Page 1

INSIDE: Coast Mountain Dairy sold to Quebec’s Agropur

Pg. 5 T U E S D A Y

July 30, 2013

10

Huskers blinded by the Sun

 N E W S , S P O R T S , W E A T H E R & E N T E R T A I N M E N T  chilliwacktimes.com

Mounties not getting their man

BY TYLER OLSEN tolsen@chilliwacktimes.com

L

ocal Mounties aren’t always getting their man—especially if that person is stealing a car or lighting a fire. The Chilliwack RCMP have some of the lowest clearance rates in British Columbia, according to numbers released Thursday by Statistics Canada. Chilliwack’s weighted clearance rate was 18.69 in 2012, down 17 per cent from the previous year. That ranked Chilliwack 159th out of 168

Chilliwack RCMP clearance rate among the lowest in province policing jurisdictions in British Columbia. While Chilliwack’s clearance rate is below average, it’s not an anomaly—almost every other RCMP-policed Lower Mainland community, including Surrey, Burnaby, Coquitlam, Maple Ridge and Langley had scores within a couple percentage points. RCMP spokesperson Cpl. Len

vanNieuwenhuizen said local Mounties will take a hard look at the numbers to figure out why they’re clearing fewer crimes. “We look at clearance rates very seriously and we always want to better that clearance rate,” vanNieuwenhuizen told the Times. “We’re going to have to sit down and analyze that,” he said of the increase. “It’s never usually just

one issue or reason. It’s usually a culmination of reasons.” The Upper Fraser Valley Regional Detachment is responsible for policing duties between Chilliwack and the Fraser Canyon. Clearance rates within that region varied. Rural Chilliwack, which is categorized separately from the city proper, saw a drop in the police clearance rate that left it ranked 139th. But the District of Kent, which is also policed by the Upper Fraser Valley Regional Detachment, boasted an above-average clearance rate and was ranked 40th

in the province. Violent crimes are solved at a faster rate than non-violent incidents—it is often difficult to find a witness to property crime. But Chilliwack’s clearance rate declined for both violent and non-violent crime. Certain property crimes have been especially difficult to solve. The number of arsons in the City of Chilliwack climbed 74 per cent in 2012, with 86 reported over the course of the year. But not a single See CRIME, Page 7

Gym at CSS taken down

VIEW VIDEO with layar

Beginning of the end as demolition of school starts BY CORNELIA NAYLOR cnaylor@chilliwacktimes.com

C

An excavator pushes down one of the walls of the J.Y. Halcrow gymnasium at the old Chiliwack secondary school Monday.

See CSS GYM, Page 16

Premium Pre-Owned Vehicles at Live Market Pricing

06198229

Plumbing Service Department 8645 Young Street, Chilliwack 604-792-5151 www.jadamandsons.com

Cornelia Naylor/TIMES

hilliwack secondary school’s J.Y. Halcrow Gymnasium is no more. The old gym, once affectionately known as the old airplane hangar, was demolished Monday to be replaced by a suite of stateof-the-art athletic facilities at the new high school, scheduled to open this September. In a matter of hours, one big excavator had reduced a good bit of history to a pile of bricks, wood and twisted metal. The gym was opened in 1952, two years after construction on the rest of the school was complete. Lore has it the gym’s shell was a repurposed Second World War airplane hangar used to repair British and Canadian fighter planes in Vancouver during the war. And the gym’s original horse-hair floor (identical to one installed in UBC’s War

SHOP OUR ENTIRE PREOWNED INVENTORY NOW WITH

DL 5952

oconnordodgechrysler.com

Price 60¢


A2 TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

UNBELIEVABLE

SAVINGS

F F O % 0 4

CONTACT LENSES

24

$

FROM

99 99**

/BOX

(Box of 6)

**Minimum purchase of 2 boxes required

CONTACT LENSES

40

$

FROM

**

/BOX

(Box of 6)

**Minimum purchase of 2 boxes required

We carry all major brand contact lenses. See store for details and prices!


CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

Upfront What’s Layared in today’s paper Page 1 -

See a video of the start of demolition Monday at Chilliwack secondary.

Page 3 -

Link to Hungry for Life’’s website to learn more about the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner program.

Page 19 -

See more photos from Saturday’s tours of the Pacific Agrifood Research Centre in Agassiz.

This edition features exciting Layar technology. Layar uses your iPhone, iPad or Android smartphone or tablet to recognize images in the Times that have been enabled for augmented reality.To join the more than 28 million people who have downloaded Layar, visit layar.com or your app store and start scanning your newspaper today.

WEB EXTRAS The Times online

chilliwacktimes.com Real Estate Weekly

 You can find the valley’s premier real estate publication inside each Tuesday edition of the Chilliwack Times.

LOWEST UMMER PRICES ELLDOWN

2013

CCNA BLUE RIBBON

OF THE SEASON

LIKE SUMMER, THESE DEALS WILL NOT LAST.

Changing attitudes On the front lines of sexual assault in the Third World BY CORNELIA NAYLOR cnaylor@chilliwacktimes.com

A

group of local nurses trained to exam and treat victims of rape in the Fraser Health Region is travelling to Haiti as part of an effort to raise awareness about sexual assault in developing countries. Like many places wracked by natural or man-made disasters, Haiti saw a jump in sexual assaults after the January 2010 earthquake there. Besides rendering women and children less secure in practical ways, like destroying their homes and forcing them to live in tents, disasters like Haiti’s also spark spikes in rape and personal violence because of a sense of powerlessness among men, according to Debbie Davidson, one of the nurses traveling to Haiti. “Sexual assault is a crime of power not passion,” she told the Times. Davidson, whose day job is managing Chilliwack’s Waverly Seniors Village, is a registered psychiatric nurse who also has more than 35 years of experience working with sexual assault and family-violence survivors, starting at Chilliwack Community Services in the mid to late 1980s. Since 2000, she has worked as an on-call Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) for the Fraser Health Authority, collaborating with doctors, police and social services to provide examinations, treatment, forensic evidence and medical-legal reports for sexual assault victims. “It’s a very rewarding job,” Davidson said. “It’s hard to say you enjoy something like

Submitted photo

that because you’re dealing with people in crisis, but I think all of us who work with the program feel that we’ve got something to give. We do for them, really, what nobody else could do for them at that moment.” The idea of raising awareness about sexual assault in developing countries came from another nurse working in the SANE program. Jackie Edinborough had travelled to Kenya with the Chilliwack-based non-profit Hungry for Life and overheard a little girl saying her father had told her never to smile at a man because that would be asking to be raped. Edinborough explored the topic with a couple more kids and was soon convinced something needed to be done to combat misconceptions and superstitions around sexual assault in places like Kenya. Back in Canada, Edinborough, Davidson and several other SANE nurses developed a sexual assault awarenessraising program and planned a trip of their own. Teaming up with Hungry for Life, the group spent three weeks in Kenya last fall, presenting their program to both community leaders and kids, but they weren’t always allowed to get their message across as directly as they would have liked.

Members of the SANE Project (above) stop for a group photo during a 2012 trip to Kenya with the Chilliwack-based non-profit Hungry for Life to raise awareness about sexual assault. To empower kids, they handed out bracelets (left) that read “I believe I am strong.” “We weren’t allowed to actually mention sex in most of the communities that we talked to,” Davidson said, “so what our philosophy and our goal was going in was to help children and help teachers know how to support children and help them believe that they are strong.” Despite that somewhat indirect approach, however, they have learned their presentations have paid off. “Following our visit, we

“We do for them, really, what nobody else could to for them at that moment.” Debbie Davidson were informed that a young boy from one of the classes we spoke to disclosed that he was being sexually abused,” Davidson said. “The teachers and community that we spoke to were better able to support this young boy because of the education and resources we provided. His disclosure encouraged several other children to come forward, and the assailant was arrested.” Considering how impor-

VISIT WEBSITE with layar

tant it is for kids to feel empowered when it comes to escaping and reporting sexual abuse, Davidson said one of the most heart-wrenching experiences of the Kenya trip for her was learning many girls there drop out of school when they start to menstruate because they can’t afford feminine hygiene supplies. When the SANE team brought reusable sanitary napkins to give to one school, the girls there wept with gratitude. “They said, ‘Now we can keep up with the boys,’” Davidson said. “That was quite amazing. It’s things you don’t think about. You never think that something so simple would prevent these girls from getting an education.” After the Kenya trip, Davidson and her fellow nurses decided to make the SANE Project, as they have dubbed their work, a yearly thing. Their next trip, to Haiti, is planned for November, when they will again talk to community leaders and kids in an effort to raise awareness. One important message they hope to drive home is that, even with scarce

J. Adam & Sons Chilliwack Central

Chilliwack Alliance Church

Young Street South

03238364

J. Ad & Sonam s

Hocking Avenue

Young Street Station

A3

is your above ground pool headquarters

resources, communities can find ways to support victims and combat sexual violence. “Just having somebody in the community that has some knowledge and that can talk to them is going to reduce the trauma to that child or that woman who comes forward,” Davidson said. Although Haiti has a long history of sexual and genderbased violence, attitudes can change, Davidson said—she has seen it herself close to home. “Thirty years ago in Canada when a woman came forward or a child came forward and said that they had been sexually assaulted, the first question was, ‘Well, what did you do to bring this about on yourself?’” Davidson said. “We have changed our attitudes in Canada, but it started off slowly and it started off with education.” ◗ The SANE Project hosts a beach volleyball tournament fundraiser at the Mission Springs Pub Aug. 10. To enter a team (deadline is Aug. 3) or donate silent auction or prize items, call Lisa at 604-722-2994 or Debbie at 604-997-2379. For more information about the SANE Project’s Haiti trip, visit www. hungryforlife.org.


A4 TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

News

Moving up the list

So nice to come home to.

Chilliwack among top 10 real estate investment towns in B.C.

BY PAUL J. HENDERSON

phenderson@chilliwacktimes.com

T

he City of Chilliwack has been called “a hidden gem” and is listed among the top investment communities in the province, according to a new report. The Real Estate Investment Network’s (REIN) Top British Columbia Investment Towns report issued Thursday puts Chilliwack eighth in the province. “Chilliwack’s lower property values compared to the Fraser Valley and Lower Mainland have always been appealing, but rents had not crept up for properties to make sense here,” said Don R. Campbell, senior analyst for REIN. “Investors who know the city and do some digging can certainly find cash flowing properties

Paul J. Henderson/TIMES - file

A surge in residential construction is partly why Chilliwack was named the eighth top real estate investment town in B.C. here.” Previously Chilliwack had appeared among the list of “must watch” cities for real estate investment but had never made the top 10 list. The report points to a number of other studies and statistics, including the May Conference Board of Canada report entitled Mid-Sized Cities Outlook 2013, which found Chilliwack’s annual GDP increases of 6.2 per cent between 2005 and 2012 put it on a list of six cities that “literally roared out of the gate following the recession, expanding by more than five per cent in 2010 alone.”

Duncan was the only other British Columbia community on that list. Mayor Sharon Gaetz was happy to see the city’s inclusion on the top 10 list. “He t a l k e d a b o u t t h e things we have all known and are working towards,” she said Thursday. “What made me really excited is that the incremental steps are working. We for med CEPCO [Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation] to look at business attraciton and retention and he said See TOP 10, Page 7

bout Call now a ing our amaz cation o l e R E E R F Package! For more information or to arrange a tour, call 604.798.1594 8531 Young Road, Chilliwack

retirementconcepts.com

Enter to win† $10,000 for home renovations. OR ONE OF 28 SAMSUNG TVs

Come have a conversation with one of BCAA’s trusted insurance advisors and get the home insurance coverage that’s right for you. Get a quote by September 30, 2013, and you’ll be entered for a chance to win $10,000 for your home renovations or one of 28 Samsung TVs. For more information, visit your local BCAA Service Location. †No purchase necessary. Valid on new quotes June 17 – September 30, 2013. Visit bcaa.com/homecontest for full contest rules and regulations. Must be a B.C. resident and 19+ to enter. One prize of $10,000 and 28 TVs are available to be won. Home insurance is sold through BCAA Insurance Agency and underwritten by BCAA Insurance Corporation.


CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

A5

News

Yarrow dairy purchased C

anada’s biggest dairy company has purchased the Chilliwack producer of Sara’s Old Fashioned premium ice cream. Agropur Cooperative, a Quebec-based firm, will own Coast Mountain Dairy in Yarrow as of Aug. 1, according to an Agropur press release Thursday. Coast Mountain Dairy, a favourite stop for people on their way to Cultus Lake from the Lower Mainland, has been producing ice cream in Chilliwack since 1997. Besides Sara’s Old Fashioned ice cream, Coast Mountain is also the maker of the

Mountain Pride premium line of ice creams and Arctic Star, an economy line of ice cream and frozen desserts. This will be the second time the plant has changed hands this year. It was purchased by Deltabased ice-cream distributor TransCold Distribution in February. “We are very pleased with thisacquisition,”AgropurCEO, Robert Coallier said in the release. “The acquisition sees us add quality frozen products to our Island Farms selection, as well as continue to offer clients locally-produced, superior ice-cream products and

expand Agropur’s offering in this sector of activities in British-Columbia.” Founded in 1938, Agropur is an important player in the North American dairy industry, with 3,400 dairy producer-owners, 6,000 employees and $3.8 billion in sales. Agropur processes more than 3.3 billion litres of milk per year in its 28 plants across Canada and the United States, and boasts an expansive line of products, including Natrel, Québon, OKA, Farmers, Central Dairies, Sealtest, Island Farms, Agropur Grand Cheddar, Olympic and iögo.

BASEBALL TODDLER IN TRAINING

Paul J. Henderson/TIMES

Young Maddison Nerbas plays ball with umpire Mike Prill in between innings of a recent MIdget AAA Cougar baseball game at Fairfield Park.

CREDENZA BED • Folding bed • Credenza 64”w x 23.5” d • Bed opens to 83” long with a Memory foam mattress

GET PAID TO SHOP AT BIG O! SPEND OVER $100

YOU GET $3.00 + YOUR CHARITY GETS $1.50

SPEND OVER $300

YOU GET $8.00 + YOUR CHARITY GETS $4.00

SPEND OVER $500

YOU GET $15.00 + YOUR CHARITY GETS $7.50

START COLLECTING REWARDS RIGHT AWAY!!

HELP YOUR FAVOURITE CHARIT Y!

L R I W S i R U GET YO T A Y A D O T D CAR BIG O TIRES!

VIEW WITH

45873 Wellington Avenue

GALLERY

604-391-0424

www.ballamfurniture.com

A Division of Ballam Furniture

@ChilliwackTimesNews all you need to know in 140 characters!

CUSTOMER APPRECIATION DAY & SENIORS DAY

HELP YOUR WALLET & YOUR CHARITY CHILLIWACK’S BEST TIRE STORE

FOR TIRES, WHEELS, BRAKES, ALIGNMENTS, OIL CHANGES, BATTERIES, SHOCKS AND MORE.

Both Mechanical and Tire Shop Open Monday - Saturday 8am - 5:30pm

2013

16 time Winner

The Bedroom

3 MONTHS FREE FINANCING AVAILABLE

Watch video with layar

www.mybigotires.com

WEDNESDAY

JULY 31ST NOW

20

ALMOST EVERYTHING OFF IN THE & DOUBLE REWARD POINTS ON ALL ‘PHARMASAVE’ PRODUCTS STORE BLOOD PRESSURE CLINIC

%*

10am - 2pm

*Some exceptions apply, including prescriptions & sale items. See store for details.

H e a l t h c e n t r e

9193 Main St. CHILLIWACK

604-792-1240


A6 TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

2013 FORD FIESTA

2013 FORD F150 Super Crew, 4x4, FX4 Stk#85-3336

5-Door SE Hatch Stk#85-7029

MSRP

Ford Employee Price Adjustment Delivery Allowance PRICE ADJUSTMENT

2013 F150 XLT

$20,999 - $1,455 - $2,750 - $4,205

YOUR FORD EMPLOYEE PRICE *

MSRP

$59,549

PRICE ADJUSTMENT

- $7,008 - $6,750 - $13,758

Ford Employee Price Adjustment Delivery Allowance

YOUR FORD EMPLOYEE PRICE *

Super Crew, 4x4, 5.0L Stk#85-3342

MSRP

$46,849

PRICE ADJUSTMENT

- $5,230 - $7,250 - $12,480

Ford Employee Price Adjustment Delivery Allowance

YOUR FORD EMPLOYEE PRICE

$16,794

$45,791

$34,369*

Includes freight & air tax $1,650

Includes freight & air tax $1,750

Includes freight & air tax $1,750

OVER 100 2013 FORD F150’S AVAILABLE

LARGEST STOCK IN THE VALLEY

0.99% LEASE RATE STILL APPLIES!

Never Open on Sundays CHILLIWACK

SALES • LEASING • PARTS • SERVICE

45681 Yale Road West, Chilliwack 604-792-1361 • 1-888-386-3366 DLN 30898

See www.chilliwackford.com for complete inventory

• TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE *See store for details on all offers. Taxes and $499 documentation fee extra.


CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

News

Local crime rate steady

BY TYLER OLSEN tolsen@chilliwacktimes.com

T

he level of crime in Chilliwack remained relatively steady in 2012, according to Statistics Canada figures released Thursday. A total of 8,446 criminal code violations were reported in Chilliwack in 2012, leaving the crime rate unchanged from the previous year. But while the frequency of violent crime offences actually dropped by three per cent in 2012, Statistics Canada’s crime severity index (CSI)—which assigns weights to certain crimes based on their seriousness—rose by 1.78 per cent. Both the violent and nonviolent CSI exhibited such an increase. Chilliwack’s CSI remains w e l l a b ov e t h e B r i t i s h Columbia index—itself significantly higher than the Canadian number. The seriousness of crime in Chilliwack was below that of the municipalities of Kelowna,

Violent crime in Chilliwack dropped; property crime rose. Victoria and the City of Langley. Crime fell in a variety of areas—particularly that of assaults, which accounts for more than one-third of all violent crimes committed in Chilliwack. The city saw 472 level 1 assaults reported in 2012, down five per cent from the previous year. The number of level 2 assaults—which feature a weapon or bodily harm (but aren’t considered

407 vehicle thefts CRIME, from page 1 one of those cases was cleared by police. VanNieuwenhuizen said there is rarely a witness to arsons—which rarely involve structures. After last year’s jump, the number of arsons in 2013 is down 31

Chilliwack is doing it right TOP 10, from page 4 that is working.” While Chilliwack’s inclusion on the list has to be considered good news, it is third out of the four Fraser Valley cities. Surrey came in number one on the REIN list. Abbotsford was two spots ahead of Chilliwack in sixth and Langley was 10th. The REIN report pointed to a number of development’s in Chilliwack as a reason for inclusion on the list, including expansion of commercial and industrial lands along Highway 1 and the Evans Road corridor.

“aggravated”)—dropped by nearly a third, with 108 reported last year. Overall, violent crime was down by three per cent from the previous year. Reports of impaired driving also dropped by more than a quarter from the previous year, with 229 incidents reported in 2012. Those led to 121 charges being laid. RCMP spokesperson Cpl. Len vanNieuwenhuizen attributed the drop to

per cent from last year, he said. On average, a car was stolen in Chilliwack every day, as 407 vehicle thefts were reported in Chilliwack in 2012. That was an increase of 12 per cent over the previous year. Police, however, found it difficult to crack those cases, with just 18 of those thefts solved and only six people charged in connection with the reported

Another is affordable house pricing, lower property taxes, access to points east, west and south, and the work done at Canada Education Park. “Chilliwack is poised to become home to numerous post-secondary institutions, which will provide the city with a continuous supply of student renters,” the report says. “The city is expected to see 5,000 [students] enrol at Chilliwack’s UFV campus and there is no telling how many students will be enrolled at various programs in Canada Education Park when the project is complete.” The positive light on Chilliwack comes despite the city’s relative isolation for a city of its size. The report

TIMES file

drinking-driving legislation imposed two years ago that allows for immediate roadside prohibitions. The total property crime rate increased by six per cent. The break-and-enter rate climbed four per cent, shoplifting was up seven per cent and mischief was up 12 per cent. More than 1,000 thefts from vehicles were reported last year, an increase of 14 per cent. That, vanNieuwenhuizen said, underscores the need for residents to take care of their personal belongings. “We need people to be more attentive to the fact that they can’t leave things in vehicles,” he said. In contrast to Chilliwack, the District of Kent saw anacross-the-board improvement in the level of crime in that community. Kent’s crime severity index dropped by nearly a quarter, to 84.21, lower than the provincial index. The violent crime CSI dropped by more than a third, while the non-violent index fell by 18 per cent.

crimes. (Ten of the cases were “cleared otherwise,” suggesting police opted not to lay charges in those incidents). VanNieuwenhuizen said those numbers may reflect the fact that Mounties may only have sufficient evidence to charge prolific criminals with one or two car thefts when, in fact, they believe the offender to be responsible for many more.

implies that a transit link to Abbotsford and beyond could further put Chilliwack “on the map.” Real Estate Investment Network top 10 B.C. investment communities:

1. Surrey 2. Maple Ridge 3. Fort St. John 4. Dawson Creek 5. Kamloops 6. Abbotsford 7. Kelowna 8. Chilliwack 9. Prince George 10. Langley

A7

VIEW MORE WITH

CSA WORK BOOT

CASCADE SUPPLY & MARINE LTD.

46108 Airport Rd. Chilliwack 604-792-1381 or 1-800-663-2269

www.cascademarine.com

HOURS: Mon-Fri 8:00am-6:00pm • Sat 8:00am-5:00pm

ECM Strata Management Managing Strata & Rental properties since 2000 • Professional service • Qualified staff • Affordable rates • No hidden charges • 100% Transparency • Proactive ph 604.855.9895 fax 604.855.9825 www.ecmstrata.com info@ecmstrata.com

HEARING AIDS

latest technology from Phonak.

from

795

$

HEA

FREE Hearing Test Professional Service

We welcome VAC, DBA & NIHB

DIRECT HEARING 604-846-4601 45668 Storey Ave. Chilliwack

$10 OFF

10

$

VEDDER RD. LOCATION ONLY

OFF ANY OIL CHANGE SERVICE

7854 VEDDER ROAD

604.847.3455

“Rectifying the city’s nonconnectedness to other cities would be game-changing for Chilliwack,” the report concludes. For Gaetz, inclusion on a top-10 list of real estate investment communities means Chilliwack isn’t only a good place to buy property, it’s a good place to live, work, play and set up business. The “surge” in residential construction in recent years has helped to propel the city onto the list, particularly the relatively decent rebound since the recession. While the report is broadly positive, there is mention of the lack of revitalization in the downtown core, which the author says has been left “in the realm of the disenfranchised.”

®

Freedom All Terrain ONLY

139

$

MSRP $299

CHOOSE FROM 2 STYLES - AS SHOWN OR WITH BASKET UNDER SEAT. BOTH JUST $139 EACH!

locally owned & operated | community focused non-corporate environment

6640 Vedder Rd., Sardis • 604.847.3496

It’s like winning an Oscar 12 years straight. Being voted best collision repair in Vancouver 12 years in a row is an honour – and proof that our quality, service and exclusive AIR MILES® reward miles at all 28 of our BC shops have made an impression. We thank our customers for so many encores. And expect our future performances to be even better.

®™ Trademark of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under licence by LoyaltyOne, Inc. and Craftsman Collision Ltd.

