Page 1

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

SEPTEMBER 17, 2015 I VOLUME 92, ISSUE 1 IMASTMEDIA.PLU.EDU--------

SOCIAL MEDIA 0 V E R L 0 A D Is PLU clogging up social media pipes?

MATTHEW SALZANO Mast TV General Manager salzano@p/u.edu There are slightly more than 3,300 students at Pacific Lutheran University, but more than 120 Facebook pages associated with PLU - roughly 5 percent of the student population is running a social media page. Even though there's a Residential Life page, there are individual pages for every hall on campus. There are pages for Dining and Culinary services and the Diversity Center even though there's a Student Life page. Is the PLU social media presence overdone or on track? According to Social Media stakeholders on campus - both students and staff - having several pages effectively disseminates information and reinforces community. Sophomore Joel Thomas is the Public Relations Director for the PLU Residence Hall Association which coordinates programming and advocates for students in Residential Life. He oversees the active RHA Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages, posting about upcoming events to roughly 700 Facebook "likes" and more than 200 Twitter followers. RHA executives work with executives at each ~all's R~siden_tial Hall Council, so part of Thomas' job rs workmg with each RHC' s PR Director. Since every Residence Hall has their own PR Director, each of the 10 halls also has its own social media accounts. Thomas says this allows "more direct, personal engagement" between residents and leadership, as well as gives everyone "a sense of pride in their hall." The Director of Content Marketing who oversees the official PLU social media pages, Lace Smith, expressed the same thought - rather than being redundant, the proliferation of accounts tied to the PLU residential experience allows for more connection to happen and information to be heard. Associated Students of PLU's Civic Engagement Director sophomore Melissa Munson runs the student government social media pages. She recognizes the ability of social media to "make sure student's voices [are] heard" and get "the campus excited aboutASPLU events." In terms of improvements, she said PLU could be doing more campaigns like the "It's on US" campaign, which promoted ending sexual violence on college campuses, and further "publicize our contributions to our communities." Along with running PLU's official accounts that amount to over 48,000 Facebook likes and almost 4 000 Twitter followers, she advises other social media gr;ups across campus. Smith compares her job to a garden: social media around campus used to be a garden without a gardener. There were some delicious vegetables and beautiful flowers in the garden, but it was also riddled with

underbrush and weeds that distracted from the beauty. Lace is the first person to be focused on gardening the PLU soc~al media landscape. She's done some weeding - remov1i:ig some defunct Facebook pages and working t~ consohd~te a few accounts - but she thinks that any site producmg valuable content is helpful in the end. Creating engaging, useful and utilized content isn't easy. "This is work," Smith said. "It's fun, fantastic and a great adventure, but it still needs the care and feeding." Besides managing content, she works with others to grow their presence. Much like teaching a garden class, she says she plans to host a social media lunch where student leaders can chat about social media from the concept to the minute details of how an event should be covered. Thomas hasn't declared a major. Munson is on the Pre-law track, majoring in Business. Smith studied Studio Art and finished her MBA. While these three are some of the largest social media stakeholders on campus - due to their defined roles - none have officially studied Public Relations and Advertising, a concentration in the Communication major. Senior Amanda Williams is a PR Student and the Public Relations Director of the co-curricular MediaLab the student-run, faculty-advised PR firm on campus. ' She understands the values Munson and Thomas express about social media; however, in her opinion as a communication scholar and practitioner, she sees a problem. "Separate accounts are dividing the various groups rather than uniting them," Williams said. "Students don't want their media feeds to be bombarded with a particular organization. Instead of following every accm.~nt, they will only follow the ones that directly pertam to them. Groups can't effectively use social media if it is not reaching the target audience." . Williams suggests moving to a consolidated system with only one PLU account that would feature diverse groups across campus. If anyone would do that, it'd be Smith. Marketin and Communications is currently developing conten hubs for plu.edu that would pool together various videos, photos and social posts from accounts across campus. Williams's idea, however, doesn't appear to be in the works. A consolidated system would silence too many valuable events that may not be of campus-wide importance, Smith said, and the proliferation of media accounts end up promoting each other. "Content comes from everywhere on campus. We don't go in and sorta stifle or squash [all th media accounts on campus] because all the information they're putting out just feeds up to other people," Smith said. "It's never in vain when you're putting out information. It's our job together to make sure the accounts are the best they can be. The beautiful thing about social media is that you don't do it alone."

V IDE O C OMPON ENT: Students share their opinions on PLU social media accounts and how they're used. Check it out at mastmedia.plu.edu.


2NEWS

THE MAST

SEPTEMBER 17,

2015

In black and gold, a new team assembles dake Bilyeu Guest Writer

bilyeujc@pfu.edu A new team has assembled to combat incidents on campus dealing with the degradation of specific groups of people. Aiming to entertain, five student athletes from Whitworth University in Spokane, Wash., were suspended from their upcoming women's soccer game after

dressing in blackface and afros. Often the cause for suspension would be missing a team meeting or cheating on a class assignment, but this incident went way beyond the norm. The players said they meant no harm. They wanted to laugh it up while portraying the famous Jackson 5 pop group. The players' actions went viral and the damage caused to their community wasn't unnoticed. With incidents like this happening at Whitworth, Pacific Lutheran University is taking steps in the opposite direction.

As students moved in this year they found a door~anger fashioned on their doors publicizing the new bias incident response team . ...

This year, the Bias Incident Response Team (BIRT) was established on campus to protect students. The Bias Incident Response Team's mission is to protect students from any act with the intention of degrading specific groups of people. These actions can come from an individual or group, like the Whitworth situation, or they could arise from a more methodical effort. In either instance, the BIRT will to react in an attempt to educate rather than agitate. Students have already seen BIRT around campus after the residence hall doorknobs were fashioned with the BIRT mission statement last week. Stuen Resident Assistant Ian Smith (sophomore) noticed the sign. He said he's glad FLU has a group that actively prevents offensive and degrading actions. "Everyone should actively be responding to bias in a way that brings awareness to others about how their words or actions can be exclusive or bias to others," Smith said. "If we need a response team to bring this awareness then I think it's a good thing." The BIRT is not alone in their fight against biases. Other groups, such as Student Rights and Responsibilities, Campus Safety and the University Dispute and Resolution Committee have also joined in the fight to ensure safety for all Lutes.

Five Whitworth soccer players received a one game suspension for dressing up in blackface.

Should a situation similar to the Whitworth Jackson 5 scenario arise at PLU, rather than trying to silence the situation, groups like the BIRT aim to educate students about the about the occurrence and reconcile with the offenders.

-

An .a ll new hall of Ordal

Vice President of Student Lite Joanna Royce Davis, Resident Director of Stuen and Ordal Angel de Jesus Gonzalez, President Thomas Krise, Resident Assitant Director Riley Burleigh (senior) and Vice President Resident Hall Council Kieran Kim-Murphy (sophomore), all gathered on a sunny afternoon to cut the ribbon simultaneously.


SEPTEMBER 17,

THE MAST

2015

NEWS3

Two new faces make for

great paces

LIBBY POSTOVOIT News Writer postov/g@plu.edu

New Resident Directors with a missi_on joined ~ampus. this year looking to b!ing c~ange. This year, PLU wel~omed P~ul Metellus as Resident . Director of Pflueger and Tolulope "Tol~" ~aiwo as Resident Director. of ~ong a_nd Hmaerhe. Thm.~gh the new. RDs hail fr?m diverse backgrounds and hope to build up the Lute community m different ways, they are united m tfleir capable leadership and passion for servmg students.

Why PLU: "PLU is a very special place, it's a very friendly place, but it's also a purposeful place. This school has a lot of values that resonate with me. And I love working with college kids because they're at the point in their lives where they're trying to figure what they want to do for their career or they're trying to figure out who they are. I love working in Res Life at PLU because I'm among so many awesome students who are figuring things out. " What she is most excited to share with the Lute community: "I want to build a lot of connections between Hong and Hinderlie. Hinderlie and Hong share task forces, so all the R.A's, RHC members, and faculty members come together to plan events and initiatives for students. The last R.D. started that. I want to continue that, bringing my skills in building teams. Team-building and team recognition are two of my biggest

CSI:

strengths and favorite things. I'm really excited to change things up a little bit, but maintain the great work people have been doing over the past couple of years." Most embarrassing PLU moment (so far): "I was making dinner, and I accidentally cooked chicken for too long, so the fire alarm went off for a little bit. But it was the right time to have that happen because A) I learned that the fire alarm works, which is awesome, B) it was a good cooking lesson, and C) there were no students around." How she wants to impact PLU: "I want to create a place for students to feel at home. Feeling at home and belonging is very important to me. At the end of the day, I want to be that RD known for creating a safe home and belonging environment for my students."

Why PLU: "I work with a lot of great people in PLU's Housing and Residential Life. And the students. They're why I'm here. I went into this field because I love working with college-level students and I love helping them develop into who their full potential can be. There's a lot of great interactions that happen with students here at PLU." Most embarrassing moment at PLU (so far): "When I first moved in during the summer. I was sitting in the first floor lounge. People were just staring at me. I was like, 'Why are they staring at me? Oh, maybe they've never seen me before.' They were definitely thinking, 'Who is this

person coming out of the RD apartment?' It was really funny, a little awkward, a little embarrassing, especially because I was in my very casual 'I'm at-home' clothes.'' How he wants to impact PLU: ''A couple of things. I want to give my students a positive experience, help them think about something differently, help them grow, and help them think more critically about what they will do with their passions. I want to help build up res life. We have a lot of great resident directors who have done great work. My goal at the end of my time at PLU is to have as much of a positive impact as they had.''

Campus Safety Investigations Taken from weekly Campus Safety reports

Medical Aid in AUC CallC 253-535 Email Campus . csin@plu.edu Or visit campus

lower level of Ha

A student reported to Campus Safety (CSAF) that she had been assaulted by her roommate her off campus apartment. CPFR responded to evaluate the apparent injuries. Pierce County Sheriff's Department also responded to the scene for a report.

Medical Aid in Foss CSAF assisted the on-duty RA with an odor of marijuana investigationWhen CSAF arrived they found the door to the room unlocked and no one present. A visual room search was conducted.The odor was present within the room but no marijuana or contraband were in plain view. This incident has been forwarded to SRR for review.

Animal Control (CSAF) responded to the track and contacted a PLU student for a dog bite. The student stated that an unleashed pitbull bit him while he was running on the track. Minor injuries were sustained. CSAF was unable to locate the owners of the dog. The owners were described as a male and female couple in their 50' s to 60's. No further action taken.


4 NEWS

THE MAST

SEPTEMBER 17,

2012

Advocates get students .to their far away dreams JEFF DUNN Copy Editor dunnja@plu.edu Students that dream of travelling and seeing the world have a group of advocates on their side to help make those dreams a reality. The Wang Center for Global Education has three new Sojourner Advocates this year. Each is ready to assist and provide support for prospective, active and former Study Away students at Pacific Lutheran University. "As a Sojourner Advocate, I help plan campus-wide events to encourage and inform students to study away," junior Sojourner Advocate Sam van Roon said. "We also provide welcoming upon return and, most importantly, getting people excited about all that awaits them in this great big world of ours." Seniors Sonja Schaefer an d Kalie Saathoff also became Sojourner Advocates this year. Schaefer h as studied away in Beijing and the famed Antarctica/Arg!=lntin a trip. Saa thoff studied away in ' Windhoek, Nam ibia and Honolulu-.

"Living in a giant metropolis with a non-English-speaking host family was exactly the independent ad venture I was seeking," Schaefer wrote on the Wang Center website. Van Roon said he never considered studying away before enrolling, but with the help of the Wang Center, he studied away in Brussels. While there, he had the opportunity to visit nine other countries. At PLU, 49 percent of students study away at some point in their college careers. "I enjoy having the position and network necessary to increase that number as much as possible," van Roon said. There are more than 20 resources on the Wang Center's website to help with funding, many of which are specific to certain study away locations. "If funding a semester abroad seems daunting, don't worry- it really is affordable," van Roon said. "There are more reasons than can be listed in the amou nt of time it takes to just ac tually apply," van Roon said. "You'll m eet incred ible people, see amazing sights, learn m ore than you thou ght imaginable, and have a lot of autonom y to have the unique, indiv idualized trip

No swiping new Lutecards MATTHEW SALZANO General Manager of Ma$t TV salzanmp@plu.edu

There's not usually news regarding the Pacific Lutheran ID Card known as the Lutecard. That's not true this summer. Starting with Xavier, buildings are switching over to contactless entry-tapping and not swiping; and to accompany this advancement is a completely redesigned Lutecard. It took four PLU organizations to accomplish this task. First, the advocate for redesign and the manager of cards. He is Adam Sripranaratanakul, Manager of Concierge Services - the department which manages Lutecard services - and he decided "it w ould be fun to introduce a new design," when he heard about new card technology being rolled out. A redesign was a way to "get students excited about the PLU spirit and colors, as well as the new power of the card." Second, on the actually changing buildings side, there is Pat Henness, Building Access Administrator, and Ginger Peck, Director of Auxillary Services. They have been working on a long-range project - since 2008- to switch all building access from card swipes to contactless entry. In order to switch the entry system, they had to switch the cards. The cards switched in 2014, when Stuen opened from remodeling, featuring contactless locks on interior doors (Ordal now features that technology, too). All the new cards, in addition to those of Stuenites, are dualcredential card s, featuring a contactless

chip and a magnetic stripe. Both contain data necessary to tell the techonology w ho they are and if they have access, dining dollars, Lutebucks, printing money, and so on. This summer, Xavier - which was one of five buildings on campus that used a traditional key-and-doorknob unlocking system - went through an approximately $20,000 update to contactless entry, Peck said. The four other hard-key buildings, Ramstad, Names, Memorial and Colombia Center, will be the next to receive this update. The funds come from the Auxiliary Services Building Access budget. In the last budget year, Peck says they were given a "fast track" to update this technology. Hard key buildings will be the most expensive, as they must start from the ground-up; buildings with magnetic swipe access will vary in price but will cost "significantly" less. There is no estimated finish date for nonresidential buildings, as completion will rely entirely on what budget allows. There is also no plan to replace swipe technology related to dining or retail (for example: copying at the library or purchasing from OMM) as that would be "too much of an expense," Peck said. While there will be some "initial investments," in the words of Peck, contactless technology may save PLU money in the long run. The new tech is much more economically sustainable, Henness said, because cards can easily be shut d own and reprogrammed when lost. If a key is lost, a whole lock or system of

you want to have." As of right now there are several Study Away opportunities still available. The deadline to apply is September 30. The J-Term international trips still open include China, England, Italy, Martinique, and Uruguay. Students can spend J-Term within the state at Holden Village, Neah Bay, or even Tacoma. "To me, being a Sojourner Advocate means having the opportunity to encourage and assist students campuswide to take advantage of the amazing opportunities that PLU has to offer," said van Roon. For more information on studying away check out the Study Away Fair. It will take place on Sept. 23 from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. in the Anderson University Center Regency Room. At the fair students will have the opportunity to meet and learn about PLU sponsored Gateway semester programs, faculty-led J-Term programs, and non-PLU Approved p roviders will be available. In add ition, resources on funding these program s w ill be there to lea rn about. An y m ore questions on studying away can be answered via the Wan g center at wan g.center@plu.edu.

!......

.E2 Q) co

..c 0

Cf)

Adam Sripranaratanakul STAFF

12345678

locks must be recorded, which eventually costs a "tremendous amount of money." The third group involved is in charge of residential halls - that's residential life. Tom Huelsbeck, Associate Vice President for Campus Life, said that every dorm built or remodeled after Stuen will have interior contactless locks. As for contactless exterior doors? "That's obviously the direction campus is going, but we haven't made any plans yet." Finally, the actual redesign - that comes from Marketing and Communications. The new card features the streamlined look of PLU most recently displayed in the Spring redesign of the plu.edu website. The new card was designed by Simon Sung, Executive Creative Director, who is responsible for many of PLU's graphic designs. This is the first redesign of the card since 1996. Prior to 1996, cards were individually laminated . The new card w ill be issued to incoming

first-years when they arrive on campus in Fall and incoming juniors, due to a Spring 2015 ASPLU legislation which funded refreshing the entire class' Lutecards. Returning sophomores or seniors can opt to purchase a new Lutecard, which is $10 to trade an old card for a new one, and $30 if the old Lutecard is not turned in. Concierge Services also guarantees that students who need dual-credential cards (such as for Residential Hall room entry in Stuen or newly-renovated Ordal) will be given them at no charge. Lutecards are infamous for their tendency to peel and disintegrate over time. Sripranaratanakul says the newlydesigned cards will lose this reputation they are "much more durable" and do not peel. Faculty and staff who want the new, tougher and better-looking card will have to wait Concierge Services runs out of their stock of dual-creden tial cards with the old design.


SEPTEMBER 17,

THE MAST

2015

A&C5

Bumbershootin' fa festiva fun SAMANTHA LUND Editor-In-Chief lundsr@plu.edu Music festivals are my favorite. When everyone else is daydreaming of beaches and sexy girls, I'm dreaming of seeing my favorite artists on stage. This year, Bumbershoot had not only The Weeknd, but Ellie Goulding, Zedd and Chance the Rapper- it was full of amazing artists that were on Top 40 radio and Spotify's Top 100, but I was the most excited to see Robert Delong. Delong, a Seattle-native,

alone made up my running playlist of 2014 and when he was on stage, I'm pretty sure I fell madly in love and haven't been able to stop listening to his music every since. Tickets to Bumbershoot were about $150 ... $150 to fall madly in love? Seems like a fair price to pay.

MATTHEW SALZANO Mast TV General Manager salzano@p lu.edu

David Mair '18, Sevryn Modalhl '16, Samantha Lund '16 and Matthew Salzano '18

I'm that sober 20-year-old at music festivals that looks like he's completely smashed. I jam out no matter what position I'm in - sitting, standing, walking, laying, using the restroom - if the music is good enough. Sitting up in the upper level of Memorial Stadium, I raged with The Weeknd. I had heard a few of this Toronto R&B singer's songs previously on Top 40 radio, but I had no idea how infectious they'd be after they'd

r Matthew Salzano '18, Samantha Lund '16 and Sevryn Modalhl '16,

DAVID MAIR News Editor mairdl@plu.edu Sasquatch was my first music festival and now festivals are one of my favorite ways to enjoy a concert. This year's Bumbershoot had it all - the artsy booths, the overpriced food, and the amazing music. Due to my love of hip-hop and jazz, Chance the Rapper was the artist I was

most excited to see. Unfortunately, my friends and I weren't in the pit. But that did not stop me from enjoying one of my favorite innovative artists. It's such a great feeling to be able to see an artist that I listen to literally all the time. To actually hear him perform my favorite songs was the absolute best.

Sevryn Modalhl '16 and Samantha Lund '16

be live. I rocked out with him as he - just one guy- commanded the entire stage, but I knew I was hooked when I couldn't stop humming "Often, often ... " for literally all of the next week. I'm actually playing his new album "Beauty Behind the Madness" right now. When The Weeknd makes his way back near the Puget Sound again probably in CenturyLink - you better believe I1l be there jamming (in my seat).


THE MAST

6A&C

Best of Summer:

.

2015

The Mast editors' entertainment faves

Movie: "Dope" is the best hip-hop-based movie of the summer. Yes, "Straight Outta Compton" was a pleasure to watch, but it had star power and a true story to draw people in. "Dope" premiered at Sundance, made its own music and created a unique plot about three hip-hop-loving nerds who end up selling drugs to get into Harvard. The music was stuck in my head, the film was beautiful, relatable and engaging, and fit perfectly into a cultural landscape where hip-hop culture is becoming recognized as a formidable, multiqimensional art form. .

SEPTEMBER 17,

DAVID MAIR News Editor mairdl@plu.edu

Album: Dr. Dre's new album, Compton: A Soundtrack, made a beautiful splash a week before Straight Outta Compton hit theatres. Confusion and surprise struck me as I saw that Detox didn't flash across the iTunes banner. Though Dr. Dre still delivered, many prominent and unknown artists rapped over Dr. Dre's continued flawless production. I just hope I don't have to wait another 16 years to get another Dr. Dre album.

TV Series: Summer typically lacks television premieres, making the season the perfect opportunity to binge watch shows on the internet. This summer, I discovered the brilliance of "Rick and Morty". The show follows the misadventures of a drunken scientist who takes his grandson on his intergalactic adventures - the prime cartoon to watch when the sun shined way too bright.

DR. DRE EAZY-E ICE CUBE

MC REN DJ VELLA

Movie: Straight Outta Compton blew me away at the box office. It brought to the screen one of the most influential rap groups ever. Holes in the story did pop up a couple times. With Ice Cube and Dr. Dre having the biggest hands in the project, they did not disappoint. A great combination of awesome music and storytelling.

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE See what Lutes picked as their best TV show to binge watch this summer. Check it out at mastmedia. plu.edu.


~

I I

I

THE MAST

SEPTEMBER 17, 2015

A&C 7

Burgundy is the new black SARAHGIOMI Mast TV Assistant Producer giomism@plu.edu Like Taylor Swift, Lutes should never be out of style, so stocking up on pieces that follow this year's fall fashion trends l& essential. Get xeady to look fabulous at every lunch, class and lab throughout the week. With the start of a new school year, fashion choices are very important to

COLOR: While walking anywhere in the city of Tacoma, one will see a trend of color. Black, white and grey are classic color trends that will always be in. This season, however, exchange some of these hues with colors like burgundy, mustard and fatigue green. These colors can be mixed

how a student presents his or herself on campus. Many aspire to look their best as they meet their professors and classmates. It is entirely too early to start wearing sweatpants to every class, so following this fall's new fashion trends is the perfect way to make the most of one's closet. In the Pacific Northwest especially, there are three key aspects to being fashionable and wearing trends that are currently in: color, texture and statements.

with the neutral blacks and whites, but can also be fashioned with warmer colors. Fall, after all, is the season of deep colors and warm contrasts. Many aspire to look their best as they meet their professors and classmates. It is entirely too early to start wearing sweatpants to every class, so following this fall's new .fashior:.t:rends is the perfect

way to make the most of one's closet. In the Pacific Northwest especially, there are three key aspects to being fashionable and wearing trends that are currently in: color, texture and statements.

STATEMENTS: Statement items to look for this season are oversized scarves (they're not just for covering hickies ), statement necklaces and sweaters. Black jeans are also a classic look that won't being going out of style anytime

soon, and will therefore be an excellent fashion investment. Adding a chunky statement necklace and a sweater to a little black dress will make the fashion statement stand out, and further draw the eyes of an audience. Adding a large statement item or warm

vibrant color draws the eye to the outfit, the person, and the personal statement. Elaborate your weekend apparel or Monday morning outfit by taking a simple statement like a little black dress or ripped black jeans and adding more.

~

0

a I Ci Samantha Durano '17 and Reilly Hartke '17

~

Texture/Layers:

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE

In addition to warm colors, adding texture and layers to looks is what fashion icons like Olivia Palermo, Gigi Hadid and Kendall Jenner are illustrating this Fall. Layers add more depth to outfits and are able to bring the style to a whole new level.

Back to school is more than syllabus week. It's experimenting with fall trends, developing your style and being the most trendy students on campus. Will you go back to sweatpants or will you be fashion forward this fall?

PLU Professors are "Open to Interpretation" been

tool Ind resource for mearungs of ords but eome words meanmgs that go beyond their definition. This August,. Pacific Lutheran Uruvers1ty lallrtched its new podcast "Open to Interpretation" This faculty-developed podcast airs once a month, and features Professor Amy Young and various guests taking time to examine the meaning of words in depth. The first episode of "Open to Interpretation" is centered around the word "advocacy Young and her featured guests posed questions about the real definition of the term and what that idea means to the students and faculty at PLU "That's something that people talk about all the time,' Young said. "But...what does that even mean? What does it mean to be an advocate?" Young chooses words that are "trending on campll.S or on social media or m con and whose meaning could have Ultiple

•:JQ~11:r ~1.: af Pt

our professors," Powers added. 'Most professors at PLU do not lecture as often as they would at other uruversities, but [would} rather have a conversation instead." Young wants to use "Open to Interpretation" to cultivate intellectual dialogue, but would also like to include an aspect of inclusivity and simplicity to the monthly show. "[I'd] really like to keep it conversational and non-nerdy," Young said. The podcast also overlaps with Young's scholarship, which examines how intellectuals engage outside of journals or books. I think this is something where . . I can talk about JSSUes that are important to me or to the community," Young said. "And {I can} give kind of a platform for other faculty to practice being more community onentated, civically engaged, etcetera in a different way."


8 FEATURE

THE MAST I SEP'Il


:MBER17, 2015

FEATURE9


.10

THE MAST

OPINION

SEPTEMBER 17,

2015

F'rst-Year

COURTNEY MIRANDA Opinion Editor mirandcs@pfu.edu

We've all had that terribly embarrassing first-year moment, whether it be spilling lunch across The Commons linoleum, losing your $75 dorm-key on the first day or striding in ten minutes late to your first class because you read your schedule wrong. So here at Mast Media, we decided to inform the embarrassed that you're not in it alone.

"I tripped and fell in front of everyone at my academic advisor meeting." -Victoria Nishii

"My first week of school, I had a meeting, but I needed to shower first and I only had a half an hour. So naturally, I locked the door when I went to take my shower, and I came back and I had locked myself out. I was stuck out of my dorm in just a towel. "

Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447

EDITOR-IN CHIEF Samantha Lund lundsr@plu.edu

NEWS EDITOR David Mair

A&CEDITOR Brooke Thames

SPORTS EDITOR

"I enrolled for a class, but I didn't know I was enrolled. So naturally, I never went. Then I received an email saying that I could get a passing grade if I came and took the final. Then I woke up and it was a dream."

-Julia Berenson

"I was walking home by myself and I jumped off the curb oi,itside the front of T-stad and sprain~d my ankle and limped upstairs." -Adam Baldwin ... -

Steve McGrain

PHOTO EDITOR Mckenna Morin

COPY EDITORS Jeff Dunn Paris Franklin

CHIEF DESIGNER Colton Walter

-Nick Brandenburg

MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER Matthew Salzano sa/zano@plu.edu

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER Genny Boots

•

Putting the "L" 1n DAVID LEON Guest Writer nguyendf@plu.edu Over the years I have struggled with what it means to be a "Lute." I came to Pacific Lutheran University in the fall of 2010 with an open mind and heart, ready to take on this institution. But over the course of my last five years at PLU the same question continues to bother me. When I was 5 or 6 years old, I suffered a stroke and was pronounced dead for about 2-3 minutes. I am not religious and I'm barely spiritual. This is what happens when you've died once. People automatically formed ideas of who I am and why I am here simply because I am attending a college like Pacific Lutheran University. Just a week ago, a young woman on the confessions page commented on a post about how I, as a student here at this grand institution, should

be representing the community and myself because I work as a Diversity Advocate on campus. She meant religious representation. I deleted and blocked her from the page. This young woman does not know my story, nor does she care to, all she appears to care about is the religious and spiritual beliefs which are so heavily tied into the "Lutheran" part of PLU. This person tried to define who I am for me. I am paying to go to this school, I am not paying to participate in any religious or faith based club, activity, social group, etc. Pacific Lutheran University prides itself as a campus community that is inclusive of all gender identities, sexual identities, religious/faith affiliations and ethnic groups. That's fine and dandy, but the fact of the matter is that a significant population of the students are white, privileged, religious and, at times, clueless and unwilling to educate themselves

on the histories and stories of other students who don't look, talk or act the way they do. There are no courses on atheism, agnosticism and the like for students of non-faith. If you are going to preach about being inclusive, then show it. Accommodate students who struggle tremendously with faith and religion and don' t want to take many of the Christian based religion courses offered. Perhaps creating an alternative to taking a religion course for nonfaith students is a step towards an even more inclusive community. Students could, for example, take two alternative perspectives courses rather than the said religion course. The "L" in PLU does not define nor does it encompass the entire campus population and our views or beliefs.

EQUIPMENT & TECHNOLOGY ENGINEER Samuel Allenberger

ASSISTANT PRODUCER Sarah Giomi

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The responsibility of The Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu.edu by 5 p.m. the Monday before publication. The Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@plu.edu.

ANNIE BUNCH Cartoonist buncha/@plu.edu

Annie 1s a first year student ong1nal!y from Portland Oregon and has focused a s1gn/ficant portion of her interests 1n the \/!Sual arts. She 1s happily attenc/Jng PLU 1n pursuit of studJ17ng art history and stuc/Jo arts.


SEPTEMBER 17,

THE MAST

2015

OPINION

11

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR 路-

"

:f

~~

SAMANTHA; LUND Editor-in-Chief lundsr@plu.edu

Sometimes, even after budget cuts, pay cuts and faulty equipment, students in Mast Media get to have an absolute blast in the name of work and learning. This team, this paper and our new publication, Mast Magazine, is exactly that: FUN. You might have already seen our first issue of Mast Magazine. Early on move in day our General Manager of Mast TV, Matthew Salzano and. I hand delivered them to every dorm on campus in the hopes to get you all talking about the incredible new opportunities we're bringing to student media. This year, we're offering any student, of any reporting level, the opportunity to be a part of our team. Come and write an opinion column, report on your favorite sports team, or have your own television show; really, this is a place for you to learn, explore and have fun. In The Mast (formerly The Mooring Mast, but who knows what a Mooring is? Most of you thought it was Morning. Don't lie.) we want to cover things you, as students, care about and can engage

.

with. So, I'm making a promise from me to you that I'll only put content up that I think you can connect with. As a young adult, I'm obsessed with our Arts & Culture section this week, which covers all the music I love and have yet to listen to. Our sports section this year will also be bigger and better than ever, with a new editor Steve McGrain, who just completed an internship at ESPN, leading the way. Check out his fantasy football picks and tips throughout the season and stay up to date with our athletic program. I hope The Mast is to Pacific Lutheran University as trashcans are to DisneyLand: you're never more than twenty feet away from one. If you're interested in working with us or writing us a love letter, you can email mast@plu.edu or scream at us through one of our many social media accounts; Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Snapchat. Last but not least, don't forget to tune in to Mast TV every Wednesday for News @ Nine and every other day for more

student-produced content- who knows, you might even see some of our editors and your friends on TV one day. As always, I hope you enjoy this issue as much as we enjoyed making it. Find us every week at a news stand near you.

.

On-: e body A response to Nicole Arbour's "Dear Fat People" focus on improving their physical health instead of using it as an excuse. She consistently asserts her concern for the well-being of extremely overweight people, and insists, despite her awful vocabulary, that she cares about the people she is The body positivity campaign is a widespread criticizing. Moreover, if the amount of a person's extra fat content movement for the social acceptance of all different body is causing health issues-Arbour mentions heart diseasetypes and figures. Nicole Arbour's controversial You Tube video, "Dear Fat the woman posits that they should perhaps look into living a "healthier" lifestyle, such as being more active People" has gained and eating healthier over 3 million views foods. She even goes since its posting on Ab<>ut 2. 560-.DOU msults (U.32 socomfa) so far to say "You the 3rd of September. are taking your body News of its offensive for granted." ("You" attitudes and meanis in reference to the spirited language "35%" previously has reached the ears mentioned.) of people across the I personally think nation. that that is a very valid What most people and correct opinion find insensitive to have, and that it about the content is one that the body in Arbour's video positivity movement is the frequent use oftentimes glosses of almost violent over. language in regards What I believe to what she calls Arbour means to say, "the 35% of North Dear Fat People Nicole Arbour Original Video - YouTube and what I would like Americans who are www. 路outut>e.romtwalch?v=nV!bk7dilVE to bring attention to obese." The popular PHOTO COURTESY OF YOUTUBE in this article, is that online comedian perhaps the body makes the claim that "fat-shaming" does not exist, that even those who use the positivity movement needs to focus less on accepting your body however it is, but rather accepting your body in its "fat-card" are making a false claim to discrimination. At one point, she makes the benighted statement that healthiest form, whether it's categorized as "overweight" these people should "stop eating," a statement that is not or even as "underweight." In conclusion, what I, and only highly offensive, but is extremely dangerous to say. Nicole Arbour, think is that people need to focus more No person should ever be encouraged to abstain from on the health and well-being of their bodies, instead of just accepting a number on the scale-a healthy person giving nourishment to their body, ever, regardless of size. Sprinkled within her harsh words however are some is a happy person, and that's what the body positivity little nuggets of wisdom, or at least some good intentions. movement needs to be about. To quote the infamous The point she seems to be trying to get across is that if a YouTuber, "You got one body, one. If has to take you all person is larger (and they do not have a health issue or the way to the end." natural predisposition to be that way), that person needs to

RACHEL DIXON Guest Writer dixonrp@plu.edu

Credit on your Student Account? $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ Be sure to turn in a

Refund Request form to receive

your refund. First Fall 2015 refunds will be available October 2 (if all requirements are met). Refund forms can be found at Student Services or downloaded from the Student Services website.

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

-

-


12

THE MAST

OPINION

SEPTEMBER 17, 2015

BEN COX Guest Writer

coxbd@p/u.edu When I was 6 years old and just starting at a new school in a new country, I literally had a teacher threaten to leave me in a room full of rats overnight. I was traumatized and terrified of being fresh-meat for large rodents. Having been the new kid most of my life at various different schools, I can say that PLU did a wonderful, and fortunately rat-less, job welcoming the first-years to campus this year. Warm welcomes abounded to the point that I hardly even felt like fresh-meat. While the NSO programs and activities were awesome, another primary contributing factor to the success was the door-holding atmosphere that permeates campus. People from all over the country, with varying religious, political, and cultural backgrounds all seem to hold doors for, and be kind to one another. Coming from a Minnesotan it means something when I say that people seem genuinely nice here.

However, we often forget just how much of an impact the little things can have. In his song "Biscuits", AGAPE talks about a boy named Kyle who was planning to take his own life until a stranger greeted him. This

simple act changed everything; it saved his life. As current first-year student Alexander Theship-Rosales put it, "Happiness is found in the little things: a quaint pat of the shoulder, a true compliment, a dollar for a pristine pack of peanuts. Even though

there are often clouds overhead as one walks along the path of life it only takes a few small courageous beams of sunlight to brighten the way." Each of us can be or can share" courageous beams of sunlight" in different ways. Although PLU is incredible as it is, that doesn't mean that it can't always be better. I challenge you to find some way to be a little light in somebody's life every day. Nobody's perfect, and we all forget to hold that door open once in awhile. However, I firmly believe that making an effort to be consciously kind is the first step towards a better world, and that many hands make light work. Together we can do incredible things, and make this planet, where I intend to live for many more years, a place I want to live in through both rain and shine. The little things may seem little, but if I'm having a rainy day, a little 'hello' goes a long way. Being in Washington we are bound to have rainy days, but let's continue to make them rat-less, good, rainy days through the little beams of sunlight that can change everything!

SO, YOU WANT TO SEE SOME MORE? watch some VIDEOS

MAST

TV

tune in for our newscast LIVE AT 9 P.M. WEDNESDAYS online or on PLU Cable Channel 26

••• •••••• •• • • •••• • •

check out our SNAPCHAT

it's all online:

http://mastmedia.plu.edu

tweet us @PLlJMast

PLU

edia


SEPTEMBER 17,

THE MAST

2015

13 SPORTS

Steve's Stance: Seahawks Loss Before kickoff in St. Louis, were all amazed that the opportunity the last play the Seahawks offense to hand the ball off to a player with the executed was an interception with one nickname "Beastmode" was skipped. The logic behind the yard to earn before crossing the goal line for a touchdown, costing them philosophy is understandable; when Super Bowl 49. Fast forward seven there is one timeout and 20 seconds months, their fate was decided on a left, so call a pass then run the ball twice while using the last timeout in similar distance. Seattle had the ball on the four between 3rd and 4th down. The. only yard line with four plays to win back issuewas that Seattle wasn't ever able to back Super Bowls. 111e thought to rw:tthe last two plays. It is easy to be play process was simple, hand the ball off Skeptical of the result; if the 1 and let the most powerful running isn t there then throw the b away back in the league get you six points. and do not assume it is an automatic Instead, they opted to pass and the reception to the receiver. Worst case result was an interception by Patriots scenario, it is intercepted, but avoid comerback Malcom Butler and the that at all costs. What if the offense ran the Lombardi trophy not returning to the Pacific Northwest for a second ball three times? If Lynch is unable to $(.'or~ on second down, hurry t9 the consecutive year. All of the. country sat in shOcl.< l,i,Ue. .q£ scrlmrnage to spike the ball when the pass was thrown; Hawks and stop the clock seems reasonable? fans were in complete disbelief of the Wrong, that would waste a down, turnover, but no matter what side of then the team is left with only one play the spectrum the audience was on, we remaining and a timeout.

No matter the scenario we with. one yard to gain. imagine in our minds, the result will Is there still going to be always be the same, a Seahawks Joss. irritation among 12s and the offensive Now Seattle is in a two coordinator? Will we say J.R. Sweezy is minute drill against the St. Louis incapable ofrun blocking and therefore Rams to open the 2015 regular season. we need to find a replacement? Lynch Russell Wilson is methodically piecing has lost his "Beastmode" quality as a together a winning drive to be 1-0 runner? No, as 12s we won't because it after the first game of the year. The Seahawks are faced with a fourth and is the first game of the 2015 season, 15 one, down four With only seconds Jeft contests remain. Last year, the HawkS struggled through a 6-4 record after a in the game. What to do? If Darrell Bevel loss at Kansas City, but won their next throws another pass play and it seven games before losing in the Super fails, the 12s would be calling for his Bowl, Seattle is only 0-1. Yes, it was a resignation, or to at least give the play divisional match-up against the Rams calling duties to someone else with the and we are doomed in the NFC West game on the line. race, but the Hawks lost to them last They don't pass though, it is a year as well in St. Louis. run play to Marshawn Lynch and the Sleep well tonight 12s, we ~till result is exactly same as before. Ram .have ,Plenty of football left. defensive tackle Aaron Donald blows up Seattle's right guard J.R. Sweezy and Lynch doesn't even sniff a first down. Rams win, Seahawks lose again

The Mast Monday Night Football pick 'em D.J. Winter Who to pick, a team that has Super Bowl aspirations but' gets embarassed on opening day or a team who beat an NFL bottom dweller? Last Sunday, the Indianapolis Colts were far from being a contender. In the end quarterback Andrew Luck had a solid performance with two touchdowns, but those came during garbage time in the fourth quarter. Runningback Frank Gore was not the back Colts fans had hoped for after only recording a 3.9 yards per carry average. An average that would leave Colts fans wondering, why did we sign him from San Francisco? 1

line and a secondary equipped with Darrel Revis against Luck should make for an entertaining Monday. I have the Colts rebounding over the Jets, 35-14.

JETS

AT

=:··~ ~~:"~£;~:.:.:~cot.::rs

against Cleveland. The win should not impress anyone, the player who rushed for the most yards was back-up quarterback Josh McCown. New York has a stout defensive

Pick: Colts

"I like the Colts in this one simply because they are better and the jets QB situation is not good."

Record: 0-0

Nicoya Benham-Marin

"Andrew Luck's last name says it all."

Pick: Colts Record: 0-0

Juston Lind Pick: Colts Record: 0-0

Tahlia Terhune Pick: Colts Record: 0-0

Traeger Jarrad Pick: Jets Record: 0-0

"I think it is going to be a showdown between the Jets defense and Colts offense. New York did well last week but it was against a mediocre Browns offense. Fitzpatrick is not promising for the Jets. Colts win 24-17." "Colts will win for sure. All in all, I think they're a better team and Andrew luck will be able to move the ball. The jets had a few injuries last game so I don't think that11 help." "I don't know a lot about American football, I have heard the Colts no longer have Peyton Manning as QB and from the commercials I have seen, he often seemed like the poster-boy for football."

Hayden McCartney "Colts looked bad last week and T.Y. Hilton is out. Quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick is an upgrade over Geno Smith, as long as the Jets run game remains consistent. The Colts will end up 0-2."

Pick: Jets Record: 0-0

Kailyn Osaki Pick: Colts Record: 0-0

"To think Andrew Luck and company are going to have two bad performances is insane. Frank Gore and Andre Johnson should help with the injury to T.Y. Hilton."

Fantasy Football: Week 2 RECAP FROM WEEK 1: we have au learned from Week 1 of the NFL

SLEEPER: Donte Montcrief, Indianapolis Colts

season is that New England's quarterback Torn Brady is a man on a mission post Deflate-Gate. Titans rookie quarterback Marcus Manota shined against Jameis w·nston. What should Dallas do wttl'lOUt wide receiver Dez Bryant, out with a broken ankle for 4-6 weeks? This week )(Ou should consider;

Jets cornerback Darrell Revis will handle Colts wide receiver Andre Johnson, therefore he should expect quite a few targets thrown in the direction of Montcrief on the outside against the Jets third string corner.

QUARTERBACK: Andrew Luck, Indianapolis Colts His Week 1 score of 19.26 was not bad in their loss to Buffalo, he should

rebound against a Jets defense without cornerback Antonio Cromartie opposite of Darrell Revis.

TIGHT END: Martellus Bennett, Chicago Bears With Al:iZona cornerbacks Mathieu and Peterson covering wide receivers away from the middle of the field, Jay Cutler should be able utilize Bennett across the middle.

DEFENSE/SPECIAL TEAMS: Baltimore Ravens After stifling the Broncos offense, Baltimore will be dominant against the Oakland Raiders, who will be starting a back-up quarterback on Sunday.

WIDE RECEIVER: Calvin Johnson, Detroit Lions It had to be the zero pre-season snaps by Johnson that led to a lackluster two receptions for 39 yards. We can expect the "Megatron" to get back into his usual groove against Minnesota.

/


14 SPORTS

THE MAST

SEPTEMBER 17,

2015

A Lost Season, Full of potential & aspirat ions I

CHRISTIAN BOND Sports Writer bondco@plu.edu There were four Major League Baseball analysts for ESPN, each of whom picked the Seattle Mariners to win the American League West. However, we all know that's not going to happen. Once again, we are spending another September concerning ourselves with a rookie's performance rather than getting ready for a post-season run. The most disappointing aspect is without question the bullpen. The inability to keep games close is jaw dropping. In the 2014 regular season, Seattle

relievers combined for an earned run average of 2.59. In the 2015 season through September 9th, Mariner relievers had an ERA of 4.28. Part of the reason for the bullpen's demise is the fact that relief pitchers had been a resource for trades by former General Manager Jack Zduriencik. A majority of their roster moves throughout the year have left fans scratching their heads. Before being fired in early September, Zduriencik traded away Brandon Maurer, Yoervis Medina, and Dominic Leone. All three players are right handed relievers. Trading away those commodities left the bullpen full of inexperienced pitchers. In any aspect of life, there is no substitute for experience. Lastly, Robinson Cano had the worst

offensive year of his career. Cano spent the first three months of the season with a batting average of .238. Analysts tried to blame the passing of Cano' s grandfather over the offseason as a reason for his struggles. A story was also published in USA Today about Cano having acid reflux disease. This resulted in Cano having to change his diet and lose some strength. I think the real reason for Cano' s struggles are due to an injury suffered during the MLB vs. Japan exhibition series. Athletes are creatures of habit. Cano had to rehab an injury, rather than continuing to perfect his craft over the offseason. Professional baseball is played everyday and when something isn' t right, players have to figure it out on the fly. Through July and August, Cano hit .344, but his slow start contributed to the team digging themselves too big of hole to overcome. Ultimately, the 2015 Seattle Mariners never had everything working in sync. When the pitching was great, the team couldn't muster up any offense. When the offense was doing its job, the pitching was giving up too many runs. Mariner fans have plenty of stories to watch unfold even though the team will not be in the playoffs. This offseason could be extremely interesting. With only five players under contract and a new General Manager taking the wheel, it will be fascinating to see what direction the team goes in 2016.

PHOTO COURTESY OF KEITH ALLISON Robinson Cano, second baseman for the Seattle Mariners.

Cano is a six time All-Star (2006, 2010-2014) and a five-time Silver Slugger Award winner (2006, 2010-2013). Cano was a member of the 2009 Yankees Wortd Series Championship team.

If fired, who could take over for Goodell? JAKE BILYEU Sports Writer bilyeujc@plu.edu National Football League Commissioner Roger Goodell is prolonging Deflate-Gate and it's time to stop. Goodell should relinquish his power and a strong candidate to fill the position could be a former Seahawks President. The list of Goodell' s misjudgements as NFL Commissioner has been run into the ground to the point that his credibility has been driven 6 feet further. Regardless of if it's a domestic violence case or something interfering with the integrity of the game,

he always comes out on the losing end. Even when Goodell tries to control the game on the field, he continuously diminishes the NFL brand. His petty attempts to make football seem like a serious business, like the unnecessary elimination of touchdown celebrations or changing the length of the point after touchdowns (PAT) from 20-yards back to 33-yards. The fundamentals of the game are being completely changed because a tyrant in charge of America's Game. The NFL recently hired Tod Leiweke being hired as Chief Operating Officer, which seems to have gone unnoticed by most.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARIANNE O'LEARY

--

As President of the Seattle Seahawks, he planted the seed for a team that would ultimately lose the Super Bowl in 2005. Almost a decade later, the Seahawks ascended to the top behind many moves that had been made by Leiweke before he left the team, including the hiring of Pete Carroll. The NFL should be worried about more than saving one team. With Goodell being a cancer to the NFL, the league may want Leiweke to save all 32 teams, not just the shield. Implementing Leiweke as the face of the organization could save it. What would basically be the NFL kicking Roger Goodell out of office seems like a bold move, the Leiweke hiring should

already come as a surprise. The NFL went nearly a decade with an empty seat at the COO spot. The last time they needed someone to fill the void was when Paul Tagliabue considered retiring as NFL Commissioner, a path he ultimately took. His COO and eventual replacement was none other than Roger Goodell. The biggest concern is when will this position change occur? As long as he is sitting comfortably in the chair, it is only a matter of time until he messes up again.


SEPTEMBER 17,

-

THE MAST

2015

SPORTS 15

A Trip To Eng and with Lena Moreno LENA MORENO Guest Writer morenolr@p/u.edu ()n August 1st the Lutes and I started our ten-day adventure to England. Eighteen women's soccer players and fourteen men's soccer players were fortunate enough to play soccer, experience a new culture, and have fun all in another country. The trip brought each team closer together and presented a great opportunity to play together before the regular season. The main objective in England was to play together as a team, before our season started in September. We played three games against

Blackburn, Manchester City and Crystal were rushed straight from the airport to Palace, all of whom were professional Wembly Stadium to watch Chelsea play soccer teams. ()ur Arsenal. Although everyone was games were exhausted, our spread out over was the ten-day trip "I wouldn't have wanted to share enthusiam with practices in these memories with anyone but soon revived by between. cheers from the We came home 90,000 capacity my soccer family. " with a great record stadium. Both 2-1 against the guys and of Lena Moreno three competitive girls team were teams. chanting along Junior Along with with the other fans. playing soccer, We attended another Chelsea we were able to watch soccer at the highest competitive game later in the trip, which happened to level. be the opening game of the English Premier After finally arriving in England, we League. We toured major soccer stadiums

like ()ld Trafford and Emirates. The trip wasn't all about soccer though. We traveled to historical parts ofEngland as well. We spent time walking around the birth city of William Shakespeare and tried to make the guards at Buckingham Palace notice us. ()verall, we had the most memorable time in England. The games and practices gave us confidence coming into pre-season competition, which will carry over to our regular season. Seeing where some of top professionals teams play was like a childhood-dream come true and traveling around England was an unforgettable experience. I wouldn't have wanted to share these memories with anyone but my soccer family.

Men's and Women's Golf Preview SAMANTHA LUND Editor-In-Chief lundsr@pfu.edu Women's Golf took a hit in their season opener, ending in fourth place at the Pacific Lutheran University Invitational. The PLU Women's Golf team, made up of seven members this year, ended the weekend tournament in fourth with an overall score of 670 at the 5,825yard, par-72 course. Whitman took the team title at the end of the weekend, beating out Whitworth. Whitworth shot 636 through the weekend and Whitworth took home a 638. Lewis and Clark finished in third, totaling 643. Behind PLU, Linfield took fifth with 703, Pacific took sixth with

776 and University of Puget Sound took last with 785. PLU's Desirae Haselwood was the Lute's top player this weekend, finishing seventh in overall standings with a score of 157. "With a team of six returners, we are looking forward to a great season," Haselwood said. "()ur first tournament was a good preview of what kind of competition we will be facing throughout our conference." Last year, the Lutes tied for second in the PLU Invitational, shooting an overall team score of 659. Haselwood, in the same tournament, shot 156 through the weekend, giving her fifth place. "()verall I think it will be our best year yet and I'm excited to see my teammates and myself improve,"

Haselwood said. Women's Golf will continue their Fall season next weekend in ()regon for the Pacific Invitational Sept. 19-20. Men's Golf is gearing up to begin their Fall season next weekend at the St. Martin Invitational in rnympia. This year, the men's team will have three incoming players, as well as Mitch Baldridge, Ryan Fenton, Tom Huddleston, Justin Lee, Zach Martinson, Sevryn Modahl and Kevin McCrossin. Last year, Men's Golf finished their season taking fifth place at the Northwest Conference Championships with Lee leading the group, taking third place overall and earning first-team AllNorthwest Conference honors for the second straight year.

PHOTO COURTESY OF BAILEY PLUMB


THE MAST

16 SPORTS

Women's Soccer: vs Hamline, Win 4-0 vs Cal Lutheran, Win 4-0

at Cal Lutheran, Loss 30-26

p Next: BYE WEEK

Up Next: vs Puget Sound at 4:00 p.m.

Men's Soccer: vs Mass. Boston, Loss 2-1 vs Mary Hardin-Baylor, Won 2-1

Volleyball: vs Linfield, Won 3-2 vs Trinity, Loss 3-0 vs Texas-Dallas, Won 3-1

Up Next: vs Ge9rge Fox at 2:30 p.m. Friday

Up Next: vs Whitworth at 7 p.m. on Friday

NORTHWEST CONFERENCE STANDINGS 1

Football

Women s Soccer

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Linfiefd

1

0

0

0-0

Won 1

Pacific

1

0

0

0-0

Won 1

Whitworth

1

0

0

0-0

Won 1

George Fox

1

1

0

0-0

Won 1

Puget Sound

1

1

0

0-0

Lost 1

Lewis & Clark

0

1

0

0-0

Lost 1

Lutes

0

1

0

0-0

Lost 1

Willamette

0

1

0

0-0

Lost 1

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Lewis & Clark

4

0

0

0-0

Won4

Puget Sound

4

0

0

0-0

Won4

Lutes

4

0

0

0-0

Won4

Linfield

3

0

0

0-0

Won3

George Fox

2

1

1

0-0

Won2

Whitworth

2

2

0

0-0

Lost 2

Willamette

0

3

1

0-0

Lost 2

Pacific

0

4

0

0-0

Lost 4

Whitman

0

4

0

0-0

Lost 4

PHOTOS COURTESY OF BAILEY PLUMB

1

Voll eyball

-

Men s Soccer

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Whitworth

6

3

0

0-0

Lost 1

Whitworth

4

0

0

0-0

Won4

Lutes

6

3

0

0-0

Won2

Linfield

4

2

0

0-0

Lost 2

Willamette

4

4

0

0-0

Lost 1

Lutes

3

2

0

0-0

Won 1

Lewis & Clark

3

4

0

0-0

Lost 3

Pacific

2

2

0

0-0

Lost 1

George Fox

3

4

0

0-0

Won2

George Fox

2

3

0

0-0

Lost 1

Puget Sound

3

5

0

0-0

Lost 1

Puget Sound

2

3

0

0-0

Lost 3

Whitman

1

4

0

0-0

Lost 3

Willamette

1

3

0-0

Lost 2

Linfield

2

6

0

0-0

Lost 4

Whitman

0

3

0-0

Lost 3

Pacific

1

5

1

0-0

Won 1

0


PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

-------SEPTEMBER 24, 2015 I VOLUME 92, ISSUE 2 IMASTMEDIA.PLU.EDU--------

Women's G If makes history SAMANTHA LUND Editor-in-Chief lundsr@plu.edu Every Lute on the Pacific Lutheran University Women's Golf team made history last weekend when they brought home their first tournament win in 10 years. For context, the last time the Women's Golf team brought home a tournament win, these things were happening in popular culture: "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire" came out, as well as "Brokeback Mountain" and "Mr. & Mrs. Smith." T}l~ Black Eyed Peas and Eminem were topping music charts and, not to mention," we were . all in elementary school. Now, back to 2015. The Women's Golf team competed in the Pacific Fall Invite last weekend, and after placing fourth in their own season opener, they had something to prove. After last weekend's match, PLU's Desirae Haselwood said: "Our first tournament was a good preview of what kind of competition we will be facing throughout our conference," and that the team did not finish as strongly as they'd like. The team of six returners was trailing by three strokes to Lewis and Clark but managed to make up for them on the final day. Not only did the final round bring home the tournament title, but it was one of the best recorded scores in Women's Golf history at PLU. The 327-stroke round will go into the history books as the second-lowest team score in the program's existance. "Overall, I think it will be our best year yet and I am excited to see my teammates and myself improve," Haselwood said. The team's overall weekend score landed at 658, 90 over par on a 5,828 yard, par-71 course. As the team brought home a firstplace title, the lowest scoring Lute took home an individual second place title.

PHOTO COURTESY OF GOLUTES.COM BY CASEY GROGAN

Kadyn Coltom (pictured) tied for 14th place overall with a two-round total of 177 stroked, 90 on Saturday and 87 on Sunday. Coach Michael Fosnick, the current PLU Women's Golf coach is pictured at her left.

Haselwood, the constently low-scoring member, finished two strokes behind the tournament's first-place competitor, Mady Rhodenbaugh with a total score of 158. The Lutes also took fifth, seventh and tenth place titles home. The tournament ended with PLU taking first, Lewis and Clark taking second and Pacific in third.

Women's Golf will play at the Whitman Invitational in eastern Washington Sept. 2627. The Lutes finish their fall season at the Northwest Conference Fall Classic Oct. 10-11 before picking back up again in the Spring for their traditional, conference season.

PLU supports lovewins MATTHEW SALZANO Mast TV General Manager salzano@plu.edu When this summer's Supreme Court decision made same-sex marriage the law of the land, Pacific Lutheran University changed their Facebook profile picture to a LGBTQ-rainbow colored rose window. After many social media requests, that rainbow logo is now on T-shirts, available at Garfield Book Co. for $12.99. Director of Content Marketing Lace Smith, who runs the PLU Facebook page, says this Pride logo is only a special recognition of what PLU represents as a whole. "The rainbow rose window was meant to be a support for the day, but we want our black and gold to recognizably hold that deep commitment to our LGBTQ students, faculty, staff and community," Smith said. And who knows, PLU could be rolling out some more LGBTQ pride apparel in the near future so keep your eyes open and support with style TOP: Pacific Lutheran University students gather to show off their #LoveWins pride in Stuen Hall. From left to right: Gavin Jackson, Paige Lily, Matthew Salzano, Sophia Mahr and Michael Diambri. BOTTOM: Garfield and PLU announce pride t-shirts on their facebook page with this image. From left to right: Amanda Wilson , Allison Sullivan, Allison Groseclose, Madison Guscott and David McHale. Photo Courtesy of PLU Marketing and Communications.


THE MAST

2NEWS

SEPTEMBER 24,

2015

Leaves are falling, bringing trees with them LUCAS SCHAUMBERG News Writer schaumlc@p/u.edu

If a tree falls in the woods and nobody is around to hear it, does it make a sound? Who knows, but when a tree falls at Pacific Lutheran University it doesn't go unnoticed. What used to be a canopy of cherry trees outside of Ordal was cut down because of structural decay. These trees were the most recent in a series of trees being cut down due to disease and rot. Once trees show significant decay and rot, they become a hazaard for people walking by. Facilities Management took the trees down to prevent a harmful collapse. Not to worry - laminated signs around the stumps recently announced the replanting set to happen this fall. The particular species of cherry tree on campus, Prunus emarginata, has difficulty grow_ing in a wet climate, suggesting-._the culprit was a spring filled with record-breaking rain. Lately, trees campuswide have been rotting and being cut down. In February, an arborist hired by Facilities Management detected an outbreak of fungus in the honey

locus trees surrounding Red Square. Last year, a discovery of similar fungal conks growing on the base of trees required a immediate removal from campus. The removal of the trees imspired students to write eulogies. "A deep connection with nature is a symbiotic relationship that benefits both us and Earth," senior Nathan Ries said. "Those trees represented that. I hope more cherry trees will be planted soon." A student protesting the removal of trees founded the still running CREAN Club more than 10 years ago. The group currently focuses more on improving sustainability in and around campus instead of protesting tree removal. The Grounds Maintenance Specialist, Kenneth Cote, promised a replant using species exclusive to the Pacific Northwest. Some replanting is already underway. The concrete boxes that held once cherry trees already have smaller trees starting to grow. To learn more about the vegetation, contact Facilities Management at their website: http://www. pl u .ed u/ facilitiesmanagement/.

Lutes

Top: Stump outside of Ordal being prepared to be ground up. Bottom: A cherry tree still standing on campus. Photos by Genny Boots

rove

ower of peace

LIBBY POSTOVOIT News Writer postov/g@p/u.edu

Pacific Lutheran University's 2015 Peace Scholars, juniors Ellie Lapp and Taylor Bozich had quite the summer. As part of the Peace Scholars Program, they went to Norway and took peace-building classes with students from all over the world. Inspired by this lifechanging experience, Lapp and Bozich are now working to strengthen peace-building within the Lute community. Mast Media: In your own words, define what it means to be a Peace Scholar. Lapp: "Being a Peace Scholar means learning the theory and practices involved in peacebuilding. This includes dialogue, theory, and international relations. We learn all sorts of things about peacebuilding in the classes that we take in Norway, but we also practice peacebuilding by meeting students from around the world and having dialogue sessions with students from the Balkans, who experienced ethnic conflict and war, and the Ukraine. It's a lot academically about what peace-building is, and also being able to practice that in real life." Bozich: "I think it means to pursue peace in everyday life, to be at peace with yourself and to work to attain peaceful situations. I think to be a Peace Scholar means to pursue peace for the sake of others and for the sake of the world. And I say this with all the humility in the world, because I don't think I actually am a Peace Scholar, just a person very passionate about peace." MM: What inspired you to apply for the Peace Scholars Program? Lapp: "PLU joined the Peace Scholars Program around the same time that I was applying to PLU and learning about the program. One person I got into contact with during my first year was Anna McCracken, who became a Peace Scholar that year. So I was in contact with her about the program before I even came to PLU. I knew it was something I wanted to do. There were a lot of factors, but it's something I'd always wanted to do." Bozich: "I took an anthropology class my first year and learned a lot about the anthropologist Paul Farmer, who is truly my biggest hero right now. He's done a lot of fantastic development work against structural violence. He shows us how to interact with people from all over the world, creating positive change without forsaking other cultures, traditions and people. Also, my own life experiences led me to apply.

Peace Scholars Junior Taylor Bozich and Junior Ellie Lapp traveled to Norway studying peacbuilding with people from all over the world

I've dealt with a lot of structural violence in my life, and I've seen that in public health. Peace-building is a passion of mine." MM: What was your experience in Norway like? Lapp: "The really cool thing about program is that we are in Norway, but we go to an international summer school at the University of Oslo. There were about 500 students from 89 different countries. All of my classes had people from all over the world in them. We were in Norway learning about current events and policies with that global context. Just being in Norway was absolutely amazing. Also, the food was awesome. They have the best ice cream in Norway." Bozich: "There were two components. We spent a week at the Nansen Dialogue Center in Lillehammer, Norway. We were with about 20 students from the Balkan region. We got to see peacebuilding and dialogue happen between these students. We would have students from Serbia talk with students from Croatia. These are

groups of people that really hate each other, so seeing young students talk about these things with each other was very powerful. Then we transitioned to the summer school portion in Oslo, where we studied the theory of peacebuilding and the history behind that. I did a group project with students from Russia, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan. It was amazing." MM: How has the Peace Scholars Program influenced your perceptions of the world? Bozich: "It made me understand the importance of getting multiple narratives. It changed the way that I think and dialogue with people. One of the most amazing things I got to witness was at the Nansen Dialogue Centre. Four Ukrainian students were asked what was going on in their country, but they all had a different version. They started arguing and getting very passionate about what was happening to their country for about two to three hours. But at the end, they were able to agree on some aspects. After that, American students were able to give their perspective

of what we think is happening and students from former Yugoslavia gave their perspectives on what they think is happening. It took a room of 40 people to understand what maybe is going on there." MM: How does being a Peace Scholar affect your future plans? Lapp: "This program has given me amazing opportunities to think about future ideas for research and grad school. I've always wanted to go to grad school, but I'd only focused on schools in the United States. Now I know about the University of Oslo, and universities in Sweden and Denmark, which have amazing programs in peace and anthropology. It's opened up a lot of opportunities for me." Bozich: "Before the program, I had every intention of applying to medical school this year. I was going to go to medical school, see where that took me, and do something with global health. Now, I'm not so sure about that. I'm still planning on applying to medical school, but I want to get a master's in public health for sure. I'm also considering ditching all my plans and applying for the Fulbright Program. Teaching English abroad, doing research abroad. Bottom line: I'm not so sure. It kind of jumbled everything up. Which is a good thing. The Peace Scholars Program made me think a lot." MM: How do you hope your experience as a Peace Scholar will affect PLU? Lapp: "This year, I hope that Taylor and I can revive the Network for Peacebuilding and Conflict Management. We want to build up this group and find a core of people who are interested in peacebuilding. We're planning on having speakers here and doing some programming when they award the Nobel Peace Prize. Hopefully, we can bring some meaningful events and conversations back to campus." Bozich: "Ellie and I hope to do as much outreach and advocacy as we can. We want to bring students together in dialogue and get them engaged in that topic. A lot of people see it as a lofty thing. We want them to see that peace-building is a very practical, very important field of study that complements every single vocation. We're hoping to bring Steinar Bryn, who is the leader of the Nansen Dialogue Center, to PLU. He's an amazing man. He's helped with a lot of conflict resolution in former Yugoslavia. We want to make peace and dialogue a bigger part of the conversation here at PLU."


THE MAST

SEPTEMBER 24, 2015

NEWS3

Something new, something old,

How to Sound Smart about:

something special

Defund Planned Parenthood

JAKE BILYEU News Writer bilyeujc@plu.edu

Editor's Note: Defund Planned Parenthood was

Foss Hall closed last year and students had to live in it through its last days, meanwile, the residents of Stuen Hall were enjoying their newly renovated home. As Pacific Lutheran University celebrates 125 years since the school first opened, it may seem impossible to track down all of the changes that the PHOTO BY DAVID MAIR campus has undergone over the years. The updated bathrooms have heated Upon returning for the new school year, students saw the floors. immediate effects of the change to the activities together." residence hall culture. Smith enjoys the improved This year, while Foss no longer hosts living conditions of Stuen, but students, Ordal Hall offers its residents mentioned another main aspect of Foss a similar renovation experience to what that he11 really miss. "The Green Movie Stuen offered last year. (Through all Room." PLU Alumni have more of the changes happening on campus recently, reminiscing about PLU's days to offer about the past than current of old suddenly has new meaning.) students could ever come up with. Many current PLU students Class of '83 graduate, Barbara Greco have witnessed the switch first-hand. has plenty of fond memories of her time S<;>p~omore ?alomon Gonzalez sp~nt at PLU. Among strange recollections his firs~ year m Foss Hall b~fore makmg â&#x20AC;˘ like Foss Pond and the bowling alley the switch to Ordal. While he_noted . ¡ next to the Cave Greco remembers that Ordal has been a major upgrade ." the comfortable e~vironment of Stuen physically, he misses the camaraderi~ - Hall. of . his old Foss "First in the Family" "It felt like a family," Greco ~:n:g: . . said. "Everyone bonded and gave an Livmg with people that _were gomg identity to the hall." While she also throu?,h the same_ expenences was noted that "it's surprising how much great, Gonzalez said. It help,;d that things do change," current Stuen and we were all from the same area. Ordal residents have maintained their . . Stuen RA Ian Smith, a senior, halls' safe family environment. ~ransit~oned ~:n:oothly from . Foss While it may be out with the mto his new hvmg space. While he old and in with the new former Foss also rem_embers Foss having a g_reat residents will always r~member that commuruty, . he h~s already noticed hall as their college home for a time, Stuen fol~?wmg smt: and they will surely remember what . Everyone m Foss would keep they learned there and apply it to theu doors open and felt free to talk to their new communities. The heated anybody," Smith said. "Stuen has a bathroom floors probably help too. very similar community. People are ' very open to talking and enjoy doing

Know your sources-

a bill in the Senate, which passed, that would

Many statistics have been thrown around about Planned Parenthood, for instance, some websites state Planned Parenthood is 94 percent abortions while others state it is only 3 percent. It's crucial to check sources when researching about Planned Parenthood. Many websites supporting either side of the issue will exaggerate statistics to prove their point.

take away federal funding from Planned Parenthood for the next year. However, as of right now, the House hasn not passed it yet. Whether it happens or not, Mast Media wants you to know about it...

Hasn't passed yetBefore people take to the streets pillaging, know that the bill has not yet passed. Yes, the bill passed in the House of Representatives. However it has not passed in the senate, which has 53 democrats and 45 republicans with 2 independents who caucus with the democrats. Additionally, Obama has said he "will veto any bill that comes his way."

SensitivityPlanned Parenthood provides many services to women. More than just sexual healthcare, it's important to realize that because these services have to do with women's bodies, it is a sensitive issue. Regardless of one's stance on the issue it is about women's bodies, not just a bill.

Two SidesLike every other issue there are two sides to 'Defund Planned Parenthood.' Not everyone has the same opinion on it, even here at Pacific Lutheran University. To truly grow as a nation, it is important to remember that every person's opinion is valid. To form an educated opinion it is necessary to understand both sides of the argument.

History-

Material was taken from the following "Maragret sites; lifenews.com Sanger.," washingtonpost.com "For

planned parenthood abortion stats, '3 percent' and '94 percent' are both misleading",

Planned Parenthood today isn't what it was when it was founded. Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood, said among other things that, "birth control must lead ultimately to a cleaner race." Though Planned Parenthood may not have been founded on the best of principles, it's significant to note that it has become a vital resource for

huffingtonpost.com

"Planned parenthood bill Obama" PHOTO BY DAVID MAIR

Students enjoying a kitchen with new appliances.

CSI:

Learn more at PlannedParenthood.org

Campus Safety Investigations Taken from weekly Campus Safety reports Medical Aid in Ordal n Ordal Resident Assistant called Campus Safety (CSAF) ----+o report a pair of head injuries sustained by two shldents ho accidentally ran into each other. CSAF and Central ierce Fire and Rescue responded to the scene, and PFR evaluated both parties. After CPFR cleared scene, ne student reported that her condition had worsened. PFR returned and reassessed. The student was then transported to St. Clare hospital by another student. The D was informed.

Theft in Stuen CSAF received a report of a bicycle theft. The student reported he left his bike locked outside of Stuen Hall on 9/19/2015 and rehlrned the next morning to find it missing. There is no information regarding a suspect at this time.

Policy Violation in Tlnglestad CSAF contacted a Tingelstad room after observing objects hanging from the fire suppression system. CSAF and Residential Life contacted two residents inside and found alcohol in plain view. A room search was conducted and several more alcoholic drinks were found. All the alcohol was disposed of and the incident was referred to Student Rights and Responsibilities for review.


THE MAST

4NEWS

SEPTEMBER 24,

2015

~IJJ,grnJ?~,!,hef~ye: A handy PSA

group compiled a list of five things to help you have a great year.

2 Clubs-

Embracing the full collegiate experience entails more than just academics. College is the perfect place to meet people who have he same, or diferent interests. There are many clubs and organizations from academic ones to physical fitness to silly groups. There's a club for everyone. To get in contact with the club leaders and to see a full listing of the clubs here at PLU visithttp://www.plu.edu/clubs/.

DfY.. e next four years of your life will be

s~t ~re.

Embrace the

lessing of that. Put up all the posters of your favorite bands and! rtists in your room. Rock your style regardl~s of what trends . Take every opportunity to~ these next four years yours.

Religion profe~~QLUnt!O~Qยง wttL~.liv'!tQ[ds LUCAS SCHAUMBERG โ€ข News Writer schaumlc@plu.edu

Religion professor Antonio Finitsis published a story on September 8 declaring the Syrian Immigrant crisis as a humanitarian conflict. The Syrian Civil War, now more than four years old, continues to tear apart the state, and shows no possibility of ending within the next five years. President Bashar al-Assad continues his barbarism from Damascus, while ISIS controls huge swaths of land the north and east, prompting an exodus of more than 50 million refugees. While the horrors of the conflict may be 10,658 miles away, the suffering is closer than we think to our PLU world. Antonio Finitsis is a professor of religion, in particular studying the plight of Israelites in the Torah and Talamud. Within those stories, he witnesses hardships akin to what Syrians now face. He is familiar with apocalyptic violence a passionate eschatologist, he studies texts describing the end of times. "We don't need religious texts or an apocalypse to know there will be a wave of violence in the next five or 10 years," Finitsis said, gesturing to an overflowing bookshelf. "And who will they blame it on then?" He wrote his story on the PLU website and in the News Tribune. He said he "wrote because he could not put the experience into words." Finitsis described a need for westerners to understand this conflict is more than a political problem and acknowledge the humanity of the refugee crisis.

but a frustration leaks into his voice when the subject turns to current policies surrounding the immigrants. While a majority of politicians seem to recognize the horror in the Syrian Exodus, he points out that a majority of left and right parties across the EU view immigrants primarily as a financial burden. Finitsis describes this as "thinking in nickels and dimes." Finitsis' story of the immigrants on Chios, a small Greek island, captures some of the fresh hells that Syrians attend to daily. Reports of travelers drowning in the Mediterranean surface daily- on the 13th, over 38 drowned off the coast of Greece. Most have seen a family member killed, many only have a single change of clothes. States that do not allow immigrants subject Syrians to bitter reminders of the violence that decimated their abandoned nation. In World War II, Finitsis' grandfather had helped Jews escape the island and the vise of Nazi rule. He gave passage to families living in Chios, smuggling them in cramped boats navigating the Aegean sea into Turkey. He ended up escaping to Ethiopia out of fear for his wife and young child, promising them that one day, they would return their home on the Mediterranean island. "He wanted to return and he eventually did. His home was wrecked and broken into but he came back," says Finitsis. "The Syrian immigrants want to return too. But unlike World War II, no one knows when the conflict will end. No one has any ideas of how to end it." That same ocean now holds boats overfilled with Syrian immigrants. It is a midpoint in a Syrian's first leg of a journey up to 1,335 miles long. It is also where Finitsis

The story shares the experience of watching children of six and eight wordlessly eating, young boys sharing a brief moment of innocence on a journey that had robbed them of any semblance of a life recognizable to the Westerners passing by. They were on one small leg of a journey through Greece and were already ragged and disheveled. Professor Finitsis did not know where they were sleeping. Perhaps in the island's graveyard, which some immigrants took to sleeping in, he had seen bodies in tattered clothes resting on the flat ground there. Finitsis drew out parallels to the experience of African-Americans at the hands of police brutality. In his class, he gives lectures on how "when the hunter backs his prey into a corner, the prey will do anything to fight back." He prophesies that the same thing will occur in the aftermath of the mass exodus. "These people have to do everything to stay alive and then they are blamed for doing so." At times he addresses his listeners directly, often in the form of a rhetorical question. "Imagine yourself as a Syrian immigrant," he asked. "You are tear gassed and shot at with rubber bullets. How would you react to that? How would you feel about your new state?' "The job you and I have, as people with privilege, is to humanize. We lose our own humanity when we view them as anything less." A lot of political discussion is being spent in this day and age on America's declining leadership in the world. Finitsis wants of us to show the world just that. He wants us to show something other than just the might of our arms: how warmly we can open them.

