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the year in review Annual Report

JOINT LEARNING FOR REGIONAL INTEGRATION


the year in review Annual Report


Contents

Opening Statement Shamshad Akhtar, Chair of the CMI Annual Meeting Vice President, Middle East and North Africa Region, World Bank 

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Learning to “Think Mediterranean” Philippe de Fontaine Vive, Co-Chair of the CMI Strategic Council Vice President, European Investment Bank

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The Year in Review by Mats Karlsson, Director, CMI 

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The CMI’s Role in Addressing Regional Priorities Rationale, Goals and Activities Highlighting Integration  Phases of Program Development Program Overview ⦿ Skills, Employment and Labor Mobility ⦿ Knowledge Economy, Innovation and Technology  ⦿ Urban and Spatial Development ⦿ Environment and Water  ⦿ Transport and Logistics  Driving for Results: Evaluating Our Progress Resource Mobilization Reaching Out 

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New Initiatives Advancing Toward a Knowledge Economy Office de Coopération Économique pour la Méditerranée et l’Orient (OCEMO)

32 35

Boxes 1 Managing Interdependence in the Mediterranean 2 Developing a University Governance Screening Card for MENA 3 Promoting Green Jobs for Youth in the Mediterranean 4 Developing Technopoles and Science Parks in the Mediterranean 5 Mainstreaming the Environment in the Policy-Making Process in Mediterranean Countries 6 CMI Web Site at a Glance

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Annexes 1 CMI Clusters and Programs 2 Logframes of CMI’s 14 Programs 3 CMI’s Approach to an Evaluation Framework 4 CMI Budget Summary for FY10—12  5 CMI Events and Content Development Update, October 2009–December 2010

37 45 75 79 83

A List of CMI Terms

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Opening Statement Shamshad Akhtar Chair of the CMI Annual Meeting Vice President, Middle East and North Africa Region, World Bank

This is the first annual report of the Marseille Center for Mediterranean Integration (CMI), submitted just before its second annual meeting on November 18, 2010. The report you hold reviews a full year of work since the CMI was formally launched on October 9, 2009. It highlights the CMI’s 14 programs and maps out the goals for 2011.

how to achieve it? Stimulating The CMI is the World Bank’s private sector investment, in part first investment of this nature. through better infrastructure, is a It complements and advances large part of the answer. Regional the World Bank’s Arab World cooperation of the sort promoted Initiative. Over the past year by the CMI can prove useful to the C M I m e m b e r s a n d p a r t n e r s objectives of building a common have come together to generate infrastructure, accelerating job- policy-relevant knowledge and creating investment and trade and analysis to address five crucial improving productivity. development challenges: skills, employment and labor mobility; This annual meeting is a first Without any doubt, regional knowledge economy, innovation p o i n t o f a s s e s s m e n t . W e integration is a daunting agenda and technology; urban and spatial anticipate that it will set the with far-reaching implications development; environment and CMI—an innovative, multi-partner for institutional, legal and policy water; and transport and logistics. c o l l a b o r a t i o n — o n a s t e a d y frameworks at all governance E ach of these challenges is course to promote joint learning levels. But that daunting goal can the focus of a cluster of CMI for sustainable development be quietly brought closer through programs, as may be seen in the in the M editerranean region. practical partnerships that foster pages of this report. This region, though it shares a culture that is open, informed the shores of a common sea and and conducive to the generation The challenge now is to succeed history, is still marked by economic, of knowledge, to broad-based in this incipient quest to produce social and cultural gaps between learning and to evidence-based and share solid and communicable and within countries, gaps that policy discussions. evidence for leaders in government, must be bridged if people are to c i v i l s o c i e t y, a c a d e m i a a n d enjoy sustainable and equitable It is in response to the demand for business, so that together leaders development. such partnerships that the CMI in their specific arenas can tackle was established as a knowledge critical challenges and seek Ensuring more rewarding employ- platform rooted in this region and practical solutions to enhance the ment oppor tunities for young driven by its founding governments— overall prosperity of the region. people entering the labor market Egypt, France, Jordan, Lebanon, remains the most pressing concern Morocco and Tunisia—along with for the region’s policy makers the European Investment Bank and and its people. We know that the World Bank. Other partners regional integration is essential to have joined in the programs to the achievement of that goal. But pursue shared objectives.

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Learning to “Think Mediterranean” Philippe de Fontaine Vive Co-Chair of the CMI Strategic Council Vice President, European Investment Bank

Since its inception in October And therein is the heart of our reflex in the Mediterranean is an 2009, the Marseille Center for commitment: to inculcate a “Medi- exciting challenge. Our goal must Mediterranean Integration (CMI) terranean reflex” into our national be to apply it concretely to pubhas been a unique laboratory for and institutional policy-making lic policies in selected areas to ideas thanks to its founding pur- process and thereby to ensure accelerate the integration of napose and its composition. It is the successful development of our tions. We must go well beyond the first inter-institutional platform region and the prospects of future simply modernizing the tools of for cooperation and partnership generations. development to mobilize civil sociin the modernization and converety and public opinion in the Medgence of public policies in the The CMI is in the vanguard of Med- iterranean. Both are already well Mediterranean. Its initial work has iterranean integration by support- along in this awareness-raising exbeen focused on five areas criti- ing dialogue among stakeholders ercise, in some cases in advance cal to sustainable and integrated (including policy makers, experts, of their national governments. development of the Mediterranean development finance institutions, basin: skills, employment and private sector, and universities), Therefore, to those who still belabor mobility; knowledge econ- and paving the way for the renew- lieve that the goal of building a omy, innovation and technology; al of the paradigms that have long Mediterranean reflex is too ambiurban and spatial development; guided the formulation of public tious, we can confidently respond environment and water; and trans- policies in the Mediterranean. that it certainly is a difficult quest, port and logistics. Because it is a multinational part- just as Europe’s integration was nership, the CMI avoids the pitfalls and remains. The CMI, symbolized The CMI is structured around the of particularistic development and during its first year of operation by principles of joint learning and is better positioned than any sin- its headquarters overlooking the the sharing of experience. Five gle institution to embody the Medi- Mediterranean from the Villa Valmof the region’s southern govern- terranean reflex, an expression of er, aims to become the fulcrum for ments (Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, the Mediterranean spirit shared the collective ambition to develop Morocco and Tunisia) have come by people on both the north and a new reflex, the reflex of “thinktogether to promote their inter- south shores of the sea. ing Mediterranean.” By means of ests through the Center. All are quick, concrete results, the CMI aware of the challenges of eco- In Europe, of course, a “European will enable us to realize—and no nomic convergence and share the reflex” is now discernible in the longer merely to dream—that vision common goal of regional integration. continent’s approach to all man- of the Mediterranean. ner of issues. Policy decisions are made only after consideration of the perspectives and experience of all European countries, with each learning from the others. Together the nations of Europe arrive at policies that benefit each and all, rather than facing off in discord. Replicating this cohesive annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 9


The Year in Review Mats Karlsson Director, CMI

The Center for Mediterranean Integration (CMI) was established to harness the powerful dynamics of interdependence across this ancient region, which today is home to 500 million people whose economic and social prospects are deeply intertwined. It pursues that purpose by providing analytical evidence and technical tools to respond to critical questions, jointly framed, and to provide policy makers with evidence-based intelligence on what measures are most likely to work in the public interest. The CMI engages with governments, international organizations and, of course, the private sector, in the form of independent public interest institutions and civil society organizations. It is a collaborative arrangement of members and partners inspired by converging CMI Outputs at a Glance (October 2009–October 2010)

views about how to respond to very real challenges such as unemployment, climate change, and trade logistics. Answering those challenges will be very important to the region’s people, whose economic future will be shaped, as was their past, by exchange across the Mediterranean Sea.

The past year of work included significant progress on the 14 programs that are the core of the Center (Annex 1). Normally, one might The CMI was created following have expected some attrition, but broad consultations that began in all 14 original programs are fully September 2008 at the initiative active, and several have substantially of World Bank President Robert expanded their content—quite an acB. Zoellick. All key elements of complishment. But quality in delivery the future Center were embod- is the true measure of success, and ied in a memorandum of under- program delivery has just begun. standing signed by the founding members and their partners in Between now and June 2012 June 2009. The CMI was formal- the CMI will have to hold itself ly launched on October 9, 2009, accountable at three levels by so the 2010 annual meeting, on providing: November 18, 2010 marks a year ⊙ C ost-saving and value added in of work. Next year’s meeting will program delivery give the Center’s members and ⊙ C ross-sectoral analytics and technical capacity ⊙ Indicators of actual convergence in national public policy choices.

⊙ One draft Screening Card for University Governance in MENA ⊙ One Guidebook on Technopoles (Plan and Manage a Science Park in the Mediterranean: Guidebook for Decision Makers) ⊙ Three Policy Notes on Non-Public Provision of Active Labor Market Programs in Arab-Mediterranean Countries: An Inventory of Youth Programs; Key Characteristics of Employment Regulation in the Middle East and North Africa; and Towards an Objective-Driven System of Smart Labor Migration Management ⊙ One study on Social Protection for Temporary Migrant Workers: Conceptual Framework, Country Inventory, Assessment and Guidance ⊙ One study on Portability of Pension, Health, and Other Social Benefits: Facts, Concepts, Issues ⊙ One report on Migration Management in the Mediterranean Region: Taking Stock, Reviewing, and Looking Ahead ⊙ One mapping of southern institutions (strategic urban development and cities and climate change) ⊙ Two CMI learning days on integration and evidence-based public policy choice ⊙ Four press conferences ⊙ Four e-letters in Arabic, English and French 10 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

partners a chance to reflect on the direction of their collaboration after the expiration of the current memorandum of understanding in June 2012.

The framework to be used in a c h i ev i n g t h e n e c e s s a r y a c countabilit y—which has been thoroughly discus sed by the CMI Strategic Council and confirmed by the Oversight Comm i t te e — w i l l p r ov i d e a b a s i c reference for the assessment of our progress in advance of next year’s annual meeting. All CMI programs work on the bas i s of c o nti n u o u s l y u p d ate d


logical frameworks, or logframes (Annex 2). Progress toward the goals set out in those logframes will be the basis for assessment of the Center.

times (by videoconference) and The budget has evolved as anticiprovided clear and valuable guid- pated, growing in size and allowing ance. Invitations to participate in programs to progress, although programs have been extended to with a moderate initial disbursement most southern and eastern coun- rate. For long-term sustainability, tries of the region, and the Center members and partners will need to Our members—Egypt, Jordan, remains open to new members consider extending their financial Lebanon, Morocco, and Tuni- from the region. commitments as early as possible sia, with France, the European to allow for forward planning. Investment Bank, and the World The Strategic Council has met Bank—have engaged positively three times, heard presentations The staff at the Center has grown throughout the year. The Over- from virtually all programs, and of- steadily stronger over the past sight Committee has met five fered invaluable guidance. year and now numbers 24, as annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 11


The Year in Review

staffing commitments have been Looking ahead to next year, I be- twin institution co-located with the fulfilled at all levels. But program lieve that the following points will CMI offers a great opportunity to delivery depends not only on the be critical for the Center’s success: enhance the effectiveness of our headquarters staff in Marseille, shared work. but also on program teams oper- ⊙ Program quality and delivery. ating around the Mediterranean While different in character, all ⊙ Knowledge for productivity. Naand within member and partner CMI programs have defined their tional authorities focus their efforts institutions. Instilling a sense of elements of objective achieve- to increase productivity and growth, pan-CMI teamwork will be criti- ment. Good collaborative man- so that succeeding generations of cal to success. agement by partners will deliver women and men can find jobs and the outcomes. apply their talents for the good of Outreach is a critical element of their local, national, and regional our work, because program pro- ⊙ Cooperation with the Union for communities. Because knowledge cesses and products are valu- the Mediterranean. As the UFM and learning are essential to proable only to the extent that rel- evolves and its secretariat pursues ductivity, a lively dialogue on the evant participants and audiences its work program, major opportuni- knowledge economy has engaged have access to them. A Web site, ties for cooperation and synergies actors across the region. The CMI www.cmimarseille.org, is up and will arise. The CMI should take full is currently in discussions with running. Hits grew significantly in advantage of all such opportunities. several regional actors to use our September and October. Language programs and capacity to advance is a particularly important aspect ⊙ Office de Coopération Écono­ that dialogue. of outreach. The Center’s work- mique pour la Méditerranée et ing language is a pragmatic blend l’Orient (OCEMO). An association There is no question that solid anaof English and French, not always made up of FEMISE and other net- lytical and technical evidence are fully supported by interpretation works of economists, Anima and needed to support public policy and translation. We still must make other networks of private investors, choices in the complex context of good on our major commitment to and several educational institu- pan-Mediterranean economic and use Arabic to a greater extent. tions has coalesced to create a social interdependence. Modestly, the CMI seeks to provide a measure of that evidence in a way that engages people all around the Mediterranean rim in an inspiring, substantive, and sustainable way.

