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ere's Where to Start Admissions Office

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535-7151

Don't forget to check our website:

535-7350

and faculty information.

(Undergraduate and Graduate) Athletics

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Court Reservations.. .. .... ... . Fitness Center Golf Course . . . .. . . . Swimming Pool .......... ..... ..

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Library

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535-7441

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School of Education

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plu.edll for office, department

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Directory Assistance EM ERGENCY .

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535-7449 535-7911 535-7500 535-72.72

Student Services (Registration, Student Accounts. Financial Aid) Summer Sessions

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535-7161

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University Center (Summer Conferences)

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535-7450

AI/listed telepholle IlUmbers are prefixed by area code 253.

Greetings from the President Welcome [0

'

u mmer 2()02 at PLU!

We an.- pleased you have chosen to study at PLU this summer. Our faculty has prepared a [ull array of academic offering:;. The s

umm

er schedule

offers the

advanta ge of conden. ed. fu l l semester courses, tlexibility. and time LO enjoy the summer sun. We bope you festivab and

will attend lhe summer concert, fruit tber spcciaJ activities. Invite your

friends and family members to join and savor the

special atmosphere al PLU Ihjs summer. We WIsh you productive tudy during your days on campus. The faculty and talI stand ready to assist you in any way they can.


CONTENTS WELCOME 2 4

A BIT ABOUT PLU TEN SIMPLE STEPS To make your summertime easy.

5

INFORMATION TO REGISTER AND PAY YOUR BILLS

12 28

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SPECIAL PROGRAMS & EVENTS Programs for youth and teachers.

33

UNIVERSIT Y SERVICES AND FACILITIES

37

LOCAL SIGHTS, SOUNDS, AND SITES

I IF YOU ARE A CONTINUING PlU STUDENT. .. Summer at PLU offers you an opportunity to catch up, speed up, or round out your time at PLU. Whether you are an under足 graduate. graduate, or non-matriculated tudent. there is a wide assortment

f

classes awaiting you. Summer has a distinctly different flavor, one which students find to be challenging, pleasant, relaxed, and during which they Jearn and enjoy their classes. Summers at PLU are stimulating. relaxing, and fun. Thanks [or joining us!

IF YOU ARE NEW TO PlU... You have made a good choice! T he park足 like campus is

10 ated close to mountain ,

forests, lakes. and Puget Sound in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. Over

200

courses, numerous worksbops, and conferences and camps of aU de criptions are offered. Look for special lectures, concerts, readings, and festivals. Faculty are informed and accessible, facilities are excellent. and opp rtunities abound. Feel warmly welcomed, and let us know what we can do to enhance your learning experience with us. Be sure to check our website reguLarly for updates and more information.

wlVw.pl".edru-swnmer Registration is easy! Just follow tile

instructions on page 6, a"d look forward

to summer 20021

COVtT design and catalog layout: Ut/iversi ty Printing

37

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

38

INDEX

41

CAMPUS MAP


Pacinc Lutheran University is located

Ac qu i sit ion"

in

(LANG 446)," Music for

t support Pacific

Classroom Teacher: World Cultures"

suburban P.arkland, six miles 'outh of

Tacoma, 40 m iles south of Seattle, and 20

(MUSI 341), " Elementary pani.h" (SPAN

miles north of Olympia . Surrounded by lhe

!OJ and 102), "Asian Arnerican Exp eri ­

Ca cadI.' and Olymp ia ranges, 1\.1 t. Rainier,

ence" (PSYC 405), "Rel igions of South

and Pugct acre cam p

und, PLU" pictu resque 126-

QlljLe simply, il'

beautiful here.

Asia" (RILl 132) will •

Rarely docs one u n iver sity truly blend

to

empower students lor

lives of rlrolightfu/lI1qlliry, service, le(/dership alld care-for other persons, for the commu­

nity mu/ for the earth.

Thoughtful inquiry.

ervice. Leadership. C<1re.A PLU education is one richly �teeped in an exploratt n of

7532 for rOlin •

teachmg, practicing managing or doing

research i n heal th care for the 21" CcntWl'. •

nly.

Admission is free. Call 535-7349 or 535-

f, r

and Outcomes Manager concentration

education , and physical education).

sentence; FLU seeks

July and August: Sundays L -4 p.m.

o ffers an exc ellent foundation for

sional schools (arts, business, nursing,

illustrated by this

and Wednesdays II a.m. - 3 p.m June,

Master's of Science in Nursing wilh a Care

founda t ion complemented by five p r ofe s­

What's so special about PLU? Perhaps

Public hours are as follows: September

th r ll Ma y : Su nday ' 1-4 p.m., luesclays

be held on campus.

The School of Nursing will offer a M aster 's Degree in Nursing in the USA

Experience

Collection l ocated in Mortvedt Library.

Scandinavian Nurses this summer. The

liberal arts with professional programs, but PLU is such a jewel. St ud en t s arc offered an insighrful and challenging liberal arts the

its es�enceis bes t

Scandinavian I mmigran t

Asia" (RELl 131), and "Religions of East

us is truly representative of the

natural g randeu r of the Pacilic Norlhwest.

Lutheran University"

canrunavian Studies Program and the

morc

in formati on about yC3T­

I programs.

Vi it PLU's Study Abroad Office in

Eastvold a nd learn about our many programs thr o u gh o ut the world.

The canclimlVian Cultu ra l Center brings tog ether individuals .md ethnic organiza­ t ion s of the Pacific Northwest to pI' serve the heritage and culture of the Nord ic

un derst anding of the i m m ig ra nt experience, to strengthen

countries, to promote

ties with contemporary Scandinavia, and

values, not imply

facts. W ith an enrollment of more than 3,500 students and a full-time

faculty of227,Ieaming is t1 personal,

interactive process between st uden ts and

facuIty, w ith a

luoent ralio f 13:1. Beautiful, a rare jewel. special-that',

PLU.

Stepping Up to the Challenge of Preparing Great Teachers for Great Kids We propose atl audacious goal . . . wit/ain a decade. We will provide every stude"t in America with what slloultl be Ilis or her educational

PLU LOOKS BEYOND ITS BORDERS AND INTERNATIONALLY IN SUMMER

2002. •

Dr. Ann Kelleher, Professor of P oli tical Science, o ffers "Nordic Approaches to Democracy and Development" in ll edmark, Norway. Credits awarded for Sc a n dinav ian Studies, Political Science,

International Co re . or Economics. (SABR 100) •

birt/rrigllf. access to competent. ClIrillg, and qllalified feacl,ers. 1996

- Tile Natiollal Commission on Teaching and America's [lu/llre, The School of Education IMPACT -

Dr. James Predmore, Professor of

Innovative. Alternative Pathways to Teacher Certification

Spanish, offers an intensive Spanish

Professional

Outstanding Masters' Degree Pro gram s for Experienced Educators

intermediate and advanced language level.

course. (SPAN 201,202, 301 and 401)

Off-campus courses include: "Arch aeolo gy:

The Field Experience"

(ANrH 465).

Courses wilh international and intercul ­

lural focus such as:" Modern Japan" (HISf 340), "Theories of Language

r-; �

and National Board Certification Programs

Endorsement Programs in S pecial Education. Reading. IJbrary and Media Services, English as a Second language, and content areas

Exciting Array

Exrursion to Sevilla, Granada and Las

Alpujarras arc included in this four week

2

Lutheran Uni versity annoWlces P ROJECT

Pacifk Lutheran Univer lty ha. is wontlerfultraditiotl of preparing excellent teachers. PROJECT IN PACfbuilcb upon tnis tradition by offering:

Granada in Spain, geared to students at the

atl'aCin

bold mitiative that will enable us to Illeet the audaoous go:!1 of ensuring

that every student has the caring and co mpe t en t teachers h� or she deserves,

course offered at the Universidad de

a

of Continuing Education Options

or mfo rmat i u o on these

exCi tin g

programs for teachers, pieClse see page 28. Or visit

lr website at WWw.plfl.edll/-edll.


Every great advance in science has issued from a new audacity of the imagination. JOHN DEWEY

WHAT'S NEW AT PLU THIS YEAR? •

Dr. Mahmood Mamdani, an expert on

Grace Wang will fund the Wang CenLer

the Rwandan genocide; Dr. Robert

prepare �ludents as leaders in shaping the

recipient of the 2000 National Hum31u­

[or InLernati onal Pro grams at PLU to

five years of the Proposed Program for the Study of the Scandinavian A pp roach to Democracy and Development, which

will be co m m i t ted to study

be advocates for w orl d peace .

director of the Chimpanzee and Human

approach tu global peace, democracy and

PLU wa� ranked the sLxth best master's

Communicatiun Institute at Central Washington University; aDd Sir John

development.

university in the w e t 111 U.S. News and

Polkmghome. a renowned scientist and

2002 guidebook

Anglican priest.

"America's Best Col leges." •

Arter a year of r emo deling Xavier Hall ,

peoed with a h igh- tedl

of the ,

a

The re nowne d Choir of the West

celcbratl!d its 75'" a nniver�ary with a huge reunion coneerl fe.lluring members

Lehmann. a 1976 PLU graduale.

n was

ational Association of Indepen­

dent Colleges and Univer�ities, which r e pre�n l more lhan 950 independent

1956 PlU graduate.

r the choir throughoul the years. The choir's new director is Kathryn

PLU Prcsidcnl Loren Anders

named chairrnlln of the board f directors

lecture hall

named fI r longt i m e his lory profes$or ilnd campus historian Philip ordqw.'it •

The universi ty has raised more than $300,000 for establi hmenl over the next

ties Medal; Dr. Roger Fouts, founder and

World Report's

Bellah, esteemed sociologi st, a uthor and

global economy and envi ro nment and to

Distinguished p ca kers at PLU included

A $4 million g i ft from Dr . Peter '60 an d

univ.:rsitie� clCross •

the country.

Au dun Toven, associate profe�or of Norwegtan. earned the Roral Norwegian

Order uC Merit on hehalf of King

Haralli.

To vcn now ho lds thl! Litle Knight of tbe First Class.

of the Nordic

The Board of Regents approve d in

concept the [8 mi ll ion Center for Learning and Technology, which will be built within a cou pl e years to house lhe Seho 1 of Business and the depart ment s of computer science and mathematics.


e Your Don't forget to check our website for updated information on any course change :

wwwplu.edul-summer

1. WHERE TO PARK

4. WHERE TO EAT

In the summ er, you do not n eu to register

Po()d 'crvicc is available

yuur car wlth CamplL� Saf, t SummIT

University Center (upper level) Cafe ria

.

parkulg iii easit'!tl in the l.1br.ll) I t. rhe

Open seven days a week

entranCe is on \\Theeler $1 across from rrinity uthcr'rln Church. P:lr king is also available in (rcc escort service

for the PLU OJmmunity Juring all hou rs; the

service In ludes all PiU facilities and an area

within a Je.\ignated 1:one off �mpus. For

Dinner: 5:00 p.m. - 6:.�O

Columbia Center (lOIMY campus) Coffee Shop Open even days a week

ISesides selImg n.:qutrcd [extbooh, the PLU enter,

stocks acadernh. supplies at a re du ced price, mduding an

mput

I"S

and software. There IS

assor menl of referen ce and general

and Administration Building ca rr y a va r iet y of baked good s and pastry items as as

daytime ph

oe

nu mber must be included. Tht'

deli andwiches. The convenience

sto re located in the bookstore offers drinks,

Student inclu

c

Service� Center. Otherwise, please

your visa or Ma.�tert:ard number and

expll'lluon date on YOllTwnttcn transcript requesL All

fi

furthcri

h ur procc log time. For

v

.

'on, call 253-535-7J3S.

books. unique clothin g, and gifts. Bookstore

snacks. and microwaveable products.

8. WHERE TO HANG YOUR HAT

among other foods.

A l ounge has been espeaally desil:,Tfled for

tenn: 8:00 am-{):30 pm. Regular hours are

5. HOW TO CALL

hours are extended the first two days of c acll 9:00 am-5:00 pm, Monday - Thur day and 9 :00 am-3:00 pm, Friday. The Bookstore is not open on weeken� during the summer.

Visit us at Illteworld.plu.edu - PLU's Official Online StOre.

Please "ote: The Bookstore will be closed on jW/t' 1stfdr invel1tory. Ph=ase purchase YOllr books early for Term 1.

3. WHERE TO GET AN ID CARD TD ..:J.rd.� are made in the LuteCard O£ffi:e and InforrnaLion C en ter localed In the Unh'emty Center. It is imporlanllhat you

have a valid TD car d to cash checks on campWi, heck b

oks ut f t h

access the computer lab and 0 leI e[Vices. Please �top by I piLlure taken and card is:;ued. For . ity

hOUfS

call

1S3 -5 3 5- 7 457.

the commuter population L

When -ailing a camp from a campus pho

s

rf calling off-c nn;t. Our area cod is 253.

Jy Wie the last pus, dial "9"

on the

IOllnge includes lunch space, a meeting

area, and plenty of room for studying. Lockers to stow your books, bags, etc. are available in [he Library.

6. WHERE TO PH OiO COPY OR FAX Copy

ca ted

lower level oC t h e University Center , the

phone number

,

fOllT digit:;.

s are available ror . tudent

m a chine

use

MorlvedL LibraTY and Rieke SClene Center. The facsimile machine (fax. located 10 the Library. It i.� availa in

by staff and t ud en ts for a nom! For further information, call 253

9. WHERE TO CASH A CHECK OR FIND

ANATM

Personal checks (ma.\:imurn $50) in

ca.\hed at the CaMlier's WlDdow

Business Office (located in the Hauge Building). You must have a valid PLU card

(

ce item 3 above). The Ca.\1

b

7. HOW TO REGISTER, FIND OUT YOUR

Wi ndow is op n Monday-Friday, 9:00

TRANSCRIPT.

The University Center hou.

GRADE AND/OR WHERE TO GET A

Regi

ter: .urrenl PlU students may

register by Banner web. Fmt-nme regis­ mmts will phon

the

umm er

ffiec at 253-535-7l29

to register for

WUtTes.

Summer essioru; 0

or

e�slons

1-80U-756- 1563

Bdore calling the

-

La read the ge 6. You will tion availabll!

phon e.

4

faxing 253-538-2545 your request, yOUf

signature, social ecurity number. address and

cash o r check if you apply in pel 'on at the

EspTesso loca t io ns in the University C enter

weU

Student Services Cenler. If you are mailing or

official transcript fee of $5.00 may be paid by

Lunch: 11:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m.

2. WHERE TO BU Y BOOKS AND

($5.00 cilargel are requested in the

tran:;crip

Breakfast: 7:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

SUPPLIES Boob. re, located in the Uni versi ty

Transcripts: Unofficial (no charge) and official

p.m.

University Center (lower level) Coffee Shop Open Mon day - Friday,7;{)Q a.m. - 2:00 pm.

further infonnalion, call 253-535-7441

via tht! PLU home page, www. plu.edu. Grade will be available on Banner web a oon a th y .He submitted.

Breakfast: 7:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

Lunch: 11:30 a. m. - 1:00 p.m.

other I ts on both up per and lower campu . Campus afetv p rovid es a

Grades: You may access your final grades by using Banner web. Access Banner web

at:

a.m.-I 2:30 p m. and 130 p.m.-4:00 p.m. a

Well Pargo

automatic teller machine (ATIvI).

10. WHERE TO GET FRIENDLY ANSWERS

Contact the Office of Summer Sessions Located

10

lhe Hauge B

or caU2S3-535-7129. We'


e Register and Pay Your Bills I

ADMISSION

535-7151 or 1-800-274-6758 or

COURSE NUMBERING

Enrollment in Summer Session is open to

www.plu.edul-admi

Courses at PLU use the following number

all students without regard to age, sex,

MASTER'S DEGREE STUDENTS

sexuaJ orientation, race, religion, color, creed, disability, national or ethnic origin,

Student

eeking admis ion to a master's

program should contact the Admissions

system: •

101-299 �Low�er-div�is�ion

or marital status.

