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The Mayor Anton Mandate

I will be the mayor for 100% of Vancouver! Here’s what I mean: “Green is Good,” but “Smart Green is Better!”

We’ll let ALL the people back into City Hall!

Every neighbourhood deserves a voice at City Hall!

Let’s build more space to live, work and play!

Let’s build more homes for more people!

The City spends YOUR money —let’s spend it right!

NPA Team for Mayor and City Council

ON NOVEMBER 19TH, ELECT

Suzanne Anton

and The Common Sense Team


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We couldn’t have said it better ourselves…

We all know there’s something missing these days at City Hall, Park Board and School Board. It’s called accountability and common sense.

! make rapid transit along Broadway and the downtown streetcar Vancouver’s transportation priorities;

“Anton is also right about her claim for overall numbers of homeless growing in the past three years.”

Whether it’s backyard chickens, taxpayer-funded wheat fields, millions spent on wacky and costly “greenwashing” gimmicks, or the lack of planning and leadership around the Stanley Cup riot and tent city on the lawn of the Vancouver Art Gallery, it’s definitely time for a change.

! put a moratorium on new downtown separated bike lanes;

“The current Board of Trustees has not demonstrated they have the management capacity to effectively govern the Vancouver School Board or fulfill all of their accountabilities and duties…”

On November 19th vote NPA to:

! support community centres, recreation facilities and more childcare; ! make it easier to do business in Vancouver and stop exporting jobs to other communities;

! put taxpayers and neighbourhoods first;

! have a Mayor who says “the buck stops with me” and demonstrates real leadership;

! cut red tape to increase housing supply and improve affordability;

! give St. Paul’s Hospital the zoning and height it needs to stay downtown.

! cap City Hall spending and return surpluses to taxpayers; ! support construction of new South Vancouver Seniors Centre and property tax relief for Vancouver Legions;

On November 19th, join your NPA candidates and bring back common sense, the kind that builds a better Vancouver for everyone.

—The Province Newspaper, October 2011

—Independent review of Vision Vancouver’s School Board by BC’s Comptroller General

“But a new poll suggest many taxpayers are waking up to the fact that there’s not much in the mayor’s policies for homeowners, whose taxes are increasingly viewed by Vision as a way to fund their own special little projects for political supporters rather than to provide efficient city services that taxpayers actually want.” — The Province Newspaper, October, 2011

“…the first step is to have dedicated bike lanes, without cars on them, all over the city…” —Gregor Robertson, 2008 Vision Vancouver nomination campaign

Suzanne Anton NPA Candidate for Mayor

“Business growth in Vancouver stalls while suburbs flourish. Vancouver… added just 46 new businesses. Meanwhile, the number of business licences in Metro Vancouver increased… 230 times faster than in the city of Vancouver. Surrey alone recorded a net gain of 5,571 new licences, and Langley Township 4,268.” —The Vancouver Sun, October, 2011

“We have not produced a solution to the housing crisis...” —Vision Vancouver Councillor Geoff Meggs, July 2011

NPA Team for Parks Board

NPA Team for School Board

“Mayor Gregor Robertson declared the City of Vancouver a “fantastic place to do business” in a Vancouver Economic Commission promotional video. But the organic juice company he co-founded and owns shares in and whose product labels bear his signature migrated to the suburbs a year after the Winter Olympics.” —The Vancouver Sun, October, 2011

“I didn’t know any details.” — Gregor Robertson on security planning for Stanley Cup Finals, June 2011

“I could care less frankly about a police car going up in flames.” —Vision Vancouver Councillor Geoff Meggs, on the Stanley Cup riot, June 2011

“The mayor’s incompetent decision to invite what became an estimated 150,000 people to party in the streets without taking serious interest in how it would be policed was itself an act of petty politics.” — The Province Newspaper, July 2011

“Gregor Robertson’s bumbling response to the illegal ‘Occupy Vancouver’ tent city is yet another example that shows he doesn’t have enough judgement or common sense to be mayor… citizens deserve better. They deserve leadership.” — The Province Newspaper, October, 2011

“Two years into this administration and unhappy employees continue to bail out of city hall… All part, I suspect, of Vision’s unprecedented gag orders being placed on the public service at city hall.” —Allen Garr, Vancouver Courier

CLIP AND TAKE WITH YOU ON VOTING DAY

On Nov 19, Return Common Sense To City Hall!

On November 19, Vote for Suzanne Anton and the Common Sense Team Candidates for Mayor ANTON, Suzanne

NPA

Candidates for City Council AFFLECK, George

NPA

BALL, Elizabeth

NPA

BICKERTON, Sean

NPA

CARANGI, Joe

NPA

CHARKO, Ken

NPA

KLASSEN, Mike

NPA

LAMARCHE, Jason

NPA

McCREERY, Bill

NPA

WONG, Francis

NPA

YUEN, Bill

NPA

Candidates for Park Board COUPAR, John

NPA

CRAWFORD, Casey

NPA

DE GENOVA, Melissa

NPA

KALAW, Gabby

NPA

PASIN, Dave

NPA

UPTON, Jason

NPA

Candidates for School Board BALLANTYNE, Fraser

NPA

DENIKE, Ken

NPA

ROBERTSON, Stacy

NPA

SHARMA, Sandy

NPA

WOO, Sophia

NPA


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Crossing guard This Remembrance Day, as Canadians honour veterans of every generation, Vancouver native Ted Pratt remembers his role as a sailor in the treacherous North Atlantic during the Second World War —story by Ted Hunt

DYSLEXIA DIDN’T STOP ALBERT. We don’t let dyslexia or language-related learning disabilities affect our students, either. They learn differently, and we offer them an education in a setting where they can thrive. See for yourself at the Fraser Academy Open House: Wed, Nov 16, 9:30-11 AM. For more info or to RSVP, visit www.fraseracademy.ca or call (604) 736-5575. © Estate of Yousuf Karsh


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in this issue

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

16 I

photo Dan Toulgoet

Museum pieces

MIKE HOWELL NPA mayoral candidate Suzanne Anton wants to move the neglected Musem of Vancouver from its Kits location to the downtown site destined to be vacated by the VAG.

12th & Cambie: Pre-occupied

Senior School (8-12) November 8 and 9, 7:00pm

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MIKE HOWELL As council fails to ask tough questions of city officials and police about Occupy Vancouver, protests this weekend could get edgy. BY

Price of communication

BY CHERYL ROSSI The city’s communications department budget has more than doubled since 2006, even as city access for journalists has been restricted.

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Tails of the city

BY ALLEN GARR As Occupy Vancouver dominates election coverage, civic party candidates wonder if they can win on the coattails of their leaders.

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The NPA wants to move the Museum of Vancouver while Vision and COPE focus on creating affordable studio spaces.

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Video: Candid Candidates

BY NAOIBH O’CONNOR A selection of school board candidates identify what they see as the key issue in Vancouver schools.

Dining: Top gnocchi

BY TIM PAWSEY Star chef Mark McEwan breezed through town to roll gnochhi and promote his new book and Toronto restaurant Fabbrica.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

cover

As war loomed, Kitsilano students marched and took rifle practice

Teenager joined navy to battle Germans on the high seas Ted Hunt Contributing writer

T

ed Pratt greets you at his door with a wide-smile and firm handshake. Blue eyes lock on you with a look of genuine interest. If you think you were facing a salesman, you’d be only half-right, because there is a natural honesty within, and a serious side for sure. He was born Aug. 31,1924 after being rushed to hospital from his grandparents’ home near Crescent Beach. Mother Beatrice caused a sensation at the dinner table by announcing labour pains, and father, Arthur, took charge. Pratt laughs, proudly showing his family ring passed on from grandfather, to father, to son. Set on a field of gold, a lancer charges a dragon. The Boer War inscription reads: “Edward Pratt. St. George’s Rifles April 24, 1889.” By 1938, Pratt played basketball at Kitsilano secondary at a time when everyone recognized that war with Germany was inevitable. Kits introduced marching and rifle practice in the basement. Students, with detentions were

Ted Pratt traversed the Atlantic on the HMCS Poundmaker, with her two large cannons and anti-aircraft guns. photo courtesy Ted Pratt given target cards. Many years later when “militarism” was removed from the curriculum, Pratt learned that teachers received 10 cents for each card turned in. During the Depression, those dimes were welcomed extra income. Lord Strathcona, the railroad magnate, wanted Canadian support for Britain, seeking “young men who sit tall in the saddle.” However, as Pratt developed his strong interest in the sea cadets at HMCS

Discovery in Stanley Park, there’d be no saddle for him. He continued navy training even when he moved back to Lord Byng for his senior grades, there discovering Canadian football. “I’ll never forget facing my old school for a football game where the newspaper predicted that ‘Kitsilano High would whip Lord Byng handily.’ It occurred to me that they might just do that because we hadn’t won a game all

season. But damned if I didn’t catch a long pass at Athletic Park and ran as fast as I could in the mud to score our only touchdown. We lost 35 to seven, but I hadn’t disgraced myself.” Pratt’s face lights up at the memory and he pulls out well-preserved press clippings and photos of teenagers of the late 1930s full of the joy of life. The enthusiasm continues as he speaks of high school clubs, dances and close games, with more girls’ names recounted by this tall young man with the wavy hair and ready smile. His graduation photo describes Ted Pratt as, “An officer in the Naval Cadets. A member of the Monitors Club. Good in all sports. Plays Senior Canadian football.”

I

n the fall of 1942, Pratt registered at UBC. “But after a couple of months it was time for me to enlist, so I signed up at age 18.” Pratt grows quiet at this point in our conversation. A change has come over him. No more enthusiastic stories or wide grins. Questions are left hanging—or he answers in a business-like man-

ner without detail. “The war was going badly,” he recalls. “I signed up at Discovery and left for training at Regina.” Acknowledging the insanity of a naval training centre on Canada’s great central plain, he says: “I was a navy guy. I did what I was told.” Asked about leaving his family: “My sister, Phyllis, was a nurse. We never talked about the war too much.” Lt. Pratt received more training aboard HMCS Prevost on Lake Erie. “Then to Halifax and Naval College for prospective officers, where they zipped us through onto a real ocean to train on a real ship, the HMCS Renard”. In what is by now a steady stream of guarded statements, Pratt says quietly, “Subs were sinking ships. It was found that torpedoes were attracted to the sound of propellers. So we were sent out to test certain things. Like a cable with a device producing a loud version of a ship’s screws.” After a long pause he ends the conversation with the cryptic observation: “It worked. Subs shot at it.” Continued on page 5

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A5

cover

Churchill called early convoys ‘the most melancholy episode of the war’

Continued from page 4 When asked if there was any danger attached to this experiment, Pratt looks blandly at the inquisitor saying only, “We served our duty aboard the Renard. We were ready to go to sea. So they sent us to Montreal where they were building a new frigate, paid for by the citizens of North Battleford. The government wanted to name it after the city, but there was already an HMCS Battleford. Another would confuse signals, so they let the people choose. Commissioned HMCS Poundmaker, she was launched on the St. Lawrence River. We had an oil painting of Chief Poundmaker in the officer’s lounge. When everything was working well, we set sail for Halifax. I said goodbye to a girl in Montreal and another in Halifax. Then we were off to Bermuda for two weeks of work-ups—depth charges, gunnery procedures, search patterns. There were two large cannons— one forward, one aft, and anti-aircraft guns… Poundmaker and crew were pronounced seaworthy. We were ready to escort convoys to Londonderry high up on the north coast of Ireland.” “We sailed out past Halifax to pick up freighters coming from New York, then accompanied them to the ‘Western Ocean’ meeting place off St. John’s. We met in daylight to assign positions in terms

of speed. There’d be three or four columns with six to 10 freighters in each. Navy ships would be on the outside: Stonetown in the lead, Poundmaker on the stern, with two Corvettes on each flank. Sometimes these escorts had 60 ships to tend.” Although Pratt did not talk about problems during the 1,250 mile trip east from St. John’s, NL, at 53 degrees north latitude, to Londonderry at 55 degrees north latitude, others have. The weather could be savage. There are also photos taken during Pratt’s years of service showing men chopping salt-sea ice from metal superstructure to avoid the risk of capsizing. A letter spoke of “. . . mountainous spray topped seas, and the sound of wind howling and screeching through the stays.” There were also log entries (from the archives of HMCS Discovery) such as: “February 2. Thick snow squalls. Ship pitching and plunging. March 4. Vessel rolling heavily. Overcast and heavy fog. March 7. Easterly gale. Sighted convoy and rejoined.” Pratt brushes aside these inconveniences during his four years of service, admitting only to the occasional “hectic journey.” Winston Churchill—known as “the man of the twentieth century”—was more to the point when considering the challenges that included the distance to travel, the

world’s worst weather to be encountered and the German battleships Tirpitz and Scheer lurking in Norwegian fjords. Years later, Churchill described the first years of convoys trying to avoid Hitler’s “wolf packs” as “the most melancholy episode of the war.” We can suppose that Pratt’s bunch well knew the importance of their work and the pragmatics of their survival rate—they just didn’t want to recall the images. “I don’t remember ever pushing the action button to have everyone below decks jumping out of their hammocks. I was mostly in the rain looking out to sea through binoculars—if I saw anything untoward, I’d call the senior officer.” Pratt avoids any mention of torpedo hits on that cold, dark ocean. There was a wistful mention of, “Sometimes freighters disappeared. We thought that some didn’t like the slow pace, and went off on their own. Sometimes we’d go after them. We might find debris…” What Pratt was clear on was the hospitality of grateful Londonderry and Belfast citizens who tried to give these visiting sailors some rest and peace before returning to their tension-filled journeys. “The people of Ireland were wonderful. Bicycles were ready for anyone who wanted a tour through the countryside.” Continued on page 6

In the fall of 1942, 18-year-old Pratt left UBC and joined the Royal Canadian Navy. photo courtesy Ted Pratt

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Continued from page 5 “There was golf equipment and grog and pubs and music,” adds Pratt. “The local golf course was trimmed by a herd of goats, and we had wonderful games in the wind, playing ‘Sniff and Snort.’ The winner of a hole would get a ‘snort’ of Irish whiskey. The others would get a ‘sniff.’ Soon the best player was not all that good anymore. After three or four days, we’d head back to Halifax for another gathering of ships with supplies for Britain. Then it was watching for subs and running through the depth charge patterns to track them down… I was a lucky bastard.”

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fter D-Day on June 6, 1944 and the re-taking of Europe, the last of the uncounted North Atlantic trips were done, and Pratt was discharged. It took five days, but he arrived home and booked an appointment with Walter Gage, dean of the math department at UBC, and in charge of student enrolment. Gage—destined to become a respected president of the university—looked at Pratt’s record and gave him credit for all his abandoned firstyear courses, except for physics. This course, Pratt remembers, would have to be taken with an all-girls class. He attended the first class—consisting of “rolling balls down inclined planes”— but the lecturer called him in. “Look,” the stressed professor said, “You’re the only male in a class of 350 girls. All pre-nurses. You might be a distraction. Just turn in the lab re-

ports. I don’t want to see you again.” “Three years later, I graduated with a BSc in forestry and still get the faculty magazine. I wanted to get into the wholesale lumber business, and got a job in the Marine Building on Burrard… then I met Beverly. My uncle had a cottage on Bowen Island where we went fishing. Beverly was a Sprott Shaw secretary at Broadway and Granville. She had a cottage at Eagle Cliff and we met on the beach. ‘Hi there, cutie,’ I remember saying . . . we were married on December 27, 1948.” “At first, we lived in a basement suite at Eighth and Dunbar. Then I was offered a job at a mill in central B.C. owned by the Cliff family. ‘Want to come to Prince George with me?’ I asked. ‘Sure,’ she said. ‘Where is it?’ Colin was born there in 1951. “Then an American customer offered me a job. Would you like to go to Portland? I asked Beverly. ‘Sure’ she said. Barbara was born in 1953. “Next job offer was at the head office in New York State. How about Poughkeepsie? I asked. ‘Sure, Ted. Where is it?’ We lived on the Hudson River. Andrew arrived in 1957. That’s the way she was, always ready for an adventure. I miss her.” “One day in 1958 a letter arrived from Barnett Lumber, asking if I’d like to come home to Vancouver. Well of course we would… so we sold our house, jumped in our four-door Chevy with baby Andrew, Barbara and Colin, for a great ride back. We bought a house

near Lord Byng and I joined Point Grey Golf Club in 1976.” Pratt pauses a while to look around his neat house in Tsawwassen and the display of his daughter’s paintings, family photos and Beverly’s favourite chair. (Beverly passed away in 2008.) At 87, he is a grandfather 12 times, and now a great-grandfather. He’s not sure to whom he should leave his grandfather’s Boer War ring. “The Veterans’ Association takes care of things nicely,” he says, passing me a menu full of food choices from which he could order for weekly delivery. House cleaning is taken care of. Living alone, Pratt’s main worry is about accidents. One day he tripped, and lay injured, preparing to spend the night on the floor, until he remembered the emergency necklace with a life-line button. “The Delta Hospital staff were great,” he says with a big smile. “We still stay in touch. I collect bottles for the deposit money, and donate cash every month for some little extras. I like doing it. “I was blessed. Still am. My kids live in Kitsilano, Calgary and Victoria. Point Grey Golf Club made me an honorary member a few years back,” says Pratt, who will attend a Remembrance Day ceremony at the golf club. They send me a monthly bill for $0.00. Can’t beat that. Beverly and I cruised and danced all over the world—Alaska, Black Sea, Mediterranean, Caribbean, Panama, South America… Beverly was great to know. I talk to her every day. ” tedhunt@shaw.ca

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A7

news

12th & Cambie

with Mike Howell

Occupied, for now

So you’ve probably heard—Mayor Gregor Robertson and senior city staff are staying the course on the “Occupy Vancouver” protest outside the Vancouver Art Gallery. Which means they’re not sending in Police Chief Jim Chu and his officers. So far, as city councillors heard at Tuesday’s meeting at city hall, the protest has remained peaceful and city manager Penny Ballem said there’s no appetite to get a court injunction to move the campers along. But if ever there was a weekend the protest could go off the rails, it’s this Saturday. The Vancouver Police Department issued a media advisory before the council meeting to reveal “the group has announced plans to march around the downtown core and potentially occupy several banks.” A couple of weeks ago, protesters occupied the TD Bank across from the art gallery and danced on counters, unplugged computers and staged a sit-in. No damage was reported and no arrests were made. But as Twitter follower and small business owner Paul Tolnai tweeted during the city hall meeting, after hearing crime wasn’t an issue for police: “Crime not an issue? Ask the staff at the TD Bank who needed trauma counselling after their dealings with the occupiers.” Police haven’t said how many officers will work Saturday or how much it will cost. These are ques-

The city’s top brass—Mayor Gregor Robertson (top), VPD Chief Jim Chu (middle) and city manager Penny Ballem—are staying the photos Dan Toulgoet course on the Occupy Vancouver protest outside the Vancouver Art Gallery. tions neither the mayor nor his 10 councillors posed to Chu or Ballem at Tuesday’s meeting. As well, the politicians—the majority of whom are seeking reelection Nov. 19—never asked the chief if the costs associated with the protest would put the VPD in the red for the first time in seven years. The city sets the VPD’s budget. Chu warned the Vancouver Police Board Oct. 19 the protest was taxing the VPD’s budget and there was a danger of running a deficit this year; the VPD does not have a contingency fund, although it wants one.

Ballem said the VPD overtime costs were $394,00. But that figure was as of Oct. 20 and doesn’t include the police deployment for last weekend’s events, including the occupation of Holy Rosary Cathedral and marches through the streets. Costs as of Oct. 31 for engineering came in at $127,124 and another $15,274 was spent by the city’s emergency operations centre on overtime costs and the installation of surveillance cameras; for a council sympathetic to civil libertarians, there was surprisingly no talk or concern raised at the meeting about the cameras. The fire department’s costs to-

talled $7,000, as of Oct. 31, and includes ensuring “fire lanes” are not obstructed, preventing propane on the site and not allowing candles in tents. Ballem also provided a better sense of how many people are camping outside the gallery, which, by the way, is providing electricity for the encampment. Ballem said 50 to 60 people are sleeping overnight and up to 150 people show up during the day. About 100 “pup tents” are set up on the grounds, with portable toilets available on site. Environmental health officers make daily visits to inspect the makeshift kitchen,

check for any sanitation issues. City bylaw officers are dealing with reports of rats. How long will the campers stay? Organizers of the annual Santa Claus Parade are guessing it will go at least to Dec. 4, the day of the parade. And that’s why organizers announced Wednesday the parade route will be changed to avoid the protest. Usually, the mayor is present at the parade. Who will it be? And will the handling of the protest affect election results? Stay tuned, Vancouver. mhowell@vancourier.com Twitter: @Howellings

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A8

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

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WEB POLL NATION Go to www.vancourier.com to vote Will you be attending a Remembrance Day ceremony? Last week’s poll question: Should the city shut down the Occupy Vancouver encampment at the Vancouver Art Gallery?

Yes 60 per cent No 40 per cent This is not a scientific poll.

Two issues are consuming the two major parties in this imminent municipal election: They can’t get traction and they are seriously worried about coattails. There is a traction problem, which is to say getting the public to pay attention because of all the other noise. Monday, for example, the NPA rolled out its arts and culture policy only to be blown off the news agenda by Police Chief Jim Chu announcing recommendations to lay charges against 60 alleged Stanley Cup rioters. But understand that Jim Chu decides to make these kinds of announcements when he alone chooses. It’s beyond the control of Vision or the NPA and easily trumps whatever either party has to say. Then there is Occupy Vancouver, the leaderless lot encamped on the art gallery lawn. (Has it only been three weeks?) It’s another issue, in part because it is leaderless and because it’s part of a global exercise that nobody here can really get their mitts on. As unfocused as that protest may be—and some say that lack of focus is part of its attraction—my friends in the media would rather pay attention to that than anything Gregor Robertson or Suzanne Anton are on about. In spite of all that, there will be an election two weeks from now and there will be winners and losers. While most of us may be oblivious to that exercise, the major campaigns are spending millions identifying their supporters with the ultimate goal of getting them out to vote. There is also a ton of money being donated. Both the NPA and Vision planned their ma-

allengarr jor fundraising dinners for this week. And as recently as Monday, both declared they were sold out, the NPA at $225 a plate at the Hellenic Community Centre with more than 700 folks while Vision expected about 800 to pay $250 a head to chow down at the Bayshore. But money never has been the problem for these two adversaries, which brings me to the second issue that has the boys and girls in the backrooms in a state of unease. It’s the problem of coattails. Coattails are a political phenomenon where popular leaders bring their team along with them. In an at-large voting system, such as ours, it’s crucial. That’s why you can count on one finger the number of independents who have succeeded in getting elected to Vancouver city council in the past four decades, which was Carole Taylor and even then it was with a lot of nudging

and winking from the NPA. While Vision and COPE are relying on Robertson, at least one of those council candidates, Tim Louis, has plans of his own. Last week, he got a great push up the ladder with a shamelessly adoring cover story and a front page photo in the Georgia Straight. And, doubtless, incumbents on council who are up for re-election have an advantage simply because their names have been out there for many years. But no one gets more votes than the mayoral candidate they’re tying their future to. And some get considerably less. As Robertson’s folks have admitted, it’s their ability to link him to Vision and Vision (and COPE in this case) to his team in the voters’ minds that is key. While Robertson is clearly popular, he is so, um, bland in his appeal, that link has been difficult to make. There is one other wrinkle: Adriane Carr, the deputy leader of the B.C. Green Party who is running for council. She has virtually no budget and no machine to pull the vote. But the public may still believe there is a deal between Vision and the Greens, which there isn’t. That impression, though, could get her a ride on Robertson’s coattails. Anton and the NPA also have a coattail problem. At this point, she has failed to catch fire and it’s fairly certain she’ll lose to Robertson. Nonetheless, the question is: Can she attract enough voter support to get some of her folks across the line? All of this is good for a case of nerves. agarr@vancourier.com

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A9

letters

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

opinion WILL MAYOR SAVE THE DAY?

B.C. Place screen lighting up the city the wrong way Since the installation of a giant LED screen at B.C. Place, Douglas Coupland’s memorial to Terry Fox has taken on a weird twilight vibe. The four sculpted figures are positioned with their backs to the screen, as if the one-legged athlete is attempting to outrun a wormhole of electronic advertising. Downtown resident David Cookson has been petitioning for the removal or relocation of the screen (one of three on the site) for weeks. He insists it “desecrates” the memory of Fox, and it’s difficult to argue otherwise. The brief video clips on the screen honouring the athlete, bumped up in frequency since Cookson’s campaign began, sit uncomfortably with ads for mobile phones and pop drinks. Beyond the optics of a Canadian hero stomping away from three-storey advertisements, there is the matter of public safety with the screen overlooking the pedestrian-clogged corner of Beatty and Robson. Cookson is mostly focused on candlepower, however. It’s impossible to get used to the bombardment of a “flashing electric lighting bolt” into his home every 30 to 40 seconds, he says. “The flashing in the house is very different from the constant light that stays on when you have a hue or glow coming off the top during a game.” Cookson feels that the official attitude is that residents of the downtown core are “open game,” having freely “invited this kind of harassment because we live downtown.” He added: “This is an entertainment district up to Beatty Street but that’s a residential neighbourhood beyond. You’d think they’d be super-sensitive that we have these two very different kinds of zoning in very close proximity.” PavCo, the Crown corporation behind the new B.C. Place and the screen, has chosen to turn off the offender at 7 p.m., excluding “major event nights” at the stadium. This concession is a non-starter for Cookson. He notes that the sun sets early for a large portion of the year, ranging from 4 to 6 p.m. “So to say this thing is going to turn off at 7 o’clock means they decide when we can enjoy our homes.” The frequently flashed, allwhite Telus ads are particularly bright. For Cookson, the telecom’s darling piglets and beatboxing owls no longer suggest connectivity, but rather a disconnect between business and community. “I explained to them [Telus] that by providing ad revenues to PavCo they… should take some responsibility for this.” Earlier this week, Telus

letters of the week

geoffolson media representative Shawn Hall responded to a Courier email enquiry with this statement: “When the issue first came to our attention we spoke to B.C. Place about it, and were advised the screen’s hours of operation would be reduced and that it would be dimmed after twilight. Given the screen is operating at an existing facility in a downtown core full of round-the-clock bright light sources those seem like reasonable measures.” Cookson claims that before buying his condo in November 2010, he looked into what kinds of zoning changes were being planned for the area. He found no paper trail. There was no public record of the giant screen’s introduction, “because they snuck it up and ambushed residents of this neighbourhood, and ambushed city hall.” The 40-year-old environmental consultant and his wife have postponed having a baby, because he says they no longer have the proper conditions at home for a sleeping infant. “I’m doing the right thing, and I’ll tell you why. If you listen to Mayor Robertson’s greenest city action plan, we’re trying to reduce the amount of transport. My wife and I have decided not to buy a car…. we use public transport whenever we leave downtown, but for the most part we walk to work. And that’s what city hall is telling us we’re supposed to do.” Cookson could well be Vision Vancouver’s poster boy: a civic-minded professional living sustainably in our ecoconscious corner of the Pacific coast. If anyone has a right to complain about a gap between Vancouver’s ideals and its infrastructure, it’s this guy. The Twitter feed StopBillboard is thick with posted complaints about the screen, including one about the “inescapable ads” flashing before daylight, at 7 a.m. Glaring injustice? On Monday, Mayor Robertson posted the tweet, “I wrote to BC Govt asking to address neighbour concerns of light disruption + be compliant w city by-law.” It will be interesting to watch this overlit production unfold. www.geoffolson.com

Describing some protesters as white punks in black hoodies, as one columnist photo Dan Toulgoet did, promotes a double punk standard, says a reader. To the editor: Re: “Robertson’s post-riot duplicity looms over Occupy Vancouver,” Nov. 2. I love the edginess of the Courier. I’m also not a fan of political correctness. But I have to highlight Mark Hasiuk’s description of rioters: “white punks in black hoodies.” I know he’s riffing off the lyrics “white punks on dope.” Further more, I empathize with his contempt for the white punks in black hoodies. But really, doesn’t it promote a double punk stan-

dard? As if white punks are held to a higher punk standard than other punk groups. Me thinks that’s endowing them with too much credit. I can’t remember many journalism articles that referred to the other punks under their group banners. Perhaps this is a new trend inspired by social media culpability? Just calling it the way you see it and letting the chips fall where they may. Richard Rajcic Jr., Vancouver

Put mixed housing on Jericho Lands

To the editor: Re: Open letter to Vision Vancouver and the NPA. Two overriding issues for the City of Vancouver, currently, are revenues/budgets and housing. And although there is a unique opportunity to make a significant positive impact on both these vital areas, it’s being ignored. Or do you and your party have a plan for the 91 acres of land, in the core of the city, called the Jericho Lands (JL)? The JL have some of the highest property values in Vancouver. And yet they appear totally exempt from city taxation. There may be minor quid pro quo payments to the city, which are not available to the public, but I understand they are far less than the possible (depending on zoning) $5-6 million of annual tax revenue these lands could generate if made

available for housing. These lands are situated between Fourth and Eighth avenues in the heart of West Point Grey (WPG). They are owned by the federal (53 acres) and provincial (38 acres) governments. The JL may have had some importance to these governments in the past, but even if the feds still use them (the province does not), it is not a use that couldn’t be duplicated on much lower-value property. Both governments could certainly use the hundreds of millions of dollars their sale would raise. At the same time, the city would also finally receive appropriate taxes from these exceptional properties. As well, hundreds of housing units could be created. If a mixed development, 900 to 1,000 are possible. Some WPG residents want the JL as green space.

