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Decorating On A Budget

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Contents 3. New RIght hits WashIngton 4. Republicans: GIvIng strong anlw ... to bIg problema

8. D.'endlng the luture lor the poor, alck, .Id.rty 8.

Human .... Ic.. Republican ax

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we"are

program.

I •• ling

10. Are AbortIon. ethIcal or legal? 12. Moral .alt retard. government corruption 14. Gov.mor Spellman: D.allng troubled economy

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15. The ThIrd House: a vl.w 01 Capitol Hili Irom th. lobby.


3

New Right hits Washington By Kathleen M. Hosfeld

The times they are '8 chanQln' for the stale's legislators and lobbylest. The Senate majority switch, compliments of new Republican Pete Von Reich· bauer. the Influence of thE Reagan administration and thE growing momentum 01 lobbying groups like Moral Majority are all contributing to an In· creaslngly conservative trend In Olympia.

Tensions between ousted Democrats and reigning Republicans, In addition 10 ten· botween Governor sian Spellman and "King" Bill Polk, Republican Speaker of the House. are nol the the only pressures that officials In the capllol face. Riding on the wake of public turmoil over Gamscam and other scandals the consensus of legislators this year Is that an important concern Is to restore lallh In elected officials. Polk was quoted in a January Seattle Times article 815 saVing, "One of our biggest Challenges for the next two years Is trying to

instill some confidence In leader3." Republicans, pushing for strong cutbacks In spending are being confronted with the "moral" demands of catering to social programs. According to Jeanette H ayner, Republican Senate majority leader, "Our real chore In the nexl tour years Is to determine what our excesses are In government..." Following a typical, hard· line Republican lead, Polk has worked 10 cut spending for ChOre serves, to allow private Insurance companies into the state workman's compensation monopoly. This week the usury Issue sur· faced with RepUblicans backing off on proposals to deregulate interest rates In the state, allhough the issue Is expected to re·surface later. This week Republican efforts on the usury issue were stalled when public opinion and Gover· nor Spellman �ave Republicans cause to back off on their plan to deregulate Interest rates. The

issue Is expected to re-aurtlce laler. Democrats on the other afde ot both the House and Senate. charge that Republicans are making terrible political and moral mistakes, especially with SOCial welta's cuts. The budget continues to be a grappling point between the parties. According to the gover­ nor, despite campaign promisee a tax Increase may become necessary. Democrats, on the other hand, suppo" a tax In­ crease but are unwilling to sup­ port any such Increase unl..a It Is clearly a Republican move. This week Magulne looks at the state legislature and the major issues and torcea being dealt with this session. While most of the major pieces of legislation will not be dealt with until the end of the session, the ground-work 18 now being laid. The public will have to walt until the conclusion of the legislative session to begin to see the results o f thei, new con· servatlve trend.


4

REPUBLICANS

Giving strong answers to big By Andy Baldwin

dxcesses are In government: the excessive spending, the Inef·

The Republicans are In con­ trol of both houses 01 the Washington State legislature for the first time In 26 years. What directions will the Repub­ lican legislature take over the

fic/enc/es, the programs that are no longer necessary, or never were cost·effectlve, or apply only to a few people." The Republicans have already had a chance at budget cutting. A supplemental budget for the I)ext four months has already been passed by the legislatures and signed by Governor Spellman. The budget included

coming years? "I think the new direction is probably nOI far too different than ttlal of Congress al the national level," Republican Representative Shirley Wlnsley from District 28 said. "And that is less government support financially of social programs, and fewer government regula­ tions." Washington's legislative leaders agree. "We're going to be looking in-depth at a lot of the programs that are currently in existence." House Soeaker WIlliam POlk. said. "We're going to be looking at the deregulation of business. Industries, and people."

'" rot.d _"./,,.t til. budgellte­ cause II dId 1101 ha.,e enough mon.y In II to tall. c.,. 01 th. socl., ".eds."

Washlnglon's Senate Majorit y LeaClf\r JeanneUe Hayner, sai d)

"Our real chore in the next four years is to (h:tlurmlne what our

stltutlon ... " Hayner argued. "What we did Is cut In the areas where we could do 8S little damage as possible. In most cases we were told and had this reason to believe thele was some fat in those programs, that

S90.7 million lor social programs instead of the $109.2 mlliion requested by Governor Spellman and the $109.1 million demanded by Oemocrats. As a result. the supplemental budget has been heavily crill· "We hive to have a balan­ ced budgel In Ihls st.I. bV Constitution."

"Ou, choIce Is 10 .,rha, ,af••

tazes orcul Ploo,ams 0' both. "

Je.n".tt. Hayne,

cized by Democrats who feel it is too tough on the poor.

there were some abuses In the system."

Democratic Senator Jim Mc· Dermott was quoted In the Feb­ luary 22 Sesrtle PosHntelligen· cer as describing the GOP's economic proposals and sup· plemental budget as lurning the government's "war on poverty" Into a "war on the poor, the sick,

Referring to McDermott's remarks Hayner said, "Jim Mc· Dermot1 falls to realize that things have changed. People are not willing to turn over alt their income 10 tile lederal and state government."

and the aged." Even some Republicans believe the recent supplemental budget was too short on money for social programs. Represen. tative Wlnsley, one of the four Republicans who voted against

the supplemental budget, said,

"I voted against the budget because It did not have enough money In It to take care of the

social needs." Republican leaders, however, strongly defended the budget. "We have to have a balanced budget in this slate by Con·

Polk argued that the supple· mental budget was generous. "Look at HI It:....dty how mucn money has been appropriated lor those areas. A huge amount has gone Into welfare pro· grams," he said. The Republican legislators are now planning the budget lor the next two years. "Our choice Is to either raise taxes or cut programs or both," said Hayner. "Actually we're going to do a little of bOth." The Republicans are planning to raise some usury taxes, such BS tuition in stale universities,


5

problems the tax on gas, and license fees a s well as trim government pro­ grams. "There certainly will be higher tullion,"

Polk said. "There Is likely to be 8 different gas t8X." ·'Now. the tuItion for a year al the University of WashIngton is somewhere in the neIghborhood of $675," said Hayner. "lOur proposal) would Increase It 10 something over $000, which Is

still very low when you compare It to any prIvate school In the country..J want 10 keep tuition at a level so the private school can survive. If we keep tuition very low and support them totally or substantIally by lax­

their nuclear waste II they take some of Washington's toxic wastes. "However, U's very clear that

we're not going to become the burIal ground for overy slate In

the union," Hayner said. Will funds for welfare abor· tions be cut? legislators don't

agree. "I think the sentiment exists today to cast that program OUI," said Polk. "My feeling is that if It came to a vote it would be ter· mlnated." Wlnsley and Hayner aren't so certain abonlon funding will be cut off. To terminate abortion

funding would be costly to the state, they say, because a large number of infants would be ad· ded to the welfare rolls. Hayner and Wlnsley point out that such a move might not go over too well

In a cosl-conscious legislature. The Republican leaders believe

that times ha'te changed-that government no longer has the solution to all the problems of life. "I don't think anyone expects government to remove all the risks out of living and provide

them with cradle-t<rgrave every· thing," said Hayner. "That's not our form of government."

payer lunds what we do Is drive the private schools right out of

bUSiness," However, with the higher lultlon In state schools the Republicans believe Lt IS likely

that more student Joans will be available, "In the public higher education system there Is likely to be greater loan availability," said Polk.

Both the Speaker 01 the House and the Majority leader In the Senate say there Is no likelihood of an In crease in the

sales or income tax. Environmental protection laws will also be '"tightened up" to provide "some balance be· tween a healthy economy and the envllOllllll::lll, �d.'U Mayner.

Polk argued that Washing· ton's environmental laws can "be made to work better." There are "an awfUl lot of problems with environmental laws right

now," he said. The legislature will continue Its support for nuclear power and the majority leaders say thai an agreement will be made with neighboring slates 10 store

HOUH Speaker Wllnlm Polk: "There cartlln'), will be higher tuition."


6

DEMOCRATS

Defending the future for the P -:...J By Marci An'teIuxen Democrats are out of the majority power In the Washington legislature this year and party leaders In both the House and Senate are concer· ned for the state's future under currenl Republican guidance. '" think the Republicans have made a terrible political and moral mistake," said Senate mi· rarity leader R. Tad Bolliger (0Tacoma), relemoo 10 decisions like budget cuts In welfare and social service programs made In a 8upplemental budget signed In last month.

budget goes into effect July 1. But the added funding In· cluded drastic cuts for some social service program s, In· eluding mental heallh programs, chore services for the han· dlcapped and the elderly, social security minimum benefits; It al80 completely eliminated monies for other programs, like Aid to Families with Oependent Children-Employable (AFOCE). Non· Assistanc e General Continuing, and federal medical

programs. Loan subsidies and grants lor college students will also be pared, as well as a $220 million cut in vocational and technical education. All Democrats (legislators) in· this believe tervlewed decreased emphaSis on social programs Is the result of a con­ servative trend in Waahlngton

Influenced by national politics, though different reasons are cited as the cause of the trend. "Yes, there 18 a conservative trend running In the country," said Goltz. "'nflatlon, a8 the number one Issue, was so frloht· .., tftInl" UN a.""bltcan' U'" m .. a ,.,,'1)1. polltlc.I and mot.' mit.......

'" see hard Urnes ahead." said Senator Barney Goltz (O-Belllng­ ham), "with k)ts of people un· employed, a return to a low pov­ erty level among the population, and Iota of ramifications 10 aU that, Including social unrest which will hit hardest minorities and poorly trained people in urban are8s." A $235.97 million supplemen­ tal budget was passed In Feb­ ruary to maintain some state programs until the new biennial

enlng becaus8 no one knew how to deal wflh It. The Republicans articulated thet they knew better how to deal with It. A simple two or three points werE' hammered on, and they [Washington Re­ publlcans( did a superior Job of bringing in the dollars. The points were: cut government spending, fight Inflation, and get government off the backs of the peoDle."

"My guess la fha' ha" the Aepublleana hftl as Inept a go�e,. nor as on our IIckfl th., would . "a�.lo.t the che/, foo," Bud Shlnpocll

"The ,.. pons. ,.�. receJ".d lies be.,. o�.rwh.rmlngry opposed to rhe cut. made In soc'.' SfI"'ces." W.,n. Ehlers,

"The Republicells were suc· cessful at labeling Democrats as big spenders and that the (Lyndonl Johnson programs of the 'Great Society' were nol making changes," said Senalor Bud Shlnpoch«()'Aenton). But some legislators leel 1ni£1 the voting in of more Republicans did not express a desire 10 adopt conservative Ideals, but rather a desire for change. "There was a demonstrated ineptitude from the chief executive at both tna state and federal levels," said Shlnpoch. "But my guess is that had the Republicans had as Inept a governor as on our ticket, they


7

r, the sick, elderly would have lost the chair 100. It has nothing to do with

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"You clln ".,.. cuts or you C'IO herll th. '."'clls but you clln'r "••• Doth."

"The people were not ad­ vocating a conservative cause," said Bottiger. "The maJority of people said that they were con­ cerned about taxes, but when the cuts In welfare aid were ac­ tuaUy made they said 'That's not , what we meant.' . An Increase In religiously oriented lobbyist groups may or may not be a factor In a conser· vative trend, the legislators said. "Groups like the Moral Malarity are well funded and have a lot of Impact," said Goltz. "And you can bet thai they have an effect on the success of political candidates." "The surveys which the Moral Majority sponsor {which rate candidates according to their stands on Issues) do not have great impact on elections," said Shlnpoch. "And In my opinion they (the Moral Majority) are neither moral nor a majority." The tradition of separation of church and state is one that should be continued, said Goltz. "If the church starts to sup-

port specific candidates [with monetary contributions) then the state starts funding those religions and repressing others," he said. Response to the curtailment and elimination of social service programs has been almo�t all negative, the legislators saId. "The response I've received has been overwhelmingly op­ posed to the cuts made In social services," said Representative Wayne Ehlers (O·Tacoma). "And I think the cuts are not only un­ wise from a human point of view, but also from the tax­ payers' point of view because It will e...st them more in the long run.

tenance of programs and suc· cess of Democlatlc ideas very difficult. "(Governor) Spellman is sen­ ding us the problems but not any of the money," said Botllger, "and It's creating a horrendous situation, with the federal gov­ ernment making block grants to states then pulling out."

"IGovernor} Spellman I. sending us the problems but not any of the money."

"For Instance, without the aid of the chore services an elderly or handIcapped person cannot live at home on their own, and will go on public assistance. The state would be paying $1,000 a month to support thai person In a nursing home versus $150·160 a month for chore ser­ vices. That's not cost effective and It creates a false economy," he said. Goltz agrees, saying Ihat providing services such as Job skill training, child care and other programs which can build self·confldence and indepen­ dence will be to the benefit of the state. "If we Invest in human re­ sources the state will get that money back many times over," he said. But decreased support from the federal level combined with policy coming from the gover­ nor's office will make main·

.." we fn�esf In human '.30",. ces rhe ,rata will gat that mona), back many 11m •• o�er." aarn.y Golll "The states don't have the capacity to expand services If the federal government hands them an extra load," said Rep­ resentativ e Helen Sommers (D-Seattie). "You can have cuts or you can have the services but you can't have both." A second supplemental budget will have to be Im­ plemenled to replace funding in some threatened programs, said the legislators. Democrats wiiJ be pushing for more money for vocational-technical education, prisons, chore services, AFDC, and mental health services. It won't be the "But Democrats who ask for a second supplemental budget," commented Bontger. Conflnuad 011 page 16


8

Human services and welf re pro 8, Tom McCredy "I'm ex,remely angry. If lhe majority of people knew whal w.a going on, they would favor an equitable talC increaBe." Kay Thode, a lobbyist for the Seattle Urban League, says in very bitter terms Ihat both state and federal budget cuts In social services were wrong and that "we're putting poople oul to slarve just to please soma polltlcens." A $235.97 million supplemen­ tary budget signed Into law by the WaShington legislature In February set 1.lda $98.83 million for human services, In· eluding .dull corrections, men­ tal health, developmentl' disability. community social services. and nursing homes. But Republican Represen­ tallve Rod Chandte" chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee. said Wlshlngton sta.e budge' cutl would have happened even If the Fed.ral government wasn't also swinging the axe on public programs.

''I'm extrem.ly .ngry. If the majority of people knew whet WI. going on, the), would I...or .. an 8ilultlt>t. tIl: Inc.r .It "To continua on with what we were doing would have required an Increase 01 a billion dollars In taxes," Chandler said. Budget cuts In the social ser· vices are ha.ppening now because "the mood across the country is that the 'Great Society' programs ot Lyndon Johnson were largel), Ineffec· live, or 80 much more eXPlnslve [than they we,. worth)," said Chandler. "There needed to be a real hard look at dismantling all or part 01 that program. "And I think there WIS a high level 01 frustration on the part ot the people with the runaway

cost 01 govemment, the percep­ tion that there are a lot of people who chose to live off 01 govern· menl rather than making It on their own. Government had stopped guaranteeing oppor· tunlty and was guaranteeing the r8lult-a IIvlno, security, so forth. And that's not what a tree society wants or needs. Chandler says the stale doesn't have enough money tor the social services becaull Olympia oranted tax cuts amounting to about 11 billion In the last five years, and because 01 Increases in other spending requirements, primarily tor the ,tate', public schools. According to Chandler, the state's supplementary budget cut such wellare programs as Aid to Families with Dependent

Children �AFDC), General Assis­ tance Non-Cont inuing, and Federal Assistan ce Medical Car. Only (FAMCO). In adOltlon, tna legislature cut $48,000 from Vocational Rehabilitation, 11.784 million trom Juvenile Rehabilitation, 11.955 million from Public Health, and Administrative and Support Service. was cut by $3.2.... million. However, Chandler said that he stili Isn't utlsfled with the "Justification documentation" ot the mental health program. "We aren't ..tlsfled," he ex­ plained, that "everything Is being done as the local level that can be done for the men­ tally handicapped. The em· phasls II supposed to be on community mental health and


9

grams feeling the Republican ax yel we see these more sever. people given up on by the local community heaUh people." Chandle, admitted that he didn't know enough about community menial health to know IIU', Justified or not. M •• nwnll.. agencies representing public Inte,ests. k»bbyllts, and wellare recipl· ents themselves are makl�O It

known to thn legislature that they strongly dlsagr .. with Ihe socIal servlco and cuts. and one agency has reeenlly won two court battles. Pat Mcintyre, spokesperson for the Evergreen Lega' Services of Seattle, said two of tna thr•• lawsuits they have filed against the state of Washington have resulted In temporary reslraln­ Ino orders. Eve'Green Legal Services Is suing Washington on behalf of low Income groups, attempting to torce the state to reslor. the Aid to Families with Dependent Children, the Medically Needy Program, and the Continuing General Assistance Program. The latt.r two won temporary restraining ordera. On March 3, approximately 400 low-Income people siaged a rally In the capitol building, to protest ttl. welfare cuts. To help Illustrate their point, the protesters 88t up a bread and soup line on the capitol steps. c.;nrlstine Marston, represen­ ting Il t e Snohomish County Welfare Rights group, told the protesters ttlat "Regardless or what the Representallves in the state House and senate say, what they are doing is cutting away programs that are the lifeline 10 millions who will become Sicker, coldel and hungrier." Kay Thode told the Mooring Mast that the legislators are not addressing the real cause of In· flatlon. "It's not Ihe welfare payments. It's energy and the

military spending Increase5. Heck. of the S700 billion federal budget, only 4.1 percent of it Is for direct money grants on welfare. Only$15 billion." With ttle budget cuts welfare won't amount to 4.1 percent of the federal budget, Thode said. However, R e p r e s e n t a t i v e Chandler said Il ls quill difficult to decide what to cut when trimming the state budget. "Wlth all the documentallon I can get on 8 particular PlOOram," he explained, '" am neve, quite sure what's fat and what'l meat. This year the Uscal crisis Is so levere that we had 10 cut entire programs. Now . one man's fat Is another man's

We've 8180 had sizeable pt'� gram Improvements over the lasl 15·20 years. The legislature would add a program thia year, anoth.r the n8xt year. They probably didn't know what they were doing at the time. Their budget batanced at the lime." Chandler did not favor lotally phasing out Ihe welfare program. "" a person Just has no other alternatlv •• Clnnot make It on lheir own, then I Ihink Social Services ought to step In. We have a responsibility to help oul people like that, like the blind and Ihe disabled. "Bul I think we've made a mistake over the years whltn we

"Thl' ,.... the flecal crtll, II 10 ..va,. til•• we had to cut ..... tlr' programl. Now, one man's f •• Is another man'1 me.t of course. but theN II no question that we went right to the bone."

_ChoncIlor

meat, of COUlle, but Ihere Is no question that we went right to the bone. "In other programs, auch .s the Chore Services, we were BC' cused of massive cuts. Actually, what we did was we let up a program a few years ago and budgeted for II. But it Just com· pietely exceeded any thought of how much we had Intended to spend on it. So with expan· dltul8s exceeding ,evenue coming In, It had to be reduced beck within the limits we had originally set. We added another S 10 million to Chore Services." Chandler said welfare spen­ ding has increased so dramatically over the years because case loads have In­ creased, programs have expan· ded, and the slate papulatton has grown. "But mainly it has been tne result 01 the downturn in the economy," he said. "People were working and they aren't now. So they're on welfare.

assumed more and more responsiblllty for people and allowed them to assume less and less. The result has been that they've become dependent on government. This is a free society. W. should have everyone Iree to the greatest ex· tent possible. SOme people Just don't want to work, and II that's the case, fine. but I don't tnink that it should be Ihe stale's responsibility to support them." But according 10 Thode, "the percent who abuse Ihe welfare program is so very small that It is a miracle to me that more don'l cheal-Ihe amount they get is so small." She said the average time a two·parent family slays on welfare Is between four and live months. A single parent usually stays on welfare fOf thirteen months. But Chandl.r said that some individuals "have become fat and lazy. They ha.... not been CoIttJDuK" pqe"


10 •

Are abortions ethical

or legal? \

'a�' Heavv lobbying continues In Olympia over the abortion IS8ue Whet'8 three House billa are stili In committees aft... over a month 01 debate. Pro-lIle proponents flied two bills affecting abortion and pushing to withdraw state publlc·asslstance lunds for abortions in February. Houso 6111 226, or the "In­ formed consent" bill, would require that physiCians discuss wllh Pallents the charac­ terlsllcs 01 the fetu8, the phyalcal dangers and r'sks of abortion, and aUerna\lv8s. The physlcl811 would then have to certify In writing the woman's consent to have her 8bol'1lon. House Bill 149 glv8I Infants born alive In an abo rllan process the eame rights to medical treatment 8S an Infant bom prematurely. According to consll1UlnlS on both sides of the Issue, the hoi· lest debate has been over a third bill flied In February, House Bill 402 (HB 492), relaUng to social and health services. HB 492 "masks the abortion IS8UO," said House Represen· talive Joanne Brekke (0), hiding II behind amendments concer· nlng chore-services, personal and hou,ehold care, the In­ school dental rinse program, and medical assistance. Seclion two of HB 492 reads: "Medical assistance may be provided In accordance with e l i g i bil i t y req u i r e m e n t s established by the Department at Social and Health Services (DSHS), provided, ho-weve r, that nothing In thl, !s,eCtion

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I shall be construed to permit the granUng of medical care ser· vices where the purpose of such services Is to obtain an abortion, Induced miscarriage, or Induced premature btrth." HB .02 does list exceptions., allowing the abortion procedure when It "'s n8Cieaaary for the preservation of th. life of a woman" or when "an Induced premature birth intended to produce a live, viable chlld. ..ls necessary tOJ th. health of the mother or her unbom child." Rape and Incest are also ex­ ceptions, and victims would bed

able to obtain an abortion if the violation was reported t o authorities within thirty days_ Brekke sees a split In govern­ ment over this Issue with the Republicans more likely to sup­ port constraints on abortion. Brekke Is pro-choice. "I don't have the right to 1m· pose choice on someone else," she said. The pro-choice side tears the future will mean 8 world In which a woman is required by law to nouriSh the product of egg and sperm that chance to meet, and to bear a child


whether she wa.nts It or not. For the desperate woman who would dare have an J I Iegel (and probably unsafe) abortion, even to prevent the birth of a child doomed to a short, pain-filled l i fe, the charge would be mur­ der. The pro-life side envisions genocide, with abortion a first step to a tuture In which groups of unwanted are destroyed selectivaly-flrst the unborn, Ihen perhaps the deformed, the old, the Infi rm , and members of particular races or religions Pro·llfe contends that the un­ born child Is a human being from the moment It loses Its Identity as ovum and sperm (i.e. from the moment 01 concep· tion). Ken VanDerhoef, president of Human Ufe, the statewide Right-la-LIfe organization, said, "To say thst It's not a human being, is, I think, Intellectually dishonest Maybe I don't value that human being because it's little, and I can't see it. But If you see pictures, it's absolutely clear that It has everything al six weeks that it's ever going 10 have. "To say that It i:; oil nonperson Pro-life contends that the unborn child Is • human being from the momenl It loses Its Identity as ovum and sperm, because it needs to be In the mother, thaI It needs those systems to survive-thet doesn't change personhood: that's lust a reality 01 where It lives." For pro-choice people tho Issue Is freedom_ Lee Minto, director 01 the Seattle-King County chapter o f Planned Parenthood, one of the groups working to defend what they call " a wom an's right to reproduc· tive freedom," said, "I think the freedom to make 8 choice is the thing that we feel so strongly about. People, regardless of their income level, ought to be able to effect a choice that's consistent with their own con­ science, not Ken VanDerhoef's 01 anyono elss's Pro-choIcers point out thaI with regard to the Informed con­ sent bill there Is no law requiring a physician to discuss with a "

11 woman the potential dangers 01 childbirth. The key Issue Is state-funding of abortions as presented by HB 492. "The issue Is primarily not whether or not abortion should be stopped but It is a matter of e c o n o m ic di s c r i m i n a t i o n , " Brekke s�ud. Since August 1977, low­ income women have not been able to get lederal assistance for elecllve abortions while wealthier women are not im· peded .n their right to cl)oose. Medicaid had been paying for three of every ten abortions (about 250,000 In 1976) until August when a lederal court allowed the Hyde Amendment passed by Congress in 1976 to take effect That court decision was prompted by a Supreme Court ruling in June 1977 that govern­ ments are not required by the Constitution to finance abor­ tions for Ind.gsnt women. Congress revised the 1977 Medicaid fundin9 restriction allowing abortion funding only when the mother's lifa would be endangered by carrying the fetus to lerm, when two doctors agree that damage to her physical heallh would be severe and long-lasting, or when rape or Incest has been reported prompt­ ly to the authorities. While federal funds have been cut off, 1 7 states (83 of January 1978) have chosen to continue funding abortion s for tow­ income women through t h e Medicaid program. Pro-choicers say fiscal Impact of abortion funds In Washinglon st"1te deal with cost choice: tun­ dh,w olborltvlIS IS, 10 the long run, cheaper than funding live births. In fiscal year 1980, the Slate paid for 5,307 legal abortions for low-Incorne women a\ a COSt of S " 126,000. (Data from Assistant Secretary, Management Ser­ vices. OSHE, December 1980,) I' cOmpuIS(J{)' cnildblrth naJ been forced upon these women, and, of neceSSity, they enrolled on weliare, the coSt to the state In one year lor each pregnancy would have been: $ 1 ,487 for pregnancy and del ivery, plus $4,332 for welfare lor mother and child. (These figures do not

include costs such a s food stamps. housing subsidy, ad­ ministrative costs, medical ex­ panses or post-natal care for low birth weight and probtem babies, day care, etc.) The cost for 5,307 cases of pregnancy. delivery and welfare for mother and child lotals $30,881,433. The savings to the state in one year would thus total $29,755,433. Brekke said she sees a changing direction In fundamen­ tal activities of legisla tors, specifically, eliminated aid and budget conflicts. Budget problems, she safd, are due to "the growth and proliferation 01 government programs" and to t h e partial distress among people over social programs. She said it Is hard to draw limitations due to the shifting ethics of people and there Is "more willingness to take ad­ vantage of social programs .>ecause they exist, not lust oe::IUJse they are needed." She said voters have turned to easy offers from the righl which sound good on the surface but in actuality show contradic­ tions. especially regarding costs. The public'S desire to constrain and cut out soclat programs stems from a desire to look In new dirQctions. In her district {32), 65 percent of her con:>tituents surveyed expressed to her, "yes, consider state funding of abortion." Eighty-seven percent said, "yes, support pregnancy prevention In public education curriculum," and 80 percent said, "yes, secondary schools should pro­ vide parenting sklils in educa­ tion." On the national scene, pro-lite workers proposed the "Human Life" Amendment which would amend the U.S. Constitution to 1t>IF�[ abortion prohibit d, :�g9ther �,J-1,;1I0tCers contend that a Human Ufe Amendment im­ plies: a woman who suffers a miscarriage could bo charged with manslaughter or '1fJghgent nomiclde, and a letus could be considered a dependent under the Income tax laws and could Inherit propeny_


12

The Moral Majority

ora By Kathle.n M. Hoefald Michael Farris, director of WashinGton's chapter of Moral Majorlly, aaya that the lobbying group's purpose Is not to evangelize via legislation but rather to be an extension of the church which works to retard corruption In society. an Is It "BaSically. educatlonllobbylng organiza­ tion. Our purpose Is to raise people'S consciousness about Issues and effectively lobby lor the kinds of positions we hold In th. state legislature and other govemmental units we touch

It here i n the state," he said. "Our positions a'. summed up In 8 three-point. pro-life, pro­ moral. pro-family statement 01 belief. Pro-life Is fairly well un· derstood, Pro-moral Is the area of homosexuality. pornography. legalization of mariJuana. gam­ bling, proslitutlon ... Pro-lamlly get6 into the area of the Juvenile . JustlcIAet, the ERA... . As part of what theologian Martin E. Marty called the "New Christian Alght," Farris described Mora' MaJOf'lty 81 "Chrlstlan·orlented" but not necessarily Chrlatlan. "W e have Jewish members.

Michael I'lmo, dlreclor 01 WI.hlnglon'. Moral Mljor\ty: "_ peopll wnt 10 k_ II WI .... Morel Mllarlly II I wllne .. lng tool. Thol'o not true_.WI'" ITyiI1ll to be tIM ..II 01 til• •Irth."

overnment We have members who bell.... s In relncarnatlon ...So it's morally than rather aflillated theologlcajly," he said. Although the leaderahlp and constituency of the group Is largely Christian. Farris said that "we are looking for the end result rather than how they arrive 81 the end result. " Farris explained that one member of the group is a ,ein­ carnatlonlst who believes that abortion la wrong because It In­ terferea with the reincarnation process. "He's just as welcome as anybody else," said Farris. The kinds of peopl. who join Moral Majority are varied. ac­ cording to Farris. Farris said an estimate would be that 80 percent of his con­ stituency were evangelicals or f u n d a m e n t a l i s t s . Churches which fall under that categofY are "lust about anybody who Isn't In the National Council of Churches:' he said. Of those Farris mentioned as pat1ldpatlng church memberS h. numbered Nazarenes, Mormons. Wisconsin and Missouri Synod Lutherans and Baptists. adding that thel. are about 88 many kinds of Baptists as General Motors make cars. Moral Majority Is nelth.r totally Christian nor Is It new. according to Farris. Although he said, "It'a new In the way that II's been ocganlzed," the rapid growth of the group In this state Indicates to him that the sentiment behind the organization could not have been "ew. Farns was IIIvOIVtt\l In Moral Majority-like organizations to! five years. "My Impetus tor Joining II that I saw my tellow evangelical fundamentalisls weren't out there fighting the fight (for moral principles). It was being won through the CathOliCS and the


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New job for John Spellman

Dea l i ng with partisan feuds, trou bl ed economy By Andy Blldwln In addition 10 8 new Repub­ lican legislature, Washington has a new Republican governor. What new directions will Gover· nor John Spellman take the state of Washington in the next lew years? "First of all we're going to try to get the slale out cl lhe flnan· clal hold and attempt to assist in gettfng the economy moving so that we won', repeal the mi stakes of the last four years." Spellman said in a March 2 In­ terview. " Hopefully we'll establish a base of programs which we'll be a b l e to l u n d from current revenues which ara supported by a healthy economy," he said. Last month the Republican legislature approved a sup­ plemental budget which in­ cluded $90.7 million for social programs Instead 01 the $109.2 million requested by the gover· nor. Does Spellman see any problems In working with the legislature? "There are always problems," said Spellman, "But none In· surmountable," T h e supplemental budget signed by Spellman has been heavily criticized by Democrats for not Including enough money for social programs. The February 22 Sea me Post· Intelllgencer Quoted Senalor Jim McDermott as saying that GOP economic proposals and the supplemental budget Signed by Spellman were lurnlng the govermenfs "war on poverty" Into a "war on the poor, the sick and lhe aged." In response to such criticism Spellman said, "The real prOblem Is the result of past programs... I'm trying to dig us oul of these problems that have been created by these past pollci88 and I don't want to get

Govemof John Spellman: getting the stata out at the IInanclal hold: our way out." The governor and legislature are presently working on the next biennium budget. Will state college tuition be raised to.help pay for this new budget? "I recom mended what I call a modest increase in tuil10n 8nd more or less a status q u o student loan program But there

"I don't ... . gener., tex In­ Clea•• at this point, but It Is nol beyond the fealm or po.slbillty." is lots of talk about much higher tuition, which WOUld reQuire, i n my opinion, a higher student loan program." Will the state conUnue 10 fund abortions for mothers on wal­ fare? "I don't really know," said Spellman. " I t would be pure guesswork 10 lell you if they would pass It I favor main· tainlng the pr4sent program the state has." Will taxes be Increased to balance t h e new b i e n n i u m budget? "Very little If any," said Governor Spoil man. "tt's too early to lell....One reason iI's too

early to tell Is that the federal budget really hasn't been sub­ mitted yet, and we keep getting different figures almost every day to the extent Ihat the federal budget continues to slice Into what i call the vital programs al the state tevel. .. "I don', see a general tax In· crease at Ihls point but It Is not beyond the realm of possibility," he said. Spellman said he will push for additional energy sources "In· cludlng nuclear, 10 the extent thai it Is economically feaSible." Spellman said he was also working on a plan to deal with nuclear waste. "I'm attempting to work out with Oregon a compact under which we will dispose of their nuclear wasle since they are disposing of our hazardous and toxic wastes. r feel that Is more than a 'air trade. I think we probably will explore with Idaho and maybe a couple of other ad· Joining states some regional' disposal grounds. And It will continue to be at the Hanford site," he said. Does ::tpttllllUln navt;! d jJtan to ContInued 1M.' PI,.


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help the economy? "Yes," said Spellman. "We have a lot of them really. One of the ones I'm working on is called the Local Economic Dev· elopment Act, which Is in· dustrial development revenue bonds, and ii's an attempt to make this state competitive with the other 49 which have the ability to olfer tax-free financing for new industry or expanding Indu'>tries."

15 How does Governor Spellman sum up his goals for the state at Washington? "I would like to direct the state of Washington towards a polley of providing the basic needs for those truly in need; educational, social, and other needs," Spellman said, "while to the maximum extent promoting the free and vigorous economy w i t h the minimal necessary governmental inter· ference.'·

The Third H ouse: a view of Cap itol H i l l from the lobby By M.rcl Ameluxen The Washington legislature is composed of the Senate, the House of Representatives, and the Third House: the lobbyists who wine, nine and pester the act either to legislators favorably on a bill or bring down the axe to kill It. Lobbyists this year have some definite, If varied, concerns. Dick Van Wagenen, a lawyer Association of Washington State Legal Services Programs, Is working hard to dull the blow as the welfare cuts to an estl· mated 200,000 to 300,000 people I n Washington. people Hi Washington. "All but the elderly and the totally disabled are feeling 15 to 20 percent cuts in their welfare grants this year and with Gover­ nor Ray's cuts of lasl year, that totals 20 to 25 percent cuts," he said. "I'm anticipating an Increase In suicides from mentally III people whose health programs are affected, and the DSHS {Department of Social and Health Services) predicts 30 percent of the families receiving AFDC [Aid to Families with C h i ldren· Dependent Employable} will break up as a result of the cuts. That's what happened In Oregon when they made similar changes In their

budget." Van wagenen says one sui· clde In February in North King County has been related to no­ tice of the Income cuts. A premium tax Increase Is what concerns Legislative Assistant Greg Zoro and Safecc Corporation, which he repre­ sents. Safeco has a major invest· ment in the Insurance business, though most of the insurances sold in Washington Is sold by

"I'm ."flcIIMtI"g ." I"c,.... ,,, sulcld.s from m."tally III ,*,p/. who•• h.alth progr.ms ar• •flee· rRlby budg.r curs]." DIck Va" W.fI...."

r.ompanies domicile In other states, ZOIO said. Safeco, domicile In Washington. sells '4 percent of the insurance here. but shares 25 percent of the tax

obligation, he said. "Now, foreign [Insurance) are taxed by companies Washington state at two per· cent. The proposal Is to raise that to 2.5 percent. The state estimates that that will bring in $15.6 million over the next two years." But, says Zoro, a retaliatory tax is applied among states that would make sure that Washington does not tax a foreign insurance company more than a company domicile to Washington (such as Safeco) is taxed In another state. Thus, if Washington raises Its foreign company tax, the 33 other states in which Safeco does business will raise their tax on Saleco ac· cordingly. The same would hap· pen for Washington's other 42 domestic Insurance com­ which would mean a combined pay-out of an extra $8 million. "For every $1 coming in, 50 cents goes out," said Zoro. "In addition, of the 993 foreign

"You can't play by 1968 rules In 1981." companies, many will say that it is not worth staying in WaShington with the additional tax, and they will move out. The state will not raise the $15.6 and anticipated, million probably quite less." But Van Wagenen does not think that higher taxes will make problems worse. "All these cuts are being done because of one central myth: that we are overtaxed at the state level. We're ninth highest In median Income level, and well below In the state and federal tax burden. We have the most regressive tax system in the U.S. and we're the only state that does nollax Intangible property, such as stocks and bonds. If we taxed this, we would generate enough revenue to restore some cuts to the poorest." Bob Shults represents 49 Wastllngton savings and loan institutions. which would like to see the state's usury rate changed.


16

""",moer.,.. conL from (Mg. 7 In addition Democrats are alao i n agreement that some

Bort of tax Increilse will have to be Initiated to relieve the billion dolla' l!hortage the state now facsB. According to Sommers. Spellman has proposed two changes in property tax assess­ ment which, In hcr view. amount to tax Increases. creases. "And when the federal govern· ment cuts aid to states, which Is what we balance our budget on, we have to pass on Ihe respon­ sibility to local tax payers," said Ehlers. " S p e l l m a n convinced the voters that McOermott was a big spender," said Goltz, "but Spellman will

be begging for a

tax Increase soon," A substanUa' number of his­ constituents have told Ehlers th.t they would lavor a graduated net Income tax or in­ creased sales tax as an answer to the stale's fiscal problems. Ehlers favors a three-prong approach to saYing money, by prioritizing within the existing budget, reevaluating property ta)( loopholes. and Increasing produclivlly. getting more Irom government employees and the system. It the Democrats were In the maJority, Goltz thinks they would favor an Increase In buslneea and occupation (8 and 0) laxes, sales tax, and the elim, Ination of some tax breaks to corporations.

501:,.' Setrk... eo.t from ".08 J held responsible for their own actions. A young girl that gets pregnant today keeps her baby. A lew years ago when the weren't weltare options anywhere near as open , they didn't keep those babies, They put them up for adoption. Then they went back to school. Not anymore. They're qultllng SChool, having these babies, Slaying on welfare. That Just doesn't make any sense to me at ail,"

Thode said that 42 percent of the heada of Ihe house In two­ parent families who receive AFOC have les8 Ihan a high school education. Kate Foreman, aenlor fiscal analyst for the council, said that during her Interviews w i t h

The Third House. cont. 'rom page 15 " Everybody knows thai with high prices and Inflation fa bank] can't make loans at 12 percent [intorest) when paying 14.6 percent to people with saYings accounts," ShuIta said. Financial Institutions are having to turn away people who are seeking home Improvement loans for tax credit purpo,es. " We have to lel1 people that If they want to Il1sulate their homes they have to go 10 small loan companies-whO charge skY·hlgh rates-when they should be going with 8slabllahed "nanclal In· stltutlons." '"The 12 percent llnteresl) lid waa made In 1968 when we had

an InflaUon rate 01 4.5 percent. You can't play by 1 968 rules I n

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1980s," he said. This Issue In par· tlcular will be 01 Interest to Ihe group because, according to Farris, "we're seeing an In· creaSing battle over who owns the kids. The battle Is presently between goyemment agencies, panlcularly social workers and Ihe publiC schools and parents." Fa"is noted that one Cilse which he said was In the slate

Van Wagene n commen ted thai there are two dillerencaa between lobbyists lor the poor and " big business" lobbyers: access to money, and organized constituencies. people " Low income bad have notoriously organization, they don't Ilave a large VOting turnout, and they're not good at wrillng letters," he said. " Many can'l aHord the 1 5 centl for a alamp." One of the biggest mistakes Ihe Republicans have made aa Ihe majority party Is to make across-the-board cuta without specifying who wins or who loses. "It's Irresponsible to put ar· bltrary ceilings on agencies and leave It to them to decide where to make the cuta," he said.

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probably go on the U.S. Supreme Court dean with Ille right 01 the state 10 Intertere In the parent/chltd relationship for "no other reaeon than that there is a dis pule In the famUy oyer , reasonable lules." "Only In cases of physical abUM and neglect should that lrelatlonshlp) be Interfered with," he said.

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federal, atate, and local of· flclals, she was given the 1m· presaion thai everyone t,..ought Congress and the Stale LegiSlature would consider veterans' benefits and human services as bas c commlnments which must remain Intact. Meanwhile, welfare reclpl. ents, lobbyists. and the majority 01 Democrats are screaming to restore the welfare cuts. "I would have been Interested to see how the Democrats. had they been In the position of responsibility. would ha"e han­ dled II dltterently," said Chan­ dler. · · I t was a real crisis situation. Tflere', no other way to describe It. SWift ilf\d stem meaaures had to be taken. I lhlnk we were 8S responslbfe as we could possibly be under the circumstances."


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Complex inflation not unsolva ble. � -

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By Erik Appdo

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-. This siory is based on a dass ;fI­ terv;ew wilh fWO pro!e.uors from Pacific Luthuon Unh·trsIIY: Stanley L. Brut from the econ· omics depo,rmen, and Andrew Turner from Ihe business depart­

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In rec�nl years the topic of in­ nation occupied an increasingl,. cen­ tralized role in the discussion ot' e<:onomics among laymen and professional economists. This is because inflation is considered the largcst economic problem facing thc country today. But what makes people: more in­ terested in inflation is Ihis-it has stepped OUI of its traditional rolc: of being a strictly economic problem, and pervaded the: political and social Slruaures of our society, Many fear thai inflation has become: imbedded and unremovable. In these articles we: hope to show the: inflation problem is not un­ solvable, !lnd show w a� some

people are doing personally to com­ bat elements of the problem. Innalion is defined as a sustained fise in the lIeneral price level. For example, a three percent increase in the general price level above the in­ crease in Wag6 is considered to be inflation. Innation is not exclusively a modern phenomenon. Inflation has occurred in hiStory, usually dUring and immediately after wars. An examination of the Wholesale Price Index shows the annual inflation rate IlS high as 2S percent during and shon'y afler the Civil War. The Second World War was nccom· panied by rapid world inflation. However, the United Slates was af­ feaed very linle by this rise. II really

Cost-Push Inflation: The price of matcrials to make an item will rise with the cost pa.ssed 011 to the consumer in the form or a

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was not until 1967 that the United States had a probleDI with innation. Since then inflation rates have climbed steadily. There art three ptrvadina trains of economic thought with regards to in­ flation: The Keynesian theory of economics introduced by ' John Maynard Keynes, the Monetarists, and the New Supply Siders. All have d i fferent approaches to the questions raised by inflation. The Keynesian theory places the blame of inflation on too much demand in the economy. There are simply too many dollars chasing too few goods and services. There are two different kinds of inrlation under Ihis theory­ Demand-Pull and Cost-Push. Demon.d PuIl I!iflQtlon: The demand for a product in­ creases, but the supply does nOI. This creales one condition that economists worry about, hi,her prices for less goods and services.

In order to control and curb in­ nation, the Keynesian theoristS would have w: implement price con­ trols and reduce iovernment expen· ditures. The MonetaristS ted that there is one single cause or inflation which overrides all clse-too rapid growth in the money supply. They � the (more lovernment federal specifically. the Federal Reserve &ard) as the chier culprit or in­

creasing the money supply. The Monetarists reason that Cost-Push Inflation could not possibly oa:ur becawe Ihe price of a product would not rise without the money 10 sustain it. To relieve inflation , the Monetarist says reduce the supply of money, which is something only the

Federal Reserve Board can do. There is a recent approach ealled the New Supply Siders. This group rormed because they felt that neitha the Keynesians nor the Monetarists

held the answer to inflation. Their reasoning on economic problems, such as innation, is dominated by qUllntity supphed rather than the traditional demand explanations. They say that if you were able to keep the ratc or inflation below Ihe rate of output it would StOP a condidon called stagflation. which is simply inflalion coupled with a high rate of unemployment. resulting in a drop in produCf.lvit} i the GroS! which means a decline n National Product. Today'oS inflalion is new and mort. complex than that seen n i the past. and it is ror this rea�on that so man), economists are having trouble analyzing Ind solving the problem. In the meanlime eacll individual Will have to battle innation until II com· mon solution can be round.


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Union s fight inflat ion for mem bers By Keilh Markman aad Toft)' Men The Seaule ProfessionaJ Engineers Employees Association (SPEEA) was just one of many labor organizations forging a new contract with an employer last year in the face of double-digit innation. Created in 1 944 by SO engineers in Ihe Seattle area, SPEEA has about 20,000 engineers and technical workers in The Boeing Co., making it the largtst independent union in the United States. Even though it has made significant gains in wages and benefits for its white<ollar-worker members. the union's executive director. Bob Bradford, said those members sliJl feel the bile of in­ nation. "During a period of high in­ flation, we (engineers) lose an average of 51.S00 to 53,00 over a 3· year period compared with blue collar workers." Bradford said . That estimate is based on a fannula devised by SPEEA, he added. The white collar worker wants his share of the wage pie, Bradford said. and the union is expected to deliver it. "When they see beer and gar­ bage-truck drivers making io �xc�s of $30,000, they ask themselves, what am I doing? With double-digit innation forecast all decade, we must make our bid," he said. The bid in their most recent negotiations with Boeing last fall and into the wimer included a revision in the cost-of living allowance. The previous contract with the company had allowed for a \Va8� in­ crease of .5 percent in cost-of-living allowance (COLA), not to �xc«d the forecast increase in the cost of liviD•. That meane that the COLA "capped ," and would create less of a wase increase for the workns if the forecast COLA increase were lC$s

that the actual increase. The new Speea contract, ratified in lkcember, calls for a .4 percent COLA but with no cap. In times of high innation, the uncapped COLA is much more favorable for the em­ ployees, Bradford said . Bradford speculates that the fighl against n i flation by organized labor will center on achieving greater productivity of iLS members and keeping COLA perCentages uncap­ ped. There was speculation Ihat ecooomic pressures on their families might have influenced the decision of

SPEEA members to ratify the Boeing contract rather than strike. Bradford said that's difficult to determine:, but other sources noted thai SPEEA members voted of the COnlracl by mail at home and may have fell the pressure of family members in casting that vote. "Innntion is not helping anybody," Bradford said. "In­ nation may lead the members to believe that it is an inability of the union to respond. We have already anained the cost-of living average to nght innation, so there's really not much else we can do."


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Nutritionist plans meals for BI SUn AItdHIo. Span.park Senior Center is a ceo· ter full of adivities for the elderly, One such proaum involves a nutritionist who spends one momina each month showina senior citizens how to prepare an economical meal that is also nutritious. Betty Bishop, nutritionist from Clover Park Tedmical lnstitute, was the ccnter of auraaion durin, her January session. Bishop began pre-measurina the in&rUfients. tnd introduced herself to the ,roup, and soon preparations be,an. Today's menu: Tcrlyaki Liver. Banana-Carr!>! Salad and Chewy Oranola Brownies. People belan filtcfina In throuah the tall wooden doors of the old church. The wooden noar CORRec· tina with heels added to the noise. M each person arrived more conver­ sation began to circulate throush the room. At the same time Bishop carefully measured and stirred the dry ingredients. and told of shon cuts to take when cookina· While milling the aranola brownies she recited mopping tips, One tip, she saJd, was 10 buy nUls In bulk because it is more economical. She also pointed out thai she was usina large eBSI, "Even thoush they're six «flU more, value is important," said Bishop. Everyone chatted among them· selves and occasionally asked questions. Everytbing from Ihe best buys 11 the market to special savings was discussed. At thts point in the prop-am Bishop baked the brownies and cutl up the onions, which were now .auteing in the frying pan wailina for the main course-liver. Bisbop said, "Nutritious food can also be prepared to tute &00<1." Everyone put on their "arin and bear it" limile, trying to hold their stomachs to a minimum chum while '"

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lefty ItIhop flom Clovel Park TechnIcal Inamute advlsea on nutrlllonal and economical meal•. Bisbop sliced the liver. Bishop continued, discussing a "three bite policy" they have in their family. Before you say "no" to a new type of food or somethmg you don't like, Bishop requires her family to try 81 least three bites. Thue was no way OUt of II: we Ill! knew the three-bite policy applied cspecially to us becau$C we wert the aucstli. Bishop said that if kids were ex.· posed to different foods they would: learn 10 love them. Pcorlecontinucd to ask qUelilions. One qucstion asked was how much Betty speRl on the meal. To our sur· prise we learned ,hal she is siven S2� to buy mouth food to make II

nutritional meal for 10-20 people. me assure )·OU she bought enouKh liver (Ot an arm)'. Bishop u.id that it is economical to buy in quantity. An dderly lady spoke up and said that she lives alont' and it is bard to ulilize aU the food when boughl in large quantitlcs. Bisbop came back with tbe idea that two or thret (riends should buy in bulk and share.

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Flna I"U"'" Credit spending adds to inflation BJ Cindy won Inflation could end tomorrow ir people would quit trying to beat it. according to Joanne Ross, a COUnty agent rrom the County Annex in Tacoma. Ross said that p\.'Ople Iry to buy goods before the prices increase, �hich prompts credit buying which, In turn, adds to the increasing price. An example Ross gave was buying carpet. Carpet she may want now could be expensive at $3 a yard. but will be more expensive next year at SS a yard. So instead or paying more next year. there would be a tendency 10 buy the carpet now.

pros and cons-for instance in buying versus renting. Ross said they let people make Iheir own dedsions. Consumer Credit Counseling Ser­ vice (CCCS), on the other hand, is, an agency that orrers rr« services· for budge, counseling, t o people out or credit traps.

help:

Millie Simonson, executive direc­ tor or CCCS, said it isn't Ihe credit that is so bad, but the mismanagement or credit spen­ ding. "Credit

always costs

money,"

Ross said Ihal sort of buying habit gets people into credit spending and credit spending is another factor to

crease inventory prices to cover the credit Inat was loaned, Ross said. Ross compared credit cards with

Las Vegas gambling. She said, "The

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will turn around and credit another

$2.0. Ross said that when lhe bill comes, people are amazed at how high it is.

The County Annex doesn't do in­ dividual counseling or what to do, RO!>$ said. ageOls he1p people spend wisely by getting them

len people but county their money to compare

break down housing, utilities, rood, clothing, transportation, medical ' child support and care, insurances union dues, and miscellaneous. Eac of Ihese categories is broken down 10 minute detail, month by monlh. . Crask saJd.

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Crask said, savings should be broken down as 10 how much money is going to what.

fim nickel comes hard and the next nickel comes easier. and the third is easier yet." Ross said the County Annex gives

Ihat people will buy S30 worth on credit and pay tC'n dollars. Then they

CCCS helps c1iems see what it COStS per mOnlh to live, rather Inan cost per year, said Crask. CCCS uses a simple outline to

paper, and soap products. Any money spent is written down and budgeted ror. said erasl.-:. Crask said that tney help people budget a savings account with a ledger. Instead or dropping one big lUmp sum into a savings account,

Credit spending is borrowing from the creditor. When credit is used. the credilOr has to in­

kecping," said Ross. People get big credit bills from

their creditors.

Crask eXplained that rood in­ cludes lunches, milk, pet rood,

inflation.

150und advice on credit by helping people le3m how to budget. Ross said the hardest part or budgeling is gening people to write OUt their income and expenses. " We try to get people to do record

make a start IOOmewhere," Crask said. Crask said tnat tnrough suggestions they help people to sustain themselves financially first. then set up a program to help pay

She said ir you deposit S50, lisl the money as SID to new shoes, S20 to

Joonne RolI Simonson said. adding that credit cr«ps up on you and prelty soon ex­ plodes. CCCS has helped return more than S6 million to creditors and Ihe community by helping people pay their bills, Simonson said. Barbara L. Crask, a counselor at CCCS said, "Budgeting is your money working ror you, rather than you working for your money," Crask tells people to help Ihem learn and accept budgeting ideas. Crask said that people feel budgeting is confining, and don't want to change Ii restyles to fit a budget. "It's my

opinion you have to

rood, and $20 10 insurance. Crask also said that when you buy new shoes n i three months, show thai withdrawal or $20 on the savings ledger, leaving you SIO budgeted ror shoes. Crask said that they get people to budget, or "to help people help themselves, by using Ihelr own runds. " "8e open and honest wilh me," Crask encourages her clients. CCCS has to know all a person's spending habits to help set up budgets. Crask said that CCCS does not exist to help people improve Iheir mode or living or duck creditors, bUI that their purpose is to help people get out or financial lrouble by paying their creditors.


I I nflation helps "Iuxury" busi ness

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Survivina with . small business is touah anytime. During times of In­ nation and economic hardship It's even harder. But el's (The Clip Joint Salon) in Graham is not only doina well in spitt of the hard times. but owners Wally and Harriott Balmer think it's doing well because of it. eJ's is a cosmetoiOlY center, of· fering hair care, make-up, facials and accesr so ies to ,0 with them. These services are usually considered luxuries. but a$ Balmer says, "A cut, perm, style and facial may be • luxur)' for a hOIlK wife, but for today's business woman it is JUSt as important as her dOlhes or her of­ fice. forher itisa necessity." Mr. Balmer k.eeps: statistia on the busincn and notes, "People ae­ luaU)' spend morc OR themselves and on their appearance durina limes when money is II,hl, and low income families spend morc per per­ son for haircuts than do higher in­ come families." Mrs. Balmer said that people want to create the Illusion that they art: not feelina the crunch. "Really, all the periods of high fashion in this coun· try have be-en during times of economic stress. Durina the arnuent 60s, no one wore make-up, and there ....as no style to speak of. People didn't need to create that illusion then," she $fid. The BaJmcn went into business for themselves during the ,as crlsls of the mid· 1970's, and their em· phasis is on Quality. "People will spend a little more money for a quality product or ser· vice. They won't even buy a mediocre onc, " said Balmer. "We don't want to be the �wCSl priced salon around," he said, adding "U we are, something's wrona." "But, we have to keep our prices somewhat n i line and that'!. getting

The CUp joint beauty IOlon In Graham, a home operated bu.lneN. difrJ(Ull to do," Mn. Balmer said. Mr. Balmer keeps expenses down by buying and repairing used equipmmt instead of buying new, while Mrs. Balmer docs the a"wort for their advertising. Many of the hair or· naments used by the salon arc hand· made and tht Balmers 1I"0w nowers for summer hair desians' in their backyard lH.rd("n. " The business may not be &rowing. but it is maintaining itself very Well, "said Mr. Balmer. "We have an advantaae over chain salons or franchise shops in Ihat WI! can be much more ne:uble. If someone rCllly wants D. haircut but doesn't have the money, well, we're wiDing to dicker for a couple dozen homemade rolls, or some firewood or Whatever ," he said. "You just don't see things like that happen at the Tacoma Mall," Mrs. Balmer added. Mr. Balmer � the current trend of WOIU movins toward franchises. "What cost mt SI,OOO in the mid· '70s will cost someone S3.lXKltoday. Most people juS( can't afford the initial COSt of staning their own

business," he said. Mrs. BaJmer explained that "five or six years 810 a perm COSt us 85 cents, now we're paying S5 or $6. Hair cok>r could be bought for 65 cents then, compared with $2 todo.y. " The Dalmers don't keep as much inventory in the salon as they used 10. Only lop-of-tht·lin� productS are used, they said, and there isn't an overabundanct. " The only way we can build up credibility is throuah our products and our services," Mr. Balmer saId. "Without thaI, we're nothing." As {or the future? It looks prttly good for Ihe Clip Joint Salon, accor­ ding to the Balmcrs. The salon has plans ror pack.aglng and labeling its own products, which will avoid the middle man mark­ up-a saving it can pass on to its customers. Mr. Balmer added: "Gas p� have forced people to shop locally. We're in I. load location and in a growina community. This bu.sin� really in a Investment for the future. "


Business people buy an Image

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spending . cording to Zimmerman. Zimmerman anacked the pension program of the federal government saying that because of a loose definition of disability, an individual could retire early. get full disability payments, full time.

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yet still find other work

The Consumer Price Index (CPt). used as a barometer for the cost of living by the government is inae· curate, according to Zimmerman. The reason for the inaccuracy is that the CPI includes mOrtgage payment figures for houses. However, people who are buying a house are paying interest rates ac¥ cording to the conlract that they signed when Ihey bought the home; because the interest rates are going up, the CPI assumes that there is an increased cost for every consumer.

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Zimmerman said that because of a poorly defined CPl. the inflation T8te taken from the CPI was up to two percent higher ,han it would be wilhout the mortgage rates figured i n.

Van Gorkom acknowledged that the CPI did have ils problems, and said that it wa� used so often by the press simply because it was the easiest indicator of explain. He said that the Implicit Price Deflator is "considered to be a much more ac¥

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Senator Hal Zimmerman. a long time Republican leaislstor from southwest Washington said that there are four ways the government can directly affect the f8te of in­

flation. These government " drivers" of inflation 8rc iqcrcasill8 salaries not relative [0 production. a pension program weakened bee.8use: of its l<hJpholes, an

itiftCcu.-a[1:: indicalOI of

inflation with the Consumer Price Index, nnd the Federal Reserve Board's management of [he moncy supply. When the salaries of government or private sector workers arc in­ creased. but production has not. then morc money is in the economy chasing the same amOUR! of goods and services. This is inflationary. ae-

curate measure of innation. " Unlike the CPl. the Implicit Price Deflator assumes change . The market basket taken for the CPI is only taken every 10 years and is not always accurate, said Van G�rkom. An example that Van Gorkom used was fuel. The CPI would assume that even though the price of fuel continued to rise, people would drive just as much. The Implicit Price Deflator would account for reduced fuel consumption due to a rise in the price of fuel. This would be a more accurate indicator of the rate of innation. said Van Gorkom.


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St u d e nt j o u rn a l i st l o oks to f ut u re beyo n d h a n d i caps By Kathleen M. Hosfeld beep . . . beep beep Beep b<ep b<ep b<ep b<ep... tn order to CQDunUD)ate more than the words "yes" or "no," DenniS Robertson, a 2S-yUf old PLU romrnunic.ation arts ma ot epoar g sets hooked up to a bod collection of m"hinery nude from I radio gangc door opener. a PWOSOUK ,.ideo monitor and an adapted newlp�pec teletype mach­ .. , He .send. a Mone code Signal by preuing • plate hnked to the door opener which .sends the sigo�l to a computer which ulrulatet the signab iDln leiters. The ktten .p­ ptu on the video mORltor or on the teletype: machine as words and oenltnuS Words doo't come lighliy and ncb sentence countJ when the sYiI('m I.S JO tediOUS :and time con­ s uming _ But the machine opened up Robertson 's nfe three and a half yeUI ago to the world of nver­ utiort and writing. R.obertson is the viCtim of cerebral palsy which resulted (rom a lack of oxygen to the bnlD during birth. He has muscle COD­ uol only in his neck and hc�. With the Itdp of the technology that has produced hi, com­ munication device and Simpler machines like a motorized whecldlair, Robertson bn betn able to extend the perimeters of his pbydcally limited world. He owru two wbeekhair$. One is for school use and has slob for books, a watch KWD 10 one urn rHI and sporu Slickers on it. The other one is for home use and It IS motorized to tilt back 5('l he can shift his weight on to his back Robcttlon 'IIys that continual sitting can-be very tiring and pain­ .••

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to Robcmon's head so thai he can direct it where evu be wants to i go. Ntar his burnt' in Lakewood, s a UDall dead-c:nd rrw:!. which he tnyeb almost every dar duriDa the ,ununer when the weather IS 800d A� he � up and down on the .hon foad with his dog, Ginger, running alongside. he think' about his futun:. Robertson has tbree mort yeus before he completes his com· mun ication am degree in jour­ rulism. but after gudwlJon he see..

himilelf trying to live a com­ pantiyely normal life. He hopes to get a job as a sports writer and perhaps even get married. "The chances of haying a family are nOI too high, but J still have hope, "he uid_ Robet-uon, a sporu writer for i determined tbe Mooring Mrut, s To :ibouf :i journ:ilistic career. emblish himself in the held he pl:ins to .. show that I nn write and try to put the rest in God's hands. " Even though a cartoon on Robertson's communication mxhinery at home reads " As loon n I get up in the morning J feel like I'm in over my head," his at­ litudt: is positive. i He auribUies this to a faith n Cod. He believes in the power of puyer and depends on God for guiiLnct :ind strength. His p:irenls' home, where he liYes, contains pictures of Christ and other signs of religious com­ mitment. He comes from a large family of three brothers and four Sisters, not to mention various

hodgepodge of equIpment translates Morse Code received by the video monitor (left) and displays 8S letters on Ihe screen or prints them on the teletype machine (right).


miscellaneous aunts, uncles, cousins and brothers-in-law. His father is a retired service man. His parents reflect the same good humor that Robertson does in his easily induced laughter. They recount the time last Christmas when "Denny" went out with his sister and brother-in­ law to buy Christmas gifts for the family, but only returned with a " Knowing

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beautiful ginger-colored puppy. Robertson's father kids him about pan days of home haircuts which were less than desirable and in his opinion unattractive to say the least. Robertson is dependant on his family for help to co with the physical demands 0 life. His brothers and sisters take him places such as shopping, concerts or spor­ ting events. His father and brothers help him take care of his bodily necds and his mother, who is herself disabled. helps him study.

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The moul support of his family is also important to him. " Knowing that they reany ore" encourages him. Robertson has an aide. Don­ ru Apgar, who helps him with class work and often escorts him to e:ctracurricubr lICtivitici. She meets him at his borne before classes, they switch to the school chair and load bim into hUi van and bead down highway ; 1 2 to PLU. Donna claims that Roberuon often ejl;c1aims o[ is frightened by hel' driving, especially the way !he takes corners, but so far the two have had no accidents. Negotiating the obstacle course of a campus dnigned for people without pbysial dwbilitie! is .; challenge in and of itself. Most c1asnooms have become 41ccesslble but the Univt'hiry Center poses problems. " OQ you w.ant to see us try to go down to the coffee.shop?" asks Donna. " Th.lt's quite aD orde.al. We have to go through people's offices . through the kitchem.... "

Esther Robertson, Robertson's mother helps him review his lec­ ture notes and other homework.

Robertson's father, Clarence Robertson kids him about less- than- beco ming home ­ style haircuts.

Sure enough, the pathway to the University Center elevator is through Food Service Director Bob Torrens' office, through the commons kitchens and down a haJlw3-.r cluttered with boxes of food supplies. The elevator itself i$ often full of boxes according to Donna which must be removed in order to board tbe contra p tion. The hallway leading from the elevator on the lower level of the University Center gots behind the coffeesbop kitchens and it too is of­ ten cluttered with neks of food and boxes. With the installation of an elevator in the .administration building. Robe-ruon has not had too much trouble making it (0 his Erst two dasses here. Robertson will take two classes per semester for the next three years in order to graduate. His schedule is limited by the amount of time it takes him to do his homework with the time limitations of "The way I have to. do it." Donna takes notes for Rober­ uon during lectures and tape records each lecture also. He replays the tape at home and goes over the notes with his mother. He often types out parts of the lectures fl,;OlJtifJuad on

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ringMast o M? !fh�n Vol. LVIII, Issue No. 3 September 19, 1980

Ded i cated L u t e s t h e n , n o w a n d fo reve r By ErIc Thomas The year was 1959, back when PLU boasted an enrollment of 1200 students. a time when the Olson and UC TingJestad, weren't and Auditorium was guided by the watchful eye of President Eastvold. No dan­ cing was allowed on campus and all freshman females in dorms were behind locked doors by 9: 1 S p.m.- any attempts to visit were met by the housemother at the door. Chapel attendance was required, with roll taken. Girls were forbidden to smoke and could only wear pants on Satur­ days. Fifty-nine was also a time when three presently familiar faces around PLU were, as seniors. at the peak of their college basketball careers. Dean of Admissions Jim Van Beek, assistant basketball coach Roger Iverson, and Tacoma salesman Chuck Cunis had, by then played three years under head coach Marv Harshman. During that time, they had not lost a conference game, had gone to the NAlA national basketball tournament three straight years, and were the leaders of a team which Harshman later called "the best bunch of small college players I have ever seen in this pan ofthe country." The season staned out minus three regular faces, as Harshman (who had taken the WSU job) had been replaced by one of his fonner players, Gene Lundgaard, and the 6'4" Van Beek and the 6'6" Cunis were out of the line� up for the first ten games because of injury. Curtis, who was an all­ conference defensive safety and offensive-end for the footbaU

Dian 01 Admissions Jim V.n B" t• •sslst .nt b.st.tb." coach Rag., ,,.,.on .nd team, had broken his leg, while Van Reek had separated his intramural playing shoulder football. "After the operation on my shoulder, my whole tife passed before my eyes when they told me 1 couldn't play that year and should sit out until nellt season, "said Van Seek. "But J pushed and pushed my arm to its full capability because I wanted to play with those guys so bad." The duo soon returned to the team (who had behind Iverson posted an 8-2 mark), just at the

The library Isn't the only good pl ace to study.

Poge S

Tacoma sa/,sman Chuck Cultls bask.tball heyday In 1959.

crucial part of the season. " ( think we only missed two or three conference games because the start or schedule was mostly non-league," remembered Cur� tis. "Iverson loved it because he got to shoot all the time." Such dedication by the players seemed to rub off on the PLU students, as the team was foHowed wherever they went by loyal fans. "PLU was a basketball school at that time, "Iverson said. "I think the team captured their

PlU hosts the U.S. premiere a ot showing Republic of China art exhibit.

P.ge IS

during

imagination, everyone loves a winner you know." liThe fans were great," echoed Curtis. "We played in Memorial Gym back then and there was never an empty seat in the house. In fact, when we traveled to Eastern, or Central, we would often have more fans the the home team. " With the fans behind them and Kansas City in front, the Lutes rolled through their conference like a steamroller, living up to

(coatiaued on pale IS)

The Mast photo presents highlights of the Alumni game.

Page 14


Page 2. Mooring Mast. September 19, 1980

A S P LU f re s h m a n s e n at o r vot i n g t o d ay The votina Co< ASPLU freshman senator is today with 5CVCIl candi4ltcs vyina for the lone position. Each of the c:aodidates has coUccted SO sianatures. liven a one to one-half minute speech in Eastvold Cbapel and posted numerous posters throuahout campus. Votlna tables are to be set up in the University and Only Columbia centers. freshman are allowed to cast votes. A brief rundown on each of tbe candidates: Kristin Farantsen is a for­ mer student body treasurer from Estancia Hiah School in Costa Mesa, California. She has been a member of the Scholarship California Association, an honor society, and a senior representative in Girl's league at her high school. "I want to work and I feel like I could do a good job," Farantsen said. "I'd like to get involved with any projects that com� up.'· • Joe Kearns is a former Boy's State representative and was active in his high school in student government Kellogg, Idaho. An all-league Buard in football and a state wrestler, Kearns said that he s i running for a senate seat because he enjoys student _

Home . . Style cookln & Home made pies'

lovernment. "I'm doina it for the people," Keams said. "If I want to get somethlna done. I usually let it done." . • John Kist, from nearby Wuhington Hiab School in Parkland, was an ASB representative his sophomore and senior years and treasurer as a junior. He lost the presidential race by four votes as a senior. "My final goal is to become President of ASPLU ," Kist said. "Being freshman senator is a root in the door. " "If elected I plan on gettin,

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Dale DIllinger. owner

don't know what's loina on in student JOvemment." 8obbl ' NodeU describes • herself as "not bashful" and "really interested in gover­ nment." A four-year par­ ticipant in student lovemment at Newport High School in Bellevue. she said that "if anybody hu Idea, I'll brina them forth." Nadell has worked for Seat­ tle Mayor Charles Royer, State Representative Emilio Cantu, and Presidential can­ didate John Anderson. • June Nordahl, from Sultan, was class president her

last two years in high school. ••ASPLU is a load program and I would like to be a part or it," Nordahl .said. "With 6S0 freshman, there should be more than one representative. Committees might be one way to have more representation." • Mark Anthony Pederson ' from Tacoma and Mt. Tahoma High School. has had no hiah school experience in gover-nment. ". think being a senator is a good way to meet people," Pederson said. "If elected, I will check what's to be spent closely. "

H arstad hot pot f i re tests Cam p u s Safety By Briu uubadl A fire in Harstad Hall sept . 8 was the first major test ofthr new Office of Safety and In· formation, according to Kip Fillmore, the director or Sarety and Information. Fillmore reported that a hot pot, which was not ther­ mostatically controlled, was left plugged in causing the water to boil. The pot be<:ame extremely hot and procrcded to burn its WRy through thr wooden desk it was sitting on. Hot pots are forbidden in local fire code manuals. Ac­ cording to Fillmore however, student cooperation and good

UI11.E PARK

my ideas from the students because they're the ones with the good ideas, not the senators," Kist said. • Janet Morrow was active in her student government at North Thurston High School in Olympia. She was represen­ tative as a sophomore. junior and senior after movina to Olympia from Germany durina her freshman year. "I've lot a lot more eneraY than the telt or the can­ didates, " Morrow said. "I hope to get more freshman in­ volved because it seems that quite a few drift apan and

sense can help curb the poten­ tial danger. extra hundred Three parking spaces have been opened for student convenien­ ce. The extra parking spaces are in the West Ad­ ministration. University Cen­ ter. Northwest and Wheeler lots. There is a catch-studen­ tS can only use them between S:OOp.m. and 7:00a.m. The parking fee-if you have not already noticed-has been eliminated . The fee was. dropped so that students would take advantage of registering their cars and for $8.fety reasons, according to Fillmore.

Due to new managemdlt and an increase or 20 new em­ ployees, the service of the escort and security patrol programs has been Improved, According to Fillmore, this in­ crease of employees is beneficial to work study. The escort senice is open 24 hours and is servicing the campus as well as a half-mile radius around the campus. To prevent thert. Campus Safety has included a Washington State program to its sc:rviccs-Qperation 1.0. A state wide identification program, it was put into effect by the Attorney General's of­ fice. This allows students to

engrave their driver's license number on personal property. If an item should ever be stolen or lost, you can report the identification number to law enforcement agenciH. Campus Safety has made this program available for students by loaning out Ihe electric engravers free of charge. For morr information on Campus Securit,y call cxt. 7441. In case of emergency call ext. 7222, The Campus Security office is located in G28 of Harstad HaJJ. and if you need information on city. county, and local services they have that 100.

Chris Le Beau is new broadcast i n st ructor By Kara M. 0lJ0. Chris LaBeau, a former television reporter. has replaced Rick WeUs as an in­ structor in the communication arts department. This fall, she is teaching radio and television production. and is the staff adviser for Focus. the student news broadcast. LaBeau received her bachelor's degree in jour­ nalism and speech and her

master's degree in radio, television and film from the University of Michi,an. After receiving her master's degree, LaBeau worked for the University of Micliiean preparing educationally orien­ ted media units. Since she came to Washington. she has been a reporter-producer for chanel IJ and a reporter for channel 62. She has covered legislature for both the stations.

Depanment Olairman Gary Wilson said of LaBeau, "We are very happy to have round someone with professional ex­ perience. LaBeau said she feds com· fortable with the role of teacher. "I viewed my previous jobs as trying to educate the public and in­ crease their awareness of public affairs." LaBeau had less than a week's nOlice before she had II

to begin teaching. "I've been getting up at 4 a.m. to keep ahead of my students, I I she said. She Is currently preparinl a documentary on domestic violence for the Department of Social and Health Services LaBeau said she's excited about working with Focus and added. "I'd like to see it take a more important role incampus communication.•.

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September 19, 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 3

Develops public service skills

N ew M a s t e r' s p ro g ram offfe red t h i s fa l l Tacoma City Manaaer Erling Mork said, "a program like This fall PLU's Social this one provides the oppor· for our midScience department is offering tunity to people management new a multidisciplinary their professional aradulte program leading to develop the Master of Public Ad· skills... The MP A degree is not ministraiton degree. John Schiller, director of completely new to PLU. Until graduate programs, repoMs last May an MPA was at· that the 36 semester hour tainable through the School of program will enhance the Business Administration. "The School of Business knowledge and skills of those seeking careers or advan· concentrated on the financial cement in public service management of public ad-

By Clndy Wolf

POSIUOns such as public policy, and the organizational and human dimension of manaaement in the public sec­ tor. The pro,ram is also �et up on a personal level to help develop supponiv� skills in finan� and accounting. Accotdina to Or. Sch.iIIer 90 percent of the people lIl\'olved 111 the araduate program are part-time students while they work .t their full-lime jobs. "Especially since it is offered in the evenings,"

mmlMration and requIred more of a math background, " said Schiller. Ther� was not enouah pal­ ticipation for the School of Business to keep the proaram 10iDI. The Department of Social Science felt PlU slill needed an MPA program. and with the help of the School of Business the social sciences have $Cl up a new program suong & provides which background in theory and research methods appropriate

to undemanding and working erf«dvely with people in public aaencies. Prere uisites for the MPA are a bachelor's degree that

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The Parkland branch of the PiO'Ct' County Libraty plans to move from the Garfield Street location to the Sprinker Recreation Center on Military Road within "a couple of years," Rccording to Roget Balliet, public relations officer for the librarieos. The library applied for an S89,OOO Grant through HUD and will eventually need over SI million more to complete the project. "We have a good chance of geumg the grant money since the peep!!: of the area feel the library is an Important paM of the community," wd Balliet. The people in the Parkland­ Spanaway area formed a task force and are: working with the Pierce County Office of Community Otvelopmmt to determine distribUlionoffunds. "We're confident because they have exprcs.sed so much SUppDM. If we get this we'll have our planning done within the yhear then It will probably be a couple of yean before the completion of the move," said

Balliet. Fiit: Districts 6 and 1 will combme and the new building will be a combination fire station and library. This qualifies it as a community center. The new building will be approximately 18,500 sqU8!e feet and will be located near Spire Rock. it will be: built in an area where there is :urrent­ Iy a parking 101 so that it will not disturb the nature lot next to Spire Rock. According to Balliet, a con­ tract will be made with the: County Parks Commission to assure that library patrons will have free parking. the in people "Some Parkland area may be disap­ pointed about the move but it is more economical and con­ venient to have one large library than t....o small onts so that money can be used to buy

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social science and at least one course of an introduction to Political Science.

For fUMh�r infonnation call or writ� John A. Schill�r, Director of Graduat� Programs in Social Scien<%, Xavier 209, PLU.

Art i st se rie s bl os so ms One of the most interesting and varied slates of attractions in several years will be presen­ ted by tht Pacific Lutheran Univenity AMi,! Series during 1980-1981

"There s i more variety and stmlalh in this year's series than we've been .ble to provide for several years," id Marvin Swenson, the prOlram coordinator. The five-program series leads off Oct 3 with Seattle lyric soprano Mami Nixon. M�. been Ni:ton has recoanized nationally since she was the sinllng \'oice for

Parkla nd l i brary to move to S pri n ker 8, Sand, William)

indludes 20 semester hours in

neW' books rather than duplicates for B .second Will library. Circulation probably mcrease as the coUection II1creases, " stated Balliet. "Our aim is to get more materials to more people," he added. Balliet said th.t the increase in both books and audiovisual materials will probably be gradual since each year the allocation for the branch will probably increase to fill it to its capacity. The county library system serves all areas outside of the cities in Pierce County with 14 branches and a bookmobile.

ClE - UE liD IiMAT DCAT - KAT VAT - IIlAT - SAT •

HArL MED liDS ECFMG · FLEX - '10E HOtll - HP8 I - HLE

Deborah Kerr, Natalie Wood and Audrey Hepburn in several hit movie mwicals of the '50s and '60s. Sh� con· tinues to proent concerts aero the country. Jazz orchestras are begin­ ning to emerge from the big band nostalgia era, and one of the most hiahly accJalmed of the newer ensembles is the Tomiko Akiyoshi/Lew Tabackin Big Band Com­ bining The best of the swing era, the Orient and lodft)"s progressive sounds, the or· cbestn will perform at PLU ov.J. ClassicaJ gUllarist Elliott

Fisk, a Carnegie Hall, Wolf Trap and Kaufmann HaU con­ �M vct.crDn, will appear at PLU Feb. l l . He has aJso been halled internationally. The Oregon Mime Theatre s i scheduled for April S. Rated by the N�w York Times as "superb mime," the trio ls directed by Paris and New York mime veteran Franosco Reynder. The Seattle Symphony, presented in cooperation with Tacoma Philharmonic, con­ cludes the susan April 29. Season tickets may be or­ dered by cOntaclinl lbe PLU University Center, 383-7457.

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Page 4, Mooring M�t, September 19, 1980

F i re alarms e m pty lower do rms; Campus Safety and F i re Dept. u pset BJPdn Rowt Three consecutive prank fire alarms were set off last night on lower campus according to Kip Fillmore, director of Campus Safety and Infonnation. At 10:20 p.m. the Parkland Fire Department received a caU for a fire in Tingelstad. According to Deputy Fire kChief, R. L. Flue, after they had responded to this caU and were preparing to leave. a second alarm was sounded, in Pflueger. Minutes later an alarm in Foss also went off. investigation, An coordinated between Fillmore and John Burgess from the Pierce County Fire Prevention Department is in progress. FiUmore said that pulling an

is a misdemeanor alarm punishable by a line of S300 or six months in jail or both. The investigation will be trying to lind the individual or individuals responsible for pulling the alarms so that legal action can be taken by the lire department and PLU. Action by PLU might include expUlsion, according to Fillmore. Fillmore said the fire department is going to take some form of aClion. and added "the county is very serious about this. While they were here, they were being detained real from It emergencies. Aue said that four pieces of apparatus responded to the call, as well as ten staff

pwple, paid between SIO-20 per hour and many volunteers. "We didn't leave until 12:00 p.m. Some fire departments charge SSOO per piece of apparatus for the first hour and a higher rate for every following hour, but we don't do that," said Flue. A few years ago this same multiple fake-alarm prank occurred and action was taken against the individuals by the fire depanment, according to Flue. Fillmore said, '" wish students realized how serious this is. Although this may be fun in someone's mind, there are a lot of other ways to have good fun-if you want to call it that."

A time to share ideas

Foc us: Men and Wom en in Soc iety BJ I'Iorft« Halllilto. The Brown Bag: Lecture Series has begun again this year, focusing on "Men and Women in Society," 'nterested individuals are asked to come to Room 132 in the University Center on Mondays from noon to 1 p.m., bring a sack lunch and participate in these forums. "It is a time for ideas to be shared from all walks of life. I encourage anyone to attend: students, community mem· befs, faculty and friends, male or female," said Kathleen B1umhaaeJl, coordinator of

the program and associate professor of sociology. Besides the informative value of these discussions, the sociology department also of-

You don't to

fers the option of attending for one credit hour. The deadline for enrollment is this Monday. The course is entitled Sociology JJ3 and there is no prerequisite. This Monday's lecture, Transition: in "Women Displaced Homemakers" will be given by Ginger Brubaker, project coordinator for the Displaced YWCA Homemaker Consortium in Tacoma. The 12 lectures topics run the gamut from "Sex Roles and Mental Health" to "af· fumative Action at PLU."

a

Two PL U s tudents die during s um mer letson expressed the im· pression of Crane ,hat he learned of when speaking Separate incidents this with her friends, noting that summer claimed the lives of she was a giving and PLU students, Nancy Crane sympathetic person who and Ray Kimura. Crane was reach«l out to her friends in killed in a car accident , need. "She had several Kimura took his own life. circles of friends, and was termed an " outgoing, active California girl." Kimura, a music D)ajor who concentrated on piano performance, completed his junior year last spring. Deemed sensitive and quiet by his rriends, Kimura was known to be happy and a good singer. One friend Crane, who had completed noted that Kimura's early­ Level III of the nursing morning shower-singing program, had been active in woke up part of the wing. hospital auxiliary work famous Internationally through rour years at Rio pianist LiJi Kraus gave Americana High School in Kimura a scholarship upon Sacramento, California. For visiting PLU last year. her volunteer community ser­ Kimura was realured as vice work, Crane was soloist with the Spokane awarded the American River Symphony after placing first Hospital Auxiliary Four at the Spokane Festival, Year Award. 1978. He also received top Crane had worked in honors in the Washington Sacramento hospitals and State Recognition Recital as convalescent homes as well well as third place as a PLU Seattle-Tacoma-area freshman in the State Music as Teachers Award. hospitals and organizations. As a high school student, He was extremely talented Crane traveled on a Foreign and girted, noted Kimura's Study League tour to music teacher, Dr. Calvin and Knapp. "He was considered Italy, England, Switzerland and took pan in 10 be one or the really fine the AFS summer exchanac talents in the Northwest and program to The Netherlands could have been called 'Mr. and Belgium. She was Inspiration' of my classes. awarded the Bank of He always upheld others Achievement before himself." America ' Award in Foreign Language in addition to the Rio Americano Faculty Award for Outstanding Language Students. On Crane's application for the School of Nursing, she wrote: "I wanted to live in a with small community nonand Christians to alike, Christians strengthen my beliefs and my outlook on my own life. I came to PLU with high: goals set for myself, to learn and above all , to enjoy my new and education experiences. " "Nancy experienced much of what she was looking for," noted Doris Stucke, director or the PLU School of 'Nursing, She added tbat mature, was Crane responsible and prepared for a high, clinical lcvel of work. "She had excellent potential for becoming a fine nurse," she said. Memorial services for Crane, who died Saturday, AugUSt 30, were held on Thursday, Sept, 4, in Trinil)' Church. University Pastor Ron Tel·

accompanist, an As Kimura worked with PLU flautist Ruth Bretheim for her graduate recital last year. He was well·respec::ted. as a musician for the many styles he had mastered, said Bretham. Dr. Sci Adachi worked with Kimura as a counselor and expressed the conscientiousness Kimura that work. his in showed "Idealism which goes astray is an example of how the can human mind misinterpret, though talented and aifted. as Ray was." he said. "Kimura's high, legalistic interpretation of his faith made him feel as though he was falling short or being a Christian, bUI he was very concerned for the welfare of others."

GOOD LUCK LUTESI from Johnson. Parkland Drug Member F D.l.e

a PLU

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A Special Studenf Discount

on all prescriptions Garfield &.Poclflc Ave. (Next to the Piggly W\QlQ yl Phone 53H)22 1


September 19, 1980, Mooring Mast. Page S

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H ow to f i n d somewhere to st u d y when you can't i n your room By Pdt'll Rowe Studying in your dorm room becomes difficult as the year progresses because, ac­ cording to Rick Seeger in Academic Advising, "your dorm room is a place where you do a lot of things. It's not identified as. solely a place to study. " Seeger explained that studying is a psychological ad­ justment. "Trying to study in your dorm room becomes like trying to study in youc kitchen ne)!;1 to the refrigerator. You

need to find someplace to study that is associated strictly with studying." How to find somewhere else. Gary Minelli from the Counseling and Testing office thinks that this is an individual responsibility, "Everyone is unique in studying. Most people feel comfortable if there are people around somewhere. , . Minetti and Seeger both said that the majority of people study best when they are alone. "If you can get into an

empty room, like a classroom, or even an empty office room, this may be the place to study," said Seeger. Minetti pointed out, however, that to some people a different en­ vironment for studying may be distracting, and so they would feel more comfortable finding somewhere within their dorm. Seeger said that the library isn't "necessarily a good place to go if you need to study. It's the social gathering center of the campus. 1 even saw a foot­ ball game in there one

evening." Seeger did say that if you can get a place in the library which is apart from the general areas of tables and stalls you will probably find a ,place for some good studying. Seeger recommended places in the library such as the stacks in the basement, the stalls around the academic advising center area, and some desks in the stairwells. Other places for study suggested by Seeger and Minetti are the local and downtown public libraries,

rooms in the UC, lounges, and empty hallways. Places like the Cave, the Coffee Shop, and Denny's were not recommended by Seeger. He said, "Most people can't handle studying in this kind of environment. They are great places to talk about what you're learning. But for most it's a great concentration problem." Minetti said. "What it comes down to, is that whatever works for students is what's best for them."

Opport u n i t i es fo r st ud ents

Job offi ce

" u nvei led"

Former student security officer Scott Peerson had a shadow in the form of his dog, Rose. She continued to limp Ifter him on hfs rounds ef'.r cuHlng he' foot on some gl.as. Peerson graduated this summe/and mo"ed to North Dakota with hfs wife, Lois, and ROSB.

8, Grq ubman Careers For Youth exists on campWl to help the youth of Pierce CoUnty find job oppor­ tunities and take advantage of tbem, according to Coor­ dinator Beverly Paske. The main office is located on Garfield Street. It has been there since last March. but only recently "unveiled" with a sign. Paske said they are more than a job-finding service. "We have very few students come into our office here. We I¥=t more or less as a broker. " She explained that CFY works through the employers by bringing them together in one place at Opportunity Fairs. At these fairs representatives from many employment backgrounds share knowledge about career and educat ionaI opportunities in Pierce Coun­ ty. CFY is financed by the Fund for the Improvement of Education Postsecondary through the Division of Social Sciences at PLU.

Paske said the CFY is the only true information and referral service in the area. "Others say they are," she said, " but they really just push their own programs." She said that since ail the job services are operated separately , students " don't know where anything is." Paske c1aim.s that school counselors are of little help because it is "hard for them to keep up with all the em­ ployment changes. " The CFY program will only run through February 1981. Paske says all the work they do is geared to "stimulate" the employment situation of Pierce County. It is hoped that if the Opportunity Fairs are successful, employers will con­ tinue them on their own in later years. Any students between the ages of 16-21 years of age can find out more about the Careers for Youth Program by calling Beverly Paske at 3837327.

1 5 Percent Discount with PLU Student ID Knit Suits . Sweaters • Drapery Cleaning • Laundry Service • Alterations

Alterations & Repa irs RON & ALICE RILEY 1 1 4 1 6 So. Park Ave" Tacoma Phone : 537-5361 Mon-Frl. 7-5:30 Sat 9-5


Page 6, Mooring Mast, September 19. 1980

D� omll mmo�

C h i n es e a rt s h ow 8,. Marea J. Oppelt

PlU staff, faculty, and nu­ dents have a unique oppor­ tunity awaiting them in the Motivedt Library Gallery. and it's an opportunity that won't last forever. What's hap­ pening? A unique exhibit of COD(emporary calligraphy and painting from the RepubUc of China that is makins its United Slal� premiere al PLU. The exhibition is a panorama of Chinese techmques in painting and callignlphy. It rencets a syn· thesis of not only traditional and modem techniques of Chinese painting. but also in­ corporates tbe innuence of Western styles in Oncntal art. On one scroll Chlan Ming­ hsicn has used • traditional technique to pnnray a modem scene: long Island. New York. The exhibit also in­ cludes examples of three: types of Chinese calligraphy: run­ ning script, cursive 5Cript, and clerical script. The exhibit contains 64 scrolls, half of which ate on loan to the Tacoma Art Museum for a show Septem­ ber IS Ihrou&h 30. If you wish to view the entire collection, visit the gallery at our library and the Tacoma Art Museum before the end of the month,

and then our library gallery again �tween October I and IS. The scrolls in the library will be: changed so the PlU community has an oppor· tunity to view as much of the exhibit as possible. The exhibit is being brought to PLU by the new Pacific Northwest International/ln· tercultural Education Consor­ tium of which PlU i� onto of the founding memOO51. Dr. Mordcehai Rozanski of the PlU Office of International Education IS chairperson of that consortium and is respon­ sible. alon, with Dean Moe', dean of the School 01' Fine Arts. and Ern)! Schwidder of the art depanmcrn for the ohibil making it) premiere at PLU. Dr. Rozanski commetued that this exhibit is only tM bqinmll£ of • conlinuln& sma of progranu to be: of· fered at PLU Ihis year. A side nOle to those who are especially inter�ted in the Chinese Exhibit: A special lec· lure wiU be presented by Dr . Chang-Ii Yiu on Sept. 22 from I I to 12 a.m. in the Admini· stration Building, room 1 0 1 . Catalogs of the show are 8vajlable in the library or from Dr. Rozanski in Knorr House Oust west of the Health Cen­ ter) for $6.

I live In the blue mountslns close to the capital of the heaven, White cloudS and red trees fill my homeward path. highest We met each other and stayed at th temple; Hall the night we heard the sound of the stream in the deep-green forest.

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September 19. 1980. Moorinl Mast, Pale 7

Extended effects i n c l ude hal l u c i nations

Students m ay deve l o p i nsom n i a By Sud)' Willi...

"AJI-nishlers" when papers arc due, exam dales are ap­ proaching. or the pany music is just too good to tum off are common in college. Insomnia, however. can have extended effects on Individuals. According 10 studies on sleep deprivation conducted by the Depanment of Health, Education, and Welfare, of periods prolonged sleeplessness can cause a per­ son to suffer sensory disorders includin, iUusions of visual and tactile sensalion that may evtntually develop into hallucinations. A tightness around the head may be o:perience<i, as well as burning or itchin, eyes, blurred vision, lights ap­ pearin, fOllY or haloed, floors undulating. and brief dreams and intruding becoming confused with reality. All individual with insomnia may show increased signs of stress. lnental instability. unevenness of mental fun­ ctioning, lapS\!! in attention, ,rO\"';ng fatigue, weariness, and a tcndency to withdraw from the outside world. He or she may experience confusion between thoughts and ex:temal events. a distorted sense of Lime, mood changes. and a

marked deterioration In per­ formance. According to HEW studies. if the sleep-loss is protracted beyond 100 or 200 hours, the symptoms may intensify and begin to resemble psychosis. Psychologically, insomnia weakens moral character and promotes listlessness, tran­ shory social action, and laziness. The extent of the effects are influenced by many environ­ mental factors such as dorm or home life, but psycholo,ical symptoms may be related in their intensity to the mental stability of the individual. Age seems to be: a significant fac­ tor. and there is some evidence that it s i easier for the young to withstand and recover from long vigils of insomnia. Accordin, to staff in the PLU Health and Counseling Centers. few students com­ plain of insomnia as their chief problem. When insomnia docs appear its essential cause is usually tensions frequently ac­ companied by depression. Many students are nOt used to the college routine; they are still programmed to their old high school schedules which. In many cases, were bUSier than their college ones. They arc not accustomed to the ex­ tra time they have so they

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This is your last chanc e, Mrs. U n i ! Most people connected closely with PLU would say that the university has a per­ sonality all its own. But it would take a computer to mistake personality for pn. sonhood. President Rieke told the faculty of just such a blunder at the first faculty meeting of the year. He prtsented a Hills Brothers mail order catalog which was addressed to Mrs. Pacific Lutheran Uni, School of Education. Tacoma, WA 98447.

TIle inrerest teasing cover read: "THIS MAY BE THE LAST CHANCE FOR MRS. UNI! Dear Mrs. Uni, We urge you to take advantage of this offer

in a hurry. II is one of the most unusual offers that has ever been made in Tacoma or anywhere else in the state of WubJngfon. First of all. it is not open to everyone. The lady living next door to you at the School of Education is probably not receiving it. "in "In facl only one lady in every 70 in the state of Washlnilon can get exclusive Hills Brothers shoes. In ordtr to be sure to receive future catalogs you must send us an order from this catalog. "So why not send an order today. Mrs. Vn)?" The offer abo iDduded a $2

11ft rrrtJneate for .ay order of .boes or bags and a Mystery Glfl ShJpplng Label "rese."ed tor Mrs. P Unt."