Office at 253-535-7151 or 1-800-274-6758

INTERESTED IN BECOMrNG A FULl­

or www.plu.edul-admi

�c o u�r s�e s�.

TIME PLU STUDENTI Contact the PLU Admissions Office at 1800-274-6758 for an application or send in a request by

f";LX at 253-536-5136 or e-maiJ

at admissions@PW.edu. Visit

ur home

page at www .pllLedu.

NON-DEGREE STUDENTS Non-degree students planning to enroll for the summer ses ion only. without inlention of working toward a degree from PLU or for a teaching certificate, need not file a formal application or submit transcripts from other schools attended. Students may enroll in any

Teaching Certification students Students seeking teaching certification should contact the School of Education at 253-535-7272 or www.plrudul-educ

VETERANS e

contact the VA

appointment. phone 253-535-8317.

500-599 r�G u�da t�a �e

u �oc rses� �.

Normally open

undergraduate students may enroll in a 500-

I vel course if, during the last emester of the

requirements with a registration of fewer

Certification request forms are available in

than 16 seme ter hours of undergraduate

the Student Services Center.

credit. TI,e total registration for undergradu­

may take a maximum of 8 semester hours.

summer term is six semester hour .

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS

hours per session must be obtained from

by contacting the Admi - ions Office, 253-

degree finds it possible to complete all degree

an

T he maximum course load for each

ion. T he necessary forms may be obtained

they are n t specific requirements in preparation for graduate study.

Center at the time of registration. To make

prerequisites. Non-degree seeking students

complete a formal application for admis­

division wldergraduates. Such courses may be a part of the graduate program prOVided

senior year, a candidate for the baccalaureate

COURSE LOAD AND WAIVERS

undergraduate degree from PLU musl

�r�m d e r g r�a d u�a t�e

Open to both graduate and upper­

representative in the Student Services

course for which they have the necessary

tudents who plan to work toward an

300-499 �Uper�-div�is�ion

to graduate students only. Upper-division

To receive Veteran's Affairs (VA) educa­ tional benefits, plea

u� r�edn r�g u �da t�a �e

�c o u�r s�e s�.

Permi ion to register for more than six the Dean of Summer Sessions, A-I03, 253535-7129. Graduate students may not take more than 12 total semester hours during the summer to count toward the master's degree at Pacifi Lutheran University.

ate requirements and elective graduate credit shall not exceed six semester hours during any one summer term. A memorandum stating that all baccalaureate requirements are being met during the semester must be signed by the appropriate department chajr or school dean and presented to the Provost's Office at the time of such registration. This registration does not apply toward a higher degree unless it is later approved by the student's advisor and/or advisory committee.

5


COURSE DESC R I PTIONS

ANTHROPOLOGY ANTH 465 - Archaeology: The Field Experience - S 1 (2 cr) July 22 - July 26 8·00 am - 5.'00 pm, MTWRF (D. Hue/sbeck) - XAVR- 7 4010ff­ Campus Learn about archaeology by doing archaeology. Find, map, test, and

evaluate prehistoric and hi..�torical archaeologi cal sites in the Washing­ ton Ca�lIdes. Past project h�ve n prehistoric Native

focused

American .:arnpsi tes. historic m ining camps, and stream ra ilroad logging camp . Prerequisite: perm� n of instructor.

te: This class is part of

a project that will continue into August. Additional course credit can be arran�d Lab tee: $50

(CRN: 1000S - Registration Blocked) Please phone 253-535-7 196 to register. ART ARTD 1 60 - Drawing - AR (4 cr) June 24 - July 1 9 9. 7 5 am - 1 2 . 1 5 pm, MTWRF (D. Cox) - INGR- 126 Th is will be a concise and intense i ntroduction 10 the basics 0 fine art drawlng. We will deal with how art! ts train themselves to see proportion, scale, value, contrast;

h w \() develop skill with various drawing media; and how to be

patient and cauli us observers. A variety of ubjects will be consid­ ered. Advanced students accepted

to work on special pTojects using

either number ARID 49 t or ARTD

498 ( conta ct inslructor for the'I.' upper level courses) . No p rerequi ­

sites required. tudio fee: $35.

Studio clJSS i n photography

as

an

art form. Primary concentration

will be in bask camera and darkroom techniques. tudent. will produce a p rtfolio of prints emphasis on creative

expression and experimentation. tudi

fee'

$50

Produ

i n of both functional and

SculPlural objects using handbuilding and wheel techniques. Include. presenlJtion on clay and

Raku techn ique. Stud io tee: $45 (CRN: 1 0007)

(CRN: 10006)

semester BlOL 206 class . Lecture

student asse ment in the art .

topics include: cirOJ.la.tory,

Additional attentIon is given to

resprratory. digestive, excretory. and

teaching art to students with

reproductive systems; metabolism;

disabilities, afety in the classroom,

tempe.rature regu lation: stress;

and an integrated, multicultural

human develo pment Laboratory

focus throug h the arts. Studio tee:

$25. (CRN: 1 059 1 )

includes: cat dissecuon: phy iology experiment ; Oldy of developing organisms. Prerequisile: BIOL 205,

BIO LOGY

ARTD 330 - Ceramics 11 - AR (4 cr) May 28 - June 2 1 S'OO - 1 0:45 am. MTR

BIOl 1 1 1 - Biology and the Modern World - NS, SM (4 cr) May 28 - June 2 7 8:00 am - 1 2: 7 5 pm, MTWRF (D. Hansen) - RCfR- 122 [ m roducti n lo biology, primarily designed for non-hiology majors.

(Lecture CRN: 1 00 1 8) (Lab CRN: 100 1 9) . Please note: yo u must

Fundamental concepts are chosen

BIOl 351 - Natural History of the Pacific Northwest - NS. SM (4 cr) June 24 - July 1 9 8:00 a m - 4'00 pm, MTWRF (R. McGinnis) - RCfR- 124 Introduaion to the geology, climate, vegetation, biogeography, and human influence on the biota of

(D. Keyes) - INGR- l 44

Advanced and uldividuali7.ed p rojects in ceramic arl. Furth e r experimen ts in glaze formulatio n are explored. E mphasis on Raku technique. Stuwo fee:

$45. (CRN:

10008)

l luman Anatomy and Physiology, or equ ivalent. Lab Fee: $50.

from all areas of modern biology in luding the environment, population, physiology, genet ics.

ARTD 430 - Ceramics

111 - AR (4 cr)

May 28 - June 2 1 8:00 - 1 0.'45 am, MTR (D. Keyes) - INGR- I44 See above course desc ription . ludio fee: $45. ( CRN : I 0009 )

ARTD 331 - The Art of the Book 1 - AR (4 cr) May 28 - June 2 1 9:00 am - 72:00 pm, MTWR (Friday open studio) (p. Temple-Thurston) - INGR- 722

Thi · cour e is a han ds - on, stuwo introduction to the tradilional aesthetics of the printed word and the crealive world of ani 'I ' b oks,

evolution, and biological control.

Includes 13boratory. No prerequi­ sile ; sati fies GUR. Lab Fee:

$50.

(CRN : 1 00 1 2)

h ike to the Olympic Penin�ula and a

(j Lerum) - RCTR- 1 1 5 *Lab.· 1 UO a. m . - 2:30 p.m., TWR - RCTR- 1 7 6 ident ical in content to the (aU

semester mOL 205 class. Lecture topics inc l ude: matter; ce.l.I!; anti

tissues; nervous. endo rioe, keletal, and muscular systems. Laboratory

mUbde physiology and human

mu ell.' dissection; experiments in

and distinctive mat('rial�. This clas '

reflexes; special senses. Required for

crea ting personal illustrated books.

cw:ricula. Limited to 20

ARTD 341 - Elementary Art Ed ucation (2 cr) May 28 - June 2 7, 9: 15 am - 12. 1 5 pm, MW (5. Watts) - INGR- / 26 Prepar

teachcr� 10 teach art in the

elementary classroom and to Integrate art into the curriculum.

Reviews the clements and priniples of art, teacile, the develop­ ment of the ,hild in art, highlights ae therics and art criticism. and teache. the.' design of art lessons placed on the essential academic

learn ing requirements for the ar in Wa. hington State, personal

( RN) when registering

for this class.

June 24 - July 1 B 8:00 am - 1 0:45 am, MTWR

incl udes: human skel et al sy·tem; cat

1 265)

number

Washington. lncludes local and oue

genre that combines language. imagery, inn ovative bookfonns, w i ll place �eci al emphasis on

register (or both the lectu re and Ihe lab. Use both course registration

BIOl 205 - Human Anatomy and Physiology - NS. SM (4 cr)

,In imagin.1tive and expressive

and rurriLUlum. Particular focus is

14

ckvel pment in the studio, and

gla7.es. Emphasi on

ludio fee: $30 (CRN: J

ARTD 226 - Photog raphy: Bla(k and White - AR (4 cr) July 29 August 22 1 230 - 3. 15 pm, MTWR (8. Geller) - INGR- 134

un

fntroducti n 10 ceramic media.

Cross - l isted with ENGL 3 13.

(eRN: 1 1 272)

with

ARTD 230 - Ceramics I - AR (4 cr) May 28 - June 2 1 8.00 - 10'45 am, MTR (D. Keyes) - INGR- 144

nursing and physical education

tudent:..

No prerequisites. Lab Fee: $50.

day field trips as well as a three-day five-day trip to Columbia Basin,

Okanogan Plateau, and

Cascades. Travel fee:

o rth $ 1 50. For

further information and a yllabus contact Dr. Richard McGinnis at 253-535-6073. (Clt�:

10020)

BIOl 503 - Advanced Place­ ment Lnstitute: Biology (2 cr) July n - July 26 9:00 am - 4. 00 pm, MTWRF

(5. Knowles) 1 16

D

RCTR T 7 5 & RaR-

igned for high school teachers

preparing to offer Advanced PlaU'J11en t Biology. Tt addresses

( lecture CRN :

content fur an adva nced placement

register for both the lecture and the

test, review of text materials, and an

100 1 6) ( Lab CRN: 100 1 7) . Please note: you must

lab. Use both course registration nwnbers

(CRN ) wben

registering

for lhil. 1iSS.

SIOl 206 - Human Anatomy and Physiology - NS. SM (4 cr) July 29 - August 22 8:00 am - 7 0:45 am, MTWR (M. Smith) - RUR- I 1 5 *Lab: 1 1 :30 am - 2 '30 pm, TWR ­ RCfR- 1 1 6

Continuing dass from BIOL 105,

Human Anatomy and Physiology, or it can be tn� mdepe ndenrly if

the prerequisite iii met. [t is identical in conlent LO the spring

cou rse,

the advanced placement

overview of typical college general b iology courses d es igned for potenlial biology majors. A major emph asis is labor:l lory; participants carry out exercises suitable for Advanced placement Biol ogy courses. The in tltute is con ducted

by co llege fuculty with t'Xperience teach ing general hio l ogy, and by h igh school teachers who currentl y offer Advanced PIa ement courses.

Course fee :

$675

includes tuition

and materials fee. (CRN:

1 1 1 3l! ­

Registration Blocked) Please call 253-535-7 129 to regystc!"


Be sure to check www.plu.edul-summer for upd ated cou rse i nformation

BOSA 305 - Create and Lead

BUS I N ESS BUSA 201 - Value Creation in the G lobal Environment (4 cr) May 28 - June 20 9. 00 am- 1 2: 15 pm, MTWR (5. Thfiliher) - ADMIN-2 7 7

vJ.lue, creating activities and the

students who are taking a first look al lhe role of business in society

demands and expectations, w i th

a

teamwork.

BUSA

(eRN: 1 0024)

in econom ics, busi ness law, or political science. (eRN: H Z33) study

203 - Managerial

May 28 - July 6 8.30 a m - 4:30 pm, Saturday (D Bancroft) - ADMN-2 1 7 Tntegrated study o f finaJ,..iaI decision- making variabJes

Accountlng (4 cr) June 24 - July 1 8 9 00 a m - 11.'30 pm, MTWR (G Van Li1IYhe) - ADMIN-2 ' 7 Introd uction 1 0 tbe use of

(both

book and market ) , the relation­

,hips among them, and rdcvant dl!cil;ion theories/modcls. Primary perspective

i5 lhal of the manager,

rather than the aCCQuntant or the

unting data for decision

making, managerial planning, and operational control. rapics include cost-volume-profit rclationship�,

cost accounting metllOds budget­ ing, and perfomlance evaluations. Familiarity wit11 Nlicrosoft Excel

or

other spread�heet software i.s

required. Prerequ isites: BU A 202, CSCE 120. (CRt'l : 1 1232)

external i nvestor. Tuilion: $534 per

and Human Resou rces (4 cr)

May 28 - June 20 130 - 4:45 pm, MTWR

A n exploration af individual and organizational practices and responsibilities related to organi­ zational entry, competency

development, and performance improl'cment as careers u nfold.

(CR : 1 087 1 )

JUly 8 - Aw)ust J 5 6.' 00 - 9:50 pm, MR (L Schreiter) - ADMN 2 r 9 Background for undcrstanding

ethical u;�ue5 decision makers in the busi ness world face today. Tuition: $554 per semester hour.

II

BUSA 50S - Managing

Effective Organizations (4 tr)

May 28- July 3 5:00 - 9:50 pm, MR (C PRltr) - ADMN-2 1 9 Examines how leaders manage four sets of factnrs to ach ieve

organization's internal environ­

val uation, financial planning,

capital asset acquisit ion. cost of

capltal. financing stralegies. Prerequisites: BUSA .202;

CSCI

1 52; MATH

STAT 23 1 . (CRN: 10023 )

1 28;

products and seTVices th roughout tbe enlin� val ue cn�aLion system.

Focns is on managerial, reduJo­ logical, and organiz.ational

chaUenges of establishing and doing business in the d igital economy Electron i c commerce

and

revenue

models, econom i cs of information,

soluLions to electronic commerce are dIscussed . Priority is given to

BUSA SS8 - New Venture

Management (4 cr)

May 28 - July 3 6.'00 - 9:50 pm, MW (C MarthaeiJ - ADMN-2 1 7 Examines the entrepreneurial skill>

and conditions needed for effective new

business start-ups whether

CHEM 1 20 - General Chemistry - NS. SM (4 cr) May 28 - June 2 1 9:00 am - 1 2:00 pm, MTWRF (F Tobiason) - RUR-220 "Lab: 1:00 - 4:00 pm, TTi - RcrR-20 1 Introdnction to the fund3mental n aLure ofchemis.lry. Topics include

energy and maller, alom ic and molecular theory, periodic propertie.s. nomenclature. �lJ.les of

matter, chemical calculations, solution properties. acids and ba�es, equilibrium. and kinetic�. The major

crnphasis of the leanre and laboratory will

be the applica tio n ()f

chemical prmciples and theory on u

need to knQw basi$. Designed

primarily for b1udents who want to major in chemistry. b iology,

engineering, environmental soence, b'Coiogy. or ph�ics. These and nther majors who an> interested in the health sciences ( e.g., premedical, predent..-u. prepharmaqJ would LLsually begin chemistry with thi,

course One yC'olf of high school chemistry is requi red. , tudents WIth

high �ool dJemi try or a weak mathematical backgrolDld should no

semester hour. Prerequ isite: ECO

take Chemistry J 04 before this course. Lab fee; $50. ( Lecture eRN:

TIM

Program. Tu it ion: $554 per

500. 520. (CRN: 1 089li - Registra­

Blocked) Please phone 5357250 to register.

tion

BUSA 580 - Technology Strategy and Competitiveness (4 tr)

May 28 - July 6 8.30 am - 4.30 pm, Saturday (I Albers) - ADMN-2 1 9 Concepts and method� tor

formulating and impli!lIlenting

competitive trategy in

global context. Addresses how to integr a te a

technology with the firm's strategy,

of strategy. Prerequisites: ECON 500. 520 and BUSA 503, 504. 505,

(CRN. 10030)

CHEM ISTRY

"tudent · m th Saturd�y MBA/

ences. and !;hange. Tuition: $554

makers. Princ.iple� and procedurCl>

financial statement analysis,

cri t i cal del ivery system tor

and the kt:y internal and e:cternal

II

act!vity, financial deClsion-makmg.

