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FRIDAY

AUGUST 2, 2013

TRI-CITIES

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THE NOW

COTTAGE REPRIEVE Park residents allowed to stay in

BUSTING OUT Locally trained tennis player

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Serving COQUITLAM, PORT COQUITLAM, PORT MOODY, ANMORE and BELCARRA since 1984

PIPELINE CONCERNS

Mayor has questions for Kinder Morgan NEWS 4

A new facility for dry-floor sports NEWS 5

Green light for 206 units of housing NEWS 12

NOW FILE PHOTO

SHARE is looking at pooling resources with other organizations to offer more services to food bank patrons.

Food bank changes? SHARE IS LOOKING AT NEW WAYS TO DELIVER SERVICES Jeremy DEUTSCH

World competition Locals play for SFU

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jdeutsch@thenownews.com Major changes could soon be coming to the way the food bank in the Tri-Cities does business. SHARE Family & Community Services Society has put out a request for proposals to develop a new model for the delivery of its service. According to the RFP, the new model, which is tentatively called a “catalyst centre” would focus on providing a variety of services, from food support to housing assistance and skills training,

under one roof. SHARE CEO Martin Wyant explained the food bank has focused on a straightforward model of raising, storing and distributing food. But now, he said, the society wants to look at working closely with other organizations in the Tri-Cities to pool resources. Wyant suggested people in need now have to travel to a handful of different locations to get services, which adds another level of challenge. “We want to focus less on the process and more about getting to understand why people CONTINUED ON PAGE 0

We want to focus less on the process. –Martin Wyant SHARE CEO

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

InTHE NOW

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OPINION

Russia’s anti-gay law doesn’t fit with the direction the world is going in. . . . . . . . . 8 We’re asking the wrong question when it comes to legalization.. . . . . . . . . . . . 9

COMMUNITY

The Port Moody Public Library will host the Great Smartini on Aug. 8. . . . . . . 14

SPORTS

Coquitlam Little League players aim for national baseball supremacy. . . . . . . . 16

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LISA KING/NOW

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NEWSNOW THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

Temporary relief for cottagers

RESIDENTS LIVING IN REGIONAL PARK WILL BE ALLOWED TO STAY ANOTHER 11 MONTHS

Jeremy DEUTSCH jdeutsch@thenownews.com A small group of people living in cottages in Belcarra Regional Park will get to stay in their homes, at least for now. Last week, the Metro Vancouver board decided to extend a lease to the cottagers, known as the Belcarra South Preservation Society, to June 28, 2014. The board also voted to refer the issue back to Metro Vancouver’s environment and parks committee for further examination. For Jo Ledingham, a member of the society who has called one of the cottages in the park home for more than 30 years, the decision offers temporary relief. However, she said the resolution is a bit ambiguous and she’s not sure what the future holds for the cottagers. “We’re still feeling kind of shell shocked over the whole thing,” said Ledingham, a theatre critic for the Vancouver Courier newspaper, a sister newspaper of the Tri-Cities NOW. She noted the society is planning to meet soon to discuss its next steps. There are seven cottages located in the regional park, six of which have Port Moody addresses. The cottages, and in some cases the people living in them, have been in the park for decades. The group has had a lease agreement with the regional district to maintain the water system, roads and cottages for nearly four decades. In February, Metro Vancouver served the residents with an eviction notice, which would have seen them out by the end of August. In 2005, Metro Vancouver wanted to demolish the cottages and asked the group to leave, in part out of concerns for their drinking water. Eventually the district relented after the residents agreed to upgrade the water system, among other improvements to the cottages. Metro Vancouver gave the cottagers several reasons for the recent eviction notice, including an interest in expanding the park and improving access to a beach nearby. The regional district also expressed liability concerns regarding water supply and the state of the cottages. Ledingham said she’s not sure if a solution can ultimately be reached in the long-term that would keep the cottagers in their homes. “I think there certainly is a feeling [by Metro Vancouver] there should be no houses in parks,” she said.

There are seven cottages located in Belcarra Regional Park, six of which have Port Moody addresses. The group does appear to have support from the mayor of Port Moody, Mike Clay. He said the Metro Vancouver board wants staff to look seriously at options other than eviction. “It’s a step in the right direction,” he said of the recent resolution. Clay was also sympathetic to the cottagers’ plight, especially over the concerns expressed by Metro Vancouver staff on the conditions of the cottages. The mayor, who noted he visited the area recently, acknow-

LISA KING/NOW

ledged a couple of the cottages need some work, but the others are well maintained. Clay also questioned Metro Vancouver’s interest in expanding the park. He said he doesn’t see an immediate need for the land that houses the cabins. “The park is in Port Moody and no one has talked to us about future expansion,” he said, arguing the cottagers act as stewards of the park. “I don’t know that we want future expansion of that park.”

