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Table of Contents

PACIFIC VOLUME

LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY III

1972

May

NO.5

Published six times annually by Pacific Lutheran University, P.O. Box 2068 Tacoma, cl ass

98447.

Washington,

p os t a g e

paid

at

Second Tacoma,

A Political Culture in Crisis.

.3

The Citizens New Role. . .

.6

A New Era in International Relations? .......... .

. 11

A Personal' Reflection.

.15

News Notes..........

.19

University Notebook.

.23

Washington. EDITORIAL BOARD Dr. Eugene Wiegman . . . . President Rev. Milton Nesvig Ass!. to the President for Church Relations and Publications . . . . . Director Rev. Harvey Neufeld Alumni Relations . Vice-President Development

Clayton Peterson

.Ja mes l.

Peterson

Roger Gruss

. . . . .Editor

Associate Editor

Sports..

.

.

.

.... . ... .

.

.

.

.

.

..

.

.

24

Kenneth Dunmire Paul R. Kusche

.

Staff Photographers

O.K. Devin Theodore Leonhardt

O.K. Devin, Inc Graphics Design

C o n t r ibutors:

Dr.

Frank

Collinge,

associate professor of political science; Dr.

W o lfgang

Ulb richt,

professor of political

science;

associate Richard

Crockett, assistant professor of political science; Bruce

1972

Bj erke, PLU senior and

Rhodes Scholar.

1


A POlITI[Al [ULI HE In [ 1515 Economic and corporate power has largely rep/aced the role of the pflvate citizen in government by Richard Crockett used to bel ieve that the government was of the

"I

people, by the people and for the people," ran the

charges become undeniable, a change is required in the American political culture.

caption of a political cartoon, but then "I used to believe

in

the

Easter

bunny

too."

Cartoonist

Brickman clearly demonstcated his doubts about the

The

American

political

culture has

included

two

values, legalism and ind ividual ism, wh ich are central

integrity of the democratic process. If Brickman is

to the question at hand. An understand ing of the

right

relationsh ip between them provides some insight into

and

Lincoln's ideal

has

"perished

from the

earth", what is government by, of and for?

the

concern

exp ressed

in

Brickman's

political

cartoon. Many critics might answer that question by arguing that

government

economically

now

the

powerful,

is

by

instrument the

of

the

economically

The American value of legalism sees moral conduct as a matter

of rule-following and

moral

relations as

pow rlul, and for the economically powerful As such

defined in terms of rules. The highest ideal of legalism

the integrity of the democratic process is th reateneu,

is a "government of law and not of men." I n and of

for

itself this seems to be a noble value. We are all aware

although

the

form

remains and

many of the

procedures are the san e, these have become symbol ic

of the abuses of governments of men. The movement

action, and real power and real decisions are made by

away

the few and the privileged.

toward totalitarianism, where both politics and law

from

absolute

monarch y

and

our

hostility

have been displaced by ar路bitrary rule, is an historical Does this sound overly harsh and misleading? My own

record of this concern. But this value is also partially

nclusion is that these charges are uncomfortably

in conflict with the values of democracy. Herbert

close

to

being

true,

and

in

order

to

avoid the

completion of this transformation, with which the

Croley,

in

commenting

on

the

movement

for

initiative, referendum, and recall at the turn of this

3


century saw these instruments of government as a

individualism,

means 'Nhereby democracy could be freed from the

lawlessness. I t brings cries for law and order. Against

bondage of the law. The law in Croley's view had

the values of legalism, it involves immorality, since

provided

moral conduct is a matter" of following rules, and

constraints

that

were

hostile

to

the

lJllfetter路ed work ing of democracy, and by these new

since it is hostile to law, is simply

moral relations are defined in terms of rules.

instruments men could challenge the law and its ad m in istrators.

The readiness to elevate conscience above the law is

A second American value, individualism, appears in two forrns.One form,like dernoCl"acY,exhibits tension with the law. Romantic individualisrn is concemed vvith

hurnan dignity and freedom and sees law as

potent ially

restr ictive and coercive.

Law therefore

must be limited by individual conscience and reason to avoid destruction of human freedom. In both the 19th and 20th centuries, it has been associated with civil disobedience, an association hostile to the values of legalism. We have heard the story ot Henry David Thoreau who, looking out the window of a Jail and seen by his friend Ralph Waldo Emerson, responded to Emerson's question, "Henryl What are you doing in

there?", with the reply, "Waldo, what are you

doing out there?" Thoreau was prepared to challenge the law "vith reason

and conscience.

century,

James

pl aywright

s p okes man

for

romantic

regarding himself as corrupted

Agee

In the 20th

was

a

leading

individualism.

anarchist, viewed

the

readiness

Dissent

is

to dissent from

an

government,

essential and

without

it

for

demoCl"atic

democracy

cannot

survive. A

second

form

of

American

individualism

IS

compatible with the values of legalism and the law. Possessive individualism sees law as facilitative, rather than

coercive.

Committed to material values and

econornic gain, it equates freedom with capitalism and regards the

ri" ghts of property as prior to all

others. The law and the values of legalism faci Iitate the interests of possessive individualism through the protection of property with legal institutions. One such

legal

institution

is

the

legal

status

that

corporations enjoy as persons. The

"cor"porate

person"

is

a

legal fiction.

Chief

Agee,

Justice John Marshall described the corporation as

the law as

"an ar"tificial being, invisible, intangible, and existing

"from the root up" and vowed that he

only in contemplation of law". Over an extended

would "r"ender little unto Caesar beyond taking care

period of j udicial

at intersection s."

Court saw corporations c i r c u mstances.

legislative activity, the Supreme

This

as "citizens" under some peculiar

manifestation

of

Most recently the readiness to elevate conscience

individualism made possible the preoccupation of the

above the law -" to use conscience as the rneasur"e of

Coun with business-governmental relations between

the law -" Martin

appeared in the civil r路lghts

Luther

King

in

particular,

movement,

and

the

war

protesters on the left who dissented in moral outrage. To those of a legalistic turn of mind, this form of

4

the existing order.

ingredient

1868 and

1937,

falling on

the side of propeny and material gain.

Since

1923,

the

with the bu Ik of their decisions

corporation's

legal

status

as

a

person" has guaranteed it the right to buy, sell and


hold property , and under the 1 4th Amendment has

contribution of $ 1 0,000 to the President's Club , a

assured it eq ual protection of the laws. The law has

Democratic campaign fund. Senator Russell Long of has

that

acknowledged

the

difference

elevated corporate rights to the level of individual

Louisiana

r路ights, the legal rights of persons The difficulty is

between a campaign contribution and a bribe is but a

that individuals do not enjoy "limited liability" as do

"hairline's breadth."

corporations.

The

corporate

legal fiction of the

person, over the years then, has become political fact.

The continuation of similar political activity seems

I n possessive indiv idualism American individualism

likely, since the political culture supports it in the

has become collective: it is expressed in the collective

values of possessive individualism and legalism. The

power of the corporat ion.

challenge to the integrity of the democratic process is then

a

product cu Iture.

of imperceptible change The

ascendency

of

in the

possessive

What form does the political action of the corporate

pol itical

person take? We have heard the expression advanced

i n d ividualism

by a Secretary of Defense that "whatever is good for

parallel led an ascendency of the legal fiction of the

over

romantic

individualism

has

General Motors is good for the country" The remark

"corporate person" over the democratic fiction of the

possessive

"public interest". While the democratic fiction is just

characterizes

perfectly

individualism

and

the

of

values

the

that -- a fiction -- the intimacy of law and possessive

acquisitiveness of "the corporate person" the demise

individual ism has transformed the corporate person

of another fiction of a more democratic character,

from fiction to fact. The net effect is the primacy of

the notion of the "public interest".

economic

sees

It

materialism.

in

power

in

publ ic

decision-making

The

values of individualism have become synonymous Perhaps the decline of "the public interest" can be seen in events described in the press and given wide publicity

by

television

which

suggest

that

the

with capitalism embodied in the corporate person, and the public interest has become embodied in the well-being of the public corporation

corporate person has indeed replaced the democratic citizen as pol itical decision-mak er. These accounts tell International

of the alleged relationship between Telephone

and

Telegraph

and

the

Republican

campaign chest , and suggest that the corporate person does

participate

in

politics

with

its

economic

resources. When the Democratic party was in office simil a r

events

occurred.