M a rla Marv in ASP LU Sena tor "I'm not going I n there with thousands of thing. I want to change-Inlt.ad with In open mind and open ..r. to IIstln to whit people want changed."

DIGHTMAN 'S, INC. BIBLE BOOK CENTERS Home of The Christian Word

Congratulations to PLU and to all of your new and returning students. Your high standards are a joy to behold.

Why do people choose a christian school? Because the Lord Jesus Christ Is the Risen Savior. Why are we In the business of seiling Bibles. Christian books and other Christian Items? Because the Lord Jesus Christ Is the Risen Savior and needs to be known by many. Two locations to Serve You: Vilio Plaza 38165 Yakima Tacoma. Wa. 98408 Lakewood Wa Phone 475-0990 Ptlone 584-3550

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CARVE YO U R WAY TO T H E TO P

APPLY NOW Paid Positi ons O pen There Is room lor anyone wi ll ing to write news. leatures and/or sports. Come up to the Moortng Maot office or call ext. 7491. -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

DO N 'T WRITE HOM E I Send Your Folks A Mast Subscription I nst�ad Only $ 8 will give your parents hours 01 reading enjoyment. Or, If you're broke already, send this form home In your check request. Name . . . . street . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zlp . . . . . . . . Make checks payable to The Mooring Moo .

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September 19. 1980. Mooring "'ast. Pago 9

"Caught In the act." 8 young co-ed assumed an acrobatic poslUon In an outdoor lecture.

Rec i t i ng Shakespeare may help

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i nsom n i acs:' Beats cou nt i ng sheep' (oo't

rrom page 1

worry about how best to spend it.

Insomnia may become an excuse daytime for procrastination, apathy, or laziness: "I'm too tired (0 do anything." Insomnia is generally rooted in deeper confusions. questions, and tcnsions. According to the campus psychiatrist, Dr. Ada Van Dooren. people who have in­ somnia consistently are tlepressed and are trying to work out their problems at night.

Two recommendations to decrease the problems of in­ somnia and tension are: get plenty of physical activity and balance study time to include relaxing breaks. Exercise. play piano, read poetry, etc. The Health Center usually docs not recommend sleeping pills because they feel there are usually other ways, including counseling, to deal with the problems from which insom­ nia arises. Brief naps are not uncom­ mon among college students. According to a psychology

Adix appointed to associate role John W. Adix, former pastor of Christ Lutheran Church in Lakewood, has been appointed associate director of church relations ill PLU. In his new role, Adix will direct the PLU church representative program among the Nonhwcst congregations or the American Lutheran Church n i America.

Adix served at Christ Lutheran for two years before spending the past year as continuing education director at the International Family Academy in Stavanger. Norway. He holds a bachelor's degree rrom Wartburg College in Waverly, IA., and a master divinity degree from of Wartburg in Seminary Oubuque,IA.

A diamond engagement ring i n a n Ingram H a l l rest· room. REWARD. Ask for Laura 474· 0343. Of g reat sen· tlmental value. LOST:

text used in PLU classes, one study found that 60 percent of 430 students occasionaJly took naps in the daytime. Twenty­ two percent said they napped because they enjoyed it. Seventy-eight percent said they napped only when they had lost sleep either the night before or cumulatively over several days. Not aU people need eight hours of sleep a night; what usually matters is whether or not one is alert the next day for classes. tests. and so forth. When one does wake up during the night, finding something constructive to do rather that worrying or brooding may help: get up and jot down ideas for a paper. Or. recite these lines from Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra IV.xii., reverently: "Unarm, Eros; the long day's task is done. And we must sleep, " Beats counling sheep,

ASK FOR QUAUTY COLOR PROCESSING BY KODAK

O U R FRIEN D IS LOOKING FOR YOU! if you're SUE, a freshman Psychology major, from a women's dorm; AARON met you at the Ordal Dance and would like to talk to you. But he can'l find you.

WE WOULD LlK E TO HELP

Please call Debbie 7842 or Dave 7085


Page 10, Mooring Mast, September 19, 1980

CAM P US SHO RTS At the F l i c ks ••

Theo l o g i a n

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Dr. Hans Waller Wolff. professor of Old Testament Theology at the University of Heidelberg, West Germany. will be visiting campus this Sunday. Sep21. Dr. Wolffis internationally con­ sidered the foremost expert in the field of the prophets by virtually all scholars of the Old Testament. His academiC expertise is rivaled only by his commitment to bringing the prophets' message alive and anew to the church ,. . today. On Sunday, at 4 p.m. in the CK, Dr. Wolff will present a lectut'e en­ titled: "Can Hosea's Wife, A Delinquent Whore, Become Faith­ ful Again? The Question Posed by the Prophet to the Church

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Today. " Earlier in the day. at I I :30 a.m. in rooms 210-212 of the UC, Dr. Wolff will be available for infor­ mal conversation. The Religion Department is pleased to announce his arrival, and encourages the PLU community to meet and hear this intriguing scholar.

Editor� forum On October 3rd. 7:00 p.m., the

Friday Eveninss at Marymount program will rocus on media the in communication Spanaway/Parkland area. Guests will include representatives from the Tacoma News Tribune, the Suburban Times and the Ft. Lewis Ranger. The panel of editors will give in­ formation on the process and problems of suburban com­ munication, then be available for questions and discussioll. The public is invited to the event at 423 E. 152nd Street , Tacoma, A simple supper is served at 6:00, children's movies are shown at 7:00. free child care is available. Call Marymount 53S-25S3 for more information.

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Youthgrants The Youthgrants program o f the National Endowment for the Humanities will offer over 1 00 cash awards across the nation this fall to young people in their teens and early twenties, including man), college and university students. to pursue non-credit , oU[-of-the­ classroom projects in the humanities. The deadline for sub­ mission of completed applications is November IS, 1980. The grants, which offer up to S2,500 to individuals and up to SIO,OOO for groups (SI5,000 for certain high-cost media projects) are intended primarily for those between the ages of 15 to 25 who have a ways to go before com­ pleting academic or professional training. While the program cannot provide scholarship support or financial aid for degree-related work, it is the only federal program which awards money directly to young people for in­ dependenl work in the humanities.

B i b le study

.. . - . . Two showings of the following movies (one al 7:00, the second at 9:30) will be held in the UC on the listed dates. See posted schedules around campus for movies to be shown every Thursday night in the Cave. Animal House starts off the schtduit on Sept. 19 followed on Oct. 1 0 by The In-Laws, Oct. 3 1 by Spook Shorts, Nov. 14 by The Seduclion of Joe Tynan and Dec. 1 2 by Kramer 'Is. Kramer. After Christmas it is Camelot on Jan. 9. The China Syndrome on Jan. 23, Dracula on Feb. 6, Midnight Express on Feb. 27. House Calls on March 14. The Deer Hllnter on April 4, and The Electric Horseman on May 9. . ,

Poetry Co ntest The National College Poetry Contest, offering $200 in cash and book prizes and free printing for all accepted poems in the ACP An­ thology, will agaill be of special in­ terest to all collegiate poets. It provides for them :\ source of in­ spiration and encouragement and a unique, intercollegiate outlet for their literary ambitions. The forthcoming ACP An­ thology will be the 11th edition since it was first published in 197:5. Any student is eligible to submit his verse. All entries must be original and unpublished. All entries must be typed, double-spaced, on one side of the page only. Each poem must be on a separate sheet and must bear, in the upper left-hand comer, the name and address of the student as well as the college attended. There is an initial one dollar registration fce for the first entry and a fee of fifty centS for each additional poem. It is requested to submit no more than len poems per entrant. All entries must be postmarked not laler than OClOber 3 1 , and fees be paid. cash, check or money or­ der, to: International Publications P.O. Box 44927 Los Angeles, CA 90044 The forthcoming ACP An­ thology will be the 11th edition since it was first published in 1975.

Anderson, J r. In the habit of following a few days behind hiS father. who was in Seattle last week, John B. Anderson Jr. Will speak at PlU Wedn�sday, Espousing the platforms of Ihe campaign, Unity NationaJ Anderson will have a question and answer session between 4 and 5 p.m. inlheCK.

Open House The Minority Affairs Office will be holding an open house Wednesday, October I . from 10 to I I a.m. in Room 1 1 3 in tbe administration building. The open house is designed to welcome minority students by kicking off the year with refreshments, door prizes, and useful information regarding student services available through the office. minoflues are All ethnic cordially invited and encourage to attend .

Reg ister, Vote! Students who wish t o vote in Pierce County must register by Oct. 3, 1980. Those who are 18 or older can do so in the UC office. Otherwise it will be necessary to obtain an absent� ballot in order to vote.

R LO asks: Please fill out the address cards in any one of the following locations: Administration bldg in front of the Bookstore. Address cards may also be obtained in the .•

Residential Life Office, Ad. l i S. Addresses must be turned in by Sept. 12, in order to be in the 19808 1 Student Directory. If you do not want your name listed in the directory, you must notify Residential Life no later than Sept. 12.

Pastor Robert Rismiller o f the Lutheran Bible Institute of Seattle will lead a special all-congregation Sunday evening Bible Study at Trinity Lutheran Church in Parkland. begillning September 14. The theme will be Alive to

Live: A Study in the Book of Ephesians

Trinity Lutheran Church is located al I 2 I IS South Park Avenue.

Zoo stuff How do you tell the sex o f an oc­ topus? Whal's the most dangerous animal in Puget Sound? How are humans related to tUllicates? What is a (unicate? Learn the answers to these questions, plus much more, when you participate in the Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium docent-training class. A docent is a volunteer who guides school children around the zoo and No experien� is aquarium. necessary. The next class begins Sept . 29 and lasts through Oct. 3, 9- 12 a.m_ daily. Cali the :lOa (7:52-8032) or aquarium (759-0121) to register_

C a l l free A list of free calling areas for Seattle and TACOma are available from telephone communication in Campus Safety and Information . They also have additional dialing instruction cards upon request, Call ext. 7443 , Sarah.

N .Y . To u r A cultural tour of New York is Dr. Knapp's Interim Course. Please see him in E206, call est.7605 or leave name and phone at the: music office. Tenative plans include 7 Braadway plays, 2 ballents, 3 metropolitan operans, York Philharmonic New Symphony and Lectures at teh major an museums. It is necessary to purchase the tickets early to get the best available seats. Watch the presidential debates on big screen TV in the Cave this Sun. from 7-9 p.m. Free coffee and donuts courtesy of the National Unity Campaign and the Young Republicans.

M arket i n g C l u b Scholars h i p The PLU chapter of the Marketing American Association will hold its first two interest meetings on Sept 23 and 24 at 4 p.m. in the UC. AMA is a nationally affiliated club for business and non­ business majors. They deal with all aspects of marketing and membership is open 10 ail interested students and the public. AMA Sponsors various speakers and field trips throughout the school year.

College and university students up to S I ,OOO in may win scholarship awards by coming up with an origmal and practical idea based on me use of poiystyrene roam. A brochure describing the conest requirements, and including 8 preliminary entry form, s i avai l able by writing to: The Society fo the Plastics Indu�try, 31Sa Des Plaines Avenue. �s Plaines, lL 600 1 8.


September 19, 1980, Mooring Masl, Page I I

T h e at e r m aj o r ' p u n i s' h e d ' f o r po s i n g n u d e B1 Mkb.d Arkub Waco, TX (CPS)-Judy Wardlaw, a theater major at Baylor UniYersity. aot her diploma last month , but wns told not to attend the graduation cermlonies. She waJ hein, punished Well·liked and an excellent student, Wardlaw did nOI violate any oencial university lawl. She was not cauaht with any illegal druss, or found cheali", on an eJtam: nOlhing that serious. Her only sin was to 13m: to have: her picture tak�-in the nude. Her ap�aranl.'C in Playboy's Sqnember issue featun on women from southwestern universities ....I..!. . just the: most ro.:mt chapter of a controyersial drama played out at Baylor, a Strict, Bapill;t academic institution. When lhe angtt and publicity finally cleared, left in the rubble was the resignation of half the student newspaper stafr and a well-respected journalism profes.sor, a major shake-up of scholarship distribution by the journalism the and department, prolonsed harrassment of Judy Wardlaw and a slew of student journalists. The school also endured. the embarrass· ment of its disgruntled stu­ dents transferring to the Uni­ versity of Texas. And it all started because Playboy de· cided to take a few pictures. Thoulh Wardlaw was unable to live her parents tbe satisfaction of sedng her with the rest of the araduates at commencement in August, she was probably more fortunate

than other key actors in the story. After a disciplinary hearing, Wardlaw WaJ only school scolded as mildly officials belatedly tried 10 bury the story. as well as its bad publicity for the university. "It was obvious they didn't like the publicity the Story sot." Wardlaw observ�. "It had become a national thing and they didn't want to do somtlblns bad to me, and thus bring the whole thing up qain." The controversy fi�t arose

when BayJor Prc:s.ident Abner McCall sternly warned last January that any univeUity nudent who posed nude (or Playboy, tb� troUing tht campus for modds:. would be CJtpeUed. In response, the BDylor Lariot, the student paper, published editorials condemn· ing McCall's policy. and sup-­ porting the right of women to decide for themselves whether to appear in the m.,azine. Infuriated by the paper'! boldness in opposing the admiRlSlration (which is tech· nically the paper's publisher), its interpretation or and Christian principles, McCall ordered Board of Publications Director Ralph Strother to fire the Lariat's three senior editors-Jeff Banon, Barry Kolar, and Cindy Slovak. The entire Board reaffinned that decision unanimously, despite Barton's last·minute appeal. At issue was not only the right of Baylor women to appear nude in a national magazine, but the editorial freedom of the student newspaper. McCall insisted

that as president he was the paper's publisher, and had the final say over the conte-nt of its editorials. The paper's editors argued McCall's Ihtervention Violated their nght to free expression. In the end, McCall won. Even after Ihey wereremoved from the Loriat, the three former editors encoun­ tered a series of admminration I'res4ure taellC1 to force them OUt of Waco. Journalism Department Chakman Loyal Could ",old Wi we should look for other schools for the next semester," former editor Slovak recaillo. Thou&h they wert: never rormally asked to leave, Sloyak saYl lhe admimMratlon repeatedly araued they would be much happier on another campus. She says the journalism department tried to make ItS case by makinl the former editors' curricula harder. "For e.'(3mple, they told us we'd have to wrile a 2�OO­ word research paper," Slovak explains. "But since we worked. on the (news] paper, we weren't supposed to bave to do that. But they wanted us to do It anyway. There's not doubt they could've made it very, very tough for us to graduate. " Feelinl they had no alternative, Slovak and Banon transferred to the University Texas, while Kolar of graduated. He is now working on a daily paper in Waco. Five other former staff members also transferred to Texas, but not before coming

under the same kinds of pressures Slom experienced. "I'm sure I would have gotten a large scholarship for my senior year, and J know that other members of the paper that had been promised scholarship� from the journalism department would ha\<e received them. But if they had sidro with us, there was no way they were goina to receive any finandal help from the uniyersity," Slovak says. Baylor officials don'r deny it. They confe;s that students who were expectro to receive generous journalism scholar· ships ....ere denied them be­ cal.l5C of thell luppon for the dismissed editors' stance. "There seemed to be little reason to Jive funds, which

are in shon supply, to those who hold this uOlyersity 10 disdain ," Gould says. Just as readily. admini­ stration officials provided in­ centives for journalism stu· dents, especially thoS(: on the student paper who sided with . the administration. Slovak claims to "know of a woman wbo decided to stay on the paper, and thus received a prestigious award. (But! the student who was even told me she would let (the awardl did not receive it because she had quit the paper. " When the issue first started to heat up, almost the entire staff threatened to resign if the three editors were forced to quit. But when it became clear the administration would play hardball and deny dissident students essential financial aid, many chanaed their

minds. '" didn't want my tuition to &0 up. I would have lost a lot of financial support if I hadn', stayed on the paper," says Tim Purnell, a Lanat spons reporter this fall. Even amona some of the 1 7 who walked Ollt, there were those who decided to return to the paper this fall for the nnancial assistance. "I guess I don't really blame them," Slovak says. "They had to think about their futures. .. For those who did \ose­ the-ir scholarships, aU is not lost. A group, consisting mostly of law-yen and journalists, has raised almost $3000 to subsidize the :students who either transferred to Texas or ranained at Baylor. Oraaniud by lawyer Robert Warde.n, it began several month� ago, and wiU hand oyer its collection to nine of the students within the neXI few week.!. "We're just waiting to collect some more funds," Warden says, "and then we plan on giving them to the who displayed students remarkable courage." the estimates Warden students may only get about half the money the would have received had they kept silent on the issue, but they've also earned a measure of profes· sional respect and admiration. admiration. "Rather than hurting their journalism careers, " Warden opines, "I think they have greatly helped them. Any editor must admire this display of principles."

' Bedtim e for Bonzo ' a favori te amon g stude nts

N ewest entertai n ment craze i s v i ewi ng an old Reagan movie (CPS)-His films were never box office bJockbusters. They're not even included in most mm directories and encyclopedias, But now, almost two decades since he retired from feature films, Ronald Reagan movies are in high demand amons universities and private individuals who rent films. Several booking agencies report being nooded with

rental requests since Reqan was assured of the Republican nomination for president. They report that most of Reagan's films are all booked up through the middle of November. "We've had so many calls on it that it's betn JUSt amazing," reports Leslee Scamahorn, a marketing representative at Uniyersal Studios in Hollywood.

Scamahorn her says company gets many of the calls because it owns "Bedtime for Bonzo," a 19�1 film in which Reasan co--stars with a chimpanzee. "That's the one everybody wants. It's the one they (students and others) like to make fun of," she adds. Many booking agents believe making fun of the candidate is the main reason

for the tarae increase in rental requests. Screening a Ronald Reagan film, Scamahorn says, seems to be the hottest idea for certain entertainment. "People just want to use the films at a party or any kind of social gatheri",. They can't believe this could be our next president," she says. sales Bee Herman, a Audio representative at Brandon Films, Inc. of

Mount Vernon, N.Y., is also surptUed by the interest in films from the Reaaan campuses she helps service. Just after receiving another inquiry from an Oregon school, she noted, "I have worked here for 14 years, and never once received a call from any of Realan's old films. Now hardly a day goes by when someone doesn't call about Reagan."

Acad e m i c eng i neeri ng c i rc l es g lad of i ncrease i n doctorates D.C. Washington, number (CPS)-The of who earned students doctorates rose for the first time in six years during 1979, says a new report from the National Research Council here. The biuest increase in c doctorates came in engineerina, physical sciences, and education. The statistics were

particularly weU·rcctived in engineering academic: circles, from which an aJanning number of arads have been tempted by high salaries in private industry. The trend encouraged rears that there would be too few ensineers left to teach in academia. " Obviously (the increase in the number of doctorates1 is good news to us," says

Donald Marlowe of the for American Society Engineerins Education. "But our problem is chronic. And certainly we have no way of knowina if those new doctors of enaineerina intend to devote themselves to academic: pursuits. .. The increase in the number receivin& students of in doctorates education

"reflects the inability of education graduates to readily find jobs," says Donald Willis of the University of Wyominl. "You sraduate, you can't find a job, so you hang around campus a while lonser and take some courses, It Willis says. He adds that "yirtually all school districts require their teachers to continue compilinl credits.

The 1979 increase: in the number of doctorates awarded was the first increase since 1973. The 3 1 ,200 doctorates-law and medical delrees were not included in lhe survey---.;o ; nferred in 1979. Women collected a biuer share-28 percent-of the doctorates awarded in 1979, compared to 26 percent in 1978.


Page 12, Mooring Mast, September 19, 1980

LETTERS

'G lari ngly apparen t m i sconcept ions' cleared- up on RA selection TO THE EDITOR: I would like to thank Gory Nelson for his interesting perspective on the resident assistant (RA). It offers a chance to clear up some misconceptions, many of which are glaringly ap­ parent In Nelson's letter. Nelson comments (if I may paraphrase) that RA's are either useless or power hungry, and notes that this Is largely due to "how an RA Is selected and what type of person applies." Just to set the record straight, all kinds of people apply for RA Jobs for all kinds of reasons. To place every RA candidate In the same category smacks of stereotyped predJudlce. Also to set the record slralght. before on RA Is hired he or she goes through several screening processes, all of which In­ clude evaluallons by other students; and what's being screened are the can· didate's human relations skills. not his Of her moral beliefs. Opinions on moral

Editor Kathleen M. Hosfeld News Editor Tom Koehler Features Editor Petra Rowe Sporta Editor John Wallace Production Editor Margo Student Photography Editor Bill Trult MagazIne Editor Morel Ameluxen EditOrial AIIlstan.. Dee Anne Houso Eric Thomas Copy Editor Koren Wold GraphIcs Editor Steve Houge luline.. Manager Corrl Minden Clrculalll>n Manager Porn Corlson Adverttalng Manager Cindy Kloth Technical Advllof Mike Frederickson Faculty Advtsor Cliff Rowe The Mooflng MDI1 Is publIshed by !he studen" 01 . wee.1y Poclflc luthetoo lJnlverlsTy un· der the ousplces ol lhe Boord OpInions ex· Regents. 01 pr8$S8d In the MOl! are nolln· . lended 10 represent tholO 01 the the ad· regenl1, ministration, the locu1!y. the student body or the Mott stoff. lellelS 10 II'Ie ed!lor $hOU1d be 5ubmmed by 5 p.m. 01 II'Ie IOrm;I ....k .. 01 P\Jbllco1lon.

Issues vary as much on the do they as stoff RA anywhere else at PlU. By the time a successful candidate Is chosen os on RA. he Of she has ben evaluated by as many as 25 people. about half of even aren't whom with the associated Residential Ufe Otflce. And It should be clarified that none of the evaluations occur at the retreat Nelson mentloned . . .the retreat Is a skill development, non­ evaluation session I

Only those candidates roted conSistently above overage In every area are serIoUsly considered as Rh. The persons we hire have been evaluated as human the having relations skills necessary to deal with a variety of dlf­ ferenl circumstances. The evaluations show them to be good listeners, willing and able to relate to different of people a with backgrounds, willingness and ability to

confront and resolve dir· flcult problems. selection any In As process as large os ours, a few less qualified can­ didates will slip through. But our selection process Is based on extensive study 01 selection techniques, and on the whole it does what It Is supposed to dO. . .lt Identifies the best talent available: and at PlU. that talent Is con­ siderable. I admit my own bios In

The Innocent Bystander

discussing 1hls quesTlor I os , work with the stoff dally. With few exceptions they are caring, concerned, hard·worklng people who offef more support than Is publicly perceived (which is the way it should be), and who get more heat than they deserve when they hove to challenge someone. PlU Is lucky to have them, And I am proud to be a port of them.

RICk Allen Director. Relldentlal Lite

By Arthur Hoppe

" Rosa l y n n , t h row Amy an i nv i s i b l e l i fe preserver." afternoon, my fellow Americans. Let. me delighted how say Rosalynn, Amy and I are to be with you today here at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard of launching the for new ultimate America's invisible weapon-this battleship. "We had hoped to keep this incredible technological breakthrough a top secret. And J want to assure you that our sudden decision to publicly unveil it here today had absolutely nothing to do with the charges my opponent, Ronald Reagan, made yesterday.

"Good

"Mr. Reagan has every right to call me a bumbling, fraidy--cat pinch penny if he wishes to. But to claim that I have allowed America to become number two to the Russians in sea power shows that he doesn't know

what he's talking about. And I think the fact that we now have this invisible battleship proves it. "But, as I say, that has no connection whatsoever nationally these with televised ceremonies today. The only reason we are revealing the existence of unbelievably this magnificent warship is an item that appeared in the Sioux FaUs Times-Ledger last June which said the Navy might be building a new vessel. By televising this launching today for all the world to see, we can effectively put a StOP to these unauthorized leaks our damage so which national s.ecurity. " Anyway, J just wish you here present and those of you watching on television could see this magnificent invisible battleship, the bow of which towers up above

an

invisible

us here on the reviewing platform:

hit to is battleship.

" There Is no Question the sight of those huge invisible l6-inch guns which can hurl an invisible one-ton shell an invisible 20 miles would strike fear into the souls of America's enemies, if they could see them. this with sir, "Yes, dreadnought invisible

"But there she goes, sliding down the ways. Did you see that? What a triumph of nautical design ! She didn't even make a ripple when she hit the water. "There. Those three tugs are shoving her over to her dock. The gangway's out. And her invisible crew of intrepid sailors are now marching aboard to do their duty and show our invisible flag in the far corners of the world so that freedom shall not perish . . . off that get "Amy, pngplankl Amy, don't you dare set foot on my invisible battleship! Amy, if you very this stop don't

added to our arsenal of democracy, America will once again rule the waves and Ronnie can eat his hean out. speech­ enough "But making. It's time for the Rosalynn's launching. going to do the honors. All right, Rosalynn, if you'll just break this bottle of champagne over the bow. . . "That 's a great swing, Rosalynn. Try it again. Okay. one more time. Dam. Well, that just shows you, folks, how difficult it

moment. .. "Darn ! Well. just don't there, stand Amy Throw preserver. "

Rosalynn, life a


September 19, 1980, Mooring Mast. Page 1 3

!!!�� E DITO RIAL

PLU offices apparen t l y not speak i n g

H as new computer system decr,eased campus com m u n i cation? Dear Dr. Rieke, At first I thought If was lust an isolated problem, a lack of communication between two offices. The General Services office failed to notify me that they processing not were purchase orders or bills computer until the Installation was complete. They had been holding all such orders for the past two months according to the secretary, except those which were designated as emergency requests.

meant that the This production supplies and subscriptions that I had ordered and needed for the first regular Mast Issue would not be arriving. The result was a smaller­ paper, than-normal-size which wasn't all that bad. But why wasn't I notified that my purchase orders being were not Furthermore, processed? why dldn" Don Jerke. Vice­ President of Student Ufe, know anything abou, It

either? Communication down breaking was between three offices. I tried to be understanding and attribute the problem to the natural confusion of new to the adjusting system. But students were not as understanding when they tried to get their I.D. cords and were referred to the from library the business office, back to the business office from the library. to the registrar's

office from the business office and back again. The problem was no one knew who had the data cords required for making the identification cords. Add three more offices to the list of those apparently not spec.�lng to each other. How about the studen' who on wonted faculty administrative I phone Ilst (you know those of pieces yellow dlnle paper folded three ways) to referred was and

General Services. Central Services, Campus Safety Information. and the Center University Office Scheduling and of Office the finally University Relations. The list has grown to 1 1 offices that do not have a of knowledge working each other's operations. Does the university's right hand know what its left hand Is doing?

Kathleen M. Hoaletd

Comment: Senator tal ks about ' RA Syn d rome' Mark Dunmire ASPLU senator � one who Is sUPPJsed to be some kind of "student leader," I have followed the debate over the "RA eager with Syndrome" concern. but not wlthout some dlsapPJintment In both advocates. who one � occasslonally tokes risks In presenting his viewPJlnt to and administration the faculty, I commend (and Gary with) empathize ,he Nelson for having courage to speak his mind publicly about a sensitive Issue. More so. because he is likely to confront the most respected ( and PJwerlul) group of students on this campus- residence hall student-staff. Unfortunately. I am also aware of how often good Ideas get lost somewhere between the brain and

typewriter, and the germ of rational critique of the system becomes a mere attack on the personalities Involved. On the other hand, Mr. Allen's clorlflcation. ("If I may pcnaphrase.") takes the easy way out by merely resPJndlng to the personal attacks, (whiCh should fall merits, own their on anyway) while Ignoring 'he real Issue s at hand. � far as I am able to deduce, two Issues spring forth from Nelson's letter. First. the Resident Assistants ore allegedly required to assume leadership and exhibit an espousal of certain values whUe doing so. There is no doubt who the student leaders on this campus are. Neither the Mast. nor RHC. nor even heavily so are ASPLU

swamped with applica­ tions when selection time rolls around. This holds true in spite of the fact that many of these positions partial or full offer offer full Of partial scholar­ motivates What ships. ships. What motivates can­ didates, then. to become RAs? Could It be the esteem of their peers? From the first hour of the freshman student's arrival on campus, to the moment he hands In his key shortly before graduation. It Is the and plans who RA partiCipates in activities, who speaks out about the resident of philosophy living. and who essentially, leads the wing. are. They in 1act. "responsible members of . the university 'family' . . And Allen. therefore, is "proud to be a r;:x:Jrt of them," Does this perception come from rlO?

itles." which couse them to assume the rore of de toc­ to student leader. often to the detriment of the devel­ oping leadership skills of the other members of the wing. IT Is my opinion that if the RAs would simply "get out of the way." and cease little quaint planning natural "wlng-dings," then might leadership to chance a have j develop, and the residents experience might something a little more creative than travelling treats, secret r;:x:Jls . and screw-your-roommates. Ale tne candidates, as Nelson also points out. also screened on the basis of their espousal of the varues ?f the office? Allen says no, pointIng to his perception of a wide variety of moral beliefs among his staff. It appears, however, that his statement may not be entirely accurate, Esoecially of light In

for Questions Stoff interviews:" "What Is the basic philosophy behind residential living at PlU?" On 'he evaluation sheet, Interviewer must the devote one category of to this evaluation the answer, alone. '!4whether or not the candidate Is willing to enforce this another Is philosophy to According question. Allen's letter. the applicant must score highly In both areas. Does RlO, In fact, require RAs to believe In the policies they enforce? let the reader decide. In short, insteed of letting �oturol leadership develop In the dorms, It is my Opinion that RLO Is both picking our leaders and those what approving leaders may profess If they wish to be such. All this to the of detriment the leadership potential and quality at social life of the residents.

The nallonal lelevlslan slallons have always lollowed the besl Coup: Many Turks welcomed Ihe coup, bul lhey markel reasoning and probably wanl changes 10 be made quickly. To go back 10 always will. They give the viewers Ihe demacrallc syslem Is much more deSirable whal they wjlnl or 01 leasl whal Ihe Ihan being gobbled up. palls say they wanl. The lalesl surge 01 tube abomlnallon Insults me mare Ihan the commercials that By J.ff Olson accompany Ihem. ··R.al P.apl.," Elections: Governor Dlxy lee Ray was "Those Amazing Animals," and "Thal's lncr.dlble" are prime examples. "blank and quiet," possibly a IIrsl for "Those Amazing Animals" earns Its meager worth mare oHen than Ihe In Ihe lasl four years as she was her resl through the mere lalenl 01 Ihe animals, such as frogs lumping 10 defealed Tuesday. Jim McDurrmol and peoples' screams. Bui lt even towers Itself and usia lIems llke "The Snaker Handlers" which Include a man lying In a sleeping bag lull 01 raHlesnakes. John Spellman will now bailie 'III Ihe "Real People," an Ihe olher hand, has tNe lallenl: one episode Nov. 4 election for Ihe governor's post. Included a mon playing music on his packel calculalor. The Icing on Ihe cake, however, Is easily "Thai's Incredible," which now baasts 01 two .malar accldenls. A man allempllng 10 lump two cars Iravelling 100 miles per - he didn't lallure flrsl the claimed hour achieve his "Incredible " feal. The second man nol only pul hlmsell In the hospital bul also braughl six speclalars with him when he dldn'l quite make Ihe 1 70·1001 malarcycle lump aver the lounlalns 01 Ceasar's Palace.

Arm. Rac.: R.I.cllng Warnings, Congr.ss has

I.nallvely aproved a dang.rous new phase 01 the arms race; chemical warfare weapons. Supporters claim del.rence 10 Sovl., superlorlly I. needed,

1�==== ==============:!!:===:::::;'1 91 �

Take lime 10 look 01 whal you're laughing 01 next lime: you may gel d.pr....d. "...But an a pasillve nale�'ve been .xpecllng 1811 Iram lelevlslon and I've been gelling iI."·Berry's World, 5epI. 16, 1980.

ASPLU: Two posilions for ASPLU Senalor· ai-large are 10 be filled at Ihe elecllon Sept. 26. Freshman senalor elections will be delermlned loday. Be acllve In ASPlU by pursuing an office andlor voting.


Page J4, Mooring Mast, Stptember 19, 1 980

O l d m ee t s n ew : Va rs i ty b l i tz es a l u m s 34 - 2 1 I n an n u al g ame â&#x20AC;˘

Sen/o, quartetlMck E,1c C.,I.on guides the offense to on. 01 thel, "ra' quart., SCON'

Number one ranking on line

Lutes tackl e ' secret ive' Western When the Western Washington University football team held a closed scrimmage rocently, they may have been signaling a reluctance to give Lute scouts any information about their new playbook before tomorrow's game. PLU imposed no such restrictions in last Saturday's AJumni game, and very openly exposed their offensive firepower as they exploded fo[ 20 first Quarter points enroute to a 34-21 victory in Cront oflhe onlooking Western coaching staff. The game, played al Franklin Pierce Stadium, attracted 2000 Caru who watched the lutes of yesteryear don pads against the number-one-ranked NAtA Division l l lcatn in the nation. The PlU varsity scored five times during the contest, while a tough Lute defense prevented an alumni first down until midway through the second Quaner. The first tally came on a 27-yard touchdown toss from senior quarterback Eric Carlson to halfback Chris UII, followed three minutes later by a four-yard scoring run by fullback Mike Westmiller . Carlson, who clicked on �en of ten pasSC$ in the game, later hit junior tiaht end Eric Monson .....ith a two-yard scoring tOSS, freshman Jeff Rohr broke loose on a 16-yard TO run, and Chris UII reached paydirt from 49 yards out to close out the varsity scoring. "We couldn't have been more pleased with an opening game," said PLU head football coach Frosty Weslering. " Our numbtr one varsity team played just greal and we were able to do a lot of changing to get everyone in, " The alumni lallied all of their points in the second period, the first of which came on a "Paper Lion" kickoff return by past Lute great Prenlis Johnson, who scampered untouched through PLU defenders on the first play of the second half. "It wus a little something to get them going." said Westering. "The alumni played a good game and enjoyed themselves." Rick Finsnh and Brad Westering both tossed legitimate fourth quarter TO strikes from 20 yards OUt, which Westering nOled " showed us some things we needed to know on pass defense." Pass defense is one area in which PLU expects to be heavily tested in tomorrow's 7:30 p.m. home showdown with Western. " They have a good quarterback," said Westering. "We bdieve They're going to be using a 'run and shoot' offense in which they would throw the II ball some 40 times a game. Ho....ever. . minus a scouting report, and aware that the Viking led the Evergreen Conference in rushing defense last year, Westerill8 is taking nothing for graRled. "They've been very setretive," said Westering. "That's a challenge for us to adjust and do what we can do. We're preparing for many unknowns aTld arc going to 80 out and give it to them." The Western game will be the first time this season that PlU has Laid its number-one national ranking on the line (as a non-<:onferenc:.: defeal wiD affect the weekly poll as much as a conference loss), and the IC8m is using it as a motivating incentive. " I think the ralina is something you can be proud of in a sharmg way," said Weslering. "We're not being cocky about it, rather, the fact that wc're recognized as one of the ben programs in the country gives us a challenge to play at the level from week to week . The bigge:;t thing is that we need the loyalty of our fans to help us stay there."

Alum Ray Pu/sIf., looks on ',om the .,d.llnes


September 19, 1980. Mooring Mast, Page 1 5 . . .

The u n forgettable trio of Van Beek, C u rt i s , and Iverson

"59" squad romped th rou g h NAIA natio nals (_l1li.... _ _ -)

areat rebounder and inside player. I wu delinitdy the third option." However. sometimes. when the same was well out of reach, the roles could oc­ casionally be altered, as in one instance Curtis remembers. "Sometimes when the lame was out of reach. IVerson would tell me that he would let me take a lona jump-shot," he said. "The only catch was that in return he'd let to take a hook shot inside."

the reputation they had started as freshmen. By our senior year, It was lUI automatic assumption that we would 10 to Kansas City," said Van 8cek. "We would blow people away. I remem­ ber Cunis and I would have to bitch and moan to let back In­ to the lame. " has similar too Coois remembrances. "Usually by the end of the Iirst half the game was over , " he echoed. "We were so dominant (and I'm not brauina), that we seldom got to play more than that half of the lame." Iver­ son summed it up when he noted,"We came to play and expected to win. We were all winners and we played as a

team." Play as a team was what they did best, and after four years together their high-low offense was so mechanical that they could expand on it when they wanted. "We fast-broke a lot since we all had good speed, " said Curtis. "We im­ provised many times from the offense as we knew what the other guys were going to do."

From conferen<::c, the "S9" squad romped through the NAIA regionals, and entered the NAJA naUonal tour­ nament for their fourth and lut tirne. They beat Western and Central Montana Oklahoma by scores of 78-

1'I8rsoo

years before when PlU had dropped a one point cliff­ hanger in the semi-Iinals. The lutes battled them the whole

"lundgaard was smart enough to keep our pattern, " Van Beck said, "as he had used the same system when he had played for Marv earlier." Iverson agreed, "He JUSt let us do our own thing, he respeaed us and we respected him. He did an ouutanwns job. " Of course Iverson, Cunis, and Van Betk were all taJented pla�rs, each of whom possessed oumanwng skills. .. (verson was unbelievably quick and could shoot the ball like nobody you ever saw," said Curtis. Van Beck

also had nothing but praise for Iverson, emphasizing his agressiveness as well as his shooting but conceding his

"quick trigger." Usually if I gave the ball to Iverson, I might as wdl lO rebound," he remembered. '" used to hate to have him luard me because he was always grabbins, holding and shoving off to stop you and keep you away from the basket . " The 6'4" Van Bee.k played

guard his last two years, having switched over from his previous forward position. Not surprisingly, Van Beck 'eponded to the Challenge in "S9" by having his best year, adding 16.8 points p« game to Iverson's 18.6 and Cunis' 20. "Van Beck was a greal shooter, was aggressive and had confidence," said Iver­ son. "Curtis was also a tom­ who never backed peter, down.

He wasn't a lood

shooter outside of ten feet (in fact he was lowy), " Iver­ son said, "but let him near the buket with his quickness and he'd get the lay-ins and the rebounds."

As far as role-playinl on the

team went, Van Beck noted, "Iverson was the shooter, and Curtis, who had the quickest hands of any big man I've ever seen or played llJI;atnst, was 8

and 68-57 respeetively, before beating Georgia Teacher's (97�5) and Fort Hayes (80-71 ) . Thus, the lutes ended up in the champ­ ionship game against an all­ "black Tennessee State team led by Dick Barnett, the future Knickerbocker great. It was a re·match of two

60,

Curtis

"The entire team was a areat bunch of IUYs and players,"

he said.

Cunis later played in the old American Basketball Association, for both the Pittsburg and Rens the Van Washlnaton Tapers. Reek and Iverson also conbastetbaJl, their tinued playing for the Cheney Studs and the Pederson Chickens. Iverson then hun his knee and was forced to retire. Van Seek still plays for Tacoma Plywood. A1thoush aU three went their separate ways upon sraduating from PLU, each has returned in some form or another to work for and sup.. pan their Abna Mater. Iver­ son, a teacher at Peninsula hiSh school, has been the assistant basketball coach (or six years. Van Beck also was an assistant coach for a time, (67· 69), and was the directer of Iipaneial aid before assumins hiS present position as Dean of Admissions. Curtis went into sales for Sweetland Hydraulic and pneumatic equipment. He is a

familiar facc at basketball games, and has personally got· ten to date 20 new Q Club members (people who can­ game, but in the end Ten­ Iribute $240 per year to PlU) nessee clinched their fourth which is tops for all par­ straight NAIA championship. ticipants. " They had an awesome What does PlU mean t� team, but we stayed with these three, 20 years after their them," said Van Beck. "We memorable season? "My played a better defense than years at PlU were the four they were accustomed to and sreatest years I've ever had in we got a lot of lay-ins off our my life," Cunis Dotes, "The high-low offense." professors, the students, aU of Iverson remembers the turn­ them were lood people. PLU ing point of the game. "It was a great influence in my life came when we were down by and I hope , can give back one with 10·.(2 minutes left in t some of what they gave to . I the game. he said. "Barnett me." came up behind Curtis, who Van Reek echoed these sen­ pivoted into him and drew his timents. "PLU was and is a fourth foul. Chuck had to super impanant part of my come out, and when he' got life," he said. "Those years back in. it was 100 late." were a profound influence on The second place Iinish was Chuck, Roger, and myself." the best er in lute history, -co.: However, Iverson may have and a litb n g culmination of summed it up best when he the college carCCTS of the never noted, "look, no one owes to be forgotten trio of Van PlU more than 1 do. Beck, Iverson, and Curtis. President Eastvold used to say However, as Iverson pointed that PLU was different, that out, it took an entire team to PlU stood for something. He play, and the glory s i jUst as was right. It's those things he

much the other members.

said that kept you going."

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,


Page 16. Mooring Mast. Septembtr 19, 1980

L u t e s l o o k i n g fo r g ood s o c c e r s e a s o n The PlU men's varsity soccer team kicked off their 1980 season Saturday with a 2· I loss al the hands (or feet) of the Alumni booters. The learn will open a five­ game homestand tomorrow

River Green against with College Community action beginning at 10:30 a.m. The Lutes, in their second season as a varsity sport, hope to improve on last year's 3-0·2 league record which gave them

a slice of the Norlhwest Championship ConCerence aiong with Whitman and Lewis & Clark. The Lutes have five starters returning from that squad including junior fullback John Larsen, junior

midfic:lder Axel Arentz, senior fullback Randy Koelze and Paul Corward s{ phomore There are also Swenson. several promising freshmen in the ranks this year. Coach Arno Zoeske said,

"We will play in our halC oC the field a little more, but al the same time our ofrensive playen will have space 10 operate." He also said, "A rundamental characteristic should be a tough defense...

&Pl. 20• . . . . Green Rivtr Communit,! 10:30 a.m.

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SP RT SHORTS CrOll CoUnll'J"-Tomorrow marks the opening meet for harriers at the Bellevue C.C. Invitational, and if past recor­ ds are IlIl indication, PlU should be in good shape with three oC the Cour top men run­ ners back from a squad which placed second in the North­ west Conference. The women, led by junior Dianne Johnson, the WCJC champion, have three girls back that are lour-tested. The gals are hoping to improve on their second place finish in the 1979WCIC meet.

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Volleyball-LoIs of Ialent is the word from the volleyball camp as they gear up Cor their first match ne:lt Saturday. Coach Kathy Hemion made cuts during midweek. as prac­ tice intensified. A new defense has been installed by Hemion to utilize the better talent, with a format middle back up middle the replacing system.

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The Mooring Mast

P L U vo l u n t e e rs w o r k at R e m a n n H a l l By Gall Greenwood Remann Hall Juvenile Court in Bremerton has 130 volunteers and during the school year about 15 PLU students work there. "We have volunteers from 1 8 to 84," said Lin Spellman, volunteer service coordinator. Sure enough. in onc of the control terminals of the complex. sal "Grandma" next to colorful packages she had wrapped for a resident's birthday, Spellman emphasized that no matter what one's age, background or skill, the possibilities for volunteering al Remann arC' numerous. Loo Randolph . 1976 gold medalist boxer. volunteers at Remann working With the kids in the weight room several hours a week. gains volunteer .. A tremendous insight, ability and maturity as far 'as working with people and working within a system," Spellman said. She stressed the diversity of the volunteer programs offered. "We have a lot of structured as well as unstructured programs." 'The Big Brother and Big Sister programs in which a young adult weekly visits a child who is on probation are just a couple of the many programs offered. Some volunteers come in on a regular basis to tutor while others come in to shoot baskets or pool with the juveniles. Remann houses about 100 kids at a time. Sometimes they are the victims of child abuse or neglect and sometimes the perpetrators of a crime. Approximately 6,000 Pierce County juveniles go through the hall a year. Once the child is brought in, he stays in a cell, usually for two days before his first hearing. Then he lives in a dormitory an average of four to six weeks while he awaits his trial; meanwhile he may be in several hearings. PLU alumna Pat Farrnish worked extensively with abused

children for experience before beginning her teaching career. Now she will be able to identify and understand the abused. child she may find in class. A school inside the complex is

just one area where volunteers are used. Besides tutoring , the 16- and 17-year-olds often have fifth grade reading abilities, some college students help with arts

Carter, Reogan and Anderson dropped by this week. Sorry Ihey missed you.

You are what you eat, but do you wont to be MSG?

Page 3

Page 7

and crafts, finding the delinquent juveniles less artistically trained but more creative. Spellman said foreign students are encouraged to come and speak about their country and culture; and any kind of musical entertainment is appreciated by the kids. People with clerical skills can get experience and a good feeling from volunteering. Students interested in science or computers are asked to share their knowledge and enthusiasm with the juveniles. A beauty and barber shop provides another avenue for volunteers to demonstrate their skills. Law students can help prepare cases, help plea bargain or aid a probation officer. Some volunteers help in treatment skill which includes videotaping and role playing. "iike how to say 'no' when your friends say 'Let's rob a store,' . . said SpeUman. Medical students can learn by giving sight and hearing tests, taking medical histories, teaching oral hygiene and talking one to one with the residents. It's this first-hand experience, Spellman said, which often makes the difference when applying for a job. The hail is eager to give recommendation letters to its volunteers. .. A degree often means little to employers. The job market is such that without practical experience you aren't likely to get hired. "The kids look up to, appreciate and sometimes confide in the volUnteers. They know the volunteers are here because they want to be," said Spollman. "We can never have enough volunteers." Spellman said . Students or anyone else interested in volunteer work or in just seeing the 1 1 .6 acre facilities are invited to a tour and orientation Oct. 16at 7 p.m.

Alum Zomberlin visits Northwest on "business trip. ,.

Pag8 1 3


Age 2, Mooring Mast, September 26, 1980

Three vie today for two ASPLU senator spots

Po l i t i c s o n c a m p u s Students are taking an a ctive part balloons and other materials

By Kelly Allea College students are taking an active part in this year's election campaigns - and PlU students arc no e.'tccption. The most popular movement seems to be the Anderson-Lucey U n i t y campaign. Marci Ameluxen, co-coordinator or the campus campaign drive, said the first two interest meetings brought a lot or support. "We will be canvassing the precincts in Pierce County on five consecutive weekends in October," said Ameluxen. "and on Tuesday and Wednesday nights we will Tacoma work at the headquarters making phone calls to supporters ror campaign donations." They hol>t to set up a table outside the UC and CC al dinner to sell butlons, stickers,

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Gorton. Baldwin said they hope to work closely with the Pierce R e p u b l ican County headquarters and organize more rorums to discuss the campaign isssues. ASPLU will sponsor a debate between the candidates ror State Attorney General, Oct. 28 at 7:30 p.m. Democrat

Voter registration deadline ror the General election is Oct. 4 and can be done in the UC Scheduling Orfice. Out-or­ stale students who wish to vote in Washington must make some special arrangements or send ror an absentee ballot ir they plan (0 vote in their home state.

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Andy Baldwin, spokesman ror the Young Republicans, said their organization Is trying to make students aware or the issues or the state, local and national campaigns. They hope to sponsor an appearance by Republican senatorial hoperul, Slade

John Miller and Republican Ken Eikenberry have agreed to apptar. P,omlst Them Ally/hillg, a film that rollows election campaigns rrom Rooseyelt through Carter will be pre:5Cnted Sept. 30 by lecturer and mroia critic James Hall. Admission is rree to students. The event is sponsored by ASPlU and they hope to have campaign inrormation and Voter registration tables set up berore, during and arter the presentation.

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to raise money ror the c a m p a i g n . Congressman Anderson is also expected to make at least one more appurance in the state berore the Nov. 4 election and they hope to attend that event.

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Today in the Administration Building, the UC and the CC, it is ASPlU election time. It s i not the usual practice ror ASPlU senator elections to be held in the rail. Traditionally all ASPLU senators are voted into office the preceding year, and have the summer to prepare ror their upcoming term or office. Last year nine ptople were chosen by the PLU student body to be their legislative representatives ror this 198081 school year, but two or those elected-Brad Seeborg and Wayne Heaslon-chose not to return to PLU. There are now three candidates vying ror the two positions: • Paul Jackson is a junior looking ror the experience or being an ASPLU senator. He reels that he could work well with people, and that this is an important ractor in his campaign. His main concerns are energy and conservation. "With publicity, questionnaires, and maybe an 'energy tip or the week' I'd like to make PLU students more aware," he said. Jackson is on PlU's Energy Committee and though his only experience as a leader has been as a church youth group counselor, he s i enthusiastic. "I do well 2: t what I do," he said. "People who know me realize this." .Marla Marvin was an active high school student, and now as a PLU sophomore, she would again like to be inyolved.

Marvin's experience in high school included being National Honor Society secretary. class president ror three years, ASB president in her senior year, as well as being involved in cheerleadina and Pep Club. The primary reason ror these activities and ror her present candidacy, she said,is her rondness ror other people. '" like to be involyed in people's lives-not just (0 say 'hi' on the street t!!{ to get in there and work with them," she said. Fun and to gain experience are two or her goals. "As a senator, I wouldn't be able to change everything, but I do like to get things done. I don't like to do an average job." .George Pender s i a new student to PLU, but he is not new to student politics. He attended Tacoma Community College ror two years and was a senator, representative, a peer counselor, a student government chairman on the Evaluation Committee, and the Orricial Registrar o r Voters. Pender reels that experience is his prime advantage. "To be an errective representative not only requires the ability to listen to the concerns or the students, it also requires knowledge or the legislative process, " he said.

"I am not a candidate or spetial interest groups. My only sp«:iaJ interest is you," he said. .Two other candidates turned 10 petitions thiS ""eek. Theresa Murton and Matt Patterson were unavailable ror comment at press time.

Regents study plans The Board or Regents met Sept. 14, I S , and 16 at Port Ludlow to study ruture architecturaJ enrollment, plans ror the fine artS .racility and the capital campaign . They also heard a report on the 1979·80 audit or the University. According to the president's memorandum, reporting on the meeting, the regents spent all day Monday discussing and hearing presentations on the topic "The Student 11.5 Nexus: Tomorrow's Student" (nexus means 'bond' or 'link'). The regent� heard reporters on "Admissions Strategies rOr the '80s," "Mar�eting PlU" and "Anticipatina Tomor­ row's Stud liS" from yariou administrators. PredlctlRg future enroll­ mem continues to be a prob­ lem ror PLU. as was stated by President Rieke in a Mo.st article last week.

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The regents reviewed a slide presentation and a model ror the fine 3ns racility. The presentation was provided by Perkins and Will, the architectural firm appointed to design the racility. The regents reviewed the general model and structural plans. Detailed planning and study of the construction will continue. Accordl!1i to the memorandum, the 'Shanng in Strength' capital rund drive. is IIOW in ilS twentieth month and i, 53.8 million closer to the S I6.S million loai. Rieke �aid that the S8 mIllion mark will be reached halfway through. or 30 months IOta the: campaign Besides the: regular s:irt� and pledges, the recently.laun hed Lutheran hurch of America IS expected to campaign provide more: income ror the dnye. . The 1979-80 audit sho....ed that the University concluded the year in the blael.. , and with a stable Imancial condition. The regents will meet again :)0 Monday, . ov 17 on :ampus ......

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September 26. 1980 Mooring Mast. Page 3 .

.. m'lor pre" d.ntl., c.ndld.f•• m.d. swings through the Th. thr Pug.' Soun,' ar•• within the 'u' 'wo wNk., 'nd.pend.nt c.ndld.,. John And.raon outlined hi• •n.rgy poncy .t • n.w. cont.tence In T.com. ''''y ,.., w.ak. Pr." d'nt Jimmy C.rt" breez.d through on • 'hrH-hour whlrl·wlnd .'op In T.com., Tuesd.y. During hi. brl.t 51.y h• •ddressed Imploy••• • t • ""'n.,,, '''.nd.d , $500 • pl.,. rec.ptlon for 'h. N.tlon.' O.moc"l/c party, �/.".d hi' c.mp" gn h••dquart.rs In T,com• •nd ,1.It.d fh. S.n/or C.n'". R.pubnc.n c.ndld.,. Ron.ld RN".n stopped by long .nough to rll'" • sm.II ."..ch In be.utltul downtown Tulew"'. on Thund.y_ Th.ra WIS no raport on th., .pe.ch ".fora prest I/mas ,hi. ",..k. Th. MAST pl.n. to run mar. CO"." ". 0' .h. pre.,dlntlll c.ndld.,as In upcoming '..U.L

Carter dampens M ast rep orters' sp i rits 8,. Kalhlft. M. Hosfeld The tJl:citement beaan Tuesday afternoon \o1then Orca Lehman, Mast photographer. came up 10 the ornee to tilt i( " .d like to see Presidenl Caner arrive' al McChord. After all. it was Ihe fint lime 5.in« John Kennedy', trip in 1963 that a president had visited "semi­ KCnic" downtown Tacoma. "Sure'" I said. W\! (l.n 10 mm. shonly btfore anRtt! four. Whik v.t ....cre talkins. Erik Allen. Sa�Q editor, and Petra Rowe, Masl (ealures editor asked if they could go 100. We piled inlo Lehman's car and crulSCd down to the air forte base. The road was lined y,.ilh people SlUing on lOp of Ihrir ca.n W1lIlinI; (or the plane 10 land. We checked our ...._,chts; . it was ,,:10 and the pre,SldeRt was supposed to came al 4:25, Lchman nL!.hed his air force identificali.m at Ihe Illlc and we were waved Ihrough. No search; 1 s.iahed with rdicf. " Now, Lord, pluse jWl ad. us past the ,ecret service Ihups" I prayed because I had no special press idemification nor did Rowe, or Allen. We parked the c r and 51l\rled walking toward the field. Our mood and walks said, "Hi, we're journalists," The white and blue plane was �TI.:hed on the runway wilh it"i doors open. ' " wonder how close we'll Itt to him," ' thought.

" Too bad v.e don't all have scerel JerVice clearance " 1 said, We waJked to the fronl door of tbe terminal and approached the guard who was screening visitors. see "Can identification, please?"

your

Lehman shov.ed his military identification card, so did Allen. ROwe and I looked at each other. "We'll wait outside," she said. "Arc they �i lh you?" the ,uard asital Lehman. " They can go In with you," That WM easy, we thought. Our ho� revived and we walked bri5kly through the terminal. We approached anOlhtr screming &lalioD and wtre suddenly av.'arc. of a great outflwt of pmple f,(lm the terminal. There was no �iln of the president. The woman at the screemnl stalion looked at u.s mildly and informed us thai the president had arrived about 10 minutes earlier. Ir she had asked wbich college we were from 1 was loing tosay "UPS." We exchanged disappointed &lances, somebody shot a half­ hearted picture of the KOMO news team and we headed out the door. As we were walking across the Irass Allen said quietly, "Well. lhat decides nte .. .J'm not '1oung ror him. He Isn'( punctual. "

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Page 4. Mooring Mast. September 26, 1980

F i n a n c i a l sem i n ar fo r wo m e n s l ated for n ext week 8,. Sin Andersen Beginning Oct. 2 a Financial Planning Seminar for Women will be held here. The seminar .. ill take place e\'ery Thursday from 9 a.m. until noon for six weeks. Ed Larson. PlU director of spetial giving programs. said thai while men are welcome to attend the seminars, Ihey were geared toward programs uniquely felt by women.

Larson said that the' main purposes of the seminars arc 10 show women the need for financial planning and why il affects them especially. "More and more women are becoming concerned about financial s i sues. We realize we'll only scratch the surface. but we hope they'll become interested in certain topics and investigate them further." The first session will be mainly to set goal for financial

planning. other sessions will include discussions on taxes, probate, wills, and community property agreements, trusts, in\'cstments, and insurance. In the session on truSts, Larson will be working with Doris Warner, a trUSt officer at Puget Sound National Bank. Warner will discuss trusts in general and Larson wi! be talking about charitable trusts. Is such a seminar for your?

"Certain phases of the seminar would apply to all women," said Larson, "and other parts would apply 10 those who have a certain amount of accumulated assets. " There is an S I 8 fee which covers the costs of runnin, the seminar (such as advertising), a book to be used throughout the se.ssions and estate planning materials. Larson

said

that

speakers, all professionals in their fields are conlributing their own time as a public service to educate women in certain areas of finance. Although geared mainly to the community, one PLU professor and one student have signed up. Today is the last day for registration and more information can be obtained by calling the PLU Estate Plannin 8 office at 383-

7420.

the

ASPLU streSS i n g services and i m p roved rel at io n s w i t h R H C Stressins servkes as a priority this year, ASPLU president Bob Gomulkiewicz has started working o n prOjects thai include betler o ut reach , community improved RHC-ASPLU re­ lations, and communication tics between students lind the Board of Regents. ASPLU is emphasiZing its KrVlces thiS year, especially those to off-campu� students, accordins to Gomulkiewicz;. All off<ampus students have the' use of a fret day care service provided by the student government. Gomul�iewlcz has stressed community outreach as a way of overcoming the campus alienation Ihat can occur at a small private school. Brendan Mangan and Judy Moore, two ASPLU senators are presently working on a project that would bring Washington's gubernatorial candidates to PLU to speak. "There's a chance that we will also get Senator Warren Magnuson," Gomulkiewicz said. RHC-ASPLU

relations.

which were uneasy last year due to personality connicts among student leaders, have imprOVed this year, according to Gomulkiewicz. The two groups have formed an intramurals board that consists of members for both organizations. "We're researching areas where we can \\Iork together said RHC," with Gomulkiewicz, "and I think this intramural board is a good start. " GomuUdewicz bdie\<cs more Christian activities can be put forward. One step is the " Maranatha Christ ian Coffeehouse" performances which are held every Saturday Cnve. the in night "Maranatha" performs what can best be described as Christian folk music in a very relaxed atmosphere. A soal of ASPLU is to improve communication ties between students and the Board of Resents. "We brought this issue up at our recent mtttins with the board, " said Gomulkiewicz. Rather than creating issues of their own. ASPLU will often ha\'e 10 deal with issues as they come up in an effort to

help the student body. . . A problem with married student housina came up this fall, and we stepped in to help sive the students a voice in the mauer," he said. Gomulkiewicz also believes

that student lovernment can play a big role in this November's election by pro­ viding information about the candidates to students.

"Back in the '60s some student governments were very

radical in trying to force their views on the student body. We are simply trying to provide information to the students and motivate them to make their o�n deCisions on a conscious level," he added.

Focus prem iers Thu rsday n ight By K.rlJdn K.den The premiere of Foe-u.s, PLU's t levi�ion masaz.ine, is scheduled to air on campus Thursday at 6 p.m. 011 channel 2. The bi-monthly show features sports highliShlS, entertainment segments, album and movie reviews and giveaways, as well as campus news. Last year's show was run by trial-and--trror. Ulid executive producer David Anderson. A few people did most of the work, he said. Anderson and co-host Darcie Pickens did everything form honing and making to producing assignments and editing. "The higher quality that we hope to achieve this year will

be due 10 more siaff members f and a greater divj)lon work," said Anderson. "There', lots of potential in the upper echelon of the staff," he said, referring to co· news directors Kathy McCor­ mick and Cmdy Kloth. " They have a great deal of on-camera reporting experiences and are really on the ball." _

McCormick feels more student-involved stories will create a larger viewing audience. "Because it's an election year, we hope to concentrate on not only PlU student elections but state and local happenings," said McCormick. Focus as a visual media, has a grealer chance to be more creative and innovative than, say, a newspaper. We hope to concentrate on special features of interest to students that are found right on campus," She McCormick said. emphasized special bi.momhly SC'Smenti concerning outdoor

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call Mark Mandl

Thursday N ights 6:00 p.m. on Channel 2

535-3087

recreation as a part of those attractions. " The sho.. will be faster­ paced with more Stories and of album return the giveaways," Anderson said. "We also hope to step up our publicity and promotion department-an important part of Focus that was over­ looked last year in our struggle to keep the program above ground. " The staff was te'rmed "encouraging and enthusi­ astic" by Anderson, who added that experienced re­ porters were still lacking. "Each show we hope to see improvement, culminating in a final production that should be absolutely top-notch," he said. First year PLU staffer Chris LaBeau, advisor for the program, expressed excitemenl in working with the students, especially in the evaluation! cntiquing process. , . A crew ....orking . on any TV production must act as a team, cooptnltin, �ith every olh� member. I am loin. to expect lhe �tudent<. to Slay �ithin production standard� by workinS spetific. houn each week and completjllK stories wilhm de.adlinb. If an)' of the coopuation breai.:s down, the whole leam )uffers." she said LaBeau nOled that her posllion IS adVisory and she Will nOI sttp IR unless Jlroblems occur.

T H I S W E E K I N TH E CA' I E ! M O N DAY· This week's special guest Is

Jari Stentz with Juraon Krust and his jazz band.

NEWS SPORTS ALBUM G IVEAWAY CAMPUS ACTIVITIES CONTESTS AND MUCH, M U CH M O R E

WED N ESDAY·

Steve and Maureen

sweet old time vocals, guitar , banjo, fiddle THURSDAY-

Movie!

The world of Suzy Wong (8 love story)

Brin g I n this ad and get a coke V. prlcb Good from Fr iday, Sept. 26, until Wednesday, October 1 .


September 26, 1980, Mooring Mast. Page S

I n vest i g at i o n s i n to p ra n k f i re a l a r m s co nt i n u i n g 8y Sandy Williams Investigati ons into the prank fire alarms pulled lasl week in Tingelstad and Plueger halls arc continuing. reported officials from the Pierce County Fire Prevention Departmen t. Sherri Ewing. Tingelstad Coordinator, and Jim Bies. Pflueger hall director are t questioning students in their dorms and are expected 10 have some information by this weekend, said Rick Allen, Director of Residential Life. Further investigation into the pranks will be conducted by John Burgess of the Fire Department . "If the pranks were pulled with malicious intents, which I frankly doubt, the fire department will prosecute," Allen said. No matter what happens the pranksters, if caught, will be brought before PLU's judicial peer review board. According to Allen the fire department is understanding of routine collese fun to a

point. "We do not want to see it get out of hand. tt Allen said. "The department is reluctant to prosecute but PLU students could nol be treated any differently from other citizens." Burgess was on campus Wednesday. Sept. 17, follow· ing the Tingelstad and Pflueger alarms. He was Iroubled by dangerous hazards such as water in the center stairways of Tingelstad, and a can of turpentine left in a Pflueger hallway. The pranks are also causinR: animosity among local residents, Burgess said. Since PLU does not pay taxes. the prank alarms drain the county fire department's money sources. the strain of which ultimalely falls on local taxpayers, he said. Contrary to rumor, which is "going around like wildfire." according to Allen. PlU docs not have pay for the equipment and manpower brought on campus by the false aJarms.

A 'self sufficient' organiza tion

R H C f u n d ed by p o p m ac h i nes, refrigerator re ntals By Unda Grippln Have you wondered what happens to the 30 cents you spend for a Coke or where Ihe S 1 8 or S21 go that you have to pay to rent a refrigerator? Residence Hall Council (RHC) is funded by such projects as refrigerator rentals, audio equipment renlals and a percentage of the Coke machine profits. RHC's proposed 198()..81 operating budget is SI4.4S0. RHC, unlike ASPLU, receives no money from student tuition and therefore is "self-sufficient," according to Kim Tucker, RAC chairperson. "RHC is around to make living in the residence halls a better place for people," Tucker said. RHC also coordinated activities and heightens communication between dorms. Most of the money goes for dorm improvements and activities. R H C is formed of six elected officials (colJeetively receiving ft salary totaling S3,400), Rick Allen of Res(J.iential Life (RHC advisor) and all the dorm presidents. One of their major functions is to coordinate teh selling of things on campus. Any group that wishes to sell something on campus goes through RHC channels to get such selling approved. This makes it possible for groups to earn money without hindering others and themselves. In the past. RAC has dealt with possible adjustments in the alcohol and visitation policies. At the end of last year these issues were ·cooled when a questionnaire was sent to the parents. asking their opinion on such issues. Also last year RHC instigated the investigation into the old security system, which resuhed in the firing of many people and the forming 5>f a new office caHed Campus

Safety and Information. headed by Kjp Fillmore. Some changes which are being talked about this year are such things as getting Park Avenue House and Evergreen Court represented at RHC meetings.

RHC is attempting to change the way in which refrigerators are rented. The new system would involve a lottery so that everyone has an equal chance to get one and no one has to wait in line for four

hours only to leave without a refrigerator. RHC meetings are held on Sunday evenings at 6 p.m. in UC 214. These meetings are

open 10 all interested students and anyone can be put on the

agenda by talking to the chairperson before the meeting. Anyone attending can stale the i$Sue but has no voting privileges since these arc reserved for the dorm presidents and the elected officials.

'Sharing i n Strength' at $3.8 m i l l ion mark 8y S.ndy WIlliams

At the 20-month point of the PlU "Sharing in Strength" capital fund-raising campaign $3.8 million dollars in cash and pledges have been raised. it was reponed at the recent regents meeting. The "Sharing in Strength" campaign seeks to raise 116.� million for new science and fine arts facilities and scholarship and endowment funds. PlU recently received a S300,OOO bequest from the Hilda Mrs. estate of Schumacher. a former Spokane resident who died l8.!lt July. The gift came in the form of a half-interest in a 372-acre

farm in Whitman County. PlU and its co·recipient. Spokane's Whitworth College, hope to sell the farm within the next few months. at the appraised price of S300,OOO, according to Presg:!ent William O. Ricke. Located in Oakszale, halfway between Spokane and Pullman, the farm lies on "good eastern Washington wheat land," Rieke said. Schumacher's trust was established stveral year ago. Before her death she gave regularly to PLU's annual fund though she had no other connection with PLU. according to Rieke. The six-acre American Lake estate of the late Charles Ingram which was bequeathed

to PLU upon Ingram's death last year has also been sold. a top Ingram, Weyerhaeuser executive and a PLU benefactor, previously had donated funds for building the Aida Ingram Lecture HaJl, a part of the art and nursing complex . · His wife's interest was in nursing. The Ingram estate, built in 1920, is described as "one of the nicest on the lake" by its new owner, Gary Gonter, president of Gonter's Music City and a chain of five other music and commercial sound stores in the Tacoma-Seattle area. The estate was the largest bequest ever received by PLU. lts sale price was around

S700,OOO . It went on the market in mid-summer. This year's campaign goal is "10 broaden the base of the people who can give SS· 10,000, " Rieke said. "I think it's quite possible in today's world to find people capable of and willing to pledge S.500.OO0," Rieke added. "It's simply a matter of time and effort. t' Other donations received within the past nine months include two pledges of SIOO,OOO and one cash gift of S7S,OOO. Some property and buildings in Sumas near Bellingham worth from $60100,000 have been donated by a PLU regent.

'Sex Roles and M e ntal H ea l t h ' to p i c of lect u re By Brian Laubach Dennis Deaton of the Crisi! in Intervention Center Tacoma will be speaking on" Sex Roles and Mental Health" on Sept. 29 for the second lecture of the Brown Bag Series. According to Deaton it will be a discussion of how society reacts to women or men who are 10 mental distress and how we naturaJly categorize men and women with mental disorders by their seJ[. If a woman acts violently sbe is automatically considered to

have a disorder, but if a man acts in the same manner he is JUSt "upset". When a man cries it is assumed he has a disorder, but it is just the opposite with a woman. The I«ture is to "inform us how to look Dt people without sex role bias. " Dt:aton said mental disorder or neurosis encompas.�es 2()..JQ percent of our population. Of that group 21 percent arc women and 9.8 percent arC' men. Those who are under 20 years old make up 7 perceD! and those who are between the ages of 21 and 30 make up the

largest percentage 01 neurotics. 33 percent. One ironic feature of the percentage of men vs. women is the suicide rate. Men commit suicide three times more successfully than women, although women attempt suicide more often. According to Dt:aton this is so because men are more destructive their to surroundings while women are more self-destructive. Deaton received his B.A. in psychology at St. Martin's College in Olympia and is currently finiShing his

Master'S in Human Pelations this fall at PlU. He is presently employed at the Crisis Intervention Clinic, where he has been an emergency services counselor for four years. Deaton hai worked with children and family connicts. psychotics and suicidal persons. Kathleen Blumhage.n, a teacher at PlU. influenced Deaton to research sex roles and mental health after taking her class on sex roles. The IC(''1ure wiU be from noon to I in UC I3S. Bring your lunch.


Page 6, Mooring Mast, September 26, 1 980

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H i st o r i a n w ri t e s o f P LU By Kelly Allea He bursts through the door of Monvedl library a.'i I f he owns the place, notebooks in hand. Almost automatically he races toward the exhibit on the main noor which displays his writings, books, and pictures about lute Jentad. PlU graduate, who climbed to the top or Mount E...erest. After brier rormalities, he begms a machine--gun deli...ery of raw and anecdotes that would cause a stenographer to ha'\le writer's cramp. He s i John D, McCallum, author of 3 1 books and, as he calls himself, the number one: sports historian. He followed Jerstad to Katmandu, Nepal on the first part of the tTlP and has recordings of their convenation at 26.000 reet. McCallum said Jerstad agreed to do a book if Jerslad came

back ali...e . He did, Dnd McCallu m presented the manuscripts and sou...enirs to PLU. McCaJlum spent three years State Washington at University and one year at New York University. where he graduated with a B.A. in English Journalism. He returned to his hometown Tacoma and worked for the old Tacoma Times as the only spons writer assigned to cover Pacific lutheran College sports in 1947. He later returned to Ne:w York to work as a columnist for the NEA newspaper syndicate. "When I was in New York, someone asked me what was the most excitinl game I had seen was," McCallum said. " I told them there were two. One was in 1947 when Pacific lutheran College went undefeated to the Pear Bowl

,amc, They played another undefeated team. Southern Orq.on Normal. The teams were made up of World War [[ veterans who were getting their education on the 01 Bill and it wasn't unusual to see a 27-year-old plaYing football." PlC won that game 27 to 21 The second game also involved PLC and included the "Marvelous Mans." Marv Harshman, now head basketball coach at the University or Washington, • nd Mar... Tommervik. who s i active in PlU's Q-Club, were both AII·American football players for PLC in 1 94 1 . "PlC was rankd 24th along with Notre Dame and Oklahoma on college football," said McCallum. "There were 177 students at I PLC at the time. t McCallum remembers what he calls " s rich history" of sports at PlU. He remembers

when major newspapers would demand coverage or PlU football games. "The New York Times used to have 2SO words wired to them after Cl'ery PLC game," said McCaUum, "and the Los. Angeles Times carne up to cover the Pear Bawl aame In '47." McCaUum is now in the process. of wrilin, a complete history of college football in Ihe United Stales. He hal planned fi...e volumes and the fourth will be out in about two weeks. Each volume takes about 1 2 months, he said, McCallum has done books on boxing, college basketball, and did a biography of baseball great Ty Cobb, called rile Tiger Wore Spikes. He also has two more projects planned after his last ...olume of the football series. '" used to say I'd quit at 30 (books) but I slill ha...e 15 or 20 books left in me, I t said McCallum. "" II keep writing until my 70s. I never plan to retire. " McCallum describes writin, as " pure sweat." " A friend of mine once told me that one hour at the typewriter is equal 10 eight hours of hard labor," he said, "I spend five hours a day writing and do m y research at night." The historical, non-fiction writing that McCallum does requires an enormous amount of research and a lot of time in libraries. "When I was in school. you couldn't drag me into a library; now I almost live in them." he said. McCallum begins at 9 a.m. with a light breakrast and then enters his "dungeon" : a room with a collection of his papers. books and writing materials. He breaks for a cup of tea, something he learned from Ty Cobb to enjoy, Then he's back to work for three more hours. To loosen up he "fanleks" around the PlU golf course, He learned fartleking (a

combination of jogging and walking) from the coach of Swedish Olympic uack coach when he covered the Olympics in 1 948 . McCallum says that two· mile \tretch help� him dear his mind every day. He then returns home and reads four different newspapers, along with Newsweek and Time. each week . Dinner is relaxing since he says he's learned to cook some "fancy things." Arter dinner. more reading and research until the early morning houn, McCallum was married to a movie actress who died in the early 60s, He hasn', remarried and says he probably won't. , "Writing is a selfish way of life, I admit it," he said, "It's the hardest profession I know but I've made it pay ofr. I've had to give up a lot to get to be the number one spans hjstorian. " McCallum says he feels ready to pack it up every day but he wouldn't do anything else. "I'\,e made up my mind to bve out my life in the world of books," he said, "When 1 get emotional and I lau&h or cry at what I'm writing. 1 know I· ...e done it." " Wrhing is the last of the gentle professions. My publi�ber once told me, "John, we may not make a lot or money at this, but at least I we are an honest proression. t Actually McCallum makes a good living at writing, His last book earned him 530,000 in three weeks just in sales , McCallum compiled the first hair or hiS life in a book entitled Going Their Way in 1969. It's never beetl published he has and received threatening phone calls telling him what might happen to him if it ever were. McCallum may someday fill another his of book memorable experiences, but said. "The beSt stories arc those you ne...er write. I t

N ew p ro f t o d i rect ' H a rvey' By Grq Lc!hmln Dirmor leis Olson is doing what she loves to do-teaChing and directinl theatre. The opponunity came when Dr. William Be\:var took his sabbatical leave, and she was hired as his replacement. For this one-year posllion, Olson la...e up a manaaeriaJ position at Frederick and Nelson Slorts, where �he was "moving up in the company very quickly." She won't go back, she said, "I'm a college teacher, I'm involved in the arts. That's my career " Her carter ha� its roots in her New York City childhood. "I've betn in...olved in the aru -since I was four years old, my entenainana In arandmother's Jewish re)OM hotel In lakewood, ew Jersey. J used 10 sin, and play the piano, and the luals used to lhrow money at me. They thouaht il wu real cUle--l was very obnoJ[ious and precocious," Olron wen! on to study mu�ic under Prince� Elana Von Kransky from the Julliard School of Mu,ic, Un!i1 the ale of 1 7 she: wanu�d to �ome "a

concert pianist and lor an opera singer, " but this dream ga...e: way to the theatre. Olson ..ays she hasn't touched a piano since. Her parents began to take her to Broad\\ay productions in New York City every weekend. Olson said she considers herself very lucky to have grown up SO near to 5uch fine theatre. "I didn'l know if I would b( in the ir I had not grovM up in a metropolitan area like that ," she said. She became heavily involved in summer $lock. community and university theauc. She received her bachelor's degree rrom Nonhwestern and a master of fine from the University of Ulah. . Olson said her main involvement is directlnl, although she docs have e:xperience in most other 85pea.5 of theatre (includina a stint as stage manager for the Utah opera company). She believes di ...ersity is important and said, " I n e:ducaLional theatre you nem to know more Ihan jU$1 one facet, and thai's what I try to Dromote. Act in one $how,

arts

a.ru

build sets on another. That's the way you're gonna learn. " This year she will be directing "Harvey" and "A Delicate Balance," According to Olson "Harvey" is Ihe "story about the six·foot rabbit (hat Jimmy Stewart made so popular. " " " m very conctrned about the role of women in theatTe," she said. alluding to the "substantial" female rol� in "Harvey," " I don't think enough plays ",rhlen with good roles ror women. It's one of my main causes. " Olson is teaching theatre history and special problems in theatre where the emphasis is on ...oiet and movement. "I "all very fonunate to lotudy with Kristen Linkleuer who is one of the leading voice teachen in the world, I t she said. "Her technique is onc that utilizes the natural \'OIce rather than "putting on" a voice for the �tage'" She nplained this is done through relieving tensiora in the actor's body. AiXording to Olson, her ...oice and movement class will observe a ...ery "loose" &rOup

are

.

Olson n,W'" . Ir• • • rud.n, to do .nythlng sh. wouldn't

do hernl',

of people. " I enjoy myselr when I teach, and 1 want my �tudenlS to enjoy thenuelvcs when they learn," she said. "I'U never a.sk a student to do anything that 1 do not do my&CIf, " she said, but. as she admits. Ol�on wlll do almost anything. For th� future, Olson would

be perfectly happy doina what she's dolns now. "I'd like IQ remain an educator, and I would like to remain a director. I'm open to JUSt about e...erythlOg as 10n& as 1 can work in theatre, and "make enough money to pay (hI' rent "


September 26, 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 7

F ac u l ty s h ow By Mllren J. Oppell Perhaps the best kept s�ret so far this semester is the faculty art show in the Wekell Gallery in Ingram Hall. I viewed the show last week, and while it isn't what it's been in past years, it's still an excellent show. Part of the reason for the sparseness is that some faculty members had works previously committed to other shows. and therefore couldn't put their top-of­ the-line works in thIs show; however, the show is still worth viewing. The purpose of the faculty art show is to acquaint PLU students with faculty work. The show gives students an idea of what can be expected in class. and the level of accomplishment, for which one can strive. Much of what is on view is aggressive and avant garde. Artists love to experiment with techniques and ideas, and they should, for that is what art is all about. Many people consider art to be a statement of the times, others consider it to

be simply what the artisl wants to do. I think Dennis Cox, printmaking professor at PLU said it best, "Art is

p a r t i c u l a r l y S l u de n t s , towards art. While plays and concerts are generally considered "enlert�in_ ment," art shows demand effort from the viewer. However, if one is willing to pUt in the effort demanded, the gain in knowledge can be great. Through art we are exposed to new ideas and new ways of approaching age·old subjects. We must (and I include myself) become willing to ut in that effort so that we can grow and be continually challenged by the fine arts as a whole. The ga1lery is located in Ingram Hall (ne)l[t to Ordal Hall on upper campus) and is open from 8 10 5 , Monday through Friday. This show will run through Oct. 3.

p

the search for individual interpretations. " One is convinctd of this when viewing an art show, movie, play, or concert. The faculty art show is an opportunity to see several people's interpretations of their search. of Many these interpretations are quite unique. The photographs of Schwidder's Ernst "Eccliastical Environ­

ments" show the true beauty of his sculptures. These environments have been created for every denomination from Lutheran to Mennonite and are beautiful renections of Christian theology

expressed through art. Dennis Cox has " Mixed Media Life Drawings" on exhibit that make one appreciate the variety of shapes that humans come in, Carolyn Adams' "Oil on Paper" paintings are interesting. The two dogs leaping at each other's throats leap out at the viewer too. Tom Torrens is showing a series of "bells" and a Gong" Ihat would get the attention of even the most defiant child at dinnertime, David Keyes' ceramics They are fascinating. brought to my mind the fairy tales and legends of

the Scandinavian countries; however, every person's viewing will di ffer i n interpretation. There are two types of photographs on display, There are photographs using a variety ?f lenses and shooting techniques by George Elwell, and gorgeous photo prints by George Roskos. Pay particular attention to "Emergence" ; it's truly beautiful. The shows at the gallery in Ingram Hall get very little public exposure. This is attributable to the location of the gallery. Another reason is the apathy of the public,

In other Fine Arts news: scripts are now available for from check-out the

Communication Arts Office for tbe drama department's second fall show. " Harvey" is the delightful story of Elwood P. Dowd and his best friend, a six-foot, invisible (to us) white rabbit named Harvey. Auditions are scheduled for Oct. 2 1 and 22 from 7 to 10 p.m. on the Eastvold Stage.

Be i n g a smart eater i s to b e a n ed u cated c o n s u m e r By Amy Blakt Eating consumes approx­ imately three hours of a person's day and an increasing amount of his attention as he worries about what to eat and how it will affect him. Trying to discriminate between fact and fiction in the

myriad of nutrition books and publications is difficult but necessary, The government, always trying to have the last word, has recently published information on nutrition which meat discusses additives, meat from animals fed antibiotics, sources of

food poisoning and health foods. According to the FDA, meat additives such as tenderizers are made from an enzyme found in the papaya fruit which is called papain.

This enzyme is destroyed by

heat when meat is cooked. It's not dangerous because we

don't ingest it. Monosodium glutamate (MSG), another additive, is also listed as safe, but the consumer report cautioned that MSG can be dangerous to certain individuals who have a low tolerance of the chemical. The FDA reports that MSG is safe only when used in small amounts. Both the additives BHA and BHT are on interim status with the FDA pending further investigation. The FDA raises the question of the saftty of antibiotics which are fed to livestock to promote fast growth and prevent disease. The report reveals the danger of bacterial resistance which can occur when people eat the animals who have been fed antibiotics. the ingested, When antibiotics allow bacteria to build up a resistance to them. There are strains of typhoid childhood and fever meningitis caused by bacteria that are resistant to two commonly-used antibiotics. People who work around livestock that are fed antibiotics carry a greater­ than-normal number of resistance to bacteria i n their bodies. The FDA also described major sources of food poisoning and how to avoid them, The sources are bacteria carried on human hands and animals, bacteria which grows in food at room temperature and in raw meat. To avoid food poisoning. wash hands before handling or

eating food, keep pets away from food. thaw meat in the refrigerator, put leftovers in the refrigerator right away and wash cutting board and knife after cutting meat. Many people don't trust supermarket food, so they turn to health food stores for "safe" food and figure that it is worth the extra cost to eat heahhfully. But the FDA warns that since health food slore proprietors can charge more for the specialty food, people go into business only to make money; they have no regard for the quality of food they are selling. No one is safe. There are many food myths, said the FDA. One of the more common is that the more vitamins one eats the more healthy one will be. Our systems do need vitamins but according to the FDA, excess vitamins are either sloughed off by the body or are stored, building up sometimes to dangerous levels. The most hea1thy way to eat is to be as informed as possible, according to the report. It is important to know the ingredients and additives in foods, to know the safety ratings of different foods and their additives and to remember that the less known about a substance the more risky it is, People should eat a variety of foods in moderation. avoiding too much fat, saturated fat, cholesterol. sugar, salt and alcohol, while being sure to include fiber and starch in the diet.


Page 8, Mooring Mast, September 26, 1980

E LSEWHE RE Vo l ca n i c as h b l a n ke t s east e rn c o l l e g es 8y Steve Pallller (CPS)- The Yakima Valley Junior College football team is holding its preseason drills in sand this year. The practice is unusual because YV JC is at least 125 miles from any ocean beach. That sand, t:IIplains college Admissions Coordinator Bob Chauvin, is the last remaining two inches of volcanic ash that stilled on the valley after the May 1 8 eruption of Mt. St. Helens. But there are other, less physical remains of the mountain and its five College eruptions. subsequent administrators throughout eastern Washington are worried that students won't show up when classes in the region start again the third week of September. A large number of no­ shows would obviously have a significant impact on the institutions' finances. "So far," says Stan Berry, dean of admissions at Washington State University, " we've only had a minor number of cancellations over previous years, only about 100. If we're reaJistic, though. I'm sure there will be others we will never hear from again." The WSU campus, he rtmembert, accumulated a half·inch of ash from the May 1 8 eruption, which has been the largtst .so f.r. He says a few students lefl the campus before commencement for health reasons. They may nOI return because of media coverage, he adds. "There has been a good deal or Inaccuracy nationally about the effects or the volcano. " Indeed, Miyon Yonemoto, an

admissions officer at Whitman College on the Washington-Oregon border, says she has been geuina fretful leuers asking how thick the ash is. "A lot of them don't believe me when 1 tell them we were 20 miles south of any of it," she says. "A few of them are convinced that the whole state is buried." Stan Berry adds that answering queries from students and parents can

be tricky. He says that while WSU has been answering questions about ash honestly, the university seeks to keep a low profile for the sake of its recruiting programs. Yet some area administrators Set some advantage to the notoriety. Dr. Jim Papas, Central Washington University's admissions dean, reports CWU's summer and fall enrollments ha\'e increased. over last year.

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" A few 0 1 our applicants are calling - not nearly as many as we expected and some of them are very eager to .sec the ash. I'm afraid they're going to be pretty disappointed when they find they can't find any to scoop up in a boule and send home," Pappas says. The May 1 8 eruption closed the CWU campus for four days, but deposited only a Quarter of an inch of ash on it. Yakima Va11ey Junior College was hardest hit of all the campuses in the region. It closed for a week while the surrounding small farming community dug out from under hundreds of tons of ash. "It looked like a big thunderstorm rolling in," recalls YVJC's Chauvin, looking out his office window at his campus still marked by scattered patches of fine, gray dust. "When It hit, the whole valley went black, and the next day everything looked dead. Chauvin quickly adds that business is now back to normal. Of courst it may not stay that way. "We're going to have (the volcano) around for a couple of years," Chauvin observes philosophically. .. fhe geologists say it could burp like thi for 20 to 30 years, and the health people say it will be two years before we know if the ash is really hazardous. I think we'n learn to live with it." To help live with it, the state government has distributed emergency procedures guidelines to all state colleges. Washmgton State University has dcveloped a comprehensive evacuation plan on its own, and has given each residence hall emergenc)' plans and food, just in case.

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N a m e of t h e game: ' Ki l l i ng as a n Organ ized Sport'

C a m p u s f ad st i l l rn a g i c i a n s a n d d ra g o n s 8y Jaatt SlalldOd

(CPS)-There will be people on campus this fall-ordinary-looking souls-who fear they're bring hunted by assassins, challenged by dragons, and beguiled by magicians. Daily living for them will be an exercise in dodging the enemy and pursuing illusions of slory. Hut the ostensible o�tbreak of paranoid schilophrenia is really just part of a fantasy game fad that has risen to peak popularity in the last half decade. The best-known variety revolves around Dungeons & Dragons and its denvatives, the other goes by names like "Assassin" and "Killing as an Organized Sport." They're being played everywhere. Dungcoru & Dragons. which borrows heavily from the works of J.R.R. Tolkien, is actually formally organized on "al least 200 campuscs" by various kinds of " Tolkien fellowships," boasts Marla Crosby of the Tolkien League. "Assassin and its namesakes boomed into prominence last winter, when bizarre reports of students hurting one another spread from midwestern campuses to the University of Florida, UCLA, and points in betwet'n. Most frequentl)' called "IGliing as an Organized sport," it has its roots in the '60s. It takes its acronym, KAOS, from the "Get Smart" spy spoof television serib, though the game's theme was plagiarized from other media. I! is roughly based on The Seven/h Victim, a 1953 science fiction novd by

Robert Sheckley that evolved into a 1965 film called The Tenth Victim. As the story would have it, a futuristic society eliminates war by allowing its most aggressive citizens to commit legalized murder. The killer's goal is to down 10 victims before someone else kills him (or her). I f the killer succeeds, he or she becomes a hero, is given luxuries and wealth, and never has to work again. The story was translated into a game played with toy weapons. It enjoyed a brief voaue at Oberlin College in the late '60s before it was replaced by other fads, and was largely forgottm. In 1976, some University of Michigan students revived the game, using plastic dart guns for weapons. From there, it slowly began to spread to other campuses, until it became a definably national phenomenon last spring. Game rules \'ary form campus to camPU3. Generally, players are given a hit list and are required to "kill" a minimum number of people on the list weekly to stay in the game. As they hunt, they a� being hunted b)' others, but the players don't lenow who is out to get them. They can be "killed" in the. shower, by best friends. All is considered fair, though classrooms and crowds are considered orr limits. The game continues until there is but onc sllrvlvor. Harold Clark, who takes his name from the chief on "Get Smart," organized a giant KAOS game as a "summer project" at the University of Texas last June. He hoped an ad In the

I

local paper would attract 25 players. He got 65. The survivor eventually collected about $165 for his skill at tracking and assassinating the other 64 contestants over almost three months of sneaky business. Dungeons " Dragons is the better known and more complex role·playing game, but can be just as consuming as KAOS. There are tales of students flunking out of school because of 0 & 0. And profitable, Niebling says sales of the D & D equipment his finn produces and markets have doubled annually each year since 1974 and have quadrupled in the last 1 2 months. "You see the field growing faster and faster," understated Jamey Adams, an editor at Games Magazine. "There are any number of imitators coming out with other roleplaying games Involving gangsters, King Arthur, and science fiction." Jim Dunnigan, who describes himself as a lapsed historian, invented one of them. He created a game modeled on the television series "Dallas." DunniSIln 58yS thot in the game, to debut m stores in Octo�r. "each player takes a charactC'r from the show, except one person who is the II dirC'Clor. It is obviou.sly akin to 0 & D, invented by MIT grad Gary Gygax and friend Dave Arneson in Wisconsin ten years ago. D & D, of course, Involved an array of eneanhly characters, derived from Tolkien books about the Middle Earth.

Each player assumes the identity of one of the characters . and takes direction from the Dungeon Master, a �ombination of a referee and spontaneous playwright. He creates fanciful, demanding situations to which the characters must respond. He may say, "You arc crossing a bridge over the Valley of the Serpents, when it suddenly collapses, hurling you into a sea of reptilian monsters." The reason ror the campus interest in roleplaying fantasies is, according to University of Minnesota SOCiologist Gary Alan Fine, tied to a desire "to move away from passive intellectual actiVities, notably television." Fine spent 18 months researching D & D and four other famasy games, and found the appeal was in the "science fiction sub-culture" was the oppor­ tunity to live out fantasies they would ordinarii), eJ(perience passively. The people who participate in the games, he discovered, "tend not to be the sorority or rraternity types. These It arc intense people. Of the simulated violence violence in KAOS and 0 It D, he says, "Maybe. somewhere in the human or male spitil there's a need for war, a need to put one's life on the line." But the sociologist thinks it futile to guess why those games should become popular 81 this time in our history. He nOlts, "There have been studies about 'why the hula boop?,' 'why the 8ea.lles?,' and 'why All in the Family?' They didn't come up with anything. Maybe the answer is because it was thought up now .. .


September 26, 1980, Mooring Mast Page 9

H o u s i n g c r u n c h h i t s n at i o n ' s c a m p u ses By Mkb.d Arkwb (CPS)-The Saturday ritual of football games. Frats and sororities courting the new kids on campus. Having to wait in line for hours to register. And not enough space in the dorms for new students. Question: Which one of these facets of university life is only a recent phenomenon, yet threatens to become as familiar as the annual homecoming weekends"! Answer: The Housing Crunch. Born in the late 70s, this infant has provoked temporary chaos on schools across the country. From Maine to Arizona, dorms are full, leaving the unlucky cramped into either converted study lounges, doubles changed into triples, or even motel rooms. (n other cases, the inconvenience lasts for only a few weeks. (n other schools, it takes months to cure the proble-m. eAt the University of Oklahoma in Nannan. between 100 and 125 freshmen received notices that they would be tripled up in rooms normally inhabited by just two stu­ dena. Otbers are shacking up with resident advisors who are usually privileged to singles. e Studen!.s at the University of New Me:xico in Albuquerque are livins in rooms previously reserved for studyinS. Cots have been moved Into thon. though that is only expected to last several weeks. eTexas A & M housing officers over-booked sludent housing at a rate 300 percent higher than last year, leaving 600 students temporarily being stuffed into study carrels or overcrowded rooms. And the list goes on and on.