Explore electronic com merce as a

the org.mi211t ion's environ­ mental context, cultura! differ­ ment,

per semester bou£:.

pertaining LO business investmen t

(c. Lee) - ADMN-2 1 7

technological challenges and

BUSA

(B. Finnie) - A DMN-2 1 9

Perspective of managerial decision

575 - E lectronic Com­ merce (4 cr) July 8 - August 7 7 830 am - 4:30 pm, Saturday

504 - Legal and Ethical Environ ment of Business (4 cr)

f

orgamzational effectiveness: the

BUSA 302 - Managerial Finance (4 cr) May 28 - June 20 7:30 pm - 4:45 pm, M7WR

BUSA 5 J 2. Tuition $554 per

busi ness strategies

(CRN: 1 0029)

(L Gibson) - ADMN·2 1 7

site:

semester hour. (eRN: 1 1 1 1 7}

�emesler hour. (eRN: J 0504)

and acting upon the legal and

BUSA 30 1 - Managing Careers

ot' advanced service and

manufacturing systems. Prereqtri­

BUSA

503 - Managing Financial

R�ources (4 cr)

and who have not had extensive

220; ECON 1 5 1,

Managerial and operational challengr-s

changing i nternal and extemal

and pru!;ttces which enhance

and the

globa l environment Designed fo r

ace

July 8 - August 15 6:00 - 9:50 pm, R. (J Baht) - ADMN-2 1 7

strong emphasis o n competencies

demands tlf stakeholde� in competitive marke

June 24 - July 1 8 7 2. 75 - 3."3 0 pm, MTWR (F 5epic) - ADMN-2 7 9 A study of how to organize and manage in today's context of

Understanding busin-ess economic

BUSA

BU5A 574 - Advanced Service and Manufacturing Delivery Systems (2 a) 'C

Effective Organizations (4 cr)

forces that detennine the evolution

S L l . 5 1 2. 5 1. 3. Tuition: $5 -4 per semester hour. Saturday MBAITIM program. Evening MBA students may take Saturday classes on a

sp ace-available ba.ill. ( RN: 1 0896 - Registration Blocked) Please phone 535-7250 to register.

U 079) (Lab CRN: l I 080) Please register for both the

note: you mut.l

lecture and the lab. U� both course regi tTaLion numbers (CRN) when regIstering for Ihi class. CH E M 232/234 - Organic Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratory - NS. SM

(41 1 cr) June 24 - July 18

9:00 am - 1 2. 00 pm, MTWR (C Fryhle) - RUR-220 *Lab.- 1 :00- 4:00 pm, TR - RCTR-20 I [nterpretation of propenies and r�lK1ion of al iphatic compounds

on the ba�i. of current chemical ilieory. Prerequisite: CUEM 1 20 or

1 25. Corequisite: CHEM 234. ( lab

must accompany 232) Lab fee:

$50_

(Leaure CRN: 1 0036) (Lab

CRN: 10037) . Please Dote: you

must register for boili the lecture Jnd ilie lab. Use both C<lurse

regisrrati()fl numbers (eRN) registering for this class.

when

independent or within larger organization,. Prerequisite: BUSA 503. Thition: $554 per semester hour. (CRN: 1 1 234 )

15


COURSE D ESCRIPTIONS

CHEM 338 - Analytical Chemistry - NS. SM (4 cr)

June 24 - July 18 8'00 - 1 0:45 am, M7WR (0 Swank) RCTR-ll4 *Lab: 1 '00 - 4:00 pm, M7WR ­ RClR-20 7

Chemicnl methods of quantitatIVe analysis, including volumetric,

gravimetric, .md selected instru­ mental methods. Includes

laboratory. Prerequ isites: CHEM 1 20 or ill and MATH 140. lab tee: $50. (Lecture. CRN: 1 108 1 ) (Lab CRN:l 1082) Ple-d.Se note: you must register for both the lecture and the lab. Use both course regisrrat ion numbers (CRN) when regi reting for this class . CHEM 503 - Advanced

Placement Institute: Chemistry (2 cr) July 22- July 26 9.'00 am - 4.'00 pm, M7WRF (D. Swank) - RCTR-224 General Chemistry in truct:mn at the university level can range from e:uremely theoretical approaches to very qualitative p resentations. The wide range of mt:thods ha� caused considerable cliscussion within the

tfu;cipline in recent ye-ars and influenC<! AP chem istry expecta­

COM M UN I CATION and THEATRE ( COMA 334 - Gender and Communication - A (4 cr) May 29 - JUly 23 6.00 - 9:00 pm, TR (1 Usosky) - INGR- I 09

COMA 49-5 - I nternship (2 cr) July 29 - AugUSt 22 9:30 am - 1 2: 15 pm, TR (Staff) - INGR- 1 09 (CR.."l : 1 1 2 1 7)

COMA 499 -Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR (2 cr)

Attempts to analyze and understand

the relationship between gender and communication behavior. Co mpar i­ son and contrast of male and female commun icati on styles, similarities and differences in language usage. interpersonal dialogues, group discushlons and listening in personal and professio nal arenas. (C':RN: 1 .1 250)

COMA 336 (01 ) - Communicat­ ing 1n Business and the Professions (4 cr) May 28 - June 20

9:' 1 5 am - 12:30 pm, M7WR (0 Harney) - INGR- 1 09

July 29 - A ugust 2 7 9:30 am - 12 1 5 pm, MW (E Inch) - INGR-' 09 This course fulfill the capstone requirement fo r all communica­ tion degrees offered 111 the Department of Communic.1tion and Theat re. These include BA in Communication ( emphasis areas

Public Relations, Journalism, B roadcasting, 'ritieal Communi­ cation tudi es) and BFA i n Broadcasting. The seminar will provide stu den ts with the

opportunity to participate jn an i n ternsh ip and complete a �enior p roj ect that wiU incl ude a portfolio

(CR ' 1 1 1 23)

Focuses 00 the nature of commu­

and e1f-asses..mlt:nt.

Student deal with i nfo rm at ive

COMA 500 - Effective Communication (2 cr) July 8 - August 13

nication in organizational sett i ngs. and persuasive speaking, basi.:

business writing. i nterviewing, and interpersonal communication. (CRN' 1 0(43)

0[

6:00 - 1 0 00 pm, T (Staff) - INGR- 1 75B look at com m un icat i n proCCSSCl. in organi7.arion with development of specific communication skills;

those prellCntly t('aching or

COMA 336 (02) - Communi­ cating in Business and the Profe-ssions (4 tr)

includes public speaking tech­

In the future. Together, we will explore the AP exam, with an

May 29 - Jl.Jly 24 6:00 - 9.'00 pm, MW (Staff) - INGR - l 09

communication. interviewing strategies. and the role of listening.

tion . The workshop is designed for planning un teaching AP chemistry

emphasis on prepa rin g tudents fo r the exam; its development, and sco ring. We will also e.xamine

course content, teaching methods..

fucilities and materials needed for success, and chemical experimenta­ lion. Significant Lime will be devoted to labo ratory experiments for AP chem istry. Time is also provided for sharing experieoces and samples of teaching materials.

Emphasis will be on techmques that have been uccessful, text and

ancillary material reviews and on efti!clive learning approaches. Course tee; $675 includes haition and materials fee. (CRN: 1 1 1 39 -

Registration Blocked) Please phooe 253-535-7129 to register.

c

See above description. (CRN:

100(2)

COMA 385 - Introduction to Public Relations (4 cr) May 28 - June 20 12:30 - 3: 1 5 pm, MTWR (J. Lingwal/) - INGR- 1 1 5B

niques, infoanatlve and persu as ive

Th i s course fulfills the BA-MBA requirement. Tuition: $554 per

emesrer hour. (CRN. 1 0046)

THEA 458 - Creative Dramatics - AR (4 cr)

Emphasizes technical and

June 24 - July 1 9 9:30 a m - 12: 1 5 pm, MTWRF (1. Clapp) - INGR- 1 09 Designed to acquaint the student

I n trod uces theories, method�, ,Uld practice or public relations. analytical skills. P rerequisi te :

with materials. techniques. and

Communication core or onsent

theories of creative dramatics.

of instructor. ( CRN: 1 1 2 16)

Intended for e lementa ry and

COMA 475 - Advanced Media Production (4 cr)

p rospective teachers. theatre

May 28 - June 20 9: 7 5 am - 1 2:30 pm, M7WR (K. Isakson) - AOMN-203 Pr od UCi ng, scrip ting . d irec ting,

and camp counselors. day care

junior higb school teachers or

performing, and evaluating sophisticated audio and video programmlng. Prerequisite: COMA 374. (CRN: 1 12(3)

majors, religious leaders. youth workers, social and psycholog ica l worker , and community theatre leaders interested in working with children. Additional fees: cost of play tickets. (CRN: 10047)

COM PUTER SCIENCE AND COM PUTER E N G I­ N EE R I N G CSCE 1 2 0 - Computerized Information Systems - NS (4 cr) May 28 - June 20 1 2:30 - 3045' pm, M7VVR (y Tang) - UClR- 136 Introduction to computers including ma n agement intonnatiun systems developmen t, telecommu­ nicatiCJns, opemting system

preadshcets, graphics, and database management. In cludes a computer laboratory componenL Lab Fee: $50. Prereq ui ite· MATI-I l lS or 140 or equivalent. (CRN: 1 1 1 47)

CSCE 1 44 - Introduction to Computer Science - NS (4 cr)

May 28 - JUly 3 8:45 - / 1 .30 am, M7VVR (J Brink) - MGYM-l02

An introd uction to compu ter science including problem solvi ng, algorith m design, tructured programming, numerical and non­

oumerical ap pl ical1ons, and use of data files. Ethical and social impacts of computing. Prerequisite: 4 years of high s.:hool mathematics or

MAfH 1 40 or equivalent . lab Fee:

$50. (CRN: 1 1 106)

CSCE 270 - Data Structures ­ NS (4 cr) July 8 - August 1 5 8:45 - 1 7 30 am, MTWR (G. Hauser) - MGYM- 1 02

Contin uation of p rogram ming technique and a study of basic data structures including lists. stacks,

queues, aDd trees. Applica ti ons of these forms to sorting, searching. and data storage are made. PrereqUisite: CSCE 1 44, Introduc­ tion to Computer . dence, or eq uivalenL For more information,

contact Dr. Hauser at 253-535873 J . Lab Fee: $50. (CRN: 1 0490)

CSCE 400 - Semlhar: Computer Security and Cryptology- NS (4

cr)

May 28 - June 2 1 8.-00 - 1 0;45 am, M7WRF (R. Spillman) - RCTR-22 1 The explosive worJdwitle growth of

computer systems has created 3 large demand for computer

scientists, engineers, and mathema­ ticians who understa nd the basic principles of computer security. During the first WIlmer sess i on,

16


Be sure to check www. plu. edul-summer fo r u pdated course i nformation

the Department of Computer dence and Engineering will offer a special co u rse designed to introduc<' our students to this impo rtant field of study. The course will cover: the comlTUction of dphm; ruetho& for breaking codes and c iphers: methods fur protecting databases and operating systt!ll'lS; access control�; how a computer virus works, and protect i o n from viruses. The only prerequisI te for the class is CSCF 144. For more infonnation contact Dr. Richard pillman at 253-5357406. (CRN: 1 05 19)

ECONOMICS ECON 1 52 - Principles of Microeconomics - 52 (4 cr) May 28 - June 2 1 9:30 am - 1 2: 15 pm, TWRF (K Travis) - XAVR-20 1 I ntroduces the study of economic dec i sion m aki n g by fInns and individuals. Economic tools and concept such as market , supply and demand, and efficiency ap plied to contemporary issues. (CRN: 1 1222) ( ECON 520 - Economic Policy Analysis - (4 cr) July 8 - August 7 5 6:00 - 930 pm, MR (K Terada) - XA VR-2S0 An intensive introduction LO the concepts of macroeconomics and microeconomics wi th an emphasi' on policy formation within a global framework. Tuition: $554 p er semester hou r. (CRN: 1 1 099)

EDUCATI O N EDUC 205 - Multicultural Perspectives In the Classroom A (4 cr) July 29 - August 23 8:30 - 1 1 .'30 am, MTWRF (Staff) - ADMN-204B t\ course which creates an awareness and understanding of divmity, d irectly addre ing iss ue such as ethnjcity, ge nder, disability, racism or poverty. There is a service component that involves tutoring students for a m in imum of 1 2 hours over t he period of the course. Meets the Alternative Perspective� of the D iversity requirement. { CRN: 1 1 1 52)

EDUC 41 1 - Strategies for Literacy Development in the OasSToom (2 cr) June 24 - July 5 8:00 - 1 0:45 pm, MTWRF (M Walker) - ADMN-20B The developmental n a l ure of litera..-y leaming with emphasis on the vital rol e of language and the interrelatedness and interdepe n ­ dence of listen ing. speaking. reading, and writing as language prucesse .. Cross-listed with EDUC 5 1 1 . (CRN: 1 0097) EDUC 413 - Language and Literacy Development: Assess­ ment and Instruction (4 cr) June 24 - July ' 9 2:00 - 4:45 pm, MTWRF (J. Lewis) - ADMN-204A Understanding of a wide variety of strategies and tools for a.'lSCSS ing and facilitating students' development i n reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Cross-listed wi th EDUC 513 and PED 5 13. (CRN: 10099) EDUC 426- Special Top/cs in Children'S Literature: Picture Books (2 tr) August 12 - August 23 2 '00 - 4:45 pm, MTWRF (C. Yetter)- ADMN-200 Exploration of the pi cture book art form and development, including the historical evolution, range of formats and notable creators of picture books. CrOsS-listed with EDUC 526. (CRN: 1 1 084) EDUC 427 - Multicultural Children's literature (2) JUly 22 - July 26 8:30 am - 4:30 pm, MTWRF (1. Lewis) - ADMIN-200 Expl oration of multi-cultural issues in the context of , hild ren's literature. There will be oppo r tu ­ nines to read a variety of texts across genres, and inco rp orate a variety of strategies for use of multi-cultural texts in te ach ing and learning. Cross-listed with EDUC 527. (CRN: 1 L270) EOUC 428 - Children's litera­ ture in the K-8 Curriculum (2 a) July 8 - July 1 9 1 :00 p m - 4:00 pm, MTWRF (C Yetter) - ADMN-209 [nvestigation of genre of

contemporary ch ild re n's l i terature

and development of a personal repertoire for classroo m use.

