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First-Year Connections

Department of Communication

Welcome from the Chair

Welcome to the Department of Communication at Cornell University. As you know, Cornell offers a wealth of recreational and learning opportunities. Whether you need information on your education and career options, internships, the vast array of extra-curricular activities, the hundreds of clubs and organizations, outings to explore the Finger Lake’s spectacular beauty, or classes, the Department of Communication can show you the way. We encourage you to get to know Andrea Poag, our Undergraduate Program Coordinator. Andrea and the faculty are here to help enrich your Cornell experience and support you through your academic and personal development. We want your ideas and feedback, either through sending us an e-mail at alp232@cornell.edu or through individual appointments with faculty. Whatever your interest or concern, please do not hesitate to contact me, your faculty advisor, or others in the department. Once again, welcome! I hope to see you on campus soon.

Geri Gay, Ph.D. Kenneth J. Bissett Professor and Chair of the Department of Communication

Summer 2013 This Packet Contains: • • • • • • • • • • •

Welcome From the Chair Advising and Support Structure Orientation Information Pre-Enrollment Dates Communication-Specific Orientation First-Year Academic Planning & Steps to July pre-enrollment (Freshman & Transfers) Communication Degree Checklist Sample Tracks to Graduation Department of Communication Connections How to Become a Succesful Cornellian Campus Resources & Links

Department of Communication Advising Contact Information Your first point of contact once you arrive on campus will be your assigned Faculty Advisor; however, throughout the summer, your contact will be Andrea Poag, Undergraduate Program Coordinator. This will ensure that all students are receiving the same information regarding preenrollment and allow us to get to know you better so we can pair you with a Faculty Advisor that is more in line with your communication interests. Andrea will be able to answer all of your questions regarding course enrollment and planning for Fall 2013. Email Andrea at alp232@cornell.edu

336 Kennedy Hall | Ithaca, NY 14853-4203 | 607-255-2601 | http://communication.cals.cornell.edu


Advising and Support Structure Cornell is a large university and it is important for you to find the places that you feel connected to on campus. Over your time at Cornell, you will find that numerous groups and places that make you feel at home. The Department of Communication wants to be one of these places for you. The academic structure of Cornell University has many levels. Within the University, seven colleges serve as home to numerous academic departments. The Department of Communication is housed within the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, which is referred to as CALS. Depending on your needs, there will be times when you will interact with each of the levels. With this in mind, the Department of Communication has support in place to help you structure your time at Cornell and is typically the best place to start with any question. Below you will find a short description of the three main places to gather information about your CALS requirements and your Communication degree. CALS Student Services Office The CALS Student Services Office works with all students within the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. As quoted from their most recent brochure, “CALS Student Services, located in 140 Roberts Hall, provides a one-stop resource for many services that will help you succeed as a CALS student. We are here to assist you with advising and academic resources, time and stress management, study abroad opportunities, academic record management, career exploration, connecting with the CALS community, and much, much more.� 140 Roberts Hall - cals-studentservices@cornell.edu http://cals.cornell.edu/academics/advising/ - 607-255-2257 Kennedy Hall - Home of the Department of Communication

Department of Communication Undergraduate Program Coordinator The Undergraduate Program Coordinator, Andrea Poag serves as an added level of advising support. Andrea can help you with academic planning, answer questions about policies and procedures, provide information about campus resources, and serve as a reference point for academic issues. If you have a question regarding your degree or an academic issue, do not hestitate to contact Andrea. If she does not have the answer, she will locate the person or resource that best suited for the your specific situation. 334A Kennedy Hall - alp232@cornell.edu - 607-254-4789 Department of Communication Faculty Advisor All students have been assigned a Faculty Advisor within the Department of Communication. Your Faculty Advisor will help you traverse your major and is a wonderful sounding board. He or she will help you plan your future coures schedules and discuss your career aspirations. Your Faculty Advisor is the best option for discussing career goals, research interests, and internship ideas. Students can view who their Faculty Advisor is in D.U.S.T. If you have any questions regarding your Faculty Advisor please speak with Andrea Poag.