The reason is that "university administrators have been unwilling to create more open housing for the students. since they know it won'I pay orf in a few years, " says Dan Hellenbeck, housing director at the University of Georgia. "If they were to construct more dorms, it would be rinancial suicide because the anticipated enrollment dropoff is scheduled for any year now. Once that happens. the school !Day have problems filling the spaces, and thus lose money," he explains .. . The housing crunch has become a problem of such magnitude that studies have already been completed analyzing the effects on students who lived in temporary units, or were crowded into small spaces. Not only have the initial findings produced evidence of irritation and bickering, but some students bave not done as well academically as they might have under more normal circumstances. Ed Spencer, a housina orficial at the University of Delaware, recently concluded an examination of students who lived in triples or in temporary hOUSing such as lounges or study carrels. "There seemed (0 be no significant diHtrence between tht' grade point averages of thost in temporary units and the students in regular situations However. the averages of the ones in convened spaces go up by a greater percent o\·er the years after they leave that situation, suggesting that they would have done better if they had been in normal rooms," Spencer says. He adds that those Iivin.a in triples or other temporary spaces wind up going home more frequently on weekends.

don't get along with their roommates, and become very irritated with the university administration. He points to a recent study done by a sociologist demonstrating a "shirting coalition theory." According to that hypothesis, when three people are stuffed into a crowded situation, an alliance of two roommates against the other occurs. Research suggests the phenomenon laps over to other social settings. Yet most housing officials remain adamantly opposed to constructing new dorms. They insist the situation is under conlrol. that temporary units are not counterproductive, and that the anticipaled enrollment decline will remove the problem once and for all.

On the other side. however. is the curious and puzzling statistic of the rising percentaae of students coming hack to live in the donns, instead of

. seeking off-campus housing. Housing officials proudly attribute it to the excellent programming in the dorms as well as the removal of restrictive rules which force� students to leave university housing in the late ti(b. If true-and other that's echoed his administrators sentiments-it seems logical that perhaps the anticipated enrollment decline will be offset by the rise in the number of students who want to stay in the dorms. "That is certainly a factor housing officials had better look at instead of just the enrollment predictions." cedes Dale Meador, director of residential racilities at Western lI1inois University, "cspccially since innation, which has caused students to seek housing in cheaper university dorms. is not going to go away.

Veterans may have to wait for aid ; Cong ress d al lyi ng Washington, D.C. (CPS) - Unless Congress moves quickly to pass a S40 million supplemental appropriations bill, thousands of veterans ....iII . not gbet their educalion aid checks on lime. Veterans Administration officials warned recently. Any delay in payment would affect nearly 128,000 veterans who registered for benefits under the GI Bill since August 28. While lhose who have been rtgularly rectivins payments should not experience anydelays, vets who have just registered since August 28 and who expected the usual month's

advance payment, payme.nt for classes already taken, or mOney for work­ study programs may have to wait. The reason is thaI the 1980 budget ceiling has already ben reached. Unless Congress votes to fund the programs with an additional $40 million, many veterans could be severely affected. " I f you extend the delay beyond a month, it will take a major toll." warned Dallas Martin. executive director orthe National ASsociation of STudeR! Aid Financial Administrators.

MORE LEnERS

Stay i n g away from arrog ant att itudes esse n t i a l to world peace -

To the EdHor: Lasl Sunday night, the Cave was filled to capacity with those who come to watch the debates between Reagan Anderson and Most people can probably recall Mr. Reagan's pIcturesque clOSing address. I suppose It was meant to be Inspirational.

but to me, It was a 1I"le frightening. Mr. Reagan seems to hove the Idea that we Americans ore somehow set apart from everyone else, "better" than the rest of the world; "A City on a HilL" he called us. Can he, or anyone else, really believe that we Americans, with wasteful. our consumer-oriented Ilfe-

style. and bigoted attitudes are a shining example for the rest of the world? Human nature Is pretty much the same wherever one goes and Americans will try to protect our "national Interests" In much the some way Russians and IranIans protect theirs. I'm not saying that I'm ashamed of being

American, or anything like that. I am saying that we Americans In particular must guaard against our nationalistic egoIsm. Instead of taking on the aHltude that we are God's gift to the rest of the world, we'd beHer get used to the Idea that other countries are Just as valid as we are. And, as Anderson said In the debates. resources,

especially all, are limited and Americans must learn to share them wllh the rest of the world. We are not the only peOple on this planet. It COUld. In the future, be vital to world peace that Americans stay away trom the orrogant attitudes displayed by Mf. Reagan.

Gerl Hoekzemo

F i n a n c i a l a i d d i ffi c u l t to g et afte r fou r yea rs To the Editor: To-old students WIth the Increasing costs at PlU, many studenls. like myself. consult the financial aId office to( help, but receive some surprising responses Last May, I consulted our "nanclal old office In response to some miSSing old As Mark Duris. assistant In the financial aid office, lOoked ot my tile, he explained thot I seemed to be "delinquent" In my

studies since I was to begin my fifth Vear at PlU and that it was a "burden" for his office to award me any aid. I felt angry and confused because this sure didn't seem like a Christian universlty's attitude nor reflective of my personal thoughts towards what our financial old office should be for. I was being told that office their didn't particularly like to help those sludenls who are

unable to finish their education at PlU In four years. for either personal or financial reasons beyond our controL When an Important office of our university such as the financial aid office reflects an a"itude of not being concerned nor understanding of a student's financial needd and when the Job of awarding old becomes "burdensome" In helping

ones education. I feel some re-examlnallon and reevaluation of theIr office's prlorftfes shOUld be moae and that more .. understandl..g and concern be gJven towards the financial pressures and that fresiratlons PlU students face each day. Nol everyone can nor should be expected to finish their education in our Idealistic four years.

fInanCial old office and aSSOCiated administration realiZe and understond that PlU students are hurting financially and emotionally when Increases are continually being made with our college costs and that we don't receive any cost of living raises nor compensatfon for a loss In Income. Help Is needed I

I sincerely hope that our

ste-ven M. Kelley


Page 10. Mooring Mast. September 26, 1980

LETTERSI

Debate continues over RA system

M ove ove r M o m , I h ave a n R A To the Editor:

Editor Kathleen M . Hosfeld

NewaEdltor Tom Koehler

_rea Editor Petra RowB

Sporta Editor John Wallace

Production Editor Margo Student

Photography Editor Magcutne Editor Morcl Ameluxen

Editorial Alllllanli

Dee Anne Houso Eric Thomas

Copy Editor Koren Wold

Glraphlca Editor Steve Houge

lualneu Manager Corrl

Minden

Circulation Manager Pam Corlson

Advertising Manager Cindy Kloth

Technical Advisor Mike Frederickson

Faculty Advisor Cliff Rowe The Mooring Most Is publlsh8d weekly by Ihe sludenls 01 Poclflc Lutheran Unlverlsty un· der Ihe ousplces ol lhEl Boord Regents Opinions ElK' 01 pressed In Ihe Masl ore not In· tended to represent those 01 Ihe the regents. ad· ministration. Ihe laculty. the student body or the Mast sloN. LeNars to the edllor should be submitted by 5 p.m. 01 the some week 01 pUblication.

Another unsympathetic article appeared In the Sept. 12. 1980 Issue of the Mooring Mast dealing with observations on many resident aSSistants and their attitudes towards themselves . . . . Life on campus. at the present time, parallels life at some sort of camp where the counselors are kept busy trying to keep track of all the IlHle kids. the roles of the RA and counselor are interchangeable. The RA Is performIng the job of everything from the I n itiator of activities to babyslHer. Their function has developed into a misguided attempt to formulate a set of rules and examples on how life should be lived while residing on campus; such activity Is simply not needed. The position ot RA is but an u n necessary waste of energy for everyone Involved. One of the many ways in which the RA manages to find tIme to spend unwisely is by trying to get wIng events started. like a big game of red rover or other frivolous activities that nob<x:ly really wants to do anyway. Planning wing events Is something that doesn·t need on RA. Another big waste of energy Is In calling together everyone for wing meetings. These also are unnecessary. How many

Illmes have people gone 10 these things. led by the RA. where everyone takes turns pronouncing their nome as they sit In a big circle not listening to what anyone else Is sayIng except perhaps to the name of the new cute girl or guy? The only valid reason for havIng a meeting as such Is to make sure everyone knows the policies that have been Issued to the dorms. Anyone (head resident) delegated to present the requIred Information can do this. all of which can be done at the first annual get·together or dorm residents, but on RA Isn" needed. Now, of course. if the RA policy was changed to "no RA." there would have to be more than two people to run things. but not too many morel dorms could The probably be run just as smoothly by having a head resident and two or three assistant heads. at the most. spread throughout the dorm. complimented by the dorm council to shore the job of operating the building with a n emphasis on managIng Instead of leanIng towards being totally responsible everybody for In r€.�r �'3nce. No chol""loe In t h e n ec e s s a r y e, t' ·c nent � .� '95, just a dUrerenl method of application. This Is also not a gross neglect of the students. bul rather a

needed strongly substantial I ncrease I n room to breathe to allow the natural development of individuals, In fact. the only present justified rationale for the pOSition of RA Is for someone to be around to unlock the doors of careless people and to enforce the alcohol policy (noise and visitation are infringement problems that can usually be worked out between wing members and roommates, but be nevertheless can reporled to the head residents for disciplinary action \f someone Insists upon being uncooperative). Now. for the benefit of the careless people. there would still be available a way 10 get back Into their rooms, either by one of the remaining staff members or through the responsIble person working at the desk. As for the alcohol policy, nothing would change. The head and assistant head residents would still be around to discourage obnoxiously loud parties and all this can be done without the RAs as they are now. Probably the best Idea that has developed under the RA system is the availability of counseling. But here, too. something Is wrong. The need to have someone to explain one's troubles to doesn" justify havIng an RA on

The Innocent Bystander

practrcally every wing. It indicates the necessity 10r the If counseli ng . condItions are mode right for tomatoes to grow, they will The some for the need to have a figurehead who appears to be looking after others In a partIcular hallway. Whether or not that person actually does maHers not, but the idea of havIng someone directly In charge does, At home there were Mom and Dad, and then when they finally leave and arrive here at PLU, they run Into another parent figure who supposedly Is responsible for them. The ability to develop as on rema i n s individual inhibited. The conditions ore mode right for some to remain dependent upon someone else Instead of switching this over to themselves, The AA game tends to promote the need for counseling by spreading the resident asslsfants out so heavily that II Is easy for an Insecure person to willingly remain under seemingly authoritative influence" . . Every funcllon the RA presently performs as an RA Is either not needed or It could be handled by the dorm council or It Is a policy requirement In which case I t could be easily handled In a different but equally efficient manner. Gary J. Nelson

By Arthur Hoppe

Lord Toyota m u st h a n d l e Perc h e ron revo l t i n Shog u n " By Arthur Hoppe With aU decent Americans glued to their television sets last week to watch the epic mIni-series "Shogun," it would be unfair to tell how the sequel. "Shogun II," comes out in the end. This is how it comes out in the end: As you remember, the hero, John 81ackthorne, is finally accepted by the Japanese as a true samurai pledged to the code of bushido. The new shogun, Lord Toranaga, makes Blackthorne (or he "Brackthorne," as affectionately calls him) his right­ hand man and relies heavily on his knowledge of Western technology to help build his dream-a Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. But it should be remembered that at hean Blackthorne is a salesman. He does his utmost to convince Lord Toranaga that he should trade

with the West . "But what, Brackthorne," says Toranaga, "can the West offer us that we do not already have?" "You will see, my Lord , " says Blackthorne with a confident smile, "when my ship comes in." For Blackthorne has been carefully studying the Japanese market and at lasl he has hit upon a product for which he is cenain there will be an overwhelming consumer demand. He has secretly ordered a shipload. At last the sails of that historic vessel appear on the horizon. He persuades Toranaga to join him on the dock. The gangplank is lowered. Down it, Whinnying and neighing, c10mps a herd of 1 00 huge Percherons. "Ai�yeel" cries Lord Toranaga, drawing back . "What are those tremendous beasts?" says , . Luxury horses," Blackthorne proudly. "Look at those white side stirrups, those

gleaming hood ornaments, those natural leather roll-and-tuck saddles. II's about time your warriors got off their shoddy little compact Mongol ponies and onto horses that befit the dignity of a samurai. . . "But they are three feet longer and two feet higher than our present models," protests Toranaga. "Exactly," says Blackthorne. "Think of the prestige. Once in the saddle and you'll look down on everyone.. . "If we can climb that high," says Toranaga dubiously. Of course, the main problem with the Percherons was that they only got ten miles to the bale of hay. Soon the starving country was in revolt under Lord Toyota. In the famous Battle of the Imports, Toranaga sent his samurai charging bravely into the center of

the rebel army. But the lumbering Percherons were no match for Toyota's maneuverable little compacts. In the disastrous rout that followed, many of the Percherons became stuck between buildings in the narrow streets or ran out of hay, Lord Toranaga, himself, was knocked colder than a cucumber when he forgot to duck while riding full tilt under his postern gate to safety. When he came to, he naturally ordered Blackthorne's head chopped off. In the final scene, Blackthorne utters his last prophetic words: "You Japanese will never make a farthing in international trade," he says, "until you learn to think big." And it's just too darned bad, if you ask me, that they didn't listen to him. (Copyrighl Chronicle Publishing Co. 1980)


September 26. 1980. Mooring Mast. Page 1 1

9!6!U E D ITO R I A L

Face-to- face d i scussion needed i n RA debate,not printed pages ,

Gary Nelson fired Ihe Ilrsl shol In Ihe editorial page Waf on RA's by writing to lhe Mast aboul "the RA syndrome." a hypothetIcal malady that was probably conceptualized In an "RA's We'd Uke To Forget" gripe­ session. Rick Alten. head 01 Residential Ufe, responded with a cordial but predictably defensive bureaucratic response that his RA's are really super. Mark Dunmire threw In his two bits by asking the question "Are RA's natural student readers?" Finally, Gary wrote In again to explain more analytically but no less cynically whot he feels Is wrong with the RAsystem . I appreciate Gary's courage to write In twice. I appreciate Rlck's need 10 I support his staff. a ppreciate Mark's attempts to clarify the Issues. I appreciate those who Involved the most In sounding off. What I would appreciate most Is not leaving the debate In print. The editorial pages of the Mast are designed to field and comments complaints. But the Mast s t a ff Isn t being paid an RA's wage to mediate between people who can't seem to talk face-Io-face. Do RA's need to be res�nslble for activities to stimulate socIal activity on campus or would this kind of activity develop naturally without them? Do students need a sefT'i­ parental influence tor

counselling or would If promote healthier emotIonal growth to cut the umbilical cord at wing IIvel? Is ResIdential Ufe aware of the need for large scale discussion on the role and necessIty of resident assistants or will It close Its doors against criticism unless It comes from above typed I n memorandum form? I sincerely hope that all

Ihe parties Involved In this discussion will get the war off Ihese pages and begin negotiations for some kind of peace treaty via self· discussions. evaluations and the like (no ad hoc committees please,)

Kothleen M, Holfeid .

..

The Mast would like to

Pawn Off:

By Jell Olaon

"Pawns In a war game," states the Seallie P·I concerning the U.S. hostages held In Iran. The Iraqi Inva.lon 01 Iran has given Iran by

proxy a reason to " Indellnltely Ireeze" the debate 01 the late 01 the S3 hostagea In Iran. 1t 18 predicted that due to the "eve 01 the election," the U.S. will stand clear lor now. Obviously being hesitant In hopea 01 maintaining their best Intere8ts with both nallon8, the Soviet Union has denied aid to Iraq and Iran In their ploy lor military and economic support. Hoping to avoid the conflicts encountered In the Somalia·Ethiopia Incident, Soviet ollicials will walt patiently to view the battle 01 Inner· polilica belore thay move to .upport or devour the prey. Does this mean that we are also merely pawns In the strategic game, along with the hostagea, Iraq, Iran and most 01 the Soviet people? Bennet's general make me think, may I say ponder. the situation. I Invite you to do the same. "Pawn ye ponder 'Nam, ye yonder or' pond bon or wrong ye con ner' gone. Ponder ye pawn ponder ye lawn ponder ye long. Ponder ye dawn lest ye ponder be gone. Pawn and non·pawn, ponder ye long.

apologize for 0 misplaCed pholo credit on Ihe fronl page artIcle photo which ron last week. The photo was attributed 10 PLU's pholographlc services but /I was actually the product of the Tacoma News Tribune. More apologies are Inorder on mls-ottrlbuted photos of the chinese art show. The photos were taken by Petra Rowe, Features editor,

The Most reserves the right to edit any letter written to the editor for length or libel, The Mast would like to encourage readers to contribute to community dIscussion In the form of letters to the editor. Leners should be typed and signed and be turned Into the Mast office by Monday of the production week.

CHINA: Animal Farm turns over .galn .1 Chin••• olllcl.,. stlmulato public criticism and d.'.clng ·T u ng , In r••pon•• ol th. late Ch.lrman Mao T•• 10 tho upcoming trial. for thl "Gang of Fou�' whom Madam. Mlo II ule.dart" the "elimination" of M.o T••·Tung la gaining action and auppor!.

MT. ST. HELENS: Black goo I. beginning to lagu. tha Toutle River vallay and are• •• Mt. St. Helena DOz.d • quiet kind of eruption. The Bub.t.nc. h.a been likened to 8 tar of an organic nature.

AMERICA"S CUP: "Freedom," the American way, appaa,. certain I' .klpper O. Conner and crw face on more contention with the Au.trallan challenger. Another win would mark tha 1 30th consecutlvo win lor the U.S.

CARTER: The odltor .nd frlenda pursuing their hope. In seeing President Carter may have been In Ylln,. but If you would Ilk. to know how I shook h.ndl with the Prelldent Tu.sd.y, let me know.


Page 12, Mooring Mast. September 26, 1980

CAM PUS SHORTS Saudi event The International Student Organization is presenting an informative cultural event Saturday in celebration of Saudi Arabia National Day. Explained by Turki Alsudairy , the mastermind of the celebration, Saudi Arabia used to consist of separate states, each with their own government. In 1932, King Abdul Alsud united all the states to form the current "Kingdom of Saudi Arabia." Sept. 23 is the actual date of their independence. Alsudairy feels this could be an ideal way to acquaint American students with the Arabian culture. Arabian students from UPS, Fort Steilacoom, and Tacoma Community College are joining PLU in celebration of Saudi independence. "Everybody and p.nybody is welcome," said Alsudairy. The itinerary for the evening includes: a 10-15 minute reading from the Koran, speakers to explain Islamic cuhure, a slide show, Arabic dancers and singers, one or two documentaries and an authentic Arabian meal including rice and roasted lamb. Admission is $ I . Festivities begin at 3 p.m. Saturday in Chris Knutzen.

Tacoma tutors Students eligible for work study who arc interested in being

The film will be shown in Chris Knutsen Hall at 7:30 p.m.

employed as a tutor within the Tacoma Public Schools should contact Nan Nokleberg in the School of Education immediately. Tutors will be paid $.5.00 per hour. Please submit letter of application and a resume to Nan Nokleberg by Oct. I .

pianists Richard Farner. Calvin and Sandra Knapp; hornist Kathleen Vaught Farner, organist David Dahl. and guitarist Andrew Schulman.

South Dakotans

The program is an assortment of humorous music. "It is somewhere between Spike Jones and P.D.Q. BaCh," stated Assistant Farner, Richard and Music of Profesoor coordinator or the program. The hour and a half show "gives the faculty a chance to let our hair down for a good cause," Farner said. "We enjoy doing it and hope II that folks get a giggle or two.

Attention: Former South Dakotans, and closet South Dakotans! The South Dakota Ringneck Guild is preparing for its campus-wide debut next week I Interest meeting will be held this coming Wednesday, Oct. I . Wath for another announcement in the Tuesday Bulletin.

Speed read i n g The Academic Advising Center a offering be will Speedreading/ aud 'Studyreading course beginning Oct. 2, 7-9 p.m. on Thursday nights. This course costs $3.5 for class fee, plus cost for textbook, and will run for five weekly sessions. Deadline for class sign-up is Sept. 29. Maximum enrollment s i 35.

Barrier Breakers

Italy

What?: A Meetlngl Why?: To form the Barrier Brakers. This will be an open forum for all students to air all grievaces on architectural and educational barriers . . . Where?: Regency Room. When?: Sept. 30 at I p.m. However: I f you are unable to attend and want to join or submit a list of barriers, please contact Amadeo Tiam in the Minority Affairs Office.

Pol itica l F i l m Promise Them Anything is the title of a film on political campaigning being shown Tuesday, Sept. 30, as a part of a special ASPLU project. The film is free to PLU students. Viewers will see fifty years of U.S. history in a collection of political and campaign television commercials and short films. The film includes campaign spots for FOR, Eisenhower, JFK, LBJ, Nixon, Reagan, Goldwater, Humphrey, Carter and others. James Hall, media critic and specialist in advertising and production will provide observations and commentary.

This Interim you can go to Italy. Study the Renaissance culture of Venice, Florence, and Rome. For details, come to the interest meeting for the course: "The Renaissance in Italy" Tuesday, Sept. 30, 4 p.m. HA 221, or call Dr. Charles Bergman (7313).

H ateful m us i c

U C courses

"Music You Hate to Love" will be presented tonight and tomorrow night at 8 in Eastvold Auditorium. The proceeds from the $5 tickets (students and senior citizens get in for $ 1 ) go into the Music Scholarship fund. The music faculty talent will be displayed in this third annual program. Performers include vocalist Barbara Poulsoock,

U C Courses are non-credit courses taught by people from PLU and the community which are open to everyone. Previous classes have been in such areas as sailboating, disco dancing, quilted boxes, Egyptian hieroglyphics. If you are interested in teaching a class and earning some money, come in to the University Cenler Office for information.

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DON 'T WRITE H OM E ! Send Your Folks A Mast Subscription I nstead Only $ 8 will give your parents hours 01 reading enjoyment. Or, II you're broke already, send this lorm home In your check request. Name Street �M . . . .

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September 26, 1980, Mooring Mast. Page 13

S PORTS

The Zamb.rlln rooting section m.de th.'r pr.s.nc. known.

Th. ".·Lut. h'ms It up during a b,..k In 'h• •ell"n.

Z.mberlln closing In on S••h.wk pl.y.

Zam berl i n f i rst Lute to g o p ro 8r Joba w.n.ce PlU stand·out John Zamberlin returned to his Scauk·Tacoma home territor)' this weekend [0 visit family and friends and to play football in the Kingdomc (not necessarily in that order). This was not his first trip to the clam-shaped stadium: however, on Aug. 29 he and the talent·rich New England Patriots lost to the Seattle Seahawks 30-23. Zamberlin staned that game at linebacker and has been starting ever since. Zamberlin is PLU's contribution to the National Football League. He is the first Lute gridder to " make it" in the pro ranks. Oh, there was Ross Boice, a defensive end who went to trainina camp with the Rams &5 a sixteenth­ round draft choice tn 1911. And, 01 course, Marv Marv and Tommervlk Hush man would surely

have made it had it nOI been for the Slart of WWII. But football is Zamberhn's work now, nOt his extra­ curricular collegiate activity. "tI was much more fun playing college ball," he said. "Bul it's also a lot of fun in the pros when you play, especiaUy when you win." Zamberlin went to work Sunday morning, changed into his work clothes and sel about taking care of the task at hand . Statistically. he ended his work day with two tackles. three assists, combining on a quarterback sack and helplns hold the Seattle offense to 134 yards rushing. He then drcssN and went home. The trip back to the home I office in Foxboro. Mass. . was I definitely more joyous for

I

Zambc:rlin and hiS business a!liodates this time than three weeks ljO, as the Palriots Defeated the SeahowhS 37·31 . "It was fun to come back," he said. "It was sort of •

homecomins. and it really fell good when they introduced me and I heard the applause'. " He does feel a difference playing at that level, though. "There is a lot more pressure on you to perform in the pros," according to Zamberlin. Looking back, he cannot believe those long bus rides to Spokane and Idaho. " I feel sorry for those guys riding to Humboldt State. Planes are a lot nicer and you get treated a lot better." He also likes New England and the PatrioLS. "There are a 101 of niC1: people both on the learn and in the area; and we have the team to go all the way." However, he has found one problem. "They certainly talk funny." Zamberlln has no idea how long he will play professional

football. " t want to keep playina as long as I can be effective; as lon& as I'm still in one piece. "

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Page 14, Mooring Mast, September 26, 1980

N u m be r o n e ra n ked L u t e s s h oot d o w n Western ' s ' r u n a n d s h oot ' o ffe n s e , 30-0 8, Erl� TbomL"

While the PLU foot ball telm's offense was off and running, WeSlern '� run-and­ 'ihool offeme never got out of the block!! Saturday, liS !.he V i k i ngs .�ufftred 11 30·0 shutout at the hands of !.he numbc-one-ranked Lutes. The contcst, played before 2800 fans at Franklin Pierce stadium, saw the PLU defense hold the Viking ground game to jUst nine yards in J6 attempts, all the while nC'\'er allowing them closer 10 the Lute end .lone than the23-yard line. . "We were aggr��i...e with aJl the excitement of il bc:inS the rim game," said PLU head football coach Frosty Wcstering. "It was hard 10 k«p !.hem in the locker room, they wanted to get out and play so bad_ We felt good that we were able to adjust to whatever they had . Our defensive front !evm did a great job." That defensive news comes as a relief for Weslering and his staff, as !.hey have been converting and interchanging people to find consistency at the defensive end position. Don Gale, Jerr Walden and John Feldmen interchanged during the coune of !.he game, wilh positive reswLS. "We're really pleased with what these three have done," said Wcstering. "They played beller and better as the game went on. Glenn Rohr and Seon McKay abo had super lames; it was a tOlal team effon:' Ofrensively. the Lutes racked up a total of .oj yards, 232 of which came from the rUShing of setbacks Oms Un (81 yards), Guy Ellison (!54 yards), and Mike Wt'5(millu (9 1 yards). "We SOt good play out of our runnins backs," said Wtstering. ""'s great to have Chris (Un) as a third running back who can go inside along which Westmiller, with co:nplim::ns Guy running oUlside and around. It's a.

good feclin, (0 know you've gol vemlility back. there." PLU tint got on the board when a nut-quarter drive slowed at the Viking 34. FaeinS a fourth and four, Westeriog sent in linebacker ScOIt McKay, who drilled the ball through the uprights for the. only points of the firS! quaner. The sa:ond period saw the Lutes break the game open with a pair or TO runs, the first being a 50-yard dash by fullback Mike Wcstmiller_ "That was the big play, " said Watering_ "There were three super blocks to spring him (WeSlering) Scott k.nocked down the derensi\'e

tackle, Knight made a great oUl-block, and El1i�on went through the hole and took OUl the linebacker .. Four minutcs laler the Lutes were on board agoun, lhis time on an I I·yard romp by UIl, glVlOg Pl.U a 16-0 halftime lead. The Lutes' last two tallj� came in the fourth Quarttr, both on tosses to sophomore tight end CUrt Rodin. With five minutes gone in the final period, stantng Quarterback Eric Carlson (8· 1 8 for 94 yards) was chased out of the pocket, rolled to the right sidehnt!l and made the toss to Rodin, who was wide open in the comer of the end zone.

"On a scramble like that, our receivers have a planned route so the Quarterback know� where they are," said WC:Slerlns. "Rodin mirrored Carlson when he rolled OUI of the pocket and got open for a greal play." The lasl PLU Kore was produced by the Lute �tcond freshman by team, led quanerbllck Kevin Skogen. who red-shirted ILU season. Skogen compleled four or four passes for 40 yards 00 the dri\'e, the last of which was a 13-yard nrike to Rodin. Another freshman, running back Jeff Rohr, also had a producthe day, tallying 42 yards on seven rushes. "Our

By Uk Thomu

Fans at last Saturday's Western game who were stcn their through searching programs may have been allertJpting 10 explain why. in the name of consisu:ncy, were Chris Un and Don Oalt stationed opposite the units they excelled with last year. Uti, a little All-Nonhwcst defensive back last year as a junior, now lines up in a stanin£ runmng back slot , while GaJe, an offenSIve end on last year's rOMer, now IOhabits a first team defensive end position. "Coach Westering told me last spring to be ready to swilch over 10 running back

because we "ere inexperienced

there," said Uti, who was an AU-5tate runnin, back as a prep!tcr. " I liked playing, de­ fen�ive back. but I'm rcally enjoying mysel( gelling in the open field and running Ihe ball, although I sure wake up 50re in the morning " Gale 100 knew about the po.ssibllity or a posilion con\'ersion, although it was a

Don Gale

Chris Ult switch he wasn't sure about until the day before practice began. "We had a really fine receiving corps last year with Bnd WeS1ering Rodin, Monson," ..aid Gale. who was an All-League prepster himself at EastmoRl in Wenatchee. . "Since I came over here as a defensi\'e end, the pos.sibiLity or. switch came up in my one· on·one sprins talks with Frosty, but I didn't know for sure until the captams told me when I Bol to PLU for preseason drills." Gale, like Uti, find! the switch a pleasant change, but

fa a different feason. "I like

playing defense a whole lot better," said Gale. "I've got some scores to settle. Now 1 can give people back Ihe shots I've bttn receiving for thr« years as an offensive end." Such position changes require learning of . new techniques and strategy• • chore which is nOI always easy and sometimes comes only through aptrie:nce. "One of the hardest things for me to learn was to !"eact on the ddensive line," said Gale. "It's a new philosophy. Before, (as an offensIve end) t would read tbe defense and

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second unil played really well." .said We5tering. "They showed they can move the ball," Moving tlte ball may prove 10 be harder for PLU tomorrow, when the Lates take on Humboldt State in their first away contest, The Lumberjacks hauled to a close 17-1 10s5 wuh UPS Wt wC'ekend, and span the hea\'ie'>t line-up PLU will face in regular �on. " They ....ere 8·2 Ian year and finished lecond in their conference last year," said We.Stenn•.

This (enifie.lIe is wOrlh FIVE DOLLARS

toward any HAIRFAX hait care servict'

for you A D mrmbers of yOU! f.lmity Offef e:ltpires September 3D, 1980.

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tough for the defense to pick up on the new oUense because there are a lot more things . gOIng on . GaJe and Utt have both found that unit toaet.herness and motivation prevail no mallt:r where you play on !.he team. " ) e:njoycd havmg a good drive, " said Un of his new offensive home, " I t is the: meshin! of the guys, the pitching in and getting something loing. I really like that." Gale too found such spirit on the defensive squad. ''In the Western lame I was making mistakes, and Scolly (McKay) who was behind me was helptng me, telling me what to do," uid Gale:. "Prell), soon J realized I had ten other guys with me and J settled down. 8y the third quaner I 'Will feeling good about my play. and we were aU concentratin, on preserving that goose-cgg on the board."


September 26, 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 1 5

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Coming off a �2 tie with Green River CC last Saturday, PlU boaters return to the turf this weekend, meeting Oregon College of Education in a 4 o'clock battle today, followed by Western Washington at 2 p.m. tomorrow on the soccer field. last Saturday's contest was a chance to get some of the kinks out and to set up a new defense. "We only had two days of practice to put together a new defense," said head coach Arno Zoske. "We did some of the things we practiced on and worked on some new con«pts, so we're headed in the right direction." Transition from defense s i one new concept being worked on, with conditioning playing a key pan. Extensive workouts are continuing, with running in the morning ronowed by fast-paced workouts in the evening. "We're starting to think

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Booters looki ng for first win

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defense first," said Zoske. "Our offense will then generate off of that." With five returning players back from last year's squad which had a share of the young, title, NWe inexperienced talent is filling some key positions. Gone from last year's squad include goalie Brad Arntson, who W8.5 a solid fixture for the defense. Freshman Joe Poulshock moves in to handle the net with the rest of the positions being filled around the strength of the fullbacks. "Right now we're Strongest in the fullback area with Randy Koetje, Brian Olson and Kim Nesselquist all playing well," said Zoske. "John larson, our sweeper, and Hani Ali Iddrisi, who scored twice against Green River, have been doing well also." One player Zoske is high on is Majed Shakour in the striker position. "He could really help the offense out." Zoske, who comes from the

Notre Dame program, is here on a one-year replacement basis. "The one-year job is a great challenge for me and I'm Quite the with impressed

cooperation with coaches and players frpm the other sports, it's just tremendous," Zoske said. Teaching physical education is another part of Zaske's life. Currently teaching at Tacoma ce, he plans to stay out west. Coming from Notre Dame, Zaske had a chance to compare west coast soccer to mid-west and eastern soccer . " The attention for soc«r is nowing from the east to the west, so it's understandable that the schools here are a little behind in the programs," he said. "But the programs here are really building. We're a

little behind now, somewhat like Notre Dame was three years ago, but I've seen an awful lot of talent in this area and the future for soccer here is looking up."

O u t l o o k bri g ht for Lut e cross country squads By Barb Ph::Kell is the Improvement watchword for this year's men's and women's cross· country teams, says first-year coach Brad Moore, and after

last year's second place finishes by the two squads in their respective conferences, improvement could mean an excellent shot at conference crowns for both male and female harriers. Moore plays down the importance of such titles, however, " I don't want to put too much weight on the conference championships, because' it's only one meet out of the season. I'd prefer that athletes have good seasons and improve and feel good about what they've done Theyworry tOO much about one big meel, " he comments. " I f you stay healthy and you improve dunng the season, those big meets will take care of them· sehes . That'S provided you've got tlllent. and I think we do."

If the harriers' performanct at the Bellevue Community la�t Invitation al College Saturday can be considered a hint of what is to come,thl: team won't be lacking talent this season. Freshmen Zane

Prewitt and Kristy Purdy placed first for the Lutes in their respeclive raees Saturday. Prewitt crossed the finish line 14th overall in a field of top national small-college competitors from B.C.C., Highline community College, and Club Northwest. Timed at 2 1 :23 for the four-mile course, Prewitt was JUSt seconds ahead of teammates Randy Yoakum and Mike Carlson, who claimed the 15th and 17th spots. Purdy placed fifth overall in the women's race, finishing 22 seconds ahead of fellow lute Dianne Johnson, who was last year's WCIC champion. Both teams perfonned well, said Moore, considering their opposition. The top five women close finished together, with fifth-finiShing lute Kris Kyllo placing 14th overall, JUSt nine- spots away from Purdy. The PlU runners took third place in the invitational, behind BCC, which is not a WCIC competitor. and just one point away from Linfield, lasl year's conference titlists. The men placed founb overall and fim ror NWC teams. In addition,

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their top five runners finished within I :41 of one another. Tommorrow the lute harriers will face regional competition at the Simon

Fraser Invitational in Burnabey, British Columbia. Coach Moore admits he's an optimist. But then, with several strong athletes

returning from lasl year's conference runner-up teams as well as a selection of excellent new talent, he has every reason to be.


Page 16, Mooring Mast, September 26, 1980

Too much studying has you down. You need some entertainment. Take lime out. Scan through our weekly listings of cultural activities In and around the Puget Sound area which will allow you to enjoy your precious time to the utmost. as well as sharpen your sense for the more aesthetic. lack of space prohibits a l1stlng of each and every event, but our edlllng of the best bels will help 10 sallstv your arts and entertainment palale.

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER

26

·MUSIC Freddie Waits, Jazz Percussionist & Bill Evans Donce Company Meany Hall. U of W (5) Until Sept, 27 S p.m. Tel 322-3733

·THEATRE "Starting Here. Starting Now" ACT (5) Until Oct 8 Tel. 285-1779 ·THEATRE "BeaflemanlQ" Multl-medla show The Moore Theatre (S1 Until Sept. 27 Tickets at the 60n -THEATRE"Prof. Roscoe living "Prof. Roscoe livin g In U,S." Tacoma Uttle Theatre Until 5ep! 27 Tel. 272-2481 ·THEATRE "Mirandollna" by Carlo Goldon! Intlman Theatre (5) Until Sept. 27 Tel 624-2992 -ART Alan Moen, "Watercolors on Seattle Rooffops" The Anne Johnson Gallery (S1 Until Sept. 27 3 1 7 E Pine

·ART Northwest Sfalned-gloss Artists, Mandarin Gallery, Marymount. Spanaway Until Ocl. 3 1 Mon Ihru Sol: 10 a.m. to 6 6p,m.

·THEATRE "Last of the Red Hot lovers" 565 Broadway Dinner Theatre (I) Until Sept. 27 8:30p.m, Tel. 272-8 1 1 8 S 12, dinner and show; S5 show only

·MUSIC Bo Mooney Ragtime Concert Federal Way library at 2 p.m. Free admission

-ART Crafts 'SO, and photographs by Randy Jeter Tacoma Art Museum Until Tues.. Sept. 30 Mon. thru Sat. : 10a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sun.: noon to 5 p.m. Free admission

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER

27

-ART Artists and Writers Portrait Drawings Seattle Art Museum Pavilion Until Oct 1 9 Closed Mon.; Tue. thru Sun.: 1 1 a.m. to 6 p.m.: Thurs. : 1 1 a.m. to 8 p.m. ·MUSIC The New Laserlum Starship Ught Show Classical Rock and Electronic Music Pacific Science Center Tue. lhru Sun. 8 p.m.; Sot. and Sun.: 2 : 1 5 p.m

-THEATRE ''The Yellow Trunk Show" Family Bathtub Theatre (5) Until Sept. 30 Tel. 323-5699 ·THEATRE "Butterflies are Free" Avenue Act I (5) Until Oct. 12 Tel. 833-0620 ·THEATRE

"I Dol. I Dol"

Starring Jane Powell and Howard Keel 5th Avenue Theatre (S1 Until Oct. 5 Tel. 625-1900 -DANCE Bill Evans Dance Company U of W, Meany Hall (5) 2 p.m. Tel. 322-3733

SUNDAY SEPTEMBER

28

·MUSIC Spectrum Nine musicians, horns. vocals Until Sept. 30 9'30 p.m. to 1 :30 a.m. Rainbow Tavern (S) 722 NE 45th

·MU5IC Opus 1 Music of Northwest composers Washington Hall Performance Gallery (5) Tel. 282-90 13 or 325-9949 ·THEATRE "Hot lunch" Skid Rood Thecolre (5) Until Sept. 30 Tel. 622-0251

·ART Andy Worhol 10 p:>rtraits of Jews of the 20th Century linda Farris Gallery (S) Until Oct. 5 Mon thru SOl: 1 1 :30 a.m. to 5 5 p.m. 322 Second Ave. 5

·PHOTOGRAPHY Tran Coo Unh Photos of Vietnam BMI Corp, (5) 651 5 Jackson Sf

MONDAY SEPTEMBER

29

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER

1

-MUSIC Seattle Sym phony Orchestra Wednesday Concert Series Seattle Center Opera House 8 p.m. 305 Harrison St. Tel. 447-4736

·LECTURE Spalding Gary, narrative performer. "Booze. Cars and College GirlS" Washington Hall Performance Gallery (5) 8:30p,m Tel, 325-9949 ·THEATRE "Agnes of Goc" West coast premIere by Joseph Pielmelr Empty Space Theatre (5) Until Nov. 9 Tel, 325-4444

THURSDAY OCTOBER

2

B p m. 305 Harrison St. Tel. 447-4700

·ART Asian Ceramics tram John O. Rockefeller 111 collection and "Song ol the Brush. ' Japanese polntlngs from the Sonso collection Seattle Art Museum (S) Until Nov. 23 Tue Ihru Sot: 10a.m. t05 p.m, Thur (free ctoy): 1Oa.m. t0 9 9 p.m.: Sun noon to 5 p.m.

·PHOTOGRAPHY William Garnett Aerial Photographs The Sliver Image Gallery Until Oct. 12 925 Washington St.

·OANCE Martha Graham Dance Company U of W, Meany Hall (5) Until Oct 4 Tel. 635-4303 ext 206

·MU5IC Seattle Symphony Orchestra Solo Pianist Emanuel � Until Oct. 1 Seattle Center Opera House

-ART Work by Dixie Rogerson Gallery VI (TJ Until Oct, 2 8805 Bridgeport Way Tue thru Sun: 1 1 a.m. to 5 p.m.

TUESDAY SEPTEMBER

30

-ART Works from artists of Utah Street Studios Klffredge Gallery University of Puget Sound (T) Last day 10a.m. t04p.m. .EXHIBIT "Dolls, Masks and Paper Dolls" Uptown Artworks (5) last day nr.JYGreenwood Ave . N

FRIDAY OCTOBER ·THEATRE ''The Cherry Orchard" by Anton Chekhov Inti man Theatre (51 Until Oct. 25 Tel. 624-2992

3

-ART Karen Berry. " Sail Paintings" U 01 W Women's Info. Center Until Oct. 31 Tue thru Frl: 7:30 a.m. to 5 5 p.m.: Mon: 7:30a.m. t0 9 9p.m, ·THEATRE ''To Kill a Mockingbird" Poncho Theatre (5) Until Nov, 23 Tel. 633-4567 .MUSIC The Kinks Seattle Center Arena Tickets at FiOelity Lane


The Mooring Mast Pacific lutheran University Vol. LVIII. Issue No. 5

October 3. 1980

Te n u re sys te m q u e s t i o n s re-e m e rg e concensus

By Kell) Alltn Can professional fr�om for faculty members exist without a (enure system? Docs the tenure system promote laziness and apathy on the part of tenured faculty,? If non-tC'nure members of the Facuhy Rank and Tenure Committee come up for review by their fellow committee members do they have an unfair advantage'? The answers to these questions come back "Maybe yes" and "Maybe no," from those involved in the system. Yet the controversy is left up in the air because faculty members can't reach a consensus on the anSwers. According to the Faculty Handbook, faculty members automatically become eligible for tenure i n their " sbnh Qualifying year of service." DUring that time. they are asked to fat.her information concerning their performance III PLU from a 'Vo.riC'IY of sources and present thtir case before the Faculty Rank and Tenure Comrnillee. The committee is made up of both tenured and non-tenured faculty members. The committee hears a faculty case and sends its recommendations on to the Provost and President. I f a faculty member is approved, he or she is granted tenure; if not, there's still a guaranteed �eventh year of employment left to look for another job. Until the sixth year, it is up to the faculty members to prove thier com�ency as instructors. As 500n as tenure is granted. the burden of proof is placed on the institution and the university is responsible for evaluating the instructors performances. "Anyone who says the tenure system isn't important 10 academic freedom, doesn't know the history of higher education," according to George Arbaugh, chairman of the Rank and Tenure Committee " Outspokeness will never be the public reason for an instructor being let go. but given the work professors do, (the tenure s.ystem) is invaluable." he said. "The tenure system is aichaic," according to Richard Jobst, chairman of the Sociology Depanment.

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Jobst favors a contract system which awards faculty members a contract for a short period of time such as two years and, as time goes on, the length of the contracts increase. "Tenure retards any kind of growth whhin Ihe institution," he said. "Although it's not true in all cases, some people sit back for the rcst of their academice life. " "You always have to put up with dead wood," said Arbaugh. "But the fact that the faculty members have to present their cases makes this different than a civil service system where no justification is requin.'Ci to relain It someone. The " dead wood" members oflen remain at the institution until they choose to retire or the university dismisses them, according to Jobst. "There are ways of getting rid of them," said Jobs!. "But who wants to take that on? These days everything ends up in court and

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you might as well forget the decision of the institution." if Jobst's contract system was employed he thinks thaI pruning Qut ineffective members would be handled by the Rank and Tenure Committee in the sallie way they handle tenure cases now. The committee itself has come under some criticism by the faculty. According to Ernest Ankrim, professor of Economics and chairman of the Committee on Commillees, a group of concerned faculty asked his commmet for an internal review of the R ank and Tenure Committee. " The concerns were about the system and the Question of non· tenured faculty serving on the committee, " said Ankrim. "The Question was: does Ihis put an unfair burden on members of that committee who have worked with those people when their case comes up for review?" "The resuits of our study showed that while there was no

WOUld-be rabbi Mark Solomon now turns Jazz tor KPLU-FM.

Zaske's boaters kick It around tomorrow.

PageS

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among

faculty

members and no mailer what changes we suggsted. it wouldn ', pass, II said Ankrim. Ankrim's commillee did propose a resolution which would make non-tenured faculty eligible 10 serve on the committee bUI not during the time they would normally be considered for tenure. According to Ankrim the motion faikd miserably. "The question of a conflici of interests looks bad," according 10 Jobst. "I[ looks like the committee is (enuring irs own. In the same way, i f the chairman of i depanmenl sits on the committee and a member' of his faculty comes up for review, he not only reviews the case, but he writes a leueT to (he committee as the chairman of the instructor's department. He gets to play judge and jury. That's a blatant conflict of interest . " "That's the price one pays for representation," according to Arbaugh. "II might be belter to have Someone farther removed but one never knows what conflicts have arisen between two ' people. Hav ing all tenured embers wouldn't be a bad idea." � . According to Provost Richard Junkun tz alternatives to Ihe tenure system have been looked at by Ihe Rank and TefJure Committee. an merits "Whatever alternative might have, it is offset by the disadvantages." said Jungkuntz. "In effect, its JUSt a different tenure system." "The main alternatives seem to relined be a lenure system, or a union system," said Arbaugh. "A union system would be jusl like the lenure system. with more disadvantag� and would involve collective bargaining,etc." in view of these comments and the defeat of the motion made by the Committee on Committees, the tenure system is thoughl to be suitable by ilS administrators and the faculty or at least. the lesser of lieverfll t'vit't. One major naw in the system seems 10 be the way information IS gathered when instructors present their case (coRUnued on

paKt shl).

Be a gypsy and see the natIon by hostelling

Pogoo lD,ll


Pace 2, Mooring Mast, October J, 1980

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Com m i tt ees : S o m et h i n g for yo u r res u m e By Undl Grippin

"ASPLU s�r\l�s os 0 voice 01 r�pr�st!nloflll� promutlnJ( In sllld�nu �ttt'IIf!m:f! In all fUp«ts oj Uni'ller.Jil)l "f� -1980·81 Siudent Handbook. ..

Ir you surrer rrom 100 much free time. � an l to aet ed. and arc lookma fOf invol... somrthina 10 put in your roume, Ahoclaled Studenh or PaciO( l.utheran Umvef\'l)' (ASPlUl Olay be the plal.."t (or you. In i ntere5led luden" I in In\ol"ed geHinK commiutt s.hould contact Kim Tucker. chairm a n or Ihe PetsonneI Eleclions and Board, or the chillrman or a pccirlC mmmlltcc. All commlllt:L:S Ibled bcl1.)w are open membership ASPLU commlll«� comrnscd (mirely of ')Iudenl�. Thert' is no need to be IRtttViewed, and one may \erVe on an unlimited number or commnled. ACADEMIC CONCERNS­ St udies academic concrrm. o r indudin& Univer(hy Ihe dC!panm(ntal evaluation. student acadetnk compialRts and advice, and rank and tenurr. Chairperson' Lynn McGuire. DAD'S DAV-Plans and

of prOKram a arranges activilu:S such as an a"'ards breakfast and an evrning of �ntr"amme nt for falhers who in campuli Ihr \ 1511 conjunction � l I h a homr

football pme. Chairpersons: Sonna Cook and Melina Majar, HOMECOMING-Organ· izes and coordina tes all HomC'l."Ominr \\'eel a(tj...ilic..

In the past. each fall Songfest, a " stomp." a parade, a home football game. half·time activities. and a formal dance have been oraanized ror Homecoming. Mardyn C h l l fJ )C � r " o n s pnueger and Jod} Tra\ii�, LEGAL INFORMATION ,SERVICES- Provides rree h:,81 refrrral and mformatlon for t udmts, An '!ltlrney I�

reuuned for l;on5ul 18tloo. Chai rpersons: Jean WlLd.rr and Carol Haugrn CAMPUS OFF T U D E N T S - P l a n ... a n d and programs mllate', activltie� and communicate� Information to orr<amflus st udCl\u. This commiu« hlU i five "'ollna �tudenu but s open 10 all Internted r.tudent!. Chair�n: Usa Guenther

A M A h o l d s i n terest m e et i n g s B) Cindy ",olf PLU'j Collep:lale Chapter

01 the Amtt)can �1arkatnl �OCla1l0n (AM.") held 1WO d.. tnleres1 meet lop Jat;t Yoe

an OUI turned Vohich l!tend.nee .,1 IIopf'roJtimalel�

41 student

This h the AM·\', �olld yr-ar at Plu. wa organ/lition 1 he larted 10 the raU or 1979 by thl" year'$ AM." Prnldenl. ecorse- xhmok. and OUI80101 PrcslJent . Rune Saatvedt. The A.\'lA 1$ open to aU PlU slUdenlS. " You don't have to be a get to major business invoh'ed, $(;hmock �<lId. A co m m u n i c a l l o n , m a j o r . Schmoek encoUfUCS all other

... to ,et invohed major fidd "'lIh the A�IA fhe association 01ren gum ,pe.�rn, field t n rs and pn;al e\e/l15. September 30, I he OrlanllaUon honed James and Hall, a meJil. crh" at h ennL ng in specialist

f'rodu(tion Lall )'el1" , l"ield ItIp\ Included St. \1.chel Wi nery and the Olympiil Brewery The AMA hu already had an InVlt.ahon 10 vi�1I Safeway'l Vellt\'ue Di.\mbulion Center October 6 81 4 p.m., the AMA Will have Juc1y L.era:u. from Leonard Gus) AUociate<;. markel ing on speaking r�ch. in the UC Regency Room,

The AMA CVt II1'1, allu" 10l udents and local hu.\lI\eues to ml('X,ate and bectlrof: lI",are of each olher to aro..". . "Thi )iear "t' ....ant Inlo I mon: r1oftUiohAll} Sludenl r e co , n i , e d orlanlullon.· · said Schmok (}nl;'e a mOnlh Witte orr bani.lUels "' ilh the �ealllt' Prof��lona1 Charter 01 ahe :\.\1" Sludt'nt memt'lcl I1te I he)e to attend Inviled banqueu by Ihe ,rour's ra.:-uhy ad\'iser DaVid E. mOllthl) ThIS \.1!,:Nabb. oPf1Onunity allo"'� members 10 meet the profe\$lonal

bu\im·�'men.

Regular meet in... Will be held c..ery other Monday II 4 p,m., beainning Oct. 10. 1980. Due<. are S7 .SO per smlC5ter

PARENTS' WEEKENO­ Plan� and coordinates a �eriet or aelll/lllc:5 ror parenh who visit the campus during ParenlS ' Weekend In the spring Chairperson: Sandra Wong QUIl BOWL-Plan� and I ) Tm'la 00",1· �UJ)U\'·I humorou, quiz g con 1\11011 or abs u r d f�tnalin8 tri\:ia quc:suon\ 80�I·a more Colle.e tl\lrllt"CIual ,",UiL prop-ram "'lfh naltonal lor l:hance a opmure, and 3) any olher quiz. plojlram Ih� commlllee rna) wi�h 10 coord l nal e Chairperson: Jean Ponet SPln,,1 E\·E.:TS-Plans and or,Inlle'! t..'thl, i-uch 11 the 'reclal ro<xh nighl"i. the Sponl Formal, and a plant durin, i-ervic:e slUin. Chrislman Vacalion Chalrpenoru. DaVid Wi� and k,,,isanl Btvtn� l' I\( kSl n STUDENT S OC I A L ACTION COMMI nU: IUSSA{.·I-I vohes �tudcnl In an eXlen program and ..aned communllv socIII OUlreach. AI:U\'lIie, .nclude tut oring . helpll\� wllh underpnvileged children, and 8 s�imming proJram ror the handicapped. Cha.irrcnon� Dori s Dahlin (!oOclaJ', and Lynnette RO!>e (�imminl).

Senate g rants th ree organ izat i o ns money; tab les one req u est By DH Allnt lfau»Q At thr Septemixr 2j Senate menmg four p-ant requcslS wen SJHO tOlaling the Spun. entertained I nt e r n a t i o n a l S t u d e n t s Oraanization . and Bread for Ihe World were granted thrir rcquesu; while the request or PI Kappa Delta, a nal ional on rrll ernilY forrmics ..::ltnpus. WI.5 tabled until Ihe he." rnmmg SPURS ...8.I gramed 10'00 II,) covet' Iheir current habi 1itie� unlil Ihe 1 ucia 8ride 16tivaJ ""hen Ihey WII! have ra.!ted enoulh mone-. 10 COWf their

�xpeniCS .

The Intrrn8lional tudrnts o raant2ll1 1 0 n WIS ,ran ted S IOOO 10 cover thr expen� of the onentation program which helps foreilj:n Itudenl� become familiar with l ife in the Unttt<! P L U in a, Slaies and and at PLU in panicular. The campw stoup Bread for tbe World was Iranli:d S I SO 10 heJp IR LIlar drive. PL Kappa �ha. a Nauonal Fotm\ic Honorary Frau:mity. re quest ed the I �oo but Appropria tion!§' comminee rrported a rt'I:Ummendalion of $300. The reason ror the larsc amount Ihe an drop

recommended aC<"ording to the committee, wa$ that (he debatr club does nOI benefit a latar amounl of slUdrms d i rectly. the: bene-hiS are s«ondary and may not be reahud for some lime and the: purpo� or the &rant! fund is to Iltnefil M many �t udent.. as

poui ble.

To araut' the ca.� for the fralernity, Mark Dunmlrcrc:ad

• Jetter from PresiJml R.ieke caus.e. their s.upporting Pre.idrnl Rieke '5 a nallona! di'tinlt:ul5hed alumnus of Pi �.ppa Ddta alld In Ihe letltt Ha led : " I rreo,ni/e that ASPlU has r!!quem ror funds

meritoriou� many rrom student arouP). I do nOI prt1ume 10 emer the quotion or ""hkh requests art' more d�mnl. I do suUt'St that Pi Kappa Delta h� euablis.hed 8 di\lInglli�hed history III Pacific lutheran . has served man)' plU� and presmt uudent� well, and becau'ie or presenl Ic:adenhlp I� 81 a lime in lIS history ""hen added finandaJ couJd be moll $UPporl effeet i ve In booutn, lIS proaram rrom"�llent" to "\urt'rlor'" Thr unusual aspttt or Ihe fralernlty', request is th., II would be a one·time &t1JU.

For the lasl ten years the club ha� \el(·surricirnl; been supponina Iheir nreds debt sp o n ! o r i n a tournaments th rough Ihe year The money r.iit'd bas enab' them to send PLU nudenu to the nultonal tournamenl. But t h il Yo inter a Inow·!olorm crippled ,he _nendant.::e at one o r thr lournaments; Ihu1 lavina the 'ratemil"!> "'ithoul fundi 10 �l Irnd the nallonal commlion. The outcomr of thei r rtqutst WIU be deaded al Ihe Senate meainl loday.


October 3, 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 3 .

Kilt

Jackson

K i st, M a rv i n a n d J ackson w i n AS PLU seats 8y Pul Mmtrr ThtCC ASPtU �enatonal posiuonJ wn� filled in the past 'l!'o .eeks. . plember 1 9 , freshmen ed for one of �e\ Cn candIdate! fat the frnhman Senale \CaL John KiM ....as the

WUlOCl'•

A w�k later , an elec\ion WI15 held to 011 two at-Iarse

or

the five candidates runmng, the tWO winners were Marla Mar\lin and Paut seats.

Jackson. This e:< tra election was ncce!sary because tWO ASPLU elected senators last sprina-Wayne Heaston and Brad Seeborg-chose not 10 return to PLU Ihis fall. The new freshman senator,

Kist. is from nearby Washinaton High School Kist said he chose to attend PLU because he liked the idea of auending a small school wub eJCcelleni iostructor, and a load student-teacher mia. Kisl ha!. bttn invol...ro in Sludent goveroment ,ince junior high §choal, and said he dedded to run for ASPLU senator on the basis of thiS

experience. Kist saId he would like ASPLU to sponsor a "Lute Luau" couples dance next spring. "Right now it's just an idea. but if the students show enough interest, I'll bring it up to the Senate," he said. "This project would be entirely for it's entertainment value." Kist

aho "ated lhat he would hke to lief the �nalon worlu", 10lether and �tri \linl for the iame aoals Lhls year. ""us way we can a"compli-.h muth more," he laid. Maria Manm, a sophomore, fillill& one of the at·large scat�, was a class preside:nt during her

program in which n i lCre'iu:d studenu wo uld travel off campus once a week to ,isn an c.1de-rl}' person "I'd &-.0 like to Ke marc dorm irueranion on campus," she added. I know that the Ruidence Hall Council handles mosl of th�e maners, but I'd still like to support it ti much as possible."

freshman, sophomore, and jUllior years at Morton High School in Morton, Wash. as well as stude:nl body president her scnior year. Marvin would like 10 sec: PLU become more involved in off-campus aClivilies. "I'd like to see the 'Ado pi a Grandparent' program started up again," she said. "Adopt a Grandparent" is a volunteer

The other at-large seat is filled by junior business student P aul Jackson. Jackson has no previous experience in student government, but has o r ga n i z a t i o n a l some experience through work with his church's youth program. "I never was really involved i n school activities until (ASPLU President) Bob

said. J(i\t

"

Gomulklewicz "Ianed Lrymg to act me interested." Paul said. "So when the elecllon came UJ'! Ihis fall I dO:ided to run for the senate." Jackson's basic conl:erns deal .'llh eneraY. "I'm on the ASPLU energy committee this fall, and this Is what I'm mo�t concerned about . because "e waste so much energy," he

said.

He is also concerned with student services uffered by A S P L U . " The day clre service that was offered to off campus students last year hasn't gotten off Ihe ground yet," he said. "Another senator is working on the problem, and I'm trying to help him."

utdoor Rec to raft down Yaki m a R iver to m o rrow 8y Sandy Wllllam� River raftina, back-packina. boating. and skiing arc some of tlte ac t i v i ties being §ponsored by ASPlU'S Outdoor Recreation ommiltee this }lear. Uoder the leadmhip of co· rperson\ Kent Ross and ie Perman and equIpment

manager Kurt xh u lu, the ,roup plans to take 1WO

raftJoads of people down the Yakima River tomorrow and Sunday. "This i1 recreatiooal rafting rather tha n exciting white water hold-on-for-your-life raftina," Schullz said . "It's a lazy trip for people who apprcciate horizontal outdoor recreation ... The ,cenery along the Yakima mcludes an old water ....heel. I peacock farm. and rod. formations. "Hopefully this �printl "c'lI e" pa nd 10 river"i in the immediate area, like Ihe NI�qulllty, " Ro.s\ aid. Warm clothes (preferat'll), wool, ....hich ....i.II . retain some warmth when wet) and suntan lotion (or protcction qainst sun &late off the water are advi� for theK trips.

The two cafts hold tiaht people each

and

are

new

additions to OR's equipment room. The money for the new rafts was rurnlShed by ASPLU. "We are very aralef ul for ASPLU's aeneroisity, " Ro s said. Boalina in the San Juam aboard TIr� Chris/ian is

heduled fOi Oct. I I and 1 2 La,t year stops IRcluded Friday Harbor . Orcas Island,

and Roche Harbor "We saw killer

whales,

Kals, oum, a spa� ShiP,

m ul tipl e deer, and other "ildlifc, Schultz said. The space ship was a toy. "

$21 to cover transport, food. and ship use. Overnight lear is required. Sign up shec:ts are at the pmes room desk . At the lime of Ihis writing 1 2 of the 25 spots available were filled. A backpacking trip near Mt. Rainier is planned for Oct. 1 8 and 19 and a canoe trip Oct. 24 through 26 (dc.�tination undetermined). Skuna trips will bqin ...,hen snow appears 3t Paradi..�e on MI. Rainier . Lan year the: fiDt trip was [)e.c. I A �ki trip will be taken during Interim. Pos�jbilitie, tnC'lude Banrr, B.C.. a Cost

is

lutheran retreat center in Montana, or Whistler Mountain in Vancouver. The group usually takes a hike somewhere during Spring Break. Last year it was to the

Ross said. The group meets Mondays at 5 p.m. in UC 214 to discuss upcoming events and evaluate old ones. Students are invited to attend.

Grand Canyon. The committee consists of about 20 people who serve as trip leaders an d are responsible for Kh edullna . plannlq, driving, and Olher details. Two leader! are sent on each trip. The group has a budget from ASPlU bUI s i practically 'iClf·�ustainina. "We brina in enough from �kijng to pretty " much take care of ou nel...�.

HEY SKIERS! Tacoma's Most Complete Shop is just around the corner on 1 12th and Paclfict Ski

MON-SAT 10-9

Layaway

phone 531-6501 "There's Only One Parkland Sports Cenler"

1n 90fi lDe'fmst \


Page 4, Mooring Mast, October 3, 1980.

PLU to host m aj o r governor d e bate 8y Ken,. Allen PlU will be the site of a subcrnatorial debate October 18. King County executive John Spellman will face off asainst his Democratic rival, State Senator Jim McDermott. According (0 organizers, the debate, scheduled for 7:30 p.m., IS expected 10 fill Olson Auditorium. In the traditional Lincoln­ DouSlas S"tyle, the two men will not respond to questions, but will alternately allMlpt to address the issues involved in the campaign, following an introductory statement " John will allempt to show the di fferences between himself and McDermott , " said a Spellman spokesman, "There was an assumption in the primary that they were like two peas in a pod. We wanl 10 show that 10hn's vir"'.. stand alone," the spokesman said. Two other debates are SCheduled. One is to be held al Gonzaga University ncar Spokane and another in the Tri-Cities area. The PlU debate will be the only one west of the Cascades A1though it is basically,anews event, il is t'xpec1ed to draw much interest from W�tern

10 stick to the iuun." PlU \\0111 abo be the sile for some other political happtnings. The three candidates for t office of Attorney Gener Independent John MIIIU Democrat John Rossellini, and Republican Kenneth Eikenberry will match wil$ in a debate on Octo�r 28 at 7:30 in the North dining room. The candidlltes will answer questions posed by a panel of campus represent8tl'CS. Representatiyes from the th ree Presidential campaigns-Carter. Reagan. Anderson- will present their views on October 1 3 at 7.30 in the North Dinins Room. On October 9th. Stat Attorney General Sin Gorton, bidding for ScnatDT Warren Magnuson's seat in congress, will be on campuJ. A speaking engagement is planned for 7:30 '" Chns Knul1en All event) arc �pon50red by ASPLU

H i g h school students to attend col l ege c l asses

I ::J ::�:;:J

I

Washington "Oten. "The debate will sive the audience a chllDee to see (Jim] more clearly and where he stands," said a McDermott starter, "and an opportunity

./so found time to campaign here. In his three-hour �/sit, .t the Doublelree Plaza Hotel In Tukwllla for . 2Q..mlnut• • ddress to j larg. group of support.rs and the press. He took the opportunity to blast economic policies of Pr.sldent Carter and John Anderson, while presenting own with now 'amlllar campaign rhetoric.

D r u g ad d i ct i o n to be top i c of B rown Bag lect u re M o n day Kathryn Ham will sptak on "Alcohol, Drugs, and Women" at Monday's Brown Baa Lecture at noon. Bain is an addiction therapist in Federal Way and instructor of alcohol studies at Fort S t e i l acoom Comm u n i t y Collese. Bain said . "Many women are personally affected by alcohol and drugs, their use by family members, people that they work with, and .. themselves.

Bam's persona) experiences with drugs and alcohol motivated her to earn a in degree master's from Anuoeh ps)'chology niversity where she focused her research on drugs and alcohol. When asked why she chose women for lhe research, Sain said, "Much rtSearch was already tabulated on malcs and not much on females." Currently conducting a private practice as an addiction therapist for alcohol and drug abuse and work ins as coordinator for drug

therapy at the Puyallup Valley YOllih Services. Bain also works with weight therapy. Bain said. "Some people Ictually have an addiC1.ion to overcatin,. .. ()oncerning her lecture Bain said. "Monday's talk will addrcss patterns of alcohol and drug use facing women in working families and situations and it will present prominent strategies in dealing with these problems." All interested are invited to attend the lecture in room 132 in the UC and bring a lunch.

B,. O.'t Arbluah High

�chool

junior

and

�eniors will be comina to PlU aaain this fsll for anolhe:r oTle· credit COurse offered throuah (he "ProJect Advance" program. The program i� offered mOre as a commuRity Krvh­ Ihan anything else, accordm, to Judith Carr, PlU ,"p"'laI programs coordinator Carr said that the program enable!; high school IiluOents to break. away from hi{(h school and to expcriellCc a small dose of colle-ge. 'Project the Since Advance" program Was fint offered to local hiSh school

students in the fall of 1978, iI hall drawn 6S to 80 students per course. This year's program will begin later this momh. The high school students are charged $1 S each at registration . The remainder of the tuition fer is picked up by businesses local to encourage the program,

.l'COrdllb ( CI ff I t is a " brr-ali e 1:0" propo�ilion. Carr y.iJ, The d ...\� is conducted i format. Grading coil with �he Honorl Pass/F nltcm

Studem� atlend the

Ie ures . take nOIC'., and have f1(am or paper to do. PlU - fO'ion I�ch the c1as�

'Many �tudenu who enJOY the progrum find thenuelve\ looking rorward to furthering their education in collegCi and universities." said Carr. " H owever, not all who participate IR the program choose to go on to higher c=duC3tiuon at PlU." Some students \\OiU come .. PLU bttause of the program," said James Van lkek, PlU's Director of Admissions. But the program is primaril a community service and not a recruitment device." Van Beek said. This fall's topic will be "Consumer Protcttion­ Whose Responsibility?"

T h i s Week I n The Cave LAKE_OOO 'H·Ol l t UNIVEIlSIlY PLACE

J/iiS.6)n

I'ARKlA"'O BJ.QI t I

Thu rsdaY:Movie: H igh Noon

NORTH (NO

1$"')5)

(DGU'OOO 927·nd fEDERAL WAif

UJ·I6GQ

DLlfMl'lA 7S•.'JSI

Wed nesdaY:Jlm McLure and 3 Damp Duck

IRUtERTON

117·9511

Sat u rday: M aranatha C h ristian coffeehouse P l u s b i g screen t. v. KPLU J azz and open m i ke


October 3, 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 5

\.. 'Argen tinia n professor to

be Beckman lec turer A formrr president of the World Council of Churches will be the featured speaker dunna PlU's third annual Beckman Memorial Lcclure5hip beginning tomorrow.

'.. ""' 1I _ r

Dr, Jose Mlquez-Bonino of 8ue1os Aires. Argentina, is to prc�t a public l«ture Sunday in the UC al 7:30 p.m. His topic ""ill be "Poverty as eunt', Blcuing and Challenge.' He wtll lho deliver the Sunday momln! University Cona,rtption sermon and

Monday morning'S chapel address. Both arc at 10. Miguez-Bonino is professor o f Systematic Theology and Ethics al the I n s t i t ute Superior [vangdico de Estudias Teologicos in Buenos Aires. He had authored a number of books, including Doing a Theology in R e vollitionary World, Chfls/ians and /I.{oTxisrs, and Room to M Peop/e. He hl$ held visiting pro(cs\orhsips in England, Icaly and lhe U.S. An informal student dlsc:uuion wilh Miguez. Bonino IS also scheduled for 9:45 p.m. lomorrov. in Ihe Cave. Beckman The Lectureship ls named In honor of Ihe late Rev James Bedma n. who �rved as Unhenal)' minister at PLU for three years before hiS dUlh in 1976.

..

'

Seniors mus t talk to regis tra r by Oc t. 30

B)' Dan Votlpcl

Senion plllnnina to or during araduate immediatel)' following the 1980·81 �cho(11 year mu�t comptac U"'e! ' ',k' ""Ilh the regi�trnr's OJi. �fore the)' ill be alloww I ,radual': Accardins to loleta spes.e1h, 8J.wciatt' re&i�I(ar. enlon mun file' an application for &raduatlon with the rell�trar 's office before CAl. 30 to be eligible for 199o..8 1 "aduation. Also, cap\ and lowns, at no charge. must be ordered from the regl..trer', office by Oct. 30. Students planning to graduate during mid·year 1980-81 must submit their Gold Book, outlining their courses and with an advisor sIgnature. to the registrar's ffiee by OCI. 1 7 . May graduation candidates must have Gold Books in by Mar. 5, 198 1 . Gold Book deadline for

August graduation candidates is July I , 1981. .. Arrer a senior has his major and minor approved by his depar tment . " !.aid EspcsC:lh, "he leaves the Gold Book. 81 our ornee. We then do a degree: check 10 see' i f everythmg ha$ btt'.n completed including things such as major, minor, general requiremelll.s and Interim." four within Sl Uden ts semesltt hours of compietina all degree requirements are eligible for May grru:1uation , providing t hey agree to complete the remaining semester hours within 10 weeks of commencement excereises on May 24, according to Espeseth. Students receiving incompletes will have May 24 diplomas withheld and degree date postponed until August or the next degree! dale after the grade is recorded. Espeseth said.

'1hi;k;SOiiOn;;o.;:-::KP

LU- FM's lezz director, was but wasn't sure he be"e�ed In God.

:::;;;;rtd!/n;;t�::::

J azz d i rector h a p py w i t h j ob

By Karen M. OIWh Mark Solomon, a graduate in philosophy and a professional musician, is new jazz KPlU·FM's director. Jazz is impoMant, according 10 Solomon. "I think thai jazz is America's classical music:," he said. Solomon has his bachelor's degree In philosophy from the University of Iowa. ' " was interested in becomina a rabbi but , wasn't sure that I bf'licvcd in God," he said. Solomon returned to the

University of Iowa a year later to do graduate work in music. During this time, he taught a hislory of jazz course for the university and played with a couple of jazz groups-one of which was the feature group at the 1975 Kent State Creative Arts Festival and won a grant from the Iowa arts council. Solomon began radio announcing for station WSUJ in Iowa City. A year later he moved to Seattle, where he was a classical announcer for KUOW. Eventually, he we.!.

abie to announce more Jall and begin taping live shows. Nalional Public Radio hilS accepted one of his tapes for broadcast sometime this winter. Solomon began as jazz director here on July 17. He says he is happy with his new position. "There are plenty of opportunities to do creauve things al KPLU·FM." he said. He plan" to incorporate intervic:v.s with jazz musicianr, in the programming, and jl!l7.L brondcast time will be increased from 42 to 4.5 houo: rs. wcck.

C i rc l e K organizes be n efit dance By Judy [ulman

J8U roc"lIst Jan Stentz performed at the C... Monday nil/hI. She ..... ".eked "y • quartet

consisting

of

the

mayor of

Port

Townsend, and pl.nlst, Sarney McLure, ba,sls, Chuck Oe"rdorf, drummer, MIke McKinley, ana .axaphonl" Denny Goodhen.

Circle K, the world's largest and one of PLU's newest collegiate service organizutions, has put together a Sadie Hl\wkins dance for later this month and h85 volunteered for the March of Dimes-KTAC Haunted House in Tltcoma. "It's areat 10 be in a club that actually carries through wilh its plans," said Jill Anderson, Cltcle K secretary. "So many groups have some super ideas. but they ne\ler end up becoming a reaJity. We (Circle K) Jre allready putting

our ideas into action . " Circle K staned at PLU lasl spring. " !t's exciting 10 see how much interest there has been in our club." said President Jim Troyer. " Helping Olhers is what we're all Phaul and we have a fun time doing it. I guess Ih: word has golten around." "We will be puttJflg on a Sadie Hawkins dance to raise mane), for some of our projects. They include working with the food banks in Tacoma, possibly the Sallere<! Women's Shelter and

Muscular DYSlrOphy. We will be volunteering our services for the March of Dimes· KTAC Haunted HOuse and continue 10 work with the March of Dimes throughout the year, " said Troyer. "An all·campus roller skating parly and a holiday dance with canned food donations as admission priced are also in the planning," Uoid Troyer. The themf' for Ihis year's Circle K'ers around the world is "Caring Life's Magic " Child care is the focus for most of their activities, Troyer said.


Page 6, Mooring Mast, October 3, 1980

Anorexia: ward i ng off ' Lutebutt' to the extreme By Lori K . Johnson In an effort to ward off "Lutebutt" many PLU women skip the food lines and head Slraight for the salad and Diet Pepsi. Someone who eats skimpily may be trying to drop a few pounds. but keep an eye on the person who literally eats like a bird. He or she may be suffering from anorexia nervosa, a disease which begins as a routine diet and can quickly snowball into an all<ansuming, self-destructive obsession. According to published s t a t i s t i c s , approximately I 80,000 Amc:ricans from the ages of 12 to 2S surrer from some degree of anorexia nervosa. Fewer than 4 pacent are males. In the past five years there has been a I,OCIO percent increase in incidence. Less Ihan half of those wit.h the di\order are reCelVIR& Heatment, and about 10 J'Crttni of the total may die if they don't seck help. Dr Hilde Bruch, tlUlhor of IWO books on anorexia, writh that symptoms of the di!oease lnc:lude radical baeliL}I changu �uch as los'> of 20-40 ptrcent of body weight, absence of menstrual periods, hair loss, waste of muscle tissue, anemia, inabilit}l to sleep. low blood pr"'>ure, !dow pulse. 10\10 body temperature and kldoe)' malfunction. 8ehaviora\ symptoms include consumption of a dtbtically reduced amount of food. and such aeu as self· induced vomiting and use of diuretics to purge the body of imaginar)' exceucs. Obsessive el{en:ising is also practiced by some anore�ics. The victim of anorexia suffers tremendously. In some cases there is 50 lilll!:: fat on a victim '.I body that the bones rub painfully against the skin. Silting down can be an ordeal Ihal leaves the bod}l bruised. ActOrding to Anna Cramer. In a Family Circle article from Auaust, 1980 the most imminent dang!::r of the dl� IS malnutrition. One Imply cannot remain healthy without some attempt at ealing the classes "well­ . ballanced meals. . Why would someone try to starve herself to death? Most doctors look 10 the mind for surfering. the psycholoaico..l C8ustS of the Cramer. a former anorexic, dllelb!::, bUI some doclors says thaI if the psychnlo&icaJ believe that one can ha\lc a problems art not deal! with. biological pre-disposition for the patient will Soon r(\lert the disease. back to the old patterns of The n,st effort at Ireatment n o n · e a l i n g , E ffect i v e must I;oncenlrate on t r e a t m e n t s include controllin. Ihe malnutrition individualized and family from which the palienl is t h e r a p y , ex t e n d e d

1

hospitalization. beh8\lior modificatIOn, and nutritional reprogrammmg. In her books, The Golde" Cage and £gting

DISorders, Dr. Bruch writes of man}l different psychological roots or lhe disease. One of the most common

reasons younl lIirl!> drive themselves to anorexia is a desire for perft.;tion. Thinness is seen as this perfection. Anorexia nef\losa is a di�ase of Ihe 'SO:I in that airls caught up in Ihe disorder see Ihemselves becoming thinner and more btaulllui. Tight

designer jeans are the status symbol of the moment. The more slender one can become. the closer she is to perfection. The tragedy is, the anorexic never reaches the desired goal. Anorexics are alwa}ls pushing, s u r m o u n t i ng i n c r e d i b l e physical discomfort t o try to be even "beller . " The anorexic strives for perfectiop by becoming as thin Altho possible, dangerously underweight, she feels it is never enough, Through therapy victims can realize that they are good enough people the way they are. They come to discover that self·wonb has nothing to do WIth weight, Another I(ason for becoming a "destructive dieter." Bruch write!, is the overbearing innuence of a dominaung mother. A parent can hardly force food down a child's throat so as the child literally wastes away they Cf' only s,and by helples�I)'. unconsciQus. unspoken message tbe anorexic is sendins out is. "You can'l make me eal' I'm going 10 hurt myself and then you'll be sorry'" As a young woman a0e5 I h rough an emotional transition. such 1IS the beginning of high school or coliege, there is 11 certain Iype who y,ants \ler) much to control allth3t happens. 1 0 her, When life bc:comes complicated thinas may be too much for this person t,p.. handle. Unable to face tbe fa that she is not In charge of life. ..he heglOs to severe regulate a pan or her life that "he i$ undeniabl) in cootrol of. her diet Thill anorelf.ic is pro\lina 10 herself that she can be 1n charge. Dieting bttomes a way ror her to prove that she can control her«,lf. A girl in a situatiOn such as this treats her own body almost as strictly as a person is dealt with in a prison camp. On a bare minimum of food she attempts to lead a normal, active life, If not treated soon, this girl w"' inevitably brrak down. The ov helminJ tragedy of anorexia nervosa is its destructiv e nature. MOl vktinu are briSht , intelligent, acti\le young people who subconsciously feel IOsuffide nt. The disorder deleriorat('S these victims into gaunt shadows. e'"'eI striving The to be e\len thinner esc.lalin g instances of Jnorelfia In the pasl few }leaf') pro\le thai the emphru.is on slender, beaullful bodiC'; has gone painfully awry in the minds of many young girls today.

Te n u re- A n o l d i s s u e i s b ro u g h t u p agai n (Continued rrom pille one) since Ihis is the only chance he or she may have One major nnw in the system .s«m5 to be the way information is gathered when instructors present their cases. Since this is the only chance they have to prove themselves deserving of tenure, it is important that their paSl performance be reviewed. Unfortunately, yearly reviews

and major evaluations which are called for every third and fifth years. are not always administered. Hence. no record of past perfonnance is available whC11 it comes time to review. " The indi\lidual is responsible to get thai information gllhered and summarized, " said Arbaugh. " These reviews have not been administratively required. "

" We get aboul 70 t o 80 pereent compliance from supervisors in turning tn eva:uatlons," said JungkuRlz. "It bas to be enforced and department heads need to be reminded. If no evaJuauon appears, it is a potential negative renection on the person's file," he said. If a facult}l member hasn't been regularly evaluated and is denied tenure. he or she may

have a legitimate complairn against the administration for not follwing through with their responsibiJities. There arc two non-voting students assigned to the committee each year whose primary responsibilities in the past have been to gather responses from the instructor's former students through surveys or other means.

Usually the workload has been large and the student!> have complained of being liUle more than a secrelarial staff. The faculty has chosen the committee to be autonomous in their adVisory role and it is doubtful that students will ever vote on the commiu«. h is the faculty's prerogative to remain autonomo us, bu they may ha\'e to recruil elsewhere for statisticians.


October J. 1980, Mooring �'1asl, Page' 7

PLU conductors excited By M.�n J. Opptlt

profane. " The pitte by Debussy was

Two very excited people on campus these days are Jerry Kracht, conductor of the U niversity Symphony Orchestra, and Roger Gard, conductor of the concert band and jazz. band. Both men and 'beir large groups have )ncerts this month that will &.hten and entertain those who attend. The orchestra is starting out its season with an interesting program . This concert will consist of four numbers: Schubert's "Overture to A I/onso and Estrella, " Handel's "Concerto Grosso in G minor, Op. 6, No. 6," Strauss' "Suite from Der Rosenkol1olier. " and the feature number will be

written in 1910, and will feature Mouer Forman Dean as the solo harpist. Dr. Kracht described the pitte as being "Debussy at his facile best." Knowing Debussy's expertise at tone-color and texture in music, I am sure the pitte will be gorgeous. It is precisely this high quaJity of music thai makes the opportunity to hear our orchestra so wonderful. Dr. Kracht's philosophy of performing is to play the finest music as well as possible; and with the musical growth that has taken place in the orchestra members over the past few years, I know the whole concert will be

�bussy's " Danses sacree et

excellent. This growth i s attributable: to many factors,

the foremost being that students are coming to the instrumental program at PLU with more playing experience and better training. AJi of this makes the performance of difficult works not only possible, but necessary for the growth of each musician. However, not all orchestra and band members are instrumental performance majors. These performers are also biology, English, and hislOry majors, music education majors, and in the orchestra there' are members of the community at large' involved. This is a wonderful example of how music unifies performers and draws the listencr into the experience. To truly enjoy music, one must b«ome involved in it; and that is what our music orOIHam i� dolna for performers and

listeners alike. Roger Gard, conductor of the Concert Band, is using a different approach 10 his concerts this year which should prove to be interesting. Each concert will have a theme or a main thrust to it. The October concert has the theme of music based on folk tunes and folk dances; Armenian, American, Irish, and Scottish tunes will be represented. Many times we think of folk tunes as being simplistic in nature. Nothing could be further from the truth. The whole group is geuing a work-out and the fingers are flying. Other themes for this season will be: Wind Ensemble music pre-I900, featuring works by and Beethov an, Berlioz, which Winds, March Haydn; will feature processionals,

marchClii and the like from many countries. Along with works by Beethoven , Sousa, and Walton will be an originaJ march from Germany of World War I I which may never have been performed in the United StalClii prior to this concert. The Ian concert in the late spring will feature all contemporary works by a variety of composers. These concerts by the orchestra and band should provide a good evening away from the studies, and I urge them. attendance at Conductors and performers alike have worked hard to provide quality music for the listeners' enjoyment, and they deserve to have a full house. The concerts are free of charge and they are both this month; watch for posters and flyers for time and place.

-'-I at f i e l d v i s i ts i n off year s By Kelly AUt" By an wering the questions of a aroup o( seminary student in Oregon, he touched on nearly every major political question possible. But thiS was not a campaign stop to woo the student vote; this was on.: of the regular trips U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield make'S to his home state every three or four weeks. " ( ' v e ofte'n (e'lt that olitician.. l:ome around ring election year and then disappear," he began. "I try to maintain continuity and I gam a feeling of what's going on. " Hatfield has long been a favorite of Oregon voters for his strong Slands on major topics in Congress. This summer, he led an overnight filibuster m the Senate in an attempt to defeat the move to register young men for the .:iraft. He called the filibuster " an educational forum." 'The whole idea of registralion is to have d.aca on

people. 1 knew the government had information the already, " hesaid. Hatfield doesn't advocate non-compliance as an alternative for young people. '" don't think you should set up any law you have no intention of enforcing; that creates a loss of respect for the' government, " he said. He said he asked the justice department what they would do i f young people didn't comply. They told him they were expecting 98 percent of the 19 and 2O-year-<>lds to do so. Hatfield said even if 98 percent did register, the other 2 percent would create 10,000 new inmates in the U.S. penal system, which it is not prepared to handle. most the Perhaps controversial topic Hatfield has been faced with recently is the movement of the so-called in majority" "moral Congress: groups of "born­ again" Christians making major political moves and speaking out against members

of Congress who do not vote along their conservative lines. " J 'm a part of the evangelical movement theologically," said Hatfield, "but I have 1T0ubie with baptizing political dogma with theological doama. There is the implication that the work of the church can be achieved by the right political stand. That's apostasy." Hatfield grew up wilh a strong Christian background, but his commitment to make his faith a part of his daily life didn't happen until 1954 while he was dean of students at Willamelte University in Salem, Oregon. "I began to see the lives of the students changing," he said. "That had a tremcndous impact on my life." Hatfield says maintaining his faith in his political life is no more difficult than being a student on a campus. "For a student, values are changing so fast. Mine is such an eao-centered profession; students have a tremendous

Mark Hatfield pressure' to conform. I n politiCS, mighu makes right, which is totally wrona in religious life. Christ's gospel of leadership is serving-in politics it's manipulation. " Hatfield also related a story of when he visited Calcutta and met Mother Theresa. Sh.: was working with the lepers in the city and at the time was

carrying the dead off the street . Hatfield asked her if she ever became discouraged, since it seemed she had no success in overcoming the city's problems. She answered, "God calls me to be fait hful-not to be successful. .. Perhaps that is true of Hatfield,IOO.

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Page 8, Mooring Mast, October 3, 1980

R h i nestone Ros ie 8y Krhlin Kade.n "Rhinestone Rosie," Mrs. Chellis Swenson's inexpensive imitation of "Diamond til," sings both the song hits and flops of 1 840· 1 9 1 9 . She attributes much of her songbird talent to her childhood days. "My sister and I used to argue over who washed and who dried dishes." said Rosie. "Whoever washed gOt to sing hannony and whoc:ver dried sang melody. • , Rosie said that for a gal who grew up with tunes of the Andrews Sisters, records of 1940's music played on a record player. and a car without a radio, entertainment came in the form of one's own devices and talents. PlU Rose. wife of University Center director Marv Swenson, performed Sunday at the 30th annual SPUR Big Sis'-tittle Sis' Banquet. Wearing a white, dotted·swiss gown and an fully hat accompanying

"It was nice to be able to be away from home knowing that the kids and family would be all right," she said, commending her husband for his acceptance of her hobby. "He knows I love it and he is always supportive," she said. At her home. Rosie proudly ushers people into her "Enter· at·Your-Own·Risk Room" containing costumes in various states of repair. IOO-year-old beads, hats and hat pins as well as nineteenth century magazines and pattern catalogs. Rosie said her costumes are all authentic and most were given to her by friends and relatives. From a trunk as dated as the hats it contained, Rosie pulled out headdresses covered by bird plumage and "auntie's lace" and netting. One over-sized hat was explained to be "my own creation that was so overly weighted on one end, 1 had to sew curtain weights into its light weight edge so as to be able to wear it. In this hat I

Sa u d i s host n at i o n a l d ay By Sanl Anderstn

and narb P i c k e ll

deck.ed. with a bird nestled in lacey trimmings, Rosie sang and interspersed amusing anecdotes from tum of the century college song books. Rose said. " I have to label myself as a 'people performer' rather than as a stage perfonner simply because I enjoy people. With the singing interaction that takes place, I have to forget my own inhibitions and become a part of the group I'm perfonning for." A 10th year Christman performer for the Meeker Mansion in Puyallup, and a sixth year state fair participant, Rosie considers herself a professional. For her . own . ...acation, " she went on a performance tour of some California and Arizona community colleges.

have to walk very gra�erully," she said while demonstrating, "and have to go through doors sideways." Rosie said her name often brings a common visual preconception. "Many people who don't know quite what to expect, hear 'Rhinestone Rosie' and picture a fat stripper in her 10's, wearing a sleay dress, who chats while playing ragtime piano. Most don't know how authentic the costuming and songs really are. For me, I think that putting together this wardrobe is half th� fun," she said. A Tacoma native, she began her vocal performing as a high school sophomore dr�ed in a gunny sack smeared with garden dirt in "Annie Get Your Gun."

Saudi Arabian National Day, sponsored by the I n t ernationnl Students Organization. was held last Saturday. Turki Alsudiary, native Saudi Arabian and organizer of the rvent, said that there are about 1 2 Saudi Arabian students attending PlU. "Saudi Arabian Day is the of anniversary the independence of the people of Saudi Arabia. which took place in 1932," explained Alsudiary. "We wanted to share this with the Americans, so that they could learn about our country and the way we live." One dollar bought a ticket into this Middle East country where water costs three times than gas and more temperatures can climb to 130 degrees. It all took place in Chris Knudzen, but the room had decorating changu. The speakers' platfonn was transformed into an Arab living room, complete with authentic cushions and a rug-no chairs because Arabs sit on the floor. In the front or the room a little girl wearing an elaborately embroidered gown danced to the beat of a Saudi Arabian folksong, her

pigtailed head nodding from side to side in time to the music. Scaled on cushions and on the floor in a half-circle around her were nine' or tcn broadly smiling men. Some played instruments; some sang; some clapped variations to the basic rhythm of the song. an Perkins, Richard Tacoma at instruct or Community College who visited Saudi Arabia in 1978. presented a side l show of the western and central parts and the Saudi oil industry. "The Iranians call the waterway between our two countries the Persian Gulf. We know it is really the Arabian Gulf," Perkins said. Non-Arabians in the crowd received an education on the subject of Saudi life. Along with the plentiful singing, dancing, and handclapping on the pan of the lively Arabs, there were displays, speakers, films, and an equally plentiful Saudi Arabian reast. Guests were offered roasted lamb, informative pamphlets lined a long table in the back or the room. Many depicted recently­ or universities built vocational-technical schools. "Just a few years ago there was only one school in Saudi

Arabia, " slaled Othman AuaUeh, an Arabian scholar who addres� the gathering. " Today there are seven universities, 23 colleges and many other schoob. We ha made great progress in the short time since we have been a nation." Photographs were display of the various kings who hav� ruled the nation since King Abdul Alsud united its various ' factions under a single government in 1932 . . The chicken and a vanetyof sid!" cooked by dishes were Kamal. a chef from Seattle. Photographs and mon· archy are successful, said one Saudi PlU student. because "We are like one family in Saudi Arabia. There are always some people who don't like the government, but mostly we're pretty happ� with it." Although the emphasis of the day was on culture and n politics the oil issue -lias tackled head-on. The Arabs stressed the importance of cooperation between east and west. Two films on the Saudi Arabian oil industry were shown. "We have the oil," commented AJsudiary, "and you have the technology. We need to work together in a constructiv way. "


Moorin, Mut, October 3 , 1910, Paac9

F i rst i n a series of f i l m s

Sharon Storey A rilm lecture entitled "Okccrenokcc: land of Trembling Earth" will be shown Oct. 13 at 7:30 in Chris Knudsen Hall. Monday evening's presentation will be an in·depth view of Georgia's great wildlife reserve, sponsored by the Tacoma Audobon Society. The Okeefenokee, 412,(0) acres called "Land of trembling Earth" by the OCfaw Indians because the mingly solid land was ually thousands of noating peat islands. is home for hundreds of brilliantly-plumed birds and over 300 types of nowering shrubs. Photographer Dennis Holt will narrate his award-winning photographic study. Holt has won the Sigma Delta Chi

Award three limes. and has worked for the Birmingham Post Herald. Associated Press [nternational. Time/Life. and

Newsweek. The Tacoma Audobon Society has been active since 1969. Ils goal is to protect the total environment of the Tacoma area by responding to current hearings on developmen t s . t hrough Environmental I n pacl Statements, and through education. "The Ok.ccfcnok�" is the first film in a �rits to be shown hen:. The rcmaioio, films in this year's series arc; Jan. 26. 1981: "Song of the Northern Prairie," Feb. 23: "Adventures of a Wildlife Photographer, " and March 30: "Wilderness Trails." Tickets are available at the Information Desk. PLU students 3TC admitted for fr«.