Belcarra mayor still has pipeline concerns BURNABY SPILL IS A FOCUS

Jeremy DEUTSCH jdeutsch@thenownews.com The mayor of the Village of Belcarra is pleased the company behind a major pipeline expansion project continues to engage with his community, but he also contends some concerns have yet to be addressed. Mayor Ralph Drew said Kinder Morgan still hasn’t provided a postmortem assessment of the Western Canada Marine Response Corp. (WCMRC) response measures and the lessons learned from the 2007 oil spill in Burnaby. “That’s what I’m looking

Belcarra Mayor Ralph Drew

for,” Drew told the Tri-Cities NOW. In June the village made a couple of requests to Kinder Morgan as the company set out to conduct an emergency preparedness study in the vicinity of its Westridge Marine Terminal. Specifically, the village wanted a “postmortem examination” of the environment-

al monitoring and impact assessment of the 2007 oil spill event in Burnaby and baseline regarding the aquatic life in the inlet study area to determine the potential impact of an oil spill. The village received a response recently from Kinder Morgan providing a glimpse of the measures the company said it has in place to minimize the possibility of an oil spill. Drew said the response from Kinder Morgan answered a lot of questions, but a big portion is still missing. The mayor noted in one instance, booms used by the WCMRC didn’t fully contain the oil and oil “slopped” over the top of the containment boom due to wave action. Drew also suggested the containment booms were inadequate in containing oil

in the shoreline intertidal zone during tide cycles. He contends the same problem happened just this year during a small spill at the Suncor Energy facility in Burnaby. “There clearly needs to be a re-examination of the oil containment technology and strategies where the intertidal zone is involved,” he wrote in a response to Kinder Morgan. As for an emergency response, according to Kinder Morgan, the vessel operator and onboard loading master would promptly begin cargo transfer shutdown procedures, which would take three to five minutes depending on conditions at the time. While one operator is shutting the loading line, the remaining staff are dispatched to the response boat and shoreline to set the sec-

ondary boom in place outside the primary boom to prevent oil from escaping the area. Additional resources would be called in to assist with a spill, possibly within 30 minutes. After the emergency phase is complete, Kinder Morgan said it would use environmental consultants to complete a contamination assessment, while remedial efforts would continue until levels meet government criteria. The letter also noted the company has two booms in the water and near the dock and what’s called an oil spill containment and recovery unit, which includes a 260metre boom. As part of the project, field surveys were conducted during low tide. The company teamed up with WCMRC to conduct the study. The emergency response

study is meant to collect, update and store information about the shoreline environment near the terminal. In June, officials with Kinder Morgan released details of the proposed route, or study corridor, for the twinning of the pipeline that stretches from Edmonton to Burrard Inlet in Burnaby. The proposed route in Coquitlam would have the line run east of the Port Mann Bridge through the Fraser River, hitting land near United Boulevard. The line would continue to follow the road west past the Eaglequest Golf complex before meeting up with the Lougheed Highway corridor to Burnaby. The current portion of the line in Coquitlam begins near Schooner Street near the Fraser River, running essentially through the centre of the city.


THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

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Changes may be coming to SHARE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 are having to come to get food,” he told the Tri-Cities NOW. Wyant said part of the interest in changing the model came after the society was forced to look for storage space for part of the food bank. In May, SHARE reached a deal with the province to lease a space at Riverview To learn more Hospital for one year. about the RFP, For months SHARE had been on the hunt download the for a 2,000- to 3,000- free Layar square-foot permanent app to your storage space for the smartphone and operation, using paid scan this page storage lockers for a time and space provided by a local health products company. SHARE’s CEO said the society also wants to develop a more comprehensive intake and referral system that works with clients to get a better understanding of their basic needs and get them on a path out of poverty. Besides looking for a more efficient way to provide services, Wyant said the model would also be asking more of those who rely on the charity. “I believe people we’re giving help to should also be asked to help,” he said. Though Wyant acknowledged the idea might be controversial, he said the food bank wouldn’t refuse service to people who don’t want to help in some way, or volunteer. Instead, he said it would be more like an “invitation” for users to give back.

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“There’s dignity in being asked to give back,” he said, adding most people want to be asked to lend a hand. “Maybe it’s now time to start looking at some different ideas about working with the people we’re supporting.” Wyant said he’s not even sure exactly what the new model will look like, but the purpose of the RFP is to find a group or person who can help develop the idea. He said after going through the process, SHARE might find the current model to be the best, but he suspects there are certain aspects that can be changed. Vancity has given the society a $20,000 grant to get the RFP process going. The deadline for proposals is Aug. 30, with the model being developed within the next six months.