The

Economists,

a

conservative British journal, reported a Republican revelation involving the dropping of an anti-trust suit by the Johnson administration less than a month after a large brewing firm in question made a political

Richard Crockett

IS

an asslstani professor of political science. A graduate of Monmouth College, he is pursuing doctoral studl s at the University of Washington. He is completing his first year at PLU.

5


THE [ITIZED'S DEW ROLE Bureauocracy and organization now implement policy but the citizen still has 8 voice in establishing directions.

by Frank Collinge The political institutions of the

United States are

Yet there is a clear, general

feeling that something is badly wrong with America,

attacking.

that

It

started

with the civil rights movement of the

1950' s and accelerated through the env iron m e nt al , anti-war,

youth

and women's

m ovemen ts

of

the

1960's. Today we see thousands of citizen groups all over the

nation contesting established patterns of

political

power

SST'S

fall

to

earth,

freeways

cru m ble , government agencies cringe, c it y counci Is scatter, party regulars are dumped.

the

system

somehow

is fai ling, and that the

citizens have to fix it. Does all this mean anything ?

Anyone's

fil-st

reaction

should

be

bewilderment.

There cannot be anyth ing fun damentally wrong with citizen

parti ci pation,

we

agree,

since that is what

democracy is supposed to be all about But st i II, 'II/hen far right and far left can use the same slogan ("power to the people", "return government to the peop Ie"), we should be perplexed. And when members of the

And politicians are well aware. Ask Gene McCarthy,

same faction flat l y disagree on principle ("develop

(the

vvilderness for people", "keep wilderness undeveloped

Found ing

Shirley

6

no single movement.

under attack, and American citizens are do ing the

Father) a nd Geor ge McGovern and

Chisholm;

ask

John

Gardner and

Ralph

for the people") we have to wonder. Finally when

Tacoma

delegates

to

the

Pierce

County

Nader; ask George Wallace; ask Richard Nixon Proud

two

populists all, paragons of the new participation. To be

Democratic Party Convention can happily agree on

sure, there is more reform than revolution here, and

George

McGovern for President and then split on


Chisholm and the

that the secret to contemporary production is the

other for George \IVai lace, we can imagine that, in

Vice-President,

one

for Shirley

division of labor: the more complex any activity the

general, citizen participation might be marked more

more specialized the labor necessary to accompl ish it.

by frustration than by logic, by reaction more than

I f Henry Ford could build his first auto with the help

foresight

of

But

there

it

is,

and

it

is

heartfelt,

requires

Some

i n f i ni t e l y

elementary

description

can

help

us

along.

adaptable

an

handymen,

the

new

army of specialists.

So too

more

(b eca use

c o mp l e x

unmeasurable)

participation

government, but really not much If participation must

mean more than this, then only about one per cent of

few

speeches

polished

of over

government.

the

largely

Calhoun and Daniel Webster could build careers on a

in

problems

Ford

with

America has always had some measure of citizen more than the simple vote.

If

years, not so

J.

C.

today.

Things move too fast and they are too complicated

the people really act in the political process, usually

for that old-time individualist statesmanship. Today,

to complain about something. Sometimes, however,

in government as well as industry and commerce, the

citizens do arise in numbers, like a tidal swell, ane!

only

they

have

democracy

changed was

populism and

the

one

nation's

such

wave,

Pioneer

application

as was

Bryan's

organization, and on Iy such an organization, makes

lhe progressivism of LaFollette and

facts

show

that during the

movements

only

per'haps

Hard

five

per

height of such cent

of

any

community actually participates. Such a 500 per' cent increase is significant, but still very few people get i n v o I ve d.

W hat

empirically,

is

self-energized

that

c i tizen a

minority

participation

small,

means,

self-appointed

occasionally

rises

and

to fight

established authority, and they do so as amateurs without illogically,

resources: yet

noisily,

effectively

answer is bureaucratic organization and the

course.

Teddy Roosevelt. But what kind of waves were these)

haphazardly,

But this only

often

sets the

scene. We must turn to the system that begets this participation.

of

the myriad special skills

such

an

possible. This is really nothing new, but only recently has its meaning become forcefully apparent. John K. Galbraith's The New Industrial State sees the implications of bureaucracy this way: increasing

time

separates

1) that an

the beginning from the

completion of any task -- the more sophisticated and finely div ided the knowledge, the longer it takes to put

it

together;

2)

that

bureaucratic

requires

specialized

manpower

--

narrow

specialties,

aware

their

of

technology

trained

in

very

vulnerability

through obsolescence and intent on protecting their positions; 3) that commitments of time and money tend to be made ever more inflexibly -- since going back

can

mean

impossibly

costly reth inking

alld

the

rehiring; 4) and therefore that modern bureaucracies

problems faced by government have been continuous

have a vested interest in p,lanning the future, even to

If

8

several

widespread, and important. What about it?

citizen

participation

has

been

spasmodic,

and increasingly complex as the nation has expanded

the extent of positively trying to control the future -足

While this is normal and expected, it is a profound

but

and largely ignored factor, All modern social theories

bureaucracies

including these of Adam Smith and Karl Marx, agree

T hus,

in

c la n d e s t ine since

mo dern

cooperation

bu reaucracies

industries

with

loathe

manipulate

other

combat. markets


often

cooperatively, Illa n ipulate

the

organization

is

illegally;

thus

and

process

political

strong Iy,

governrnents

These emergencies are usually propelled by popular

Bureaucratic

participation, its effect on puulic opinion, and the

perhaps inherent Iy,

effect

c o nsequent

for

looking

politicians

on

antidemocratit.

constituent power'. Such popular demonstrations are

Sound familiar7 People seem to know this, if only

a r rogance

dimly. But there are yet wider implications Whatever

immobility

of for

the

They

system

potential

are

cheery lies high school civics may perpetrate about

correctives

individual citizenship, the fact is that we are a nation

system,

of interest groups, each of which is bureaucratically

available, They are thus valuable in the extreme,

th e

indeed,

defects;

system are

they

only

the

aga inst

and

intransigence,

a nd

bureaucratic

against

protests

poignant

basically

democrat ic

given

the

corrective

organized, and American politics is largely a matter of the coalitions and conflicts of these groups. (Among

But

the most significant of these are government agencies,

short¡lived, and how unintended their consequences,

how

fragile

these

have

protests

how

been,

who not only employ and minister to millions, but

Bryan

who also control most of the information upon which

domination, and , .. 7 The Progressives wanted to free

wanted

to free r ural

America from

urban

governmental policy is passed.) This entails a system

the cities and states from machine domination and t o

in which elected representatives are not so much

return power t o the people,people who would crp-ate

statesmen as

brokers

and expediters, a system in

whic:h bureaucratic groups, not citizens, define social values. There is also great cost: we are prone, as Karl Deutsch puts it, to an immobility-emergency cycle

laboratories of democracy in every comillunity, With what result7 The

fact seems to be that our system does

not

respond to citizen part icipation as theoretically it

When most groups are organized and have access to a

should - by opening itself and expanding the benefits Under

political system in which they bargain for position, it

of democracy as the situation would require

is far easier to protect an existing position than to

the cond itions stated, how cou Id

take risks, easier to do nothing than to respond to

' dical action, precisely the sort require action, often ra

The more difficult the problems, the more

of aďż˝:tion of which the system has not been capable.

tendency there is toward immobility. But of course

Action required the application of power, and the

problems

it7

Emergencies

problems do not go away, particularly the very real

only way to do so is by concentrating power so that

problems represented by unorganized groups with a

new patterns of interests can be created, By vvhat

grievance, like C hicanos, Blacks and women. Pretty

means7

soon, thr'ough some

other

frustration,

mechanism,

natural

catastrophe,

a public crisis

or

arises, an

social

Considering the comp1ex nature of modern emergencies, it

bureaucratic

can be done only through

organization

and

direction,

INhere7

emergency for which the ordinary process is largely

Considering the national character of our economy society,

it

must

occur

within

the

federal

to blame. At that point the emergency is publicly

and

declared, and politics as usual wobbles about, often in

government -- and in the federal administration, not

circles, looking for a solution.

the congress, Political emergencies marked by waves

9


the

that if we continue to value material things and the

shape of A me r i can po liti cal power, but they have not

s tabilit y in which to play with them, then we will

of

participation

citiLen

have

indeed

changed

made it any more democratic. Rather, each major

sure ly

e{ ,ergency has

author itarian goverrlment that sort of life requires.

added

measurab Iy

to the arb itrary

get

the

technocratic,

bureaucratic

and

po'Ner of central government bur-eaucracies. President

B.ut if freedom means anything, and if we understand

Nixon's economic phases, a remarkable admission of

that

system failure, is surely the best case in point.