M a rn i N i xon i s a bus y l ad y 8)' Kflly Allfn

Marnl Nixon

With 21 Emmy awards, one Grammy award nomination, three musical soundtrack recording and numerous recordings of her own to her cred it, it would Sttnl Marni Nixon wouldn't have much more to strive for. It would seem that way, but one can never make assumptions abou� multi-talented this and incredibly busy lady. Nixon may be bat known to people outside the Seattle area as the voice behind Deborah Kerr in The Xing and I. Natalie Wood in West Side Story, and Audrey Hepburn in My Fair Lady. Recently Seattle viewers might know ber from her work as hostess award-winning the of program children's "Boomerang." But that's not all she has ever done or plans todo. " I want to go back to school in an individual course or study for my doctorate," she said. "As I tour and perform, I'm actually doing research on my thesis of the classicist in popular America." Nixon will be performing (and perhaps researching) at PLU toniaht with a program "The Great entitled

S o ngs . . . p o p u l a r and unpopular." She likes to cross the lines of classical and popular music in her programs. "I present both styles, and I break down barriers that way," she said. "It �ems to me if it is presented properly in the style in which it was written, then it comes off." Nixon is planning to ltave on tour soon which will include a club act in San Francisco and New York, and college appearances. But her schedule is not easy to follow in Suttle. She spends tWO days a week filming "Boomerang" and plays lots of tennis. "It saves my life." She has I S private voice students and is planning an appearance in Seattle with the Chamber Symphony. "Usually my relaxina consists of doing something else," she said. She enjoys the cultural aspects of Seattle and does not them find limited in comparison to New York or Los Angeles. '"

feel can really contribute something to the cultural enrichment of Seattle, especially with the show," she said. ''It's nice living here and

very lively. AU my kids and my family are in Los Angeles. I went down to visit them and the air and the city, aaah!," she frowned. "I'm just as busy here as 1 would be in Los Angeles; I might as well be somewhere where there's clean air." She finds that her travels ... take her to enough different parts of the country and she gains "a feeling for what people are and what they like." Nixon was married to composer Ernest Gold for 19 · years. Gold received an Oscar for his music in the IiIm "Exodus." One of her three children, Andrew is a popular singer. Besides her plans to return to school, she also has her countless appearances and plans to go to Europe. "I've recorded in Europe and in just about every language, but I want to stay there and learn to speak their Janauages nuently," she said. She also hopes to write some' music herself but for her own reasons. "I think that would take a lot of time being in one place," she said, "and that sounds very nice. "

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Paae 10, Mooring Mast, October 3, 1980

A m e ri can Yo u t h H oste l s h a rbo u r t h By Saud)' WIlliams Hosteling is traveling "under your own steam"-­ bicycling, hiking, canoeing, skiing, sailing, horseback riding--and staying at youth hostels. which are inexpensive overnight 8ccommodations with adult supervision. owned or chartered by one of the S O national hosteling associations arfiliated whh Ihe International Youth Hostel Federation. A youth hostel provides for young people what a hotel prOVIdes for traveling adults: a place 10 sleep, wash . and eat. But when�as a hotel segregates people--in private rooms and a\ private tables--a youth hostel brings them together. The simplest youth hostel, in a country district frequented by wRlkers or climbers, will provide only the basic requirements of

dormitoril!s, washrooms, sanitary installations and a kitchen in which travellers can prepare their own meals. A large modern youth hostel, in a city or main touriSt center will offer bedrooms with four . eight beds, hot to

showers. baths, recreation rooms, a restaurant or cafeteria. and other facilities. Hostels are fou:ad all over the world , including in college dorms. mountain lodges, national parks, medieval castles, Swiss chalets, and even in a three-masted sailing vessel moored in a scenic Swedish harbor.

The hostel movement began i n 1909 under the leadership of Richard Schirrmann, a German school teacher who wanted to help young people escape from industrial cities to the peace of the countryside. Schirrmann felt that "for young adults, exploring the country on their own or with one or two friends, seeking an a:onomical bed each night at a youth hostel, there was a valuable developme nt of character and Inltlallve routes to be planned, maps to be studied, equipment and food to be prepared; then. In the hostel. a shan! in the domestic duties. from potato­ peeling to the sweeping of noors" (Quote from an AYH brochure). The movement began in Central Europe and has since expanded to nations on every continent. By making it economically possible for young people to travel. hostels seck to help them broaden their cultural experience and develop an appreciation of the environment. bOlh nalUral and social.

Home Hostels If a place is interesting enough for hostelers to want to visit but there are no building in the area to convert into hostels, someone in the area will simply make their home available, or several homes, if the need calls for it. In King County, Sea haven Hostel has four location where

"home hostels" are currently available. Rates at home hostels arc usually $3 per night plus incidentals. Information on the fluctuating locations of the homes open to· hostellers can be obtained by calling Scahaven at 624-8012. Anyone in the Sea-Tac area willing to open their home to hosteler!. should contact Damian Bakewell at Sea haven. "We're always looking for new homes," BakewtU said. Auburn home hostels are located near such tourist attractions as Auburn Fish Hatchery, White River Valley Historical Socicty, Green River Gorge. Nolte State Park, Flaming Geyser State Park, M u c k elshoot Reservation. bike routes and trails. and Jellum Site­ Cinnabar Mine. Home hostels in Federal Way give access to Dash Point State Park. Steel Lake, bicycle and nature trails. Sea-Tac Shopping Mall, square dancing, tennis courts, a recreation center. golf courses. skin and sky diving, and swimming pools. In Enumclaw. the home hostels are near King County Park, King County Fair. Mt. Rainier 40 miles to the southeast, 14.8 acres of cilY parks, Chinook Pass 46 miles east. Farman Pickle Industry. and Crystal Mountain 40 miles southeast. Kent home hostels offer access to Green River Bike Route, Longacres Race Track, Seatlle International Raceway, Lake Meridian. Mill Creek Canyon. Garrison Creek, Olenn Nelson Park, and Russell Road Park.

Washington State Hostels The Unittd States boasts

240 youth hostels. se\.en of Wllich nrc in Washington state.

The Sea Havan Is Washington st.te.

The Fort Flagler Hostel in Nordland s i located at the end of Marrowslone Island, 1 0 miles from Hadlock and miles from Port 20 Townsend. This old military rort olTers a view of the Olym pies. Cascades and Puget Sound and is open June I through Sept 30. For more information call 385-1288. Fort Worden State Park near Port Townsend offers a fourplex barrack-style facilitv housing 3()o persons. Fort Worden is a complex of historic fort buildings now used as a Conference Center. Port Townsend. founded in the 18805, has many hiS(oric homes and is the terminal from ' Whidbey Island Feny. This hostel has a scenic beach and recreation area and is open year-round. Call 38S065S ror more information. Fort Columbia Youth Hostel is located on Highway 101 10 miles eaS( of Ilwaco on the Pacific Coast Bike Trail. The accommodations are dormitory-style. For more

Hoat.llng begn In Europe nd. h.. a/nce .xpanded .. ont' of the moat enjoyab/. waya tor young peopl. to traY.' an broaden thtlJr appr.c/atlon ot the en'lironmenl

Fort wnte inrormation Columbia, WA 9814. To find the Evergreen Hostel in Carnation, take the Fall City -Preston exit . It is located three blocks east or the Carnation school and library. Call 33.1-4978 or 333-4�3 for more information . Ashford houses a hostel at tbe lodge just outside the Nisqually Gate entrance to Mt. Rainier National Park. It provides access to hiking. longmire Museum. water falls and With canoeml. accomodallons for 10 III cabins. thi.!> hOlitel is open year-round but only by reservation durin, the winter month.�. fnrmore inrormation call S69-23 12. Mik�', Beach Resort in Lilliwaup is located 15 miles north of Hoodsport on Highway 1 0 1 along Hood Canal. It boasts a scenic bcach and view and access to hiking trails up the Hamma Hamma and Duckabush valleys . It is open June I through Sept. 30. For more information call 877·5324. Other youth hostels in the region include three in Oregon- one in Ponland, the Sea,ull in Coos Bay. and one in Mitchell. British Columbia also has three hO.!lels- one in Vancouver at the end of Discovery Street. just off Fourth Avenue, one at Whistler Mountain on Alta Lake which pro'lidC$ a scenic skiing area, and one on the C h iIliwack River in a

wilderness area of Vancouver. For additional information contact American Youth Hostels, Inc. National Campus, Delaplane. VA 592·327 1 . 22025. (705)

Hosteling in Seattle Brass doors. terrazzo noors. inch -, thick marble and characterize the old Wintonia Hotel. home of Seahayen Youth Hostel, Seattle's shelter !"or young uayelera. The grand old hotel ..:an accommodate lSO overnight guCSts providing them with beds - (bedro l l s required), recreational and laundry jacihtles. a kitchen, showcrs, Wayfarer the and Restaurant. Located on the corner of Pike and Minor a few blocks east of Inlerstate S, the Seahaven building is currently in "deplorable" condition, according to ExeCUtiye Director Damian Bakewell. Since Bakewell founded the Seahayen in 1976 . the hostel has met its operation expenses but has not had the capital to remedy the b u i lding's plumbing and electrical problems. Operation expcnses are covered by the overnight fees charged to hostelers (53.25 for members of American Youth Hostels, Inc. and S4 .2S for non­ members), but these fees do


October 3,

1980, Mooring Mast, Pagr I I

at i o n ' s yo u n g t rave l l e rs not covrr thr high cost of outsidr labor. The

city

of

Srattlr

has

ff u these residences grow. Existing American

hostels

$100,000

enjoy diverse clirntde. In Washington, about SO percent

'6.5,000 from three sources:

of the guests 3re foreigners. "Most domestic hostellers are rrom WaShington state and

. ranlrd Seahavrn a

loan for emeraency repairs. "We have also requested

PACCAR, Doring, and Weyerhaeuser , with the hope

lhat they'll help �ith a loan or Irant," staled Bakewell. $eaha\'en began a project four monlhs aao 10 raise

52,300,000 to renovate the buiJdinl'

"Wr

are

seeking

most roreigners are rrom Canada and Gtrmany," said Blakewell. Last

year

Seahaven

had

14,000 overnighters showing a 37 percent increaJe over the

previous year." Generally we have a 30 to 40 percent

investors to supply S6OO,IXIO each." Bakewell laid. "They'll get a 25·)0 pctttnt

increase Bakewell.

rc=turn a year, plus they'll be paninl owners of a 52 milhon

survey on opcrallofl5. most hostelen are singlr males with

budding. Our only task now is to locale in\'estol"l. "

an

The

federal

a

year,"

According to

average age

a

said

Seahaven

or 24 years

who arc travelling aJone. Most

lovernment

travel by bus and are "just

currently provides no funding

passing through." According to Ihe survey none of the hostellers were

to assist hostrlr. However, a bill rncouraging local go\'crnment bodies to aid hostels was passed by the House last May and is currently being introduced 10 thr

Senate

with

sponsorship

of

the

co­

senators

Magnus;)R and Jackson. According to Bakewell, the bill wiU establish a national plan for hosld development

and is pan or a pilot project which will make available

from the Ocpanment of the Interior a maximum o f

$200,000 for any one project and 55 million total within the

nelll three years.

Three states- Alaska, Washington, and California '

receiving

welfare

beneriu

indicating lhal Stahaven is not a welfare home. A YH is awaiting government approval on a recent offrring of the Whatcom County parks and Recreation Depanment of two buildinas on the old Blaine Airforce Base. The local AYH council has made Tacoma a priority location for a new hoslel. "To establish a hostel all it requires is someone interested and willing to work, staled Bakewell. II

Annual AY H membership fees are $7 to 514 depending

for

on the applicant's age. Membership cards allow

hostel devrlopment. According to Dakewell, the

any pan of the world at special

have

passed

legislation

20

country is over behind

other

years

countries

in

hostel developmen t. " We need to educate others to the benefits or youth hostels." he said.

According

statistics,

to

AYH

Washington

can

support 120 hostels, yet they have only kVen.

holders to use any facility in ral(S. Non-members can :'1'8Y at the hostels, though they pay slightly more. Membrrship forms can be picked up at various locations on campus where Youth Hostels are advertised on bulletin boards.

youths ',om .11 0".' the country find pie.sent and Jnerpens/"e way '0 'ra"el.

"The trouble wilh ho tels in Ihe United Statts is that they

are too few and far bct\loC'C'fl," stated 8 Seahavcn hostder on hiS way around the world by bike, people

"In

Europe

travel

young

more

and

tvtrytrun. i clO\er there." Wesl Germany boa!tS more

than �so faclhllts and children are Introduced to hostels as part of their schooling. in London, four racilities

provide 1 ,000 beds , f)n any mg,tu, while many or the 269 hostels dotting the EnaJish and Wdsh countrysides are only I day's hike or bike trip from each other. America among having

is

also

western no

unique

nalions

in

government

subsidies for il5 hostels. Only about 20 »treent are in cities, the arU! most attractive 10 foreigners. New York City has

none at all, According to Bakewell, members of Amencan Youth Hostel, Inc, , the sole hostel sy�tem in the United S't atc!, are hoping Ihat lheir two years of planning and lobbying for conares.sional action will pay

Typlca' hoa'el room designed to jjbrlng people toget"er."


Page 12. Mooring Mast. <Xtober 3, 1980

Peer review board ex p l ai ned By Sandy Williams Peer Review, PlU's judicial process, begins at the RA level and progresses into three levels of peer review boards. Each of the three boards is designed to help students who have been "written up" for breaking campus policies. Lauralee Hagen, Assi5tant Director of Residential Life, stated, "We feel we've come up with the best system to work with in our endeavors to oversee policies set by the Board of Regents. Students need to be challenged with responsibilities and guidelines to learn to be responsible for thier actions." The PlU student handbook describes the peer review boards as "low-key meetings among students, designed to give all parties the opportunity to identify concerns, explain perceptions, explore behavior ahd hear suggestions. Emphasis is placed on student behavior and the thinking behind it." The purpose of the boards is to place incidents in a seuing to be reviewed by a neutral group to discuss a student's involvment in the incident and determine whether or not a breach of university policy has occurred. Hagen emphasised that the boards are not courtrooms but meetings in which university policy student and responsibility are clarified and explained. Hagen termed them as "fruitful discussions" aimed at helping student's community realize responsibility and awareness. "Write ups" occur when an RA, staff or facuhy member discovers a student or group of students violating university

policy. The review boards determine how serious the violation is and which sanctions to implement. According to Rick Allen, Director of Residential Life, if an RA witnesses obvious violations of rules he or she "hOi!> no choice but to report .. it. "As soon as you put an RA in the position of judge and

jury people start Questioning and their credibility consistency and blame them for picking favorites," Allen said. If an RA has only an " intuitive feeling" Ihat someone is acting against policy he or she is instructed by Residential Life to confront the suspected party and give warning. "For example, say some guys who are well known for their beer parties come in with brown paper bags. The RA may suspect they are carrying six packs. The idea is not to catch them doing something wrong but to warn them and say to them 'if you're going to have a party here, don't,'" Allen explained. I f an RA is exposed to hearsay concerning a possible violation of policy, he or she is instructed to contact the party in a non-judicial way by sending an "unofficial letter of policy clarification." Other university members may refer incidents requiring judicial review to the Assistant

Dean for Student Life. According to Allen there were apprto:c.imately 300 write ups last year. Most of these were for alcohol misuse on campus followed closely by visitation then noise and damage. About 90 percent

were handled by Hall Review Boards at level one of the Pter Review System. The Hall Review Board for each dorm consists of four to seven hall residents and the haJJ director who serves as staff advisor. Their areas of jurisdiction include alcoholic beverages, noise. visitation, and damage less that $ID. At the second level. the Residence Hall Council (RHC) Review Board consists of seven to eight hall Vice Presidents and on off--campus representative with the Housing Coordinator serving as staff advisor. They deal with incidents of a more strious nature, including possible repeat violations. Theri area of jurisdication expands from that of level one to include false alarms, fire hazards, and firearms explosives. marijuana, obstructing freedom f expression, solicitation, adn damage of property valued at $50 to$100. At the third level, three student government leaders and three faculty members constitute the. Faculty-Student Review Board with the

Ir-------""II

EARN OVER $ 8 0 0 A MONTH FOR THE REST OF YOUR SENIOR YEAR. Interested in math. physics or engineering? Then you could earn as much as $800 a month, for the rest of your senior year, in the Navy's NUPOC-ColJegiate program (NUPOC is short for Nuclear Propulsion Officer Candidate).

If you qualify, you'll get 16 weeks of Officer Candidate School, and an additional year of advanC(:d technical education. Education that would cost thousands in civilian life, bUl n i the Navy we pay you. And you'lI receive a $3,OOO cash bonus In the end of your training year.

1t isn't easy. But those who make it find themselves in one of the most elite engineering training programs anywhere. With unequalled hands-on responsibility and a $30,000 salary in four years.

For more details. simply see your Navy Officer Programs Representative. Or drop him a resume. The NUPOC-CoJlegiate Program. It could be the start or a great career. Sign up for an intCTview in the Placement Office on <xtober 60r 10, or send resume to: Lt. Scott Evans Navy Recruiting District Seattle 300 120th AVf!. N.E., Bldg. I Bellevue, WA 9800s or call collect (206) 442-5700

NAVY O FF I C E R S G ET R ES PO N S I BI LITY FAST.

Assistant Dean for Student life serving as adviser. They hear situations which might warrant special consideration and decisions possible having immediate impact on a student's future at PlU. Their area of jurisdiction includes abuse. intimidation. or harassment of others. dishonesty academ i c (cheating, collaboration. plagiarism). repeat violations. assault. damage over $100, drugs and narcotics. and theft. They have the power to recommend expulsion to the President, impose sanction of suspension. or any lesser sanction. " Sanction Inappropriate." (used at all board levels) means that the review board determined no violation of University policy occurred. "Deferred Sanction" means that a violation of university occurred. but the issues surrounding the violation were adequately resolved i n the meeting. Allen said he wuld like to see "100 percent of these because this sanction indicates that the problem has been worked out." Right now about SO percent of the students going through the review system are deferred. If an official warning is issued and any incident involving the student occurs during the specified warning period. the review will be heard by the board at the路next level higher. Hall Probation places restrictions on the student's activities within his or her living unit for a specified period of time. "Official Probation," (used only at levels two and three), i nc l u d e s campus-wide restrictions such as limited eligibility to participate in activities or to hold elective or appointive offices. " Disciplinary Probation," (used by level three only), makes the students continued rnrollmem conditional upon his or her behavior. The student must demonstrate during the probationary period that he or she can act on a manner consistent with university policy. Disciplinary Suspension" meand the withdrawl of all privileges of anending PlU for a specified period of time. Students may not attend classes, make use of university facilities, or visit the campus. " Oeferred Suspension" means that suspension is appropriate, but it is held in obeyance under certain specified c o n d i t i o ll S . Allen to According "Emerge ncy Procedure," ,t

which includes disciplinary probation and disciplinary suspension. has been imposed by the University President only one in the past six years. Expulsion means that the student may no longe.r attend PlU and has no promise that they may be reinstated to good standing at any future time. Both disciplinary suspension and expUlsion are recorded on a student's official transcript. Other actions may include counseling, consultation with hall staff, work projects, and or restitution for damages. A student facing possible disciplinary action may make written request to withdraw '"rom the university. Such a request is directed to the Vice President of Student Life.. Student rights include timely notification of re.ason,p place and time of hearing, orderly meeting. fair and impartial review and decision, and the opportunity for self颅 initiated appeal. All meetings are closed unless the nudent requests the contrary. Appeals can be based on two grounds: lack of fair and impartial hearing and or that the sanctions imposed are overly severe.. Disciplinary records are basicly confidential with access given only to Residential Ufe staff and the s t u d e n t . Faculty-student reviews are recorded on tape and students may listen to them, particularly i f they choose to appeal. Off--campus students who violate university regulations have the choice of being referred to RHC Review Board or to the Assistant Oean o f Student Life. Allen noted that people usually enter college knowing that they will be testing themselves and their ideas, freedoms, and values. Clashes result from these tests including emotional and cultural conflict. "In the outside world such conflicts often go unnoticed; college, however. seems to encourage conflict and sometimes it appears almost intentional," he added. "A lot of people come into Iht boards saying so J did it "but that's as far as they think. They don't chall:nge themselves to think aboul acting responsibly," Allen said. "Student's decisions are voluntary but they don't like to be cal!ro on. Unless a person is challenged to grapple. issues, they with can't ,. develop. he added.


October 3, 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 13

E LSEWH ERE Due to 'spicy image'

College Papers suffe ri ng adve rtisi ng l osse s Bu Helen Cordes

(CPS)-- It was a magazine cover tailored txquisitdy for coUege students: First there was the Imperative element of selling copies on a ncwSland: the celebrity. This time it's Chevy Chase. Nestled about Chase, in a none-loo-subtle fashion, were the siock oUerings 10 the 18-to-lS·year-old crowd: su, drugs. and rock 'n roll. A joint punctuated Chase's smirk. and a lacy-bras!;lI�re-clad breast was dressed againsl Chase's head, which in Irun was wreathed in stereo headphones. Everythmg was there and, nOI surprisingly . it worked. Some 300.000 college students picked up thai spring issue of College Papers. Rolling Slone's slick new coliege magazine. Furthermore, morc than half of them passed along their copy to a friend. Yet Chase's blissed-out beam didn't work for everybody. Certain "more conservative" advertisers were "uncomfortable" with the pull-out­ the·stops cover and the spicey copy inside, says College Paper's ad manager Billy David. David believes advertising for the next issue, due out this fall, suffered because of it. II is just one of the problems anyone­ - even an entity as powerful as Rolling Slone can expect to encounter whtn tryin, to push a national student magazine over the top. So many magazines have tried, and many have failed. They've been undone by the shirting taStes and attitudes of $Iudent readers, by the expense of selling to them, by compelltion from existing magazines thai already go to part of the "student markel, " and the� days by a sluaglsh economy. Rolling Stone was prob3bly the fillest and most mnovame concern to it announced . facc Iho$C perils ....hen plans for Colleg� papers last ,year. The maptine .....as to � a quarterl,y, and then was re-cast as a three:·times-pcr· year publication. By the time CP staffers were putting together the fall 1980 i"sue, they knew that plans for the spnng, 1981 bsue had already been scrapped. The editors are now shooting for a fall, 1981 issue. " We realize most college magazines fail, "acknowledges CP editor Kate Wenner. Sitting in her small office on one of the four noors that ROiling Stone occupies in a Park Avenue skyscraper, she ticks off some of the other realities of the frade.

"College is an insular time. Students are focusm on their work and their own community. They don't have lots of time to read things other than textbooks, or eXira money to buy magazines. That's why the successful magazines are usually free:. " Enter the competition. College Papers competition include; Nutshell and a �vy of other college magazines distributed free by the 13·30 Corporation o f Knoxville, Tenn. , and a Ampersand. music and entertainmem paper that borrows

and they never step on the totS of these human issues." advertisers," contends Wenner, who The verdict on Collegc papers adds she "doesn't want to sound like success in drawing student readers I'm puning them down JUSt because from its freely-distributed competitors is still OUt. But the magazine's stiffest they're competition." A spokeswoman for the 1 1-10 comoctition has come from another Corporation, which distributes not direction-CP's parent Rolling Slone. "The competition (with Rolling only Nutshell but sponsored college newspaper inserts for Datsun and Slone) is a problem," admits Wenner, Ford, and which last year broke out of whose brother Jann founded and still the college market with its purchase of edits Rolling Slone. She says CP tries esquire magazine, declined comment to differentiate itself from its par�nt by the types of Stories it runs. "We don't, on the competition. for instance, do many music stories or The less-circumspecl Wenner flatly have a cover with music people." Yet in view of the corporate, familiar connections artistic and - CP gets some editorial and much production assistance from Rolling Slone similarites are inevitable. CP has the same page size and paper stock as Rolling Stone. Its first two covers ­ of Chase and Gilda Radner - were reminiscent of Rolling Slone's repeated use of former "Saturday Night live" actors on its covers. And, of course, Rolling Slone also garners a large college audiencc. The problem shows up most acutely in advertising. "Some of the accounts we approached said they already use Rolling Slone or NalionalLAmpoon to reach college audien�s," ad manager David laments. "We stress that there's a different readership," he says. "Rolling Stonc's average reader is 24 and CP's is 21." David, however, attributes CP's in3bility to attract asmany ads as it had hoped to a "wait and see" attitude among potential advertisers. The altitude IS not uncommon toward r char�es that "those magazines are 11m-year publications. Some potential boring and innocuous. They have good advertisers are Simply used to buying headlines that make them look like ad space 10 Nlilshefl, which has been they're reporting on relevant i sues on the market for I I years. but Ihere's nothmg there. Nothin "That doesn't necessanly mean delivers. " they would prefer NUlshell," David is "Since they're free, they're not quick to add. "I've heard no rave accountable to the audience," Moss . endorsements. . chimes in. "They can tell their Wenner, on the other hand, blames adveru.!>ers they're reaching millions of the slack economy ror Cpts failurt' to studenlS, but no one takcs them ., get more ads more quickly, "Money is senousty . tight," she says, shaklO8 her head and Tackling controversial issues can be e�plaining that It is "the biggest a problem in itself, Moss notes. Citing reason" CP was forced to drop its a rise in studcnt political conservatism, spring, 1981 i5.!iue. he says CP is careful not to alienate Advertising aside, industry repons "students on either political pole." aTe favorable. Although spring issue "I know how I fee:l about the draft sales were disappointing (only three­ and abortion, but what students want fifths of the press run was sold), a to kno�s is not what we think," he Starch Report survey found that 77 emphasIsed. "We feef lhat our stones percent of its readers would like to see are treated in a non-partisan way, so more, and 60 percent said they would that all Spectrums can identify with like to Set monthly issues. _.

--

heavily from Rolling Slone's formula and that is lucked free inside many campus newspapers. Between (he two, campuses arc blanketed �uh free magazines that touch on studeR! issues, music, entenainment and the arts - in shon, everything College Papers covers Collf'f(e PaIWrs tries to outdo them With Stories that are frequently better­ 'Mitten and more thoughtful. and with more sophisticated graphics. " The other magazines are Simply not giving college people what they want," Associate Editor Adam Moss claims. ' " look at CO/tf'If' Papers as a full· service magazine bridging the gap bet�een entertainment and being a stoous, thoughful magazine for students. " The "other magazines" are viewed with thinly-veiled contempt at CP. "They're magazints for advertisers,

g

X- rated movies ba rred at t h ree I l l i n o i s c a m p u ses (CPS)-- Students at three Illinois universities have been prohibited by the state's Board of Regents from showing X-rated fJlovies on campus because the "people of Illinois are opposcd to that kind of thing taking . place In university buildings." The ban, imposed by the Board in its July meeting, has stirred rumblings of protest at each of the three schools­ Illinois State University, Northern Illinois and Sangamon State. So much opposition has been recorded at Northern Illinois that Student Regent Mike Ross plans to introduce a motion to rescind the resolution when the Board meets later this week . "" m fairly confident that we'll get this thing resolved one way or the other. I've spoken to some regents and I think they'll change their minds .. Ron predicted. "At the very �orst t e r�lution will � relegated 10 jus an advisory one."

h

If Ross is unsuccessful and the ban is cemented into policy, a strong tradition at Norhtern Illinois would be in peril. For the pasl nine years, students there have hel d an "Erotic Week." During the week , they would have an X-rated film festival and see such hit porno attractions as "Det:p Throat," "The Devil in Miss Jones," and " Behind the Green Door." But Ross and other argue there is more at stake than JUSt the luxury of students seeing dirty movies. "Forget the films. The issue here is choice, and when you start allowing the regents to make choices and judgments about what entertainment we're allowed 10 see:, then you wonder what's ne�t," Ross asserts. '" would worry about them (the regents) taking away our right to hear a certain speaker because: they may disagree wilh his or her views."

Even if the board backs off from its July position, and decides only to use the prohibition as a recommended position, presidents at the three schools would be In a "tough bind," Ross claims. " The presidents would be an administratively awkward position, " he predicts. "They'U feel compelled to 10 by what the regents believe, and we think the president has just as liule right as the regents to enforce this

ban." To make sure students will have their "Erotic Week" as well as the right to

..isualize their sexual fantasies on the screen, the Norhtern Illinois Student Association has asked the American Civil Liberties Union to sue the regents (or a violation of the students' constitutional rights. There has betn a nurry of campus legal actions related to the use of

school facilities for showing X-rated movies, which of course is a generally lucrative fundraising technique for campus groups. Last May, tWo Harvara �tudents were arrested the day after shOWing "Deep Throat" at a 'university dorm. The Civil Liberties Union of Musaehusetts filed a federal suit in their defen�, claiming their freedom of speech had been abridged. I n March . two University of Houston students were called to testify in an obscenity case in which the film "Barbara Brodcast" was sold to an undercover pO:lce officer soon after the movie was shown on campus. And, closer to the Illinois case, Arizona State University President the banned Schwada John pornographic films from his campus last December. In respon .. e. �veral ..ute sludent groups Ihreatened suit.


6e \4, Mooring MllSt,

Oclober 3. 1980

LETTER

S t u d e n ts advoc ate l ess p o l i c i n g RA' s To The Edllor:

Over the past several weeks I have read with letters interest the regarding RA's by Gary Nelson, LIke many other people, I found these letters to be bitter and offen baseless attacks on the present system which made not constructive of s u gg e s t i o n s Improvements. I don't like this kind of attitude, but I'm glad I read the letters because they pointed out an Important and serious problem in ou r residence hall system. I feel that the present system of RA' is not only Ineffectglve but in fact harmful to the living the of atmosphere dormitories. The RA should be there to help students with problems, to give advice to those who wish It. and to make the dorm a pleasant and healthy place to live and study. The way the system Is now run puts the RA Into an enforcement position which alienates him or her 'rom the other students and destroys the relationship of

,

� YO�iE 1I\81E

l'M SHERLOCK IIOlMEI. JUST Fill THIS OUT 1M TRIPLICm �NO WAITWITH TIIeO!"'!5...

IIOffMI� �ND

!!e""*,,,,,, ces

friendship and trust which is essential to a happy. healthy dorm life. This is not to say that all RA's are "Power hungry" and "out to get the student." On the contrary. most of them could be excellent counselors and friends, could old considerably the smooth operation of dorm life. If they could shed their roles as rule enforcement officers. I suggest that Dorm Head

I"esldents only persons with the authority to make write-up of students breaking dorm policy. This would remove the barrier between the RA and the student and establish a closer. more effective relationship. I am not advocating anarc hy In the dorms . There is a need for the rules to protect the riQhts of

others. let it be the RA's responsibility to see that no one's rights are being by another abused student. For instance. If there Is a loud party which

Is disturbing other students the RA should report this 10

the Head Resident who will write-up the offenders. But If students are breaking minor rules. but are not disturbing others, the RA

The Innocent Bystander

should'not have jurisdiction over them so as to maintain his or her relationship of trust with fellow students, An example 0' this would be an Infringement of visitation polley. If It is not disturbing other students. it should be outside the RA's area 0' responsibility because he or she should be there to assure a healthy environment. not to be ready to pounce on every minor Infraction of the rules. I believe that the idea 'oehlnd having RA's Is good: to provide a person 'or the other students to respect and trust who will help 0 make thler living and working relationships at PlU happy. healthy and productive, let's make this a reality by removing the pollcing rote of the RA and make them effective In the job which they would like to do. let's remove the frustrations of the RA's whose wings "Hate them" and make life on campus a mature. adult system 0' r e s p o n s i b i l i t i es a n d relationships Peter C.O. Andersorl

By Arthur Hoppe

C h ee r u p A m e r i c a ! C h i n s u p !

by Arthur Hoppe

Cheer up America! Smile, darn you, smile! Sure, fh.ere's war in the Middle East the economy's out of control; and you have more faith in your your garbageman than presidential candidate. So there's asbsetos in you hair dryer; they've just recalled you car; the scientlsts had another genetic engineering accident; this one got away; and the RU5sians have perfected an Intercontinental Ballistic Socket Wrench launcher to attack our Titan missiles. Is that any reason to succumb to the preachers of gloom and doom? No! Chins up! Think positive! Look on the bright side. And join the National Muddle Through Society today. Remember, friends, that this great land of ours was founded on muddlins;. As any student of the Revolutionary War will tell you, our little band of forefathers didn't out-fight,

!!.!�������ln�'�B�Y�O F WEll, FRED-ITLOOI(S THIS IS 60ING BE TilE 'fEAR I

I Fi,'ALJ:Y &&11\A00'm. ! \

out-march or out-think the British. They out-muddled them. And, surely, the final product of that long, acrtimonious, confused Constitutional Convention of 1787 was one of the greatest. trium p hes of muddling the world has ever seen. Under muddling presidents, muddling congressmen muddling bureaucrats and muddling generals we conquered a continent and muddled our way into becoming the most powerful nation on earth. Perha ps Ronald Reagan expressed it even better in his closing statement during The Great Tee-Vee Debate with Me­ Anderson: lOFor 200 years we've lived in the future," he said, "believing that tomorrow would be better than today and today would be better than �esterday. I still believe that. I m not running for the presidency because I believe I can solve the problems we've discussed tonight. 'i believe the

talks about muddling through in people of this country can." in these Now there's a presidential the White House_ candidate who Sincerely believes perilous times, I say we need an in muddling throu�h. And it experienced hand on the helm of came as no surprtse when a the ship of state, And if there's group of activists at last week's one man Who's proven he can meetmg attempted to win him muddle throu�h somehow, it's the official endorsement of the Jimmy Carter! ' In the end, we endorsed both National Muddle Through the promising muddler and Society, Scarcely had we finished the proven muddler and said we saluting each other with crossed . were confident the nation would fingers, hoisting our banner (a be lucky under either of them as clenched fist rampant on a field president -- as it always has of four-leaf clovers) and singing been. We hope this makes you our theme song, "Everything's feel better. It certainly should. Despite all Coming Up Roses, " than the chant of "We Want Reagan !" the current talk of gloom and doom, we're a nation of true swep,t through the hall. believers. Show me a person I Any man who can muddle takes a three-year hes way through SO second-rate who movies to become governor of magazine subscription, has a California is a muddler to be baby. dias i n the garden or buys reckoned with," argued his a suit with two pairs of pants staunchest supporter. And it and I'll show you a person who looked as though the members has faith that somehow, some way, we'll muddle through. would be swept off their feet. And why not? Up to now, no But cooler heads prevailed. "Don't froget, " cried a Carter one's come up with an fan, "That Ronnie Reagn only alternative we can live with.

Comes to Pacific Lutheran 'frs, As 1 R;:L.J'I� /1l!:lZ.f AT OLO MAI�I 'I CA.-J �tE IT /r1.. L Nc;u}: ' ST/lI'f6HT 1'\ 5, CAS" TER/V'\ P,<\P€"R$ ,AND /'10 Ho"'eWO�I( !

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AND HOW \J.IILL to.) MANAGE" THIS?

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L ..-1 @» E D ITORIAL

Octo�r 3, 1980, Mooring Mast, Pagt: IS

....

W i l l the s i l e n t p l ease s peak u p? "Oh. noJ Another tenure story" Is the exasperated response of most veteran faculty, admlnstrolors or students to the front page article this week. In pre-press discussion of the article with some of its sources, It began to appear that lenure was definitely a passe Issue and thot the MOlt was giving space to dead­ horse-kickers by airing old complaints and misunderstandIngs. That was until the Molt got a note from an administrator responding to discussion of a student­ related topIc which took place on Molt pages. The odmlnls1rator fen that the student ideas expressed were probably In the mlnexity and that they w6l8 worth discussion nol because they hod generated so Httle student response. The "Sllenl McJorl1y·· Ideo hasn't held up well Int he CXJst and doesn·t In Ihese :: a s e s ellher.malnly oecause the minority is sIlent too (you'lI notice that lhosa who got the bod end of the tenure deal dido!, live professtonally to lell oboUi llJ. Whether If be faculty reo hashing the tenure system or students talking about residence hall policies. there are for fo many rumblings and mumbllngs and not enough open debate. I've been to enough faculty meetings to know that discussIons are many times unproductive. or that

AND AFT£R THAT?

WHAT COMES THE PRIMARIE�?

Editor

Kathl9'tn M. Hosfeld

Newa Edltor

Tom Koehler

Featu,.. EdIto,

Petra Rowe

SporIt Edlto,

John Wallace

P,oductton Edlto, Margo student

Photography Edlto, Magazine Edlto, Morel Ameluxen

Editorial Aulstanll Dee Anne Hauso Eric Thomas

Copy Editor Karen Wold

G,aphlca Editor Sieve Hauge

lullneu Manager Corrl

Minden

CI,culatlon Manage, Pam Carlson

Advertiling Manager ClndyKlolh

Tech nical Advlso, Mike Frederickson they begin on the last agenda Item 01 five mlnu1es to fIve and nobody wants to miss dInner. But for heaven's sake. would people around here plea.e slart talking to each other?-Tolking. nol in the gossiping coffeeshop or

c o m p l a i n i n g amongst nof other. each disorganized. random comments directed to the wrong person anyway. H's gOing to be difficult, That means that all you people out there with opinions ore going to have to sit down and figure out

E D U CAT I O N

the logic behInd your opinions. But what will be even more difficult Is actually getting up the courage to tell somebody who disagrees with you that you have on opinion "/orth debote.

Kathleen M. Ho.feld

Faculty AdVloo, Cliff Rowe

The MootIng Moat Is published weekly by the sludenlt 01 PocIfIc lutTIeron Urllverlsty un­ der the ClJ!pIces 01 !he Boord 01 Regen". Opinions al(' pressed In Ihe Mo.1 ore nol ln­ lended to represent those 01 Ine r&gantt, Ihe ad· mInistration. the faculty. the student body 01 the MOil slaff. leITers 10 !he editor should be submitted by 5 p m . or Ina same week 01 publicaTion,

BU DGET: A 32 million dollar culback In alai. spending by Gov. Dlxy Lee Ray eliminates two welfare programs. Non-continuing general assistance and tederal assistance aids are the programs cut.

Educa tion encom passes much more than your $508 class at PLU, It also Include s social functio ns. emotional crises, late-night talks, and attending the next orchestra concert.!. Includes looking beyond your classes. AWAC: Amongst your plies 01 required text books and readings in research make It u.s. AWACS radar planes have been senl 10 a habit 10 brief Ihe "new book" shelf In Ihe llbrary. R.ad Ihrough Ihe nn.s end Saudi Arabia .s warning device. from attack. pick up thoSG that are foreign to you as wellesthose which ar. In your field. The Airborn Warning and Conlrol Syslem Is Examine the "other side" or unpopular view point of Issues Important to you .....purely for defenslvB purposes," saya a 118 well 88 those whIch affect the people around you. Pentagon spokesman. The fore Ian magazines have much to offe" and so what If you can't read every word 01 II, you'll pick up • 101 01 Ihe language JUII by being exposed 10 II. Allow yourself 10 b. culturally and globally challenged. Th. education you gain by realizing Ih. PRIME RATE: opInions you hive are not necI.sarily the slime IS those of Experts claim the recession Is tilling, however, Ihe foreign mlnd,wlll be an enrtchlng part of your college and prtme mortgage rale. ere slill unseltled. Major lifetime educatIon. To The Polnt:News In Depth, Trlunfo, PariS C.llloml. banks have boosled Ih.'r prime once Match, Scals, Vision: La Revis'. Interamllrlcana, andL'Epress more as high a s 14.5 percent. are good examples of varying 'orelgn perceptions. The attitudes and sometimes oblique humor expressed In these magazines can expand any reader's mind and education. Llkewlls, It you need II "studY" brellk from the norm, don't run only to the N.tlon.' Geographic. Merl.n, Art International, Ole Kunst, and Print are exceUent publications In the arts. You may hava trouble aeparatlng the The third annual Beckman Memorial Lecure will .dvertlsements from the artlcles··only because the advertisements are 80 lak. place Ihls Sunday al 1:30 p.m. In Ih. UC.Dr. exceptional. Jose M lguez·Bonlno, Professor a. Systematic Just remember that there Is a lot more to the world than News In 8r/e' or Theology and Elhlca 10 Ihe honored gu.... Mooring Masf.

rr=====:!!===='ii"===dJ


.Page 16, Mooring Mast, October 3, 1980

CAM PUS SHORTS P i n i o n lect u re The author of books on Jane Austen, the Brontes, Thomas Hardy, and D.H. Lawrence will Ie<:ture at PlU Monday. Frank Pinion, educator and literary scholar from the University of Sheffield. England, will make a presentation on "The Brontes" in Ingram Hall at 7:30 p.m. The presentation will begin with an introduction of the outstanding literary Bronte family. which included Emily, the author of Wlllhlring Helgh/s, and Charlotte. the aulhor of Jone Eyrl, bo th or. which were major Victorian novels. The Bronte brolher, Branwell, and the clergyman father, Patllck. were also persons of prominence. The remainder of Ihe free lecture will rocus on the classic. WUlhering Heights. In antiCipation of the English Department-sponsored letture, the film verSion of WutIJering Heighls will be presented in Ingram Hall at 7 p.m. Satu rday. and 3 p.m. Sunday. (This IS an update from an earlier schedule.) Pinion is in the Northwest to participate in a Victorian Conference at the University of Vi :toria in early October.

Federal aid for those students who have not signed by Oct. 1 7 will be cancelled. There will be no exceptions.

Student i nterns

all bids.

8 M I award s The 1980-81 BMI Award.. com­ pethion is open 10 studen t com­ posers who are Lllilens or per­ manent residents 01 the Western Hemisphere and are enrolled in ac­ schools. secondary credited colleges and conservatories, or engaged In private �Iudy wilh established and recognlled teachers anvy,herc in Ihe world, E'Hl ant5 m \1 he undc;r 26 years or age on Decel':1ber ] I , 1980. No iLmitations are cstabli�hed as to in­ strumentation, ::;tylistk COIl­ siderations, or length of works submitted. Students may enter no more than one composition which need not havt been composed during the year of entry. The 1980·8 1 competition closes February 16, 1 98 1 . Official rules and entry blanks are available from James G. Roy, Jr., Director, BMI AWllids to Studem Com­ posers. Broadcast Music, Inc ]20 West S71h Street . ew York, N.Y. 10019.

U

••

F i n anc ia l aid Recipients of Fednal funds as pari or all of their financial aid awards are required to SIgn forms in the Financial Aid Office . have ThIS should been completed during the first two weeks of class, as explained on the certification section o f award notices. So far. less than half of Federal aid recipients have signed. The deadline to sign for fall semester is Oct. 17.

accepted) , and many more miscellaneous items will be for sale at reduced prices. Vehicles may be setn in the maintenance area on lower Campus. There is no minimum bid, but the University reserves the right to reject any and

Wareho use sale A one·day saJe will be: held on Friday, Oct. 1 0 from 10:OO a.m. lo 3:00 p.m. in open sheds next 10 General Services warehouse in the Maintenance area. Office machines, assorted chairs. coumer laps, couches, stoves, refrigerators. light fixtures, doors, 1 9S3 GMC Pickup Truck, 1963 Ford Pickup (sealed bids will be

Arts workshop A series o f rree arts management workshops will be offered by the Tacoma·Pierce County Civic Art"i Commission Neighborhood Arts Technical The P rogram . Assistance Workshop Series i� designed for individuab nnd organizations involved in an, programming and community service actiVIties. The series will begin w i t h "Workshop for Locol Small Project Funding" scheduled for Tuesday from 9 a.m. to S p.m. in the Lincoln-Kaiser Room of the Tacoma Public Library The workshop will include information on fundraising �ommillees, funding sources. fundraisers, and Washington State law concerning fundraising. The workshop will be led by Mike Grimes. a program coordinator for the Metropolitan Development Council Other workshops in the series are " Planning and Promoting Community Festh'als." Oct. IS; "PromOllon and Publicity," Oct. 23; "Financial Management for Small Non-profil OrganiuUions: The Basics , " Oct. 27; "Artin Survival," Nov. 8; and "ArlS Advocacy, " Nov. 18. For further informations and registration call the Civic Arts Commission olTict: S934754. The Neighborhood Arts Program is a project of the Tacoma-Pierce County Civic Arts Commission, sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts. ArU Stale Washington Commission. County of Pierce, and City of Tacoma.

Gel involved in exciting community project in a way that will benefit you, too. Earn credit by serving as a student intern �n one of eight task forces studying needs and services for county chIldren and youth. CanlBet Co-op Ed. Offi« (7469).

F i rst aid There will b an 18-hour Stllte Industrial First Aid course held on three conseeutive Thursday beginning October 9. 1980. The�e classes will be held in Chris Knutzen hetw«n the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Please contact the Director of General Services if interested in attending this course. Current card holders may up-datc existing cards by attending a portion of these classes. For more information. call (71 70).

C h i na s l i des Vi..u the PtOple's Repubhc of China thiS coming June! All those who are interelited In learmng about and visiting Contcmporary Chin a are inviled to a slide prese ntatio n by Dr. MordtehiRozanski o n "PLU in China. ' I Details on the upcoming China Tour will be provided by Dr. Gtc!g Guldin at thaI lime. Wednesday. Oct. 8 at 4 p.m. in the UC Regency Room.

WHO ME?

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October 3, 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 17

SPORTS Lu tes see ' P r i d e o f a C h a m p i o n ' bef o re c h a m p i o n s h i p- l i ke come f ro m be h i n d w i n Bl' Eric Thomas As pari of their pre-game preparatioo last Saturday. the PLU football learn viewed a film entitled "Pride o f a "hllmpion." which stressed the concept of having the confidence and patLence to come bad. from behind. Later that day. when the Lutes wen� trailing Humbolt State 14·) in Ihe first quarter, the mo¥ie stuck QUt like premonition. , lOur being behind and having the challenge to come back was just what the movie talked about." said backup quarterback Kevin Skogen. " I , was like they had insulted our pride, and when someone illsults your pride you've gOl the motivation to come back all the harder to beat them." In the next three quaners, tht Luleti seemed to follow the in�lrumcntHI movie scripi to the letter. as they came back by nUlling off 42 unanswered poinls enroule 10 a 4S·14 trouncing of the Lumberjacks. "The great thing aboui lhis Same was our patience and JX'nisllm�," said head coach FroslY Westering. " We kept our poise am.I played well when we got behind. Thai's the sign or a grtat football team.. . PlU got on the scoreboard first when linebar:k Scon McKay kicked a 42-yeard fieldgoal, which was SCI up by a 30·yard return of the o�ning kickofr by halfback Guy Ellison. Humboh Stale then scored a pair of first quarter TO's on scrambling tosses of IS and 20 yards. It wa'i then, with three minutes gone in Ihe second quaner, that defenstvcbad: Jay Halle returned a Humbolt Slale punt 86 yards to paydirt, sparking the lUle SCOrinl!! barraSe. "That was a momentum play al that lime, as they'd golten those two big TO plays," Weslering said. "We were so keyed up during the first quarter that we had to seule them down." PlU soon got the fOOlbaJl back and moved it up the field u t i lizing the running of setbacks Chris UII (19 yards), Mike Westmiller (107 yards), and Guy Ellison (42 yards). With the ball deep in lumberjack territory, lute quarterback Eric Carlson hit Scott Westering with a 100yard TO strike, the fiTS! of three such scoring hook·ups of the evcnina.

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" We had a great mix this game," said Westering. "They were playing the pass strong at the start, so we felt we could run. The blocking of the offensive line was the spark we needed to make the ball go.'Tack·to·tackle' did a great job." The second half saw the lut� offense pic� up where they left off, scoring four touchdowns while the PLU defense kept the lumberjacks in check. " The longer we played in the second half, the betler we got," said Westering. "When you get momentum going for you, everything starts to go your way," Weslering singled out the defensive play of defensive

tackles Rocky Ruddy and Steve Kirk, linebacker ScOI! McKay and safety SCOIl Kessler as the leaders of a " Fine defensive effon. " PlU scored a pair o f third quarter TD's, the first coming on a fivC'·yard blast up the middle by Westmiller after two reverses by UII produced gains of IS and 19 yards. "The reverses were really work.ing well," according to Un. "Their linebackers were just standing there reading and we were able to get the blocks on them." The lutes got on the board again with 22 seconds left in the third period when Carlson (4-8 and 46 yards) found Wcslering on a 2 1 yard TO

toss. " Scott played a tremendous game," said coach Weslering. "He caught three TO passes and made three great blocks which sprung long runs." The rirSt unit scoring was closed o ut III the fourth quarter on the final Carlson·to .Westcring combination, thilt one from five yards OUt. Two minutes later the lute second stringers produced the lasl PlU tally, on a tell yard scoring plunge by freshman Joel Johnson. Second·year quarterback Kevin Skogen completed a 16-yard pass to Dan Harkins on the drive. his ninth consecutive completion of the season. The game produced two

injuries to the lUle ranks, as safety Scotl Kesslt'r sustained a shoulder injury on an int erception return and freshman Jeff Rohr incurred a pussible concussion . PLU's next aClion will be tomorrow, when thc:y travel to Ellensburg to meet Central. Allhough the Wildcats have dropped 28 consecutive games 10 the lUles, they should bt· well prepared. " Mike Dunbar, who was our offensive coach for three years is their defensive coordinalOr," said Westering. "He knows our system inside-and-oul. They'll be pulling out all the stops 10 knnck us off."

Run a t Fort Casey tomorro w

H a rri e rs p l ace f i ft h , seve n t h By Barb PicKell Running without thc:ir key compttitors-RuSlY Crim and Kris Kyllo, the PLU harnerlrt

demonstrated the deplh of lheir team� last Saturday 81 the Simon Fraser Invitational In Burnabey. Brhish Columbia, 100Led women The especially slrong according to coach Brad Moore. "I was very pleased to �ee us finish We�tern of ahead Wa�hinglon, the defending regional champs," sa id Moore. "It·s very early for them, however . since their sc:hool has just started." Freshman pacesetler KrislY Purdy finished first for the lady lutes, placing fifth

overall. Teammates Dianne Johnson, Debbie Trl and Melallle Langdon followed within a minute and 1 8 seconds. Junior tran�fer Linda Van Beek: finished S9 seconds doser to Purdy than she did two weeks ago to take the fifth spot on the Lute rosler. The PLU men sho.....ed depth and mlProvement as well, despite a less·than·1>pectacular seventh place I1nbh overall. "Our top Ihree finisht:rs are looking very strong." Moore remarked, "but I was most impressed the with improvement of Joe Voetberg and Bill Whitson." Voelberg moved 34 seconds closer to number one man Zane finished Prewitt., who

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ntneleenth in the race, compared to the BCe meet . Whi non moved up thl e notche5 from the eighlh to Ie fifth place for the Lutes. Rusty Crim, who finisl: d (ounh for the lutes at the BCC Invitational sat OUt lhe race, nu�ing an injured arch. The Fort Casey Invitational tomorrow should prove a good test of PlU strtngtb>on the regional le\·el. . 'The� Will be compet.iuon there from aU over this region." At SFU the harriers showed what they could do without Crim and Kyllo; at Fort Ca�e:y they hope 10 show-maybe to find out for themselves-what they can do with a full roster.

SPORT . iSHORTS

A,.".Ouanrr PLU·FOIltUlln I�·pul Irom PlIIJII_ H.)U, "'ktN!�1"l' 1t1'l.w tram Pen! l lel(.(Rando.ol k",k}. ScalndQum.". PlU·B&lJ� SS·rWlt rdtuft .."h t2:29 Idl \MtKa" PLU,\\c�'"'n. IO·111S\ frOI!! Ca!loon (Md ... .y Ud).

Third Ouanft I'LV Wcll.millct j·run (M.K.,- kld).PLU· 'Wctm", ll·!.lU (r"m C&tt:w!<1 (McKay kl�"l. F()unh Quana PIU WeJ(orin" 'flU" hom Carbo", (M.:Kal k>l;k).PLU·J ,hnloDll »run ....i,h }:03 left

(Me"a)·).


Page 18. Mooring Mast, October 3, 1980

L u te socce r team g e t t i n g off to fast start by Do"1 SlefkH With four games under their belts, Arno Zaske's hooters get their first stern test of the season tomorrow when Pugct Sound makn an apperance. PlU hopes to reign the Tacoma region but, as always, Puget Sound makes for tough competition. "We really expect a dose. tight game, t' fullbac.k Brian Olson ex plained "We alway, seem to play them pretty . close . .

.

Game lime is 1:00 p. m. tomorrow 00 the soccer field. Wcdnesda\. PlU andEvCfeu C.c. playt'd but it was last wcekend'\ &ames apiRSt the Oregon College of Education and WenerR that pUI PlU back on the track 10 winninl ways. In a 8� shUl-out of OeE, things all feU in "lace. "We jU�1 totally dominalC'd them, we passed whC«'ver ....e . wanted to and JUSt controlled the �hole lame," !>aid sv.eeptr John Lanan. who punched in a goal.

Coach Zoske admitted the lu tes played impressively against firth ranked OeE. "We played good, tough defense, used our heads on offense, were dangerous on

showed a lot and came back. They were a real physical learn." PlU scored another twice m the second half 10 take the lame 3·1.

With PlU's fast start at the belinning of the season. another piece of the NWC title doesn't look that far off. "I think we have a stronger

attack and played together. t , "We were really pumped for the game, It was pretty exciting," added Larson: Two fn:shmen from Saudi Arabia made up a dangerous tandom as the netl-footed forwards streaked past their men time and again. Majed Shakour scored a pair against OCE and Hani Ali Iddnsl ,

another forward wilh spttd . also contributed in the K('tring,. In lhi:! Western game. PlU <;taned orr well by \."Qnnc\''1ina on a John Larson penalty shot bUI the lame was soon tied v.hen Wou:m trick.led a aoal past the LUle defcruc:.

"That goal

wu

really

demoraJizina, il ju.<;t made II in , said Lanon. ''But the lame was n real ChaIa�let builder. We were down but we "

Axel Arentz mo�es to ball as Paul Swenson (17) 'ooks on.

E�iDe �H-g'rb a.� ".F.

John Larsen (7) walt. for tha b.lI.

(1lIliNG VOWl OWN '''W

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DATE "MlIIIUI Dc1 Z1 a Jill ' Dc1 28 0... 21 "" 3. 0.. 31

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Ma/ed Shekour scar •• • goa/ ag.'nsf Wes'ern.

and more exciting team this year," said Olson. "We have a good group of freshmen and if things go riaht we could do very well."


October 3, 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 19

Lute s p i ke rs d rop o p e n e r P lU wo men ' s The volleyball tcam opened their 1980 season Saturday with a loss to Willamette. last year's league champIOns. !.S·13. 1715, 13-1.5. 15-12 and !.S.1. great "We a had performance until the laSI gamc," said coach Kathy Hemlon. "Then we sceml!'d 10 lose focus and concentration and were a li tt le fatigued." Hemiol! prillsed the auack work of fres h man Carie Foszholz and the a�sists of c;euers Jorie lange and Sonny Mackin. Folzholz had eight kills (a n acks) and lange and Mackin had nine and eight assist s respectively. lange also had four ace se.rves Hernion was also pleased with the defense, "We played team defense very well throughout . " However. she added, W e need more consistency. and we need 10 be more aggressive on the a!lacks and going after the ball." The learn Icrt yesterday for a three-same swing. through Oregon, playing Willamette again last night. They will play Linfield tonight and Lewls& Clark tomorrow . .

PLU studonts enjoying a friendly game of flag

"

The PLU intramural season is off and running into its second week . The lea�ue is divided imo lhree divisions, a women's league , a men 's recreatio n league and a men' competetive league. "The panicipation has betn good," acording to league fat:ulty director Gene Lundguard. "The the players arc �Iowty Itarning to play fairer. " o fficials are improving with eat:b each and I think

Lady·Lutes walt for bell.

P LU f i e l d h o c ky team top ped By Dennl Robl!'rbOn

The PlU field hod.ey learn played il� fim game or the \e8$On asain\1 Ihl!' Uni\"en.iIY of Idaho. one 01 the lor !um\ in the Pacific Norlhy,e\t . on hiday and lo..t J-O. Coach Hacker said the team played '<'Oml!' of the.' be�t hod·I!'Y sh(' hat ICCn played by a PLU team dunng the firm hal! but the palyen showed a (olal lack ",f Intcmity during the second half '1t Yo'as a Jekyll and H}'de kind of p('tform8Jlce , " ,he s aid . "ruJly good and reallY bad. .

It

FB with Frosty Frosty ha� the answer for those students who always wanted to undentand football but had non one to ask. Head football coach Frosty Wesler-ina Will hold an hourly session entitled "Footba.lI wllh Frosty" beginning at 8 p.m. this Tuesday in Ihe UC North Dining Roo" , in which he wiIJ try to help fans be-tier undenund the lame. " we're going 10 look at football from the fan's standpoint so he can better undermrnd (he lame and enjoy it more," he nid. "We-'ll show film clip�. bring Ih d,rrerem players and do different thin&$

Neekly. WE dunk it will be

intere51ing and • load time." The Idea is 3 tue-ofr on a previous get-toaelher Weste-rina hosted. called "Kitchen Qaunerbacks for Wom�n." Some of lhl!' older fans may remember the: Lady Lutes in the stands lOin I n ut s in previous season' bec:ause Frosty tipped hIS hat a certain way, thereby �ianallina a special play to be uSl!'d whose erislencl!' only thl!' fanale rans knew of, I f enough fans show up 8t Ih� meetings, he might be persuaded to do it 8gam

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The game was scorelc\S until with fifteen minutes: remaining when t he.' University of Idaho licored t heir flP.it goal. The other two goah "Were scored in the linal mlOutl!"i of the gnme. On Salurda�' thl: Lady Lutei played Southern Oregon State College and bf:aJ them l�. 1\ IOLaI learn effort was shown The.' auads. link<. 8Jld defen..1!' all did Ihe job Ihey had (0 do . t.l.lm Krumm and MarIO MaLLot te played an

oUI\tanding defensive ,arne.' Saturday. The fiul goal WiU scored by Jennifer Grigsby

" The bium part of our game that we ne«i 10 impro'<e on is to lll.IUnHlIn Ii I,'on�btnll ('rron in both mental and gaml!' skill�." remarke'd Coach Hacker. "Condillt'lnlOg. and sti ck "Work i.s aoing to be thl!' emph_ is an praclil:e lhi� coming �'«k " This week Ihe team travel, to C en l r a l Washin,lo n Univer\ity to play aaainfol Ceotral Wa,\hinglon and Wl!'!olern Washington.

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FRIDAY OCTOBER -ART Michel Delocrolx Lithographs 01 Paris Nancy Teagua Gallery Until Oct 4 Tua thru Sot: 10 a m. to 5:30 p,rn,; Frl unlit 8 p.m. 1425 5th Ave (S) Tet. 329·5_

3

SUNDAY OCTOBER

-THEATRE "The Cherry Orchard" by Anton Chekhov Inllman Theatre (5) Untlt Oct. 25 Tet. 624·2992 -ART Karen Berry. "Sail Paintings" Women's Info. Center. U of W Untlt Oct. 3 1 tue fhru Frl: 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.: Mon until 9 p.m. -THEATRE "To Kltl a Mocktngblrd" Poncho Theatre (S) Until Nov. 23 Tet. 633·4567 -MUSIC The Kinks SeoHle Center Arena Tlckels 01 FideHty Lone

SATURDAY OCTOBER

·THEATRE "The Shadow Box" Bremerton Community Theatre 599 lebo Btvd. Bremerton Tel. 373·5152

4

-MUSIC Early Music Guild French and Italian Music for Baroque Oboe 8 p.m. United German Church of ChrIst Tet. 634·2781 TICkets: 54 and 55, discount tickets for students at door on space available basis. -ART Steve Shohboghllon Stained glass Panaca Gallery Until Oct. 8 Mon thru Sat: 1 0 o.m. to 5:30 p.m.: Wed until 8:30 p.m. 376 Bellevue Square Tet. 454.Q234 -THEATRE "None 01 the Above" An inprovlsotional theatre group Skid Road Theatre (S) Until Oct. 5 102 Cherry St. Tet. 622·0251 -THEATRE "Measure of Our Days-Shakespeare's Great· est Stage" Wilson High School General admission: $4 8 p.m. Tel. 756-3235 Guest actors from the Royal Shakespeare Company of london: Sebastian Shaw, John Nettles, Anne Flrbonk and Geoffrey Hutchings.

5

·ACTIVITIES AJapanese Tea Party demonstration Seattle Art Museum at Volunteer Park Activities Room 3 p.m. Free with museum admission Tel. 447·47 1 0 .MUSIC Seattte Symphony Orchestra Chamber Music Series Sonatas by Brahms Seattle Art Museum at Volunteer Park Auditorium 1 : 15 p.m. Museum admission lifted from noon to 1:30 p.m. Tel. 447·4710 ·THEATRE "Domino Courts" The Northwest Premiere of William Hauptman's force about two former bank robbers. Pioneer Square Theatre {S) Until Oct. 26 107 OcCidental Tel. 622·2016 .THEATRE "UTBU" (UnheolthyTo Be Unpleasont) James Kirkwood's comedy of murder and mayhem The Dflttwood Player's Dinner Theatre (S) 950 Main St., Edmonds Tel. 774·9600 ·FllM "Snow Goose Associates" A multl·medla show by Jim Schappert Until Oct. 18 Thur thru Sat: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 4220 NE 125th St. (S) Tel. 362·3401

MONDAY OCTOBER

6

-THEATRE ''Vanities'' Center Siage Theatre Federal Way Elks Bullding Until Oct. 1 1 Tel. 94101170

-THEATRE "Any1hlng Gaes" The Carco Theatre {S) The Valley Community Players of Kent Until Oct. 25 Tel. 226-5 190

·OANCE Repertory Dance Company of Northwest Free Concert Jefferson Comm. Center (5) 10:30a.m. Audience participation in movement requested.

-THEATRE "Mary, Mary" by Jean Kerr Bross Ring Theatre (S) Until Oct. 12 1 1 5 Bell St. Tel. 682·8470 ·PHOTOGRAPHY Works by several local artists and photographers Frame It On Broadway (Tl Until Oct. 1 1 Tuethru Sat: 1 0 a.m. to 5 p.m. 1822 Broadway Ave. Tel. 452·7706

TUESDAY OCTOBER

7

·ART Philip McCracken Retrospective exhibition lacoma Art Museum Until Nov. 2 Mon thru Sat. 10 a.m. to .4 p.m Sun: noon to 5 p.m. Tel. 272-4258 .•

-PHOTOGRAPHY Marc Abrahamson Color photographs with sculpture by George Frank Arts Resource Services Gallery Until Oct. 30 Man thru Frl: 1 0 a.m. to 3 p.m. 1 1 4 Alaskan Way S -THEATRE " Ah Wllderness" Eugene O'NeU's nostalgic comedy The lakewood Player's Playhouse (T] Every Frl and Sat until Oct. 25 Tel. 588·0042 ·THEATRE "Carousel" A Rodgers and Hammersteln Musical Falstaff Dinner Theatre en Until Nov. 8 Tel. 383- 1 1 49

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER

8

-MUSIC Seattle Symphony Orchestra Conductor Rainer Mledel with Seattle Symphony Chorale Brahm's "Tragic" overture and "The German Requiem" 8 p.m. Seattle Centsr Opera House 305 Harrison Sf. Tel. 447·4736 nckets: 57.50. 56 and 55

·ART Rentoloft's 1980-81 featured artists series wifh Dewitte R. Hendon SeoHle Art Museum Pavilion Reception 5:30 p.m. 10 7:30 p.m.: Tue Ihru Sot: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tel. 447·4710

·ART RiesN!emi "True Value Art" Roscoe louie Gallery Until Oct. 1 4 Mon thru Sat : 1 1 a.m. Ic 6 p.m. 87 S Washington St. Tel. 682·5228

-EXHIBITION " Images: Artists/Machines" Prints. photos and Xeroll:es by Washington artists Henry Gallery. U of W Until Oct. 12 Tuethru Frl: 10a.m.105 p.m.: Sot and Sun: 1 to 5 p.m.; Thur until 9 p.m.

THURSDAY OCTOBER

9

·ART "selections from the Museum's modern collection" seattle Art Museum Pavilion Until Nov 9 Tue thru Sat: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.: Thur. 1 0 a.m to 9 p.m. (free admission): Sun: noon to 5 p.m.: closed man Tel. 447·4710 -EXHIBITION Erotic etchings. woodcuts and lithographs from 18th Century to present Davidson Galleries Until Oct. 31 Tue Ihru Sot: 12 to 5 p.m. 701 First Ave. Tel. 624·7684 ·ART Oil paintings by Monnick. and silk screen prlnls (usIng volcanic ash) by Marion Fino Elaine's Gallery (T] Villa Plaza Shopping Center Mon thru Sat: 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. -ART Pottery, paintings. weaving and photogrophy by Northwest artists The WIng luke Memorial Museum (S) Until Oct. 3 1 Mon thru Frl: 1 1 a.m. to 4:30p.m. 414 8th Ave. Tel. 623·5124

FRIDAY OCTOBER

10

-THEATRE "Born Yesterday" by Garson Kanln The Driftwood Players Theatre Until Oct. 1 1 1407 B St. . Hoqulem Tel. 533·2659

·MUSIC Tacoma Symphony Edward Seterian, violin soloist 8 p.m. Ufe Center sanctuary m Free admission S 18th and Union


!fh�uMooringMast Vol. LVlIl. lssue No. 6 OCtober 10. 1980

Sewage p l ant to remai n. open u n t i l at least 1 984 By Tom

Koehler

Operaling " way over ils designated capability," the PLU Sewage Treatment Plant will cOnlinue to pump biological ' waste into open sewage lagoons until 1984, maybe longer, accord ing 10 James B. Phillips. director of the Physical Plant. The putrid odor permeating much of the northwest corner of the campus, especially Foss and Hinderlie Hails, will have to be lived with until then, when county sewer lines are expected to be built. " The basic reason for the smell is that the plant was

designed for 1 . 500 people and we now have up [0 4,000 people on campus, inc.luding 2,000 who are here 24 hours 3 day," Phjllip� said.

" Except in the summer mon· Ihs. there is never a day when the plant is anywhere near i t s designated capability. but con­ stantly over it." he said. Major improvements have not been made to the plant. located west of Olson Auditorium and adjacem to the Joggerundcn . because the universilY has expected the county to build sewer lines in the area within a short time.

DANGER : AREA _

.l � , ' -. ",

I

_�,---

A sign warns passersby at the PLU Sewage Treatment "" .'nr. A sewage lagoon, maintenanc e buildings and Olson

Aaditorium are in the baCkground.

According 1.0 Phillips, PlU worse during warm days when investigated the possibility of there is JilIle wind or breeze Ihat building a new plant six years would dissipate the fumes." agIJ at a cost of one million Phillips said. dollars, but the County would not He said that the heat increases let the university operate this the decaying process of the waste Improved system once the sewer and makes the smell more lines were installed , At that point noticeable. the university decided to wait. "We are not allowed to use thinking the county line would be any chemicals to treat or mask in"taHed in a few years. the odor other than chlorine," "As you can see we stiU don't Phillips said. "We use this ill the have county lines and are in the final stage before the waste same position," Phillips said. enters the lagoon," In the twelve years that he has " I f we were to build a new plant 31 current cost or between three been at PLU, Phillips said that or four million dollars, it would he has !lever heard of any serious allergic reactions resultmg from have to be abandoned in 1984." the fumes. Also, there is nothing Phillips said that based on the in the files to indicate that there history of trying to get sewers in were any complaints reponed to this area, and the delays in the the previous plant director, he last three years, the 1984 date said. could be extended . Students in Foss and Hinderlie The plant is what is known as a Halls find the smell annoying, secondary treatment plant. but expect a reprieve with the Through biological action rhe advent of colder weather. " I t was a choice between my waste is partially decomposed and sent to the sewage lagoons. friends here in Foss and the There, about 75 percent of the smell-I chose the social life," sewage seeps into the ground, said Eric Monson. The smell is The rest is dissipated through really bad only in the fall and

. . ..::. ....

spring. But 1 wish they'd find a evaporation. The plant has been smelJing way to control it anyway." "I thought it was my shoes at worse than usual recently ..J � b�ause of the warm, sunny first," said Foss freshman Mike Dumas. " I hardly notice it weather.

_ _ _ _ _ '-

A coke can lies on the slime in one of the sewage lagoons.

Students beware, Campus safety has begun to ticket parked cars.

Page 3

"Typically

the

plant

smells anymore.

II

ltnebacker·Kicher Scott McKay sparks Lutes to win num· ber three.

Dorm doors ex· press how Lutes feel about campus life.

Page 1 7

Page 9


Page 2, Mooring Mast. October 10. 1980

P LU ' l u c ky" to h o st g overnor ae bate B1 Tom Koehle.r

ASPlU "really lucked OUI" in 1e1lin& .ubanalorial can­ didatC$ John Spellman and Jim McDennoti to debate her onOct I � . according to ASPLU senator Brendan Mangan . "Spellman and McOcrmoli had over 200 requests for debate Bppearan<X!s in the state and they accepted only three o( them," Mangan said. "We kept calling the cam­ .. they paign managers and Finally accepted our in­ vitation," Managan said. " I think the debate is a great way lenerating of student awareness on some of the issues involved i the governor race. " PLU will host the only

debate west of the Cascades. The first debate was Oct. 8 in Spokane; the last will be Oct.29-f1\"e days before the election-in the Tri.cities. The PlU debate .....ill be in Olson A The PLU debate will be: in Olson Auditorium. Doors open at 6:30 p,m. and close at 1: 15. The debate, lasting exac­ tly one hour, StartS 8t 7:30. John Komen. currently working for the Tacoma News Tribune and a former television anchorman in Seat­ tle will be the moderator. T.here will be no questions asked; the candidates are to spe: ak directl:y on the issues. PLU presldem William O. Rieke is tenatively scheduled to give an introduction. Other ASPLU sponsored events: Monday represen-

tatives from the three Room of the University Cen­ presidential capaigns-Carter. ter. The thret candidates for the Reagan and Anderson--will present their views at 7:30 offi<X! of auorney general. In­ John Miller. p.m. in the North Dining dependant

Democrat John Rosellini and Republican Kenneth Eiken­ berry will match wits in a debate Oct. 28 at 7:30 p.m. in the UC North Dining Room.

AS P LU ap po i nt s n ew c o m m i ttee m e m be rs The appointment of new members to ASPlU commit­ tees was the most talked about piece of business at the weekly senate meeting Oct. 2, New committee members include: Entertainment Com­ miuee: David Boring, Steve Any Jackson. and Umenato;Publicity Board : Debbie Jacobson; Intramurals Board: Eric Frokjer; Univer­ sity Center Board :Judy East­ man; Cave Board:Paul Jackson. The three new senators, Freshman John Kist, and at­ large representatives Paul Jackson Bnd Marla Marvin were introducted. Senator Mark Dunmire an­ nounced that student regIstration for the November

presidential election was very successful. The registration deadline was Oct, 3 but amny students had picked up absen­ tee ballot request forms before this. Paul Jackson reported that the ASPlU energy committee is aiding "Bread for the World" in their energy con­ servation efforts. "Bread for the World" is the association responsible for all the recycling efforts around cam­ pus, " We dedded to help them out, because they are in need of some help with publicity," said Jackson. Another issue at the meeting was the PI Kappa Dc:lta $ 1 ,900 appropriation request. Pi Kappa Delta had requested this amount to have anough funds to send PLU

MAK E BUC KS DEL UXE The Mooring Ma.t holds weekly meetings on Friday at 10:00 a.m. In the Ma.t olflce. If you are Intere.ted In making "Ioney a. a reporter, photographer, ad Iale.perton, or graphic artl.t, come and JOin u•. We need your talent and energy-you need our

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students to national debate competitions this year. Although the group is usually self-sufficient, they were unable to host a large enough fund-raising debate •

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fraternity $JOO at the last meeting and the issue was up for rediscussion. No decision was made and the discussion will continue at later meetings.

P LU Sy m p h o n y O rc h est ra p l a n s to perform off cam p u s By Kelly Allea

In an effort to increa!Oe their audience, PLU's Symphony Orchestra will lake Iheir talen­ IS off campus to perform whe're symphony orchestras don't usually perform, accor­ ding 10 Jerry Kracht. conduc­ tor. " (The concerts) will expand the community we play to and they will be beneficial in a public relatIons aspect." he said. Following each of the four regularly scheduled concerts this year, they symphony will appear at an outside location. Amonl those locations are Stadium High Schook in Taco m a , downtown Snohomish and the Shorecrest area, nonh of Seattle. "These places don't often get a symphony performance, but they are rich in interest, " said Kracht. "We also get the benefit of

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last year to meet their financial needs. Many schools did not show up because of a snow storm. The approriations commit­ tee had onlv offered the'

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a second performance," said Kracht. He said taking 3; full symphony orchestra on an ex­ tensive tour is incredibly ex­ pensive and though it is primarily a student orchestra, It does include members of the faculty and community who would not be able (0 ta�e part in such 3 lOUr. Kracht said because of students' busy schedulc�, the performances are limited to places Ihal would allow them to return Ihe same' day. The additional performan­ ces are nOI meant to "show off

the wares" or the symphony. Kracht said. Kracht said PlU's sym­ phony has a regular audience of peopk who attend their concerts. The outside perror­ man<X!s give the "The musk we play hM become more difficult concep� tually and technically and we tackle more di fficult music each year." said Kracht. "Music is the onl> single reason we all have in common, reason we all have in com­ mon."

Bids recieved to remodel UC's Chris Knutson Hall By Din ArbaUlb

Bids have been received for a remodeling prOject under consideration for Chris Knut­ son Hall in the University Cen­ ter. Richard Moe, dean of the school of the arts. said the revisions would be made only to the west end of CK. He said that possibilities were being explored in how to make the room "more functional and more pleasing aesthetically" and not restrictive to music acoustically. Moe: is concerned that any project undertaken will not conflict with Student Congregation. which meets every Sunday in the CK. Funding will be primarily gifts to PLU from supporters who would like to see the CK utlized in a better manner. Moe see minimal difficulty in financing a project cosint bet­ ween SIO,OOO and 512.000 but he said that he felt somewhat disheartened by the high cOst of the project, still in its ex­ ploratory stage.

According to Moe, there are three major considerations being examined. The first is to improve the appearan<X! of the west wall which "says nothing." A graphics class taught by Ernest Schwidder will be con­ sidering different ideas for that wall. The second consideration is the possibility of purchasing a light bar. Hopes of this were somewhat dampened said Moe, when the price was discovered to be 56,000. There ....o . uld be an additional 52,000 charge if a rheostat light system were also installed. Some kind of portable, elevated seating is also being considered. These would be used for performances such as student recitals or faculty chamber music. Moe, to According possibilities are that the arts committee will ac<X!pt a plan of prOCffding in incremental stages, holding off completely or going on with a full com­ mitment to the project.


October 10, 1980, Mooring Mast

Campus Safety gets to ugh on parking By Dan VOfclpel Get·tough parking policies by Campus Safety and Information and the Stale Patrol will highlight a wttk of seminars on tape prevention. vandalism. and PLU·UPS relations for the Campus Safety and I n formalion Office. In order to curb the growing probltm of students and staff parking their cars in illegal or reserved spaces. Campus Safety has b«'n issuing $1 10 SS lickets. said Kip Fillmore, dIrector. "Now thai all the signs are up and the parking directory is OUI, enforcement is the only step left," fillmore said. will be " E n forcement sirong." he added. A State Patrol office source blasted PlU car owners with a similar gct-Iough stand. "If it 's illegally parked. we're lonna tOW 'em," a trooper said. "It's as SImple as that."

The State Patrol has had about 30 cars towed away since school began, including nine in one day, said Fillmore. "We don't sit down there all day." claimed one Stale Patrol ofl'icer, "but we cruise through there, and if we see a car illegally parked or get a complaint from security, we'll tow h. And it costs bucks to gCl lt back." The "bucks" add up to $42 to extricate a car that has been towed. "I'd rather we not write any tickets," said Fillmore. "We're nOt out to make money. We JUSt have to see an improvement." Another move to relieve parking pressure is to initiate a van shuttle from lower to upper campus. The van would run a IS-minute loop around campus. However, this move is stili in the "planning \tages," Fillmore said. e Campus Safety has been In\olved in the planning of a

, I

series of rape prevention seminars. The seminars are designed to inform the public about rape prevention, support groups, medical steps, and police investigation. According to Fillmore. the seminars have been well­ received so far. eTwo students involved in drinking and destroying a

"No Parking" sign near the swimming pool at 4 a . m . Saturday were identified by a Campus Safety officer. A report has been sent to the Residential Life Office, where, if action is laken, the first step in punishment would be the peer review board. e "To &tt beller relations with UPS," PlU rented a van to

UPS students. The UPSers. who were planning a trip to Me Rainier, discovered their van had been stolen and called FLU's Campus Safety. "We had three not being used that day," said Fillmore, "so we lent them one. We are rival schools, but that doesn't mean we can't help each other " OUI.

R H C f u n d i n g po l i cy : n ot q u i t e as i t s ee m s 8y Uncia Grippin "We beuer get our bid in now so we will get our share of the money" may be something your dorm council represen­ tatives are saying in response to the new RHC policy that dorms will be given funds for dorm improvements on a first­ come-first-serve basis. This new policy does not function as sounds, however. Jf a dorm chooses to apply for funds for dorm improvements before another dorm that doesn't automatically mean that the first dorm will be awarded Ihe money and the second won't. What is meant by this policy is that since there is a limited amoum available, S 1 750.OO per semesler, the dorms who apply first and are gramed funds will get them over some dorm who

applies later when the amount left is lower, The old policy read that each dorm was granted a specific amount per student for dorm improvements. This meant that a dorm like Ordal could receive more funds for improvements than could Delta because Delta has fewer students. The new syslem requires that the dorm treasurers get together and analyze whether the expenditure being applied for is realiy needed. I f they feel it is needed it will be gran­ ted, provided RHC still has the funds left that semester to award such money. Anothrr stipulation on the money the dorms can apply for is that not dorm can apply for more than $400.00 per semester_ There is some truth 10 the belief that RHC allots its money on a firsi-come basis

Dads h o n o red w i t h bru nch, game, show By Unda Gripplnl Brullch and a football game Will kick off PlU's annu.' ! Dad's Day tomorrow. After the football game dads will t;.. treated to a vanety show spon· sored by the theatre frater· nuy APO in co-operalion \\ i tl1 ASPlU. Registration and packet· pick-up will begin at 9 a.m. and go umil 1:30 p.m. This will be done In the Universil) Center. The brunch will begin at 9:30 a.m. During Ihe brunch� President Rieke will speak. as well as Don Poier! an ex-PlU football captain. Poier, a 1974 graduate. was a defensive end and earned three leiters durin@. his college career. Now he is the sports director fOf KING-TV in Seallie and ha.i been innuemial in getting the lutes mentioned on radio and

but it should also bt remem­ bered that all applications for funds will need to be of speeific need or the chances of being awarded the money will be drastically lower. An example o f an ap-

plication Iht may not receive funds would be a dorm like for applying Harstad microwave ovens on each noor. First there would be no need for five microwave ovens in one dorm and second. thev

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MON-SAT 10-9 layaway television. After the brunch the Lutes will take on Southern Oregon State College. The game will be held at Franklin Pierce Stadium at I :)0 p.m. coMelissa Majar, chairperson of the Dad's Day committee said that Ihe com­ mittee had almost met the Quota (or maximum possible attendance of the functions.

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Page 4, Mooring Mast. October 10, 1980

'A new and far more workable method'

AS PLU budget syste m so lvi ng o l d problems Nakamura feels Ihat this will provide fairer and more equitable distribution of fun­ ds. The second major revision Nakamura completed last May

A new and fSr more workable method of kttping the $125,000 ASPlU budget i being em­ now,"g lomoothly s ployed thiS year, acrording to Alan Nakaura, ASPlU Com­ ptroller_ Nakamura was voted into office last March and since then has completely revised the system for organizing the ASPlU committt'e budgets, and for providing ASPlU grants. Thought not all of the ideas were his originally, he maintains that he did "try to solve problems." The office of comptroller is slightly different from teh other ASPLU office in that there is an overlap of about 3 months shared between the newly elected comptroller and the exiting comptroller. This overlap is provided, according to Nakamura, to enable the new comptroller to learn all the aspects of the complicated job. The large part of Ihis

was to establish a criteria s.heet for judging which groups

overlap time in the spring is devoted to assembling the budget for the following year. Nakamura has gone to a modified zero-based budget. According to Nakamura, this is essentially the same system that the PlU administration uses. By going to this budget system. the two systems could be standardized. This sim-

should and which should not recieve ASPlU grant funds. According to Nakamura, previous to (he time thaI he was elected there was no set criteria for such judgements. Each different group that ap­ plied for grant funds from ASPlU was dealt with dif­ ferently in the pasl. plilies any process whereby ASPLU budgets must be reviewed by members of the administration. Nakamura got rid of all the old forms that had been used by previous comptrollers in the process of going to a dif­ ferent budget system. All the forms this year ace different and standardized.

Nakamura claims that there were no established answers to questions such as where does ASPLU deny grant funds to a group or why should they turn down a fund request. This year, Nakamura has also tried to make committee chairmen more responsible. He said that last year some committee chairmen did not

even know their own budgets. This yar the chairmen are respon!)ible for knowina their 0 .... '1\ budgetlo and are r�pon· sible for �eeing that accurate r«orch are kept concerning their commiUee eJCpenditurcs. Nakamura �tre!)sed that hb work is not without its faults. "We're going to make mistakes. " he said, "but Ihat is the only way to learn." He said that it took a long lime and a lot of energy 10 put together the revisions and thaI he feels that they are n marked improvement over the way the office procedures were dealt with in the past. Nakamura added that he was very careful about making his changes. He didn't want (0 "ramrod" anything through, he said. Nakamura described his of­ fice as being one with a very low visibility to the student body. There is however, a high workload, but he is fairly ac­ ctssable in the ASPlU offices, he said.

President R ieke visiting dorms Foss Pond, Residential Life, the Q Club and tuition were the most popular topics that PlU President William Rieke discussed with residents of Hinderlie (Rainier) Hall last week. President Rieke is making a point to visit every dorm on campus this semester in an ef­ fort to get student input on all aspects of campus life. He has already visited a few dorms

and plans to visit the fcst in the near future. The first question asked of Presidenl Rieke on his recent visit concerned Foss Pond. The students complained about the smell and asked if a date had been set for ter­ mination of the facility. President Rieke said that "unfortunately Foss Pond would probably be in used for four or five more years." "We're using an old system built for 2000 people, and now

ASPLU MOVIES COMMITTEE PRESENTS ON FRI., OCT. 1 0th: The FID'TCertified Crazy Person's Comedy While the Father of the Bride was

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close to 5,000 people are using it," he said. Until the county builds a new sewage treatment plant, Foss will remain in use. Rieke said however, that for this year, "the worst is over." With colder weather and more rain on the way, the pond stench will be kept in chcck. The students also asked if tuition was expected to go up again next year. "As a basic rule. you can assume tht tuition will rise the same amount as the inflation rate. However, I think there will also be more financial aid available next year, too," Rieke said. Rieke also said that students should be grateful to the Q Club, PlU's alumni club. whose members donate to the university on a monthly basis. "on the average, Q Club donations held down tuition

by $500 per student this year," hI; said. Rieke asked the students about campus life at PlU. The studenu said that, although PLU is a tremendous school academically. what makesthe school special is the residential life. No one.voiced displeasure about life in a dorm or on campus. The students like the relaxed at-

mosphere on campus and the good ration of social activities to study time. " The president's dorm visits are a very good idea," one student said. "They allow the students to volice thier opinions on campus issues as well as allowing President Rieke to obtain feedback and ideas from students."

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October to. 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 5

90,000 cases are diagnosed per year

Breast cancer stri kes one woman i n th i rteen By Cindy Kloth

is nearing menopause and has completed her family. Marlene The U.S. Depanment of discovered a painless lump in Health. Education and her breast and had it checked Welfare has published some out by a doctor. The doctor startling statistics regarding told her the lump was nothing. breast cancer. Some 90.000 Nine months later, the lump women a year are diagnosed to still existed. so she had it have breast cancer. In simple checked out again only to be terms this means one of 1 3 !Old the lump was not can­ women is destined t o gel cerous (malignant) but breast cancer during her "atypical . " Marlene went iOlo lifetime. Despite the fact that the hospital for a simple breast cancer kills ]4.000 surgery to have the lump women annually, the survival removed only to wake up in rale is now at 80 percent due to the recovery room to find a recent medical advances. modifjed mastectomy had Carol is 25, happily been performed. The tumor married. and finishing up her was malignant . graduate degree in education. Marlene underwent six She found out a month ago weeks of radiation and will that she was two months year's complete one pregnant. The good news was chemotherapy treatment in shattered by the discovery of a October. Hairloss from the lUmp in her breast . The doctor chemotherapy has been believes the cancer was minimal but she finds it makes pregnancy-related, saying that her tired and nauseated. breast cancer has been linked Marlene said, "The most to the hormonal changes ex­ difficult aspect of the ordeal is that the treatment will never perienced during pregnancy or menopause. Carol had a end. The follow-up treatments radical mastectomy (removal '" will always be. I can deal with of both breasts) but has the present; it's the unknown refused chemotherapy. She future that is a struggle." has no intention o f ter­ Breast cancer's major target minating her pregnancy; is women over ]5, but like therefore. she does not want to Carol, statistics show it is risk harming the fetus with striking women younger and chemotherapy treatment. younger. To date, no new cancer has For women under 35. the been found in Carol. It is risk o f breast cancer is early, but Carol said she is op­ minimal but risk increases timistic. "I go in each week with age. All women are at a for a checkup and JUSt pray higher risk if they have a per­ that the news will be good_ All sonal history of breast cancer 1 can do is wait and see. Once or a history of breast cancer in the baby comes and I see it has their immediate family. A clean family history. however, ten fingers and toes, then I'll does nOt immunize any begin to feel relieved." woman from breast cancer. Carol went on to say, " I never worried about breast Statistical studies also suggest cancer. My monthly concerns the risk of developing breast were in paying bills and gelling cancer is lower still for women my homework done. Brcast who have children before they examinations were the last are25 years old. thing I worried about-if I The cause of breasl cancer is remembered, great ! " unknown. It is a common Marlene is another breast misconception that an injUry cancer victim. Marlene, at 42, to the breast can cause breast

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cancer, but the American Cancer Society says there is no evidence to support this claim. About 95 percent of breast cancer cases are discovered self­ breast through examination. The signs of breast cancer are a lump. a thickening or dimpling of skin, pain or tenderness. All symptoms can be detected self­ breast through examination. Not all tumors are cancerous, and aboul 80 percent of all tumors found in the breast are this kind. If a a discovered , is lump physician should be consulted. Malignant tumors can and do endanger life. They push aside, invade. and destroy normal tissues. The American Cancer Society defines cancer as a " disease characterized by uncontrolled growth and

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spread of abnormal cells." They say that sometimes the growth takes place rapidly; sometimes it takes years. Success in treating breast cancer depends on the stage at which it was first diagnosed, and its response to the various th�apies. I reatment of breast cancer may include surgery known as a masteclOmy-removal of the breast , radiation treatment to control the growth of existing tumors and the development of new ones, and chemotherapy. Chemotherapy may be used alone or in combination with surgery or radiation. Chemotherapy may keep the cancer under control for mono ths or years. Some may not benefit at all from

The effect of chemotherapy treatment on women's reproductive systems-more importantly on the unborn child. as in Carol's case-has been under recent study. Doc� tors now advise their patients to use birth control throughout chemotherapy treatment even though concep­ tion is highly improbable during Ihis time. The National Institute of Health made this recommen­ dation for women with cancer whose cancer has not spread. They believe that "these women of child-bearing age should be spared chemotherapy until it is determined who is al risk of relapse." Chemotherapy would "expose the majority to the risks of toxicity without possible benefit. " For college-age women the risk of breast cancer is in­ creasing. It means breast self­ examination is something to be taken seriously. The responsibility lies with the in­ dividual. Finally, it means that there are options to consider in choosing treatment that will affect not only the cancer but all aspects of women's lives. For more information on breast cancer and breast sel f­ examination, contact the Health Center at 383-7337, or , Tacoma's office of the American Cancer Society at 383·1663.

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Page 6, Mooring Mast, October 10, 1980

�D� IIm[l BrnD� : By MiteR J. Oppel! The communication arts dtpartment's first dramatic offering this season isn't aU drama. Bill Parker, director of " Darl of the Moon," ex· plained [hal the show incor­ porales dance, music, comedy, and drama. While it incor­ porates all Ihe element� of a musical, it isn't one. In a musical, Ihe focal points arc the music and the dancing within the musical numbers. However, in this show, Ihe music will serve as more of a moodselltr and also as an in­ legral part of the show in Ihat the music is necessary for the continuance of the show. Af­ ter all, most revival meetings do have a lot of singing in them. The Story behind "Dark of the Moon" is an old one. Based on the "Legend of Bar-

bara Allen" from Scotland. the story has undergone many transitions before finally being put into dramatic form in 1942. The play has run on Broadway and had IWO revivals there, bUl has rarely been performed in this area. This should make it a real treat for Tacoma audiences. .The basic plOl of the show centers around the love of a young witch boy for the beautiful Barbara Allen. He desires to become human and to marry her. bUl his superiors (the Conjurors) add a con­ dition to hi requot; before he can become human, Barbara Allen mUSt be faithful to him for one full year. John (the witch boy) then comes as a stranger to the North Carolina community where- Barbara Allen lives, and marries he-r. Everything goes along fine until the townspeople discover

' Dark of t h e M o o n '

who and what John is and the condition that goes along with his desire to become human. In a tense. emotion-packed revival meeting, the town­ speople decide on a soludon to their "problem. " In the meantime, the wit­ ches, wh don't want this "an­ �ition to take place either, are trying 10 find a way to seduce John into !ilaying with them. It i� in these sequences that Ihe music anc origin al choreography by Dave Rob­ bins of Ihe music depanment and Maureen McGill of the physical educalion department will lake place. I am amtiously waiting 10 sec the.�c scenes as Robbins and McGill are very accomplished in their respec­ tive fields. Their contributions 10 the play should enhance it greatly. Parker explained that while all Ihese wonderful Ihings are

going on, we must still be­ aware of the theme. The main· theme of the play is the un­ willingness of many people to accepl anyone who is the sHghtest bit different i n any way. It is not only the town­ speople who are unwilling to accept John as one of them, but also the witche.!> who don't want to accept Barbara. This is a theme which should hil everyone who attends Ihe play. No one is �xempt from these type.� or feeling), whether they be based on race, rC'ligious or political beliefs, education, or sex. The only way 10 overcome these fetlings is be learning about others and finding similarities among us rather than differences. A sub·theme of the play is the human tendency to excuse anything in the name of religion. Through the ages we can see countless incidents of

this. The Roman persecution of Jews, the Crusades , the Spanish Inquisition, the Salem Wilch Trials, and closer to our own lime period, the Nazi persecution or Jews in World War II. These are inCAcusable and we must all work to end Ihis type of persecution. Perhaps this play will serve to open our eyes lO that bit of persecutor (hat lies . deep within all of us. Maybe Ihese are shocking subjects for many people. but perhaps it is what we need to get us am of our presen! state of complacency and apathy. The purpOloe or (heaue is not just to entertain and delight, to teach and also but enlighten. "Dark of the Moon" should do all of chese things. The show runs for the next two weekends in Eastvold Auditorium at 8 p.m. and students can attend free with PLU ID.