Places to Visit for Academic Support Faculty Advisor Department of Communication

University-Wide Academic Support Resources

YOU

College of Agriculture & Life Sciences (CALS) Student Services

Undergraduate Program Coordinator Department of Communication

336 Kennedy Hall | Ithaca, NY 14853-4203 | 607-255-2601 | http://communication.cals.cornell.edu


Orientation Information

To be better prepared for orientation and your first semester at Cornell, plan to take time to work through each of the websites below. You will continue to work with many of the sites throughout your time at Cornell, so bookmark them now! Contact your Faculty Advisor or Andrea Poag if you have any questions. Cornell University First-Year Information Website • Housing Information • Financial Aid Information • Student ID Card Request • Dates and Deadlines • Swim Test Information • Health History & Immunizations Compliance • Request Disability Services & Accommodations • Parking & Transportation CALS To Do List: From Orientation to Graduation Website Some of the topics covered include: • Activate your Cornell NetID • Student Center • How to Pre-Enroll in Classes • Update your Biography • CALS Orientation Information CALS First-Year Student Information Website Some of the topics covered include: • How to Enroll in Classes • AP Credits • How to Change your Classes • Academic Calendar • CALS Distribution Requirements • DUST • CALS Registrar vs. University Registrar University Course Enrollment Information Website Some of the topics covered include: • Definition of Credit Hours • Student Center Link • Pre-enrollment Information • Course Add/Drop

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Pre-Enrollment Dates

It is important to take advantage of your opportunity to pre-enroll in courses in July. You will have time to adjust your courses and schedule during orientation and for the first couple of weeks in the fall, but we encourage you to have you schedule finalized as soon as possible. Pre-enrollment Starts: July 11 starting at 9am (EST) Pre-enrollment Ends: July 20th at 4:30pm (EST) To gain access to course enrollment, go to the Student Center at http://studentcenter.cornell.edu

Communication Specific Orientation

Monday, August 26th 10am-3pm - Attendance Required Location: Monday, August 26th in Malott Hall 253

*

Cornell offers an extensive orientation for new students to become acquainted with the University, our resources, and our major. You should have received information about campus-wide orientation already. As part of the Cornell orientation events, you will attend the Department of Communication orientation on Monday, August 26th in Malott Hall 253. This is your initial opportunity to connect with your major, learn about what the Department has to offer, and have your questions answered. A panel discussion with current Communication students will kick off our orientation program, followed by an introduction to the major. You will also meet with your Faculty Advisor over lunch to discuss your interests.

If you have not completed the Communication New Student Survey, please do so as soon as possible. http://tinyurl.com/CommunicationNewStudentSurvey “The Communication faculty are a great group: all the professors are distinguished researchers, and what’s even better, they know how to enjoy life. You’ll like them!” -- Linda Van Buskirk, Communication Senior Lecturer


Freshman Academic Planning To graduate on schedule, you will need to take required courses during your first few semesters on campus. We strongly recommend that incoming students enroll in a maximum of 12-15 credits for their first semester at Cornell to help ensure a successful transition to your new environment. To view all courses offered at Cornell for fall 2013 visit the Courses of Study online catalog. 1. All entering Communication majors will be pre-enrolled in our introductory course: COMM 1101: Cases in Communication. You will not need to add this course yourself during pre-enrollment because we will do this for you. If you have not been added to this course by July 15th, please contact Andrea Poag. 2. The Distribution Requirements for the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences require you to take a range of Physical and Life Sciences courses. In the drop down menu choose either Physical & Life Sciences or Introductory Life Sciences/Biology depending on which requirement you are trying to fulfill. You should focus on the ones highlighted in green because those are non-science major science courses. http://oap.cals.cornell.edu/searchDist.aspx 3. Our department builds on ideas that come from the fields of psychology and sociology. We recommend taking either Psychology (PSYCH) 1101or Sociology (SOC) 1101. http://courses.cornell.edu/content.php?catoid=18&navoid=4312 4. In addition, you should select a First Year Writing Seminar from the John S. Knight Institute for Writing in the Disciplines for an additional 3 credits. These courses are selected through a system of ballots, unlike other courses. You will find more information on how the balloting works and the 2013 list of course options at the following website. http://www.arts.cornell.edu/knight_institute/fws/fws.htm In addition to these courses, you may want to enroll in a Physical Education (PE) course to begin completing your Physical Education requriements. http://pe.cornell.edu/physed/ First Semester (Freshman) Pre-Enrollment Worksheet Course Choice Credits Day(s) Time COMM 1101 3 MWF 9:05am-9:55am