Thomas

The problem is, clearly, that there are emergencies at all.

This

is

something

another

wrong

way of saying that

with

American

there is

pluralisrn

-- or,

only

t h r ou g h

the

kind

ex perimentat ion

of

J efferson spoke of will democracy

mean

anything, then we will realize th at p art i cipation is itself

a

valuable

thing.

Through

it

we

become

ourselves and are not defined by the bureaucracies to which we belong.

anyway, the way we work it. me, that if our

Ihat won ' t be easy. These days the crises come too

democratic theory requires co ntinu ous part i c i patio n

rapidly, perhaps, and there is no way to repeal the

by

division of labor short of utopia

That

s ornething

all

citizens,

pos i t ive ly

is,

it

and

seems

it

disc ourages

to

do e s, our it.

Why

political system would

anybody

toward

solving

any problem

But the f ir st step

is to know what t he

I t's a v er y costly and

problem is, and I aln inclined to think that, today,

literally unr ewarding thing to clo, unless you regard it

vast num b er- s of people are finding out. This seems a

as recreation, which most people don't. Where, for

new

most people, is any return?

arrogant as so often before The words the people are

participate in normal times?

Literally there is no

return since the rewards in the pol itical system dre controlled

by

the

groups

bureaucratic

broker-pol iticians that form it

and

the

As Anthony Downs,

an economist, sarcastically p uts it

"In a democracy it

son

speaking

of are

part icipation, largely

the

not

right

cI irectecl vvhere they ought to be

blind,

words;

greedy they

or

seer

1

toward responsib Ie

experimentation with cornm ni t y, with selfhood, ancl with freedom.

is irrational to be well informed" -- unless, of course, But that is the point: it is no t

there is an emergency

a

case

of

unless.

Emergencies

will

arise

when

bureaucra tized interest groups immobilize each other, and the emergency likely will be solved at a cost in democrat i c f r eed om Thus what is ratio nal nature

of

reali/e

the

our

is to real ize the crisis-prone

interest-group

villain

is

us.

If

democracy,

in

"

and

represe n t i n g "

to us,

interest groups define f or us what our social rewards shall be, it is our fault. We are the

c iti L e rl s ,

and also

we are the bureaucr-ats. It is up to us to understand

10

So I say feeble though YOll are, peo ple , charge ahead. You are the only hope you've got.


A EW ERA In InTE nATionAL ELATiOnS? bV Wolfg

n

UI

icht

A new era in internat ional relations has begun : "A

wars, tired of having U.S. so ldiers die for purposes

gener'at ion of peace." Or has i17

often but dimly perceived by the A merican people or outright oppo sed by many of them.

Presi ent Nixon and the First Lady taking tea with

A question at this point: Does a visit by the A merican

the Mao's in Peking while the war winds down in

president in Peking and the smiling faces of Chou and

in South Vietnam

Mao signify, indeed, (as an editorial in PLU's Mooring

steadily declining and the day drawing near when the

\lietm an.

U. S.

troop strength

Mast puts it) that we "and a quarter of the human

last American GI will have left Indochinese soil. The

race will be friends again"? Is there such a thing as

administration'S disengagement policy in South East

friendship among countries? Countries, after all, are

Asia and the Far EClst opening up power vacuums

societal

which other states, for a change, can attempt to fill.

purposes, not the least of wh ich is to guarantee a

The U.S. giant tired of playing policeman in local

specific way of life.

organizations which developed

for certain

11


I t so happens that Pek ing and Wash ington represent soc i e t al

s y s tems

with

diametrically

opposed

the Soviets and the U.s. share in common (such as urban

blight,

alienation

in

value-scales. Whereas we believe that individual rights

environmental

pollution,

transportation

are important and are willing to go to great lengths to

etc) than aspects that divide us.

defend

the

sphere

of

private

discretion

an

industrial

society,

dilemmas,

against

government encroachment, the Red Chinese leaders

These writers stress that governmental functions in

teach

our society, too, have increased over the past four or

that there

are

primarily

the rights of the

collectivity as interpreted by the Communist Par-ty.

five decades, to the point that public agencies now

No dissent

collect more than one third of the GNP for purposes

is tol erated, not

even in party ranks_

Witness the gigantic purge of the late 'sixties, the so足

of re-allocation_ With an extended Social Security

called cultural revolution_

system and with compulsory health insurance and

It

are we not much closer to living in a socialist system

guaranteed minimum income just around the corner, would

seem

that

s e l f - preservation,

Peking,

would

in

have

the interest to

condemn

of a

value-system such as ours and any government that promotes such a system, Friendship between America and Mainland China will have a chance to prosper only if the friends keep at a respectful distance so they cannot examine the warts on each other's noses.

than we realize or care to admit? All this may be so - and yet, in the U.S there is no single

party

in

a

position

to

outlaw

political

opposition; we still believe in majority rule and not in the imposition of minority rule based upon Marxist dogma. And as long as we cl ing to our system despite

Friendship, it would appear, is possible only among

all of its imperfections and they cling to theirs, there

coun tries which share political values in common. But

will be no convergence.

this axiom likewise is not borne out by experience. a

But while there may be no convergence, does this

Marx ist-Communist ideology and yet have become

mean that Cold War politics will have to continue?

utterly

Cold War politics which became a two-way street in

80th

China

and

hostile

Peking and

to

the one

Moscow

Soviet another.

Union

profess

Rivalry

between

for- influence over developing

1947 with the containment of Soviet expansion and

countries seems to outweigh the shared interests of

which

promoting

solidarity

relations:

classes

a nd

the

among

the

s t r u g gl e

world's a g a i nst

working the i r

led

to

the

bi-polar

the West vs.

the

view

of

international

East, Communism vs.

Democracy has left us with a dangerous heritage, the

"cap ital ist-imperi alist oppressors"

nuclear arms race_ Since 1969 both powers have been

I n contrast t o China, the Soviet Union offers the

the missile race (SALT). And yet, the race continues

negotiating about the desirabil ity of putting a stop to

society and

at an ever increasing speed: U.S vs. USS R; neither

there are voices which point toward an increasing

side trusting the other to stick to an agreement on

convergence between the U.S. and the Soviet systems.

limitations.

