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JOINT LEARNING Regional integration


JOINT LEARNING Regional integration


CMI’s MISSION Sustainable development in the Mediterranean The Marseille Center for Mediterranean Integration (CMI) strives to facilitate access to best knowledge, enhance sustainable development and converge policies towards greater integration. It does so by creating opportunities for leaders in government, civil society, academia, and business to generate, integrate, share, and apply policy-relevant knowledge and analysis. CMI provides a platform for the formation of communities of practice focused on the Mediterranean region’s core development issues. These communities tackle critical challenges, and seek practical solutions to enhance the prosperity of the region. We invite you to learn more about CMI’s programs in the pages that follow.

A MULTI-PARTNER SPACE for joint learning

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CMI was created by a group of Mediterranean governments—Egypt, France, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, and Tunisia—along with the European Investment Bank (EIB) and the World Bank.

CMI does not claim leadership, intellectual or political, over any particular sector. Rather, it lends its unique governance structure to the support of other think tanks and collaborative arrangements in the region.

It is not an aid facility. Instead, it promotes sustainable growth and development by providing a forum for research and the sharing of knowledge in a region which is becoming ever more socially and economically interdependent. CMI fosters synergy as participants build on and benefit from each other’s comparative advantages. In particular, CMI engages countries in the global South in a constructive dialogue through which knowledge and experiences are shared and solutions to common problems are identified and discussed.

The Center opened its doors in Marseille on October 9, 2009. It welcomes expressions of interest in participating in its programs from other governments and organizations in the Mediterranean region. More information on CMI’s governance structure appears at the end of this brochure.


With its unique mix of partners from the South and North, the Center for Mediterranean Integration is well positioned to advance the well-being of people living on both sides of the Mediterranean through jointly-devised innovative solutions to common development challenges. Rima KHALAF HUNAIDI Former Jordanian Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of International Cooperation, Middle East Initiative Visiting Scholar, John F. Kennedy School of Government

By bringing together all of the partners who share an interest in the future of the Mediterranean, CMI is a fount of innovation, forging synergies from the public policies of individual countries. Its approach encourages the convergence of the sectoral approaches of development actors and their country partners, a promising sign of coherence and effectiveness. Philippe de FONTAINE VIVE CURTAZ Vice President European Investment Bank 5


HOW CMI PROGRAMS are designed and managed Having adopted a pragmatic approach to regional cooperation and integration, CMI has chosen to focus its efforts on a small number of sectors identified by CMI’s members and partner organizations in the region. CMI operates five program clusters devoted to urban and spatial development; environment and water; skills, employment, and labor mobility (including youth issues); transport and logistics; and knowledge economy, innovation, and technology.

Leverage for policy choice Within each cluster, think tanks, training institutions, centers of excellence, development institutions, and other partners help design and deliver programs. Programs typically adopt a multi-sector approach to critical development challenges. They are designed to ensure that lessons will be debated by a wide range of stakeholders, public and private, in the Mediterranean region.

development of the Mediterranean region. The city provides office space for the CMI, as well as two renovated conference rooms at the Villa Valmer.

CMI believes that by sharing training, research, and experience, the region’s governments can attain a common vision for addressing development challenges, especially the important challenges that transcend national borders. CMI Each program is led by a particular programs reveal gaps in knowledge organization, in collaboration with and priorities for reform that provide other interested partners in the re- inputs for evidence-based policy gion. Lead organizations include the choice in the region. Agence Française de Développement (AFD), the Caisse des Dépôts et Activities developed by CMI can also Consignations (CDC), the European stimulate government commitment to Investment Bank (EIB), the Forum reforms and to more effective public Euroméditerranéen des Instituts de policies on pressing development Sciences Économiques (FEMISE), issues such as climate change. CMI the United Nations Development succeeds when the consensus that Programme (UNDP), Plan Bleu of it encourages finds its way into the the United Nations Environment planning and budgeting cycles of Programme, and the World Bank. governments in the region. The city of Marseille, in addition to participating in various programs, facilitates relationships with key local actors who are engaged in the

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A wide range of interventions The activities undertaken by each program vary from one topic to another. Many activities fall within the broad category of knowledge generation—in the form of country and regional studies, policy notes, scenario-based analysis, tools and methodologies for economic analysis, and analytical frameworks. Others belong to the realm of capacity building and training—through the

knowledge sharing and technical assistance. Still others involve advocacy for reforms, networking, and outreach. The broad themes addressed by the five clusters are described below. More information is available at www.cmimarseille.org