@craftsmanshops

HE


A8 TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

Opinion

◗ Our view

Who we are

Drownings are all too common

The Chilliwack Times is a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership.We’re published Tuesdays and Thursdays from 45951 Trethewey Ave., Chilliwack, B.C. ◗ Publisher

T

Nick Bastaja

nbastaja@chilliwacktimes.com ◗ Editor

Ken Goudswaard

kgoudswaard@chilliwacktimes.com

◗ Administration Shannon Armes ◗ Classifieds Arlene Wood ◗ Advertising Jeff Warren Brian Rumsey Marni de Boer ◗ Editorial Paul J. Henderson Tyler Olsen Cornelia Naylor ◗ Distribution Lisa Ellis Brian Moffat Anja Kim ◗ Contact us Switchboard 604-792-9117 Classified 604-795-4417 Delivery (24hrs) 604-702-5147 Fax 604-792-9300 Visit our website www.chilliwacktimes.com Twitter @ChilliwackTimes Facebook www.facebook.com/pages/ chilliwack-times Email us editorial@chilliwacktimes.com Send us a letter 45951 Trethewey Ave. Chilliwack, B.C. V2P 1K4

www.layar.com

◗ Opinion

The Stellar wasn’t quite I had to take the car (I’ve owned it long enough for a simple definite article) through AirCare this week, for the last time. It got a simple pass after they hooked up its electronic guts to a computer and determined it had been a good little engine for the past two years. They printed out my pass form on the last dot matrix printer in B.C. and sent me away. It’s the last time I’ll have to get the car AirCared, as the program is ending as of this year. That will feel strange. I’ve been driving cars through AirCare testing bays ever since I started driving. The program started in 1992, two years before I got my licence. My cars and AirCare have seldom been friends. Like most of us, I owned a series of early vehicles that teetered on the line between “car” and “pile of rolling metal.” My worst car was a 1988 Hyundai Stellar. Never heard of the Stellar? That’s because of its painful failure to live up to its name. A small four-door sedan, it’s main selling feature was the very small amount of money I paid for it. It took me to and from college and survived almost through a full year of my first postschooling job. Even before its untimely death, it had seen the white light at the end of the tunnel a few times. It’s most impressive near-death experience was its black lung disease. Apparently, for the entire life, the exhaust system had been

MATTHEW CLAXTON

Be Our Guest building up deposits that were slowly choking the engine to death. The car started losing power so slowly that I hardly noticed, until going up hills was as painful as a three-pack-a-day smoker climbing 10 flights of stairs. I took the alleged car to two repair shops. The first one quoted me a price of $1,300 to fix it, approximately five times what I judged the car to be worth. The next shop suggested $1,600 would be an appropriate repair bill. Possibly taking pity on my sad facial expression (I was still in school and approaching dead broke) the fellow there suggested I take it to Kershaw Performance, an old-school shop that still operates here in Langley. The Kershaw mechanic poked his head under the hood, said he could maybe do something about it, and then took out a thin piece of steel rod, inserted it into the engine, and whaled on it with a ball peen hammer. After he dislodged the accumulated gunk, the car ran for another year before it succumbed to a new ailment.

They charged me $25. The Stellar’s tale was not yet over, however. I put it up for sale, basically willing to accept any offer. A friend of a friend of a neighbour turned up and offered me $300 for the barelymobile vehicle, and I took it without haggling. He then gave me $150—all in $5 bills that smelled suspiciously of cannabis—and drove it away. After he was gone, I noticed that he had filled out part of the transfer papers incorrectly. I tried to call him, but for three days, he ducked my calls, probably because he didn’t want to pay me the remainder of the money. The next day, I got a call from the RCMP. Did I know that a car registered to me had sped away from a police stop, run over a stop sign, and crashed into a ditch? Had the driver, now in cells, stolen my car? I explained the situation, and I swear I could hear the officer on the other end of the line roll her eyes when I mentioned the pile of $5 bills. The car was still legally mine, she said, and I could come down to the impound yard and pick it up if I wanted to pay the fee. Otherwise, it would be crushed into a cube. It would cost about $150 to get it back. I left it to its fate, and it has now likely been reincarnated as a crate of toasters. ◗ Matthew Claxton is a reporter with the LangleyAdvance.

here has been a spate of drownings in recent weeks in British Columbia. So far this year, 43 people have drowned in the province, almost twice as many as at the same time last year. The Lifesaving Society of B.C. and the Yukon keeps track and said drowning numbers are rising over the long term. No one should have to avoid going to B.C.’s lakes and waterways. In addition to offering stunning scenery and recreation opportunities, they can be vital during hot spells and provide places for people to cool off, but B.C. lakes, rivers, creeks and watercourses are also places where people can get into trouble. Swimming in a lake is different from swimming in a pool. Bodies of water have their own currents, and lake and river water levels change throughout the year. The temperature of natural water bodies is usually colder, as well. People can’t assume that, because a lake site or other waterfront spot is public, there will be help at hand. Cutbacks have meant there are few lifeguards at public lakes and swimming spots around B.C. And it takes time for emergency crews to get to these spots. As has been shown, a person can drown or get into serious trouble even when surrounded by hundreds of people. Often, by the time a person realizes he or she is in trouble, there is neither energy nor voice to summon help. Always use safety gear in or near water, keep the booze at home, and before any risky behaviours or extreme adventures, always assume you are not as good a swimmer/diver/boater as you imagine.

◗ Your view This week’s question Do you think Chilliwack residents should vote for Cultus Lake Park Board commissioners? VOTE NOW: www.chilliwacktimes.com


CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

A9

Letters

Make Tyson Road stop signs bigger Editor: Dear mayor and council: As a taxpayer I am addressing you today to ask you to revisit the apparent decision of someone at city hall to (reportedly) spend $2 million on the round-about at Tyson and Keith Wilson roads. $2 million! You cannot be serious. There is nothing in this world that could justify spending this amount of money on one intersection. There must be a more affordable alternative. If carefree and stupid young people running the stop signs is the justification, then bigger stop signs could be a much cheaper alternative. I might add that I have personally observed older people also running the stop signs. For these folks I suggest really big stop signs. Double the fines for those with Ns on their vehicles. This money would be far more justifiable if spent to widen the last congested two-lane section of Vedder Road at the Thomas Road intersection. Has totally destroying homeowner property values on Tyson Road become an unwritten policy of City of Chilliwack? No, I do not live on Tyson Road and I am sure glad I don’t after the Evans Road performance. What has been done to this peaceful neighbourhood is a disgrace! And stupid. And unnecessary. In closing I want to remind you that in the real world, $2 million is a lot of money. It is not your money. It is ours. Please do not let this irresponsible and negligent runaway project continue without a severe and compelling look at alternative solutions. Please tell me the same thing is not being considered at Tyson and Watson. Richard Thompson Chilliwack (Editor’s note: The Tyson roundabout project involes two roundabouts: one at the Tyson/Keith Wilson intersection and one at the Tyson/ Watson intersection.)

Roundabouts are treacherous Editor: Mr. Giesbrecht (“Reconsider roundabouts” July 23, 2013 Times) is spot on: I drove pass the home on Keith Wilson and Tyson whose yard is being expropriated, good on you for leaving that part of your front yard for the city to mow. I then noticed the city is cutting into the Agricultural Land Reserve on Watson and Tyson roads for yet another traffic circle. They are also expropriating the Mount Slesse school yard that has gas lines and who knows what else.

Send us a letter TO INCLUDE YOUR LETTER, use our online

form at www.chilliwacktimes.com, contact us by e-mail at editorial@chilliwacktimes.com, fax 604-792-9300 or mail us at 45951 Trethewey Ave, Chilliwack, B.C. V2P 1K4. Letters must include first and last names and your hometown and should be fewer than 200 words. To view our letters/privacy policy visit our website at www. chilliwacktimes.com.

As we were told in the article on July 18, this is going to be a heck of a lot more costly then expected. Duh? Ya think city planner and council? Has this city gone circle crazy? Who is this planner that is bent on beating Abbotsford for the most roundabouts in the most stupidest of places. I would like the city council (without aid of any security) to ride a bike or try and cross the street at the roundabout on Evans and Yale Road West during rush hour. It is like taking your life in your hands and hoping for the best. I know, I have done it. That traffic circle does not even have the foot or bike traffic that the corner of Tyson and Watson has due to the proximity of a junior high and elementary school. Keith Wilson and Tyson is a very popular road for foot traffic and bikes as well and, again, traffic circles are not pedestrian or bike friendly. They aren’t meant to be, they are meant to keep traffic moving, which in turn means car has the right of way and not the guy pushing the baby buggy. What are you thinking city council? And since you said it’s cheaper, give us the total cost and not a guesstimate since you said traffic circles are more cost effective. It was mentioned it will cost more now to move gas, water and electrical lines? Not to mention removal of land taxes and ALR from expropriated home yards and fields. Is it cheaper and safer than a stoplight that is triggered by traffic or pedestrian? I doubt it, and so would the Chilliwack taxpayers that are footing the bill. Why is there not a townhall meeting on this? Why are the logging trucks and gravel trucks that use this corridor not considered? One bad turn and there is a load of logs going into someone’s home, on someone’s car or someone and their child. P. Szerencsi Chilliwack

Unneighbourly rock practice Editor: Some neighbours don’t know about consideration for others: a dense housing area is that a place for

a rock band? Amp full out, windows open, drums, guitar, etc. makes our house shake so loud in our living space we cannot hear the TV wearing earplugs. We must keep windows closed year round. We are retired, lived here for years. Imagine old folks enjoying a living amidst a loud rock concert. We spoke to the father, asked him to tell his son to tone it down, he did reluctantly once. Who cares about neighbours? Asking sonny to turn down the amp or closing his window is too much to ask I guess. Solution for you, soundproof area. Other neighbours are bothered, but want no involvement. All are subjected to excessive noise for hours, why? We are viewed by neighbour as cranky old vipers. High noise level for neighbours? Who cares? Thank you so much for your consideration, neighbour. Maria Berry Promontory

Summer means more bicycles Editor: It’s summer. That means people will be out and about commuting. Vehicles everywhere, pedestrians everywhere. However, I want to remind everyone about bicycles. As the gas prices have risen, I have taken up biking to work and around town for the summer. While it’s cheaper, I also find it’s quite dangerous as other vehicles don’t respect, or simply don’t know the rules, that bicycles follow. Please understand that bicycles are technically a vehicle and can ride on the roads. To maintain our safety, we are allowed to ride up to a meter away from the curb to keep people from trying to pass us in the same lane. We do this because if we get too close to the curb, if a vehicle tries to pass us, we may fall off the edge or run into the curb. When making left turns, we will signal and get into

traffic. We will take the turn with the other vehicles who are also making a left turn (in a line, of course). We will watch to make sure we aren’t pulling in at an unsafe distance, but we will pull in, so please do a favour and watch for us too. If it’s dark, and two bikers are biking, we are able to take up a whole lane. We will have lights, so please pass us as you would any other vehicle. It is about safety. Please watch for us bikers! We want to share the roads with you. Please visit www.icbc. com/news/2011may26-04 for an ICBC notice on helping keep bicycle riders safe (for vehicle drivers and bicyclists). Jordan Peters Chilliwack

ONE DAY ONLY! SUNDAY, AUGUST 4*

Amazing and honest people Editor: I find the people featured in the Times’ articles interesting. There is the sex offender who looks so miserable, then the mom of the year nominee Susie V. who looks so happy with her lovely daughter, Holli. There is no picture of the bank robber, but I imagine he looks pretty miserable too. Just goes to say a life a crime doesn’t pay; it just makes everyone including yourself miserable. There are people who make our community a better place and those who make it worse. We choose which one we want to be. There are a lot of good people in Chilliwack. To the person who returned my stolen purse and all of you out there who are making Chilliwack a better place by volunteering and/or just generally being decent and honest, thank you so much. Life is so much more pleasant for everyone when our community is safe. Moneca Savoie Chilliwack

Hot Seat Drawings: 2 - 6 pm

7 pm Grand Prize Drawing: $10,000 CASH – 1 Winner

Special Prizes for Earned Points! WHILE SUPPLIES LAST!