They emphasize that there are more problems that

Whether a multipolar power constellation will put a

picture

12

of an advanced technological


stop to the nuclear race is anybody's guess. Will China

therefore be tempted to exploit the present pattern

content itself to play in the minor leagues together

of global instability for the sake of their own political

with Britain and France or will she continue with her nuclear weapon developmentl Will either the U.S. or the U.sSR. call it quits as iong as China continues? Will Japan and Ind ia and any number of other states decide they need nuclear devices of their ownl

ends". In

a

multipolar

democratic

states

world are,

w,ith

indeed,

shifting at

a

alliances

disadvantage,

Robbed

of an ideological undergirding for the understanding of international relations ("to make

the world safe for democracy") they may find it

In one sense, we have entered a new era in international relations. With the admission of Red

d i f ficult

China to the

consensus for a foreign policy which one day may be

United

Nations

and

Washington's

to

establish

the

necessary

domestic

acceptance of this fact, the bipolar constellation of

directed to support a Communist system and the next

the 'fifties and 'sixties has changed into a multipolar

day a mil ital'y dictator.

balance

of power constellat ion

Wi II

it bl'i ng a

"generation of peace"? The only th ing we can be sure of is that it will, at least initially, usher in a greater degree of uncertainty in international relations. Gone are the days of Cold War "certainties"

Will

A merican

disengagement

policy as actively

pursued now in Asia extend to Europe? President Nixon says no, but Congress may not leave the administration much choice, Pressures are begi nning to build for recalling American NATO contingents

On the other hand, some of the countries and blocs

stationed

may devote more time to domestic developments

stronger as troop costs in Europe are seen as

than to international relations. One scholar speaks of

the major factors in the continuing balance of

the

payments deficits of the US

"communication overload" that governments in

advanced technological

societies are exposed to,

meaning that most of their energies will henceforth have to be devoted to meeting the increasing demands for services in the domestic field, a new kind of isolationism.

the

in

Europe,

performance

Such pressures will become

of

the

one of

Dissastisfaction with

NATO

partners m igh t

contribute to a withdrawal of American forces to the North American continent. US. mil ital'y disengagement in Europe, whatever the

make a meaningful and sustained foreign pol icy

circumstances, would play into the hands of the Soviet Union. Moscow has been straining hard to bring about a European Security Conference which presumably would come up with a document sanctioning the status quo in Central Europe and

increasingly difficult. He expresses the opinion that

leave Moscow free to concentrate its attention on her

"social and political fragmentation in the communist

frontiers

states

oontinuation of

Another one speaks of "mounting global anarchy" and

of

"social

and

political

fragmentation"

in

developing as well as industrial countries which will

might

come

somewhat

later",

presumably

beca us e of th eir tighter control over their populations "that some of the Communist povvers may

and

with

China. the

Status

Quo

would

mean

Elbe-line as the Western-most

frontier of the Soviet empire. It probably would also mean some kind of recognition of the principle of

13


"peaceful

co-e x iste n c e

of rival social systel

IS"

and

the Kremlin's right of military intervention to prevent in

"counter-revolution"

Eastern

Europe (8reshnev

Doctrine) . withdrawal from \tVestern

might provide the necessary push for the

Comrnon Market

alliance tovvard building its own

nuclear deterrent and integrated defense system and cause it to make th

step from a lumbering economic

giant to an integrated pol itical power

or

the

lack

of

it

is

should be regarded as underdeveloped. The underlying used

synonymously

desirable_

with

-

the term frequently

industrial ization

rs

It will create jobs, bring about a higher

standard of living, induce people to spend more on consumer goods to the point that they will come to prefer a high standard of I iving over large fami Iies. No more population problems But there is no easy formula for development. Some

To indulge in funher speculation, what about the

governments believe in state-controlled economies,

futllre of the US

others in free enterprise or in various mixtures of the

6th Fleet in the M ed i ter ranea n ?

Would it re m ain? If not, who would

u n d ertake

triple function that it presently fulfills the

Southern flank of

free

Israel's foreign policy and, to

the

two. Some countries encourage the inflow of foreign

protection of

investment capital, others scare potential investors

E u r ope, b a c k sto p for SOrl

eextent, protection

of Western oil interests in the Middle E stl An

analysis

of

international

observers consider- a

relations would

be

foremost moral postulate for

industrialized sopeties

The iSSl

e

a id to developlIlg countries.

has not been able to provide a

c-

talyst for

internat ional cooperation as had been hoped_ For one thing, the world is not simply divided into hav e

and

WmiJlex

have-not nations. There are

internCltionClI

plane

a

g e o g r aph ic-s t r a teg ic, ideo logical,

e th n

Reality is m uch more

multitude of divisions on the

and

they

are

determined

econo mic:,

by

n a t ionalist,

ical and rei igious factors. A Imost any

of these factors transcends whatever solidarity there might be among deve loping countries. Incidentally, how does one determ ine whether or- not a cou ntry falls into the cleveloprnent category? I s the GNP sole

criterion;

Is

an

oil-rich

sheikdorn

illjtcrClte pO!Julation a developed country?

away with their nationalization policies

Most of the

less d e velopecl countries are as much interested in guaranteecl markets as they are in foreign loans. Here

incomplete without mention of an issue that many

14

industrialization

assumption is that development

On the other hand, a U.S Europe

Usually

considered as an indicator as to whether a country

with

the an

it is lack of willingness on the part of industriClI ized to

open

nonreciprocal

countries

base

up

their

to

the

own

markets

on

half-manufClctures

a

and

primary commodities of the LDC'S which could very well

become

development

a

major

snag

on

the

path

A Ithough industrializecl

toward

nations have

lately shown some half-hearted generosity on the question of tariff preferences, there are signs that point in the opposite direction trying

to

stave

High-wage countries

unrestricted

off

imports

from

low wage countries. In fact, it is quite likely that the "exportation AFL/CIO

of

calls

development

jobs" it

aid

may be

.

as

the

cause a

it

in

President

of

the

reexamination

form

of

of

government

sponsored loans or- private investment abroad. With the shak iness of the currency arrangements of the

Western

world

and

the

threat

that

such

uncertainty poses for free trade, it may be that future


trade relat ions will have to be compartmental ized in international trade-zones or blocs. Such blocs would probably contain (as the Common Market already does) some major industrial powers and a group of sponsored developing nations, a sort of development symbiosis. Such arrangements, at any rate, would help us to adjust to the development process on a manageable

Persona Reflection by Bruce Bjerke

scale. Development, after all, does not seem to be a transitional

stage

at

the

end of which the LDC

reaches graduate status as an industrialized country. Rather,

as

we

become

increasingly

aware,

the

so-called developed nations cannot afford to let the technology

gap

close

between

them

and

the

"developing" countries. There appears to be a need to stay ahead, technologically speaking, to introduce new products and initiate new production processes, to retrain labor and shift investment primities to new sectors as the old ones are put out of business by imports from low-income states.

After four years the time has almost come for me to leave

Pacific

Lutheran

University. The years have

been good ones and I welcome the opportunity to offer a few

parting I-eflections on my experience.

These views are undoubtedly biased and corne from an admittedly limited perspective but perhaps some will find it interesting to see how one student sees the last four years of change and growth at P.L.U. Dr.

Robert

Mortvedt was the president of PLU.

d uri ng my fresh man year

Under his leadersh ip the

institution had ach ieved the stab i Iity necessary to

A new era in international relations does seem to be

attract fine

making its appearance. Whether it will be inspired by

reputation. From a student standpoint however, this

human itarian

concern

is

another

question.

And

educators

administration

was

and

also

build a solid academic

the

year

of

compulsory

whether humanitarian concern will suffice to tr-iumph

chapel attendance, strict administration-defined dress

over

and

the

enormous

complexity

of

international

relations is yet another one.

Or, Wolfgang Ulbricht has taught !merna ional relations

conduct

codes,

and

virtually

no

student

participation in the decision making processes of the

t

PLU

smce

1967. He formerly served as adm nlstrative ssm nt to the German Peace Corps director and 05 an assistant to th pokesman of the Europe n AtomiC Enefgy Community.

university. New attitudes and approaches to college education

were

rising

on

campuses

across

the

country, and I have great respect for the rare courage and wisdom Dr. Mortvedt displayed when he stepped aside after (flak ing so

many contributions

to the

institution and called for new leadership to begin the new stage in the development of PLU In the fall of 1969--my sophomore year--Dr. Eugene Wiegman

was installed

as the

ninth

president of

Pacific Lutheran University. Looking back on it, it

15


seem s

that

u n i versity

so me

very

co m m u n i ty

d iverse

l o o k ed

el ements

in

the

o p t i m i st i ca l l y to h i s

a r r i v a l as t h e f u l f i l l m e n t o f t h e ir own part i cu l a r --a nd often

co n f l i ct i n g

ho pes

and

ex pectat i o n s for

the

f u t u r e o f the i n st i t u t i o n . T he a i r was fu l l of new beg i n n i,ngs as D r . W i eg m a n began h i s ad m i n i s tration as the " Y ear of Jo y " . Every c a m p u s fa ct i o n pr essed to have an

i m port a n t v o i c e i n t h e new o rd er a n d

st udents

were

d e c l ared

h is

no

e x cept i o n .

op enness to

Whe n

Dr.

