Page 1

OOfin

U You're Not Part of Tbe SolutioD

You're Part of tbe Problem

Voice of the Student Body at Pacific Lutheran University PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1970

VOLUME XLVIII

NUMBER ONE

Wiegman Challenges University To Year of Active COllllllitlllent A "Year of Joy" ended, and a

President said, "Our faculty acts

"Year of Commitment" began on

as a propeller driving us forward,

September 10, as Dr. Wiegman set

yet remains a faithful anchor, re­

the tone for a new year, and a

minding us of our tradition of ex­

new decade at PLU, in his open·

cellence. "

ing

convocation

address

entitled

"Where are we going from here?" As the last few comments of the "Year of Joy" flew by, Dr. Wieg­

globe as products of this age-not

cuIty and students.

the cause."

accomplish­

complimented

them

on

through

in

the

last

few

give

continue

to

structure

greater

the

university

flexibility.

The

r. Jungkuntz Assumes ew Duties As Provost ity has a Provost. The creation of

this

office

en­

ails a broadening of the responsi ­ ,i1ities

and

powers

:xtinct office resident.

of

the

of

A cade mi c

now­

Vice

1 he Provost will serve as coordi­

ator for all academic aspects of

1e univ er sity and wi\l be the top ecutive in the absence of the resident. Filling the post is Dr.

jchar d Jungkuntz.

ecclesiastical and ministerial struc­

ture encouraging ag reem ent am on g denOm inations. Dr.

Jungkun tz expressed as his

homework,

stated, "I know PLU students and

the

constant striving for technological

"progress," the President praised

students for recognizing "these ad­ vances for what they really are." The

concern

that

students

are

exhibiting has caused them to !l$k questions

outside

the

traditional

areas of academic inquiry. These new

questions in

nion

have

tion

to

Wiegman's opi­ "a

caused

Christian

re-orienta­

social

commit­

ment."

faculty. He feels it is necessary to

PLU

students

already

have

a

produce sound and vital changes ,

tradition of social action in such

while the various departments and

programs

schools work together to prevent

individual department changes di ­

as

CHOICE,

ban Coalition.

cessful with out change. He hopes

University

quality and structure of the pro­

are genuinely

innovative, creative thinking in the

fessional school functions.

structive change."

The Provost also expressed a de­ to maintain and strengthen

sire the

liberal arts

while

focus within the maintaining

the

USSAC,

TACT, and the Tacoma Area Ur­

verging from the general trend.

to be a catalytic agent to trigger

around

Criticizing his generation for its

goals a des ire to preserve and strengthen the good academic as­ pects of PLU while recognizing that

no insti tution is go ing to be suc­

Wiegman

the year was attributed to the fa·

the

years. He also admonished them to

with a discussion of doctrine and

Claiming that these men h ad not

contemporaries

carried

Univer­

students their perpetual scapegoats.

their

reviewed

the changes they had initiated and

Lutheran

who have made

ments of that year. The success of

Wiegman

For the first time in its SO-year

national leaders

w ith

issue

took

their

Calling them "the best .faculty"

tistory Pacific

Wiegman

done

man

DR. WIEGMAN addresses the eommunlty at opening convoeatIon.

Dr.

Wiegman emphasized the integral

relationship between the university ancll the community and reminded city

leaders

that

"PLU

slands

ready to assist those officials who committed

to

con­

A troupe of young dan ce rs and

their 12th tour of the United States,

opens the 1970-71 Artist Series sea­ son at Pacific Lutheran Un iversity. The B ayanihan Dancers, the first of five series at tra ctions, appear in Olson Auditorium Friday, Sept.

18.

Also

scheduled

are

other nations who can draw from

such rich springs of folklore as the

Filipinos."

Reserved season tickets for the

five attractions at one-third reduc­

tion over single admission prices

are available at the PLU Alumni

Schola r hip

All

Artist

Series

Fund,

by the poli tical

r

Wiegman encouraged stud nts w h o are interested in

the

elective

participation in

process,

but

asked

them not to request a Moratorium

on

c las se s. He emphasized that a

student

desiring

be

to

involved

"has the opti on of making his own

arrangements. .. The Pre ide n t later modified this

statement. He said, that in speak­

ing

of

one of

a

Moratorium,

he

meant

the type wh ich the Yale

administration has granted. He sta­

ted

that

a

Moratorium

sh or er

would be feasible, but in his opi­ nion should come now when stu­

dent cam paigni n g would be most

helpful.

The difference between c ommit­

ment in words and commitment In actions

was

also noted by Wie g­

man. Students th r ough their com­

mitted

source

actions

have

become

of i ns pir ation in a

"a

world

sorely in need of a little ide alism."

Church-University re lations were

also discussed. Dr.

Wiegman de­

fined the role of the university as

one of

ch allenge r,

leader, and in­

novator. "Through j oint- yet separ·

ate-commitments, we

m ai ntai n a

ideas ,"

churCh

constant flow of new life and new between

the

and

university communities. A dialo gue characterized

by honest criticism

Borrowing the ancient Indian de­

finition of a great man as one who "does not slacken

in car rying out

what he has begun,

which

Performa nces

will be held in Olson Auditorium at 8:15 p.m.

com­

activities of the fall months. Dr.

although obstacles tower

provides sch olarsh ips an nually for

PLU students.

traditional

to

fronted this ye

Office. Proceeds go to the PLU Alumni

addition

must be maintained.

Philippine Dance Troupe to Lead Off Artist Series musicians fr om the Philippines, on

In

mitments. PLU students are con·

thousandfold

unlil he has succe eded" he challenged all members of the

PLU

family

to fuum

this definI­

tion, du ring the coming year.

soprano

Marni Nixon Nov. 13; pianist, I.e­

rin Holl ander, Feb. 26; Canadian pantomimist Claude-S t. Denis. March 10; and the Denver Sym­ phony Orchestra, Brian Priestman conducting, April 21. The Bayanihan Comp an y, com­ posed of 27 young dancers and 12 musicians, is top rated among sev­ eral folkloric dance ensembles in the Islands. It first appear ed in­ ternat ional ly

Dr. Jungkuntz h as a strong aca·

-mic background in BibIJcal Lit­

'at ure and the Classi cs, and bas d seven years of pastoral experi­

Ice. Du ri ng the past five years l

served as Executive Secretary

. the Commission on Theology and

nurch Relations of the Lutheran hurch-Misso uri Synod. Jungkuntz

bas

served

on

the

)mrnittee of the National Faith ld Order Colloquium. He has thus tempted

to uni fy Christian de­

}minations into 'ganizatio ns

one

concern

at

the

Brussels

World's fair in 1958 and enjoyed

DR. JUNGKUNTZ

body. Both themselves

sold out appearances in New York City

in 1959

and 1961.

In the past 10 years the troupe

has appeared t hro ughout the world, most recently at

Expo 70

in Osaka,

J ap an . Through folk dances and music the Bayanihan company portrays the regional cust oms of its Arabi c·

past, Ma layan-Spanish-American a s well as those of the tribal ­

ples of th? fslands. In

Israel.

a

critic

l aude d

the

beauty and movement of the Bay­

performance. ad d ing, "It i s doubtful whether there are many

anihan

nlE BAYANIHAN DA."lCE COMPANY will appear this Friday nlgbt in Olson Auditorium at 8:15 p.m.


Page Two

Wednesday, Sept. 16, 1970

MOORING MAST

ParaUax

A Word of Caution

God Is Alive; PLUIs Dead

When writing this year's opening editorial it is difficult to remain somewhere between the poles of cynical barb toss­ ing and golden-throated optimism. Given the tone of Dr. Wieg­ man's opening address, it has been tempting to revert to the former-if only for a little balance-but I have resisted it for

remember looking forward to entering PLU as

gy, talent. and idealism is rarely tapped. Although

an idealistic freshman in the fall of 1967. I wanted

we are all very nearly the same age, neither the

the time being.

to grow here for four years, then graduate and go

worship services nor the other activities (?) of the

on to a seminary and become a Lutheran pastor.

congregation has capitalized on this unique situation

I suppose that I have done so because I share much of

the optimism, the excitement, and the pride which has already been evidenced as the coming year approaches. I cannot lose

By GLEN ANDERSON

Hopefully,

PLU

other, yet this vast, concentrated reservoir of ener­

would challenge and nurture

my

by

somewhat uncertain faith.

focusing the congregation's ministry

upon

the

needs of young, intelligent Christians. As a result,

I have been profoundly disappointed.

Student Congregation is no different from any other

myself within those feelings, however. For though the Year of

Aside from some very thoughtful stimulation from

church-it's just closer.

Joy has ended, many of its more unpleasant notes still sound

our excellent Religion Department, PLU has pretty

in the distance. It was not a Year of Joy for the students of Kent State

For three years,

however, there was a ray of

much been devoid of the kind of challenging and

hope-PLU flickered from time to time with excite­

nurturing that our maturing faiths require.

ment whenever a certain gadfly awakened us to the

University, or of Jackson State.

otherwise

reality of Christianity. He was a rare man who lived

imaginative Office of Student Affairs-is generally

his religion and inspired others to see the beauty and

It was not a year for the environment either, or for those fighting in Vietnam, or in the ghettos of Tacoma.

conceded to be an eminently forgettable experience.

the relevance of Christianity. His ministry greatly nurtured my faith and challenged it to grow. But

The thoughts mentioned above are disquieting to be sure.

"What did he say?" "I don't know.") Its best fea­

unfortunately,

ture is that it rarely lasts the entire allotted time,

professors, Pastor Dalton was too much for PLU

But they are the honest thoughts which we must face both as individuals and as a nation if we are to truely commit ourselves

thus giving students and faculty alike a few extra

to handle fot very long, and he was not re-hired for

minutes to talk before third period classes begin.

this year. Another victory for mediocrity.

to the restructuring of our society. We have been told that the coming year is to be one dedicated to such a commitment. I would like to suggest to you that it is the type of word that one might well take quite seriously. The decision to become "committed" must be made with extreme care. For once the step has been taken you can never step back. I would close then with a word of caution. When you speak of commitment in the coming year, be sure you mean -John Aakre what you say.

Chapel-an

function

of

("Who talked today?" " .................

the

.............. did."

Even the variety which was possible on the Eastvold

What

stage was sacrificed last year for a "churchier" Student

Congregation

is

virtually

like

other

too

many

spiritual

honest and creative

stimulation

do

we

have?

Well, we used to have the "tongue-rs," but we good

atmosphere across the street in cold Trinity.

orthodox Lutherans fought with them and laughed

indistinguish­

at them until they left and went elsewhere. Having

able from a typical middle-to-older aged congrega­

ignored

viable,

though

"threatening,"

challengp.s from liberals and conservatives, we are

tion in liturgy, organization, conservatism, lack of and declining at­

now insulated enough from the real world of theo­

tendance. People are questioning Student Congrega­

logical questionil!g that we may now safely relax,

tion's future existence. What we need is somebody

secure in our righteousness and piety-and ignor­

to question whether it even exists now. It might have

ance.

community and

communication,

Maybe 1 should give up my hope of ever becom­

died long ago and no one has yet noticed.

[ could just settle

ing a pastor. After graduation

Boundless opportunities for experimenting exist,

down as a silent member of a lethargic congrega­

but seem never to be brought up, or else are appar­ ently shelved. All of the congregation are college

tion and calmly accept the encroaching stagnation

students living within a few hundred feet of each

of my faith.

President's Letter

Peace Group Urges Support of Yule Boycott

All around us here at PLU change is evident. It is probably most evident in our new University Center,

official

but certainly there are many

other areas in which we will all notice change if we haven't already.

(Editor's Note: The following let­

back in Christmas - what better

matize the horrors of war or the

Not the least of these is the change in ourselves. In a sense, we are all

ter

Mast

way to observe the birth of Christ

contradictions

new students here this year, and I welcome each of you to a year of

from a peace group headquarter­ ed in C QIlIlecticut They request­

than to bring an end to the war

the military.

growth, change, and enrichment. were responsible for the very effective Orientation Program this year, particularly Jim Harri and Gayle Severson who were in charge and responsible for its success. Many others helped them all along the way, This year the ASPLU officers were able to meet many freshmen and transfer students as a result of the short tours arranged during orientation. We hope that as we move into our new offices in the Univer· sity Center all students will feel free to visit our offices to discuss stu­ dent government and offer suggestions to aid us in better serving you. It was a pleasure meeting those of you who dropped by. We hope to see many more of you in the near future. There will be notices of all student government activities either in the MOOring Mast O'r distributed throughO'ut the campus. Minutes O'f all Senate Meetings will be posted in each dO'rm,

so

be lO'O'king to see what

is happening, and yO'U will find many ways in which yO'U can pursue any special interests yO'U have. By all means, jO'in in and make it a very profitable year fO'r yO'urself. If yO'U have any questiO'ns, call the ASPLU O'ffices at ext. 412. Thank YO'U, and have a prO'perO'us year.

MAST

The Voice of the Students at Pacific Lutheran Universll;' ...... ....... ............ ................................. ............................

.

. .

........._ .......... ........ ........ .. .........

Editor

Managing EditO'r

KATE MANCKE ... ..... ... .................................................. ... News Editor

PAULA SEIBERT

. ..

.

................... ........

...

groups

to

. ..

... _ .

..

.

.

..... . . . . . .....

celebration

of

Christmas

when there is no peace on earth. So our group feels it is time for a Christmas boycott. We are not going to buy presents

this year,

nor are we going to receive them. We will do without decorations, and maybe

fasting on Christmas day

instead of feasting. Instead of spending, we will work for peace on earth by giving our money to help make amends for the suffering we have caused ­ such as by financially adopting a Vietnamese

child,

and

by

giving

our time to stop the war. We are for

CO'Py Editor

people

to

put

peace

The ASPLU Student Senate will meet this Thursday in a banquet meeting in Chris Knutzen at 6:00. One of the main items of business will be to decide how to select the Freshman

representative

to

the

Senate. There are a variety of pos­

DA VE SODERLUND ............................................................ Sports Editor

sibilities, but in any case, all those

MARY SHADOFF

freshmen who are interested in be­

................. ........................ Circulation Manager

PAUL BERG

....................................... .. Business Manager

DR. JOHN PETERSON . ........................................................ ..... AdvisO'r

STAFF-Glen Anderson, Paul Wuest, Kansas, Glen Zander, Steve Larson,

John

Hushagen,

Heavey,

Russ

JohnsO'n,

Dave

Mary

Giles,

Jane

Dave

Dykstra,

Thorson, Kristi

Tom

Johnson,

Becky Rodning, Bruce Bjerke, Cathy Wark, Steve Cook, Nancy Shaw, Karen Svendsen, Wanda Huber, Bob Steward, Rich Diet­ meier, John Rankin.

ing that representative

will

need

to apply first to the Elections and Personnel Board. Applications are available from the ASPLU Secretary in her office in the CUB. The election scheduled for this week will not be held. Also there will be frosh repre­ sentatives on all ASPLU commit­ tees this year. That does not in·

Opinions expressed in the MO'oring Mast are not necessarily those of Pacific Lutheran University, its administration, faculty, or the Mooring Mast staff. The MM reserves the right to edit all CO'py for length, propriety and libel. Materia,ls submitted should be typewritten, double-spaced with

65 spaces to the line. The deadline for each issue is 8 p.m. on the Sunday priO'r to' publication.

c1ude faculty committees with stu­ dent representatives or ali-univer­ sity committees. Included in this number Elections

and

Personnel

is the Board.

which handles all ASPLU elections and makes recommendations to the ASPLU President on committee ap· pointments.

counting do

most

on of

college

the

local

work. Here are some possible ap­

We see as hypocrisy the extra­

ASPLU Senate Asks Frosh Help

ASPLU President

.

our letters to the editor section.)

proaches

for

organizing

the

boy­

stations,

the

thinking

of

1. Contact local clergy - many should be receptive to taking com­ mercialism out of Christmas and putting peace back in.

2. Organize picket lines at depart­ ment stores and shopping centers.

J. Do guerilla theater on the side­ walk in front of large stores. Dra­

churches

and

shopping

centers.

5. Urge fellow students not to go home for vacation unless their par­ ents

cott.

agree

to

participate

in

1M

boycott. We

would

cisms

and

welcome

any

suggestions

criti­

readers

might have of this proposal. Westport Citizens for Peace P.O. Box 207 Saugatuck Station Westport, Conn. 06880

Ruby Makes A Comebacl To the Editor of the Mooring Mast and the men of the PLU Student

She

would

also

like

to

clarify

why she wants to know all of you. The reason is that Ruby Begonia

Body: Last year, many O'f you became

lives in the hearts of men,

each

Begonia.

and 'every one of you. She considers

This year, Ruby hopes to get to

this a rare and beautiful privilege

know even more of the male popu­

and wants only to spread a little

acquainted

BILL CHRISTENSEN

MOORING

are

Dear friends,

in

4. Leaflet at high schools, train

this year? We

calling

Sincerely,

.

by the

ed that the following appear in

vagent

including the Spurs and IK's. We thank you all.

BOB HASSELBLAD

received

.

We would like to give special thanks at this time to all those who

JOHN AAKRE

was

with

Ruby

lation of PLU. In order to inaugur­

happiness and joy in your lives in

ate this, she is writing this letter

return to you.

to say hello and welcome to all of

In radiant happiness,

you.

RUBY BE GONIA


Wednesday, Sept.

Environ....... t

Arthur Hoppe

Saint Progress Assailed

Our Man Hoppe There's a new reader for tots on the market. It's not an old-fashioned

(Editor'S Note: The following is

reader about Dick and Jane. It's a modem reader about Mark and Janet.

the first in a series of environ­

You can tell it's modem because Mark and Jane have a little friend

mental features to appear on a

who is black. This will give our first graders a modern picture of Our

semi-weekly basis in the coming

American Way of Life. It should satisfy everyone. It doesn't. The Women's Lib is mad at Mark and Jane because their Mother wears an apron. Mother cooks.

Fortunately, to prevent rioting and bloodshed in our first-grade class­ rooms, a new reader is being rushed into print. It is called, Leong and Conchita." It will give a really modern picture of Our American Way of Life. It should satisfy everyone.

Leong is a Catholic Afro-American of Icelandic descent. Conch.ita is a persuasion.

Zoroastrian-Love-Cult-&-Human-Sacrifice

the

Vasalai is a homo­

Their little brother, Vasalai, plays with dolls.

can lick Daddy at

Indian wrestling.

Leong and Conchita are proud

of Mommy. The family bas a cook. Her name is Aunt Jemina. Aunt Jemina Aunt Jemina says,

is big and fat and jolly and wears a bandanna. Honey-chile,

"Heah,

She is

have s'mo these scrumptious hotcakes."

a Caucasian. Leong and Conchita have an uncle. His name is Colonel Jefferson a string tie

Lee Stonewall. Colonel Stonewall wears a planter's hat, and gaiters. He

is

and defending his

for segregation, racial purity

womenfolk with guns. He is a Black Panther. Leong and Conchita have many little friends. There is Giuseppi. He is Polish. He is smart. There is Cyznewski. He is Irish. He is smart. There is Billy. He is Anglo-Saxon. He is dumb. Leong and Conchita live on a farm in the ghetto. They are for ur­ ban renewal, the Soil Bank program, increased welfare allotments and lower taxes. Daddy is for killing all Commies, pinkos, outside agitators and John Wayne. He is also for sexual equality and buying a dishwasher. Mommy is for peace, freei.ng Jimmy Hoffa and buying a sports car. She is also for sexual equality-as soon as Daddy can lick her in Indian wrestling. tittle Vasalai is the only one in the family not for sexual equality.

He is for segregation. It is a good reader.It will give our tots can Way of Life. It wilf satisfy ...

*

*

*

true picture of OUI' Ameri­

a

Hold it! The publishers, Harping & Row (cq) are being picketed by an angry coalition from the Anglo-Saxon Anti-Defamation League, the Male Liberation Front, the Watch & Ward Society and, among others, They find the new reader denigrating, defamatory and downright

to question it without being brand­

trol measures in this country, let

ed as a nut, a lazy idealist, or even

alone in underdeveloped, (actually

a communist.

overdeveloped) countries, has been

-turn off your gas

The fact remains, however, that the lack of space is one obstacle

-turn off your heat

that civilization has never met be­

-turn off your electricity -sit naked on the floor and re­ peat this chant: product, progress is our ... " It has been almost five months

This year the English department has given birth to

a brainstorm.

To

"frontier

to

explo-ita­

tion and waste. Today we are so

quote from a poster tends toward

much in the grip of this attitude

panic it points out one area of the

that action on environmental issues

environmental crisis which has re­

must be taken at a national level

ceived little notice-that of growth,

only if it will not upset the course

too much growth too fast.

of our totem, Progress.

good grades and where does that

By RICHARD DIETMEIER

school year is beginning

A ne

looking forward

is

and everyone

Mr.

Jones will be using professors from

of

many other departments such as

Literature, is largely the creation

philosophy, biology, physics, psych­

English

221,

Experience

The

of Richard P. Jones, a second-year instructor in English. The class will meet at I: 30 on Mondays, Wednes­ days and

Fridays in Xavier 201.

It is open to anyone in the uni­ versity community. Mr.Jones said that he would like

ology and chemistry. Literature dealt with will cover a wide range also. The class will begin by Jones

selections from

reading

plans

to

writers,

var,ious

at

look

chronologically

works

Hessiod.

and

Genesis,

Homer,

including

Renaissance

as many people as possible to take

Elizabethan

the class for credit, to audit it, or

works, on up to Darwin and Freud.

just to sit in On the course.Xavier 201 seats two hundred and twenty,

"We have to look at the Hebrew creation

story

in relation

to

the

and as of last week there were still

Greek creation story and perhaps

vacancies.

even the Puyallup Indian myths,"

would

contended Jones. He explained that

a

hundred

But

Jones

sixty

and added

that

he

not close the class even if seating

one of the goals of the course will

were full.

be to look for some sort of cosmo­

The

rationale

behind

this

open

logy between many seemingly dif­

structure is that he wants indivi­

ferent

duals from many areas of study

world.

responses

of

man

to

this

involved in the Experience of Lit­

As Christianity rose in influence

'experi­

it brought devastating changes to

encing literature," but we will try

the western world. One of the big­

erature.

"We will not be

to look at what literature has ex­

gest chariges was the unified cos­

perienced," said Jones. He views

mology of the Middle Ages; "That

literature as the most simple, re­ liable account of man's response to his world. And since literature is not limited to an y one discipline, Jones sees a great need for ex­

was the last complete security for western

man."

The

universe

of

Thomas Aquinas and the Catholic fathers has since been challenged by science, secular knowledge, and

money-and

job,

better

A

them?

get

more

headaches

and

time

who

fail

have

to success. Those of you who are

payments. People

returning know all about college,

just as good a time as those who

but freshman have only primitive

pass

ideas. In any case the object of

mental breakdowns.

college is supposedly to pass and a

living, marry, have child­

ren, and die.

Let Me Count the Ways:

1. The most effective way to fail and go only When you are in the This

out

works

well with

on passing, and every college stu­

mood.

dent is capable of passing to some

boring classes, which are a prime

degree. But what about the other

motivation for failure.

will

many

How

alternative?

fail

2. Destructive criticism is a valu­ professors

against

weapon

without knowing how to fail prop­

able

erly?

who tend, as a group, to be overly­ art of failing

an

is

exact

science dating back to the begin­

will

be a problem left to

stated that all he can offer is looks

my mind

literature

at

'the

different off

bounds

and

ing

you

until

have

goal

priorities for the

correct

of

failing.

in

unfair

and

are

measuring

the

affaris

world

to

grossly

mark of any individual. 5. Live life with the idea that if

from

there. "

end

accumulate

to

cannot

abruptly. You

hangups Now

about

that

thus foresaw this catastrophe in the but only now is it

18th century,

necessary to live it out. The worship of progress also de­ mands an increased drain on na­ in the last

Only

resources.

tural

few years has man realized that house for resources and that we are slowly approaching the end of our and

lumber,

fuels,

Fossil

rope.

beauty in the natural state are all alarming rate

disappearing at a

and who is to say which of them is more important to save? A basic attitude change is in or­ painfully

are

ttitudes

but

der,

The whole world

slow to change.

and this commitment will

not be broken easily. An alterna­ tive, a new "spaceship economy" has been offered, but it will be dif­ ficult to direct all of life toward the conservation and re-cycling of resources and toward becoming an integral part of the world ecosys­ tem rather than a wasteful exploi­ ter.

Earth

Spaceship

If

were

to

become a way of life the effects might

far-reaching. It

be

would

even save

a

little of life as we

know it for our children.

..

*

*

A CHANCE TO ACT: The Student with

Thrust

associ­

Committee,

Environment ated

Environmental

the

Forum

on

campus,

holds

its first meeting of the fall semes­ ter tonight at 5:30 in Chris Knut­ zen. Bring

and find

dinner

yO'Ur

out what is being done on campus this fall. Also in the near future will be meetings of the Puget Sound Coali­ tion Environmental Awareness Pro­

rules,

the

don't waste time studying. Get out And if

there and practice failing!

you do succeed, try,

at first

that no matter what action is taken it is already too late. Thomas Mal­

guilt

failing. know

famine

must face world-wide

if nothing is done, and others feel

afford

unnecessary

you

food

limited

our

give us less than a decade before we

for

time

no

classes. This will help you set the

you don't pass the world will not

variety

experimentation. EssentiaHy, Jones way

in

involved

deeply

Become

tinent

result in a watering down of tbe course wiU

3.

social activities like clubs and dat­

4. Refuse to take exams on the

to look at in English 221. too much

usually deliver a bad grade.

grounds that they are never per­

schools of thought that Jones hopes

Whether

When struck hard they

sensitive.

and

supply is imminent. Some experts

omy,"

is to ignore the class completely

The whole cycle is dependent up­

The collision between expanding population

is dedicated to the "frontier econ­

How Does One Fail?

get a degree, go out into the world, make

fewer

23%

experience

and

an astutely avoided issue.

the earth is not a limitless store­

Frosh Anticipate New Curriculum

politics. It is some of these diverse

variety,

dedicated

above

the

Although

campus.

on

dents are concerned with getting

this

achieve

can west all fell to what Dr. Paul economy,"

none at all. The majority of stu­

pertese from all areas.

the Am.eri­

and

world, Australia,

new

The

exploit.

to

areas

new

Ehrlich has labeled the

Stude:nts Offered Unique Experience in Literature By BOB HASSELBLAD

has been skyrocketing for the past 500 years there have always been

Day 1970 haunted us at every turn

the object is to get bad grades or

1970)

population

man's

Although

fore.

since the rude awakening of Earth

"You simply can't satisfy everyone," as Mr. Harping himself put "with just one American Way of Life."

tion of one individual for a lifetime

pear over the next ten to twenty

ing years of non-stUdy to perfect,

(Copyright Chronicle Publishing Co.,

Na­

as a market with

years, we suggest a little dry run:

So Harping & Row is hastily withdrawing it from publication. it dispiritedly,

Gross

babies

lIumber of

vast potential. The total consump­ is a staggering statistic. Yet, the

disap

ning of formal education. Requir­

disgusting. Besides, it's in English.

the

and especially

has lived the wor·

States.

implementation of population con­

The

the Spanish Speaking Alliance.

many

for

Industry

population.

yea rs has heralded the increasing

ades that it has become impossible

services and products will

Daddy is a SAC General. Daddy is a full-blooded Choctaw Indian. Mommy is a Sumo wrestler. Mommy belongs to the Peace & Free­

growth

this

of

manifestation

syndrome is the continuing rise in

control of the growth process. The

ship of the expanding

Progress is our important

dom Party. Mommy is big and strong.Mommy drives a truck. Mommy

The simplest and most immedi­ ate

tional Product for so many dec­

sexual. He is proud of it. Daddy goes around licking cowboys. Daddy also does the dishes.

a

of a group of cells which has lost

United

-turn off your telephone

Leong and Conchita Schwartz are brother and sister. Or visa versa.

to

in t ha t his

this plan·"t

we stern world.

By DAVE SODERLUND

-turn off your water *

*

compared

been

has

lifestyle parallels the development

"Appreciating that most of our

What kind of male chauvinist pig wrote this inflammatory rot?

of

Man

cancer on

months.)

Mother sews. Mother washes dishes.

Mother never even drives a car.

Dravidian

Page Three

MOORING MAST

16, 1970

try

gram, which is being coordinated by

at

office

CHOICE

the

PLU.

Your own awareness of the issues depends on your willingness to in­ volve yourself.

again!

Regents Select Dederer Chairman The Pacific Lutheran University

Board of Regents Monday elected

Also . elected

t.erms

to one-year

meeting

yesterday's

during

was

Pflueger,

Jesse In

other

Ephrata. the

business,

passed a resolution

Regents

of thanks to

a

Thomas Anderson of Tacoma, who

one-year term as Board Chairman.

will serve as vice-chairman of the

outgOing officers and members of

Cornell of Port

the bOard; former chairman Bruec­

Dan

kner, former vice-chairman Carl T.

of

Ded'erer

Michael

Seattle

to

Dederer, who replaces Rev. The· odore

Brueckner

of

Beaverton,

On?gon, is president of the Seattle Fur Exchange. A member of the PLU governing body for six years, he also serves

on

the Board of Re­

gents at Washington State Univer­ sity and is former chairman of that

b dy. The new chairman is a graduate of

Great

Falls

Business

Donald E.

Angeles,

secretary,

Buchanan,

and

treasurer,

A.

were

re­

Anderson.

president of Concrete

Technology Corp. in Tacoma, is in his first year as a member of the boa rd. for

Fyniloe of Tacoma, Mrs.

member

elected.

Buchanan is vice-presidi'nt

business

and

finance

at

the

university. SWDrn in as ncw Regents were

a membe,' of Queen

Mrs. Jesse Herbert, Portland, Ore.,

Lutheran Church in Seattle.

Dr. Alfred Stone. Seattle, and Dr.

College and Anne

(Mont.)

board.

J.

and outgoing

L.

Moilien

of

Portland. A resolution was passed thank­ ing Dr. Charles Anderson for his four years as dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Anderson who resigned the position last fall, lc'a vcs

on

sabbatic'al

leave

this

month. He will return to the camp­ us next year as professor of chem­ istry.


Page Four

MOORING MftST

Wednesday, Sept. 16, 1970

Indians Beaten by Authorities By JOHN AAKRE One week ago today, fifty-se ven Indians camped along the .Puyallup Rive r were arrested. M any of them

were clubbed and beaten and all were tear gassed in the process. The

Indians,

members

of

the

PuyaUup tribe, had been holding a

fish-in on the

river for the past

events

las t

of

Wednesday

began when the State Fisheries 0&­ partme nt. backed by a large nom­ ber o f police, moved to confiscate the indian

nets. As the fisheries

boat approached them two warn­

ing shots were fired (the poliCe say

five) by an I ndian woman. Though many were armed, the Indians did

not use their weapons further. Af­ ter

t he

warning

shots,

however,

the police moved rapidly and the arrests

quic.kly fol­

and gassings

lowed.

The history of the events which have led up to this recent confron­ tation is a long and confusing one . The original justification for the In di an fishing rights on the Puyal­ lup dates back to the Medicine Creek Treaty of 1855. That agree­ ment guaranteed the Puyallup tribe fishing rites in perpetuity. There were no qualificat ion s. The struggle which they are noW involved in, howe ver, began as a reactio n

to the

clearly supercede the provisions of t he Medicine Creek Treaty. A recent decision by the Federal

regulation of In­

ty of the Indian community. It is not recognized by the BIA which

has charged ballot box irregulari­ tiesties--<lespite

their

own

super­

vision.

In Oregon, stating

The third group consists of the

that the fish must be shared, has

activists or radical element. With­

been he l pful in clarifying the 1968

in this group and the entire Indian

District Court

decision, but much ambiguity still

remains nonetheless. This basic

several months.

The

state to act in the area of conser­ vation was uphe ld but it did not

legal arena, however, is bot a fac­ disjointed whole.

and equally

Central

to this

has

been the fragmen­ Puyallup Tribe itself. For a clear understanding (if as an outsider, I could ever provide one) of the s ltuation one would need something along the li ne of a score card. However, the distinction between the three ma­ jor factions within the Indian com­ munity should be pointed out. The first of these groups in­ volves the original tribal council of the Puyallup tribe which wa s elected a few years ago. Its spokes­ man is Frank Wright, one of five members on the Council and It is the group which is recognized by the B ureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). problem

tation

within the

The election was disputed, how­ ever, and a second one (supervised by the BIA) was held. This c uncil when elected,

the

most

prominent

and articulate leader is

contusion within the

et of a much larger

community

contained only two

of the orig inal five and is recog­ nized and supported by the majori­

Sta te Fisheries in the early fifties. The Indians took their case to the courts in 1954. In the fourteen years that followed the Pu yallup tribe spent aver thirty thousand dollars and pressed the case to a Supreme Court decision in 1968.

Hank

Adams.

The

probably

preeminence

granted Bob Satiacum by the med­ ia not born out among the Indians themselves. Apart from the above, there are also

problems involving both

the

ownership and jurisdictional rights of the Indian land itself.

This is

perhaps the least clear of any area of the controversy. Over

a

number

of

years,

the

boundaries of the reservation have slowly

receded

as

the

land was

sold off in bits and pieces by the Indians.

Now,

the

thirty-three acres

approximately of their

ceme­

tery is all that remains. This all seemed reasonably clear until it was pointed out that treaty boundaries

can

only

be

changed

TACOMA POUCE OFFICERS OIl tactieal alert stood at the ready an hour Wednesday morning before tile clash with Indians at their Pu yallup River fishing camp.

for more than

by Presidential proclamation. As a result of this much of the Federal

aHup Indians had encamped during

land

did enter and the results were not

the

very pretty.

formerly

within

the

bound­

fish-in.

The

word

"Federal"

aries of the reservation is now in a

here is

state of "limbo"-and nobody real­

the Indians. For unless there is a

ly knows who owns it.

It was upon this land, still under Federa l jurisdiction, that the Puy-

of critical importance to

The ting

Puyallup

Indians

are

up another camp nOW.

set­

This

breach of the peace, the local p<>­

time it is in the cemetery so there

lice cannot enter it.

can be no dispute if or when the

A week ago today, however, they

authorities move again.

dian fishing by the

Department

THE COMMON MARKET - A THIRD FORCE IN WORLD AFFAIRS? THE BRITISH - CAN THEY AffORD TO REMA1N OUTSIDE? WILL PARJS lET THEM IN?

This decIsion, however, stated tew things c learly. The right of the

GERMAN SOVIET NON-AGRESSION PACT - WILL IT WORK? DOES NATO NEED A NEW LOOK?

Activist Coalition Assemb es Tonight Ton ight at 9:00 p.m.

in

,

WHAT DO BONN'S STUDENTS THINK OF THE ESTABLISHMENT?

X-I07,

the Democratic Students Coalition will

hold

first

its

fall

meeting.

FOR FIRST-HAND, ON-THE-SPOT INFORMATION ON THESE QUESTIONS

What with the hordes of Freshmen and transfer students, perhaps

brief history of

the

a

organization is

JOIN THE HUTCHEON-ULBRICHT TEAM

in order.

ON THEIR EUROPEAN TOUR

A short time ago, there was a group on campus called the Young Democrats, affiliated with the state

GO WHERE TH E ACTION IS

and nation al organization of Young Democrats. It spawned a sman but viable troop of young Kennedyites who produced such miracles as getting Robert Kennedy elected during the CHOI CE 68 co lleg e pri­

GO INTERIM 314

,

mary elections. (On the PLU cam­ pus, that is the equivalent of water walking!)

Realizing

that

Demo­

crats on the PLU c ampus are de­

finitely a minority, it was decided that

the

organizational

structure shoul d be broadened to include as many concerned Ilberal people as possihle--and the Democrati c

dents Coalition (DSC "disc")

was

the

-

Stu­

pronounced

result.

The purpose thus became one of espousing liberalism and/or calism

and

providing

a

radi­

become involved in the solut ion of pr oblems common to us all-whet­ community,

state or

natlenal problems.

Thus DSC provides

a

forum for

the di sc ussi on of those

problems

and a mode of involvement for the active search for solutions to these exigences

confronting

us.

All s tude nts , faculty and yes, admi nistration are invited and urged to attend this opening ses­ sion of DSC.

Political Science 314

BRUSSELS

W. R. Hutcheon and P. W. Ulbricht BUSINESS, POuncs, AND THE COMMON MARKET

ANTW5RP

JANUARY 4 THROUGH

JANUARY 25, 1971

COLOGNE The course was designed to give the student a m ore vivid picture

BONN

of international business and politics than is possible in the class­

ve hicl e

whereby students and faculty could

her campus,

Business Administration

to

room. Visits of the headquarters of international organizations (NATO,

BERLIN

Common Market, OECD and UNESCO) are planned.

In discussions

with opinion-leaders (politicians, newspaper editors, student representa·

PARIS

tives), the participants will be able to famiLiariz.e themselves with Eu­

LONDON

The role of European and American enterprises in the Common Market

ropean perspectives on international problems and national priorities. wi\l be examined.

Costs:

$709 including transportation, hotels, most meals Rebate: A $30 credit will be applied to spring board for participants who are registered for both. fall and spring semesters. (See p. 20, 1970 PLU Bulletin)


Page Five

MOORING MAST

Wednesday, Sept. 1 6, 1 970

Underth,e Gramhtand By DAVE SODERLUND Greetings!

.

After three months of semi-retirement we resume the

fearless view from beneath the bleachers . .

As you by now know the Lutes crank. things up on the football field this year against Whitworth Saturday night at FP stadium, starting at 8 p.m. Although the Pirates are technically non-conference competition they join the NWC next year and will be familiar opposition in the future. They are coached this year by Hugh Campbell, the former WSU pass-catcher. Campbell played under Lute coach Carlson when Carl­ son was an assistant at WSU. Come out Saturday night and stretch your vocal cords. •

For those of us who take football a little less seriously intramural action starts on Monday, September 21. All entries are due by today

-

at the latest in the PE offices. Get your teams in if you haven't done so already. (Incidentally, refs are needed for 1M football

actIoD. LUTE QB JIM HADLAND surveys the possibWties In last year's

On tap also are individual tournaments in billiards, and table tennis and bowling leagues. These are dependent on the completion of the re­

Gridders to Defend NWC Title The 1970 edition of the PLU foot­ ball team initiates its defense of a share of the NWC title this week­ end against Whitworth College at Franklin

Pierce

Stadium.

Coach

Carlson, honored last year as NA­ IA District 1 Coach of the Year, has at his disposal a bumper crop of

backs

but

must

replacements

find

for

durable

the

departed

members of the meat squad. Both

offensive

and

defensive

lines were hard-hit by graduation. Lost

from

the

offense

are

Rick

Johnson, Duane Oyler, and Randy Jorgensen, all of whom were men­ tioned in the post-season NWC hon­ or roll.

Returning

are

all-confer­

ence guard Ross Boice and tackle Bill Broeker, and the likes of Steve Harshman,

Stan

Pietras,

Gary

Huntington, and frosh giant George Van Over are expected to plug the holes. The defensive line lost Neil Bry­ ant to the cap and gown but re­ turns Boice, who goes both ways, HE LP

WANTED TOY TRAINS

6th South,

M. Cox,

Seattle,

Hillesland

and

Big

Bob

1765­

Wash 98134

LI 8-2230

and

lettermen

as Dave Halstead, and Gary Ham­

department. This handy book collects in one place all necessary in­

Ferguson, and John Umeno lead­

mer.

Behind

formation concerning varsity, extramural, and

ing the crew. The defensive back­

soph

Rob

man

Richard

Pete

Olbertz,

field

is

Pete

minus

Ugstad,

pass

Paul

thief

Tim

them are

Sherwood,

Coleman,

men and women including dates for entry into all intramural competi­

Amundson.

Hans

tions. It either is available now or will be later this week in all dorms,

but Grant Spencer and Jack Irior:t

has moved to a split

return along with John Oberg and

and is catching everything in sight.

end

Burnell Coleman. Oberg is a con­

On the other side is Bernard John­ son,

burner who may play some offense

transferred from Grays Harbor CC.

as well.

Johnson is big and quick, provid­

The

frosting has

on

to be

the

cake

this

the point-scoring

impressive

who

and frosh

quarterback to lead a talented and

out the receivers.

Harriers Trai for

Eric Hansen to round

bigger

turnout than

ever

before.

chance of bettering their standing

cross

country runner, putting in his daily ten miles in

preparation for the

coming season. Coach John Thie­ man

greets

five

lettermen

and

paration

for

PLU's fifth year

of

competition In the newest of NWC

Following is the 1970 PLU cross schedule:

Returning

from

last

year's

fourth-place team effort are senior Gugel,

junior

Chris

Buck,

ed seventh in tne conference meet in 1968 and ninth in 1969. Thieman

are looking up

believes

that

this year with

AI.CO

TUNE-UPS BRAKE SERVICE STARTER AND GENERATOR REPAIR

Lee's

OPEII 7:00

Shoe Repair 20% Off on

all

MEN'S DRESS

A.••

12166 Pacific

--

10:00 P.

LE 1-3040

26--Lewis & Clark .................... Here

OCTOBER 100Pacific & Linfield .......... Here 17-Central Invitational ................ Ellensburg 24-Whitman .............................. Here 31-Willamette

NOVEMBER

WORK SHOES

from

To

ball team in addition to service as. a PE teacher athletic recruiter. Broeker has taken a one-year sabbatical for further graduate study. Jim Kittlesby is the new face in the sports information department. Officially titled an administrative assistant, he is the sports information director, baseball coach, and assistant athletic director. Kittlesby is a former PLU baseballer and has served in the front-office end of a •

...................... Salem

.. . . .

This year PLU football will take on a new look in two areas peri­ pheral to the actual game. First, all Lute games will be broadcast this year by KMO radio (1360 kc). This is the first time in recent years that PLU has had total radio coverage. Second, half-time shows have been scheduled for all but the Homecoming game. The first one, at the Whitworth game, will feature a youth soccer exhibition between Arne­ berg's Landscaping and the Little Wanderers, a pair of teams from a local league for nine·year-olds. •

7-NWC Pier Park ........ Portland

The women's lib movement at PLU has received a serious setback

14-District ... .. .... ...... .... Cheney _

-a separate sauna for women is near completion in Memorial Gym.

21-National ............................

Delerably speaking By mOMAS HEAVEY

On April 23, 1970, President Nix­

college.

For those of you who are holding

on made several sweeping changes

Mr. Nixon has promised, however,

out hope for an all volunteer army

in the Selective Service laws. Most

to postpone a college student's in­

by July, 1971, when the Selective

important

duction until the end of the semes­

Service law expries, forget it. Last

ter.

month a bill that would have set

of

these

changes

was

his announced intention of elimina­ ting future student deferments for college students.

tion

order while still

Since the

bill

has

in

not reached

an

all

volunteer

t

army failed

to

the floor of Congress yet, student

clear ei her house and it will be at

Because the law forbids the Pres­

deferments are still available for

least another two years before a

ident from cancelling such defer­

this year's freshmen. When the bill

volunteer army could be set up.

ments through executive authority,

does get to Congress it is expected

So, the Military Service Informa­

he must receive the power from

to pass with little or no opposition.

tion Center advises all those who

the Congress.

On

April

28, 1970,

do not yet have a II-S classification to apply for them now. You may

BLUE SPRUCE

troduced H.R. 17314, a bill to carry

new law retroactive back to April

apply by picking up SSS forms 104

MOTEL

out Mr. Nixon's request. If passed,

23, 1970. Therefore, all those per­

and 109 from the Registrar's Of­

this bill will give the president dis­

sons who were not college students

fice or the MSIC office.

cretionary

on thar day will have their defer­

12115 PACIFIC AVENUE Tacoma, Wash.

Ave

department.

the

PARKLAND SQ UARE the "Pig"

athletic

will

NEAREST TO P.L.U.

Pacific

the

It is {ben expected that Mr. Nixon

12213 Pacific Avenue across

in

Representative Mendell Rivers in­

ONE AND TWO BEDROOM UNITS SOME WITH KITCHENS - PHONES FREE TV AND COFFEE

and

three new faces

Place

Team

good nucleus of lettermen and a

Dee and Gene's

PLU has hired

couple of major league teams.

SEPTEMBER Date

3-Western Wash ..... Bellingham

sports. -

things

in the 1970 NWC season. country

has been hired to take Joe Broeker's place as line coach of the foot­

other

a

country, this band always presents a varied and entertaining concert. If you enjoy music be sure to catch this one.

Chase. Chase, in addition to being a coach, is an exercise physiologist

The Lute harriers have an even

probably

Band in concert. The marine band was here two years ago and played

to a full house in memorial gym. Drawing on the best musicians in the

and will teach in that area here. Tom Mays, a former Lute footballer

past you on the golf course the day was

On October 12 the Lettermen's club will sponsor the US Marine

coach the swim and water polo teams this year we now have Gary

a on

ew

Ed McGrath, Kip Taylor,

machine. Jim Hadland returns at

That strange-looking guy who ran

receiver

ing Hadland with yet another good target

the PE office, and at the info desk.

position

verted end and Coleman is a spee d­

year

for

fresh­

Lindstrom, who started last year,

an

intramural sports

and

Chandler as well as Doug Jansen,

a

Ken Jaeobs

This year you will be able to add to your collection of handbooks

with

FLOWERS, Inc.

Stella

the Intramural Sports and Information Guide put out by the athletic

Coach

Phone 531-0205

crew. In the

year's leading ball carrier, as well

talented,

burg, and Bob Matson. Gugel plac­

1 2 1 69 Pacific Avenue

Sign-up sheets and further information are available at the

backfield are Dan Pritchard, last

and

and sophs Bruce Pyrah, Kirk Sand­

$1e/b.;J.

offensive

21 also.

info desk in the UCenter.

ful

Jerry

ARTISTRY IN FLOWERS

diversified

creation portion of the University Center and should start around Sept.

Nordstrom. Linebackers are plenti­

some promising freshmen in pre­

!!

Any make, age or condition. Give details. A.

Denny

if you are

interested, see Mike Benson in the equipment room or call ext. 339.)

LE 1-6111

for

powers to make

undergraduates

II-S

rules defer­

ments. Then, presumably, he will

make

graduate

this

for

those

ready

students

enrolled

in

who

except

were

college

of

your

January,

If you have any questions con­ cerning the draft or the Selective

Due to the almost certainty of having

deferments,

provisions

ments revoked.

carry out his promise to end under­ II-S

the

deferment you

Service System, if you have any

revoked

particular draft problem, or need

may ask why

any help whatsoever in that regard,

al­

bother to even apply for a defer­

please contact us. Me are here to

before

ment. The reason is that there is

serve you. ASPLU Military Service

April 23, 1970. This bill will also

still an outside chance, albeit slim,

Information

end the I-S

that this fall's deferments may not

cated in Room 718 Tinglestad ext.

be revoked.

1447.

(C)

deferment

avail­

able for those who get their induc-

Center

office

is

lo­


MOORING MAST

Page Six

Wednesday, Sept. 16, 1970

! MOORING MAS!

-. - """"

·TOTHE POINT

r.

DEMOCRATIC STUDENTS COALITION MEETING The Democratic Students Coalition will hold its first fall meeting this evening in Xavier 107 at 9: 00 p.m.

MARKETING CLUB TO MEET The Marketing Club's first fall meeting is Thursday at 9:40 a.m. in A-2.

MM REPORTERS NEEDED Any students interested in writing for the Mooring Mast are en­ couraged to call the MM office at ext. 431. News, feature, and sports reporters are still needed.

SAGA STAFF INTEREST MEETING

MR. JOBST PONDERS the formJdable ordal poster, which offers needed advice on such topics as ''pet­ ting-social and sexual: Think of your honeymoon!

Wait! To everything there is a

There will be an important organizational meeting, Thurs., Sept. 17

season."

for those interested in working on the 1970-71 Saga staff. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. in the basement of the library at the Saga office.

Numerous Student Committee Positions Still Open As the ASPLU government gets set

for

another

year,

there

are

still a number of positions On var­ ious

committees

as

yet

unfilled.

Leading the list are the spots open

and at least three other members

University Center Board­

are

Leadership Retreat-

needed.

This

committee will

direct all tournaments, and special

posium November 19. Call ext. 1259 or ext. 639.

Student Relations--

HOUSING PICTURES FOR SAGA

events in the games area of the

Homecoming Co-Cbairmen­

University Center.

A cademic Concerns Cool'dina.tor­

Admissions Committee-One jun­

SYMPOSIUM COMMITTEE OPENINGS Volunteers are needed to help on the committees for the Drug Sym­

The following is a schedule of when pictures will be taken. On Mon.,

Current Af fai rs Forum Chairman­

on the All University Commission.

Sept. 21, Rainier and Hong-Rainier;

ior and o.ne senior, one a male and

Publications BoaTd-

This

Sept. 22, Kreidler and Ordal-Stuen; Alpine and Ivy-Tinglestad. Wed.,

the other a female, are needed, the

Facul ty Committees with

commission

segments

of

represents

the

university

all com­

junior

being

appointed

for

two

The times for each of these days are 3:30 to 7:30 p.m.

years. These two will assist in ad­

Financial Aids

to the President.

missions work.

Educational Policies

Also needed is a co-chairman for

Those c'ommittees now filled are the following:

There will be no cost to the students for these dorm pictures. Meet in th living room of the designated hall on the scheduled day for your

Interim

picture. The dress is dark sweaters for the girls and sports jackets and

Rank and Tenure

ties for the men. Off campus students may have their pictures taken any of the days at any of the locations.

Pam Larson has been appointed as

Entertainment Series­

Library Committee

one c(}-chairman, but the other ­

USSA C Co-Chairmen­

sition is vacant. Members are be­

All-University Committ

Artist Series-

Parking and Appeals Board

Ing

sought

for

the

Information

Committee, which will be in charge of publicity of ASPLU events. Applications for any of the above positions

or

any

of

those

listed

below may be obtained from the

ASPLU secretary in her office in the CUB, or you may submit your own application to ASPLU through the

ampus mail.

Applications are reviewed by the Elections and Personnel card for recommendations

to

the

ASPLU

President, who makes the appoint­ ments. Sufficient information as to name,

address,

phone

number,

year and committee(s) applied for must be included in the applica­

ASPLU Officers Urge Voter Registration With the primary elections over now,

following committees have openin gs that need to be filled in The

The Shoe Faetory

as possible to register.

By LINDA BAR ER

attention is directed to No­

The last day for registration in

The engagement of Gretchen Van Biber and Peter

Johnson was

vember 3, the date of the General

Washington is October 3, and there

Election. So that this student body

is

by

announced at a candlepassing ceremony last Sunday evening at Har­

may be fully prepared for that day,

mail. Those eligible may register

stad Hall. Both are sophomores at PLU. The wedding is planned for

the ASPLU officers are trying to

with the County Auditor or the City

the summer of '72.

make it possible for everyone eli­

Clerk,

no

registration

permitted

gible to register and vote. The Assoc'iation of Students for Voter Registration has supplied in­ formation concerning

the correct procedures, and ASPLU President has stated that the League of Wo­

men Vorers will be asked to come 'on

tion.

Sept. 23, Stuen and Harstad-Stuen; Evergreen and Cascade-Tingelstad.

Students-­

munity, and is an advisory board

the Leadership Retreat Committee.

Foss and Pflueger-Foss. Tues.,

campus

with

duly

You can start in the mailro m, or IJOU can start on

authorized

executive

registrars to help as many students

the next few weeks. Cave Committee - A chairman

row.

and at least three other positions needed. This is a committee that will be responsible for the Cave, the "nightclub" in the basement of the University Center. Movies--A

Campus needed, as

a salaried

many

director

position,

assistants

as

is

plus

h e/ she

needs . Special Events Committee - A chairman and at least three other

members needed. This committee would plan and schedule any spe­

cial events for the University Cen­ ter. Music and Art Commitree - A chairman and at least three other

members needed. This committee will arrange for art displays in the

University

Center

and select the

records ferr the listening center. Games

Committee-A chairman

Austin's Lakewood Jewelers DIAMONDS

-

WATCHES

Repairs VILLA PLAZA Phone JU 8-4311

'Books of aU tFubtishers Supplies xtbooks 'Posters

Most people say you have to start at tne bottom no mat­ ter how high you wan to climb.

Gifts --

Is that really S07 Maybe it's a story they tell jus

to get p eople to s ta r t

at the bottom. '-

BOOK NOOK

Villa Plaza, Lakewood

MORRIS BOOKS 945 Broadway, Tacome MA 7-0324

The United Stales Air

orce lets you slart climbing you

as scan as you get out of 0 ficer Training S chool . I

have a college deg re e you become highly responsible, fast. a5 an Air Force pilot

You become a space·age leader

on

the A rospa e

UNITED STATES AIR FORCE Box A. Dept SCP-79 Randolph A" Force Base. Texas 7BI48 Plea e send m mc,re m l ormdlton '1ge

Name

College Gnctu,l Ian

Dat

T ea m . Lc so' people start a t h e bottom. . W(;re asking you to start on executl e row.

Phone

Address

Sti1!e I

u n"cf!,l ,no th"re

; nil obltgal,on

UNITED STATES AIR FORCE


OOfl

Wayne

Who'

Voice of the Student Body at Pacific Lutheran University PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1970

VOLUME XLVIII

NUMBER TWO

Associated Students To Convene Tonight The

ASPLU

meeting

for

Assembly

the

first

will

time

be this

John

McLaughlin,

Steve

Carlson,

Jody Schwich, AWS; Dave Gutzler.

year in Xavier 201 tonight at 7:30.

MPC;

The Assembly, along with the Sen­

Barthel, Jim Bjelde, linda Craft,

Ken

legislative

Dick

branch of student government at

Pete

PLU.

Weeks,

ate,

comprises

the

Any member of the student body is welcome to attend and to voice his or her opinion. Those students who attend make up the Assembly for the night, and they have the power and

to

veto

institute

Senate new

legislation

legislation

if

there is a sufficient number pres­ ent. The Senate met in a dinner ban­ quet meeting last Thursday even­ ing to begin another year's work. It is made -up of the executive offi­ cers,

representatives

from

AWS,

MPC and Student for Black Prog­ ress,

a

representative

from

the

freshman class, and eight senators elected at large. This year those serving on the Senate include:

ASPLU officers­

Bill Christensen, Tom Gumprecht,

Chinneth,

Ostensen, Sandvig,

SBP;

Becky Eric

Kurt

Rodning,

Strand,

Pam

Representatives at Large,

and a frosh representative still to be chosen. All students are encouraged to speak to any one of these senators about any ASPLU matters that you are concerned about. Senate min­ utes will be posted in each donn so that you may keep up with what is happening there. It you don't talk to a senator then you may voice your views at the Assembly meetings to be held regularly. At the first meeting of the year, the

Senate

took

care

of normal

MORE POLLtmON such as this will be our pUght unless collective action Is tAken

Coalition Battles Urban Blight

business and also aJlocated funds

social

By LINDA GARDNER

for Bill Christensen to attend the Conference

Unlike many controversial issues

in Washington, D.C. this weekend.

facing our modern society today,

Also Carolie Eggan was approved

urban crises affecting us require

as the new ASPLU Secretary, to

action,

take the place of Carol Malvin.

land use,

President-to-Presidents

not argument.

Population,

institutions and values,

Hard Hats xit, Ne'N Center Opens By

DAVE SODERLUND

All eyes this faU are on the east­

bowling

As

aHey and

soon "as

these

billiard

room.

facilities

are

ern side of the campus where the

available-Sept. 25 is the projected

new

date - intramural competition in

University

Center

is

taking

final shape. The bookstore, clearly

both

an improvement over' the old estab­

start.

lishment, is already in operation, and within a month and a half the whole building will be in use. The next area to open up will

be the lower floor containing the

bowling

and

billiards

will

On October 5 the main floor is scheduled

to open,

including

the

dining hall and the multi-purpose Chris

Knutzen

Fellowship

Hall.

This will put the CUB dining hall

SIOOD.

welfare,

economy,

ecol ogy

tion in Changing Environment

involved

( CHOICE) at PLU, pointed out the

group,

in

one

the

concerned,

Puget

Sound

local Urban

The year-old project will begin

our carrwus working with the Fuget

September 27. These programs, in

students interested in tile program

turn, will stimulate thought·provok­

should expect to really get invol·

ing diSCUSSions relating to man and

ved."

ei ht

television

and Moor.ing Mast offices.

lives. Beginning the first week in

fee

shop will

and

the

close

Columbia

permanently Center

coffee

shop will restrict serving to golf course hours only. Dedication of the University Cen­ ter is scheduled for November 8. By this time the student body will be getting used to having a major student-oriented

entertainment

cility

and

available

the

fa­

question

"What can you do on campus?" will be answered.

the

community in

which

he

Participation in the Coalition by local the

colleges

Slate

is

funded

Planning

through

and

Commu­

October, discussion groups, organ­

nity Affairs Agency under a federal

ized by various groups, and indi­

grant for innovative pr ograms In

duals,

education.

will

discuss

together

the

problems affecting the quality of life and will consider what action they

take

can

to

improve

the

quality. is the

PLU, So und,

The

University

and

Tacoma

of

Fuget

Community

College will train the group leaders and coordinators in one or two-day

The Puget Sound Urban Coalition beginning point in an or­

workshops

in

North

Central and

Southern Fuget Sound.

ganized effort to involve the whole

Western

Washington

State

Col­

"City of Puget Sound" in planning

lege will be responsible for main­

what our Ii es will be like as our

taining

region

materials and training latecomers.

becomes

more

urban and

congested. The major goal of the project is to make possible the in­ volvement

of

large

numbers

citizens in taking action on,

Although the whole building was

he

Sound Urban Coalition, and those

of

and

for use. At t,h is time the CUB cof­

"CHOICE,"

"the basic element on

pro­

series

pletion at this time are the ASPLU

last unit will be finished and ready

students.

stated, is

grams, produced by KING-TV, on

a

his relationship to himself, others.

111e final area to open will be

-

need for individual suwort from college

Coalition.

out of use. Also scheduled fOT com­

the coffee shop. On October 30 this

of the Center for Human Organiza­

and politics are some of the issues

becoming

knowledgeable

of,

of and the

scheduled for opening by the be­

many problem

ginning of the school year it was

quality of life in our area. The Ilope

felt it would be more practical to

of the Coaliti n is that concerned

open up sections at a time rather

citizens

be

given

the

Seattle

groups

University

by

providing

is

preparing

the discussion materials, press re­ leases and leaders' guides. All of th

preceding college s are recruit·

ing

participants,

and

interested

PLU students are urged to contact Steve Cook at extension 1419. KING

will

begin

showing

the

tools

series on Sept. 27 at 6:30 p.m. and

than have the finishing touches put

necessary to take effective action

successive showings will be at the

on in the midst of the novelty of

on

projects of their choice.

Steve

student use.

will

which influence the

the

Cook,

an

active member

same time for the next seven Sun­ days.

PLU Activists Set Year's Direction whelmed by the mammoth influx

By STEVE LARSON

A

spirit

campus of

has

returned

to

Pacific Lutheran

the Uni­

versity. It is a spirit that has been

members,

DSC

outlined

Inspired by the unusualJy large

turnout

of

faculty

and

students

some of the projects they intend

(which necessitated the

to undertake this year.

lecture hall in Xavier at the last

use

of the

carried for years in the hearts of

These projects include: increas­ ed education to students about the

to sponsor films and speakers to

peared on the campus in full ma­

war in

i.n.creased

enlighten the Unjversity commun­

Indo-China

and

moment) DSC again plans this year

turation following the Cambodian

efforts to END 1liE WAR; work

ity about the pertinent issues con­

invasion and the Kent State Massa­

with

fronting today's society.

cre. It is a spirit of love, of con­

plans to set up a family planning

For those members of the uni­

of action. In short, it is a

and birth control information cen­

versity community who missed the

spirit of caring. Last week this spirit returned in full

SUDday at 8 p.m. lID Olson Auditorium. Ticklets may be purchased at the Info Desk.

new

some people, but which really ap­

cern;

WAYNE NEWTON, Mr. ExcItement, wtD appear

of

force

at

the

organizational

Remann

Hall

in

Tacoma;

again

ter on campus; renewed efforts to

first meeting, DSC will meet

work for the state-wide passage of

tonight at 9:00 p.m. in X-20I, to

the 19-year-old vote;

continue

and a com­

its

organizational

struc­

Stu­

mitment to work with the Puyallup

dents' Coalition. Invigor ted by the

Indians to obtain the rights they

(or what) to sponsor on campus

return of old members and over­

need and deserve.

before the October Moratorium.

meeting

of

the

Democratic

turing and begin plans

as

to whom


Wednesday, Sept. 23, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Two

Parallax

The American Way In recent years the plight of the radical student u pon the

By GLEN ANDERSON

university campus has been investigated, analyzed, and com­

mented ·upon ad nauseum. The fate of such students, however, -be it for good or ill-will not be able to change things to an

ap preciable degree. The question which must be faced today concerns the fu­ tUfe of the new activists. They are the politicized moderates

of the move into Cambodia and the killings at Kent State, and they are large in number. The question is obvious, where are they headed? The answer is not an optimistic one I am afraid. The reasons are two fold. The first centers around the fact that these students are no longer in the dark as to the issues

now facing this country. They, like the more radical students before them, are becoming convinced that in order to realisti­ cally combat the problems of today a number of basic changes must be effected within our society. Brought up within-and believing in-a system which pro­

fesses a truely responsive government, however, they are skep­ tical of the radical claims to the contrary. Only now that they have be gun to work for the changes which they have come to believe in have the realities of the political arena hit them. The first step in the process is being taken now. Students

who have given up school time to "work within the system" have been told to stay away if they want to help their candi­ dates_ Such is the reputation of the student with the electorate. Great system isn't it?

I am sorry, it gets worse, not better, from here on. For as

"I don't want to get involved."

We humans, however, can detect problf.ms and,

This is the lame excuse which allowed nearly forty persons to witness a brutal stabbing in New

unlike the tree, have the option of actively trying to solve them. It is truly sad that so many people

York a few years ago without coming to the aid or even calling the police.

deny their humanity and either play ostrich and pre­ tend the problems don't exist, or else play tree and

Not only in sensational or spectacular cases as this, but also dozens of little experiences and op­ portunit,ies of our daily lives, we decline to get in­

decline to act toward solving the problems. We are all involved. Let's admit it and get off our dead behinds.

volved (or to be "relevant," in America's favorite cliche'). Inaction plagues Parkland as weJl as New York.

Each of us has some good ideas and some a bili­ ties. Each of us is needed by the rest of us. Ask someone who is active in your favorite cause what you can do to help . Don't be like the citizen who doesn't bother to vote, and then gripes all the next year about the

A student here decides not to join an ecological action group, a student there quits tutoring a local grade school kid to whom he had promised com­ mitment, another student just never gets around

clods who got elected. It is comforting to say, "Peo­ ple should work within the system" to bring about change. All right, what have YOU done? Whose

to writing his congressman about the war, and a dif­ ferent student goes to the beach on the day when a current events seminar is held in place of classes. All would shrink away from involvement.

campaign are YOU working on? Which USSAC pro­ gram have YOU volunteered for? If a person doesn't actively work for a better

But what they don't realize is that we are all involved, whether we want to be or not. There will be no hiding from World War III. We will all suffer

world, he deserves the crummy one he gets. Don't be a victim of your own lethargy. Of course, everybody agrees with these ideas. We

in one way or another from the injustice suffered by other people. No one escapes repression from

all nod and self-righteously offer platitudes of agree­ ment. But nobody will do anything to become in­ volved as a result. It is enough merely to agree.

a totalitarian government or avoids involvement in their country's civil war. Everybody has to breathe the air.

Of course we all care about the world. We just don't do anything about it. You see, it's not that we're apathetic-we're just hypocrites. How long can the world stand to put up with our loafing?

When a tree is threatened by disease, insects, or fire, it can't protest. It just has to stand there and suffer.

the electorate becomes more conservative the reaction of the government to such things as the bombing at Wisconsin has be­

come crucial. It is heading in the wrong direction.

Review

On The Marquee'

RepreSSion of a very premeditated variety is beginning to emerge. It is the type which will soon aid the radicalization of the moderates who believed it could never happen. What will happen when it is over? Perhaps campus unrest will finally end-from despair-beca·use all those who hoped for

change will have given up or left. For now, at least, we know there are others who care enough to try. How long that will last is hard to say. When I spoke to Garret DeBell (the editor of the Environmental Handbook) in Washing ton D.C. last spring he gave us five years, no more. After that he believes it will be too late. Persona ll y, I would think such an ending to be abhorrent. I wou ld much rather go out with a bang than a whimper. Given the power structure within the country, of course, heaven knows we could never win. But then again, to go down fighting would be the Ameri­ -John Aakre can W ay .

By SCOTI GREEN (Editor's Note:

joined the MM staff in the

himself

was

shocked

by

conservative PLU stu­

this thought, coming as it did in

dent which, to be fair, was really

the year of commitment. Poor Eric

Eric

was

his only sin (being a conservative,

-he downed a six-pack of middle

I me an ), and he tried to cover up

class beer and re-read three old

this

copies of the Mooring Mast before

in as much as possible by

using words like relevant, the Es­ tablishment,

and

hell.

he

Editor's

Just to make sure that nobody

be

the Mooring Mast every week. Af·

on

thoug h, he would

Now, I'm not going to pretend

only safe place for

any subversive activity. El"ic attended classes fairly reg­ ularly but not religiously since that term is sometimes associated with conservatism. In

class

Eric

was

reminded

that the conservatives are the bad guys and the Ijberals are the good guys,

and liberals

are extremely

tolerant of conservatives a conservatives thing. Well,

do

not

long as

say

any­

Eric didn't want t o

make negative waves, sO naturally he said nothing. But then one day Eric happened to wonder if maybe, just maybe, even

one

other

person

composure. Miss

Note:

Martens

appearing

in

will

for m

column

a semi-weekly basis.

felt

the

same way he did. He really got carried away then and· began to

year has

new

A

barely

gotten

underway. Nearly half of the stu­ dents on campus this fall are new students

at

PLU,

transfers

and

freshmen, who have come to this university, I suspect, with a great deal of anticipation. Many people have been working in various ca­ pacities since last spring to make this year exciting, stimulating and rewarding.

And the

yet

Mast

has

Glen

Anderson's

the

audacity "God

Mooring to Is

print Alive;

PLU Is Dead!" in its first issue of the year. Although I realize that the camp­

there were even a dozen members of this silent minority on campus. And then Eric made a nasty con­

optimistic, pro-establishment publi­

would

happen

cation in the last year or two, and

I will be the first to agree that con­ structive

criticism

is

necessary

conclusion-perhaps si­ lence breeds apathy, which would at least explain that conservative

in order to implement chauges, I

attl"ibute.

ly

servative

haven't heard, PLU is presenting "Between Stop,"

Two

felt that "Parallax" was extreme­ prejudiced

and

in

very

poor

Thieves,"

ers in Villa Plaza, located behind the Tiki. Currently they are per­

"Bus

"Star Spangled Girl," and shows,

so we'll have quite a variety right

You When the Water's Running."

atrical events worth noting

here

of the world or even

the

north­ here

"Man of LaMancha" in addition to the

year's two children'S on

campus.

The highlight of the evening is the

far

I'll talk more about these as they

away. So . . . especially for those

arrive. UPS, TCC, St. Martin's in

and

also,

Seattle

isn't

that

of you who have no access to a

Olympia,

newspaper (even a TNT!) I hope

Seattle colleges all have a number

this column will enlighten you and

of shows each year. I will try to

eliminate the fact that these things

keep you posted on them too.

come

and

go

without

U of Wash.,

last

one-acter

called

"I'm

Her!).

ert." You have to see it to believe

and other

it. I've seen it twice and cracked up both times. I hope this column will be useful to at least some of you.

There is one more type of theatre

I know

most people go to the movies, but

who's existence is often unknown.

I'd lilre to encourage you to take

I plan to keep you up on what's

That is the community theatre. Ta­

in a play or two in the near future.

happening locally on stage and on

coma has two which also offer a

There

the silver

fine

events coming up. Also if you know

has

screen.

around

ten

Tacoma itself,

or twelve

movie

evening of

surprisingly Little

Theatre

sizes,

three

blocks

and

There's

of various the

qualities.

beautiful

Tacoma

Mall Theater, the small and quaint Lakewood Theatre,

and we can't

forget the Parkland Theatre, can we?

There's the Cameo in down­

School They

at are

entertainment at

low

houses in various areas, of various

prices.

Tacoma

from

now

Stadium

North

"I"

showing

Flower," which is

some

very

worthwile

something that you think I might

(T L T) is located

210

are

not, please let me know!

High

COMING:

Street.

"Man of LaMancha" at PLU "Case of Libel" at TLT

"Cactus

"Summertime" at Lakewood

ry entertain­

Players

ing even if you have seen the mov­

"rndians" at the Seattle Rep.

ies as I had. Curtain time is 8:30

town Tacoma for those of you who like that sort of thing.

weJl as

very

untimely.

It disgusts me to think that self­ ation,

in

particular

the

religious

JOHN AAKRE .

.

..

.

..

BOB HASSELBLAD

.

it a chance to develop in a new

MARY SHADOFF

university

administration

has given first priority to an up­ grading of PLU's religious activ­ ity. Pastor Taylor has been work­ ing diligently in the last year on new innovative programs designed to stimulate and nurture the Christ­ ian growth of students on campus. The newly elected Religious and

leaders

of

Life

Student

Congl'egation have not even been given the time to function. If the religiOUS activity on camp­ us has

not

been

everything

that

it should have been in the past, pledge full support to the Religious Life Council.

.. . . .

....

. .. ... _

.

. . . ......

. _. ...

.

.... ...

...._.

...

...... . ...

..

Editor

........ Managing Editor

..

. _... .........

PAUL BERG

.

.. . . . .

.

. . _. . .......

.

....................... Copy Editor

.

. .

.. . . . . . _ ....... ..

.. _ ....... . . .

Sports Editor

Circulation .... . . . . ........... . . . . . . .

DR. JOHN PETERSON

.._. __ .

.

. . . . ....

Manager

. . Business Manager

... .

. . . . . . ............ . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . ... .................

Advisor

STAFF-Glen Anderson, Paul Wuest, Kansas, Glen Zander, Steve John Hushagen, Dave Giles, Dave Thorson, Tom Heavey, Russ Johnson, Mary Jane Dykstra, Kristi Johnson,

Larson,

Becky Rodning, Bruce Bjerke, Cathy Wark, Steve Cook, Nancy Shaw, Karen Svendsen, Wanda Huber, Bob Steward, Rich Diet­ meir, John Rankin, Scott Green, Priscilla Martens, Pat Stiles, Lindsay Grader, The Footrubber. Opinions expressed in the Mooring Mast are not necessarily those of Pacific Lutheran University, its administration, faculty, ar the Mooring Mast staff. The M 1 reserves the right to ed it all copy for length, propriety and libel. Materials submitted should be typewritten, double-spaced with

65 spaces to the line. The deadline for each issue is 8 p.m. on the Sunday prior to publication.

Jody Schwich

.. . .. ..

.

PAULA SEIBERT .... .................... .... DA VE SODERLUND

year.

.. .

......

KATE MANCKE ... ..... ................ ........... ........................ News Editor

life on campus, without even giving

The

MAST

MOORING

The Voice of the Students a t Pacific Lutheran Universt.1

made judges can condemn a situ­

Council

us paper has not been the most

what

nothing else, it's a cheap date!) There is also the Lakewood Play-

ings such as PLU's. In case you

west, but occosionaJly we get the­

taste, as

To the Editor:

on ThurS.-Sat. and the price is a mere 78 cents for students. (If

forming a hilarious and somewhat risque quarret of short plays, en­ titled "You Know I Can't Hear

that Tacoma is the cultural center

Coed Responds to Columnist

if

wonder

As far as live theatre goes, there are numerous colleges around with a full schedule of dramatic offer-

read

National Review in Eastvold which

Is really th

his

joined the MM staff and

has

wouLd suspect him, he also read terwards,

regained

roming months.)

umn during the

people even knowing about them.

Thinking Right

Eric

past

w:eek and will be writing a semi­ weekly theatre BOO review oo

sometimes

By PRISCILLA MARTENS

has just

Scott


Wednesday, Se pt 23, 1970

MOORING f-.AAST

.

Satisfied Pigs

Max Lerner

We've got cute ones, ugly ones, fat ones, thin ones-all

Order and Disorder

sorts of XY's.chasing after XX's-to lead them off to the blood­ stained altar. All sorts of ants searching out their prey to help shelf-a cubicle labeled "Mr. and Mrs." So many ants have come to the belief that love is just another myth, something you convince yourself of to make it all very easy, a word of con­ venience to please the old folks at home, a word to give mean­ ing to a couple whose real excuse is too shocking for them to face. something not found in sociology text books, something not to be explained away. Yet so many of those latter-mentioned have all sorts of latent and subconscious devices helping them surreptitiously justify any and all ways possible to find the "ideal" someone-that mate that fills the gap. so you've got the almighty itch to find a white

The question is one of order and disorder. The

behind? Poor King Hussein seems to have reached

Israel which Mrs. Meir represents is one that has

the moment of truth-{)r had it thrust on him by

maintained a strong political fabric and an orderly

the terrorists. Time after time he has marched up to

society

the brink of a confrontation with the guerrillas who

able

have waved within Jordan like a cancerous growth,

That

kill the itch by buying a silver band and after all this time a virgin, you're now a wedded bitch. A salute for contented cows, too satisfied ... Wouldn't it be better to get roaring drunk for just a few moments ... Yet for some love is something very real-an enduring living struggle sometimes painful, but always edifying-some­ times sorrowful, but always joyful. Something that makes us fraudulent and pseudo-from artificially in­

flated but mitigated emotion. For us it is too precious to mis­ treat. For us it is a walk of quiet awareness, honesty and com­ munication, rather than a procession to the hive. For us, should

move him into

numb.

Footrubber

a

plan;

.1

ASPLU

form printed in this issue of the Mooring Mast that should be filled out

and sent to ASPLU offices through the campus mail. The procedure for electing that representativc will be worked out by the Elections and Per­

sonnel Board this week. All of the ASPLU commiLlees will have freshmen representatives

this year. so any frosh interested in serving on committees should also submit their application for that position.

In addition to the committees mentioned in the Mooring Mast last

selected soon. Also two faculty committees, the Student Activities and ments, need student representatives.

Anyone interested in filling such positions should also submit their

applications as soon as possible so the Elections and Personnel Board may review them before selection.

in his speech at Kansas State Unive rsity and his

Name Age '$

too

..

. ___________ _ _ _ _ _ _ . __________

__ . _________ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____________ __ . _____________________--

(example: Senator, member of .

.

Year n School i

..

regimes,

including

will

Saudi

even Nasser's .

keep

the

legitimate

other reverberations. President Nixon pl ayed it hard

Arabia's,

Chicago visit.

Hussein's and

- .

---

--

----- -- -- -------

--

-.

on the "Radic·Libs," and from which the Administra­

tion tacticians hope to derive an immense political

overthrow.

eral U Thant had made a plea for an int e rnatio nal

tion"

of the very governments which it hopes to Nasser must know that when

And from another direction, U.N. Secretary Gen­

Hussein

goes, his Own doom is Mly a question of time. :Jc

tribunal which will pass final judgment on the air

hijackers

*

Meir, in their Washington talks,

------.----...-..-.. -........

::

.

��=j

For once U

the United Nations will be worth the cost of t he

know how much

turns on the question of stabiliTy among the Arab

buildings that house it if

by

area for a genuine transnational tribunal to operat e

an

outright

guerrilla

government,

the

slim

in, as a start toward the even harder task of poliCing nuclear weapons. "We

East

wars,

past

and to

come. They

are

all the

new

barbarians," a Berkeley

underground paper wrote the other day, identifying

the Arab terrorists . . 1 think not. 111ere are reserves of sanity in America that go

beyond the terrorists

and their sympathizers, and also beyond the crack­

Dryden added, and one can say the same about the

Middle

the a narch y of the air

terrorists goes unchecked. This may be exactly the

will destroy Israel is the beast in view for the ter·

downs of vigilantism.

will

As

possibilist,

a

I am con­

vinced that social change can ta ke place only withi n

bring nothing about, even for the Arab leaders who

a social order, not a social chaos.

have been arming so frantically, except to destroy

any remaining Arab and Israeli moderates and leave

Copyright 1970, Los

Angeles Times

United Republics of America (Editor's Note : 1be following, is

Since that time he has been one of

'30's were the TVA and conserva·

to appear concerning Mr. Tug­ well's version of a new Consti­

structural

the TVA bill, he saw it as the most

of a series of art icles

the f i rst

tution for the

United Re,)U.btics

i

concrete

111

change

alternatives

withln

our

for

s()Ciety,

I

would urge you to read this.) "An experimental attitude would

conceive

of

the

Constitution

and

would want the document revised

as changes made revision desire­ the Constitution as conditions and

ideas change might result in a ris·

ing pressure of popular indignation would

explode

and

with

with

disastrous

terrific social

the United States."

Rexford Guy Tugwell made this

statement in of

the

1935, and the social

This

1960's

verified

month

Tugwell

his

in Center

presented

his

It could channel some of today's

protests into productive directions.

For the last six years, Tugwell

has been working on a new Consti·

tution and the published result is the thirty·eighth edition

His

re­

search has been done at the Cen· ter for the

Study of Democratic

Institutions in Santa Barbara. The

Constitution

represents

change

States.

in

the

A former professor of

United econom·

ics at Columbia, his ideas received their first practical test in the Ag·

ricultural Adjustment Act, of 1933. thought

not

only of the

farmer, but also of the entire com­

munity,

Through the AAA plan, he hoped

to initiate

economic

planning

by

incentive. He felt that "under this

plan it will pay farmers,

for the

first time to be social-minded, to do something for all instead of for

himself alone. We thus succeed we

think, in harnessing a selfish mo·

tive for the social good." Long

an

planning,

advocate

the

AAA was only the

first step in the "new deal" legi­

slation.

The

National

Industrial

Recovery Act (NIRA) moved plan· ning into the tor of

manufacturing sec·

the economy. Government

control and planning for industry

was

to

come

through

stringent

code regulations and the licensing

power of the Federal gavernment. NIRA, fully

capitalist well's

consistent

system,

belief

that

the

with the

reflected

Tug­

overhead

plan

­

ning was necessary, and was com·

pletely compatible with the price

machi nes .

Rexford Tugwell entered public life

1932 as one of three, original

members of FOR's "br a ins trust."

never

fully

carried

tion. As one of the co-authors of far· reaching

FOR

days

reform

because

of

it

the

early

combined

the qu·cstions of conservation and

poverty. In addition it represented

the first instance of public owner­ ship of industry in the U.S.

Labeling himself a "collectivist"

and

advoca ti ng

"communitarian·

ism," he set up fa rmin g co-ops and anticipated the g rowth of suburbs, and the need for urban renewal.

In 1935 he wrote, "My idea is to

go just outside

enters of popula­

tion, pick up cheap land, build a

whole community and en ti ce peo­

ple into it. Then go back into the

cities and tear down whole slums

of economic

Although adopt ed, his ideas were

work and experience of a lifetime. in

the most provocative advocates of

Tugwell

the United Republics of America.

on I,f, ,:; ' ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••.••••• ••• •••••••. ••••••••• •••..�l --­

and their victim hostages.

Thant makes good hard sense. No organization like

Both President Nixon and Prime Minister Golda

Magazine,

rI'

which Vice

capital.

version of a new Constitution for --- .. ---.-.

also the stuff o f

la's central committee to appeal for the "interven·

prediction,

-----

It is

President Agnew is w eaving the fabric of his attacks

Given these purposes it is ironic for the guerril­

unrest

------ -- -- -- --

. committee, etc.)

. __ ___ . ________________________ . ________ ._ .. __________

I=

which

consequences to all the people of

Date.

_______ . _______ . . . . __ .. _____

climate,"

out war with Israel; failing that, to overthrow the

force

Application

*

Arab regimes off·balance and force them into an all·

tionary

that

ASPLU

*

This theme of order and di sorder has had two

able. A refusal to consider revising

""• "• • • • ' ".rI'rI' • • ••"". • "" " ""• •"'•••••••• • "" • • • • • "rI'• •••• ..... . .. ...... .,....{'J'\ • •• . ......

..

*

to maintain a continous tension, or "revolu·

Welfare committee and the Committee on General University Require·

..

forces it will bring to the fore.

to break up the American truce

1Y1 Ame rica. For those interested

week. another ASPLU committee, the Food Committee, will need to be

Arab

they won't be able to control the Maoist-anarchist

chain reaction. The triple purpose of the terrorists is clear enough:

nonextremist

will benefit them. If so, they are wrong, for even

the

rorist chase. But "Thy wars brought nothing about,"

Applications are .till being sought from anyone interested in bemg

Position

off

sec re t for his own pro­

the frosh representative to the ASPLU Senate. There is an application

:-

set

of his era, and this apocalyptic dream of a war that

joined

tection.

.

hijackings

the Mooring

has recenUy

case of Superlute, his identity will r e main

:

terrorist

the

end. Maybe the Russians have the illusion that this

"Thy chase had a beast in view," wrote Dryden

Mast staff and will be appe a ring on a semi·weekly basis. As in the

from

the

even

and will prove the fuse for inner explosions without

go down the drain.

The Footrubber. The

another phase of his tragi·farcical

chances preventing an all·out Israeli·Arab war will

beware,

Note:

time

with

have already turned inward, in Jordan's civil war,

doom more tightly each time. This

trouble

depend to "liberate" the Middle East from Israel

but

governments. If Hussein is overthrown and replaced

Struggle to be real; leave your maidenform mentality.

(Editor's

anything,

Israel's

cannot quiet. The desperate hatreds on which the y

serial, postponing the showdown and fastening his

we never quite make it to the altar, it is still better that we have our quiet relics of the past, than the roaring misery of

guerrillas that don't solve

Nasser's Egypt.

stake in Israel's survival milita ry capacity, and its

regimes is that they have raised the demons they

deposed, or be killed or-as anticlimax-reach an­ the

(to a degree)

why America's

beyond

The

be

other of those interminable standstill "agreements" with

is

science and technology, to its basic stability.

the Perils of Pauline.

His fate (as I write) is still unclear. He may

something that no Arab state has been

-

to do except

goes

for unresolved survival has reminded all of us of

bitch to complete the number on your niche so you

$

China to struggle over.

NEW YORK-If Hussein falls, can Nasser be far

and each time he has marched back. His capacity

Then there are those who sincerely believe that love is

:.

the Middle East a coc kpit for Russia, America and

By MAX LERNER

them make a comfortable and secure box on some dust-free

cower from the

Page Three

out.

In

the

midst of the current economic cri­

sis, Tugwell's ideas, in substance, are again being suggested. Two of his pet projects

and make parks of them."

Hounded out of government by

adversaries,

was appointed as head of the plan­ ning department of New York City.

He served as velt,

advisor to Roose­

an

and continued teaching and

writing. For several years he was

a contributing editor to the New

Republic. He has authored twenty books in­

cluding The Place

of PIaJIIlq III

Society, The Brains Trost. Battle for Democracy, and 1be Industrial Discipline. While pessimis tic as to its pos

­

sible acceptance, Tugwell sees his

proposed Constitiution important w ork

tial to make

again

in the

Tugwell continued to

be active in public life. In 1938 he

our

his most

"democracy"

responsive

to the people.

as

[t has the poten­

.

once

and responsible


Wednesday, Sept. 23, 1970

MOORING MAST

Environment

Where Do We Go FroID Here? By DAVE SODERLUND We are

in

our sixth month of

plentiful. With this in mind it is

in the next year will be fought in

difficult

convincing

tional level

industrial

some action was being taken on

have proceeded and take a short

states.

look at some areas that have so

and

far escaped the knife of adverse

success with the volatile abortion

one

publicity.

issue

that was responsible for the death

long

haul

toward

attitude

there

are

billboard admoni­

a narrow, alley-like street, by all appearances just another memory of the

old city. But this summer

several new businesses have open­ ed up in Court C. One of the most exciting enterprises Edge,

is

the

Outer

an art gallery and design

studio. The outer edge is the result of a partnership

between

Dave Eas­

ley and Jay Tronsdale. Easley i s a former TCC art student,

while

Tronsdale has been an art teacher at several local schools. Located

at

lIth Street,

311Y2'

and

the Outer Edge lives

from

hand-made

and

the

work

be

somewhat

of

leather

remains

billboards

that than

there

they would like to provide as many good artists as possible with space. One

exciting

off-shoot

of

the

Outer Edge will be art classes in mixed

media-clay,

painting,

and

leather. These classes will be held in the Court C Coffee ginning

the

first

House

week

of

be­

Octob­

er, tentatively on Thursday nights. The classes will last six weeks, will cost 15 dollars, and will be led by terested is invited to call MA 7­ 2831. Since the Outer Edge is only a month old, the owners are looking

clothes to oil and acrylic paintings,

forward

ments. Easley said that hopefully

unique work on the outer edges of

the mixed-media classes will con­

many art fields.

tinue until next summer.

to

many

new

develop­

Mr. Tronsdale's own interests lie

The Outer Edge is open from 11

in oils and acrylics as well as scul­

a.m. to 11 p.m. on Thursdays, Fri­

Mr. Easley, on the other

days and Saturdays. A visit to this

hand, deals mostly in pottery and

unique establishment as well as the

leather work.

whole

Besides their own products,

the

nor

very

are

society.

The

Court C

Community,

of

industrial

near

San

Francisco

25 horses in a period of six months, the new menace of mer­

of

well

understood

publicity

about

cury poisoning appeared. In

November

there

will

be

conservation

last twelve months has put an ir­

legislation.

and

environmental

Check the voting rec­

use the Highway Trust Fund to get

rational fear in the minds of many

ords

rid

of

women even though the best medi­

vironmental issues and see whether

the

1965

billboards

and

Highway

implement

Beautification

cal sources agree that the danger

environment has been made an is­

complications

sue in any of the campaigns. The

of

the

through the use

bi rth control

pills is less

in Puget Sound is down to three

than that involved in normal child­

now,

birth.

but

that

is

still

three

too

but

little

thought

a

resource

is

has

of water

recyclable,

its

ability to keep all of the pathways of the water cycle free from con­ tamination. This includes not only much

publicized

rivers

and

lakes but also estuaries, marshes, the ocean, and even soil and air. When the air contains

sulfur di­

oxide as it is liable to around coal power plants, it i s not unusual for the

next

rain

storm

to

drench

the countryside with dilute sulfuric acid. The road to comprehensive care of the world's water supply is neither short nor simple. It is also prudent to remind our­ selves

that

man,

by

the

sheer

weight of his numbers, is the most pressing

environmental

problem.

We are not pressed for space but we do have

to eat,

with

industry will

be best

both local and national, and who is

Perhaps the greatest battle of all

elected makes a big difference.

Deferably speaking

been

continuing use is dependent on our

the

battle

fought with government sanctions,

environ­

adult human being. Although water as

of those incumbents on en­

of

By rnOMAS R. HEAVEY

and

as last

year's Hunger Symposium

what he is talking about and some­

"From the President of the Uni­ ted States of America,

Greeting:

You are hereby ordered to report for induction into the Armed Forces of the United States." Okay you blew it. What should you have done? You read a news­ paper you

article,

figured

about

the

you were

lottery,

safe.

You

talked to a friend about your stu­ dent

deferment,

were

safe.

You

you

figured

called

the

you local

board clerk, she said don't worry and you didn't. Those are three of the most com­ mon mistakes in dealing with the Selective papers

Service

are

just

System. that,

News­

they

offer

news not legal advise. "Friends" can be your worst enemy. Each case

is

different

and

should

be

treated that way. The local board clerk

works for

the

System

not

for you.

one who will work for you. The need for counseling is obvi­ ous, as evidenced by all the mis­ information floating around. On this campus

rather

When seeking advice about the

forcefully showed the food is not

draft, talk to someone who knows

there

is

a

place

where

one may obtain factual information concerning

the

Selective

Service

System. The Military Information Center has been set up to aid all those who have problems with, or questions about the draft. We do not set

ourselves

up

as

men of

great knowledge, but we feel we can answer most of your questions and if we can't, we'll tell you so and then we will find the answer from someone who does know. The

MSTC office is in room 718 Eve r green ext. 1447.

­

We are here to

serve you.

As you are reading this article the

author

is

taking

his

Armed

Forces Physical Examination. see next week's paper for a first-hand account

of

(Allright,

what really turn

your

goes head

cough.)

Listen to KPLU·fm MONDAY-

Villa Plaza Shopping Center

THURSDAY4-6 p.m.-Glen Keto

4-6 p.m.-Glen Keto 5:30 p.m.-Linda Gatch "Your Day Under the Stars"

6:00 p.m.-NASA Space Notes 7:00 p.m.-"The Drum"

6:30 p.m -UPI Special Report

8·10 p.m.-Glen Zander

7:00 p.m.-"Drug Age"

7:55 p.m.-Inform·ation

8-12 p.m.-Ken Doggett 8:00 p.m.-"Music of the Masters"

JU 4-4464

i

TUESDAY-

10:30 p.m.-"Buchwald On"

FRIDAY -

4-6 p.m.-Pete Johnson 4:30 p.m.-"American Profiles"

--

i

Week" 5:00 p.m.-Folk Tunes

7:30 p.m.-Campus Show

7:00 p.m.-Show Tunes 8-12 p.m.-Pete Johnson 8:00 p.m.-"Boston Pops" 10:00 p.m.-Jazz

WEDNESDAY-

SATURDAYRotation of 3 or 4 hour shifts. Be sure to

4·8 p.m.-Glen Keto 5:00 p.m.-Dinner Music

tune in at 8:00 p.m. or 1:30 p.m. for PLU's

6:00 p.m.-Campus Show

home games. KPLU will cover it all.

7:00 p.m.-Campus Show

If your club or organization would like to announce their news or events, contact Bob

8-12 p.m.-Jim Fischer

r 1

4:00 p.m.-"Featured Artist of the

6:55 p.m.-Information "70" News

lO:30 p.m.-"Buchwald On"

50. GarflMd I'....... ' C" 1-8744 -- Sunday tt-.ru Thursdl\)'. 4 30 p.m. to 1200 HOURS: F"day and Satmday, 430 pm. to 1 00 • "'.

4-8 p.m.-John Skans

6-8 p.m.-Jim Fischer

11 :30 p.m.-"Periscope"

i

News

11: 30 p.m.-"Periscope"

8-12 Glen Zander

i i i

"70"

lO-12 p.m.-Ken Doggett

10:00 p.m.-Nightside Music

!�-------l

-

4:00 p.m.-Campus Show 6-8 p.m.-Jim Fischer

6·8 p.m.-John Skans

Lakewood

a

chance to cast a ballot in favor of

88.5 on your dial

HI FASHION WIGS

-

smelter

the dangers of The Pill during the

WIGS AND HAIRGOODS IN TACOMA.

-

instances

when

guarantee an enjoyable afternoon.

THE STORE WITH GREATEST SELECTION IN

)

overt

Just

pollution, including the closing of

ever along

will

Hi Fashion Wigs

i

the

pollution.

highways and an attempt to

It takes 2,500 gallons

original,"

political

can

fact

each day to maintain one naked

tends toward the original and truly

pturing.

ular

ted.

said Dave Easley. He added that

bitter

the

air)

good

Alaska,

legislative

Birth control is neither very pop­

given by most people to the waste

Tronsdale and Easley. Anyone in­

Court C

up to its name. The merchandise, ranging

that

quality

many

mental issue (closely following the

the work of others. "We only de­

York, had

and religious battles.

of water to which we are dedica·

mand

after

New have

throughout all segments of Ameri­

the second most volatile

Court C in downtown Tacoma, is

Only

Hawaii

tions to end the litter fallout. Still,

many. Water pollution is perhap.s

willingly put on display

some

reducing

the level of potential law in most

The count of raw sewage dumps

two men

put

tion legislation which has reached

Act is being squashed.

By BOB HASSELBLAD

to

back into

in this country. Per­

the

Court C Features New Art Studio

industry

profit

haps it is time to see how far we

more

art experiences in the Court C area.

hard·

of the

look

is looking for unique

the

core resistance to liberalized abor­

The

,

understand

environmental awareness at a na·

change has begun. Everywhere we

DAVE EASLEY, co-owner of the Outer Ed ge

to

8:00 p.m.-"Music of the Master" 11:50 p.m.-Information Final

"70"

News

Lundy or Ken Doggett at KPLU, ext. 269, 287, 355. The

above

October 10th.

schedule

will

last

throug h

on. and


Wednesday, Sept. 23, 1970

Uruhrthe Grandstand By DAVE SODERLUND Sareault of the TNT chooses to call them Jim Hadland and the Four Stumps, but whatever the name .it is evident that the 1970 Lutes have a potent backfield-make that two potent backfields.

Footbllll Notes: Jack

There is virtually no talent loss between the first and second units, and the competition for starting jobs is by no means over . . . . the line, sup' posedly the weakest group of individuals on the field, consistently opened big holes for the backs to waltz through no matter which unit

The Lute football team opened

down. The rest of the yardage was

their 1970 campeign Saturday night

split up between Hadland and O'­

the

with

a

Rourke, who both had fine days

shadowed. The Knights stoppers did

the

visiting

both

their own part, however. allowing

convincing pulverization of Wbitworth

Pirates.

running

With six minutes gone in the game,

backs

Jim Hadland had already directed

Amundson,

13-0.

The

and

passing, and

McPherson,

Rick

and Rob Sherwood.

The four members of the start­

Pritchard, each colIected one touch·

down a piece and second stringers Burnell Coleman and Tom O'Rour­

led by Pete Ugstad and Rich Pettus, played superb defense and made

ke each added one. The count at

their p£esence painfully felt. Tom O'Rourke, who came to PLU this year from Charles Wright with impressive credentials, showed a lot after taking a little time to get into the rhythm of the game. Next week's game against Western has a touch of human inerest. Jim Hadland's brother will probably handle the Vik's quarterback duties

halftime

this chance to get things rolling. •

*

hankie sets available.