Details at the Rewards Club Center

Get

Player-Bucks and Cash-Back Points! We Pay You To Play. UP TO

*

Horse poop on the Rotary Trail Editor: What’s with the horse poop on the Vedder River Rotary Trail? Over the five kilometres between the three- and eight-kilometre markers [I found] at least 90 horse poop piles to avoid stepping into. That’s 18 poop piles per kilometre. Not nice. Len & Marilyn Wiens Chilliwack

Every Half-Hour, 2 – 8 pm AUGUST 8 GRAND PRIZE

Owned by Upper Skagit Indian Tribe

AUGUST 15 GRAND PRIZE

AUGUST 22 GRAND PRIZE

Display vehicles courtesy of Blade Chevrolet, Mount Vernon. Photos are representative of prize makes and models; colors, trim levels and options may vary.

.3 6-0 5: ,79: *2/ ( :;'<85=9:+1)4 ( 877-275-2448 Casino opens at 9 am daily. Must be 21 or older with valid ID to enter casino, buffet or attend shows. *Must be a Rewards Club Member – Membership is FREE! Must be present to win. Skagit PlayerCPP Bucks are non-transferable and cannot be redeemed for cash. Management reserves all rights.


A10 TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

Sports

Tyler Olsen

Phone: 604-792-9117 • E-mail: tolsen@chilliwacktimes.com • Fax: 604-792-9300

On deck

Sailing courses

The Cultus Lake Sailing Club offers sailing course sessions for both adults and children/youth throughout the summer. The kids courses are week-long day camps where the focus is fun and safety while learning the basics of sailing. All courses cover water safety, terminology, knots and sailing skills and are taught by Sail Canada certified coaches. For more information phone 604-858-8678 or visit www. cultuslakesailing.com.

Lacrosse camp

The Chilliwack Minor Lacrosse Association hosts a summer camp Aug. 10 to 11 from 6 to 8 p.m. This fun, athletic camp allows kids who have never picked up a stick, as well as those who have played for years, to learn and improve their skills and develop a love of lacrosse. Cost is $30 for players aged four and five (two hours/day) and $40 for players six and up (four hours/day). Registration for the camp takes place at Waves Coffee House (Garrison Village 1-45560 Market Way) Aug. 1 and Tim Hortons (45837 Yale Rd.) July 30.

Chief school

The Chiefs Hockey School returns Aug. 12 to 16 at Prospera Centre. Current and former players, as well as Chiefs head coach and general manager Harvey Smyl and assistant Coach Doug Ast, will put the players through their paces both on and off the ice. Camps are available for players aged seven to 14. There is also an evening conditioning camp for midget and junior players. Register in person at the Chiefs office (Monday to Thursday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.) or at www.chilliwackchiefs.net.

Gary Nylander/The Daily Courier

Husker running back Ty DeRayos looks for an opening during first quarter BCFC action at the Apple Bowl during the Okanagan Sun’s home opener Saturday.

Huskers’ super start fizzles fast to the Sun BY TYLER OLSEN tolsen@chilliwacktimes.com

T

he Valley Huskers opened their season Saturday with a bang. The thing about bangs, though, is they don’t last very long. On their opening possession, the Huskers drove 92 yards through the Okangan Sun defence en route to a Danton Nagorski rushing touchdown and a 7-0 lead. It was an exciting start to a year during which the Huskers franchise hopes to find respectability. But the ensuing three quarters showed there is much work to be done. The Sun took over the game and led 37-10 at halftime, with kicker Daniel Erickson scoring the Huskers’ last points of the game on a 36-yard field goal. The final score was 65-10. Huskers head coach Tyson St. James

said once things started going wrong for Valley in the second quarter, the problems—and the miscues—seemed to snowball. “We had a couple real big mistakes on the field and all of a sudden our guys get back to last year or the year before,” he said. “A couple of mistakes happened and all of a sudden it kind of steamrolled, and it seemed like we couldn’t get back from that.” Those mistakes also underscored the fact that the Huskers remain a young team that is still rebuilding. But despite the outcome, St. James said he saw plenty of bright spots. “I was really happy with a lot of things,” he said. St. James said he saw “a lot more progress than we were able to make last year at this time.” Defensive coverage was a big problem, but one that St. James said can be fixed. And bad snaps frequently

put the offence in a bind—the final scoresheet saw the Huskers fumbling the ball eight times, four of which were recovered by the opposition. Otherwise, St. James said, the Huskers offence showed plenty of spark. In his first full game behind centre in the league, receiver-turned-quarterback Cody Parray completed 17 of 22 passes. Most were of the shorter variety—Parray finished with 96 yards passing. But the overall performance left his coach pleased. “Cody had a real good game. I’m really encouraged by his poise in there and what he brings to the team,” St. James said. “The guys really rally around him and I’m excited to see what he’s able to do this season.” Ty DeRayos led all receivers with 40 yards on eight catches. And running back Josh Hayden had a good game, finishing with 75 yards on nine carries.

The Huskers will play their home opener this Saturday at 1 p.m. at Townsend Park against the Kamloops Broncos. (The Huskers’ normal home at Exhibition Field has been dug up to allow for the installation of turf). The hosts should have a chance at evening their record. Last season, the Huskers beat Kamloops in their final game. And the Broncos suffered a similarly difficult start to their season, falling 51-0 to the Langley Rams. If the Huskers can make their opponents work for their points, they’ll have a shot at extending their home winning streak to two games. “We’re working on the film right now, evaluating what personnel we want to have on the field, and eliminating the mistakes because we’re giving away points that I don’t think are necessarily being earned by the other team,” St. James said.

The Jolly Miller “Where Friends Meet” Pub and Liquor Store 2012

Mexican Mondays 6-10pm

Wing Night

Tuesdays 6-10pm

$2 Burger & Music by Murphy’s Lagh

Wednesdays

5865 Vedder Road • 604-858-3505

Prawn Thursdays 6-10pm

BBQ 8oz NY Steak

Fridays 4-10pm

Chilliwack’s Largest Liquor Store Open 7 Days a Week

Liquor Store Hours: 9am-11pm 7 Days A Week Pub Hours: Mon-Sat 11am-1:00am • Sun 11am - Midnight


CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

VIEW WITH

Sports

F6SMHA

Shortlisted for Team BC

C

hilliwack’s Ryan Bowen has been named to the shortlist for Team BC’s U16 squad. Bowen was one of 16 forwards named to the shortlist. Coaches will select a dozen players from the list to lead Team BC’s offence at the 2013 Western Canada U16 Challenge Cup in October. The under 16 program is designed as an introduction to BC Hockey’s high performance program, which exposes players, coaches and officials to short-term competition. The U16 program also acts as a precursor to the B.C. hockey high performance U17 program, which is used to identify

4 STROKE OUTBOARD

SALE PRICE

C/WPDI

CASCADE SUPPLY & MARINE LTD.

46108 Airport Rd. Chilliwack 604-792-1381 or 1-800-663-2269

www.cascademarine.com

HOURS: Mon-Fri 8:00am-6:00pm • Sat 8:00am-5:00pm

Submitted

Ryan Bowen of Chilliwack has made the shortlist for Team BC’s U16 squad. Bowen has already been drafted by Moose Jaw Warriors of the WHL.

in are a p h c u m How

58

S E C I R P S A MILES PER RISING G you? GALLON WILL HELP giving

YOU FEEL BETTER!

Don’t spend any more of your hard earned cash than you have to at the pumps - NOW IS THE TIME to trade in your GAS-GUZZLER for a FIAT 500 UP TO 58 MPG! Think how much you could SAVE in your NEW FIAT!

Great for Back to School

2 DOOR FIAT 500 HATCH or the brand new 4 DOOR FIAT 500L HATCH STYLISH & SAFE Rated best for safety

FUN but PRACTICAL

ZERO DOWN plus

Space for up to 5 plus luggage

NO PAYMENTS for 6 MONTHS

AFFORDABLE to BUYFINANCE FROM

from $13,995 or $88 bi-weekly

ECONOMICAL to RUN

Drive over 600km on a $56 fill-up

0

%

1679

$

and train players and team personnel for provincial, regional and national teams. The Western Canada U16 Challenge Cup takes place every second year. It is a round-robin format tournament consisting of teams from B.C., Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Earlier this year, Bowen was selected by the Moose Jaw Warriors in the WHL Bantam Draft.

! H C OU

Great for Commuters

A11

Don’t pay a penny til 2014 (oac)

OAC

GET up to $10,000 CASH Just in time for school fees! (oac)

The money you save in fuel could pay for your NEW FIAT! PLUS GET A 51" HDTV WITH ANY NEW 2012 FIAT See what our customers say at www.fiat.ca - It’s FIAT-abulous here! HOURS: 22856 Lougheed Hwy., Maple Ridge, BC V2X 6P6

1.800.NEW.FIAT

MON - THURS 8:30am -7:30pm FRI & SAT 8:30am - 6:00pm SUNDAY 10:00am - 5:00pm DL : 31062

Limited time offer subject to change or extension without notice. Vehicle price is net of all rebates and based on 2013 Fiat 500 Pop Stk # FH111241 financed at 4.99% over 96 months with $0 down. Total interest $2,991.Total paid $16,979. Offer acceptance conditions (OAC) apply – 0% interest offer is based on a 36 month term. Cash back if required is added to vehicle purchase price. Interest is accrued on “no payments for 6 months” and added to the loan. Tank of fuel based on 40 litres at $1.40 per litre. Fuel consumption figures provided by Fiat Canada.


A12 TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

Warehouse

5

CHILLIWACK FRI

THUR

SAT

SUN

MON

DAYS ONLY Sale ends Monday 5pm

ar eh ou se Pr ice s. W at ld so be ill w re itu rn fu e • Al l br an d na m co m e fir st se rv e. st fir as ld so e ar s m ite l Al • • Al l st oc k is on e on ly ite m s Swivel Recliner

Reg

898

$

Warehouse Liquidation

Love Seat

$

Reg

998

$

7 pc Dinette

1 Table & 6 Chairs. Bench available.

7 pc Dinette

1 Table & 6 Chairs. Solid Mango wood.

299

Warehouse Liquidation

698

$

Reg

1498

$

1898

$

$

798

200 fabrics to choose from

Warehouse Liquidation

1698

$

898

348

$

$

Sofa & Love Seat

Sofa Reg

Warehouse Liquidation Reg

7 pc Dining Reg Set $ 1 Table & 6 Chairs

Warehouse Liquidation

Warehouse Liquidation

798

$

6 pc Dinette

1 Table, 1 Bench & 4 Chairs. Rustic solid oak.

Proudly Canadian

Warehouse Liquidation

Love Seat Reg

1498

$

698

$

2 pc Sectional

Warehouse Liquidation Reg

1498

$

2198

$

$

1198

Your Choice!

698

$

Warehouse Liquidation

Warehouse Liquidation Reg

Reg

$

Reg

999

$

Warehouse Liquidation

99 ea.

$ Reg $498 ea.

Reg

598

$

$

Warehouse Liquidation

298

$

MJM Furniture Showcase

MJM Furniture Showcase

MJM Furniture Showcase

45150 Luckakuck Way

32009 South Fraser Way

20359 Langley Bypass

CHILLIWACK

604.858.1994

ABBOTSFORD

604.864.8148

1498

Power Love Seat 100% leather $3999 Queen Mattress & Box 2 pc set

FUTON OR BUNK BED

Twin Mattress WAREHOUSE LIQUIDATION

348

LANGLEY

604.532.8146

Mon- Wed Thurs Frid Sat Sun

399

Hours: 10-6pm 10-7pm 10-9pm Now accepted at MJM locations! 11-6pm See store for complete details on financing 11-5pm offers. Certain conditions may apply.


CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

Liquidation Sale

THUR

FRI

A13

CHILLIWACK

SAT

SUN

MON

ed w ith in 48 ho ur s. ov m re be t us m s m ite l Al • is • Al l ite m s ar e as St ric tly Ca sh & Ca rr y. • ld Ho or ay Aw yLa no y rr • So

Sofa

Sofa

With beautiful accent wood trim.

2 pc Sectional Grey linen.

Warehouse Liquidation $

Reg

798

$

398

Warehouse Liquidation Reg

1398

$

$

798

Warehouse Liquidation Reg

2498

$

$

898

High Grade Reg Micro Fabric $ Reclining Sofa

1298

Kids Furniture Reg Twin Bed $

6 pc Home Theater set

$

499

Warehouse Liquidation

799

299

$

Warehouse Liquidation Reg

3198

Reclining, leather seating. $ Black or brown.