W i eg m a n

student pa r t i c i pat i o n

in

po l i c y for m u la t i o n at a l most ever'y level i t was l i ke p u l l i ng

the

co r k

from

a

l o ng -fer m e n t i ng

bott l e .

Du r i ng t h ese f i rst m o n t h s scores of new i d eas were b ro u g h t

forward

as

the

u n ivers i t y ' s

co n s t i t uent

gro u p s began th in k i ng a nd d i sc u s s i ng and p l a n n i ng toget h er

for

the

new

per iod

of

growth

and

deve lo p m e n t . A n d t h e new d ream s a s w e l l as so me l o ng h e l d h o pes eventu a l ly beca me rea l i t y w it h i n nova t i o n s l i ke : t h e fo u r -o n e-fou r co u r se

and

st ructu res

of

i n co r p o ra t i ng

calenda r ,

the

i nt e r i m

co re-req u i re m ent un iver s i t y g reater

p l a n n i ng

power s

p ro g ra m ,

sy s t e m s , of

and

and

new new

governa nce

part i c i p a t i o n

for

stud e n t s , facu l t y and sta f f . S t u d e n t s for the f i r st t i m e gai ned a p e r m a n e n t plac e i n a l l o f t h i s a n d a t t h e sa m e t i m e were i n v ited t o d evelop a n d eventu a l l y p u t i n t o p ra ct i ce po l i c i es a l low i n g f o r greater person a l fr eed o m

and

co n t r o l over l iv i n g g r o u p cond i t i o n s .

T h e en t i re i n st i tu t i o n seemed to b e o n t h e mov e a n d i t w a s a n e x c i t i ng t i m e t o b e a part of i t . T h i s year o f new

b eg i n n i ng s o n

ca m p u s a l so

saw

the

peak of

nat i o n a l st u d e n t consc i o u s ness ev idenced part icu l a r l y by

t h e V i et

N a m War morator i u m s . W e ha d

l it t l e

pat i ence i n t h o se d ay s a n d i t seemed for m a n y o f u s that a l most a n y t h i ng cou ld b e acco mp l i s h ed i f o n I y enough peo p l e wou l d care enough t h a t d ay .

16


It wasn't long however, before the dream ing stage had

for commitment from all sides to work together to

to

of

make the university prosper and to give the new

administe r i ng and polishing the new progra ms, and as

programs a fa ir trial. O ne of the advantages of a small

give

way

to th e hard

work

and tedium

the exciteme nt began to die down o n campus the

institution like P L U is its abil ity to experiment with

Kent State tragedy delivered the final b low to any

an educat io nal i n novat io n a n d after a reaso nable trial

remai n i n g illusions about the power of stude nts as a

per iod modify or even d i scard it without nearly the

group in i n fluencing national politics Stu dents a n d

trauma o r cost wh ich accompany such changes in a

faculty were also lear n i ng t h a t w h H e Dr Wiegman is

larger

flex ible and w i l l i ng to listen to a ny proposal , he has

program should be put i nto practice merely for the

ideas of his own for the future of P . L. U " and that it

sake of novelty, but a w illi ngness to co n s i der new

and

less-flexible

i n stitutio n .

Certa i nly

no

is impo ssib Ie for any man to sat isfy all the co nfl icti ng

ideas and plan different approaches is necessary to

expectations

the life and vitality of an educat io nal i n st itutio n .

of various groups

in the

un iversity

co mmunity. Thus the year was not without conflict as definite policies and progra ms gradually emerged. Oppositio n was exp ressed by some who felt too much had been attempted too fast, from others who feared that someth ing of that wh ich is central to the na ture of the i n st i tution would be lo st in the sh uffle, and even from some of the early reformers who fe l t too much

had

been

compromised

and

too

l ittle

acco mplished,

T h e current year, my last a t this un iversity , h a s appropriately been named the " Y ear o f Reflection". Pacific Lutheran U niversity has come a lo ng way in the past few years and m ust novv deter m i ne what course to follow in the co m in g years

Like most

people who are co ncerned for the future of P. L. U . I have my own hopes fo r the d irection it will take. First of all , I hope that the university leadership w ill recognize that the institution cannot do all things and

I t seems to me, however, that by far the majority of

must rather use its energies and resources to do so me

the un iversity community suppo rts the directio n I see

things well , P . L U. ca n not hope to compete with the

the

university

head i n g ,

namely

towards

greater

ra nge of specializat i o n s offered by larger inst itut ions,

perso n a l freedo m for its co nstituents and towards

and moreover there is no j u st if icat io n for duplicat ing

greater academic strength. At the sa me t ime , in my

'Ivhat other sch o o l s are i n a better po sitio n to offe r .

view, very little has changed all that mu ch. The

Lar'ger univers ities provide obv ious advantages for

i m po r t a n t

many students, but I believe that if P . L . U . can accent

commitme nts

to

C h r i stian

higher

educat ion are as much alive as they ever were , and

and develop those elements which make it distinct. it

only some of the m a n n er and style th rough wh ich

w i ll attract those who are looking for a fine, small

these are expressed has been altered to meet the

university wh i ch i s deeply co mm itted to learning , the

changing needs of th i s age.

well-bei ng of its students and the teach i ngs of Christ .

Dr. Wiegman christened the academ ic year 1 9 70-7 1 as

education and a l ienated stude nts I hope that Pacific

In

th is

age

of

mega-un iversities,

mass-produced

the "Year of Com mitment" and while he certainly

Luthera n will rema i n small in size and retain the great

mea nt m uch more than this, I ' m sure he was calli n g

potential for close interact ion between those who are

17


a part of its life . St udents learn not o n l y from the

instruction and example--the t\iVO most powerfu I tools

lecture hal l , laboratory and

of an educational i n stitut ion.

l ib rary

but a lso from each

other and from the exa m p l e of teachers who profess dedication to a disci pline and a way of life.

F i nally , I

Second ,

give

determin ing the futur'e of P L U . will not be satisfied

increas i ng emphasis to the Iiberal arts as the core of every student's educatio n . A m a r k of a f i n e

w i l l v igorously pursue th is institution's potentia l for

I

hope

that

this

U niversity

will

univers ity--it seems t o me-- is i t s ability to i m part so m e

sen se

of what it is to live well-before the

u n d ergrad u a t e b eg ins h op e

that t h i s i n st i tut i o n

i n creased

w i l l not

p ro f ess i o n a l iz ation

d ep a r t m e n t s and co o per a t i o n

and

in t e r a ct i o n

a r ea s of stu d y w i t h w h ich no

p r ev i o u s

co

suffer the ba ne of

and

nt a c t

in

segregat ion

between

the

they

may to

i n to

have had little or

expand into

n ew

\ive l l as m e m b el's o f t h e

w i l l recog n i z e t h a t P L U . B i b l e ' co l l eg e ,

nor

prospective stu den ts as

p resent is

u n i ve r s i t y co m m u n i t y

n e i t her

f i n is h i ng sc h oo l ,

and is I'ather b y definition a n

i n s t itut i o n ded i ďż˝ a t ed

t o the cu lt ivation o f the

m i nd

C e r t a i n l y an i nv a l u a b l e

part of education c o m e s f ro m exposure to and p a n i cipation i n a variety of cult u r a l , soc i a l ,

for

a

political and athletic activ i t i es fo r -

t h ese m a k e

f u lle r and r icher l i f e , but first a nd foremost t h i s

i nsti tu tion exists f o r the pursuit o f k no w l e d g e continual polish ing o f one mind by a no t h e r .

and

th e

F ourth, within the context o f all that h a s j ust been said , I hope that this universi ty will continue to be concerned w ith

the whule

life of its students.

