their all, resulting in a fantastic 2-1 victory. During the season we have scored over 60 goals! Top goal scorers were Becky Soanes and I. Hatty Lord played fantastically in goal and along with some great defending from Vicky Hodgson, Georgina Beevers, Grace Pimlott, Serena Leach and Emma Adesile. Overall, the team only conceded 8 goals. Other mid field and attacking players who have contributed greatly to our outstanding season include Jules May (vicecaptain), Lucy Snowden, Lucy Bryan, Brittany Hopkins, Sophie Burn, Sara Eggleston and Katy Peel. All the girls played amazingly and we hope for another great season next year.

Overall:

Played 14

Won 13

Lost 1

U16 XI

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n U16 team, comprising players from the 2nd XI, 3rd XI and U15 teams, participated in the National Schools’ championships before Christmas.

They qualified to represent Humberside at the North East finals – a superb effort. Subsequently, they progressed to the semi-finals, where they were narrowly defeated by RGS Newcastle, 2-1.

his season we had a large squad of twenty girls keen to play in the team. This meant we had quite a few switches to try and give everyone the chance of playing competitive games, writes captain Becki Heuck (U6).

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In total the team scored 23 goals, our top scorers being Issi Platt, Sara Eggleston and Emily Wride, and only conceded 8 thanks to the goal keeping of Hanna Walls. We had plenty of great games, such as beating Hymers 4-2 in our first outing against a strong team and a convincing win against Barnard Castle 4-0 away. The best game of the season was definitely our 1-1 draw against St Peter’s; for despite the result, the squad played superbly as they were tough opposition and we played the best we have all season. In all we did not lose a match this season and only drew one which is an impressive feat for any team. It’s been an amazing season, with an extremely strong team and some fantastic play from each individual. Thanks to the level of commitment shown by everyone coming to practice week in, week out. I hope that next season will be just as good!

Overall:

Played 7

Won 6

Drawn 1

Well done to all who played!

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U15 XI

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ue to the tremendous strength in depth within the U15 squad, there has been significant competition for places this season. The girls are all to be commended for their enthusiasm, determination and positive approach to the game. Highlights of the season were 5-0 wins against Hymers and Hull Collegiate. The A team scored 38 goals and conceded 11; the B squad recorded 36 for and only 7 goals against. It has been a pleasure working with these girls for the last four years. U15A Overall:

Played 13

Won 8

Lost 3

Drawn 2

Lost 1

Drawn 1

U15B Overall:

Played 9

Won 7

CJP/AGC

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he ‘A’ team had a tough opening to the season but gained strength throughout the term. All the girls worked really hard to make progress and improve. We managed to get through to the semi-finals of the Humberside Tournament but unfortunately came up against strong opposition and just failed to make it to the finals. Overall, we had some close victories over Ampleforth, Silcoates, Saffron Waldon, Giggleswick, Ashville, Mount St Mary’s, Hull Collegiate and St Peter’s. Bright performances came from captain Megan Glew, Diane Watson, Sofia Risso-Gill and Megan Glew. The ‘B’ team had an impressive season, winning the majority of their matches. Notable wins came against Queen Margaret’s, Bootham, Fylinghall, Read and St Peter’s. Particular mentions to the following star players: Marni Esa, Flo Judge-Claydon, Martha Headley and Emily Wright. Well done to all who played. U14A Overall: Played 18

Won 10

Lost 7

Drawn 1

U14B Overall: Played 8

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Won 6

Lost 1

Drawn 1


U13 XI

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t has been a very enjoyable and successful term for this group of girls, who love their hockey. This season, captain Angela Curtis has led with her trademark right wing runs, while sharp shooter Emily Boddy has been prolific in his goal scoring. Girl of the season has been the dependable Lucy Eggleston, who has real class in defence, able to put in crucial tackles just when we need it. Our most improved player has certainly been Marianna Hankin, who worked her way from B to A team, proving a strong contributor to all eleven ‘A’ team fixtures. There were two highlights this year: capturing the East Riding trophy for mini hockey and a fabulous performance on tour at Stamford School. The girls have been a joy to work with and I hope they continue to progress with similar panache in seasons to come. Overall:

Played 13

Won 10

Lost 2

Drawn 1

Squad: Tracy Fofie, Lucy Eggleston, Emily Boddy, Angela Curtis, Nicole Marshall, Ella Marshall, Lucy Duggleby, Marianna Hankin, Jennifer Newall-Watson, Thea Davis, Jasmine Bunn. MSW

U12 XI

T

he U12 A team have been amazing this year, winning all their matches and one tournament. All the players have played really well and showed a great amount of effort and enthusiasm, believes Millie Barnes (1HUT). The best we have played, I would say, was in an U13 tournament, when we went through as second team – which we were very happy to do! In the end, we lost to Hull Collegiate A, with them winning 10, so they went through as the winners. I don’t think we played any game badly, as our team was always ready. A hard match was against St Olave’s: after the first half they were winning 1-0 but after a good team talk, we brought it back in the second half to 2-1. I thought this was a great victory and a match to be proud of. I think it has been a great season and I would like to thank Mrs Newhouse for being a great coach throughout the season. It has been said that these girls are the best in the area at the moment. Praise indeed! They are unbeaten this season, scoring 72 and conceding only 1 goal. Indeed, one game yielded 16 Pocklington goals in total. The girls have been an absolute pleasure to work with. They are completely dedicated to the game and I expect great things from them in the future. Overall:

Played 10

Won 10

Squad: Millie Barnes, Georgia Rothwell, Mia Parkinson, Fenella Scutt, Cordelia Cavill, Alice Mowforth, Alice Birchall, Georgia Sweeting. MN

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U12B XI

O

ur season has gone really well. Lucy Garvin had not played hockey before and got into the B team! Olivia Aitchinson, our goalkeeper, has made some brilliant saves, although most of the time she didn’t get a touch of the ball. There have been some amazing goals scored by Ellie Frisby, Saffy Adams, Georgia Brown, Bryony Underwood, Emma Burke, Livy Parker, Alex Moss, Lucy Garvin and Flo Bean. The team always worked well together and encouraged each other. Naomi Allison, Beth Noble, Tiggy Elwes and Holly Laverack played a couple of games for the Bs. Out of the whole season we scored 76 goals and only conceded 7! A combination of solid defence from Georgia Brown, Flo Bean and Emma Burke and great goals scored at the other end kept us undefeated for the whole season. Girls of the season were Lucy Garvin and Georgia Brown. Everyone in the team worked really hard and were treated to chocolates from Miss Gray for doing so well! Overall:

Played 10

Won 9

Drawn 1

LG

U12 VII

P

ocklington’s U12 7-a-side hockey team took part in the U13 East Riding competition last week. The school’s U13 team also entered, meaning the U12 team were competing against older girls. But the team still managed to make it through to the next round after coming runners up in the competition. Hull Collegiate U13 girls went through as the winners, after beating Pocklington U12s 1-0. This is an incredible achievement as we did in fact knock our U13 girls out of the competition! They are a very talented team. This follows the team’s earlier success at a mini-hockey tournament held at Hymers in October. Thirteen teams were entered and these were divided into two groups. Pocklington came first in their group and went through to play St Olave’s in the semi-final. The girls won this match 1-0 which took them through to meet Wakefield Girls’ High in the final – which we went on to win convincingly. Pocklington were dominant from the start and scored the first goal very quickly. This was followed by two more goals leading to a convincing win of 3-0. This meant that we were overall winners. It is to be noted that throughout the whole tournament, the girls did not concede a goal!

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Well done to the following girls who played some superb hockey: Millie Barnes (c), Georgia Rothwell, Fenella Scutt, Mia Parkinson, Cordelia Cavill, Alice Mowforth, Alice Birchall and Georgia Sweeting. MN


1ST XI

T

his has been a frustrating season for a number of reasons. We lost fixtures due to inclement weather and many opposing teams were simply too strong for us.

BOYS’ HOCKEY

However, the highlight of the season was a very competitive match against Ashville College. The team was down 1-3 at half-time but did not let that affect our determination and resolve. In the second half, we picked ourselves up and the eventual result was a 4-3 win. The standard of hockey steadily improved throughout the season, culminating in a very accomplished performance against the OPs on Mother’s Day, winning 7-1. PRH

I

n the Yorkshire Schools U18 Hockey Championships, drawn against Hall Cross, QEGs and Ampleforth, the squad found it hard work to convert promise into results. Hall Cross were a terrific side, able to pass the ball with pace and accuracy, eventually beating the boys 5-1. Two further defeats to Ampleforth and QEGs, 3-0 in each game, were the results of the team’s efforts and the fine leadership of John MicklemCooper. The energy and commitment shown by the entire squad was a great credit to them all. However, at this level, unforced errors cost teams dearly and this was the case at Leeds. Overall:

Played 6

Lost 6

DB

U16 XI

D

rawn against Ermysteads, Cundall Manor, QEGs and Leeds Grammar in the Yorkshire Schools U16 Hockey Championships, the squad equipped themselves extremely well.

Ermysteads were a terrific side who beat the boys 4-0.

A

much-improved season this year was reflected in two fine wins against Ashville (6-0) and Worksop (2-1). The team was led well and with quiet authority by Ed Chappelow from the sweeper position. He received good support from committed team mates. Particular thanks to U6 leavers Chappelow, Luck and Woodhouse, who have been 2nd XI stalwarts, seeing the good, bad and ugly of competitive school hockey. (Worksop was quite ugly!) Let us not forget the up and coming players, either: Alex Tong has already made appearances for the 1st XI and Billy Risso-Gill is a fine attacking presence on the left wing, while Olly Medforth was top scorer this year. The foundations have been built and the future looks bright!

However, confidence was gathered with a hard fought victory over Cundall Manor, Will Broadbent converting a short corner to win. The 1-1 draw to QEGs, probably the result of the season, saw the spirit return within the team in earnest. Leeds Grammar was the final game, which saw the boys go down 2-0. Overall, a very creditable 4th position for the boys. Well done on a terrific display. Captain: Will Broadbent

Overall:

Played 4

Won 2

Lost 2

DB

MJD

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U14 XI

I

t has been a pleasure to coach the U14 squad this year. It has not been a perfect season, but I believe that the hard earned victories and agonisingly close defeats demonstrate that they are a team making great progress, and certainly one for the future.

U15 XI

O

n many occasions, the boys came up against more physical teams and as such had difficulty penetrating defences. The highlight of the season was beating Hill House in an ‘ugly’ encounter, where the boys stood tall and claimed a narrow victory.

Edwin Au led the team well, setting high standards in defence. In midfield, Ben Byas showed a relentless work ethic. Will Fox and Marc Sewell became a potent force in attack.

Contrary to the statistics, a keen eye would indicate that this U14 side has the potential to become a serious force to be reckoned with. A team bristling with the technical flair of Durie (c), Dyson and the Wightmans; the pace, presence and distribution of Dyrdal in midfield; and the courage and cover of Webb and Hutchinson at the back, has much to shout about. The team often proved difficult for the opposition to handle but failed to convert the many chances they created in front of goal, in spite of their many turnovers and their learned ability to keep and maintain possession of the ball. Along with the aforementioned players, in any great team you always remember the keeper, and here Brodie Nicholson proved to be a reliable and invaluable shot stopper when the need arose, single handedly earning our only draw of the season against Hall Cross. These boys truly are an intelligent and exciting bunch of players with much talent and passion for hockey. After a few more seasons playing together, and (importantly) once they can match the size and muscle of their opposition, I have no doubt that these boys will become greater still and be able to muster a fairer and more reflective set of results.

Well done to the entire squad. Overall:

Played 7

DB

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Overall: Won 2

Lost 3

Drawn 2

TH

Played 9

Won 2

Lost 6

Drawn 1


SQUASH

U13 XI

T

he team grew in stature throughout the season. Returning after half-term, we travelled to Leeds for the County Cup competition. Matches against QEGs, Harrogate Grammar, Scarborough College and St Olave’s saw the team play close to its full potential. Beating Harrogate, drawing against QEGs and St Olave’s with just one loss against Scarborough College was a terrific display of spirit and determination. The 1-1 draw to St Olave’s was particularly frustrating as Olaves equalized on the final play of the game. The team was well led by Will Blackburn and developed across all positions. Well done on a fine season.

A

t senior level, it has been a challenging season, although lack of regular time on court for a number of the players hasn’t helped. The 1st V defeated Woodhouse Grove last term, but the return fixture was unable to be played due to other commitments. However, the team enjoyed a dramatic 3-2 victory against Bradford in the final fixture, with three of the five individual matches going to a deciding game, and U14 Olly Peeke-Vout saving five match points on his way to an amazing victory! The 2nd V were rarely at full strength, but defeated both Barnard Castle and Woodhouse Grove at home last term. The U15 team enjoyed a 5-0 win against Ampleforth and 8 players travelled to Woodhouse Grove and came away with a 5-3 victory. Special mention goes again to Olly Peeke-Vout, whose only defeats this season were against Yorkshire county players at The Grammar School at Leeds, before he made a winning debut for the 1st V at Barnard Castle. The U14 team consists of U13 players, so it is tremendous that both teams have only tasted defeat once, at Leeds. Having won there last term, the opposition were much stronger this time around! Well played to Jack Garvin, Tom Loten, Jonty Atkinson, Adam Harrison, Will Harris, Jimmy Quinney, James Laudage, Jack Medforth, Charlie Medforth, Hamish Sleigh and Edward Dare, who have made it an exceptional season at the younger end of the scale.

1st V Overall:

Played 8

Won 2

Lost 6

Played 5

Won 2

Lost 3

Played 8

Won 4

Lost 4

Played 9

Won 8

Lost 1

Played 6

Won 5

Lost 1

2nd V Overall:

U15 Overall:

U14 Overall:

U12 XI

U13

I

t is a great privilege in teaching to be given the opportunity to guide a group of enthusiastic young players through their first full competitive season. It is an underrated task and key in the long term development of all athletes and performers.

Overall:

TML

The U12s have found their first full hockey season challenging, as a number of them try to grasp the unfamiliar concepts of ‘reverse stick’, receiving the ball from their right hand side, and simply hitting the ball accurately in a straight line. All this whilst trying to learn the rules and master the art of talking whilst wearing an oversized mouth guard. The complexity of these tasks often yields to those who persist, and the sheer energy, wit and relentless enthusiasm of the U12 boys have been key to finishing the season with back-to-back wins. The U12 season commenced with a convincing win against St Olave’s, though they struggled to maintain this form as the season progressed against stronger, more experienced opposition. They have, however, grown as a unit with notable performances from Croston (c), Laing, Nutt and Watson who have linked up to produce some lovely passages of play, along with Dick who has been a strong shot stopper and organizer of his defence between the posts. The team played its best hockey against Hymers College in a very competitive match which they eventually won 3-1. They have learnt the importance of playing from the onset of the starting whistle, holding position on the pitch and supporting each other by linking up in both attack and defence. Overall:

Played 7

Won 3

Lost 4

TH

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NETBALL

T

his was a frustrating season in many respects, due to the number of fixtures which had to be cancelled through bad weather and lack of opposition. As a result, the girls never really got into their stride!

However, all three teams gave their best in energy and commitment throughout the season.

1st VII: Overall:

Played 8

Won 6

Lost 2

Sophie Duncan (c) led by example in her final year at school, clearly helping to develop younger players and leading the team with dedication and enthusiasm.