CITY APPROVES $3.9-MILLION FACILITY FOR POPULAR SPORTS LIKE BALL HOCKEY

Sam SMITH

with FREE Grid

509-0185

Dry-floor sports get a boost in Coquitlam editorial@thenownews.com It’s been 40 years since the last one was built, but the City of Coquitlam has approved construction of a new $3.9million, 25,000-square-foot, multi-sport dry-floor facility to be built next to Centennial Pavilion. With a doubled population since 1975, a major spike in dry-floor sport demands and a desire to keep both kids and adults active, sports organizations must be smiling about the new building, now scheduled to be complete by midto-late summer 2014. The new covered dry-floor facility will feature a 21,000square-foot field with four change rooms and wash-

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rooms, readily available for a number of sports, including lacrosse and ball hockey, some of the largest and fastest growing sports in the city. But the approval didn’t come without reservations. Coun. Brent Asmundson questioned the placement of the building when the Poirier Sports & Leisure Complex is already next door. “I have concerns about the location to attract more participation into sports,” he said. The city should place a new facility somewhere like Eagle Ridge Field or Town Centre Park to spread out its sporting facilities, according to Asmundson. “We’re probably losing

young children with travelling distance,” he said. The move will improve what’s already there, but not necessarily give more opportunities to those living elsewhere in the city, Asmundson said. “Is this a mistake of $4million dollars?” he asked, adding city staff should have looked into grant funding for the project. Mayor Richard Stewart also questioned the price tag and whether a new building would cause parking problems. The near $4-million price tag comes from the building design and the expanded change rooms, city staff said. CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013


THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

NEWSN0W

Sports centre gets go-ahead it would be, and not in the context he anticipated. Coun. Neal Nicholson said “Change rooms with washrooms were considered man- the facility is needed, and datory by the working group,” councillors had heard that message loud and clear at a report to council states. City staff explained that meetings with sports groups. Stewart agreed the budget during their research with sporting organizations, a is higher than expected, but desire for four change rooms said it’s well worth the cost to allow for back-to-back of getting youth more actgames was important, which ive and creating a space for is why they included them in adults to use as well. However, he said he wishes the proposal. Coun. Craig Hodge fully the city had created a longterm sports supported the facility proproposal and posal to get wanted to get the most out started on the of taxpayer constr uction I think this plan dollars. as soon as posis ready. I think “Getting sible. it’s time to the best bang “Ball hockey for our buck is the fastest construct it. means we’ll growing sport –Craig Hodge be able to proright now,” he Coquitlam vide better for said. “Last year Councillor them in the they turned roles we’ve away 100 kids been asked to because they play, and I’m couldn’t get not sure we’ve done it here,” the floor space for them.” Speaking on the location, he said. Hodge concluded by sumHodge said it was chosen in consultation with the sport- marizing council’s thoughts ing organizations that voted on their ultimate decision. “Every year that we don’t in support of that spot. “I think this plan is ready,” have this, kids are not playing he said. “I think it’s time to sports,” he said. Council voted unanimousconstruct it.” But Coun. Terry O’Neill ly in favour of building the was uncomfortable making sports centre, and construca decision with a site more tion is expected to begin in expensive than he thought the fall.

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OPINION

8

THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

Tri-Cities NOW is a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership. Our offices are located at 216-3190 St. Johns Street, Port Moody BC V3H 2C7 Phone: 604-444-3451

New Russian anti-gay law unacceptable

L

ooking back on the 2010 Olympics, there was a lot for us to be proud of, like our haul of gold and our remarkably smooth running of the games. But this week, one other thing stands out in hindsight. Among the dozens of international pavilions set up for athletes, fans and everyone else was a happy addition — Pride House. This was the first time the Olympic Games included a special place to welcome and celebrate the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community. The tradition was carried on in London for the 2012 Summer Games, but sadly no such place will exist in Sochi when the torch is lit in less than six months. Instead, Russian President Vladimir Putin has just signed into law new “anti-propaganda” regulations that will allow police to arrest and detain for up to 15 days anyone they suspect of being gay, lesbian or pro-gay. That includes foreign athletes, media and visitors. This type of homophobic thinking belongs in a century that is rapidly disappearing in our rearview mirror and it certainly doesn’t belong in the Olympics, the most visible symbol the world has of international openness and friendship. If, as the cynics say, the Games are really about politics, let’s see some political action to correct this anomaly. It is incumbent on our federal government, the International Olympic Committee and their well-heeled sponsors to put pressure on Russia to let them know this isn’t becoming of a host nation. Or an acceptable position in any civilized society. — guest editorial from the North Shore News

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Yes, it’s a major health hazard. . . . . . . . . . . . 14.04% Yes, I hate it when I step in droppings. 43.86% No, I love to feed the geese. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.88% Geese and people need to co-exist. . . . . . . . 35.96% I don’t go to Rocky Point Park. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.26% Copyright in letters and other materials submitted voluntarily to the Publisher and accepted for publication remains with the author, but the Publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic or other forms. The publisher shall not be liable for minor changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions with respect to any advertisement is limited to publication of the advertisement in a subsequent issue or the refund of monies paid for the advertisement.