Cross-listed with EDVC 528. ( CRN: 10582)

EDUC 429 - Adolescent literature in the Secondary Curriculum (2 cr) Augu� 12 - August 23 9:00 am - 12:00 pm, MTWRF (Staff) - ADMN-2 1 2 Genres in adolescent literature and exploration of strategies for i n tegrati on of young adult materials across the m i ddle and secondary sch ool curriculum. Cross-Ii ted with EDUC 529. (CRN: 1 0578) EOUC 438(0 1 ) - Strategies for Whole literacy Instruction K 12 (Reading Emphasis) (2 cr) July 22 - July 26 8:30 am - 4.-30 pm, MTWRF (Staff) - ADMN-209 trategies for teaching l iteracy skills, co ncepts, and processes thro ugh th=lic units, int egrated curriculum and resea rch projects for K- 1 2 clas rooms. Focus on curriculum components for Library Media Specialist · and collaborative p roJects with classroom teachers, Cro 's-listed wi.th £DUC 538. ( C RN : L 009 1 )

EOUC 438(02) - Strategies for Whole literacy Instruction K 1 2 (2 cr) July 29 - August 9 9:30 am - 12:30 pm, MTWRF (Staff) - ADMN-209 trategies for teaching literacy skill , concepts, and pwcesses through thematic units, in t egrated curriculum and research projec ts for K- 12 classroom . POCllli on curriculum components for Library Media Specialists and collaborative p rojects with classroom teachers. (CRN' 1 1 273) EOUC 445 - Methods for Teaching Foreign Languages and English as a Second Language (4 cr) June 24 - July 1 8 2:00 - 4. 45 pm, MTWR

(8. Reisman) - ADMN-20B

Th<.'Ories and related techniques for

teaching languages K J 2 within their cultural context. including direct methods, content-based instruction, proficiency orienta­ tions, and the integration of

technologies. Attention given to va ri atio ns in approach for those teaching English as a second language. No prerequ i sItes. Required tor teacher certification in a language and for minor in Engl ish

as a Secontl I.a:nguage. Strongly recommended for elementary major in a language. Cross-listed with LANG 445. (CRN: 10593)

EDUC 470 - Curriculum, Materials and Instruction for Teaching English as a Second Language (4 cr) July 2, 3, 9, 1 0, 1 1. 16, 1 7 and 1 8 8:00 am - 2.:30 pm, TWR (E Coghlan) - ADMN-202 Examination of curriculum , assessment, and tnSlrliClion in bilingual l earning- teaching contexts. Critical walysis of language tea chi ng methodology, i mplemen tation of m at e ri a l s, and asses ment des i gn s. S p ec ia J emphases on the hjsto rical and socio-poliucal contexts of ESL instruction and issues of language d iscri minati on relevant to literacy in!>truction. Cra s - I iste d With LANG 470. ( CRN: 1 1 164) EOUC 475 - Practicum in Teaching English as a Second Language (1 cr) July 2 - July 1 8, TBA (Staff) - TBA Extended clI:perience and partici­ pat i on in an assigned ESL setting. Pre.requisi.te:

(concurrent

LANG/EDUC 445

with LANG/EDUC

470 ) . (eRN: 1 0597)

EOUC S03A - Workshop: The Good-byes and Hellos of Kids and Teens Grieving (4 cr) June 24 - July 19 9.'30 am - 12: 1 5 pm, MTVIIRF (I Johnstone) - XAVR-250 This course will explore the impacts of loss and the res ul t ant grIeving process that occurs within young people. Losses cxpJ red will be: dying and death, divorce and detachments (i.e., moving-­ including fCster care and adoption�, jife c:yele changes, physical disabilities and injuries) . We will cover developmental aspects of grieving in dying, death and divorce; in terventions that support grieving at school, home and in the community; gender commonalties and sirnil.iritie j when grieving

visits the cllool hOlllic; rituab of healing; ethnicity and cultural im pacts on the grieving journey; the fine arts in grieving; commu­ nity resources for healing grief; disenfranchised gr ief in youth; care for caregivers; teaching and curricular connections wi th loss

17


COU RSE D ESCR I PTIONS

a.nd gric� and compl icated grief

of schools. Required of any track

opt i on selected. (CRN: 1 0580)

interventions. Class activities

i nclude mini lectures. group dialogues, guest presentations, 4-5 field trips to commun ity resou rces ( i.e., Mary Bridge Ch ild ren's

Ho-pital, Bridge$ GTieving Center,

fLmeral home and cemete ry ), major flInu ami personal interviews and

outsi de feadings. Class projects will be individualized field of interest

to

,�ch �tudent's

(i.e., education ,

social work, sociology and nursing) . Cross-listcd with

(CRN: 1 0902)

SOCW 399.

t o acquaint

studcnt.� with

grounds, perccptual systems, soc i a l

organization, language, .lod non­ verbal messages in i n Lercultural communication. (eRN:

1 1 086)

5030 - Advanced

Placement Institute: American Government (2 cr)

July 22 - July 26 9'00 am - 4 '00 pm, M7WRF (G Westergaard) - ADMN-204B

This is an intensive co urS!! for high �ool faculty i nvolved in teaching

AP Ameri",'111 Go�rnment cou rses . It 6 designed to aid both the

new

AP

te'.lcher and experien.:ed Ai> tcacht'rs

$675, includes tui ti on and materials fee. (eRN! I 1 1 46 -

Tuition:

Registration Blo ked) Please phone

253-535-7 1 29 to register.

EDUC 503(11 - Workshop: I nformative literature and Curriculum Development (2 cr) July 1 July 3, and July 22 July 26 9.00 am - 12:00 pm, MTlNRF (Staff) - RAMS-204 Field wode required 1 :00-4:00 -pm.

daily. For W R. sludcnts only.

(CRN: 1 1 2·m

505 - CUrrent IS5ues in

Literacy Education (2 cr) Avgust 12 - August 23 2:00 - 4:45 pm, MTlNRF (J Lewis) - ADMN-2048

Imtial COLlISe required for all

51udents in the

master"

program

in literacy education. Overview of hi 'turicai and CUrre nt theory. practice, defin itions. and research

in l �ngu.lge and literacy acquisi ­ tion ,md development in and ou t

18

and secondary sou rces. incl uding docu ment. b i bli ography. rul l text, statiStical, visual, and reGorded

forms.

(eRN: 1 1 1 85 - Registrat ion

EOUC 509 - Foundations of Collection Development (2 er) JUne 24 - July 7 9, TBA (C Yetter) - TBA

the influen ccs of cultural back­

E DUC

dala ilnd information in primary

ment o nly.

(Staff) - ADMN-2 1 7

E DUC

Explorat ion of a broad ra n ge of

Blocked) Regi ·trn�ion by depart ­

E DUC. 5038 - Workshop: language and Culture (2 cr) July 22 - July 26 8030 am - 4.'30 pm, M7WRF Designed

EDUC 507 - P ri n ci p les of Information Organization, Retrieval, and Service (2 cr) June 24 - July 1 9, TBA (C Yetter) - TBA

The philosophl al hases and parameters of ment

oUeclion develop­

i n the school library media

cenLer.

(CRN: 1 1 1 86 - RegisLration

Blocked) Regi ·tration by depal"t­

E DUC 526 - Special Topics in Chi l d ren 'S Literature: Picture Books (2 er) August 72 - A ugust 23 Z'00 - 4A5 pm, MTWRF (C Yetter)- ADMN-200

EDue 537 - Media and Technology for School Library Media Specialists (2 cr) July B - July 7 9 8:00 a m - 12.·30 pm, M7WRF (I Moomaugh) - OFF CAMPUS (Rogers High School)

(arm and development, ind udi ng

The management of media and

Exploration of the pic t u re book art

the hL<;torical evolut ion, mnge of

tech nology service in the school

fomlatS and notable O"ltators of

library media center..'ipecial

pi dllIT books. "ross-listed with

emphasis on emerging technologies

mue 426. (CRN: I \ 085) E DUC 527

used in K-'12 instructional programs (CD-ROM, interactive video,

- Multicultural

distance learning, and computer

Children'S Literature (2)

tcchnoiogit.'s). (eRN: I I OB7)

Exploration of multi-cultural

E DU C 538(0 1 ) - Strategies for Whole Literacy Instruction K 12 (Reading Emphasis) (2 cr) JUly 22 - July 26 8�30 am - 4:30 pm, M7WRF

July 22 - July 26 830 am - 4. 30 pm, M7WRF (J Lewis) - ADMN-200 is

ues

in the context of children's

literature. There will be opportu­ nities to read a vari ety of texts

aero

S

genres, and incorporate

a

variety of strategies for use of

multi -cul tural texts in teachi ng :md learning. Cross�listed wi th

£DU

EDUC 5 1 0 - Acquisition and Development of language and Literacy (2 cr) July 22 � July 26 8.30 am - 4.30 pm, M7WRF (Staff) ADMN-2 1 6

E DUC 528 - Children's litera­ ture in the K-8 Cu rri c u l um (2 cr) July 8 - July 1 9 7'00 p m - 4 0 0 pm, MTWRF (C Yetter) - ADMN-209

lnvestigalian o f how young

children acquire their firsL language and what they know as a result of this learn ing.

(eRN; I 006fl)

nature

of

:

lnvestigation of genres of

contemporary ch ildren's literature a nd developmen t of a personal

use . El)UC 428.

repe rto ire for cla sroom

Cross-lis(ed with

(CRN: 1 0583)

EDUC 51 1 - Strategies for Uteracy Development in the Classroom (2 cr) June 24 - July 5 8.·00 - 1 0:45 am, MTWRF (M Walker) - ADMN-20B The developmental

427. (CR

1 1 27 1 )

men t only.

EDUC 529 - Adolescent literature in the Secondary Curriculum (2 cr) August 12 - August 23 9�OO am - 1 2.'00 pm, M7WRF (Staff) - ADMN-2 ! 2

literacy I c-aming with emphasi on

Genres in ddokscent literature and

the vital role of language and the

exploration of strategic for

interrelatedness and interdepen ­ dence of l isteni ng, speaki ng, reading, and processe¢.

w rit i ng as language

ross-listed w i th EDUC

integration o f young adu l t

materials across lb.e middle and

seco ndary school curriculum . Cross-listed with EDUC 429.

4 1 1 . (eRN : 1 0098 )

(CRN: 10579)

EDUC 5 1 3- language and Uteracy D eve l opment: Assess­ ment and Instruction (4 cr) June 24 - July 7 9 2 '00 - 4:45 pm, MTWRF

EDUC 530 - Children's Writing (2 cr) July 8 - July 1 9 8:00 - / 0'45 am, MTWRF (I Bates) - ADMN-20B

Understanding of a wide variety of

straregie� and rools fur as,;essi ng and

teaching and learning of writing i n elementary da.srooms. (eRN:

fucilirating students' development in

1 0424)

(J Lewis) - ADMN-204A

reading, writing, li ten ing, and speak i ng . Cross,listed with IIDUC 4 1 3 and SPED 5 1 3. (eRN: 1 0 100)

(Staff) - ADMN-209

Strategies for teaching literacy sIGHs, concepts, and processes through thematic units, i ntegrated

curriculum and research proj ect for K - 1 2 classrooms. Pocu on U1rriculum components for

Library Media Specialist and collaborat ive projects with cla sroom teachers.

(

.RN:

1 0092 )

E DUC 5 44 (02) - Research and Program Evaluation (2 cr) June 25 - A ugust 22, TBA (L McGraw) - OFF CAMPUS

Knowledge of evaluation tech­

niques. induding portfolios, and or

research de.sign ; ability to interpret educational research; to identify,

locate, and acquire typical research

and related literatures; to use the results of research or evaluation to pr pose program changes and write grants.

(eRN: 1 1 047)

" E DUC 550 (0 1 )-- Prinapalshjp I - GEPC (3 cr) May 29 - July 24 6:00 - 830 pm, MW (M Baughman) - ADMN-2 7 5 In troduction to the roie -and function of the principalship, with enlpha�is o n team b u ild ing and

Current theory and practice i n the

inti!rpersonal professional rela t ionships and et hical dec ision ­

making. Prereqmsite: Admission

to

Ed. Admin. Program . (CR:--J: ) 0069

- Registration Blocked) Registra­ tion by Program D ircctor.

" E DUC 550 (02) - Principalship I - GEAO (3 er) May 29 - July 24 6:00 - 8:30 pm, MW (M Baughman) - A DMN-2 1 5

Introduction to the role and


Be sure to check www.plu.edul-summer for updated co u rse i nformatio n

function

of the principal�hip, with on team building 3Jld

emphasis

t ion Blockell) Registration by Program Director.

Thi s culmi nat i ng effort i.� R research

EDUC 563C - lntegrating Seminar: Legal and Statistical Issues in Education (1 cr)

and lhl' grJ.dudLe adviser. Prerequi­

paper

i'sue selected jointly by the ;tudent

i n rerpe.rsonal professional rciationship .lnd ethical decision­

makin' . Prerequi sit � ; Admission Ed. Adm in . Program.

-

to

(eRN: 1 074 1

Registration B locked) Registra.­

tion by Program D i rector.

EDUC 552 (01 ) - Principalship I I I

- GEPC (4 cr) May 3 1 - July 27, TBA

June 1 and June 8 8:30 am - 430 pm, Saturday (L Reisberg) - ADMN-202 StLldenL� will complete m u l t i ­

(Staff) - TBA

for comm unicat ion pallem� in the

other wa.ys to usc tcdloology as a vehicle for program assessment in

agencies, including medical, legai.

�nd sodal ·ervices. as well as with

students, pa rents, and struT. Prerequisite.; Admission to Ed. Ad min Program.

l ion by

Reg i stralion Blocked) Reghtration

by Program D i reclor.

EDUC 552 (02) - Pri ncipalship III

- G EAO (4 cr)

May 3 1 - Ju.ly 27, TBA (G Dewey) - TBA Knowledge anJ skill development

the

school setting and with a.'i.'iOQated

agencies i ncl uding m e d i cal, legal, and socia! crvice�. as well

as

wilh

s t udent , parents. and star{ Prerequ iliite: Admission to Ed.

Admin Prog ram. ( eRN: 1 1 090 Registration Bloekeu )

Registration

by rrogram lJirectOf.

(CRN: 1 1 1 99

Program Di rector.

Development (2 cr) June 26, JUly 3, 10 and 1 1 8"00 am - 2:30 pm, W (M Hillis) - XAVR-20 1 Type or wrriculum organi za­ tions, programs and techniques of

curriculum development.

f'rerclJui�i le:.: Admissio ns to the

(CRN,

1 1 045 )

EOUC 562 - Schools and Society (3 cr) June 10 - June 28 8:30 am - 7225 pm, MNVRF

(e Lamoreaux) - ADMN-2 7 5

Indi v idual and cooperative study

ofthe sOQo-cultural and cultural, pol itical, legal, historical and phill'lSophical foundations of Cu rrent practices of schooling in

EeUC 5630 - Integrating Seminar: Issues of Child Abuse and Neglect and tile Law (1 cr)

June 1 5 and June 22 8:30 am - 4:30 pm, Saturday

- Registra-

concentration and

must be

a re expected

in

a

fin al

LO

ral

defend their theses

xaminati n

conducted by lh�ir committee. Prerequisite: Instruc tor's signature i ndependen t study card prior

(eRN: I 07 1 fl)

E DUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

child abuse and neglect. Includes

registration .

identification and reporting procedure .• and the legal Hnd professional responliihilities of the

educator. Prerequisi t e: Admission to M.A. with Certificatjon

(eRN; 1 1 200 - Regi tion Blocked) Regi tration hy Program

tra­

EDUC 564 - The Arts. M i nd and Body (2 cr)

EPSY 560 - Communkation in the Schools (3 cr) July 1 - Ju ly 1 9 8:30 a m - 72;25 pm, MTWRF (S Yerian) - ADMN-2 1 5

Study (If the theories a n d concepts of those he lp i ng skill, needed to facill tate problem-solving and persollal and a.cademic growth with appLicaliom to the cla)'sr(Jom

July 22 - July 26 8:30 am - 4:30 pm M71NRF (Staff) - £CAM-G YM Exploration of methods to

and to interaLlions with. prof< ' ­

faci litate creativity and mea.ning­

Registration BI eked) Regi.�tration

making in the classroom

through

visuai, musical, nun·verbaU

physical movemenl, and arts.

dramatic

invoLvement in direct arti�lic

and phys i c:al educatio n expe[i<'nccs provides the foundation for

understanding the teacher's role in enhancing children's thinking and concept expl()ration in the

da.o;sroom. Materials fee: $25. Prerequisite: Aclmi sian

[0

M.A./

CeIt Program. (eRN : J 0095 Registration

Blocked) Registration

July 29 - A ugust 24, TBA (St<Jff) - TBA

EPSY 566(02) - Advanced Cognition Development and Learning (3 cr)

June 25, July 2, July 8, July 9, July 7 " July 1 6 and July 1 8 8:00 am - 2:30 pm, MTR (L McGraw) - XAVR-20 1 See de5cription above. (eRN: 1 1044) EPSY 583(01) - Current Issues in Exceptionality (Urban Learners Cohort Group) (2 cr)

July 30 and 3 7, August 1 and 6 8:00 a m - 2:30 pm, TWR (Staff) - INGR- 1 1 58

The characteristics of exceptional st udent and cu rrenl issues involving the educator\ role i n dealing with their speClal

( 'RN:

approvell by the andidate's

i nstrun iun a l issu�'i conceming

Thj� course will focus on legal and

EDUC 598 - Studies in Educa­ tion (2 cr)

j 0535

EOUC 599 - Thesis (1 u) May 28 - August 24, TBA (Staff) - TBA The thes i problem w i ll be chosen from the candidate's maj or field of

to

the curre n t status f schools and the evaluation of the i r past, prese.nl, and future. Prerequisite:

,eRN:

lion. (GRN: 1 05311)

on

by Program Director.