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Event List: 22 CMI Knowledge Sharing Events (including ten located in Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, Tunisia and Syria)

1. EM2: Universities as Key Partners for Good Governance, Dec. 16-17, 2009, Marseille 2. EM3: Employment and Labor Mobility Week, including workshops on Managing Migration; Establishing Portability of Benefits; Income Protection for the Unemployed and Unemployment Insurance; and Active Labor Market Policies, March 8-12, 2010, Marseille 3. EM4: Young People in Arab Countries: Promoting Opportunities and Participation, Marseille April 28-30, 2010 4. EM2: Enhancing Qualifications Frameworks and Quality Assurance in MENA: Exploring Potential Tools to Facilitate Labor Mobility, Alleviate Skills Mismatches and Create Lifelong Learning Opportunities, June 14-15, 2010, Marseille 5. KEIT: Participation in Building 21st Century Knowledge Economies for Job Growth and Competitiveness in the Middle East, Tunis, Dec. 1-3, 2009 6. IT1: Technical Meeting for the Innovation Financing Program, Oct. 18, 2010, Paris 7. UD3: Workshop on Medinas 2030, Oct. 8-9, 2009, Marseille 8. UD1/UD2: Presentation of Urban and Spatial Development and Cities and Climate Change Programs at Africities, Marrakech, Dec. 14-19, 2009 9. UD4: Regional Conference on Urban Transport, Damascus, April 11-12, 2010 10. UD3: EUROMED Heritage Conference on Économie et financement du patrimoine and second tenure of the Medinas 2030 exhibition, Damascus, June 6-8, 2010 11. UD2: Tunis Workshop: Adaptation to Climate Change and Disaster Preparedness in the Coastal Cities of North Africa, May 18, 2010, Tunisia 12. UD2: Alexandria Workshop: Adaptation to Climate Change and Disaster Preparedness in the Coastal Cities of North Africa, June, 15-16, 2010, Egypt 13. UD2: Casablanca Workshop: Adaptation to Climate Change and Disaster Preparedness in the Coastal Cities of North Africa, June 22-23, 2010, Morocco 14. UD1: Session on Urban Renewal Operators at the International Forum: Villes nouvelles: pour des métropoles durables, September 30-October 1, 2010, Marseille 15. EW2: Consultation on the TORs for the Water Demand Management Case Study on Jordan, October 2009, Jordan, with the Ministry of Water and Irrigation, Ministry of Agriculture, Jordan Valley Authority, Water Authority of Jordan, KfW, EIB, and GTZ 16. EW1: Workshop on Network of Environmental Prosecutors (with French Ministry of Justice), March 15-16, 2010, Marseille 17. EW2: Partner Forum on Water and Governance with InWent, May 31-June 4, 2010, Tunis 18. EW2: Kick-off Workshop on Jordan Water Demand Management Case Study, June 2010, Jordan with the Ministry of Water and Irrigation, Ministry of Agriculture, Jordan Valley Authority, Water Authority of Jordan, and consulting firm ArabTech 19. EW/UD: First workshop on Climate Induced Migration and Displacement in MENA, June 15-16, 2010, Marseille 20. EW/UD: Participation in the Climate Change Mediterranean Initiative, Athens, Greece, October 22, 2010 21. CMI learning event: Recoupling or Switchover: Developing Countries in the Global For an explanation of program codes see Annex 1.

Economy, Presentation by Otaviano Canuto, Vice President and Head of Network , Poverty Reduction and Economic Management, World Bank, July 19, 2010, Marseille 22. CMI learning event: Consuls Day, Encounter on the CMI’s Activities, Oct. 25, 2010, Villa Valmer, Marseille annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 13


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The CMI’s Role in Addressing Regional Priorities ⦿S  kills, Employment and Labor Mobility ⦿K  nowledge Economy, Innovation and Technology ⦿ Urban and Spatial Development ⦿ Environment and Water ⦿ Transport and Logistics

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The CMI’s Role in Addressing Regional Priorities

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The CMI’s Role in Addressing Regional Priorities

When the CMI platform was created in 2009, fourteen programs expressed interest to be part of the CMI. They were easily grouped into five policy areas. Each cluster has a dialogue across the programs, but each program has an independent work program expressed in a logframe. In addition, each program is led by a different organization, such as the Agence Française de Développement (AFD), the Caisse des Dépôts et Consignations (CDC), the European Investment Bank (EIB), the Forum Euroméditerranéen des Instituts de Sciences Économiques (FEMISE), Plan Bleu, UNDP, and the World Bank. The City of Marseille, in addition to

Rationale, Goals And Activities

participating in various programs, provides the CMI with office space and two renovated conference rooms at the Villa Valmer. These organizations work with regional and national partners—such as think tanks, training institutions, centers of excellence, and other development institutions—to design and deliver programs that address critical development challenges facing the region. The CMI’s knowledge generation and learning activities ensure that experiences and lessons learned are debated by a wide range of interested people and institutions from both the public and private sector, as well as by civil society representatives in the Mediterranean region.

The Center for Mediterranean Inte- The activities undertaken by each gration is a multi-partner cooperative program vary. Many fall into the broad arrangement aimed at facilitating ac- category of knowledge generation in cess to advanced knowledge and best the form of regional, country, and lopractices, while also generating sup- cal studies, tools, policy notes, and port among public and independent methodologies for sector work. Others institutions, to further improve coopera- belong to the realm of capacity buildtion, enhance sustainable development, ing through knowledge sharing activiand converge policies toward greater ties, such as conferences, workshops integration in the Mediterranean region and policy dialogues. Still others in(as defined in the founding Memoran- volve networking, outreach and even dum of Understanding of June 30, advocacy for reforms. 2009, available at the CMI Web site: www.cmimarseille.org). Ultimately, CMI The CMI is engaged throughout the programs strive to provide solid inputs Mediterranean region, generally invitfor evidence-based policy choices, and ing broad participation, beyond CMI in so doing, help to improve govern- membership. A year into the launch ment strategies and actions, increase of the Center, 22 knowledge sharing the level of innovative and investment events were delivered or cosponactivities in the region, and facilitate sored by the CMI. Ten took place cooperation between countries around in Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, Syria the Mediterranean. and Tunisia. annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 17


The CMI’s Role in Addressing Regional Priorities

The CMI’s Role in Addressing Regional Priorities

Highlighting Integration Joint learning between northern The integration aspect is also ap- What matters most is the quality of the and southern partners is central parent in the development of a com- knowledge and information generated to the integration aspect of the mon vision and culture among the through program activities. ProducCMI’s work (box 1). It is intended concerned communities to address ing solid, communicable evidence is to take place through a participa- important challenges that transcend therefore a primary objective of CMI tory approach to program design; national borders. This takes place as programs. That evidence, shared with the mobilization of experts from partners gradually build a common the public in various ways, can be in the South in the development of understanding of issues and pos- the form of tools, benchmarking instrustudies and reports; and the par- sible policy responses through peer- ments (such as screening cards for uniticipation of policymakers and to-peer learning processes. versity governance), solid environmental representatives from the private indicators, or inspiring case studies and sector, academia, and think tanks First and foremost, policy-making good practice from the region (for exin the CMI’s knowledge-sharing communities and the public at large ample, in the areas of education, innoactivities. are influenced by factual evidence. vation, and using ICT for development).

box

1

Managing Interdependence in the Mediterranean

The increasing interdependence of societies, markets, and states in the Mediterranean region, as elsewhere, is nothing new. Less understood is how best to tackle the associated challenges—among them bridging the widening disparities in income inequality, creating new jobs, protecting human rights, and ensuring access to productivity- and innovationenhancing infrastructure and technologies. But interdependence offers opportunities as well as challenges, particularly in the presence of a shared policy framework that enables convergence on common objectives. Those objectives include maximizing trade complementarities, developing shared strategies to combat the effects of climate change, and ensuring the effective management of critical resources such as water and energy. Knowledge sharing and integration will be key to this process if the countries of the Mediterranean rim wish the benefits of globalization to accrue equitably to all

citizens of the region. A host of challenges ⊙ Forecasts indicate that the region remain, amid signs of notable progress. would be the second most affected of all global regions by a rise in sea level— Consider the following: and this in an area where high water ⊙ Levels of unemployment in the Arab stress is already present. Major extreme Mediterranean countries are among the weather events such as increased temhighest in the world. About 80 percent peratures, decreasing precipitation, and of the unemployed in these countries runoff are expected by 2030, but building practices in the region have not yet are between 15 and 34 years old. adapted to the worsening climate. ⊙ By 2030, the employable population is expected to increase by more than ⊙ Europe’s per capita expenditures 100 million throughout the area. Four on information and communication out of five of these additional workers technologies in 2008 were more than will be living on the southern shores. ten times those of the Middle East and North Africa. ⊙ The Arab Mediterranean countries have the lowest labor participation rate But there are also positive trends: of women in the world. ⊙ In Tunisia, gross enrollment rates in secondary school rose from 21 per⊙ The coastal cities of the Arab cent in 1975 to 85 percent in 2005. Mediterranean countries are among In Jordan, enrollment increased from the largest and most vulnerable urban 58 percent to 84 percent during the same period. agglomerations in the world.

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⊙ Internet usage in several Arab

Mediterranean countries has skyrocketed in the recent decade. For example, in 2000 there were more than 30 Internet users in Europe for every one in Morocco. By 2008, the gap had narrowed sharply: Europe had the equivalent of two users for every user in Morocco.

⊙ Starting a business in Egypt was

75 percent less costly in 2009 than six years earlier (as a percentage of GNI per capita). In Jordan, it was half as much. Tunisia, which ranks among the top performers, is on par with Europe in terms of the cost of starting a business.

Data were compiled by the CMI from vari­ ous sources (FEMISE, European Commis­ sion, World Bank). The Arab Mediterra­ nean countries include here Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia and the Palestinian Authority.


Phases of Program Development The current 14 programs based at the CMI are developing in the following way: ⊙ F irst, they gather key organizations in different countries to build the nucleus of technical and policy experts to provide guidance to the programs. ⊙ Second, studies are undertaken through research and analysis and validated through consultation events, expert meetings, and workshops for policymakers. ⊙ Third, analyses are consolidated for dissemination and dialogue. The specific products can be in the form of reports, guidebooks, action plans, and joint frameworks for action, which are disseminated through conferences, publications, Web sites, and the media. A number of programs are also expected to inform operational projects, whether financed by national authorities with or without external finance, or by the private sector. Most of the CMI’s 14 programs have entered the second phase. annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 19


The CMI’s Role in Addressing Regional Priorities

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

1 Skills, Employment and Labor Mobility (SELM)

This section gives a brief overview of each of the CMI’s 14 programs, highlighting their objectives and work plans for the coming 12–18 months, as well as their deliverables. The list of the CMI’s 5 clusters of 14 programs is presented in Annex 1. The logframe for each program is presented in Annex 2.

Job creation in the MENA region the mobility of the labor force; to has not kept pace with growth develop dynamic labor markets in the labor force. In particular, with adequate income protection the number of women and youth for workers; and to promote young seeking work is increasing. It is peoples’ economic opportunities thus important to understand the and enhance their participation as barriers to job creation in MENA. active citizens across Arab MediThe four programs in the SELM terranean countries. cluster have several objectives: to identify the basic skills and com- The program on Skills Developpetencies needed for employment ment to Promote the Emergence in key economic sectors in MENA of Knowledge Based Economies countries; to develop national (EM1), led by FEMISE, aims to and regional qualifications frame- identify the key skills, competenworks for enhanced employabil- cies, and occupations in 30 to 50 ity and labor market mobility; professional fields that will lead to build a regional approach to to job creation in MENA countries. improve quality and governance The work targets a few countries in tertiary education; to support in the region, including Egypt and

Developing a University Governance Screening Card for MENA

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Context, mission & Goals

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The University Governance Screening Card is a tool that will allow universities in the MENA region to compare themselves with universities around the world. The screening card will assess to what extent universities in the MENA region are following good governance practices that are aligned with their institutional goals and international trends, as well as monitor their progress over time and compare themselves with other institutions. The University Governance Screening Card was developed with other benchmarking tools in mind, such as the Australian Universities Benchmarking tools, the European Autonomy Score Card, the UK Good Practice Code and the Governance Guidelines reviewed by OECD. The questionnaire developed for the screening card includes 45 questions. It has been tested in Egypt, Morocco, Palestine and Tunisia. The next phase is ready to be launched, and so far 10 countries have expressed interest in participating: Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Syria, Tunisia, U.A.E., and Yemen. It is important to note that the Screening Card does not recommend a single model for good governance. In other words, the proposed approach is far from “one size fits all.” Since governance patterns are complex and context-sensitive, the goal is not to get the maximum score on each axis, but to determine if the governance arrangement is coherent (see illustration).


Tunisia. This analysis will enhance The second component is the the region, one concrete outcome mutual recognition of competen- program on building a regional this work has been the developcies, reduce skill mismatches in approach to improve quality and ment of a University Governance the supply and demand of labor, governance in tertiary education. Screening Card for MENA counand increase possibilities for It builds on the substantive work tries (box 2). The screening card is migrant circulation. The report done in this area in FY10. Work- the first step in developing a more on this work will be completed shops on university governance comprehensive tool to monitor uniby the end of 2010 and will be were held in Marseille in December versity performance. followed by dissemination events 2009 and June 2010. Each event in 2011, including a call for pro- was attended by high-level gov- The program on Employment posals for implementing the iden- ernment representatives including and Labor Mobility (EM3), led tified skill and competency frame- three ministers of higher education by the World Bank, also has two works in selected education and from the region in 2010, academics, components. The goal of the first training institutes. and representatives from several is to improve employment outkey partners such as ETF, OECD, comes by removing binding conThe program on Regional Har- ANQAHE, ENQA, and AFD. These straints that hinder the creation of m o niz at i o n o f S t an dar d s , exchanges led to the development more and better jobs. Two policy Qualific ations and Qualit y of a community of good practice. notes—one on labor regulation and A s suranc e Mec hanisms in In response to client demand from another on active labor market Post-Basic Education (EM2), led by the World Bank, has two main components. The first looks at the development of national and regional qualifications frameworks for enhanced employability and labor market mobility in MENA. Morocco, Tunisia , Egypt and Jordan have developed national qualifications frameworks (NQF) that they would like to compare to a regional qualifications framework (RQF). A position paper is being developed in FY11 on the potential relevance of a RQF for MENA countries. As a first step, a network of NQF practitioners and stakeholders has been established to promote regional dialogue on skills and mobility issues. annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 21


The CMI’s Role in Addressing Regional Priorities

PROGRAM OVERVIEW policies—were developed in FY10. active labor market policies. The Finally, the work program on They are disseminated through first two workshops were mainly Young People in Arab Counworkshops and the CMI Web site. oriented toward migration experts tries: Promoting Opportunities The second component of the and researchers from international and Participation (EM4), led by program aims to strengthen migra- organizations or research centers/ the World Bank, was launched at tion management (at the level of universities, both in Europe and a high-level conference in Marsending, receiving, and returning the Arab-Mediterranean world. seille in April 2010 (box 3). Beyond countries) and establish portabil- The last two workshops were the significant participation of ity of social benefits for migrants. geared toward academics, policy- the southern rim of the MediterIt will provide policy makers on near research, and client-country ranean up to the ministerial level, both sides of the Mediterranean counterparts working on design the conference led to the adopwith innovative concepts and evi- or implementation of labor market tion of a common declaration with dence-based guidance on effec- reforms. In FY11, the program will the League of Arab States detailtive policy interventions in this include mapping and priority-set- ing the next steps of the program. area. To launch this program, a ting workshops that should lead The main aim of the program is to “labor week” at the CMI in March to a vetted and partner-agreed collect data and share knowledge 2010 included four workshops action-oriented research program. about young people’s economic focusing on migration manage- The work program on monitoring and active citizenship opportuniment, portability of social benefits and evaluation of policy interven- ties across Arab Mediterranean for migrant workers, income pro- tions will also continue if financing countries. The program will protection for the unemployed, and can be found. mote evidence-based options for youth-related programs in the region (starting with Tunisia and Morocco) by providing comparable qualitative and quantitative data sets, replicable research methods and tools, and capacity building opportunities for Arab partners. Data collection and analysis for the Morocco youth inclusion study Promoting box has already been completed, and a Green Jobs for workshop to share the results with Youth in the key youth policy stakeholders will Mediterranean be organized in FY11. Opportunities for youth employment in Business” (KAB) program and Green Busi-

3

green industries were discussed with the founders and managers of new sustainable businesses in the Maghreb during a technical session at a conference held in Marseille in April. The conference, entitled “Young People in Arab Countries: Promoting Opportunities and Participation,” was organized by the cross-sectoral youth team from the World Bank and the CMI. The discussion focused on the challenges of environmental preservation, employment, and entrepreneurship in southern and eastern Mediterranean countries. Specialists from UNEP and ILO introduced several programs, for example, the “Know About 22 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

ness Development Services. The KAB global program, initiated in the early 1990s by the ILO and the International Training Center, integrates entrepreneurship into secondary, vocational/technical training, and higher education systems. The program has been implemented in 10 MENA countries. 
 