This car was hardly Stellar

I

had to take the car (I’ve owned it long enough for a simple definite article) through AirCare this week, for the last time. It got a simple pass after they hooked up its electronic guts to a computer and determined it had been a good little engine for the past two years. They printed out my pass form on the last dot matrix printer in B.C. and sent me away. It’s the last time I’ll have to get the car AirCared, as the program is ending as of this year. That will feel strange. I’ve been driving cars through AirCare testing bays ever since I started driving. The program started in 1992, two years before I got my licence. My cars and AirCare have seldom been friends. Like most of us, I owned a series of early vehicles that teetered on the line between “car” and “pile of rolling metal.” My worst car was a 1988 Hyundai Stellar. Never heard of the Stellar? That’s because of its painful failure to live up to its name. A small four-door sedan, its main selling feature was the very small amount of money I paid for it. It took me to and from college and survived almost through a full year of my first post-schooling job. Even before its untimely death, it had seen the white light at the end of the tunnel a few times. Its most impressive near-death experience was its black lung disease. Apparently, for its entire life, the exhaust system had been building up deposits that were slowly choking the engine to death. The car started losing power so slowly that I hardly noticed, until going up hills was as painful as a three-pack-a-day smoker climbing 10 flights of stairs.

I took the alleged car to two repair shops. The first one quoted me a price of $1,300 to fix it, approximately five times what I judged the car to be worth. The next shop suggested $1,600 would be an appropriate repair bill. Possibly taking pity on my sad facial expression (I was still in school and approaching dead broke) the fellow there suggested I take it to Kershaw Performance, an old-school shop that still operates here in Langley. The Kershaw mechanic poked his head under the hood, said he could maybe do something about it, and then took out a thin piece of steel rod, inserted it into the engine, and whaled on it with a ball peen hammer. After he dislodged the accumulated gunk, the car ran for another year before it succumbed to a new ailment. They charged me $25. The Stellar’s tale was not yet over, however. I put it up for sale, basically willing to accept any offer. A friend of a friend of a neighbour turned up and offered me $300 for the barely mobile vehicle, and I took it without haggling. He then gave me $150 — all in $5 bills that smelled suspiciously of cannabis — and drove it away.

After he was gone, I noticed that he had filled out part of the transfer papers incorrectly. I tried to call him, but for three days, he ducked my calls, probably because he didn’t want to pay me the remainder of the money. The next day, I got a call from the RCMP. Did I know that a car registered to me had sped away from a police stop, run over a stop sign and crashed into a ditch? Had the driver, now in cells, stolen my car? I explained the situation, and I swear I could hear the officer on the other end of the line roll her eyes when I mentioned the pile of $5 bills. The car was still legally mine, she said, and I could come down to the impound yard and pick it up if I wanted to pay the fee. Otherwise, it would be crushed into a cube. It would cost about $150 to get it back. I left it to its fate, and it has now likely been reincarnated as a crate of toasters. Matthew Claxton writes for the NOW’s sister paper in Langley, the Advance.

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Share your opinion on this column or anything else you read in The Tri-Cities NOW by sending a letter to the editor to editorial@thenownews.com, with “letter to the editor” in the subject line. We edit for taste, legality and length, and both letters to the editor and opinion columns may be reproduced on The Tri-Cities NOW website, www.thenownews.com.


LETTERS WE’RE ASKING THE WRONG QUESTION

On marijuana criminalization, we are still asking the wrong question. It should not be “Is marijuana harmful?” (it may well be) but rather “Is prohibition causing more harm that it cures?” (certainly, yes). I am in no way advocating for the use of drugs (I am an aging baby boomer; I don’t use drugs, don’t smoke and only occasionally even drink alcohol). However, the so-called “war on drugs” is a massive fraud on taxpayers, parents and the addicted. It causes much more harm than it cures. The “war” funds organized crime, funds terrorists and uses our taxes to pay thousands of police, lawyers and prison guards (financially, all on the same side as the criminals — ironic, huh!) and builds massive disrespect for the law amongst our young people and, for all that, does little to curb drug use. Cynicism also grows, because our youth well know that perhaps half of the baby boomers — today’s lawmakers — according to polls, experimented with marijuana or other drugs in their

youth (even if they didn’t inhale!). Under our so-called “justice,” the only reason those lawmakers are not rotting in jail is blind luck or money. As to the war on drugs, it is tough to think of any rational basis for the war, on at least four levels: 1. Cost/benefit: the perfect outcome would probably be that people didn’t use drugs. But that is not going to happen. Voltaire said, almost 250 years ago, “The perfect is the enemy of the good.” Well, that is what is happening here. Just saying “drugs are harmful” is really myopic. Of course they are — some more so than others, and some based on the individual and on the dosages and frequencies of use. But if the “remedy” is more harmful than the harm, then only a moron or a blind ideologue will persist in pursuing that failing remedy. 2. Principal: maybe we should step back and ask why we even have the prohibition on drugs. Admittedly, they can be harmful (although, with some, probably not to the level of political hype). But so are cigarettes and alcohol harmful (each killing thousands every year), and junk foods and cars that can drive at over 110 km/h (the maximum in Canada).