H owever, I do not bel i eve this can a ny longer be accompl ished through constant superv ision a nd the ad m i nistration of petty discipl i ne , but i nstead can be most effectively conveyed through the chan nels of

18

excellen ce . That means i nvesting hard wmk and a lot of money to attract f i ne teachers and recru it capab Ie It

students.

a lso

means

constant

attention

to

improv i ng and r efining programs of instruction , and cant i nued

care for each

individual student.

anything less than that si m p l y Wh i l e

still

wo u ld n ' t be

a h ig h ,sch o o l st u den t I a t t e n d ed

prese n t a t i o n s

by

B ut

enough. a series of

fro m co l l eg e s

ad m i s s i o n s o f f i ce r s

th r o ug h o u t t h e N o r t h west , a nd a f t e r h ea r i ng a l l d a y t h a t " R ed b l' i c k U

avenues of t h o u g h t a n d pe r so na l d ev e l o p me n t T h i rd , I h o p e t h at p a r e n t s a nd

to let i t be j ust a nother sma l l Lutheran college but

va r i o u s

students to venture

o r der

of

rat her en cour ge

schoo l s , b u t w i l l

en co u rag e

d i sc ip l i n e s a rld

I

his more speciali7ed study

hope that those who have a voice in

I

was

very

h a s j u st w h a t every s t u d e n t w a n t s "

su r p r i sed

and

i m p ressed

repr esen t a t i v e f ro m P . L U . o pe n ed h i s t h e staterT l ell t

m

yo u

'

re

the kind of

i g h t b e i n terested i ll wh a t we h a v e

can p r o m i se

wi l l d o

the w it h

" P a c i f i c L u t h e r a n U n i ve r s i t y i s 110 t

everyo n e , b u t if you feel vvh o

w h en

remar k s

ev e

you

ry t h i ll g

t h e y ca n to h e l p yo u

you 're l o o k i n g fOI' . "

T h o se

to offer ,

Ill dny people here

t h a t t h e r e are

peo p l e

p r o rn i se m a n y t i m e s ovel' , and I

I

who

f i nd what

have k ept his

s h a l l miss them .

BnlCIl BIer ke IS grad ual i ng rom P LU thiS sprmg A h i story malar . he has been active III student government and drama. He w i l l altend Oxtord Unlvcl sity III Cambridge England . next fa I ali P LU 's first R hodes Scholar .

for

perso n


News Notes PU B L I C F O R UMS A I R

A ccord i n g to Pro f . S t uart

sciences, a nd D r . Vernon S t i n tz i ,

PU G E T SOUND I SS U E S

Bancrof t , t he p roject a d v i so r ,

dean o f t h e Schoo l of B u s i ness

o n e of t h e goa l s of t h e P L U

Ad m i n i strat io n , was selected by

A research project i n tended to

S choo l o f B u si ness Ad m i n istrat i o n

F o r t Lew i s over proposa l s offered

deve lo p greater p ub l i c under­

i s t o cont r i b u te to the ed u cat i o n a l

by the Un iver s i t y of Cal i f o r n i a

stand i ng o f current Puget So und

d eve l o p ment o f the co m m u n i t y .

a n d t h e U n iversity of 0 k l a h o rna.

r eg i o n issues was cond ucted at

" T h i s p rogra m i s hel p i ng us

PL U t h i s spr i ng by 1 5 sel ected

f u l f i l l t hat respo n si b i l i t y , " he

st udents.

sa i d .

The st udents, a l l o f who m were enro l l ed i n an ho nors se mi nar offered by the P L U S choo l of Busi ness A d m i n i strat i o n , began t h e i r research in ea r l y F eb r u a r y . To p i cs to be covered i nc l uded no-fa u l t i n sUI'a nce , Tacoma

The prog ram ca l l s for s i x ei ght­ week c l ass terms a year beg i n n i ng

Deve l o p ment of t h e p roject to

Aug . 2 1 , 1 972. C lasses w i l l meet

date has gai ned the who l ehearted

for s i x h o u r s a week , w i th two

support of the b us i ness ad m i n is­

cl asses offered each t er m . The

trat i o n fa c u l t y a t P L U a nd s i m i l a r

degree req u i res co m p let i o n o f

projects fo r t h e 1 9 72 fa l l semester

e i g h t co u rses and associ ated work ,

and the 1 9 7 3 s p r i ng semester

selected fro m a m o ng f i ve offer i ngs

are a l read y b e i ng p l a n n ed .

in soc i o l ogy , th ree i n b u s i ness ad m i n i stra t i o n , one in eco n o m ics

po rt expan sio n and better ser,

P L U O F F E R S G R ADUATE

v i ces to the e lde r l y .

PROG RAM AT FORT L E W I S

and o n e in p h i l o so p h y .

T h e f i rst grad uate degree prog ram

Sch i l ler d e sc r i b ed the p rogram a s a

F o l low i ng so me s i x wee k s o f

ever offered a

presentat i o n a nd d i scuss i o n of the

p l an n i ng a nd stud y , t h e st udent s

b eg i n th is fa l l u nd er the a u sp i ces

f u n d a m e n t a l s o f h u man r e l a t i o n s ,

moved i n to t h e co m m u n i ca t i ve

of P L U . The new prog ra m offers

w h i c h i n t u rn w i l l l ead t o more

F o r t L ew i s w i l l

phase of the project. A ser ies of

m i l itary perso n n e l a master of

effective ind i v id ua l s in wo r k o rg a n i ­

week l y p u b l i c f o r u m s were co n­

arts d egree i n so cia l s c i e n ces

z a t i o n s and more mea n ing f u l

d u cted on ca m p u s, led by t he

with e m p h as i s in h u man relat io ns.

students t he m se l ves together

pa r t i c if-l a n t s i n so ciety. " T h i s pro­ gram i s a b o u t peo p l e a t work i n

w it h g u est ex perts fro m t h e

Mad igan G eneral H o s p i t a l a nd

b u s i ness, gover n me n t a l and

organ iz a t i o n s and how th ey may

M cC hord A i r F o r ce Base w i l l

academ ic co m m u n i t ies.

be m o t i vated to work together ,"

a l so par t i c i pate i n the p ro g r a m ,

he sa id .

w i th c i v i l i a n st udents ad m i tted o n a I n A p r i I the st udents beg a n a

space ava i lab l e b a s i s.

Per ma n e n t u n iversity f a c u l t y w i l l

ser ies a i red by KTN T -T V in

The d egree pro posa l , pr epared b y

most cases. Dav i s C a r vey , assistant

Tacoma S u nd ay even i ng s at

D r . J o h a n nes A . Sc h i l l er ,

pro fessor ot b u s i n ess ad m i n i strat i o n ,

9 30 p . m t h r o ugh May 28.

cha il' m a n of t h e d i v i s i o n of so c i a l

w i l l serve as on -post coord i n ato r.

s i x -week televi sion panel prog ram

i nstr uct the o n -post p rogra

in

19


News Notes G RANT ST R E NGTH ENS

study and provides add itional

200 COURSES O F F E R E D

PHYSICS R E SEARCH

opportunities for gifted students

THIS SUMM E R

PROG RAM AT P l U

involved in the department's honors program.

A $ 1 5 ,400 Cottrell College

More than 200 courses, workshops and foreign tours are bei ng offered

Science G rant from the Research

The proposed research is a theo­

this summer through the P L U

Corporation of New Y ork has

retical investigation of the frequency

su m mer study progra m. Regular

been awarded to the P L U

dependent polarizability of matter,

sessions will be held June 1 9 to

Department of Physics.

the most elementary optical

J uly 1 9 and from J uly 20 to

response function to the inter­

August 1 8 .