Regional integration is one of our key priorities. Integration will increase the development impact of our support at the country level. Regional integration necessitates partnerships, and with the CMI, we hope to play a role forging and strengthening such partnerships within the countries of the Middle East and North Africa and beyond. Shamshad AKHTAR Regional Vice President, Middle East and North Africa World Bank 7


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CMI CLUSTERS AND PROGRAMS Productive, livable cities: The urban and spatial development cluster

The challenge In 20 years, 100 million more people will be living in Mediterranean cities. Nextgeneration solutions for energy, transport, water, climate change, and productivity growth will play out in cities and their surrounding metropolitan areas, shaping the destinies of nations. Decisions taken now will resonate for decades. CMI has convened a series of high-profile events in urban and spatial development. Such events have surrounded the launch of the 2009 World Development Report on reshaping economic geography, the World Bank’s paper on cities and climate change prepared within the context of the World Urban Research Symposium convened in Marseille in June 2009. The cluster is home to four programs.

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Strategic Urban Development Regional and urban planning, urban land management, and urban expansion and renewal are the topics of the program. The first component reviews public policies that address regional imbalances and provides planning advice in selected urban centers. The second component tackles the tough institutional issues of land management, notably in relation to property rights. The third component explores the multidimensional aspects of large-scale

projects of urban renewal and expansion, including the development of new towns. The program as a whole features policy conferences and workshops, analytical studies and technical advisory services, and information-sharing activities. A hallmark of the program is close collaboration with other institutes in the field (such as the Arab Urban Development Institute) and with municipal and local government networks

Lead Organizations

World Bank /// Caisse des Dépôts et Consignations (France)

Principal partners

Euroméditerranée /// European Investment Bank /// Medcities /// Cities Alliance /// World Bank Institute (Urban Program) /// Agence Française de Développement (Centre d’Études Financières, Économiques et Bancaires) /// United Cities and Local Governments

Contacts

Anthony G. BIGIO abigio@worldbank.org /// + 1 202 473-6304 Pascale CHABRILLAT pascale.chabrillat@caissedesdepots.fr /// +33 1 58 50 98 31 Maryse GAUTIER maryse.gautier@caissedesdepots.fr /// +33 4 91 99 24 02

Cities and Climate Change Urban vulnerability to climate change, climate-appropriate urban development, and energy efficiency of buildings are the themes of the program. The first component assists central and city governments in producing urban vulnerability maps and in preparing action plans for adapting to climate change. Partners include research centers and meteorological institutes. Tools include satellite observation.

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The second component provides governments with sound policy choices through reviews of current experiences, notably in the European area, working closely with central and local agencies. The third component aids in the dissemination and application of technical solutions to reduce energy consumption in buildings (commercial, residential, and industrial) through appropriate financial incentives, while exploring options for piloting and mainstreaming such approaches. Close collaboration with established institutes (such as the Regional Center for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency in Cairo) and with relevant city and local government networks is one of the program’s priorities.

Lead Organizations

World Bank /// Caisse des Dépôts et Consignations (France)

Principal partners

French Environment and Energy Management Agency (ADEME) /// Geopolis /// Agence Française de Développement /// Urban Anchor /// MEDENER (the Mediterranean association of national energy management agencies) /// Cap-Sciences /// European Spatial Agency

Contacts

Anthony G. BIGIO abigio@worldbank.org /// + 1 202 473-6304 Pascale CHABRILLAT pascale.chabrillat@caissedesdepots.fr /// +33 1 58 50 98 31 Maryse GAUTIER maryse.gautier@caissedesdepots.fr /// +33 4 91 99 24 02


Renewal of Historic City Centers Widely known as the Medinas Initiative 2030, the program aims to define a strategic framework for renovation projects encompassing the architectural, social, and financial dimensions that must be considered in such operations. The project is taking stock of the experiences accumulated by various countries and or-

ganizations, with a view to identifying the key parameters of historic renovation projects and the best ways to involve different partners, particularly the local population and related authorities.

generation (including spatial, economic, and social planning, and public governance and consultation) and to lay the groundwork for adequate financing. Another is to raise awareness among decision makers concerning the imporOne thrust of the program tance of urban regeneration is to integrate mechanisms in the historic city centers of and strategies for urban re- the south Mediterranean.

