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CHASE WATERFALLS Talk about drama! The Olympic Peninsula touts more than 20 beautiful waterfalls throughout the area. From handicapped-accessible falls to those you must backcountry camp to see, everyone can enjoy the year-round excitement from our falls. The Olympic Peninsula Waterfall Trail (p. 130) is an easy online guide that can help you plan your waterfall adventure. Some of the more easily accessible waterfalls include Madison Creek Falls and Marymere Falls. Madison Falls is handicapped-accessible and is near the currently closed Elwha River entrance to Olympic National Park. The 200-foot trail is paved, leading to the roaring sounds of the water hitting Madison Creek. Marymere Falls is at the end of a relatively flat — then steep! — .75-mile trail that starts at the Storm King Ranger Station next to Lake Crescent. Sol Duc Falls is a stunning signature sight of Olympic National Park. The jaw-dropping views from above the falls will make for great photo memories. SOL DUC FALLS, OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK

SET UP CAMP Ready, set, camp! If you don’t take in some camping on the Olympic Peninsula, you really are missing out. We have myriad options for all types of adventure-seekers — from primitive sights in the Olympic Mountains or down in secluded valleys, to RV hookups and yurts. Before setting up a camping trip, make sure to have the appropriate passes, if necessary, to your location (p. 18). In Olympic National Park, Kalaloch and Sol Duc campgrounds are the only ones that accept reservations in the summer; all others are first-come, first-served. Many state parks and the state Department of Natural Resources offer camping options, too. Camping on the Olympic Peninsula is an opportunity to connect with nature and neighbors. Remember to always leave it better than you found it.

ZING A LINE There’s nothing like hooking into a fighting salmon on the banks of a West End River or from the bow of a boat in the Pacific Ocean. Whatever you’re eying for dinner, there are plenty of options for the angler who visit the Olympic Peninsula. Try your hand on the Hoh River, on the West End of the Peninsula, or check out the Bogachiel or Calawah. For marine fishing, salmon, halibut, sturgeon, lingcod and rockfish are prizes to be won. With state fishing laws subject to change, be sure to check the local fishing guidelines for wherever you intend to fish, and always have an up-to-date Sport Fishing Regulation Pamphlet handy (p. 18). Visit wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/washington for more information.

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Special Sections - Olympic Peninsula Visitors Guide Summer 2018  

i20180507124621616.pdf

Special Sections - Olympic Peninsula Visitors Guide Summer 2018  

i20180507124621616.pdf