Taking the History of PLU on the road First, Reverend Bjug Harstad founded many Lutheran schools throughout the Midwest only to realize that no Lutheran schools were on the West Coast. Continuing to celebrate the In 1890, Harstad founded PLU 125th anniversary of Pacific Lutheran in the Pacific Northwest. The PNW is University, an exhibition is preparing referred to as the last frontier, said Ward. ready to hit the road. The second meaning behind A variety of activities have been the title comes from the unique style of held to celebrate PLU's 125th birthday. A committee formed to facilitate Lutheran Education. "People often don't realize that all the events. Members included people from Media Lab, Archives, Alumni and Martin Luther pushed for creating public education in Germany," said Dr. Ward. other groups around campus. In addition, Luther pushed the To keep the party going, Dr. Elisabeth Ward, director of the idea of questioning, along with taking a Scandinavian Cultural Center, was asked broad look at education. Dr. Ward described 1890 as a to create an exhibit, and she created it as "breakthrough" for both Norway as well a traveling exhibit. "I've been curating for over 20 as thePNW. Simultaneously in Norway years, which is why they asked me to do it," said Dr. Ward. "It is a lot of work but many philosophers put a critical lens to Norway's society since it was the turn it's exciting." Ward titled the exhibit "PLU @ of the century. The philosophers wanted to put a critical lens on how things were Lutheran Education on the Frontier". The title's inspiration draws being done. Lastly, the "frontier" refers to from PLU's own location and way of teaching, as well as the Scandinavian the Scandinavian immigrants whose last stop happened to be the PNW. The immigrants. immigrants worked primarily as loggers. DAVID MAIR News Editor mairdl@pfu.edu

The exhibit will open in Seattle at the Nordic Heritage Museum on September 26th. Portland will display the exhibit next. All the artifacts, except a few pictures, used in the exhibit have never been on display before. One book in the exhibit tells the tale of PLU' s band in 1896 which climbed to Camp Muir with their instruments to play. To find out more information on current and future exhibits, as well as way to get involved in the Scandinavian Cultural Center, contact scancntr@plu. edu.

Top: Beanies first years had to wear. Bottom: Old voting box. For campuswide issues... Much like we'd use a computer swvey today.

6=). PLC PHOTOS COURTESY OF PLU MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS


THE MAST

SEPTEMBER 24, 2015

A&C5

Washington State Fair: exciting, educational, expensive LYZ FRERKING Guest Writer frerkila@plu.edu

Let me just say that I know from experience how expensive some fairs can be. That fact is especially true when the comoination of park rides, carnival games, fatty foods and souvenirs turns into a vacuum for one's hard-earned dollars. I get it. A person may not want to spend that kind of money in this economy. I know I certainly didn't when I saw all the rides in the fairgrounds. Luckily, there are plenty of things at the Washington State Fair that you can do beyond the $30 human slingshot fee and $30-$60 concert tickets.

Sweet: A Tasty Journey This free event details the history of candy in a museum-style format. Here, guests will learn a~_0ut how and where cocoa beans are harvested and who the Willy W onkas of the real world are. All of these exhibits circle around a literal candy mountain sculpture (however, it doesn't look too tasty). Once the tour is completed,

guests find themselves in a candy shop with treats ranging from the retro (Pop Rocks) to the weird (a sucker with a real dead scorpion in the center). All in all, I found this event well-organized and thorough, but rather small in the space provided. One can certainly learn a good amount here, but it is definitely far from a full museum experience. PHOTOS COURTESY OF LYZ FRERKING

Hobby Hall Here, I found the unexpected. The Hobby Hall houses various displays of collections and handicrafts. Glass cases feature an array of Harry Potter memorabilia, and a whole collection of piratethemed props and furniture sit on display in the center of the room. Other displays held people's handcrafted items, such as

dollhouses and crocheted toys some of which have been given ribbons and awards. This is a well-rounded collection, full of all sorts of curiosities that people have seemingly donated for the duration of the fair. Everything is well-organized and it's obvious that that some of the hobbyists are very talented.

Petting Zoo Animals Staying true to the fair tradition, there are plenty of animals on display for contests. While the creatures are not meant for petting, guests who feel the need for interaction can stop by the small petting zoo where a few goats and sheep wander around a small pen. This alternative certainly serves its purpose of

making up for the disappointment of not being allowed to pet the cows and horses and other livestock that are on display. Still, this rule makes sense, as these are prized animals and the owners are not necessarily around to specify how they want their animals to be treated.

Sweet: A Tasty Journey featured a large candy mountain sculpture in the center of the exhibit.

The Star Trek Experience ($8 extra) Calling all nerds: there is something for the Trekkies. This events houses many official props and costumes from the show, as well as a detailed replica of the original Enterprise bridge. Decorating the wall is a full timeline of Star Trek history, starting with the space race in the '60s.

While it did not disappoint, I found this museum a little smaller than what was expected and not worth the $8 charge. However, as I do not consider myself a true Trekkie, I'm sure it is worth much more to the guests who will smile ear to ear at the sight of the original uniforms of Captain Janeway and Counselor Troi.

Timber Gulch and Stage Show In addition to a petting zoo and a candy mountain, a stereotypical Wild West town has also been incorporated into the Washington State Fair. Timber Gulch consists of people walking around dressed in clothing typical of the era and various fun activities to do, such as panning for gold or using a sawblade. A vintage photo booth has been set up where guests can dress up and take a picture in a Western

scene. The main attraction for Timber Gulch exists as a stage show. In a great comedy act, four actors set the stage for a showdown between a sheriff, his deputy and two outlaws. There wasn't much to the plot of this play, but the witty banter and hijinks produced a lot of laughs, my own included.

Timber Gulch is a mock old western town that features fun activites and a lively stage comedy show.


6A&C

THE MAST

SEPTEMBER 24, 2015

Indigenous films, coming to a classroom near you PARIS FRANKLIN Copy Editor franklpm@plu.edu An on-campus film series aims to immerse Lutes in the spirit of understanding in less than two hours a week. Hosted by the First Year Experience Program, the Indigenous Film Series is an event that showcases one indigenous film per week during the Fall Semester. Conceived by Norwegian and Scandinavian Studies professor Dr. Troy Storfjell, the series is geared toward educating students on issues involving indigenous peoples around the world. "I wanted students to know in what context people are making indigenous film because these aren't the first films about indigenous people," Storfjell said. . Storfjell came up wiili the Pl:IOTO COURTESTY OF AMAZON.COM idea for the series when he , . was given the opportunity to design a FYEP writing account respectively. course this fall. In "Reel Injun," director Neil "I've been working for a lot of time Diamond explores the ways in which in my research on indigenous studies First Nations people have been and methodologies. On the other hand, depicted in film over the last century. one of my big loves is film studies, Starting in the silent film era and so combine the two, film studies, making its way up to present times, indigenous studies - indigenous film," the film employs the use of interviews Storfjell said. of Native American activists and clips Each film is chosen based off of from famous films featuring Native books that are read in his FYEP course, American actors or plot lines. such as "Seeing Red- Hollywood's The film showcases other movies Pixeled Skins: American Indians and all while provoking thought about Film." prevalent issues among representation While not all the films will be of Native Americans. Best of all, it is available to the entire Pacific Lutheran readily available on Netflix. University student body, flyers will be "Thunderheart" is a quintessential posted around campus when they are '90' s action film in which a government open to the public. conspiracy of the '70s is explored on a A full list is to be announced later this fictional reservation. While the acting is fall. So far, the films shown have been not quite Oscar-worthy, this two hour "Reel Injun" and "Thunderheart," a movie is jam-packed with gun fights documentary and a partially fictitious worthy of the Old West and dialogue

PHOTO COURTESY OF LISTAL.COM

that will run through a person's mind for days after viewing the film. What makes "Thunderhe art" especially noteworthy is that many Native actors were used to represent their specific heritage in the film, and many other Native Americans were involved in the research of the film. One of the actors in the film was even a part of the event that the movie was loosely based on. Storjfell has also arranged for Melissa Woodrow, a filmmaker and member of a Californian tribe, to present a film of hers and give a talk on campus in November, in the event that students are more interested in the filmmaking aspect of indigenous films. "I plan on attending all of the films because it is really helpful to be able to discuss them with my professor as well as not having to find the movies on my own," said Maddie Titelbaum,

a first-year global studies student in the course. "It's a really nice setting to be with my classmates taking in all the same information, taking notes, and then being able to have questions answered or have intelligent discussions that are going to help us write our papers." After each film, Storfjell initiates conversation with the group so that they will be prepared to write about their experience in class. "If we could tum the films I'm showing for this course into a public film series, it might get people thinking about indigenous issues on campus in a way that could be really helpful," Storfjell said. The featured indigenous films do not only center on Native Americans, but extend to indigenous peoples of all nationalities. "We're doing global indigenous films. It is not just Native American film, although probably two thirds of the films are from this continent," Storfjell said. "We've got films from Australia, from New Zealand, from Hawai'i, from Norway, from Africa, and from Mexico as well, so we're trying to make it a bit global." Students agree, and those in the class are excited to share the experience with their peers. "I think that if more people learn about indigenous issues and can kind of take off their previous [notions] about it and just really listen, we're going to be a more inclusive society and real progress for equality can actually be made," Titelbaum said.

Gender Reconciliation aims to cure gender conflict Helen Smith Guest Writer smithhe@plu.edu

Experience new relationships, share your experiences and talk about gender all in one place. The Pacific Lutheran University Women's Center and the PLU Men's Project go on annual retreats to talk about issues surrounding being a man or a woman in today's society. In an exciting change of pace, the separate retreats will be replaced this year by the Gender Reconciliation Workshop from September 25th27th, in which with both groups will participate. This year, the joint workshop will give people the opportunity to engage in an open conversation about issues surrounding gender a n d

gender identity, and to learn from one experiential work and sharing personal they aren't being blamed for things out of their control. Vulnerability and another's opinions and experiences. experiences. "I think it's an opportunity for Important topics which will also inquisitiveness are an important part everyone to transform one another and be discussed at the workshop are, as of these difficult conversations. be the teachers and be the learners all at Dr. Smith puts it, "how socialization As challenging as these the same time," said Jonathan Yglesias, around masculinity and femininity conversations may be, sometimes it creates dysfunctional relationships can be surprising who is willing to director of the Men's Project. The workshop is a new experience across those two groups." Participants have them. "There are a lot of good folks on for PLU students and is planned by can expect the workshop to work Gender Reconciliation International. toward uniting genders through campus who are very open to that GRI is a group that worked in South examining some of the ways in which conversation," Yglesias said. "I think the concept of gender is uncomfortable Africa to promote race reconciliation, they are divided. "A lot of the topics will be [centered] for men because, for a lot of men, it's and has taken that goal and process to bridge the gap in gender conditioning around socialization, communication, just this unknown given." At the same time, Yglesias says in our society. Gender conditioning is storytelling, authenticity and then the idea that individuals must tailor skills to cultivate to move forward that some of the "traditional hyper their behaviors to fit within specific across those differences," Smith said. masculine" people on campus also crave that conversation. gender stereotypes. "I think it's really important to One may wonder what exactly it is that is being "reconciled." "It's important to (dissect] how examine gender and examine the Dr. Jennifer Smith, director of concepts of gender have taken way that we align our identities and our beliefs and our behaviors," the Women's Center, asserts that this event will work to "reconcile away [our] choices of how to act and Yglesias said. "It's important to [dissect] how concepts of gender the conflicts that are imbedded behave." have taken away [our] choices when identities are defined as of how to act and behave ... and binaries." Jonathan Yglesias [to view] concepts like gender in The Gender Reconciliation Director of the Men's Project a way that aren't things that we Workshop will be spending created.They're just things that time digging into these we're kind of handed down." conflicts within gender "I think it's important to do the An important foundation of the identity, and deconstructing project is to work through these work both on a personal level but as gender stereotypes. "[We11 be] unpacking conversations "without blame well as on a community level," Smith how we've been socialized to or shame," according to Gender added. "So the hope I think for the workshop think a particular way about Reconciliation International. what it is to be a man, and Men can often be put in a position is that ultimately we're able to sort of what it is to be a woman, [and] of blame for women's place in a bring some of these lessons into the how that socialization impacts patriarchal society, and women are larger university-wide community us on a personal level," Smith sometimes criticized for feeding into to engage in dialogues across those said. the current stereotypes of femininity. differences." Participants will learn However, it is important for the through telling stories, role playing, foundation that participants feel as if


SEPTEMBER 24,

THE MAST

2015

A&C7

Top 5 Fash'on Week Trends that Lutes are a ready loving JULIA GROSVENOR Guest Writer

4. Towel Dress

grosvejm@plu.edu

Some of Mercedes Benz Fashion Week's top designers didn't realize that several of the Spring/Summer 2016 pieces nave been signature looks around Pacific Lutheran University's campus for a while.

1. The Bucket Hat If anyone still thought this look belonged exclusively on ÂŁratty boys or back in the '90s, think again. This is Washington, where nothing stays in the '90s. Plenty of designers are feeling the same vibe this year, including Alexander Wang, Tommy Hilfiger, and BCBG. If you really want some bold '90s kid throwback head gear we recommend that you look to the stylings of Dionne from "Cfoeless."

2. 8 A.M. Class Chic

Sometimes PLU' s fashionistas can be so ahead of the curve that they can't build up the courage to wear their looks outside, but that doesn't mean no one will ever see them. For example, one short strapless dress by Charles Youssef may look very familiar to any students who spend their free time around the showers. While he may have made a much safer fabric choice with opaque black chiffon, the styling (no-makeup makeup, messy hairstyle, slip on shoes, and zero accessories) gives away this obvious play on the towel wrap dress. If that's not bold enough, simply look to Monse' s collection full of dresses seemingly inspired by repurposed sheets!

"A good look for the Hinderlie Toga Party!" - Michele Lynn Matthew, Junior PHOTO COURTESY OF ELLE.COM

No one is completely innocent of showing up to an early morning class in at least one of the items they slept in. Well, worry no more for fashion reputations, because the runways were littered with countless executions of bold pattern loose fitting pants. Don't they look so comfy and effortless? What's that? Yes, pajama pants are the new skinny jeans. Maiyet and Devon Halfnight Leflufy emerged as the kings of this trend with their full body slumber-party-ready looks of sweatpants, sweaters and loose tees and tanks.

3. Big 01' Jackets Fashion runs on a different schedule from reality, so these spring collections are often unsuitable for impending sweater weather. However, Rag & Bone's collection seems to have taken a tip from the Northwest, where outerwear is always a must. The huge coats they've designed would be enough to get anyone all the way from Morken to Mortvedt in this fall weather. Of course, Lutes already have plenty of stock in the jacket game.

"I'm a fan but sometimes I wonder about the practicality of big jackets in summer, you know?" - Gillian Dockins, FirstYear

5. Half-Dressed Diva Whether they're late to a class, doing a walk of shame or simply don't care, some students just can't manage to get all of their clothes completely on. Well, Altuzarra, Monse, Telfar and many more brands are featuring several unbuttoned and disheveled pieces. This just proves what some residents already know: if their clothes are mostly fastened, someone's trying too hard. Ain't nobody got time for that!

"Looks like you could literally throw it on." Kayla Dice, Sophomore

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ASSOCIATED PRESS

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ASSOCIATED PRESS

Spin around Chris Knutzen Center in Scandinavian Folk Dance Class JULIA GROSVENOR Guest Writer grosvejm@plu.edu

The Cha Cha Slide. The Tango. The Charleston. The Nae Nae. Pacific Lutheran University students have all heard of, if not performed, some of these dances. But how many can say "Now watch me polska?" Coming soon to the Scandinavian Center is a class that will teach all kinds of Scandinavian folk dances, polska included. Starting Sept. 28, instructors Bob Hamilton and Leslie Foley will devote their Mondays from 7-8:30 p.m. to teaching students, regardless of their dancing background. "Leslie and I have put a lot of thought into the best way for beginners to learn this kind of dancing," Hamilton said. Both instructors taught the same class last year and are happy to teach it again. "I danced a lot when I was in college,

so it is very satisfying to 'complete the circle' and be teaching dancing to college folks." Hamilton said. Even with their experience, they have been practicing and doing their best to plan the greatest experience possible. "With a bit of luck, we're gonna have some live music with a guest Danish fiddler," Foley said. Students will be spending the sixweek class learning classic dances from all over Scandinavia, especially Sweden and Norway. While some mixers and set dances will be taught, the class will primarily consist of couples dances. "It's a social dance," Foley said. "Bring anyone you want to dance with." "Besides the specific moves for a given type of dance, students will learn how to move their bodies in a way that makes dancing easier and more fun," Hamilton added. "They will also learn

how to be a good partner in a partner dance." One thing both instructors are certainly bringing is their passion for Scandinavian folk. "If [I] have a good dance floor and the right shoes and a great partner and great music, I can just turn alight," Foley said. "So I'm excited for them to learn to kind of feel how that works." "You will get to listen to great music and dance to it with a partner," Hamilton added. "What could be better?" Hamilton said. The full course costs $15 for students, $20 for individuals and $30 for couples. It is suggested that those who sign up bring a desire to dance, a partner (if possible) and good shoes with leather soles, not rubber. "Everyone is very welcome to attend," Hamilton said. "We will be delighted to meet you and teach you."


8 FEATURE

THE MAST

.

.

... -

I~

.

PACIFIC LUTHER~


~Yf. 24, 2015

FEATURE9

----

o _ _ __

D---D---D---D---D---D---D-You'll feel better, really.

-~路

-~

-

N UNIVERSITY


10

OPINION

THE MAST

SEPTEMBER

24, 2015

-

A new brand of fashion Racial activism in New York Fashion Week

MARISOL ESPINOSA Opinion Writer espinomr@plu.edu

-

When we hear about New York Fashion Week, it's "5 Tips to Bring NYFW to Your Closet" or it's commentary on what celebrities attended which show. However, on September 10, fashion designer and founder of Pyer Moss, Kerby Jean-Raymond made an important statement when he created a fashion show dedicated to continuing the conversation of racism and police brutality; a statement that should not go unnoticed because of its significance of the reality faced by the black community in the US. Jean-Raymond began his powerful show by dimming the lights to provide attention towards the video screen lit up at the end of the catwalk. . Shocking images and scenes of death paired with power abuse, dead bodies lying in pools of blood, an~ interview clips of grieving families were creatively spliced together to provoke discussion between members of his audience; an intended eye-opener that began the

introduction of his 2016 spring collection. As the video continued, models, mostly of color, walked down the runway to sounds of gunshots and police sirens in attire that resembled military attire fused with modem, urban aspects. The most popular article of clothing being stark white boots with splattered red paint and the names of those who lost their lives to police brutality as well as the final words of Eric Gamer, "I can't breathe." . Other pieces of clothing included netting, straps, and tight collars accurately representing the binding and entrapment of the black body within our current culture; the way the clothing dinged to the body depicted what it means to be dark skinned and unfairly hindered by societal prejudice. As models continued down the runway, graffiti artist Gregory Siff spray painted on them as human canvasses, displaying words and phrases like "savage" and "breathe, breathe, breathe." Creating a visual experience such as JeanRaymond did was a big step in outspoken activism as social media isn't enough of a platform to get word out for needed change, especially a year later. Since the beginning of the #BlackLivesMatter movement, there has been an abundance of social media support from celebrities and news reports on celebrities attending a protest, but where has everyone been now ~at it's a_ year late_r? How is word supposed to present itself outside of social media now that protesting has died down? Deaths since the lull of major protests have gained social media recognition, but not much more than offered. New York Fashion Week is highly attended event, filled with reporters and big names. Jean-Raymond knew this and utilized his status to fulfill his activist intention: get the word out. He sought an objective and he achieved it better than even he would have expected. He forced people to look at reality. Yes, reality. Our society is broken in places that even JeanRaymond himself can attest to. He stated his inspiration came from his own experiences as being a victim of police brutality; his most recent run in being a month ago when his injured fingers, taped together with black tape, were mistaken for a gun. He had just finished a phone call only to tum and find two police guns on him. Before the age of 18, he was stopped and frisked by police officers more times than he

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CARA ANNA

could count with both hands. Being a big name in fashion and using an event that has been known to attract many audience members, Jean-Raymond knew he needed to bring more visibility ba_c~ onto the #BlackLivesMatter movement, so despite the critiques he knew he would receive for using NYFW as his media platform, he made his statement. My question now is, when will you make yours? A year may have already passed since the start of the movement, but the length of time does not excuse for the lack of continued conversation that is needed. Why aren't we still talking about this? In order to start doing, we need to start by talking, discussing, and recognizing. If nothing has changed since this movement has first began, we have failed as members of our society. We tend to forget that our voices can be powerful as a whole; we shouldn't rely on a single voice to make a change when together our voices can be heard around the world. Follow in Jean-Raymond's footsteps, and don't be afraid to speak out. And to those who lost their lives due police brutality and prejudice, may they rest in power.


SEPTEMBER 24,

THE MAST

2015

OPINION

A year of DISCERNMENT JOHN ROSENBERG Guest Writer rosenbjp@plu.edu

Forty years ago this fall, I walked on to the campus of PLU as a young seminary intern assigned to the Campus Ministry. In some ways it feels like "deja vu all over again" as Yogi Berra used to say. Back then I was long on enthusiasm but short on wisdom and experience. Patient mentors helped me to not only survive but thrive during a year that was life-transforming. 路 This fall, I've returned as the Inte.rim Campus Pastor during a time of transition for campus ministry with an opportunity to "pay it forward" as the saying goes. The University has grown dramatically over the past 40 years and, as the old hymn puts it, "new occasions teach new duties." In response, we've undertaken a year of discernment in which we're asking some "big enough questions" about campus ministry. What does excellence look like when it comes to the engagement of religion and religious diversity at PLU? How does PLU maintain a strong Lutheran identity while also remaining genuinely hospitable to the diverse expressions of religion and spirituality present on campus today? Some things haven't changed in 40 years. Once again, I've experienced gracious hospitality and patient mentors throughout the University and especially in Student Life, where campus ministry now resides. But in other important ways, PLU is a different campus than it was 60 years ago when the first campus pastor, Robert Lutness, was called and certainly 40 years ago when I showed up on campus. The university has been enriched by a more ethnically, racially, and socioeconomically diverse student body, faculty, and staff.

People from all over the world come here to study and PLU students and professors carry on their work on all seven continents. This mobility has brought a rich diversity in religious and spiritual outlooks that was not present in prior generations. For example, Lutherans, who once comprised the vast majority of students, faculty, and staff, are now less than 17% of the student body. Yet with all its diversity, in one way or another, all of us have been drawn to PLU by the Lutheran understanding of and commitment to liberal education. Our year of discernment began last May with the formation of a Campus Ministry Review team made up of representatives of the university and congregations of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the church body to which PLU is related. The review team met with students, faculty, administrators, staff, area clergy, honorary chaplains, alumni, and others to gain a better understanding of the strengths and challenges facing campus ministry in this new context. Some of their preliminary recommendations (for example, going from three chapel services per week held in Lagerquist Hall to one Morning Prayer service each Wednesday in Ness Chapel) have already been put into place. Others, like the reconstitution of the Campus Ministry Council and a renewed commitment to Interfaith dialog and ministry are in process. The second part of the review-a campus-wide Spiritual and Religious Life Student Survey-is currently underway. All students are encouraged to take part in the survey and make their voices heard. Together, the conversations with stakeholders and the student survey will provide the basis for shaping the next iteration of Campus Ministry at PLU and the search for a permanent Campus Pastor this spring. It's good to be back at PLU and to have an opportunity to contribute to the life of a place that was so important in my own formation and sense of call. It's exciting to see all the ways that God is at work during this time of discernment and transition.

11

THE MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room

172 Tacoma, WA 98447

EDITOR-IN CHIEF Samantha Lund lundsr@p/u.edu

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The responsibility of The Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues1 events and trends that impac1 the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mast adheres to the Sociefy of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words fyped and emailed to mast@ plu.edu by 5 p.m. the Monday before publication. The Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. SubscripqQns cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@plu.edu.

OPINION EDITOR Courtney Miranda

,-.

NEWS EDITOR David Mair A&CEDITOR Brooke Thames SPORTS EDITOR Steven McGrain PHOTO EDITOR Mckenna Morin COPY EDITORS Jeff Dunn Paris Franklin Hannah Sultz Sanna Vargas CHIEF DESIGNER Colton Walter

~]\~AST

MAST

TV

MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER Matthew Salzano sa/zano@plu.edu EXECUTIVE PRODUCER Genny Boots EQUIPMENT & TECHNOLOGY ENGINEER Samuel Allenberger ASSISTANT PRODUCER Sarah Giomi

Interim Campus Pastor, John Rosenberg

n defense of d sagreement CARLY STAUFFER Opinion Writer stauffce@p/u.edu What do you think of when you hear the name Kim Davis? This Kentucky county clerk has made a lot of enemies in recent weeks after refusing to issue :2; marriage licenses to same-sex couples. Following the monumental 8 Supreme Court ruling in June, Davis' job ~ requirements have changed in a way that ~ she says "violate [her] conscience." !z Now, befor~ you roll your ~ eyes or scoff at the close-mindedness ~ of conservative Christians, I ask you to iii consider an alternate viewpoint. That's t:: what Lutes are supposed to do, right? ~ I do not defend Kim Davis wholeheartedly. 8 Though she surely has an undeniable right ~ guaranteed by the Constitution to practice ~ her religion, she cannot use her power as o.. county clerk to force others to submit to her Two women debate Kim Davis' decision to withold same sex marriage licenses due to her beliefs. religious beliefs in Moorehead, Kentucky. While I'm sympathetic toward her example of peaceable disagreement. She is has been (incorrectly) translated to hatred. situation, I recognize one must, to an extent, not sending death threats to those whose This misunderstanding makes it essential separate personal beliefs and occupational lifestyles she does not approve of. She is, to attack and extinguish divergent opinion, duties. I do not, however, recognize Kim however, receiving them. This is what I'm and those who practice it (cough cough Davis as a hater. She is not persecuting worried about. Kim Davis), in order to ensure the harmony those with whom she disagrees. In fact, The truth is, Americans don't of the nation. since resuming her position after being know how to disagree anymore. This is a In doing so, however, we redefine released from jail, her office has issued big deal for a nation that was founded on what it means to be an American, negate the marriage licenses to same-sex couples. the belief that a group of diverse people possibility of peaceful disagreement, and her conscience To keep with varying lifestyles, religions, and instead make necessary abandonment of unperturbed, Kim does not sign the opinions can live in one land peaceably. individuality, and adoption of the doctrine marriage licenses herself. This is an Today, however, disagreement of mainstream America. If you don't accept

(

everything, you're a hater. You're closeminded. You don't belong here. That is what the new America is about, but don't believe for a second that that's what made us America. It is because I live in America that I can write this article, knowing full well that a vast majority of the PLU campus will likely disagree with me. I expect this, and, in fact, I welcome it. For I still believe in an America where you and I can disagree, and also have a cup of coffee together; where we can practice starkly different religions, and still be friendly wing-mates in the residence hall. I still believe in an America that is not afraid of the true meaning of diversity. What I am afraid of, however, is our nation's new definition. We are all created equal; that does not mean we are all the same. The moment we believe we must be, we embark on an impossible journey that has the possibility of destroying us. And next time you call Kim Davis a hater, remember that she's not the one sending death threats.

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE MASTMEDIA.PLU.EDU

--


12

THE MAST

OPINION

THE

CYCLE"

IHE

SEPTEMBER

24, 2015

CARLY STAUFFER Cartoonist

GYM

stauffce@pfu.edu "My name is Carly and I'm a Physics major here at PLU. I'm a total nerd, I'm in love with Olympic National Park, and enjoy singing in University

Chorale, writing, learning, acting, spending time with family and Jesus!, and a lot of other things! While I somehow manage to look as though I've got my life pretty under control, I generally feel like I'm awkwardly stumbling around, trying to figure out life .. .just like Little Carly. Enjoy!"

Donate blood. ''No homo.''

PARIS FRANKLIN Copy Editor franklpm@plu.edu

-a I

§ ~

s:

R ~ z

:J>

~ ~

Blood drive buses wait in Red Square Tuesday, September 22, 2015

A blood drive was held on campus on September 21 and 22 in Red Square, but certain Lutes were not able to participate. "I don' t know a whole lot about the ban, I just know that I would not be permitted to donate even if I wanted to," said Gavin Jackson, a second year nursing student at Pacific Lutheran University. Like all gay men, or men who have participated in male-to-male sex (known as MSM) even once since 1977, Jackson will never be allowed to give blood in the United States. A policy is in place today by the Food and Drug Administration stating that any male who has had sex with another male since 1977 is unable to donate blood. Women who have had sex with men who have had sexual contact

-

with another male may also be banned from donating blood. Many countries were quick to follow the United States in the original hysteria once learned that there is an increased risk of recipient AIDS contraction if donor blood is infected. According to Jackson, gay people are the only people to be banned from donating. A few groups who are not banned are those who have participated in intravenous drug consumption, those who have paid for sex-so long as it was at least one year prior to donation-, and those who have recently received a tattoo or piercing. While a question about body modification is on the FDA's donor information sheet, it is each state's discretion as to whether or not a donor is able to give within twelve, six, or zero months of the use of needles to administer ink or jewelry into the skin. The same questionnaire also asks whether or not males with a desire to donate have participated in male/ male sex, but it does not ask of the HIV/AIDS prevention methods that could have been used during all sexual relations. The FDA screens blood regardless of its origin, therefore a ban is suggesting a substandard screening process. That should be no reason to prohibit gay people from donating if they claim to screen for negative agents in all blood. "My blood is just the same as everyone else's. If I have healthy blood, I feel like other people should be able to have it if they are in need," Jackson said. He has never been given the ability to donate, but there are many instances of clean men who donated blood frequently before coming out as gay. Even without a significant risk of contracting HIV from a blood transfusion-the risk is about one per two million units of blood transfused according to the FDAthe policy has only been amended once since 1983 when panic originally ensued, and there are no plans to change it anytime soon.

"I think that HIV prevention has come so far that the ban is a little bit of a dated decision ... It is time to make a change," said Sophia VanDyke, another second year nursing student at PLU. VanDyke believes that the FDA ban is representative of 80's ideals, rather than fact based on current medical technology. All donated blood is tested for negative agents soon after collection, and modern testing methods allow for results about diseases such as HIVI AIDS to come up within seven to 10 days of collection. Because of possible inaccuracies in the test, other countries who originally

"I think that HIV prevention has come so far that ttie ban is a little bit of a dated decision ... It is time to make a change." - Jackson banned gay men have now instead opted for a deferral period, usually ranging from one to five years, rather than an outright lifetime ban for gay men. "I don't think that there is any harm in getting more healthy blood to give out," said Jackson. Many Red Cross blood shortages have occurred since the ban was put in place, and there have still been noted cases of AIDS contractions in patients receiving donated blood despite the 0 percent chance that any gay men would have donated. So what is this policy really helping with, and should it be stopped? "If enough people complain about it, or petition against it, eventually the FDA would do something about it. I feel like a lot of people don't know that it is a rule, and if they did, I feel like they would get behind it," suggested Jackson.

indecision JEFF DUNN Copy Editor dunnja@plu.edu

Editors Note: This editorial is in concurrence with Lucas Schaumberg's News article covering the Syrian Refugees. More than 175,000 Syrian refugees have poured into Europe since the onset of the Syrian civil war, now entering its fifth year. In a testament to European bureaucracy, the European Union has struggled to capacitate this influx of refugees. This inability to act with immediacy has cost the lives of dozens migrant men, women and children. Even while western European countries - Germany, France, and the U.K., to name a few - have agreed to receive varied amounts of asylum-seekers, other countries close their borders, blocking the route the refugees need to take to reach their destinations. All of this only begs the question; is the EU doing enough? The EU's asylum policy calls for "a joint approach to guarantee high standards of protection for refugees." So far, after four months of bickering, the EU and United Nations have enacted a plan to impose refugee quotas on European nations. The quotas would require several EU nations to share a 120,000 incoming refugees.

This has caused a significant amount of anger in the countries that voted against the plan; Hungary, Romania, Slovakia, and the Czech Republic. The Slovakian Prime Minister has vowed to defy the plan, calling it unprecedented. Words like "pathetic" and "disgraceful" peppered the tweets from European officials. Serbia publicly denounced Hungary for its use of tear gas against migrants on the border, Hungary is blaming Serbia for failing to stop migrants from throwing stones at its border police, and Slovenia expressed its anger that Croatia has begun bussing refugees to their shared border, The Seattle Times reports. So, why is it the EU can't seem to work together? The EU has been trying to reach a decision since May. Even now, the number of refugees continues to skyrocket, reaching well over one million people, at least 400,000 of which will need permanent residency. 120,000 is barely a dent in the enormous wave of displaced people, and the refusal to cooperate from the four nations above won't help at all. While the European nations quarrel with each other, thousands and thousands of refugees wait. They wait at the border of Hungary, they wait in boats trying to cross the Mediterranean, and they wait on the roads at night to be robbed of what meager possessions they have. This isn't a political issue, it's a humanitarian issue. These are human beings. They've had their entire lives uprooted by a civil war that has left more than 240,000 dead. And now they're told that their lives are in the hands of a group of ill-behaved world leaders?

tune in for our newscast LIVE AT 9 P.M. WEDNESDAYS online or on PLU Cable Channel 26

::r -a ••

= :::::::

51

m

!L 51 CD

l:a.

m • -a

c •

CD

l:a.

PLU

c

edia


SEPTEMBER 24,

THE MAST

2015

SPORTS 13

The Masf Monday Night Football pick 'em Editor's Note: PLU's student body picks who will win on Monday Night football and the reason behind their choice.

Impressive picks for Jarrad <J.nd thing, but that did not transpire. Now, the Green Bay defense has McCartney going against the Colts to face another elusive threat out of to remain undefeated. The Colts and Jets were a prime ' the backfield, Jamaal Charles. Chiefs win 21-20 and intercept time match-up the National Football League did not want. Their Rodgers. next greatest quarterback Andrew Luck fell to 0-2, while journeyman quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick went to 2-0. This week, the Kansas City Chiefs try to bounce back after a demoralizing loss to the Denver Broncos. Green Bay looks to keep the Packers faithful comfortable with the loss of another key player runningback Eddie Lacy. Quarterback Aaron Rodgers will continue to find new superstars along with wide receiver Randal

CHIEFS

AT

::!7z~;:~~·"':";:;;;~,,b~ rft nA ICKERS defense, there was hope Seahawks' Marshawn Lynch would do the same

D.J. Winter Pick: Packers Record: 0-1

'Tm going to go with Green Bay because they have the future M.V.P. of this year in Aaron Rodgers and they are coming off a big win and are going to continue to go on a roll."

Nicoya Benham-Marin Pick: Chiefs Record: 0-1

"Not a fan of Green Bay."

Juston Lind Pick: Packers Record: 0-1

"Aaron Rodgers at home is too good. Even though Kansas City is coming off a tough loss against Denver, Packers are just too good for the Chiefs' defense."

Tahlia Terhune Pick: Packers Record: 0-1

"Aaron Rodgers is just really good. I mean, no interceptions at a home game in three years? Come on! It's too early to tell, but if Eddie Lacy's ankle injury keeps him from playing Monday then that will certainly give the Chiefs an advantage."

Traeger Jarrad Pick: Packers Record: 1-0

"I am going to say the Pack daddies are going to simply pack the the Chiefies up and ship 'em back to Kansas. I have a good friend who likes the Packers so I will put faith in her and the Pack from Green Bay. Let's go!"

Hayden McCartney "Packers are really good even with injuries and playing at home. Kansas City." Pick: Packers Record: 1-0 Kailyn Osaki Pick: Packers Record: 0-1

"Going with Green Bay. Tough to beat at Lambeau. Run defense tough. Even if the Packers don't have Lacy, running back James Starks will carry the load in his absence."

Fantasy Footbal I Picks: Week3

Position .Player QB T. Brady D. Williams RB WR ,T. Benjamin TE R. Gronkowski K M. Crosby DIST Broncos

FLEX WC

•L: f=i~9er:ctl~ E. Sanders

Team Week 2 Points • NE 27 12 Pit 14 ; Cle NE 27 7 GB Den 18 8; Ari 6 Den

Colton Walter Fantasy Guru waltercj@pfu.edu


THE MAST

14 SPORTS

SEPTEMBER 24, 2015

Expectations for Women's Soccer: Northwest Conference Games STEPHANIE COMPTON

Guest Writer comptose@pfu.edu A devastating end to the 2014 women's soccer season has left the team with a chip on their shoulder. Last season, the Northwest Conference Championship Title for the Lutes came down to two games. Only one victory was needed to seal the deal and the Lutes just couldn't make it happen. A 1-0 loss to Willamette and then a 2-0 loss to Linfield sent the Lutes home emptyhanded. "We were the best team over 14 games, but the conference schedule is 16 games and we fell short at the end." Lutes coach

Seth Spidahl said. Junior goalkeeper Takara Mitsui chalked the losses up, "We weren't as fresh that last weekend as we should have been to push through and get the conference title." September to the middle of November is a long season and that can be enough to drain any team's energy. But it is a new year, the start of a brand new season, and the Lutes are ready to take on as many games as it takes. The _team already has 4 wins and 1 tie against their cross-town rivals UPS under their belt. A pre-season trip to England also allowed the Lutes an early jumpstart to the season. "It put us ahead as we got to play some

extra games before we started conference play," Mitsui said. The Lutes were able to play 3 women's professional teams while in England, ending the trip with a 2-1 record. The team gained valuable experience that they used to carry them into preseason practices and games. The incoming freshmen class was not allowed on the England trip, but the team had no problem meshing with them when they arrived for preseason practices. Furthermore, Senior Lauren Larson and Junior Kaylie Rozell both sustained ACL injures that will keep them off the field this season.

Two early-season ending injuries for upperclassmen leaders can't stop the Lutes from firing on all cylinders. Even with losing two keys players, the Lutes have started off strong and the team sites their depth of talent as a huge factor in how well they have done this season. The Lutes have upcoming home games on Saturday October 10, against Linfield, and Sunday October 11 against Pacific. "Our daily goal is to improve each day and grow closer as a team and at the end we will look up and see where we finished." Coach Spidahl' s philosophy for the 2015 season.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MCKENNA MORIN: Lutes Defender Nicoya Benham-Marin getting ready to set-up one of her teammates in the middle of the field.

PHOTO COURTEST OF MCKENNA MORIN: Hailey Smoot (22) competes for a corner kick.

An Athlete's Perspective: D. J. Winter D.J. WINTER Guest Writer winterdj@plu.edu You never want to start out the season with a loss but that is how the first game played out for us. We traveled down to California Lutheran to play the Kingsmen. We played a decent game but in the end we made too many mistakes. . This has, in a way, propelled us and has been a great learning experience for us leading further down the road into the season. The loss has also motivated us that

much more to strive for excellence and we could not be more excited to open our home season this weekend against Trinity from Texas. It's going to be nice to be in front of our home fans finally and have some great support. Speaking from an offensive perspective, know we are going to execute better because a lot of the mistakes we made were just little errors, each and every week we will continue to get better. By the end of the season, we will be getting so close to peak performance that it will take a pretty good team to beat us. are always Defensively, they guaranteed to fly around and make plays which they did in our first game.

Just like offense, they made mistakes too and they recognize that and are working to fix those. We all have trust that they will admit it, learn from it, and fix it. Year in and year out, the Northwest Conference is one of the best in the nation. Looking forward, there is never going to be an easy game at this level, especially in the Northwest Conference. As I said before though, when we keep getting better every week the standings take care of themselves and we are always competing for a conference championship. I hope to see everyone out there this weekend wearing their black and gold.

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE Hear what Lute footballers have to say about their first home game

Men's Golf post consistent scores, finish p

STEVE MCGRAIN Sports Editor mcgraist@pfu.edu PLU Men's Golf opened their first tournament play of the season at Saint Martin's Invite at Olympia Country & Golf Club. "It is a short narrow course with fast greens that have a lot of break," said Senior Sevryn Modahl. Modahl finished at 56th overall, he recorded a 76 on Friday and Sunday, but went into the clubhouse on

Saturday with an 80. Two-time All-Northwest Conference golfer, Justin Lee, continued his consistency on the links. On Friday, he posted a 75 on his scorecard, which was followed up by a 76 on Saturday. Lee would finish out his first performance of his senior year tied for 35th. The biggest issue for the Lutes was not to overextend ourselves. It is easy for an athlete to try to do too much. This can be an easy trap to fall into while golfing, trying to hit a miracle shot rather than get out of a bad

situation to get on the green. "Everybody on the team, myself included is improving by just eliminating the unforced errors," said Modahl. Lute's Men's Golf will look to continue to improve from this last weekend's tournament, as they play at the PLU Invitational starting on Saturday at the Home Course in DuPont.

PHOTO COURTESY OF D. J. Winter: Sophmore Tight End for the Pacific Lutheran Football Team.

13th in Olympia


SEPTEMBER 24, 2015

THE MAST

SPORTS 15

Disappointment Friday, Series Sweep on Saturday against the Whits JAKE BILYEU Sports Writer

bilyeujc@plu.edu The Lutes' Volleyball team followed up their disappointing loss Friday night against Whitworth by beating the Whitman College Missionaries in three straight sets Saturday night. The Lutes hadn't pulled off such a flawless win since their season opener against Evergreen. The Lutes came out firing in the first set, jumping out to a 13-6 early on, forcing the Missionaries to regroup. Whitman kept it close, but the hot start followed by the endless barrage of points from Seniors Lucy Capron and Kacey Hartman provided the Lutes with more than enough power to take the first set, 25-16. Both sides turned it up a notch in the second set. The fans in attendance were treated to a back and forth battle that neither side looked to back down from. After trading off points until halfway through the set, the Lutes edged ahead, 1713, and then fended off the Missionaries.to 路 the tune of a 25-20 set win.

After the intermission, the Missionaries knew that they had to start strong if they wanted any chance at a comeback. They did just that, opening up a 6-1 lead. However, the Lutes regrouped and surged out in front with the help of a 17-3 run.

Then, having planted the seed of doubt, the Lutes finished off the Missionaries with a 25-16 set and match win. This will surely send the Lutes off for their road trip next weekend in heartwarming fashion. The fans stuck around after the game, and the coaches and players thanked their family members and

friends who cheered them on during the weekend matches. The fans weren't the only ones providing positive energy. The Lutes' bench cranked up the volume from start to finish, helping the team reboun.d after the previous night's loss. Capron couldn' t be happier to see her teammates bring the noise. "Our bench's energy has gotten better every year ever since I've been here," Capron said. "We learned this weekend that we need to feed off of that positive energy to have more nights like tonight." Head Coach Kevin Lutes Aoki his team philosophy put into action Saturday night, as the Lutes consistently made the big plays on the way to victory. "We live by the adage 'it's a marathon not a sprint," Aoki said. As far as next week is concerned, Aoki aims for his team to simply "practice hard and smart." The Lute volleyball team will take a road trip south to take on Lewis & Clark College and Pacific University, this weekend. To follow PLU Volleyball 's stats and rankings, visit golutes.com, PLU's athletic's site.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MCKENNA MORIN

Can Men's Soccer rebound? CHRISTIAN BOND

Guest Writer bondco@p/u.edu For every win, there is a loss. That was the story of the 2014 Pacific Lutheran men's soccer team. The team completed the year with a winning percentage at .500. Only four seniors graduated from that team. Players return being a year older, a year smarter, and a year stronger. That's to be expected. New seasons mean new hope,"I really like the attitude, mindset, and ability of this group. Our team was disappointed with what we would consider

a bit of a down year last year," Coach John Yorke said "Our goal is always to win the Northwest Conference and our guys believe in their ability to challenge for that," stated Yorke, "I believe they can accomplish big things" Yorke is thrilled with his entire roster. The new face first-years bring youth and exuberance to the program out on the field. Sophomores Eddie Na and Bennett Bugbee are key to the Lutes attack. Juniors in Pacific Lutheran University's Men's soccer program are valued for their experience. Junior Diego Aceves knew exactly where to be

when he deflected a shot from Bennett Bugbee to seal the deal in overtime win against Mary Hardin-Baylor. "We have a strong returning senior class," proclaimed Yorke, "they will provide leadership and on field quality." Senior goal keeper Mike Arguello commands defensive excellence from goal. Tyler Bennette is also working hard to return from injury. Upon return, Bennette plans to provide a spark in action. The 2015 team looks to rebound from last year, and contend for a conference title. To follow PLU's Men's Soccer team, visit golutes.com .


THE MAST

16 SPORTS

-

p Next: vs Trinity at l p.m. on Saturday

Up Next: at George Fox on Sunday at 12 p.m.

Volleyball: ~s Whitworth Lost 3-0 vsWhitman, WoR 3-0 1

Up Next: at Lewis & Clark on Friday at 7 p.m

NORTHWEST CONFERENCE STANDINGS Womenjs Soccer

Football TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Linfield

2

0

0

0-0

Won2

Whitworth

2

0

0

0-0

Won2

Pacific

1

1

0

0-0

Won 1

1

0

0-0

Won 1

George Fox Puget Sound

1

1

0

0-0

Lost 1

Lewis & Clark

0

2

0

0-0

Lost 2

Lutes

0

0

0-0

Lost 1

Willamette

0

0

0-0

Lost 2

2

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Whitworth

4

3

0

2-0

Won2

Puget Sound

5

0

2

1-0-2

Tied 1

Linfield

4

0

1-0-1

Tied 1

Lutes

5

1

1-1-1

Won 1

George Fox

3

2

2

1-1-1

Tied 1

Whitman

5

1

1-1-1

Tied 1

Willamette

4

1

1-1

Won 1

Pacific

6

0

1-2

Lost 1

2

0

0-2

Lost 2

Lewis & Clark

4

"U

I

80 ()

0

c

:JJ -I

m

(/)

-<

0

"Tl

s:: () ;>;

m

z z)>

s::

0

PHOTO COURTESY OF MCKENNA MORIN

:JJ

z

-

PHOTO COURTESY OF MCKENNA MORIN

Menjs Soccer

Voll eyball TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Whitworth

8

3

0

2-0

Won2

Whitworth

6

0

0

2-0

Won6

Willamette

6

4

0

2-0

Won2

Lutes

5

2

0

2-0

Won3

Lewis & Clark

5

4

0

2-0

Won2

Puget Sound

4

3

0

2-0

Won2

Lutes

7

4

0

1-1

Won 1

Linfield

5

3

0

1-1

Lost 1

Puget Sound

4

6

0

1-1

Lost 1

Whitman

1

4

0

1-1

Won 1

Linfield

4

7

0

1-1

Won 1

George Fox

3

5

0

0-2

Lost 2

George Fox

3

6

0

0-2

Lost 2

Pacific

2

5

0

0-2

Lost 3

Whitman

2

6

0

0-2

Lost 5

Willamette

1

5

1

0-2

Lost 4

Pacific

1

7

0

0-2

Lost 2


PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

OCTOBER 1,

2015

I VOLUME

92,

ISSUE 3 IMASTMEDIA.PLU.EDU

â&#x20AC;˘

omecom1n Anyone can be a princess liquid courage to get your groove on, drinks will be served. Not a part of the ticket cost, students can have up to three drinks. For all the boogiers at PLU, The homecoming dance is the music will be a mix of all Cinderella story: you get dressed genres and recent hits. The DJ up, find a date and at the end of Brandon Jefferson came highly the night you go back to your recommended from across the normal life of school, books -and Pacific Northwest. _- "My goal for this event is to tests. . For that one night however, .,_-give students a night they11 never you're living the dream. forget," Giomi said. "With the Coordinated by Sarah Giomi this elegant venue in the heart of the year, Pacific Lutheran University's city, students will feel glamorous Homecoming dance will be more and they deserve that." Don't forget, the dance is just glamorous than ever. Homecoming will be held at one night. Homecoming Week has The Pacific Grill Event Center in five days of events including a downtown Tacoma, Oct. 10 from kickoff on Monday during chapel 8-12 p.m. Tickets are $25 for one, break in Red Square where there or $40 for a pair and they can be ' will be a "Happy Hour" ticket sale for which single tickets will purchased at the concierge. "In the past years, students be $20. On Wednesday, the Cave have noted that the dances felt like a high school prom and I wanted will hold a Hump Day event something more," Giomi said. with trivia. The winning group This year's event aims to be more from that night will receive free mature and s.ophisticated. "We all Homecomi11~ tickets. On Friday, have so much stress from school, there will be a laser tag war in every student deserves a night to the field house and karaoke in the forget about that stress, dress up Cave to get students active and creative. A list of all Homecoming and feel beautiful." This year's theme is "Black and activities will be released in the Gold Never Gets Old" and it's a next week. If you're completely stumped and "black and gold tie affair" Giomi said. "It's a formal event and have no idea what you'll wear to this students should feel like they're year's Homecoming, check out our Arts & Culture section for Sarah being treated to a great night." One of Giomi' s goals for this Giomi and Brooke Thames's take on year was to give students a reason 2015 Homecoming fashion. to dress up, but not feel like they're being sent back to high school. The Pacific Grill is catering the event, featuring finger foods and a dessert bar. All food and entertainment for the night will be covered under the cost of the ticket. There will also be tables with entertainment for students VIDEO who don't like to dance. COMPONENT ONLINE AT MASTMEDIA.PLU.EDU If you're over 21 and need some

SAMANTHA LUND Editor in Chief lundsr@pfu.edu

IMAGES BY COLTON WALTER, GRAPHICS EDITOR

Clubs for all curiosities PLU has the club for you BROOKE THAMES A&C Editor thamesbe@plu.edu In today's tech-obsessed world, there seems to be an abundance of applications that cater to any interest, hobby or necessity known to man. At Pacific Lutheran University, the same can be said about student clubs. Whether students are looking to spend an evening discussing the latest breakthroughs in Biology or playing a competitive Nintendo game, PLU has a club for anyone. PLU praises diversity and provides students with opportunities to create their own clubs on campus. Students with interests ranging from academia to opera are free to create organizations that bring people with similar hobbies together to mingle, learn and explore. "Clubs are important to the fabric of the university, because [they allow] students to explore their passions and interests," Ian

Jamieson, Director of Student Involvement & Leadership, said. "The ability to create a club gives students optimal leadership potential," Miranda Martens, Student Involvement & Leadership Assistant, added. "If students think of a club to establish, it gives them the power to make changes on campus." Student clubs not only provide Lutes with the opportunity to explore their interests and exercise leadership, but also provide campus with diversity and uniqueness. Student-created clubs can revolve around virtually any topic, which supplies the university with limitless possibilities for student involvement. "Student clubs bring a level of life to the PLU community," Jamieson said. Student clubs need not be large or wellknown to make an impact.... lack the level of advertising that groups such

CONTINUED ON PAGE6

Inside this issue.

I

I

"My main focus was to just have fun playing a game I've always loved ... l'm extremely proud of the way our team competed. Go Lutes!" Kyle Drugge on the golf team's win "2015 Golf Teams kick it up a notch" pg. 15

"I like having people come to life and showing them that there's a transformation that happens in theatre." Professor Kane Anderson on teaching theatre "Acting Out" pg. 6

"I think surPLUs's opening is paramount to our efforts to allow sustainability to flourish on campus and provide a fun way to integrate it into campus culture." Bailey Smith on SurPLUs "Campus thrift shop ready for comeback" pg. 2


THE MAST

2NEWS

OCTOBER 1,

2015

Campus thrift shop ready for a comeback DAVID MAIR News Editor mairdl@plu.edu Looking to pop some tags? Only $20 in your pocket? A new store on campus is just the place to go. SurPLUs makes a comeback this year as Pacific Lutheran University's very own on-campus used store. Last year it was on hiatus, but on Oct. 10 the doors will open again from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Regular store hours for SurPLUs will be from 8 a.m.-11 a.m. and 2 p.m.5 p .m .. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. SurPLUs is located on lower campus, next to Morken. Price tags will read 10 dollars or less, except for electronics. SurPLUs even delivers to students' dorms if a large item, such

as a couch, is purchased. The store will sell everything from clothes to mattresses to coffee mugs and much more. Everything sold comes directly from campus. A lot of odds and ends come from move out day, when students toss out stuff they no longer want. Other items come from various departments around campus getting rid of the old department stuff such as chairs, computers couches, etc. Students who wish to give their used stuff to SurPLUs can bring it in during the hours it's open on Tuesday and Thursday. "I think SurPLUs opening is paramount in our efforts to allow sustainability to flourish on campus and provide a fun way to integrate sustainability into campus culture," said senior Bailey Smith the logistics

coordinator for SurPLUs. After a year off, the store returns with a new manager, excited to take on the challenge. Sophomore Ben Accord became the general manager of SurPLUs at the end of the summer. "I've found a calling for this," Accord said. "I feel blessed " He began working for PLU Sustainability this summer. When he helped move a lot of furniture out of Foss. He said he was "curious" about where it all went, which is when he expressed interest in working for SurPL Us. Accord says he has three goals for SurPLUs as it opens up this year. "Our monetary goal is to make $10,000 dollars," Accord said. In addition, he said he wants students to see it as a "valuable asset to have" and for it to "increase waste diversion on campus." Accord receives a lot of items, which he filters through, finding a way to sell it all. "There' s a field hockey set that came in that I'm selling now," he continues. ''I'm selling partition boards, somebody could put together a cubicle in their dorm room if they wanted." So if you want to wear your granddad's clothes, looking incredible with that coat from down the road, SurPLUs fills that desire.

SurPLUs will sell everything except electronics for under 1O dollars.

PHOTOS BY DAVID MAIR

Sophomore Ben Accord said he's excited to become the general manger of SurPLUs.

If students throw stuff out when they move out for the spring, it goes to SurPLUs.

Does PLU have a hunk of Bern ing ove?

The Lutes featured in this article represent a wide array of political viewpoints. Yet, if forced to vote between Clinton and Sanders, all but one of them would choose Sanders for president. Many politically liberal students, "Look out, Hillary Clinton! Bernie such as Brunelle, immediately 'voted' Sanders is right behind you!" That's what for Sanders because they preferred his national polls should say. ideology and transparency. While Clinton's approval among "He spends a lot more time Democrats slipped in April from 48 percent advocating what he wants to see out of to 43 percent, Sanders skyrocketed in the U.S.," explained Brunelle. "He wants March from 12 percent to 25 percent. He to focus on the future and how to make shows no signs of slowing down. A recent America's future better, and how to make America great again, whereas Hillary Quinnipiac University poll shows that Sanders leads Clinton by a wide margin in spends more time attacking people on the Iowa and New Hampshire, two key swing Republican side. We don't really know her states for the 2016 presidential election. game plan yet." "As a college student, I feel like Students who supported more he appeals to people in my age group," conservative political causes "voted" for said first-year Erik Carlsen. "I feel like he's Sanders because they saw him as the lesser looking out for us." of two evils. Carlsen clearly isn't the only "At least he's well-spoken," said college student who feels this way. Stauffer. "At least he knows how to talk. According to a Chegg poll last week, 59 Hillary Clinton is not good at talking. She's percent of college students plan to vote in the midst of a huge scandal right now. for Sanders, compared to a 18 Even though I don't agree percent for Clinton. with Sanders' viewpoints, Sophomore Marisol at least he's not drowning Espinosa had only good things in a scandal. I understand to say about Sanders, citing his Democrats who vote for record of advocacy. Sanders. I don't understand "He has always had a voice in Democrats who vote for what is right. He knows how Clinton." to be a proper ally in terms of "He' s at least women's rights, rights of people predictable," added Fiedler. of color and social injustices." "He's really radical and he's Quenessa Long, going to do what he's saying another sophomore, had similar he' s going to do if he gets praise for him. "Bernie is elected as president. You someone who's outspoken about don' t know exactly what what he believes in, so it' s easier Clinton is going to do." to trust him. You know what he' s Robertson, the only student who didn' t 'vote' for fighting fo r." In contrast, students Sanders, felt so tom between who support m ore conservative the candidates that he political cau ses don't harbor couldn' t make a decision . "I really d on't know," much Bem-ing love. Kaylee he said after a long pause. "I First-year Fiedler was skeptical of his views really like the ideas of one sid e whereas I like the moderate on defense. route of another." "I don' t agree with Bernie Sanders' idea of Currently, Clinton is still in the lead for the Democratic demilitarizing the police and nomination. But if PLU is cutting back drastically on military spending," she said. "I at all representative of the nation at large, it appears that think those are very important. That's what keeps us safe." Sanders, rather than party favorite Clinton, will win the Philip Passantino, a Bernie Sanders ratings skyrocketed from 12 percent to 25 percent in March. Photo courtesy of Michael Vadon. junior who currently serves as bigger prize. LIBBY POSTOVOIT News Writer postovlg@plu.edu

president for Students for Life, wasn' t impressed with Sanders' economic policy. "Even though he's a socialist, he's representing what the Democratic Party is becoming," he said. "That's very in the vein of European socialism, which hasn't worked out so far." Hillary Clinton, deemed "a bit of a wild card" by first-year student Haedon Brunelle, evokes a more diverse set of reactions than Sanders. "I think Clinton is a good candidate because she's in the middle of the road for all of her policies," said senior Foster Robertson. "That's more likely to get through a very divided Congress than what many other candidates are proposing." Sophomore Carly Stauffer has far less confidence in Clinton's abilities. "It's very clear that Clinton jeopardized our national security with her email scandal," she said. "There's no way she would be a competent leader." Long, like the majority of Lutes interviewed, had mixed feelings about Clinton. "She's a very educated and

very knowledgeable woman with a lot of experience," she said. "Talking about injustice overall, I don't think she does a good job of addressing it." Clinton and Sanders may both be Democrats, but many Lutes concluded that there is one key difference between the candidates: Sanders seems more trustworthy than Clinton. "I don't think that [Sanders and Clinton] have that many differing opinions on things," said Passantino, "but at least Bernie is honest." Fiedler shared similar concerns. "Clinton's very unpredictable. We've seen that in the scandal that has happened. Bernie's very predictable. I believe that he will fulfill all the things he wants to fulfill." Long summed up liberal and conservative opinions perfectly. "I think it's important to notice how much trust [Clinton]doesn'thavefromthenation,"she said. "People are falling in love with Bernie really fast, and people have known Hillary for a long time but are still controversial about her."


OCTOBER 1,

THE MAST

2015

Lutes purge cave of garbage SAM ELLEFSON Guest Writer ellefssG@plu.edu President Krise and Pacific Lutheran University faculty can sleep soundly knowing that some of their students took sustainability to heart this past weekend. While spelunking in Ape Caves on an Outdoor Rec trip, PLU students decided to take it upon themselves to clear out as much trash as they could from the caves. If the trash is not picked up, it will ultimately sit in the cave forever. The only way plastic is broken down at all is through a process which involves sunlight, and caves are in short supply of sunlight. The garbage that explorers carelessly toss aside will sit in that exact spot on the trail for a very long time and make Ape Caves less fun for everyone. Other people wishing to enjoy the cave will not have as good of an experience if they are trying to avoid garbage as they climb through it. Firstyear Daniel Richards, one of the students on the trip, discussed how the trash affected his experience and why he was compelled to pick up the garbage. "It was like our experience was being taken away by the trash,'' he saia ,"We wanted to potentially remove that for the next people who came intu• the cave, make it a better a experience for them." It is especially important that moveable trash be taken out of the cave because some parts of it have already been permanently damaged. In some portions of the caves, people have written their

PHOTOS BY MCKENNA MORIN A group of Lutes sees light at the end of the tunnel of trash.

CSI:

names, profanity and symbols that will most likely never fade away. There was even toilet paper and human waste. That is one brown package not even a college student wants to see while exploring these amazing caves. The Outdoor Rec guides Sophomore Sam Altenberger and Senior Sarah Henderson were ecstatic that these Lutes decided to leave the cave better than they found it, especially since many of them were first year students. "That was super exciting. There's hope!" Henderson said, Even after just a few weeks of being on campus, Lutes have already adopted sustainability. Altenberger really felt that sustainability is just an important part of PLU's identity. "It is really ingrained in the culture," he said. Henderson mentioned that this was the first time she had seen PLU students go so far out of their way to clean the area they were exploring on an Outdoor Rec trip. Both of the guides felt that PLU students are in general more respectful towards the environment, but this was above and beyond what they would normally see. PLU can be proud of how these students have reacted to sustainability. The students are not only taking in the lessons they learn about sustainability on campus, but going out and making the world cleaner and more enjoyable for everybody. With young Lutes already joining in the effort to sustain our world, the potential for PLU students to make positive changes on campus, in their community and in the world is promising and exciting.

How to sound smart: Pope Comes to America

Pope Francis became the first pope to speak in front of a joint house. Photo courtesy creative commons £1 !tor's Note· 7111s co/1111111 1s des1g11cd to i11for111 tile reader 011 a11 issue going 011 11atio11a/ or 111tcmatio11a/. Pope Frm1ci~ traue/cd to A111cnrn for tile fll"'t t1111c last zucck.

That's what he said-

1

Nothing like the first time:

His motive behind not coming to America ties into his personality. Before becoming Pope he was the archbishop of Buenos Aires. He was very critical of America's economic and political hegemony. It's also no secret that Francis prefers to be among the poor and downtrodden, than the rich and powerful. He does however, appreciate America's democracy, religious diversity, as well as it being a nation formed on absorbing immigrants.'

3

Though same-sex marriage has been legalized and Planned Parenthood put on a hold the Pope barely touched on either topic. Rather his talk in front of Congress centered more on immigration, the death penalty, racial injustice, the weapons trade, and poverty. His speech touched on topics like global warming and Pro-Life, receiving applause from both sides of the House at different times.

For more information check the sources used for this article: cnn "Pope Francis Washington Congress updates," NY Times "Pope Francis is coming to America after avoiding it tor 78 years," NY Times "Before the Pope visit a 180 foot tall Francis arrives in midtown."

Campus Safety Investigations Taken from weekly Campus Safety reports

If you ever need hefp Call Campus Safety at 253-535--7911 Email Campus Safety at csin@plu.edu Or visit camfus safety in the lower level o Harstad Hall

,.. .

Sophomore Connal Boyd stares down the trash.

NEWS3

Domestic Violence off Campus SAF was notified by a student that she had been ssaulted by her boyfriend while off campus. She stated at her boyfriend had struck her several times while the o sat in his car off-campus. He is not a PLU student. he did not wish to file a police report. She was given list of campus resources. CSAF escorted her to the omen's Center to speak with staff. No further action

......_-+------1

Medical Aid in Harstad A student called CSAF to request an ice pack for soreness sustained as a result of an offcampus car accident earlier in the day. CSAF provided a nice pack. No further action by CSAF.

Medical Aid in Rieke Stock Room A student injured her hand when it was accidentally cut by a broken glass pipette in the west stock room of Rieke. CSAF responded and transported the student to the Health Center for medical care. No further action was taken by CSAF.


THE MAST

4NEWS

OCTOBER 1,

2015

Paleoanthropology: Aive & we at PLU PARIS FRANKLIN Copy Editor franklpm@plu.edu Since Sept. 10, the internet has been abuzz with anthropologists discussing the discovery of a new species of homonid in a remote South African cave. The research was released, along with a NOVA documentary available on the Internet for free, in September about an archaeological dig in November of 2013. More than 1,500 bones from nearly 20 individuals of a new human ancestor, Homo Naledi, were unearthed by a team of researchers led by paleoanthropologist Lee Berger over the course of 21 days. "[It is] a cool discovery, and it is exciting to see the media spotlight on anthropology," Dr. Amanda Taylor, an anthropology professor at Pacific Lutheran University, said. "I hope this find will inspire more PLU students to take the introductory bioanthropology class and learn more about the m!nd-blo:ving story of the human past." Others in the Lute f{Hriily share the excitement

"Berger has had this reputation of being very theatrical about the find and making speculations. That may be controversial in the field, but I think that it is drawing people in," senior anthropology major Katy Johnston said. Anthropologists do not intend to dramatize the field, but are truly fascinated by the work that they are a part of. "Finding like-minded people is probably my favorite thing of Anthropology Club," said Johnston. "You just get this group of people and you know that everybody is really passionate about their interests. You can really get into the nitty gritty and be like, 'what are you interested in specifically?"' Johnston believes that the most significant part of the Naledi discovery is that it has sparked interest within students who have previously shied away from the anthropological field due to the notion that everything has already been found. "It has opened my eyes that there are a lot more artifacts and human or evolutionary remains that we have not found yet," said Johnston. She believes that the discovery "opens up a lot of room for good controversy and good science back

and forth through archaeology." Much of the controversy surrounding the find relates to its lack of dates and where Homo Naledi may fit into the evolutionary spectrum. Johnston elaborates, "If it is as old as Lee Berger thinks that it is, that this is the very base of [human] evolution, I think that would be completely earth shattering for evolution." "The discovery of Homo Naledi shows anthropologists, and the general public, that what we think we know about human ancestors is constantly changing and new research can dramatically challenge an accepted scientific narrative." Dr. Taylor said. "In this case, it is fascinating that this hominin had similar hands and feet to later Homo species, but similar skull morphology to earlier Homo species. And the brain size was similar to Lucy the famous, tiny, australopithecine!" Lucy, who is thought to be dated before Naledi and is at least three million years older than Sapiens (modern day humans), was discovered in the 1970s. The small skeleton was the basis for searching for more evidence that Homo Sapiens could in fact have originated from the apes.

"Maybe the next piece of research to fall into place will be the dating of these very old remains, or those similar to Naledi," Dr. Taylor stated. "I think this work will inspire scientists to think more about the feedback between the development of the human brain and the development of the human body." "We don't know a lot of dates or super details yet, but just the fact that there is a new species ... and that they have a whole lifespan from infant to elderly in those bones, I think that is really ground breaking on the evolutionary scale to be able to have a full lifespan and kind of see that and where that will lead." Added Johnston "The fact that it is a new species is obviously going to change what is taught and also the controversy around it what professors try to put it in or if they want to wait for more information." Further evidence is expected to be released about Naledi as it is finalized. While those studied in anthropology may be dead, the fiell.d itself is more alive than ever. ~

II

Annual conference coincides 路with tragic anniversary BEN COX News Writer coxbd@plu.edu The Lutheran Studies Conference helped the Pacific Lutheran University community learn more about another culture and religious belief. The annual conference was held last Thursday, September 24. Several presenters shared a wealth of knowledge regarding JewishChristian relations both past and present. This fascinating topic was chosen because 70 years ago the Nazi concentration camps were liberated-. While we are better about interfaith dialogue now that we were then, we still have a long way to go to achieve justice and understanding between all people, which is where this conference comes in. Almost 6,000 hate crimes were reported by the FBI in 2013, not to mention the countless more atrocities that have gone unreported. To end this and to reach our full potential we must learn from and about our neighbors who very well may not agree with us because, as Margaret Wheatley put it, "You can't hate someone whose story you know." To kick off the day, Dr. Agnes Choi discussed the "parting of the ways" between Judaism and Christianity. Christianity was originally a reform movement within Judaism, and many Christians held onto Jewish traditions for several centuries.

One may note the history, beliefs and traditions that are shared between Christians and Jews and wonder why there has been such anti-Semitism in the last few centuries. Dr. Mike Halvorson, the second speaker of the day, looked to 16th century Germany and Martin Luther as part of the cause. While Martin Luther did have countless inspirational insights that are well known, his animosity towards the Jews is frequently overlooked. Yet Dr. Halvorson explained that "only by studying the past can we move beyond it."

While Luther chose to deal with disagreements through hostility, that doesn't mean that present day Lutherans have to. History teaches us that we are both able to learn from and coexist with various cultures, and the first step towards this is to avoid stereotypes and to seek understanding. Dr. Heather Mathews shared a few visual masterpieces from the era immediately following WWII which reflected the tragic stories of the Holocaust. These inspiring paintings remind us yet

PHOTO CREDIT MCKENNA MORIN

Yaakov Ariel , a speaker, at the conference created a space to talk about religion.

again of the need for understanding and communication so as to prevent anything similar from ever happening again. Looking at a different form of art, Dr. Samuel Torvend hosted "The Songs We Share in Common" in which several facets of the human experience were explored through ancient psalms. They were sung in various ways ranging from the original Hebrew to Duke Ellington's jazz interpretation of Psalm 23. Multiple times it was made clear that the Jewish community is willing to have inter religious conversations. Dr. Suzanne Crawford O'Brien talked about the Jewish healing movement and Rabbi Bruce Kadden discussed Dabru Emet, both of which encourage Jews to work together with Christians. Have we as Christians done our part in returning the favor? As Dr. Darrell Jodock shared, we could be worse, but we definitely could also be better. Keynote speaker Dr. Yaakov Ariel ended the day with his exploration of interfaith dialogue in American history which left people aware of the value of having different faith groups talk to each other. Here at Pacific Lutheran University, we are committed to justice, diversity,and sustainability. To fully achieve any of these, inter-religious and inter-cultural conversations must occur in a non-discriminatory fashion. "Here at PLU," said Dr. Torvend "one will not find a friendly home for prejudice." However, what one will find is an environment conducive to discussion and an ongoing search for knowledge that is just waiting to be tapped into.


OCTOBER

THE MAST

1, 2015

â&#x20AC;˘

ires

A&C5

or a

Natalie Mooney Guest Writer mooneynr@plu.edu

Forget Netflix! This season's lineup of sizzling TV show premieres will have even the biggest binge watchers tuning into cable this fall.

"Empire" - 9 p.m. Wednesdays on FOX "Empire" returned ¡for a second season on Sept. 23 after a highly-rated first installment (which ensured the second season after only two episodes). Since the series' debut last fall, fans have been anxiously awaiting the premiere of "Empire's"

second chapter. "Empire" is based on a mp hop music entertainment company and follows the founding family's battle for control of the company. Season 1 did so well in ratings and on social media reviews that fans and critics are waiting to see what season two

has in store for the characters and the plotline they left with. Previews have included favorite characters Luscious, Cookie and Andre along with the question of who will inherit the throne of the company.

"American Horror Story: Hotel" - Premieres Oct. 7 on FX Season 5 of the wildy successful "American Horror Story" is set to premiere Oct. 7 on FX. This season is set in the haunted Los Angeles Hotel Cortez and features fan favorites Evan Peters, Kathy Bates and Sarah Paulson, as well as newly added cast member Lady Gaga who is suspected to be a show-stealer. Creator Ryan Murphy describes this season to be very similar to the first season, "Murder House," especially with Gaga' s captivating character traumatizint~ the hotel. Thi< '->edSO 1 w1 be ri hter ng, di urbiroc1 ti C>i.teme r.rs are ..,o.ng LTaLy in anticipation of the premiere. PHOTO COURTESY OF IDIGITALTIMES.COM

I Join LASR DJ at the Bob Dylan Dance Party Brooke Thames A&C Editor thamesbe@plu.edu

I

r

When it comes to music, phrases like "best songwriter of all time" tend to spark debate. While the Swifties of the world are mourning Rolling Stone's crowning of Bob Dylan as the "#1 Greatest Songwriter of All Time," one LASR DJ is celebrating in full Bob Dylan fashion. Senior Eddie McCoven, DJ of "The Crossroads," will be hosting a Bob Dylan Dance Party Monday Oct. 8 at 8 p.m. in honor of the singer/ songwriter's musical achievement. For one hour Lutes are welcomed inside the LASR studio to sing, dance and jam along to some of the artist's biggest hits. "It's gonna be a great time for people to come in, hang out, dance a little bit, sing a little bit

or just be there while I do the broadcast," McCoven said. During the one hour broadcast, McCoven will also be giving students the opportunity to perform Bob Dylan covers live on the air. McCoven will also be performing hls own Bob Dylan cover. As a musician himself, McCoven finds that Dylan's music speaks to him and inspires hls own creativity in a way that only true musicianship can. "The quality of his lyrics - the poetic nature - speaks to me as a writer[ ... ] it speaks to me as a musician," McCoven said. "There's some powerful things that [Dylan] can do with words

and a few chords." McCoven's adoration for Bob Dylan is what inspired mm to host a special hour dedicated to the musician. However, Dylan's music is not far removed from the songs regularly featured on McCoven' s show "The Crossroads." Inspired by the old blues tale of Robert Johnson (who sold his soul to the devil at the crossroads), "The Crossroads" showcases music from a variety of genres. Blues, country, and classic rock are just some of the musical styles McCoven highlights during his reign on the radio. "A lot of times there are artists such as Bob Dylan who cross those genres," McCoven said. Students who wish to join McCoven for his Bob Dylan Dance Party can join the DJ Monday Oct. 8 in the LASR studio.