2nd VII: Overall:

Played 6

Won 5

Lost 1

Jules May had a super season as captain. The team were technically excellent and tactically aware throughout the term.

3rd VII: Overall:

Played 3

Lost 3

All those who represented the team did so with cheerful flexibility, with many required to play out of position. They were unable to fully hit their form but promise much for next year. Well done to all involved! SAM

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U15 VII

U13 VII

T

he ‘A’ team girls have had a successful season, enjoying some fine wins against strong opposition. Two fixtures against Hymers were closely fought and the team achieved two respectable scores in these matches.

T

his year the team has improved a lot, with Jasmine Bunn coming up to joining the ‘A’ team and producing some good passes from WA, writes Lucy Eggleston (2DOL).

Notable performances came from Charlotte Horsley (who shot excellently all season), Alex Riddell (c), Katie Stuart and Hayley Harrison. All worked very well together in centre court. Camilla Eggleston and Emilia Bean both produced some great defending.

Then we had our shooters: I mostly played GA but sometimes switched with Emily Boddy, who was GS, and between us we scored many goals. Angela Curtis was a very reliable Centre who was good at moving the ball up the court, along with Nicole Marshall, who played WD. Our GD and GK, Maddy Ford and Thea Davies, were very stable at the back.

The ‘B’ team won the majority of their fixtures, with only one loss (St Peter’s). They proved themselves a strong second squad, thanks to their all-round athletic abilities.

We won most of our matches. We tried very hard in every single game; sometimes we lost, but we would always know that our team tried hard. We have had a few very successful wins, one which was at Bootham, winning 11-5, which I think we deserved. We have been through a lot of challenges but we worked well as a team.

I wish all of the girls luck as they enter senior teams next year. They have been a pleasure to coach.

It was a very successful season for the U13As and I think we all enjoyed every moment of it.

CJP

U14 VII

T

he U14A VII got off to a fantastic start with convincing wins against Hull Collegiate (22-6) and Scarborough College (26-4). Bootham was a tough match against a very strong attacking side. Unfortunately the team didn’t get to play Hymers in the first half of the term due to the icy weather, which had the girls without a match for three weeks. The next match was St Peter’s after half term and possibly our strongest opposition. The match started very close but then Peter’s pulled away and ended up winning 25-5. Following this, a very tough match against Queen Margaret’s saw us off to a slow start but we pulled the score back up to finish 9-5. We then had an extremely hard match against another strong team, Silcoates. The result certainly did not reflect the game and possession and Pock fought throughout. Finally, we played Hymers and Ampleforth in a triangular match. Pocklington played extremely well in both matches, winning against Ampleforth 8-5 but losing to Hymers 14-3. Much credit goes to Annie Holding for leading the team so well. Overall:

Played 8

Won 3

Lost 5

T

he ‘B’ team played some fantastic netball, demonstrating real depth and talent throughout the year group. We won every match but one, against St Peter’s; but it was close, finishing 12-14.

The first game pitted us against The Mount, who beat this age group last year. We were on top form, however, resulting in a convincing 24-7 win. There were fine victories against Hymers, Silcoates and Ampleforth, too. Overall, an excellent season for the ‘B’ team. Well done to captain Alice Watkins for her leadership this season and well done to all who played!

Overall:

Played 8

Won 7

Lost 1

RS 71


SPORT

U13B VII

T

he U13B netball team was amazing this year, enthuse Georgia Covell (2DOL) and Marianna Hankin (2WIL).

The team was as follows: Georgia Covell (c), Mariana Hankin, Anna Sangwin, Ella Marshall, Jeni Newall-Watson, Tracey Fofie and a new player, Heidi Longthorpe. Heidi has made an excellent impact on the team and has contributed a lot, swapping from centre to wing attack with Marianna. We were very privileged to have some excellent shooters in the team this year. Ella and Anna were lethal in the attacking D, barely missing a shot at goal. Notably, the team went to Queen Margaret’s and played an outstanding match, winning 13-2, with Anna scoring 9 of those goals. Our defence players, Tracey and Jeni, were strong and kept their heads high, only letting in two goals. All of our centre field players have been brilliant this season, passing effectively to our shooters. Georgia has done a fine job as captain, gee-ing everybody on. We finally have to thank our two awesome coaches, Miss Gray and Mrs Wilson! We have had an amazing season with you.

U13C VII

T

he ‘C’ team had quite a good season. We didn’t have many victories; but then again, we hadn’t many matches, write Lauren Coatsworth (2GRU), Bekki Mann (2HUT) and Lucy Duggleby (2DOL).

All the players consistently tried their hardest all the time and always came out fighting when we seemed to be up against a tough team. We never gave up. Lauren Coatsworth and Billie Cheney as shooters did very well, missing a few shots here and there, but nobody’s perfect! There was excellent defensive work from Rebecca Witty and Emma Krebs, defending the goal as if their lives depended on it. Brilliant centre court work came from Lucy Duggleby, Fay Chappelow and Bekki Mann, who worked well together and had a good chemistry on court. There were some sloppy passes, but that’s one of the things we can improve on for next season. There’s always room for improvement! All in all, the girls worked amazingly as a team and were a lovely squad of friends.

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U12 VII

T

he netball season began with over twenty first years fighting for a place in the ‘A’ and ‘B’ teams! As a result of this, the teams kept changing, as people tried different positions, and consequently we lost the majority of our first matches, writes captain Lucy Garvin (1GRU). However, as the teams became more settled, we started to unite and our playing became more fluent. The ‘A’ team’s first victory came as part of a tournament where we beat Hymers ‘B’. This helped the team’s confidence and built up their morale, which had been waning. During the following week, and after a few further shooting practices, the ‘A’ team faced Hull Collegiate. Our shooters were on form, our defence was strong and we won 16-8. The ‘B’ team also ended on a high, with a hard fought match against Hymers ‘B’, winning eighteen to sixteen. Overall, we had an enjoyable season, learning lots of new skills and improving as teams. We have much to thank Mrs Danby and Mrs Newhouse for. A team: Overall:

Played 9

Won 2

Lost 7

Played 7

Won 2

Lost 5

B team: Overall:


CRICKET

1ST XI

M

atch Report: ‘Cancelled due to inclement weather’.

Never has the school suffered as severely as this season. Games sessions, and weekends hampered by constant rain throughout the season has made preparation and practice extremely difficult. To date the first team have played 6 (W 3, L 3) and had 6 fixtures cancelled. At the time of writing, we have four games remaining, including the Festival that we are hosting and one can only hope that the weather prevails. Tom Sowersby has led the team well; he has shown tremendous enthusiasm and energy throughout the season. Exams and poor weather have played their part in disrupting team selection, however. On numerous occasions, boys were drafted in at late notice. Frankie Beal and Tom Benthall have bowled skilfully all year and both will develop into more than useful all-rounders for the school next year. James Hanley has been the main contributor with the bat, showing a maturity beyond his years. A number of 4th and 5th year boys have played for the first team through the season and this bodes well for the future.

2ND XI

T

wo matches in a season – unbelievable! The weather has taken its toll on our fixtures and therefore this review will be brief and factual.

If only we can guarantee a proper summer! DB

We played Silcoates on a freezing May afternoon and won comfortably by 8 wickets. Silicotes made 119 for 8, Bird and Medforth taking 3 wickets apiece. The school knocked off the required total for the loss of two wickets. Captain Remblance hit 44, Billy Risso-Gill 26 and James Pavlou ended the game with a six. It would be a long wait for our second game with Hymers. We batted first, again in very cold conditions, and only reached 103. (Liam Oddell 29). We managed to take 5 wickets and drop several catches before Hymers overtook our total. Johnny Bird again took 3 wickets. No continuity has been possible, no team spirit engendered and the practices have either been cancelled or poorly attended due to examinations issues. A washout! The following boys played: James Pavlou, Jonathan Bird, Billy Risso-Gill, Jake Sherwood, Jerome Remblance (c), Will Hick, Sean Perryman, Will Stephenson, Scott Dyson, Oliver Medforth, Raul Haque, Liam Oddell and Oliver Norgate. MPN

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U14 XI

I

t was a really promising start to the season from Pocklington, who won the first three matches in a row. Against Headlands, a scintillating 119 run opening partnership was constructed between Jonty Atkinson and Tom Loten, both scoring superb half centuries.

U15 XI

T

he lads have performed well this season, even though only having played 3 games and a six-a-side tournament due to appalling weather conditions, writes Ben Byas (4HUT).

Against Malton in the next game, another crowd pleaser of an innings from captain Matt Besford held the Malton team at bay, but not the weather. A tense bowl out ensued with Sam Bunce providing the heroics to see Pock through to the next round. Archbishop Holgate were next in the cup, and were dispatched with a professional performance; Alex Varley taking four wickets, and Brad Wilson bludgeoning their attack to all parts, including a 6 worthy of the IPL.

Winning two out of the three games played and only narrowly losing to Driffield in the Cup, the highlight of the year was our performance at the GSAL six-a-side tournament, where we placed joint 2nd on points with St Peter’s but due to us having scored less runs, St Peter’s just snuck in and grabbed the silver medal. Great performances were needed to beat GSAL, St Peter’s and QEGS, and we delivered with Will Stephenson scoring runs throughout the tournament and getting wickets with the ball, and both Curtis brothers, Mikey and Alex, keeping their lines and length tight.

The unbeaten run wasn’t to last however, and ill-discipline against Hymers in their home fortress led to a disappointing loss in spite of a four wicket haul by Tom Foster. Confidence dropped, and St Aidan’s capitalised by defeating Pock in the next game. However, the 14s’ character then shone through against Hill House. The latter batted first, putting on an impressive 119 runs for the loss of only one wicket. It was a poor bowling performance, but we showed real class in chasing down the target. Last rites of hitting the winning runs were left to the calm and collected Matt Wilde, but this was only made possible by a 76 run partnership between Tom Foster (37) and Jonty Atkinson (47) to break the back of the chase.

We should also mention James Hanley’s 100 in the opening game of the season before going on and joining the 1st team and some outstanding fielding and catching by Alex Curtis and Tom Hick. I think we will all thank Mr Hymers for coaching us through the season and improving us both technically and practically. Great season, lads, hope we have a longer one next year!

Pock once again looked on for a morale boosting victory against Driffield with good runs from Matt Besford (37), Tom Foster (39*) and Alex Varley (20) but fell short of a difficult target of 160. The boys made amends for this with excellent performances in the 6s competition, finishing 3rd, and look set for a strong finish to the season. Overall:

Played 7

Won 4

Lost 3

EGL

U15 XI

I

t has been a pleasure to coach the U15 squad this term. They are a hard-working bunch of players who are passionate about their cricket, but have been unfortunate in the number of fixtures that have frustratingly fallen victim of the weather. Highlights of the season include convincing wins against Rydale and Hill House, along with 6-a-side victories against QEGS, GSAL, and St Peter’s. We won’t mention their cup exit to Driffield, where a more ruthless approach with the bat would have put them into the driving seat, and likely the next round. On their way to victory, there have been a handful of personal achievements, notably James Hanley’s 113 not out against Rydale; Alex and Mikey Curtis’s 66 and 48 runs (respectively) against Hill House and Tom Loten’s 4-4 off 4 against the same opposition. Champagne moments also go to Will Stephenson for his ‘6’ on the penultimate delivery of the game against GSAL, Mark Sewell for shying the stumps against Hill House’s No 9 batsman, and to Jack Wainwright for his outstanding over the shoulder, ball moving away from him catch against (again) Hill House’s No 6. A special vote of thanks goes to Ben Byas for his captaincy over the course of the season, and particularly for helping to cajole the team to play and practice in the face of such terrible weather. We all hope that next season is much less rain-affected. TH

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U14 VI

T

he boys equipped themselves well in this six-a-side tournament, with narrow losses to Hymers and GSAL the only disappointments throughout the day.

The team beat St Peter’s off the final delivery in a very close contest, Alex Varley and Jonty Atkinson scampering the single that they required off the last ball! The boys then went on to beat Hull and Scarborough emphatically. Matt Besford led the team strongly and received significant contributions from all the team. Well done! DB

U12 XI U14 VI Results Pocklington v Scarborough College – Pocklington won by 5 wkts Pocklington v Hymers – Pocklington lost by 2 wkts Pocklington v GSAL – Pocklington lost by 4 wkts Pocklington v St Peters – Pocklington won by 3 wkts Pocklington v Hull Collegiate – Pocklington won by 5 wkts 1st – St Peters 2nd – GSAL 3rd – Pocklington/Hymers

I

t has been a very promising but frustrating season for our new boys. Promising, due to their enthusiasm, developing skills and confidence; frustrating, thanks to a summer of rain and more rain!

The games that the boys competed in showed that they could put runs on the board and take a good couple of wickets. Notable mentions go to captain Kieran Wilde who has often scored well with the bat along with Ed and James Wraith. Max Crowther has been a revelation this season. Another strong and experienced player who contributed in all departments is Rory Stephenson. We look forward to the U12 team having future seasons where they can express themselves and carve out many victories. Well done boys. Overall:

Played 5

Won 2

Drawn 3

MSW

INTERMEDIATE HOUSE CRICKET

T

he Intermediate House Cricket competition took place over the course of two afternoons at opposite ends of the Summer Term. The standard of cricket was good throughout and it was particularly pleasing to see a number of 3rd form boys making a mark within their respective teams. For those not yet inaugurated, this is a 7-a-side, round robin competition, with each team playing a 10 over innings. The competition was well fought and culminated with a resounding win for Gruggen, who won all three of their games against the other houses. A special vote of thanks should go to those athletes, tennis players and golfers, who entered in the spirit of the game and played their part in this House competition.

U13 XI

TH

T

his has been an inconsistent season for this talented group of players. The dire weather restricted the boys from getting into any real rhythm and meant they consistently had to fight to get into any real form.

A close loss to Leeds Grammar early on, followed by a heavy defeat to St Olave’s, put the boys on the back foot. But through grit and sheer determination they started to get into the habit of winning (even in some tricky situations). Wins over Hymers, Woodleigh, St Martin’s and Minster saw some individual success and confidence grow. Performances of note would include Will Blackburn’s hat trick at St Olave’s, the consistency in line and length of Adam Harrison, the enormous potential of Lewis Medley as a fast-medium bowler, and the dogged, resolute batting of Harry Isenstein (who pulled us out of a number of sticky situations). They have been a pleasure to coach. Overall:

Played 6

Won 4

1. 1.

Wilberforce v Gruggen, Gruggen win by 18 runs. Hutton v Dolman, Hutton win by 5 wickets.

2. 2.

Hutton v Gruggen, Gruggen win by 54 runs. Dolman v Wilberforce, Wilberforce win by 5 runs.

3. 3.

Wilberforce v Hutton, Hutton win by 2 wickets. Gruggen v Dolman, Gruggen win by 85 runs.

1 2 3 4

Team Gruggen Hutton Wilberforce Dolman

Played 3 3 3 3

Won 3 2 1 0

Lost 0 1 2 3

Points 6 4 2 0

Lost 2

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GIRLS’ TENNIS

SENIOR GIRLS

T

he senior girls’ tennis teams have played eleven matches this term, six being York League matches.

The 2nd VI started off the season with a 7-2 win against Scarborough College. The U16s went on to win at Hymers 5-4. In the U18 Bradford Tournament, the team went through to the semi-finals but unfortunately got knocked out by Woodhouse Grove. The 1st and 2nd VI played Queen Margaret’s in a friendly, with our 1st VI winning 5-4 and 2nd VI just losing 3-6, in very close games. The 1st and 2nd VI played Hymers in a friendly but were unfortunately without some key players. The 1st VI suffered a 7-2 defeat but the 2nd VI’s result was a little closer, losing 6-3.