Lead Organizations

European Investment Bank

Principal partners

World Bank /// Agence Française de Développement /// United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization /// Foundation Aga Khan /// Caisse des Dépôts et Consignations /// Alliance of European Cultural Cities (AVEC) /// International Union of Technical Organisms and Associations (UATI) /// Medcities /// Arab Towns Organization

Contact

Guy FLEURET g.fleuret@eib.org /// + 352 4379 7 4619

Sustainable Urban Transport The goal of the program is to bring about a Mediterranean sense of ownership based on good practices as far as sustainable urban transport is concerned. It will contribute (i) to strengthen the Mediterranean skill network in the field, (ii) to develop partnerships and (iii) to nurture a concrete methodological toolbox tailored for Mediterranean cities.

Four major subjects will be addressed namely: (i) strategic framework, (ii) multimodal integration, (iii) urban structuring and (iv) social and environmental impacts. Each subject will be thoroughly considered in the frame of four specific workshops which will culminate in a regional assessment and stocktaking conference in 2012. Meeting places will be elected in turn on South and North of the Mediterranean Region.

Lead Organizations

Agence Française de Développement

Principal partners

Blue Plan /// CODATU (Cooperation for Urban Mobility in the Developing World) /// French Ministry of Ecology, Energy, Sustainable Development, and the Sea (MEEDDM) /// CERTU (Center for Research on Networks, Transport Urbanism, and Public Works) /// World Bank

Contact

Xavier HOANG hoangx@afd.fr /// + 33 1 53 44 31 31

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CMI CLUSTERS AND PROGRAMS Thinking outside the box: The environment and water cluster

The challenge The Mediterranean region is strained by unequal water allocation and ecological fragility. As populations and economies grow—and as the climate changes—further degradation of the region’s natural resources base is likely. As many of the countries of the region border the Mediterranean Sea, water-related changes in one country will be felt in others. That shared destiny raises the importance of improving the management of water and other natural resources. Solutions will require sharing knowledge and lessons learned, as well as building institutional capacity in natural resource management. The three core programs of the environment and water cluster all aim to mainstream environmental and water issues in broader policies. They are being developed in close collaboration with partner organizations and the concerned countries in the region. They will provide a platform for the identification of solutions to common environmental and water challenges.

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The Governance and Knowledge Component of “Sustainable MED” The goal of the Environmental Mediterranean Sustainable Development Program, “Sustainable MED”, is to integrate environment within the economic development agenda of the Mediterranean, following a shared common approach. The first phase of this 5-Year program, co-financed by the GEF (Global Environment Facility) has an International Waters focus, and its objective is to enhance and accelerate the implementation of transboundary pollution reduction, improved water resources management, and biodiversity conservation measures in priority hotspots (locations with high pollution or degradation levels) and sensitive areas of selected countries of the Mediterranean basin that would help achieve the Strategic Action Plans’ (SAP MED and SAP BIO) targets. The Program also provides a framework for future interventions in other priority areas, such as land degradation, climate change, solid and hazardous waste management, which will be addressed through the development agenda of the World Bank and with other partners.

and lack of reliable data for informed decision making. Special attention will be given to increasing knowledge on vulnerability of water resources to climate variability, droughts, and floods, and means to enhance resilience to climate change. It will support exchanges of information and expertise, transfer of knowledge and sharing of best practices between Sustainable MED investment projects and technical assistance projects, and also between Sustainable MED and other regional programs and specialized centers.

MAIN AREAS OF INTERVENTION OF KNOW-MED ⚈ Promoting the use of environmental economics to mainstream environment in the economic development agenda (e.g. environment valuation, cost of degradation, cost of mitigation); ⚈ Identifying innovative instruments for environmental financing and promotion of green business; Strengthening the environmental regulatory and judiciary systems; The aim of the Knowledge and Tech- ⚈ Promoting the use of tools for nical Assistance component of the strategic environmental assessProject (Know-MED) is to set-up a ments of development in economic regional hub for knowledge gen- sectors (e.g. tools for assessment eration, dissemination and capacity of vulnerability and development of building which will capitalize on Sus- impacts scenarios). tainable MED’s technical assistance projects, promote adoption of policies to achieve common objectives, address the continued need for institutional strengthening, sectoral reforms, capacity building activities Lead Organizations

World Bank

Principal partners

United Nations Environment Programme Mediterranean Action Plan /// Plan Bleu /// Agence Française de Développement