Next week PLU travels to Bell­

record boot, made in 1941. A few

ingham for a night game with the

minutes later he added a 37-yard

WWSC Vikings, who can be counted

effort to better his own record. A later attempt of 53 yards was short.

on to go down a little tougher than Whitworth did.

The

game

is at

8 p.m.-see you there.

was 20-0 with statistics

shOWing an even more lopsided pic­ ture. PLU held

a 293-36

rushing

yardage lead at the halfway point. They went on to amass 552 yard s

rushing, a new conference record. The Lutes' 653-yard total yardage effort was only 26 yards short of the conference mark. With all of that rushing yardage to spread around quite a few backs had fair days. Dave Halstead look­ ed to be back in 1968 form with 139 yards in only 9 carries. Gary Hammer appears to be in one piece again with 10 carries for 90 yards, including

Intramural football is under way. Check schedules and be on time to avoid forfeitures. If you have the urge to be everyone's enemy and offi­ ciate, check with Mike Benson. There still may be a few whistle-and­

50 yard

line only four times in the entire

Jack Irion and John Oberg each picked off passes.

ing backfield, Jim Hadland, Dave Halstead, Gary Hammer, and Dan

Intramural bowling will start upon completion of the alleys in the Ueenter. Leagues are forming now-all interested bodies should sign up at the UCenter info desk or get in. touch with Dave Schmidt. Don't miss

the Pirates to cross the

over­

game. Pete Ugstad led the Lute

other disaster. Some fine individual efforts:

Cross-country ·action opens this weekend with a home meet around the campus against Lewis and Clark. Th.e Lutes now have 12 men turn­ ing out-a lot for cross country-and will have their hands full with the traditionally·tough Pioneers. Look for the action to start at 11 a.m.

be

to

defenders with eight tackles and

35 yards in the third quarter which broke Marv Harshman's 3l·yard

*

tends

A new school record was set in Ed McGrath kicked a field goal of

defense

the second half when placekicker

was just an exercise in offensive

*

In an offensive show such as this

final count 47-0

two touchdown drives, putting PLU ahead

Don

execution and arithmetic.

in what should be an interesting duel.

Page Five

Lutes Pulverize Whitworth 47-0

was in. Even admitting the real lack of competition, it was an impres­ sive show. Next week Whitworth takes on Linfield in what should be an­ John Amidon, rookie receiver from Clover Park, saw a lot of action and spent a lot of time in t he pen. He latched on to four passes, not including a wide -open TD which was called back for interference on the other side of the field. All of the linebackers,

MOORING N\AST

one

51-yard TD gallop.

Burnell Coleman, who also went on defense, added 52 yards in six carries

and powered through

the

whole Pirate defense for his touch-

ED McGRATH, who also doubles as a placekicker, battles for

a

pass against WhitwortiJ.

PART OR FULL TIME FOR ADDED INCOM{ WE SECURE LOCATIONS

Reliable man or woman wonted as dis­ tributor in this area to service route for NATIONAL ADVERTISED ALKA­ SELTZER, ANACIN, BAYER ASPIRINS, and TUMS wid thro ah our latest machme in h andy modern vend i no now being poc et packs. Dealer hi established and appointed u on our Clcceptancc. Will not interfere with your present <.'mployment. as Locations Con be serviced cveninas or weekends, collect and ref ill machines. EARNING POTENTIAL $450.00 a ,nonth, or more dcpcndino on size of ou e. This IS a MULTI - MILLION DOLLAR A YEAR BUSINESS. Cosh .nvestment of $1,900.00 to 53,410.00 is rCQuired, also a aood cor and 5 to 10 hours a week. I f you can mcet these requirements. and cosh investment, and arc sincerely interested in a fast repeat business of your own then WR ITE givinQ Nomc, Address, and Telephone Number, for local per­ sonal interview with a Company Rep­ resentative.

u

s ps

YARNS and NEEDLECRAFT Lessons given between classes KNIT and PURL 406 Garfield

LE 7-5317

p

r t

ARTISTRY IN FLOWERS

gtelkj, FLOWERS, Inc. 12169 Pacific Avenue Phone 537-0205

HEADACHE-BAR VENDORS CORP.

7821 Manchester Maplewood, Mo. 63143

Stella and Ken Jacobs

Fine calfskin leat her, bold strap and buckle, timely broad toe. Total fash­ ion in t he Florsheim manner-ye t priced to offer exceptional value. AndavailableinsizesAAAto EEEEE. Black or brown. T he Broadmoor.

Most Florsheim styles S 1995 to 52995

/Most Imperial style5 S3995 $25.95

FLORSHEIM SHOE SHOPS CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED Master Charge, First Bank, B an k

Americard, American Express

Pac. Lutheran University

Conege Union Building CHRIS KNUDSON HALL TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29

10 a.m. to 5 p.m.


MOOR I NG MAST

Page Six

We dn e sday

Sept.

23,

1970

pens Ne

Iberian Tour By KATE MANCKE

,

The tour begins in Madrid, and

Worlds Spanish

life

a visit to

will be

Five months from today, you can

during the following three and a

be in Granada, the last bastion of

half weeks will move through the

passes through Jerez de la Front­

Moorish power in Spain. Travelling

Iberian

era, center of the sherry industry.

Peninsula,

across

the

with you through the "New Worlds

Straits of Gibraltar, and visit the

of Old Spain," will be other PLU

modern, Arab city of Tangier.

students

and

Drs.

Arbaugh

Designed to give the participant

and

an understanding of the major his­

Schnackenberg. Born out of last year's interim

torical and philosophical trends of

tours to Greece and Italy, the study

Spain, the tour will visit the major

tour is a joint effort of the History

cities

and

Philosophy

cluded on the itinerary are Toledo,

will

provide

PLU

Departments.

It

and

regions

of

Spain.

In·

the

opportunity

for

Seville, Cadiz, Barcelona and Mala·

to

experience

the

gao

students

Exposure

glory that was and is Spain.

to

other

aspects

of

The Spanish Civil War

Valley of the Fallen, a memorial of that struggle. While in Madrid students will have an opportunity to meet their counterparts at the Open to all students, the tour will

on

Sunday

semester.

The

total cost for

credit

will

be

applied

to

the tour. For further information

udying pre-law. Their

--Miss Peg­

LDE

Please try to attend. on campus. The final tryouts will be October 1.

Tryouts and practices are now being held. Check the phone lists

AnENTlON SENIOR PRE-LAW STUDENTS The registration deadline for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) given on Oct. 17. Any senior who is interested in attending law school is Friday, Sept. 25. This test is required by all law schools and will be

should contact Dr. Farmer in X-I09 to obtain a registration fonn for the test. This test will be given again later this year. The Jamaiakins will be having a hike to Barclay Lake

spring

mony in Pflueger Hall that Miss Karen Suoja an­

wedding is planned for the summer of '71. LEMEN

meetings

board for all students enrolled in

SI

1256 or 301 by September 23. Tryouts will be held Thursday, September 24 at 7;00 p.m. in Memorial Gymnasium. This is a student body election;

will be required to attend regular

the tour will be $675.00. A $30.00

nounced her recent engagement to Dave Thorson.

leading squad, call Davis Strandemo for sign-up and info rm a tio n at ext.

ophy or history. All participants

SUOJA-rnORSON-It was at a candlepassing cere­

Dave is a junior from Evcrgrecn, Colorado

CHEERLEADING ELECTION Any guys and girls interested in trying out for this year's cheer­

SEA SPRITES TRYOUTS

fulfill one course in either philo­

the

BARKER

. TO THE PO'NT

University of Madrid.

preparatory

By UNDA

will be

brought to life by a visit to the

evenings during the remainder of

The Shoe Faetory

MOOnING MAsr ---a---­

provided by

a winery as the tour

or philosophy, by October I,

contact the departments of history, the

deadline for enrollment.

JAMAIAKINS PLAN HIKE

26-27. They will be leaving at 6;00 a.m. from Stuen parking lot on Sat­

the U. C. If there are any questions, please contact Steve Gregory at ext. 1383 or Joyce Viele at ext. 541.

�----,

from Seattle, has recently revealed engagement

to

Phil

Golden­

man from Hemiston, Oregon. Phil, a '69 PLU graduate., is presently teaching in Richland. They plan to marry in December of '70. REITZ-BOLEYN--The engagement

of Miss Emily Reitz to Doug Bol­ eyn

has

been

made

known

to

friends in Ordal Hall. Emily is a senior

biology

and

math

major

from Portland, Oregon, and Doug is a '70 Oregon State graduate in electrical engineering. He is also from

Portland.

Their

wedding

TWA's Youth Passport offers you a world of fun... t fantastic discounts. *

is

planned for June of '71. Miss Helen Heutzenroeder inform­

HEUTZENROEDER-MELLAND

ally announced her engagement to Jim Melland to friends in Pflueger Hall. Both are juniors from James­ town,

North

Dakota.

Helen

is

(And you use it on over 20 a i r l ines in the United Stat including Alaska and Hawaii, nac:Ul. an 'thin co u nt ri es overseas,)

a

nursing major and Jim is majoring in business. They plan to marry in August of '71. If you would like notice of your engagement printed in the Mooring Mast,

please call ext.

40% off regular coach fares on any TWA plane. Even

1146.

the 747! On a standby basis in the continental U.S.

*

Co-Ed Bee Nigbt SEPTEMBER 24

Hotel disco u nts- up to 50%-at Hilton, Sheraton and Pick hotels in the U.S. and Caribbean.

*

7:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.

Discounts at Aspen and Vall. On lift tickets, meals, ski lessons and rentals.

Olson Auditorium

* *

LET IT ALL HANG OUT!!

*

Car discounts in Europe. On renting, buying or leasing.

Tr avel check discounts- V3 off Thomas Cook Cheques. 300 exclusive discounts at hotels, shops and restaurants around the world.

PLUS Free TWA hospitality parties in Paris, London and

ou's Place

Amsterdam. Every week during the summer. One free day in Europe on any Arthur Frommer $5-a-Day Tour booked through TWA.

FEATURING Live Music Every

Wed., Thurs., Fri. & Sat.

This Week's Entertainers "DAWN'S CREATIONS"

------ ------------------------------- ----------------------------------

Name

�� Youth Passport •

YOUTH FARE IDENTIFICATION CARD APPLICATION FOR AGES 12 THRU 21

Go out Pacific Ave. to Roy

Y, turn left on Mountain HiWay,

2'12

miles.

Sept.

urday the 26th. Anyone wishing to go please sign up at the Info desk in

gy Lemen, a senior nursing major her

on

Mill 10: Trani World Airlln•• P.O. BOl 2952 Clinton, lowl 52732

t

lease print)

Address Citl_____ __ _ _---: :-:-:-_____ _ _:::-

--Z i p Code

State

Date 01 Birth Month

$3.00

Day

Year

0 MAKE CHECKS PAYABl£ TO: TWA (Not rtfundable-DO NOT MAil CASH)

Hair COlor __

Fee paid by,

Eye Color

Check 0

Male 0 Female

0

Money Order

K!'ature

ISef'tlCt mM" O'Iriled uclUUVf'r by TUM World A.rllnts. Inc,

---------------------------------------------------------------

1

1-067 8 - -

\ -} f 8 r 51:6 { 41

---------

,


Caution: Clowning May Be Hazardous to Your Health

I miss you. I miss the circus. I miss the unde­

he is an innovator. He teaches from creative con

finable familiarity of the midway. I miss the "Hey, there, friend!" of the pitchman. I miss the horde of

And I love the INSTRUCTOR CLOWN. He doesn't

kid hustlers waiting to take me for the price of ad­

know what to teach. He learned what to teach at

mission or to lift my pocket watch. I miss the bark­

another circus. He wants to belong. He carries the

er with his instant smile, tr,iggered by some hidden

bucket for the SENIOR FULL PROFESSOR CLOWN.

sensor, like an automatic high-beam switch, it bright·

He prats-falls a lot.

ens quickly to high then shunts back sharply to low,

I miss the fantasy of vanity in the center ring, of it. The RINGMASTER and the MAN-SHOT-OUT­

CLOWN.

and

the

high-wire

balancing

acts

Sometimes he

chases

the

ER says everything in cross-word puzzle words, so that 48 across I'm a sea-bird but up and down I'm a medieval English indentured servant. The FOR­

and espeCially the clowns.

really a lady .She has a big steno-book with pages

clowns.

love the

I

I miss the things to eat, like the cotton candy which is mostly air, and the hot-dogs which are sixty percent dried skimmed milk solids, and the

The SECRETARY CLOWN has a dress on. With lumps

funny

TI1NE-TELLER is hard to figure out.

SECRETARY

and the dancing bear who pretends to read a book the

And the FORTUNE·TELLER. The FORTUNE-TELL­

sanw time. Sometimes he goes in circles to keep his balance.

miss

believe. The lady with three legs, that's very un­ natural. How do you kiss a lady with three legs?

a unicycle. He goes backward and forward at the

pretending vainly to universality. I miss the hilarity

I

man with two heads. You don't know which one to

The ADMINISTRATOR CLOWN is fun. He rides

the pass completed.

OF-A-CANNON

I don't like the sideshow. I don't like freaks. The

wdth pictures.

clowns.

inside.

The

that fall out.

Clowns are hilarious. They wear sad faces. They

squirt-gun.

SECRETARY

And a

CLOWN

fountain-pen

Sometimes she

talk lugubrious. They prat-fal\ a lot. They get their

TRATOR CLOWN.

foot stuck in buckets and pour the water from their

cream pie. In the face .

galoshes onto one another's heads. They get their

I love the clowns.

is

imitation chocolate milk-shakes which are reconsti­

not

tuted animal fat blended with selected man-made ingredients.

that's really a

squirts

the

I miss the smells: sweat and elephants and too

ADMINIS­

many people for the number of Johnny-Pots and

Sometimes he hits her with a

straw and horses and the plaster imitation china first·prizes don't

wigs wet. They wring-out their wet wigs on each

The PLUMBER CLOWN has a wrench that breaks

other's suits. Then they throw the bucketful of dry

things. He has a little car that backfires like it just

paper shreddings into our shocked deUghted faces.

ate beans.

I love the SENIOR FULL PROFESSOR CLOWN.

put into the car of the PLUMBER CLOWN. The

He has his name lots of places in the program. He

CHEF CLOWN cracks eggs on the head of the SE­

gives seven courses in his special subject:

NIOR FULL PROFESSOR CLOWN,

These are some of the things I miss. Come and

little make-believe show where we have real things hidden under all the shells. Sometimes real things

but he likes

THE HISTORY OF

They bark when the RINGMASTER points with his

SURVEY OF

baton. They roll over. They balance big balls on

THE F1JTI1RE OF

their noses. Some of the balls have poJka-dots. I

WHY NOT

like the seals. But most of all I miss the pink-bot­

and SENIOR SEMINAR He knows what to teach. He has seven ways to teach

tomed baboon. He's gone now. He's not at the circus anymore. He defecated on the RINGMASTER'S

it. He repeats a lot. He teaches creative can.

HELPER. While the show was going on. They got

It's

not a real circus. Not even a carnival. It's just a

hurt. Sometimes real things make you laugh. Almost like the circus_

I miss the animal acts. I miss the trained seals.

WHY TO

even when they're

see me in Seattle. I have a new shell-game.

eggs. He has a long tongue. He eats the eggs.

HOW TO

at all

am.-pits and the bad breath and the Johnny Pots.

The CHEF CLOWN has a big pot of beans to

I love clowns.

smell

painted and the food does and the feet do and the

Love,

RICHARD E. ARNOLD Artistic Director The Lyric Theatre

Professor. He too knows what to teaeh. He learned

circus. He says nasty things. But he doesn't mean

(Editor's Note: Richard Arnold was an instructor in the Speech and Drama department from the fall of 1968 to the spring of 1970. For further com­ ment, the reader is referred to this week's edito­

from the SENIOR F1JLL PROFESSOR CLOWN. And

them, because he doesn't have a brain. He's alright.

rial.)

I love the ALUMNI CLOWN. He is an Assistant

rid of him. And the talking bird. He is still in the

THEI

SA\, AGE JOJ wlilo,v

VOICE OF 11IE STUDENTS AT PACIF1C LVI1IERAN UNIVERSITY WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1970

VOLUME XLVII

Hammer:1ess $Inokeless Six Shooter

NUMBER THREE

USSAC Answers Cry for Help By GLEN ZANDER

agencies pendent

What is USSAC? No, with

it's the

not

directly

United

States

affiliated

or

and

on

programs

are

de­

by volunteers from the community

volWlteer workers and/

and from USSAC at the First Meth­

are understaffed. By participat­

govern­

ing in these programs and agen­

ment-it's a student movement to

cies, the USSAC volunteers provide

get to where the hurt is. USSAC

the

Commktee is the part of ASPLU

eff€-Ctive in helping people.

(University Student Social Action

that attempts to work on commun­ ity needs.

USSAC atfers students

who are sincerely concerned about other

people

a

chance

to

help

and

multi-service

commWlity

agencies

programs

have

been formed in Tacoma to help many people

who

help themselves.

of

necessary

to

these programs and agencies

These are the programs in which USSAC volunteers get to where the hurt is:

The NisquaUy Indian Program is underprivileged children.

Nisqually

Indian

Many of the children in

this program do not have a good

: "Ii., d F

iR. iU" RH · Wk.1

', '

'1:'--.:.'

'

.

.;:_" nq.,, f:,

, bk1:9;.

),

.; ,��.�: ��. c

,-::,:11:".:): ..... H,-·-· · . i,. :; - .j-. : )-... ..... ;-.••-· It, <.';. , ..< .\':' f:"'

USSAC volunteers leave PLU at

thit'

Pd ',",

l ,hl.( ",\··;;jfi;J.i·r ; \iiif"'N'" .t\.d ..�...J._ "::llUl:,;.-h '''''

odist Church in Puyallup.

.

.: -'.

6:00 p.m. from the front of Har­ stad and return to c'ampus at 9:00 p.m. on Thursday evenings begin­ ning

Oct.

1.

Steve

Stoner,

ext.

1369, the head at this USSAC pro· gram, hopes to arrange for more tutoring on other days of the week. However, it will not be necessary for USSAC volunteers in this pro­ gram to attend more than one ses­ sion each week.

to

environment for studying at home;

The Handicapped Swim Program

these

for this reason, they are tutored

was formed to help mentally and/

are Wlable Some

human·power

primarily a tutoring program for

those people in need of help. Various

make

. (:

or physically handicapped children find release from the frustrations they encounter in learning to be normal. With the assumption that

The picture above U1ustrates well the white IlUUl's attitude toward the Indian in our history. The prejudice which we exhibited theo Is still wIth us today.

Indians Air Grievances Over Current Dispute By KIM LEBERT Two

members

of

Indians and join in their struggle

the Puyallup

for

rights

Indian Tribe, Ramona Bennet and

Federal

Hank Adams, will speak Wednes­

preme

granted

Treaties Court

them

and

under

recent

Su­

decisions. Hopefully

fun in

day night in X-201 at 9:00. Their

the Indians will again be able to

the water, USSAC volunteers will

talk will focus on the current dis­

fish

be meeting with these children

pute

without

almost

anyone

Thursday

can

mornings

have

at

9:30

on

and

Fridays mornings at 11: 30 in the

between

the

"State Officials"

Indians

and

concerning fish­

and

for

food

on their

own

land

illegal invasions at state

city

officials

who

have

no

ing I;ghts and other things. Cur­

right, moral or legal, to trespass

not need to know how to swim. Jer­

rently the Federal Government is

upon Federal land.

ry Hansen (ext. 1327) is the head

suing the State of Washington in

of this program.

behalf

PLU swimming pool. Volunteers do

The

Tacoma

Program

Public Assistance

offers perhaps the loos·

est program for a USSAC volun­ teer. The

volunteer

decides

and when he wants to hel

how there

is no fixed program. In this pro­ gram,

a USSAC volunteer

works

on a social case under the super­ vision of a professional casework­ er from TacOma Public Assistance. This program needs college men

of

the

Indians

to

make

Stare Officials obey treaties signed by State and Federal Officials.

DOW

lack

fifty

glasses

dollars to replac'e

smashed

by

"state

the offi­

cals." Concerned students can help the

shown. You owe it to yourself to

see what your sales tax money buys. Democratic

Student

Coalition,

(DSC), is sponsoring the event. A students would become aware of

Page 6)

are

Indians as their needs are many.

DSC

on

children

Officials charged the camp will be

as

ture adult ima

(Conthwed

Indian

State

A film of what happened

who are willing to provide a rna· for children with

Two

suffering headaches because they

spokesman

the current

said

he

hoped

plight of the Puyallup

Office equipment and cleaning ma­ terials are needed for the Indians new office. A second thanksgiving and a N()­ vember 14 dance are two of many campus

activities

being

planned

concerned,

contact

to aid the Indians. If

you

are

Kim at Ext. 609. What are you do­ ing today that's so important?


September 30, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Two

ParaUax

Regret Comes Cheap

Touching A Nerve

For those students who attended PlU last year, little ex­ planation is needed for the letter printed on the front page of this week's edition. For those who were not, let me begin with Two weeks

last year-as has been the case several times before-PlU lost the services of yet another ta lented and highly innovative professor. In this case his name was Dick Arnold. Before him there had been others, names like Urness and Anderson come

weekly to visit the kids who are locked up in Pierce

By GLEN ANDERSON

a brief history.

ago in this fall's

first Parallax,

County's detention home,

I

Though the reasons we lost them are numerous, the pri­ mary factor moves to the fore rather quickly upon even the most superficial inquiry. It is very simple, if you will pardon the cliche, they rocked the boat. Much to the delight of their students, at times they even went so far as to threaten to tip it over. Such conduct is usually referred to in departmental meet­ ings as "terminal"-as in contract. I would suggest to you that as we develop a history of such cases our reputation as an institution of "free inquiry" will not go .untarnished. For some students it has already become caked with mud. It is helpful to remember that the "sense of community"

which has developed upon this campus over the years is not always a positive element. It can be used as a club as well. For when retaining the "safety" of the community becomes an end in itself, the death knell has sounded for those who thoughts cannot be tied.

raising

breathing.

But they do. And what is more, they have been happening and we have known and we have done nothing. Perhaps I am to blame more than most. It is part of my job to speak out-and I have waited. what we are going to do that is important now. How signifi­ cant student concerns will be in this area is up to you.

Perhaps they realize that each person who doesn't

group who don't

those guilty of having too much haIir could all be

sizable

eliminated in one feU swoop. I failed, presumably

anything here to meet their

see

on both counts. Thus ends my career with CALL.

religious needs. A number of us acknowledge these

I wonder whether bearded Abraham Lincoln, whose

facts.

picture was hanging

But I was disappointed by some bad vibes which

And how could I neglect to mention an absent

weeks. Somehow I couldn't resist thinking that per­

member of the PLU community who wrote me a

haps these people who seem to be satisfied with

cheery letter from a faraway place, urging me to

inadequate reliigious life might be a major

consider whether I'd like my epitaph to remember

source of the problem. Several of these contented

me as a cynic if I should die this year. And if that

cows urged me to be patient and give PLU a chance.

didn't hit me low enough, I was asked to "please

This is my fourth and last year here; how much

refrain from such vile diatribes as the one you wrote

longer must I wait? Yes, I know this is only the be­

for the MM."

J never knew I was that nasty. I had only hoped an inadequa te status quo, per­ haps some improvements could be made. But these are hard times for us members of an effete corps

it's too early to identify some real problem areas

that by challenging

so that constructive work can begin to correct them. A number of people took the time to write me personal letters of criticism. Fine. I like to receive

of impudent snobs. Maybe one of these years .

mail, and I like to hear other people's ideas. Some­ began, "Glen­

When they appear, ponder them carefully. -John Aakre

ASPLU

from

Presldent-to-Presldents Cooference

Bi ll

Christensen

Leas ure are arriving today from W ashington

,

and

Dr.

correspondent

is

Christian ideals and firrri convictions, but just not

per semester was in trouble. It was only the trouble

quite enough nerve to stand behind what

he/she

and not the chapel, which was a function of the

writes. This same warm, nameless person invited me to

Office of Student Affairs. Aside from that correc­

join CALL, which I did three years ago. We went out

not recant. Here I stand.

and heard top government officials speak on the pressing problems in­

at 7:00 in the Pr es ident s Conference room. The tentative business items '

to be discussed are: Lo bb y for private universitJies (in Olympia) Status of the Advisory members on the Senate

Pr oposal for Abortion Forum Report on the Puyallup Indian situation

5) Committee Appointments 6) Number of Cheerleaders

7) Petition on Drug Policy to go to the faculty ASPLU Committees The Elections and Personnel Board needs to Cave

committee, games committee, movies committee, Music and Art com· mittee, Special Events convnittee, Housing committee, Admissions com­ mitt e, Elections and Personal Board (freshman), Food committee, and Applic"ation blanks may

t the I nfo r mat ion desk or at the ASPLU offices. Return

Box No. 148.

them to ASPLU, Xavier

person

Traventng all day tImIugh many

began to notice all the many dif­

through-all,

or

ferent types of people.There was

been turned

away.

a man

another

approached the guard. He asked,

with a knife, still dripping blood.

the

unceasing

through

a

roar

desert

of

of

chatter,

words

and

JOHN AAKRE ......... BOB HASSELBLAD

.......... .. . .. ..... ......... ..

..

.

..

...... Managing Editor

_

News Editor

KATE MANCKE .. .. . . ... ....... .

.

.

.

....... Copy Editor

PAULA SEIBERT. DAVE SODERLUND ....... .. ... .......

.

"00 you wish to pass through?" I nodded. He then said, "If you are

who oft times are harder than the

thousands of purple feathers. There

willing to remove all your clothes

streets

was a man carrying a dictionary

you may pass." I was naked within

came to a place which I knew was

and

seconds.

not far from my destination.I was

many books

surprised to find a long line of ­

carried in his arms;

ple stretching

paper-back

they

walk

as

on,

I

finally

far as I could

see. This worried me, for the day was

growing short.

But

seeming

PAUL BERG

..............

.

Larson,

John

Hushagen,

Heavey,

Russ

Johnson,

Becky Rodn in g

,

Dave

the time

being

I was too

I just stood in line, waiting when the line was still, moving when it

I soon discovered many

Mary

because

I

knew for sure it hadn't happened yet.

I

could

see

that

it

hadn't.

Many of them were cursing, others were silent,

seeming

very

down­

cast, full of regret. I wondered on this. The line began to grow shorter

nothi ng else to do except run also

Jane

Dykstra,

Thorson, Kristi

Tom

Johnson,

Bruce Bjerke, Cathy Wark, Steve Cook, Nancy

meir, John Rankin, Scott Green, Priscilla Martens, The

understand

. Advisor

Shaw. Kar n S ve nds en , Wanda Huber, Bob Steward, Rich Diet· Grader,

couldn't

run, almost frantically. I knew of

Dave

Footrubber,

Linda

Pat Stiles,

Gardner,

Barbara

editions

because if I hadn t I would have '

been trampled under by all those

behind me. Fi nal ly

,

I came to what seemed

a huge gate. Because of the hordes

of people, I was obstructed from getting close to it, although I knew

the smaller bulged

from

I passed through the gate onto the other side. I knew it must be

ran

about time so I

as quickly as

I could to the shore. Yet I could still hear the roar of the crowd

anyone

For

with

his pockets). There was a young

end of the line. tired to look at any of the others.

another

(the larger ODes he

who

.................. ..... Business Man ager

Giles,

thesaurus,

a

clutching

Eventually everyone broke into a

STAFF-Glen Anderson, Paul Wuest, Kansas, Glen Zander, Steve

lady

woman,

C i r c ul ation Man ager

. . ...... _..

a

crucifix,

-it also began to move quicker.

DR. JOHN PETERSON

was

to have no choice I fell dn at the

................... .... Sports Editor

MARY SHADOFF

bad

covered with

I

. ....... ........... Editor

-

hammer,

all,

I hesitatingly

There

from which I had just come. This

MAST

with a

almost

cliches, through a crowd of people

people walking back the direction

MOORING

tion, I'll assume my stance as a good Lutheran and

cities of cement and steel, through

moved.

The Voice of the Students at Pacific Lutheran Universh)

with

On Being Comfortable

the President to Presidents Conference. Student Body Presidents from

Student Senate Tomorrow night the Student Senate will meet again

a

dance was compulsory (Remember, seniors?), roll was taken and any student who missed five days

Dan

volvi ng students today.

described the chapel program as a function of that office. Back in the bad 01' da ys when chapel·atten­

high

colleges and universities all over the nation attended this conference

the Student Activities and Welfare committee.

would like to apologize to Dr. Leasure, whose Office of Student Affairs I unintentionally Hbeled when I

cryptic "Sincerely, a friend in Chirst"? No doubt

D.C., where they attended

have a pp lic ations for the following committees by 4:30 today !

The only real change is a point of infonnation. I

name-that's what it's for.But why, then, did that

secret

.

who have been jostled in their comfortable retigi0U8

first name even though I am a lowly freshman."

my

.

sleep, the article still stands pretty much as written.

so friendly, I didn't think you'd mind me using your

response. How seriously you consider their proposals will have a decisive effect upon both their use and acceptability.

.

Notwithstanding the perturbed mutterings of those

I've found everyone here at PLU

writer send the letter anonymously, signing only a

the wall beside us, would

on

have passed.

likewise reverberated on the campus these past two

PLU's

un­

desirables. Interviews were to be in person at Re­

rent chapel programs, and that those students who a

an

out the

screen

mann Hall, so those guilty of thought crim,es and

Well, I don't mind if someone calls me by my first

later in this semester the first efforts of an all-university

Linds y

interview, which would serve to

go to chapel constitutes a "NO" vote against cur­

committee on faculty evaluation will be released for student

Morris.

any more unless we submitted to and passed

own way to improve it. Great!

thing struck me funny, though, about the letter which

But being sorry never helps, regret comes cheap. It is

be picked up

that we would not be welcome to play with the kids

sphere. Each of these individuals is working in his

to

or other assorted evi·

Thereupon the institution's administration decreed

ment with my criticisms of PLU's religious atmo­

amount

beards, long hair,

dences of low moral character.

theological backgrounds have expressed their agree­

Student Congregation

run,

and a few. of us committed the heinous crime of

what I had feared. PLU, if not vigorous, is at least

ginning of the school year, but No, I don't think

One always hopes that such things will not happen again.

1) 2) 3) 4)

the shoddy conditions and the way the place is

tion is a bit closer to what I had hoped than to

avoid

Bastille called

the staff some rather embarrassing questions about

haps PLU was dead. It now appears that the situa­

Students, faculty, and administrators of various

to mind most quickly.

a junior

Remann Hall. Unfortunately, a number of us asked

suggested that although God is certad.nIy alive, per­

who

a

kept

small· silver on

came

to

left behind. I finally looked up. I

her,

had just made it. The sun had en­

saying

close

to

"Don't touch me!" There was a

tered into its finale-the day was

chap with long hair who kept on re­

ending-I had made it. The

peating, "Right on, power to the

setting-I

people!

glorious, and I was alone except

people" There

Right He was

on, said

a

Power

to

nothing

man,

very

the

more.

for

f,inely

short

SUD

was

stood watching-it was

one other

person

standing

a

distance away. As the sun

dressed in a tweed suit and black

set I reflected upon the day-the

wing-tip shoes,

things I should have done and the

who kept

picking

his nose very discreetly so no one

things I shOUldn't have done. Yet,

would see him-then he'd introduce

by watching the sun set I knew

himself

to

anyone available

and

shake his hand. There was a lady

that it would rise again bringing another day-and with it hope.

and

The voices back behind the gate

rings. There was a minister saying

had fallen silent, perhaps they had

with the

many

beautiful

jewels

Lord's prayer with his

closed,

continually

bumping

eyes

left, or maybe they were just stand­

into

ing there with empty faces.I don't

people. There was a man with his

know.

sack lunch. There was a man carry·

won't be enough sunrises or sun·

Perhaps

for

some

there

ing his Bachelor of Arts degree.

sets.

There was a group of soldiers, all

some there may never be another

wearing many medals, swords, and

sunset to reflect upon.

shields.There was a man who kept kicking

his leashed

and muzzled

dog. There were man people, many many strange people, many chat­ tering people, people ...

that I must ev en tually pass through

Eventually I reached the gate­

it. As I struggled to get closer I

but no one had been able to go

Perhaps,

just

perhaps,

for

Perhaps bondage is too con1fort­ able. I was naked, but very alive . . . "I'd love just once to see you in the nude . ..

"

Peace, Hope & Joy footnlbber


Wednesday, Sept. 30, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Three

EDvlronmeDt

Against Himself

Spiro Who (What) Is He? -

WHO (WHAT) IS SPIRO?

having one hell of a t i me letting his mania for alli­

many-not only on the far right, but to former Demo­ crats who are workers-he has become an icon, to others-not only

a

insane excesses of

question

The question which must be ask­

has been directed only toward man

ed-and answered-within the next

as he seems to be in relation to

decade is, how should man tit into

in

the State Department and

else­

others

tional role: Hence the telling desc ription of him

Republicans, the recent

straw polls show a sharp decline in Nixon ' s stand­ ing. The assumed confidence has the shakiest kind a

are

confidence, keep the faithful together and (above all) bning in the straggling sectors from the Demo­ cratic infidels. The voter has off·year election grips,

been estimated that if man were to be an integral part of the world ecosystem rather than a despailer there

centuri es

are

already

many

men

would

put

on the

the

six times too planet. This

maximum human

population of the world at .67 bil­

Christian world has been enjoined

lion, a figure which was surpassed sometime around 1740. To even try

"be fruitful

and multiply, fill

has to concoct one-the "radic·lib." This h ybri d- term

the earth and subdue it." It is no

to get back to a figure like that

enemy also has a tradition, but a pretty ilnoble one. It goes back to the a t-prop era of the CommunJsts,

wonder

would be hopeless.

come to see himself as the rea­

Somehow we must figure what

and the Birchers came up with the "com-symp"

son for being of the universe and

the carrying capacity of this plan­

hybrid. The British Tories

has

derided the "Li

once

composite other,

that

man

has

naturally

taken his superficial

superi­

et is for men. and it must be done

ority over the other habitants of the

soon. The cultivation of marginal

globe as proof of his uniqueness.

lands creates deserts; the cultiva­

It has been said that the rape of

tion of the sea is just anothe

in­

and thus get out from under the direct attribution.

the environment began some 8,000

stance of exploitation,

the sea has bee n fully raped there

Bill Fulbright is not Dave Dellinger, and Edward

years ago when the first seed was

Kennedy is not William Kunstler. As analysis this is

planted

pretty shoddy stuff. As attack it can be effective.

lit has become painfully evident that

And dangerous. I don't go for the busi ness of

supremely about inflation. The old Southern strat­

the world scheme of things? It has

has been sought In

the Judeo­

to

verbal photo two images that blur into each

That's where Agnew comes in-to shore up the

man

For forty

The trick is to put together in a single

baronies,

and the state races are a toss-up.

The

recently being asked In depth.

labs."

national party

are a shambles, but the state parties

as

But since he and his party are the "in," and he

The calculation is pretty clear. Despite the air

species.

own

the nature of man in the world? 1bat is an altogether different question, one that is only

cannot look for a Democratic enemy in power, he

the role for Dwight Eisenhower.

his

What is

*

*

*

ment by the Nixon camp, the first time a Vice Pres­

of

the

virtual vacuum.

a

"Nixon's Nixon . "

ident has been used this way since Nixon played

however,

nature of

version. Agnew is following the hatchet-man tradi­

Clearly he is being used as a major political instru­

of base. True, the Democrats as

inQ.uiries,

corruption and Adlai Stevenson for softne ss on sub­

to be answered with coolness. First, on the wbat:

among the

Classical

enemy figure . F.D.R. used the "economic royalist" as the enemy, and later the isolationist. Truman

Hence my question-Who Is Spiro, what is he?­

of confidence

to

contemporary

Egypt are now studied In the des­ ert-the desert was of their own

philos­

making.

took the high one, attacked the Truman crowd for

society that is losing its bear­

a

that

ophers have debated for centuries.

where. Nixon himself, taking the low road while Ike

ings.

one

In virtually aU of the philoso pher's

"subversives"

symbolic devil, almost a fascist ogre. Such are the

question,

tions

What counts far more than the phrases is the

used the "do-nothing Congress." Joe McCarthy used

talisman. To many

the far left-he has become a

on

heavy

thelT\ angrily, only rub them ;into the memory.

more puzzling to size up than Spiro Agnew, and yet also no one whose political uses are clearer. To

by chance that the great civiliza­

What is the nature of man? It's

teration run wild. And the Democrats, by repeating

NEW YORK-There is no one on the political scene

be cherished and used as

By DAVE SODERLUND

the

and

S im pl est ,

cultivated.

Certa.inIy

and when

will be nothing left. Man Is backed into a corner. He

and therefore the most

is being made to see that he is not

calling Agnew a "fascist," which many liberals are

vulnerable, ecosystem is the farm

doing

the

where the relationship of one crop

look at evolution should tell any­

sophisticated. Agnew makes the liberal left his pri·

one

and one predator does

one

mary target, and there is more than a trace of

not leave

much

ances about social disorder. The local candidates

anti -intellectualism in his attacks on professors and

stop Ylrith man. The anthropologist

Man finds himse lf in the embaras­

loren Eisley, while meditat i ng on

need someone's coattails, and Nixon won't do. Hence

commentators. This isn't fascism, however, unless

sing

the fossil skull of an early mam­

slogan, an enemy. That

you use the term "social fascist" as the Communists

millenia of history in the

is where Agnew comes in: To furnish the icon, to

once did, or as Joe Mccarthy used

of

mental destruction racket. It

egy won't work in local situations. But another strategy may work-that of stealing the worker from the Democrats by distracting him from his pocketbook ills and playing up his grnev­

Spiro. They need an icon,

a

But what Agnew does is a dangerous sIoganed attack on a synthetic enemy symbol, and it isn't

Even th e Democrats have to agree, reluctantly,

of his "radic-Iibs"

a ranter-a Coughlin, a Huey Long, a Joe McCarthy,

with his flaming sword. •

a compound of the flabbier side

which is unlikely, I would say that it is unwise to use up good political material like Agnew too ex­

plus

the

eight

environ­

mal.

is not

it

made

logically

the

basic

(Cootinued

should

not

connection. on Page 6)

Oh, it's good to be back. in The Promised Land. As count ries go,

American

rhetoric,

Churchilllan

having

that

A NEW ISRAELI PEACE PLAN

Tel Aviv

If the Republican high command were to ask me,

frenetic stumping tradition, plus the advertising slo­

the

of

error.

Our Man Hoppe

takes a centrist position as if

underst ated. of

room for

simple

creature-a

Arthur Roppe

Agnew had the right to keep him out of this Eden

a George Wallace-he would make his audience un­ easy. But his face is deadpan, his maMer cool and are

poSition

pretty. What makes it worse is his anger when one

that the performance is pretty good. If Agnew were

His prases

the idea

pest,

ultimate

"social Communist."

mint the slogans, to dramatize an enemy. •

ven some whom I had thought to .be more

Israel is one of my very favorites .

pendobly. The time may come when he and his

For one thing, hardly anyone anywhere is more for peace than the

of negativism" and "the hopeless, hysterical, hypo­

party may want him to play a different role, but

Israelis - as you would be too if you were surrounded by 100 million

chondriacs of history" are not easily forgotten. Who­

the stamp of the hatchet man wiJI be upon him.

angry Arabs.

gan. But they seem to work. The "nattering nabobs

Copyright

ever dreams them up-probably Bill Safire-must be

1970,

Los Angeles Times

To

ppose these hostile forces, Israel has two mlllion Israelis and,

by my calcul ati ons, three million peace plans. So it's no surprise that my oid friend, Mordecai Shalom, has a new

Review

one. Over a fine IsraeU breakfast of herring and sour cream, he kindl y

n am probably not a fair critic anym re

because

I've

been

un­

der her spell for such a long time but go see "On A Clear Day You Can See Forever," and tell me if you don't think Barbara Striesand is the funniest, sexiest, (yes, sex­ iest)

and

most

amazing

talent

around. I have seen "Fwmy Girl" no less than seven times, "Hello Dolly" twice, and now "On a Clear Day" twice.

A lot of people won't go to her movies because of all the "nasty" things they've heard she's done, or because away

she

from

took

"Hello

Carol

Dolly"

Channing,

but

they are only denying themselves. for

I, the

one, am

relase

of

eagerly

her

awaiting

latest

picture,

"The Owl and the Pussycat." Give her a chance! Go see any of her

three

movies

come

away

and

at

I'll

least,

bet

you

hating

her

a little less. "Man

of

LaMancha"

opens

15. I

The Marque

bee,

By SCOTT GREEN

in

unveiled it to me.

Moliere's

and

Wives."

"School

for

The two shows will run

"We Israelis are going to get together with the Arabs, demand a cease fire, compel negotiations, and impose a lasting peace." In the Middle East?

next time. Dan't

forget

tryouts for PLU's

in repertory for four weeks. You

"Between

can get a brochure

and tomorrow at

71

their

an

197!}'

season by writing to University

Theatre,

Tacoma,

UPS,

Wash.

98416.

Two

Thieves"

7

morrow afternoon at

123.

in EC

ness. "But you are our ally," he said, paternally putting an arm around my shoulder. "We admire your industriousness. your democratic spirit, your will to survive. Rest assured that a free a nd independent America

3:30

and

even i f

you've

never

been in a play before, come read

of

an

for one of the roles. Mr .BiIl Park­

excellent play, "Summertree"

by

er, new drama teacher

sponsoring

a

Club

PLU

at

performance

the Lakewood Players next month. I'll have more information on that

at PLU,

will direct the production.

arket Tour

ipants will be able to familiarize

iness Administration, and P.W. Ul­

themselves with European perspec­

bricht, Political

tives on international problems and

an

informal

"Kaffeeklatsch"

to­

European

and

American

enter­

morraw night to show films and

prises in the CommOn Market will

talk

be examined.

about

their

planned

Interim

Tour, "Business, Politics and the Common Market" The tour, students,

air

travel

The European Government s have

Paris, the PLU group will be the

Brussels, Bonn, West Berlin, Paris

guest of the French government. The price of the tour,

$709

(all­

attend·

The course was design-ed to give

ed one rehearsal the other night

PLU students a more vivid picture

result of these negotiations. It in­

and although it's hard to tell from

of international business and poli­

cludes sight· seeing in West Berlin

the little I saw, I do not hesitate

tics than is possible in the class­

Paris, London, a one-day bus tour

to recommend that you buy your

room.

to

tickets early. It could be a great

of

show.

(NATO.

two weeks on October

UPS has announced their of shows for the year.

slate

beginning

Visits of the headquarters

the

may

Port

of

be lowered

Antwerp

as

and

a

a

organizations

one-day bus tour through the Ruhr

Comman Market, OECD,

region of the Krupp steel plant in

international

and UNESCO) are planned. In

inclusive)

discussion

with

opinion-lead­

Essen. The meetings will be held in the

October 29 with "Who's Afraid of

ers (politicians, newspaper editors,

Administration Building, room 200,

Virginia

student representatives) the partic­

at 8:00 p.m.

Woolf,"

by

Edward

Al-

OO-day cease fire wdth Cuba."

It almost involved the entire Middle East in a nucl ea r holocaust. We can't have that again. "Naturally. duning the cease fire, both sides would pledge not to en· gage in military build-ups. Then serious negotiations could be conducted through the U.N. To show your good Will, I'd suggesl you wit hdraw from the Florida Peninsula , give back all the land you stole Crom Mexico and agree to the internat ion alization of Hollywood." "Hollywood!"

r cried. "But

that's

our

most cherished

nahlonal

"It's a worldwide shrine for people of all faiths," said Mordecai gently . "You must make sacrifices for peace."

erative. During its 4-day stay in

to

and London.

a

With Cuba?

shrine.'"

shown themselves extremely coop­

which is open to all

includes

"Therefore, we want you to sign

percussions in the Middle East. Remember. the Cuban MissiJe Cr isis.

Professors W. R. Hutcheon, Bus­ Science will host

is the very cornerstone of Israeli foreign policy in the Caribbean.

··Certainly. A Cuban-American confrontation could have serious re­

It's really quire a play!

Professors Offer Common

J said a littl e huffily that I'd thank Mordecai to nrind his own busi­

There are quite a number of

parts Call

*

p.m. and to­

is

Curtain

"No," said Mordecai, spearing a tomato, "in the Caribbean."

tonight

"But to give Cuba back the Florida Peninsula would imperil our security," I said.

" Besides ,

what if the Cubans cheat during the cease

fire and again start installing those missiles we eliminated? You can't trust those Communists." "We'd urge y ou to be patient for a few months and not do anything hasty," said Mordecai. "And if the Cubans seize their ill-gotten opportunities, imperil

US

again and once more threaten to wipe us out?" "You can count

on

us," said M ordecai , "to make the most vigorous

protests to the U.N. Between allies. as I say, no sacrifice is too great." And he's absolutely right. Among aUies, each nation stands ready to make sacrifices for peace . Its only problem is deciding which ally to sacrifice first. (Cclpyrlgbt Chronlcle

PubIlshlng Co., 1$70)


Wednesday, Sept. 30, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Four

United Republics of America 2. def ine citizens relation with one

executive, feels that the courts

too strong, and that the legislative branch needs to be overhauled.

jail had to wait for el even months

and their collective as­ sociations: 3. state clearly what can and can­ no t be done: 4. establish dCvlces needed for self ·

for his trial, although it is his con·

government.

Of the 25 am endments to date, only one has affected the balance

By KATE MANCKE An eighteen year old in Oregon was not allowed to register to vote, despite a law giving her that priv­ ilege. A prisoner in a New York

a nother.

With these criterion as a basis,

stitutional right to have a "speedy trial."

pu blic

and

The

Federal

government and the Federal Re­ serve Board have aggravated not

Tugwell and many o ther constitu·

current economic crisis, by their uncoordinated ef·

tional scholars sta te that the Con·

forts to curb inflation.

of the Supreme Court. "It no long­

lIeviated.

the

The system perpetuates problems

er described the governmellt that really exi st ed and no l onge r de­ fined the people's relationsh1ps

nature of the American political system, this phenomenon the

has created the need to re-examine

Constitution.

America n

the

Rex·

day of programmlng.

Programs from the local as well

By BARBARA MORRlS

as natimlal scenes add to the va·

v ision. His first concern was to de linea te

preme Court."

the purpose of a constitution. For Tugwell , a constitution must: 1. be the expre ssi on of the ptin· ciples a democracy relies on, a law above laws;

preme Court, thus bave the effect

at 4 with

an hour of rock, a featured artist

side-splitting adventure is spent Mo nda y through Thursday, 10:30 p. m., with humor column­ ist Art Buchwald in his over·the­ a ir comedy, "Buchwald On." "The Goon S how, " starring Peter SeHers, Harry Se combe, and Spike Milligan, features a half hour at comedy Tuesdays at 7 Linda Gatch, keeping in touch with the heavenly forces, reports

at 5, old folks tunes from 6 to 7,

to twelve. "Our format

i s refresh ing .

not

s teri le and stagnant," says student station manager Ken Doggett. "We've got a crew of 15 studen ts who

work

hour s to right

literal ly

upon

hours

bring together j ust the

sound

for the

campus

and

''Your Day Under the Stars" ev­

5:30.

ery evening at

Graduate unds OHered Informp.tion on Danforth. Nation· al

Science

Foundation,

Woodrow

Wilson ,and Fulbright Fellowships are avai la bl e to unive rsity senior, graduate, and postdoctoral studen ts interested in science or liberal arts

research.

Danforth Graduate Fellowships Inquiries about the Danforth Gra· duate Fellowship. offered to senior or recent graduate students who have a serious interest in a college teaching career. may be directed to a local c ampus representative Dr. Lucille M. Johnson (A 220·0).

To qualify, candidates must be nominated by a Liason Officer of the University no later than Novem­ ber 1. must be under 30 years of age, may not have undertaken any graduate or professional study be­ yond the baccalaureate, and may

be either single or married. The Danforth Foundation of St. Louis, Missouri, will award approx­ imately 120 Fellowships in March. 1971 .

National Science Foundation Fellowships Fellowships for advanced study certain social sciences, and in the nistory cience

and/or are

philosophy

granted

of

annually

the by

the National Science Foundation on both the graduate and postdoctoral

sons

jazz.

troops

into

Cambodia and the furor over the appoi ntment

Carswell

both

mus­

trated this problem. Where In the nebulus mass of du ties and powers should the line between the power

of

th e

exec u tive

and

l egislative

branches be drawn?

Tugwell, an advocate of a strong

relaxa tion

and

with "No School Today," a bit of old time radio for the kids (and the young at heart). KPLU also gives live oaverage

to al l home football ball games. "Dateline Campus

and

basket­

Noteboo k,"

Radio personnel

encourage stu­

dents to call in happenings to ex·

New Pacific Lutheran U niversity

art collection acqulstlons, including four

prints

rece ntl y

donated

by

MauriCio Lasansky, are on display at the

University

Gal lery in the

Mortvedt Ubrary through Oct. 2.

TIle Lasansky prints,

series of

a

black and wh1te intaglios entitled "For

an

Eye

an

Eye:'

bring to

2,600 gr aduate-will be annou nc ed

ment, co mmuni ca tions might soon

uate study in preparatio.n for a col· lege t eaching career in a liberal arts field are el igi ble to be nomi · nated for a Woodrow Wilson Fel­ lo wship. Applications

are

available

only

upon recommendation {rom a uni· versity professor

to the

regional

sel ecti on committee, and mus t be

Selection is based primarily on a candidate's p romise as a college tea cher. Interested persons should contact Dr. George E. Arbaugh ( ext . 257). Fulbright-Hayes United States Government Grants, provided for under the Fulbright. Hay s Act, give students an oppor· research,

or reo

ceive professional training in

one

of «J countries. forms,

obtainable

from Dr. Rodney Swenson (Al20R) are limite d to those students who are U . S . citizens, hold a B.A. de· gree

at

the

ti me

of

interested

in

the

grant,

ei t her

a

full

grant, travel grant, or a foreign grant should make application by Octob r 31

a full d gree,

depart ·

hopefully

by

next year. to

interested

are courses in

radio pro­

Already students

av ilable

duction, broadcast media, and tele·

vsion prod u ction.

3rd cl ass FCC l icense and pass a board exami n atio n prior to joining the radio broadcast staff. After a short probati()n period, studen t s are paid for their services. Students

must

acquire

a

Faculty director Mr. Judd Dough·

received by October 31.

Application

expanding

cons t antl y

A affer

Woodrow Wilsoo Fellowships Students who plan to begin grad·

to

solve

has these

problem s.

of power. The problem of states' ri g hts has never been approached th rou gh amendment. Bureaucratic inertia is complete· ly outside the real m of constitu­ ti onal refonn, under the present system, because the executive de­ partments a s they exist are extra· constitutional. Their existence has also increased the responsibilities of the President to s uch an extent that he cannot control the admin· istration poli ci. es. While the Pre sident cannot ful till his responsibilities, the legislature especially the Senate, is faced with the p robl em ,of coordinating con· stituent desires and national needs. Tugwell would alleviate th e p rob­ lem of legisl at ive conflicts by re­ struc turing the Sen ate . and allow­ Ing f or election 01 rep resenta tives­ at·large. They would have to con­ sider only the needs of the nation. The President's workload would be redistribute d between himself, two v ice presidents, a planning branch and a regulatory branch. In addition, Tugwell believes that a revised Con stitution ought to make amendment easier, and it should list the rights and respo11Bi­ biJ itie s of individuals to each other and the body politic.

asansky Donates Fo r Prints

when

reminiscing

"Sparky and His Gang" Come on

to PLU by the well·known Argen­

March 15.

amendment

ab le

.bee n

Saturday'S noon show calls for

on "Dateline."

re­

Recipients are chosen by a panel

The elusi ve idea of "checks and bal.ances" depended on restraint

fic co mpetence . Awards - 200 postd oc toral and

fellowships is December 7.

in te re sted in postdoctoral

sea reh

under

tension 355 or 4M for broadcast

sons

through

of c hanging the prinCiples

10 the number of works donated

30, while the closing date for per­

available

hours ot

dorm and camp us a ctivi ti es.

the P rovost ' s office (A·loo), will be accepted from seniors and grad­ uate students through November

Applications,

two

and

offered as a free publicity service,

have a language profi c ien c y suf· fi c ie n t to communicate with the people of the host coun try, and who are in good health. Dr. Swenson indic at ed that per·

level.

pops,

gi ves the up to date l atest on aU

of prominent scientists on the basis of ability, letters of recommenda· tion, and other eVli.dence of scienti·

tunity to sLudy,

in the basic and applied sciences,

followed by Broadway showtunes, Boston

the Su­

which our governme nt operates.

Nixon's deploying of

Fridays are set aside for "the mu sic nut," beginning

by

Reversals of decisions

and respect on the part of all three branches of governnymt. These two factors no longer exist. President

riety of the broadcast schedule.

KPLU FM radio, 8.55, turns it on every w e ekday from 4 p.m. to m id· night and Saturdays from twelve

longer really ex­

something only to be understood by studying opinions of the SUo

re­

a drug forum, or a Saturday mo m· ing with "Sparky and the Gang, "

no

s.fdering the theoret.ical and prag·

Dog Night. or an old Bo ston pop,

A

est patriOts,

isted. It was by way of becoming

KPLU Expands Program Slate Whether it's the sound of Three

among each other. The Constitu­ tion, referred to so fo ndly by earn·

ford Tugwell spent six years con­ matic aspects of constitutional

ano t her

the opinions

stitution exists only in

rather than solves them. Because of

KPLU MODERATOR prepares for

he found that the US Constitution di d not fulfill the need.

Constitutional never

are

ty

indicates

the

that

fi eld

is

wide open to interested students.­ "interested

and

dedicated

stu·

dents."

tini an artist. Lasansky, who received

at the University of Iowa and one of

tM finest

printmakers i n the

.United States. There is a definite relationship between the print series and Las­ ansley's f amous "Nazi DraWings,"

ac cording to Keith Achepohl, PLU printmaker.

'''They depict Lasan·

sky's ea rly concern for the lnhu­ manJty to which man subjects his fellow man," he said. Also on display are two extreme· striJdngly

beautiful

Noon Music

artists.

temporary

woodcut

at Pacific Lutheran University the

w orks

entitled

depa rtm ent

MaJawa" and "Panope."

undenakes

the task of presenting another year of tine music in its WEDNESDAY

are

"Stream of

"Creallion

Images,"

The of

a water·

color by Charles Stokes, American

NOON MUSIC pr og ram. Recitals will fe ature voice, piano, organ,

and

other instruments in

concert. Throughout the year, stu· dents, faculty. and speaiaJ guests will appear in reci tals. SEPTEMBER

30th

recital

will

feature auditions for parts in this year ' s OPERA which wiu be pre­ se nted later this year.

Student, Faculty, and Stafl are invited to COme a nd enjoy these performances. They are all held in Eastvold Chapel and start at 12:30 p.m.

play.

The

me nd ed

painting

for

was

recom·

purchase

by juror Clement Greenberg at last year's Northwest Painting Exhibition in Seattle. The collection includes an etch·

ing of Salvatore Roas, one of a series of portraits of great artlists by Leonard Baskin. There is also an

etching, "Marriage

a

la Mode,"

by 18th century William Hogarth. Also in the exhibition are repro­ ductions of paintings by 17th cen­ tury artists Nicolas Maes and Car·

10 Dalci Seattle printmakers Ste­ ven Hazel lis represented by his colorful "Boat No.3" intaglio and stencil. as are PLU artists Ache­ poW and Walt Tomsic. Achepho!'s much lauded ''Tres­ pass" and Tomsic's "National Eter­ nal

Flame

Monu

nt"

complete

the exhibit. Most of the works in the exhIbi·

tion have bee n acqllired by the unive rsity in the past two years.

On Oct. 4 the conceptual art of Baxter of Vancouver. B.C., will go on display at the University Gallery. Jain

color woodcuts by carol Swnmers, one of America's outstanding con­

With a new school year opening musi c

hon­

from PLU in 1969, is a professor

ly large and

of

an

orary doctor of fine arts degree

contemporary artist, is also on di s­

Dee and Gene's

ARCO

TUNE-UPS BRAKE S6RVICE STARTER AND GENERATOR REPAIR OPU 7:00 A. ••

12166 P.cific

--

10:00 ,.

LE7-3040

Lee's Shoe

Repair

21% Off on ell MEN'S DRESS .nd WORK SHOES

12213 Pacific Avenue PARKLAND SQUARE across Pacitic Ave from the "PiC'


Under the Grandstand

Lutes Scramble Past Vikings Last ran

Saturday

into

Western

a

night

the

hard-hitting

Washington

Lutes

crew

of

Vikings

in

Bellingham but were tough enough to come away with a 29-14 victory. The second game of the season started out a

little tougher

than

the first, and it was not until the second time the Lutes had the ball that they were able to score. Dave Halstead did the trick with a neat 70-yard scamper through the en­

his second TD of the night, mak­

goal, making the score 9-0. Western had a few problems with the PLU defense in the early going

ing the

score 22-7,

Page Five

MOORING MAST

Wednesday, Sept. 30, 1970

By DAVE SODERLUND

and then the

control strategy backfired as Wes­

and another drive ended with Dan

tern scored again and the defense

With Western out of the way the Lutes now can concentrate on the

Pritchard diving for the TO. Again

spent the rest of the third quarter

Northwest Conference hassle. First on the list is Linfield, and you can

the PAT just missed and the score

and the early fourth quarter with

be sure that the Wildcats will be out to gain a little revenge for the

stood at 15-0. At this point Glenn

its back to the goal line

fiasco at McMinnville last year where Hans Lindstrom went 67 yards

PLU took over the ball on their

for a TD on the first play of the game and Linfield never quite recov­

a

own ten yard line with eight min­

ered. The Wildcats beat· Whitworth 37-9 this last weekend, but that is

score just before the end of the

utes left and were able to sustain

not much of a comparison.

Hadland got things together for the Western

offense,

driVling

for

second quarter to leave the Knights

a march for the final TD, grinding

Dave Halstead takes an impressive start into the third game of the

with a 15-7 halftime lead.

the yardage out on the ground and

1970 season against his old high school coach. Halstead has put toget­

running out the clock. Jim Hadland

her two prolific games in a row and has 300 yards already this season.

drive stalled deep in Western ter­

little,

as the Lutes were content

ran the final two yards on an op­

Halstead also has had three successive good games against Linfield

ritory and Ed McGrath made up

to control the ball and wear down

tion play for the fourth TO, icing

in his career and will be a marked man Saturday. The collision should

tbe clock.

the game at 29--1 4 with only one

be interesting.

minute remaining. The statistics showed

much

record- the fact that Gary Hammer and Dan Pritchard are off to good

against

starts as well tends to get hidden. After all, someone has to be responsi·

tire Viking defense. A second Lute

for his miuecl PAT witb a field

The second half slowed down a

Dan Pritchard added

evener

game

than

With Halstead grabbing the headlines - and the career rushing a

that

Whitworth. Once again PLU garlned

ble for the 940 yards of rushing offense amassed so far this year. •

big on the ground, piling up 388 yards. Western managed 131 yards on the ground and added 180 more

small,

on the passing ann of Glenn Had­

enough noise to combat the Western croWd. For those that went, the

land for 311 yards of total offense

team has voiced its appreciation for moral support in enemy territory.

compared to the Lutes' 411. Jim

Keep it up!

they

were

vocal.

Combined

Hadland did not have to pass much,

&: C. Chris Buck took ninth and

skies. The Pio neers of Lewis and

Next Saturday finds the Lute har­

Clark were the opponents of the day and proved as tough as ever. The final score of the meet was

L &: C 20, PLU 39. L &: C's top five finishers (the counters in

a

dual

meet) placed 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 &: 8. PLU's harriers ended the meet with places

ingham

another

meet

which

Hike Held By MARK STRAND

3, 5, 9, 10 and 12. Gerry Gugel paced the Lutes with

for

should prove equally as tough.

Did you have an interesting time

21:37_ Kirk Sandburg, showing dm­

this weekend? If you didn't and ended up in your donn doing noth­

provement over

ing, then you should have been cn

his third place finish in a time of last season,

fin­

ished fifth in 2 1 : 56. Bob Byerly of

L &: C won the four mile race in a

time

of

20:58

with

teammate

a hlke_ This

past

weekend

students and two

twenty-four

staff

members

Keith Woodard in second at 21: 12.

took a

Mike

Boyer,

and

Leaving PLU early Saturday morn­

Roo

Reidlinger

sixth through eightb respectively for L

ing. we went to Eagle Lake, nest­

Doug

Johnson, finished

hike

into the

mountains.

led high in the Cascade range. We packed our food and bedding and spent the weekend on a peaceful shore sunbathing and relaxing. So if you had a dull, boring week­

Lou's Place

end on campus why don't you join

the Jamaikans? Take a long hike and walk your blues away.

breaking

the

YARNS and NEEDlECRAFT FEATURING Live Music Every

KNJT and PURL 406 Garfield

Wed., Thurs., Fri. & Sat.

LE 7-5317

career

last spring's conference three mile race did not seem to hinder thell\.

rushing record previously held by

Jerry Gugel, who was not able to train all summer, is not yet up to his

John Fromm. Gary Hammer added

past form, but Kirk Sandburg was a pleasant surprise. (Is it true that

82 yards and Dan Pritchard came

red suspenders add to one's speed and endurance?)

Hans Lindstrom

It is fitting to consider markmanship and accurate shooting in this

rushed for 42 yards from his split

section of the paper. The viewer from beneath the bleachers extends his congratulations to some stalwarts from Olympic House who have

excellent kick returns.

been sharpening up their aim with catapulted water balloons. They are

The defense gave

to be commended for hitting the right building (Pflueger) but were not

up a lot of

yards in the middle of the field

so

but was continually tough when the

this weekend.

fortunate in their choice of windows. It's a good thing it was warm The Lutes arrived in Bellingham Saturday night without Coach Roy

This weekend the Linfield Wild­

Carlson's lemons. (It seems that the coach's consumption of lemons in­

cats come to town looking for re­

creases as the opposition drives deeper into PLU territory.) The day was

venge for last year's homecoming

saved, however, and the Saturday Night Lemon Suck went off as sched­

humiliation. This game could vir­

uled - who knows what might have happened in those tense goal line

tually decide the NWC champion­

stand minutes if the defense had not been able to look to the sideline and

ship.

see that the coach had plenty of lemons?

Deferably Speaking

By 11I0MAS R. HEAVEY

"The Anned Forces Examining

"brow."

sweat here, State of Health; check

and Entrance Stations can perhaps

We then p roceeded to take the

be best compared to the stockyards

Mental test which we were told

where the cattle are herded in and

was impossible to nunlt. I tend to

inspected, the diseased animals re­

agree.

jected,

and

slaughter."

the

healthy

sent

to

(IV-F, a Guide to Draft

Exemption by David Suttler.)

one: Good; Fair; Poor. .check that 'poor' box, but fast! We then went down to the locker roomJ where we were ordered t o

After the mental test two medical sergeants came in and told

us

h<l

strip to our shorts and socks. We put our clothes in a basket and

(Continued

to fill out the medical fonns. No

The pre-induction physical is ad­ ministered

by

Army

the

for

the

Dept.

Selective

of

the

Servlice

System. It is quite an experience, to say the least. Last Wednesday I took the physical. When I arrived it was still dark out and for people like myself it was the middle of the night (actually 6:45 a.m.). In my traditional style I was a bit late so when I walked in the door all the guys were going downstairs to the

examining

area

where

they

had just received their instructbns. Being the natural follower that I am, I followed them downstairs to

on

Beginning in the month of Octo­

Mr. Steve Armstrong,

nowned karate black belt, will be

PLU

on campus Wednesday, Sept. 30th

offered

on

campus

by

the

Karate club. The club was organ­

for

ized last spring with the pI1imary

the idea of kara te to interested stu­

a

demonstration to introduce

purpose being to offer instruction

dents. All

in the art to students and faculty

and women alike, are welcome to

of the university.

attend.

Instructors in the

those

nterested,

The location will be in the gym­

PLU students as well as being ka­

nastics room on the second floor

rate students at the Isshinryn ka­

of Olson Gym. The demonstr' tion

rate dojo in Tacoma.

will beain at 7:00 p.m.

and

calis our names and hands us our folders and sends some of the guys to different rooms and some of us In the true tradition

of SSS bureacracy they had some­ one else's statement from a doctor in my file. The poor guy probably was found acceptable because he

This WeelCl Entertalnen

Austin's

"DAWN'S CREATIONS"

Lakewood Jewelers

Go out Pacific Ave. to IRoy Y, turn left on Mountain HiWay,

2112

miles.

DIAMONDS - WATCHES

Repairs VILLA PLAZA

Phone JU 8-4311

couldn't come up with a doctors letter.

He

then

explained

about

several of the forms, including the Armed Forces Security Question­ aire. He said that if we didn't want to fill it out we didn't have to, but that they would conduct an investi­ gation of our background if we did not.

"If

you

cc>-operate

with

us

we'li try to cooperate with you." The officer said that he was going to get out in 93 days so whatever we

did

was

no

sweat

off

his

men

club are all

posters and charts on the walls.

stayed put.

world-re­

ber, lessons in self-defense will be

podium up front and ali sorts of in

Page 6)

Karate Club Initiates Lessons

a room with numbered desks and a

A minor officer comes

Lessons given between classes

was

for distance runners and the absence of the men who placed 1 and 3 in

carries,

Lutes. riers traveling to Western in Bell­

there

for their opening meet this weekend. Lewis and Clark is the NWC Mecca

on

Vikings threatened.

John Olson pla ced tenth for the

band

led all rushers with 161 yards in

to hit

end position in addition to some

By JOHN RANKIN

PLU

throws for 53 yards. Dave Halstead

managed

through w,ith 81.

The Lute Cross-Country team be­ gan the 1970 season under sunny

*

the

Jon Thieman's cross country group drew the conference bummer

15

Pioneers Wipe Up Lute Harriers

with

5 of 10

but

PLU AND lAC Cl'OS6 country team!I begiu Saturday's endurance test.

Although the band of rooters that made the trek to Bellingham was

KARATE EXPERTS get their klcks t.be hard way.


-

MOORING MAST

Page Six

Wednesday, Sept. 30, 1970

Mini Still Rates NUlllber One

KOOHING KIS! ---1.--­

By

LINDA McCONNELL The age of reverting to the old, has come upon fasmon designers like the bubonic plague. Their very whims are widely publiciled, try­ ing to infiltrate their ideas among the American people. Why is it that they no longer design th.eir new clothes for the future, but for grandma and her high-laced boots? This, of course, can only reflect a system of tyranny where the sopbistocated play with money as they sell their vi.ews. It is evident that the American public is actively participating in an age of "doing your own thing." HopefulJy, most women are willing to wear what looks best on them. This time of diversity, then, is de­ voted more to the individual and reflects quite naturally a person's own nature in dress. Asking students and faculty here at PLU what they thought of the new midi look, was an interesting task. Here are some of the st at ist­ ics and comments: Most male students (95%) ex­ pressed a violent dislike of the midi, either because they couldn't stare at those gorgeous Jegs, or that it added ten years or more to a girl's age. One expressed that the new length "is a disaster and is probably only suitable for gov­ ernment aid." Another exclaimed, "Seeing a girl in a midi is just plain weird," - and he added, "Have you ever seen clothing that cuts off balf-way between the joints?" "It's too bad," said another, "that since women can be so beauti­ ful, feminine, and youthful in the mini, that they have to be co n­ trolled by a designer's old.-ias-

Coalition Comm. Solicit Support

The following is a List of commit­ tees w hic h have been set up by

the Democratic Students Coalition. Students interested in serving in the various areas are urged to con­

tact the chairmen at the given extensions Immediately. Here is an excellent opportunity to put one's talents and interests to work use­ fully and effectively. Extension No. Ind<rCbina War ....Bill No 1452 Puyallup Indians, Kim Lebert 609 campus concerns: Pam Weeks (Kansas) . . ........ ... . 866 Remann Hall: Gl e n Anderson 1419 McNeil Island: 'Becky Rodning 1695 Planned Parenthood: Linda Loken . .. .. .. LE 1-8367 19 year-old vote: Pat Rickle 867 Military Service Information Center: Tom 'Heavey .. .. .. .1447 Tacoma Political Activity: Erik Strand . .. . .........602 Young Wo ld Devel opment : ..602 Erik Strand . . .. . ...

rman

.. ..

__

_.

..

.

.

.

... .

_._

..

. .. _

__

.

_

..

.... ...

r

.

Child Welfare: Jerry Oakes Free University: P III Berg

Crisis Colo ny :

LE 1-3938 Red Birchfield LE 1-9371

Environment (Continued from

Page 3)

"This creature had never lived to see man, and T , what was it I was never going to see?" The

fu ll

realization

of

man's

place in nature comes slowly-it is too p rofo und to be grasped in

a mi n ute or a year. It's effects embrac e rel ig i ou s beliefs and poli­ tics, soc ia l problems and the struc ­ ture of society itself. Yet, unless m an can live with t his less exalted position he may not be allowed to

live at all

. TO THE PO'NT THE BARDS ARE COMINGI

Give yourselves a break from the study g rind. Enjoy the Bards

music Friday, October 2nd, in Memorial Gym. Dancing tiDe is 9-12 p.m.;

the cost only $l.00 per person. The dance is a benefit for tile Valley Day

School in Puyallup.

CONTEMPORARY WORSHIP

This Sunday there will be a contemporary worship

Sun­ the floor

experience

day at 8 p.m. on Xavier second floor floor. Yep! Ri«bt at the top of the stairs. Come as you ·are.

on

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ORGANIZATION

ISO will meet this Monday, Oct. 5 at 6:30 in HinderUe Hall. All

students-American and foreign-are mvited.

HOMECOMING CONVOCATION

The Homecoming Convocation will be Tuesday, Oct. 6 at 9:50 a.m. in

Eastvold Auditorium. The theme will be announced.

De Shoe File""

., LINDA BAllO..

FOUR PLU COEDS modeJ the ups and downs of the fashion hioned views." To men th en , "once you've seen the legs you just can' t take them away-and if you want to be warm you can wear pants!" Man felt that the overaJl picture of lengths at PLU was quite satisfying. This still doesn't speak for the

5%. One simply sa i d, it-it's something new."

remaJining

"1 like Another said th at he really l iked it for "dress-up" on his girl friend. Girls, bei ng the ones wbo have to make the chOice, shouted in a chorus of 75% that they hated the midi, liked the maxi and loved the mini. "The midi," said one, "is like an over-grown disease." "The onl y way to get boys to chase m,e, is to wear the mini," offered another. Approximately

that

midis

were

50%

exclaimed

fine

on

people

who could wear them. Many felt that only a tall slim person had a

chance at looking nice in one. "On me i t would look dumpy and ugly," said one.

Another 30% (of the last 50%) thought that they liked the midi. coats and cardigans better than the midi skirts and dresses. When

asked

fo r what

lengths

you like

best, the majority said tbat they definitely favored the

mini,

with

industrY.

severaJ saying that they liked tbeir

hems 2" to 3" below the "mini"

-I.e. 3" above the knee and up.

Many like the maxi for.a change.

"The midi," said 25%, "express­

es elegance and is quite suitable for dressy occasions." At this point, no one felt that they could wear

the midi everyday. Still, it is quite fortunate that the present fashions offer quite a v a riety of "in looks."

RICHARD-SCOlT- Miss Kathy Richard recently made known to friends in Pflueger her engagement to Dave Scott. Kathy is an English major and Dave is in Pre-Medleine at Oregon State University. Both are sophomores from Klamath Falls, Oregon. They plan to marry in the summer of '72. HANSON-MERZ-Miss Signe Hanson held a candlepassing in Pflueger Hall to announce her engagement to Dennis Merz. Signe is a senior from Portland, Oregon, majoring in elementary education, and Dennis is a senior English major from Sunnyside, Wash. Their wedding is planned for the summer of '7l. ERNSTMEYER-DRAKE-Ordal Hall was the setting for a candlepassing held by Miss Carol Ernstmeyer to announce her engagement to Ted Drake. Carol is a senior elementary education major from Washington , D.C. Ted, from Seattle, is a senior in chemical engineermg at the Uni­ versity of Washington. No date has been set for their wedding. If you would like notice of your engagement printed in the Moortag Mast, please call ext. 1146.

Deterably Speaking: Pre-Induction Physical, Cont. (Ccmtinued

from Page 5)

rIlied our valuables around in a

green bag. Then we were measured weighed and chest X-rayed. After that we went one at a time into the next room when a guy yelled,

"NEXT." I w nt .in and there was

a doctor (I think) sitting there in

a white smock. Upon closer obser­ vation he was also wearing levis and cowboy boots and he looked as if he jusl got back from the. last roundup-.and the needles he used for the blood test felt as if they were with him at branding time. Next came the eye and ear tests. They made sure we had two of eacb

then, passed us. Nat really, but I

waited for 15 IIl!inutes to take the

eye test then waited about half an hour to take the ear test. Finally a guy came by and said for ten of us t o follow him, 80 I followed him into a room for the 'clinical evalua­ tion.' This consisted of a series of

excercises to determine the cap­ abilities of our muscles. At this lIime came the

fampus

orders from

most

the doctor:

"Bend over and spread 'em" and "Tum your head and cough." I've

kind of wondered what kind of a person could spend eight hours a day checking hundreds of young

men for hemorroids and hernias. Then we waited some m ore for

orders on what to do next. Th.e fel­ low who conducts the ear test came

(CootiJated

fathers.

733 is the p gr a m .

from Page

third Wednesday evening of each

J)

Nancy Johnson

head

of

this

(ext.

USSAC

ro

The Rainier Sehool Progrwn is in cooperation with Rainier School for t he handicapped in Buckley. Washington. USSAC volunteers in this program atte m pt to help men­ tally handicapped youths to be· come responsible for themselves. Beginning Oct. 3 USSAC volunteers in this program will leave from the Stuen parking lot at 8:30 a.m. aDd return to campus by 11:30 a.m. Kathy Burwash (ext. 1506) is the head for this program.

'!be Westero State HospitaJ ­ a new program in USSAC. It will give USSAC volunteers an opportunity to participate in vari­ ous theraputical programs at West­ ern State Mental Hospital. No def· inite schedule has be n made yet. gram i s

Contact KIis Torvik (ext. 1279), the

head of this program, for more de­ tails.

The Madigan Hospital Program gives USSAC volunteers a chance to en terta in Vietnam Veterans at least once each month. On every

month,

female USSAC voltmteers

in this program will leave from the front en Harstad at 6:30 p.m. and after partiCipating in a dance, they will return to campus at 9:00 p.m.

Girls to act as hostesses at home PLU football games are needed, and Bands, student musicians, or

tudent singers are needed for a show once a month. The

talent

head

of

Binz (ext.

this

program

is

Walt

l235). The Tacoma Area Child Tutormg Program is a tutoring program for

educationally (and often economi· cally) disadvantaged grade-scbool Most of the children c hi l d ren.

belped by this program are from

the Tacoma Hilltop area. In this program,

USSAC

ONE AND TWO BEDROOM UNITS WITH KITCHENS - PHONES FREE TV AND COFFEE

SOME

NEAREST TO P.L.U.

12715 PACIFIC AVENUE Tacom., Wash. LEl-6111

the test, and when we were d e we waited some more until the

on

guy came back. He then sent US to the Head Doctor. When I finally

got to see him I presented a series of X-rays and a letter from m y doctor explaining why I shouldn't be taken. He said he disagreed with my doctor's analysis. (How can you argue with an X-Ray) but that he would send me to a special­ ist on Tuesday (yesterday). So, after seven and a half hours

of parading around in my skivvies

and taking different tests,

I still

will

finally comes out, watch the north­ east window or 7th floor TingJstad.

(I can't tel l you here because of the Sunday deadLine for the MM).

meet with their own trustee once

a week on a one-to-one basis for

twa

hours.

Simple

reading

and

arithmetic are usually the lesson

subject. Sue Eklund (ext. 695)

ARTISTRY IN FLOWERS

is

Stellili

the head for this program which is to begin in October.

FLOWERS, Inc. KPLU.FM SALUTES LUTE FOOTBALL

12169 Pacific Avenue Phone 537

05

Stella aod Ken Jacobs

1970

BLUE SPRUCE MOTEL

volunteers

some more for him to show up.

We went into a little booth to take

didn't find out. If you are really interested in finding out how it

USSAC Community Proiec.ts Cont. no

and said to go back to the ear test ar ea and we did. Then we waited

ALL STUDENT NEEDS

Cosmetics

* Greeting Cards'"

Photo Equipment * Magazines

JOHNSON DRUG AT 'HE CORNER GARFIELD AND PACIFIC AVE. 9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. Weekdays 11 :00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. Sundays


Qorn Voice of the Student Body at Pacific Lutheran University PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY - WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1970

VOLUME XLVIII

NUMBER

Lilj e to Address Convocation Dr, Hanns Lilje, Bishop of Han­

n(lVer, Germany, author, and once

Nazi prisoner, will receive an Hon­ orary Doctors Degree from Pacific

Lutheran University in his visit to

the campus October 19-20. the October 20

convocation,

beginning at 9:50 a,m. in Eastvold

Auditorium,

where

ler and spent the following year in

sages from God's Word, and The Last Book of the Bible.

Nurenberg prisons. The sweep of

Dr. Ulje played a leading role in

solitary confinement in Berlin and American and the

President Wiegman will preside over

the Gestapo for his defiance to Hit­

Bishop

Lilje

forces

across

retreat of

Bavaria

the Nazis led

to the liberation of prisoners and

spared his life.

HE records the story of his prison

experiences in his book, VaDey of

After he was freed from prison,

rebuilding the church in Germany and

throughout Europe,

He

has

served as Bishop of the Evangeli.

caJ-Lutheran Church of Hannover since

the

and was president of

1947,

Lutheran

World

Federation

will be awarded an Honorary Doe­

the Shadow, recognized as a devo­

from 1952-1957.

address university students, fac\l!­

German into five languages, Othet

members of the presidium of the

torate of Humane Letters and will

ty and assembled guests.

tional classic and translated from include

books

Luther

­

Now,

Bishop Lilje is also one of six

World Council of Churches.

A reception open to pastors and

community members will follow at

10: 30 a,m, in the University Cen­ l' r (room 2()4).

Members of the f aculty and their

are invited to meet with Dr. Lilje at 3:45 p.m. in the Uni­

Rally Champions Free Speech

versity Center lobby, while an in­

"The

First

Amendment

of the un comfortable things."

some

from 7:30 to 9 that evening.

professor from U.P.S"

the

oss Hall

lounge

Dr. Lilje is visiting the Pacific

Northwest ropolitan

s the guest

Se ttle

0

the Met­

Lutheran

Count

cil, and will be the featured speak­ er

October 25.

DR. MANNS ULJE, a poHtkal prisoner under RUler, WIll address

In 1944, Dr, Lilje was arrested by

the studeat body at a speclaJ coovocatilm Tuesda-y, Oct. ZO.

With these words Leroy Annis, a

sum

up

speech

the purpose

rally

which

seemed to

of the free

was

held

at

Wright Park in Tacoma Monday

afternoon.

at their Refonnation Celebra­

tio:! in the Seattle Center Arena on

is'nt

worth a damn unless you can say

formal gathering with students will be held in

draft

By GLEN ANDERSON

wives

More than two hundred

people

met to hear speeches by and about

some of the many political prison­ ers

in

the

Seattle-Tacoma

area.

The rally was both a demonstration

B. B. King H adlines Ho Tickets are now available for the

to

Nancy

Lundquist

Swenson,

upcoming B. B. King homecoming

program

coordinators. Show-

This

They may be purchased for $2.50

range of variety and creativity.

down"

to

theme,

Vern

concert, to be held on October 23,

in Olson Auditorium at 8: 15 p.m.

year's

and

open

to

"The

an

unlimited

ecomlng •

Knee,

Harstad;

Marian

Mattelin,

of support to these victims of re­ pression and a chance to find out

Kathleen

Johnson,

Nordic;

Mary Howard. Alpine; Linda Bark­

er, Evergreen; Pennie Knight, Oly­

hand

truth was sometimes appall­

Th

Establish ment p ress,

we

groups scheduled to

understand

include Alpine and Harstad, Ever-

Stuen, The girls' pictures are pre­

a

Knife, and the Brass Ear.

Pflueger, Foss and Ordal, Ivy and

Center,

edge over most of his contempor­

group consisting of off-campus stu­

students

(with a

with

University Desk,

PLU

Center

dollar

1.0.)

off for at

Inter-dorm

the

perfonn on Thursday, October 22,

Information

The Bon Marche, MaC' the

green

and

Hong,

Hinderlie

and

Kriedler, Stuen and Cascade and a

What King is doing gives him an

dents. These groups will comPete

aries. Confidently he fluctuates be-

for first, second and third prizes

tween folksy, primitive blues and

depending on the overall perfonn­

urban hipness. "Some people," he says, ''used to think that because

ances. These trophies

be intelligent or professional. Now

ember 15, in the University Center.

I admire.

gym.

display, Nancy added, after Nov­

when I go on stage I try to be professional in the manner of the men

Songfest will take place after the

ated in the individual dorms.

really

activities.

A

will give us

feeJing for their concern.

The Tacoma Six were arrested last April and tried this fall for

trespassing order

and

to

in

have

provide

a

an

an

public

park

anti-war

opportunity

rally

for

those who wished to turn in their

the

both

Queen

Songfest

canddidates,

Songfest

ler;

Marcia Taylor, Ordal;

...

...... , . . .

. . . . .... . .. ......

9:30 p.m.-Bonfire .... ""....... ..

.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

................ ,

10:80 a.m.-Powder Puff Game . 11:00 a.m.-Alumni Tea

5:45 p.m.-Alumni Banquet

2:00

"".

.m.-Football Game ""... "

the

anti-war

mary reason for refusing permis­

sion to use the park. Although the

judge in therr first trial had de­ clared the Park Board ordinance

unconstitutional, the judge in their

second trial refused to allow dis­ cussion of this issue.

During the appeal trial one of

the defendants was asked by the

attorney for the prosecution why

the Resistance didn't go to court in order to secure the park pennit. She

replied

that

the

Resistance

couldn't afford it. She added the

realistic observation that the only

way poor people could take an is­

sue to court is to break the law. Contmued

on

Pap 10)

Freshman Class Holds Election

will

be

the

election

and

to

contribute

to their

will take place at the meeting, with

ballots. The results will be made

available as soon after the meeting as

Susan

.the ballots can be tabulated.

Since there is

no

class govern­

ment structure this ye!lr" th .

Elec­

tions and Personnel Board is hand­

........... Olson Gym

ling the elections with AWS. With

Lower Campus

the present set-up, class meetings

will be a rarity, SO the freshmen

may not have much opportunity to

meet together.

Special efforts are being made,

however, to get as much frosh rep­

resentation as possible. In addition

Intramural Fjeld

to these elected positions, spots

Behind Foss Hall ""........"... University Center vs, Whitman at F.P.

8:30-12:30 p.m.-Homecoming Dance ,,, ...... ""......."..... " ...OIson Auditorium "Golden Nugget"

of

only those present allowed to cast

by

""""".. """... "." U. C. - Room 204

_. . . . . .

against

proper representation. The voting

"B. B. King"

Saturday, October 24 9:00 a.m.-Intramural Championships

b ias

movement was apparently the pri­

All freshmen are invited to at­

Olson Auditorium

8: 15 p.m.-Homecoming Concert

cooperation of the park board. Poli·

tical

tend

"Truth" Friday, October 23

noted hawk and candidate for re­

and to AWS.

. .. ".,...,...,...... Memorial Gym

10:00 p.m.-Hoedown .......... ,.,.,........

featuring

election, This meeting had the full

business

HOMECOMING SCHEDUL.E Thursday, October 22 7: 15 p.m.-Songfest

gathering

a frosh representative to the Senate

Hong Hall; Karen Haubric ,Kreid­

festivities are underway according

political

U, S. Senator Henry Jackson - a

of the

each dorm, include: Beth Sundet,

annual

use the park because it was to be

a

and maybe its only, class meeting year. The I'TUllin items of

Olson

elected

of

This evening at 7:00 in A-lOI the

University Center

and Columbia Center.

rer-pect me and my music.

Resistance,

freshman class will hold its first,

from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and during

dinner at

The

members, was denied a pennit to

in

ing Queen will be held tomorrow Building Administration in the

soon the young Black people will

the

in

are in the process of being nomin­

however,

orthodox

to

Elections for the 1970 Homecom­

achieve better Black rapport. "Up until now almost all the college dates have been white, but I hope

for

7:15

Escorts for the candidates, bet­

ter known as "Handsome Harrys"

radical

the

fail

Homecoming Elections

The forty-four year old singer has played numerous college dates, both back and white, but hopes to

Plans

at

sently on display in the University

few facts,

and

often

will be on

I was a blues singer I shouldn't

coronation

verson, Cascade; and Eileen Rue,

what is

ing, Conditioned as we are by the

mpic; Cindy Greer, Ivy; Gayle Se­

and $3.50

sources

really happening in this country.

Pflueger; Kristie Harstad, Hinder­

lie;

first

from

cards,

which some of the Tacoma Six are

MAN OF LA MANCHA

bealns at 8:15 Tbuf8day 011 Eastvoid S....

on

aU ASPLU committees have been held open to freshmen only. Any­ one interested in such a position is encouraged to notify the Elections and Personnel Board through cam­ pus mall.


Wednesday, Oct. 14, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Two

ParaUax

Amidst the Bombings

The Silent Majority

This weeks feature on the Tugwell Constitution concern5 one of the most pressing questions facing current political institutions. For it raises the question of the possibility of order­ ly change within a modern democratic society. The alternatives in

wor ld torn between radicals of both stripes can only be

a

By GLEN ANDERSON

The mechanics of change in a mass technological society, however, a re complex almost beyond comprehension. Because of this, such proposals as the Tugwell Constitution, from the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions, should be con­ sidered with the upmost seriousness.

Rather, it is the res·ult of six years of carefully directed study . by some of our most p ro m inent scholars.

If meaningful change is to be effected within this society, and if it is to remain peaceful, we must be willing to bear an even greater re spon s i bil i ty toward our obligations within a democracy than we have in the past. The questions and issues which are raised in the T'ugwell proposal are not simple and if they are to be implemented it will take both ti m e and a renewed concern for the workings of our system on the part of the electorate. People, however, have been more wont to say that although the proposal is undoubt­ edly good in many respects little can be expected in the way of response-either from the electorate or the leaders within our country. Unfortuna tely it is this response which is of such para­ within the pro posa l at all, but within the assumptions which it has made. Tugwell still has faith in our system as basically democratic-those of us on the Mast who are presenting it also share that faith, at lea st for now. if our soci ety is not able to react to such

reme m ber ,

cern the assumption of democracy and not the validity of the Tugwell alternative. Amidst the bombings of the ir r esponsible left and the adamant rhetoric of the radical right, we on the Mast have found the Tugwell Constitution a thoroughly intriguing alternative.

Nor can I admire the leader of a democracy

pated in a peace march, criticized his policies in

who turns a deaf ear to the desperate pleas and ur·

writing, or burned their draft cards are presumed

gent requests which he hears (though he tries to

by Mr. Nixon to be in full accord with h is policies

avoid them), and bases his policies rather on the si­ lence which he doesn't hear.

lent majority."

Certainly

Well, we're not. Millions of American citizens deplore the stupid "honorable"

was

ordered

by

our

again,

sacrificed

to

with the rights of Negro the

political

nation's

of

then join us in investigating a p roposal that attempts to change and still manages to "go through channels." -John Aakre

too, do not agree with Nixon's policies, will you to do our pol,itical thinking for us?

the

(Note:

"Southern Strategy." Millions of us are insulted by the divisive rhetoric

accompanying box, fill in your name, and become a

gether again." Millions of us are sick about Nixon's vetoes of

fantastically expensive weapons which will only in­

flate

th e

economy,

worsen

the

arms

6:00

in room

204

of the

V. P. for Student Affairs. 2) Let ter and Questionaire from SE!nator George McGovern. of tIle ASPLU Senate

5)

Committee Appointments

NOMINATING CONVENTION CO-CHAIRMEN The Elections and Personnel Board is still looking for applications from anyone interested in being a c<Khairman for the annual Nominat­ Ing Convention. Please submit your applications, which can be obtained

from the information desk, to the EPB, Xavier Box No.

MOORING

148.

..

,,,

"Every year

I live I

am

BOB HASSELBLAD

KATE MANCKE

.....

.......

. . ............................................... . .

.

...._ . ............ .... ..

. . . ..._........ ....

.. . . ....

.. ..... ..... ........ _ ... ..... . .. .........

.

.

Editor

Managing Editor

.. .

....

PAULA SEIBERT .

...........

.

. News Editor

.... ......

. ................... . ... . . ............................ . .....

. ......

Copy Editor

DAVE SODERLUND ............................................................ Sports Editor MARY SHAOOFF PAUL BERG

J OHN

_

.

. . .. . .

. . ...........

. . ........ .......... ......

PETERSON

.

. ...

.

... ....................

Circulation Manager

. ................... .. . ...

......

Business Manager

. ....... . ....... ..................... . .....................

Advisor

STAFF-Glen Anderson, Paul Wuest, Kansas, Glen Zander, Steve Larson, Heavey,

John

Hushagen,

Russ Johnson,

Dave

Giles,

Mary Jane

Dave

Dykstra,

Thorson, Kristi

Tom

Johnson,

Becky Rodning. Bruce Bjerke, Cathy Wark, Steve Cook, Nancy Shaw. Karen Svendsen. Wanda Huber. Bob Steward, Rich Diet­ meir,' John Rankin, Scott Green, Priscilla Martens, Pat Stiles, Lindsay

Grader,

The

Foottubber,

Linda

Gardner,

Barbara

Morris, John Beck. Opinions expressed in the Mooring Mast are not necessarily those of Pacific Lutheran University, its administration, faculty,

the Mooring Mast staff. The MM reserves the right to edit

all copy for

Materials

length, propriety

and libel.

submitted should be typewritten, double-spaced with

65 spa ces to the line . The deadline for each issue is 8 p.m. on tile Sunday pr ior to publication.

.

..... . .

.

. .

. . . ...._............ _..._____. . .

. . . Now SPEAK UPII

Yet it seems to me that

more

we

time our ruin is in apathy and

self-destruction but most assuredly the same frame. It seems to me that God gambled when he gave us life.

He

gambled

a

It seems to be an example that

ing of any value in order to avoid

easier valuing one idea no higher than another in order to avoid any is easier never to know love in or­

we could. do well in following. The

question of existence is not really that important. A rock exists. Big deal . (Ex.cuse, please, Dr. A.) The question is about life. Are we will­ ing to live it?

Perhaps, nay, for sure, it would

my well-being at all. Yet, I know as well as you that life is not de­

fined by one's mere existence.

Perhaps you have heard the pro­ found

quote

think,

therefore

from I

Descartes, am."

"I

Perhaps

you have even heard the Moody Blues slightly revised rendition "I think, therefore I am .. . I think."

One night John Aakre and myself

By

PRISCILLA MARTENS

Eric was merrily on his way to

lunch one day, never realizing that it

would

soon

be

his

destiny

to

meet the Liberal Organizer. Brief­ ly, the Liberal Organizer is

stu­

but is never cursed by the thought

that perhaps not all Liberals are smart. to

It

is

recruit"

the

Organizer's

support

for

job

Liberal

causes. As Eric approached, the Organ­ izer immediately launched his pro·

sibly not

ing this afternoon to decide what

laughing so

at

this

osten­

profound reiteration.

Tonight it has hit a new light.. To­ night I am almost struck to tears by

its

earth·shaking

relevance.

Perhaps the revision is more pro­

found than its first utterance. In paraphase it asks, what more than existence? Years ago God said, "Let there

ing down the

gra.m.

"We

are

having

a

meet­

to do' about grass. Will you come?" "Well, sure," said Eric. "What with everybody smoking"­ "No,

no,"

said

the

Organizer.

"I'm talking about the green stuff -it's a Committee to Abolish Green Grass because green discriminates

be light." Man blew it once by pull­ shade,

settling for

nothing more than mere existence.

God has given us another chance.

by

on

shirking

Is it easier being a rock or

of course.

Is

be a man?

it worth the effort to

Indeed.

It takes a little faith to ascend

the womb, or to leave the breast.

Perhaps the fear of stepping out

is the lack of faith in the life that you could make it. If you are like

me, perhaps an occasional leap is a very healthy thing.

Perhaps a little responsibility is

left

to us in mai k ng existence a

living experience .

perdurably yours, footrubber alias David Giles

The Organizer eyed Eric a little suspiciously. "Look, are you a Con­ servative

or

something?

It's

go­

ing to be hard enough trying to figure out a way to make all that

grass multi-colored. Just because dent who has been dutifully taught . it's always been green doesn't that all smart people are Liberals make it right." a.

stayed up until four-thirty in the

morning

well,

Thinking Right

it is easier never to stand in order

I

pain?

as

a man? It is easier being a rock,

prudence are we going to Iiisk noth­

to avoid being knocked down.

should be much safer never to risk

iog? Are we going to miss out happiness

Because of selfish

der to avoid being hurt. Perhaps

Indeed,

time

of propitiation.

Cbolmondeley

breast.

second

when he reached out in the name

Perhaps it is easier to have noth­

mother'S

an0-

mie, perhaps a new approach to

In the IODgIiIn for having once in a lifetime-let out all tbe length of the reins."

-Mary

many

first ruin again trample us. This

have not givw

yet was the poorer

ever

so

times we let the elements of our

convinced that !be waste or We

my

MAST

.

...... . . ...._ . .... . ........ . . ... _ ... . ... _ . . . . ..

What ore Than Existence?

...----.....:.I

have been easier to have stayed at

'lbe Volee of the Students at PaCific Lutbera.D Universiix ............ .