The U18IV played well in the York League, beating Bootham 6-0, Queen Margaret’s ‘B’ 4-2 and Queen Margaret’s ‘A’ 6-0 (they had to forfeit the match due to a lack of players). They had close matches against St Peter’s (4-2) and Poppleton (4-2) and a surprising defeat by The Mount (5-1). Overall the team has had another successful year of tennis with some outstanding individual and team performances. Well done to all. Overall:

Played 11

Won 7

Lost 4

RS

U15

T

he U15s have had an interrupted season, due to the appalling weather, but their attendance at practices has been good and they have played positively in matches.

The team beat Scarborough College and Ampleforth’s ‘B’ team but lost against Silcoates, Ampleforth As twice and Queen Margaret’s. Millie Atkinson and Emelia West have played particularly consistently as a pair and Charlotte Horsley and Annabelle Redfern have been a very reliable third pair in the ‘A’ team. Flo Philip has played very well but has been unable to play in many fixtures. Ellie Medley and Hayley Harrison have come up against some tough opposition as 1st pair but have battled well. They have been a pleasure to coach.

Overall: CJP

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Played 6

Won 2

Lost 4


U14 IV

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s the Magnum melted all over Sofia Risso-Gill’s right arm – and left traces of chocolate stickiness on her games kit – I experienced a minor twinge of regret that the girls had not lost to Bootham. My car would have been so much cleaner… As it happens, the U14s found it difficult to lose this season and I was thankful for our unseasonably wet, cold weather, which kept the logic of ice-cream rewards at bay. Ably led by the formidable Natasha Leach, whose waspish serve scared more than one unsuspecting opponent, the girls sped from victory to victory in the early part of the term. Performing with aplomb at two, Sofia delivered some uncompromising groundstrokes, dovetailed neatly with Tash and rescued some unlikely games from the jaws of defeat. Our second couple, Megan Glew and Georgie Fenny, the engine room of the quartet, produced some of the most impressive performances of the season, individually and in their doubles pairing. Megan’s game is now quite startling; deep, powerful forehands mixed with the odd spinning serve frequently catching oppositions off guard. At the net, Georgie snapped up anything going, pouncing on volleys with athleticism and precision. An exciting pair to watch. So many other girls have proved excellent value at this level and I am grateful for all the extra games they have played for the team. Thank you, too, to all the supportive parents who turned out, often in all weathers, to cheer on this promising group. I predict that they will be quite a proposition in the future. LAL

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t senior level, we only suffered two weather-related cancellations. There were two excellent victories by 8 sets to 1 for the 1st VI, against Hymers and Worksop, while the only disappointment came in the 5-4 defeat against St Peter’s. The 2nd VI recorded 8-1 victories against Worksop and Woodhouse Grove, and were similarly frustrated 5-4 against St Peter’s. Fortunately, that day the U15s won 7-2 against our local rivals to brighten my mood! The only team to beat the U15s was Ampleforth. Having won the school match 6-3, hopes were high when we travelled there in the national AEGON championships, but we faced much stronger opposition that day. The individual performer of the season was Angus Field, who has not dropped a set in school or championship matches for the U15s and U14s. The U14s have romped away with the York League title, their 100% record including a 6-0 victory against St Peter’s. In the Northern Schools’ championships, Angus and Oscar reached the quarter-finals and Jonty and Tom made the semi-finals, with both pairs eventually losing to the very strong Altrincham Grammar School. Well played to the squad of Angus, Oscar Cavill, Jonty Atkinson, Tom Loten and Olly Peeke-Vout.

BOYS’ TENNIS

The U13s won the Ryedale area of the AEGON championships and then defeated St Olave’s 5-1 in the regional play-off final, being crowned Yorkshire champions! Well played to the squad of Oscar, Jonty, Tom, James Laudage, Adam Harrison and Jack Medforth. They now progress to the North-East regional knockout rounds in September. In the U12 Plate event at the Northern Schools’ championship, Ed Dare and Charlie Medforth reached the semi-finals before losing to eventual winners, Bolton School. 1ST VI

Played 7

Won 4

Lost 3

2ND VI

Played 5

Won 2

Lost 3

U15

Played 6

Won 4

Lost 2

U14

Played 6

Won 6

U13

Played 5

Won 5

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SENIOR MIXED DOUBLES

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enior mixed doubles has enjoyed a superb run this season. The team, comprising James Bisson, Emma Loten, Michael Evans and Sophie Duncan, won through to the National Finals at Bolton in March – the first time Pocklington had made it so far in the competition since 2006.

En route to Bolton, we faced Runshaw College, the Lancashire region winners, at the David Lloyd Club in Chorley. The match went to a tiebreak – having finished 2-2, and also level on games – after James and Emma had won both of their matches (and played superbly against their first pair). We had planned and practised beforehand for the shoot-out, in which one of the boys is selected to play with a different girl. Mike and Emma played well and held their nerves as a 6-1 lead was whittled down to 7-6 (I could hardly bear to watch!) – then a 9-6 lead was established, hence three match points, and we took the second. It was 10-7, and celebration time! The 200-mile round trip was very worthwhile indeed! At Bolton, having been drawn in a really tough group, our first match on Saturday seemed to be our best chance of victory, against Peter Symonds College (Hampshire); at 1-2 in sets, James and Emma had set point against their first pair to take the match to a tie-break shoot-out, but they ultimately lost it 7-5. We lost 4-0 to top seeds Ellesmere College (Shropshire), who were a different class, then 3-1 to Culford School (Ipswich) (the defending champions!). It would have been nice to have won one match, and for the players to feel that they’d played their best (which wasn't the case overall, partly due to the strength of the opposition), but the main achievement was in getting there! Many congratulations to all four players, who have done themselves and Pocklington proud. TML

ATHLETICS he number of pupils attending training sessions and representing the school was greater than ever this year. Unfortunately, a number of matches were cancelled due to poor weather conditions, which was disappointing.

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Despite these setbacks, the school athletics team enjoyed its most successful season to date. We were delighted to see the 2nd year boys winning both competitions they competed in and the 3rd year girls winning the Independent Girls Schools’ Athletics Competition (hosted by Ashville College) for the first time and being placed second in the HMC North of England Schools’ Championships. It was also great to see a number of athletes progress and compete for the school for the first time. There were a number of Lower School girls and boys who posted some excellent performances, including Fenella Scutt, Mia Parkinson, Ben Carlile, Georgia Rothwell, Tracey Fofie, Jack Garvin, Callum Stubbs, Jonty Atkinson and Jack Medforth. There were also a number of athletes who represented Yorkshire this year. Georgie Fenny became East Riding and Humberside Schools Javelin and Shot Putt champion (Junior Girls). Bradley Wilson was crowned East Riding Junior Shot Putt champion and Josh Wagstaff was placed second in the East Riding and Humberside competitions in the Intermediate Javelin competition. Unfortunately, Sports Day was abandoned due to poor weather conditions on three occasions…you just couldn’t make it up, could you?! SS 78

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ROUNDERS

U14

U15

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e have all had an enjoyable rounders season, writes Alice Cullen (4GRU). In practices, both batting and fielding have been worked on and improved, despite the bad weather.

Results may not reflect this, but we all enjoyed the matches we did manage to play! Notable play came from Phoebe Longthorp and Charlotte Horsley. Thank you to Miss Metcalfe for taking us. Overall:

Played 2

Lost 2

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espite a wet start, the U14s progressed really well over the term. Their team spirit and enthusiasm for the game has been truly impressive. Notable wins include: Ashville (25.5-12.5), Hull Collegiate (17-6.5), Bootham (27-4) and Ampleforth (26.5-9) in very exciting matches. With two games rained off and only two losses, to Queen Margaret’s (21-6.5) and St Peters (10.5-9), all ‘A’ team girls should be congratulated on their commendable efforts throughout the season. Megan Glew, Adelle Kama, Julia Fairbank and Diane Watson displayed brilliant batting skills; Amy Robinson, Jessica Pigeon and Natasha Leach provided excellent bowler and backstop combinations; and Marni Esa, Georgie Fenny, Annie Holding, Emma Huddlestone, Hannah Frisby-Pape, Olivia El Jassar, Grace Jackson, Katie Wagstaff, Holly Green, Belinda Richardson, Alice Watkins and Martha Headley were all exceptional as deeps and posts. Unfortunately, the ‘B’ team only played two matches out of the three that had been arranged. Silcoates was rained off; Queen Margaret’s proved too strong (24-10.1/2) and a win against St Peter’s (32-11) was the sum of their competitive season. However, all girls should be congratulated on their team work, commitment to the game and spirit throughout both matches. In particular, Alice Watkins’s play was consistently impressive. A great season of rounders from a fantastic group of girls! ‘A’ team: Overall:

Played 6

Won 4

Lost 2

Played 2

Won 1

Lost 1

‘B’ team: Overall: JK

U15 National Schools’ Rounders finalists, 2012

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arrived, and we have a tough home (hoorah!) draw against Loretto. The highlight of the school golf year, however, is the annual Staff v Students match at Christmas, hosted as brilliantly as ever by The Oaks Golf Club. This year’s match was particularly welcome, as it was the first for three years to survive the weather!

GOLF

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he Staff Golf Day in September was held at Rudding Park, near Harrogate. The weather was kind to us and a full complement of 20 staff, ex-staff and friends enjoyed some gentle but intense play, before Mr Kettlewell walked away with the individual trophy, whilst Mrs Kettlewell, Mr Tyrrell and Mr Pinder (from the canteen staff) won the team competition.

The HMC Foursomes Competition saw us get a tough away draw against Merchant Taylor’s School from Liverpool, which meant a two-and-a-half hour journey to play at Formby Hall Golf Club. The team of James Kerr (c) and Olly Smith, Liam Hessay and Fraser Davis, and James Bisson and Sam Dawson put up a very good show against tough opposition. The matches are played off scratch, so our boys’ higher handicaps could not be used to level the field, and on paper it should have been a comfortable win for Merchant Taylor’s. Whilst James and Sam could not cope against some excellent play from their opponents in the bottom match, Liam and Fraser produced some consistent golf, winning their match by the 16th. It all came down to the top match, where despite a good fight-back from James and Olly, their unfamiliarity with a tight and difficult course meant they could not quite turn things around and their low handicap opponents recorded a victory by 3 & 2. The future looks bright for this young team, especially if they continue to improve as they have done recently, with James Kerr, following his School Championship winning form from 2010 – he shot a 71 off a handicap of 13 – now playing off 6, and Olly off 13. The draw for 2012/13 has just

I

n the annual Pocklington Golf Championships played on Wednesday 27 June at The Oaks Golf Club, golf captain James Kerr (5GRU) won his second Hamilton Trophy, which is awarded to the Champion Golfer of the Year. He shot a 76 to score 33 Stableford points, to win the trophy by 4 points from Ollie Smith (5GRU). Fraser Davis (5DOL) was third. The Halliday Trophy, which is played on a handicap basis, was won by Gerald Fenton (U6 DOL) who scored 44 points to clinch the trophy from Fraser and Ollie. This concludes the school golfing year, which restarts in August with the Staff Golf day in August, before the students play their first round HMC Foursomes match against Loretto, most probably in September. DAG

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First up were Mr Galloway and Mr Butcher against a couple of recent OPs, and former golf captains, Isaac Green and Tom Screeton. Tom made a lightning start, winning the first two holes, but a Butcher birdie on 3 and a couple of steady holes meant the staff pairing was two up by the 8th. A near eagle from Isaac on the 9th kept it close, but Mr Butcher holed a stunning 20 yard chip for a winning birdie 2, to close out the match 3 and 2. In the second match Miss Postlethwaite and Miss Lamb took on James Bisson and Jerome Remblance. Some steady play from Miss Lamb, and a possible best-ever round from Miss Postlethwaite, including a stunning birdie on the 4th, saw the staff emerge victorious by 5 and 3. The third match saw the Headmaster and Mr Nuttall (ex-Deputy Headmaster) take on two young OPs, Mr Loten and Mr Milne, who, due to some student holidays, stepped into the breach to represent the pupils! After a dodgy start, particularly on the first from Mr Ronan (!), the staff pairing roared away, helped by an outrageous chip-in birdie 2 from the Head on the 13th. Despite some battling play from Loten and Milne, the staff won by 5 and 4. The fourth match saw newcomers James Hanley and Will Stephenson take on Mr Donaldson and Mr Kettlewell. A great start saw the students 5 up after 5 holes, but after the staff perked up, James and Will couldn’t live with the comeback and went down on the 18th green by 2 holes. The final match saw captain James Kerr and Olly Smith play Mr Davies and Mr Tyrrell. There were birdies flying about in this match, despite the rain arriving later on. James and Olly gained the upper hand and eventually won by 4 and 2. DAG


TRAMPOLINING

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he Trampolining squad has had a fantastic season. We competed in the Yorkshire Grade G-D Championships in October 2011 in Hull, the Yorkshire Open Championships in November 2011 in Hull and the Yorkshire Schools Championships in December 2011 in Hull. Furthermore, we won a Bronze Medal at the National Finals 2012 Bristol, competed in the Yorkshire Grades G-D Championships March 2012 in Hull and took part in the Inter-house Elite Championships. To round off the season, captain John Chatterton qualified for the English Championships in July 2012 – a superb achievement. The pupils have performed some fantastic routines and gained many top place positions. The school and Regional Elite squad members need to be congratulated on their outstanding efforts in competitions and contributions to school and East Yorkshire trampolining. Well done to all of you! JSK

JOHN CHATTERTON

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began trampolining during my first year at Pocklington and recall watching students from the senior school performing routines with a range of somersaults, which inspired me to take steps to further my interest in the sport, writes John Chatterton (U6). Learning my first routine was a great experience and allowed me to qualify for my first schools’ competition at which I was really nervous, but thanks to reassurance from Mrs Kilsby, I managed to perform both the set and voluntary routine requirements and gained third place. It wasn’t long before I was developing new moves and progressing from Grade G to Grade C, which is currently my position. Over the last few years I have taken part in competitions all around the country, including the annual galas where I qualified for the National Trampolining Championships in Birmingham. I have also won the Yorkshire Trampolining Championships for two consecutive years and was selected for the County Trampolining Squad, and picked to take part in the English Championships. When Mrs Kilsby started a public Trampolining Club, I took the opportunity to coach other children to gain experience before achieving my Level 1 qualification in coaching and judging and I thoroughly enjoy passing on my knowledge. This year I have progressed further in my grade and have been to three galas, gaining two third places and most recently a first place at Liverpool, which has boosted my confidence for the British Championships in July, when I hope to compete a ten somersault routine (which is my hardest yet!). I owe a big thank you to Mrs Kilsby for training me and more generally, for all her help and encouragement.