Contacts

Sergio MARGULIS smargulis@worldbank.org /// + 33 4 9199 2459 Gilles PIPIEN gpipien@worldbank.org /// + 33 4 9199 2458 Guillaume MEYSSONNIER gmeyssonnier@worldbank.org /// + 1 202 473 0642

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Water Resources Policy Management The program objective is to support Mediterranean countries to develop economic approaches as they devise new policies to manage demand for water. Scenarios developed by the program enable planners and policy makers to assess the impact

of climate change on water resources, to analyze the water-energy nexus, and to gauge the cost-effectiveness of various measures to manage demand for water better. Scenario-based case studies are planned for Morocco, Tunisia, and

Jordan. Developed in close coordination with national authorities, the studies will be discussed by policy makers responsible for water, agriculture, energy, tourism, and the environment at the central, catchment, and local levels.

Lead Organizations

Agence Française de Développement

Principal partners

Plan Bleu /// Government of Jordan /// Government of Tunisia /// Government of Morocco /// Conseil Général Hérault /// World Bank

Contact

Fréderic MAUREL maurelf@afd.fr /// + 33 1 53 44 31 31

Environmental Economic Evaluation The program’s objective is to marshal comprehensive environmental economic analysis to help decision makers make informed choices about sustainable use of natural resources. In particular, the analysis is expected to provide realistic estimates of the costs of implementing alternative and more sustainable development scenarios for the region. Planned program activities include economic valuation of the

benefits provided by Mediterranean ecosystems and particularly  marine and  coastal ecosystems; production of methodological tools for assessing the impact of flows of trade, materials in the region; and a contribution of the evaluation of the likely economic impacts of climate change.

Lead Organizations

Plan Bleu

Principal partners

Université de Lyon /// Agence Française de Développement /// Forum Euroméditerranéen des Instituts de Sciences Économiques (FEMISE) /// WWF Mediterranean Programme Office /// United Nations Environment Programme Mediterranean Action Plan (RAC/SPA) /// French Research Institute for the Exploitation of the Sea (IFREMER) /// Université de Nice /// Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations /// Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) /// French Ministry of Agriculture /// French Environment and Energy Management Agency (ADEME) /// RECORD Association /// European Topic Center

Contact

Pierre ICARD picard@planbleu.org /// + 33 4 92 38 86 19

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CMI CLUSTERS AND PROGRAMS More jobs, better jobs: The skills, employment, and labor mobility cluster

The challenge Job creation in the Middle East and North Africa has not kept pace with growth in the labor force, including the increasing number of women and youth seeking work. The job gap signals problems in education and training that must be solved if the region is to put people to work and improve its international economic competitiveness. Gaps in education and skills are compounded by a lack of recognition of skills and degrees across the region, particularly in countries that host large numbers of migrants. Social security systems (pensions, unemployment insurance, and health insurance) are not designed to support mobility and labor-market flexibility—nor do they provide adequate income protection for workers. The objective of the cluster is to promote cooperation between the countries of two regions—Europe and the Middle East and North Africa—toward three goals: (i) to stimulate economic growth and create jobs for the rapidly growing and increasingly educated labor force in the Middle East and North Africa; (ii) to support the mobility of the labor force; and (iii) to develop dynamic labor markets with adequate income protection for workers. 17


Skills for Knowledge-Based Economies The program aims to identify the basic skills and competencies needed in key economic sectors in the Middle East and North Africa through the development of a regional qualifications system. It will also pinpoint training needs and opportunities for selected professions, while making recommendations for the improvement of technical and vocational education programs.

The program operates in partnership with other donor initiatives related to qualifications—such as the work of the European Training Foundation (ETF) on national qualifications frameworks and the Arab occupational classification developed with the support of Germany’s GTZ and other donors.

Lead Organizations

Forum Euroméditerranéen des Instituts de Sciences Économiques (FEMISE)

Principal partners

World Bank /// European Investment Bank /// École de la Deuxième Chance (Marseille) /// Euromed Management /// Conseil Culturel de l’Union pour la Méditerranée /// Association Nationale pour la Formation Professionnelle des Adultes (France)

Contact

Frederic BLANC f.blanc@femise.org /// + 33 4 91 31 51 95

Regional Harmonization of Standards, Qualifications and Quality Assurance in Post-Basic Education To reduce mismatches of skills in the labor market and increase the employability of graduates across the Middle East and North Africa, the program strives to improve the ability of higher education institutions and quality-assurance agencies in the region to match European qualityassurance standards in the mutual recognition of international qualifications. The program will focus on building capacity in three particular fields: (i) quality assurance, (ii) governance of higher education institutions, and (iii) promoting science and technology policies that stimulate innovation. In partnership with the European Network for Quality As-

surance, the Arab Network for Quality Assurance in Higher Education, and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the program will offer technical assistance to consolidate the Arab regional network for quality assurance.