THE MAST

6A&C

OCTOBER 1,

2015

PLU professor publishes poetry more social aspect of his writing. Passing this love of poetry on to his students is what Barot believes he frerkila@plu.edu enjoys most about teaching at PLU. "[It's important] to be able to As a liberal arts college, Pacific introduce this material that I think Lutheran University emphasizes the is really beautiful and important to importance of artistic expression. people who might really might benefit One PLU professor serves as a prime from this material and might feel example. larger and themselves and the world," Rick Barot published his latest book Barot said. of poetry in July. It's a project which As for his time here at he began working on right after the PLU, Barot says that his greatest events of 9/11 and continued until accomplishment in life is becoming 2012. A body of work born out of "When I was younger, what inspired me a teacher. the tragedy of 9/11, Barot feels as He thinks of teaching as was the idea of creating beauty." though the poems are highly based a kind of feedback loop where off the collision of domestic and something that the students say Rick Barot family life with the political and Assosicate Professor of English can change what the teacher social environment of the time. thinks. In this way, his students "If you were an artist, you inspire him to write better, and couldn't really help but feel the the advice that he gives to them he pressure of all of that reality on your intersections." uses for himself as well. domestic, personal life," Barot said. Over the years, Barot has found He thinks of teaching as being Barot has a special connection to himself inspired by a variety of similar to writing because each the art of poetry. Beginning in his different poets. In the 30 years that involves communicating with people. junior year of college, Barot said that he has been reading two poets in "I think what's great about being he was inspired to make the change particular have had an influence on a teacher is the effect of your work," from journalistic prose to_poetry. after his work. His "foundational poets" are Barot said. "There's evidence right being exposed to the art form lli his Elizabeth Bishop and Adrienne Rich. away, [which is] your students classes. 路 ... - 路 Each of these poets inspires Barot' s learning." He said that he simply likes work, with Bishop contributing working within more of a compressed sensory aspects and Rich inspiring the

LYZ FRERKING Guest Writer

space. The only thing that has changed is the reasons he is inspired to write poetry. "When I was younger, what inspired me was the idea of creating beauty," Barot said. "These days, I think the inspiration that I have comes from thinking about how people have multiple identities and sometimes those identities don't get along. Poetry is a way of recording those

Barot released his collection of poems in July 2015

Acting out with PLU's new theatre professor Helen Smith Guest Writer smithhe@plu.edu While trying to navigate through the sea of confused first-years rushing to find their next class, students will notice a new face in the theatre department. He is the latest addition to Pacific Lutheran University whose wardrobe "tries to make a statement." Kane Anderson, Visiting Associate Professor of Theatre, is both a unique character and teacher. Students in Anderson's class take off their shoes when they enter, start the class with a five minute buffer to block out the day and then do 10 minutes of yoga to loosen up. 'Tm impressed with his style of teaching," first-year Josie Courtney said. "He's a really funny teacher and I love the class." Through his teaching Dr. Anderson strives to break actors out of their shells and help them act for themselves, not for others. "My gift as an actor has often been seeing what other people do and bringing that out in them. I like having people come to life and showing them that there's a . transformation that happens in theatre," Anderson said. "I want to know what you think; I want to hear your voice." "He wants us to look at things from different points of view, try new things and challenge [ourselves]," first-year Chuck Stem said. Anderson hopes to push students to step outside their comfort zones by encouraging them to act in unique ways. "He really tries to make class a safe place and always reminds us that the stakes are low, and if we mess up, so what? Life goes on," Courtney said. His personality seems to appeal to his co-workers as well. "There's a lot of laughter and costumes," Amanda Sweger, Assistant Professor of Theatre, said. "He's really fun but he's all business under his friendly exterior." Not only is his teaching style unique, but so is his personal education. Anderson got his doctorate from the University of California, Santa Barbara in Theatre Studies, and wrote his dissertation on superheroes in performance. "I was looking at the way superheroes are American icons and are used by different subaltern groups to try to create the new face of America," Anderson said. "The big surprise of my career was that I didn't think I would get a PhD." Before getting his PhD, Anderson went to Arizona State University for his master's in Theatre Performance and endured "two and a half years of emotionally painful work." However, when the committee met for his master's they urged him to continue with his education. "If I'm going to do a PhD, doing something for five-plus years of my life, I want to do something that I get up every day and I love to do. So I said, 'I've always been a comic book fan, I want to study superheroes in performance,"' Anderson said. "I can't believe they let me do it. I keep thinking they will call me back saying 'You know how you got that PhD? Yeah, that's not real."' His five years of research - as well as his time spent dressed as Mr. Incredible at Comic-Con - are what enabled him to write his book, "Truth, Justice, and the Performative Way." The book is modeled after his dissertation and explores "superhero performance and the battle for social

justice in 21st century America." This year Anderson will be directing "Goodnight Desdemona, Good Morning Juliet" in the spring. The play features a professor who goes into a dream state after a series of horrific events. In this dream, she finds characters Desdemona and Juliet and tries to save them. "I was drawn to the script because it has such strong female roles while much [of] Shakespeare is mostly about the men," Anderson said. This will be Anderson's first year at PLU, and he is excited to spend it teaching a subject he has spent so many years studying. "I'm lucky I got this job. Otherwise I'd be selling my blood," Anderson said. "I love what I do, and I'm lucky to do it

"I like having people come to life, and showing them that there's a transformation that happens in theater." Kane Anderson Visiting Associate Professor of Theatre

Clubs for all curosities PLU has the club for you CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 .....Clubs that lack the level of advertising that groups such as Outdoor Rec and PLUtonic/ HERmonic still contribute to student involvement on campus, especially if they're niche oriented. "By having small clubs of different topics, students have a high chance of [finding] a club they would want to join," Martens said. Hidden gems such as League of Legends Club, Anime Club, and The Mark cater to specific audiences, givingstudentswhoareinterestedinJapaneseanimation or creative writing a space to engage their interests. "The importance of a club isn't about their size, but about the effect they have on the community, both within the club and the community at large," Jamieson said. "So all clubs, no matter their size, can help change lives and help students grow." The club-creating process is also easy for any student looking to fashion a club themselves. In order to create a club, one must only acquire 10 signatures in order to demonstrate that interest for the club exists. In addition to finding a faculty member to serve as club advisor, a Petition for Formal Recognition for must be completed. From there, only a written constitution and a club officer training are necessary to finish the process. According to Jamieson, the entire process can take a minimum of three weeks if students are timely. Some newly founded clubs even premiered at this year's Involvement Fair, including Sociology Club, created by sophomore Sarah Ney. So no matter what interests, hobbies and passions students may harbor, there is an open opportunity at PLU to engage in clubs t h a t cater to numerous curiosities. "I strongly encourage all students to get involved with clubs to gain a sense of community," Martens said. "Joining a club is the best way to make friends with similar interests." So any interest one might find in an app, PLU could have a club for that.


OCTOBER 1,

THE MAST

2015

A&C7

How to ook haute at Homecoming BROOKE THAMES A&C Editor thamesbe@plu.edu

With Pacific Lutheran University's annual Homecoming dance quickly approaching, time is running out to put together the perfect outfit for t:be night. Students looking for inspration need look no further than the Mast's tips on how to look haute at Homecoming.

Mix It Up For guys, the classic black and white suit is always a great choice. However, for this year's Homecoming, shake up the traditional style with unique accents like a bold hankerchief, unique socks or a flashy tie.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MEGBORDERS.COM

Show It Off While formal dances usually call for fancy full-length numbers, short and sweet dresses embody all the fun of a Homecoming dance. Those who feel so inclined may choose to opt out of drowning in a ball gown in order to dance the night away in something a bit more comfortable and far more flirty.

First-Year Courtney Miranda

Let It Flow Speaking of comfort, the Grecian Goddess look is a fantastic way to look effortlessly glamorous at any formal event. The drapery of Grecian style dresses is elegant while maintaining an air of simplicity. Therefore, this style is sure to make anyone appear heavenly at this year's Homecoming.

Sophomore Matthew Salzano

"Harmlessness" makes the world a beautiful place & I am no longer afraid to die JEFF DUNN Copy Editor dunnja@plu.edu "The Emo Revival Ends Here" reads the title to Noisey's review of Harmlessness, the sophomore album from "The World Is A Beautiful Place & I Am No Longer Afraid To Die" (abbreviated TWIABP), released Sept. 25 via Epitaph Records. With a history almost as long as their name, TWIABP has become (by none of their own intentions) the poster-children of the so-called "Emo Revival," but this new release has cemented their transition into a more accessible indie rock sound without losing the core themes that have permeated their previous releases. "Emo" as a genre carries certain connotations that elicits negative responses from unaccustomed listeners. People are often turned off by harsh vocals or shouting, which emerged as a major part of the genre from its punk and hardcore roots. Contrary to their previous full length, "Whenever, If Ever," 2013, "Harmlessness" has no screams. In fact, the album features the

band's female vocalist on several tracks, "January 10th, 2014" being my personal favorite. Rebranding to a more accessible style is often met with accusations of "selling out" by die-hard fans. Really, that argument only works under the assumption that a band is making its music for you, which is pretty self-centered of you. For shame. It's a momentous occasion when artists can sustain themselves long enough to really "feel out" their sound and fine-tune it. Members of the band have noted in interviews that writing this album felt more cohesive than "Whenever, If Ever." "For 'Whenever, If Ever,' that whole thing was just a mess," guitarist Derrick Shanholtzer-Dvorak said in an interview with Themusic.com.au. "You know, it'd be like, two or three hours in the studio every couple of weeks, and not everyone would be there. We lost our vocalist during the middle of recording. It just wasn't focused; we kind of rushed it." "Harmlessness" is full of references to the band's first EP, 2010's "Formlessness." Since then, the band has fluctuated in size between four and 10

members. But just because they've gone twenty-something's search for meaning through a few lineup changes doesn't mean and purpose in their world. they've slowed down at all. If anything, Writer Ian Cohen summarizes TWIABP has done the opposite - pushing this album better than I ever could in his the limits of their sound to new heights. review from Noisey: "As much as I want to say What they've done is nearly impossible for many great artists; maintaining their "Harmlessness" is what the emo revival popularity long enough to keep going back was leading up to, that still feels like selling it short[ ... ]The emo revival ends here to the studio. On Pitchfork, writer Evan Rytlewski because its flagship band made the best writes: indie rock record of 2015, period." "TWIABP have succeeded where past generations of emo bands have often stumbled: tidying up their sound without losing any of the exuberance and immediacy that made that sound so striking in the first place." Throughout all of their musical endeavors, TWIABP strives to create a sense of community and collaboration. This album doesn't disappoint in those regards, and takes it a step further to tackle myriad issues from mental well-being and displacement from old homes to new ones, to violent revenge against sexual predators and everything in between. it's these themes that landed TWIABP the "emo" title in the first place. The lyrical content is reminiscent of any PHOTO COURTESY OF THEWORLDIS.BANDCAMP.COM


8 FEATURE

THEMASTI


OCT.

1, 2015

FEATURE9


10

OPINION

THE MAST

ANNIE BUNCH Cartoonist bunchal@plu.edu

Annie is a first-year student originally from Port/and, Oregon. She loves the visual arts and is happily attending PLU in pursuit of studying art history and studio arts.

OCTOBER 1,

2015

THE MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN CHIEF Samantha Lund /undsr@plu.edu OPINION EDITOR Courtney Miranda NEWS EDITOR David Mair A&C EDITOR Brooke Thames SPORTS EDITOR Steven McGrain PHOTO EDITOR Mckenna Morin COPY EDITORS Jeff Dunn Paris Franklin Hannah Soltis Sanna Vargas CHIEF DESIGNER Colton Walter

#UnexpectedMomVisit

College Scorecard Obam a level s th e p lay ing fi e ld for s t uden t s natio nw ide

~J\~AST

MAST

TV

MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER Matthew Salzano salzano@plu.edu EXECUTIVE PRODUCER Genny Boots EQUIPMENT & TECHNOLOGY ENGINEER Samuel Allenberger ASSISTANT PRODUCER Sarah Giomi POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

HELEN SMITH Guest Writer smithhe@plu. edu President Obama debuted his college an online scorecard, database full of information about college costs and averages a few weeks ago, in an effort to support students in making better college choices, according to the White House website. During my first look through the scorecard, I was amazed. I looked through pages upon pages of college stats for places like University of Washington, Yale, Harvard and, of course, Pacific Lutheran University. I felt like it was some type of poetic justice. Finally the colleges are applying to you. The website covers average costs of attendance, average SAT/ACT scores, average graduation and retention rates and financial aid packages. What I admire most about the college scorecard is that it's adding a bit of transparency to the application process. Colleges will tell you the highest amounts they might give for

financial aid, but the scorecard tells you the average amount that students receive. With an added option to calculate an aid package, the scorecard gives families numbers they might actually be able to work with. Last year when I was sending off my college applications, I was taking a lot of shots in the dark. With something like this, I would have been a much more informed applicant. With so many businesses out to solicit money from the application process, such as College Board and the Common App, I think the scorecard is a good combatant against a lot of the ambiguity surrounding what students can expect from colleges before they apply. It also helps that it's coming from a third party, the Department of Education. So how does PLU stand up against the national averages? I'm happy to say PLU does pretty well. Statistics show the average PLU student pays about $23,000 a year. Contrary to popular belief, students aren't paying 50 thousand dollars a year for slow wifi, we're only paying half that. PLU also has an above average graduation rate, and students are able to start paying back their loans within three years. The website also has information on what everyone really wants to know: the average salary of a PLU graduate clocks in at about $45,000 per year. Not bad! Although the website has great statistical information, it really doesn't say who colleges are as institutions, so I suggest we start a petition to leave space on the website for colleges to tell us about themselves, in 350 words or less of course.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

The responsibility of The Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community.

The Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu.edu by 5 p.m. the Monday before publication. The Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@plu.edu.


THE MAST

OCTOBER 1, 2015

The weekly "Let's talk about sex" series will look into a different topic about sex and sexuality zn an effort to raise awareness, bring education and be a forum for discussion. To write in and share your opinions and stories, email mast@plu.edu The Pacific Lutheran University campus is sexually congested. It' s funny to hear students whispering about sex without knowing the basics about initiating and sustaining a sexual relationship with someone they find attractive. The only thing on campus that comes remotely close to being semi-adequate sex-ed for young adult students is PLU's Sex+ series. Sex discussion and education is vital. Between 1991 and 2004, the U.S. teen birth rate fell from 62 to 41 per every 1,000 female teens. That drop in teen pregnancies can be attributed to education and contraception, according to the 2005 Vital Statistics Reports. The same goes for Sexually, Transmitted Infections (STis). There'-S a clear correlation between sexual education and sexual health, accordmg to other journals - here are a few: Perspectives on Reproductive & Sexual Health (2004), Washington D.C.'s National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, Family Health International, Journal of Adolescent Health and the Committee on HIV Prevention in the United States. In light of the millions (maybe billions?) of pages of research on this topic, it's clear: ed ucation is key. Sex+ is a series of panels and lectures that take place d uring the school year. Students and faculty are invited to Sex+ to discuss sex and sexuality. "Sexperts" lecture and sit on panels to h elp facilitate

and educate. The panelists offer insight into various sexual practices and ways to safely practice them. This is a safe, open space to come with any questions you have. I found it interesting to witness a Sex+ event and to see how intrigued and curious some PLU students are about sex. Students offered questions that we all wonder but don't want to ask. Last year, one Sex+ event centered on the topic of BDSM/Kink/Fetish. At the end of the event, sex toys and supplies were handed out to students. It was a frenzy. One of my straight, male friends left the event with a pocket vibrator, which he gifted to a female friend! I wished I could've just gone up to the students and told them: this is the type of lube you'd want to use for this form of sex, this is the type of toy you'd probably want to try as your first time sex toy, even preparation/cleaning basics. Even students can be "sexperts." I know a small handful of students on campus who have connections to and have dabbled in BDSM, kink and fetishrelated activities. But sadly, none are able to tell other students about their sexual experiences. Students with years of sexu al experiences sh ould provide feedback and guid an ce to the more curiou s students. Open conversations about sex will fos ter more sex positivity outside of Sex+ events. This year, The Mast is dedicating this spot, right here, to answering questions and offering advice from students, faculty and sexperts. Our authors will remain anonymou s so they can be open and honest about sexu al experiences w ithout fear.

11

arly roots for Carly

Let's talk about sex! How do we talk about S*X?

OPINION

CARLY STAUFFER Opinion Writer

stauffce@plu.edu Whether you're a devoted liberal or a die-hard conservative, odds are you've been heanng an earful about Carly Fi-Orina. After flying under the radar for the greater part of the 2016 presidential campaigning season, Fi-Orina is now obviously determined to be heard loud and dear - and she is succeeding. Fiorina stands out as the sole female among the primary Republican contenders vying for the nomination to face off against the Democrats' pick, which many assume will be Hillary Clinton. But her sex is surely not Fiorina's only distinguishing feature. It was during the past two Republican presidential debates that Fiorina proved herself tO be a worthy candidate. Quick on her feet and assertive in speech, Fiorina stole the debate stage (even from buffoon Donald Tnimpl) in these televised events - and a record 23 million people reportedly witnessed her do so. Fiorina becomes noticeably impassioned whenever she speaks, which likely strikes a chord in the many frustrated Americans who are disturbed by the direction oUJt <:Ptintty is heading. Speaking loudly on issues ranging from our failing foreign, policy (including the recent Iran Deal) to our inability to defend the sanctity of life and our population's most vulnerable, Fiorina is, for many conservatives, not only their knight in shining armor. SM is a knightess. Voters should be able to look past their candidateS' SeX, as this is an

important asset as a Republican politician. Long accused of being the party of old white men, the GOP has found a fresh face with Fiorina - yet she still stands for the conservative ideals and traditional values that I believe make our country great. As a female, Florina challenges her opponents to come up with new arguments against conservative politics. Clinton wUI find it very difficult to brush off Republican support for defunding Planned Parenthood as misogynistic when her opponent is a no·nonsense, tough·as·nails, independent woman. It's her strong belief in the antiabortion movement, in fact, that has brought Fiorina much attention. One sound bite from the most recent debate, in particular, quotes Fiorina explaining that how we in the US view and treat unborn children, is more than a personal choke, but is "about the character of our nation." Cue the ap plause and "Amens." Critics of Fiorina are quick to cite her time as CEO of Hewlett Packard and her recent reference d uring a debate to an undercover post-abortion video of questionable existence as reawns to consider her an unqualified contender. However, supporters point out the state of the economy during the time at which Florina ran .HP, and nullify the. vi reference criticism by reasoning whether or not this video in particular exists, countless videos undeniably equal in horrifying content do. The latter fact alone should be enough to hush anyone. The truth is, for the conservative voters yearning for "one nation under God" again Florina is our voice. That's exactly what a politician is supposed t<> be. And that is where my vote will go.

Hey Hillary • 1

• •

A letter in response to Hillary Clinton s appearance on Th e To n i g h t S h ow w i t h J i m my Fa II o n rr

JJ

but I wish you would have stood with them on live television. Besides the motherly conversation, I was confused as to why the high number of jokes Dear Mrs. Hillary Clinton, were necessary. Teasing Trump Watching your interview seemed to be the main reason on "The Tonight Show" with you decided to be interviewed. Jimmy Fallon unsettled me. I The one-liners were not apart was far from moved to Team of a productive political Hillary after multiple jokes about conversation but instead were Republican candidate Donald mild bullying remarks about Trump, the absence of any political hair and attitudes. conversation and your dancing Talking about varying views around the email scandal. on issues lightheartedly is much As a college-age woman, different that blatantly poking I feel the Women's Rights platform fun at another candidate. I is empowering. Closing the wage would prefer to hear about the gap, fighting to end sexual assault ways in which yourself and on college campuses and increasing Trump differ than to hear about funding for reproductive rights are his hair. a few winning stances which were Your interview on Wednesday left untouched while speaking with PHOTO COURTESY OF MIC/YOUTUBE night showed a new side to Fallon. Jimmy Fallon impersonates Donald Trump in a skit with Hillary Clinton during an episode of Team Hillary I had not seen Telling the story of reading The Tonight Show wit h Jimmy Fallon Sept. 16. before. This television show is to your children nightly was seen as comical, which should charming. The relatable anecdote ability to see all rights equally. draw another layer of empathy was pleasant but not compelling. Running as a presidential candidate involves from myself and other voters. I hope that throughout the Last week before you were talking with Fallon, being relatable, but I would suggest that your supporters campaign, the bullying will be put aside and the strong, there were efforts to defund Planned Parenthood. While are more diverse than was assumed on this program. confident candidate you are will shine. this is a complicated issue, Wednesday night gave you the While you were giggling about reading to your opportunity to speak on how you would prevent further daughter, other daughters were worried about not being Sincerely, attempts to defund the healthcare provider, but instead, able to receive cancer screenings, birth control and STI Brooke Wolfe you talked about your children. This made me doubt your tests. I know that you stand with equality and equal access,

BROOKE WOLFE Guest Writer wolfebh@plu.edu


12

THE MAST

OPINION

OCTOBER 1,

2015

.Feminism in STEM MEGAN LONGSTAFF Guest Writer /ongstmr@pfu.edu

How is it that when one demographic tries to move forward, another group gets held back? Injustice can be a two-edged sword in which removing prejudice, another is created. This past summer, a viral movement started where women engineers took pictures with the hashtag #ILookLikeAnEngineer. The campaign started ·after a tech company's ad featuring one of their female employees sparked uproar about gender stereotyping in the Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics field. As a woman in science and engineering, I am well aware of the gender gap, but that doesn't bother me. What is bothersome is how some people go about changing this and try to make the field more diverse. It has become more about identifying what makes male and female engineers different, rather than blurring the lines between genders. The feminist movement in STEM singles out women in the field by labeling differences like appearance and constantly identifying science-inclined women as heroes. How can women expect to be treated as equals in a field they keep separating theIJlselves from? Hackbright Academy was founded ·in 2012 and is the number one software engineering school.. ._. far women. By segregating themselves and closing the education opportunity for men, the college aims to promote women in the STEM world. This divide isn't necessary because it's easier for women to get accepted into engineering schools. nearly 30 percent of the female candidates were accepted to MIT in 2003 as opposed to only 11.6 percent of their male counterparts, according to College Confidential. I personally hated knowing during the college admission process that I could be denying a more qualified male a well-deserved spot just because I had two X chromosomes. I am a person, not a means to get your diversity statistics up. I want to be judged on who I am and what I do, not what I

1: Lc0kLi1<.(!.~ cn3'\n.t~ ~v\e J:

Wl (l

be

ortt,

$0W\ed.a.1j.

~~ PHOTO BY COURTNEY MIRANDA

am.

The #ILooklikeAnEngineer campaign went viral when the tech company Onelogin featured their female employee standing against gender stereotyping in the STEM field There are special societies and scholarships solely for female engineers and scientists as well. Organizations like the Society for Women Engineers (SWE) and Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) promote the growth of women in STEM by providing additional aid that a

"stereotypical male engineer" would be unable to receive, potentially hindering somebody else's opportunity to make the most of their abilities. This favoritism towards women is unfair because we are punishing men now for prejudice they had no control over in the past. It used to be a hierarchy of men over women, but the times have changed and we need to move on with it. I think the most painful part of the effects of feminism in STEM is how it negatively impacts women. We may get great perks like easier admission and additional money for education, but this push to increase the number of females in technical fields sends a message to younger girls that is counter-productive. By creating girl-specific engineering toys and having campaigns to teach girls science and engineering, society is telling them that they can and should be engineers, but different engineers. They will be female engineers. Why not just create all engineers equal and all STEM education universal? Why must we have a female empowerment movement to provoke change in STEM? So many kids of both sexes dislike science and math, so don't boys deserve an equal chance to become more educated as well? In my view, stop trying to force change and diversity. If the numbers shift naturally then so be it, we have achieved diversity and equality. But the more women are separated from the science and engineering fields for the sole purpose of making us "equal," the worse the epidemic becomes. Feminism is corrupting STEM and making the divide bigger. I shouldn't be congratulated for taking an engineering class, like it is some brave task, as if I am accomplishing an impossible feat. I should be treated like any other kid who wants to be an engineer and whatever it is I do should be impressive not because of what I am, but because of what I can accomplish. Stop trying to make it about the feminist agenda and start making it about the advancement of science.

SO, YOU WANT TO SEE SOME MORE? MAST

watch some VIDEOS

T

tune in for our newscast LIVE AT 9 P.M. WEDNESDAYS online or on PLU Cable Channel 26

• ••• •••••

it's all online:

http://mastmedia.plu.edu •

1n PLU

dia PL

us

• • •• • ••• • •• • •• •• • • •• • •• •

check out our edia SNAPCHAT


OCTOBER 1,

THE MAST

2015

13 SPORTS

Steve's Stance: Earn your trophy, kid. STEVE MCGRAIN Sports Editor mcgraist@plu.edu These days, coaches give children participation trophies just for showing up. It's a growing trend that's detrimental to their perseverance and will rob them of their work ethic and competition. Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker James Harrison returned his kids' participation trophies after receiving them. His thought was that they didn't earn them because they hadn't learned a lesson, win or lose. It is wrong fol' children to think they don't have to aim for first place and still get rewarded the same way. 1 understand first place can only be achieved by one person1 so those can

be some lo ¢7{pectattons. But even second plac s a lesson; it can be understood as a need to work harder. Third plate, well go back to drawing board and come back with a different perspective on the competition. No one. ever r.ri.ade it to the top by being handed a trophy- it's earned. Not understanding that prizes are earned and pride is worked for leaves children in a bad situation. They won't know how to strive for success. Athletics teach you more about life and yourself rather than the game. No matte:i: the sport, tennis, golf, basketball or baseball, there are life lessons associated with them. Some of the lessons are to remain disciplined, to have sportSmanship toward am>ther team and, most importantly, to have a work ethic. I h,c;itve three nephews llnd two

nieces, Md l w()ti,ld be disturbed to !i:nd out they earned a. trophy based on just being at the field. DUring one of thetr soccer ma.tches, they could be the child pulling grass up out of the ground and receive a trophy; after the gallle they may not even know the score. At PLU, it's a privilege to have the opportunity to play athletics. There is more attention drawn to academics, but the athletes still understand how important it is to give their best each and every play. Aim to finish first place and become Northwest Conference Champions, not settle for anything less. Children need to understand that everything is ea:i:ned. ln a world where everything we want is accessible at any point, they need to have the mentality that some things need to be worked for and not have instant gratification.

The Mast Monday Night Football pick 'em Who to pick, a team that has Super Bowl aspirations but gets embarassed on opening day or a team who beat an NFL bottom dweller? Well Aaron Rodgers and the Packers proved they are invincible in front of the entire country after two consecutive prime time games. This week Monday Night Football is special for the Pacific Northwest because it will be in our own backyard. The Seattle Seahawks host the Detroit Lions. Strong safety Kam Chancellor is back and it showed dividends last week at the home opener. The only question mark is whether Beastmode will be in all systems go or nursing his hamstring injury on the sideline. The Detroit Lions are coming into town and still displaying a team that on paper should dominate their division and NFL, but cannot piece it together. Nevertheless, they still have "Megatron" and I do not care how old he is, Calvin Johnson is force to be reckon with on the

outside. Another intriguing match-up is the return of Lions wide receiver Golden Tate to the Northwest for the first time, since winning a Super Bowl in a Seahawks uniform. At Centurylink, the Lions will tamed by the noise being cranked all the way up to 12. Seahawks win 24-14.

D.J. Winter Pick: Seahawks

Nicoya Benham-Marin Pick: Seahawks Juston Lind Pick: Seahawks David Mair Pick: Seahawks

vs

"The Seahawks will win this one! I see the Seahawks going on a roll now, that they got Kam back, which adds to their swagger. The Hawks offense is gonna start rolling as well." "Seahawks! One: we got The Kam Factor back, two: the Seahawks are ready to start winning. Three: I love the Seahawks, and four: There is no one like us. Finally, five: I love the Seahawks ... wait did I already say that?

"Seahawks because I'm a 12 and I'll never pick against the Seahawks. Plus, we're gonna win."

"The Seahawks are ranked higher, so I'm thinking they'll crush the lions .. "

Colton Walter Pick: Seahawks

"The Seahawks because the lions are just bad. "

Hayden McCartney Pick: Seahawks Record: 0-0

"Seahawks over the lions. The hawks are starting to click a little more and only getting better with Graham emerging and Chancellor back Lions haven't looked great thus far and the hawks are nearly unbeatable at home."

Kailyn Osaki Pick: Seahawks Record: 0-0

"I say it's a toss up but since the Seahawks are home, I would pick them."

Fantasy Football Picks: Week4

This Week's LineuR Position Player QB Aaron Rogers

RB WR TE K DIST FLEX WILD

Team Proj pts 18 GB 13 Jamaal Charles KC 13 Julio Jones Atl

Greg Olsen Phil Dawson Colts Le'Veon Bell Ryan Fitzpatrick

Car SF Ind Pit NYJ

8 9 12 12

Colton Walter Fantasy Guru waltercj@p/u.edu

_.,,


THE MAST

14 SPORTS

OCTOBER 1,

2015

Softball Highlight U .S. Soccer victory hO dS weight at PLU An interview with Emily McConnell

STEPHANIE COMPTON Guest Writer comptose@p/u.edu

CARA GILLESPIE SJ:?,orts Writer g1/lesce@plu.edu

PHOTO BY JON FROSCHAUER

Emily McConnell is a returning third baseman/outfielder for the Women's Softball team. McConnell, who received All-NWC honors last year, returns to the field with high hopes for the season. I sat down to get to know her and to hear her perspective on fall ball and the upcoming season. Mast Media: What are you studying at PLU? Emily McConnell: I am a biology !_hajor. MM: What are you planning to do after you graduate? EM: When I graduate, I would like to pursue a career in marine biology either doing research or helping in an aquarium. MM: What is your favorite thing about playing softball at PLU? EM: The team chemistry and all the excitement we bring to all the games and practices and just having fun together. MM: How is fall ball going? EM: Really well. We have a lot of new and fresh talent with both first-year and transfers. It is very exciting to see how we are all going to come together and play come the springtime. MM: What is the biggest improvement you want to see during fall ball? EM: This season, I would really like to see us grow together, to all become more comfortable with each other. We want to have that relationship that all good teams seem to have.

The Women's United States Soccer team winning the World Cup is the best thing that could happen for Women's Soccer at Pacific Lutheran University and every other school. For the first time since 1999, the United States Women's National Soccer Team are World Cup champions. It was a long ride for the USWNT that ended on July 5 2015. After playing three games and making it out of the "group of death," the group of teams that had the strongest chance of winning, it was on to the round of 16. The women's team continued to shine, beating Colombia and Germany by scores of 2-0 to advance to the World Cup Final against Japan. This World Cup Final was shockingly similar to the 2011 World Cup Final where the US played Japan. Japan beat the U.S. 3-1 after penalty kicks and a hard fight. It was a devastating end to an otherwise dominating performance by the U.S. leading up to the final match. The rematch would be very different this time around. The 2015 World Cup Final was laughably easy for the US team. Veteran Carli Lloyd scored a record breaking three goals within the first 16 minutes of the game, marking the first time one player has ever done that in a World Cup Final. The final score came out to five goals to two. Three US players combined for those 5 goals with Lloyd obviously in the lead with three. Lauren Holiday and Tobin Heath each contributed one goal apiece to the record-breaking score. "World Cup Champions" has a lot more meaning to the US than just another trophy on the shelf. The final match was one of the

most watched televised sports events ever and the stadium in Vancouver was packed with over 50,000 fans. For a women's team to bring in that much attention has large ramifications within the sports world. Highlighted very quickly after the team's victory was the extreme difference in earned winnings. On the men's side, the 2014 World Cup winners took home over $35 million, the US Women's team took home only $2 million, only five percent of the men's winnings. Women's soccer has long been a powerhouse and the inequality of payment is a big deal. A handful of the women on the US team pull in well over two million dollars per year in endorsement deals, and yet the award for a national tournament is just that. However unequal the playing field is between the men and the women, this kind of win does not go unnoticed on the national stage. More and more girls are now going to sign up to play soccer to hopefully win a World Cup some day. This kind of attention is also welcomed for the future of soccer at PLU. The more girls who play soccer in the U.S., and the better the girls of our nation get as a whole at the game of soccer, the better the future prospects for PLU's recruits will be. Starting now, girls who will be recruited by PLU are going to have that World Cup victory as a moment that changed everything for them. PLU could be the next powerhouse, fueled by one championship game on July 5, 2015.

FLU Women's Soccer plays their next match on Oct. 3 at Whitman and Oct. 4 at Whitworth. For more on FLU Soccer, visit golutes.com.

MM: What does the team chemistry look like now and how do you want it to look in January? EM: Right now, the newcomers seem not as comfortable with all the returners as the returners are with each other. By the time season starts, I would like everyone to feel comfortable with each other. I hope that come January everyone is friends on and off the field, so we have that chemistry when we play. MM: How are you working to build team chemistry now? EM: Our team tries to have positive communication with each other. Outside of practice, we spend a lot of time together both working the volleyball games and team bonding. MM: What skills are the team looking to improve on? EM: We really want to focus on our hitting and bring in the offense that we can all bring to the field. MM: What are five facts everyone should know about you? EM: I have a brother who goes to PLU, I work for PLU Recreations as an intramural referee, I have been playing softball since I was six years old, I was born in Amarillo, Texas and I can't touch my toes.

PHOTO COURTESY OF Wikipedia

Men's Soccer takes on the "Whits" JAKE BILYEU Mast TV Sports Producer bileujc@p/u.edu Men's Soccer brought a ruckus on the road to two confei;ence opponents this weekend. While they took a victory in their first match, the second contest left them feeling a little empty. After a strong start to their conference play, Pacific Lutheran University's Men's Soccer team took a bus to rivals Whitman and Whitworth for a weekend of two crucial showdowns. The Lutes prepared all week for these two games, and it showed as they got off to a hot start against Whitman Saturday afternoon. The Lutes found the back of Whitman's net twice early on, as sophomores Bennett Bugbee and Eddie Na shifted through the defense for two goals within the span of eight minutes. Although the Lutes generally outshoot their opponents by keeping the ball in their possession to force the offensive issue, Whitman did come back with strong return fire, creating quite the challenge for the Lute defense. Thankfully, the team was able to withstand Whitman's 15 shots, including 5 on goal, to come up with the win, 2-0. This win brought Coach John Yorke to 149 career victories, tying him for the most of

all time by any Lute Men's Soccer coach. Coach Yorke wasn't concerned with himself, though, he was just glad to see his team get the win. "It was a good win today against a solid team," Coach Yorke said. "Scoring two in the first half allowed us to conserve some legs in the second half and get a lot of players into the game." The team would need all of the fresh legs they could get for their next opponent, but even with that, the game did not go according to plan. Just after Sunday's match against Whitworth got underway, the opposing Pirates caught the Lutes off guard with a surprise attack and scored in the third minute to take the lead 1-0. While the Lutes had plenty of leftover energy to attempt a comeback, they would ultimately never score, taking the 1-0 loss back home. Once again, though, Coach Yorke wasn't upset by the loss. "Whitworth is a very good team and we played very well against them," Coach Yorke said. "I am really happy with our guys and their efforts this weekend." Catch more men's soccer Oct. 3 and Oct. 4 taking on George Fox and Willamette at the home field. PHOTO BY BAILEY PLUMB, COURTESY OF GOLUTES.COM

Sophomore Eddie Na (9)

-


-路 THE MAST

OCTOBER 1, 2015

SPORTS 15

2015 Golf teams kick it up a notch SAMANTHA LUND Editor in Chief /undsr@pfu.edu This could be the year for Pacific Lutheran University golf, both the men's and women' s teams. This weekend, the Men's Golf team brought home their first tournament title of the year from the PLU Invitational at The Home Course in DuPont. Not only did the men bring home the tournament title, first-year player Kyle Drugge took the individual title. To win the team title, the men's team had to beat out Willamette, and after the 18th hole, the two teams were tied. The teams competed in a one-hole playoff to determine a winner. With two pars, one by senior Justin Lee and the other by Junior Drugge, and two birdies, one by senior Sevryn Modahl and the other by sophomore Mitch Baldridge, PLU took the title. "It was a great win," senior Justin Lee said. "I'm really proud of the team; everyone contributed to the win."

PHOTO COURTESY OF MEN'S GOLF From left to right: Head Coach Kris Swanson, Ryan Sturdivan, Ryan Fenton, Sevryn Modahl, Kevin Mccrossin, Kyle Drugge, Justin Lee, Mitch Baldridge, Thomas Huddleston, Zach Martinson, Ryan Hallquist and Auston Hi Ii kin.

Drugge brought home the individual title with a total 2-day score of 143 (71, 72) on the par-72 course. This was Drugge's first college title. "My main focus was to just have fun playing a game I've always loved," Drugge said. "After the first round I knew I had a great opportunity to win individually, but

Looking forward with

PLU Vo eyba

PHOTOS BY MCKENNA MORIN

DYLAN FOREMAN Sports Writer foremadf@p/u.edu In the past three years, the Pacific Lutheran University Women's Volleyball team has won the Northwest Conference and advanced to the NCAA Division III tournament. Kevin Aoki, the head volleyball coach, has led the team to nine NWC championships in the last 16 years. In preseason, it seemed like coaches throughout the league felt the team may have lost a step after Whitworth was named the favorite to win the conference. In preseason, coaches across the conference voted Whitworth as the dominant team of the year and voted down

Sophomore Gabrielle Alley hits a serve.

PLU. After their first weekend of conference play, the team was swept by Whitworth, losing 0-3. The next day, they bounced back to beat Whitman 3-0. The Lutes play was inconsistent causing the large discrepancy in play between the two matches. Outside hitter, junior Cara Gillespie shares insight into what is needed to make sure the Lutes are on their game all the time. "We have an overwhelming amount of young talent this season," Gillespie said. "I think the key to our success will come down to can we play well consistently together." The senior captains, Lucy Capron and Kacey Hartman along with senior libero Kylai Cooley are this year's team leaders. According to Cooley, the senior leadership stresses young talented players, like firstyears, Kendle Valade-Nunez and Chloe Epker, take on larger leadership roles within the team. "It has been amazing to see how well our first-year students are transitioning into their roles," Cooley said. "Their excitement and passion for the game, on top of their talent, is a key factor in our team chemistry this year." It' s a different mix of players this year for the Lutes. After losing key seniors like Amy Wooten, Samantha North and Amber Aguilar, the Lutes had to make adjustments. The end resu It was many talented first-years mixed with talented upperclassmen. With their 7-4 record, the chemistry hasn' t clicked perfectly. However, it is only a matter of time before we see the team back on track, consistentl y winning games with both the fi rst-yea rs and veterans at the helm of their well-oiled squad. Look to keep up with weekly scores on how the Lutes are doing in conference play. Their next game is Oct. 2 at Willamette at 7 p.m.

I really just wanted to help the team bring home the trophy. It was a total team effort and I'm extremely proud of the way our team competed." With a solid start to their nontraditional season, the Lutes travel to eastern Washington next weekend for the Whitworth invitational before finishing

their nontraditional season at the Northwest Conference Fall Classic Oct. 1011. After a first place victory last weekend and a third place title this weekend, the Women's Golf team is on fire. Last weekend, the Lutes brought home their first tournament win in 10 years. Leading Lute Desirae Haselwood said the Lutes have been practicing and it's been paying off. This year, Haselwood is excited to see how the team grows and improves. This weekend, with a total score of 669 on the par-72 course, the Lutes brought home third place at the Whitman Invitational behind Whitman (626) and Whitworth (650). The team also had two outstanding players, both finishing in the top 10. Haselwood brought home her second top-five finish, tying for fourth with a total score of 158. Behind her, Katlyn Coltom tied for eighth with 169. To finish the nontraditional season, the Lady Lutes will compete in the Northwest Fall classic in Oregon Oct. 10-11.

For play by play on the teams' tournaments, visit golutes.com.


THE MAST

16 SPORTS

vs 'frinity, Lost 23-13

p Next: at Pacific at 1 p.m. Oct. 3

Up Next: at Whitman at 12 p.m. Oct 3 ~

Volleyball: vs Lewis & Clark, Lost 3-1 vs. Pacific, Won 3-1 Up Next: vs.Lirifield at 2:30 p.m. Oct. 3 ,-

Up Next: at Willamette at 7 p.m. Oct. 2

NORTHWEST CONFERENCE STANDINGS Football

Women:s Soccer

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Linfield

2

0

0

0-0

Won2

Whitworth

3

0

0

0-0

Won3

Pacific

2

1

0

0-0

Won2

George Fox

2

1

0

0-0

Won2

Puget Sound

1

1

0

0-0

Lost 1

Lewis & Clark

0

2

0

0-0

Lost 2

Lutes

0

2

0

0-0

Lost 2

Willamette

0

2

0

0-0

Lost 2

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Whitworth

3

4

1

3-1

Won 1

Puget Sound

1

0

3

1-0-2

Tied 2

Linfield

2

1

1

2-1-1

Won 1

Lutes

6

1

1

2-1-1

Won2

George Fox

3

4

2

1-3-1

Tied 2

Whitman

1

7

1

1-3-1

Tied 2

Willamette

3

4

1

3-1

Won2

Pacific

1

7

1

1-3-1

Won 1

Lewis & Clark

iI I

rI ?-

Menjs Soccer

Volleyball TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Whitworth

10

3

0

4-0

Won4

Whitworth

8

0

0

4-0

Won 7

Willamette

8

4

0

4-0

Won4

Lutes

5

3

0

3-1

Won3

Lewis & Clark

7

4

0

4-0

Won4

Puget Sound

5

4

0

3-1

Lost 1

Lutes

8

5

0

2-2

Won 1

Linfield

6

4

0

2-2

Lost 1

Puget Sound

5

7

0

2-2

Lost 1

Whitman

6

0

1-3

Lost 2

Linfield

4

9

0

1-3

Lost 2

George Fox

4

6

0

1-3

Lost 2

George Fox

4

7

0

1-3

Lost 1

Pacific

3

6

0

1-3

Lost 1

Whitman

2

8

0

0-4

Lost 7

Willamette

2

6

1

1-3

Lost 1

Pacific

2

9

0

0-4

Won2


PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

OCTOBER 8,

2015

I VOLUME

92,

ISSUE 4 IMASTMEDIA.PLU.EDU

ELEPHANT ·IN THE ROOM Conservatives: An unseen campus minority

chvers1 y.

"I'd pretty much be playing the devil's advocate,'r Brookins said, "I'd have Jo explain my· views, then they'd say, 'Oh, that's .r idiculous' and drop it at that" Many conservative Lutes, such as Brookins, said they don't always feel welcome to express their political vi.ews atPLU. "If I'm around friends, I can share my views.with them," .h e said. "They';!l just joke, ·'Oh Shawn, y p.u're so diffe;i:entJ But around people I don't know, 1 keep

about how to be brave regarding this imp · issue has ~lped me." He r;ves as urrent p~e~ifient of 'bapter dents for Life, asked to escribe political consel;V:atives, severalleft-leaning Lutes used fl;le words "jutlgmental," "shortsighteq/ ' "crazy," ana even "cruel/ ' Scµ:)'t e .. PLU ulty m~bers demdn sftate s bias against conser~ative students, professor of communication, Art Land said. ''OJ).e of my students' professors essentially told her that if someone doesn't support ga}lc marriage, fl:ley're ba · nota goo<lpgrson," said Band. "So s thought, 'I'd better not say what I thinl(ib.en, or the professor will think

dominance the classroom sometimes proves challenging, she enjoys the challen!ila'. "It just reminds ip.e that I ne • to know '\VhY I believ~ ·.)'\':\lat I be e, whether ' that be in Eo.fi:tical, econ , or soci:alissues," she'explained. "I need to be ready to explain. why I stand.w]iere I stand, and also to listen to why other people stand where they stand, too," Passantino, on th.e .other h<µi~, noted tl).e distinct lack of conserva'tJ,ve professors on campus. · "It's boring when only one

Open for suggestions: Women.'s Center changes name HELEN SMITH Guest Writer smithhe@pfu. edu The Women's Center is just coming out of its 25th anniversary of service to the Pacific Lutheran University community. As the center celebrates this milestone in its history, members have decided to take a moment to reflect on the past quarter-century of service, and how to continue from here by choosing a new name to better reflect the work they currently do and what the center hopes to accomplish in the future. "The name change is an evolution in that overall history," said Dr. Jennifer Smith, director of the Women's Center. As a part of that evolution, the Women's Center is using this name change as an opportunity to take steps in being more inclusive in the PLU community.

One reason the center's staff wants to change the name is that the word 'Women' can give certain ideas about who does and doesn't belong there, while in reality the center is for everyone. The Women's Center provides services for victims of violence. A main concern of theirs is that for those who haven't always been welcome in women only spaces such as queer women, trans women or those who don't identify as female, those services can be difficult to seek out if they don' t feel they identify with the space they're being provided in. The name change will serve to make people who don't necessarily identify as female, or someone who feels unwelcome in a women's only space, feel more comfortable about seeking out those services. The mission is to make the new name of the center more inclusive and reflective of the gender equality goal.... CONTINUED ON PAGE 5

Eve11~ough they -ffon't feel accep yet, Bro , Pass and are opti that PL ty more in the wel olitical div future. "I was really impressed when ASPLU's president, Martha Spieker, discusse,d 'radic inclusivit~;"' Passa:g.tino sa.i d. .. . e m,eµtio.ned . , different views being included in diversity!. In my opinion, that's the most important part of diversity. You can have le from different races and gend t if they think the same way, ally borin .....~ Pa ino wasn' e only pe:11$'-0n moved Spieker's message of''radical inclusi ."The concept struck a Chord with s liberal L s well t plenty ocrats atBI.!J, single conserva~ve , "d f,irst . . ·.··· ince AdaJl.ls. else stays ~llent. And that's not g m anybody/' First~year Nathan 1.audolff belieyes the s · · a attached to conservati ve stude . PLU is · · r. to the sti attache gay peo some area "You. shouldn't have .to come out of the closet as a Republican," he said. Here's the million-dollar question: if conservative Lutes <to come out of the cl will liberaf L'Utes roll outfhe wek at? : .

Inside this issue ... "Coach Dickerson is very passionate and he lets us have a little bit freedom within our play." Kyle Sawtell on his coach's style and philosophy "Student Athlete Spotlight" pg. 14

"Advocacy and activism requires not being silent. It's about speaking up, supporting things others disagree with or may not understand and having thoughtful conversation with those around you about issues." Matthew Salzano on social media activism. "#PINKOUT" pg. 10


THE MAST

2NEWS

OCTOBER 8,

2015

The senate gains five new faces MCKENNA MORIN Staff Photographer morinmn@plu.edu

Hannah Peterson

Joining these three as new senate members are Skylar Larson and Theo Hofrenning. Together these five first-years are striving to accomplish new goals and connect with more students on and around campus. They are looking forward to your input and ideas on how to improve campus.

Hannah Peterson enjoys working with others about issues and how to develop short term and long solutions. Peterson is looking forward to being a part of the ASPLU organization. "I want to be right in the middle of the whole system" said Peterson. Peterson is currently on the Outreach board and is

April Nguyen Government and leadership have always been a large part of April Nguyen's life and she wants to show others what a positive impact it can have on the community. Nguyen is an intended political science and economics major and knows that being a part of ASPLU will be the perfect fit for her. She said she enjoys being immersed in the community around her and always aims to improve it. . "I really just like to be involved in the school and serving others in any way I possibly can," Nguyen said. Through her new role, Nguyen hopes to bring the idea of "service over status" to the PLU campus. She said she wants to get to know what others in the student body are concerned and passionate about so

aiming to involve as many passionate people as possible. She said she wants to create a community of people that have the same vision and goals. With this mindset, there are limitless possibilities in what can be achieved. "I believe that everyone has something that they see needs to change, or don't see happening at all and believe should be," Peterson said.

she can advocate for them. Nguyen said she believes that no matter where you stand on the social totem pole, everyone is an important piece in the PLU community. "In my eyes, just because I am a senator, doesn't mean that I am any more important than anyone else. To me, it means that my peers are trusting in my capabilities to represent them and to be their voice among many," Nguyen said.

.

'

Lights out: · Power outage on ·campus . ....

RHIANNON BERG Guest Writer bergau@pfu.edu Lutes were forced to find creative solutions to power their daily routines on Sept. 24 after sections of Pacific Lutheran University's campus were left without power due to a damaged power line off campus. Parkland Light and Water tried to reinstate power after "Comcast subcontractors on Park Avenue hit a line on 121 and C Street," explained Bruce Broussard, the Maintenance Manager of PLU Facilities and Management. "When the power goes down we just wait until it comes back and then make sure everything came back up. It was an inconvenience, but had nothing to do with the campus. We just waited for Parkland Light and Water to fix it," Broussard explained. Professors and students showed innovation for classes · held in buildings that were- left without power: Ingram, Hauge, and Xavier. Sophomore Gena Powell said she attended a class in Hauge where her professor hand-wrote everything on the whiteboard he had intended to show as a PowerPoint presentation. Many students were inconvenienced by the outage. Students living in Ordal, Hong and Stuen had to find solutions to using pitch black bathrooms and nonoperating drinking fountains. Sophomore Paige Lily, an Ordal resident, explained that she had to do her makeup in the lounge with natural lighting as opposed to using the bathroom mirrors. After swipe access into Stuen stopped working, junior Garth West, an RA and front desk worker, said he "developed a system to let people into Stuen" by looking at students' Lute Cards. By the end of his shift he had a new appreciation for the usual entry system. Interestingly, during the PLU outage a Lutheran University in California was also left without

"Real" footage from the power outage ...

'"•

power. Students at California Lutheran University were undergoing a two hour long test of "Scheduled power reductions." Mark Jacobsen, Director of Facility Management at CLU, explained these planned outages are an effort to save energy. He said, during the peak demand times for power use the local utility company can reduce the amount of power available to the campus. Southern California Edison is "one of the nation's largest electric utilities" and has various programs to help companies and homeowners to lower their utility costs and conserve energy, according to their website. CLU is enrolled in the "Base Interruptible Program" and receives credit when they allow Edison to redirect their power to other customers on an emergency basis. These credits have equated to more than $100,000 in energy savings for CLU throughout the ten years they have been involved in the program. Enrollment in this program means SCE can cut off power to CLU's non-essential buildings, which includes residence halls, at any time with less than 30 minutes of warning. Jacobsen explained, "When [SCE] get[s] this call to reduce power, we have to do what Edison asks. We have no control. We don't know when power is going to come back on." This is a controversial issue at CLU because "many students feel that it is an unnecessary inconvenience and students get concerned about when power will come back [to] power to devices and refrigerators." CLU has had unplanned voluntary outages that have lasted for more than 12 hours in the past and CLU did not reimburse students for food that had gone bad and thus been wasted during the outages. While losing power at PLU for four hours was inconvenient for some Lutes, it is a common and impactful issue for CLU students.

SnapsfrOm bhe power oubage:


OCTOBER 8,

THE MAST

2015

NEWS3

Comunity Corner:

-Painting a Picture of Hinderlie Hall ELISE ANDERSON News Writer anderser@pfu.edu You're walking through the doors of Hinderlie Hall for the first time ... A harmonious chorus of friendly voices and laughter greets you. As you pass open dorm rooms, you notice collections of handmade sculptures and ceramics, half finished easels surrounded by pencils and paintbrushes, instruments and sheet music and scripts accompanied by costumes and set pieces. Every person you see welcomes you with a big smile or strikes up conversation. Walking out the doors, your soul cannot help but feel at home during your visit. Pacific Lutheran University offers many different and unique communities to students. Today's community focus highlights Hinderlie Residence Hall. Located in the heart of campus, Hinderlie is best described as the "perfect place for the creative soul" (plu.edu). Approximately 130 creative souls have discovered their perfect place. The hall encourages its residents to express creative outlets in a community of like-minded students. Its residents find mutual appreciation in diverse and worldly art forms. Built in 1954, Hinderlie was one of the first residence halls on campus. Its original name, South Hall, changed in 1966. The current name derives from . long time staff members Mr. and Mrs. Berenr and Ragna Hinderlie. Mr. Hinderlie worked as a custodian _for 31 years and Mrs. Hinderlie in the campus laundry"" room for 5 years. PLU renamed Hinderlie Hall in honor of the well-loved members of the PLU community. Hinderlie houses one of the two gender-neutral wings on campus. junior Anthony Aguilaras Resident Assistant for Hinderlie' s gender-neutral wing, discusses how in the community, "Everyone is usually an art kid and we all have very similar interests so it makes it fun to go do things because we are usually interested in the same stuff. You11 hear people practicing music everyday and it's so cool to hear everyone's talents and go support them when they have an event." When asked the strangest thing he's ever seen happen in Hinderlie he responded, "one time my residents made a three story couch and all watched a movie together." Often a first impression is the best impression. Sophomore and Technical Theatre major Nicolai Roycroft knew from the beginning that this hall would provide more than just a place to live. When asked if any particular memories or eccentric experiences stand out, Roycroft reflects his pre-Lute life. "I don't really have any weird experiences that I personally recall, but when I came here for Passport Weekend -now known as Overknight I believe- I was wandering around Hinderlie at la.m., unable to sleep. I encountered people in the ground floor lounge who were playing music on a few various instruments. They ended up inviting me to jam with them, which was completely unexpected. They didn't even know who I was and yet they were allowing me to join them. That experience was

PHOTOS BY ELISE ANDERSON

the final push in me deciding to come to PLU." The encounter left a lasting impact on Roycroft. Now returning to live in Hinderlie for his second year, he serves as Vice President for Finance Administration of Hinderlie' s Residence Hall Council. Hinderlie can be seen as a community, but Nicolai sees it as much more. To him, Hinderlie is home. While this residence hall throws the wildest toga

parties and hosts the spookiest haunted houses, a deep community of innovative students thrives. The next time you walk through the halls of Hinderlie, there's a chance you may very well see the next Michelangelo, Pablo Picasso, Ludwig van Beethoven, or Barbara Streisand. And with the ambition often associated with PLU graduates, those chances are fairly high.

A group of first-years put together a mega couch. Top (Left to Right): Georgia Eastlake, Ethan Wiederspan Middle (Left to Right): Hannah Gorham, Logan Marshall, Grant Benson Botton (Left to Right): Annabelle Falloria, Daniel Aliment

Bunk rankings send PLU off the chain GENNY BOOTS Mast TV Producer bootsgj@pfu.edu October means one thing in higher education: ranking season. Clear away your Fantasy Football teams and prepare for the onslaught of college rankings. Parents and students find their perfect college match pouring through lists of "Best in the West," "Best Post--Gfad Salary," "Best Campus Life" and many more. And it's all a load of hooey. "All of us in higher education like to dislike the rankings. Particularly anything that presumes to reduce something as complex as a university to a single number and then to rank it," said Pacific Lutheran University President Thomas Krise. According to Krise, some of the biggest flaws to the ranking system are how often the ranked qualities change. One of the biggest names in college ranking is the U.S. News and World Report magazine "and they have never had the same criteria two years in a row," said Krise Even the College

Scorecard, released earlier this fall by the White House, has been resisted from leaders in higher education. These rankings are a series of equations based on selective data. For the Scorecard, the only students included are those who have federal financial aid. For many private schools, including PLU, this excludes a significant part of student population. One of the biggest topics among college rankings is post-graduation salaries. _PLU was recently ranked ninth in

Washington State for post-grad earnings. For universities like PLU, where many graduates pursue service careers, such a ranking looks unfavorable. "If you judge an institution on nothing but the salary of the graduates, what is that saying about the purpose and value of college?" said Krise. Last week, PLU was recognized in the New York Times as a "Brookings Common Sense" school by the Brookings research institution.

D

R

According to the New York Times, these Common Sense schools were factored "without a curriculum component and identified the highest 'value added' colleges regardless of major." All of the universities that made the top ten were small liberal art schools. PLU consistently does very, well in rankings, especially in more big picture, value surveys such as the Brookings ranking. However, according to Krise no ranking can ultimately define a university. The benefit to ranking season is data. "You can credit U.S. News [and World Report] with getting universities to collect more data than they were ever accustomed to before," said Krise. "All of us in higher ed are interested in more data and better data". The ranking season continues to make headlines nationwide. But for administrators in higher education, it can be frustrating. "The idea of ranking universities is a very troublesome thing," said Krise. As PLU dances around ranking lists, take it with a grain of salt.

7l 0 median salary with

1O+ years of experience job

cp::;+'1掳+a路 ,.,+路on- i vu_;~ ult liU

rating


THE MAST

4NEWS

Racial Diversity talks take to the web ELISE ANDERSON News Writer anderser@pfu.edu

Pacific Lutheran University is bringing racial issues to light around campus through iGroup, the new 7-week pilot program hosted by the Diversity Center. The series, titled "Exploring Race through Dialogue," welcomes students from the communities of Stuen, Ordal and The CAVE to participate in topics such as social systems and identity. They will work together to learn strategies to initiate positive social change on campus and in the community. Student facilitators will lead members to explore better understandings of themselves and each other to apply to the concepts and issues of race. Students are invited to voice their own opinions centered around the theme of race and create action plans as a team building strategy. iGroup will meet weekly on Fridays starting October 2nd until November 20th, from 4-6p.m .. Nicole Juliano, the Assistant Director of the Diversity Center, is the main coordinator for the series. Senior student Maria Cruse has been working to develop the curriculum for the program, as well as recruit and coordinate. -路 She explained the Di_versify _Center's plan to implement this program of social issue discussions on campus for every semester. Each program will target different communities on campus and emphasize a particular social issue for debate. Students that participate, and successfully complete the series will receive a certificate of achievement. iGroup will provide an outlet for conversation about sensitive issues, but it will also encourage openness to new ideas and opinions that students can apply beyond an educational setting and to whatever future enterprises they pursue. The program can add a positive and constructive mood to PLU's campus and push students to make a call to action. The best way to understand cultural issues is to embrace them. As every one of are readers are apart of the human race, it's equally necessary to realize your role and influence among the rest of the world. To sign up to participate in iGroup, students can pick up forms at the Stuen or Ordal front desks. Stop by the D-Center to talk with Maria Cruse or Nicole Juliano with questions or comments.

OCTOBER 8,

2015

How to sound smart: Recycling on campus

2

4

What goes where?Items to go into blue bins are such things as paper, cardboard, plastic, glass bottles, coffee cups and pop cans. Food waste, flowers, pizza boxes, paper ice cream containers, napkins and paper towels can be thrown into the compost. Anything else left such as Styrofoam, chip bags and candy wrappers can be tossed into the garbage.

It's easy being greenRecycling may seem like a tedious thing to have to do. The temptation to dump everything into the trash is very real. But it's easier than most may think. Whenever you see a piece of trash around campus just bend down to pick it up. Soon campus will be barren of litter, or at least students can become aware of the necessity to recycle.

CSI: Campus Safety Investigations Taken from weekly Campus Safety reports Policy Violation in lnqram During routine rounds, Campus Safety (CSAF) officers found empty beer cans in the trash container inside of an Ingram room. Custodial was dispatched to discard the trash. No further action taken by CSAF.

Bike Theft in Rieke CSAF was contacted by a student who reported her bike was stolen from the rack outside of Hauge. The bike had been left outside while attending class. When she returned, she found the cable lock cut. There is no suspect information. No further action by CSAF.

Medical Aid in Stuen

;....;....;__---1-------1

CSAF responded to a medical aid in Stuen Hall at the request of the RA. A student had sustained a possible broken hand after falling while riding a scooter in the hallway. Central Pierce County Fire and Rescue (CPFR) responded to the scene. The student was transported to the hospital by a friend. No further action by CSAF.


OCTOBER 8,

2015

THE MAST

A&C5

''TGIT'' â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ The Shonda Rhimes Television Revolution BROOKE THAMES Arts & Culture Editor thamesbe@plu.edu The once popular anagram "TGIF" finds itself being steadily replaced. One accomplished ABC network writer/ producer is encouraging millions of viewers to claim that it's Thursday the world should be thanking god for instead. Every Thursday night at 8 p.m., a television event begins that ABC network has affectionately named "TGIT (Thank God it's Thursday)". "TGIT" is a threehour block that features some of ABC's most popular programming. "Grey's Anatomy," "Scandal" and "How to Get Away with Murder" air back to back from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. and showcase not only captivating stories but exceptional characters as well. What makes

these programs unique, however, is not their plots or their figures, but rather the woman who created them. Producer and writer Shonda Rhimes has become a household name in the mouths of Americans. In addition to creating the wildly successful "Grey's Anatomy," Rhimes also produces two of TV's most popular programs - "Scandal" and "How to Get Away with Murder." "I know that she's blowing up," D' Ajah Johnson, junior and president of Black Student Union, said. Although Rhimes' show "Grey's Anatomy" claims ten years of success, the writer didn't gamer recognition as a mastermind producer until the premiere of "Scandal" in 2012. Since then, Rhimes' work has generated viewers who never fail to tune in to ABC's "TGIT." Additionally, dedicated fans of "Shondaland" flock to the producer's work.

PHOTO COURTESY OF FOX40.COM

Viola Davis became the first African-American Woman to win an Emmy for best actress in a drama series.

Women's Center name change CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 "A few years ago the Volunteer Center transitioned to the Center for Community Engagement and Service, and so that's a similar move that we're hoping to make [as] we move from something that's identity based to something that's mission based," Smith said. "Our programs don't reflect female exclusive values. A variety of programs look at issues that are gender based and we want a name that reflects the programs and the work that we're already doing so there's cohesion between the two." A few suggestions that reflect that mission have been names like the "Center for Gender Equity," "The Gender Equity Resource Center" and "The Gender Equity and Sexuality Resource Center." Although the Women's Center is changing its name, Smith hasn't ruled out having "women" in the title. The next open forum will occur Friday, Oct. 9 in the Anderson University Center room 171 for the PLU community to help decide what the new name should be. As the Women's Center works in the PLU community, they want to make sure the community helps to decide on a name that will serve best.

to establish "We wanted forums and hold them somewhat early in the fall semester so we can involve the PLU community in something that we see as a significant change for the Women's Center," Smith said. That significant change is also in part due to the changes made in activism since the Women's Center began. Although they feel that the title "Women's Center" has served it well in honoring changes in women's and gender studies, changing ideas of what it means to be a woman with the emergence of transgender rights is something they'd also like to reflect in changing the name. Along with that, the center is also thinking about what their physical space says about what they do and their focus on gender equity and inclusivity. The Women's Center would like for anyone available to attend and be a part of the renaming process and also provide suggestions of how the community would like that process to go. Although suggestions have already been made, Smith says they have no specific name already in mind. There's a real opportunity for the community to help the Women's Center meet its needs through the name change.

"I didn't watch 'Grey's Anatomy' at first, but then I found out that she wrote it. That's pretty much why I watched it," junior Shelondra Harris said. Perhaps more impressive than the producer's success is her diverse and colorful cast, which features many prominent African-American actors and actresses. Actresses Kerry Washington and Viola Davis both appear at the forefront of their respective shows. Washington portrays professional "fixer" Olivia Pope in "Scandal," while Davis acts as complex teacher and defense attorney Annalise Keating in "How to Get A way with Murder". The presence of these women as lead actresses not only diversifies television, but also produces a large ripple effect in media and in reality. The October issue of Essence Magazine features a cover-story highlighting the achievements of Rhimes and her cast. At the 67th annual Emmy Awards, Viola Davis also became the first African-American woman to win an Emmy for best actress in a drama series. Davis dedicated her speech to vouching for more roles and opportunities for black women in television and film, saying: "The only thing that separates women of color from anyone else is opportunity. You cannot win an Emmy for roles that are simply not there. So, here's to all the writers ... who have redefined what it means to be beautiful, to be sexy, to be a leading woman, to be black." Davis' history-making accomplishment serves as proof of the impact that writers such as Rhimes are making in the television industry, especially in regard to AfricanAmericans. "It's really important that we highlight these wonderful actors and these wonderful people of color who are actually doing real work," junior Theo Hofrenning said. "I think it's wonderful that we have spaces and institutions set aside for people of color, and that those are being successful." "For once, it's good to see that all of these public people are of another ethnic group or race," senior Yannet Gudeta added. Beyond providing opportunities for black women, Rhimes' stories showcase

dynamic characters that transcend traditional African-American stereotypes and provide a new, inspirational definition of "The Black Woman." "I remember the episode where I saw Viola Davis take off her wig, and that kinda spoke to me [as to say], 'My blackness is okay," Johnson said. "At school, I used to be so afraid of wearing my natural hair or taking out braids. Now, I'm like, 'If she can do it on TV in a high-rated show then my blackness is fine." Characters such as Olivia Pope and Annalise Keating present the modem African-American female in a way that is professional, strong and multi-dimensional while still staying true to the ethnic experience. "[Rhimes] doesn't just try to ... go completely over the stereotype. For instance, in HTGAWM I appreciate how she had Viola Davis wearing her head wrap at night," Harris said. "She mixes [the black experience] in as real life." Although Rhimes has done much by showcasing black talent and crafting inspirational Black characters, Hollywood still seems to lack a viable amount of opportunity for African-American actors and characters. As highlighted in Davis's speech "you cannot win an Emmy for roles that are simply not there". "It think it's really cool that [this] is something that can happen nowadays. The fact that it's such a big deal though, on the flip side, shows deficiency," Hofrenning said. "This should [just] be something that happens." It's no secret that there is progress left to be made. Even so, the work of Shonda Rhimes and other writers and producers like her are making revolutionary waves in the world of television and film. "It's going somewhere," Gudeta said. "It seems like we're developing toward something that could ultimately [be equal]." Meanwhile, fans continue to praise the work of a writer who seeks to showcase and normalize black talent and the AfricanAmerican narrative. "It's been a long time coming," Johnson said. "It's about time."


THE MAST

6 A&C

OCTOBER 8 ,

2015

"The Reactivated Man '' seeks to shock BEN COX Guest Writer coxbd@plu.edu Illegal brain surgery was reported to have taken place here at Pacific Lutheran University. According to one witness, who wishes to remain anonymous, the people responsible may or may not have had their

conscience and guilt complexes removed through similar surgeries and therefore suffer no remorse over their atrocious crimes. "The Reactivated Man," a dark comedy written by Curtis Zahn and directed by Sam Collier, is coming to PLU Oct. 9 and 10. "It will be different than any show you have ever seen before. Guaranteed," first-

PHOTO COURTESY OF RACHELREYNOLDS

Sophomore Nicolas Roycroft rehearses for "The Reactivated Man" as Charles.

year and cast member Dana Brager said. development and change within some of "The Reactivated Man" is an emotional the characters are some of the forces which rollercoaster. Audience members will whip drive the plot through its many twists and through a whirlwind of emotions, ranging turns. from empathy to revulsion to fear. All the However, this show didn't come about while, students will thanks to magic. Blood, be sitting on the sweat edge of their seats, and tears - both unsure of whether intentional and "It will be different than any show they should laugh otherwise, - have you have ever seen. Guaranteed." or cry at the gone into the production. production. Dana Brager "They have The play First-year includes sweet, poured so much into it," sophomore tender moments as well as times of and Assistant Stage betrayal and hurt, not to mention the head Manager Grace Anderson said. "The chemistry on stage comes from the stabbing. Part of what keeps this emotional chemistry off stage," sophomore and Stage rollercoaster rolling is how the story is Manager Becca Marsh said. "We went from told from various points of view and complete strangers to being best friends." occasionally breaks the fourth wall. Getting The hard work of the cast (Nathan a glimpse inside people's heads, in more Laudolff, Grant Hillard, Dana Brager, ways than one, adds an intriguing layer Michelle McGrath and Nicolai Roycroft) rarely seen in live theatre. and crew/directors (Sam Collier, Becca While the cast consists of only five Marsh, Grace Anderson and Vince Adams) people, the characters are larger than life. has paid off. Anderson said that it still For instance, two characters can't seem "gives [her] chills, like, every time." Students can seize the opportunity to to agree on lefts and rights while another tends to throw brain surgery tools all over witness the shots, the creepy window, the strobe lights, Grant's smile and the whole the place. The sincerity that these characters operation Oct. 9 and 10 at 7:30 p.m. in the possess make them relatable, but they by Black Box Theatre. no means remain stagnant. The drastic

Norwegian,Cooking Class connects with community HEGE FATLAND Guest Writer fatlanha@plu.edu Close friends of Pacific Lutheran University's Scandinavian Cultural Center will return to campus this October to share a bit of Norweigian cuisine with the PLU population. On Oct. 6 the "Daughters of Norway" will host a Norwegian cooking class where students and other visitors are invited to learn how to cook and to taste traditional Norwegian dishes. But besides foreign food, what makes this event so special for PLU? Elisabeth Ward, Director for the Scandinavian Cultural Center, explained there has always been a strong connection between PLU and the NorwegianAmericans in the area. PLU has been very important to the Norwegian-Americans in the Northwest ever since they first immigrated to the country. She explained that a mission for PLU is to strengthen the ties between these two nations. Many also aware of the strong connection PLU has to Scandinavia. The school has always tried to include Scandinavian traditions in campus activities. Ward believes that sharing cultural dishes is an ideal way to do so. "Food is one of [the] really strong places where people make connections," Ward said. "I am very excited that we do have a cooking class here, because it keeps people feeling connected to PLU and their own heritage. Even if it's not their heritage, it's still very comforting." The "Daughters of Norway" will be hosting these three Norwegian cooking classes in October and in March. The

first class will take place is happening Oct. 6 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Some of the exciting dishes that will be made include Lake Wraps, Trondheim Lemon Raisin Soup and Glominge Torte. The event is free for students all who want to participate, and a $5 fee is charged for others who would like to learn more about Norwegian traditions and cooking.

PHOTO BY HEGE FATLAND

President for the Scandinavian Cultural Counsel Linda Caspersen & Director of the Scandinavian Cultural Center Elisabeth Ward.

Thomas & Molly's Music Reviews: Zara Larsson THOMAS FLATMOEN & MOLLY LINDALL Mast Radio Arts & Culture DJs Lindallmj@plu.edu At the age of 10, Swedish artist Zara Larsson won "Sweden's Got Talent." When you hear her voice you11 understand why. Nowl 7, Zaraiscinartisttowatch. So far only two songs have been released from her u pcoming studio album, but we can't wait to hear more. She has been compared to the likes of . Rihanna and Whitney Houston, and is . rurrently nominated for Best Swedish Act for the "MTV Eruopean 1{usic Awards." Her latest single "Never Forget You" with Grammy nominated British artist MNEK was released in July and has been successful in Scandinavia. British singer Sam Smith shared his love for the song on Instagram, and we could not agree more. brings The upbeat hit "Lush Life" back memories of summer and promises great things for the upcoming album. The album is scheduled to be released in October, but Larsson already expressed this summer that she would rather have the album come out too late than rush it and release it on time. Either way, we are excited for when it will be released and you should be, too. To hear Zara Larsson and other emerging artists, tune in to "Thomas & Molly in the Morning" on Mast Radio, Tuesdays at 8:00 a.m., and catch our weekly reviews in the Mast.

ZARA LARSSON

Check in wtih Thomas and Molly Tuesdays at 8 a.m. on LASR to hear more from them on music and other Arts & Culture stories.


OCTOBER 8,

THE MAST

2015

A&C7

rrVote or DyeJJ gets students engaged ~~-

BROOKE THAMES A&C Editor thamesbe@plu.edu With the 2016 Presidential election swiftly approaching, one Pacific Lutheran University organization is doing its best to get students politically charged. ASPLU hosted "Vote or Dye" Wednesday Sept. 30 in Red Square in hopes of getting unregistered students excited to vote. "The whole point of it is to engage the community ... but to also make it a really public event so that voting is cool [and] also fun," Martha Speiker, senior and ASPLU President, said. "What's better than tie-dye, right?" "Vote or Dye" supplied participating students with bundled up T-shirts they were able to dye with paint. The T-shirts served as a souvenir from the event and a reminder to students

··~~...,,.~

~ ~t~

4

to ~ote in next year's presidential election. "I think that this is the most important presidential election that our country [has faced] in at least 20 years," senior Steve Shumaker said. "So, I really think it's important to get people registered to vote who will actually vote." or Dye" was "Vote conceptualized as an event to get students thinking about the impact their vote can have on campus, on the local community and on the nation as a whole. Getting students excited to exercise their voting rights is what Speiker says will promote a better functioning society. "College is kind of a preparation for the real world, and so I think engaging people in understanding issues - and having a space to talk about those issues - is a lot of what college is about," Speiker said. "Doing a y.~ting drive and making sure

.

'

~ ·--

that people are registered to vote and actually voting in larger elections .. .is really important because that's the basis of our society." It's not only the members of PLU's student government that feel the young vote matters. PLU students also agree that voting is the optimal way to have their voices heard. "I feel like we should all be able to be adults and be in charge of [our futures]," sophomore Tatiana Iglesias said. "Now that have the opportunity... I feel like I'm gonna make a difference, even if it's just my vote." Students also agree that there's nothing like tie-dye to get the student body to engage in their civic duty. "It's always a good thing when there's tie-dye," first-year Melanie Gungerson said. Sophomore lana Mae Abinales resiters Lutes to vote on Sept. 30 at the Vote or Dye event in Red Square.

Sophomore Jana Mae Abinales helps sophomore Matthew Gillis register to vote. PLU students eagerly participate in ASPLU's "Vote or Dye" event.

Junior Christine Consulta dying her shirt.

Sophia Mair tie dyes her shirt for Vote or Dye 2015.

"Color Me Calm" provides oasis for stressed students NATALIE MOONEY Guest Writer mooneynr@plu.edu Posters advertising the Diversity Center's new activity hang all around the UC, but what is "Color Me Calm" really about? In partnership with the Counseling Center, the Diversity Center is putting on a new event called "Color Me Calm." Every Monday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., students can come in to the Diversity Center in the lower level of Anderson University Center and color pictures to destress. This event is open to all students and is meant to be inclusive, social and enjoyable. There isn't much structure to the event, other than the effort to take stress away from students through coloring. It serves as a social yet relaxing time for students. "Over the last year, adult coloring books became very

popular on Amazon and in the news," Joanne Ito, director and senior psychologist of the Counseling Center said. Ito was inspired by this concept and brought the idea to Diversity Center Assistant Vice President, Angie Hambrick. Hambrick then implemented the idea and turned it into a weekly event. "Coloring allows people to focus and uses different parts of the brain than academic classes [use]," Ito said. While coloring may seem like a juvenile activity, it has actually become very trendy among adults. Websites are now offering free "stylish" and "zen" coloring pages. Even Barnes & Noble is selling adult coloring books complete with intricate designs and patterns. It is a stress relieving activity, and it is also easy artwork for those who do not consider themselves to be artistically inclined.