So why do we ban marijuana and not the others? Why does the government feel it must police the private activities of adults? It is really only ideology or the power of the vested interests, not any rational principal. 3. Supply/demand: the whole war on drugs is driven by the premise that if you control supply, you will beat the problem. But it is not supply-side driven — it is demand-side driven. And the war is not even working on supply — high school kids that I talk to tell me that it is easier to get all kinds of drugs in school than it is to get beer. As long as the demand exists, someone will supply it. As the “war” escalates, the illegal profits skyrocket, further increasing the motive to supply. Prohibition didn’t work with alcohol; why would it now? 4. Harm reduction: the theory seems to be that by trying to reduce supply, we are protecting the users or possible users. All that means is that there is no quality control. And the ideologues aren’t willing to fund adequate rehab services. So, in fact, the war is increasing the harm. I think that any complete analysis would show that if we diverted the massive funds now spent on police, courts and pris-

THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

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ons to education and rehab services, we would be both financially and socially much better off. The education approach has certainly worked with tobacco. The perverse and unintended consequence of the war against marijuana was to make everything much, much worse. And it is very clear to all who have any interest at all in the facts or evidence that this war cannot be won. Even the death penalty wouldn’t stop it — the gangs already live under a much more immediate threat of being shot — and drug prohibition doesn’t stop them. One can only hope that someday, our politicians will let research and reason prevail — but I’m not holding my breath, and certainly not with the ideologues in the Harper Conservatives. Ian MacLeod Richmond

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

13

COMMUNITY&LIFE

Local piper and drummer head to Worlds

PAIR WILL BE IN SCOTLAND ON AUG. 17 AND 18 AS PART OF SFU PIPE BAND’S ENTRY wanted to try it out. “It’s a little difficult to learn at the begineditorial@thenownews.com ning, but if you just stick with it, it just gets It may not be hockey, but these Canadian better,” he said. “There are lots of great teachers around.” boys sure do play their hearts out. This year marks the first time Techy will The Tri-Cities’ own Daryl Techy and Gavin MacRae are heading to Scotland this month be in the Grade 1 ranking for The Worlds in Scotland. Last year he competto compete in the World Pipe ed in Grade 3 where his group Band Championships (The won its division. Worlds). It’s his third time competing Techy and MacRae are part at such a level since his first of the famed Simon Fraser It’s a little showing as part of the Juvenile University Pipe Band, which difficult to band in 2009, when his team has won multiple world chamlearn at the placed fourth overall. pionships and is consistently “It’s something I look at as a ranked as one of the top piping beginning, but lifetime thing,” he said. “Once contenders worldwide. if you just stick you start you don’t ever really The two musicians are carrywith it, it just stop. You can’t just quit the ing on that tradition and will gets better. bagpipes.” be bringing their finely tuned MacRae is a snare drummer craft into the Grade 1 ranking, –Daryl Techy for the band and it is also his the highest competitive divfirst time going into the Grade ision at The Worlds. “I’m not so much nervous, just anxious 1 division. It might be daunting to some, but maybe,” Techy told the Tri-Cities NOW. “It’s a he finds it exciting to go back to Scotland for new venture going into Grade 1, so we’ll see another chance to compete on a world scale. “I’m really excited to play and [I’m] workhow it goes.” He is a piper for the band and has been ing hard so I play my best,” MacRae said. Last year MacRae won best lead drummer playing since he was seven years old when his mom took him to a concert of the same and his team did well in the 18 and under band he would end up joining, and he said he section.

Sam SMITH

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Daryl Techy, along with Gavin MacRae, is heading to Scotland this month to play in the World Pipe Band Championships as part of the acclaimed SFU Pipe Band. Following in his father’s footsteps — he played with the 78th Fraser Highlanders Pipe Band, the first Canadian band to win The Worlds — MacRae is practising hard so he can help his team bring home the championship. “I am a very competitive person so I strive to

achieve a very high level,” he said. Led by Pipe Major Terry Lee, the SFU Pipe Band will be heading to Scotland for the World Pipe Band Championships on Aug. 17 and 18. For more information, visit theworlds. co.uk.

Museum hosts centennial train trip to Mission TRAIN LEAVES FROM PORT MOODY

Jeremy DEUTSCH jdeutsch@thenownews.com The railroad, like in so many communities across Canada, played an integral part in developing Port Moody into what it is today. But as the country modernized, opportunities for most people to ride a train started to dwindle. Thanks to a donation and a celebration, though, residents will have a chance to ride the rails to raise funds for the Port Moody Station Museum. On Aug. 18, it will be all aboard for a train excursion from Port Moody to Mission on a Canadian Pacific Railway 1950s diesel train to celebrate the city’s centennial.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Passengers will ride a 1950s diesel train to celebrate Port Moody’s centennial.