For some too m uch exerc ise is hazardous for health By Karen M. Olson Researchers at Stanford University are questioning just how good regular exercise is for the heart . According to their research, for some individuals. particularly those the disease, heart with increased worldoad which exercise puts on the heart can lead to serious problems, even death. -

month. Only two of the people had exercised for less than a month. The main cause of death was heart failure. Thirteen of the people died of documtntd coronary artery disease, three died of OIher heart-related dysfunctions, one died of heat stroke and one died of unknown causes. The majority of the people did have the study in

Gary Chase, an associate physical of professor education at PLU, emphaSized some of the poims made by the researchers. "There is a segment of the population

who should never exercise , " he said. "Only a physician can determine

this

for

sure.

Fortunately, it is a very small the of percentage

"Most people who have trouble running should be walking."

In one of the cases studied, a man had difficulty breathing when he was out running with his wife, but he didn't let that hold him back.. Instead, ht: raced her over the final distance to their home, where he collapsed and died. The study focused on 17 men and one woman who di,'(j during or soon after running. The majority of these people had been regular exercisers. All but four of the people had been exercising for over a year and three of the men had been runnin� over 100 miles a

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preexisting, severe coronary artery disease and were over 40 Six of them experienced potential warning signs. but ignored them. The researchers said that the study does not invalidate the regular that contention exercise, such as jogging, is a valuable health-promoting activity for most Americans. Unrortunately. the researchers said, there is no specific way to identify those risks of exercise· related deaths. William L. Haskell , one of the researchers, said. "In the past, we considered the start of an exercise program as the for period risk high cardiovascular as well as orthopedic complications, and advised middle-aged men to programs e:o:ercise stan g·radually. However. this study indicates that even long-time exercisers are not totally sudden to immune cardiovascular complica­ . tions. .

population. " Exercise does improve the efficiency of the hean by increasing stroke volume and decreasing the resting rate, Chase said. "Many studies have shown that phYSical activity can reduce the number a In attacks heart of populat ion," he said. The heart is negatively affected when you push yourself too far, Chase said. "Improperly prescribed and r!'�" hued exercise is a bad People lend to thillg.· ove! do. he said. They netd to define Ihe limits of cheir exercise. " Most people who have trou�de running should be said. Chase wall..;lIg," " An:vone who has been physically inactive all their " I"'I�� college including students, should begin an with program exercise walking. " Chase said that people can scnsibly limit the amount of exercise that they get. First of all. exercise should never hurt. he said. The myth that exercise has to hurt to do you any good is taught by coaches, not physical educators. according to Chase. Secondly, you should be able to talk freely while you are exercising, Chase said. If you aren't able to talk comfortably, then you are pushing yourself too hard. Finally, Chase said. if you develop pains in your Joints, then you should change your is body Your activity. signaling you that something is wrong. "Proper prescription and diagnosis could prevent the bulk of most problems," he said.

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October 10, 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 7

Toxic s hock syndrome

I s R e l y " re l i a b l e?" relation to Rely tampons, while IWO studies show that Rely is more responsible for the disease. The Center for Disease COnlrol reported thai 7 1 percent of the women studied, who had TSS, used Rely tampons. They also said that women who use Rely are more likely to contract TSS. Don Tassone or Proctor and Gamble, the manufacturers of Rely, said that "Rely was in­ trodu� to the market in 1974 in limited areas. National ex­ pansion was completed in 1980." On Sept. 22, Rely was voluntarily withdrawn from the market. Tassone men­ tioned that consumers can get a refund by sending the unused product back , with the price, to P.O. Box 8448, Clin­ ton, Iowa, 52736. He declined 10 comment on the pendmg lawsuits. One case is a $ 1 5 million suit filed by Richard GIDndon Dgainst International Playtt, Corp. ( m anufactu rer of Playtex tampon.!,), Proctor and Gamble, and against the follow'"K retail stores: Fred Meyer Inc. . Safeway, Payless. and Thriflway. Glandon's daughter would be a high school junior today. but is now forced to attend special education classes because of permanent damage to her brain, central nervous system, and cardiovascular system. This damage was caused by

By Gille Holmlund.ad Klren FII!lles Tampon disease-scien­ tifically known as toxic shock syndrome-has shaken many young. women. Indeed, most girls on campus were sent scurrying to their "Good Sturr" boxes to throw away the Rely brand tampons given to them by PLU. Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) IS a disease that has killed in 28 out of 300 cases. Beginning symptoms include a high fever. vomiting and diarrhea. These nrc often mistaken as nu symptoms. Within the next two to three days, the woman's lingers and toCS tUM! bluc, and a rash. which IS similar to a sunburn, covers the body. The- woman is likely to be very weak and to have a dangerously low blood pressure. TSS oceu" in men�trualmg women from I S 10 SO years old. though I( is predominanl in those under 30. According LO Sue Hutchcroft or the Federal Drug Admintstrallon (FDA) in Seattle, irthe woman has had TSS berore, she is 30 percent more likely to catch it again. The disease is not cau\td by the tampon, but by a bacteria, SllJphylococcw Aureo, which gen trapped by the tampon in the vagina and enters the bloodstream during the men­ strual period .

strong1y to five major tampon manuracturers that they print the foi1owing warning on their packages. "Toxie �hock loyndrome (TSS) is a rare hut serious disease lhat can occur In men· stru8ting women. rss can cam,e death. The disease ha�

TSS.

Rely is not the only brand Lhat has be� invohed with the diselBe. Hutchcrort said that of rour �ludies, twO show no

On behalf or all w('Ime:n who have used Rely tampons, a class aClion SUit has been filed in San FranciM:O. fhe FDA ha� sugge:,ned

been as..ociated with the u�e of tampons. You may therefore

Tam pons "tossed"

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IA<.D'''5. MeCOoL

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.

'The Great and Sones-Popular Unpopular" \\'45 the mle uf the program pr�:\cnted by Marni N"lon lau Frida}" mghl to a nOt-qUlle·lull hou e in Eru.t�old Auditurium " I like to smg 10",' Ihat are ni�e and Ihat �n«t the jO),i and sorro....s of Ilur h�t"," she told her oudien�e. Her a program , repre�('nllnll !ope<:tTum of mU5icai Myle� Bnd eras, reOected liIe's joy� and sorrows. The audience burst in 10 enthusiastic applause Ilt Ihe opemng nottS of !.he" theme song rrom The Sound oJ Music. It fell into a pin -drop si1en� as Nixon sang the story o f a young maid who dreams of a bloody revenge on her haughty employers in "Pirale Jenny." The uncontested ravorite of

pons out of the (orien­ lalion) kit wherever and , whenever possible. Nevenhele<is, it wah nOI a serio us problem , he added, if only a dozen of the 4,000 new women students at Maryland threw the tampons away. .

I IJClN'T NEED

2

By Bllrb Pldi.rll

Bob Hanggi. a \pokesman for the I)30 Corp, nOled tha t "we've a.. ked univer­ "hie" to IBke the lam·

dow ofthier dorm. They had gotten the tampons for free in an orientation pocket proided by t he 13-30 Corp . or Knoxville, TN. Sophomore Mary Brown e�plaincd the protest was against the universit y , which should have: warned women of the potential Richard Stimharm. pson. director of

To DO IT

AN'<MORE!

I

CUtN NOT? Irs ouE 'J TOMORROw! HoW ARE you

phy,i.;ian." Thl .. suggc\ted warnina went in the form of a telegram

to the makers of PlaYlex , Tampax, Kote)(, O.B.. and PurseHes. The Canadian Cen· ler for Disease Control is also e"amimng Pla)'lex, TamplUl and Carefree tom pons. PlU', Health Cenler ha, had no problem with TSS. The disease i'l very rarc-only three out of 100,000 women can­ Iract it.

N i xon sere n a des s t u d e n t s

resident life 81 (he cam­ pus, countered, " I don 'l know that the univcnity \\- o u l d n�l:essarily see lhlll as ii' re;pono;ibilit)'. It w<, a free dilotribullon. No one wa. ... male 10 lake theID. "

Collele Park, M0 (CPS)About a dOlen female "tude:nt!i at the University of �Iaryland wen: "0 dil\lurbfiJ about repon� thai Rei)' lam­ pom may cau"e a fala) i lln e ..s called 10'1(.' ..hoel I)ndrome rhal they threw rhe tampom OUI o f the �Mh Ooor win·

wan! to consider not using tsmpon\ or alternating lam· pons with napkins. If you develop high fever and vomiting or diarrhea during your menstrual period, you �hould rtmo\"e your tampon imm�dlQlely und talk to a

EASY-BY N().oJ IN[)[PE'NDfflr SruD'( IN P'fRD­ HAS

MY

the evenmg ....as . a mutley rrom Wt'st Sidt' Story, one of .;;evend films in which Ni�on iho�Han& h:<jdinS rain. " I ....IU . \lef) $hy when I .... :u. young." �id Ni"on, ",w) I let thC'm ml1�C' me Inlo a gho�." Called "the &ho\tc�t wl!h the m('»I�I" by T imt' magazine. �hc !ollns un�n rol� in The A"inR and I lind My Fair Lad)I, a� wdl a� If'r.t( SIde Story. Nixon has alia performed in mu�ical comedy, opera, televiSIon, r e c or d i n g , symphonies, and, as in last Friday''!' program, a!! a recital aniM The host of the popular children's progra m , . . Boomerang, " Nixon mluntaincd that she has a special love: for the young. have such "ChildrC'n imagination," she explained. "Children likc 10 discover program Her things."

included c\eraJ �ng.-.,. tor the young and young-al·hearl, She .sang " The: Rainbo.... Thf' rrom Conne\.'t ion" MwpPf'1 .\IOI'If', S I n B Ii "Jenny Rainbo"' , " and Rcbc\::ca, " about a bab) ltlrl and v.hal the .... o rld hold! for her. NI'on seemed 10 ha....e liuk teBard for the rarclY-Cfol.,C'\J line between cla\'qcal and popular m u -.,. i c Shc ..ang Puccini'!; "Un Uel O i . " Ovorak'� "Song� M y Mother Taught Me," and Sondhcim'5 "Send in the Clo�II'" wllh equal COn\·iclion. "People from the claMical musk world asl me what I'm doing singing popular music. and people from the world o f popular music wonder why 1 sing songs rrom operas." she lamented. "I Iikt to sing both. I think music is aile of the ways we have of ennobling our IivC!." "

DORMSDREARY TRIC.t<' EH";o

PRETTY


Page 8, Mooring Mast, October

10, 1980

R a p e , t h e act, t h e v i ct i m By Barb PicKdl "The biggest shock was people's reactions." said a PLU freshman I'll call Jean. "The kids at school gave me the worst remarks you can imagine. And their parents would call my parents up and say they thought it was awful and disgusting and ask what I did to bring it on. I ended up having to go away to live with some relaliv� for awhile." Like one in three American women, Jean was a victim of a sexual assault, in this " r a rape. The term "sexual as­ sault" also refers to altempt�d rape, incest, child molestation, statutory rape and what police call "indecent liberties," which included various other forms of sexual contact with a non-consenting adult. Unlike most of these victims., she chose to report the incident. Four years later one of her two attackers was arrested and convicted. Word of her rape got into the community when police arrested a suspect who turned out to be the brother of a friend. Lauri Engleking, a PlU student who works as a rape victim's advocate at Pierce County Rape Relief, and who has, herself, been the victim of a rape attempt, believes that guilt is one of the biggest problems a victim of an assauli must cope with. "Our society has taught women to accept anything a man does to them. A woman will get raped and then take the blame for letting it happen. Hitchhikers are good examples of this. When a girl is raped while hitchhiking, everyone-her­ self, her family and friends, the police, and even her attacker-thinks it's her fault. The rapist rationalizes that if she's dumb enough to

hitchhike, she deserves to be raped. That's not true. A woman may be puuing herself in a very vulnerable position when she hitchhikes, but she should be able to do that without being attacked." Jean said her decision to report her rape to the police was largely due to her own anger at her attacker and to her parents' prodding. "My mother made me write down a real good description of the guy," she explained. She said she was less than thrilled with the level of understanding displayed by the police officers handling her case. "The officer who was sent out to question me seemed really nervous talking to a rape victim," she observed. "He kept saying he'd get a policewoman so I could talk to her. I didn't mind telling him what happened, but he was so uncomfortable that he made ,. me uncom fortable. She felt the officers did do a thorough job of investigating her case, however. "There was a policewoman who was following me, and I had a phone number to call in case I saw them again." Jean did see her attackers again. "I saw their car driving around, but I never could get to a phone or to my policewoman fast enough. One night I got a rock thrown through my window. It had a note on it that said to keep my mouth shut or else, They also broke into our house, and took some stuff from our liquor cabinet." What a rape victim who reports her -assault can expect from police varies, of course. from situation to situation. "The first thing we do is to take basic information on you and on the incident," states Detective John Clark of tht" Sex Crimes Division of the

Pierce County Sheriff's Office. "We need to have you teU your story very explicitly. Sometimes giris will say, 'he did it to me,' and we have to ask exactly what it was that he did. A defense attorney can tear up a case based on a statement that just says, 'he did it.' " According to Clark, the victim is then asked to describe her attacker's appearance. An effort is made to put togeth� a composite drawing of the suspect. This is done with a series of transparencies laid atop one another. The victim chooses hair, chin, nose, eyes, and other feat ures which resemble those of the attacker. The victim may also be asked 10 examine photographs and police tine-ups, which the attacker may or may nOI be part of. Hospital staffs must ask the victim's permission to do any tests, collect evidence or involve the police. Tests may include a blood test for syphilis or alcohol content, a pelvic examination, pregnancy tests, gonorrhea tests, and evidence-gathering. Physical injuries, such as bruises, are documented. In Jean's case, her bruised body and broken ribs served as evidence of her attack. disease and Venereal pregnancy tests performed immediately do not tell whether the victim is pregnam or has V.D. as a result of the rape. Follow-up checks are necessary for this. The tests performed immediately only determine whether or not the victim was pregnant or had V.D. prior to the rape. Many rape victims choose not to report the crime. An alternative hert' is (0 seek help from Rape Relief or a similar organization. lorraine London, community liaison

for Pierce County Rape Relief, the stresses confidentiality of the hotline. "We don't even keep names on file here; we only keep numbers. " Rape Relief offers a variety of services. ranging from short-term counseling of anonymous callers on their 24hour line to group discussions, to the benefit of an advocate throughout the hospital and police system. Rape Relief receives more reported incidents than does the police depanmeOi. last year the Pierce County Sherifrs office handled 106 rapes, nine statutory rapes, and 63 attempted rape cases. Pierce County Rape Relief aided a total of 276 victims. There is some overlap between the two agencies, as some victims report their assaults to both the police and Rape Relief. The reactions of the victim's family and friends to the assault can greatly help or hinder her handling of the incident. Pierce County Rape Relief offers these suggestions: First, believe the victim's story. Nothing is worse for a rape victim than to tell her parents, husband, or friends what happened, only to have then insist she must be lying. Second, let the victim know you think she is not to blame ror the incident. Third, rape victims need extra love and support. Fourth, if yay have been sexually involved with the woman, try to pick an appropriate time to discuss her feeling about the attack, about you, and about Sex, in that order. Fifth, in cases of virgin rape, female support is important. Mothers, sisters or close rrknds may be able to help. Sixth, allow the woman to talk about what happened, but do not push her with specific Questions. Seventh, if

she does choose to press charges, try to become aware of the legal 'processes and problems involved. Just how frequent are sexual assaults at PlU? Because most incidents are never reported to police, health aid authorities, or organizations, it is impossible to tell. Kip Fillmore, head of Campus Safety and Information. states that there were no rapes reponed to his office lasl year. " I do know for a fact that there were a number of unreported incidents on campus last year," he added . Ann MiUer of the Health Center reports that she works with one or two rape victims per year, usually in the capacity of follow-up to the work of Rape Relief. In the Parkland area, there have been 23 rapes reported to police so far in 1980. This can be compared with 46 repons in lakewood. Crime Rauch, Ron Prevention Officer ror the Pierce County Sheriff's Office. Slates that an average of one in 10 rapes are reported to police. Americans. particularly women. are beginning to understand the issues involved in sexual assault. What is known about it is, however, only a small part of a large problem. The vast majority of rapes are still nOI reported to either health authorities or law enforcement officials. According to London, following programs of education and rape awareness for both girls and boys in public schools. an increasing number of junior and senior high school students are reporting incidents of sexual assault. Some women are now seeking help in coping with incidents which took place 10 to 20 years ago.


October 10, 1 980 'Mooring Mast,Page 9

D o o rs s h ow p e r s o n a l i t i es By Gall Glftawood "Eat a live toad the first thing each morning. And that will be the worst thing you'll , have to face all day. . "Life is like a beaver colony . . . .Just one dam thing after another. " These morsels of wisdom come from PlU students, or rather from their doors. If first impressions count, so does what one sees first in your dorm room-your door. With this rule in mind, on­ students are campus displaying their personalities blatantly. A check around campus led to endorsement ,)f politicaJ candidates and much. much more. "Take the clouds with the sun and your days will be fun." ••Jesus loves mc. " "My life is going by too fast. My only hope is that we go into overtime." A student, ;:,r�cumabJy from Montana.had-" Entering Big

Sky Country-Beware 01 Bigfoot. " Stickers were the p r e d o m i n a n t p o l i t ical expression. However, a couple of Reagan and Bush stickers and one "Don't blame me I voted for Ford" sticker can

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admitted, "Sorry, We're lost. " One door is a yield sign with Norwegian " Ca u t i o n Crossing." Another door assured visiting women that " Unescorted ladies Dept." Welcome. " "Men's Restroom. " Stuen seemed to house a 101 " No Soliciting." PlU football fans; it had of O N , 0A NGE R the most "PlU FOOTBALL-GO LUTES" stickers. Hong has the m0.51 cr�alive doors. On one i$ a crayo';ed picture of a boy and a girl with BOY and GIRL printed next 10 the pictures. The caption­ " N I N ETH GRADE HEALTH LESSON NO. I . " wonders (One the If occupant passed ninth grade spelling.) Other gems in Hong include license plate$ from Minnesota and Illinois, a motion sickness , bag, a garbage chute With sign Food " UC says Ihat .: Preparation," and a wooden " Mental Ward" sign. ..J ...L� � L Wandering the halls of one finds "New Pflueger TRESPASSING ON THESE Orleans French Quarters" and PREMISES BY ORDER OF , " Slave Quarters. . PIERCE COUNTY FIRE A door in Foss states "Bear MARSHALL." and looking" Area-no Quotations from TennYson, Robert louis Stevenson, and the Bible filled the list. But on one door in Cascade Miss Piggy explains, "Just because I'm beautiful doesn't mean I'm not talented!" Another in tidbit profound Cascade-"Every day of school is a day closer to vacation!" "REALITY is for people who can't handle DRUGS," a i sign in Rainier claims. "Rainier's got lhe navor � \\-�en you've: got a thirst for -.J.a hfe," boasts another A third •

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be found on campus. A couple of Hong girls stated their political beliefs on their door thusly: " The occupants of this room wish to announce their whole-hearted support for Snookers, B. Newton otherwise known as the Tooth Fairy, for the office of President of the United States. •A political paid announcement.·

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If indeed their doors have anything to do with their personalities, it would seem that college students crave power and authority. Park Please "Visitors Outside. " " Private Residence."

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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several doors on campus " Messy admonish Room-enter at your own risk. " Then there are the notes. The best was simply: "Out to lunch Sue." But "Dana I want bubblegum" and "lori-are Me you studying ? neither !-Shelley" were close competitors. One door in Kreidler had "O.K. Alright let's fight!'· scribbled on a nOle pad with smeared blue felt pen. I( you arc: lookin. for a little amusement you neuln't go farther down the: hall!­ " ONE WAY to pass is to be i to a genius. (The other s study!)" " QUIet-Playboy at work." "Life's a celebration (And you don't need an invitation)" "My tastes are simple. I like the best. " "BOOZE is the only answer. " "We know it's DIFFICULT but try to show a little CLASS." "Jesus is the answer." "Watch for falling grades." "Never be ashamed of what you are. (8y the way, what are you?)"


Page to, Mooring Mast, October

10, 1980

Lo n d o n to Lagos By Scott Cummins and Kathleen M.

K n ow w h y you a re g o i n �

England - "home" because he had been living and going to school theresince �ptember. "The crll8blng shudder of · According to Cummins the the train coming to a halt trip was typical of those taken roused me from a fitfull sleep. by American college students My bed consisted of a padded on a "junior-year-abroad" lounge chair in a train compar­ program. tment which smelled of "The nice part of my thousands of stale European Higher Education in Europe cigarettes. I was too tired to program was that it allowed a sleep, so I opened one eye and whole month for travel in the glanced at my watch. It was spring. There was also a mon­ 4:37 a.m." th-long holiday period at

Hosreld

fiNo one gets anywhere very soon in Portugal. " "My brother, Tim and 1 had been on this train since 12:30 a.m. We had boarded it in Lisbon earlier that day. WE had travelled from Lagos, a village at the southern tip of Ponugal the afternoon before. We had known that this train was heading in the general direction of Paris; we needed to be there very soon. One thOUght appeared in my head that morning last April. No one gets anywhere very soon in Portugal. ' , As senior political science major Scott Cummins taJked to the Mast this week about his experiences on a ·'JUNIOR YEAR " ABROAD PROGRAM in Europe, one point became clear -- "foreign travel isn't all its cracked up to be." At the moment Cummins and his brother found them­ selves on the Portugese train, they were nearly tWO and one half wctks into a month-long trip through England, France, Italy. Spain. Portugal and Ireland. Then home to

Christmas," he said.

"The question or travelling in Europe confronted me just over a year ago, when I arrived in Britain for ten months of study at the University of Bath. I was dealing with anew living situation, an income that was not stretching as long as 1 had anticipated, strange and different academic challenges and intangible desires to 'do it aU' ," he said. Within days of his arrival in Britain, one thing became ap­ parent to him, he said. "I was not prepared to take on the challenges of anything but an American lifestyle. 1 had read over a few guidebooks. acquainted myself with maps. memorized the travel connec­ tions and bought travellers "cheques" (remember I was in Britain). 1- even had a few relatives to look up. I was ex­ cited for weeks before I was to leave but I was still un­ prepared. " "Ln retrospect, the reason why I was uunprepared was I was unrealistic about my

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ability to handle the cultural change. 1 had been to Europe twice before and din't feel that I going to Britain would bc much different than going back east. 1 had to admit I was wrong after arriaving in Bath which is a small city. one hun­ dred miles west of London. At that point 1 profound desire to

get away from PLU," he said. This was complicated by Cummin�' almost immediate dislike of the "preppy" east o:oast Students who made up the majority of the American students at the University of Bath. "( wondered if I would have been happier taking a

Tak e the HB " roa ds n o t Ha " roa ds By Sandy WilHams from the Swaying motorways and main A ' · roads a n d taking orr through the English coun­ tryside aJong "B" roads is lhe best way to locate inns and pubs that offer low­ cost meal and overnight accommodations. England has approximately 50,000 inns from medieval to modern which are usually social centers where villagers gather for conversation and a 'pint of bitter' at a polished-coppe:r-and-brass pub. Some inns are Tudor with oak-beamed cC!ilings. others are old coaching inns with cobbled cour­ tyards, thatched roofs. or stones from Hadrian's Wall, a Roman-built wall in Northern England. Many boast ties to such historic figures as Oliver Cromwell or Sir Francis Drake while others are associated with well­ known terary il names like Charles Dickens and John Keats. Many were on« hideouts for smugglers. highwaymen, nr clergy. In most cases cost of room includes an English breakfast. Most inns also offer lunch and dinner. ••

with an additional charge. On Sundays, some may ,Jffcr the traditional , "high tea. . Nearly every city and large town in Europe has at least one open air market, the origin of which goes back centuries to when farmers brought surplus vegetables and fruits to the city to sell. These colorful. fragrant . and often noisy markets usually opera!.e once or twice II week or, in some places. �eryday and are treated a� "local fairs" by the townspeople. In product markets merchants set up displays on portable tables or spread boxes and baskets beneath striped or brightly colored awnings and um­ brellas. Vegetables and flowers arc common in Swit­ zerland, crab and squid in Venice, and round. golden cheeses in Holland. Fish are and shellfish traditionally sold at Lon­ don's Billingsgate, meet at Smithfield, and sausages Germanv. Other in · to markC!ts po pular tourists include Palenno's Vucceria, the elegam Boqueria market of Bar­ M un i c h ' s celona.

MonleCarlO'

Viktualienmarkt, and Ihr.! crowded Rue Mouffetard of Paris. Interspersed throughout Europe are also bird and animal markets and nea markets. Hobby markets display craft bazaars and art shows. Paris. for example. specializes in stamps in one market and sewing fabrics and notions in another. Brussels is known for its weekend an­ tiques and book market. A country's hand-made products refleet a facti. of the people and their way of life. Traditional crafts for various regions include copper cookware from Normandy, hand-carved violins from the Bavarian Alps. pottery from the villages of Portugal, and glassware from Sweden. Tourists frequently have thC! privilege of watching craftSmen at work . More than 100.000 miles of railroad track stretch across Europe. Europeans depend on their trains for regular transpon. Rail sta tions are located near the center of nearly every city. A traveler can choose between first or SttOnd accom­ train class modations and smoking or non-smoking cars.

Meal service may be anything from Itn elegant dining to lap-style picmcs. E u r a i l passes cover limited first class travel in thir teen countries for periods between three weeks and three months. A similar Britrail Pass is available for travel in England, Scotland. and Wales. More infor­ mation is available from travC!1 agcms. To obtain p�POr1! La travel abroad an in­ dividual is required to prove citiLenship (lisually with a birth certificate) show an idC!nlificalion card (such as drivers' license or credit card). and provide two identica l , signed photographs taken within six months of the date of application. Photos must be between two and one-half and three inches square and must be taken in street at­ tire, without a hat and without dark glasses uruess worn for medical reasons. ThC! photo.lo may be in color or black and white. An execution f« of 53 is paid to the person e.xeeuting the application. In addition. a $10 passport fee i s ,harged.

year at the University of Washington," he said. OnC! of the major factors contributring to Cummins' cult rue chosk was that he hadn't thought about why he was going to Europe. "I had not come to Eurpoe with any goals or with any sen­ se of purpose," he said. Cummins felt that although this had psychological drawbacks "it was good that I didn't plan out my travelling on a rigid itinerary. The magic of uavel in Europe is letting it happen. I never would have planned a trip through Por­ tugal which means ( never would have experienced seeing the beartiful coast of golden rock cliffs and smooth sand." he said. "Or 1 would never have been shoded. revulsed and enlightened by seeing the same coastline smeared with that winter season's oil tanker spills. Thought likC! that linger the way the tar clings to my walking shoes." he said. "The culture shock and loneliness was eased by the travelling." said Cummins. " When you are travelling IOU are both dependant and indepe:ndanl. You are depen­ danton innumerable fantastic people. printed schedules, guide books and maps, travel dictionaries, people who speak English, food and ample fun­ ds. At the same time you are accountable to no one but yourself. You are dependant t)nly on your own resour­ cefulness and the grace of God." What ate the rewards of European travel when Y0lt transport on grimy trains all night or have to sleep in strange places all the from train stations to hoslels? "For me, beyond the beautiful buildings or varied CUltures, the answer is in the people that you meet."


October 10, 1980, Mooring Mast, Page I I

"National borderlines and international geo-politice s«m artificial and transitory when you become involved in com­ munications with those people, even when you don't share a common language," said, " I don'l mean to say that a Eurail pass is a month-long Aquarian ride of blissful visions of 'how thing should be.' Contrary to that, in­ creased awareness of the world and its problems hits you like divine enlightenment. The oil­ slicked Portugese beaches are an example of that," Cum­ mins said. "No," he continued, "reality pervades. But travel is still fun, enjoyable and easy."

The Savvy or European Havel is as involved as �legoliating New York sub­ ways according to Cummins. "Portugal is by far the wor­ St train system in Europe bUI it .till gets you where you have to go. France, Germany, Swit­ zerland and England offer nighl speed train service that is smooth, efficient and fast." Travel agents can book arrangements for train travel in Europe in a wide variety of modes -- Eurail, Interail, Eurail Youth Pass and Britrail. All have advantages and drawbacks according to Cummins. "Make sertain your travel arrangements suit ""hat you want 10 accomplish and that you dan', limit your accom­ plishments to what the travel arrangmenu can offer," he adviSC5. "Be nexible Don't give yourself a «-hedule that at­ tempu lO duplicate Kissinger's shuttle diplomacy. Take into con�ideration tah, you might pull into some little village and have a "year or the cat" for a week or IWO or more ," he said. "Hitchhlkins offers a vary viable alternative to the e"pen­ se of the train travel as long as one of your party is male," said Cummins. "Realisticall). in order to gft a Un, two is the maximum amount for a travel party Hitchhikina is safer in Europe .

.

than in America although it still requires a certain amount of common sense."

Tehrt are necessitie, ror tbal will belp trndlttS a.,old btlna bassled by police, rlnding good places to stay and eal el cetera according to Irnrl

Cummin,.

"More (han any olher book, an American young per­ son 01 .. ,1 carry let's go:

Europe. Leave Eugene Fodor's and the Sunset travel guides to those with money. Lei's Go gives you in­ numerable ideas, with par­ ticualrs. and tells you how to do it for the least possible cost. Although at times the guide tends to advise behavior that the encourages 'ugly American' image, it is still the best book," said Cummins. On the "ugly American" syndrome Cummins commen­ led that "Americans aren't hated over ther. It's just that people who come in on their TWA get-away vacations are pretty ugly. They aren't ne"ible. Things have to con­ form to them." Another survival tool Cummms recommends if your travel is centered around a rail pass is a copy of

Cooke's International Timetable. "The 'Cooke Booke' is one of the world's most amazing publications because it offers an updated version every mon­ th of efery train and steam ship service scheduled in the entrie world. It lells what time t o catch the Amtrak in Tacoma and its arrival time in Salim as easily as the connec­ tion between London and Istanbul," he said. The 'Cooke Booke' is available at the Thomas Cooke Travel Center in the Rainier Towtr in Seatlle, along with a host of other travel information. " The only other 'must have' items would be maps and a library full of European literature and periodicals. The former is to know where 'you'll be. the laner is for knowing why you are there," said Cummins. Food and sheller art the next bridge a traveller crosses, after mode of transportation has been e"tablished. "My pet peeves are Youlh Hostels," said Cummins. "Though they are a darned deal for a place to sleep, Britain they are, for the most

part, dank, drafty and musty," he said. "On the continent their management is characterized by immature authoritarianism. ONE CAN BE TREATED IN A MAN­ NER HALF-WAY BET­ WEEN THE YMCA and a Hitler youth camp. Many of us refer to them as youth hostiles," he said. In Britain and Europe there s something bener than youth lostels for a place to stay ac­ cording to Cummins. Although they are unheard of in Nonh America, Bed and Breakfast Houses, B &. B's, are found as part of someone's home. Cummins said that for $12IS per night, one has not only a room but also a very cozy, homey atmosphere and break­ fast In the morning. "Besides the: British pub, B &. B's arc the best way to sam­ ple British character and lifestyle," he said, "The continent offers a variation on this called Pen­ stones," said Cummins. Pensiones are often a spare room in someone's yome, and though meals are nOt provided in the cost they are often available. They are: most prevalent in areas around tbe Mediterranean. Since his return to PLU, Cummins feels he has learded to appreciate the atmosphere of a small campus. " I apperciate the less pejorative aspects. Special thing happen; people go out of their way for you and it reminds mC' or things thaL happened while Ira\elling," he �ald. CUmmtn5 still has the travellinl but bUI "It'S a feeling lile' yes, I ....ant to go back 10 Europe. but I'd like to ge camping at Mt. Rainier this Weekend IDol It's a malter of time and values." Cummins said that wants 10 go bad.. to Euro� soom. although nOI within the next year. "It's something I can see domg once every tWO or three summers for the rest of my life," he said.


Page 12, Mooring Mast, October 10, J980

E LSEWHERE

Start l i n g co u rt ru l i n g shakes col lege sports (CPS) -- A federal court has not only re-inserted quarterback Daye Wilson into the University of Illinois' starting football line-up, it has set a precedent that could shake apart NCAA and regional conference rules that have governed intercollegiate sports for decades. "If that ruling stands," Indiana University basketball Coach Bobby Knight said before the federal court's final ruling last week, "we might as well not have a Big Ten, or any other body trying to enforce standards of education ." At issue was Wilson's eligibility to play for minois after transferring there from Fullerton Junior College in California this year. Big Ten rules dictated that he was ineligible. Wilson and his attorney successfuDy argued that the rules governing junior coDege transfers were stricter than those governing transfers from other schools, and therefore were discriminatory. While the court said the conference rules on eligibility should not be enforced in Wilson's case, it did not deal with the larger issue of the conference's right to make such rules in the first place. Robert Auler, Wilson's lawyer, says his legal action does attack the Big Ten's and the NCAA's riaht to impose

eligibility rules. But he doesn't expect the legal arguments in the case to slart until early next year. Auler clearly thinks the court's recent decision bodes well for his challenge to the legal structure of college sporls. The story started when Wilson broke his arm the first game of his career at Fullerton Junior College in 1977. He was advised thai he could save a year of eligibility for himself if he dropped out of school that same first semester, and take only eight credits in his second semester. Thus when Wilson transferred to Illinois earlier this year, he expected to be classified as a third-year stUdent, eligible to play both the 1980 and 1981 seasons. Tht; uniyersity'� own eligibility committee agreed. But the Big Ten's faculty representatives decided that Wilson's eligibility was effectiyely used up. The faculty representatives said Wilson needed 78 credit hours to set a special "waiyer" to play as a third-year student, oyerruling the university's decision that Wilson needed only .5 1 hours. Wilson has earned " hours toward his degree. Moreoyer, NCAA and BiS Ten rules require that most junior college

transfers must lose a year of eligibility. If the Big Ten representatives had their way, the transfer rule would have forced Wilson to sit out this, his last year of eligibility because he had played�·albeit just one game--for Fullerton in 1977. Wilson, of couse, took issue. After a month-long legal battle, last week the 4th District Appellate Court reinstated a temporary injunction against the Big Ten's efforts to keep Wilson off the field this season. Auler contends that Wilson "had a bona fide injury, and should be given two more yeaTS of eligibility." The NCAA, he adds, has violated the 14th Amendment, which guarantees equal protection, by implementing its rule that athletes transferring from junior colleges lose a year of eligibility, while athletes who transfer from four-year NCAA schools only lose the right to participate in post-season games if they played in more than 30 percent of a prior season. "The NCAA has set up a double standard of justice here," Auler says. "Kids from junior colleges don't gel the same kind of trealment that kids from big schools get." While the guidelines technically allow the Bil Ten to rule Wilson or any other athlete eligible for two more

years, the NCAA frowns on the practice. The conferences, Auler says, "follow the NCAA in these CaRS all the time." He wonders, "Why would (the Big Ten) give him two more years, when he could only play in bowl games during Ihis (year)"!" And, as the NCAA's own Steve Morgan jokingly puts it, "when was the last time Illinois played in a bowl game?" Morgan, who is the executive assistant in the NCAA's enforcement division, defends the rule as the best way to insure " the accuracy of the transcripts and other information that these smaller schools send to us." Oyer tbe last year, of course, intercollegiate sports have been rocked by allegations that more then a dozen NCAA DiYision I schools have helped doctor the transcripts of junior college players who otherwise would have been academically ineligible to play. Still, Morgan says the eligibility rule Wilson is challenging can be changed by a vote of the NCAA membership. " I f the University of Illinois wishes to change that rule, they can bring it up at next year's m«ting." Diyision I schools, he recalls, approved the rule now under fire at their January, 1980meeting.

Have had little trouble returning this fall

Effort s fai l to s q ueeze I ran ians out of schoo ls (CPS) -- Despite the vigorous efforts of legislators in four states to either ban the enrollment of Iranian students or make tuition so expensive that they would have to study elsewhere, foreign student advisors report the Iranians have had no trouble since returning to school this fall. Though efforts to squeeze Iranians out of state schools in Lousisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico and Arizona faltered or were overturned by the courts, \iiolent con frontations among Iranian students in Washinlton, D.C. and memories of oyer the summer yiolent campus confrontations oyer the last twO academiC year - raised fear\ that Iranians would let o\ieTtly hoslile receptions when they returned to _.

c1a� thi!. fall.

But so far. there ha'·e been no reports of pc'f$Onal harrassment or �"m public indian'lIon at schools in the siales that tried to ban the Iramans. " I clon't know of any students who have suffered personal problems, or who have been mistreated since they came back to school," said Erin Schmidt. the director of the Office of Foreign Student Affairs at Lou is iana State University at Baton Rouge. "They seem to be by and larle content with their situation here."

For a while this summer, it appearea that they would be far from conlent. The governing board at LSU voted in May to prohib it Irania ns from enrolling there. beginning with the summer session s. In effect, the resolution said students from countries that ha\-e held American hostages for more than three months or with whom diplomatic relations have been severed would not be allowed to enroll the:te. The: Louisiana state: House of Representatives lhe:n urge:d all state­ funded colleges and universities to refu\e to admit Iranian \tudents. The vOle was 82·12 on the: resolution sponsored by leii�lator James Cain. "Our leal ,oal ls to 101' them from loinl to school. n Cain «plamed.

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"SO, IS IT A

DEAL, SENATOR?

"If we stop them from going to school they'll start contacting their home folks and say, 'Hey, y'all, you're hurting us now, let those people (the hostages) go • "I don't want to sound harsh, but they don't have any consitutional rights," Cain added. Eyentually, though, a court in ruled the ban Louisiana unconstitutional, a clear yiolation of the 14th Amcndment . The threat of judicial re:jection didn't deter the MississippI legldature from attempting a different tactic to pu!.h Iranians out of 11\ higher education syMem. Goyernor William Winler �i&ned a bJlJ ICUina a $4,000 tuition fee per !<oludenl "who i\ • nonimmIgrant ahen from . nation not ...

. .

SPEAK DIREc.TL'I It-fTO YOUR CHICKE N."

haYing diplomatic relations with the United States and against whom the United States has economic sanctions in effect at the time of registration." A court eyentually agreed with the American CiYil Liberties Union argument that the special tuition hikes yiolated the 14th Amendment's equal prmection clause and the 1964 Ciyil Rights Act's ban against ethnic bias. Yet tensions at schools in Mississippi also appear to be low this fall. " l'ye seen no signs of any overt hatred of Iranians or even subtle graffiti against them Without knowing better, it �iould be impo..\ible to gUta what was tried apinsl th� �ttJdenl\ this summer." said John Windhaustr. a Journalism prolcuof at

the University of Mississippi at Oxford. At New MeJtico State University at Las Cruces, a spokesman for the International Student Services office said he has received no complaints or witnessed any signs of mistreatment of Iranians. A resolution similar to the one in Louisiana had been passed by the school's governing board. Yet Iranian students themselves generally refuse to reyeal how they feel I1bout lhe 8ltempted discrimination. In many cases, university foreign student adyisor!i aggressiYely shield the Iranians from the preu. E\et1 ....hen . Iranians tudying at the: schools in qu�tion could be comlcted. direaly, all dt(:lined comment to ColI(Je: Preu

Scrvi�_


October 10, 1980. Mooring Mast, Page 1 3

Deportation u.s. starting proceedings against 12, 000 Iranians

Washington, D.C. (CPS)-Nearly a

year after it began its effortS to identify and deport Iranian students who are here illegally, the U.S. Immigration

&

Naturalization

Service

(INS)

announced last week it was prepared to start deportation proceedings against nearly 12,000 Iranians. So far, only 432 Iranians have been escorted out of the country. INS spokesman Vern

Jervis

says

it

is

uncertain when proceedings against the bulk of the allegedly "out-of-status" Iranians will begin. Jervis noted that immigration

20

judges

temporary are

being

deputized, but that their priority will be participating in expUlsion hearings against some 1700 Cubans. The round-up of Iranian students was begun by President Carter shortly after the November seizure of the American embassy in Teheran.

AYKlblLAH YOU fo

LEAVe

Since then, around S9,OOO Iranians have voluntarily reported to immigration

officials.

INS

agents

nushed out 2443 more students, and now estimate that 8,()()()"IO,OOO others remain unregistered. Of that "out-of-status" pool, the INS has charged that219S had violated various civil and immigration laws, and ordered them deported. The most common infraction, Jervis says, is overstaying the term dictated in the visas. Others have been charged with

attending

school

part-time,

despite visa regulations that they be full-time students, and with failing to get the required special work permits. But nearly half as many (2386) have applied for political asylum. None of the applications have been approved so far.

The

holds

the

State

Department,

applications,

which

refuses

all

comment about th e requests for

asylum.

Is the law necessary?

Few take advantag e of 'truth-i n-testing' l aw (CPS) Surprisingly few students have bothered to take advantage of New _.

York's new "truth-in-testing" law by asking to see the answers on the Scholastic according

Aptitude to

figures

Tests

(SATs),

released

at

a

Coliege Entrance Examination Board meeting here last week. The College Board,

which

has

opposed both the New York law passed in

1979 and the truth-in-testing bill

now before Congress, further said that the studems who have asked to see the answers tend families,

to be

more

from

involved

wealthier in

grade point averages than the students who didn't ask to see the answers. Those trends contradict claims that the law would help disadvantaged students do better on the standardized tests, board President George Hanford told the meeting.

answers were. The College Board, Hanford said,

necessary" to make sure studems get needed inromation. The law, which became effective in January, compels testing companies to

extra­

allow students to see their own answer

eurricular activities, and have higher

sheets, and to find out what the correct

on normal dates for, say,

religious

expected about ten percent of the text takers would take advamage of the

reasons.

law. Fewer than five percent had asked to see the answers through Sept. I S .

the New York law's effect, the board

The testing companies themselves

The record. he says, does nOl "support the assertions that a law was

students who could not take the exams

have

argued

the

legislation,

now

pending in twelve states as well as in Congress,

would

make

the

tests

themselves so expensive to administr that

they

couldn't

rrequently. Before the

New

be

York

given law

as

lOok

effect, the board had seven "special t'!st d�tes" ear.h year to acc(lmodate

Last December. in anticipation of eliminated all special test dates, and scuttled entirely plans Medicat

College

to offer the

Admission

Test

(MeAT)_ Recently, however. the board has liberalized

its

policies.

In

July

the

board announced it would re-insti tute four of the special lest dales. A month later it announced it would administer

the MCAT this fall after all .

8t. J o h n ' s U n i vers i ty' s c l ass sched u l i n g i ntri g u i n g When I attended PLC as a student, there was a real eXCitement for me in most of because classes, stimulating course content and the concerned and dedicated teachers . learning was Its own reward as new ''worlds'' of thought appeared. The parade of new Ideas and new points of view, made college one of my greatest adventures. Our classes usually met on alternate days (M-W-F. or T-R), Classes rarely occurred on a dally basis. Today, the pressure that students feel Is often keen. Some pressure stems from the very high standards that must be mel to enter professional careers. But many students seem to be reeling with the frustrating need to catch on and catch up in their classes. The fault Is not uniquely that of ability or of course difficulty. Some of the pressure may stem from

too many cons9Cutive-day class meetings. Indeed, about one-third of my current 160 students have few or no classes on Friday. Some student stress 15 selt· made when studies are "hit and miss," and the night-before cram sessions are looked at as adequate to "get by." However, there are genuine situations which are beyond student control. If It Is true that pressure depletes student ranks, that "burn-ouls" and "drop-outs" are victims of here tempo and elsewhere, then perhaps we should look at our use ofUme. I was Invited to evaluate the Biology Department of St. John's University, Collegeville, Minnesota, which Is shared by nearby College of St Benedict, Father linus lured students to a three·hour meeting using pop, beer. chips and dips for bait. At this

meeting and elsewhere. I was Impressed by the seemingly easy tempo of student work and study. While I found many departmental features well worth Our consideration, It was the university's dally and weekly scheduling of time that Intrigued me most. St. John's uses the 41-4, as we do. Classes are held five days a week. The total semester In-class time for comparable classes were very close to ours. Vet class preparation seemed more relaxed. The library was always full of s t u d e n t s-yet s i l e n t . Students were serious, yet obviously had their good times. So what was different? There are two unique things worth noting In St. John's schedule of closses: The tirst is that class periods are 70 minutes long with 30·mlnute breaks between classes. The other Is the use

of two class cycles (one and two) that meet on For alternate days. example, if classes start on Monday, at the beginning of the semester. all cycle one classes would meet Monday, Wednesday, and Friday In the first week, while cycle two classes would meet Tuesday, the and Thursday, following Monday. These cycles begin over again on alternating days. A class meets three times a week, ond only twice the next week. There are no back-to-back classes. But there Is one free day (or weekend) between every meeting of a given course. The advantages are simple. Time is available to read, re-work notes, and memorize between class meetings. This makes for less pressure, for a better overaiJ understanding of closs material, and aiJows students to ask better

questions at the next lecture. Clearly this format produces less stress, just as our Monday-Wednesday­ Friday classes now do. The longer class period provides adequate time to cover lecture material. with fewer classes per semester. I can find minor pitfalls In some aspects of St. John's proc:edures that I would like to study more. But the point Is not what St. John'S does as such, the point Is that they seem to have enough time for students to be students without the memorizing stress that many at PLU must cope with. If we can make studies more exciting and learning the adventUre it should be, then time spent studying scheduling would be well repaid. What are your views? Jens W. Knudsen Deportment of Biology


Page 14. Mooring Mast. October 10. 1980

LETTE RS H ave you thou g ht you r fanaticism t h roug h? To the Editor: Are you a starry-eyed? Do you believe that everything In the Bible can be taken literally? Have you even thought about lt? Are your specific religious beliefs really what you believe or are they Just what your parents raised you to believe? Do you cite Bible passages when arguing, or worse yel, the Apostles' Creed? Ale you enjoying fellowship and pouring your heart oul to those who you've known but a tew hours? Ale you loving everyone tor love's sake and yet haven·t established any sincere relationships? Are you always starting sentences with "I just really wanl to say ." or "I Just really feel that . . . "? Are you so I m mersed In PMA that you're beginning to believe you can do anything? Do you know why you go to church? Do you really understand why you recite what you do

when you go? Hove you become lost In the ceremonies practiced? Is the real reason that it's on Sundays church because you want to listen to people say words you want to hear? Are you starry-eyed? Starry-eyeds, I Invite you to think. Where did your religious beliefs originate? If you've never really considered thIs question. Ihen the answer Is most likely from other people. whose own beliefs slemmed from still others Your whole life you have been bombarded with opinions. statements, and propositions of well· Intentioned givers. all of which tends 10 discourage thought by making It easy to just pick out paris of others' theOries to form what seems to be a personal strong belief but what Is nothing more than an assembled puzzle of currenlly-occepted state· ments. Thinking. even

though It's harder to do than it sounds, can be practiced. Why don't you try to develop your own set of beliefs Instead of carrying around a bag of the most popular ones? The results could be fascinating. Starry·eyeds, have you ever stopped to consider the possibility that what you hold to be true may not be and Ihal the way In which you believe and want the "Divine" 10 be is olmost for sure different from actuality? For the number people of agreeing that the nature of the "Divine" is Indeterminable, there sure are a lot who claim that their thoughts on the matter are Ihe only with pertinent ones everyone's being alfferent from everyone else's. With all these different opinions cIrculating around, who decides which one Is most relevant except the Individual? Storry·eyeds,

how can one view be more accurate than another? Have you ever thought that everyone's claim 10 their views are unjustified on the basis that no one can be rIght because no one view is superior relative to others because all arguments are based upon the Irrational assumption that the "Divine" does exist. Faith requires such an assumption and since nobody truly knows any more about their fa1th than Iheir need of hope to be fulfilled, it is possible lhat, as unfavorable as It may seem, that the only thing awaiting one who dies is nothing. Starry·eyeds, have you ever thought of your cherished beliefs as than more nothing cherished hopes? Perhaps It Is time to think instead of simply memorizing scripture. Do you believe that pastors and prlesls are holier than thou merely because they attended seminary or the like? Do you truly believe that those

in charge of the church actually have the power to forgive your sins? Do you feel that the big wheels of the church have more Insight than you? Ale you praying for countries at war and for the starving poor and believing that because you did, things will be better? Do you feel II Is necessary to deliver a percentage of your Income to the church? Do you give money because when you do. you feel that your social obligation to others has been fulfilled? Do you congregate in a group because you're afraid to face religious q u estions alone? How much of the Old Testament Is accurate? Do you ever t h i n k of such molters? Think? Or has everything you need to know In order to be happy already been thought out? Is It easier tr­ let others decide what yc..... should believe? Are you a starry-eyed? Gary J. Nelson

S t u d e n t s u g g est s bak i n g s o d a fo r P o n d To the Edttor: Jt Is now three o'clock In the morning (I feel a song coming 00. .J. but before ending this long day I tell obliged to sit me down cnd voice 0 problem I om sure you Wilt understond Saturday nIght I attended the movie Wutherlng Heights. Glorlousl The enllre expefJence was-well. an experience. As many of us know Ingram 100 was designed lor housing cOld­ blOOded life tarms who must malntoln a body temperaturE:' at at 19051 1Q5°F In order to survive. As

a resull. we human lite forms tend to. as they soy In the vernacular. sweat like horses. One remedy would be to keep the doors standing open. but thaI exposes the occup::mls 10 a very grave danger ,Ihe very some one we-those who attended the movle­ experienced. II happened near Ihe end 01 the film.. Kathy and were H e o l tl c l l f f e becom i n g quite Inlense -my hearl wos pound lnQ - m y eyes began to water-I could scarcely breathel My knuckles paled as I gripped my ChOlf seat-no alas. It was not _

because of the drama unfolding before rny eyes-II was Foss Pond waning through the open door. And there we were, Irapped--caught between a rock and a hard place. unable to breathe and unwilling to close oN our only supply of cool OIL,.olackl

of focI. I once calculated (while Jogging past satd pond, breathing Into several used Kleenex to keep from gagging I n public) that PLU would need to spend nearly a quarter of a mUlion dollars on Arm and Hammer Baking Soda to neutralize that sme!!

An Isolated case? No, dear Editor Hundreds of people-reSidents of Foss Pflueger-ore and subjectecl 10 this tOfTTlent every day. SO. also, are all of us who wish 10 Improve our general Meollh and well-being by utiliZing the Joggerunden As a matter

Perhap.· that money would be better spent on a new sewage·trealment plant .or at least gas masks for those of us who find Foss Pond an unhappy experience of the most lnconvenlenf times

The Innocent Bystander 8y Arthur Huppe

A major go "�rnm�nt commission predicted a surplus oj 70. 000 doctors by 1990 and warned this could mean detrimental t:hanges to the present methods 0/ proclicing medicine-news item. "Good a fternoon. May I help you? " "Yes. I ' m Dr. Herbert Vamplew and I'm here to see a paoent, Fred Frisbee, It for his annual checkup. " O h , yes, I ' m Mrs. Frisbee. Do you have an appointment , Doctor?" "Yes. for one o'clock. I'm a few minutes early, I'm afraid . " " That's quile all right Please have a seal in the living room and patient will be with you as roan as possible. . .

"Thank you. E�cusc me. who are those Olher gentlemen in there?" "Oh, that's Dr. Katl. Dr. Trevis and Dr. Clagenson Patient feels you can' t be too careful and he wants a

second. third and fourth opiDlon. While you're waiting, will you please fill out this medical history form? " "My medical history?" "Yes. it asks where you attended medical school. what courses you took. honors. if any. and your financial assets in t.:ase of a malpractice suit. Then you might wish (0 b row5C: through this copy of Vberly magazine. There's an interesting article predicting victory for Alf Landon." " M r 'i , Re mem ber

F r i s bee? me,

Mrs.

Fri.s.bee? I'm 01. Vamplew and l · ..·e no\\ been waiting an hour and a half to see the

P&UCf1t. .

.

" 011, h av en ' t we forgonen you. Doctor. Patient is running a little late today. He got stuck in a sand trap on the 1 7th." "Look here! 1'01 a very busy man and . . . • • ('01' course. you are. Hut patient is with a doctor right now. " "How many doctors arc ahead o f mc?"

" I do think maybc you're next . Why don't you follow me OUI here to this powder room? After I close the door. please remove your coat and PUI on this white medical jacket with the: opening on the front and have a seal . Herc· .. a copy of Wor and Peo� to keep you occupied. I'm sure

Ruth Jordon, Victim

By Arthur Hoppe palieR! ....i11 be with you 81 any minute. " "Mrs. Frisbee, I've been in that powder room two hours and I'm not wajting another mmutc!" " Oh, there you are, Dr. Vamplew . I was wondering where I put you. I'm so sorry, but patient was called away on an emergency . They needed a fourth for dominoes. But let's make another appointment. shall we? Let's sec . patient can see you at 2 p,m. seven

weeks from next Tuesday. How does that sound. Doctor? Doctor? Doctor! Darn. now we ' lI need another new front door., These doctors just don' I seem to understand how valuable 8 patient 's tUne is the5-C days." ILopJf!P, Otr"flltk Publhl"",l"G I'"

EdHor Kathl9l/fl M . Hasteld Newa Edltor Tam Kaehler Feature. EdHor Pelro Rowe Spom EdHor John Wallace Produclton Ednor Morgo Student Photography Editor Greg lehman Magozlne Editor Morel Ameluxen Ednorlol Aulllanll Dee Anne Hauso Erie Thomas Copy Editor Koren Wold Graphics EdHor Steve Houge IUllne.. Manager Corrl Minden Circulation Manager Pam Corlson Advertiling Manoger Cindy Kloth Technical AdvIIor Mike Frederickson Faculty AdvllOr Cliff Rawe The MooI'tng Mall

Is publ,sheo weekly by The 51UdenJ� 01 PacifIC lutheran lIt1lve/lsty un· der the auspices 01 ltis Boord 01 Regents. Op!ntons p­ pI$!59d 11\ lhe Mod ore nol ln tended to raprmenl those at regents, me me Cd mJnlSITOflO(l. the faculty. !he ,,-rudenl booy or Itle Mast sloff Lett9ls 10 tNt ad!ot mould De t\JOITImed by 5 p m . 01 the somewMj,' 01 pub!lcallon


I

I

October 10. 1980. Mooring Masl, Page 15

E D ITO RIAL

Be c a refu I a n d c o n e e rned a b o u t rape

No rapes were reporied on campus lost year ac­ cordrng to Kip Fillmore. head of Campus Safety and Informallon; but he Is quoted this week as .saying that he knows for a fact that a number of unrepor· ted incidents happend on campus last year. One Journalism student repor­ ted that unidentified num· ber of sexual assaults losl spring 05 high as 27. although the Mast did not confirm that report. The Parkland area alone was the scene of 23 repor· ted sexual assaults last year ond only one out of every fen such assaults are reported. according to locol authQ(ities The point Is that the perlmieters of this campus ore not magical walls which shield students from danger. Women do not live under a protective bubble when they arrive on campus and the one night they decide to fake a chance by jogging alone may just be the night a rapist decides to take a chance too. Student Lori EnglekJng and the Campus Safety and Information office are to be commended for their rape prevention program i n i tiated this year. The program is not designed to' strike undefserved fear into the hearts of campus women. but to Instill a common-sense caution. The Campus Safety and Information patrollers are limited In their ability to prevent asoults during their regular rounds. but the of· fice stresses use of their escort service. The service Is available

ENbLI5H �UILP I "' Cr

I'. I" '. I' ."

AU

'

' Ih ' I I, ! I /! III

�U'LOINCr

·

, I . '1 .'1

·

·

!'I -S I "

-

..

.._ - -

. . . .

MAT BUI LD I

'

,, !

!

. '., ItifII',,

GENERIC . UNI VE�S I TY .x IM/I"i. vII ,',""'IVJ .,

I

.

. . - --

,

'

'

College Press se'VICf>

" THf C.AMPOS IS /(1"'011 BLJ}iVO, Bur nlE TV ITION5 24 hours

a day ana students do not need ap­ pointments for escorts. Any student can call the office and their request for an escort will be answered within ten minues. Although the service tries to confine its escorts to within a mile radius of campus. it Is available point in beyond that

special cases. A sexu al assa ult can happen to you. Use the escort service. Be careful. Be concerned.

Kathleen M. Hosfeld In a recent Mast article the Remann Juvenile Cen· ter was reported to be located in Bremerton. This

is nOI true. The cenler Is located in downtown Tacoma. The article about the center also implied that it houses abused or neglected children which is also not true. The Mast apologizes for this error and for any com­ plications thaI may have been caused by false reportino.

C.HEAP! ,.

The Most sends out weekly feedback forms asking specific sources 10 write bock about the ac­ curacy and completeness of our reporting. The Most wishes to encourage those who recleve theses forms 10 return them to us. and also to encoura ge all their readers fo write in comments.

I'ILM: "Alas poor Yorick" thou is to be and free. Safety and Information-the words Hamiel i n Ollvers film version 01 shakespearian and title Imply andlor direct a respon·! c la ss i c will be held Monday al 7:30 p.m. Ingram slblilly-a responsibility much broader than most look upon il as. Aspects 01 100. Courtesy 01 Ihe Intergrated Studies this responsibility include confidentiality ' Prog ram

in a consistent manner, honest, informed '= ==== ==============J.!:=== =;"I =;;= safety '" personnel and practical

procedures. Each of these necessary qualities are required for responsible ALC·ERA: action; they are not easily attained, but correcting undermining 'actors early "Vote your consciences" was the favo red In development will allow for growth without repercussion later. allernative when Ihe delgales 10 the Education to prevent these downfalls must come from an objective, In· American Lulheran Church conventio n formed authority within the system of Safety and Information. It is the rejected support 01 the Equal Rights Ame . responsibility of the community to assure that this authority ;s Informed and n dment. ef· objective. Providing that the authority and the commun ity do their fect1\1ely and efficiently those people working W lthll n' t�he :�� �� ; • position 10 best do their jobs e"ectlvely and e f l � �, However, when communication fails to take precedence, PARIS: power, real or fabricated does. The "power syndrome" that Persecution contlunes as more than 100,00 Gary Nelson's RAs supposedly have are mere Inklings of people rallyed the slreels 01 Paris in whal has some of the security personnel's Ideas and actions. It is this undermining that forgets or Ignores the necessary qualities been called the " unmatched demonslralion 01 of responsibility. This Is the undermining that speeds In the anU·Semltls since World War two." new high-power carts loud enough to wake a student at 2 a.m. and fast and dangerous enough to knock one down time of the day. This is the officer that tells me about the " p" ."ibl who doesn't even know me and this Is the officer who DEBATE: 'acully parking sticker. A gubernatorial deba le for Spell man vs Kip Fillmore has some good Ideas and goals and some good people to McDermott will lake place al PLU Wed Oct. . carry out these plans, but the importance and the effectiveness 01 Safety 15 In Olson Audilorlum. Be there early and Information lies not In Its objectives but In its ability to grow within Its doors will open al 6:30 p.m. but will b responsibilities. If It does not accept this responsibility it will be the same closed at 7:15 p.m. old scandal in a faster cart.

i P:�!ll!�£.d!=====iF===d.1


CAM PUS SHORTS

Page 16. Mooring Mast, October 10, 1980

S k i m ov i e •

Warren "SKI PEOPLE" Miller's all new 1980 ski movie will be shown in Tacoma on Saturday, Nov. 8 at 7:30 p.m. in Wilson High School Auditorium. KTAC and the Florence B�ny Orthopedic Guild are sponsoring the Show with all proceeds to go the the Mary Bridge Children's Health Center.

St Festival On Friday and Saturday, Oc­ tober 3 1 and November I , at 8:00 p.m the Department of Perfor­ ming Arts of First Lutheran Chur­ ch of West Seattle will present a program of music and drama as part of its annual celebration or the Festival or all Saints. The first half of the program will feature a concen of vocal music by the St. Masrk's Cathedral Compline Choir conducted by Peter Hallock. The second half of the program will be a production of the play, morality medieval Everyman, directed by Dean Walter Hard. Admission is $3 for adults and $2 for students and senior citizens.

Highlight of the evening will be the four fantastic rarne prizes/ A TRIP FOR TWO to BIG MOUN­ TA IN including transortation, lodging, meals and lift tickets donated by Washington Travel Bureau and SKI-Pak INC. Second prize will be a complete ski equim­ pent package including Elon skis, Caber boots, Soloman Bindings, and Poles donated by Lakewood Sports Center. K-2 skis donated by Skiers' EDge will be third prize and century skis donated by Lakewood Sports Center will be the fourth prize. A style show of the latest ski wear will be presented prior to the movie plus door prizes alon with the fabulous rarne:. Tickets are available at most ski shops, the: Bon Marche, or by calling Mrs. Charles Gould, S826719

Debates here

.•

S peec h c l u b Pi Kappa Delta, the national speech debate honorary. has established a distinguished 40 year history at PL U, according to Public Relations Director Mark Dunmire. Boasting an impressive alumni roll, including President William O. Rieke. the PLU chap­ ter has won numerous national chamionships, the latest in 1976.

Currently, the PLU Pi Kappa Delta chapter is a recognized leader in the national organization, National the to according Secretary-Treasurer, Theodore The chapter holds O.H, Karl. both first and second placings in regional debate competion, and the current PLU forensics director. Michael Bartaner, is the Northwest governor. This year, the PLU chapter hopes to send representatives to national competition. "There's no doubt about it, we will do well. We're going for the hardware, " said Dunmire. The organization will hold an interest meeting Thur­ sday at 7:30 p.m, Walch the cam­ pus bulletin for details.

Three political debates are scheduled at Pacific Lutheran University in October. Area representatives for the three presidential candidates will speak Monday at 7;30 p,m. in the University Center. Gubernatorial candidates John Spellamn and James McDermott have scheduled a debate in Olson Auditorium, Wednesday at 7;30 p.m. The three candidates for Washington state attorney general will debate Oct. 28 at 7:30 p.m. in the University Center.

and support of the Cheney Fjoun­ dation on behalf of private higher education and the PLU science program in particular," Bekemeier said. PlU is now in the second year of a five-year $165 million capital campaign to provide funds for new science and fine arts facilities and strengthened scholarship and en­ dowment programs. he indicated . The campaign total is presently approaching the $4 million mark. Bekemeier said.

Energy up The Energy Committee. whose basic goal is to educate the PLU community on the energy crisis, was formed in September this year. The committee works toward making people more aware of the facts about energy and the problems that are currently facing us. The committee hopes that through its efforts people will be able to deal with the energy situation more effectively. The committee iks funded through a grant by the U.S. Depar­ tment of Energy. It works in con­ junction with nine other colleges. The committee is currently working with "bread for the World" in a paper recycling i to building project . It is looking n a solar greenhous sometime in the future. Thje Energy Committee is greatly interested in recruiting new members. It strongly encourages anyone who has ideas or people who are concerned about the energy problem to become in­ volved. For more information con­ tact the ASPLU office.

Fa l l p l ay

G i ft A S2S,OOO gift toward construc� tion of new campus science facilities has been received by PLU from the Ben B. Cheney Foun­ dation of Tacoma. The announcement was made jointly by Elgrin Olrogg, exer­ culive director of the foundation, and Luther Bekemeier, PLU vice­ president for development. "We appreciate the leadership and Support of the Cheney Foun­ dation on behalf of private higher education and the PLU science program in particular," Bekemeir said.

Free f i l m Free wildlife film: Okefenokee: Land of Trembling Earth will be presented in person by Dennis Holt, the cinematographer. The film will be shown Oct . 1 3 in the CK at 7:30 p.m. PLU students with ID will be admitted free. Christian context will be held this Sunday at I I :30 a.m, in UC Richard Dr. with 210-212 Jungkuntz as our speaker . Dr. Jungkuntz will talk on "The Lutheran Synods--What Are They , How Do TheyStand?"

Open house Open house and dance! ! Come visit the men of Rainier this Satur­ day night from 9-10 p.m. Then stick around and dance your . troubles away from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.

Loa n f u nd A memorial loan fund in honor of Nancy Crane of Carmichael, Ca., has been created at Pacific Lutheran University. Miss Crane was beginning her senior year as a nursing Student at PLU when she was killed in an auto accident Sept. 6. The daughter of Mrs. Sylvia Crane of Carmichael had also been working this past summer as a student nurse at Tacoma General Hospital. The loan fund is intended 10 provide emergency short term fun­ ds to PLU student. Contributions may be addressed to the development gift records of­ PLU. at fice o A 2S,OOO gift toward construc­ tion of new campus science facilities has been received by PLU from the Ben B. Cheney Foun­ dation of Tacoma. The announcement was made jointly by Elgin Olro&8. executive director of the foundation, and Luther Bekemeier. PLU vice­ president for development. "We appreciate the leadership

pLU's Northwe:st Wind Quintet. 'the quintet also includes flutist Doris Ziegenfelder, oboist Bernard Shapiro, clarinetist Jerry Kracht. and Bruce Grainger on bassoon. The group will perform a work by Paul Taffanel. Classical guitarist Andrew Schulman will perform two works by Fernando Sor, and pianist Richard Farner presents Chopin's Scherzo No I in B Minor.

Five performances of "Dark of the Moon," a former musical hit on both Broadway and London stages, will be presented at Pacific Lutheran University beginning Thursday,OcLl6. The theatre production is also scheduled Oct. 17, 18, 24, and 2S in Eastvold Auditorium at 8 p.m. Reserved seating or Univerfsity Theatre season tickets are available by calling 383-7768 between 8 p.m. and 5 p.m. Tickets are also available at the door.

Faculty show Abroad range of musical sounds will be featured during a program presented by the Pacific Lutheran University Faculty Chamber Series Thursdav. Oct. 16. The free program will be held in the University Center at 8 p.m. Hormst Kathleen Vaught Farner presents a sonata by Bernhard Heiden and also nerforms with

Foc us i n Watch "Focus", the campus televsion magazine, this Thursday at 6 p.m. on Channel 2. The show will fealure campus news, sports and entertainment.

Frosty talks Every Tuesday night coach Frosty Westering explains all about the game of football. Actual game films will be shown. Everyone is invited to attend the get together at 7 p.m. in the University Center commons.

Ski i nt erest SKI TEAM interest meeting Wed. Oct. I S 5:00 p.m. Olson 102, Any questions call Greg X8080 or Dana X81 1 3 .


October 10, 1980. Mooring Mast. Page 1 7

SPORTS ,I

..

..

�__ __ ____ __ �� � � L-

�/�N

__

Center Scott Davis rips through a banner.

End Dan Harkins struggles for extra yardage in the Lutes' 24-3 win over Centra l Washington.

W i n n u m ber three McKa y s cores ten firs t qua rter poin ts to spark L u tes 8y Eric Thomas

One way to prepare for a game wiLh the number-one­ ranked PLU foothalI team is to find .someone with inside in­ formation on the program . Central tried that route last week. as they utilized the knowledge of former Lute coach Mike Dunbar to find a way to StOP the explosive PLU offense. Unfortunately for the Wild­ cats, the Lutes have other ways of scoring than from the offensive set and one of them starts at linebacker. Junior Scott McKay. who has added place-kicking chores to his All­ Conference defensive skills, scored len first-quarter poims to spark PLU to a 24-3 road victory with Central. McKay's first tally was a 35· yard field goal on the lutes' first possession, followed eight minutes later by a 52yard interception return for a touchdown, OntO which he tacked the extra point. "That was the best Central defensive team we've played since I've been here," said head PlU football coach Frosty Westering. "Our slow start offensively wasn't because we didn't play well. it was that they played excep· tionally on defense. Our defense played a great game and of course Scott (McKay) made the big play 10 get us aoing. " The PlU defense shut down the Wildcat attack aU after­ noon. holding them to 182 IOtal yards and JUSt three third down conversions, while picking off four pa.$se5. In ad· dition t o McKay's steal. defensive back Dennis Mc· Donough had two and safety Mark lester, filling in for an injured ScOI! Kessler, pilfered one. " The secondary as a whole plAyed very well." said

Westering. "Mark lester did a great job." The PlU offense finally got on the board late in the second quaner on a 6-yard TD pass from Eric Carlson ( 1 5 of 25 for 125 yards) to senior tight end Scott Westering, ending a 62-yard march. "Central's stunting and moving around on defensive helped the guys on the offen· sive line to really be challenged," said Westering. "We took advantage of their moving around on the big plays, the reverse, the counters and pass plays." Running backs Guy Ellison. Mike Westmiller and Chris Utt tallied 77, 58, and 55 yards respectfully, while reserves Joel Johnson (18 yards), and Jeff Rohr (23 yards) also saw action. The lutes' last score was a 13-play, 77-yard fOUMh quar­ ter drive capped by a 23-yard reverse to paydirt by Ellison. Westering praised the dfor­ ts of the defensive coaching staff led by Paul Hoseth nOling, "they did an outstan· ding job preparing for the game." Other performances lauded by Westering included the defensive line play of Greg Rohr inside and the kicking 01 freshman Jeff Rohr, who reached the end zone four times on kickoffs. PlU suffered several in­ juries in the game, as Greg Rohr pulled a back muscle, Scott Westering injured his hand, Da...e R�p twisted an ankle and backup quarterbaclt Kevin Skogen rc("-eived a con· cllssion. Howe...er. all e:<cept Skogen should be ready ror the Lutts' next game. PLU will be at home for the next three weeks. hosting Somhern Oregon next for parentS' weekend, followed by during W h i tworth homecoming.

Southern Oregon has a new coach this year in Chuck Mills, a veteran of successful seasons first with Vanderbill and Utah State then, in more recent years, with the Kansas City Chiefs. " Th�y're turning to a pro-type passing attack," said Westering. " They're an aggressive, hard·hitting team , capable of putting together a real good game, so we'll be prepared. "

Chris Vtt rambles for a few of his 55 total yards on the afternoon.

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Page 18, Mooring Mast, October 10, 1980

Field hockeyers dom i nate , then s i t on lead 81 Mllr.e Lanon Th� PLU fi�ld hockey t�am upped th�ir record 10 4- 1 with IWO wins last w�k�nd against West�rn Washington Univer· sity and Central Washington University. Sophomore Kim Krumm scored the only goal in the game against Western on a

penalty stroke In the first half. "We always dominate play in the beginning and usually score the first g03.I, but tnen we sit on our lead. We have to improve on keeping th� pressure o n , " said coach Colleen Hacker. Against a much·improved Central squad, the Lady Lutes

tallied first on Julie Haug�n's goal off an aSSISt from Krumm. Th� Wildcats then scored 10 tic the game. The Lutes responded immediately, however, as Haugen scored her second goal of the contest orf an assist from freshman Holly Adams to go ahead for good 2·1.

" I f�lt a big plus against Central," remarked Hacker. "We showed a lal of poise and confidence to come back and win." Hack�r's main concern on the practice field this past week has b«n "to get the team to work as a unit and to improve our transition from

off�nse to defense as well as from defens� to off�nsc." Th� Lady Lutes travel to Monmouth. Or today 10 face Southern Oregon State College in a 4:)0 game, and play Oregon College of Central Education and Washington University tomorrow.

I n t ra m u ra l foot ba l l season i n f u l l sw i n g w i t h 36 sq u ad s league is compoM!d 01 men

8y Dennis Ro�r1son

PLU has 36 intramural football temas this year. There arc 1 3 teams for wom�n; 6 ar� in the American Lcagu� and 7 in the national I�ague. The m�n's league has 23 t�ams, divided into two divisions. On� division is the recr�ation league with 1 6 tCBms; 8 American league and 8 National League. The other division is the compelltlve league with 7 tenms. this

who arc very competitiv�. and want amore physical contcst. They are u.seally students who have played in competitve spons porgrams while in high school. The football season started

September 22nd and �nds in late october. The playoffs will be played the Orst week of Nov�mber. Gene Lundgaard, Director of intramural sports. says that th� goal of his program is to have fun. I:om·

petition. and cooperation while playing competitve spor· u. H� states, ") am reasonabley happy with th� cooperation that th� students arc giving from the standpoiOl of I�arning to play within the rules." The Program has set up strict rules to cut down on unnecessary roughn�ss in the games and th� officiating is strict. This ketps th� ijury list low. so far. there have been only two injuri�s. the most seriOus b�ing n broken nose.

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���---c� c- --c---�c-�--Ji �---c --c� No they're not dancing, just some action duriog last __

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Majed Shakour battles fora loose ball in the Lutes' first loss of the season.

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October 10. 1980. Mooring Mast. Page 1 9

P u rd y a n d P rew i tt p a c e L u t e ru n n e rs Shansky. who defeated all of the Oregon women (0 take fir­ s( place in the contest The men faced runners from the Club Northwest. Bellevue Community College and the University of Washington. The women placed twelfth overall, ahead of any OIher Division I I I squad. The men took the 14th spot, fourth for Division II competitors. On the individual level. Debbie Tri and Bill Whitson took the honors for im­ provement. Two weeks ago, at the Simon Fraser Invitational, Whitson broke into the top five PLU men for the first time. At that meet he finished 2:50 after top man Zane Prewitt. At Fort Casey, Whit­ son cut lhat lime lapse in half, running I :25 behind Prewitt. 1 ri moved 17 seconds closer to Front-runner KrislY PUrdy. passing Dianne Johnson to finish second For the Lutes.

8y 81rb PicKell PlU cross-country coach Brad Moore said he was "very ))urprised" 8t the performance of his harriers at the Fort Casey InvLt.ational. hosted last Saturday by Seallle Pacific University on Whidbey Island. "After an extremely hard workout week, I thought we would be: very flat and tired Saturday. but our team splits still show improvement." With over 200 runners and 25 teams entered in both the men's and women's races, the Fort Casey meet provided the Lutes with their toughest competition this season. The women's run boasted such contenders as Division I regional champion Robin Baker and U.S. Olympic team member Leann Warren, both from the University of Oregon, and Seattle Pacific's freshman sensation. Larie

Vol l ey ba l l e rs need w i ns to stay in title competion

l'laving started the season nearly a minute and a half behind Purdy, Tri crm.s«J the finish line at Fort Case)' only 21 seconds behind her. Moore str�sed that as the PLU harners strive to close the gap bet\\-cen first and fifth runners, those athletes in the tOp spotS are also improving. Of Purdy, who finished 3 I St overall at Fort Casey, Moore said, "She putS a lot of effort into her running and il pays off for her. She's also a smart runner. She knows her limitations." Former Curtis High School standout, Zane Prewitt is, according . to Moore. "an exceptionally hard worker. I thought he would be pretty nat Saturday after last week, but he ran well." Prewitt finished 59th in the men's ract at Fort Casey. Number two man Randy Yoakum has been on Prewitt's heels all season. Unofficial times show him finishing nine seconds behind the Lutes' tOP runner in every race this

season. His official time at Fort Casey wa, JUSt four second� slower than Prewitt's. " 1 think our top three men (Prewin. Yoakum and Mike Carson) have improved at the same rate all scason ." com· menled Moore. "Zane has taken the lead so far, but any of the three could come out ahead at the conference

meet." The male PlU harriers hal(e only one more regular $eason race . The: .....omen have t.....o. Tomorrow both teams will travel to Bellingham for the: Western Washington in­ vitational. "We'll be tapenng down our workouts now and sharpening up for the con­ ference meet." Moore stated.

Trivia of the week By John Wallace QUESTION I: When "The Babe" George Hermann Ruth was moved to Ihe oUlfield, who was the current Yankee pinstriper playing that :>osition? QUESTION 2: Who was the last National league baseball player to win the "triple crown" (highest batting average:, most home runs and most runs batted in) and in what year it? was

ANSWER I When Babe Ruth was moved to right field by the Yankees he: replaced George Halas. Halas is better known as long time owner and coach of the Chicago Bears professional football team. ANSWER 2: The last National Leaguer to win the triple crown was Joe "Ducky" Medwick of the St. Louis Car­ dinals in 1937. He led the league with 154 RBI's. tied MclOIl with 3 1 home runs and had a .347 batting average.

definitely should have won but we didn't take the advantage of the opportunities." The end result was a 1-15, 1 5-6. 8-15. 15-9, I I -IS tally giving Lewis & Clark the win after the tie­ breaker. The team also suf­ fered a defeat to Wi!lamelle Oct. 2 by scores of IS-I I , 5-15, 3-15, and 3-15.

By Bill Trull After losing three league games last week, the women's volleyball team desperately needs victories today and Saturday or they may be out of the running for the con­ ference tilIe quite early. This evening at 7, the spikers host Linfield in Memorial Gym. a team Ihat defeated the Lutes in straight sets 2.15. 6-15, and 12-15 Oct. 3. Tomorro..... the learn plays the role of host again at Memorial at I I a.m. against Lewis & Clark. It was I I Saturday that PlU lost to Lewis & Clark but Lute coach. Kathy Hemion, admitted, "We played well defensively and offensively and very

Hemion stated that Ihe defense is very good but noted, " we're having a harder time on offense. especially on being agressive on hitting." Though the LUle mentor said everybody played well last Saturday. she cited Luann Macan as being "amalmg" on pa ss.es In all three of last week's games. Hemion also alluded to Cindy Bens' offen­ sive performance on Saturday as being commendable.

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Page 20. Mooring Mast. October 10. 1980

FRIDAY OCTOBER

10

-MUSIC

Tacoma Symphony Edward Saferlan, violin soloist 8 p.m. Ufe Center Sanctuary (T) Free admission 5 1 8th and Union -THEATRE

"Born Yesterday" bY Garson Kanin The Driftwood Players Theatre Until Oct. 1 1 1407 8 St. Hoqulem Tel. 533-2659 .

·THEATRE

·THEATRE

"The Cherry Orchard" by AnIon Chekhov Inti man Theatre (5) Until Oct. 2S Tel. 624-2992 ·PHOTOGRAPHY

Pauli Dennis Gallery 1S0 years 01 photography works of Adams, Weston, Cunningham and Curtis Until Oct. 12 Bainbridge Istand ·MUSIC

Ida Kovafian, guest soloist Muslca Chamber Players SeaNle Concert Theatre Unlll Ocl. 1 2 8 p.m. Tel 624-2 186 ·EXHI81T10N

"Mary, Mary" by Jean Kerr Bross Ring Theatre (5) Until Oct. 12 1 1 5 Bell St. Tel 682-8470

Jules Verne Festival Films, models and photos from Verne museum (France) Pacific SCIence Center (S) Until Oct. 1 3

-ART

Carl Christopherson Morine paintings Olde Main Gallery Untll Oct 24 Tue thru Sot; 1 1 a,m . to 5 p.m.: Sun 12 to 4 p.m. 100:l.S Main St., Bellevue Tel. 454- 1818 ·EXHIBITION

Deceptive drawings and hidden images Michael SCuyt Pacific Science Center (5) Until Nov. 2 Mon thru Fn: 1 0 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tel 625-9333

SUNDAY OCTOBER

12

·MUSIC

1st annual Northwest Chamber Music Festival Concert debut Pacific String Quartet Cornish Institute Poncho Themre 7 p .m. SOth and Fremont entrance to the Seattle Zoo Te1 625-40 1 7 Free 10 public ·MUSIC

-ART

Playground for Innocence by Diane Katsiaficos Erica Williams Gallery (5) Until Oct, 25 Tue thru Sat: 1 1 a.m. 10 S p.m. 3 1 7 E Pine Tel. 623-7078 ·PHOTOGRAPHY

Works by several loca[ artists and photographers Frome It On Broadway (T) Until Oct". 1 1 Tue thru Sat: 1 0 a.m. to S p.m. 1822 Broadway Ave. Tel. 452-7706

SATURDAY OCTOBER

11

Seattle Symphony Sunday Concert Seattle Center opera House .3 p.m. Tel <)47-4736

-MUSIC

Faedora Kosh multi-media works Unlil Oct. 3 1 Cornish lnslltute (S) Man thru Fri: 1 0 a.m.-S p m. 5ot:noon-S p.m. 7 10 E Roy 51.

Seattle Symphony Orchestra RaIner Miedel, conductor Roberto Knie, soprano All Wagner program Until Oct. 1 4 SeaNle Cenler Opera House 8 p .m. Tickets S6 to S 16, student rush tickets 53.50 beginning at 7A5p.m. Tel. 447-4736 -THEATRE

" Carousel" A Rodgers and HamfTlerstein Musical Falstaff Dinner Theatre (T) Unlil Nov. 8 Tel 383- 1 1 49

TUESDAY OCTOBER

14

Seattle Art Museum Fall Chamber Music Series 8ruce Bailey Quartet MusIc of Brahms SeaNle Art Museum at Volunleer Pork Auditorium 1 . 1 5 p.m. Museum admIssion IIffed from noon to 1 . 30 Tel. 447-4710

MONDAY OCTOBER

-ART

Fred Machenatz Lithographs

13

-ART

·THEATRE

"Domino Courts" The Northwest Premiere of William Hauptman's farce about two former bonk robbers. Pioneer Square Theatre (S) Until Oct 26 107 OCCidental Tel. 622-2016

FRIDAY OCTOBER

17

-MUSIC ·LECTURE

Bill Cosby Green River Community College speakers series Tel. 924-0180 ext. 337 ·THEATRE

"AnythIng Goes" The Carco Theatre (5) The Valley Community Players of Kent Until Oct. 2S Tel. 226-5190

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER

15

·THEATRE

"To Kill a Mockingbird" Poncho Theatre (5) Until Nov. 23 Tel. 633-4567 ·FILM

-MUSIC

-ART

Betty Philips, paintings with Helen Waggoner, staIned glass sculpture Unili Oct. 29 Artists Gallery Northwest (5) 7814 Greenwood Ave N Tue hru 501;1 1 a.m. to S p.m.

THURSDAY OCTOBER

·THEATRE

" Ah Wilderness" Eugene O'Neil's nostalgic comedy The Lakewood Player's Playhouse (T) Every Fri and Sal until Ocl. 25 Tel. 588-0042

16

Frye Art Museum (S) . Untlt Nov. 2 Artist present on opening day Man thru Fri:10a.m. to Sp.m. Sun & holldays:noon-6 p.m. Tel. 622-9250 Admission Free

"Snow Goose Associates" A multi·media show by Jim Schappert Until Oct. 1 8 Thur thru Sat: 1 1 a.m. to S p.m. 4220 NE 125th St. (5) Tel. 362-340 1 -ART

Philip McCracken Retrospective exhibition Tacoma Art Museum Until Nov, 2 Man thru Sat: 10a.m. to 4 p.m.: Sun: noon to Sp.m. Tel. 272-4258

Seattle Symphony Orchestra Pops Concert SeaNle Center Opera House Until Ocl. 18 8 p.m. Tel. 447-4736 -ART

William Cumming, paintings Patti Warashlna. sculpture Foster White Gallery (5) Unlll Oct. 20 Mon thru Sat : 1 0 a. m. to 5. 30 p. m. Sun:noon to S p.m. 3 1 1 112, Occidental Ave. S -MUSIC

UniverSity of Washington Symphony Orchestro Mecny Hall. U ofW (5) 8 p.m. Tel. 543-4880 Tickets S4. S2.S0 students .THEATRE

"Agnes of God" West coast premiere by Joseph Pielmelr Empty 5pece Theclre (5) Until Nov. 9 Tel. 325-4444 ·THEATRE

"A'Mon For All Seasons" William Becvar, director Tacoma Actors Guild Until Nov. ·2 first ploy of the season 1323 S. Yakima Ave. Tel. 272-2145 Tickets:SS to S9.5O ·EXHI81T10N

Deception Drawings and Hidden images Michael Schuyt Pacific Science Center (5) Until Nov. 2 Man thru Fri: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tel. 625-9333


!;h�,,�ooringMast Vol. LVIII, Issue NO.7

October 17, 1980

G u be rn atori a l debate h osted h e re AfcOermofot accused Spellman of "lJcurrllous campaigning" and ""a/f·truths lind Innuendos" he has employed In his cam· pa/gn. Bur McDermott claims hIs campaign has been " positive one. The two clashed on education spending, energy US8Sg. and development and taxes In the'r hou,"'on{l deb"r, Wednesday nlghL

By Sandy Williams

PLU hosted the Spellman-Me Dermot! gubernatorial debate Wednesday night in Olson Auditorium . The goal of the debate was to encourage student awareness and political activity. President Rieke opened the debate with the comment that "although Ihis year has been said to be one of political apathy we can proudly say there have b«n a number of students on campus active in political groups. " John Komen, an editor for the TNT, set the ground rules and time limits and introduced the debators. Republican candidate John Sp�llman began the debate by outlining his vi�w of the gover­ nment's basic role which he described to be two part . First, each level of government provid�s basic services for people's basic needs. Second, governemtn serves to meet par­ ticular needs for those people who cannot help themselves. This includes "providing oppor­ tunities for individuals to sharpen their skills in order 10 have a bet­ ter community," Spellman said. A basis rule is that "people should obtain what they need from government, not what they want," Spellman said. "We

don't have the ability to give people everything they want." Spellman emphasized the need for a helthy economy "which is essential since government ob­ tains revenue from the privatt sector, " he said. He proposed a IO'point job program to create a new partner­ ship between private industry and stale government, with a goal of producing 60,000 new jobs over the next 1 0 years. This plan calls for issuing industrial bonds to promote new commercial and in­ dustrial development and attrac­ ting new labor-intensive in­ dustries to Washingto through lax incentives. According to Spellman. "We can grow with grace within the Slate of Washington and can con­ tinue to have good job oppor­ tunities and good living con­ ditions. . . Spellman is opposed to new taxes and said they should be a last resort to solving problems. "For too long we have had short­ term proposals," he said. "We need to take long-term proposals to provide an economic base and allow for government growth." Opponent Jim Mc Dermott (0) opened his debate with the statement , "I'm glad you're here instead of at home watChing baseba1J. I think politics is mor important than baseball." He next accused Spellman of "Scurrilous campaigning" and using "innuendos and half� truths" panicularly on campaign fliers distributed in Seattle and Spokane. McOermoll also Quoted a past PI article in which Spellman stated that he (Spellman) supported all taxes. "What you get in the campaign is what you get in the gover­ nment," McDermott said. Mc­ Dermott supports tax reform proposals.

" ' A m y ' s f i n e and Billy does fine every other day, " C h i p Carter told students her e Sun­ day

Page 2

In the ensuing six sets 01 ex­ changes, Spellman stated, "I wanted to cOnlinue along with my positive campaign. " Regarding energy conser­ vation, Spellman called for a billion dollar energy development program in Washington state by issuing tax-free industrial revenue bonds and conservation tax credits. The program would utlin $100,000 revolving fund to develop supplemental energy needs. Spellman would like to see all of Washington's energy resources developed including geothermal, small scale hydro, solar and wlnd.He supports nuclear power development and wants to restrict future plants to the Hanford area. His overall plan is designed to help meet the 3 ,000 megawatt shortfall predicted in the Nonh­ west in the next decade. Spellman supports Initiative 3g3 to ban out-of-state nuclear waste. McDermott followed by citing the prediction that average household energy bills in 1982 will be S3,OOO a year, twice what it was two years ago. According to McDermott, 30 to 40 percent of energy produced each year is wasted. McDermott plans to push all forms of alternative energy by developing "a balanced state energy plan promoting the least cost and most available energy resources," he said. "Nuclear energy has a place in our future," McDermott said, "but we must control runaway costs, improve the management and prevent Washington from becoming the nuclear waste dUmp for the nation." Next, Spellman voiced his sup­ pon for local control for schools and full Slate funding for educational improvements. He

The Mast examines issue, the procedure and student opinions on abortion.

Pages 8 and9

McDermott

estimated that $200 million and perhaps ten hours a week could be saved if cutbacks were made in the amount of paperwork presen­ tly required of teachers and staff within the public school system by the legislature. McDermott followed by stating his belief that the US s i entering what he termed "The Pac Hie Century" because "Washington state is becoming the center of interest. " McDermott said he would like to achieve "growth with grace" which includes affordable housing and "mature and prosperous communities." He said it is important to draw private sector investors. state and local governments and citizens together to "take advantage of the opportunities before us." Ac­ cording to McDermott. "the time for single-issue, me-first politics must come 10 an end." The debate continued with McDermott stating that unwise decisions conc�rning state forest lands have led to tr�mendous economic hardships in many towns and counties. Small in­ d�pendanl mills are closing down and unemploymenl in some areas is ov�r 20 percent. By exporting Whole logs from state forest lands employment and (Contlnutd on page five)

The women's volleyball team had a split personality in two games last weekend.


Page 2, Mooring Mast, October 17, 1980

G o rt o n c a l l s t h i s e l ec t i o n year ' ex c i t i n g a n d p rofo u n d ' By KristJn Kadt.n With the general election on Nov. 4 less than three weeks away. campaign hopes, ten­ sions and political rhetoric are running high, especially for State Attorney General Slade Gorton. Gorton. who will relinquish his three-term title as he runs for senator, faces the challenge of upsetting incum­ bent Democratic Senator Warren Magnuson. whose 44 years in Congress have given him the role or president pro tempore and chairman of the Senate Appropriations Com­ mittee. In a question/answer period before a small PLU crowd, Gorton urged student support on his issues concerning fiscal reform, conservation and nuclear waste. Calling this election year "exciting and profound," he reminded his audience that upcoming changes will not be ror four years but for a generation. "Ir Congress now represen­ sents your beliers, then vote to re�lect Magnuson," iBid Gor­ ton. "But if you're looking ror a change, vote for me. He

"Amr', brother, " Chip Cert.r emphas/z.d the Cart.r ed­ m/nl,tratlon', education ,pending whll. h. app.erMJ on cempus Sunda, arternoon to spea" to ASPLU repre.en­ tat/�••• the pre" and fhe communIt,.