"Sometimes we color in quiet, other times it is a great way to meet new people and check in how people's days are going," Nicole Juliano, Assistant Director of the Diversity Center said. While the event is scheduled for every Monday, the coloring materials are usually left out all week. Students are allowed to come in whenever they want. The Diversity Center provides coloring materials as well as printouts of coloring pages to students for free. Students can take their artwork home or leave it there for the Diversity Center to hang up in the office. There are even folders available to students to leave their unfinished work which they can come back to work on anytime. Students who are stressed are encouraged to pop into the Diversity Center and color the anxiety away.


8 FEATURE

THEMASTI

Yorke hits 151, breaks a JAKE BILYEU Mast TV Sports Producer bi/eujc@plu.edu At the start of the season, Pacific Lutheran University Men's Soccer head coach John Yorke had 143 wins, seven wins shy of the team's all-time record. The team set their sights on 150. It seemed like an average game when the PLU Men's Soccer team took the field last Tuesday against non-conference opponent Trinity Lutheran. After the Lutes defeated them 2-0, the game became an entirely new experience. Head coach John Yorke had just tied the all-time record for most wins. The team beat Linfield over the weekend, bringing coach Yorke's record to 151 wins, 100 losses, and 14 ties. Coach Yorke cherishes memories from special games like this, and has been for years. "There's always been a lot of good victories," Yorke said. "The best memories are the relationships that I've formed with players." Some of those players stuck

around after they finished their careers with Yorke, including assistant coach Jamie Bloomstine, who completed his 400th game with the team a few days before Yorke took his record. on the same "We are wavelength," Bloomstine said of his 14-year partnership with Yorke. "It's just been a great experience, and I've learned a lot from John." Assistant coach Peter Voiles with Yorke and partnered Bloomstine after the duo's first year together. Voiles said he has never regretted that decision. "The friendship that the three of us have created is pretty amazing," Voiles said. "Through traveling and working together, the two of them have become my closest friends." Voiles also added that the most impressive aspect of Yorke's coaching is his ability to adapt. "Yorke can work with any team in any situation," Voiles said. Yorke gives his assistant coaches just as much credit and says he benefits from coaching with them as well. Together, the trio has produced a winning record for the team in all but one of their seasons

together, including a first place finish in their Northwest Conference in 2011. "When I first got the job, Jamie and I didn't know each other," Yorke said. "When he and I talked, though, it was a perfect fit right away." Yorke is also on his way to becoming the longest tenured coach in Men's Soccer history. On the way there, he led the way to many memorable victories over the years. "Over the years, many games have had a monumental impact on our team's success," Yorke said. "Defeating Redlands after they had eliminated us from the NCAA tournament was huge, as well as ending Wisconsin-Whitewater's five year home win streak." While Yorke's success may dominate the limelight now, he has always been quick to put his team first. That mentality has carried onto his current team. "He's always positive, regardless of the game's outcome," senior Jacob Beck said. "It makes us feel like we are a part of the team," senior Troy-Mikal Oliger added.

PLU's Suwilanji Silozi '17 (20), gets some air while playing Linfield during a home game on Oct. 3. PLU walked away with a 3-2 win over the Wildcats.

PLU Athletics Director Laurie Turner gives PLU Men's Soccer head coach John Yorke the game ball after breaking the all-time record for most wins.

Yorke has with his alu even first-year i and first year pl well as fellow n no trouble int into the group. "Coach is opportunities practice," Davi all feel that we' individuals, wh us a better team Yorke ackn mutually additions. "The conn freshman and h overlooked," ~ way that they !themselves into The season yet, but coach has provided that no one on forget. The tea this a memora continue that j when they face road. c


::>CT. 8 , 2015

FEATURE9

'I-time PL

trong relationships , older players, and 1layers. Sophomore ayer Colin Davies as ewcomers have had 1 grating themselves

always giving us to compete in s said. "It makes us ea team rather than lch definitely makes

I"

bwledges that he lects his newest

~butions

of our bnsfer class can't be rke said. "I love the lave fully immersed !the team." may not be over Yorke's 15lst win a special moment lthe team will soon h still aims to make Ile year, and they11 ~mey this Saturday uget Sound on the

The soccer team rushed their coach, John Yorke, cheering after they won and broke the all-time record for most wins by a PLU soccer coach .

./


10

THE MAST

OPINION

#PIN

OCTOBER 8,

2015

UT: -

MATTHEW SALZANO Mast TV General Manager salzano@plu.edu It's not slacktivism. Making your profile pichire pink to #StandWithPP 'is a valuable way to show support and start conversation. Planned Parenthood has been highlighted in the national conversation lately due to recent Republican-led efforts in the House of Representatives that sought to defund the sexual health organization for one year. It has since been blocked by the Senate (and the President pledged to veto it). Planned Parenthood's President, Cecile c Richards, made headlines after appearing before ~ -<J,:House committee to defend the organization. : As the suits in D.C.Jiglit about funding, t fraudulent videos. and falsf.l. inf~:mri<;l,tion, people l ii.cross the U.S. are showing their support ; hJ participating in #PinkOUt for Planned Parenthood, turning their soci<;l,} media profile • pictures pink to #StandWithP.P. I did it, my friends - and probably some of your friends - did it, and Lena Dunham, Elizabefh Banks, Bernie Sanders and.HillarY.:Qinton did it. The cyn1cal may initially think this is useless. What good does it do to add a pink filter to your profile picture on Facebook or Twitter? There's a word for this - slacktivism. It's showing sµpport for a cause without really spending much time, effort or funds to support it. It's passive activ,ism, an oxymoron. However, "pinking out" isn't so passive. In my experience, most of these Facebook posts were accomparlied with a personal narrative about why standing with Planned Parenthood is so important.

I wrote a post. I grew up in a conservative, Christian community in Spokane, Wash., where teachers regularly condemned abortion in class, encouraged strict gender roles and made sure everyone knew being anything besides straight was wrong (oops). '~ I ~ad been politically quiet on Fac~book for some time - why engage people who so strongly attaeh their religion with their politics? Why be condemned when I could just be silent? In the November 14, 2014 issu~of The Mooring Mast, guest writer Leah Larson wrote about Slacktivism during the rise of popular FCKH8 campaigns. The campaigns, discussing issues of women's rights and homophobia, utilized viral videos to sell T-shirts with catchy slogans like, ''Some chicks marry chicks. Get over it." OJ:l. said this wasn't really,aqfiyism - it wa ktivism. "Effective advocacy,'' she writes, "meai;is engaging in thoughtful discourse with peo.ele around you, even if it's just on Facebook." I ·agree with my fellow Mast op-ed writer. 4dvocacy and activism requires not being silent. It's about speaking up, supporting things that others may disagree with (or may not understand) and having thoughtful conversations with those around you about issues. It worked with the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, which raised $100 million. It has worked in raising awareness about net neutrality, which helps us keep an open web. It worked in showing sweeping support for same-sex marriage throughout the years with rainbows and equal signs. To me, that meant a post about standing with Planned Parenthood could work, too. So I

wrote one. "I declared my second major today: Women and Gender studies. It seems to fit well in today's conversations regarding Planned Parenthood. "The House decision is not a pro-life decision. It is not a c;onservative decision. It is : a misogynist decision; I stand with PP because : I stand with women everywhere who deserve to choose how sexually active they want to be and when. Who deserve good sexual health. Who deserve expert sexual health care. Federal funding for Planned Parenthood provides that. "I recognize many of my Facebook friends are pro-life (j.e., believe abortion should not be legal). You have every right to believe that and advocate for that. Please don't comment about how unchristian I am or send me anything hateful. I almost didr}'t post this today out of the ~ fear what some of you may say. "That's not how advocacy works, , and rm going to ad\f.OCate for women. Today, Congress demands it of me more than ever." Few, if any., · of my Spokane friends "liked" my post or wrote anything to me. But it's likely some .read it - and even if they wrote me off after, it's important that a different perspective got in their heads. This is why choosing to #StandWithPP is not slacktivism. That pink profile picture often results in real conversations, further awareness and true advocacy - whether the conversations happen in person or via digital means, it doesn't matter. It doesn't even matter if you change someone's mind. What matters is getting the word out: so more people are attentive to issues that matter.

The button

RACHEL DIXON Opinion Writer dixonrp@plu.edu

Talk has been buzzing lately about a new addition to Facebook, a dislike button, and I don't think it should happen. However, the announcement that started the rumor did not even say there was to be a dislike button. In fact, all Mark Zuckerberg said was that the new feature will, hopefully, expand the scope of the like button. He said he wants it to give users a way to show empathy to their friends, particularly on sad posts, posts that it might normally feel odd or inappropriate to like. He wants people to be able to show sympathy to their friends, instead of dislike. I love this idea, and I think other people will as well. More times than I can cou:ot, I remember seeing friends' posts about unfortunate times in their lives and choosing not to like their posts simply because I didn't "like" their situation per se, although I had sympathy for them. F o r this reason I am glad that Mark Zuckerberg does not seem like he will add a dislike button. If I, or anyone else, wanted to express sympathy or empathy to a friend, how would a dislike enable me to do that? It would inform the friend that I disliked their situation, which, I suppose, coµld be perceived as better than liking their status. "Liking" does have more positive

connotations associated with it than "disliking." For all a person would know, people are disliking their status not out of sympathy, but out of annoyance at their post. Facebook is a very public website; the majority of people can see most posts unless a profile has specifically altered privacy settings. It would be awful for strangers to have the ability to share their collective dislike of a post. It would have the exact opposite effect of having several strangers like a post- it would lower self esteem, especially because of the ambiguity

associated with a "dislike". Imagine this on a smaller scale, a young teenager makes a post about having a bad day at school. Picture how worthless this kid might feel after everyone at his school essentially informed him they did not like his post, that they didn't even care enough to comment? A dislike button would only perpetuate cyber bullying and other forms of social media aggression. A sympathy button, not a dislike button, would be a very good move on the part of Mark Zuckerberg and the Facebook corporation.

Corrections In "Paleoanthropology; alive and well at PLU" Katie Johnston was incorrectly credited for an interview conducted with her co-president Katy Leonard-Doll. The correct writer of "Acting Out" 1s Dina Longstaff.

Like

Sarcastic Thumbs

Dislike

Really Dislike

Mama Mia!

~& · ~ Deuces

This Guy Here

Most Excellent


OCTOBER 8,

THE MAST

2015

OPINION

11

out sex" seri'es t topic aboif:l sex and se n effort .to raise awareness, rmg e cation and be a forum for di$/J1f;ggi0n. To write in artd share your opirtiQ.J1S and stories, email mast庐plu.

ve vocal and hings ate getting t is effective. I have heard plenty of horror stories about taking the m fter pili, but the two times Yve done ce after not using protection and the other after a condom broke) I have had no bad side effects other than eriod starting early that to anyone who t or hod , pills, I doms until partner and you are r any STis or viruses. make the sex better.

Howe should how effective, realistic and expensive different types are. To preface, I am a woman, I've been sexually active for five years and I've tried most of these methods. Hormonal freak me out. Hormonal 路 like small pods doctors p arm that 路 hormones od . that c but I those and are low. ce and l couldn't I felt my even give it that. What madeit it her "nuobin" worse was because it $rn<1ll anil]tal ce I haven't tried attached to

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

SPORTS EDITOR

CHIEF DESIGNER

ASSISTANT PRODUCER

Samantha Lund /undsr@p/u.edu

Steven McGrain

Colton Walter

Sarah Giomi

COPY EDITORS

I

OPINION EDITOR

Courtney Miranda NEWS EDITOR

Jeff Dunn Paris Franklin Hannah Soltis Sanna Vargas

David Mair

~l\/IAST

TV I

GENERAL MANAGER

Samuel Allenberger

Matthew Salzano sa/zano@plu.edu

ACADEMIC ADVISOR

Joanne Lisosky

PHOTO EDITOR

Mckenna Morin

A&C EDITOR

EQUIPMENT& TECHNOLOGY ENGINEER

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER

Genny Boots

Brooke Thames

THE MAST

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447

The responsibility of The Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mast adheres to the Society of Professional ournalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and dvertisements do not necessaril re resent those of

The Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 50 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu.edu by 5 p.m. the Monday before publication. The Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing o title for verification. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 pe academic year. To subscribe, email mast@plu.edu.

Ebenezer Scrooge buys AIDS Samuel Ellefson Guest Writer

el/efssc@plu.edu

~

I

The price of the life saving drug Daraprim has been raised from $13.50 to $750 practically overnight by Touring Pharmaceuticals. The company purchased the rights of the 62-year-old drug and instituted a 5000 percent increase in the price. The company's actions made Martin Shkreli, CEO of Touring, one of the most hated figures in America. Daraprim is used to treat toxoplasmosis, which can dangerously affect patients with weakened immune systems from HIV and other conditions such as cancer. Shkreli is beating money out of people who are already drowning in medical bills. He is taking advantage of sick and dying patients and their families because they will have to buy the drug out of desperation. There was talk about boycotting the drug, but doing so would only hurt those who need it. Shkreli justifies his actions by claiming he will use the money to fund research to make the drug more effective. He claims to be a man of the future by charging dying patients hundreds of

dollars for a daily medication because they need it to survive. How noble of him. I'm no ethics professor, but this just isn't right. His claim has even less merit because he has hiked prices on drugs before. According to an article in The Independent, Touring Pharmaceuticals also bought the rights to a drug called Thiola, which is used to treat a kidney disease called cystinuria. The company increased the price of Thiola by 2000 percent. Cystinuria is a rare condition beginning in childhood, in which stones made from the amino acid cystine form in the kidney, ureter and blatter. Some with this ailment will take this medicine their whole lives, and Shkreli takes advantage of their situation to make a profit. Shkreli isn't the only one cashing in on sick and suffering patients. The Business Insider reports that several other medications have also had their prices hiked after their rights were purchased by new companies. Some of these medications would include Doxycycline, Isuprel and Nitropress. These companies can set the prices at whatever they want because there is no competition in the market. The drugs like Daraprim don't have a high enough

demand for generic brands to make them. This situation results in a monopoly over the drug, so whoever owns the rights can set the price, which hurts those who need it. After the articles were written about the companies that hiked their prices, those companies went about lowering their prices. Shkreli has even said that prices will be lowered after the outburst following his price hike because of the hit it took to Touring Pharmaceuticals' stock prices. These companies' actions to lower prices after being exposed shows their guilt in the matter. They are just in it for the money. Even if they were using the profits to research the drugs, they should .ff ; not take the money from the already suffering patients who have enough medical expenses to pay already. It's important for them to realize that people's lives depend on this drug. I am hopeful that the exposure of these cruel moneymaking methods will stop similar situations in the future. Political figures such

Hillary Clinton have already announced plans to stop this practice, and other organizations hiking prices are being targeted. The future of pharmaceutical practice in America is beginning to change because of this incident, and hopefully it will change for the better.

-


12

THE MAST

OPINION

â&#x20AC;˘ Warning â&#x20AC;˘

OCTOBER 8,

2015

satire at play

en

ditor's Note: This week, The Mast is transitioning page 12 to a satir page titled Den Lok, which is Norwegian for The Onion (... get it?). Eve eek we will try to make you laugh, because reading is fun!

KAT FINEMAN Columnist finemakd@plu.edu A party thrown at Mini Golf House was not busted on Saturday night, according to patrons of the get together. "I was pretty bummed that I didn't get a flashlight shined into my face after a few hours of drinking," sophomore Kyle Dison said. "Usually, I like to sober up a little bit before walking back to The Snack Senter on campus, but without a cop to wake me up a bit first, I just wasn't in the mood for a trip to The Commons," Dison added. He stated that he was shocked to find Denny's to be "lit" at four a.m.; usually

he and his friends frequent the diner on the cusp of midnight. According to Dison, this is when the joint is really happening with inebriated peers from his college, University of Lutheran Studies: Northwestern Corner. The party at the Intramural House was said to begin around eight and last well past last call. "I stayed until three a.m., but after eleven p.m., everyone was sort of at a loss for what to do next. The mingling was over, and before I knew it, the house's decibel level rapidly decreased," Dison said. "We sort of just sat around drinking IPAs out of a relatively full keg until we were done socializing with our fellow Martins," fellow sophomore Jenna Bells agreed. "It is the first time I feel like my five bucks went to good use," she went on to explain, "but I would rather have gotten shwasted within the course of an hour and found a person to 'Netflix and Chill' with before campus security was on its way."

PLU considers new ' uxurj student expenses JULIA GROSVENOR Guest Writer grosvejm@plu.edu ,

Lute Bucks

Business students will be impressed by profit raising changes in the works for student accommodations all over campus. If put into effect, these changes will have students giving out the Benjamins for everything from cappuccinos to extra copies.

Caffeine Inspired by Martin Shkreli' s brilliant choice to rebrand a life saving toxoplasmosis drug by increasing the price more than 4000 percent, OMM is charging $400 dollars for all made-to-order coffee items, and $70 for any other items containing caffeine. "If you think about it, it's sort of like we were just giving away caffeine before. The new pricing will fund research for a better, more modern caffeine alternative," Craig Craigerson, Chief Counselor of Finance Creativity, explained. Critics may raise concerns about how this will only urge students to seek out unsanctioned, home-brewed alternatives, but Campus Security confirmed Wednesday they are prepared to launch an all-out 'War on Mugs' if necessary.

Ice packs

Freshmen Parking Pass

Lately students have been reporting that older buildings can get "a little sweaty" or "hallucination-inducing level hot," especially during later hours. This is supposedly a problem with the older heating systems, where the heaters turn on when there is a temperature drop and simply won't turn off. "We thought about fixing this problem, but then I remembered every problem is actually a business opportunity," Craigerson said. The new solution will be to rent out individual ice packs for $40 dollars per hour, or per class. Market research surveys have already been conducted for this new amenity. "I don't care, 111 give you my house if you want, just give me the ice little birdie!" a delusional student said.

CARLY STAUFFER Cartoonist stauffce@plu.edu

My name is Carly and I'm a Physics major here at PL U. I'm a total nerd, in love with Olympic National Park, and enjoy singing in University Chorale, writing, learning, acting and spending time with family (and Jesus!). While I somehow manage to look as though I've got my life pretty under control, I generally feel like I'm awkwardly stumbling around, trying to figure out life ... just like Little Carly. Enjoy!

OECE"PT1

One of the simplest ideas for raising funds is the re-branding of the Lute Bucks system. Instead of the 1:1 transfer rate students have grown accustomed to, one US dollar will now be worth 0.50 Lute Bucks. Students would have to pay twice the amount it actually costs to, for example, do laundry. 'Tm sure it makes sense if you think about, like, inflation or something," Craigerson said. Craigerson notes the most brilliant aspect of this plan is the potential to apply this change to existing account balances. "I have to credit the idea to my buddy Geoff. I was all 'wouldn't that be illegal or something?' and he was all 'I don't know dude.' Geoff is so smart," Craigerson said.

For the same $50 price as any other student parking pass, first year students would be given a special pass which would force them to park on the "sketchiest, most garbage-y" lots on lower campus. Even residents of Harstad, a primarily first year dorm which has its own parking lot, would have to walk all the way across campus any time they need to get themselves or a friend anywhere. "Oh, wait, apparently this is already a thing we do here," Craigerson added.

oN

OR (

WHY

to

CLOTHC-5

WORK OUT WEAR 81\SICALLY ALL THE


OCTOBER 8,

THE MAST

2015

SPORTS 13

The Mast Monday Night Football pick 'em Another controversial call in Seattle, first the "Fail Mary" and now "The Tap" but ultimately a win is a win for the home team. Russell Wilson continued his "In Russ, We Trust" trend playing magician out on the field: Seahawks move to 2-2 on the season. Detroit flew home with an apology from the National Football League on a blown call, but that doesn't suffice for "one" in the win column. Lions fall to 0-4 at the quarter point. Now, the entire country will have to sit through the Pittsburgh Steelers at San Diego Chargers on Primetime. The students have spoken and a majority of them are going with the Chargers to beat the high-powered offense of the Steelers. Steelers' quarterback Mike Vick will get his second start after "Big Ben" went down with a leg injury. Look for Steelers Head Coach Mike Tomlin to get the ball to running back LeVeon Bell as much as possible and utilize wide receiver Antonio Brown on the outside. San Diego has troubles of their

own with two more targets going down for quarterback Philip Rivers. Steelers win 24-17 in San Diego.

D.J. Winter So. Pacific Lutheran Football Player

"I'm gonna go with the Chargers because the Steelers are going to struggle without Big Ben for a couple week."

Nicoya Benham-Marin Sr. Women's Soccer Player at PLU

Juston Lind Jr. Wide Receiver for the Lutes

Tahlia Terhune Senior, Advertising Major

AT

Traeger Jarrad Senior, Kinesiology Major

"I'm thinking the Chargers will win this week. It should be a good game though. Not sure why though? Chargers have a stronger overall offense and defense."

"I pick San Diego at home with some guys back from injury and Pittsburg struggling to get the ball to Antonio Brown."

"The Steelers will win I think. The Chargers are an inconsistent team. Big Ben is out but they got LeVeon Bell back and he's a stud." "San Diego holds a dear place in my heart. Though I never watch football, I have to say this is a gut feeling, San Diego will prevail. I don't even know where the Steelers are from."

Hayden McCartney "Mike Vick will bounce back, LeVeon Bell and Antonio Brown Senior, Financial Mathematics Major

are too explosive to not have a big game. San Diego doesn't have the firepower to hang with Pittsburgh."

Kailyn Osaki

"To think Mike Vick will continue to be efficient is absurd. Bell in the backfield will help relieve some of the pressure, but the Chargers will load the box, making Vick throw."

Jr. Softball Player at PLU

Fantasy Football: Week 5 SLEEPER: Alfred Morris, Washington Redskins Trading handoffs between him and Matt Jones has been head scratching. With that said, during the Redskins' two-minute drill, Morris was the lead back and kept them competitive until their win over Philly.

QUARTERBACK: Carson Palmer, Arizona Cardinals After a disastrous first loss of the season to St. Louis, the Cardinals will seek to put up big numbers against Detroit. Palmer threw for 352 yards without a touchdown last week. He should continue to do that against a lackluster Lions defense.

DEFENSE/SPECIAL TEAMS: Denver Broncos After posting another 10 points against the Minnesota Vikings. Their defense will continue their case for being number one in the National Football League as the Broncos travel to Oakland.

WIDE RECEIVER: Keenan Allen, San Diego Chargers With three of quarterback Philip River's targets out due to injury, Antonio Gates, Malcolm Floyd and Stevie Johnson. Allen will retain a majority of the passes in his direction.

/


THE MAST

14 SPORTS

Athlete Spotlight: Kyle Sawtell

OCTOBER 8,

2015

From the court to the boat Men :S Basketball takes to water MADDIE BERNARD Sports Writer bernarma@pfu.edu The Pacific Lutheran University Men's Basketball team will experience a change of scenery on Wednesday as

they head out to American Lake in Lakewood, Wash. for a rowing competition. This summer, the team read The Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown. The book is about the struggles and triumphs of the 1936 American Olympic crew team.

PHOTO COURTESY OF GOLUTES.COM

Sawtell shooting a three-pointer against Whitman College. He went on to score 21 points in the loss on Senior Night.

CARA GILLESPIE Sports Writer gillesce@p/u.edu Kyle Sawtell is a junior wing for the Men's Basketball team. This week, Mast Media collaborated with Pacific Lutheran Athletics to begin a new feature spotlighting our student athletes. You asked the questions, and I sat down with Sawtell to bring you his answers. MM: What is your favorite animal? Kyle Sawtell: A tiger, beca碌se they are majestic animals. '路 MM: What is the most points you have scored in a game? Sawtell: In high school I scored 33 points one game, and in college I scored 21. MM: Who is your favorite basketball player to watch? Sawtell: Probably Kevin ' Durant because he is very skilled. The stuff he does is amazing. When he's on his game, no one can stop him. MM: What do you like to do for fun? Sawtell: I like to hang out with my

friends and family, just relax to get my mind off school and basketball. MM: What is your favorite color? Sawtell: My favorite color is blue. MM: What is your favorite card game? Sawtell: A fun game called 99. MM: Who is your biggest supporter? Sawtell: My mom and dad, for sure. MM: What is your major? Sawtell: My major is business. I am deciding on my emphasis, either marketing or accounting. MM: What is your favorite class? Sawtell: Right now, it is statistics. MM: What do you enjoy most about Coach Dickerson's style and philosophy? Sawtell: Coach Dickerson is very passionate and he lets us have a little bit of freedom within our play. He is not always calling plays and structuring everything we do, he just lets us play.

Inspired by the young rowers abilities to overcome the odds and work together to achieve greatness, the basketball team decided to try their luck out on the lake. Senior team captain Erik Swartout believes rowing will help bond the new and returning players, as well as give everyone a great learning experience. "It will be good for the older guys and the younger guys to get together and have to work hard at something new and challenging," Swartout said. "It will help bring us together as a team before the season starts." The basketball players will wake up bright and early at 4:30 a.m. on Wednesday and the PLU Women's Crew Team will give them a rowing lesson. After, the basketball players will divide into two teams for an inter-squad rowing competition. Swartout said he thinks the experience will allow the team to understand the difficulties other teams have to face and gain a greater appreciation for athletics. "I think it will expand our horizons a little bit and help us to relate to other sports," Swartout said. "It will give us a different perspective on athletes. I'm really excited, rowing has always looked interesting." Be sure to check out the photos from the event on Wednesday at mastmedia.plu.edu

Check out @golutes or search #AskALute on Instagram to submit your questions for next week's student-athlete Q&A.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE DIXON PUBLIC LIBRARY

Veteran Boxer squad too much for young Lutes

Meet In The Huddle: Richard Johnson (11) Reggie Collins (8) Ryan Chynoweth (44) Elijah Clayton (31) Marc Gallant (22) Juston Lind (14)

KELLEN WESTERING Sports Writer westerka@pfu.edu In their first two games of the season, Pacific Lutheran University football program has had its fair share of growing pains. The difficulties continued in their first Northwest Conference game against the Pacific Boxers as they fell 34-7. Coming into the season, the Lutes knew how much of a challenge they were up against, having almost an entirely new slate of starters on both sides of the ball. In fact, they returned just six starters. The Boxers, on the other hand, have a plethora of returners that dot the roster at nearly every position. Heading into last weekend's game appeared to be a great conference matchup as the Boxers were picked to finish second and

the Lutes were picked to finish third in the Northwest Conference polls. Not to mention the 2014 contest between the two, which came down to the wire as the Boxers beat the Lutes 31-28, as well as the year before when the Lutes beat the Boxers 17-16. The match up between the Lutes and Boxers this year was not as dramatic. Out of Pacific's five drives of the first half, they scored on four of them: Two touchdowns and two field goals. It was a different story for PLU in the first half. On the Lutes' second drive, they drove the ball all the way down to the 10-yard line but came up just short on a 4th and 2nd. After that, the Lutes punted three straight times. It couldn't have been scripted much better for the Boxers in front of the 2,710 in attendance for their Homecoming. Lutes had proved throughout the first two games that they were capable of getting off to fast starts. They led 26-10 against California

Quarterback Jon Schaub (9) doing a read-option with running back Marc Gallant(22) as Austen Kindle (4) goes into motion

Lutheran at half and against Trinity led 7-6, but Pacific was able to control the tempo from the beginning. To start the second half, the Boxers came out aggressive once again and scored on their first possession. Then the Lutes' defense stepped up and forced Pacific to punt in two straight possessions as well as force a turnover. But it was too little too late as Pacific scored one more time, giving them 34 points on the day with 444 yards of total offense. Senior quarterback Warner Shaw finished the day 25-of-32 for 353 yards and three touchdowns. Offensively in the second half the Lutes looked much better. Sophomore running back Mark Gallant scored a late touchdown in the fourth quarter making the score 34-7. The Lutes moved the ball up and down the field but committed two costly turnovers in the red zone that kept them from adding to their total. PLU had 287

yards of total offense and junior quarterback Jon Schaub was 19-32 with 187 yards. On a positive note, the Lutes had 106 yards rushing compared to 0 from the week before. In addition, they only committed six penalties compared to a previous 15. Looking ahead there's a lot to get excited about with this young team. Next week provides another opportunity as the Lutes take on Willamette University in a Homecoming contest at Sparks Stadium at

lp.m.

Editor's Note: Kellen Westering is the colorcommentator for golutes.com, the son of coach Westering and a former PLU football player.


OCTOBER 8,

THE MAST

2015

SPORTS 15

Okubo, poised for an impactful 2016 season Editors Note: Dylan Foreman is a hired writer for golutes.com DYLAN FOREMAN Sports Writer foremadf@plu.edu Junior James Okubo is one of the key veterans on the Pacific Lutheran Men's Tennis team. This upcoming season is very important for the veteran. "Our expectations for this season are to fight for every point, and give it our all for the team," Okubo said. As a team leader, Okubo emphasized

his need to become the best player he can be when the season starts. With all emphasis on conditioning and practicing with his teammates, taking advantage of the offseason was a main priority. It isn't just his physical attributes, though, that make him an important asset to the team. "As a veteran of the team, I hope to lead my team by being a positive influence on and off the court," he stressed. "I hope to show my teammates a hard work ethic, and a "want-to" attitude toward getting better everyday."

In order to improve their record from last year, Okubo has become a positive model on which his teammates can thrive so that the team can have success. The focus for the team has always been teamoriented. "We go through a lot of ups and downs as a team but in the end we are one big family that sticks together when times get tough," Okubo stated. Even though Okubo and his teammates are serious in achieving their goals on the court, the team is not just all work and no

piay. In their free time, the squad can be seen playing table tennis and video games that help build a strong camaraderie. As for Okubo, he personally enjoys the serenity of fishing with his father. The tennis season doesn't officially start until February, but Okubo is anxious to start preparing the team for success now. With his leadership qualities, PLU will be a force in the Northwest Conference this year

-

PHOTO COURTESY OF GOLUTES.COM

Athlete's Perspective: Samantha Lund

SAMANTHA LUND Editor-in-Chief lundsr@plu.edu

I recently quit my job. I had a tough choice to make: quit your job, quit your sport or quit your extracurriculars. I chose my job, but some students aren't as lucky and don't have that choice. They have to keep a job to stay in school and that means quitting their sport. I've seen other athletes in the nursing program forced to quit because their clinical times corresponded with practice

and clinical times aren't easily shifted it just seen. doesn't happen. So, in the light of "athletes get special Last year, I produced a documentary treatment" and "athletes act like they're called "INjured and OUT" about injured above the rules and better than everyone student-athletes who can't play their sport else" keep in mind the 3+ hours per day that anymore. From concussions to bad knees, athletes put in and the countless sacrifices athletes get injured every day and are they make to compete for this school. Yes, athletes get some allowances with forced to quit. That project really opened my eyes to missing classes and getting to take tests at how important a later date, but sports are to chances are, he or students. she will still get What I'm less time than you trying to say is that "All I'm asking is that you to study for that I'm lucky. Along same exam. with the other acknowledge what athletes do." My goal isn't 400-ish athletes on to say that athletes campus, I'm one of deserve special Samantha Lund the fortunate ones treatment, but Women's Tennis that can shift my as someone who schedule around is a part of the practices, lifting, arts and upper physical therapy campus bubble as and competitions well as "athletics bubble." on weekends. For a lot of people on the outside I know the stigmas and gossip that of athletics looking in, we are known surrounding about athletics. Those side-eye as "determined," "self-absorbed" and glares when an athlete needs more time to sometimes "clique-y," but, to me, this complete an assignment because they had group is amazing and the sacrifices a Friday-Saturday-Sunday competition student-athletes deal with everyday to need to stop. It's just not fair for student-athletes to be keep playing is unlike anything I've ever

ashamed when they ask for help. Everyone needs a little help and support sometimes. On the Women's Tennis team, we're constantly battling with practice and school work. We have had the highest team GPA since my first year, three years ago. If anything, my team knows what it means to be student-athletes where the "student" comes first. That doesn't mean we have it down to a science though. The reason these girls have succeeded is because they ask for help (and, I11 admit, drink lots of coffee). Asking for help and not feeling ashamed to need it is the only way athletes can survive. If they're being shamed by their peers, or their accomplishments aren't appreciated, that's going to hurt the Lute spirit. All I'm asking is that you acknowledge what athletes do, how impressive they are, and maybe give them an "Attaway!" the next time you hear a team won a competition. On the other end, the arts aren't going unnoticed by us. As an athletics-wide initiative, each sport will attend at least one arts event and support other groups around campus. It would be great if we got some of that love back. I know every team would appreciate it.

- ~,


THE MAST

'

NORTHWEST CONEERENCE STANDINGS

---

Football

l ...

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Linfield

3

0

0

1-0

Won3

Whitworth

4

0

0

1-0

Won4

Pacific

3

1

0

1-0

Won2

Puget Sound

2

1

0

1-0

Won 1

George Fox

2

2

0

0-1

Lost 1

Lewis & Clark

0

3

0

0-1

Lost 3

LUTES

0

3

0

0-1

Lost 3

0

0-1

Lost 3

Willamette

0

3

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Willamette

5

4

1

5-1

Won5

LUTES

8

1

1

4-1-1

Won4

Puget Sound

6

0

4

2-0-4

Tied 1

Linfield

6

2

1

3-2-1

Lost 1

Whitworth

5

6

0

3-4

Lost 3

Pacific

2

7

2-3-1

Won 1

Lewis & Clark

6

4

0

2-4

Lost 2

Whitman

1

8

2

1-4-2

Tied 1

George Fox

3

5

2

1-4-1

Lost 3

1

Men s Soccer

Volleyball

....

1

Women s Soccer

CONFERENCE

STREAK

5-0-1

Tied 1

0

5-1

Won3

4

0

4-2

Lost 1

5

6

1

2-3-1

Tied 1

Linfield

6

6

0

2-4

Lost 2

Won 1

Willamette

3

7

1

2-4

Won 1

2-4

Won2

Pacific

3

7

1

1-4-1

Tied 1

0

1-5

Lost 3

Whitman

7

1

1-4-1

Tied 1

0

1-5

Lost 1

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

Willamette

10

4

0

6-0

Won6

Whitworth

9

0

Whitworth

10

5

0

4-2

Lost 2

Puget Sound

7

4

Lewis & Clark

7

6

0

4-2

Lost 2

LUTES

8

Puget Sound

7

7

0

4-2

Won2

George Fox

LUTES

9

6

0

4-2

Lost 1

Linfield

5

10

0

2-4

Pacific

4

9

0

George Fox

4

9

Whitman

3

9

TIES


PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSI1Y

OCTOBER 15, 2015 I VOLUME 92, ISSUE 5 I MASTMEDIA.PLU.EDU

mostly by PLU students, can get a bit heated. News Writer Senior Frank Edwards was a mccovee@plu.edu frequent commenter until he was At private college institutions banned by the administrators of in the U.S., students do not have the page. "I was disappointed the the freedom of speech that is admins chose to ban me, but assumed by all. I certainly wasn't surprised," According to the Pacific Edwards said. "That sort of Lutheran University Freedom of behavior is typical of liberal Expression policy: "Every student has the right students and has come to be status to express a personal opinion quo. If you don't agree with their as long as it does not infringe poin1: of view you're accused of on the rights of others, disrupt . bemg all sorts of horrible things." ..... "Edwards was one of many community or university students who chose to publicly functions, or otherwise violate comment on the anonymous university policy, or local, state posts and soon found his views to or federal laws." Recently, a popular Facebook be in the minority. He was often page, formally known as "PLU slammed by other viewers. "If the same students who Confess & Misc," had to change pride themselves in their activism its name to "People.Let.Ur voices qnd having a 'voice' are the first be heard Confess & Misc." fo censor an opposing view, who Senior David Leon, who started and administrates the then, is the real bigot?" Edwards page, created it as an outlet for said. Leon said that he "didn't have students to air their frustrations a rubric" for what was posted anonymously. "Personally for me, I hate on the page, but he's blocked censorship of any type," Leon people from commenting "for the said. "My goal for the page was protection of the community." Leon was recently subjected to not censor anything. I wanted people to post the most vile, to conduct meetings with the repugnant things they could administration concerning the think of, and the most happy, page and its content. Student humorous things they could Rights and Responsibilities did to Leon what Leon did to Edwards. think of." Leon was called in for posts Having a confession page is made before school started. nothing new to PLU. Leon said two other pages existed before "It dealt with some路 sensitive his but he doesn't know why they information. Some people within the PLU community commented were deleted. and I commented, and it just blew Leon uses SurveyMonkey for his page so people wanting to up into this crazy thing," Leon "confess" anonymously can do said. While Leon could not so. The survey responses are then elaborate, he did say the post was pulled by the page administrators and posted for public viewing about sexual assault. "I think a lot of times, and comment. students feel a little bit more Content from the page, free to say whatever they want including public comments, on those pages, which is great

EDDIE MCCOVEN

since students have every single right to express themselves in whatever way they want to," Associate Director for Student Rights and Responsibilities, Connie Gardner said. "Where I think it comes into some problematic, gray area is when the comments or the language used could infringe on another person's rights." While there is no university-sanctioned alternative to venting frustrations anonymously, Gardner assures there are no PLU officials patrolling social media. "If it was brought to our attention by a student that says 'hey this was really bothersome for me, here's why,' we do look into it," Gardner said. While Leon was unaware of the recent name change of the page because he stepped down from being an administrator, it may have to do with his recent conduct meetings with administrators. Private colleges are not st actors and therefore the Amendment does not stop from enacting speech-restr路 policies. Institutions like are in their full right to d students take down Faceb(),9 pages that relate to PLU or i likeness. "Student Conduct came do on me and told me you 11e to step down and you need evaluate your position at PL and how this page represe PLU and you as a student ef community," Leon said.

JEFF DUNN Chief Copy Editor

dunnja@plu.edu

WORDS

Every student coming to Pacific Lutheran University listens to a mandatory lecture on diversity and inclusivity. Staff and faculty, though, have no required training in dealing with what's termed as "microaggressions." The Diversity Center defines microaggressions as "the everyday verbal, nonverbal and environmental insults, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory or negative messages to target persons based solely on their marginalized group status." That doesn't mean there aren't any options available. Faculty and staff attending their summer orientation had the option to attend a workshop on microaggressions led by Galen Ciscell (a visiting sociology professor) and Nicole Juliano (Assistant Director of the Diversity Center). "[During the conference]

we explored the taxonomy of microaggressions," Juliano said. "We talked about how microaggressions play out in our everyday lives and in the classroom." Eliminating microaggressions is about creating a safe space in the classroom, Ciscell said. In their workshop, they gave attendees the tools they'd need to identify the biases that everyone, whether they're aware or not, have. "We're living in a world where we all have these preconceived perceptions and biases, and many of those biases we don't know about until we discover that we have them," Juliano said. The workshop focused on educating people to find their biases and eliminate them. Additionally, PLU's Bias Incident Response Team (BIRT) is operational now and accessible via the Diversity Center's website. The BIRT's mission is to "strengthen and sustain an environment of respect, justice and care for all members of the PLU community." It serves as a way for students and staff to report incidents of explicit and implicit bias, and can respond accordingly to each incident.

"At the very minimum, I think its consciousness-raising." Juliano said. "We're beginning to create dialogue between students and the staff and faculty." Jenny James, an assistant professor of English, and currently teaches a course on American literature in which, one of the major themes is displacement within a community. She attended Ciscell and Juliano's workshop at orientation. "If there's a microaggression raised in the classroom, [the workshop] taught us to create a conversation of self-reflection," said James. "[The training] is a key step in all of us being a part of this diverse community that's working for a just world." There will be more workshops available to staff and faculty at the beginning of the spring semester on Feb. 3 at 8:30 a.m. in the Anderson University Center. "It's a lofty goal to eliminate bias and microaggressions in the world," Juliano said. "But we do hope to provide skills to our students, faculty and staff to engage in those difficult conversations."


2NEWS

THE MAST

OCTOBER 15, 2015

New exhibit hi,ghlights forgotten people The interactive exhibit diversity will show thats been present in Scandinavia since the Vikings. PARIS FRANKLIN Copy Editor

franklpm@pfu.edu Imagine walking into a room filled with exhibits from your time period. Imagine passing photos, blurbs of text and artifacts that represent the people living around you. Now, imagine continuing that trend and walking through every era all the way back into the time of Vikings. With the Scandinavian Center's new exhibit, you can do that.路 This January, the newest Pacific Lutheran University exhibit will be "Forgotten Nordics: Ethnic Diversity and National Narratives." The interactive exhibit will highlight diversity that's been present in Si;:andinavia since it was first inhabited.by Vcikings. Six different sections will.be present, beginning with the Viking age and going on to educate about religion, colonization, national romanticism myths, World War II and contemporary efforts of migration and inclusion of national identity. On Oct. 21, the Scandinavian Center will host a preview of the new exhibit and a round table discussion of modern global issues like the refugee crisis,in Europe. "The round table discussion is going to be really interesting," Hagstrom said.

PLU su HELEN SMITH News Writer

smithe@pfu.edu Although the march happened in Washington, D.C., addressing stereotypes and harmful representation is something Pacific Lutheran University's Diversity Center does every day. At PLU, a part of being a Lute is learning about and advocating for social justice. An important event in the history of advocacy is the Million Man March. On Oct. 16,. 1995, . a group of black men under the leadership of Louis Farrakhan gathered in Washington D.C. to protest their representation in the

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Hagstrom added that Troy Storfjell from the linguistics department and Angie Hamburg from the Diversity Center will be speaking alongside her. The full exhibit will debut during J-term, but Hagstrom and Ward wanted to give Lutes a chance to sit in with experts and begin learning before the display is even open. "It is going to be really exciting and cool and everybody should come see it when it is done," Hagstrom said. Overall, the exhibit' s goal is to edurnte "in the sense of all of the different groups that people don't talk about," said senior Chloe Hagstrom, an intern for the Scandinavian Center.

Scandinavian Center, Hagstrom is helping curate her second e.xhibit. This time around, she is in charge of writing the script for half of the exhibit; the bays on national romanticism myths, World War II and contemporary efforts of migration and inclusion of national identity. Ward will be currating the Viking age and religion bays, and Troy Stotjell, a Scandinavian studies professor, will cover the topic of colonization. While curation is nother ultimate goal, Hagstrom said she is very happy with her time in the Scan Center. "It is a really useful experience, especially thinking about anthropology and also archaeology because working with creating exhibits,

"Since not everyone is an anthropologist, you want people to read through the exhibit, walk through, look at the pictures and create this understanding for themselves." Chloe Hagstrom Senior

"Scandinavia is often talked about as homogenous and that's not true [... ] We have these different shifts of who is in and who is out," Hagstrom said. She and Elisabeth Ward, the lead curator of the Scandinavian Center, hope to send a message to students that says, "look at all of these different cool people that have been coming and going for thousands of years," Hagstrom said. One year after starting work for the

especially in a cultural setting, you're working with culture, you work with language - linguistics-and artifacts," said Hagstrom. She feels that curation "gives some really good life experience in how to put things into a readable or legible context for other people." After completing her study of anthropology and global studies with an emphasis in transnational movements and

cultural diversity, Hagstrom hopes- to go into foreign affairs in her home country of Norway. Hagstrom's Capstone studies how countries struggle with issues like Islamophobia and how national identity is then affected, and it is the main reason that Ward chose her to help curate the new exhibit. In the wake of so many tragedies caused by extremist groups, her focus surrounds the recent shift of racism to become cultural when a group moves countries as opposed to it being based on skin color. Hagstrom and Ward said they hope that upon leaving the exhibit, visitors will "recall different marginalized groups in the Nordic region and infer that the populations within the Nordic region are trying to embrace multicultural identity." While creating the exhibit, Hagstrom followed the question: "How do you translate this into something that anyone could come in and understand?" She recognizes the difficulty in created content that may be difficult to swallow for an average person. not everyone is an "Since anthropologist, you want people to read through the exhibit, walk through, look at the pictures, and create this understanding for themselves," said Hagstrom. While foot traffic is typical from community members and PLU alumni, Hagstrom wants to remind current Lutes that they are, of course, always welcome to drop in. "We try to be really inclusive. The Scan Center is not just for Scans or for Scan affiliated people, but for everyone. It is for anybody who wants to come in and learn about a different culture," elaborated Hagstrom.

arts million mile march media, an event that brought attention to many of the issues students at PLU are learning to address today. Their protest was recorded as the largest gathering of black men in history. Farrakhan, who is the current leader of the Nation of Islam, put together the Million Man March to provide a genuine representation of black men opposing the negative stereotypes that had been so often shown in the media, the Nation of Islam's website says. The March's significance has not dampened over time. The influential moment of black men reclaiming their image for themselves and vowing to better their community made its mark in history.

A history that Minister Farrakhan made plans to revitalize with an anniversary event at the national mall on October 10. Although such a long time has gone by since the original event, the gathering on October 10 deals with many of the same issues that it addressed in 1995 such as representation in the media, and issues within the black community. This year, the march is also to bring attention to violence toward black people by law enforcement, and the struggles of Native Americans dealing with poverty and land seizure. Other causes include the mistreatment of the Latino community and the struggles Latino women have getting paid the same as even women of other races, according to

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Million Man March. This year's million man march pictured above.

the Justice or Else website. The original march was more about a making a commitment to the black community and undermining harmful representation. The march this year will also centers around bringing attention to issues within societal systems which bring violence against minorities. "One way that the Diversity Center does that is through education, so we do lots of workshops," says Nicole Juliano, assistant director of the Diversity Center. Diversity Center workshops help to explore understandings of other people and our own identities, to understand where harmful thoughts and perceptions can come from. Some important parts of the representation on campus are the unintentional biases and stereotypes that people bring with them to school. These behaviors were discovered when people examine their own thought processes behind their language and actions. Part of the work that PLU does with representation is the "My Language My Choice" campaign, which addresses harmful language and its impact. Not only that, but the campaign works with people to help them own the impact when they use harmful language, which then hopefully spurs dialogue. The campaign on billboards in the Parkland and Tacoma areas to help spread awareness about harmful language. Language is an integral part of representation, says Ms. Juliano. "I think words that we hear, whether they're in the media or visuals or we're taught them or they're perpetuated in other systems, help develop the biases and perceptions that we have of others," she said. In this way, the "My Language My Choice" campaign is not only taking on harmful language but also the thinking behind the language we use that shapes our ideas about other people.


THE MAST

OCTOBER 15, 2015

Scholarships lend to greater opportunities MOLL¥ UNDALL News Writer

undallmj@plu.edu Do you feel like having a bit of extra money, but don't feel you have the time to work? Or maybe you're having trouble finding a job. One thing you can do, that will take less time than a full-time job, is apply for a scholarship. It's normal to apply for scholarships before attending college, but did you know that you can actually apply for scholarships even after you have started at Pacific Lutheran University? Most, if not all students, could probably use some more money. PLU has its own share of scholarships for students and they can all be found on PLU's website. These scholarships are often based on need or academic achievements, but there are other scholarships that you can apply for. If you go to thewashboard.org, you can create a profile and the site will show you scholarships that you're qualified for. Best of all: it's free. The site is specifically for Washington State residents or students at universities in Washington state. For those majoring in health care, engineering, science or mathematics, you can apply for the Washington State Opportunity Scholarship. Their goal is to expand college financial aid to a greater group of young people beyond the current state ·need pant which only reaches families with 70 percent of the median family income. Another place to search for a scholarships is Independent Colleges of Washington, icwashington.com. They award more than 1 million in scholarships each year. All of these scholarships are free to apply for, so what's to lose? Apply now, and get some extra cash for your 2016-2017 wallet. Keep in mind: When you enter/private information about yourself on the Internet, it's not always safe. Be sure to check the ratings of a site and Google it before you apply. You can also check the Federal Trade Commission for red flags. You can find these scholarships and more information at plu.edu/financialaid. Be sure to check application deadlines, because they're just around the comer. Applications for the 2016-2017 academic year will open in January.

NEWS3

How to Sound Smart About Mast Media Editor's Note: This year, Mast Media has transformed from a newspaper and news show into a multimedia platform for all types of student-produced content. We house news, art and student opinions in print, video and podcast form. With all the changes, I saw it fitting to take over the "How to Sound Smart" this week and explain how you can use Mast Media everyday. -Samantha Lund, Editor-in-Chief

Print Did you know you can read The Mast from anywhere on campus? Each week, The Mast is distributed on Thursdays to every building on campus. Once a month, Mast Magazine will be distributed to the same places. The Mast is the weekly newspaper and Mast Magazine is our monthly 16-page, glossy publication.

Pod casts The newest addition to Mast Media is Mast Radio. Mast Radio features news and student-produced content from LASR as well as podcasts from Mast Media's website. Unlike LASR, Mast Radio is scripted and planned student content. For show times, visit mastmedia.plu.edu under the "Pod casts" section.

l• CamRUS Safety Investigations Cs • ·Taken from weekly Campus Safety reports Medical Aid in Scan Center Campus Safety responded to a guest tripping over herself in the Scan Center. She sustained no injuries. She just needed help getting up. No further action was taken by CSAF.

Substance Abuse in Hinderiie The Resident Assistant on duty contacted CSAF when a resident made an allegation that his roommate was in possession of marijuana. After CSAF did a search no evidence was found. The incident was referred to Student Rights and Responsibilities.

Burglary in Anderson University During a regular patrol, CSAF noticed damage to the University House equipment shed. The engineer was contacted to secure a padlock on it. University House staff will conduct a thorough search to determine if anything had been stolen.


THE MAST

4NEWS

OCTOBER 15,

2015

Gun violence sparks questions on policy LIBBY POSTOVIT News Writer postovlg@plu.edu The topic of gun violence at college campuses is personal to Pacific Lutheran University. In May 2001, a man with no affiliation to PLU shot and killed James Holloway, a talented and well-loved music professor right outside of Hong International Hall. The gunman pulled the trigger on himself and died, leaving only a 16-page suicide note. Though PLU hasn't experienced any on-campus gun violence since then, gun violence has escalated at many other American college campuses. In 2015 alone, there have been over 20 campus shootings. Last week, three campus shootings occurred. Twelve people died and 13 people received serious injuries. To keep this in perspective, the average class size at PLU is less than 30 students. In light of past and recent tragedies related to gun violence, Lutes are determined to keep this campus bulletproof. First-years April Nguyen, and Seth Chapman believe in order to prevent campus shootings, it's important to evaluate certain aspects of our culture. •· --· Nguyen noted the prevalence· of video game violence among American you th. "Shooters have learned violent behavior from the video games they're exposed to," she said. Chapman believes that America's Cultural Obsession with freedom contributes to gun violence on college campuses.

"Our country values freedom above all Hofrenning. PLU administrators aren't blind else, and that means that we generally have a lot less regulations than other countries," to the relationship Hofrenning referenced. he said. "But at the same time, it's In a recent email to the student body, unfortunately not shocking when we see all President Thomas Krise and Vice President these school shootings, and it's impossible Joanna Royce-Davis shared the "University to not form that correlation." Plan" to prepare for emergencies such as Noting how deeply-rooted firearms are campus shootings. "PLU has plans and protocols in place for to American culture, junior, Hofrenning responding to calls for active shooter reinterpretation scenarios, as of the Second well as well Amendment. of rehearsed "I think response Second the tactics for Amendment a variety of talks about gun emergencies control in a and natural very different Theo Hofrenning disasters," context than we Junior they explained. think about gun "These plans control now," are regularly he explained. reviewed and "I think we have to understand where the Second updated." Regularly updated or not, most Lutes Amendment was coming from, where the idea was coming from, when they wrote won't know about these plans for a while. it (i.e. Revolutionary War). We have to The next campus-wide lock down drill will reevaluate the Constitution in a modern not take place until the Fall 2016 semester. First-year Laila Bevan believes more drills context." All Lutes interviewed expressed are necessary to ensure student safety. "I think it would be important to have concern that college students are often the perpetrators of campus gun violence. a drill during a time when people aren't They all cited "stress" brought about by in classes, because that's when we're most raging hormones, adult responsibilities, vulnerable if a shooter comes in," she and college coursework as the root of the said. "I think having drills when we don't expect them would be a way to prepare for problem. "There's some kind of relation between a campus shooting." Her point is especially this time in our lives and violence," added noteworthy because the 2014 shooting

"There's some kind relation between this time in our lives and violence."

at Marysville-Pilchuck High School took place during a lunch period. Nguyen believes that PLU should explain its safety plans and procedures all students on campus in a training course. "Knowing what to do would probably reduce the amount of aftershock and negative results of shootings happening on campuses," she said. Chapman believes that the problem is bigger than practicing lock down drills."There needs to be better access to mental health services so that people who are really stressed out don't drive themselves to the point where they go and shoot the school," he said. Junior Emily White thinks guns are too readily-available and regulations are too lax."Guns should be treated the way cars are treated in the sense that you get checks often to see if you're still qualified to be using one," she said. Sophomore Rachel Dimmig believes that the risk with guns far outweighs the reward on college campuses and in the United States as a whole."It would be so much better if we just stopped selling guns to people," she said. Along the same lines, junior DeVere Dudley suggests that a change in the Constitution could reduce the problem. "People could possibly even revoke the Second Amendment," he said. Only time can answer this question: will school policy and student ideas keep PLU bulletproof, or are these attempts to prevent campus gun violence only shots in the dark?

Community Corner:

Greetings from Hong ELISE ANDERSON News Writer anderser@plu.edu This week's Community Focus highlights the diverse residential life of Hong International Hall. Pacific Lutheran University's campus provides a variety of residence halls to students; Hong, however, stands apart as a global experience with a local address. This residential community houses approximately 75 students, but their impact is far reaching. Hong International Hall consists of six wings, five that focus specifically on language: Norwegian, Chinese, French, German and Spanish. The sixth wing provides residency to International Honors (or IHON) students. Hong encourages residents to pursue "global awareness, language immersion and cultural engagement" (PLU). Built in 1954 with name changes in 1966,

GRAPHIC BY ELISE ANDERSON

Hong and Hinderlie are seen as' sister halls' of campus. The school originally appointed Hong as North Hall, and Hinderlie as South Hall. The rededication of North Hall in 1966 honored Nils Joseph Hong, the University's third president. He served as president for 20 years and remained as a professor for an additional 20 years. Most notably, President Hong taught at least 12 subjects at the school. This comes as no surprise due to the hall's emphasis on global education. Sophomore Joel Earlywine lives in the Spanish wing of Hong. An Economics major considering a double major in Hispanic Studies, Joel will study abroad in Granada, Spain this spring. "I'm trying to think of how to describe it," he said. "I don't want to say eccentric, more like .. .it's like a family. And everyone in my wing speaks Spanish, so it makes studying easier." Joel went on to explain the community involvement of Hong, noting the variety

\ \-\o\-a! I \ive iY\ \-lo\'\~ \-la\\{ 11 wi tY"ljiY\~ -to .{;\.--;\'\\<'.. of \.--ow -to desc<i\?e. ;-t... \i1 s \i'f..e a

fawii\IJ. 6-veY"'joY\e i\'\ w-'j WiY\~ syea\'..s S'f'CIY\ish, so ;i wia\t..es siu~iY\~ easieY-. OV1e.

ihi\'\' abou-h Ho\'\~ ;s -thai yeoy le

~e LM'Cl'f..e SO LM'Cl\'\'j d;ffeY"E!-Vlt

"•Vlds

of food WoLM cliffer-e.V1i cu\iur-es ihai

ihe SWiel\s ca\'\ ~ei \c,,i\'\d of we;r-d!

-.)oe\ and number of wing and hall events offered. While appreciative of the presence of other language communities, the only downside for Joel is the clashing aromas of all the cultural cooking. With such a welcoming campus community, though, any passerby might certainly find opportunity to try some incredible homemade dishes. Bryn Benson, a first-year and intended Nursing major, also resides in the Spanish wing. She first heard about Hong from her older sister, who lived in the residence hall her first year at PLU as well. Bryn finds comfort living in the small community that bonds so well. "People that live in these communities are more interested in having this kind of a community," she said. "It's a community with a unifying feature - there's always one thing you have in common with everyone in the wing, which is the language." For Benson, the unity extends beyond her own hallway. She said she loves how she can go to the kitchen to wash dishes and end up having a 20-minute conversation with someone she doesn't know. While this residence hall may not be as warm as Harstad, the students of Hong International find warmth in the community of one another.

PLU offers students with culturally diverse backgrounds and interests a place like Hong to find peace and acceptance of like-minded people. You don't need to live there to explore the mixture of community and culture; the halls and residents of Hong await everyone. Hong International Hall's residents represent the world's future diplomats, travelers and international inspirations. Far away places and the cultures within them ignite the passion of this tight-knit community. For now, the community of Pacific Lutheran University can appreciate the impact and presence of these students, but soon enough they'll be sending their postcards from farther away.

For more information about Hong and other residence halls on campus, go to http://www. plu.edu/residential-life!residence-halls/.


OCTOBER 15,

THE MAST

2015

A&C5

AHA asks students to UnPLUg PARIS FRANKLIN Copy Editor franklpm@plu.edu

Swapping Sweaters Lutes traded a multitude of knitted garments on campus on Oct. 6 in the Commons. Thanks to the planning of Pacific Lutheran University's Residence Hall Association, many students participated in the first event of UnPLUgged. "The Sweater Swap was a huge success," senior Drew Huff, the sustainability director for RHA, said. Lutes were encouraged to come in with old sweaters and trade them out for new designs in the name of sustainability. "The most rewarding part was just hearing students say how cool the idea was," Huff said. Even if students didn't see advertisements, the second annual swap was placed in the middle of daily foot traffic in the Anderson University Center so that they would still see the event itself and become a part of it. Huff said students were so excited about the event that they are hoping to see another sweater swap, hopefully closer to Christmas so that further exchange of tacky . . sweaters can take place. The Goodwill offered their support. to the RHA by giving PLU 100 sweaters at a reduc~d- cost to start the sharing spirit, and Lutes brought in as many as four sweaters each, often-times only leaving with one. Many sweater enthusiasts traded out the old for the new, but RHA is pleased to announce that it is not only Lutes who will be getting new threads this season. Seventy-five sweaters and $121.66 were still left over to donate to the Tacoma Rescue Mission, just in time for the colder months. "We thought that bringing both the monetary donation and the sweaters to the Tacoma Rescue Mission would be more of an immediate response to help those in need," Huff said. "The Sweater Swap in particular is not just about wearing a sweater and turning down the thermostat during the winter to save energy, but it is also sustainable in the way of clothes exchange and then sharing that with the community." This year, the Sweater Swap adds to one of RHA' s

bigger goals surrounding the events of UnPLUgged: "all programming with purpose," said senior Bre Young, the president of RHA. "Students want to help-they want to be involved-especially on this campus, and it is cool that we can provide outlets for them to do that," explained Young. RHA partnered with Sustainability and Energy on campus to organize UnPLUgged this year. Each residence hall also has a sustainability representative, each of whom are welcome to plan their own events for their hall throughout the month. UnPLUgged began more than half a decade ago, starting with the "Hour of No Power," an event that remained consistent in UnPLUgged every year since.

Dropping Technology In recent years, UnPLUgged has turned into a month long schedule of events that encourage students to get out of their residence halls and participate in activities that don't require power. The halls are in competition with one another to try to use the least amount of energy; the power consumption of each hall during October is recorded and reported back to students. "The most exciting part for me has been, as president, I get to learn a lot," Young said. "I've been educated immensely about the actual sustainability processes as well as what goes on on campus already." She said she is happy that she has been able to gain the tools that have allowed her to create "better awareness and

education for students." When planning UnPLUgged, Huff and Young aimed to create events that are entertaining for college students. "Sustainability is big downer sometimes in the sense of where our world is going, so [UnPLUgged] brings some light and hope to it and a little bit of fun," Young added. "One big theme this year is the idea of tangible sustainability," Young said. Huff agreed, saying, "In the past, so much of UnPLUgged has been educational for students, and we are definitely still keeping that theme of educating students [... ] but something that I think is really special is making sustainability tangible. With events like the Sweater Swap, students are actually bringing something home to utilize. It is not just words that we are imprinting on people, but we are actually sharing things with people." Huff feels that while events like a documentary about climate change are great, they do not necessarily whip students into a fit of excitement. This year's documentary can be seen in Admin 101 on Oct. 20 at 7 p.m. Another event on campus this month is the "Hour of No Power" on Oct. 16. This year, Huff tried to add more events encouraging students to leave their residence hall. He believes that participating in events that require unplugging and leaving areas in which students usually use technology can be good practice to use less power. Scared of the dark? There is an acoustic concert in the Cave, a bonfire and glow in the dark Frisbee at Foss Field to keep Lutes occupied between 8 and 9 p.m. Along with the sweater swap, a documentary and the "Hour of No Power," Huff and Young are both looking forward to this year's Recycling Fashion Show. Huff said he is excited because he likes the idea behind the fashion show, "having teams of people designing an outfit made of recycled materials." Lutes can watch the fashion show Oct. 30 with a panel of judges who will deem how fashionable and sustainable each outfit really is. "I hope a lot of people are there to see it, otherwise they will really be missing out," Huff said. "The most satisfying part for me is the day of [each of the events]. I look forward to the rest of the month; there is so much to come!"

PHOTO COURTESY OF PLU MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

Tacoma Film Festival: "Tumbledown" is a let down GENNY BOOTS News @ Nine Producer bootsgj@plu.edu This was the whitest movie I have ever seen. "Tumbledown" (featuring Jason Sudeikis and Rebecca Hall) premiered for the first time on the West Coast Oct. 9 for the Tacoma Film Festival. Throughout the 105 minute movie, there was never a person of color on the screen. It was weird. "Tumbledown" follows a young widow named Hannah (Hall), whose late husband, Hunter Miles, was a famous folk singer. The surprise death of the singer and his continued post-mQrtem fame martyred him as a cult favorite. Hannah attempts to write Hunter's biography while living in his large shadow. Hannah's world is small-town northern Maine, where everything is worn leather and straight from L.L. Bean. There are tasteful animal skulls and indigenous blankets in the rustic lakefront home that Hannah shared with her husband. Enter: Andrew, a hip New Yorker and university professor. He is working on a book of his own, featuring Hunter Miles when Hannah asks for his help. The two team up to finish the biography. Throughout their week together, the two fall in love with the northeast winter as a backdrop. The movie features stunning shots of mountains and sunsets. There is a little comedy, a little love and exclusively white people. The mediocre plot and the lack of on-screen diversity was a disappointment. "Tumbledown" has been described as a "crowdpleaser" by the Hollywood Reporter and "easy watching for multiplex auds." I am not so sure if those "auds" who don't identify as a hip, wealthy Caucasian Northeasterner

would agree. Despite the ethical conversations this movie might spark for the more socially minded, the music was incredible, the landscape was remarkable and my wardrobe was inspired. "Tumbledown" premieres nationwide in February 2016. For more information about the Tacoma Film Fest, visit tacomafilmfestival.com.

PHOTO COURTESY OF HELLOARTDEPT.COM


THE MAST

6A&C

OCTOBER 15, 2015

Comedy: "Rumors" has it DINA LONGSTAFF Guest Writer

dlongstaff@plu.edu Need a midterms study break? Relax and watch other people humorously handle the troubles of life in Pacific Lutheran University's upcoming production of "Rumors." The colorful cast of 10 brings Neil Simon's comedy to life. Focused around an elegant 10th anniversary celebratory dinner, the possible suicide attempt of New York's Deputy Mayor starts the show. Guests run about trying to figure out what happened before the party. This farcical play clashes elegance with chaos as hectic situations ensue, but it's not the first time Simon's classic comedy has been on campus. The show first ran during the 1998-1999 theatre season. Seventeen years later, "Rumors" is coming back to PLU's stage, and this revival could not have come at a more bittersweet time. Professor William Becvar, the 1998 director, passed away Sept. 4, and the current production is now being dedicated in his honor. "I was a student of his; I became a colleague of his. It is kind of neat th<!J we WS!te doing the show when he passed," Rumors" dJri;ctor Jeff Clapp said. "It is kind of this nice· fu-it circle." Clapp was also the technical director of the 1998 production. He wanted to do "Rumors" again not only in honor of Becvar, but because it is a

"slamming-door farce." The actors run around and immerse themselves in the situational comedy of one-liners that are neatly strung together. "The actors are actually what brings the uniqueness to it. We have several new students in the play and that's unique," Clapp said. Energy and passion are certainly things that the cast feels they have poured into this production. "We have a great cast lined up ready to do great work," first-year actor Joshua Wallace said. Clapp is also certain that this play will have viewers falling out of their seats in laughter. "You can watch something on television and kind of go 'huh huh huh,' [ ... ] but you come into the theater with a large group of people out there and these actors running around on stage ... you're going to just laugh your face off," Clapp said. "You're going to have a blast. You're going to think this is one of the funniest things you've ever seen," Wallace added. Rumors will premiere in the Eastvold Auditorium Oct. 16, 17, 23 and 24 at 7:30 p.m., as well as Oct. 25 at 2 p.m. The student preview show is Oct. 15 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $3 for PLU students and alumni. They can be purchased at the door, or by calling (253)-5357441.

"REVIVAL" fails to revive Selena Gomez's career BROOKE THAMES A&C Editor thamesbe@plu.edu Former wizard and spring breaker ,. Selena Gomez recently took to the New York Times to complain about how she isn't respected as a real musical artist. While the onand-off actress' new album is titled "Revival," it does next to nothing to revive Gomez's already nonexistent singing career. dropped "Revival" Friday Oct. 9 and consists of 11 tracks (14 on the deluxe). Despite presenting over a dozen songs, the greatest thing about the album is quite possibly the cover which is plain to say the least. "Revival" kicks off with the title track and seals the doomed fate of the entire record in the first five seconds. Instead of opening the album with a punchy pop beat, Gomez's speaking voice (which might be better than her singing one) rambles some extremely needless words about being "blinded" and "reborn." "Revival" as a song isn't bad, but the awkward, unnecessary monologue in the beginning definitely sets the melancholy and overdramatic tone of the album. Most of the subsequent tracks are just a long list of basic pop songs that fail at hitting the "trendy" mark that Gomez was obviously going for. Over-synthesized beats and oddly-pitched background vocals are just some of the follies that plague tracks like "Kill Em With Kindness," "Sober" and "Survivors." Songs that aren't painfully bland are just a bit over-the-top. Reminiscent of "Come & Get It," "Body Heat" tries far too hard to sound cultural. Equipped

with a confusing beat and distracting saxophone, the song feels misplaced among the other tracks. Similarly, Gomez's single "Good For You" lacks a steady musical flow and fails to hit the "trendy pop" mark previously mentioned. Perhaps Gomez should focus less on looking good for us and focus more on sounding good for us instead. While "Revival" is not a great album, it does have its gems. Single "Same Old Love" is strange, but in a really interesting and almost genius way. The mechanical sound of the piano riff keeps the song consistent and simple, while Gomez's vocals present ancreative melody. The deep voice that appears during the breakdown also presents an excellent example of autotuning done right. The third track, "Hands To Myself," showcases an excellent beat which is both fun and unique. Gomez's crazily unspectacular singing voice is masked as she whispers majority of the song, which complements her non-existent vocal range. And while "Revival" may not begin on a strong note (or a note at all), it definitely ends with something better. "Rise" closes out the album with an excellent chorus that verges on anthem-like. "Rise" is earthy and and full, but unfortunately lacks the layering to be as robust as it could be to finish the album with a bang. While Gomez's first adult album is not a terrible record, it's definitely not album of the year. She may have named the record "Revival," but Gomez is going to need to revive a lot more if she wants to be taken seriously in the music industry.

Thomas & Molly's Music Reviews: Mato ma THOMAS FLATMOEN & MOLLY LINDALL fl' • Mast Radio Arts & Culture DJs undallmj@plu.edu

"Revival" Tracklist

•••

1. Revival . .

. 2. Kill Em With Kindness 3. Hands To Myself ~ ~ ~ ~ 4. Same Old Love ~ ~ ·~ ~ 5. Sober** 6. Good For You 0.. 7. Camouflage o_o 8. Me & The Rythm ~ 9. Survivors* 10. Body Heat 11. R 1se ~ . . ~-. 12. Me & My Girls (deluxe) 00 -

0

*

13. Nobody (deluxe) 14. Perfect (deluxe)

******

The last few years, the world has seen a massive wave of Scandinavian house DJs emerging. First Avicii, then Kygo and now all we want is Matoma. The Norwegian DJ initially gained popularity for his remixes of pop songs. His throwback remix of The Notorious B.I.G.'s "Old Thing Back" led to record companies expressing interest in his productions. The 24 year old Matoma (whose real name is Tom Lagergren) produces music in the tropical house genre, and has created his own sound with his remixes. His biggest hits are fun remixes of "old" hits, such as "Payphone" by Maroon 5. Matoma brings life to old songs, and we love it. His first original song "Try Me" is found on Jason Derulo's new album "4," «· featuring Jennifer Lopez. Matoma is - ~ playing The Showbox in ·" Seattle Friday, Oct. 16. If you can't make it to his concert, check him out on Spotify or Soundcloud. And of course we will play his songs on our show Thomas. & Molly in the Morning on Mast Radio, every Tuesday 8-9a.m.

·t:


OCTOBER 15,

2015

THE MAST

A&C7

Black & Gold Affair: Homecoming in pictures MCKENNA MORIN Mast Photographer morinmn@plu.edu

Plenty of Lutes showed up to show out at Homecoming 2015 Oct. 10 at the Pacific Grill Event Center. Two hundred and fifty students attended Pacific Lutheran University's "Black & Gold Affair" and danced the night away.


8 FEATURE

THE MAST

I~

SAMANTHA LUND & BROOKE THAMES Editor-in-Chief and A&C Editor

mast@plu.edu

The New York Times published a stor two weeks ago about millenials and ot obsession with rap, hip-hop, and R&l When looking at music streaming an purchases, it's become clear that youngÂŁ generations streams more, buys les, Looking at which music is the most activ on streaming services like Spotify an Apple Music sheds light on the mm popular music for millennials. In maybe the least shocking news a week, hip-hop and R&B topped those list1 with specific occurrences being cited as th


CT. 15, 2015

recent album releases of Drake, Kendrick Lamar, A$AP Rocky and The Weeknd consistently topping charts with a large margin over other genre. The highlight for rock and alternative music lovers was Mumford and Son's newest album "Wilder Mind" which was streamed 15.4 million times in May. However big that number seems, compare it to Drake's "If You're Reading This It's Too Late" that was streamed 48 million times in one week and Kendrick Lamar's "To Pimp A Butterfly" which was streamed 38 million times during its opening month. 路 Mast Media wanted to take a look inside campus culture and see if we're like the rest of the country: hip-hop and l\&B fa碌atics. What we found was a little off the ]:)_eaten path. -.. -

v

FEATURE9


10

OPINION

THE MAST

OCTOBER 15, 2015

Warning: satire at play Student to train PLU squirrels JULIA GROSVENOR Opinion Writer grosvejm@plu.edu Myra Maines, a Pacific Lutheran University junior, approached reporters this week with claims that she plans to train the campus s uirrels. "We've a 1 1

thought about it. It's time someone steps up and does it. And that someone is me," she said. Maines clarified that she was not afraid of students knowing her as the master of the squirrels She doesn't however, want to get in trouble. She claimed this mission is "too important to be stopped by Campo or the Humane Society or whatever." According to the Revised Code of Washington, it is illegal to possess wildlife without a license, but it doesn't say anything about training wildlife in the wild, so anything else is supposedly for PLU to decide. "There are a few reasons why I've decided I need to do

this now," the woman said, "the first is that the squirrels are out of control." Indeed, there have been reports around campus of squirrels frightening students by yelling from trees or jumping out at them from trash cans. "If I can train the squirrels, it would definitely teach them that humans are friends." The student also claims to have personal reasons for training the squirrels, involving her own safety. "Campus Security is all the way on the edge of upper campus, so if I'm really in trouble, it will at least take them a couple minutes to get to me. But squirrels are everywhere. If someone tries to steal my money, I could just blow

a

whistle, and boom. The thief is surrounded by squirrels," she said. The student added that if administration' got on board,' she could use the squirrels to solve some other campus problems. One example Maines listed was the apparent infestation of bats in Ramstad building. "Let me in there with a few highly trained squirrels, and we11 take care of those little monsters,"

she said. Finally, Maines told reporters the reason she approached The Mast with her master plan: she has no idea how to train squirrels. "I tried throwing one of them a cracker and it ran up a tree," she admitted. She asks any readers who may have experience or even ideas for squirrel training to reach out to her. The Mast has agreed to accept emails and continuously refresh Yik Yak on her behalf.