ProgrllI!l.

the

InSli uetor's signatme on indepen ­ dent study card prior to regi lra­

(K Ger/achJO Breen) - ADMN-200

America. Bmphasis will be given to

Admission to the MA/Cert

of 26

graduate t:ommittce. Candidates

Program Director

( DUC 555 - Curriculum

graduate program .

Prerequis ite: Admiss.ion Lo the

- Registration Blocked) Regi t ra­

(eRN: 1 1 089

for communi 'ation pat terns in

explore

their publ ic school classrooms.

M .A.!Ccrt p rogram.

m i nim u m

student's advisor. Prerequisite:

ing t he i r professional educat ion in

school se'lli ng a.ml with associateu.

program; 544, 545;

M.A.; consultation with

media d igital portfolio document ·

Progra.m . They will als

s ites: Admission to the graduak

hours 0 coursework leading to the

th<' MA w ith Certilication

Knowledge and skill develapment

or project on a n educ.ltional

s i ona l col l eagues. Prerequ i site:

Ad mission H) M.A. with Certifica­ tion program. (CRN: 1 0083 -

1 1 1 65)

need�.

EPSY 583(02) - Cu rrent Issues in Exceptionality (Urban Learners Cohort G roup) (4 cr)

July 29 - August 9 ROO ilrn - 2:30 pm. MTlNRF (K Gerlach) - ADMN-208 See descrip t ion above. (eRN: 1 1 2(9)

SPECIAL E D U CATI ON ( SPED 301 - Assessment!

Evaluation in Special Education (3 cr)

May 28 - June 20 4:00 - 8.·00 pm, TR

(G. Williams) - ADMN-200

Examination of knowledge and

skill used in formal md i Momlal assessm e n t.

I ncludes examInation

of scoring procedures, issue· in validi t y and reliability. and We role of assessmenl in deci ion making.

(eRN: 1 1 148)

c

SPED 350 - Teaching Students with Moclerate Disabilities (4 cr)

May 28 - June 1 9

- 7:45 pm, MW (Staff) -- ADMN-208

by Progra m D ireClOr.

5:00

EPSY 566(01) - Advanced Cog nitio n Development and Learning (3 cr) July 29 - August 1 5 8:30 a m - 1230 pm, MTWR (L McGraw) - ADMN-200

E.x.am i nation of specific interven­

Study uf principles and current thought and ["('search in cognil ion , development and learning.

Application to tile organization,

Lions to enhance the acquisi tion or knowlellge and skills for students who need additional support to

meet

lheir l ea rn i ng p o ten t i a l . Includes 45 hour of (ielcl based work. (CRN. 1 1 092 )

SPED 399 - Practicum in Specia l

Prereqursite: Admj ·ion to the M.A.

Education (1 cr) June 24 - July 20, TBA (Staff) - TBA Experience w i t h speciill education

1 0 1 l1 - Regi!.tration Blocked)

supervised setting. 1 hour credit

planning. and the delivery of

instruction wil! be addressed.

with Certincarion Program. ( CRN: Registration by ProgTam Director.

children or adults is () IT<'red in given

to

a

�LlCCCSSfu) completion of

45 clock hours. Prerequisi te:

19


COURSE DESCR I PTIONS

flor infonnati n about Continuing Ed ucati on courses that will be

offered th is summer for edllcator , pll:'ase ph on e 253-535-7273 or check our website al www.plu.edll/-edllc for an updated listing. consent of i n s tru c to r. (CRN:

1 1 1 37 - Registration

B loc ked ) To

register ph on \! 535-7272. SPED 404 - Communication and Collaboration (3 cr) July 22 - July 26 830 am - 4 '30 pm, MTWRF (K. Gerlach) - ADMN-2 1 9

Focus o n knowledge and �kills necessary for effective collabora­

lion and s upe rv is io n with pa re nts,

professionals. and paraeducators.

(eRN : 1 1 1 3'5)

After the first day of c1as , we will tanlC)' Eleme n tary

[ndudes -L'l hours of field based

work. (eRN: 1 1 094) SPED 407 - Curriculum, Instruc­ tion. and Tech nology (4 cr)

July 29 August 23 9 1 5 am - 12. 1 5 pm. MTWRF (Staff) - ADMN-2 1 5 Kn mvledge a n d skills needed fo r teach ing academic. social, and a da p tive skil l s to

Incl udes 15 hours of field based wo rk .

(eRN:

1 1 246)

SPED 5 1 3 - Language and Literacy: Assessment and Development (4 cr) June 24 - July 1 9 2 '00 - 4:45 pm. MTWRF (J Lewis) - ADMN-204A Under tanding of a wi de variety of

SPED 405 - Teaching Students with Mild Disabilitjes (4 cr) June 24 - July 1 8 / '00 - 4:00 pm, TR (Sta ff) - ADMN-2 15

meet a l

" SPED 492 - Strategies for Early Leamers (2 er) May 28 - June 20 5. 00 - 7:00 pm, TR (Staff) - ADMN-204A

lea rners with

special needs. Includes writing IEP's, data based instruction. t ask

analysis. and co mputer assisted

instruction. Prerequisites: rolf

400 and SPED .�O l , 350, 355, 390 ,

39 1 . or 405, ( CRN: 1 0 ( 1 4)

SPED 408 - Transitions from School to Community(2 cr) June 24 - July 1 7 3.·00 - 5:45 pm, MW (Staff) - ADMN-200

Exa m in ation of knuwle cige and

skills related to caree r vocational transition and life adjust ment

(CRN: 1 1 145)

SPED 480- Issues in Child Abuse and Neglect (1 cr) Augusr 3 and August 1 0 8:30 am - 4 '30 pm, Saturday (K. Gerlach) - ADMN-200

Scope and p mblems of child abuse. n eg lec t . and family violence.

i ncluding behaviors exhibited by

abused and neglected c h i l dre n and adolescents Includes identificauon

and reporting procedures, and the

leg.!1 and p ro fessi o nal respomibili­

ties of the educator. Methods for teaching personal safety will be

addressed. (CRN: 1 0888)

st rategies anti toob for assessing and facilitatmg st ud en ts' develop­ ment

i n readmg, writing, J j stenillg,

:md speaking. Prerequi ite: EDU

5 1 0; h i ghly recom mended to be taken at the end of the track

se ss io ns . Cross l isted with ED 4 1 3/ 5 1 3 (eRN'! 10592) SPED 577 - Inclusive Classroom (U rban Learners) (2 cr) August 7. 8, 1 3 and 1 4 8:00 a m - 2030 pm, TWR (P Leitz) - ADMN-2 1 0 In trod uctioIl fo t he pri nc ip l es and

practICes of inclusive ed ucat io n .

PROJECT I M PACT For more information about Project I mpact program for educators see page 28. visit our website al WWw.plll.edu/-edll or contact:

Mr. Tony Aho

or

School of Ed ucat io n

allott@plludli

la",orew@pll1.edu

EN GLIS H

diary, 0 dass performance and several . hor. papers. (

ENGL 2 1 7 - Short Story: Native American Literature- A, LT (4 cr) July 29 -August 23 1 2: 30 - 3: 1 5 pm, MTWRF (D. Miranda) - ADMN-204A

bort prose and poetry from contemporary

alive American

N:

1 1 221 )

ENGL 251 - British Traditions I n Literature - LT (4 cr) June 24 - July 1 9 9:30 am - 1 2 . 1 5 pm, MTWRF rr Campbell) - ADMN-2 1 4 A tri p through 1 9th and 20th

authors. (eRN. 1 1 220)

Century British li ter ary hi sto ry

ENGl 227 - Imag inative Writing I - WR (4 cr) May 28 - June 2 1 9.30 am - 72: 1 5 pm, MTWRF (D. Seal) - ADMN-2 1 1 B

the "c r i t i cal " tradilion: wri ters wl:to

question ed orthodox values,

Students will work on variOtL�

sexuality. We'll read ear l y fem i ­

the lerm will comp lete one solid,

nist , rom an tic revolutionaries. ViLtorian aes t he te s, modem

focusing on what could be called

fiction writing tech n iq ue and over

successful s ho rt sto ry. Exerci e on character and plot devel opment.

SPED 598 - Studies in Special Education (2 cr) May 28- August 24 (Staff) - TBA

will co m p lem en t class workshops

and practice refining writing styles on students' work and individual

conference., with the in ·truetor. St uden ts will also keep a wr iter' s iournal.

(

RN:

1012 ) )

c h a l le nged exist i ng standards,

articulatl.·tJ alternative view o f

literature. Dature. ge nder, god,

iconoclasts, and post-modern revisionists.

(CRN;

1 0 1 23 )

E N G L 3 0 1 - Shakespeare - LT (4 cr) May 29 - July 24 6;30 - 9.30 pm, MW (S Jansen) - ADMN-200

The R�naissance is th .. Golden Age

of En gli sh Iiteralllre, the fh eate r it

ENGl 232 - Women Writers of the Americas - A. LT (4 tr) May 28 - June 2 1 9:30 am - 12 · / 5 pm, MTWRF (L Marcus) - ADMN-2 1 6

most remark1lblc l i terary fonn,

535-7272.) (eRN: 1 0 1 1 5)

A w071lall wizo

be read m g 3 rep rese ntat ive

SPED 599 - Thesis (3-4 cr) May 28 - August 24 (Staff) - TBA

mId dlildrerr alld islmllls IVl:!'en'r elJough; C1S ifmourners and gossips

The thCSIS problem i chosen from

Sire think:. slle alii

an ed ucat ion al ISsue selected

j o intly by the �Ludl:'nt

and the

gra d ua te adviser. I I will be

reviewed by the st ude nt's graduate

committee.

(To regi�ter ph o ne

writes Jefls 100 !nUcll, rhose rrances ami POrtetl/s! As if cycles

tlrld vegetables were never WflTIl

erJO llgh.

the >tars, A

the candidate's major field of

writer is esse rftial/y a spy. These

concent ration and must be

wo rds by Americall poet Anne

approved by the candidate's

Sexton hi ghligbt women's rich :md

graduat\:' committee. Candidate..� are

varied e:'qleriences as writer�. The

expected to defend their thesis in a

oou� will explore the writing of women across borders of land, water

finaJ oral examination conducted by their c;ommittee. (To register phone 535-7,m.) (CRN: 101 18)

and language; class, col or and kin. We will read a variety of texts from Cristina Sant iago'� Dreaming in

Cllban to Haitian immigrant Edwidge Danticat's Brentfr, Ej'f!S,

Memory; from Canadian Margaret Atwood's The Ha71dmaiden's 'flue to the diaries (and paintings) of surrealist Mexican painter Frida

Kahlu. Course work \YilJ i nc lu de II

20

of Education

253-535-8342

writ in g dialogue and descript ion,

be a research paper or project on

choo l

253-535-7276

(eRN: 1 1 1 M)

This culminating experience may

Dr. Doug Lamoreaux

and Shakespoare-perhaps-the

g reatest

f aU English author

.

How can any \'lriler live up to this reputa t ion? fn this course we will

sampling of S h ake sp eare's plays

(comt!dy, tragedy. hi.�tory, romance) as well as tackling so me of the plays that presen t "prob­

l ems " for contemporary a ud iences/

readeTS. rn addition to

ur reading,

we will lncorporate a number of

film versions of the plays into the course so tha t we c an see h ow

hakespeare's work ha.� been "staged," reinterpreted and even

reinven ted b y modem directors fOT contemporary audiences. And we'll ask how and whether, after

aU, Shakespeare does live up to his

rep u t ati on . (eRN: ( 0 1 25)


Be

ENGl 3 1 3 - The Art of the Book

1 - (4 cr)

May 28 - June 2 1 9'00 a m - 12:00 pm, MTWR

(Friday open studio) (P Temple-Thurston) - INGR- 1 22

This course is a hand.� -on, studio introduction to the traditional

s u re to

check www.plu.edul-summer for u pdated cou rse i nformation

ENGL 503 (01) - Advanced Placement Institute: Eng l i sh Literature (2 0)

July 22 - July 26 9. 00

am

- 4.'00 pm, MTvVRF

(L Balra) - XAVR-20 1

Suitable fer experienced or inexperienced AP teachers, both

aesthetics of the printed word and

Lirer.tture and Composition !f<lchers

the creative world of arl ist�' books,

or

Language and Composition

an imaginat ive �nd expressive

teachers. Although the AP Examin.1-

gen re that co m b i nes language,

tion unites teachers and students in

imagery, innovatiw bookfonns,

a common

and distinctive materials. TItis class

is differen t. This weekIong CQufSt�

will place special empha.�is on

enables teadlers

creating personal illu trated books.

diverse experiences. All

Cross-listed with ARID 33 1

encouraged to bring materials, and

Studio fee' $J() (eRN: 1 1 264) E NGl 327 - Imaginative Writing II - WR (4 cr) May 28 - June 22 9:30 am - 12: 1 5 pm, MnNRF

(0. SeaQ - ADMN·2 1 1 B Studt:nts will work on various

fiction writing techni q ues and over

the

lerm

will complele one �olid,

uccess[u] hart story.

Exercises all

character and plot development, writing dialogue and description. and practice refining writmg styles wlll complement lass workshops on students' work and individual co.nferen,e� with the instructor.

StUJ:knts will also keep a writer'h

journal. (CRN. l O L 22)

ENGl 403 - The E ng l is h Language (4 �r)

June 24 - July 20 9:30 am - 72: 7 5 pm, MTWRF (1. Beech) - RAMS-206 Studies in the- structure and h istory of English, with em phasis o n syntactical anaiy b and issues 01 usage..

(CR.i'!: l 1 l 24)

for S�andjnavjan Nurses (2 cr) "ENGL 501

-

Writing

June I B - lLlly 9 1 30 pm - 5:00 pm, TWR (Staff) - ADMN-2 1 7 A Advanced English compositioD and conversation in the English Language. Emphasis on English competence using American

health care agencies for analYSIs and discussion. Open to summer MSN student... and all Scandina­ vian studen4;. Cost: $554 per semestu hour. (CRN: 10869 Registration Blocked) RegistnLtion by department only.

endeavor, every AP class to

share their are

aJl leave with a wealth of new ideas. In addition, the instructor has organized sessions on a Shakespeare play, a short story, selected poems,

and a change Lo work with English

Vertical Teams. All of these sessions employ VlIrious model· of collabora­

live learning and some brief writing assi gnments. Although a variety of

writing a�lgllments are d iscussed through the week, tht:re i' also a

H I STORY

�tudents more successful in the dass and an the AP exami nation . This week we come together as 3 learnjng community to sec how we can make AP Language more

i nclusive and Ies.� exclusive to our student populatio n . We will discuss

the ba,ics of the examination. what i t look.� like, and how it is scored.