DATE

cies cn what he mistakenly assumes to be the na­

the worries of theft. Perhaps i.t lis

(possiblY the All-University Commis­

. . . . . . .

tional mood, an assumption for which he has no ba-

Gonfrontation or fight. Perhaps it

JOHN AAKRE

NAME

that silence denotes consent and base further poli­

D.C. attended by ASPLU President Bill Christensen and Dr. Dan Leasure

Revised grading system

and

Yes, millions of us have these feelings. But un­

No one

Report on the President to Presidents Conference in Washington,

.f)

race,

threaten our very existence.

selfish prudmce that will risk aDd which, shirking pain, misses happiness as weD.

The Student Senate wilJ meet tomorrow at

3) Membership

of the Great Silent Majority

because he wants to slow ionation, while he urges

the

University Center. The proposed items for the agenda are the following:

*

NON-MEMBERSHIP CARD

*

billions for an expanded ABM, and pushes for other

nothing,

SENATE MEETING 11IURSDAY

you do write to Nixon and withdraw

Card-Carrying NON-Member of the Silent Majority)

ident whose partner had promised to "bring us to­

en, the powers we have not used,

ASPL

If

your membership, you are eligible to cut out the

and name-calling spewing forth from the Vice- Pres­

lies in the love

from

agree with him

join me in writing to him and declining his offer

children

maneuverings

I

unless I loudly demonstrate to the contrary. If you.

highest court sixteen years ago, is being needlessly delayed

of

I resent Nixon's attempt to do my political think·

ing for me by insinuating that

are embarrassed that school de­

which

majority"

bility to stand up and be counted.

dishonorable military dictatorship. segregation,

"silent

not protesting while their government went astray.

settlement to a war which was dis­

us

substantial

We Americans likewise have a tremendous responsi­

honorably escalated and perpetuated on behalf of a Millions of

the

Nazi Germany must assume some of the blame for

war in Vietnam and realize that there can be no

Whatever the case, jf you do believe we live in a democracy,

or

and everything that Nixon does.

him. In other words, everyone who has not partici­

less we let Nixon know, he will continue to assume

orderly proposals-even in part-then the answer may well con­

DR.

be acclaimed as enthusiastic approval of anything

insists that those who are not against him are with

aid for hospitals, schools, and other crucial concerns

mount importance-for without it perhaps the problem is not

sion).

sl ick gimmick, since their apathetic reticence can

and simply faceless, nameless members of his "Si·

This effort goes far beyond the "novel proposal" label

1)

The "silent majority" is being used as a pretty

are against· me." In a typical example of Nixonian

with which it has already been tagged by some columnists.

But

sis---except the grossest political opportunism.

Once Jesus said, "Those who are not with me

illogic, the President has distorted this thought and

stagnation or violence.

Gimmick

against other colors." Eric

searched

the

Organizer's

face hoping he was joking. "What's wrong with grass-I mean

it's always been green."

Eric decided to try another ap­ prmich. "11tis issue has nothing to do with being a Conservative or

a Liberal. It's just plain' common

sense that's involved. Grass is green, and it would seem that if you just accepted. that as a fact, you could· get

issues."

on

to more important

By this time the Organizer was thorougly

exasperated

with

Eric.

As he wallred away he said, "Prac­ tically the entire campus is com· ing to the meeting. Eric figured that as long as ev­ eryone was jumping on the band­

wagon, he might as well form his

own committee. He decided to get to

work immediately

and

design

a placard which would read: Join the Bowel Movement.


Wednesday, Oct. 14, 1970

Our Man Hoppe

U Dele SanI and the Fire Ant

A Military Base, Israel

By DAVE SODERLUND

Private Moishe Ben Dov was court-martialed today and given a bad conduct discharge from the Israeli Army. He was accused of saluting an officer. Ben Dov made no attempt to deny the allegation that while

on his way to the mess hall he did, willfully and in the presence of wit­ nesses, salute one Captain David Lev. Pale and trembling, the private told the tribunal that he had been carried away by an "overwhelming compulsion." He promised never to do it again and threw himself on the mercy of the court. In his behalf, a psychiatrist testified that Ben Dov, before emigrat­ ing to Israel, had served two years in the Austrian Army. His unheard-of act, the psychiatrist said, was probably triggered by his having seen the American movie, "Patton," at the base canteen the night before.

official word is that it "doesn't know" what the ef­

This is the Environmental Decade, right? Come

fect of this Mirex barrage will be on the environ­

with me, then, as we tour the southeastern states

ment. Yet it continues with a spray now, study later

to watch our enlightened government in action, play­

plan using a compound that has both family and

ing to the hilt the role of menace to man's pest

personal histories of equal bleakness. Forget

and protector of things natural. The focus of our attention is the fire ant, import­

These included: shining his shoes, picking up cigarette butts around company headquarters, wearing a regulation cap in a regulation manner, addressing his superiors as "Sir" on more than one occasion and keep­ ing his tunic buttoned on the hottest of days. "The next

thing you know, he'll be wearing a necktie_"

the prisoner. "Our job is to fight Arabs, not pick up cigarette butts." "Yes, S . . . I mean, I guess so," said the prisoner, catching himself. "But in the American Army . . . " "The Americans have unlimited manpower," said the Colonel, frown­ ing. "They can afford all this shining shoes, buttoning tunics and en­ forcing regulations. But how could we lick a hundred million Arabs with one hand tied behind our backs-which we all know we can easily do­ we

and another 25 percent died after removal to fresh

ing activities. The ubiquitous creature has been for

sea

Now the

U.S.

Department

use the other hand for saluting?"

"But what's wrong with saying, 'SIr'?" asked the Private. "I kind of like it." "It shows respect for the uniform," explained the Colonel patiently. "Remember that every Israeli male now has to spend years in the Army. If he starts respecting uniforms instead of ability, we'll have the mak­ ings of a ntilitaristic society. Although, up to now, thank God, there's no danger of tha t . " "I see the error of my ways!" cried the Private, unbuttoning his

The

National

Research

Counc:il's

not now biologically and technically feasible. The buck passes to the USDA people,

who

turn their

back on the National Research Council report and

seem that fire ants would be on the wane. By 1963

listen with both ears to the politicians involved.

when the program was halted, the fire ant's range

By a series of events that are too involved and

had increased by 11 million acres. In 1965 the fire

ridiculous to explain here the fiire ant has become

ant was discounted as an agricutural pest, and the

a political issue of no mean proportions. During Nix­

new eradication program hinges on its nuisance val­

on's

ue. In 1967 the National Research Council's fire ant

campaign he

was asked

what

he

would

do

about the pest if elected and he promised to wage

committee-our ant has gained a lot of status for an

an aggressive campaign against it. Now the fiasco

immigrant-reported that the fire ant rated below

has the presidential stamp of approval, which is

mosquitos, sand flies, stable flies, midges, and as­

even

sorted other insects as a human nuisance_

more

keeping.

Now we return to the present. The new eradica­

control

tion program uses Mirex, another chlorinated hydro­ 450

program?

Committee found the eradication of the fire ant is

With all of that pesticide in circulatrion it would

involves

Louisiana

Who, then, is responsible for the continuation of this

fire ants; it worked wonders against fish, wildlife,

It

for

Also, the Department of Health, Education and Wel­

DDT. Heptachlor was reasonably effective against

DDT.

good

fare classifies Mirex as a carcinogen.

which eventually covered 5 million acres

to

look

food chain with the highest concentration in birds.

with a poison closely related to the now-infamous

related

doesn't

In a test spray over one county in Mississippi,

In 1957, a program of heptachlor saturation was

carbon

It

tissue levels of Mirex were found throughout the

seems like we've heard this line before. started

water.

prawns.

and previously uncontaminated ecosystems as well.

necktie?" asked the Lieutenant next to him.

"Look here, private," said the presiding Colonel, sternly addressing

if

in sea water killed 11 percent of the shrimp tested

It does erect mounds which tend to break up hay­

program to mop the critters up for good-but it

citations for displaying "a soldiery attitude."

a

three-week test, one-tenth part per million of Mirex

leisure, it rates low on the list of agricultural pests.

eradication campaigns.

hearing this last.

eries knows that one granule will kill shrimp. In a

it zeroes in on. Although bothersome to man at his

compelled its harsh decision. One was the defendant's long record of

"Good God," whispered a Major on

to kill things. The U.S. Bureau of Commercial Fish­

to be a real pain in whatever part of the anatomy

of Agriculture is launching a 12 year, $200 million

is a chlorinated hydro­

DDT, heptachlor, and dieldrin .. Mirex is also known

ed from Argentina early in this century and reputed

At first, the court seemed disposed toward leniency. But two factors

not that Mirex

carbon, a member of the elite group which includes

over a decade the object of a sweeping and ruthless

*

*

"What's

.Page Three

EnviroDment

Arthur Hoppe

Privat

MOORING MAST

pervasive

than

that of

Good

House­

In the Southeast, to be against fire ant is

to

side

against

motherhood

and

con­

servationists are considered as fair game.

million

What will be the fate of the ecological balance

pounds of tiny Mirex granules over 120 million acres

in nine states? It is looking like a long wait to con­

of country, or 50 granues in every square foot of

firm that which we fear already.

field, stream and city.

Yes,

That is one hell of a lot of pesticide. The USDA's

tunic, scuffing up his shoes and lighting a cigarette. "I'll never salute

folks,

this

is

the Environmental

Decade.

O.K. USDA-pull your head out.

agaln_" "'

..

Review

The Court, obviously moved by his contrition, conferred briefly and announced he would be let off with a warning.

On The Marquee

Pl1ivate Ben Dov squared his shoulders, clicked his heels and tucked in his jaw. "Yes, sir!" he said. "Thank you, sir!" Naturally, he was immediately tossed out of th.e Army for "conduct becoming a soldier_" As the colonel said: "If

we

1 raeli

ever develop

a well-d ri lied,

superbly

disciplined,

By SCOTT GREEN

spit-and-polish Army, we might as well throw in the sponge."

attended ings

(Copyright Chronicle Publishing Co., 1970)

Senate Position

Freshmen See

students on campus but

this

two

week which

worthy.

The

preview

of

Crossing the Delaware." And last

dramatic

first

were note­

was

Seattle's

offer­

the

press

Lyric

Thea­

of our class to attend the meeting

This is not the way it should be

tonight, listen to the speakers and

and as your senator I will commit

a

vote for the person they feel will

myself

situations.

years, is the theatre's artistic di­

best represent them. As a candid­ decide in my favor, but the choice

eligibility or

ability

to represent the freshmen. I am in the unique position of being a re­ turning student but still being a freshman.

I feel for that reason I am even more

qualified

to

represent

freshmen. Last year I

the

The main reason I decided to run for the position of Freshman Rep­ resentative to the Student Senate is because the foremost duty of stu­ dent

government

is

to

be

re­

sponsive to the students.

If elected I would attempt at

worked on

responsive to the

to distribute a sheet to all fresh­

the

m

Information

n

my

asking

Center. By working on such proj­

suggestions.

ects and being involved with simi­

Another

ar campus activities I became fa­ workings

of this

J still consider myself very much freshmen

make

e

first their

issue

action

being

opinions

I

would

and

like

to

concentrate on is the general sub­ ject of intrusions by the University into the

University. a freshman. The

dents.

private

lives of

its stu­

An example of this is the

hypocritical dorm regulation which

up approximately 30% of the entire

enforces

student body but yet they are only

not on men.

allowed one senator and token re­

Tonight,

curfew on women but

a

In Xavier Hall 201,

is

cognition in other areas of the uni­

the election for the Freshman Rep­

versity life.

resentative to the Senate. I would

r feel I can best represent the

hope that

enough

Freshmen

turn

freshman class on the senate be­

cut to make this election at least

cau e

somewhat representative of the de­

I

am

concerned

with

the

plight of the freshman. The fresh­ men

comprise

the

Mr. Richard E. Arnold, who was drama

The

1'0 THE EDITOR,

largest

single

sires

of

our

class.

My

Mark Davies, Ext. 1472.

name

is

of

directed

professor here

for

two

of three

one­

play

was

called

"It

Should Happen to A Dog," based On

the

Whale.

myth

of

Next

was

Jonah

and

about

the

George

Washington crossing the Delaware entitled,

"G e

0

comedies.

a diversified, entertaining, and in the case of the last play, a some­ what disturbing evening.

acted in the pro­

conSisting

first

situation

tion run wild and what results is

Tom Heavey

um and I was a staff member of

the

the

duction,

all times to

with

are

act plays and billed as "The True

students;

miliar

boy,

Thank you,

posium and the national crisis for­ Service

but

rector and also

such projects as the hunger sym­

Military

nice,

History of Everything."

There are some people that would question my

is

cokes expensive.

is yours; please use it.

saw any

Arnold

Here again, he has let his imagina­

senate. I urge all of the members

ate I hope that most of you will

who

phere

are

unequal

Dr.

run-of-the-mill

freshman are getting the shaft.

these

you

while at PLU know he doesn't do

they

change

of

shows

was held at John John's Restau­ your representative on the student

to

Those

Samaritan."

rant in Seattle, where the atmos­

of

The

ence to the "Good the

bOdy

least.

"What to do Until the Doc­

tor Comes," which makes prefer­

tre's season opener. The preview

Tonight you will be voting for

represented

was

rg e

Washington

The

first

two

shows

are

quite

amusing and in the first there is a

fine

characterization

of

Jonah

by J. A. Bradley. The fun in the second play came country" as the hero of a grade scheol play. The "Cherry Tree In­ was thrown

in,

too.

Mr.

Bradley and Mr. Arnold were hil­ arious portraying two old, old men

TO THE EDITOR,

"witn-essing" the historic crossing.

Seeking the frosh position on the ASPLU Senate is Chuck Mitchell, a

political

Scl'cnce

major

from

As

far

as

a

But the highlight of the evening came in the last play in the per­ s·:. n of Michael BryJ, Seattle

Gladstone, Oregon. platform

Mitchell

who

has

a visitor to

studied

and act­

ed in New York. I sat in amaze­

to

ment at his control of himself and

stress communication. I don't think

his timing was perfect. He played

any

a young man who was picked up

has

no

definite

freshman

ideas has

except

been

around

PLU or the people I would be rep­ I

esenting

long enough to have a

out

of

the

Samaritan"

gutter

by

the

'Good

(Harlan Snyder), who

definite platform. If I am elected

in turn runs up hundreds of dollars

I'll try to find out what the people

in bills in Snyder's name. His work

I'm representing want and then act

and

upon their wishes."

James as the nurse, complimented

Mitchell has held various posi-­ tions of leadership in the past in­ cluding high

b ing:

school

president

student

body,

of

his

junior

class president, editor of his high school

paper,

and

serving

Luther League president.

as

a

the'

performance

of

Linda

Bryl very well. The show is touring between now and

Thanksgiving

The Lyric Theatre is a different type

ot

Arnold

community is

theatre.

attempting

to

Mr. offer

unique theatre experiences to make the trip dov.-ntown worthwhile. The slate of shows for the year seem very promising and I wish him the best

of

luck.

The

schedule

for

1070-71 include a Christmas show, "Muzeeka," "LUV," "And Things That Go Bump in the Night," and "The Roar of the Greasepaint, the Smell of the Crowd," a musical. If you are interested in tickets, sea­ son or individual, give me a call at ext. 1220.

in the form of "the Father of our

cident"

Mr. Arnold or myself.

and

can

be

"rented" for a reasonable fee. If

The other production marked the directional debut of Bob (Cecil B.) Church, with "A Hot Time in the Old Town." I think he co-authored the script with Charles Nordquist, but I couldn't tind out for sure. The cast of thousands was well handled and they were very con­ sistent in their portrayals as the people of Luteville. Mr. Nordquist was a logical choice for the lead rile of Mayor Wigwam and could be in contention when award time rolls around. All in all, the show was a great success (at least no one walked out that I saw) and provided a very pleasant diversion. Congratulations GROUP!

Go see "Man of La Mancha." I had a sneak preview of the first half and it looks great. I'll have a review of it next week. Get your

tickets for

"Summer­

a

tree" which is on November I, at

performace of the show, possibly

7:30. Take a study break! It'll be

as

well worth the time.

anyone

would

like

to

sponsor

money-making project, contact


Page Four

MOORING MAST

Wednesday, Oct. 14, 1970

United Republics of AmericaSenate TerIns Cause Structured Inequality OBERHOLTZER

DWIGHT

By

land of the un­

the

America is

equal. Only white fifth graders still believe that equal work opportuni­ ty and equality before the law ex­

anyone committed to the greatest op ortunity for the

treme stand to take, of course. But

ber.

practices

en­

law

and

forcement in our country leads to the conclusion that life-chances are related to skin color ,the social po­ sition of parents, and the influence

of friends_ One's position in society is often not a product of personal

ssay

ment with the American political system. Attempts to solve the problems of the nation have come from all segments of the political spectrum, from the Minutemen to the Weatherman. The cancerous growth of dissident groups indicates a needed The recent proposal of a new constitution by the Center for the Study of Democratic Instituitions is an effort to modify the structure of government in such a way that it can respond

By RONALD GENDA

Social

and

D..viant

Behav-

er

would

assist in

better

CDordina ted

Tugwell, model constitution is presented in this tradition. The main thrust of the document is in the direction of centralization expresses

its basic

goals, "So that we may join in common endeavors, welcome the future in good order, and create an adequate and self-re­ pairing government-we the people do establish the United "

The presentation of this proposal by the Mooring Mast is

control

and

organization

eco­

with

dealing

aspects

the

basic democratic tenets which have existed under the present

the finest analyses of problems in the U.S. in recent years. The

about

bringing

It is ironic, therefore, that such an honest effort has not been taken seriously. National leaders have ignored Tugwell's proposal, and have chosen instead to attack the still unwritten Panther constitution. It is easier to respond dogmatically and emotionally, than defend rationally a document which has be­ come sacrosanct. We are not advocating the total adoption of the Center's

services

and

goods

"invisible

an

markets hand"

pro­

resources.

the

lies

strength and weakness of th'e mar­

constitution

the

of

section

The

eco­

of

methods

suggests

which

nomic manipulation, which diverge sys­

present

from our

drastically

t'em is Article VI "The Regulatory provides

article

This

Branch."

"there shall be a regulatory branch and there shall be a National Regu­ With a National Regulatory

lator.

Board, he shall make and admini­ ster rules for such enterprises as to be af­

law

by

determined

According to the subsequent sec· corpora­

all

article,

this

of

tions

tions would be chartered by the Na­ tional Regulatory Board and would be

subject to

of

which

regulations,

various

most

are

following

the

interesting_ The NRB would be re­ sponsible for approving or prescrib­ ing the distributing of profits to the stockholders, allowable amounts of working capital and reserves and costs.

within the system breaks down, the system becomes subject to fluctu­ ations in thE' business cycle that

we

call recession and inflation. suggested

proposal

The

in

the

constitution would give the Regula­ tory Branch the power to modify supposedly to present

the system

cyclical fluctuation. The question is would the NRB be capable of ana­ lyzing the parameters of economic change in order to successfully pre­ economic

damaging

fluctua­

tions. In my opinion, the possibility of achieving this admirable goal is dubious. Article II of the constitution in question also deals with economic concerns. The neutral Planning Au­ thority provided for in this article represent

not

does

from

parture

provided

planning,

radical

a

de­

economic

present

under

for

our

present governmental organization_ our

However,

In addition the Board would have

Herein

ket system_ When communications

vent

present

economic

advisory system is not constitution­

constitution. Rather, we are suggesting that responsible citizens

the power

and leaders use the proposal as an analytical tool, and as a

when they restrict access to, or in·

government is not bound to follow

crease

the advice of our economic advis­

source ot ideas which could be adopted piecemeal into our current Constitution. The present Constitution has never been directly changed through a grassroots movement althought such an endeavor is legal. However, changes in our "supreme I'aw" through legi­

enterpris2s

restrain

to

of goods

prices

serv­

and

ices;

or where their ecological ef­

fects

are

see

to

are

costs

external

that

it

assessed to their originators.

slation and iudical interpretation have produced discrepancies

in question were adopted as wril­

in laws, and delays in basic considerations which have often

ten, the section referred to

temporarily resulted in the deprivation of basic rights. The possibility of having another national constitutional

aoove

would destroy our economic s 'stcm Whether

as we presently know it. this basic

brings ahout

alteration

convention is intriguing, but it raises certain key questions.

a better coordinated economic sys­

Considering the current tenor of the nation would a popular

tem, is a moot point.

document perhaps deny some of the civil rights overtly and covertly expressed in the present Constitution, and would it mirror the popular concerns of the days rather than then endur­ ing concerns of the nation? An honest analysis and consideration of this proposal by persons in positions of power would demonstrate the depth and sincerity of their belief in the possibility of orderly change. Their response to efforts of this quality and magnitude could be a deciding factor in the future of change in America, for, as

The would

N ationa I have

new

the

constitution

would have the potential of cr at­ the advice of the planning

sector.

The result would be a better coord­

Boa rd to

potential

sub­

heroin addiction in the Black ghet­

1950's

tos of the

get the same rap­

sky

id politicial attention that the

­

re­

Jets

white-owned

of

jacking

The answers are obvious.

ceives?

Tugwell's Constitiution attempts to these

that

inequalities

the

erase

questions uncover. The manner in Repr-esentatives

of

House

districts

regular elections in

with

pro­

his

structures

(I)

he

which posed

rezoned every thrt'e years, (2) pru­ easy emergence of

the

for

vides

new political parties, and (3) cre­ just

of

Overseer

national

a

ates

learned

a

elections. indicates

at­

approach to the manipula­

inating

ity. This brief reaction can only do

prevent

hopefully

cyclical

fluctua­

intricate

Tugwell's

to

injustice

formulation. As well-conceived as it is to pro­ duce the opposite, his Constitution inequality.

structured

create

does

The Senate's role and composition are the culprits. Note for instance, where the Senate has ultimate au· theoretically has

it

First,

thority.

suspension

the

for

approval

final

of the Constitution. It should men­ tion that what may actually hap­ world

political

Tugwell's

in

pen

may be quite different from what constitutionally

or

formally

IS

deci­

political

many

structured;

sions are made in cocktail lounges Second,

gatherings.

informal

and

by majority vote,

it may remove,

the Overseer of the national elec­ it may prevail over

Third,

tions.

Fourth, two­

or twelve year plans.

reject

may

Senate

the

of

thirds

the six

either

in rejecting

Board

Planning

the

and

President

the

any candidate for either President prevails

ate

authorizing

in

without

finally

approved

Seventh,

declares

na­

Eighth,

the

emergencies.

tional

of

Jusice

Principal

is

Senate_

the

by

Senate

the

consent"

their

nations

of

in other

or

in far waters,

Jorces

treat­

deployment

"the

Sixth,

ies.

the Sen­

Fifth,

President.

or Vice

United

the

Republics is chosen by the Senate and the Principal Justice's fille ap­ pointments to the Judicial Council be approved by

must

Finally,

Senate.

the

appoint­

Presidential

all

be

must

ments

by

approved

the

Senate.

tion of our economy which wr:uld

The Senate plays the major role -or

can

play

the

major role-in

tions from reaching damaging mag­

crucial areas. But it is composed

nitudes.

of

Our present economic system is

Regula tory

the

Therefore,

ing a system that could not ignore

constitution

the

if

Essentially,

the

ors.

should

and

deliterious;

consequently

controlled,

ally

the

or

Senate

the

either

in

House proportionately Black? Does

which

regulates the allocation of produc­ tive

cational process. Within the University community the various

menting negative, undirected critcism.

intcr­

the

and

pricing

Factor

ac.tion of supply and demand in the vide

Are the lead­

trenches inequality_ ers

en­

also

structure

political

Our

greatest num­

tempt to structure political equal­

aging economic fluctuations.

are

proposal should silence those who accuse universities of fo­

prices.

tem which would be free of dam­

fected with the Public Interest."

problems of change. The consideration of a concrete, pragmatic

a

sys­

economic

in the spirit of critical analysis which should typify the edu­ disciplines can bring their particular expertise to bear upon the

a

function of

regulatory

imizing the

value judgement concerning wheth­

Constitution, in fact it would broaden our democratic freedoms The Center, a liberal, think-tank, has produced some of

nffer

to

was

constitution

this

nomic

and responsibilities. .

central authority control while min­

The task assigned in analyzing

to the ills of the Twentieth Century. It does not change the

Republics of America ...

Hewitt,

New Constitution Would Institute Centralized Economic Control

change in the structure of our democratic institutions ..

The preamble eloquently

J. P.

Stratification

The past few years have revealed a growing disenchant­

and planning.

(Cf.

merit.

for

consolation

little

ist in our society. This is an ex­

ployment

But

inequality.

greater

offers

that

societies

Other

The Power Elite,) evidence

sociological acquaintance with em­

The Mast

Miller and Roby, lbe Future

ior;

of Inequality; and C. Wright Mills,

by

means perfect,

no

created

wealth

but

it

unprecedented

has in

30

or more members-and here

is the problem-serving life terms. in Tug­

This may raise Senators,

well's eyes, above the favor-trading

of our market

the history of the world. Our sys­

and political in-fighting that elect­

system and to remove the alloca­

tem does work and it works weli

ed officials thrive on.

tive mechanism of pricing. Our sys­

as

tem

concerned.

vert the

is

operation

presently

combination supply

and

environment, government central

of

controlled

by

interaction

the

in

demand

a

a of

market

regulated by certain agencies

authority.

with limited

The

proposed

far as capital

better

accumulation is

I believe we would be

Dff to continue our present

evolutionary path toward a bala;1("; between and

central economic

market

operation,

control

instead

of

But it also

stresses the entrenchment of pow­ erful to

leaders

who an:�

not

forced

the will

be attentive either to

of the majority or to social change. Only

their

interests

own and

collective, values

vested

need

be

pursuing public policy which w:Juld

served-a dangerous movement to­

President Kennedy observed, "Those who make peaceful rev­

above, would reverse this relation­

r-everse the contrulling mechanism

olution impossible, make violent revolution inevitable."

ward inequality flowing from cons­

ship, by placing an emphasis upon

of our present economic syst nl.

tit utiona I provi ions.


Wednesday, Oct. 14, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Five

A Proposal for Orderly Change

Pragmat;cAlternativeSupported By DAVID W. JOHNSON

the

should be held responsible for the

power of the present Constitution

mane

environmental despoilation which it

met to create the Constitution of

to comprehend-even

process of amendment--<lictate the

has done so much to cause, and for

1787, they chose to fashion a docu· ment which, through extensive re­

promulgation

liance

character,

When the Philadelphia Founders

upon

specific mold

itself

an

establish a National Sharing Fund,

cordingly. To wit:

knowledge,

they

a Constitution

the

pre

nt

age, testifies

-It is absurd, for

states

to

mobile so­

ciety,

new residents wait

But despite this adaptive capacity,

months for the right to vote. The

the Constitution of 1787 has often

Tugwell Constitution, sets a max­

require up

imum thirty-day residence require­

shown

ment, thereby eliminating all legis­

particularly

provoca­

Presidents alike, several

they

along

constituencies

profess

to

represent,

ha\"e not always desired or under­ stoa<!

how to interpret its broad,

sweeping phrases so as to main­ tain the relevance of the institu­ under

function

which

tions

its

lation

That the Constitution of 1787 has proven itself to be remarkable and

which,

through

disinfran­

chisement, penalizes mobility. the

democratic

through

misuse

of

process

the

seniority

rule in legislative committees. The Tugwell Constitution imposes a six­ year limit on House chairmanships while the appointive Senate would have no standing committees. -It

is immoral for speculators

profit.

availability of such property, par­

hu·

The

rapidly

diminishing

ticularly in urban areas, tax-dollar

Tugwell Stresses Flexibility is

not

without

good

reason

isting

of ready change, as the constitu­

approval

by

of the states.

that Rexford G. Tugwell was chos­ en to head the group of experts at

of

An

tional history of some countries has

amending

procedure

which

the Center for the Study of Demo­

does not involve a nation's major

cratic Institutions charged with the

subdivisions in either the proposal

drafting of a new constitution for

or ratification stages, unless other

the

safeguards

U.S. The former member of

are

present,

is

char­

shown. Nevertheless, a well·draft­ ed constitution leaves detail to or­ dinary legislation. Of the 400 members of the House

acteristic of a unita ry, not a feder­

elected

ed a number of far-reaching, and

al st.ate.

year terms,

often controversial, political ideas during his lifetime.

The Tugwell proposal is long and

erms.

would be

100 districts 100 at-large for

from

for

g·year

With three representatives

detailed; it lacks the flexibility of

elected from each of 100 districts

should,

less wordy documents, such as the

representation

therefore, be recognized as the pro­

present US Constitution. With long

candidates is more likely than un­

duct of considerable thought and

and detailed constitutions, frequent

der our present system.

experience by some of the nation's

amendment becomes almost inevit­

leading

able.

The

Tugwell

proposal

thinkers,

whatever

one's

Perhaps

that

is

reaction to it, and not dismissed

amending

merely

gests is rather simple.

as

an

offering

which

"should at least be good for a few laughs," as the TNT does. The ability of the Constitution to bend with the times has come not through

formal

amendment,

but

through the interpretations of the federal

courts.

Since

these

inter­

pretations have generally broaden­ ed the powers of the national gov­ ernment and favored the forces of

Of

process

course,

why

Tugwell

the sug·

of

minority

party

of

of that

body

could

fluctuate

be­

the

By KATE MANCKE

"The sacredness of man and of the human spirit requires that hu­ man dignity and integrity ought to

different. Tugwell

and

associates

moved

We

will

settle

for at this

for

nothing

point in

bistory

anything less is but a living deatb.

ative of the people. The Panthers stated

that

the

Constitution

has

WE WILL BE FREE and we are

been "of the pigs, by the pigs and for the pigs."

power.

which will ensure our freedom by enshrining the dignity of

the hu­

man spirit."

an organization known for its IiI:>­

The words were Huey P. New­

eral leanings, indicates a dissatis­

ton's and the scene was the first

faction

constitutional convention in the

weaker

the

gated, meeting in Philadelphia, re­

other a central authority stronger

presented the third world citizens

than at present.

of the

government,

Tugwell is no supporter of states' rights, and although states (repul:>­ lics) of

much

1787.

The dele­

United States, certainly a

different body than the aristocratic founding fathers.

to exist under his

The Center for the Study of Dem­

they have been stripped

ocratic Institutions has been study­

continue

scheme,

U.S. since

to meet

spectrum. One side would want a national

of their

autonomy,

and

ing the

problem of

constitutional

Both

bodies

considered

amend­

ments as ineffective. Tugwell

la­

mented the restriction of presiden­ tial

powers

through

the

22nd

amendment and the Panthers call­ ed the 13th, 14th and 15th amend­ ments safeguards for Northern in­ dustry. vitated around the development of institutions. People were the central

are

completely

of

world

United States-in the face of diminished

authority

abroad

and its ever-increaSing internal re­ sponsibilities- can continue to pur· sue its

space

program wth

only

half-hearted gestures toward inter­ national cooperation. The Tugwell

subsidiary

business

opera­

tions. By requiring that all "enter­ prises owned or conducted by re­ ligous establishments or other non­ profit organizations" be taxed, the

motives

to

intense

and

ongoing

scrutiny. -It

is

logical

that

industry

Maintaining

that

sanct,ion

for

multi­

lateral efforts encourages a healthy internationalism and the establish­ ment of a defensible set of finan­ cial priorities. -It is shortsighted for a techno­ logical society to pay mere random atl1ention to a major ramification of

that

technology:

the

problem

of worker displacement. The Tug­ well Constitution provides machine­ ry for programs in continuing edu­ cation, including those designed to "re-educate or retrain those whose occupations may become obsolete." -It has proven increasingly un­ sound

to

require

that individuals

serve in the armed forces against their will in time Tugwell

of peace. The

Constitution

emphasizes

this fact by ordaining a volunteer army, except in time of national emergency,

"when

uniform

ser­

vice may be required -The unqualified people

"right of the

to keep and

bear arms,"

perhaps appropriate to the genera­ tion of the Revolution but certain­ ly inappropriate to our own, con­ tinues through its reckless employ­ ment to bear tragic fruit. The Tug­ well guns

Constitution shall

be

stipulates

licensed,

that

thereby

"the

consigning to oblivion the bumper­

18th Century have

sticker mentality which proclaims

become the ruling class of the 20th

that "If Gun s Are Outlawed, Only

Century, and the people of the 20th

Outlaws Will Have Guns."

Century are the descendents of the slaves and dispossessed of the 18th Century and

the

people of today

stand wanting for a foundation for their own life, liberty and pursuit of

happiness,"

the

Panther

call

for a new set of institutions for a new constituency. A list of 17 priorities came out of

the

plenary

c1uded:

session. They in­

self-determination for na­

tion for national minorities, women and the street people;

control of

the military, means of production, educational and legal

systems. Other problems considered were family

planning,

drugs,

health,

Particularly Tugwell

indicative

Constitution's

ary relevance is

of

the

contempor­

its strategy for

Presidential elections, which com­ bines procedural mechanisms with an attack on three situations that have become increasingly trouble­ some. The first of these concerns the electoral college, long since an­ achronistic. the

The

potentially

second

concerns

disruptive

threat

posed by third-party candidates of Wallaceite to

win

perhaps

but

stripe,

who

rather

to

seek

not

force-and

control-selection

of

the

President by the House of Repre­ ;;entatives. The third concerns the often uncomfortable position of the

interna­

which

the

three of these since World War II. a

victorious

of the popular vote, and by pro­

election day. At that time the new

viding for a runoff election between

in

the

U. .s.

speaks

the

The to

third

Tugwell

constitution

the

same

for

toric and harassment by the police.

people that the Constitution of 1787

constitution

will

be

meet

that

Washington D.C., on November 4,

of

will

stipulating

the

citizens

itself,

By

ter and the Panthers is filled with angry

Convention,

President, of

c.andidate must receive a majority

streets, was typified by fiery rhe­

vote

the its

in

amending process, which provided majority

from

The Revolutionary Constitutional

Barbara, California. The Panthers

by

-It is naive, chauvinistic, and fi­ nancially reckless to believe that

tionalism.

and the power of the people.

discussion, held in the field house

ratification

so

in groups to consider the problems

in the national Senate,

the

disallows

twentieth century has seen five­

tion

and

scrutiny,

minority

regions have no direct representa­

University,

gressional

political prisoners, political power,

The gulf which seperates the Cen­

Temple

such institutions,

revolutionary artists and

it in the quiet of a villa in Santa

the

all

concern of the Panthers. The Rev­

zed unitary state. Not only do the

in

bringing

volutionary Peoples Convention met

are as subdivisions in a decentrali­

by-passed

ment of taxes on profits derived

land and th

Deliberations at the Center gra­

revision for six years, but they did

they

for

non-profit organizations - particu­

peoples of the

was also vastly

here to ordain a new constitution

political

immoral

larly churches - to escape pay­

addressed.

Constitution

the Left, but from the Right, and

the

similarly

The attitude taken towards the cur­

in the direction of limiting federal

spans

is

rent

less,

which

ments so to discourage.

Black Panthers Hold Constitutional Convention

cent

entirely new fundamental law from

on land

improvements, the

Tugwell Constitution allows govern­

(Continued on Page 8)

tion has been relatively represent­

The proposal at this time of an

higher taxes

land

mands that such institutions suI:>­

from the premise that the Constitu­

amend the federal

on

ject both their purpose and their

man.

years to

than

bership in the Senate, and the size

be always respected by every other

constitution have come, not from

sanctioning

Tugwell Constitution in effect de­

most far·reaching proposals in re­

change, it is not surprising that the

in real estate be discouraged. By

Tugwell is less precise for mem­

tween 28 and 70 members depend­

simplicity

governments

services, demand that speculation

-It

of Representatives, 300

FDR's "brain trust" has expound­

to

its to perform legitimate welfare

amending process is no guarantee

procedure

loss

and the

pressed beyond their financial lim­

of the electorate instead of the ex­

by

public or private, under close Con­

constitutional

would

the

source, under any conditions, inter­ est-free. The Tugwell Constitution,

property from the market, pending

Tuiwell and his Center Associates But

tutions to use any money, from any

Constitution, by providing specific

its anticipated sale at substantial

deny.

-It is unethical for financial insti­

in real estate to withhold valuable

malleable instrument, Rexford Guy hardly

by law."

unconscionable a practice.

-It is unfair for ancient men to thwart

aegis.

It

that

to twelve

shown momentary-and sometimes permanent - impotence in

which would in turn find applica­ tion to "such welfare and environ­ mental purposes as are determined

in a

than any other charter of its kind.

tive measures. For jurists, legisla­

By LOWELL CULVER

ac­

which has stood time's test better

which

it

does an acute sensitivity to the poc

full

the

which

litieal, economic and social temper

powerful

out

with

displacement

and

a

displaying

of

tors, and

social

supervisory agent.

document,

In the process, and doubtless with­

the face of

the

often engenders. The Tugwell Con­ stitution would use a percentage of

Their

would also

new

net corporate taxable incomes to

into

their

entirely

it

than

readily

they

through the

as

rather

would

brought into being

-

of

beyond

urge.

general

assertion,

comprehensive

considerations

drafted

and

adopted.

(continued on page

10)

the two candidates having the most votes in indecisive contests waged

(continued on page

10)


Wednesday, Oct. 14, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Six

Stude

t

e

--- p

Stude t Life Grav·tates to U Any net profits from the Center

The new University Center, aU three and a third million doUars

assist In establishing policies and of

will go inlo the University's oper­

worth, is just what its name im·

the building. A series of seven Program Com­

ting budget to be re-budgeted to fi­

plies-a center ferr social activity, a center for student government and organizations, and geographi. c ally the center of campus. A product of six years of plan­ ning and 15 months of construc­ tion, t opened

building will be officially In dedication ceremonies

setting

guidelines for the

mittees -'

forums,

art,

:Jse

music,

games, movies, the Cave, and spe­ cial events-will be responsibl-e for planning their

respective individ­

ual programs. "The games committee already has plans to sponsor a pool and

November 8.

billiards tournament," Mr.

A "student night" on November 6 will feature special promotions

son commented, "and the forums committee is making arrange­

and events to introduce students to all the Center's facilities.

ment to 'utilize local tsltmts for discussions on several controver·

"For the first time students will have a place In the new Chris Knut­

sial issues." Students wishing to serve on any

zen Lounge and the Cave to hold

ot

all-campus

through ASPLU.

mixers,

have a series

and

they'll

Swen­

the

committees

should

apply

nanCial

aid

and

other

programs.

"When we planned the buldlng," says Mr. Swenson, "we did so with the

assumption

that

if

students

were provided with nice furnish­ ings in a pleasant atmosphere they would take care of them. We re­ sisted using the less attractive materials which are made espe­ cially for hard·wear," he continu­ ed, "so we would hke to ask all students to

take it

easy

on the

equipment and furniture." "The interior decoration is beau· tiful, so let's keep it that way,"

Mr

Swenson said.

The Center was designed to be

of meeting rooms

The Uni versity Center building is

which are not used for classes,"

financed through the American Lu­

the heart

commented

Swenson,

theran Church LfFE (Lutheran In­

link binding upper and lower camp­

University Center Director. Two boards, established by the

gathering for Education) Fund. The $10 fee to be charged against stu­ dents each semester for the next 10 yea rs will raise only S250,000 of the total three and one third mil­ lion cost, ac cording to Mr. Swen­

us.

son.

programs."

Mr.

Marv

University, will make up the gov­ erning

body of the Center.

The University Center Poli cy Board consists of a group of students and faculty members wbOie role is to

s

of the

University,

the

"You have only to look at the E: that the heart ex­

building to

ists," asserted M r. Swenson, "but

whether or not that heart beats will be planning

up to you, and

taking

the students, part In its .

u. G

Provide c alio Faci ilies

ne

ms

By DAVE SODERLUND Perhaps the most popular addi­ tion to date in the new University Center

is

the

recreation

room/

bowhng alley complex below the

Commons. For the first time there is sufficient opportunity to relax

for a little while with a little eight­ ball after dinner or a couple or games of ping-pong. The six lanes of the bowling alley are kept in constant operation by bowling classes and Intramural ac­ tion, but one Can get a lane during the day or on the weekends it be is persisten After displaying a lew aberrations due to the new finish the alleys have settled down and are getting brok en lin rather well -and it is a p leasure to use new equipment. The prices (4.0 cents per line, 15 cents for shoes) are better than the local di es as well. . The preliminary report on the pool tables is enthusiastic-take a cue (bool) from me and check it out Maybe it's just that billiards luis just bee n sanctioned by COIl­ seTVlltive Lutheranism as a past­ time fit for the righteous, but the convenience of the place i a little .

-

.

hard to get used to .Once again the $1 per hour per table Is a good rate for such good equipment and it is getting more and more difficult to get a table. The latest prognostication is that the girls on campus will have to sufrer through more and more dates with destitute gentlemen as more and more money is lost at the pool table. (That is unless a girl should hoop up with the cur­ rent Parkland Fats.) Rounding out the facility are two ping pong tables. The most valid comment on this area concerns durability-the ping pong tables have the ability to withstand the worst that occasional ping-pong players can dish out. An added advantage is that the games room will become the home of jntramur­ al table tennis competition. Al­ though this tournament has drawn a lot of action, it bas alway.. been somewhat of an orphan. ,

When the Cave and the stereo list enin g room are finally com­ pleted the PLU campus wUl be

re­

laxation-rich. It won't be too dif. ficult to live with.


Wednesday, Oct. 14, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Seven

New Commons Enhances Mood By KATE MANCKE

still

appears

rather

regimented

45

minutes.

Mr. Robert Torrens, the new food

The second line leads to the dish­

Commons

service director says that eventual­

room. Frequent breakdowns of new

"Don't get in a line," was an even

ly there will be groupings of tables

machines, and a new system have

which will seat groups of four, six

meant that students have had to

For hundreds of PLU students, the

sign

in

the

new

more welcome sight than the new dining room. For the first time in the recent history of PLU, students are not supposed to have to wait for diMer. And the "scatter system" works. In a wide-open serving area, stu­ dents are able to pick up hot food,

and ten students.

wait as long as 20 minutes to leave

An added feature lin the Com­ mons

are

rooms.

small

private

Designed to

seat

dining 12,

the

their trays.. Mr. Torrens compli­ mented PLU students on their pa­ tience.

"These

students

are

the

rooms can be reserved by students

finest I've seen in f,ive colleges,"

who want to have a meeting or

he stated.

private

party

during

the

dinner

The easy access to seconds has

salad, dessert and beverage in a

hour. Reservations should be made

also

fraction

in the scheduling office.

feeding of non-paying guests has

of

the

time

it

used

to

In addition to the small dining

require. Proceeding through the checkers' stalls,

students

enter

a

spacious

room which deserves the tag din­

rooms and the Commons there are two banquet rooms. One seats persons, the other

400.

70

presented

already

been

a

problem.

reflected

The

in

the

amount of food consumed. Should this practice continue, the addition­ al cost will be added to the already

ing room, not cafeterna. The open­

Some snags have already arisen

rising board bill, or seconds and

beam ceiling, fireplace, attractive

in the new facilities. There have

such specialnies as steak will have

red carpet and new smaller tables

been

to be eliminat€id.

create

The first is caused by the students'

Torren's office, just outside the

for dinner at

Commons area, is open to all stu­

a

feeling

of

warmth

alid

casualness which the CUB facilities lacked. Due to electrical work which is not yet completed,

the

table ar­

rangement in the main dining area

two lines in the Commons.

4:50

early arrival at

5:00.

Torrens

reported

that

ap­

dents. He expressed the hope that

proximately SO% of all students are

students would come to him with

served by

their compliments, complaints, and

5:30

and the remaining

20% are served

in the following

ideas about the facilities and food.

ASP

Occupies Suite of Offices By PAUL WUEST

the same level of the UC is a small

It has not been unusual for the

conference room for private meet­

ASPLU offices to be moved around

ings. The room first entered after

in the last couple years, but none

using the stairway is a clubs and

have been more eagerly anticipat­

organizations room, to be used by

ed than that whjch took place just

the various clubs on campus. Desk

recently. The okay has been given

space, a s well as limited drawer

and

the four elected officers, as

able.

news bureau director, are enjoy­

new at this univerSity.

ing

their

new offices in the top

floor of the University Center. For the last few manthes the of­ fices have been in the CUB. Be­ fore that they were in the old 111B (temporary union building), which formerly stood on the site of the University Center. And before that they were back in the CUB, That was onJy two years ago. It

appears

that

the

moving

is

over with for quite a while. Presi­ dent

Bill

Christensen

occupies

a

private office just off a suite of

PLU Students Make Pilgrimage By KATE MANCKE

raeli

experi­

will be given by Dr. Govig an Oct.

flood

ments in social communism. They

IS, at S p.m. in X-20l. All students

be

have provided much of the spirit

are invited to attend.

joined by a group of PLU students

of tenacity and unity which typi­

The ing

to

of

Israel

pilgrims this

year

journey· will

and professors on "Interim Israel

'71,"

an

offering

of

the Depart­

ment of Religion. John Petersen,

the tour will

expose students to the religious tra­ ditions

of

Judaism,

Islam

and

Christianity, through visits to syno· gogues,

mosques,

shrines and ar­

chaelogical sites. Two of the highlights of the tour will be trips to Massada and Kum­ ran, Massada, the last stronghold of the Jewish Zealots in their strug­ gle against the Romans, is CIne of the

most

extensive

archeological

digs in Israel. The desert village of Kumran was the home of the authors of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Students

will have

occasion

to

visit a tell and participate in the archeological excavations. The unique character of the na­ by

visits

novel

The itinerary has been specially

to

the

give

students

posure

the

possible.

maximum

Both

men

ex­

have

studied the Bible in Israel, and are acquainted with the area.

A

slide

Hebrew·

presentation

featuring

some of the places to be visited

be registered by December l. Prep­ aration for the trip entails an in­

semi·private offices being used by the

three

vice

presidents,

Tom

Gumprecht, John McLaughlin, and Steve Carlson. Secretary

Carolie

Eggan

and

This

is

something

Mooring Mast

The

entirely

has also found

a new home. It has also done its share

of

moving.

Offices

were

formerly in Delta, and before that in the CUB where the scheduling office has been for the past few months. Editor John Aakre is not only looking forward to the use of new

facilities

but

also

to

being

things

have

more centrally located. Needless

to

say,

come a long way since the days when

everything

was

located

necessity for relocation seems to be gone for the forseeable future as the acclamation process begins. All are invited to come and

the new facilities, and it is hoped

also have desks in the compara­

that students will not only just visit

tively roomy space available.

but become involved in the various

Also available for student use on

areas of service available.

thought of the area. Further infor­

On October

mation and registration forms are

ceptual

acquaint

the

student

with

at

available in the Department of Re­ ligion.

see

News Bureau Director Paul Wuest

SEA Outlines Plans

to

in

Harstad, then called Old Main. The

least one aspect of the history and

dividually chosen reading program

Interim Studies Desert Habitat

15,

Moto'r

a lecture on "Per­

politicial action, and teacher edu­

Skills,"

cational reform.

and

their

effect on a child's reading ability

Besides

wilt be given by Mr. Kimble Stu­

tions

art.

gram.

The lecture is the first in a ser­

the

S.E.A.

1106)

evening

has

Maxine

presenta­

a tutoring Wallender,

pro­ (ext.

will take the names of those

ies of presentations, sponsored by

students

PLO's Student Education Associa­

child in a certain subject.

interested

in

tutoring

a

Those wishing to escape the rains

trip, the instructors will have in­

tion chapter, which will expose stu­

Currently the club is writing let­

of January may have a chanc'e to

formal discussions correlating the

dents to the current experiments

ters to the local F.T.A. chapters to see if any PLU students can as­

do so by going on the biology in­

research efforts and explaining the

and programs being used in U.S.

terim to the Sonora and Mojave

biological bases for the adaptations

school systems.

deserts. Drs. Ran Heyer and Har­

seen.

old Leraas are planning to take a caravan of campers to two desert localities where field studies will search experience with the pecul­ iar adaptations of desert life. Each student will take part in a

University, the Knesset, Mt. Henl,

research project which will involve

a memorial to the 6 mil!ion Jewish

defining

a

research

problem

de·

martyrs of the Second World War,

vising methods to gather data, ac­

and a stay on a kibbutz.

tual gathering of data, and an anal­

Klbbutzin, long the source of Is­

The total cost for the twenty-one day tour is $1039. Students must

fies the Israelis.

be conducted in order to get re­

tion of modern Israel will be high­ lighted

are

tailored by Govig and Petersen to

Led by Dr. Stewa.rt Govig and Dr.

leaders,

cabinet, and filing space are avail­

well as the ASPLU secretary and

ysis of the data. Throughout the

sist them. Students willing to help

S.E.A. is an educational resource

The class will be limited to

20

for the college student which pro­

which will depend On the number

conventions

of people expressing an interest in

the school programs and the na­

the desert interim. The projected

tion. It is a reference where an­

and

additional fees for travel and food

swers can be found about educa­

Shephard, president; Dorothy Bei­

tional concerns,

lin, treasurer; Denise Little, mem­

at

15

$175.00.

the

sponso.rs

Membership forms· are available

vides

on

and

tact the officers.

students, the exact composition of

are

information

a high school chapter should con­

issues

within

with the help of

at

the

Information

University Center. their

Desk

positions

the

are:

the Washington and National Edu­

bership

p.m. on Thursday, October

cation Associations, In addition, it

nell, program chairman; and Kriss

provides opportunities, on an indi­

Baldwin, publicity chairman.

in Ramstad lOS. Anyone inter­

ested in th desert interim is in­

vidual' basis,

for

vited to come.

projects

minority

as

pursuit

of such

education,

Mr.

Stuart's

Linda

Teena

An interest meeting wilt be held

7:00

chairman;

in

S.E.A. officers

lecture

McCon­

begins

7:00 in the Hinderlie Lounge.

at


Wednesday, Oct.

MOORING MAST

Page Eight

1970

14,

PLU Acquires Musical Relic By LINDA GARDNER

versity Center, after PLU students

Seattle's first pipe organ, built in

assisted in delivering and organ­

1890, has found a permanent home in the basement level of PLU's

izing the various parts.

new University Center.

runs

Dahl pointed out that the organ by

mechanical

action,

and

It has an interesting history.

that electricty is only being used

After traveling around the Horn,

for the blower, which is still cap­

the instrument

was

sold to

Hill·

able of being blown by hand. He

crest Presbyterian Church in West Seattle,

where

it

served

until

it

was abandoned in 1940. Later, Pas­ tor

Leslie

Larson

purchased

the

organ for House CYf Prayer Luth· eran Church in Seattle, was

used

merged

until

with

where it

Larson's

a

larger

Church

congrega­

tion. Just recently, the pipe organ was offered to PLU. The instrument has a rare tone quality, according to David Dahl, "The organ," he said, offers a late

nineteenth century tone that

can't be duplicated again. It rep­ resents the tail end of a good era of pipe organs." Consisting of

SEATILE'S FIRST PIPE ORGAN is now in the process of being I.nst:aIJed In the basement of the new University Center.

twelve

stops

and

approximately 655 pipes, the pipe organ was assembled at the Uni-

(Continued from

Page 5)

jority in the House.

lng on circumstances, a significant

upon

Second, granting Senate seats to

most

constitutional

ex­

perts.

former Presidents

membership in the Senate comes

posed on a number of occasions

amount of structural change may

that

be desirable to improve the opera-

a

certain

and

body.

all

tion of our governmental system,

time legislative membership is for-

former Presidents senators for life.

it can be accomplished within our

eign to Americans, it is a practice

Thirdly, it i!:i time that we look into

presently

public

makes

financing

the

is

institutional

not

so

structure

campaigns,

distribution

at least to the extent that winning

and the priorities reflected by that

most democracies, the lower house

candidates do not feel beholden to

uneven distribution. There is cer­

i

any particular

indivi­

tainIy no guarantee that under the

the popu la rly elected body, it has

dual. Such financing could conceiv-

Tugwell system, power and wealth

complete say over the budget a nd

ably

can override the Senate's decisions In leg islati ve matters by a two·

relationships would be drastically

of candidate for public of ice.

given

practice

of

legislative supremacy. As

thirds vote. Nevertheless, the Sen­

ate retains special appointive and powers,

emergency

as

well

as

special authority in foreign affairs.

Tugwell shows an extre me elit­

ist bias in his proposals, and is

interest or

encourage

Fourthly,

complete

much

It

manner that Tugwell proposes, but the

the

election

document.

B ritain and Italy. following

in

of

present

countries, including Canada, Great Also

not

to

while

by virtue of having held a parti-

Italy

beneficial

conclusion,

cular office. While the idea of life-

in the upper houses of a number of

be

In

that

a

higher

there

quality

are

that is troubling us, as the uneven

altered,

pro\:}.

of power and

more

competent

would be elected

or

people

appoin ted to

subdivisions

public office, or the disease of bureaucratic inertia, a malady of all

too

many

recognized by the regional offices

highly developed societies, whether

of the federal government, which

it be in the United States, Great

encompass

a

number

of

states.

Moreover, the jurisdictions of the

Britain or the Soviet Union, would be cured without basic changes in

willing to place extensive power in

Circuit Courts of Appeal are re-

the basic American value system

the hands of a small number of

gional in scope. Some of the major

first taking place.

individuals, most of whom are ap­ He gives them such pointiw.

problems

resulting

resource

distribution

names

Overseer,

easily be attacked through other

impersonality of life, the frustra-

Regulator, Intendant, Watchkeeper, Principal Justice and Chairman

than the present groupings. How­

tions of the "rat race," material­

ever, geography would make a

of the Planning Board. The Overseer, who heads

the

gionalization in the West exceed-

ism and greed, the decline in rili­ cal thinkring-are hasicaHy immune

ingly difficult. Although logical the

from correction by schemes aimed

extensive authority over party activity and the electoral machinery. The Prin-

provision to change the existing system of state may be, it would

at stuctural change.

Electoral

as

Electoral

Branch,

has

Justice, himself appointed, appoints and can sus pend the mem­ bers of all courts. Constitutions of the several re-

cipal

publics

are to be drafted of

assembly

the

highest

by an courts

of the states to be included in each republic. Elected delegates have no hand In the actual writing of the documents, only the power to ap­ prove

or

reject them.

The term of nine years .for the

from

uneven

could

more

re-

adopted. We can't even get rid of unnecessary counties and

special

districts, let alone states. Fifthly, the Tugwell's Planning Branch is not as far-out as idea as it might appear. Under the "Ur­ ban Growth and New Community na­

tiona I

"to

urban

growth

policy,

the growing

Polyunsaturated Lemming Water '@'

';' . ;

'(

aI, orderly, efficient and economic

counties and towns in rural areas

warrant futher study and possible adoption, not as part of a new constitution, but as part of the exist-

-

encourage and. support the ra.tion-

shows further deference to the strong leader concept. Even though

With respect to all the foregoing criticisms, Tugwell does present a number of interesting ideas which

problems of hu­

Ole Torgerson's

Development Act of 1970" the na­ tion would commit itself to a

growth

vote.

the

be among the most difficult to get

President, longer th an for any existing president in a democracy,

recall after three years is possible, it can be accomplished by a 40%

Moreover,

man living-together­

and

states,

development

metropolitan

of

areas,

our

cities,

which demonstrate a special poten­ tial for accelerated growth." (H.R. This is what

16647).. seeking,

and

no

Tugwell is

matter

how

we

feel about plannling, ecological sur­ vival is going to demand an increasing amount of it in the years to come. One

Guaranteed to cure Halitosis, Delirium Tremens Rectal Cornea

disturbing

provision,

ever, is that which

how­

specifies the

Myopia Rigor Mortis

ing document. First, a small number of repre­

portion of the national budget (in

Hoof·in-Mouth Disease

from

this case one-half of one-percent)

Hypochondria,

to be available to the Planning Branch to carry out its functions,

sentatives

elected

at

large

the entire country could conceiv-

ably overcome some of the paro­ chialism of the lower house and, lr elected at the same time as the President, could help to assure the winning candidate a working ma-

leaving

no

flexibility

for

future

needs, except through amendment Tugwell earmarks funds for certain of the other branches in this some manner, a practice frowned

The primary function of the or· gan will pe to serve as a practice organ for some thirty·four organ students.

It will be available for

use twelve hours a day.

are:

taken,

the

stomachs

whistle tighten

blows as

the

and

22

ball

is

bullied, and yes, it's true-another victorious season of hockey is un­ derway. The Lutes are very fortunate to have all returning players and six newcomers who are learning quick­ ly and doing very well. CD-ached

by Miss

Sara

Officer,

assisted by Mrs. Edie Broeker, and managed by Miss Terry Monson, the Lutes have a 3 for 3 record. The first game was a pre-season

weeks ago they traveled to Central­ ia where well-executed passes and fine backfield coverage led them to a

10-0

win.

The

right

wing - Kathy

"KC"

Knorr, right inner-Evelyn "Evil" Tisdel, center-Linda "Zurf" Zur· fluh,

left

Deetz,

inner-Corrine

left

"Corky"

wing-Diana

"Dolly

Dum Dum" Dahl, right halfback­ Sally Landt, center halfback-Jody Schwich, left halfback-Peg "Zip" Zander,

right

fullback - Nancy

"Bummer"

Myklebust,

back-Ellen

Martin,

left

full­

goalie-Ruth

Klavano, extra frontiine-Jo Flem, Tricia Simmons, Helen Cole, extra backfield-Carol,

Sandy

and

Son­

ja. (Apologies for not knowing last names.) The Lutes to date have not been scored against and have 19 in their favor. Corky leads the Lutes with six goals, Jady-5, Evil-3, Zurf-2, and Helen-I.

happy-hearted

The team travels to Everett this

hockey players then went through

Friday in hopes of a fourth win.

a week of harder conditioning and

Next

when Centralia came to visit last

coming game with UPS, here Sat·

week, the Lutes, despite the driz­

urday, October 24, 10 a.m. on the

home

game

is

the

Home·

hockey field which is located be­

zle, took them 4-0. Those turning out for the team

hind the nursing building.

wealth

(states) in this country is already

ably

By DIANA DAHL The field is marked, positions are

brought home a 5-0 victory. Two

range. Instead of through election,

would

has been pro-

by

has not been restored in any way since 1890.

Girl Pucksters Remain Unbeaten

practice with UPS and the Lutes

Tugwell Stresses Flexibility (continued)

went on to say that the instrument

Ad Nauseum HURRY!

Place your order now .at the Mast Office. Supply is limited. Our other lemming died

You'll buy life insurance eventually. Why not now when you'll save a bundle? Education isn't all academic matters. It's sm art to give some thought now to matters outside the ivied walls . . . such as life insurance. Why now? Because you can never buy at a lower rat.e than today . . . and that rate remains the same for the length of the contract. Also, your present good health will allow you to establish certain options that guarantee your abil i ty to buy additional insurance in the future even if poor health should come your way. And life insur­

ance is actually a savings ac­ count that builds steadily in cash value through the years . . . money which you may need to pay off college debts, to put your new bride in a home of your own, or to set yourself up in business. A good friend to help you with your life insurance plans is the Aid Association for Lutherans representative. A fel­ low Lutheran, he puts it all together for you in a meaningfuJ way. It's all a part of our com­

man concern for human worth.

Merle R. Vertheen, Fie Route 12, Box 798 Olympia, Washington 98501

W

"'1:;:. Aid Association for Lutherans

:l

Appleton,Wisconsin

Fraternalife Insurance


Wednesday, Oct. 14, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Nine

Under the Grandstand By DAVE SODERLUND All of the lemons in the world couldn't have salvaged a victory for . the Lutes agamst UPS Saturday. President Wiegman had bet Presdient Thompson a case of peanuts (it seems that Loggers coach Ryan inhales . peanuts durmg the rough going) against a case of lemons for coach

Carlson's fetish. Ryan is now up to his ears in elephant-food and Carl­ son returns to the chalkboard.

Actually some of the blame for this disaster must rest with the coaching staff, for it became obvious early just who wanted the game more. The wind disappeared from the Lute sails immediately following the Fumble in the second quarter. PLU was not up for this one, nor did they appear to be against Linfield the previous week-the clue

Bg

Lies in the bungled opportunities near the goal line. The first time PLU had the ball the black machine moved to the UPS thirteen with ease and then fumbled. ..

..

1be You're In Good Hands Dept: It's looking like the whole team

should go

antibiotics for a while-something has to be done to com­

on

that dreadiu! wave of fumbleitis going around. Saturday afternoon

bat

it proved contagious, too, as each team fumbled four times-but PLU s lost nine out of twelve fumbles this year in four games, d the rune lost fumbles have been direcUy responsible for three enemy touch. mE STEADY PAS SING of Jim Hadland was

not emugb to offset

an

downs and two losses. ("All right, team, this is a hand. Got it? This is football. OK, now don't let them get separated.")

sat­

alert U.P.S. defense In last

a

urday's action.

..

Fumbling Lutes Bow to Loggers The PLU pigskin brigade fumbled to their second consecutive defeat

a

field

goal

over

the

crossbar,

h aving the score 7-3.

got so bad that the ball changed hands four times in a minute and

Saturday afternoon at the hands of

Prospects were still bright. The

the UPS Loggers by a score of 24­

second quarter was almost over,

officially

7.

PLU was ahead and had thwarted

both

UPS quick

opened display

the of

game the

with

old

a

ballet

offense (1·2-3-kick) and the Lutes

a

serious

touchdown

UP

threat

and

- had

without

a

possession

again with a ball·control

offense.

drove on their first possession to

The Lutes ran only one play, and

the UPS 13. At this point the ball

then Jim Hadland fumbled. The Loggers' Roy Bogrand found the

became slippery and UPS recover· ed the first of four Lute fumbles.

handle and romped 40 yards for an

The 'rest of the first quarter was

unmolested

played in UPS territory with PLU

score ta 10-7 in favor of UPS and completely turned the game

always

on

the move but never get·

TD which

moved

the

around.

ting anywhere significant.

As the second quarter opened,

Before the half was over, UPS

a half. By the time the game was over it

teams motions

the

appeared as

were to

going

get

things

over

PLU

UPS

with.

Total Plays ............................71

59

First Downs

. ....... ...... .. l 6

15

Rushing Yardage ................125

87

_

Passing Yardage

......... .168

142

Passes Att./Camp.... ....11/23

9/17

Total Offense ................. ..... .267

255

Fumbles/Ball

4/3

Lost..............4/4

Gary Hammer slammed the final

added another touchdown on a 50-

yard for a touchdown, capping a

yard march. Most of the yardage

Interceptions

47-yard

a

was gained on the arm of Bob Ca­

Penalties No./Yrds. Lost2/20

couple of gocrd passes by QB Jim

son, who threw the final 6 yards

Hadland.

drive

which

Things

included

were

looking

to Ross, who was on the loose in

pretty good at this point, but UPS

the end zone.

put together a drive of their own which c'arried to the PLU 6 before

in mass futility. The only scoring

it died. Van Erks barely dropped

came as a 25-yard bomb two plays

The second half was an exercise

after Andy Lofton pilfered a Jim Hadland pass to make the score

Wanted

24-7 in favor of th'

than that it was very uninteresting

Experienced Carpenter to

build garage.

Call

Loggers. Other

and unproductive football-neither

Dr.

team could put together more than two or three first downs in a row.

Beal - Ext. 203

At one point the fumbling disease

if

througb

J

......... 0

6/34

PARKLAND CHEVRON AND

Showing

constant

improvement,

the PLU Cross Country team did Saturday,

tb-e

Lutes had a

meet

with Western Washington at Bel· Iingham.

The

Lute

harriers

lost

that contest by a close score 01 33-24. The 10th

of

October found

the Lutes hosting a triangular meet with Linfi'eld and Pacific. duel

and

Lutes

at

its

had earned

completion two

Phone LE 1·9988 -

important

crass

country)

and

sent

Pacific

ARTISTRY IN FLOWERS

THROUGHOUT mE WEEK

Cason had a busy afternoon, however, as Ross Boice caught up with a total of 61 yards in losses, 45 of them on one shot.

him three times for

The latter play set up a unique tbird-and-78 situation for UP ey gracefully gave up and punted. Jim Hadland did not fare much better (if better at all) as he spent a lot of time On his back and was without any visible pass protection for most of the second half.

Sundays

8:00 p.m. Innovative Service: University Center 10:30 a.m.

Eastvold This Week: Pastor Taylor Liturgy: Second Setting, Hymn Book

8:00 p.m.

Innovative Service

Let us make a joyful sound unto the Lord our God!

vincing double victory. Jerry Gugel and Kirk Sandburg finished 1-2 to­ gether in

a

dead tie with hands clasped together,

a

llIlliqu e situation for

Luterunners. Dr. Olson, PLU's athletic director, was caught telling of

IUs days as cross country coach at Wartburg when all five of his runners would cross the finish line together hand-in-hand in first place. (PLU cross country coach Jon Thieman was part of that quintet-it gives the Lute barriers a little to shoot for.)

home to Forest Grove with

20-39

A hilly, 5.2 mile course was the setLing

awaiting

the

Lutes

wh.en

they arrived in Bellingham. Taylor Scott of

f Western was the winner

the

FLU's

race in

a time

Gerry

Gugel Kirk

with

teamate

close

third. - Gugel

have

given

PLU

of

was

26:17. second

Sandburg and

a

Sandburg

consistent

sound nucleus in the number 1 and 2 positiOns. Other Lutes finishing in the top ten were eris Buck in seventh and John Olson in eigbth. The 10th of October was PLU's day. The Lutes country cross

Gerry Gugel and Kirk Sandburg of PLU highlighted the race. The tWO finished with identical times of

21 :43

on

the

4-mile

campus

course. John Olson placed fourth for the

Phone 537-0205

Lutes with Chris Buck, Bob Mat­

and Ken Iacobs

son and Dave Friedman finishing seventh, eighth. and ninth respec-

KTAC Radio 85 Tacoma , would like to thank PLU and

KPLU-FM for helping us become the most

popular station

in Tacoma.

Remember the PLU·

UPS hour between 7-8 each Sunday evening and wl1en it comes to good music, news, and feature events, remember 85 AM and 88.5 FM.

tively. The two harriers from Pa­ cific took home a third and a sixth with Johnson's tenth rounding out Pacific's

placing

runners.

Ruden

in of

the

top

Linfield

ten gave

the Wildcats bis lowest finish by plaCing eighth. Next Saturday the Lutes travel to Ellensburg for the Central In­ vitational.

per­

formances all season and provide coach Jon Thieman with a very

soundly defeated bath Linfield and The dead-heat finish of

gte1kl

SteUa

a

setback.

AS A COMMUNllY ON SUNDAY

STUDENT CONGREGATION

The cross-country team did better things Saturday, posting a con­

Pacific.

12169 Pacific Avenue

INDIVIDUALLY

a

score of 17-46 (low score wins in

FLOWERS, Inc.

Worship God

the

win . PLU defeated Linfield by

120th & PACIFIC AVENUE

-

Fran Tarkenton) trapped at the five yard-line when he unloaded the ball to a nearby teammate who just happened to be a guard--{)ne of the most ineligible of receivers. After much arbitration it was ruled an incom­ plete pass and the Loggers were out of trouble.

well in their last two outings. Last

PARKLAND CAR WASH FREE WASH WITH LUBRICATION

..

PlU Harriers Outdistance Pacific

The meet was sC'ored as a double

Ralph Andersen's

..

This week we extend our hearty congratulations to Mr. Merkel, one of the refs Saturday, for his excellent work under pressure. The PLU defense had the Loggers' Cason (who labors under delusions of being

Christian Athletes Set Meeting Date A to

short form

organizational a

Fellowship

local of

chapter

Chl1istian

meeting of

the

Athletes

was held last Thursday evening in Olson gym. Over twenty interested athletes attended, and they are now

preparing

to

organize

and

elect officers. The next meeting is being plan­ ned for Monday at 6:00 in one of the small private dining rooms in the University Center. The main item of business will be the elec­ tion of officers. A small nomina­ ting committee has prepared a slate of candidates, and additional caooidates may be nominated from the floor. Anyone who was a high school athlete or who is an intra· mural or varsity athlete and has an interest in Christian fellowsh.ip is welcome to attend and take part. The Fellowship of Christian Ath­ letes is a national organization d&­ signed to let Christian athletes ex­ press their experiences as well as listen to many other athletes, fam­ ous or not-so·famous, express theirs.


Wednesday, Oct. 14, 1970

MOOR I NG M AS T

Page Ten

KDDBIIG MAST --I.�

·TOTHE POINT

women's fraternity, should contact Karen Hendrickson, <li<t. 563, or Bon­ nie Henningsen, ext. 1138.

The theatre's eighth season opens with Arthur Kopit's

"Indians,"

a

fantastic spectacular about "Buffa­ lo Bill Cody," set in a wild west

hestra, Milton Katims, Conductor, in a series of four evening concerts to be presented at 8 p.m. in the Temple Theater, downtown Tacoma, on Bachauer,

Pianist),

19 (Milton Katims,

and

March

24

Violi' st),

(Isaac

Stern,

Violinist). PLU students, faculty, and staff are offered the opportunity of pur­ chasing the $14 ti.ckets for $10. If interested, call Mr. Kra.cht, Depart­ ment of Music, ext. 684.

AIR FORCE ROTC MEETINGS

A FLEA IN HER EAR-Nov. 10

INDIANS-October 18

THE MISER-Dec. 8

A FLEA IN HER EAR-Nov. 8

HAY FEVER-Dec. 29

THE MISER-Dec. 6

THE PRICE-Jan. 19

HAY FEVER-Dec. 27

HAPPY ENDING & DAY OF

THE PRICE-Jan. 17

ABSENCE-Feb. 9

eus farce with uproariously funny "hair - breadth" Miser,"

escapes;

another

"T h e

masterpiece

of

comedy by Moliere, the supreme genius

of

French

theatre;

Noel

Coward's "Hay Fever," which will guest start Maureen O'Sullivan;

Pragmatic Alternative (cont.) initially among three or more can· didates,

the Tugwell

Constitution

eliminates all three

of the prob­

proved by a major,ity, it would re­ main in effect. But if the majority

sociates might well prefer a muilli­

should judge it inadequate to the

by Arthur Miller, Broadway's most

party system on the European mo­

times, it would be redrafted im­

popular contemporary playwright; and the Rep's final offering, "Hap­

del, they obviously recognize that

meditely.

the dual myths of consensus and

Founding Father.

"The Price," a compelling drama

act comedies, both long run hits

Center to discuss their program with interested students on an informal

in New York!

have produced the two-party sys­

basis.

Students may choose either the Sunday afternoon series at 2:00

NEW SIGN POLICY

p.m.

campus must be approved and stamped at the

day

scheduling office in the University Center.

CALL RETREAT CALL is having a retreat October 16, and 17 at Lutherland. The theme is What is Evangelism.

Great fellowship wdll be found as old

members and new ones get to know each other and come closer to the Lord. call 1401 for information.

or the one presented Tues­ evenings at 8:00 p.m.-both

given prior to each play's opening performance. All seats are re­ serv-ed, and all performances are staged at the Seattle Center Play­ hous:!, 225 Mercer.

Ticket reservations will be taken by phone at the Repertory box

eratiQJl of Americans, tem

NINETEEN YEAR OLD VOTE

ing

for all students interested in working on getting the Washington

State 19-year-old vote amendment passed. If you are at all interested please attend. If you have any questions please can Pat, ext. 867 or John at 1436.

Panthers Cont. Tugwell and the Panthers both seek to extend democracy, guide

the course of America's future and reshape our institutions so that they can cope with the problems of tomorrow. However, to the public,

REFERENDUM 20 Tonight at 7:30 in

Killworth Chapel at the University of Puget

Sound, a forum will be held to discuss the pros and cons of referendum 20. This referendum deals with legalized abortion.

Tugwell's effort appears to be an academic exercise,

and the

in America,

cal, racist revolution. If the truth is in the process this

SEATTLE OPEN KARATE CHAMPIONSHIPS Members of the PLU Karate Club will be competing in one of the biggest events in karate in the U.S. on Saturday, October 17 in the Seattle Arena. Tickets for $2.00 and $3.00 are available at the U Center Info

Desk. The competition will be going on throughout the day.

effectively

pre­

judgement is correct. However, if the truth is in the motivation or

hath

no

Selling Something? Need a Ride?

four-, or five-party system.

Want

concede

this

situation

and deal with it

They

implicitly,

pragmatically ..

Yet. even as Tugwell and his as­ sociates have attempted to fashion a constitution geared to

contem­

porary America - a constitution which would permit governing in­ stitutions adequately to respond to pressing social, economic, and poli­ problems-

provided

an

they

have

explicit

also

warning

against faUing victim to the great­

to apologize for last

weekend? Hard up for a date? Want to tell the world to flake off? STARTING NEXT WEEK: 3 lines, approx. 21 words In the Desperate For m for only

75 cents.

Place your offer at the 11Ifo.

Desk by Sunday evening.

est myth of all: that the American Constitution, somehow

like

a

Scnipture,

sacred-unchanging,

is

Austin's

un­

changeable, unchallengable. For in

Lakewood

Article X, Section 2, they stipulate that the Constitution for a United

Jewelers

Republics of America be subjected

DIAMONDS - WATCHES

Pan­

ther's effort appears to be a radi­

love

Notice

and which

vent the growth of a viable three-,

tical On Wednesday, October 14, at 9 p.m. in X-I07 there will be a meet­

Greater

democracy, which have captivated

November 6, and November 18 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. dn the University

Members of the Air Force ROTC staff will be on campus October 21,

to general referendum at the end of five Presidential terms. If ap­

lems. Although Tugwell and his as­

the minds of generation after gen­

on

ABSENCE-Feb. 7 Tuesdays, 8:00 p.m. INDIANS--Oct. 20

py Ending" and "Day of Absence" - r Ward, two one­ by Douglas Turnc

All signs posted

HAPPY ENDING & DAY OF

Ear" by Georges Feydeau, a riot­

SEATTLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA TICKETS

(Swingle Singers), November

Playdate Schedule Sundays, 2:00 p.m.

show; followed by "A Flea in Her

The Tacoma Philharmonic will sponsor the Seattle Symphony Orc­

(Gina

in person at the campus ticket of­ . fice.

ductions for only $12.00

economics who are interested in joining Phi Chi Theta, a professional

13

office-MA 4-6755-0r may be made

the opportunity to see all six pro­

All women majoring in business administration, business education, or

January

Season tickets for the Repertory's special preview series are now on sale on campus, allowing students

PROFESSIONAL WOMEN'S FRATERNITY

October 21

Repertory Theatre Offers Tickets

IWI..U-FM

Repairs

SALUTES LUTE FOOTBALL

VILLA PLAZA

1970

Phone JU 8-4311

the result, these two efforts may

I:e symptons of the same malady.

POET TO APPEAR TUESDAY Michael Harper, a poet of national repute, will visit the PLU campus Tuesday, October 20 Time and place to be announced at a later date.

Free Speech Rally Cont. (CondJJued from

the freedom of speech, or of

Page I)

The Sea ttle Eight and other so­

caHed conspirators also are being into

railroaded

court

on

flimsy

charges. These people deserve our suppo rt. They are selflessly risking

their own freedo m in order to pre­ serve our freedom.

the press; people

or the right of the

peaceably

assemble,

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or p·rohibiting the free exercise thereof, or abridging

The Place to go for

for a redress of grievances_"

Contemporary Music

Unless

the

government

doesn't

like what you say, I guess.

Lessons given between classes KNIT and PURL 401 Garfield

LE 7-5317

ORDER YOUR PERSONAL COpy OF THE PI at student rates through the University Center Information Desk and pick it up 7 days a week whim school is in session.

and Dancing. PHONE LE 7-5361

OPEN EVERY DAY

Dee and Gene's

Live Music Every

College Cleaners

Wed., Thurs., Fri & Sat.

Parkland's Quality Dry Cleaners

ARCO

This Week

11418 PARK AVENU E

TUNE U P S BRAKE SERVICE STARTER AND GENERATOR REPAIR -

YARNS .nd NEEDLECRAFT

Dancing

and to petition the Government

The First Amendment to the Uni­ ted States Constitution:

Lou's Place

OPEl 7:00

A .•.

12166 P.cific

--

10:00 P.

LE 7-3040

PARKLAND, WASH.

"SIDDARTHA" Go out Pacific Ave. to ,Roy Y, turn left on Mountain

HiWay,

2112

FEATURING-

miles.

Chicken Filet Road Runner Steak B-B-Q Sandwich

-

BLUE SPRUCE MOTEL

Cosmetics * Greeting Cards i< Photo Equipment * Magazines

TWO IEDROOM UNITS SOliE WITH KITCHEIS - PHONES FIIEE TV A.ID COFFEE NEAREST TO P.L.U.

12715 PACIFIC AVENUE T.com., W••h. 1-

Fish Sandwich Hamburger & Cheeseburger

ALL STUDENT NEEDS

01lE A .. O

Ul-6111

*

* on

the perimeter of the campus

between t:CN1 aal 10 p.m. Tues., Thurs, and Fri.

AT THE CORNER GARFIELD AND PACIFIC AVE.

LOCA.TIONS

9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. Weekdays

--

Hot & Cold Drinks The Road Rumler will be

JOHNSON DRUG, 11 :00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. Sundays

Murph's Road Runner Food Service

I

* * *

In front 01 Pflueger By University Center By CUB on Wheeler St.


Ofln

The Marines

Blow It Again

Voice of the Student Body at Pacific Lutheran University PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY - WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1970

VOLUME XLVIII

NUMBER FIVE

Homecoming Concert Boasts I(ing of Blues tal advances

By LiNDA GARDNER B. B. King,

known to many as

ways

of

have been different

punctuating phrases. He

to

sometimes plays a long succession

perform at PLU on Friday, Octo­

of chords to introduce a whole sec­

father

of

blues,

is

scheduled

ber 23 for the annual Homecoming

tion ctf extended improvisation and

weekend.

he will lay down

King, who plays his guitar, Lu­ cille, began developing his unique style in the '50s. Initially, B.B.

effect a transition.

played

his

himself,

guitar

but

by

to

accompany

the time

he

cut

his first records, he was playing single string runs responsively. According to his own account, he played this way for practical rea­ sons:

"From the very beginning,

when I first started playing,

my

coordination wasn't very good,

trying to

and

sing

play

at

so the

same time didn't get to me. I'll it this way; while I'm enter­ taining, whlle I'm trying to get

put

my breath, or think of a new line tell you, then the guitar takes

to

over, until ) think of what I'm go­

few chords to

In more recent years he has pun­ ctuated increasingly just by vary­ ing the volume of sound. He will drop notes softly one moment and some bars later will let them fly assertively relieved

to

a

by

summit

more,

that

is

understated

notes. Unlike many other bluesmen, he is

almost

with

exclusively

women.

recent

The

single,

Blues, "

concerned

exceptions-his

"Why

I

Sing

the

life in the South,

or exper­

;' nces in the city. B.B.'s immense inf!uence on pop.

Man of La Mancha Class ic Debut

ular music is due to his dedication

have to hit a chord and hold it, be­

to' his style: "If you tak<'! the blues

cause I

sing

and try to make the blues modern,

present the first major production

and play to myself at the same tJme-now, I could hit on the gui­

tben you leave the blues, If you ta\re some of the mod ern chords

"Man of La Mancha."

tar, but I'm talking about making

and

could

never

try

to

put

them

in

the

blues

15,

On Friday, October

PLU will

of the current Broadway musical The curtain will rise at 8: 30 p.m.

and

or Cervantes employs the tale of

and a defense of man's idealism"

"Don Quixote' 'as his defense, both

of his life and his ideals.

"The life of Don QUixote is a

leave them the way they are, with

over a unique "raked island stage"

quest, "

which symbolically represents the

holm, "a quest for the impossible

you get modern and good soul ef­

prison that held Cervantes during

dream to do right, to do good, for

fects."

the

mankind. The only way Cervantes

inquisition.

It

is

in

student

how the cost of higher educ'ation is rising steadily. But there are a few things that students may do about it h.ere at PLU. Approximately spent

on

$130,000

electricty

and

It

came

year,

to

but

be

heating

attention

And ctf course, there is the grass

last

find this year that

maintenance

ing through the grass on a warm

dent help on weekends. It is not be

a

full position would

eliminated with less

littering,

careless­

but the maintenance de­

day,

which we all enjoy.

a

"short

wears

partment would like to be able to

into

use these men for something other

come.

if students would take a few sec­ onds to turn out the lights when they leave their rooms and turn

than trash pickup during the week

their hea ter down when the win­

a compactor, which has saved both

dows are opened.

time and money, but there is still

where

help

is

needed.

PLU

has

converted from an incinerator to

unnecessary expense in this area.

Rather,

it is the continual foot traffic over

more can be saved

Then there is the trash problem.

prob­

lem is not so much leisurely walk­

plus added stu­

that

or

The

two men work full time at PLU

fuel tills year. But it is estimated

HI%

problem,

picking up trash, likely that

will

some

we

cut"

a

path

which away

mudhole

a

Where

will

eventually

which turns

when

the

rains

the money go that

is saved by such measures? Prol:r ably

into enriching the academic

program by such. things as buying more books for the library, Nothing 'definite

is

known

in

this

area.

What is known is that money can

be

spent

in

more

helpful

areas

than it is now.

classics and popular music in con­ cert

on

Monday,

October

12,

in

Olson Auditorium, Under

the

directorship

of

Col.

Albert Schoepper, the Marine Band is known to Americans through its annual

tours,

its

frequent

radio

and television appearances, and its cmcert series in the Capital. This

is their second appearance at PLU.

out

that Cer­

TAKING TIME TO CARE about our campus can

save

beauty and money.

"Man of

numbers

Me," and "Aldonza."

The original production, accord­ ing to the PLU director,

is

still

playing in New York where guest artists [rom different countries are invited to play the Don Quixote­ Cervantes role. The success of the long-playing

production

is

very

hard to expiarin according to writer Dale as

Wasserman,

"plowing_

against

who

squarely

sees

it

upstream

the prevailing current of

philosophy in theatre." magazine,

Life

which describes

the production as a "metaphysical

smasheroo" explains that it is the human

ambivalence

of

Marine Band has played for every presidential

inauguration

since.

Created by an act of Congress in 1798, the Band still wears the scar­ let, full dress uniforms of that era. Brought to the

campus by the

Lute Club, the PLU athletic boost­ er

organization,

the

"Redcoats"

will play two concerts, a I: 00 p. m.

matinee

for

an 8: 15

p.m.

school

children

and

performance.

ter and at the Athletic Department offices

try during each annual tour.

cost

is

and

$2.50

the

Other

collecting.

Since that time the Band has tour­

Thomas Jefferson,

Dream." Psalm,"

ed a different section of the coun­

by

from

the Church for the offense of tax

mation Desk in the University Cen­

Given the title "The President's

music

"Man

mance are available at the Infor­

Own"

The

La

Mancha" is highlighted by one of

vantes himself was imprisoned by

on its first national tour in 1891.

the

is one of the greatest

dreamers and idealists of all time

widely known as "The Impossible

Nordholm points

best known director, took the group

Sousa,

ince in Spain where Don Quixote was born)

wrote as their defense."

Tickets for the eve.ning perfor­

Philip

man of La

Mancha (La Mancha is the prov­

the most popular numbers of the

Band's

John

that makes us love him. There is

last decade· "Quest" which is more

so

Marine Band Slated for uesd y will present a program of marches,

criticism

he and

"acmngly

The United States Marine Band

is both a

his man servant put on the play he

by his fellow prisoners,

Schoo Seeks Aid In Cutting Costs the

director Eric Nord­

can get out of prison is to be tried •

like

says

who

little doubt tbat th e

the same sound and feeling, then

Spanish

ctober15

Quixote,

Having committed himself to playing single runs responsively, B.B. 's most important instrumen­

knows

OIl

the setting of this prison that auth­

sense with it."

Nobody

Homecomlng eoneert

perform for the

October 23rd.

doesn't si.ng about poverty, frustra­ tions,

blues, and Lucille, hJs guI tar, will

B.B. KING, fatber of th e

is one-are very few. He

If I'm singing, then I

ing

to do.

Ii

$2.00

in Olson Auditorium. The

$1.00

for

PLU

students,

for adult general admission for reserved seats.

of

Music

La

include

Mancha, "

"The

"What Do You Want of for

the

PLU

production

is being handled by music instruc­ tor David Robbins who says he is "well pleas.ed" with the brass-per­ cussion orchestra, The

lead

role

of

Cervantes

played by Bruce Bjerke,

is

a junior

from Walla Walla, Playing opposite Bjerke as Aldonza .is senior Connie

Koschmann, Juneau, Ak. Sancho is junior Mark Schultz, Calif.;

Sacramento,

Padre is Doug Parker,

Marysville junior; senga,

Billings,

a

and Craig Hui­

Mn.

is

a

sopho­

more cast in the role of Dr. Car­ rasco. The

supporting

cast

respective roles are: sen,

innkeeper;

Antonio;

Beth

and

their

John Svend­

Kare n Wraalstad, Sommars,

House­

keeper; Norman Carlson, the cap­ tain; Sandra Haugen, Maria; Sus­ an

Logan,

Fernima;

Ed

Amund­

son, the barber; Don Yoder, Jose; John Hunter, Paco; Juan;

Frank Payn,

Arden J. Olson,

Anselmo;

and Jim Derck, Pecho. Tickets for what the NY Daily

News described as "the finest and most

original work in the music

theatre Roof'"

since

'Fiddler

on

the

are available at the Uni­

versity Center

information

desk.

All tickets must be purchased in advance as seats are reserved. The cost is

$1.00

for students, and $2.00

for adults. The

musical

nights, October

will

run

15, 16, 17,

for

four

and 24.


Page Two

Wednesday, Oct. 7, 1970

MOORING MAST

Letters to Our Edito'r

My First-Born I was in the mountains for a short while ...

To the Editor:

Should my first-born be a girl, I would rather have her learn the smell of a meadow than the stench of a city. I would rather that she see the trees and flowers than have her smog­ ged vision see only a blur of busses and buildings. I would prefer that she touch poison ivy than be poisoned by cement, poisoned by the innumerable perversions of "civilization" that would be incessantly besetting her. I would rather see her running through a field of daisies ubway train.

than crowd into a

I would want her to know the itch of tall grass against

her knees rather than the itch of nylons and shaved legs. I'd

As John Aakre pointed out in his editorial, it is indeed a profound sadness felt by the academic com· munity when it loses talented, in· novative professors. And perhaps it is more deeply relt by the stu· dents as we look to our instructors not only for "book" materi:!l but also a presentation that is challeng· ing, enlightening, and abov!! all, relevant. To this end, "rocking the boat" is applauded by the students and respected by the administra­ tion as it leads to the fulfillment of the academic community's goal of education.

wish for her quiet, peace and simplicity-not hierarchy, burea­

But the point I wish to stress is

cracy and competition. May she know a quiet compassion and

that, in the past, student evalua· tion of a prof was limited to emo­ tional polarity and the side of whichever circus member he talked to. When dealing with reputation it is imperative to, if you will par·

humility-not aggression and "nobility." As I write I can already hear many of yo.u saying that life "must" be made of both-the field of daisies and the pains of cement. Perhaps. And, yes, while I confess to take one with the other as almost all persons do, I still love only one and hate the other. While I may learn to endue the frustrations of ce­ ment I shall never praise it or perpetuate it. I will do all I can not to become hard like it. I will always prefer the quietness of the forest to the ridiculous motions of the cemented society. I will cling to that which remains soft in it, but disdain that

which is hardened by it. if only I could choose, I would choose green to grey

don th'c cliche, stop, look, and lis· ten-wait for the facts and then ask if you are qualified to evalu· ate an instructor's proficiency and knowledge. If so, the most ration· al solution would be to use the all·university community on facul­ ty evaluation. Nothing destroys the Fcputation of even a creative in­ novative prof better than the gos­ sip of factions. Respectfully, Karen Wendt

For a few of us it is often a lonely world when we strive to be real, when we strive not to be handcrafted or overly af­

fected by

fads

their passing temptations-temptations

and

which belong to the realm of concrete. To be real often means patient endurance to the ridiculing and ostracizing pins and needles of the proponents of Fad. To be real often means en­ during those Fadists who would readily decapitate one's hum­ ble nobility-that nobility being the faith in what one considers worth the struggle. To be real means to struggle-a struggle to resist "civilization's" self styled dementia. It perhaps means

To the editor, Last Saturday the Rev. Carl McIntire, a fundamentalist radio preacher, led his second "Victory in Vietnam" march in Washington, D.C. This march seemed to tell the rest of the world that the "church," (i.e., Catholics, Protes· tants, Jews, etc.) approved of the death and destruction in Southeast

bloodying a fist against a four foot thick cement wall. It means fighting, with the greatest of effort, the effects of numb. It means courage to look past your neighbor's nose. It means that we must confess that a heartbeat is slightly more than me­ chanical. I wish I were a bird-then I could fly very high and es­

cape man's handcrafted nebula here below (although it is en­ tirely possible that I couldn't fly high enough'> Yet by flying so high I would also escape that which is left of God's handi­

work-the things that are green and verdant-the things I do love. If only I could discover . . . ah, on second thought, I never want to know the secret of this ruthless dichotomy of I wish I were a . . . Silence you fool; daydream quietly! dein footr·ubber

MAST

. . . . . . .. . . . ....................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

........... . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . ..

Editor

BOB HASSELBLAD ................................................... .. Managing Editor News Editor .. . . .. . .. KATE MANCKE PAULA SEIBERT ........................... ..................................... Copy Editor DAVE SODERLUND .................... . .................................... Sports Editor MARY SHADOFF .. Circulation Manager PAUL BERG ................................................................ Business Manager . ...... Advisor DR. JOHN PETERSON .......................................... .. .

.....

.

.

........

....... .

.......

.

.

..

.

_ ...

....

..__ ....

eral acquaintances dropped in. "Hi," said Eric (one never says "good morning" to a Liberal be­ cause it implies a hasty value judg· ment). "Peace," replied the Liberal. "Hey, did you see the football game last night on TV? Man, was

"No, I missed it," said Eric and, not realizing the limits of academ­ ic freedom, added, "I listened to a speech by Agnew." This state· ment was Eric's first mistake. "Are you kidding?" asked the Liberal. "How could you possibly listen to anyone who says such

The Voice of the Students at Pacific Lutheran Universlt)

JOHN AAKRE

By PRISCILLA MARTINS

Eric was studying in his room one morning when one of his lib­

it gory-three guys had to be drag­ ged off the field!"

being ...

MOORING

Thinking Right

...

... . . . . . _... . .

STAFF-Glen Anderson, Paul Wuest, Kansas, Glen Zander, Steve Larson, John Hushagen, Dave Giles, Dave Thorson, Tom Heavey, Russ Johnson, Mary Jane Dykstra, Kristi Johnson, Becky Rodning, Bruce Bjerke, Cathy Wark, Steve Cook, Nancy Shaw, Karen SV.endsen, Wanda Huber, Bob Steward, Rich Diet­ meir, John Rankin, Scott Green, Priscilla Martens, Pat Stiles, Lindsay Grader, The Footrubber, Linda Gardner, Barbara Morris, John Beck. Opinions expressed in the Mooring Mast are not necessarily those of Pacific Lutheran University, its administration, faculty, or the Mooring Mast staff. The MM reserves the right to edit all copy for length, propriety and libel. Materials submitted should be typewritten, double-spaced with 65 spaces to the line. The deadline for each issue is 8 p.m. on [ne Sunday prior to publication.

stupid things?" "Maybe he's saying what a lot of people are thinking," ventured Eric. Which was Eric's second mis­ take. The Liberal turned purple and began screaming, "We want peace P·E-A-C-E - do you hear me-" (Eric quickly nodded his head since deafness is not a concomit­ ant of conservatism) "and along comes Agnew that intolerant, in· sane, bloodthirsty and . . ." "And the American people like him," finished Eric. Which was Eric's third mistake and it was a charm. But Eric really should have known better than to make a joke although he probably didn't quite deserve the punch which nearly broke his jawbone. As the Liberal stormed out of the room, Eric rubbed his jaw and ruefully decided that peace is very much like PLU food-a little bit goes a long way.

Asia, and that the actions of the warring nations were justified.

er social injustices by calling them "un-Biblical.

To me, the thought of the Church actually cO"ndoning or even encour· aging the slaughter in ViNnam is quite disconcerting, to say the least. As a child I was always taught that to kill another man was a grievous sin. Yet a mere four years after my Confirmation

The church must act quickly and forcefully lest it be completely dis· crcdited as a hypocritical organi· zation. This seemed inability or un· willingness to act leads me to ask: Where is the Church?

in the Lutheran Church faith I find some elements of the Church ac­ tually encouraging me to bear arms against my. brother in Viet­ nam. It doesn't make sense.

To the Ediwr and the Men of Rainier, There are many moments of joy in the dorms of the women of PLU.

The time has come for the Church to take a stand on the is­ sues that plague our land and threaten to tear our society apart. Imagine the power of a church­ sponsored lobby or an ecumenical statement condemning all war and killing and pledging support to a movement to end the war. The time is now for evangelists like Billy Graham and thousands of oth· er noted churchmen to stop avoid­ ing such issues as racism and oth-

"

John Hushagen

One of the happiest of these is dur­ ing a candlepassing when a friend reveals her plans of intent. Last week, the Men of Rainier added to this happiness even more, following a candlepassing at Hong Hall. Their appearance was a pleasant surprise and a welcome 'relief from the usual goings·on af· ter candlepassing. For this I would truly like to commend the Men of Rainier in their good taste. Admirably, Ruby Begonia

Review

On The Marquee hurry. If the only thing stopping

By SCOTT GREEN

"Summertree,"

by

Ron

Cowan,

is one of the most sensitive, rele· vant, and honest plays I have ever had contact with. If you have read it or saw the reading of it during the Crisis Forum last spring, I. think you'll agree. I was excited to learn that it was to be presented in Tacoma by the Lakewood Players in Villa Plaza later this month and it has been arranged for a performance to be sponsored by the PLU Chapter of Alpha Psi Omega and Curtain Call Club. The performance date will be Sunday, November I, and will be­ gin at 7:30 p.m. Prices are $1.50 for adults and $1.00 for students. This is a reduction in the normal Tickets are on sale admission. from any member of either club or by calling me at ext. 1220. There is a limited number of tickets, so

from

you from going is a transportation problem, let me know and I'm sure it can be arranged. I feel it is a very important and worthwhile piece of work and urge everyone to see it. The time is approaching to regi· ster for the interim. One "class"

I recommend you look into is the New York City Art and Theatre Experience. I went last year and I can't say enough about it. New York is like a different world and the shows aFc fantastic. Last year there was a lot of sightseeing, at­ tending other shows, or enjoying the New York night life. (You're legal at 18 there!) If you might be interested and want to know more about it, con­ tact the Communication Arts of· fice or talk to someone who went last year. I still enjoy talking (cont. on page 6) about it.