There will be two trips leaving from Port Jim Millar, manager of the Port Moody Station Museum, noted CP doesn’t normally Moody and going to Mission, one in the morrun the cars, but has leant them out for the ning and one in the afternoon. A bus will complete the day for the occasion. other half of the trip, and the “Riding a train is an interentire excursion is expected to esting experience. There aren’t last about three hours. that many opportunities anyRiding a train is Tickets are $30 per person, more,” he told the Tri-Cities with the money going back to NOW. an interesting the museum as a fundraiser. “Riding on a train is someexperience. Kids and families are welthing that’s kind of hard to do There aren’t come, but given the vintage of these days.” It’s also rare to ride a train the train, there are accessibilthat many that will provide entertainment ity issues, and people are being opportunities as you board and disembark, as asked to call the museum to anymore. is planned for the event. arrange accommodations. Train conductors will also be Tickets are available at the –Jim Millar on hand to provide information museum, at 2734 Murray St., Station Museum on the trip to guests. and can be paid for by cash or “It should be fun,” Millar cheque only. said, adding it will be different than riding To learn more, visit portmoodymuseum.org the commuter West Coast Express. or call 604-939-1648.

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

COMMUNITY&LIFE

Port Moody library hosts the Great Smartini EDUCATOR AND MAGICIAN WILL ENTERTAIN MEMBERS OF THE SUMMER READING CLUB Aug. 8 at 1:30 p.m. in the Inlet Theatre for some magnificent monkey magic. “Smartini’s shows are spe-

cifically designed to both encourage, as well as teach, sound reading skills. Each of the magic tricks has its

own built-in reading related theme or lesson,” according to a press release from the library. Jeff Christensen (a.k.a. the Great Smartini) is a School District 43 educator who holds a master’s degree in language and literacy instruction from UBC.

Smartini has performed his award-winning magic for schools and libraries from Vancouver to Hope and most places in between. He has also attended the prestigious McBride Mystery School in Las Vegas, where he trained with magic legends Jeff McBride, Eugene Burger

and Max Maven. This program is suitable for kids five years and older. Registrationisnotrequired, so those interested in attending are asked to come early to ensure a good seat. For more information about this event, call the library at 604-469-4577.

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

CALENDAR

SATURDAY, AUG 3 Terry Fox Library plays host to ventriloquist

Kellie Haines from 11 to 11:45 a.m., with activities ranging from theatre, dance, singing and clowning. Free tickets are now available at the library, located at 2470 Mary Hill Rd. in PoCo. Tri-City Wordsmiths will hold their second meeting from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Poirier Branch of the Coquitlam Public Library, 575 Poirier St., Coquitlam. The area’s newest writing group will host guest speaker Daryl R. Stennett, a Sunshine Coast author who will speak about life as a self-published author, as well as reading from his book and signing copies. Info: 604-475-2875.

TUESDAY, AUG 6

Coquitlam Prostate Cancer Support and Awareness Group (PCCN Coquitlam) holds its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. at the Pinetree Community Centre, 1260 Pinetree Way in Coquitlam. All those involved with prostate problems are welcome to share their concerns and experiences in a strictly confidential atmosphere. There is no charge and donations are accepted. Info: Norm (604-936-8703) or Ken (604-936-2998). Art Focus Artists’ Association members Sherry Carroll and Eunice Hodge will have selected artworks placed on display at Port Coquitlam City Hall, located at 2580 Shaughnessy St. The works will be on display until Sept. 3.

WEDNESDAY, AUG 7 Terry Fox Library offers an evening storytime

event from 6:45 to 7:15 p.m. for preschool-aged kids and their families. Books, songs, fingerplays and flannel stories are offered as part of this free event. Info: 604-927-7999. Hyde Creek Watershed Society holds its

monthly general meeting at 7:15 p.m. at the Hyde Creek Education Centre and Hatchery, 3636 Coast Meridian Rd., PoCo. Member Isaac Nelson will share information about a recent UBC Fish Health Management workshop he attended. Everyone is welcome to this free event. E-mail hcws.info@gmail.com for info. Colony Farm Community Gardens Society invites children and parents to a potato dig from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Find out how potatoes grow, how they are harvested, and what critters — besides us — eat potatoes. Take a potato or two home, while the rest will be donated to the food bank. Meet at the pagoda visible from the south parking lot on Colony Farm Road. Event happens rain or shine. Info: 604-936-7423

THURSDAY, AUG 8 Port Coquitlam Heritage and Cultural

Society host a heritage garden walk starting at 10 a.m. Local historian Bryan Ness will lead participants through the city’s northside, and the group will be joined by members of the PoCo Garden Club as well. Meet at the Kinsmen Hall on Coquitlam Avenue at Aggie Park. For more info, call 604-927-8403 or e-mail pocoheritage1@gmail.com. The Inlet Theatre plays hosts to a performance by the Great Smartini, also known as Jeff Christensen, at 1 p.m. at 100 Newport Dr. in Port Moody. Smartini’s show, which is suitable for kids aged five and up, is meant to encourage and teach reading skills. No registration is required for this free event. Info: 604-469-4577.