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SWIMMING

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n all age groups, the first match this season was against Silcoates for the U13, U15 and senior boys and girls. The seniors won their age group 92-76 points. The U13 age group scores were 102-66 to Silcoates and the U15 age group scores were 73-95 to Silcoates. The overall result was 273-231 to Silcoates. The second match was a victory against Queen Margaret’s with Pocklington winning 196-185. U12 girls: Pocklington 45, QM 31. U13 girls: Pocklington 46, QM 32. U14 girls: Pocklington 37, QM 39. U15 girls: Pocklington 30, QM 43 and senior girls: 48, QM 30. This was a fantastic match against a strong team. Well done to the U12, U13 and Senior teams for winning their age groups. The third match wasn’t so victorious against St Olave’s. The U12 girls’ age group: Pocklington 29, Olave’s 69. U12 boys: Pocklington 25, Olave’s 40. U13 girls: Pocklington 24, Olave’s 51. U13 boys: Pocklington 28, Olave’s 47. The results do not reflect the closeness of many of the races and some super performances by the lower school swimmers. The Senior Girls’ Swimming team have been undefeated for the past 5 years, winning their age group in all matches against Silcoates, Ashville, Queen Margaret’s and The Mount. The current senior team consists of Frankie Marsh, Becky Heuck (c), Charlotte Prescott, Laura Arnott, Faye McFarlane and Georgina Hatfield-Chetter. Other pupils who were in the team and part of the unbeaten success but have since left the school are Kayleigh Kilsby, Annie Prescott and Lisa Stillie. Frankie has swum exceptionally throughout her time at Pocklington, showing a high level of dedication to training and matches. Her only defeat in a school match was at the hands of Danielle Hall-Jackson of Silcoates, who finished 6th to Rebecca Adlington in a National Final in March 2012 at the new Olympic pool! Frankie always swims butterfly and freestyle for

school and has also competed at breaststroke and individual medley. She started competitive swimming as an 8 year old with a time for 50m Freestyle of 50.11secs. One year later she achieved a podium position at the Harrogate Open Gala with a time of 36.22. Swimming for New Earswick Swimming Club at the Ridings Premier League Gala at Scarborough in May 2011, she clocked a great time of 29.01 for the 50 Freestyle. At the same meet, she swam a superb 32.06 for the 50m Backstroke, putting her in the top 10 times in Yorkshire. Frankie’s times are inside the North East Counties qualifying times. Just recently, she swam a PB in a Ridings League Match at Scarborough for 50m freestyle in 28.94. She is now a qualified Swimming Teacher and a NPLQ Lifeguard. Jake Galley (c) has also been very successful both in school and outside matches. He swims for York and trains with the York City Baths Club four times a week, working his training tirelessly around his studies. He teaches swimming at Lyndhurst and is also a lifeguard for the school. Jake holds the school records for 50m Breaststroke and Freestyle and is unbeaten at senior level. His recent success was entering for the NER (North Eastern Region) at Sunderland in the 50m breaststroke, essentially one step below the Nationals. (Impressive for someone who only trains four times a week!) RS

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ocklington entered three teams into the East Riding Schools’ Cross Country Championships this year. These were held at Longcroft School in Beverley.

The Year 7 Girls’ Team ran exceptionally. The individual position of 1st place went to Fenella Scutt. Out of a total of 80 runners, Georgia Rothwell came 6th, Cordelia Cavill 10th, Millie Barnes 17th, Georgia Brown 31st, with Bryony Underwood 36th and Beth Noble 67th. A fantastic set of results gave the team 2nd place overall. The Year 7 Boys’ Team also ran very well. James Harrison was the first Pocklington runner to finish, claiming 9th place. Out of 80 runners, Ed Dare came 36th, Will Parker 37th, Edward Wraith 41st, Kieran Wilde 44th, Alex Laing 45th and Ben Pettifer 64th. The Junior Boys’ Team came 5th out of 7 schools. Aaron Baxter, Adam Harrison, Ben Dyson, Dan Tunnicliffe, Jonty Atkinson, Jimmy Quinney, George Heywood and Will Bulmer were the team and they claimed positions ranging from 17th to 48th out of 75 runners. Special congratulations must go to the following runners, who have been selected to run in the next round of the East Riding v York Schools Championships: Fenella Scutt, Georgia Rothwell, Millie Barnes, James Harrison and Aaron Baxter. It has been a successful season for all the runners; well done to you all! RS

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team of 1st form girls competed in the East Riding Championships in December with the top 20 in each race going through to represent East Riding against York Schools in January. Fenella Scutt, Georgia Rothwell, Cordelia Cavill and Millie Barnes all qualified. In the next round, they all went through to make the third and final competition, again representing East Riding against Lincolnshire and North Lincolnshire. We had some excellent results there, with Fenella coming 4th, Georgia 5th, Cordelia 7th and Millie 17th out of 50 runners.

CROSS COUNTRY

F

enella Scutt (1DOL) has had an impressive season in cross country, getting through to the final round of the East Riding Championships this year. In the first round at Longcroft School she came 1st out of 80 runners with the top 20 going through to represent the East Riding against York Schools, where Fenella came 8th out of 18. The third round was against Lincolnshire and North Lincolnshire and Fenella put in an outstanding performance, coming 4th in the Country Championships. She recently competed in the U13 cross country team, mixing with older runners. In both the Terrington and Woodleigh events, she finished first, beating rivals from Queen Margaret’s. Both events were very challenging; the Terrington course was 5K and included a great hill. At the Woodleigh event, Fenella was in 2nd place for the initial part of the course but then really pushed on, overtook the lead runner and powered on to the end. A fantastic display of fitness and sheer determination resulting in two triumphant victories for her. Well done to Fenella for her outstanding achievements in cross country this term and best of luck for the coming years. RS

In the boys’ competition, James Harrison was also selected to run after an excellent performance at the Championships, coming 9th and then 7th in the East Riding v York Schools. Unfortunately, he was unable to enter the final round, due to rugby commitments. At Terrington, the U13 girls came 2nd and the boys 5th in their respective competitions. They were placed as follows: Girls (out of 50 runners) Fenella Scutt (1st) Georgia Rothwell (6th) Cordie Cavill (13th) Nicole Marshall (15th) Angela Curtis (23rd) Bryony Underwood (26th) Mim Philip (48th)

Boys (out of 49 runners) Adam Harrison (6th) Jimmy Quinney (21st) James Laudage (28th) Kieran Wilde (34th) Alex Laing (37th) Jonty Atkinson (39th) James Harrison (43rd) Edward Wraith (44th)

At Woodleigh in March, the girls had an excellent day, with Fenella and Georgia taking the top two spots respectively. The team ranked second overall out of 13 schools, just losing to St Martin’s Ampleforth but beating their rivals Queen Margaret’s (priorities, eh! Ed). All girls displayed tremendous determination and gave their absolute all to compete in a very gruelling and competitive event. The boys also ran well, only one point behind 3rd placed St Martin’s Ampleforth. Adam Harrison had a great run, coming 8th out of 74 runners. Well done to all for a fantastic term of cross country.

FOOTBALL

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n the Junior League, after losing their first match, ‘PAPA DREW AND HIS CREW’ went on a long winning run to storm to the title. The closest challengers were ‘LIVERTONSEA’, who ended the season five points behind. Well played to the winning team, consisting of Harry Isenstein, Adam Harrison, Jack NewtonTaylor, James Laudage and Hamish Sleigh. In the Intermediate League, ‘NN4’ were bottom of the table at the October half-term break, but then went on a ten match unbeaten run to claim the runners-up spot behind champions ‘MFC’, who won eleven of their fifteen matches. Well done to Alex Curtis, Mikey Curtis, James Hanley, Tom Hick and Will Stephenson. Finally, the Senior League saw a two-horse race between ‘PASTAFARIANS’ and ‘GUESS WHAT?’ Going into the final match of the season against one another, the former held a one-point advantage, and that proved sufficient as they recovered from a 1-0 half-time deficit to draw 1-1. Congratulations to Olly Smith, Fraser Davies, Shreyas Gopal, Matt Springett and James Pavlou. My thanks to regular referees Mr Andrews and Mr Hymers, without whose support I could not run these popular competitions. TML

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conclusion of the task the sum of the two towers formed our score. A number of tasks followed: a quiz, a kayaking task in the swimming pool and a communications stand that had half the team in one room relaying information to the other half in an adjacent room, via a radio link. Different team members attempted to take command of the radio, but no real improvement was apparent. The task was completed in an average time.

WELBECK On arrival at around 6.30pm, the team were directed to their ‘pitch’ – an area roughly 10 metres square. The ground was already very sodden, so there was no need for mallets!

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here were 30 teams of cadets in the competition from all over the UK, both CCF and ACF. We were hosted by two Welbexians, Kayleigh Kilsby and Chris Walker. Their role was to chaperone us and ensure we were where we are supposed to be. After a staff briefing, it was time to brief the team: Annabel Fawcett, Lydia Ford, Tom Fuller, James Hanley, John Pearson, Will Sayer, Charlie Sleigh and John Soanes. Our first task was a Command task, led by John Pearson. It involved getting a tyre up and around two bars approximately 8ft above the ground in an area the cadets were not allowed to touch. All was going well until the very last few seconds when the four guys holding the barrel in place became rather casual, assuming the task was complete. This allowed the barrel to move and as such dislodged Tom from a plank. He subsequently fell into the out of bounds area. No points, but a very valuable lesson learnt. From there we began to get into the swing of things with our next task of erecting a tower out of MTA. Two teams of four had a kit each and at the

A First Aid stand saw four cadets selected to manage a scenario involving severed hands. John Pearson was superb in command as Lydia and James attempted to wrestle with victims of shock and blood loss. The code breaker task was a struggle as we felt later that the briefing given to Annabel was poor and led the team down the wrong avenue. Tug of War saw our team take on a CCF from Bedfordshire. After a demonstration from the College staff it was a best of five ends. The team had John Soanes at the front and Will Sayer at the back. We dragged the opposition like rag dolls through the mud on the third end after wearing them down by winning the first two. Because we finished early the staff asked for one team member from each team to step forward for an individual duel. Will was our man and he subsequently toyed with his opposite number to win comfortably. On the Gym Tests, the team was outstanding, scoring well above the others. John Soanes, Will, James and Charlie blasted out hundreds of press-ups and sit ups between them. The medicine ball throw saw an equally high score. This was all backed up by some sound scoring from the remainder of the team. That night was atrocious. Cold, howling wind with rain. At times I thought the tents were going to be lifted up and deposited somewhere else. As it was, come the morning the area was strewn with debris, but no tents had been damaged. It was still raining and there was no let up with the cold wind. By this time there were streams of water running across the playing fields. After a hearty breakfast, our first task was the High Ropes. The ‘Pack’ (John Soanes, James, Will and Charlie) were selected to climb ‘Jacob’s Ladder’. It was very difficult but they completed the task in some 6 minutes 46 seconds. After this the whole team had to stack crates as high as they could with one person standing on the top of the crates. Tom was chosen to stand on the top with John Pearson below. The remainder of the team had to build the tower and ferry crates backwards and forwards. 14 crates was the height the team had to reach, any lower and the team would have a minute added to their ‘Jacob’s Ladder’ climb time. The team managed 15. Prizes were given out based on everyone’s best ten stands, the most improved team and the individual deemed to have performed the best throughout the weekend. We were not amongst the prize winners. However, we did get a t-shirt each and we all thawed out on the journey home. I would like to say a good weekend was had by all but I think that would be stretching it somewhat! The cadets were superb and maintained a great attitude throughout. Thanks for the assistance of Mrs Kilsby and the welcome given by Kayleigh and Chris, who bent over backwards to ensure the cadets were well looked after. GK

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This year, for the first time, the CCF decided to enter the 15 (NE) Brigade First Aid Competition. Lt Jan Kilsby spent a few weeks before the Easter break selecting, training and preparing the following cadets, who formed two Cadet teams and one Young Adult team: FSgt Jake Galley RAF Sgt Charlotte Prescott RAF Cpl Tom Semeniuk Cpl Josh Walls Lcpl Josh Baines Cdt Georgina Lloyd Cdt Tom Lynch RAF Cdt Faye McFarlane RAF Cdt Megan Smith Cdt Hanna Walls

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Our team was awarded first place

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After a hearty breakfast the next morning, the teams descended to the holding area. In teams of four, they were escorted to the ‘Team First Aid Scenario’. This happened to be a wood where the casualties simulated sitting around a camp fire, where a tin of beans had been put on the fire to heat but had exploded, causing burns. One team, led by Tom Lynch, and the other team, led by Georgina, coped very well with this. After a debrief, two individual scenarios were set up. One, a boy had fallen from a tree whilst attempting to retrieve a ball and suffered a punctured chest from a broken branch. A severe bleeding and breathing incident; but to add interest, he was also an asthmatic. The second incident was a case of anaphylactic shock as a boy had eaten mushrooms. The incidents were completed with degrees of success: Jake, Josh Baines, Faye and Megan getting the tree scenario and Hanna, Tom Lynch, Charlotte and Georgina tackling the other.

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FIRST AID

n arrival, we were greeted by the CSM from the ACF who very kindly produced a curry for us to eat as a belated evening meal. A briefing for the cadets on the does and don’ts of the camp was then administered by the ACF officer in charge.

We made the journey home with some very happy cadets

Unfortunately, Tom Semeniuk and Josh Walls were judged too old for the cadet competition and removed from their team. This meant that Georgina and Josh Baines had to compete as a team of two, so they could not score sufficient points from the individual scenarios to be a threat to the overall winners. Tom and Josh were invited to compete as a Young Adult team but declined the offer, citing their inexperience.

Once all the scores were in, it was time for the prize giving. The team of Megan, Tom Lynch, Hanna and Faye were awarded first place and received gold medals and a cup. Josh Baines was the winner of the individual competition, while Jake and Charlotte completed the day by winning the Young Adult team prize. A long journey home with some happy cadets was a blessing after a very long, wet and cold weekend. Special thanks to Lt Jan Kilsby for preparing and training the cadets along with her overall organisation. Now she has it all to do again, as the winners go forward to the National finals at Sandhurst in October 2012! GK

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KAYLEIGH KILSBY

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hen I first learnt I had got into Welbeck, I couldn’t believe it, skipping though the Quad was my way of celebrating but then I realised, I had to get the grades! Five months later, the news that I had the grades to leave Pocklington brought joy but also sadness as it began to sink in that I would be leaving the place where I grew up, the school I spent nine years of my life, the place I loved to be with all my friends and family, writes Kayleigh Kilsby (OP).

After final good byes at the end of the summer, I set off with four suitcases, a ruck sack, three bags and a suit carrier to Welbeck, not knowing what to expect. On arrival, we received a warm welcome from the housemasters and those pupils who are in the U6 this year. The first couple of days were hectic as we went from running a Personal Fitness Test (PFT) to getting photos taken for our ID cards. I was assigned to Trenchard House, which seemed really friendly. Being quite small, it was fun trying to fit into my uniform for a 5ft girl with size 3 feet! Waddling out of stores with skirts that fell down, shirts with huge colours and a size 18 blazer didn’t go well with my street creditability! As the term progressed we swapped rooms to live with and get to know other people in the house. Trenchard had very high standards from the beginning. With room inspections by the housemaster, where the entire room had to be spotless under the scrutiny of the prefects and with duty weeks of washing other people’s clothes and other strict regimes, it was living up to its reputation! Monday became a day for cleaning; not only did we have room inspections but uniform inspections too, three times a week, where our shirts had to be perfectly ironed along with shoes polished. It was great I could use my shoes to see my face in! It definitely felt as though I had been thrown straight in the deep end. The first weekend came and the house competitions began. At Welbeck, we have five houses: Trenchard, Stirling, Alanbrooke, Nelson and Portland. All houses compete against each other in a number of events, ranging from Singing (called House Shout) to football and debating. As the term progressed, days began to blur into each other: Welbeck is quite an isolated place and there is little to do than study or play sport. The second term is very different as the college falls silent due to revision. The subjects I study are Maths, Physics, Chemistry and Geography. With four exams in January, I had a lot of revision to do! After the exams, the College came back to life with two more socials, Casino night and a Rave social both which were greatly enjoyed by everyone as it was a time to have fun and be with your friends. Now in my third term and only a couple weeks from completing the year, I can safely say I have enjoyed my time at Welbeck so far. I have made friends for life and worked in all types of situations, helping me to mature and take a few more vital steps towards my future. After my second year at Welbeck, I plan to apply for Newcastle University, studying Geomantic Information Systems, which involves mapping the ground using the latest computer and technical equipment associated with geopolitical sites around the world. This is sponsored by the Royal Engineers for three years. Then I hope to take up my place at Sandhurst for one year and pass out as an officer in the British Armed Forces.