ASPLU

I

An amendment to the By-laws and over $800 in appropriations were among the main items of business last Thursday as the ASPLU Senate met formally for the second time this year. The amendment would add a part nine to section I of Article VII of the By-laws, concerning alternates for senators. It states that all senators except the student body officers shall select alternates to sit in their place in their absence with full rights and pr;ivileges. Also the same academic qualifications must apply. It was passed with no dissent­

ing votes. Two appropriation bills were considered. The first was from the Student Committee for Abortion Reform, asking for $400 for an abortion symposium on October 19th. Included in the symposium will be a film documentary entitled "Abortion and the Law" and various speakers and a panel discussion. Also literature on abortion will be provided for in­ formation. This bill was approved unanimously. Tom Heavey, the newly selected Director of the Military Service Information Center, submitted a request for $445 for expenses for two to a seminar in San Francisco offered by the Rural Economics Oppor· tunity office. The seminar is concerned mainly with draft counseling and training of draft counselors. It also passed. A motion was also carried to have PLU join the Intercollegiate Political Action' Group, which is mainly a student lobbying group in Olympia. This means that PLU students will be asked from time to time to lobby in Olympia for students concerns. Action was also taken by the Senate in the areas of drug policy and the age to live off campus. Motions were carried to create com· mittees to study both of these problems. The committee on drug policy will study the statement on drugs in the Student Handbook and make recommendations to the Board of Regents concerning it. The second committee will explore the problems of the age limit for living off cam­ pus and will report back to the Senate for further action. Also approved was a long list of committee appointments, as the Senate had a very busy night. Minutes of the meeting are posted in each of the dorms for those who wish to' explore the details of nil that went on.


Page Three

Wednesday, Oct. 7, 1970

United Republics of America

The Deadline Syndrome Civilization has a way of closing in on one these days. We

In 1787 an unauthorized group of

Taunted and harangued by all' those

our own private cage.

KATE MANCKE

By

have become a harassed and imprisoned species, each within

men met in Philadelphia and wrote

not-so-little annoyances, we rarely seem able to escape.

what they hoped would be a docu­

society enamored with diesel trucks and loud commercials.

Constitution

The

ages."

last

would

which

ment

For some it is simply the infernal racket produced by a

"for

all

was

the

fathers were

result. The founding

Quiet thoughts can find no place. For others it often develops

singularly

into the appointment-class-meeting-study-and make the dead­

Constitution is the longest lasting written constitution in the history

line syndrome. I have gone that route myself.

What

government.

democratic

of

d for

were the factors which allo

We have lost something very precious. The world as God

this success?

created it has become foreign to us. The Significance of a rush­

first

The

ing stream or a forest path is lost to those who live with a

important

most

and

factor contributing to this success

deadline in a concrete canyon. It is a loss, as a society, which

was the frequent alteration of the

we cannot afford to sustain.

document to respond to the needs of the day and the changes in the

Its results can so twist our perspectives that we fail to

social balance of power.

look beyond our own petty accomplishments to the signifi­

This can best be seen in swing

cance of a much larger plan-a plan of which we are only a

of the power pendulum

from the

legislative branch to the executive

part. Strength is not garnered from a cause or an idea, but

branch. The current weakness of

from a feeling for life. Until one realizes that, devotion to no

the executive has little chance of

cause, however just, wi,l,l enable you to fill the gap.

being modified due to the passage of the XXII amendment, which lim­

That one must become involved to be real is not in ques­

its the president to two terms in

But you have to know yourself-at least in part-first.

tion.

successful, for the u.s.

thus

office,

In a world where yesterday was too late, however, time be­

level

one

stratifying

of political power.

comes a tyrant, and we never let ourselves stop and think about

The existence of the frontier in

where we are.

the early days of the republic pro­ playground

democratic

a

vided

The very fact that it takes such a brief gHmpse of the

where dissidents could experiment

world as it is to convince us of our need to stop gives us the

with novel ideas. The concepts of

clue to its tremendous importance. Nothing but that which is

referendum,

closest to our nature could move us so forcefully in the direc­

initiative

later applied on a national level.

tion opposite from the life style Which the twentieth century . has bestowed upon us.

to

political

that

contributing the

success was

constitutional

fact

As long as we can feel the importance of such things. As

factor

second

The

had

minorities

some voice in the political struc­

long as man does not lose touch with the world around him,

several

has

inventive

and

parties.

third

a

U.S.

the

country,

ParaDax

long

Although,

ture.

-John Aakre

he will find hope.

and

recall

were first developed in Oregon and

two-party had

also

of his goals as a member of the commission: "One

organization's president

of the things I want to try to figure out is who gave

does when he's confronted with an issue or problem

what orders to send police on campus and were they

to

thinking about 'campus bums' when they pulled the

know

We all he

to

wants

what an

duck:

appoints

he

a

committee

trigger,"

"study" it. On

July 29, 1967, President Johnson authorized

the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders (popularly known as the Kerner Commission, after

and

"the

whether

President's

vice­

and

president's statements are killing people." In contrast to Agnew, I think these should have been among the most" significant questions

be

to

its chairman, Gov. Otto Kerner of Illinois) to in­

investigated by the commission. If the Administra­

America's

tion's inflammatory rhetoric is dividing the country,

vestigate

the real underlying causes of

racial riots, and to recommend remedies for racial

this certainly should be of critical importance, parti­

problems.

cularly since the commission's report suggested that President had

the President should take the initiative to really

said. "As best you can, find the truth and express

cool tempers. But, then, Agnew disapproved of this

it in your report." He wisely admonished the com­

recommendation, too.

"Let your

search

free," the

be

missio'l that "this matter is far, far too important

The President's Commission on Pornography like­ wise

for politics."

reported

this

week,

concluding

that

porno­

O.K. Got the tone and magnitude of the under­

graphy is relatively harmless and censorship should

taking? Urgent, night? Imperative, right? Crucial,

be abolished. Although its findings are based upon

right? This report from the experts would provide

the best scientific data available, it is being roundly

the authoritative answers that would be needed in

denounced

order to solve our country's racial problems. Yeah. The commission's findings,

however,

were very

by

narrow-minded

hard-core

moralists

uncomfortable for a majority of whites. The report

My home town newspaper, for example, ran an

white

editorial last summer entitled "Report Is Ridicul­

talked

about

things

like

responsibility. It asserted,

racism

white

and

"The major need is to

generate new will-the will to tax ourselves to the extent

necessary

to

meet

the

vital

needs

of

the

,in

ous,"

which the

are

conclusions

commission's

cast aside because they conflict with the supposed moral teachings

of the

Old Testament. Therefore

the editorial suggests that "the commission's work

nation." Now, if you have talked with your folks or work­

ed with middle class people this summer, you know now American taxpayers

would

react

to

talk

of

has been purely a waste of time and money."

On the same day last week as the pornography report

was

released,

the

commission's

chairman

raising taxes, let alone talk of white guilt for the

announced that he doesn't expect the Nixon Admin­

racial crisis!

istration to follow its recommendations. 1 fear the

It is not surprising, therefOre, that the Kerner Commission Report, which was released in the

gentleman may be correct; more than a month be­

spring of the 1968 election year, was almost totally

any responsibility for the liberal conclusions, since

ignored

by politicians at .all l evels of government.

Last week we were again treated-not once, but

fore the report was released Nixon was disclaiming LBJ

had

appointed

the commission

members.

(I

secretly suspect the real reason is that Tricky Dick,

twice-to the spectacle of seeing an official report

that crafty 01'

compiled by experts shot down by politicians who

tis comprised of people who have negative gut reac­

are sensitive to the biases of the population. President Nixon's verbose sidekick and alter ego,

politician, knows his political base

tions to "dirty" pictures). Isn't it funny to investigate and find the truth,

Spiro Agnew, is again playing his role as the Ad­

only to be afraid of it and deny it because it

ministration's censurer of liberalism.

flicts with previous biases? (My mind is made up.

Way back on June

16,

Agnew had vehemently

called for the resignation of a 22-year-old student

con­

Don't confuse me with the facts.") A

very

perceptive

American

history

professor

who was serving on the President's Commission on

from "the battle zone-like Univerity of Wisconsin"

Campus Unrest. He felt that the student, who had

figured out this recurring paradox:

been appointed by Nixon the jmmatur

previous week, was

and lacked good judgment in stating one

"Presidents ap­

point commissions to satisfy critics, not to provide action programs."

real differences. The recent

homoginization of our two parties means

be

not

could

majority

apathetic

designed

be

should

forced on a relatively intense and active minority.

feel

The third factor in the success

American

combination of the Constitution was

that

many

persons

no

choice

in

is

there

pOlitics. The best example of this

its

dilemma was the 1968 presidential

look on the Constitution as an in­

election.

fallible document. The Tugwell and

Minorities, if not represented of­ felt

usually

party,

a

by

ficially

that they would be listened to dur­ ing

in

lacking

especially

was

This

years.

interelection

the

feeling

Americans

deification.

early

Panther Constitutions are the first efforts in our history to massively alter the Constitution. did

Southerners

the

Even

not

doubt the essential wisdom of the

1970. Preceding the announcement

Constitution,

of the invasion of Cambodia, Pres­

States adopted a constitution vir­

ident Nixon stated that he would

tually

not be influenced by public opinion.

Union.

Confederate

the

for

the

of

that

to

identical

his decision alone.

Lastly the Constitution survived

This trend is continuing with the

because the social conditions pre­

made

He had

dismis­

administration'S summary

during the 19th and

velant

early

sal of the findings of the Commis­

20th

sion on Campus Unrest and others

blundering government could per­

appointed to discover the sources

form its tasks. Solutions to social

of discontent in Amer.ica. resented, is there a majority opi­

that

such

were

centuries

a

came

dislocations

economic

and

If minorities are not being rep­

through private initiative, or they were simply allowed to run their

nion which has been clearly arti­

course. With the growth of govern­

culated? The only answer to this

mental

question since World War II can be

deal," the private sphere of action

the

1948

Since

no.

has had

States

United

elected

three Presidents

on pluralities, not majorities.

the

during

powers

"new

was partially eliminated. Considering the lack of patience evidenced by today's society, the

The expression of the will of the

question of efficient and responsive

"silent majority" by today's admin­

government

istration belies the· will of at least

have the time, the resources,

one of the founding fathers. James

the right to continue governing by

forwarded

Madison

idea that

the

do

We

vital.

is

not or

mistake.

CALL Channels Christian Energy

By JACK KILLCREASE

ated in the Hilltop area which is

think a good way to describe

the ghetto of Tacoma. We try to

what CALL is about and what we

reach the kids and show them that

"warm, nameless people" are try­

"Whitie" isn't so bad after all. We

ing to do, is to put down the first

also

verse in the song, "Pass It On."

streets by keeping them busy. We

It only takes a spark to get a

off

them

keep

to

try

the

work with young children on Mon­

fire going

days and t2en-agers on Thursdays.

And soon all those around can

We really need guys out there be­

warm up

men to

ople need

cause these

To its glowing

look up to. Call Dave Jacobsen at

That's how it is with God's love

1321.

Once you've experienced it you

Remann Hall

spread His love to everyone.

The people who go out to Rem­

Yeu want to pass it on.

ann Hall are not gutless wanders

These Christians need to use this

who sell out to the Esta blishment

love. They are like a power plant

out there as the poor disillusioned

that has made too much electricity

young man who writes "Parallax"

and needs it used. CALL provides

would have you believe. All I can

a channel for this overflowing and

say to him is what is more import­

in not just one way but in many

ant, your beard or the welfare of

areas

those kids? These kids do live in

of service, not just Luther Leagues

a junior Bastille and they desper­

many

provides

CALL -

as the handbook would have you of

some

outline

me

Let

believe.

areas.

these

· ly ate

Lewis. The

one

first

on

is

Sunday mornings and it is Sunday this

Now

teaching.

School

might

sound kind of boring and uninter­ esting

are

you

realize

you

until

not teaching average children. You teaching

are

sons and

more

had

daughters

These

kids

have

experience

and

seen

servicemen.

of

more things than you had at a com­ parable age. The people out there are very nice and thankful to have you.

Wallender

Call ,Maxine

at

1106. The other group that goes out to the Fort are some people who put on

for

Mark Reiner at 1492.

We have two areas of service at Fort

care

to

someone

need

and love them. If you care, call

Fort Lewis

who are all bent out of shape because the facts fail­ ed to confirm their biases.

repre­

parties used to

Political sent

and

The Truth That Hurts

By GLEN ANDERSON

government

so that the views of a relatively

powerful

Populists

The

Progressives both had widespread support and influence.

a chapel for

the

servicemen.

Rest Homes Some of the lonliest people in the world live in rest homes. With no one who care except nurses, these there

lie

people

waiting

to

die.

What we try to do is t{) visit and talk, sing and possibly bake some­ thing.

you

If

are interested,

call

Donna Anderson at 536. Luther Leagues Plans are being made to involve people in a Lutheran church in Ta­ Lakewood.

in

c.hurch

a

coma or

Call me at 1401. But service is not all to CALL. To

accomplish

this,

we

feel

we

must docvelop what I feel "church"

Their talents lie primarily in sing­

really means,

ing and the playing of instruments.

lievers.

The men are happy to have this

gether to strengthen themselves by

fellowship are

because

most

far from home and

be with people

their

of

them

need to

own age.

If

you are interested in this type of service,

call

Linda

Robertson

at

Peace Lutheran Church Peace Lutheran Church is situ-

must come to­

each others' faith, so we are seek­ ing to

bring

aII these

groups

to­

gether at least once a month. This month we are having a retreat on the

16th

discussion

1339.

a fellowship of be­

Christians

ism?"

and is

17th. The topic "What

is

Sign-ups will be

on the 13, and 14th,

for

Evangel­ at dinner


MOORING MAST

Page Four

Wednesday, Oct. 7, ., 970

Insuran

Is It Wise to Buy It Now? By DR. A. J. LOUER

first,

Life insurance and the financial security

of dependents are

equta ed

by

adult

often In

Americans.

it

this seemingly simple equation

who is planning ahead to purchase

breadwinner

premature death to a named benefi· ciary. to

When

But

and

What,

buy?

from Whom? The initial and crucial question the prospective buyer should ask

Do I need life insur­ ance coverage now? Or, to put it himself

is:

another

way:

What

would

a life

insurance policy do for me at this stage of my life ? there

general,

In

are

least

at

three reasons for spending money a

work of

for life insurance protection. The

limmm.

art?

Visual Sensitivity Keynotes Exhibit Visual Sensitivity In­

and plastics. Whatever the company

denotes more ap­

produces appears to be outrageous,

day at the Pacific Lutheran Uni­

propriately the meaning of the tra­

creative and almost always unique.

versity Gallery.

ditional words,

called VSI,

A machine is a part of the new

formation.

conceptual art exhibit opening t()­

So

several

are

"art,"

"fine art"

and "visual art." It also refers to

beautiful

very

VSI

the artist as a "visual informer,"

classic drawings.

according to Baxter.

Baxter's exhibits at PLU will in­ ob­

completed

traditional

clude

It will also have a special

jects.

son. estate

taxes,

develop a systematic savings plan above

merit from the fact that the great­ er

upon

depemdent

for

her

or

him

tional

art scene,

has re­

Baxter

Baxte.r used to be an artist of

cently had work included in major exhibits aU over the world, includ­ ing the Museum of Modem Art in New York City.

whom a Vancouver art critic' once said, "He may yet berome the out­

a

standing figure of 20th century Ca­ nadian art and a sculptor of ma­ jor significance."

His PLU exhibit, however, is his

"Infor­

exhibit

of

conceptual art.

U1.SU rance has been

reated.

Born in England,

Baxter came

chelors and masters degrees at the

the president of N. E. Thing Co.

in Japan, he took a m aster of fine

His studio is three big tables over­

arts

he is

with

photographs,

paper

degree

at

Washington

State

University.

same day that you talk with an agent. The person considering in­ suran ce should carefully determine

e

­

by

ged

Social

Securi ty

benefits,

savings, and investments;

various topics which relate to the environment has

been greatly expanded. Some of the material has

we.\l-being of underage children.

be care fully scrutinized before he

For reasons two and three, how­

been around for a long time waiting for the public to catch up to what it ha

to offer. Perhaps the

most vo l atile resources have been developed speci ­ fically out of the awareness of and in support of the

environmental cause, and some of it has also been written in answer to direct questions about the pile

of problems at hand. It is my attempt to present to the non-specialist student a list of resources which would alloW him

to pursue his own questions and interest without

it may be felt that the congrega­

Commoner, Barry, Science and Survival. Garrett (ed.), Pop ulation, Evolution,

Birth Contro l (A "collage of controversial writ­

cide pollution.) Borgstrom, Georg, The Hungry Planet (Another as­ sessment of the food crisis.)

trivia. The books listed below are presented Wlith the idea of providing a chance to find out just what the crises are and what directions have been sug­ Included in this list are some books which are not specifically related to environmental disasters but center instead on the nature of life and the place of man in nature. It has become increasingly obvious that there will be no positive, lasting action we know it (or

,as

the world as it should be) unless we come to under­ stand our place in the scheme of things. Ehrlich, Paul R., The Population Bomb (The fore­ most book on the population crisis.)

Paying the Piper (A discussion

of the problem involved in supplying food fr the mounting world population.) EllrUch, Paul R. and Anne Ehrlich, Pop u lation, Re­

sources, and Environment. Eisley. Loren, The Immense Journey. (A group of articles on the place of man in the evolutionary

pattern.)

Eisley, L oren, The Firm a ment of Time (A discussion of

man's

changing

view

of

his

own

nature

through history.) Ardrey. Robert, African Gensis (A new theory on the

nature of

man's

evolutionary

With reference to a pattern

Paddock,

Hungry Na­

-

1975! De Bell, Garrett (ed.), The EnviroJm'lental Hand­

antecedents

of cultural traits

compiled for the First National Environmental Teach-In.) Storer, John H., The Web of Life (A survey of the principles of ecology.) de Cayeux, Andre, Three Billion Years of Life The most immediate chance for you as an in­ dividual to act is to support with your vast income the national environmental lobbies. If you are moved to act, pick an address and write for student mem­ bership information.

as

a

for

principle

guiding

Student Congregation. Tower Chapel, a com m union ser­ vice held at 8:00 a m

.

on S u ndays,

shall continue as it presently is. The community service held there elebrated by Imeeling worship­

pers and with a common cup.

At 8:00 p.m. on Sundays there shall be an Innovative service with a

Famine

book (A collection of resources prepared and

gest ed in the movement toward a solution.

to save and preserve the world

William and Paul Paddock, William and P aul

the offices of

ill

the Church Council decided on a

s

Appleman, Phillip, The Silent Explosion.

Paddock,

Meeting

.

Carson, Rachel, SHent Spring (The classic on pesti­

Paddock,

Paul R.,

Congregation

S t u dent

the various services sponsored by and

ings" both ancient and modern.)

tiOns .

Ehrlich,

of

policy of 'offered variety of wor­ hip'

Hardin,

being caught in the morass of scientific jargon and

signs an insurance contract.

Congregation Stresses Diversity

Pastor Taylor, PLU Campus Min­

Marx, Wesley, The Frail Ocean.

to dependen ts

plus his financial situation should

ister, at 6:30 p.m. last Sept. 27,

the Sun.

tion

free

format

which

may

could

meaningfully

addition to providing current news and resources. NATIONAL AUDUBON SOCIETY 1130 Fifth Avenue New York, N.Y. 10028 SIERRA CLUB 220 Bush Street San Francisco, CA 94104

temporary liturgy. It is felt by the Church Council that this program-T ower Chapel , the

I nnov ative

service,

367 State Street Los Altos, CA 94022

and

the

Traditional service with occassion­ al adaptation of cOl1temporary wor­ ship forms variety the

can offer with its best oppo rtunit ies 01

-

meaningful worship for the great­ 'est number of students. The next meeting of the Church Council shall be on October 11, at

6:30 p.m. Campus

in

the

Minister

o ffices

of the

(Harstad,

109).

All interested persons are invired

to attend and express their opi­ nions on pertinent matters.

vary

from week to week. TIle location of this service varies in order that

ARTISTRY IN FLOWERS

it cis appropriat e to the form of t he service.

The

worship

service

held

at

10:30 a.m . shall be remaining in Ea!"tvold until the new University Center is completed. The liturg y shall be basically that of the sec­ ond setting as found in the red Hymn Book. This shaH vary per­

haps once a month and/or at sllch

$1eIIc;/4

FLOWERS, Inc. 12169 Pacific Avenue Phone 537-0205 Stella and Ken Jacobs

times as Lent, for example, when

Ralph Andersen's

PARKLUD CHEVRON AND

PARKLAND CAR WASH FREE WASH WITH LUBRICATION 120th & PACIFIC AVENUE

ZERO POPULATION GROWTH

express

their worship with perhaps a con­

The most it will cost you is

$10 and this supports the national lobby force in

meet

stiJl

provide for the general economic

ciaB)'.

Rienow, Robert, and Leona T. Rienow, Moment In

an,cl

In sum, the individual's current

format was resolved, at ieast offi·

found in social man.)

program

other obligations.

life in­

the probl em atic issue of liturgical

In recent months the literature concerning the

surance

status with respect

Council

By DAVE SODERLUND

what amount he or she can take out of current income for a life in­

surance benefits can do much to

By R. G. BAKER

Resources for the Concerned

A good rul e is to never sign a contract fOr life insurance on the

js especially effec­

Life insuran

At the last meeting of the Church

Environment

incidence of several debilitating

diseases occurs later in life.

tive in providing financiaJ protec­

to Canada in 1937. He received ba­ University of Ida.bo. After studyin g

now

flowing

mation." The key to his work is

discussion

a businessman,

"But

States.

Baxter him­

And finally,

self will be on campus Oct. 31 , for

first major showing in the United Baxter calls the

proach.

art

.

money on which to live. a need for li fe

between

of

the protection of insurability, gains

one or more persons necessarily

all the way to the conceptual ap­

forms

­

one. If the prospective buyer has

Rejected Thing).

traditional

advant

The second part of the argument,

The traditional reason for buy­

ed Thing) and ART (Aesthetically

of

one

"

of the ­ Lower premuim rate

will be erased.

ing life insurance is still the best

the

Currently

age"

college-age adult to opt for life in­

of a family's primary sonrce of income can only be partially brid

figures on the interna­

period of time. Thus, the

surance?

The show will span the transition

B.C.

certainly true that

be paying premiums over a longer

three

reasons does it make sense for th

includes ACT (Aesthetically Claim­

"hottest"

is

,

for retirement. the

.it

based on life expectancy tables, are lower for young people. The t hing to remember here, however is that the young person also will

salesmen and representatives, is to

created by lain Baxter of Vancou­ ver,

First

premimum charges, since they are

one often stressed by life insurance

of

premium

"

vided for in this manner. The third

which

lower

ability ? The answer to this sales

reason for buying life insurance,

For

the

of

arg ument is two-pronged.

pro­

be

could

etc.

tion for families. The huge finan­

nomenclature

vantage

charges and to protect your insur­

property loans, a home mortgage,

cial gap usually created by the loss

Baxter

The

31 has been

while you are young to take ad­

personal

mation gathered during the month.

display through Oct.

on

be

will

But what about the often-heard admonition to "Buy life insurance

­

section devoted to hanging infor­

which

ed.

after the death of the insured per­ expe nses,

return

of

ra te

much higher on the money deposit­

vide cash to pay debts remaining F uneral

the

cases,

some

A se cond reason for purchasing a life 'insurance policy is to pro

personal

of

in vestment could be

equally as effect iv e as a l ife in­

dies.

prematurely

,

and

sur ance program. and, in at least

penden ts

also

exhibit,

The

savings

de­

Such

individual.

insured

a life insurance policy which will pay X dollars in the event of his

PENTAGON is

the

methods

other

ever,

Pf()­ vide for the monetary needs of persons financiall y dependent upon to

is

insurance,

life

need not suffer undue hardship if t he insured, the chief

seems prudent for the young adult

1lIE

for

reason

traditional

the

buying

Phone LE 1·9988

*


Wednesday, Oct. 7, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Five

Under the Grandstand ,y DAVE SODERLUND This year the roles were reversed-it was PLU that was nationally ranked this time, it was the Lutes who seemed to be the dominant team in northwest small college football, and it was Linfield who had every reason in the world to be high for the game. Last year PLU destroyed Linfield's unbeaten season, their hopes

for an undisputed

conference

championship, and their homecoming festivities in one shot at McMinn­ ville, but this time the shoe was on the other foot. It's probably a good thing that it wasn't our homecoming or it could have been worse. Although it may seem a little fatalistic it is reasonable to assume that the 1970 NWC championship was decided at FP stadium Saturday

night. Linfield now has the impetus to roll through the rest of their opposition with the added advantage of being

,a

team that does not make

many mistakes. PLU must win the rest and hope that someone knocks off Linfield to salvage even a share of the championship. Still, a quick glance at last year's four-ring circus shows that all l}ope is not lost. Dave Halstead seems determined to wipe John Fromm out of the football records completely. Last week Halstead broke Fromm's career rushing record and with an unofficial 422 yards in only three games he has

a

good shot at the 692 needed for Fromm's single season mark.

Fromm holds the NAIA national javelin record, however, and that seems

to be safely beyond Halstead's grasp. *

*

On October 12 the Lute Club is sponsoring the U.S. Marine Band in

LINFIELD'S MIKE ACHONG

concert in Olson Auditorium at 8: 15 p.m. The Marine Band is 172 years

(20) is corraJed by George Vanover (78) and Jack Irion (22).

old this year and is composed of professional musicians who must audi­ tion before they can enlist. Treat yourself to a great evening of excellent music-the cost is only $1 for students. "

*

Wi deats Sneal� Past PLU 16-13

Does your girlfriend think you should turn out for wrestling? An interest meeting for wrestlers, both returning team members and new prospects, will be held Wednesday evening, October 7 (that's tonight) at 7:00 p.m. in the' Foss Hall main lounge . The team's objectives and goals

for the season will be outlined and practice schedules and eligibility rules will be discussed.

Satur day

Last

*

the

Lutes

Linfield Wild­

ca ts 16-13 in an exciting, but frus·

tration·ridder. game. preliminary exchanges of

After punts

"

night

were edged by the

capitalized

Linfield

the

on

first break in the game, a Jim Had·

A final thought concerning football-PLU was ranked twelfth in the

land fumble on the PLU 29-yard

nation and Linfield was unranked. Saturday night's game should provide

line. Six plays later Mi k e Achong,

an interesting shakeup in the ratings. (GOing down . . . . )

who

spent

most

of

the

evening

Counselor Discusses Sexuality doesn't

di couraged students from having

know enough about love or sex,"

intercourse in the dorms, because

stated Mrs. Judy Baker ,in a recent

of the tension

"The

average

person

jt creates for the

Mrs.

three points, 13-10, and the defense held the Wildcats in check for the

Irion b\oclred the PAT attempt.

better

Just before

is

Baker

well

halftime,

the Lutes

put thin gs together well enough to drive to the Linfield two-yard line alter

a

PLU

returned

fake field goal after

attempt.

the

to

half

drive to the Wjldcat six but again they

were

stalled

and

Ed

Mc­

which was once again repeUed at the Linfield 20. Ed McGrath kicked a 37-yard field goal to tie the game. At this point in the action, a tie was looking pretty gOOd, pleasing and

Grath kicked a 22·yard field goal.

no

but at least spreading around the

Dave

Halstead fumbled and

capitalized

once

again,

one

goal

quarter with a ten-yard scamper

fie.ld

for a TD to move the Lutes wtthin

maining.

of morals, Mrs.

Baker

the

should

students. First, she hopes to reach

reminded

students already having sexual re­

not

lations and encourage them to use

live with.

some form of contraception. ond,

Sec­

she hopes to teach students

who see sex as proper only in mar­ riage enough about their bodies, s that they will be able to wait un­ til they are married. In a short lecture, she introduced her

topic

and

distributed

infor­

mation on contraception to the stu­ dents. Concerned about the plight of college couples, she touched

on

some of the psychological problems involved with pre-marital sex. She

YARNS lind NEEDLECRAfT Lessons given between classes KNIT and PURL 406 Garfield

LE 7-5317

She

group

anything

do

to

tried

they

they

could

impress

the

sexual

needs

and

being

are

sought

All-University

Commission.

Sele<'­

im­

tions

Commission

and a

portance of the difference between the

Applications

for student representatives to the

desires

of

for

the

so the

Commission can begin meeting. Also

to

be

selected

are

soon

committees in the following areas:

tees will be made this week, ac­

housing, admissions, food, general

cording to Jon Vingerud, cbairmtlll

understa nding of these differences

of

the

Elections

and

Personnel

university

and

requirements

stu­

dent activities and welfare. These

would al leviate some of the strain

Board. Deadline for applications is

committees are faculty committees

in dating relationships.

this Friday, October 9.

with student representatives. Also

Discussion

ranged

from

dating

customs and abortion, to emotional maturity

and

birth

control.

She

stated that rhythm definitely was

Com mission

needed are Nominating Convention

is a very new committee at PLU.

Cc;.Ch.airmen and a freshman rep­

All-University

The

It was created last year as visory

to

board

the

together

an

ad·

President,

not an effective method. Whlie ad­

bringing

vocating the use of other forms of

from all segments of the univer­

birth control, she also pointed out

sity community including Admini· faculty,

representatives

staff,

and

stu­

some of the problems involved in

stration,

using the pill or other devices.

dents. It's job is to appro e, ad­

Mrs. Baker will be available to

vise,

and

make

recommendations

talk to other dorms and organiza­

to the President concerning

tions during the remainder of the

ters that affect the university as

year.

a whole.

mat·

Three positions on the CO'm m is-

sion go to the ASPLU President Let us make a joyful sound unto the Lord our God!

Worship God INDIVIDUALLY TIiROUGHOUT mE WEEK AS A COMMUNITY ON SUNDAY

and Executive Vice President and the

Mooring

Mast

Editor.

But

resentative

LISTEN TO

the

Elections

and

Personnel Board. Anyone interested in these posi·

Sundays

8:00 a.m. 10:30 a.m.

Tower Chapel: Communion Service Eastvold

KPLU-FM 88.5

Uturgy: Second Setting, Hymn Book 8:00 p.m.

Innovative Service

RADIO-FREE PARKLAND

I was glad when they said unto me. "Let us go inLO the House of the Lord!"

his

successive good

fourth

against effort

Linfield-but was

his

virtually

game

123-yard

offset

by

Acnoog ' s 121 yards in 20 carries.

The highly- regarded Linfield defen· sive could not contain the nation's small-college

leading

at­

running

tack - PLU gathered 247 yards rushing - but they did stop two drives within the ten-yard line with

no scoring damage and allowed a field

goal

stalled at­

another

on

the

tempt in additiOn to causing

two fumbles that set up both Wild· cat touchdowns. Next week PLU hosts UPS in an afternoon encounter. UPS is smart­

picked up at the information desk,

received over the past wee kends

ing

from

ccrllection of wounds

a

and should be submitted

through

and is looking for someone to step

campus

by 4:30

on. The

mall

to ASPLU

ult should provide an

re

excelient game. See you there.

Friday.

Intramural Football Fumbles On This is the third already

halfway

A LEAGUE

k of intr a -

football and the season is ove r.

After two

Stuen-Cascade Evergreen

full weeks of a'ction the A league

Faculty

race is shaping up as a two-way

Ivy

.._-_. .

-.

, .......3

0

1

.. ,., ..3

1

0

_

-_ . .

2

I

.......2

1

..... 1 ....,1

I 2

I 1 2 1

,0

2

2

B LEAGUE .. .. . .4 Evergreen - ... . . . ..... . .-. . . ....... ...3 Alpine .. " .......,',........ .2

0 1 I

0

League race is Alp ine, deadlocked

Rainier

1

I J

with Rainier in third place.

Olympic

.. ... 2

2

0

1

3

0

.1

3

0

battle

between

the Stu n-Cascade

Fa ulty and I vy tied for third. The

only

blemish

n

. .. ........... ..

-

. . . ..

- . . . . . . . _-

....

Alpine

otr Campus Rainier

Stuen-Cascade's

record is a 24-24 tie with Alpine. In the B League , Nordl

has yet

Evergreen trails with only one loss, that

to

Rainier.

Also

in

the

B

The standings a fter four games ............ ..............,... ...-".. ......".. .

of{ the burst

3 1-yard

for applications is this Fri­ day, Oct. 9. Appli ations can be

to be defeated in four games while

This week: DR. GOVIG

a

l ine

remin<led

conglomerate and Evergreen with

STUDENT CONGREGATION

with

that the dead­

tions is

mural . . . . . . . .. ......... ......... . . . . ....... . ......... .

to

seconds re­

kiclred

Dave Halstead once again was

there are other positions open, and they must be filled soon,

four

the game's leading ground gainer­

number of other ASPLU commit­

men and women. She feels that an

in

around end.

ASPLU Sets Committee Deadline

not

with

Achong

drive

final

She devoted most of the evening

the issue

few

and

from their own 26 to the Lute 15 where Davis kicked the winning

Dave Halstead opened the fourth

qualified to teach a sex educat ion

type of discussion available to PLU

however,

by Achong.

course.

to answering questions raised by

Wildcats had a

ideas,

the last two minutes they moved

couple and other residents of the

the students. Remaining aloof from

everyone,

driving 48 yards to another score

hall.

gave two reasons for making this

offending

The

sorrow. different

discussion on "Love and Sex" with

ling and testing staff, Mrs. Baker

With

ustained drive fTom its own 33

a

the resident.. of Stuen Hall. A new member of the counsel­

quarter.

the

part of

time running out PLU put together

The Lutes got the ball right back but

man sexuality and counselling at State,

through the PLU secon­

dary, scored for the WUdcats. Jack

Linfield

Having taught a course on hu­ Penn

weaving

are

as

follows:

Nordic II

.

.

'-

-. -..-..-- -.--'"

.

.

.

... " ...................2

. . -' . - ..

-

-

-.

.-,.

Tvy Nordic I

. .

.. ..

._"

_

.

_____

____

0


..,

Wednesday, Oct. 7, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Six

t)i KDDIlIHG MAS!

By LINDA BARKER

---tl __-

. TO THE POINT

WEAVER-WICKRE-Miss Heather Weaver announc­

ed her engagement to Curt Wickre at a recent can­

Next

dlepassing in Hong Hall. Heather is from Portland,

a

meet·

ing for all st dents interested in working on getting the Washington State nineteen-year-old vote initiative passed. If you are at all interested please attend_ If you have any questions please call either p.at at ext. 867 or John at 1436.

ALPHA KAPPA PSI PLEDGES

All sophomores and upperclassmen majoring in business administra­ tion or economics interested in joining Alpha Kappa Psi, a business fraternity, should contact Terry Knapton, ext. 1423 or Jon Steiner, ext. 688.

sentative

spring of '72. FRY-STRONG-A unique candlepassing was held in Hong Hall by Miss

the candle together. Pamela is

Gary

This Saturday evening at 8 p.m., Art Perry will be at Mt. Tahoma High school, along with LBI Impact Teams.

place your votes_ There will be an opportunity

re­

give

in Cascade House where Miss Marilyn Cozart announced her

BAPTIST STUDENT MEETING

All Baptist students are invited to a fellowship meeting this Friday

Mast,

please call ext. 1146.

didacy,

the main dining hall, after first going through the line. The purpose of this meeting is to explore ways we may deepen our relationship t.o Christ and minister in His name as Baptist students. Rev. Sam Fort, from

saw

"Watermelo'n

It's

week.

about

by

a

Godfrey

Man" white

this man

(played

clude by 7:00 p.m.

with a beautiful house in a nice

Cambridge)

neighborhood, a wife (Estelle Par­

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TUTORS NEEDED

sons)

and two kids,

and a good

School, 6701 South Park Avenue, who are having difficulties for one

job. One morning he wakes up to

reason or another in reading_ These pupils are generally well below the

find himself a Negro'. r didn't know

reading norm of their class and are in definite need of a teacher on a

whether to laugh or cry.

It

really an awful feeling to watch

Because it is impossible for the school to handle all of these stu·

the world disintegrate around this

dents, they have expressed an eager desire for help from PLU students.

man. The film really made an im­

It is not at all necessary for a student to be an education major or

pact, but didn't attempt to show

If interested please contact Mrs. Hoffman at Park Avenue School or Gary Eckhardt, LE 1-1737.

all

potential

Elections and Personnel Board no

Mooring

later than this Friday, October 9.

Mooring Mast by Sunday the lith. However, the articles and the speeches at the meeting are only

think about it a lHUe more, but if

voluntary.

com m nts.

day the

you've seen it, I'd appreciate any Don't forget

Campaigning may begin on Mon­

1 2th with proper discre­

tion as to the placement of signs.

'Man of

La Man­ cha which opens on Oct. J5. r hope

The voting will take place at the meeting, with only those present

to have a little preview in next

allowed to vote.

week's column_

any unprejudiced white people. One line used a couple or times, once by a policeman referring to Cambridge

KIDNEY DONOR NEEDED

the

Negro

stole

something.

We

awaiting transplant surgery. Any interested person may contact Linda

what

it

but

Shelton, ext. 822, for further ,information.

there's

A kidney donor with Type 0 blood is urgently needed by a patient

is

yet,

something."

was,

"He

don't

know

we're

sure

I'll

have

to

In,itiative 25& Job Hunting Trouble?

For those persons interested in helping make Washington a clean­ er place to live, your chance has come! Initiative deposit-no malt

to

256,

return"

beverages

prohibit

"no

containers

for

and

soft

drinkS,

needs your support. There is an urgent need for per­ sons

to

fill

all

of

the following

positions: Speakers to go out to community groups; doorbellers and persons to organize them;

Recent statistics in the Wildcat reveal that non-technical job openings for college graduates are becoming sca rce, and the trend is continuing. Firms are looking for graduates with experience and many related qualifications. Many firms won't consider graduates who are qualified but have uncertain draft status, so the chances for a job are reduced even further.

Persons to write

letters to the Editor; creative in­

dividuals to come up with publicity

Air Force ROTC may offer you a solution. The Air Force of­

ideas; persons to raise money-con­

fers one of the most highly specialized managerial and

tributions, selling bumper stickers;

clerical help and all other normal campaign helpers.

If you are interested in any of

technical education programs available to college graduates.

Officers, after completing their obligated service, are in high

When you know

demand in almost all commercial concerns.

it's for keeps

these positions or have any help­

ful ideas please contact Mrs_ Anne

Sare at LE 1-7625.

If you are interested in your futme and have at least two years of university study remaining (undergraduate or gra d ­

Happily, all your special moments together will be

uate) then consider the U.S. Air Force. (Incidentally, AFROTC

symbolized fo rever by your engagement and

members in graduate school do receive deferments.) The

wedding rings. If the n ame , Keepsake is in the

Professor of Aerospace Studies is now interviewing appli­

ou's

Place

FEATURING Live Music Every

Wed., Thurs., Fri. & Sat.

and lasting satisfaction. The engagement diamond is flawless, o f superb color, and precise

Opt ical Science

cut. Your Keepsake Jeweler has a selection of

Aircraft Navigation

Medicine

many lovely styles. He's in the yellow

Aeronautical Engineering

Missile & Aircraft

pages under "Jewelers."

Maintenance

Civil Engineering Mechanical Engineering

Scientific Research

Business Administration

Space Operations

Criminology

Personnel

Foreign Technology

Finance

Rings from ;dOO

Thil Week'i Entertainen KIDD AFRIKA without obligation at 8:00 a_m., 21 Oct, 24 Oct, 7 Nov and 21 Nov in

HiWay, 2112 miles_

10

DIAMOND

RINGS

SI'O,CCO T M Rc-g "... H P"md CCn1p4n.y

------------------------

I HO W TO PLAN YOUR ENGAGEMENT AND WEDDING I Plc4s.e send new 10 pdge boo 'et ' P t " n r ung YO«.lr Erg geme"t .,jnd W e d d i Q " and rull color ' o l d e r , both for o".v 2.5c. Also, tell I""1C now to obt41o the b c u t "ul I H poge B r ide', Keep,. e Boo\ .1 nolf F-7D I I _ ,"ceo

The Air Force Officer Qualification Test is being offered free and

Y, turn left on Mountain

Keep-sake' REGISTERED

Other related fields

Go out Pacific Ave_ to ,Roy

ring and on the tag, you are assured of fine quality

cants interested in careers in the following areas: Aircraft Pilot

the Fieldhouse, Aerospace Studies classroom I, Un i v of Puget Sound, to college students who wish to determine their eligibility for the Air Force ROTC two Year Program.

For further details,

contact the

Professor of Aerospace Studies, Univ of Puget Sound, Tacoma, Wash­ ington 98416, Phone:

SK 9-3521, Ext 264, 265,

to

candidates

was

one·to--on e basis.

minor in order to participate in this program.

candidates

Articles may be submitted to the

Portland, Oregon, will counsel with us on Friday. The meeting will con­

Students are needed to instruct children at Park Avenue Elementary

all

must submit an application to the

On the Marquee (Cont.)

at 5:30 p.m. in the University Center. We will eat together in a room off

for

short speech at the meeting

But in ord.'!r to qualify for can­

.from Imperial Beach, California, and Michael, also from Imperial Beach,

If you would like notice of your engagement printed in the

a

before the voting.

engagement to Michael Achten. Marilyn is a sophomore biology major

ding in January of '71, they plan to live in Yokohama, Japan.

to at

just to listen to the candidates and

is presently in the Navy, stationed in Yokosuka, Japan. After their wed­

TEAMS ON CAMPUS

and

will begin

Senate

tend, either to run for an office or

from Billings, Montana, and Gary is a junior from Anchorage, Alaska

cently

the

All freshmen are invited to at­

blew out

majoring in biology. Their wedding is planned for the spring of '72. COZART-ACHTEN-PLU's first coed dorm candlepassing was held .

14,

7:00 in Xavier 201.

sophomore elementary education major

a

to

AWS. The meeti.ng

Pamela Fry, during which she announced her engagement to Gary Strong. Their engagement was revealed when both Pamela and

October

a class meeting to elect a repre­

from Seattle_ They are both sophomores, planning their wedding for the

This Sunday, October l l, at 1 :00 p.m. in X·107 there will be

Wednesday,

1970, the freshman class will have

Oregon majoring in elementary education, and Curt is a biology major

NINETEEN YEAR OLD VOTE

IMPACT

Frosh Elections Scheduled

Tile Sboe Faetory

I

I

I

Co 1'P

::

A":;

��-.!

_9:'.2.Y.!...A. 3;.

I

I I I I

Addl"u

I C;'" I 1'S'')le

I I I I I

':"::

I


oorlng

ast

Voice of the Student Body at Pacific Lutheran University PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY - WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1970

VOLUME XLVIII

NUMBER SIX

Army Court Denies Afro Rights By GLEN ANDERSON After

two

days

of

active duty

in the U.S. Army, a draftee named Theoda Lester, Jr., (African name: Amon) invoked his Constituitional

his legal rights to refuse an order

which irked the members of the

which he believed conflicted with

Resistance is apparent in the fol­

his religion.

Apparently · the

agree.

Last

Army

Thursday

didn't

the

court

right to freedom of religion. Claim­

martial sentenced Amon to three

ing the religion of Black National­

years at hard labor and a dishon­

ism, he refused to shave his beard

orable discharge.

or cut his Afro.

While his case was pending he

"To the army, an Afro and beard

observed, "Fight to keep the world

is trivial, unacceptable, but to me

free,

it is a gift from nature, which links

human rights."

me with my Black brothers and sis·

while

you don't enjoy your

last

week's account

of

the

Free

the world who are fighting for lib­

Speech Rally, it 3hould be known

eration," he explained in a flyer

that a printing error omitted a few

which was distributed at the Octo­

very imoprtant

ber 12 Free Speech Rally.

at

Hauled

before

martial,

he

an

told

Army

the

court

judge

and

panel that he felt he was within

which

words. The rally

the

The Tacoma Six were arrested last April and tried this fall for trespassing in a public park in or­ der to have an anti-war rally and provide

The Resistance, of which some of

Tacoma

Six

were

denied a permit to use the park because it was to be a political gathering. The

the -latest alliterated episode in the "

bungling adventures of Agnewisms. However. it is, in fact, an attempt

park for a political gathering fea­

son was held in May. The lirony

for re-election. This meeting had

(for Homecoming

activists):

Frankenstein Meets the Werewolf; and Dracula. The

8:30

films p.m.

begin and

scheduled

for

TONIGIIT

they

at

are

being

in

Chris

showing

Knutzen in the CUB. Admission for

of late night T. V. movies and, in­

Famous

cidentally to

Flick Fesival is 75 cents. Seating

The

Festival

will

rare

opportunity

to

the

to

see

Old-Fashioned

will be on the

bring

pillow and

floor,

the

Funny

so bring a

a home-brewed batch

screen such internationally famous

0f .. . popcorn (sorry!) and allow

characters as W. C.

your fancy to be tickled.

Magoo,

and

the

Fields,

Three

Mr.

Stooges.

Upcoming DSC sponsored events

A sampling of the titles to be shown

include

includes: W. C. Fields in The Big Thumb, The Fatal Glass of Beer, and The Golf Speeiallst; Mr_Magoo

Birch Society

in The Man of La Mancha.;

presentation

the

Three Stooges in Shot in the FroB-

the

same

turing U. S. Senator Henry Jack­

the

cents in treasury savings.

however.

used the

son-a noted hawk and candidate

tion to rise above the mediocrity their 63

month,

Legion

Senator Jack­

by the Democratic Students Coali­

rise above

next

American

gathering featuring

tier

The F.amous Old,Fashioned FIm­

those

arrested was held in April, and the

DSC Sponsors Funny Flick Series ny Film Flick Festival sounds lilre

for

cards.

the

By STEVE LARSON

an opportunity

who wished to turn in their draf t

the Tacoma Six are members, was

(To clarify some confusion about

ters in this country and throughout

lowing account.)

a

presentation by the John (open for any

and

all questions), which will be held next

Thursday,

October

will

29.

The

a

film

include

and panel discussion.

full cooperation of

board. Political

the

park

bias against the

anti-war movement therefore was apparently the primary reason for refusing

permiSSion

to

use

the

park. And although the judge in their first trial had declared the park

board

ord·inance

tional, the judge in

unconstitu­

their second

trial refused to allow discussion.

Thursday

weekend

evening,

Oct.

begi

MINNEAPOLIS

- The

general

convention of the American Luth­ eran Church in San Antonio, Texas, Oct 21 to 27, will make decisions with

significance beyond its

own

2.5 million membership_ Because of

the

ALC's

involve­

ment with other Luthel'an church bodies in the U.S., the election af a new president to succeed Dr. F. A. Schiotz, who will retire, takes

with

22,

the coronation of the Homecoming

Friday, Oct. 23, in Olson Auditori­

um. King, whose music was filled with

"soul"

two

decades

before

escort,

the term became popular, has a!>­

Handsome

Harry.

Queen

candi­

peared recently in Las Vegas and

dates

eniors Marcia

Taylor

on many of the top TV network

Queen

and are

her

weekend

and Cindy Greer and junior Gayle Severson. The coronation is follow-

variety programs. Dr. Rieke, a 1953 PLU alumnus who has become an international leader in the field of medical re-

lead in

"Man of La Mancha,

Saturday,

ALC Considers Female Clergy

'70 Homecoming Begins T omorroYi Homecoming

BRUCE BJERKE plays October 24.

the University of Iowa. He will re­ ceive

PLU's

fifth

Distinguished

Alumnus award. Alumnus of the Year awards will be presented to Malcolm Soine of Tacoma and Robert Nistad of Seat­ tle. The Homecoming football game Saturday

at 1:30

p.m.

pits PLU

against the Whitm n Missjonaries

on

than

more

parochial

import­

ance. There are ten official nomi­ nees for the office. Scheduled to receive

major

at­

of sex. Earlier this year

the Lutheran

Church in America, largest of the ' U. S. Lutheran bodies, approved

tention at the San Antonio conven­

action

tion is a detailed plan for reorgiza­

to be ordained upon acceptance of

tion of the church's internal stru­

a call.

ture. Drafted by a group k nown as

tonio

Committee (CLRSC), the plan aims

cant

the church "more effec­

will

enable

women

Action on the issue at San An­

the Continuation Long Range Study to enabl

which

will

be

particularly

because

of

in some circles

fears

signifi­

expressed

that such action

tively to minister to people and to

would tend to alienate relationship

the communitie s in which the con­

with

gregations are located."

souri Synod, which last year a!>­

The question of authorizing the ordination of women will reach the convention

in

connection

Lutheran

Church-MiS'­

proved formal altar and pUlpit fel· lowship with the ALC.

a

Social issues likely to be debated

an iinter­

at San Antonio include a position

Lutheran agency, Lutheran Coun­

paper calling for reform in abor­

cil, U.S.A. The report, which deals

tion laws.

study report· issued

with

theological

by

with

the

aspects

of

the

PLU will be represented by Paul

question. concludes that there is no

Reitz, a senior, who will be an offi­

strong Biblical or theological basis

cal delegate. Paul

either

for advocating or denying

man of the PLU religious life coun­

the rite of ordination on the basis

cil, will attend as a youth observer.

Wuest,

chair­

at Franklin Pierce Stadium. There is

a choice of activities

Saturday evening between "Man of La Mancha" in Eastvoid Auditori­ um or the Homecoming Dance in Olson the

Auditorium. The

semi-formal

dance

theme is

Litter Initiat·v Seeks Support By BILL SARE

of

"The

Golden Nugget," with the Spring­ field Rifle the featured musicians.

rniative 256 will be on the N<r vember ballot. It is an " Act pr<r hibiting the sale or distribution of beer or any other malt beverage, or

of

any

non-alcoholic

mineral

water, soda water, or other carbo­ nated CINDY GREER

for

ed by the annual songfest, bonfire and stomp, all planned around the

1970 Homecoming theme, "Man of La Mancha,"

search related to organ transplan­

the uni­

ni homecoming banquet Saturday

versity fall musical, and a concert B.B.

blues,"

King, will

"bossman

highlight

of

the

the

1970

Blues artist Lucille,

King will

and

be

beverage

his

red

featured

this

state

tubs,

in

vessels,

refund value of at least five cents for each such co ntainer."

tation, will be honored at the alum­

encourage

the

consumer

It will and big

business (i.e. bottle and can man­

evening, beginning at 5:45 p.m. in

ufacturers, wholesalers, and retail­

the new University Center . A long-time Seattle resident, Rie­ where he is a professor and head of the department of anatomy at

consumption in

or other receptacles not having a

ke now resides in Iowa City, la.,

Homecoming festivities. guitar,

uncarbonated

cans, bottles, jugs,

GAYLE SEVERSON

"A Hot

Time in the Old Town."

by

or

(commonly known as soft drinks)

MARCIA TAYLOR

money to defeat it. Our opmlOn is that they are doing so because

they will make less profit with re­ turnable bottles and cans, since

returnable containers cost less to make and cost more for ' us to buy. Industry is fronts.

By

fighting 256 on two

the

Washington

Com­

mittee to stop litter, rUll by a pub­ lic relations firm in Seattle, it is sponsoring Initiative 40 which, os­ tensibly, is industry's proposal to the next session of the state legi­ slature about how to deal with the litter problem.

This Model Litter

Law provides for more of the same

ers of beer and soft drinks) to reo

kind of litter enforcement we have

cycle these containers, not to dis­

now,

card them. But industry is opposed

and

to

256 and is spending a lot of

i.e.

trash cans,

litter bags,

fines and has nothing what· (Continued

o.n

Page 6)


Wednesday, Oct. 21, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Two

ParaDox

A Coming of Age nothing but praise others seem able to engender continual complaints and little more . As is often the case, both sides have a point and neither is right. prove r bia I

i n volved -not the

crit i c ism comes from the

construction

"hard·hat"

while

.pull n o punches,

complainers. Though the cri ticisms continue

dialog of a most healthy variety has resulted. It has been in such a spirit that the Mast has presented the more controversial articles as the "God Is Alive; PLU Is Dead" Parallax of a few

of normalcy against the raging forces of disruption.

drive in at 10 o'clock one morning, but there was no

Or so it 'seems to most Americans, apparently in-

reason for alarm. He had punched in at his regular time and had merely been downtown for an hour

lud ing Dick and Spiro.

A little cont a ct, however, with the "hard-hats" are a more serious threat to America's well·being

ceing at work.

precisely from perceiving the

Today, the sti fli ng hostility of a past still very fresh in

univer sity community, however,

many of the changes seem to be approach i ng at an ever-accel.

erating rate-the d i r ecti o n of which appears anything but dear. To this, one can only say that change of any kind un avoidably

involves at least

a

measure of uncertainty and even risk.

What is important to re member in this regard is the fact

"workers."

rules. Two dozen large POSITIVELY NO SMOKING six

hours'

for

approxima tel y half

that time in coffee and

have been

There

around from group to group check­

ably so.

ing to see if there are any prob­

great

lems. As a consequence, my mind

between people.

is usually occ upied with the groups

Alvina

that are having problems.

each year by employees, often right out from und er

is

of dollars' worth of tools and supplies are stolen

are

however,

decline,

to

This causes me to forgel about

she is kind of responsible for me

job.

this

And

forgetting her group because she

what

is

does such an excellent job as

happened in my previous article.

leader. She has had no problems

I forgM to tell the readers about the

people

who

go'

and is very dedicated so I haven't

Veteran's

to

thought of her.

Hospital. These peop!

go

a

r wish to apologize to Alvina and

to the Hospital

her group for my great mistake

and assist the chaplain in the Sun­

and

day service. Then they break into

encourage people to get in­

volved in this work of the Lord.

groups to discuss the sermon with

-Jack KIlcrease

.

..

. . ... .... .

BOB HASSELBLAD KATE MANCKE _ PAULA SEIBERT

.

... .

..

_. .

.

. ....

. __ .

DAVE SODERLUND

.

..

._ .

..

__

...

.

.

___

_

_

_

.

_

...... .

.

..

._ . __

.

_

.

. ...

........

. ..

...

Managing Editor

.... . ... . .

. _

.

.

...

News Editor

Copy Editor

. .. .. ....... "'" . Sports Editor . ... . Circulation Manager .

..

_.

..

..

._ ..

. .._

..

.. ....

. . _

... .

. ........ .

... .. ... . .. .. . .. .

MARY SHADOFF ... . . . .. . PAUL BERG . . .... .. . .. .. . . ............... DR. JOHN PETERSON .............. ....

.

................ ............ . .. .

. ..... .... . ...

__..

...

_

..... . ... Business Manager _ .

. ... . .

.

.

. .... . ..

.

..

. . . . Advisor

. _. .. ..

.

.

STAFF-G len Anderson. Paul Wuest, Kansas, Glen Zander, Steve Larson, John Hushagen, Dave Giles, Dave Thorson, Tom

Heavey, Russ Johnson, Mary Jane Dykstra, Kristi Johnson, Becky Rodning, Bruce Bjerke, Cathy Wark, Steve Cook, Nancy Shaw, Karen Svendsen, Wanda Huber, Bob Steward, David

Aakre, John Rankin. ScoH Green, Priscilla Martens, Pat Stiles, Lindsay Grader, The Footrubber, Linda Gardn r, Barbara Mon·is. John Bec k.

Opinions expressed i n the Mooring Mast are not necessarily those of Pacific Lutheran University, its administration, faculty, or

the Mooring Mast staff. The MM reserves the right to edit

all copy for length, propriety and libel.

erals. The value and meaning _of our country for many

them by now.

my hard·hat

of

Jim is a short middJe-aged man who worked jn

co·workers is

Peter

by

captured

"Arnellican democracy could

Ustinov's assessment:

be described as the inalienable right of the Arneri·

him DO anything during the first month of the sum-

can

to sit in his pajamas on his front porch with a

can of beer, shouting, 'Where else is thi£ possible?' ..

mer. Tn fact, it took me two weeks to even find out

Review

On The Marquee By SCOIT GREEN

to offer his talents through PLU dramatics.

is sometimes difficult to say exact­

An outstanding supporting per·

ly why you liked it. Howev'er, such

formance was turned in by Doug

is not the

ase with PLU's "Man

Parker as the Padre. His transfor­

La

Although

there

mation from a prisoner to the Pad­

contrib­

re was hilarious and his s ingi ng .

of

Mancha."

are many elements show, such

w hi ch

of

"electricity"

the

to

ute

the

the sef a nd the or­

as

chestra, if the acting and/or sing· ing

weren't good, the production

would suffer. There was a trio of pe rformances which I cannot be too enthusiastic a bout

.

There

is one word for Connie as Al­ prefer).

or Dulcinea, if yo is

word

That

Every­

"perfect."

thing about her was beautjful, from eating the st w while San ho was the

reading

Does

"What Her

of

Want

He

with

performance,

singing

to

missive,

Me?"

all

it's

changes In attitudes , was so con· tantly h nest that she was Aldonza.

This is in no way to light Bruce Bjerke as DOn Quixote, who had

a

big role to fill. The tea rs in the

eyes of audience members shpuld aLtesL til the fact that he was im­ mensely

sucC'.'!Ssful.

He

was

so

natural when he was putting on his

make·up, that you really could be· Iieve his change of character. His confrontation with the

Mirrors

se'cone,

especially

cinea"

of

and "the

was

end,

"To Each His Dul­

"Psalm," at the

njoyed

by

the

entire

alldienre. Mark Scholz's Sancho was funny

Koschmann's performance

The Voice of the Students at Pacific Lutheran Universh" JOHN AAKRE ... . .. . . . . .. ... .. . . ... .. .. .. . . _ Editor

international re-

lativism which predominates among our young lib-

estimated tlu; everyone must be well stocked with

donza

MAST

NG

MOOR

than is the positive and healthy

is

it

because

This belLigerent provincialism, it seems to me, far more' dangerous and a much more serious

threat to the sanity and well-being of our nation

r with the assistance of--employees

for those goods. Thefts of some items

expected

some

is

is every bit as deplorable as that of the extreme left, but is rarely recognized as such.

mteraction number

alistic democracy. Such arrogant self-righteousness

is standard operating procedure. Many hundreds

When you view a production, it whose

Rauf,

it" mentality. which is likewise a threat to our plur·

they are practi cally suDversive.

are

751, is the leader of the group and

some groups which are dOing an excellent

discussions and

A manifestation of this is the "love it or leave

day's work for the generous pay we receive, many

mentally disturbed, but not notice·

postion of a trO'ubleshooter. 1 hop

kind of patriotism.

tainly be aware of it.) Rather than give an honest

inter'

patients

these

since

esting

As president of CALL, 1 am in a

This is very

"communists"-an all·encompass­

ing term referring to anyone who disagrees with this

reluctant to admit it, although they must cer·

mor

ember's Work patients.

groes, etc.), and

but mo t regular employees are

this,

I1cwledged

"foreigners" (Jews, Ne-

"peaceniks," intellectuals,

(Some other summer employees have ack·

mill. Although I saw him often, I didn't actually see

the

that is used as a club against new ideas, hippies,

summers likeWIse must know that their work is a farce.

fu ture.

To the Editor,

chauvinistic way. Theirs is the brand of patI1iotism

The goldbrickers at the pulp mill where I work

the room next to me during my first summer at the

CALL President Praises

Oh, they're patriotic . .. in their own provincial,

energy to call it work.)

has begun to develop will point the way to a most ho pefu l

-John Aakre

His car window displays a flag decal.

upper-middle class wages and don't exert enough

responsihl

one begin to worry.

The last person I asked swore at me.

called "working class," since they make middle to

the noses of

Only when the dialog stops -and nothing is heard-should

asked and told the same individuals to please stop parking right beside the huge NO PARKING sign.

(Lo ngshoremen. by the way, don't deserve to be

novative Sunday evening services are all in the process of de­

interest gr o u ps continuing at the present rate, the dialog which

several times a month for several years we have

r swear it ' s the honest truth!. It's one of

gation, and those who have been implementing the more in­ fining or re­ defini ng their roles within a rapidly changing

tions forbid parking private cars on the dock, but

by com­

energetic

his

to put out

longshoreman

a

ing; I'm just holding it." U.S. Coast Guard regula·

annot help but be cynical. These loafers make PLU's maintenance crew look

asked

Cigarette, the longshoreman sneered, "I'm not smok­

breaks, and being permitted to be drunk on the job

Deliberately wa ting comp a ny time and materials

religious community. With the growth of denominat i onal and

watchman

beer

portant fact, for it spea ks mo r e eloquently than any document

The newly c reated Rel i gio us Life Council, student congre­

house filled with combu'stible pulp. but when a night

wasting

work,

tremendous wages)

employees are so co ntemptuous of the company that

to the question of p rio r i ties upon this campus.

signs are painted a1l over the wooden dock ware-

ing paJid eight hours' pay (at

Longshoremen

that the question of religious life is a ve ry real topic at PLU­

and it always has been. That, I believe, 's an extremel y im­

company's

the

break

contemptuously

themselves

the most despi cable things I've ever seen.

For t h ose outside the

they

and order" upon students and blacks,

contempt implied in the actions of these blue-collar

parisen.

been both apparent and welcome .

While urging the typical "hard-hat" crackdown of "law

gross cynicism and

take its place. We h ave finally come to realize that those who

to entrenchment and little more. Our growth in this regard h as

in the window.

The cynlcism of thoughtful radicals often comes

our memories is gone and a willingness to listen has begun to

really care are rarely dogmati c in their app roach, for that leads

Jim has a different car now. And a flag decal

than are the radical students. Many faults attribu·

Historically, as many of you know, an atmosphere con­ dusive to such dialog has not always been present. Sides have

wifh the one doctrine-take it or leave it-approach.

transmission fixed,

all the while earning $4. 2712 per hour for supposedly

ted to us are characteristics of them as well.

have progressed beyond the point where we are confronted

and a half having his Buick's

can dispel this illusion, for in their own way they

weeks past.

been drawn all too often upon this campus over religious ques­ tions-and the res u l ts have said surp ris i ngly little to the issue of Christian freedom. Fortunately, for s all, we seemed to

be doing, and I found

. out then only because I asked someone. I had been especially curious when I saw him

and

workers

Decals

what he was supposed to

College students are a major threat to our coun· try,

longshoremen are its backbone and a major bastion

It is im portant to note, however, that even the most notice­ able

and Flag

H�!�Al!!ts

The quality of religious life upon a campus s uc h as oLirs is an elusive entity to describe at best. While some can fi n d

and

the his

Knight

of

deathbed

were two of his strongest

and he has a beautiful voice, but

I felt his character lacked a cer­ tain degree of depth as a result of not taking hirnseU seriously and "pOinting" at his funny lines.

The Muleteers (Jim Derck, Ar­ den Olson, Don Yoder, Frank Payn and John Hunter) worked togeth· er very well. They seemed to en­ joy their roles and "handled" AI· donza very qicely in the numbers which required nice handling. other supporting roles Craig

In

Huisenga -as

Dr.

Carrasco,

Beth

Sommars as the "'woe·ful" house­ ,keeper and

as

The

few

faults

the

show

had

were almost completely over·shad·

owed by its assets. After all, who am I to argue with three standing cvations? ! The set and lighting, by the way, wer'C

nothing

short

of

fantastic.

Eastvold stage was a dungeon in

ance. With his voice (singing and

with a change of lighting, became

hope

Bruce

continues

and crews

to

can do

is amazing. One person I

heard remarked that it was better the Broadway

than

set.

is

PLU

very fortunate to have such a mas­ ter

stagecraft

of

in

depart·

the

ment. If

you

the

missed

last

show

week, there is one last chance this Saturday. If you miss it then, "you lose." Oh, by the way . . . is there any truth to the rumor that Mr.

Nord­

holm is planning to take a sabbati· cal from PLU to go on tour as a Moorish Dancer? *

*

"Summertree"

tickets

for

vember I, at 7:30 p.m. can

No­ ob­

tained by calling ext. 1220. Hurry, it's a great theatrical experience. "Between Two Thieves" is now

in rehearsal and will open on No­ vember II and run also the 12th and 14th. Marni Nixon is here on Nov. 13.

san Logan as the Moorish dancer were very entertaining.

Seville

I

case)

this

a sta

a prisoner, and Suo

moments in an excellent perform· acting),

his technician (Roger Gebhard in

an

in

the

16th Century

inn. What Mr.

and

Nordholm and

Desperate For-om London-Paris Art Interim Interes ted Students Meet Wed.

(Today) 3:30 p.m. in Art History Room C. U. B.


Wednesday , Oct. 21, 1970

Environment

with state standards-with the un­

issue

There are a couple of important

once

again.

By THOMAS R. HEAVEY House

The

of

reincarnated

derstanding that after this period

Representatives

particular

of time they would be able to re­

program by a 176-162 margin , and

corner of the world which deserve

move 40% of the sulfur. The Air

now the Nixon

Administration

mention but have not yet reached

Pollution Control Board, in a gross

faced

job

the stature of a full feature.

instance of misguided soft-hearted·

rather unpopular

items

our

concerning

home,

to

Closest

Tacoma

the

Smelter is in the news again. Any­

ness (or soft-headedne9lJ} -dropped the pending suit.

one who has looked back toward

Th� battle in this area is by no

Mount Rainier from Point Defiance

means over. It would be 'very in­

Park On a clear day has seen what

teresting to hear from the Pollution

has to be one of the all-time sicken·

Control Board for reasons why the

ing views-the mountain, brilliant

suit was dropped and the five-year

white on the upper slopes, bleakly

reprieve tacitly granted. The smel­

shrouded with a brown haze below

ter theoretically can remove 90%

now line and the smelter stack

of the sulfur from its waste, but

proudly belching sulfurous smoke.

there is a lot of money involved.

the

There has been much uproar re­

Granted

adequate

installing

that

cently about the waste sulfur in the

filtering equipment would carve in·

ore which ultimately ends up in the

to the profits for the coming year

sulfur dioxide,

and possibly for the coming two

it reacts instantly with ozone pro­

or three years; still an important

question is raised concerning prior­

and becomes

ities. Which is more important in

air.

as

Emerging

wires

power

or

storms

electrical

duced in round

long

sulfur trioxide. At this point it is

the

ae theticall y lacking and irritating

steadily

run,

breathable

air

A J­

profits?

increaSing

or

to the nasal passages in very large

though my personal bias is evident

concentrations----and if it never rain­

I am sure there are sound argu­

However,

ments which must be considered

sulfur triox.ide reacts with water to form sulfuric acid and things are instantly serious.

on both sides. Keep your eye on

The Puget Sound Air Pol1ution

cerned people got the impression

ed it would end there.

this one. Many Congress-watchers and con­

Control Board has had a suit pend­ ing against the smelter to force it

about

comply

to

Presently

standards. has

to

able

been

pollution

state

with

was

SST

the

ba r el y passed and in- the interven­

only

ing months a large pile of evidence

its waste

in opposition to the program, both

eliminate

and

economic

cn

grounds, was amassed.

smelter asked for a five-year grace period "":"a period of non-compliance

Before however,

was

summer

the

over,

the SST became a live

selling

a

environmental

extreme speeds and al ti tudes of the

Student

week on Tuesday evening and will

meeting Oct.

13, voted to' sponsor a series of

be held in a different dorm each week. The first one will be in the

discussion'

second floor lounge of Sluen Hall

at its

Congregation

'coffee

informal

of

Council

Church

and

gatherings in

the various dorms. Known as a 'Chla U ,' which is ad­ from

apted

a

wo rd

Hebrew

for

' gathering ,' the series is designed to provide an informal set ting in which the students, both members and non-membe rs of Studen t Con­ gregation, can e xpress their ideas and discuss the.ir questions about

on Oct. 21, from 7-8 p.m.

rou t es.

air

The

Chlall is

also

designed sn

noise factor. The SST breaks the

Every movie house showing "art" flicks for "mature" adults. Thank goodness there were a few shows in town that were done in good taste. Shows like HAIR and Oh Calcutta!

sound barrier regul arly, and it is dubious whether urban centers will put up with a constant diet of sonic booms. Although the problem here is one of a value judgment and a determination of the qualit y of life its immediacy is nm diminished. Nixon

President

has

his

own

as to be an info rm al social study break. There will be no progra m

the

on

chicken-an d-potatoes

fried

tour at this moment, speaking of

as such. There will be free coffee and cookies.

A person can come

and go without bei ng la te or leav­ ing early.

Council wjJJ

be Oct.

at 5:00

25,

the meeting rooms by

the dining hall in the University

PLU and the friendly smile and casual greeting that we have become known for. The seminar on draft co unsel 1 ng was an exciting experie nce. Actual­ ly, it was more (}f an apprenti eship program. The Central Committee for Conscien tious Objectors were the sponsors of the program. They have been in the busines s of draft counseling for over twenty-two years.

- "BlIilding the SST will improve the international balance of pay­

We were immediately put into Lhe position of counseling by answering

ments." -"The t echni c al challenge b ri ngs cut

the

Yankee

all

in

Trader

Americans." -We mll t "continue to be first technological

in

development. "

(The French-En glish cooperative Concorde has al ready made over

50 test flights. )

It is the ir belief that the' best way to learn draft counseling is to do it. letters from people who have written in aslcing for advice. We reviewed

for the SST_" -"(;{)ntinuing government subsidy Joser the day when

to p rivate capitaL" Magruder 0Jts down the envjron­ mentalists and their objections

"pa tently

be in g

as

( his

absurd"

speech writer and Agnew's should get toget her) and blithel y contin­ to

ues

counter

serious

questions

and objections with a long string of homespun bull and sell the pro­ gram to the people with an emo­

spiel

tional

more

at

with

borne

W

must now live with the SST individuals,

however,

we

sentatives. It will only take a few changed minds to dump the thing next

year

before

It

atta ins

the

level of the Viet Nam Syndro me­ "it was a mistake to get in here in

the

place

first

but

can ' t

we

get ouf without losing face."

ourt decisions dO i ng research for the staff

legal manuals and read counselors. Each night

were assigned more reading and research

we

for homework. About the middle of the week we were allowed to observe counseling . After each. session we would discuss the case and

We learned how to use the various law boo ks , manual s , and guides to the greatest advantage. We learned things that cannot be learned from books but only from the actual both feel that we lea rned

mOre

the trip . Soon the Military Service Inform tion Center wUl be expanding off c ampus in an effort to reach out into the hig h schools and the gen eral Pierce County commuhity. We will have a total of nine coun selors for the two offices. It is hoped that all those with quest ion s about the draft and those with a particular problem will ca tl us. We are here to serve you; please take advantage of our se rvices. The MSIC offic

Theater Interim Visits London London is the unchallenged cap­

Students will discuss the plays

jta) of the theater world and the

be fore and af te r seeing the produc­

site

tions. Dr. Klopsh hopes to be abl e

of

from

offering

an interim

the English Depart menl . "London

to provide the tour members with

Theater," led by Dr. Klopsh.

an

to

Structured pants

an

dr ma

give

exposure

from

partici­

of theater in England, and a criti­

to

English

cal appreciation of drama.

Shakespeare

the

to

present, the tour features attend­ ance at thirteen plays. The pr-oduc· tions include Fiddler

on

the Roof,

Salnt Joan. Twelfth Night, Hedda Gebler and Promises, Promises.

reflected in the I'ousing

school i

invited.

being made possible for PLU stu­

Band Protestor Offends Co-Ed

Goethe Institute in Passau, Germ­

room with a non-English speaking student in a German home. Meals will te eaten with the family and

any.

at a student cafete ria.

To the Editor :

Now r will be the first to speak

Foreign Languages, the four-week,

protest

German,

interim course is open to all stu­

an border makes it espec ially at­

be

held

a

once

dents

On Monday ev ening, October 12,

r attended a th ri lling and exciting concert by the United States Ma­ rine Band in Olson Auditorium, a

in

tiefense

of

those who

and demonstrate. for I believe the

trents

right of free speech is one of the

ledge of German.

most imf:ortant rights we citizens of the United States are attempting

cally excellent, but thoroughly en­

to maintain.

joyable as welL The musicians con­

tion of this right interferes with the

ducted them el es with dignity and

expression of the rights of others,

decorum and the audience was ­

I do not believe in it. There is a

attentive,

and

appreciative.

H owever , r encountered which

spoiled

this

one

thing

otherwise

de­

lightful evening, namely. the pres­ ence of a placard-bearing war pro­ tester

outside

the

auditorium at

the conclusion of the concert.

But when the asser­

time and a place to demonstrate. Monday

evening

after

the

U.S.

Marine Band concert was neither the time nor the place. Respectfully NANCY

session

a

the

Sponsored by the Depa rtm ent of

c on ert which was not only techni­

li te,

a

th rough

submitted,

STEPHENSON

with

an

elementary

know­

instruc tion at the

Institute. Thei r classmates will in­

clude persons irom all over parts of the world. Formal classroom in­ structiOn lasts five hours each day and tion, The

includes

grammar,

nversation Institute

Passau

on the

Czechoslovakian,

Austri­

t ractive, All weekends wil l be free and students will be enc ou raged to

p rtici p a nts wil1 en roll in a nor· mal course of

The location of

and

organizes

composi· literature. ne

field

trip for students during the four­ week session.

The i nternational roake-up of the

travel during this free time to gi ve them a more complete k nowledge of the nearby countryside and cit· ies. The cost of the trip is $685 and is all-inclusive. with the exception of

weekend meals.

fly fr

m

Students

will

Sea-Tac on January 2 a nd

return January 31. from Dr.

Sw enson

AILhough the

main

emphasi s is

on dra ma, art will be of major im· The

portance.

tour

in udes

visit

to the N ational Art 'Gallery,

the

National Portrait Gall ry, the Tate Gallery, and the Wallace Col lec­ tion. This po rtion of the tour will be in conjunction with Mr. Kittle­ son's art tour to L ondon and Paris. Field trips will be taken to Can· Windsor,

terbury,

and

Oxford.

While in Oxford, students will meet the !l1'2mbers of the coll eges at in­ formal student clubs. Contact with student g1'oups will also be made in London. London's hisorical

ights will also

be visited. S tudents will e le brat ed

see

the

of

"changing

the

guard," Big Ben, the Br-itish Mu­ seum and the Tower of

Students

will

eat

lunch

London. the

in

Cheshire Cheese," the favorite ale· houSE' of Dr. John son. ost of the twent -one day

The tour

is

approximately

$600.

Stu­

dents will be required to attend a few meetings before the trip be· gins.

Regis t rat ion for the tour is

scheduled for early November.

F urther information can be ob­ tained

understanding of the tradition

the

ture and language of Germany is

will

is tempor­

arily located in rm. 718 Tinglestad at extension 1447.

accomodations. Most studen.s will

ChlaU

ounseling experien e. Dan and I

than enough to justify the expense of

Center. All interested persons are

A

the situation.

itting in.

counselor was

Intensive German Study Offered Complete Imm rsion in lhe cuI·

re v iew

At the end of the week we were dOing the cou ns eling and the slaff

-"Darn right it's patriotic to be

munjcate our wishes to our repre­

in one of

avoid eye contact, people afraid to look at each other. It's a far cry from

the alleged benefits of the SST:

of aU faith.

The next meeting of the Church

WaTking down the st reets at mght, afraid of every passerby , you wander w!-.�ch one is going to mug you. People t u rn away, 'trying to

saJe.:;man, one William Magruder,

scrapped after this year if we com­

required by t he University) to the

Bottomless joints.

Jointless joints.

ship opportunities for PLU students

Campus Minister.

and enj oy the sights of their clubs. Topless jOints.

Certainly just as import ant is the

can see that a useless program is

(as

Draft Counseling.

on

bit hustlers standing in front of their jo in t s urging passerby to come in

heavily-traveled

over

cerned

sire by sending an invitation

We were in the Bay City attending a seminar

permanent layer of cirrus clouds

Minister to meet and speak with

all dorms so expressing their de­

want to

a good lOOking young woman calIs out "Hey fel as, wanl to have some

students. His interests in clude wor­

worship opportunities for PLU stu­

WOU ldn' t

fun?" Upon closer observation his Adam's apple gave him away. Two.

program for another year. As con­

dents.

and

a nice place to live but J

IS

visit there.

appear and may eventually form a

One further aspect of the Chlall

Student Congregation for any and

Congregation

long time. San F ran cisco

into the Mecca of po or taste and perversion. Walking down the street

not

may

is the availability of the Campus

about

Student

Dan Hauge and I have just returned from a nine day visil to the paradise of the west and hopeful ly we won't have to go back there for a

dis­

which

atmosphere

patent medicines.

A ChJall will be scheduled by the

more Like it.

trails ("vapor trails") high in the

the project can be turned back

The

That ci ty by the bay. AHH San Francisco . That paradise of the west coast. AHH San F ra ncisc o The Golden Gate to the future. AHH an Francisco . AHH -C HOO ! ! I is

We found i t to be a pleasant city during the day but al night it turns

will bring

Student Cong Explores Worship Possibilities

AHH San Francisco .

planes once in use may cause con­

environmental

emissions, while the state requires 90% removal. This last week the

is

p rOd uct.

causes

SST

The

of

the

problems in two basic areas. The

to die a qu iet death. The

budget appropriations for last year

smelter

the

f the sulfur from

17%

that

summer

this

the

wi th

Page Three

Deferably speaking

Sulfur and Sonic BoolDs By DAVE SODERLUND

MOORING MAST

in

Foreign Language Department.

the

Further inquiries

should be di­

rected to Dr. K lopsh in the Depart­ ment of English.


Wednesday, Oct. 21, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Four

Court C Communety Prov·des Out e s Building Bridges Court C exists. One can walk down the alley and enter the narrow doorway -and one can leave it at that. But what made several establishments locate in blighted downtown Ta ­ coma? Why was this community born? Perhaps they are trying to prove that Tacoma is not an arm-pit city, but one in which people reach out for cultural and edifying needs. Perhaps they are trying to inflict the ur­ ban area with new ideas and life patterns. Or perhaps they are just trying to provide artists and performers with outlets for their specific energies. They are accomplishing all of these, but there seems to be

a

more subtle, yet over-riding goal.

Many "hir> communities," such as the U District in Seattle or the numerous rural communes, promote sub-cultural inter­ ests. That is, they seek only the reassurance that their one life­ style is valid. They seek the necessary security of being im­ mersed in the group experience. In contrast, the Court C community is attempting to prompt

intra-cultural reactions. The World's Fairs are attempts to allow different groups of our "global village" to interact. Court C also boasts a wide variety of individuals. A grandmother crochets down the hall from a pottery

FOLK AND BLUES WORKSHOPS at Court C offe r many ta.lented artists a chance to perform.

shop. An antique store relaxes next to a drop-in center for recent mentel hospital patients. The same wooden stage hosts

Workshops Off'er Dramatic Arts Court

C

place for

has

been

people

a

gathering

of many talents

for two years. The community re­ alizes

the

need

for

providing

a

means of expression for these peo­ ple:

The

result

has

been weekly

workshops at Court C Coffeehouse. On Monday nights at 8: 30, Court C Cinema allows film makers from the area to present their work. Lo­ cal underground movies, communi· ty films, and special slide presen­ tations are featured in different ar­ rays each week. The fare can run the

gamut

light

from

shows.

travelogues

Anyone

to

involved

in

films or doing their own work can get

in

touch

with

Ted

Barton

through Court C. Tuesday evenings offer tLe Cir­ cus of Tongues at 8:30. This verb-

al arts forum offers an open mike for local writers.

Poetry,

drama,

folktales, and prose pieces can be read to a'n appreciative audience. Theater scenes

groups from

may

bring

plays to

with techniques;

down

experiment

PLU's own Car­

petbaggers and the Berkeley Com­ mune Theater have dO'ne dramatic work. The small stage may just as

The

Pacific

Counseling

Service

local collective which

a

shares an office with Tacoma Draft Counseling at 917 Court C. The

PCS

gyman,

staff

includes

ex-servicemen,

cler­

Vietnam

veterans, civilian conscientious ob· jectors and

other interested civil

ians. It is an autonomous organi­ zation affiliated with similar PCS offices in California and Japan. The first PCS office was opened in

Monterey,

spring

of

Calif., In

1969.

in its

the

late

first

six

months of operation it handled over

700 cases. In light of the success of the service in Monterey and the obvious

needs

for

counseling

in

San Francisco, an office was open­

1969. In No­

ed there in October, vember,

offices

were

opened

in

Oakland and San Diego and, last spring, in Los Angeles, Tokyo and Tacoma. The primary function of the Ser­ vice is providing information and counseling

to

reasons of

conscience are unable

those

persons

for

to participate in the military and! ' or combat duty. Counseling is als o available on a variety of problems related

to

milita ry

service.

The

clientele is composed primarily of men from Fort Lewis; but includes men from McChord and the various re,erve programs in the area. The Serivce also holds G.!. meet· ings for disseminating information; provides contact with lawyers, doc­ tors.

psychiatrists

and

prints

materia Is

conscientious

on

clergy;

addict and a lawyer within an hour.

banjos, piano, mandolins, and har­ monicas rings far into the night. Speaking for aU the workshops, Chris admitted. "We really haven't had the leadership to bring com­

The has

Folk

been

and

Blues

operating

Workshop

for

about

a

year. Chris Lunn, th'c coffee house publicity man, also manages this workshop. stage

The

are open

microphone

and

to performers

at

7:30 on Wednesday and Thursday nights. Groups, duos, and individ­ uals are welcome;

the only stipu­

lation

music

is

that

the

remain

non-electric. The union of guitars,

current

practices;

rhetoric and internalized ignorance. The result of this interaction might be a synthesis of mere tolerance. But more than this, the result has been actual human warmth. T h at is the end that justifies all the frustrated effor ts and thwarted m eans. -Bob Hasselblad

has

a wide range of talents.

Court C Encourages Open Dialogue By BOB HASSELHLAD C Coffee house is located

Court

strong. But this

unassuming coffee­

hou se at 915 Court C ha s rapidly

in the old pre-Mall heart of down­

become the

town

and talents in Tacoma.

was

Tacoma.

Two years

ago it

struggling establishme nt lo­

cated on a dingy alley-street; in came for music, coff ee

,

a

or

people just to

the

same

warm dimly-lit atmosphere

Today

meeting place

for ideas

Court C's main attraction is its open forum . . riday, Sa turday, and S un day

nights

are

find

discussion

nights. One can drop in and hear

place. The Cof­

fee still comes in eight flavors-all

John

Birch

Society.

Political

groups often discuss pertinent legi­ slation;

this Friday Iniliative 256,

pub­

and

maintains rooms; ades, ing

the

free

reading and

visits

prisoners

legal

and

pastoral

G. I.

im­

arranges

for

G.1.'s

meetings to

for

to

Court

want

a

Different

interest

The

only

C has

had

confrontation with

police in­

volved their customers parking in nearby loading zones. By the gen· eral

response,

the

city

appears

grateful for a fresh breeze in the old downtown area.

The major response of the com­

As Chris Lunn restated their goal,

munity has been one of ignorance

"Court C is

and/or apathy with no serious in­ There

creative

has

letter-writing

paigns,

from persons sympathetic.

the

sur­

viding, as well as good quality and

and

and

to

many discussions. Court C is pro­

nificant response, with respect to rallies

come

ercised with respect is the star of

eral clergy and attorneys and sig­ courts-martial

trying to help local

ideas

face." The freedom of speech ex­

been considerable support from lib­

1. Movement.

not

have presented several past

young.

tion to militarism.

to the G.

do

merely a "hippie" hangout for the

promoting

tious objectors and unites service­

at

They

The Tacoma downtown commu­

men and civilians in active opposi­

attendance

Mr.

nity accepts them as far more than

maintains a Registry of conscien­

hositility.

crowd,"

programs.

Order supports peace movements,

of

left-wing

"hip,

UPS

'1

peacefulness among all men. The

dications

alligned

Noting that

cause. People from PLU, TC , and

tian." The members of the Order dedicated

becoming

groups can promote their specific

believe in the goodness of peace are

from

joy and freely use the open dis·

cannot be a soldier; I am a Chris­

and

thesis that is achieved.

cussion format.

into

the Roman army in 295, saying,

left

Thus far they have been wildly

named

refusing induction

and

successful. Political candidates en­

after a young man who was exe· cuted

wing

compJish that.

to

The Service is closely related to of Maximilian,

factions-right

wing." And this is the unique syn­

ty of other places which can ac­

zations. Order

goal is to set up a dialogue between all

objective.

church groups and similar organi­

the

are

publicity

closed atmosphere. There are plen­

and

speak

questions

Lunn,

Lunn said that this was not their

leviating family problems; secures for

or

Chris

Chairman for Court C, said, "Our

th e

prison conditions and al­

speakers

ideas

welcome.

they could try to appeal only to

stock­

aid,

The discussions are totally open.

Anyone's

with any one group.

providing counseling, secur­

proving

will discuss drugs in Tacoma.

refrain

press;

discussion in

methers and a group from the Ta­

To do this, Court C has had to

lication and distribution of books, pamphlets

concerning returnable bottles, will

be dealt with. Saturday night John coma Narcotics Treatment Center

anyone from the Tacoma Six to th e people

things at the sa m

promotes

life-styles. The quest is to force people to communicate; the goal is to build bridges between factions ripped apart by hasty

allowed many artists the opportunity to displ ay

the open stage

talk.

objection, military regulations and

In such an arena, one senses the obvious attempt of in· dividuals to facilitate the exchange of differing ideologies and

munity participation in fully." B ut

well give way to a puppet show.

Pacific Counseling Aids O.l.'s operates as

Tacoma politicians and Fort Lewis G.I.'s. A clerk talks to a drug

pleasant

cam­

music,

a

healthy

outlet

for people. In so doing it has be­

A HUGE BULLETIN BOARD of IocaJ

news

ereets visitors to CourtC.

come

the

center

of

a

experience in Tacoma.

wonderful


MOORING MAST

Wednesday, Oct. 21, 1970

Page Five

for Cultural and Creafve Express·on Artists Mall Slinlulates Talent By BARB MORRIS Court C is a marketplace of tal­ ents where everyone does his own thing,

where

creativity

self-expression

replace

the

and

familiar

stamp "made in Japan." At

the

intersection

of

Court C

and lIth Street a sign on a door

"311 Galleries in Music."

reads,

Inside Charley Bennett has given

art a new atmosphere. On the

main

floor

is

a

music

store specializing in almost every kind

of

stairs

"blues" albums, are

sculpture,

displayed and

pottery

and up­ paintings, anywhere

from the $5 price range to over

$1,000. No plush carpeting, No soft lights. Charley says, sphere

"I think the atmo­

makes this place.

It's re­

laxed and easy." For

his

grand

opening

show,

coming up October 24-25, Charley has collected paintings of William Phillips,

ARTISTS' MALL provides quiet, relaxed atmosphere for browsing.

Betty

Tronsdale,

a

Mears,

'59

PLU

and

Jay

graduate.

reports t estifyin g that he

i

unfit

ment, he said they were "so happy to get back they don't care about

at least one

aids those members of the military

base

who question its policies by advis­

week he is supposed to be trans­

ahead

of his records. This

either

military

authority

or

the

G. 1. Movement." Many of the men who are coun­

ing them of rights which give them

ferred to Korea, again losi ng his

to fight arbitrary rules.

records and a chance for an opera­

seled

paranoid

about

The Service plays a s.izable role

tion he has needed for two years,

the power of the military.

Many

of Theoda Lester, a Black National­ ist

Who

was

sentenced

three

to

years of hard labor last Thursday for

refusing

to

shave

his

beard

and cut his hair, and the pending

He re fe rred to rank

s

"some­

are

almost

have urgent physical or psychiatric

thing to wear on your arm to L

problems that are being neglected.

ov er people. You just have to be

All

careful

thing

not to lose it."

He

was

have

decided

wrong

there

about

the

way

once a sergeant; now he is a pri·

Army has treated their individual

vate.

case.

And all feel that what the

He also said officers "have the

military has done regarding their

right to pass law and judgment."

particular case either is or should

for refusing to go to Vietnam, (All

In a military trial,

be Illegal.

the

"Ft.

the presiding

to

commented,

establish

an

"We're

arts

and

crafts center-something that will provide

an

outlet

for

everyone's

Such

an outlet is

Artists'

Mall,

found in the

a section

of Court

C which house s a variety of "mini­ shops" that feature products rang­ ing from puppets to potholders. Mrs. Gladys Cox, who describes herself

as

"the

neighborhood

grandmother" when she's at home, often works on her crocheted doi­ lies

while

tending

the

arts

and

crafts booth. She learned to crochet when she was eight. and makes potholders, napkin hold­

to

with

and

the

two

friends

variety

their

of

the

copper work,

Faulkner-£ome short, others tall,

Among the many shops availahle at Court C, in Tacoma, there are the

friendly

a

charge.)

entire

mall.

atmo­ They

a bookstore offering an added col­

They also receive less spectacu­ lar cases.

the

relaxed

er shop, and The American Dream,

and/or

of

and

dis­

status

lection of recent contempory wri­

A serviceman in basic

bulbs, sand.

in

airbrush

and

velvet,

and in a corner booth Steve Olsen hangs his sign, "Posters and Paint­ ings."

Examples

work

hanging

of

on

their

the

handi­

walls

are

evidences of their talents. ing,

jewelry,

knitting.

A

gems,

and

custom

se ior citizens

group

sponsors a small-scale art gallery where amateur artists can display their works for a minimal charge. Mr.

Chamberlain,

proprietor

of

a puppet business, uses his lot as a factory-stage where he nf)t only creates

his

toy

characters.

but

also stars them in live shows which he produces.

mache, though Mr. Chamberlain is also experimenting with glove-type and rod puppets and marionettes. "We're like a family here," says Mrs. Cox.

"We don't dress alike,

and our interests aren't the same. But everyone is sO' friendly. girl

wears

over

overalls

there

always

with patches,

and

I think they're cute!"

the

fact

that

young

work together, and other,

becoming

and

respect

more

or

old each

less

a

special kind of a family unit.

two in particular which emphasize

are The Daily Flash, a unique post­

of

portraits

ed

By UNDA GARDNER

sphere

change

light

cartJns,

Both Book Store and Poste Shop Emphasize Individuality

a

refused

milk

wine bottles.

"The

Candle s are the specialty of Judy

six are conscientious objectors who been

variations:

forms,

The puppets are made from paper

She also stretches glass bottles

husband

square

Farther on: rock and wood paint­

have

continually

jello

creative abilities."

the

Lewis

of

Works

is some­

6," who come to trial next Monday

court-martial

Mud

When asked how most Vietnam

recourse

in such prominent cases as th ose

ning. As Jim Kessler of the Family trying

ones,

In another stall an artist paints

But gallery art is only the begin­

a.nd ashtrays, to name a few.

transferring him (without his re­

teresting

able type of media," he says.

wind chimes, wall plaques, flowers,

cords). keeping him

Counseling

located in Court C

and almost every imagin­

and the defense lawyer. veterans regarded the G.I. Move­

Pacific

pen in ink and copper

officer appoint s the Court, the jury,

tell him they cannot discharge him without his records, but they keep

authority.

prints,

round

a variety of molds to produce in­

"We've got realistic and abstract paintings,

products

without question by installing in its

Service (PCS)

with a focus on variety.

Her

for military service. His superiors

of

ones, and some shapeless. She uses

contribute

The military tra in s men to obey membership a respect for and fear

multi-colored,

ferent group of Northwest artists,

ers, and magnet butterflies.

Center Cites Military Neglect By DAVE THORSON

Each month he will feature a dif­

"There

is

something

everyone," she

said,

here

for

referring to

the "arts and crafts" mood of the various shops. In one day, a law­ yer, a young child, a grandmother, and

a

drug

Daily

addict

Flash,

overall,

came

which

to

the

reflects

an

everyday view of the us­

training came into the office scared

ters and newspapers that are ordin­

ual type of clientele

to death he was going to be court­

arily hard to find.

there's no big drug scene here,"

martialed for having a dirty wea­

The bookstore contains a variety

pon. He was referred to a compet­

of

ent Lawyer.

authors

from

Shakespeare,

Another serviceman has needed

Jerry

and

Rubin

almost

to

every

a hernia operation for two years:

category of books are available at

it

reasonable prices. What makes this

is

finally

scheduled

for

next

month. He was pu t in the stockad e

bookstore

for two weeks for refusing an order

to

carry

because (The should

60-lb. of

bags

his

Army's have

of

hernia

potatoes condition.

philosoph followed

the

said

while

he

was

One

can

extremely friendly one, where peo­ ple from "all walks of life shop,"

stockade he was handcuffed to an

as one customer described it.

awakened mornings with a broom­

ger shop,

He also tried to commit suicide

black-light

while in the stockade and has since separate psychiatric

THE HOUSE OF SCIENCE When I see you,

features a well-situated room

which

displays

lows,

to

these, and

anywhere.

In

addi­

hundreds

of

other

rare

posters

cover

earrings,

incense,

pil­

used records for $1.00, and

other interesting objects.

shoulder.

rapidly

cooperation,

respect, and mutual concern. She commented on the fact that com­ petition

could

not

be

tolerated,

all of the shops at Court-C are one­ of-a-kind,

ranging

from

a

The young girl behind the count­

Any

mode of dress is

"accept­

tomer

is

looked

upon

as

that

when

Court

C,

people they're

enter

into

the for

the

shops

eek

to

dividual.