Lead Organizations

World Bank

Principal partners

European Training Foundation /// Agence Française de Développement /// International Labour Organization /// Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development /// Arab Network for Quality Assurance in Higher Education /// European Network for Quality Assurance /// Universities

Contact

Adriana JARAMILLO ajaramillo@worldbank.org /// + 33 4 91 99 24 47

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Employment and Labor Mobility The goals of the program on employment and labor mobility are to make labor markets more dynamic and simultaneously to improve social protection for migrants.

The quest to improve social protection for migrants depends above all on the safe, transparent, and legal intermediation of labor demand and supply across the Mediterranean. Secondary priorities include the Dynamic labor markets—in which supply and development among predeparture migrants demand strive constantly for balance—de- of life skills, including effective negotiation pend on the presence of effective mediating with employers, and the advancement of the institutions. Those institutions, in turn, must policy dialogue on bilateral social protection have the capacity to design, implement, and coverage and social security portability for monitor labor-market policies that aim to im- labor migrants in Europe and the Middle East prove the balance of supply of and demand and North Africa. Portability would enhance for skills, to promote employer-focused skills social protection for departing migrants in enhancement, to facilitate the transition the absence of bilateral agreements. between education and employment, and to create opportunities for young people This program will be developed by the World to develop entrepreneurial skills and income- Bank in cooperation with international organigenerating activities. The necessary capacity zations, ministries of labor, chambers of combuilding is supported by twinning arrange- merce, and national employer organizations. ments between public sector institutions in the Euro-Mediterranean area. Lead Organizations

World Bank

Principal partners

European Training Foundation /// International Labour Organization /// Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development /// International Organization for Migration /// Bilateral aid agencies (including those of France and Germany) /// Research institutions in the North and South

Contacts

Robert HOLZMANN rholzmann@worldbank.org /// + 33 4 91 99 24 45 Andras BODOR abodor@worldbank.org /// + 1 202 473-9020

Promoting Income Opportunities and Active Citizenship among Young People The program focuses on disadvantaged youngsters in Arab Mediterranean countries. Specifically, this will take place through strengthening national and local youth policy frameworks, in line with current discussions on neighboring countries’ policy harmonization; building greater capacity

among national and local governments as well as youth stakeholders to implement and evaluate inclusive youth investments, including in conflictaffected areas; and encouraging knowledge sharing of best practices and inter-regional exchanges among youth stakeholders.

Lead Organizations

World Bank

Principal partners

League of Arab States /// International Labour Organization /// Agence Française de Développement /// Education for Employment Foundation /// Sylatech Foundation /// The European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument /// The Education and Culture Directorate of the European Union /// Forum Euroméditerranéen des Instituts de Sciences Économiques (FEMISE) /// The city of Marseille

Contact

Gloria LA CAVA glacava@worldbank.org /// + 1 202 458-7646

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In the Mediterranean Basin, the planet’s most heavily populated arid region, we must work together to preserve the common space and public goods we share. Christian MASSET Director General of globalization, development, and partnerships, French Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs.

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CMI CLUSTERS AND PROGRAMS Links in the quality chain: The transport and logistics cluster The challenge Most countries in the Middle East and North Africa have extensive road networks and impressive facilities for air, sea, and rail transport. A strategy to integrate those assets would enhance the region’s economic competitiveness while also raising awareness of the potential impacts of climate change.

LOGISMED The objectives of LOGISMED are (i) joint learning about the benefits of integrated logistics platforms that conform to international best practices and (ii) training to make those practices a hallmark of the region. LOGISMED’s target of a logistics training network extending across the Mediterranean region centers on the creation of a regional pool of specialists and experts who can be tapped by Euro-Mediterranean

logistics operators. The logistical expertise represented by the new network would extend to a range of efficient services covering the entire logistics value chain—from training to the provision of administrative and management services. LOGISMED is open to interested partners, including Mediterranean partner countries and technical and financial institutions.