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somewhat select crew of RAF cadets attended camp this year. As is tradition, we camped with several other schools; this year it was Caterham, Cowes and Batley Grammar School. Flt Sgt Charlotte Prescott found herself the senior cadet on camp and initially had her work cut out with some very young and inexperienced cadets from the other schools. Ably abetted by Cdt Cpls Olivia Crompton and Alix Coole-Varlow, though, Charlotte soon had all the cadets on time to the varied programme of visits. Cadets Tom Lynch and Alice Cullen, though on their first camp, both did really well. Camp Commandant was Wg Cdr Kevin Bage from Caterham who did a marvellous job in keeping a tight ship and ensuring a very full programme of visits and activities. Sunday was spent off base up off the A1 at Rutland Water. Cadets enjoyed a morning mountain biking and the afternoon climbing and abseiling at the climbing wall and on a high ropes course. The obligatory “Fam Ex” on the Sunday night meant that cadets could find their bearings on base prior to all the regular military personnel arriving back on Monday. As Marham is a Tornado base, many of the section visits were related to the engineering, maintenance and flying side of the Tornado planes. Cadets all got to sit in the cockpit of the planes and get the inevitable “Top Gun” style photos. Amongst other visits, the Tactical Information Wing, the Imperial War Museum at Duxford and the Central Maintenance Unit all proved really interesting. The more active visits were to the Fire section and the RAF Regiment where cadets tried their hands at the timed obstacle course. The night ex proved a highlight, with cadets carrying out a number of simulated missions in a nearby forest. All good fun! On to the awards. With fewer cadets than normal and cadets from three other schools, one might have thought that we would come home with fewer prizes than usual. Not a bit of it. Alice Cullen was smartest cadet on camp and Olivia Crompton was best shot in the DCCT indoor shooting range. Charlotte Prescott shone as senior NCO on camp and was rightly awarded the Best NCO on Camp Award. The paper plate awards proved as popular as ever with the cadets. I would like to thank the cadets for making it a very enjoyable and profitable camp. Mr Long, Miss Spencer and Mr Evans all played their part. For Mr Long it was his first camp, for Miss Spencer her last and we wish her well in China and thank her for her contribution to the RAF section over recent years. PMD THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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FRENCH EXCHANGE

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n the first evening in the capital, we traversed our way through the intricacies of the Paris Métro, wandered around the inside of the stunning Sacré-Cœur and then split off into groups for le déjeuner. The restaurant we found in Montmartre Square was exquisite, writes Laura Arnott (L6). La deuxième journée was spent roving around the streets and visiting the famous monuments of Paris. Although the rain was pouring down, this did not deter us! Paris is a truly magical place, in spite of the rain and many of us didn’t want to leave. After seeing sites such as The Louvre (even though it was closed), the Arc de Triomphe and walking down the beautiful Champs-Élysées, all the pupils headed over to look at the Eiffel Tower, illuminated against the night sky. We travelled to Besançon the next day and met our French Exchange partners. Everyone immediately clicked with their partner. Their families were very welcoming and kind. They offered us delicious French cuisine which was important for our ‘French experience’. We then spent a day at our partners’ school, Jules Haag Lycée. We participated in lessons on subjects such as History and Maths in French, followed by an afternoon playing rugby and working as a team with the French pupils. Bowling was very popular with the French students and the evening at the bowling alley with everyone together was very enjoyable; a definite highlight. The next day was spent visiting the Besançon Citadel, seeing the animals in the zoo there, and then at the Besançon Salt Museum. An educational and entertaining few days pour tout le monde! Sadly, on 6 November, we said au revoir and started on their long journey home to Yorkshire. It was a really sad moment, no-one wanted to say goodbye and some of the French mothers were crying! Everyone on the French Exchange benefited from the experience of listening to the French language first-hand. It was a great deal of fun and the students can’t wait for the French pupils to make their return visit in March 2012.

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I really enjoyed the meal we had on our second night in Paris. We were in the Latin Quarter and they gave us cool hats to wear. Ed Chappelow (U6) To my surprise, I enjoyed the rugby; so much so, in fact, that I’d quite like rugby as a games session for girls. Now then, Mr Houltham?! Ed. Livi Crompton (L6)

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ctober half term saw the second Pocklington visit to Besançon and the Jules Haag Lycée; for the staff at least it gave a chance to meet up with old friends, re-visit places of interest, and try out new cafés and restaurants. Besançon is such a beautiful town, in the glorious Comté department of North East France. The region comprises rolling hills, with small towns and villages nestling in lush countryside – at the time of visiting clothed in glorious Autumnal colours – and is renowned for its cheese (Comté & Mont d’Or), wine (of course – it’s France!) and other culinary delights. The local ancient salt mines are a source of justifiable pride for the natives and fascination for visitors; similarly, Besançon’s Citadel is an extraordinary monument to history ancient and modern in the area. Mr Dare and I were alternately engrossed, shocked and appalled by the wealth of detail and information in the Citadel’s Museum of Occupation from the Second World War. Educationally the visit is hugely worthwhile. Not only do the students increase their vocabulary and ease with the language, but they learn a tremendous amount about the culture of France: visiting monuments in Paris – or simply wandering through its Boulevards and Avenues; finding their way around the Paris Métro; living with French families (albeit for a very short time) and of course having a taste of the French education system; if nothing else our students return with a sense of how easy their educational lives are in comparison! As staff we were tremendously impressed with our students – both Fifth and Sixth form. Well done all of you for your excellent participation. Returning the hospitality shown to us by the French was a real pleasure. The initial nerves felt by students in October were replaced by an excitement to see friends again and to show the French students the delights of Yorkshire. Along with time spent in school we managed day trips to York, the Brontë Museum and The National Museum of Mining. However, the highlight was perhaps the impromptu, but excellent, concert, held in the Annand Centre, organised between French and English students – with some help from Mr Dare leading the dancing! FBM

We went bowling almost every night and although I was rubbish I still really enjoyed it.

My favourite part was probably seeing the Eiffel Tower lit up at night. It was really magical! Isobel Carlile (L6)

Ellie Wareham (L6) Playing rugby with the French guys was my favourite part; it was a really fun afternoon.

Moi sur l'échange j'ai beaucoup aimer rencontrer des personnes d'un autre pays, surtout que j'adore l'angleterre, puis j'ai aimé faire decouvrir comment ca se passe chez nous.

Jacob Sherwood (U6)

Cindy Goutelard Faire de nouvelles rencontres! Pouvoir parler une autre langue. Vanessa Grangereau

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GERMAN EXCHANGE

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e really enjoyed going into Alfeld as it was very different to Pocklington, writes Grace Jackson (3GRU). We all went for a tour around Alfeld on the first day, but we nearly got lost! During the week we went into Alfeld, shopping with Pia and Nicole and their friends. We met quite a few of Pia and Nicole’s friends and they were very enthusiastic to speak English to us! We tried our best to speak German back to them. The town has a great history and the shield represents the town very well. ❤ I loved it! ❤ The Autostadt was the best trip that we went on in Germany, believes Will Fox (4HUT). It was interesting because they had many old and modern cars. Volkswagen is the main manufacturer of the cars in Germany; they also own Audi, Bugatti, Llambougini, Sseat, Skoda, Bentley, MAN, Porsche, and Scania. They have many buildings which are very attractive and hold the cars from each of the producers. At the Autostadt we got the chance to build our own solarpowered motorised car made from copper rods and fixed together with solder. The Autostadt trip was, all in all, a brilliant day out! I was introduced again to my family almost straight away. Pia, who was my Exchange partner, had made me a photo collage of pictures of us together in England; she had put it in a nice frame and I was really pleased, recalls Amelia Lawrence (3HUT). Pia’s mother is an English teacher, so it was luckily quite easy to communicate. I was shown to my bedroom which was really nice – I had my own bathroom and a double bed. Pia has a younger sister too and she was really sweet; I tried my best to speak German to her but she didn’t really understand! She also had a pretty older sister, who always got up early to drive us to school. I got on with everyone in the household really well and especially liked baking with Pia and her mum. We baked cookies and brownies and sometimes I helped cook the dinner, although I learnt that I am a rubbish carrot peeler! Most of the exchange students went swimming with their German partners on the 2nd night in a leisure centre just outside town. We arrived in good spirits with anticipation in the air, just itching to get in the pool and have a bit of a swim, writes Jordan Littlewood (5HUT). We had great fun on the slides, going down ten at a time, somewhat to the lifeguard’s shock! On the last night, the whole group went bowling at the Seven Hills Bowling Centre just outside Alfeld, writes Jake Male (5HUT). The best score at bowling was by Laura Schultze which was 124, the worst score was 0 (Jordan!). It was a really fun night and we even saw some exchange students from last year’s exchange : Luisa Diener, Erika Scheermann and Marilena Titze. Ich mag Lebensmittel in Deutschland. In Deutschland scheint es, dass die Deutschen Leute immer essen. Normalerweise essen wir Frühstück morgen früh, ein Brötchen und Küchen gegen 10 Uhr, dann Mittagsessen um 1 oder 2, und später isst man das Abendessen auch. Aber die Gerichte sind nicht klein. Ich habe, zum Beispiel, gestern Abend Currywurst mit Pommes im Restaurant gegessen. Aber ich habe auch 3 anderen großen Mahlzeiten gegessen. Aber ich weiß, warum man so viel isst. Meines Erachtens ist alle das Essen echt besser in Deutschland als in Enlgand. Es gibt so viel gute Lebensmittel und ich habe sehr gutes Essen jeden Tag gegessen. Es gibt zum Beispiel Schnitzel, Currywurst und Spagettieeis. Aber es gibt natürlich viel mehr. Deutsches Essen ist schön. Sam Berridge (U6) In Hanover we went to the flea market with Josh and Lennard and on the way back we saw the carnival, which was massive, remembers Alex Varley (3WIL). They played all types of music and threw sweets to the viewers – one hit Josh on the head! Alfeld Gymnasium ist großer als Pocklington School, weil es 1200 Schüler gibt. Es gibt achtzig Lehrer. Der Unterricht beginnt um Viertel vor acht und endet um ein Uhr oder drei Uhr. Die Stunden dauern fünfundvierzig Minuten. Es gibt eine Kantine, aber die Schüler müssen für das Essen bezahlen und das Essen ist kalt. Die Lehrer müssen zum Klassenzimmer der nächsten Klasse gehen und die Schüler bleiben. Einige Stunden sind in Englisch, zum Beispiel Erdkunde und Biologie. Alle Schüler müssen Englisch und eine andere Sprache lernen. Alice Cullen (4GRU) Die Abende in meinem Haus waren sehr gut. Am ersten Abend sind wir zum Freibad mit Sam, Sven, Josh, Lennard, Aimee, Carina, Annika, Alex, Richard, Simon und Jordan gegangen. Es war sehr toll und ich habe dieWasserrutschbahn gemöchtoll gefunden, aber es war ein bißchen langsam. Auch war das Wasser sehr kalt aber es war ok. Am Samstag Abend bin ich zum Restaurant mit Aimee, Annika , Carina und ihren Familien gegangen. Ich habe ein Pizza Spaghetti Bolognese gegessen und Aimee auch. Es war richtig gut, aber ich war sehr müde. Ein Abend habe ich ihre Freunden getroffen, weil Sie mihr treffen wollte. Sie waren sehr nett . Wir haben viele Filme gesehen und wir haben auf dem Wii gespielt. Emma Loten (5DOL)

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GERMAN PERSPECTIVE

on relaxing. I really would like to have a German lesson. It must be very funny to listen to an English teacher who is speaking German! Moritz

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hen I first learned that I would stay in a boarding house, I was afraid. I had no idea what it would be like. But when we arrived at Friday morning my exchange partner, Faye, was already waiting for me. Next morning we got up at 7, took a shower, got dressed and went to the dining hall for breakfast. No great difference to my morning routine! After every trip Faye waited for me to go to the common room and watch TV or to prepare ourselves to go out. Everyone was really friendly and helped me feel comfortable. And with all the people it was never boring: on Monday we went to the Chinese restaurant, on Wednesday to the Italian restaurant. All in all, I’m going to miss life in a boarding house! Alina

At midday we ate lunch at Betty’s in York, it’s very famous and delicious. In the afternoon my exchange partner had a riding lesson, because she had a riding competition on Sunday. Very interesting!! After the riding lesson we went with the riding instructor to the cross country course and went through it, so she knew the course. In the evening we went home and made ‘Sloe Gin’, for my parents. For tea we had chicken with bacon, very delicious! All in all, it was a brilliant weekend and I think it was the best time of the whole exchange, because I spoke English all the time and understood a lot! Annika

At home with an English family…Well, it’s not very different to life in Germany! The people in the family I stayed with were so nice and always funny. Especially my exchange partner, Jake, who was like a little clown, laughing and smiling all the time. Lennard and I (I was lucky, because Jake’s brother got an exchange student as well, so I wasn’t so lonely there) enjoyed it a lot. The house was like a palace big enough for two football teams! The time in the host family was the best time of the whole exchange! Jake, Valerie (the mother) and Josh (Lennard’s exchange partner) were so nice and I will miss them a lot! It was brilliant to get a look into the typical day life of English people. Laura The lessons were quite interesting, especially French. It is different to learn two different languages at the same time! I had a lot of geography lessons with Mr Sykes. We were talking about the terrible tsunami in Japan and other things, but unfortunately I didn’t understand a word of it. The teachers are more relaxed than our teachers in Germany; before registration a lot of students are laughing, talking and sitting on the desks. When the teacher is doing the roll call, the students listen, but still keep 91


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well seeing the Honours Boards, the site of the Olympic Flame, the Pool and the Maifeld and Clock Tower. The afternoon meant a trip to the end of the S1 line out to Oranienburg, about 20 miles from the centre, to visit Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp. As Josh says, this is always eerie and thought-provoking, and although a painful reminder of ‘man’s inhumanity to man’, it is still a must. Saturday night was quiet, when, after a quick visit to Aufsturz for Herr Galloway to imbibe his favourite Lausitzer Porter, we stayed in and played cards and entertained ourselves in the hostel.