We will also partiC1pate in a train i ng sess ion, which simulates the t raining of the teacht:I� who read and

core

the anl'll for The

College Board. Most importantly we will discuss strategies for analyzing style in literature. Course ftc: $675, includes tuition and materials fee . (CRN: I I t 4 1 -

ENGL 503 {03} - Advanced Placement Institute: English Vertical Teams (2 cr)

that AP Englis.h .should

Examination. In

isolated course but

be an

rather a planned

participants learn t read and grade

progrnm of teaching skills and

an essay question llSi ng actual AP

concepts owr several years and that

standards. Course tee: $673, includes

a

planned program is best achieved

pbune 253-535-7 119 to register.

coordinatL' their tcaching tfforts.

ENGl 503 (2) - Advanced

Placement Institute: English Language and Composftion (2 a) July 22 - July 26 9.00 am - 4�00 pm, MTWRF (J. Narron) - XAVR- 1 50 Prose Style 8nalysb is the focus of

thi course.. We will do a variety of close reading strategies of literatme and ess.1y. We will look at the construction of idea/theme/motif and how that constru tjon creates meaning. We never get away from the intent of the author. What WI'

will do is e:cam ine how the author develops meaning th rough style. I

wiU share with you many models of

prose style analysis, and the

institute will be very hand�-on. You will take away from the week of discussion and writing, specific st:rategie an d )dections that you can USe in yOUT class rooms in September. There is no one nght

way to teach Advanced Placement

English, but

there dIe many skills

and strategie:; to help make our

size

and membership; team leadership; and how to evaluate the tearn's

�uccess. Course fee:

$675, includes

tui tion alld matenals fee. (elm: 1 l l42- Registration Blocked) Please

phone 253-535-7129 to register.

GEOSCI E NCES GE05 1 02 General Ocean­ ography - NS, SM (4 cr) May 28 - J une 2 7 B:OO am - 12:20 pm, MTWRF (5. Benham) - RCrR- / 09

Oceanography and its relationship

chemical, piological, climatic, and geological to other fields: phYSIcal,

aspect� of the sea. Includes lab and field tri ps. Lab fee: $50 (CRN: J J 251 )

war with the U.S., and the i mpact

of the war on contempOT1lTY Japan and its social and economic

(CRN: 1 1 226)

HIST 381 - The Vietnam War and American Society - S1 (4 cr)

of American elected officials in W;1Shington, D. . . , tbe North and South VietnaDlc

c,

John Q. Public

\Io'litchlng the war I".'ery night on

TV, and the average Gf fighting the l;lighlands and jungle,

1 1 227)

10

(CRN'

HIST 399 - Internship (1

TIns course will cover such topics as establishment at the team; tearn

the role- of the challenge of the

West in that hange, t he industrial­ i za t ion of Japan, the reasons for

Vietnam War from the perspective

writirlg requittd by the AP

by the wnical cooperation of teachm working together to

modem �miracle" in East Asia. Primary focu.� on traditions thaT enabled Japan to change rapidly,

Multifal;t"ted exam ination of the

session devoted to the sort of limed

tuition and materials fee. (eRN: I J 140 - Registration Blocked) Please

(C Benson) - ADMN-20B

Study of how Japan became the

June 24 - July 20 T 2. 1 5 - 3:30 pm, MTWRF (IN. Carp) - XAVR- / 50

July 22 - July 25 9:00 am - 4.00 pm, MTWRF (K Morrella) - XAVR-250 nOl

9. 1 5 am - 1 2· 15 pm, MTWR

in.>u: ilutions.

Blocked) Ple;)Se phone 253-535-7 l 2.9 to register. Registration

The concept of English Vertical Te3JTlJl (EVD;) incorp(')rates the id£3

the fInal session.

HIST 340 - Modern Japan - C, S1 (4 cr) May 28 - June 20

-

May 28 - August 24 (A Martinson) - Tf3A

6 cr)

An academic proJect requi ring a Cooperative Education Learning

Agreement, the faculty span and

an

o r,

employer base. Prospective

students need to discuss the

internsbip with the

mstrudor

dming Spring Semester. Ideal for

history major<; but open to others. FaT further

information and to

register phone 253-535-7595.

(CRN:l 08'17 - Regi Blocked)

trarion

HIST 401 - The Civil Rights

Movement - S1 (2 July 22 - July 26 9:00 am - 4:00 pm,

cr)

MTlNRF (8. Kra;g) - ADMN-208 This 2-credit course will employ the film series "Eyes on the Priu," assigned readings, lectures, and

class discussions to outline and analyze the Afri can American

:itruggle for civil rights m the 1 950s

and 1 9605. Key issues to be addressed i nclude the effect iveness of non-violent protest, schisms

21


COURSE DESC R I PTIONS

ANTHROPOLOGY ANTH 465 - Archaeology: The Field Experience - S 1 (2 cr) July 22 - July 26 8·00 am - 5.'00 pm, MTWRF (D. Hue/sbeck) - XAVR- 7 4010ff­ Campus Learn about archaeology by doing archaeology. Find, map, test, and

evaluate prehistoric and hi..�torical archaeologi cal sites in the Washing­ ton Ca�lIdes. Past project h�ve n prehistoric Native

focused

American .:arnpsi tes. historic m ining camps, and stream ra ilroad logging camp . Prerequisite: perm� n of instructor.

te: This class is part of

a project that will continue into August. Additional course credit can be arran�d Lab tee: $50

(CRN: 1000S - Registration Blocked) Please phone 253-535-7 196 to register. ART ARTD 1 60 - Drawing - AR (4 cr) June 24 - July 1 9 9. 7 5 am - 1 2 . 1 5 pm, MTWRF (D. Cox) - INGR- 126 Th is will be a concise and intense i ntroduction 10 the basics 0 fine art drawlng. We will deal with how art! ts train themselves to see proportion, scale, value, contrast;

h w \() develop skill with various drawing media; and how to be

patient and cauli us observers. A variety of ubjects will be consid­ ered. Advanced students accepted

to work on special pTojects using

either number ARID 49 t or ARTD

498 ( conta ct inslructor for the'I.' upper level courses) . No p rerequi ­

sites required. tudio fee: $35.

Studio clJSS i n photography

as

an

art form. Primary concentration

will be in bask camera and darkroom techniques. tudent. will produce a p rtfolio of prints emphasis on creative

expression and experimentation. tudi

fee'

$50

Produ

i n of both functional and

SculPlural objects using handbuilding and wheel techniques. Include. presenlJtion on clay and

Raku techn ique. Stud io tee: $45 (CRN: 1 0007)

(CRN: 10006)

semester BlOL 206 class . Lecture

student asse ment in the art .

topics include: cirOJ.la.tory,

Additional attentIon is given to

resprratory. digestive, excretory. and

teaching art to students with

reproductive systems; metabolism;

disabilities, afety in the classroom,

tempe.rature regu lation: stress;

and an integrated, multicultural

human develo pment Laboratory

focus throug h the arts. Studio tee:

$25. (CRN: 1 059 1 )

includes: cat dissecuon: phy iology experiment ; Oldy of developing organisms. Prerequisile: BIOL 205,

BIO LOGY

ARTD 330 - Ceramics 11 - AR (4 cr) May 28 - June 2 1 S'OO - 1 0:45 am. MTR

BIOl 1 1 1 - Biology and the Modern World - NS, SM (4 cr) May 28 - June 2 7 8:00 am - 1 2: 7 5 pm, MTWRF (D. Hansen) - RCfR- 122 [ m roducti n lo biology, primarily designed for non-hiology majors.

(Lecture CRN: 1 00 1 8) (Lab CRN: 100 1 9) . Please note: yo u must

Fundamental concepts are chosen

BIOl 351 - Natural History of the Pacific Northwest - NS. SM (4 cr) June 24 - July 1 9 8:00 a m - 4'00 pm, MTWRF (R. McGinnis) - RCfR- 124 Introduaion to the geology, climate, vegetation, biogeography, and human influence on the biota of

(D. Keyes) - INGR- l 44

Advanced and uldividuali7.ed p rojects in ceramic arl. Furth e r experimen ts in glaze formulatio n are explored. E mphasis on Raku technique. Stuwo fee:

$45. (CRN:

10008)

l luman Anatomy and Physiology, or equ ivalent. Lab Fee: $50.

from all areas of modern biology in luding the environment, population, physiology, genet ics.

ARTD 430 - Ceramics

111 - AR (4 cr)

May 28 - June 2 1 8:00 - 1 0.'45 am, MTR (D. Keyes) - INGR- I44 See above course desc ription . ludio fee: $45. ( CRN : I 0009 )

ARTD 331 - The Art of the Book 1 - AR (4 cr) May 28 - June 2 1 9:00 am - 72:00 pm, MTWR (Friday open studio) (p. Temple-Thurston) - INGR- 722

Thi · cour e is a han ds - on, stuwo introduction to the tradilional aesthetics of the printed word and the crealive world of ani 'I ' b oks,

evolution, and biological control.

Includes 13boratory. No prerequi­ sile ; sati fies GUR. Lab Fee:

$50.

(CRN : 1 00 1 2)

h ike to the Olympic Penin�ula and a

(j Lerum) - RCTR- 1 1 5 *Lab.· 1 UO a. m . - 2:30 p.m., TWR - RCTR- 1 7 6 ident ical in content to the (aU

semester mOL 205 class. Lecture topics inc l ude: matter; ce.l.I!; anti

tissues; nervous. endo rioe, keletal, and muscular systems. Laboratory

mUbde physiology and human

mu ell.' dissection; experiments in

and distinctive mat('rial�. This clas '

reflexes; special senses. Required for

crea ting personal illustrated books.

cw:ricula. Limited to 20

ARTD 341 - Elementary Art Ed ucation (2 cr) May 28 - June 2 7, 9: 15 am - 12. 1 5 pm, MW (5. Watts) - INGR- / 26 Prepar

teachcr� 10 teach art in the

elementary classroom and to Integrate art into the curriculum.

Reviews the clements and priniples of art, teacile, the develop­ ment of the ,hild in art, highlights ae therics and art criticism. and teache. the.' design of art lessons placed on the essential academic

learn ing requirements for the ar in Wa. hington State, personal

( RN) when registering

for this class.

June 24 - July 1 B 8:00 am - 1 0:45 am, MTWR

incl udes: human skel et al sy·tem; cat

1 265)

number

Washington. lncludes local and oue

genre that combines language. imagery, inn ovative bookfonns, w i ll place �eci al emphasis on

register (or both the lectu re and Ihe lab. Use both course registration

BIOl 205 - Human Anatomy and Physiology - NS. SM (4 cr)

,In imagin.1tive and expressive

and rurriLUlum. Particular focus is

14

ckvel pment in the studio, and

gla7.es. Emphasi on

ludio fee: $30 (CRN: J

ARTD 226 - Photog raphy: Bla(k and White - AR (4 cr) July 29 August 22 1 230 - 3. 15 pm, MTWR (8. Geller) - INGR- 134

un

fntroducti n 10 ceramic media.

Cross - l isted with ENGL 3 13.

(eRN: 1 1 272)

with

ARTD 230 - Ceramics I - AR (4 cr) May 28 - June 2 1 8.00 - 10'45 am, MTR (D. Keyes) - INGR- 144

nursing and physical education

tudent:..

No prerequisites. Lab Fee: $50.

day field trips as well as a three-day five-day trip to Columbia Basin,

Okanogan Plateau, and

Cascades. Travel fee:

o rth $ 1 50. For

further information and a yllabus contact Dr. Richard McGinnis at 253-535-6073. (Clt�:

10020)

BIOl 503 - Advanced Place­ ment Lnstitute: Biology (2 cr) July n - July 26 9:00 am - 4. 00 pm, MTWRF

(5. Knowles) 1 16

D

RCTR T 7 5 & RaR-

igned for high school teachers

preparing to offer Advanced PlaU'J11en t Biology. Tt addresses

( lecture CRN :

content fur an adva nced placement

register for both the lecture and the

test, review of text materials, and an

100 1 6) ( Lab CRN: 100 1 7) . Please note: you must

lab. Use both course registration nwnbers

(CRN ) wben

registering

for lhil. 1iSS.

SIOl 206 - Human Anatomy and Physiology - NS. SM (4 cr) July 29 - August 22 8:00 am - 7 0:45 am, MTWR (M. Smith) - RUR- I 1 5 *Lab: 1 1 :30 am - 2 '30 pm, TWR ­ RCfR- 1 1 6

Continuing dass from BIOL 105,

Human Anatomy and Physiology, or it can be tn� mdepe ndenrly if

the prerequisite iii met. [t is identical in conlent LO the spring

cou rse,

the advanced placement

overview of typical college general b iology courses d es igned for potenlial biology majors. A major emph asis is labor:l lory; participants carry out exercises suitable for Advanced placement Biol ogy courses. The in tltute is con ducted

by co llege fuculty with t'Xperience teach ing general hio l ogy, and by h igh school teachers who currentl y offer Advanced PIa ement courses.

Course fee :

$675

includes tuition

and materials fee. (CRN:

1 1 1 3l! ­

Registration Blocked) Please call 253-535-7 129 to regystc!"


Be sure to check www.plu.edul-summer for upd ated cou rse i nformation

BOSA 305 - Create and Lead

BUS I N ESS BUSA 201 - Value Creation in the G lobal Environment (4 cr) May 28 - June 20 9. 00 am- 1 2: 15 pm, MTWR (5. Thfiliher) - ADMIN-2 7 7

vJ.lue, creating activities and the

students who are taking a first look al lhe role of business in society

demands and expectations, w i th

a

teamwork.

BUSA

(eRN: 1 0024)

in econom ics, busi ness law, or political science. (eRN: H Z33) study

203 - Managerial

May 28 - July 6 8.30 a m - 4:30 pm, Saturday (D Bancroft) - ADMN-2 1 7 Tntegrated study o f finaJ,..iaI decision- making variabJes

Accountlng (4 cr) June 24 - July 1 8 9 00 a m - 11.'30 pm, MTWR (G Van Li1IYhe) - ADMIN-2 ' 7 Introd uction 1 0 tbe use of

(both

book and market ) , the relation­

,hips among them, and rdcvant dl!cil;ion theories/modcls. Primary perspective

i5 lhal of the manager,

rather than the aCCQuntant or the

unting data for decision

making, managerial planning, and operational control. rapics include cost-volume-profit rclationship�,

cost accounting metllOds budget­ ing, and perfomlance evaluations. Familiarity wit11 Nlicrosoft Excel

or

other spread�heet software i.s

required. Prerequ isites: BU A 202, CSCE 120. (CRt'l : 1 1232)

external i nvestor. Tuilion: $534 per

and Human Resou rces (4 cr)

May 28 - June 20 130 - 4:45 pm, MTWR

A n exploration af individual and organizational practices and responsibilities related to organi­ zational entry, competency

development, and performance improl'cment as careers u nfold.

(CR : 1 087 1 )

JUly 8 - Aw)ust J 5 6.' 00 - 9:50 pm, MR (L Schreiter) - ADMN 2 r 9 Background for undcrstanding

ethical u;�ue5 decision makers in the busi ness world face today. Tuition: $554 per semester hour.

II

BUSA 50S - Managing

Effective Organizations (4 tr)

May 28- July 3 5:00 - 9:50 pm, MR (C PRltr) - ADMN-2 1 9 Examines how leaders manage four sets of factnrs to ach ieve

organization's internal environ­

val uation, financial planning,

capital asset acquisit ion. cost of

capltal. financing stralegies. Prerequisites: BUSA .202;

CSCI

1 52; MATH

STAT 23 1 . (CRN: 10023 )

1 28;

products and seTVices th roughout tbe enlin� val ue cn�aLion system.