A laudable position, but in this case we (I live in WPG) already have an almost obscene amount of “green space” compared to other Vancouverites. For example, for every 70 residents of WPG, there is one acre of park land. If the contiguous Pacific Spirit Park is included, this ratio drops to under 25 people per park acre even after assuming 25,000 permanent residents on the UBC endowment lands. By comparison, the average ratio for the city is over 300. In Grandview/Woodlands, it’s over 1,100. We need a plan for these lands today. The other governments should be pushed to either sell its JL or, if this won’t happen soon, to properly compensate Vancouver for leaving them undeveloped. Jack Jefferson, Vancouver

Louis’s longer bus idea won’t work

To the editor: Re: “Council candidate longs for longer buses,” Oct. 19. I always wonder if [COPE candidate] Tim Louis does any feasibility research on his schemes before he opens his mouth. Granted there is such a thing as a threesection bus that carries 50 more passengers than the two section buses that now oper-

ate on the 99 B-Line. However, in cities where those longer buses operate they’re on flat routes. The 99 B-line buses go slow enough already up hill on 10th Avenue. Can you imagine how slow an even longer bus will go up that hill? Not what I would call rapid transit. Dale Laird, Vancouver

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It seems to take a crisis to fill seats at an educationrelated meeting. Parents and community members packed school gymnasiums when five East Side elementary schools faced closure recently, but trustee elections typically don’t generate that kind of drama. School board candidates discovered that Tuesday night. Ten trustee hopefuls faced mostly empty chairs at a two-hour all-candidates forum in Britannia secondary school’s auditorium, which attracted 15 to 20 spectators. Britannia Community Services Society, Britannia elementary and secondary parent groups, and neighbourhood community organizations such as the Grandview-Woodland Area Council, sponsored the event. Jane Bouey, Al Blakey, Gwen Giesbrecht and Allan Wong represented COPE, Mike Lombardi and Rob Wynen spoke for Vision Vancouver and Ken Denike, Stacy Robertson and Fraser Ballantyne appeared for the NPA. Louise Boutin was Green Party rep, while Lily Harvey was the only one of five independent candidates to participate. Despite the low audience turnout, there was no shortage of submitted questions. Candidates were

quizzed on wide–ranging subjects from provincial education funding and aboriginal students’ graduation rates to whether trustees should take a pay cut and if high schools should start later to allow teenaged students more sleep. For the record, trustee candidates want more education funding, though differ on how to get it; they acknowledge aboriginal grad rates are “abysmal” and are optimistic a new aboriginal-focused school and other programs will drive up success rates; they don’t think trustees’ pay should be cut given they don’t earn much in light of the work involved; and they’re prepared to look at studies about teenagers’ sleep and learning.

Jane Bouey For those who haven’t kept up on education matters, it would have been difficult to decipher many differences between candidates based on their responses. There was more agreement than disagreement on many issues. Occasionally, distinctions emerged. The COPEVision coalition stressed “advocacy” and the need to pressure the provincial government for more money, while the NPA contingent highlighted the need for “sound financial

management” of existing resources and accountability. “The differences between us tend to be the way we look at advocacy and management,” Denike said, adding, “The system we have in place is due largely to the work of the NPA over the last 20 years.” Ballantyne noted he’s passionate about public education and students and the NPA is not bound by what unions want. Robertson agreed advocacy is important, but said that alone doesn’t address problems faced by the district. He noted the Vision-COPE approach to advocacy didn’t generate more money for last year’s budget. Lombardi asked voters to look at the current board’s record. “When you go to the ballot box, ask yourself who will stand up for the kids of Vancouver and go to Victoria and get the funding we need for the kids of Vancouver,” he said. Bouey and Blakey’s answers centred on pushing for more government funding, particularly to help vulnerable students. “Public education is a right that’s being undermined and underfunded globally,” Bouey said. Boutin insisted the Greens bring fresh ideas and, if elected, she’ll focus on areas such as neighbourhood schools, childcare and the budget. Harvey, who immigrated to Canada in 1995, has run businesses and earned an MBA, promised to bring project management skills to the board table and said she would be “inclusive, open, caring and transparent decision-making.” noconnor@vancourier.com Twitter: @Naoibh

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A11

news

NPA mayoral candidate wants protesters given one week’s notice

City will ‘watch and wait’ on Occupy Vancouver Andrew Fleming Contributing writer

While an estimated 1,700 different cities around the world are facing ongoing protests allied with the Occupy Wall Street movement, Vancouver is probably one of the few where it has become a hot-button election issue. The question of what to do—or not to do—about the Occupy Vancouver protesters that have been camping out on the Vancouver Art Gallery’s north plaza since Oct. 15 was front and centre at a well-attended city council meeting Tuesday, Nov. 1, the final meeting of council before the Nov. 19 election. Mayoral candidate Suzanne Anton, the lone NPA member on the Vision Vancouver-led city council, wanted to give the protesters one week’s notice to pack up and go home. “Standing back and hoping for the best is not a plan,” said Anton. “There is a significant cost in terms of business to the hotels, to food vendors, the neighbouring businesses and also a significant cost to our city’s reputation, and also to the taxpayers, over half a million dollars to date. The point is people are good, protest is good, but tents are not and are causing a significant inconvenience.” Anton failed to find a seconder to put her motion forward to a vote. Her wish to send in police to end the protest went against the recommendations of city staff, who are instead advocating what they call a “watch and wait” approach. “There is a lot of public resonance with a lot of the issues that are discussed through this global protest, and up to this time the protest in Van-

couver has been peaceful and cooperative and reasonably responsive to our requests,” said city manager Penny Ballem. “We would like to try and resolve this over time through peaceful means… We haven’t provoked any major confrontation and we don’t want to do that. We know that if we push too hard, we could get it back.” Police Chief Jim Chu pointed out other cities have sent in police to end Occupy protests and it hasn’t worked. “In other jurisdictions where they’ve tried to end it with police intervention, it hasn’t ended it,” said Chu, citing the examples of Chicago and Oakland where protesters simply turned up again after violent mass arrests. “Our role in the police department is to help facilitate lawful protest. We want the safety of the protesters as well as the public… If the police are going to be asked to move in, we would prefer that an injunction is obtained.” Ballem added that a court injunction might not be even granted because it would require proving there are significant risks to the public, and judges might decide protesters’ right to freedom of expression under the Canadian Charter of Rights would trump private property rights. Lauren Gill, an Occupy Vancouver protester who is also running for city council, said it would be counterproductive to try to end the protest without addressing the issues it is raising. “We’re not going anywhere,” Gill told reporters after council adjourned. “The reality of the situation is even if they move us from the art gallery, it’s going to pop up somewhere else.” Twitter: @flematic

NPA mayoral candidate Coun. Suzanne Anton (left) wants police to end the protest outside the Vancouver Art Gallery. photos Dan Toulgoet

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Deputy city manager Sadhu Johnston made no mention Tuesday of Vancouver city hall seeking Seattle’s advice on how to deal with the Occupy Vancouver tent village. But an adviser to Seattle’s mayor said Mike McGinn did speak with Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson “in the past month” about the Occupy Wall Street anticorporate greed movement. “I don’t know the details of the conversation,” said McGinn’s assistant communications director Aaron Pickus. Johnston told city council that “we have spoken with our peers in other cities, particularly places where they have had conflict.” He mentioned Portland, Denver and Oakland, but not Seattle. Occupy Wall Street-inspired protesters set up

camp Oct. 1 at Westlake Park, a popular downtown Seattle gathering spot for protests, charity and corporate events and civic celebrations. Seattle Police arrested 25 Occupy Seattle protesters who refused to remove their tents Oct. 5. McGinn, a Democrat elected in 2009, served protesters coffee on Oct. 8 at Westlake Park and spoke to the crowd the next day. He stood firm on the city’s anticamping bylaw but invited them to camp overnight at City Hall Plaza. “Mayor McGinn is very supportive of the broader message,” Pickus said. “While supporting the message of the movement, he is the mayor and his primary responsibilities are public safety and health.” Permits with detailed terms and conditions were issued to Occupy Seattle for non-exclusive use of both spaces on Oct. 18. Seattle city hall’s website includes

a page devoted to Occupy Seattle with links to the permits and orders to comply with all “city, county, state and federal laws and rules.” On Saturday, Occupy Seattle set up camp at Seattle Central Community College with the institution’s permission and published a “good neighbour statement” on its website. Pickus said Seattle spent $321,000 in civic services on the protest through Oct. 25. Occupy Vancouver has cost taxpayers $540,000. Seattle voters go to the polls Nov. 8 to elect five city councillors. McGinn’s term ends in 2013. Vancouverites vote Nov. 19. “[Vancouver] has the wherewithal to move forward and enforce its bylaws, but because of the election they’re being hesitant,” said Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association executive director Charles Gauthier. Continued on page 13


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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news

BIA director concerned about bank protests

Continued from page 12 Gauthier said he is conferring with leaders of the 600-member International Downtown Association, which represents urban centres around the world. “They’re all sharing the concern that our civic leaders are not addressing it the way we’d like,” Gauthier said. Gauthier said he visited Occupy Vancouver’s camp three times since Friday with Johnston and senior housing planner Dan Garrison to establish communication. Coun. Suzanne Anton, the NPA mayoral candidate who wants the camp removed, told council she visited Monday. Gauthier said he respects the right to protest but wants the camp to end peacefully. Until then, he hopes Occupy Vancouver will adopt a code of conduct, avoid occupying private space such as banks, and share the plaza with groups planning Christmas and Hanukkah activities. Organizers of the Rogers Santa Claus Parade have altered the Dec. 4 route to avoid the Vancouver Art

UBC Dialogues: Vancouver

Immigration to Canada is painted in the rosiest of terms, the proverbial ‘land of milk and honey.’ But how are the needs of immigrants being met once they arrive? Is there truly a wealth of opportunity, or are their dreams curdling? Are there institutional biases acting against them, and what can be done to level the playing field? Conversely, where are people from Canada going and why? Are they looking for opportunities they simply can’t find here? Join experts from UBC and the community for a provocative dialogue about immigration. Then, following the program, continue the conversation at the reception.

Due to the “tent city” at the Vancouver Art Gallery, this year’s Santa Claus Parade has been rerouted. photo Dan Toulgoet Gallery, where protesters have camped on the bark mulch and pavement without civic permits since Oct. 15. Grey Cup committee general manager Scott Ackles said the art gallery plaza is not a venue for the Nov. 24-27 Canadian Football League championship festivities. “From the festival

standpoint, there has been no planning around that area,” Ackles said. All official Grey Cup events are planned for the Vancouver Convention Centre and Robson and Beatty streets outside B.C. Place Stadium. Ackles said the Nov. 26 parade would not pass the art gallery. 2010goldrush@gmail.com

Tuesday, November 15, 2011 6:30 – 9:00 pm UBC Robson Square 800 Robson Street, Vancouver, BC 2011-12 EVENT SERIES SPONSOR:

MEDIA SPONSORS:

Please RSVP by online Tuesday, November 8, 2011. For more information, contact Nicola Wootton at nicola.wootton@ubc.ca or 604.827.5831. Admission is free and everyone is welcome, but advance registration is required. For a complete list of panelists, visit www.alumni.ubc.ca/events/dialogues You can also follow and contribute on twitter at twitter.com/ubcalumni, hashtag: #ubcdialogues. It will also be recorded for a podcast.

www.alumni.ubc.ca/dialogues

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A14

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

Vancouver Votes November 19, 2011 Be ready. Be informed. Be a voter.

On November 19, 2011, Vancouver voters will elect one Mayor, ten Councillors, seven Park Commissioners and nine School Trustees for a three-year term. The ballot will also contain three questions about the City’s 2012 – 2014 Capital Plan borrowing. Voting Places will be open from 8 am to 8 pm. Advance Voting Opportunities Many people find it convenient to vote before Election Day. Here are the expanded locations and the times that you can vote in advance: CITY HALL 8 am to 8 pm - Nov 9, 12, 15, 16 Noon to 8 pm - Nov 10, 11, 13, 14 DUNBAR, RENFREW PARK, SUNSET and WEST END COMMUNITY CENTRES 8 am to 8 pm - Nov 9, 12, 15, 16

All eligible voters who wish to do so can vote in advance. To find out if you are eligible to vote by mail, call 3-1-1 (7 am to 10 pm, daily) for information. Who Can Vote You are eligible to vote if you are: 9 M C5B165HA 5J57AGC 0,G@ J1/5 in Vancouver) OR 9 M HGHIC5B165HA FCGF5CA, elector (you live elsewhere in BC but own property in Vancouver) You must also meet ALL of the following requirements: 9 (35 ?* GC GJ65C GH November 19, 2011 9 ( #MHM61MH 71A1+5H 9 ( C5B165HA G4 &# 4GC MA least 6 months immediately before the day you register to vote

9 ( C5B165HA G4 $MH7G@/5C (for at least 30 days) OR a non-resident who is a registered owner of real property in Vancouver (for at least 30 days) immediately before the day you register to vote 9 <GA 61BD@MJ1E56 8, JM. from voting in an election Landed immigrants who are not yet Canadian citizens are not eligible to vote If you are eligible to vote and you have not already registered to vote, you can: 9 C531BA5C MA MH M6/MH75 voting location 9 C531BA5C MA ,G@C 65B13HMA56 voting place on November 19, 2011. There are three ways to vote * $1-( %! /)'/!+( * $1-( ,& "/%# * $1-( 1! .#(+-%1! 0/&

Voter Registration If you are registered on the Provincial Voters List, and you live in Vancouver, you are automatically registered on the Vancouver Voters List. If you are not registered, you can do so when you vote. You will be asked to complete and sign a registration form, and show two pieces of identification, at least one with a signature. The following documents are examples of acceptable ID documents: 9 &# "C1/5C!B >175H75 9 &# K" 7MC6 9 &# #MC5 #MC6 9 K#&# ;.H5C!B #5CA1E7MA5 of Insurance and Vehicle Licence 9 )G71MJ KHB@CMH75 #MC6 9 #1A1+5HB21F #MC6 9 :CGF5CA, 'M- <GA175 9 #C561A 7MC6 GC 6581A 7MC6 9 %A1J1A, 81JJ

9 =1H1BAC, G4 LG@B1H3 MH6 Social Development (formerly Ministry of Employment and Income Assistance) Monthly Report/Request for Continued Assistance (HSD 081) Non-resident property electors (NRPEs)—voters who have owned property in Vancouver for more than 30 days, but are resident electors in another BC municipality— may also register at the time of voting. NRPEs must bring proof of ownership and, if applicable, the Consent of Registered Owners for NonResident Property Elector Registration form. For more information on advance voting, eligibility and registration, call 3-1-1 or go to vancouver.ca/vote.

Where to Vote On November 19, 2011, you must vote at the designated voting place for the voting division where you live. Nonresident Property Electors must vote in the voting division where their property is located. You should receive a WHERE TO VOTE CARD and the Vancouver Voters’ Guide by mail in early November. The card tells you where you vote in your neighbourhood. Please look carefully at your voting location. Some locations have changed due to adjustments to the voting divisions that were necessary due to population growth in the city. If you did not receive a WHERE TO VOTE CARD by mail, please use the easy Where do I Vote search tool at vancouver.ca/vote or call 3-1-1.

Candidate List This is the official list of candidates, organized by electoral race and in alphabetical order. City of residence is Vancouver unless otherwise shown (in brackets and italic).

Mayor

Councillor

Park Commissioner

School Trustee

1 to be elected

10 to be elected

7 to be elected

9 to be elected

ANTON, Suzanne NPA

AFFLECK, George NPA

FOX, Amy “Evil Genius”

BUDAY, Gölök Zoltán

ALM, Kelly

FRASER, Grant

CAISSY, Menard

AQUINO, RJ COPE

GAROSSINO, Sandy

COOKE, Lloyd Alan DUBGEE

BALL, Elizabeth NPA

HELTEN, Randy Neighbourhoods for a Sustainable Vancouver (NSV)

BENSON, Nicole Neighbourhoods for a Sustainable Vancouver (NSV)

LAWRANCE, Robin

BICKERTON, Sean NPA

MCGUIRE, Gerry Vancouver Citizen’s Voice PAQUETTE, Victor B. PELLETIER, Sam ROBERTSON, Gregor Vision Vancouver ZIMMERMAN, Darrell “Saxmaniac”

CARANGI, Joe NPA

GILL, Lauren R.I.C.H. GREGSON, Ian De-Growth Vancouver JANG, Kerry Vision Vancouver KERCHUM, Marie Neighbourhoods for a Sustainable Vancouver (NSV) KLASSEN, Mike NPA

MCCREERY, Bill NPA (Richmond) MEGGS, Geoff Vision Vancouver MURPHY, Elizabeth Neighbourhoods for a Sustainable Vancouver (NSV) NGUYEN, Bang NGUYEN, Marc Tan

ANDALIS, Juliet Victoria

HASKELL, Peter Raymond

BACCHUS, Patti Vision Vancouver

BARNES, Constance Vision Vancouver

JASPER, Aaron Vision Vancouver

BALLANTYNE, Fraser NPA

BLYTH, Sarah Vision Vancouver

KALAW, Gabby NPA

BLAKEY, Al COPE

COUPAR, John NPA

LOKE, Trevor Vision Vancouver

BOUEY, Jane COPE

CRAWFORD, Casey NPA

MACKINNON, Stuart Green Party of Vancouver

BOUTIN, Louise Green Party of Vancouver

MURRAY, Andrew

CLEMENT, Ken Vision Vancouver

ORSER, Rick

DE GENOVA, Melissa NPA

REIMER, Andrea Vision Vancouver

GRANBY, Brent COPE

PASIN, Dave NPA

SHAW, Chris De-Growth Vancouver

GREENWELL-BAKER, Donalda COPE

PRI TOOR, Freyja

DENIKE, Ken NPA GIESBRECHT, Gwen COPE

LAUENSTEIN, Misha LOMBARDI, Mike Vision Vancouver NGUYEN, Bang PAYNE, Cherie Vision Vancouver ROBERTSON, Stacy NPA SHARMA, Sandy NPA STARK, Robert Allan WONG, Allan COPE WOO, Sophia NPA

CARR, Adriane Green Party of Vancouver

LAMARCHE, Jason NPA

CHARKO, Ken NPA

LOUIE, Raymond P. Vision Vancouver

STEVENSON, Tim Vision Vancouver

COPELAND, Cord “Ted”

LOUIS, Tim COPE

TANG, Tony Vision Vancouver

DEAL, Heather Vision Vancouver

MARTIN, Terry Neighbourhoods for a Sustainable Vancouver (NSV)

WENDYTHIRTEEN

MASSON, Chris De-Growth Vancouver

WOODSWORTH, Ellen COPE

De-Growth Vancouver

Vancouver Citizen’s Voice

Green Party of Vancouver

MAXWELL N BUR, R H

YUEN, Bill NPA

IDEA: Independent Democratic Electoral Alliance

Vision Vancouver: Vision Vancouver Electors Association

DHARNI, Michael Singh

Download

VANCOUVER VOTES

SPIRES, Aaron R.I.C.H.

WONG, Francis NPA

on your iPhone

For translation services in more than 180 languages, call 3-1-1.

HADLEY, Eleanor HAMILTON, Jamie Lee IDEA

SHARMA, Niki Vision Vancouver TRUONG, Tammy UPTON, Jason NPA

HARVEY, Lily

WYNEN, Rob Vision Vancouver

HASKELL, Peter Raymond

Elector Organizations COPE: Coalition of Progressive Electors

NPA: Civic Non Partisan Association

Neighbourhoods for a Sustainable Vancouver (NSV)

For more information: Phone: 3-1-1 E-mail: voter.questions@vancouver.ca Web: vancouver.ca/vote


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

The Capital Plan Borrowing Questions On side two of the ballot, voters will be asked to give Council the authority to borrow $180 million to fund a portion of the 20122014 Capital Plan. Eligible voters may vote “yes” or “no” to the following three questions: 1. COMMUNITY FACILITIES AND PARKS This question seeks authority to borrow funds to be used in carrying out the basic capital works program with respect to Community Facilities and Parks. Are you in favour of Council having the authority, without further assent of the electors, to pass by-laws between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2014 to borrow an aggregate $65,800,000 for the following purposes? A. Community Facilities To provide for major maintenance, upgrading or replacement of existing

community facilities, such as libraries, recreation facilities, cultural facilities, affordable housing, social facilities and childcare centres, that are beyond economical repair or no longer meet operational requirements, and provision of new community facilities to serve Vancouver’s growing population $58,600,000 B. Parks To provide for major maintenance, upgrading or replacement of existing parks and features within parks, such as pathways, playgrounds and playfields, that are beyond economical repair or no longer meet operational requirements $7,200,000 TOTAL

$65,800,000

If this question receives the assent of the electors, Council has the power, without further assent of the electors, to pass by-laws, as and when Council considers

appropriate, to borrow money for the projects described up to $65,800,000. 2. TRANSPORTATION This question seeks authority to borrow funds to be used in carrying out the basic capital works program with respect to Transportation. Are you in favour of Council having the authority, without further assent of the electors, to pass by-laws between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2014 to borrow an aggregate $66,300,000 for the following purposes? A. Street and Bridge Infrastructure To provide for major maintenance and reconstruction of the street and lane networks, and to undertake major maintenance of bridges and other structures $41,150,000

B. Transit and Safety Improvements

money for the projects described up to $63,300,000.

To provide for modifications to the arterial and neighbourhood transportation networks, and to expand and make safety improvements to the system of greenways and cycle routes $8,500,000 C. Street Lighting, Traffic Signals and Communications Systems To provide for major maintenance, replacement and expansion of the street lighting, traffic signal and communications systems that are beyond economical repair or no longer meet operational requirements $16,650,000 TOTAL

$66,300,000

If this question receives the assent of the electors, Council has the power, without further assent of the electors, to pass by-laws, as and when Council considers appropriate, to borrow

3. PUBLIC SAFETY AND CIVIC FACILITIES This question seeks authority to borrow funds to be used in carrying out the basic capital works program with respect to Public Safety and Civic Facilities. Are you in favour of Council having the authority, without further assent of the electors, to pass by-laws between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2014 to borrow an aggregate $47,700,000 for the following purposes? A. Public Safety Facilities To provide for major maintenance, upgrading or replacement of existing public safety facilities, such as fire halls and police buildings, that are beyond economical repair or no longer meet operational requirements $13,200,000

B. Civic Facilities To provide for major maintenance, upgrading or replacement of existing civic facilities and infrastructure, such as information technology systems, civic offices and maintenance yards, that are beyond economical repair or no longer meet operational requirements $34,500,000 TOTAL

$47,700,000

If this question receives the assent of the electors, Council has the power, without further assent of the electors, to pass by-laws, as and when Council considers appropriate, to borrow money for the projects described up to $47,700,000.