Lead Organizations

European Investment Bank

Principal partners

Centre d’Etudes des Transports pour la Méditerranée Occidentale (CETMO) /// Institut des Sciences et des Techniques de l’Équipement et de l’Environnement pour le Développement (ISTED) /// Mediterranean partner countries /// Mediterranean Universities Union (Unimed)

Contact

José Manuel FERNANDEZ RIVEIRO fernandm@eib.org /// + 352 4379 82705

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CMI CLUSTERS AND PROGRAMS The knowledge-economy, innovation, and technology cluster

The challenge Many countries are already seizing the opportunities provided by the twin forces of globalization and technology and are seeking new ways to boost growth and competitiveness. By building on their strengths and carefully planning investments in human capital, effective institutions, key technologies, and competitive enterprises, countries can make an effective transition to the knowledge economy. At a recent high-level conference, participants adopted the Tunis Declaration, an important step in helping the countries of the region make the move towards the knowledge economy. Programs in the cluster are designed to foster innovation through science parks, technopoles, and incubators for small and medium enterprises, among other instruments. To build the capacity of national policy makers and local authorities, the programs will share regional and international experience, policy strategies, case studies, and analytical tools to create a better environment for innovation and territorial development—and to benchmark countries’ progress toward building knowledge economies. Two programs are now active in the cluster 23


Financing Innovation Projects By boosting the number of bankable innovation projects, the program aims to sharpen innovation policies and to raise the managerial, technical, commercial, and financial capacity of innovation agencies in the Mediterranean region.

The program is aimed at decision makers, for example, in ministries of science, technology, and innovation or in ministries of education; at managers of innovation sites (innovation poles, incubators); and at representatives of the private sector (including small and medium enterprises). The activities envisaged to The program for 2009/2011 is designed date include training workshops, innovation to (i) train policy makers, innovation agen- surveys, audits of obstacles to innovation, cies, and technopole managers; (ii) survey and an international conference on technoinnovation projects in specific sites and poles, complemented by a guidebook on the institutions to identify success factors (such development of technopoles jointly prepared as collaborative research and spin-offs); and by EIB, the World Bank, the City of Marseille (iii) perform “innovation audits” to identify and Medibtikar (an EU-supported program). obstacles to innovation, using a variant of the investment climate surveys undertaken by the World Bank. Lead Organizations

European Investment Bank

Principal partners

World Bank /// Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) /// Forum Euroméditerranéen des Instituts de Sciences Économiques (FEMISE) /// MED-Invest/ANIMA /// Caisse des Dépôts et Consignations (France) /// Agence Française de Développement

Contacts

Philippe GUINET p.guinet@eib.org /// + 352 4379 7 4619 Guy FLEURET g.fleuret@eib.org /// + 352 4379 7 4619

Information Society Initiative for the Mediterranean Region (ISI@MED) Information and communication technologies can serve as a crucial enabler of territorial development, while reducing poverty and stimulating inclusive growth. The program, conceived as an instrument of co-development between North and South, includes three main components: (i) ICTs for territorial management, that is, for strategic planning and management of local resources; (ii) ICTs for local economic development, notably for cooperatives and small and medium enterprises;

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and (iii) ICTs as a means of engaging diasporas and migrants and of facilitating cross-cultural youth activities. To date the program has conducted information-gathering missions in Morocco, Lebanon, and the Palestinian Territories. Joint learning activities (seminars, visits) to inform the design of future projects will be carried out with the support of several partners—among them networks for the decentralized cooperation of cities and regions and private entities.

Lead Organizations

United Nations Development Programme

Principal partners

World Bank /// Lombardy region of Italy /// City of Malaga /// City of Marseille /// Provence–Alpes–Côte d’Azur region of France /// Networks of cities and regions

Contact

Najat ROCHDI najat.rochdi@undp.org /// +41 22 917 8866


There is so much common culture around the Mare Nostrum, so much wealth to be shared, and so much trust to be built. The Marseille Center for Mediterranean Integration has brought together brains, means, and willingness, in a unique effort to promote well being, shorten distances among people, and encourage them to focus on their common future. Alain BIFANI Director General, Ministry of Finance Lebanon

The CMI is unique in that it builds on the expertise of leaders in various fields and shares knowledge generated among a range of countries from France to Jordan to achieve greater cooperation on development policies. Ipek CEM TAHA Managing Partner, Melak Investments Istanbul, Turkey 25