Twin Mattress $

Warehouse Liquidation

1598

$

Reclining Sofa

Reg

1998

$

599

$

Warehouse Liquidation

$ 3 pc set Sofa, Reg Love Seat & $ 1998 Chair

Queen Sleigh Bedroom set

Hb, Fb, rails, 2 night stands, dresser & mirror.

898

Warehouse Liquidation Reg

3998

$

$

1698

Reg

498

Warehouse Liquidation $

Warehouse Liquidation

99

Recliners

STARTING AT

MJM Furniture Showcase

MJM Furniture Showcase

MJM Furniture Showcase

45150 Luckakuck Way

32009 South Fraser Way

20359 Langley Bypass

CHILLIWACK

604.858.1994

ABBOTSFORD

604.864.8148

All Curio Cabinets

398

$

LANGLEY

604.532.8146

35% OFF SALE PRICE Mon- Wed Thurs Frid Sat Sun

Hours: 10-6pm 10-7pm 10-9pm Now accepted at MJM locations! 11-6pm See store for complete details on financing 11-5pm offers. Certain conditions may apply.


A14 TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

WorkBC Employment Service Centre

AUGUST

101- 5658 Vedder Road 604.858.5472

! ! ! ! !

2013

1

Family Resource Program – Day trip to Fire hall

Central Gateway Preschool Registration Open

4

5

CIVIC HOLIDAY ALL CCS OFFICES WILL BE CLOSED

The Employment Program of British Columbia is funded by the Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia

*'$!#"% )"!'("&

11

18

25

12

Youth Drop-In Recreation Program 12:00 – 4:00 pm

19

Youth Drop-In Recreation Program 12:00 – 4:00 pm

6 Chartwell Homes 7 “Stuff the Bus” with school supplies at Walmart,11:00 – 3:00

Family Resource Program – Day trip to Cultus Lake

13

Welcoming Communities - Conversation Circle, 12:15 to 2:00 pm

20

Welcoming Communities - Conversation Circle, 12:15 to 2:00 pm

14

Welcoming Communities - Settlement Worker 9:00 am to 4:00 pm

21

All summer long CCS provides great activities to get at-risk youth out and enjoying our community and area. We create active healthy opportunities by going hiking, swimming, biking around the Seawall or going to Playland or the Waterslides. The Chilliwack community is a great partner with service clubs donating funds and businesses offering reduced entrance fees, opening their doors and giving a greater margin of understanding.

2 Work BC – August 3 Workshop Schedule available now, call 604-858-5472

9

CCS Board meeting Sardis office, 5:00 – 7:00

26 Youth Drop-In 27

15 Family Resource 16 Program – Day trip to Johnson Park

Party in the Park CCS at the Kids Zone

Welcoming Communities - Conversation Circle, 12:15 to 2:00 pm

CCS Open House from 5:00 – 8:00 pm 45938 Wellington Ave

22Family Resource 23

CCS offers free Monday drop in activities to Youth, ages 12 – 18 from noon to 4:00; count on swimming and healthy BBQ. The Drop in is at Central Community School, come join us!

10 GrandEnglewood Opening,

10:00 – 4:00 45750 Keith Wilson Announcing the winner of the Englewood Courtyard Charity Contest

MEALS ON WHEELS

17

NOW DELIVERING FRESH MEALS TO SARDIS & CHILLIWACK MONDAY to FRIDAY

24

Program – Day trip to Leisure Center Pool

Welcoming Communities - Conversation Circle, 12:15 to 2:00 pm

28

29 Golf Fore CCS 30 Chilliwack Golf Club 2:00 shotgun start

Family Resource Program – Day trip to Waterpark at Leisure Center

HOME QUALITY COOKING PREPARED BY COOKIES GRILL

31

Ho, Ho, Hoedown at Fantasy Farms, 9423 Gibson Road, 7:00 - 11:00 pm

Call Today 604-793-7242, or email triemstras@comserv.bc.ca www.comserv.bc.ca

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE 7-13H MW9

Recreation Program 12:00 – 4:00 pm

8

YOUTH SERVICES

Child Care Resource and Referral – Offering resources to child care providers and child care referrals to parents Family Resource Programs – Monday to Fridays – mornings and afternoons. Field trips will take place on Thursdays in August at Downtown and Sardis Family Place. For times and locations contact Sherry Sinclair, 604-793-7205

IMMIGRANT SERVICES Welcoming Communities Program improves access to local services, helps build intercultural relationships and supports the successful integration of immigrants. A settlement worker will be at the Mary St. office on Wednesday, August 14 from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm. Please call reception at 604-393-3251 to make an appointment.

ABOUT CHILLIWACK COMMUNITY SERVICES Serving the Chilliwack Community for over 80 years! A simple act of kindness, a woman noticed a family struggling and recruited a group of volunteers to help them in their time of need. That is how Chilliwack Community Services (CCS) began in 1928. Today, CCS provides counseling, education, resources, and over 40 programs for early years, youth, family, seniors and immigrants, plus employment services. “Creating opportunities with people to make positive changes in their lives” Board of Directors: Allan Billingsley, Kathy Funk, Kim McLandress, Tom McMahon, Peter Monteith, Bill Sheridan – Secretary/Treasurer, Paul Donaldson – Vice-President, Luke Zacharias – President, James Challman – Executive Director

Horse Riding Program is offered through the generosity of Dora Isak and her volunteers at Freedom Reins Equine Connections. Riding enhances relationship skills, selfesteem and helps repair brain architecture damaged by abuse and neglect. During the last two weeks of August, family service workers support many low income families in getting children ready for school with supplies

Stuff the Bus – August 6 at Walmart from 11:00 to 3:00 supported by The Chartwell homes. Hampton House, Lynwood and Birchwood Retirement Residences are working together to support CCS families in need. Their goal is to stuff the bus with back pack, pens, paper and other school supplies. Come out and join the fun, have lunch – BBQ will be on site and meet CCS Staff.

MARY ST. OFFICE HOURS are Monday to Thursday, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm and closed for lunch between 12:30 & 1:30

PARTY IN THE PARK featuring CCS Early Years Programs at the Kid’s Zone. Come join us for fun, games and prizes

CCS continues to provide support to Chilliwack’s foster families and foster children. Summer allows foster families to increase focus on relationships through activities that promote family fun and foster kids interacting and realizing “I’m not the only one” in care.

COMMUNITY FUNDRAISING EVENTS

Conversation Circles encourage people to join in conversation and offers support to visitors, temporary foreign workers and other newcomers. They are held between 12:15 and 2:00 pm on August 6, 13, 15, 20 & 22.

AUGUST 16

FAMILY SERVICES

Investors Group - $5,000, RBC - $10,000 and Murray Honda – 2013 Honda Civic LX

Englewood Homes will be announcing the charity winner of their $20,000 prize at their Grand Opening on Saturday, August 10 at 45750 Keith Wilson Rd. Will CCS be the winners? Ho, Ho, Hoedown at Fantasy Farms, 9423 Gibson Road on Saturday, August 31 from 7:00 to 11:00 pm. Proceeds will support the Christmas Sharing Program.

OPEN HOUSE

from 5:00 – 8:00 pm at 45938 Wellington Ave. Meet the staff and learn more about CCS

45938 Wellington Ave., Chilliwack, BC V2P 2C7 ph: 604.792.4267 fax: 604.792.6575

Scan QR Code to Donate! www.comserv.bc.ca 6/13H CCS6


CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

A15

Community Music and More

The Chilliwack Library’s annual Music and More events take place every Wednesday until Aug. 21 at Salish Park behind the Chilliwack Library. The series features weekly children’s activities and evening concerts. Admission is free. On July 31, kids can explore the world of insects and have fun playing games and creating craft projects at 12:15 p.m. At 7 p.m., check out music from the KMH Trio, a group created from the

Community events To include your event, contact Tyler Olsen at tolsen@ chilliwacktimes.com. Put your event on our digital calendar by visiting www.chilliwacktimes.com.

Senior Recreation Centre’s old time Saturday night jams.

Weavers Guild meets

The Chilliwack Spinners and Weavers Guild meets in the

fibre arts room at the Chilliwack Cultural Centre every Thursday between 10 a.m. and noon. The guild also meets the first Thursday of every month (Aug. 1) at 1:30

p.m. for its day meeting and the third Thursday of every month at 6:30 p.m. for its general meeting. Visitors welcome. For more information contact Betty Sheppard at 604-794-7805.

Regiment members meet

The PPCLI Association invites former members of the regiment and veterans who have been attached to the regiment to its monthly luncheon on the first Thursday (Aug. 1) of each month

at 11:30 a.m., at the Vedder Legion Branch 280, 5661 Vedder Rd. Spouses are welcome.

Optimists meet

The Optimist Club of Chilliwack hosts its monthly breakfast on the first Saturday of every month (Aug. 3) at 11 a.m. at Dakota’s restaurant. Its business meeting takes place every third Thursday at 7 p.m. at Mount Cheam Riding Hall. For more information call Sam at 604703-0095.

Your Guide to Great Shops & Services Business of the Week

Terry Fox volunteers needed

This year marks the 33rd annual Terry Fox Run and volunteers are needed to help organize and execute the run. Volunteers are needed to join the organizing committee and also for various run-day duties on Sept. 15. If you are interested in volunteering, contact organizer Margaret Kostrzewa at Margaret@crystalridgemanor.ca or 604-7983652. For more information about The Terry Fox Foundation, visit www.terryfox.org.

• Covetop Counters • Granite Counters • Solid Surface Counters

QUALITY USED HOT TUBS FOR SALE

On site service and repairs to all makes of Hot Tubs. Call Blake 604-795-1792

Casey Neels 604-819-0875

Your One-Stop Accessory Shop

“Proud supplier of Merit Kitchens”

604-795-3163

44915 Yale Road

Tom Th om p s o n

AUTO GL ASS LTD.

Commercial - Agriculture - Residential

Can’t sleep at night? Call us about our air conditioners TODAY! Refrigeration - Heating - Ventilation Air Conditioning IF IT

HEATS OR COOLS.....WE DO IT!

McLean’s Funeral Services Ltd. Chilliwack’s only locally owned and family operated Funeral Service. All arrangements can be made in the comfort of your own home, by appointment in our office: 45651 Lark Road, Chilliwack

Cremation, Memorial & Traditional Services Free Estate Planning Guide Provided Stewart McLean Owner/Director

604-847-3477

24 hour Professional Service

604.792.3443

#1-44135 Yale Rd W 44467 Yale Road West (across from O’Connor RV) 604-792-3132 • www.vehiclesolutions.ca Mon - Fri 8am - 5pm • Sat 9am - 5pm AIR CONDITIONING

Complete Heating & Cooling Systems

SINCE 1987

604-793-7810 WE’RE SMALL BUSINESS,GIVING

BIG SERVICE

• Propane Specialists • Complete Engine & Drive Train Repairs • Ignition Tune-Ups/ Computer Scans • Brake, Steering & Suspension Repairs • Lube, Oil & Filter including Safety Inspection • Cooling System Flush • Repair

8915 Young Road South

(corner of Young & Railway)

CHILLIWACKSince HEATINGLtd. 1992

Sat by appt.