 Participating were the Moroccan Energy Agency, the Centre de Développement des Energies Renouvelables (whose Maison Energie program supports the creation of SMEs in renewable energy), and the founder of BTZ Energy, a private solar energy company. The session produced recommendations for policy makers.


2 Knowledge Economy, Innovation and Technology (KEIT) Technological innovation and dif- wards demonstrating the impact put in place. The program is fusion are the main driving forces of ICT on local development. Pi- implemented with the support of for long-term economic growth lot projects are currently being European communities, such as in the Mediterranean region. The developed in Morocco and Leba- the cities and regions of Milan, two programs in this cluster aim non in partnership with local au- Malaga , Reims and Marseille. to promote technological innova- thorities. The pilot projects focus A workshop will take place in tion by offering policy insights at on three dimensions: local admin- Marseille in November 2010 to the national and sub-national lev- istration, support of small enter- take stock of results and lessons els, both with a clear operational prises, and citizen engagement. learned. The involvement of new perspective. C o n c r e t e I C T a p p l i c a t i o n s , cities and regions is expected to such as Geographic Informa- develop both North/South and The main objective of the pro- tion Systems (GIS), are being South/South knowledge transfer. gram on Fostering Innovation an d Financ in g I nnovat ion Projects (IT1), led by the EIB, is to increase the deal flow of box innovation projects in the Mediterranean. Activities anticipated to begin in early 2011 include Developing benchmarking of innovation supTechnopoles port organizations (such as speand Science Parks cialized agencies and innovation in the Mediterranean incubators); innovation climate assessments to identify legal, The EIB, the Medibtikar program of the European Commission and the World regulatory, and other obstacles Bank have in recent years adopted a number of initiatives geared toward helping to innovation; and a feasibility Mediterranean countries develop technopoles and science parks. In doing so, they study for technology platforms discovered that little had been written about them. They therefore felt a need to take stock of these countries’ experience and of the knowledge accumulated by offering common services to inexperts regarding their creation, planning, and management. terested countries. In addition, training sessions will be offered The result was the guidebook Plan and Manage a Science Park in the Mediteron technopole management in ranean: Guidebook for Decision Makers, which was formally launched during a EIB/CMI press conference on April 16, 2010, followed by wider dissemination to the region (box 4). A steering partners on both shores of the Mediterranean. Algeria, Egypt and Monaco have committee is being set up to expressed high interest in the area. guide the IT1 program.

4

The IT2 program, Information Society Initiative for the Mediterranean Region (ISI@MED), led by the UNDP, is geared to-

Along with other countries, they will participate in the high-level workshop on technopoles to be organized by the EIB and the World Bank Institute in 2011. To help stakeholders think about what is needed to foster such initiatives, videoconferences will be organized with representatives from both the Maghreb and Mashrek countries, leading to a workshop with practitioners in the first quarter of 2011. A wrap-up conference on this topic is planned for 2012. annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 23


The CMI’s Role in Addressing Regional Priorities

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

3 Urban and Spatial Development (UD)

24 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

The importance of urban issues in The Strategic Urban Developthe Mediterranean region cannot ment (UD1) program, led by the be overemphasized. Throughout World Bank and the CDC, has history, cities have played a key role three main components: (i) regionin economic development. The four al and urban planning; (ii) urban programs that constitute the CMI’s land management; and (iii) urban Urban and Spatial Development renewal and expansion. In particu(UD) cluster deal with key issues fac- lar, it will provide analytical work ing local and central authorities, the leading to the assessment of the design of urban development strate- current spatial structure, regional gies, adaptation to climate change, imbalances, and forecasts of urrenovation of historic city centers, banization in 2030 and 2050, in and improving urban transport. close collaboration with national governments. This work will be discussed at a workshop in the spring of 2011. In parallel, the program is establishing a network of private and public urban planners and operators to stimulate exchange of experiences in urban renewal and expansion operations. As an initial step, a mapping of key research centers and think tanks working in or on the region has been completed and is available on the CMI Web site. These components will converge at a high-level conference on urban development strategies in Barcelona in March 2011. The conference will take stock of and assess the different methodologies currently being used in urban development, along with specific city experiences. It will be organized with the support of key networks, including Medcities and Cities Alliance.


The program on Cities and Climate Change (UD2), also led by the World Bank and the CDC, started with the development of studies on urban vulnerability to climate change in three coastal cities: Alexandria, Tunis, and Casablanca. The studies were disseminated to decision-makers, academics, and urban experts in these cities in FY10. The program now focuses on analysis of resilience capabilities and formulation of action plans, which will be presented at a regional conference in Marseille in early 2011. In addition, a regional study of opportunities for climateappropriate urban development and energy efficiency in buildings (which are a major source of carbon emissions in cities) will be carried out in the five partner countries and presented in Barcelona in May 2011 (after the Carbon Expo).

The Medina 2030 program (UD 3), led by the E I B , wa s launched at a regional conference held in Marseille in October 2009. It concentrates on the renewal of historic city centers. The work now includes developing a study to identify 20 potential sites for investment projects to be financed by public authorities, financial institutions, and private entities. The study is expected to be completed in 2010 and will be followed by indepth investigation to select six to ten sites. A scientific committee, with high level representatives from selected, influential organizations operating in the field, has also been constituted to oversee the program.

The goal of the Sustainable Urban Transport program (UD4), led by the AFD, is to develop a comprehensive and integrated approach to planning, developing, and managing efficient and sustainable urban transport policies and systems. The program is being developed jointly with southern stakeholders and a variety of partners (CERTU, CODATU, Plan Bleu, CETE, and the city of Marseille). A three-year cycle of six targeted capacity building conferences is planned. The cycle will end with a general conference in 2012. A Web-based handbook that builds on analytical materials and concrete experiences showcased at the workshops is also being developed. The launch conference took place in Damascus in April 2010, and the next one, focusing on old city centers, will take place in Marseille during the November 2010 Semaine Economique de la MĂŠditerranĂŠe (Mediterranean Economic Week). The goal of this meeting cycle is to build a community of practice that would take stock of best practices on both rims of the Mediterranean and contribute to deepening the Mediterranean culture in this field.

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 25


The CMI’s Role in Addressing Regional Priorities

PROGRAM OVERVIEW 4 Environment and Water (EW) The Mediterranean region is strained capture the economic dimensions by unequal water availability and of natural resources management ecological fragility. According to the and reach out to non-water and World Bank, the worldwide average non-environment policy makers to water availability is close to 9,000 mainstream environment and water cubic meters per person per year management into the broad ecocompared with only around 1,100 nomic development agenda. cubic meters per person per year in the MENA region. Moreover, that fig- The Governance and Knowlure is predicted to fall by half by 2050, e d g e C o m p o n e n t o f t h e and the region’s natural resources “Sustainable MED” Program base is expected to degrade due to (EW1), led by the World Bank demographic and economic growth. and with support from the GEF, Despite significant improvements seeks to generate and diffuse over the past decade, adequate natu- knowledge to inform decision ral resources management within and makers in the design and impleacross national borders still requires mentation of sustainable envithe attention of a broad range of policy ronmental programs. Key areas makers in the Mediterranean region. to be addressed include legal frameworks, innovative financing, To address these challenges, the environmental economics, crossthree programs of the Environment cutting strategic assessment, and Water (EW) cluster aim to and capacity building. Work has

box

5

Mainstreaming the Environment in the Policymaking Process in Mediterranean Countries

The aim of this major CMI 2012 report is to support efforts to mainstream the integration of the environment in the agenda of policymakers in Mediterranean countries using critical evidence, innovative analytical tools, and updated data gathered at a regional level. This CMI flagship report will assess the socio-economic cost of environmental degradation, the benefits of ecosystem services and natural capital, and the integration of environmental issues in economic and social development. It is being developed 26 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

begun in the area of environmental economics with substantive discussions on the preparation of a flagship repor t for 2012: Enhancing the Economic Benefit of Environmental Assets in the Mediterranean Region (box 5). On the theme of legal frameworks, a second workshop on the Mediterranean Net work of Environmental Prosecutors was held in 2010 in Marseille, with support from the French Ministry of Justice. During the workshop it was proposed that REMPEC (the Regional Marine Pollution Emergency Response Centre for the Mediterranean Sea), based in Malta, should coordinate the network until a meeting of all parties can be convened to discuss the final implementation arrangements.

in close collaboration with the World Bank and with support from the GEF, AFD, EIB, FEMISE and Plan Bleu. The development of the report relies on a highly consultative approach through networks of national experts and workshops to bring together policymakers and experts. It will involve representatives from governments (in particular, ministries in charge of finance, the economy, and planning) as well as stakeholders involved in environmental issues within the

Mediterranean, including international institutions, academic research centers, the private sector, media, and other parts of civil society. A consultation on the report with a broad range of public and private actors from the North and the South, including ministerial level representatives, is planned during the Semaine Economique de la Méditerranée (Mediterranean Economic Week) in Marseille in December 2010. It is anticipated that the report will be available for the 6th World Water Forum in Marseille in March 2012.


5Transport and Logistics The program on Water Resources prove environmental economic The Euro-Mediterranean NetPolicies and Management (EW2), evaluation in relation to climate work of Logistic Platforms led by the AFD, aims to support the change, water resources, and (LOGISMED), led by the EIB aims adoption of sustainable water de- marine and coastal ecosystems. to facilitate international transit and mand management. It was launched A comparative assessment of sev- exchanges between Mediterranean with the preparation of the Jordan eral case studies on water manage- countries and the European Union case study led by the Jordanian group ment from the Mediterranean is and help better organize internal Arab Tech. Discussions are underway already complete. In addition, as traffic flows. LOGISMED is a conwith two other countries, Morocco an integral part of the flagship tributor to the development of the and Tunisia. Two upstream capacity- 2012 report, Plan Bleu will take private sector in the Mediterranean— building training seminars are planned the lead in conducting a regional notably through the establishment for 2011—one in Jordan and one in analysis of the economic valua- of public-private partnerships—and Morocco—with the support of the CE- tion of fisheries to assess their is included in the Regional Action FEB (the corporate academy of AFD). importance to the region. It will Plan of Transport developed by the The objective of the training is to pro- also conduct a cost-benefit analy- European Commission. mote understanding and the use of a sis of marine protected areas to common language on the economic determine the benefits of ecosys- At the CMI, the goal of the LOGISMED aspects of water demand manage- tems services, assess the impact program is to provide the Mediterment among stakeholders. Finally, a on employment and job creation (or ranean region with integrated loprospective study on the potential loss) of a significant move toward gistics platforms that conform to for water saving in 12 countries, with the adoption of renewable energies internationally recognized practices comparative assessments at the re- and energy efficiency, and evaluate through joint learning and training. gional level, was recently completed the economic impact of extreme More specifically, the program aims by Plan Bleu. The study will comple- climate events. Finally, the program to: develop a network for logistics ment the country case studies on wa- plans to assess the implementation training in the Mediterranean with ter demand management. costs of the Mediterranean Strate- similar curricula so that the region gy for Sustainable Development—a has a pool of specialists to serve The Environmental Economic strategic framework that was ad- the needs of logistical platforms and Evaluation program (EW3), led opted in 2005 by countries around companies in the sector; establish by Plan Bleu, is intended to im- the rim of the Mediterranean. networks of teachers and professionals with an interest in training in transport and logistics; and provide support for the creation of a network. In line with the spirit of the CMI, LOGISMED focuses on a variety of stakeholders ranging from policy makers, logistics operators, transport companies, transport and logistics professionals, and training professionals from the higher education sector.

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 27


The CMI’s Role in Addressing Regional Priorities

driving for results Evaluating Our Progress The raison d’être of the CMI is to facilitate greater integration of economies in the Mediterranean region. The notion of integration is therefore at the very core of the evaluation process that is being put into place. The CMI has developed an evaluation framework at three levels that would be applied to each of the 14 programs. The evaluation framework has also been discussed at meetings of the Strategic Council in December 2009 and February 2010. ⊙ First, programs are evaluated based on their design, which should demonstrate the value of the CMI as a unique multi-partner platform, highlighting the value added and increased efficiency brought about

28 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

through collaboration with and between different institutions in the delivery of joint work programs. The value of the programs should also be reflected in the close association with and involvement of southern partners, in line with the raison d’être of the Center. ⊙ Second, programs are evaluated based on their outputs, such as the new knowledge they develop through studies and reports, the common culture they build among partners and participants, and the analytical tools they provide. Several programs have already reached this evaluation stage. Client demand for further intervention, such as technical assistance or dissemination events, is also a positive sign of interest generated by the programs.