ANNIE BUNCH Cartoonist buncha/@plu.edu Annie is a first-year student originally from Port/and, Oregon. She loves the visual arts and is happily attending PLU in pursuit of studying art history and studio arts.

Kill the Chill CARLY STAUFFER Opinion Writer stauffce@plu.edu I'd like to click pause on "Netflix and chill." Actually, I'd like to cancel my subscription. Ever since I first heard the phrase just a few weeks ago, it seems this trendy sexual euphemism is everywhere. "Netflix and chill," described by the ever-so-eloquent Urban Dictionary as "going to go over to your [partners'] house and [having sex] with Netflix in the background," combines the modern stereotypical teenager's favorite things: sitcoms and sex. Perhaps I don't appreciate this convenient term as I ought to. Perhaps I'm taking a slang term too seriously. Or perhaps our "anything goes" society would benefit from actually evaluating its habits and tendencies, and considering their deeper connotations and harmful effects. I haven't seen much rallying behind the latter side so, naturally, 111 take that one. It's not only that I find the phrase slightly annoying - I find it dangerous. I know what you might be thinking: Don't be such a conservative, Carly! However, I'm not trying to change your mind. Think of this as practicing a "[life] of thoughtful

inquiry!" (That's got to get me some PLU brownie points.) "Netflix and chill" represents our society's desire to make sex as casual and commonplace as possible. The phrase suggests that we treat something that should be meaningful as though it's equivalent in significance to watching an episode of "The Office." It accurately reflects culture's this yearning to isolate the physical component of sex from its non-physical meaning. You may be wondering why I view sex as so meaningful in the first place. Here's why: my faith in God and belief in the Bible tells me God created sex and He created it for marriage. Outside of this context, sex is misused. The Bible tells me that my body's a temple, and I can either use it to glorify God or to ignore Him and give in to temptation.

A critique of our generationls new favorite slang-term: "Netflix and Chill"

Rather than call our actions "wrong," though, we humans like to make excuses for them. Enter the convenient philosophy of hedonism (meaning, if it makes you feel good, do it)! A favorite excuse for misusing sex comes from reducing it to something as casual as a fun pastime (like watching Netflix). "It's no big deal," says this generation. "It's just sex." And the more present sex is in our media and conversations, the more casually we come to view it. In cleverly stripping sex of its meaning, we're left with all the thrill without the hassle. No wrongdoing, no need to commit or make any promises - just pure, fun sex. "Netflix and chill" says sex is not so much a special bond between a monogamous, committed, (dare I say, married) couple. It's a pastime. It's 100 percent physical. You

can do it with anyone. You can do it while watching Netflix. It's basically green eggs and ham. Regardless of moral or religious values, I believe most can accept that this increasing expectation to have sex without much hesitation is damaging to relationships. It tells us that the physical component of a relationship is its most important aspect. At this point, the relationship can all too easily revolve around sex. Which might be fun, thrilling and passionate at first. And then, void of meaning, the relationship will die. It will feel empty. The sex isn't enough anymore. Now all you have is the Netflix, which doesn't even have the Harry Potter movies. The increasing tendency to make sex as casual as possible is a costly one. "Netflix and chill" may be written off as harmless slang - but I believe our language is reflective of our traditions and values. Thus, this commonplace catchphrase is evidence of a hedonistic culture embracing sex with open arms and no strings attached. While some Lutes might - in the words of the recent 'Sex Column' - accuse me of being "sexually congested," I'm not too concerned about my apparent sexual headcold. I personally would rather have a stuffy nose than be blind.


THE MAST

OCTOBER 15, 2015

OPINION

11

THE RIGHT TO DIE DINA LONGSTAFF Guest Writer dlongstaff@plu.edu On Oct. 5, California governor Jerry Brown signed the "Right to Die" law into action, making physician-assisted suicide legal. California joins Oregon, Washington, Vermont and Montana who all have similar bills. Legalizing physician-assisted suicide allows doctors to prescribe lethal doses of drugs for patients to take in the comfort of their own home or in a hospital. Patients must be terminally ill and have two physicians verify that they have less than six months to live to qualify. This is not enough. While six months may spare patients with cancer or other diseases pain and suffering, many terminal i_]Jnesse~ .路can take years to develop. There are even some non-fatal diseases that cause a massive decrease in quality of life, making daily life unbearable, and still don't qualify for

physician-assisted suicide. This summer I worked as a Certified Nursing Assistant in a nursing home that specializes in hospice care. I cannot put into words how it feels to watch someone die. To know that the pain and suffering is consuming them. To know that it isn't going to end soon. To know it will be dragged on for months or even years. It is not the way I want to go and I do not wish it upon anyone else. Parkinson's disease is by far the hardest to watch. In general patients lose control over their bodies and become unable to eat, stand, walk and do everyday tasks without assistance. Most patients in their later stages need full-time care. The worst part is that their brains do not deteriorate. One patient described it to me as "living in her own tomb." They know and understand what is going on around them but cannot do anything about it. It broke my heart to have people beg me to kill them because all they want to do is leave the pain. To this day the screams of my first

Parkinson's patient haunt me: "Please kill me! Oh, God, please kill me! What the f*** do I have to live for anymore?!" Yet Parkinson's is not labeled as a fatal disease. Anyone diagnosed with it would not be able to escape the inevitable suffering through physkianassisted suicide. And even if it was fatal, Parkinson's takes years to develop and can leave people immobile and helpless for long periods, not just the short six months needed to qualify for physicianassisted suicide. Even if you have moral or religious oppositions to the bill, put yourself in their shoes for a second. You have just been told you have Parkinson's disease. You know that it is going to consume you for years until you eventually cannot do anything. The doctor tells you that you will be at higher risk for things like dementia, bedsores and infections because you will become immobile. Shouldn't people have the option to escape that? We empower young adults to grab life by the horns and make it their

own, shouldn't people be in charge of their death, too? I commend Governor Brown and the other four states for giving patients the opportunity to end their lives on their own terms with dignity, and I hope that other states will soon adopt similar laws. However, these laws should not only grant the right to die for terminally ill patients given six months to Jive but should expand for patients with conditions that will dramatically decrease their quality of life such as dementia, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. I realize there are a lot of people who will not agree with me on this. But I challenge you to look into the eyes of someone begging you to kill them and not feel an obligation to let people meet death on their own terms. Physicianassisted suicide may not be something you choose for yourself or for a loved one, but it is an option that should be on the table.

Shame photo leakers, not victims their own body and willing to share that comfort with another person, shouldn't that be considered beautiful rather than shameful? Shouldn't someone be allowed the freedom of sexual liberation, particularly within a private or consenting partner setting? Now, should someone who is posting or sending these types of photos be mindful of possible outcomes? Yes, they should. Unfortunately, there will be always be a possibility of negative consequences when carrying out an action, but with that being said, the exposure of someone's personal photos should not be used as ammunition against them. If anything, it should be used as ammunition towards those who leaked the photos. Exposing someone's nude photos or blackmailing someone with their nude photos is what's wrong with this equation. Legally, those who release media without the consent of those involved could be charged for committing a sex crime, but it's not always easy for those charges to go through, nor is the offender ever really mentioned in a negative light. If focus should be directed towards anyone, it should be against those who committed a crime and breached privacy. The focus shouldn't be on those who've had their trust taken advantage of. Overall, as a sexual human being, doing what you want with your body (within terms of personal safety) and wanting to show off your body are all okay. Someone taking advantage of that is not. So, with that being said, flaunt what you got if you want; don't let others bring you down.

MARISOL ESPINOSA Opinion Writer espinomr@p/u.edu

Editor's Note: Anyone under the age of 18 sending nude photos of themselves is categorized as distribution of child pornography. For the purposes of this article, it's important for readers under the age of 18 to remember that distribution of nude photos of themselves is illegal. Don't break the law, friends! At a young age, I distinctly remember an obnoxious MTV commercial of a girl in a towel listing off how her sext message was going to ruin her career and relationships with other people, present or future. It didn't sit well with me then when I was absorbing that information, and it doesn't sit well with me now either. Our society says, "Don't send nude photos of yourself because you're giving someone power to ruin your life." Thus, there is the possibility someone will take advantage of this sexual exchange. It blows my mind that this line of thinking still exists. It correlates with victim blaming. Being in a sexual relationship encourages trust between two people, but if one person was to cause a rift in that trust, we've come to shame the victim, especially if the victim is female. In our culture, discussion surrounding sex and sexual topics is still incredibly taboo, which contributes to a lack of needed sex positivity. If someone is comfortable with

Letter to the Ed tor

Editor's Note: Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University President, Martha Spieker is responding "The elephant in the room " in the most recent edition of The Mast. Hello Lutes, As we dig into the school year, I am glad to see so much conversation regarding inclusive dialogue on campus. I was intrigued to read the most recent issue of The Mast, which detailed the sentiments of some conservatives on campus. Pacific Lutheran University' s mission statement does indeed place a large importance on community, and that value is something that Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University seeks to encourage and support. The importance of a diversity of voices

/

on campus is critical. Hearing from people who do not think like us is how we grow. It's how we challenge our perceptions. It's also how we practice radical inclusivity. We need to be certain that the Lute culture is a place where everyone can be included in dialogue- and that goes for voices of minorities as much as it does for conservatives. I appreciate the sentiment of the published article, but also think it's important to recognize the context in which these conversations and struggles occur, acknowledging those who may feel hurt by the language used and comparisons made. ASPLU intends to continue creating spaces for dialogue to ensure that the student body can hear one another, and that those messages can be passed accurately to the administration. As I mentioned

in my convocation speech, ASPLU and the student body are only successful when we collaborate. It is ASPLU's job to provide forums to have conversations about inclusivity of all kinds to the PLU community. ASPLU will do just that. Be on the lookout for conversations and forums like Senator Steve Schumaker' s discussion about guns on college campuses towards the end of this month and other "ASPLU to You" forums. Each individual voice is valued on campus. Let's be sure to continue these conversations as a community that thoughtfully welcomes all Lute voices. Warmly, Martha Spieker ASPLU President


12

OPINION

THE MAST

OCTOBER 15 , 2015

Head to head

in response to Miley Cyrus

1

dreadlock hairstyle

Editor's note: For the sake of the argument, both writers are identifying as white, female feminists.

Locked on locks Dreading the impact PARIS FRANKLIN Copy Editor franklpm@plu.edu Every person living in a free society h as a right to enjoy their own appearance. In today's America, however, this is increasingly difficult; judgement is imminent for anyone who does almost anything to alter their physical self. Adding in the issue of what is "appropriate" for each race further complicates the matter and makes for discomfort surrounding personal decisions because of the reactions of others. What a person d oes w ith their h air is a ch oice that should not be scrutinifed until it directly affects others. k p ersorr.sh ould not have a right to judge the action -of another until they fully understand why-said person made th at d ecision. I am Jewish and I h ave half of my h air crocheted into dreadlocks. I fully support any individual's right to the same selfexpression that I was using nearly six months ago when I first had my hair professionally locked. I am not defending Miley. Rather, I am defending those who ari;i criticized for locking their hair when they are told that they don't deserve to do so. Dreadlocks once represented religious implications (ie. in Biblical times, the connection between a person and G-d was often cemented by the locking of the hair). The creation of dreadlocks allowed a person to prove their commitment to live a life of few material possessions, combs included. In the Old Testament, the Nazirite Oath includes a rule that requires followers to let hair grow as it pleases. In another section of the Hebrew Bible, the story of Samson, a character with seven dreadlocks that contain his superhuman abilities and represent his relationship with G-d, is present. When his dreadlocks are cut off, he loses his power and is killed by his enemies. It was these two pieces in JudeoChristian religious texts that first inspired the Rastafarians in the Caribbean to regard dreadlocks as a holy addition to one's physical appearance. This is the first time that dreadlocks became associated with African-Americans and not those of Caucasian descent. This idea that dreadlocks were reserved only for sacred people was a short-lived trend, to say the least. Dreadlocks quickly became a part of popular culture figures like Bob Marley came on to the scene. While Marley held dreadlocks in the same spiritual regard as many Rastafarians still do, a vast

majority of people who were inspired to lock their hair because of him didn't. Dreadlocks developed in multiple different places under different circumstances. To think that people today who get them are trying to prove a religious belief (and therefore they are being disrespectful when they do so) is about as realistic as thinking that all people who braid their hair are hateful towards Native Americans or Scandinavians. I understand the fear of taking something that was not mine to begin with and trying to make it m y ow n. I understand that as a white person, I cannot ever feel my ancestors went through anything as horrific as black people have in the country we currently live in. The stru ggle that I can understand, however, is the struggle of my Jewish ancestors in World War Two and throu gh out history. I also recognize that the definition of cultural appropriation is w hen a group w h o has power w ithin a culture takes on traits of an oppressed group in th at same society. I bring this up because I believe that people of color are just as entitled to their culture as I am entitled to my own Jewish culture, and I understand that these two groups in particular have been oppressed by the same group of people. I should feel no more guilt for admiring the hairstyle of another culture than I would for wearing a T-shirt with words in French on it or having a friend of Latin descent who drives a model of car entitled "Cherokee." There is a difference between cultural appropriation and cultural exchange. There is a difference between a person doing something as a part of a religion and doing it because they like the concept of it. Not only did I get dreadlocks to tame my coarse, frizzy hair and take advantage of the same ease of style as a black person who also doesn't want to have to spend a lot of time working with a natural hair texture would, but I also got them because I do not feel that it is fair to say th at dreadlocks are only allowed within one culture of people. I hope that those of AfricanAmerican ancestry do not feel I am disrespecting them by having dreadlocks and that people of any genetic background do not ever see me as culture-stealing or racist. I hope that outside parties recognize my right to have my hair in a style that is convenient for me and that shows my admiration for something that is so trivial as my own hair before they jump to the conclusion that I didn't know what I was doing when I got dreadlocks.

SANNA VARGAS Copy Editor vargassi@plu.edu Recently, Miley Cyrus has served as a host of both the MTV Video Music Awards and Saturday Night Live. During her times as host, she has continued to surprise and intrigue us all with her wacky, revealing costumes and brand new dreadlocks. The debut of her new look was definitely sh ocking, but not in the way Miley intended it to be. As a disclaimer, I am a white, female feminist. Wait, before any of you stop reading, I want to express my belief that everyone, regardless of group memberships, should reserve the right to dress how they please as long as their choice does n o harm to other people. For instance, if Miley decided to sh ow up on stage ass-out, wearing n othin g but a cowboy hat, I would support her choice. With this in mind, I want to address what was truly shocking about Miley' s appearance at the VMAs and on SNL. It was not her wild, off-the-beaten-path antics nor her revealing outfit choices with which Miley intended to shock audiences that brought me to address her behavior. It was the negative impact of her choices, and her failure to recognize it, that I found to be outrageous. With every choice comes a repercussion, and I was abhorred to see that Miley failed to anticipate the harmful consequences of her choice to wear and appropriate dreadlocks, which have a deep, significant history within black culture. Cultural appropriation, a phrase which seems to be gaining more traction in popular culture, is when groups that hold privilege adopt cultural elements from an oppressed group of people. The Diversity Center's Rieke Fellow for Intergroup Dialogue Maria Cruse explains it simply as, "taking something away from somebody without permission so that permission is ... a key aspect of it." Miley has set a precedence of culturally appropriating and exploiting oppressed people for the sake of her on-screen

Do you have an opinion? Write us a Letter to the Editor at mast@plu.edu and see yourself published in The Mast.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

SPORTS EDITOR

CHIEF DESIGNER

ASSISTANT PRODUCER

Samantha Lund lundsr@plu.edu

Steven McGrain

Colton Walter

Sarah Giomi

COPY EDITORS

~\~[AST

OPINION EDITOR

Courtney Miranda NEWS EDITOR

Jeff Dunn Paris Franklin Hannah Soltis Sanna Vargas

David Mair

THE MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447

appearance. She is guilty on multiple offenses for sexualizing black bodies in her music videos, using black slang, having a dream catcher tattoo (which appropriates Native American culture) as well as perpetuating other equally offensive behaviors. With the addition of her dreadlocks, Miley takes on a whole new level of ignorance. Her hairstyle is harmful and ignorant because it's not fair for people of color who choose to wear non-chemically altered hairstyles, like dreadlocks, and are discriminated against because of their choice. For example, in March of 2014, the U.S. military prohibited soldiers from wearing d read locks, twists, afros and other natural hairstyles. After receivin g an uprising of adverse responses to the n ew regulations, the Army, Air Force and N avy h ave since authorized twists, althou gh the natural h airstyle is still high ly regulated. Dreadlocks and afros remain unauthorized. As a privileged, white celebrity who has a larger opportunity than most to influence others, Miley has a great responsibility to recognize her place of privilege and use it to combat racial inequalities as opposed to contributing to them. Although she may not intend to cause harm, Miley must realize that regardless of intent, her actions still have a negative impact. In a similar way, I encourage all others, especially those in my Pacific Lutheran University community, to recognize the impact of their actions, regardless of their intent. Fortunately, cultural appropriation, as well as other contributions to racial inequalities, can be prevented. Miley should understand the history behind the appearances she adopts from other cultures before deciding whether to display them. If upon discovering that wearing a certain style may have a harmful impact on the culture from which it comes, I would advise her to find a new look. I welcome all members of the PLU community to adopt this method as well. "It's everyone's responsibility [to educate] ... about issues like this because it affects all of us," says Cruse.

MAST

TV

GENERAL MANAGER

Samuel Allenberger

Matthew Salzano salzano@p/u.edu

ACADEMIC ADVISOR

Joanne Lisosky

A&C EDITOR

CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER

Brooke Thames

McKenna Morin

Genny Boots

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The responsibility of The Mast is to discover, report and istribute information to its readers about important issues, events nd trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists ode of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and dvertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mast

EQUIPMENT & TECHNOLOGY ENGINEER

staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@pfu.edu by 5 p.m. the Monday before publication. The Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters to length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academi year. To subscribe, email mast@pfu.edu.


13 SPORTS

THE MAST

OCTOBER 15, 2015

Steve's Stance: Lutes Football Mid-Season Grade STEYE MCGRAIN

Sports Editor mcgraist@plu.edu

Pacific Lutheran football continues to leave points on the field as they suffer a heartbreaking loss to Willamette, 10-9. The Lutes' offense was tinable to put the ball in. the endzone,Junior Quarterback Jon S&aub did not necessarily have a terrible outing, but missed a few opportunities. On a fourth and seven for PLO,, Schaub felt pressure ft,Qtn left Side, and st~pped up in tl\epOOJ<et to the right, but ultimately did not trust his offensive line and decided to run.for first down. The offense was in thetedz<>ne and, ~d have settled.Jor a £teld goal, but ~t for it arid ~ded up With nothing. The inability to finish is a kryptonite that 'Ollr~.PAiteJ1$e.;

.ms.

to fi~e out. In the four games.<:>£ the season, they have only been able to score two touchdowns in the second half, The two came during the fourth quatt~s in the h<m1e opener agaipst Trinity and the N()J:thwest Con(.:i:i•e,tce opener at Pacific. This offense is certainly capable of putting points on the scoreboard, but they have yet to finish in games. . During t~ .first half of the game against California Lutheran, the Lures proved. impressive for players starting for the first time in their. <:ollegiate. careers. The rhythm ~ &:haub and. his re<:eive:tswas therexwith him mtting them on their roures, Ever since, the offense has gone astray. In every game, halfffirte. js meant to make ents. Fot~me rea~ po one o correct theit miSmkes or even give the idea a chance. Sticking with the initial game-

plan.has led to field goals and nqthing else. The impact of how solid the graduated offensive and defensive units ts becoming a harsh reality .for this.year's team. They were the class with the most wins while Head Coach Scott Westering has been at the helm. The graduating class had winning percentage of 74 percent. At the halfWay point ·U;t. all game$ of the season so far, the te®l is there but just can't figure out how to close out games. Each side of the ball needs to finish es. The offense ~\tQ.figure to score.~ven points on any given,. drive, m~t just settle tor field , tflere

them.

In the sect)t\d half <>f the seasan,.th.e Lutes should be able to notch three wins out of the final five ~ games, and complete the year at 3-6 '1>ig ptay/t or overan ··tecOrd with. a lot of promise

needs .to in not

g up ge~ ~pponents 9i tl)e field.

They DiviSibn-III

groommg the offense with his style of play. Junior wide receivers Juston Lind and Ben Welch, along with sophomore tight end D.J. Winter, are veterans who will develop into a fantastiq receiving group. The defense will continue to perform consistently like they have been for the last five years. It has been a tough .first half of the season for a young team of Lut~1 but they have an opPQrtunity to continue to mature into a solid high-powered offense with a stingy defense to compliment

~

ate now

experienced

pltlyerS. The with Schaub

oon~

f()r fU~years.

Grade: D - dose, but nee<f•· to add a little more for the first win of the

season.

The Mast Monday Night Football pick 'em Editor's Note: Pacific Lutheran's student body picks who will win and the reason behind their choice. We started this Week 2, that is why it represents five games.

The off-season acquisition For back to back weeks, the officials have had their effect on running back DeMarco Murray is a National Football League game. a beast on the field. With no more First, it was #Batgate in Seattle ' running back by committee in with linebacker K.J. Wright Philly. Giants with the win, 21-17. tapping the ball out of bounds. Now , in the Steelers game vs the Chargers, 18 seconds ran off the clock without anyone realizing it. What kind of controversy are we going to witness in the city of Brotherly Love? The New York Football Giants are beginning to find their stride on offense. Veteran quarterback Eli Manning of the Giants' playing similar to what brought him two Super Bowl rings. Wide receiver O'Dell Beckham Jr. is an absolute force to be

GIANTS

AT

reckoned with on the outside for New York and a massive problem for Philadelphia. After being out two consecutive seasons due to injury, quarterback Sam Bradford is continuing to stay healthy.

EAGLES

D.J. Winter Pick: Giants Record: 3-1

''I'm going to go Giants on this one, because they showed a lot of resiliancy last week against the 49ers and they're going to ride the momentum from that."

Nicoya Benham-Marin Pick: Giants Record: 2-2

"Giants, because they have a better and more experience defense."

Juston Lind Pick: Eagles Record: 2-2

"Eagles. A match up of two pretty even teams in regards for numbers put up this season. I think, however, the Eagles have a bit more they need to prove, being 2-3."

Tahlia Terhune Pick: Giants Record: 3-1

"I think the Giants! They've won three in a row and they could very well be 5-0 instead of 3-2 if it wasn't for them blowing two big 4th quarter leads at the beginning of the season."

Traeger Jarrad

"The Eagles represent all that is American. The animal themselves are majestic, yet fierce, just like any American. Giants, on the other hand; trolls and other unamerican beast-things come to mind. Watch the Eagles soar high above the Giants."

Pick: Eagles Record: 3-1

Hayden McCartney "I like the weapons the Giants have and surprisingly their defense has done well. Eagles have had shaky quarterback play Pick: Giants and haven't been able to put a full game together." Record: 4-0 Kailyn Osaki Pick: Giants Record: 2-2

"Eli Manning is coming back into his Super Bowl form and with O'Dell Beckham on the outside, the Giants should win this game against the Eagles."

Fantasy Football: Week 6 RECAP FROM WEEK 6: Another WeQk in the NFL, another star goes down due to a leg injury. Kansas City running back Jamaal Charles is done for the year with a tom ACL seahawks rookie running back Thomas Rawls totals 169 rushing yards and a touchdown against a Cincinnati defense that had not allowed rushing touchdown in the Urst four weeks. This week you Should consider;

a

QUARTERBACK: Tom Brady, New England Patriots Brady and company travel to Indianapolis on Sunday night for a match-up. If you think Brady doesn't want to annihilate the Colts for Deflategate, you are wrong. The

SLEEPER: Charcandrick West, Kansas City Chiefs With running back Jamaal Charles ending his season due to injury, a new lead back needs to emerge for Kansas City. They do have veteran Knile Davis, but West is more elusive. Pick him up and play against the Vikings.

IGHT END: Rob Gronkowski, New England Patriots Brady's favorite target against the Colts, enough said.

Patriots should come close to scoring 50+ points and Brady will have a field day.

RUNNING BACK: Adrian Peterson, Minnesota Vikings Peterson Should be able to continue his dominance on the field. His week 6 match..up is against the Chiefs, wtio have a dttftet.tltdefense, but Peterson doesn't seem to care who the opponent is putting out on defense.

DEFENSE/SPECIAL TEAMS: Green Bay Packers San Diego's Tight End Antonio Gates is back for quarterback Philip Rivers, but the Packers defense is all of the field. Lam beau Field will be a hostile environment for the Chargers.

KICKER: Steven Hauschka, Seattle Seahawks WIDE RECEIVER: Allen Robinson, Jacksonville Jaguars Yes, tight end Julius Thomas will become quarterback Blake Sortie's favorite target, but he will also be the defense's main cover. Robinson should have one-on-one coverage all day against Houston.


THE MAST

14 SPORTS

Student-Athlete Spotlight

CHRISTIAN BOND Sports Writer bondco@plu.edu

PHOTO COURTESY OF KYLE HESS: (12) Ben Welch sets himself to field a grounder.

Junior Ben Welch is a starter on both the football and baseball teams at Pacific Lutheran University. The Mast s-at down with him to answer some qf your questions and to ask some of our own. Mast Media: What is your spirit animal? Ben Welch: I would probably go with, a bald eagle. I've had a cabin out in Hood Canal my whole life and there are tons of bald eagles up there. It's fun to watch them. I think they're interesting. :fhey swoop out of the sky and kill their prey. MM: What kind of shampoo do you use? BW: I use "Head & Shoulders", the blue one. MM: Is your sister, Peri, really a better athlete? BW: Without a doubt, she is the best athlete in the family. She is twelve now and she plays volleyball soccer and basketball. She is a seventh grader but she plays on the eighth grade team for her school in volleyball. MM: What are some of your life goals? BW: Probably the same as everyone's. Probably graduate college, lead a successful career, maybe eventually start a family, maybe start my own business.

2015

World Series Prediction

An interview with Ben Welch

CARA GILLESPIE Sports Writer gillesce@plu.edu

OCTOBER 15,

MM: Have you ever wondered if there is more to life than being really, really ridiculously good looking? BW: Oh, my brother asked this one. That is actually a quote from Zoolander. My brother and I joke about that. But, yeah, there's way more to life.

Football may be fall's favorite sport, but October belongs to baseball. After 162 regular season games, Major League Baseball has found its 10 best teams. Two wild card teams, and three division winners from both the American and National league will compete for the crown of baseball's best. I think the new kings of baseball will reside in Queens, as the New York Mets will be the 2015 World Series Champs. Great pitching and solid defense are a must for success in postseason baseball. The New York Mets have some of the best starting pitchers in the game. Matt Harvey, Jacob deGrom,and Noah Syndergaard all had a regular season earned run average under 3.30. One of the best moves made at the trade deadline was the acquisition of Yoenis Cespedes by the Mets.

Along with his big bat, Cespedes brings outstanding outfield defense to his new ball club. Cespedes best defensive ability is his arm. He has 48 outfield-assisted put-outs in four seasons. Cespedes' cannon could keep base runners from advancing an extra base and keep runs off the scoreboard. The Mets offense is not one to take lightly. As a team, the Mets ranked fourth in doubles, and eighth in home runs. If the home runs come at the right time, the Mets could be tough to beat this postseason. Ultimately, postseason baseball is tough to predict. New York Yankee Aaron Boone taught us that the most unlikely players can become legends with one swing of the bat. Any team can come out on top. I believe that with their great pitching and some timely hitting. The Mets could find themselves as World Series Champions.

MM: What was your favorite class you have taken at PLU? BW: The finance class I am in right now. I think it is interesting seeing how the concepts you learn apply to real life. MM: What are three things that we should all know about you? BW: I take academics very seriously. I enjoy downtime. I enjoy taking some time to hang out with my housemates, watching TV, watching a movie. I waterski in the summer and snowboard in the winter whenever I can. MM: Did you ever think that you would be a dual sport athlete in college? BW: I knew I loved baseball and football and I'm pretty good at both of them so, "I was thinking I'm either going to go to a state school and I'll play neither or I can go to a smaller Division III school and hopefully try and do both. PLU has just been a great fit for me.

Check out @golutes or search #AskALute on Instagram to submit your questions for next week's student-athlete Q&A.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MLB.COM

Athlete Perspective:

DYLAN FOREMAN Sports Writer foremadf@plu.edu Anyone that talks about being on a sports team usually end up describing their teammates as a "family." From this, athletes go on to talk about how their team is a tight-knit group of people who always get along. I think that this claim doesn't fully apply to the Men's Basketball team at Pacific Lutheran University.

Dylan Foreman

Yes, having played basketball with the same people for more than eight months out of the year, naturally our team has become close. But, if anyone knows anything about being around people for long periods of time, there will be fights, because,in families family members will fight. If someone came to an open gym or practice and watched the men's basketball team play, that person would realize that our team is nasty group of individuals; in a good way of course.

Our team is tough. We11 push and shove to win a loose ball. We11 fight and bicker over calls that don't mean a whole lot in the long run. We11 get on someone's case for taking a bad shot or for not boxing out. 'We11 retaliate when someone gives someone else a cheap shot. We11 give someone a cheap shot. Why do we do this? We want to win. Sometimes, in sports, it is not about getting along. It's about the end result: winning. It's more than getting along or

acting like it's all sunshine and rainbows; it's the desire to compete at the highest level possible far which exceeds the need to get along. Don't get me wrong, we're the one of the most fun groups of guys off the court. We love to have fun and do team-bonding activities, but once we step out on the court, it's a different ball game. One of the themes that our coach Steve Dickerson has instilled in us is "embrace the grind." As a team we take pride as a group in our ability to embrace the hardship that goes along with being a successful team. I could not be happier about our team this year. Since summer league started, our firstyear players have shown that they will be able to contribute to the team. Our veterans have all improved over the summer and are ready to lead the team in whatever ways necessary so that we can win. This upcoming season, we believe we have all the pieces to be an elite team in the Northwest Conference. I think we have the talent and even more importantly the toughness, it takes to endure a successful long season. Being on the basketball team, I can say that honestly and proudly we are a family, but not the type of family other athletes usually refer to. We are not a perfect family but a working family that will always strive to be the best people possible and the best basketball team on any court.

PHOTO BY JACQUI GUTIERREZ: (15) Sophomore Dylan Foreman does his announcing ritual with (32) Junior Drew Ardissone.

/


OCTOBER 15,

THE MAST

2015

SPORTS 15

Homecoming crowd fuels series sweep over Linfield JAKE BILYEU Sports Writer bilyeujc@plu.edu

TOP: Junior Julia Hutchison returns service. BOTTOM: (18) First-year Mackenzie Harris elevates to deflect a spike.

The Pacific Lutheran Volleyball team kept the homecoming spirit going Friday night with a three set sweep of Linfield. The win brings the team's overall record to 11-6 and their conference record to 5-3, just one game behind Whitworth for second place in the Northwest Conference. The first set opened up with both teams trading points until the Lutes seemed to take control by going up 149, forcing a timeout. Linfield rallied back to even things up at 15, but the Lutes' Homecoming crowd brought the energy, and their home team responded by taking the first set 25-23. "The fans make it fun," Head Coach Kevin Aoki said. "As soon as they started going, we started playing more of our style." The second set began just as the first did. The Lutes didn't seem to waver as they used the crowd noise to their advantage and turned a 7-7 tie into a 17-9 lead, and eventually a 25-16 set win to go up two sets to none. "The fans really gave us some energy," senior Kylai Cooley said. "We could tell it affected the other

team, too." The Lutes jumped ahead of Linfield from the start of what would be the third and final set. Coach Aoki called a timeout with one point left in the game to let the support from the fans really sink in. The team then finished off Linfield, winning the third set 25-12. After the contest, fans and alumni stuck around to celebrate the tradition that winning has become for PLU volleyball. "PLU has such a great athletic

community," Cooley said. "It's great to be a part of this positive environment." "We've come a long way, both in the rule books and with our victories," Aoki added. As far as his team's progress is concerned, he's not too worried. "We are improving, that's the key." The Lutes will hit the road this weekend to take on Whitworth(S-2) at 7:00 p.m. Friday, followed by a match with Whitman (2-5) at 5:00 p.m. Saturday.

(3) Senior Lucy Capron spikes the ball against the Linfield defense.

NFL: National Fugitive League ¡ We applaud you CHRISTIAN BOND Sports Writer bondco@plu.edu I'll admit, I was a little worried that it would come to an end. One of the most impressive professional sports streaks was on the line. It was one day away from ending, but a player came up clutch. Tennessee Titans wide receiver Doria! GreenBeckham made sure that

the 80 month long streak of a National Football League player getting arrested stayed intact. A hero walks among us. The extent of NFL player arrests does vary. GreenBeckham kept the streak alive by failing to pay a parking ticket. Dallas Cowboys running back Joseph Randle was arrested for shoplifting. Randle makes nearly $30,000 a game, but couldn't pay for the underwear and cologne that

left the mall in his possession. Several players are linked to domestic violence cases. A handful of players have murders on their record. Animals appear to be the only living beings safe from NFL players. Wait. The NFL continues to be the most popular league in American sports. It's mind blowing that the average American can continue to support a league full of people

who think they are above the law. I guess it doesn't matter, as long as I win my fantasy league. Call it what you want, 80 months or six years, it is a long time. We can always rely on the NFL to make headlines. Don't worry fans, in the next 20 days, we should know who the next player will be added to the NFL Arrest Database. PHOTO COURTESY OF NFL.COM

Injured Lutes contributing off the field STEPHANIE COMPTON Sports Writer comptose@plu.edu The women's soccer team can't seem to catch a break this season. Within the last few months, they've already lost three players to season-ending . injuries. Senior Lauren Larson and Junior Kaylie Rozell are both out with torn ACLs and sophomore Kristi Kaneta has a broken ankle. Larson's injury occurred before the 2015 season even began. â&#x20AC;˘ In a pre-England trip practice, Larson landed wrong in a one vs. one drill and

"heard a huge crack." That was the sound of her ACL breaking; something only surgery could fix. During the Lutes home game against Willamette, Kaneta broke her ankle going up for a header against another player. Kaneta says this injury is an especially difficult one to deal with, "Athletes are always going to have this constant struggle of dealing with injuries and I've had my fair share, but nothing like this." Injuries are common in contact sports like soccer and PLU has an entire staff dedicated to preventing and helping athletes recover from injuries. "Our coaching staff as well as our trainers do an amazing job and hold us accountable of doing rehab, getting in the

weight room and conditioning to prevent muscle and tendon injuries," Kaneta said, commending her coaching and training staff. ACL injuries and even ankle breaks are things that no amount of preventative training can avoid. With intense training and rehab, the Lutes will have their players back in no time. In sports, time is not something to take for granted. Larson is redshirting this season in order to play her final season as a Lute next year. Though she will not be present on the field this season, Larson will be as much a leader off the field as she would have been on the field. "Even though I can't be on the field

(11) Junior Kaylie Rozell looks to pass against

Hamline.

ABOVE: (14) Sophomore Machaela Graddy fights for the ball against Pacific. MIDDLE: (22) Sophomore Hailey Smoot receives a pass. FAR RIGHT: (18) Sophomore Kristi Kaneta dribbles the ball down field.

everyday I want the young players to see that I am still dedicated to the team's success even if that dedication isn't coming from my actions on the field." Losing three experienced players is not easy for any program, but the Lutes have been rallying behind their injured teammates. The Lutes are currently 8-1-1 overall with 4 conference wins. The Lutes next home game is Sunday October 25th against George Fox.


--THE MAST

16 SPORTS

NORTHWEST CONFERENCE STANDINGS 1

Women s Soccer

Football TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Linfield

4

0

0

2-0

Won4

LUTES

10

1

1

6-1-1

Won6

Whitworth

s

0

0

2-0

Wons

Willamette

6

s

1

6-2

Lost 1

Pacific

3

2

0

1-1

Lost 1

Puget Sound

8

0

4

4-0-4

Won2

George Fox

3

2

0

1-1

Won 1

Linfield

7

3

1

4-3-1

Won 1

Puget Sound

2

2

0

1-1

Lost 1

Lewis & Clark

7

4

1

3-4-1

Tied 1

Willamette

1

3

0

1-1

Won 1

Whitworth

s

7

0

3-S

Lost 4

LUTES

0

4

0

0-2

Lost 4

Pacific

2

9

2-S-1

Lost 2

Lewis & Clark

0

4

0

0-2

Lost 4

Whitman

1

8

3

1-4-3

Tied 2

George Fox

3

7

2

1-6-1

Lost S

PHOTO BY MCKENNA MORIN : (14) Junior Juston Lind fights for a touchdown against Trinity.

- -

...

(75) Junior Maxwell James Bartholomew runs at the PLU Invitational.

(24) Junior Nicoya Benham-Marin receives a pass against Pacific.

1

Men s Soccer

Voll eyball TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Willamette

11

s

0

7-1

Won 1

Whitworth

10

0

1

6-0-1

Won 1

Whitworth

12

6

0

6-2

Won2

Puget Sound

7

4

0

S-1

Won3

LUTES

11

6

0

S-3

Won3

LUTES

8

4

0

4-2

Lost 1

Lewis & Clark

7

8

0

4-4

Lost 4

George Fox

6

6

1

3-3-1

Won 1

Puget Sound

7

9

0

4-4

Lost 2

Linfield

7

6

0

3-4

Won 1

Pacific

7

9

0

4-4

Wons

Willamette

3

8

1

2-S

Lost 1

Linfield

6

11

0

3-S

Won 1

Pacific

3

8

1

1-S-1

Lost 1

Whitman

4

10

0

2-6

Lost 1

Whitman

1

8

1

1-S-1

Lost 1

George Fox

4

12

0

1-7

Lost 6


e courage to come home Overcoming autism and enjoying higher education at PLU

Spilling the secrets behind PLU party culture


alloween is upon us. It's a time for the unusual, the interesting, the bizarre and the first full issue of Mast Magazine. With this issue, we had one simple mission: to "wow" each and every person who picked it up. Whether you're looking to be inspired by a student's story, intoxicated by a tale of parties or inspired by student creativity, this issue has a story for you. Over the last few weeks we've had an outpouring of support from faculty and staff, which has been truly appreciated. I feel blessed everyday to have that encouragement. This issue, however, is presented as a more studentfriendly publication. When my team and I sat down to plan stories for our first issue we asked one simple question: "What would we want to read?" We let that question carry us forward throughout

H

our production of this publication. Now, this Mast Magazine is in your hands. You can decide: did we get your attention? Did my 48-hour party bender in the name of "research" or Thomas & Molly's look into the grossest things happening on campus make you stop and read? Hopefully Brooke's take on body modification on-campus sparks creativity and understanding in you. Or, if fhat' s just not your style, I hope you at least take the time to read about Nathan Olson, who is overcoming the setbacks he's faced with autism to finally get his college degree. I hope you enjoy reading this magazine half as much as I've enjoyed working on it. This is just the beginning for Mast Media and Mast Magazine, but you're the true key in making this magazine a success. The ball is in your court now.


ATCH

PHOTO COURTESY OF RUBY FILMS

I

If you're a social justice-minded Lute, make your way out of the Lute-dome to a screening of "Suffragette," a U.K. film about the British women's suffrage movement. Meryl Streep, Helena Bonham Carter and Carey Mulligan star. If the story wasn't enough, the cast should be. Don't forget the return of all the favorite TV shows this fall. My favorites to catch up on are "Modern Family," back in classic form, "The Mindy Project," which made its Hulu premiere Sept. 15, and "Scandal," because I can't resist quality time with Olivia Pope.

four a favorites By Matthew Salzano

LENNY READI Look no further than the Lenny Letter for a weekly dose of... well, everything. It's the "email newsletter where there's no such thing as too much information," compiled by Lena Dunham (famous for "Girls" on HBO) and Jenni Konner (the Executive Prod ucerof "Girls"). Every Tuesday, it features writing about anything and everything by women. From the political (Jennifer Lawrence expresses her disgust with wage gaps) to the outrageous (Actress Jenny Slate reviews her "vagacial" - vagina facial) and the personal (women discuss their abortion stories), every week is filled with stories worth reading. Sign

up at lennyletter.com.

EAT

I

Everyone within a 10-mile radius of 208 Garfield should be eating there once a week. I don't just mean stopping for coffee and studying. I mean getting some real food. Happy hour is all day Saturday and Sunday with extremely student-accessible prices. Share the "Petite Fondue with Goat's Milk Brie served with Green Apple, Ciabatta and Sweet Cherry Conserve" for $6 - for the sake of all things delicious, buy some goddamn cheese. 208 Garfield St S • 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mon - Fri, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sat - Sun • Happy hour 3 to 6 p.m. weekdays, all-day weekends •

I LISTEN

PHOTO COURTESY OF DISCLOSURE

When I'm not bumpin' some classic *NSYNC in the shower, I'm listening to "Caracal" by Disclosure. Remember them from that Sam Smith feature, "Latch?" That's from their first album, "Settle," which the electronic duo released to largely positive critical reviews in 2013. Their sophomore follow up, "Caracal," was released Sept. 25, 2015. It's a high-energy album with an all-star cast that keeps attention for the full 52 minutes. Sam Smith appears again on "Omen," Lorde comes out of nowhere on "Magnets," Miguel croons through "Good Intentions" and The Weeknd opens the album on "Nocturnal." It's great studying music. It pumps you up for those late-night library visits.

3


WARNING:

IF READING ABOUT BODILY FLUIDS MAKES YOU UNCOMFORTABLE, SKIP THIS ARTICLE. Pacific Lutheran University's campus is a treat for the eyes. It is green, beautiful and clean. The lush forest surroundings create a magical atmosphere that could easily be the set of a Harry Potter movie. Dig a little deeper, though, and you find the disgusting reality of college students. Lutes, in general, may still be in that awkward 'Tm not an adult but not a teenager" phase. Students still find poop, and everything related, hilarious. Some like to talk about it and some like to do it. Some are so comfortable with poop, they don' t feel the need to use a toilet. We have our wonderful grounds services staff to thank for maintaining the campus that we're so proud of. Not only do the grounds need to be maintained, but a lot of work is required to keep the buildings on campus functioning, clean and safe. With 30+ Environmental Services staff working to keep our campus buildings clean, you might think it is an "easy" to job. But no, you're wrong. The cleaning staff has a lot of ground to cover, and if that's not enough, they can always rely on students to shit or vomit wherever they please. Poop in fall In the beginning of this semester, housekeeper Chung Morley, who is responsible for cleaning in Pflueger, was about to clean the girls' showers on the second floor of the building. She walked in and discovered someone had been nice enough to take a dump on the floor. Although shocked, she had no choice but to clean it up. She shared her story with other staff members in Environmental Services, but no one believed her. The next day, Chung went to clean the same showers. To her surprise, someone had pooped on the floor again. Baffled by her discovery, she contacted another crew member to have them look at the situation. Unfortunately for Chung and

her colleagues, poop incidents aren't uncommon. According to Mary Dennie, the Interim Manager of Environmental Services, there is a poop or vomit incident that requires clean-up every single day. Sometimes it is just a clogged toilet or vomit in a sink or trash can. But other times it seems like people go out of their way to make the day interesting for the Environmental Services staff. Finger Painting in the Past One Saturday morning a few years ago, housekeeper Susan Garland, who has been working for Environmental Services for the last six years, was walking through the hallways of Harstad. She noticed there was a strange smell. The plumbing in Harstad is outdated, so Garland thought this was the cause of the bad odor. She entered the bathrooms on her cleaning routine. Inside one of the bathroom stalls, she discovered the origin of the smell. Somebody had finger painted with - you guessed it - poop. On the toilets, on the walls, on the entire inside of the bathroom. Everywhere. Let's paint a picture here (pun intended), the person you are currently sitting next to ,while r~ading this article could very well have painted the bathrQ0In with poop. Think about that, you disgusting 20-something college student. You probably thought this was a one-time qccurrence, right? Wrong. Mary shared a similar story where a student enjoyed a finger painting session with excrements. This time a Tingelstad shower received the bad end of the deal. Burying the Bile Students don't just love to poop. All bodily fluids are extremely funny to them. Poop is "winning" but vomit is not far behind. "In Tingelstad, the vomit last year was like I've never seen...

it was like every day, we were starting to have concerns that students had health issues," Mary Dennie said. Some students manage to vomit in the toilet, while others like to try and hide it. A few weeks ago, housekeeping staff found vomit in a trash can. Yet again, the student's creativity did not disappoint. Cleaning staff did not find the vomit in the trash bag along with the trash that day. Instead, the person who vomited decided to remove the bag first, vomit, and when finished, put the bag back on top to hide the vomit. "Toilet Ho-Ho-H-Oh My God" Holiday season is upon us and PLU students are eager and bring their personal traditions of food, music and decorations to campus every winter. For most of us, this is a time shared with our loved ones with good food and hopefully some good surprises. Students have been known to give surprises to the grounds and cleaning crews, too. One year, students in Foss decided to wish the housekeepers a Merry Christmas by leaving them a present. With the best intentions, (Because what other intentions would anyone have during the most wonderful time of the year?) students got creative with their Christmas ornaments.

When it came to decorating, it seems the students couldn't agree o n where they would put the ornaments. There are so many options: tree, wreath, trimmings ... Instead, their plan to decorate Foss for Christmas

went down the toilet. That's literally what happened. And one kind student decided to leave his own surprise on top of the ornaments. If it's still unclear to you what happened: a bunch of Christmas ornaments were put in the toilet followed by a student taking a dump on top. Environmental Services were gifted a very flooded bathroom that year. Happy New Year's Ewww During Christmas and New Year's Eve when most PLU students make their way home, diligent Campus Safety officers patrol the campus grounds and maintain order. With students gone, parking lots are left open for the use of neighborhood visitors. This past New Year's Eve was no different. Campus Safety also keeps the University safe by monitoring campus grounds and buildings with security cameras. Some PLU students have initiated their relationships with Campus Safety when they were lucky enough to be spotted on camera doing very illegal activities. Sometimes, there are also lucky non-students who get to begin their Campus Safety relationship the same way. On New Year's Eve 2014, Professional Safety Officer Shawn Thompson had the pleasure of making the


acquaintance of two campus visitors. Thompson was on-duty the last night of 2014 and ended up having an eventful celebration. In the final hours of the year, a 路 couple from a neighborhood party made their way to a parked SUV in a PLU parking lot. What the couple was not aware of were the cameras monitoring the lot. The party guests appeared to be intoxicated as they made their way to the vehicle. They got in their car and, a while later, Campus Safety Officers watched the male get out of the car and proceed to go to the next car and and pee on it. Thompson and his colleague decided to say something. By the time they got to the parking lot, the couple was up to other activities. Thompson knocked on the car door and told them they had to have a talk with them about their behavior. The man got out out of the car, barely dressed. "He's pulling up his pants, and she's fixing her dress and getting that in order," Thompson said. While having a conversation with the two, the female, hanging out of the back seat of the SUV, threw up on the car parked next to them "the girl just started spewing ... and it hit the ground so hard that it splashed up probably to [her partner's] knees." One unfortunate PLU student received a call saying they might want to come wash their car so the vomit and pee would not freeze. Happy New Year to you. Friendly new year's reminder: Students, someone is watching you. Keep your clothes on. Please.

Off-road, On-campus Trucker Bombs According to the Marketing and Communications Department, Pacific Lutheran University has been nam~d Recyf!er of the Year twice for recycling 70 percent 路of waste material and is constantly rahk~cl - iri the top 15 of North American colleges in the "Recyclemania" Contest. Students cannot take full credit for this recognition. Some students have missed_ the point when it comes to recycling. Many readers are probably not familiar with the habits of long-haul true}< drivers. Truck drivers drive across the country coast to coast, border to border and they have delivery and pick up deadlines they need to ' meet. Sometimes when a driver is behind schedule, human needs are trumped by deadlines. Desperate times call for desperate measures. When nature calls - one way or another, you eventually have to give in and go. To avoid stopping, truck drivers save time by doing their "number ones" and sometimes even "number twos" while driving. How do you go about this? If you have a bottle you're set. The concept has earned the tasteful name: "trucker bombs." Truckers do their business in a bottle, then this gets tossed on the side of the road. You might justify and understand it; while gross, they gotta do what they gotta do. Some PLU students are fascinated by this, or possibly practicing to become truckers themselves, and therefore have decided to

adopt this piece of trucker culture. Dennie explains trucker bombs have become a common find in recycling bins at PLU. It seems sometimes the struggle is too real when it's time to go potty on-campus.

Hungry Hungry Hoarders Environmental Services staff want to make sure that every student who moves into a dorm at PLU feels they have a clean room to live in. One would hope that people who are old enough to go to college would be able to keep their rooms relatively clean. However, staff often find weird things after people have moved out. Sometimes, it even seems like students have intentionally left the room in a bad state. In South Hall, someone had hidden salmon under the vegetable drawer in the fridge. It was there for at least a couple of weeks, so when housekeeping found it, it did not exactly smell nice. Speaking of food, a lot of people who live in dorms have meal plans. You would think the students would be able to eat enough when The Commons is open, but that is just not enough for some. PLU is apparently the home of future hoarders. In one of the residence hall lounges, a student hid food under the cushions of the couch. "I got a call about an apple core. We found a banana peel, a half eaten pork chop in a ziplock bag, and a bottle of salad dressing hidden under the cushion," says Dennie. The possibly worst thing Dennie has found after a student has moved out of a dorm room was the remnants of a booger hoarder. Not just a few. Someone had stuck a whole load of boogers under their desk, Dennie said. "One of the RAs says 'we've got some stuff under the desk and I want to show it to you.' They roll out the thing where your keyboard goes - the whole bottom of it was covered with boogers, someone had sat there in that desk for pretty much the entire school year and put all their deposits under the desk." According to housekeeping, the grossest dorm varies from year to year. This semester Tingelstad is the worst so far, Dennie said: "I would have to say Tingelstad is probably where we have the majority of our gross-ness issues. The majority of the poo that we find in unpleasant places is Tingelstad." Perhaps Lutes living in Tingelstad can think of this as a wake-up call and start being more cautious. Dennie explains that the easiest way for the cleaning crew to deal with the situations they meet every day is to think of the students as children "a lot of us working here are moms; sometimes it helps to think of the students as our children. It makes it easier to clean." In these four years, students will learn a lot about being adults and about themselves. Maybe they will even learn that poop is not a toy ... or paint. Seriously though, stop shitting everywhere.


-..-

. ..

~c>

/•

J1·· . / '

ords are important to Herm would go out driving Nathan Olson. together. Olson was especially This is his first year fascinated with driving as he at Pacific Lutheran University. grew up. They would drive He's a published author, a and talk, and Olson felt like Herm was his main supporter. PLU legacy and autistic. Olson has been going to Part of the PLU class of 1951, college for six years. After Herm would tell his grandson, struggling in classes and being and anyone who entered his a "failure on paper," his family home: "When you come over, decided to get him tested you don't need to be anyone for learning disabilities. At but yourself." 22-years-old, Olson learned he Olson remembers thinking was on the autism spectrum. to himself at a young age, "But Autism Spectrum Disorder what if I don't know who I neurodevelopmental am?" is a disorder that impairs one's Growing up, Olson ability to communicate struggled to form bonds with and interact with others. people, struggled in school It also includes restrictive and struggled to explain why. repetitive behaviors, He ma,de his way through interests and activities that school, eventually attending cause impairment in social, the University of Alaska, occupational and other areas Anchorage. of functioning. Eng}ish was always easy "For so long I didn't · · for~; Olson enjoys reading have an identity. That day, and writing. However, school November fourth, I was the was'fiarder for him than most most proud of myself and my and he was finally tested for identity," Olson said. "At least autism after failing through I had a name for it finally." his college career. When Olson was younger, After finding out he was he had a hard time forming a autistic, Olson decided to bond with his family. He was explore himself. He wrote in always different and didn't ' journals and everything began quite fit in. And his family falling into place. couldn't quite understand. "I journal," Olson said. "It He connected with one was really about exploring person more than anyone, his myself and finding the courage to be that open and find the grandfather, Herman (Herm). He and identity behind the disorder." t His journaling lead to selfdiscovery. Beyond that, he found the unwavering desire to educate others on the autism spectrum. Olson's journaling turned into "A Journey Through My Heartland," a memoir dedicated to Herm, •his late grandfather.

W

... -.· ,. J'. .

~

::t· •

!

-

..• • ..,.' 6 •

In his book, he tells the story of what it's like being misunderstood and bullied through school. An Everett native, Olson writes about being tormented by classmates and eventually graduating from Everett High School. His story doesn't end there. Before his grandfather passed, Olson promised Herm he'd graduate from a fouryear university. Herm was a teacher and believed getting an education was the most important thing a person could do. Keeping that promise, Olson went to Everett Community College, Univ. of Alaska, Bellevue College, and now, PLU. At Everett and Alaska, Olson never felt comfortable and dropped out. Bellevue opened him up to learning and Olson finished with an associates degree in the Autism Spectrum Navigators program. That still wasn't enough. Olson applied to his late grandfather's alma mater with one goal in mind: graduate from a four-year university. "Coming to this campus, see my grandfather," Olson said. "I've made more connections here in the last 30 days than I ever did." Olson is proud of how accepting and diverse the PLU community is. Now, poised to graduate in 2017 with a major in Sociology, Olson said he's found where he belongs. Coming to PLU was like coming home. Even though he is now more comfortable than ever, Olson still struggles with his

disorder. There is no beginning or end to it. Living in the dorms, eating in The Commons and sitting in classrooms are . still social-anxiety provoking activities he has to participate in everyday. "This journey has been about finding myself and courage to have my identity," Olson said. "I just hope others out there have the courage to try and understand or accept that I'm different." Even though he's starting small, Olson has big dreams for PLU. "I envision PLU coming to the forefront of embracing neurodiversity in higher education," Olson said. Words are important to Olson. When he talks, he chooses each one carefully. He turned to words when he was diagnosed, journaling helped him find himself. The words in his book are his contribution to the Autism Community. And he hopes that with those words he can change stigmas and assumptions around the disorder. Starting here, at PLU. "I've been so impressed with PLU, they accepted me even with my grades because they look at the whole person," Olson said. "PLU paved the way to let me come, learn and make connections."

\

7


Editor's Note: To cover this se tudents who held parties and attended parties, but decided t_o !~ape them anonymous so thefj ut fea.r of repercusswns from Student Rights and Responszbzlztzes. To write this article, I attended four parties and talked to Lutes about smoking, drinking, p_artying and hooking up at PLU. I am 21 yeari old and everyone who I witnessed drinking, to my knowledge, was of age. For this article, I will relell st<?ries from parties in first-perso1JAIJl'1'tltive as they were tolcf to me from several people from each party. Hope you en7oy.

W

e're standing in the middle of a house we don't know, with people we just met for the first time. There's a girl in the corner who's bumpin' and grindin' alone while 20 guys gather around a table waiting for their tum at beer pong. In the kitchen, first-years are stealing booze and a group just snuck outside to smoke. Next thing I know, the cops are here and we all squeeze out the back door dropping backpacks full of beer and weed as we go. We end up here every Friday and Saturday night. How do we get here and how does this all get started?

9


To start

from the beginning, I talked to Jack*, a constant party-goer and party-thrower, I knew he'd have all the answers. It all starts with a text. Jack lives in a house off-campus and his roommate is a member of an elite te;\(ting group mostly comprised of athletes who live off-campus. Each Friday, someone texts the group to see what's going on that weekend. If nobody has anything going on, Jack said his house picks up the slack and agrees to throw a party. From there, strings of texts go out to friends about the time and location of that night's party. Sometimes party invites are sent through Facebook, but usually those parties have closed guest lists. "We usually send out the invite around six or seven that night," Jack said. "People don't start showing up until about 11 anyways." This weekend, the first party was at Derek* and Luke's* house. "We usually pregame before," said Derek. "We11 just chill here, play a couple games and drink a few beers. Then people start showing up." Luke and Derek put away their TV, their expensive alcohol and anything that could be use as a weapon around their house before the party starts. For them, the weapon removal is important because part of their house decorations include boxing gloves and nunchucks. Avoiding shit-faced students boxing is a must. We cracked open some beers, took some shots and got dressed for a night out. 10

Three beers in Let the party begin.

As people start to roll in, the games come out. Beer pong is a classic because it can be constantly played as people show up and move around the house. At smaller parties, King's Cup, Baseball and Rage Cage are also popular because those games, in particular, are hard in huge groups. "We play a lot of games and try to just have a good time," Luke said. "It's different. I feel like as freshmen we just wanted to get as drunk as possible." A group of girls show up drinking Mike's Hard Lemonade, but other than them, most of the party drinks Coors and Rainier. Don't think I'm not judging that Mike's. I might not say it, and nobody else is, but we're judging you. We aren't even an hour into the party and I'm being escorted into the back where the housemates are taking Jager Bombs, which are shots of Jagermeister dunked in Red Bull. Two shots later, we're back in the living room and there's a group standing around one man, who's about to freestyle rap his way through a hat of words. While we were in the back getting drunk, a hat, paper and pens were passed around the room and guests wrote down words or phrases on the paper and put them into the hat. Then, they were given to the performer and he rapped and joked his way through the entire list. Don't worry, we caught it all on video and you can find it at mastrnedia.plu.edu.


.¡â&#x20AC;˘

Five beers, three shots Seven beers, four shots Let's talk about people finding the party. When you throw a party at Pacific Lutheran University, there's always the chance you11 get unwanted visitors. Because we're close to campus and everyone knows that parties thrive on Friday nights, some students roam the streets until they hear music or see other groups of people on their way out. Those "party creepers," as I refer to 't hem, are the plague of offcampus partying. Everyone who I talked to said unwanted visitors are the scariest thing when it comes to a house party. You never know who they are, who they11 invite or what they11 steal. "Sometimes we have our big roommate stand at the door and let him decide who gets to come in," Jack said. "And when it gets out of control, we send him through the party to kick out whoever he doesn't want in there." That night, a group of unwanted party creepers made off with a bottle of Jack Daniels and broke the pong table before making a speedy exit while nobody was looking. During another night out, I decided to take the party creeper role and followed a friend to a house party that I otherwise wouldn't have known about. They're diseases at parties, but 111 admit, being a party creeper is pretty fun. You go in, maybe take a beer or score some free weed and then enjoy the party. If you're lucky, you11 even find some friends there and snag a spot on the pong table. My night as a party creeper wasn't looking too shabby.

And the night begins to fade. After that fourth shot, I didn't know if I could do any more. When the last one feels like it's going to come right back up your throat, it's time to slow down. At this point, there are about 60 people in the house and 10 out back smoking. We're halfway through a game of King's Cup and a drunk girl shows up, grabs the King's Cup (currently full of wine, Mike's Hard, Coors and a margarita) and chugs it. Game over. Girl: 1 Group: 0. My next stop is the dance floor. About four shots in, the dance floor starts to look like your best friend (I learned, after watching my GoPro footage the next morning, the dance floor was not my best friend.) "PL U parties can be kind of lame because it's like a lot of people standing around," Jack said. "Not a lot of houses have good dance floors. But bigger schools, like UW, they dance way more and that makes a party just better." But before long, everyone is screaming and it's time to go out back: there's a beer bong contest. A beer bong contest happens when two people funnel beer through a tube and see who can chug it faster. Opening your throat and taking in beer as quick as possible is like a pissing contest for PLU men. When I asked them why, they had no answer. Just that it was hard and just "something we do to see who's better." 11


Eleven beers, five shots

This is how I lost my pants.

Finally, it's my turn on the beer pong table. What's the first cup I hit? Bitch cup. The cup in the exact middle of the table is bitch cup. At some houses, if you hit bitch cup first you have to chug a beer, at others you have to shotgun a beer but at this house, you had to pull your pants down and play until you made another cup. For the boys? No big deal. For girls like me who decided to wear leggings; and therefore a thong, to the party? Big deal. I manned up, pulled my pants down, pulled my shirt down to cover as much as I could and played through. It only took two more turns to make a cup, but the damage was done: I was mortified.

Top Right: Students at party, gathered in kitchen. Middle Right: Students gathered around beerpong table. Above: Freestyle rapping student grabs everyone's attention. Right bottom: Morning after in back yard (Photo by McKenna Morin). Bottom: Beer bong competition in the back yard.

Chuaging water... The night winds down. The end of the night is usually marked by everyone going outside to either smoke a cigar, smoke weed or walk to Denny's. Some nights end because the cops come, some nights end because someone puked and some end because a girl (or boy) has begun crying for no apparent reason. Our night ended for three reasons: 1. One of the hosts was blackout drunk and nobody could find or understand him, 2. Some guests got too high and stopped being able to function and 3. A group of party creepers came in, took a bottle of Jack, broke a ping pong table and hauled ass out, breaking the spirit of the party. At a lot of schools, and for some Lutes, hooking up at the end of the night is a goal. However, from what I saw, it happens a lot less at PLU.

"It's really hard because everyone knows everyone," said Derek. "Like you have to see them all the time on campus and that's just awkward.'' With nobody getting lucky that night, half of the party passed out on beds, couches and during their walk home. The other half went to Taco Bell and got some cheesy shit to stuff in their faces before passing out. "Yeah, I woke up with pizza all over my room, had my clothes and shoes on, didn't know where I was and my head was on the wrong end of the bed," Luke said. "I was like, 'How did I even get like this?"' "So you had a rough night?" I said. "Yeah, at some point I guess someone just found me in the closet," he said. "Just sitting in there in my underwear with the door closed."


red canv difaction on By Brooke Thames & McKenna Morin people exclusively stream their music, Hover Boards roll and breaking social norms is basically a sport. :Of age, members of the new generation wave "Bye, Felicia!" to the constructs of old. These young individuals are .new social rules that value individuality, creativity and free personal expression. Hair dye, piercings and tattoos w of the ways emphasis on free espression is manifesting itself in lhe 21st century. Pacific Lutehran University Lutes are representative of changes 路 路ai construct. Their body modifications and from new social norms and stand on their own as nods toward 路 gs.


shawn, sophomore HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT YOUR PLUGS AND THEIR SIZE? "I decided to get gauges because I liked them. I saw other people who had them and I was like, "Oh, this is really interesting and really unique." I wanted to see if I could do it. I feel like [my gauges] are a good size. They're big enough for me to know that I have them, so I'm perfectly okay with it. Of course, some people aren't okay with them being this big. But I'm perfectly okay with the fact that for all of eternity I will have holes in my ears."


lauren, first-year WHY DID YOU GET THIS TATTOO AND STYLE? "It's a watercolor map of the world. I have a huge affinity for 1:1aI?s; I'm kind of a geograI?hY nerd. The world seems a little

less terrifying 1f it's right there on your writst. I've always thought the [watercolor] style was gorgeous and I knew a really good tattoo artist. I've never been a person who wanted the tattoo that everybody has. I always wanted something unique, and I thought the watercolor was a really nice touch."

rachel, sophomore WHAT KINDS OF REACTIONS DO YOU GET? 'Tm a counselor for kids during the summer and all the other adult counselors think my hair is really cool every year because I usually dye [it] to match whatever color group I'm with. [My campers] think that's really cool. I had a little girl [in my group with] short, blonde pixie hair, and she put colored chalk in her hair every day after seeing me so that she matched [me]. Most people have been very supportive of me dyeing my hair."


PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

NOVEMBER 6, 2015 I VOLUME 92, ISSUE 6 IMASTMEDIA.PLU.EDU

CHRISTMAS NEWS ALREADY? Campus ministry decides against Christmas tree

JAKE BILYEU Mast TV Sports Producer bilyeujc@plu.edu Northwest Conference cross country runners gathered at Pacific Lutheran University to compete in a league championship meet. The weather was atrocious, but athletes powered through and ran as hard as they could. The women ran 6 kilometers, but didn't go anywhere. The first competitor to cross the finish line was Olivia Mand, a junior from Willamette. Mand finished the race with a time of 22:20. The top finishing Lute was first-year Mary Josten with a time of 24:43. Senior Amie Wilson was not far behind her with a time of 25:03. Whitworth took

the women' s title back to Spokane with them on the strength of five runners inside the top 11. The men's race was as exciting as cross country gets with plenty of lead changes early in the race. PLU's Brad Hodkinson, a first-year, spent time at the front of the pack early, but couldn't stay there as he finished fourth. Hodkisnon finished the 8 kilometer race at a time of 26:26, and earned first team Northwest Conference honors. Puget Sound's Tyler Shipley won the race finishing with a time 25:48. Willamette grabbed the men's team title. The condition was less than ideal, but volunteers, coaches and runners all had a great time hosting the Northwest Conference Championship meet.

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR Sophomore Madison Thackana takes a photo with her phone at the annual Light Up Red Square event in 2013. After the tree lighting, attendees sang "Joy to the World." Light Up Red Square was an annual Christmas tradition at PLU.

JEFF DUNN Chief Copy Editor dunnja@plu.edu Hoping to appeal to a larger group of Lutes, the "year of discernment" continues for Campus Ministry as they shake up the traditional treelighting ceremony in December. There won't be a traditional Christmas tree in Red Square this year. Instead, Campus Ministry will decorate the two young trees behind the bell. In addition, the Rose Window in Karen Hille-Phillips Center and the star on top of Harstad Hall will be lit. "We're gonna switch it up a little bit this year," Interim Campus Pastor John Rosenberg said. Rosenberg said he wants the ceremony to focus on the "coming of the light." "That's a pretty old Christian image of Jesus as the light of the world," Rosenberg said. "But it's also an image that appears in other religious expressions as CONTINUED ON well."

PAGE4

Lutes' Voices In response to last week's Mast Magazine, Lutes voiced their opinions via social media. The Mast Media editorial board met Monday, Nov. 2 and published a response letter. Below, we've selected some of the responses with the hopes of creating a dialogue about The Mast's journalistic choices.

Tw @

Ca f Left: Sophomore Acacia Tobin competes at the Northwest Conference Cross Country Championships, held on PLU's campus. Top Right: Senior Hannah Walton followed by Shailee Woodward. Left: First-year Ryan Gutierrez competes for the men's side.

Top

at ast

a

"It's moments like this when I'm not necessarily proud to be affiliated with PLU, and I want to be nothing but proud of my school. I think it's unfair and harmful for Lutes to be associated with such negativity and lack of class, as well as very ironic and contrary to our mission statement. Think of the alumni and perspective students, please! We can do much, much better than this tabloid material. Good things never come out of the "any attention (even negative attention) is good attention" philosophy." (Facebook)

Kayli Febinger "So this is awful and just gross. Shame on you, Mast."

(Facebook)

Jessi Marlow "Don't you think promoting ladies to "man up" to keep up with "the boys" takes away a woman's agency in this situation. I'm disgusted. Also, there are no secrets in this." (Facebook)

@gavjacks "This isn't a story prospective students should see on the front page @PLUMast" (Twitter)

"they call me elsa" "@gavjacks @PLUMast I (& Others) felt it lacked any form of morality or activism. It endorses a negative culture with no overall message." (Twitter) PHOTOS BY BAILEY PLUMB


2NEWS

THE MAST

NOVEMBER 6,

2015


NOVEMBER 6,

THE MAST

2015

NEWS3

~ an<l h<>Wb.1 ~

ts th~'leading ~of

SARAH GIOMI

glomlsm@plu.edu

more<than cttrcamd u d rapes combined. Jn addition, domestic abuse happens to all genders-- 40% of

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month and Pacific Lutheran University's Sexuality Awareness & Personal Empowerment Team wants to spread awareness and end abuse on campus and beyond Parkland. According to DOmestkAbusestatistics. org, every nine seconds in the US, a woman is assaulted or beaten. DOmestic violence

domestic abuse victims are men. 06mestic abuse is physical or emo~(lnal violence from a spouse or signilicant other, and happens every day. Abuse is an issue that happens on college campuses and at homes an(! it is tin:leabuse ends. The team include$ students that, through presentations anit events, ~ to educate other .studertts and ~ uni tsi to. ks about t- ·

Arts &Culture Prodooer

·ons.tUp.

·•·

TheSe workshops taught by PLU'&

S.A.P.E.T. team provides trainqig to prepare stqd.ents and membel'$ ol the w()tkShops to promote. a healthy and safe community. The workshops will teach warning signs and skill$ to help abolish abuse from. individual relati00$hips and PL!U The T~g is a part ofGteen Dot-. the cam~wide violence prevention project.

<

-community or partidpate in an event or training; contact the Women's Ginter >at womenscenterplu.edu, the Sexuality Awareness &: Personal Empowerment Team at sapet®plu,edu or Voices against Violence at voices®plu.edu. Together, as Lutes, let's bring domestic abuse to an end.

To. l

How to sound sinart A Recipe to The Commons Dining Services

-

~~ f -

/iiu_

'((l)

(/\RE TO 'EllT

There are 7 All You Care to Eat (AYCTE) meals every week. But not all meals are created equal, well, equally filling at least. The Commons offers If you have any-

meal plan that

includes the

AYCTE meals,

AYCTE meals for Sunday brunch and dinner meals Sunday through Friday. Saturday is the only day in which all three meals charge 'a la carte.'

meal period multiple times.The only with smaller meal plans who only have a specific

Anyone can dine in the Commons at any time. Every meal

number of AYCTEswipes per semester.

period accepts payments of cash, card, dining dollars and Lute bucks. So if you don't have a meal plan, you can still enjoy an AYCTE meal.

$ ~TEl1 t - ~ NJ EYE

The Commons doesn't offer trays during

~$

AYCTE meals because: 1. You can make multiple trips without needing to

Want to keep track

many dining )

pay all at once which eliminates the need for trays.

you have? You

2. It saves water that would be needed to wash

-

~R ~~

Tl{)St

(}J

--;,.-

~

!( _)"':

)

l

of how dollars

-Can :heck your

dining dollar balance at any dining location on

all the dirty trays as well as the cost to do so.

campus at any time. Just ask a cashier to check your balance.

CSI:

Campus Safety Investigations Taken from weekly Campus Safety reports

I

If you ever need help Call Campus Safety at

.+-----1

253-535-7911 Email Campus Safety at csin@plu.edu

Vandalism at the Women's Center On a routine patrol Campus Safety noticed a few planks of wood missing from the Women's Center's fence. There is no supsect information at this time.

Or visit camfus safety in the lower level o Harstad Hall

Eezt

~tfmum

Me1dca1 Aid on f- !SS Fie1d A student contacted CSAF for head pain after a soccer ball hit the student in the head. CSAF recommended that transportation was not needed. No further action was taken.

lb

~----<

\!1udical A1 :J n rack CSAF provided an ice pack for a student who reported pain from being hit by a soccer ball in the nose.


THE MAST

4NEWS

NOVEMBER 6

2015

FROM PAGE1

Campus ministry decides 路 against Christmas tree JEFF DUNN Chief Copy Editor dunnja@plu.edu

religious expressions as well." Rosenberg said the ceremony won't have as much of a religious emphasis. There wasn't enough of an "organic" connection between the birth of Christ and the Christmas tree, so the tree was "axed."

Hoping to appeal to a larger group of Lutes, the "year of discernment" continues for Campus Ministry as they shake up the traditional tree-lighting ceremony in December. There won't be a traditional "We want to be hospitable Christmas tree in Red Square and welcoming and celebrate this year. Instead, Campus Ministry will decorate the two diversity from a whole variety young trees behind the bell. of other religious expressions." In addition, the Rose Window in Karen Hille-Phillips Center John Rosenberg and the star on top of Harstad Interim Campus Pastor Hall will be lit. "We're gonna switch it up a little bit this year," Interim Campus Rosenberg calls the "light Pastor John Rosenberg said. Rosenberg said he wants the in the darkness" a powerful ceremony to focus on the "coming message, especially during winter in the Pacific Northwest. Short of the light." "That's a pretty old Christian days plague us in the middle of image of Jesus as the light of tlie December, and the lights will bring world," Rosenberg said. "But it's a warm glow to campus. This isn't the first change also an image that appears in other 路

implemented during Campus Ministry's year under review. Most notably, chapel break has become Morning Prayer on Wednesday mornings at 10:30 a.m. in the Ness Family Chapel (in KHP). "It seemed like a better location for us, given the numbers that we were drawing," Rosenberg said. In an attempt to connect with students and hear what they want from a Campus Ministry, a survey was emailed out to all PLU students. Additionally, Campus Ministry has revived the Campus Ministry Council. "Campus Ministry Council is a student-faculty committee that really has some oversight and responsibility for the religious life on-campus," Rosenberg said. "It hasn't met for a couple of years, and we'll be bringing up that data [from the survey] at our meeting." "We want to be hospitable and welcoming and celebrate diversity from a whole variety of other religious expressions," Rosenberg said.