(Magnuson) does not have any new ideas and I believe I do." Gorton initially supported John Anderson when he was a Republican candidate for president but then found his loyalties leaning toward Howard Baker. With Ronald the­ Reagan receiving Republican party nomination . Gorton has further allered his view and now suppons Reagan. According to Gorton, most questions he gets concern the A m e r i c a n po c k e t b o o k . Though those questions were initially a surprise, he now admits that after three years of double-digit inflation, he un­ derstands such monetary queries. Gorton's single mOst impor­ tant issue is limiting the size or the federal budget to a certain percent of the gross national product. "I am looking to Congress to come up with a requirement that will eliminate programs that don't work ," he said. "There is such im­ mense power in special interest groups, but what good are they if the goals of none of them represent the goals of none or society as a whole?"

As a politician, Gonon knows that this year's issues are the only ones being discuued. However. he noted that few politicians know whal will bt important by 1985. Consequenliy, he said. we have 10 project characteristics, values and issues into the future. "Too often the newsp­ paper headlines act as a vehicle to carry today's issues. But what's importam are the issues of tomorrow." Gorton, who terms himself more conservative than Magnuson, sees the U.S. court system "far too activist" and that they "make too many decisions." As a lawyer, Gor­ ton represented cases 14 times in the U.S. Supreme Court, the most cases represented by one lawyer. As State Attorney General. Gorton claims it is the finest position a lawyer can hold in the state because of the amazing scope it encompasses. "At the present, the majority views of the people are not the represented at Washington, D.C. level, " he said. "It is my, hope to change that view."

Presiden tia l represen ta ti ves deba te iss ues in UC Representatives ror three of the candidates ror President of the United States, Reagan Carter and Anderson, debated Monday in the UC_ The debate was sponsored by ASPLU and was attended by only a small numher of students. Each representative was given time to make an opening statement, in which he discussed the views of his can­ didate and critidzed his op­ ponents. Afterwards, the floor ror was opened up questioning. Kirby Wilbur represented Ronald Reagan. Wilber said that both Anderson and Car­ ter have resigned themselves to the ract that the people or this country must take a step backwards in their standard of Jiving to overcome present economic problems. "They are telling you that we are racing problems that cannot be solved," Wilbur

government of passing too many bills that help the economy in the short run, but are detrimental in the long run. The Carter representative, Jim Salatino. began his statement by accusing Ronal(J Reagan or bombarding the public with rhetoric. Saying that he- "throws out a lot of difrere-nt figures that go in a multitude of dirrerent direc­ tions. " He also criticized Reagan ror wanting to return the country to a lifestyle similar to that of the 50's. "ThiS is unrealistic." Salatino said. Salatino de-emphasized the importance of balancing the budget. "China has a balan­ ced budget. Mexico has a balanced budget. I'd rather live here in the United States than in China or Me-xico," Salatino said. Salatino said . .lth Reagan .. and Anderson offered "very simplistic answers to questions of immense complexity.

iBid. According to Wilbur, Reagan believes that with a shift away rrom government regulation, and with a tax cut, the economic problems of our society can eventually be over­ come. He accused the president of not keeping campaign promises made in 1976. Said Wilbur, "In 1976 President Carter promised the people a balanced budget by 1980. He made his personal ethics the keystonf' to his campaign, and he has not fulfilled his promises. " John Standon represc:nted John Anderson. Standon em­ phasized Anderson's "Tough on theory Medicine" economic recovery. "The key is not what hap­ pens to the economy in the next lour years," Standon said, "bul the the things that happen in the coming decades due to the economic policies or the next four years." Standon

accused

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prOblems In a moderate way, and I like how he doesn't look ror simplistic answers to dif­ said problems ," ficult Salatino or Carter. The queslion pe-riod following the statements was brief, with one new issue brought up. It was stated that the hostage situation in Iran had not been dealt with at all. In answer to this, all of the representatives agreed that making a political issue out of the hostages is not the thing to do. "The Presidenr IS Com-

mander in Chief, and I'm sure he is doing everYthing possible to rree the hostages. To divide the country over this issue in a political campaign would be totally wrong," said Wilbur. Ironically, Nov. 4, the date of the election, also marks the one year anniversary of the captivity orthe hostages. When the debate was over, a Mooflng MaSl straw ballot was held for the few who were in attendance. The final results of that ballot; John Anderson - 15, Ronald Reagan - 6, Jim­ my Carter - 4, undecided - 2. Ted Kennedy· I .

Taki n ' it on t he road By Barb PicKell The PLU jazz ensemble, characterized as a "serious" but "daring" group of musicians by conductor Roger Gard, set their 1980-81 season into mOLion last week with a fr« concert in the UC dining room. "Over the past seven years the number of very serious students has doubled in the jass ensemble." said Gard. "They're serious musicians, but they're less inhibited than last year. They're quite a bit more daring on solos." Gard named sophomore piano performance major Dave Sorey, junior trom· bonists Brian Priebe and Dave Johnson, and sophomore sax man Mike Hylland as the band's strongest soloists. Nov. I is the next importanr date ror the ensemble. The group will by hosting the second annual PLU jazz festival. "One hundred letters went out," explained Gard, "and we're laking the first 12 (high school) bands that answer. " Each guest band will play ror a hair hour and will then

be critiqued by professionals In the jazz field. The festival will also include performances by the PLU jazz ensemble and by the Toshiko Akiyoshi/Les Tabackin Big Band, which Gard called "one of the best bands around today." The Akiyoshirrabackin Band will perrorm laler that evening as part or the Artist Series for PLU students and the general public. The jazz ensemble plans to play off campus more than it did last year. Performances are planned throughout the year in the public schools. In the planning stages is an end­ of -Interim tour of the Pacific Nonhwest. The band's biggest restivai this year will lake place the first wttk in March at the University or Idaho. Fifteen college bands rrom all over the western U.S. will perrorm. The restival will be videotaped ror "Jazz Northwest." a program put together by the University of Idaho for airing on educational television. The band will cap its year's activities by playing ror a 1940's dance here on May I .


October I ' , 1 980, Mooring Mast, Page 3

Fire departm ent inves tiga ting

PLU regent Larson d ies ei

R cm Dr. Roger C. Lar· son of Pullman died Oct. 9 after a long-Icrm battle with cancer. Larson was a professor of education at Wmhington State Univc:rsily. He served on national, state and regional boards dealing with comprehensive health planning. He founded Camp Easier Seal in Washington State, an en­ terprise aiding handicapped children. He had served at PLU since 1972. In

1969.

Larson

was

Arson f i res set i n T i n g e l stad

awarded the Distinguished Service Award by PlU.

By o.n Voelpd

Arter serving several years in the navy. Larson attended the University of Minnesota. There, he gradualed in 1946 with a certificate in physical therapy. Returning the following year. he earned his bachelor's degree. Finally. in 1951 Larson rccicvcd his master's degree from Washington State University. •

Surviving Larson are his wife Lucille Larson and their three children.

1 ,000 tee n s to be here tomorrow for League Day By Kalrio OIbonat

An estimated 1,000 mem­ bers of Lutheran church youth aroups around the northwest will be on campus tomorrow ' ' for PLU's annual League Day. League Day gives the high schoolers an opportunity to visit and explore PLU for a day. "It's not necessarily a hard­ core recruitment plan," said Phillip Miner, associate dean of admissions and coordinator of the event. " It's held so that Lutheran youth know that PLU is a school that they can attend." Lealue Day is an e'IIent sponsored by the ofrtct of admissions. It has been held annually for approximately 20

years. This year 663 congrqation from the Northwest have been invited to take part in Leaaue Day. There will be congregations from aU three major synods of the Lutheran church, the American Lutheran Church (ALC), the Lutheran Church in America (LCA) and the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod (LC­ MS). There will be luided tours of the campus and entertain­ ment provided for the leaguers. They wi l l have ac­ eess to all of the recreational facilities at PLU, ill(luding the pool and aolf areas, and they will also be provided with lun­ ch. festivities will end with the PLU-Whitworth football game.

Nine faculty to be considered for tenure The Faculty Rank & Tenure Committee has announced that nine faculty persons are to be considered for tenure this fall. They are: Edward W. An­ derson, M . S . , School of Physical Education; Stephen E. Barndt. Ph. D . . School of Business Administration: William A. Brochtrup. Ph.D School of Education: John T. Carlson. P h . D . , Bioloay ; Donald C. Haueisen, Ph.D., Physics and Engineerina : Dennis J . Martin. P h . D , Biology; Susan J . McDonald, M.L.S., Reference Librarian; .•

John N. Moritsugu, Ph.D Psychology; and Janet E. Rasmussen, Ph.D., Modern and Classical Languages. In the sixth year of teaching at Pacific Lutheran (or a minimum of three years here and a maximum of three elsewhere), all faculty must be evaluated on the basis of teachins. scholarship and con­ tributions to the University and the community. Those receivill8 positive recommen­ dations are granted tenure af­ ter the successful complttion of the sevtnth probationary year. .•

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criminal code. There has 1>«n a rash of car battery thefts, said Fillmore. Four reports of baueries being stolen from cars in the Har­ stad and library lots were tur­ ned in last week. Fillmore ad­ vises students to check and s« if the battery under their hoods is their own. For the "second time in 10 days, someone has decided to destroy the gnus in front of Delta with a car," said Fillmore. Accordins to Fillmore, Campus Safety has a suspect following the- report of a witness who saw the car.

Focus, Outdoor Rec g iven funds By Paul Meatft"

Money was allocated to two ASPLU committees at the student government's weekly mming. ASPLU the Focus, television prosram was allot­ ted S6S0 to cover advertisina costs. Focus airs every other Thursday night at 7 p.m. and reviews campus activities. Outdoor Recreation was allotted S410 10 help pay for a temporary storage room where they can store canoes and rarts. At this time there is no facility to house such equip­ ment. The . . Adopt a Grand­ parent" program is now get­ tina under way behind the leadership of scnator Marla Marvin. There was an interest mming held yesterday, but anyone who missed this meeting can get more infor­ mation by geuing in touch with Marla Marvin. "Adopt a

Grandparent" will serve the nearby Sherwood Nunina home this year. There were three appoin­ tments made to ASPLU com­ mittees at the mmins. Ap­ pointed to the USSAC han­ dicapped swimmins proaram: Lynnene Rose. To the Publicity Board: Bobbie Noll,

and to the Elections Personel Board: Marla Maoin. Last Sunday, Chip Carter. son of President Jimmy Car­ ter, visited PLU and talked to members or ASPLU. The conversation dtalt mainly with federal aid to universities and hightr education in general.

H atfi e l d speaks here Mark Hatfield. United States Senator from Oregon, will speak here Wed., Oct. 22. The Program, sponsored by the PLU Lecture Series. will be held in the University Center at 7:30p.m. Hatfield, a leadini Christian layman. will discuss the topic, II "Church-State Relationships. As a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, Hat­ field is deeply involved in determining rederal spending priorities. He is also a ranking member of the Rel'ublican Rules and Administration Committee. He is the author of three books. Not Quite So Simp/e, Con­ /lict and Conscience. and Between Rock and a Hard Place. He also co-authored Amn�ty: The Unsettled Question of Vietnam. Tickets for the lecture are available in advance at the Univer­ sity Center Or may be purchased at the door.

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Arson fires. in three dif­ rerent locations, were set in Tingelstad between 4 and S a.m. Sunday, according to Kip Fillmore, Campus Safety and I n rormation director. The Pierce County Fire Marshall. Shtrlff's orfice and Campus Safety are investigatina. Using "clothing and paptr materials." an arsonist set multiple fires in a first-noor laundry room and sinale fires in the rourth and sixth noor fire escapes, said Fillmore. Thick smoke already filled the lower noon whtn the Parkland Fire Department responded to extinauish the fires, which kept students out­ side for nearly SO minutes. "The fire department used fans to clear the smoke," said Fillmore. Pierce County Fire Preven­ tion Inspector John Buraess is seeklna the help of PLU students and starr in trackins down the arsonist. "We can determine acciden­ tal or intentional," said Hurless, "but with a fire like that, the investisalon are only as aoOO as their information." A fire could scar, cripple, or

kill people directly from the names and smoke or indirectly during the escape, said Buraess. "Wt are havina a lot of problems with PLU this year, " said Bursess or the ar­ son and string of false alarms. II "But now we need your help, he added.

Layaway. Welcome There's Only One Parkland Sports Center


Page 4, Moorin� Mast, October 17, 1980

Administra tive response unknown

M arried st udents prot est ho using conversion By KathlHn M . Hosfeld It didn't take Family Student Housing residents long to recover from the sur­ prise of learning one of their housing facilities was going to be convened into single student dorms next year.

In the four weeks since the residents read about the con­ version in the Mooring Mast, they have written a letter of complaint which has been sent to members of their home congregations and to various administrators. They have also met with the same ad-

ministrators to discuss their arguments against the conver­ sion plan to make suggestions for alternative plans. But Vice-P resident of Student Life Don Jerke told .the Mast this week that he could not say at this point what effect the students'

A Le wants L u t h e ra n u n i ty By Dave Arbaulh The American Lutheran Church "seemed pretty united" in the cause of Lutheran unity, said Mary Roe, a delegate to the ALC national convention held last week in Minneapolis, Min­ nesota. Other issues that the con­ vention dealt with were abor­ tion. homosexuality, the Equal Rights Amendment , the divesting of funds held by ALC in corporations that have branches in Soulh Africa, and the ALe elections. Roe, currently a fifth-year nursing student at PLU, was one of the two lay delegates sent from the Rainier Can­ ferenCC' of the North-Pacific District of the ALe. She felt that the unity question was one of the mosl exciting aspects of the conven­ tion. It was a "bigger thing than I expected," she said. Involved in such a merger would be the ALC. THE Lutheran Church in America. and the American Evangelical Lutheran Church. The ALC will try to spread as much in­ formation as it can around to its churches, explained Roe. Polls will be taken in 1981 at the regional conventions, and then in 1982 a decision on a course of action will be made at the national convention.

"I would like to see students getting a hold of the infor­ mation," said Roe. "I'd like to see them active in a possible merger. '.' Roe said that she was im­ pressed with the involvement of the church in social issues, but that she noticed a "lack of sensitivity" in the debate forums issues of on homosexuality and abortion.

MillY ROil However, the vote did not show that "lack of sen­ sitivity," she said. The convention voted to ac­ cept a statement that was written as "Comment and Counsel"-different from an official policy stand. said Roe,

opposing abortions especially as a personal "convenience." The ALe believes that a human being exists from con­ ception. she said. On homosexuality, the con­ vention also voted a statement to "Comment and Counsel. " She explained that the resolution was "vague." but that through the resolution and understanding of some of the debating, a line between homosexually "oriented" and homosexual "behavior" was drawn. The convention voted not to push for ratification of the ERA in the church because of a strong opposition by a women's group. Roe said that the group felt thai politics should be left out of the chur­ ch. "I was angered by that," she said. The convention also voted to divest itself of its monetary holdings in multi-national corporations having branches or factories in Soulh Africa. Cash is a symbol of disagreement . ALC national elt'Ctions were also held, and David Preus was re-<Iected as president. Lloyd Svendsbye was elected vice-president. Roe is an active member of University Congregation, and will be speaking briefly to that congregation on Sunday about the convention.

" Where style is an ongoing tradition "

protest would have on the housing decision although in­ vestigation into alternatives is continuing. The major issue in the FSH argument is the availability of space. The increased need for single student housing was the reason the university gave for the conversion of Evergr«n Coun to single housing facilities. According to FSH represen­ tative Perry O'Claire and Vice-President of Finance and Operations Perry Hendricks, the three contributing factors to the increased need for single student housing are a one per­ cent yearly growth rate, a traditionally excessive over­ booking for "no-shows" and a lack of new dorm space. FSH representatives claim that these factors do not take into account the increased housing needs for married students and that the univer­ sity's arguments are based on the assumption that dorms are

operating at a J 00 percent carrying capacity efficiency. O'Claire feels that the university is ignoring the need for married student housing and ignoring the possibility of utilizing unused dorm space which could be used for living quarters. These factors have caused the FSH students 10 develop the goals of increasing donn capacity to 100 percent e(liclency and to encourage single students to move off campus. According to O·Claire. the lack of space could be solved by convening unused dorm lounges and storage rooms in­ to Jiving quaners. He said that there is a possibility for a 3 to 4 percent increase in the housing capability of the dor­ ms which translates into housing for an additional 53 to 70 students. In Foss Hall alone, accor­ ding to O'Claire, 40 spaces could be created by conver­ ting "mini" lounges into living quaners while the university will only gain 31 spaces by converting Evergreen Coun. The conver­ sion of the "mini" lounges would nOt infringe on the amount o f lounge space available to Foss residents. because the dorm houses an inordinately high amount of

lounge space in comparison to other campus dorms. Regarding the overflow problem the FSH students suggested a more substantial housing deposit than that which will be instigated in 1981. According to the studen­ ts overnow claims at least 20 housing spaces per year. According to the letter the FSH representatives sent out. their suggestions for space utilization (only two of several are reported here) could "postpone the conversion of Evergreen for three or more years. " O'Claire mentioned , however, that the university may take the students' suggestions but still convert Evergreen Court as well. According to Jerke, the residential hall staffs are being questioned abou� space available for conversion to living quarters and the opinions of hall staffs about conversion of that space. O'Claire said that the em­ phasis of the group's argument is on reducing the question to an economic issue. He stressed that although FSH residents pay approximately the same amount as other students in rent the university claims to be losing about 5S000 per year on the units. The FSH group criticized this aspect of the university'S argument because through in­ sulating the currently un­ insulated units the university could save the same figure in heating costs every year. After offering solutions to the economic and spacial problems the group f«ls that what is left is a case of discrimination against married students. But Jerke and Rick Allen. head o f Residential life, both claim to be suppor­ tive of the beneficial diversity that the married students add to campus life. Jerke, According to discussion of the problem is continuing. O'Clalre said that the FSH group would wait for the of­ ficial administrativc response and then decide what to do. "We could play hard ball with them, get mean and nasty or we could give up," he said. "Either way, the university stands to lose."

Refrigera tor ren tal to be charged during In terim by Linda Grippln Residtnce Hall Council has recommended that a rental fee be imposed on rental refrigerators during Interim

1980. ' . '. • •

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In the pasl. rental fees were only imposed for fall and spring semesters. Students will now be charged at a rate of 56 for a small and 57 for a large refrigerator. These rates are based on a pro-rated basis from the f«s charged during the regular semester. The vote was unanimous for the change. There was one ab­ stention. "We are not doing it to make moncy, we are doing it to CO\'er losses earlier this year," said chairman Kim Tucker.

It was moved and passed that the replacement fee for all refrigerators damaged or not returned be raised from 5100 for a small to $200 and from $ I SO for a large to 52S5. Tucker said that the reason for such a raise in replacement costs was to rene(:t current rates. When the contracts were printed the costs were estimated at 1977 prices . Since then inflation has brought up the price, she said . RHC discusses issues that are revelant to students and their meetings are open so students can express their opinions. Their next meeting will be in Harstad's main lounge on Sunday at 6 p.m.


October 17, 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 5

St i m u l ants: W h at goe s u p , w i l l c o m e d o w n By Sa,. Andenen It's 2:36 a.m. You've Iyped 159 words of the 5,()()().word lerm paper that's due at 8 a.m. Your roommate rolls over and starn to snore. You can't stand it any more and reach for that miracle, the only thing that can help you make it throuah the niaht: cafreine. Cafreine is a drug whichaas as a stimulant on the hean, central nen-ous, and respira­ tory systems. One result is in­ somnia, a condition desired by many students who need to usc their usual sleepinl time ror studyina· But caffeine has many othererrects-,n the body, some potentially daJllerous, which occur when the drul is harshly abused. According to Tht E.JMn/io/

irritability, liahtheadedness, rcelina or drunkenness, im­ paired thinkina (not aood for studying), nausea, heanburn, indigestion, and stomach irratation. On a more serious

note, consuption of caffeine can result in the development or a stomach ulcer. A white, oderless powder with a biuer tlSte, caffeine is

used as a navorina in cola and root beer and occurs naturally in coffee and tea. Products such as No-Doz and Vivarin are sold for the purpose of keeoinlt alen and contain hiRh

amounts or carfeine. Drug ac­ tion begins in approximately 30 minutes and reaches a maximum in 50 to 75 minutes.

The Essentiol Guidt 10 Prescription Drugs sugaests that you do not exceed 250 rna per dose or SOO rna every Z4 hours. A mild overdose can result in nervousness. restless­ nns, insomnia (followed by depression in some individ­ uals), tremors, sweatinl, rinl­ ina ln the ean. spots �rore the eyes, hean palpitation, and diarrhea. Larae overdoses can result in excitement. rap;.:J and irrqular puJx, rapid breath­ inl, rever, delirium, hallu­ cinations, and convulsions. With prolonled use, vltyina dqrecs of tolerance and psy­ choloalcal dependence may occu r.

Guide 10 Prucriplion Drugs

by James W. Lona, M.D., natural and unaviodable side efrects are a sense or ner­ vousness and increased urine output, but these depend on the dosage and susceptibility or the individual. Mild adverse erfects can be a headache,

Caffeine has proved to be very effective for maintaining aienness when used properly. Howeve r, if any of the previosly mentioned side ef� reclS occur you should discon­ tinue use and consult a physician.

S pe l l m a n , M c De rmott me rry-go-ro u n d cont i n u e s (contlnutdfrom /HIlt ont) tax: bases are undermined, ac­ cordina to McDermou. "State rorest lands must be manaaed for the public good-not just ror private profit," he said. Followinl this. Spellman accused McDermott of changing positions. Accor­ dina to Spellman. "last week (McDermott) wanted to limit «onomic, housing and com­ munity development." Spellman said he believes in local community control over land questions. He wants to devdop overseas markets to export finished products, develop inland porI facilities, and expand tourism as well as to expand the salmon enhan-

DATE

"

Oct. 27

"" 28 Oct. 29

Oct. 30 OcI. 31

cement program. restore full fundina ror agricultural research and development, and improve rail and air ser­ vi« to Washington. Next, McDermott commen­ ted on the probable use of McNeil Island as a prison, savina taxpayer dollars and allowing the government to deal withovercrowdina as Walla Walla and Monroe. Ac­ cording to McDermott "a firm but humane prison system" is needed. Spellman rollowed by stating the one prison is under federal control and state men­ Ial institutions are ranked among the worst in America. Spellman said he would like to

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see McNeil Island convened to a state racllity. Next, McDermott stated his views on the educational system and the Depanment or Social and Health Services . He said he would like to "help problem students and teachers deal with problems." He would also like 10 encourage the involvement of parents in the school system. Spellman responded by em­ phasizing his support for por­ table housing, more local school control. major tax exemptions, and lax replacem-

men!. Next. McDermott said there was a need ror a more aggressive Department of Economic Development to develop small business, Sixty percent of state jobs come from small businesses in the private sector. he said. Mc­ Dermott would like to establish a small business ad­ visory committee ror suaaestions regarding rules and regulations. In closing the hour-long debate. Spellman said. "If people are aoad they have no reason to fear for their jobs.

Everyone really wishes to do a ,ood day's work. They need a strong leader ." McDermott concluded by Slating: "I will always lead when the issue is in doubt. I want to involve the people or this state so they know they ,. are a part orthe state. McDermott, 43. is midway throuah his firsl rour-year term in the state senate. His training is in psychiatry. Spellman, 53, is in his third year of a four-year term as Kin, County Executive. He graduated rrom law school at Georgetown University.


k

Page 6, Mooring MaSl , l tooer n, 19i5O

C u l t s a p pe a l to

s sed yo u n g peo p l e

8, Randl Cleven

..,re you vulnerable to � ure of cults? If you

the are between the ages of 18 and 25 and are undergoing a period of

stress or transition, you may very well be. lt is not necessary for a prospective cult recruit 10 be a victim of poyeny or ignoran­ ce. According to Edward M. Levine in an article conc�­ . ning deprogramming of for­ mer cult victims, "those who join cults are characteristically white, middle-class young people, many of whom were attending college imm "ly prior to conversion." People who join according to Bob Cogg;i . day supervisor for

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!.

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Gospel Mission in seeking "friendship, and love; a family mosphere... Accordina to Ron Vianec, campus minister, cults appea(.... · to younS people by offering ;' authoritative naures, fun- ::: damental beliefs, and strons . regulation to ,overn their daily lives. Their beliefs and standards provide them a clear sense of purpose, direction and an intensely souaht-aftcr "...,.. Reverend Guy Sicr. also of the Union Gospel Mission. stated that " the Christian church has failed in meetin, the needs of many youna people." n the ICCUlar .:x:icty of which is composed, teli­ aion is not taken seriously. nor is serious attention Jiven to the development of skills in dis­ c.ernln, relisious choices. Without this background� youna people are subject to anythins. They join the aroup manipulation. They are out of a felt need that has not hun,ry for a sense of been satisfied in their lives belonsing and are easily outside the group. swayed to believe most According to writer Edward

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M. Levine in the March 1980 issue of Society Mandne, the

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The operation of cults and their effects on people and society should not be taken lightly. A convert is forced to dissociate himself from those individuals or groups that con­ stituted the structure of his former environment. He is now subject to certain author­ ities and leaders only within the cult and to their "sacred writings." Pastor Vignec said it is im­ portant to consider your own vulnerability to such situations. According to Dr. Hulme, "All of us have a need to live for something bigger than our­ selves or our immediate family."

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October 17, 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 7

Gifted students work In chal leng ing class •

By Flo Hamilton "Gifted is great ! " The bold blue letters are spread across the classroom wall. The words set the scene: a room full of in­ telligent young faces. 5th and 6th graders. interested in everything and anything. " These kids are so sharp it's frighleninl' " said Evy McNeal, instructor of the gifted at Col­ lins Elementary near PLU, The room is a blur of ac­ tivity, Lifelines. a class project, hang in the room cen· ter, computer terminals line a wall, and bottles of marine life are strewn about, ready for study, Fingers r1y at the typewriters and tcrminals, while Eric programs a disc and starts playing an electronic game of his own making, Sound like grade school? Incredibly 50, this is a classroom situation. AJthough she has 23 years of teaching behind her, this is McNeal's first year workin, with accelerated students. "I love it. They arc so fuJI of challenge," said McNeal. McNeal's classroom houses only half of the "crop" from the Franklin Pier« district. Students arc accepted into the program on the basis of two to three years of achievement tests, a non-verbal eltam, parental referral, and teacher recommendations. McNeal "These said, students are super-bright and that's an understatement-in

fact we have one student who is near genius level. " Projects arc as intense as the students in the classroom. The lifelines suspended from the ceiling arc strings with in­ dividual eltperiences and futuristic goals. The students were asked to write. draw, or simply represent five impor­ tant things that have happened in their lives. The second part of the assignment found the kids representing five things they wanted: goals. Diversified were all the responses. Typical previous happenings included: "I was born; baptized; we moved; Mom had my brother; Charlie my dog." But goals soon reveal more depth: "graduate, receive two scholarships; coUege degr�; become an ar­ chitect; be successful; get married; have twins; create a motorcycle; live in Hawajj, The lifeline project had taken a week and a half, much of it done on the studenu' own time. "Yeah, 1 have a lot of homework. but 1 like it that way," said Mya, an inquisitive female of the class. "Hey, let me on the ter­ minai," cried Noel, "I want to make a program." The classroom computers are all self-contained. Students feed them discs programmed for homework assignments and others to create their own games, problems, and fun. German, computer, and It

GI"ed chlld,en .t Collins Element." such ., wo,t/ng with comput.". journalism specialists work with the students several times a w�k to provide stimuli for these bright students. Cliff Rowe, a PLU faculty member and advisor to the Mast, is the journalism specialist. Several students were writing and typing ar· ticles. Typing is one of their activities and many students do their reports and reviews on these machines. "But I just lot on the typewriter-I - can't stop now ! " a girl pleaded at the close of the day. "Yes, my kids come early and don't want to leave. I always have to shoo some of them out when I finally

School .,e t,••ted to stlmul.tlng .ctM".,

leave," said McNeal. Sure enough, at the 3: 10 bell, five or six students paid no heed. They kept writing, reading, plotting, and lear­ nins. " People often stereotype: in­ telligent individuals as not being athletically inclined; not so with these kids. They arc in­ to all sports," McNeal said. "These kids are really fan­ tastic. They arc extremely goal�irccted and futuristic. It will be somewhat hard for them to go back to the regular classroom situation. It's too bad they only have haIr a year here." Lack or runding results in

Tim e usage in science and health departments criticized

the half-year system wherein the �th and 6th grade gifted students are in this special classroom for the first half of the year, and the Jrd and 4th grade gifted will be in the in the second program semester. "But I'm so glad gifted programs are on the upswing, as it is frustrating to sec these kids in a normal classroom, which docsn't hold as much challenae for them. J ' m hoping there will be something for these students at higher levels of schooling, and with this new trend, perhaps there will be," added McNeal.

S t u d e n t s ' u n s u re' a b o u t effec t of cyc l e p rog ra m By Sand,. WIIII.nII

Jens Knudsen of the depart­ ment of biology raised the issue of time usage within the science and health depart­ ments in a Mast feature article submitted last w�k. He cited the Cycle 1 and Cycle 2 program used at 51. in University John's Collegeville, Minnesota, as making for "Jess prCS5ure, a better overall understanding of class material, and allowing students to ask better questions at the next lccture." Students questioned in a recent interview said they felt this program "sounded good" but they were unsure about the lengthened days it would require. "The material they present in class goes by too quickly as it is," stated one anonymous student. "It (the S1. lohn's program) would help even out study time, though." About the nursing program in general an anonymous nur­ sing student stated. "It's a good program. I'm learning a lot from it but they cram a lot throat. your down Academically it may be no harder than other programs, but they give just too much material in too shon a time. It should be a five-year course, since some things really should be gone over more." "If you're a 24-hour-a�ay person it's great." stated a nursing studem absorbed in her workload with no time for an interview.

Mark Chesnutt, a chemistry and biology student, said he felt one·hour labs were a "shortcoming" within the science departments because "they sometimes put more work into them than into a four·hour class. "

James Hafford, a bioloJY and chemistry student, stated, "It's imponant to get lab work wonh more than one credit . .. "The courses refrain from getting into the subject. They drag us through everything," stated Gary Nelson, a senior chemistry student. "They focus on an overview of con­ cepts and familiarizing people with ideas and terms. We should dissect the subject, in­ stead of just look at it." "A lot of pre-mcd students go through the chemistry and biology classes," Nelson ex·

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plained. " H a r d -c o r e chemistry docsn't apply to them so all they need is the overview they're getting and they're happy. It wouldn't hun to have a more hard-core program, especially for chemistry majors." According to nursing students, changes have hftn made in the material they use and the degr� to which they must know it. They no longer have to pass their mastery tests by IOO per«nL lnstead, if they can score 80 per«nt or better, they can move on to take a summatlve, which consists of an overview of material and is taken for a grade. "I think the faculty does more to help students than they're given credit for," Dana Virak. level four nursing student, said. "They know there arc problems and they're trying to work on them. , t

Chesnutt stated, "We have top-notch, totally dedicated profs. They will always drop what they're doing to help . students.. However, a level two nur­ sing student who asked to remain anonymous revealed that "instructors arc almost impossible to get a hold of and some have no office hours. They are competent but don't usc their time wisely with students and arc often disorganized," she said.

"In any career there's always a lot of work," said Meagcn McDougall, a level four nursing student. "That's the way it is in the field of nur­ sing. If they made it easy for us we wouldn't have the high credentials we have." "We have to be pressured to get ideas down and meet deadlines," said Chesnutt, "otherwise we wouldn't get

anything done."

"There's an overwhelming workload at times, but we set used to i t and always manaae," said Vonda Broom, a level four nursing student. "The balance of work is self­ paced. There arc some deadlines but the final during dead w�k is the most impor­ tant date." " A lot of prCS5Utc:5 are what you PUt on Yourself," said Virak. "You won't feci it so much if you're relaxed. You should SCI your OWIr aoals. Some students tend not to be well-rounded persons because they're so busy," she added. Students interviewed agreed that PlU standards set high expectations, espctially since the university is competing with other schools, but all realize that this will prove beneficial to them when they hit the job market.

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Page 8,

Mooring Mast, �tober 17,

1980

A bortion may be your only choice

' I ' m n ot ready t o be a', p a re n t , I ' m too yo u n g , I ' By

Karen M. OlllOn

pregnancies were confirmed at

Planned Parenthood In Seplember wed no binh control measures. The reason most women seck an abortion, Rutenbeck i that they do nOI feel said, s ready for the responsibilities o f a family. "The most common thing Ihat I hear," said RUlmbeck, "is 'I'm not ready to be a parent, I'm tOO young. I'm still in school.' '' Rutenbeck said 50 percent of the prtgnancics confirmed in September occurred in women

AbortiOQ, one of the op­ tions available to preananl women who do nOI want a child, has been debated. in the courts, Now ii's up to the in­ dividual to decide for or BgBinn it. The biggC3it reason ror un­ wanted pregnancies is non·use or birth control measures, ac­ cording to Nancy RUlenbeck , supervisor of patient services for the Tacoma PlAnned Parenthood cUnic. Seyenty percenl o r those whose

between 15 and 21 years of age. Planned Parenthood coun5el.5 women who arc seeking a.n abortion, RUlenbeck said. "We're here to provide suppen 10 the person and information both aboul aborlion and the alternatives. We encourage the woman to invalve her pan ncr and also her parcnls i f she is a minor, I t she n.id. ft's nOI an easy decision either way, Rutt'llbeck said. " Some women know tbey're pregnant and that thev want

an abonion. They are already emolionally Set, have made their decision, and know that ii's best for Ihem," shesaid. "Others fccl lhal abonion is the ani), altcrnati1lc, bUI really don't Want to have one. Up to that point, abortion is not a decision which they would have made. They often say, 'I don', like it, but I can't continuethi!i pregnancy.' '' Planned Parenthood infonm the person about both optiolUi: abortion and continuing Lhe pregnancy, Ruten· beclr said. "We don'l en-

courage or discourage any deciSion. Weju.5t present all of the alternatives. Continuing the pregnancy does nOI mean thai the woman must become a parent." Women who decide to conlinue their pregnancies may be eligible to recti1le coupons from the Department of Social and Health Services for prtnatsJ care. Rutenbcck said. If they choose to give the baby up for adoption, they are referred 10 Ihe Children's Home Society. "In the counseling, we talk

Mast Abortion Survey

Men and women disagree on legality

"My fn'end was J3 and gOI pregnant. If she had had the baby it woula have ruined her life. There was no way in this society that she could have supported and kept her baby. An abortion was the only way. Ilshe hod kept the baby she would not have been happy. Also the girl hod V. D. II she had the baby, both her and her baby's life might have been in danger. "

The feature department of theMasl conducted a random survey on cam­ pus lasl week. I J S surveys were passes OUl, and 75 were returned. 40 by females and 35 by males.These are the statistical results and some of Ihe comments.

QUESTION I • "In the upcoming prl!Sldtntial eltctionI are you con­ sidering the candldaus' abortion views as part 01 thdr pliltlorm ? MALES-NO 16

FEMALES-NO "

YES

''Theletus may bea/ive, bUI it's not Ihinking. .. "It 's ridiculous to comf}Qre these two issues. "

NO RESPONSE

IJ

l

YES

NO RESPONSE

18

l

QUESTION 6- "II abonion was illegal would thai SlOp you from gmint one? lIlt would. why? (or why not) "

.

'" FEMALES-NO 14

YES

10

FEMALES- NO Il

24

FEMALES-NO 14

NO RESPONS!?

14

YES

NO RESPOf'\.:iE

24

2

NO RESPO�SE

7

4

YES

NO RESr.>()NSE

24

2

QUESTION 4- "1/ ),ou do or da not JaJ'Or abortion. under what speci/i,· circumslances wouldyou I�,aliu or not 14allu It?"

"Abortion should not be reglliated as long as the parents art' competent {o decide. .

.

..

FEMALES

.

"Aborlion isjusl making on easy way out 01a problem " "I think the oresent lows aresufficent. .. "II's a1!ainst women 's right nOl lO be able 10 gel one. " "It should be legal lor one abortion per woman- then I would make il very expensive and maybe illegal ifnecessary. ..

QUESTION 7- "II )'ou are against abortion k'ould

2D

FEMALES- MO 30

YES •

YES l

NO RESPONSE •

NO RESPONSE l

)'QII

classify your

2

10

9

14

3

11

9

14

FEMALES- LEGAL ETHICAL RELIO. MORAL

"IIpeople are going to!ool around ther should toke thepill. ..

" The gift of life s i the most precIOUS gift entrusted to mankind and it's difficult/or me to IInderstand anyone wonting to begin a life and then wan­ l;n8 to end it, In>I0re it has hodchance to 8row and blossom. " It.

" I'm really only against ;1 ifprostilules or other unscrupulouspeople use

"

MAU:.S

"I don 't like children especially unWantffl ones. .. . WI/h so much pre-marital sex it's ntcessar:r. ..

,

FEMALES

" I'm only in la\'or 01aborilon incases oJ rope delt>rminf'd by a doc/or.

" It 'sjusf 100 easy fosay

" Abortion is a justified cause. Why allow a child 10 come into Ihe world and be a drug addict or a prostitute, a burden /0 society, when it could die pea�ully?"

'.tIm don 'f Rei pre�nant. "

.

,

"II abortion .legalized maybe contracepl;ves and other methods would become more ullilu d. .

.

QUESTION 9- "If we used any 01your comments ;n the JXlpt>r would you p"lt>r to remain anonymous? Ilso. why? MALES- NO

FEMALES- NO

QUESTION 5- "Do you consldrr abortion rela{iv� ta the issue of capital MALES-NO

.

MALES- LEGAL ETHICAL RELIO. MORAL

20

?"

,

.

"It should be legaliz.ed ifIhegovernme.nt doesn 't have to poy. .. "A girl could gel one In Japan. ..

punlshmenl

NO RESPONSE

21

QUESTION 6 "Ilyou arelor ubortlon, why.'"

MALES

"You should take care 0/problt'ms belore they Slarr.

YES

declsinn OS legal. tthlca!, "lIg;ous or moral?"

YES

" The government should play no pan in this issue. ..

2D

" Ifit was illegal this would be because society had declared il so. Societal rejrction 01 aborllon would influence me so I would not be drastically OStracized from society . .

QUESTION J- "Do you la vor KO�'�rnmentalftna"ce ofabonion ? MALES-NO

l

"No WIfe or child ofmine will ever have on abortion as long as I live. .

QUESTION 1- "Do )'oulavor I�,al abortion' " MALES-NO

NO RESPONSE

YES

MALES-NO

"The candidates opinions on abortion are nowhere near as important as the issues ofloreign policy and Ihe mililary. . "It 'sjusl nOI a concern lor Ihe public "

'"

YES "

NO RESPONSE

YES

NO RESPONSE

Il

l

"I don 'I w,sh i 10 defend my argument agalllst allY a'/II-abortlOn person, because they re not worth my lime. . . "I'd like to be anonymous and Idon 'f think u'syour place to ask why. "I don 't need thegritif/ram th£>feminists. " 'This is so COntroversial and many ofmyIrlends disagr" with my views, and I don ', want to cause dishannony. "

"


October 17, 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 9

m st i l l i n s c h o o l about guill," Rutenbeck said. "We talk about how they f�1 now, how they have felt before, and how they think they arc going to f�1 . But you can't really sit here with a crystal ball and see how you are gOing 10 r�1. .so the only thing that you can do is to make the decision on what Is the best thing fot you right now." RUlenbedi said once the person hlb decided on having an abortion, she h given detailed Informmion about the process and referrt'd to a doc­ tor who has been screened by Planned Parenthood. Thr Proccdun which is used for early abonions (up 10 1 4 weeks from the last menstrual period) is a vacuum aspiration, according to a pamphlet put out by Planned Parenthood or Pierce County. A local anesthetic is usually in­ jected into the cervix, then the opening is gradually stretched by a series of long, narrow rods, each a liule wider than the one before. The cervical opening may also be stretched over a period of several hours using laminaria, a slim roll of ab­ sorbent material placed in Ihe cervix. When the opening is wide enough, a blunt-lipped suction tube is inserted inlO the uterus. After the Ulerus is emptied by gentle suction, a spoon-shaped curette may be used for a final cleaning of the lining of the uterus. Relatively few complications occur with an early abortion, according to Plan­ ned Parenthood. One possible complication is a laceration of the cervical opening. Stitches are sometimes required for this. Another complication, perforation of the uterine

wall, happens about once for every 400 abortions. Treat· required ment usually bO!lpitallzation for obser­ vation andlor completion of Ihe abortion and. sometimes, surgical repair. In approximately one OUI of 20 cases, some pans of tht' coments of the uterus may be retained. To remove Ihis tis!oue, il may be necessary to do a repeal procedure 81 a clinic or hospital. FinallY, infeclion occur.� in about lwo percem of the cases. Suc.h i n fections usually respond to antibiotics, bUI may require hospitalization and possible surgery. s erv i ces Abortion throughout the United States are carefully monitored by the Center for Disease Conlrol and the U.S. Department of Heallh and Welfare, accor­ ding to Planned Parenthood. The CDC has reported that abortion in the first trimester is one of the 'safest of all surgical procedures. The CDC has also found that the risk of maternal death from full-term pregnancy and childbirth is approximately nine times greater than that from first­ trimester abortion. Abortion is not a financial issue any more, said Ruten­ beck. An early abortion costS from $125 to $175, she said. 11ais is below the cost of delivering a baby. Also. medical coupons in the state of Washington will still pay for an abortion, she said. "The problem isn't just fin­ ding out where to go for an abortion, " Rutenbeck said. "It's finding out the alter­ natives, the faC15 about abor­ tion and getting some assistance decision­ in making. "

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.' "111 Page 10, Mooring Mast. October 17, 1980

I'fJexicD

Treaty avoids trouble south �-1:: Forecasts of the --of trouble border ,

city � .

I

with the Panama Canal have yet to materialize in a tension f i l led part of the world ----------------- Lat i n Am er ica

EC

young Panamanians" who would have launched a "war of liberation " i f the agreement bet­ hen the United States turned over control of the Panama ween the two nations had not been been settled. Canal Zone to the Republic of Student demonstrators, who on­ Panama in 1 979. there were ce threw rocks at the U.S. Foreign forecasts of deep trouble for the Ministry building and chanted anti­ historic waterway. u.s. slogans advocating the im­ Public opinion polls at the time mediate take-over of the canal by showed that most Americans felt demand better force now they were giving up something for nothing. Many feared that the little Central American country could not handle the responsibility of The treaty "avoided the running the canal. deaths 01 50,000 young But today, one year after the Panamanians" who would Panama Canal Treaties went into By Tom Koehler

,B

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Brusili",.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

have launched a "war 01

effect, the anxieties and fears are 1/ the libera tion" fading fast. By giving up the canal, agreement between the the U.S. did get something in two nations had not been return--a rare foreign policy success reached, that improved its national security" Panamanian animosity toward Americans. which once erupted in educational facilities instead. bloody rioting, canal sabotage and uring the late 1 960's and brutal acts of violence, has vir­ throughout the 1970's, when tually disappeared since the Tornjos pressured the U.S, for a treaties went into effect. In an interview, Brig. Gen. Omar new canal treaty. Panama adopted Torrijos, Panama's Strongman dic­ leftist policies aimed at helping the tator, insisted that the treaty 600,000 Panamanians living under "avoided the deaths of 50,000 the poverty level. Torrijos used the

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threat of communism as a lever in the treaty bargaining,

,

According to a Sept . 29 U.S. News & World Report anicle, the government has again become anti· communist and leftist officials are being moved out of the country or sent abroad . Panama could have concievably fallen to an extremely radical government if the treaty had not been approved. While Torrijos' regime has been criticized in the past for human rights violations, it does represent a motlerate stance when compared to Cuba, Cuban influence, once described as growing "by leaps and bounds," is said to be nil. In Central America before the new treaties, the canal was seen as, in Torrijos' words, "a colonial conquest "--with the U , S . as a belligerent superpower trying to dominate a small nation. The Cen­ tral Americans argued that the canal was not important ceon· omically or militarilY to the U.S. They cited facts: many of the U.S. Navy's vessels were too large for the canal; with fleets in both the Atlantic and Pacific, the U.S. had little need to send even small w�r·

ships through the docks; in the event of a nuclear war, the docks could be totally demolished by a single missile; and only eight per· cent of the American-foreign and seven percent of the east-coast west-coast trade used the canal. The Central American nations no longer see the U.S. as a bully who pushes little guys around. It appears the U.S. actually recieved something for practically nothing. nder joint operation, the canal moves ships between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans at the Sclme rate as it did when the water· way was under total U ,S, control. The U.S. still has the right to inter­ vene militarily if the canal's com­ merce were threatened and since the treaty called for the permanent neutrality of the waterway, the U.S, has guaranteed access. The decreasing animosity, the waning communist influence and the new image the U.S. has in Cen­ tral America are proof that the adoption of the Panama Canal Treaties was a wise move and that it gave the U.S, friends·-where there were none·-in a volatile pan of the world.

Ustill


October 17, 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 1 1

E D ITO RIAL

St u d e n t s t h i n - l i p p ed o n a b o rt i o n A man and a woman God and her physician." wefe the watching But the politicians ore not presidential debotes this reducing the Issue to a year listening to discussion question of morality. They on the topic of abortion. are considering the main­ "BoY," said the man, "I tenance of constitutional think thol any girl who Is consistency in the notion's dumb enough to get her­ legal systems. They also self pregnant deserves consider the effect on the what she deserves. I black market abortion rate wouldn't ever respect a girl of making abortions who got on obortlon " Illegal. Keeping in mind The woman nodded silen­ that the government can· tly but hel heart sank. She not legislate morality. who was pregnant. She hod do you agree with? planned on telling him that let's try hitting a little night but didn't. She had closer to home. One third already made the oppoln­ of all legal abortions per­ men' at the family plan­ formed In the U.S. are per­ ning clinic for her abortion formed on women under the next week. the age of twenty, accor­ The scenario did not take ding to 1975 statistics from place on a television soap the Center for Disease Con­ opera. A reasonable tac­ troL But these abortions did �mlle of II took place bet· not take place as a two ween people method of regular birth associated with PLU. PLU control. They took place students were also respon­ because of myths about sible for frequently making such comments as '" don', feel (abo<1lonl should be discussed by the Mast. It Is a private decision," In response to a survey run this week. Although the decision to have on obof· tlon legally or Illegally Is of course a personal one It Is on Issue that cannot be wiped out of public discussion for a variety of reasons. let's toke it t o the national level EYefY single the for candidate presidency of the United States has given cam­ paign time to the discussion 01 the Issue. Thetr views cover a scope of positions from actively lobbying against abo<1lon to allowing each woman to make her own decision conjunction with her

how easy I t Is to get �1fegnant. "We do not have evidence that chance· taking or neurosis Is In fact the predominant reason for patlenls coming In for abortions." say the authors of Medical Aspects of Human Sexuality. They continue by saying that It Is an "extreme Injustice to women I n general to stigmatize them I n this fashion,"

In a book written In part by a University of Washington professor the authors nole the placement of high value on sexual spontaneity and euphoria, a lack 01 com­ mitment and a lack of communication are three of the moln reasons for non-use of contraceptives and the subsequent need

The language of man (man in the u n iversal sense, t h u s I n c l u d i n g women) encompasses nearly everything he does. His rhetoric and semantics d i rect and control the ac· By Jeff Ol.on tlons of all mankind. The talk goes on

for abortions, In you private decIsion­ making process will you lake the time to find out that 70 to 80 percent of the women that hove abor· lions Immediately select an altern'atlve birth control method offer they have had an abortion and an additional 13 . 5 percent select an alternative offer they return for their postoperative visit?

The man and woman I mentioned before were not abstract concepts In some book In the HQ sec· lion of Mortvedt library. The fetus the woman bore before her abortion was also not on abstract con­ cept. Aren't these reasons for enough public dlscussSon?

Editor Kathleen M, Hosfeld N..... Edltor Tom Kaehler Featur.. Editor Petro Rowe Sporta Editor John Wallace Producfton Editor Margo Sludent Photography Editor Greg lehman Magazine Editor Marcl Ameluxen Edltorlat -.onta Dee Anne Houso

Eric Thamos Copy Editor Koren Wold Qraphlcl Editor Steve Houge lull..... Manager COlli Minden

CIrculation Manager Pom CorIsan

AdYeI1IIIng Manager Cindy Kloth Technical AdvIoor Mike Fredeflckson Faculty AdvIoor Cliff Rowe

The MootIng Molt

II published weekly by the students of Pacific lulheron Ufltverlsfy un­ der the ousplces 01 the Boord

of Regen!S, OpInions ex­ Pl'essed In the Moll ore nol ln· !ended to represent !hose of !he regenlS, the ad· ministration, the faculty. the stUdent body or the Mall 'taft. leiters to the edI10r should be submlHed by 5 p.m, 01 the some WfMM( of publlcotlon,

NUKE MONEY: Puget Power has been in the planning for a nuclear plant for quite some time but Its 700 million dollar estimate in 1973 has now risen to 8.2 billion due to delays and interest rates. Its customers will have to absorb the costs If it is built.

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and on and yet people's minds are bound by the language of com· BOMBING: m u nlcatlon that they have or have not mastered. Bombin g cont inue s In the Persian Gulf despite Iran and Iraq debate upon the Persian Gult and Its conflicts. Iran and Iraq's talks and debates of settlement Both countries' armies are taking an offensiv� Presidential candidates, their underlings, spouses and friends voice approach, their platforms through their talk. They make promises, proposals, and predictions with their words. Language represents power; the power of Immediate control, which d i rects, defeats, and decides the "victor of rhetoric," Brezhnev has asked the U.S, to resume the Arm Talks, warning that "the Kremlin would never per· ARETE: mit the United States to achieve m i litary superiority," I Plan to join Arete .tudenl/faculty lunch and forums Thursdays at 1 2:00 In the North Dining ask, where does the power lie? I n the words of human Room. Dr. Sudermann of the Modern and Classical language. Languages Department will be the speaker this The power of language has been equated with In· coming Thursday_ telligence and Intelligence has been attributed to the person who best uses his language, rather than the per· son with the best Ideas, These two Items work best hand In we most often listen to the talk and deny the communication. DOME: language and words of mankind have the potential to be man's Three designs are in the bidding for the greatest attribute, or the downfall of our abllity to communicate. If Tacoma stadium, Two are domes, one Is as a you doubt man's communication abilities, I challenge you to express covered cube, Final decision will be made Oct. your sensual teellngs with only his words, If we are to survive and 28 by the city council. thrive In our society we must express the language of com· munlcation, not ani that

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Page 12. Mooring Mast. October 17. 1980

E LSEWHE RE

Co u rt r u l e s a g a i n st f i ve co l l e g e wo m e n (CPS) - Endins the nation's most silniricant sex-for-,rades case, a federal appeals court rutin, last week dmied five Yale Univnsity women's ap�al to re-hear their scxual harassment charles alainu certain faculty members. Thcthrctjudle panel of the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said charles of .wxual harassment and an "atmos­ phere o f inequality" were pure spc'CUlation and conjecture.

But in its three-year journey thrOUgh the courts, the Yale scx-for-arades case set several important lepl precedents, includln, a ruling that sexual harrassment consitutes discrimination alainst women. "The momentum we've established here has already reached many women across the country," asserts Anne

Simon, lawyer for the five women. "And sooner or later a judie will rule to aet these guys (the accused male professors). Simon adds that women from across the country have bttn seeking more in"

fonnation about this case, and how it could icad to more equitable guidelines

at their insitutions. The five women. who have aJready Iraduated. were not askinl for monetary compenstation, but sought a court order directing . Yale to insitute Irievancc procedures dealina with harrassment complaints. When the complaints were.rst aired more than three years ago, there were no procedures. Since then, Yale has established lrievancc procedures, thouah there's some dispute as to how crfective they will become. "It appears that the major relief soulht in this suit has already b«n ,ranted," said the rulin,. Simon, however, argues the new procedures fall short of insuring reasonable protection for collele students aaainst professors' sexual desires.

"We do not believe that the courts should indulJe in specUlation of the sort required here," Judae Edward Lumbard ruled. Of the five women, one had com­ plained a male professor slashed her If_de from an "A" to a "C" bctw.use she refused. to submit to his sexual demands. Another woman claimed she had been forced to have sexual inter­ course with an instructor, and ultimately had to foresake her chosen­ major. Still another said she was for­ ced to leave her position as an athletic assistant to the men's hockey team because of sexual harnwment.

"it's lot of paper, but very little ac­ tion. For example, the dean makes the final and only bindin. decision. The board has no power at all, except to advise," she complains. She adds that either a grade chanle or some other type of compensation for a victim can be made only if the alleged perpetrator agr�s. "Now that's ridiculous," she claims.

In its ruling, the court said the women had not suffered "distinct and palpable" injury because of Yale's ac­ lion (or inaction) on the allegations. ,

H ig he r Education Rea ut horization Act IMost important student bill of the year' passed through congress (CPS) - After an unprecedented lob­ bying effort, some cosmetic face­ saving, and a power struggle between two le,islative committees, Congress has finally passed what one lobbyist called " the most important student bill of the year." The Higher Education Reauthorization Act effectively funds most federal college programs, in­ cluding student financial aid, for the next five years. The act, among other thinas : e Gradually increases the maximum Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) from $ 1 800 to S2600 by 1985. e f ncreases maximum funding for Suplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOGs) from $1500 per student to 52000 per student. e Requires that students receiving College-Work Study monies get the minimum wage e Requires that stud t''lts are represen­ ted on Slate college planning com­ missions. eEstablishes a single application form e Raises the interest rates on National Direct Student Loans (NDSLs) from three to four percent. The NDSL interest increase was the major concession made by higher education groups in the intense politicking that produced the legislation. though there were others. " The higher interest rate will be a problem for students , I I says Joel Packer of the 1''Ultional Associalion of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges. "But most of the other cuts arc 'paper cuu. They lowered the amount of maximum fundina of programs, but most arc still hiaher than what they get anyway." '

But most higher education lobbyists consider themselves lucky to huve got­ len anything. The legislation. which will ultimately affect about five million studenu, was originally introduced last year. In early 1980, the House P3SSed a $60 billion version while the Senate passed a S30 billion version. Over the summer a House-Senate conference

committee concocted a $49 billion compromise that the House quickly passed. In early September, however, the Senate SCnt shock waves through the higher education community by rejecting the bill. It was "the first out-and-out defeat in tons of years , " recalls Larry Zaglaniczny of the American Council on Education . "'It came as a real shock. " "The higher education hone\moon is defin itely over:' another official sadly remarked. observing that congressional sentiment toward cutting back on social programs had apparen­ tly reached education. Indeed, Sen. Ernest Hollings (D-Se) voted against the compromi�e bill becau<ie it helped ..tudenl� \Nith "millionaire fathers \Nho take out {studem) loans as an investment." Hollings added. "I used to think education was a good investment No! anymore . •,

"Some sen'lIors weren't that infor­ med:' says Steve Leifman. a student lobbyist for COPUS (Coalition of In­ dependenl College & University

Students). TO" inform them," Leifman and others mounted an impressiVe lob­ bying effort, which aimed at bringing the bill up for a vote again. For example, Leifman and some Virginia student leaders showed bill opponent Sen. John Warner (R-VA) figures showing that his state's student loan program had actually made money for Virginia. " Write that down' Warner reportedly barked to an aide. Warner ultimately voted for the versIon approved by the Senate lasl week. "

Other tacHCS included sending a lob­ byist's spouse to argue with Sen. Russel Long (D-LA) and waving p r otest banners lit an American University speech by Sen. Howard Baker (R-TN). Baker departed Irom text of the speech to announce he was changing his vote on the Issue to yes. Al Cummings, a staffer for Sen.

Richard Stone (D-FL), says "we were really surprised by the Sludent lob­ "

bying. Eduardo Wolle of the U.S. Student Association says his group mobilized "more support than we've ever got " around the bill. Yet for all the shouting, "the change in votes was a symbolic thing , " lob­ byist Packer says. "There was a power struggle be­ tween the education committee and the budget commiUet, I I he explains. "The budget committee proved its demand ror budget CUIS was mel , though IR ac­ tualit)' they hadn't done that much . (cuning). Once the budget commIttee was .satisfied, people felt it "as okay to vote ror the bill." Hollings, the budget committee ..:hairman and a leading opponent of the onginal compromise bill in early September, was the key. "Many senators were waiting 10 �ec what Holling would do," Says Patricia Fleming, assi$lant secretary for

legislaton al the Dept. of Education. " When we learned Hollings changed his vote to approval, " she adds, "we knew the bill had a good chance of going through." Few senators would admit it was an internal power Struggle that nearly gut­ ted federal higher education programs. Florida Senator Stone said he switched his vote form no to yes because, on the second vote, "we had a very good higher edcation bill that also showed some fiscal restraint." Tht. second bill is worth an eSt­ imated S49 billion to studena and co11eges. The first bill was worth bet­ ween S46 and S48 billion, according to COPUS· Leifman. But the defeat of the first bill and harried passage of the second has �haken the Washinton higher edcation community, which is used to kinder treatment in Congress. ,·It's created a . lot of uncertainty, , Parker reOects.

Ca l to continue n ukes (CPS) - The University of California will continue to administer two nuclear weapons program$, despite protest from student groups and from Slate Gov. Jerry Brown, who is a university regent .

The entire Board of Regents VOted last week to keep its COntract with the federal government 10 oversee weapons research to the Lawrence Livermore and Los AJamos laboratories. David Saxon, preSident of thenlne-campus University of California system, favored continuing the 5900 milljon per year contracl. "You just can't walk away for that kind of responsibility," he argues. Brown, in additIon to numerous student and anti-nucleargroups,moved that the regents terminate the contract last year, soon after the near-meltdown at the Three Mile Island nuclear power

plant in Pennsylvania. Brown's motion was defeated then. too. The university created the weapons research program at the Los Alamos, N.M. lab 35 years ago, and the program at the Livermore lab in Berkeley in 1 895. It has supervised the research ever sin�. The research came under increasing criticism as part of the anti-Vietnam war protest, and again as the anti­ nuclear power movement swelled in the mid- and late-seventies. Brown has helped mount additional pressure to sever ties betwccn the unversity and the labs. ''It's more of an issue than it's ever been in the past , " Saxon told a press conference. " He attributed the con­ Iroversy to "more public concern about thing nuclear and the fact lhat we now have a governor that's out in front leading the issue."


October t7. 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 1 3 ' ' . • • • •

. • • •

SPORTS

. . •

-

,

/

Lute DBs Chris Miller (29), Scott Kessler (5) and Jay Halle (38) converge on SOSC receiver In fourth win of the season.

N u m be r o n e t e a m ro l i s to a n ot h e r v i cto ry

By Eric Thomlls

zle with eleven pieces and each

A swarming PLU defense gave up just 1 9 yards on the

play we were trying to put it together, but we could only get

eight pieces in at once. One

ground while picking off three enemy passes to spark the

time eight guys would execute and the other three would be

shutout of visiting Southern

these guys would pUt it

"There

are

momentum

plays in every game and that was one of them," said

Westering:'Dennis did a good job of laying back and picking

we're trying to use him in terns

where

we

can

pSI­

draw

people to him and open people ..round him." Westering singled out the

tackle Greg Rohr for their line

tions, runbacks and contain­

make. The great thing was that the offense kept their cool and

the intercep­

ment," said PLU head coach

Frosty Westering. "The alert

play of the �condary and the

other inspired performances

were an inspiration to the of­

fense. " The Lute defense is curren­ tly ranked second in the nation

against the rush, allowing just

4.5 yards per game and have

quick adjustments we had to

kepI coming and coming."

Persistence paid off in the

second half when PLU scored their last two touchdowns.

The first was set up midway through

the

third

quarrer

when defensive back Dennis McDonough

picked

off a

Raider pass and returned it

42

yet to be scored against in the

yards to the SOSC I I yard

an opening drive touchdown as they moved 70 yards in 13

carries) rammed over from the three, boosting the lutes lead to 16-0.

final thrce quarters of a game. PLU appeared headed for

plays' before a Guy Ellison

fumble (the first of five lost on

the afternoon) ended the drive

two yards short of paydirt. The

Lutes

then

traded

possessions with the Raiders

before returning to the goal­ line with

3:43 left in the �riod

on a seven yard TO pass from

senior Eric Carlson to Guy Ellison. Scott McKay's extra point gave them a

This

was

7-0 lead.

expanded

three

minutes later when a high snap from center forced the Raider

punter to attempt a last ditch kick from his endzone that

wa�

blocked

by

linebacker

Mike DUrrett. The ball then

bounced back into the pun· ter's

hands

before

a SCOII

McKay tackle sent it rolling out of bounds for a safety, closing out the sconng i n the

"We just weren't putting it all together offenSively," said Westering. "It was like a puz·

line. Minutes later halfback Chris UII (72 yards in 1 .5

The

Lutes'

last

score

was

similarly set up by an intercep­

which

of

Don

produced

Gale.

four

sase quarterback sacks i n

tion. This one by Mark Lester,

Halle, injured on an intercep­

The Lutes' next action will

filling in for Jay

tion return of his own. The TO came

on

Carlsons

second

scoring tOSS of the day, a five

'yard strike to tight end Scott Westering,

who,

double-covered

most

though

of the

game caught 4 passes for 6 1 yards.

"We're getting double coverage on Scott all the time now,"

said Westering.

"So

spanaway q€Rman belt

eGer man Lunch meat and Sausages e Imported Cheese & Delicatessen e Daily Fresh Bread & Brotchen e Imported Cookies & Chocolates Beer & Wine to go Deli Sandwiches here or to go Germ an Records & Magazines Saturday

performances

addition t o shutting down the Raider rush.

who was

1 0 A . M . -5 P . M .

1 65 1 1 Pacific Avenue

Tel 535-1827

Located inside the True Value Hardware Store

will

be

PlU's

first

defense of their N.W. con­

play

kn�

with all

cOntest

bec=n very aggressive, they're

together but someone else would be off. It was just Iiltle

great

al

Franklin Pierce Stadium . The

record. "They've got a good said football team,"

Oregon. "The defensive play was so

in his endzone while fielding another poor snap.

I :30 when

Whitworth

John Feldman and Garth Warren along with defensive

defensive ends

in the forth quarter when the Raider punter touched his

hoSl

ference crown. Currently the

off a little and the next play

all

they

rotating

it off." PLU gained a second safety

number one Lutes to a 2.5-0

come tomorrow al

Pirate squad is sporting a

2·2

Weslering. "Their defense has

good against the quarterback

rUnning the option and a lot of bootlegs. It's going to be a good,

game. "

competitive

football


· Page 14, Mooring Mast, October 17, 1980

Triv i a of the wee k Test your knowledge but don't PEEK!

By John WaliKe

PlU bool.,s flghl '0' b." .g./nsl Un/••,.", 0' Portland In H) loss ,.. , Sund.,.

But defense sparkles

Socc e r team l os e s B, Ban PkKeU Socctt coach Arno Zoske has been talking about defense all .season .. Last Sunday that strong defense paid off as the PLU booters lost to the University of Portland, a NCAA Division I I team which has the lop-ranked NAlA team in the nation, 1-0. Although the Lutes lost to the U, of P. on a penalty kick, Zoske said, "We played them pretty much even. Everybody played well." Zoske cited sweeper John Larsen, halfbacks Paul Swenson and Kim Nesselquist, and goal-keeper Joe Poulshock as key to the

Last year the Lutes shared Lutes' successful defense in the conference title with Sunday'S game. Whitman and Lewis '" Clark. The Lutes did pick up a win With a 3-4-1 record 50 far this Saturday against Evergreen year, the team wiU play its State. NesselQuist scored to league opener against Whitnudge the Lute hooters 1-0 man here tomorrow, Whitman Zoske, Evergreen. past should prove to be a tough however, was not entirely competitor, according to satisfied with the performance Zoske, as should lewis & of his athletes in that game. Clark and Willametle. " We were a little nat," said Zoske stresses the team's Zoske. "Maybe we took them need to improve, particularly a liule lightly." in offensive areas. "What Against Evergreen State, we're trying to improve - and explained Zoske, "We tried a we can improve in these areas few things out. We ex- are passing and placing the perimented a liule on Saturball in the goal. We've made day. It was a chance for us to some progress, but we're still find out just what kind of i" a posi'iO" 'O imp'o' ' . .. , Sys"m w, ·,, gOi "g 'O PI'Y : · ....:. _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ = � == = = = : _ =

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Since 1 935

_-,

Student Disco

THE ROAD'" AUTHORITY Were here to get you there... safely.

MICHELIN-UNIROYAL FIRESTONE Frank Pupo

Question I : We are curremly in the middle of World Series time, that being the case, here are the questions. The only two major .series records not held by members of the New York Yankees are bat­ ting average and stolen bases. Who holds the record for thtse series categories and what art' the figures? Question 2: What famous slugger pitched 29 213 con· secutive scoreless innings against Brooklyn in the 1916 World Series? Question 3: Who holds the record for the most homers, RBI's, runs, total bases, walks and strikeouts during the series? This man is also second in hits ('9) to Yogi Berra (71), who, by the way, holds the record

for playing in the most World Series games and hit the first pinch-hit home run. .UOS1!4M 11!8 5ltAl. WOOlf s;lWltD : n �ql u! lS�JOJ 1l8ql00J S,)j�M. 1581 JO J�UU!M. ;)41 puy 'SlR();)'I:!llS vS: ';l5JnOJ JO 'pUll S'lIIU'" (to '�q 18)01 Ell 'sunl tv 's1811 ot 'SHH 81 584 ;)4 l!P;.o S!lI oj. 'spJOJ3J 118Q-tuol JO ISIl tuol 5!41 SPlol! ;)11 . \l -ueW ,.(;nplW :£ n....su '

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R u n n e rs t u n e u p for year- e n d mee ts By ..rtf PicKell With the NWC and WClC championships just over a week away, the PLU harriers are hoping to get all their run· ners back on their fcct and ready to run in the Oct. 25 race. The top three men looked strong at last Saturday's Western Washington In­ vitational, despite the fact that number two harrier Randy Yoakum was slowed down somewhat by a cold. Zane Prewitt, timed at 25:30 for the hilly five-mile course, placed 1 1 th in the field of 83 runners from eight NAIA Divison I I and junior college teams. Yoakum finished : 1 8 behind Prewitt, leaving the largest gap lKtween the two runners yet this season, to take the nineteenth spot overall. Mike Carlson finished :23 behind Prewitt for the third time this year and placed 22nd in the race. Only at the Bellevue In· vitational -- their first meet of this season -- have the lute men raced with a complete team. Rusty Crim, who has been running fourth for the squad, sat OU I the Simon Fraser Invitational with a sore foot, and Joe Voetberg who ran fifth behind Crim at Bellevue, has missed the last two meets for the same reason . "Teamwise, it (the con­ ference championship) dep­ ends on our firth maq," said Yoakum. Sophomore Bill Whitson has moved up from the eighth position to run con­ sistently in the fifth spot for the Lutes. He has not, however, been able to keep up with either Crim or Voetbc:rg. The PLU men are hoping to have Crim and Voetberg healthy and Whitson running strong in order to round out

their top five at the conference meet. The Bellevue race gave freshman Kristy Purdy the opportunity she needed to find out what she could do. Clocked at a carreer-best 17:22 for the 3()(x) meier run, the former aJl-city harrier from Spokane finished fourth overall and first for Division III competitors. " l like college races better than high school ones," said Purdy. "They're longer. and the distance really helps me." She also prefers the larger field in collegiate in­ vitational meets. "You can just go out and run your own race without Ihe pressure," she stated. Senior runner Debbie Tri Melanie freshman and langdon took the second and third spots for the Lady lutes, placing eleventh and sixteenth in the meet. Ailing Dianne Johnson ran fourth for the PlU women, posting a 20th place finish in the race. Senior Kris Kyllo, back after two weeks taken off for medical school entrance exams, ran a strong fifth for the Lutes, finishing I :30 behind front­ running Purdy. Tomorrow the women will run against national com­ petition in the University of Washngton Women's In­ vitational. The men, w.ho have no scheduled competition, will get a feel for the conference championship course in an in­ Fort at run trasquad Steilacoom, where the NWC race will take place next week. "Fort Steilacoom is a tough course because of the hills," 'laid coach Brad Moore, "but the conference meet shouJd be our easiest as far as com­ petition because that's the first time we'll be running only against NAJA Division II teams."


October 17, 1980, Mooring Masl, Page 1 5

Lutes c o m e back with big win By Bill Trut.it

I n II Jed.yl·Hyde transfor­ the mation . women's volleyball team ahernattly played abominably and with the precision of a surgeon in separate games \aSI weekend. The learn picked up their first league victory of the season by sweeping Lewis and Clark in three straight selS 15· 1), 1 5-8. 15-l l la51 Saturday. The preceding night howev'er, the Lutes were beau:n 9-15,0-15, 5-15 by lin­ field in a match thai lasted less than 50 minute=s. Pat Shelton, whose vicious spikes were instrumental in Saturday'S victory, explained the Icam's apparent dual­ personality as a lack of con­ fidence when behind.

Accounting for the abun­ dance of confidence against Lewis and Clark, Shelton said, "aefore the game, we set a goal of playing to our poten· tial instead of winning. " Women's Athletic Director Sara Officer. substituting for coach Kathy Hemion who was attending a coaching camp in California, echoed Shehan's remarks while beaming with obvious satisfac­ tion, "They decided they were going to play the best they could and they did it!" Game one against Lewis and Clark was the premier set of the weekend. Points were drawn out and earned by both teams. In fact, neither team was able to score more than three consecutive points. Jorie lange started the game at service but it wasn't until PlU naded service with lewis and Clark that Tracy Vigus, with luan Macan ser­ ving, thundered a spike to the noor for the game's first point. Both teams throughout were alert, aggressive and en· thusiastic which lead to a well­ played set with few violations. Highlighting Ihis game was a kill for Gretchen Wick, a

block by Shelton, and another overpowering spike by Vigus. The real di fferC'nce in game one was the lute's ability to maimain composure in the clutch . At 13-13 both teams traded service until Cindy Bet­ ts came to serve. With Betts serving, lewis and Clark panicked, hitting (he ball into the net twice for PlU's final poims. In game two, PlU quickly got on the scoreboard after lewis and Clark gave up their opening service by serving into the net. With Macan servina,

PlU gained the first point on a carrying violation.

Though the lutes lost ser­ vice after the point, it set the tempo for the rest of the game and the match. The lewis and Clark became learn unorganized, resulting i n errors on which PlU capitaJized. In game two, familiar faces i n the front line Vigus, Shelton, Carie Faszholz, and Wick played with authority. adding to point scoring, spike and blocking totals. At one point, however, PlU was behind 4-7 but made a charge of eight unanswered points to lead 12-7 from which they coasted to their 15-8 victory.

}1.

)

Game three started off poorly for both teams. Bet­ ween PLU's second point and lewis and Clark's first, there was a string of eight violations ranging from spiking the ball into the net to carrying of which both teams were equally guilty.

Even with scoring spikes by Vigus, Shelton and Lori Han­ son, a well timed dink by Lange and, later, an ace on service by lange, PLU found themselves behind at 5-9. From that point on, the Lutes continued to pour on the pressure with more spikes by Vigus and Hanson and an ad­ ded salvo of spikes from Wic� and Macan to lead to the Lewis and Clark downfall at 1 5- 1 1 .

Lute front liners te8m up fOII.turn In win ovel Lewis & Clalk aftelloss to Linfield. The victory proved that the defeat to Linfield was not due to a lack of talent.!n fact. in game one of the series, PlU maintained parity with the Wildcats until succumbing 9-

IS.

Unfortunately, losing the first set deflated the lutes to

the point where they lost the second game 0-15. Game three showed only slight im· provement as PlU was able to score five points to Lin(ield's

IS.

With the weekend's results tabulated , PlU now stands with a 1-5 league record, little

hope for a league champion­ ship, but an outside chance for a playoff berth prOVided the lutes muster a long winning streak. After the game against lewis and Clark, however, the possibility is promising. As Vigus stated after that game, "If we play like we did today, we can do it."

Field hockey team re turns home with 6 - 1 record By Dennis Robertson

The PLU field hockey team had an outstanding weekend, coming home with a great up­ beat feeling, after winning all three of their games.

They won the first game on Friday against Oregon College of Education by the score 3 - 1 . This was the best game played all year and best team effort shown, according to Coach Colleen Hacker. The Lady

Lutes had the ball constantly on attack and dominated the play from beginning to end. The first goal was scored by Debby Fergin with an assist by Shannon Robinson, The other two goals were scored by Julie Haugen with assists by Kim Krumm.

They won their next game against Southern Oregon State College by a score of 3-1. All three of the goals were scored by Julie Haugen with assists

made by Kim Krumm. This was the first hat (Tick of the season for Julie. Once 3iairt the Lady lutes dominaled the play and sasc was unable to penetrate the PlU defense.

The third game was against central Washington. The Lady Lutes outscored central 3-2, Again Julie Haugen had a hat trick, scoring all three goals. Kim Krumm gave assists on the first two and Haugen scored the third unassisted.

"Although the same names keep reappearing each week, ii's a very team-oriented group," said Hacker. "We are able to substitute players relatively freely. The players are also beginning to recognize their mistakes as a learn and at this point of the season they are sharpening their team playing and able to play top quality field hockey." Hacker also praised the play of Judith Logan as Goalie; Tami Billdt, centerbacl-

Margo Mazzota, sweeper; Diane Bankson, a consistent defensive player, and Jean Manriquez who has been agressive on attack. Next week the Lady lutes travel to Willamc:tte to Play against WilJamette University, Northwcst Nazarene Univer­ sity, and Oregon College of Education. Currently they have a 6 -I record and have outscored their opponents 15-7.

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FRIDAY OCTOBER

17

-MUSIC

5eo»ls Symphony Orchestra Pops Concert Seattle Center Opera House Until Ocl 18 8 p.m. Tel. 447-4736 -ART

William Cumming, paintings Patti Waroshlna, sculpture Foster White Gallery (5) Until Ocl. 20 Mon thru 501 -10 a.m. to 5.30p.m Sun:noon to 5 p. m. 3 1 1 Y2, OcCidental Ave. S -MUSIC

university 01 Washington Symphony Orchestra Meany Hall. U ofW (S) 8 p.m. Tel. 543-4880 Tickets 54, S2 .50 students -THEATRE

"Not Enough Rope" Seattle Actor's Workshop Frl and SOl 17th. 1 81h. 23rd and 241h:mldnlghl Tel. 325-2663 Free to a1t ·THEATRE

"A Mon For All Seasons" William Becvar, director Tacoma Actors Guild Until Nov. 2 first play of the season 1323 S. Yakima Ava. Tel. 272-2145 Ticket" 55 to 59.50 -MUSIC

U of W Symphony Orchestra Olivier Messiaen, conductor Music of Bn.Jckner. symphony No. S in B·Fla' Major Meany Hall. U of W (5) 8 p m. Tel 543-4880 TlCkets:S4, S2 50 students

·MUSIC

-THEATRE

An Evening with Mary McCaslin and Jim Ringer Seattle Concert Theatre 8 p.m. Fairview N and John St. Tel. 322-9496 Tlckets:56.50 advance. 57.50 at door

"STRIDER the Story of a Horse" Based on a story by leo Tolstoy UntH r-lov. 16 West coast premiere seattle Repertory Theatre Tel. 447-4764 An art1ul experiment in the magic of JIIuslon. "Strider" is a story told-theatre-style-from the perspective of its central character. a horse

·ART

Calligraphy by Misoo Yukei Aoki and students and Sumi paintings by students of FUmlko Kimura Handforth Gallery. Tacoma Public library Until Oct 30 Mon-thur:9a.m.-9 p.rn Frl and Sat 9 a .m.-6 p.m 1 1 02 Tacoma Ave. S Tel. 572-2000

SUNDAY OCTOBER

-ART

"Trlxie's Delight" by Tracy lamb non-sliver hand-tinted photography Open Mondays Gallery (5) Until Ocl. 31 Mon:noon-9 p.m. Sat and Sun:noon-5 p.m. 61 0592 Roosevelt Way NE Tel. 524-6715

·ART

Paul J Sparks recent paintings &drawings Klku Gallery (S) Unlil Oct 31 Tue-Frl' 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Sat: 1 1 a.m.-5 p.m. Tel. 323-1 141

SATURDAY OCTOBER

-THEATRE

"Felffer's People" by Jules FeiNer Until Ocl. 25 Burien little Theatre 435SW 1441h St

18

MONDAY OCTOBER

20

-MUSIC

Pablo Casals Trio Meany Thealre. U of W (5) 8 p.m. Tel. 543-4880 Tickets:S8. S5 students

·MUSIC

New England Ragtime Ensemble U P S Fieldhouse (I) 8 p.m. Tel. 756-3366 Tlckets:53

21

-THEATRE

" Scaplno" :.Jdapted Irom the play :)y Moliere 'he Glenn Hughes Playhouse J of W (S) Jntil Nov. 1 '�E 41 st and UniverSity Way NE lei 543-5636 rlckets· S4. 52.50 students 1.\ boisterous comedy combining force nd commedla with a contempofary twist

·MUSIC

U 01 W Faculty Artists Series Favorite Violin literature Meany Hall. U of W (5) 8 p.m. fel 543-4880 Tlckets:S4. S2 50 students

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER

-PHOTOGRAPHY

Photographs by Stanley Smith Whatcom Museum of History and Art Unlil Ocl. 30 121 Prospect 51. Bellingham

-LECTURE

'ihe SOlmon Show" Bob Carrol's comedy narrative performance until Oct. 1 8 Washington Hall Performance GAllery (5) 8,30p.m. Workshop open to pubUc on Sun Oct. 19 153 14th Ave. Tel. 325-9949

19

TUESDAY OCTOBER

22

·ART

Harold H. Hoy. wood and bronze sculpture and Joan Kyle Dietrich. all paintings and mixed media studies Greenwood Gal1erles (5) Until Oct. 25 Tue-SOf: 1 1 a.m.-6 p.m. Tel. 682-8900 .THEATRE

"The Paranormal Review" by Erik Brogger Until Nov. 8 Empty Space Theatre (S) 919 E Pike Tel. 325-4443

THURSDAY OCTOBER

23

·ART

Collfornla Video (vldedotapes by California Artists) ArId/Or Gallery Until Ocl. 31 Mon-SOt:noon-6 p.m 1525 10th Ave Tel. 324-5880

-THEATRE

"A Man's A Man" by Bertold Brecht Untll Nov. 22 Tel. 323-6800 A musical satire on love and war

FRIDAY OCTOBER

24

-FILM

Photographers on Film 3-doy 16-fIIm festival Seattle Art Museum at Volunteer Pork (5) 810 10p.m "Pull My Daisy" by Robert Fronk (1 959) "Conversations In Vermont" by Robert Fronk ( 1969) "Retour a 10 Raison" by Mon Roy (1923) "Letolle de Mer" by Man Roy (1928) "In the Street" by Helen levitt Tel. 447-4729 Tickets:S3.50 -MUSIC

Fenner Douglass Head of organ Dept at Duke UnIversity Music by French composers of Baroque and Romantic periods St. Mark's Cathedrat 8 p.m. 1 245 10th Ave. E Tel. 323-1 040

·EXHIBITION

DeceptIon Drawings and Hidden Images Michael SChuyt Pacific Science Center (5) Until Nov. 2 Man thru Fri: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tel. 625-9333 -FILM

·ART

Joe Morris and Sharon Ross recent paintings: and bronze sculpture by Duncan Yves McKiernan Gallery VI (T] Until Oct. 30 Tue-Sun : 1 1 a.m.-5p.m. 8805 8ridgepart Way Tel. 588-8585

"Stardust Memories" written and directed by Woody Allen Ridgemont Theatre (S) 78th and Greenwood N Tel. 782-7337 AutobiographIcal comedy with a unique touch


!,h� l�ooringMast Vol. LVIII, Issue No. 8 October31, 1980

R i e ke t r i e s m e r i t pay By Kelly Allen A five-year plan to eliminate across-the-board pay increases for PLu employees and instead, to pay according to merit, is one of the goals proposed by President William Rieke for the '80s. In a memo last January en­ tilled "Launching the '80s," Rieke outlined his iOlention to cut sliding scale pay increases from 100 percent to to or 1 3 per­ cent of the total salary based, with the remaining salary awar­ ded on merit. Since then, the proposal has gone through some changes and Rieke now estimates the salary base will be made up of SO per­ cent across-the-board increases. 20 to 30 percent nat dollar amount (producing a sliding­ scale effect which provides the largest percentage increases to those with the lowest salaries sin· ce they are most penalized by in· nation) and 20 to 30 percent awarded as "discretionary" merit. is it said Rieke "discretionary" merit rather than "simple" merit because the final decision lies with the budget head. According to the memo, the criteria for e...aluating an em· ployee for merit pay will focus on two areas: demonstration of professional or task skills, and forwarding the objecti...es of the university (as stated in the univer· sity catalog, page seven). These criteria ha...e come under sharp attack by some faculty members who call the objectives "ambiguous" and "grounds for discrimination." They also see the system as "punitive." " The guidelines are not inten­ ded to be a test of religiosity or to see if you are a card-carrying Lutheran," said Rieke. Rieke said he hopes the system will serve as "a carrot rather than a stick" and reward those doing a good job rather than penalize those who aren 't. He did concede that there can be no reward without any opposite effect. Rieke said it is assumed that all employees are meritorious and

are doing thier jobs. This s)'tem would provide a built-in check· point, he said. "this is not intended to weed anyone out but to reward them," Rieke said. "Payroll s i not the way to get rid of incompetents," he said. A series of four hearings was held in December of last year to promote discussion between Rieke and the faculty. Some members of the faculty believe the merit pay plan was a direct result of those hearings and might be due to hard feelings on the part of Rieke after the criticism he recieved. Rieke says the plan is not a "Specific consequence related to the hearing" but he "sensed a growing concern among the faculty who spoke, that teaching in the '80s might not be worth· while or economically possible." Rieke said he "knows that some people have already decided the plan is going to fail. I I He is prepared for a lot of criticism in the first year and if that criticism continues, he will be "the first one to abandon it." "The reason I'm being stub­ born is not because I'm angry or want to prove a point," said. "But I believe if there is any in­ stitution in loday's complex society where it could be proved that merit can be rewarded, it's here. If this doesn't work, we'll go back to the mindless system where everyone gets paid the same." Rieke said the merit pay system has "historicaJly been debated for years" and cited a memo from the faculty affairs commit­ tee date June 20, 1980 which pointed out two examples where the faculty initiated the idea. SOme committee members argue that the memo was sent in op­ position to the origniaJ merit plan when the proposed percentage of merit pay was going to be 80 to 90 percent of the salary base. The memo was intended to point out where the faculty had placed limits on how much of the saJary base should be awarded on merit. Those members claim he took their arguments and used them for his own purposes.

"I justification going to do it. a precedent," Rieke Rieke said the faculty are not designed to be implementers and "it's one thing to suggest (merit pay) in principle, but another to put it into practice." Rieke has met with ad· ministrative staff and members of the faculty affairs committee and the plan has recieved "a mixed reaction. " The meetings have been confidential and Rieke has asked the faculty affairs committee not to give the infor· mation to the faculty, according to chainnan Carl Spangler. Some facuhy members are concerned about the "confiden­ tiality of faculty business" and want to be informed on the details of the plan. "To go public with this infor· mation would be. a violation of confidence , " said Spangler. "The president has consulted with us in confidence to bounce some ideas off." One faculty member said,

" that's the our committee we appoint OUI comminees, we expect them to take care o£ everything. " Another addtd, " We are going about the merit pay plan as if there are no other alternatives. There are, and they need to be looked at." Rieke admits thtTe are some nawcls in the plan, such as, once someone is awarded merit, that amount s i built into his salary permanently. He would like to see the system as a ·'bonus." He said he realizes • 'this may be mOle than society can bear" and at the majority of schools that have tried merit pay, the results have been disastrous. He was unable to name any specific institutions, but said where the plan is successful, there is a large amount of faculty involvement. "In this standardized, mechanical, depersonalized world we have to have some place where merit caD be recognized. The last thing I want is for this to be divisive." Rieke said.

PlU harriers picked

Everyt h i n g you always wanted to know before you vote Is in the Mast Election Review

A donated Chandler Price press has sparked interest in a cross·disclpli nary printing program.

up second and four­ t h places I n the WCIC and NWC championships Sat· urday.

Pages 11·15

Page S

Page 23


October 3 1 , 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 2

Pos s i b l e F i fe ra p i st s p otted i n l i b ra ry alone as late as 2 and 3 a.m.'· Fillmore said. "Students should be using the escort ser­ vice for their own protection." Escons to and from both on and off-campw locations can be arranged by calling c..'tl.

By Sandy Williams

victims" in university church services lasL week . He had no comment except that he heard the information "through Jerlet:. " Neither Fillmore nor Jerke could veri fy the rumors, however, Jerke said, "I know of only one case where the description rape is maybe adequate." Jerke said he only hears of incidents in which students have talked to and related information to ad­ ministrators. " If students report to us or to the police, I hear about such problems," Fillmore said. "But if they go to Rape Relief I don't." Jerke said, "I am not in a position to respond to rumor. We don't want to generate un­ duly a sense of hysteria. Then again, If there ate persons who have problems, we want to

A man resembling lhe. Fife rapist was reported to be seen by a staff member of Mor­ tvedt Library at closillJ time la.sl Friday. Campus Safety took extra precautions that 7441 . According to Fillmore, the night but no related incidents occurred, according to Direc­ Fi fe rapist is an escaped tor of Campus Safety Kip prisoner known to be "ex­ tremely violent." The man is Fillmore. Fillmore, Vice President of approximately 1 5 5 to 160 Student Life Don Jerke, and pounds, 5'8" with brown three deputies from the Pierce curly hair, a full beard and County Sheriff's Department moustache, and blue eyes. has attacked He patrolled the campus until early the following morning. women in cars and in homes, Dorms were locked early, as well as outdoors. Security security escorts were doubled, orticials encourage people to and dorm staff members were lock doors of both cars and alerted to warn students to use homes. Extensive rumors claim four caution, particualrly when rapes occurred last week on outdoors. " I was particularly concer­ campus. Associate Pastor Ron ned to see female students out Vingo:: prayed for the "recent

1 9 79-80 By Lisa PlIlLIam

Studenls expeeting the 197980 Saga may have an indefinite period to wait, according to Saga Editor Erick Allen. The

overdue annuals are scheduled to arrive by early November, but printing company delays may extend Ihe delivery date later inlo the month. Once the annuals have arrived, they will be distributed 10 all students carrying over twenty yearly credit hours free of charge. The 1979-80 Saga was originaUy to be distributed at the beginning of the school year. The company that prints the annuals consolidated several of its plants, however, resulting in numerous produc-

;:ion setbacks, Allen said. Allen hopes to avoid future problems by changing $Dga :r production methods. Instead of partially completing the an­ nual and sending it to the prin­ ting company to be finished, the 50ga staff will make the annual "camera-ready" before shipping. The staff will by setting type, cropping pic­ tures, and cODlpletill8 designs and layouts, tasks previously left to the printing company. Allen expeclS this new production system to enable the annuals to be completed on schedule, as well as servin" as an educational tool. Sr members will now be able to gain valuable production ex­ perience. Funds saved by the new

.

method will be used to include more color photos in the an­ nual, and to pay staff mem­ bers a small honorarium, not previously possible because of

By Plul Menter

The next two weekends will be filled with ASPLU-spon­ sored special events. Tonight sponsoring is ASPLU "Spooktacular," and next annual the Iweekend Homecoming restivities will be held. "Spooktacular" will get un­ derway tonight at 9 with

I

II

I

I

and class pictures, the new Saga will be divided alphabetically. .. Football" and "faculty" will be featured together, as will "soccer" and "Seniors...

horror movies in Chris Knut­ zen Hall. There will be three eight-minule movies shown in one each succession, "Guaranteed to curl your hair." Also at 9 there will be a magic show in the Cave. At 1 0 the Spooktacular dance will begin in the Com­ mons. Everyone is encouragw to wear a costume for the costume contest. Contest win­ ners each receive free pump­ km PIC and. wmner's certifi­ cates. Music for the dance wiu be hosted by a hired disc jockey with a custom sound system, a light show and fog effects. Next week, homecoming festivities will get underway with the Songfest Dresen­ tation, and the coronation of the king and queen. This

year's theme is "PLU Through Time and Space." There will be six skits, each depicting a different period in PLU's history. At lO "The Stomp" will begin in the CK with the theme: "Happy Birthday PLU I" The dance will con­ tinue unti l 1 a.m., with music provided by Freddy and the Screamers. On Saturday, festivites will continue with the football game against Lewis and Oaek starting at I :30 p.m. At half­ time an "Almost Anything Goes" dorm competition will be held. Rounding out the ac­ tivilies will be the Home­ coming Ball, held from 9 p.m. to I a.m. at the Tacoma Mall. Music will be provided by Epicenter.