Voting Places and Divisions 1 Stanley Park Lawn Bowling Club 2099 Beach Ave Club Room

29 Franklin Elementary School 250 Skeena St Gymnasium

2 King George Secondary School 1755 Barclay St Gymnasium (Denman St. Entrance)

30 Dr. A.R. Lord Elementary School 555 Lillooet St Intermediate School Gymnasium

3 West End Community Centre 870 Denman St Auditorium 4 Sunset Towers 1655 Barclay St Ground Floor Lounge 5 Lord Roberts Elementary School 1100 Bidwell St Gymnasium 6 Guardian Angels Parish 1175 Broughton St Millenium Hall 7 St. Paul’s Anglican Church 1140 Jervis St Lower Hall 8 Gordon Neighbouhood House 1019 Broughton St Conference Room 9 Coal Harbour Community Centre 480 Broughton St Multi-Purpose Room 10 Vancouver Public Library 350 W Georgia St Alice MacKay Room

31 Garibaldi Elementary School (Nelson Annex) 1025 Slocan St Activity Room 32 Templeton Secondary School 727 Templeton Dr Main Gymnasium 33 Britannia Community Centre 1661 Napier St Gymnasium C 35 Creekside Community Recreation Centre 1 Athletes Way Gymnasium 36 BC Housing 705 Jackson Ave Lounge 37 Mount Pleasant Community Centre 1 Kingsway Multi-Purpose Room 2 38 Mount Pleasant Elementary School 2300 Guelph St Gymnasium

11 Lord Roberts School Annex 1150 Nelson St Gymnasium

39 Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood House 800 E Broadway East & West Hall

12 Twin Arms Apartments 1030 Burnaby St Games Room

40 Grandview Elementary School 2055 Woodland Dr Gymnasium

13 Vancouver Aquatic Centre 1050 Beach Ave Top Landing

41 Queen Victoria School Annex 1850 E 3rd Ave Gymnasium

14 Century Plaza Hotel 1015 Burrard St Salon A

42 Chief Maquinna School Annex 2882 E 4th Ave Gymnasium

15 The Gathering Place 609 Helmcken St Theatre

43 Sir Matthew Begbie Elementary School 1430 Lillooet St Lunchroom

16 Jubilee House 508 Helmcken St Large Meeting Hall 17 Elsie Roy Elementary School 150 Drake St Gymnasium 18 Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Vancouver 50 E Pender St Auditorium 19 Vancouver Community College (Downtown) 250 W Pender St Foyer 22 Carnegie Centre 401 Main St Theatre 23 Strathcona Community Centre 601 Keefer St Seniors Activity Lounge

44 Thunderbird Elementary School 2325 Cassiar St Gymnasium 45 Broadway Church 2700 E Broadway Room 105 46 Laura Secord Elementary School 2500 Lakewood Dr Auditorium B

26 Tillicum School Annex 2450 Cambridge St Gymnasium 27 Macdonald Elementary School 1950 E Hastings St Gymnasium 28 Hastings Elementary School 2625 Franklin St Gymnasium

81 Sir Sanford Fleming Elementary School 1401 E 49th Ave Gymnasium

54 Dickens School Annex 3877 Glen Dr Gymnasium

82 Waverley Elementary School 6111 Elliott St Activity Room

57 Lord Selkirk Elementary School 1750 E 22nd Ave Gymnasium

83 Dr. George Weir Elementary School 2900 E 44th Ave Gymnasium

58 Gladstone Secondary School 4105 Gladstone St Small Gymnasium

84 MacCorkindale Elementary School 6100 Battison St Gymnasium

69 Carleton Elementary School 3250 Kingsway Gymnasium 70 Cunningham Elementary School 2330 E 37th Ave Gymnasium 71 Tecumseh School Annex 1551 E 37th Ave Gymnasium

75 John Oliver Secondary School 530 E 41st Ave Girls Gymnasium

52 General Wolfe Elementary School 4251 Ontario St Gymnasium

95 Langara Golf Course 6706 Alberta St Club Room

123 Fairview Presbyterian Church 2725 Fir St Main Lounge

97 Sir Wilfrid Laurier Elementary School 7350 Laurel St Gymnasium

112 Dunbar Community Centre 4747 Dunbar St Room 006

124 Vancouver Resource Society 2006 W 10th Ave Main Room

113 Queen Elizabeth Elementary School 4102 W 16th Ave Auditorium

125 Kitsilano Community Centre 2690 Larch St Lobby Room

99 Marpole Place for Seniors 1305 W 70th Ave Main Floor Dining Room 100 St. Augustine’s Church 8680 Hudson St Church Hall 101 St. Faith’s Anglican Church 7284 Cypress St Basement Meeting Room 102 Dr. R. E. McKechnie Elementary School 7455 Maple St Gymnasium 103 Kerrisdale School Annex 3250 W 43rd Ave West Hall 104 Southlands Elementary School 5351 Camosun St Gymnasium 105 Kerrisdale Community Centre 5851 West Boulevard Multi-Purpose Room 109 106 Maple Grove Elementary School 6199 Cypress St Gymnasium 107 Dr. Annie Jamieson Elementary School 6350 Tisdall St Gymnasium

76 General Brock Elementary School 4860 Main St Gymnasium

79 St. Andrew’s Church 480 E 47th Ave Hall 80 Culloden Court 1375 E 47th Ave Community Room

115 St. Chad’s Anglican Church 3874 Trafalgar St Basement 116 Prince of Wales Mini School 4750 Haggart St Activity Room 117 Shaughnessy Elementary School 4250 Marguerite St Gymnasium 118 Redeemer Lutheran Church 1499 Laurier Ave Parish Hall 119 Douglas Park Community Centre 801 W 22nd Ave Auditorium 120 St. Mary’s Ukrainian Catholic Centre 3150 Ash St Boardroom 121 L’Ecole Bilingue 1166 W 14th Ave Gymnasium 122 L’Ecole Bilingue 1166 W 14th Ave Gymnasium

110 St Mary’s Kerrisdale Church 2490 W 37th Ave Gymnasium

UEL votes for School Trustees only. UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS

City of Vancouver and School District No. 39 Voting Divisions General Local Election November 19, 2011

126 Carnarvon Elementary School 3400 Balaclava St Activity Room 127 Point Grey Community Church 3512 W 7th Ave Sanctuary 128 Lord Byng Secondary School 3939 W 16th Ave Girls Gymnasium 129 West Point Grey Baptist Church 4509 W 11th Ave Watson Room & Foyer 130 West Point Grey Community Centre 4397 W 2nd Ave Gymnasium 131 Bayview Elementary School 2251 Collingwood St Lunchroom 132 General Gordon Elementary School 2896 W 6th Ave Activity Room 133 Kitsilano Secondary School 2550 W 10th Ave Large Gymnasium 134 St Augustine’s Parish School 2145 W 8th Ave Gymnasium 135 St. Mark’s Anglican Church - Sanctuary 1805 Larch St Sanctuary

109 Point Grey Secondary School 5350 East Boulevard Cafeteria

77 Hillcrest Centre 4575 Clancy Loranger Way Multi-Purpose Room 78 Van Horne Elementary School 5855 Ontario St Gymnasium

114 Lord Kitchener Elementary School 4055 Blenheim St Activity Room

108 Emily Carr Elementary School 4070 Oak St Gymnasium

73 McBride School Annex 4750 St. Catherines St Gymnasium

48 Grace Memorial United Church 803 E 16th Ave Lower Level Activity Room

51 Simon Fraser Elementary School 100 W 15th Ave Gymnasium

94 Sunset Community Centre 6810 Main St Multi-Purpose Room

111 Knox Fellowship Centre 5600 Balaclava St Gymnasium

72 Lord Selkirk School Annex 4444 Dumfries St Activity Room

74 Sir Alexander Mackenzie Elementary School 960 E 39th Ave Lunchroom

50 St Patrick’s Regional Secondary School 140 E 11th Ave Lunchroom

93 Moberly Arts & Cultural Centre 7646 Prince Albert St Main Hall

96 Laurier School Annex 590 W 65th Ave Gymnasium

98 Trinity Baptist Church 1460 W 49th Ave Gymnasium

59 Lord Beaconsfield Elementary 85 Captain James Cook School Elementary School 3663 Penticton St 3340 E 54th Ave Gymnasium Activity Room 60 Renfrew Park Community Centre 86 Champlain Heights 2929 E 22nd Ave School Annex Room 110 7835 Champlain Cr Gymnasium 61 Renfrew Elementary School 3315 E 22nd Ave 87 South Vancouver Cafeteria Family Place 7710 Nanaimo St 62 Graham Bruce Elementary Activity Room School 88 Ecole Anne Hebert 3633 Tanner St 7051 Killarney St Gymnasium Gymnasium 63 Windermere Secondary 89 Kingsford-Smith School Elementary School 3155 E 27th Ave 6901 Elliott St Front Foyer Gymnasium 64 John Norquay Elementary 90 David Thompson Secondary School School 4710 Slocan St 1755 E 55th Ave Large Gymnasium Cafeteria 67 Collingwood Neighbourhood 91 Walter Moberly House Elementary School 5288 Joyce St 1000 E 59th Ave Gymnasium B West Gymnasium 68 Collingwood Neighbourhood 92 Henderson School Annex House 801 E 54th Ave 5288 Joyce St Gymnasium Gymnasium A

47 Queen Alexandra Elementary School 1300 E Broadway Gymnasium

24 Ray-Cam Co-operative Centre 49 Kivan Boys’ and Girls’ Club 2875 St. George St 920 E Hastings St Gymnasium Gymnasium 25 Lion’s Den Recreation Centre 770 Commercial Dr Activity Room

53 David Livingstone Elementary School 315 E 23rd Ave Gymnasium

STANLEY PARK

136 St. Mark’s Anglican Church - Basement Hall 1805 Larch St Basement Hall 137 Henry Hudson Elementary School 1551 Cypress St Gymnasium 138 Vancouver Museum 1100 Chestnut St Joyce Walley Learning Centre 139 St. Augustine’s Church 2028 W 7th Ave Parish Hall 140 Vancouver Masonic Centre 1495 W 8th Ave Lobby 141 Developmental Disabilities Association 624 W 8th Ave Main Room 142 False Creek Elementary School 900 School Green Gymnasium ADV A West End Community Centre 870 Denman St Bidwell Room ADV B Renfrew Park Community Centre 2929 E 22nd Ave Room 112 ADV C Sunset Community Centre 6810 Main St Multi-Purpose Room ADV D Dunbar Community Centre 4747 Dunbar St Lobby ADV E Vancouver City Hall 453 W 12th Ave Main Floor UEL 1 University Hill Secondary School 2896 Acadia Rd Gymnasium UEL 2 UBC-Student Union Building 6138 Student Union Blvd Concourse Display Area

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

news

Art gallery operators eye Cambie Street location

Anton advocates moving museum downtown Mike Howell Staff writer

A minute-to-minute market calls for a person-to-person approach. Even in uncertain markets, there are steps you can take to discover investment opportunities that these days, appear few and far between. One is getting expert advice. Discussing your portfolio with one of our financial advisors can help ease your concerns and protect your wealth even in today’s volatile market.

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VANCOUVER

BURNABY

WEST VAN

NORTH VAN

SQUAMISH

WHISTLER

PEMBERTON

NPA mayoral candidate Suzanne Anton is proposing to move the Museum of Vancouver to the current Vancouver Art Gallery site after the new gallery is built on a former downtown bus depot property. The museum is located in Vanier Park. In a speech Wednesday to announce the NPA’s entire policy platform, Anton suggested it wasn’t a popular destination. She believes locating the museum downtown would attract more visitors. “Do you know I was in a room full of people talking this morning and I asked them how many had been to the Museum of Vancouver… not one person had been there,” Anton said from the NPA’s downtown campaign office. When asked by reporters after her speech how much such a move would cost, Anton responded saying it was a long-term plan and would be helped by a so-called Vancouver Arts and Culture Infrastructure Fund and a Vancouver Arts and Culture Endowment Fund. The NPA’s plan for arts and culture involves using community amenity contributions paid by developers to support capital investments and help with operating costs of such city institutions as the museum. Anton’s announcement came on the heels of proposing to give the Vancouver Art Gallery development rights on a former bus depot site at 688 Cambie St. that would achieve “a revenue-generating endowment” and repay $40 million owed to the city as part of a complicated deal involving renovations to the Queen Elizabeth Theatre. In January, city council agreed to give the art gallery up to two years to present a business case for the Cambie property to the city

that takes into consideration the expectations of the city to recover the $40 million. The operators of the gallery want to move to the Cambie Street site because they say the current building on Robson Street is too small. The estimated cost of a new art gallery is $300 million, with the provincial agreement agreeing to pay for at least $50 million of the tab. The museum proposal was one of the few new announcements Anton made Wednesday, having rolled out several policies over the past month. She summarized many of them, including the NPA’s plan for affordable housing and homelessness. “The NPA housing plan recognizes that market-based solutions to housing supply are the only effective means of creating real affordability,” she said. “Everything else is a gimmick.” Vision Vancouver responded to the NPA’s housing plan by issuing a statement shortly after the press conference, saying Anton was “out of touch” on affordable housing. Vision Coun. Kerry Jang, who is seeking re-election, said the NPA’s plan is not credible. “Suzanne Anton thinks that city hall’s only role is to get out of the way of the free market,” Jang said. “Mayor Gregor Robertson and the Vision team strongly disagree. The affordability crisis in Vancouver is not going to be solved by a city hall that buries its head in the sand while people are priced out of the city.” Vision’s housing plans include implementing the city’s 10-year affordable housing and homelessness plan to create and enable 38,000 units of housing, continue with its program to build rental housing by providing developers incentives and supporting renters by creating a rental landlord base. Though Vision has been successful in lobbying the provincial government to open winter shelters, this is the first winter since Robertson was elected that Housing Minister Rich Coleman declined to continue the funding. The election is Nov.19. mhowell@vancourier.com Twitter: @Howellings


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A17

news

Fledgling party denounces developer donations

West End activist eyes mayor’s chair His name may not be familiar to some readers but Randy Helten plans on being the next mayor of Vancouver. Helten, the founder of civic watchdog websites CityHallWatch.ca and MetroVanWatch.ca and the former president of the grassroots activist group West End Neighbours, is making his political debut with the newly created Neighbourhoods for a Sustainable Vancouver (NSV). The party is also running four candidates for city council. Helten acknowledges that third-party mayoral candidates are generally considered a bit of a long shot—the last one to win more than 10,000 votes was former NPA councillor Jonathan Baker in 1996—but he believes a sense of change is in the air. “We are at a rare moment in Canadian history right now and it relates to global movements and global financial woes and the huge dissatisfaction across the city with Vision and the old way of doing things,” the 51-year-old freelance translator told the Courier Tuesday. “Occupy Vancouver is getting a lot of attention and their core message is really to get corporate influence out of the political system. I and the others running with me with NSV also feel compelled to stand up and take action. We’re ordinary citizens but we’ve spent thousands of hours over the past few years fighting city hall and I could give you hundreds, maybe thousands of examples of systemic dysfunction there.” He hopes to get NSV’s message to a wider audience through the use of social media sites like Facebook and Twitter, which last year helped fellow idealist Naheed Nenshi to an unexpected victory over front-runners in Calgary’s mayoral race. Helten’s biggest beef with Vision Vancouver and the Non Partisan Association—a party his name is indelibly linked with after Mayor Gregor Robertson infamously, and unknowingly, dismissed him and others at a public hearing as “f***ing NPA hacks” last year—is the vast sums of

11046380

Andrew Fleming Contributing writer

“...[VISION VANCOUVER AND THE NPA] ARE LIKE EVIL, IDENTICAL TWINS, AND IT MAKES VERY LITTLE DIFFERENCE WHETHER [SUZANNE] ANTON OR ROBERTSON GET IN BECAUSE THEY ARE BOTH BEHOLDEN TO THE DEVELOPMENT INDUSTRY.” Randy Helten

money both parties receive from corporate donors. “This is the most expensive municipality in Canada for civic elections and [Vision Vancouver and the NPA] are like evil, identical twins, and it makes very little difference whether [Suzanne] Anton or Robertson get in because they are both beholden to the development industry. Both got 2.5 million each for their budgets this year with the largest share coming from developers… If you look at the governing documents for the city, there’s the Vancouver Charter and then there is the code of conduct for all city employees. Right at the top of the code of conduct, it says that all staff, elected officials, everybody has to serve the community first and that they are prohibited from having undue influence. I believe the public should decide on Nov. 19 if that huge amount of money from the developers is undue influence.” He pulls out a well-worn copy of Donald Gutstein’s 1975 book Vancouver Ltd., which lambastes how corporate influence and the old boy network shaped city policy decisions in the 1960s and early 1970s. “You could change the dates and the names but it’s the same stuff, the same archetypical stuff that happens in any place in the word when you have precious land where there is money flowing.” Twitter: @flematic courier.yvr@gmail.com

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

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Fan zone attendees contributed to Stanley Cup riot

City withholds fan zone info until after election

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The City of Vancouver is refusing to release key records about the Stanley Cup fan zone until at least three days after the Nov. 19 civic election. On June 17, a Freedom of Information request was filed for a business case for the fan zone, which was trashed in the June 15 hockey riot. The request asked for a list of suppliers and payments and copies of contracts, including one with Hockey Night in Canada broadcaster CBC TV. On Aug. 2, the city postponed its response until Sept. 14, citing a “large number” of records to be searched and consultation with an unnamed thirdparty or other public body. A Sept. 8 letter from FOI manager Barbara Van Fraassen said the city was required to give a third party until Oct. 11 to respond. Van Fraassen’s Oct. 21 letter said the third party has until Nov. 21 to request a review by the Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner. “The records will be released to you on Nov. 22, unless we receive notification

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City hall spokeswoman Wendy Stewart was asked Tuesday for the FOI office’s annual budget and statistics on requests received and information released. She said Thursday that “staff are getting the information.” NPA mayoral candidate Coun. Suzanne Anton has blasted Vision Vancouver for turning city hall into a “sealed fortress” since taking power. In August, Brand Live Group senior vice-president Paul Runnals told the Courier his company was hired two days before the start of the Stanley Cup finals to manage the fan zone. He said Fresh Air Cinema sourced screens from Impact Video and he confirmed Super Save fencing and Pit Stop porta-potties were used. Concord Security was also hired. Fan zone supplier contracts were not included in a report published Aug. 17 on the city’s Supply Management website. In 2010, the city spent $2.2 million on 32 no-bid contracts. The city reported in September that it spent $1,501,908 on the fan zone, including $28,191 on porta-potties and $25,756 to repair damaged screens. In response to a separate FOI request, the city disclosed that it paid $114,218.28 to Pit Stop from April 1 to July 31, including $22,907.36 for “portable toilets June 215/11 (Stanley Cup).” 2010goldrush@gmail.com

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of a review on this file,” Van Fraassen wrote. At a Sept. 1 news conference, Mayor Gregor Robertson was challenged by a reporter about whether riot-related FOI requests would be fulfilled before his Vision Vancouver party seeks re-election. “I expect those will be much sooner than before the election,” Robertson said. “I expect those FOIs to all be released very soon.” Over two weeks in September, the city dumped hundreds of pages of information online in three phases, but not those related to the June 17 request. When he was sworn in as mayor on Dec. 8, 2008, Robertson promised to “ensure transparency” at city hall. “When the city uses your money, you have a right to know where it’s being spent, and what it’s being used for,” Robertson said in his speech. “When leaders fall short of that standard, public confidence is shaken.” But after the Oct. 30 mayoral debate in Chinatown, Robertson said “I don’t manage the details of our FOI office.” “It is important that that is not political,” he told the Courier. “We do have an extraordinary number of requests, the number of requests has gone up dramatically. Improvements have been made to open up the process and increase the flow of information from city hall.”

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

news

Nearly 40 messages disappear during cross-city move

Time for your flu vaccine?

Telus loses woman’s voice mail messages Cheryl Rossi Staff writer

A Vancouver woman says she learned the hard way that she shouldn’t have depended on Telus to transfer her voice mails in a move. Telus has been unable to retrieve Celena Benndorf’s nearly 40 messages from her voice mail that were lost Oct. 16 when she and her telephone number moved from Kitsilano to Kensington-Cedar Cottage. “A lot of these were things like my mom singing to me, special memory things that will never be repeated,” Benndorf said. “And then some of them were business and legal related—evidence.” On the evening of her move, Benndorf checked her voice mail from her parents’ home. She discovered she had no saved messages. She immediately phoned Telus and a customer service agent told her how to retrieve them. The agent said voice mails are backed up on a server for 24 hours after a move. Retrieving them didn’t work. Later calls that night and the next two days resulted in being put on hold or being told by agents the company was working on her problem. But on Oct. 19 a manager told Benndorf her voice mail could not be reinstated. Benndorf, who previously worked for Telus, phoned and asked to be connected to the president’s office, but she was directed to customer service.

She says a retired friend and colleague who worked with Telus for more than 20 years told her the company keeps messages on its server for a week. “I think the story is that they are on the server and they can’t be bothered,” she said. “Big old Telus can’t be bothered to go digging for a little residential customer’s voice mail that they lost. It’s not worth their while.” But Telus spokesperson Shawn Hall says a technical problem occurred during the transfer of Benndorf’s messages and they are not retrievable. He noted the company completes thousands of transfers successfully. “It can be a technically complex manoeuvre to move them in the server from one address to another and that’s what happened in this case. They were lost in that move,” Hall said. He said customer service agents are instructed to tell customers to back up their voice mails before a move. He added those with deluxe voice messaging like Benndorf’s can log into the Telus site and save their voice mails into sound files. Benndorf says when she placed her work order she wasn’t told that she should back up her voice mails or her options for doing so. “[It] kind of begs the question of why one pays Telus a monthly fee for voice mail. You can get your own machine and have it for free,” Benndorf said. crossi@vancourier.com Twitter: @Cheryl_Rossi

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

news

Artists target Mayor Robertson online Bob Mackin

Contributing writer A group of artists is scoffing at a Vision Vancouver website promoting the party’s arts and culture agenda. WeBacktheJuiceMan.com, by comedian Sean Devlin’s TruthFool Communications advertising agency, launched Oct. 17 to hype Mayor Gregor Robertson’s support for Vancouver’s creative community. Robertson is nicknamed “Juice Man” for cofounding Happy Planet Foods, the Burnabyheadquartered organic juice company that closed its East Side office last February. Devlin and Cameron Reed produced the anti-Conservative ShitHarperDid.com website critical of Prime Minister Stephen Harper that went viral during May’s federal election. Reed is Vision Vancouver’s digital communications coordinator. In response, the group of artists launched WeDontBacktheJuiceMan.Tumblr.com to counter the pro-Vision website. “We are not backed by any party, we are entirely volunteer run,” said spokesman Graeme Fisher. “The [We Don’t Back the Juice Man] site is not paid for by a political party or a developer, which the NPA and Vision Vancouver are.” Fisher said he is part of a collective effort by local artists who argue the Vision Vancouver and NPA-endorsed gentrification of the Downtown Eastside and other areas is driving artists and the working poor out of the city. Fisher accuses the pro-Robertson website of “art-washing.” We Don’t Back the Juice Man mentions the hasty evictions and demolitions at the Little Mountain social housing project,

which is now barren and awaiting redevelopment. “There’s a lot of rumbling in the arts community, but also in the opaque left in the city,” Fisher said. “In a sense the site is trying to repoliticize the debate and make it so artists and the working poor in the city are able to continue to live here.” Reed said the anti-Robertson site is more about housing issues than the arts. “As for protecting artist spaces, that is a key issue for our creative community and Vision Vancouver has a clear platform for that,” Reed said via email. “We feel that being out there in the community as ambassadors engaging people directly is more effective than anonymous websites.” Reed said he was asked by Vision to handle the We Back the Juice Man campaign’s Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and blog presence a few weeks after TruthFool pitched the party with the concept. “They provided a bit of funding to get the site going,” Reed said. “We created the content and received submissions. It’s pretty arm’s length as far as control and input.” Images include a painting of Robertson by Robert Mearns and a photo of Robertson’s head Photoshopped onto Canuck Ryan Kesler’s nude body, with a bottle of Happy Planet’s Extreme Green perched on a rock. Videos on the site feature proprietors of The Lido and Little Mountain Gallery praising Coun. Heather Deal, Vision Vancouver’s arts and culture advocate. We Back the Juice Man promoted a “timeraiser” for Vision Vancouver on Monday at the Waldorf Hotel where items were auctioned in exchange for volunteer time. Thirty-three people pledged a total of 336 hours for the campaign. The donors list included entities directly or indirectly reliant on city hall, such as H.R. MacMillan Space Centre, Science World, W2 Media Cafe and bar and nightclub owner Donnelly Group. 2010goldrush@gmail.com

The Painful Consequences of Impaired Driving

The following is the content of an email (slightly edited), now widely distributed online as a public service by a contrite BC motorist:

BC has one of the toughest drinking driving laws in Canada, and I found out first hand. As a first time Cedric Hughes offender I immediately (lost) my vehicle. I was polite and cooperative and I was allowed to take a cab home. If not I wouldn’t even want to consider the consequences. First, I have no transportation and I have to explain to everyone that I have lost my licence. I was not yet fully aware of (all) the consequences. When I actually read my tickets and realized I have to pay towing and storage fees for 30 days, for me that was $626. (After 30 days) to reclaim my vehicle I had to go to the Licensing Office and have them fax a release to ICBC (insurer) who then must fax it to the towing office. (Then I had to) contact the towing company to have the vehicle released and in this area they only seem to take cash. Not to mention that you need two other people in order to pick it up as you can’t drive. The next thing that happens is that I received a letter that informed me that I must go to a meeting with a councillor who will determine which course on driving I must take. This course costs approximately $985. I had to be enrolled in this course before the end of the 90 days to apply for my licence. (Next I had to have an) ignition inhibitor installed in any vehicle that I drive. This lovely contraption costs another approximately $700 to have installed, locally it can be done in Nanaimo at the Fountain Tire. This also had

THE ROAD RULES

to be installed before I can even apply to get my licence back.

So now I am thinking, ok well at least now I can get my licence, but let’s not forget the $500 fine that came with the ticket, then of course I must apply to get my licence Barrister & Solicitor back which is a $250 fee and the additional $31 licence fee. Wow, that is another $781 but at least will I have my licence back. Now that I have done all of this I can …drive. So now I must blow into this (device) every time I want to start my vehicle and, even more fun, it may request a breath in the middle of a drive. I must pull over within three minutes or the horn starts honking. If I fail or fail (to) comply, it is a violation. This machine has to be monitored monthly at a cost of $105 per month for the next year and you have to at least go to Nanaimo every other month to have it done. If I have bad readings, or violations, or any other issues, then they can extend the requirement until they are satisfied. …All in all my night out cost me over $5,000 between the cabs, courses and other requirements, and it is my first offence…I know most of my family, friends, co-workers and even complete strangers are learning a lesson from my mistake. I hope by reading this you will too. Please drive safely. Road Rules is by Cedric Hughes, Barrister & Solicitor with regular weekly contributions from Leslie McGuffin, LL.B. www.roadrules.ca

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A22

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

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Community Calendar

• Germ Warfare: Ever witnessed the wrath of others when sneezing on the bus? How we deal with the perception of 'catching' colds, flus and assorted maladies. Viral alert - what to watch out for; prevention tips.

with Sandra Thomas

• Cocoa Power: We'll explore the benefits of really good chocolate, and visit some local confectioners who have your health - and tastebuds - all wrapped up for the season. • Point & Click: Getting your teeth their whitest and brightest for holiday pictures.

Feature publishes in full colour on Friday Nov. 18, citywide. 11049232

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Nov. 5 and 6

The Point Grey Chrysanthemum Association’s Late Chrysanthemum Show takes place Nov. 5 from noon to 4 p.m. and Nov. 6 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Gardenworks Mandeville Garden, 4746 Southeast Marine Dr., Burnaby. Admission is free.

Nov. 5

Music-A-La-Tea takes place Nov. 5 at Avenir Middle School, 207-877 East Hastings St. The event, described as “musical fun for the whole family,” includes the jazz stylings of Britannia’s own Riley and the Transporteers. Admission is free, but reservations are recommended by calling 604-569-2222.

Nov. 6

The Vancouver Holocaust Education

centre at the Beth Israel Synagogue is presenting Dr. Anna Ornstein of the Boston Psychoanalytical Institute and Harvard University, who will present the lecture “Jewish Heritage and Jewish Survival: Lessons from the Holocaust.” The event was organized to mark Kristallnacht Commemoration Day Nov. 9, which will also be officially recognized by the city. The event takes place Nov. 6 at 7:30 p.m. at Beth Israel, 4350 Oak St.