BERLIN

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his year’s A2 German group of Sam Berridge, Ed Chappelow and Josh Male set off just before the Easter holidays for the annual U6 trip to Germany’s capital city, one of the most fascinating places in the world. En route we picked up Laurie White (OP), who left at the end of her L6 year but didn’t want to miss the Berlin trip, which she had looked forward to for years, just because she had happened to change schools! After arriving on Thursday evening and getting to know the local area (Friedrichshain) we started to hit Berlin with gusto on the Friday morning. First up, as ever, was a guided walking tour, through Insider Tours, and this year led by Nigel Dunkley (MBE) who must be the best tour guide ever! We made our way from Hackescher Markt, via the Berliner Dom and Museum Insel, past the Neue Wache and Unter den Linden to Bebelplatz, and then on to Gendarmenmarkt and Friedrichstrasse and Checkpoint Charlie, and the Wall, and the Reichsmisterium building and Gestapo HQ on Wilhelmstrasse, via the site of Hitler’s Bunker and the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe and Pariser Platz and the Hotel Adlon to the Brandenburg Gate and, finally, the Reichstag! On the way Nigel told us many tales and thoroughly captivated us all with his experiences as, amongst other things, soldier with the British Army, US Army and his time as a spy in East Berlin. We rounded off the afternoon with some time in the Kaiser Wilhelm Gedächtnis Church, whose half-ruined state is a symbol of the city, and a quick visit to KaDeWe, the Berlin equivalent of Harrods! After finding their own way back to the hostel via Berlin’s excellent transport network, the students enjoyed an evening sampling local culture – we took in a rock/metal band in a gig at a club nearby, which gave everyone the chance to interact with some Berliners in more relaxed surroundings.

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We were led by the best tour guide ever!

Saturday saw us head first for the Olympic Stadium, over in the west of the city, where we took in a guided tour in German, which meant we could go inside the stadium and see the Olympic Lounge, the Jesse Owens lounge, the very impressive chapel, the press area and warm-up track, as well as the changing rooms. In fact we were in the changing room, which is usually given to away teams, and to Sam’s great excitement, was the one used by the French in the World Cup Final in 2006. He took great delight in washing his hands in a sink, possible used by Zinedene Zidane when he was sent off after his famous head-butt! I did draw the line at him using the loo there, however…We also saw the rest of the stadium, including getting to sit on the VIP-Tribune, where Hitler presented the medals, as 92

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Sunday was another busy day, with an East/West Berlin theme, which started with a short tram ride to Nordbahnhof to see some info about the ghost stations, which were cut off and abandoned when the Wall went up in 1961. Then we had a short walk up to Bernauerstrasse, where there are remnants of the Wall, and much more to show how it divided the city and here, the street itself! They are still developing the memorials there, but there is already so much to see and learn. We kept on walking up Bernauerstrasse to Mauerpark (WallPark), where we sampled the wares at Berlin’s best and biggest flea market. The quality of goods on sale is variable, as is usual at flea markets, but Ed in particular found most of it ‘tat’. However, Sam and Ed did find a present for Josh. See the photos/video to see what he got! The afternoon was filled with a visit to the Stasi Museum, where we learnt all about the ‘Sword and Shield of the DDR’, which was how the Stasi or secret police saw themselves. It was very interesting, especially when we saw all the spying gear, as seen in films like The Lives of Others. We finished the day by returning to the Memorial for the Murdered Jews of Europe, where as well as wandering through the field of stelae, we visited the documentation centre below ground, which although harrowing and upsetting, is another must-see. Monday started with a new visit to Unterwelten, which gives guided tours of bunkers below the Berlin underground network, which have been used by Berlin breweries for hundreds of years, but also of course during the wars. This was fascinating and great fun for me, especially as I had never done the tour before, despite my many visits to Berlin! After lunch in the nearby Gesundbrünnen shopping centre, we made our way to the other site featured in The Lives of Others, the prison and interrogation centre at Hohenschönhausen, where our guided tour gave an insight into the interrogation techniques which forced DDR citizens to confess to ‘crimes against the state’ through psychological means. After tea we set off for the suburb of Köpenick to see the real Berlin football team, and now everyone’s favourite German team: FC Union Berlin – also known as Eiserne Union (Iron Union) – playing against Eintracht Frankfurt. As explained below by the students, this was brilliant, as like most German professional football, the atmosphere was great, the fans were keen, the food and drink was cheap, and the tickets were half the price of those in the UK!


Tuesday was our last day, and we started off by strolling to the nearby Mühlenstrasse, where one can see the longest remaining stretch of Berlin Wall, which has been turned into the ‘Eastside Gallery’ where artists from all over the world have painted their take on life in Berlin and worldwide. At midday we had a guided tour inside the Reichstag building – another first for me – where we learnt all about the varied history of the building and saw how Lord Norman Foster renovated it brilliantly. Of particular interest were the Chapel, the Russian graffiti from the war and the magnificent cupola, which is one of Berlin’s biggest tourist attractions! In the afternoon we had time to squeeze in a trip to the Hamburger Bahnhof, an old station, which has been converted into a modern art gallery. The gallery is great... the art less so!

My highlight of the Berlin trip was when we went to see FC Union play a football match against Frankfurt, recalls Ed Chappelow (U6). Although the side we wanted to win, lost, it didn’t bother me as we got to see four goals! The atmosphere inside the stadium was brilliant with lots of chanting and singing going on by the home supporters and with the away fans, who weren’t allowed to even be in the stadium, jumping across into the empty closed stand. As well as the football, I really enjoyed the tour that we had with Nigel, possibly the most knowledgeable and genuinely interesting person I’ve ever met. We got to see all the main sites in Berlin and got a big insight to the history and culture of the city including the Berlin Wall, Checkpoint

Charlie and the Brandenburg Gate. Other things that I especially enjoyed were visiting the 1936 Olympic Stadium and getting to see an underground WW2 bunker inside a current-day tube station.

Our flight home on the final day was not until late afternoon, so we were able to squeeze in another visit, this time to the Pergamon Museum on Museum Island in the heart of Berlin. This museum is generally considered to have one of the best collections of wonders from the ancient world anywhere and it didn’t disappoint. The magnificent and enormous Pergamon Altar is matched by the wonderful market gate, and numerous other pieces which have the ‘Wow factor’! The journey back to Pock was only eventful in that Laurie, Sam, Ed and I were fascinated to see if Josh would manage to get his present from the flea market through customs and security...and he did!

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This was another very successful trip: the students gained a lot and were wonderful company. In particular, for Josh and Sam this is the end of an era, as they have each clocked up seven visits to Germany with the school (Ed and Laurie have managed six between them too!) and I would like to thank all of them for their enthusiasm and willingness.

For me, the U6 trip to Berlin was a really enjoyable week, with a couple of my friends and a pretty laid-back teacher, writes Sam Berridge (U6). As well as visiting all the important cultural and historical sites in the city, we were given lots of free time. We were given the chance to plan most of the week and we had control over what we did. We therefore took in a lot of the Berlin lifestyle and saw some incredible sights. As well as seeing the outstanding Pergamon Museum, along with other monuments and museums detailing the incredible history of the city, we saw a Berlin football match (with a much better atmosphere than in England), had a tour of the Olympic Stadium, and went out to a gig on one of our first nights after arriving.

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this was one of the best trips ever

This was definitely one of the best trips I’ve been on in my seven years at the school and I think it could be a potential deal-breaker in choosing A-Level subjects, as no other department offers such a good week away. I found that Berlin is an incredible city with huge amounts to see and do. Culturally and historically, there is plenty to learn – and it is a brilliant city for a night out!

The visit to Sachsenhausen will stay with me for the rest of my life - the atmosphere in the area was eerie, and the site was incredibly thought-provoking, remembers Josh Male (U6). This was contrasted by the intense atmosphere at an FC Union football match, where even during a huge defeat, the fans remained supportive to the final whistle. By visiting various monuments, such as the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe and the East-side Gallery, we were able to absorb as much culture as possible throughout the week. I can thoroughly recommend this trip to anyone interested in studying German or German history/culture. A link/URL to the videos on the Exchange and the Berlin trip can be accessed by all at http://pockmfl.vidmeup.com/ or http://herrgalloway.wikispaces.com.

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VALENCIA

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hen we landed in Spain we instantly revelled in that most unfamiliar of sights and feelings; the warmth of the Spanish sun! ¡Qué guay! While in Valencia it was decided that to further improve our Spanish we ought to stay with host families, so we were continually speaking the language. The thought of living in a stranger’s house was very daunting for some, but once we’d met our families and settled in back at their house, our fears were soothed (their delicious cooking also may have helped somewhat, too!), writes Hannah Hutchinson (U6). On Monday morning, having congregated in front of the Taronja School, we met Marta, our guide, for our first activity. She presented us with gymkhana, but not as we knew it. To Marta, gymkhana was a worksheet with which we were to ask Spanish people the answers to certain questions. Although this may have meant work, the location was Valencia’s stunning beach, la Playa de Malvarossa. Before beginning the most exciting prospect of gymkhana, we explored the beach, did a bit of tanning and played copious amounts of beach volleyball! First, though, we had a forfeit to carry out. It was promised that whoever was the last to hand in their EHIC, passport or money for hoodies, would incur a forfeit. First up, Ollie Dawson. As beautiful as the sea looked, it was still freezing at 10am and so our first forfeit came to mind; Ollie had to go entirely under. As he came shivering out of the sea he was met with applause and multiple cameras; an undeniably brave effort!

That evening was spent with host families and, for Georgia Oddell and me, it meant having our first taste of Spanish television; in particular a programme called Salváme. Now, Japanese television is renowned for being bizarre but I have never witnessed something as confusing as Salváme. It was as if they had taken Jeremy Kyle, The One show, a cooking course, a live band and a man with a particular liking for crazy spinning camera shots and just thrown them all in a studio. We still cannot figure out why, at one point, every member of the live audience and presenters were waving around bags of pre-packaged salad… On Tuesday afternoon, we took a trip to the Plaza de Toros, Valencia’s famous bullfighting ring. Time for forfeit number two. This time Liam Oddell and Maggie Bean were in the spotlight. Seeing as we were in the bullfighting arena, they were to enact a bullfight with Maggie as el toro and Liam as el matador. Again, hilarity (and copious amounts of camera footage) ensued.

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We met Marta with some apprehension on Wednesday but our hearts were filled with joy and delight when we discovered the morning’s activity – more gymkhana! Today’s location was the central market, el Mercado Central, the biggest covered market in Spain. With purchases made and gymkhana completed, we hurried back to Taronja for a cooking course with ‘The Great Chef Nando’ (who also happened to be The Great Head teacher of Taronja). However, Nando was away so we ended up having a cooking course with Nando’s dad, Papa Nando. Sangría, Paella de Mariscos, Patatas Bravas; it was a Spanish culinary delight, made all the better by the fact that it was taught entirely in Spanish. That evening brought a delight dreaded by many of the boys: a salsa dancing course. We arrived at the club Azúcar and watched as the expert class finished. This only proved to reaffirm some of that dread. As we took our places on the dance floor, sheepishly crowding at the back desperate to be out of site of the enthusiastic and gyrating dance instructor Señor Salsa, the music started and we were off. For a nervous first time dancer, Nathan Waddell managed to shuffle backwards and forwards in time with the music and not fall over; a definite success. However, the prize went to Georgia and Sam Dawson who danced the night away with enthusiasm and flair (but we still maintain that Sam had cheated due to previous training over Christmas). Friday was our final day. It was inevitable that someone would be buried under the sand and the task fell to the salsa champ Sam who was a good sport and just lay there and let us have our fun (and multiple!) pictures. Finally our last lesson with Alex and Carlos arrived. The task: to create and act out a short Spanish play encompassing everything we had learnt during the week. One play consisted of a debate between the Spanish and English trying to decide which country was better, with both sides presenting quintessentially English things (farmers, cows and dandies) and Spanish things (bullfighting, parties and fruit). However, the play ended on a touching note with the two sides uniting. The next play was a heart-felt rendition of two American ladies, Rebecca Soanes and Rob Ashton, watching a Spanish bullfight and their commentary on it; “OH MY GOD! Mary, have you SEEN it?!” We were sad to leave Valencia as it is such a fantastic city and I think many of us were surprised by how much we’d come to love it there. The realisation of how much we’d miss the city and the people (and the weather!) was something which we wished we didn’t have to think about. I wish the Spanish department all the best with this new trip and thank both Mrs Scott-Somers and Mrs Haldane for all their hard work; especially when they had to go to so many stressful ‘lunch meetings’. I hope this trip becomes a long-standing tradition. ¡Viva a Valencia!

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LONDON

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sleepy crowd of 52 history students gathers in the entrance to York Station, ready to board the late train to London Kings Cross. We are organised into our groups, strategically designed to make moving through the Tube the slightest bit easier. We have Team Hughes, Team McNelly, Team Hall (aka Team Awesome), Team Webb and Team Long. The effectiveness of these groups proves itself spectacularly when we temporarily lose the injured Johnny Bird after our first tube journey to Aldgate East, writes Emily Grieve (5GRU). After dropping our bags off and briefly arguing about who was going to share a bed, we travelled by tube again to Westminster, and to our first port of call, the Cabinet War Rooms Churchill Museums. Once inside, we were pretty much free to wander the museum and explore the perfectly preserved Cabinet Rooms ourselves. When finally the group of ‘people who somehow managed to get lost’ (again?! Ed.) (lead by Josh Wagstaff and Mr Hughes) emerged and joined the rest of us outside, the group photo commenced, followed shortly by another tube trip to London Bridge, where we had a small amount of free time before boarding the HMS Belfast. The ship seemed endless, and many of us had difficulty with the ‘face ladder’ instructions when moving from level to level. We saw countless disturbing wax models including graphic heart surgery and dentist scenes. The sun was beginning to set as we made our way across the ever-busy Tower Bridge and by the time we came back from our free time at Tower Hill, it was suitably dark for the main event of the trip, The Ripper Tour. The tour of the Ripper murder sites was an exciting way to bring to life what we had learned in theory in the classroom. Once we had had our fill of the dark streets of Whitechapel and gory murder details, it was time to return to our hotel for dinner.

After a refreshing two hour sleep (thanks to Lucinda Rix, who wins the prize for ‘most hyper’) and waking for unknown reasons at half five on Monday morning, we were ready for our next main event, a guided tour of the Houses of Parliament. For me, this was the highlight of the trip, and we were very lucky to have an exclusive group tour of the House of Lords and the House of Commons and given an insight into the history of the building. This was commenced by a short walk down Whitehall, passing Downing Street, Banqueting House, stopping briefly at Horse Guards, then making our way onto Trafalgar and Leicester Square. We finished the trip with the inevitable shopping in Covent Garden, concluding what can only be described as an action packed and incredibly fun weekend in London. Big thanks to all the staff who came on the trip, and especially to our Pied Piper, Mr Hughes, who made leading a large group through London without anything going wrong look easy!

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USA Upon arrival in the Big Apple, excitement and anticipation ran through the group… until we arrived at the YMCA. Mr Hughes said we were on a tight budget and judging by most of our experiences in the YMCA, he wasn’t wrong, reminisces Charlotte Prescott (U6).

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ur first full day; New York! After a light breakfast, the subway took us to Battery Park where we were to board a ferry to both Liberty and Ellis Islands. This gave us the first opportunity to witness the famous Manhattan skyline; it really was the ‘concrete jungle which dreams are made of’! ‘You are either with us or against us’ is the saying; and at that moment we were very much with the people who, on the morning of 11 September 2001, lost their lives in the terrorist attacks. That night saw Mr Hughes and Simon Hodgson face their biggest fear, height – and it came no taller than the Empire State Building. The next day saw us hit the highway, where some received the great honour of being forever immortalised in caricature by the ever-artistic David Dickinson.