⊙ Third, programs are evaluated based on the impact that they have on the policy-making process. Programs should aim to improve policies or contribute to the establishment of cooperation schemes (such as joint qualification schemes in education or cooperative R&D projects). A number of CMI programs should lead to such tangible outcomes. Ultimately, programs should contribute to the greater convergence of economies and societies in the Mediterranean region. Although it is not easy to assess the contribution of CMI programs it is nevertheless essential to have such a long-ter m per spective within the overall framework for the assessment of the value added of the CMI.


The value of the CMI as a whole will be a result of the sum of the outputs and outcomes of the individual programs and the synergies among them. Monitoring tools and indicators are being put in place to appraise progress made on each of the three evaluation levels outlined above. These elements will serve as the basis of the overall evaluation of the Center to be undertaken after three years of active operation. Annex 3 provides the CMI’s approach to an evaluation framework. Resource Mobilization Funding for the CMI is assured for F Y10–12 (ending June 30, 2012). The Center’s budget currently stands at $21.934 million for FY10–12, despite budget constraints faced by contributors. The World Bank’s contribution for the period is $8.982 million (as of October 27, 2010). The CMI’s Multi-Donor Trust Fund (MDTF) stands at $3.94 million for FY10–12, with contributions from the European Investment Bank; the French Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs; the French Ministry of Economy, Industry, and Employment; AFD; and the CDC.

Partner contributions to the five cluster s of 14 programs are $9.012 million. Actual disbursements in FY10—a start-up phase when programs were gearing up for deliver y—amounted to $4.405 million. Allocations from the MDTF for various programs began in October 2010. As programs develop and mature at the CMI beyond this three-year horizon, it is possible that contributions from partners to the Center’s overall activities may increase. The CMI’s long-term sustainability requires commitment from all partners to move the agenda forward. Annex 4 provides additional details on the budget.

box

6

Reaching Out The CMI has developed communications and outreach activities to reach out to stakeholders from government, the private sector, and civil society, including academics, think tanks, research organizations, and the media. The CMI’s Web site, www.cmimarseille.org, is the first point of outreach and provides an overview of our activities to date (box 6). Annex 5 highlights the CMI’s activities between October 2009 and December 2010. In addition, we have developed a CMI brochure and CMI e-letters, of which there will be five issues by the end of 2010. The CMI has also organized press conferences (for example, for the launch of the Technopoles Guidebook) and developed press releases on CMI events. The Web site and most other materials are available in English, French and increasingly in Arabic. Moving forward, the CMI will invest in building Web-based interactive tools to engage a broad audience in our work.

The CMI Web site at a Glance

Over the last six months since launch of the website in May 2010

⊙ 5 680 website visitors ⊙ 99 631 hits ⊙ Visitors are increasingly originating from southern Mediterranean countries including from the Gulf region

⊙ Increase in the number of visitors by 67 percent between August and September For the month of October

⊙ Nearly two-thirds of content viewed via downloadable files (reports, brochures) ⊙ Nearly half (44 percent) of visitors are referred from external web pages including from partners. annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 29


30 /// CMI /// annual report 2010


new Initiatives

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 31


new Initiatives

1 Advancing Toward a Knowledge Economy

32 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

The CMI is responding to an in- The time is ripe for countries in the creasing interest in advancing the Mediterranean to take similar advanknowledge economy. In an era of tage of the knowledge revolution to globalization spurred by technolo- spur a new era of growth and comgy, knowledge and innovation have petitiveness and to develop modern become key drivers of growth and economies that are agile, networked competitiveness. internationally, and constantly learning. The importance of the knowlTo cope with the current economic edge economy as a fundamental and employment challenges, coun- pillar of economic growth and job tries are making the move to knowl- creation is increasingly recognized edge-based economies to capture throughout policy-making communifull benefits from global integra- ties in the Arab world, as evidenced tion and to better use their human by the strong interest of high-level capital base to boost productivity, policy makers on the knowledge growth, and employment. Many economy approach as a lever for countries—including Chile, Finland, development at the Tunis conferKorea, Malaysia, Singapore and ence that was held on December Tunisia—are already reaping the 1-3, 2009 under the auspices of the benefits of investment in human Government of Tunisia, ISESCO and capital, innovative and competitive the World Bank. enterprises, effective institutions, and relevant technologies to thrive in the global economy. Policymakers from Brazil, China, India and Russia—which are home to more than 40 percent of the world’s population—are also using pragmatic policies to leverage their strengths through sound investments in education, science and technology, transparent governance, institutional quality, and modern information and communication technologies.


Some MENA countries are already Countries have also embarked on placing knowledge-based devel- reforms in the various pillars of the opment processes at the core of knowledge economy. For example, their development strategies. For Jordan has instituted reforms of its example, Tunisia has developed a higher education system. It also comprehensive knowledge econo- made skills development a priority my strategy as part of its five-year as part of its goal to become a replans. In recent years, Qatar has gional center for ICT development, initiated a national knowledge and, more importantly, a knowleconomy campaign that aims to edge economy. The Government diversify its economy. In Algeria, of Saudi Arabia is also investing in the Conseil National Economique the development of new universiet Social has organized national ties, especially to boost education conferences on the knowledge in science and technology areas. economy to raise awareness on key issues.

Since the development of a knowledge economy involves several domains, it relates to various CMI programs dealing with innovation finance; skills, education, migration, and youth; and urban development. This initiative has also been discussed with various stakeholders from the region, especially from Tunisia, who have expressed strong support. Through this work, the CMI also endeavors to provide technical and intellectual support to the proposed Heads of State Summit on the Knowledge Economy that is anticipated to take place in 2012 under the auspices of ISESCO and other partners.

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 33


new Initiatives

34 /// CMI /// annual report 2010


2 Office de Coopération économique pour la Méditerranée et l’Orient (OCEMO)

The idea of the OCEMO was pre- business schools, and the Medisented by Prof. Jean-Louis Reiffers terranean network of schools of during the Union for the Mediter- engineers. It would be founded ranean “For’UM” on May 27, 2010, as an independent association in Marseille. Consultations are on- under French law, which would going to oversee its establishment, allow it to enter into financial and possibly in November 2010. The administrative arrangements with Office would support a network partners, such as the CMI. for economic researchers, private sector investors, and institutions of The Of fice’s multidimensional learning, creating a platform to fur- activities would encompass: (i) ther enhance economic coopera- FEMISE and other think tanks tion in the Mediterranean and the such as Cercle des Economistes; Middle East. It would be located (ii) Anima and Med-Alliance as in the currently unoccupied part of private sector facilitators; and (iii) the Villa Valmer and together with research and learning centers. It the CMI would constitute a major would inherit the work programs knowledge hub for the Mediterra- of each constituent institution, nean. Closely coordinated with the but would immediately be able to strategic approach, work programs, embark on strategic partnerships, and administration of the CMI, the benefiting from cross-fertilization Office would also be a resource for and synergies. Two major ideas regional cooperation, in particular are to create a cycle of high-level the Union for the Mediterranean. conferences on specific economic issues and a cycle of engageBased on the EU-funded pro- ments with the private sector. grams of FEMISE and Anima , the Office could bring together F r o m t h e o u t s e t , t h e O f f i c e a number of regional and sub- would have a foundational partregional networks and institu- nership with the CMI. The Office tions. It would benefit from the would complement the CMI’s fosupport of key institutions such cus on knowledge tools with key as the CDC and Euromed, as networks of economists, private well as the City of Marseille and firms, and learning institutions. the Chamber of Commerce of C o l l a b o r a t i o n w o u l d b e e n Marseille Provence. Bodies that sured from the beginning on (i) have expressed interest are the strategy, (ii) program synergies, C ercle des Economistes, the and (iii) administrative efficiency. M e d -A l l i a n c e a n d A S C A M E , Access to the Office’s networks along with learning institutions would enhanc e the potential s u c h a s th e U ni ve r s i t y Paul impact of the CMI’s outputs in Cézanne, Euromed Management both the generation and outand its network of Mediterranean reach phases.

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 35


36 /// CMI /// annual report 2010


Annex 1 CMI Clusters and Programs

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 37


annex 1 CMI Clusters and Programs

Cluster

programs

Skills, Employment and Labor Mobility (SELM)

EM1 Skills Development to Promote the Emergence of Knowledge-Based Economies

EM2 Regional Harmonization of Standards, Qualifications and Quality Assurance Mechanisms in Post-Basic Education

EM3 Employment and Labor Mobility

EM4 Young People in Arab Countries: Promoting Opportunities and Participation

38 /// CMI /// annual report 2010


Main purpose: To support new policies in the listed areas

Specific issues

Lead organizations and partners

Accountable manager or task team leader

Planning for a regional qualification framework to improve vocational training

Outlining a regional qualification framework for basic skills to be acquired by the end of compulsory schooling and for 30–50 trades in selected sectors in 3–4 countries of the region

FEMISE WB EIB École de la Deuxième Chance – Marseille Euromed Management Cultural Council of the Union for the Mediterranean AFPA

Frédéric Blanc FEMISE f.blanc@femise.org + 33 4 91 31 51 95

Building the capacity for management and provision of quality assurance in higher education

Improving quality, relevance, and governance of Arab universities in order to meet European standards

WB ENQA AERES OECD European universities Arab Network for Quality Assurance in Higher Education

Adriana Jaramillo WB ajaramillo@worldbank.org + 33 4 91 99 24 47

Activating labor markets in the Mediterranean Improving social protection and labor management for migrants

Enhancing employment creation through better matching of supply and demand and better labor market policies, income support systems, and labor market information Improving labor mobility through better migration management and portability of social protections

WB IOM ETF Ministries of labor Chambers of commerce National employer organizations ILO EFE A4E

Andras Bodor WB abodor@worldbank.org + 1 202 473-9020

Strengthening the youth policy framework, local participation, and incomegeneration opportunities

WB AFD ENPI Education and Culture Directorate (EU) FEMISE City of Marseille

Youth employment and empowerment

Jean-Louis Reiffers FEMISE jl.reiffers@femise.org + 33 4 91 31 51 95

Robert Holzmann WB rholzmann@worldbank.org + 33 4 91 99 24 45

Gloria La Cava WB glacava@worldbank.org + 1 202 458-7646

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 39


annex 1 CMI Clusters and Programs

40 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

Cluster

programs

Main purpose: To support new policies in the listed areas

Knowledge Economy, Innovation and Technology (KEIT)

IT1 Fostering Innovation and Financing Innovation Projects

Technological parks and incubators as levers for fostering innovation

IT2 Information Society Initiative for the Mediterranean Region (ISI@MED)

Territorial development and information society

Cluster

programs

Main purpose: To support new policies in the listed areas

Urban and Spatial Development (UD)

UD1 Strategic Urban Development

Long-term urban strategies in metropolises and mid-size cities

UD2 Cities and Climate Change

Urban adaptation to and mitigation of climate change

UD3 Renewal of Historic City Centers: Medinas 2030

Cultural heritage and social upgrading

UD4 Sustainable Urban Transport

Share good practices and tools for sustainable urban mobility systems


Specific issues

Lead organizations and partners

Accountable manager or task team leader

Support for technopoles through: ⊙ Training/coaching of central officials, local authorities, and site managers ⊙ Knowledge dissemination

EIB WB AFD FEMISE Maghreb countries

Philippe Guinet EIB p.guinet@eib.org +352 4379 84616

Initiation and support of pilot/demonstration projects in selected regions (Morocco, Lebanon, Palestine)

UNDP WB Networks of regions and cities

Najat Rochdi UNDP najat.rochdi@undp.org +41 22 917 8866

Specific issues

Lead organizations and partners

Accountable manager or task team leader

Regional and urban planning Urban land management Urban expansion and renewal

WB CDC AFD EIB Cities Alliance UCLG Medcities Euromediterranée

Anthony G. Bigio WB abigio@worldbank.org + 1 202 473-6304

Urban vulnerability to climate change Climate-appropriate urban development Energy efficiency in buildings

WB CDC AFD Plan Bleu ADEME

Maryse GAUTIER CDC maryse.gautier@caissedesdepots.fr + 33 4 91 99 24 62

Integrated plans and programs Adapted financing Network of experts

EIB WB AFD Networks of cities City of Marseille

Guy Fleuret EIB g.fleuret@eib.org + 352 4379 7 4619

Institutional framework and planning Integrated multimodal management Mass transit and urban densification Environmental and social impacts

AFD Codatu MEEDDM Plan Bleu EIB WB Medcities City of Marseille UCLG

Xavier Hoang AFD hoangx@afd.fr + 33 1 53 44 31 31

Guy Fleuret EIB g.fleuret@eib.org + 352 4379 7 4619

Pascale Chabrillat CDC pascale.chabrillat@caissedesdepots.fr +33 1 58 50 98 31

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 41


annex 1 CMI Clusters and Programs

Cluster

programs

Environment and Water (EW)

EW1 Governance and Knowledge Componement of the “Sustainable MED� Program

EW2 Water Resources Policies and Management

EW3 Environmental Economic Evaluation

42 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

Cluster

program

Main purpose: To support new policies in the listed areas

Transport and Logistics

T1 Euro-Mediterranean Network of Logistics Platforms (LOGISMED)

Regional integration through transport and logistical platforms


Main purpose: To support new policies in the listed areas

Specific issues

Lead organizations and partners

Accountable manager or task team leader

Sustainable and integrated management of the Mediterranean’s large marine ecosystem. Priority sectors: natural resources management (integrated coastal zone & water management); pollution abatement (water treatment; solid and hazardous waste; industrial pollution; sea transportation; maritime safety); climate variability (resilience to reduced water resources; increased occurrence of droughts/floods)

Environment valuation; cost of environmental degradation and benefits from ecosystems protection Strategic and regional environmental assessments; payment for environmental services environment as a business opportunity Development of tools for assessment of climate change vulnerability and of impact scenarios for integrated coastal zone management and integrated water resource management Enforcement of legal and judicial regime

WB GEF UNEP/MAP Plan Bleu AFD FEMISE EIB

Sergio Margulis WB smargulis@worldbank.org +33 (0)4 91 99 2459

Environmental economic analysis to enlighten policy makers’ decisions about planning and water management

Thinking outside the water box: water efficiency, water demand management, links with agricultural policies

AFD Plan Bleu Jordan Tunisia Morocco WB

Frédéric Maurel AFD maurelf@afd.fr + 33 1 53 44 31 31

Public goods evaluation; cost-benefit analysis; modeling; mainstreaming ecosystem analysis in sectoral policies

Pricing of public goods (benefits provided by marine, coastal ecosystems) Assessment of cost of inaction Evaluation of costs of extreme events

Plan Bleu GEF WB AFD

Pierre Icard Plan Bleu picard@planbleu.org + 33 4 92 38 86 19

Specific issues

Lead organization and partners

Accountable manager or task team leader

Regional integration through capacity building for professionals in transport and logistics

EIB CETMO ISTED MPC

José Manuel Fernández Riveiro EIB fernandm@eib.org + 352 4379 82705

Gilles Pipien WB gpipien@worldbank.org +33 (0)4 91 99 2458

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 43


44 /// CMI /// annual report 2010


Annex 2 Logframes of CMI’s 14 programs

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 45


annex 2 Logframes of CMI’s 14 programs

Cluster: Skills, Employment and Labor Mobility (SELM) EM1 Program: Skills Development to Promote the Emergence of Knowledge-Based Economies

46 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

Overall goal

Specific objectives

Audience

The program aims to identify, through a consultative process, the basic skills and competencies needed for key economic sectors in the countries of the Middle East and North Africa

To identify key competencies and occupations that will lead to new job creation in MENA countries in a set of 30 to 50 professional fields

Vocational training institutes in Mediterranean countries (both public and private), Euromed training institutes, trainees, employers


Note: Updated September 15, 2010

Lead organization Partner organizations

Involvement of the South

Deliverables

Expected results

FEMISE

Participation of FEMISE members from the South in the team of experts: Université de Tunis El Manar (for the Maghreb) and Cairo University (for Egypt)

Enhancement of mutual recognition of competencies

École de la Deuxième Chance–Marseille

A report that will outline a regional qualification framework for basic skills (to be acquired by the end of compulsory schooling) for 30–50 trades in selected sectors across 3–4 countries in the region.