Locally Owned & Operated Since 1989

Failed AirCare? WE ARE YOUR ONE STOP REPAIR SHOP

Top Quality Installation & Service

Open Mon-Fri 8am - 5pm

Call Dave

604-991-2235 -COMMON PLUMBING REPAIRS -WATER & WELL SYSTEMS -BOILER REPLACEMENT AND REPAIRS -HOT WATER TANK REPLACEMENTS -NEW INSTALLATIONS COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL

WWW.HELLAMPLUMBING.COM 44344 Yale Rd., CHILLIWACK

Your One Stop Accessory Shop 604-792-3132 www.vehiclesolutions.ca

44467 Yale Rd. West


A16 TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

News New facility at CSS is state-of-the-art with weight room and more CSS GYM, from page 1 Memorial Gym at the same time) was once the envy of high schools everywhere. “It was a beautiful, beautiful gym—for the time,” CSS gym teacher and alumnus Joe Ogmundson told the Times. “It became the biggest, dustiest old dump after a while.” The gym was named after longtime CSS principal Jim Halcrow, an influential educator not just in Chilliwack but provincially as well. During his 43-year education career, Halcrow was principal at CSS from 1955-1977 and a founder of the BC Principals’ and Vice Principals’ Association. He’d been offered the post of superintendent at plenty of B.C. school districts,

according to his son, Dale Halcrow (also a therefore, I don’t know that it’ll be officially principal at CSS from 1989-2002), but that’s named that when we move over there. It probably should be.” not where he felt he belong. Although he said he wouldn’t be outraged “He didn’t want to leave the school; he didn’t want to leave the kids,” Halcrow if the name was lost, the younger Halcrow would like to see his father’s name live on at said. the school. After his retirement, staff “Just because the buildat CSS initiated the idea of “Just because the i n g c h a n g e s d o e s n’t naming the gym after him. necessarily mean all hisWhat will happen to that building changes tory goes out the door,” name now is unclear. doesn’t necessarily he said. There are rules around “I live on Keith Wilson naming buildings and parts mean all history goes Road. I don’t even know of buildings in Chilliwack out the door.” who Keith Wilson was, school board policy, and not all the names that have been Dale Halcrow but it’s always going to be Keith Wilson Road assigned to parts of CSS have because someone decidfollowed those rules. ed to name it after that “I think the Jean Keith person.” Library was the only one that Officials would have two gyms to choose was officially named,” Ogmundson said, “so the new library will also be the Jean Keith from if they decided to keep the name. The new Chilliwack secondary will have Library. But I don’t know if the J.Y. Halcrow Gymnasium was officially named that and, two new gyms, each with two main basket-

ball courts and four smaller cross court Other sporty additions include a new weight room with aerobics machines and areas for free weights, a fitness room for dance classes, an outdoor basketball court, four new tennis courts and a new lit artificial-turf field. “The facility is state-of-the-art; it really is,” said Ogmundson, “and that’s good for us. We’ve had an overused facility and we’ve been under-resourced for so long we’ve almost gotten used to it.”

Correction

In an article in the July 25 Times, it was reported that Mayor Sharon Gaetz, Chilliwack-Hope MLA Laurie Throness and former MLA Gwen O’Mahony took part in the July 20 Chilliwack-Vedder Cleanup. The three politicians were actually in attendance for the society’s first cleanup of the year in April.

PARADE WAR AMPS

Photo submitted

Stefanie de Koning, 13, of Chilliwack, is a left leg amputee who recently rode onboard the War Amps float in New Westminster’s Hyack Festival Parade.

Seniors in Agassiz are going digital

S

eniors in Agassiz can now drop by their local legion to learn basic computer skills. The Royal Canadian Legion No. 32 in Agassiz has launched a pilot program called the Lifelong Learning Centre with computer equipment from Computers For Schools (CFS), a federal non-profit that collects used computers from government and business and refurbishes them for schools and other non-profit organizations. Thanks to CFS, the legion now has two Dell Latitude laptops with Windows 7 and Microsoft Office, along with a laser printer, set up in its club room to give adult learners in the community a chance to try their hand at computer basics. “This will allow older people to learn and get comfortable with the technology,” CFS program consultant Sandy Balascak said. “It’s an economical way to help people to learn the technology in a comfortable environment without having to attend regular classes.” With the computers in place, the legion is now looking for volunteer tutors willing to spend some time help-

ing adult computer newbies along. Balascak hopes other legions around the province take up the Agassiz model and make use of CFS’s services, which would cost them no more than $200 to $300 for a similar setup. Since 1994, CFS’s mandate has been to provide increased access for students and learners of all ages to computer technology. It refurbishes and redistributes thousands of computers in B.C. every year, extending, and often doubling, the life span of computer electronics, thus significantly eliminating e-waste in landfills. It also puts good used computers into the hands of schools and other organizations that wouldn’t otherwise be able to afford them, said Balascak, who is also the principal of the Agassiz Centre for Education, a Fraser-Cascade school district alternative school. ◗ For more information on CFS, including how to buy or donate equipment, visit www. cfsbc.ca. For more more information on the Agassiz legion’s Lifelong Learning Centre, call 604-796-2332.

If you see a wildfire call *5555 on your cell. Nearly half of all wildfires are preventable. Please, be responsible in our forests.

To learn more visit BCWildfire.ca


ON NOW AT YOUR BC CHEVROLET DEALERS. Chevrolet.ca 1-800-GM-DRIVE. Chevrolet is a brand of General Motors of Canada. ‡/**/*Offers apply to the purchase of a 2013 Chevrolet Silverado Cheyenne EXT Cab 4X4 (R7C)/2013 Cruze LS 1SA (R7A)/2013 Trax LS (R7A)/2013 Equinox LS (R7A) equipped as described. Freight included ($1,600/$1,550) License, insurance, registration, PPSA, administration fees and taxes not included. Dealers are free to set individual prices. Limited time offers which may not be combined with other offers, and are subject to change without notice. Offers apply to qualified retail customers in BC Chevrolet Dealer Marketing Association area only. Dealer trade may be required. GMCL, RBC Royal Bank, TD Auto Financing Services or Scotiabank may modify, extend or terminate this offer in whole or in part at any time without notice. Conditions and limitations apply. See Chevrolet dealer for details. tBased on GM Testing in accordance with approved Transport Canada test methods. Your actual fuel consumption may vary. **$7,500/$2,250/$2,500/$1,000 manufacturer to dealer delivery credit available on cash purchases of 2013 Chevrolet Silverado Thunder/2013 Cruze LS/2013 Equinox LS/2013 Trax LS (tax exclusive) for retail customers only. Other cash credits available on most models. By selecting lease or financing offers, consumers are foregoing such discounts and incentives which will result in a higher effective interest rate. See dealer for details. $2,500 non-stackable cash credits is a manufacturer to dealer delivery credit (tax exclusive) for 2013 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Crew. Non-stackable cash credits are available only when consumers opt for the cash purchase of a new or demonstrator model. By selecting lease or finance offers, consumers are foregoing such discounts and incentives which will result in a higher effective interest rate. Offers end July 31st, 2013. See dealer for details. ‡0%/0.99% purchase financing offered on approved credit by RBC Royal Bank/TD Auto Financing/Scotiabank for 84 months on new or demonstrator 2013 Trax LS/2013 Cruze LS/2013 Equinox LS/2013 Silverado EXT 4X4. Rates from other lenders will vary. Down payment, trade and/or security deposit may be required. Monthly payment and cost of borrowing will vary depending on amount borrowed and down payment/trade. Example: $10,000 at 0%/0.99% APR, the monthly payment is $119/$123 for 84 months. Cost of borrowing is $0/$354, total obligation is $10,000/$10,354. Offer is unconditionally interest-free/Based on a purchase price of $28,599 with $3,300 down on the 2013 Silverado Ext 4X4. +®The Best Buy Seal is a registered trademark of Consumers Digest Communications, LLC, used under license. *^For more information visit iihs.org/ratings. *†Comparison based on 2012 Wards segmentation: Middle/Cross Utility Vehicle and latest competitive data available, and based on the maximum legroom available. Excludes other GM brands. ~OnStar services require vehicle electrical system (including battery) wireless service and GPS satellite signals to be available and operating for features to function properly. OnStar acts as a link to existing emergency service providers. Subscription Service Agreement required. Visit onstar.ca for OnStar’s Terms and Conditions, Privacy Policy and details and system limitations. Additional information can be found in the OnStar Owner’s Guide. ^^Based on latest competitive data available. ¥Offer only valid from July 3, 2013 to September 30, 2013 (the “Program Period”) to retail customers resident in Canada who own or are currently leasing (during the Program Period) a GM or competitor pickup truck to receive a $1,000 credit towards the purchase, finance or lease of an eligible new 2013 Model Year Chevrolet Silverado Light Duty, Chevrolet Heavy Duty, GMC Sierra Light Duty, GMC Sierra Heavy Duty, or Chevrolet Avalanche. Only one (1) credit may be applied per eligible vehicle sale. Offer is transferable to a family member living in the same household (proof of address required). This offer may not be redeemed for cash and may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives available on GM vehicles. The $1,000 credit includes HST/GST/QST/PST as applicable by province. As part of the transaction, dealer will request current vehicle registration and/or insurance to prove ownership. GMCL reserves the right to amend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without prior notice. Void where prohibited by law. Additional conditions and limitations apply. See your GM dealer for details.

CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

ELLDOWN

UP TO

INCLUDES

INCLUDES

INCLUDES

INCLUDES

**

$9,500

LOWEST CASH PRICE O THE OF TH SE SEASO AS N ASO SEASON

$25 ,495*

$2,500 **

$10,000

2013 SILVERADO CHEYENNE EDITION EXT CAB 4X4

LOWEST PRICE OF THE SEASON

2013 EQUINOX LS

TO GUARANTEE OUR QUALITY, WE BACK IT

POWERTRAIN WARRANTY ^Whichever comes first. See dealer for limited warranty details.

160,000 KM/5 YEAR

DLN 8692

$26 ,599*

COMBINED CASH CREDITS LTZ EXT MODEL WITH CHROME ACCESSORIES SHOWN

2013 CRUZE LS 1SA

LOWEST CASH PRICE OF F THE SE SEASO ASON ASO N SEASON

AT

$13 ,995*

IN CREDITS ON PURCHASES $2,250** CASH CRUZE LTZ SHOWN

2013 TRAX LS

LOWEST CASH PRICE OF F THE SE SEASO SEASON ASON ASO N WITH

$18 ,995*

IN CREDITS ON PURCHASES $1,000** CASH

IN CREDITS ON CASH PURCHASES

CHEVROLET TAHOE

CHEVROLET AVALANCHE

CHEVROLET CAMARO

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY

45930 Airport Road

604-795-9104 Toll Free 1-877-362-8106

UMMER

** IN COMBINED CASH CREDITS ON SELECT MODELS. EFFECTIVE RATE 2.41%.

OR FINANCE FOR 84 MONTHS OFFERS INCLUDE TRUCK BUCKS FOR CURRENT TRUCK OWNERS¥

$1,000

AT

BI-WEEKLY WITH $3,300 DOWN, BASED ON A PURCHASE PRICE OF $28,599* EFFECTIVE RATE. 3.11% INCLUDES $7,500 IN CASH CREDITS**

• BEST IN CLASS 5-YEAR/160,000 KM POWERTRAIN WARRANTY^, 60,000 KM LONGER THAN FORD F-150 AND RAM^^

• PROVEN V8 POWER WITH EXCELLENT FUEL EFFICIENCY

• SEGMENT EXCLUSIVE AUTOMATIC LOCKING DIFFERENTIAL

25 MPG HIGHWAY 11.2 L/100 KM HWY 15.9 L/100 KM CITY▼

OR FINANCE FOR 84 MONTHS ‡

• 10 STANDARD AIR BAGS

WITH • STABILITRAK, TRACTION CONTROL AND 4-WHEEL ANTILOCK BRAKES

DOWN

BI-WEEKLY, BASED ON A PURCHASE PRICE OF $13,995* INCLUDES $2,250 IN FINANCE CASH**

OR FINANCE FOR 84 MONTHS

DOWN

BI-WEEKLY AT 1.99% BASED ON A PURCHASE PRICE OF $19,995* EFFECTIVE RATE. 3.51%

OR FINANCE FOR 84 MONTHS

AT

BI-WEEKLY WITH $2,699 DOWN, BASED ON A PURCHASE PRICE OF $27,995* EFFECTIVE RATE. 2.70%

CHEVROLET IMPALA

CHEVROLET SILVERADO HD • POWER WINDOWS, DOOR LOCKS AND KEYLESS ENTRY

52 MPG HIGHWAY 5.4 L/100 KM HWY 8.2 L/100 KM CITY▼

*^

• TURBOCHARGED 1.4L ECOTEC ENGINE WITH 6-SPEED TRANSMISSION

• STABILITRAK, TRACTION CONTROL AND 4-WHEEL ANTILOCK BRAKES

• ONSTAR® INCLUDING 6 MONTH SUBSCRIPTION ANDREMOTELINK MOBILE APP~

50 MPG HIGHWAY 5.6 L/100 KM HWY 7.8 L/100 KM CITY▼

*^

+

TRAX LTZ SHOWN

• MULTI-FLEX™ SLIDING AND RECLINING REAR SEAT, OFFERING CLASS-LEADING LEGROOM*† • A CONSUMERS DIGEST BEST BUY FOR 4 YEARS+

• STANDARD BLUETOOTH®

46 MPG HIGHWAY

6.1 L/100 KM HWY 9.2 L/100 KM CITY▼ *^

EQUINOX LTZ SHOWN

JUST ANNOUNCED

“Highest Ranked in Initial Quality for Midsize Sporty Car (tie), Large Car, Large CUV, Large Heavy Duty Pickup, Large Light Duty Pickup (tie).”