FRIDAY, AUG 9 Colony Farm Community Gardens Society

invites gardeners and naturalists to join ecologist Elizabeth Elles in looking for wild pollinators in

the gardens from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Learn how you can help pollinators maintain their populations at this free event. Meet at the pagoda visible from the south parking lot on Colony Farm Road. Event will be cancelled in the event of rain. Info: www.cfcg.ca or 604-936-7423. Coquitlam RCMP host a Show ‘N’ Shine event from 9 a.m. to noon at the Poirier Recreation Complex, 633 Poirier St., Coquitlam. The RCMP’s Air One helicopter makes an appearance at 10 a.m. Demonstrations and displays offered by RCMP specialty sections and agencies such as Coquitlam Search and Rescue, B.C. Sheriff Service and Coquitlam Fire and Rescue Services. Coquitlam Public Library, Poirier Branch, hosts a seminar promoting the Helping Hands & Heart In-Home Care Services from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at 575 Poirier St. in Coquitlam. Learn about the services offered by Helping Hands and Heart, including post-operative care, pet care, laundry and housekeeping, meal planning and transportation services, among other things. To register, leave a message on the library’s registration line at 604-937-4155.

SATURDAY, AUG 10

Hyde Creek Watershed Society members host an invasive plant species removal event starting at 9:30 a.m. at the society’s education centre, located at 3636 Coast Meridian Rd. in PoCo. Bring work gloves and long pants. Info: 604-461-3474 or e-mail hcws.info@gmail.com.

SUNDAY, AUG 11

Riverview Horticultural Centre Society host a Catalpa and north end tree tour on the Riverview Hospital grounds at 1 p.m., leaving from the upper entrance of the Henry Esson Young Building. For a site map, visit

LIST YOUR EVENT:

Contact The NOW

Phone: 604-444-3451 Fax: 640-444-3460 Email: events@thenownews.com

www.rhcs.org. For more information, call 604290-9910.

TUESDAY, AUG 13

Terry Fox Library welcomes guitarist and renowned kids entertainer Tony Prophet from 2 to 2:45 p.m. at 2470 Mary Hill Rd. in PoCo. Enjoy singalongs to songs like “Splish Splash,” “Good Love” and “Cat Came Back” at this free event. Info: 604-927-7999.

THURSDAY, AUG 15 Eagle Ridge Hospital Auxiliary holds a

used book sale in the main lobby of the hospital, at 475 Guildford Way in Port Moody, from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Funds raised will go towards the purchase of equipment and patient comfort items for Eagle Ridge Hospital. Info: 604-5441470.

FRIDAY, AUG 16

Port Coquitlam Heritage and Cultural Society host a heritage walk at 6 p.m. beginning at Heritage at Leigh Square, 2100 – 2253 Leigh Square in PoCo. The downtown historical walk lead by Bryan Ness kicks off the Homecoming Weekend. Info: 604-927-8403 or pocoheritage1@gmail.com.

SATURDAY, AUG 17 Minnekhada Park Association hosts its fifth

annual Art in the Park event from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. This free event includes visual arts, live music, roving performers, arts and crafts workshops, a children’s area and great nature trails. For more information on the weekend-long event, see www.minnekhada.ca.

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SPORTSNOW THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

GOT SPORTS?

Contact Dan

Phone: 604-444-3094 Fax: 640-444-3460 Email: sports@thenownews.com

Tennis phenom transcends age barrier

Dan OLSON

A

sports@thenownews.com lmost two years shy of sweet 16, Rosie Johanson is enjoying success beyond her years. The teen tennis whiz has already been selected by Tennis Canada to train at its national training centre, and captured the Canadian under-16 national championship in March. Her win at the B.C. u-18 women’s championships in late June is just another feather in her cap. Coupled with a sparkling debut on the international stage and four wins out of six at a Junior Fed Cup event in May, all the recent results suggest things are pretty rosey for Johanson, who trains in Coquitlam. As she prepares to make the move to Montreal, the Grade 9 Abbotsford student says a big step in her improved results has come from a lot of work off the court. “It’s been a giant jump from before and a lot of my improvement has come through fitness,” said Johanson. “My fitness level is a lot better, I’ve got more agility, more stamina — I like going for long runs.” Long runs and lengthy travel itineraries have all come together due to her talents and determination on the court. The road to the u-16 Indoor National final wasn’t easy, as the soft-spoken but confident member of People’s Court Tennis Club/Global Tennis Academy of Coquitlam drew No. 1 seed Marie-Alexandre Leduc of Quebec. She handled the crowd favourite 6-3, 3-6, 6-3 in the quarterfinal and kept up that pace right to the final, beating No. 2-seed Katherine Sebov of Ontario 5-7, 6-1, 6-4 for the title. She followed that by placing second a week later in the u-18 nationals in Ontario, with 17year-old Leduc returning the favour. Buoyed by some nice results earlier in the year in Mexico and Central America on the International Tennis Federation (ITF) circuit, Johanson has created an impressive racquet resume — but even she is surprised at how things have turned out so far. “I don’t think I was expected to do well (at the nationals), but I was doing well at the time and had some nice ITF results so I just kept going,” she said. “I had momentum going but I was shocked at how well it went.” Her coach, however, wasn’t as shocked. “First of all, she has a perfect technique,” remarked Dimitri Penchev, a coach at People’s Court/Global Tennis Academy. “She’s very motivated, self-motivated, and many parents don’t understand how important that is. I knew she could do these things. I read that