Earn$40 a week or mo re Typeset for

The Mast

--- -------- -----�---------------

1 0 peRcent o��

a bmited budget . The 1980-81 Saga will also be deviating from traditional formats. Rather than dividing the annual into separate sec­ tions such as sports, activities,

Fest i v i t i es beg i n t o n i g h t

mm ;

persOll'S life and 8fowt11, JR­ eluding studies, relationships, and allitudes toward others. "We'll do everythin& we cnn to protect the privacy and feelings of the people in­ volved," Jerke said. "The vic­ Iim calls the shots and is in charge of how far they want to pursue something and in what ways." such as legal action and counseling. "Contacting one office doesn't mean a chain reaction of other offices, " he added. Last year ' 'at various points in the year there were a variety of rumors" according to Jerke. He added that incidents that receive the most ad­ ministration response and ac­ tivity has happened on the edge or exterior of the cam­ pus. "On-campus incidents rarely generate information," Jerke said.

ye a rb o o ks dela yed a t prin ters

THE FARMER'S DAUGHTER

I I

, help and take caulion. . " The most helprul thing we can do is emphasize preventive safety," Jerke said. "If these rumors persis! we'd like 10 k.now if they are legitimate so we can respond to people and help them with their traumas. " Jerk.e encouraged students to use the campus ministry. health cemer and counseling cenler services. He empasized that a student can maintain as much privacy as he or she wants and that meetings are kept "confidential." "It is important to find someone to be a confidential and competent friend," Jerke said. Jerke said that in a person who feels he or she can't talk to anyone, a der.erioralion is often seen in the emotional side as well as the reSt of the

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Page 3. Mooring Mast, October 3 1 , 1980

YM: IG o, m a ke disciples ' By Sandy WIIIIIIDI

and KII�n M . OIsuD Youth With A Mission, an imer-denomino.tiooaJ evangel· ism proJfllm, adh�m 10 no doctrine but the word of Christ: "Go therefore and make disciples of all the nalions. " The YW AM cenler in Tacoma Is dedicated to challenging, training, and equipping people over 18 for lhis task, according to YWAM leader Denny Gunderson. The Discipleship Training School is the first phase of YWAM training. This five­ month program involves three months of intensive classroom studies, followed by two mon­ ths of applied training on a field trip. The classroom phase is designed to develop each per­ son in understanding the ways of God as related to prayer­ intercession. relationships, character growth and evangelism, according to Gunderson. The field trip affords the student an opportunity to gain first-hand experience in a variety of areas, from missionary evangelism to prac� tical assistance such as church building repair. " At first we zero in on in­ dividuals, then, 85 they progress in their own deveJopment, we zero in on the: outside-those people who need to know Christ ," Gun­ denan said. "We feel it has been suc­ cessful in changing people's lives. Lives and relationships are suaightcoed OUI and stud­ ents become aggressive evangelical people," Gunder­ son said. "We do not give assign­ ments for miS!ion work," he added. "The individual must find from God where he is to be. " "It's real good. It helps to build my character. It's helping me to sec the character of God and as I get closer to him, I have more of His character," commented Dan Ked, a student currently enrolled in the program. "I don't know where )'11 be goini. When J find out, then

111 study the culture. YWAM has training programs about different cultures." This fall's 32 DTS students

represent I S States and Canada, Norway Md Sweden. After spending five months in the classroom, the:y will spend two months distributing Bibles in Juarez, Mexico, as part of a involving project 400 YWAMers and a number of Juarez churches. The: spring class will minister to an Indian tribe in Northern Canada. Founded in 1960 by Inter­ national Director Loren Cun­ ningham, YWAM has teams on every continent, with 2S DTS around the world, in­ cluding 10 in the U,S. Inter­ national headquarters in Lin­ dale. Texas. Regional and national directors operate un· der the council's supervision; Leland Paris is the North American director. Those graduating from DTS will have an opportunity to at­ tend a YWAM School of Evangelism. These schools are located in several states and various countries around the world. of Schools YWAM Evangelism explore methods of evangelism. and deal with history of church renewal. un­ derstanding salvation truths. principles of God's Ki ngdom, apologetics. presenting the Gospel cross-culturally, un­ derstanding counterculture youth, Eastern mysticism, cults and the occult. and ways to transform a society, in­ cluding intercessory prayer and spiritual warfare. DTS graduates may also join with Lbe on-going YWAM evangeJistic ministry in the

Pacific Northwest, other parts of North America, or over­ seas, or they may find oppor­ tunities to serve in other organizations, ministries.

churches or

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For example. after com­ pining the program, Wendy Stonex, a PLU graduate. spent

A camera was stolen from a car parked in the library lot between 8 and 10 a.m. Oct. 8. The car was locked. but someone "ap­ parently used a coat hanger or something to unlock it." said Campus Safety and In­ formation Assistant Direc­ tor Rovaughn Newman, Newman said the owner did nol know the camera's serial number. "With n serial number or 10 num­ ber. you have a positive prosecution tool. Campus Safety has engravers, if students want to put their driver's license number on something," said Newman. "I wish the students would use our engravers. crime It's even a

three months in Thailand. and

is now working with refugCt:S

in Tac:oma. According to Gunderson. YWAM worb closely with other Christian organizations such lU Young Life and Agape Force. To be eligi ble for the YWAM program, an ap­ plicant must be at least 18 or a high school graduate, must have committed his life to Jesus Christ as Lord, and have a genuine desire to share Him with others, Recruiting is done mostly by word of mouth. While recognizing that disciple training is a life-long commitment, the OTSs are designed to "'ay a strong foundation upon which a per­ son will be able to build a lifestyle glorifying to God." The cost of the DTS is ap­ proximately $1300 and in­ cludes tuition, food, housing, and the field trip. The fall school began Sept, 29 and the spring school is scheduled to I begin March 17. Tuition income is used only in the operation of the school. according to Gunderson. All YWAM staff members are responsible for raising their own support. although unlike some similar ministries. they aren't required to raise a specified amount before beginning their work. "We don't solicit for our own needs. We fttl there: is a

higher way seems to be ween God something

to do it. There a correlation bet­ guiding us into and the money

and we practice that," he add­ ed.

"We do a 101 of praying. Through this we've seen a lot of miracles from God. People respond with church orr::rin�s being provided, " Gunderson said. "We teach a life of faith and donations. We feel thai. as we seek God, He has the power to speak to people and impress on them the need and the opportunity for giving," Gunderson said, The year-old Tacoma based DTS is located in rented facilities on Tanglewood Island and is the first YWAM in Washington state. With II staff of 20 people, Ihe school is under the leadership of Gunderson, Rix Warren. and

Wes Anderson, Gunderson, 33, left Skagit County 12 years ago to take a bank job in California but resigned after he and his wife Dodie were challenged about the YWAM ministry. He met

deterrent." he said. In separate incident. a IlltJe amount of candy was stolen from the UC infoT· mation desk between 7 and 7:30a.m. on Oct. S. A studem rrom Keithley Junior High School. who was discovered to be in possession of a large amount of candy. was ap­ prehended on Oct. 6 and lurned over to juvenile aUlhoriti�s. Several traffic signs were removed from 121st Street north of Ordal Hall on Oct, 4, A "Loading Zone," "No Parking," and "Fire Zone" sign were found leaning against teh outside of a Hong Hall window. There are no suspects in the in­ cident, said Newman.

Anderson at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, where both were involved in an outreach ministry and also worked together at the 1976 Olympics in Montreal. They joined forces a year ago to establish the Tacoma base in an old store building at North 46th and Orchard streets. Anderson, 36, served as a minister of education at the First Covenant Church in Tacoma before JOlmng YWAM in 1978 with his wife, Nancy. Warren, SSt is an Australian with more than 20 years of CJ(­ perience as a missionary in South America and as a parish minister. Warren, who is leading a South American group on an outreach tour in the Soviet Union, joined YWAM with his wire. Inna, tWo and a halfyears ago. To assist YWAM in its "mercy ministries," a SOO­ foot ocean liner, "The Anastasis," which was built in Trieste, Italy, in 1953, is now being refitted and modified. " The Anastasis" (a Greek word meaning resurrection) has an 18·bed medical unit, dental facilities, and living facilities for 600 passengers and crew. The ship will be used primarily in the Southeast Asia area. Food. clothing and medical ' supplies 'will be aboard for distribution in areas of urgent need, such as cities of natural disasters.

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October 3 1 , 1980, Moonna Mast, Paae 4

N u rs i n g st u d e n t s kept act i ve i n p ro g ram 81 Flo Hamilton From the very nUl semester, thr PLU nursin. student I involved an some kand of practical experience. often o(f-campw., accordiDI to the nursinl descnption sbm. As ror what the 266 students currently enrolled in nursin, can pin rrom the complete absorbtlon in the actual out­ or�laSl nursing experience, Dr. Doris Stucke, director of nurslnl, said. "A nurse couldn't be one withoUI It.

Confidence, skills, and abiliutS are developed and hci&htened... In Level I. the siudent establishes a relationship with a bulthy gmatric (elderly) person living Ln the com­ munity. Vuus are wC'C'kJy. and this develops communlcauon skills and an underslandin. of how an older per!On functions within his ecosystem. StUdenlS must keep a diary of these visits. and in 1..c"el 11, the student must terminate this relationship u often a nUrK must do in a regular nursina

situation. " Wellnesl" is the focus of the fint two levels of activity. Second .semester holds clJnicaJ eAperiences wilh infants, community healtb clinic·s, lCbooh., and home visilS, ac­ cording to Dtrector Stucke. ResoUJ'C'CS and racllities used by PLU nurSUla majors are usually local hospitals and clinia. Madigan. St. JOJeph's, Tacoma Oeneral, and the Tacoma Public Schools are just a rew of the institutions workins in conJuncuon with the PLU program.

L i b e r a l art s e d u c at i o n c h a l l e n g ed t o s u rv i ve By Flo Hamilion Liberal education hu long been the source or great con· troversy. The J 978 September Issue of The Atlantic painled a dreary picture of the libcral ar· ts education-declinIPJ. It cited as examples: grade in­ flation , a droppaae In man· courses, and dalory c u r r i c u l u m c o m m i t t ees routinely addinl new I:OUI'lO rqardJcss of academiC "alue. Restonn. tht' eduCluonai system IS now the ,oa! or many collejes and uru\'enillo, accord'"l to Th� Chro'flc/t oj

HI(htr EdUCfWon.

PlU'. PrOYOSI klchard Junpunu.llIrec$ thai at PLU. there ha.t; been thiS aim 15 ionl a� H hat been around nationally, lf not lonaaPLU shows sevcra.l eviden· ces of this "Improve-again­ the·qualny" trend, The Educational Polities Commit­ tee, made up of eiJht members includina one from every

school or diviSion and two students, serves as a type or " curriculum committee." Workshops with instructional improvement as the emphasis and faculty braIRstormma sessions aid this SWIRl toward restoration. The Foreign Area Studies Program (FASP) has been recogni2ed nationally for "in­ novation and apan�lon" by Forum. PLU·, intearated studies program. or Core II, W81 f a c u l t y - o r i a i n a ll : d Educators here wanted to Shirl and update the conlem and deh\'ft'Y system When Qucslloned Yfhethcr the new polky of allowing a student the pasJ" fail option 00 tWO of the unl\,euu\ requiremenu w� rel�ing Iho: standards the prOYOSI said, "There doesn 'e seem to be a limidnl reason not lo-of course not across the board, though. This policy, as such, s i not to make it easier but to

improve the outcome." The example was given in which a student who has nC'ler been cxposed to abstract thinking hi requited to take philosophy. Should his OPA plummct simply because of a requirement course? In the last few years, the total PLU enrollment has in­ creased. ThiS increase can mostly be attributed to a larger number of part-lime studenls. Is this indicative of declinina liberal s". educatlon� While arade inrlation reached " cpldemic" propor· 110ns in the '70s, a Michigan study re ...cal thai thu Sleady rue lR OPA III collqeo and univCTluies hu come to a h.t.I� but il IS far ftom bctnl re· venod TIlt' cvidcoC!' rna) be snong elsewhere, bUI the decline of liberal an is not al the PlU campus. "Uberal arts are by no means dead; in fact, PLU is way ahead of the pack ," add­ ed the prOVOst .

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said. Supervised clinical e.x­ perience with the acutely ill highlights Level V. Tht' student SUpervises health care for a family with a medical suraicaJ problem and aho a family complex wilh psychiatric problems. Technical procedures are learned. including bronchiaJ suclioning, and performing and inlerpretin& electrocar­ diograms. Specific areas are "sampled" by the nursq, in­ cluding Ihe emeraCl1CY room, critical case ward, and inten­ sive care unit (lCU). The student s i exposed to aU facets of nursin, and Slucke­ called Level VI the "cap­ stone." Hospital work is in­ tense in thIS final phase of the nursing proaram. Accordin, to the nursina fact sheet, "the student nurse is immersed completely in t1>' rofessional role as a nurse." Under the supervision or a rqistered nurse preceptor, the PlU student must spmd 32 hours a week working in the hospital. Seminars and lec­ tures must still be attended at campus but the student must keep hours with the preceptor nurse. The student, in this last plunge into hospual wor , requcsts hu; or her lOp chOIce 01 workml liluauon fcom munlfy nursmg ICU,

On campw. in the nur"ing

buUdln" the 10nl white divider sheets define the clinical lab. Stethoscopes. fluks, beds, and human models add 10 the erfect that suggcsts a medical silu'flon. In this on�ampus resource. .the sludent nurSon perform various tuk!, and '" level I I are DOW preparina for the "physical exam lest." "Thls involves givinl a peer a com· plete, bead-Io-toe physical exam," saJd Phyllis Page, tn­ structor.

The firsr hospital experience is in Level 1II. usually the fall of the junior year. Nutse hopefuls work in obstetrics medical sur,ery. and in public heahh care. A " pregnant family" is assigned to each student and when possible, the student nune follows the mother all the way tbrough delivery. Since this is Ihe firsl possible contact wilh ill patients, it could be a shock, but instructor Page said that Level II and III become tran­ sition levels to prepare the nurses ror the upper dIvisions. Lael IV forms the most slruCiurai experience 50 far in lhe program. Six weeks of the semester are spem in medical surgery while the remamm, S1: weeks arc spent m psychiatn� Thil l2-hours...·week in tht field is on top of the nurneroUJ cl� taken If the PLU cam­ pus. . . It's hard bUI y�. I do en­ JOy the proaram, " a Sludttu

p

pedl8lrio, ClC.)

'The RUdcrus m\Ut �or" hard-4 days a \1J'eek. with tht':r nurse," said Pa,c.

Let buyer beware

D i et p i l l s d u b i o u s By 80bbl Node)) In our society, where beina thin is in, more and more people are resorting to ovtr­ the-counter "weight­ reducing" drugs. with little concern for their erreets. Although tbe FDA declared these diet aids " safe. and effec­ tive," skepticism still remains amona doctors and mor't im· ponandy, consumers, who',·e been becoming increasinaJ dissatisfied with the pill's results. Before over-the-counter diet pills were invcntd. people relied on amphetamines to suppress their appetites. Recently the FDA declared that amphetamines were detrimental to the body's heart and central nervous system. Now researchers have disco"cred milder druas to control cravinas. Phenyl­ propanolamine (PPA), closely related to am­ phetamines, and Benzocaine, a widely used nasal congestant, are the two main ingredients in today's diet pills. Caffeine, which actS as a stimulant, is also commonJy used. As explained in Th� Gu;d� to Prescription Drugs, PPA works by depressing the brain's appetite center which is in . the hypothalamus. Ben­ zocaine, the other dru, used, works by dulling the tute buds. There IS no evidence of ad· diction to diet piUs and the side effects are nothin. more than a mild headache, dry mouth or crampS. PlU studeRls who have used diet

pills say that they other "let hyper or sick." An overdose, thollah, could result in nero vousness, rcstI�ncss, severe headaches, sweating and nausea. The problems arise: when PPA is used in comblnalion wiLb other drugs. A lady was reponed as havina: kidney failure when she used a diet pill alonl with her preacribed a5pjOn. Effectiyeness or diet aids WI!. disputed in • bulleting for physiaans, 1'1tI! Mtdicat u(­ (tr. A study of 66 obese patients revealed that people on placebos lost considerably more weight than those using diet pills. Gaining weight at college is a common problem, especially among new students who aren't used to the regular rq;ime and tend to overdo the starches. Hemmen strongly advises students to stay away from diet pills. She em­ phasized the n«d to watch serving portions and fat in­ take. She also recommended students to control food intake in with connection socialization. "Pills don't solve the problem; only changing one's eating habits will aid one's fight for weiaht loss." Time magazine (Sept. 3, '79). Dr. Victor Vertes of Weight loss Clinic at Cleveland's Mt. Sinai Hospital stated, "These drugs are not going to bum calories. You'"e gOI to curb your caloric in· take. And for long-term weiaht loss, thcy1re completel) .Iseless. I I


Page S, Mooring Mast, October 3 1 , 1979

P re s s wo rks h o p m ay beco m e p rog r a m By Dan Voelpel

ri/QS County Tribune in Cle

Elum. The addition brings the total value of the present equipment to $1625. A donation of SSO was given as an •'expression of gratitude, for restoration of the press and to acquire type," by Vivian Skardahl. said Van Tassel. Skardahl. who lost a diamond al a Pacific North­ west Writer's Conference here this summer, donated the money after the diamond was found, said Van Tassel.

A 7()..year-old Chandler and

Price hand letter press, donaled to PLU last spring, i� defying the mandator.) rel.irement age for its first Icheduled run here during In· terim. lis younger and smaller brother. a hand- and motor· driven press, purchased from Washington State Surplus this past summer, will also see ac­ tion in January. In order to accommodate Lhe (wo presscst the English depanmem has scheduled a Press Printing Leiter Workship worth four Interim credits. The class, which will be held in Knorr House, will explore the history of letter press printing. Students will be able to set, design, and print their own texts on the two an­ tique presses. The class, which will incor­ porate "field trips and various poster projects," marks the beginning of a printing program that is "in Ihe works, " said Dan Van Ta5sel. Printing Press Committee chairperson. The committee. which com­ prises of art, English , com­ munication, and student per­ !lonne!, eventually hopes to combine several departments into a "bonafide program Ihat transcends any single depar­ ment," Van Tassel said. "After Interim," said Van Ta.s�l, " we hope it will lead to a standardized printing

The Chandler· Price press gillen '0 the un/llers",.

program. We're probably not talking major, rather an em· phasis which could provide graduates with a practical. in­ formational and aesthetic backlround ror work out· side." said Van Tassel. The committee has acquired the services or Portland poet Kim Stafford as instructor for the printing course. Stafford has a medieval literatur e PH.d. from the UniversilY of Oregon. He also has the prin­ ling experience. Stafford views his class as

the place • 'where the whole alphabet of human possibility lies ready in a drawer, where the ear. the eye, the tongu�, the hand combine in the work of word and image, where a student can undertake lotal devotion to a legible form on paper-all the fragility and permanence of human 1ife." Despite Stafford's teaching duties. there is a "problem with qualified staffing after Interim," said Van Tassel. English staffers Rick Jones

and Les Elliot have some prm­ ting experience, but there will probably be a need for a new instructor in that area, accor­ ding to Van Tass�t . In addition to the tWO presses referred to as "the pygmy and the giant" by Van Tassel, assorted wood and metal type, a proof press and other printing equipment hav� been donated to PLU by Walter L. larson. Larson s�nt Ihe outdated equlpment worth S8OO, from the Northern Kit-

The current sire for housing the priming equipment and conducting printing classes is the Knorr House garage, across the street from the ad­ ministration building. Knorr House itself. acquired by PLU last summer, has been conver­ ted into office space. However. "with but onc light socket and no outlets. the garage lacks adequate wiring. " said Van Tassel. Beginning tomorrow, "a group of faculty, some of whom have carpenter ex­ perience and tools," will do some "modest finishing-off" to take care of "insulation, ventilation, and lighting, " the Division of Humanities chairman said. I f this proposed printing press program fails to capture student interest of ad­ ministrative approva1, Van Tassel sees one option. "If !.he whole thing folds, we'll have a garage sale, and the three little pigs can go home."

S parks f l y between f i re d e p t m e n t a n d t w i r l e r By K.E. Fosler

That's just for practice. 'That night we had the fire alarm. I had two empty gasoline cans in my room Ihat I was going to till on Saturday so that the balon would be presoaked for the game. The Wizard Char­ coal Lighter was outside my door."

The dancing flames leapt upwards towards the night sky. h was one of PLU's nighttime games. and baton twirler Becky Thompson was perfoming during halftime, Because PLU does not have a marching band, Becky had Thompson explained fur­ volunteered to come out of retirement and to perform her ther that she was taking fire baton act that night. Uuh: freshmen on initiation and did she know when she volun­ when she got back that teered. that the fire marshall evening, everybody from would pay her a visit two days Tingelstad, Foss and Pflueger was oUlside and there were berore h�r performance. Eager to drar up the rumors firemen in her room. Thom­ pson said, "I explained every­ that have been circulating. Thompson described the thing to the fire marshall. He evening of Oct 18. " That night was pretty upset to begin with there were thrtt fire alarms in because of the three alarms Tinglestad, Foss, and Pflueger that had been pulled that Everything gOI (where Thompson lives). I niah!. straightened out between me went OUI to practice using only Wizard Charcoal Lighter. and the fire depanment, but as

rumors got started, I became an instant arsonist. " Thompson began twirling when she was about five, her mother having introduced her

to it. She continued working at it outside of school until her senior year of high school, when she decided to stop. She practiced two hours each day,

and competed about two times each month. She has travelled all over the U.S. for her com­ petitions, and has been to nationals three times.

" Where style is an ongoing tradition "

H u n g e ( concerns g ro u p By Gale Rolmlund

The PLU branch of Bread For Ihe World (BFW) is off to a big start this year. The main thrust of this year's hunger concern organization is in its �ervi« to the campus and community through recycling. EYery other Saturday morning BFW members can be found roaming the campus in search of aluminum caos, bottles and newspapers for recycling. The proceeds from this projeci go to Ihe Tacoma a local food Bank, organization that f� needy people of Tacoma, and FISH, a similar, church-based

organization . Last year 8FW collected nearly $ 1000 through recycling. Retreats, lectures and films help BFW members and the public become aware of hunger issues. Bread For the World also sponsors the an­ nual campus rast. On the weekend of Nov. 8, BFW will be having a retreat. If you're interested in this service organization, join them for meetings on Thursdays or on the November retreat. It's a group for fun and feUowship, with an active desire to respond to the needs of people.

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Classic clothing for men·& women " 1/17 BrOGdway Pla�a Downtown Tac-oma Houn: M· Fri: 9:30 · 5:10 Sal: 9:JO · 5:f)()


October 31. 1980. Mooring Mast. Page 6

Seaside sees celebration

C a rt e r d e c l a res 1 980 Yea r o f t h e Coa st

deep4:lraftcd, ships could have

By Hlns Ryser

1980 has been declared as the Year of the Co ast by President Carter and the governors of :ZO coastal states. Why have authorities singled out the coast for par· tkular attention this year? With its 100,000 miles of coastline, the United States has one of the longest coastlines of all the nations in the world. However, since 60 �rcent of the U.S. population lives in the coastal zone, and this number is expected to increase to 75 percent in the next decade, a natural landscape that is beautiful and of in­ calculable economic value is in

imminent danger of being transformed shortly into a man·made fortress. ACCQrding to Dr. Richard McGinnis, biology professor at PLU, the coastline and its intertidal zone with it tremedous variety of life, represents one of the most valuable natural resources.

McGinnis mentioned that about 60 percent of the fish harvest takes place in the coastal area. The so-called lit· teral and shelf regions provide shelter and food supply for the world's largest number of living organisms. That goes from the smallest organism up to big mammals such as the gray whale, which feeds on small animals, according to McGinnis. However, the coast is able to maintain this tremendous variety of life only as long as its natrual cycle remains un· disturbed. McGinnis said that the intertidal zone is extremely susceptible to disturbance from pollution or physical alteration. It is estimated that

about

50 percent of the natural intertidal zones have already been damaged. For Hanson, Carla President of Tahoma Audobon Society, every year represents a year of the coast. "Since we are living in the coastal area of the Puget Sound, our impact is to save II our coast. According to Hanson, the Puget Sound area represents one of the world's most unique sound systems. The ex· tremely deep salt water system which was created by glaciers contains a unique variety of life. For instance, on the bot· i tom of Puget Sound the world's largest octopi are found. Unfortunately, the Puga Sound s i also in acute danger. According to Hanson, the I only remaining relatively un­ disturbed natural delta is the estuary of the Nisqually River. This national wildlife refuge provides resting wintering areas for milratory water fowl . as they make their way be­ tween northern nesting

I nation's

grounds and sunny wintering areas in the south. Hanson said that twice a day the tides wash through the salt marshes and mudnats, carrying rich organic foods to fresh and salt water organisms alike. As the shoreline of Puget more becomes Sound developed, this estuary in· creases in value and impor­ tance, especially since all other

estuaries in the YlCIDIty of Seattle and Tacoma are com· petely transfonned into urban areas. Hanson explained that the Audobon Society is tryinl to prevent a well·known logging company from buildinl a port to load and unload ships right on the refuge boundary. Since Puget Sound is extremely

G row i n g u p w i t h i n f l at i o n By Bril. tlubacb Caught up in the 16 percent rate of n i nation blues, where money does not go as far as you wished? Well, let's take a little trip into the past and reminisce when gasoline was only 30 to 40 cents per gallon and at McDonald's you could get two hamburgers, fries, and a coke for under S I . The year was 1970, and you could make SI .45 per hour for minimum wage. If you had a summer job and were working 40 hours a week for three months you could make $696.

Then you de<:ided to go to PlU to start your education. A PLU education consisting of 32 credits and room and board in 1970 would total $2700 for the entire year. If, while you were there, you decided to move off campus, the rent for a two-bedroom apartment was S 130 and up, and a one·bedroom apartment would go for S8S and up. With independence comes cooking, dcpending on your culinary tastes and cooking abilities. a steak would go for SI.29 a pound, hamburger for 49 cents per pound or a TV dinner

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'access to most places along the sound's coastline. For Nisqually, such an in· crease in ship traffic could be very harmful. According to Hanson, the last breeding­ place for harbor seals in the south-sound would be destroyed by such a develop· ment. "We do recognize tne need for certain industrial projects, but why do we have to give up everything?" Hanson encourages students interested in questions such as the preservation of a natural coast to take the effort to go into nature to study the dif· ferent issues and problems in reality. "Only what you have s«n with your own eyes are you willing to go for." According to Hanson, man must learn to live with the coast but in some places not on it. This means understand· ing how coastal ecosystems work and how to regulate ac· tivities and design structures in such a way that the coast's natural system works.

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for 55 cents. One last thmg i a car you would have to buy s 50 that you could get to and from PLU. A 1970 Camaro went for $3631 and the gasoline to fiU it up was 30 to 40 cents per-gallon. But if you cannOI remember that far back, Ict's look at 1975. Minimum wage was $2 pl!r hdur and a 4O-hour-a·week job for three months would get you approximately S960. You went to PLU, and at 32 credits and room and board it would cost S3600 for the year, up 60 percent from 1970. Of course you could move off C8J1lPUS, but it would cost you

,

a little more. A two·bedroom .

'

apanment went for SISO and up, and a one-bedroom apar· tment would go for SI00 and up. Again culinary tastes would determine if you would pay $2.59 a pound for steak, 75 cents a pound for ham· burger, or 75 cents for a TV dinner. The car that would get you to and from PLU, a 1975 Camaro, went up to S2,OOO and ranged in price from S5,OOO to S7,OOO. To fill up the Camaro, and head on down to McDonald's, you would pay SO to 70 cents a gallon, the only compensation being that while at Mc· Donald's you could get a hamburger, fries and a coke for under S I . 1 980? about What

Minimum wage is S3.10 per hour and your 4O-hour-a·week job for three months would pay you S1488. But then the education at PLU has gone up 60 percent since 1975 and 120 percent since 1970, ap­ proximately a 12 percent in­ crease per year. The 32 credits and room and board tor the year costs you S5899. The move off campus to your own apartment has not gone up that much since 1975. The two-bedroom apartment goes tor S240 and up, and the one­ bedroom apartment SI75 and up. But according to your tastes and budget, a sirloin steak goes for 53.50 a pound, the hamburger for $1 .SD a pound and the TV dinner for S I .21, making eating a bit more expensive. The 1980 Camaro that you could be driviD8 ranges from $8,000 to SIO,OOO, and the fuel that it takes to go to and from PLU ranges from S U 5 to $1.30 a gallon. And if you went to McDonald's and could only spend SI you could get a ham· burger, a coke and some change. One item that bas not in· nated much over the last I().. year-span is Levi jeans: 1970-$10; 1975-S I3, and 1980-$15.


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H u n t i n g sea so n o p e n s By Hus R)'Sft' Last Saturday al 7 the. legal hour for many Washington hunters had arrived: the Openina 01 tofs year's hunting season. An estimated 400,000 invade will hunters Wa.shinSlon's game areas Ihis season, according to Bud Angcnnan, superintendml of the game department, working at the Same (arm here in Tacoma. " Hunting is a tool to manage, in a efficient way, our game," Angerman said. He explained that the hunting seasons and the amount of animals being shot are deter­ mined by the game department accordinS to biological sur­ veys. The eruption of Mount St. Helens, for instance. made it necessary to close down the whole hunting area n i that vicinity until the stock of game has recovered, Angerman said. According to Angerman. no or education hunting firearms-safety is required for hunters unless they are under 18. Hunters under 1 8 have to pass the Fir�marms Safety Trainina Certificat� before they can let a huntina licensc:. Angerman said that they have an averaae of five fatalities a year during hunting is season. Although it unlawful to hunt while in­ toxicated, many incidents hoppen because some hunters do not respect this regulation, Angerman said. According to Angerman. the introduction of a hunting exam for all people who licen­ Exam for all people who apply for a Jjcms�. as in European countries, would be desirable but hard 10 realize without discriminating against people. " Since the wiJdlif� of this stat� belongs to everybody, people who would like to hunt during hunting li�a.son should be able to do so," Anaerman said. Eighty professional same wardens, together with rangers

and other law enforcement alencies, try to enforce the hunting regulations. Actually, poaching is one of the major problems the game depar­ tments is confronted with. "We need the help of everybody to stop poaching," Angerman said. He explained that at least one third of the deer which are designated for hunting are poached. The game department offen the following loll-free poaching hotline where violations can be reported: 1-800-562-5626. Jim Erickson, a PLU student, is an avid hunter. For Erickson hunting is absolutely necessary to survive school pressure and everyday struules.

According to Erickson, pres�rvationislS who want a huntinl prohibition are more harmful to wildlife than hun· ten; since hunters want to use game they are also interested in preserving th� wildlif�, in· eluding its habitat . Erickson recommends that students who 10 hunting be sure that they do know the handling of their firearms very well. "Guns do not kill people, but people kill people," Erickson said. Erickson added that hunters keep self·control and respect of life while hunting. "Since God gave us game to use and to enjoy we should also respect it," Erickson said.

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3rOtlln17?atfM!t:�O A � IoiiiiiIj

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IT'S BEEN A PLEASURE PLEASING THE STUDENTS AND FA'CUL

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Page 7, Mooring Mast, October 31, 1980

Eggs: Cheap protei n a n d ve rsat i l i t y too By aDdy KIo,. Boneless chickens. Eggs. At PLU, egg as are a regular feature on the breakfast menu­ scrambled, soft boiled, hard, or fried . UsuaUy one doesn't stop to think about the number of eggs included with a dinner casserole or dessert, but eggs are a common insredient to campus food. For orr�ampus students, the coffee shop omlettes are a favorite. Eggs are one of the best grocery buys for off­ campus students. They are relatively cheap and versatile. F o r h e a l t h -c o n s c i o u s people, all this egg consum­ ption causes uneasiness. Over the last 15 years, we have hem bombarded with warnings about eggs by the Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs, and the American Heart Association. Either we have cut egg con­ sumption or felt a twinge or conscience when we risk an omletle. But just how hannful are eggs'? How many minutes will a poached egg on toast snuff out or a life'? Eggs are indicted for con­ taining cholesterol. Each egg yolk contains about 250 milligrams of cholesterol. The five eggs the average American consumes per week account for a third of the average cholesterol intake of 600 milligrams per day; most of the rest of the cholesteral comes from meat, milk, and cheese. In 1964, the American Heart Association recommen­ ded that the general public reduce cholesterol intake to 300 milligrams per day. Since a single egg nearly exhausts this recommended daily allowance of cholesterol, and because egg consumption is relalively easy to monitor and

control, eggs frequently are singled out for restriction in dietary recommendations. The Inter-Society Commission on Heart Diseases, for instance, urged that Urged that "the public. . .be encouraged to avoid egg con­ sumption, and the industry . . . be persuaded to minimize the egg-yolk content of commer· cially prepared foods." The usual advice is to cut egg consumption to two or three per week. If followed, this recommendation would halve egg consumption in the United States. With theory uncertain, the relationship between eggs and death is based on the evidence of clinical trials on animals, a few clinical trials involving human volunteers, and a series of surveys. For more than 60 years, laboratory rabbits, rats, chickens. dogs. and monkeys have been subjected to diets that di ffer widely in cholesterol content. The responses have been consistent in showina that high cholcslrol intake results in heart disease and related problems. The reaUstic solution for students, according 'to the American Heart Association, " Eating i s " moderation. " eggs in moderation is fine sin­ ce they are an excellent source of protein·but don't restrict your diet to eggs only." They reminded students to balance their diets with proteins low in cholesterol like chicken, turkey or fish. Excercise is not to be forgotten either. Find an excercisc: you feel comfortable with like walking, running, swimming or biking lhat works the cardiovascular system. Excercise and good eating habits are the best preventive medicine for cholesterol buildup and cardiovascular disease . Both on alternative to a diet ommiting eggs entirely.

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October 3 1 , 1980, Moorins Mast, Pase S

Anderson chap eau champion

Roo m m at e , bear a d d t o h at co l l ect i o n that hat for tests when I was a freshman," Eric explained. "I Eric Anderson, Brian Ash, and a stuffed bear named Balboa Hnd have 1 10 hats in their room. Eric, a junior at PLU, besan collecting hats four years aso. "I don't really consider it a hobby." Eric said. "The hats are just interior decoration in our room. Most suys have six or seven baseball hats, and when I was a senior in high school, I started picking them up here and there. Now my friends bring me back hats go they whenever somewhere. "

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Eric has hats from all over the United States, Mexico. Canada, England, and the Scandinavian countries, "One of my hats is from the St. An­ drews Golf Course in golf where Ensland, originated," Eric added, Brian Ash, Eric's room­ mate, enjoys having Eric's hats around. "I love to wear them because I love hats,

of his hats some of my best friends ... Both Eric and Brian have

to

Brian said. "I consi�r some

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"test hats." These hats are desiJ,nated to be worn on days �f important exams. Eric's

principle test hat is a green and white golf hat from North Carolina. "I staned wearing

got up late one morning for a quiz, so 1 threw on a hat and went to my eisht o'clock class . . I did well on the quiz, so I kept wearins the hat and it seems to help ... Over the past few years, Eric and his hats have become . rather notorious. Last year, Eric was the victim of a "hat trick." Several friends, Rob "WaJdo" Corbin and Scott Charleston, broke in and van­ dalized the room, messins up all of Eric's hats. Another in­ cident occurred when Eric was a freshman. "A fire started in our room while I was in c.Iass, to Eric said. "The first thins people would tell me was 'Your room causht on fire, and yes, your hats are okay,' , t Eric's hats are very popu[ar, so he usually has severaJ hats "out on loan." However. it is not a Soad idea to take one without askins. "Eric can aJways tell if one of the hat is missing," Brian said, "They're like family. They're like our kids."

Ret u rn i n g st u d e n t l oves cam p u s l i fe, food By Bart> PIcKell If you've ever felt a little down about dorm life-or about life in general-what you probably needed was a lit· tie chat with Dot Otto. At S6, Ouo lives in a single room in Kreidler, and loves it. " I'm so bappy here in my little nest," said Otto. "When I first eam here I thought this wa., a beautiful room; I had so mBny ideas about how to decorate It. but I haven't had time to do any of them so far." And what about that famous college food? "I love it!" she said. "I don't have to c:ook it, and I don't have to clean it up. I've eliminated the shopping time and the cooking time. And I haven't had a bad meal yn." OUo is studying for her bachelor of science degree in nursing in an accelerated program for registered nurses. S1-4:: received her nursing diploma from the three-year R.N. program at St. Joseph's hospital in Tacoma. At that time, she wanted to go ahead and get ber dearee, but she

said, "I couldn't afford to do it then. I had four kids at home, and I wanted to help them all I could while they were young." Otto's decision to come to PLU was based in part on the "Christian Context" in which the school is set. "I think (aith has a areat affect on what kind of nurse you are," she said. "Nurses have always used their Christian religion, or whatever their religion is. There were Egyptian nurses who used their religion in their nursing. And the early Christians o�ed hospitals for those who couldn't afford to pay." The decision to live in the dorm was based on two things: finances and time. "I counted up aU the money I had or could set a hold of," said Ot­ to, "and I decided that, to kCi:pup an apartment I'd have to get a part·time nursing job. I decided that to try and work and keep an apartment and go to school would be too much. Here, all I have to do other than studying, is to clean myu room." At present, Otto's room

looks more like a campaign headquarters than a "nest. " She is an active volunteer in the Carter-MondaIe cam­ paign, as well as those of Washington several Democrats. On a recent trip to visit friends in Centralia, Otto said, "I took my campaign things with me and cam­ paigned all the way there and aJl the way back." She insists, however, that she is non-partisan in her politics. " I grew up in North Dakota in the time of non­ partisan league politics.

Everyone knew the issues. H ' an eisht-year-old didn't know about something, he could ask a to--year-old, since a to-­ year-old would surely know." Otto's favorite hobby, however, is visiting her four children and seven gran· dchildren, "That's what 1 like besl, I t she said with a noticeable touch of pride in her voice. " I love visiting them and watching them grow." How does she like living with over 100 women less than half ber age? "I don't think there's as much generation gap

'There goes the neighborhood' It's 9 a.m. and as a ground noor resident of Harstad, you decide to go "brush your teeth," still wearing only your nightgown. You go out into the hall, intent on youl mission, when suddenJy you're caught halfway between your room and the bathroom. There are male students wan· dering in the haJl. What are they doing there? Looking for their classroom. A new classroom has been instaUed in ground noor Har­ stad. As soon as the old swit­ chboard equipment was removed, workmen renovated the room into a classroom. For two weeks ground noor occupants woke up at 7 a.m. to electric drills. pounding hammers and the cheerful whistle of the workmen. The reason for this invasion

THIS WEEK IN THE CAVE

IS that PLU is literally scram­ bling for classroom space. By utilizing space in this way, the university is able to keep costs down. However, holding class on ground noor has its shor· tcomings. Noise is a big problem. Riclc Mattson, a student in Friday's noon class, said "The classes are often distracted by the constant rumble on the stairs. Girls are running around, the vacuum cleaner is goillS, and last Tuesday it was the Stones. " Mattson's class u3ed to meet. in the University Cen­ te ... When asked for comments on their transition to Harstad, a teacher described her new room as "noisy and stuffy." Because of the noise, the class can't open the door to increase

MONDAY: Jazz TUESDAY: Open until 2 am for election result

returns on big screen,

WEDNESDAY: The Future Pastures Band THURSDAY:. Finion's Rainbow - Movie Sp«iai on Monday wm be blgels

Ind creme ch.... for 5_30_

as people think," she said. "I'm not in their generation, and I don't try to be. Maybe that's why it works for me. They pray for me when I'm writing exams, and they come in with their popcorn poppers and visit." Five years ago, Otto under­ wem cancer surgery, an ex· perience which, she says, changed her Iik "Things don'( bother me like they used to, I t she explained. " I'm aJive! 1 can see; I can touch; I can laugh; 1 can love; I can even fight! I'm alive!"

" .... _ow.o ....

• ..." �_btt

Jobnson's Parkland Drugs

air now. Another teacher siad that "it is a nuisance to use the bathrooms because you have to yell when you nush if there o is anyone in the shower. t Ac· cording to Mattson, the only improvement in Harstad is that "the room has desks." One of the most affected by the new addition is sophomore Cynthia Dahan, who lives next door. She chose her room because of the size, and would not have done so if she had known about the classroom. "I don't appreciate waking up to chwk squeaking across the board or to movies about Russia. I spoke with the prof and he was quite agrCi:able to moving the movie projector's 5tpeaker to the other side of the room." Some ground noor residenlS fCi:1 as if they should control their natural exuberance when a class is in sel$lon. though Mattson said reassuringly that "the girls shouldn't have to restrict their lifestyles." Classes scheduled in the basement will be kept to a resident. if minimum proressors and studentS have their say. Par the lime being, girls will have to look both ways before they gO to "brush their teeth I t


Mooring Mast. October 3 1 , 1980

Paroc h i a l sc h oo l s g a i n p o p u l a rity education is a valuable com­ modity." Charles Wright is a cooCc The number of United academy founded on Christian States kids in private schools principles. It is a college has doubled between I96S and preparatory school with 8. 1915. according to the Bureau selective admissions process. h ofCensw. is also expensive-51 ,000 Independent schools arc beiRS founded at a fatc of tuition for beginning school, 53,300 for the high school. three a day. estimates Robert "More people are taking a Baldwin, executive director look at private school-we of Citizens for Educational had more inquiries last year Freedom. Growing disenchantment than we've had in years past-but many are turned with the public school system s i cawing more parents to opt away by the cost," Mahar for private schools for their said. Still, there is a waiting list for the lower school. children. lot of "There's a "Parents are perceiving a lack of discipline and a poor dissatisfaction with the public learning atmosphere (in public school domain. I don't see schools), There's also the how they can teach with 40 religious aspect, the difference kids in the room. I don't see of attitude: four-letter words. how they could do much more dress, druss." stated Constan­ than keep the lid on, I I Mahar tine Angelos, Education said. "Our advantaBe is classes of Editor of The SNllle Timu. IS or 16. The kids get to recite The increase in private schooling has been called every day. They come out of everything Crom a temporary here with a good academic trend to "an explosive background and also a lot of growth. The boom is a reality care and concern from the in a sense that they are faculty about their social gTowing. but not at the rate (well-being)," Mahar said. He also listed a "very sup­ people think: because most of portive parental body" as an the established private schools are not bia enouBh to hold advantage. Angelos believes the private schools' "ability to many more students," pick and choose their students Angelos said. i one of "The Christian school and discipline them" s movemmt is arowing fast, but the fundamental differences. Young, PLU Judi this kind of school is oftm sophomore, has had experien­ tacked onto churches and s i not very big, 100 kids or just a ce in both private and public couple of grades. But there are schools. She went to Catlin a lot of them springing up," Gable and St. Helen's Hall, Angelos said. t both in Portland for four and Tony Mahar. head of the five years, respectively. She upper school at Charles then went to public high Wright Academy in Tacoma. school. "The education is bruer at thinks one of the reasons for renewed interest in private private schools. You're able to schools is that "the pendulum Bet to know your teachers bet­ is coming back; more people ter and get help when you need are realizing that a college it," Young said.

By Gall Grftnwood

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." .

.

.,.

,

,

,

,

"In private schools you didn't have the freedom to yeU or talk back to teachers. At public schools the students tend to have less respect for the teachers and a lot more freedom and free time," Young said. "We learned manners and

/

were taught how to act in public places," Young said. The federal government is dealing with the upswina of private schools. Pendina bills would help alleviate the problem of those who pay twice for a slngJe education: taxes for public and tuition for

private. Meanwhile, if the dissatisfaction with public schools continues at the current rate and if parents are able to afford tuition, by 1990 there will be more independent schools in the United States than governmental ones.

B o o k i n d u st ry g row i n g p a i n s h i t h o m e By s.ady Willi..... The arowth of the college textbook industry has followed the unprecedented growth in collqe enrollments since 1960. Durina the past 16 years, it has srown from estimated sales of 597 million in 1960 to 50564 million in 1976. accordina to the Association of American Publishers. Inc. These figures include only sales of new tex­ tbooks to students, not sales of used books or non­ textbooks that are used in the collese classroom. In this "couage industry" • each editor is like an in­ dividual entrempreneur, ser­ ving the textbook requiremen­ ts of its particulat subjects. College textbook publishers ruist the assembly-line technique of other indwtries, according to AAP brochures. The PLU bookstore orders textbooks from hundreds of di fferent publishers since faculty members have com­ plete freedom to select the tex· u used for each course. Nearly all publishers follow the in­ dwtry tradition of setting a textbook's retail price and then granting a 20 percent discount to the university

bookstore. in other words. approximately 80 percent of what a student pays for tex­ tbooks goes to the publisher of the book. The National Association of College Stores surveyed a number of stores and found that some of them are actually losing money on their tex­ tbook operations and are trying to make it up on their more profitable sweatshirt and record sales. In the PLU bookstore, sales by category this last year were: 056 percent textbooks. 9 per­ cent other books, 12 percent school supplies, I I percent in· signia items, and 12 percent other items. The bookstore's 20 percent gross margin on textbooks must be used to pay for operating expenses such as freight, utilities, salaries, debt retirement on the University Center building, insurance. and other expenses, accord!na to Lynn Isaacson, PLU Bookstore Oirector. The margin must also cover the time and round-trip postaae on unsold textbooks remaining at the end of the semester that are returned to the publisher. Average figures for the

colleae textbook publishing in· dustry reported in 1976 in an annual survey found that 29 percent of every dollar made on the sale of a book goes to manufacturing e"penses. 6 cents to editina, 14 cents to marketlna, 1 8 cents to overhead. 1 .5 cents to royalties, and 8 cents to taxes, leavina a 10cent profit. Sin 1976 the averaae small publisher (505 million and un­ der in sales) made only two cents in profit. A medium· sized publisher (5.5 to 10 million) made 4 cents. A larger publisher (SIO to 20 million) made 8 cents and the largest publishers ($20 million and over) made 1 3 cents. Accordina to Isaacson, some books received this year have increased by SO cents or $1 since the title was used p r e v i o u s l y . " I n fJ a t i o n definitely i s affecting the prices of te"tbooks but you would have to compare the current prices of many specific books with the prices of the same books last year to have a meaninaful estimate and we do not have the time to figure thai," Isaacson said. have a "We don't sophisticated inventory con­ trol system for textbooks that

can inform us of the total number of textbooks sold per semester," Isaacson said. "The total number of titles used as textbooks per semester is generally 1 ,000 to 1,200." One common problem Isaacson cited in the retail of textbooks is that "we have ac­ cess to pre-reaistration infor­ mation from the Registrar's Office but no one knows exac­ tly how many students will finally enroll in each," Isaac­ son said. "This means that the last students to register or buy their books for some courses will not be able to purchase a book immediately if their course is larger than an­ ticipated and their te"t is sold out. We reorder more copies as soon as the shortaaes are known but the book publishers can't get the book­ to us fast enought to help the student who is without a teJIt for the first week of the semester." The other side of this problem, Isaacson said, is that excess books remain on the shelves for the overwhelming majority of courses. If these books are not re-used the neJIt tenn, labor and postage e,,­ pense must be paid by the tx>okstore to pack the books

ujl and ship them back to the publisher. Another common problem is that books ordered out of print or out of stock at the publisher. " Some publishers are not prompt about infor­ ming us, I t Isaacson said. "This relults in last-minutel changes or problems for the professor who has spent hours preparing to teach a course using a specific textbook.ss Most publishers will send examination or complimen­ tary copies of their teJItbooks to a faculty member. This does not cause any problems for the bookstore but problems do arise for the publisher if significant quantities of these free books find their way into the used book market and displace the sale of new copies of the publisher'S book. According to Isaacson, thousands of unsold textbooks are returned to publishers each year "at great expense but there is no acceptable solution to the problem. We could avoid e"cessive quantities only by purposely underordering on each title. This would cause many book shortaaes and problems for students and faculty members," he added.


October 31, 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 10

C re d i t c a rd s h u ff l e

Harder to ge t, m ore expe n sive

By SUI! Anduun

i ThC' credit card. Not only s it needed for its original pur­ pose, buyina merchandise on credit. but many businesses require a major credit card and another piece of iden­ tification when purchases arc beina paid for by check. Accordinl to U. S. News and World RC'port� July 2 1 , 1980 luue. Ihere arc an estimaled 565 million credit cards ouulandin, In the United States this year. That aVeraaes out to more tban

credit cards, esllmated that U.S. banks Ion at least $250 card credit 00 million operations io the fint hair of Ihis year. This will resull in Visa and Mastercard holden paying more to use the cards. They used 10 be s I sued for free, but now many U.S. banks are charging an averqe orSl2 ptT year. Another reason for the dif­ fic.uhy in obtaininJ a credit ca.rd is a person's credit history. Requests for a credit card or loan can be denied because o f an insufficient

two and one-half cards for each of the nation's 222 million people. But con­ sumers, and especially young ones, arc still finding it hard to obtain these precious pieces of plastic. One reason, accordina to U. S. News and Worfd Report, is that the credit card programs are losing money. This is because it COstS the issuers more money to finance and service the cards than they make on interest and fees. An article in Time (Sept. 29, 1980) stated that Jack Cox, a publisher of a newsletter about

credit history. where no credit has been established, or a delinquent one, where past credit has not been good. Information on a person's credit history can be obtained from credit bureaus. Accor­ ding to an article in the June 1980 issue of Glamour, by Susan Ingram, an attorney specializing in consumer credit, if you've ever applied for a loan or hold any kind of credit card, chances are at least one credit bureau has a file on you. There are over 2,000 credit bureaus in the U.S.; most serve a local or

I

regional atC'a but a few operate nationally.

A credit bureau is most likely to start a file on you when you first apply for a credit card or loan. The rcport contains information such as your name. address, and social security number; Income and place of employment; any charge accounts and loans received, amount of credit and payment history; any bankruptcies, judaments or other public record infor­ mation; ifnd listings o f

creditors who've previously requested a credit report on you. The Fair Credit Repor­ ting Act, enacted in 1970, allows you to see your report upon request from the credit bureau. Most credit card ap­ plications also require a listing of credit references. All this makes it especially hard for a young person to establish credit . But once &ood credit is established somewhere, it can be used as a stepping-stone toward a pocketful of plastic.

By Martn J. Oppelt In Wekell Gallery in Ingram Hall there is an an show that is intertSting, to say the least. Larry Saltz of Bellevue and Paul Nerge of Sealtle have combrned their talents in paintina and sculpture to produce the an show. In spite or the nebulous meanings of the works, the viewn- should enjoy the elthibit . Of the two artists. Saltz is deOnitelY the most accom­ plished. Having studied and the PrIll institute and Columbia University, and also havina held a variety of­ positions in the ans from commercial anist 10 Univer­ sity professor, Saltz brings a wide range of skills to his works. Netge. on the other hand. I reemt graduate of PLU and the Univtfsity of WashinJ1on, hasn't had the years of experience that Saltz has accumulated. Because of this, he still has some rough edges that need polishing. Joinings of the piCCC$ in some of his sculp­ tures were rough, and occasionally some of the !itains he used did not match. SallZ's contributions to Ihe show are what he terms "Monotypes." Some are done with acrylic paint and some appear to use watercolor. These monotypes are not pictures, per se, but experiments with color. tex­ tures, and form. As such they work very well and fulfill the purpose for which they wtrt created. One aspect of Saltz's work that I found interesting is his experiments with border space. In several of his works he leaves a border area that makes the colortd portion of the piece appear to be moving into the space from outside. One gets the feeling that if the canvas were extended, one would see more of the work. It is in these monotypes that ant is best able to enjoy the colors and textures ustd. In the monotypes taht don't usc the botder techniQut, there appears to be almost more than the eye can com­ prhend. There are more colors and textures. One finds oneself pulling away from these works and turning back to the more relaxed, bordered monotypes as a relief from the violence. If Saltz was workiRB for a negativf response from viewers. he certainly achieved his objec­ tive. Nerge's sculptures are also very interestin. My two favorites were "Tacoma SOO" which is a very accurate example of the Intentate at rush hour. The piece truly makes one cbuckle as one realizes the comment it makes on what we like to think of as the "Beautiful Pacific Nonhwest." My other favorite was "Chess set and Pieces." If I'd had enough in my checkbook I would have written the check on the spot. This set is as large as an end table and is gorgeous. Nerge has pieces together triangular blocks of wood to form the table, overlaid it with an acrylic top, and formtd represen­ tative pieces of wood and acrylic; it was difficult to pull away from it. The rest of Nerge's work was rather monotonous. There were spires comina out of wood blocks, spires through wood blocks, and spires sitting on the noor. One spire work that every future educator should take notice of is "First Orade Conrormation." It is truly representative of wbat we do to children and tbeir imaginative powers once they enter school. This show is worth seeing and I urge you to attend. It runs through the end of the month in Wekell Gallery. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Loc a l b uyer- se l l e rs cat c h ' g e n e ri c f ever By Brian uubaeb

or products, No-frill "generic" foods as they are commonly referred to, are the latest line of products added to local grocers' shelves. They have been on the market for three'years and are designed to be sold at reduced prices. The lack of an appealing label and national advertising are the sources of the price reduction. "'hat are you getting on those plain black-aod-white labeled packages? About the same as the comparative nationa.l brands, claim the local supermarkets. The only possible differences are in tex­ ture, appearance, color or uniformity. In the PlU vicinity there are only four supermarkets that stock "generics": Fred Meyer,

Lucky, ' Mark and Save and Piggly Wiggly. The supermarkets and their managers wish to remain anonymous to avoid complications brought on by their head offices, and hereafter are referred to as "they." They all agree that these plain-labeled products "are good sellers" and that they are "good quality items." They added the "no-frills" itftns to their shelves mainly out of "customer demand" and added that the "time was riaht." Who arc the customers of these no-frill products? A 1978 consumer response corporation (CRe) poll stated that 49 percent of the population was interested in the product. fifty-four percent wen under 3S, 57 percent were . professionals or had some

college, SO percent were married with three or more children. and the percmtage of families with an income over $IS,OOO a year that purchased these items was S8 percent. According to AdvC'rtising Agt, Oct. 30, 1978, generic products appeal to the upper middle class more than to the lower middle class. Beer, peanut butter, pop, paper towels, baby shampoo, cake miXes, cookies and tea are just a sample of the types of Sromc products OD� can buy. The selection of generic labeled products is up to 100 items, with most supermarkets carrying .sO to 70 of these products. Supcnnarkcts carry and sell what " moves right along" in the generic line. The savings in price on the generic product is usually

more than 10 percent compared to the nationally-known products. Comparing prices on a six-pack of Beer at $1.69 and Rainier at $2.73, or 100 baas of Tea at $1.69 and Lipton Tea for 52.69, or 36 oz of Peanut Butter at $1.2S and 40 oz. of Jiffy Peanut BUtler at 53.19 are some of the relative price savings for buying nofrill products. According to the FDA Consumer, Nov. 1978, the lower price of the no-frill products does nol dictate their quality. The same standards lhat are enforced by the FDA on producers of national products apply to those who package generic products. Generic products vary from product to product on how much they excttd standards depending on the packaaer, states the FDA

Consumer. According to the major supermarkets, the packagers of generic products are mainly major companies who supply the wholesalers with their national brands and ermarket lines. various sup One major supermarket claimed that Nalley's is a packager of the generic labeled Pickles and Chili. and Potlatch, Inc. packages the paper goods. Generic products are not widely avaib.ble. It takes an eagle eye to find the black­ and-white labeled packages on the shelves of the super­ markets . According to the FDA Consumer, Nov. 1978. if you are looking to save money, generic products can be boUght at reduced prices without a large reduction in product quality.


Page I I . Moorin& Mast. October 3 1 , 1980

The Mooring Mast's E l e"tion Review

P i et h o ra of c a n d i d ates vy i n g t o be t h e o n e co m m an d e r- i n-c h i e f J immy Carter Jimmy Caner, 56, is the incumbent candidate for president of the United States. He is a Democrat. Carter was born and raised in Plains. GA. He graduated from the United States Naval Acadamy in 1 946 and ser­ ved as a nuclear engineering officer un­ til 1953. He then took over the family peanut farm and warehouse business in Plains. Carter was elected to the Georgia Senate in 1962. He became the state's governor in 1970 and was named Democralic Pany election chairman In 1974. He and his wife Rosalynn have four children.

DduR: Carter proposes an in­ crease in defense spmding of 55 billion over lasl year. This is a reversal of the policy which the U.S. has been follOWing of dccreasi"B defense spen­ ding from 1968 to 1976. Carter said his administration, in cooperation with the governmenlS _of E'typt and Israel has achieved "ex traor dlnary" progress toward peace In the Middle East. In addition, the Carter administration is committed to limiting the spread of conventional and nuclear arms, he said. Enel'lY: The president has proposed an energy-conscrvalion play which, he says. will cut oil imports by two-third5. This plan includes incentives for in. dividuals and companies to conserve energy, the increasing of domestic oil, natural gas and coal production, and the expanding of public transit. As for nuclear power, Carter feels that it is stiU a viable option that must be explored. After an investigation of safety problems at Three Mile Island, he feels that safety reforms are nceded. and that safety remains his admin­ Slration's priority in the regulation of nuclear power. J.n.tJoa: Carter still strives toward a balanced budget. saying that the sour­ ces of innation are too complex to be treated with a simple remedy. Progress cao be made. he fccls by: I . Reducing oil imports and increasing enerlY conservation. 2. Continuing the voluntary partnerships of government, business and labor to restrain the in­ nationary spiral of wage and pri« in­ crea&CS. 3. Restraining the growth of

federal spending. S. A Strong exports program. 6. Renewed economic strength In critical sectors such as steel and automobiles. Jobs: Carter wants to concentrate a program for the unemployed minority, teenagers. He advocates a prOlram to train un­ skilled and jobless persons to fill a per­ centage of new jobs created by the private sector with the aid of about S5 billion of federal funds.

Ronald Reagan Ronald Reagan.

69,

is

the

candidate for president. Reagan WIU born in Illinois and attended schools there. He bolds a SA degree In sociolo&y and economics. He began his carccr as a film actor in 1937. Rcapn was elmed gQvt'rDor of California in 1966 and KT\Ied two tCT­ ms. He has three children. DdellM: Reagan c.lls national security "our mon critical fortego policy concern." He advocates more spendin& on land·bMCd missilcs, and a 'Htonger navy and other arm!! programs. While he want.. to rever�e what he tt'lTllS a "decline" in U.S. defense, he opposes "blind and ell­ travagant increases in defense spen­ ding." £nerp: Reagan feels that the U.S should reduce the demand for forgiegn oil by increasing oil and gas produc'­ tion at home and developing alter­ native sources. 'he opposes gasoline ratiomng now to avoid "theoretical" future shor­ tages. Rationing, he says, would be hardest on urban dwellers without adequate mass tranliportation systems. He supports the continued operation of nuclear power plants and Strict safety standards.

loDatloo: Rcaaan feels that the budget must be balanced. This would be done throuJh strict limits 00 federal spending, which would result in a decrease in the inflation rate. He also calls for across the board tax cuts to restore production incentive, inspire. investment and increase the number of jobs. Jo": He sees high unemployment

Campaign '80

Understanding the issues is becoming harder and harder to do-for students Al election day creeps closer and c1oRr, understandiRl the issues and seeing the distinctions between can­ <tidatn is becoming harder and har­ der to do-especiaJly for college students How do Caner, Reagan and An­ derson differ? Is Warren Mag.nU!On really as old a� his opponent says he 1$1 What s i Initiative 383 or SJR 123? As perhaps a slieht aid to lJying to figure thina.s OUt, The Mooring Mas' offen you this five-page section (pages I I-IS) or election neW's and view'.

u • symptom of a weak economy.

Slrengthenin& of the economy would Increase the number of Ihe employed. he I8YS that he would like to lift bur· densome regulations from the private �ector. Reagan would also like to repeal minimum wage to bring more youth Into Ihe Job market_

The presidential, Washington state . governor's, U.S. Senatorial and the state's 2nd District legislative races are covered-as well as those " unknown" bailor measures. As usual, all sides are predicting victory and the opinion polls are Splt­ ling out information that can be used to prove an)'thing. What are the choices? Where do the candidates stand? Well-read on and good luck. The section was wriuen and prepared by Tom Koehler. Sandy Williams and Dave Arbaugh. Use legislation and executive authority to review and prune relulations that waste capital and do not provide walid regulatory objectivcs. 5. A tough . . conservation�riented energy program to curtail the now of Amencan capilal OVttSdl! to pay for imported oil.

John Anderson John Anderson, 58, is an indepen­ dant candidate for president. He WaJ born in Rockford, illinOIS. After graduating from the University of Illinois, he served as an anilleryman in World Was II. He holds a master of law degree from Harvard. He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1960 and was named chairman of the House Republican Conference In 1969. He hold that job for 10 Years. Dtftrue: Anderson says thai our national derense position must demon­ strate to the SoVietS that it cannot gain stratigicadvanr8gt over us. He would like to see increased military spending and a larger com­ mitment to NATO. He opposes the MX missile program, calling it a waste of money.

Entf'&)': Anderson propoSCl four ways to help slow the consumption of foriegn oil: I . Conservation. 2 . Development of alternative enerIY sources such as solar and wind power. 3. Provide reasonable alter­ natives to automobile usc. 4. a "50/SO gas plan" in which the price of gasoline would be increased SO cenlS per ,allon and Social Security taxes reduced 50 percent. l.natloD: Anderson proposes a five­ part program to combat Innation: I . Use restrained monetary and fiscal policy to dampen interest rates and foster a stable economic environment. 2. Ue lax code to encourage &reater personal savings and capital for­ mation. 3. Use tax incentives and direct fedna! aid to stimulate research and development to spur productivity. 4.

Jobs: He feels that federal assistan­ ce programs running in conjunction with the private sector. H� advocates a lowered minimum wage which would allow teenagers to work at 85 percent of the minimum wage for the first six months of their employment.

Minor Candidates Commualst P.rty: Gus Hall, 70, of Yonkers, New York is the Communist Party candidate for president. Hall was born in Minnesota and spent many years as a steel worker and union organizer there. He spent eight years in prison after being convicted of communist activities under the Smith Act.


October 3 1 , 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 12

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O l d ve rs u s n ew

Magn uson a n d Gorton fight it out for a Sena te spo t

Warren Magnuson Senator Warren G. Magnuson, 75, is running for his seventh term in the United Stales Senate. Born in Moorhead, Minnesota, "Maggy" received his SA and law degree from the University o f Washington. He served as King Coun· ty special prosecutor in the early lO's

Megnu.on and was first elected to the Washington State Legislature in 1933. Magnuson served as a naval officer in the South Pacific during World War II. He was first elected to the Senate in 1944. His list of legislative and political achievements since 1944 are literally too long to list here.

He s i recognized BS a leader in health care, product safety, fisheri� and labor legislation. Magnuson is chair� man of the Senate Appropriations Committee, ranking member of the . Slade Oonon, state attorney aeneral, commerce and Banking Comminee is running for United States senator. and president pro-tern of the Senate. Gorton, 52, is a araduat of Darrnouth He and his wife Jermaine live in and the Columbia Law School. He Washington D.c. during the Senate began his political career n i 1958 when session. elected to the state House of Represen­ Innallon: He sees government as tatives. Gorton was selected as House one of the key causes of inflation. " We majority leader in 1967. must reverse the trend in recent years which has seen government at all levels consuming a larger and larger share of the Gross National Product." he said. Magnuson recently proposed a plan placing Strict limits on the percentage of funds federal agencies can spend during the last quarter of 1981. He is also supporting a package of Senate measures designed to spur investment in small business. Defense: While the U.S. is steadily improving its defense capability, Magnuson feels we need to do more, Gorton and favors increased defense spending. He was elected attorney general in En",,: He favors development of 1968. He was president of tbe National alternative energy sources, but with an Association of Attorneys General in eye towards preserving the environ· 1976 and '77 and was a representative ment. on the President's Consumer Advisory He supports nuclear energy Council from 1975 to 1977. Gorton is a programs, but opposes the dumping of colonel in the Air Force Reserve. out of state wastes in Washington. He He and his wife SaUy live in Olympia has also killed plans for supertanker with their three children. travel in Puget �und.

Slade Gorton

Innatloa: Gorton proposes to reduct: innation by balancing the federal budget. The budget should represent no more than 21 percent of the nalion's Gross National Product, he said. In addition, the nation n�s incentives for economic growth to heap control the budget, according 10 Gorton. "A balanced budget is the greatest single step in reducing inflation that congress can adopt," he said. Defense: Gorton favors increased defense spending. Papamount is a pay increase, he said. Low pay is forcing the military's skilled cadre of specialists to resign. Without them, the all-volunteer concept does not have a fair chance for success, Gorton said.

Eaergy: Energy is the biggest single problem facing the United States during the remainder of this century, Groton said. If elected, he would promote conservation through price mechanisms and tax incentives for in­ dividuals and corporations. In addition , Gorton supports promotion and development of new energy sources through tax incentives. The United States must deve10p solar energy, coal, nuclear energy and syn­ thetic fuels, he said.

Cam paigns go door to door By Sandy WOliams Local campaigns for Carter, Reagan, and Anderson plan to go door to door in a last-ditch attempt for votes before election day. As November 4 approaches, efforts for the Carter campaign will be direc­ ted toward bringing out the public vote, according to democratic party spokesmen. Traditionally, the higher the voter turnout the greater the advan­ tage for the Democratic party. Party volunteers hope to contact 70 to 80 percent of aU registered voters in Ihe Slale by phone or doorbell. Accor- I ding to volunteers, efforts will be rocu� on Pierce County sintt the high population Ihere makes the coun­ Iy a pivotal cenler for the vote in Washington stale. Equal rights, fr�om of choice, war and peace are the issues emphasized by the campaign as well as a major attack on Reagan's bill to destroy unions (National Right to Work bill). The Reagan campaign also hopes to bring out the vote by phone and door­ btU contact with voters in the area. Major issues for the Republican par­ ty at this point include alleged

misquotings of Reagan on senior citizens and on social security. Republican campaign staff say Reagan is pro not con on both issues. In their final campaisn drive, the Republican party is also citing Senator Warren Magnuson's statement favoring the bagging of Salt II to move on the Salt Ill. Final efforts for the Anderson cam­ paign will focu:i on canvassing, distributing information issue sheets and putting up yard signs. The goaL according to campaign workers, is to 'mock on every door in Pierce County twiCt:. The Independent party wants to persuade voters that Anderson is still a viable alternative to the other two candidates. Anderson has divided the United States into four levels of "winability." Washington i! on the number one level and has more undecided voters, accor­ ding to polls. Independent party mem­ bers feel this is an advantage for An­ derson. Major issues being pushed at this time include Anderson's stands on ERA, abortion rights, economic policy and his 50-SO plan for a 50-cent-a­ gallon gas tax.

Llght.r mome,,'s we,. few ."d '.r betwee" for . somb.r Jimmy C.rter during hi. n.tlon.lly te/.�/sed deb.t. with Ron" d Re.gan Tue.d.y night. Among the ba".ge of mud-.llnglng was 'comment by Carter ,h.t Reeg.n b.g.n hi. ce,.er lobbying .galnst we""•. Reag.n compared C.rter to e witch doctor. The Pr.slden' only .ml/ed twice, two Ie" th.n hi. Republican counterp.rt

M i n o r p res i d e n t i a l c a n d l i d ate s (co nti n u ed) He has been general secretary for the Compmnlst Party since 1959. The 1980 platform calls for detente and !'tace with the Soviet Union. The Communists hold that the capitalist system breeds war, poverty and racism and that "socialsim can finally eliminate these evils. " Carter, Reagn and Anderson are considered " stooges of Bia Money. " CItizens Part)': Barry Commoner, 62, of St. Louis, is the Citizen's Pany candidate for president. Educated at Harvard and Columbia, Commoner is a Navy veteran of World War 11. He is now director of the Ceo-

ter for the Study of Biological Systems at Washington University. Commoner calls for decntralized energy production and developement of more renewable energy resources_ The Party would stop American military n i tervention into foreign af­ fairs, lowering defense expenditures, Commoner said. Libertarian Party: Ed Clark, SO, of Los Angels is Libertarian Party can­ didate for president. Clark is a graduate of Dartmouth and Harvard Lwas School and served as a gunnery officer i n the U.S. Navy. In 1978, Clark ran for governor of

California on the Libertarian ticket and received five percent of the vote. The Libertarian platform calls for withdrawl of American troops from foreign bases, wilh a resultant cut in military spending. At home, he would call for a 50 percent across the board tax cut, abolition of the FBI, CIA, Department of Enttgy and numerous other federal agencies and an open trade policy. To stop innation, the Libertaiians would stop printing currency.

Socialist Worken: Andrew Pulley, 28, of Chicago is presidential candidate from the Socialist Workers Pany. He

is represented on the Washington ballot by Clifton DeBarry because he is too young to qualify in this state. He is a member· of the United Steelworkers Local 1066, Gary, Ind. He WIlS active in the anti-war movement of the sixties and early seveOlies. His playform calls on the labor movement to form its own party on opposition to the Republicans and Democrats. The Socialist Workers Par­ ty opposes draft registralion and believes large corporations and Congress are endangering the Equal Rights Ammendment and progress in racial equality.


Page 13. Mooring Mast. October 3 1 , 1980

H ere comes the 'gUY'

Will it be McDerm o tt or Spellman?

Jim McDermott Jim McDermott, Democratic can· didate for govClllor, 43, believes a comprehensive, balanced energy program is Washington state's greatest nted. The quality of life, economy, and environment all depend upon safe, reliable, and affordable energy. Mc­ Dermott said. Since Washington has no energy plan, he would like to develop one and plans to advocate for the consumer by supporting conser­ vation as the state's first priority. McDermott has said Washington must not become the national nuclear dumping ground. By promoting Initiative 383, the proposal to prohibit dumping of out-of-state, non-medicaJ nuclear wastes, McDermott worked to give citizens the opportunity to vote on "Don't Waste Washington." McDermott considers the governor a trustee of the state for its citizens. But today, he has said, state lands and tim­ ber resources are managed as a private business rather than a public trust; in­ stitutions, particularly prisons and mental hospitals, are in shambles; and departments, boards, and commissions are full of "embarrassing" appoin­ UIWlts. '"

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McDermott The state government needs capable, dedicated public servants, he says. Merit-not partisan politics, financial ties, or crony-ism should determine appointments and promotions. McDermott said he knows that leadership is working out problems openly and encouraging differing viewpoints. McDermott served two years as chief psychiatrist at the Long Beach Naval Station, caring for returning Vietnam veterans and their families. Since entering public life ten years ago, McDermott has chaired the Coalition for Open Government, spon­ sored the Public Disclosure Law: created the Senate Seleet Committee to investigate nursing home abuses; and written the Basic Education Act. Born in Chicago, he attended Billy Graham's Wheaton College in lIJinois. He received his medical degree from the University of Illinois with the desire

to be a medical mBSiODary. He served his internship in Buffalo and his residency at the University of Washinglon.

John Spellman "It's crucial that the people 01 Washington have a governor capable of solving the state's fiscal crisis before it's too late," says Repuhlican can­ didate John Spellman, 53. In recent years, the leadership in Olympia has eroded the state economy. and "we have moved from a fluent, successful community to a position of instability and, finally, desperation," he said.

Miller

Ellcenberf)

Roselllni

Attorney general's race close prosecuting attorney for four years, was associated for six years with a . Seattle law firm and was judge pro tern for the Seattle Municipal Court. He John Miller, 42, is an independent received his law degree in 1959 at the candidate for the office of state attor­ University otwashington. ney general. If Miller's bid is suc­ "If elected I'll bring a little different cessful, he will become the first in­ management style to the office," dependent elected to the post since Eikenberry said. He would like to see 1889 when Washington became a state. Over the past 16 years Miller has ser­ the more than 200 attorneys on the at­ ved as assistant attorney general, par­ torney general's staff brought into more of a "cluster" arrangement. tner in a private law firm and member "Out of the agencies-into a law firm and president of the nonpartisan Seat­ setting," he said. tle City Council. "One issue separates me from the other candidates," Miller said. "I believe the attorney general's office should be independent and nonpar­ tisan; my opponents believe the office should remain partisan." There is A storm brewing over his handling nothing partisan about law enfor­ of estate trust funds has dimmed the cement, he said. hopes of 41-year-old John Rosellini to become the first democrat in 12 years to become attorney general. Son of former Gov. Albert Rosellini, he has been a practicing attorney for the past seven years and served in the Republican Ken Eikenberry believes legislature from 1966 to 1972. He was the diversity of his background makes active on the Judicial Committee where him the best candidate for attorney he "saw how th office operates." general. Rosellini believes he can "make the A former FBI agent, he has spent three terms in the House of Represen­ attorney general's office more respon­ tatives, was a J(jng County deputy sive to the people who deal with it ...

John M i ller

John Rosellini

Spellman Rising unemployment. an energy crisis and a spendthrift legislature have combined to create havoc in state in­ stitutions, Spellman believes. He said the state needs to: improve the economic climate, help farmers, or lose more jobs; develop all energy sources or "grind to a halt"; and solve the problems of seniors, schools and institutions or the state will face a breakdown in society. Spellman claims these challenges demand the attention of a leader who can control his impulses and deaJ in facts. His executive accomplishments in­ clude new parks, new roads, new housing, new bridges, the Kingdome, and a country-wide transportation system. His first attempt at elective office. the Seattle mayoralty, was unsuc­ cessful, but he went on to become King County commissioner and for the past 1 1 years bas been executive under the county's new fonn of government. He beat King County Assessor Harley Hoppe for the Republican gubernatorial nomination in 1976, only to lose to Dixie Lee Ray. An Irish Catholic, Spellman took a Navy tour of duty and graduated in 1949 as valedictorian from Seattle University in political science. He went on to ajesuit seminary for nine months then to Georgetown University Law School, where he was a member of the national champion moot court team.

Ken Ei kenberry

Cherberg, Trea d well vie for lieu tena n t govern or . Democrat John Cherberg, 69, is the . IDcumbent in the race for lieutenant governor. A former University of Washington football coach, Cherberg said he retired from that job "bttause of illness and fatigue ...the athletic direc­ tors and the regional directors got sick and tired of me," he joked. However for the past 24 years--ever since he was first eleeted in 1956-the voting public has evidently not tired of him and Cherberg, a Seattle resident, is optimistic that same trend will hold true again on Nov. 4 as he makes his bid for his seventh consecutive term as lieutetant governor.

Bill Treadwell, a 4 1 -year-.old trial at­ torney. is the Republican candidate for lieutenant governor. He is a Vancouver resident and for­ mer teacher at the Gonzaga Law School, and also has served as an assistant United States attorney, an appointed post. Treadwell said one significant issue is whether the lieutentant governor's job will remain a part-time position as it has been or will be changed to a full­ time state post. "While that (part-time) may have been satisfactory for the past 20 years, 1 don't think that's adeqate now. I think we ought to utilize the lieutenant Itovernor full-time," he said.

State t reasu rer' s race i s between O ' B r i e n , Wa rd Robert O'Brien Robert S. O'Brien, 61, Democratic candidate for state treasurer, has been incumbent for 16 year. He is particularly proud of the reeord of his office in managing and investlng the state's temporarily sur­ plus funds: in the year ending June 3D, 1980, he earned for the taxpayers a record of S 104 million. " That adds up to S 1 ,000 an hour less taxes you have to pay," O'Brien said.

O'Brien's investment policies give in-state financial institutions the first opportunity to bid on state funds; more than 85 percent of our investmen­ ts remain in-state, while earning at the highest rate possible. "I intend to continue to seek more efficient ways to maximize our ear­ nings through profesSional money management." O'Brien said. O'Brien has served 14 years as lreasurer of Grant County and has been presidenf of the National AssociaLion of Statl! Auditors, Treasurers IUld Comptrollers.

Marilyn Ward Republican candidate Marilyn B. Ward has had 25 years of experience in government. She has served as director of the Of­ fice of Citizen Participation for the Department of Social and Health Ser­ vices, as a former board member and regional director for the Washington Stall: Federation of Republican Women, and as vice president of the Seattle Municipal League. Ward has also been state chairman for Refer�ndum 29, a measure ap-

proved in 1972 which provided $25 million for senior citizen centers and health facilities. Ward serves on the advisory board of the University of Puget Sound Graduate School of Business, and has co-chaired several bond issues. She serves on a number of other boards and commissions includjng the Metropolitan YMCA. Ward holds a degree in public ad­ minist.ration. is an effective consumer advocate, and was a high-level ad­ ministrator under Governor Daniel Evans.

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October 31, 1980, Mooring Mast. Page 14

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F i ve b a l l ot m e as u re s a re t o be voted o n

From nuclear wa s te to ea s tern Washington waste land

Referendum 38

Referendum 38 asks whether 12S million dollars in state general obligation funds should be authorized for construction and improvement of water supply facilities. If approved, the measure would authorize the State Finance Committee to issue bonds which would be repaid from the state general fund with revenues from existing tues. Of the 12S million dollars, 7S million would be used for municipal facilities. The remaining SO million would be used for other water supply uses lin_ eluding agricultural and fisheries. Supporters argue that present fun­ ding sources do not adequately meet needs, that federal funding has been irregular, that population growth means facilities should be upgraded with energy saving technology. Opposing arguments point out that no specific programs have been oUllined, that upanded waler programs could contribute 10 uncon­ trolled growth, that too much money is being allocated for aariculturaJ projec-

' projects. $150 million is spa:ifically designated for use on systems which provide renewable energy sources as a result of waste management. Supporters argue that current fun­ Ding Resources aren't sufficient to meet the state's needs for waste disposal, that facilities must be im­ proved 10 protect state waters from pollution, that the measure encourages creating energy from waste, that con­ struction projects resulting from the measure will create jobs. Opponents argue that new sewer lines encourage growth, that the bur­ den of paying for pollution control should fall on polluters. not on tu­ payers, that no specific projects have been outlined so that voters can't judge whether the projects are important, that it may be overly optimistic to assume the state economly will grow enough to pay for the projects, and that only 7.5 percent of the total cost of projects can be paid for the fund.

H o u se J o i nt Reso l ut i on 37

ts,

Referendum 39 Referendum 39 asks whether $4.50 in state general obligation bonds should be authorized for constructing and im­ proving public wasle disposal facilities in the state. If approved, the State Financial Committee .....ould be authorized to issue 30-year general obligation bonch. The money would be repaid from Ihe state general fund, which is derived from existing taxes. The major part of the money-$31.5 million-would be used 10 construct and improve municipal waste water treat­ menl plants. Of the remaining amount, $90 million would be used for solid waste management facilities. S3S million is designated for lake restoration projects and $10 million is designaled for agricultural 'waste

t:-iJR 37 i! a proposed conslitUlional amendment which, if approved. would establish a judicial qualifications commission and give the Supreme Court aUlhorilY to discipline or remove judges on the basis of the commission 's recommendation. If approved, the judicial Qualifications commission would be composed of seven members-one representative each selected by and from the Court of Appeals, the superior courts. and the district courts. In addition, two attorneys selected by the State Bar Associalion as well as two non-attorneys appointed by the gover­ nor with senate confirmation would serve on the commission . HJR 37 would make it possible for the Supreme Court to censure, suspend or remove a judge conduct and 10 retire a judge or juslice who was found to have a permanent disability. Proponents say the state has no ef­ fective procedure for removing or

disciplining judges during their elected term, that the impeachment process is cumbersome and difficult and can be the result of political retaliation.

enlorctment or regUlations regarding transport of waste have made transpor­ tation accidents less of a factor.

Opponents argue that the state's judiciary has done just fine with self­ regulation, that the legislature has the ability to create a system to remove judges and should act on that, that judges are elected by a vote of the people and should be removed that way.

Senate J o i n t Reso l ut ion 1 32

I n it i at ive 383 Initiative 383 asks whether the state should ban the importing and storing of non-medical radioactive waste. unless otherwise permitted by inter­ state compact. I f approved, no non-medical radioactive waste produced outside the stare could be transported in or stored here. The measure would become ef­ fective July I , 1981. Proponets argue Ihat rransponing rfldioactive w8$te into Washington and storing it here poses risks to the state's environment and its population . They say ils unfair for Ihis state 10 be a!Oked to take the: mk for other statd. The backers poml lO (he incidence of transportation accidenl$ and say the initiative will encourage regional plan­ ning between slates. They Ja y Ihal the amount of radioactive wastes brought to Hanford since 1977 has increased grtatly and despite that. no adequate fund for handling continual main­ tenance of the Hanford site has been crealed. They also question the safety of the l-lanford site, saying that because of its proximity to Mt. St. Helens, mote seismic research is needed. Opponents say that if the state has suitable storage facilities, they should be used for waste from areas without such facilitie!. They say that Washington residents are not the only ones who would be affected by an ac­ cident at the Hanford site. They also say that siricter regulations and better

SJRl32 asks whether the state con­ stitution should be changed to allow the state to take over unappropriated federal public lands. The measure is part of the so-called "Sagebrush Rebellion" in which some western states are trying to take control of unappropriated federal lands. When Washington became a state, it agreed to conditions set down by Congress which included a disclaimer in the state constitution 10 the title 10 unappropriated federal public lands within state. boundaries. The discJwme:r can't be revoked unless both the redcral government and Ihe. citizens of Washington agree 10 it. Conaress 't aarted 10 the change·

has�

Yet But Washington's legislature has already approved a bill whic:h would tum the land over (0 the State Depar­ unent of Natural Resources. Voters saying "yes" to SJR 132 e:ndor'ie the Slate action. Supporters argue that rederaJ con­ trol of vw:anl land creales arbitrary and unfair limits on community that federal development, mismanagement has created environ­ mental damage, thai the state is going to need tvery available resource in the future, !.hat the potential sale of some of the land could help boost the state economy. Included in opposing arguments are: Only a small portion of the state is concerned and that portion of the stale is concerned and that portion has only marginal economic value. that the stale tccei"cs money from Bureau of Land Management activities, that the response of the federal government is unknown and Ihat lhe move could Icad to a cO'ilt ly court battle.

Colleges a re almost certain victim's of the. 'balanced b udget '

Cart e r a n d Rea g an w i l l not specify aid cuts (CPS) -- 80th Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan seek balanced budget as soon as possible, but neither can­ didate will specify which segments of government's aid to higher education would be CUi to meet that goal. AlmOSt certain victims of any belt­ tightening, colleges and universities I1re still in the dark as neither man has disigned a long-range strategy to cope with the escalation costs of higher education. At the same time, the two candidates have been waging quiet campaigns claiming they are Ihe closest friend of the nation's colleges and universities. Tbe President's crew points to his long list of accomplishments in subisdizing college edcation for many lower and middle-income youth. With tbe same pride, Ronald Reagan's team makes it sound like no other former governor ever did as much for students of his State. "Jimmy Carter has done more for students of higher education than any

other president," says Anne We.l(]er, special assistant to the president. "Over a four-year period, he has in­ creased aid to the system by more than 72 percent. Our focus will coniine to be to help students make it into college." "Ronald Reagan boosted state loans

nover cut anYthing out that would be vital to that investment." Wexler, though admitting there would have to be budget cuts ;omewhere to achieve the promised balanced federal budget, refuses to speculate where they would be. In-

and acress-the-board scholarshi,ps by 900 percent during his two terms." counters Mary English, a Reagan press aide, "and he reaist state expenditures for state schools and community colleges by severa) times. " "The president knows education is an important investment in our fu�ure," says Wexler, "and he would

stead, she says, the 'American people should leave it up to the better judgment of Jimmy Carter to decide what is necessary and what is fat in the budget. "Reagan wants to restore the in­ tegrity of our higher education system, expecially the student loan program," English adds, "Most of all, he believes

. that if we fix the economy. that would be the best solulion for the colleges." Carter, on the other hand, raises some doubts about his future plans for higher education. Even Wexler con­ cedes that the president has de:veloped no concrete overall plan to deal with the upcommih problems of colleges during the next four years. Despite the certainty of difficult financial con­ ditions, neither aide could promise that the federal government would be there to pick up the slack. "Everybody has to learn how to tighten the belt," said Wexler, im­ plying Ihat colleges and universities would have no choice but to reduce or even eliminate specific progrmas of departments. "The role of the federal government will be what is has always been," she adds, "and that is to help the students as much as possible. If we do our part and the states do theirs, there shouldn't be any problem. SliII, we can't be responsible for mismanagement. , .

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Page IS, Mooring Mast, October 3 1 , 1980

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Remain i ng state offi ces: Secretary of State -Ralph Munro, 31. Republican, resident of Bainbridge Island. Munro believes he has proven .stale wide leadership ability Bnd points to his role in pusing numerous pieces of legislation as evidenct. -Ron Dotauer, 34, Democrat, resident of Vancouver. He said his practical background in local &ovemment makes him better for thc.job than Munro.

Auditor -Robtrt Kttne. l8, Republican, resident o f Richland area. He said that his backsround as a CPA and the "new blood" he will bring are his 'tonsest at· tributes. -Bob Grabam, S9, Democratic: incumbmt. resident of Olympia. Oraham point with pride 10 his years of experience in lhe office and the recopition his operation has achieved. �

Land Co m m i ssioner -Bert Cole, 70, Democratic incumbent, resident of Callum County, Cole is relying on his record of 24 years as land Commissioner to carry him past Brian Doyle in this low-ket campaign. -Brio DoJIe, 39, Republican, resident of Longview. Doyle is optimistic that his appeal to environmental interests and his jabs at "inconsistent management" will be enoush to win the election.

I n s u rance Comm issioner -Rkhanl I\flrquardt, Republican incumbent. Marquardt stands on his record in his first term�peciaJly in terms of the service his offering his con­ stituents. -Joe Davis, Democratic challenger. He charges that his opponent is an "ab­ sentee commissioner" and has failed to carry out his duties promptly.

2nd D i st ri ct Leg i s l at ive seats: State Senator -Jim Mdbnlel, Republican challenger. H e feels that most elected officiaJs tend to withdraw from their constitLIents. He has vowed to remain available if elected. -Ted Boldaer, Democratic incumbent. He is currently chairman of the Energy Committee and feels that we should have safe, affordable energy without hurting the environment.

State Representative Pos ition 1 -Jnn MlUer, Republican challenger. He says that her only special interest is in better government. -WaJ1lc Eblen. Democratic incumbent. He said that he is interested in developing better planning for arowth.

State Representative Position 2 -Frank ROlm, Republican challenger. He said large sums of money are going to school! which produce children unprepared for life. He hopes to change that. -PbJIIIs EridtlOn, Democratic incumbent. She said that she puts her own in­ tegrity at the top of her priorities.

,III'

O u t l i ne:

Reagan 's and Carter's educa tion policies If the education policies of a Reaaan presidency followed those of the Reagan candidacy, the next rour years would feature less federal intervention In school policies, less federal aid to schools and !iludenl.S, and more Itate and local control. The most visible ef­ fect would be: the dismamlina of the Department of Education. Though the Washington, D.C. education community was by no means united in iu approval of the new depar­ tment, which was officially born last May I , there now .seems to be a leneral concurrence that destroyins the depart­ ment, which was officially born last defeat for education. "I think that statement (promising to dismantle the department) struck a nerve in a 1m of people, " proffers Tom Duffy, president of the American Student Association. Terry Herndon, executive director of the pre-Carter National Education Association (NEA). which was perhaps the most insistant advocate of the new department, isn't sure he'd want to keep the agency if Reagan won. "An education department under a President Reagan is somethins we'd have to think twice about. " he says. "It might be: easier to let the depart­ met go," he adds. The campaign's education views on key points: Fuadlnl: Reagan's January policy

statement on education asserted he wanted to "maximize control (of school policy) by parents, teachers and local school boards" by transferring reponsibility for funding back to the states. In other words, explains Reagan deputy press aide Ken Towrey, "states that wanted to continue federal programs would have to raise taxes locally. " Financial aid: The Republican plat­ form pledges "to enact tuition tax credits," an aid program that was rejected in 1979 in favor of President Carter's plan to expand grants to mid­ dle-income students. QvalllJ of eduCltion: Reagan and the 1 �-page sedlon of the Republican platform that deals with education agree that the federal govenment is reponsible for 10w-quaJity learning. As Reagan's January policy statement put it: "Since 1962, when federal aid to education began, per­ student costs have increased and test scores have faUen virtually in propor­ tion to the rise in federal spending for and control over education." Reaaan fails to note, though , that the largest single aid to education programs in American history was

beaun In June, 1944, when President Roosevelt signed me G.I Bill. II gave aid to millions of veteraru: auending college. Standardized leSt scores peaked in .1963. some 1 9 years after . federal aid to education began.

Jimmy Clner

The Democratic platform'S education section is 6 � ·pages long, a fact not overlooked by education lobbyists in tryina to discern candidate conccrn for leaming. But education lobbyists readily ex· press concern for Carter's record on education. "Carter has directed more aid to education than any other president." says Steve Liefman of the Coalition of Private Colleae and University Studen­ IS (COPUS). But Carter, he adds, didn't always follow through on his proposals. "In many of the education policies in­ troduced, the administration had to be: prodded to carry them out." Jerry Roschwalb, director of gover­ nment relations for the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges, agrees that in many instances the administration wasn't "out there fighting" during congressional debates. Still, the Carter campaign's education policies - authored by the NEA -- do appeal to most edcation lobbyists contacted by College Press Service. Among those policies: FaadlDl: The Democratic platform favors "a steady increase" in federal education support, aimed at equaJiring funding and opportunities from state to state. Fluad,1 ,Id: While supportina "tax aid for private schools," it wants to with-draw it for "segregationist academies." (The Republicans have pledged to oppose efforts to remove tax-exempt status for private and religious schools). The administration has expanded the amount of grant money available to lower-income students, and has made .middle·income students eligible for federal aid programs for the first time. As a budgCl measure last spring, it also cut SSO off each National Direct Student Loan. It has opposed tuition tax credits. Teacher. unloas: While the Republican platform "opposes any federal action to establish 'agency shops' in public schools," Carter's support for teachers unions is unqucstioned. Both the NEA and the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) -- the two largest unions - are campaianlng for the president.

P L U p ro f s d o n ' t l i ke lc a n d i d a tes By Sbaron Storey A sampling of PLU professors inter­ viewed dislike the choice of candidates ;\VaHable in the presidential election. "People are unsure of who they support because they're unsure of the candidates," said bioloay prof Jens Knudse:n. Knudsen is upset by the lack of definition on the candidates and has not made a commitment to any of them. "I suppose you could call it apathy," he said. "Out not to vote is a worse kind of apathy. It's better to take the risk of makina a choice." Gregory Guldin, anthropololY

professor, said that half 01' the country doesn't vote. Voter apathy b not a case of childish irresponsibility but "a stront indictment against the choice of candidates," said Guldin. Guldin's view wa, echoed by political science professor, David Atkinson. "People tend to criticize alienation." Atkioson said, "but, in a way. it's a political value in and of it­ self. Who wants to contribute to dec· tina someone they have no affinity

with?"