First Semester COMM 1101 Physical & Life Sciences PSYCH 1101 or SOC 1101 First Year Writing Seminar Physical Education Additional CALS Distribution Requirement

Location TBA

If you have credit for some of the suggested courses above, contact your Faculty Advisor for additional options.Visit the CALS website to learn more about credit for AP courses. Typically CALS accepts AP scores of 4 and 5 as credit. The pre-enrollment period: 9am EST July 10, 2013 to 4pm EST July 19, 2013.

The four steps below must be completed to ensure a successful enrollment:

1. Click here to review the 6 minute Welcome to CALS video 2. Activate your netID (It is essential to activate your Cornell email. Advisors and the University will use your Cornell email to communicate with you throughout your undergraduate career.) 3. Review schedule requirements 4. Review the Physical Education requirement

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“Be open-minded; there is something you can learn from every single person in this department.� -- Poppy McLeod, Communication Associate Professor


Transfer Academic Planning

Transfer students should attend orientation and speak with your Faculty Advisor to map out your semesters at Cornell. You should have received information from the CALS Registrar’s Office regarding your transfer credit and how it fits within the CALS Distribution requirements. Please contact the CALS registrar (607-255-2257) if you have not received this information or if you would like to speak with one of their advisors during orientation to verify your credits and how they will count towards the CALS Distribution Requirements. Please bring any documentation that they have provided with you to the Department of Communication orientation. To view all courses offered at Cornell for fall 2013 visit the Courses of Study online catalog. During the Communication orientation you will be able to meet with your faculty advisor to discuss your transfer credits within Communication, review your pre-enrolled courses, and consider options for you for the fall. You will be able to pre-enroll in courses from 9am EST July 10, 2013 to 4pm EST July 19, 2013. We encourage you to use the knowledge of your previous course work, in conjunction with the Communication requirements and enroll in courses that you feel best fit your academic plan. You can find the Communication requirements at http://communication.cals.cornell.edu/cals/comm/academics/undergraduate/loader.cfm?csModule=security/ getfile&PageID=1018570. While the courses you pre-enroll in may change once you meet with your Faculty Advisor, it is better to pre-enroll in courses than to wait until orientation. We encourage you to have your schedule finalized as soon as possible. All Transfer Communication majors will be pre-enrolled in our introductory course (COMM 1101: Cases in Communication) unless your records indicate that you have a course that will count in this area. If you find that you have been enrolled in this course and believe that you already have this credit, please contact Andrea Poag. You may remove the course from your enrollment once it is verified by your Faculty Advisor that you have received credit for this course. Transfer Pre-Enrollment Worksheet First Semester Course Choice Credits Day(s) COMM 1101 COMM 1101 3 MWF (will be allowed to drop with proven credit)

Time 9:05am-9:55am

Location TBA

Students are allowed to apply 12 credits of transfer Communication coursework towards their major requirements: 9 credits towards core Communication coursework and 3 credits at the 3000/4000 level. If you have a Communication course that you would like reviewed please bring a copy of the course syllabi with you to orientation. The pre-enrollment period: 9am EST July 10, 2013 to 4pm EST July 19, 2013.