Lute student wins local award David Mair News Editor mairdf@pfu.edu

A senior Lute earned a regional award for his accomplishments in business this fall. Kyle Parsons won the Puget Sound American Marketing Student of the Year Award. 'Tm very honored. know it's common to feel undeserving,"Parsons said. "Like there's always someone else who could have gotten it. I'm very humbled." One student from each college in the Puget Sound area is recognized for the PSAM award, if their professors see them fit. Parson's advisors found him deserving in the recommendations they wrote

which brought him to be recognized in marketing in the Puget Sound area. He received the award at a ceremony on Nov. Parsons is a business major with a concentration in marketing. He represents the School of Business at Pacific Lutheran University as an ambassador. He said that he enjoys the atmosphere of the corporate world because marketing is something you can always use, even outside of business. 'Tm a person who likes structure," Parsons said. "I like dressing up." He also feels qualified for working in business. As of this fall he became certified to chair a committee and test on animals along with being citi trained. These certifications enable him to

legally conduct studies. Conducting studies is what sparked Parson's interest in marketing research. His current study involves social media and the correlation with high fashion. As Parsons sees the horizon of his college career coming ever nearer, two paths diverge after graduation for him. He would like to someday become a lawyer, making law school a potential next step. On the other hand, PLU has created a new master's program for marketing that started this year, the Masters of Science and Marketing Research. This program would "further my knowledge," Parsons said. Photo courtesy of Kyle Parsons

Community Corner: Tinglestad through residents' eyes ELISE ANDERSON News Writer anderser@plu.edu

Editor's Note: This hall was named for former Pacific Lutheran College President Oscar Tingelstad in 1967. Tingelstad was originally a men's dorm but later became co-ed. Nine stories tall, Tingelstad is the tallest building in Parkland. It also houses the most students. The hall is divided into houses so that every two floors share a common lounge area. This week's community corner approaches Tingelstad Hall through the viewpoints of Sophomore Sam Couch, an RA on the ninth floor, and First Year Rika Boorsma, a third floor resident. The narrative is based on reflections of both students. Through the window, Sam could see Mt. Rainier in the distance - just his daily reminder that he will someday climb it. The mountain is my motivation, he repeats his mantra in his head. One day, Sam Couch will summit Mt. Rainier. For now, he's summiting Tingelstad. After finishing his psychology homework, Sam checked on what was happening with his residents. He couldn't help but reflect on how much he had hoped to be the Resident Assistant for the ninth floor of T-stad when he heard that the floor was reopening and how that dream came true. Sam's love for the hall began when he moved in last year. He loves how diverse the people are. He loves how he can always see a new face in the elevator or walking down the hall. Sure Tingelstad has a reputation for being the loud dorm, but Sam couldn't help but think how social and outgoing and friendly everyone is. It is a place for introverts because the extroverts

can help pull them out of their shell, Sam said. Tingelstad is awesome, he said to himself. 路 Sam loves to support everyone around him. One of those people is first-year Rika Boorsma. Rika took the elevator back down to the third floor after getting a pep talk from Counselor Couch in the Penthouse. Midterms were coming up and she was starting to feel stressed, but Sam is a great mentor and helped reassure her. Like usual, a lot was happening on the third floor. Rika borrowed a scooter from someone who lived in the wing across from her. She was talking on the phone with one hand and attempting to eat a sandwich with the other while on the scooter. She laughed to herself as she remembered the day that a guy on the other side of the floor was using a milk carton as a pretend weapon to start a war. Everyone played along, but Rika realized she had the same brand of milk carton in her own fridge. She ran to her fridge and the two of them battled out their milk war. He made fun of Rika for her skim milk, but it didn't faze her. That's the beauty of Tingelstad. You can meet a new person every day and there are never ending possibilities for having a good time. What other place just doesn't question a milk war? After the exhaustion of the milk carton fight, Rika took the elevator down to the first floor and walked through the lobby

to the front doors. One of her favorite desk workers gave her a big smile. Have a great day, his words echoed. And she smiled because she knew she would. Tingelstad is awesome, she said to herself. This is a small glimpse of the 300 resident community. This is a small glimpse of a day in Tingelstad Residence Hall.

PHOTOS BY ELISE ANDERSON


NOVEMBER 6,

2015

THE MAST

personal essays I fiction I art I photos I articles I poetry

social ju~tice I equality I passion I sustainability I diversity

PLU's social justice magazine is accepting submissions.

Until November 13*, we are accepting submissions relevant to social justice (anything and everything) in the form of academic articles, short fiction, personal essays, poetry, screenplays, photography, visual art, music, and other pieces of art.

SUBMIT YOUR CONTENT AS A WORD DOCUMENT OR HIGH-RES JPEG/PNG TO MATRIX@PLU.EDU. Submissions received by November 13 will be guaranteed review for the Fall 2015 edition. Submissions received after ths day may still be considered or encouraged for publication for the Spring edition.

A&C5


6A&C

THE MAST

NOVEMBER 6, 2015

PLUtonic & HERmonic share the stage to the sound of "And So It Goes," hand in hand with almni who where in attendance. Other songs included a PLUtonic performance of "Shut Up and Dance" and a HERmonic Coldplay mash-up.

The groups choreograph and direct all of their pieces and have arranged the vast majority of the songs they will perform at the fall concert. Just like the variety of genres they perform, PLUtonic Known for combining seamless harmonies, raw and HERmonic have diverse membership. A cappella emotion and fluid choreography, PLUtonic and HERmonic draws in many Lutes who participate in PLU's renowned joined forces in a concert this fall to give Pacific Lutheran music program and choirs, as well as students who are University an earful. Nov. 3 the groups gathered in otherwise uninvolved in music at PLU. "PLU has a huge music community, and it's not just Lagerquist to perform Top 40 Hits, choral music, sacred limited to choral and instrumental music," said Megan refrains, and some tried-and-true favorites. PLUtonic and HERmonic have been praised as giving Zink, president of HERmonic. "It can also be a cappella "stellar" performances resulting in their consistent ranking and non-music majors. Anybody can audition. Anybody as two of the 10 best college-level a cappella groups in can sing." PLUtonic and HERmonic put plenty of effort into Washington and Canada. their fall concert, and it shows. In less than two months, they have successfully welcomed new members, arranged and learned several pieces, and developed unique group identities. Collaborating together as two fully-formed entities, PLUtonic and HERmonic are a dynamic duo on campus. "This year especially has been really good," said Kyle Mitchell, president of PLUtonic. "Communication between PLUtonic and HERmonic has been really chill and fun. It's fun to collaborate." These groups also like to collaborate with alumni, as they called former Lutes in the audience to share the stage at the fall concert. PLUtonic partnered with alumni to Left to Right: Senior Kyle Mitchell, Sophomore Tevita Tupou Ethan Wiederspan, perform Pie Jesu, a hymn written for the group Sophomore John Doster, Sophomroe Dylan Harm and Senior Dominic DeSoto by a former PLU student. HERmonic swayed

LIBBY POSTOVOIT Guest Writer postovlg@pfu.edu

PHOTOS BY MCKENNA MORIN

Left to Right: Sophomore Sarah Crum, Sophomore Rizelle Rosales, Sophomore Lydia Bill, Tegan Mitchell and Senior Megan Zink

Country music for Country haters

Thomas & Molly's Music Reviews: Lapsley

1. Taylor Swift - Taylor Swift

2. Rascal Flatts Greatest Hits Volume 1

It's hard to pinpoint one Rascal Flatts album that's amazing, given that their best songs are sprinkled throughout their nine studio albums. Luckily, this greatest hits album compiles many of these songs onto one perfect record. Spanning from their debut album in 2000 to Still Feels Good in 2007, Rascal Flatts' Greatest Hits Volume 1 contains smash singles such as "What Hurts The Most" and "Bless The Broken Road." Tracks like "Mayberry" and "Prayin' For Daylight" are as country as country gets, but the pure plucks of the banjo and heavenly harmonies make them true listening pleasures. "These Days" and "Skin (Sarabeth)" present that tear-jerking country storytelling, while "Fast Cars and Freedom': showcases the surprising funk the genre can carry. While the album only represents the first half of Rascal Flatts' career, it's a great introduction to the group's impressive music.

PHOTO COURTESY OF AMAZON.COM

Flashback to 2006, when a young, curly-haired Pennsylvania girl launched a career that would change the world and define a generation. It's hard to believe that anyone doesn't have Taylor Swift's first ablum in their music library. But the singer has transformed so much in nine years it's easy to imagine that no PHOTO COURTESY OF AMAZON.COM one actually listens to it anymore, especially those who are in favor of her new pop identity or never liked her country music anyway. Taylor's country career may be nearly a decade in the past, but the quality of the music still stands. Even country haters can't resist whipping their hair to the strong strums of "Should've Said No," shedding a tear while singing the sad lines of "Cold As You" or simply dancing around their room to the sassy chorus of "Picture to Burn."

THOMAS FLATMOEN & MOLLY LINDALL Mast Radio Arts & Culture DJs unda/lmj@plu.edu Holly Lapsley Fletcher - better known by her stage name Lapsley - is a singer-songwriter from England. Her single "Hurt Me" was released in late August, a song filled with emotion and sincerity. Her music can be described as a combination of indie and electronic, and we love it. Lapsley was nominated for the BBC Sound of 2015, an annual poll of music critics and industry figures to find the most promising new music talent. Lapsley started her tour in the United Kingdom Tuesday, Oct. 27. The only two concerts in the U.S. are in New York. There are a few tickets left for her concert on Nov. 11, so if you are interested we recommend you hurry up and order them. Lapsley told music website Clash in an interview she's excited for the release of her next album scheduled for release in 2016 "[I'm] just ready to have this piece that I'm very proud of, and I don't have any regrets at this moment in time so I'm really excited aboutthe future," Lapsley said. "I don't feel like people have seen truly who I am as an artist. I've not released a lot of things, and I feel the album shows me fully where I am now." You can hear Lapsley and other great artists on Thomas & Molly in the Morning every Tuesday on Mast Radio, and read our weekly reviews in the Mast.

3. BoyslikeGirls - Crazy World Those familiar with BoysLikeGirls will remember the pop-punk boy band that blessed the radio with "The Great Escape," "Hero/Heroine," and "Thunder" in 2006. Six years later the group took an unexpected tum down a country road and didn't look back. With the release of Crazy World in 2012 BoysLikeGirls officially introduced themselves as a country-pop crossover band, a transition that was shocking in a strangely amazing way. Crazy World's 11 tracks are basically pop songs with an over-arching country theme. Songs like "Life of the Party" and "Shoot" contain that good ol' country twang but are so feel-good it's easy to forget how Southern they actually sound. Other tracks such as "Cheated" and "Stuck In The Middle" are just pop songs in disguise, while "Be Your Everything" and "Leaving California" sound like ballads straight off of a BoysLikeGirls album from 2007. All in all Crazy World is a softer country-themed album perfectly suited for those country haters who need just a bit more synth to accompany their banjo.

~

O

d

8 i

-i

m

(/)

-<

.,,0 0

z m m

$: 0

)>

i:lJ

r

0

G)

(/)

"U

0

:-1 0

0

$:


NOVEMBER 6,

THE MAST

2015

A&C7

PLU showcases Tacoma art talent one of the most important art awards in the South Sound.

HEGE FATLAND Guest Writer fatlanha@plu.edu Ingram Hall is known as Pacific Lutheran University's one-stop-shop for all things art. This fall the University Gallery showcases a collection that is not only unique but produced by fellow Tacoma natives. Until Nov. 11 the University Gallery in Ingram Hall is presenting special art from the Tacoma community as part of the eighth annual Foundation of Art Award Exhibition at PLU. The Foundation of Art Award Exhibition is extra special this year because it has been recognized as

"It's the first time that we have an exhibition that's not our own," University Gallery Director Heather Mathews said. "[The Greater Tacoma Community Foundation] have had it in lots of different places around Tacoma, and this year it worked out that we could host it, which is exciting for us since we have not been able to do it before." The Foundation of Art award is meant to represent the best new art in the city, and this year's show proves to be different than those of the past. "They seem to have younger artists this year, [more] recent art by up and coming artists," Mathews said. The University Gallery usually has six shows a year, and two are reserved for PLU students.

With the other four shows, PLU tries to bring in people or organizations from the community. Artists like 2015 winning artist Christopher Paul Jordan will be featuring his artwork in the gallery as part of the Foundation of Art Award Exhibition. Christopher Paul Jordan is a former PLU student, and is a known name to the Tacoma community. Jordan will receive a $7,500 award as the winning artist this year for his art piece.

PHOTOS BY MCKENNA MORIN

The University Gallery is located in Ingram, MondayFriday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

How to be a LASA DJ in 5 easy steps MCKENNA MORIN Mast Photographer

Sign Up

morinmn@plu.edu Lute Air Student Radio, more commonly known as LASR, is Pacific Lutheran University's own student-run radio station. Broadcasted from the bottom of Anderson University Center, LASR aims to "represent the tastes and musical diversity of the student body at [PLU] and the greater local and global communities." If you've ever wanted to be a DJ or radio personality, here are the five steps to do so according to DJs and LASR leaders Eddie McCoven and Haleigh Missildine.

Training Missildine: "You then need to do a DJ training on how to run the boards, what you can say, what you can't say, and how to answer a call."

Planning & Playing Missildine: ''.After that, you can sign up for a show time. Then you come in, sign in, and then play your show. Most people do it off their laptops, but some play records or cassettes if they want to be cool and crazy. Some people plan out their shows and some just do it as they go."

McCoven: "The firstthingis you have to sign up. Youhave to come to the office hours and talk to one of the station leaders like myself, or email the LASR General Manager at lasrgm@plu.edu [to] let the GM know you're interested."

Spinitron McCoven: "From there you sign up for a Spinitron account. Sprinitron is a wonderful piece of software we use to make sure that when you're playing a song on the radio, it shows up on the screen at the same time."

Promotion McCoven: "Fifth is promoting it. Make a Facebook page, make a twitter account. Make sure that everyone knows you're doing your show at [whatever] time. LASR is fun and can be really cool thing."


THE MAST I

8 RESPONSE

EDITO

AL

Regarding Mast Magazine community while it exposes its weaknesses -- in an expression of deep care for the university its participants attend and enjoy. At Mast Media, we love being Lutes. We love that the culture of Pacific Lutheran University promotes "thoughtful inquiry, service, leadership and care." It's why we celebrate Lutes like Nathan Olson, who defied odds as an autistic student in higher education. It's also why we shed lights on potentially problematic issues on campus, like party culture.

our community. The reporter chose to do this by creatively incorporating multiple events she viewed and stories retold to her into one narrative. We don't advocate participating in any of these activities. We also do not wish to discriminate against those who wish to participate. We apologize for not making this message clear. We attempted to maintain anonymity of all sources in the story. In photos, we covered faces with Lancelute

Mast Media apologizes for ineffectively living up to this purpose at PLU with Volume 1, Issue 2 of Mast

mascot heads. A video was created that told the chronological story of a party. Participants were promised anonymity, including through distortion of voices. This was not fully accomplished. We apologize for not appropriately concealing the identities of those who were promised such, and we regret any perceived generalizations made about student groups.

MAST EDITORIAL BOARD mast@plu.edu

On Oct. 30, Mast Media printed its first full edition of Mast Magazine featuring the cover story "Get Drunk Make Mistakes." The Mast Media Editorial Board would like to follow the publication and the resulting conversation with a public clarification. Student media at any university holds a large amount of responsibility. It's not a marketing tool for its school. Rather, it must highlight the strengths of its

Magazine. We think talking about partying at PLU is important. We decided to tell a story entitled "Get Drunk Make Mistakes" to shed light on a little-talked about issue, hoping to spark conversations about how party culture works and what it means for

SAMANTHA LUND Editor-in-Chief MATTHEW SALZANO Mast TV General Manager COURTNEY MIRANDA Opinion Editor DAVID MAIR News Editor BROOKE THAMES A&C Editor

STEVEN MCGRAIN Sports Editor JEFF DUNN Copy Editor PARIS FRANKLIN Copy Editor SANNA VARGAS Copy Editor MCKENNA MORIN Chief Photographer

There were also concerns about the story "S--- Happens." We desired to show the daily struggles of our fantastic Environmental Services staff, not glorify any inappropriate behavior. We apologize to anyone who felt they weren't given the care and respect they deserve as members of our community due to the content of Mast Magazine. Most importantly, we wish to use Mast Magazine and the stories in it to point campus conversation toward productive discourse. In this issue, that meant writing about partying and the health and safety issues that follow it, the way students modify their body as artistic expression, the service of Environmental Services Staff and the resiliency of a PL U student. We sincerely apologize that the stories we told were not more thoughtfully designed in a way which facilitated productive conversation. As a PLU student organization, we are dedicated to being intentional in our interactions with campus dialogue. In the coming months and the publications that accompany it, we plan on engaging with the student body we proudly belong to through events and stories that help it continue to grow and evolve to a better place. We hope you will actively share your thoughts and feelings about the things that matter to you as we strive to meaningfully care for Pacific Lutheran University.

COLTON WALTER Chief Designer GENAVIE BOOTS Mast TV Executive Producer SARAH GIOMI Assistant Producer JAKE BILYEU Assistant Producer EDDIE J. MCCOVEN Mast Radio Director

TH Student organizations respond to Mast Magazine Hello Lutes, We write to you concerned about . a variety of things that were published in the most recent Mast Magazine. The manner in which student life at Pacific Lutheran University was portrayed doesn't reinforce community standards or values. In traditional roles, the media and government both need to collaborate and balance one another. This is one of those situations. This isn't meant to be personal rather it's about our organizations' role as conduits for student voice. Over the past few days, the Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University and other student-led organizations have been approached by various individuals with diverse concerns. Many were surprised and angered to find both video and photos of themselves in Mast publications. We certainly support First Amendment rights of free speech - when that speech is backed by knowing individuals who consent to their participation in this publication. Just as the university must seek consent from students when it uses their image, we feel the student publication must also seek the same standard of consent. In addition to unknowingly recording individuals at this party, the

appropriation of the knight helmet to somewhat obscure the identities of students is also of great concern. This symbol is one of the university at large (and particularly athletics). Associations like this one imply

"party creepers," girls being pressured to "man up" and take off their pants, and the concerning title "Get Drunk Make Mistakes" all have serious ramifications that weren't addressed in the article.

In order to do so, we are hosting a "Let's Talk About: Party Culture at PLU" session 7:30 p.m. Nov. 11 in AUC 133, open to all. university connections that condone the actions of this group. Additionally, I'm concerned about the construing of various party games and their implications for how our campus may be promoting unhealthy behavior. The off-hand comments describing

Associated Students of PLU CHARLES MOGEN Executive Senator ELLIE LAPP Vice President MARTHA SPIEKER President

Now that this article has been published, these points need to be used as a starting point for conversations about our community of inclusion and care. From the students at the party to those who were not, there is a real concern about how our institution is perceived and what we

Residence Hall Association ATHENA GORDON Activities and Outreach Director TONO SABLAN Social Justice Director DREW HUFF Sustainibility Director TANNER HENDERSON Vice President BRE YOUNG President

actually stand for. The original intent of the article may have been to initiate dialogue regarding serious issues facing college students nationally: drinking culture and sexual misconduct. That intent is unclear to a reader in the form provided. After consultation with Mast Media, ASPLU, RHA, SAAC, and SAB seek to take this opportunity to transform the conversation into a beneficial dialogue regarding student life and culture at PLU. In order to do so, we are hosting a "Let's Talk About: Party Culture at PLU" session at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 11inAUC133, open to all. We also plan to expand this opportunity of dialogue by encouraging and collecting statements from Lutes about their vision of a healthy community through tabling early next week. We invite you to send us a short description of what a vibrant, healthy, and inclusive community could (or does) look like at PLU. These considerations can be emailed to asplupres@plu.edu or as comments on the ASPLU Facebook page. This is an opportunity for the entire community to engage in conversation and we look forward to partnering with others to ensure that our community of care is a reality.

Student Athletic Advisory Committee MELISSA DEAN President Student Activities Board SHIORI OKI Director


NOy. 6,

2015

RESPQNSE9


10

OPINION

THE MAST

NOVEMBER 6,

2015

Let's talk about sex! Easy lnformatjon to swallow: An oral sex and STI discussion The weekly "Let's talk about sex" series

will look into a different topic about

sex and sexuality tn an effort to raise awareness, bring education and be a forum for discussion. To write in and share your opinions and stories, email mast@plu.edu. Coming from a public school in a liberal state, I often forget how lucky I am to have taken sexual education courses in such a open place. From 6th - 10th grade, every sex ed unit in health class was the most exciting topic for me because it meant learning new ways to understand my body and to know how to protect myself from pregnancy and STis (Sexually Transmitted Infections). I mention this is because it still shocks me when I hear people say that they don't understand why people use condoms for oral sex or that they have no idea what a dental dam is. If you're one of these p~ople who hasn't had the chance to .f~am why protecting yourself dur.i ng or~l sex is important, here's your chrui.ce now so you can make better educated decisions for your sex life in the future. First things first, STls CAN be passed from person to person during oral sex, and I'm not just talking about

herpes. It's easy for gonorrhea, syphilis, chlamydia and HPV to be transmitted from the genital area or anus to the mouth and throat during unprotected oral sex. There's even a chance HIV could be transmitted if you are giving oral sex, although the likelihood of this isn't as common as the others. Some of these STis, such as HPV or herpes, are transmitted through skin to skin contact, so it's good to be aware of the fact that condoms or barriers can offer limited protection if partners aren't careful. There is a possibility that these may also be passed during mutual masturbation from genitalia or the anus to hands or fingers. In terms of protection for this, gloves are an option used to prevent transmittance. Another important factor to consider is that not all of your partners may be aware they are infected. I've had people tell me, "I would hope I got to know someone well enough to know if they're infected," but the problem with that logic is if neither party has been tested since their last unprotected experience, how can you know for sure either of you are clean? I make it habitto get tested consistently,

The next eye witness A comment on police body cameras MIKEY LANGNER Guest Writer langnemw@plu.edu Imagine being able to see exactly what happened every time a police officer has a questionable run in with a suspect. The regulations 1hat require police to wear body cameras are still in the trial and error process, but more agencies are starting to tu~ to this in the hopes that itwill dear up police brutality issues. Body cameras are increasing in popularity, and a significant figure backing this reform is President Obama. He is a complete supporter of all police working the street wearing body cams. This spring, the Justice Department announced a three year program budgeted for $75 million, including $20 million this year to 路police departments for body cameras and body camera training. Research shows there are 88% fewer incidents of use of force and 59% fewer complaints against officers wearing body cameras. The uncertainty of not knowing exactly how things happened in cases such as the Michael Brown shooting in Ferguson, Missouri this past year have caused an uproar. There are always multiple sides to a story, and most of them are morphed and stretched to form a story vastly different than what actuaily took place. Figuring out which story is true and providing the correct facts

-

of how things really took place is always a difficult process, especially when every person claims to have seen something different. Body cameras can help eliminate tJ:ie elements of uncertainty in such'' cases and even help with a speedy verdict in trials. However, there is an issue with the body cameras being an J.nvasion of privacy because they provide stateowned footage. Does every person want their arrest to be recorded? Ate the people living their everyday lives okay with showing up on the footage of an arrest? When it comes to bystander::; being on the video there is always the option of blurring their faces, which is what is likely !o be done. The state of Washington has an open records law and the police in Seattle received so many requests of bodycamera footage that they released videos to Youtube, and censored them beyond what is required by the state's law. To this point there haven't been enough studies done to determine whether or not police wearing body cameras would have a positive or negative outcome. However, the very few studies that have been done have had some positive outcomes and many people believe that body cameras are.the future qf law enforcement. A body camera on every officer may be the reality in the near future, especially with the government pouring millions into the cause.

even if I use protection. Most STls do not have visiJ;>le indicators, and it is not common for noticable symptoms to arise. Most people may not even be aware they have herpes or HPV until they experience a flare-up. For your own safety and for the safety of your current or future partners, it's important to routinely have yourself checked. Now that you know why it's important to keep yourself protected during oral sex, how do you go about carrying this out? For penis to mouth oral sex, condoms are the safest route. It's just important to know that skin to skin contact with the testicle area still allows for transmittance, as stated before. If the taste of condoms sounds unappealing, most condoms companies sell flavored ones. Flavors vary from mint to banana to even whiskey flavored, and they're just as effective as non-flavored condoms. Play around with what tastes best to you. If you don't think you'd mind the taste of plain rubber, there are condoms always provided by RAs in resident bathrooms. For mouth to anus or vagina oral sex, barriers such as dental dams are generally used. Dental dams are used

as a simple stretchy barrier to place over the area of contact. Dental dams are not sold in most stores, but Planned Parenthood clinics can carry them and they can be bought online. You can also create one by simply cutting the tip off of a condom or a latex glove, then cut down the side and you'll find yourself with a handy homemade dam. Now, not everyone decides to have oral sex with protection. All of my partners I've given oral or received oral sex from were with people who had been tested recently prior to our sexual engagement. It's important to keep yourself aware of what risks are out there in terms of unprotected sex and what precautions to take to lower those risks. In terms of oral sex, get tested regularly, communicate with your partners about getting tested as well (especially if you just recently began a monogamous relationship or participate in a non-monogamous one), and use protection when you're unsure if either party has an STI. Don't let risky behaviors get the best of you. Now that you have the informational tools, take what's been given to you and see what works the best for you.

The rights路 are wrong The term 'women's rights' is a misnomer. Here's why. CARLY STAUFFER

Opinion Writer stauffce@plu.edu I'm a female sophomore in college. I'm also an uptight old man. At least that's what the perceptions about my political ideologies seem to say about me. Our culture has a tendency to personify stances - that is, to assign genders to ideologies. From this we get the term, "women's rights." "Women's rights," however, does not translate to "the inherent rights of women." According to this generation, though I am a woman, I do not support women's rights. Our society has largely accepted the meaning of this term to include "reproductive rights," a kinder label for its essential definition: abortion rights. While I support improvement in maternity (and paternity!) leave, and equal pay for equal work, my pro-life stance seems to eliminate me from saying I support the rights of my own gender. What a way to feel isolated. When my beliefs apparently make me a traitor to my entire sex, I think there's a problem. Here's the deal: "women's rights" is a misnomer. If you believe in equality of the sexes, then there should not be a right existing for a man and not a woman, and vice versa. Certainly biological differences between the sexes may lead to slightly different applications of the law (i.e. maternity versus paternity leave), but in essence there should be no rights specific to a sex - otherwise, we'd have dejure sexism. "Women's rights," should then also mean "men's rights." We can eliminate gender and call them "human rights." So, human rights? Those I believe in. But women's rights, I do not. For us divergent females, "women's rights" is an isolating term. As for the men supportive of the liberal causes associated with "women's rights," the term is alienating. And when there are men who do root for women's rights and women that don't, it's dear that the phrase is a misnomer perpetuating a false perception - that ideologies are a matter of

gender. (They're not.) Ideologies are a matter of the mind. This is an extremely important truth to recognize, as it peels away another layer of the battles of the sexes that so often appears in politics. Here's what I mean: in labeling a desired "right," such as abortion, a women's right, it suggests that abortion is something women are naturally entitled to. It also implies that the guilty party so evilly hindering women from attaining this entitlement is men. Let another battle of the sexes begin. While blaming women's apparent lack of rights on men is certainly a convenient argument, that doesn't mean it's a good one. (It's not.) The modern application of the term "women's rights" harmfully suggests that the "old white men" in power are the ones keeping these entitlements from women. But here's the plot twist...some of those "old white men" aren't actually old white men at all. They're people like me! Perhaps our society's quest for equality would be a little more fruitful if we would stop shooting ourselves in the foot. Pitting men against women hinders achievement of equality and derails the efforts of true feminism. Feminism is about cooperation between the sexes as equals. When ideologies are gendered, however, a line is drawn between men and women, and we find ourselves one step further from solving the problem. Rather, in recognizing that ideologies are matters of the mind and not matters of gender, we can eliminate the term "women's rights" and, in doing so, remove another barrier between the sexes. "Women's rights" is a term both misleading and unnecessary. If you support the causes aligned with this term, such as the pro-choice movement, then say so. But don't classify these causes as "women's rights." To do so generalizes women, isolates men and derails the efforts of true feminism. And I refuse to accept the notion that my pro-life views make me a woman hater, a traitor to my own sex, an opponent of equality and human rights. They don't make me an old man. They make me a conservative.


NOVEMBER 6,

THE MAST

2015

China invests $5.2 billion; just 13 miles away LUCAS SCHAUMBERG Guest Writer

schaumlc@plu.edu China is looking for a nexus of methanol production and exportation for the United States. They seem to have found it in Tacoma. Backed by a $5.2 billion investment from China, Northwest Innovation Works (NIW), itself a company owned by the Chinese government, will begin construction of methanol plants along the coasts of Washington and Oregon starting in 2017. The largest of the plants, which will convert large amounts of natural gas into methanol, would be located in the Port of Tacoma just 13 miles from PLU. The demand for this process has tripled in the last five years alone, and will continue to increase as countries divest from coal and oil based energy. China in particular, currently the largest world consumer of coal, has ramped up demand on cleaner-burning methanol in an effort to reduce fossil fuel dependency. While the global environment stands: to gain from China's increase of methanol consumption, for the tide-flats of Tacoma, the plant's environmental impact remains unclear. The Clean Air Act (CAA), Clean Water Act (CWA) and the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) do not require , methanol monitoring, meaning there is no available database on occurrence of methanol in the environment. A study done by Duke University, titled "China's growing methanol economy and its implications for energy and the environment," determined that no prediction on the correlation between long-term methane production and air quality could reasonably be made. The plant's long-term production, as well as the possibility for leaks, has a chance of fouling the air that future Pacific Lutheran University students will breathe.

A recent article in Seattle-based Sightline Daily points out a possibility in harm to the local ecosystem, writing that methanol plants "produce a stew of waste that includes heavy metals, volatile organic compounds and various air pollutants." Computer modeling of methanol air levels is a shaky science at best. A study in 2011 documenting methanol concentrations over Beijing found levels that were 10 times higher than those predicted by models. Methanol has low rate of evaporative emission which means it poses less danger in the event of a spill. Proponents of the deal taut the three year construction as a catalyst for the local economy. "We can have family-wage manufacturing jobs, and build strong and enduring communities while reducing carbon pollution," said Brian Bonlender, the director of the Washington state Department of Commerce, in an August statement. Powering the plants requires huge amounts of natural gas to be piped in from Canada, which will stimulate investment in the required infrastructure as well. The potential creation of as many as 1,000 jobs over three years, as well as the supposed millions of dollars in tax revenue would reconfigure the already expanding cityscape of Tacoma. Future PLU students are already projected to live in a denser and more populous Tacoma. Their views of Commencement Bay will be filled by mammoth freighters hauling methanol on a slow crawl to Dalian, China, 5,295 miles away. Students will certainly face more traffic congestion to reach the city as well. PLU might stand to gain something from these plants. China's partnership with Tacoma will continue to strengthen an already robust economic link, recently highlighted in President Xi Jinping' s visit last week. It's not implausible to imagine a strengthened link between PLU and China resulting from the plants as well.

OPINION 11

The rage on wage COLTON WALTER

Chief Designer waltercj@plu.edu For the past few years, cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles and Seattle have approved a raise to their minimum wages. In Tacoma, this decision will raise the hourly rate from roughly $8 to a bold $15 over the next three years. The issue is polarizing to many. While some see the initiative as a way to increase revenue and spending power, the raise' s speculated consequences on the job market make $15 seem a lot less appealing. One group that would definitely be harmed by the raise is the people who are currently employed. Though their pay rate would jump to double the federal wage, most employees' job security would be jeopardized. "There will be people who lose their jobs over this. I don't think there's any question about that," said Norris Peterson, Pacific Lutheran University's Chair of Economics. While large corporations may have an easier time affording an increase in their workers' pay, smaller companies would have to decide whether or not to fire workers and reduce the number of hours they give their employees. Thus, with fewer hours, these workers' incomes will roughly stay the same as it was before the wage raise. It doesn't make sense to raise the minimum wage if the consequences are likely endangering jobs and shortening work hours if people's income stays the same or drops. Those who are trying to enter the job market are also going to be seriously affected. This raise in minimum wage makes it a lot easier for hirers to pick

their employees based on prejudices. "That's a recipe for disaster," said Peterson. "This gives employers a license to discriminate on any margin they feel like, just because they can." Additionally, people who held back entering the workforce for $7 an hour will likely try to get jobs that pay $15. This increases the number of people trying to enter the workforce, making it harder for anyone to be employed. PLU Economics Professor Lynn Hunnicutt expressed how people looking for jobs will have it the hardest. "If the minimum wage goes up we should not be surprised that companies will try to get by with fewer workers," she said. Entry-level jobs, typically reserved for high school or college students, would be handed to overqualified adults. Even businesses that offer attainable jobs wouldn't hire an inexperienced high school student for $15 an hour when there's a surplus of grown adults with greater professional experience. Raising the minimum wage would cripple people trying to push their way into the labor force. This unprecedented wage jump will be brimming with negative consequences for the job market. While a sudden jump to a $15 wage seems great on paper, it's not realistic. Both Professor Peterson and Professor Hunnicutt say that a better solution would be raising the wage to $11 or $12 in cities like Seattle. This is a more practical figure and wouldn't hurt the job market like a devastating $15 wage would.


12

THE MAST

OPINION

NOVEMBER 6,

2015

'' J

j

MARISOL ESPINOSA Opinion Writer espinomr@plu.edu Governor Greg Abbott of Texas, recently signed a law that will be enacted during the beginning of the 2016 fall semester for college students, allowing for concealed weapons and firearms on campuses in Texas. Public universities will be prohibited from outright banning firearms with the aim to normalize gun carry in light of the recent Oregon shooting. Due to the nature of the law, many students are upset and aim to

protest against it the only way they can: with dildos. "#CocksNotGlocks" is a student-based protest that finds allowing concealed weapons on campus a higher risk than what it's worth. Many students are disgusted by the nature of Texan laws that only just recently (in 2008) allowed for the purchasing and owning of dildos, despite their non-violent nature, but absolutely supports the owning and possession of firearms on a college campuses. Do these students have a right to be upset? Short answer: yes. But that doesn't take away from the

fact that if a student feels safer possessing a concealed weapon, they should be allowed to carry it. It may seem appalling for such a law to have been passed after another school shooting that resulted in the death of students, but some people would legitimately feel better knowing they have a way to protect themselves. Everyone's definition of what it means to feel safe and how to go about it is completely different. Therefore, I understand where the law's supporters stand; students should be allowed to carry a weapon if it means feeling safer. If a shooter truly intended

on hurting other people, laws against carrying guns would not matter by any means. With that being said, I also agree with the protesting students. As adults, students should be allowed the freedom of sexual expression (within appropriate terms). Before 2008, it was a felony to own more than 6 dildos in Texas. It shouldn't be shameful for someone to fully embrace their sexual self. Talking and expressing allows for mindful discussions about sex that are generally beneficial for students our age. Why censor full grown adults from doing so?

It's easy to simply say that seeing another person's dildo in a public space is uncomfortable for other students, but seeing someone with a gun or knowing someone is carrying a gun can also be unnerving. As stated before, feelings of safety vary for each individual, but if someone truly had the intent to harm others, the inability to carry weapons would not change that outcome. Therefore, as long as safe and healthy habits are used with either item, both groups have a right to carry what they'd like, whether it be firearms, dildos, or both.

Little Carly's Corner A

LITTLE

RUSTY

CARLY STAUFFER

Cartoonist stauffce@p/u.edu

f NSl/JJ:.

7HE

1'1lN/)

My name is Carly and I'm a Physics major here at PLU. I'm a total nerd, in love with Olympic National Park, and enjoy singing in University Chorale, writing, learning, acting and spending time with family (and Jesus!). While I somehow manage to look as though I've got my life pretty under control, I generally feel like I'm awkwardly stumbling around, trying to figure out life ... just like Little Carly. Enjoy!

of""

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Samantha Lund lundsr@plu.edu OPINION EDITOR Courtney Miranda NEWS EDITOR David Mair

MAST ~l\llAST

MAST

TV

THE MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447

A&C EDITOR Brooke Thames

SPORTS EDITOR Steven McGrain

CHIEF DESIGNER Colton Walter

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER Genavie Boots

COPY EDITORS Jeff Dunn Paris Franklin Hannah Soltis Sanna Vargas

MAST RADIO PRODUCER & PROGRAM DIRECTOR Eddie McCoven

ASSISTANT PRODUCERS Jake Bilyeu Sarah Giomi

MAST TV CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER McKenna Morin

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The responsibility of The Mast is to discover, report and istribute information to its readers about important issues, events nd trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists ode of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and dvertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mast

GENERAL MANAGER Matthew Salzano salzano@plu.edu

EQUIPMENT& TECHNOLOGY ENGINEER Samuel Altenberger ACADEMIC ADVISER Joanne Lisosky

staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu.edu by 5 p.m. the Monday befor publication. The Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters fo length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and clas standing or title for verification. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academi year. To subscribe, email mast@plu.edu.


NOVEMBER 6,

THE MAST

2015

13 SPORTS

The Mast Monday Night Football pick 'em Editor's Note: Pacific Lutheran's student body picks who will win and why. This poll began Week 2 and there wasn't an issue for two weeks. This is reason for five games.

Hayden McCartney is human and has relinquished his first place spot with a loss after picking the Giants over the Eagles in Week6. Chicago Bears travel to warm San Diego for a Monday Night

:::~:c:i~:rs A:~~~Te~~ryb~~~

week in their loss at Minnesota. They were able utilize him early and often, but fell in the fourth quarter due to Vikings kicker Blair Walsh kicking it a field goal to win as time expired. Chargers received the same treatment after their game at Baltimore. San Diego was able to put up a lot of points -29- in the loss. Ravens kicker Justin Tucker

which team turns the ball over most often, expect both teams to Âľght up the scoreboard.

BEARs

AT

:~;:'':i:g:â&#x20AC;˘m::nn:~,::: CHARGER

Chicago because they have the firepower to throw the ball over the field against a weak secondary. This game will be decided by

D.J. Winter Pick: Chargers Record: 3-2

"111 take the Chargers because they have a decent defense and Phillip Rivers is still a pretty good quarterback."

Nicoya Benham-Marin Pick: Chargers Record: 2-3

"I've got California in my blood and they had a higher expert pick on fantasy."

Juston Lind Pick: Chargers Record: 3-2

"Two teams that have struggled this season. I give it to Chargers because I think the Bears will have a hard time making up for losing Matt Forte in the backfield."

Tahlia Terhune Pick: Chargers Record: 3-2

"111 go with the Chargers. I feel like their offense will pull through and Rivers is more consistent than Cutler. Neither defense is great, but I think the Bears are worse."

Traeger Jarrad Pick: Chargers Record: 4-1

"It's already written in the stars who will be the victor. I am from San Diego so I have to support my team."

Hayden McCartney Pick: Chargers Record: 4-1 Kailyn Osaki Pick: Chargers Record: 2-3

"Don't like the Bears without running back Matt Forte and Rivers for San Diego has been playing really well lately, despite coming out on the losing end of games." "Flipped a coin on this one. Taking the Chargers at home."

Fantasy Football: Week 9 FLEX: Jeremy Hill, Cincinnati Bengals The Bengals continue to steam roll through the NFL and next week should not stop them. Cleveland will make the trip the Cincinnati, the Browns defense gives the second most points in Fantasy to running backs.

QUARTERBACK: Drew Brees, New Orleans Saints After posting a stat line of completing 40 of 50 passes for 511 yards and 7 touchdowns, this offense will not stop anytime soon with Titans up next.

DEFENSE/SPECIAL TEAMS: Denver Broncos Broncos are undefeated thanks to their defense, play them against the Colts.

WIDE RECEIVER: Dez Bryant, Dallas Cowboys Continuing to find chemistry with Quarterback Matt Cassell will only improve their passing game. Last week was difficult against Richard Sherman and the Legion of Boom.

/

TEAMS ON BYE: SEAHAWKS, LIONS, RAVENS, TEXANS, CHIEFS, CARDINALS


THE MAST

14 SPORTS

Student-Athlete Spotlight

NOVEMBER 6,

Could daily fantasy sports help Pete Rose?

An interview with Michaela Edgers CHRISTIAN BOND Sports Writer bondco@p/u.edu

PHOTO BY BAILEY PLUMB: Edgers elevates to spike the ball against George Fox.

CARA GILLESPIE Sports Writer 路11 @ I d 91 esce P u.e U Michaela "Mack" Edgers is a senior middle blocker on the volleyball team and a center on the women's basketball team. I sat down with my teammate to ask her your questions. Mast Media: How tall are yo~- 路 Michaela Edgers: I am 6'4", but you can look that up on the rosters. MM: Which sport is your favorite and why? ME: My favorite is basketball, but if you ~sk which sport is my f~vorite to play, that is a secret. MM: What are your plans after college? ME: I am currently applying to graduate school for veterinary medicine and I hope to get accepted this fall and attend next fall and go into the field of wildlife medicine and hopefully work at a wildlife preserve. MM: Where would you want to work on a wildlife preserve? ME: I would really like to work outside of the country, travel abroad and do something with large animals in Africa, but I think I would be happy just about anywhere. MM: What animal are you most excited to work with? ME: Probably lions and elephants if I get to that, but I really like dogs and cats too so that will be fun.

MM: You went to high school in Illinois; what is the biggest difference between Illinois and Washington? ME: Easily the geography. In Illinois you can see for miles and here you can't see 20 feet in any direction because trees are everywhere, and mountains.

2015

Baseball's hit king could be receiving a second chance in the eye of the public. Pete Rose is back in the spotlight, courtesy of Fox Sports. Rose gives his take as analyst for Fox coverage of Major League Baseball. Pete Rose comes off as a crotchety old man, whom most find humorous. Controversy has surrounded Rose for most of his life. After 15 years of denial, Pete Rose admitted in 2004 that he had bet on baseball. Documents were found that proved Rose had bet on games he both played in and managed. Rose's actions have disgraced his legacy more than even he could have imagined. Former Commissioner Bud Selig placed a lifetime ban on Pete Rose from the game of baseball. Rose's action were deemed unforgivable by the man in charge during that time. Selig retired in 2014, and in 2015 Pete Rose has appeared on television sets at major baseball events.

New Major League Baseball commissioner Rob Manfred is trying to modernize America's pastime. We've seen pace of play initiatives go into effect to make games move quicker. We've also witnessed a new home run derby format, which turned out to be highly entertaining. Manfred is also a supporter of sports betting. "Gambling in terms of our society has changed its presence on legalization, and I think it's important for there to be a conversation between me and the owners about what our institutional position will be," Manfred said in an interview with Outside the Lines, a show on ESPN. Manfred has had hearings regarding the punishment handed down to Pete Rose. Rose could be reinstated after years of being banned from the game he loves. Pete Rose is undoubtedly a Hall of Farner. His numbers speak to how great he was. If re-instated, Pete Rose will be immortalized, after being dead to many of his peers.

MM: What is your favorite thing about playing volleyball at PLU? ME: I love my teammates so much, there is so much energy and so much friendship and we just get along really well. MM: What's your favorite part about playing basketball at PLU? ME: Probably my teammates again, but it is funny because basketball has a very different dynamic than volleyball. Where volleyball is really fun, happy and upbeat, basketball is down to business and you get a lot of solidarity in just how hard we work and how dedicated we are to the sport. MM: What is the weirdest thing about you? ME: I really like to crochet, and will do that in my free time just for fun, so if you need a blanket let me know. MM: We hear that you like baking, what is the best thing you bake? ME: My best dish is probably apple crisp if we are talking about dessert and I make a really good stuffed chicken lemon thing that is also very tasty. Check out @golutes or search #AskALute on Instagram to submit your questions for next week's student athlete Q&A. PHOTO COURTESY OF LORI BRANHAM

Offensive woes hurt Lutes football KELLEN WESTERING Sports Writer westerka@plu.edu It was a wet day at Baker Stadium in Tacoma, Wash. The scene was set for the classic crosstown rivalry showdown between the University of Puget Sound Loggers and the Lutes. "It felt like I was playing in a shower," said junior running back Kyle Madsen. "It was so hard for either team to get their footing down." Three of the Loggers' four wins have come within single digits, whereas the Lutes are on the opposite end of the spectrum:

Three of the five losses for the Lutes have come within single digits. Even though both teams' records looked vastly different, this game was going to be competitive. Plus, anything can happen in a rivalry game. It was a very sloppy first half as both teams struggled on offense. The first points of the game didn't come until the 14:43 mark in the 2nd quarter when Lutes Junior linebacker Isaiah Watkins sacked backup Loggers quarterback Tan.'1er Diebold in the end zone for a safety giving the Lutes a two-point advantage. Throughout the first half the Lutes offense had the ball in the

red zone two different times but couldn't convert. When the second half started the Lutes ran out onto the field to start their first possession but starting freshman quarterback Cole Chandler was nowhere to be found. The third string freshman quarterback Walker LaVoy from Big Timber, Montana would be under center for the rest of the game. Much like the first half, both teams struggled offensively until the 4:25 mark in the 4th quarter, when the Loggers scored on an 18 yard touchdown pass from Hans Fortune to Brennan Schon to give them the lead 6-2. They went on to miss the two-point conversion.

PHOTOS BY JASON BOREAN: (Left) Lutes' offensive line preparing for the upcoming play. (Right) Sophomore Kris Singstad (98), juniors Ben Welch (12) and Marc Gallant (22) lead everyone out on to the field.

The Lutes had one final drive to score the game-winning touchdown. After taking possession on their own 32-yard line, the Lutes picked up three first downs and moved 55 yards down the field in 12 plays. On 4th and 10 on the Loggers' 15 yard line the Lutes failed to convert and the ball went back to the Loggers who took a knee to end the game, winning 6-2. The Loggers hadn't beaten the Lutes since 2005. "Today was a tough one to swallow. I'm really proud of the way so many guys competed today. The thing

I love about this team is it never matters what our record is, we love each other and will always strive for excellence," said senior Captain Chase Houser.

PHOTO COURTESY OF JASON BOREAN: First-year Cole Chandler (6) is the second quarterback for the Lutes to fall to injury during this season.


路.

NOVEMBER 6,

THE MAST

2015

SPORTS 15

Na records hat-trick, Soccer wins 8-1 JAKE BILYEU SP.Orts Writer b1/yeujc@plu.edu Pacific Lutheran University's men's soccer team finished up their road schedule for the 2015 season with two wins against conference foes Pacific and George Fox last weekend, improving their conference record to 11-2, and putting them just one point behind conference leader, Whitworth. "The second time you play someone, especially on the road, can be difficult," head coach John Yorke said. The team's Saturday match with Pacific got off to a shaky start. While the Lutes kept control of the pace of the game, outshooting the opposing Boxers 19-3, they struggled to capitalize on Pacific's vulnerable defenders. The tone of the game changed

in the final minutes. As things heated up late, Pacific's Matt Kimball was red carded in the 86th minute. This swung the momentum in the Lutes' direction, and they capitalized when sophomore Joel Frykholm kicked in a goal from 13 yards off of a pass from Diego Aceves with a minute to go to give the Lutes the 1-0 win. "We were not consistent in our decision making in our attack and tried to force too many balls into places that were not available," Yorke said. "In the end, it was a great finish by Joel on a great pass from Diego, and an excellent fight by our team to get the result." The Lutes followed up their tough win Saturday with a powerful offensive attack, the likes of which the team hadn't seen since 2011. Thanks to Frykholm, senior Troy-Mikal Oliger, sophomore Eddie Na, first-year Hunter

Clarke, and sophomore Rene Ramos, the team scored eight goals as they cruised to an 8-1 victory over George Fox Sunday afternoon. "It wasn't the eight goals themselves that were impressive to me, but that we had the resolve to do the things correctly that allowed us to score those goals," Yorke said. Na had his most productive game of the season for the Lutes. Along with two assists, Na scored three goals of his own in what became the team's first hat trick of the season. "Eddie Na had a great PHOTO BY BAILEY PLUMB: Lutes Goalkeeper Mike Arguello (1) has allowed game today," Yorke said. "Our four goals during the Lutes seven game winning streak. midfield of Diego, Joel, Troy and Bennett really set the tone of team's total on the year to 16, some dangerous players," Yorke how the day would go." which would set a school record. said. "Both teams will be ready to Next up for the Lutes is their Should the team climb into the play next weekend and it should senior night game, where they national rankings, the win could be a fantastic game." will host UPS, third in conference, send them to the playoffs as well. Saturday at 6 p.m. "UPS is an outstanding A win would raise the program with great coaches and

PHOTO BY BAILEY PLUMB: Senior Troy-Mikal Oliger (10) scored the second of the eight goals on Sunday.

PHOTO BY BAILEY PLUMB: Sophomore Eddie Na (9) celebrates with Junior Diego Aceves (7) and Sophomore Jacob Beck (2). Na has scored seven goals over the last four games.

The Regulators "regulators," attendance has been up. "We've seen a huge difference in attendance. Just three years ago we were at around 450 students," Thompson said. "Last year we had 782 students play Intramurals have been around since intramural sports, and this year we are on 1913 and they are a staple of university pace to grow even more." The rules are also a bit different for athletics. At Pacific Lutheran University, intramurals as they are for varsity sports. "We really adapt so they have intramurals are offered in a variety of sports including volleyball, football, similar rules, but not nearly as many. We soccer, softball and basketball. Some just really aim to simplify the rules to a sports are so popular they are offered point where someone who hasn't played multiple times a year. Each sport has a can come right in immediately and feel season and any student at PLU can sign comfortable." Fewer rules and a friendlier up to play. It wasn't that long ago when PLU atmosphere are key pieces to the enjoyment of intramurals were intramural an sports. unorganized, A new title unregulated "May have been listening to has also been organization. Coordinator Warren G & Nate Dogg when created in intramural of Recreation designing the shirts." sports this Rob Thompson season. Student was hired by referees are PLU to create Rob Thompson now called and oversee Coordinator of Recreation "regulators," programs like a change that Outdoor Rec, can be seen on the Bike Coop, the shirts of and intramurals. Something he has been working on is straightening up and Thompson's employees. "I wanted it to be a bit different and improving intramural sports. A big feature that Thompson has the word "referee" was a bit boring to me. created is the position of intramural I'm also a fan of '90s hip-hop and may have been listening to Warren G & Nate referees. Before Thompson became coordinator, Dogg when designing the shirts." With new titles and a growing list of intramural sports had no referees and it was a free-for-all for athletes. offered sports every year, intramurals "Without refs it's really whoever has have become a welcomed diversion for the loudest voice usually gets the calls," student athletes at PLU. The new winter Thompson said. This organization, or lack season is coming soon and all PLU thereof, kept attendance and enjoyment students are encouraged to try their hand at their favorite sport. low in intramurals at PLU. Ever since the implementation of referees, or as Thompson now calls them

STEPHANIE COMPTON Sports Writer comptose@p/u.edu

PHOTO BY EMILY MCCONNELL: Senior Christian McConnell (left) and Junior Stephanie Compton (right) display the back of Intramural Referee shirts


THE MAST

16 SPORTS

Eootpa,tl:

.

". .-· ;at fuget .. ~

~ound, -Lost

Women vs.Whitman, Won2-l~ .vs Whitworth, Won 2:-1

2-6

.

·:;..

js;·

p Next: at Lewis & Clark, Saturday, 1 p .m.

Up Next: at Linfield, Saturday, 12 p.m.

Volleyball: vs Willamette, Won 3-1 vs George Fox, Won 3-1

Men's Soccer£ at ,PaGific"'~ ·l-0 :/ Won ..,, at George Fqx, Wdn 8-1 . .

~~

Up Next: at Linfield, Friday, 7 p.m.

NORTHWEST CONFERENCE STANDINGS Womenjs Soccer

Football TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Linfield

7

0

0

5-0

Won 7

Puget Sound

14

0

4

10-0-4

Won8

Whitworth

7

1

0

4-1

Won 1

LUTES

15

2

1

11-2-1

Won3

Puget Sound

5

2

0

4-1

Won3

Willamette

8

8

2

8-5-1

Won2

Pacific

5

3

0

3-2

Lost 1

Linfield

9

5

3

6-5-3

Won 1

Willamette

2

5

0

2-3

Won 1

Lewis & Clark

10

7

1

6-7-1

Lost 1

George Fox

3

5

0

1-4

Lost 3

Whitworth

6

10

3

4-8-3

Lost 2

LUTES

1

6

0

1-4

Lost 1

Whitman

2

11

6

2-7-6

Lost 2

Lewis & Clark

0

7

0

0-5

Lost 7

Pacific

3

13

2

3-9-2

Lost 4

George Fox

5

11

2

3-10-1

Lost 3

PHOTOS BY BAILEY PLUMB: (Far Left) Senior Hannah Walton runs in the NWC Championships. (Left) Freshman Chloe Epker (6) tries to tip the ball over the blocker (Right) Freshman Bo Frohock approaches the finishline at NWC Championships. (Far Right) Senior Emily Hanna (10) playing her final weekend of soccer at PLU.

.

1

Men s Soccer

Volleyball

~

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Whitworth

18

6

0

12-2

Won8

Whitworth

15

1

1

11-1-1

Won3

LUTES

16

7

0

10-4

Won5

LUTES

15

0

4

11-2

Won?

Willamette

13

9

0

9-5

Lost 2

Puget Sound

9

7

2

7-4-2

Lost 1

Linfield

10

13

0

7-7

Lost 2

Linfield

9

0

10

5-8

Won 1

Lewis & Clark

9

12

0

6-8

Lost 1

Pacific

6

11

4-8-1

Won 1

Puget Sound

9

13

0

6-8

Won 1

Willamette

5

11

2

4-8-1

Lost 1

Pacific

8

14

0

5-9

Lost 4

George Fox

6

10

3

3-7-3

Lost 1

George Fox

7

15

0

4-10

Lost 1

Whitman

3

12

2

2-9-2

Lost 2

Whitman

6

14

0

4-10

Won2


PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

NOVEMBER 13, 2015 I VOLUME 92, ISSUE 7 IMASTMEDIA.PLU.EDU - - - - - - -

Lute running backs outshine Pioneers KELLEN WESTERING Guest Writer westerka@plu.edu Pacific Lutheran University football found itself playing in a downpour for the second week in a row. This game had all the makings of_ being competitive, but the Lutes . were able to put together a complete game and beat Lewis and Clark 26-7. Both the Lutes and the Pioneers struggled to put points on the board this year. The teams currently sit at seventh , and eighth respectively in the Northwest Conference in yards per game. Even though the Pioneers haven't won a game, they look much better than last year, due in large part to their new head coach, Jay Locey. The Lutes struggled to run the football this season, but in this game, the runs added up to a win. The Lutes got on the scoreboard first with 13:03 left in the second quarter when sophomore running back Mark Gallant scored on a threeyard touchdown run. Gallant went on to score his second touchdown of the day with a 25yard scamper with 13:41 left in the fourth quarter. He finished the day with 15 carries for 66 yards with an average of 4.4 yards per carry. This was the best game the Lutes offensive line played this year, Gallant said. "The 0-Line played absolutely incredible today. They owned the line of scrimmage from the very start. Today was by far the best blocking of the season and the exciting thing is almost all of them will be back next year." Gallant wasn't the only Lute who shined Saturday. First-year running back Elijah Clayton and junior running back Darin Hargrove each had seven carries for 36 yards averaging 5.1 yards per carry. "It's so fun to play with other great running backs because we are able to rotate every couple plays and it keeps our legs fresh," Gallant said. The Lutes finished the game

with 158 yards on the ground, a season high. The Lutes' defense held the Pioneers to just 243 yards of total offense and only 46 yards rushing. The Lutes are second in the conference in yards given up per game behind Linfield. They forced the Pioneers to commit four turnovers. Junior safety Derek Chase, sophomore linebacker Isaiah Watkins and senior comer Reggie Collins all picked off Pioneers quarterback Mike defensive Machado. Junior lineman Moe Rodriguez had a fumble recovery to record the fourth and final turnover of the game. In his second start, PLU first-year quarterback Walker LaVoy finished the day 14-of-23 passing for 175 yards and two touchdowns connecting with two differe:nt receivers. Junior wide receiver Beau Lockmer caught a 25-yard touchdown with 6:41 left in the second quarter and sophomore Wide receiver Garrett Hittner hauled in a 30-yard touchdown with 8:41 left in the fourth quarter. The Lutes return home next week for the final game of the season against Linfield. They11 celebrate both Senior Day and Military Appreciation Day with kickoff set for 1 p.m. at Sparks Stadium in Puyallup.

A&C Worldfamous conductor performs with Choir of the West pp.5

NEWS Roots of Resilience: Progressive activism is not enough pp.3

"The 0 Line [. .. }owned the line of scrimmage from the very start. Today was by far the best blocking of the season and the exciting thing is almost all of them will be back next year.,, Mark Gallant Sophomore running back

'

.

(Photo by Angelo Maija) BOTTOM: Quarter back Jon Schaub drops back into the pocket to make a pass. (Photo by McKenna Morin)

FEATURE Starbucks and PLU both kick Christmas to the curb pp8-9

OPINION

SPORTS

The christmas Fall season sends Intramural sports Lutes into Santaphylactic champions pp.15 shock pp. 11

News pp. 1-4 A&E pp. 5-7 Feature pp. 8-9 Opinion pp. 10-11 Satire p. 12 Sports pp. 13-16

The Red Scare JEFF DUNN

News Editor dunnja@plu.edu Red meats may or may not be the death of you, but there's no need to whip yourselves into a frenzy. The World Health Organization (WHO) published findings in October suggesting a link between the consumption of certain types of meat and cancer. Processed meats, like hot dogs, sausages and bacon, were listed as" carcinogenic to humans." Tobacco smoke is under the same list. While red meats, like steak, are listed as "probably carcinogenic to humans." By "probably carcinogenic," WHO means "based on limited evidence from epidemiological studies showing positive associations between eating red meat and developing colorectal cancer." The limited evidence means even though a correlation has been observed, other explanations for the link may exist. Overall, the lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer in the U.S. is about 1 in 20, or 5 percent, according to the cancer society. By the WHO' s calculations having a cold-cut sandwich every day would only raise that to around 6 percent, the Seattle Times reports. PLU's Dining & Culinary Sous Chefs, Chuk Blessum and Anthony McGinnis said this isn't a cause for alarm here on campus. "The risks, though real, compared to what we already knew about red meat (the risk of heart disease and diabetes), don't make it seem any riskier than it already is," McGinnis said. "It should be consumed in moderation, just like all things," Blessum added. WHO had no specific dietary suggestions, saying in a Q&A on its website that it "evaluates the evidence on the causes of cancer but does not make health recommendations." The main health concerns for the consumption of red and processed meats are still sodium and fat intake, risk factors that contribute to cardiovascular disease and obesity. Pan-frying and grilling were listed as the most harmful way to prepare the meats, since the hightemperature and flames makes the meat more carcinogenic. On campus, the Dining and Culinary team has already begun to take steps to reduce the risks that come with eating. "Over the years, we've taken a lot of measures to reduce the bulk amount of food that is consumed by eliminating trays at All You Care To Eat meals and limiting the portion size of the protein," McGinnis said. "The only cooking practice we use [that makes the meat more carcinogenic] is grilling, so we try to limit the ways we create those carcinogens." The Dining & Culinary Services team also offers allergy & special diet support, healthy eating seminars and one-on-one nutrition counseling. In addition, vegan and vegetarian options are offered at every meal. The Dining & Culinary Services team wants to emphasize how important receiving feedback is for them. You probably won't have to change your diet to avoid the risks of colorectal cancer, but if you do, know that the Dining & Culinary Services team is here to help.


Lute research recognized HOW TO SOUND SMART said, but the Murdock Conference helps students meet up with graduate News Writer schools to further their education. PL U' s research program /ongstmr@plu.edu gives young scientists a foundation for successful futures. Previous students Students and faculty from the that performed research on campus Division of Natural Sciences ventured have gone on to work with Nobel prize to Vancouver, Wash., to attend the winners, gain doctorates and perform Murdock College Science Research research for elite companies and Conference. organizations. A total of 23 students Among the projects this presented research this weekend at the year is Waldow's work with seniors Murdock conference. The conference Sevryn Modahl, Collin Peterson and Tom Kolibaba. focuses on Over the past few work done by undergraduate "It's really celebration months, they've students and been working on students developing new the emphasizes the of advancement polymers to serve accomplishments." of the natural as electrolyte sciences. support for lithium " Dean Waldow batteries. Chemistry Professor "It is really In basic a celebration terms: they are of the students' accomplishments," trying to stop your laptop battery from professor of chemistry Dean Waldow catching on fire. said. "Murdock really supports a broad "It's a great opportunity," interest in having undergraduate Modahl said. "We got to present our research to other schools in the students actually doing re~earch." This is an opportunity unique Northwest and we can get their advice to students at schools like PLU. Many and suggestions for moving forward undergraduates do not get to' perform with it." research or do the majority of the work Also travelling were associate at larger universities because more professor of biology Julie Smith and qualified graduate students take those seniors Emily Gunnarson and Ingrid research positions. Clark to present ecological speciation However, at smaller schools there are in red crossbills. This more opportunities for undergraduates opportunity helps to get their hands on projects. students practice for future events, such "Moving into the research as next spring when chemistry students where you are actually trying to solve will present their work at the American problems is one of the best education Chemical Society Conference. ACS is tools," Waldow said. a prestigious organization and these Not only does this conference students will be displaying their work help them learn in the present, Waldow to some of the top minds in their field.

MEGAN LONGSTAFF

About class registration

It's that time again! The most stressful time of the semester has descended upon us once again. Registering doesn't have to be stressful though - take some tips from The Mast to organize your registration process.

Know when your registration time is

a

A

8

Don't

General University uirements

Utilize J-Term


NOVEMBER 13,

THE MAST

2015

What to do at PLU:

Voices of courage all of us to stop the domestic violence in our community and the injustices in our [justice] system." Members of the Pacific Lutheran University Sexuality and Personal Awareness Empowerment Team (SAPET) attended the event. PLU's Men's Project Coordinator, Jonathan Yglesias said "It was an incredible opportunity to hear real stories that affected not only people, but the communities they and their

attendee of the event, Sedoni Young said. "They're champions and conquerors." The U.S. National Domestic Violence reported one in four women and Tears of courage filled one in seven men who are 18 and the eyes of sympathetic audience older have been victims of severe members and five domestic physical violence by an intimate violence survivors as they partner in their lifetime. told their stories Oct. 30 at the "It was really powerful," University of Puget Sound. YWCA volunteer Nerissa Kenan October was domestic said. "I think it's a really great Violence Awareness Mtonth and healing process for the women, the YWCA of Pierce County seeing that all of these people organized "Voices of Courage," came out to hear their an event to share the stories." stories of domestic An associate survivors violence from the Puget Sound "Telling my story is me taking my board member of the YWCA, Kaitlyn Sill, area. "There are first step. This is me letting go of said it takes up to seven people that want to the past. A new beginning for me" attempts for a survivor to leave their abusive tell their story, but relationship for good. it's not always safe," Janelle In her said Jessica Gavre, Speaker monologue, character Ahe Development Paula said, "It took a Director at the YWCA long time for me to -..- "of Pierce County. realize it was abuse. Not "This was a way for all kinds of abuse leave bruises." survivors to tell their stories that families exist in." The YWCA of Pierce After the performances, was safe and confidential." Each of the five County provides safe shelter the survivors whose stories survivors met with a storyteller and comprehensive services for had been shared were given to develop her experiences survivors of domestic violence. the opportunity to stand. Their into monologues. Volunteer An associate board member of stories brought more than 75 actresses then performed those the YWCA, Justin Leighton, audience members to their feet monologues at the event. No said more than 8,300 domestic with tear-filled eyes. violence incidents were reported "Telling my story is original names were used. "My hope is we've in Pierce County in 2014, me taking my first step. This is me letting go of the past. A new touched people's heart and including eight homicides. "It was so inspirational beginning for me," Janelle said. spirit," storyteller Kimi Irene Ginn said. "It's going to take and so real and emotional," an

RHIANNON BERG News Writer bergau@plu.edu

Camas Wind Quintet: Lagerquist Concert Hall, 3:40 p.m. International Coffee Hour: Hong Hall Language Resource Center, 4 p.m. The Mask You Live In Film Screening: Xavier 201 6p.m. Steel Pan and Percussion Ensemble: Lagerquist Concert Hall, 8 p.m.

Veteran's Resource Fair: University Center, Chris Knutzen Hall, 11 a.m. Veteran's Football Game

2015: Sparks Stadium, 12 p.m. Lutes Football vs Linfield. Final game of the season: Sparks Stadium, 1 p.m.

Danish Sangaften: Scandinavian Cultural Center, 12 p.m.

NEWS3

Mostly Renaissance Concert; Lagerquist Concert Hall, 3 p.m.

Roots of resilience: Lecturer calls for more progressive goals in activism Helen Smith News Writer smithhe@plu.edu "Roots of Resilience" is the theme for this year's Spotlight Series of lectures. The annual Pacific Lutheran University tradition aims to examine

humanity's capacity to overcome. The most recent lecture in the series titled "Romantic Notions: Soldiers, Spouses and the Limits of LGBT Equality" was given by Seattle University School of Law associate Professor Dean Spade. His lecture focused on the current goals and milestones in activism, and why the benchmarks are not as progressive as they seem.

Spade argued the goals of current activism only help the most privileged of the disenfranchised. Those who need the most help are still in the same vulnerable positions they were in before these milestones were reached. He used himself as an example, commenting on how solving all of his problems as a transgender man would do nothing for a

PHOTO BY OLIVER JOHNSON Associate Professor Dean Spade addressed issues of legal reformation and activism

transgender person of color in prison. Getting laws passed to address these issues isn't helpful, he says - they don't make situations better for people who really need it. Legal action often only affects things just enough to make it look like something has changed without creating a significant difference. This is based off of the assumption that changing things for the most privileged will eventually help the most disenfranchised, which has repeatedly been proven wrong in the past. Spade argued that by passing certain laws, it gives society the chance to say the problem has been solved, when it really hasn't. The enforcement of activism through politics serves to expand institutions that are some of the worst agents of oppression like the police force and the military, including the recent immigration reforms which make it more difficult for criminals to cross the border. Spade said these types of results often end up being more divisive than successful. "Reforms often divide between the deserving and the undeserving," Spade said. "In Obama's recent executive action he said, 'Let's have people who are parents of American citizens have a pathway, so we're going to target the felons not the families.'

In that same piece of executive action he granted a small amount of relief, he also enhanced immigration reinforcement," Spade continued. "Think about which immigrants are most likely to have criminal records: people with darker skin, poorer people, people in more desperate situations, people who live in more policed neighborhoods. We're starting to see the more vulnerable people are getting left out." Spade's line of thinking revealed a whole new way to look at people who are often considered undeserving of activist help to better their situations and called for a reexamination of who movements are leaving out, and why. Throughout Spade's talk, he questioned the ways that people normally think of to deal with social justice issues and the goals that activists should be striving for. He called for a closer examination of activists' actions and their effects, who they help, who they leave disenfranchised and what they're doing to help people who need it the most. "It was a wealth of information," said graduate student Kristen Williams. "I would say he was great; I recommend someone else go out and see him."


THE MAST

4NEWS

NOVEMBER 13,

2015

''These Four Years'' Student documentary premieres at Seattle Central Public Library

JEFF DUNN News Editor dunnja@plu.edu "These Four Years," a documentary "about college students, by college students," will premeire at the Seattle Central Public Library this Saturday, Nov. 14, at 3 p.m. group The of four student documentarians includes seniors Natalie Deford, Evan Beringer,

screen, scribbled on the backs of Frisbees and the tops of coffee lids; "Average debt levels for all graduating seniors with student loans rose to $29,400 in 2014." "In 2014, students self-rated health emotional "Average debt levels for all graduating seniors dropped to 50.7%, its with student loans rose to $29,400" lowest level ever" The media lab documentary team The Institute for College Access and Success promises it will be engaging and relevant to PLU students.

Jasper Sortum and Grace Takehara. The documentary deals with costs of higher education, and whether or not the ends of graduating with a

degree justify the means of paying gratuitous amounts for that education. In the trailer, facts about college students flash across the

â&#x20AC;˘ Campus Safety Investigations Csl â&#x20AC;˘ Taken from weekly Campus Safety reports ........

.--~~~

...,..........-.....-~---,.,.

Building Secunty \!1olation A PLU student contacted Campus Safety (CSAF) to retrieve her Lute card that she had tossed out the window and was now stuck on a window sill. She stated that she intended - - - t o toss the card outside to a friend so that they could access Harstad Hall by using her card. She was informed that CSAF would not be retrieving the card because of the location/ danger and that it was a policy violation to allow someone to access the hall with their Lute card. The incident has been forwarded to SRR.

Medical Aid in Hauge ---1

CSAF was contacted for medical aid by a student who tripped and injured her ankle descending the west staircase. The student was escorted to her room, and informed she could request a special escort to the Health Center if her condition worsened.

Medical Aid in Ordal CSAF received a report of a medical aid in Ordal involving a student who --+----twas suffering from abdominal pains and nausea. CPFR was declined and CSAF escorted the student to the Health Center.


Fa season 's Smash season LUCAS SCHAUMBERG Guest Writer schaumlc@plu.edu Students walking past the windows of Ordal' s first floor lounge on any given Friday may catch a glimpse of Smash Club, one of Pacific Lutheran University's only safe havens for serious gamers. PLU Smash Club was founded last year for casual and professional play of all versions of the widely popular "Super Smash Bros." video game. The club will be hosting a singles tournament Friday, and founder Devin Turner is preparing for a large turnout for the rapidly expanding club. Friday's tournaments are composed of winner and loser brackets. Students square off against each other in heated battle. Smash games typically last about five minutes, though they occasionally reach up to 15 minutes. Victors stay in the winners btacket, while the less fortunafe.are booted to the

loser bracket. Elimination rounds eventually determine the week's champion. Turnout for the tournaments has steadily increased. Turner notes that he didn't expect such large numbers when he founded the club last year. He says the club formed organically out of "a love of Smash." "I know that sounds simple," Turner said. "Honestly that's where it all began, and for me it was all about building a community - a place for people who may not play sports but are still competitive, or just a place to have fun." Under Turner's leadership, the club has almost doubled in size, keeping its core group of hard smashers while welcoming in newcomers. Even the club's founder is a newcomer to the game. 'Tm definitely not the best person here," Turner said. "We got some guys that blow me right out of the water.

Kyle Bendebel, the club's co-president, hopes to continue the growth after Devin leaves. He's the more competitive of the two, and occasionally enters tournaments "maining" (a term players use to describe their preferred character) as Zero, which matches his up-tempo and offensive based playing style. Bendebel says people mention to him how much they need to blow off steam after long weeks. He remarks that the fun of playing Smash Bros. seems to help most people here. "It's such an accessible game," Bendebel said. "It can be competitive, but it really is a party game at its core." When asked if any moments from the last tournament stick out for him, Turner lights up. He mentions that one player pulled off a move that he considers equivalent to a slam-dunk: Captain Falcon's knee jab. "The winner knocked his opponent off the map with it in the final game," he said. "It was such a big impact, the guy went flying! Everyone went crazy."

Thomas & Molly's Music Reviews: Nico & Vinz THOMAS FLATMOEN & MOLLY LINDALL Mast Radio Arts & Culture DJs undallmj@plu.edu

SAB inherits student programming Henry Smith Guest Writer smithhc@plu.edu Student programming used to be in the hands of PL U' s Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University, but a change of ownership now places student programming under new jurisdiction. PLU's Student Activities Board (SAB) will be holding its first interest meeting at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 16. SAB is a new student-run organization in charge of programming events like Homecoming, . LollaPLUza and Spring Formal. They are

also in charge of weekly events like Highly Unstructured Midweek Procrastinationand Late Night Programming. In past years, this type of programming was done by ASPLU, but SAB has stepped in to be the official organizer of student activities. 2015 is a year of growth for SAB, and the organization has already accomplished feats such as Homecoming and the Involvement Fair. "We don't just want programming to be supplemental to your PLU experience, we want programming to be a huge part of what gives PLU its identity," said Shiori Oki, director of

SAB. "Our programs are a part of PLU and they're there to take advantage of." SAB runs a minimum of two programs per week. H.U.M.P. and the Late Night Program are two of the most popular programming. The Late Night Program's events include things like Laser Tag, Grocery Bingo, and Late Night Breakfast. The schedule for these weekly activities can be found on the PLU Student Activities Board Facebook page and on posters placed around campus. SAB is open to student feedback and encourages students who have ideas for programs to stop by the SAB office in the Lower UC 140.