A COMMITMENT TO EVALUATION The raison d’être of the CMI is to facilitate greater integration in the Mediterranean region. That notion underpins the three-level process used to evaluate CMI programs. Program relevance (macro-level evaluation). CMI programs should, in the medium and long term, lead to observable integration of the economies and societies in the Mediterranean region. They should bring about convergence in economic performance, social conditions, and environment sustainability. Evaluators will ask what policies and reforms have been put in place (or will be put in place) as a result of the CMI evidence based learning programs and the international cooperation that stems from those programs. Examples include joint qualification agreements in education, joint research and development projects. Program impact (meso-level evaluation). In the short and medium terms, CMI programs will have their most tangible impact through the joint learning and training that occurs through networks of people and institutions as programs are implemented. The experience thus gained should deepen the scientific and analytical understanding of related topics and affect the activities of program partners (for example, the financing approaches of donors). Program justification (micro-level evaluation). Evaluation efforts in this domain should document why programs have been initiated and the extent to which they have been successful, given the rationale for the founding of CMI. Did the programs add value over existing initiatives? Did the programs make efficient use of the competences and knowledge of existing networks while also building the capacities of the founding partners?

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CMI’s GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE CMI, headed by Mats Karlsson, director, is a collaborative arrangement between Egypt, France, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Tunisia, EIB and the World Bank which also administers the platform. It has the following governance structure: ⚈ An annual meeting of founding members and partners active in the programs is held each year in Marseille. ⚈ An Oversight Committee chaired by the World Bank meets twice a year. The committee consists of high-level representatives of CMI’s founding members, including from Ministries of Finance (France, Lebanon and Morocco), Ministries of International Cooperation/Planning (Egypt, Jordan and Tunisia) and Heads of Mediterranean/Liaisons Offices for AFD and EIB. The committee makes decisions on implementation of the memorandum of understanding under which CMI was established. It also provides guidance on activities and programs developed by CMI, offers advice on other issues submitted for its consideration, and approves CMI’s annual budget. ⚈ A Strategic Council composed of 12 councilors of international repute—drawn from founding members, partners, the private sector, civil society, and academia—guides and orients CMI’s work, provides mid-term strategic feedback on CMI’s work, and enhances CMI’s international and regional visibility. ⚈ A coordination unit, ensures the effective delivery of current programs, cultivates synergies among partners, and develops future partnerships. Composed of operational and support staff from a variety of partner institutions as well as interns from the region, the unit promotes the work of the Center through communications and media outreach, among other things.

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STRATEGIC COUNCIL MEMBERS Mr. Philippe DE FONTAINE VIVE Co-chair Vice President, European Investment Bank (EIB) Mr. Abdelhamid TRIKI Co-chair State Secretary for International Cooperation and Foreign Investment, Ministry of International Cooperation and Foreign Investment, Tunisia Mr. Ahmed ABDELKEFI President and Director General, Tunisie Leasing and Factoring / Tuninvest Ms. Zoubida ALLAOUA Director, Finance, Economics and Urban Department, The World Bank Ms. Ipek CEM TAHA Managing Partner, Melak Investments, Istanbul, Turkey Ms. Rima KHALAF HUNAIDI Former Jordanian Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of International Cooperation; Middle East Initiative Visiting Scholar, John F. Kennedy School of Government Mr. Gerd LEIPOLD Former Executive Director of Greenpeace International Mr. Christian MASSET Director General, Globalization, Development and Partnerships, French Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs Mr. Fatallah OUALALOU Mayor of Rabat, Municipality of Rabat, Former Minister of Finance, Morocco Ms. Hanaa KHEIR-EL-DIN Professor of Economics, Cairo University, Faculty of Economics and Political Science; Former Executive Director and Director of Research, Egyptian Center for Economic Studies Mr. Jean-Louis REIFFERS Professeur à l’Université du Sud, Président du Conseil Scientifique, Institut de la Méditerranée & FEMISE, France Mr. Ghassan SALAME Former Minister of Culture, Lebanon; Professor, Institut d’Etudes Politiques (Sciences-Po), Paris, France

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© C MI - Marseille 2010 // Graphic design & map: Estève GILI /// www.graphicvertigo.com Photography: CMI, World Bank, Estève GILI, Chloé de Lestrade, D.R. Printed in France by Impremium Groupe Superplan - Marseille 2010.


contact us Villa Valmer 271, Corniche Kennedy 13007 Marseille, France + 334 91 99 24 51 / 56 www.cmimarseille.org


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