More 2013 J.D. Power Initial Quality Awards than any other automotive brand.*

VEHICLE PRICING IS NOW EASIER TO UNDERSTAND BECAUSE ALL OUR PRICES INCLUDE FREIGHT & PDI

CHEVROLET.CA

A17


A18 TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

$25

Spend $250 and receive a

FREE $25

u

Gift

Card

Spend $250 or more before applicable taxes at any Real Canadian Superstore location (excludes purchase of tobacco, alcohol products, prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products which are provincially regulated) and we will give you a $25 President’s Choice® gift card. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. $25 President’s Choice® gift card will be cancelled if product is returned at a later date and the total value of product(s) returned reduces the purchase amount below the $250 threshold (before applicable taxes). Valid from Friday, July 26th until closing Thursday, August 1st, 2013. Cannot be combined with Valid until any other coupons or promotional offers. Thur. Aug. 1 307451 u

SUMMER CLEARANCE WHILE QUANTITIES LAST SELECTION VARIES BY STORE

25 - 55 OFF %

%

all BBQ grills

Butcher’s Choice burgers frozen, 1.13 kg 383030 / 760033 20349649 / 20350513

40% - 55% OFF all patio sets patio accessories & BBQ accessories

35% OFF

The Laughing Cow original or light, 32’s, 535 g

select summer toys

no name® plastic beer cups red or white, 50 ct. 879184 / 380334 5870301955 / 6038312294

no name® paper plates 100 ct. 559184 6038336795

3

57

5

328167 4175701141

ea

LIMIT 4 AFTER LIMIT

224440 6038303666

ea

LIMIT 4

Pampers club size plus diapers size 1-6, 104-210’s

AFTER LIMIT

6.99

481862 3700081890

7

Fuel up at our earn gas bar and

PC® potato chips selected varieties, 235 g

3.99

97

works out to .27 per piece

¢

6

98

AFTER LIMIT

8.99

8 1

ea

UP TO

Starting Fri. Aug. 2

Cook’s ham portions shank portion

LIMIT 6 AFTER LIMIT

2.19

58

ea

LIMIT 4 AFTER LIMIT

44.99

in Superbucks® value per litre** when you pay with your

250* 150* $ 100* $

ON GAS

OR USE PC® MASTERCARD® AND SAVE

25¢/L 15¢/L 10¢/L

$

¢ PER LITRE

mini Babybel

no name club pack® freeze pops 50 X 150 mL 187690 63417

Huggies Little Swimmers 17-20’s 268499 3600016184

1

48

/lb

3.26 /kg LIMIT 4 AFTER LIMIT

2.28

312923 20147128

original or light, 12’s, 240 g

ea

35

BUY THIS SAVE THIS AMOUNT AMOUNT AT IN GROCERIES OUR GAS BAR

35¢/L 25¢/L 20¢/L

WITH THIS COUPON AND A VALID IN-STORE PURCHASE UP TO 100 L AT OUR GAS BAR. With this coupon and a minimum one time store purchase of $100, save up to 35 cents per litre as detailed above, up to a maximum of 100 litres. Single fill-up only. STEPS TO REDEEM THIS OFFER: 1. Make an in-store purchase of $100 or more (excluding taxes, prescriptions, tobacco, alcohol, gift cards, phone cards, gas bar, post office, dry cleaning, lottery tickets, and other provincially regulated products) at Real Canadian Superstore from Friday, August 2, through Thursday, August 8, 2013. 2. Present this coupon along with the valid Superstore receipt to the gas bar cashier at time of gas purchase by Wednesday, August 14, 2013 and save cents per litre, as detailed above, off fuel (not valid on pay-at-pump transactions). Save an additional 10 cents per litre of fuel when paying with a President’s Choice Financial® MasterCard®. One coupon per family purchase and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Cannot be combined with any other coupon or promotional offer. ®PC, President’s Choice, and President’s Choice Financial are registered trademarks of Loblaws Inc. ®/TM MasterCard and the MasterCard Brand Mark are registered trademarks and PayPass is a trademark of MasterCard International Incorporated. President’s Choice Bank a licensee of the marks. President’s Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by President’s Choice Bank. Redeem at participating stores only.

522971 307378089735

68

35

ea

LIMIT 4

48

SAVE

OR

/lb 5.03 kg

7

27

ea

LIMIT 4

8

AFTER LIMIT

7.98

98

ea

LIMIT 4 AFTER LIMIT

9.98

20

00

2/

OR

13.97

EACH

2 lb clamshell fresh strawberries

product of USA, no. 1 grade 725773 36983

no name® English muffins selected varieties, pkg. of 6 302974 6038300824

PC® Power Quenchers

2 1

96

00

Nestle Good Start infant formula powder with Omega 640-730 g 397252 6500068941

ea

LIMIT 4 AFTER LIMIT

2.62

10

regular or diet, 24 X 591 mL 127117 / 1458832 6038385678 / 6038302290

ea

24

98

ea

LIMIT 6 AFTER LIMIT

12.99

63

ea

LIMIT 4 AFTER LIMIT

28.97

in Superbucks value using Or, get 3.5¢per litre** any other purchase method ®

®

Redeem Superbucks towards purchases made in-store.**

**Redeem your earned Superbucks® value towards the purchase of Merchandise at participating stores (excluding tobacco, alcohol, lottery tickets, gas and prescriptions). With each fuel purchase when you use your President’s Choice Financial® MasterCard® or President’s Choice Financial® debit card as payment, you will receive 7 cents per litre in Superbucks® value. When you use any other method of payment, you will receive 3.5 cents per litre in Superbucks® value. Superbucks® value expires 60 days after date of issue. Superbucks® value are not redeemable at third party businesses within participating stores, the gas bar, or on the purchase of tobacco, alcohol, lottery tickets and prescriptions. Superbucks® value has no cash value and no cash will be returned for any unused portion. Identification may be required at the time of redemption. See Superbucks® receipt for more details. ® Trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. ©2013. † MasterCard is a registered trademark of MasterCard International Incorporated. President’s Choice Bank a licensee of the mark. President’s Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by President’s Choice Bank. President’s Choice Financial personal banking products are provided by the direct banking division of CIBC.

Prices are in effect until Monday, August 5, 2013 or while stock lasts.

superstore.ca

*Price Matched Look for the symbol in store. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match select items in our major supermarket competitors’ flyers throughout the week. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We match identical items (defined as same brand, size, and attributes, and carried at this store location) and for fresh produce, meat and bakery, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us). Guaranteed Lowest Prices applies only to our major supermarket competitors’ print advertisements (i.e. flyer, newspaper). We will match the competitor’s advertised price only during the effective date of the competitor’s print advertisement. We will not match competitors’ “multi-buys” (eg. 2 for $4), “spend x get x”, “Free”, “clearance”, discounts obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners etc.). We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this promise at any time. Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. NO RAINCHECKS OR SUBSTITUTIONS on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, pattern, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/TM The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this newspaper ad are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2013 Loblaws Inc. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.


CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

Music in the Park

Community

A19

Clinton, B.C.

COME FOR THE MUSIC, STAY FOR THE WEEKEND!

Reg Conn Centennial Park (bring your lawn chair) Show times are 7:30pm – FREE AUGUST 10: Ridley Bent AUGUST 31: Barney Bentall

Also happening in the centre of town: AUGUST 10: Ken Sheen with a chainsaw demonstration 4pm to 6pm

VIEW PHOTOS with layar

More information: www.village.clinton.bc.ca or 250-459-2261

AGRICULTURE SLOW FOODIES

Cornelia Naylor/TIMES

Cyclists from across the Lower Mainland and beyond hit rural roadways in Agassiz Saturday for the annual Fraser Valley Slow Food Cycle Tours. Stops included Tasty Chicken (above), the Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre and the UBC Dairy Education and Research Centre (left and below).

YOUR FARM INSURANCE EXPERTS

Our hard work will save you money! FARM INSUR ANCE Our Farm & Agribusiness experts understand that every operation has its own special insurance requirements. As your Insurance Brokerage, we will successfully negotiate with the marketplace to find the best coverage and rates available. Drop by out Whatcom Road branch or give us a call at 604-853-0077.

ABBOTSFORD LOCATION Unit 4 - 2054 Whatcom Rd, T 604-853-0077 F 604-853-0037

H S F Ifor R E E F

ENTER

ULTIMATE

RECEIVERSHIP AUCTION A long established wholesaler of fine Persian and Eastern imported handmade

TO WIN AN

FISHING PACKAGE

wool and silk carpets has seized by creditors. Their assets are ordered to be sold by auction liquidations.

FOR 4 $1000

VALUED AT

PUBLIC AUCTION 2.PM VIEW FROM 1.PM

SPONSORED BY:

TO ENTER GO TO :

F I SH F OR F R EE . C A / CHILLI WACK

Sunday, August 4

An enormous selection of rugs in all colours and sizes from Iran

LARGE WOOL AND SILK

Plus many more from other corporate contracts; TRADITIONAL AS WELL AS

CONTEMPORARY: CALVIN KLEIN, LARGE SILK TABRIZ, SHIRAZ GASHGAI, ANTIQUE SIRJAN, SAROUG, NEPAL, CHOBI, NAIN, TIBETTAN, TRIBAL BALOUCH, ONE OF A KIND VILLAGE RUGS, RUNNERS AND MANY LARGE DINING /LIVING ROOM SIZES.

Terms: Cash, Visa, MC, 15% buyers’ premium plus GST/PST applicable. Some items in advertisement are subject to prior sales/error/omissions. Licensed auctioneers. For more info please call 6048086808

073013

HARRISON HOT SPRINGS RESORT & SPA 100 ESPLANADE, HARRISON HOT SPRINGS

READ BETWEEN THE LINES


A20 TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

®

This Wednesday, July 31 to Thursday, August 1 Only!

Spend $100, Earn...

®

54 00000 530

Siles* U 1AIR0M0ILEBS OreN m rd a w

5

®

ARN SPEND $100, E ®

AIRMILES reward miles ®

UGUST 1, 2013

*

®

®TM

g B.V. used under International Tradin Trademarks of AIR MILES

license by LoyaltyOne,

Inc.

0

sented LID JULY 31 - A nsaction. Coupon must be prensa a tra ction. r tra *With coupon and ery VA made in a singleer discount offer or Bonus Offer pe e be on st it mu Lim ase ase. Purch combined with any oth y & Senior’s at time of purch minimum $100 groca ns cannot be ing Customer Appreciation Da scriptions, AIR MILES coupo includ ludes pre er in exc off e on n up ad po Co m . cou Stores blood AIR MILES purchase Safeway Liquor n pump supplies, ies, bottle Day. Not valid atandise, insulin pumps, insuligif t cards, enviro lev diabetes merchors, tobacco, transit passes, ply. See Customer Service forivate single transaction. nit ap act pressure mo sales tax. Other exclusions the coupon only once to deposits and of exclusions. Cashiers: Scan ce. complete list fer. Do not scan more than on the Bonus Of

Long Weekend Savings! July 31

to August 1st

Gourmet Meat Shoppe Burgers

Value Red Wieners

st

Prime Rib, Sirloin, Mozza & Bacon or BBQ. Frozen. 907 g. ®

Regular or BBQ Style. 675 g.