WRITTEN AT A TABLE NATIONAL PARK AT 12:00 AUGUST 12, 1970 The glow recede

into ashes,

the interplay of fire and wood concluded,

mous, had a lot to say about the

Da rkness rises on all sides

Daily Flash and its relationship to

when I tel\ you goodbye.

the entire Court C mall. She stress·

-William D,

as

CI. C.

provide

what they can offer for E V E R Y in­

er, who wished to remain anony­

UNASSUMING ENTRANCE cloaks creative complex known

in­

recognized

A lIne devoid of

-William D. Hastings

an

dividual. She concluded by saying

miracle stretch straps fr om the House of Science.

bead

shop to an antique shop.

that

available

the walls and ceiling, not excluding

down the gentle line of your

has

through

ers

hand-made

and long to run my hand

only

be hazardous

which

what they are, as individuals, and

popular

technology

grown

C,

some of the best black light post­ tion

I remember the miracle of modern

scandal could

Court

able," since each browser or cus­

The Daily Flash, a somewhat lar­

slick.

to

ciples that Court C is established upon. It's not difficult to see that

hungry till. The atmosphere is an

the

drug

ing to worry about an over-anxious

orders

in

she added, "There's just no room for it." She went. on to say that a

since it would contradict the prin·

sales clerk who wants to fill the

overhead pipe and beaten. He was

received five

special?

"But

browse at his leisure without hav­

He

is:

and then filed a complaint.)

He

so

there.

Hastings


Wednesda y , Oct. 21, 1970

MOORING MAST

Insurance

Prof Examines Policy Options Editor's Note: The following ar­

ticle , the

second in a series of

three, is intended as general in· formation uSE·rul to st ude n ts con­

t e mpl ating

the purchase of

in s u rance.

Dr.

• Endowment

surance

were

college-age allocate life

a sav­

discussed.

adult

some

of

insurance,

available

does his

th'e to

income

for

forms

are

next

con­

what

becomes

If

decide

the

Life insurance contracts ,or pol­ icies

can

be

classified

into

four

general types.

• Term insurance pays benefits

to the beneficiary only if the death of the insured person occurs within a

fixed time period.

• S trai g ht or ordinary life (same

times

called

whole

life)

Insurance companies offer a wide variety

of

policy

forms that

are

combin2.tions of these four general types. Although the array O'f forms and

brand names

complicate

the

picture, the basic principle of life insurance is relatively simple. It is a cooperative risk-sharing plan in which the insured

person

pays a

part of his earnings into a fund to

make provision for the time when his income ceases because of his death. The event insured aga inst ,

death,

is

uncertain death,

certain to happen . The aspe ct

is

the

time

of

and this uncertainty is the

sharing group, the insurallce com­

in advance and stated in the con­

when signed by both parites, the

person's

life span at a premium rate fixed tract.

pany.

The

life

insurance

policy .

insured person and the insurance

company, is

Initiative 256 (Continued)

To needs

a

provide of

contract. for

persons

the

manetary

financially

de­

pendent upon the insured inillvid­

People have asked why they don't

ous amount

hear a defense of 256. The answer

people of Washington for

of

support from

the rea­

Olre

son-we want to see all the trash

\lal, or to provide cash to pay the

debts remaining after the death of

the policy holder, are reasons for buying any of the first three types

If we don't find a lot more money

cleaned up! 256 will do something

ficially not taking a stand on 256.

and a lot more volunteers,

about Litter and solid waste.

But the second industry front, Cit­

will

izens Committee Against 256, is us­

and UPS are doing a lot for this

derway

ing lniative 40' in an all-out effort

initiative. PLU is doing practically

thinking that 256 is a lie and that

to defeat 256 even though Iniative

nothing.

I nitative 40 is the truth. We need

di vidual buyer, using some of the Term i nsuran e sho ul d be used

The Washington Committe:e is of­

be no

defense.

High

there

Now a massive campaign is un­

schools

to

con

the

people

into

Recently, grocery stores in Ta­

people willing to work for what we

vembr and could conceivably exist

coma started handing out flyers in

beli'eve to be the truth about 256

as law alongside 256.

an attempt to deceive the

from

40 will not be on the ballot in No­

The

campaign

of

the

Citizens

Committee is heavily financed as

about

the

results

of

public Last

256.

spring Iniative 256 had a tremend­

now

until

Nov.

Contact

3.

Anne Sare at LE 1-7625 if you want to help.

ther

group

sponsors

will

are)

reveal

and

the

who

its

people

of

Citizens Against 256 are con.stant­ ly quoting figures about how many jobs and

how

will be lost if 256 goes into effect. These

figures are quoted

from a

study made by Harry J. Prior in

Seattle which is, in effect, a sec·

ret document as it is impossible to obtain a copy. Initiative

256

needs

you;

h'elp!

ASPLU Signs New Contracts first

of

these

for

a

contracts

sored

this

by

ASPLU

the

weekend

the

new

is

as

is

University

spon­

part

celebration

of

opening

Center,

stu­

dents may purchase the $3.00 seats for $1.00,

and the $2.00 seats for

50 cents. These tickets will go on sale next

Monday,

October

Desk. The other new contract is with of

the

best

show

groups

around, The Association. They will

be here on February 11. Coming

up,

We

also

have

the

Friends of Distinction, famous for their hits, "Grazing in The Grass," "Going in Circles," and "Love or Let Me Be Lonely." They will per· form here on Sunday evening, No­ vember 22.

ity to become part of this campus through the new off campus organ­ of

Off­

under

the

leadership

of Greg

". . .

signed,

newed by the policy holder without

an increased premium rate for his

life,

or

limited

payment lHe. Which of the three to choose must be decided by the in­ foUowing suggestions. only

needs.

to·

provide

The

for

premium

Limited p yment life policies pro­ span of policyholders, but are paid

up for full face value in a specified period, such as 20 or 30 years ("20-

pay-life" or "30-pay-life" policies). Premium payments are computed as in straight life, but are higher because

the

total

in

communication

that

ha

been

With the support of you, the off­ campus

student,

we

can

develop

into a group as active at this uni· versity as join

tiS

any dorm.

at

our

next

So,

please,

meeting

on

October 22 at 4:30 in the U.C We can help make this campus through involvement.

the total computed for the life ex· pectancy of the insured person un­ der straight life. A selling point of­ ten advanced for limited payment

life is that the purchaser can af­

ford a higher premium charge dur­

ing the period of maximum earn­ bg s. Howe er any higher -premium

form

of

insurance

reduces

drive to school - go to class - drive home-syndrome and

to

support and

sponsor activities providing the co­ hesion

necessary

to

grate the off-campus the

campus

Much

really

inte­

student into

Lessons

vidual can obtain for a given

between

classes

KNIT and PURL 406 Garfield LE 7-5317

If the c ol l ege-a g e adult has no

dependents,

but

wishes

or

tirement

some

other

The

term· insurance

component

would pay his beneficiary the face

val u e of th e policy if the insured person

died

w it hin

endowment

perio d .

the

On

the

endowment

period,

is computed as in an

additional

term

141st &

M ...nuin

Pcacific Avenue

-CLOSED ANGElO

H iahw&Y"

MONDAYS--

MARZANO,

Pro.i,ltr

insurance

loading

factor

charge

for th e endowment-component. en­

is

dowment

insuranc

policies

than straight life.

expenditure

In deciding whether t

agreement terminates and the pol-

(Continued

opt for an on

Lakewood Buffet House FOR BUFFET DINING FIRESIDE LOUNGE OPEN FROM 10

a.m.

to 2 p.m.

Menu Service in tbe Lounge.

AND AT LUNCH and DINNER at COLUMBIA CENTER WED., THURS., and FRI.

$1.75 Stella's Flowers, sponsored by Spurs

pro­

vide les s -life insurance for a given

insurance

ROI -Dee-Voo the

face

plus

SOLD ALL DAY IN THE UNIVERSITY CENTER

"on

the

to' him. Since the premium cha rge

ANGEI..O'S - CHICKEN

otber

value o f the policy would be paid

Homecoming Mums

SPAGHETTI

specifi e d

the

hand, if the policy-holder survived

ing formed and the constitution is

PIZZA - RAVIOLI

type of

l ife insurance c oul d be considered.

of the machinery to run

are be­

estab­

purpose,

the endowment insurance

such an organization is in the pro­ been elected, committees

to

lish a sav ings program for his re­

community."

cess of being set up. Officers have

ex­

penditure.

(Formerly Olav's)

given

the

amount of protection that arl indi­

temporary

based on the insured person's age

YARNS and NEEDLECRAFT

paid-in

amount

over the shorter period must equal

in thoe new U.C. will definitely aid less than desirable in years past.

usually

a new medical examination, but at

OPEN DAILY FROM 11 :30 a.m. to 8 p.m.

to alleviate the detached

26 at

the University Center Information

one

sociation. But this year, off camp­ us students have a real 0ppoTtun­

Federation

straight

cf the term period the

aims in the following way:

special concert

concert

dif­

fuse as the off-campus students as­

the

is

that the policy can be reo

Gruzenski, who outlined the club's

rriday, November 6, at 9:00 p.m. Because

as

is

tainment Series Committee. Bread

people

know there is nothing quite

Campus Students. The organization

been made by the ASPLU Enter­ The

against itself

can not stand." As many

ization,

Two m w contracts have recently

with

divide ' d

contract

means

currently under revision. An office

By MIKE SWENSON

"A house

surance,

sj::ecified time pe riod. At the end

Off-Campus Students Organize

much tax revenue

of life insurance policies-term in­

and his chance of dying within the

is the Washington Committee (nei­

the

vide protection for the entire life

entire

insured

a renewable or convertible clause. This option, if in force at the time

in the policy.

risk tha t is accepted by the risk­

the

ash surrender value.

Often term insurance policies have

new age bracket.

extends

over

icy has no

paid to the insured only if he sur­

vives the fixed time period stated

S.ideration.

is that we don't have any money.

insurance and

ment." The endowment savings are

B us iness

In the previous article some ba­

ay about the problem of

term

Administra­

of

sic reasons for purchasing life in­

solid waste disposal.

cines

com­

insurance

ings plan known as "pure endow­

By DR. A. J. LAUER

ever to

payments so that the policy can be

tively few years.

life insurance agents Or firms.

(Continued from Pa ge 1)

is

paid up for face value in a rela·

Ufe

ti o n, and has no connection wi t h

returnable bottle littering Washington StaCe highways.

lite

eight years. He tea ch es in PLU's

School

­

payment

Lauer served as

a corpo rate insurance buyer for

PASSAGE OF INITIATIVE 256 will alleviate the proble m of non

• Limited

straight life with higher premium

Page 8)


Wednesday, Oct. 21, 1970

M OORI NG MAST

Page Seven

Under the Grandstand By DAVE SODERLUND Last week's little diversion with Pacific's Boxers will hopefully have

served to give the Lutes the confidence in their passing game needed to overcome the Whitman troops Saturday afternoon.

exactly heavy competition,

but after three extremely

Pacific was not physical

games

in a row a breather must have felt nice. Perhaps the individual hero of the afternoon was linebacker Dave

Anderson. Anderson spent much of his time in the Boxer backf.ield, roar­ ing in through the gaping hole left by the wing-back-in-motion, and was

a big factor in the Lutes' six interceptions. He was personally respon­

sible for (by Jack Sareault's count, not mine) two inbe-rceptions and

five incompletions in addition to decking the Pacific QB four times for 38 yards in losses.

It was good to see Jack Irion back in action again. jack did not seem to be hampered by the concussion incurred twO" weeks ago and did an excellent job on pass defense. He came close to intercepting passes a couple of times and is still looking for his nineteenth career theft. That

one, if it comes will set a new career interception record and give rookie Greg Collman, who picked off four last weekend, something to shoot for. (Incidentally, Irion was weaning a special air-suspension hel­ met to cushion the hard knocks-whatever the method, it kept Jack

functional, even though he looked kind of weird pumping up his head periodically. )

*

*

*

Intramural action has narrowed to the championship tournaments in both leagues this week. In A League Evergreen, Stuen-Cascade, Al­

QUARTERBACK JIM HADLAND gets good protection from Lutes in Saturday's actlon_

pine, and Ivy will square off to determine the ulbimate champion. In B League Nordic II, Evergreen, Rainier, and Alpine will do the same. The

finals of this double-elimination tournament, the Second Annual Toilet Bowl, will be held Saturday morning at 10 on the intramural fields,

come rain, snow, or hangovers.

I{nights Massacre Boxers 45-14 The sun shone once mor·e for the

*

Green RJiver Community College is sponsoring a badminton tourna­ ment on November 7. Any student or faculty member wishing to pa.rti­ cipate should see the one and only Mike Benson in the equipment room or call ext. 339.

as the Knights took it to the hap­

less Pacific Boxers to the tune of 45-14. For the third week in a row,

the Boxers watched the ball move

*

*

PLU football team last Saturday

I have been asked to run at the mouth with the proverbial bull­ manunu in order to fill some empty space. I can't guarantee that any­ thing I have to say this week is better than that empty space. In fact,

' d a doubt worse as many would have it, anything I have to say is beyon than nothi.ng. But allow me to say at this time, should I have any friends in the land of the discalced, that 1 would be most happy to hear from

you in the the form of a letter, postcard, or 'just some scribbling on a

through

effortlessly,

them

losing

their games to Lewis and Clark, a

by

us

and

Linfi'eld,

score of 125-30. first

The

duce

any

did

quarter

scoring,

combined

the

but

pm­

not

Lutes

kept a proprietary hold on the ball. seconds

into

the

second

piece of toilet tissue. Send any and all correspondence to foot rubber,

Eleven

footrubber will die ...

yard field goal to give the Lutes a

your friend and mihe, c/o Mooring Mast. Perhaps, without your love,

Renting a House?

Need a Ride?

Eleven Lutes, with stick in hand,

awaited the whistle. The center squared up with her head over the

Heard a good one lately? 3 lines, appro)(. 21 words in Desperate For-urn only 75 cents.

it out,

By DIANA DAHL

Selling Something?

ball and

for

began the bully

as the

whistle blew. The pass went to the inner who soon passed to the wing.

Place your offer, message,

The

confession or whatever at the

wting being

free

dribbled

to

the 25 yard line, centered the ball,

Info Desk by Sunday evening.

the center drove, the goalie kicked

and wing pushed it back,

the halfback tried to clear, the in­

ner rushed and as the ball went in the cage the eleven players ex­ uberantly yelled.

The women's field hockey team

has done it again. Friday they beat Everett 4-0. Goals w ere scored by

Linda Zurfluh (3), and Evelyn Tis­

del (1).

PARKLAND CHEVRON

exciting. Why not plan it in your

coming game.

It should be very

day's activities and cheer the team on to victory NO. 4.

FREE WASH WITH LUBRICATION

*

120th & PACIFIC AVENUE

Phone LE 1·9988

Support your local hockey team

-the more moving feet the better!

The hockey team extends a con­

gratulations

to the

football

team

for a game well played.

gte1/44

123rd and PACIFIC AVENUE

the 12. Tom O'Rourke, in at quar­ terback, ran one play and then hit

McGrath for the score. The Lutes

repossessed the ball once more be­

fore halftime and drove 76 yards for

score

another

still

plays. The TD came on

a

in

seven

pass from

Hadland to Dave Greenwood. mak­

ing the halftime SCOre 24-0.

The second half continued in the

dogged

the

Boxer

day, picked off

a

receivers

Pacific finally got

gone in the third quarter as Ward

Hadland-Halstead up a pitchout and rambled 25 yards for

picked the

After

score.

the

successCul

two-point conversion the score was 31-8. When they got the ball back

again the Boxers put on their only sustained drive of the day. march­

took

string

the first

at

ball

the

attempt to

an

in

47

Pacific

the

beat the clock to paydi rt. The drive

was accomplished in 42 seconds in plays, with the scoring

five pas

John son

Bernard

to

going

heave

again to make the final score 45­ 14.

Pac.ific stifled

the PLU ground with what was virtually a nine-man line, so the Lutes took to the air for the most of the after­ game

noon. 209 yards of PLU's 326 yards of total offense were th rough the

air as Hadland went 14 for 24 and O'Rourke came on to hit 5 of 9 Dave Halstead led Lute rushers with 37 yards, wh i le Ed McGrath hauled in 8 passes for 104 yards rnard JOhnSOIl grabbed an­

and

other five_

Homecoming next weelrend brings in the Whitman MiSSionaries, who,

their 31-14 loss to Linfield

despif

this last weekend, are formldable.

La st year on their hom grounds Lutes rolled up close to 600 th

interceptions, Hadland hit Bernard

managed

After another of Collman's four

in

yards

still

and

offense

total

to lose.

Scandinavian Seminar Plans Tour Scandinavian Seminar is now ac­

cepting

applications for its

study

abroad program in Denmark, Fin­ Norway,

land,

or Sweden for the

academic year 1971-72. This living­ and-learning experience is design­ ed for college students, graduates

and other adults who want to be­ acquiring a second language. initial

An

3-4

weeks

language

course, followed by a family stay, will

give

the

student opportunity

to practice the language on a daily

basis and to share in the life of community.

the

part of the

ear

major

the

For

he is separated

from his fellow American students

living and studying among

Scandi:

t a "People's College" residential school for continuing

navians

adult education) or some

more

cialized institution.

spe­

All Seminar participants meet at week-long

the

year

and

which navian

the

Mid­

Introductory,

Final

Sessions.

during

and

Scandi­

American

Program

Dire tors

work

closely with each student on mat­ ters related to his studies, exper­

EDWARD FLATNESS

Phone 537-0205

Lutheran Mutual Life Insurance

District Agent P_O.

Box: 2275- Parkland 98444 LEnnox 1-0826

iences and progress. The focus of the.. Seminar program is the stu­ dent's

Study

Jnd p ndent

Project

in his special field of interest. More and more American

colleges and

univerSities are giving full or par­

tial credit for the Seminar year. The fee, covering tuition, room,

PHONE LE 7-5361

College Cleaners Parkland's Quality Dry Cleaners

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT IN THE VIKING ROOM

Johnson for another score to make

it 38-14.Then, with 1:11 remaining,

ing 92 yards for their final score.

12169 Pacific Avenue

(Just two blocks east of the college)

aU

flat pass at the

FLOWERS, Inc.

Stella and Ken Jacobs

who

Collman,

vein. Greg

same

come part of another culture while ARTISTRY IN FLOWERS

Barlo's Restaurant

off and Keith Koehn recovered on

The Lutes are now preparing to day at 10 a. m. in the annual home­

WASH

kick:

following

the

fumbled

cific

on the board with seven minutes

Ralph Andersen's

PARKLAND CA

the 14 to cap a 32-yard drive. Pa-.

the end zone.

chop down the Loggers this Satul'­

AND

things began to

happen. Jim Hadland scored from

Pacific 3-yard line and waltzed into

Hockey Team Bullys Everett

No'tiee

The

3-0 lead. Then, with seven minutes

footrubber

Your friend in fungus,

quarter Ed McGrath kicked a 29­

half,

left in the

llUS PARK AVENUE PARKLAND, WASH.

board, and one-way transportation, is

$2,200.

scholarship

A

For further

limited

loans

are

number

information

SCANDINAVIAN

of

available. write

SEMINAR,

to

140

West 57th Street, New York, N.Y.

10019.


Wednesday, Oct. 21, 1970

MOORII\JG MAST

Page Eight

Vote 19 Effort Solicits Help

MOOBING MAST

\

By PAT RICKLE

. TO THE POINT

They may be committed to fed­ eral

and state

prisons.

They are

MUMS FOR SALE

required to pay taxes, paying $50 million

per

year.

be

Buy your Homecoming Mums on Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday

But

anytime in the University Center, or during lunch and dinner in the cc.

The argument that if one is old

Students' International Meditation Society will meet tonight, October

enough to fight, he's old enough to

21, in A- lOl. at 8:00 p.m: Interested students and faculty please come.

drafted into the

military

19-year

vote

They

service.

olds cannot

carries a

can

deeper

vote.

MEDITATION LECTURE

meaning­

CAMPUS INTERVIEWS

and that is that no person should

Mr.

be assigned to a life or death situ­

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION

automobile. With this privilege he

Registration closes November 24, 1970 for the Graduate Record Ex­

opportunity to

amination to be given on Saturday,

maim or kill someone else.

ing Saturdays: January 16,

education on the young car driver,

USSAC VOLUNTEERS, meeting

an archaic tradition

Vietnam wo unded at Madigan Hospital from 7:00 to 9:30 p.m. For further information about the Oct. 28 trip call Walt Binz at ext. 1235.

a candidates' forum, with representatives from the sixth congressional district and the 29th

of

the

qualifications

ciudng With

the

far

minimum

voting, voting

few exceptions,

age.

voting

age

requirement

of

21

years, but in several it is appreci­ ably higher. Of the seventeen coun­ tries which have reduced the mini­ mum voting age to in

Latin

America

Communist

18, eight are and

nations.

eight

The

are

other

is

Israel. Perhaps the biggest single rea­ SOn why there has been relatively little success with efforts to lower the voting age is the lack of grass­ roots organization and support. No one

has

fervor

succeeded

in

among young

creating people

a

such

as they have had for other causes. The

grass-roots

organization

at

BERG-KNAPTON-A

candlepassing

was

held

in

Kathy Berg to Terry Knapton. Kathy is a sophomore chemistry major from Enumclaw, Wash., and Terry is a senior from Vashon Island majoring in business. No date has been set for their wedding. SHERMAN-CARLSON-The

engagement

of

Miss

Claudia

Sherman

to

Steve Carlson has been formally announced. Both Claudia and Steve are ern Washington State College, and Steve is a senior majoring in socio­

She is from Portland and he is from Tacoma. They plan to marry in May of '71 and continue their education in pre-med. COLEMAN-AIKIN-At a candlepassing in Harstad Hall,

Miss

Shirley

Coleman announced her engagement to Travis Aikin, Jr.

Shirley is a

senior

graduate

nursing-sociology major

from

Tacoma.

Travis,

a

of

Tennessee A. and I. State in business administration, is from Texas. Their wedding has been planned for May of '71. TORGERSON-HUNZIKER-The engagement of Miss Dianne Torgerson and Conrad Hunziker was annouced at a candlepassing ceremony

SCHAEFER-PAULSON-Harstad Hall was the setting for the candle­

If you are willing to leaflet on Oc­

passing held by Miss Diane Schaefer to announce her engagement to

tober 26, 27, or 28 in the afternoons

Dave

or evenings, then either attend the

major, and Dave is a junior pre-seminary-philosophy major from Spo­

final briefing on Sunday,

kane. No date has been set for their wedd'ing.

25, in X-201 at 6 p.m. or call Pat

Paulson. Diane,

from Geneva, Switzerland,

If you would like notice of your engagement printed in the Mooring

should t'e considered a major com·

insurance type of savings program,

mitment of income over an extend­

the

ed

consider the liquidity he deSires for For

the

cannet

withdraw

the

of

policy

his

and

policyholder cash

still

period

demands

of

the

insurance in force. He can get at his cash only by borrowing, usually at a true annual interest rate of about five percent.

thoughful

are

the

same.

A

person covered by a $10,000 policy leaves

$10,000

to

his

surance, straight life, limited pay­ ment life, or endowment insurance. terminate

on

the insur'ed person's death. Because

of

the

unique

decision-mak­

COMMUNITY

STUDENT CONGREGATION Sundays 8:00 a.m.-Tower Chapel 10:30 a.m.-This Week: Liturgy:

Second

of protection and investment (cash

Setting

value) in all of the lit', insurance

8:00 p.m.-Innovative Service:

types

C'xc ept

purchase of

a

term

insurance, the

life insurance policy

Contemporary Music and Dancing. OPEN EVERY DAY Live Music Every

Pastor Taylor mixture

Dancing The Place to go for

AND AS A

beneficiary

ou's Place

that

INDIVID UALLY

whether that policy was term in­

Premium payments

one

Worship God

coverage, the death benefits to the person

and

ing.

In all four types of life insurance insured

time,

value

keep

Interested seniors

YOUNG LIFE MEETS

University

Center

ity Center (main

LARSON LECTURES Steve Larson, 'a PLU senior, will give a lecture concerning "The Church in the Third World," on Saturday, Oct. 24 at 10:00 a.m. Spon­ sored by the Dept. of History, the lecture will

be held in X-loi.

TUGWEU CONSTITUTION Copies of the Tugwell Constitution are on sale in the

University

Bookstore. The cost is $1.00. Center Magazine is also available in the library.

SPEAKERS FORUM During Thursday Convo,

Vern Hanson's Social

Intervention

class

is sponsoring Mrs. Harriet Colbert of the John Birch Society. Speaking in X-lOl, she will deal with the organization from the member's point of view.

GO.GO DANCERS NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY

21 or over $2.00 per hour to start Nights. Full or Part Time

Insurance Article (Continued) his savings.

is a junior nursing

Mast, please call ext. 1146.

should

schools of business.

Young Life, a Christian youth group, will have a casual meeting

in

help for the final campaign drive.

purcha er

by many graduate

tion and applications. This test w.ill also be given on April 3, 1971.

Lynn and Dick are seniors with double majors in biology and chemistry.

of '71.

prospective

is required

should contact the Counseling and Testing Center in A-I09 for informa­

floor ) . All persons interested are welcome-bring your thoughts.

tion major from Stockton, California. They plan to marry in the summer

from Page 5)

1971 Admission Test

for Graduate Study in Business is January 15, 1971. This particular test

ment to Dick Ostenson at a recent candlepassing in Stuen Hall. Both

visit in May and is now in need of

( Continued

ATTENTION SENIOR BUSINESS STUDENTS The registration deadline for the February 6,

of conversation, devotion, and study this Sunday, October 25, at 8 :45 p.m.

mittee

at Ext. 867 or John at 1436.

the

We will· meet in the east loun ge of the new Uni ve

Los Angeles, California. Conrad, also a junior, is a mathematical-educa­

October

Following

GESCHWIND-OSTENSO -Miss Lynn Geschwind announced her engage­

cratic Students Coaltion. The com­ Kramer's

by sorority members.

logy at PLU. They plan to be married ,in June of '71.

Harstad Hall. Dianne, who lives in Delta, is a junior nursing major from

Lud

Gowns will be modeled

the many different styles of wedding invitations that are available.

from Spokane. Claudia is a senior elementary education major at East­

PLU started last spring by Demo­ sponsored

is encouraged to

program will be a reception with displays of flowers, a cake, music, and

Harstad Hall to announce the engagement of Miss

of 21 years has been standard prac­

ern Europe also have a minimum

at 8: 15.

By LINDA BARKER

a minimum

times. Most of the nations of West­

Everyone

A fall and winter bridal show will be offered by Mu Phi on Oct. 27,

The Slute Faetory

in·

tice in this country since colonial

district.

MU PHI EPSILON BRIDAL SHOW

it

states,

within certain limitations, to estab­ lish

Legislative

attend.

ogy. S. Constitution,

Interested stu­

Tonight, at 8:00 p.m. in Washington H. S.'s cafeteria, there will be

of advanced education and technol­

perogative

February 27, and April 24.

CANDIDATES' FORUM HELD

visit

twice a month at Harstad,

not worthy of following in this day

the

college

formation and applications.

It seems about time that we face

Under the U.

Most

dents should contact the Counseling and Testing Center in A-I09 for in­

is nat even allowed to vote . . .

is

1970.

requisites to admission. This test will also be adl11linistered on the follow­

who has 3 years of maturity and

age of 21 is

December 12,

and university graduate schools require scores from the GRE as pre­

person,

the fact that the minimum voting

Co.

in the Placement Office in the University Center. Resumes are required.

of 16 can get a license to drive an

19-year-old

Wellcome

an emphasis in Sales and Marketing. Sign-up forms are now available

[n Washington State, a youngster

a

The Burroughs

logy majors, Pre-Meds, Pre-Dent, and Pre-Vets along with BBA's with

make the decisions for him.

yet,

representing

to interview any interested students. He is primarily interested in Bio­

right to help determine who shall

And

Prestbo,

(a pharmaceutical firm) will be on PLU's campus on Tuesday, Oct. 27,

ation who does not have the basic

has the unforunate

Wallace

Wed., Thurs., Fri & Sat.

PLAYERS CABARET

8602 So. Tacoma Way

JU 4-6722

Murph's Road Runner Food Service FEATURING-

Chicken Filet Road Runner Steak B-B-Q Sandwich Fish Sandwich Hamburger & Cheeseburger Hot & Cold Drinks

* This Week "SIDDARTHA"

Go out Pacific Ave. to -Roy Y, turn left on Mountain

HiWay, 2'12 miles.

*

The Road Runner will be on the perimeter of the campus between

9:00 and 10 p.m.

Tues., Wed., Thurs, and Fri. L OCA.T I O N S

* * *

In front (jof Pflueger By University Center By CUB on Wheeler St.


I(napp Solo Highlights Concert Mr. Calvin Knapp will be the fea­

tured soloist in. the first University

symphony

orchestra

concert,

No­

vember 3. A member of the music faculty,

Knapp

will

perform

Brahm's Piano Concert No. 1, D

of

his

mature

period,

example of pure, The

piec'e

American

of

and

is

an

classical music. Hovhannes,

composer,

an

exemplifies

one of the great variety of develop­ ments in 20th Century music. In­

Minor Op. 15.

spired

zart's Symphony No. 36 C Major,

to depict a contemplative,' transi­

A Ballade for Orchestra Op. 209 by

by the union of ad

The program, which includes Mo­

(K. V. 425) and Floating World­

Alan Hovhaness, shows the orches­ tra

in

three

distinct

styles

eriods of music.

and

Opening the program will be th'e

Mozart composition. Although, not as

well

known as

his last three

symphonies, the 36th is one of his

finest works. Written in a few days at

the

request

of

a

fri nd,

the

symphony represents the beginning

by

an

hist concept,

old

Japanese:Budd­

Hovhaness has tried

tory world which is brought to life nture with un­

certainty.

through three transitions and took five years to write.

According to Jerry Kracht,

symphony

tle

8"

X-201

defendants,

will

the

solo

and

in

tonight at 9 p.m. After he

speaks,

he

and

members

of

the

Resistance, an anti-draft organiza­

compliment

each

other."

was

one

Marshall and seven others were indicted by a federal grand jury fer violation of the riot-conspiracy law due to their activities in con­ nectien with the Feb. 17 Federal Courthouse demonstration in Seat­ tle. The

demonstration

was' held

"Chicago 7"

harmony in concertos. The orchestra,

year, Kracht is "very pleased with

delicate and tornado-like sounds."

The Brahm's cancerto is in the

romantic tradition, and shows the interplay

between

the

forces

of

soloist and orchestra. Begun when

Brahms was 21, the cancerto went

the next day if he wasn't arrested b fore then.

Marshall then left with Michael

Lerner, another "Seattle 8" defen­ dant

who

David

was

out

Dellinger,

a

on

bail,

and

defendant

in

community. Although early in the the

progress

trial.

ing

lot.

Plainclothes

police

Anticipating a.n active year, the

orchestra will be performing three

more concerts. The next program will feature Miss Vivian King, cell­

the

rally. Five of the eight were ar­

on April 16, but Marshall

went underground. On April 18, Marshall, wearing a

long, black raincoat and a Navy his

stocking

head,

cap

pulled

stepped

low

onto the

on

stage

of the anti-war rally at the Seattle

Center

at

3:05

p.m.

A

reporter

asked if he planned to give himself up.

"Man,

replied.

this

is

,it,"

will

The

sent

take

March

students

place

January

concert will

in

soloist

pre­

perform­

ances. In May, the concert high. light will of

be the world premiere

a work

member

of

by

the

David PLU

composition staff.

Robbins,

theory

Beginning at 8: 15 p.m. the con­

cei"t

is

complimentary,

and

will

Marshall

Although the rally was heavily

weighted with plainclothesmen and

away in

a car with Lerner and

F.B.I. agents and Seattle police

arrested Marshall in a tavern at On

April

20,

Marshall was ar­

VOICE OF lHE STUDENTS AT PACIFIC LUllIERAN UNIVERSITY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1970

VOLUME XLVIII

reduced from $25,000 to $5,000. On

April 28, he posted the bail and was released.

The eight will be tried in Tacoma

in the court of United States Dis­

trict Judge George H. Boldt begin­

ning at 9 a.m. next Monday, Nov.

9. One of the defendants, Michael Justesen, is still at large.

In addition to the SLF speaker

this evening,

the Democratic Stu­

AbortionForum Sparks Dialogue By BARB MORRIS "Does the unborn have a voice?" .

. "Should the mother have a

choice?" 'The basic issues behind the pro­ posed abortion reform legislation, Referendum 20, were explored and debated in an Abortion Symposium

dent Coalition is sponsoring speak­

held on campus October 19-20.

Society tomorrow night. That pro­

tion and the Law," was presented

gram will begin at 7:30 dn X-201.

CBS's news documentary, "Abor­ Monday night to introduce the sub-

Assembly

will

tion refO"rm were ,Z. Joseph Vozen­ i1ik, . M. D., retired captain of the

Dr. R.

Hartley

for at

least 90

(2) that the woman has resided in

days prior to date1:>f tennination; formed in

an

accredited

hospital

medical director for

Parenthood"

in

King

lawyer Mr.

D.

Laporte;

G. Kateerhagen, hemotolo­

less

a

physician

sary to

meet

gency.

determines

that

the medical emer­

Offenders could

be guilty of

gross misdemeanor.

a

The law further asserts that no

hospital

or

person

quired to participate

shall

be

re­

in a termi­

Tacoma

nation of pregnancy if he objects to

R,eferendum 20 provides for le­

such person shall be discriminated

the

Ballasoitis,

a

conditions

that

(I)

-

such

termination,

and

that

".no

against in employment or profes­ (Cclntinued

on

Page 3)

Children's Show Twists Old Tale son),

on

married and under the age of 18);

Washington state

termination is immediately neces­

and Dr. R.

Slyboots,"

adds

a

It concerns a wolf (Greg Thomp­ who

thinks

as human beirtt

Draft Counseling services available

the

Krause, the

"Grandmother

a discussion by Tom

by

by the State Board of Health, un­

sity of Puget Sound;

new twist to an old story.

Items to be covered at the meet­

or

(if the girl is un­

Clinical Psychologist at the Univer­

This fall's Children's Theater pro­

recommends

together);

or at a medical facility approved

staff of Tacoma

duction of "Red Riding Hood." or

legislation to the Senate.

living

General Hospital;

on the courtesy

der

the Assembly can veto any acts of

and

legal guardian

and (3) that the operation is per­

gal termination of pregnancy un­

I

prior consent be given by the w()­

man and her husband (if married

USAF Medical Corps and presently

area housewife.

for the night. With a 5% quorum

Counselor

Spokesmen on the panel for abor­

Eleanora

be

who attend constitute the Assembly

ASPLU

erS.

"Voice for the Unborn;" and Mrs.

is welcome to attend and to voice

Heavey,

and community lead­

gist and Pierce County chairman of

his or her opinion. Those students

ing include:

students

Dr. J.

Any member of the Student Body

also

of

The opposition panel consisted of

year in Kreidler Lounge tonight at

It

the referendum before an audience

Tacoma

7:30 p.m.

Senate.

panels argued the pros and rons of

County.

meeting for the second time this

the

ject, and the following night two

"Planned

he said he

ASPLU Assembly Meets Tonight ASPLU

NUMB5R SEVEN

trict Judge William T. Beeks. He

to arrest Marshall. After he spoke

The

ber 3.

Dellinger, but was followed closely.

F.B.I. agents, no effort was made rally ended,

MR. JERRY KRACHT will conduct the University orchestra Novem­

take place in Eastvold Auditorium.

No attempt was made immedi­

ers to appear from the John Birch

and the

a

and

ately to arrest Marshall. He drove

pleaded innocent and his bail was

blue

and

26.

and

were

war rally. Most of those indicted

rested

has

F. B. 1. agents followed them.

raigned before United States Dis­

in Washington, D.C., on April 16,

at

orchestra

with riot-clad officers to a park­

just two days before a large a.nti· speak

the

made."

walked past 10 police carS filled

The indictments were made public

to

a group of stu­

dent and faculty musicians is join·

pools, mysterious clangerings, and

about 5 p.m. He did not resist.

scheduled

Brahms

of the first to achieve this

the Chicago conspiracy trial. They

tion, will be open for questions.

to protest the

orchestral

forces are equally represented, and

ed by several persons from the

result in "wild whirl­

planned to turn himself in at noon

speak

the

final

Unusual combinations of moods

and music,

Seattle 8 Defendant to Speak Chip Marshall, one of the "Seat­

the

work is "a very strong piece in

which

ist,

By DAVE mORSON

conductor,

he

is

as

good

and strives to be·

Hoff

(Nicholas),

Frank

Calsbeck

(Peter) and Becky Shear (Mother).

All, except Gwen Larson and Bob Hoff, are new to Children's Thea­

ter.

Children'S Theater has produced

two

plays

each

year

since

1956.

come accepted as one. He steals

They are designed to appeal espe­

(Gwen Larson) and learns to walk

through the third grade. Between

lots; the feasibility of ASPLU elec­

learns the password used between

are expected to view "Red Riding

a

mother (Julie Harris).

at PLU; a representative from the Security

Department

will

the

discuss

Campus Security and the increas­

the

campus

movies

program. The floor will be opened

Unfortunately,

for any other items which may be

completely

of interest. a

If you have not been talking to Senator,

then

you

may

voice

your views at the Assembly meet· ings held monthly.

Red

Riding

Hood

Red Riding Hood and her grand­

tions being held in December and on

of

and talk exactly like her. He even

ing number of thefts in the parking

report

cloak

ways

ASPLU is presenting BREAD in concert at PLU Nov. 6 at 9:00 in Ol­ son

Auci;tor i um Tickets are now on sale to students at the Info. Desk .

for $1.00 and 50 cents.

and

is

Pennie

included Knight

wolf

tripped

grandmother in Also

the

control

his

up

the

end.

in

the

(Old

cannot

wolfish

by

the

cast

are

cially six

to

and

Bob

seven

in

pre - school

thousand

children

Hood."

Performances will be given on

Nov. 5, 6, 10, 12, and 13 for the var­

ious school districts in the area. On

Nov. 7 and

14, open productions

will be offered at 2:30 p_m. to ac­

comodate

Wolf),

those

the

students,

parents

and children whe were unable to

attend through their schools.


Wednesday, OCTober 28, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Two

Parallax

In the Last Hour

The Ungrateful Gooks'

With the issue of law and order predominating election­

rhetoric, the student intent upon working for a candidate has

By GLE N ANDERSON

found himself, more often than not, an issue and not a parti­ cipant. For many, he is the personification of every long-haired radical who ever burned a flag or bombed a classroom and his opinions are respected accordingly.

problem, however, when they say "think like us ... "-for I can not do that, and I wonder to myself why it has become so

hard. Upon the surface, such problems often appear the out­ growth

of

petty

generational

misunderstandings

and

little

more. A closer investigation, however, shows that it is not at all that simple. The uneasiness evidenced by our generation with the mechan ics of the electoral process is indicative of a

perceptive statement.

The difference is not over the need for change, both young and old admit that, but rather it is over the effectiveness of the method. Though the ballot has been offered in November, against the backdrop of candidates which offer no true choice, Nixons statements concerning the power of the vote possess a It is here that our uneasiness begins to grow.

For the

magnitude of the changes which we envision concern a basic redirection of our society. When such is the case, a commin­ menf is needed which goes far beyond the power of the ballot box . It must be a commitment which involves the life style of

How much influence we can hope to have upon the pres­ ent generation is problematic at best. On Iy the priorities which we are able to establish within our own generation will be sure -but it will take time. urgency

of

the

be soon enough.

problems

-John Aakre

to John Lindsay on the right.

Students at Liberty were encour­

aged to hate the Establishment be­

cause at 53000 tuition per year they

school named in honor of such li­

could

rtarians as Marx and Lenin.

members

academic prerequisites. The abili­ write

course

which

was

listed

365

which

their

of it.

Of

course,

some

Surprisingly enough, considering

the extreme emphasis on academic

advanced students could sign Bombs

speak

out into a tainted society.

as

tre::!dom, most of the students who

up for courses like Construction of

Simple

to

der that they wouldn't have to go

Picket Design 101 in the catalog.

Mor

afford

students stayed perennially in or·

was unim­

portant except as it pertained to one

well

minds b fore they had to become

At this university there were no

graduated had similar viewpoints.

offered

rour hours of credit with a lab sec·

They wanted to end poverty, over­

tion building.

jobs and earn lots of money.

throw the System-and get secure

tion which utilized the administra· Other

courses

theoretical natur

Eric

were of a more

politicians

awoke

from

enough to be a student at PLU.

ranging

MOORING .

. .

.

_ .. . ... . . . . .

BOB HASSELBLAD . .

.

KATE MANCKE

PAULA SEIBERT

..

. ... . .

DA VE SODERLUND

.. ..... ....

.

.

. . . . . . .. .

..

...

...... ..... ..... .

Editor

... . ................ ... . Managing Editor ..... News Editor

....... ..........

............ Copy Editor

..

Sports Editor

Circulation Manager

MARY SHADOFF PAUL BERG

....

DR. JOHN PETERSON

. ... . . ..

...... Business Manager Advisor

.. ............

STAFF-Glen Anderson, Paul Wuest, Kansas, Glen Zander, Steve Larson,

John

Hushagen,

Dave

Giles,

Heavey, Russ Johnson. Mary Jane

Dave

Dykstra,

Thorson,

Kristi

Torn

Joh.nson,

Becky Rodning, Bruce Bjerke, Cathy Wark, Steve Cook, Nancy Shaw,

Karen

Svendsen,

Wanda

Huber,

Bob

Steward,

David

Aakre, John Rankin. Scott Green, Priscilla Martens, Pat Stiles.

Lindsay

Grader,

The

Morris, John Beck.

Footrubber,

created a scandal in the U. S. only because they were slaughtered en masse at close range. Ameri·

cans don't worry about large numbers of human

horror was nicely justified by an American officer who offered the now-classic:

beings destroyed by bombs or cooked in napalm

"It became necessary

dropped from planes way up in the sky. But either

Linda

way, we turn hearts and minds against us. Of the

not a good way to win hearts and minds. American

planes

have

sprayed

50,000

tons

survivors, anyway.

of

So how is the hearts-and-minds count (not to be

defoliants over 4000 square miles of Vietnam. Scien­

confused with the body count)

Gardner,

Barbara

Opinions expressed in the Mooring Mast are not necessarily

those of Pacific Lutheran University, its administration, faculty, ar t he Mooring Mast staff. The MM reserves the right to edit all copy for length, propriety and libel. Materials submitted should be typ';!written, double·spaced with 65 spaces to the line. The deadline for each issue is 8 p.m. on the Sunday prior to publication.

going? Every year

tists are now discovering genetic damage done by

many thousands of South Vietnamese citizens join

er that we have deformed many Vietnamese child·

vaders, and pt'!)li,: opinion polls taken in South Viet­

defoliants to test animals, and we may soon discov­ That probably

hearts and minds either. As of November 1,

isn't

the Viet Cong in order to expel the American in­

winning any

nam indicate that, a.fter all our expense and bother, a

1969, we and our allies had

majority of South Vietnamese want U.S. troops to

get out of their country. Why, of all the ungrateful

killed 566,501 Vietnamese human beings and injured

things!

pressed it,

fore they'll appreciate us?

another

3.500,000.

As

"U.S.

one

Vietnamese

attacks kill more

citizen

ex·

How many of those gooks do we have to kill be·

civilians than

Letters to Our Editor formance of "Man of La Mancha."

To the Editor, On Tuesday, October 20, the stu·

dents

at

called

a

Kent

State

University

nation-wide

non-violent

moratorium on

"business as usu·

al." for this Friday, Oct. 30. The test

the

special state grand jury

which indicted 25 students, non·stu­

dents and faculty but exonerated

At this time

pecial thanks should

Craig Morgan, Kent State student body presid'cnt and an Air Force R.C.T.C. Cadet, made the call at

present instance, it was carefully

provided

by

Cervantes

when

created the character of Sancho.

ensen and forank Wilson, and their

comic relief figure is an extremely

year's Hom=coming, Diane Christ­

entire committee who spent many long

hours

making

this

year's

Homecoming the Barn Buster that

it was. Your efforts were appreci· ated by all whQ participated.

BiB Christensen

last week's

of

such

delicate matter and especially so must never overshadow Don Quix­

ote.

Secondly,

to

be

just

funny

enough (in the midst of the three

dry

the

audience's

critique

of the PLU production of Man of

eyes

without

breaking the entire mood takes an light

touch.

Falstaff

may well be a buffoon, but Sancho

cannot be one! Mark Scholz, under

La Mancha, I found one grave in·

were indicted, called for a day i n

in high tragedy is well established.

would be pleased. Bravo Mark!!

"what is happening to us, what i s

hence

meeting

a

of

the

entire

student

which

students

happening

to

would

civil

d.iscuss

liberties

justice. The place of comic relief

have

Falstaff.

America today" with parents, fac­

the

nation

demon­

strate their unity in whatever man· ner they desire, whether that be

through fasts, teach·ins, rallies, or whatever. Craig stressed that there

SENATE MEETING THURSDAY The Student Senate will meet tomorrow at 7:00 p.m. in Room 204 of the

University Center.

done

non-violently.

He

said

tr:ere are politicians in this country

who

are

hoping

for

violence

he

proposed

items

for

the

agenda

on

the campuses this weekend in or­

I)

Revised Grading System

2)

Committee Appointments

3)

Purchase of Projectors

4)

Purchase of a calculator

might get elected.

5)

Report on Draft and Coul1seling Conference

Morgan said, "We can't give them

6)

Campus Security

der that

they

Here

at

Pacific

Lutheran

Uni·

versity thet'e will be no organized strike as such. I would urge those students

that are

so inclined.

to

At last week's meeting, the ASPLU Senate confirmed the following appointments to the All-University Commission. Robert Baines Linda Loken

stay away from classes on their

K. J. Satrum

onw perogative. I would urge the

Tom Gumprecht

students

at PLU

to use this day

as a day of education, to educate themselves as to the situation the American student faces today

A!; Craig Morgan said, "We are asking that for don't

go

one day students

to classes,

their time drinking

ing football."

d:m't

spend

beer or play·

Thank you, Thomas R. Heavey

1970 <:ertainly was

a Hot Time in the Old Town. High· lights included capacity crowds at the

B.B.

King

Concert,

at

the

Homecoming game, at the Alumni Banquet,

and

Steve Lansing As the result of several informal discussions with members of the Student Affairs .staff. the ASPLU Senate recently formed a five member student committee to review the PLU policy on drug use. The committee is to study the adequacy of the present policy as stated in the Student Handbook. It i;:' ll'l o to suggest possible means of advising students that

seek advice or information about drug use. Students interested in serving on this committee should apply at the ASPLU office in the University Center or call ext. 438. The committee will be formed in the next week. Anyone having any suggestions on

how the present drug policy might be made more effective should also ASPI.U offic", or members of the committee, once it is

contact the

To the Editor: Homecoming

are the

following:

in one restriction however; it must

be

Senior, English

SPLU

From

Mr. Morgan has asked that stu· across

Sue Peterson

the

in

ulty and administrat.ors. dents

In

has achieved a

Sancho with whom even Cervantes

It was recognized by Shakespeare, we

a

in the case of Sancho. Firstly, he

xceedingly

To the Editor: reading

personification

climaxes which finish the show) to

Sincerely,

[n

The

careful direction,

body. Morgan, one of the 25 who

he

te given to the chairmen of this

the National Guard in the killing of

that opportunity."

MAST

The Voice of the Students at Pacific Lutheran Univers.... JOHN AAKRE

his

ly a dream and that he was lucky

tical class where students studied contemporary

finally

c·ream, grateful that it was mere­

such as the poli­

mese people-hearts, minds, and all. Of course, it

of

nine others.

from Eugene McCarthy on the left

in this dream he was a student at

February

four students and the wounding of

Thinking Right Liberty University, a very famou.s

in

1968, whereupon American planes and artillery blast­

Moratorium is being called to" pro­

which we now face, my only worry is that perhaps it will not

nd

it

exist not

And how could we forget the My Lai massacre

ed it with high explosives and searing napalm. This

ty of life. It is not the amount one is able to accumulate, but rather the question of its relative worth in tomorrow's world.

ty tll read

entered

These inhumanities

which eliminated a vast multitude of South Vietna·

Remember Ben Tre, a city of 50,000 inhabitants? guerrillas

government.

So many ways to turn hearts and minds against us!

effort to lose the war.

Communist

our

only on Con Son Island, but throughout the country.

could logically be interpreted only as a determined

Our priorities do not lie with material goods but with the quali­

Eric had a dream one night, and

by the South Vietnamese government and tolerated

by

a vigorous campaign of death and destruction which

Our present life style is within a dissenting counter cul­

PRISCILLA MARTENS

This summer the story of the tiger cages broke.

Incredibly barbaric prison conditions are established

than you might think, what with the U.S. conducting

ture whose precepts reject many of the old values out of hand.

given the

surprisingly

war in Vietnam we must win the hearts and minds

a generation.

last hour,

a

of the Vietnamese people. This is actually harder

ren yet unborn.

hollow ring.

By

made

He said in order in win the

to destroy the town to save it." Hmmm. Definitely

deep-seated problem within our society.

In the

LBJ

who do you hate?" We might just as well

write off 4·million-plus hearts and minds we'll never win.

handed over to President Nixon the inept prosecu·

tion of an insane war,

We have been told to shut up or go home or move along or grow up or get a job or any number of things all of which posit our endorsement of their life style for approval. It is a

Viet Congo When your father is killed by the Ameri­

cans.

Several years ago, before President Johnson had

at

the

final

per­

formed.

ASPLU has arranged for a fifteen per cent discount to the Fifth Dimension concert to be held in Seattle on November 8. TIlis discount will be available to all Pacific Lutheran

University students, faculty

and staff. If you are at all interested or wa.1t more information, please call the ASPLU office at extension 438.


Wednesday, October 28, 1970

MOORING MAST:

Page Three

Iax I erner ..

The Agnew Litmus Test

I Miss You ...

Many months have passed now.The months already seem like years. At the moment I feel a little tarnished and wrinkled.Memories of those carefree evenings in a small wine cellar, with friendships made by the mere tapping of glasses, stand out in sharp contrast to my present state. It seems like years since I last rubbed your feet. It seems like years since we ran through the woods, high in the Alps, with the snow so deep we stumbled with every leap. Now I just stumble. I miss you. I used to blow the dust from the picture I have of you on my desk. You remember the one, I'm sure. The picture taken when you were

standing on the high bluff overlooking Hope Bay, the bay where the Spanish armada parked before their destruction in 1588. The bluff where we found wild ponies grazing. The bluff where I chased you gleefully when an old arthritic collie made a gallant you-he thought I was going to harm you. saw our last sunset together. A little village for the Spanish armada . .. and myself. I

and noble effort to protect SiJly dog. It was there we called Hope Bay-an irony miss you.

With the passing of time I no longer blow the dust from your pic­ ture. On the back you have written, "A reflection of joy, of serenity, and of peace . . ... The memories of those moments are genuinely joy­ ous, but they are no substitute for satisfaction. And here lies my great­ est fault. For in your wisdom you also said, "Now we reflect on the hOpe that someday new joys wi1l be discovered and past joys never lost or forgotten." For while I play the role of a disciple of hope, I have mani­ festly failed to live up to this hope I have often superficially propagated And what is worse I have mitigated the memories to avoid the pain of what I am losing, or have already lost. Tonight 1 am broken, tired, and a little disgusted with what I have let myself become. I miss you. It has become too easy ta resort to the hackneyed diatribes about the "system"-<>r any other object or event that leaves itself open to criticism. What used to be a rapport with the living has become a ver­ bose dialogue with the dead composed of vapid platitudes. I was once truly the footrubber, but have since put on the trappings of a banal bounder. I, like so many, have fallen into the category of what our friend Mr. Agnew (Teddy Roosevelt before him) perhaps correctly labels "naggering nabobs of negativism." It's not easy becoming negative­ no easier than becoming an alcohlic or a dope addict. It takes a little neglect of self. I miss you. How easy it would be to resort to the autisms of yesterday. It would be so easy to wish that yesterday was today ...and tomorrow. But I still sustain enough park in my life to take your words seriously."Now we reflect on the hope that someday new joys will be discovered . .. " There is no time like now. And should I fail to take heed of the mess­ age you gave me then, I should also destroy the memories I cherish as well. I shall leave the eulogy writing to someone else. Perhaps an occasional death renel,l's the meaning of living ... Life can always be found amongst the ashes. With renewed hope, Footrubber.

LOS ANGELES-I hate to be a fall guy for Spiro Agnew, but his lO-point Wilmington catechism is wholly irresistible. He wants each of us to take a litmus test by answering his lO-question quiz, to see whether we belong to the radic-lib elite.So here goes, abbreviating his questions but sticking to the nub of them. I-Do I w alk around looking as If "the whole world smells a little bit funny"? Alas, I lost my sense of smell when I was nine months old and was hit by combined measles and pneumonia. I have had to get along with only four senses ever since. But it's a dangerous question to ask, especially when the haze of smog hangs over our cities and the waters are infested with contami­ nants. 2-Do I wish "those great masses of people" would stop questioning my "right to determine pub­ lic morals and public policy"?

That's a boomerang question. You do more to determine public policy, Spiro, than the rest of us. A for public morals, I wouldn't myself touch the censor role with a long pole. But who is playing censor over whom? 3-Do I think that having a college education makes me "not only inteUectually but morally superior " to those who didn't get it? No, I have .known noncollege people who were primitives, but I've also known many a Ph. D. who was an idiot. But I don't mind it if people in either group feel superior to me, intellectually or morally. I want as many youngsters as can cram into a col­ lege to do it: to risk its dangers, survive-and per­ chance flourish. 4-Do I think that blue-collar work Is lower ("not nearly as dignified or si gnif icant") than white­ collar work (''pushing a pencil at a tax-exempt f4)u nda tion ") ? Come, Spiro, that's too easy a play for the anti­ intellectual vote. In my indolent self-indulgent life I spent two years-in India and in France-as the darling of the foundations, and I was tempted to intone daily, "Praise Ford from whom all bleSSings flow." Obviously, I won't bite the hand that fed­ and drank-me, whether or not it pushes a pencil. But why so defensive about the truck driver and auto mechanic who don't need my defense or yours? *

*

5--Does the thought of a "Silent Majority" flU me with "revulsion" while "Power to the people."

seems "the essence of revealed wisOOm"?

(Cootioed o from Page 1)

2 to 4 weeks. "We have no assurance that a four and one half or five month old fetus will not be aborted," he continued. He said the provision requiring the husband's signature is point­ less because a woman could easily s parate from her husband until the abortion was completed. "And the bill provides no guarantee that the woman will receive her oper­ ation in a fully equipped hospital," he claimed. "A 'medical facility' could mean a nursing home." Dr. Katterhagen agreed that the safeguards are few and added that the "physician" could be a derma­

During

January

PLU

students

wi1l have the opportunity to ex­ change the concrete and rain of Tacoma for the natural beauty and warmth of the desert, on the Death Valley' Interim. Led by Professors Martinson and Halseth, students will consider the national parks system and its role

tologist. ''There are controls over physiCians operating in grade A hospitals," he said, "but not in their private practices." He ex­ plained that any physician could say that the termination was "im­ mediately necessary" and any ju­ ror would probably honor his word ov r that of a lawyer, who after all, knows nothing about medicine.

Dr. Hartley defended the refer­ endum on the grounds that it is not a mandatory law but on.e that . gives each woman an option. "An American woman does not need statutes to tell her how to use her judgment," he asserted.

As opposed to the above, Dr. Krause told of the mahy girls and women who approach her every day with the question, "Doctor, where can I get an abortion?"

Mrs. Ballasoitis expressed a deep concern for preservation of human life, "whether in the fetal stages, a growing child, or an ag­ ing woman."

"1 must turn them away," she said, "knowing that many will reo sort to unsafe and unclean illegal abortions." As a physician she said she was unable to respond to the needs of her patients, and as a woman she was not given the choice of whether or not she would reproduce.

"The supporters of Referendum 20 claim that the fetus does

The present law, written in 1909, she also claimed to be discrimina­ tory against the poor and unedu­ cated. "Those with money can go

*

Does it make me feel "warmly and 9IIugIy proteot.!d" to read the New York Review of Books?" No, but neither does the National Review. The only reading that makes me feel "snugly protected,"

I fear, is an unlikely fan letter from a reader of this column. Will you write me one, Spiro? 7-Do I think it "awkward and demeaning" for U. S. senators to have to go to "the great unwash· ed" for re-election?

No. I didn't know you were promoting the hip­ pies, however. 8-Do I tune in on a ptesJdentlal speecb at the end to get my opinions "from the instant alalysis"? No, Nixon fascinates me enough to keep me grimly watching and listening to the end. Then, alas, I have to tune off to write my own "instant analysis" in time to catch the deadline. *

*

Do I ever "sleep and dream" of BiU Ful­ bright being secretary of state ''without waking up screaming"?

No, Spiro, I don't wake up screaming because I have dream-subjects other than Fullbright to dream about. He had his near-thing on the secretaryship, with John Kennedy, and I'm pretty glad he didn't make it. But your own foreign policy speeches do worry mel at times, Spiro. 1000Do I want to see the office of Vice President abolished?

No, but·if the Vice President is to spend his time primarily, like a boy George Washintgon, with his little hatchet, then I favor the idea of a couple of congressmen that we should elect two Vice Pres­ idents, one for each party. Well, I am sorry I have given no yeses to qualify me as a radic-lib. But I did find the questions di­ rting, Spiro. And as for that offer of two seats on the aisle for "Oh! Callcutta," I saw it and found it unutterably boring. Copyright 197() Los Angeles. Times

History Profs Organize Excursi n to Death Valley

Abortion Forum (Continued) sional privilege because he so ob­ jects... Mr. Laporte said he considers the referendum to be a poorly con­ structed piece of legislation, and that he anticipates several loop­ holes. He pointed out that a doctor has no way of determining the ex­ act age of the fetus and may mis· judge the date of conception by

No, to both. Because both terms are gimmicks, stereotypes, phonies, and I suspect you know it, Spiro. I don't downgrade either of them for sheer political effectiveness: Richard Nixon's speech on the Silent Majority brought the house down in a din of cacophony and Eldridge Cleaver's "Power to the people" (borrowed from every past leftist move­ ment) has them raising their hands like manic r0bots. But as for me, I say a pox on both your cliches.

to Europe, Japan, Mexico, or any number of places to get their abor· tions," she said.

indeed have one right," she said, "but they place the right to be wanted above the right to be born." The strong feelings on both sides of the

question made it evident

that it is not a subject to be taken lightly. "Does the unborn have a voice," or "Should the mother have a choice?" The ultimate de­ cision will be in the hands of the voters November 3.

in the informal history of America. The Death Va1ley National Monu­ ment will be the primary example of this phenomenon.

Participants will have frequent op­ portunities for hjking and evaluting the recreational facilities of the park.

Secondary objectives of the in­ terim will include assessment and evaluation of numerous wild-life refuges, national forests, local mu­ seums, historic landmarks and Northern California Indian Reser­ vations.

Students wiiJI keep individual study tour journals, which will con­ tain background information gain­ ed during the on-campus orienta­ tion period, and a daily record of activities and ideas garnered dur­ ing the tour. A four-day summary period will complete the program.

In addition, lecture per-iods by officials of Mount Rainier National Park and an on-the·scene inspec­ tion tour of Lava Beds National Monument will round out the pro­ gram. Based in Furnace Creek, Calif., the tour will take daily excur­ sions to points of interest. The group will visit Ryan Ghost Town, Zabriske, Scott's Castle, and Stove­ pipe Wells, as well as other areas.

The study tour is open to all stu­ dents and will fulfill the core re­ quirement in the social sciences. The total cost of $220 includes a1l transportation, lodging and side tours. For further information see Pro­ fessors Halseth and Martinson in the History Department.

Desperate

Hocl ey Team T opples UPS

Once again the hockey team cut UPS down to size in the annual homecoming _ game. With many sp·ectators on hand more showed that victors of the day; rained very hard

the Lutes once they were the and though it at times the

Knights proved that they would neither be watered or logged. The final score was PLU 3, UPS O. When the chips are down the Knights are up!

Fo....am Mondays thur Thursdays Round­ trip from Tumwater. Will share cost of gas. call 943-3955 after 7 p.m. FOR SALE Pentax Spotmatic Magnavox portable stereo Min­ olta movie camera 58 For more info call Roy Mesler GR 2-4604 Up to 21 words in Desperate For-urn for 75c. Place message at U. C. Info Desk by Sunday evening


MOORING MAST

Page Four

Wednesday, October 28, 1970

Abortio.1

A Responsibility of Conscience

DON'T LABOR UNDER A MISCONCEPTION

By DAVID GILES

We

can be

certain that

if

the

problem of abortion was as mor­ ally "uncomplicated" as birth con­ trol we would find relatively lit­ tle difficulty in alleviating the pres­

SUPPORT A80RTI0 REFORM

ent

laws

the issue cerned

restricting

abortion.

shou.Id

simply

with

be

personal

and society's

If

con­

happiness

welfare in

general,

then emotional happiness and p.hy­ sical and mental health would take all

precedence

in

the

matter

of

abortions. But the issue of abortion concerns a great deal more than just the "white or black" accou.nt of

happiness.

It

becomes

a

bit

more complicated after a little reo flection. The point that remains salient in all

discussions

the

question

about

of

abortion

murder.

is

Whether

the moral question of abortion be­ comes

a

legal

question

or

not,

rests, I believe almost entirely on whether

or

not

abortion

can

be

proven to be murder. With little reflection I think we

Interim Examines Navajo Culture The existence of a pure, tegra

wlin·

d culture in Twentieth. Cen­ Americ a

tury

is

a

phenomenon

found onl y on the Navajo Reserva­ tion in New Mexico.

"Navajo Country,"

an

Dr.

interdJs­

for members of the university community to study opportunity

course

ing two weeks in eac h city, stu­ dents will have the chance to ex­ in depth, different

aspects

at Eight nth Century ar t . Cost i estimated at approximate­ ly $670 - inc l ud i ng transportation, breakfasts.

Dinners

and lunches are not included.

There will be optional side trip towns

and

citie·.

While in London students will join the EngUsh Theater by Dr.

att .od

I nter im

,

led

Klopsch,

Interl:!sted a

students are urged

under­

room 109. Interesled

students should contact Mr. K it t el· son at extension 421 for further in­ formation.

nasty business, no matter what the context. to

extension

1420

ASK FOR THE LORD

follows is

as not

murder. If we can cnclusively veri­ fy the proposition that abortion is in fact murder, then it follows that abortion wrong,

is and

beyond

any

doubt

the present laws re­

stricting abortions are justified.

cational institutions,

one go about prov­

reli­

ing whether or not abortion is mur·

gious, economic and family life on

der? Obviously, we must ask when

reservations, an

and the

But how doe

students

understanding

of

should of

Navajo,

the

the

which

The tour will visit museums, his­ torical sites, the B.LA. offices, and new juni r co l lege on the reser­

a

Living-in experiences may

vation. be

rranged for participants, also.

The fina.! cost of the tour has not been determined. however. it will be approximately $275. In addition ,

to the two weeks spent on the res­ ervation,

seSSion

a

of

intensive

human life begins.

But when this

cial usefulness is far more import·

Further more, by

ant to herself and to society than

this type of thinking, would killing

the precarious future of a bundle of cells.

merons not be murder?) I hope that is has become fairly obvious by this point that there is

child, which implies one hell of a

no conceivable way of "proving"

life

when

life

born.

While

we

becomes

human

life.

all probably agree that

murder is a bad thing, immoral,

Let

"ludents

desiring

CONCEPTUAL

while

and that there should be laws to

any

inhibit murder, there is no agree­

gather and they also present their

ment as to when life begins,

and

furthermore whether abortion is to be considered murder or not. As

a

hypothetical

situation,

let

us us'e the following as an example. Suppose I hold that life begins with conception, and that life is sacred, and that abortion, no matter what the

situation,

is

abominab\.e.

Let

us assume also that I am confront· ed by a girl who is pregnant. She is morally convinced that life does not begin,

humanly

speaking,

un­

til the fetus is capable of survival outside her womb, or at 28 weeks. She protests

that

if

she

has

the

baby it. will cause her very severe and

psychological

problems.

She

will have to drop out of school. but refuses to marry the father. She is also

convinced

suffer ter

that

psychological

the

she

will

not

problems

abortion-or at

least,

af­ ali

things being weighed, she will suf­ fer less if she has the abortion. I

try to convince her that the

life of her child is more important than any utility that can be found by abortion. She tries to convince

form,

number

a

of

people

views. The issue of rape is brought up. It is contended that both the mother and the child will both hear psychological stigmas for the rest of their lives. It is also conjectured that the child and mother, in some cases,

may

become

a

public

charge because of the psycholg o i­ cal problems confronting them.

additional

der-and simply confess it to be an unfortuna te circumstances in life. omeone says

this is not life at

all. The argument continues with cir· cumstanO'cs such as pregnancy of the mental

defective,

pregnancies

resulting from incest,

pregnancies

of widows. etc. being added to the list. Suppose also that by some per­ son's

moral

standards,

aboTtion

would be appropriate in some in· stances and not in others. So on and so on.

ALL we Can conclude from the above is that there are moral

systems

dictating

different what

it is impossible to find agreement

(Continued on Page 6)

when the fetus is capable of sur­ vival outside the mother's womb. Others would say that life begins

at birth. It is also believed by many that life doesn't really be­ gin until the cognitive powers come into practice. (Would these persons

Worship God INDIVIDUALLY AND AS A COMMUNITY

ANGEl.O'S

STUDENT CQNGREGATlON

PIZZA - RAVIOLI

SPAGHffil

- CHICKEN

Sundays

8:00 a.m.-Tower Chapel

"on tho MlHmllin Highway"

141 st & Pacific Avenue

10:30 a.m.-This Woo.k: Dr. Juogkuntz Liturgy:

Second

Setting -CLOSED ANGELO

8: 00 p.m.-Innovative Service:

MONDAYS-

MARZANO,

Pro.iete,

Our time is an exciting time. Supersonic jets ..

.

flights to the moon. It's a fast-moving

world-why not move with it? Look into the Air Force ROTC Program. Find out why the a

college student.

Learn where the scientifiC breakthroughs are.

HE LITTLE GASTHAUS 8920 GRAVELLY LAKE DRIVE

AUTHENTIC German Cuisine

IMPORTED Beer and Wine

l<5asthaUS I

LIVE MUSIC Friday and

Find out about financial aid to help you get your degree. Looking for a groovy way to study? Then enroll in Air Force ROTC.

U. S. AIR FORCE ROTC.

The Air Force Officer Qualification Test is being

Saturday Nights

offered free and without obligation at 8:00 a.m.,

HOURS

24 Oct, 7 Nov and 21 Nov 1970 in the UPS Field­

TUES. - SAT.

house, Aerospace Studies classroom 1, University

11:30 a.m. to \0 p.m. closed Sun. & Mon.

determine their eligibility for the Air Force ROTC

of Puget Sound, to college students who wish to Two-Year Program. For further details contact the Professor of

AND 20th CENTURY

Sound,

Aerospace

Tacoma,

Studies,

Washington

9-3521 Ext. 264, 265.

is

right and what is wrong. And since

that human life begins at 28 weeks,

in­

I

may contend that murder is mur­

me that her mental health and so-

SYMMETRY LEAGUE

MIMETIC IMAGERY

assume that

doctors believe, on the other hand,

Ekllmd, ext. 258 or Professor Jobst

ART

SPONSORED BY

be be

it, the Catholics, for example, that

ext 379.

OCT

PUBLIC INVITED

us also

should

life begins with conception. Many

formation should contact eith r Dr.

BE AT CWSC IN

DISCUSS CONCEPTUAL

child,

question is asked please notice the

prior to departure.

BAXTER WILL NOT

3 p.m. TO

the

study will be conducted on camp u s

CONFIRMED - JAN

31

for

I was arguing against abortion in

Aerospace Team is where it is. ' You may learn to fly while still

THE GALLERY

Further more, she knows

she will psychologically reject the

many responses. Many would have

Ron-Dee-Voo

Dial-A-Prayer

question

Th'e

whether abortion is or

to

meeting tomorrow at 3: 30

in the CUB,

to

all minority groups.

cities of Paris and London. Spend­

neighboring

attempt

the

could be applied to the study of

sponsoring an i nte ri m tour. to the

to

Jobst,

Throu gh an exposure to the edu­

problems

This y ea r the Art Depa rtm ent is

and

an

Organized by

Mr.

ved their i dentity.

achieve

Interim Tour Explores Art

hotels,

is

and

stand the sense- of the Navajo ex­

the

plore,

Eklund

perience, and how they have achie­

ciplinary, interim tour wUl provide

the

this unique culture.

can all assume that murder is a

consider a moron or a mental spas­

tic not human?

Univ of

98416,

Puget

Phone:

SK


Wednesday, October 28, 1 9 70

MOORING MAST

Page Five

Under the Gra.JUhtand By DAVE SODERLUND Coach Roy Ca rlson djpped into his bags of tricks Saturday an came out with the ingredients for a satisfying vic tory. The wingback formation looked sus piciously like a throw back to some uf the things used four years ago, wh ile fullback in motion, the "shadowing" of a

w i de receiver with a bac k and the old bootleg complete urprises here. Whitman must have be e n well-scouted, because each of lhese wrinkle:. worked successfully dunng lhe course of the game. ,

I'm going to h ave to at a lot of what I sa id last week about a lack of spirit. This game showe d the Lutes really ready for action, refUsing to be stopped. Perhaps last yea r s humiliation-ahead 23-10 in lhe second quarter, then defeated 45-23 was the spark that was needed_ Perhaps '

-

It was leftover bad taste after losses to Linfield a nd UPS. Not enough can be said for the defense. Whitman got only 33 yards total offe n se in the first half and missed on their first eight pass at­ tempts. Twice the defense held dee p in their own t er r itory, once at the one-foot line with a 37 point l ead The men u p front d ropped the Wh it man quarterbacks for 81 yards in losses and were a big factor in the poor compl etion percentage and the interceptions. .

GRANT SPENCER (15) GOES UP for

int ercep tion as PLU m assacres the Missionaries at the Home.

an

coming Game Saturday.

PLU's

Knights

settled

old·

an

plays and punted the offense was

defeat­

back in gear again. Dan Pritchard,

ing the Whitman Missionaries be­

enjoying his best game of the year,

afternoon,

Saturday

fore a Homecoming crowd by the score of 37-9. The tone of the g ame was set o n when

kickoff

opening

the

Hans

Lindstrom handed to Bernard John­ son who ran the ball to the Mis­ sionary 19-yard

From there

line.

it took the offensive troops three plays to score with Dan Pritchard carrying for the T.D. After Whit­ man

ran

ineffective

qui c k,

three

Dan Prit char d fi na ll y found a defense that wasn't stacked against

SOME WITH FREE

BEDROOM

kiTCHENS

-

to stop the Missionary attack, how­

field goal to give the Lutes a 10-0

ever, and PLU scored once more

lead.

before the half as Dave Halstead

Not content to sit on a ten-point lead, the Lutes scored again as Jim Hadland

pitch,

option

an

faked

slipped betwe:en two defenders, and 499

ra,n

yards

McGrath's

for another score,

PAT

missed,

attempt

but PLU scored once more in the

first quarter by a 23-0 m argi n. The defense continued ta make

PHONES

miserable

life

Missionar­

the

for

ary offense which was so effective

NEAREST TO P,L.U.

last yea r and the offense kept the

12715 PACIFIC AVENUE Tacoma, Wash.

pressure on. Jim Hadland unveiled the musty bootleg play for a four­ ten-yard

LE 1-6111

After scoring the first five times had to punt. The defense continued

McGrath

the Knights up at the end of the

COFFEE

AND

TV

making the score 30-0,

kicked a

Ed

and

died,

McPherson on a power sweep for

UNITS

Lindstrom for a fourth touchdown,

13. There the momentum

sionary

54 yards and another TD, p ut tin g

MOTEL

-

Dave Halstead

they had the ball, the Lutes finally

situation Hadland pitched to Don

BLUE SPRUCE

him and turned in a 87 yard rushi ng performance to l ead the Lutes.

rambled for 53 yards to the Mis­

first quarter. With a fourth-and-one

ONE AND TWO

gain

then

and

51-yard

perfect

a

threw to

bomb

Hans

scored

the

from

8' nnett

after

13

recovered

Dave

Wh i tman

a

fumble.

Whitman

mission

and

Johnson

tried

Eric

QB

to

vainly

put

the

visitors back in the game. Robbed of a consistent running game and with

time

working

aganst

them,

defense

PLU

but

the

and

Johnson

was tough

up

wound

throwing

two interceptions to Grant Spencer

and one to Jack Irwin, as well as one each to Paul F ergUso n, Greg Collman, and Dave Anderson that were dropped. Johnson spent a j t of time eat­ ing football as well, as Ross Boice, Dennis Hillesland, Dave Anderson, and Pete Ugstad kept the heat on.

ter as a lone Missionary got be­

PARKLAND C EVRON

two points came when Dave Hal­

AND

stead was tackled in the end· zone

PARKLAND CAR WASH

after the PLU defenSB had held on

FREE WASH WITH LUBRICATION

seri' s of three road games to fin­

hind the Lute sec ondary The other .

downs

one-yard line.

inside the

Next weekend the Lut es start a ish out the season,

120th & PACIFIC AVENUE

irst on the list

are the WilJamette Bearcats in

Phone LE 1-9988

lem,

College

of

Idaho

and Lewis

and

.........

3Y2 weeks - June 18, 1971

.

$239.00

. . _ ..

_mi3.00 ..... $263.00

J uly 14, 1971

$U3.00

ONE WAY December 19, 1970 - Portland to London . 1971 - Portland to London

Sep1ember 9, 1971

-

.. ".

Portland to Londo n

....._" .

... $150.00

_._ . . . "

Se ptem.'Jer 15, 1971 - Portland to London.

.$135.00

December 16, 1970 - Amsterdam to Seattle

._SI50.00

January 3, 1971 - London to Portland

June 2,

1971

-

Oregon 97204,

Corbett B ldg.

Would you like to see what r eal ly happens

on the field at PLU foot­ ball ga mes? Come to the Lute Club game film viewing each W e d.nesaay morning in the north dining room of the U Center, at 7:30 a m . Come and see the big p lays in stop action and hear wha t the coaching staff .

'

has to say about the game. Remember, the next three are on

The PLU water polo team spent Saturday and S4nday at the Oregon In vita ti onal Water Polo Tournament in Eugene, Oregon. It was nol a successful tr i p as the Lute group lost matches to Portland State, Lewis ,

and Clark, UO, an d Southern Oregon Col lege . The only lopsided game was agains t University of Oregon and the match with SOC, the eventual winners, was very close. I ndivi d u al ly Larry Gliege sc or ed 1 5 goals and ,

was selecte d to t he all-tournament team.

Coach Gary Chase feels that this has been a learning season for a very young team-<lf eleven team members, 7 are freshmen and soph­ omores. He feels, however, that thin gs are imprOving and that the col ­

lege c onfere nce championships in Portland on November 6 and 7 may

prod uce a better showing

.

Lute Volleyball Team Smashes angers The Women's volleyball team got off to a fine start last week with a

victo ry over the Rangers of Oly­

College in

Bremerton. The in the

,

and

of

Western

Washingwn

battled bravely they were left with scars

between classes

KNIT and PURL LE 7-5317

406 Garfield

*

Greeting Cards" Photo Equipment

*

Magazines

JOHNSON DRUG

Only for students, faculty, stafr aM members of immed iate family household)

of Pacific

of

15-12,

15-6

and

came b ck with a quick smile and a victory of Ui-B, and 15-12 to end

it all suddenly. Those turni ng out for volleybdll are : Margaret Lamb, Diane S m ide can g,

Sa ta l ion

Sue

L slee

,

Lutheran

Univers i ty,

a

member of the No rthwes t Association of Private Colleges a nd Univer­

AT THE CORNER GARFIELD AND PACIFIC AVE.

9:00 a,m.

-

9:00 p.m. Weekdays

1 1 :00 a.m, - 7:00 p.m. Sundays

­

Ad­

ams, Ivy Sch wartz, Dian e Gwyther, Lyn Steiner, Linda King, Kris Gul·

srud,

Lessons give!)

(scores)

by the northern girls, The B team

Pat

K ris George, Mary George, .

Conk,

and

Claudia

F ri ede n

The team is coached by Miss Kar

en Goodro, teac her

at

a

High,

(Dol·

ly).

Dee and Gene's

ARCO TUNE-UPS BRAKE SERVICE STARTER AND GENERATOR REPAIR OHII

7:00

.

­

hysical Education

Ke ith l ey Junior

and assist ed by Dianna Dahl

(503) 226-3566

sam

e r ad.

*'

YARNS and NEEDLECRAFT

phone JU 8-4311

Cosmetics

Portland,

,

Address

sities.

last week, while Lute end and placekicker Ed McGrath shared lineman of the week honors as the result of his eight-reception effort against the Box.ers.

ALL STUDENT NEEDS

Name

[he

set an unofficial school record with four interceptions against Pacific two weeks ago. For his efforts he was named NWC back of the week for

..$150.00

am eligible to participate. Please send application to:

(living in

*

State College, Although the Lutes

VILLA PLAZA

so get your rosters in to the

,

Notes: Greg Collman, frosh defensive back fr om Winon , Wisconsin,

Saturday the Knights faced the

Repairs

other flights available. Charters West, 310

ber 30. League p la y will begin soon after PE office.

DIAMONDS - WATCHES

You can book with confidence - confirmed reservations -

Call or write:

24-0.

The Deadline for intramural bas ketball entries is this Friday, Octo­

Vikings

$150.00

London to Vancouver 8. C.

League title by a s core of

15-3 to take the match . .

Jewelers

.$150.00

_.

The final standings of both intramural football leagues were s ettled Ivy for the A League championship while Rainier took care of Nordic II for the B

with PLU's comeb ack of 15-4

Lakewood

. ....... $175.00 .

*

in t he Toilet Bowl Saturday M ornin g, Evergreen edged

first game but were stoppe d dead

Austin's

ROUND TRIP PORTLAND TO LONDON

12 weeks - June IS, 1971 - September 10, 1971

*

Rangers shot off to a 15-13

Charter Flights to Europe 16 da ys - December 19, 1970 - January 3, 1971 9Y2 weeks - June 13, 1971 - August 2 0, 1971

ground.

mpic

Clark,

though only 5 for 14

,

throu gh the air. picked up 57 yards as the team totalled 327 yards on the

Sa·

followed by encounters with

McPhers on

behind with 83 yards a nd Don

the Missionaries went to th'e air,

yard pass late in the fourth quar­

Ralph Andersen's

was close

added 60 more on just two carries . Jim H adl and

The second half was anti-climatic. PLU did not score after the inter­

Whitman's only TD came on a 56-

March 28,

Jack Irion's pass interception on the fourth quarter set a new ca ree r record for interceptions here. With the last three ga mes on t he road it

was good. to see him pick one off against Whitman.

Lutes Trample Whitman 37-9 score

­

A.•.

12166 Pacific

10:00

,.

LE 7·3040


Page Six

MOORING MAST

28, 1970

Wednesday, October

Film POll'rays Alaskan Experience By DAVE SODERLUND On Saturday night,

After a visit to the base of Mt.

October

31,

at 8 p.m. in Olson Auditorium, the Tacoma

Chapter

of

the

Audobon Society will film

"Northwest

to

National

present the Alaska"

as

part of its screen tour series. Naturalist·photographer H.

Berlet

traveled

to

Walter

the

forty­

ninth state to capture the unique and

rugged

terrain

and

wildlife

that are products of harsh living conditions.

A

spectacular

parade

United

States.

He

"Northwest

McKinley and a close·up view of

to

has

developed

Alaska"

is

the

climaxes

first film in a series to be present­

with the migration of thousands of

ed at PLU. A second film, "Death

an

avalanche

the

film

caribou.

\

) MOOBING lUST

'TOTHE PO/NT

Valley: Land of Contrast" will be

Walter H. Berlet, an Audobon So­ ciety lecturer,

present d in March. PLU students

has been involved

will be admitted free with a stu­

with nature photography for many

dent body card. Admission will be

years and is one of the outstand­

$1.00 for adults and 50 cents for

ing close-up

non-PLU students.

photographers in the

RALLY CLUB MEETING OCT.

28

Organizational meeting for the Fifth Quarter, a rally club, will be held Oct. 28, at 7 p.m. in Hong Hall lounge. All interested persons are invited to attend.

MODEL UNITED NATIONS

Fort Highlights Drug Symposium World,

--a---=

At the session of the Model United Nations of the Far West to be held in April 1971, at Los Angeles, PLU will represent Malaysia. Stu· dents who would like to become members of the PLU-delegation are

of wildlife passes before the cam­

Dr. Joel Fort, the country's lead­

Fort

asked to attend a preparatory meeting on Wednesday, October 28, at

eras of the photographer. The film

ing expert on mind-altering drugs,

approaches the drug problem from

7:00 p.m. in Xaxier 107. For more information contact Steve Lansing,

opens with the fur seals of the Prib­

will b:e the featured speaker at the

the sociological point of view, and

cha.irman of the PLU-delegation. Ext. 1296.

ilof Islands in the Bering Sea and

fall drug symposium. The sympo·

stresses the reform of drug laws.

moves north-east to the Yukon and rubber raft ride down the Yukon

a

River,

and

The Mad

sium will take place November 18

He calls for individualism, creative

and 19.

social change and "dropping in" to

entering the habitat of the

mountain goat and the Dall sheep.

ates,

The author of several books, in­ cluding Dmgs and' Society, Utomi­

Abortion and Conscience (Cont.)

YOUNG LIFE MEETS

Young Life will again meet in the University Center this coming

improve society and the quality of

Sunday at 8:45 p.m. We will meet in the room next to the information

life ;:tnc solve the drug problem.

desk. All persons interested may come.

Jcining Fort will be Dr. George Gay from the Haight-Ashbury Psy­

JOHN BIRCH SOCIETY

Tommorrow evening PLU students will have a chance to meet some

as to whether abartion is murder

chedelic Drug Center. Chief of the

the given value system.

members of the local chapter of the John Birch SOCiety.

or not, and that there can never

Heroin Clinic and Drug Detoxifica­

cratic Students Coalition-sponsored event, beginning at 7: 30 in X-201,

tion

time when human life begins, and

And my last comment goes like this. Whether or not abortions are legalized, they will occur-millions

that there is no one "right" way

of

of deciding

when

mean

appropriate

or

be any conclusive evidence for the

an

not,

abortion there

is

seems

to be no legal justification in con­ demning abortion as murder. There moral

is

no

issue,

unanimity and

tlvem.

and

therfore

this legal

abortions

non-theraputical

butchery.

It also

often

abortions means

the

rich will get abortions and the poor will

in

Illegal

not.

It

means

thousands

cf

deaths for women. It means that ignoring

the

issue

makes

hypo­

issues must be abandoned. It is,

crites of us all. As Jerome E. Bates

in

comments:

fact,

utility

probably

to

of

more social

allow abortion to exist

freely than to restrict it. Therefore the argument that the law restrict· ing aborions is for our own good is without merit. What is the good, if not happiness and/or social util­ ity? We must conclude that the deci­ sion of abortion lies not in the law, but in the individual and his con­ science. Let me say that, because of my moral beliefs I cannot, in truth, condone ahortion for myself, nor recommend it. BUT, I know the opposite is true for others. Some

last

observations.

There

are many who will vote next week to retain the present abortion laws

"Knowing all thi s what do we do about

it?

people

Virtually

nothing!

The

and politician are usually

C2nter,

Gay

will

speak

on

"The Changing Face of Heroin Ad­ diction

and

Predicted

Patterns."

In addition to the two main speak­ ers, students will be able to partic­ ipate

in

discussion

groups,

hear

panel discussions, and watch four films

on

the

use

of

films are "LSD-25," cr

Insanity,"

drugs.

The

"LSD-Insight

"Escape

to

The symposium has been organ­ by

Gary

Horpedahl,

it

from

their

conscienoe.,

Jenson and Dav;e Hoak.

will

become

promiscious

and will leave morals to the aged and

dying.

Let

me

say

that

if

keeping one's pants zipped depends only On threat, the.n the worth of

reassess their justification for con­ demning abortion reform or their faith in their chosen beliefs within

Dancing

The Place to go for Contemporary Music and Dancing.

when

the crisis is

and

'that it doesn't exist.' " The man who thinks the issue of abortion is simple, should perh.aps reflect

again.

plicity he

Perhaps

initally

the

found was

phone

sim­ n.ot

in the issue of abortion, but in him­

537-0205

Stella and Ken Jacobs

self. T

PHONE

LE

7-5361

College Cleaners Parkland's Quality Dry Cleaners

11416 PARK AVENUE PARKLAND, WASH.

Be A Sentimental Santa

GIVE YOUR PO RTRAIT

Olympia, Washington 98501 Aid Association for Lutherans LE

7-6217

Murph's Road Runner Food Service FE ATIJRING­ Road Runner Steak Fish Sandwich Hamburger & Cheeseburger Hot & Co ld Drinks

of 25 to 100

Go out Pacific Ave. to ,Roy Y, turn left on Mountain HiWay, 2112 miles.

TAppleton,Wisconsin

Fraternalife Insurance Life . Health. Retirement

B-B-Q Sandwich

Professional catering to groups

Education isn't aU academic ance is actually a savings ac­ matters. It's smart to' give some CDunt that builds steadily in cash thDught now to' matters outside value through the years . . . the ivied walls ...such as life money which YDU may need to insurance. Why nDw? Because pay off college debts, to put your YDU can never buy at a lower new bride in a hDme Df your rate than tDday . . . and that own, or to set yourself up in rate remains the same for the business. A good friend to help length of the cDntract. AlsO', YDur you with your life insurance present good health will allow plans is the Aid Association for you to' establish certain DptiDns Lutherans representative. A fel­ that guarantee your abiljty to low Lutheran, he puts it all buy additiDnal insurance in the together for you in a meaningful future even if pDor health should way.It's all a part of our com­ come your way. And life insur­ mon concern for human worth.

Route 12, Box 798

BELL STUDIO 14106 PACIFIC AVE.

You'll buy life insurance eventually. Wynot now whenyou'll save a bundle?

Merle R. Vertheen, Fie

A Gift Only You Can Give

Live Music Every

"HOME TOWN BLUE"

If you would like notice of your engagement printed in the Mooring

Mast, please call ext. 1146.

FLOWERS, Inc. 12169 Pacific Avenue

Chicken Filet

This Week

Hall. Linda is an elementary education major from Kennewick, Wash.,

gteJkj

over they reo

turn to their make--believe world

OPEN EVERY DAY

Wed., Thurs., Fri & Sat.

The engagement of Miss

and Dave is from Aloha, Oregon majoring in physical education. They

activity,

Hurry - Call Now

Lou's Place

-

BARKER

are both seniors, planning their wedding for June of '71.

candle.stine

those

who fear promiscuity should either

By LINDA

critical

whether it be Christian or other· Perhaps

The Shoe Factory

are temporariy stirred into hypo­

very profound, and that the faJth in

coercion.

The symposium begins at 9:00 a.m., is being held in room 101 of the administration building. Registration fee is 50 cents.

nounced at a candlepassing ceremony in Pflueger

ARTISTRY IN FLOWERS

one's ethics is truly lacking. Faith,

indirect

Needs Care." There will be films and a question and answer period.

BARKER-HALSTE AD

except

any value or moral system isn't

wise, hopefully dO'es not depend on

1970, Delta Iota Chi, the nursing organization on

campus, is presenting a symposium on venereal disease, entitled "LDve

Linda Barker to' Dave Halstead was formally an·

because they fear that without them people

VENEREAL DISEASE SYMPOSIUM On October 31,

Harold

content to the evil by eliminating when it strikes home. Then they

will include a film presentation, a short talk by one of the members, and a question and answer period.

No·

where," and "The Speed Scene."

'zed

The Demo­

*

*

The Road Runner will be on the perimeter of the campus

between 9:00 and 10 p.m. Tues., Wed., Thurs, and Fri. LOCATION S *

In front of Pflueger

*

By University Center

*

By CUB on Whee ler St.


Ureall In Concert

Cou l. Up The Dough

Voice of the Student Body at Padfic: Lutheran University PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY - WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1970

VOLUME XLVIII

NUMBER EIGHT

U C Doors Officially Open This Sunday By BARB MORRIS

versity Band will lead a procession

After fifteen months of pouring

to the Center where tours of the

pounding

building and a coffee hour will be

cement

and

nails,

con·

struction wor k ers have moved out of the

Un iver si ty Center and the

University Center Director, Mr.

app lied­

Marv Swenson, indicated that 12,-

fence, c l eanin g of carpets

000 invitations have been sent to

final touches are shrubs,

provided for guests.

being

and sidewalks-in preparation for

students,

dedication

colleges and universities.

ceremonies

slated

for

Sunday, at 3 p . m . in OIS<ln Audi­ t rium.

parents,

staff,

alumni,

A group of 125 pe<>ple who have played a part in the planning of

Mr. Michael Dederer, Chairman

the building over the last six years

of the Board of Regents, will act

will gather for a banquet Saturday

as

master

progr am,

of

remonies at Unjversity

with

the

in the University Center.

Presi­

dent Dr. Eugene Wiegman, ASPLU

Friday

Is "S

Night"

The opening of the Cave, Coffee

President Bill Christiansen, Dr. J.

Shop,

Raymona

rooms in the Center will be hjgh·

Tobiason,

the Alumni

President

Association,

of

and Mr.

Norman Fintel, representing LIFE, also taking part.

and

music

and

listening

lights of "Student Night" from 6 to 9 p.m.

Programs planned by the

U.C.

Architect Mr. John Wright of Bin­

Committees will feature special at­

Partners, will pre­

tractions in the Coffee Shop and

d

,Wright an

sent the key of the building.

At the

Soprano

same

time

the various

clubs on campus will set up pnr

Drama Portrays Trial of Crist The University Theatre will pre­

sent Between Two Thieves, a play on

November 11,

12, and 14 in Eastvold Auditorium at 8: 15 p.m. A modern re·trial of Jesus of Nazareth, Between Two ThIeves centers

around

compan

a

Jewish

acting

which examines the ques­

Pacific

tions

activities and

to

of

their

arouse

organiza­

interest

in

Lutheran

University,

The world's onJy two-nation mili­

tary

band will

be ,in concert

at

Pacific Lutheran University Thurs·

On

oper a tic

the

day, November 12. The North American Air Defense Command

Cavalcade

of

Music

headquartered in Colorado

sical opera and Light opera through­

stage," Time Magazine has com­

out the Uni ted States and in lon­

mented.

d on. She made hel" motion picture

The last two of her concert sea­

No­

sons have been spent in Israel. She

deb ut as "Sister Sophia" in Twen­ tieth C. Fox'

"The Sound of Mu

­

won two premieres with Leonard

sic,"

clarity of voice cannot be denied.

Bernstein and the New York Phil­

on e of the most adroit

Eliza Doolittle in "My Fair Lady."

harmonic and has appeared in clas­

is

gram directed at all ages and mu­

sical tastes in a perfonnance

et

for 8: IS p.m. in Olson Auditorium. The

Springs, Colo., will present a pr­

the

8S-piece

more

than

band

represents

100,000 Canadian

and United States servicemen and

its, and' radar sites guarding the

continent against air attacks. The

band's

concert

selections

her portrayal

of

Her first professional experience, though, was not as a singer, but as an actress as she play d the "brat" Angela Abernathy in "Lum 'n Abner." Her after- school job du ring her teens was playing "Ju­ nior Miss" and "For Keeps" at the

Pasadena Playhouse

produc

tions.

a blend of classics, pops, Broad­

the life of Stephen Foster), was her first musical. After this, she ex­

way, modern jazz and contempor­

women of NORAD who man jet in­

ary Cf

rock, plus

rarely

heard

reo

ations of the big band sound of

the '30's and '40's. Some of their more no t able

bare stage, the trial takes the aud­

and later

range from Bach to the Beatles­

terceptors, ground-to-air missiJe un-

practically

a

comediennes

NORAD Band Slated for Concert Band,

on

ap­

Her clear diction, warmth and "She

membership.

Nixon will

the 1970-7\ Artist Series season at vember 13.

and

Marni

oncert for the second of

acquaint students with the purpose

tion of th.e 2000 year persecution place

pear in

motional bOoths at the Center to

of the Jews. Taking

PLU Hosts Soprano Marni Nixon

games areas.

Following the ded.ication the Urn-

by Warner L e Roy

PLU's NEWEST BUILDING wilt be dedicated on Sunday, Nov. 11, at a ceremony in Olson AudJto.rJum.

Friday

"Oh

Susanna"

(portraying

plored operatic form with Dr. Hugo Strelitzer of Los Angeles City Col­ lege and Dr. Carl Ebert d irector of Stadische Opera in Berlin. She became a member in one

Modern costuming will bring back

pearances include Carnegie Hall, tHe Hollywood Bowl, Old Milwau­

of

the

kee Days, the Alaskan Centennial,

groups

EXPO 67, and Hemis Fair 68.

di stance acting, perfect pitch, and

ience back to the time of Christ. episodic play

back

into

the

context of the Twentil!th Century.

ban d s

85 members,

the

original with

madrigal

singing

Roger Wagner.

Her

18

flair for comedy brought forth a

comes an indictment of the Christ­

compri e the Commanders, a da nce

most desirable combination f r Mo­

ian community which has failed to

orchestra specializing in jazz and

zart's

examine the life and teachings of

big band numbers.

Figaro" or in StraVlnsky's "Night·

As the play progresses it be­

Of the

'

Prior to their military service,

Christ. Mr. Bill Parker, the direc­

in

"

Ma r ri a g

01

ingale."

tor, hopes to reawaken Christians

individual members

the Com­

She has worked with the New

through the questions raised in the

manders have performed with Les

play.

Elgart,

Stan Kenton,

Woody

Herman,

England Opera Company and thE: Cosmopolitan of San Francisco.