Nov. 11

The annual Community Remembrance Day ceremony takes place once again at UBC Nov. 11 at the university’s War Memorial Gym, 6081 University Boulevard. The event is free for all and doors open at 10 a.m. This year the ceremony, which typically draws more than 1,000 participants, includes music provided by the UBC School of Music and several speakers, including Reverend Roberta Fraser. Free parking is available up to 1 p.m. at the general services and administration building parking lot beside the gym. Parking is also available in the North Parkade for $6 a day. sthomas@vancourier.com Twitter: @sthomas10

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

EW23

news

Anton says mayor ‘gagged’ city staff

City hall communications budget balloons The city’s communications budget has more than doubled in the last six years with the biggest annual budget increase by far coming in the past year. The department’s budget increased 2.45 times from $631,110 in 2006, which was midway through former NPA mayor Sam Sullivan’s administration, to $1,546,425 in 2011. The number of staff since 2006 has increased by three, which does not include three graphic designers who were transferred to communications from another department. The biggest leap in the department’s annual budget happened between 2010 and 2011, when it increased by $412,941. The department saw a 35 per cent increase in media calls “requiring a response” since the Olympics, according to Mairi Welman, the city’s director of corporate communications. But the city has also changed its media policy over the last two years. Reporters can no longer contact city staff directly to get answers to their questions, as was past practice for decades in Vancouver. In a move widely derided by journalists covering the city, all media enquires must go through the communications department. “That is Gregor [Robertson] controlling the message. As you know, city hall staff have been gagged,” said NPA mayoral hopeful Suzanne Anton. “Even I have a tough time getting information from them. In fact, I’m told now that they have to filter the information they give to me.” Vision Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson told the Courier last December that city manager Penny Ballem decided to implement the new media policy. Robertson added that funnelling calls through communications was more efficient for city staff and their workload. He said staff need to get the work of the city done first to benefit taxpayers. “It’s important to create an efficient system for the communication side but

Suzanne Anton

not at risk of undermining all the work that taxpayers are expecting to be done,” said Robertson. Anton wouldn’t say at the Courier’s recent mayoral debate whether she would replace Ballem, who was hired by Vision Vancouver in 2008, if she is elected mayor. But Anton said she would lift the “gag order” on staff. “Openness, transparency are fundamental to my new administration,” Anton said at the Oct. 21 debate. Vision Vancouver campaigned on a more open, transparent government in 2008. Anton said she would reduce the communications budget if elected. Welman said the communications department responded to an average of 260 media calls a month in 2011. It responded to an average of 190 media calls per month in 2010. She said 90 per cent of media enquiries are resolved on the same business day they are received. Welman reported the city added a position of public engagement manager to the communications department midway through this year to respond to council’s direction to expand consultation on major initiatives that include the city’s housing strategy, transportation plan, greenest city, capital planning and the future of the viaducts. She said requests for communications assistance from other city departments increased by 25 per cent from 2009 to 2011. She noted the annual budgets reflect compensation increases since 2006. Welman added that the communications department ran with extra temporary staff in 2010, which was funded through the budget of the Olympic Secretariat and not included in the figures she provided. crossi@vancourier.com Twitter: @Cheryl_Rossi

STYLE report

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Coming up:

• Holiday in the city: We’ll showcase three styles for the upcoming party season - from pretty to glam to tuxedo looks. Find out how to dress it up, for less.

AM$MI@M$ >;$HI

11028261

• When in doubt - accessorize!: With hats bewelled and purses encrusted - you’ll turn heads for the holidays. Plus: beauty from the inside out. Feature publishes in full colour on Fri. Nov. 11, citywide. To advertise in this feature, call 604-738-1412.

?@VJ"RHX TBH AMXHO'XHH :HT@XH%H$T Y@FHVT6=H MT E%@JM MT :@IHMS WM$"XP @$ CSX$MK6

11042326

Cheryl Rossi Staff writer

“EVEN I HAVE A TOUGH TIME GETTING INFORMATION FROM THEM. IN FACT, I’M TOLD NOW THAT THEY HAVE TO FILTER THE INFORMATION THEY GIVE TO ME.”

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A24

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

garden

Best time to plant is in October

Garlic ‘seeds’ really tiny bulbs

Q: My mother, who lives in Saskatoon, grew some purple garlic and the end of the stem had a mass of seeds. At least, that’s what I think they are. Can I plant these seeds, and if so when and where?

thick rigid stem that stands straight up. The other has a smaller bud and a thinner stem. Any thoughts?

A: Garlic doesn’t make true seeds. Instead, it makes a head of tiny bulbs at the end of each stem. These are called bulbils. They can be planted, but in my garden it was two years before I could harvest garlic clusters from them. I planted them in October and the following August each bulbil had produced one bulb that looked like a small onion. They tasted like normal garlic cloves. I stored some in my cool, dry basement and planted them again in October. The following August I found they had grown into normal garlic clusters that could be split into cloves and planted to continue the cycle. In B.C., garlic gets a really good start from October planting because it can make roots all winter. But if

The World In A Garden and FarmFolk CityFolk present

PLAN A PLAN

annemarrison garlic is planted in spring, the resulting clusters are often smaller than those of fall-planted garlic. It’s possible that bulbils planted in spring might need three years of growing before producing normal garlic clusters. Garlic’s favourite conditions are a sunny spot and rich soil.

Q: I have been trying to figure out which varieties of Oriental poppy I have in my yard. Based on some old tags I found, I believe one is Turkenlouis and the other Pizzicato. But I don’t know which is which. One has a larger bud before flowering and a very

A: Pizzicato is described by sellers as being semidwarf and having a very strong stem. So that’s probably a positive ID. Turkenlouis is a poppy with a fringed edge to the petals. So if your other poppy is fringed, that will be Turkenlouis. But it’s easy for old tags to migrate. If the smaller, thinnerstemmed poppy doesn’t have a fringe, it may be some other kind of poppy you bought or even a seedling. Often people let Oriental poppy heads dry on the plant, hoping to use them for dried flower arrangements in winter. If you’re just a little late in gathering them, you can get quite a few seedlings next spring. The smaller bud and thinner stem may indicate a very young plant. Send your garden questions to amarrison@shaw.ca.

VANCOUVER SCREENING of

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Joyce Diemert

A25

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A26

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

community briefs Occupy and Santa

The Occupy Vancouver protest on the grounds of the Vancouver Art Gallery has forced organizers of the Dec. 4 Santa

Claus Parade to change the route of the parade and the location of an annual food bank drop-off centre. Normally, the parade travels east

on West Georgia Street before turning right at Howe Street. This year, the parade will start at 1 p.m. at West Georgia Street and Broughton, travel

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east along West Georgia, turn north on Burrard and finish at Burrard and Cordova. “Our focus is on working with the City to make sure we have a

route that can accommodate parade goers and allow us to raise as much food and funds for the food bank as possible,” said parade producer Robyn

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JonesMurrell. “We’ll be working with the media to let people know about the new route and encouraging families to join us downtown again this year. The parade kicks off the holiday season, so we want to get the word out that even though the route is changed the Rogers Santa Claus Parade will be as entertaining as ever.” The parade claims to attract 300,000 spectators and is one of the largest food and fundraising events for the Greater Vancouver Food Bank Society. Since 2004, the parade has collected $96,200 and more than 63,500 pounds of food for hungry families in the Lower Mainland. Each year, the lawn of the art gallery becomes the Coast Capital Savings Christmas Square, with family entertainment and a drop-off location for donations to the food bank. This year, the Christmas Square will be located on Thurlow Street between Georgia and Melville, between 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Candidates debate

With the Nov. 19 municipal election looming, all-candidates debates are springing up all over the city. All-candidates meeting for park board happen Nov. 5, 9 a.m. to noon, at Coal Harbour Community Centre, and Nov. 6, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at Kerrisdale Community Centre. Mainstream and independent candidates for council, the school and park boards have been invited to a debate Nov. 6 at Douglas Park Community Centre, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Get Your Vote On! is hosting a debate and cabaret at the Biltmore, Nov. 14. The event will include a mix of musicians, artists and council hopefuls speaking about concerns of “young(ish)” voters. A politician “speed dating” session will follow the debate to give attendees and politicians the opportunity to take conversations to the floor. The Caucus Cabaret and Debate runs 7 to 10 p.m.

Vegan Prom

All of Vancouver’s vegans need to hang out more often. This is but one of the socially conscious, community-building mantras of the maiden Vegan Prom, an event organized by partiers who admire animal-rights thrift store finds and don’t want to doubt the ingredients of the seven-layer dip. VeganMania provides the snacks. Beer, wine and spirits available at a cash bar. Party karmically Nov. 5, 8 p.m. at the WISE Hall (1882 Adanac). The $15 tickets can be purchased at Nice Shoes and at Edible Flours. No tickets at the door. You must be 19 or older. Info at Veganpromyvr.com.


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

exotic courier

Courier readers: The Beach and Taillefer families Destination: Dordogne, France Favourite memories of trip: The group of friends

Include the Vancouver Courier on your exotic adventure and send a photo of yourself and/or travel companion displaying an edition of the Courier, along with a brief description of your trip, your name and contact information to fhughes@vancourier.com.

(John, Martha, Julia, Graeme and Myles), whose family vacations overlapped, enjoyed exploring the Chateau de Castelnaud in the Dordogne region of France this summer. The area is known for prehistoric cave painting, picturesque villages and fortified towns. Highlights included the cuisine and exploring castles.

You are invited to

WI N iPA AN D 2! Bu ya s of piece 350+ dia art by ... i-me mult members e ! l E t t L e A K OR S F L L A

tick raffle et!

Eastside Cultural Crawl at The Kettle Friendship Society 1725 Venables Street at Commercial Drive Friday November 18th 5:00 -10:00 pm

1s 2n t pr AR d p ize riz : i T 3r P e RA : O ad dP 2 r iz r FF e: by igin with LE Le Jen al F Sm fu s F n ra a i ar nds r m a f e t ux r tis su e C its pp Bo Bro d Ja ove liv or ur us zz r in tin g e Et eo gw g ch is, in ith ar t Di g s m up n n en p e rf ta lies or l il ln for 2 es s

p27 final colour

Art & Artists that Fight Stigma g Against g Mental Illness

Saturday & Sunday November 19th - 20th 11:00 am - 6 :00 pm 604-251-7633 www.thekettle.ca

Untitled Collage by N. Chodirker

YOU ARE WELCOME TO JOIN US AT 4:00 PM ON FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011 FOR THE KETTLE’S 35TH ANNIVERSARY EVENT AT THE SAME LOCATION AS THE ART SHOW SPONSORS

PRESENTING SPONSORS

ARTIST SUPPLIES PARTIALLY SPONSORED BY

COMMERCIAL DRIVE COMMUNITY BRANCH

Supporting people living with mental illness to lead healthier lives

A27


A28

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

travel

We are pleased to honour the finalists for the 5 Annual Vancouver AFP Giving Hearts Award Program th

Outstanding Philanthropist

Outstanding Youth Philanthropist

Mrs. Maria Logan Dr. Djavad Mowafaghian

Alexandra Roberts-Mendel Palvi Mroke JuliaTikhonova

Outstanding Volunteer Fundraiser

Outstanding Fundraising Professional

Pixie Riddle Mr Sing LimYeo

Wanda Dekleva

Janice Boyle Vivian Smith

The winner for each category will be announced at the luncheon. Help us honour these outstanding individuals at the National Philanthropy Day luncheon Presented by

Tickets on sale now at afpvancouver.org

F U N D R A I S I N G DATA B A S E C O N S U LTA N T S

The Richard III Museum, atmospherically housed in Monk Bar, built in the 1300s, contains interesting information about the much-maligned king, but its display is photo John Masters a bit amateurish.

Restoring Richard III’s reputation John Masters Contributing writer

YORK, England—Marvellous writer, Shakespeare. Not such a dab hand with historical accuracy, though. Case in point: Richard III. Shakespeare has the last Plantagenet king down as being a hunchback and a monster whose crimes included the murder in the Tow-

er of London of 12-year-old Edward and 10year-old Richard, who were the two legitimate claimants to the English throne on the death of their father, Edward IV. Nastier still, the man who made himself king was supposed to be safeguarding the two princes, who were his nephews. Oh, and he also had his brother, the Duke of Clarence, drowned in a barrel of wine. Continued on page 29

p28 ffinal colour

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

EW29

travel NEW WESTMINSTER

Five-century cover-up rankles museum founder ACCORDING TO THE MUSEUM, RICHARD NEVER SAID: “MY KINGDOM FOR A HORSE.” HIS LAST WORDS WERE, “TREASON, TREASON, TREASON, TREASON, TREASON!” various press clippings. There’s a 10-minute audio “trial” in which Richard justifies his conduct before a judge and prosecutor (and claims that it was the Duke of Buckingham, once Richard’s right-hand man, who was responsible for the princes’ deaths). A nice flourish is the series of front-page headlines torn from the tabloids of the late 1400s, chronicling Richard’s rise and fall: “Official: It’s Tricky Dicky!,” “Where Are the Princes, Richard?” and “Yorked! King of England in Death Shock! Unknown Welshman Seizes Crown!” Another of York’s ancient gates, Micklebar, is also open to visitors. It’s operated by the people who run the city’s Jorvik Viking Museum, and they bring to it the same professional slickness that’s made Jorvik such an international hit. But it lacks the mustiness, quirkiness and passion of Monk Bar, and it costs a pound more. For more information, visit richardiiimuseum.co.uk. John Masters is a member of the Meridian Writers’ Group.

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Continued from page 28 Bollocks, according to the Richard III Museum. Shakespeare was working from historical sources friendly to or controlled by Henry Tudor, the man who won the crown from Richard at the Battle of Bosworth Field and became Henry VII. Another Shakespearean inaccuracy, according to the museum, Richard never said: “My kingdom for a horse.” His last words were, “Treason, treason, treason, treason, treason!” Henry VII begat Henry VIII who begat Elizabeth I, whose reign covered most of Shakespeare’s working years. Playwrights in Tudor times didn’t diss the monarch, so even if the Bard of Avon knew a different story he was unlikely to tell it. But this five-century cover-up (Richard died in 1485) rankles a certain type of Englishman, leading to the formation the Society of Friends of King Richard III. One of its number, Michael Bennett, has gone to the trouble of creating the Richard III Museum. The museum itself is strange and wondrous. Or tacky, depending on your inclinations. It’s in the apartments above Monk Bar, one of York’s four ancient city gates, built in the early 1300s. From the street it’s reached by a narrow stone stairway in the gate wall, and each of its three small floors is heavy with the building’s age. The fact that the museum is little known and gets only about 13,000 visitors a year means you’ll likely to have the place to yourself, which adds to the atmosphere. On the other hand, the floors are lit with fluorescent strip lights and the displays consist of Bennett’s notes typed up neatly, laminated and stuck on boards along with


A30

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

“In my house great food always meant good company.” At Tapestry retirement communities, we respect your independence as well as the personal choices you make. In fact, we believe they’re what keep you feeling positive and enjoying life to the fullest. Whether it’s dining in the restaurant, cooking in your own kitchen or making new friends, Tapestry can provide you with the resources and support to do it. Call us today and see what kind of individualized QPRFPKTO BG IKS RWGP NR EGUQ VGGQ ARCP JRHAL TDSH KSH spirit healthy, vibrant and young at heart.

Angela Smith savouring her appetite for life

www.DiscoverTapestry.com Tapestry at Wesbrook Village UBC 3338 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC 604.225.5000 Tapestry at The O’Keefe - Arbutus Walk 2799 Yew Street, Vancouver BC 604.736.1640


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

travel

Statue, museum, cinema highlight actor’s life

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Stewart’s hometown honours its star Mitchell Smyth Contributing writer

INDIANA, Pennsylvania—“Harvey and I have things to do. We sit in the bars, have a drink or two, play the juke box.” Thus speaks Elwood P. Dowd (actor James Stewart) in the great 1950 movie Harvey. Harvey, you may remember, is a six-foot-tall rabbit, but we never see him, for he exists only in Dowd’s imagination. If you come to this west-central Pennsylvania town, however, you can see Harvey. You can even sit next to him and cuddle him. This Harvey is a huge stuffed doll and he has a permanent seat in the little movie theatre in the Jimmy Stewart Museum on Philadelphia Street. Indiana was Jimmy Stewart’s hometown and no one would dream of calling him “James” here. Another of Stewart’s best-loved movies is It’s A Wonderful Life, which is set around Christmas and has become a staple of Yuletide television. In many ways small-town Indiana (population 16,000) resembles Bedford Falls, the fictional town in the movie, and for years Indiana renamed itself that for Christmas, putting up a sign reading “Welcome to Bedford Falls.” The practice was discontinued after vandals defaced the sign. Outside the courthouse there’s a bronze statue of the actor. And atop Vinegar Hill stands the two-storey home where James Maitland

IN MANY WAYS SMALL-TOWN INDIANA (POPULATION 16,000) RESEMBLES BEDFORD FALLS, THE FICTIONAL TOWN IN [IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE], AND FOR YEARS INDIANA RENAMED ITSELF THAT FOR CHRISTMAS... Stewart grew up. But the museum is the main focus for visitors. It highlights his boyhood, his career in 80-plus movies and his service in the Second World War, in posters, clippings, photographs and items donated by the actor. There’s a flight suit worn by the man who flew more than 20 bombing raids over Germany and earned six battle stars and a Distinguished Service Medal. The rifle he used in Winchester 73 (1950) keeps company with part of a propeller, autographed by the cast, from the crashed plane in 1966’s Flight of the Phoenix. In the eight-row cinema, Harvey and visitors watch interviews, a career overview and clips from many of the tall, gangly, slow-spoken actor’s films. Continued on page 32

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A32

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

travel

A statue of Jimmy Stewart stands outside the courthouse in Indiana, Pennsylvaphoto Mitchell Smyth nia, the beloved actor’s hometown.

Monday, NOVEMBER 7

7 pm | Doors 6:30 pm

St. Andrew’s-Wesley United Church 1012 Nelson St. (at Burrard) Vancouver

For more info: staw.ca/debate

Stewart was ‘honourable, decent man’ Continued from page 31 “Part of every Jimmy Stewart movie was part of what he really was: an honourable, decent man,” says a guide. Some of the posters and reviews remind us that not all of his films have become classics. Sure, there’s Vertigo, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Anatomy of a Murder, Rear Window and dozens more that the critics and the public love, but he also appeared in some forgettable stuff. (No one remembers Art Trouble, You Gotta Stay Happy or Pot o’ Gold, do they?) The museum notes that when Stewart won

his only Academy Award, for The Philadelphia Story (1940), his father displayed it in the window of his hardware store for 20 years. The store is no longer there, but a plaque marks the site. Visitors also learn that Stewart wore the same cowboy hat in most of his western roles, and rode the same horse, Pa. Stewart, who died in 1997, visited his hometown several times, the last on his 75th birthday (May 20) in 1983. For more information, visit the Jimmy Stewart Museum website at jimmy.org. Mitchell Smyth is a member of the Meridian Writers’ Group.

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Kidz beat

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

BUILDING CONFIDENCE THROUGH WHOLESOME TRAINING

CHILDCARE OPEN HOUSE Saturday November 5th 10am — noon SPOTLIGHT ON: POWERHOUSE MARTIAL ARTS

Sensai Ramin instructs a student in karate. Photo: supplied.

by Helen Peterson Children today have to deal with many overwhelming challenges growing up that can erode their self-esteem, with lasting negative results. But, “there is something we can do,” says Sensei Ramin Emami, a Japanese trained 5th-degree black belt and head instructor of The Powerhouse Martial Arts Academy.

“I’ve come to believe that we must provide the kids with the necessary skills to resist peer pressure, and empower them enough to be able to say firmly – ‘no’ - to negative influences, before, or soon after they start going to school,” he says. “Karate is not a game, it’s a tool we hand our kids to have with them, to lead a healthier and safer life,” says the Sensei. This approach has spawned a “Confidence Building” program at the Powerhouse specifically designed for young kids. Not the typical karate class, it addresses two main areas: fitness (first) and then technical skill; both combined will result in improved self-confidence and simply a better

ability to cope with life. Sensei Ramin says some parents (and kids) picture karate as a violent game and perhaps don’t consider this wholesome training system for their children. But he says that the main emphasis in his classes is, “better behavior, discipline and learning how not to fight,” which all martial art styles are expected to promote. “We want to raise strong, confident children… and at the same time wellbehaved and peaceful kids!” he says with a smile. Sensei Ramin adds that members at the Powerhouse - kids and adults - train seriously two to three times a week, and to ensure that no child is left behind, there is a generous charitable program offered at the Powerhouse for those who cannot afford to pay for training. To find out more, go to www.the-powerhouse.ca, or call Sensei Ramin directly at 604-812-3656.

Face painting — Circle time — Bubbles — Refreshments & more

Come find out about our affordable & flexible childcare programs! We offer play-based programs that support the healthy development of your children. Programs service the entire Westside. Bumble Tree Childcare: 18 months - 4 years Kits Preschool: 3-5 years Kits & Dunbar Out of School Care: 5 - 12 years

Open House location:

6th & Highbury - Jericho Garrison For more information about these programs and directions: www.kitshouse.org

11048301

Being a parent himself, understanding all the concerns parents have, and knowing how karate could change a child’s life, the Sensai has turned the focus of his 18 years of dojo towards the younger kids.

604-736-3588

Photo by Kyoko Fierro

WEST POINT GREY ACADEMY INFORMATION SESSION Tuesday, November 8, 2011 Grades 5 – 12 at 9:30 am RSVP not required

Register for next year! Visual, media and performing arts classes available for children and youth ages 2-19, all skill levels. Winter Session classes start January 9!

Arts Umbrella Supporters: Bunt & Associates Engineering Ltd., The Christopher Foundation, Margaret & Gordon Davis, Mary Lou and Peter Gazeley, Darrell & David Mindell, RBC Capital Markets, The Vancouver Trolley Company Print sponsor:

An Independent Co-Educational University Preparatory School Entry Years: Junior Kindergarten (Age 4) and Grade 1 Acceptance in other grades dependent upon available spaces

APPLICATION DEADLINE – December 1, 2011 Admissions Office 4125 West 8th Avenue Vancouver, B.C. V6R 4P9 | admissions@wpga.ca (604) 678-2351

Visit our website for more information www.wpga.ca

11047001

www.artsumbrella.com


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

Kidz beat HOLIDAY CRAFT PROJECTS:

GET STARTED NOW! compiled by Helen Peterson

For many parents, the holiday season brings an endless stream of shopping excursions, festive gatherings to plan, and meals to cook. But the holidays are also a great time to embrace new family traditions and create memories with your loved ones that will be fondly recalled for years to come.

© Disney/Pixar. © Mattel, Inc. © Hasbro. All Rights Reserved. Slinky®Dog™.

PHOTO: NEWS CANADA

Supply requirements: for first timers, they recommend a chunky yarn and six-mm needles; those wanting to start a project, bring one ball of any yarn and needles to match yarn (novelty yarn is not encouraged). Classes run 3:30 to 4:30 pm on Thursdays; cost is $50 + HST for four sessions. Urban Yarns Point Grey is at 4437 West 10th Ave. Tel: 604-228-1122 web: www.urbanyarns.ca.

A home-made gift from a child is a treasured thing to receive. Our local crafty stores can really help! The Urban Yarns store in Point Grey features a Kids Club (geared for ages six to12). Amanda Kaffka leads this fun knitting class where you’ll be learning the basics, like making a simple garter stitch scarf or fingerless gloves or little simple animals. All levels are welcome, from learning to knit for the very first time to seasoned “pros!”

Baking with kids is one of the best ways to bond with your little ones during the holiday season. Whether they are toddlers or teenagers, kids will enjoy lending an extra hand in measuring, mixing and decorating fun holiday treats. And of course, they’ll enjoy eating and sharing their treats after all the baking fun is over. Looking for quality time together and a tasty treat too? Go online to find a wealth of recipes.

Make an impression

“The holidays are a perfect time of year for families to get together and get creative,” says Shelli Gardner, co-founder of Stampin’ Up!, a crafting and décor company explains. “Whether you’re decorating your house prior to the festivities, creating a perfect table setting for your holiday meal or gathering all of your memories in a scrapbook, our crafts will give you and your family a lot of options this holiday season.”

You can customize stockings for the mantle or use pressed cookie stamps. They’re food-and kid-safe and can be used with your favourite shortbread cookie dough or fondant. Better yet, give your sweets a personalized touch by placing them in a homemade decorated box wrapped with the designer series paper and designer fabric. Tips courtesy www.newscanada.com.

PHOTO: NEWS CANADA

CLASSES THAT KEEP YOU IN STITCHES

For youth living on the streets, there is no home for the

holidays...

The Fun Begins at $17! NOV. 18 - 20

Fri. NOV. 18 ★ 7:30 PM

OPENING NIGHT Buy One Ticket, Get One FREE!*

Sat. NOV. 19 12 NOON 3:30 PM 7:30 PM

Sun. NOV. 20 1:00 PM 4:30 PM

*Excludes Rinkside and VIP seats. No double discounts. Additional fees may apply.

NOV. 23 - 27 Wed. NOV. 23 ★ 7:30 PM

OPENING NIGHT Buy One Ticket, Get One FREE!*

Pacific Coliseum at

Thu. NOV. 24

Fri. NOV. 25

7:30 PM

7:30 PM

Sat. NOV. 26 12 NOON 3:30 PM 7:30 PM

Sun. NOV. 27 1:00 PM 4:30 PM

*Excludes Rinkside and VIP seats. No double discounts. Additional fees may apply.

Buy tickets at www.abbotsfordcentre.ca, www.pne.ca, Arena Box Offices or call 1-866-977-AESC (Abbotsford) or 1-855-985-5000 (Vancouver). Regular Ticket Prices: $17 · $26 · $32 · $55 VIP · $70 Rinkside 184458

Additional fees may apply.

www.disneyonice.com

Vancouver’s problem with homelessness is at an all time high, with many of those with no home of their own being under the age of 24. At the Courier, we decided to provide an opportunity to our readers to give a little cheer and kindness to the youth on our streets this holiday season.

Here’s how you can help: When out shopping for those stocking stuffers this holiday season, see what’s on special and grab an extra something on top of your usual purchase. Please note that we ask all items we collecting to be NEW (please, no used goods at this time)!

Suggested gifts include:

Socks, underwear, mittens, gloves, scarfs, toques, boots, jackets, blankets or sleeping bags, toothpaste, toothbrushes, dental floss, deodorant, soap etc... Transit tickets, grocery vouchers or restaurant/fast-food/coffee shop gift certificates Directions to Youth Services centre, operated by Family Services of Greater Vancouver is our partner in this endeavour, and will distribute the goods to youth who are homeless or living in atrisk situations. Anything you can give will help make the holidays a little easier for the youth on our streets.

Thank you for your support!

Happy Holidays!

Simply drop your items off in the big box situated in the Courier lobby at 1574 West 6th Ave., near Fir St. by Friday, December 16th. Hours are Mon-Fri, 8:30 am to 4:30pm.


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Ofreneo Joaquin rns 4 on tu 13th! November

HAPPY BIRTHDAY to all these NOVEMBER Kids! November 3 Kyleah Kubota 15

November 6 Isaac Fuggersberger 4

November 10 Findlay Bell 6

November 4 Darren Lee 8

November 8 Zhevrick Villareal 10

November 12 Nereda Lau 13

Make a

Brodie Alexander 13

November 13 Micah Fuggersberger 6

Joaquin Ofreneo 4

November 16 Caleb Chua 7

November 29 Ashley Brooks 9

November 17 Ethan Daniel Lam 6

Birthday wish come true Our DQ Ice Cream Cakes are made by our in-house Cake Master.

Receive $5.00 off a DQ cake!