Euromed Management

The report will provide:

AFPA

⊙D  etails on the required competencies, content of needed training, and lists of potential schools, institutes, and universities that are able to provide the needed qualifications

WB EIB

Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur region (France)

Enhancement of Mediterranean capacities to jointly develop new activities Reduction of skill mismatches in labor supply and demand Better opportunities for migrant circulation

⊙R  ecommendations for: (a) improving technical and vocational education and training programs and teachers in the concerned field in MENA countries to make them more responsive and relevant to labor market needs; and (b) improving the mobility of persons in these sectors through identification of a network of organizations that are potentially suitable providers of training in these sectors. Organization of a technical workshop in Winter 2010 and another in first quarter 2011.

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 47


annex 2 Logframes of CMI’s 14 programs

Cluster: Skills, Employment and Labor Mobility (SELM) EM2 Program: Regional Harmonization of Standards, Qualifications and Quality Assurance Mechanisms in Post-Basic Education

Overall goal

Specific objectives

Audience

The program aims at improving post-basic education and related institutions in MENA countries. It will have two components:

To increase the transparency, portability, and understanding of qualifications in the region

Ministries of education and training, training institutions, employers, quality assurance and certification agencies

1 Development of national and regional qualifications frameworks for enhanced employability and labor market mobility in the region

To promote knowledge sharing on issues related to qualifications frameworks and systems To support the development of national qualification frameworks (NQFs) To help reduce skills mismatches in the labor market

2 Consolidation of the Arab network of accreditation and quality assurance in higher education and governance reforms affecting university management and accountability

To improve the employability of higher education graduates To facilitate mobility of students, teachers, and graduates across the region To develop analytical tools to improve the management and quality of higher education To promote knowledge sharing on issues of quality, governance, and financing.

48 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

Ministries of higher education, quality assurance agencies and networks, universities, and related research and policy institutions


Note: Updated September 15, 2010

Lead organization Partner organizations

Involvement of the South

Deliverables

Expected results

WB

The network of practitioners and stakeholders in the area of national qualification frameworks will include countries in the South that are already advanced in establishing NQFs

FY10: Two regional workshops on issues related to national and regional qualification frameworks (December 14–16, 2009; June 14–15, 2010)

Enhanced employability of graduates in MENA

ETF AFD ILO

At least four countries with an approved national qualification framework that wish to explore its extension into a regional framework

FY11: A follow-up position paper on the potential relevance of a regional qualification framework for MENA countries, including analysis of different scenarios for setting up a regional cooperation mechanism

OECD

A larger share of employers in selected MENA countries aware of the existence of qualification frameworks Three pilot countries participating in the program for the International Assessment for Adult Competencies (PIAAC) with WB support

⊙ Organization of an interagency meeting on technical and vocational education and training (UNESCO, ILO, OECD, ETF, EC) (January 17, 2011) ⊙ Establishment of a network of NQF practitioners and stakeholders as a first step in developing a future platform for regional dialogue on skills and mobility issues. WB ANQAHE ETF AFD ILO OECD ENQA Universities

A regional seminar including representatives from the South (in December 2009) raised the need for a screening card for the MENA region.

FY10: Two regional seminars: ⊙ Governance of Universities, December 14–16, 2009 ⊙ Enhancing Qualifications Frameworks and Quality Assurance in MENA, June 14–15, 2010 Concept Note on screening card for university governance

Three countries with university governance reforms underway A learning community to disseminate good practice examples on university governance, quality, and financing

FY11: ⊙ Report on challenges and opportunities posed by mobility and migration for higher education systems in MENA ⊙ Constructing a screening card for university governance ⊙ Conference on dissemination of screening card findings, April 2011 ⊙ Conference on financing of higher education (with AFD), January 2011

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 49


annex 2 Logframes of CMI’s 14 programs

Cluster: Skills, Employment and Labor Mobility (SELM) em3 Program: Employment and Labor Mobility

Overall goal

Specific objectives

Audience

The program aims at improving labor market activation policies and ultimately increasing welfare, labor mobility, and labor market performance in the Mediterranean region. It has two components:

To take stock of countryspecific cross-sectoral analyses of labor market performance and identify regional patterns in binding constraints on employment creation

Relevant ministries (labor, social affairs, education), national statistical agencies, employment services, labor market observatories, social insurance agencies

1 Improving employment outcomes through the removal of binding constraints on the creation of more and better jobs

To improve the design of income protection programs for the unemployed, with special attention to unemployment insurance schemes To establish a platform to share M&E results on ALMPs, and to foster an M&E culture in labor market interventions To improve labor market information systems and standards of statistical data collection on labor markets

2 Strengthening migration management (at the level of sending, receiving, and returning countries) and establishing portability of social benefits for migrants

50 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

To provide policy makers on both sides of the Mediterranean with innovative concepts and evidence-based guidance on effective policy interventions

Relevant ministries (labor, social affairs, migration); NGOs and policy-oriented research institutions dealing with migration.


Note: Updated September 15, 2010

Lead organization Partner organizations

Involvement of the South

Deliverables

Expected results

World Bank in cooperation with international organizations (ETF, ILO, OECD)

Latin America’s experience in using and producing reliable, high-quality data for use in making public policy under the MECOVI program

Regional workshops on unemployment insurance design and active labor market programs that take stock of existing programs, research, and M&E and help set a joint agenda with donor partners and relevant national players

Better understanding of the most binding constraints on employment creation in the region Better knowledge and shared learning on regional labor market patterns in line with the World Bank’s MILES framework for identifying and removing binding constraints on employment creation, a strategy that can guide country-specific policies and prioritize reform options across labor, education, and social protection policies

Data collection on public employment services and an inventory of ALMPs (governmental and nongovernmental) in Arab Mediterranean countries Regional policy note on income protection for the unemployed and unemployment insurance design

Widespread access to organized knowledge on existing ALMPs and their M&E

Regional workshop on international best practices: use and management of labor force survey data

Better design of unemployment insurance reforms in the region Better availability, comparability, and dissemination of microdata (mainly labor force survey data).

World Bank in cooperation with international organizations (e.g., IOM, ILO, OECD), bilaterals (e.g., AFD, GTZ) and research institutions in the north and south (e.g., CARIM)

Inputs into the stocktaking exercise

Mapping and prioritysetting workshops

Participation in stock-taking assessment workshops

Vetted and partneragreed action-oriented research program

Sponsorship of key deliverables (e.g., social protection for temporary migrants) Requests for M&E on domestic migration programs

Development of: ⊙ Results framework for migration management ⊙ C onceptual framework and operational guidance for portability ⊙ Evidence base for migration management interventions

Fund-raising for filling knowledge gaps M&E-focused work program on policy interventions Dissemination activities, including e-learning

Work program beyond workshops and research strategy depending on funds from AWI and success with donors

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 51


annex 2 Logframes of CMI’s 14 programs

Cluster: Skills, Employment and Labor Mobility (SELM) EM4 Program: Young People in Arab Countries: Promoting Opportunities and Participation

Overall goal

Specific objectives

Audience

The aim of this program is to expand young peoples’ economic and citizenship opportunities, with a special focus on disadvantaged youth in Arab Mediterranean countries.

To strengthen the national and local youth policy frameworks, in line with current discussions on neighboring countries’ policy harmonization

Ministries of youth; youth employment departments of labor ministries; national youth agencies; Arab civil society organizations focused on disadvantaged youth

To build greater capacity among national and local governments and youth stakeholders to implement and evaluate inclusive youth investments, even in conflict-affected areas To encourage sharing of best practices and inter-regional exchanges among youth stakeholders

52 /// CMI /// annual report 2010


Note: Updated September 15, 2010

Lead organization Partner organizations

Involvement of the South

Deliverables

Expected results

World Bank

Policy dialogue with youth-related ministries in Morocco, Tunisia, Lebanon, and Jordan through consultative meetings.

Presentation of youth Inclusion country study (including data analysis) in Morocco (late fall 2010)

Improved understanding of youth exclusion and youth transitions through multi -country data sets (Morocco, Tunisia, and Egypt)

League of Arab States Agence Française de Développement City of Marseille École de la Deuxième Chance Microsoft Manpower WBI

Attendance of Arab youth representatives in policy discussions at the Euro-Arab Youth Conference in July 2010. Youth representatives are selected from Arab youth organizations and networks through the youth forum of the League of Arab States(LAS). Involvement of stakeholders from Morocco, Tunisia, and Lebanon in the youthclimate change initiative.

Launch of youth inclusion country study and data collection in Tunisia (through FY11) Youth and Climate Change workshop for Morocco, Tunisia, and Lebanon (October 2010) In the overall context of the Arab World Initiative (AWI): 1. Preparation of institutional development fund for the League of Arab States’ Population and Youth division, an effort that includes: ⊙ Establishment of structures for youth participation ⊙ Training and capacity building for youth ministries and relevant agencies ⊙ Guidelines and procedures for creating national and local youth participatory councils ⊙ A consultation in Marseille with Arab stakeholders on the design of the fund.

Increased capacity for Arab youth policy development, monitoring and evaluation at LAS and subsequently at country level Initiation of preparations for a youth development program in at least one country Initiation of preparations for a youth development grant project in at least one conflict-affected area

2. Technical assistance for national youth policy and youth friendly labor market policies.

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 53


annex 2 Logframes of CMI’s 14 programs

Cluster: Knowledge Economy, Innovation and Technology (KEIT) it1 Program: Fostering Innovation and financing innovation projects

Overall goal

Specific objectives

Audience

The main goal of the program is to increase the flow of bankable innovation projects within the Mediterranean area by:

To generate diagnoses and recommendations on key aspects of the ecosystems of innovation, accompanied by analysis at various levels (local, regional, national)

Decision makers and leaders from ministries of science, technology, and innovation; ministries of education and skills; innovation sites (innovation clusters, incubators); universities; local governments and municipalities, etc.

• Identifying areas for improvement in regulatory, financial, and organizational aspects of national innovation systems • Backing initiatives that broaden the skills and information of entrepreneurs and various agents of innovation and kick start financial arrangements in support of innovation.

To produce preliminary studies of operational tools using maps of existing structures, geographic information systems, and collaborative information and exchange tools that bring together disparate actors To stage direct training and awareness-raising sessions; to organize workshops and conferences To share knowledge and create a steering committee

54 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

Representatives of the private sector and from innovative SMEs Promoters of innovative projects


Note: Updated September 15, 2010

Lead organization Partner organizations

Involvement of the South

Deliverables

Expected results

EIB

The program has started to involve appropriate southern partners from Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia who will work on various facets of the program. Other countries such as Algeria and Syria have also expressed interest in the program.

A reference document for the planning and management of science parks in Mediterranean countries (March 2010)

More innovation projects

Various training workshops based on the themes identified in the above document (early 2011)

Better governance and management of technoparks and innovation agencies

The first launch meeting was October 2010.

Benchmarking studies on arrangements for business incubators and/or intellectual property systems (fourth quarter 2011)

World Bank EU Commission (Directorate General for Research and Enterprise) FEMISE

Improvement in the understanding of innovation systems

MEDINVEST/ANIMA CDC AFD GTZ UNCTAD Partner countries (MIT Tunisia, MICT Morocco, GAFI, Egypt)

Removal of obstacles to innovation, including adaptation of legislation, university education (curriculum geared toward entrepreneurship, etc.), development of new financial schemes

Identification of legal and regulatory obstacles to innovation systems, in the form of an innovation assessment (first quarter 2012)

Coordination of initiatives and demonstration of the value added of a Web portal

System of professional qualification in the field of Innovation (1st quarter 2012)

Validation, knowledge dissemination, and enhanced visibility of the program

Preliminary study on the development of technology platforms A pre-feasibility study on an innovation portal to disseminate information, support innovation, and promote collaborative projects (fourth quarter 2011) International conference on technopoles/science parks (early 2012) Meetings of steering committee (up to two per year)

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 55


annex 2 Logframes of CMI’s 14 programs

Cluster: Knowledge Economy, Innovation and Technology (keIT) it2 Program: Information Society Initiative for the Mediterranean region (isi@med)

Overall goal

Specific objectives

Audience

The main aim of the program is to support local development by helping territories adopt participatory, integrated approaches to the use of ICT for development and implementation of local information society plans that are consistent with national development policies.