Leads

in

production

the

Scott Green,

are

Cinolto,

ed Forces.

and

portra. ed by Susan Logan and Tom Wagner. Craig Huisenga is cast as Pilate and Tom O'Neil is Caiphas. Wayne Nunley I

he

Appelo,

Penny

Otto, Clint and

La ry

On

Fishbeck,

Johnson,

Mr. Bill

Jim

Meeting in the Regency Room of

Illinois University, where he taught

the UC. the Board will discuss re-

[or two years. He had previously

ports

theatre in are

Grounds

avail·

t

Acad emic Affa i rs thE'

Building

Committee,

the

and

Student

Life Committee, and the Financiai

able at the information desk, and

Affairs Committee.

cost 75 cents for students and $\.25 tor adults.

from

Committee,

St. Louis, Miss uri for five ye ars. pl ay

stu d ents

The R egen ts will be on campus for one-day meeting a nd the ded­ ication of the Universi ty Center.

Parker, a new drama

Tickets for the

PLU

gents during their lunch hour.

is the show's director.

a c mmunity

9,

with members of the Board of Re­

ee make up

He comes to PLU from Southern

dire ted

No v-em ber

wili have the opportuni ty to talk

supporting cast.

professor,

H er appearances have been on tele vision on Hollywood Pala e, Ed .

cational T. V., B.B.C.'s "The Best of Two Worlds," and the Ford Foundation'S "Spotlight on Opera"

Regents Vote on Religious Life

Greg Yock. Mary and Joseph are

Steve

Severinson,

ek Stannard of the Canadian Arm·

family. The

disciples are played by Doug Park­ Walt Binz, Ben

Dick Clark,

Associate director is Captain Der­

Olson ,and Leslie Gerth, members

er,

Doc

and Henry Mancini.

Don Sbandrow, Pat

of the Jewish acting

of

Susanna

GREG THOMPSON and Gwen Larson star in "Uttle Red Ridin g Hood."

Board.

Rejected last summer, the Consti­ tution has b een the s u pport

which has

a

of

revised Dr.

and has

Wi egman

Q u estion s of fiscal policy pr edom i nate

at the meeting.

wil l

Regents

discuss

ment portfolio,

the

.

Will Th

ndow·

the funds coming

from the LIFE progr m, and the gen era l auditing of the books. The f ac u lty representative to thl: Board

The main proposal being consid­ 'red by the

di.rect effect on student life, is the Religio us Life Council Consti tut io n.

while

is

Dr.

William

Gidding:.,

the s tu dents will be reprt:

sen ted by

Bill Christ nsen.


Wed nes d ay, Nov. 4, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Two

Parallax

A Statement of Policy As was the case last year, questions have again been

Those Hypocrites

ra ised both to myself and the staff in regard to the editorial

policy of th e paper. Though I ha v e spoken to these questions

By GLEN ANDERSON

in the past, its significance is such that we believe a more com­ p r ehensive statement to be in order. Perhaps the best way to begin is to state what I be lieve college newspaper

s houl

a

d not be.

It should not be a propaganda sheet for the administra­ tion, for the Office of University Relations, for Admissions, or for prospective contributors to the university. .It should not be a salve for the alumni telling them all is well at the old alma mater. All may not be well, and what­ ever the case, what is is probably different from what they may have expected or wanted. It s ho uld not be a bu ll etin board for ca m pys eve nts . We a l r eady have enough of them around here and

they seem to

work quite well. Finally, with the exception of the news stor y, the paper

s hould not-and indeed cannot-be obiective in its reporting. This is a most important point, for those who try will u ltima tely fail because a newspaper is run by people. R e gardless of one's att empts at impartiality, hidden biases inevi tably shade all that we do. To make claims to the contrary would be dishon est . It is not our contention, h owe ve r , that such ob ject i vity would even be desirable were it possible to achieve. A stu­ dent ne wsp aper t o d a y which does not posses a direction and a commitment is a bulletin board and will draw the corres­

ponding amount of attention and resu l ts. It is not onl y the op­

I'm not preaching a sennon.These are just some thoughts I've had on my mind. If someone else can identify with them . . . well, you know what they say about "if the shoe fits ... " Gee, I hate Christian hypocrites. They

The very complexity of the issues which are now facing pivotal importance, for only an alert and critical mind can fath­

om the subtleties of our comtemporary situation. Thos e who

are to be capable of making such judgments, however, mus.t first know what they believe th emselves and why. Unfortunately, many-and perh aps the maj ority-o f the s tud en ts who attend this university have been handed a se t of values by thei r parents. They h ave been told to accept many of them without question-and they ha ve . Regar dless of the ult i mate worth of those values, jf the students who profe ss them ca n not defend them with the rea­ soning from which they follow, the fragile tablets of their par ental commandments will shatter with the first blow. Many of the values which you have been taught-probably most of them-are sound. Nevertheless, you have to know why the y are sound to make them stick. If you cann ot , when they are chall enged they may fall useless when y ou need them most. It is for this reason that the paper has, and wilt continue to challenge many of the values and assu mpti o n s which you may have come to accept without thi nking. We do not do it because we wish to d e stroy them, but with the intention of forci ng you into an examination of those values so that you

know wh y you believe as you do. If you f ind that you have no valid reasoning behind your belief then perhaps you are wrong and had better find some­ thing more concrete to hang on to. If you have reaso ns , a nd re sound-even when different from our own-the n they great, as l ong as you know why you be l i eve them. It is the peop l e who do not know why who are mos t dangerous within a de m ocra cy . For th ey are the ones who re­ treat to authoritarianism when challenged by c h an ge . Suc!) pe o ple can k ill a democracy, and the Mast does not inte n d to -John A.akre foster such a mentality.

MAST

The Voice of the Students at Pacific Lutheran UnJversli) JOHN AAKRE .. . . .

..

. . .

_

BOB HASSELBLAD . .. . . KATE MA eKE . ..

__.

.. ...

. .._......

_ .... .... ........... .

.......

PAULA SEIBERT .. DAVE SODERLUND

...

_ . . _.

. .

. . ._

___..

.

.

MARY SHADOFF

__

PAUL BERG DR. JOHN PETERSON

.. . .

.

_

... ..... .

.

_._.

._

.... _

.

.

__

. . .. . .. ..

.

.

..... . Business Manager .. .

....

.

.

.

. ... . .

...

.

..... Advisor .

STAFF-Glen Anderson, Paul Wuest, Kansas. Glen Zander, Steve Larson,

John

Hushagen,

Heavey,

Russ

Johnson,

Dave

Mary

Giles,

Jan

D ave

Thorson. Tom Dykstra, Kristi Johnson,

Becky Rodning, Bruce Bjerke, Cathy Wark, Steve Cook, Nancy Shaw.

Karen

Svendsen.

Wanda

Huber,

Bob

Steward,

David

Aakre, John Rankin, Scott Gre en, Priscilla Martens, Pal Stiles, Lindsay Grader, The Morris, John Beck.

Footrubber.

Linda

Gardner,

Barbara

Perh aps, then-just perhaps-you and I are the people Jesus talked about when he referred to hypo­

because each of us is secure in the knowledge that

he is a true all-week Christian, and it's aU tbe· rest of those numbskulls in chur h who are the hypo­

act.ions

from our hypocrisy; we're still responsible for our

(and

inaction).

n's us. Very personally, it's

critical "Sunday Christians."

us:

you and me.

I like the sermon each week. You know, that Not only do we sel f-righteously mouth pious pLa­

twenty minute session when the pastor stands up in

we don't take seriously and which

front and enumerates the faults of the person sitting

titudes which

next to you.And I can rest easy and sa y, "r thank

therefore turn around to condemn us, but for some

thee, Lord, that I am not like other men.-A1J in all,

st range reason we likewise piously mouth-yet neg·

a very reinforcing experience.

lect to seriously believe-God's message of forgive·

My favorite Gospel text is the Good Samaritan

ness. That's us, too.

story. It really comes down hard on those religious hypocrites

who

boy, Jesus,

pass

by on the other side. 'Atta

When John says "God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him

should not perish, but hav e eternal life," he really

ve 'em hell!

A few summers ago I was on a downtown side­ walk minding my own business when a d i rty man

means, "God

so

loved Glen Anderson that he ... "

Just insert your own name. And take that serious­ ly, too. It's us

.

Letters to Our Editor Ta the Editor: over

alre ady

and

for

orable ex perience. We turn in

oW'

thanks

to

this

year,

it proved to be a mem­

many of u

all

those who

worked

hard to make it·l1 success, most es­ pecially

Pam

Larson,

Jim Harri,

and Scott Miller. Their efforts will

prove Lo be of great benefit to those who attended, and in turn to the en ·re student body. But r would also like to thank

lhase who reall y made the differ­

ence at the retreat, and they would have to be al l tho s e that eagerly attended and gave of tltem lves in their participation and i nvolve­ men t . Wi t hout that the meaning of the retreat would have been inSig­ nificant. Again I thank

you all.

Sincerely, Bill Chris tensen, ASPLO

President

To the Editor: Does a sol d ie r nave the right to sta te his beliefs? And be heard! The most recent case of military's "blind" justice con cerns the Fort Lewis "six", tried and convicted in court martial style. A few reflection s on the trial of

Private First Class Jeffrey C.Grif· fith

will

make

my

point

clear.

Griffith was charged with failure to obey a lawful order, that order to report to the overseas replace­ ment

center.

as clear a

But

his case isn't

that.Griffith is a con­

scientious objector as much as any­ can be conscientiously o pp osed

to war.The AmlY doesn't want to believe him. It appears as though o nce your in, you can't get out. There is little room for change. Griffith admits that he joined the

freedom for all people." Upon see­ ing the

method

by

which

young

men are prepared for the preserva­ tion and extension of freedom to

all people, Griffith became a chan­ ged man.He couldn't scream with animal

fury

free­

most sincere indiividuals I've ever

man who can't say what he believes

right to quiet a man lik e Jeffrey

means to love and to d esi re

The Ann ual Leadership Retreat is

purpose "to preserve and extend

..

I am a hypocrite. And so is the person in church

th eti cal scribes, Pharisees, and other assorted Bibli­ cal villains. Maybe the Bible is a bout us. If so, let's finish the story, but it still won't let us off the hook

long.It's an issue all of us can agree on-ALC, LCA,

..............News Editor ..Copy Ed ito r .. .._

expected a rooster to crow. Sitting on the right of the person on your left.

and even Missouri Synod. It's comfortable to say

Army because he believes in its

... . Sports Editor Circulation Manager

_. _ ._...

.

. ... .... ... ... . . . .Editor

bug

We should be Christians all week

Managing Edltor

. . _.

.

. . .. .. ...... .

....

...

.... .. ....

.. . . _

.

.... .

. ..

... .

...

_

... ... ..

money on me, and he walked on.Only after he was

We shouldn't just be "Sunday Christians." Oh, of course not!

on

MOORING

re a Uy

tbat they don't realize what they're doing.

tion, but the responsibility of the paper both to raise the un­

our society makes the nature of the paper's commitment of

I mumbled some sort of a lie ao':>out not having any

out of sight did I realize what I had done. T fully

me. I mean, it's so obvious, /Jut they' re so stupid

comfortable issue and to aid in the instigaltion of the changes

which are n eces s a ry . If it does not act as such it bec o m es a news sheet an d li ttl e mo r e.

with grubby clothes and a few days' growth of beard walked past. He stopped and asked me for a nickel.

"kill. kill, kill," or chant "blood. blood. blood makes the grass grow tall." or sing with the res t of the troops, "I want to kill Charlie Cong." The very fact that he was present where such an attitude could be held initiated a re-evaluation of his life style and a d ee per understanding of what it

dom for al l. In his own words, "A

met."

a nd be believed is forced by a n on­ believer to have a troubled con­ science. As for the fate of Jeffrey Grif­ fi th, it is far from being decided . Griffith received a light sentence, 58 d ays of confinement, and a 60 doUar fi ne, two months of pay. But he is still in the Army, a private now, but a far cry from freedom. Griffith asks onl y to be allowed the freedom he so dearly wants to defend His commanding officer said of Griffith, "Jeff is on e of the

Does

the

Army

have

the

GriHith by throwing him in jail? Freedom is a high price to pay. Glenn Keto

To the Editor:

In the past few weeks the Moor ­ ing Mast has taken on a certain uplifting and human quality that I think deserves mention. So m any times when I read the paper, I get the feeling that the writer is just printing the facts . . . those cold,

emotionless ,

.

but necessary tidbits

(<Antlnued on

Page 3)

Go Ahead, Touch Touch me when I'm fall ing .

.

touch me when I'm silent ... toud . . . Don't be afraid . . .

me when I'm down .. . touch me when I hurt

go ahead . . . please

.

. . touch me .

.

.

I am essentially alive. But there are moments when I feel Like J am amongst the dy.ing. Momen ts when 1 feel trapped without a ny thoughts-without words-word s of encouragement for myself or for anyone else. Moments when my energy feels so att enua ted that I be­ come o bli vious to any motion. Moments when I am so alone that the sound. of someone' s voice leaves me stupefied. Indeed, there a re moments wh e n I tre asure being alone ...but only when I know th at you are nearby. Serenity, even sol itu de, can be a beautiful thing. But only if it is chosen. It is ugly if forced upon me. Many of my fOndest memories are of moments when you walked on ahead-to some patch of green-to the other side of a meadow-to reflect, to think. to .hear your own heart beat, to leave me for a momen'

to ga ze at my own thoughts.

I am essentially alive. But would I be if no one else believed it? There are moments when I want to be alone, but please stay very near.

I( there is no one willing to vi e w a sunset with me, is there really

any worth to my poetry or song? In the moments when I am most ugly, most unlovable, mo st untouchable, if no one reaches out to touch me, if no one is wil ling to be possibly dirtied by entering the nebula in wh ich J have fallen to help me out, will it be possible to ascend a premature grave? I'm not saying you have to love me. The re is no need for you to think my thoughts,

or

to walk the same path as I, or to worry my wor­

ries. But when our p aths do draw close. see me, hear me, touch me. care about me . . .Don't disdain me because of my weakness. In passing, know that ( care about you. And know that I don't need to own you.An artist

can

love and cherish a painting, but that doesn't

mean he has to own it. To know that it exists, and that it is in good keeping, is enough . Joy is not possession. Joy is knowing. Joy is help­

ing. Joy is defendi ng that which you love. Joy is touching and being

touched. Touch me in my sorrow, touch me in my joy ...touch me .

I am essentially alive ... But it takes two people to prove it. love and joy,

foot rubber


Wednesday, Nov. 4, 1970

Nixon: Friend of the Eart

Our Man Hoppe

By DAVE SODERLUND

"The old joke that says any successful President must bring along

his own contingent of hippies and shaggy-haired protestors if he wants

win the sympathy of the majority is only a half-gag now. Nixon's

advance men this fall have carefully arranged with local police to allow

enough dissenters in the staging areas so the President will have his

theme well illustrated as he warms to his job." -Hugh Sid.!j\!Y, writing in Life magazine. *

*

The Republicans would surely have swept the country in the fall of

19'10. if it hadn't been for the fiasco in Ashtabula, Ark., on election eve. Speaking at a nationally-televised rally, Mr. Nixon, as usual, prom­

ised that peace and prosperity were just around the corner.

turned.

as usual, to the "rock-throwers and

He then

obscenity-mongers"

waited, as usual, for the usual demonstration to erupt.

and

It did. "Right on, Mr. President!" cried a shaggy-haired .type in the 23rd

row. "That's telling it like it is, sir!" shouted his even shaggier com­

panion. All over the auditorium, hippies waved their smuggled-in pla­ cards.

The President gestured at them contemptuously, as usual. "I say

don't answer these obscenity-shouters in kind. I say ... " He paused as

Page Three

Environment

Arthur Hoppe

to

MOOR II·..JG MAST

their words sank in. "What did you say?" he asked incredulously.

"You've convinced us of the error of our ways, sir!" said an un­

believably-hairy, gap-toothed spokesman, waving a sign that read, "We Love Pat, Too!"

and even during his campaign, tried to convince

ret

that he is willing to consider our ecological needs.

It seems that he has been following Biblical advice

edeldl On June 19, 1970 Mr. Nixon ord r d agen ies t draw up plans permitting a ir Lfeas d production of timber, probably to the erriment of other valid uses of the already-ravaged national for­ ests. Congressman John P. Saylor (R- enn.) des­

to the letter. however, and has, while feeding con­

servationists a meager diet of concessions with the

left hand, been patting business firmly on he back

all along with the right. It is time for the left hand to

find out just exactly what the right hand is doing.

cribed this maneuver as a successful end run by the lumber industry to gain by Executive fial what they had no prayer of gaining through legislation. Saylor

For a long time industrial and business 10h.'Jies

have opposed a strong water pollution control pro­ gram for the simple reason that once cities cleaned

laid the blame directly on the White House and said, " ... conservation, environment, ecology that is, the pu,llic's concerns - are to be subser­ vient to the pressures and profits of the logging in­

at

up their mess the finger would point directly

_

the industrial polluters.For 1970 the Nixon Adminis­

tration appropriated $214 million-a carryover from

the previous budget-for water pollution, cleanup.

" dustry.

Congress responded by upping this appropriation to

Perhaps the sealing piece of evidence concerns

$800 million in response to the general public uproar

the formation, by executive order, of the National

over environmental quality. The power for the use 360 million was

and only

obligated, leaving $440

than a few polluters. Bert S.Cross of 3M, whose

National Advertising Company subsidiary is a bitter

be a communications gap be­

month, we realize we've been downgrading America. Now we all belong

case of one carl L. Klein, ,former Assistant Secre-­

opponent of billard removal and highway beautifica­

tion, is the chairman of this rogues' gallery_ As a

and the ones making the policy decisions.Take the

to our Dick Nixon Club instead."

tary of the Interior for Water Quality and Research

and dabbing his upper lip with his handkerchief, "these specimens were

a focus for many years in the

of

composed

63 officials of major industries - including more

million as a "carryover"-it lies idle.

tween the people involved in enforcing pollution laws

Council

Control

Pollution

Industrial

of this money lies with the administration, however,

"We used to be in The Effete Corps of Impudent Snobs," explained

the spokesman. "But after listening carefully to your speeches this past

have come from the President hims II OJ the ec­ f the Interior. Klein resign d his post on September 9.

the country that he_ is not environmentally blind and

There seems to

"Now, wait just a minute," said Mr. Nixon, frowning.

out new facts and push for an earlier compliane date ut his order was countermanded from "up­ stairs_" The cancellation of the hearing could only

since he first took office

has,

President Nixon

? •

final coup Nixon funded these public-spirited men

with $475,000 for "operations," more than one quart­

er of the amount requested for the whole operation

"Look, friends," said Mr. Nixon, turning to the television camera

which involves our own area.Puget Sound has been

of the Council on Environmental Quality. The sad

obviously hired by unscrupulous Democrats in a cheap attempt to em­

pollution.Since 1962 procedures have been underway

inet by the Secretary of Commerce while the Ad­

"Gosh, no, sir," cried the spokesman, his eyes gleaming with un­

compliance schedules were set. Scott Paper Com­

Agency has no voice there at all.

barrass my Administration."

questionable sincerity behind his granny glasses_ "We want to work with you and your supporters to build a decent America. We want to move

into their neighborhoods, join their country clubs and marry their daugh­ ters.

was

her shriek, of course, that set off the en­

loyalty to Mr. Nixon were hospitalized_

something a,"x>ut their garbage.Klein wanted to call

Mr. Nixon immediately gave orders that henceforth he would bring

could be trusted. But it wa, too late for the next day's election. Republi­

cans went down to defeat in droves.

As one astute Wbite House aide Later summed up:

"With the way

must Americans loathe most other Americans, the last thing the public

of information that everyone sup­

to

this

demands

degree,

a

but

sometimes this style can permeate

the readers' mind and leave him

feeling as impersonal and emotion­ less as the words he reads.

Anyway, my point is not to knock

Mooring Mast (which is de­

the

did I go wrong?"

the emergence

finitely on the way up), but to hail of a new,

warm,

and creative writer to its staff .

, 1970) (Copyright Chronicle Publishing Co.

I

its

with

wants. Society,

wants is any more togetherness."

"I know," said Mr. Nixon, shaking his head ruefully."But where

I

Review

On The Marquee So far the drama season in the

Tacoma

has

area

been

great.

There has been such a variety of

shows presented that if you didn't like one, you were bound to like

one of the next.

Last weekend, Curtain Call Club

of PLU sponsored a performance

of " ummertree," which is being

presented by the Community the­ atre

in

Lakewood, the LakewO'od

PI yers. One

of the purposes

of

the project was to introduce peo­

ple with the community theatres,

and I think those who went were

glad they did.

"Summertree"

is

a

fantastic

play and I would like to take issue with

the

reviewer

from

middle

beginning,

By SCOTT GREEN

the Ta­

sometimes can be confUSing. B ut

vich and Randy Scofield, and fine

lighting technique, the show flowed smoothly.

I expected a lot from the play,

as I had seen a reading of it and had read it myself a number of

times, but 1 was not disappointed

at all.Dorothy Clark, as the moth­

er, was very effective. It- was not

an easy part, and like the others, have

could

soap­

Friday and

Saturday with an 8:30 curtain time so if you get a chance,

see

As the father, Richard Monaghan

was amusing as he made the char­

Gerry Sandstedt played the lead the

young

man and had

a big job as I had tried out for

the part and was supercritical. but

is some­

should have been timed differently

were

moments

had

a

which

different

I

thought

interpretation

times a bitter pill. However, I will

or

Also in the area at the Univer­ of

sity

Afraid

of

is

Sound,

Puget

Virginia

Woolf?"

The

ple. Hopefully, it is not about to­ day's typical marriage,

but it is

still a very disturbing play. YOli can't

something

enjoy

I

very easily.

carne

like

out

this

approach is attempted which works.

with Pamela Reed (the young girl)

but, especially in

his

scenes

Riner as George and Gail Bryson as Martha provide very good per­

formances.

I don't see how they

do it night after night. There

three

are

are

also

presenting

Moliere's

"School for Wives" on Nov. 5, 7,

13, and 19-21.

Also in the area:

At PLU-"Between Two Thieves" At TCC-"The Crucible"

pNfec , is a very effectual one.

formance. Her naturalness added a

At TLT-"Case of Libel"

ov. II, 12, 14

Nov. 19-22

Nov. 4-7

heap.

Footrubber article

An

Dave

(alias

creatively

ex­

pressed has always had more ap­ peal to me than the regular stuff­ and from what l' e picked up from inmates

fellow

around here,

['m

not the only fan of the forward

and f re e-writing FootTUbber. Whet­ her he's writing on existence, his first-born,

OT

a distant love, people

seem to be able to relate with his not words,

feelings ..

feelings.

Rumor has it that his inspiration

often

comes from

riding

his

speed up nine floors in Tinglestad's

elevator, and from birthday par­

ties out at everyone's favorite pre­

functional resort, "Fritz's" (oil., by way

the

Gene);

many

returns

happy

but whatever the case, it

always results in a good piece of

journalism Wednesday afternoons. At any rate, I think Footrubber

deserves a pat on the back for his I just hope he con­

articles and

tinues to write on.f'd also like to

give a hearty "right-on!" to Glen

nderson's article "The Ungrateful

last we k. The Mooring Mast is definitely in good hands this year and 1 hope more people

Gook

to

utilize it; not only for readi g but

also for self-expression.

a

democratic prin iple ot freedom of speech constructively. President Wiegman inItiated this year as a year

of commit el t. He asked that we actively commit au selve_ out time, talent, and onvictions to

the

well-being

,':lrothers_

of

Ilum

r

Students at this umv rSlty tOOk up the challenge in many ways. One such group sponsored the sym­

posium on abortion. The intention was to present both sides of Refer­ endum 20_ Students committed to each point of view atcempled to present material summarizing thelt reasons, and convictions_ However,

this

ideal

to reality.

was

dIfficult

to

endum 20 from the UnIversity en ter denied the freedom of spee h

f those of us among (he studtmt body who want ou Ill' ori!y voiCeS heard, and who rbk the status quo

to do it. The paste was OUI last resort. It is h autiful becau it the image of a person "becoming."

It is repulsive because it is a re­ of the victim-essence of this vote of the poopl".

transfer

student,

I

was

I respect students lIke my room­

mate who, accordjng to their philo­

sophical

tate open communications.Faculty

ner in Our rOOm, and respec

' University to facili­ cific Lutheran students

brIng

Students who repeatedly remov­ ed the bumpersticker, buttons, and finally the poster opposing R f r­

impressed with the efforts of Pa­

and

II

abortions which may result fwm

To the Editor: As

couraged the silent majority and minority to speak out, to utilize the

minder

Tom Holmes

alike last May

performances

remaining, Nov. 6, 12, and 14. They

and the mother, he was quite good.

lot to' her scenes with the young

Giles).

feeling

contact with Edward Albee's play,

But Summertree does. And the pro­

I also enjoyed the young girl's per­

namely,

very tired and drained, and just a

of,

The play is not like most, with a

"Who's

play is about four very sad peo­

agree that it isn't often that a new

duction at Lakewood, although not

it.

it is worth the time to see. Richard

he did a fine job. Of course there

and very near to everyone.

moments.

The play runs this

seen.

tle or people against people is very Perhaps that is why it

tender

funny and

little sick.If you haven't had any

role of

real

man, and there were some very

of herself and provided one of the

more enjoyable performances I've

to swallow. On the contrary! The

eratiun gap, and the constant bat­

very

become

opera-ish, but she was in control

acter quite pitiful.

theme against war, about the gen­

and

with help of guitarists, Mike Dumo­

coma News Tribune who said the theme was trite and a bitler pill

end,

and

control on polluters with an enemy at the top of the

Letters to Our Editor (cont.)

(Continued from Page 2)

fast-moving, ever changing pace,

along his own contingent of shaggy-haired protesters whose rotteness

Protection

Environmental

new

difficult than ever to achieve effective gove rnment

a public hea ing, the next precedural step, to bring

posedly

of the

The evidence speaks for itself; it will be more

16 years after initial steps were taken-to do

197

Administration." His voice choked with emotion."You've brought us all

suing violence. Forty-three hippies, each still protesting his, her or its

ministrator

pany, one of he major offenders, was given until

together!"

matron next to him. It

part is that these men are represented in the Cal>

to curb pollution by government enforcement and

"Don't you see, sir? You've at last realized the goal of your whole

With that, he threw his unwashed arms around a plump, mink-coated

ar against industrial

from

en-

premise, rllust vote f01 Referendum 20. She hears her ban­

(Continued

on

me

Page 4)

ASPLU

Have you ever wanted a book or magazine that PLU'

lib

jU!>L

doesn't have? Or have you ev r wished you had access to somethIng that

makes for lighter reading than the latest chemistry journal? The good word from the library is that a fund has been set aside for the

tudents'

use in purchasing materials for the library.

So that the students are fully represented in deciding how this money

is to be spent, suggestion boxes :>re available in the libr ry.

Or it

you have some ideas, and the lib is just too far away, call Linda Edlun at 1336 or Bill Christensen at 1316.


Wednesday, Nov. 4, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Four

Convention Adopts Reforms By PAUL WUEST

out.

It wasn't with the greatest an­ ticipation that I went to San An·

the Fifth Bienniel Convention of The

tonid,

Texas.

American

last

week

Luth ran

for

Church.

It

seems that no one ever h ars about anything that the national church does. And at the same time you

do hear people degrading it for all

the things it doesn't do. Along with those considerations.

I could

only

anticipate this con­

vention experience to be as oUrers

I

have

had,

experiences

whose

worth I h ve questioned. Add

the

Antonio

I

fact was

at

San

confronting

that

that

monster the Establishment and you

have about the frame of mind that was mine as we arrived in hot and humid Texas.

I suppose it's from

the

only

beginning

fair to say that

was

I

overwhelmed and truly impressed proceedings at San An· tonid. Never before has there been so much to do at an ALC conven­ tion. The pre-conven tion prepara· tional book they 5'ent us was over

with the

900 page s. long. The one issue that

took the most time was the elec·

tion of a new President and Vice

President. That took up less than ten of those pages.

But the con­

vention C'overed most of all its as·

signments, and with an exception

or two, not in a shabby style.

Other than the elections, the con­ enacted

approach

a new

to confirmation and first commun­ '

ion.

S"elective

conscientious objec­

tion,' the ordination of women, a statement on tax reform, loweri ng

the age of eligibility delegates towards

to

18,

convention

or

significant

inter-Lutheran

steps

unity,

as

well as a Long Range St udy pro­

gram designed to restructure the ALC.

T

could

believe so

hardly

much was handled.

-Of course there were those with their special interests who felt that

not enough was done in thase ar­

eas. Tn a number of cases, this, I

felt was true. The Church ac ts slow­ ly. My special interest was to learn

what

I

could.

That interest

fulfilled substantialJy.

was

wh.en

1

were was

a

for that

the was

there was well accepted and eager­ The

convention

was

not

The emphasis is on a continuing dead.

It was quite open to new thought and progressive ideas.

Especially

when

the

concerned .with

Long

Range Study and the other issues mentioned before. The symptoms

of a stagnant and dying body were

not

there.

This

was

evident not

only in what was expres5'ed and voted upon, but also in the system which proved to be conducive to hearing minority opinion while re­ maining

efficient

enough

to

get

thngs do.ne. I obviously could not go into each

I would like to,

but

I

think a number of them need men­ tion at this time. First of all must be the new President of the ALe.

The Rev. Dr. Ke nt S. Knutson js the youngest man ever to be elect·

ed in the history of the synods now comprising the ALe. He was the

youngest of the ten candidates at

45 years of age. A former chemical engineer, Dr. Knutson

to

speak

educational program in the church for the youth, with pre· and post­ communion education all referred

to as the process of confirmation. The convention voted to accept the ordination of women upon caJl as the practice of the LeA. Three women

seminarians

has become known here

and abroad as an extremely cap­

delegates, very convincingly. lac· tually

did

Federation,

currently chairman of the standing ological

in

Studies

the

Lutheran

(LCUSA).

Council in the USA

I found a very favorable reaction to his election at

an Antonio. He

was sUghtly behind an the first bal­ lot,

but

as

eliminated

the he

candidates repeatedly

were

gaIned

substantially more ..,otes than any­

he won on the fi nal ba l lo t, 566 to 411.

one else until

­

Of extreme interest in this elec­

tion was the open campaigning that

is unprecedented in the protestant church.

It is

interesting

to note

that of the three final candidates,

Dr. Knutson, Dr. David ?reus, and

Dr. Gerhard Belgum, Knutson was

th.e least active politically. Confinnatkm, Ordinatim The decision of confirmation and

firm communion was to accept a sponsored

by

as

LCUSA

much strong

men while I was there, that

the

I was

so

vote

was

as

close as 560 to 414.

Church RestructlIriD8 I suppose the issue that intrigued

and impressed me the most was that

of

the

restructuring

of

the

church

as proposed by the Long

Range

Study

Committee.

It

was

proposed in 22 parts, only three of

which were not accepted, those di­ rectly related to the restructuring of the national boards. Among the

(OooCinued

OIl

Page 7)

(Continued from Page I

3)

who call our attention to views of

need to maintain and improve the

when there is

effectiveness,

sistent with our basic national va·

'

report to the President. The Com­ mission was headed by Thomas S. Gates.

former

Secretary

of

De·

fense, and contained such persons as:

the Presidents of the Univer·

sities

of

Rochester,

Notre Dame

such

movements as Tacoma

Re­

As a consequence of this lack of

sistance. However, 1 do not respect

interest, one can only assume that

student s who participat e in or sup­

in a sense PLU is dead. For

as

a

Director,

NAACP;

Alfred Gruent­

her, Former Supreme Allied' Com· mander of Europe. The recommendation of the Com­ mission ment

was,

of

an

in short,

establish­

alI-volunteer

Armed

Forces by June 30, 1971. For the

next several weeks I will be writ­ ing excerpts from, and comments

about,

the findings

of the Gates

Com miss i on .

A primary task of the Govern­

emplify the university at large. If they did, my graduation

diploma

would be a banner of shame and

A few groups, such as our athle­ can not

stage a big farce by demonstrating to people from visiting schools and

Sincerely, Terry Staeheli

na tional

has

States

th roughout Its history on armed

force

a

ly is a major social change, but it

tary

volun­

strengthen

our

remove

freedom,

an inequity now imposed on the ex­

pression never

youth,

of

patriotism

promote the

the armed

forces,

has

among

lacking

been

that

our

effiCiency

and

of

enhance

their dignity. When di scussing

re­

a

dinner cost the school about $13OO? An amount of such importance that it could have paid for the food bill a

welfare

family

of

four.

It

tuition for an underpl1ivilaged kid. It could have started

a

new library

for Remann Hall, these are just a

few things that this money could

student body.

within 5 miles of our utopia there

Has it ever occured to you that

.

President Richard M. Nixon has so

long that too many of

us accept it as normal and nec­

essary."

The

draft

inequ itabl e,

has

and

been

a

divisive

all

boards with painful decisions about who shall be compelled to serve

and who shall be d eferred. It has

weakened the political fabric ot our

society and impaired the delicate

web of shared values

that alone enables a free society to exist. These coS"ts of the dratt would

have to borne If they were a neces­

By TOM HELGESEN

by starting last Tuesday the 27.

the Bible. We will experiment with

involved.

In doing this I hope that the money

study and discussion methods de·

for my piece of meat will go tow·

veloped

ample of the now apparent apathy engulfing this campus. Of the total number

of

on

campus

students,

only two were really curious as to

tempting to form this type of club,

ards a much better cause. In your

512.

ing that you can do, think harder.

please let me know by calling ext. Janet Allen

case if you think that there is noth­ Russel Anderson

or in transit, while only 9 perc en t

On

Sunday,

November

Congregation

will

8,

Stu­

begin

a

morals In an age of turmoil. Re­

by

students,

the

With an all·volunteer force, the

serve longer, thereby reducing los­ ses due to seperations upon com­ pletion Second,

of

initial

obligated

tours.

the same effective force

strength can be maintained wit h a

smaller total active duty force. Next

week

arguments

against

and rebuttals for an aU-VOlunteer armed force will be presented.

amining

sense of '.>elonging and want to get at­

Put a'llOther way, 13 pe rcent of a force is assigned to non­

odern Christian Ethic

Class Studies

are kids that go to bed with only

to provide a unified type of school

in

provide the same effective power.

for two reasons. First, volunteers

of

spirit for our athletic teams.

interested

mixed force

young men. It has burdened draft

lives

sources for tbe class will include

is

a

of draftees and volunteers but still

rate of replacement will be smaller

the

professors,

If anyone

all-voluntee r force

our

into

I am fasting without meat from

This meeting was a typical ex­

an

can be smaller than

tainty

our food services for one month

out to those people

fective men.

B&­

fewer non·ef­

so occupied.

H has introduced needless uncer­

who need a

other students. and als o to reach

it will have

the tax burden on the rest of us.

ish ego is frightening. For my part,

held to form a rally club on cam­

s t atus .

forms of non·effec1J.ive cause

of the all-volunteer force wJll be

many

pus whose primary purpose was

recruit

each

of young men while easing slightly

ed

with

turno ver,

spends a small fraction of his ser·

effective poSitions at training basiS

dent

consulting

flect defense capability. With lower

the armed forces. It has imposed

class to study and discuss Christian

after

duty forces does not directly re­

mixed

To think of that large supply of

28, an organiZ'ational meeting was

of future military forces are criti·

cal variables. The size of the active

procedure for recruiting men for

money going towards our own self­

that there was a lack of spirit at

-

vice career in training or in other

antly of volunteers

games, this conclusion being reach­

October

In planning for an all volunteer

arme d force, the size and quality

ent forces are made up predomin­

often ignored fact is tha t our pres­

heavy burdens on a small minority

Did you know that your steak

day's armed forces.

personnel

comly,

To the Editor:

be IlllUlDed largely by

turn to an all·volunteer force the

one meal a day in their stomachs.

Last Wednesday night,

the personnel of our armed forces_ force will

to involve those persons who felt

To the Editor,

conscription

of

will not produce a major ch ange in

relied

except

lues. The elimination

curity. The United

alternative con­

the practice of drafting, admitted­

se·

the draft

the community off-campus the spir

This organization was attempting

the

pointed out "We have lived with

have bought.

it which should be evident in the

hypocrisy.

of

to provide for the common defense

campus? tic teams and pep staff

in promotion

ment of the United States has be en

pertinent material of students sup­

I hope such students do not ex­

they may

so

continue t o play their proper role

an

the same kind of individuals as to­

could have paid for a semester's

porting the Voice for the Unborn.

status

and security. They are intolerable

turn to an all-volunteer force will

for

on

of the armed forces

and

the

University; Roy Wilkins, Executive

Center of the literature and other

activities

dignity,

was

The reality is that an all-volunteer

Stephan

of

of

Commission

majors wars and since 1948. A re­

Institute;

community, are we not responsible support

the

Herbits, a student at Georgetown

Hampton

port removal from the University

the

guided

during

and

the blessings of liberty and justice.

objectives.

sary price for defending our peace

ident s Commission on an AlI·Vol­ unteer Armed Forces submitted its

tions.

and what were to be its primary

olunteer Army

A f undamental consideratlon that

of a society established to secure

what type of organization this was

respect students

In the pool.

•.m_

By THOMAS R. HEAVY

On February 20, 1970 the Pres­

Letters 10 Our Editor (cont.) bearing mine.

aad Fri. 11:30

a.m.

The Case for An A

grams in the individual congrega·

It suggests that first com·

AIN'T HEAVY, HE'S MY BROmER! USSAC Swimmlllg Thurs.

HE

I:!O

Deferably Speaking

the

World Council oj Ch urches, and is

not hear

objection to the ordination of wo­

wor k ed under the auspices of the W-Orld

present

many hours with a great number of

able symematic theologian. He bas Lutheran

were

at the convention, and they talked

surprised

The New President issue as

munion be given some time around the fifth grade year and confirma· tion be during the tenth grade year.

ly heard by the convention.

study

couple of times

pe rtur bed

regret,

delegation

guidelines or the confirmation pro­

A Uve CCIIlventim There

without

youth

committee for the Division of The­

Convention Issues

vention

and

small

authors

Ecumenical

and

In­

stitute in Chicago which are design·

ed to ground learning in the every·

day encounters of the participants

.

We invite you to join us in ex­

men

,

the

messages

in reflecting on

of

our

other

own in­

sights and in rooting these In the

experience of our lives as we de­

cide to live them.

The class wil l meet at 9:00 a m. ,

in

the

Pflueger

Hall

recreation

room and will begin at 9:15 a.m.

lf you would like more information

or are interested in he lpin g with the class please call extension 578. Tom Helgesen

Student Cong Education

Committee


Wednesday, Nov.

1970

4,

MOORI NG MAST

Page Five

Women's Lib AHacks Female Role By KATE MANCKE quently

families are led by men who have

attacked

and

fre­

incomes

misunderstood,

the

Wo­

Although

Vociferously

causes,

doubtedly

against women on the

the

most

controversial

Touted ported

liberals reform

have

who

contributes sup­

movements

Entertainment will be provided by on and off·campus artists. Any

level as the entertainers. The ta­

persons

tainment for the opening night of the Cave. They will be playing in PLU's

long

awaited

coffeehouse

immediately after the Bread con­ cert on November 6. The entertainment progTam will rounded

Je

Sinclair

out

and

by

Misses

Lauri

Juli Waesche.

Lauri

a freshman from Arcadia, Cal­

15

ifornia. Juli is a senior from UPS and ;he has previously performed in . he

Red

Lyon.

Entirely

student run,

the Cave

:an potentially be open 24 hours a jay. A unique ex:per ime nt at PLU, tt will be a quiet sanctuary where ,tu.dents can relax and qu ietly talk. fhe kitchen will be open nJghtly Uld

pizza,

'Ties,

drummettes,

soft drinks,

french

coffee and hot

;hocolate will be featured on the nenu. The eating area has been raised,

Interim Tour To Study Legislature \ course in pTactical political sci­ mce is being offered by Dr. Don· lId

Farmer,

during

inte ri m .

the

3:ntitled "Comparative Legislative ;ystems," the course will expose ;tudents

to

six

different

legis1a·

ures in the U.S. and Canada. A series of introductory lectures Ifld briefin s will take place on :ampus C!, .rine' the first week of the nterim. Students will be ex:pected select

J

he

a specific

legislative

hey

will

topi<

within

fra mework

whjch

consider

at

all of

the

egislatures visited. The three field trips will includt" rips to the Oregon, California, Ne· 'ada, Idaho and WashingtcID State egislatures.

Three days will be pent in Victoria observing the Leg slative Assembly of British Calum­ ·

,ia. Besides latures

watching

in

process,

the Dr.

Legi·

Farmer

las arranged interviews and lunch· on meetings where the

students

viii be able to discuss pertinent iuestions

with

the

lawmakers.

Ranging in size from the highly ,rofesslonlll California Legislature, .

the informal atmosphere of the gislature evada,

of

each

sparsely

populated

legislature has

its

wn character. The Legislative As· embly of British Columbia, follow­ ' g the Westminster model, will of· =r a sharp contrast to the legisla·

ive bodies in the United States. The co t, without meals, is S150. tudents desl"rfng turtner

IDwrma·

'on should contact Dr. Farmer in 1e Political Science Department.

interested

in

performing

bles in the eating area are a mem­

at the Cave should contact Char­

orium to our times and Ilre cover·

maine Strong,

ed

On evenings when entertainment is

by collages of magazine and

featured

newspaper articles and pictures. Inspired by the prehistoric cave

there

extension

will

be

a

1623. cover

charge of fifty cents which will in·

paintings of France and Spain, the

c1ude

initial theme for the coffeehouse

cold drink.

will be "The Cave." The walls will

at

the

purchase

of

the

first

Student help is also needed in the

last

w

Erin

k's

Van

Speaker's

For­

Bronkhorst

and

tenents

of

the

movement.

chapter

of

the

Women's

predicament of women, Erin stated that workin,g women earn only 58% the

of

salaries

of

men,

the

in

same positions. Limited by tradi· tional views and hiring practices, women

find

the only fields

that

open to them

completely

the

on

gory of services, tially

extensions

and are essen­ of

the

woman's

role in the home. Teachers, nurses waitresses,

dieticians

and

maids

are in this classification. Attempting to tie the issue to pov­ erty to

sexi sm ,

Erin pointed out

petroglyphs or bison and hunters

Bob Torrens, Food Service Direc·

drawn by early man. The theme

tor, if they would like to work on

families led by women are poor,

can be changed periodically.

a part time basis in the Cave.

while only 28% of

contact

the fact that 66% of the non-White the non-white

By RICK SHAVER, Security Chlef

Security

thefts

any help

as seeing a car driving from lot

tica.ble

that the students would be able to

on

our

campus

,

A student legislative intern pro­ th'e

is now

being offered with

Washington

State Legislature

This program coordinated in the

We have had

please

call

Security

at

agajn be expanded in 1971 to in­ clude Central Washington State Col· lege,

Western

College,

the

Washington

University

of

State Wash­

ington and Washington State Uni­ versity. The purpose of the program is to provide at the undergraduate up· per division level a vehicle for a comprehensive

internship

experi·

ence in the legislative process in which one political science student works very closely with one legi­ sl a tor. Any student of a cooperating col­

the

in history. Tradition­ ally viewed as a sex object and an incubator, manding

women

are

de­

their

in­

today

recognition

of

tellectual qualities.

Born on the univ ersity campus, women's lib was sOOn espo used. by profeSSional Wives.

women

Caught

in

and

the

role of wife and mother i n the

breaking

nuclear

age

an

family

wo men

up,

house­

traditional was

found

that

they were often blamed for

the

collapse of the family unit. Professional

women,

of

talent,

found that top flight positions were

incre a se in all

In an age of social move­

ments women discovered that their role as initiators of social action was not

recognized.

Women

lllre

Rosie Parks, who began the Mont­ gomery bus boycott, have been {or­ gotten as the wave of revolution, ridden by men, !>-wept through the country.

ities in masculine terms. For tile first

students we have checking lots. it

that they like other women, stated

is still impossible to prevent every

Mrs. WinslOW. This feeling, much

theft that occurs during the night

cations are available at the Depart· ment of Political Science in Xavier tions which are now ready should no

later

than

November

5,

soon thereafter as

Each student intern who is select· ed at Pacific Lutheran University will be required to enroll for the interim in a course known as In­ ternship in the Legislative Process (P.S. 464).

Arrangements

have

been made to pemit Pacific Luth· eran students during the interim

they

are

discovering

ship caused by the loss of wheels and tape decks and I assure you

greatest hope.

private prope rty.

guard your

All

personnel are aware of the hard­

Pacific Lutheran University appli­

time

akin to black pride and th.e Chicano has united the women in a fellowship of sisterhood. And it is. through this sisterhood that the leaders of women s Jib ree their

.

Every effort is being made to safe­

that the Security Dept.

is taking

every

with

possible

action

the

means available to prevent this. Your help

s needed. When you

are in the lots com ing in from a aate or departing, sh.ould you

no­

tice anyone around the cars, please call

and we shall

have someone

come and check them out. Do not try to apprehend anyone. Get the license

number

and

description

and report it. If everyone on th.e campus

takes

this

responsibility

mentality

'

Until recently, the literature

on

the role of women and sexual dis­ crimination was limited. However, several new books have appeared which buttress the classics of Bet· ty Friedan and Simone de Beau· voir. The following titles arc: rec­ ommended

by

the

Women's

Lib­

e ration Front: Sexu.al Politics, SIs­ terhood

is Powerful, Century of Struggle, Bom Fem ale. 1be Wgh Cost of Keeping Women Down, and Male and Female.

we will have fewer car thefts.

RLe Schedules Open Meeting Tonight This evening the ReUgious Life

to live in Olympia with the interns

Council is holding

from the other colleges and uni­

meeting for anyone inrerested

an

informal open at

such a committee, concerned

wit h

which will be

planning,

coordi­

nating and initiating forms of war·

versities. During spring semester

the Cascade Lounge beginning at

ship on campus, is asked to sub­

the student will be expected to live

8:30.

mit his or her name with a brief

in Tacoma and commute daily to Olympia Session.

for

the

balance

of

the

Members of the CounCil will be there to answer any questions you

description

of

qualifications

Internship duties and reo

haw concerning the makeup and

to

the proceedings of th.e Council. The

through the campus mail.

to be full time during the interim and approximately 3/4 time during the spring semester. The

legislature

is

expected

to

Department of Political Science. At

expenses.

and

personal interest in this com milt

lated class activities are expected

at least a part of each student's

wants

of

role

force we have and the additional

take part shall apply through the

who

and the recognition

County as well. With the limited

appropriate funds to take care of

institution

ality

woman's

make of car, and descriptions of

to

legiate

The second necessary change is a redefinition of a woman's person­

Women are finding that they du

possible.

and will

and

not need to defiJre their personal­

leges and universities.

Sound

devices

campus proper, but includes Pierce

1970. Selection of interns will be

of Puget

birt h·contr ol

If possible get the license number,

announced as

versity

of

This increase is not limited to the

in seven public and private col­

st. Martin's College and the Uni­

ity

abortion to all women.

forms of thefts from automobiles.

the Department of Political Science

expanded in 1969 to include

day care centers, the idea of the extended family and the availabil·

ext.

be submitted as soon as possible

first

an

Included within this area

247 or 248 any time of night or d.ay.

and

of Political Science at Pacific Lu·

how

cidents in our surrounding parklng

is to be a cooperative one involving

theran University the program was

matter

unusual sighting.

Office of the Speaker of the House

Begun in 1967 by the Department

No

give would be greatly appreciated.

100 or from Dr. Farmer. Applica­

for the coming session.

sighted.

Anyone observing any unusual in­

Internships Offered In o ympia Legislature gram

persons

minor the incidents may be, such

to lot, it won't hurt to check it ou t. So don't feel foolish to report any

lots

ac·

men,

opportunities, the establishment of

parts.

(EdItor's Note: The followiDg article, submitted by the PLU

Cblef concerm the no­ increase in thefts upon the campus. In the past two weeks within the Parldand-Lake­ wood area five cars have been stoJeo-three of them here in Parkland. The d.Isappearanee of cameras, tape decks and car parts lsalso increasing.)

with

not open to them because of thei r sex, and they were seldom paid as well as their male counter­

Security Notes Theft Increase In order to help cut down on the

bodies.

when

kitchen.

should

poSition

are the issues of equal employment

labor market fall within the cate­

be decorated by facsimilies of the

Student s

equal

should be given equal work oppor· tunities, and control over their own

Dwelling mainly on the economic

feet and to put eaters on the same

changes are nec

eration Frant.

Liberation Front.

to give the room a split level ef·

Two major

cording to women's lib. First, they

Seattle

and

prob­

an

the rhetoric

Both women are members of the

Kruse

market

thiS

and reasoning of the Women's Lib·

basic

Jorgen

job

to

tion have ballre d at

Barbara Winslow, articulately pre·

Dube,

heavily

lem.

from

sented and defended some of the

Dan

discriminatIOn

sary for women to be elevated to

At

their Band will headline the enter­

the

the Panthers to the Urban Coali·

um,

Cave Opening Slates Rock Group

also,

oth':r

t ()

attributable

men's Liberation Movement is un· development in today's society.

TIlE CA VE, a replacement for the Red Lyon, will open for the first time Friday Night:

below the poverty level.

the

Religious

Life

Council

topics of debate before the

A main concern of the Council

Couneii at present are the selectian

this year is the formation of non­

of personnel to fill the postion of

Lutheran religiOUS organizations on

ad­

campus. Also they are trying to in·

ditional positions required, also the

volve community churches in PLU

defining of the

religious activities.

main

UniverSity

Minister roles

and

any

of these posi­ tions. The formation ·of a Worship Committee will be dealt with soon. Anyone interested in serving an

Any questions you have c n ce m

ing these come.

or

­

other topics are weI,


Wednesday, Nov. 4,

MOORING MAST

Page Six

1970

PLU Harriers End Regular Season The PLU Cross-Country team has

t:nded its regular season competi­ tion. The Lutes ended the 1970 sea­ son with a four win, four 'loss rec­ Jrd. On the past

three Saturdays

PLU won by scores of 26-33 of

UPS.

The

next

two

be much more

outi.ngs prowd to

difficult. Seattle Pacific handed the Lutes

47-16

a

course.

loss

on

the

PLU

Willamette University

re­

spond'ed in kind by sweeping the meet with a finishing total of 15 puints compared to the Lutes' 48. The Lutes also participated in the Central

Washington

Invitational.

RUJlning in the CoUege Division in the

5.4 mile race the

Lutes tied

for fourth with Western Washington

Interim to Study Air Pollution During

the

month

of

come under scrutiny,

January

as

will the

science major. and the emphasis

benefits of different stages of con­

on community problems will make

PLU students will have the oppor·

trol and the present

the course especially suited to stu­

tunity tu study the social and eco­

government control programs.

functions

of

dent s

majoring

in

business,

eco·

nomic problems presented by air

Based on the PLU campus, this

pullution through the course "Prob­

program will include general lec­

lems In Urban Air Pollution" gi­

ture and discussions with the fa·

this course. is senior meteorologist

ven by Mr. Elmer R<¥)inson.

nomics, and education. Elmer Robinson,

who wi1l give

culty and with invited outside reo

and chairman of the Environmental

This interim course will approach

source people. The resource people

Research Department at Stanford

the problem from the perspective

will be drawn from ,':lotb industry

Research

of what is an obvious dichotomy:

and government in an attempt to

Mr.

Institute

Rohinson is

in

give a broad and full picture of the

meteorologist with the

controversy.

Pollution Control District and was

be degraded, but man must also use resources available to him induding the air - if a better life is to be spread to all people. The abatement of these problems and the

cust

to

the

community

will

industfiies

to

local

and governmental con­

trol agencies will also be scheduled. There

are

content

of

responsible grams

of

be

sten from the inside out, by partici­

trol Association,

pants in the art and theatre tour, 'Twenty-One Days in New York." The excursion to America's theatre capital has been arranged by Pro­ fessors

T.O.H.

Karl,

Bill

Parker

and Keith Achepohl. During their stay in New York. the students will see twelve on and uff

Bruadway

shuws to

productions.

The

be seen will be chosen

by the participants, under the guid­ ance of the professors, during the first week in December. Planned to give students of the theatre

on

view

a

all levels,

the

tour will include a visit to the Met· rupulitan Opera House. Ther-e stu­

Guggt!nheim Museum and others. three-day D.

C.

is

example

of

technical

suns in the

theatre will also ad­

dress the group al these meetings.

A second emphasis in thc seminars \i11 bt: On the art museums which will be visited. Guided wur

will

by

Mr.

Achephol,

the

the

Cloi ters,

the

se(

Metropolitan

Museum

of An, the

Riders Wanted LEAVING FROM SEATTLE,

which

3rd.

Wis.

Room

includes

only

American ASTM

meals The

and

their

estimated

proved

a

poolications

Meteorological

disappointment

the

suffering

from

in

Re­ for 2

ishes

cunsidering

Place your offer. message, confession or whatever at the Info Desk by Sunday evening.

a bad

The next action the harriers of

places with the top man winning in

PLU wiU have will be in the Con­

a time of 2:20. Jerry Gugel spoiled

ference meet at Picr Park in Purt·

SPC's try for a sweep by placing

land on Saturday. If yuu're going

third ahead of Suller of SPC. John

down for the Lewis and Clark foot­

Olson placed ninth for the Lutes

ball game, leave a little early and

and teammates Chris Buck,

attend the cross-country meet. In

and Curt

Dave

Beeman fin­

meet

a

as important as this. it's

good to see some friendly flces.

ished tenth, eleventh. and twelfth respectively. Bush Park in Salem. Oregon was

YARNS

tbe site of the Lute meet against Willamette. the meet by

The

Bearcats

taking

swept

NEEDlECRAFT

sons given between classes

the first six

Lessons &1ven

places.

Detweell"

KNIT and PURL

Cbris Buck of PLU placed seventh follo

and

406 Garfield

d by Jerry Gugel in eighth.

Dave Friedman placed te nth, John

You've

reached

the

maybe things look you

eVf!r

stopped

point a little

to

of

decision

confusing.

consider

a

career

in

build

Federal

buildings...maintain

the

National Archives...provide the Government's transportation and communications network doesn't need . We are the business arm of the Federal Government. We're progressive ...we·re diversified ...and we

ROUND TR[P PORTLAND TO LONDON 16 days - December 19,

1970 - January 3, 1971

9Y2 weeks - June 13, 1971 - August 20, 1971 .....

.....$239.00 .... $263.00

.

3Y2 weeks - June 18, 1971 . July 14, 1971

.... $263.00

ONE WAY Dec.ember 19, 1970 - Portland to London.

........ $175.00

. . . ..

..$150_00

March 28, 1971 - Portland to London

September 9, 1971 - Portland to London

.

Septem.'Jer 15, 1971 - Portland to London . .. . .

December 16, 1970 - Amsterdam to Seattle

care.

We're

pollution ...to

doing help

our

part to

combat air

minority businessmen...t o

rebuild cities.

.... $263.00

12 weeks - June 15, 1971 - September 10, 1971

"............... • .. . . . .

January 3, 1971 - London to Portland ... ....

_

.

.. $150.00

.. . . .

........$135.00 . $150.00

. . . . . . _.

.

We're on the move' Stop the confusion and go talk to the GSA recruiter. Ask about the opportunities at the General Services Administration.

.

... . . .

June 2. 1971 - London to Vancouver B. C.

. . $150.00 .

... $150.00

You can book with confidence - confirmed reservations uther flights available.

1- -- Campus:tervlews -,

I Nov. 10 I L Se lacemen f,ce J

�sa

Name Address Only for students, faculty, staff and members of immediate family

horne phone.

sities.

and Have

government?

We

in the same household)

of Pacific

Lutheran

University,

a

Equal Opportunity Employer

CI

LE 7-5317

..supply its needs ..and dispose of what it

Charter Flights o Europe

cumpetition

SPC took tbe first four

stomach.

for

(living

in

the

only 75 cents.

$500.

sixtieth

and the dusty, hilly cuurse.

good one lately?

memher of the Northwest Association of Private Colleges and Univer­

Seattle, Thurs_ after 9 p.m.

and

Society,

For·um

fifteenth

Kirk Sandburg fol­

nineteenth

3 lines. approx. 21 words in

The Desperate

in

overall. These were very good fin­

Lutes. Kirk Sandburg couldn't run was

finishing

have

riders. Call Mr. Sam Be s, SU 2-0778,

I'ege divisions. lowed

because of leg problems and Jerry Gugel

meet

bined totals of University and cul­

Pacific for

by

Need a Ride? Heard a

cost is

fO'rmation.

Seattle

team

Special Technical Publica­

lodging

of the tour leaders for further in­

with

in

in 33:52 and fifty-first in the com·

Wright in thirteenth for the Lutes meet

invitat,ional

Notice Renting a House? Selling Something?

at

Interested students should see one

PLU

Bob

in the double dual meet. The

an

tions, and the Archives of InduS'·

transporta­

total

and

in

trial Health.

dents will be responsible for their own

Ifth,

had

Ellensburg. Jerry Gugel paced the

Pollution Control Association, Jour­

and the tickets for the shows. Stu·

tion.

in t

have

nal of Meteorology, Bulletin of the

The official cost of the tour is $211

pated

ninth. Dave Friedman in eleventh, Matson

'dual meet com­

Lutes

the past weeks, the Lutes partici­

for seventh. Chris Buck followed in Bob

the

the

am eligible to participate. Please send application to:

over Christmas. 'o rt h ern Route through Deluth and Halve!. Final destination is Minuqua,

attend

petitiOll,

Society.

C har t ers West, 310 Corbett Bldg., Portland, Oregon 97204, (503) 226·3566

Going to Chicago

Woodruff.

and

Along with th

Sandburg took sixth for the Lutes

Call or write:

ON DEC. 17, 5 p.m.

turning .Ian.

While

and

Meteorological

Robinson's

was by WU's Johnson in 21: 39.

appeared in the Journal of the Air

least one show.

DaiJy seminars, structured to in­

pating prof ssors. Well·known per­

Washington

Mr.

the PLU squad. The winning time

of

the Arctic Insti­

of North Amel1ica.

the Smithsonian Institute, the Na·

perfec­

bt' seen, will be led by the partici­

to

being c.onsidered.

tional Art Gallery

tiun in staging techniques. truduce and evaluate the shows to

side-trip

of a

in Washington, students would visit

dents will tour the Met's stage as an

ew York possibility

analysis

and atmospheric sampling. He is a

tute

the

pro­

member of the Air Pollution Con·

signed for the student who is not a

Currently,

body's

meteorological

lectures and discussions will be de­

Theatre Tour Heads for

that

for

American

The world af the slage will

for

Bay Area

both

no prerequisites

this course. The

his

Sos

CaliJornia.

lems if the quality of life is not to

trips

with

behind

assooiated as a

man must resolve pollution prob­

Field

Lutes

fth and Bob Matson thirteenth for

Whitman and Donnel of UPS. Kirk

Friedman,

By DAVE SODERLUND

the

finish

ing in tbe same tick of the clock

Loggers

last

paced

third-place

two setbacks.

over Whitman and 25-34 over the

season

Gugel

with teammate John Olson finish­

man,

Saturday with a 4-4 record_ The Lute team will travel to the confer· ence me2t in Portland on Saturday.

Olson eleventh, Curt Beemon t

At the UPS-Whitman meet, Jerry

the Lutes have won two and taken

In a meet against UPS and Whit­

THE PLU CROSS COUNTRY TEAM ended' its regular

with a total of 124 points.


Wednesday, Nov. 4, i 970

MOORING MAST

Page Seven

Under the Grandstand By DAVE SODERLUND Now that the Lutes do not have to worry about a winnjng record they can concentrate on backing into another N WC champions hip. Our

5-2 mark insures a second wi nni ng season for Coach Carlson, s ometh i ng that the Lutes have not seen for a few years. Another conference titl is yet a different story, however. Linfield, 5-0 in conference play, faces its last conference battle thi s weekend against Lewis and Clark. Should the Pioneers win we still have a chance, but o therwise there Is no hope. PLU racked up another impressive rushing recor d against the Bear­ cats. 271 yards total, with no one back dominating. Dan Pritchard led Lute rushers with 72 yards, while Dave H alstead followed with 68 and Don McPherson contributing another 49. H a ls tead is now 25 yards short of the school season rushing mark and 30 yards short of the 700-yard mark for th ls season. Dave se ems like a sure bet to eclipse both ma r ks in the final two games. This year s secondary, though racked with injuries , is beginning to '

look more like last year's. Grant Spencer nabbed t wo more and frosh Greg Collman picked off his fifth. With both Burnell Coleman and John Oberg injured, Carlson has had to patch th i ngs together and seems to have come out smelling like a rose. The whole defensive unit. has become tougher. Except for the UPS disaster the stop squad has done a crerutable job and once again this weekend neatly handled the opposition. Grant Spencer led all defenders

mE PLU CREW TEAM migrated southward this weekend, traveling to Klamath Falls for the Klamath Falls Regatta. The o arsmen pulled off IIIIOther fine showing, defeati.ng Stanford by 1 second ov er the

with 12 tackles, while Pete Ugstad added 10 stops. Dave Anderson con­ tinued his steady play in the opponent's backfield. personally racking up

1500-meter course with Oregon State a more distant third.

17 yards of WilJamette losses. It is tempting to look toward the last game with Lewis and Clark as

the big one, determining whether or not the season can be measured

as succes sful The next game, an invasion of C of r territory, bears a lot .

The officials in Cladwell have been known to look one way most of the time addIDg to home-field advantage and makjng a perfect setting for an upset. Afte r aU, PLU must win both the C of I and LC games to ha ve a ghost of a chance for the title. of c()Dcentration, however

Lutes Break Bearcat Jinx 37-7

.

The

'"

*

*

football team

Lute

seWed

41·yard

stead ran a WU punt back to with­

an enduring score fOT the second

field goal, putting the score at 16­

in the Bearcat 20, but most of the

weak in a row Saturday afternoon

o

,

in

Salem

,

Oregon.

Playing away

clock Ed McGrath toed

a

fen- halftime and breaking

his

OWn school record in the process. All

effort was nullified by yet another penalty. Eight rushing plays later

of the scoring in the third

The Lute harriers were somewha t crippled going into the meet with

from home for the first time since

the Be arcats

the second game of the season PLU

quarter was dooe by Willamette.

swept PLU handily. Jerry Gugel has bee n hampered with wisdom teeth

tr ampled th e Willamettee Bearcats

After a whole half of frustration

With WiUamette's Clark throwing

extraction and the mysteriou s stomach problem which plagued him last year, while Kjrk Sandburg did not even make the trip due to a bad case of shin splints. Here's hopi ng that PLU can get it together before the

37-7.

in desperation, Lute safety Grant

ever for PLU over the Bearcats

the Bearcats finally got the ground attack in gear, unleashing Dan

and was accomplished at the ex­

Mahle for several long runs. Mahle

ception to set up the final sc ore.

conference meet next weekend, although it is \ookjng Uke a rather frust­

pense

capped the drive with a one-yard

McPherson got the call once again

ratin g season for Coach Thieman's group.

festivities.

the first touchdown for the

with only 50 seconds left in the

Willamette in Salem Saturday and it definHely showed

as

The

of

victory

was

Willamette

the

first

homecomjng

plunge

The Lutes started off in typical fashian. Rob Sherwood scooped up a WU fumble and Jim Hadland di­ EnrOll in a coll ege witll Air Force

rected the troops for 62 yards in

and you m ay qualify for f1 ymg lessons free. It's just a little plane. Nothing

thirt een plays, all on the ground.

ROTC-become

a

cadet

Dave

'

away from th e grind. way

up

key

yardage along the way and

Dan

the one with only a minute gone in the second quarter. The two­

But it s a wonderful way to get good

picked

Pritcha rd hauled the mail in from

fast or fancy.

A

Halstead

point conversion attempt failed.

to get a private

As soon as they gat tbe ball back

pilot s certificate, too.

thi ngs

'

You may even get financial help for some of your coll ege cost s

were

rolling

again

.

Jim

Hadland missed On his first four passing attempts, but th e fifth one

.

And after you graduate you can

Lindstrom alone be­ hind the Bearcat defense and 48 yards and the score. Ed McGrath found Hans

join the Aerospace Team and fly something much faster than a train­ er. You'll be an officer too. With officer prestige. Minor in flying. Someday you may be a major.

,

Bearcats in 13 quarters of play.

and another touchdown.

Spencer picked off his second inter­

game,

The Lutes put behind them all thoughts of a second-half let-down in the fourth quarter, racking up 21

it was McPherson for the final 15

points i.n the final period and

scoring from one-yard out

to make the final

tally

PLU

37,

Willamette 7. Looking ahead, the Lutes finish out

on

the road at Caldwell, Idaho

sealing the victory. After an ex­

this weekend and in Portland the

cellent ltickaff return by Don Mc­

following weekend. College of Ida­

Pherson PLU drove 49 yards for

ho may seem like a pushover, but

their third TD. Halstead did the honors

for

the

final

two

yar ds

and put the score, makJng the total 23-7. Shortly afte rward, Dave Hal -

A

their

field is often a

risky propoSition

It would be wise

playing

on

.

not to look too far past this one to Lewis and Clark.

C Convention eport (Continued)

(Continued from Page 4) most significant changes was the

present

Boards

Parish

Education,

of

Stewardship, Evangelism,

Worship and Church Music (which

added the PAT to make the score

realigning of the Church Council,

13-0.

has been changed to just Worship),

eliminating District presidents as

and Youth Activity as well as the

As the first half drew to a close the Knights were on the move again , starting on their own 20.

voting members, as well as elimi­ nating regional

offices altogether.

The big shakeup of

the national

Council of Auxiliaries all into one Department

Parish

of

Services.

The idea is to focus on the indio

Hadland threw an apparent 29-yard

boards was referred for study to

vidual parishes and to give each

TD to John Amidon but the play

the new president and the Council.

parish something easier to relatE:

was nullif ied by a motion penalty.

The most significant part of this

With

15 s econds showing on the

proposal,

I

feel,

is

lumping

the

to on the national level

1 am very

at the next convention. There

Ralph Andersen's

.

anxious to see how that works out were

a

lot

more thing

discussed and many more

PARKLAND CHEVRO

points

on each of these I've discussed. I would be more than delighted

Lo

discuss anything about the conven­

AND

PARKLAND CAR WASH FREE WASH WITH LUBRICATION

tion as well as any questions yoo may have about the Religious Life Council

at

our informal

meeting

this evening in Cascade Lounge at

8:30 or any time.

120th & PACIFIC AVENUf

Phone LE 1·9988 U, S. AJR FORCE ROTC The Air Force Officer Qualification Test is being offere d free and without obligation at 8:00 a . m .

7 and 21 November in the UPS Fieldhouse, Aero­ Studies classroom 1, University of Puget Sound, to college students who wish to determine

space

their eligibility for the Air Force ROTC Two-Year Program. For further details, contact the Professor of Aerospace Studies, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, Washington 98416,

Ext. 264 or 265.

phone:

SK 9-3521,

ARTISTRY IN FLOWERS

Be A Sentimental Santa

GIVE YOUR PORTRAIT

gleJJa'4 FLOWERS, Inc.

A Gift Only You C a n Give

12169 Pacific Avenue

Hurry - Call Now

BELL STUDIO

14106 PACIFIC AVE,

Phone 537-0205 LE 7-6217


MOORI N G MAST

Page Eight

Wednesday, October 28, 1970

I KOOBIIG JUSr ..

--4._­

TO THE POINT

...

.

Tarr Establishes New Pol icy for Deferments By THOMAS R. HEAVEY

On

Tuesday,

Selective

27,

October

Service

Director

numbers

1970

Curtis

Tarr announced the establishment of a new policy allowing men to

RECRUITING SCHEOUlE The following firms will .l:Je recruiting on campus in November and sign-up sheets are now ready in the University Center. Resumes are required.

November, 19

2-Price Waterhouse & Co.

BBA Accountants only - Jrs

a-General Accounting Office

& Srs.

BBA Accountanls only

lO-General Services Administration

.......... All Majors

ll-Naval Surface/Aviation - fnformation Team ....All majors, all classes 12-Naval Surace/Aviation - Information Team .... All majors. all classes ' BBA Accountants - Jrs. & Srs. -Moss Adams & Co. -Aetna Life & ca s u al ty -Lybrand

All majors, all classes

Ross Bros. & Montgomery

17-First National Bank of Or gon

... BBA Accountants only

....... BBA majros (Lib Arts-strong

interest in finan e with some accounting & finance I9-Arthur Anderson & Co.

banking & finance Economics-Accountants

... . ...... _.

23-Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co.

BBA-Accounting & Fin. or MBA

_. .......

. . .. _.

Accountants only - Srs. only

ATTENTION EOUCATION STUDENTS The Bluebirds need leader

and assistants very badly. For further

infonnation please contact Mrs. Ruby Raybell at LE 1-1538 or Maxine

WaUender at ext. 1106. There is a possible chance for credit.

Volunteers are also needed for Day Care Center for Retarded C hild ­

ren (on Pacific Avenue not far from PLU). Please contact Mr . Long at LO 4-6644. The Day Care Center is open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mon­

days through Fridays. You may

work

any hours desired.

U. S. NAVY OFFICER PROGRAMS INFORMATION TEAM United States Navy Officer programs information team will be on

Election of Officers will be held. Future functions will be discussed.

The SPS is the only national society designed explicitly for physics students and operates within the American Institute of Physics (AlP)

All interested students are welcome.

be affected next year.

If you received your lottery num­ ber

Even if the local boards go over

in

1969 and your

December

number is over 195 it will be ad­ vant.ageous to you to request your

I-S

If you have any questions please

cancel the induction order and give

(C)

deferment

which

would

call Tom Heavy at 1447.

abandon it whenever it is to his advantage. What this means is that all those with lottery numbers over 195 can

Off-Campus Students By MIKE SWENSON

drop their student deferment and

safely

enter

the

I-A

manpower

pool late in the year when it is ap­

F.O.C.U.S.,

of

of

Federation

Off­

parent their is no danger of them

Campus University Students, was adopted as the new officiaJ name

receiving their induction notice.

for the off-campus student group

This

new

those

who

policy received

effects their

only

at their last meeting. Also at the

lottery

last meeting, there was much dis­ cussion about plans for future so­ cial activities.

Student Nurses To Fight Rubella Senior Health

students Nursing

of

up

Community

are

joining

the

the

Pierce County

Health

Department in cooperation with the March of Dimes. They have volun­ teered their services to help im­ munize

of

children

the

The

project,

called

again

dinner

when

Social

Activities

Meet

to

meetings,

tabled

last

meeting until a greater response could be gathered is liable to come up this week. Starting events

of

very

soon,

interest

a

to

list

brary bulletin board. Watch for it.

An off campus intramural basket­ team

has

been

fonned

but

could use more players. Those in­ terested

should

attend

the

next

C.hairman, Jeff Swanson, leads the

meeting. And even if you're nol in·

discussion

terested in intramural basketball,

at

our

next

meeting.

The agenda will include the pos­

sibilities of a dance sponsored by F.O.C.U.S., utilization of the Cave,

you, as an off campus student,

can

not afford to miss this next meet­ ing. We're planning events to help

a meeting at Court C coffee house,

make this campus belong to you.

and activities centered around the

Our

Lucia Bride festival. The question

next

meeting

is

tomorrow,

Nov. 5 in the U. C. at 4:30.

Tacoma "Measles

movement to prevent the predicted of

as

rubella,

the

commonly

German

Measles,

this winter. This disease can cause birth de­ fects

in

an

unborn

child

if

tris

mother contracts the illness dur­ ing

the

first trimester

of

preg­

nancy. The PLU students are anxi­ ous

to

become

involved

in

this

community project.

ATTENTION OFF-CAMPUS STUDENTS A mee ting will be held tomorrow for all off-campus students. It will begin at 4: 30 in the University Center.

ATTfNTION POETS Here's your chance to gain notice to your writing skill. Should you

Lou's Place

have any poetry you consider to have merit and would like to see in the

Mast,

submit your work either to the

Mooring Mast

Dancing

office in the

New University Center, or simply call Bob Hasselblad at extension 1394.

SCIENCE AND ENGINE'ERiNG FELLOWSHIPS

The Place to go for

Applications for graduate fellowships and student trainee ships for summer or interim,

sponsored

by

Contemporary Music

the United States Atomic Energy

Commission, are available now in the provost's office to students in­

OPEN EVERY DAY

terested in nuclear science and engineering.

Live Music Every

TREMAINE TO BE SOLOIST TREMAINE,

ANN

concert

violinist

and teacher here

at

Wed., Thurs., Fri & Sat.

PacifiC

Lutheran University will be soloist with the Bremerton Symphony on

Saturday, November 7 at 8:15 p.m. The concert will be at Coontz Junior

High Auditorium

on 5th and High Street in Bremerton, Students with

This Week

activity cards will be admitted free. Adu.lts $2.00.

"BULLDOG"

ATTENTION N,T,H.S. ALUMNI North Thurston H. S. wishes to an nounce their Homecoming Corona­

tion and Dance, to .l:Je held Nov. 7, beginning at 8:00 p.m. in lhe high school gym. All 1968·69 and 1969-70 alumni welcome! I

PLU SOCCER CLUB

A meeting will be held 10:00 a.m. Saturday at the Foss Socc r Field

for all men interested in forming a PLU soccer team. If interested call

When you know it's for keeps

Professional catering to groups of 25 to 100

Happily, all your special moments together will be

Go out Pacific Ave. to ,Roy Y, turn left on Mountain HiWay, 2112 miles.

symbolized forever by your engagement and wedding rings If the name, Keepsake is in the ring and on the tag, you are assured of fine quality

Mark at 769 or Paul at 771.

and lasting satisfaction. The engagement

EXPRESS YOURSELF

r·�-"""'------"-"-·---"""""""'''''--

''''''--''-'''-'

diamond is flawless, of superb color, and precise

---:

cut. Your Keepsake Jeweler has a selection of

with

many lovely styles. He's in the yellow

KPLU-FM 88.S

ANGELO'S PIZZA - RAVIOLI S PAGHETII - CH ICKfN Ron-Dee-Voo "!m

14151

tho

M

...nl_in

HiGhwn"

& Pacific Avenue

-tLOSEO ANGnO

MOHDAY

MA RZANO,

PO 0' GLOSS

i

Pro l.te'

!

pages under "Jewelers."

fromYardley

\

I

!

CHECK OUR COSMETIC COUNTER

II

PLU BOOKSTORE

i .........,.......... .,... . ...,..... ... .......

....,....,...� -

......

-.......-.......-

Keep-sake'

I I I

I

I

I -...I ,

of

off-campus

students will be posted on the U­

ball

These items and others will come

campaign against rubella, sponsor­ ed by

epidemic

The Society of Physics Students (SPS) is having its first meeting on

drawn in the July 1970 lottery will

erhood or hardship deferment can

known

Nov. 5, (Thursday) at 7:00 p.m., R-IOB.

the student time to regain his II-S deferment.

with a student, occupational, fath­

Must Go," is part of a nationwide

SOCIETY OF PHYSICS STUDENTS TO MEET

1969

local board to reclassify you I-A.

for service as a Commissioned Officer in the United States Navy. Programs are available for undergraduates and a qualification test

December

duction order, he is elgible for a

The new policy is that a man

School District this week.

can be given with no obligation.

the

195 and a student receives his in­

drop certain deferments at will.

campus at the Placement Office, Student Center, on November 11 and 12 from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p. m. to provide information on opportunities

in

drawing. Those numbers that were

REGISTERED RlnQ'> frorn $1 DO

10

S I o.cco T _M R

DIAMOND

RINGS

A H Pc.., Compor,..,.

r------------------------.

I I I I I I I

II I

HOW TO PLAN YOUR ENGAGEMENT AND WEDDING

" WedO lng" Please se d (lew 20 p ge boo Ie', "PI ing Y ou r Eng .J Q c.merlt Grtd full color fo-Ider, both for only 2Sc. A110, tell me how to obtein Ihe b e o u liful 4 p.ge BrIde's Keeps.ke Boo. p"(e. F·lO

.If

N, , Add,w.

C;'dl

z.p

��

I_G

OX_9

_2.YR":..=.

.!:

I 1 I I I I I

I

I I

..!.} I_1


oorng

University Center

Marvin Gardens

Voice of the Stu de nt Body .t Puific Lutheran U niversity PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY - WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1970

VOLUME XLVIII

NUMBER NINE

Magnuson Cites Priorities for the Seventies "The state of the nation is good," claimed Senator Warren Magnuson in his State of the Nation address before the 22nd Annual Washington State

Student

Congress,

Friday,

November 6. Confident of Democratic strength after

the

national election,

Mag­

nuson looks forward to an active year in the Senate. He told stu· dents that the Congress faces "no new problems, just more of them." This proliferation of problems has arisen because of better communi­ cations, population growth and the increasingly

technical

nature

of

the economy. Chairman of the Health, Educa­ tion and Welfare Committee in the Senate, Magnuson believes that the Supreme Court will give a favor­

nationwide 18-year·old vote. He or­

on this issue. Emphasizing the need for health research and more doc­

iginally

tors,

able ruling on the question of the proposed the

amendment

Magnuson

which was made law by President

the

Nixon earlier this year.

money

Magnuson devoted the major por­ which

he

feels

confront

the

two

for

pointed

bills

health

that

out

appropriating research have

been vetoed by the White House.

tions of his speech to the three cris­ es

last

The third crisis facing the nation is the problem of unsafe products.

country today. The first of these is

A member of the "B.N.

(Before

the environmental crisis. Express­

Nader)"

Senate,

ing confidence in the natural sci­

Magnuson stated that food, toys,

group

in

the

ences and today's youth, he stated

electrical appliances and automo­

that

chem­

biles are all potentially dangerous

ists, physicists, and city planners

to the American consumer. He also

will be able to repair the damage

expressed a concern over the ex­

biologists,

engineers,

we have done to our natural habi­

istence of hucksters who bleed the

tat.

poor of our nation.

Claiming that "the U.S. stands on

the

brink of

a health

crisis,

Magnuson attacked the current ad· ministration, for partisan behavior

Laying the blame on administra­ tors, not legislators, he stated that bills concerning all of these issues have been passed, but they have not been effectively administered. The

Experts to Keynote

plans

Two

nationally acclaimed

drug

led

by qualified

persons

from the Puget Sound Area. One group will deal with the problem

ber 18 and 19.

of drugs in the miHtary. The lead­

PLU's

Drug

er of that group will be from Ft. Lewis. A second discussion will deal with some

integrated

of

drug usage

and

cleaner

third discussion session.

also

be shown. They are "LSD-25," "Es­

cape to Nowhere," and "For Ad­ ults Only."

Gary Horpedahl, one of the sym­

Dr.

Joel

Fort will deliver

the

Culture." Fort, who works in San Francisco, is

the

authority on

mind...altering drugs.

nation's leading

A prolific writer, he has authored

provides

bonuses to

(Continued

on

Page 6)

ASPLU

presents

THE

NEW

HOPE, a vocal and instrumental Angeles,

at Eastvold Auditorium,

Sun., Nov. 15 at 8:00 p.m. Considered highly professional by young

listeners

as

well

as

CSI' productions, the group represents college·aged coeds recruited from various areas in the U.S. A three­

posium as "an attempt to educate

man rhythm section, a three·man

faculty

and

students

about

brass

section

and

five

(three guys and two girls), under­

will clear up some major miscon­

lines a

ceptions

in both their sacred folk-rock and

drug

use

and

abuse." Harold Jensen and David Hoak have also worked with Horpedahl on the planning of the symposium.

colorful

melodic

balance

gospel-soul songs. As Christians, THE NEW HOPE group believes they have a unique opportunity

through

music

to

Drugs and Society, Utomiates, and. 'Ibe Mad World.

f avors

legal

the

problems

in

Be

Inc.,

Born

"Master

Again,"

Kurt

Designer,"

Kaiser's

Ralph

Car·

*

*

_____

*

to

*

*

society,

_ _ _________

*

*

.

there will be songs such as "Tell

and youth rallies.

Me the Story" and "Solid Rock"

'Between T

Warner LeRoy's "Between

Two

Thieves," a powerful drama about Jewish

oppression

that

ran

for

more than a )-ear on Broadway in

the

of

their

audiences,

"Why have we been persecuted for The major scene is a courtroom trial with Biblical characters call·

(Editor's Note: Having acquired.

.....- .._--._------------.

question

2,000 years?"

ed as witnesses. Among them are Jesus' star

in

Admission is FREE.

0 Thieve

any traveling for 15 years asking

O'NEIL

Singspiratio n,

Their nation·wide tour presently

play as a modern re-trial of Christ. ' It concerns a Jewish acting comp­

TOM

of

consists of colleges, high schools,

Director Bill Parker, assistant professor' of communication arts in

DOUG PARKER, GREG YOCK AND tween Two Thieves."

division

michael's "Tell It Like It Is," and

ginning at 8: 15 p.m. each evening.

. ...

the "ofHc1al" st&mp of the realm -the homemade variety. 'Ibis paper Is DOW leJitimate and may be posted at ril.)

a

Inc.

others. For those who prefer 'soul'

Production dates are Nov. 11, 12

APPROVED FOR POSTING General Bulletin Boards Pacific Lutheran University *

the

titled, "What's It All About, Any­

his first year at PLU, describes the

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ._

be

how?" published by New Sounds,

and 14 in Eastvold Auditorium, be·

ence on drugs.

*

will

ious contemporary selections such

night.

refonn,

which drive individuals to depend­

from

also,

group's New-Folk-Rock Musical en­

as the Free Design's "You Could

Lutheran University. It opens to­

and creative social change to help solve

which reflect simple gospel themes. Premiering

The program is made up of var­

the mid '50's, will be presented by

Especially concerned with legal he

bring to young people Christ's mes­ sage of "New Hope."

the University Theatre at Pacific

problems surrounding to the drug culture,

day at 8:00 p.m.

vocalists

drugs." He added, "Hopefully, it about

TIlE NEW HOPE, A young and versaWe group, will appear Sun­

Ne-w Hope Appears In Free Concert

posium chainnen, defined the sym­ the

keynote address on "Today's Drug

law

folk--rock group on tour from Los

Three ftims concerning specific will

The

companies which develop engines

An officer from the Federal Bu­

DR. JOEL FORTE

air.

funds for government

will

reau of Narcotics will conduct the

use

which was re­

cently passed, as a step towards

cal School.

drug

reo

Magnuson made reference to the

be led by Dr. Larry Halpern from

of

coordinated

Low Emission Act

the University of Washington Medi­

areas

and

search efforts.

of the specifically medical

aspects

Institute,

share in the costs and benefits of

Symposium,

at

Environmental

where all countries of the world

which will take place on Novem­

ers

specific

currently under

three crisis areas. The first is a

World

On Thursday, discussion groups will be

presented

consideration to help alleviate the

Drug Symposium eXJhlrts will be the featured speak­

Senator

which are

"Be- .,.

disciples,

Judas,

Peter,

James and John as well as Christ's parents others.

Mary

and

Joseph

and

'Premier

Scott Green, a senior from Enum­ claw, is cast in the lead role as the prosecuting attorney. Shandrow,

of

Tacoma,

Donald

plays the

head of the Jewish acting coml>­

any. Other major roles are portray. ed by Pat Olson, who plays Sarah, a member of the acting company, and Greg Yock as Judas. Susan Logan and Tom Wagner are cast in the roles of Mary and Joseph.

Craig Huisenga

Pilate,

while

Tom

portrays

O'Neil

plays

Caiphas. Other roles are filled by Leslie Gerth,

Doug

Parker,

Walt

BinI,

Ben Cinotto, Steve Appelo, Penny Fishbeck, Wayne Otto, Clint John­ son, Jim Nunley and Laury Lee . The University Theatre presents

two

productions each academi year. "Bus Stop" is scheduled to be offered this spring. Tickets for next week's perform­ ance are available at the Univer­

sity Center and at the door.


Page Two

MOORING MAST

Wednesday, Nov. 11, 1970

ParaUax

In the Na.me of Freedom

'And the Beat Goes n'

With the election over, the political columnists are again reminding us of the profound wisdom which somehow over­ takes the common man as he enters the voting booth in No­ vember. Cloaked with all the mystical and near sacred trap ­ pings of a DEMOCRACY, his vote sets straight the course of the government for another two years and in some manner-as equally unclear as the sudden aquistition of "profound wis­ dom" mentioned above-our freedoms and sovereignty have been preserved. I f you don't mind, I think I will stop waving the flag now; for given the issues of this election and the realities of con­ temporary America, I find the argument above too much of a loke to be taken seriously. I Its consequences, however, are too tragic to be ignored. We do not live within a free country, and until those of you who do not believe that can come to under­ ;tand what it is like for those on the other side, the situation i s going to continue-and it is going to become worse.

Contemporary America, despite its claims to the contrary, does not tolerate or understand the place of the radical within this country. Commitment to radical change in our time, wheth­ er it be with the anti-war movement, the draft resistance, or the Black Panthers, is a commitment which challenges many of the basic premises of today's society.The result, for those dedi­

The

emotions

Cambodian

generated

this

spring

from

invasion and the Kent State

have died down. It would

dents and faculty, including their student body presi· In unleashing the irresponsible South Vietnamese ipitated a bloodbath, because for centurie s the Viet­

We

are

countryside,

disfiguring

and

agricultural

have ruined Vietnam's economic,

the

Cambodian

regions

just

Lon

as

we

causing all sorts of social,

Nol's

government

parallels

our

catastrophic

to support this illegitimate government, which will As the Cambodian mess continues this fall,

and the rifles, and then remember that you live in a "free country." You can also remember that the headquarters of the Seattle Panthers represents one of the last of their major-city offices as yet not raided by the police. The problem, as Gene Martin points out in his book The

Black Panthers,

"

... is that Stokley Carmichael and those who

have come after him-the "militants," and the "extremists"­ are not simple haters nor black racists nor anarchists.They are, by and large, revolutionaries, and it is one of the tragedies of America that most of us do not know what that means."

so

The facts, however, speak to the contrary, for we have them both-and they are not as hidden as some would like. Nevertheless, . it is not the fact of repression which I find so abhorrent-for I can understand that. , Rather, it is its use in the name of freedom which I cannot tolerate.

-John Aakre

By

siblity

PRISCillA MARTENS

Eric turned on the TV

set

just

in time to catch Brinker Davidson and Huntley Chesterson analyzing

to

The symbol of approval is that

While neither a planned parent­ hood or a birthcontrol center exist here at PLU, Sterilization is very much a fact of life. The steriliza­ tion of which I speak Cffilcerns the PLU about

campus

grounds.

pollution,

right?

We

cry

Sure,

but

right here in the center of univer­ sity life many a quiet, sunshining afternoon is rudely interrupted by the tiny though amazing distract· gallantly

ridding

our

beautiful

people.

We've got to do something-I know, call the National Guardl" "Calm

yourself,"

said

Brinker

the outcome of the New York sen·

soothingly. "Anyway, the National

atorial

Guard is still smarting from our

election.

"Well, it looks like Buckley wan,"

condemning them when they

put

said Brinker. "Of course, Goodell

down the last campus riot." Brink­

will

er looked thoughtfully far a minute

probably

demand

a

recount

since he polled a whopping 25 per­ cent

which is twice

what anyone

"Never mind that!" fumed Hunt­ ley. "Think of the significance of most

election.

New

enlightened

York

has

populace

the

in the

U.S., but they elected a Conserva­ tiv.e and "Well,

Joodell

confused

every·

body by running under the alias of Christine Jorgenson," said Brinker. "Dammitl"

"This is

no

screamed Huntley.

time

for jokes.

The

whole nation is leaning toward the

righJ. As r porte

it's our respon­

then

continued,

"Now

that

James Buckley is senator, Lindsay will

expected-including Goodell."

this

and

probably

maybe

Bill

go

into

exile,

mayor, and the Buckleys will begin a dynasty just like the Kennedy's!" "No, no," moaned Huntley, and the

camera

Brinker

slowly

producing

a

faded half

with empty

hottle of whiskey and urging Hunt­ ley to take a big drink. Eric

smiled

to

himself

as

he

turned off the TV. He thought he just might dig out his old Gold­ water

button" again

wearing it.

single

day is a bit too often. By cutting down on t.he leaf-on­ lawn fiasco, perhaps maintenance could spend a btt more time filling in

(rather

than

repairing)

the

Parkland poop-hole when it starts with

and

all

this

noble

scape 'engineers"

begin

extra

staff

time,

of

"land­

would not have

to work on Sundays, such as last weekend when His Royal Highness, King of Luteland, joyfully commit­ ted his engineers to manicure the Kingdom so He need not be embar­ rased

before

dignitaries

the

who

remaining He

thinks

few may

still think He is something special. Long live University Center, and who stole my tire?

ic Lutheran University from .. to Last Saturday (Nov. on

a

general

board,

asked

to conform to a rule stating that

bulletin small

and

shall

be

boards signs

reading,

other

announce­

placed

solely

and

on

"General

easels,"

bulletin Bulletin

on and

boards Board

Notices and posters placed on this bulletin board not approved at the University Center Office will be re­ nlovcd,"

I noticed

7),

University

bulletin

thirty-seven letters of con­

gratulations on the opening of the University

Center

from

various

universities and important people. These

letters

with the

were

stamp

of

not

stamped

approval

and

the

notice i s to

remain

bers of the University community fo!low the rule with equal vigor, I also question the purpose of "from --­ to not of

" when this is

---

always the

filled

in

at the

stamping,

in

other

time words

how is one to know if the notice is no longer applicable? Questioningly

were apparently placed there by Mr. . Swenson. Are adminstrators

from

if

up or be removed unless all mem-­

Yours, Steven T. Cook

ASPLU

ASSEMBLY MEETING The November meeting of the ASPLU Assembly will be next Wednes­ day, ORe week from today, at 6:30 in Ordal lounge. These meetings were designed

to give

ASPLU

is doing,

ASPLU

officers.

tried

to

give

the

every

student a

including Senate

chance

to

question

actions as well

In addition,

ASPLU

Assembly

meetings

President and

as

Bill

anything

Chr,istensen

informative

that

actions of the role.

has

Various

speakers have been invited to inform the PLU student of campus and community problems and projects. Information is sought as well from the students as to what and how the ASPLU officers could do to im­

prove their service to PLU.

As for next week's meeting, a report is in this issue of the Mast about the last Senate meeting,

Mooring

and the minutes of tomorrow's

meetings will be posted in your dorm and in the administration and university center buildings before next Wednesday. Of special interest in next week's Assembly meeting is

the guest

speaker, A. Dean Buchanan, PLU Vice President for Business and Fin­ ance. Many students have wondered exactly what is contained in the. PLU audit. Since it is a long and involved document, a good deal of explanation is needed, and this is what Mr; Buchanan will provide at

The Elections and Personnel Board is looking for applications from

This year we have been

ments

--

I would question how one is to know

DRUG COMMITIEE

To the Editor;

"Posters

made?

the meeting next Wednesday night.

Dan Knutsen

and

Buckley will become

ing General Bulietin Boards Pacif­

except whoev'er it is who gives the orders can see that every

exempt from the rules they have

ing that it js "Approved for post­

I realize leaves must eventually

maybe our the

said poster receives a stamp stat­

be removed, but surely everyone

more,

enlighten

Dare we forget?

eHer to Our Editor To the Editor:

oozirg down Clover Creek. Further­

Thinking Right

State and Jackson State students, the surviving vic­ tims of repression here at home cannot forget.

But we don't need to look as far as Ohio in order

more veautiful-Ieaves.

possibility of political imprisonment within our society.

cannot forget. And while the American people seem to have forgotten the senseless massacre of Kent

dent leader, Craig Morgan, has become a symbol

easier to lump those things which we cannot understand into

of the concept of political repreSSion, and correspondingly, the

bodian invasion, the victimized people of Cambodia

of civil liberties under attack."

capable of drawing very few distinctions.. We find it much

criminal. The result of this mentality has led to the rejection

18 sins listed above, I'd call that

So while the American people seem to have for­

Kingman Brewster, Jr., said, "The. Kent State stu­

lawns of what I believe to be even

the more comfortable catagories s·uch as militant, anarchist, or

the

gotten the continuing collossal blunder of the Cam­

dicted on riot charges. Yale University President

ing sound of blowers and vacuums

As a nation, we are possessed of a mentality which is

committed repression.

Kent State University stu­

No? Then walk into the Black Panther

note the steel plated door, and the sandbags against the walls,

When American citizens are arrested and charged with breaking a federal law because they allegedly

then become another puppet of the U. S.

and it is a dirty business. Heard enough?

dictment, if anyone would like to read it for him­

self.)

entanglement in Vietnam because we will be bound

down the stree changes. I have lived through that scene too,

Headquarters in Seattle-providing that they let you in-and

ous statements at least a week before the. violence occurred. (I have a copy of the full text of the in­

and political disorganization and public

dents. On October 16 twenty-five of th em were in.

term in the balance and see how your view of that nice officer

acts eonsist of playing a tape recording, taking ka­ rate lessons, studying maps, leading a march, ad­ dressing "assemblages of persons" and making vari­

cities,

for quite some time.

an AWOL G. I.one step ahead of the police and with a prison

fice building, with no allegation that any of the de­ fendants participated in the breaking. The other 16

Khmer people, a particular ethnic group in Cam­

does the repression of

sistance can w'itness the repression first hand.Travel north with

acts." Two of the listings simply state that doors were broken at the courthouse and the federal of­

namese and the Thais have been enemies of the

picture on file too. I am sure that they have had both on me Those who became involved in serious work with the Re ­

actually destroying property themselves. The con­ spiracy indictment against them lists 18 "overt

army upon neutral Cambodians, the U. S. has pre-

unrest-the very things which the Communist move­

who consider themselves "regulars" in that regard have their

The Seattle Eight are being charged with viola­ ting the s()-called "anti-riot act." However, none of the eight people arrested have been charged with

dent.

ment thrives on. Furthermore, the U.S. support of

last two years they probably have your name by now. Those

Why do we say these people are victims of re­

charges have been filed against 25 Kent State stu­

bodia .

For

pression?

riot

7),

justice.

out information besides that which appears in the

which revealed what really happened at Kent State Oct.

of

Esta blishment press.)

irreparable damage to that country and has greatly

Parrallax

mockery

November 16. (Watch this one carefully, and seek

widened the war. And despite studies and reports (see

a

press their views and were arrested and convicted.