Dunbar Dairy Queen & Orange Julius 3380 Dunbar Street (@ 18th Ave) 604-733-2884

HELP SQUIGLEY THROUGH THE UMBRELLA MAZE Birthday Club Entry Form Name: ______________________________

Phone # _____________________________ Turning_______on: ____________________

Send to: The Birthday Club, 1574 West 6th Ave., Vancouver BC V6J 1R2. Deadline for entries for the upcoming month is Nov. 30th, 2011.

NEXT BIRTHDAY CLUB WILL PUBLISH

DECEMBER 9TH, 2011 Hey Kids... Simply send us your name & birthdate and we will publish it the month of your birthday on our special Birthday Page. You will also be automatically entered to WIN a birthday prize from H.R. MACMILLAN SPACE CENTRE & DAIRY QUEEN. Winners will be contacted by phone in addition to an announcement in the paper.


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

Budding chefs Max Redmond and Dixie Worland helped out at the Growing Chefs fundraiser held at the Pacific Institute of Culinary Arts.

The Courier’s Sandra Thomas was just as happy to pick up a Stingray Skin purse for the Webster Gala as she was with her nomination in the best reporting category.

Fred Celebrating the best in B.C. journalism, Jack Webster Jr. welcomed veteran CTV anchor and keynote speaker Lloyd Robertson to the 25th Webster Awards.

UNLEESHED

Barrie Mowatt feted Mexican sculpture artist Yvonne Domenge at the Vancouver Biennale Lifetime Achievement Awards.

Journalism jamboree: A thousand guests attended the 25th annual Webster Awards Dinner held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel. CBC’s Tony Parsons and Shane Foxman were masters of ceremonies of the Oscars of B.C. journalism. Thirteen trophies were handed out for best reporting in television, radio and print. The Courier’s Sandra Thomas was a finalist in the Best News Reporting category. Former Kamloops mayor and Kamloops Daily News editor Mel Rothenburger picked up the Lifetime Achievement Award. Kitchen party: Foodies piled into the Pacific Institute of Culinary Arts for Growing Chef’s third From Farm to Fork fundraiser showcasing local producers and the culinary talents of 18 participating restaurants. They included La Brasserie, Vij, Miku and Bishop’s. Yours truly and Margaret Gallagher emceed the gastronomic gala in support of the non-profit society’s children’s urban agriculture programs. Miracle on Hastings: Chaired by Robin Dhir and emceed by Global TV’s Robin Gill, A Night of Miracles attracted 400 business leaders and socialites to the South Asian philanthropic gala to raise money for child health in B.C. Held at the Vancouver Marriott Pinnacle Downtown, this year’s record haul of $300,000 will go towards an interventional radiology room at the new B.C. Children’s Hospital. Hear Fred Mondays 8:20 a.m. on CBC Radio’s The Early; email Fred at yvrflee@hotmail.com; follow Fred on Twitter: @FredAboutTown or Fredabouttown.blogspot.com.

Art enthusiast Kim Spencer-Nairn kibitzed with collector, arts advocate and Philanthropy in the Arts recipient Michael Audain at the Biennale bash.

Growing Chefs executive director Helen Stortini, founder Merri Schwartz and CBC’s Margaret Gallagher fronted the Farm to Forks party.

Sisters Leslie and Carol Lee checked out Tiffany’s newest leather collection and met its celebrated designers Richard Lambertson and John Truex.

Lucky Janda, Wally Oppal and A Night of Miracles Gala chair Robin Dhir raised more than $300,000 at the black tie benefit for B.C. Children’s Hospital.


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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arts & entertainment

Picks of the week

1. We’d be lying if we said we weren’t a little apprehensive about the upcoming Lemonheads show this Friday. Frontman and former ’90s heartthrob Evan Dando has a history of self-destructive behaviour and we worry we’ll be wearing the same plaid shirt as dozens of other rapidly aging dudes attending the gig. But damn if Dando doesn’t write catchy pop songs, as evidenced in the Lemonheads’ 1992 hit buffet It’s a Shame About Ray, which the band will play in its entirety when they drop by the Biltmore Nov. 4. The Shining Twins, Street Chant and Erich Luening open. More info at biltmorecabaret.com.

2. Like nuts and gum, pairing Cirque du Soleil with the music and life story of Michael Jackson is a winning combination created in the fiery loins of Las Vegas. Described as “a riveting fusion of visuals, dance, music and fantasy that immerses audiences in Michael’s creative world,” Michael Jackson THE IMMORTAL World Tour features 65 artists including 12 musicians paying tribute to Jackson’s legacy. Do you like people standing inside giant replicas of Jackson’s slip-on moonwalking shoes and white socks? They’ve got that, too. The glittery glove drops Nov. 4 to 6 at Rogers Arena. For tickets and info, go cirquedusoleil.com/MichaelJackson or call 1-855-985-5000. 3. Best selling author, humorist and contributor to This American Life, David Sedaris returns to Vancouver for a sure-to-be memorable evening when he reads from his most recent book Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk: A Modest Bestiary and acts like his charming self. It all goes down Nov. 5, 8 p.m. at the Centre in Vancouver for the Performing Arts. Tickets at all Ticketmaster outlets.

2

kudos & kvetches Wall to wall

We received several emails informing us there would be a “big” announcement Tuesday concerning the first major concert event to be held in the newly reopened B.C. Place, which recently underwent half a billion dollars in renos but still managed to overlook such things as proper staffing and beer variety. But we digress… Maybe it was the intensity of the emails or the glowing eye of the Mordor billboard outside the stadium, but we began to feel the anticipation. What dynamic musical sensation would be the first to christen this shiny paean to technology and spectacle? Who would best encapsulate and reflect the vibrancy of this reinvigorated sports complex and the youthful, multicultural city it call homes? Who, pray tell, who? Roger Waters’ The Wall. Seriously? The same Roger Waters partly to blame for Pink Floyd’s overwrought double LP, The Wall, way back in 1979? The same Roger Waters who launched his own touring production of The Wall minus the rest of Pink Floyd in 2010 and told the Associated Press, “I’m not a great vocalist or a great instrumentalist or whatever, but I still have the fire in my belly, and I have something to say. I have a swan song in me and I

4. The new album, Days, by New Jersey band Real Estate is one of our favourites of the year, filled with lush, easy-going guitar jangle and hazy nods to the Feelies, the Shins and a whack of New Zealand bands from the ’80s and ’90s that make us wish we had the guts (and gams) to wear cut-off jean shorts in the summer. Feel the warmth Nov. 8 when they play the Biltmore with fellow Garden State residents Big Troubles. Tickets at Red Cat, Scratch, Highlife, Zulu and online at ticketweb.ca.

think this will probably be it”...? Apparently so. Of course, swan songs of multimillionaires who let extravagant stage shows compensate for their vocal and instrumental limitations don’t come cheap. Individual tickets for the May 26 concert top out $271.25. So in retrospect, maybe it is a fitting concert for a $563-million renovated stadium in a city where most people can’t afford to buy a home… just like… bricks in the wall. Genius.

The defence breasts, your Honour

Like many of you, the fraction of a second glimpse and subsequent slow motion replays on YouTube of Janet Jackson’s breast and demon-like areola have been burnt into our eyes for years. Thankfully, we can now get some closure on that fateful day in 2004 when Jackson suffered a “wardrobe malfunction” at the hands of Justin Timberlake during the Super Bowl XXXVIII halftime show. Nearly eight years and countless scorched lives later, the U.S. Circuit of Appeals in Philadelphia ruled on Wednesday that boob broadcaster CBS doesn’t have to pay $550,000 in fines levied by 20 affiliates for indecent exposure. According to AVClub.com: “Voting 2-1 to void the fine, the court stated that the FCC

has maintained a ‘consistent refusal’ to treat sudden nude images as indecent, and there was no reason to treat the Jackson case differently.” The nightmare is finally over.

Say it ain’t so, Juggalo

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We were sitting in our K&K crib the other day, applying grease paint to our face and guzzling back a two-litre bottle of Faygo, when we heard the news. The rowdy, clown-faced fans of the rap-metal group Insane Clown Posse known as Juggalos have joined the ranks of Crips, Bloods and Hells Angels, and are now considered a gang according to the FBI’s 2011 National Gang Threat Assessment. According to Rolling Stone, the FBI claims that “most crimes committed by Juggalos are sporadic, disorganized, individualistic, and often involve simple assault, personal drug use and possession, petty theft, and vandalism, however open source reporting suggests that a small number of Juggalos are forming more organized subsets and engaging in more gang-like criminal activity, such as felony assaults, thefts, robberies, and drug sales.” And here we thought the only criminal element surrounding the Insane Clown Posse was the band’s ongoing crimes against music. But seriously folks…


THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

theatre

Stories and photos from your

community

Unhappy husband and wife do battle in Fifty Words

~ In print and online all the time

Them’s fighting words Fifty Words

character likeable—mostly by making Jan a bitch. But a confession from Adam tips the balance. Poor little Greg. Nine years old. Hiding in nests of clothing in dark closets. Insecure. Unhappy parents. On the positive side, perhaps this night will bring Adam and Jan closer together. Maybe not. But “I’m your wife. Of course I want you to have secrets from me” doesn’t sound like a foundation upon which these two can sustain a lasting relationship. Fifty Words is a real slice of a life you’d rather not have. If you’ve already been there, you never want to go there again. Hip New York apartment set by John R. Taylor. Good performances, painful material. •••

At the Cultch until Nov. 5 Tickets: 604.251.1363 thecultch.com

vancourier.com

Reviewed by Jo Ledingham

PARK THEATRE

3440 Cambie Street, 604-709-3456 The Ides of March: *FINAL WEEK MUST END NOV 10, 4:00, 7:00, 9:05 + Sun Nov 5, 1:45 Wagner’s Siegfried: Live in HD from the Metropolitan Opera, Nov 5, 9:00 am J. Edgar: Vancouver Sun Sunday Film Series – Free Breakfast w/ admission, Sun Nov 6, 10:00 am www.festivalcinemas.ca

RIDGE THEATRE

3131 Arbutus Street, 604-738-6311 The Rum Diary: *NEW THIS WEEK, 4:00, 7:00, 9:30 + Sat & Sun 1:30, (No 7:00 & 9:30 Shows Nov 10) Queen of the Sun – What are the Bees Telling Us: *ONE SHOW ONLY, Thurs Nov 10, 7:00 - Presented by Farm Folk City Folk www.festivalcinemas.ca

DENMAN CINEMAS

1779 Comox Street, 604-558-3456 Dolphin Tale: Fri, Sat & Sun 12:00pm

RIO THEATRE

1660 East Broadway, 604-879-3456 The Rum Diary: Daily 7:00 & 9:30 + Weekend Matinees 4:45 Midnight Cult Classic – V for Vendetta: Fri. Nov. 4, $10/$8 costume www.riotheatre.ca

INTERNATIONAL VILLAGE CINEMAS

88 West Pender, 3rd Floor, 604-806-0797 Footloose: Fri-Thurs 1:05, 4:05, 6:55, 9:35 Real Steel: Fri-Thurs 12:55, 3:50, 6:45, 9:50 Contagion: Fri-Sun 4:30, 10:00; Mon-Wed 1:20, 4:30, 7:30, 10:00; Thurs 1:20, 4:30, 10:00 Anonymous: Fri-Thurs 1:10, 4:15, 7:15, 10:25 The Help: Fri-Thurs 12:50, 3:55, 7:05, 10:15 Johnny English Reborn: Fri-Sun 1:15, 7:10; Mon-Thurs 1:15, 4:10, 7:10, 10:05; Wed 1:15, 4:10, 10:05 Moneyball: Fri-Thurs 12:45, 3:40, 6:40, 9:45 Drive: Fri-Thurs 1:35, 4:40, 7:35, 10:20 The Rum Diary: Fri-Thurs 1:25, 4:25, 7:25, 10:30 The Guard: Fri-Thurs 1:45, 4:20, 6:50, 9:40 Le Harvre: French w/subtitles, Fri-Thurs 1:30, 4:35, 7:00, 9:30 The Women on the 6th Floor: French w/ subtitles, Fri-Thurs 1:00, 4:00, 7:20, 10:10 www.cinemarktinseltown.ca

November 4 - 10

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FIFTH AVENUE CINEMAS

2110 Burrard Street, 604-734-7469 The Skin I Live In: *NEW THIS WEEK, 1:30, 4:15, 7:15, 9:45 Martha Marcy May Marlene: 1:45, 4:30, 7:05, 9:20 Anonymous: 1:15, 4:00, 7:00, 9:35 The Guard: 2:00, 4:45, 7:25, 9:30 Moneyball: 1:00, 3:45, 6:50, 9:25 (No 6:50 Show Nov 9) www.festivalcinemas.ca

Sarah’s Key: Daily 2:20 Harry Potter: Fri-Tues 4:20 Midnight in Paris: Fri-Tues 7:00, Wed & Thurs 12:15pm & 4:20 Die: Fri–Tues 9:00 Cell 211: Fri & Sat 11:00pm, Mon & Tues 12:00pm www.denmancinemas.com

First comes love, then comes marriage, then comes baby in a baby carriage. That’s often the way it goes after a couple says those three little words to each other. What follows over the years are words, words, words—not all of them nice. Silence can be even worse. So, although Jan (Kirsten Robek) says there should be at least 50 words to describe the kinds of love (like the multitude of words for snow by dwellers of the frozen North), she’s having a hard time applying any of them to how she feels about her husband Adam (Aaron Craven) after about a decade of marriage. Michael Weller sets his play on the first evening Jan and Adam have had alone together in the nine years since their son Greg was born. Uh oh, there’s trouble right there. Nine years without some alone time? Even though Greg is exceptionally insecure (maybe a result of his overly anxious mother), don’t Jan and Adam know about babysitters? Adam has planned a romantic evening. He brought take-home food back to the apartment so Jan doesn’t have to cook. He bought champagne. Maybe they should light some candles, he suggests. “You know where they are,” Jan replies wearily. We know where this is going. What follows is every fight every couple on the cusp of a breakup has had: the accusations and revelations going all the way back to

Kirsten Robek and Aaron Craven verbally slug it out in Fifty Words. the beginning. Then make-up sex. Or break-up sex. Or just plain bad sex. John Murphy directs this Mitch and Murray Productions fight fest. Robek has the widest, brightest smile going and personal warmth to make you want to cozy up to her. But the playwright makes Jan an impossible character to like, who, after Adam does what he can to romance her, sits down at her laptop, leaving him to languish upstairs in the bedroom. Adam sums it up neatly when he suggests Jan let him know what might be “a mutually convenient time to copulate.” But even though playwright Weller tips the scales in favour of Adam with his quick sense of humour and apparent desire to make the marriage work, Adam’s no saint. Craven makes his

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Notes from The Drive

Halloween came early on Commercial Drive. Zombies jostled Lady Gagas, witches hung out with fairies—and these were adults—last Saturday night when I caught fellow critic Jerry Wasserman’s performance in Asymmetry. The patio with overhead heaters was packed, the sidewalks were spilling over into the street and parking was at a premium. There’s always a buzz on Commercial whether you’re buying bulk calamata olives, Portuguese buns, B.C. apples or going to Havana theatre—known for its edgy, short run plays—that’s tucked in behind the bustling Havana Café. If Wasserman’s UBC students have any desire to see him exchange his academic gown for a sexy blue dressing gown, it’s too late; Asymmetry closed last weekend. Produced by reality curve theatre, it was a scorcher. joled@telus.net

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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entertainment

Local art, crafts, fashion aplenty

’Tis the season for craft fairs

ORDER ONLINE DELIVERY AVAILABLE 4432 Dunbar Street 604-738-3186

State of the Arts

www.handicuisine.com

Halloween is over so it’s time to gear up for the pre-Christmas craft market season. The Vancouver events offer inexpensive and luxurious gift options for loved ones, which, if you give into temptation, might end up including you. There’s a plethora of art sales and fairs this year, so this non-exhaustive list only covers November.

Until Nov. 27

• The Festive Collective pop-up shop features locally designed items for the men, women and children in your life. The shop in The Rize at 196 Kingsway, near Main and Broadway, includes veganfriendly Naugahyde vinyl bags by Astrosatchel, jewelry by Filou Designs, oldschool T-shirts for men and clothing for kids. Runs Tuesday through Saturday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday noon to 5 p.m. For more information, see festivecollective.wordpress.com.

Nov. 4 to 6

• Art aficionados can choose from a broad selection of original paintings, photographs, prints, ceramics, sculpture, wearable works, housewares and more at Emily Carr’s 38th annual student art sale. The sale starts at noon and runs until 8 p.m. on Friday, 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday in the Concourse Gallery, North Building, Emily Carr University of Art + Design, 1399 Johnston St., Granville Island.

Nov. 9 to 13

• The sprawling Circle Craft Christmas Market, which includes housewares, decorations, clothing, pottery, glass, accessories, toys and food, runs at the Vancouver

Dine-In Only Valid only at Dunbar location Expires Nov.30/2011

This year’s Circle Craft Christmas Market includes fashions from Faeries from the Prairies. Convention Centre West, 1055 Canada Place. It runs Wednesday to Friday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, see circlecraft.net.

Nov. 17 to 20

• All three public floors of the Edwardian heritage mansion near Granville and 16th Avenue will be decked in Christmas finery for the 39th Christmas at Hycroft. Buy from non-profit boutiques, local artisans, listen to carolling and other music, visit the coach house to peruse gifts of food and snack at the Holly Bistro. The University Women’s Club of Vancouver holds this annual fundraiser to support scholarships, bursaries, charity and advocacy groups, and to maintain the stewardship of the grounds and buildings of Hycroft. The market starts at 10 a.m. at 1489 McRae Ave. and runs until 9 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. For more information, see uwcvancouver.ca. The heritage building can’t accommodate strollers. Wheelchairs can only access the main floor. Continued next page

FREE

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“JOHNNY DEPP BREATHES LIFE INTO HUNTER S. THOMPSON!”

REQUIEM FOR PEACE

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8 pm | Saturday, November 19, 2011 Chan Centre for the Performing Arts (UBC)

JOHNNY DEPP

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Vancouver Chamber Choir | Vancouver Chamber Ensemble | Jon Washburn, conductor Jon Washburn leads the Vancouver Chamber Choir, soloists and ensemble in Vancouver composer Larry Nickel’s inspiring Requiem for Peace, presented in cooperation with the UBC Museum of Anthropology’s powerfully moving photographic exhibition Hiroshima by Miyako Ishiuchi. An evening of inspiring music and poetry in 11 languages. Join John William Trotter for a pre-concert talk at 7:00pm.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

entertainment

Limited edition T-shirts, woodwork, pottery, oh my Continued from page 39

Nov. 18 to 20

...that’s where the city’s finest omelettes are to be found.

• Local artists open their studios to the public during the Eastside Culture Crawl. It runs at multiple venues, Friday from 5 to 10 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. You can browse participants online by artist, building and image at eastsideculturecrawl.com.

Jurgen Gothe, Vancouver Flavours on 100.5 THE PEAK

• The local accessories and jewelry market extravaganza called Fab Fair will draw the ladies and those who love them to Heritage Hall, 3102 Main St., from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, see fabfair.ca.

Nov. 20

• Blim Monthly Community Market will include 60 vendors of jewelry, fine art, cards and more at the Chinese Cultural Centre, 50 East Pender St., noon to 5 p.m. For more information, see blim.ca.

Stylin’ T-shirts from Ole Originals are at The Festive Collective pop-up shop.

Nov. 24 to 27

Nov. 26

09099016

• More than 110 Canadian artisans, designers and crafters will sell fashion, accessories, art, jewelry, baby items, home decor and even stuff for men at Make It! Visitors can pay once and shop for four days at the Croatian Cultural Centre, 3250 Commercial Dr.

WALMART CORRECTION NOTICE

On page 13 of our flyer distributed on October 26 – 28 and effective October 28 – November 3, the new Drake CD Take Care (#30258549) will not be available until November 15. On page 17 the following items will be available at a later date. NHL 48” Hockey Table (#30236524), NHL 72” Hockey Table with Table Tennis (#30234388), NHL 40” Rod Hockey Table (#30237142), Halex 48” Combo Table (#30237114), Halex 54” Flip Table (#30237117). On page 2 of the SuperCentre flyer the Fresh Atlantic Salmon or Tilapia Fillets Value Pack (#30136554/609) will not be available.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused.

Firehall Arts Centre presents

VIMY

Tim Matheson Photography Daryl King, Sasa Brown

Vern Thiessen

Nov 2 to 19 8pm

Previews October 28 to 30 & November 1 Weekend Matinees 2pm, Wed Matinee 1pm 280 East Cordova

Tickets

Nov. 26 and 27

Nov. 19 and 20

Breakfast & Lunch • Open Daily 7am-3pm 2211 Granville Street @ 6th Ave 604-737-2857

by

• I Heart Crafts! runs at Artbank, 1897 Powell St. at Victoria Drive from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. • The Strathcona Winter Craft Fair runs from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Strathcona Community Centre, 601 Keefer St.

firehallartscentre.ca

or call 604.689.0926

For hours, information and $2 off admission, see makeitproductions.com. • More than 140 local vendors selling handmade crafts ranging from jewelry to woodwork will populate the juried Dunbar Craft Fair that runs at the Dunbar Community Centre, 4747 Dunbar St. For more information, see “special events” at dunbarcentre.ca.

• Among other goods, local artisans at Portobello West sell chocolate, perfume, bamboo linens, bison leather journals and custom wood furniture and cabinets. The market runs 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Creekside Community Recreation Centre in the former Olympic Village, 1 Athletes Way. For more information, see portobellowest.com. • The 18th annual Women’s Winter Faire will feature the creations of B.C. women artisans, artists and craftswomen at Heritage Hall, 3102 Main St. from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, see soundsandfuries.com. • Urban Artisans Craft Fair, a juried craft fair with work from more than 50 local artists and craftspeople, happens at the Roundhouse Community Arts and Recreation Centre. Items include pottery, toys, clothing and jewelry and there will be a craft area for kids. It runs from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 181 Roundhouse Mews. Info: roundhouse.ca. crossi@vancourier.com Twitter: @Cheryl_Rossi


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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A42

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

sports & recreation

Seventeen-year-old praised for intelligence on the field

Magee’s McEown a soccer natural Megan Stewart

Staff writer

On and off the ball, J.B. McEown can turn straightforward, even predictable possession into dramatic, fastpaced action. The entertaining 17year-old Magee centre fielder, whose initials stand for John Brendan, leads his high school team with nine goals and is thoughtful enough to credit his teammates in his success. “We all work together really well, especially in the midfield,” he said last week after scoring two goals to lead the Lions to a 3-2 victory in the city championships. “For some reason, I just always ended up on the right end and in front of the net.” It might be modesty, but finding the ball in front of the net is not just a talent of McEown’s clever teammates but also a mark of his natural strengths. In one city playoff game, McEown played keep away from defenders. He relied on the strikers ahead of him and wingers to the outside, but as the attack moved over the half line, McEown raced forward and showed for a pass. He then beat two defenders, broke left and shot from outside the 18-yard box. He created the one-man challenge, which was threatening and exciting. “He’s got great skill but his biggest asset is his ability to find space,” said Pete Brion, the head coach of the

“HE KNOWS WHERE TO GO BEFORE OTHER PLAYERS KNOW THAT HE’S THERE.” Coach Fred Gault

Point Grey Greyhounds, a West Side high school competing against Magee this week for one of three berths to the provincial tournament. “His intelligence away from the ball is his biggest strength.” Defending McEown, who plays in the B.C. High Performance League, requires parallel smarts, said Brion. “What you want to do with a player like that is you want to shut him down. And guys need to be aware of where he is. It’s easy to say that but sometimes it’s hard to do.” “He knows where to go before other players know that he’s there,” said McEown’s head coach at Magee, Fred Gault. “It’s not something you can teach. You either have it or you don’t. You can hone it by playing with the best, which he’s done, but really that’s an innate skill.” mstewart@vancourier.com Twitter: @MHStewart

Magee Lion J.B. McEown also plays in the B.C. High Perforphoto Dan Toulgoet mance League.

St. George’s Saints, Magee Lions advanced to second round Megan Stewart Staff writer

Kitsilano and Saint George’s duked it out Tuesday in the opening round of the AAA senior boys soccer zone tournament, drawing even after 90 minutes and another 15 minutes of overtime. Goaltending heroics by Kits Blue Demon Torin O’Regan and Saint Kirk Bonnis kept the game intense and tied at 2-2. Kitsilano’s two goals came from Acil Amrani and Taylor Guerin. St. George’s points came from Brendan Catliff followed by Mohammad Kashanipour in the last five minutes of regular time. In the shootout, Bonnis stopped one Kitsilano shot and another sailed wide. The Saints shooters put four shots past O’Regan for the win. St. George’s and Magee adKitsilano keeper Torin O’Regan stonewalls St. George’s forward Ben Daly vanced to the second round of (centre) as defender Markiian Kostjuk does his part Nov. 1. The Saints beat the double-knockout, played Kits 3-2 in a shootout. photo Dan Toulgoet Thursday, in addition to Rich-

mond’s McMath and McNair. On Tuesday, Magee shutout Winston Churchill in a close 1-0 game. Point Grey fell to McNair 2-1. Vancouver Technical couldn’t get on the board against McMath in a 5-0 loss in Richmond. Magee played McMath at 3:30 Thursday at Memorial Park at the same time as McNair visited St. George’s. Results weren’t known before the Courier’s print deadline. Visit vancourier. com/sports for results. When Magee played McMath earlier this year, the Richmond school came out on top 4-0. As last year’s zone championship, they are the No. 1 ranked Richmond school and finished third at Provincials last year. The championship game is set for Nov. 8. Three teams advance to provincials in Burnaby, Nov. 24 to 26. mstewart@vancourier.com Twitter: @MHStewart

DAVID BERNER

The tough questions – asked & answered!

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Tuesdays 10:30pm • Wednesdays 8:30pm • Fridays 2:30pm • Mondays 4:30am

POLITICS HEALTH CARE LAW & ORDER TAXATION ADDICTIONS SENIORS CITY PLANNING EDUCATION


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

sports & recreation

Yoga conference this weekend at convention centre

Yoga, activism go together—lecturer

$6 !

ENJOY BREAKFAST IN BED THIS SATURDAY. THEN LUNCH.