Nico & Vinz are a singing and songwriting duo from Norway. Their music can be described as hip-hop/contemporary R&B. They released their first single, "One Song," in Norway in 2011 . The duo gained international fame in 2014 with their song 路 '\m I Wrong." The song appeared on several international music charts, including the Billboard Hot 100, becoming the highestcharting song by a Norwegian artist since 1985. They released their EP titled Cornerstone on Oct. 30, including the hit song "That's How You Know," featuring artists Bebe Rexha and Kid Ink. In the song, Nico & Vinz sing about going from being huge international artists to having to return to Norway and start all over again. The EP features the same catchy EDM sound that made them famous worldwide, and it marks a new beginning for the artists. We have played it on repeat for the last few days and we love it. The lyrics are catchy and beats are contagious. Unfortunately, they do not have any upcoming concerts in the area. But if you really want to see them, you can catch them on Dec. 5 in Chicago. You can hear Nico & Vinz, and other great artists, on Thomas & Molly in the Morning every Tuesday at 10 a.m. on Mast Radio.

POP CULTURE UPDATE: 72-Hour Shia Stream :: newmve

LABEOUF, R6NKK6 & TURNER

#ALLMYMOVIES

For those not in the know, Nov. 11 marked the first night of Shia Labeouf' s #AllMyMovies event. The not-famousanymore actor has invited all of his fans and closest friends to join him in a non-stop film festival featuring all of the movies Labeouf has ever acted in. The best part about #AllMyMovies: those not in the theatre with Shia can tune in to the festivities via livestream. However the livestream isn't of the movies, but rather of Labeouf's face reacting to his own films. Those interested in the 72-hour Shia Stream can check it out at newhive.com/allmymovies.

PHOTO COURTESY OF WIKIPEDIA.ORG


THE MAST

NOVEMBER 13, 2015

A&C6

PREMIERES 9P.M. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER19 IN THE CAVE ARRIVE AT 8:30 P.M.

Hosted by first-year Sam Ellefson

LIKE YOU'VE NEVER SEEN BEFORE ... WATCH LIVE ONLINE AT MASTMEDIA.PLU.EDU

SUNDAY FUNDAY: BROOKE THAMES A&C Editor thamesbe@plu.edu As a university that seeks to exemplify inquiry, service, leadership and care, Pacific Lutheran University constantly pursues opportunities to impact the community. This weekend, PLU hosts PLU Sunday - a chance for the university to live out its mission statement and forge deeper connections with the greater Tacoma area. Sunday Nov. 15, PLU joins Eastside Baptist Church for a service geared

PLU church event engages community

toward displaying the university's dedication to community outreach and passion for social justice. "This is an intentional way for FLU to go out into the community to showcase who we are [and] what we do," said Melannie Cunningham, Director of Multicultural Recruitment A church founded in the Southern baptist tradition, Eastside Baptist is an inner-city congregation focused on civil engagement. "It is a place where there is a lot of music, a lot of joy, a lot of praising of God and a lot of care about the community," said Douglas Oakman, pastor and professor of Religion at PLU.

The PLU Gospel Choir rehearses songs for the PLU Sunday event. PHOTO COURTESY OF MELANNIE CUNNINGHAM

In alliance with Black Student Union, Cunningham championed communication between PLU and East Baptist to coordinate this event. Oakman was specifically invited to give the sermon at PLU Sunday, mainly due to his background in the African-American church. "He has a real passion for AfricanAmerican faith-based worship," Cunningham said. "Looking (at this man who is white), you wouldn't know that he has that fire." As a grad student, Oakman joined Bethlehem Lutheran Church, an African-American congregation in West Oakland, California. There he

cultivated his career as a pastor and discovered a passion for social justice. "[I] felt very much so ... that diversity is important," Oakman said. "With all that's happened in our society within the last couple years, [I'm] very aware of the kind of unjust treatment of people in our society, especially people of color." Oakman' s experience in the black church, he says, helped him learn how to be part of another culture. His sermon for Sunday focuses on addressing racial ignorance and injustice in American society, promoting love and justice and highlighting the importance of PLU's partnership with the community. To craft his sermon Oakman drew upon a quotation by pastor Cornel West: "Justice is what love looks like in public." Oakman says he hopes to spread the same sentiment with his sermon on Sunday. Accompanying Oakman at the PLU Sunday event are some of PLU's own students, faculty and staff. David DeaconJoyner, Professor of Jazz Studies, will join with recent graduate Sasha Julian to treat attendees with a rendition of Duke Ellington's "Come Sunday." PLU's gospel choir will also share the stage with Eastside Baptists own company to provide music for the sermon. with "This place rocks gospel music," Oakman said. Both Cunningham and Oakman hope Lutes will come out to Eastside Baptist Church in support of the PLU Sunday event. It's not only a chance to connect with the community, but also an opportunity to discuss the meaning of PLU's mission statement in a political, cultural and global scales. "We want to roll up in big Cunningham said. numbers," Eastside Baptist Church is located at 3575 Portland Ave E, Tacoma, WA 98404. The PLU Sunday event begins at 10 a.m. Sunday Nov. 15.


NOVEMBER 13,

2015

THE MAST

Carrington conducts Choir of the West BROOKE THAMES Guest Writer fatlanha@plu.edu Pacific Lutheran University is known for its music program, which produces a number of award-winning choirs and bands. One of PLU's most prestigious musical groups is making strides once again. This November, Choir of the West will serve as the featured performers for the 2015 National Collegiate Choral Organization Concert, held in Portland, Oregon Nov. 12-14. NCCO hosts conferences that bring university choirs together to perform for each other and learn about improving their craft. PLU's Choir of the West is not only this year's featured choral group, but will be led in their performance by Simon Carrington, one of the world's most renowned choral conductors. Carrington is the former conductor of the esteemed Yale Schola Cantorum, and one of the founding members of vocal ensemble The King's Singers. "Simon Carrington amorig the

1s

best in the world at his craft, and preparing to work with him brings the focus and intensity in our rehearsals to an even higher level," said Richard Nance, PLU music professor and Choir of the West conductor. Carrington now works as a freelance conductor and choral educator, one that is in high demand. Performing under his direction at the NCCO is a special honor for Choir of the West and the PLU community at large. "The invitation to perform on this prestigious stage with a highly sought after conductor has come to us because our program is growing in national and world reputation," Nance said. PLU's Choir of the West stands as one of the University's most esteemed musical groups. The choir has completed world tours and won numerous awards for their performances. This year, the group will even appear television as part of the nationwide broadcast of PLU's Christmas concert in December. Choir of the West was invited to perform with Carrington by special invitation from the NCCO conference organization committee. Nance says he is not only impressed the group's past accomplishments, but also with their

dedication to preparing for this unique opportunity. "It has been very gratifying and inspiring to watch the students work so diligently and with such cohesion in preparation for this conference program," Nance said. "I am very proud of my

students and the choir for continuing this tradition of choral excellence at PLU." The NCCO event will be held at the Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception in Portland, Oregon, at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 13, for those who wish to attend.

Choir of the West will perform during the nationwide telecast of PLU's Christmas concert Dec. 11. PHOTO COURTESY OF PLU MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

H.U.M.P.'s Fall Line-Up WED@9 -0

I

IN THE CAVE

~

()

0

c

~

~ 0

"TI

r

~

c...

0

I

z

(/)

contact programs@plu.edu for questions

0 z


8 FEATURE

THE MAST

"I wouldn't ever think it was that big of a deal. I don't really see why people are freaking out about it." 路 - -Ashley Frobington, First-year

"I think it's kinda silly. They're changing their cups to red, which is Christmas-y in itself. Plus their [mermaid] is already green, so you've got red and green." -Brittany Bates, First-year

I


-路

..Joe Perez, Junior

"Personally, I think it's ridiculous. I think people are getting way too hurt over the fact that they wanted to do the simplistic design. I think it's really unnecessary. It's not 'gonna make your Christmas experience any different." -Winter Manisto-Saari, First-year

"I don't think Christmas is very corporate in itself in America. So, I think it's just

one way of moving away from corporate America." -Luke Ruiz, South Hall and Kreidler Hall Resident Director


路.

JULIA GROSVENOR Opinion Writer grosvejm@pfu.edu Some bnmmer5 students and staff appear to be allergic to all signs of Christmas before Thanksgiving. Pacific Lutheran University's Health Center is become overrun with patients exhibiting bizarre symptoms. "It all started November 1 when a student came in saying, and I'm not kidding here, Tm going to claw my eyes out if I see another Christmas ad in the next three weeks.' In all my years in the

medical field, I've never seen such an overreaction," resident nurse Shawna Tweap said. Dozens of cases rushed in as the week went on. The most common symptoms included groaning, eye rolling, acute awareness of the days left until Thanksgiving and aversion to fun. The most severe cases include claims of "literally dying" with a lack of actual death. Despite their poor condition, many of the affected were still able to give their input on the issue. In fact, all of them really wanted to say something. "Old Main Market has already started serving eggnog lattes. Do they have no respect for the

ANNIE BUNCH Cartoonist buncha/@plu..edu

pumpkin spice latte?" professor Craig Middlebrooks said. "I thought I was fine until my roommate starting playing 'All I Want For Christmas Is You' as she took down the Halloween decorations," sophomore Marcia Langman said as she wiped her eyes. The reporter noted she wasn't actually crying. Doctors were quick to assure residents that the patients were not contagious, but they did become more annoying when put in a group together. "If you're kind of a passive person who doesn't feel strongly about this issue, you might find yourself nodding along or even

agreeing with someone who is having a severe reaction," campus physician Dr. Nightgard warned. "This is what we in the medical field call being a pushover, but it's not an actual allergy. We advise that if this happens to you, immediately walk away from whomever you were talking to." There is no confirmed cause for the allergy at this time, but researchers suspect that, like many allergies, it is worsened by prolonged exposure to irritants. Triggers to avoid include craft stores, coffee shops and any sort of media that broadcasts holidaycentric advertisements. "The good news is that we know

it's only a seasonal allergy," Dr. Nightgard said. Researchers calculate a full recovery by December 1. Unfortunately, despite the doctor's advice, some of the patients ended up being put in the same room and were allowed to talk to each other, leading to lots of emphatic whining and rationalizing. "It's not like I hate Christmas - it's super fun and all - but there's a line that's been crossed. Can you not at least wait until Thanksgiving? One holiday at a time please," Langman said. "Bah! Humbug," Middlebrooks replied.

Annie is a first-year student originally from Port/and, Oregon. She loves the visual arts and is happily attending PLU in pursuit of studying art history and studio art.


NOVEMBER 13,

THE MAST

2015

OPINION

11

T.h irty minutes of Sabbath JOHN ROSENBERG Interim Campus Pastor rosenbjp @plu.edu One of the draft recommendations in the recently completed Campus Ministry Review is devoted to the weekday chapel schedule. The review team recommended that the Campus Pastor be responsible for planning and leadership for Wednesday chapel opportunities while maintaining the scheduled "chapel break" periods on Mondays and Fridays. This naturally raises the question of what might happen during the Monday and Friday "chapel time" slots fro~ 10:30-11:00 a.m. when there is no formal "chapel" scheduled. I've been mulling this over and talking with interested students, faculty, administrators and staff for the past few weeks. Here are a few-thougnts

I'm sharing in the interest of continuing the conversation. We've already made several significant changes. The name change from "Chapel" to Morning Prayer is an effort to reframe and rename a time and a program that's accumulated a good deal of baggage over the years. We wanted to put some qistance between the opportunity for weekly corporate prayer as a university community and a sense of guilt and obligation that was a byproduct of mandatory chapel attendance. In order to do that, we've drawn on a long-standing tradition of daily prayer in the church, using a simplified Morning Prayer (Matins) liturgy. There are enough other places in the life of the university where attendance and performance are measured and recorded. Worship and especially prayer doesn't need to be another one of them. Everyone is invited to Wednesday Morning Prayer. But we operate out of the assumption that everyone here is an adult and need s to balance that opportunity with all the other opportunities, duties and

obligations that are part of their daily lives. No obligation. No guilt. Morning Prayer is about grace, not law. The second change has been location: from Lagerquist Concert Hall (which holds approximately 530 people) to Ness Family Chapel which holds between 50 and 60 if we squeeze in tight. Don't get me wrong, Lagerquist Hall is an amazing space. The acoustics are outstanding and it's home to one of the world's great pipe organs. But it's space which lends itself more to performance than to corporate worship. Given the attendance at chapel over the past few years, its size contributes to a sense of isolation rather than community. The Ness Chapel is designed for worship. If our regular attendance grows beyond 50, we'll need to think about different space. But, as the saying goes, we11 cross that bridge when we come to it. This brings us back around to the question of what might happen during those Monday and Frid ay "chapel times." I've started thinking of them as "30-minute Sabbaths." You may remember that the Sabbath first appears in the opening

chapters of Genesis when God decides that after six straight days of creating the cosmos, even He needs to take some time off for rest and rejuvenation. At PLU, we often ask ourselves, "What will you do with your one wild and precious life?" That's a big, important question. Here's an admittedly smaller but still important one: "What will you do with the gift of a 30-minute sabbath three times a week?" Take a walk? Meditate? Practice yoga or tai-chi? Have coffee and conversation with a friend (including the Campus Pastor on Mondays)? Spend some quiet time in Ness Chapel? There will undoubtedly be additional opportunities to engage a variety of spiritual practices during "chapel time" as Campus Ministry evolves during this time of transition. But for now, do yourself a favorandfigureouta way to take advantage of the 30-minute Sabbath already built into the schedule every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Remember, even God takes time off.

"EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Samantha Lund lundsr@plu.edu

MAST

nVlAST TV THE MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447

MAST RADIO PRODUCER & PROGRAM DIRECTOR Eddie McCoven

COPY EDITORS Paris Franklin Hannah Soltis

MAST TV

NEWS EDITOR Jeff Dunn

CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER McKenna Morin

GENERAL MANAGER Matthew Salzano sa/zano@plu.edu

A&C EDITOR Brooke Thames

CHIEF DESIGNER Colton Walter

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER Genavie Boots

OPINION EDITOR , Courtney Miranda

MAST I\1I

SPORTS EDITOR Steven McGrain

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The responsibility of The Mast is to discover, report and istribute information to its readers about important' issues, events nd trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists ode of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and dvertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mast

ASSISTANT PRODUCERS Jake Bilyeu Sarah Giomi EQUIPMENT & TECHNOLOGY ENGINEER Samuel Altenberger ACADEMIC ADVISER Joanne Lisosky

staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu.edu by 5 p.m. the Monday befor publication. The Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters fo length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and clas standing or title for verification. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academi year. To subscribe, email mast@plu.edu.


12

THE MAST

OPINION

NOVEMBER 13,

2015

Donjt Judge a Fiorina by her face Society obsesses over appearance - kills feminism CARLY STUAFFER Opinion Writer stauffce@plu.edu If you ever feel like you need a little more hypocrisy in your life, you can always count on the mainstream media to have your back. I can't count the number of times I hear Hillary Clinton supporters bemoan the tragedy of how she's reduced to her looks by men and the media. Women mourn the outright injustice of it all: men in power are apparently worthy of being judged by their minds - the stuff that actually ought to be judged. Females, on the other hand, are"typicaily critiqued first and foremost on their , outfits, their makeup, their smile - anything, it seems, but their intellect. "This is a man's world," women shake their heads and grumble. And it's the men's fault, right? Boo, men! You guys are clearly the opponents of feminism, holding us back from achieving harmony and realizing ciur full potential. Not so fast. Enter the women of "Th,e View," who

conveniently provide me with a fascinating counter-argument - thanks, ladies. As you may recall, Carly Fiorina was recently "The View's" new favorite punching bag. The wom'en, among them Joy Behar, Raven Symone and Whoopi Goldberg, said Fiorina looked "demented" when she smiled, and her face would make a great Halloween mask. I fully understand not everyone agrees with Fiorina's conservative policies. This, isn't the proper way to show disapproval of a person. When Donald Trump insulted Fiorina' s looks, it was sexism. When these women did the same, they called it "comedy." I don't know about you, but the degradation of a person based on appearance doesn't make me want to laugh. People with great visibility wield great power. The women of "The View" abused this power. By critiquing Fiorina in this manner, they tell us that attacking other women is entirely permissible. They tell us if you want to get under a woman's skin, you need only attack her looks as though they are all that matters. They tell us not to root for the members of our own gender who challenge the status quo and strive for leadership in male-dominated politics, but to pick them apart. They tell us to tum off our moral compass, forget respect and essentially abandon real feminism.

Feminism is supposed to be about the treatment of women as intellectual equals. Yet you only need to turn on the TV to see what happens when a group of women of one ideology dislike their divergent female counterpart: throw her intellect out the window and call her ugly. When such phenomena like this is witnessed, we can't just blame it on the men. Rather, it's this woman vs. woman hating that proves our society's failure at peaceable, respectful disagreement. Apparently, harnessing society's attention and directing it solely on the matters of her mind and the quality of her character is a nearly impossible task for all, but especially for a woman. However, to be able to focus on the content of one's character rather than one's sex or appearance is crucial. Because of this, Hillary Clinton isn't doing women any favors when she implies a great reason to vote for her is because she'd be the first female president. "Congratulations, Hillary," we all proclaim. "You have a uterus!" What we ought to care about are the thoughts and ideas and solutions a person

has that make her unique from any other individual. Sure, she also has a face. But if we live in a country that preaches liberty and justice for all, and if we want our country to succeed and unite and again do great things, then we need to recognize and respect above all our greatest e 1s e tool our

MAST

JtV{ "' . 路" 路. 1 ~l\tlAST

M AST

TV

It's all

Greek to me MONICA PAYNE Opinion Writer paynemk@plu.edu "I, of my own free will and accord, in the presence of God and of these witnesses, do hereby solemnly declare that the views of Pacific Lutheran University as they have been explained to me accord entirely with my own views; and I solemnly as a member of this university will faithfully adhere to those principles endeavoring in every way to perfect myself morally, intellectually, and socially, endeavoring also to act towards others according to that high standard of conduct required by the university." -PLU Fraternity Pledge of Oath via Delta Upsilon International Fraternity

I anticipated the presence of sororities when arriving on the university scene. I expected exclusive guilds where only those who can sacrifice the most will rise above the rest and be awarded with the prize of social security and sisterhood. But Pacific Lutheran University is not that kind of place. Certainly the prestigous palace of education I've committed my next four years to wouldn't allow the disturbing rituals of the common four-year establishment, right? Perhaps, but who's to say the students of PLU don't live in their own version of a frat house. When I think of those groups, I see them as friendly individuals who are not afraid to showcase their letters to prove that they've been tested into the club. Lutes may not sport Greek symbols, but not a day goes by without seeing Sir Lance-a-Lute plastered across someone's chest. We do pride ourselves as a band of friendly folk, don't we? That's all fine and dandy, but there was no pledging in

PLU's registration process. No test of limits, no huge sacrifice. Or was there? We may have not promised to do some humiliating or potentially dangerous act, but we made our own sacrifices to be granted entry. Laura McCloud, assistant professor in the social sciences department and a former Gamma Phi Beta sister, told me that many of the commitments she made to her sorority sisters, money and time were hugely involved. What are two things that every Lute has given to the university? Their time and their money. So that's it, I have cracked the code. We have all been pledged into a secret Greek society posing as Norwegian so as to not be detected by the anti-frat groups. I don't know about you, but I'm ready to drink to that! Case closed, that's a wrap, see you at the next house meeting everybody. Okay, I'll drop this ludicrous idea. Money is no small issue and most of our time goes to the university, but who in their right mind would believe such

a peaceful, beautiful place could ever come close to the Greek system? PLU is a sanctuary for acceptance, which McCloud says is an issue with sororities and fraternities. "Exclusivity breeds inequality," she says, and at PLU, inequality is to be avoided at all costs. And those "best friends forever" that you are promised after you are - potentially - hazed to the point of humiliation could've been anyone without the price tag attached. McCloud said that her best friends in undergraduate school were mostly from her dorms and in her major, not so much her sorority. What does this mean? It means there are places where the familial bonds of the Greek system exist without the involvement of the system itself, such as PLU. USA Today writer Aja Frost wrote in his viewpoint article, "The Time Has Come to End Frats,"that "fraternity mission statements talk about leadership, philanthropy, community service,

character and brotherhood." PLU's mission involves all these things, as well as so much more. Best of all, there's no drinking quota! Plus the students of PLU sacrifice for the identity they11 have in the future rather than their present one and, to some, that's a sacrifice that leads to nothing but a successful future. There's no reason for the existence of sororities/fraternities. Their positive traits can easily be replaced and their negative traits will die along with them.


• • Men's Basketball predicts NBA results DYLAN FOREMAN Sports Writer foremadf@pfu.edu The NBA basketball season kicked off and the Pacific Lutheran University men's basketball team is already making predictions about how it will go. Here's the quick recap of how last year's season went. Point guard Stephen Curry won the Most Valuable Player award. Golden State cruised to an NBA championship victory over LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers. According to the team, there's a great mix of people who have the chance to be the breakout star this year. However, it seems relatively unanimous that either the Warriors or the Cavaliers will win in the NBA Finals.

Also, it seems clear that we could have a mirror race for the MVP from last year between Stephen Curry, LeBron James and James Harden. With all the roster changes, emerging superstars, injunes and comebacks, this season could shape up to be an exciting one for basketball fans. Senior captain Shane Jacob NBA champion: "Cavaliers will win the finals. Once Irving comes back they will be the best trio in basketball and will have an easy time going through the East." Breakout Star: "Victor Oladipo of the Orlando Magic." MVP: "Stephen Curry because no one can guard him and he's going to average 35 points."

Senior captain Bryce Miller NBA champion: "Toronto Raptors will win the finals because there is only one other team in the east that can beat them and I predict injuries will again cripple the Cavaliers." Breakout Star: "Jahlil Okafor." MVP: "James Harden, he will lead the NBA in scoring this year and his team will make the playoffs behind his dominance on offense." Sophomore Zach Wallin NBA champion: "Warriors will win because they are the hungriest and have the best roster." Breakout Star: "Tony Wroten" Philadelphia 76ers who is also a Seattle native. MVP: "Anthony Davis because he can average quadruple doubles in points, rebounds, assists and blocks."

First-year Tyson Birrer NBA champion: "Warriors, they will repeat because Stephen Curry is unstoppable and they have too many weapons." Breakout Star: "Seth Curry. I've watched him in summer league and he has the same abilities as his brother [Stephen Curry] just hasn't gotten the opportunity." MVP: "Stephen Curry, he literally can't be guarded. Best shooter on and off the dribble and an amazing passer." Junior captain Brandon Lester NBA champion: "Cavaliers will win with ease. Team gets healthy and sweeps the Clippers in the finals." Breakout Star: "CJ McCollum from the Blazers." MVP: "LeBron James because he is easily the best player on earth today."

The Mast Monday Night Football pick 'em

TEXANS AT BENGALS Cincinnati comes into this game still undefeated and looking to dethrone New England in the American Football Conference. Houston on the other hand, has found their starting quarterback Brian Hoyer, but their losses are starting to pile up as well. Bengals' tight end Tyler Eifert has become another receiving threat for quarterback Andy Dalton. Eifert recorded three touchdowns last Thursday. Cincinnatis went from a running by committee with Jeremy Hill and Giovanni Bernard to having Hill take

over as the lead back. On paper, the Texans look like a legitimate contender in the National Football League. Head Coach Bill O'Brien cannot catch a break on the offensive side of the ball. Pro Bowl running back Arian Foster has gone down with another knee injury. Former number one draft pick Jadeveon Clowney is hurt once again. This contest will stay close mid way through the second, but Bengals are too much for Houston.

Tell us who you think will come out on top on Twitter!

D.J. Winter Pick: Bengals Record: 3-3

Juston Lind Pick: Bengals Record: 3-3

Traeger Jarrad Pick: Bengals Record: 4-2

"I'm going to go with the Bengals. They're on a roll and the Texans don't have a good quarterback to beat them."

"Cincinnati is looking to keep their winning streak alive. They are clicking pretty well while the Texans have struggled this season."

"Now, usually, I would say Texans because it seems American, but I'm going to go with the Bengals due to it being Halloween recently."

@PLUMast

Fantasy Football: Week 10 FLEX: Jeremy Langford, St. Louis Rams No one knows what happened to the front seven of the Rams, and this should be Langford's last starting gig before Matt Forte comes back from his knee injury.

QUARTERBACK: Andy Dalton, Cincinnati Bengals Dalton has been throwing it all over the field against some of the best defenses in the National Football League. Texans are atrocious, play him.

DEFENSE/SPECIAL TEAMS: Denver Broncos

RUNNING BACK: Justin F~ Baltimore Ravens Without Wide receiver Stev$ SrtUth Sr•• look for Baltimore to band ·the

ball off more to Forsett.

WIDE RECEIVER: Davante Adams, Green Bay Packers A slow start for Adams after his ankle injury, but he finally found his groove. Packers head to Detroit, who should be no match for Aaron Rodgers.

/

A rough loss to the Colts last week, but with Kansas City trying to find their identity, this secondary should be able to intercept quarterback Alex Smith a few times.

KICKER: Kai Forbath, New Orleans Saints As loog as quarterback Drew Brees and company continue to light up the scoreboard.• their kicker will get many opportunities to put the ball through th& upt'jghts.


THE MAST

14 SPORTS

NOVEMBER 13,

2015

Heartbreak for Men's Soccer on Senior Night JAKE BILYEU SP.Orts Writer b1/yeujc@pfu.edu The Pacific Lutheran University's men's soccer team season came to an unexpected end Saturday night as the team lost 2-1 to cross-town rival University of Puget Soun. The Division III Men's Soccer Bracket was released Monday, and the Lutes were absent from the list of teams that made the tournament. Even with a win, PLU's team wouldn't have been awarded the Northwest Conference Championship. But, a win might have allowed the Lutes to snag an at-large bid for the tournament. Now, instead of preparing for next week, the team is preparing for next year. The loss also dropped PLU's conference record to 11-3, and their overall record of 15-5, just one win shy of setting their all-time record for wins in a season. The Lutes were rolling through their opponents as they went undefeated for an entire month. After playing at such a high level for so long, the team would inevitably fall from their peak at some point. They, along with head coach John Yorke, just didn't expect to fall as fast as their rival Loggers stood up to the task of winning a tough road game. "UPS took us out of our game, and we played panicky," Yorke said. "We weren't very good tonight." That energy went far during the first few minutes of the game. Eddie Na took the first point of the game in the 12th minute with a successful penalty kick,

g1vmg him 12 goals throughout the season and giving the team a 1-0 lead. Even with an opening goal, the Lutes weren't able to maintain their lead. UPS roared back in the 27th minute with a goal from Josh Sonico, assisted by Sam Zisette. The score brought a wave of silence over the crowd as both teams went into halftime tied at 1-1. It didn't take long into the second half for UPS to score again. Logger Ezra Kraus fired a shot from 20 yards out which flew past the Lute defense to the back of the net, giving his team a 2-1 lead and shocking the Lutes with their first deficit in more than month. The Lutes did outshoot the Loggers 12-9 for the game, but the second goal clearly affected them. They were only able to fire off two shots in the entire second half. The Loggers maintained their control until the end, giving them a 2-1 win and putting the Lutes post-season hopes in limbo. Although this wasn't the end to the season the team was looking for, they might just have to settle. Coach Yorke has formed plenty of great memories over the years with his seniors. Even though the team may not have reached their full potential this year, he still won't let the loss affect him too much. "Looking back, we've had a very successful four years," Yorke said. "One game doesn't define their careers here." Saturday night was Senior Night for the Lutes. PLU honored seniors Mike Arguello, Jordan Downing, Todd Hoagland, Troy-Mikal Oliger and Kyle VanderWaal.

PHOTO BY BAILEY PLUMB: Senior goalie Mike Arguello as he was honored during Senior Night. Arguello gave up 10 goals in 14 Northwest Conference games with five shutouts.

PHOTOS BY BAILEY PLUMB: Far right: Sophomore Eddie Na (9) hugs senior Troy-Mikal Oliger (10) after scoring a penalty kick. Na was second in the league with 12 goals. Middle: Junior Diego Aceves attempts to make his move around the defender, he was fourth in the league with six assists. Left: Senior Jordan Downing (16) looks to lead his forward with PLU on the attack.

Student-Athlete Spotlight An interview with Shailee Woodard CARA GILLESPIE Sports Writer gillesce@pfu.edu In this week's Stud ent-Athlete spotlight, The Mast sat down with junior cross country runner Shailee Woodard. Shailee is a captain for the Cross-Country team and recently ran in the Northwest Conference championships.

Mast Media (MM): What is your favorite memory of running at PLU? Shailee Woodard (SW): Every chance I get to compete with my teammates.Which is funny because I always feel as though I hate the racing part the most. Just being with them and spending time with them, not necessarily during the race but after the race when you feel accomplished, proud of each other, proud of my teammates and the relief of it being over and the accomplishment. MM: What is it about running that motivates you to put yourself through that much torture? SW: It's the ultimate test of personal will. I love the fact that

it is so driven by your effort. I'm not a big skills person - hand eye coordination ZERO - skills sports don't come very naturally to me bu t running is 100 percent correlated to the effort you put into it, which I love. As long as you put in the effort, you11 continually get better and it is so rewarding. It's so hard but you feel so bad a-- for putting yourself through something so hard. MM: You recently battled back from an injury. What has been the most challenging part of that for you? SW: This is like my fifth time being injured. I've been injured almost every season. Normally it isn't that bad, I just rest for a couple practices. My first bad injury happened when I was a senior in high school. That one probably affected me the most mentally. I had been running since the beginning of high school and all of the sudden I couldn't run for like two months. Just losing that identity, I thought "can I even call myself a runner? I don't even feel like a runner, I don't deserve the title." That was difficult because I didn't realize how closely related to my iden tity running was. This time

with my injury I was able to keep going to all the practices and lead the girls through the warm up. I think that helped me mentally stay with the team. MM: Do you think that you will continue to run after you graduate fromPLU? SW: Definitely. I don't know what I would do with myself if I d idn't run. It's very easy to not run once or twice. It isn't as if I'm super excited everyday to get my run in. There's definitely the "I want to be lazy and not run," but knowing how it feels to be injured, and knowing how it feels to go a long time without running, it's so hard. Definitely will be a lifelong runner - until my knees give out when I am in my 60s or 70s - and then I will just run a couple of miles a day, or a couple days a week. MM: What is the farthest you have ever ran? SW: 13 miles. Once you hit seven miles, everything hurts the same after that.

Check out @golutes or search #AskALute on Instagram to submit your questions for next week's student athlete Q&A.

PHOTO BY BAILEY PLUMB: Junior Shailee Woodard running at the Northwest Conference Championships.


NOVEMBER 13, 2015

THE MAST

SPORTS 15

CHAMPIONS OF THE FALL Victorious Fall Intramural participants

Flag Football FLAG FOOTBALL

Soccer

Doubles Tennis

GREEN HORNET The 2015 fall Intramural soccer championship went to Ballz to the Wallz after a hard fought match.

Seniors Jimmy Nguyen and Anthony Ryan, known as Green Hornet, took down Full Metal Racquets to become Intramural Royalty. They concluded the season with a 6 -1 record.

Ultimate Frisbee

Volleyball

VOLLEYBALL

-

The Pen 15s came out on top during the fall season, despite their second place ranking in the regular season. The Pen 15s finished out the season with a 7-1 record.

After a season of varied attendance, ReDISCulouness and Huck it or Bust decided to join forces to overcome their opponents WeWantDiscs! and Disky Business.

Pro Bowl

All-Stars

Birthday Sets took the fall intramural season by storm with a perfect 9-0 record. Senior Tanner Bogart went to lnstagram to express his sentiments: "They said it couldn't be done 32-0, the perfect season. Hours of practice, 4:30 a.m. lifting, 100-mile bike rides all for the shirt and the love of the game. I can't tell what the future will hold for each person but we came and conquered."

RAG l'OOl8AU.

ALL STARS

After the regular season, All-Stars were selected and formed into East vs West opponents. West won the Pro Bowl.

The volleyball All-Star Game was won by the West.

• • • • •

Water pofo ' Softball Dodgeball Volleyball Beaell volle


THE MAST

16 SPORTS

--

Up Next: vs Linfield, Saturday, 1 p.m~

Confe11~nce

Finish: 2nd place

NORTHWEST CONFERENCE STANDINGS 1

Football

Women s Soccer

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Linfield

8

0

0

6-0

Won8

Puget Sound

16

0

4

12-0-4

Won10

Whitworth

8

1

0

5-1

Won2

LUTES

15

3

2

11-3-2

Lost 1

Pacific

6

3

0

4-2

Won 1

Willamette

9

9

2

9-6-1

Lost 1

Puget Sound

5

3

0

4-2

Lost 1

Linfield

10

5

4

7-5-4

Won 1

LUTES

2

6

0

2-4

Won 1

Lewis & Clark

11

8

1

7-8-1

Lost 1

Willamette

2

6

0

2-4

Lost 1

Whitman

3

11

6

3-7-6

Won 1

George Fox

3

6

0

1-5

Lost 4

Whitworth

6

11

3

4-9-3

Lost 3

Lewis & Clark

0

8

0

0-6

Lost 8

Pacific

4

14

2

4-10-2

Won 1

George Fox

5

13

2

3-12-1

Lost 5

PHOTOS BY BAILEY PLUMB: Left: Junior Kelly White (4) clears the ball from the Lutes' side of midfield. Middle: Senior Lucy Capron (4) spikes the volleyball over the net against Puget Sound. Right: Sophomore Bennett Bugbee (4) looks to pass against the Loggers last Saturday.

1

Men s Soccer

Volleyball ~

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

1

12-1-1

Won4

5

0

11-3

Lost 1

10

7

2

8-4-2

Won 1

Pacific

7

11

1

5-8-1

Won 1

Lost 1

Willamette

6

11

2

5-8-1

Won 1

6-8

Won 1

Linfield

9

11

0

5-9

Lost 1

0

5-9

Lost 4

George Fox

6

11

3

3-8-3

Lost 1

15

0

4-10

Lost 1

Whitman

3

13

2

2-10-2

Lost 2

14

0

4-10

Won2

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

TEAM

WINS

Whitworth

18

6

0

12-2

Won8

Whitworth

16

LUTES

16

7

0

10-4

Wons

LUTES

15

Willamette

13

9

0

9-5

Lost 2

Puget Sound

Linfield

10

13

0

7-7

Lost 2

Lewis & Clark

9

12

0

6-8

Puget Sound

9

13

0

Pacific

8

14

George Fox

7

Whitman

6

LOSSES

~

-


EDITOR A

slwritethis,f

watchingmy

Facebooktum d, white and

blue. I add a aris support filter to my :own profile picture and read one w man's story

about watching people e around her as she hides on the fl r. This letter feels so small in com on. 1here's an

coming

ou~

of support

Pacifi Lutheran University, and the rest f the world. Not only for Paris, but r Beirut and Baghdad as well Wi the world in shock and horror the recent terrorist attacks, Mast from

to show our support gside you. It's not our place to co er the terror around the world - we leave that to major outlets. But we 1 stand with you in support and ounce that the PLU students tly studying abroad in France were in Paris and are all safe. For the ilies, schools and communities that were more closely affected by the a ack, my staff and I stand with. you. .¡â&#x20AC;˘ Theseattaclcshadme inkingabout â&#x20AC;˘ community and suppo It's amazing ,. what a large number of eople can do and what kinds of mo ements that

come out of events like this. In times like these, I'm immensely proud to attend a school that stands for peace, justice and social consciousness. We originally put together this issue of Mast Magazine with stories we liked that thought were interesting. Over the last month, this issue has shifted into an inspiring and touching compilation of stories from across campus. Mast Media reporters covered the sale of KPLU and the PLU music program's shift into being a regional powerhouse and international presence. Sitting alongside those stories is a feature on Patricia Krise, our very own first lady of PLU, and a profile on Kyle Parsons who was named Marketing Student of the Year and is now transitioning into the world of reality television. I hope you enjoy reading this magazine half as much as I've enjoyed working on it. Just like always, you're the key in making this magazine a success. The ball is in your court now .


READI "I' m currently reading "Into Thin Air." It was the first-year common read. I guess everyone reads it. So I'm reading that, whith is great. I havent seen the movie though .... I'm also rereading "To Kill a Mockingbird" because I want to read the second, new novel that's coming out."

WATCH

Winter favorites tour

according to Patty.

I

What's your favorite TV show? "Right now I guess I'm watching - you know kinda like binge watching - Scandal, on the treadmill, right now. So I like to go d ownstairs where we have a treadmill and exercise and watch Scandal. It' s the current new favorite ."

right now I have Pandor I listen to everything, but Martini I like for backgro d musk. And actually Train I 路 a . .J.ut. 路They sing a lot about the Puget Sound area so I love ain for exercise-type music. Thos are two of my favorites right now. '

This month we put the spotlight on Patricia Krise, the first lady and number one fan of Pacific Lutheran Unviersity. She let us into her home, her relationship and her years working at Ford.

Check our her full profile on pg. 10.

WATCH THE VIDEO ONLINE

EATI "I guess if I just had to pick a comfort food, you know something you always fall back on, it would be spaghetti. With red sauce. But then again if you really wanted something fancy and extra special. it would probably be French food."

What about your favorite place to eat locally? "Marzano's is one of the best restaurants in Tacoma. In Seattle, Tom and I really like Max in the Market which is really close to Pike ' Place Market so that's a great place. I think pla<Es like Pacific Grill. locally in Tacoma. are great"


By Jeff Dunn

Pacific Lutheran University announced its intent to sell KPLU, the award-winning National Public Radio news and jazz station, and its and broadcasting rights facilities to KUOW and the University of Washington for $8 million on Thursday, Nov. 12. The announcement shocked Lute students, faculty and community members. "This [decision] made sense to us because we have long shared a common mission and a common region," PLU Vice President of Marketing and Communications Donna Gibbs told Mast Media Thursday. "We feel it is better to come together for the good of the community and the listening public." In a press release, KUOW said it plans to transition KPLU to an all-jazz station, while it takes on all of the National Public Radio broadcasts and Northwest News. If

KPLU switched to a jazzonly broadcast on its own, the audience would shrink dramatically enough that it wouldn't be an effective use of budget or time. , Many Lutes consider KPLU an integral part of PLU's identity. It makes sense, considering it's been an asset of the university since its inception in 1966. The decision has been criticized by students and faculty as being "purely financial." "Who knows why they did it, but the fact that we needed to signals to me that there's some desperation or something," junior Theo Hofrenning said. "We, the students, should know why this happened." When a similar question was posed to PLU President Thomas Krise, he wanted to assure students that the university was not in any sort of financial trouble.

"I think it's important to note that this is not in any way a 'fire' sale; the university is in very good position," President Krise told Mast Media on Friday, Nov. 13. "We had a budget surplus at the end of last year, we're at a record number of graduate students and our endowment is at $85 million, the highest it's ever been." Both KPLU and KUOW were spending well over $1 million a year on the same broadcasts, President Krise explained. Additionally, the radio listenership in general has been way down in recent years. "People are consuming media very differently now," President Krise said. "Over the past 15 years, the listenership of all radio in teenagers and 20-somethings has dropped 41 percent, and for the over-50 crowd, it's dropped 13 percent." The decision had been in the works for a while now,

Krise noted. At least 12 years of confidential discussions had been under way. Krise also emphasized the importance of the station as an "asset of the university." "A dozen years ago, we did an evaluation of KPLU and it came in at $12.8 million.You can see that the value is declining over that time," Krise said. "We're responsible for making sure that the assets of our university continue to support our mission to educate our students. If we have an asset that is declining in value, we need to figure out what to do about it." Even if it's not a financial decision, that $8 million dollars has to be going somewhere. The $8 million includes $7 million in cash that will be added to the endowment fund and $1 million in "underwriting announcements," which includes advertisements for

â&#x20AC;˘.


PLU that would run on-air on KUOW and 88.5. The $7 million will be put toward the PLU endowment which, funds programs and events around campus and improves salaries and campus maintenance, Krise said. KPLU's legacy of jazz has definitely left its mark on PLU, with evants like the KPLU Christmas Jam and Jazz Under The Stars. Faculty from the music department expressed concern in emails to Mast Media. "I am speechless, disheartened, worried, angered and insulted. I have never seen any decision like this at PLU in my nearly 32 years here," professor of music and composer Greg Youtz wrote. He compared this decision to cuts made in the early 1990s, a time of financial trouble for PLU, saying the community faced these decisions together. "I am also shocked that we were not included in such a monumental change to our public identity. Is the word Lutheran next? Perhaps the word 'service?"' "I can't imagine without KPLU," wrote Education Chair Lin

hearing the stories and the music, and having it so close to campus down in the Neeb Center was awesome." During the Faculty Assembly last Friday, other staff expressed concern in an open Q&A session with President Krise. Questions included whether or not event support from KPLU will cease, what will happen to the music license that KPLU provided for the campus and if the KPLU call letters have met their end. Some questioned

Since PLU owns Pacific Public Media (parent of KPLU and Jazz24), the BMI, ASCAP, and SESAC mu,sic airplay license (required for public broadcasting of copyrighted music), covers not only the two stations, but also LASR, Mast1V, and music that is played in Old Main Market. If the university were to include the license in the sale of Pacific Public Media, the university would have to purchase a new music airplay license to be used for student media and play in Old Main Market, or discontinue the practice of playing copyrighted music.

of investing $1 radio advertising, a that Krise himself called dining.

"Even when I t Georgia, I co and it was muchofwha Pacific Nort Stude

will affect the PLU students currently employed at the station. "I haven't heard anything yet," KPLU student-employee Makayla Tolmie told Mast Media on Thursday. 'Tm more concerned for the donors, reporters and staff. Some of those people have worked there for 20 years." Thirty-six members of the KPLU staff will be laid off as the sale is finalized. KUOW has 20 open positions that every KPLU employee

The details of the music license haven't been ironed out yet by PLU or KPLU staff, _.but the路 information should be .availabJe in the coming months as the FCC begins the review period. This can take anywhere from three to six months. Until then, the station will continue to be independently operated. President Krise also confirmed at that time that ,even though the only official document signed has been letter of intent, there will continued support for ents, such as the KPLU , as Jam and Jazz Under

is "encourage According to Seattle newspaper The Strange , open positions are assume be music and administrative jobs, not reporting positions." KPLU's on-air staff includes at least eight full-time reporters. "It's important to note that KUOW has no expertise in jazz, and they're about to set up a 24-7 jazz station," President Krise said. "The best jazz people and programmers in this country, if not the world, are KPLU employees. Everyone is quite confident that the best people will continue to be employed." Krise also noted tha empathizes with the staff, drscribing the di he had reaking the new ov. 12.

An FAQ posted by KUOW says that this is a reflection of "a structure that is being adopted successfully across the public broadcasting landscape nationwide. It strengthens our radio community with a dedicated jazz station, and broadens the reach of our news and information station." and KUOW President General Manager Caryn Mathes told the Seattle Times this will be a big win for the community. "People will get more of whichever thing they like," she said. "We're eliminating content duplication." KPLU said if the public wish to challenge the purchase, they can do so through the FCC' s "Connect America Phase II Challenge Process." The full details on how challenge can be found online at the www.fcc. gov. An online forum group named #KeepKPLUKPLU started an online petition Nov. 14. Those who wish to stop the sale of KPLU to KUOW can go online to change.org and electronically sign the tition. As of Monday, Nov. e petition has about 600 es with the overall goal 0.

our private e form bonds d the music. d. Loyal.

5


field and be a doctor:' he says. "His idea of me working in the business world was that I was just going to be stuck in the mailroom for the first five years of working, and I wouldn't get as far -as I hoped:' Parsons, however, is determined make it in the corporate world. He dreams of being a marketing executive for a famous fashion house, such as Louis Vuitton, Chanel or Hermes. "I just want to work in the fashion world because I love fashion, and I think it would be amazing to have a career where I can tie in my passion for marketing and my love for fashion:' In addition to being President of the Puget Sound American Marketing Association, Parsons hosts a radio show on PLU's Lute Air Student Radio. "After Hours with Ramy and Kyle" airs weekly, Wednesday nights at 7 p.m. "It's more of a talk show. We have music in there, but [Ramy Carter and I] spend majority of our time conversing over the radio:' Their popular segments include "Would You Rather;' "Buzzfeed Quizzes" and "Text Messages with Ramy and Kyle;' where they read the last texts they've sent from their phones. Parsons has a lot of fun as a radio host, and he says he enjoys his dynamic with Carter on the air. "I think our chemistry meshes very well on the radio;' he says. "We banter back and forth, and it's just a lot of fun to do:' Fun seems to be a focus for Parsons. He leaps at enjoyable experiences, whether they be connecting with people through social media, taking photos to add to his website or diving into the world of reality TV. He wants to make the most of his life, as per the selfspoken quote featured in his Instagram bio: "True immortality is being remembered both in life and death; so make sure you live a life worth remembering." - KSP

to

8


Brazilian dams topple The collapse of two dams at a Bra~ilian mine has cut off drinking water for 250,000 people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. On Tuesday, Nov. 10, 11 people were killed and 12 are missing, while over 500 people were displaced from their homes.

From around the world ...

In Paris on Friday November 13, several gunmen and suicide bombers almost simultaneously, attacked a major stadium, a concert hall and several restaurants and bars. At least 129 people are confirmed dead and hundreds wounded.

-------1

Attacks cover Baghdad

Bombing in Beirut On Thursday Nov. 12, at least 41 people were killed in two suicide bombings in Beirut, the capita] of Lebanon. This bombing is the deadliest in the capital since 1990, the end of Lebanon's civil war.

In Baghdad on Sunday Nov. 15, several blasts killed at least seven people and injured 15 others. In the center of the Iraqi capitaJ two attacks left three dead, while two other explosions killed two soldiers and two civilians.

Earthquake in Japan

Earthquakes in Mexico In Baja California, Mexico on Friday Nov. 13, a magnitude 4.3 earthquake struck in the morning. There were no immediate reports of injury or damage.

LOCAL Ravensdale recognizes Washington's.mining disaster Ravensdale, in Southeast King County, Wash. marks 100 years since the day 31 coal miners died in one of the state's worst mining disasters.

,-

Washington welcomes refugees Gov. Jay lnslee says that unlike some governors across the nation, Washington would welcome Syrian refugees in the wake of the Paris attacks. 25 Syrian refugees settled in Washington between October 2014 and September 2015, according to the refugee coordinator for the state's Office of Refugee and Immigrant Assistance, Sarah Peterson.

New bill aims to help homeless, youth attend college A federal bill proposed by Sen. Patty Murray, looks to improve the number of foster care children who attend college. The legislation reaches out to colleges and universities to increase the outreach and resources for homeless and foster youth.

Toxic algae concerns the West Coast In Washington, razor-clam season has been shut down since the spring and isn't expected to be open until December. A surprisingly large toxic algae bloom began growing off the West Coast. It has been affecting fisheries and wildlife from Southern California to Alaska.

'Empty Bowls' PLU annual fundraiser Pacific Lutheran University hosted its annual 'Empty Bowls' fundraiser to promote awareness about hunger within Pierce County. The PLU ceramics program created over one hundred handmade bowls for the event. Proceeds were donated to the Trinity Lutheran Church Foodbanks.

Five Lutes awarded all-conference Juniors Takara Mitsui and Kelly White and sophomores Machaela Graddy and Hailey Smoqt received first-team nonors. Sophomore Taylor Lunde was awarded second-team recognition for the Northwest Conference 2015 Women's Soccer All-CoTlference Team. News brief compiled and written by Courtney Miranda

Terrorism in Paris

Friday Nov. 13, a magnitude 7.0 earthquake hit Japan's southwestern coast, triggering a small 30cm (lft) tsunami according to the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). There were no immediate reports of damage or injuries.


Detail-oriented businesswoman Patricia Krise cares about Lutes more than saving millions at Ford. Story by MATTHEW SALZANO Photos by MCKENNA MORIN

P

atty Krise leads the way into her office. As she poses for photos at her mahogany desk, she points out some details in th~ room. behind two She sits computers - one for working, one for keeping her eye on other things. Sitting in front of a shelf crammed with books, there's a Dia de los Muertos mask from when she and her husband, Pacific Lutheran University President Thomas Krise, visited the PLU gateway study away program in Oaxaca, Mexico. Under her leather desk pad, she keeps a Lutes athletics calendar. As we leave, she spots the car I took down Spanaway Loop to Gonyea House, parked 20 yards away. "Nice Explorer," says Patty, a third-generation Ford employee. Patty Krise pays attention to detail. Whether it's business, personal or Lute life, she doesn't miss a beat. t about 6 a.m., Patty starts checking her email. She has to keep up with her Ford team in Shanghai, otherwise the time difference causes delays. When you're a project manager and a Six Sigma black belt - whlch means taking a four-hour, proctored exam to be a certified leader in process improvement - you don't let a 16hour time difference slow you down. She started her business career at Hanover College in Indiana, where she graduated with a bachelor's in business. As an undergrad, she played Division III Volleyball and Basketball, missing only her senior year of basketball because of an internshlp. The economy was in a downturn when she graduated with her Master's of Business Adminstration from Omo' s Miami University in 1982. She lived at home. She worked as a substitute teacher

A

for first graders up to hlgh school students, a waitress and other odd jobs to make money. in 1984, she Then, accidentally continued a family tradition. Both her father and grandfather worked for Ford Motor Company in Detroit plants; she followed suit but worked a variety of management positions in the Midwest. The field was maledominated. It was quintessentially American: the Midwestern car dealer, the U.S.-made car and all the masculinity that goes with it. When Patty showed up, the dealers were a little puzzled, but that didn't stop her. "They weren't used to having female sales representatives. It was different for them, especially when going to very remote and rural dealers who were used to dealing with male sales reps. When they're selling big F-350 pickup trucks, they'd think 'What's this woman from Indianapolis going to tell me about how to run my business?' "Trying to prove to these dealers - who had never had a woman try to help them with their business - I had to go that extra mile. I had to prove to them I knew what I was talking about." After briefly leaving Ford for Chlcago to establish the dealer network for Nissan Infinti, a luxury car brand, Patty is back as a project manager at Ford Motor Credit, the division of Ford that loans money to the dealers and buyers of its cars. As of April 2015, she's running process efficiency projects on a new IT system in China. Her only project is to "make sure China launches successfully." She runs in between time zones in Shanghai, Ford's Headquarters in Dearborn, Michlgan, and her own here in Tacoma. She's up at 6 a.m. for conference calls and has them scheduled through 7 p.m. about three

11


days a week. She travels to Shanghai two or three times a year. She's not just a first lady. In some pre-interview Googling of 路 Patty Krise, I found some surprising numbers attached to her efficiency. She's worked on more than 10 teams doing Six Sigma projects in the last 10 years at Ford Motor Credit. "I haven't kept track, but it's annual ongoing savings, and $90-100 million is pretty close to what multiple teams have been able to save with Six Sigma." Shoot, I hope those dealers listened back in the '80s. Clearly, Patty Krise pays attention to detail.

COLTON WALTER

'' o

h, you11 get the hang of it." Patty is talking to a young Thomas Krise. He's struggling to master some dance steps in the aerobics class they're both taking in a small health club in Minot, North Dakota, a town that she estimates had a population of 50,000 at the time. Patty is working one of her first sales territories for Ford; Tom is on his first assignment out of the Air Force Academy. They got to talking after she encouraged him. 'Tm going over to Perkins to meet some friends," Tom said. "Do you want to go grab a cup of coffee or something like that?" Patty felt hesitant. "And so, I'm thinking 'Gosh, I don't even know this person,' you know? 'I don't know!' But I went, and that's kind of how it all started." Patty was commuting every weeK for Ford from where she lived in Minneapolis, Minn. to her sales territory in Minot. She and Tom continued their relationship this way for six months until she was .promotea to the larger sales territory of Fargo, North Dakota. The distance didn't stop them - - 路 they regularly drove about two hours to meet halfway for dinner at one of two restaurants in Devil's Lake. In fact, distance has always been a common factor in their relationship. Even before she began making international trips for Ford and Tom became a nniversity president, they found themselves making appearances across the nation and globe. "I think for the first 10 years we were married, we commuted half of our lives." As they carried on their commuter relationship, they tried to make one weekend a month exclusively dedicated to doing something fun together. Patty fondly remembers seeing the musical "Phantom of the Opera" together in a trip to London two years after they were married. Cleveland to Washington, D.C., Illinois to Colorado Springs, Shanghai to Tacoma. They've made it work for some time - November marked 30 years since Tom proposed in a Minneapolis breakfast joint. "The important part - and I think it's still the tradition we have today - is that regardless of where we are in the world, we always talk to one another every day," Patty 12

What'd you think about "Princess Krise?" "Oh, I thought that was hysterical! That was great. I got a good chuckle out of that. "So Tom came home with the edition, and I think it was the front had something, right? But he goes, 'Oh, but wait until you see the middle!' "I thought it was very cute. We got a good chuckle out of it."

I heard something about gray hair. "I was talking to Vicki in the President's office. It was laying out, and I said 'the only thing he's going to be upset about is there's too much gray hair.' "Sure enough, that's what he said! Mimicking an angry Thomas Krise: 'I'm not that gray, am I?!"'

says in regards to sustaining their long-term, often long-distance, relationship. "We've made sure we did that all the time. Always keeping those lines of communication open." When they're in the same place, they get up together and eat breakfast before both start busy days - her conference calls, his life on campus. Patty and Tom still attempt to keep up that work-free weekend tradition, although it often fails - a recent trip to Walla Walla turned out to be a little more "business" when they visited Whitman College. On some of those weekends and free moments, the two enjoy heading out on their sailboat. It's a pastime that Patty, who "didn't grow up on a sailboat," picked up from Tom. Otherwise, they spend time together in their almost 5,000 square foot home known as Gonyea House. It's regal in name and size, yes, but it's not very threatening when you understand how much the Krises have made it their home. It's the only home they own, and it's largely filled with their furniture. They utilize the whole space, every foot of it the best they can, she explains. They also watch "House of Cards" on Netflix. She says one of the things they enjoy most is when they get to just make a simple meal at home together. "It's all about the food," she says. Food is a common symbol of the Krise household. Every first-year class is welcomed into their backyard at the President's garden party. If an organization wins the biggest prize possible, its members are invited to dinner - like the 2012 Softball team that won the National Championship. International students who can't make it home for Thanksgiving are invited over for dinner. Patty says it's all about the food, and that's certainly true. But that food, whether chicken on the grill with Tom or a fully-catered meal, is representative of a deep amount of care.

'' I

was waiting in the UC equivalent where the dining area was," Patty says, describing a recent university visit experience she had while waiting for Tom, "and I was just sitting, kind of watching. Even walking, I noticed the students would look down. They wouldn't look at you, no holding the door, just not that sense of friendliness you get here that I think is very evident when you walk onto campus." Patty Krise is a Lute by association. She's undoubtedly one of us - but she doesn't work for PLU and she hasn't studied here. "I think it started right away. I just think that's the way it is at PLU," she says, regarding her Lute identity. "Feeling like a Lute, it's like a big family. They just kind of bring you in and make you a part of their own."

I've always felt a little skeptical about the passion of any university president for his or her university. Even more so when


Patty poses throughout her home. LEFT: the front room. TOP: the entry of Gonyea house. BOTTOM: in her office.

it comes from the spouse. Patty isn't paid or employed by the university like her husband. But as we spoke, it only became more clear to me that there was no act. She deeply, truly cared about the university, its mission and its people. But why? ~路 -路路 She says staff, faculty .iind adminstrators want to be on campus "b~cause it's a great mission and you're surrounded by great people." "You as students might not see that, but [for] us who have been out of school for a while and in the workforce, we see what great things students are doing and it makes you feel so good. It's just something you want to support. It's a privilege to be able to spend time with students who are tho]lghtful, smart, caring and who want to give back." Giving back is what "Lutes do," Patty says. It seems this is what strikes the closest to her heart. "You might think that's common with other schools," she says. "Having been at other universities, it's not common. "PLU has something really different, something that's really special - that not a lot of other schools have. It's a great place. More people should know about it." e've been chatting for more than an hour now, and the sunlight that put glare in her glasses has mostly faded, leaving a clear view to her eyes. Her voice has softened. The conversation has gone through her business

W

Do you consider yourself the first lady of PLU? "Certainly I'm here for support and to be a good listener. "I know a lot of people see it as the first lady, and that's fine. It's just a term that's been around for a very long time. I'd say if I have to describe myself, I'd say maybe like first fan because I love to go to all the events, and I like to cheer on PLU whether its music, theater, sports or whatever it is - I just like to be there as a support and fan of PLU. "That's kind of how I see my role is to kind of be there to help Tom in whatever way I can. Sometimes it's just being a good listener."

life, her relationship with Tom and ended on care for the PLU community. It occurs to me that, even though she demonstrates such a deep care for the university and the students who give it life, she doesn't have explicit forums for interacting with students like her husband does. "How do you wish more students would interact with you?" I ask. "Gosh, I'm open to just about anything," she says. She mentions enjoying when people interact with her tweets at @pattylkrise. But most of all, she wants students to "feel comfortable just coming up and saying hi." "Any advice?" she asks. I'm not sure how I think campus could interact with her. I wish everyone was able to do what I did: just sit down with her for an hour and talk about life. "I think students like to know it's okay to speak to you." "Yeah! Tom and I are of that age where we could have students who are in college. We don't have kids, but we certainly could be parents of kids." Her voice, still with the strength of a powerful businesswoman, is a little slower than normal. She appears to truly reflect on her role as a Lute by association - beyond first lady, avid fan and occasional business lecturer. "I would like them to treat us just like they treat their parents. Because that's what we are, I guess. We're surrogate parents, right?" 13


Pacific Lutheran University houses a music department that's regionally, nationally and internationally acclaimed. This music department has tackled some of the most difficult operas, won international choir titles, brought in' world famous composers and conductors and has produced some of the foremost performers in the profession today. The music program at PLU connects us to our university's past, sets a path for our future and makes one music department very, very busy.

WHY SO MANY MUSICIANS? If you're in the Puget Sound music community, or have teachers, coaches and/ or directors from the Lutheran tradition, you're sure to know PLU. It seems like everybody had a choir director who went to PLU, or whose family member went to PLU to study music. According to admission statistics, about 25 percent ofLutes participate in the music program. A large faculty presence mixed with a hungry student body produces a perfect, probably cacophonous, storm. PLU is not a conservatory, such as

Juilliard or Oberlin, but the comfetitive program is based off of this mode . PLU students are required to take classes outside the music program as a part of PLU's overall liberaf arts curriculum. "The level of performance is, in many cases, as you'd find at a conservatory, but it is done at a liberal arts setting. That is even more remarkable because the students can't dedicate their full time to just performance," said Choir of the West Director Richard Nance. "I am really amazed by the things they do." This high level of performance partly comes from a performance-based faculty. Most of the music faculty do not hold doctorate degrees like their cross-campus counterparts. The majority of professors have a Doctorate of Musical Arts (D.M.A). This is a more performanced-based, rather than theoretical, degree. "Most of us are performers. That is where our home base is and we think in those terms," said Director of Orchestral Activities Jeffery Bell-Hansen. In recent years, the staff has also widely grown. For a small liberal arts school of 3,000 undergraduates, a typical music

faculty would look more like four or five. At PLU, there are 15 full-time music faculty. "When I got here, I was the 15th or 16th full time member of the faculty . It was staggering for a place this size, and they seemed utterly fearless," said Professor of Music and Composer Greg Youtz. There are also around 40 part-time faculty that teach specialized lessons to students. This performance mindset, mixed with a dose of fearlessness, has produced some incredible undergraduate performances. In 2007, the PLU opera program performed Monteverdi's "L'Orfeo" for the PLU mainstage. According to Brown, the Director of Vocal Studies this is performance is an accomplishment to perform and PLU opera undergraduates students took it on. "Everybody in music knows this opera, and nobody does it,,artly because it is really hard," Youtz sai . "It was outrageous. What school our size would do something like that? Or have the connections to do something like that?" It is this type high level work that keeps professors coming back. "That community of people that can make music at such a high level and do it together - there is something really electric about that. When it's really going, everything is meshing together, you feel this electricity in the room that you just can't get anywhere else," Nance said. The PLU environment creates a particular music community. "Because it's a small school, we don't have these various things thatJeople get distracted by. So there is a re focus on music here," Nance

I


said. "Not that there aren't other great programs. There certainly are, but there's a real focus on music here that is very visible." A part of that focus is rooted in PLU's middle name. The musical heritage attached to our Lutheran identity is, in part, how the music program started anc}. remains so strong. -路 -路 .

HISTORY The PLU music program began right after the school's cftarter was signed in 1890. "We love to tell the tale that, after the president, the first person hired at PLU in 1890 was the music professor," said Youtz. "Because if this is a school for Lutherans, you have to have a choir. It's absolutely essential. So that's the story and we're sticking with it." And so came the Choir of the West. In 1925, the choir was formed and has been a mainstay at PLU ever since. Through the years, the choir gained regional acclaim, with several national and international tours. Yet the biggest turning point of the Choir of the West and whole music department came in the 1960s. PLU welcomed Maurice Skones as the new choir director and department chair. Skones was an instrumental part of where the PLU music program is today. Under Skones, PLU welcomed the world famous Polish composer Krzysztof Penderecki to campus. The Choir of the West performed the west coast premiere of Penderecki's "Passion According to Saint Luke" in 1974. That performance garnered critical acclaim and put PLU officially on the map. "I talked to people who had been at

that performance, and there was buzz about that for a decade and half. Suddenly everyone knew that PLU was the school that had Krzysztof Penderecki and had done the west coast premiere of his 'Passion,"' said Youtz. "You do one sort of big thing like that and it literally sticks in people's minds for a very long time." Thanks to Skones and then Dave Robbins, two powerful department chairs, the PLU music department quickly began to grow. The PLU name still holds strong in the musical community, with connections that have continued to bring in well-known and regarded composers, directors and performers. Growing connections come from a faculty that is still creative and actively involved in their professional careers. "We are getting more and more faculty who are deeply invested in the creative, professional work of their field," said Youtz. "What this means is that students not only get to see us be excellent teachers in the classroom, but they get to hover over us as we do our frofessional thing. I saw less of that when first arrived." The history of professional, welltrained faculty has not ended, but the new wave of professors who are also current professionals has made a big impact on the music department. "Students are our new colleagues and we really think of them that way," said Bell-Hansen. CHRISTMAS CONCERTS One of the biggest performances of the year is the annual PLU Christmas Concert Series. These concerts have been an important

tradition for the music department. The choirs and orchestras spend all month rehearsing while students balance the end of the year rush. "I swear, no one is as busy as a music student," said Nance. This year the Christmas Concert is particularly special. As it is the 125th year of PLU, a special Anniversary Gala Performance will be held Dec. 11. This performance will feature PLU alum, and current New York Metropolitan Opera singer, Angela Meade. The orchestra will also be premiering a piece by Los Angeles composer J.A.C Redford. According to his biography, Redford has written and composed for Hollywood blockbusters such as "The Little Mermaid," "Skyfall" and "Avatar." Redford composed a piece for the University Chorale, Choir of the West and the University Symphony Orchestra especially for this year's concert series. And to really sweeten the pot, the gala performance will be broadcast on Seattle public broadcasting station KCTS (Channel 9) and Oregon Public Broadcasting stations on Christmas Eve, and on OPB Christmas Day. The concert will also be available on DVD starting spring 2016 and be shown during the holiday season countrywide. Performances are held in the Benaroya Concert Hall in Seattle, Schnitzer Concert Hall in Portland and in Lagerquist on campus. These shows typically sell out within a few days, and this year's performance is no exception. At time of print, tickets remain for the Seattle and Portland shows only. The Christmas concerts are one of the biggest gateways for the public into the PLU music program. These concerts are only a handful compared to the 100-plus performances each year. "I don't think that people really understand how much we do. And usually if someone comes to our concerts who has never been before, they come back. They see it's a really good thing to go to," said Nance. All concerts are livestreamed online, but to get the full experience, a live show is a must. "There is definitely an interaction between what is going on onstage and who is in the audience. There is a personal connection there that is really important," said Nance. SO WHAT? In short, the music department at PLU is a big deal. Hours of work, practice and performing by students and faculty build on a strong and reputable music program. "I would like to say that we are certainly a unique kind of institution. I would never claim to be the best, but I'm not even sure I find that an interesting thing to say," Youtz said. PLU music figureheads, Richard Nance, Gregory Youtz and Jeffery Bell-Hansen, across three interviews, during a stressful and hectic time of travel and rehearsal, all said the same three words about PLU: "Why would I go anywhere else?" 15


PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

DECEMBER 11, 2015 I VOLUME 92, ISSUE 8 IMASTMEDIA.PLU.EDU

"NOT FOR 路SALE" In the wake of the KPLU sale, doubts about PLU's future arise

ROTC brings com petition to Oregon

DYLAN WARD Guest Writer warddc@plu.edu

Photo by Courtney Miranda

JEFF DUNN News Editor dunnja@plu.edu "Save KPLU!" and "Not for Sale!" were chants heard in Red Square and all over upper campus last Thursday, Dec. 3, as students, faculty, staff and listeners of KPLU rallied and marched to protest the sale of

Senior Zoe Velie rallies protestors before they march around PLU.

KPLU. President Thomas Krise reiterated that Pacific Lutheran University's financial state is fine in an open letter to the PL U community. However, the sale of the beloved radio station KPLU to KUOW has left many wondering about the possible financial reasons behind the sale. In that same letter, Krise called the sale a "strategic decision based on careful analysis of the future of radio and a concern about how best to sustain public media in the region for as long as possible." He writes that the 2015-2016 enrollment is above expectations, but in an email shared with The Seattle Times, it's stated that firstyear enrollment fell 22 percent since 2011. He also announced a 2.5 percent increase across the board for all wage and salary employees. Not to mention, Standard and Poor' s bond rating status of PLU has fallen from BBB to BBB-, calling the outlook for our future "negative." "KPLU has over 430,000 listeners every week. By combining KPLU and KUOW, you're not actually saving

money," said junior Zoe Velie, who organized the rally. "Instead, you11 be making KUOW pay for more because it pays based on listenership." The KPLU Advisory Board unanimously voted Nov. 12 to oppose the sale of the station to KUOW, calling the confidentiality of the sale "disappointing." "KPLU has recently had one of their most successful fiscal years yet, gathering nearly $50,000 at their last fund drive," Velie said on the Facebook event page for the rally. "The station is in no way struggling financially, or in popularity." KPLU will end this year $389,000 in the black, according to KPLU general manager Joey Cohn. "Only $30,000 per year goes from PLU to KPLU, it's mostly sustained by donors," Velie said. "Most other NPR stations affiliated with schools pay at least $200,000 per year." The President said he will "listen to the protesters' concerns, and will continue to hold individual meetings and constructive forums for dialogue just as he has since the news was announced on Nov. 11."

Since then, he has held multiple open meetings on campus for students, staff and faculty to come in and discuss the sale with him. Krise clarified the reasons behind the sale in a meeting with Mast Media on Dec. 8. "The two problems are that [KPLU] is a seriously declining asset to the university that is a drag on the ability of the university to do its primary mission, and the other thing is the survivability of public radio in our region." "We really have thought of every action and every argument," Krise said. "If you can find a way to solve these two problems in any other way, I'd love to hear it." ''I'm hoping this will raise people's awareness," said sophomore Lyndi Knox at the protest. "Hopefully, if we get more of the campus and the community involved, President Krise will have to take notice." Velie encourages supporters to sign the change.mg petition to appeal to the Federal Communications Committee to reject the sale of the station. It currently sits at just over 1,000 supporters.

111 NEWS

A&C

FEATURE

OPINION

SPORTS

J Terms:

Star Wars: The Hype Awakens pp.5

Where can study away take you? pp8-9

One Big Yakup: Racism on social media strikes college campuses pp. 11

Sarah Barnes: ROTC Women's Basketball pp.16

Whats up with that? pp.2

News pp. 1-4 A&E pp. 5-7 Feature pp. 8-9 Opinion pp. 10-11 Satire p. 12 Sports pp. 13-16

Pacific Lutheran University's Army Reserve Officers Training Corps program sent a team of 10 to compete in the annual Ranger Challenge Competition at Camp Rilea over the weekend of Nov. 13. Overall, PLU took third place behind Seattle University in first and University of Washington in second. The Lutes earned first place in knot tying and One Rope Bridge, and placed towards the middle of the pack in the rest of the events. The weather was consistently heavy rain with winds up to 30 mph for the entire weekend. Every individual on the team, especially the first-years, demonstrated considerable character and grit to stick out the competition despite freezing rain, wind and soaking wet feet while carrying their ruck, helmet and other equipment from event to event. Each year, every ROTC program puts together a team to compete regionally and, if successful, nationally at the United States Military Academy at West Point. ROTC as a whole is divided into eight brigades by region, and those brigades are divided into task forces. PLU' s task force, TF West, included eleven universities this year: Seattle University, University of Alaska Fairbanks, University of Washington, Central Washington University, University of Portland, University of Oregon, Oregon State University, University of Guam, University of Hawaii, Eastern Washington University and Pacific Lutheran University. The team began training for the two-day physically and mentally rigorous competition in the first week of September. Training for the competition included five days of morning practices per week beginning at 6 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday, the team conducted physical training in order to prepare for the tough physical challenge the competition offers. On Monday and Friday the team would "ruck" which means carrying a military backpack of up to 45 pounds and moving at a slow jog for a set distance. At the peak of training, PLU's team was rucking about five miles on Fridays, two

CONTINUED ON PAGE 2


PLU voted 6th best campus for the holidays What to do at PLU: Friday, Dec. 11 The House of Blue Leaves by John Guare; 7:30-9:30 p.m., Blad< Box,KHP

125th Anniversary Scholarship Concert; Reception: 6 p.m., Concert: 8 p.m .., Lagerquist Concert Hall, Mary Baker Russel.

Saturday, Dec. 12 Winterfest; 9 a.m.-12p.m., PLU East Campus (Old Parkland School)

Photos courtesy of John Froschauer

Nurse Pinning 9-11 a.m.,

Ceremony;

Sankta Lucia; 5 p.m., KHP, with a reception to follow in the Scandinavian Cultural Center The House of Blue Leaves by John Guare; 7:30 p.m., Black Box, Karen Hille Philips Center

Sun~Dec.13 University Congregation; 10 a.m ., Lagerquist Concert Hall, MBR Women's Evergreen; Gymnasium

Top left: Sophomore Quenessa Long Left middle: President Thomas Krise Bottom left: Sophomores Emma Bauman and Sydney Davies Bottom right: Sophomores Joel Thomas, Tono Sablan, Senior Breanna Young, Drew Huff, Melissa Williams, Sophomore Sarah Myers, Tanner Henderson, Athena Gordon More than a hundred Pacific Lutheran University students and community members gathered in Red Square at PLU on Dec. 4 for the Celebration of Light. Pastor John Rosenberg and President Krise Jed the gathering in popular carols such as Silent Night and Deck the Halls. "I loved the tree lighting and carols," said sophomore Sydney Davies. "It got me in the spirit of Christmas." For the first time, Campus Ministry and Student Life decided to light the trees surrounding Red Square rather than lighting one large tree. Before the lighting more than 50 PLU students and staff participated in the Jingle Run. The run was organized by Campus Ministry, Residence Hall Association and PLU Recreation. By Rhiannon Berg, Photos Courtesy of John Froschauer.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 on Mondays (which were followed by sprints on the track) and five to seven on Wednesdays, which were long distance run days .. Tuesdays and Thursdays were skills training days. The team trained in skills that were anticipated to be in the competition. At the beginning of the season, they received a short instructional PowerPoint which hinted at what skills could be part of the challenge, but they never tell the teams exactly what to prepare for in order to test a team's foresight and initiative. This year, the competition consisted of a 6k ruck, knot tying, One Rope Bridge, extraction of intelligence from an urban chemical environment, an obstacle course, weapons assembly and an Army Physical Fitness Test on the beach. This season PLU's team was led and managed by outgoing senior Jacob Callewaert, from San Diego, California. Callewaert has been a member of the team all four of his years at PLU, and has acted as Team Captain for the last two. I asked Jake to comment on the team for this article and he replied: "RC always provided me the opportunity to challenge myself and those around me. Each year we form a strong bond and endure countless additional skill and physical training hours in the darkest hours of the morning." He recently received the news that he will be entering the Army as an Infantry Officer come graduation in May. The rest of the team consisted of firstyear students Hannah Peterson, Mitch Perantie, Ruben Quintanilla and Levi Alton, sophomores Alex Moore, Jesse Scanlan and Nick Lund, junior Dylan Ward and seniors Jacob Callewaert and Sarah Barnes.

Basketball vs. 2 p.m., Olson

Composer's Forum; 3 p.m., Lagerquist Concert Hall, MBR Songwriter's Workshop Concert; 5:30 p.m., The Cave, AUC

Students in ROTC get 100 percent of their tuition paid for by the Army ROTC Scholarship.

The student to faculty ROTC classroom ratio is 15:1.