Nothing could be farther from the truth. Our un·

State

making

The Seattle Eight will be tried in Tacoma beginning

warranted invasion of neutral Cambodia has done

Jackson

and

Constitutional and civil

example, the Tacoma Six used a public park to ex­

thorities.

cated enough to be effective, has been a life of fear, suspicion,

you have attended more than five anti-war rallies within the

liberties

be easy to assume, as

having been nicely taken care of by the proper au­

and

in Tacoma a n\lmber

of trials a nO! ignoring our

many Americans have, that these issues are dead,

and bitter cynicism. It has begun on levels close to home for many of us. If

to find repression. Right

the

massacre

any one interested in the newly formed Drug Committee. This commit­ tee needs five members and its purpose is to explore and research the drug problem on the PLU campus. Its intent will be to make suggestions concerning the drug policy now employed by PLU as stated in the stu­ dent handbook.

TELL IT TO 1HE UC BOARD The student members of the University

Center

Board are requesting

that any complaints or suggestions that you have concerning the acti­ vities or management of the University Center be directed to them for consideration. They are:

Steve Carlson, Connie Stonack, John Louder­

hack, and Bill Zander. Your cooperation ,is appreciftted.


::: A Man on a Donkey G p Wields Heavy Hammer MOORING MAST

Wednesday, Nov. 11, 1970

Page T11rl e

nate

Joh. "met"' Rl",

I" ... .d Mighty Rim . • "t i' wu opaq",

from filth and pollution . Before him, across the Mighty River, lay a vast plain, a desert. Far in the distance, John could barely see what appeared

to be a man

a donkey. He came (rom the direction of the sunr

'.10

.

To the north was a great range of mountain. From this direction John spotted another

figure coming his way. John was very thirsty.

th

Looking t

south John sc anned an immense valley. Again he

could perceive figures in the distance. To the west was the great city from whi ch he had just come. He knew there were many behind him. His thirst was becoming greater. The man from the mountains was now coming very quickly. He was very near. Within moments John could see that the man was riding some kind of motorized vehicle-a motor scooter. Coming with great speed and a cloud of dus t and exhaust follow ing him, he finalJy arrived in much glory and fanfare. There was a funny purr in his engine. John was very thirsty. The man on the motor scooter now came toward John. He was dressed in many fine robes of dUferent colors. He also wore a faded minister 's collar. With a smile extending across his unblemished face, his teeth

learning, Iris head cocked giving him the air of a sage, he low and controlled voice, "Greetings, my

approached John and said in

son. " Not being able to resist John responded with a " Rowdy, Dad." The man in the robes faintly grimaced but was able to keep IUs all-knowing smile on his face. After a few benedictions and wonderful words the man in

robes told John his name was the Infalli ble.

the

J us t a few moments later came a man called the Patri arch. Pat­ riarch, of course, all the while impervious to the Infallible, asked John If he was interested in purchasing high purgatory, heaven, or just an icon on a stick. John felt very faint. He was very thirsty . Then came the man from the valley wearing hippie beads and bell bottom pants. Neglecting to remove the cigarette from his mouth, he in­ troduced himself as the Big Malcolm. He told John that he could just call him Malcolm baby, if he liked. Malcolm baby gave John an auto­ graphed edition of his latest book. Malcolm came and Left. John ' s thirst was mounting. Coming f

m the city came a group of seven. They were all speak­

ing in some strange language which John had never heard before . Hands

raised, eyes closed, bodies quivering, they halted before John, just be­ fore falling in to the River. John was

Iiille frightened. Opening their

a

eyes the seven broke into a chorus of "hallelujah's" and "praise God's." Lord was. What seemed to be a

They asked John how his walk with th

spokesman for the spiritual fruit inspectors asked in a loud resounding

voice, "are you saved?"

Before John could respond to either question

(not

the squad of blistered tongues ejaculated

as in sex, though John

wasn't too sure they weren't far from orgasm) in harmony a chorus of

"Are you saved , are you saved, chat chat cbal, etc." Stopping abruptly after a few momen ts of chest beating and hair pulling, the spoke man then asked if John could do this. The Burien Seven then began their strange oratory again. John snuck away without being noticed. He was very thirsty .

In the midst of all this came a man called BiJly, the friend of Dick. He said in a grand voice, "Follow me and

find the road to the Uncle

Sam in the Sky, Accompa nied by a cast of thousands, most of them

camera men and used car lot owners , they al1 cried in unison, "God save the Billy." The y asked John if he would be dnterested in joining the Save the Billy Club? John said a humbl

"no." His thirst was very

great. He was dying of thirst. He was dying. He was thirsty. The Mighty River could not satisfy him.

Then, without fanfare and to-do, came the man on the donke y. He

had come without notice and was now on the shore opposite John. The Man on the Donkey dismounted and stood erect with the vast Iileless wasteland behind Him, and the Mighty Polluted River before Him . look­

ing at John he smiled. Extending His hand as if to reach out and touch

John, he said in

11

very clear but quiet voice "I love yo u. "

With no one taking notice, John found him s elf standing once again.

For he had fallen, but no one had seen it. Hardly reaUzing it John was

By JAY FIELD

The

other in

dinner

I

week

one

of

was

the

eating

abandoned

dining rooms in the new UC. After the delicious meal, I crawled under the table to tie my shoe and ended up falling into a serene snooze. I finaUy opened my eyes to the tap­

and knew not whence it came. awaken

some

primitive

kangaroo

court?

Tom, the MC, eased all my fears when he called the Student Senate of ASPLU to order.

Y stay ed WIder the table through·

out the meeting hoping to find some material with which to blackmail some of the senators. No such luck. All they talked about was a bunch of tuff to do with the students here. What a down. I tried to go back to sleep, but Tom k ept beat· ing that damn hammer on the ta­ ble.

Bill Christensen, chief honcho of

ASPLU, rapped for a while about people

putting

out cig rettes, or

whatever, on the gymn floor. This

is not good. They have to sc rape

out the burns or replace the floor

cost s the students money. It might be noted that the gym floor

which

may soon look like the surface of the moon -and this will ce rtainly not help the basketball team's drib­

..... .... ....

John

Mclaughlin,

Rip-off

Unlverst'i)

BOB HASSELBLAD KATE MANCKE

.... ....

.

__._._._....._ ...

.

PAULA SEIBERT

_

..

DA VE SODERLUND MARY SRADOFF .. PAUL BERG .....

.___ .__

....

_

..

___ _. __. __..

___.

..

___

_

..

_ _ __.

.

.

.

....

... _._ . .

.

.

..... .

.. ... . ..

time financiers

books

so

they

juggled their

never

lost

any

money. I don't know if that's what he's doing, but somehow he seems to

be beating

inflation with

our

money. Right on, John. Gump (the gavel banger) said he had sent for info

from the Nat'l

Student Assoc. about benefits and procedures for joining. Then, with· out even catching his brea th , he read a letter from Pres. W which said the PLU audit was out. It was decided that any student who didn't have anything

better to

audit is 50 pages long) in Buchanan' s office

do

(the

could go

and look at

it. If anyone wants it explained, they have to get an appointment through the senate. A couple of Jr. Lincoln·Douglas' got up and debated over a proposed

._

..

..

_

..

. ___

.

.

_._ ......_ . . __ ______

......

Copy Editor

. _._

John

Hushagen,

Heavey,

Russ

Johnson ,

Dave

Giles,

Mary Jane

Karen

Svendsen,

Wanda

Dave

Dykstra,

Huber,

Thorson, Kristi

Tom

Johnson,

Bob

Steward,

David

Aakre, John Rankin, Scott Green, Priscilla Martens, Pat Stiles, Lindsay

Grader,

The

Foot rubber,

Linda

Gardner,

Barbara

Morris, John Beck. Opinions expressed in the Mooring Mast are not necessarily those of Pacific Lutheran University, its administr ation, faculty , the Mooring Mast staff. The MM reserves the right- to edit all copy for length, propriety and libel.

or

$75.00

9.

Excellent

or best

offer

call C. Fears at ext. 1398.

to

1

mean

really;

looking

at

poor

c hance.

4)

the meeting was raId­

Birch Society, and was adjourned

security

at 8:25 p.m. Late

Flash:

The

next

Senate

meetmg is in Rm 204 of the UC

who's

on Nov. 12 at 7 p.m_ All students

are invi ted . They s y that, th i nking

going to try to rip us off for East­ void during the day. The A dminis·

no one will come. Why don't you

tration will be reque sted to look

all shock them and throw the meet­

into the matter and fork out more

ing into a tunnoil by coming. You can see h ow good Gump is with his

bread for night guards. Four other things of varying in­

hammer. Discussed wiU be: Birth

terest-how do 1 know what turns

Control T nfo Center, Action Models

you on-were brought up. 1) Two

Fair, Student Rights, beer dispen­

be

sers in the dining nalls, and addi­

bought by ASPLU for use in East­

tional items, whatever that is. See

ful that they would melt the walls

free beer and pretzels)

of Xavier. They "should" pay for

-Jay Field

projectors

and

a

screen

will

void. The pro jectors are so power­

you th ere.

(NO amission charge;

Nov. 8, 1970

themselves before long. 2) Approv-

Arthur Hoppe

Our Man Hoppe The election analyz-er s have now analytically analyzed the election results to explain what they all mean. It is therefore now time to an­ alyze the election analyses to explain what they all mean. First, what do they mean to Mr. Nixon? Here, the analysts have shown conclusively that the poli ieal debts Mr. Nixon garnered by his intensive campaigning plus the gain of sever­ ernorships assure his defeat in 1972. There, the analysts have shown conclusively that the enemies Mr. Nixon made, the divisiveness he created and the loss of a dozen gov· ships assure his defeat in 1972. Thus we see that Mr. Nixon will now be returned to the White House in 1972 if he wins the election, •

*

*

But it is clear that Mr. Nixon's Southern Strategy,

on

which he

pinned such high hopes, worked. Mr. Nixon's Southern Strategy worked in Ohio, New York and several other Northern States. Unfortunately, it didn't work too well in the South. It didn't work too well in Illinois, either. But that was because Adlai Stevenson TIl is t he son of Adlai Stevenson.

Similarly, the son of Gene Tunney, the son of Robert Taftl the son of Joseph P. Kennedy and the son of a Rockefeller all won. True, in Maryland, the son of Senator Tydings was beaten. BUl he was bealen by the son of Senator Beall.

Thus the results prove a candidate Is fortunate these days if the voters know his own father.

vative tide that en gulfed California, Alabama, Mississippi and hltlf of Ohio

.

It did n ' t engulf New York, where two Liberals piled up 60 per cent

of the vote over ConservatiVe James Buckley, who won . But then be's William

Buckley ' s

brother,

which

proves

words

in

Desperate

something

about

brothers.

It ' s unclear what. Meanwhile, most analysts agree,

Up to 21

a s trong

Liberal tide engulfed CalI­

fornia, Minnesota, Wisconsin and half of Ohio.

For-urn for 75c. Place mes age

The problem in CalifornJa was that both ti des engulfed the voter.

at U. C. Info Desk by Sunday

Each voter. The California voter walked into the voting booth, lhe re­ sults show, and voted in a Conservative mood for Governor, a Liberal

evening

mood for Senator, a Conservative mood for Attorney General and a

Liberal mood for State Superintendent

r Public lnst ruction.

This proves what we have all long felt about moody instability or

Califo rnians.

_

Becky Rodning, Bruce Bjerke, Cathy Wark, Steve Cook, Nancy Shaw,

Hi-Matic

.. ... Advisor

STAFF-Glen Anderson, Paul Wuest, Kansas, Glen Zander, Steve Larson,

a

only 2 guards and a vicious chicken night.

by

ed by the PLU bra nch of the J.

guards on duty during the day, and at

kicks

your

But they were ele ted, most ana ly s ts agree, on the strong Conser­

. Spo rts Editor

_..

10,000

groups

Buckley.

Business Manager

.__

are

community

by

.

being

people or want some idea s on how to help them, you may .oon get

a few

senato rs raised the question a

people

of Gove rn or Reagan, Governor Wallace, Senator Stennis, and James

Desperate For-am

Circul a tion Manager

_

_

..

Lutheran

Quite

a display of poor

helped

There is a proposed Senate in­ vestigation of Security. there

An Action

around the country. So if you get

His phone number is 1447.

why

J)

In several areas, however, victory went to candidates whose own

_ ...... ...

DR. JOHN PETERSON ..... . . .. . .. .. _ .

Editor

. _ _ . _ __ ._. .

..

.._ . .__ .... _

....

. .... . News Editor

..

._

_

Managing Editor

..._._._ .._... ____

._...

. _ _ ._____________

.

_ .

._

.. .

__ ____ ._ . __.____.

... ... . .. .....

._

.

..

. _ . _ ._" _,,

..

railway - via

VP,

since last May. He explained how big

condition,

MAST . .... .. ..

ground

chairs to rock during an assembly

talked about all the bread ASPLU bad made, spen t, lost, or stolen

It i

Dissen tion

sponsored

and Draft Counseling Center. If all

or concert?

Minolta

._._............. __._ .._________

ASPLU

swinging

pretty

was proposed for the last of No

Tom Heavey told everyone about hi s

be

could

Mode ls Fair, to be rented for SI50,

into." Far out.

bling any. Bes.i des, who wants their

FOR SA.LFr- Camera, 35 mm

footrubber.

.___ _____ _ ___ ._.

places in no time, e h ?

fathers the voters didn't know. These unkown fathers include the fathers

The men across the river heard a faint cry of "I believe in You"

JOHN AAKRE

ate decided that it will be "looked

churches to Canada by March 17.

walking across the river, finally to faU into the anns of the Man with the

The Voice of the Students at Pacific Lutheran

donns

newal of

Donkey. John's thirst wa s gooe. No one had seen John go.

IOORING

less the dummie wants it. The se n­

goes well, we should have an under"

Was it

Info Ce nt e r to be looked into. The

are not shown or put in GPA's un­

ping of a wooden hammer wielded by Tom Gumprecht. Was this a re­ the in quisition?

al was given for a Birth Conlr I

grading system where D's and F's

*

Need Some DraJt Facts? CALL THE MILITARY SERVICE INFORMATION CENTER

Ext. 1447

*

So a thoughtful analysis of the State<- by · S ta te analyses explains what

they al\ mea n .

They all mean that the voters, in a conservatively-Il.beral or vice ver a mood, want either fresh n w faces or experienced leaders who stressed

law and order or bread and butter issues to go to Washington and get America out of Vietnam immediately or sooner or later.

The people have spoken. The mandate is clear. If we are going to pres erv e our sanity in these troubled times, if we are going to preserve our cherished democratic heritage, if we are going

) preserve our in·

alienable right to vote as we please, then we:re going to have to abOlish" election analyzers. It's them or us. (Copyright Chronicle PubUshing Co., 1970)


Wednesday, Nov. 1 1, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Four

The Religious Page It seems to me at times that the most striking thing about the religious life at PLU is the genera l, lack of information cir­ culating concerning the "religious" events on and off campus

R C Consftution Approved By PAUL WUEST As the Religious Life Council be· gan this its first full academic year

as well as ideas and concepts concerning the varied aspects

of work it had two major duties

of religious life here and/or anywhere. Whether this be the

before it. Working on its constitu­

case or not, it is true that more and better information in these areas is needed.

tion and seeing it through to its final approval by the Board of Re­ gents was one of these, The other

To help al!leviate this situation, the Religious Life Council

is commencing nomination proced­

has initiated a proposal to include in every issue of the Moor­

ures to nominate some one for the

ing Mast a page or so of information, opinions and dialogue having to do with the "religious situation," however that can be defined.

position of University Minister. The first of these was completed Monday, as the Board, after long and deliberate consideration reach­

This is at least in part helping to fulfill the objectives of the University as a whole. In the objectives of the University we find that its fundamental obligation is "to confront liberally educated men with the challenges of Christian faith and to in­ still in them a true sense of vocation." Included in the Pream­ ble of the ASPLU consti1'ution is the provision for "the growth of the academic, social, and religious life of the University ... " And, of course, the Religious Life Council was formed for the sole purpose of furthering the sense of religious community founded in Christian freedom. to provide a variety of articles, representing as many interests

By-Laws of the Religious Life Coun­ cil. Last May the constitution was could

Council

sO that the

"in spirit"

approved

the

while

function

details of the constitution could be ironed out. Much of

the

by

the discussion

Board concerned the position of the University Minister. With the con­ Council will now proceed with the second of its tasks. The necessity for such action is a big question in

as possible and trying to cover the h,uge scope of spiritual

most people's minds, I will try to

concerns, A number of major concerns are before the Religious

clarify that.

Life Council in this, its first year of existence, We will try to keep you up to date on what is happening there as well as with all the religious groups on campus. Special interest arti­ cles from other sources will be included from time to time so that you might see what is happening in areas that rarely make the headlines of the newspapers. Contributions are welcome from all students and faculty.

University

The

Religious Life Council was

The

aI=-proved

not

of

May

until

last

Taylor and

Both Rev, Don

year. Rev.

Minister

had contacts

Morris Dalton

which expired last year. It was the responsibility make

of

Council

the

to

concern­

recommendations

ing these men and the position of

'Any announcements or bits of information or articles that you

University Minister.

or your group feel are appropriate for this page will be gladly

so late in the school year full nom­

received. They may be submitted to Paul Wuest, in care of the Religious Life Office, through the campus mail. Your coo pera­ If you have any

tion and involvement will be appreciated.

questions, comments, or suggestions contact Paul at ext', 336. I would like at this time to express the appreciation of the ,Religious Life Council to John Aakre, editor of the Mooring

Mast, for his cooperation and continued assistance. He and his staff have been most helpful, and in agreement with our ob­ jectives. For this we are thankf.ul. Most of all, the hope of the Religious Life Council in this and anything more on the part of each individual involved. And that includes quite a few since religious life isn't any­ where, it's everywhere.

Council de­

Therefore the

cided to act in ad hoc fashion, pro­ viding for one position of Acting

Over the Thanksgiving weekend, November Youth

26-29,

Lutheran

the Lutheran

is sponsoring Congress.

Youth

Thjs

event

will

be held at the San Francisco Hil­ ton HoteL Ne arly 3000 youths and adults are expected to attend. TIle Congress is intended to

be

Planned

are special events and courres for

college students. Unanimity was not

An open letter to the members of the Student Congregation:

and the common celebration of our

Peace: During the week of Oct. 21-27 represented YOlj, and other mem­ bers of the Tacoma Conference as a delegate to the American Luth­ eran Church Convention in San An­ The many and speci­

tonio, Tex.

fic discussion s and decisio-ns of the

convention have little relevance to life at PLU, but the spirit in which they were made, does, From vention

the

beginning,

moved

gressively

open

by

con­

the and

means.

political

ag­

Open

campaigning was practiced and al­ lowed by all the candidates for the office of president. The resolutions on the faith and life of the church were made after lengthy, and often heated discussions, In the end, un­ animity was not accomplished, but obvious difftrences of opinion were overcome, Controversy was the stimulating force. dissension kept the conven­ tion

a movable and viable

body,

The "body" of the convention did have its many members, the bur­ eaucrats from Minneapolis, the Lu­ ther

Leaguers,

the

Rotary

Club

members from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, the

token

blacks,

and

the

faith,

common

but in the the common call,

issues,

the

in

found

vocal

Lord's presence, of celebration

sense

This

blos­

somed into some exultant moments but eventually withered as bureau­ cratic mundaneness

smothered

it as the convention progressed, The celebration

opening

of

the

Holy

Due to the mere expediency of the final Eucharist Ser­ vice was cancelled. But the Real

business

Presence happened late that final night of the convention in a humid hotel room as Sunny, Cari, Carol, Mike, Joel, P aul, and Steve (fellow collegians) celebrated each others presence, and our Lord's presence in the breaking of bread.

those pastors who had died since

is our purpose, even if the battle

the previous convention, while si­

forces us into dissolution, for if we

Texas Lutheran

as a church are not willing to die,

Choir sang and spoke of the call

how can we dare to live in the life

multaneously the being

of

sent

into the

world

as

of the resurrection.

Testing Center has acquired a new face

and

wider

reach

this

year

with the addition of a fuJI-time wo­ man counselor and innovation of two evening group-sessions for stu­ Mrs.

Judith

Baker,

joins

with

counselors Dr. Seiichi Adachi and

them, Mrs. Baker will make the rounds to residence

halls on

(upon invitation) for infor­

mal forums

with co-ed

The center is open

groups , daily from

appointment, ext. 201 or 364), and also offers tests of vocational

up

for

Tuesday

meetings,

nights,

6:30-8

set at

the counseling center (A-I09), will

of not only nomination procedures number of positions

but also the needed to

adequately provide for

an effective campus ministry and the defil1ition of the role of the Uni­ versity Minister.

terest,

personality,

aptitude

in­

and academic

free of charge u!Xln

quest of the student.

concern

vital

re­

be­

fore the Council is providing for the worship needs of the campus. The Council has. voted to establish a worship committee' to have either

5 to 7 members, The responsibili­ ties of this committee will

be to

recommend to the Council any pro­ posals concerning worship forms,

Nominations Sought Nominations for the position of Un.iversity Minister will be accep­ ted by the Council any time before November

Worship Committee Another very

20, Included

be

should

the person's name, his current ad­ dress and why you feel he would be a good nominee. You may sub­ mit them to the Council in care of Paul Wuest through the campus appli­

mail.

The only restrictions

cable

are that the person be

an

locations

materials,

procedures,

innovations or whatever that would improve the op)X>rtunities for wor­ ship for all those connected with the PLU community. If you are interested in serving on such a committee, please sub­ mit your application to any mem­ ber of the Council or to the ReLi­ gious Life Offices through the cam­ pus mail.

Students Offered Fellowships For rial Year At Seminary Interested in, but undecided about as

Some form of th'e ministry possible

the

If

vocation?

a

answer

is yes, then the "trial year" fellow­ ship could be for you. Offered by th

Fund for Theological Education

th'e fellowship is designed to enable students to attend any accredited, theological

graduate

Pr:;testant

school for one year in order to de· termine whether the ministry is a

viable vocatian.

definitely

now

are

who

Those

a graduate

attending

planning on

theological school are not eligible for the fellowship. It is rather for those who are presently experien­ cing indecision concerning vocation and/or further study, but who are consider

seriously

to

willing

the

ordained ministry. This applies to those for whom the ministry is a recent or new vocational possibility and to those who in the past have been

high school, college age youth and adults (mainly pastors and spon· sors). The Congress planners are

the

undecided.

now

are

but

on

planning

definitely

ministry

At the end of the year of study, the fellow is under no obligation to continue theological stuay.

hoping that at least three hundred colJege youth will attend this, the largest inter-Lutheran event of its

iors this year or who have a Bach­

Several one hOUI" and two hour

tion is nation-wide and only 70 fel­

kind ever held on the west coast.

ELECTiVE courses have been pared

specificjally

yo uth .

Included

in

1)

are:

for

pre­

college one-hour

the

the

and

College

ourses for college

The two-hour youth are:

1)

Strategy in Reaching

the Campus for Jesus, 2) Oppor· tun.i ties

for Cbristian Service,

The Authority of the Bible, and

3) 4)

The College Student and Civil Au­

and

Candidacy is open to men

women under age 31 who are sen­

are

lowships

the competi·

Since

elor's degree.

each

offered

year,

candidates should have at least a undergraduate

record.

The for room, board, tutition, fees and an "B"

stipend

fellowship

for books and miscellan·

allowan eous

provides

'crsonal expenses.

Candidates must

be

nominated.

The deadline is November 30. For further info-rmation and nomination see

Prof.

Knutson,

Religion

De­

partment, A-222I, phone ext. 356.

thority. has be:cn sent

An invitation

to

all students at PLU to attend. The

BLUE SPRUCE

costs will include $39.50 for food,

MOTEL

room, and registration fee, that is if you stay at the Hilton. If other arrangements

can

be

made

for

room and board, the Congress will cost only $10.00. Activities

at

the

cQurses,

Congress will

general

sessions

BEDROOM

ONE AND TWO SOME WITH

FIIEE

KITCHENS -

TV

AND

UNITS PHONES

COFFEE

NEAREST TO P,L.U,

12715 PACIFIC AVENU Tacoma, Wash. LE 1-6111

ship and learning.

ALL STUDENT NEEDS

Cosmetics

*

Greeting Cards i< PhotQ Equipment * Magazin s

Wednesday

program that brings the focus on therapy"

The Council has began discussion

that concern

flicts and problems

8 to 5 fQr individual counsel (by

"Group

Rev. Don Taylor.

opportunities for Christian fellow·

Mr. Gary Minetti in developing a student concernS.

to fill the position this year was

small discussion groups and many

give kids a chance to get together and help each other work out con­

nights

dents.

will be made next semester.

mclude

Counseling Center Adds Staff The university's Counseling and

an additional man is necessany it

versity Minister. The mal) chosen

.

the body of Christ.

To celebrate amidst controversy

ritually

of this semester. If the selection of

this fall to nominate a man for Uni­

Single Christian, and 2) Faith-In­ tellectual Su icide

remembered

Communion

ination procedures be commenced

courses

ALe Affirms Faith Amid Strife By PAUL REITZ

will hopefully be made by the end

utheran Youth Congress 0 ns

three congresses in on e.

-Paul Wuest

it was

Since

ination procedures could not be fol­ lowed.

Alive

and all other "religious" endeavors is to arouse some thinking

ordained Lutheran. The nomination

year. It further stipulated that nom­

ing back to last May's Board meet­ ing, approved the Constitution and

stitutional provisions finally set the

This page is a further attempt in this endeavor. We intend

University Minister for this school

JOHNSON

D

UG

AT THE CORNER GARFIELD AND PACIFIC AVE.

9:00 a.m.

-

11 :00 a.m.

9:00 p.m. Weekdays -

7:00 p.m. Sundays


Wednesday, Nov. 11, 1970

MOOR I NG MAST

Page Five

Environment

Politics and Ecotactics ception and magnanimity as long as the measure

By DAVlD SODERLUND

involved clearly insures positive results and hurts

The recent election was very instructional for

individuals seeking

the

change

no one, least of all the voter. This painless altruism

through legislation,

is able to overcome even the strongest of gut-level

especially on environmental issues. In the state of

campaigns. The fate of Initiative

Washington alone the problems involved were epi­ tomized by the fates of two measures, Initiative 256

to change both prevailing way of life concerning

but it had

waste products and their disposal as well as in­

many things in its favor. First, it was initiated in

cumbent attitudes as to what constitutes necessary

the Legislature and therefore gained the prior sup­

packaging. From the reponse it is obvious that the

port of those who feel that the elected legislators

measure came before its time and that the people of

know what they are doing. Also, the abortion ques­

the state of Washington are in no way ready to

tion has been in the public eye for a long time and

change the American Way of doing things just to

most voters - usually those who are concerned

save the environment.

enough to examine the issues involved-have had

The very successful opposition to this measure

plenty of time to form an opinion or reinforce a

was no doubt funded by the packaging industries­

prejudice.

who saw in the passage of this bill a substantial

On the other side of the fence, those who opposed

spones in the voter. They argued that reduced pack­

appeal. Their original billboard showing a fetus in

aging would cost jobs and that this state, already

the palm of a hand and the slogan "Don't Kill Me,

hard-hit by a recession, could not afford to save

Kill Referendum 20" was modified, presumably be­

its natural resources at the expense of money in the

cause of the sensational tone. The unfortunate thing

voting pocket.

is that an emotional campaign is usually quite suc­

Although this economic argument has some merit

cessful, due to the fact that the American voter

Drug Education Course

It is doubtful whether many people recognized

area in the field at drug lise

educa­

tion is the January Interim course, Drug Education Workshop, coordi­ nated by Prof. Robert K. Menzel, director of PLU's Center for Hu­ man Organization in Changing En­ (CHOICE).

vironments Smethers,

John

Mr.

director

education

for

the Tacoma Narcotics Ce11ter, will be in charge of the curriculum. Of­ fered· as on interdepartmental In­ and

Health the

under

Sociology,

Physical

Education,

Course

terim

PLU faculty Paul

Prof.

Menzel,

includes

Hoseth

Prof.

and

abortion reform is the first step toward effective population control. The final success of this measure

way patrolman. The class will meet On Tuesday and Thursday afte·rnoons and Sat­ urday morning for the convenience of teachers and other profession­ als.

The course design· will incl ude

the narcotics center, public schools, state, county and local public and private agencies. Participants will

doc­

lectures by pharmacologists,

tors, pscychologists and educators; and curric­

small group dialogue;

ulum and activity planning. The course is also open to stu­ University

from

dents

The course will use resources of

Sound;

of

Puget

tenn

January

their

Is

called Winterim. Prospective students should con­ ta t Mr. Menzel, ext. 397.

about

Mr. Menzel is well qualified to

drug use and abuse through con­

sponsor this course because of his

tact with drug users under treat­

experiences in Portland, where he

the

have

chance

former

ment,

to

learn

users,

therapists, physicians, public officals and theo­

rists.

Teaching skills and resour­

operated the Charix Coffee House for

counter-culture

youth.,

and

helped organize the Outside-In free before

there

he

ces for drug abuse education in the

clinic

classroom and fOT community use

PLU in February 1969.

will be

came

to

Referendum 20 as an environmental issue, although

About one-half of the forty par­ lic school teachers, with the rest

upper division Education However,

Prof.

Menzel

majors.

said that

In recognition of the widespread

areas of social and

student concern over the growing

Phone 537-0205

tion have barely made a dent in the problem.

Homosexuals Victimized by Society By BOB HASSELBLAD

The

oppression

of

homosexuals

within our society is unlike that of or other minority

blacks

Rather than

uSing political

groups. or ec­

nomic means, our culture employs social pressure against gay people. This pressure feeds on stereotypes, rumors, and myths accepted by the masses. At last Thursday's Speaker's Forum, seven members of SeattIe's Gay Liberation Front spoke to these myths.

an effemmate faggot, nor is the lesbian a "diesel" - a masculine woman. Most heterosexuals as­ sume incorrectly that in a homo-

not work around his value judge­ ments about gay men. He condud­

sex. While older gays often work

ed

within these stereotypes, most of te younger ones avoid them. h

does not stem from their sexual

Secondly, homosexulaity .is not a

manifestation mental illness of which· can be "cured." Case his­ gible for cure,

while 2% achieve

misconceptions simply do not a­

the change. All cases require ex-

ply.

tensive

The male homosexual is not

counseling

The program will be limited to

will

trips

Field

granted to participants.

condition

and

scheduled

be

throughout the semester. lowing courses:

dent has already taken one of the

I. Political Science 354 State and

mester. The program will be inter­ disciplinary

scope,

in

involving

study of the many facets of the ecological crisis from the perspec­ tive of a number of different dis­ ciplines are invited to enroll in the Env,ironmental

Studies

semester,

a bloc of four environment-oriented courses

and

interdisciplinary

se­

minar. Four course credits will be

Ralph Andersen's

PARKLAND CHEVRON AND

PARKLAND CAR WASH FREE WASH WITH LUBRICATION

120th & PACIFIC AVENUE

. Phone LE 1·9988

courses in the bloc,

a single al­

The ESS bloc consists of the fol­

Local

Government

-

(MTWRF

ternate course may be substituted.

I: 30 A-200) - 1 course Culver

Although student s other than those

2. Biology 111 Biology and Modern

in ESS may enroll in the separate

Man (MTWRF 2:30 A-IOI) -

courses, only students participating

Knudsen

in the entire bloc of courses may Students will meet with individual instructors

for

the

four

courses

comprising the program and then once

a

week

in

3. Earth Sciences 490 Environmen­

a

seminar-type

situation with the four instructors.

1/2 course - Culver,

C611ege Cleaners Parkland's Quality Dry Cleaners

Knudsen,

Knutson, Ostenson 4. Biology 222 Conservation of Na­ tural Resources (Thurs. 4: 30 R­

PARKLAND, WASH.

homosexuals

in

societal

nature. It is a result of stigma.

Until recently, the gay commun­ ity of Seattle has been largely an underground culture.Covering their many

shame, straight

hold

homosexuals jobs.

nine-to-five

After

hours they may frequent one of the city's dozen or so gay bars. Or tbey may "cruise" Volunteer Park for pick-ups. The goal of the Gay Liberation Front is to educate both straights and the gay community. One wo­ man pointed out that peopJe must relate to each other as individuals. They cannot afford to be put into sexual categories. Homosexuals

been

not

have

viewed as political

activists.

But

many gay individuals into the left­ wing Hberation movement. most

oppression

While

generalized,

is

some acts of oppression (such as police

on

raids

gay

bars)

have

come at points of political expedi­

1/2 course - Ostenson

ncy. The national GLF was form­ ed in response to just such a raid

108)

-

(MW

Consciousness

Modern

4:30 - 6:00)

-

1 course Knutson

Religion 430 will meet the Uni­ versity requirement for a second religion and

course ,

Political

and

Biology

Science

354

111

the

Science and social science require­ ments respectively. Interested additional program

students

information and

may

obtain

about

application

the form

from Dr. Lowell Culver, program 11416 PARK AVENUE

neurosis

5. Religion 430 Christian Thought

& PHONE LE 7-5361

that

our society's overt hostility prods

tal Seminar (Tues. 3:30 - 5:30)

take the Seminar.

One male speaker, having been under psychiatric care, observed that his heterosexual doctor could

member

one

relationship.

tories show that only 4% are eli­

First of all, SOCiety's time-worn

ing, and most end in frustration.

has to play the role of the opposite

sexual

to juniors and seniors. If a stu­

Students interested in an in-depth

12169 Pacific Avenue

The

problems.

good degree of per­

Studies Program will be introduced

courses from the Humanities, Na­

FLOWERS, Inc.

a

tle to change attitudes has just begun, and those of us who wish to alter the American Way of Destruc..

35 students, with preference given

tural Sciences and Social Sciences.

g

environmental

voting public is capable of

served. as a barometer of sorts,

The message is, unfortunately, all to clear. The bat­

awareness on the part of the general public in the

ecological cr,isis, an Environmental at PLU during the 1971 spring se­

ARTISTRY IN FLOWERS

Initiative 256

measuring a change in the attiudes of the people.

Spring Classes to Explore Environmental Issues

being drawn from PLU and UPS student bodies, with preference for

deity.

be attributed, I think, to a rising level of

may

developed.

ticipants in the course will be pub­

self on the basis of something other than the dollar

in

Jo

Fletcher.

a value judgment in favor of more people than him­

courses,

police

in

here,

to see the urgency of environmental action and make

was very much in doubt.

cluding a Washington State high­

are

enemies

learned

yet gotten through and that the average voter has

of

whom

by the

not yet attained vision far enough beyond h is nose

election day approaching the fate of this measure

four

majars,

sociology

were

proportion

The lesson to be

though, is that the environmental message has not

train of George Wallace by many of the followers

the majority of early registrants

initiative.

the

of

the man or the issue. (Witness the migration to the

Surveys Tacoma Scene An offering unique to the Tacoma

it was pushed out of

will vote by prejudice and emotion as often as by

of Bobby Kennedy after he was assassinated.) With

gut-level

loss in profits--and hit another set of

the issue based their whole campaign on emotional

THE FAILURE OF 258 guarantees this sacred lnstltuUon

n o credit to the

measure in its broadest application was an attempt

Referendum 20, reforming abortion laws, passed in spite of a rather bitter opposition,

256, does

abilities of the voter to handle a complex issue. This

and Referendum 20.

organizer, or from Drs. Jens Knud­ sen, David Knutson or Burton Os­ tenson.

in New York. To educate and increase dialogue, Gay Liberation has undertaken lec­ tures in the Seattle area. They are also trying to set up an informa­ tion center switchboard, and crisis clinic. While most literature deals hastily speakers

with

homosexuality,

suggested

reading sources: by

Martin

the

the

following

Tile Gay World. Must You

Hoffman;

Conform?, by Robert Linden;

and

Dr. R uben's Everything You Want­ ed to Know About Sex.


Wednesday, Nov. 11, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Six

IDsuranee

Informed Before Signing

Be

(Editor's Note: This is the in a series of three a.rtieJes viding general information students contemplating the chase of life insurance.) The

buyer of

a

life

program purchases

last pro­ for pur

insurance

well

as

ser­

a life

both insurances,

the

are

usually

dependable.

the

respect

and

confi­

However, if initial contacts with an agent do not prove satisfactory to you, and you do not feel that he or she is a person you wish to work with, terminate the rela­ tionship without further waste of the agent's time or yours, and be­

Secondly,

he

told

the

students

about the proposal fOT a National Health Care Service Corps. Simi­ lar to the Peace Corps or VISTA, i t would allow for two t o four year periods of service for qualified per­ sons.

their

fore you make any commitments or sign your name to anything. If you still wish to do business with

kn

is

super­

pose are often simplisitic and not realistic.

Finally,

willing to thei.r

give

both

up

sides

are

democracy

short-sighted

ends,

to

claimed

the

Senator.

We need to turn away from war and join the battle again t pover­

Con­

ty, disease and pollution, for "the environment can and will be clean­

sumer Prorection Act. Joining other politicians in dis­

ed up."

claiming the two political extremes

youth

which

closed

exist

today,

Washington's

what his insurance needs are. He is not a captive audience for a sales

talk.

rnstead,

he asks

the

agent to furnish the information he needs to make a sensible decision.

on life insurance, as well as a very

It is

encompassing

other agent. The informed buyer has decided

"We need a change in national

Magnuson.

er crisis is being prepared. more

gent's company, contact an­

The informed buyer respects the

a

new

the

stat d

priorities,"

A partial solution to the co-nsum·

ledge

Placing his fa'th in the

of by

our

nation,

telling

Magnuson

the

assembled

ment

be obtained from insurance agents,

over

insurance)

in

writing

his signature_

and

With this

in­

company are shopped, make sure

you personally will be satisfied.

ideas,

panies doing business in the Uni­

tions for the prospective purchaser

rriends is probably one with whom

ficial and the solutions they pro·

ract that the agent is well-informed able salesman who has a financial interest-the

commission

premium charged

on

the

States.

Such information

in the insurance

the

(If

premium

Generally, a small or a new life insurance firm

will

have greater

(ConJinued on Page 8)

Knight Wrestlers Open Practice; Competition Begins November 20 PLU's

to

grapplers

action

for

have

returned

Berner, ISO, a freshman from Oak

the coming winter

Harbor who was 16-3 last year.

season with rising hopes. The Lutes return

four

lettermen

from

Five football players round out

last

the heavy end of the

year's squad which placed fifth in

rge

the conference and hope to bolster the

squad

with

some

ros ter.

Crittendon joins Bob

buyer

asks

questions

at 177, while Keith Koehn and Den­

promising

ny Hillesland will vie for the 190

Returning are captain Paul Farn­

chores will be George Van Over

freshmen and transfers.

spot.

ham, at 142, who placed second in well

as

Paul

Mattison

coaching duties wlll be Dave Sch­ mid , assistant to Marv Swenson

OVervold

at the U Center and business man­

who was NWC champ at 158 his

ager for touring musical organiza­

freshman year and runnerup the following year.

Pete

tions from PLU. Dave a graduate

not be

will

,

of St. Olaf, was NCAA champ at

eligible, however, until the interim

177 in 1964. Compiling

due to transfer regulations.

finalist

eligibility is Bob Hervey, a trans­ record.

that

stationed at

fer from Arizona with a promising competition

26-1 re­

a

cord overall. he was an OlympiC

Also facing a few weeks of in­

AAU

heavyweight

Assisting Roy Carlson with the

and

Ralph Neils. Also returning after a year in Oregon is Pet

the

and Gary Huntington.

his class at the conference meet as

Handling

Ft.

he was

Later

year.

Lewis,

and was

Army champ at 198. Dave wiu han­

Jim

dle the early training with the learn

Schuller, a freshman from North

\Virile Carlson is still working with

St. Paul, Minnesota, fashioned a 30-2-2 record as a lrigh school wrestler and can go at either 167 or 177. Another new face i Gary

the football team. PLU's first home match is against the Western Vikings on Dec. 4.

which

a comparison of what amounts and types

of

insurance protection

he

may purchase for

cal right and the radical left are

pare for tomorrow."

dollar cost. The buyer should de-

a

given premium

PlU Succeeds in Teacher Placement Despite a national trend which

the millage, school districts are of­

schools as compared to 17 the year

finds many new teachers facing the

ten forced to make severe cuts in

before," he said.

1970

the budget, including cutting teach­

of

unemployment,

ing

cation

loads.

at

Pacific

Lutheran

Uni­

versity found a high degree of suc­ cess in landing teaching jobs this fall. Of this year's 239 graduates in education

who

actively

sought

teaching positions, 163 are present­ ly

employed

in

the

educational

field, announce4 John S. Hanson, PLU's Director of Teacher Place­ ment. "Though in a normal year we would be able to place a better percentage of our candidates, we have

done

ve ry

well

even

this

year in comparison to other Wash­ ington colleges. Numero_us factors contribute to the present situation. I don't feel that

our problem is

too many teachers. How can any­

staffs

increasing

and

class

Even the primary grades, form­ erly a sanctuary for women edu­ t:ators is beginning to attract male

An example is the Clover Park

teachers. "We placed three men in

School District which was able to

the primary grades last year and

hire

only

spring as failure.

12 a

new result

teachers of

a

last

millage

During the previous year

Clover Park hired 150 new teach­ ers,

including 21 PLU graduates.

Despite the common empl oyment problems faced by most new teach­ ers, men trained on the elementary level continue to be ve ry much in demand. "More

Next to male elementary teach­ ers, music and physical education teachers

found the

most

men,

who

in

previous

gone into second­

are now preparing for elementary teaching. This year PLU placed 30 men in elementary teaching,

ly working in classes of 30 to 40 or more

students,

nearly

twice

as

many as should be a maximum teaching load?" asked Hanson. "The problem is not an oversup­ ply of teacher, but rather a tight­ ening of the

trings on school bud­

gets," he claims. Under Washing­ depend on the yearly approval of gram. When voters fail to approve

-

7 PM

$6.50 ·55.50

$4.50

FOR CHOICE SEATS - ORDER TICKETS NOW! Fidelity lane Tid.e'l, lamont' of BIJli ; Shoreline MUlk lynnwood Corouu 1 Music. e..-erett; Book &. Condit:'. Selle".; Bon Morch •• Tocoma Moil

Bell.

I

ORDER BY MAil, Send Check 10; FIDELITY LAN£: TICKETS 1622 .\lh A'Ir! .. St!olllt!, WClIhrngton

[nclo'· ,tampp.d , Il ddrp seJj envelope.

level. "We still have a few open­ ings for music teachers, but agajn the di triets

are

requesting men

On

the

secondary

level,

math

and scienci! still are good bets for employment.

while

the

areas

of

English and social studies are suf­ (Continued

on

Page 8)

T&R's German Auto Repair 1315 SO, 38th STREET

(across from Safeway

OPEN 9

-

-

next door to Crazy Eric's)

6 daily except Sunday

GR 5-9925

RICHARDS Photographers

ENGINE REBUTLDING

-

TUNE-UPS

SENIORS, STILL TIME FOR SAGA PORTRAIT

WELDING - AUTO ELECTRICAL

Senior Special prices granted to faculty and undergrads.

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE

All orders completed by Christmas.

ton's tax structure, school districts a millage for financing their pro­

SUN., NOV. 29

SEATTLE CENTER O P ERA HOUSE

in locating jobs on the elementary

one claim we have an over-supply when many teachers are present­

ONE NITE ONLY

success

teachers even in this area."

years would hav ary

have eight men presently enrolled in primary education courses.

MA 7-9111

734 PACIFIC AVE.

­

Hervey

will allow him the buyer to make

students that, "our job is to pre·

graduates from the School of Edu­

can

by writing the companies directly,

policy he sells. With this in mind,

senior senator said that the radi­

prospect

the

ted

costs of more than one insurance

dence of family members and close

sion standards delineated.

distinguish

(for term insurance, straight life,

sents are thus important considera­

obtained

obscure rather than communicate

strength

more than 1,700 life insurance com­

available at most libraries.

The life insurance agent who has

which comply with the low emis­

financial

limited payment life, and endow­

relation to his needs.

recommendations of satisfied cus­

(Continued from Page I)

the

insurance programs and costs in

tomers

(Cont.)

asks

the agent and the reputation of the

a dealer in

much the same. Both attempt to

Attributes such as age, size, and buyer

company or companies he repre­

ting an automobile salesman and

Magnuson Speecb

are

or by consulting reference books

Selecting an agent and an insur­

MAGNUSON addresses the State Youth

informed

programs

formation ,the buyer can compar

ance company is not unlike selec­

Congress.

The

insurance

insurance policy. The integrity of

of life insurance.

SENATOR WARREN G.

NOT the agent. agent to give comparison proposals

financial

as

that the

comparable.)

­

vices and advice from the agent­ representative,

termine what amount of earnings he can allot to insurance premiums

Bring this ad to T & R's for

a

FREE Lube Job & Safety Check


Wednesday, Nov. 11, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Seven

Under the Grandstand By DAVE SODERLUND

Ladies and gentlemen! You have a fantastic offer before you in the

near future. On Saturday, November 21, there will be the Second Annual Turkey Trot, an event of unsurpassed excitement and importance on this

campus.

Contestants

will

race

for

approximately

one-half

mile

around upper campus, vying for the coveted trophies to be awarded in

both men's and women's divisions. Winners in each division will receive

a turkey for their efforts, and many dignitaries will be

on

both winners the bird. Stay tuned for further information! *

*

hand to flip

This week we Mnally note the passing of yet another record. Dave

Halstead, who missed the single-season rushing mark by four yards his

sophomore year, left little doubt this time as he racked up 148 yards against College of" Idaho to give him 819 yards for the season, easily

surpassing John Fromm's previous mark of 695 yards. Halstead is also in the process of raising the PLU career rushing mark.

Although Dave has been getting a lot of publicity this year, we

should not forget that PLU is the top rushing team among the Northwest small colleges and that others have contributed to this success. Dan

Pritchard has been consistently tough and leads all backs in scoring after this week's three-touchdown outburst.

Gary Hammer has come back

from an injury to do some tough inside running as well as some clutch

receiving in the new "shadow" offense. Don McPherson, who has seen

shattered

the

somewhat limited action behind these three, has unofficially the best

per-carry average in the conference. Jim Hadland, who is usually in­ volved in giving the ball to someone else, has kept the ball on the option

enough to be listed as a rusher in the conference stats and has con­

tributed several key runs.

We will be hoping that Lewis and Clark did not scout this game too

closely, for the Coyotes managed to foind some holes in the PLU defense that had escaped detection

so

far this year. At any rate, a resumption

of the tight defense of previous games will be needed to stop the Pio­

neers, who were barely edged by Linfield 12-7 Saturday and are certainly no patsies.

PLU has at least a second place tie in the NWC assured, but a win

or a tie would given them sole possession of second place and a better season record-wise than last year. It should be. a good game. •

Although final results were ava:ilable too late to meet the copy dead­

line preliminary reports show PLU placing third in the Northwest college water polo tournament behind Southern Oregon and Central Washington.

Larry Gliege and freshman Jay McClaugherty were named to the alltournament team.

PLU

sJngIe

seasGn

The word is out -basketball practice has begun and different and exciting things could be happening this year. Curious? The team prac­ tices at 3:30 every day in Olson Auditorium.

rushlnB

mark

Knights Outlast Coyotes 30-21 The Lutes went prowling in Coy­

scored his second TD on a 13-yard

on the PLU six, the Lutes drove 94 yards for the final score. Hal­

barely

romp, putting C of I ahead once

came an acute case of the turn­

around once again by stepping in

yardage in this drive and Pritchard

21 and take over sole possession of

another PLU TD. Jim Hadland di-·

out to make the final score 30-21.

ference.

s.ary 5,8 yards with the aid of Dave

an outstanding day, as C of I was

ote

country

Saturday and

again. Greg Collman turned things

escaped with their lives. PLU over­

front of an errant pass to set up

overs to defeat College of Idaho 30·

rected the- troops over the neces­

second place in the Northwest Con­

Halstead and a facemasking pen­ Dan Pritchard once again

PLU wasted no time in giving

alty.

the Coyotes a chance to score. An

interception off of Hadland put the

ball on the Lute 27. After an off­ side infraction against PLU Coyote

QB Cisco Limbago (yes, folks, he

favor as Jack Irion hopped on a Dan

Pritchard chugged the final

ondary to

score the

first of his

at 7·all.

they

intercepted

second

half

kickoff

87

an­

hitting

quarter.

417 yards on the ground. Dave Hal­

goal by McGrath, his

untracked

in the last

The offense was also spotty. Had­

terceptJions,

and

the

Lute

backs

there, however, and PLU amassed

stead led all rushers with 148 yards

in 22 carries, breaking the single

season rushing record and moving

Pr'itchard, Halstead, and Hammer

his season mark to 819 tatal yards.

scored on two long drives to ice

with 142 yards in 20 carries and

Dan Pritchard and Gary Hammer

performance of the season. Gary

age,

lems recovering from a broken leg,

running

at

their

best.

PLU

covered

69

yards

and

was

fense and the rain forced a fumble

Please send me your paper free

though,

lost three fumbles. The power was

field

capped by a four-yard scoring shot by Dave Halstead. After the de­

CHRISTIAN NEWS

counted,

ninth of the year, leaving the Lutes

chewing up large chunks of yard­

New Haven, Mo. 63068

it

land was only 2 for 7 with two in­

the game. The first one, featuring

Christian News

when

ter PLU could manage only a 32­

all

FREE FOR ALL STUDENTS

more interceptions while Greg Coll­

side the 10 in the fourth quarter.

period and averted disaster. With

other Lute pass and Gary Evans

ever, and Grant Spencer added two

and it looked like an upset might

finally got

like re-runs. The Coyotes drove 85 after

hard and stopping the Coyotes in­

the

PLU's devastating ground game

The second quarter was almost

yards

yards for a score, making it 21-14,

behind 21-17 going into the fourth

three touchdowns, tying the score

able to run on them like no other

team has done all season. They did

man picked off one. They did i t

yard

21 yards through the C of I sec­

The PLU defense did not have

C of I went back in front quick· ly, however, as Everett Carolina

be .in the works. In the third quar­

Limbago pitch-out at the Coyote 44.

scored his third m from one yard

recover two Coyote fumbles, how·

took

a touchdown. C. of I. returned the

stead and Pritchard picked up big

scored to tie the game at 14-14 at

halftime.

does exist!) probed the defense for

against College of Idaho.

DA VE HALSTEAD. shown here against Whitman,

Dan

Pritchard

was

close

behind

three touchdowns, by far his best Hammer ,who has had his prob­

showed

his

old

form

gaining

96

yards in only 7 carries for a whop­

ping 13.7 yard average.

of charge for the school year.

Lute Harriers ab Fourth ·n NWe

Name Address City ................ .... ... State . Zip

.. ......

College

.. .................. _... ............. .

many hours of cold, pain and ex­

CHRISTIAN NEWS is an inde­

pendent,

conservative

haustion for most of the PLU cross­

newspa­

country team. The Northwest Con­

per dedicated to Biblical Chris­

ference meet

tianity, the highest standards of

scholarship

Were you born to fly?

Not everyone is. II takes a blend of brains, drive, and

an aeronautical education and

dedlcation. We're looking for

born flyer. The Naval Aviation Program

men like this for the Navy Air Team. men who are Doers. If you measure up, we'll

a career. And we gel another

news.

and

dal.(s) marked below: why nol

demanded to handle our

drop in and see if you were

sophisticated aircraft. When

born 10 fly.

The Lutes, taking a 4-4 record

Saturday

into

the

meet,

win-loss finIshed

Talk to the Navy Officer Information Team Date: 11·12 NOV.

The Navy

Lewis

& Clark

The winning time

of

the

meet

was 26:45.6 by Freshman Don John­

son of Willamette. PLU's leading finisher for

the 5·mile

Behind

winning

race

was

Gerry Gugel who placed seventh. the

WU

runner

Johnson, Sos of Whitman was se­ of L & C fourth, Oses of WU fifth

PRIVATELY?

besides Gug's seventh were Olson

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

of the meet. Other Lutes placing in

We believe you're entitled to your privacy when it comes to buy­ ing contraceptives. We're a nonprofit family planning agency and we offer you contraceptives through the privacy of the mai Is. We specialize in men's products (including two exclusive new Euro­ pean imports)-but we have nonprescription foam for women, too. And a wide assortment of books and pamphlets to answer your questions on birth control, family planning, the population prob· lem and ecology. Want details? Write today:

I

Place: Placement Office

31,

to round out the top five finishers

1- -

Time: 9 to 3

with

with 40 and Whitman with 76.

WANT CONTRACEPTIVES

sion as a Naval africer. So it works both ways. You gel

lamette

cond, Stienke of WU third, Byerly

Wings of Gold and a cammlSw

hY nol be somelhing ' ia

held

morning at Pier Park in Portland.

unmanaged

we're through. you'll have your

��

was

Information team wil l be visiting your campus on the

teach you all the skills

If you 're going to be some-

fourth with 99 points behind Wi!­

By JOHN RANKIN Last Saturday marked the end of

.

-

-

twentieth,

fourth,

Beeman

Friedeman

in

twenty­

in twenty-fifth

Sandburg in twenty-seventh, Buck

in

twenty-eighth

thirty-fourth. The

final

and

outing

for

Ma.tson the

in

Lute

runners will be the district rneeL

-

POPULATION SERVICES, INC. Ill5 N. Columbia St.. Dept. X2, Chapel Hill. N. C. 27514 Gentlemen: Please send

nie

lull

det lils WIthout ohllgatlOn:

_ NA l l!:... .. __ _ _

ADDRESS _____ ----CITY_______ STATE

YARNS .nd NEEDLECRAFT Lessoas liVeD

___

ZIP __

between clas5es

KNIT and PURL LE 7-5311

4. Garfield


Wednesday, Nov. 11, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Eight

I) MOOnIRG MASr

Speech Department Oratory Contest Set Nov. 30

- .--­ --1

An oraturical contest. sponsored

· ·TOTHEPO'NT

....

..

NAVAJO INTERIM TOUR All students considering going on the Navajo Interim tour, please attend he meeting held Thurs., Nov. 12, at 7:30 p.m. in Rm. A-208.

Applications can now be submitted to the Elections and Personnel Board for those interested in serving as Freshman Orientation C(}-chair­ men. These two people will be responsible for the orientation activities during the first week of school next fall. The selection will be made soon, so if you are interested submit your application through the cam­ pus mail, box no. 148.

Iota

Beta

Chapter

of

Alpha

Phi

Omega

wili

be

celebrating

its

twentieth anniversary with a banquet this coming Sunday evening, start­ ing at 4:00 p.m. in the Regency Room of the University Center. Those interested in attending our festive occasion should contact Bill Newton at ext. 1275. All members of the university 'community are

"Problems in Air Pollution" (Econ. - Earth Sciences 305) should contact Mr. Marlen Miller in X-206 or call ext. 361. .

122-123 and the judges wiU consist of PLU faculty. The final judging

for November 30 and December \.

one hundred words of quoted ma­

will take place on December 1 in

According to Professor Theodore

terial is to be used. All interested

Xavier 201, and will be judged by

PLU students should sign up for

encouraged

a rts

trary

He to

to participate in this pointed

out that,

popular

belief,

participants will have had previous There will be first, second, and third place prizes of $25, $15, and $10 consecutively. All speeches are according to

Teacher Placement (ccntinued from

page 6)

fering severe unemployment pains,

to

hire

new

teachers.

Now

greater

than

the

many

district

administrators

kindergartens in operation, and ad­ crease the number of programs in

is available on the bulletin board at the Health Center. Smallpox and

teaching the handicapped and the

Dip-Tet. may be given at a later date than listed on the schedule.

gifted,"

Hanson

claimed.

"Perhaps the current supply of

TACOMA AREA URBAN COALITION

teachers will spur educators, gov­

An EMPLOYMENT task force meeting will be held tomorrow, Nov. at the Washington Natural Gas Company

Builc.ing, 3130 South 38th.

ernment, and business to work to­

the available manpower will pro­

who care can make it go. Join us Friday and Saturday nights at 5437

vide long overdue improvements in the education of our children," he concluded.

South Tacoma Way.

EXPRESS YOURSELF

DEMOCRATIC STUDENT COALITION

with

A meeting will be held Wednesday, at 9 p.m. in X-201 for any stu­ dents interested in the Democratic Students Coalition.

KPI I-nl 88.5

Insurance Article (Cont.) pay

higher

develop

should

be

included

in an insurance program. The in­ surance company and agent should stand ready to assist in planning changes

become

necessary

The buyer must be an informed

penses of an insurance company.

buyer if insurance dollars are to

For example, the purchaser of a

be

neW life insurance policy pays the

insurance company's

agent's

the

the

cost

of

spent wisely. buyer

Contrary

DOES

need

to

name o'f his insurance company.

insurance

than

fice overhead, salaries of officers, etc. These

ex­

and are part of premium calcula­ tions.

Premium

cost

differences

among insurance companies result

reserves,

dividends,

and

This Week I/BULLDOG"

"On

Ihe

Mevntaln

HI,hway"

Since the purchase of life insur­ -CLOSED

ance is a longterm commitment of resources,

flexibility

to

ANGELO

MDHDAYS--

MARZANO, Pro,leler

meet changing coverage needs as

Austin's Lakewood

Professional catering to groups of 25 to 100

Repairs

WEDDINGS PORTRAITS Hurry

Call Now

BELL STUDIO

VILLA PLAZA Phone JU 8-4311

Go out Pacific Ave. to Roy Y, turn left on Mountain - HiWay, 2112 miles.

Engagement Photos ...

Jewelers DIAMONDS - WATCHES

men's

down from Mount Vernon the Lutes

November

sent them home with a 5-0 loss.

Lutes

Last Friday the Lutes woot to UPS

Washington at 3:30 and meet Cen­

coming home with a victorious 5-0

tral Washington State College Fri­

win.

day at 3:30. Both are home games.

The

seasonal

record

now

Field take

Drop

by

Hockey

19-22. on

the

and

Conference

Wednesday

the

University

watch

the

of

Lutes

continue to drive for goals,

The Shoe Faetory By LINDA BARKER BALL-SAILER-A

candlepassing ceremony was held

in

to

Kreidler

Hall

In Parkland 14106 PACIFIC AVE.

announce the

engagement of

Miss Janice Ball to Dave Sailer of Tacoma. Janice is

a

senior nursing major from Seattle, and Dave is presently in the

Air Force, stationed in Tuscon, Arizona. Their wedding is planned for January of '71.

MELLOM-ANDERSON-Miss

Sandie Mellom announced ber engagement

to Mark Anderson at a recent candlepassing in Harstad Hal\. Sandie is a junior from New Halem, Wash., majoring in business, and Mark is a senior music major from Hockinson, Wash. No date has been set for their wedding.

If you would ike notice of your engagement printed in the Mooring please caU ext. 1146.

Mast,

If "life insurance" turns you off, ow does "Money for Living" grab you? A key word in life insurance is "life". Because it's for the living. You and your benefi­ ciary. Put simply, you and Aid Association for Lutherans make a contract to reach a certain financial goal. As you build toward that goal, your contract amasses "living" money that could be the basis for ail your plans for the fu­ ture. Money you can use for

any purpose - down payment on a home, new car, business of your own, rainy day fund_ Right now you're probably in good health and can buy "money for living" insurance at the lowest possible rate. Have a no obligation visit with your AAL representative. He'll help you put some "life" in life insurance. He repre­ sents our common concern for

human worth_

Merle R. Vertheen, Fie Route 12, Box 798 Olympia, Washington 98501

Aid Association for Lutherans

{$f: =E::'ili"

Appleton,Wisconsin

Fraternalife Insurance Life · Health. Retirement

Ron-Dee-Voc..

141 st & P.cific Avenue

financial

DAY

Live Music Every Wed., Thurs., Fri & Sat.

PIZZA - RAVIOLI SPAGHETTI - CHICKEN

inVest­

ments.

for the Northwest Extramural W(}­

Tuesday when Skagit Valey came

ANGELO'S

from how each allots premium in­ come to operating expense, policy

OPEN EVERY

the

administrative expense such as of­ costs,

Contemporary Music

know

more

about

The Place to go for

to an

issuing the policy, and a share of

penses are called "loading factors"

Dancing

commercial,

medical examinations, the cost of

advertising

Lou's Place

or advisable.

holders pay for the operating ex­

commission.

Twa games remain to be played before the team travels to Eugene

gether in developing new programs and curriculums that while using

SHELTER HALF OCCUpy your local Shelter Half G. L Coffee House. Only people

and

they

beat Everett 6-2, and the following

are

min'strators should be able to in­

more

29th

demand,

going on interim tours to foreign countries. The schedule of requirements

advertise

ago.

the

The Health Service is giving required immunizations for students

commissions to its agents. Policy­

October

pressure is on the candidates.

in the number of pre-schools and

IMMUNIZATIONS FOR INTERIM TOURS

when

record,

3-1 loss to Skagit Valley two weeks

"We may also see an expansion

be­

sonal

years ago there was a great deal of

additional teachers.

company,

The women's field hockey team continues to add wins to their sea­

Since the supply of teachers is

Center.

established

Bo<:!rger.

Women's Hockey Team BaHers Foes

stands 7-1, the only loss being a

Sign-up sheets are now available in the Placement Office, University

larger

Additional information can be ob­ tained from Carl Schwink and Chris

The pendulum has swung. A few

seeking ways to redirect funds in­

cause the new company needs to

€ople not associated with PLU.

all

expereince.

exceed ten minutes,

office.

Preliminary judging will be held

con­

not

to decreasing class sizes by hiring

operating expense than an old or

their

the contest in the communication

terviewing. He is interested in Seniors with BBA in Accounting/Finance.

they

select

ment head, all PLU students are

ATTENTION: BUSINESS MAJORS Tuesday, November 24, Mr. Dan Greer of Ernst & Ernst will be in­

from page 6)

to

Karl, Communication arts depart­

now

(oontinued

on November 30 in Eastvold Chapel

topics. In addition, no more than

are

competition among school districts

All students desiring more information concerning the interim course

12, beginning at 3:00 p.m.

parti­

ment at PLU has been scheduled

welcome.

AIR POllUTION

Individual

own

to be memorized and are not to

ALPHA PHI OMEGA TO CELEBRATE TWENTY YEARS AT PLU

Karl.

cipants

event.

FROSH ORIENTATION CO-CHAIRMEN NEEDED

Professor

by the communication arts depart­

LE 7-6217


109

Congress shall make no Iaw • • •

Voice of the Student

Body

ast

Mario Who?

at Pacific Lutheran University NUMB5R TEN

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY - WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1970

VOLUME XLVIII

Security Busts De'JlOnstrators By GLEN ANDERSON

Soon after this a campus security

PLU students witnessed a rare event on this campus

Friday!

8

leaflets

were

tails (1f such a rule eitiler were

versity

regulations.

the upcoming trial of Vne Seattle at

UPS

last

Friday evening. Joe Covach. shoeless and wrap­ ped in an army blanket. collapsed to the cold ground in front of the Administration Building. While he moaned and groaned in agony. the otner three. Timothy Pettet.

Bill

Nelson and Steve MacAskill. asked passers-by for aid for their ailing friend. They approached several students and

faculty

with

the

suggestion

that committees and a symposium be formed to define and explore the

problem.

students

When

percepti

two

ly

women

pointed

out

that it mig'nt be too late to help Joe if they were to hold meetings first.the three cautioned them and reaffirmed

TIlE FRIENDS OF mS11NCTION will appear in concert November 22 in Olson Auditorium at 8:15 p.m. Tickets are on sale at the Info Desk.

their

intention

to

do

nothing without first going tfnl'ough the

proper and established chan­

nels and procedures.

Friends

of

Distinction."

actor Jim Brown. Completely sold

RCA recording artists. will be ap-

On their potential. he had signed

pearing in con{;ert Sunday night.

them to ilis management firm af-

November 22 in Olson Auditorium

ter hearing them sing at their first

8:15

at

p.m.

Having

made

the summer of one

of

professional date. its

debut

1968

during

at the Daisy.

Hollywood's

top

disc­

tneques. the group was brought to the

attention

of

RCA

The

Friends

of Distinction are

Harry Elston. Flo-yd sica

Cleaves.

and

Butler.

Barbara

Jes­ Jean

Love. After a fling at professional base-

by the Friends number one fan.

ball in which he made the start­

Drug'Symposium Begins two-day symposium

use begins today at

1: 30

on

drug

in Chris

Knutsen multi·purpose room. Plan­

Dr. Robert Dunn and Robert Men­

zel

will

discuss

two

methods

of

ned to provide the average PLU

treating addicts. Dunn is a psychol­ ogist at the V. A. Hospital at

student with an understanding of

American Lake and treats addicts

·the use and abuse of drugs. tne

in the military. Menzel. director of

symposium offers a variety of ac­

CHOICE. established an open-door

A series of four films on drug usage will be shown this afternoon. After the films. Dr.

George Gay

will field questions concerning the films and drug use in general. Dr. is

the Chief

of

the

Heroin

Clinic in San Francisco and

has

had extensive experience with treat­ ment of drug addicts, The evening program will feature several discussion groups dealing with specific areas

of drug

use.

Groups will be led by persons from toe community who ha

been in­

volved in prevention and treatment of drug addiction. Lt, Col. J. D. Lyles and Warrant Officer

V.

E.

Yarnell

will

lead

one group discussing drug use in the Army, Yarnell is

make

a

a rock group in the early sixtes. touring troupe of soul singer Ray Charles. Harry met Floyd Butler, the

nucleus

of

the

Friends

Harry is the act's writer. he

composed

Hugil

the

Masakela

lyrics

hit.

and

to

the

"Grazin'

in

the' Grass." The song was the in­ itial RCA single for the Friends. and is included in their debut Vic­ .. tor LP... Grazin· . Tickets. available at a one-dollar discount for students are

$2.00.

to be approved by the Office of be subject to arrest if tney con­ tinued without permision from the administration. line Mast was told by an admini­

$1.00

and

Couples may purchase two

main floor seats for a special rate.

$3.00

a

criminal in·

schedule

and

PLU's

Music

Department

Auditorium.

8:15 p.m.

works by five contemporary com­ posers

and

one

whose

influence

older has

in

to

Pieces highlighting the program are

David

(1969). on

Rdbbin's

Charles

America"

gram two

Ives'

"Kabop" "Variations

(1887). and Lucino (1961). The pro­

places

an

elements

of

emphasis Fine

upon

Arts:

im­

program

will

provisation and theater. In

addition.

the

present conventional pitch sounds from instrumentalists as shown in Russell Peck's "Automobile". Uni­ que also in quality. are percussive non-pitch sounds given in this pieoe from

the

flute

and

double

bass

which add a "Textural fabric" to the work. Perhaps "sporatic and soloistic" is "Kabop" which presents a sense of improvisation through the use of instruments. The true "'ensem­ ble" is not yet formed until the final movement. The in

theater

"Variations

intrigue

element on

-expressed

is

shown

America." by

An

composers

as they experimen.t with dramatic. choreographic.

and

cinematic

forms and with pure music. Ives' pieoe reflects many examp­ pies

of

the

variation.

and

performer

ending on a

appears

to

have

made the mistake when it was act­

"theatrical

touches"

by

tention. "Visage"

represents

a

sound

track for a 'drama,' never written. Basically. the piece relates to vo­ cal behavior gestures

supported

by vocal

various

inflections

and

with their own special meanings. Meaningful speech cannot be gras­ ped. Ibut there is in it its likeness. Here. the word 'parole,'

single

a

word. meaning words. is repeated again

and

again.

The

emotional

vocal events are in forms of in­

articulated or articulated speech. or in laughtel'. crying.

singing.

or

"For me." wrote Berio. "Visage" constitutes a tribute to the radio as the most widespread dissemin­ ator of useless words." The

concert

is

described

as

"light." It is not to' be analyzed. for there are no significant or hid­ den meanings. The program is pre­ sented merely to observe seeming­ ly unr,elated events and: to react to them.

ASPLU Assembly Meets Tonight The

November

meeting

of

the

ASPLU Assembly will re opened tonight.

by

Bill

Christensen

6: 30 in Ordal Hall. speaker A.

at

Dean

President

the

meeting

Buchanan. for

at

The featured

be Vice

will

PLU

Business

and

Fi.

nance. Buchanan will explain the PLU audit

which

year.

His

sponse

to

was

conducted

last

presentation

is

requests

numerous

by

in

reo

students as to the result of last spring's audit. The nature of the document demands that it be pre­ se,nted by a qualified person. These meetings are designed to

general

give students a chance to question

and relate it specifically to drug

the actions of tine ASPLU officers

he

and Senate. Christensen has tried

able to ask questions of tne panel

to give the meeting an informa­

usage

at

PLU,

Students

will

tive role. Guest speakers will in­

members at that time. Jensen.

form the students of campus and

Dave Hoak. and Gary Horpedahl.

community problems and projects.

the

Information

Organized

by

symposium

Harold is

sponsored

by

works

to PLU students and the general

of the Post Provo-st's

helped

ary style.

for

ASPLU and is open. free o-f charge.

out

composer

shape the direction of contempor­

A faculty panel will examine Vne use

the use of chromatic runs in the

ually the composer's deliberate in­

Drug Culture." drug

18.

Featured in the concert will be

today. He will speak on "TOday's

of

in its

Wed.. Nov.

much of the addiction that exists

question

will

series begun last spring). in East­ void

been

structure

page 3)

on

false start on the second run. Thus.

(the second

zation of some drugs. He blames social

(Continued

ary Music II

active in the movement for legali­ America's

likely end here. So long as free­ dom of expression at PLU is in

first

includes

has

administration. the matter will not

present an evening of Contempor­

Dr. Fort is an expert on mind­ drugs

Although some clarification is ex­ pected to be forthcoming from the

Concert Stresses Improvisation

speeches by Gay and Dr. Joel Fort. altering

not readily available or else do not exist in writing.

strator that there is indeed some

Center. Thursday's

Uni­

further·

Student Affairs. He said they would

closely with the Tacoma Narcotics

vestigator at Fort Lewis and Lyles Office,

to

When tne group signed with the

and

by

and

more that the leaflets would have

clinic in Portland and has worked

tivities.

Gay

decided

career of Singing when he joined

was formed.

executives

A

ing lineup of the Los Angeles Ang­ els. Elston

prohibited

Berio's "Visage"

Friends' Perform Sunday Night "The

sort of policy or regulation dealing with the control of outside people coming on campus and passing out

in order to build interest toward teach-in

and

printed material. However. the de­

performed. a guerrilla theater skit

the

four

tion and distribution of any type of

visited our sheltered campus and

and

the

told them tinat their "demonstra,

Coordinating Committee of Tacoma

8

approached

A

bust. Four members of the Seattle

officer

public.

is

also

sought

from

the student body as to what the ASPLU officers could do

JOINTS AND PILLS

are no

longer aDen to PLU Ufe.

prove their service to PLU.

to

im­


Wednesday, Nov.

MOORING MAST

Page Two

18, 1970

ParaDax

You Lose Last Friday four individuals appeared on our dampus to hand out leaflets concerning the upcoming conspiracy trial of the Seattle Eight. They were busted by Security for participa­ 1'ing in a "demonstration" and failing to obtain approval for the material which they were passing out.

By GLEN ANDERSON

those individuals to exercise their Constitutional rights was not immediately apparent. A representative from the Mast was told by an administrator to rest assured that the rule or policy did exist-somewhere.

presence

The title of this article sounds like the title of a

freedom,

equality

and

all

that

But the funny thing ideals;

I

do

believe

in

is that I believe in those America-at least in the

America that is promised to us in these ,ideals and in those

cherished

documents,

the

Declaration

of

believe that America is living up to her promises.

am

firmly

convinced

that

most

students,

most

blacks and most anti-war protestors do believe in America and are conscientiously trying to help her fulfill her potential. Significant change

is needed,

but we are

con­

reaction generated by a particular event is usually in an inverse

demned for pointing out the embarrassing realities

proportion to its relative importance. Though many of you may

and upsetting the self·satisfied status quo.

be inclined to think that characterization rather amusing, I do not, and I will tell you why. It means that in an age of environmental destruction the Homecoming Dance is somehow more important. It means that demonstrations against the longest and most disputed war in our history must play second fiddle to Mayfest practice or a football game. It means that a discussion of the election prospects does not concern national figures but Lucia Bride candidates. It is all of that and more and it is sometimes enough to make one sick. Among those who haven't the gall to admit the priorities above, the best excuse they seem able to manage in defense of their inactivity is a lame "Sorry, but I have to study." Now that is funny. How many students do you know here that you could honestly classify as real scholars? How many put their studies first and mean it? I told you it was funny. I can count . them on one hand. In view of this rather singular situation I have been toy­ ing with the idea of suggesting a new name for the place. University somehow just doesn't seem too accurate.

I don't

know if it ever has. Maybe we should go back to "college" or perhaps "academy"-at least they sound less pretentious.

It has

been rightly said that "You do not prove your love for your country by gently absolving it of all its sins. "

I do believe in America. I think

upon

tum

the

Statue

of

Liberty

around

so

we

those who refuse or ignore the challenge to pro­

This disparity-this discrepancy-i s the cause of

PLU students invariably follow is a simple one. The amount of

insistence

I seem also to have more faith in America than do

stuff.

Yeah, we've all heard a lot of speeches Like that.

much of the social unrest in our coull.try today. I

As any of my predecessors can tell you, the rule which

their

should

about the incident related above. The closest they have come

takes no reaI chances.

by

Americans can read the inscription.

to confronting the problems raised by political activism has been confined to the intellectual arena. There, of course, one

especially

corny Fourth of July speech. You know the type.

Independence and the Constitution. I don't however,

True to form, most PLU students neither know of or care

and

sharing the blessings of this rich land. Perhaps we

The speaker resurrects all those old, trite ideals of democracy,

Precisely whose approval should possibly be required for

I Believe in Alllerica

vide opportunity, justice and freedom to all our citi­ zens. If we have the resources and the imagination to send men to the moon, we are able to improve living on earth. "The p:Jor you will always have with you"

was not a divinely ordained commandment;

rather we should take it as a lament,

for indeed

we shall always have the poor among us until enough people give a

damn.

America

is

rich

enough to

Most young people who are termed

"radicals"

eradicate poverty-if it wants to.

do believe in America. The people who don't believe in America are the ones who think it is unimportant or

impossible

to

achieve

peace,

justice,

racial

equality, and freedom. America's violation of its own stated ideals may so tarnish those ideals that they may be rejected by the very world with which we hope to share them. If some people have contempt for the law, perhaps it i s because the Jaw has made itself contemptible.

can do better

we

How

can

Southern

politicians

demand

"law

ignoble

records

and

as a nation to guarantee ,peace and freedom to all

order"

our people. I wish that we would realJy become

violating desegregation laws and getting away with

"the land of the free" as well as "the home of the

it? The rich continue to be protected by legal tax

brave."

when

they

have

such

of

loopholes, while millions of poor peple, without large

Apparently I have more faith in America than do

lobbies in Congress, are relatively ignored. Despite

many who criticize demonstrators and protesters. I

the

think we are strong enough to tolerate a diversity of

servitude, our American boys are conscripted and

13th

Amendment,

which

forbids

involuntary

views. I must disagree with those people who seem

ordered to kill other human beings under threat of

to think that the Bm of Rights is something to be

imprisonment in a war which international authori·

praised on the Fourth of July, but ignored or weak­

ties assert is an illegal war. In the name of freedom,

ened the rest of the time. Nor do I agree with those

our government perpetuates a known corrupt mili­

"Iiherals" who approve of protest as an abstract

tary dictatorship in South Vietnam.

principle, but become upset when someone actually protests. I belieVie in freedom and democracy enough

Am;erica is turning from a democracy to a hy­ pocrisy.

that I feel our greatest strength is the free expres­

Which is t.he real problem: young people who ob­

sion of ideas by individuals, groups, and unshackled

ject to injustice,

news media. It has been said that a nation afraid

for one, and there are millions like me,

of ideas -any ideas-is unfit for self-government.

stand by and watch America's promise and potential

"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to 'be free," reads the inscription

or the injustices

themselves?, will

I

not

prostituted for the sake of a comfortable status quo, or so a president can save his face.

at the base of the Statue of Liberty. I believe we

I believe in democracy. The citizelloS can govern

should warmly accept these people. Unfortunately,

themselves according to cherished ideals. Most pnr

the United States has an ugly history of nativism

testers and demonstrators are trying to make dem<r

and of prejudice and discrimination against many

cracy work.

University, as you know, impl'ies that at least some degree

immigrant and minority groups. Our country is too

of critical thought occurs occasional,ly among those who are

We are not trying to destroy America, as some

often content to let even our own blacks, Indians and

people would have you think. Just the opposite, we

there. Sorry kids, you lose-we aren't even close. -John Aakre

whites continue to remain tired, poor and still wait­

are trying to build it into what it promised that it

ing for freedom. But the public seems annoyed not

would

so much by the plight of these people as by their

and Justice really spread his wings and fly!

regents,

from

students

or the hometown pastors is their

alike

for

essential

and

non·students of

freedom. citizens

first, and PLU

By DAVE SODERLUND Perhaps the single greatest challenge facing the

open atmosphere for the students.

world in the next ten years is the stabilization of

to

allow

a

free

children.

natural

a

the

facei

liberal

education.

Tnis

uni·

between population and

not

have children for specified

Finally, on a more general level, shifts in social

food

and economic institutions could promote a drop in

versity pmfess-es to be an academic

supply, but few people have realized that it is our

the birth rate. The raising of the minimum age for

community dedicated to finding the

fate to live out this massive collision of diametrically

marriage,

of real estate in the coun·

truth. How a bsurd it is to restrict

opposed forces.

force, and the promotion. of two types of marriage

etc.),

restricted

or

which cannot be

withheld

from

trv. Since, to toe best of our know­

the free exchange of ideas and al­

ledge,

low only that truth which

U.S.,

have

no

women

in

the

labor

-One childless and easily dissolved, the other more stable and designed to rear children effectively -

PLU's administra·

proved by the Office of Student Af­

significantly above a figure which would staibilize

might lbe the steps necessary to stabilize population.

rigi1.t

fairs I If PLU is afraid and unwill·

our population. In India, though survey methods are

ing to a\low ideas to be expressed,

less

how can it justify its existence as

would prefer two to three sons, which would entail

a university?

a normal family of five or six children. Their prob­

United States ·it appears that there is onJy one of

lem is double that of ours, and is coupled with a

these

food shortage as well.

getting off

to' abrogate

ti,m's ubligation to the alumni, the

MAST

MOORING

The Voice of the Students at Pacific Lutheran Universti:) . ..... . . . . . . .

JOHN AAKRE

BOB HASSELBLAD

..

.

.. . . . . _

.

. . __ .......... . . . . . . . . . . . . ........ .

......

.. .

PAULA SEIBERT. DAVE SODERLUND

. . . . . . . ...... ......

..

_

_.

.........

ROBINSON

PAUL BERG

.. ._

. ..........

Editor

Managing Editor

Hu hagen,

Hf'avey.

Ru,,

Johnson,

family

The most difficult decision is to decide first that a

change is necessary and then

to decide which

avenue of change will bring the best results. In the alternatives the

which

ground.

has any

real

This country

chance

of

is unfortun­

What are the alternatives for populatiOn contrOl,

ately inhabited by a uniquely uninformed voter who

then? Five broad t.ypes of programs have been sug·

would be required to institute any drastic program

geste<lJor implementation at the

establishment,

of

a

national level. First,

involuntary

fertility

control

Sports Editor

Such a measure is not feasible nOw, but it could

similar to the ones suggested above.

The odds in

favor of this are nothing short of phenomenaL The only place to begin seems to be with an edu­ cational program,

although the

others

should not

be ruled out. We must start now with a program

be realized in five years if the nation were com­

of

Business Manager

mitted to its use. Other involuntary measures could

'education, sex education, and environmental educa­

include

tion to deveLop in the next generation a sensitivity

Advisor

both

temporary

population

to the problems of an overcrowded earth. Only then

and permanent.

Johnson,

tensified educational campaigns from the primary

cant change in social institutions which might be

Becky Rodning. Bruce Bjerke, Cathy Wark. Steve Cook, Nancy

level on up and the use of nation-wide mass media

necessary to maintain a new lowpr level of popula­

Shaw,

Karen

Svendsen,

Wanda

Dykstra,

Huber,

Bob

Thorson,

sterilization,

educatirln concerning

A second alternative is the establishment of in­

Jane

Dave

compulsory

comprehensive

Tom

Mary

Giles,

typical

ting the water supply with a birth control agent.

. .. . . .

Dave

the

Circulation Manager

PETERSON

John

appears that

might be possible in the near future by supplemen­

STAFF-Glen Anderson, Paul Wuest, Kansas, Glen Zander, Steve L.arson,

it

News Editor . .

. .. .

accural\e',

. ... . Copy Editor

KATE MANCKE

JOHN

of

The prepared family size in the United States

seceded

More sacred than the administw­

DR.

utilization

remains at slightly over three children per family,

has not

uur Constitutional rights.

'fERRY

the

is ap­

Parkland

from the toT!;

relationship

or do

any

assembly, piece

could

slap jn of

of speech,

Ine;entive programs

traceptives

tional rights

(freedom

childbearing.

also be established for those couples who use con­ periods, or for those who havre nO more than two

planet. Much of evolutioQary theory is based on this

are

encourage

ago the biotic, or breeding, potential of man is ulti­ mately due to outstrip the carrying capacity of t.hig

we

Freedom

population. As Malthus foresaw over two centuries

of us students

Therefore

of

Not only is censorship a threat to

and a repudiation of the purpose

s-econd.

eagle

American values, but it is also a

entitled to certain basjc Constitu­

people

American

children and would serve to discourage rather than

and

Many students feel that we are American

the wealthy contributors,

obligation

tilis

the

Education or ElDasculation

(Continued from Page 1) jeopardy we may exp-cct pressure guarantee

May

Environment

Demonstrators (Cont.) the

be.

Kristi

Steward,

David

Aakre, John Rankin, Scott Green, Priscilla. Martens, Pat Stiles, L.indsay ·Gradcr. The Footrubber, Linda Gardner, Barbara Morris, John Beck, Beth Nordberg. Linda McConnelL

fur direct dissemination

of population and

family

planning information.

could any other program of incentive, or any signifi·

tion, be instituted through democratic action. The ultimate salvation from the disaster of too many

economic level two more possibilities have

people seems to lie in the situation of creative, far·

been suggested. Tax and welfare benefits and pen·

sighted population education programs - it may not

alties could be adjusted in favor of those with fewer

yet be too late.

On

an


Wednesday, Nov. 18, 1970

I Really M st

MOORING MAST

Page Three

Activists Test Leaflet Policy

I'm a bitch. HURRAH! You're a virgin. HURRAH! You're nursing a dead g.oat. Praise the Lord and aJI of His creation. HURRAH! HUR­

An Open Letter of PLU: Last

RAH! HURRAH!!!

to

Friday,

the

the

Students

13th,

three

friends and I came onto your cam­ would it embarass you if I told you that I love you

pus to gather support for the Seat­ tle 8

and to attract attention to

The pOint here is not one of just our rights as non-students is much debate over not

we

have

any

whether

on

a

pressure rather than through legis­

(there

lative actions taken by an isolated

or

and non-representative bureau.

private

If you are concerned about your

campus). The point is that these

freedom,

laws

seeking

control

your

activities

as

and

as

a

education r

community suspect

you

story about hunger, on credit.

the teach-in on repression at the

well. You

your­

Meet my friends. Here is a homosexual and here is a political prisoner.

UPS campus that same night. We

would be, I recommend exploring

selves til rough leafleting, posters,

There is a thief and there is a lamb.Here is

passed out leaflets about both and

this are a of your community's life

and demonstration unless the form

and taking the actions necessary

of expression and the content meet

to secure these fundamental rights.

Come to my place and I'll tell you

a

rose with petals.There

a

is a (ose with thorns. Over there is one with both thorns and petals.

did some guerrilla theatre in front

Here am I - without a HtOe of both.

of the administration building. It wasn't long !before a security guard we were doing was prohibited with­

power

'but the good? HURRAH . . . damn you ...

out

sion

administration. We quit and went

gee it, hear it, smell it - I can feel it - it is he.re and I know it. Lord, HURRAH, you came once and all fists were l1eady to strike.The time was ripe.Again you come. But is the time so ripe this time? Now you come and no one will even acknowledge your presence.Sing your mins­ trel song, and listen to the cold. You're not even a man now. You could at least bleed then. I wonder which is the harder death - 11eing nailed to a tree or of

Do this, or in the words of Toque­ ville,

touch me ...touch me you damn you damn you .

The time is ripe.But I am afraid.I can recognize my fear. I can

dying

with the approval of the non-aca­

was on hand to teII us that what

loneliness. This

time

you

can't

even

permission from the

be forsaken-no

one

knows you are here. But I know. COUldn't you have spared me my ignor­ ance. Love is Silence . . . HURRAH ...You ... me . .. I am . .. HURRAH!

the whole world astounds you .. .

I'm quivering from mind to heart.My body is tense and my eyes diJated from fear. The obduratJe crowd of loving soldiers, bricklayers and grave­ diggers stand demured as the drum roll begins. I see in the crowd

a

baby at its mother's breast.Its face is smeared

with blood.Its fingers are clutciling at the breast of a dead woman-a grey woman. Its fine white body resembling a waxened and blenched corpse.Good luck, kid.HURRAH. None of them

s willing to admit fear. They are beyond the point

where. they even know what it is. They are all all right. Yes, I'm sure of that now, they are all all right. Watch them adamantly propound their values HURRAH!

HURRAH!

HURRAH! Ashamed to be . . .

HURRAH! "fighting for peace is like L. ....king for virginity"

Ah, but I can not.More like it, I wiIl not.I could but I won't.But

I know. Thus, how can I not.It's easy-HURRAH! It seems to me that it saems to me it seems to me .. . I must. 1 was born in a plague.I can remain diseased, should I not choose. If I say yes to You I will,

for sure, be a cripple in this world-a choice of remaining diseased

deci­

few students and facul­

That

evening

we

went

to

the

teach-in.There ;Here several speak­

Timothy Pettet

term imprisonment

for

people who are or were actively involved in organizing for radical survival

of their own

people. In

reflecting on the two experiences recalled

a

passage

from

de

ToqueviUe in Saul Alinsky's Reveil­

le for Radlcals that seemd to fit the situation. "It must oot be forgotten that it is

especialIy

dangerous

to

enslave men an the minor de­ tails of life. For my own part,

I shOl ld be inclined to think freedom less necessary in great things were

than

little

possible

ones,

to

be

if

it

social

A young girl I know and love phoned me the other morning, her . vOIce uneasy and unsure. She had been awakned in her college dormitory by the loudspeaker. It ordered her to evacuate her room immediately. An anonymous caller had warned that a bomb had bee n planted somewhere on the campus. "Do you know anything about it?" the young girl asked hopefully.I said I didn't, but I'd check.Should I call her back? "No," she said, "I guess dt doesn't reaHy matter.does it?" What she wanted from me, I think, was reassurance-- some verity in this new world of bombings, kicinapings and hijackings where innocence is no protection.

I couldn't give it to her.I said the things you say: Don't worry, it's probably just

a

hoax.Don't worry, don't worry ...

"I know," she said and I could sense her fear.

" But

it's an. awful

way to start the day." *

secure

of the one without possessing

and

Our Man Hoppe

of repression in this country.Each speaker dealt with terms of death long

moral

Arthur Doppe

ers dealing with the high degree

and

by

the

Yours in Peace and Freedom

propriety of

Steve MacAskill

a

ty about the situation and then left.

*

*

This time, it was a hoax. This time, there wa s no bomb. And yet I

the other. Subjection in mioor

think the fear, hers and mine, was justified.

affairs

and is felt by the whole com­

I don't so much fear the bombs. The chances of my being blown · to bits are, thus far at least, infinitesimal. What I lear is the self­

It .indiscriminately . does not drive men to resist­

the innocent to build a better world.

breaks

out

everyday,

ance,

righteousness of the bombers-these young people who would slaughter

but it crosses them at

every tum till they are led to surrender the exercise of their wilL"

I have met a few. In many ways I admire them. The

ones

I met are

bright. They are dedicated to doing good for mankind. They are ready to sacrifice themselves for their ideals.And they are Oh·so-terribly sure they are right. I fear this most.

e Toquevi\Ie 1835

For each man must justify to himself what he does. How much easi­ er it is to justify your means when you are absolutely certain your ends

like to speak to the special repres­

are righteous.How easy it was for Lee Harvey Oswald.How easy it was

sion we experienced on your cam­

for Sirhan Sirhan.

policy (leaflet law) we were denied our first amendment rights as citi­ zens. I noticed in the last issue

Mooring Mast a letter that

of the

spoke to a similiar policy control­ ling

what

is

posted

on

bulletin

lboards. I don't think it is an exag­ geration to point at these policies and to

condemn them as un.con­

stitutional and oppressive.

footrubber.

"surrender

controlled

talked to

We

it. I am laughing. It is good.

I am left laughing against the wind

The

eventualy

exercise of your will."

William L. Nelson

office.

about love.Yes, I wiIl listen - I can stiIl hear.I am smiling. I feel

hurrah

the

this

form and content of any expres­

pus. Because of an administrative I know myself now.I understand.But I am afraid. Go ahead, tell me

illegitimate.

concerning

that

Joe Covach

affairs

With this as introduction I would yes, I really must.

is

contention

munity as a whole and should be

or

becoming a cripple.

my

in the student

munity

HURRAH !!!!!

is

sion should be made by the com­

I

I am left standing before the executioner and a crowd of henchmen.

It

to see the man but found no one

change or were struggling for the you are a very lonely man, doing what you can . ..

express

derriic administrative authorities.

i love you came a man also 'nis eyes priestly said

express

cannot

"What does it matter if a few innocent people die here?" these young militants say. "You aTe slaughtering thousands of innocent people in Vietnam.The System must be destroyed." How sure they are of this. To prevent the sl aug ht er of the innooen.ts, they would slaughter the innocents. "We'lI spread fear," they say. "And when The System is frightened enough, it will react with repression. And when tine repression becomes bad enough, the people will join in our revolution." And what frightens me is not that they may be wrong in these tac­ tics, but that they may be right. *

..

For the fear is spreading now. A few innocent people have been killed, a score of buildings blown up,

On Capitol Hill,

And with it comes

On The Marquee quee "

is

"On The Mar­

written

viewer Beth

by

guest-re­

Nordberg this week.)

By BErn NORDBERG . Jesus of Nazareth. Was he innocent or guilty according to the law, and who was really re­ sponsible for his death?"

lines and adopts

J1ieW

ones, scrap­

ping their customary play to ad lib

and

hunt

for

some

rock

of

more

repressive

So it may come. In the ugliness of our fear, in our own self-righ­

Moving into the second act, ac­ anted among the audien.ce

superl;>ly assist to create dramatic tenseness

Interesting

are

the

characters

who

p·resent themselves as wit­ nesses. Greg Yock's portrayal of Judas

is

strikingly

strong,

his

whole body and attention seeming to be devoted to the character.As three of the disciples, Doug Parker,

Thieves"

Walt Binz, and Ben Cinotto each

adapted from Dieto FaJ::jbri's "Pro­

add

cesseo A Gesu") has presented a

tion of the men who followed the

play which legalistically addresses

discipline

itself to these questions until one

Worthy

to

the

humanistic

of

of

early

particular

presenta­

Christianity. note

were

night, the players agree to attempt

LeRoy's in.sights on Judas, rep'l'e­

a new avenue. With hopes that be­

sen ted in the play as a sincere,

yond the law and tradition rests

practical

truth of more lasting and realis­

had looked for an earthly king to

tic value, the acting troupe abon­

politically liberate his people, and

dons their conventional roles and

<\Iso on the Roman Pilate, depicted

man

who

unaffectedly

these the

and

suspense. Through

characters

who arise from

audience, ideas

which

would

strike near pedantry if presented on the_stage gain currency

into

and

her

evening's

should be commended. These spec­ tator-characters are a joy to watch; from priests to prostitutes, they add

to

the

feeling

of

the

presentation.Scott Green, the pros­ ecuting attorney for the entire play, effectively changes as a character due to the witness' and audiences presentations. Despite

nominal

these

bombers,

Perhaps, in the end, the bombers may

e ven

wID. But I don't think

they will build a better world.For r keep thinking back to that young girl-the way her voice sounded, the way she had been awakened to another day. And I think that if you must methodically set about to frighten even one innocent young girl to build a new world, it won't be a damned bit better than the one we've got. (Copyright Chronicle Publishing Co., 1970)

partner

do a convincing presentation and

finely

down and kill

slaughtering the innocents who get in our way.

the play. Particularly; Penny Fish­ beck

For our system is based on the con­

teousness, we may set forth to hunt

as no small poIititian. tors

an \mease.

cence is no protection at all.

Jesus.

For years the peripatetic drama leRoy and

debate

cept that innocence is the best protection from harm. And now inno­

truth regarding the crucified man

troupe depicted in "Between Two (by Warner

hundred bomb hoaxes called in.

anti-cliime legislation. The fear is spreading.

Review

(Editor's Note:

a

Congressmen nervously

costumes

and

sets, the audience sits in what may

be assumed to be attentive silence.

a battIe cry to eliminate persecu­

And it may weII be, for although

tion of the Jews, but perhaps it is

the play seems to have both loose

also a cry to an even higher task,

ends and a groping attitude, much

that of expelling that truthful spir­

was said

it

on which the audien.ce

could ponder. Many questions re­

which

has so

Silently hidden

in

long

been

kept

man. Injustice

garding Jesus' life and death are

and wasted sufferings grow from

raised which deliberately lack reso­

the lethal silence

lution, but this is part of the play's

has long tolerated in itself. "We

lingering effect.

all have our

At

the

play's

conclusion,

there

exists what many interpret to be

which manking

moments of silence ... It is those moments that allow

persecution to exist."