The grant will be used to support

act ion of radiation with atoms and

research in polarizabi I ity of

molecules. An exa mple of the

I nnovative workshops, lasting

matter, according to Dr. K. T .

phenomena occurs when light

from four days to a full month,

Tang and Dr. Sherman Nornes,

from the sun interacts with the

dominate the summer curriculum,

physics professors at P L U.

atoms and molecules in the earth's

along with a complete offer ing

atmosphere

of regular courses.

they indicated, will support a

Accord ing to Nornes, attempts to

Seven workshops for laymen and

post-doctoral teaching -research

compute the infinite sums that

clergy are being offered through

fellow who will be added to t he

make up the dispersion formula

PL. U's CHO I C E agency . Education

P L U physics staff. It will also

have either been prohibi t ively

offerings include 34 courses and

provide summer salar ies for the

di ffi cult or have yielded results

1 5 workshops; 1 4 courses and 1 0

principle researchers and summer

of unknown accuracy. Anticipated

workshops are offered in physical

stipends for three st udents.

studies at P L U w ill hopefully

education. E i ght workshops are

provide new criteri a for j u dging

scheduled in music and nine are

The major portion of the funds,

The funded program is unique in that it ( 1 ) adds a young scholar to the staff who can contribute both as a researcher and teacher while gaining valuable professional experi ence; ( 2 ) frees professors Tang and Nornes from a portion of their teaching load to parti cipate in the research program; and

(3) adds emphasis to the under­

20

the rei iabi Iity of these measurements

offered in sociology, along with

and to stimulate further exper i ­

regular courses.

mental work in this area. The English department offers a As important as the research

children's literature summer tour

aspect , however, is the ex pansion

of E urope from Vienna to Copen­

of quality undergraduate educa·

hagen.

tion and research opportu nit ies , Tang indicated.

A sampling of new cours e and workshop titles include history of

graduate research program, helps

racism, the Silent Maj ority,

prepare students for ad vanced

homose xuality, drug use education,


News Notes problems of inner c i ty schools ,

professor of art, was awarded

Rev. Broker ing spoke at chapel

women's liberation and Chicano

the 1 9 72 Distingu ished Teacher

services and to many small,

culture, offered through the

Award, presented annually by

personali zed groups d uring his

socio logy department. Reform

the Wash i ngton State

stay . H is message emphasized

and revol ution in contemporary

Automob ile Dealers' Associati on.

ways in wh ich people can ce l ebrate

Pacific Northwest are among the

Fred Tobiason, assoc i ate

ordinary experiences in the i r dai I y lives.

Amer ica, the Reformation and the

Christ through even the most

offer i ngs in history, and the English

professor of chemistry, was

department p l ans courses in

named the Blue Key Outstandi ng

crea t i ve writing and literature of

Teacher of the Y ear.

Black America.

ST U D E NTS H E A R PO L I T I C I A NS

B R O K E R I N G G U EST F O R A full range of courses in music,

STA L E Y L E CT U R E S E R I E S

Jesse Unruh, 1 970 Democratic cand i date for governor of

art and drama is also offered. Rev. H erbert Brokering,

Cal ifornia, and Kevin Ph i l lips,

author and instructor at

syndicated column ist, polit i cal

business administrat ion, educat i on,

Luther Theological Seminary,

analyst and author, were the

humanities, music, natural sciences

spent three days on the P L U

headliners at Pac i f i c Lutheran

and social sciences.

campus i n April for a series

U nivers ity ' s spring symposium

of talks and d iscussi ons on the

enti tled , "Po I iti cs: Elect ions

Special studies for h i gh school

subject, "A Celebration of the

'72 - I ssues and Trend s".

students include the Northwest

Gospel" .

Graduate studies are available in

The week-long symposi u m also

Summer Music Camp, a forens ics institute, a youth organ institute

Broker ing's v i sit was sponsored

featured a broad slate of county,

and four five-day basketball

by the Staley Lecture Seri es,

region and state political leaders.

clinics.

a project of the Staley Foundation

I nquiries regarding the P L U summer study program should be addressed to Dean of Summer Sessions, P L U .

P R O F ESSORS H O NO R E D Two outstandin g P L U teachers were honored early in May. Keith Achepohl, associate

of N ew York which was

Timothy Strege , a P L U student

establ ished at P L U in the fal l

who ran for a seat on the Taco ma

of 1 9 69 .

city counc il in 1 97 1 , was sympos ium chairman. Accord ing

Staley Foundat ion projects

to Strege, the sy mpos i u m was

are based on the conviction

intended to g ive students, now

that the message of the

armed with the vote, an

Christian Gospel, procla i med

opp ortu n i ty to hear the issues

in its historic fullness, is always

and know the cand idates

relevant and meaningful to

representing a broad range of

any generat ion.

viewpo ints.

21


University Notebook H i stmy C l ub b a n q u et in A p r i l

A q uest io n n a i r e see k i ng perspec t i ves

R o a c h , a ret i red A r m y o f f i cer

on goa l s and object ives of

co m p l e t i n g h i s u nd ergrad uate

H i s t o p i c was " Ba ck g r o u n d

Pac i f i c L u t h e r a n U n i vers i t y

stud i es at P L U t h i s spr i n g , w a s o n e

Aspects of U .S J F ar E a st R e l a t i o n s

was d i st r i b u t ed i n M a r ch to

o f 1 5 s t u d e nts i nv i ted t o t h e co nfer-

S i nce Wor l d War I I a n d T h e i r

a l l P L U co nst i t uencies.

ence and the only student from

Effec t s Toda y" .

states west of the M i ss i ss i p p i R i ver

Board o f R eg ents, ad m i n i strators,

The 500 del egates attend i ng i n-

students, f ac u l ty and a sa m p l ing

e l u d ed ed u ca t i o n a l spec i a l i st s ,

o f pare n t s , a l u m n i a nd c l ergy

elected o f f i c i a l s , co m m u n i ty l ea d e r s ,

took p a r t in the pro ject . Quest i o n s

parents a n d students,

both se n i o r s , represented P L U

cur r i c u l u m , cui tura I - i n t e l l ec t u a l 足

at t h e A m er i can F o r e n s i c Asso c i 足

re i i g i o us em p h as i s, u n iver s i t y gover na nce and many o t h er t o p i cs.

The s u r vey was a f u r t her step

T h ree d i st i ng u ished l ec t u rers i n the

a t i o n ' s N a t ional to u r n a ment i n

field of i n ter n a t i o n a l affa i rs v i s i ted

Sa l t L a k e C i t y , U t a h , i n A p r i l

the P L U ca mp u s t h i s spr i ng O n l y t w o tea m s , Go nzaga

taken by t h e P L U C o m m i ss i o n on Acad em ic E x ce l l e n ce to eva l uate

Dr . S te f a n S c h n e l l ,

a l l facets of

j o u rnal i s t , d i s c u ssed West G e r m a n

u n i v e r s i ty

l i fe w h i c h

Ja mes C o l l i n s o f Sa l e m , O r egon

and Marv i n S m i th of T aco m a ,

d ea l t w i th fa c u l t y me r i t s ,

a

G er m a n

r e l a te t o t h e deve l o pment of a n

po l i t ics a t a progra m spo nsored by

except i o n a l acad e m i c env i r o n m e n t .

the fore i g n l a ng uage a n d po l i t ica l

U n i v er s i ty a n d P L U , were se l ected to represe n t the northwest states. F i fty-four tea ms took fja rt in the d eb a te to u rn a m e n t .

sci e n ce d epartments i n M a r c h .