To build the capacity of local authorities to use:

Local decision makers Local ICT experts

⊙ ICT for territorial management: use of ICT (information systems in general and participatory GIS (PGIS) in particular) for strategic planning, management, and monitoring of local services and resources ⊙ ICT for local economic development: targeting of local SMEs, especially cooperatives in poor areas, to help them better exploit market opportunities ⊙ ICT for community engagement and empowerment, notably: (i) Migrants and diasporas (ii) Youth employability and access to labor markets (iii) Social inclusion and involvement of youth across cultural and national boundaries.

56 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

National actors in related fields

3 target territories: ⊙T  angiers-Tetouan and Oriental (Morocco) ⊙N  orthern and southern Lebanon ⊙ L atakia (Syria)


Note: Updated September 15, 2010

Lead organization Partner organizations

Involvement of the South

Deliverables

Expected results

UNDP

North/South cooperation: ISI@MED is built on cityto-city cooperation. The ultimate beneficiaries (local authorities in Lebanon, Morocco, Syria, and Senegal) participate in joint formulation of action plans.

Ongoing activities:

Design and implementation of local information society plans in selected territories

World Bank Lombardy Region (Italy) Provence–Alpes–Côte d’Azur Region (France) City of Malaga City of Marseille Networks of cities and regions

South/South cooperation: Adding to the implementation of ICT tools in each ISI@MED local project, the program is in itself an innovative approach, one designed to develop and facilitate city-to-city cooperation in the South. Events for knowledge sharing: ISI@MED networking events are organized in close collaboration with decentralized cooperation actors on both rims of the Mediterranean. Some of these workshops are taking place in the southern partner cities.

⊙ ISI@MED Strategic Workshop 2010: a high-level workshop to build on ISI@MED early success (December 2010). Workshop outcomes will be the first inputs to the ISI@MED handbook, a guide to how and why ICT should be integrated into local policy plans.

Enhanced capacity of local decision makers and technical experts Network/community of ICT expertise in selected areas Innovative economic activities

⊙ Morocco /// City of Oujda: PGIS /// Oriental region: (i) policy notes; design and implementation of an e-services portal for citizens, businesses, and tourism; (ii) e-learning platform for training on strategic planning for local decision makers and elected municipal officials; (iii) development of a database on historic and cultural heritage in preparation for an ecotourism platform.

Public–private partnerships

⊙ Lebanon - City of Tripoli: PGIS

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 57


annex 2 Logframes of CMI’s 14 programs

Cluster: Urban and Spatial Development (UD) ud1 Program: Strategic Urban Development

Overall goal

Specific objectives

Audience

The program aims to contribute to improved public policy-making related to urban development.

To assess current spatial structure, regional imbalances, and forecasts of urbanization

Policy makers

The program concentrates on the following three components:

To predict the size and shape of major cities

Urban experts Operators

⊙ Regional and urban planning ⊙ Urban land management ⊙ Urban expansion and renewal.

To review urban land management policies, practices, and regulations To facilitate access to secure land tenure and functional land markets To explore the technical, institutional, and financial aspects of urban renewal programs To facilitate exchanges and foster innovations in urban practices

58 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

Researchers


Note: Updated September 15, 2010

Lead organizations Partner organizations

Involvement of the South

Deliverables

Expected results

World Bank Caisse des Dépôts et Consignations

The program has already carried out a mapping of relevant institutions and centers of excellence. With about 100 entries, the mapping is online at the CMI web site.

A network of urban operators active in urban renewal will be created in partnership with Euroméditerranée. An expert meeting will take place in Marseille in December 2010, followed by a study of main issues and themes, and by a conference to launch the regional network by June 2011.

Establishment of a permanent mechanism to facilitate exchanges among agencies and institutions responsible for urban renewal operations in the cities of the Mediterranean

Euroméditerranée EIB Medcities WBI Cities Alliance AFD

The key consultant for the network of urban renewal operators is from Tunisia. The study of future urbanization will imply the involvement of statistical and urban planning institutions from the five member countries of the South. The conference on urban development strategies will be based on the involvement of municipal governments of the region which have been or will be carrying out strategic urban planning.

A study of future urbanization in the five partner countries of the South is being conducted using statistical and spatial data and will be presented at a regional workshop by June 2010. A conference on city development strategies will take place in Barcelona in March 2011. It will be organized with Medcities, Cities Alliance, and WBI.

Promotion of policies related to urban sustainability Forecasting of urban growth in the member countries to help governments plan infrastructure and other investments, as well as related social protection and human development policies Enhancement of the role of subnational governments (particularly municipalities) in the development of city plans and local economic development policies and investments

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 59


annex 2 Logframes of CMI’s 14 programs

Cluster: Urban and Spatial Development (UD) ud2 Program: Cities and Climate Change

Overall goal

Specific objectives

Audience

The program is designed to contribute to improved public policy-making related to climate change.

To develop a methodology on the issue of urban vulnerability to climate change and natural disasters that could be applied to cities across the region

Policy makers

The program concentrates on three components: ⊙ Urban vulnerability to climate change ⊙ Climate-appropriate urban development ⊙ Energy-efficient buildings.

To identify policies and review models and best practices of climateappropriate urban development initiatives To assess projected ecological and carbon footprints of major urban operations To explore options for piloting and mainstreaming eco-friendly and energy efficient approaches To facilitate exchanges among practitioners

60 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

Urban experts Operators Meteorological institutes and climate research centers Researchers


Note: Updated September 15, 2010

Lead organizations Partner organizations

Involvement of the South

Deliverables

Expected results

World Bank Caisse des D茅p么ts et Consignations

Ministry of Environment, Morocco

Urban resilience and adaptation action plans will be prepared for the cities of Alexandria, Casablanca, and Tunis and for the Bouregreg Valley in Morocco, focusing on urban planning, infrastructure protection, and institutional preparedness.

Assistance to central and city governments in forecasting the impacts of climate change and natural disasters on specific urban locations through the production of urban vulnerability maps and the preparation of adaptation action plans

A regional workshop on urban vulnerability will take place in Marseille in January 2011 to discuss and validate the urban action plans.

Guidance to facilitate and promote climateappropriate solutions for urban development and mainstreaming of energy efficiency in urban areas

Casablanca Prefecture European Space Agency Bouregreg Valley Agency WBI-CF-Assist GFDRR NTF-PSI

Ministry of Environment, Tunisia Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency

TFESSD Arab Academy for Science, Technology, and Maritime Transportation, Alexandria MEDENER RCREEE, Cairo Urban planning authorities and energy agencies in the five member countries

A regional assessment of demand and opportunities for climate-appropriate urban development and urban energy efficiency will be carried out in the five partner countries.

Reinforcement of partnerships with the regional and national entities in charge of these issues

A regional workshop will take place in Barcelona in May (after Carbon Expo) to present and discuss the outcomes of the study. Outreach materials will be disseminated.

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 61


annex 2 Logframes of CMI’s 14 programs

Cluster: Urban and Spatial Development (UD) UD3 Program: Renewal of Historic City Centers: Medinas 2030

Overall goal

Specific objectives

Audience

The Medinas 2030 initiative will identify projects that integrate numerous strategies. These projects will be used to raise awareness among policy makers and international organizations of the need to rehabilitate historic town centers and specifically to inform on the types of projects that should be implemented to ensure the sustainable development of the medinas.

To raise awareness among public decision makers (at the local, regional, national, and international levels) of the importance of urban rehabilitation in the historic city areas of southern Mediterranean countries

Urban regeneration experts: public and private sector, international and local, technical operators

To identify integrated mechanisms and strategies for urban regeneration, covering spatial, economic, and social planning, including public governance and consultation issues, especially with international financial institutions

Public decision makers (national and local)

To design funding mechanisms that can support such operations throughout their progress, both upstream (diagnosis) and downstream (final evaluation and regular follow up)

62 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

Representatives of stakeholders and financing organizations


Note: Updated September 15, 2010

Lead organization Partner organizations

Involvement of the South

Deliverables

Expected results

European Investment Bank

Organization of a workshop in 2011 in partnership with the Arab Towns Organization

Creation of a steering committee: a network of decision makers and experts to accompany and monitor the implementation of the program. The first meeting is scheduled for December 2010.

Identification and establishment of adequate mechanisms for integrated spatial, economic, and social planning.

World Bank AFD CDC Aga Khan Trust for Culture (AKTC) EuroMed Heritage European Commission (CoR, ARLEM) French Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs (MAEE) Medcities UNEP UNESCO AFESD

Participation on steering committee of national policy makers from the southern Mediterranean countries Involvement of southern Mediterranean countries: Morocco (MHUAE) Syria (MLA) Tunisia (ASM) Egypt Jordan Lebanon

Design and adaptation of suitable financing products to facilitate the implementation of urban rehabilitation operations in historic centers. These products would complement existing loans and grants (in the form of PPPs, for example).

Completion of a study in October 2010 that will provide an analysis of selected urban rehabilitation projects across the Mediterranean. Launching of a comprehensive study to identify specific rehabilitation projects, define the economic and financial components of the projects, determine financial needs, and adapt financial tools and mechanisms to support projects. This study is to be started by 2011, with final results expected by the end of 2012.

Launching of technical assistance activities related to the Medinas 2030 investment program.

UATI/AVEC/IUAS Arab Towns Organization

Organization of two conferences to communicate the progress and results of the program to a wide network of experts and policy makers (mid2011 and end of 2012). Pursuit of a one-year process of consultation of financial partners begun in June 10. Conduct of a pilot project in Meknès to identify ways to assist the housing sector. Initial results are expected in mid-2011.

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 63


annex 2 Logframes of CMI’s 14 programs

Cluster: Urban and Spatial Development (UD) ud4 Program: Sustainable Urban Transport

Overall goal

Specific objectives

Audience

The program will develop a comprehensive and integrated approach to plan, manage and develop efficient and sustainable urban transport policies and systems.

To strengthen the Mediterranean skills network in the field and forge partnerships

Policy makers at the central and local levels in charge of urban development, urban areas, and environment High-level civil servants in charge of urban transport

The program has four main themes:

To assemble a methodological toolbox on urban transport policies tailored for Mediterranean cities

⊙ Institutional framework and planning

To disseminate best practices

⊙ Integrated multimodal management ⊙ M ass transit and urban densification ⊙ Environmental and social impacts.

64 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

Urban transport experts as well as experts and policy makers on specific environmental issues Representatives of CMI stakeholders and financing organizations


Note: Updated September 15, 2010

Lead organization Partner organizations

Involvement of the South

Deliverables

Expected results

AFD

Alternation of events in the southern and northern rim cities of the Mediterranean

Six Mediterranean conferences on sustainable urban transport policies in the Mediterranean region

Fostering of a Mediterranean sense of ownership based on good practices in the field of sustainable urban transport

CODATU CERTU CETE

Joint financing, management, and hosting of the first event (in April 2010) by the government of Syria

FY10 (completed): • Regional conference in Damascus (April 2010)

Plan Bleu City of Marseille

Presentation of about half of all cases by experts from the south

EIB World Bank Medcités UCLG

This approach relies on active involvement of public institutions, local governments, universities, and centers of excellence in Mediterranean countries The development of the Web-based handbook will allow for the sharing of knowledge between decision makers and practitioners in Mediterranean cities

FY11 (planned): • Workshop in Marseille (November 29–December 1, 2010) on urban transport in medinas and ancient centers • Workshop in a southern rim city (May 2011)

Building on the workshops, promotion of operational solutions that can be quickly implemented Contribution to the improvement of North– South and South–South dialogue and its impacts

FY12 (planned): • 2 workshops: one in the North (Spain), one in the South • Wrap-up Mediterranean conference Updated guidance and recommendations

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 65


annex 2 Logframes of CMI’s 14 programs

Cluster: Environment and Water (EW) ew1 Program: governance and knowledge component of the “sustainable med” program

Overall goal

Specific objectives

Audience

The overall goal of KnowMed, the knowledge component of the Sustainable Med program, is to generate and diffuse knowledge and strengthen governance in the Mediterranean region to encourage appropriate policies in the following areas:

To generate and diffuse knowledge within and outside the Sustainable Med program in order to create the conditions for the implementation of appropriate political measures and support informed decision making (public policies, commitment on common objectives, investments)

Public sector decision makers (at national and local levels) responsible for development of public policies that affect the environment, such as ministries of economy, industry, finance, energy, housing, transport, health and education

⊙ Sustainable natural resources management: (i) integrated coastal zone management; (ii) protection of marine resources; (iii) vulnerable ecosystems and biodiversity; (iv) water resource management ⊙ Pollution abatement (corrective and preventive measures): (i) water treatment; (ii) solid and hazardous waste management; (iii) industrial pollution abatement; (iv) sea transportation, (v) maritime safety ⊙ Climate variability: (i) resilience to reduced surface and groundwater reserves (WRM); (ii) increased occurrence of droughts; (iii) increased occurrence of floods (weather-related disaster management); (iv) carbon finance

66 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

The Know-Med program includes 7 sub-programs for FY11–12: ⊙ Legal framework (mainstreaming environment in legal framework): • EW1.1 Network of Environmental Prosecutors ⊙ Environment as a business opportunity (developing innovative financing and private sector involvement): • EW1.2 PPP platform to support green technologies ⊙ Environmental economics (developing economic instruments to mainstream environment in the economic development agenda) • EW1.3 “2012 Med report” ⊙ Sectoral approach (developing cross-cutting strategic assessments): • EW1.4.a Health and environment • EW.1.4.b Biodiversity offset / Capacity building: • EW1.5 “EW Academy”

Civil society, NGOs, and academics Private sector


Note: Updated September 15, 2010

Lead organizations Partner organizations

Involvement of the South

Deliverables

Expected results

WB, GEF EW1.1 Network of environmental prosecutors: WB, REMPEC, French Ministry of Justice

The first activity to be implemented under EW1 is EW1.3, the publication of the 2012 Med report on economic benefits from environmental assets. This activity will involve partners from the South through:

Deliverables for FY11: EW1.1 Network of environmental prosecutors: Workshops focused on marine pollution

Strengthened and coordinated network of think tanks and centers of expertise in southern and eastern Mediterranean countries

EW1.2 PPP platform to support green technologies: WB, IFC, institutional investors EW1.3 2012 MED report: WB, UNEP/MAP, Plan Bleu, AFD, FEMISE, EIB EW1.4.a Health and environment: WB, AFD EW.1.4.b Biodiversity offset: WB, AFD EW1.5 EW Academy: WB, AFD, Plan Bleu

⊙ Local experts: Much of the analytical work will be performed by local experts (ERF in Egypt, FEMISE experts). ⊙ Decision makers: At least two consultation workshops will be organized to bring together national experts, stakeholders, and decision makers. ⊙ Local institutions: Country statistical institutions will be involved in data collection and gap identification. ⊙ Dissemination: Key messages will be shared with southern partners before March 2012. ⊙ CMI: The Oversight Committee will be regularly informed during the project.