BUY 2 EARN 20

8

4

AIR MILES® reward miles

99 ea.

Product of U.S.A. No. 1 Grade. 1 lb.

1

Purewal Blueberries

2

ea.

5

2$ for

Club Price

Assorted varieties. 12 pack. Plus deposit and/or enviro levy where applicable.

for

ea.

Club Price

Safeway Kitchens Hot Dog Buns

Club Price

e Deli! From th

Or Hamburger. Assorted varieties. Package of 12. ®

10

3$

99

Club Price

Assorted varieties. 414 to 475 mL. LIMIT SIX - Combined varieties.

Coca-Cola or Pepsi Soft Drinks

Product of Canada. Canada No. 1 Grade. 1 lb.

99

Kraft Salad Dressing

ea.

Club Price

CLUB PRICE

Fresh Strawberries

99

Signature CAFE Family Size Caesar Salad

599 g. Or Chef Salad 872 g $8.99.

BUY 2 EARN 10

699

2

AIR MILES® reward miles

29

ea.

Club Price

CLUB PRICE

Prices effective at all British Columbia Safeway stores Wednesday, July 31 through Thursday, August 1, 2013 only. We reserve the right to limit sales to retail quantities. Some items may not be available at all stores. All items while stocks last. Actual items may vary slightly fro m illustrations. Some illustrations are serving suggestions only. Advertised prices do not include GST. ®™ Trademarks of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne, Inc. and Canada Safeway Limited. Extreme Specials are prices that are so low they are limited to a one time purchase to Safeway Club Card Members within a household. Each household can purchase the limited items one time during the effective dates. A household is defined by all Safeway Club Cards that are linked by the same address and phone number. Each household can purchase the EXTREME SPECIALS during the specified advertisement dates. For purchases over the household limits, regular pricing applies to overlimit purchases. On BUY ONE GET ONE FREE items, both items must be purchased. Lowest priced item is then free. Online and in-store prices, discounts, and offers may differ.

JULY/AUG 31

WED

1

THUR

Prices in this ad good until Aug. 1st.


A24 TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

Aug

2013

Z[\L=T<H O`B<]N b<F D\X`TXBN Party in the Park x…†Yr WYL‰‹r KLoRH XŽa ZXoXhH fe 6 – 10pm Š†HY‹a Š|‘‘XLHr `‹Yd SUL[ G< G<QT<B;MLQQBU JRbX<H ZXoXhH f ‹‰ J 6 – 8pm TƒL ILdh Chilliwack Fair and Rodeo ZXoXhH J n gg ˆ†YLH‹o† `‹Yd ƒƒƒv\RLaaLƒ‹\dq‹LYv\|‘ ab=TQI ?L`TB >THV] YOcG@W ZXoXhH fc 7pm `Y|‘|H|Yr xa†‘†H‹Yr \R||a

Cb]BU MBN]UT\XL<N lX† g H| †]H†‘^†Y fj

ab=TQI ?L`TB >THV] Y^VB @ULLFNW ZXoXhH fb 1pm I|h†‰‹a† TY‹‰LŽ|‹a Š|‘‘XLHr \R||a JP==BU DU] @b=[N ZXoXhH fjge ŠRLaaLƒ‹\d ŠXaHXY‹a Š†HY† ƒƒƒv\RLaaLƒ‹\d\XaHXY‹a\†HY†v\‹ A@KE JVL_\bNB O`B<] †]H†‘^†Y Q n M `Y|h]†Y‹ Š†HY† ‡~|aXH††Yh ††‰†‰y \|H‹\H HR† ŠRLaaLƒ‹\d ŠRL†qh ‹H QjcveJfvccee |Y Lq|m\RLaaLƒ‹\d\RL†qhv†H 5)1 8)1" "."70$ 27% 26(.'("$3 6-"6* )#0 )#1 "."70 42!" )7&'7" 20 ,,,/6-'&&',26*/6)8+"."70$

Chilliwack Fair and Rodeo ZXoXhH J p gg

TR† ŠRLaaLƒ‹\d W‹LY Lh ‹aa ‹^|XH a|\‹a \XaHXY†y R†YLH‹o†y ^XhL†hh ‹‰ ‹oYL\XaHXY†v Z{Y‹\Žo ‘|Y† HR‹ fjyjjj ]†|]a† †…†Yr r†‹Yy |…†Y HRY†† ‰‹rhy HR† W‹LY R‹h ‹ a|o hH‹‰Lo HY‹‰LŽ| hR|ƒ\‹hLo HR† ^†hH |q ‹oYL\XaHXY† L |XY \|‘‘XLHr ‹‰ HR† †ŽY† ]Y|…L\†v TRLh r†‹Y HR† I|‰†| Zhh|\L‹Ž| Lh \†a†^Y‹Žo HR† fbHR ‹L…†Yh‹Yr |q R|a‰Lo ‹ ŒŠIZ Y|‰†| L \|iX\Ž| ƒLHR HR† ŠRLaaLƒ‹\d xtRL^LŽ| ‹‰ W‹aa W‹LYv x…†Hh L\aX‰† ^Xaa YL‰Loy ^‹Y†^‹\d YL‰Loy Ž† ‰|ƒ Y|]Loy h‹‰‰a† ^Y|\y hH††Y ƒY†hHaLoy ^Y†‹d‹ƒ‹r Y|]Loy a‹‰L†h ^‹YY†a Y‹\Lo ‹‰ H†‹‘ Y|]Lov lXL|Y †…†Hh L\aX‰† iXL|Y hH††Y YL‰Loy iXL|Y ^‹YY†a Y‹\Loy iXL|Y ^Y†‹d‹ƒ‹r Y|]Lo ‹‰ ]††ƒ†† ^‹YY†ahv

bwjj ‹‘ H| Mwjj ‹‘ |Y Pwjj ]‘ H| gjwjj ]‘ x…† X‘^†Y†‰ ‹‰‰Y†hh†hw }†‰†h‰‹r ‹‰ ‹HXY‰‹r ‰‰ X‘^†Y†‰ ‹‰‰Y†hh†hw TRXYh‰‹r ‹‰ X‰‹r  ‹ ‹…†Y‹o† ‰‹ry ŠRLaaLƒ‹\d Xh†h fM ‘LaaL| aLHY†h |q ƒ‹H†Yv ŒXH L HR† hX‘‘†Yy ƒ† Xh† X] H| bf ‘LaaL| aLHY†h |q ƒ‹H†Y ]†Y ‰‹r OhLo a†hh ƒ‹H†Y h‹…†h ††Yory h‹…†h ‘|†ry ‹‰ \|h†Y…†h HR† hX]]ar qY|‘ HR† ‹Y‰Lhp~†‰‰†Y Z[XLq†Yv Œr \|h†Y…Lo H|‰‹ry ƒ† Y†‰X\† ††Yor \|hX‘]Ž| ‹‰ hXhH‹L‹^ar ‘‹‹o† |XY ]Y†\L|Xh oY|X‰ƒ‹H†Y h|XY\†v

Downtown Community Garden

‚ lXar …|aXH††Yh ^†o‹ ƒ|Yd | HR† ŠLHrsh ‰|ƒH|ƒ \|‘‘XLHr o‹Y‰† hLH†v TR†r ^XLaH o‹Y‰† ^|t†hy h]Y†‹‰ ‰|‹H†‰ h|La ‹‰ hH‹YH†‰ ]a‹Žo „|ƒ†Yh ‹‰ …†o†H‹^a†hv TR† \|‘‘XLHr o‹Y‰† R‹h cj o‹Y‰† ^†‰h HR‹H a|ƒ L\|‘† L‰L…L‰X‹ah ‹]]aL†‰ q|Y HRY|XoR IXHR ‹‰ K‹|‘L€h NLhhL|y HR† |]†Y‹H|Yh |q HR† o‹Y‰†v ˆ‹aq |q HR† q||‰ oY|ƒ | HR† ]Y|]†YHr ƒLaa o| H| HR† ‘LhhL|v

T| a†‹Y ‘|Y† ‹^|XH HR† ŠLHrsh ‘XaŽq‹\†H†‰ ]a‹ H| Y†…LH‹aLV† HR† ‰|ƒH|ƒy …LhLH ƒƒƒv\RLaaLƒ‹\d‰|ƒH|ƒ]a‹v\‹v

Beat the Heat ‚ HR† hX‘‘†Yy HR† \|‘^L‹Ž| |q RLoR R†‹H ‹‰ RLoR RX‘L‰LHr \‹ ^† …†Yr ‰‹o†Y|Xhv }R† LHsh R|Hy Y†‘†‘^†Yu

ŒYLo HR† q‹‘Lar ‹‰ †i|r ‹ ƒ††d†‰ ‹H HR† ŠRLaaLƒ‹\d W‹LY ‹‰ I|‰†| ‹H ˆ†YLH‹o† `‹Yd

S S S S S S

W|Y ‘|Y† Lq|Y‘‹Ž| …LhLH ƒƒƒv\RLaaLƒ‹\dq‹LYv\|‘v

S

Slow Down in the Cone Zone

TR|Xh‹‰h |q Y|‹‰hL‰† ƒ|Yd†Yh ‹Y† ‰†]†‰Lo | ‰YL…†Yh H| d††] \|HY|a |q HR†LY …†RL\a† L ‹ Š|† _|†v TR†h† HRY†† hL‘]a† ‹\Hh \‹ h‹…† ‹ ƒ|Yd†Ysh aLq†w 1. a|ƒ ‰|ƒ ‹‰ ‰YL…† ƒLHR †tHY†‘† \‹Y† †‹Y ‹ Š|† _|†v fv H‹r ‹a†YH ‹‰ ‘LL‘LV† ‰LhHY‹\Ž|hv ev TRLd ‹^|XH †…†Yr \|† ‹h Lq ‹ RX‘‹ ^†Lo ƒ†Y† hH‹‰Lo ^†RL‰ LHv W|Y ‘|Y† Lq|Y‘‹Ž| …LhLH ƒƒƒvh‹q†Y\LHrv\‹v

Carolyn Marleau, Manager of Leisure Development, Councillor Popove and his daughter Chloe help ready the gardens.

K†…†Y a†‹…† \RLa‰Y† |Y ‹L‘‹ah L r|XY \‹Y ŠR†\d | †a‰†Yar †LoR^|XYh |Y qYL†‰h }†‹Y ‹ R‹H ‹‰ ‹…|L‰ HR† |XH‰||Yh ‰XYLo ‘L‰‰‹r H‹r \||a U| H| ‹LY \|‰LŽ|†‰ a|\‹Ž|h T‹d† ‹ ^‹HRhR|ƒ†Y |Y ]XH \|a‰ \a|HRh | r|XY q‹\† ‹‰ †\d H| \||a ‰|ƒ zYLd ]a†Hr |q ƒ‹H†Yy †…† Lq r|X ‹Y† |H HRLYhHr

W|Y ‘|Y† Ž]h ‹‰ Lq|Y‘‹Ž| …LhLH ƒƒƒv\RLaaLƒ‹\dv\|‘^†‹{R†R†‹H

CT<<T<H ELHL SBNTH<

N‹r|Y R‹Y| U‹†HV ‹‰ Š|X\La ƒ|Xa‰ aLd† H| \|oY‹HXa‹H† r‰†r ˆ†L^†Y qY|‘ NHv a†hh† NL‰‰a† \R||a q|Y ƒLLo ‹ \a‹hh \|‘]†ŽŽ| ƒLHR R†Y ‰†hLo H| ]Y|‘|H† ‹ †ƒ LLŽ‹Ž…† L ŠRLaaLƒ‹\dy HR† }†a\|‘Lo Š|‘‘XLŽ†h `Y|oY‹‘v U||‰ i|^ r‰†r

Chilliwack Times July 30  

Chilliwack Times July 30

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you