The three steps below must be completed to ensure a successful enrollment:

1. Click here to review the 7 minute Welcome to CALS video 2. Activate your netID (It is essential to activate your Cornell email. Advisors and the University will use your Cornell email to communicate with you throughout your undergraduate career.) 3. Review schedule requirements

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“Save some time (perhaps by taking fewer credits the first semester) for getting to know Ithaca, Cornell, our Department, your new friends, and most of all... yourself!” -- Sahara Byrne, Communication Assistant Professor


ADVISING CHECKLIST HECKLIST The following checklist can help you track your progress toward completing your Communication Major withinA theDVISING Department ofC Communication at

Communication Degree Checklist

Cornell University. Students should ALWAYS refer to DUST (https://dust.cals.cornell.edu/) for the most up-to-date information regarding their progress in the following CALS distribution and you credit hour requirements for graduation. Please this form to the bestthe of your ability byofprojecting when you The checklistareas can help track your progress toward completing your complete Communication Major within Department Communication at will enroll in the required courses. We ALWAYS strongly encourage you(https://dust.cals.cornell.edu/) to meet with your Faculty Advisor or Andrea Poag, Undergraduate (alp232), to in Cornell University. Students should refer to DUST for the most up-to-date information Coordinator regarding their progress verify your academicareas progress graduation plan. the CALS distribution andand credit hour requirements for graduation. Please complete this form to the best of your ability by projecting when you will enroll in the required courses. We strongly encourage you to meet with your Faculty Advisor or Andrea Poag, Undergraduate Coordinator (alp232), to Name: ___________________________ ID Number: __________ NetID: _________ Reviewed by: ________________ Date: ____________ verify your academic progress and graduation plan.

Name: ___________________________ ID Number: __________ NetID: _________ Reviewed by: ________________ Date: ____________

CALS DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS

NOTES

Physical and Life Sciences - 18 credits Semester CALS DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS Intro Life Sciences/Biology Physical Life Sciences - 18 credits Semester Intro Lifeand Sciences/Biology Intro LifeorSciences/Biology Physics Chemistry Intro Life Sciences/Biology Quantitative Literacy (may be COMM statistics) Physics or Chemistry Student's Choice Quantitative Literacy (may be COMM statistics) Student's Choice Student's Choice & Humanities - 12 credits Social Sciences Semester Student's Choice (D) Human Diversity Social Sciences Semester Student's Choice& Humanities - 12 credits Human Diversity Student's Choice(D) Student's Student'sChoice Choice Student's Choice Written and Oral Communication - 9 credits Semester Student's Choice Written Expression

Written Oral Communication - 9 credits Written and Expression

Semester

Grade Grade

NOTES

Your Degree can be broken down into three main parts: 1. CALS Distribution Requirements

Grade Grade

Grade Grade

2. Department of Communication Requirements (including outside concentration) 3. Electives

Written Expression Oral or Written (may be COMM 2010) Written Expression DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENTS Oral or Written (may be COMM 2010) Communication Core Courses - 15 credits Semester Grade Introductory Focus Area - 6 Credits Semester Grade REQUIREMENTS COMM 2200 (CMS) – Media Communication (F) COMM 1101 – Cases in Communication (F)DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION Communication Core Courses - 15 credits Semester Grade Introductory - 6&Credits Semester Grade COMM 1300 – Visual Communication (S) COMM 2450 Focus (CIT) –Area Comm Technology (F, SS) COMM 2200 (CMS) – Media Communication (F) COMM 1101 – Cases in Communication (F) COMM 2760 (CSI) – Persuasion & Social Influence (S) COMM 2010 – Oral Communication (F,S, SS) COMM Communication (S) COMM – Comm & Technology (F, SS) & Health (S) COMM1300 2310––Visual Writing About Communication (F, S) COMM2450 2850(CIT) (CESH) – Comm, Environ., Science COMM 2760 (CSI) – Persuasion & Social Influence (S) COMM Communication SS) COMM2010 2820––Oral Research Methods in(F,S, Communication Studies (F) COMM 2310 – Writing About Communication S) 2850 (CESH) – Comm, Communication Upper-Level - 9 credits (level(F, 3000+) Semester Grade COMM Communication Focus Area –Environ., 6 CreditsScience & Health (S) Semester Grade COMM Course2820 #1 – Research Methods in Communication Studies (F) Course #1 Communication Upper-Level - 9 credits (level 3000+) Semester Grade Communication Focus Area – 6 Credits Semester Grade Course #2 Course #2 Course Course #1 Course#1 #3 * See reverse for list of courses that will complete each focus area Course #2 an additional 3 credits of a third focus area. Course #2 May count Students must earn a B- or better in the Introductory Focus Area course to declare Will not#3 count: 3020, 3030, 3032, 3040, 3070, 3980, 4960, 4980 or any Writing courses. Course *that Seeparticular reverse for listArea. of courses that will complete each focus area Focus Maxcount of 3 credits from 4970, 4990,ofora 4991 May an additional 3 credits third focus area. Students earn a B- or better in the Introductory Focus Area course to declare may elect to4960, complete anany Outside OR themust Professional Development Concentration. Will not count: 3020, 3030, Students 3032, 3040, 3070, 3980, 4980 or WritingConcentration courses. that particular Focus Area. Max of 3 credits from 4970, 4990, or 4991 Please discuss both options with your Faculty Advisor to develop your plan.