EW1.2 PPP platform to support green technologies: ⊙ Phase 1: Development of concept of the Sustainable Med PPP platform, consultation and mobilization of private sector partners, and submission of a PIF to the GEF ⊙ Phase 2: Structuring phase of the investment fund EW1.3 2012 Med report: Consultation and preparation of a report on enhancing the economics benefits from environmental assets in the Mediterranean

Raised awareness among decision makers on environmental issues Wider access to relevant knowledge on environmental stakes and opportunities in the Mediterranean A shared common vision to integrate environment within the economic development agenda of the Mediterranean Mainstreaming of environmental considerations in the development of public policies

EW1.4.a Health and environment: Phase 1: Workshop, study, and work program for phase 2 EW.1.4.b Biodiversity offset: ⊙ Phase 1: Workshop, short statement note, and work program for phase 2.

Identification and implementation of appropriate new investments

EW1.5 EW Academy: (i) Test curricula (ii) Launch of a network of trainers and former students

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 67


annex 2 Logframes of CMI’s 14 programs

Cluster: Environment and Water (EW) ew2 Program: Water Resources Policies and Management

Overall goal

Specific objectives

Audience

The program provides decision makers analytic tools to assess a range of policy options related to sustainable water resources policies. Three key elements :

To translate broad discussions of water demand management (WDM) into operational actions

Policy makers involved in the water, agriculture, energy, tourism, and environment sectors at the central, catchment, and local levels

To introduce economic analysis into countries’ water strategies to help prioritize cost-effective measures for WDM

Research centers and think tanks from both rims of the Mediterranean

⊙ Assessment of the cost-effectiveness of different investments aimed at reducing water losses and, where applicable, development of non-conventional water resources ⊙ Assessment of the optimal use of political instruments (tariffs, monitoring of excessive withdrawals, etc.) ⊙ Consultations on water allocation among different users (agriculture, industry, municipalities, etc.).

68 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

To build capacity among decision makers at the regional level

Water users (WUAs, NGOs, etc.) and financing organizations


Note: Updated September 15, 2010

Lead organization Partner organizations

Involvement of the South

Deliverables

Expected results

AFD

Commitment of Jordan (organization and financing) for the first capacitybuilding seminar

Capacity-building activities (training on environmental economic valuation for the program audience) Planned for FY 11: • A three-day capacitybuilding seminar in English in Jordan (first quarter 2011) • A French-speaking seminar in Morocco (second quarter 2011)

Endorsement of the findings of case studies and regional analysis by policy makers at national level

Plan Bleu EIB World Bank

Joint elaboration of terms of reference and joint steering committee for each case study Mandatory local consultancy for case studies National workshops with stakeholders for discussions of results High-level exchanges between countries and between several ministries (including finance, planning, agriculture) National studies discussed in workshops with national experts, synthesized, and made available online (done in FY10)

Endorsement by decision makers of enhanced environmental economic analysis in political decision-making process

Scenario-based case studies for selected countries (Jordan, Morocco, Tunisia, Croatia) Recommendations from national and regional seminars to discuss findings of studies (policy recommendation paper) Delivered in FY10: ⊙ Finalization of TOR following national-level workshop in Jordan ⊙ Selection of Jordanian consulting firm, Arab Tech ⊙ Launch of Jordan case study Planned for FY11: Jordan case study ⊙ October 2010: key findings of the situation in Jordan ⊙ First quarter 2011: first national diagnostic workshop ⊙ June 2011: construction and analysis of scenarios and analysis of economic impact Morocco case study ⊙ End 2010: study launched ⊙ Second quarter 2011: key findings and national workshop on diagnosis Tunisian case study (second semester 2011: study launched) High-level regional seminars to exchange findings of the studies Plan Bleu prospective study to update data on potential for water savings at national and regional levels (on 12 countries with comparative assessment at regional level) – Delivered in FY10

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 69


annex 2 Logframes of CMI’s 14 programs

Cluster: Environment and Water (EW) ew3 Program: Environmental Economic Evaluation

Overall goal

Specific objectives

Audience

The program aims at improving environmental economic evaluation in relation to:

To assess the implementation costs of the Mediterranean Strategy for Sustainable Development (MSSD), taking into account adaptation measures for climate change

Policy makers at the national and local levels; civil society in Mediterranean countries

To encourage economic approaches to water management and promote economic accounts for water in the Mediterranean countries

Policy makers at the national and local levels; civil society in Mediterranean countries

To assess the importance of fisheries in the Mediterranean economies (SeaMed for Med Report)

Policy makers at the national and local levels; civil society in Mediterranean countries

To conduct cost-benefit analysis of marine protected areas To support the sustainable management of forest services through a four-year joint program (2011-2013)

Policy makers at the national and local levels; civil society in Mediterranean countries

⊙ Climate change ⊙ Water resources ⊙ M arine and coastal ecosystems ⊙ Forest services.

70 /// CMI /// annual report 2010


Note: Updated September 15, 2010

Lead organization Partner organizations

Involvement of the South

Deliverables

Plan Bleu

Local consultants, dissemination through local partners, and local discussion of the reports

Three scenarios : • Business as usual • MSSD implemented • MSSD implemented, plus climate change adaptation

Same as above

Comparative assessment based on case studies from Mediterranean countries estimating the cost of increasing water efficiency

Better management of water demand

Same as above

A regional study on economic valuation of Mediterranean fisheries

A common metric to help policy makers better manage environmental issues

Plan Bleu AFD EEA

Plan Bleu FEMISE WWF MedPo MAP-RAC/SPA IFREMER Nice University

Expected results

A common metric for use by policy makers in evaluating the costs of implementing MSSD

Case studies with cost-benefit analysis of protected marine areas (to be launched in 2011)

Financing: EC (via MAP) FFEM AFD AECID

Plan Bleu FAO GTZ French Ministry of Agriculture

Same as above, plus Silva Mediterranea

Sectoral and methodological analysis and sharing of regional experience.

Mainstream the socioeconomic importance of forest-based ecosystem services in relevant sectoral policies (e.g., tourism, rural and urban development, energy

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 71


annex 2 Logframes of CMI’s 14 programs

Cluster: Transport and Logistics t1 Program: euromediterranean network of logistics platforms (logismed)

Overall goal

Specific objectives

Audience

EIB has developed the concept of LOGISMED, with the goal of developing a network of Euro-Mediterranean logistical platforms to facilitate exchanges among Mediterranean partner countries and EU countries.

To develop a network for logistics training in the Mediterranean basin with the aim of creating a regional pool of specialists who have followed a harmonized curriculum

Policy makers, logistics operators, transport companies, transport and logistics professionals, training professionals and institutions (including the higher education sector)

The objectives of the project are focused on identifying training needs in the logistics sector and providing solutions to meet those needs. The program addresses training needs at three levels: ⊙ Administration ⊙ Logistic platforms operators ⊙ Logistic platforms users.

72 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

To create networks of teachers and professionals in the field of transport and logistics To encourage sharing of best practices and encourage interregional exchanges in logistics training To provide support for the creation of the LOGISMED network


Note: Updated September 15, 2010

Lead organization Partner organizations

Involvement of the South

Deliverables

Expected results

EIB

The LOGISMED program was presented in Jordan (April 2010) and Syria (June 2010) to an audience including representatives from all MPC.

An expert seminar to identify training needs and discuss potential solutions (Barcelona, November 2010).

Development of an action program for creating a logistics training network in the Mediterranean region

CETMO ISTED UNIMED MPC

Representatives from MPC will be invited to participate in forthcoming seminars. Feedback and recommendations from concerned MPC will be considered for the development of the main LOGISMED study. Proposed solutions to address training needs will assure participation of stakeholders from MPC. Participation of LOGISMED partners in the Euromed Transport Project, developed by the EC, will assure dissemination of results among MPC. The involvement of EIB in providing technical assistance for feasibility studies of logistic platforms in the MPC will also help in the dissemination of results.

Use of the Internet as a communication tool between members of the network

A short report summarizing the main findings of the seminar that will be the basis for the terms of reference for the main LOGISMED study (November 2011).

Creation of a pool of logistic training specialists that could be shared by training centers

A follow-up report on the elaboration of an action plan to propose solutions aiming to meet training needs in MPC. The study should also analyze the feasibility of a LOGISMED training network (March–April 2011). A high-level workshop with experts to assess and validate the guidelines and solutions proposed by the study (mid-2011).

Exploration of the feasibility of a certification mechanism for quality training in logistics Promotion of logistic platforms as a tool to provide a more efficient supply chain

Final seminar to present and disseminate results (December 2011).

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 73


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Annex 3 CMI’s Approach to an Evaluation Framework

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annex 3 CMI’s Approach to an Evaluation Framework

76 /// CMI /// annual report 2010


CMI’s Approach to an Evaluation Framework

Level 1: CMI’s Value for the Concerned Communities of Practice

Given that the CMI is a collaborative platform for knowledge sharing and aims to be a network among networks to foster greater Mediterranean integration, this level appraises the interest of different communities in potential CMI activities. A range of indicators can be used, including hits on and unique visits to the CMI Web site and on related programs, evaluation questionnaires to gauge the level of satisfaction of the target audience participating in different events, leveraging of resources provided by various partners and requests for customized policy services.

Level 2: CMI’s Impact on Joint Learning and Capacity Building The most tangible impact of CMI programs in the short and medium term will be on joint learning, which will take place through networks of people and institutions involved in, and benefiting from, the Center’s activities. Indicators to measure progress in this regard concern knowledge generation and dissemination, in terms of the impact of reports and publications (as, for example, through bibliometrics), and the development of communities of practice on certain topics that have been developed at the Center.

Level 3: CMI’s Contribution to the Convergence Process CMI programs should, in the medium types of questions. The first conand long term, produce evidence of cerns policies and reforms being put greater integration of the countries in place at least partly as a result of of the Mediterranean region. It will the CMI programs, including through be difficult to make firm attributions international cooperation schemes about such contributions owing to (as, for example, joint qualifications the presence of many other factors agreements). The second concerns and players. However, programs observed convergence in economic should, to the extent possible, docu- performance, social conditions and ment their relevance by asking two environmental sustainability.

Source: CMI Program Charter, as approved by the third Strategic Council Meeting on June 18, 2010 and available on the CMI website: www.cmimarseille.org annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 77


78 /// CMI /// annual report 2010


Annex 4 CMI BUDGET 2010

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 79


annex 4 budget 2010

CMI BUDGET SUMMARY FOR FY10-12 Update as of October 27, 2010 /// in US$’000; Exchange Rate: 1 Euro = $1.45 (as of January 2010)

CMI Coordination

Use of Funds Source of Funds

Governance meetings /3

Administration /4

Communication and Outreach

Operational Activities /5

World Bank /1 CMI Bank Budget allocation (FY10) Actual expenses (FY10)

100

900

32

410

54

784

30

453

50

1,428

50

413

50

1,450

50

350

200

3,778

132

1,173

54

784

30

453

100

400

300

3,140

300

4,178

432

4,313

54

784

30

453

Other Bank Budget allocations (FY10) Actual expenses (FY10) CMI Bank Budget allocation (FY11) Other Bank Budget allocations (FY11) CMI Bank Budget allocation (planned for FY12) Other Bank Budget allocations (FY12) To be determined Subtotal—World Bank CMI Bank Budget Allocation (FY10-12) Actual expenses (FY10) Multi-Donor Trust Fund (MDTF) (net of fees) /2 of which, contributions from: European Investment Bank (EIB) French Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs French Ministry of Economy, Industry and Employment French Development Agency: Agence Française de Développement (AFD) Caisse des Dépôts et Consignations (CDC) (France) Partner Contribution to Clusters of which, contributions from: AFD /6 Actual expenses (FY10) CDC /7 Actual expenses (FY10) EIB /8 Actual expenses (FY10) MEEDDM /9 Actual expenses (FY10) PLAN bleu /10 Actual expenses (FY10) CITY OF MARSEILLE /11 Actual expenses (FY10) ETF /12 Actual expenses (FY10) UNDP /13 Actual expenses (FY10) GEF /14 Actual expenses (FY10) Total Budget (World Bank, MDTF, Partners) Total Actual Expenses (FY10)

/1 World Bank Budget (BB) for three Fiscal Years: FY10-12 of $8.982 million (as of October 27, 2010). The budget sheet shows actual Bank disbursements for FY10 and the planned allocations for FY11 and FY12. /2 MDTF: $3.94 million, of which: AFD: €200,000/year for 3 years = $780,000; CDC: €100,000/year for 3 years = $390,000; EIB: €300,000/year for 3 years = $1,170,000; MOFA: €400,000 plus $750,000 from the donor balance account = $1,353,113; and MINEFI: $300,000 from the donor balance account. Exchange rates used according to the trust fund proposal submitted in 2009 (1€ = $1.3). Minus $35,000 for the set up fee and 5 percent for the trust fund administrative fee. /3 Governance meetings include 1 Annual Meeting , 3 meetings of the Strategic Council, and 2 meetings of the Oversight Committee per year. /4  This column includes staff salaries, travel, IT, consultants. /5 CMI operational activities, including funds for cluster/program activites and related events. /6 AFD contributes €150,000 ($218,000) for Urban Transport (UD4) and €220,000 ($320,000) for Sustainable Water Policies (EW2). AFD also provided €40,000 for the Youth program (EM4) in FY10. It will provide €40,000 for work on Financing of Higher Education (EM2) in FY11. Amounts reported do not include staff seconded to the CMI.