FR O M

Yoga has something to offer us, believes Michael Stone, something much more than postures. “When people start to deepen their yoga practice, they start to make contact with deeper values in their life,” the instructor and lecturer said from Toronto. “When you start going inward, you naturally also start going outward.” Off the yoga mat and out of the studio, people can become sensitive to societal, economic and environmental imbalances, he said. Yoga is not a selfish pursuit, an escapist diversion for a recluse. “The practice is actually opening people up to a more engaged life,” said Stone. “In the ’60s there was this term drop-out. Nowadays I think what we need is this term: drop-in.” The Toronto-based author and activist, Buddhist teacher and psychotherapist leads Centre of Gravity, a non-profit, primarily volunteer-run yoga and spiritual practice in the urban core. Stone will be in Vancouver this weekend for the annual Yoga Conference and Show at the Convention Centre, where he’ll deliver a theme he’s been refining for at least the past five years and has explored in two books. On Friday night, Stone probes the connections between yoga and social activism in a lecture titled Awake in the World. At noon Sunday, he will speak to the Occupy Vancouver demonstrators. He also teaches throughout the weekend and will visit

Semperviva Yoga in Kitsilano. Over the phone, he delivers his words carefully, as if considering their meaning and reflecting on his message with each phrase. He’s an activist and one who ponders the importance of the behaviours and values that define the meaning of the word. “I consider myself an engaged citizen. I think that being somebody who cares about healing means being somebody who cares about the structural problems in our society that prevent people from living meaningful lives. “I would say that I’m an activist in the sense that it gives me meaning to serve people. I think any way you’re engaged in your community is activism.” Stone is supportive of the international movement currently on exhibit at the Vancouver Art Gallery. “Whatever your politics are, the Occupy movement has grabbed our attention because there’s something about the values they are prescribing that is in line with our deepest values of interdependence, of community of simple and healthy food and of taking care of each other,” said Stone. “The next phase of the Occupy movement is going to be how people deal with conflict.” When he addresses the demonstrators at Occupy Vancouver, he’ll talk about the constructive ways society can turn anger into creativity. For more information, visit theyogaconference.com. mstewart@vancourier.com Twitter: @MHStewart

G IF TS

Megan Stewart Staff writer

p43 final

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ORDER NOW 604-605-7323 (1-866-377-2737) subscribe@vancouversun.com ASK FOR OFFER CODE: VANVN01 *Offer is for a 6-month print subscription to The Vancouver Sun delivered on Saturdays only. Offer is only available to households in the Lower Mainland delivery area that have not had home delivery of The Vancouver Sun within the past 45 days. Introductory price for weekend delivery will be in effect for a 6-month term at which time delivery service will continue at our regular home delivery rate. Price includes applicable taxes. Other restrictions may apply. Offer expires December 31, 2011.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

sports & recreation

Spin classes good for when it’s rainy Gearing up with Kristina Bangma

Introducing

It’s time to get in on some sweet deals ! SwarmJam brings you amazing deals on the coolest shows, restaurants, fashion, activities and family adventures. We deliver great offers because we assemble a group called “The Hive” with combined purchasing power.

Go to www.swarmjam.com to join a hive and find some great deals!

UPCOMING HOME GAME

Last Saturday, I woke up to the sound of pouring rain against my window. I lay in bed a few minutes longer, smug in the knowledge that I was getting a break from riding in the rain today. This particular morning I was getting up early to teach a spin class, and yes, I do call spinning a break from riding outdoor in the rain. For me, the class is a treat. Spinning indoors with a group of enthusiastic cyclists, the music pumping, is candy for a die-hard cyclist. For one hour, someone else entertains you. You don’t have to worry about traffic, dogs, keeping up with the peloton or getting soaked in the rain. You don’t even have to think about trying to balance the bike. For one hour, cyclists can focus on form and cadence or simply zone out and have a great workout. The choice is yours. As an instructor, I do my best to guide the cyclists in my class on how to get the most out of a workout. But I’m not the one changing the gears or moving their legs—it doesn’t matter the level of rider, each of us chooses how hard to work and how hard to push. The benefits of indoor spin classes make it obvious why so many studios have recently popped up all over Vancouver. The

luxury of no set up, no clean up and not even a need for equipment makes it a nobrainer for any athlete. For runners, skiers and other team sport athletes, spin classes make for great cross training by increasing endurance and building overall leg strength. For experienced cyclists (road or mountain), indoor classes help build power and speed as well as increase anaerobic threshold without adding more junk miles. Here’s how to prepare for your first class: • Arrive 15 minutes early to familiarize yourself with the instructor and set up your bike for your size and preference. • Expect to sweat a lot. You’ll need a towel or two and at least one water bottle. • The best choice of clothing is a lightweight, short-sleeve top and mid-length shorts. Bike shorts are best but not necessary. For your own comfort, bring a change of clothes for after the class. • Most spin bikes will accommodate an SPD cleat (a specific type of clipless cleat) but running shoes work fine as well. • To ensure you have enough energy, eat something light that is easy to digest within one hour of the class. A piece of fruit is good. • Arrive at each class with an open mind because one of the best parts about indoor cycling is that no two classes are alike. Every instructor and every class is unique. Explore and find the class that works for you. Kristina Bangma is a coach, personal trainer and writer with a love of riding and racing. Email questions to kris@getfitwithkris.com.

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER MMU

Y • 190

8

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604-630-3300

N IT

IN YOUR

CO

– 2008

Sales Centre Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8:30am - 5:00pm email: classified@postmedia.com

fax: 604-985-3227

ur Place yone ad onli 24/7

jobs careers advice

vancourier.com

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 1010

Announcements

Grandview Community Centre Association All advertising published in this newspaper is accepted on the premise that the merchandise and services offered are accurately described and willingly sold to buyers at the advertised prices. Advertisers are aware of these conditions. Advertising that does not conform to these standards or that is deceptive or misleading, is never knowingly accepted. If any reader encounters non-compliance with these standards we ask that you inform the Publisher of this newspaper and The Advertising Standards Council of B.C. OMISSION AND ERROR: The publishers do not guarantee the insertion of a particular advertisement on a specified date, or at all, although every effort will be made to meet the wishes of the advertisers. Further, the publishers do not accept liability for any loss or damage caused by an error or inaccuracy in the printing of an advertisement beyond the amount paid for the space actually occupied by the portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred. Any corrections or changes will be made in the next available issue. The Vancouver Courier will be responsible for only one incorrect insertion with liability limited to that portion of the advertisement affected by the error. Request for adjustments or corrections on charges must be made within 30 days of the ad’s expiration.

For best results please check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Refunds made only after 7 business days notice!

1010

delivery: 604-439-2660

CONNECTING COMMUNITIES

Annual General Meeting Thursday, November 17, 2011 at 7:30 pm At Trout Lake Community Centre & Ice Rink (In portable next to ice rink) 3350 Victoria Dr, Vancouver More info at www.troutlakecc.com or call 604-257-6955 Please Join Us!

1031

GOSPEL MEETING Sunday 7:30 P.M.

Fairview Gospel Hall 1666 West 10th Ave.

All Welcome - No collections Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners.

To place your birthday announcement visit

Announcements

Children’s Hearing & Speech Centre of BC Inc. NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 3575 Kaslo Street, Vancouver, BC V5M 3H4 Thursday, Dec. 1, 2011 at 7:00 pm CRIMINAL RECORD? Canadian pardon seals record. American waiver allows legal entry. Why risk employment, business, travel, licensing, deportation? All CANADIAN / AMERICAN Work & Travel Visa’s. 604-282-6668 or1-800-347-2540 www.accesslegalresearch.com

Mindfulness Meditation Workshop

1965 Main St. Vancouver 4 Free Classes • Start Nov 15 Tues 7:30pm to 9:30pm Register Online www.satipatthana.ca or call 778-279-7705

PRAYER to the Blessed Virgin (Never known to fail) Oh Most beautiful flower of Mount Carmel, fruitful vine, splendor of Heaven, Blessed Mother of the Son of God, Immaculate Virgin, assist me in my necessity. O, Star of the Sea, help me and show me here, you are my Mother. O Holy Mary, Mother of God, Queen of Heaven and Earth, I humbly beseech you from the bottom of my heart, to succour me in my necessity. (Make request). There are none that can withstand your power. O Mary conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee, (Three times). Holy Mary, I place this cause in your hands (Three times). Say this prayer for three consecutive days and then you must publish. It will be granted to you. Grateful Thanks, A.B.

Coming Events

VanCourier.com

1110

1085

Lost & Found

househunting.ca

EMPLOYMENT 1232

Drivers

CLASS 3 DRIVERS

Small GREY and WHITE Cat found Oct. 6 at Halley Avenue and Bond Street (near Kingsway and Willingdon) in Burnaby. Call to Identify • 778-580-6775

LOST Woman’s Prescription Eyeglasses Oct 22 in a soft black fabric pouch Dunbar area. Call: (604) 264-9178

1105

Personal Messages

EUROPEAN GENTLEMEN, 70 seeking lady 60+ for part time companion & outings. Reply to box V1 C/O Vancouver Courier 1574 West 6th Ave. Van, B.C. V6J 1R2

1107

Singles Clubs

ENJOY A GREAT SOCIAL LIFE *** TGIF SINGLES *** Things to do, places to go, friends to meet. Dinners, dances, walks, trips, tennis, golf, etc... with fun people. Info. evenings Thursdays Call 604-988-5231 www.tgifcanada.com

Volunteers

UBC - Study Seeking Participants...

Parents and their 15-17 year old adolescents are invited to participate in an ongoing study on identity development and daily life dynamics. This study includes an interview session, online questionnaires, short iPod-based diaries over 8 days, and two follow-ups. Each family member will receive up to $75 in giftcards for the first study phase and $20 for each follow up in 6 and 12 months. For a good representation of families in Canada, all cultures are encouraged to apply. For more information, please call the Health and Adult Development Lab at (604) 822-3549.

A division of Postmedia Network Inc.

remembering.ca

We are a ready mix and precast business located in Langley, BC. We are currently looking for Class 3 Drivers. We offer benefits for all fulltime employees. If you are interested in applying for this job please fax or email us your resume and driver’s abstract. Fax: 604-533-3238 Email: bchessa@ fraserwayprecast.com

1240

General Employment

APT BUILDING MANAGER Live in, full time North Van. Experience required. Please send resume to: nvanapt@yahoo.com EARN UP TO $28.00/HOUR. Undercover Shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Experience Not Required. If You Can Shop - You Are Qualified! www.MyShopperJobs.com F/T FLORAL DESIGNER Order flowers, Design arrangements, create displays, conduct workshops, assist Director & Train other workers. Floral arrangement skills & knowledge of creative floral design required. $14-16/hr, 37.5hr/wk. 655 Seymour St / 297 Davie St Vancouver Queensberry Flower. Email: queensberryflowers@hotmail.com

1240

General Employment

F/T DISPATCHER

Needed for local company. Must have excellent communication and strong computer skills, and be customer service oriented. Extensive knowledge of Lower Mainland and a minimum of two years dispatching experience in a transportation company is required. Medical and dental coverage offered after three months.

Call: 604-599-6949 Fax resume: 604-599-6941 Email: metroexpresscanada @gmail.com

General Employment

1240

INDUSTRIAL PAINTERS AGI Envirotank in Biggar, Sk. requres industrial painters/sandblasters. Relocation required. $25-30/hr DOE. Company offers a comprehensive benefit package. Forward resume with references: info@envirotank.com or fax: 306-948-5263. FORKLIFT DRIVER NEEDED with experience for a Burnaby Fish plant. Apply in person to: 3777 Keith Street, Burnaby. GORDON NELSON INV. (Van) seeking F/T Tile setter. Several yrs of experience and compl. of high school req’d. $20.70/hr. E-res: gnincjob@gmail.com

Lamontagne Fundraising

is looking for Commissioned

Sales Representatives Some great kids aged 12 to 18 who need a stable, caring home for a few months. Are you looking for the opportunity to do meaningful, fulfilling work? PLEA Community Services is looking for qualified applicants who can provide care for youth in their home on a full-time basis or on weekends for respite. Training, support and remuneration are provided. Funding is available for modifications to better equip your home. A child at risk is waiting for an open door. Make it yours.

in Vancouver and the Lower Mainland. Your position will require you to contact schools and non-profit groups and help them raise money using Lamontagne programs and products. For more information please contact us by email: ccarbno@lamontagne.ca

Decorations/ Trees

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Fairs/Bazaars

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Fairs/Bazaars

FAB FAIR CHRISTMAS LIGHTS installed. www. affordahomeservices.ca Reas rates. 778-386-3783

175 tables of Bargains on Deluxe 20th Century Junque!

Sunday • NOV 13 • 10am-3pm Croatian Cultural Centre 3250 Commercial Drive, Van. Info: 604 980-3159 • Adm: $4.00

Call East Vancouver:

604.251.4473 604.683.7400

Call Vancouver:

sprottshaw.com

1250

Hotel Restaurant

FOOD SERVICE Supervisor G-12, Exp 2 yr, no cert, 40hr/w, $15up/hr, Korean/ some English, duties: schedule, train staff, qlty control, maintain record, supervise servers. 1323 Robson St.,Van/F604-602-4949 Daebakbonga Rest. daebakbonga@gmail.com

F/T THAI COOK Duties: Prepare & cook Thai meals, plan menus, ensure food quality, train staff. 3-5 yrs cooking experience required. $17-19/hr. 40hr/w Medical included. Email: hrwasana@gmail.com Baan Wasana Thai Restaurant, 2143 W. 41 Avenue, Vancouver, BC V6M 1Z6 KOREAN Food Cooks G-12, 3 yr exp, no cert, $18up/hr, 40hr/wk, korean, no/ basic english. Duties: cook& plan menu, check order supl. train 1P/R or 1 Canadian :604-602-4949/DaeBakBon Ga Rest. #201-1323 Robson St.Van Email: daebakbonga@gmail.com

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Call 604-708-2628 www.plea.ca

Christmas Calendar 1635

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1675

Holiday Helper

ST.ANTHONY’S CHURCH

Jewelry & Fashion Accessory Sale

Fall Bazaar & Bake Sale

45 Local Designers Heritage Hall

Baking, Crafts, Collectibles, Gifts, Books, Silent Auction, Clothes & Accessories, and much more!

$2 Admission, Kids free!

(at Montcalm St)

Sat. Nov 19 • Sun. Nov 20 11:00am - 5:00pm 3102 Main St. at 15th Ave.

Sat., Nov. 12th 10am - 4pm

1345 West 73rd Ave

Capturing and Inspiring Growth...

Ready to Tie the Knot?

Announce your engagement to family, friends & neighbours in one easy step!

Call

604-630-3300 to advertise

Promote your Craft Fairs, Christmas Events & Services ... and because we like Christmas as much as you do we are offering a SPACE

For:

25% discount

NORTH

BOOKING SHORE Rep: NMather Ad#: 1337251

on Christmas Corner ads until December 25. Call 604-630-3300 and book today!

NEWS


A46

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

2015 2010

Appliances

WHIRLPOOL SMOOTH-TOP SELF CLEANING STOVE Very good condition. Was replaced during recent renovation. $500. Call: (604) 738-5497 or email: drmargaretallan@hotmail.com

2010

Art & Collectibles

2015

Art & Collectibles

MUST SELL 17 antique porcelaine dolls with original boxes from Franklin Mint, must be seen $35-$75 ea. Call 604-940-0106

Pen Delfin

Collection of 196 different Pen Delfin pieces. Would like to sell all together for $20,000 but will sell individual pieces. Most pieces come with original box. Please phone 604-467-8914.

2060

FREE 120 PAGE CATALOGUE from Halfords. Butcher supplies, leather & craft supplies and animal control products. 1-800-353-7864 or Email: jeff@halfordhide.com or visit our Web Store: www.halfordsmailorder.com

WHOLESALE APPLIANCE LIQUIDATION washers, dryers, dishwashers, ranges, cooktops, hoods, fridges BOSCH, THERMADOR and MORE! Open: M – F (9am to 3pm) #24 – 11151 Coppersmith Way Richmond 604-275-4421

HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best Price, Best Quality. All Shapes & Colors Available. Call 1-866-652-6837

www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper

PURCHASE Watkins Products through an Independent Distributor. Earn free products by hosting a Watkins party. Contact Alison Platt and request a free catalogue. 604312-6679 watkinswithali@gmail.com

FEATURED EMPLOYMENT

2070

INSIDE SALES DECORATING ASSOCIATE

Alder • Birch • Maple Dry, Clean Hardwoods

#1 in Sales • 28 yrs in business Full & half cords 7days/week

604-805-6694

2075

Furniture

TWIN BEDS, wtith mattresses, headboards, very clean, price neg. 604-261-6028

Fax your resume to attention Mike: 604-291-6522 or email: mike@arlenes.com

vancourier.com

before November 12th, 2011

Carriers NOW HIRING – OWNER OPERATORS FOR OUR: COME DRIVE WITH US • DRY VAN – CANADA/U.S. DIVISION Earn 46 cents per mile @10,500 miles per month! Security WE OFFER: • INDUSTRY LEADING PAYdrivers PACKAGE for the We are seeking qualified for our • LICENSE AND INSURANCE PAID Long Term Canada/USA Open Deck Long Haul Division • FUEL BONUS HEALTH BENEFIT PACKAGE We• Offer: • PRE-PLANNED DISPATCH - Dedicated Fleet Managers • DEDICATED FLEET - Pre-Planned DispatchMANAGER

Committed to excellence

GORD MACKAN GORD MACKAN Call Ron Janco 1-866-862-2626 1.866.857.1375 • www.canamwest.com 1-866-862-2626

3020

Childcare Wanted

LIVE IN NANNY required F/T for 2 girls 5 & 11 yrs old. Refs. Call 778-928-8687

3505

Boarding

HORSE self board 2 acre pasture, secure fencing, barn with 2 stalls complete w/water electricity. Storage for hay/tack. $50 per horse per mth. Agassiz area. Avail now. Gord 604-796-9623

3508

AMERICAN COCKER SPANIEL blonde, p/b pups with papers vet. shots, dewormed ready now, Vanc. $500 obo. 604-708-1752

Legal/Public Notices

BEAUTIFUL STANDARD Poodle pups, CKC reg. apricot, deliver avail. 1-250-256-0518 paganwoodgallery@telus.net

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS Re the Estate of STELLA GRACE GAUDETTE, otherwise known as STELLA MARY GAUDETTE, STELLA GAUDETTE and STELLA G. GAUDETTE, Deceased, formerly of 240 East 19th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5V 1J2, are hereby required to send the particulars thereof to the undersigned Executor, on or before December 2, 2011 after which date the estate’s assets will be distributed, having regard only to the claims that have been recieved. Thomas O’Flynn, Executor, Fasken Martineau DuMoulin LLP, 2900550 Burrard Street, Vancouver, V6C 0A3, Solicitors.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS Re: The estate of KATHLEEN AMY STUART-STUBBS (also known as Kammy Stuart-Stubbs), deceased, formerly of 203-1827 West 3rd Avenue, BC. Creditors and others having claims against the above estate are hereby notified under section 38 of the Trustee Act that particulars of their claims should be sent to the Executor c/o Megan Stuart-Stubbs, 1157 East 13th Avenue, Vancouver , BC on or before November 20th, 2011, after which date the Executor will distribute the estate among the parties entitled to it, having regard to the claims of which the Executors then have notice.

To advertise call

604-630-3300

WE ARE.

We are looking for a temporary, full time distribution clerk to work in our busy newspaper environment. This fast-paced, deadline oriented environment will suit an enthusiastic self-starter.

RES SPONS SIBIILITIES S: Handling email, phone and in person customer service inquires Communication/problem solving with newspaper carriers, agents and public Dealing with delivery concerns and complaint management Data entry and order entry Various clerical duties

5505

LAB X Retriever M $500/ F $550 First shots. Call:(604) 794-3295 or email....cutepups100@hotmail.ca

Legal/Public Notices

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS

NOTICE is hereby given that Creditors and others having claims against the Estate of MARIBETH JEANNE SINCLAIR, Deceased, late of Suite 106 - 5989 Iona Drive, Vancouver, British Columbia, who died on the 16th day of July, 2011, are hereby required to send them to the undersigned Executor, BMO TRUST COMPANY, 595 Burrard Street, 9th Floor, P.O. Box 49500, Vancouver, B.C., V7X 1L7 on or before the 30th day of November, 2011, after which date the estate’s assets will be distributed, having regard only to the claims that have been received. BMO TRUST COMPANY Executor 595 Burrard Street, 9th Floor P.O. Box 49500 Vancouver, BC V7X 1L7 Tel: 604-668-1350 Fax: 604-665-7461

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS

NOTICE is hereby given that Creditors and others having claims against the Estate of ELIZABETH BEATRICE FULWELL, Deceased, late of Room 217-2803 West 41st Avenue,Vancouver, British Columbia, who died on the 28th day of July, 2011, are hereby required to send them to the undersigned Executors, BMO TRUST COMPANY and MARY ANNE RICHTER c/o 595 Burrard Street, 9th Floor, P.O. Box 49500, Vancouver, B.C., V7X 1L7 on or before the 30th day of November, 2011, after which date the estate’s assets will be distributed, having regard only to the claims that have been received. BMO TRUST COMPANY MARY ANNE RICHTER Executors 595 Burrard Street, 9th Floor P.O. Box 49500 Vancouver, BC V7X 1L7 Tel: 604-668-1350 Fax: 604-665-7461

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS

NOTICE is hereby given that Creditors and others having claims against the Estate of CONSTANCE L. FRIEDMAN also known as CONSTANCE AILEEN LIVINGSTONE FRIEDMAN also known as CONSTANCE FRIEDMAN, Deceased, late of 4916 Chancellor Boulevard, Vancouver, British Columbia, who died on the 15th day of June, 2011, are hereby required to send them to the undersigned Executor, SYDNEY M. FRIEDMAN, c/o BMO Harris Private Banking, Suite 600, 4789 Kingsway, Burnaby, B.C., V5H 0A3 on or before the 30th day of November, 2011, after which date the estate’s assets will be distributed, having regard only to the claims that have been received. SYDNEY M. FRIEDMAN Executor c/o BMO Harris Private Banking Suite 600, 4789 Kingsway, Burnaby, BC, V5H 0A3 Tel: 604-665-7382 Fax: 604-665-7441

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS

QUA ALIFIC CATIO ONS:: Strong data entry skills Strong Windows and Microsoft Office skills Excellent customer service skills Superior organizational and multi-tasking skills Quick problem solving skills A valid driver’s license and vehicle are required. This position is located in Langley /postmedia.com

GOLDEN DOODLE pup, male, born May 10, all shots $500. owner incapacitated 604-824-8449

Dogs

BLUE NOSE Razor Edge pit bulls puppies $400F, $500M, vet checked & 1st shots. 604-392-6085

5505

Dogs

ALL SMALL breed pups local & non shedding $399+. 604-590-3727, 604-514-3474 www.puppiesfishcritters.com

ADORABLE PUREBRED Presa Canario pups, family raised indoors, 4 F, 3 M, ready to go to loving homes Dec 1. $600 incl 1st shots/deworming. 778-688-2487

LEGALS

3508

Foster homes urgently req’d for rescued, abandoned & neglected dogs. Many breeds. www. abetterlifedogrescue.com

LABRADOODLE PUPS, black & chocolate, 1st shots, dewormed, $1200, Abbts. 1-604-751-4048

DIS STRIB BUTIO ON REPR RES SENT TAT TIVE

Please apply to com mmunittycarreerrs@postmedia a.co om

Dogs

★CATS & KITTENS★ FOR ADOPTION ! 604-724-7652

We are looking for a

• • • • •

3508

Cats

LOST - Calico Cat. West Abbotsford. Micro chipped. Goes by Dior. REWARD. Call: (604) 556-6513

ARE YOU EXCITED BY THE CHANGING MEDIA LANDSCAPE?

• • • • •

3507

Old Books Wanted also: Photos Postcards, Letters, Paintings. (no text books/encyclopedia) I pay cash. 604-737-0530

Fuel

Burnaby and Vancouver

Arlene’s Interiors is a growing home décor business that offers the Lower Mainland’s largest selection of in-stock home decorating fabrics, blinds and accessories Arlene’s Interiors is looking for talented, enthusiastic individuals to join our inside sales team, so if you: • Love to decorate • Know what it means to give outstanding customer service • Like to have fun while you work • Love working with peoplep • Enjoy working in a fast-paced, creative environment • Are available days and weekends Then Arlene’s would like to talk to you about our career opportunities! Previous retail experiences an asset. Part time openings available in our Burnaby and Vancouver stores now. If you would like to join our team:

Wanted to Buy

For Sale Miscellaneous

2 Concerto Grand’s hi fi radios & turntable, 1954 not working. Make an offer. 604-437-8179

Appliances

2135

NOTICE is hereby given that creditors and others having claims against the Estate of HAZEL MAY SOUTHARD, otherwise known as HAZEL SOUTHARD and HAZEL M. SOUTHARD, Deceased, late of 7051 Moffatt Road, in the City of Richmond, in the Province of British Columbia, V6Y 3W2, who died on the 8th day of May, 2011, in Richmond, BC, are required to send full particulars of such claims to the undersigned Executor, Vancouver City Savings Credit Union, at 183 Terminal Avenue, P.O. Box 2120, Station Terminal, Vancouver, B.C., V6B 5R8, on or before the 5th day of December, 2011, after which date the estate assets will be distributed, having regard only to claims that have been received. VANCOUVER CITY SAVINGS CREDIT UNION Executor 183 Terminal Avenue P.O. Box 2120, Station Terminal Vancouver, BC, V6B 5R8 Tel: 604-877-4576 • Fax 604-708-7852

IF YOU like the Bernese but not the up keep these pups are for you. Call for more info on these Entlebuchers. Ph 604-795-7662

LABRADOODLE PUPPIES Family Based Hobby Breeder. Born Sept 20 Avail Nov 20. 604 595-5840. $750. Visit our website for full details redbarnlabradoodles.blogspot.com

5505

Legal/Public Notices

#1 IN PARDONS Remove Your Criminal Record! Get started TODAY for ONLY $49.95/mo. Limited Time Offer. FASTEST, GUARANTEED Pardon In Canada. FREE Consultation: 1-866-416-6772 www.ExpressPardons.com NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS RE: ESTATE OF Natasha Doreen Allen, also known as Natasha Allen, N. Allen, Natasha Doreen Weisgerber, Natasha Weisgerber and N. Weisgerber late of Pennsylvania Hotel, 412 Carrall Street, Room 209, Vancouver BC V7A 4R1 (the “Estate”) NOTICE is given that creditors and others having claims against the Estate are required to send them to the executor, The Canada Trust Company, at P.O. Box 11130, #3000 – 1055 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, BC, V6E 3R3, on or before December 5, 2011, after which date the Estate assets will be distributed having regard only to claims that have been received. EXECUTOR: THE CANADA TRUST COMPANY SOLICITOR: Bull, Housser & Tupper LLP

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS PAUL ERIC ALFRED ROMERIL, deceased, formerly of 107 - 2298 McBain Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6L 3B1, are required to send full particulars of such claims c/o Bell Alliance Lawyers & Notaries Public, Attention: Dana George, 201 - 1367 West Broadway, British Columbia, V6H 4A7, on or before November 25, 2011, after which date the estate’s assets will be distributed, having regard only to the claims that have been received. Bell Alliance, Lawyers & Notaries Public, Solicitors. NOTICE TO CREDITORS & OTHERS Re: The estate of JOHN SHARPLES, deceased, who died on the 2nd day of August, 2011, formerly of 2862 West 37th Avenue, Vancouver, BC. Creditors and others having claims against the estate of JOHN SHARPLES are hereby notified under section 38 of the Trustee Act that particulars of their claims should be sent to Jerome R. Berkson, Executor, c/o Coric Adler Wenner at #620 – 1385 West 8th Avenue, Vancouver, BC V6H 3V9 Attention: Richard M. Wenner on or before November 30, 2011, after which date the Executor will distribute the estate among the parties entitled to it, having regard to the claims of which the Executor then has notice. Jerome R. Berkson, Executor


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

3508

Dogs

GERMAN Shepard 5 y/o Looking for a new home, pure bred, well trained, full of joy and energy. $500 Call: (604) 771-8503

PITT BULLS, 3 boys, 1 girl 8wks. ready, shots, view parents, see history. $350 obo. 604-504-0738

5040

Business Opps/ Franchises

Your future is here

Due to Extraordinary Demand, We are looking for entrepreneurs who want to build equity and become franchise owners. $1500/week GUARANTEED* www.jimsmowing.ca

310-JIMS (5467)

PUREBRED CHOCOLATE Labs, dewormed, dew claws removed, 1st shots, 8 wks. 604-230-5136

Do You Need Cash???