may elect to complete an OutsideSemester Concentration the Professional Development Concentration. Outside ConcentrationStudents – 12 credits Grade OR Professional Development Concentration (PDC) Semester Grade Please discuss both options with your Faculty Advisor Course 1 Course 1 to develop your plan. Outside Semester Grade Professional Development Concentration (PDC) Semester Grade Course 2Concentration – 12 credits Course 2 Course Course Course13 Course13 Course Course Course24 Course24 Course 3 Course This option allows for students, in consultation with their advisor, to develop a The PDC3option, like the Outside Concentration, allows students to create their own Course 4 Course 4 concentration of related courses outside of the Department of Communication. The concentration of related courses focusing on Professional Development in concentration mayfor include courses from more with thantheir one major or to college as long This option allows students, in consultation advisor, develop a as it maintains thematic or disciplinary consistency. A formal minor or double major The concentration of related courses outside of the Department of Communication. satisfies the outside concentration. concentration may include courses from more than one major or college as long as it maintains thematic or disciplinary consistency. A formal minor or double major satisfies the outside concentration.

Statistics - 3 credits Statistics Statistics - 3 credits ELECTIVES (required Statistics

Semester Semester to reach 120 credits to graduate)

ELECTIVES (required to reach 120 credits to graduate)

Grade Grade

Communication. Students couldConcentration, choose from the approved list of The PDC option, like the Outside allows students to Professional create their own Development of courses within the Department of Communication concentration relatedoffered courses focusing on Professional Development inas well as courses across campus related Professional Development. must work Communication. Students couldtochoose from the approved listStudents of Professional with their advisors to offered verify that theythe areDepartment choosing the or approved Development courses within ofsatisfactory Communication as well as combination courses. courses acrossofcampus related to Professional Development. Students must work Communication options for the with their advisorsCourse to verify that they arePDC: choosing the satisfactory or approved COMM 3020,of3030, 3032, 3040, 3070, 4940 (Sustainability) and 4960. combination courses. Communication Course options for the PDC: COMM 3020, 3030, 3032, ACADEMIC 3040, 3070, 4940 (Sustainability) and 4960. RESOURCES

communication.cals.cornell.edu/ ACADEMIC RESOURCES courses.cornell.edu/ cals.cornell.edu/academics/registrar/ communication.cals.cornell.edu/ cals.cornell.edu/academics/advising/career/ courses.cornell.edu/ cals.cornell.edu/academics/registrar/ cals.cornell.edu/academics/advising/career/

336 Kennedy Hall | Ithaca, NY 14853-4203 | 607-255-2601 | http://communication.cals.cornell.edu


Focus Areas

Minimum of a B- is required in the corresponding Focus Area Introductory course in order to declare your desired focus area. Students will submit the Focus Area Declaration form by April of the sophomore year or no later than December of the junior year (for transfer students)

Communication Focus Areas Communication, Environment, Science, and Health (CESH) Intro Course: COMM 2850