80 /// CMI /// annual report 2010


CMI Clusters Urban and Spatial Development

Environment and Water

Transport and Logistics

Skills, Employment and Labor Mobility

Knowledge Economy, Innovation and Technology

Total 8,982

17

30

11

1,500

17

30

11

1,379

300

250

1,190

649

17

1,044

11

1,721

19

1,960

744

200

838

100

1,882

1,740

1,900

1,044

467

2,058

130

649

34

1,074

22

8,982 3,100 3,940 1,170 1,353 300 780 390 9,012

218

320

116

654

87

47

58

192

2,175

2,175

197

197

218

218

122

116

334

886

21

75

218

500

500

56

56

609

609

170

170

217 74

109

109

435

29

19

122

100

100

100

100 653

653

250

250

3,000

3,000

0

0

3,872

4,896

218

2,499

1,226

21,934

1,129

307

0

1,282

366

4,405

/7  CDC provides €500,000 ($725,000) per year for 3 years for the programs on Strategic Urban Development (UD1) and Cities and Climate Change (UD2). /8 EIB provides €150,000 each ($218,000) for (1) Renewal of Historic City Centers: Medinas 2030 (UD3); (2) Transport and Logistics (T1); and (3) Fostering Innovation (IT1). In addition it provides €80,000 ($116,000) to Skills Development (EM1) and, through FEMISE, to KEIT (IT1). /9 M EEDDM has seconded a senior expert to the EW cluster for 2.5 years. /10 Plan Bleu will provide €200,000 ($290,000) for 3 years for the EW3 program that it leads, and €220,000 ($319,000) for activities under EW2. /11 The City of Marseille provides €100,000 per year for 3 years ($435,000) for various programs (possibly UD1/UD3/EM4/IT2). This contribution does not include the costs of renovating the second floor of the CMI as well as of the two conference rooms at the Villa Valmer. It also does not include the cost of one staff member based at the CMI. /12 The European Training Foundation (ETF) funded a secondee to the SELM program in FY10. /13 UNDP will provide €450,000 ($653,000) for 3 years for the IT2 program. /14 GEF will provide $3.0 million for FY11-12.

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 81


82 /// CMI /// annual report 2010


Annex 5 CMI Events and Content Development Update October 2009–December 2010

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 83


annex 5 CMI Events and Content Development Update

CMI Events and Content Development Update October 2009–December 2010

Skills, Employment and Labor Mobility (SELM Cluster) ⦿ Universities as Key Partners for Good Governance, Marseille, Dec. 16-17, 2009 ⦿ Employment and Labor Mobility Week including workshops on Managing Migration; Establishing Portability of Benefits; Income Protection for the Unemployed and Unemployment Insurance; and Active Labor Market Policies (ALMP), Marseille, March 8-12, 2010 ⦿ Young People in Arab Countries: Promoting Opportunities and Participation, Marseille, April 28-30, 2010 ⦿ Review Meeting for Regional Work on ALMPs and Labor Regulation in MENA, Marseille, June 10, 2010

⦿ Enhancing Qualifications Frameworks and Quality Assurance in MENA: Exploring Potential Tools to Facilitate Labor Mobility, Alleviate Skills Mismatches and Create Lifelong Learning Opportunities, Marseille, June 14-15, 2010 ⦿ Draft of University Governance Screening Card for MENA ⦿ Draft Framework to Evaluate the Impact of Migration Policies, jointly with IOM, ILO and the Global Forum on Migration Development ⦿ Three Policy Notes: Labor Regulation; Active Labor Market Policies; and Towards an Objective-driven System of Smart Labor Migration Management ⦿ Study on Social Protection for Temporary Migrant Workers ⦿ Report on Migration Management in the Mediterranean Region: Taking Stock, Reviewing, and Looking Ahead ⦿ Study on Portability of Pension, Health, and other Social Benefits: Facts, Concepts, Issues

84 /// CMI /// annual report 2010


Knowledge Economy, Innovation, and Technology (KEIT Cluster)

Urban and Spatial Development (UD Cluster)

⦿ Participation in Building 21st Century Knowledge Economies for Job Growth and Competitiveness in the Middle East, Tunis, Dec.1-3, 2009

⦿ Workshop on Medinas 2030, Marseille, Oct. 8-9, 2009

⦿ EIB/CMI Press Conference: L’innovation, priorité émergente du développement économique en Méditerranée, Marseille, April 16, 2010, based on Plan and Manage a Science Park in the Mediterranean: Guidebook for Decision Makers, Joint Publication of the EIB, World Bank, Medibtikar and City of Marseille ⦿ Technical Meeting for the Innovation Financing Program, Paris, Oct. 18, 2010 ⦿ Joint CMI-UNDP Strategic Workshop 2010 – Information Society Initiative for the Mediterranean (ISI@MED): Territorial Approach to Development and Democratic Governance through the Use of ICTs, at the Semaine Economique de la Méditerranée (Mediterranean Economic Week), Marseille, Nov. 30 - Dec. 1, 2010

⦿ Presentation of Urban and Spatial Development and Cities and Climate Change Programs at Africities, Marrakech, Dec. 14-19, 2009 ⦿ Regional Conference on Urban Transport, Damascus, April 11-12, 2010 ⦿ EUROMED Heritage Conference on Économie et financement du patrimoine and second tenure of the Medinas 2030 exhibition, Damascus, June 6-8, 2010 ⦿ Sustainable Urban Transport: Draft methodology toolbox for Mediterranean cities

⦿ Three workshops on Vulnerability and Adaptation of the Coastal Cities of North Africa to Climate Change and Natural Disasters. Presentation of the First Phase of the Study on Coastal Cities and Climate Change: May 18, 2010 in Tunisia; June 15-16, 2010 in Egypt; and June 22-23, 2010 in Morocco ⦿ Session on Urban Renewal Operators at the International Forum Villes nouvelles pour des métropoles durables, Marseille, Sept. 30-Oct.1, 2010 ⦿ Session on Transport in Old Urban Cities at the Semaine Économique de la Méditerranée (Mediterranean Economic Week), Marseille, Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 2010 ⦿ Session on Sustainable Urban Development, Marseille, Dec. 1, 2010, at the Semaine Économique de la Méditerranée (Mediterranean Economic Week) ⦿ Mapping of Mediterranean Southern Institutions focused on Strategic Urban Development and Cities and Climate Change

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 85


annex 5 CMI Events and Content Development Update

CMI Events and Content Development Update October 2009–December 2010

Environment and Water (EW Cluster) ⦿ Consultation on the TORs for the Jordan Water Demand Management Case Study, Jordan, Oct. 2009, with the Ministry of Water and Irrigation, Ministry of Agriculture, Jordan Valley Authority, Water Authority of Jordan, KfW, EIB, and GTZ ⦿ Workshop on Network of Environmental Prosecutors (with French Ministry of Justice), Marseille, March 15-16, 2010 ⦿ Regional Training on Environmental Safeguards, Marseille, March 17-19, 2010 ⦿ Partner Forum on Water and Governance with InWent, Tunis, May 31-June 4, 2010 ⦿ Kick-off Workshop on Jordan Water Demand Management Case Study, Jordan, June 2010, with the Ministry of Water and Irrigation, Ministry of Agriculture, Jordan Valley Authority, Water Authority of Jordan, and consulting firm ArabTech

86 /// CMI /// annual report 2010

⦿ First workshop on Climate Induced Migration and Displacement in MENA, Marseille, June 15-16, 2010 ⦿ Development of Training Modules on Environmental/ Water Economic Valuation with CEFEB (AFD) ⦿ Sustainable Med 2012 MED Report on Environment and Economy in the Mediterranean. Draft Concept Note and new studies commissioned with contributions from FEMISE, Plan Bleu, AFD and EIB ⦿ First series of consultations with southern partners and countries scheduled during the Semaine Économique de la Méditerranée (Mediterranean Economic Week), Marseille, Dec. 1, 2010


Transport and Logistics Cluster

CMI Governance and Learning Events

⦿ Regional seminar on Training Needs in Logistics, Barcelona, EIB, Nov. 23-24, 2010

⦿ Preparatory meetings for the CMI: Sept. 29, 2008; Nov. 18, 2008; Jan. 23, 2009; and July 21, 2009

Partner Activities

⦿ CMI’s First Annual Meeting: October 9, 2009

⦿ For’UM UFM Conference on Investing in the Mediterranean, ⦿ CMI’s Second Annual Meeting: November 18, 2010 Marseille, May 27, 2010 ⦿ Kick-off meeting of the 6th World Water Forum, Marseille, June 3, 2010 ⦿ Conseil International de la Ville de Marseille, Marseille, June 4, 2010

⦿ CMI Quarterly Program Leaders and Staff Meetings: Nov. 12-13, 2009; Feb. 17, 2010; June 16, 2010; Sep. 15, 2010 ⦿ CMI Oversight Committee Meetings: Feb. 10, 2010; June 9, 2010, Sept. 23, 2010; Oct. 13, 2010; Nov. 10, 2010

⦿ CMI Strategic Council Meetings: Dec. 4, 2009; Feb.19, 2010; June 18, 2010; ⦿ CMI Learning Days: How to Promote Mediterranean integration? Lessons from Experience and Ways Forward Feb. 18, 2010; How Can CMI Programs Contribute to Evidence-Based Decision Making? June 17, 2010 ⦿ Recoupling or Switchover: Developing Countries in the Global Economy Presentation by Otaviano Canuto, Vice President and Head of Network, Poverty Reduction and Economic Management, World Bank, July 19, 2010 ⦿ Consuls Day, Encounter on the CMI’s Activities, Oct. 25, 2010

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 87


A list of CMI Terms

ADEME

Agence de l’Environnement et de la Maîtrise de l’Énergie

AECID

Agencia Española de Cooperación Internacional para el Desarrollo

AERES

Agence d’Évaluation de la Recherche et de l’Enseignement Supérieur (France)

AFD

Agence Française de Développement

AFESD

Arab Fund for Economic and Social Development

AFPA

Association Nationale pour la Formation Professionnelle des Adultes

AKTC

Aga Khan Trust for Culture

ALMP

active labor market program

ANQAHE

Arab Network for Quality Assurance in Higher Education

ASCAME

Association of the Mediterranean Chambers of Commerce and Industry

ASM

Association de Sauvegarde de la Médina, Tunisia

CARIM

Consortium for Applied Research on International Migration

CDC

Caisse des Dépôts et Consignations

CEFEB

Cabinet des Etudes Financières, Economiques, et Bancaires

CERTU

Centre d’Études sur les Réseaux, le Transport, l’Urbanisme et les Constructions Publiques

CETE

Centre d’Études Techniques de l’Equipement

CETMO

Centre d’Etudes des Transports pour la Méditerranée Occidentale

CMI

Marseille Center for Mediterranean Integration / Centre de Marseille pour l’Integration en Mediterranée

CODATU

Cooperation for Urban Mobility in the Developing World

EC

European Commission

EEA

European Economic Area

EFE

Education for Employment Foundation

EIB

European Investment Bank

ENPI

European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument

ENQA

European Network for Quality Assurance

ETF

European Training Foundation

EU

European Union

EW

Environment and Water (CMI program cluster)

FAO

Food and Agriculture Organization

FEMISE

Forum Euroméditerranéen des Instituts de Sciences Économiques

FFEM

Fonds Français pour l’Environnement Mondial

GAFI

General Authority for Investment and Free Zones, Egypt

GEF

Global Environment Facility

GFDRR

Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery

GIS

geographic information systems

GTZ

Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit

ICT

information and communication technologies

IFREMER

Institut Français de Recherche pour l’Exploitation de la Mer

ILO

International Labour Organization

IOM

International Organization for Migration

ISESCO

Islamic Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization

ISI@Med

Information Society Initiative for the Mediterranean Region

ISTED

Institut des Sciences et des Techniques de l’Equipement et de l’Environnement pour le Développement

88 /// CMI /// annual report 2010


KEIT

Knowledge Economy, Innovation and Technology (CMI program cluster)

LOGISMED

Euro-Mediterranean network of logistic platforms

M&E

monitoring and evaluation

MAEE

French Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs

MAP-RAC/SPA

Mediterranean Action Plan– Regional Activity Centre for Specially Protected Areas

MEDENER

Mediterranean Association of the National Agencies for Energy Conservation

MEEDDM

Ministry of Ecology, Energy, Sustainable Development, and the Sea, France

MENA

Middle East and North Africa

MHUAE

Ministry of Housing, Urbanism, and Spatial Planning, Morocco

MICT

Ministère de l’Industrie, du Commerce, et des Nouvelles Technologies, Maroc

MIT

Ministry of Industry and Technology, Tunisia

MLA

Ministry of Local Administration, Syria

MPC

Mediterranean partner countries

MSSD

Mediterranean Strategy for Sustainable Development

NGO

nongovernmental organization

NQF

national qualifications framework

NTF-PSI

Norwegian Trust Fund for Private Sector and Infrastructure

OCEMO

Office de Coopération Economique pour la Méditerranée et l’Orient

OECD

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

PGIS

participatory GIS

PIAAC

Program for the International Assessment for Adult Competencies

R&D

research and development

RCREEe

Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency

REMPEC

Regional Marine Pollution Emergency Response Centre for the Mediterranean Sea

RQF

regional qualifications framework

SELM

Skills, Employment and Labor Mobility (CMI program cluster)

SME

small and medium enterprise

TFESSD

Trust Fund for Environmentally and Socially Sustainable Development

TOR

terms of reference

U.A.E.

United Arab Emirates

UCLG

United Cities and Local Governments

UD

Urban and Spatial Development (CMI program cluster)

UFM

Union for the Mediterranean

UNDP

United Nations Development Programme

UNCTAD

United Nations Conference on Trade and Development

UNEP/MAP

United Nations Environment Programme/Mediterranean Action Plan

UNESCO

United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization

UNIMED

Mediterranean University Network

WB

World Bank

WBI

World Bank Institute

WDM

water demand management

WUA

water users association

WWF Medpo

World Wildlife Fund Mediterranean Programme Office

annual report 2010 /// CMI /// 89


© CMI - Marseille 2010 Graphic design & map: Estève GILI /// www.graphicvertigo.com Photography: CMI, World Bank, Estève GILI, D.R. Printed in France by Impremium Groupe Superplan - Marseille 2010.


The Marseille Center for Mediterranean Integration strives to facilitate access to best knowledge, enhance sustainable development and converge policies towards greater integration

CMI Villa Valmer 271, Corniche Kennedy 13007 Marseille, France + 334 91 99 24 51 / 56 www.cmimarseille.org


Cmi annualreport2010