Unlock your homes equity today. We lend even if the banks say no!!

604-531-0166

REG/ BELGIAN Shepherd Malinois pups, top European working bloodlines. Avail mid Nov. vet checked, vac. 1-250-333-8862 weldonbay@gmail.com

Need Cash Today?

✔Do you Own a Car? ✔Borrow up to $10000.00 ✔No Credit Checks! ✔Cash same day, local office www.REALCARCASH.com

604.777.5046

5075

Mortgages

Bank On Us!

SAVE A LIFE. Wonderful rescue dogs from Foreclosed Upon Pets. Spay/neutered, regular vaccinations & rabies, microchipped. $400 adoption fee, avail at your local Petcetera stores.

YORKIE PUPS healthy home raised $875. 604-700-9469 N Van www.mysweetiepaws.com

Beat bank rates for purchases and refinances, immediate debt consolidation, foreclosure relief, and equity loans. Free, fast, friendly, private consultations. Call 1-888-685-6181 www.mountaincitymortgage.ca

Metaphysical

#1 Gentlemen’s Choice!

Relaxed & Amazing Massage by Sweet, Sensual Dolls. Classic Service! International Collection! 411- 1200 Burrard St., Van. 604-569-1858 • Open 7 days HOTEL SERVICE AVAIL. • HIRING

To find out more contact:

Jarome Lochkrin at 778-388-9820 or info@thealternative.ca

7015

1410

Education

FOODSAFE

www.advance-education.com

604-272-7213

Escort Services

GENTLEMEN! Attractive discreet European lady is available for company. 604 451-0175

Body Work

One call does it all...

$38 Relaxation Massage 604-709-6168 410 East Broadway

**RELIEVE ROAD RAGE**

604-739-3998

GARAGE SALES 2080

Garage Sale

21ST CENTURY FLEA MARKET 175 tables of Bargains on Deluxe 20th Century Junque! SUN NOV 13 10-3 Croatian Cultural Center 3250 Commercial Drive, 604-980-3159 Adm: $4

GARAGE SALE

Empty your Garage Fill Your Wallet

MAKE IT A SUCCESS! Call 604-630-3300

2080 VAN

COLLECTOR’S UNIQUE INDOOR SALE

SUNDAY NOV 6 Noon to 5 Ideal Xmas gifts at bargain prices: $5 to $50: vintage and high-quality items: jewellery, china, home de´cor pieces, art, clothes, books, video games, dvd’s, toys, youth sporting equipment. Plus new handcrafted baby clothes, teddy bears, cherubs etc to benefit Street Angels charity. Dealers welcome. Free Coffee & Cookies while they last. But please no early birds. 2726 Wallace Street – 2 blocks West of Alma.

Travel Destinations

WHISTLER - FAMILY 4-6, Xmas &/or New Years, private accomm, rental on Green Lake, 5 mins to bus, 2 Br, all amen, min 3 nights $150/night 604-985-3759

5035

Financial Services

Cut Your Debt by up to 70% DEBT Forgiveness Program Avoid Bankruptcy, Stops Creditor Calls. Much lower Payments at 0% Interest. We work for You, not Your Creditors.

Call 1-866-690-3328 www.4pillars.ca

5040

Business Opps/ Franchises

A Great Janitorial Franchise Opportunity

*Annual starting revenue of $12,000-$120,000 *Guaranteed cleaning contracts *Professional training provided *Financing available *Ongoing support *Low down payment required Contact Coverall of BC A Respected Worldwide Leader in Franchised Office Cleaning!

604.434.7744 • info@coverallbc.com

www.coverall.com

West Vancouver

RD 37 ANNUAL 43 NNUAL 38TH TH

ELEGANT FLEA MARKET

ATURDAY SSaturday, ATURDAY, NNNovember OVEMBER OVEMBER 5th 45THTH 8:30am-3:00pm 8:30 AM - 3:00PM

West Van United Church 2062 Esquimalt Ave. West Vancouver

vancourier.com

EDUCATION

AUCTION CALENDAR

2020

Auctions

PUBLIC AUCTION: Saturday, Dec. 10th, 9am

80-100 CARS, LIGHT TRUCKS & RV’s Industrial, Construction, Forklifts, Farm & Turf Equip., Fleet Trucks & Trailers, Lumber, Boats, Tools

Industrial Smalls Welcome / Online Bidding Available 6780 Glover Rd., Langley, BC www.canamauctions.com Phone: 604-534-0901

1410

Education

1415

From here. To career. The Shortest Path To Your Business Career

Music/Theatre/ Dance

IN HOME OR STUDIO LESSONS Piano, Theory & other instruments. Allegro Music School 604-327-7765

1420

Train today for: 7 Accounting & Payroll Administrator 7 Business Administration 7 Paralegal 7 Hospitality Mgt 7 International Trade 7 TESL 7 Human Resources Professional

Tutoring Services

ENGLISH, Grades 8 - 12, by experienced professional. West side. 604-274-6234

TRUE ADVICE! TRUE Clarity! TRUE PSYCHICS! 1-877-342-3032 (18+) 3.19/min. 1-900-528-6256 www.truepsychics.ca NOW HIRING. (No calls, email only) info@mystical-connections.com

4530

Garage Sale

604-630-3300

Try the Best 604-872-1702

EDUCATION 1 DAY COURSES – ONLY $62 BEST VALUE GUARANTEED Classes Every Sat, Sun & Monday Taught by Certified Public Health Inspectors ADVANCE Hospitality Education BC’s #1 Foodsafe Choice Since 2003!

4060

• Federally Regulated – Audited Annually • RRSP, RIFF, RESP, LIRA, etc. Eligible • Backed by the hard asset of Real Estate

7005

Body Work

ESCAPE SPA

*10.5% TARGETED ROI PAID MONTHLY

Money to Loan

Mortgage Direct

TOY KING CHARLES CAVALIER will deliver boys $850 girls$900(250) 547-6040 email: puccarue@hotmail.com

7005

Investment

*Historical performance does not guarantee future returns.

*Conditions Apply

5070

5050

A47

TRAIN WITH BC’S LARGEST AND MOST RESPECTED CAREER TRAINER

We’re taking your education to the next level!

• EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION: This ECE program will help promote children’s healthy development, maximize quality of life, assist families in their role as primary caregivers & support full participation in community life. Train locally for the skills necessary in this rewarding career field.

Starting Sept 2011, you will receive an iPad when you begin classes at Vancouver Career College. All iPads will come with e-books and educational apps, providing you with a more interactive learning experience!

• PRACTICAL NURSING: With the aging population, Healthcare & Healthcare providers are one of the hottest career opportunities available. Practical Nursing is one of the fastest growing segments in healthcare. Train locally for the skills necessary in this career field • HEALTHCARE ASSISTANT: Healthcare Assistants are prepared to work in both healthcare facilities and community agencies. HCA’s provide & maintain the health, safety, independence, comfort & well-being of individuals & families. Train locally for the skills necessary in this rewarding career field. • PAYROLL ADMINISTRATOR: Payroll Administrators are specifically concerned with employees pay & benefits. They also prepare & check statements of earnings and provide information to employees on payroll, benefit plans and collective agreement terms. Train locally for the skills necessary in this competitive career field.

JOIN US ON:

Step into the career you’ve been dreaming of. Call today!

van.vccollege.ca

N 1.800.993.4086

Vancouver Campus:

604-683-7400 604-251-4473

East Vancouver Campus:

www.sprottshaw.com

.com/VancouverCareerCollege

.com/VCCollege

.com/VCCollege


A48

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

REAL ESTATE 6002

For Sale by Owner

6015

Agents

6020

Houses - Sale

6020-01 uSELLaHOME.com

3BDRM/2BTH 5031Reese Hill Rd Sumas WA 2 plus acres of privacy $299,000 Call: (360) 296-0988 or email: jim@jimsands.net.

3BDRM/2BTH Condo, Kauai Best time to buy dream properties on Kauai. Buyers market. $249,000 email: yelena.okhman@remax.net

6008

Condos/ Townhouses

6008-04

6020

Burnaby

6008-26

SAVE MONEY Foreclosures Condos, T/homes & Detached Shirley 604-551-2112 Macdonald Realty Olympic

❏WE BUY HOMES❏

Any Price, Any Location Any Condition. No Fees! No Risk!

604-435-5555 / 604-786-4663 www.HomeBuyingCenter.ca

www.bcforeclosures.com 5 BR home from $20,500 down $2,025/mo. 604-538-8888, Alain @ Sutton WC Realty W. Rock

6020-38

Vancouver East Side

No Equity? Expired Listing? Penalty?

We Take Over Your Payment No Fees!!

www.GVCPS.ca/(604) 812-3718

Find your perfect home at

househunting.ca Condos/ Townhouses

6008 Port Moody

PRICE REDUCED! NOW 319,900 $

College Park, Port Moody

Best Value in Pt. Moody 301B Evergreen Drive

Large, 3 bdrm., 3 bath townhome. Three levels, approx. 1800 sq. ft. Features include: Lge. L/R with wood-burning fireplace & view of greenbelt; den area with sep. laundry and storage. Top floor has 3 lge. bdrms, 4-pce. bath & 2-pce.ensuite.Closetoelementary school, beaches and parks.

Jess LaFramboise 604-815-7190

8015

8060

VAN APPLIANCE SERVICES Repair home appl. Low rate guar. Permit/Lic. Tom 604-323-8063

8055

Cleaning

A QUALITY CLEANING 7 days/wk Res/Comm. Low rates! Senior’s’discount. Experienced. 778-998-9127 or 778-239-9609 ALPHA-TECH CLEAN Always eco fresh clean guar. homecleaning ins. & bonded. 604-255-9334 A.S.B.A. ENTERPRISE. Comm/ Res. Free Est. $25/hour includes supplies. Insured. 604-723-0162 EXPERIENCED HOUSECLEANER with over 15 years work experience. Basic Residential Cleaning Only. 3 hrs minimum. Eva 604-451-3322 LIDIA’S EUROPEAN Cleaning. Res/Com. Specializing in detail cleaning. Bonded. 604-541-9255

BY OWNER Vcr lot & old time house, approx 37x103, nr bus/ shops $838,000, 43rd nr Earles Rd. 604-916-5104 * 604-298-4335

6050

Out Of Town Property

GOLF COURSE lot—rare,1/3 acre, Fairwinds, Schooner Cove, Vancouver Island. Custom home plans will build to suit, or sell lot. Courtesy to Realtors 250 714-2001

OCEAN WILDERNESS INN - SOOKE - Just Listed $1,225,000. Walk on oceanfront over 4.5 acres. 8 large bdrms with ensuite baths & fridge. Beautifully maintained & updated. Operating as a B&B & retreat center. Almost a mile of semi private low bank beach. website: bedandbreakfastforsale.net or call Peter Birrell Remax Crest 604-250-3301

6060

Real Estate Wanted

Real Estate Investor looking for, Houses, Townhomes, Condos, Fixer uppers. Call Calum (604) 532−1923 or email: calums@shaw.ca.

Concrete

CONCRETE SPECIALIST Sidewalk, Driveway, Patio Exposed Aggregate, remove & replacing

6508

BBY MODERN Apartment Rentals at Collingwood Village. Steps to Joyce skytrain. Low-rise/Highrise buildings. 1-888-811-7538

LANGARA GARDENS

Call 604-327-1178

info@langaragardens.com Managed by Dodwell Strata Management Ltd.

Cancer June 21-July 22: The weeks ahead feature romance, creative surges, speculation, risk, winning, joys from children, pleasure and beauty. At times, you might have to decide between a pleasurable intimacy and a social joy. (The latter is probably more fortunate in the long run.) Be ambitious Sunday to Tuesday. Make sure that financial or sexual “flag” is really inspiration, not deception (Sunday/Monday). Your hopes, popularity and social side burst forth Wednesday/Thursday – love could reach a climax. Retreat to rest and contemplate, Friday noon through the weekend. Now to July, a flurry of activity! Leo July 23-Aug. 22: The main emphasis lies on home, family, security, property, garden, retirement and similar themes. But your main luck resides in career, ambition, and goals outside the home, so these two might conflict, especially Wednesday to Friday. (Do you take a chance, or remain secure?) Legal, learning, travel, religious and love concerns arrive Sunday to Tuesday. You might feel a deep, strange pull toward someone – but perhaps you don’t trust him/her – or your feelings. Be careful. This puzzle will “dissolve” by next February. Social joys Friday/Saturday. Money’s coming – beware spending! Virgo Aug. 23-Sept. 22: This week and next fill with errands, calls, paperwork, details, reports, quick and casual meetings. But this light, busy “surface” turns deeper, as another thread in your psyche begins to raise questions about – and prospects of – lifestyle changes, investments and debts, sexual bonding and commitment, and a big, general change of life. These are slated now to next July. Research these, ask questions, read, Google, study the options, especially Sunday to Tuesday. (In all this, there is at least one fantasy or red herring that you need to see, and dismiss.) Wisdom, love midweek.

WATER-PROOF DRAINAGE & SEWER 15% OFF - 604-722-1105

Mia Casa − Drain Tile/Sewer Line Water Line Repairs / Replacement & Cleaning. Vince 604-941-6060, Al 604-783-3142

Concrete Specialist. Garages, sidewalks, exposed aggregate & patios. Santino 604.254.5551

8075

L & L CONCRETE. All types: Stamped, Repairs, Pressure Wash, Seal Larry 778-882-0098

ALL WORK GUARANTEED

8073

Drainage

Drywall

J.A. CONSTRUCTION

Specializing in drywall & textured ceiling repairs, drywall finishing, stucco repairs, painting. Fully insured.

604-916-7729 JEFF

BAJ MINI EXCAVATING Snow removal, sewer, oil tanks, paving, retain wall. 604-779-7816

Apt/Condos

BEAUTIFUL SUITES Marpole area. Bach, 1 & 2 BRs. Newer kitchens & baths, H/W flrs balcony/patio. $800 & up. Incl heat, h/water, 2 appl. Or 604-327-9419 or 778-558-3410

6522 #101 - 621 W. 57th Ave, Van Spacious 1, 2 & 3 BR Rental Apartments & Townhouses. Heat, hot water & lrg storage locker included. Many units have in-suite laundry and lrg patios/balconies with gorgeous views. Tasteful gardens, swimming pools, hot tub, gym, laundry, gated parking, plus shops & services. Near Oakridge Centre, Canada Line stations, Langara College, Churchill High School & more. Sorry no pets. www.langaragardens.com

Drainage

253-0049

A RETAINING WALLS, Stairs, Driveways, Sidewalks, ponds, All concrete work. Free Estimates. Call Basile 604-617-5813

6508

Apt/Condos

8073

DRAINAGE, SEWER & WATER Call Tobias 604 782-4322

Reasonable rates. 35 yrs. exp. For free estimates call Mario

RENTALS

Tim Stephens' Astral Reflections Aries March 21 - April 19: Plunge into depths, mysteries, research, intimacy, commitment, change and large finances. Since 2008 you have been undergoing many changes in your career and community status (e.g., marital status). These changes will continue to 2023 – 2011 and half of 2012 urge you to capitalize on these changes, especially financially, through investments, separation awards, a more profitable lifestyle, etc. Think about this, and act on it, Sunday and Tuesday through Thursday. Don’t act on a whim or dream (or fear) Monday, and contain your temper Friday noon. Much hard work until next July! Taurus April 20-May 20: Crucial, exciting, beneficial relationships face you. If single, you might meet a life partner in the next few weeks. It begins on a sensual/ sexual note. Married folk meet opportunities to rise financially, through partnership, inheritance, travel, higher education or law. All of you face new horizons, new joys. Thursday begins eight months of romantic adventure for singles. If married, avoid being heavyhanded with children. Rest, lie low Sunday to Tuesday. (Success with “head office” or government Tuesday p.m.) Your energy and charisma surge Wednesday/ Thursday: start things! Gemini May 21-June 20: For the next eight months, step lightly at home. If you must change residence before July 3, 2012, do so now, before Thursday eve. If you must move after that, make it a rental, a shortterm one. On the good side, you’ll spend the whole eight months being happy and hopeful about your domestic prospects. It’s very likely you’ll start sifting through your friends, deciding which ones are really keepers, and which aren’t. Social joys visit you Sunday to Tuesday. Retreat, rest and contemplate Wednesday to Friday noon. After this, you’re in charge, energized – tackle some big tasks!

Appliance Repairs

TWO LITTLE LADIES WITH BIG MOPS. Your one stop cleaning shop!!... Call 778-395-6671

●DIFFICULTY SELLING?● Difficulty Making Payments?

New Westminster

Condos/ Townhouses

Real Estate

★ ALERT: WE BUY HOUSES ★ Older House! Damaged House! Difficulty Selling! No Fees! No Risk! Quick Cash! Call Us First! 604-657-9422

BEAUTIFUL 14TH floor, S.W. location, Royal City Centre, 2 BR + den, corner unit in Woodward, $499,000. To view 604-515-1456

6008

Houses - Sale

6020-01

1 BDRM #1605-3737 Bartlett N. Burnaby Great views, bright 734sf corner suite. updated & re− designed kitchen & bath, plenty of storage. Building boasts several amenities. 5min walk to Skytrain & Mall. Call Judy @ Sutton West Coast Realty 604−970−3088. $229,900

6008-18

Sell your home, only $99. 604-574-5243 Hope like new, updated 930sf 3 bedroom mobile home $79,900 414-0589 id5446 Langley immaculate 2185sf 4br 3.5ba, No Strata Fees $499,900 888-6556 id5447 Richmond beautiful 2151sf 3br 2.5ba exec. townhouse $788K 275-6846 id5440 Tsawwassen huge 4700sf 7br 6ba w/mortgage helper $895,888 948-5441 id5448

Real Estate

HOME SERVICES

Furnished Accommodation

HOMAWAY INNS Specializing in furn accom in the Westend Vancouver at reas rates. call 604-684-7811 or visit www.homawayinns.com

6540

Houses - Rent

3 BR + den part furn, 4400blk, West 9th ave, Point Grey, n/s np, $3200 + utils. Avail now. Call Mike 604-649-3028 SHELL/WILLIAMS, 3 BR, Upper, 1300sf, 5 appls, f/p, lrg storage, sundeck, lrg fenced b/yard, lots of prkg. Avail Dec 1, $1450 + 2/3 utls. Close to school, transit, mall. CALL 778-862-5697

vancourier.com

*Drywall * Taping * Texture * Stucco*Painting * Steel stud framing Quality Home 604-725-8925

8075

Drywall

Wayne The Drywaller

Quality Drywall Finishing. Textured Ceilings & Repair. Renov Specialist. No job too small. 837-1785

8080

Electrical

A. LIC. ELECTRICIAN #19807 Semi-retired wants small jobs only. 604-689-1747, pgr 604-686-2319 A Lic’d. Electrician #30582. Rewiring & Reno, Appliance/ Plumbing. Rotor Rooter and Hydro Pressure Jetting Service, 778-998-9026 or 604-255-9026 Free Est / 24/7 ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR: Exp, friendly, reliable. Specializing in replacing old nob & tube wiring. Lic.#50084. 604-725-4535 LIC. ELECTRICIAN #37309 Commercial & residential renos & small jobs. 778-322-0934.

LIC ELECTRICIAN res/comm, Building Tech Diploma. Free Est, Reas. Lic 106797. 604-773-5190 YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 service call. Insured. Lic # 89402. Fast same day service guar’d. We love small jobs! 604-568-1899

6595

Shared Accommodation

6595-20

Coq./Poco/ Port Moody

ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 1800 sqft Townhouse in Port Moody, w/d, laminate floors, $595 incls utils, cable & internet, parking, indoor pool, nr SFU & Lougheed Mall. Suits professional working person or student. References Required. Avail Now. Call 778-846-5275

6602

Suites/Partial Houses

2 BR new bsmt suite, own wd & alarm, walk out bsmt, Fraserview area, ns, np, incld cable & net, $1000+1/3utils, 604-209-5590 4 BR, 2 baths, nr Kingsway & Rupert, nr schools & bus, $1600, share w/d, ns, small pet ok, avail immed. 604-837-6151

Call 604-630-3300 to place your ad

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Libra Sept. 23-Oct. 22: This week and next accent sensuality, sex, possessions, earning and spending. Enjoy life! Relationships loom large Sunday to Tuesday. You might dream of a fantastic romantic life with someone – whether there is truth in this or not, will show Tuesday night. Sexual bonding, investments, large finances, secrets and commitments arise midweek. You could take a big step! Wisdom and gentle love appear Friday night, Saturday. In all this potential development of a relationship, realize that Thursday night begins eight months during which you might be at a disadvantage with a partner. Scorpio Oct. 23-Nov. 21: Your energy, charisma and effectiveness march forth strongly. Start things, see and be seen, tackle projects/tasks which intimidated you previously. (Start only short-term things, as late November brings a slow-down.) Sunday to Tuesday brings chores, co-worker relations, and success in these (for eight months). Take care with one deceptive – rose-garden-type – promise or prospect that involves your career and home: be realistic about such a combination right now. Relationships excite and benefit you Wednesday/Thursday, not Friday. Secrets, intimacy, and finances lure Saturday. Sagittarius Nov. 22-Dec. 21: Continue to take a restful stance. Lie low, contemplate, plan.Your energy will return late November (one day before Mercury retrogrades, so you’ll be handling major things from the past, perhaps a relationship). Meanwhile, fulfill old obligations, deal with government agencies, be spiritual and charitable. Romantic notions bring a smile Sunday-Tuesday: don’t expect much “solid reality.” Tackle chores Wednesday onward. Friday/ Saturday bring relationships, opportunities and competition (avoid the last). Now to July, your career is filled with creative ideas – and some temper.

8087

Excavating

# 1 BACKHOE, EXCAVATOR & BOBCAT

one mini, drainage, landscaping, stump / rock / cement / oil tank removal. Water / sewer line, 24 hours Call 341-4446 or 254-6865 CONCRETE driveway, drainage, excavation, sidewalk, pavers, retaining walls landscape, back hoe & bobcat services 604-833-2103

8105

Flooring/ Refinishing

Hardwood Floor Refinishing Repairs & Staining Installation Free Estimates

Century Hardwood Floors 604-376-7224 www.centuryhardwood.com

CARPET, VINYL & HARDWOOD Repair & Replace. Material sales Dwight, 778-322-6048 I’ll show you the inexpensive route www.fccarpets.shawwebspace.ca

Nov. 6 - 12, 2011 Capricorn Dec. 22-Jan. 19: This week and next bring optimism, social delights, popularity, entertainment, and above all, a wishing, an urge to dream and envision your future – which will in turn bring, promote, the best future. Don’t think small – look out a decade, two decades. Home, domestic interests, property, security, retirement – these fill Sunday to Tuesday. The next eight months will bring either a) good fortune in these, or b) legal fights over them. DON’T trigger legal fights before July next year. The good fortune might include a home abroad. Romance soars Wednesday/Thursday: respond, seek. Aquarius Jan. 20-Feb. 18: Be ambitious, kow-tow to authority, seek more responsibility, upgrade your community status, this week and next. But avoid starting big new projects (other than house-buying) as a slow-down begins late month. Sunday to Tuesday features communications, emails, calls, talk, short trips, errands, casual acquaintances and siblings. These will grow important for the eight months ahead, as you start digging into the private, hidden or “undiscussed” side of life. You’ll be holding private talks, perhaps with a lover. Domestic, retirement and real estate luck visit you Wednesday/Thursday. Pisces Feb. 19-March 20: This week and next fill with mellow thoughts, wisdom and compassionate love. You can forgive others. Open your eyes, too, to foreign climes, higher learning, religious/philosophical truths, and your own “cultural hungers.” This wise, loving time is a good launching pad for the next eight months, which will feature intensity in relationships, both in love and money. You could surprise yourself by your possessiveness toward someone attractive. (Someone very “male” if you’re female; someone assertive, vivacious, if you’re male.) Big, maybe important communication Wednesday/Thursday. timstephens@shaw.ca


HOME SERVICES Flooring/ Refinishing

Golden Hardwood & Laminate Prof install, refinishing, sanding, and repairs. 778-858-7263 INSTALLATION REFINISHING, Sanding. Free est, great prices. Satisfaction guar. 604-518-7508

8125

Gutters

Alliance

Windows & Gutter Cleaning

8130

WEST SIDE HANDYMAN Carpentry • Painting • Ceramic Tiles Fences • Kitchens • Bathrooms Basement Suites • Roof • Plumbing Leak Repair • Decks Residential & Commercial 604

Cell:

References Available

YOUR HOME GUTTERS

NO HST!

til Nov. 30 • Gutter Installation, Cleaning & Repairs • Roofing & Roof Repairs • Moss Control, Removal & Prevention 25 year Warranteed Leaf & Needle Guard WCB – Fully Insured 100% Money Back Guarantee

604-340-7189 atyourhomeservicesgroup.ca

EDGEMONT GUTTERS

• Sales & Installation of 5’’ Continuous Gutter • Minor Repairs • Cleaning

604-420-4800 Established 1963

POWER WASHING PLUS

Clean gutters, windows, yards, roofs, decks, siding & fences.

Call Ken 604-716-7468

604

Part of RJR group

604-202-6118

Waters Home Maintenance Gutter Cleaning, repairs, windows Free estimate 604-738-6606

You Want It We’ve Got It

Find Whatever You’re Looking for in the Classifieds.

South Vancouver Mini-Public Storage Clean • Secure • Heated • Free Lock • No Admin. Fee Vehicle/Motorcycle Storage

— Units Start at $30/mo. TAX Included —

MASONRY and REPAIRS •Stone Walls •Bricks •Chimneys •Slate Patio/Sidewalk •Fireplaces All Concrete Work + more. Senior discount. George • 604-365-7672

8185

Moving & Storage

AFFORDABLE MOVING 1, 3, 5, 7 or 10 Ton $ From

45

Int/Ext. Com/Resid. Many Years Experience Top Quality Drywall Free Estimates

604-258-7300 cell: 604-417-5917

AAA Professional int/ext painter & wall paperer. Guar work. Free est. John 604-318-2059 (Kits)

FREE ESTIMATES Seniors Discount

MASTER MATCH PAINTING. Int & Ext. Good Prices, 18 yrs exp. Thomas 604-724-8648

www.affordablemoversbc.com

PROFESSIONAL PAINTER more than 10 yrs. Small jobs ok. Call Serj 604-377-2417

BEST PRICE! Bath, kitchen, plumbing, flooring, painting, etc. Call Mic, 604-725-3127 BOGI House Maintenance Fencing, painting , flooring, plumbing. All repairs & renos. 778-865-0846 DUSTTIN’S HANDYMAN Service All jobs Large and Small. Competitive Rates 604-873-5990 HANDYMAN - framing, decks, tiles, hardwood, drywall, re-roof. Total additions & basements. Ken 778-773-6251 or 604-455-0740 HOME REPAIRS - No job too small. Carpentry, painting, fencing, drywall, baseboards, lam flooring, deck repairs, p/washing, gutters. Brian, 604-266-2547 / 785-4184

Heating

Lorenzo & Son Plumbing & Heating (604) 312-6311 Local , lice’d plumbers & gas fitters.