The first thing that came to mind was “where are all the people?” when we arrived in Washington DC. The first morning, a day of birthdays (Tom

Burke, Chloe Rayner and I were forced to share this year!), saw us move into the confederacy (by metro); the Pentagon being the target. The tour was incredibly insightful, in particular the fact that the soldiers guiding us walked backwards the whole way and could step onto escalators backwards without looking. This nearly caused many accidents, in particular with Sixth form boys trying to replicate this feat for the rest of the trip! Afterwards, we went to Arlington (the national cemetery), the final resting place of JFK. In the afternoon we visited Ford’s Theatre; the site of President Lincoln’s assassination. The Hard Rock Café that evening (6th burger of the trip) provided a rather embarrassing rendition of ‘Happy Birthay’. However the way Simon Hodgson put back the ice cream, you’d have thought it was his special day! On our last full day we were in the same building as ‘the main man’, the White House. What a place it was to stand – just below the Oval Office, looking out across the gardens and fountains to the Washington monument. “Let’s go Caps” was slogan of the evening as we took in an NHL game, a very different atmosphere from football matches back in the UK! The Capitol building was our final visit. The seat of American power; seat being the operative word, as poor Chloe became the first and only casualty of the trip, being wheeled around in a very dashing wheel chair by our very own Rambo (aka Mr Hall). Getting the chance to sit in the House of Representatives was a once-in-a-lifetime experience. It just so happened there was no one there: as some people might argue, American politics at its best! From there, we began the long trip home, all feeling heavier with the weight of souvenirs and burgers. To conclude, as many say about the America trip, “You don’t know man; you weren’t there!”

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BATTLEFIELDS

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he second week of the Easter break saw a coach load of Pocklingtonians travel to mainland Europe, visiting Belgium and Europe to explore the events of World War One, reports George Luck (U6). On arriving in Zubrugge, we were immediately thrown into the meat of the trip – the first day consisting of multiple visits. These included a visit to what could easily be mistaken for an industrial river bank, which was the site of the first action that the Allied troops saw in the war. Our next stop was the St Symphorien Cemetery, a particularly emotive graveyard due to the graves it contains – including the first and last British war fatalities. In keeping with the theme of emotive memorials, we next visited Vimy Ridge, a spectacular monument which signifies Canada’s nationality as well as those lost as a result of fighting. Concluding the day was our visit to the Wellington Quarry, site of Allied tunnelling. The second day was certainly one which will stick in all of our minds, being our visit to the Somme. Standing on what was the front line one hundred years ago hit us all hard and was a surreal contemplation. To keep us all on our toes, the day was livened up by the frequent discovery of shrapnel and even live shells! Discovering the Ypres Salient on the Wednesday was certainly welcomed for two contrasting reasons: first, the fascinating yet copious amount of history found in such a small area and second, the fact that the coach journeys were far shorter than the previous two days- a relief for us all, given the everworsening state of the coach’s toilet… Our day consisted of an intriguing visit to Poperinghe – the Talbot House being a particularly illuminating experience, after viewing a video of a man dressed as an emu, amongst other things. Taking a more sombre tone, the day also included a disturbing visit to the execution post and cells. The day concluded with our attendance at the Menin Gate for the Last Post Ceremony – an incredible event which happens every night of the year although the incomparable atmosphere suggests an unique occurrence. Thursday was our final day and in keeping with History department tradition, we had more visits than could physically be packed into a day. These were Messines Church (where Hitler was billeted while serving in WW1), the Island of Ireland Peace Park, the Pool of Peace at Spanbroekmolen, Bayernwald Trench, Hill 60, walking the Ypres Ramparts and, of course, shopping. Although hard to conclude due to the phenomenal itinerary, I think all that can be said is how excellent the trip was, which of course means thanking all of the members of staff who came. I don’t think we could have done or learnt any more.

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THIEPVAL

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here was an innocence in 1914 that had long since vanished by 1939. Men answered the call of conscience, their patriotic duty – pro patria mori. Young volunteers were slaughtered in their thousands along the chalk bluffs and escarpments of the Somme in 1916. The Thiepval Memorial marks the 73,000 names of British and Commonwealth soldiers whose final resting place remains unknown – either buried deep in the French soil or lying below a simple gravestone carrying the elegaic words ‘Known unto God’. It towers above the

battlefield: monumental, stubborn, solid. There is a loneliness to the place. On exposed terrain, it stands in stark contrast to the grand intimacy of the Menin Gate, which commemorates the ‘unknown’ of the Ypres Salient. Thiepval has meant, and continues to mean, many things to many people. Built in 1928, Lutyen’s memorial stands as a proud reflection on the sacrifice of those that fell. It is neither victorious nor triumphal (the British have never been good at that), but nor is it repentant. It quickly became a place of grief for those who had lost their sons, their fathers, their brothers, their lovers; a place of solace for the living without a grave. In the 1930s, as attitudes hardened against the war, it came to symbolise for many the folly of war, the arrogance and callousness of the generals and politicians who had committed that proud army to a miserable and blood-soaked death. It cost £117,000 or £1.60 per name. Cheap at the price when one considers the cost of the war at over £1000,000 per day. No place affects me more than Thiepval. Not coming from a military family I, unlike some, have nobody to search for. This year I resolved to find the name of George Butterworth, a composer whose music I grew up with as a boy. Killed by a sniper’s bullet, he was buried by his soldiers in a makeshift trench. Two days of German shelling obliterated his remains. His musical output, delicate, mournful yet intensely lyrical, was small. His death became a potent symbol of that ‘lost generation’ – the men, and all their creative output, who might have been. Today more people visit Thiepval than ever before. School parties visit in their thousands. And for what? To help with their studies perhaps, to remember maybe, to visit the name of a relative possibly. But as Mr Hughes pointed out, the trip is a spiritual journey too for all the young minds that travel to this ‘corner of a foreign field’. To learn a tangible lesson of history; to reflect on mankind’s inhumanity and folly; to value our lives afresh and to seek to build a better world. Long may this trip flourish for as long as Thiepval stands. JMW

FLANDERS

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have just returned from a 3 day tour to Ypres, Passchendaele and the Somme led by Head of History, Mr Hughes, and organised by Mr Bennett, our Bursar.

Their detailed knowledge, readings and poems, with a focus on Old Pocklingtonians, made for a very personal and emotional trip bringing some empathy and understanding for an individual’s horror in an otherwise incomprehensible slaughter. A sea of 10,000 grave stones or 55,000 names of the lost in one place is somehow too much to take in, yet a personal connection is almost too much to bear. A number of our party shared their own family links with graves we visited and laid wreaths at the Menin Gate in Ypres, including me, as President of the OPA, and Christopher Oughtred, as Chairman of the Governors, in a most moving Ceremony. All traffic stops at 8pm and the Last Post is played by trumpeters from the local fire brigade - they have not missed a single night since 1928, except to carry on in England for the duration of the occupation during the Second World War. I am grateful that it was possible for us to be part of such an occasion to honour the School’s fallen. Mr Hughes takes groups of current Pocklingtonians each year to learn about the 1st World War at first hand and I think he was unused to the problem of dealing with wilful and unruly adults! We were a party of 30 OPs, current and past parents, teachers, governors and friends of Pock and family members. An easy overnight ferry to Zeebrugge put us, ready to go, within an hour by luxury coach of the front line. Museums, memorials, original trenches and craters together with beautifully maintained grave yards set the scene. Mr Hughes and Mr Bennett spoke about the history, tactics and daily slaughter to great effect, giving us much to come to terms with over excellent suppers and Belgian beer.

Friends and family spent time together on personal journeys and new friendships were made. There are many references in the Pocklingtonian during and after both World Wars to OPs who fell – some almost straight from the classroom, batting crease or rugby pitch to the front line never to return. We heard the daily letters home of one family’s grandfather who survived the whole war in Flanders and all its horrors with some 14 recorded near misses, including taking a bullet full on his belt buckle which they still have at home. Thank you once again to Mr Hughes for the commitment of taking annual school trips and for keeping the OP memories and self sacrifice alive in our pupils today and sending them home wiser and humbler. It was a most moving and worthwhile trip that I commend to everyone. As we approach the centenary of the start of the war in 2014 there will be a great impetus to go in the next few years. Should other OPs and parents wish to follow in our footsteps in future years, please contact Mr Bennett to express your interest. Tom Nash OPA President THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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TRIPS

LOWER SCHOOL HOUSE CAMP

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he drive wasn’t too bad as we stopped off at the Forbidden Corner, which it has to be said can only be described as very strange, very weird and sometimes even a bit scary. There were a couple of sneaky water fountains squirting us here and there, remembers Charlie Proctor (2WIL). We easily settled into our hotel and my room had the most amazing view of Bamburgh Castle. In the evenings, we all had a delicious meal, ranging from bangers and mash to chicken in a tomato sauce. Afterwards, we would play a game or quiz, such as beetle or a music round. We did all sorts of things during the day: going to the Grace Darling Museum, which I found very interesting; playing on the beach; visiting Alnwick Castle; and even going to Edinburgh to watch Ice Age 4! We played lots of sports such as football, rounders, cricket and touch rugby. We also painted plates (which I really enjoyed); we saw (and held) birds of prey; we saw where some Harry Potter moments were filmed; and we had loads of ice creams along the way! There was an Awards Ceremony on the very last night and the prizes varied, from most enthusiastic person to the camper with the tidiest room (definitely not me!). But all in all, my favourite part of the whole trip was Henry Burr’s mask of the Queen, which he wore for the duration of the holiday!

STRATFORD

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n Friday 23 March, the English department welcomed the end of term with a delightfully sunny weekend spent in the tranquil surroundings of Stratford-upon-Avon. Our A2 English Literature students were lucky enough to have the opportunity to see a performance of Twelfth Night – their current exam text – in the world famous surroundings of the Royal Shakespeare Theatre. Shakespeare’s play deals with issues of love, loss and reunion, producing a performance which was alternately entertaining, hilarious, moving, disturbing and – thanks to Malvolio’s PVC yellow stockings – truly unforgettable! As well as the performance, we were able to retrace Shakespeare’s footsteps through his home town, visiting his childhood home on Henley Street; witnessing the site of his later home, New Place, and ending with his grave in the grounds of Holy Trinity Church. LJP

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NATIONAL MEDIA MUSEUM

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n a cold and snowy February day the ICT department and A level groups visited the exciting National Media Museum in Bradford. The museum is an excellent facility, focusing on all aspects of media and technology; from television over the decades to gaming and the evolution of animation in films, from the Aardman Studios to the early cartoons and the latest PIXAR productions, using the finest computer animation. The students enjoyed the interactive nature of the day, being able to operate the TV cameras and experience cinema production in its early forms, to the superb IMAX 3D cinema which left us in awe of being able to almost ‘touch’ the beautiful animals in the Born to be Wild film. The developments of cinema in all its various forms continues to amaze us and was highly appropriate for the pupils’ A level course, giving them a chance to observe rapid advancements in modern technology. An excellent day out for all involved! HTA

PLATFORM GAMES EXPOSITION

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n March, a selection of U6 and L6 ICT students were once again invited to attend the Platform Games Expos in Hull. The event is hosted each year by Garth-West and other business leaders in the Gaming and Design industry, from Microsoft to Nokia, write Forreset Cheung and Josh Male (U6). Thirteen of us set off to the University of Hull in the morning. Apart from a delay due to Mrs Alexander getting lost in the journey, we managed to arrive at the University of Hull, Computer Science Department on time. The conference showcases some of the game industry’s biggest companies, featuring displays from Sony, Microsoft and Ubisoft, to name a few. The conference also featured talks about emerging technologies and displays of retro games. Throughout the day, Josh Male and James Reckitt (U6) experienced the brand new iPad 3 and raced on the driving simulators! Our football expert, Ruth Tyrrell (U6), managed to beat Tom Rhodes (U6) on FIFA Street 3 on Xbox; Alex Stevenson (U6) had a play on Rayman Raving Rabbits on the Xbox Kinect and was featured on BBC News on the same night. As well as some new innovations, there was a room dedicated to the past of gaming; including Pacman, Space Invaders and Super Mario which Forrest Cheung did really badly on! As well as playing on consoles, students attended talks on the future of gaming, one in particular from Onlive on cloud gaming; and were privileged to listen to some live cover bands. Overall, the group of us had so much fun on the day and we are grateful to Mr West for providing us with the opportunity to attend this inspirational and educational trip. THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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KRAKOW

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e arrived at a snowy Krakow and booked ourselves into the Wielopole Hotel, situated between the old city centre and the historical Jewish district, Kazimierz. The district dates back to the 14th century and once had a thriving Jewish community of 65,000. However, only one working synagogue remains in Kazimierz (the Remuh Synagogue) which caters for the needs of the 200 practising Jews who live there today. Gosia, our guide, gave us an excellent insight into the Jewish life of the city. She showed us around three different synagogues, one of which had a Jewish graveyard and a wall surrounding it that was made of Jewish gravestones that were destroyed during the war. Although Kazimierz is small, there is still plenty to see, such as Jewish restaurants, shops and museums. We ended our tour at the Galicia Museum which combines art and photographic exhibitions about Jewish life in Poland with a very good coffee shop!

Auschwitz is about an hour’s drive from Krakow. The bitter cold and snow added to the bleak atmosphere of the camps and seeing the ‘Arbeit Macht Frei’ sign above the camp gates, that iconic image of Auschwitz, set the sombre tone of the day. Auschwitz and Birkenhau are very different experiences. Auschwitz, with most of the original buildings in-tact following the Soviet liberation of the camp, is compact, claustrophobic and intense. Birkenhau, on the other hand, is a vast area (400 acres) with few remains of the original buildings (destroyed by the Nazis before evacuating in 1945). From the watchtower at the entrance to the camp you get a sense of the overwhelming, industrial scale of ‘the final solution’. The mission of the Auschwitz Museum is to ensure future generations, knowing what happened here, will never let genocide like it occur again. On the second evening, we had some free time to wander around the city including the beautiful main square, Rynek Glowny. We all explored the city, some visiting the fantastic St Mary’s Church and doing a little shopping in the indoor markets that sold everything from reindeer skins to rabbi figurines to ‘I love Polski’ T-shirts. You could also pick up a very decent hot chocolate! (I sense a recurring theme here, Miss Young! Ed) Krakow and the Kazimierz district are fantastic places to visit; vibrant, youthful and positive. A visit here balances recognition of the past with an uplifting sense of the very best things that society can offer. HMY

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In the evening, we had an opportunity to become further immersed in Jewish culture when we visited the Ariel restaurant: a typical Jewish restaurant with kosher food and fantastic Klezmer music. The food was rather different (stuffed goosenecks was one of the restaurant’s specialities, but the Passover Cheesecake was pretty decent). The décor was unusual, including a Fawlty Towers-esque Moose on one wall, all of which added to a thoroughly enjoyable experience.

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Auschwitz is compact, claustrophobic and intense


HOLY ISLAND Our group arrived on Holy Island at the beginning of half term to enjoy two days of the peace and tranquillity offered by this remote island, off the Northumbrian coast. On the way up we were fortunate enough to be able to visit Durham Cathedral. We were blown away by the detail in the architecture of the building, and the feeling of spirituality which was exuded by this magnificent place, writes Ralph Pillmoor (L6).