Communication Media Studies (CMS) Intro Course: COMM 2200

Communication and Information Technology (CIT) Intro Course: COMM 2450

Communication and Social Influence (CSI) Intro Course: COMM 2760

Students focusing in CESH will investigate how communication influences public understanding of science, health, environmental, and risk-related issues. While exploring conceptual and theoretical issues, students will learn specific skills for communicating science, health, environmental, and risk information to a variety of audiences. Possible career paths include public information officer, science writer, environmental educator/outreach specialist, environmental or health-risk communicator, and business, legal and other graduate study. COMM 3760 Planning Communication Campaigns (S) (SBA) COMM 3210 Communication and the Environment (S, alt.) (SBA) – previously COMM 4210 COMM 4300 Ethics in New Media, Technology and Communication (S) COMM 4660 Public Communication of Science and Technology (S, alt.) (SBA) COMM 4860 Risk Communication (F) (SBA) Students focusing in CMS will investigate the forces that shape media in contemporary society, investigating how what we see and hear comes to be. They will also analyze and understand the psychological, social, and cultural processes that are in turn affected by media, from politics to entertainment to news to the very question of what we understand as real about ourselves and true about the world around us. Students may pursue careers in the media industries, in designing the laws and policies regarding media, in business, legal or other graduate study, or in the service of making media better; most of all, they will be more informed and astute citizens in a highly mediated world. COMM 3200 New Media and Society (S) (CA) COMM 3300 Media and Human Development (S) (SBA) COMM 4200 Public Opinion and Social Processes (S, alt.) (SBA) COMM 4220 Psychology of Entertainment Media (F) (SBA) COMM 4280 Communication Law (S) COMM 4300 Ethics in New Media, Technology and Communication (S) Students focusing in CIT explore the social and psychological dimensions of the design, use, and evaluation of communication and information technologies. Students explore the ways people relate to each other online, the uses of language in social media, the social practices and implications surrounding communication technologies, as well as, people's interface and information needs. Possible career paths include social media director, online marketing strategist, research analyst, user interface designer, software designer, usability specialist, campaign specialist, network organizer, as well as business, legal and other graduate study. COMM 3200 New Media and Society (S) (CA) COMM 3400 Psychology of Online Relationships (F) (SBA) COMM 3450 Human Computer Interaction Design (F) (SBA) COMM 3460 Online Communities (F) COMM 3650 Technology in Collaboration (S) (SBA) COMM 4220 Psychology of Entertainment Media (F) (SBA) COMM 4300 Ethics in New Media, Technology and Communication (S) COMM 4400 Advanced Human-Computer Interaction Design (S) (SBA) COMM 4450 Seminar in Computer-Mediated Communication (S) (SBA) COMM 4500 Language and Technology (S) (SBA) COMM 4650 Mobile Communication in Public Life (F) (CA) Students focusing in CSI will use communication principles to analyze issues and situations involving groups, organizations and selected audiences to design, implement, and evaluate appropriate communication programs. Courses stress the positive, ethical, and effective uses of communication in human affairs. This focus area would be appropriate for students interested in using communication to bring about change at the individual and societal level. Possible career paths include public relations, marketing communications, polling, human resources, governmental affairs, and business, legal and other graduate study. COMM 3100 Communication and Decision Making in Groups (S) (SBA) COMM 3110 Educational Psychology (F) COMM 3150 Organizational Communication: Theory and Practice (F) (CA) COMM 3400 Psychology of Online Relationships (F) (SBA) COMM 3460 Online Communities (F) COMM 3760 Planning Communication Campaigns (F) (SBA) COMM 4200 Public Opinion and Social Processes (S, alt.) (SBA) COMM 4280 Communication Law (S) COMM 4300 Ethics in New Media, Technology and Communication (S) COMM 4860 Risk Communication (F) (SBA)

Special Notes Regarding Countable Communication Courses: • COMM 3020, 3030, 3032, 3040, and 3070 will only count within the Professional Development Concentration or overall graduation but not towards COMM Upper Level coursework. • COMM 3980, 4960, 4980 will only count as overall credits towards graduation not as any Communication coursework. • COMM 3110 (Educational Psychology), COMM 3560 (Computing Cultures) and COMM 4840 (The Science of Behavior) may be used as towards the 9 credits of COMM Upper Level Elective. • COMM 4940 (Special Topics) may be repeated for credits when the topics are different. • Only 1 Communication course will be counted, if approved, from Study Abroad. • Only 12 credits of Communication coursework will be counted, if approved, from transfer coursework. (9 credits at the 1000/2000 level and 3 at the 3000/4000 level).