8150

Kitchens/Baths

Plywood Kitchen Cabinets & Refacing, Counter Tops • In business 50 years 604-879-9191

Superior Cove Tops & Cabinets

8160

Lawn & Garden

HEDGE SHRUB TREE & STUMP REMOVAL FREE ESTIMATE INSURED

224-3669 Expert Pruning ISA By Certified Arborist Ornamental & Fruit Trees, Shrubs & Hedges Northwest Arboriculture

Licenced & Insured Local & Long Distance

604-537-4140 B&Y MOVING Experienced Movers ~ 2 Men $55 ~

Over 10 yrs. Exp. • Licenced & Insured • Professional Piano Movers

604-708-8850

Fall Yard Clean-up lawn care, weeding, raking, pruning - Greg the Gardener 604 440 9502

Patios/Decks/ Railings

604.321.0213

HOME SERVICES 8220

Plumbing

Licensed & Insured

10x10 STORAGE LOCKER $135 MOVING EVERYWHERE BEST PRICES ANYWHERE 604-710-2008 MOVERS.CA AMIGO'S MOVING. Delivery. Storage. No Job too Small or Big. Clean up, Garage, Basement. Call 604-782-9511 Best West Moving fast, 7 days/ week, short notice moves, great mid-month rates. 604-319-1010 TwoGuysWithATruck.ca Moving, Storage, Free EST 604-628-7136. Visa, OK

MOVING GUY 30/HR Clean full size cargo fan, smaller moves, deliveries anytime Call: (604) 250-1528

8193

• Sunrooms • Aluminum patio/deck covers • Aluminum roof • Glass railings • Aluminum fencing • Auto gates Free Estimates 604-521-2688

www.PatioCoverVancouver.com

8205

ALLEN ASPHALT concrete, brick,

drains, foundations, walls, membranes 604-618-2304/ 820-2187

8220

Res - Com Professional Service FLAT RATE 7 DAYS/WK

604-551-8531 Free Est Lic - Ins - Bonded

• Oil Tank Removal • Work complies with city bylaws • Always fair & BC Mainland reasonable rates • Excellent references

Off: 604-266-2120 Cell: 604-290-8592 Serving West Side since 1987

8195

Painting/ Wallpaper

Cell 604.626.1975

D&M PAINTING

Interior/Exterior Specialist Many Years Experience Fully Insured Top Quality, Quick Work Free Estimate

604-724-3832 Andrew’s Painting & Wallpaper 25yrs exp. WCB/Ins. Refs Free est Off season rates! 604-785-5651

Water Lines (without digging) Sewer Lines (without digging) Install. Drain tiles. 604-739-2000 PLUMBING, SEWER LINE, drainage, bathrooms, kitchens, drywall. John: 604-617-5054

8240

Renovations & Home Improvement

Renovations

from concept to occupancy

Winner of Gold & Silver Georgie Awards Winner of the National SAM Award

– Best Renovated Kitchen in Canada

❑ Renovations & Waterproofing ❑ Complete Bathroom Renovations ❑ All Plumbing & Electrical

WE CAN FIX IT

Interior / Exterior • New construction/Renovations/ Additions • Drywall hanging/ taping • Foundations/ Framing • Flooring: laminates/ tiles •Licensed & Insured • Free Estimates Call 604-220-7422 or 778-960-4004

drytech.ca RENOVATIONS

❑ A Total Reno Company ❑ Homes ❑ Garages ❑ Sundecks ❑ Window Replacements ❑ Lifetime Sundeck Coatings

When your house is great except… ❏ The kitchen’s too

NO OVERTIME BEST RATES Call Today for Your Free Quote

604-889-6409 Certified Plumber & Gas Fitter * Reno’s & Repairs 24 hrs/day * Furnaces * Boilers * Hot Water Heating * Reasonable Rates * Hot Water Tanks

604-731-2443

small

MOZAIK MOZAIK HANDYMAN HANDYMAN SERVICES SERVICES LTD.

• Painting • Electrical • Plumbing • Tiling • Carpentry Carpeting

Tel: 739-8786, Cell: 716-8687 ~ FREE ESTIMATES ~

A1 CONTRACTING. Bsmt, bath, kitchen cabinets, tiling, painting & decks. Dhillon, 604-782-1936 BASEMENT SUITES, bathrooms, kitchens, drywall, plumbing, tiling. John: 604-617-5054 ★ BATHROOM SPECIALIST★ Tiles, tub, vanity, plumbing, paint framing. From start to finish. Over 20 yrs exp. Peter 604-715-0030

RIGHTWAY Home Services AllHomeRenos,painting,flooring,tiling etc.Free est. Alan 604−782−0992 D & M RENOVATIONS, Flooring, tiling, finishing. Fully Insured. Top quality, quick work 604-724-3832

AaronR CONST

KITCHEN & BATHS Home renovations, 30+ years experience. Call 604-731-7709

Repairs & Renos, general contracting. Insured, WCB, Licensed

604-318-4390 aaronrconstruction.com FERREIRA HOME IMPROVEMENTS Additions ★ Renovations Concrete Forming ★ Decks Garages ★ Bathrooms Ceramic Tile ★ Drywall Hardwood Flooring

GET OUT YOUR LIST!

604-312-6311

Since 2000

604-222-8453

NORM, 604-466-9733 Cell: 604-841-1855

Licensed, Insured & Bonded Lic. Plumbers & Gas Fitters Over 20 years Experience Custom Renovations to Small Repairs

PLUMBING & HEATING NO JOB TOO SMALL

❑ All Painting & Coatings ❑ Decks/Stairs ❑ Drywall Repairs

Showroom: 1230 West 75th Ave.

''Satisfaction Guaranteed''

• • • •

PAINTING LTD.

Jean-Guy Bottin

PLUMBERS

– Renovator Member of the Year

For Free Estimates Call

.com

❑ Warranty ❑ References ❑ Fully Insured

604-732-8453

ATLAS The Reliable Plumber

731-8875

Since 1989

9129 Shaughnessy St., Vancouver, B.C. V6P 6R9 10% Off with this Ad! For all your plumbing, heating & reno needs. Lic Gas Fitter, Aman. 778-895-2005

Plumbing

24/7 Days A Week R Seniors Discounts EA TY All Work Guaranteed 8 YRRAN A W Also Furnaces, Gas Very Reasonable Rates

Renovations & Home Improvement

Plumbing Ltd

Complete Plumbing & Drain Cleaning Services

Oil Tank Removal

FLECK CONTRACTING LTD.

Paving/Seal Coating

8240

WESTMOR

Give us an estimate and we will beat it!

Call 778.994.5403

We Do Moves

To place your ad in “Call the Experts" call 604-630-3300

★ 3 Licensed Plumbers ★ 66 years of exp. 604-830-6617 www.oceansidemechanical.com

MOVING

Int. & Ext. Specialist, 20 yrs exp. * Reas. Rates, High Quality * Fast, clean, with ref’s Licensed, Insured & WCB

Rakes & Ladders.. Lawns, trees, gardens, shrubs. Certified, Ins. & WCB, 604-737-0170

8200

Garbage Removal • Deliveries

AVANTI GARDEN SERVICES Fall cleanup, new design, planting, pruning. Laura 604-264-0775

Ny Ton Gardening clean up trimming, shrubs, hedging, pruning & topping, 604-782-5288

VANWEST Painting - Professional quality at competitive prices. Call for free estimate @ 778.892.9828

1175 W.15 St. North Van

CONFIDENT

JAPANESE GARDENER Landscape & maintenance, clean-ups, trimming. Reas, free est, 25 yrs exp 604-986-8126

★ STAFFORD & SON ★ WINTER RATES! Interior/Ext. Top quality work. 604-221-4900

MOVING & STORAGE

604-723-2468; Tran the Gardener. New lawns, fall cleanup, pruning weeding, maint. 604-723-2468

GARDENER: Fall clean-ups. Gardens, leaves, light pruning Gail 604-251-8012

www.southvanminipublicstorage.com

DJ PAINTING

732-8453

8140

Call ThE Experts

Masonry

ACCURATE PAINTING - Int & ext. Competitive prices. 15+ yrs exp. Henry cell 604-754-9661

RENOS • REPAIRS 9129 Shaughnessy St., Van.

A49

SELF STORAGE

We accept Visa, Mastercard & Interac

604-618-9741

vancourier.com http://classified.van.net

8175

Painting/ Wallpaper

Since 1989

Colin Malcolm, Insured

Check Out Our Website:

8195

Semi Retired Gardener, 35 years exp. Garden cleanups, pruning, free est. 604-277-6075

1 to 3 Men

#3 - 8652 Joffre Ave, Burnaby Professional Powerwash Gutters cleaned & repaired Since 1984, 604-339-0949

Lawn & Garden

671-0288

RJR Small Projects Division

Work Done by Professionals

604-723-2526

8160

224-1005

Complete Home Maint./Repairs Certified Trained Pros. For that small job. Rates you can afford.

• Professional Power Washing • Gutter Cleaning • Window Cleaning done by hand • Contract Pricing • Will Beat Any Reputable Estimate

Fully Insured

Handyperson

604

8105

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

New Construction, Reno’s & Restorations: Electrical, Plumbing, Drainage. All Jobs • TWE Stan 604-588-5555 or 604-671-7061

Renos • Decks • Repairs

BATHROOM• KITCHEN • BASEMENT Structural ● Water Ingress Kelly Construction 604-738-7280

cont. on next page

MOVING?

We do all the fussy little jobs no one else wants to do. Complete home repairs. Workmanship and your Satisfaction Guaranteed. Est 1983. Ralph 682-8256

❏ You need another

bedroom

❏ The carport could be

a two-car garage

❏ One bathroom just

isn’t enough anymore

We Fix The “EXCEPTS…” Since 1978

604-987-5438

www.rjrrenovator.com

Additions. Kitchens Bathrooms. Landscape Const. Design & Build Renovations 604.662.8150

www.jasonsmithbuild.com

WWW.RENORITE.COM

Save Your Dollars!

✓ RenoRite

778-317-1256•604-451-0225 Bath *Kitchen* Suites & More

Call 604-630-3300 to place your ad


A50

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

HOME SERVICES cont. from previous page

8250

8250

8255

Roofing

782-2474

Free Est’s • Large or Small Jobs

Call for a free estimate:

1.877.602.7346

NO HST! til Nov. 30

WCB – Fully Insured 100% Money Back Guarantee

604-340-7189

atyourhomeservicesgroup.ca

Visit us online to receive a special discount:

www.crownroofgutters.ca

MASTERCRAFT ROOFING Ltd. Right the 1st time! Repairs, reroofing, garage, decks. Hart 322-5517

ROOFING

Showroom: 1230 West 75th Ave.

604-228-7663

#1 Roofing Company in BC

604-588-0833

SALES@ PATTARGROUP.COM

WWW.PATTARGROUP.COM AMBLESIDE ROOFING

All types - Reroofs & Repairs 778-288-8357

Stucco/Siding/ Exterior

J. PEARCE STUCCO CONTRACTING. 604-761-6079 www.stuccocontracting.com

1990 ROLLS-ROYCE, 1-owner, only 31,000 km, all original, like new. $32,500 604-987-3876 D24627

9125

Scrap Car Removal

9145

9155

Sport Utilities/ 4x4’s/Trucks

Domestic

2003 CADILLAC STS Seville + 4 new winter tires, 78,000 km, 2nd owner, $11,000 no accid 604-689-4010 or 604-926-4030

Disposal & Recycling

$49

ROOF LEAKS? Have your roof checked. Free est. 604-738-6606 Trimax Roofing Ltd. 24hr. repairs, reroof WCB, Ins. Will beat all written prices. 604-856-4999

Rubbish Removal

A L L JU N K ?

Rubbish Removal Residential & Commercial Free Estimates 7 Days a Week

Large or small jobs Nobody beats our prices $

s r

r

TM

15 OFF with this ad

604-537-8523

10% OFF with this ad www.studentworksdisposal.com

A.J.K. MOVING Ltd. Special truck for clean-ups. Any size job Lic#32839 604-875-9072 DISPOSAL BINS: Starting at $149 + dump fees. 604-306-8599 www.disposalking.com HOMEX HAULING & Deliveries. Please call Luigi at 778-994-5403 JACK’S RUBBISH Removal Friendly, Fast & Cheap 604-266-4444

Quality Home Improvements Install tiles, marble, granite, mosiac & stone. Guar. 604-725-8925

8315

RUBBISH REMOVAL

@

VanCourier.com

2007 PT Cruiser convertible, white, auto, only 39,000km, Immaculate $13,800 ‘‘open to offers’’ 604-971-3179

9145

2008 F-150 XLT supercab 4WD BCAA inspected $17,860 75,300 km’s www.autofleet.biz 604-304-7653 Carproof report & warranty included

Scrap Car Removal

Window Cleaning NO WHEELS, NO PROBLEM

Edgemont Building Maintenance • Power Washing

Reasonable rates - Free Est. Pat 604-224-2112, anytime

place ads online @

Tree Services

MAGNOLIA TREE Service & Landscape, fence install, yard reno’s, excavating, irrigation 604-214-0661

8335

Sport Utilities/ 4x4’s/Trucks

2010 Volkswagen Touareg V6 3.0 TDI Clean Diesel 39,000 kms. Excellent Condition. 40,000km left on the manufacturer's warranty. $47,500 email: ckwong@marnetrealestate.com

2007 GMC CANYON SLE Ext Cab 4X4 BCAA inspected $15,960, 87,000 km’s www.autofleet.biz 604-304-7653 Carproof report & warranty incl’d

John 778-288-8009

NORTH WEST ROOFING Re-Roofing & Repair. WCB & liability insur. Jag, 778-892-1530

9155

9160

Tiling

Student Works

Trips start at

Collectibles & Classics

B i n s f ro m 7 - 2 0 y a rd s a v a i l .

8255 All types of Roofing Over 35 Years in Business Call now for Free Estimates

8300

8309

Crown Roofing & Drainage Residental Div. Roofing installations & repairs. 1-877-602-7346

9110

#1 FREE Scrap Vehicle Removal Ask about $500 Credit!!! $$ PAID for Some 604.683.2200

Quality Home Improvement ★ Stucco ★ All Kinds. No Job Too Big or Small. 604-725-8925

At Save on Roofing - specialize reroof/repair★ Fully Ins. WCB. 24/7, Free est. 778-892-1266 saveon.roofing@yahoo.com

drytech.ca ❑ Sloped: Lifetime Shingles ❑ Flat: Instacoat Rubber ❑ Sundecks: Lifetime Coatings ❑ Repairs: Leaks & Chimneys

10% OFF WITH THIS AD www.604rubbish.com

Rubbish Removal

AUTOMOTIVE

RUBBISH REMOVAL STARTING @ $50 Free Est . 604-214-0661

* We Remove & Recycle Anything*

Tried & True Since 1902

• Roofing & Roof Repairs • Duroid, Cedar, Torch-on • Moss Control, Removal & Prevention • Gutter Installation, Cleaning & Repairs

8255

604-RUBBISH

Roofing

YOUR HOME ROOFING

Rubbish Removal

Ads continued on next page

2008 F-150 XLT SUPERCREW 4X4 BCAA inspected $23,980 44,900 km’s www.autofleet.biz 604-304-7653 Carproof report & warranty included

SCRAP CAR & TRUCK REMOVAL

604-420-4800 Established 1963

WHITE ROSE Window Cleaning. Inside and out. Gutters cleared and cleaned too! 604-274-0285

CASH FOR ALL VEHICLES

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1998 HONDA Accord, 166k, AC, cruise, pwr/hted mirrors, pwr windows, pwr locks, new rear brakes, aircared. Well maintained. Clean reliable car. No accidents. $5200. 604-377-7233

2010 NISSAN ALTIMA S (2.5L) BCAA inspected $15,980 85,600 km’s www.autofleet.biz 604-304-7653 Carproof report & warranty included NEED CHEAP AUTOBODY ? www.cheapautobody.ca 604-341-7738

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2008 F-350 LARIAT Supercrew 4WD SWB (DVD) BCAA inspected $29,860, 134,000 km’s www.autofleet.biz 604-304-7653 Carproof report & warranty inc’d

Sports & Imports

RV’s/Trailers

2004 PLEASURE - WAY PLATEAU M/H Mercedes Benz Turbo diesel. Immac cond fully loaded with Onan Generator, 62,937k’s, $54,900. Ph 1-604-220-5005

1979 Dodge 30’ MH 166,000K runs good needs tlc $1,500 (604) 897-6944

Text-to-Donate For years, you’ve supported the Legion. And proudly wore your poppy. This fall, a new generation of veterans are returning home, and your gift has never been so important. Veterans will turn to the Legion for affordable housing, career counseling & trauma relief. And we’ll be there with your support. Simply text the word “POPPY” to 20222 on your mobile phone and $5 will be sent directly to the Legion’s Poppy Funds.

Come visit us from November 24 to January 3, 2012 Visit Festival of Trees during this holiday season at the Four Seasons Hotel Vancouver and Pacific Centre as we celebrate our 25th anniversary. Vote for your favorite tree by making a donation to BC Children’s Hospital Foundation. Visit www.bcchf.ca/festivaloftrees for information on events in Victoria, Port Alberni and Sooke.

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A51

dashboard

Honda minivan raises the bar on sophistication and style

2012 Odyssey makes the box more interesting When it’s time to pack your gear up, rectangular boxes make the most sense. Certainly, cartons that are circular or triangular might be more interesting to look at and may have their uses in specific cases, but they lack the versatility, practicality, and overwhelming usefulness of the tried and true, rectangular box. The same goes for vehicles. If you need maximum passenger space and cargo flexibility, then you need a rectangular box. You need a minivan. Most major automakers sell a seven-passenger SUV, and with Ford and GM having dropped out of the minivan game a few years ago, it would seem that crossovers (which are often, ironically, tall wagons) are winning the war. But not if the people at Honda have anything to say about it. While some automakers continue to build the same old, rectangular boxes, and others have abandoned them completely, Honda has gone another route. They’re building a box that, quite simply, doesn’t look like a boring, rectangular box. And they’re doing a good job of it. That box is, of course, the new Honda Odyssey, and it’s easily one of the most stylish minivans ever produced. It has a lot to live up to, as the past two generations of Odysseys have been some of the most sensible and well-built vehicles on the road. In each successive model, Honda en-

er than competing V6 engines, choosing instead to bump up the torque—a smart move for a vehicle intended to carry lots of people and cargo. Honda has equipped the Odyssey with a six-speed automatic, but only in the topend Touring trim—all other models get a five-speed automatic. Since the Touring costs almost $47,000, most consumers won’t benefit from the more advanced and fuelefficient transmission. Without a doubt, the new Odyssey is smoother, softer, and more luxurious than before, feeling almost on par with an Acura luxury sedan. Unfortunately, the improved, softer ride quality comes with a price, as the Odyssey has lost the sporty handling that made it more fun to drive than other minivans. Environment Up front, the Odyssey is a comfortable cruiser with large buttons and logically placed controls. Some consumers will find the stereo to be mounted a little too low on the centre console, but the steering-mounted controls make up for it. Honda has one of the best seating systems you can get in a minivan, carrying over the last model’s excellent second-row centre seat, which converts the two captain’s chairs into a bench. You can fold the centre backrest to create an arm rest, or remove it entirely for easier access to the third row. The third-row bench has been significantly improved, with an exceptional design that requires a single pull to fold the seat flat into the floor, and large headrests to compensate for the short seatbacks. On models equipped with the power tailgate, owners will appreciate the ability to

cludes ABS, traction control, air conditioning, cruise control, tilt/telescope steering, power windows, remote keyless entry, five-speaker CD stereo, tire-pressure monitoring system, and front/side/ side-curtain airbags. Perhaps the biggest is-

override the auto-opening mechanism by pulling on the handle, which enables the hatch to be quickly and easily paused and reversed. Features The Odyssey starts at $29,990. Standard equipment on all Odysseys in-

sue with the Odyssey is that many of the most desirable features—from the six-speed automatic to the power sliding doors and tailgate—aren’t available on the base LX model, forcing consumers to step up to the $35, 490 EX. editor@automotive.com

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gineers have raised the bar on sophistication in the minivan segment, delivering luxurylevel performance, handling, and ride quality. With the 2012 Odyssey, the sophistication continues to rise, and the styling comes along for the ride. It’s still a rectangular box—and comes with all the advantages of one—but the SUV-like design cues draw your attention that you almost don’t notice. You might even describe it as a crossover minivan, though that’s pushing things a bit. Design The Odyssey’s designers have blessed it with the sharp edges and odd shapes you’d expect to find on the funky CR-Z hatchback, set against a superb front grille that manages to look both tough and refined. It’s still clearly a minivan, but the unique touches give it an uncommon flair. The most striking detail can be found right behind the sliding doors, where the windows dip down in a hard bend. The unusual beltline draws attention to the Odyssey’s forwardleaning stance, giving a sense of power and athleticism you don’t expect in a minivan. On the inside, the Odyssey comes across as functional and business-like, updating the tall dashboard layout found in previous models and maintaining a professional look and feel. Build quality is also a strong point, with excellent materials giving the Odyssey an upscale feel. Perhaps the only real issue with the overall design is Honda’s decision to limit the Odyssey to a boring choice of six mostly monochrome exterior colours. Performance The Odyssey is powered by a 3.5L V6 producing 248-hp and 250 lb-ft of torque. Honda has tuned it for less horsepow-

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EW52

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011

WEEKLY SPECIALS 100% BC Owned and Operated Prices Effective Thursday, November 3 to Wednesday, November 9, 2011.

We reserve the right to limit quantities. We reserve the right to correct printing errors.

Grocery Department

Meat Department

946ml

Valley Pride Organic Milk

L’Ancetre Organic Cheese

skim, 1, 2 or 3.25%

assorted varieties

assorted varieties

737g • product of USA

112-126g • product of USA

3.99

all varieties

save 1.00

assorted varieties

4.49

2/5.00

8/12x100g product of Canada

on random weight

save 1.50

398ml • product of USA

on each item

Patel’s Indian Dishes assorted varieties

2/6.00

3/6.99

615g • product of Canada

265ml • product of India

R.W. Knudsen Fruit Spritzers

Bakery Department 3.49

assorted varieties

Simply Pure Extra Virgin Olive Oil

bags or bins

10% off

283-454g

regular retail price

Health Care Department Sĭsû B Stress with Rhodiola Bonus Bottle A complete B complex formula plus rhodiola to support overall health, particularly for those who are under mental or physical stress.

480g

23.99

150caps

New Chapter Whole Food Multivitamins All of New Chapter’s Multi-vitamins are probiotic and whole. The herbs and cultured whole-food vitamins & minerals in each formulation work together to promote optimal health.

Rice Bakery

assorted varieties

Brown Rice Sourdough Bread

5.99

Eco-Max Liquid Laundry Detergent assorted varieties

9.99

1L

Organic Pecan Pieces and Halves

package of 3 slices

Stahlbush Island Farms Frozen Grains and Legumes

2/4.00

Bulk Department

6.99

170-340g • product of USA

113-142g • product of USA

1.48lb/ 3.26kg

Carrot Cake

2/5.00

311ml

+ dep. + eco fee

B.C. Grown

Sundried Tomato and Green Olive Bread

Casbah Side Dishes

assorted varieties

6.99

Happy Days Dairy

3lb Bag

Honeycrsip Apples

2/4.98

reg 3.99 ea

Wolfgang Puck Organic Soups

assorted varieties

3.49

2.98

Zorba’s Spanakopitas

2/3.98

Olympic Yogurt Multipacks

assorted varieties

B.C. Grown, Certified Organic

Deli Department

Pirate Brands Booty Snacks

540g

3 L • product of Canada

Save 2.00 off the purchase of any regularly priced New Chapter Multivitamin Various sizes

Seminars and Events:

Tuesday, November 8, 7-8:30pm at Choices Markets South Surrey, 3248 King George Blvd. Balance Your Blood Sugar with Exercise with Curtis Christopherson of Innovative Fitness. Cost $5. To register call 604-541-3902.

choicesmarkets.com/locations Kitsilano

Cambie

Kerrisdale

Yaletown

2627 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver 604.736.0009

3493 Cambie St. Vancouver 604.875.0099

1888 W. 57th Ave. Vancouver 604.263.4600

1202 Richards St. Vancouver 604.633.2392

2lb bag

Spartan Apples from Clapping Chimp

8.99lb/ 19.82kg

Bob’s Red Mill Buttermilk Pancake and Waffle Mix

Sahale Gourmet Nut Blends

2/5.00

200g • product of Canada

4 L • product of Canada

.79

Leg of Lamb Roast Bone In

4.99

7.99

B.C. Grown, Certified Organic

6.99lb/ 15.41kg

1.99

21.99

Carrots from Fountainview Farm

value pack previously frozen

assorted varieties

2 kg

Silver Hills Big 16 Bread

Wild Sockeye Salmon

Pacific Foods Organic Almond Beverages

The Granola King Hemp Hazelnut Granola

Produce Department

Choices in the Park 6855 Station Hill Dr. Burnaby 604.522.6441

Rice Bakery

South Surrey

2595 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver 604.736.0301

3248 King George Blvd. South Surrey 604.541.3902

Choices at the Crest 8683 10th Ave. Burnaby 604.522.0936

Kelowna 1937 Harvey Ave. Kelowna 250.862.4864


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Voting Info If you have not previously registered to vote in a provincial or federal election, or you moved after registering, you may not be on the Voters List. To confirm that your name is on the list please use the following: http://vancouver.ca/ctyclerk/elections/ 2011election/voterlist.htm Where do I Vote?

CLIP AND TAKE WITH YOU ON VOTING DAY

Are you on the Voters List?

CITY COUNCIL

Suzanne Anton, For Mayor

George Affleck

Elizabeth Ball

Sean Bickerton

Joe Carangi

Mike Klassen

Jason Lamarche

Bill McCreery

Francis Wong

Bill Yuen

Ken Charko

PARK BOARD

Voters are required to vote at their designated voting places. Use the following to confirm your voting location: http://vancouver.ca/ctyclerk/ elections/2011election/where.htm#1

John Coupar

Casey Crawford Melissa De Genova

Advance Polling?

Gabby Kalaw

Dave Pasin

SCHOOL BOARD

All electors are eligible to vote in an advance voting opportunity if they choose to do so. Advance voting will take place on November 9, 12, 15, and 16 from 8 am - 8 pm at the following five locations: ! Vancouver City Hall ! Dunbar Community Centre ! Renfrew Park Community Centre ! Sunset Community Centre ! West End Community Centre Advance voting will also take place on November 10, 11, 13 and 14 from Noon to 8 pm at Vancouver City Hall.

ON NOVEMBER 19TH, ELECT

Suzanne Anton

and The Common Sense Team

Fraser Ballantyne

Ken Denike

Stacy Robertson

Sandy Sharma

Sophia Woo

DOWNLOAD YOUR COPY OF THE NPA COMMON SENSE PLATFORM AT:

www.npavancouver.ca

Jason Upton

Vancouver Courier November 4 2011  

Vancouver Courier November 4 2011