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aving arrived, at the beginning and end of each day, we would go to the basement, later known as ‘Rev Rob’s Rave Cave’, for meditation and prayers, which helped us to reflect over the time we spent on the island. This experience was enhanced by our walks around the island, during which we discovered the Elizabethan fortress of Lindisfarne Castle which was originally built to protect the harbour. Further walks revealed the natural beauty of this part of the coast line, providing great inspiration for the members of the group who were undertaking photography assignments. In order to strengthen the bond between us we were encouraged to express our thoughts and aspirations, which helped us to subsequently open up and share our beliefs with each other. Following this, each evening we had the opportunity to participate in discussions about our beliefs, looking specifically at the Christian faith from various perspectives. The varied contributions provided much material for our later reflections.

On the more active front, we visited the beach and I will not mention the name of the person who got caught out by a rogue wave, but you know who you are, don’t you, Cal! The sand dunes in particular provided great entertainment, and football was a regular feature of our sporting activities whilst on the island. Part of the island’s uniqueness is that access is subject to the tides and this gave us the sense that we were very much under the control of the elements; and, for us, contributed greatly to the feeling of spirituality that the name of the island invokes. The general opinion of the group was that this was a wonderful opportunity to relax and unwind before our forthcoming exams. The bonds that we created gave a feeling of mutual support between both ourselves and teaching staff. Our thanks go to Reverend Roberts and Miss Young for making the trip possible.

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SOUTH AFRICA After a long two years of waiting, we finally met on Monday 13 August for our tour to South Africa. Everyone looked fresh in their pristine tracksuits. 23 hours and 9673km later, we arrived in Cape Town to blustery winter weather, writes Tom Slater (5WIL).

That night, everyone billeted with the opposition, which was a great experience (although better for some than others). The next day we visited the Adonis Musati project, where we saw how our fundraising money was

In the afternoon, we visited Cape Point which gave us spectacular views to remember.

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My favourite part of the tour was meeting everyone from Port Rex School. They were really nice and were fascinated by our accents!

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he first full day held our first rugby match against Wyneberg Boys High School. The rain had turned the pitch into a mud bath, which resulted in a forward dominated game. The whole team had to dig deep, showing massive commitment in both defence and attack. This effort was rewarded with an excellent team try scored by James Pavlou. Wyneberg equalled but we crossed the line again to put us up 10-5, as all conversions were missed in a difficult swirling wind. Towards the end of the game, we suffered our first major injury as I dislocated my shoulder. My playing tour was at an end. In the final moments, Wyneberg scored again to equalise with a 10-10 full time score. We had mixed emotions about this result because a win was definitely within our grasp for much of the match.

The following day, the boys played a township team, winning 49-0 against a developing side, whilst the girls bought banners for out SA vs ARG rugby match at Newlands in the Rugby Championship. After the boys’ fixture, everyone regrouped for a township tour. It was Katie Stuart incredible to see how those in the township lived, and we all felt privileged to have the opportunity for such an experience. We also had what some people described as ‘the best meal on tour’. That evening, we travelled to Newlands Stadium to watch the Springboks take on the Pumas in a rather poor display of rugby. Although the game was poor, it was a great experience to see what rugby means to Southern Hemisphere fans. A few days later, we drove to the town of Stellenbosch, where we played fixtures against Stellenbosch High. The boys played out a 20-10 win in a challenging match, putting our physicality to the test. The whole team played outstandingly, one of the highlights being the ‘The Bedford Shuffle’. This match, against tough opposition in a beautiful setting, was a real confidence booster for the rest of the tour. After the matches, we enjoyed a traditional South African ‘braai’ before another night of billets.

being spent. This had a significant impact on the party because it made us realize the plight of many people who have nothing. The girls had a match in the afternoon, winning hockey 12-0 against Bergvliet High School. Another night with billets followed, which was again hugely enjoyable Playing Port because of the insights into South Elizabeth was a African life and the hospitality of our hosts. fantastic experience.

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They performed their spartan war cry while we stood in a line, shoulder to shoulder, before facing them in one of our most challenging encounters.

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Charlie Sleigh

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The next day, we went on a peninsular tour with our trusty bus driver Russell and the excellent Marcopolo Sleepliner, which was probably the comfiest coach the majority of us had been on. We started off from Hoat Bay on a boat trip to Seal Island. The sea was more than a little rough and the lesser sailors among us were soon revealed, with a number of breakfasts becoming fish food. However, it was enjoyed by most!


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On the last night of safari, it was great seeing everyone giving out presents and celebrating the trip together.

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Hayley Harrison

After Stellenbosch, we travelled for a full day to get to Knysna River Club. Our journey was broken up by a stop off at an ostrich farm. The ostriches were interesting, and the ostrich riding was even better. However, the most memorable part of the day was Mr Houltham losing a pair of Y-fronts from his tracksuit trouser leg while sitting on an ostrich!

It was fun when we went kayaking down river and we were allowed to swim in the sea!

The Knysna River Club was definitely the best accommodation so far and we enjoyed a great two day stay there. A highlight of the tour was spending a day doing water-sports in canoes and standing Ellie Medley boards. We had a canoe safari down a river to its mouth and swam in the Indian Ocean, which was much colder than we expected! GCSE results day also came at Knysna, but fortunately there were many more happy faces than sad, so we had a celebratory dinner for their success. From Knysna we moved on to Port Elizabeth, stopping off at the Addo Elephant Park. It was interesting to see and learn about the elephants, the really are amazing animal. Once in Port Elizabeth, we settled in to the Pine Lodge hotel. After such a long day, we were all shattered so it was an early night for the games the next day. In the penultimate game of the tour, we faced tough opposition in all sports. In the rugby, it is fair to say it was not our finest hour in defence, despite a heroic effort from Will Sayer. Despite an under-average performance, we learned many lessons from our defeat to Victoria Park High School about South African rugby. That night we enjoyed a meal together in the Pine Lodge restaurant.

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Departing East London was a slight relief, especially when we arrived at

the Kariega Game Reserve, 8000 hectares which is home to lion, elephant, leopard, rhino, hippo giraffe, zebra, eland, wildebeest, waterbuck and many other antelope. We settled into beautiful chalets overlooking a huge gorge with spectacular views and then went out on our first game drive. This was an incredible experience, with the majority of tourists seeing the South African bush and its animals at their finest. This helped us to appreciate the variety that the country has to offer. On our final night, we had a banquet including a variety of African meats such as Kudu. This was followed by the prizegiving ceremony. It is fair to say that Dougie will enjoy his parting present… On our final morning, we set out for the last game drive. We learned exactly what the ‘mating season’ really meant, seeing lions and ostriches, as well as buffalo, elephants and giraffe. It was truly an eye opening experience and everyone had a fantastically great time. Once we returned, it was time to say goodbye to Africa and we set off on our long journey home. It started off well, with Liam being relieved of certain equipment by the airport security!

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After P E, we went to East London and the completely inappropriately named Majestic Hotel, although we made the best of it in typically Pock fashion. On our final game day we went to Port Rex High School, where the girls played netball in the Going out for a afternoon before a late rugby match meal to celebrate under floodlights. The pitch was in an amphitheatre, which felt like a Katie’s birthday cauldron, because of the noise of home was definitely one supporters cheering from the stands. of the high This created an electric atmosphere, points! which was reflected in the outstanding Emelia West performance on the pitch. The players put everything on the line, using all the lessons we had learned over the past four matches. We emerged victorious at the final whistle, winning 20-10. An unusual highlight of this game was the JT ‘powerslide’, proving that four years of physio training provides many diverse skills. It was definitely the best sporting experience of many of our careers, and a match which will never be forgotten.

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Everything was amazing! But the safari and the watersports were the very best days of all. Annabel Fawcett

A day and a bit later we arrived back at school. South Africa has left its stamp on each of us, with highlights being Cape Town, the sport, Knysna and the game reserve. It was an absolute once in a lifetime experience and a huge thank you must go to Miss Metcalfe, Mr Houltham, Mr and Mrs McDougall, Mrs Danby and JT. It wouldn’t have been possible without such hard work! THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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DESTINATIONS OF 2012 LEAVERS

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Name

Surname

University

Degree course

Mustafa

Alsudani

Northumbria University

Applied Sciences Extended

Sophie

Appleyard

Harper Adams University College

Food and Consumer Studies

Anup

Bahik

Staffordshire University

Marketing Management

Imogen

Barker

Newcastle University

Financial Mathematics

Georgina

Beevers

Newcastle University

Agriculture (deferred choice)

Samuel

Berridge

University of Birmingham

Modern Languages

James

Bisson

University of Nottingham

Mathematics and Management Studies

Thomas

Brown

Sheffield Hallam University

Psychology and Sociology

Thomas

Burke

University of Sheffield

History

Doruk

Canbolat

University of Sheffield

Business Management

Edward

Chappelow

University of Birmingham

French Studies and Mathematics

Jonathan

Chu

University of Warwick

Economics

Liam

Corbally

Oxford Brookes University

International Relations and Politics

Isabelle

Cowley

Leeds Metropolitan University

Marketing

Jake

Dale

Newcastle University

Ancient History

Samuel

Dawson

Plymouth University

International Business with Spanish

Jeremy

Deas

Sheffield Hallam University

Criminology

David

Dickinson

University of York

Chemistry

Niall

Donnan

University of Sheffield

International Politics and Security Studies

Katie

Donohue

University of Birmingham

Theology and Religion

Sophie

Duncan

University of Leeds

Theology and Religious Studies

Sophia

Eggleston

University of Hull

Chemistry with Molecular Medicine

Samuel

Elcock

University of Reading

Film and Theatre

Michael

Evans

Newcastle University

Business with International Management

Lawrence

Fok

Durham University

Accounting and Finance

Jake

Galley

University of Hull

Geography

Imogen

Henderson

University of Leeds

Art and Design

Henry

Hetherton

Imperial College London

Medicine

Rebecca

Heuck

Harper Adams University College

Rural Enterprise and Land Management

William

Hick

Harper Adams University College

Agriculture with Mechanisation

Matthew

Horrocks

Northumbria University

Design for Industry

Alexandra

Howard

University College London

Biological Sciences

Rosemary

Hull

University of Liverpool

Nursing

Hannah

Hutchinson

University of Birmingham

Modern Languages

Agnieszka

Jakubowska

Queen Mary, University of London

Medicine

Deferred entry

2013

2013

2013

Amy

Kendall

Oxford Brookes University

Business and Marketing Management

Stephanie

Kerr

University of Chester

Geography

Rebecca

Knight

Nottingham Trent University

Fashion Communication and Promotion

2013

Thomas

Launders

Sheffield Hallam University

Product Design

2013

Harry

Lawton

Oxford Brookes University

Real Estate Management

2013

Serena

Leach

University of Reading

Rural Property Management

Harriet

Lord

Northumbria University

Applied Sciences Extended

2013

George

Luck

University of Westminster

History and Politics

2013

Alexander

Lyon

Northumbria University

Criminology and Forensic Science

2013

Joshua

Male

University of Edinburgh

Computer Science

Ellie

McCabe

Oxford Brookes University

Medical Science

Joseph

McNelis

University of Nottingham

Physics

John

Micklem Cooper

Heriot-Watt University

Structural Engineering with Architectural Design

Oliver

Norgate

University of Birmingham

Political Science

Georgia

Oddell

King's College London

French and Hispanic Studies

THE POCKLINGTONIAN


Name

Surname

University

Degree course

Elizabeth

Oughtred

University of Southampton

Mathematics with Physics

Alexandra

Pallier

University of Hull

Psychology

Lewis

Pearson

Newcastle University

Business Management

Christopher

Pratt

University of Leeds

Civil and Structural Engineering

Chloe

Rayner

Northumbria University

History and Politics

James

Reckitt

University of York

Law

Laura

Reeson

University of Bedfordshire

Sports Studies

Oliver

Richmond

University of Kent

French and Italian

Luke

Sewell

University of Hull

Computer Science

Jacob

Sherwood

Northumbria University

French and Spanish

Luke

Simpson

Newcastle University

Agri-Business Management

Tom

Sowersby

Harper Adams University College

Agriculture

Deferred entry

2013

2013

Sophie

Stuart

University College London

Pharmacy

2013

Olivia

Swaine

Manchester Metropolitan University

Criminology/Psychology

2013

Ho Fung

Tang

London School of Economics and Political Science

Management

James

Tomkinson

Northumbria University

Criminology

Sarah

Veitch

Sheffield Hallam University

Business and Marketing

Nathan

Waddell

Aston University

French and Spanish

Jack

Whitlock

Bath Spa University

Business & Management (Marketing)

Anna

Wilkinson

University of Sheffield

Medicine

Benjamin

Woodhouse

University of Sheffield

History and Politics Communication and Public Relations

Emily

Young

Northumbria University

George

Wagstaff

Eligible for Clearing, but not used

Sze Hang

Wong

Eligible for Clearing, but reapplying 2013

Robert

Arnold

University of Applied Sciences, FHDW, Bergisch-Gladbach

Business Management/International Business

Forrest

Cheung

University of Hong Kong

Psychology and Counselling

Jeanny

Law

Chinese University of Hong Kong

Nursing

2013

University abroad

Chin Him

Ng

University of Hong Kong

Engineering

Jerome

Remblance

Charles University, Prague

Medicine

Emma

Hessay

York College

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design

Georgina

Lucas

York College

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design

Lucy

Soanes

The Academy of Contemporary Music

Music Business Degree

Gerald

Fenton

Employment

George

Hetherton

Assistant technician in a recording studio

Martin

McVey

Applying to join the Army

Ryan

Phillips

Applying to join the Navy

Charlotte

Prescott

Trainee Associate, PWC (School Leavers Scheme)

Other courses

Employment

Gap Year Joseph

Bedford

Gap Year, applying in 2013

Guy

Harland

Gap Year, applying in 2013

Simon

Hodgson

Gap Year

Andrew

Johnson

Gap Year, applying in 2013

Juliet

May

Gap Year, applying in 2013

Iain

Moorhouse

Gap Year, applying in 2013

Theo-James

Moulton

Gap Year

Thomas

Rhodes

Gap Year, applying in 2013

Thomas

Roberts

Gap Year, applying in 2013

Georgina

Sleigh

Gap Year, applying in 2013

Alexander

Stevenson

Gap Year

Ruth

Tyrrell

Gap Year

Freddie

Wride

Gap Year, applying for Drama School in 2013 THE POCKLINGTONIAN

107


Exit, pursued by a bear!

STAFF OFF DUTY

Double trouble... Hmm. Not too sure about this burger...

Hughes, Long and McNelly safely behind bars on Christmas Day. Phew! The Long view...

Mr Galloway dons the official Swaziland Olympic uniform, presented for his outstanding service to their National team.

A Reverend's home is his castle....

Mr Andrews, firmly bricked in.

Three escapees, armed and dangerous.

108

THE POCKLINGTONIAN

Pizza Express Delivery!


Nuts!

Mrs Scott-Somers wins the MFL prize!

See ya Jimmy! His sporran tends to be worn more effectively on the left.

Mr Taylor spots Something Nasty on the Stage.

Mrs Peel's attempt to rob the Tuck Shop failed miserably.

The 5th form finally locate Mr Newhouse, after a year of searching.

Mr Kettlewell laughs off the fact that no-one has turned up for Party at Pock.

Mrs Wilson should have gone to Specsavers.

The Mitre Been. I could've been a contender... just give me a chance... oh go on!

Mr Dare ready for take-off. Mwha ha ha. When I pull this plug, they'll all be history!

Orchardians Unite! THE POCKLINGTONIAN

109


Pocklington School West Green Pocklington YORK YO42 2NJ Tel +44 1759 321200 www.pocklingtonschool.com


The Pocklingtonian 2011/12