LISA KING/NOW

Rosie Johanson’s progress through the tennis ranks defies her age, and she’s now training alongside Canada’s best in Montreal. (competitive) thinking in her eyes a long time admits that it is happening more and more ago.” frequently. “Rosie is a role model for all our It’s something others have noticed as well. up-and-coming rising stars.” She is a member of the Western Canada In 2012, Johanson debuted on B.C. Tennis’ National Training Centre, one of 12 players top-10 rankings as its youngest player. The u-14 provincial and u-16 selected to study under coach national champion had made Oded Jacob. a host of other top tourneys to Johanson has been playing the sport since the age of seven. attract the attention of Tennis The family emigrated from Canada. Rosie is a role England when she was eight and Coming into 2013, she set the signed her up at the Coquitlam model for all our bar high and went into her first ITF series unranked, requiring tennis facility soon after. Over up-and-coming her to qualify each time out. In the years she has been an ideal rising stars. Mexico, she marched right to pupil, said Penchev, earning a full club scholarship along the –Shayan Mirhosseini, the semifinals in her inaugural way. event, then fell just short of People’s Courts Her official hitting partner, qualifying for the tournament Tennis Club in El Salvador. Shayan Mirhosseini, is witness Demonstrating the feisty to how far she’s improved over bounce-back demeanour of her the years. “She has improved dramaticfavourite tennis player Serena ally. Mentally, she just loves to come here and Williams, Johanson responded by collecting play and I can see how important it is for her her first career ITF title with a huge win in the to try and beat me,” said Mirhosseini, who final stop in Guatemala.

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TAYLOR HURLS SILVER

Port Coquitlam pitcher Paige Taylor was as good as it gets on the mound last weekend. Taylor tossed a shutout for her Fraser Valley Fusion Rep A Girls under 16 fastball team against the favoured White Rock Renegades, leading her side to a 2-0, silver medal win. Last weekend’s tourney included 14 of the province’s best fastball teams, and the Fusion marched through the round robin with a 3-1 record thanks to wins over Richmond, Vancouver and Victoria. The club was tripped up by a 7-0 loss in the crossover bracket at the hands of the Renegades 97 team, but collected two more wins en route to silver: 9-7 over the Surrey Storm 97 and a 11-3 over the Surrey Storm 98 team.

She noted that the brief setback in El Salvador, like the loss at the u-18 nationals, was fuel for her next challenge. “It motivated me and made me want to win all the more,” she said. Penchev notes the Johanson family has bought into the commitment and sacrifices required to take tennis to its highest level, from commuting to Coquitlam from Abbotsford regularly, making the time and financial commitments required, and giving the coach the ability to do his job. “I’ve taught 28 years in three countries and what I’ve seen is that to be successful you need a triangle of support from player, coach and parents,” Penchev said. “She’s our messenger outside, that if people work hard and have outstanding support, success is possible.” That jump, while daunting, has the teen excited. “It’s going to be tough for sure,” she said of moving away from home. “I know my parents or I will be flying to meet up every six weeks, and if there’s a big tournament Tennis Canada will fly them in. I’m ready.”

OF DIAMOND PURSUITS

They’ve recently tasted success at the provincial level, and now they’re hungry for more on the national stage. Eight players out of Coquitlam Little League are currently in Thunder Bay, Ont. vying for Canadian bragging rights at the Canadian championships running through until Aug. 8. Players who made the trip alongside their FraserValleyCyclonesteammatesincludeAndrew Walton, Keegan Baldwin, Kyle Williamson, Ben McCarthy, Derek Fong, Allen Velten, Brett Honeysett, Sean Perry and Kyle Habkirk. The team of 15 and 16 year olds dropped their tourney opener 9-8 to the Quebec representatives from the Valleyfield Elites on Wednesday. McCarthy got the call on the mound, giving up five runs in the top of the first alone, while Honeysett tallied a pair of RBIs. Walton and Velten drove in a pair of runs as well. The Cyclones took on the host club from Thunder Bay on Thursday after NOW deadlines. The team won the B.C.s two weeks ago, after defeating the North Shore All-Stars 10-0 and 9-3.


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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

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Tri-Cities Now August 2 2013  

Tri-Cities Now August 2 2013

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