" N ew Doors to M a i n l a nd C h i na "

P L U se n i o r C ha r l es R o ach

was t h e to p ic o f a M a r c h l ecture

represented t h e S t u d e n t N t i o n a l

b y R obert E k va l l , a n author who

E d u ca t i o n Asso c i a t i o n at the

spen t f Ilany yea rs w i th A m er i ca n

N at i o n a l Co nference o n Ed ucat i o n

d i p l o m a t i c a n d m i l i tary represe n 足

f o r B l acks i n Wash i ngto n , D C ,

tat i ves d ea l i n g w i t h t h e C h i nese ,

in April

b o t h befor'e a n d after t h e

T h e co n ference, sponsored by

C o m m u n i st takeover o f M a i n l a nd Ch ina.

the C a p i t o l H i l l M i no r i t y C a u c u s ,

22

A f i ve-day ca m p a i g n foc u s i n g stud e n t at t e n t i o n on t h e prob l e m o f hu nger, p a r t i c u l a r l y i n P i erce Cou nty , was c o n d u cted at P L U in ear l y M a r c h , M o re t h a n 9 0 p e r c e n t of t h e res i d e n t s t u d e n t s on ca m p u s part i c i pated i n a 24- h o u r fast o n t h e f i n a l d a y of the pI'oj ect , T he a p p ro x i m a t e l y

fo c u sed o n the I i nger' i n g p ro b l e m s

A ret i r'ed U .S . S t a t e D epart ment

$1 ,500 saved b y P L U F o o d

of ed u cat i o n r e l a t i n g to d e p r i ved

o f f i c i a l , G eorge H e l l ye r , was t h e

Serv i c e was d o nated to food

co rnm u n i t i e s.

fea t u r ed speaker a t t h e a n n u a l

banks in the Taco ma area,


University Notebook 1)

P L U's Ma yfest Dancers successf u l l y

co mpl eted thei r f i r st o ut-of-state perfo rma nce to ur ear l y in A p r i l . A perfo rmance at Di s n e y l a n d was o ne of t h e h ig h l i g h ts of t h e tour, w h i c h w a s wel l recei ved t h r o ug h o u t O r ego n a n d C a l i f o r n ia .

2)

Sta l e y Lect ure Ser i es guest

Rev. H erbert Bro k e r i n g talks with u n i ve r s i t y m i nister Rev. Gordo n La t h r o p a nd students. (See story page

3)

21 . )

A p r i l saw t h e brea k i ng of gro und

for a lec t u r e-u n i t additio n to t h e P L U N u rs i n g -Art B u i l d i n g . T h e ent ire b u i l d i ng wa s f o r ma l l y named A ida I n gr a m H a l l i n memo r y of t h e l a t e M r s . Cha r l es I ngram of Tacoma d ur i ng private dedication

7. The lect ure

cer e m o n i e s May

ha l l add i t i o n w i l l have sea t i n g for

1 20 perso n s .

C u l t ural a nd e n terta i n m e n t events were a m o ng the h ig h l ig h t s of t h e spr i ng seaso n . A m o ng the programs were

( 4!t h e

spr i n g m u s i ca

"T h e K i n g a n d

I";

a n d h i s Orche s t r a ;

(6)

I,

( 5 ) Sta n

Kenton

t h e O s i po v

5

4

Ba l a l a i ka Orchestra w i t h si ngers a n d dancers f r o m t h e Bolshoi Opera a n d Ba l l et; a nd

(7)

I Sol i s t i de Zagreb,

a Yugoslavi a n chamber orchestra .

6

7

23


University Sports BAS E B A L L, T E N N I S TEAMS SU R G E A t t h e m idway m a r k i n P L U ' s spo rts seaso n , two act i v i t ies 足 ten n i s a nd b a seba l l - a p peared t o b e m a k ing a r e m a r k ab I e resu rgence f r o m l ac k l u st r e 1 97 1 seaso n s , g o l f c o n t i n ued i t s w i n n ing way s , w h i l e trac k a n d f i e l d coaches were gett i n g rather " j u mpy " . M i k e B e n so n ' s t e n n i s sq uad , o n l y 3- 1 0 i n 1 9 7 1 , loo ked for h e l p t h i s year to back up ret u r nees J i m S heets, Ted C a r l so n , a nd To m B a k e r . They g o t i t fro m newco mers Dave K nodd el , Pau l B a k k e n , Ken C u rren s, a nd Vern Swenso n , who w o n 22 of t h e i r f i rst 24 matc h es as t h e L u tes took seven of e i g h t co n t ests. The L u te B a seb a l l er s , 4- 1 3 i n l ast years' N W C race,

P L U go l fe r s , defend i n g N WC ch a m p i o n s, wen t und efeated t h ro ug h reg u l a r season d ua l match p l ay and w o n the N o r thwest S m a l l C o l l ege G o l f C l ass i c . F reshman M a r k C l i n t o n j o i n ed veter a n s Jeff S p e r e , B la k e Bost r o m , E r i c F'est e , a nd G a ry R i ck on t h e L ut e tee sq uad . S p a r ki' i ng i nd i v i d u a l perfor mances were in abund a n ce in t rack , b u t tea m sco r i ng suffered because of a shortage o f ma n power i n j u m p i ng events. T h e L u tes ca me u p short i n a l l fo u r d ua l meets. P L U showed co n s i d erab l e st rength i n t h e w e i g h t eve n t s , getti ng record - b reak i n g effo rts fro m Dan P r i t chard ( 5 2 - 3 '12 ) i n t h e shot a n d S t a n P ietras

( 1 54-1 ) i n the d i scu s , w h i l e fresh man Kev i n K n a p p to ured the t h ree m i l e in 1 4 : 30 . 3 , anot h er P L U stand ard .

i nc l u d i ng a v i ctory over L i n f ie l d , defend i ng N A I A n a t i o n a l

24

U n i versity o f Wash i ng to n , Har sh man was t h e o n l y coach selected t h i s year for t h e N A I A ' s g r eatest honor.

bo u n ced back to w i n seven of t he i r f i rst 1 3 l o o p g a mes

Lute mentor fro m 1 946-58 a nd now head coach a t t h e

N A I A CAG E H A L L O F FAM E P I CKS P L U G R EATS

I verso n , a Lute stand o u t fro m

1 956-59 , o n e of t h ree n a m ed

ch a m p i o ns. P it ch i ng w a s P L U 'S

Two of t h e most i l l ust r io u s

greatest asset as M i k e B erger ,

f ig u res f r o m t h e Go lden E ra

is t h e f i rst pl ayer se l ected fro m

Jo h n R oe b er , Dave B e n n et ,

of P L U b a s k etba l l , M a r v

the Pac i f i c N o r thwest in 20 years.

t h i s year i n t h e p l ayer ca tegory ,

and R o n C h a p m a n co mb i ned

H a r s h m a n a n d R oger I v erso n ,

He is current l y a teac h er and

to g i ve the L u tes a l ow y i eld

were named t h i s sp r i ng to t h e

co u n selor at Pen i ns u l a H ig h

rotat io n.

N A I A B a s k e tb a l l H a l l o f Fa me.

Schoo l i n G ig H a rb o r , Wash .


Mr T W. Anderso n . Vice chairman Dr Paul Ba ndo Mr GoodWin Chase> Mr Carl Fv nboe

Mr Douglas Gonyea

Mr Melvin Kn udson

Mr Warren Peterson Mr Howard SeOI ! Dr . E ugen e Wiegman , P LU president

Dr. Carl Bennsn Mr Michael

Dederer. chairman

Rev Dr . A G. F,el l ma n

Mr John Nelson

Mr. G raid Schimke

Dr RoV Schwarz

Rev. Dr. Clarence Solberg

Dr. Albert Stone

Rev

M r s Esther Aus Mrs Wi n ifred Herbert Mr . GalYen 'rby Rl'II.

Duane Tollefson e

Mr John BuStad Mr Donald Corn e l l , 51Cf'etarv Mr Ronald Douglass Rev, Frank ErIcksen

Mr ChestIII' Hansen

Mr . VIClor Knutzen

Dr. Je$te Pflueger e o

Dr . Kenneth Erickson Rev Philip NatWlck •

Mr

E Lee Barton

Rev. Glenn � .

.

Husbv

.

Rev Dr Lo ui s A l men. LeA Or George Arba ug h . faculty flev. Walton Berton. A LC Mr. A.D, Buchanan, treasurer Mr . Norman F ,,',el. ALC

Mr Don Yodel . St udent Rov. lvar Plhl, LCA


Reflections 1972 may  
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