MOORING MAST

Page Four

Wednesday, Nov. 18, 1970

Drug Use Veiled with Confusion The Mast Essay We of the Mooring Mast, along with the majority of responsible individuals and groups, find it difficult adequately to define "the drug problem" and the schisms within. In fact, in the effort to explore some of the many questions regarding drug use we are confronted by a complex myriad of prob­ lems-medical problems, social problems, psychiatric problems, to mention a few, and the interrelations between them. One of the nearly insurmountable difficulties in approach­ ing the subject of drug use relates to the fact that there is a lack of consistency in the definitions of the various drugs and

Coed Stresses Misuse of Drugs By KATE MANCKE

used. Out of curiosity, she tried a

"Around PLU, pills are used to get

you up for the

Thing,

and

that's

Friday night bad,"

stated

Alice, a PLU sophomore. Currently off drugs, Alice has been a user

joint and found, like most begin­ ners that it had little effect. Guided

by

acquaintances

who

know how to use drugs properly, sne found that smoking grass reo

since sne was fourteen, and holds

quired a certain degree of matur­

a very strong opinion about drug

ity if any of the frequently·touted

use.

benfits

were

learned

how

Concerned that the

increase in

to to

accrue. control

As her

she own

drug usage on campus is an es­

mind to take advantage of the drug,

cape mechanism and that in most.

that we find confusion within the individual about the "facts"

Alice

cases

and concerns after we stop to look at the confusion within our

individual

the problems resulting from misuse. It isn't at all surprising

legal structure. How well the confusion is epitomized by the many incongruities within our laws, at both state and federal levels.

it

is

harmful

marijuana

en·

the

abl d her to block out the irrele· vant trappings of everyday prob­

AI.ice tried to explain the proper

lems and see the essence of the

and

questions which confronted her.

improper

the

reasons

both

that

community,

and

to

found

for

drug

use.

Usage of harder drugs and pills

We believe the confusion stems from the lack of a proper

She began by giving a shart Ihis·

soon supplemented blowing grass,

tory of her own drug experience

as her search for a course of ac·

perspective. In the past, what the courts have -usually asked

which included use of virtually all

tion

is only "what" and not "why". The problem repeats itself throughout history. The problem, simply stated, is a tendency to generalize and attach labels of good and bad without first

drugs

from

to speed.

marijuana

progressed.

She

hoped

that

dope would be a speeding factor

Alice's initial exposure was at a

which

party where marijuana was being

enough

would

give

ner

understanding

a of

clear social

and individual problems so that she would be able to start acting

an

some of the solutions. Refusing

to

participate

the

in

patching process, which site feels only

aggravates

problems,

Alice

wants to change the essentials. In this aspect she likened herself to the young people who nave com­ pletely dropped out. Drop-outs, in her opinion, have chosen the pure form of dr · opping out rather than mouthing support of a system with whioh they cannot identify. They do not deign to destroy th.e sym­ bols of a way of life whidn they find

completely

For

worthless.

droJHluts

and

users, doping is

other

drug

individual

an

ex­

ercise which is best experienced in groups. Alice stated that you have to

have the

right

people guiding

you and cannot be afraid. Fear of detection, or fear of the effect of

exploring the underlying factors of certain activities. In this

the drug itself, invariably makes

way we tend to over-simplify and over-react without a clear

doping dangerous. It is for these

understanding of either the effect or cause.

two reasons Vitat drug use is prevelant

Our basic concern here is to illuminate the motives, goals,

at

rock

festivals

potentially so harmful in

values, disvalues, and the overall implications of drug use for

tion like PLU.

the individual within the social structure. In discussing intelli­

Unlike

so

and situa·

a

other col­

lege campuses, there is a "fairly

gently the many aspects incorporated in the topic of drug use,

tight watch on things around here."

it is necessary to begin with a perspective whose antecedent

Alice reiterated·, "If there's a has­

premises are concern and understanding. We believe that an in­

sle around, dope can be bad." Wiilile

telligent forum can not merely be a device to reflect our own individual biases. Our purpose then is not to condemn or to

PLU

condone. This is an effort to discover and ask the important

ing.

tru · e the misuse of drugs, one way or another, is on the incline.

thy,

fined to minority

groups,

"bohe­

mians," or other small and peri­ pheral sectors of society. Perhaps the greatest realization was

that

there

in. the laws

is no ·uniformity

governing j::ossession

and use of marijuana from state to state and that very often there was no legal distinction pusher

and

movement has

to

user.

Although

legalize

been under way

scale for some

between

time

the

marijuana at a small the general

public is for the most part ignor­ ant in respect to the cOf\Sequences

or may not be treated separately,

years by a Houston judge for giv­

depending on the state.

ing-llf.Jt

Penalties

tend to fall into three general cate· First are those which in­

volve sentences of less than a year or fines less than $1,000. Washing­ ton, Oregon, California, Utah, and New Hampshire fall into this cate­ gory as well as some other states. here

is

Nebraska­

for the first offense the guilty par­ ty spends seven days in jail and must complete an educative course on drug abuse, as long as he was convicted of possession of less than eight oun.ces. The

second

category

involves

those sentences from one to five years

and

fines

not

more

than·

$2,000. Montana, Hawaii, Maryland and

Massachusetts

are

in

this

group, which is perhaps the most popular.

The last

group

con.tains

those states with heavy penalities, and here there are found some real

of the possession of just one joint.

surprises.

A quick sur';ey of the penalties in the 50 states unearths some in­

penalty

is 20 years, Ohio's ,i s 15

with

$10,000

teresting comparisons. The penal· ties described below a re for first offense possession; second offenses and the selling of marijuana may

a

Alabama's fine.

students will

never

gat rid

of

the

"If

black

maximum Minnesota's

is 20 years with a $10,000 fine, and

selling-one

jOint

to

an

undercover agent. ties

are

separate

pushers, and

for

users

and

possession penalties

themselves are

graded

according

to repetition of the offense. First

gross misdemeanor and results in a maximum

penalties

are

grams­

of

detennined more

by

the

order for the

dardize and to some d·egree lighten

the penalties for possession.

misunderstanding

of

and

teen-agers

who

use

need to be understood to be used correctly.

proper .setting States in

is

not the United

1910.

Drug Forum Schedule

WEDNESDAY-

1: 30-Films in Chris Knutzen "LSD-25 " "Escape to Nowhere" "For Adults Only"

8:

"I Love You Alice B. Toklas"· Question and Answer period following, led by Dr. George Gay. Discussion Groups in. U.C.

Drug Usuage in the Army, \led by Lt. Col. J. D. Lyles and Warrant Officer V. E. Yarnell

than 40

Heroin and Hard Drugs, led by Dr. George Gay

fer.ent. Sale of marijuana is a fel­ ony punishable by 3-10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000 a sentence identical to the third pos­ If

the

Treatment of Addicts, led by Dr. Robert Dunn, V. A. Hospital

the maximum is raised to 20 years.

last instance, Lee Otis Johnson, a

Even in disregarding whether or pen.alty

Open-door Clinics, led by Robert Men2le1. 11IURSDAY9:30-Lecture in Eastvold "The Changin.g Face of Heroin Addiction and Predicted Pat­

pusher

should sell to a minor, however,

stri. ngent

and

drugs is perpetuated by armchair

Potentially they could be valu­

For the pusher it is a little dif­

not any

She is especially concerned tIilat misuse

able, but as Aice pointed out, the

or ao b ut an ounce and a

offense.

commented Alice.

in Washington which would stan­

half-of pot.

session

right

ent time legislation is in process

of one year in jail

not

it is obvious that

sake of consistency. At the pres­

fense is a felony and is punish­ able by Jhree to ten years in prison

possession

grass

liberals

and a fine of $1,000. The tbird of­

and a possible $10,006" fine. These

now,"

legalize

drugs as a social symbol. Drugs

offense possession results in a max·

the se.cond offense is rated as a

Above

all,

be established for possession or use

imum senten.ce of six months with an accompanying fine of $500, while

the situation is controlJed.

of marijuana,

legal reform i s in

In the state of Washington penal­

Texas' is two years to life. In this SNCC leader, was sentenced to 30

How­

ever, I'd set up places t o go where

Inconsistent LaW's Reveal Need for Reform

classic

a

market, fine. Then legalize grass,

will prove more successful.

The

of

DMT, LSD, and Mescaline.

proven ineffective. Hopefully, a concerned and benign hand

out society and was no longer con­

because

legalization

We feel the iron hand of the legal superstrucflure has

had made a place for itself through·

setting

legalization of certain drugs.

cation - as clear an understanding as is possible.

plant,

the

destructive pastime would be the

tion channels. We feel that the answer to drug control is edu­

hemp

in

drug use a productive, rather than

has plagued us and has done much damage to the communica­

mild-mannered

Placed

One of the most beneficial moves

able information which is responsible. Inaccurate propaganda

a

in­

which could be made in making

gate the underlying reasons for misuse, and then to have avail­

that pot, the ubiquitous derivative

dopers.

factor

move out of themselves."

remedy the ills of irresponsible use of drugs is to first investi­

of

time

cnly "result in a permanent apa­

We of the Mooring Mast staff believe that the only way to

people in this country were aware

weekend

the

the use of drugs on campus would

People use drugs. There ,is no denying this fact. It is also

marijuana. For the first time many

are

of

personal problems, Alice feels that

the social as well as psychological.

gories.

on

rationalistic approach to social and

drug use itself. Our bellief is that disorder can be found within

were arrested for the possess.ion. of

use

tend to put studies ahead of dop­

verse character, and which problems are resultant from the

dy, Jr. and R. Sargent Shriver III

drug

volved in most drug use, students

problems concerning drugs are but symptoms of a more di­

By DAVE SODERLUND

users

Because

questions. It is an effort to single out and elucidate which

Last summer Robert F. Kenne­

discussing

campus, Alice postulated that most

should

terns", Dr. George Gay

1: 30-Faculty Panel Discussion in Chris Knutsen, repeat of films and 8:

infonnal discussion groups following the panel. Lecture in Eastvold "Today's Drug Culture," by Dr. Joel Fort.

-


MOORING MAST

Wednesday, Nov. 18, 1970

Intelligent Evaluatio

Page Five

Essential

Center Provides Counseling

cian at Madigan Hospital. Ma'ny of

By BOB HASSELBLAD

the

The first thing an individual who

outside source. This is the

median age of people coming in for

an

last thing he

Mission.

Located at

would find

counseling, 17.

at The

"The idea is that even the pro­

feSSionals here look loose . . . this

S. Yakima, the

3813

is

Mission is a clinic associated with

nine volunteers

allows The Mission to refer cases Although high schOOl youth were

ly structured drug counseling ser­

the original target, the clinic has

to nine, and the phone, GR 2-1202,

cOlloCern ­

vice. The office is open from nine

since expanded to a.nother area of

is answered 24 hours a day.

Refusing to provide a panacea, that

osophy

people

must

troubled about some drug they have children's health.

their own actions. No one is forced

to provide educational opportuni­

tured

Representatives

in counseling." He explained that

penetrated every city, every town,

says Dr. Eklund.

drug traffic has

ing degrees the

Ashbury Medical Cliruc, wdll be fea­

ties for our students and faculty,"

from

Such a focus will be the aim of

and every campus.

symposium

drug

two-day

the

ago a university

Several years

"One of our major objectives is

to

sale of mind-altering drugs might

begin this afternoon. Student co-chairman David Hoch

section of a large volume of "do's

bring out the straight and up-to­

issue in any student handbook, and

of personal opinions on drug use.

standards boards.

a

or

use

the

regarding

regulation

reported that the symposium will

have been quoted in some obscure

and don'ts." Today it ds a front

date facts as well as a wide variety Dr. Joel Fort of San Francisco,

is a prime concern of policy and In an attempt to define and eva­

luate PLU's stand on drugs, three

faculty members and two students

met to discuss the issue.

concerning

law

present

PLU's

leading national authority on the

their

and

possession,

use,

distribution by anyone directly as·

sociated with the university com­

munity, and cites immediate dis­ sociation from the university as the penalty for all vio1.ators. Dr.

of the

Eklund,

Emmet

Faculty·Student

Chairman

Standards

Committee, commented on a fine point of the ruling. "The standards board

has had some problem in

distinguishing

who is directly as·

sociated with the "QuestiolloS

said.

he

university,"

come

mind,

to

'Does this include off-campus stu­ dents?' and 'What a!bout marrjed students?' " Dr.

Daniel

Leasure,

Vice-Pres­

ident of Student Affairs, answered that from a legal aspect the uni­

versity may be likened to a club organization.

or

"When

you

join

an organization and agree to be­

have in a certain way, your mem­ becomes

bership

contingent

upon

your abiding by that agreement.

"Students must €xpect some sort

of behavior standards," he said. Dr.

Eklund added that the ma­

jority and immediate suspension of Il

violators

was

another

point

under study. "In some instances I

think it might be better to keep a

student in school where he can

continue

his studies

and

receive

help from st.aff and counselors,"

he commented. Dr.

Phillip Beal. Dean of Men,

committee

administrators

and

take

a

also be on hand.

Dave said that the program will

begin in the afternoon and be con­

tinued after dinner, and that hope­

fully a bloc of afternoon classes

will be dismissed so faculty and students can attend.

physical

results

of

drug use,

added,

are made.

as

The Mission 4S one arm of the

Tacoma

mented

the

that

people

have

to

be

asleep to believe Tacoma has no

Mission opened. Boyle has had ex­ perience as

along

a Hill­

education program. Peterson com­

had worked for Tacoma's Halfway before

Center,

top outreach office, and a public

other full·time counselor. Peterson years

Narcotics

with the Halfway House,

Boyle, a TCC student, who is the

two

problems.

familial love.

"no value judgements

for

other

of the ovoerall problem of lack of

Jim Peterson is joined by Dick

House

many

Rather, they are one manifestation

well as the legal aspects. "But,"

he

of

cause

people are informed of mental and

drug problems.

a psychiatric teehni­

Peterson and Boyle readily ad­

many others also handle mar juana

(Editor's Note: The following ar­ ,ticle was submitted under a pseu­ donym by a G.I. from Ft. Lewis.) It is said, and rightly so, that

the

reflects

community

military

the problems of the civilian com­

munity. Not only are these prob­

lems reflected, but they are exag­

gerated and expanded in the mili­ tary environment. drug

use

of

or albuse in the military

is listed at between 30% and 60%,

the unofficial estimate hovers near

80%.

AFB,

On Ft. Lewis and McChord

seems

the high percentage

accurate.

Uppers,

grass,

downers,

acid,

heroin, cocaine and other "illegal"

drug are available in almost every

barracks of every

unit

on these

bases. The problem of proving this assertion is diWcult because, first,

people using these drugs will oot

admit to the fact, even anonymous·

ly. Second NCO's and officers are

loathe to report incidents of drug

use in their units. But there are indications

the

bases

from

that

the

officials

a major

on

problem

exists. McChord has its marijuana

sniffing dog, "Midrught," and Ft.

Lewis has its monthly drug abuse meeting. The

illegal

drugs

are

obtained

from dealer .. on and off base, and di pensaries,

their

is

extensive?

so

use

HlstoricalIy, the military has had

become a pleasurable escape and

re­

plete in enabling the user to re­

a problem with traditional drugs and

alcohoi

of

cently,

opiates,

and

with the wider variety of

drugs now circulating around the country.

has a "problem" with drugs. They went

on

to add that many people

handle tobacco and alcohol wisely,

wisely. But at the point that indi­

release. They are quick and com­

viduals feel that their halbit is get­

ting out of hand, the clinic stands

move himself from his boring ex­

ready to advise. The Mission only

the services give their personnel.

or her own solution.

istance

in

the

limited

free time

demands that each person finds his

Answers to this question of why

vary from person to person, but

two

paramount -

seem

reasons

boredom and identification. Aliena­

tion of the GI from the civilian

estimates

official

the

While

prescription.

standards

and Tacoma open-door clinics will

smash the idea that drugs are the

not being told what to do. Drugs

disciplinary or a medical problem. The

the U. S. Army, and the Seattle

why

By RICHARD LYNN

the

university

department,

pharmaoeutical

the Federal Bur.eau of Narcotics,

are put to the individuals involved

Army Lile Increases Drug Usage

pointed out that there is no real

definition whether drug abuse is a

University of Washing­

the

will be messed up on drugs. The

Mission attempts to educate and

mitted how.ever that not everyone

dangerous and/or illegal drug s pro· hibits

ton's

speakers.

high potential for yielding kids who

workers and a junior dn psychology

puses across the country. In vary­

business at universities and cam·

homes

eration gaps. Such homes have a

Jim Peterson, one of the full-time

at PLU, stated, "New alternatives

been

has

drugs

besides

-broken either by divorce or gen­

solution.

of drug detoxification at the Haight­

their

the biggest problem he dealt with

seling is expected to select his own

of view rather than a punitive one.

about

Realizing the interplay. of parents

same time, evoeryone under coun­

TIle sale of illegal drugs as big

or

and offspring, Peterson said that

mise himself in any way. At the

in charge

home,

at

found

decide

to come to the clinic or compro­

Gay,

Jim 0b­

the parents.

served that many parents call in,

The Mission operates on the phil­

subject, and Dr.

to

we have in­

to other_ drug clinics.

The free clinic attempts to

provide Tacoma youth with a loose­

preventative and rehabilitive point

agency,"

addition

roads to the 'establishment' ." This

has

been operating since February of

1970.

"In

Peterson.

being approachable,

clinic staffed by two full-time em­ and

non-profu6sional

a

boasts

the Tacoma Narcotics Center. The ployees

very close to the

counselors is

an immediate solution provided for

By BARB MORRIS

well

equipped. Yet the median age of

by

PLU Drug Policy Delineated

equally

are

volunteers

is having drug prdblems wants is

been ripped off or

either

given

having

out by

In any discussion of drugs in the

military, the real point should be,

to

adds

world

servioeman's

the

prdblems of relating to his new en­ Instead

vironment.

attemping

of

to offer a smooth transit,ion from to military

civilian life

the

life,

change is abrupt. Shaved head, no civilian ment,

clothes,

real

no

move­

restricted

no

friendships,

chance to think. By the time his training

finished,

is

about

four

months, the new serviceman finds he can't relate to his previous en­ vironment and civilian friends.

come the quickest and

Drugs

easiest metilod by

which he can

divorce himself from the military environment.

The second, but no less import­

tant

reason

for

using

drugs

on

statesid e posts like Ft. Lewis and

McChord is the boredom that ex­

ists in the jobs performed by the

servicemen. Frivolous and useless formations and work details, rou­ tine,

recurring

assignments

and

the famous "hurry up and wait"

attitude of the militay contributes heavily

people

to

who,

the

boredom

after

being

of

the

trained

not to think, find themselves with

long periods of time when they are

• IN THE SHOOT-UP ROOM r.,.,., nh In "Opera lion A ... N....' ....m . IV"-. Around tho w lt. art wildly painttd al FI. ISr ... N.C . • Imu'.' ,hool"l hefoin PQtten. This i. porI of "" Army', new P'O' IIndIr Iha _",",.,Idon of • hOJplt.' t.dInlc In, grIm clti1llned 10 CUNI d,ug .dclim. Tn Thol II .....t.d 1M ehoot ·up roo", which II pllnt­ lochnlclan II Sel. OlOrge Smj h. - AP Wi,.· sd dui< Io...k Ind li1Ihfld with I /lIlON.ant photo "


Page Six

MOORING MAST

Wednesday, Nov.

18, 1970

Movement· Consciousness More than 200 people, largely students, met at the UPS

Oppressed Minorities Speak Out By GLEN ANDE RSON

SUB Friday night, November 13, to hear speakers from the Seattle 8 Coordinating Coml11ittee of Tacoma and other dis­ sident groups. Publicized as a teach-in, the session centered on the upcoming c:onspiracy trial and minority and class repres­ sion within America. True to their traditional apathetic form, only about 14 or 15 PLU students attended what may have been one of the most significant educational experiences held in Tacoma this year. Speakers included two alleged conspirators: Michael Lern­ er, a former professor at the University of Washington; and

for vegetable workers, especially fOCUSing on lettuce growers in the Salinas Valley of California. Con-

Many of Friday night's speakers represented

movements

relatively

removed

concerns.

Rather

on

issues

such

that

from than

as

are

sumer are being asked to boycott . non-umon lettuce Just as they boy· cotted nonunion grapes. He said

student

centering

drugs,

abor­

we should look for the United Farm Workers union label, whiC'il

tion, and tile 19-year-old vote, these speakers dealt with issues affecting

shows an Aztec eagle.

ethnic minorities and the lower ec·

Representing the Welfare Rights

orwmic classes.

Action Council (formerly the ADC

An organizer for Cesar Chavez'

Motivated

Mothers)

was

a

very

Roger Lippman, a young man who seemed rather baffled by

United

the absurdity of the whole trial. Two of their defense lawyers

that organization is doing to pro­

warned the group about upcoming

vide

thous­

cuts in tile State welfare budget

ands of oppressed migrant laborers.

and the havoc this will wreak on

Several years of dedicated sacri­

low income families.

fice

..

also spoke. Representatives from the United Farm Workers, Tacoma's Welfare Rights Action Council, the People's Constitu­ tional Convention, and a spokesman for the Puya",up and Nis­ qually Indians also addressed the gathering. The group

dealt handily

with this great

diversity of

topics. They seemed receptive to a basic idea articulated by the representative of the People's Constitutional Convention: al­ though a variety of concerns necessitate different courses of

Farm

economic

have

Workers justice

earned

told for

them

what

black

articulate

approxi­

woman

who

Some welfare checks will be cut

mately 95% success witil their fa­

as much as 30%, and certain types

mous struggle to get grape grow·

of

ers to meet them at the bargain­

may

ing table. Now they are

State of Washington plans to take

seeking

decent pay and working conditions

benefits

care

be

such

as

entirely

of

its

medical

aid

eliminated.

budgetary

The

problems

at tile expense C1f its largely un· and hence defenseless poor people. Since inflation and organized

unemployment hit low-income pea­ pie hardest of any group, she was understandably distressed that in

these days -of high inflation, wei· fare recipients are ilaving their incomes

actually

pointed

out

that

cut.

She

the

also

proposed

changes would require welfare re-­ . clpients wilo own their own homes to sign them over to the state. A

personal

encounter

witil

re­

pression was related by a young black man. He and several of his friends

were

stopped

in

Seattle

by the police for having a burned out rear license plate bulb. They were frisked and put in the back of the police car, and their truck was searcned and impounded for suspicion of auto theft. After the police had had the blacks' truck

action, these different thrusts must operate within a unified

towed away, they refused to give

spirit. It was this "movement consciousness" which pervaded

the men a ride home.

the teach-in.

Wily should he be subjected to

Far from being the stereotyped mob of wild-eyed radicals

such harassment? The speaker im­

clutching at their Marxist rhetoric, the group was characterized

plied that it was for two reasons:

rather by a mutual concern for practical and positive change.

he is black, and he is actively sup·

The accompanying articles attempt to portray the main

porting the People's Constitutional

ideas and issues presented by the speakers.

Convention.

-Glen Anderson and Bob Hasselblad

The People's Constitutional Con­ vention (see Mast, Oct. 14, p. 5) is

Seattle 8' Defendants Face ConspiracyCharge This

(Editor's Note:

from

the

office

of

release

the

is

Puget

Sound 'TRAIL, which has one of press seats at

the few co

the trial and will have material

cited

included

attending five meetings,

The

o·vert

acts

four oc­

casions of addressing an ing

a

tape recording,

one

gether to commit offense against the United States, will go on trial at Tacoma's federal courthouse. Charges

arose

from

The

(fDA) demonstration,

After

Day

ruary 17, 1970. Some 3,000 people staged

a

mass

demonstration

final

at

the

only

two

acts

not

breaking win<:jows and doors,

are

not attributed to any defendant.

convention, and a few days before the plenary

the Chicago conspiracy trial The demonstration Ibroke into what was termed

a

riot

when

the

people

found the court had been closed.

Ramona

Battles between. police and demon­ strators resulted in numerous in· juries, broken windows and other damage

amounting

to

several

thousand dollars. Spokesmen

for

and twa of their lawyers spoke at last

Friday's

teach-in,

and

gave

their impressions of the conspiracy charges and their general theories of American repression.

the

conspiracy

claim they were to talk with court

EX'professor Michael Lerner sug­ gested

that

imperialism

exists

officials, but when they found the

whenever

court closed and riot police inside,

for business interests and uses eco­

the crowd became en.raged. Spokes­ men claim this frustration was re­ sponsible for violence. The eight indicted included: Mi­ chael 20;

Lerner,

Michael

27;

Jeffrey

Abeles,

19;

Dowd, Susan

Stern, 27; Joseph Kelley, 25; Chip Marshall, 25; Rofer Lippmann, 22; and Michael Justesen, 19. Justesen has not yet been arrested. Spokes­ men for the Eight indicated that he is with friends and doing well. One

of

the

defense

attorneys,

Michael Tigar, pointed out that no defendant is charged with actual acts of violence at the IDA demon­ stration.

The

charges

consist

of

four coun.ts of "traveling in inter­

state commerce . to incite .

. with intent

. riot." One count con­

sists of using "the facilities of in­ terstate commerce

. . . Pacific Northwest Bell T<?lephone Co., with

nomic

foreign policy operates

exploitation.

The

problem

to ta1<e It off paper

and

on

paper, and

she was busted in San Francisco

the minute you try

for

make it a reality, you're in trouble." UPS

professor Leroy Annis addresged the teach-in held at their SUB Friday, Nov. 13th.

American arrogance. In Vietnam, America has destroyed 25% of the arable land. U.S. planes currently drop the

equivalent of

2%

Hiro·

shima bombs every three weeks in Soutlneast Asia. Lerner observed that the same philosophy is applied to domestic problems.

The

government

at­

tempts to make the risks too high for its citizens to argue witil fed·

two points. First, the U.S. has be­

The former U C1f W prof asked how we can maintain our self­

power

at a point

tions are realizing that there is no necessity

for

their

exploitation.

Secondly, many dissid€nt factions within America are voicing com­ plaints about its role in interna· tional

affairs.

ne

Vietnam

war

has allowed such feelings a fpcal point. TIle U.S. response to foreign pm.. test is simple-escalate and make

selling

fish

speaker

took

teach-in

and

there.

her

Another

place

explained

at some

the of

he problems of local Indians and

eral policies.

come a world

representiDa

was unable to be at UPS becau.. "11IE AMERICAN DREAM is

of U.S. imperialism develops from

in history when Third World na·

Bennett,

Survival of the American Indian.

it economically difficult to resist

By BOB HASSELBLAD

all three of·

by the police.

their

Alleged Conspirators Hit Imperialism, Repression Two of the Seattle 8 defendants

session

fices of vne Panthers were raided

the U.S. Courthouse in Seattle to protest Judge Hoffman'S decision in

Much of

11he Black Panthers in Philadel­

dows. that

c-ooperating.

phia were active in organizing the

coun.t of ibreaking courthouse win­

out

are

years ago.

double

dealing with speech or assembly,

Blacks, students,

delphia where the U.S. Constitution

breaking doors and windows in the a

society.

was drawn up nearly two hundred

house area in Seattle, one count of and

better

homosexuals,

the work is being done in Phila·

courthouse or judicial system, one

Spokesman for the eight pointed

Feb­

beings

count of using maps of the court­

courthouse,

a

poor people, wo.men's Iibbers, and

count

counts of calling for attacks on the

for

other varied and assorted human

assem­

connected events.)

jury in Seattle for conspiring to­

es

whites,

blage of people, one count of play­

of joining in Karate training, three

sons indicted by the federal grand

draw up a new constitution incorp­ orating constructive radical dilang­

the intent to incite a riot."

available daily on the trial and

Monday, November 23, eight per­

an attempt by various groups to

remade. This was far more than an ab­ stract lecture, since Lerner is ac-

PHONE LE 7-5361

College Cleaners Parkland's Quality Dry Cleaners

11416 PARK A VENUE PARKLAND, WASH.

physical

battles

(Continued on Page 8)

and future are being seriously jeop­ ardized.

He

argued,

ilave your

own

orgamzmg

and

People

who

"Don't

theory,

implement

value

just

ARTISTRY IN FLOWERS

but start

their

it."

freedom

g

cannot afford to be sC'ared off by repressive tactics. The Vietnamese War has proven that the spirit of

FLOWERS, Inc.

human freedom can oppose over·

12169 Pacific Avenue

wilelming odds. Roger Lippman appeared gener­

Phone 537-0205

ally confused about his indictment.

Stella and Ken Jacobs

He has been in San Francisco duro

(Continued on Page 8)

WANT CONTRACEPTIVES

cool things?" but rather "How do we overthrow the ruling class?" Lerner warned that change is not

i

and

tually a defendant whose freedom

respect and humanity if we do not resist oppression. He observed that the question is not "How do we

an mmediate Qccurence, but that in 15-20 years a society can be

legal

with the State of Washington.

PRIVATELY? We believe you're entitled to your privacy when it comes t:) buy· ing contraceptives. We're a nonprofit family planning agency and we offer you contraceptives through the privacy of the mails. We specialize in men's products (including two exclusive new Euro· pean imports)-but we have nonprescription foam for women. teo. And a wide assortment of books and pamphlets to answer your questions on birth control, family planning, the population prob­ lem and ecology. Want details? Write today: I I

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

POPUL,.\TION SERVICES, INC. Chap 1 Hill. S. C. 27514 illS S. Culumbia SI .. O p!. X2. : Genth ..' men

Pleose send Inf' flill details wilhout IlhlJttatlUIl.

__ __ NA"E: __ _ __ ___ ______ _ __ _ _

ADDRESS ______ .. _____ CITY.

-------

STATE._____ Zlf'


18, 1970

Wednesday, Nov.

MOORING MAST

Page Seven

Under the Grandstand

By DAVE SODERLUND

Time is running out! Saturday is the big day for the Second Annual Intramural

Turkey Trot!

If

you

could

a

winning

dig

lovely

turkey

present yourself at the starting line in front of the Ad building at 10 a.m. Saturday morning-there are no complicated forms to fill out, no es­ says to write, no

phoney testimonials for the winner. The race will

mile course (it gets longer every time I wI1ite something)

cover a

and is not open to cross-country team memlbers. See you the<re. ..

..

..

Speaking of Turkeys,the PE department has realized that not every­ one will be able to vacate the place for Thanksgiving and has been announced that both the gym and the pool will be open for student use. The gym will be open from 9 to 9 except for the periods between 12 and 2 and 5 and 6. Got that? The pool will be open from 2: 30 to 4 and from 7:30 to 10. ..

>I<

>I<

Speaking once again of Turkeys, I would like to award this week's Player of the Week trophy to one Mr. Matheys, referee of the LC foot­ ball. Although his unique case of partial blindness probably did not affect the ultimate' outcome of the game his artful display of incon­ sistency, one-sidedness, and !broken-field refereeing deserved some credit. Maybe he should get the game ball. (Maybe if he improves they'll let him work this year's playoff games with Central in basketball.) >I<

>I<

..

It has been suggested that basketball players obtain money on fals pretenses. How else could you explain getting a scholarship for dribbling in your shorts?

RICHARDS Photographe.rs SENIORS, STILL TIME FOR SAGA PORTRAIT Senior Special prices granted to faculty and un

Campbell, Steve Harshmann, Bill Broeker, Jack Irion, Paul Ferguson, Pete Ugstad (with Coach carl­ son), (Kneeling) Hans Lindstrom, Dave Halstead, BurneD Coleman, and Pete Olbertz.

Lutes Drop Final Contest 34-20 With the final battle over,

rgrads.

the

tie

day, making the score at the end

posting their second 6-3 record in

momentary

run away wi th things early when

things could have been better at

bid to get back into things at the

they scored again

on a 41 yard march with Dave Halstead pushing

beginning

the final yard. The Pioneers came

score.

right back after the kickoff with

well and called on aU or bis backs.

the

of

absorbed

Lutes

at the

Saturday

loss

their third hands

the

as

end

Lewis

Clark

and

Mike

Gano and

things

up

returned Pat early

punt

a

Miguel with

a

a

73

yard

39-yard

as

Mi­

ing the final

By DAVE SODERLUND

at 34-20.

score

Park. the Olympic peninsula. and

has announced the addition of two

219,

Canoeing,

to

diverse

are both

advantage

take

recreational

de­

of the

faCilities

of·

fered in this area and to give stu· dent s in.struction in the pr oper use of these facilities . Canoeing will be offered for the first time spring semester. Meet­ ing at a

to

Spanaway Lake and open maximum

of

15

students,

this course is designed to present the recreational skills of canoeing. Instruction will be given in nomen­ clature, strokes, portaging, and ca­ safety.

noe

of his wild imagination.

It

will be

held

once

a week for one and one half hours. Advanced swimming status is re­ quired for registration.

If anything, a young man's fancy is exactly what we need.

kiCkoff. The PAT

a lonely corner of the end zone.

The School of Physical Education

Live Music Every

Go out Pacific Ave. to ,Roy Y, turn left on Mountain HiWay, 2112 miles.

play after the

was missed and time ran out leav­

P.E. Dept. Schedules New Coors'es

OPEN EVERY DAY

of 25 to 100

broke

guel hit Gassner for 12 yards in

PE

Professional catering to groups

off for good. bow­

Larry Mellum

for their final score on the second

signed

"5 1 DDARTHA"

when

for two touchdowns. The first came

culum. PE 218, Backpacking. and

This Week

ever,

two tackles and rambled 73 yards

new activity courses to jts curri­

.

plays

third quarter as Pat Miguel threw midway through the period

of

A young man can climb into this incredible piece of hard­

his

choked things

first

their

of

Lewis and Clark dominated the

39

Wed., Thurs., Fri & Sat.

mixed

the game again.

openep

march

Hadland

finally giving to Halsread for the

mage. PLU came right back, how­ with

quarter

final ten yards. Lewis and Clark

the Pioneers' first play from scrim­ ever,

fourth

score.

duplicate

a

Lewis and Clark got rolling early. yards

the

of

by driving 68 yards for their third

covering 60 yards in one play to tie

Contemporary Music

It all started with imagination and dreams.

a

made

The Lutes

a row. Although that sounds good,

The Place to go for

beyond.

of the thjrd quarter 28-14.

The Lutes looked as if they would

Dancing

Now in a space suit he explores the outer reaches of the

to

down

fourth

the score.

Lou's Place

And the awe-inspiring prdbes into space are not figments

score went to Skille

the score on

typical composition. Jim Hadland

ware and break the sound barrier.

second

to other forms of recreation after

bomlb to Doug Skille for a TD on

Anything but.

The

again, his third TO reception of the

ly hosts.

This is not just a young man's fancy.

and Dan

Pritchard went the final yard for

Pioneers, who were most unfriend­

734 PACIFIC AYE.

keeper

a

on

4

gained

PLU football team can now turn

the

All orders completed by Christmas. MA 7·9111

llfESE SENIOR LUTES played their last game Saturday: (Back row) Gary Hammer , Ross Boice, Mfb

Backpacking will be offered dur­ the fall semester, beginning with fall 1971. Due to the proxi­ ing

mity of PLU to Rainier Na 'ona!

the North Cascade areas and to

the po pularitY of backpacking and

the heavy use of these areas. it is essential that all people using these facil ities have a basic familiarity with the skill s necessary tor wilder­

ness existence. Topics such as the selection and of equipment, wilderness travel, outdoor living. first aid. and survival techniques wi ll be dealt with in lecture in addition to field buying

experience. Students registerung for this course will !be expected to pro­ vide their own equipment. including hiking boo ts. backpack and frame, and a sleeping bag. For the first time PE 228. Basic Mountaineering, will be offered duro ing the regular school year. This course stresses the basic skills of mountain-climbing

as

opposed

cluded in the course are fi ve group climbs i n addition to lecture pres­ entations.

YARNS .nd NEEDLECRAFT

Without it we'd all still be on the ground.

Lessons

Jivea

between daueI

KNIT and PURL 401 Garfield LE 7

17

JOIN THE AIR FORCE ROTC The Air Force Officer Qualification Test is being offered free and without obligation at

21

November

1970

8:00

ANGRO'S

a.m.,

PIZZA - RAVIOLI SPAGHETII - CHICKEN

in the University of Puget

Sound Fieldhouse Aerospace Studies Classroom

1,

to college students who wish to determine their eligibility for the Air Force ROTC Two-Year Pro­ gram. For further details contact the Professor of Aerospace

Studies,

Tacoma, Washington Ext.

264, 265.

University

98416,

of

to

those of hiking or backpacking. In­

Puget

Pho,, : SK

ONE NITE ONLY

SUN., NOV. 29

-

7 PM

SEATTLE CENTER OPERA HOUSE

Sound,

$6.50 ·55.50

9-3521,

$4.50

Ron-Dee-V0() "VII IlII II_lain Hlllm1 " 1411t & Pacific Avenue

FOR CHOICE SEATS - ORDER TICKETS NOW!

--CLOSED IIOIIDAYS­

I

ANGELO IIAIlIAIiO. "",It.

Lan. Tid..h-; lomonh of flurien; Skor.lin. Mu . i e, Lynnwood; CorOVI.1 Mu,je. Ever.,,: BIf!III. Book & Condie-, Belleyu.; Bon Mo"h • . T <o me Mell.

Fidelity

o

ORDER BY MAIL S.nd Check. to: fiDELITY LANE TICKETS . 1622·.th ...."e .. S.oul., Wo,hlngton

Enclose stamped el addressed envelope.


18, 1970

Wednesday, Nov.

MOORING MAST

Page Eight

Dance Troupe Presents Diversified Concert A two-week Tacoma residency by

sic Festival in August 1969. It will

the American Dance Reptertory of

be

about

urday evening, Nov. 21, with the in

University's

Pacific

Eastvold

of

Seattle­

born Richard Englund, tile compo any has been

conducting

hearsals at area high schools,

A

example of

bravura

witty look

at foibles

today,

traction of the PLU Artist Series.

first performed in Moscow in 1875.

University Center or at the door.

It

is

day, October 28. Dr, Malterud, who is Administrative Direc tor of the

theran Univeristy Propeller Club of

Norwegian Export Council, toured

the United States has successfully

the campus, met with some of the

completed the first of two stages

students and delivered a lecture on

of a three-stage program to revital ·

the economy of Norway.

ertory,

ize the club.

creative

folk,

and

The

first

The

company's

performance

phase

was

toe

joint

sponsorship, with the School of Bus·

at

PLU opens with "Fete Galante,"

iness Administration, of the

first performed at the Newport Mu·

of Dr, Otto Chr. Malterud, on Tues-

visit

The second pha se was an explor­ atory meeting to determine if there is,

in

fact,

enougo

interest

on

campus to' sustain an organization that

is

focused

on

maritime

af­

fairs and international trade.

Annual Benefit Concert Set Band

Though attendance at that meet­

Highlighting tne conrert

a trumpet solo by John Byre per·

will pres-cnt its annual family mu· sic

program

sponsored

by

forming " Q uixote, " by Klein·Koff.

the

Unique in its performance is a

Parkland Orthopedic Guild on Sun., 22, at 3:00 p.m.

Nov.

Selections include not only con· ventional march styles as in

"

will be

$2.00 per family.

Julie , Do Ya Lave Me?"

benefit the Mary Bridge Onildren's

and Hagen-Daum's "Mod Squad."

Hospital.

(Continued from Page 6)

government hopes to prove a point

ing the February disturbance, but

in an area wito only a minimal

since he had attended two Seattle

radical

meetings in January he finds him­

pose

Lee

element

which

might

op­

literature

distributed

ary there were riots in many large

scapegoats

upon

social

economic problems

in

trial.

Hoffman's

Judge

the

Why,

Chicago

then,

choose

in

Holly

:e · attle?

de­

conspiracy

suggested

and

conspiracy tions,

Such

Rap

Brown

against

Minorities (Cont.) that

the

recognize

State

toese

rassment,

so

an uutrageous har·

far

as

the

speaker

was concerned.

Nur do the officers always cun­ duct their raids according to stand· ards

of reas,)O or decency. The

speaker

told

man woo

was

of

one

Indian

wo­

often busted and on

one occasion actually clubbed

(in

suffered

whom

to

was

no

from 3:00 to 5:00. Dinner will include turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes, giblet gravy and cranberry sauce,

Engagement Photos

be of interest to the members and

WEDDINGS PORTRAITS

the seamen. The basic objectives of the Pro­ portunity for its members to learn about international trade. Anyane interested in the activi·

Hurry - Call Now

BEL

In Parkland

ties of the Propeller Club can ob­ tain

more

information

from

the

STUDIO

14106 PACIFIC AVE.

School of Business Administration.

of

is

a

Charge

not against ac­

charges law"

anybody.

as can

the be

"H. used

Therefore

he

IS THE MOST MOVING, THE MOST INTELLIGENT, THE MOST HUMANE - OH, TO HELL WITH IT! -IT'S THE BEST AMERICAN FILM I'VE SEEN THIS YEAR!"

from dizziness from

indoor to

Torrens. A brunch will be held from 9: 30 to 11: 30 and dinner will be

as

plumbing

in

SAVE UP TO $3.00

her

she went out to the river

one night

Universi ty Center to

discuss whatever subjects seem to

THANKSGIVING MENU TIMES The Thanksgiving food service schedule has been announced by Mr.

blame

time to time after that. Since there house,

November 24 in Eastvold Auditorium at 8:00 p,m. She will be accom­

-VINCENT CANBY, N. Y. TIMES

the head and given a concussion. Shl

MRS. HOPP TO PRESENT RECITAl Mrs. Irene Hopp, Asst. Prof. of Voice, will present a faculty recital

'"I:'\TCII-22'

re­

rights,

acquitted, arrested and acquitted, IS

until 11:00 p.m. on week-days and until 12:30 on weekends.

'filE TACOMA MALL TIIEA'FRE

fishing

They are recurrenly arrested and This process

mation call Patty Hassel at 803 or Jim Dunn at 1493. Cave hours are

rights by the United States govern·

to

been created. This will Ibe a paid position and the G, M. will be respon­ sible to the Cave Committee, If you are inerested or want more infor­

en,

ment, many Indians feel extreme frustrated

CAVE MANAGER NEEDED With the opening of the Cave the position of General Manager has

argued that the law must be beat·

(Continued from Page 6)

Iy

being used

coarge

against tnoughts,

that

isolated city and the

permanent

are

8

tois choice came because Seattle

fuses

sored by Delta Iota Chi, is open to the public as well as the students.

Holley also pointed out that the

prosecute

to

Seattle

is a highly

Guaranteed

in X-20l. His subject will be Population and Ecology. This event, spon­

the Puget Sound area.

did the federal

government

the

of Education,

Friday that

the

after

in

pus to interview teacher candidates in grades K-B on Decembe r 2 from 9:00 a,m. to 12:00 noon. Schedule interviews in the office of the School

the proceedings.

lawyers, noted that during Febru· cities

On Novem ber 24, officers from a

ing

TEACHER INTERVIEWS Mr. Leroy R. Bogan of the Bureau of Indian Affairs will be on cam­

The theory was also advanced in

Hulley, one of the defense

cision

vile third

peller Club are to provide an op­

Seattle Defendants (Continued) self going on trial.

to proceed with

was

will be invited to a dinner meet­

Proceeds from the concert will

"

.

interest

Robbins' percussion lab class.

also, recent popular moods as in Bahler's

shown phase

enough

ship calling at the Port of Tacoma

and students, $1.00 for adults and

abeUa" by Kenneth Williams, but

that

piece for percussiO'n by Professor Tickets are 35 cents for children

Vil­

cided

\ ·TOTHE PO'NT

panied Iby Calvin Knapp and Jerry Kracht.

ing was rather sparse, it was de· PLU's University Concert

waso her hair.

She

fainted and fell in and drowned. The death was officially reported

Top Artists! Major Lahels!

as a suicide,

Many. Many Morel Classics IncludedI

World Campus Afloat

Come Early for Best Selection.

A FULL SEMESTER CREDIT FOR A 4 MONTH WORLD CRUISE W, C. A. rep, on c.ampus November

23 - 24

p u BOOKSTORE

Info Table in U. C. Lobby November

23

-

Movie in U, C.

204

For further info call Teri 1345

Get Your Favorites at Bic Discounts! -

=

DR. KNUDSEN TO SPEAK

made up of 12 accomplished dan­ ballet,

--.-

Dr. Jens Knudsen wil l speak tomorrow night, the 19th, at 7:00 p.m.

cers who perform a diversified rep­ modern.

) MOORING MAS!

in Bellingham, Wash.

The performance is an added at· Tickets may be purchased at the

follows.

ballet,

The Student Port of Pacific Lu·

High School c1assroom·audtiorium. company

precedes "Hang It All," a brand­ new

By W. R. HUTCHEON

toe dedication of the new Wilson professional

tale

was

Nov, 17 performance will highlight

The

most popular of romantic ballets,

Club to Study Maritime Trade

reo

the

who

toe oldest and

flew

mythical

man

one of

premiered

a celebrated

Auditorium

direction

the

in­

"Pas de Trois," from Swan Lake, classical

the

of

foolish

an

into the sun.

Lutheran

at 8: 15 p,m, Under

the

"Icarus,"

by

terpretation

New York will wind up next Sat·

performanre

followed

"Napoli,"

LE 7-6217


oorln

Turkey Power

Voice of the Student Body

Stuff The Establishment

at Pacific Lutheran University

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY -

VOLUME XLVIII

NUMBER ELEVEN

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1970

Alleged Conspirators Set Defense Strategy On April

1970,

15,

were indicted by

a

eight people federal grand

jury and charged with conspiring,

in violation of

1361.

the

against

fenses

Section

18 371

of­

commit

to

together

agreeing

and

confederating

combining,

United

States

371,

2101 &

USC

of the Criminal

Code imposes a penalty of $10,000 and five years in prison for

COIlr

spiring to violate the laws of U.S.

2101,

Section

the

Riot

Interstate

Act.

then he went on to give a general idea of the defense tactics.

Th y wiJl attempt to commoni­ cate with the jury and make them believe that the indictment is "bull­ also stress that

will

They

shit."

this is a political tmal, that the seven people

trial have deep

on

openly

and

concern

political

a demonstration

ganize

or­

and that

the jury do esn't have to agree with their political views to find them innocent. Tigar also discussed the paradox informer,

government

the

of

a

This section, used in the Chicago

person paid by the government to

conspiracy trial, imposes a similiar

lie and gain acceptance into the

penalty for travelling in, or using

Movement and then offered b y the

the

com­

interstate

of

facilities

merce with the intent of inciting, organizing, encouraging, or parti­ cipating in a riot. A riot is any violent act by any one person when three or more persons are assem­ 'bled together. Section a

$10,000

fine

1361

and/or

imposes

a ten year

priSOn term for damaging federal

$100,

property in excess of defendant

$30,000

thus

fine

faces

Each

a potential

and twenty years

in

prison. At

a

defense

press

conference

last Saturday, Mike Tigar, one of the defense attorneys, pointed out th t none of the eight defendants are actually charged with acts of vioLence or destruction. Roger Lippman, one of the de­ fendants,

claimed

that they were

mdicted because "the government lost

poorly

at Chicago,"

government He

a credible witness.

as

that, in lieu of

stated

the

Chicago trial, the lawyers will also

THE RECENT DRUG SYMPOSIUM sparked

By BARB MORRIS

have already presented themselves government's

the

investiga­

tory resource s are being employed in connection with the activities of the defense attorneys.

Dr.

Joel

Fort's

lecture

Thurs­

came quite clear that a drug such

drugs," Dr.

day drug symposium proved him

as marijuana was not a narcotic

on the roster alcohol and nicotine, and summarized that such phrases

and not addictive, in characteris­ tic American fashion we invented

as

Dowd,

edies for many of the emotionaUy­

people from the realization that be­

Roger Lippman, Joe Kelley, Mike

a new language to deal with that:

tinged problems inherent in drug

Lerner, and Susie Stem (Mike Jus­

we

USi!

lesen

underground)-went

still

is

Jeff

Abeles,

Mike

shall,

to trial last Monday. Watch for a

and abuse.

Carefully fostered language has helped

to

cloud

the

drug

issue,

report of this week's events in next

says Dr.

week's Mooring Mast.

image has been passed on to users

"The 'dope fiend'

Fort.

the

prosecutio n

and

2) the defense was dependent on what the prosecution will do. But

pe ople the dif·

distinguished

Fort

Dr,

ferences in

abuse, addict i on

use,

and habituation of different drugs. "Some people do not understand ,"

Lucia Bride Opens Yule Season

drug-either boo ze, pot, speed, or

the

for

you

next

minutes

45

he

Marking

a long-time Scandinav­

lighted

Performance

candles.

by

at

ceremonies

in

Eastvold

torium December 4 to signal the beginning

of

Sponsored

Eastvold, and a true-ta-life Scandi­

the Christmas season.

navian reception in Chris Knutzen

by Spurs, sophomore

Fellowship Hall. Tickets for the event are on sale

service honorary, the program will be

highlighted

by

coronation

of

the lucia Bride with a crown of

to

students and

community for

members

$1.00

mation desk in the University C

"Drug abuse, when properly used

fore a day heralding longer hours of light.

impairs your health

Traditionally,

daughters

the

of

Scandinavian households enact the Lucia

or

their

for

families.

of beauty and charity to

honored,

cale­

annual

and in

hrations in Stockholm, the royally feted "Queen of Ught" is an in· spired title hy out

reigns the

as

year

the

thousands of girls.

Bride

The Lucia

th.rough­

symbol

of

and visits hospitals, homes

light,

for aged, and those without fam­ ilies. Bride

Lucia

PLU's

contestants

are Luari Sinclair, Rainier; Kelly Wilson,

Alpha

Susie

Phi Omega;

Christensen, PUueger; Pat Carden, Off-Campus;

Cathy

Cas­

Wiitala,

Ever­

Holsinger,

Nancy

cade;

green; Judy Satrum, Norsk Klubb; Kimber y

Nordic;

Green,

Debby

CorniJs, Hong; Karen Larsen, Ivy; Joan RiChter, Alpine; Dena Slavik, Kriedler: Kathy Fynboe, Olympic; ancy Barkley, J.K.'s; Linda Rice, Stuen;

Rae Edwards,

Mary Overvold,

from the left - Karen Larsen, Debbie Cornils, Nancy Ho lzinger, Kimberly Green. Seated around

-

Kat

Fynboe, Rae Edwards, loan Richter, Susie ChrIS-

Wiitala,

Pat

Carden,

Unda

Rice,

Kelly Wilson, Mary Overvold. Center - Dena Slovl k, Nancy Barkley and Judy Satrum.

sub-category is drug abuse." as a term, should mean excessive

b

Cathy

regular, only some regular use is dafly, only some of that involves

shortest day of the year and there­

Each village chooses a wholesome

tensen,

that only some use of Lbe dnIg is

Day is celebrated December 13, the

maiden

1970, Standing

occasionally,

or

once

anything,

use any

you can

"that

said,

excessive quantities, and the final

In Nordic countries, Lucia's Feast

of the

at the Infor-

ter.

role

LUCIA BRIDE CANDIDATES for

80 million

and

on

of the Christmas tree in front of

to

con­

he

narcotics,"

soft

75

tween

divert

tend to

each use alcohol or tobacco.

'soft' narcotics,

"n makes no more sense to talk about

"Speed Kills,"

cluded, "than if I were to lecture

Audi­

strategy

certain

about

talking

began

drugs as

dances will be followed by lighting

1) he

foremost

Fort listed

to see, but also down·ta-earth rem­

Spurs of Scandinavian songs and

didn't want to gi ve away defense

"mind-altering

of

speaking

indeed to have not only the vision,

Lucia Bride will be named

spond, giving two reasons:

In

"When it be­

he stated.

The seven defendants--Chip Mar­

sity'

Mike Tigar hesitated to re­

soft pergnancy. A drug

a narcotic or not a narcotic."

cotiCS,"

ian tradition at PLU, the univer­

tics,

is either

of a variety of other drugs, simp­ ly by labeling them falsely as nar­

day night in Eastvold Auditorium

ber two Chicago trial. When questioned on defense taco

ciety

as to the wind-up of PLU's twa­

and he asserted that this was the num­ so

groups.

dlscusalon

informative

Dr. Fort Brands U.S. Drug- idden

be on trial in a sense. Indications that

many

and

Ordal;

Harstad.

day.

and

the

final

taken Wednesday.

vote

"while

drug

physical

n

Mon­

will

be

or social or he

adjustment,"

vocational

dependency ,

said,

meaning

addiction,

a

is

sub­

category of drug abuse." Using the analogy of the cOCk­ tail party, Dr. Fort noted that the basic ingredient in drug experience is

underlying

the

character

and

personality of the user. "People often ask the question, 'Why do young people That

use

drugs?'

read,"

question should

Dr.

Fort rephrased, "'Why do people. young and old, use drugs-meaning alcohol, tobacco, pills, marijuana, LSD, narcotics, etc?' " The answer to that question, ac· cording

to

Dr,

Fort,

that

is

live in a drug-ridden,

we

drug satu­

rated society, where from infancy onward we

are taught to accept

and live the industrial slogan, "Bet­ ler Living Through Chemistry," He

ited peer pressure, psycho­

logical

reasons,

pleasure­

and

seeking as other possible causative factors. While

drug

questionably

Three candidates will be selected at the Primary elections

use of any drug that measurably

use hav

hard effect.s, Dr.

and

abuse

many

un­

personal

Fort emphasized

that the dest ructi ve effects of

so­

cial policies, laws and enfor ement (Conrinued

on

Page 3)


Page Two

Wednesday, Nov. 25, 1970

MOORING MAST

ParaDlD

The Estimate of a Tactic

Youth and Positive Action

As was anticipated, the reactions to many of the issues presented in last week's M.st have been both vocal and pointed. In some cases the criticism was thoughtful and well reasoned, in others it was neither meant nor fit to print. In con­ trast to this, numerous elements of t e University community

ficant

By GLEN ANDERSON

How often we young people hear this!

We are

have gone out of their way to commend the staff and myself

accused of being negative and having nothing posi­

in regard to what they considered an excellent issue..

tive or constructive to offer. These criticisms are

The reasons for su · ch a disparity are obvious only to a certain degree. Though clearly our taking a particular stand contributed to this reaction, the schism runs deepers than that. The response to my editorial points up most effectively the .

nature of this difficulty.

The variety and tenor of the comments which I have re­ ceived came quite honestly as a surprise. The implications in­ variably chastise me for being so rough on the University or the student body. Don't I appreciate all the good things we have here? Why must I point out "that" uncomfortable corner? From such a response you would think that I must hate the place so much that I can hardly wait to leave it. If that were the case-if I did believe such dreadful things about this University-then I would probably not be here. But both myself and the members of the Mooring Mast staff are not someplace else. We are here, and what you apparently do not realize is that we do like it here. The point is that we love this place too much to let it cheat itself out of its potential. We do not engage in fervent editorial campaigns in de­ fense of all that is good here. For they have the weight of tradition behind them and do not need our endorsement to The article concerning the confrontation over the leaflet policy is a case in point. Surely the contention is not that our individual liberties under the Constitution are absolute in any sense of the word. No one, as Justice Haimes pointed out, should be able to exercise freedom of speech by shouting "fire I" in a crowded theatre. That certain limitations exist is obvious and shouldn't have to be reiterated. What is significant is that it is not at all clear where either the University or the students stand in relation to the issue of freedom of speech or assembly upon this campus. As such, we believe the question needs to be raised and done so forcefully. The answers to the questions raised concerning my edi­ torial and its admittedly heavy-handed tone follow the same reasoning and I believe are even more important. For it poses the question of both the purpose and results of maintaining a certain academic distance from the issue involved. There are times, and I would suggest to you that last week was one of them, when the calculated, logical, low-key approach to an issue carries neither the effectiveness nor the sense of urgency and significance which a claim may involve. The subject of my editorial, the question of priorities, is

It is a shock tactic and we know it, but it is frequently an effective way to ga in the genuine attention which is often lacking when approaching an issu · e. To assume that we do it for the effect alone is to seriously underestimate both our in­ tentions and our concern for the school.

The second reason, as was touched upon above, regards the emotional as well as the rational nature of our concern. There are times when we care too much about an issue to pre­ tend that it is simply one more problem to be considered . We care a great deal about this University and our anger at times is an indication of the deep-seated feelings we have for the issues which confront it. If I did not feel compelled to harangue this place on occasion when I thought she needed it then I would know I have stopped caring about her as well. -John Aakre

MOORING

plan

The Voice of the Students at PacUic Lutheran JOHN AAKRE

Editor Managing Editor

.. . . ..... ...................................... ..................................

BOB HAS SELB LAD

KATE MANC KE

.

.

. . . . . .... _.... ........................... ........

.... . ................ .. ...........

News Editor

PAULA SEIBERT ....... .... ............ .... .. . .... .... . .................. Copy Editor

DA VE SODERLUND TERRY ROQINSON PAUL BERG

.

...... .. .. . ..... . .

... . _... . .

.

.

....................... ........... .

. . .. . . . ...... .. ..

.

.

Sports Editor

Circulation Manager

. . . . . . . . . . ............... .... ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Business 'Manager

DR. JOHN PETERSON .. ...................... . ....... . . .

....

... ..

.

Advisor

Opinions expressed in the Mooring Mast are not necessarily

those of Pacific Lutheran University, its administration, faculty, the Moormg Mast staff . The MM reserves the right to edit

all copy for length, propriety and libel.

program

we

support

it

enthUSiastically.

his continujng fight against pollution.) We are urged to follow our national Administra­ tion, for example, but we can't follow it because we aren ' t led. Having failed to rationally convioce the nation of the wisdom of Nixon's policies in Southeast

be offered. Indeed, in a society with

so

much insti­

tutionalized inertia for maintaining the status quo,

achi ev ing awareness and the openness to change are significant

accomplishments.

We

have

had

some

Asia, the preSident's supporters tell us to support

succ ess in this area.

them anyway just because he's tbe president,

But we have gone beyond this step. People who tbi nk we are against everything don't seem to

kind

that every prot st against war Is a plea for peace, every demonstration against racism is a hope for racial equality , every word or act against injustice or repre ss ion is a commitment to justice and freedom. These are certainly positive goals. Our

We can see that the current Administation and its predecessor have lacked dynamic, creative lead­

ership, and so initiativ e and leadership are falling to the citizens by default. We are called rebels with­ aut a program, but we are rebels preelsoely because there is no progTam.

what's wrong

Nevertheless,

AdJai Stevenson proclaimed

tivism is a slap In the face to youg people who were

acting positively within the "system."

and many white

The American people should not be

of

I can't

and

determination

Against formidable opposition the previous two

Many people grumble at us that, altl1ougl1 we

fully-for the rights of working men, and today we enjoy the benefits from those actions. In the best

a number of specific suggestions

tradition of American democracy our generation is

and proposals bave lbeen put fo rth . so that these

now fighting for the rigl'rts of all oppressed pe<>ple

positive goals may be achi ved. But it really isn't

to help build and share in the blessings which this

U

world can yet bestow, and we are trying to create

the answers, although we do make use of petitions,

a peaceful world and a healthy environment for all

forth. ( Initiative No. 256, for

of us to live in.

was largely a student-conducted effort.)

example,

comp tence

generations protested long and hard -and-success­

may have good general ideas, we have no concrete

so

the

be easily satisfied.

nik"l

the initiative, and

but much more importantly, they should not

stim ate

of th e majority of ycuthful dissenters: we will not

wrong with

up with

u.s

unde

being a "peace!Jik"? It's better than being a "war­

the job of the ordin ary citizenry to co

distracted

by the irrational activities of a very small minority

belp wondering whether these middle-aged objectors

plans. Actually,

patriotic effort,

don ' t want young people to work within the system

people object to seeing black pe<>ple on television

are not being the negative ones: what'

state

after all, and voted down the measure. Such nega

For some people, the mere mention of the word

but not simply as pe<>pl ?)

this

of

but tbe adult voters apparently decided that they

Is the idealistic youths who are posltlve, and it Is the poob-poohe rs who are the negati ve ones .

(Maybe Negroes are 0.1t. as singers

people

ing the dglrt of 19 and 20-year-olds to vote. That

It

commercials.

young

certainly sounded like a positive,

is possible?

and athletes,

the

pat iently tried to "work within the system" by seek­

to achieve peace and justice unless we believe it

dirty word,

am called

and Agnew being positive when they alienate group

practice of tomorrow." How else shall we be able

a

Must I be

after group with their divisive rhetoric ?

Why are we denounced as being negative at the

peace has become

should follow?

respond positively when I

a "campus bum" or an "effete snob"? Are NIxon

same time as we are dismissed as Ibeing ideaJistic? The two are incompatible. Anyway.

of leadersrup we

exp ect ed to

hope for a better and more peaceful world is far more positive than. many adults' resignation to the inevitability of war or poverty.

with being idealistic?

re­

gardl ess of the policies' lack of merit . rs this the

realize

What could be more positive than that?

We are doing our democratic part by raising signi­

Letters to Our Editor To th

tor . Just out of curiosi ty I wonder

Editor,

It is Significant that so many who write for the MoodDg Mast f1l!el it

how much better informed than I

were those who objected to the in­

incumbent upon them to personally

cident.

American . For those of us who are

are valuable.

defend the constitutional rights of individuali sts by temperament this would be most reassuring ­ - if only

and insight are generally about as rare as they Wisdom

There is no doubt that American society is frequently qui. te undemo­

the clarity and objectivity of whal

cratic and that the oppression of

is printed were more commensur­

individuals is a continuing threat.

ate with the passio n evident in it.

No less than three articles in the

For such reasons the constitutional guarantee of basic righls should be

November 18th issue of the paper

vigorously defended , but those who

f the group

see every restriction an free speech

made the

"

bu sting "

which performed.

spoke

and

dis·

tributed leaflets on campus on Fri· day, th 13th, a constitutional is­ sue. In a spirit of moral indigna­ tion one insisted thal our constitu ­ tiona rights to freedom of speech

and assembly

,

One has the the right t

assembl

lime in my Living room perhaps?

in the midst of a legislative assembly? Come nowl or a courtroom?

0r

an

infringement

from

any piece of

any group to say anthing and at any

as

rights show little under· standing of the structures and insti­ tution wh.ich exists to make meanon such

and asseQ.1blY "canJl()t be restrict­

real estate in the country."

University

or

to be aware that it exists. Only then can solutions

ed or withheld from

MAST

our elected legislators to

a start. The first step in solving any problem is

come from the Mast but from other elements within the Uni­

priorities.

of

Witness Senator Gaylord Lelson' s Earth Day and

nize that certain things need to be changed, tl1at's

versity as well. The problem is that what is meant never seems to hit home. Often the only way in which to effect that is by

and

sensitivity,

has been sadly lacking in federal, state, and local

several problem areas. If America can then recog­

an old one on this campus and the arguments have not only

hitting rather hard some of the more "sacred" aspects of those

for rooral

gove rnment . (When a Senator does develop a good

t ha t "The idealism of today is the hope for the

survive.

ar

It is really the job

protest has at least Identified

our

striving

"have a plan." Current cr i ses require imaginative solutions, but with a few exceptions, imagination

invalid for a number of reasons. First of all,

issues,

urging public support f o r reform.

"But what do you suggest that' s positive?"

freedom

An

possible.

responsible precipitate

ir­

defense of

liberal principles is the surest un­ doing

liberal

of

-Dr.

principles. George

Arbaugh,

Philosophy To the Editor,

I would like to take this oppor­

tunity to publicly thank the three co-chairmen

this

of

Sy mposium

for

their

fall's

Drug

efforts

in

making this a truly important and

s ign ificant event

of our campus.

Dave Hoch , Gary Horpedahl, and Harold

Jensen

have spent

m any

hours of hard work putting togeth­ er a fine program.

(Continued

Page

on

)

ASPLU

Symposium Chairmen for Spring Two symposiums are scheduled Drug. Symposium is

ingfuI

and Ibudgeted for

now completed and preparations

this

event this spring are beginning. Anyone interested in being man for the Spring Symposium is urged to submit

an

year. The

for a a

similiar co-chair­

application to the

We deserve better treatment than

Elections and PeTSonnel Board. This challe nging and important oppor­

pus" whi h ought to be cal led an

through the campus mall.

this even on "a ademy! ' Where

our "sheltered

justice

cam­

or wisdom lay in

the particular incident reported on

I cannot say. There may--of may

not-be good reason for objecting

to the action of the security guard· and thf' answer of thf' administra-

tunity can be equally rewarding. Applications can be mailed to ASP LU

Campus Chest Drive A nother opportunity to

serve the campus and

the community is

yours if you would like to help coordinate the Campus Chest Drive this spring

at PLU. The

Elections and Personnel Board

is look ing for

interested students who would like to be co-chairmen for this annual

event. Please submit your applications to them tlirough ASPLU.


ee h :.:: r ; e...:T.:.: g:.::. M ,; S.:,.T _P a:.; ...;.;. A:;;; ;.,;.;, :.M:.. IN,;.:G ;.O R... O..; 0___ 5 ,_'_9_7_ . _2...; .. _o_v_ y , _N W_e_d_ne_s_da_ ;. Deferahly 'Speaking _

Arthur Doppe

The Case for An All-Volunteer Army

Our Man.Hoppe

By THOMAS

Mr. Agnew wants to know my political affiliations. He keeps saying we l"iews commentators should reveal our political biases and prejudices just the way he does. Actually, people have been coming up to me for years demanding to know, "are you a conservative, a moderate or a liberal?" have

I

always

given

this

straightforward

question

the

straight­

forward answer it deserves. "Yes!", I have answered straightforwardly. But this is no longer good enough. If my Vice President wants to know my political affiliations, it's by duty as a good American to give them to him.

*

The American Monarchist & Bring Whist Party, of which I am a charter member, royally support J. A. Filbert as the only suitable Pre­ tender to the American throne. Filbert, an unemployed Oklahoma oil baron, has all the qualities of an ideal monarch: He is rich, idle, dissolute, under-educated, over­ sexed and a great rum pot. His beautiful wife, Queenie, is known from Tulsa as a discriminating collector of antique scrimshaw and door-to­ door salesmen. of

King

Filbert

and Queen

Queenie

would fulfill

a growing unmet need of the American peopl'e-the need to gossip about their leaders. Now Mr. Nixon is certainly an adequate President as Presidents

go. But his private life is an open book! Indeed, th'i!re have been several

stories lately speculating on his marital relationship with Mrs. Nixon­ which shows just how frustrated the news media and the public have become. But-ah! -a lascivious, decadent, morally rotten King and

Queen!

Think of your delight in opening your paper in the morning to find such headlines as, "King

"Where Was Queenie When the

Tumbles

for

Girl

Acrobat."

The

Lights Went Out?"

British

have

been

or

relishing

such stories for years, The Royal Family would divide its time between the White Palace on

established

civilian

con­

the draft will adversely affect our

trol over the military through the Glorious

Revolution

of

1688. The

primary argument s are: 1) An army of volunteers will threa n clvlltan control. 2) Isolation from

limitations

the rest of society will erode civ-

President the Commander-in-Chief

ilian respect and therefore dilute

the

quality of the armed

forces.

J) With higher pay the all-volun-

norities thus creating a poor man's

*

English

SOCiety or our Armed Forces. Their

black people and low income mi-

"Power," I cry, "to the Purple."

The coronation

democratic political processes. -rile

teer force will draw predominately

I am, Mr. Agnew, a Monarchist. *

R. HEAVEY

Critics argue that elimination of

army fighting

for

the

rich man.

4) An all-volunteer force will cause a decline in

patriotism or a de-

cline in interest of the foreign poli­

5)

cy .

An all-volunteer force will

encourage military adventurism. There are several reasons why the

dire

consequences

need for a military but put strict on it by making the and by giving Congress the power

to raise and support armies.

In short, a watchful population

will continue to be the strongest force limiting the influence of the military in American society. Third,

there is

much

evidence

that our society has more to gain than to fear from an all-volunteer force.

Before

1948

military

con­

scription was abandoned after each major war and voluntary recruit-

an all-volunteer force will not pro­ duce

founders of America recognized the

that'

some would predict.

ment

was

reinstated. During

the

long periods of voluntary recruit­

ment there was never any threat to civilian control by the military.

First of aU, the creation of an

Furthermore, the rush of volun.

aU-volunteer force will not affect

teers

the institutional framework within

war demonstrates that a voluntary

which the Department of Defense

at

the

outbreak

of

every

military did not produce a decline

and the military now work. Man-

in

power recruitment is only a very

evidence that a voluntary military

small part of that framework. The change

from

a

mixed

volunteer

keep

intact

the

patriotism.

has

spurred

Nor

is

there

any

any military adven­

turism. Our experience shows us

conscript force to an all-volunteer

that

force

mote civilian control, and improve

will

legal

structures that define the role and

a

the

volunteer

force

will

pro­

quality of the armed forces.

status of the military services.

It will promote continued patrio-

Secondly, Americans firmly ­

tism and help avoid military ad­

Pennsylvania Avenue, the Winter Palace in Florida and the Summer

lieve in a clearly defined and lim·

Palace Guards, a Royal Jet and Royal Yachts at their disposal, and all

derived from the Anglo-American

framework, firm public attitudes,

heritage of individual freedom and

and the similarity of future forces

Palace in California. They would, of course, have fancy-dressed White the other panoplies of power. No court is complete without intrigue. And what a boon to us com­

ited military

role.

mentators!

the Heir Apparent? Who is the real power behind the

By

throne, Duke Mitchell or Cardinal Kissinger? Will the Barons of Capi­ tol Hill succeed in their rebellion against the King? True, the subjects are pretty much the same as we write about now. But our stuff would have a heU of a lot more class, Thing of how all this would perk up the interest of Americans in their government-an interest that has been sadly flagging thanks to the im· peccable dullness of the administration's morality. It's little wonder that several people have already flocked to our Monarchist banner in droves, True, some prospects have been skepti­

ca\.

"How can a drunken King," they ask, "end the war in Vietnam,

lick poverty, clean up pollution and cure this inflation-recession we're in?"

But we just raise our brows, look them in the eye and reply: "So?" (Copyright Chronicle Publishing Co.

tending

class

1970)

as

opposed

that day,

to

the

at­

deci­

sion is not hard to make. Such was the case last Thursday as the The­ atre History class attended the Se attic Repertory Theatre production of Georges Feydeau's "A Flea in Her Ear." That the show was un­

the speech defect (you'd have be­

the Hotel

the

crf her hus­

a pair

suspenders

with

through

return

the

address

of

Pussycat. This, coupled

with the observation that her hus­ band' up

perfurmance par

to

her to the

lately,

hasn't

been

naturally

leads

conclusion that he

is

playing around, and with the help uf her best friend, she sets out to pruve his infidelity. The show is billed as "a farce" and it is definitely that. It would

be impossible to describe all the twists and turns of the "plot" but from

th.e

moment

the

husband's

nephew. Camille, walks on, kisses the

maid who

is married

to the

butler, and utt rs something com­ pletely

ed to hit on the topic of desegre­ gation. wonder

"I

when

the

South

is

finally gOing to desegregate," said the Liberal. "Oh,

probably when the

does," replied Eric. The

Liberal

mark and

ignored

continued,

North

Eric's

re­

"It's really

a shame that racists

like Strom

Thurmond prevent desegregation."

that

Associate Justice

Hugo Black of the Spreme Court

once accepted a life membership

in the Ku Klux Klan?" The Uberal gave Eric a rather severe look and Eric, ever mind­ ful that peace is nebulous, edged a few feet away.

been

"The Negroes have

oppres­

sed for centuries and it's time we did

something

about it," shouted

the Liberal. "But is

rt any better to force

integration than it is to force seg­ r gation?"

asked

Eric.

"For

in­

stance, what's the difference be­

unintelligible,

you

knOW

for

Scene

the

Negro and telling that

lect,

with

although

his

perfect

hardly

a

timing

minute

went by without a belly laugh no matter who was on stage, Clayton Corzatte

showed

exceptional cen­

fied parts, often having to change

New

interim,

celled. In its

it

York has

place,

Cultural

been

can­

a Workshop

of seconds. For the longest time, I had the idea that Seattle Rep was a stuffy, old theatre that could only be en­ joyed by stuffy, old people. If any­ thing

will dispel

sort,

"A Flea in Her Ear"

Even the stuffy,

an idea of this will.

old people were

rolling in the aisles

(figuratively

speaking, of course!). "A Flea in Her Ear" continues through

November

29

so

you've

only a few chances left. Moilere's "The

Miser"

opens

December

9

and runs through Dec. 27. Students can

get

tickets

for '

$2.00

an

a

"stand-by" basis at the box office at curtain time and regular prices are $3.60-$4.85-$5.60. Because too few students signed

fered and taught by Mr. Bill Park­ The course registration num­

ber is CA-JI4, and is described as follows: Individaul research and analysis of all genre of literature direct­ ed toward the compilation of an Interpreter's Theatre script. Em­ phasis

will

be

upon

develop­

ment of analytical and perform·

ance skills. The course will cul­

minate in a p ublic performance.

The course will meet the Core Curriculum Fine Arts requirement. Interpreter's lacking

Theatre

from .PLU's

has

speech

been and

drama offerings, but hopefully this class and future spring events in the field will change this. If you are interested in the course, con­ tact Mr. Parker at ext. 422 or the Communication 305,

Arts

office,

ext.

as soon as possible, because

the enrollment is limited to 20 stu­ d·ents. It should be a fun course whether

it is in or

out of your

major.

white

benefactor

boy like the plantation owner did

in the Old South? Aren't we still

refusing to recognize the Negro as a man?" The Liberal

gave

elude and then to beat a hasty re­ treat.-"It's sort of like "Catch-22."

If the Black people want to remain Black and retain their own culture while living in a White world and

White people want the Blacks to accept integration

0/\

their terms

which implies that the Blacks be­ come Whites, the

terrible

Negro is in a

predicament

if

it' s

still

true that Black is ·Black."

With that remark Eric made his

exit,

leaving

the Liberal to

pon­

der the meaning of the Puzzle of the Week. Your Eyes." Lakewood Players-"Thurber Car­

nivaJ." PLU-"Christmas Carol" Movies of Note­ "Catch 22" at the Tacoma Mall Theare.

"Funny Girl" at the Proctor The­ atre, Tacoma.

Little Theatre-"Suds

Eric another

funny look. so Eric decided to con­

"Scrooge" at the Blue Mouse in

Upcoming Plays-

Tacoma

great

Negro slave

a

will take care of him if he's a good

er.

evening

his

in

Seattle.

prevent 'separation

be­

if the United States adopts an all­ volunteer force. Some critics feel that the high turnover of manpower generated by the Selective Service System is a healthy phenomenon. Even with an

all-volunteer force

65%

the turnover will be about

the

first

term

volunteers

of

which

would be three-fourth s of the turn­

over that we now have.

The charge that force

will

be­

come mercenary is the easiest of all

to

answer.

The

implies

cenary"

term

one

tive-money-which

"mer­

single

mo­

automatically

excludes patriotism and all other motives.

This

charge

cannot

be

taken seriously. Why would an all­ volunteer army be considered mer· cenary when our local police, FBI agents and Federal Marshals,

all

entirely voluntary, are not? To

suggest

that

men

enlist

to

serve their country do so only for pay is to

doing a

great

disservice

the hundreds of thousands

young

men

who

are

of

voluntarily

serving today. When today's first term

pay

levels

are

taken

into

consideration, these men must be motivated by other considerations,

including a high sense of dedication to their country. Contrary to what the

opponents

of

the

voluntary

force would have you lbelieve, pa­

triotism Is now weakened by the fact

tbat

society

initially under­

pays men who volunteer and gen· erally

treats

military service as

take only if compelled to do so.

ards for a Negro because he's a

and mastery over his unusual dia­

from one to the other in a matter

mail

to

in Interpreter's Theatre will be of­

The play is concerned with a wife

cake,"

receives

talking

lieved it?) was the highlight of the

tral of himself in two quite diversi·

who

was

one of his more peaceful, peaceful

up

Marc Singer, as the nephew with

believably funny was "icing O n the

band's

Eric

"By the wa.y," said Eric, "did

you're in for something different.

By SCO'IT GREEN a play

day,

On The Marquee

Whenever you have a chance to to

One

help

an activity which men will under­

tween lowering educational stand­

Review

go

you know

PRISCILLA MARTENS

Liberal friends, and they happen­

*

*

*

The long estblished institutional

Thinking Right

We can write reams on such questions as: Can his enemies depose

Prince Spiro,

This !belief 1S

venturism.

will

tween the armed forces and society

This is the second in a series of articles, the basis of which is

the Report of tbe President's Com­ mission on an All-Volunteer Armed

Force.

I

welcome

any

questions

or inquiries about this or any other area of the draft. Please address

your comments to MSIC, Box 150, Xavier.

Fort Speech (Cont.)

(Continued from Page

1)

can be more harmful than the drug itself.

In a proposed

program

verse

the trend of

ency,

Dr.

Fort

drug

said

to

re­

depend­

that

many

things need to be done, and added, "we must do as many of them at the

same

can."

He

changes in

time

as

we

possibly

summarized

needed

seven-point plan, be­

a

ginning with the total ban on all advertisement

and

promotion

of

drugs, among whi h he included al­ cohol

and

tobacc::>.

He

calls

for

an end to subsidiaries of hundreds

of millions of dollars to tobacco farmers, prominent labeling of all bottles, packages

and

containers,

drug education beginning in grade !;chool

and

continuing

into

adult

education. Revamp of drug treatment and rehabilitation programs to include comprehensive out·patient facilities is

of

prime

importance

in

Dr.

Fort's view. His final point stressed the need to attack the complex roots C1f ali­ enation, and he quoted Thoreau's words, "There are a thousand

pe0-

ple hacking away at the branches of evil for every one striking at the roots." Dr. Fort

offered an alternative

to the psychedelic "turn on, tune in,

and

dropout,"

way of life in

proposing that "in the long run wt: will be more successful if on to the

we

tum

orld to to people, tune

in to knowledge and feeling, and drop in to changing and improv­ ing the quality of life."


Wednesday, Nov. 25, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Four

Theological Elephants EDITOR'S NOTE: 111e foUowlng

Is being reprinted from

article

the Lutheran Standard. May 12, 1970.) Bv KENT S. KNUTSON

I DEN J

FHNG t heo logi cal trends in the chmch is not unlike a blind man trying to le scribe an elephant . He can discover certain shapes and textures

but he ca nnot be SlIre he has rightly di.scemed the whole subjectl I write from the standpoint of one deeplv in­ volved in one of Ollr seminaTies and with the convidion that. tudents re­

!lect the inne r feelin gs of the church

fairly accurately. They bring their re­

ligiollS

convictions

with

them

from

t he i r horne congregations and mix them with their hop s for the church of the future. They the refore combine

the stntus quo with future. In embody trends.

leaning toward s cnse,. students

a

this

the

Two gene r al characteristics are

prese.nt: First, ther is the fe e lin g that

we are s ta ndi ng on the thrcsholu of new developments and directions. "Ve do not yet know them all precisely, but there is a sense of expectancy and, I think, of hope. Second, an nnxiolls

DR. KENT S. KNUTSON is the second president-elect of the !\meri­ can LutiteraD Church.

frustration pe rmeate.s the hoping. It is

Nominations Open for University Minister inate a person to fill the position.

By PAUL WUEST

Th.e deadline date tions

for

the

for

position

nomina­

of

Univer·

or suggestions.

A number of questions have been

They are trying to accomplish one as

a p reliminary

Also,

sity Minister bas been moved back

to

other.

the

raised

in a more specific sense,

one week to this Friday, November

the

27. The Religious Life Council is

kind of man can fill the position

of all, only one

very

in

essary

concerned

that

.nominations

RLC

has discussed just what

terms

of

educational

back­

the

concerning

procedures

that will be followed in the ryomina­ tion

of University Minister. for

nom i nati on

a man

First

is nec­

be brought

to

be allowed to come from a wide

ground, strong interests, work with

into consideration. Secondly, there

area, resulting in the contacting of

youth,

has

will be no fo r m al voting by anyone

church officials all over the United

not led to anything definite, and it

other than the Council itsel f. The

States for nominations and in the

well may not, but the CoUncil mem­

question raised here is, of

change of the deadline.

bers have individually begun to es­

how

tablish

Along

etc.

Such

discussion

can

course,

one not on the Council

ures, a great deal of discussi.on has

first look for in a man to fill the

show his or her support for a nom­ inee ? Considering the procedures

been

position.

t

with

nomination

proced­

priorities

that

they

would

tion of the role of University Mini­

Suggestions from any member of

ster. This has included how many

the University community concern­

be followed, the best answer to that would probably be to talk. to the members of the Councll. It is

ef­

ing not only nominees for Univer­

a

fective campus ministry and just

sity Minister but any of the things under discussion are welcome. Fee l

of students,

what would he or they be expect­

held

people

concerning

are

the

necessary

for

defini­

an

ed to do. The RLC is constitution­

free to talk to any member of the

ally bound to defi.ne the role of the

Council or

University Minister as well as nom­

Wuest

call

if you

or write

to

a sum of over $400 to send two stu· dent draft counselors to San Fran­

increased

the

awa reness

of

the

PLU community as to the nature, extent,

and

drug use.

the

We

implications

ho;:>e

that

of

the

ef­

t'orts of the co-chairmen, as well as all who participated in the sym­ posium, will prove to be of great benefit

as

solutions for the various

problems

concerning

drugs

are

sought.

you

Thank looking cant

all

forward

and

again. to

We

more

beneficial

are

signifi­

sympo'siums

in the future. Christensen,

Bill

On Friday, Nov. l:l the small un­ derdeveloped nation cf East Pakis­ tan was struck hy

a

cyclonE' ,

series of de­ tid a l

waves,

Officials fear the toll

could re::.ch 500,000. Many ['ate this a

o Ill'

of the wor t disasters in the

hls ()ry of mankind. La t was

wt:ek

the

Student

Senate

asked to consider the appropri­

;lUon of funds

to

aid in the Pakis­

tani rdi'd efforts. Credihll' sources wid ver

me Ihat the pruposal met a negative

rather ir,mi,

The Senate's action or inaction leads me to question the priorities

of our student government. Perhaps my brother was correct in labeling this institution the "monastery" fOr it seemed inability to pay anythi n g but lip service to the crises that plague countries of the world les s

Although pointed

in

I'm the

own.

extremely Senate's

disap·

action

I

izations to make donations to the

to

response.

It sel'ms

me that at an earli·

Crnss.

If

this

is

to the approprite church (the

to')

longs

impossible

then I urge individuals to withdraw their dues from the club or dorm

District

sy nod

of

nominee

the

deadline

the

after

Officer

be­ Fri­

day. Early next week a screening committee comprised of members of the Councii will visit these of­ ficals

and

receive

from them all

information that

the

ditsrtict

offices can give them. Th

screen­

then

narrow

the ing

wil l

committee

down the list of candidates to some number that can easily be

small

This leads to an underlying rest· lessncs . I do not view this as being rebellious or disloyal but rather a he..lthy sign. It is at times irritating

to church administrators (who like thei r ideas q uestion d?) . no discon­

certing to t['aehers, but how els are nd feelings made hon $t qu es ti on known? Anyone wh) is not Testless at (Jur stage of history must indeed be

insensitive to bo th the Gospel and the times. Let

m

look

at

four trends.

Toward a New Ethics

OIlT church, an I indeed our whole American society, has gr ow n up with

an "individualistic" ethics, a style of r;hri5tian life whi h pu ts the em pha sis

on the feelings and responsibilities of

the i l1 di idual per.'on, both ill faith and in life. There is a trend now to­ wards gr01lp 'onsciousness, a demand for inter-relatedness and exercis of soci al r sponsibility that is quite. harp

apd growing.

3t·nlinary students, for example, dis. uss endlesslv their bck of com ml l ni ­

ty, not realizing th.t in thei r very disIIssion they are xpcriencing:tll im­ portant as pe ct of cornnlunit},. At the same time they seem incapable or un­ Willing to bri ng into being the l'Om­ rnunit they ue ·ire. And they are deeply conscious of the needs of th eir fellowmen. J lie stuaenr generatIOn, lik m, ny of their el ders , identify with the l1eelb of mankind and not onlv with the Lutheran or grenter Christia

communit .

Two distinct strategies seem to be

commg into being. One group tends to

be "romantie" in th iT thin k i n g . Their zeal and ide;IJiim Ie d them to Jc­ lIlalld instant solutions to probletns.

Operatin nut of a ,Ither perfection­ ist th '(Jlogy, this vie\ instinctively ac­ cepts the'idE'a tha t man (:an by an act

of his will chan e ev Tything for the hett r. Only man 's lack of Willingness stands in the way of a mOTe perfect societ '. Some would con. icier thi ap­ proadl t h ve u 'serious defect in the unclerst, nding of man, bvt it i. not meant to be that. Rather it seeks to ;'\ deep compas ion for man

c'\"pre.ss

hllTt by \.!vil. A second st ra tegy might be de­ scribeCl as "realism." Qllit aware of

are they right in their goals and are their me thods acceptable and useful?

\Iuch f this prohlem ('enters around a bck of so un tl tradition in our

theology fOT a social e thi c. 'vVe need to wurk hard on this. But it seems clear that the old individualized approach

to the Christi'ln life is letrving us.

Toward

I

New Pietism

i

an by this th, t th intellectual dime" cion in theology elicits much less interest th, n the personal life of faith. III

Students are not necess,lTilv uninter­ ested in d octr in e but it mt;st have a direct relevance to the social good and the inn r life of the peTson. This gap is not always easy' to bridge. To follow Jesus seems much more i m portant

than k-nowing of the ancient contro­ versies about hiS humanity and divini­ ty. How one "feels" about one's rela­ tion to J us receive.s mu h more

attention than a ri ght understanding of the Formu la of Concord. This I call a new pietism, Ithough

students p rob­

ably would not like the de scrip tion. This new pietism is not especially threatened b)' new id as a ho ut the

Bible or by charg thaI the are not traditional. Thev insist rather that they are Cospel- ri ted which is the , right trauition, nd that the in ne r com­ mitme.nt to authority is more hiblical t ha n the outward sign' of loyalty to church authority or to a particular

variety of theological tradition. ft is

not the kind of pietism that relies heavily Oil PI', yer or em otion a l display but it is deep l y 5uspicioll' of hypo ri­ s)' a nd the love of power and money. There is \

mship

a

d ep lesire and search for which

forms

expr

S5

thei r

longing ,lOd need for grace bllt a sharp rejection of nle<lningless ri tua l. The prophetic breaking of tradition is "in." ' The hlind continuance of the past i s "out."

Toward Theological Neutralism This means. further, that theology n o longer centers around theological heroes - either men or schools of the­ olog

.

Iv!y generation was ra t h er

fore J to 'hoose be tween "orthodoxy" .und "pi e tism . " he generation after mine tenJed to follow Karl Barth, or Rudolph Bultmnnn, Or Pa ul Tillich or t o emulate . larlin Luther in a b ,rst

:

(Continued on Page 6)

the stllbbornn ss of man's sin and the

p rsistcnce of an institutiona l strl\C· tllTes, some prefer to tal'kle particui. I' problems \"ith vigor and perhaps pw­ d nce. Chungc can come about only by the judicio IS lise of power to h al­ lenge power. first gr oup is often charg'd with the heresy of lh "soda I go,pel" hut I think that this rilicism is hastil\' ma de and only applicable to a few. . he secolld group is criticized for b ing impud nt but anyone who chal ­ lenges power h, s alw ys been helittled in this way. The (lnly real question is, The

••

Austin's Lakewood Jewelers DIAMONDS - WATCHES

Repairs VILLA PLAZA

Phone JU 84311

considered. These will be b ro ught the Council.

befor

RLC will decide to further

The narrow

the

list

or

not

and

will

determine the method of consider­ (interviews, telephone calls,

ation

encourage dorms and other organ­ Red

To the Editor:

floods.

country.

source of money on this campus. I

ASPLU Presdient

and

be

realize that ASPLU is not the only Sincerely,

vastating

yet now no money can

found to help sav-e lives in a distant

fortunate than our

tatively set now include the follow­

whatever

We all know the seriousness and

cisco,

procedu res as they are ten­

Th

sent

urgency of the drug problem not only here at PLU, but everywhere.

for your voice to be hea r d.

official

er metting the Senate appropriated

Such a symposium has effectively

admini­

ing. The names of all nominees will

Letters (Continued)

(Continued from Page 2)

and

faculty

strators, so the channels are there

Paul

have any questions

com prise d

body,

representative

feared that others arc not open to change. And that the tr ans it i on is more drift than direction.

whate v e r ) . They will then pro­ ceed unl il one nominee has been selected. This could possibly be

Ralph Andersen's

PARKLAND CHEVRON AND

or

cnmpleted

hy

the

end of the se­

mester, but the Council is not reo

PARKLAND CAR WASH FREE WASH WITH LUBRICATION

stri ted to' that deadlIne. [f he

a

or

sl'cond

person

i

fi:

120th & PACIFIC AVENUE

needed,

Phone LE 1-9988

she_will not be selected until

next semester Or possibly later.

treasury, allowing them to decide how their money is to be spent. The

death

of

500,000

people in

East. Pakistan is roughly equivalent to the population of Seattle. I won­ der h<,w we Americans will respond to an unexpected crisis that obliter­ ates a city the size of Se a ttle. Will the fact that Americans rather than Pakistanis are dying influence our rc::sponse to such a crisis? I would hope not. -John

Hushagen

Dee and Gene's

ARCO

RICHARDS Photographers SENIORS, STILL TIME FOR SAGA PORTRAIT

TUNE-UPS

Senior Special prices granted to faculty and undergrads.

BRAKE SERVICE STARTER AND GENERATOR

All

REPAIR OPEl 7:00

A.•.

12166 Pacific

-­ 10:00

ord ers completed by Christmas.

P.

LE 7-3040

MA 7-9111

734

PACIFIC AVE.


Wednesday, Nov. 25, 1970

MOORING MAST

Page Five

Under the Grandstand By DAVE SODERLUND With the intrasquad game out of the wa y roundball season is upon us and the time has come for the campus to awake fmm Its fall slum­ bers to support the sch ool ' s favorite sport.

What does the 1971)..71 season have in store for the Lute? First of all, there is the probJem of putting together a team out of a bunch of new faces and organizing the obvious talent into a team that will score points and play defense. PLU could be righ t up there in the NWC dog­ fight once again and should have a better chance now that Linfi eld is without the seniors that won last year's crown for them . Before that happens Coach Lundgaard has a few things to sort out. The first is whether or not to run. Practices this year have been geared toward a fast-break offense, but during the in rasquad game a lot of

pdtential breaks were ruined !by hesitancy. PLU has the speed to run this year, a factor that was missing on last yea r 's team, but whether the team can concentrate on running enough to make It woTk effectively . another thing.

TIlE TIIR EE RETURNING LET'TERMEN starting for the Lutes this year include Lyle Macintosh, Greg

The Lutes have a few mioor problems in the backcourt as well. Junior captain Lyle Mcintosh bas succee ded Kevin Miler as Door leader and seems to have one starting spot nailed down but detennining who will be his partner is another story. Senior John Rankin was the logical

Lute Cagers Eye Season Opener

fers from TCC who can sc ore but their ability to change from wlde-open JC ball to the more disciplined game favored by Lundgaard is ques­ tionable. Also, JC transfers, as a rule--,and ours this year are no excep­

Freitag. aod Ake Palm.

The

latest

edition

of

PLU

the

baske tball team put on a friendly exhibition Friday night in the form of

the

annual

intrasquad

game.

Predicitably, the varsity beat the junior varsity 100-78, but that's only part of the sto ry. The

varsity

MaCIntosh

and

o

ned

Tom

with

Lyle

Patnode

at

guards , Mike Willis and G reg Frei­ tag at fo rwards, and Ake Palm at center, whi le JV coach John Mal­ min conutered with Randy Leeland and Neal Anderson at guards, John Corman and Dennis Phillips at for­ w ards, and Roger Wiley at center.

from a 19-al\ tie to lead throughout the remair..edr of the game, build­ ing the lead to 14 points at the ha lf. With a warm hand in the second half the varsity moved away for good and were able to engineer a

Lundgaard

dUTing

the

past few seasons. The varsity shot a

neat

r.aU

54.5% 48%

and

for

second

the

the

gam e

to

jayvees and held a 5­

44% for th

35

during

bounding edge as well.

r

In

an

intrasquad

game

der game Conditions but the start­

due to successful free-lancing rath­ er

the

opening

minut es

neither team could es ta bli sh much offense or sufficent rebounding to fast break. The varsity pulled away

BLUE SPRUCE MOTEL ONE

AND TWO BEDROOM UNITS

SOME WITH

KITCKENS - PKOItES

FAEE TV

AND

COFFEE

NEAREST TO P.L.U.

12715 PACIFIC AVENUE

luoma, Wash. LE 1-6111

than to

Patnod'C!,

a

good

execution.

Tom

transfer

from

junior

TCC, led the varsi ty with 19 points while Pal m and Terry Finseth ad­ ded 14 each. Mike Willis hit for

13,

Don

McIntosh

Martonik popped

12, in

11.

wh.o

Simon

Dec.

5

against

Washington the

Wildcats

Lutes

the

in

NAIA D istrict 1 Playoffs last ye ar and went on to place

second in

the National Tournament. Both of these games should give an early

and

Lyle

For the

much work

11 and 10 points respectively. Although the action was a little ragged at times, Lundgaard got a chance to see all of his new faces, including six JC tra nsfers in ac­ tion and played host to a few problem

can

be

and

remains to

how

mold an

effective, unified team. Th:

Northwest

somewhat of Linfield,

Conference this

year's

is

year.

champions,

College Cleaners

a question mark for this season. Lewis and Clark returns a veteran team that could

cause

pr oblems

some

but

hopefully will not be the class of is

traditionally

a

11418 PARK AVENUE PARKLAND, WASH.

lips , who transferred last year from Montanoa State, appe ars to be able to use his 6-8 height both at forward and center -for added depth. The talent is there-it's up to both Coach Lundgaard and the team to make use

of it.

*

*

11

At the r isk of ap plying

an early jinx, I'd like to mention the paIr of guards that started the game for the jayvees. Both Randy Leeland and Neal Anderson are facing the task of living up to the perfot'mances of their brothers, who also were basketballers at PLU. Randy had a chance to show