Focns is on managerial, reduJo­ logical, and organiz.ational

chaUenges of establishing and doing business in the d igital economy Electron i c commerce

and

revenue

models, econom i cs of information,

soluLions to electronic commerce are dIscussed . Priority is given to

BUSA SS8 - New Venture

Management (4 cr)

May 28 - July 3 6.'00 - 9:50 pm, MW (C MarthaeiJ - ADMN-2 1 7 Examines the entrepreneurial skill>

and conditions needed for effective new

business start-ups whether

CHEM 1 20 - General Chemistry - NS. SM (4 cr) May 28 - June 2 1 9:00 am - 1 2:00 pm, MTWRF (F Tobiason) - RUR-220 "Lab: 1:00 - 4:00 pm, TTi - RcrR-20 1 Introdnction to the fund3mental n aLure ofchemis.lry. Topics include

energy and maller, alom ic and molecular theory, periodic propertie.s. nomenclature. �lJ.les of

matter, chemical calculations, solution properties. acids and ba�es, equilibrium. and kinetic�. The major

crnphasis of the leanre and laboratory will

be the applica tio n ()f

chemical prmciples and theory on u

need to knQw basi$. Designed

primarily for b1udents who want to major in chemistry. b iology,

engineering, environmental soence, b'Coiogy. or ph�ics. These and nther majors who an> interested in the health sciences ( e.g., premedical, predent..-u. prepharmaqJ would LLsually begin chemistry with thi,

course One yC'olf of high school chemistry is requi red. , tudents WIth

high �ool dJemi try or a weak mathematical backgrolDld should no

semester hour. Prerequ isite: ECO

take Chemistry J 04 before this course. Lab fee; $50. ( Lecture eRN:

TIM

Program. Tu it ion: $554 per

500. 520. (CRN: 1 089li - Registra­

Blocked) Please phone 5357250 to register.

tion

BUSA 580 - Technology Strategy and Competitiveness (4 tr)

May 28 - July 6 8.30 am - 4.30 pm, Saturday (I Albers) - ADMN-2 1 9 Concepts and method� tor

formulating and impli!lIlenting

competitive trategy in

global context. Addresses how to integr a te a

technology with the firm's strategy,

of strategy. Prerequisites: ECON 500. 520 and BUSA 503, 504. 505,

(CRN. 10030)

CHEM ISTRY

"tudent · m th Saturd�y MBA/

ences. and !;hange. Tuition: $554

makers. Princ.iple� and procedurCl>

financial statement analysis,

cri t i cal del ivery system tor

and the kt:y internal and e:cternal

II

act!vity, financial deClsion-makmg.

Explore electronic com merce as a

the org.mi211t ion's environ­ mental context, cultura! differ­ ment,

per semester bou£:.

pertaining LO business investmen t

(c. Lee) - ADMN-2 1 7

technological challenges and

BUSA

(B. Finnie) - A DMN-2 1 9

Perspective of managerial decision

575 - E lectronic Com­ merce (4 cr) July 8 - August 7 7 830 am - 4:30 pm, Saturday

504 - Legal and Ethical Environ ment of Business (4 cr)

f

orgamzational effectiveness: the

BUSA 302 - Managerial Finance (4 cr) May 28 - June 20 7:30 pm - 4:45 pm, M7WR

BUSA 5 J 2. Tuition $554 per

busi ness strategies

(CRN: 1 0029)

(L Gibson) - ADMN·2 1 7

site:

semester hour. (eRN: 1 1 1 1 7}

�emesler hour. (eRN: J 0504)

and acting upon the legal and

BUSA 30 1 - Managing Careers

ot' advanced service and

manufacturing systems. Prereqtri­

BUSA

503 - Managing Financial

R�ources (4 cr)

and who have not had extensive

220; ECON 1 5 1,

Managerial and operational challengr-s

changing i nternal and extemal

and pru!;ttces which enhance

and the

globa l environment Designed fo r

ace

July 8 - August 15 6:00 - 9:50 pm, R. (J Baht) - ADMN-2 1 7

strong emphasis o n competencies

demands tlf stakeholde� in competitive marke

June 24 - July 1 8 7 2. 75 - 3."3 0 pm, MTWR (F 5epic) - ADMN-2 7 9 A study of how to organize and manage in today's context of

Understanding busin-ess economic

BUSA

BU5A 574 - Advanced Service and Manufacturing Delivery Systems (2 a) 'C

Effective Organizations (4 cr)

forces that detennine the evolution

S L l . 5 1 2. 5 1. 3. Tuition: $5 -4 per semester hour. Saturday MBAITIM program. Evening MBA students may take Saturday classes on a

sp ace-available ba.ill. ( RN: 1 0896 - Registration Blocked) Please phone 535-7250 to register.

U 079) (Lab CRN: l I 080) Please register for both the

note: you mut.l

lecture and the lab. U� both course regi tTaLion numbers (CRN) when regIstering for Ihi class. CH E M 232/234 - Organic Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratory - NS. SM

(41 1 cr) June 24 - July 18

9:00 am - 1 2. 00 pm, MTWR (C Fryhle) - RUR-220 *Lab.- 1 :00- 4:00 pm, TR - RCTR-20 I [nterpretation of propenies and r�lK1ion of al iphatic compounds

on the ba�i. of current chemical ilieory. Prerequisite: CUEM 1 20 or

1 25. Corequisite: CHEM 234. ( lab

must accompany 232) Lab fee:

$50_

(Leaure CRN: 1 0036) (Lab

CRN: 10037) . Please Dote: you

must register for boili the lecture Jnd ilie lab. Use both C<lurse

regisrrati()fl numbers (eRN) registering for this class.

when

independent or within larger organization,. Prerequisite: BUSA 503. Thition: $554 per semester hour. (CRN: 1 1 234 )

15


COURSE D ESCRIPTIONS

CHEM 338 - Analytical Chemistry - NS. SM (4 cr)

June 24 - July 18 8'00 - 1 0:45 am, M7WR (0 Swank) RCTR-ll4 *Lab: 1 '00 - 4:00 pm, M7WR ­ RClR-20 7

Chemicnl methods of quantitatIVe analysis, including volumetric,

gravimetric, .md selected instru­ mental methods. Includes

laboratory. Prerequ isites: CHEM 1 20 or ill and MATH 140. lab tee: $50. (Lecture. CRN: 1 108 1 ) (Lab CRN:l 1082) Ple-d.Se note: you must register for both the lecture and the lab. Use both course regisrrat ion numbers (CRN) when regi reting for this class . CHEM 503 - Advanced

Placement Institute: Chemistry (2 cr) July 22- July 26 9.'00 am - 4.'00 pm, M7WRF (D. Swank) - RCTR-224 General Chemistry in truct:mn at the university level can range from e:uremely theoretical approaches to very qualitative p resentations. The wide range of mt:thods ha� caused considerable cliscussion within the

tfu;cipline in recent ye-ars and influenC<! AP chem istry expecta­

COM M UN I CATION and THEATRE ( COMA 334 - Gender and Communication - A (4 cr) May 29 - JUly 23 6.00 - 9:00 pm, TR (1 Usosky) - INGR- I 09

COMA 49-5 - I nternship (2 cr) July 29 - AugUSt 22 9:30 am - 1 2: 15 pm, TR (Staff) - INGR- 1 09 (CR.."l : 1 1 2 1 7)

COMA 499 -Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR (2 cr)

Attempts to analyze and understand

the relationship between gender and communication behavior. Co mpar i­ son and contrast of male and female commun icati on styles, similarities and differences in language usage. interpersonal dialogues, group discushlons and listening in personal and professio nal arenas. (C':RN: 1 .1 250)

COMA 336 (01 ) - Communicat­ ing 1n Business and the Professions (4 cr) May 28 - June 20

9:' 1 5 am - 12:30 pm, M7WR (0 Harney) - INGR- 1 09

July 29 - A ugust 2 7 9:30 am - 12 1 5 pm, MW (E Inch) - INGR-' 09 This course fulfill the capstone requirement fo r all communica­ tion degrees offered 111 the Department of Communic.1tion and Theat re. These include BA in Communication ( emphasis areas

Public Relations, Journalism, B roadcasting, 'ritieal Communi­ cation tudi es) and BFA i n Broadcasting. The seminar will provide stu den ts with the

opportunity to participate jn an i n ternsh ip and complete a �enior p roj ect that wiU incl ude a portfolio

(CR ' 1 1 1 23)

Focuses 00 the nature of commu­

and e1f-asses..mlt:nt.

Student deal with i nfo rm at ive

COMA 500 - Effective Communication (2 cr) July 8 - August 13

nication in organizational sett i ngs. and persuasive speaking, basi.:

business writing. i nterviewing, and interpersonal communication. (CRN' 1 0(43)

0[

6:00 - 1 0 00 pm, T (Staff) - INGR- 1 75B look at com m un icat i n proCCSSCl. in organi7.arion with development of specific communication skills;

those prellCntly t('aching or

COMA 336 (02) - Communi­ cating in Business and the Profe-ssions (4 tr)

includes public speaking tech­

In the future. Together, we will explore the AP exam, with an

May 29 - Jl.Jly 24 6:00 - 9.'00 pm, MW (Staff) - INGR - l 09

communication. interviewing strategies. and the role of listening.

tion . The workshop is designed for planning un teaching AP chemistry

emphasis on prepa rin g tudents fo r the exam; its development, and sco ring. We will also e.xamine

course content, teaching methods..

fucilities and materials needed for success, and chemical experimenta­ lion. Significant Lime will be devoted to labo ratory experiments for AP chem istry. Time is also provided for sharing experieoces and samples of teaching materials.

Emphasis will be on techmques that have been uccessful, text and

ancillary material reviews and on efti!clive learning approaches. Course tee; $675 includes haition and materials fee. (CRN: 1 1 1 39 -

Registration Blocked) Please phooe 253-535-7129 to register.

c

See above description. (CRN:

100(2)

COMA 385 - Introduction to Public Relations (4 cr) May 28 - June 20 12:30 - 3: 1 5 pm, MTWR (J. Lingwal/) - INGR- 1 1 5B

niques, infoanatlve and persu as ive

Th i s course fulfills the BA-MBA requirement. Tuition: $554 per

emesrer hour. (CRN. 1 0046)

THEA 458 - Creative Dramatics - AR (4 cr)

Emphasizes technical and

June 24 - July 1 9 9:30 a m - 12: 1 5 pm, MTWRF (1. Clapp) - INGR- 1 09 Designed to acquaint the student

I n trod uces theories, method�, ,Uld practice or public relations. analytical skills. P rerequisi te :

with materials. techniques. and

Communication core or onsent

theories of creative dramatics.

of instructor. ( CRN: 1 1 2 16)

Intended for e lementa ry and

COMA 475 - Advanced Media Production (4 cr)

p rospective teachers. theatre

May 28 - June 20 9: 7 5 am - 1 2:30 pm, M7WR (K. Isakson) - AOMN-203 Pr od UCi ng, scrip ting . d irec ting,

and camp counselors. day care

junior higb school teachers or

performing, and evaluating sophisticated audio and video programmlng. Prerequisite: COMA 374. (CRN: 1 12(3)

majors, religious leaders. youth workers, social and psycholog ica l worker , and community theatre leaders interested in working with children. Additional fees: cost of play tickets. (CRN: 10047)

COM PUTER SCIENCE AND COM PUTER E N G I­ N EE R I N G CSCE 1 2 0 - Computerized Information Systems - NS (4 cr) May 28 - June 20 1 2:30 - 3045' pm, M7VVR (y Tang) - UClR- 136 Introduction to computers including ma n agement intonnatiun systems developmen t, telecommu­ nicatiCJns, opemting system

preadshcets, graphics, and database management. In cludes a computer laboratory componenL Lab Fee: $50. Prereq ui ite· MATI-I l lS or 140 or equivalent. (CRN: 1 1 1 47)

CSCE 1 44 - Introduction to Computer Science - NS (4 cr)

May 28 - JUly 3 8:45 - / 1 .30 am, M7VVR (J Brink) - MGYM-l02

An introd uction to compu ter science including problem solvi ng, algorith m design, tructured programming, numerical and non­

oumerical ap pl ical1ons, and use of data files. Ethical and social impacts of computing. Prerequisite: 4 years of high s.:hool mathematics or

MAfH 1 40 or equivalent . lab Fee:

$50. (CRN: 1 1 106)

CSCE 270 - Data Structures ­ NS (4 cr) July 8 - August 1 5 8:45 - 1 7 30 am, MTWR (G. Hauser) - MGYM- 1 02

Contin uation of p rogram ming technique and a study of basic data structures including lists. stacks,

queues, aDd trees. Applica ti ons of these forms to sorting, searching. and data storage are made. PrereqUisite: CSCE 1 44, Introduc­ tion to Computer . dence, or eq uivalenL For more information,

contact Dr. Hauser at 253-535873 J . Lab Fee: $50. (CRN: 1 0490)

CSCE 400 - Semlhar: Computer Security and Cryptology- NS (4

cr)

May 28 - June 2 1 8.-00 - 1 0;45 am, M7WRF (R. Spillman) - RCTR-22 1 The explosive worJdwitle growth of

computer systems has created 3 large demand for computer

scientists, engineers, and mathema­ ticians who understa nd the basic principles of computer security. During the first WIlmer sess i on,

16


Be sure to check www. plu. edul-summer fo r u pdated course i nformation

the Department of Computer dence and Engineering will offer a special co u rse designed to introduc<' our students to this impo rtant field of study. The course will cover: the comlTUction of dphm; ruetho& for breaking codes and c iphers: methods fur protecting databases and operating systt!ll'lS; access control�; how a computer virus works, and protect i o n from viruses. The only prerequisI te for the class is CSCF 144. For more infonnation contact Dr. Richard pillman at 253-5357406. (CRN: 1 05 19)

ECONOMICS ECON 1 52 - Principles of Microeconomics - 52 (4 cr) May 28 - June 2 1 9:30 am - 1 2: 15 pm, TWRF (K Travis) - XAVR-20 1 I ntroduces the study of economic dec i sion m aki n g by fInns and individuals. Economic tools and concept such as market , supply and demand, and efficiency ap plied to contemporary issues. (CRN: 1 1222) ( ECON 520 - Economic Policy Analysis - (4 cr) July 8 - August 7 5 6:00 - 930 pm, MR (K Terada) - XA VR-2S0 An intensive introduction LO the concepts of macroeconomics and microeconomics wi th an emphasi' on policy formation within a global framework. Tuition: $554 p er semester hou r. (CRN: 1 1 099)

EDUCATI O N EDUC 205 - Multicultural Perspectives In the Classroom A (4 cr) July 29 - August 23 8:30 - 1 1 .'30 am, MTWRF (Staff) - ADMN-204B t\ course which creates an awareness and understanding of divmity, d irectly addre ing iss ue such as ethnjcity, ge nder, disability, racism or poverty. There is a service component that involves tutoring students for a m in imum of 1 2 hours over t he period of the course. Meets the Alternative Perspective� of the D iversity requirement. { CRN: 1 1 1 52)

EDUC 41 1 - Strategies for Literacy Development in the OasSToom (2 cr) June 24 - July 5 8:00 - 1 0:45 pm, MTWRF (M Walker) - ADMN-20B The developmental n a l ure of litera..-y leaming with emphasis on the vital rol e of language and the interrelatedness and interdepe n ­ dence of listen ing. speaking. reading, and writing as language prucesse .. Cross-listed with EDUC 5 1 1 . (CRN: 1 0097) EDUC 413 - Language and Literacy Development: Assess­ ment and Instruction (4 cr) June 24 - July ' 9 2:00 - 4:45 pm, MTWRF (J. Lewis) - ADMN-204A Understanding of a wide variety of strategies and tools for a.'lSCSS ing and facilitating students' development i n reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Cross-listed wi th EDUC 513 and PED 5 13. (CRN: 10099) EDUC 426- Special Top/cs in Children'S Literature: Picture Books (2 tr) August 12 - August 23 2 '00 - 4:45 pm, MTWRF (C. Yetter)- ADMN-200 Exploration of the pi cture book art form and development, including the historical evolution, range of formats and notable creators of picture books. CrOsS-listed with EDUC 526. (CRN: 1 1 084) EDUC 427 - Multicultural Children's literature (2) JUly 22 - July 26 8:30 am - 4:30 pm, MTWRF (1. Lewis) - ADMIN-200 Expl oration of multi-cultural issues in the context of , hild ren's literature. There will be oppo r tu ­ nines to read a variety of texts across genres, and inco rp orate a variety of strategies for use of multi-cultural texts in te ach ing and learning. Cross-listed with EDUC 527. (CRN: 1 L270) EOUC 428 - Children's litera­ ture in the K-8 Curriculum (2 a) July 8 - July 1 9 1 :00 p m - 4:00 pm, MTWRF (C Yetter) - ADMN-209 [nvestigation of genre of

contemporary ch ild re n's l i terature

and development of a personal repertoire for classroo m use.