Degree Checklist 6/21/13


Sample Tracks to Graduation

It is extremely important for students to work with their Faculty Advisor and/or the Undergraduate Program Coordinator to develop their path to graduation. Every student is different, which means their pathway to graduation is different as well. Plan ahead because even though some coures offerings are flexible you should make sure that you understand which courses are offered only in particular semesters. Advanced planning for Study Abroad and other off-campus programs should be done with your Faculty Advisor or the Undergraduate Program Coordinator early during a your time at Cornell. To view course discriptions for all of the courses listed below visit the Courses of Study online catalog. Below is a sample of one path to completing your required Communication courses if you started as a Freshman. First Year Fall Spring COMM 1101 COMM 1300 COMM 2010 (flexible) Second Year Fall Spring COMM 2820 COMM Focus Area Introductory Course COMM 2010 (flexible) COMM 2310 (flexible) Statistics Outside Concentration (flexible) COMM Focus Area Introductory Course Third Year Fall Spring COMM Focus Area Course COMM Focus Area Course COMM Upper Level Course COMM Upper Level Course COMM 2310 (flexible) Outside Concentration (flexible) Fourth Year Fall Spring COMM Upper Level Course Outside Concentration (flexible) Outside Concentration (flexible) Below is a sample of one path to completing your required Communication courses if you started as a Junior transfer. *this plan is assuming that a student transfers in no Communication course credits. Third Year Fall Spring COMM 1101 COMM 2010 COMM 2010 (flexible) COMM 1300 COMM 2310 (flexible) COMM Focus Area Introductory Course COMM 2820 COMM Upper Level Course Outside Concentration (flexible) Outside Concentration (flexible) Fourth Year Fall Spring COMM Upper Level Course Outside Concentration (flexible) COMM Focus Area Introductory Course COMM Focus Area Outside Concentration (flexible) COMM Upper Level Course COMM Focus Area COMM Upper Level Course “Too often, we think about what is, not what could be” -- Kathy Berggren, Communication Senior Lecturer


Department of Communication Connections

There are several different ways that the Department of Communication communicates with their students regarding upcoming events, deadlines, awards and scholarship information, and course information. Although the Department reaches out to students through various ways it is expected that Communication students seek out information about the Department and its events as well. Methods of Student Outreach for the Department of Communication • Communication Undergraduate Program Facebook (CornellUComm) • Communication Undergraduate Program Twitter (CornellUComm) • Communication Academic Update Newsletter (twice a month updates) The Newsletter includes dates, deadlines, announcements, event information, and internship and career openings. Department of Communication Events • Fall Pre-Enrollment Student Panel • Association of Women in Communication Meetings (open to all women majoring in Communication) • Spring Pre-Enrollment Student Panel • Spring Internship Panel • Spring JobC.A.M.P. (Communication Alumni Mentorship Program) • Communication Awards • Speech Competitions (fall & spring) * We are planning to add several more Communication-specific events for the 2013-2014 academic year. Watch for updates in the Academic Update Newsletter and on social media. Department of Communication Student Groups • Association of Women in Communication • Communication Student Advisory Board • Lambda Phi Eta (Communication Honor Society)

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“The Communication Department at Cornell is truly unique. Just looking at the some of the articles published by the amazing Communication faculty can give you an idea of what kind of research you could be the next to help pioneer!”- Rachel Boochever, 2012 Graduate