When asked what he thOUght about the national election, Bob Torrens, Food Service Director, said, "Not much." Torrens has been disappointed in the poor quality of the candidates

and remains undecided. "Eishteen- to 2O-year-olds," accor­ One week before the election dJng to Spencer, " have the lowest rate Torrens says he leans toward Citizens of voter tUtn-out of any group IR the party candidate Barry Commoner, if population, with the exception of the: he votes at all. He agrees with the deceased. " The lack of student in­ Oregon group wor�in8 to put NOTA volvement in government at PLU is (None Of The Above) on the ballot, "nol atYPical," he said. " At least it's a choice," said Torrens. Guldin said that the bastc quesuons Political science proressor Wallace are nev:r answered. The candidates Spencer explained that studf!nt apathy have become "politician Entertainers" had three basic causes: 1 . Many Carter and Re&lan spend more time students " have a lack of identity wilh a defending what they did or didn't say location for purposes of voting." They than dealing with the issues, says have no real community ties outside Knudsen. He sees the campaign sym­ the university. 2. They have "not yet bolized by "Reaaan's hot air balloon discovered the impact of government seen on his television advertisements "s on their well-being. " 3. "They simply to Caner's big mouth. feel that they have better things to do"


Octo�r 31, 1980, Mooring Mast. Page 16

E D ITORIAL

M ora l M a i oritv: W h at ' s w ro n g

WE:RE'§ A LITTLE §OMETJ-IING FOR THE POOR ORPI-lA N§ , REV EREND . . .

ORPHANi>? WHO CARE� ABOU T ORP�AN�? THI� WI L.. L.. H ELP DEFEAT A LIBERAL.. §ENAToR! Dl.E'·oo yo V !

with t h i s p i ct u re? It would be a shame If people were being per­ suaded to Join the New Right by political groups like Moral Majority or california's The Christian VoIce because the New Right's stands on Issues seem to be morally con­ sIstent with ChrIstian ethics. It would be a shame to see concerned. sincere Christians let someone else do their moral thlnklg for them. It would be a shame not only because most of the New Right's stands ore not based on scripture. but also because the "movers and shakers" In the political faction are not church mambers at all but political pros taking ad­ vantage 0' the enthusiasm and financial backIng of the growIng number of evangelical Christians. There are at least three reaons to believe that such "religiously based political actIon groups or belng In­ spired not necessarily by God but by opportunist politIcians ready to cosh in on the power behind the fundamentalist movement. The fIrst reason Is that the mot Influential and con­ troversIal of the New Rlgh movements. Moral Majority was not born out of the church. Phill ips, Howard organizer of the right-wing lobbying group called The Conservative Caucus. Paul Weyrlch, who according to

magazine Newsweek "runs a highly regarded In 'training school' Washington for conser­ vative candidates," Robert Billings, one of Weyrlch's pupils and Ed McAteer, a veteran marketing man of t h e COlgate-Palmolive company, formed the core group which convinced Rev. Jerry Falwell to set up the politIcal organization. According to Newsweek "Falwell's backing was crucial; the financial and logistical resources that he commanded were Imrnensa."

The second reason the group's spiritual authority on political Issues should be questioned Is that although they do claim Christian doctrines against such Issues as abortion, gay rights, drugs and por­ nography. they also claIm moral discernment on Issues such as the ERA. sex education, SALT II, the Department of Education and defense spending cuts. S1rong's Exhaus1lve Con­ cordance of the Bible doesn't Ilst any of these Issues anywhere. not even I the Apocrypha. If Moral Majority's Executive Secretary Michael Harris' staternent that the group does not promote can­ dIdates but rather prin­ ciples, Is true, where is their basis for moral judgement except In the assumption that Is conservatism

_

Christian? The third reason that the New RIght's convictIons may not be consistent with Christian ethics Is that their methodology Is not con­ sistent with the classical in· terpretatlon of the New Testament message. Although Christ come InitIally for the Jewish people they rejected him because they expected the Messiah t o be a political king. But Christ didn't come to abolish Jewish law, but to fulfill It. Instead Christ worked his kingdom through the heart of man.

Politicians (theoretically) reflect the views of the people. In order then to in­ sure that the government is moral. the people who elect the government of­ ficials must be mora. Morality should be worked in the hearts of man not legislated. TheIr tactics are likewise Inconsistent with the Ideals America was founded on. Richard John Neuhaus, a Lutheran pastor and a member of the board of Worldvlew magazine sold of the maJorltlsts, "They really don't understand the ethIcal and philosophical

tradtlons of democracy or how to brIng about change in a pluralistic society, " To set forth any one par­ ticular set of morals as "the" correct system, and Imply that any other inter­ pretation Is less moral Is legalistiC and dogmatic, If not dangerous. In this case, It is even more dangerous when the morals claim a spIritual ph i l os o p h i c a l and authority they do not possess.

Kathleen M. Hosfe\d

BUNDY: An error of procedure I n 123 Florida death penalty court cases; Including that of Ted Bundy may result In the overturning of all the sentencing. The Florida Supreme Court will pass the judgment of penalty.

By Jeff OllOn

"What have you men got against peace?," asks a cartoon character woman to her husband, whose newspaper shows a head l l n g stating "war I n. ., " According to the Oxford Dictionary, peace Is

"Freedom from, or cessation of, war or hostilities; .. ," but I n our world VOTE: where strategies of conflict, m i l itary power and war determine the Tuesday, Nov, 4 Is the day; be a respon­ superiority and strength of a nation, peace Is unheard of, People sible Informed citizen; know how you are throughout the world fight for peace-far safety, welfare, and Libya's Iraq, with going to vote on all the Issues. Don't be prosperity-shalom, Yet, Khomelnl rejects peace apathetic, remember to vote, superman, Qaddafl announces he will build a "Chinese wall" between Libya and Egy�t, and the Holy war I_ssue ends saudl-Libyan rel at lo ns ' db :II = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = IF= I n a world of selfishne ss and defensiveness will there The Tacoma area has recently been victim ever be peace? Men do not have anything against peace, to many violent acts of rape and assault, so .but the Interests and Ideas men equate with peace seem please take warning. There Is a picture and selfish and defensive, We refer to the " M iddle East description of the wanted assailant I n the Peace Talks" but It would be more correct to refer to Admlnstratlon Building, take time to see It, Be them as the "Middle East War Talks," Peace exhibits careful-ask for an escort or offer one your­ very little power and strength and a nation's superiority self. Is quite relative to this view of control. But must we be I n confli ct to assure ourse lves we are adequately super KHOMEINI: ior? I think not, the human concept of, particularly the Ameri can Frank Moore, the head of the presiden· concept, of superiority, does'not need superiorness over others to tial/congresslonal liaison staff has an­ be superior but rather superlamess within our relative view. Your relativ nounced Khamel ml "has cancer of the e view Is mallea ble so as you go to the polls Tuesday, ask yourse colon" and Is "not going to last long," The lf befare you vote, Is peace an attitude relative within my heart and Iranian State Department refused to com­ mind or Is It a candidate and his m i l itary defense budget? ment.

r=

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CO M M E NT

Paae 17, Moorina Mast, October 31, 1980 • •

R i e ke- ' P LU d o i n g t h e m o st for t h e m ost' President RIeke recently attended the bi-onnuol American National lutheran Church COfwen­ tlon. ofter which he retur­ ned ond reported to the PlU faculty that the feeling among those Involved In the division of colleges ond university services was that PlU has become a leader among the twelve colleges and universities the by represented Notional Church, In an Interview lost week. Dr. Rieke explained his faculty report and its im­ plications. MOIl: Specifically what was the report of. the dlYfllon of college and unlveratty aeMc••? RleI<e: They always give a general report. Each college and university have their own written report... 8ut the main action I'em that came from the divlslon ...was a motion In­ troduced by the the chairman of the board [of­ that division I which had

EdHor Kathl9<!O M.. Hosfeld

Newa EdHer

Tom Kaehler

Featur.. EdHor Pstra Rowe

Sparta EdHor John Wallace ProducftOn EdHer Margo Sludent Photography EdHor Greg Lehman

Magazine EdHor Marcl Ameluxen

EdHorlal AIIIstan" Dee Anne Houso ErlcThomos

Copy EdHar Koren Wold

Graphlca EdHor Steve Houge lullneu Manager Corrl

Minden

Circulation Manager Pom Corlson

AdVertising Manager Cindy Kloth

Technical AdvIIor Mike Frederickson

FacuHy AdVIsor Cliff Rowe

The MoorIng Mast Is pubIlIhed weekly by the Jtudenls 01 PocInc lutheran lJMtertsty \on dar the auspices of the Boord ODIrlJons e.. of RaQents. pressed In the Mad Ole not In­ tended 10 tep!&senl fhose 01' the !he regents. ad­ mInISfrofton. tne faculty. the student body Of the Most ,torr Latter, 10 the editor shOuld be submitted by 5 P tTl. Of !he sorne weeiI of PJDI\cotIon.

been presented at the and convention 1978 studied since then. What It coils for Is Increasing sup­ of the church coUege and university system. There's nothing really specific saying that the convention urged that every congregation cough up 8 1 000 or something like

that. But whOl there Is Is a positive very of lot language about the im­ portance of congregations from supporting people their own local church to go to one of the colleges Q( universities In the church system. Turns out that If every congregation In the National American lutheran Church sent one mora student. just one more...to one 01 the church colleges. then the church's enrollment In the whole system would double. .bond there were some specifics like it would be the tor useful congregations to develop scholarship funds. It would be useful for them to have educational programs teJllnlJ the youth of the chUrch what the church colleges and universities are about. It would be im· for the portont congregations to reach out and develop two-way the between liasons congregations and the that And colleges. resoutlon was adopted by the convention. That was the specific action item that came out, MAST:t am Int",.".d In what wal reported to the faculty from the conven· flon.. ,

Rieke: . . on my percep­ tions 01 PLU becoming a leader in the system. Well. that Is based on a number of things. Some of the things that might be of In­ terest to you are we have the largest enrollment of any of the schools, even bigger than Capital Of St. Olaf's (as we typically hove had the largest head count), we give more degrees every year than any of the others schools, [and] we spend more money every year for educotlan. [The budget as revealed by an audit is brokoo out in various portions:] main· tenance. etc. and a por. lion of It Is called "e and G' which Is Education and General. That Is the portion of the budgel that Is rsolly aimed at underwriting the ocodemlc enterprise of

the university as opposed to kooplng the buildings cleon or Shovellin g the snow off the walks. We spend significantly more money for E and G than any of Ihe other schools even though our tultlonis not the highest. The national church is now In the process of re­ studying Its method of allocating funds. Each year each college and church gets a certain amount of money from the National Church...They are In the process of revising their fOfmula such that PLU will get the largest amount from the National Church In thats and I lack, rucognltlon of productivity. n'ey are talking about n' Imber of degrees given. number of students S9fVOO. Another way that [we exhibit leadership) Is that If we're not unique In the correct sense we are nearly SO in terms of having a c o n g r egational representative program where there Is a person that PLU Identifies. trains and asks to represent the univerSity to each of the �gregations.

We have broadened that program out from the American lutheran Church and extended It beyond to Include the lutheran Chur­ ch of America SO that we hope by Ihe end of the year we'll have some 450, plus or minus. churches In which there will be a per· son or a couple who will be the specific represen­ tatives of the university. And their Job Is Iwo-way. not only to try to represent the university to the church but also to see If the unlver· sity can serve the churchln someway...

MOlt: Do other unlver­ Iities and collges look to PlU lor tr.nds? Rieke; Very much so. Par­ ticularly since so many new programs hove come on line both academic and service programs, recently. SOme of the other schools hove hod programs we hove not had but we are developing a number of programs that are very In· terestlng to them. For example the core two program, the foreign area study program The Co­ operative education program, the legal studies program" Some of those are represented to varying degrees 01 othBf schools

too. But in response to your question "00 other schools look to us as examples?" the answer Is "oh, yes."

Moat: Does thll IOrt of leadership role reflect on the atuden" as wal l 01 the admlnlltratlve programs? Rieke: I certainly think so, yes. Geography has on awful lot to do with the kind of students that are presen· t In the different schOOls. So you'll find a very different kind of student body at California lutheran than you will here. Or In a par· tlcular school like Texas lutheran where you have a very heavy Hispanic In· fluence... But If you are talking about just over')1 quality of studdents we at· tract a very high qua'lty. I wouldn't say we C'lHract [the highest quoll�'j but I ' would soy we don't have to toke a bock seat to al.IYbody.

Mast: What do.s this mean to tuture students and future programs, .tc7

as many ways as we are and spending the kind of money we are In support of that presents no different challenge than the overall challenge we face as a university to keep quality high. Its just a subset of the same problem" . We are growing, gelling better; our intent Is to continue Ihat.

Malt: Does this have any effeCI on the relaffonshlp belween the university and the church? Rieke: Yes. I think It does. I or people that think looking for quality and looking tor a good return . on the dollar Invested fo. education. To the extent that we can document that we are doing a responsible Jab I think thot It makes our recruiting easier. our retention better, more people turn to PLU as possible donors. support from outside Is easier·· everybody loves a wlnnerl I don't wont to say that In a haughty sense at all or put down any of the other schools at all because they are all goad. It Just hap­ pens we've been growing more rapidly and doing more things.

Rieke: I think It means a great deal because as our s preads reputation nationally It means that students corne through her are more readily accep­ ted across the nation. (It makes It) easier (fOf them) Mast: That's all Ihe to get jobs or assigned positions of Importance -=luestlons I have, Is there and respect. It also means anything yau'd Ilk. to If we can develop and add? support new programs it is Rieke: I'd like to [soy) jusl an encouragement to a sentence or two .. since other schools to find ways everbody is worried about In which they can develOp p r ivate I n dependant and support programs. We schools I n the '80s and regularly get Inquiries whether they ore going to about "How did you get survive. Among the church such-and·such a program particular colleges in off the ground? Can we do there's been a lot of worry. the somer'... There's been a lot of And I don't wont to come pressure in some church across saying we hove the schools to soy "he, in order bet of everything because to survive the '80s -�o there are some some very something different." The real strengths in many of mesoge has become clear our sls1er Institutions and that you if you have we look to them. But when uniqueness, If you have you look at 11 overall we are distinctiveness. whether it is dOing the most for the your church relatedness 0 most your excellent physical education program or your reputation for this. that or something else, If you have it, for heaven's sakees em­ phasize It. hang tight to It and build on It. Because the schOOls that do that ore the only ones that are going to survive. Those that either cut their ties or try to do something different from what they've been or try to pretend that they ore something different from Mast: What kind 01 what they are. are the ones this do.s challenge that are really going to go pr...nt to this untvenlly? under. In that regard I Rieke: Nothing different know that, since the thon the fact thot we hop­ all share flnon· presidents pen 10 be number one /n clal data, last year was the our church college system. first year all the schools at least by the Indicators In up ended the that I've given (and I'm sure black.... Port of 11 is hanging my presidential colleagues onto the distinctiveness of would want to debate with beIng church'related In­ me [over that)). The fact And a mild winter stitutions. thai we are servlnQ as many students as we are in In the midwest helped too


October 31. 1980. Mooring Mast. Page 1 8

LEnERS

' T h i n k a n d re a s o n w i t h a n d t h ro u g h fa i t h ' debatIng amonQ them­ selves. The common people were unaware of Mr, Nelson has on amazIng Intellect; a prac­ what was happening and ticed mind. Rarely have I for the most part unaffec­ been so InspIred and ted. We, as today's com­ prompted as when I read mon people, may remain his letter to the editor, unaware of the struggle "Have you thought your but we cannot remain fanatIcIsm through?" ( OCt. unaffected. We are the first 10/80 ).There Is huge truth moss population to be in much of what Mr. Nelson raised by the SCientIfIc said In his letter. So much, method of thought. Moss public education as well In fact. that It scores me. Although It Is not a sudden as more Institutions of shock; thot is, I wos not "higher learning" have reatly token by suprlse, For created a more Intelligent Nelson Is common man. This Is the what Mr. speakIng of Is no new new battle. The struggle to struggle. It Is a struggle. It attend school. work, rear Is a struggle that only now. children and sustaIn some however. is beginning to kInd of faith with crItIcal seep Into the heart of the and proof seeking mInds. schooled are western world. Mr. Nelson . We poses the struggle as beIng between fanatIcism and thought. Historically It has been known as the struggle between religion and science. It is an old war, but today a new bot­ tle Is on the front. Our generotlon ond those to follow are the first to face thIs new battle, In the past the struggle bet­ Wl 'n scIence and religIon has been fought primarily by just a handful of scholars. secular and churched. arQulng and To The EdHor:

Christians. No easy pilgrim belief for us. We "know" that thIngs which cannot be observed are questionable realitIes. Moses parted the Red $ea-an entire sea. We read hear and talk about It tIme and tIme again. Through faith, trust. hope or whatever sIngle word you use to pigeonhole the phenomenon--we belIeve it. Vet. In the back of our studied. educated, scIen­ tIfIc minds a voice whIspers, sometimes shouts to us, "a whole damn sea? How do you expect me to believe that? How do you expect me to believe Jonah and the whale; bur­ ning bushes that are not

consumed; clouds of smoke and fire leadIng an entire nation through the wilderness? Have you ever seen anything like that really happen?" Finally and most shatterIng of all. ..Jesus a man resurrec­ tect We all "know" that o('1ce a man dies he stays dead. He decays and tur­ ns to dust. How could Jesus have lived agaIn? We want to believe un­ critically and thevoice, our scIentific port, demands proof. facts. Never before has the "common man" been so deeply Influenced by these two movers of mankind; faith and science. Never before have they mixed on this level of human existence. Science is the prover, the enforcer of our day and age and It Is shIning lts light on our fanh. Mr. Nelson's cry of "think fool. think" is an ex­ cellent example of how we have finally become children of the scientific revolution, So what do we do with these seemingly Incom­ patible realities; faith on the one hand and our own powers of observatIon on the other? We could refuse to think, Ignore the voice of scIentific truth and

become "starry-eyed." We crumbleand poss away. We ludIcrous Chrlstlans and our faith would quickly cruble and pass away. We would at the very least be poor wItnesses In. this modern world, There Is the other danger too. The danger that the simple scientist falls Into; believIng nothing unless It can 'be brought Into the lob and scrutinIzed. This alternatIve Is no better than the first. To do this Is to creote a world much too small to contain us. There Is a third alter­ native. The only truly honest one. By all means thlnk...try to understond as much as possible, but ot the some tIme we must realize that our understan­ ding Is extremely limited. We try to force a boundless universe In,o a nutshell when we deny those thIngs which do not fit our under­ standing. In short we must think and reason wIth and through faith. It may not solve all lhe problems. frustrations and pains but at least we wilt have tried, and having tried, may die In peace.

J. Matthew Weinhold

' I s ' n t H e wo rt h k n ow i n g f o r yo u rs e l f? ' To The EdHor:

Do you know what you believe and why you believe It? On what foun­ dation does your life stand? These ore a few of the questions raised by Gary Nelson In hIs article en­ titled, "Have you thought your fanaticism through?" These kinds of questions ore relevant. We all need to stop and examine our lives and the direction we ore headIng. . . Let's toke that time to �.op, to search for the foun­ datIons at ute and see what we flnd--decell or truth, To arrive at the truth, let's put aside the guidelines we have for evaluatIng things: the values and contributions of society. our background, what our parents and friends tell us, and all that man has created on thIs earth. Let's also put aside the Bible, church doctrine, the church itself, and our m a n y misconceptions about Christianity. What Is lett? AHer peeling away the layers plied up around us, we are left alone with the universe. Where did It originate? What is Its meaning? These questIons could be debated for hours, but the Issue we need to consIder is whether or not ther� is a creator. In the uhiverse we see a vastness that Is In­ comprehensible. Amidst our solar system is a perfect

order that seems the result of something more than chance. In the universe we know that we live on a del icately balanced masterpiece, the earth, whIch mysterIously allows us to exist. Did the order and perfection we observe in our world come about by chance? Or does It reflect the nature or a creator? Just as a painting reveals the nature of the artist. our unIverse would seem to reflect the order and perfection of a creator. If. at this poInt. you do not believe that the world was created and therefore, deny the possible exlS1'ence of a creator than you need not read further because

However, If there Is even a slight possibility that such a one exis1s, don't we need to look a IIHle deeper? So we continue wIth creation. looking at history. certain men stand out as having hod specific purpose and directIon that made theIr lives significan­ tly meanIngful. One such man was Jesus, the only man who claimed to be the creator of thIs universe. He mode many astoun­ ding claims about Himself, God, and the truth of life. History reveals Jesus as no ordinary man and that He. more than any other, has changed the course of mankInd. What does this mean for us? Jesus was either who He claimed to

be, or the greatest ilar the world has ever known. Is It worth takIng the tIme to find out who this man was and whether or not His words were true? We all need to consIder these questIons and be able to have deflnUe an­ swers for them. decidIng for ourselves what ' we betleve and why we believe It. Test the values and philosophies of today and yesterday by the lives of the philosophers them­ selves. Do their lives con­ vince you of their truth? After examlr ng the evidence of II a life of Jesus, we mu. ,divldually declare the ve. �: liar or creator. 11 He \ s a liar,

non­ Christians and Christians have the some­ fate--a brief exIstonce lollowed by death. nothIng more. If He Is c reator and His words therefore true, Chrls1ians do not have the same fate as non-Christians for Jesus of­ fers the some purpose and life that He hod to those who believe. Isn·t It worth tlndlng out who He was and how He lived? Isn't It worth knowing for yourself what He really said? John Lewis Klr.ten Pedersol"l Cothy Milburn

G a ry N e l so n s a l ready j u d g ed To the Editor,

There are many Gory J. Nelsons In the world. There were many In Jesus' time also who looked upon hIs "starry-eyed" followers and asked the same ques1lons of them as Gary asks now. Gory shouldn't really be blamed for his derisions for they are from on u n r egenerated heart. mInd, and soul. He won't unders1and until he has the Spirit of God alive In his heart. He won't have the Spirit until. he asks God tor It.

He won't ask God for It because he Is too maud. .....God reslsteth the proud but glvelh grace unto the humble" (James 4:6). If he can't humble hIm­ self. he cannot admit his sin before God, 'rr' ne' cannot adml, his sin, he connot confess It and ask God for forgiveness. He - cannot receive forgiveness unless he recognlies that Jesus Christ paid for all of his life-long .s lns through his (Christ's) death and Christ can give' him the gift of a new life by virtue of the resurrection.

This new life Includes a new capacity to know. love, and serve God, to learn from and be led by the Spirit of God. This is frequently referred to as "grace," Groce Is nof on "assum-' ptlon". It Is a foct aHested to by all who are blessed to receive It (John 5,9). The Impact of this "grace" (new capacity, being bar again, ect.) and the love, forgIveness and peace that comes from It changes a person's life. "new capaclty" a person has a new perspective on

the world. This gIves a new strength to believe In Christ as God's only son and the Bible as God's only word. QuIte frequently the Im­ poct of grace Is mistaken for "starry-eyed" -Ism, but It is the strength of millions of believers In the West and countless more behind the iron and bamboo curtaIns. No man sholl Judge or condemn the Gory J , Nelsons of this world for they are already under Judgement because they aren't "starry-eyed." JohnP. May


II --------�

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I A • O ' AS P L U . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. • • • • N . . '.. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . .

It only takes a little time

..;

• • •

to dial extension 7479 ! slory, column one.

W••k of Novemb.r 2-8

TAKE TIMElo call Ihe activities IASPLU hear hotline-you'li I everything from who's , havlng a dance tonight, to I what you'll be eating tor I breakfast tomorrow mor­ Inlng. Each day. activities lare recorded on a tape which Is played I 'oop, automatically for those , WhO dial 7479. Menus for ,each meal, together with lall student-sponsored levents Bfe given. To place n activity on the line, call

Tu••day, Uv. Jazz with Jorgan Kru•• 'n the elv•. CoIl8Q. Bowl TuesdlY end Wednesday In UC It 7 p.m. ThursdlY, movie: uFlnlln', Ralnbow," ln elve. Friday. Songf.s' In Olson. 7 p.m.• followed by Stomp In CK. SlturdlY I, Homecoming footbln with lewl. end Clarl<, c.pped ott by tho alII at T.coml Mill that night.

After Homecoming, thing' wind down I bit In preparltlon forThlnksglvlng brelk. N.v.rth.,.... "The Seduction of Joe Tynln" will be shown In the ue It 7:30 Ind 9:30 F�d.y. Week of November 18-22 Agaln, lIvallzz with Jorge" and gang a. the elve M0nd8y nlte. Tue.day the 8CH1rd of R8gentl will meet, bAnlnnlng at 8:30 I.m. Th.... will be . campus·wlde blood d�•• on Wedneaday. "A Star I, Born" will � ahown Thurliday In the Cave. Week of November 23-29

t -------- -----------------------------------, Hne a r.'ulng break and I Super Thanksglvlngl l l

ASPLU Senate: who are they, what do they do?

I The ASPlU Senate Is the formal decision making , I body of ASPLU. As such, It I makes the various ASPLU r policies, appropriates all I ASPLU funds, and end orI' ses or lobbys against policies. I University rhrough Indlvlduaily I initiated projects, Senate I a/so provides services· for I the PlU community, such pOlitical awareness l as month, voter registration, the photo lab, van service, activities hotline, and other special services. Senate meetrngs are held every Thursday at 5 p.m. In the Regency Room. All meetings are open to the public.

ASPLU Sene'e:

Sene.e Ictlon:

executive Officer.: PresIdent Bob Gomulklewlcz VIce President

Discussed possibilities for Incorporatrng Orientation Into the University strueture. It Is presently being handled by students.

8048

Mark Davis

7012

Alan Nakamura

7919

Comptroller

Program Director Rick Mattson

Senetors:

AODroved B new intramurals board structure.

535·4741

Investigated a means of providing day care to children of PLU students.

i

I I I I I I I I I I I I

Mark Beeksma 8124 I Mark Dunmire 7841 I Paul Jackson 7782 Looked Into a grievance I John Kist 7921 proceedure developed by I Brendan Mangan 8124 Student LIfe Marla Marvin 7973 I I Judy Mohr 8266 Announced that the Cave is I Mike Ronning I 8680 operating at a piofit. I Steve Vltallch 82\lt I ----------------------1 .-----------------I Dont forget to vote November 4. Dont forget to vote November 4.Dont forget to vote November 4. Dont'forg I et to vote November 4. Dont forget to vote November I Tool rental I I Staff Box So you just decided I you'll finally build those I bunkbeds you've been of and note 2-8 is arlgmal musical scores, meaning to get to. buy all I November choreography, and or­ homecoming week, during the wood, then you I which, chestration. Finally, dorm the PLU community remember...you left your I explores thanks . . . history, decorations and posters Its tools at home! Well, never I explores Its history and will be Judged In the main fear, just head over to the on Saturday, I traditions In a contem· lounges Games Room and check November 8, at 9 a.m. Publicity The ASPLU light. out the ASPlU tool rental I porary Ali lutes are Invited to PLU has long entrusted Committee: service. A variety of tools I its homecoming festivities celebrate PlU's 90th birth­ are available at nominal I planning to lis students_ day at the Homecoming Mark Dunmire, Chair prices. Do something

Homecoming

by Marilyn Chaired this Pfleuger. year's committee will sponsor an old Lute tradition. Many of these activities fall under the umbrella of dorm competitions. Tha tlrst of these Is the College Bc,)wl competition In the Aegency Room, Tuesday and Wednesday, at 7 p.m. "PLU Through Time and Space" will be the theme of Friday'� Song test com-· petition In Olson at 7:30. Competitors are hereby warned that this Is a flrst­ cluss PlU tradition, and rr, any entries have been • quite elaborate, Including

I I I

publicize

W..kof Nov. 9-15

� t'480.

It pays to

Friday after Stomp, Songlest, In the ck A live band will be on hand to rock and roil you,Ad· m/sslon Is 50 cents, or free with a homecoming button. Homecoming royalty wlU be crowned (!) Immediately before song lest. find will Saturday dedicated past and present Lutes at the football game against Lewis and Clark at Franklin Pierce stadium 1 :30. beginning at Homecoming week ends , with the formal dance at the Tacoma Mall. Tickets are available at the Inlo desk.

Debbie Jacobson Bobbl Nodell

nice for your room todayl

wishes to thank: Advisors Marvin Swenson, Bob Jerke, Donald Kathleen Gomulklewlcz, Hosfeld. Alck Mattson. also: Cindy for the graphic. Kim for all the footwork, Dave and Santha for the en· couragement, Mom for the laundry, and most of all, everyone in Senate fo being so patient.

Disclaimer TAKE TIME 18 published monthly by the Associated Pacific of Students University. Lutheran Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of PacifiC lutheran Un iversity, its Board of Regents, administration, faculty. staff, the Moorlf19 MI't, or the student body. Inquiries may be directed to the ASPLU Publicity Committee.

What can be said about a student government that advertises Itself? Plenty. How effective would It be If it didn't? What If Orientation, Homecoming, picnics, concerts, and so on, went unadvertised? Obviously, on the activities side of ASPlU, It would be 1m· possible to operate without publicity. The marginal cost of this · Important aspect of student govern­ ment Is small In com­ parison to the benefits. Many more students are able to profit from ac· tlvlties, thanks to adver­ tising. But to stop there Is to neglect duty, as well. Do you know what your elec· ted officers and senators do? What choices they are faced with, and how they make Student them? government Is your link to the administration, and your voice In University policy-making. Do the decisions senators make reflect your views? You have a right to know. Also, those decisions take on an added dimension of validity when all students are aware Of. and Involved In, those decisions. In short, we spend the money to strengthen and the student unify association-of which you are a part. On a related note, the phrase I have heard more times at PLU than any other Is, "I dont have time." These words are ready responses of some toward student government, com­ mittees, clubs, programs. and activities. I dont beHave that. Do you ever nollce how unbudgeted 1Ime seems to evaporate? Time that Is available for the things Ihat make college life fun and rewarding. A student needs only to be persuaded that these activities are worth hlsfher time. Then, time Is 'made' for them. Such Is the purpose of this page; purchased. writ· ten. and laid out by the ASPLU Publicity CommU· tee. We hope to make ex· tra-curricular student living more visible to you. So you can TAKE TIME . to join us!

Mlrk Dunmire


October 3 1 , 1980, Mooring Mast, Page 20

PORTS gun that makes their learn go," he said. "Defensively, I.hey try to take a lot of your play away from you by over­ play,"

The- Lutes have been con­ ditioned to overplay, however, as two weeks ago, a fired-up Whilwonh team took away the PlU runnina game, only to � the Lutes switch to the air, with quarterback Eric Carlson throwing for a school record 362 yards enroule to a 39-38 come-from-behind vje• lOry. Carlson, 20-lS for four touchdowns on the afternoon, also went down in the Lute record books for total in­ dividual offense, as he rached up 3 1 S lotal yards. PlU mo,ed out to a 14-10 first half lead after Whitwonh shocked the number·one Lutes by marching down and scoring on their first possession. "They took the opening kickoff right down the field and scored, just like 'who arc you guys1'," said Westering. PlU came right bad with two big plays, the first being a 48-yard pass from Carlson to tight end ScOlt Westering and the playing so dishonest against the - run we lhrew out our game play in the first quaner and went straight to a pass of­ fense," said Westerlng. " They were gambling on the past." The third period saw the Lutes expand their first half lead out to a 30-17 advantllJe on Carlson's third T.O. tosS of the afternoon, this one a 33yarder to tightend Eric Mon­ son, followed later by a two yard plunge to paydirt by freshman halfback Jeff Rohr. The game turned into a disaster in Ihe founh quaner, however, as Whitwonh came up with three big plays of their own. The Pirates broke a S3yard run deep into Lute !! territory before punching the .: ball over from the one to -1 :i narrow the margin t031-24. '-A pair of fumbles set up two Lut. d.'.ns/�. end Don G.I. (88) t.kes to the .lr to prn.nt Plr.t. pess, more Whitworth scores, which came on T.O. tosses of 17 and S3 yards by Pirate quarterback Dan Harder. The second almost lOSS touchdown wasn't. as Lute defcosive back i for the Mark Lester moved n inter�ption and lipped the 6-0 records and it isn't ro, £ric Thomas between these Northwest Con­ ball before the Whitworth suprising that the media will ference schools have been receiver grabbed it and scam­ 1:30 the for force full in out be Recent conrrontations bet­ decided by a single poinl. with pered in 10 give the Pirales a Ore. McMinnville, i n kickoff comewetn the PLU and Linfield producing two garna 38-31 lead with 3:3S lefl in the "There's gOIDi to be three have squads footban contest. the in victories from-behind stations V. T. two and radio ,enerated enouah heart­ "We had a couple of big closing moments. Add to that covering the lame," said PLU stopping excitment thai fans plays in the third quarter and tradition the fact that the head coach FroslY Westering. wilh cardiac conditions should then they got a couple of Lutes and the Wildcats, "It's going to be pretty hectic think lwia: before aucodina motivating plays in the fourth two and one ranked presently even station one down there; tomorrow's contest. period," said Westerinl, "It's respectively in the national wants to put live mies around Four ('If the lasl six meetings NAIA Division II polls, sport one of the few times we've our necks on the sidelines." had a boomerang come back Westering said he expects a at us. We got caught in a hard billing. clean game and stalemate, but I wasn't disap­ noted the balance that Linfield pointed. I've been in tOO many hlU between their offense and that before." gamcslike defense. The Lutcs lot the ball back "Offensively, they've got a and began to move it up the good quarterback who's a big

i

_ _ _ _ _ _

L u t e s " u p " fo r L i n f i e l d

Number one meets number two

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Roo ter bus es ava i l able By Jo'hn WaJla« Students: the Campus Safety and Residential Life offices are sponsoring a bus to tomorrow's football game against Linfield. Ad­ mission will be free to all studentl with a valid 10.

The bus will leave from Harstad at 9:30 a.m. and return at approximately 8:30 p.m. Round trip cOSt, including lunch, will be $S. Reservations can he made by calling Campu Safety and Information. Seats arc filling rast so call now.

field before the drive stalled, putting PLU in a fourth and 19 situation. "We had 10 get the fint and we knew they'd take Scott and Guy away rrom us," said Westering. "So we told Cun (Rodin) to go down Ihe middle and get deep enough for the first down." The strategy worked, as Carlson hit Rodin sill inches ovcr the first yard line, A pass 10 Scott Wcslering moved the ball further up the field before Carlson connected with hilf­ back Guy Ellison on a lS-,ard touchdown toss with 1:13 lefl .sent Franklin Pierce Stadium into bedlam. Needing two points for the win. Ihe Lutes never thOUght tWice about going for the tic. "We'd already decided that if we were going to be number one we wert' going to do it

right," said Westering. "We decided we wcrco', going (0 play for any tie here and if we don't do it, we don't do it. We knew weknew the play we were going to call because we knew down on the goal line that Scott would be like a maanet for Whitworth defenders. We put Guy and Scott on the same side, Scott ran the slant-in curl and Guy scraped orf of him to the outside." The result was a successful two point conversion, (he Lutcs' 12th Straight conferena: win and PLU remaining on lop of the nationa] football pole. "The great thing that a champion does is Ihey got it in the clutch, and we had it in the c1utcb," said Westcring. "The kept coming guys just 1hrough with clutch play after The fireworks or the Whit­ worth game continued the against week following Pacific, as the lutes chalked up 380 yards of total offense enroute to a 41 -20 win over Pacific. Behind Ihe efrorts of a speedy lute offense and a fired-up defense, PlU moved to a 41-0 lead midway through the third Quarter before the first stringers retired to the bench to give the younger players playing time. "We came out excited about playing after the week before, especially the defense who wanted to get their confidcoce back. " said Watering. "We established ourselves carly, dominating the game with tough defense while dOIng a lot of things on offense because of our quickness. Our team very was speed noticable. " Although the PLU second stringers gave up 20 points, Westering beHevcs that giving younger players experienCt! is a necessary ingredient. "We decided there's no way we were going to run up the score but were going to go ahead and play our new kids," said Wcsterina. "Its good 10 .see them gaining some game ex­ pericoce." Looking back on Ihe ex­ periences of Ihe past weeks, Westering sees the games as a buildup to the Linfield con­ tCSt. "Against Whitworth, it was a championship perfor­ manee in the clutch, and last week was a very assertive week to establish our tearn al a con­ sislam level." said WEstering. "This week, we have a cha]lenge to play a champion­ II ship game.


Page 21. Mooring Mast, October 3 1 , 1980

S h u t o u t s p u t L u t e boa t e rs back o n t rac k By Mike urson Defense has been the key as of late for lhe men's soccer learn, as they recorded back· lo·back shutouts against Whitman College and The Evergreen Slate College two weeks ago. "We've been playing with real good defensive intensity, as shown by these two games," said · coach Arno Zoske. "and our passing is improving a lot." Better passing and defense could easily be seen as the Lutes out­ scored these two opponents

IO'{).

Against Whitman, the Lutes tallied in the first half on a comer kick header by forward Majed Shakour. Axel Arenlz then raised the score 2-0 on a " fluke" goal off a direct frcc kick. The Whitman coach protested the goal, claiming that the refercc had not blown his whistle to begin to play again, but to no avail. Shakour then scored his second goal of the contest on a hreakaway to make the final score 3-0. "This was a big game for us because they were cooo(:hamps last year and one of the teams to beat this year." commented Zaske. The Lutes had a slightly easier game against Evergreen winning 1·0. Three PLU players-Shakour. Kim NesselQuist, and Hani Ali Id· drisi-had a pair of goals, and sweqtCr John Larsen added

one. Sopbomore fullback Brian Olson said, "The last time we pillyeci Evergreen we only beat them 1�. so we really wanted t o beat them bad

this time." Zaske singled out defenders Randy Koetje, John Price, Larsen, and Olson as having particularly outstan­ ding games, describing them

as the "backbone" of the team. Concerning the game, Zaske said, " I think we also saw III 101 of the potentially

dangerous offense that we

have. " The Lutes Iravel to McMin· nville, Oregon tomorrow to face Linfield College in their second conference game.

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stick to those budgets, With info on where to live, and how to get the best buys on food, entertainment, clothing, travel, textbooks, stereos, and more. Then we'lIlell you how to be sure you're getting what you pay lor. And how to complain when you don't. Check Itout. You·ll iind some great tips on how to stretch your college dollars. And who knows. you may even discover being frugal can be fun! Also be sure 10 checkout Ford's exciting new 1981 lineup, inclUding Escort. The front-wheel drive car that's built to take on the world, With Escort you·ll lind some great ways to multiply your fun.

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October 3 1 , 1980. Mooring Mast, Page 22

Sp ec ia l m idnigh t pra c tis e

Basketba l l tea m beg ins 1 98 0-81 season ton ight

By John WlJllee:

The PLU basketball team will begin defense of their North­ we5t Conference champion­ ship crown tonight in a vcry unusual manner, The Lutes, who can not of­ ficially begin praticing until November t, will hit the Tar­ tan surfaced floor of Olson Gym tonight at 12:01 a.m. Coach Ed Anderson is calling for this night-owl get together 10 allow the players 10 travel to McMinnville, Ore, to walch

the nalion's number t and 1 ranked footba11 teams (pLU and Linfield respccrively) meet eaeh other ror probable play off berths, To help kick-off the teams new season and to generate fan awareness the Mooring Mas/ in conjunction with the Lute Oub will be offering free apple cider and donuts 10 all spectators who attend tonight's practice (costumes will not be required, however). The Lutes, who have cap­ tured thret straight Northwest Conference titles. will have

nine IC1.tennen retumina from last year'� team which was 16I I overall and 10-2 in league. Among these nine will be Coach Anderson's three leading scorers. Dave Lashua. John Greenquist, and Dan Allen.

Lashua, a 6-7 forward-cen­ ter, was an all<onference. all· destrict and Little AII­ Northwest pick on 1979·80 and averaged 16.4 points and 10,6 rebounds per game. Lashua will be joined in the front court by another 6-7

Lad y Lut es atta ck-o r i e nte d b u t d i d n ' t cage a v i ctory By Dennis Robertson "We played good the whole weekend, but we just couldn't put it in the cage," explained coach Hacker after the Lady Lutes lost two and tied on in their lripleheader on the weekend of Oct. 17 and 1 8 . "We did everything right but score. Although we: didn't win, we were attack-orien­ , ted . The three games lost were to WilJarneue University, Oregon CoUege of Educalion. and Northwest Nazarene College. This. pa.n weekend the Lutes played another tripleheader, winning two and losin& one, The fim same was on Friday against Willameue University, which they won 100{), Jennifer Grigsby s ored the goal with an assist by Julie Haugen. "It

was the best attack-oriented game the team has played all season. The passing was very sharp and accurate, " said coach Hacker. "We had 27 shots on goal. They had three. Jean Manriquez did an ex­ cellent job on hand stops at penalty comers. " The second game was again­ st Centra] Washington Univer· sity, which PLU won 1-0. Goals were 5COred by Julie Haugen and Kim Krumm, both unassisted. Hacker said it was very actina for Krumm to score that goal because she had had a lot of good shots and it was her second goal of the season. "In both or these games 1 was able to substitute players fretly, giving younger players a chance to see action and get practice in game situations," added Hacker. "I

felt the team controlled the tempo of the whole game in mid·field and at attacking and defensive ends," The Lutes lost the last game against Western Washington University 1�. Hacker sum· med il up by saying, ''It was a very fast passing game. The derensive effort of both teams was strong during the entire game. We had more shots on 80al and more come� on Kame, bUI jusl \¥eren't able to score," She also praised goalie JUdith Logan for the ouman­ ding job she has done all """'". Tomorrow PLU will play tWO lames, both al home. The Lutes will put their 9-4-1 record on the line at 9 8.m. against Southern Oregon State College and 4 p.m. against Tacoma Club.

senior, forward John Gretnquisl who tallied an average of 14 points last season Dnd was also another NWC ali-star.

The third leading scorer from last year will also be back. junior guard Dan Allen who averaged 13.3 points and was a second team all­ conference selection. Other lettermen include 6-3 senior guard Tom Koehler. 6-4 senior forward Bryan Lunggaard, 6-6 senior forward Dave Lewson. 6-3 sophmore guard Ron An-

derson. 6-2 sophmore guard Ken R�dy and 6-5 sophmore rorward Martin Reid. The first game or the �eason for the Lutes will nOI be untt! Dec, 4 againsl 51. Martin·s. Most of the team, ho....'ever. . has been playing together in the afternoons, causing Tom Koehler to CQmment. "We should be pretty good with the big men. There are also some good freshmen, sO(lhmores and transfers around. Overall. we should do really well this year. "

Water p o l o team h o p es t o i m p rove B y lHan15 Robertson The water polo season has been going for two weeks at PLU. Although the record, 1-3, has not been Impressive, coach Jim Johnson says thal this will changc. Most of the players are: new to the game so they Ire still lear­ ning. The team is playing we1l. and with experience and resuves he hopes they will soon be playina on a more competilive level. The team had lost 10 UPS twice before playing two games last weekend. The first game was against Lewis &, Clark which they won 14-12. They dropped the game against Oregon

The "Million Dollar Look" for the PLU Homecoming at the 'lux 8h0p.

State 18-12. Scoring leaders were Rick Mat· tson, who had six goals in the first game, and Drew Nelson with seven goals in the second game, The staning lineup for the team is as follows: seniors Drew Nelson and Rick Mattson; juniors Alex Evans and Jerry Giddings; sophomores Drew Martin and Scott Herfindahl; fr es h m an goalie Mark Olsen; and as roerves. sophomore Mike Huff, freshmen Neil TraCht, Eric Miller and Todd Standa! . The Lutes will play a game against WSU tonight and Lewis & Clark tomorrow.

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H I S C O UP O N


Page 23, Mooring Mast, Octo�r 3 1 , 1980

Harriers do well P LU p l aces second and fo u rt h o l ace i n WC I C and NWC m eets By Barb PicKell

set of the race, and Purdy held the top spot until number one finisher Gore turned on the heat near the end of the race to leave the lutes' lap runner seven seconds behind at the finish. The men's team ran, said coach Brad Moore, . 'some good races and some not-so­ good races. I I Overall. thoush, the lute men had a disappoin­ ting day at the conference meet, as they fell from last year's second-place status to a fourth-place finish n i the six­ school NWC. One of those "good races" Moore talked about was Zane Prewitt's sixth-place finish. Also named a conference all-star. Prewitt ran in the third position throughout most of the race, only to be passed up by a strong trio of WiJlamette runners in the last part of the race. Mike Carlson also ran well, placing second for the lutes and 12th overall. Rusty Crim, the Lutes' third man on Satur­ day, finished in the 16th spot.

Running on their hilly home course at Fort Steilacoom Park, the PlU harriers picked up second and founh place finishes in the WCIC and NWC championships last Saturday. The women's team fell four points shon of their goal of toppling Linfield's conference crown. but succeeded in defending their own position as the number two learn in the WCIC. Kristy Purdy led the lady Lutes' erfort. finishing second to Linfield's Carolyn Gore. Behind her were seniors Deb­ bie Tri in third place. and junior Dianne Johnson, plaCing seventh. Melanie Langdon in the 15th spot. Linda Van Beck in 16th, Kris Kyllo at 20th and Muy Bran­ son at 38th rounded out the lutes' squad of six WCIC competitors. Purdy, Tri, and Johnson were named con­ ference ail-stars. Tri took the lead at the out-

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"We're ready for this thing." Johnson said. "I think we're goina to be psyched. Linfield beat us once and then we beat them and then they beat us on Saturday. It's time for us to beat them."

team to victory? Question Number Three: What is the largest point difference that has occurred in a PlU vic­ lOry? Question Number Four: What were the most points every scored in the first half by a PlU football

for you (Paul Hoscth). Question Number One:In a previous issue of The Mooring Mast it was stated that John Zam­ berldl was the first PlU gridder to play football in the NFL. This was. however, untrue. Who was the first PLU foot­ baller to go pro? Question Number Two: Who was the first man to coach a PLU football

In recognition of the fact that PLU,ranked number one, will play Lin­ field. ranked number two, this segment of Trivia of the Week will be devoted PlU to football. However, it has come to the attention of this writer that there are several people who have so far hem stumped by Trivia of the Week, that being the case there will be quetions

Randy Yoakum, who has been running on Prewitt's heels in the second spot all season, suf­ fered from breathing problems and finished 29th and Joe Voetberg. returning after several weeks out because of an injured foot, finished 32nd. This weekend, while the men rest up for the district championship, which is still a week away, the lady lutes will lravel to Missoula, MOnl. for the regional champion­ ships. Dianne Johnson said that the team hopes that they will be able to defeat rival Lin­ field at the regional level, and grab a second-place finish behind powerful Western Washington University. The top three teams and I S in­ dividuals will qualify (or the national championships.

Colleg iate Research

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October

31. 1979.

Mooring Mast. Page 24

FRIDAY OCTOBER

31

.HAUOWEEN Halloween Party and "Monster Bash" Music advisory council In conjunction with KZAM 9 p.m, thru 2 a.m. featuring The Heats and HI路Fi with Ian Matthews and David Surkamp food &. beverages provided Showbo' Theatre [S) 1424 1st Ave. Tel. 682-0478 Ticket" S6 audience must be over 21

'HALLOWEEN Haunted House Sponsoree by KNBQ FM Near Kent Boeing Plant 21 250. Russell Rood 7 - 1 0 p.m. weekdoys

'HAlLOWEEN "Big Bey porty" Mama LaMoyne's 4th floor Old City Hall [T) prizes at 6.30 for the happy hour crowd Third annual costume party Tel. 627-7 1 1 1

.HALLOWEEN E R Rogers Halloween night Free photos of the ones in costume Prizes for the best dressed couple E R Rogers [T) corner of Commercial and Wilkes [behInd town hall) Steilacoom For reservations call:S82-D280

'HALLOWEEN Starlight Theatre Halloween film presentation Three horror films presented by Variety Club 6.30p.m. 84th and S. Tacoma Way

'HALLOWEEN Hauntee House sponsOfee by KTAC and March of the Dimes 1Sth and Commerce 7-12 p.m. Admlsslon:S2 Tel. 752-WAlK and 473-Q085 Entrance discount coupons at Parkland Sports

'HALLOWEEN KTNT "Free Party" Roadway Inn must be 21 Of above and In costume cash first prize for best costume 8:30 p.m.路 1 :30 a.m. Tel. 597-8700 72nd &. Hosmer

SATURDAY NOVEMBER

MONDAY NOVEMBER

-ART Works on paper by etching master Johnny Friedlander and students Original Graphics Gallery [S) Man-Sat: 1 1 a.m.-6p.m. Tal. 623-4444 5-3 Lenora Sf,

Edmonds Art Festival Museum "Contemporary Masters" Original wOfks of Boulanger. Toby. Colder. Picasso. Vaserelll and others Tue-Thur: 10a,m.-2p.m.

'THEATRE "Accommodations" Cirque Dinner Theatre (S) Until Dec. 7 Tel. 622-5540 131 1aylor Ave. N Comedy about a suburban housewife who leaves her husband for roommates In Greenwict'lViliage 路EXHIBITION And/Or Gallery [S) Manifestos and work by young architects Until Nov. 8 Mon-SOt: noon-6 p,m. Tel. 324-5880 1525 10th Ave.

-MUSIC Northwest Wind Quintet Works by Reiche. Schuller and Sweellnck Columbia Club Senior Center 1 p.m. Tel. 625-401 7 Blaine Hall [S) 424 Columbia St. Free to all Members of PLU faculty 'THEATRE "A Man's A Man" by Bertold Brecht Until Nov. 22 Tel. 323-6800 A musical sotire on love and war

.THEATRE ''The Price" Ethnic Cultural Center Director. Ruben Sierra By Mhur Miller Until Nov. 2 rei. 543-4327 or 543-4635 3940 Brooklyn Ave. NE

SUNDAY NOVEMBER

-ART

TUESDAY NOVEMBER

2

-MUSIC )eof1le Symphony Orchestra 111chard Buckley, director Jeffrey Klrschen. soloist Seattle Center Opera House 8 p.m. Tel. 447-47 1 1

路DANCE Ohio Bellet Seattle Debut U of W Meany Theatre [S) Until Nov. 1 8 p.m. Matinee at 2 p.m. on Nov. 1 Young people matinee on Oct. 31 Tickets: S7.OO. S9.50. S 1 1.50 Tel. 543-4880

.MUSIC The Second Annual Corky Corcoran Jazz Scholarship Fund Concert and Dance Doubletree Inn Tel. 282-2262 SOuthcenter Call for tickets

4

'THEATRE "STRIDER the Story ot a Horse" Based on a story by Leo Tolstoy Until Nov. 16 West coast premiere Seanle Repertory Theatre Tel. 447-4764 An artful experiment In the magic of illusion. "Strlder" ls a story told-theatre-style-trom the perspective of Its central character. a horse

-ART Henry Gallery. UPS [T) Roconteur: Private lives Multi-media show by Washington artists utilizing art to tell stories Until Nov. 26 Tue-Frl:10 a.m,-S p.m, Sal-Sun: 1-5 p.m. Tel. 543-2280

WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER

5

-MUSIC Seattle Opera production of "Alda" Seattle Center Opera House Nov. 5. 8. 1 2 and 15 8 p.m. Tel. 447-47 1 1 Tickets:S 10.50 to S25. 75 at Seattle Opera suburban outlets

'THEATRE " Scapino" adapted from the ploy by Matiere The Glenn Hughes Playhouse U of W [S) Until Nov. 1 \IE 41s1 and University Way NE Tel. 543-5636 Tickets:S4. 52,50 students A boisterous comedy combining force and commedla with a contemporary twist -PHOTOGRAPHY Berenice Abbott and David Millman Equivalents Gallery (5) Until Nov. 30 Tue.-Sot: 1 1 a.m.-6 p.m, Sun: noon-S p,m. Tel. 322-7765 1822 Broadway Ave.

THURSDAY NOVEMBER

6

-ART Betsey Dorris Signee lImltee Edition etchlngs. Lllhographs and Serigraphs Watercolors by Betsey Dorris Graphics Gallery [T) Mon-Sot: 1 0 a.m. -5 p.m. 410 Gartleld Ave. S NearPlU

'ART Prints by Contemporary New YOfk Mlsts Diane Gilson Gallery [S) Until Nov. 29 Tue-Sot: 10,30a. m.-5:30p.m. Tel. 622-3980 1 19 1st Ave. S

FRIDAY . NOVEMBER

7

'-FILM "Ordinary People" Director. Robert Redford Starring Donald Sutherland. Mary Tyler Moore. Judd Hirsch and TImothy Bottom Tacoma Moll Theatre Te. 475-6282 4302 S Ferry -MUSIC Kenny Rankin and Reilly and Moloney U of W Meany Hall [S) 8 p.rn, Tlckets:Tower Posters rn Tel. 543-4880

-FILM "The Elephant man" Starring Anthony Hopl<lns John Hurt and Anne Bancroft Tacoma West CInemas Tel. 565-6100 1 802 S Mlldree


!h!?uMooring Mast Vol. lVII, Issue No. 9 November 7, 1980

A .,/ew of the Unl.,.,.", Cent.r from lotnr cempus under const ruction In 1970 (lns.rt), with the completed building I.t.r tha, y••r.

1 980 m a rks U C ' s t e n t h a n n i ve rs a ry

Birthday parties tend to bring visions of pin-the-tail-on-the­ donkey, birthday hats, noisemakers and clown-shaped caltes. But today, PLU's University Center celebrates a birthday with a different sort of pany com­ memoratina the buildina's tenth anniversary. An open house this afternoon for PlU faculty and staff will feature refreshments lnd door prizes along with a display in the bookstore window of the building's history. Sunday, a birthday dinner for

the students in the .dinillJ com­ mons will include party decorations as well as a pany favor for each Sludent. November 8 marks the dedication of the 85,000 square­ foot buildina that was built and furnished in 1970 at a cost of $3.3 million. In 1969, initial bids for the building exceeded the amount budgeted and, consequently, three major architectural revisions were made. The original plans included an air conditioning/cooling system, brick-sided OUler walls and varying levels of spired roofs, ac­ cording to Marvin Swenson,

The Msst provides a summary of the national and local election returns.

P.ge 2

University Center director. Revisions left the air con­ ditionina equipment in the plans without tbe rdrigerating unit. Brick walls were substituted by wooden ones and the roof was given only onc major slope. The University Center was financed mrudy by the Lutheran 'ngivin& for Education (LlFE)- a project which netted $1 million. Students, during the building's first three-year period p1edaed S2j(),OOO-S IO per student pet semester. The balance was linan­ ced without any federal &rants or loans and is being paid from operating income each year. The original building on the

Now you know who t o call; Toll free numbers for every­ thing. ""' J

/

P,ge &

present UC she was a gymnasium that burned down. Follwing the rue, a new student union was built on the remainina faun­ dalion before the enlire structure was finally torn down and the UC built. The buildina has won acclaim as "The finest small coUeae student union buildina in the Northwest, I t said Swenson. We used to have a steady stream of architecture students comina to look at the buildina during a national architects examination, he .<aid. Swenson, who has been UC director since ilS 1970 com­ oletion. noted his own difficulty (Contla.ttI 08 pile 1)

They lost but the Lute football players arB stili winners.


Page 2. M ooring Mast. November 7, 1980

.

U C f i n ishes f i rst decade

(ConUnued rrom paIr I)

religious needs. In an October interview. Swenson said the UC is " The hean of the University, the link binding upper and lower campU5." Today, the ve's image remains the .same and its inside structure h� seen only minor change. Ne� carpet 1S to be laid in the commons during T h a n k s g i v i n g v ac a t i o n following the laying of nev. carpet in the hallways laSI year, said Swenson. Swenson's own dream for future change is 10 convert the gravel pit under the bookstore into a commuter-studenl lounge. "Heal, electricity, and ven­ tilation of such a room would. however. be difficult." he said.

in visualizing the campus with­ out the building. "h has made possible a sludeR! activities program thai PLU couldn', exist without," he saId. "The schedulmg office alone last )tear programmed more than 5,000 evenLS on campus. We've had kmgs, governors, and world­ renowned singers on Ihis cam­ pus. A good many of those (even\s) were held in IhlS building. " Swenson went on to �ay that the title "University CeRier" is significant as opposed 10 a student union, bC('ause the building serves all aspects of the campu s community, in­ cluding facilities for cultural. social, recreational, and

Form.r PLU president Eugene W" gm.n cut. the ribbons at UC dedlc.tlon In 1970.

N at i o n a l a n d l o c a l e l ec t i o n ret u rn s at a g l a n c e Compiled from The Tacoma News Tribune and other sources Attorney General

National results

John Aoselllni (D) Ken Eikenberry (A) John Miller (1)

President

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Jimmy Carter Ronald Reagan John Anderson .

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34,393,282 . . 42,745,580 . 5,528,049

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226,124 676,246 562,663

yes . nO . .

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Secretary of State

Ron Dotzauer (0) . Aalph Munro (A)

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894,229 464,330

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Referendum 39

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Referendum 38

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682,129 707,352

yes no

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648,415 489,863

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U.S. Senate Warren G Magnuson to). Slade Gorton (A) . . . . .

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Insurance Commissioner

. . . . . . . . . . . 698,556 827.499

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Richard Marquardt (R) Joe Davis (D)

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808,779 563,241

yes nO

HJR 37

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Congress 3rd Congress

Bert Cole (D) Brian Boyle (A)

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700,61 1 716,204

Treasurer 6th District

Aobert O'Brlen (D) Marilyn Ward (A) .

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768,420 628,821

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Governor

Auditor

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814,069 548,090

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91 3,683 412,359

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507,432

764,108

2nd District Jim Mc Daniel (A) A. Ted Bot1iger .

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Senator .

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1 1 ,168 13,695

POSition 1

668,852 867,848

State Issues

Lt. Governor .

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Repre.entative

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John A. Cherberg (D) William M. Treadwell (A)

Legislature

Governor Jim McDermo1\ (D) John Spellman (A)

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State Offices Aobert Graham (D) Aobert Keene (A)

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SJR 132

Land Commissioner

Don Bonker(D) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 36, 1 96 Aod Culp (A) 79,854

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Jean Miller (A) Wayne Ehlers (D) .

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Initiative 383 .

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1 1 ,554 13.247

Position 2 .

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1,059,562 348,275 .

Phyllis K. Erickson (D) Frank Rogers (R) .

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16,444 8,140 .

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4,

'eP ARTISTR Y IN FLO WERS

" �,

m . . 'w.�

Remember to pick up your Homecoming corsage or boutonniere!

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November 7.

1980. MoorinlMast, Pale 3

Hom eco min g s tarts tod ay

I t ' s a t i m e for ' Re m i n i sc i n g ' By X.lrina Osborne

1 98 0 , Homecoming "Reminiscing" will be held today and tomorrow. Event! begin with Songrest, which will be held tonight. The theme for Songfest this year will be "PLU Through Time and Space. " Dorms arc combined and var:ous dorms will represent a particular time period in PLU's history, The paired·up dorms are: Cascade and Pnueger; Rainer, Sluen and off campus; Evergreen and OrdaJ: Harstad and Ivy; Alpine and Foss; and Hong and Kreidler. The dorms

will compete in a variety of ac­ tivities. The coronation of king and queen will be held tonight at 7 p.m. Songfest begins direc­ tly after the coronation at

1:30. After Songfest. an in­ formal dance, "The Stomp" will be held at 9. Performing at the dance will be Freddie and the Screamers. On Saturday at B a . m . judging for the dorm lounge decorating contest will be held. At I I there will be the preljminaries for the "Almost Anything Goes" competition. The football game begins at 1:30. PLU will be playing

against Lewis and Clark at the Lincoln Bowl. Half-time ac­ tivities will consist of a per­ formance by the Kentridge High School drill team. finals for the "Almost Anything Goes" competition and the presentation of the court. The formal Ball begins at 9 p.m. It will be held at the Tacoma Mall in front of the Bon Marche. Enlenainmenl will be provided by Epicenter. During Homecoming four special awards will be presen­ ted by the PLU Alumi Association. Selected as PLU Alumm of the Year, for their service as members of the

1 1 -year-o l d ru n away p i c ked u p By Dan VMlpel An I I -year-old runaway boy was picked up by Campus Safety Officers and returned to his parents at 1 a.m. Tuesday. The boy was seen " going through pockets" at the University Center and str:n at differr-nt times during the day, according to Campus Safety

up ncar Tingelstad at 10:34 Monday night by campus of­ ficers, Fillmore said. In other happenings: After jumping a curb and

and Information Director Kip Fillmore.

travelling more than 75 feet, a car struck the metal railing along the north side of the University Center at I :28 a.m. Saturday. according to Fillmore. Two Campus Safety officers were at the scene and �an questioning (he driver "who

The boy is a Brookdale Elementary School student rrom Spanaway. He l e ft ichool Monday morning. came to PLU and was picked

The statc patrol wascontact­ ed and given a description of the car and driver. ShonJ.... al-

decided to put the car in re­ verse and leave the scene of the accident." fiUmc;:e said.

ter. the driver. who was not a PLU student. was apprehen­ ded. "Restitution will be made," said Fillmore. who stated S400 as a "t:onservative estimate" of damagc done to the rading. Two hand purses, which were reported stolen from Olson Auditorium friday morning. were found in the trash from the Columbia Cemer Monday morning. A total of $ 12 cash was missing, "but everything else w<u int8C1," including whal Fillmore described as "many. many credh cards." Thtte are no �U!ipt:'Ct5 in the in�ide.nl.

P u rse take n ; s u s pect c a u g h t 8)" F.rle Thoma'i PLU prof�sor Lise Olsen had het pune �olen from her orrice: this Thursday while she was teaching in an adjacent classroom. According to the Campu� Safety report on the in· cident, she saw (j man peerinH into the classroom door and when she relurntd to her unlocked office the purse was gone. Shortly thereafter. the repon stated. Austin Powell. a physical plant cU5todian. saw a man leave Memorial Gym alld 80 inlo Ihe bathroom of the Columbia Center. He walted outside and as the man came OUt. he asked the lime.

intending to get a close look at him. Powell checked the bathroom garbage can he had recently emptied and found Ol�en'� bag. Meanwhile, Campus Safety had been notified of the thd, and two available student of­ ficers were dispatched to the lower campus vicinity. One of the officers went into Olson Auditorium, came across the suspect. and brought him OUt to where the second officer was wailing. One security officer staled afterwards that "enough rorce was used as was necessary to subdue the suspect, " who he estimuted to be a ap­ proximately 25 years of age.

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The suspect was then taken to the physical plant where Powell identined him ti the man he had setn in the CC The sU.!l,pecl was then tran­ ,ferred to the �tturity office. where the sheriff was notified.

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All cars parked illegally in the fire lane in front of Pflueger and west of Tingdst.ad will be towed away, beginning Monday. according to Rovaughn Newman. assistant director of campus safety and in­ formation. "We've been ticketing those cars, blll there seems 10 be no response," �id ewman. " So the fire and police depanmems infor­ med U!l that they will begin towing cars next week. " StudenlJ should start parking their cars in lots. because Ihe CO\t of picking up a lowed ear u S42.SO. he said, and this amount in­ creases from day to day.

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Students who usually park their cars in illegal areas should use either the Tingelstad, or Olson lot, as these are designated student lots. he said. "It's a shame that something like this has to happen. but those fire lan� must be kept open, and the police. and fire departments simply will nOI put up with it any more." said Newman. Newman said that students that will be forced to park theIr car� farther away from their dorms are reminded the Campu5 Safety ofrer\ an e5Cort ser­ vice 24 hours a day to anyone needing it.

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Page 4, Mooring Mwt, Novembtt 7, 1980

Se n at e re ac ts t o g r i ev an ce s by Paul Mellitt Complaints from off cam· pus students, freshmen orien· tation, and plans for a student government workshop in Oregon were issues thai hishlighted the lasl Senale meeting. A group of off·campus students spoke to Ihe Senate concerning the grievances of the typical off·campus student. According to ASPLU vice· president Mark Davis, the group's spokesman, Lisa Guenther. said that the pur· po5e of the ,roup's mming with the Senale was to make student government aware of off·campus SludenlS ' can. cern,.

Davis said that oHo(:ampus Students were rq>OTloo to want to receive the .same infor· mation thaI on·campus student receive. For example, he said, off-campus students were given no information about Dad's Day evenlS.

Davis said Ihat ASPLU plans to try to disseminate more information to off· campus students. "They also asked us if we were working on the day care and married student housing programs," said Davis. "We told them that these are programs that we are presently working on ... One or the objectives of the group according to Davis was 10 establish the Senate as a liason between the off·campus student and the university. Djl.vis said that he did not feel the group's concerns needed to be presented in any formal way to the ad· ministration, bUI that the Smale would take such for. mal action If it became necessary in the future. The Senate approved a motion supporting a turning over of the responsibility of student orientation to the university "In the past ASPLU has

been in charge of orientlttion, but because it comes right at the beginning of the school year it '5 difficult to gel a committee together to handle it. Usually one person would end up organizing the entire thing," said Davis. "Orientation covers all freshman rrom events programs to opening Con­ vocation, and it's really a big job." he said. ASPLU wi1l be sending two senators and IWO committee members LO an Association of College Uniolls·lnternational Willamette at workshop College in Salem, Oregon, Ihis weekend. The proaram will consist or various studic$ in student government and leadership. The auending senatOls will be Mark Dunmire and John Ki�t. The commiltee members will by O1eryl Goldberg, Cave committee, and Steve Jack­ son, entertainment commit· tce.

rh. Tosllileo Aklyoshl/L.w r.b.ckln Big B.nd ,s lenown tor tltl., such es "Long Y.llow ROld," "A1D-20S.932 (AII.n R.glstrefion C.rd)," .nd "MITch 01 the r.dpol••, " .nd those w.r• •mon" the songs p.rform.d 'astS.turd.y .�.n'ng In Ol.on Auditorium. A crowd 01 .bout 2,000 .n· thu.,••flc .tud.nts .nd .dult. wer. on h.nd to .njoy the b.nd th.t w•• rec.nt'y �ot.d the best big b.nd In the world by the flld.,. of Downbl•• mag.zln•• Th. b.nd I. lid by composlT .nd pl.nl.t, ro.hlleo Aiel· yoshl, .nd f••tur.s h.r husb.nd L.w r,b.cleln on self' option• •nd tlu•••

' Te c h n i c a l d i f f i c u l t ie s '

Channel 1 3 finally on the ai r By Cd Grennrood "We are e",periencing some temporary technical dif· ficulties "seemed 10 bechannel U's current response to its noticeable lack of program­ ming. The station was scheduled to begin broadcasting this week after being off the air since Feb. 29, 1980. The Clover Park School District sold the station to the Kelly Broadcastin& Company in January of 1979. It took 14 months to transfer the license. In 1952, the FCC designated Channel 1 3 as a commercial television station. It operated as such until 1974 when it went

bankrupt. The Clover Park School District bought it at the bankruptcy auction. Clover Park had it back on the air in 1975 as a nonoo(;ommercial station and operated it until the recent sale. "Channel 13 is now an in· dependent commercial station, which means it is not affiliated with a network," said the station manager, Julianna Guy. "We want to become the movie station of the Puget Sound area. We will be showing 17 movies a week. We've bought 1,200 to 1 ,400 titles, so,we'U have quite a selection," Guy said. Bob and Job Ke.lly, brothers

aDd partners in the Kelly Broadca5tin& C o m p a n y , bousht the station for $6,250,000. Another S7to $10

million in cash has been put in· to the station, according to Guy. The money has been used to pay for the remodeling of the old buildin. and to pur­ chase. new equipment. Also, a new antenna site had to be found for the company to build its tower. A ncw circular polarized an­ tenna will top Ihe tower and "will deliver a 'ghost fret' signal over most of the Puget Sound area-from Mt. Vernon to Centralia," Guy said. "Usually when one com-

pany buys another, they buy it and step right into it. We bought a totally unknown quantity," Guy said. A small group of people of· ficially opposed the license transfer, but they did not have genral public support, accor­ ding to Guy. "The FCC reviewed the written material both sides submitted and ruled seven to nothing that the station should be awarded to Kelly Broad· casting," Guy said.

Other Ihan that small group, "Everything we've heard has been very, very positive. We are getting a tremendous number of calls from people who are won· dering why we're not on the air yet," Guy said. So when is the station going to be broadcasting again? "Sbortly," "As soon as possible," and "A matter or hours if everything goes OK," Guy offered. "Right now tbey're hauling the antenna up," she said.

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November 7, 1980, Mooring Mast, Page S

Foss 'Oriainal'

Fo r E r i ks o n , l i fe' s g a m e By Hans RY5er His voice is so powerful that he can easily talk from lower campus to a friend on upper campus. Usually he wcars a biB cowboy hal decorated with �olorful feathers, a red searl lnd cowboy boou. While eating, he talks with many hand·geslurcs which may become falal 10 Ihe audience when the fork h loadtd whh .paghttti. Trus is Jim Erickson. a juruor educallon maJor. en­ thUSiastic hunter and football player. known among nudenls as the "OriainaJ", living on lower campus. When entering his room on $COOnd noor Foss, one under­ stands why Erick$On s i con­ sidertd unique among PlU students. The walls are d«orated with deer antlers. the tail of a deer, scaring traps and pictures of Same, natuce and football scenes. The couch in covtted with a cozy deer fur. "I used to have a bobcat skin as well; but girls did not like it espttially, so J moved it away," Erickson said. For Erickson, outdoor ac­ tivities such as huntin8, fishing and football rcprcsent an essential pan in his lifc. Hc said that it from naturc or on the football ficld that hc 8ets stimulated for studies. not in the library. Erickson said he does not like students callinl him "red­ neck " "�I am not . redneck . I .. am just diffcrent Erickson. who likes campus Iifc. il famous for �mc of the cl(periences hc hIlS had on campus. For instancc, Erickson said that he gOt sur­ prised by the firc department 10 his room whcn he was having a barbecue with somc friends. Many lIcars on his body are souvenirs of more or less dangerous incidents Erickson has experienced with dorm windows. hunting knives. or football players. According to Erickson, one of the most dangerous and spectacular incidents hap­ pened one day durina a race against a friend. on the way back from the CC 10 Foss. Erickson said that he ran so fast that he mi.ssed the handle on the door and smashed the whole window with his arm. " The blood was splashing, some girls were screaming, it took a while until �mebody called for help." For Dote-takina in class Erickson sometimes uses the top of an old hunting-bullet

M.ft:D J. Oppelt

Jim Erickson, Junior, claims "'I .m nof a redneck, , am Just different... mstead of a pencil. and even durina class he usually weats his hat. According to Erickson all these habi15 do Dot prevent hun from being I strong Christian. Erickson said that it is not the weekly worship at church thal .makes a good Christian. but th� way people respect �ach other in their ev�ryday life. "I am of a happy nature and enjoy life and people a lot," Erickson said. Accor­ ding to Erickson. some crazy orr.·campus partjes do not violate any rule of the Christian way of lire as long 8$ they art don� reasonably. Erickson said Ihal some students her� at PlU are over· cmrismallc in Ihis concern . "Jesus did nOI turn wine into water but water into winc." Erickson said that he likes football because it is a "hard­ killing" sport which provides an exccllent chaJlenge to studies. Accordng to Erickson it is

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on the football field that people can learn how to cope with different life situations such as success, failure. tolerance and 5e1f-dl�plin�, which may become very valuabl� for somebody's future life. To illustrate his opinion Erickson u!«!. P LU coash Frosty Westerln,'s quote, "Education is not something you gel, it is something you become.

One of the most deliahlfuJ play of the 19405 is in rehcarsal in aUf drama department. "Harvey." direct­ led by Lise Olson, hi the story of Elwood P. Dowd and his rriend Harvey. who is a six-foot, invisible rabbit. Elwood is the archetype of the "nice auy." He is klnd, lenerous. and concerned about oth�rs. Of course. Elwood does bave his fauits, and his main foible is that he dnnks. He is not a drunk. he simply enjoys a drink at the local bar nay. and then. But cv�n there Elwood is kind and carinS, showina that a man caD be a good Christian soul anywhere. This play has universal appeal . AU of us in some way can relate to Elwood and the problems be runs Into as be tries to convincc- everyone that Harvey is actually there. Haven't all of us. at o� ume or another, tried to convinct: someone that our way of Jooking at things was the correct way? The show also deals with the questions of ramily and insanity. The relationship between Veta (Elwood's sister) and Elwood is rasc:inatins. Veta can sec Harvey and she doesn't want to. Her plan is to act Elwood committed, that way she won't be able to sec Harvey; and then she'll be "o.k." - not the action of a loving, coneemed family member. It is more the action or a selfish. ima&�nscious, society matron. Director Olson commented that she has an excellent "85t for the show. They arc hard-workina, dedicated people, concerned about improving their actina skilli. she said. This play is PLU', entry to tbe Am�rican College Theatre Festival Compt1ition. As such, it is possible that an actor may be chosen 10 compeu for the Jrene Ryan Award. Set designer Steve Hauge and costume dcsiJRtr Jan Nix have also been entered in the contest as student designers. Should any or a1l of these students win the nationa! contest. it wiU be a very important Step in their theatrical carteTs. The play opeos in a few weeks. Walch this column for datcs and times. In other fine ans news, the orthe�lta will &lve their second concert on Nay. I I al 8 p.m. in Eastvold Auditorium. Featured performer will be piani.st Willa Doppman. performing Prokofiev's " Piano Conceno No. !l ID C major. Op. 26."

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Page 6. Mooring Mast. November 7. 1980

H a l l ow een p ass es; i t ' s bac k to c l ass es

i

figs are bent toward reading

By fllzabfotll Allen The decoration.s hlUlB Ump. Iy. ,u or the twisl lone. The candlu in the Jack·O� Lanttrn� have burned OUI. leavlQg empty smiles.

The room. which only a rew houf'1 nao wti nUed ""itn the ex· citemem of people in colorful costumes , uas like tne balloons over tne rireplace tnat have lost their air Halloween on a college campus is a time for students to let go. Parties, dances and haunted houses are prevalent: many students take the day off to drt:Ss up and enjoy them· selvcs, but the day after, it's I back to Ihe same old routine. Those same students who , were dressed in silver clothes, who had painted their bodies Breen, and worn feelers on their heads, are now loaded with books and headed for the library wilh, perhaps, only a hint of dark circles under their eyes and slightly dry tluoats reflecting the festivitics the night before. Costumes are folded and put away for anOlher year. Borrowed clothes are returned, and the imaginations and taJents that were used to create unicorn masks and Cinderella

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In Ihe lounge of Hong Hall, ... ....,... Warren, a dorm vice-presidenl, is cleaning up what Is left of the decoralions so carefully put up the night befort.

"Kristie and Cindy sure did a great job on that sign," Warren says. "Makes you hate (0 pull it down." " Can't we leave it up for a while?" an observer asks.

"Sure, why not," answers Warren.

So tbe silO. saying " Another one bites the neck" , is left on the wall and a few pumpkins are left standina in their niches. " How long are )lOU goiRl lo leave it up?" Warren is asked. " Oh, probab'"ly until Chrislmas, then we have 10 decorate again," Warren says.

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The work is done in rdalive sileDce. The crcpe·paper quickly accumulates. s i balled The up and thrown away. garbq;e can looks like a giant orange-and·black punch bowl . Tables and chairs that were stuffed into the tiny kitchen to make room for tbe dance are brought back out and set up. The room looks like there never was a dance, except for the big red·and·white sign over the stereo and the gapina Jack· O·Lantems.

I

,

nexi week's chemistry IJ1d writing that Core II paper that is due Mondav.

"Need some help?" he'. asked. "Sure, if you can," is the reply, .systematically, the crepe· paper is pulled down and the lape is lipped off the walls.

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Women who have surftftCI listen to your problem ana emotional or JUIIII abURmay refer you to another depan­ call the Domtsllc Violence menl. or take your number

Do you ever need infor­ mation or ad\lice? Have you wanted 10 voice 11 complaint or �epon a crime? You may want to u�e a Ilate toll·free hothncs. On-campus students al PLU can dial toll·free numbers from their rooms by dialin, 9,

number: 1�S62-6015. This hotline provides stale·wide in­ formation for abused women or children by directio& vic· tims 10 local shelters or by helping them find Icgal assis18nce. If you suspect people are sufferins n u rs i ng home nqlcci. questions concerning Stale Nunln. Homt RegulaUons can be answered by calling l-IOO-561..(j078. Operalors can answer qutstioru about pay rates, and they can refer people wishing to compla.in about care or report possible abuse 10 specific depanments. AI 1-100-56 - 2-6906. you may repan pDulble W,Uart rrlud. The Welfare rnud Hotline �;U record your complaint for funher investigation. The Deparmrnl or

then the 800 number. Studenu U$e the "hotlincs" to aet can information on everything fr· om finding a ferry schedule 10 filling out an insurance claim.

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"Red tides," or unsafe levels of paraletic shellfish toxins. frequently close beaches In Washington state. The or· n� 0' Environmental Health has a hotline which gives notice of beach closures. Call 1-800·562·5632, The BuslntlS Ucerulng In­ formation number, 1..s0<h561· 8203, is for people doing business under a private name. Anyone calling this number can get information on basic and spedal requirements needed to register a business. Need ferry information?

The Wuhlngton State Ferry Hotline provides schedules and closure information of Slate ferries: 1.JOO.54 . t.0810. The recycling bollinr receives an average of 232 phone calls daily. At this n u m b e r , 1�800.732-925J, operators can direct you 10 local recycling centers and can answer questions about recycling various products. Olher toll-free hotlines can be found in your phone book. They save lime and money and can provide you with a wide range of information.

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I 1 @*5 EDITORIAL .

November 7, 1980. Mooring Mast. Page 1

.

Twe l ve· page Ma s t i s j ud g ment of God Tuesday evening when a Mast staff person roused me out of bed to report thai our composltton unit " wcsn" worlclng tlgh':' I hod 00 premonition thai It would turn out to be a problem out of the or­ string dlnarv of catastrophes which occur for the newspaper. The usual problems. however. only delay us a mare throo Of four hours and In the four years I hove ottended PLU. the paper has coma oul. no matter what. "I'll lake a look of II In the mornlng." 1 sold. Wednesday morning. I arrived in the office to find an Oiling composition unit. t called the Com­ pugrophlc company and described the mysterious symptoms. Company managers concluded that they would have to send down a service man. At first guess the man would be down Wed­ nesday evening. This would set bock production several hours but I was con-

lHE WOR.lD fIj �E" 8'(

KKOME'Nl�

fidenl we could still make our deadlines. Stott hopes revived. The plot soon sickened Wednesday afternoon. "Mark" the service man called saying he wouldn't make It until Thursday mor­ ning. The ideal of corn· plating the paper before deadline faded quiCkly trorn vlew. Veteran editor Jody Roberts visited the office and temporarily revived the sick. and fainting machine. All hour later it slipped into mechanical oblivion once again. News editor Tom Koehler remarked as I hung up the phone otter coiling Suicide Hotline, "I can't believe so many things are going wrong with the machine." I sold calmly. "I do. God is punishing me," I returned to my office, closed the door and prayed fervently. "God. I promise I'll never write another editorial against Moral Majority again. I'm sorry I dldn'l vote I'll be a for Reagan. staun c h c o n s e r v a t i v e Republican the rest of mv life If you Just please fix our comp unit," I sold.

God jusl laughed and told me reassurIng thIngs ' like "All Ihlngs work together for good for those who love the Lord," I went home Wednesday night and looked up all the scriptures t could find on judgment 10 see If Ihe old adage I'God punIshes" was hue Unfortunately I couldn't find anything that applied to compugraphlc units -

I sent up one last ptea before closing my eyes, "Lord. please. toke me now." but t woke up again Thursday mornIng, stlll on earth. in my own bed with a cat purring In my face, The compugraphlc man arrIved promptly at 8 a.m. opened up one cover of the machine and said. "Oh. Ihls liffle lamp just needs to be pushed tor­ ward."

"Will you sign here," he saId after completing a once-over of the now perky machIne; I wanted to sign II "Job " The time setbacks are the reason the poper Is only twelve pages this week. This probably won't be thick enough to line your bIrd cages this week. We're sorry,

Kathleen M. Horfeld

LEnERS

A m e r i ca n ee d s G od ' s h e l p EdHor Kothl""n M. Hasfeld

News EdHor

Tom Koehler

"..,tur.. EdHor Petro Rowe

Spom EdHor John Wallace

Production EdHor Morgo Student

Photography EdHor Greg Lehman Magazine EdHor Morcl Ameluxen

EdHorial AasIIIanll Dee Anne Houso Erlc Thomos

Copy EdHor

To the Edttor: Amerrca! Land of the free and home of the bravel Lord grant us the freedom to be brove In the face of the next ad· ministration. for we fear what Is to come, Fof us and for our "leaders" we pray tor vision, strength and love. We pray for toleran­ ce. perseverance and community. We pray tor restraint. active concern for the exploIted, and p:lr­ tlcularly, peace. Lord we need these so that we may be true to you In spite of the

people at Ihe lop. Americal land that I lovel lord, grant each of us a p a r t i c u l a r l y g e ne ro u s measure of love-core. concern, empathy. Let us walk thai mile In the other's shoes. especially those who orB less for· tunate than we Let us not be blinded 10 Ihe plight of our neighbors locally. noflonolly or globally by the glare from the Idols we have built to our selfish In· dlvldual concerns-suc· cess, money, happiness. Let us love even as you

hove loved, America! God bless Amerlcal Lord. bless this yoU! people-your people the human racet Bless Iranians. Iroquls. Norwegian Lutherans. Blacks. Jews. Hlspamcs. Indians. Onen tals. Russians, and a l l peoples. Bless those who are led by you and those who are not. Bless the poor and Ihe Moral Majority. Bless the kind-hearted and Ihe KKK. Bless Ihe fallhful and the Nazis. Bless the ex­ ploited and Ihe exploiters. Bless PlU.

Amerlcal God shed his grace on thee! Lord, shed your grace on America, but let It nol be cheopl let It cost us all ihal we are, all that we have. Let yOUl grace shock us, challenge us, e)(cite us, deliver us. Grant us the courage to face adversity, the tearful. this future. Fulfill In us your promise to turn even the bleakest situation into a possibility for youl Americal God help us! Amen.

Eric lean

Koren Wold

Graphlca EdHor steve Houge

lulln... Manager Carrl

Minden

Circulation Manager Pam Corlsan Advertfllng Manager Clndy Klofh

Technical AdvllOr Mi ke Frederickson

Faculty Advisor Cliff Rowe

The MoorIng Malt Is published weeklv bV the students of PocIfic lutheran lX\lv8fSl1y un­ der the auspices 01 the Boord 01 RegenlS. Opinions ex­ pressed In the Most ora not intended to represent those 04 the regents. fhaldmlnlstrotlon. the locuftV. the sNdent body. or the Most stoff. La"er, to the editor should be subml"ed by 5 p.m. MondaV 01 the $Orne week 01 publication.

N eed m o re s t u d e n t t u t o rs To The Editor, Education, a right or a prlvledge? The Academic Advislna and Assistance Cenler supplied me wllh the nome and number 01 a math tutor. I called her and we set up mutually agreeable meeting times and places. Because of the difficulties I have with math, I figured I would need to meet with her twice a week. This is where my right to on education became un­ clear. At a rate of S3.SO an hour, I could offord to see a tutor only several timeS a

Free moth help sessions held on campus two nights a week were an alternative. However, as on off-campus student with a 1 5 mile round-trip to make once a day, I could hardly afford to return to campus In the eveninQs.

month.

The service that a tutor renders is certainly worth payment, without question, but who should make that payment is what I am asking? The Academic Advising Center. acting as a supervisory employer, should pay tutors a work­ study wage. That way more needed work-study

positions would be created. An agreement could be worked out be­ tween them for an hourly wage and a maximum number ot hours a week, as it is In other offices on Campus that employ work­ study students. Within the current program. my right to receive tutoring depends on my ability to pay for It. This makes tutoring a privilege, reserved for the elite few who can afford It. Money seems to be the determining factor In one's ability to obtain many ser­ vices In our society. Med­ Ical care, legal assistance,

and education are rights, not privi leges; therefore. they should be available to all regardless of Ihelr ability 10 pay. One way to eliminate the inequality In the tutorial program Is to hold math help sessions during the day. Then off-campus students who can't offord a tutor or offord to return to campus at night could exercise their right to an education at PLU without paying twice for itl

janice E. Hoy"


Page 8, Mooring Mast, November 7, 1980

LETTERS

M e rit pay: R i e ke ' s sta t e m e n t s co n t rad i ct. . . presIdent Is a talr man, and

To Ihe Edttor: kelly Allen's artIcle on laculty merll poy was ap­ preciated, although more dIscussIon on pros and cons could have been made.

Ment pay Is a nIce ideal, although I am dubious about how fairly It can ark for faculty Thai area IS already too political [WIt­ r'l95S the tenure system), nnd merIt pay is too likely fo make II more so. Stilt. RIeke's plan de­ serves support on at least a Irlol basis. I believe the

It anyone can make It

work, perhaps he can (although Ihere Is slill a question on what may happen under Mure ad· ministrations). Because I do hove a high regard tor Rieke. I was dlsaDPolnted and sur­ pnsed to see him apparent­ ly tailorIng his explan­ allons ot merit pay 10

his audience.

Rieke totally contradic­ ted hImself In statements to faculty lost week and In comments to a group of students lost January. The faculty should be made

aware of those comments, PJ an open meeting on tuItion In Interim. Rieke was asked by a ,tudent II tenure dldn't make It im­ possible to get ,Id 01 In· competent professors

Rieke sold that that problem o c c a s i o n a l l y he.. However. 8xlsts r9CJSSured the students. a new merit pay system beIng planned would help end that problem. Under merit pay Rieke said. II a prolessa, dldn'l gel a raise tor several years running, he would probably look for work ,

elsewhere. " Unwanted" professors. Rieke thus assured students, could be encouraged to move on because they simply would not get raises. Compare that stotemenl with Rieke's reassurances to the faculty In lost week'!

Mast

"This Is not Intended to weed anyone Qut but to reword them... Payroli Is get rid of In· not the woy to .. competents I reaUze It 15 tempting to reassure sruden+! that the merit pay system will en·

sure they aren't "stuck" but Incompetent with tenured professors. and to reassure professors that merit pay won·' be used to weaken the tenure system and throw It open to move political manipulation 80th ore slatements -Nhlrt, deserve applavse. although from different groups. Unfor1unolely. they contradict, and I am curiOUS as to whIch one RIeke Inlands to give more weight. or if he means to abandon eIther promise

Jody Roberti

Love n ot a fact o r i n m any m a rri age s , w r i t e r c l a i m s

10 the Editor:

Most people get morrled by at least their mId to late twenties, If not before. love Is the most com­ monly-used justification for marriage a bond. However. the real reason Is probably something else. DIfferent people marry for many different reasons, but none marry for the sole 'easen of love. The age when many marry people In­ Is !erestlng-the years of 18 fo 25. tt's not thot during these years one finds another to foil In love with so much as one becomes tmmened In and aware of one's sexual role. People don't marry for love. they marry because they have been raised to believe that one day fhey

will love is Just a disguise used as an excuse to fulfllJ a social requirement. Marriage seems to be a strong social prerequisite to adulthood and respon· slblllty. It Is therefore more marry to convenient someone than It Is to Just live WIth them. People marry because It Is expected; tram society and tram themselves Ever notice the rust'l of marriages in the group graduating from high school and 1hen again when that same group emerges from collegiate studies? The presumption Is thot everyone will even­ tually marry, and stemming from this. then Is the question of when is the best time to pIck a portner. The obvious answer is when one Is In school where the

field to large.

choose from

Is

It Is easier to pick a mote as a studenl and the rush post-graduate of visual are marriages evidence thot many take advantage of opportunity school offers �n terms of one's search tor a com­ patible person. Another thought thai justifIes marriage relative to bachelorhood Is the tendency of the 10Her to be lonefy, Living with a spouse Is nol on ly a solution to Ihls, but also of sense a provides security and on crea of Is This familiarity, something on unmarried person doesn't have. People don't marry for love. they marry for com­ panionship and In order to secure a dependable

outlet arise.

10 frustrations that

Once again, It one who Is engaged was asked why he or she was going to get married. there Is a good chance that their reply would be because they're In love. What else are they to say? .... .I·m doing It to please my parents"? .... l'm adh9flng to social etiquet· te"? . "I'm hOfny"?... " .I·m Insecure"? Probably not; instead the real reasons for marriage hardly ever sur· face and lava Is what Is used to explain away such teal behavIor

The Ideo of marrying for love sounds nIce and when thIs is coupled with a religious context. what ap· more be could proprlate? Connecting marriage and "God" turns matrimony Inlo even a greater social etiquette

than It was by Itself. Religion transforms marriage Into a necessity. Everyone must marry In or­ der to have a family or It Is a sin and since one must have a family one must marry, Now. most have a hard tIme questioning beliefs stemming trom religious ties Since for many marriage Is nght In the mIdst of thiS. Therefore questioning marriage Is analogous to questioning religIous beliefs stopU Mustn·t do that. therefore mC!lrrl oge cannot be orgued and must occur,

no1.

Admit If Or not. like it or you reason the married or will marry was and will be one of many common rationalizations, but love was not why and it will nof be whyl Gory J. Nelson

PRESIDENT: Minnesota, Georgia, West Vlrglna, Maryland, This first week of November has been Island, HawaII. and the District of Colum· Rhode significant in numerous ways to a Jimmy Carter's only vIctories as Ronald were .!Jia numerous variety of people. These the managing chair for the next four won Reagan aspects of significance have drawn me years, . to their consideration of what Elnstlen ==== would have called the "lIfth dimen'· ==-====.J.b:=== = = � slon"-Time. The concept of time goes much beyond the ca I ;n'd�� TI orth�ir clock, in fact It often goes beyond comprehension, as a physicist or a philosopher might tell you. This concept is attacked. asserted. and or can. PLU: fused by the viewer. The viewer of time in any given Instance will differ upon Say happy bIrthday to the UC and partake In circumstance, depending If the vIewer Is effected dlrectty or Indlrectty by this week's Homecoming. Activities will in­ their view. clude a coronation, stomp, game, banquet, ball, and a reunion of friends. The hostages In Iran have now been held prisoner for one ye._a�r,:.� t ;;: a:;;,; s;; m ;; u; ,; re; d ; b r::!I ==============, === that their concept of one year Is different from our