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Psychology The department of Psychology was formally established in 2011 and offers an exciting and rapidly developing environment for research, having benefitted from recent research infrastructure development. The department hosts two established research groups: the Cognitive Science Research Group and the Health and Social Issues Research Group. Each of these groups supports the collaborative research activities of its members. However, research is not restricted to these areas, so that we have particular strengths in social psychology, visual perception, organizational/work psychology, biological psychology, neuropsychology cognitive psychology, and sport and exercise psychology. We would be happy to receive enquiries concerning research to PhD level in any area of Psychology. Expressions of interest would be particularly welcome in the following:                       

Behavioural and linguistic indicators of personality Cognitive control and skill acquisition Cognitive performance in substance misusers Contextual influences on personality assessment Contextual, social and cultural influences on substance abuse, health and well being Digital gaming in social contexts Effective acquisition and performance of motor skills Executive function and theory of mind in schizophrenia Eyewitness Memory and suggestibility Family food choices and obesity False memories and eye movements How iconic gestures interact with speech in everyday conversation Implicit and explicit attitudes to the environment in the light of the threat posed by climate change Judgement and decision making Motivation and happiness within organizational contexts Implicit attitudes to doping in sport Parallel motor planning and the role of multiple brain regions in representing sensorimotor decisions Physical exercise and cognition Subliminal representation of object affordances and the automatic activation of the motor system Social cognition The neural mechanisms involved in action prediction and anticipation for every day actions The neural basis and cognitive correlates of elite sport performance and sport learning Visual cognition and eye movement behaviour

Informal enquiries may be addressed to the Head of Department, Professor Philip Murphy, murphyp@edgehill.ac.uk Tel: 01695-584508.


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