How to Become a Successful Cornellian 1. Use your Cornell email account Read all messages. Do not delete messages from University offices without reading them. The Department of Communication Newsletter as well as other important updates will be sent to your Cornell account. 2. Attend the College orientation activities You have a lot to learn about Cornell. Attend orientation activities; you will find answers to questions and begin to feel comfortable with your new surroundings. 3. Explore Take time to explore the campus before classes begin, noting the buildings and rooms where your classes will be held. This will help the first few days go more smoothly. 4. Time management Time management will be the key to your success at Cornell. Be organized and stay current on projects and assignments. Use your Cornell planner and don’t get behind with your coursework! 5. Get to know your Faculty Advisor Your Faculty Advisor will be one of your best resources at Cornell. Advisors often know of research opportunities, summer internships, industry contacts, and will recommend the best course of study for your intended interests. 6. Limit your credits to 12 or 15 in your first semester There will be an adjustment from high school or your previous college and the last thing you want to feel is overloaded. Twelve to fifteen credits is recommended for your first semester. 7. Learn graduation requirements for your major and for CALS Help is available from your Faculty Advisor, the Counseling and Advising Office, and the Registrar’s Office. 8. Get involved Cornell is a big place and the only way it will begin to feel smaller is if you meet new people and find fun things to do! Numerous clubs and organizations on campus (http://sao.cornell.edu/SO) will be looking for new members. Getting involved is highly recommended, but you do need to balance your activities with your academics. Involvement in one or two organizations is recommended for your first semester. 9. Get to know your professors They encourage and appreciate student feedback and are interested in your experiences in and out of class, so be sure to introduce yourself. 10. Seek help when needed If you need help with a problem set or assignment, DO NOT WAIT! Contact your professor or TA (teaching assistant) right away. 11. Have fun learning and trying new things Your time at Cornell is brief, so take advantage of the expansive academic offerings! Spend time looking through the Courses of Study and make a “wish list” of all the interesting courses you would like to take. http://www.cals.cornell.edu/cals/current/orientation/tips.cfm “In 1995, I came to Cornell as a first year communication major and I liked it so much I got my PhD and came back as a professor!” -- Lee Humphreys, Communication Assistant Professor


“Save some time (perhaps by taking fewer credits the first semester) for getting to know Ithaca, Cornell, our department, your new friends, and most of all... yourself!” -- Sahara Byrne, Communication Assistant Professor

CampusResources Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) http://www.gannett.cornell.edu/CAPS

Gannett Health Center

255-5155

CALS Tutoring Services http://cals.cornell.edu/academics/advising/academic/tutoring Learning Strategies Center 420 CCC Building 255-6310 http://lsc.sas.cornell.edu/aboutLSC.html Student Disability Services 420 CCC Building 254-4545 http://sds.cornell.edu/ Writing Workshop various locations 255-6349 http://www.arts.cornell.edu/knight_institute/workshop/workshop.htm Advising and Diversity Team in the Student Services Office http://cals.cornell.edu/academics/advising/

140 Roberts Hall

255-2257

Additional Support Resources

Athletics Student Services 232 Bartels Hall 254-7472 http://www.cornellbigred.com/sports/2007/7/11/SAServices.aspx Biology Advising Center 216 Stimson Hall 255-7429 http://biology.cornell.edu/index.php/advise/ CALS International Opportunities for Undergraduates http://cals.cornell.edu/academics/international/ Career Development Team in the Student Services Office http://cals.cornell.edu/academics/advising/career

140 Roberts Hall

Cornell Study Abroad: https://www.cuabroad.cornell.edu/ Cornell Career Services http://www.career.cornell.edu/ Department of Communication Scholarships and Awards http://tinyurl.com/CommAwards2013 Health Careers (University Career Services) http://www.career.cornell.edu/paths/health/exploring/

255-2257

Thro this b ughout can h rochure y ou ove click the w r over an d ebs be d irectl ite links to to the y linked w ment ebsite ioned .

Help Sheet http://cuinfo.cornell.edu/Campus/helpsheet/ Also available in 140 Roberts Hall and at the Information and Referral Center in the lobby of Day Hall. Mathematics Support Center http://www.math.cornell.edu/Courses/FSM/support.html

256 Mallott Hall

255-4658

“By the end of your first semester, you will see that the discipline of Communication puts you front and center on some of the most vital issues facing society today, and offers the analytical tools to gain new insight into them.”-- Tarleton Gillespie, Communication Associate Professor


First year 2013