THE MAST

DECEMBER 11, 2015

NEWS3

lntramurals

I

ELISE ANDERSON Guest Writer anderser@plu.edu Recreation reached a major milestone this past month when BestColleges. com named the PLU Intramural Sports Program among the top 50 best college intramural programs in the country. Coordinator of Recreations Rob Thompson manages the campus exercise programs and finds new ways to engage the student body. "Not only are we bringing more programs to the table, but each of

'

these ptrograms we've found a way to make unique," Thompson said. "We are constantly adapting to improve the student experience from broadcasting our intramural softball championship game, to having intramural All Star games, to even keeping goal scoring statistics." Participation in intramural programs increased from 452 to 782 participants in the last three years. The 2014-15 academic year accounted for 782 members of the student body being involved in some way with an intramural sport. "It has been incredible to watch the number of students participating continually grow and to see the positive

attitude that the campus has about recreation activities," junior Cara Gillespie, an intramural regulator and social media marketing assistant, said. PLU's intramural program offers 38 leagues over the course of the school year Adding to the variety of sports for spring semester is the introduction of inner tube water polo, which will serve to test the waters for the possibility of future aquatic based sports. The January term intramural

season will offer soccer, volleyball, doubles pickle ball, basketball, coed basketball and dodge ball. Team rosters are due Jan. 7 by 3 p.m. Recreation offers students to participate in exercise programs, including Outdoor Recreation, Club Sports Teams, Intramural Sports and Group Exercise. Each program provides students opportunity for fitness oriented activities and social engagement with other students.

Students start conversations about race RHIANNON BERG News Writer bergau@pfu.edu Colleges across the country have been featured in the news with images of upset students and apologetic administrators because of the privilege and oppression that is intertwined with . race. Pacific Lutheran University students held conversations Dec. 7 about racial inequality at after presenting research on the perceptions and experiences of more than one hundred PLU students. While PLU prides itself on being ethnically diverse and welcoming to all people, it is not immune to racial inequality. Students from Sociology 332: Sociology of Race and Ethnicity surveyed PLU students about topics such as affirmative action, the success of minority students, drug use and awareness of racial diversity on campus. "I'd like to see more dialogue around race

and its importance to students' experiences," said the instructor of the course, Associate Professor of Sociology Teresa Ciabattari. "We have a lot of education to do at PLU so a broader group of the student body, as well as the faculty and staff, are aware of how salient race and racial identity is for students of color and how much it does affect their experiences." Students presented research that showed minority students experience isolation within their major at rates higher than non-minority students. Ciabattari said she analyzed data reported from last year's first-year students and found students of color also report a lower sense of belonging than their non-minority peers. "Having more conversations like these is important," said Ciabattari. "We need to do more to change the culture of PLU so that all students feel like they belong." The PLU Factbook reported PLU's student body is made up of 27 percent students of color

and 14 percent of faculty are non-white. The Dean of Students, Eva Frey, said PLU strives to have the grezatest pool of applicants to ensure that they're diverse on a variety of levels, including gender and race. She was the first ASPLU diversity director in 1993 while pursuing a degree at PLU. more "PLU is conscientious about racial diversity today than they have ever been," said Frey. "We're doing all that we can and I appreciate that." Multiple faculty members declined to comment on the topic of racial diversity amongst PLU's faculty for this article. The current ASPLU director of diversity, senior Maya Perez,

presented her findings on how confronting whiteness effects and perpetuates racial inequality at PLU during the Dec. 7 event. "I really have faith that PLU will continue to complexify it's hiring practices in seeking out a more racially diverse staff and faculty," said Perez. "I think that it's something that as students we're holding them accountable for and that they're learning to hold themselves accountable for as well." "Be open to the conversation and hearing stories and experiences that might challenge what you have know or experienced about the world and PLU," she said.


THE MAST

4NEWS

Stress Ninja: Give it a .try during finals week Samantha Lund Editor-in-Chief lundsr@plu.edu Understatement of the year: finals are stressful. Not only are students trying to make that final leap for an A+ but we're scheduling our trips home, emptying our bank accounts for Christmas presents and fighting off the winter weight gain that comes with late night trips to Old Main Market. This finals week, Mast Media got an interesting opportunity. A company in Seattle, Stress Ninja, reached out to The Mast to give their service a try. Stress Ninja connects people with help and support anytime, anywhere and in any medium. If you're having a hard week, need emotional support or are just feeling lonely you can contact Stress Ninja and路 scheduie

CSI:

a meeting with a "Ninja." Meetings can be in person, over the phone, via video chat or even just through instant messages. The Ninjas can help you with anything from goal setting to sleep deprivation. It's like having a best friend right in your pocket. Normally, an hour long session with a Ninja is at least $30. However, Stress Ninja Seattle is giving Pacific Lutheran University students the chance to try it for free! That's right, absolutely nothing. All you have to do is go to http:// eepurl.com/bFHtxz and redeem your free code for a friend. Appointments are scheduled on their website and all you have to do is pick a time and which type of appointment you'd like to have. Give it a try and let us know what you think by tweeting @PLUMast. If you think it's cool, Mast Media will have more promotions like this.

DECEMBER 11, 2015

JWhat's Term: up with that? JESSICA LEE Guest Writer leejn@plu.edu One hundred and twentyone students, including 12 firstyears, here at Pacific Lutheran University face a big problem: not being enrolled in necessary classes for this year's January Term. J-Term is practiced by two other universities in the area (Trinity Lutheran and Whitman) and has occurred here for decades. Previously called interim term, J-Term offers unique study away and internship opportunities, options for experimental or special topic courses that would not normally be offered for fall or spring and, most notably, a different framework for courses to be taken in. All classes at PLU are planned in two-year cycles, meaning the classes that are available are predicted based

off of previous years and expert opinions. the most J-Term is unpredictable term and prompts the most issues with class availability for students. Director of Academic Ad vising Hal DeLaRosby sheds light on the problem of predictability. "We don't actually know, until students register, where we might be either in a case where a class is short on seats where more students would want to be there, or in some cases we have some classes that if you look at [them], they have 7 students in a class designed for 30 you know, so how do we balance all that out?" DeLaRosby said. The unique problem this year is a lack of availability in courses overall, not just a lack of courses that students prefer to take. The process for fixing that problem is underway and many students in the situation have been

contacted by academic advising with possible options. "It's not just, 'oh quick, let's make a class out of thin air' you know, these things take time to do that and it can be so frustrating as a student in that situation," added DeLaRosby. The Office of Academic Advising offers tips for students in this position. Checking a course description can prove valuable as some courses have remaining seats that allow exceptions such as "approval of instructor" for enrollment. Additionally, some courses have seats reopen over time. While emailing to show interest in a course will not automatically ensure a seat, it can help the situation, especially for sophomores If you would like additional about J-Term information classes, email the academic ad vising office or go to Ramstad 112 to make an appointment with an advisor.

Campus Safety Investigations Taken from weekly Campus Safety reports

Medical Aid in Tlngelstad tudent fell in the 2nd floor bathroom in ingelstad and struck her head/face. CPFR . esponded and assessed. CSAF provided er with two ice packs. No further action by SAF.

SAF personnel discovered fresh spray paint on the east ide of the East Campus building and two empty spray paint cans on the ground nearby. There is no suspect 路 ormation. No further action by CSAF.

ehicle Vandalism CSAF was contacted by Dining Services who reported vandalism to a PLU service vehicle. A gas line had been cu and fuel had been siphoned from the vehicle. CSAF was ---1.-nable to locate any suspect information. Information has een passed on to the Risk Manager.

Stolen Food in OMM Keithley Middle School students were observed concealing food items in a backpack at the OMM withou paying for them. The items were recovered. Both student ere restricted from campus and the Keithley MS Studen esource Officer (PCSD Deputy) responded to the scene. e deputy contacted the respective parents to come and ick up their children. No further action by CSAF.

Drug Policy Violation in Pfiueger _____.- uring a fire alarm response CSAF discovered a plasti bag covering the fire detector in a resident's room. Also 路n plain view were two water bongs. CSAF contacted e resident for a room search. Two empty container smelling of marijuana were discovered along with several small plastic baggies and rolling paper. This incident ha een forwarded to SRR for review.


TV wi nd·s down for winter NATALIE MOONEY Guest Writer Mooneynr@plu.edu Television shows are wrapping up for winter, leaving fans wanting more and patiently awaiting their returns in the spring.

Last Week Tonight With John Oliver: ideas and find the show enjoyable, yet informative, because of it. Oliver focuses on controversial topics and brings current events to viewers in a Jon Stewart format. Not to worry. Two seasons consisting of 35 episodes are promised to viewers for the upcoming years. With the success the show has had so far, the next seasons shouldn' t disappoint.

"Last Week Tonight with John Oliver," HBO's comedy-news show, will not return until February. The British comedian's current events talk show became very popular amongst young audiences this year because of his hilarious wit and utter straightforwardness. College-age viewers tend to agree with his

Dancing with the Stars:

POP CULTURE UPDATE: Taylor Swift shows love ·to the Seattle Symphony Taylor Swift donated $50,000 to the Seattle Symphony Orchestra afterhearingJohnLutherAdams'Grammy-winning"BecomeOcean." The Seattle Times reported the donation will go to funding Link Up, a music program for elementary school students, and the pension fund of the symphony's musicians. This is not the first charitable donation Swift has made. She was named the number one on DoSomething.org' s Gone Good list for being the most charitable celebrity for the third year in 2014.

"Dancing with the Stars" ended Season 21 with an emotional win for Bindi Irwin and her partner, Derek Hough. The 17-year-old Australian daughter of Steve Irwin took home the mirror ball trophy after a very emotional season of honoring and remembering her dad in multiple dances. The young star captured the hearts of viewers through passion and excitement, and it was no surprise that she would take home first prize. This was also Hough's sixth win, giving him the most wins as a professional on DWTS. Coupled in the final three were Nick Carter of the Backstreet Boys with his partner Sharna Burgess and Alek Skarlatos, a Legion of Honor recipient and soldier, and his partner Lindsay Arnold. DWTS will return for Season 22, along with judge Len Goodman, who took a hiatus for a season.

Mast Media's Christmas Picks "A

Christmlt~'Story.. '' (.><':-

~~

':t

"I like to romanticize~~idw'est." Jeff Dunn, s"'~ditor

.

. t:--

,,,, t·

~ ~¢

./['f$oA

"How The Grinch Sti~: .

>A

r1stln,as '' ;:ti:f ;~

"The Grinch is what Christm Jake Bilyeu, Mast TV Spo ·

"It's adorable." Genny Boots, Mast TV Executive Producer

it a lot with my family, and it's really quotable." ew Salzano, Mast TV General Manager

• -:J,,,,. .-.t"T-,{~

Photo courtesy of Wikipedia.

' :.niJ·.


THE MAST

DECEMBER 11, 2015

A&C6

KPLU: The Last Jam. JESSICA LEE Guest Writer /eejn@plu.edu The KPLU Christmas Jam, Thursday Dec. 10, marks the 19th year of a holiday jazz musical tradition. The Christmas Jam started at KPL U nearly two decades ago by the general manager of KPLU, Joey Cohn, in the second floor of the administration building. Its purpose was to celebrate jazz music in a festive way and put a spotlight on the University's jazz program. Each year brings different sounds of the season, featuring different professionals playing different songs and arrangements. Today, it has graduated to the Karen Hille Phillips Concert Hall. This year KPLU is teaming up with Pacific Luteheran University's Jazz ensembles - Stormy Monday and Ruby Tuesday - and highprofile jazz musicians to draw a packed house with hundreds of thousands of listeners on the radio and online. this year features tenor saxophonist Anton Schwartz, a well known jazz figure from Seattle. Arrangements and famous faces aren't the only things that are different'this year. The question everyone may be _路a sking is how this pending sale is affe?:fing KPLU, especially this time of the year. News of the sale and the resulting fallout sparked a debate on whether the KPLU Christmas Jam should still take place this winter. "We decided that it was a good idea to go on with the show because the audience enjoys it, and I don't war'tt to shortchange the students. I want to give them the opportunity," Cohn said. "I think it just still made sense to put on a show for the reasons that we'd put on a show anyway: that it's a wonderful holiday tradition, people

enjoy, it makes for good radio programming and it's a fun free show for our audience." As for whether this will be the last time, "the people who are in charge of the new entity will make that decision." KPLU's history with the University pivots around giving opportunities to students both at PLU and in the community. "One of the things I'm most proud of is giving the students the opportunities to start theircareersinmedia," Cohn said. "Somebody needs to give you a chance, somebody needs to take a chance on you and give you that break [... ] I'm very pleased that I've had the opportunity to pay it back in that way."

Screw feelin' 22 SAMANTHA LUND Editor in Chief lundsr@p/u.edu I was driving back home from Thanksgiving dinner alone last Thursday using Spotify in my car and singing very loudly. Very, very loudly. My Spotify hit "Hello" by Adele, and once wasn't enough. After repeating it four times, I realized I still hadn't heard her new CD "25:" I knew what I had to do. I grabbed my phone while driving - I know I should have stopped but I didn't - and went into iTunes and downloaded the entire album. "25" is the pop singer's third studio album. It has 11 tracks and was released Nov. 20, 2015. As a sidenote, this was the first album I've been willing to put real human dollars toward since getting my student Spotify subscription three years ago. The fact that Adele chose not to put her music on streaming sites was a betrayal of our relationship. I'd been resenting her for a while, but it all ended when the album came on. The first track, "Hello" started, and even though I'd just listened to it, I sang along once more. It's just that good. The next track, "Send My Love," begins with a heavy beat that ties you into the experience. Adele hasn't gotten old, her music isn't a repeat from the album "21." It's new and shiny. It's ear crack. Even without knowing the words you11 find yourself humming along. The beats are catchy, and Adele shifts from strong music to soothing melodies seamlessly. Between tracks three ("I Miss You") and four ("When We Were Young") she takes you from a dance floor to a love song. "We're burning down the highway skyline/ On the back of a hurricane that started turning/ When you were young," Adele

I'm all about "25"

sings in "When We Were Young." It's no wonder Adele's album shattered Billboard records and sold over four million copies in a week. "25" looked at the Frozen Soundtrack and Taylor Swift's "1989" and laughed in their faces as it passed them by. Sales of "25" accounted for 41 percent of all music sales the week it came out. Adele made the decision not to allow her music on streaming sites like Spotify and Apple Music. Music sales are down about 25 percent across the board because of streaming sites, and several artists, including Taylor Swift, have banded together to not stream their music. It was a risky choice, especially with listeners like me out there that take those decisions personally and choose not to listen to their albums at all if it means I have

to shell out $10. But, if we can learn anything from Adele's recent success, it's that these streaming services may nothaveasmuchofanaffect aswethink. Now I'm on track 10, "All I Ask," and I've caught onto a few words that I'm belting out. I can't help but thinking, Damn this song is amazing. It speaks to me. Maybe Adele gets me completely. And then, of course, I start to cry. No shame. No shame. Adele swiftly shifts from "All I Ask" to her final track "Sweetest Devotion," which leaves you on a happy note. In the '70s-esque music festival song, Adele's 3-year-old son actually makes a cameo, which is only appropriate because he was the inspiration behind the piece. Then the album is over. But I've still got another hour left to drive. Repeat.

Thomas & Molly's Music Reviews: Years & Years THOMAS FLATMOEN & MOLLY UNDALL Mast Radio Arts & Culture DJs undallmj@plu.edu Years & Years is an electronic pop trio from London, England. They released their debut album "Communion" in July 2015. The trio have been playing together since 2010, but only recently gained international fame. Their most popular single, "King," topped many international charts when it was released this summer. The single made us fall in love with their sound. The album showcases their broad talent, including the more emotional song "Memo," different from their normal pop sound. The highly successful trio were named the "Sound of 2015" by BBC Radio 1 earlier this fall and are nominated for the BBC Music Awards "British Artist of the Year." In September, the group's lead singer, 25 year old college dropout Olly Alexander, told Metro Weekly that he had never expected to hear the songs he wrote played on the radio, let alone perform them for packed houses around the world. The band joined Sam Smith on his sold-out UK tour this year, and toured in North America and Europe. Years & Years is joining Ellie Goulding on her spring 2016 U.S. tour dates, and you can catch them in Seattle April 2, 2016.


DECEMBER 11, 2015

THE MAST

A&C7


THEMAS11

ll'

This year, Pacific Lutheran University is sending more than 250 students across the globe this J-Term. As the Christmas season ends and before spring hits campus, PLU students will be traveling to Europe, Asia, Africa, South America and beyond to to study in new and unusual ways. This January, 22 students will visit Germany, 35 will go to The Caribbean, nine will go to China, 17 will travel to England, 30 students will be in Italy, five in Tobago, 20 in Uganda, 13 in Uruguay and 10 in Hawaii. Some


DEC. 11, 2015

~Y:

1oing fo

students won't travel as far, but will still get the study away experience. With 16 students in Holden Villege, 15 in Neah Bay, 14 in Hilltop, plenty of students will get to participate in alternative studies in our back yard. To read more about the Wang Center and their study away programs, students can visit plu.edu/ studyaway. Online applications for J-Term 2017 open Feb. 8, 2016 and close April 18, 2016.


c. I ca '

~

·-ca "'CJ) •• c ·-c I ,

...,-..

I..

on JULIA GROSVENOR Satirist grosvejm@plu.edu For Thanksgiving dinner, students who could not go home to see their own annoying families enjoyed a meal with the Krise Family who provided annoying relatives for them. Many students were already aware of the Krise Thanksgiving tradition. Those who were not able to fly home spent Nov. 26 with Thomas and Patty Krise and shared a wonderful meal in their home. This year, however, a few more Krises were br!:m ght into the mix. "We realized that these students are hotnesiQ;,- not just hungry. So we decided to hire a group of actors to fill in as other relatives," Patty explained. "These aren't actual relatives of ours. Heck no," President Krise laughed. "Our relatives are basically perfect/ like we are. We held auditions for the most chaotic guests we could find," he said. The Kri~es understood that, while their Thanksgiving dinners were always amazing, they lacked the upsetting element of extended family who make the night cringe-worthy with awkward questions and nonstop bickering. While the performers were not given scripts, they were given very specific roles to play. There was even a rehearsal dinner so they could establish character history. "We really got a feel for how much we despised, misunderstood and tolerated one another. My favorite part was when we came up with all

of the fights we'd had in the past so we could bring them up during later fights," actress Sandra Gillsby, who played Grammy Krise, said. The most surprising talents were the youngest of the group, a handful of actors aged five to 11 years old, playing the nieces and nephews. "They were surprisingly method. Little Tristan talked about Minions the entire time! No one even asked him to." Patty commented. "Ba-na-na!" Tristan said. In order to create genuine reactions, the guests were not informed of the plan. Some of the actors greeted guests along with the Krises when they arrived, while others showed up very late on purpose. While the guests mingled before dinner, Aunt Cathy-played by Lena Maple-convinced as many students as she could to add her on Facebook. Uncle Kevin, played by Douglas Smyth, discussed marijuana, randomly switching his stance between asking to buy it and ranting about potheads. All of the actors socialized during this time, except for Aunt Kim, who walked up to a couple students and asked them to watch her kids for a "second" and proceeded to vanish for the rest of the night. The real antics started at the dinner table. When the room stopped to pray a blessing, the Dorners, a Catholic couple played by Arnold Doone and Helen Chang, loudly prayed grace instead. Once everyone began eating, about half of the adult relatives made it their goal to drink as much as possible. "I would never drink on the job, so it was pretty tricky to make everyone

think I was drunk," actor Bob Finn, who played Uncle Kenneth, said. The actors used a variety of tricks to seem plastered, from spraying themselves with alcohol-scented perfume to dumping their wine into plants when no one was looking. By the time dessert rolled around, every offensive joke had been made and every controversial topic had been discussed. "I really killed it with my offensive Hillary Clinton impression. I stuck dinner rolls in my shirt and talked about my period and emails for like 15 minutes!" Smyth said. "I asked invasive questions about human sexuality all night, and I actually learned what a furry was. That was not so fun for me," Gillsby said. Instead of asking everyone to go home, the Krises had planned a big finale. "It was like when at the end of a fireworks show, they light off about half of the fireworks at once in a huge explosion," President Krise said. As Aunt Cathy went for her second slice of pie, one of the children called her "Aunty Tubby," which caused her to yell at the kids, triggering shouts from defensive parents until even the Dorners were yelling at each other. "I was all 'you can't tell me how to raise my kids,"' Finn recalled. There was so much shouting that students simply left, having had their fill of both turkey and drama. "I11 certainly never forget it, even though I kind of want to," junior Randy Sanchez said. "The sweet potatoes were great, and I had to sit through a conversation about #AllLivesMatter," senior Laylani Shaw said. "It felt just like home."

# f ·i n a I s We e k LITT LE"

CARLY

oOE S

TO

LET'5

Co LL. t:: 6£::

!3E HONEST... Thahk$, Carl7 - er.. .

wnat's

f"10lt

on your

hoYYJework ...

~CC(

?

My name is Carly and I'm a Physics major here at PLU. I'm a total nerd, in love with Olympic National Park, and enjoy singing in University Chorale, writing, learning, acting and spending time with family (and Uesus!). While I somehow manage to look as though I've got my life pretty under control, I generally eel like I'm awkwardly stumbling around, trying to figure out life ... ·ust like Little Carly. Enjoy!

we 111 !urn rn Yi?1r> vr-> -fh0i+ would be cof'fee . .. _ . k»»7>1 Prl»Y~//r

Annn d

Com"fi>rf food. . .

.

tears. Poss ib// fears.

Cfi

CARLY STUAFFER Cartoonist stauffce@plu.edu

(


TH E MAST

DECEMBER 11, 2015

OPINION 11

One big Yak-up: HELEN SMITH Opinion Writer smithhe@plu.edu Recently throughout the country, there have been increasingly visible instances of institutionalized racism rearing its ugly head on college campuses. This fall alone, at least three incidents have made national news. A faculty member at Yale University questioned the inappropriateness of wearing racially offensive costumes on Halloween and members of a frat turned away nonwhite party goers. At University of Missouri, incidents of racism have also occurred with alarming frequency, and students .feel that their complaint~ are falling on.. aeaf ears within the university administration, according to CNN. Western Washington University (WWU), located just three hours away in Bellingham, Washington, has also experienced an increase in racist behavior on campus.

Late Monday and into the early hours of the Tuesday just before Thanksgiving break, racist remarks were made toward two black members of the student body on the popular app Yik Yak. According to an email sent to all students by the President of the university, Bruce Shepard, some of the messages, including one post saying "Lynch her/' were threatening to both African-American students mentioned on the app and students of color in general. These remarks came in response to the movement at the university to change the WWU mascot, the Viking, to something more inclusive and representative of the student body, which, according to the Associated Press, is 25 percent non-white. In response to the threatening messages on social media, the university's president rushed to provide accommodations for the threatened students and cancel classes the next day, Nov. 24 according to Kirotv.com. Later that day, Shepard sent out a long email somewhat outlining the situation, but largely shined a light on the steps that Western took in response. Out of the nearly 3,000 words in that email, only 50 of them were dedicated to talking about institutional racism. Although WWU made sure to let everyone know how they dealt with the threats on campus, the extent to which the real situation was really dealt with is questionable. While the university mobilized staff and

Racism on social media strikes college campus

administrators to provide for the temporary safety of those affected, with such little talk about the cause of the situation institutional racism-the university didn't deal with the long term issues which will continue to threaten the safety of the students on campus. Properly handling cases of institutional racism on college campuses is vital because they're institutions which were designed to benefit privileged groups in the first place. College is essential to the future success of our population and to closing the gap of opportunity between white students and students of color is a civil liberty well past its due date. In response to this ordeal, Western had a forum about the situation to begin a conversation about institutional racism on their campus, according to the Buffington Post. However, one discussion is hardly a fix. This incident has revealed complex issues within the Western community about who gets to be represented at school. Threats made against students of color at WWU for attempting to change the mascot from a white, male Viking to be more representative of the diverse WWU community revealed a group on campus that feels minority representation is unimportant. Because that sentiment has surfaced, the need for representation of students of color on campus is even more urgent than it was before. Changing Western' s mascot is necessary

to ensure students of color that Western is a safe space for them. Maintaining the Viking as the Western mascot would show that the university is still a place exclusively for privileged white men, and even with the conversation that Western has started about institutional racism, nothing has changed. Although it took a terribly jarring incident to make it happen, a conversation has started at Western about institutionalized racism, representation, and making Western's campus a safe place. Now that it has finally started, it's plain to see that there's still much to talk about. After all, feeling safe when going to class should not have to be considered a privilege.

Photos by: Western Freshman Rachel Newkirk

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Samantha Lund lundsr@p/u.edu OPINION EDITOR Courtney Miranda

M AST 1V1ED11\

l\/Jf

~lVfAST

TV

NEWS EDITOR Jeff Dunn A&C EDITOR Brooke Thames

THE MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447

SPORTS EDITOR Steven McGrain

CHI EF DESIGNER Colton Walter

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER Genavie Boots

COPY EDITORS Paris Franklin Hannah Soltis Maxine McDade Rachel Dixon

MAST RADIO PRODUCER & PROGRAM DIRECTOR Eddie McCoven

ASSISTANT PRODUCERS Jake Bilyeu Sarah Giomi

MAST TV CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER McKenna Morin

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The responsibility of The Mast is to discover, report and istribute information to its readers about important issues, events nd trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists ode of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and dvertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mast

GENERAL MANAGER Matthew Salzano sa/zano@p/u.edu

EQUIPMENT & TECHNOLOGY ENGINEER Samuel Altenberger ACADEMIC ADVISER Joanne Lisosky

staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu.edu by 5 p.m. the Monday befor publication. The Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters fo length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and etas standing or title for verification. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academi year. To subscribe, email mast@plu.edu.

Let's talk about sex! Exploring sexua ity

The weekly "Let's talk about sex" becoming more cop.voluted by the series will look into a different topic .~ute j.n today'.s worid. Social progress about sex and sexuality in an ejfort to has been made in many areas over the raise awareness, bring education and years, and ''discoveries" in the wodd of be a forum for discussion, To write sexuality are no less frequent in and share your opinions or stories, For a number 0£ years, I felt that I was email mast@plu.edu. bisexual. r have been attracted to boys Onee upon a time, sexuality was considered to be black and white. In some ways, this is still accurate, and in others, nothing cotild be farther from the truth. In majority of human societies, people have divided sexuality into the dichotomy of straight and not-straight. Certain societies throughout history however, did not feel the need to label sexuality at all. For example, according to a pbs.org article on homosexuality "Relationships we would call homosexual, especially between men and youths, played an important role in Ancient Greek society." Often it feels like sexualities are

since kindetgarten, but as I entered the. high school. world and actually began inte:i;acting with other people .in a romaµtic ap.d physical way, l seco1;1dguessed my orientation. l never doubted that I was interested in pursuing relations with men, but I also didn't see a reason why l wouldn't want to explore them with women, too. After all, girls are smoking hot. As I continued my journey, 1 became interested in pornography and found myself more attracted to what the women were doing than what the men were doing; their noises and reactions were far more important to me than the men's. r never enjoyed female-female porn, but 1 wasn't opposed to what

Wotild be catled a FEM (Female-Female-Male) t.Q.reesoxµe. At parties and ba:rs1 l found myself getting drunk and kiss.ing women for dares or because they were interested in me. 1 was not, however, corofoi:table labeling rny sexuality until I had exper~enced a .new type of physical or romantic relationship for myself. Everyone's path to finding their sexuality is different. There is also no perfect way to dete:i;mine whether or not a defined sexuality is their correct identity. My experiences have proven to me a label that I am now comfortable with. Some people may never be comfortable with a specific label at all, and that is okay, too. Pornography and erotica provide safe ways to explore different options for sexualities. Physical experimentation is the next step up from that and is the best way to understand your body. If you have questions about your own sexuality, or you are simply curious, the

best way tor you to get information is to $imply ask. Sexu(\Jity is an everychangjµg t'lpectrum and the. maorl.ty of people don't fit into one category. You can be whoever you want whenever you want. Heterosexua}, Straight: A person who is attracted to the opposite sex, usually people whose genitalia interlock with theirs in order to reproduce. Homosexual Gay/lesbian: homo, which means same, lends itself to this word. The definition of homosexual is when a person is attracted to people of the same sex. Bisexual: A person who is attracted to both sexes. Bisexual. people may prefer one gender over the other while remaining attracted to both male and female. Pansexual: A person who is attracted to other people based on personality regardless of the other person's sex. Asexual: A person who does not feel sexual attraction to any sex.


THE MAST

12 OPINION

DECEMBER 11, 2015

Donjt sweat over a sweater The hypersensitive culture of the U.S. citizen CARLY STUAFFER Opinion Writer stauffce@plu.edu I have a feeling that if there were a contest between all peoples across history for the generation most easily offended by the absurd things, ours would take the cake. Look no further than recent news for ample proof. Starbucks decided to remove snowflakes from its seasonal Christmas coffee cup, and Target put a new sweater up for sale, which had on its front the words "OCD," with "Obsessive Christmas Disorder" printed underneath. Uproar thus ensued highly disproportional to its cause. Because in this culture, it's not just a paper-cup, and it's not just a sweater. It's obvious and undeniable proof that Starbucks hates Christmas anq . Target hates people with mental illn-esses. Grab your pitchforks and torches and get ready to boycott. Those who are unhappy with these criminal corporations are those who read deeply into the subliminal intentions behind seemingly neutral actions., The doctrine of these offended citizens commands all to be on tip-toe, wary of the myriad messages any simple action could send. We sometimes

call this practice "political correctness." We call it being mindful, inoffensive and nondiscriminatory. I call it ridiculous. The Target Christmas sweater, for example, is clearly intended to be a silly play on words. It uses the common acronym OCD - for Obsess~ve Compulsive Disorder - and replaces a word for comic effect. (To the P.C. police unfamiliar with this tactic, it's supposed to be a "joke.") I highly doubt it was a well-calculated attack by Target on those who suffer from mental disorders. It's just a sweater, folks. For those who perceive this as an attack, however, or are of the opinion that the ignorant Target ought to be mindful of the negative ways the sweater's design can be interpreted, I offer some input. I find it a dangerous practice to embrace over-sensitivity and hunt for the possible undertones of a neutral action. It's a nice disguise for the belligerent behavior of looking for a fight. Overwhelming emphasis is placed on all the negative ways in which the action could be interpreted, while one of the greatest components of an action's rightness - the actual intent of the action - is largely disregarded. Adopting such behavior has consequences. Everyone becomes a potential offender, as the politically-correct stand ready to attack, dissect and obsess over a single "wrong" word, then shame the culprit who wasn't even trying to be one. Comrades become enemies. Tension brews between citizens of a politically-

• •• •• • • • •

correct world, as another uproar could break out any minute. Anyone can become an enemy,even if he lacks malicious intent. Another cost of political correctness lies in its clash with free speech. First Amendment rights lose their power when one must be wary of attack after they're exercised. Don't misinterpret my point here - I am not encouraging bullying or intentionally offensive language. But when a lighthearted Christmas sweater is treated like hate speech, it's clear that our discrimination detectors are in need of some serious recalibrating. In addition, our society's greatest achievements have historically been rooted to a people voicing their opinion. Because of this, it's extremely dangerous when citizens feel threatened if they speak up. Indeed, this all too easily offended society embodies the quote by Elbert Hubbard: "To avoid criticism, do nothing, say nothing, be nothing." The grand result, therefore, of a culture obsessed with correctness is a "be nothing" culture. If, after all those words of wisdom, you are still ticked off by Target and sore over Starbucks, I'm happy to point out that we live in a free-market society in which your money is your vote. No one is forcing you to wear the Target sweater or buy the latte. So, if you don't like it, don't buy it. Simple as that. Both you and the businesses can

enjoy autonomy. What a win-win situation. And if you are a member of the P.C. police, I11 be honest, I hope you retire from the position, bbecause I'm starting to develop the opinion that this culture is nuts. It's ironic, disturbing and simply nonsensical that this hypersensitive culture is the same one that brought us "Cards Against Humanity," the shameful "game" that makes such issues as murder, the Holocaust and abortion a laughing matter. Yet, simultaneously existent is a culture priding itself on being "politically correct." Yep. We're definitely going wacko. In the meantime, neither Target nor Starbucks is backing down, and for that I applaud them. If you're offended by the corporations, so be it. You reserve the right to your own opinion. But I'd advise you to consider cooling your jets and growing a spine. (Members of the invertebrate community, my deepest apologies.) And if my suggestion insults you, well, this is the United States of America, not George Orwell's 1984. Not yet, anyway.

.. . . . . . .• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

The least wonderful· • Bathroom time of year • MONICA PAYNE Opinion Writer paynemk@plu.edu While some of you spent your Thanksgiving in the presence of family, friends and poultry, others broke away from the dinner table early to catch the sales of the season. Corporations have extended their Black Friday hours into Thanksgiving Day. Because who needs . to spend time with their families when they could be fighting complete strangers for the latest Frozen doll or Lego play set? That's classic familial bonding! But seriously, there is absolutely no reason for big business to take away our holiday. The "List of Stores Open Thanksgiving and Black Friday" includes Walmart, Target, Kohl's, Macy's and Dick's Sporting Goods which opened at 6 p.m. Toys R Us and Best Buy took the 5 p.m. spot, Michael's at 4 p.m. JC Penney's at 3 p.m. and lest we forget Radioshack opening at 8 a.m. until 1 p.m. according to the Seattle Times. And these stores will just keep opening their doors earlier and earlier. By this time next year, people will be camping out on Wednesday night and what was once a feast will be reduced to mere snacks. The junk food dinner Snoopy made in the Peanut's Thanksgiving special is looking more realistic by the year. In a few years we11 be renaming Thanksgiving "Black Friday Pregame". And for those who don't celebrate Thanksgiving, then let them have the day off. They have families too. At the very least they should have a day to relax. With the terror they have to endure on Black Friday, and the days that follow, they deserve a day to prepare. But no, they are thrown right into the heat of battle alongside the rest of the troops. Who needs a break? Certainly not these workers! We have a nice colony of Energizer bunnies! No. No you don't. Let these hard working people have a little

vacation. Is that too much to ask? Apparently it is for this capitalistic so~iety. All those classi~ traditions are bemg thrown out the wmdow, and for what? A TV that was $700 and is now $600. And they11 still consider purchasing the $800 flat screen for the surround sound or whatever sort of extra function ak · h b b · h h it as t at m es it t e etter uy. If that's the case, you can shop for that TV anytime, but it's not everyday you have the chance to gather your entire family in one house and just spend some quality time together. I'm all for buying great gifts for the

people you care about. That's the reason for this wonderful season. However, it's going way too far when the preparations .d k h f th for one h oli ay ta e t e p 1ace o ano er. , CNN . . d "I arhc1e tit1e s Bob G reene s 'd Ed . Thank . . 7 ,, Black Fn ay gmg 0 ut sgivmg. · Bl k F ·d f . lams ac exp n . ay .per ect1y ' saymg ,, It celebrates . .nothmg; it commemorates . only itself. . It ,,is an annual festival of the cash register. What is a holiday, if not a time to gather, be festive and have fun without the stresses of everyday consumerism? It's just you, your family and some good food. Black Friday is not that kind of day and we should not try to mold it into one. The people you give the gifts to are far more important than the money you spend. This society needs a huge priority checkiftheychoosethepurchaseoverwho they are purchasing for. Thanksgiving is as important as any other holiday. Let's not sweep it under the

e e

PARIS FRANKLIN Copy Editor franklpm@edu.com

My name is Paris, and one of the most liberating experiences of my life occurred in e a public restroom. I tl d l ·d 1 f · d recen y pee a ongsi e a ma e nen • of mine. One evening, a mixed-sex group of my friends and I heard the call of nature • and came to discover that the only place to relieve ourselves was a gender neutral • bathroom nearby. •

We walked into the same restroom, split into separate stalls and urinals and got

• on with our business. We emerged from our respective stalls, washed our hands . eM together and talked about our experience. bl d" d hi h ost nota y, we iscusse t ngs t at we . . e had never realized about what gomg to the b thr b l'k f h th d a oom must e i e or t e o er gen er. F 11 th 1e, many men are ta er an sta11 e or examp d wa11s an are easi·1y able t o 1ook over them. · 1y e Wh o knew.7 A s a 5,2,, fema1e, I cer tam d ·d , t · e iAsn bizarre and possibly stupid as this account sounds, I had such a positive e experience that I began wondering why humans have gendered bathrooms at all. Not • only are there multiple benefits for people whose sex matches their gender, but having • gender neutral bathrooms allows comfort for those in the transgender community. • Furthermore, the equality of the sexes is proven through that bathroom, one of the e most intimate and primal settings that we as

e •

rug for some big sale sign.

binaries

• • • •

domesticated mammals participate in. The lack of access to gender-neutral restrooms is one of the most prominent concerns among trans individuals. For transgender and gender non-conforming people, the lack of safe bathroom access can be viewed as a form of discrimination. For those who are currently in the process of transitioning genders, and for those who do not find themselves on the gender spectrum at all, going to the bathroom is a far more stressful event than cis-gendered people often realize. Gender neutral

bathrooms help combat transphobia and allow for gender non-conforming and nonbinary individuals to be more comfortable with a basic body function without the added pressure of thinking that they will make somebody else uncomfortable. Past a certain age, it is socially unacceptable for a child to accompany their parent to the restroom. My parents divorced before I could walk, and many of my childhood memories include splitting up from my brother and father to go into public restrooms when family bathrooms were not available. This caused safety risks for a young girl and discomfort for people in the bathroom when my father would inevitably yell into the women's bathroom in order to check on me. Going to the bathroom is one of the only activities that is completely equal across all gender lines, and separating people by gender to participate in a natural bodily function encourages shame. Gender neutral bathrooms equalize male and female genitalia, as well as further legitimize the identification of other genders. Please make no mistake in thinking that I don't understand that not all people will be comfortable with the concept of mixed gender bathrooms. Familiarization with a situation is what makes humans more comfortable with it. There is no reason to think that people will forever ban the idea that all genders can find common ground in the bathroom. I am not suggesting that we immediately do away with gender-specific restrooms. Rather, I feel as though if there was always a neutral bathroom alongside other bathrooms, there would be positive results for all.


Steve's Stance: #WhatShouldWePrayFor? STEVE MCGRAIN Sports Editor mcgraist@p/u.edu Earlier this fall, a high school football coach in Bremerton was suspended for praying with his team in the middle of the field after games. His intention was to keep in mind any injured players and to thank God for the opportunity to play or coach the game they love. Prayer may or may not have a religious connotation to it. In sports, prayer is utilized in hoping for safety for each of the teams or for the opposition to get home safely. No matter the circumstance, praying is meant for the wellbeing of others. I understand why parents would be upset or even the school, due to separation of church and state. 路

If the players and coaches came together in the center of the field to pray for the safety of others, would this be an appropriate act? After the deadly terror attacks in Paris, there was an outpouring of support for the victims and their families. All over social media, profile pictures were changed to display the French flag in the forefront. Along with the hashtag, #PrayforParis. People integrating the flag into their main picture symbolizes standing in unity with Paris and their community. To me #PrayforParis is keeping those people in our thoughts and wishing them safety in their everyday activities. It's hoping that the citizens of Paris regain some sort of normalcy. It's praying for them in their travels and hoping they don't endure any more hardship after the tragic events. 路 I understand the differences

between a terror attack and a high school football game, but I do not understand the differences between praying after a high school football game and #PrayforParis. So I pose the question, what does it mean to pray? I went to a private Catholic high school. Therefore, we prayed before and after each game for the same things: for everyone to remain healthy, if anyone was injured for them to recover as soon as possible and for the other team and ourselves to get home safely. Although the difficulty of trying to bring high school football players to the center of the field to pray can cause concern, these are teenagers. They could perceive these gatherings as, "If I do this, I will get more playing time. But if I do not join then I will sit on the bench." Parents, however, could think

the coach is trying to place one religion over another on a public format. But religion aside, praying for something does not have to have a religious connotation. Prayer to me is similar to throwing a penny in a fountain and wishing for something positive to happen. "#Praying" for the well-being of someone or something is wanting the best in the end. To suspend the coach for praying after the game could send the wrong message to his high school players. The message he is professing makes people comfortable, but once religion is brought into the conversation, he is condemned. It is the message, not the act of praying that people should be paying attention to. Sports can be a very demanding aspect of life, not only physically but mentally as well. Bringing to light what the

coach is doing fine, but to portray his message, of wishing something positive especially towards the opponent, as negative is the real problem, we are missing that. If these same people who got the coach suspended are also placing #PrayforParis on their Facebook profiles, is there not some sense of hypocrisy? There can be teams in sports or a player standing alone, like tennis or golf. These athletes can play recklessly and end up injured after any play. They will never know until it transpires. Praying for them is appropriate because they have perfected a game the fans have grown to appreciate. Religion or not, pray for everything and everyone, because Lord knows we all need to be in someone's thoughts for us to be at peace and remain healthy.

The Mast Monday Night Football pick 'em

GIANTS AT DOLPHINS Last week, the New York Giants hurt their playoff chances by losing a heartbreaker against the Jets. The Miami Dolphins won an ugly game against Baltimore, 15-13. New York tries to close the gap on Seattle for the sixth and final playoff spot. The biggest thing to keep an eye on this Monday Night is how will Miami slow down Giants' wide receiver O'Dell Beckham Jr. Last week, Beckham Jr. recorded six catches for 149 yards and a touchdown.

Two-time Super Bowl winning quarterback Eli Manning will try to bring some positive momentum to the last quarter of the season. Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill will look to help continue wide receiver DaVante Parker's emergence into the National Football League. The Dolphins' defensive line needs to put pressure on Manning in order to keep the game close. Giants need to exploit the Dolphins weak secondary. Giants win, 24-17.

D.J. Winter So. Pacific Lutheran Mtball Player

路 Juston Lind Jr. Wide receiver for the Lutes

"I'll take the Dolphins in this one, merely just because they're at home."

1 'Wide receiver O'Dell Beckham Jr. is a playmaker and plays . with passion. And the Giants defense has caused more turnovers ~the . Dolphins. Expect a cl拢?se game."

oyou come out on toQ;Qn Twitter!

Fantasy Football: Week 14 FLEX: Doug Baldwin, Seattle Seahawks He has five touchdowns over the span of two games. With tight end Jimmy Graham out for the season, Baldwin will continue to be a touchdown machine for Russell Wilson.

QUARTERBACK: Russell Wilson, Seattle Seahawks Wilson will have no pressure on where he needs to direct his passes with running back Marshawn Lynch and tight end Jimmy Graham out due to injury. He is going to against a terrible Baltimore Ravens secondary.

DEFENSE/SPECIAL TEAMS: Carolina Panthers The Panthers get set to take on quarterback Matt Ryan and the Atlanta Falcons. As long as they can contain wide receiver Julio Jones on the outside, it should be an fairly favorable match-up.

WIDE RECEIVER: Sammy Watkins, Buffalo Bills Quarterback Tyrod Taylor should be able to toss the football all over the worst secondary in the National Football League, his favorite target: Sammy Watkins.


THE MAST

14 SPORTS

Student-Athlete Spotlight An Interview with Melissa Dean

DECEMBER 11, 2015

Remembering the Mamba DYLAN FOREMAN Sports Writer

foremadf@pfu.edu

Photo by Kiana Sullenberger MM: What is your favorite part about the athletic training room? MD: Lucy Capron

CARA GILLESPIE 81?.orts Writer

g11/esce@pfu.edu

Melissa Dean is a senior Pacific Lutheran University swimmer and President of the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC). This week, The Mast sat down with her to ask your questions. Mast Media: How many hours of sleep a night do you get? Melissa Dean: On a normal night, I usually get about six hours, and then if it's a good night, maybe eight. MM: Do you find that you h.a ve to sacrifice certain things to maintain balante? MD: Yes, I think I do. I'm not able to hang out with friends as much because school and swimming are really my two commitments at the time and I have to give and take on some things and make sure that I'm balanced and putting those first. '

MM: What is your favorite movie? MD: I really like Finding Nemof MM: Why is that? MD: Because I am really excited for Finding Dory to come out in 2016. MM: Where do you see yourself in five years? MD: I'm not really sure where I see myself in five years. I'm just enjoying life. Hopefully, 111 still be able to participate in swimming somehow. I will be working in a public accounting firm in Seattle called KPMG. MM: What is your favorite pizza topping? MD: Bacon! MM: What is your favorite part of being a member of the swim team? MD: I think my favorite part is just hanging out with my teammates and being able to be a part of an environment where everybody is there because they love swimming and being able to train hard with my team and also hang out with them at the same time.

MM: What is the most fun thing you have worked on with SAAC this year? MD: I wouldn't exactly call it fun, but we just put out a letter about the missed class time policy at PLU, especially in regards to athletes and students in other leadership positions at PLU. We addressed it to the faculty and staff hoping to create a more unified policy regarding absences to make sure that athletes aren't getting docked for competition seasons when they are representing PLU. MM: What has been the most challenging aspect of college for you? MD: I think the most challenging aspect is being able to participate in everything I want to and having enough time. Especially with swimming and school, it's hard to balance all of it because you want to get things done in the best way possible but you also have to know that sometimes you can't commit to everything. I think figuring out the organization and creating habits to make sure that you can do everything you want. MM: What is your spirit animal? MD: I really like koalas, except I am kind of the opposite of a koala because I don't get to sleep that much. MM: What is the most rewarding thing you have been involved in at PLU? MD: I think the most rewarding thing is being able to be a part of SAAC and making an impact on not only the athletic community but the PLU community. Just making people more aware of the athletes here at PLU and also helping with whole athletic department and with SAAC and making sure the athletes have a voice. Thank you for participating in #AskALute on the @golutes Instagram! We appreciate your continued support and wish you the best of luck on your finals. May the odds be ever in your favor, Lutes.

Kobe Bryant, shooting guard for the Los Angeles Lakers, made the decision to retire after this current NBA season, thus bringing an end to a historic and legendary 20-year career. You either love or incredibly loathe Kobe Bryant. Whichever category you fall into, one thing is for sure: you respect the Black Mamba. Was he the next Michael Jordan? Some might say he was. Others might disagree. One thing is certain: he was the closest thing to MJ from when he was drafted in 1996 to present day. He was drafted out of high school in Philadelphia with arguably one of the greatest draft classes of all time. It included Allen Iverson, Steve Nash, Stephan Marbury, Jermaine O'Neal, Ray Allen and undrafted Ben Wallace. His list of accolades goes on: Five time NBA champion, one time league MVP, two time finals MVP, 11 all-NBA firstteam, nine time all-defensive first team and 17 time all-star. However, with these spectacular accomplishments, there comes skepticism. Many people have doubted him in his career. Some say that Kobe's first two titles weren't really due to his performance, but rather to the performance of his dynamic counterpart, Shaquille O'Neal. As one of the most dominating centers of all time, Shaq is thought to have led the Lakers during the dynasty run in the early 2000s before Kobe took the reigns of the team. Once he had attained control of the team as his own, questions began to arise as to whether or not he was a toxic teammate. Some people surrounding him couldn't take how much he demanded the ball. He has been described as selfish by a multitude of his own teammates. The most legendary feud came between him and Shaq where the two reportedly could not stand each other even though the team was winning. To be a great competitor and a great champion, an athlete must maintain an ego that they are the greatest player on the basketball court at any given time. Kobe had that ego. From the fist pump to the gritty underbite, Kobe possessed some of the qualities that only the greatest players possess. At the same time, with the world revolving around one individual, those surrounding Kobe are liable to Photo Courtesy of Alexandra Walt agree with the idea that he is the greatest gift to the game of basketball.

MIKEY LANGENER Guest Writer

/angnemw@pfu.edu

....-

Photo Courtesy of Erik Drost: Johnny Manziel (2) is starting quarterback for the Clevland Browns

People doubt you, judge you and in many cases, hate you. With all the speculation surrounding Kobe as selfish or undeserving of some of his NBA titles, there is no doubt that the Great Mamba will be remembered for his dominance and the excitement that he brought to the NBA. Was he my favorite player? Far from it, I think sometimes he tried to do too much on the court. I also think there were times he could have trusted his teammates more instead of taking it upon himself to single-handedly win a game. If I were a teammate, I'd probably not love to play with or even be around him. However, I can't help but marvel at the skills he possesses and his work ethic. To be that good in the NBA, Kobe put in countless hours to perfect his craft. Famously known for being a gym rat to become legendary, Kobe nearly mastered all aspects of the game. I will always regard the Black Mamba as one of the greatest to play the game of basketball.

All young athletes have an athlete that they look up to and strive to emulate someday. However, not every athlete is a good role model and certain athletes may even give young kids the wrong impression .. Some athletes take their situation for granted and flaunt all of their money. They usually don't know how to handle media attention, and these are the athletes most commonly shown on television. In our society today, athletes play a very big role and tend to draw the spotlight whether they want to or not. Anytime a big name athlete does something negative, everybody is going to hear about it. Professional athletes are under a microscope and everything they do is being watched and judged by the public. Anytime an athlete is involved in an incident, it's all over the news within minutes of occurring. Players such as Cleveland Browns starting quarterback Johnny Manzie! are constantly all over the media for all the wrong reasons. This is the

perception most young aspiring athletes think it's all about because it's what they see day after day. The 2012 Heisman trophy winner has constantly been in the news since his college days and well into his short professional career. Several run ins with the law, including multiple pictures and videos of Manziel partying with drugs and alcohol, have been all over the media. He portrays the athlete-party lifestyle by carrying himself as being above the law and not caring about anyone but himself. Manziel is just one of many athletes like this, who make it difficult for people to say professional athletes are worthy role models. With so much negativity surrounding sports, it's easy to get caught up and forget about the athletes who are actually good role models. Negative events immensely outweigh the positive things done by athletes. This makes it hard for kids to find someone worthy of being looked up to and want to follow in their footsteps. As a collegiate athlete myself, I look up to current athletes such as Marcus Mariota and Russell Wilson. They are two of the most humble athletes you could ever find.

They truly love playing the game and don't get caught up in the money and the spotlight. They constantly give back to the community and organizations. They show the true meaning of being a leader and a team player. Growing up as a young athlete, I loved to play sports and wanted to be like the big time athletes that I saw on television. An athlete like Peyton Manning always had the spotlight on him and received all the attention because he was the best in his sport. Watching these athletes at a young age made a big impression on me. I dreamed of one day being in their shoes and making the big play in the spotlight in front of tens of thousands of screaming fans. With all the negative things done by athletes, it can be difficult at first to find one to look up to and admire, but if you take a good look, there are hundreds of great athletes out there setting good examples for kids all over the country. You just have to look past the select few being portrayed by the media.


路.

DECEMBER 11, 2015

THE MAST

SPORTS 15

Men's Basketball continues to impress early into the season CHRISTIAN BOND Sports Writer bonco@plu.edu The Pacific Lutheran University Men's Basketball team was picked by the coaches of the Northwest Conference to finish tied for seventh at the conclusion of this season. But, after an impressive 6-1 start, the team could have several coaches changing their picks. Senior Bryce Miller and junior Brandon Lester are the leaders of the 2015-2016 team. Lester is having a great year for scoring, averaging 17 points per game. Miller has dominated the paint, supplying 12.3 points and 9.5 rebounds per game. "This being my senior year, there is extra motivation to

be successful and finish in the top of the league," Miller said. "I was fortunate enough to have some good games thus far, which can be attributed to my teammates giving me the ball in places on the floor where I can be efficient. As we roll into conference play, I anticipate that competition will continue to rise, along with my production." Sophomore Dylan Foreman has scored in bunches for the team this season. Foreman scored 20 points in three of the first seven games this season. He is averaging 16.5 points per game. Junior Kyle Sawtell scored 22 points in a historic game against Northwest Indian College. The Lutes beat NWIC 130-52. PLU's 130 points broke the previous program record of 119, set back in 1989 against

Concordia (Ore.). New players, first-year Tyson Birrer and sophomore Jarred Christy have provided the team with youth and athleticism. Birrer has provided a nice point guard option off the bench for the team. Christy is coming into his own underneath. The 6 foot 6 inch transfer student is averaging 5.3 rebounds per game. Head coach Steve Dickerson is pleased with the level his team is playing at. "We can compete at the highest level, and we are resilient," Dickerson said. "As long as we do what we do, we can compete." Your next chance to catch the men at home is January 15 against Lewis & Clark at 8 p.m.

Photos by Bailey Plumb: Top Left: Senior Bryce Miller (44) attempts a teardrop, he finished with 12.7 points per game and 9.4 rebounds per game. Right: Sophomore Jarred Christy (22) does a layup over UPS defenders. Christy transferred from Washington State this season, he is averaging 5.4 points and 6.6 rebounds per game. Photo by Oliver Johnson: Left: Sophomore Dylan Foreman (15) shoots a three from the right wing. Foreman is averaging 17.0 points per game.

Lady Lutes' refute "rebuilding" claim JAKE BILYEU SP.Orts Writer b1/yeujc@plu.edu The year of rebuilding has gone much better than expected for Pacific Lutheran University's Women's Basketball team. After kicking off the season just before Thanksgiving with nine new players, the team has won two games and lost two games. However, their two losses have been very competitive. The Lutes began their season with a match against nationally-ranked University of St. Thomas at the Doug McArthur Classic. The Lutes stuck with the 18th ranked Tommies through the first three quarters, as they only trailed 52-48 heading into the final period. While their foes were ultimately able to pull away and win 76-62, the Lutes' competitive play showed just how good they can be. "We played a very good team," head coach Jennifer Childress said. "As a

testament to our players' hard work and togetherness, we hung right with them." The team followed that game by finishing up the Doug McArthur Classic with a game against Hardin-Simmons. After a back and forth first half, the Lutes slowly took control in the second half and held on to get their first win of the season, 72-61. "I am proud of our ability to find another gear when the game entered the fourth quarter," Childress said. From there, the Lutes got some rest and prepped for their conference opener, a home game against University of Puget Sound. They would definitely need that rest, as the game would wind up going on a little longer than expected. After long runs from both sides saw the Lutes enter the half with a 34-29 lead, the opposing Loggers slowly mounted their comeback. As the Lutes tried to secure the win late in the game, a Logger buzzer beater sent the

Photos by Bailey Plumb: Above: Senior Megan Abdo (10) attempts a free-throw. Top Right: Firstyear Anna Hurd (20) performs a lay-up on the left side.

game into overtime. The Lutes' energy that had been spent holding off the comeback to that point was not enough to get the win in overtime, as the team fell 79-69. "We showed that we can compete," Childress said. "We were not satisfied with the loss, but we know that we will definitely improve going forward." The team showed that dissatisfaction when they took on Willamette on the road on Dec. 5, as they took an early 21-12 lead after the first quarter. Although Willamette was able to come back from the deficit, another 21-12 run by the Lutes in the fourth quarter gave them the 69-55 win, as the team won its first conference game of the season.

"Our depth and the rotation of fresh players was really to our advantage," Childress said. "We were able to sustain pressure for 40 minutes." So far, the team has been led in scoring by senior Megan Abdo, with 14.5 points per game, and junior Ionna Price, with 10.3 points per game. Junior Lacey Nicholson has led the team in rebounds with 8.8 per game, while Abdo has also contributed 6.8. The team's season continues this Friday at Northwest, and they'll be back home Sunday, Dec. 13, when they host Evergreen at2 p.m.

__,.


THE MAST

16 SPORTS

DECEMBER 11, 2015

Athlete's Perspective Sarah Barnes

Editor's Note: Senior Sarah Barnes is part of Pacific Lutheran's Women 's basketball team and the Reserved Officers' Training Corps (ROTC).

SARAH BARNES Guest Writer barnessa@pfu. edu WYBO. It means Work Your Butt Off. This is a motto coined by Women's Basketball head coach Jennifer Childress, that is used every day at practice. When I first heard this acronym used by Coach Childress my sophomore year, I thought it was weird. It sounded silly and I didn' t accept it ini tially. I was wrong. After three years, I am 100 percent on the WYBO train . It is a goofy motto, but it has come to be very applic<:1ble to every aspect of my life. My life includes ROTC,

basketball and academics. Looking back to my firstyear of college, I never had the intention to be commissioning as an Aviation Officer in the Army. Playing Lute Basketball has opened doors for me, while WYBO has walked me through them. At times it is difficult to balance everything, but the support I receive from Cadre (ROTC instructor), Coach Childress, my teammates an d my peers allowed me to succeed. As I come into my final season as a Lu te, I am very excited. Basketball and ROTC have p ushed me physically, m'entally and emotionally, arid have taught me lessons ' that forced me to become

mature. I have noticed these forces at work on the basketball court. I am seeing plays and reacting to pressure in new ways. My perspective has changed. I love playing basketball, but being a part of a team as awesome as ours and watching the younger girls learn is better than playing. We have never looked better. Expect great things from the PLU Women's Basketball team for the next couple seasons. We finally have team chemistry that has no t been here for a while. We work hard, support each other and care about each other. Photo by Angelo

Mejia

Ashley Mindnich ASHLEY MINDNICH Guest Writer mindiam@pfu.edu This year, Pacific Lutheran's Women' s Soccer was the first PLU sports team to take an international trip since 1993, we led the NWC with 94 saves, had a league best of 38 goals and achieved the best program record since 1992. I could go on. We had two full slides of accomplishments on a PowerPoint shown in our post season meeting. During our last game, with rain pouring down, we lost by one goal to one of the last teams in the conference, it didn't feel like a success. But without a doubt, all the incredible things our family achieved this season cannot be written off. We had exhibited growth as studentsathletes and now are eager to start the grind for our next season. The most distinct aspect of the PLU Women's Soccer family is that everyone has their own role on the team. Our success is a collective one. Each member plays a part in orchestrating our peak performance. Many teams have one star player

that carries the team, but that's not the case on our squad. This year, we had players all over the board scoring goals, assisting them, playing major minutes and rallying the bench. The collective work ethic that each individual sacrificed to the program created a well-rounded and outstanding performance on the field. Our family never spends too much time being comfortable. We allow ourselves a short, sweet celebration after each of our wins this season. But by the time we got into the team room, we were back to business. Within an hour from our previous game, we were mentally and physically preparing for the next game with repeated trips to the ice bath, by watching film and critiquing our play. Although we take pride in our successes, we refuse to settle. This is the mindset we will have going into next season. We are proud of what we have accomplished, but we are hungry for more. Unfortunately, PLU Women's Soccer is losing four incredible

members of our fa mily, seniors Kailey Lyman, Emily H anna, Jamie Hoffman and Nicoya BenhamMarin, to the intimidating world of post-graduation. Although it is heartbreaking to move into next season without them, we are looking forward to welcoming back three members from injuries that put them in red shirts for this past season. Sophomore Kristi Kaneta, junior Kaylie Rozell and redshirt senior Lauren Larson will be returning to the action come next fall, along with 23 other returners and a group of first-years . We will have a deep offensive and midfield bench, a strong defense and many players ready to step into the big shoes that are being left behind. In the 2016-2017 season we will be upholding the collective passion that we all have for this beautiful game. Our preparation starts now. Our family is ready to welcome new members, say goodbye to others and continue our legacy here atPLU.

Photo by Bailey Plumb: Sophomores Ashley Mindnich (29), Hailey Smoot (22) and Taylor Lunde (17) celebrate Smoot's goal.

Sophie VanDyke DAVID MAIR Guest Writer maird/@pfu.edu When sophomore Sophie VanDyke began her college search, she knew a school with a club lacrosse team was a must. She knew right away that Pacific Lutheran was where she wanted to play. VanDyke started playing lacrosse in the eighth grade. This spring will be her seventh season playing lacrosse and her second season with the Lutes. She works hard to keep playing lacrosse while balancing lacrosse with being a nursing major. As far as nursing goes, there was never a particular moment that inspired her. Rather she got the idea in high school because she loved studying the human body.

"I like the idea of being part of something bigger than myself," VanDyke said. Not to mention, "the job security and pay doesn't hurt either." She likes to think she has a talent for brightening people's days. "Being a nursing major, I was pretty worried I was not going to have the time to play," VanDyke said. "Thankfully, last year I managed to make it work, so I am hopeful this next season will work out the same." Playing on the lacrosse team primarily as low defense and being a full-time nursing major is a difficult balancing act. "I would be lying if I said it was easy to balance [them both]," VanDyke said. Sacrifices have to made to be make it all work. Her teammates are supportive of

her academics and help her how they can from quizzing her with flashcards during road trips to letting her miss a practice to put in more hours to study for a test. "Ultimately, we all want what is best for everyone on the team. It is a very supportive atmosphere," VanDyke said. It may seem intimidating to balance nursing with other activities, but VanDyke wants to encourage others to put themselves out there and get involved. "Yes [nursing] is a difficult major, but life is all about balance and finding other passions will prevent you from getting burned out," VanDyke said.

--~~---.-.-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~----,

Photo by

David Mair


\ 路路......


Reaching the end of her first year of college, Kelly Hall was nervous. "I didn't know what I wanted to do. I was starting to get kind of anxious because I couldn't figure out what I wanted to major in," Hall, now a senior, said. After talking to her Literature prqfessor Jenny James, Hall decided to look into her love of her own Native American heritage and the cultures of other tribes. Hall was connected with Suzanne Crawford-O'Brien, another professor from her first year. Crawford-O'Brien told Hall about a group on campus who was trying to create a new program of study relating to Native Americans. The group's progress slowed, but Crawford-O'Brien explained that an individualized major was an option for Hall. "I thought that it was a cool idea, but I never really thought that I would be able to be a person who was going to major in Native American and Indigenous Studies," said Hall. Crawford-O'Brien told her she "could be like a guinea pig for the major that they wanted to create for the school," said Hall. "I was super excited about it." Halfway through Hall's sophomore year, the major was approved and she began studying tribal affairs. Hall is a part of the Samish tribe, a Salish Coast nation from Puget Sound. She first visited her tribe in 2003 and was able to have a brief exploration of the culture by riding in a traveling canoe with her father. She didn't, however, return for a number of years. Following her sophomore yearand the declaration of her major-Hall received a grant from the Wang Center to go to her community and help research how to get more people involved with cultural events. Hall did not feel connected to her tribe upon arnvmg with them during her first summer there. "I feel like I had an outsider perspective." Hall didn't know anyone and didn't have specific details about the Samish, so she had to observe those

around her in order to learn important aspects of the culture. "It took the whole first summer for me to really get that comfortable with even labeling myself as Sarnish," said Hall. "I would say 'the tribe' or 'Samish' and I wouldn't say 'we' or 'our.' At the end of the summer, one of the tribal members said 'I think you need to start referring to yourself as a member because this is your home and your place." Last summer, Hall went on her first youth-led canoe journey. "It's a really powerful experience to be a part of something that means so much to so many different cultures," said

Hall. The journey was an opportunity for Hall to meet peers from other tribes who are also interested in their cultures. "A lot of things started to fall in place and make sense," Hall said. "You form a connection with everybody that you're with on the journey. You overcome obstacles with them. When I started the journey, a lot of the people I was with were complete strangers, and by the end it was hard to leave," said Hall. Scattered membership has been an obstacle for the Samish, as they have no formal treaty or reservation, the tribe was officially re-recognized by the United States government in 1996. "It has been good for our tribe in many ways because politically we're able to get away from some problems that exist in other communities," said Hall. "It has given our tribe a unique chance to really focus on culture." Hall believes that the geographic spread of Sarnish people allows for connections in other ways. "We' re all a big family. I didn't exactly understand that until I was back in my community," said Hall. "I have shown my tribe that I am very interested and committed to learning cultural knowledge and preserving cultural knowledge and language." "It is also really important and valued when Samish youth are interested because that's what we ultimately need to carry on our culture and traditions and language," said Hall. "I care about what is important in the tribe and I want to do whatever I can to help serve my community and they recognize that." Hall will graduate this spring after finishing her classes within the Religion, Anthropology and History departments. She wants to work for her tribe in a cultural or language department. "I don't know where my journey will take me first, but know that I will end up working there and living there."


"

u're the big ticker!" Skoda said.

Oord laughed and then looked at me seriously.


What should everyone know about

Ya~~~

''I'm gonna have to get a bulldog," Oord replied excitedly. "An english one, truthfully I'd like a white and black one or a gold one like Lola Kort's dog, she's awesome" I turned to Skoda "What about Y! u Kort?'' I asked while Oord sang a victqry song ~d scored a touchdown.

"What about you Kort?'' I asked "Oh ice cream .. " "What kind?" "ColdStone half cake batter half chocolate and throw in some Kit-Kats."

Pastimes?

What is your plan after you graduate? "Well I hate travelling and I really _路 the Tacoma area and all my friends are here, so 111 look for an internship that will hopefully turn into a job," Oord said. "What did I just do?" Oord commented, remembering the game for a minute as Skoda ran the ball into the endzone.

"I don't know," Oord said. "And you Kort?'' "He likes camping," Skoda said. "No I don't, I hate travelling," Oord laughed.


Mollie Paree on

Philosophy & Opera By Jeff Dunn

J-Term is a time of transition for Lutes and junior Mollie Paree is no exception. Her last two J-Terms were dominated by Pacific Lutheran University's annual opera performances. This year, the opera class was held during the fall, freeing up Mollie's January to fulfill her Philosophy credit by taking Ethics and the GE:Jod Life with Professor Mike Rings. ~ "I feel like [Ethics anc:htne 路cood Life] makes me question my own opinions and views, which is weird because I am really passionate about what I believe in," Paree said. GURs, or general university requirements, such as the philosophy course Paree is taking, offer a unique opportunity to gain perspective. "I usually am pretty stubborn about my opinions, I can talk to other people about it but usually don't change my mind," she said. "This class makes me see things from a different point of view." "It makes me use a different type of thinking," Paree continued. "Opera is more of a habitual thing and I can pick up the material a lot faster because it's what I'm good at. But when I have a different class it challenges me a bit more. Last year I did both a J-Term class and opera and it was awful just because I had a hard time balancing both. This year I'm having an easier time in my GUR because it's really the only thing I have to focus on." Comparing this year's opera to the last two she's performed in, Paree preferred performing during January. Last year, the opera class performed "Alcina" by Handel. The year before that, they performed an adaptation of Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream." "I thought it would be better during the fall because we had more time, but I think J-Term is a better setting for it. It's intensive, and you do it for five hours a

day, every single day, Monday through Friday. It's harder because you have to memorize your music quicker, but I think it's better because it keeps you more focused on that specific thing because it's your J-Term class." "During the regular semester you have all these other classes going on, so it doesn't feel like as much of a priority as it really should be, especially for people who are vocal performance majors." It takes a special kind of crazy to become a music major, especially with a focus in vocal performance. It's a lot of hard work and dedication to produce those kinds


of results. The results they produce speak for themselves, though. All that great music follows naturally from the amount of work they'll put in to honing their craft. "It's a cliche, but you are your biggest critic. It's hard because your body is your instrument, so when you get sick or you're tired you can feel it and hear it in your voice. Even if you're fatigued from carrying boxes all day you can feel it in your voice." "I question it almost every day; 'is this the right major for me?' The difference is it's me saying that and not my vocal teacher or a professor."

Mollie Paree is a junior Vocal Performance major She has performed in the PLU opera the past three years and sings in the Choir of the West


Nate Hansen on Working at OMM By Jeff Dunn

"Its great to see your friends all the time. I live off-campus, so I don't get to interact with students oncampus as much anymore, especially first-years and sophomores," Nate Hansen, a senior this year, said. "You can see what gets them going and have those conversations you don't often get to have. "I've had a couple on-campus jobs, I've been an RA, I've worked in the music hall as an usher and I've been a note-taker, but this has been one of my favorite on-campus jobs by far." Nate found his vocation as an Economics major with a Women's and Gender Studies minor. 'Tm a feminist economist," he said. He thinks the way the two disciplines intersect is very important to the world right now.

"A lot of the issues that face our world right now are deeply rooted in economic inequalities and some of those are deeply rooted in gender issues," Hansen said. "I think the interplay of the two disciplines is really interesting, especially in developing countries." Focusing back on his job, I asked Hansen which drink he absolutely hates making for people. "No! I love it when people order anything!" he responded, loud enough for his boss to hear from the other side of the market. Besides his classes and oncampus work, Hansen also competes for PLU's Track and Field team. He runs the 200 meter and said he's "trying" to be a sprinter. With all this on his plate, Hanson had to learn the hard lesson of time management. "That's something I learned in my first year. It's something you11 have to learn. Being a student-athlete and holding a job on campus teaches you a lot of skills you can use in your life outside of college." Hansen also took time in our

interview to reflect on his years here at PLU. "It's crazy how the time flies, next thing you know you're a senior, you wonder 'what did I do that was meaningful to me and to other people?"' I asked him why he loves his major, and he told me he loves the way others are inspired by Economics. "Other than loving the subject material - when you meet people in your discipline that are really excited about what they do, it makes it so much more easy and a lot more fun, and that's what I found in the Economics department. Get in contact with the professors. They're more than willing to help you. Everyone's really nice in the departments and it's a great choice," he said, not forgetting to add: "Pick it over science."

Nate Hansen's extroverted personality makes working at Old Main Market a breeze


St Lou.ts

~o

Los A"'-9e.le.s

AccordingtoCNN, Tuesday,Jan.12NFLCommissioner Roger Goodell announced that the National Football League's 32 team owners voted to give the St. Louis Rams approval to move to Los Angeles for the 2016 season, and the Chargers have the option to join them within the next year.

El Ck°'po c°'p~u.re.d.. 1'tck· Sp°'d.~ P°'sses °'~°'~ Saturday, Jan. 9 the infamous Mexican drug lord Joaquin El Chapo Guzman six months after he escaped from a maximumsecurity jail by a 1 mile tunnel dug in the showers. According to BBC , the president said Guzman was apprehended following a shootout with Mexican marines in Los Mochis, a coastal city in his home state of Sinaloa, in northwest Mexico.

Co-founder and namesake of local burger chain Dick's Drive-In died Sunday morning at the age of 92. Spady and his two partners opened the Wallingford restaurant on Jan. 28, 1954. A hamburger cost 19 cents, Dick's was, is and always shall be open until 2 a.m. for those in need of a late-night snack.

1'l°'~ o~

M°'""sto"'- tor s°'le. On Wednesday, Jan. 6 Playboy Mansion went on the market for $200m, Hugh Hefner included! Hefner bought the home in 1971 for $1m. The estate eventually replaced the original Playboy Mansion, which opened in 1959 in Chicago.


Maria Cruse is a Senior. She is a Women's & Gender Studies major and a Music minor. She's studying music and she's a pretty good drummer if you haven't heard her play before. Maria is also hyper-involved on campus. She's a First-Year Residential Assistant in Harstad Hall and one of two RAs that collaborate with faculty for programming for linked courses. "My residents take a linked course having to do with the the theme of the hall, which is Women's Empowerment and Gender Equity," Cruse said. Cruse also works with the Diversity Center as a Rieke Fellow where s~e helps facilitate iGroup, a pilot program tbat engages students in conversation about , _social systems, identities and ways students can enact change. Cruse's involvement and care for her comi;nunity doesn't stop there. She's the recipient of the Women's Center Kandel Oleksak Scholarship, and as a part of the scholarship she helps with event programming for the Women's Center. Additionally, she serves on the Women's Center Advisory Board. She worked a gender panel discussion that was a part of Gender Exploration Week and Love Your

Body Day this year. Even with all this on her plate, Cruse remains a humble scholar. "I want to acknowledge, too, that there's a lot of student voices that don't get recognized as much and everyone can be newsworthy in their own way," Cruse said. Carrying a full load of classes, being an RA and being involved with the dCenter and Women's Center is quite the undertaking. But, Maria is involved in one more area. On Sundays, Cruse goes to University Congregation. In addition to participating in worship services as a reader and prayer leader, she serves as the Missions Coordinator, helping to connect members of the congregation with community engagement and service outside the campus community. Recently, she traveled to Chicago and participated in a Lutheran Student Movement gathering. The event lasted four days and consisted of several workshops and forums on how social justice and faith interconnect and the struggles of the "microchurch" in the world of mega-churches, as well as service projects and exploring the city.


One of our newest members of the Lute community is Jacob Gleichman, a Fall 2015 transfer from Columbia Basin College, a community college in Pasco, Wash. "I took those two years of school very seriously and as a result, I have the privilege of attending a quality, well respected university such as PLU," Gleichman said. Gleichman is a junior Communication major and a Business Marketing minor. has been Gleichman playing baseball all of his life. His love of the game is only matched by his commitment to academic

achievement. Gleichman is a pitcher, and hopes to be a starter in the upcoming season. Gleichman said his experience with the baseball team so far has been a great one. But there's mu h more to come. "I cannot credit the coaches enough as well. They truly care about not only my athletic experience, but my academic experience," Gleichman said. "I respect coaches who care for your success as a student first, and as an athlete second." Gleichman credits his teammates with helping him settle in as a new member of our Lute community.


The Mooring Mast Fall 2015  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you