Cross-listed with EDVC 528. ( CRN: 10582)

EDUC 429 - Adolescent literature in the Secondary Curriculum (2 cr) Augu� 12 - August 23 9:00 am - 12:00 pm, MTWRF (Staff) - ADMN-2 1 2 Genres in adolescent literature and exploration of strategies for i n tegrati on of young adult materials across the m i ddle and secondary sch ool curriculum. Cross-Ii ted with EDUC 529. (CRN: 1 0578) EOUC 438(0 1 ) - Strategies for Whole literacy Instruction K 12 (Reading Emphasis) (2 cr) July 22 - July 26 8:30 am - 4.-30 pm, MTWRF (Staff) - ADMN-209 trategies for teaching l iteracy skills, co ncepts, and processes thro ugh th=lic units, int egrated curriculum and resea rch projects for K- 1 2 clas rooms. Focus on curriculum components for Library Media Specialist · and collaborative p roJects with classroom teachers, Cro 's-listed wi.th £DUC 538. ( C RN : L 009 1 )

EOUC 438(02) - Strategies for Whole literacy Instruction K 1 2 (2 cr) July 29 - August 9 9:30 am - 12:30 pm, MTWRF (Staff) - ADMN-209 trategies for teaching literacy skill , concepts, and pwcesses through thematic units, in t egrated curriculum and research projec ts for K- 12 classroom . POCllli on curriculum components for Library Media Specialists and collaborative p rojects with classroom teachers. (CRN' 1 1 273) EOUC 445 - Methods for Teaching Foreign Languages and English as a Second Language (4 cr) June 24 - July 1 8 2:00 - 4. 45 pm, MTWR

(8. Reisman) - ADMN-20B

Th<.'Ories and related techniques for

teaching languages K J 2 within their cultural context. including direct methods, content-based instruction, proficiency orienta­ tions, and the integration of

technologies. Attention given to va ri atio ns in approach for those teaching English as a second language. No prerequ i sItes. Required tor teacher certification in a language and for minor in Engl ish

as a Secontl I.a:nguage. Strongly recommended for elementary major in a language. Cross-listed with LANG 445. (CRN: 10593)

EDUC 470 - Curriculum, Materials and Instruction for Teaching English as a Second Language (4 cr) July 2, 3, 9, 1 0, 1 1. 16, 1 7 and 1 8 8:00 am - 2.:30 pm, TWR (E Coghlan) - ADMN-202 Examination of curriculum , assessment, and tnSlrliClion in bilingual l earning- teaching contexts. Critical walysis of language tea chi ng methodology, i mplemen tation of m at e ri a l s, and asses ment des i gn s. S p ec ia J emphases on the hjsto rical and socio-poliucal contexts of ESL instruction and issues of language d iscri minati on relevant to literacy in!>truction. Cra s - I iste d With LANG 470. ( CRN: 1 1 164) EOUC 475 - Practicum in Teaching English as a Second Language (1 cr) July 2 - July 1 8, TBA (Staff) - TBA Extended clI:perience and partici­ pat i on in an assigned ESL setting. Pre.requisi.te:

(concurrent

LANG/EDUC 445

with LANG/EDUC

470 ) . (eRN: 1 0597)

EOUC S03A - Workshop: The Good-byes and Hellos of Kids and Teens Grieving (4 cr) June 24 - July 19 9.'30 am - 12: 1 5 pm, MTVIIRF (I Johnstone) - XAVR-250 This course will explore the impacts of loss and the res ul t ant grIeving process that occurs within young people. Losses cxpJ red will be: dying and death, divorce and detachments (i.e., moving-­ including fCster care and adoption�, jife c:yele changes, physical disabilities and injuries) . We will cover developmental aspects of grieving in dying, death and divorce; in terventions that support grieving at school, home and in the community; gender commonalties and sirnil.iritie j when grieving

visits the cllool hOlllic; rituab of healing; ethnicity and cultural im pacts on the grieving journey; the fine arts in grieving; commu­ nity resources for healing grief; disenfranchised gr ief in youth; care for caregivers; teaching and curricular connections wi th loss

17


COU RSE D ESCR I PTIONS

a.nd gric� and compl icated grief

of schools. Required of any track

opt i on selected. (CRN: 1 0580)

interventions. Class activities

i nclude mini lectures. group dialogues, guest presentations, 4-5 field trips to commun ity resou rces ( i.e., Mary Bridge Ch ild ren's

Ho-pital, Bridge$ GTieving Center,

fLmeral home and cemete ry ), major flInu ami personal interviews and

outsi de feadings. Class projects will be individualized field of interest

to

,�ch �tudent's

(i.e., education ,

social work, sociology and nursing) . Cross-listcd with

(CRN: 1 0902)

SOCW 399.

t o acquaint

studcnt.� with

grounds, perccptual systems, soc i a l

organization, language, .lod non­ verbal messages in i n Lercultural communication. (eRN:

1 1 086)

5030 - Advanced

Placement Institute: American Government (2 cr)

July 22 - July 26 9'00 am - 4 '00 pm, M7WRF (G Westergaard) - ADMN-204B

This is an intensive co urS!! for high �ool faculty i nvolved in teaching

AP Ameri",'111 Go�rnment cou rses . It 6 designed to aid both the

new

AP

te'.lcher and experien.:ed Ai> tcacht'rs

$675, includes tui ti on and materials fee. (eRN! I 1 1 46 -

Tuition:

Registration Blo ked) Please phone

253-535-7 1 29 to register.

EDUC 503(11 - Workshop: I nformative literature and Curriculum Development (2 cr) July 1 July 3, and July 22 July 26 9.00 am - 12:00 pm, MTlNRF (Staff) - RAMS-204 Field wode required 1 :00-4:00 -pm.

daily. For W R. sludcnts only.

(CRN: 1 1 2·m

505 - CUrrent IS5ues in

Literacy Education (2 cr) Avgust 12 - August 23 2:00 - 4:45 pm, MTlNRF (J Lewis) - ADMN-2048

Imtial COLlISe required for all

51udents in the

master"

program

in literacy education. Overview of hi 'turicai and CUrre nt theory. practice, defin itions. and research

in l �ngu.lge and literacy acquisi ­ tion ,md development in and ou t

18

and secondary sou rces. incl uding docu ment. b i bli ography. rul l text, statiStical, visual, and reGorded

forms.

(eRN: 1 1 1 85 - Registrat ion

EOUC 509 - Foundations of Collection Development (2 er) JUne 24 - July 7 9, TBA (C Yetter) - TBA

the influen ccs of cultural back­

E DUC

dala ilnd information in primary

ment o nly.

(Staff) - ADMN-2 1 7

E DUC

Explorat ion of a broad ra n ge of

Blocked) Regi ·trn�ion by depart ­

E DUC. 5038 - Workshop: language and Culture (2 cr) July 22 - July 26 8030 am - 4.'30 pm, M7WRF Designed

EDUC 507 - P ri n ci p les of Information Organization, Retrieval, and Service (2 cr) June 24 - July 1 9, TBA (C Yetter) - TBA

The philosophl al hases and parameters of ment

oUeclion develop­

i n the school library media

cenLer.

(CRN: 1 1 1 86 - RegisLration

Blocked) Regi ·tration by depal"t­

E DUC 526 - Special Topics in Chi l d ren 'S Literature: Picture Books (2 er) August 72 - A ugust 23 Z'00 - 4A5 pm, MTWRF (C Yetter)- ADMN-200

EDue 537 - Media and Technology for School Library Media Specialists (2 cr) July B - July 7 9 8:00 a m - 12.·30 pm, M7WRF (I Moomaugh) - OFF CAMPUS (Rogers High School)

(arm and development, ind udi ng

The management of media and

Exploration of the pic t u re book art

the hL<;torical evolut ion, mnge of

tech nology service in the school

fomlatS and notable O"ltators of

library media center..'ipecial

pi dllIT books. "ross-listed with

emphasis on emerging technologies

mue 426. (CRN: I \ 085) E DUC 527

used in K-'12 instructional programs (CD-ROM, interactive video,

- Multicultural

distance learning, and computer

Children'S Literature (2)

tcchnoiogit.'s). (eRN: I I OB7)

Exploration of multi-cultural

E DU C 538(0 1 ) - Strategies for Whole Literacy Instruction K 12 (Reading Emphasis) (2 cr) JUly 22 - July 26 8�30 am - 4:30 pm, M7WRF

July 22 - July 26 830 am - 4. 30 pm, M7WRF (J Lewis) - ADMN-200 is

ues

in the context of children's

literature. There will be opportu­ nities to read a vari ety of texts

aero

S

genres, and incorporate

a

variety of strategies for use of

multi -cul tural texts in teachi ng :md learning. Cross�listed wi th

£DU

EDUC 5 1 0 - Acquisition and Development of language and Literacy (2 cr) July 22 � July 26 8.30 am - 4.30 pm, M7WRF (Staff) ADMN-2 1 6

E DUC 528 - Children's litera­ ture in the K-8 Cu rri c u l um (2 cr) July 8 - July 1 9 7'00 p m - 4 0 0 pm, MTWRF (C Yetter) - ADMN-209

lnvestigalian o f how young

children acquire their firsL language and what they know as a result of this learn ing.

(eRN; I 006fl)

nature

of

:

lnvestigation of genres of

contemporary ch ildren's literature a nd developmen t of a personal

use . El)UC 428.

repe rto ire for cla sroom

Cross-lis(ed with

(CRN: 1 0583)

EDUC 51 1 - Strategies for Uteracy Development in the Classroom (2 cr) June 24 - July 5 8.·00 - 1 0:45 am, MTWRF (M Walker) - ADMN-20B The developmental

427. (CR

1 1 27 1 )

men t only.

EDUC 529 - Adolescent literature in the Secondary Curriculum (2 cr) August 12 - August 23 9�OO am - 1 2.'00 pm, M7WRF (Staff) - ADMN-2 ! 2

literacy I c-aming with emphasi on

Genres in ddokscent literature and

the vital role of language and the

exploration of strategic for

interrelatedness and interdepen ­ dence of l isteni ng, speaki ng, reading, and processe¢.

w rit i ng as language

ross-listed w i th EDUC

integration o f young adu l t

materials across lb.e middle and

seco ndary school curriculum . Cross-listed with EDUC 429.

4 1 1 . (eRN : 1 0098 )

(CRN: 10579)

EDUC 5 1 3- language and Uteracy D eve l opment: Assess­ ment and Instruction (4 cr) June 24 - July 7 9 2 '00 - 4:45 pm, MTWRF

EDUC 530 - Children's Writing (2 cr) July 8 - July 1 9 8:00 - / 0'45 am, MTWRF (I Bates) - ADMN-20B

Understanding of a wide variety of

straregie� and rools fur as,;essi ng and

teaching and learning of writing i n elementary da.srooms. (eRN:

fucilirating students' development in

1 0424)

(J Lewis) - ADMN-204A

reading, writing, li ten ing, and speak i ng . Cross,listed with IIDUC 4 1 3 and SPED 5 1 3. (eRN: 1 0 100)

(Staff) - ADMN-209

Strategies for teaching literacy sIGHs, concepts, and processes through thematic units, i ntegrated

curriculum and research proj ect for K - 1 2 classrooms. Pocu on U1rriculum components for

Library Media Specialist and collaborat ive projects with cla sroom teachers.

(

.RN:

1 0092 )

E DUC 5 44 (02) - Research and Program Evaluation (2 cr) June 25 - A ugust 22, TBA (L McGraw) - OFF CAMPUS

Knowledge of evaluation tech­

niques. induding portfolios, and or

research de.sign ; ability to interpret educational research; to identify,

locate, and acquire typical research

and related literatures; to use the results of research or evaluation to pr pose program changes and write grants.

(eRN: 1 1 047)

" E DUC 550 (0 1 )-- Prinapalshjp I - GEPC (3 cr) May 29 - July 24 6:00 - 830 pm, MW (M Baughman) - ADMN-2 7 5 In troduction to the roie -and function of the principalship, with enlpha�is o n team b u ild ing and

Current theory and practice i n the

inti!rpersonal professional rela t ionships and et hical dec ision ­

making. Prereqmsite: Admission

to

Ed. Admin. Program . (CR:--J: ) 0069

- Registration Blocked) Registra­ tion by Program D ircctor.

" E DUC 550 (02) - Principalship I - GEAO (3 er) May 29 - July 24 6:00 - 8:30 pm, MW (M Baughman) - A DMN-2 1 5

Introduction to the role and


Be sure to check www.plu.edul-summer for updated co u rse i nformatio n

function

of the principal�hip, with on team building 3Jld

emphasis

t ion Blockell) Registration by Program Director.

Thi s culmi nat i ng effort i.� R research

EDUC 563C - lntegrating Seminar: Legal and Statistical Issues in Education (1 cr)

and lhl' grJ.dudLe adviser. Prerequi­

paper

i'sue selected jointly by the ;tudent

i n rerpe.rsonal professional rciationship .lnd ethical decision­

makin' . Prerequi sit � ; Admission Ed. Adm in . Program.

-

to

(eRN: 1 074 1

Registration B locked) Registra.­

tion by Program D i rector.

EDUC 552 (01 ) - Principalship I I I

- GEPC (4 cr) May 3 1 - July 27, TBA

June 1 and June 8 8:30 am - 430 pm, Saturday (L Reisberg) - ADMN-202 StLldenL� will complete m u l t i ­

(Staff) - TBA

for comm unicat ion pallem� in the

other wa.ys to usc tcdloology as a vehicle for program assessment in

agencies, including medical, legai.

�nd sodal ·ervices. as well as with

students, pa rents, and struT. Prerequisite.; Admission to Ed. Ad min Program.

l ion by

Reg i stralion Blocked) Reghtration

by Program D i reclor.

EDUC 552 (02) - Pri ncipalship III

- G EAO (4 cr)

May 3 1 - Ju.ly 27, TBA (G Dewey) - TBA Knowledge anJ skill development

the

school setting and with a.'i.'iOQated

agencies i ncl uding m e d i cal, legal, and socia! crvice�. as well

as

wilh

s t udent , parents. and star{ Prerequ iliite: Admission to Ed.

Admin Prog ram. ( eRN: 1 1 090 Registration Bloekeu )

Registration

by rrogram lJirectOf.

(CRN: 1 1 1 99

Program Di rector.

Development (2 cr) June 26, JUly 3, 10 and 1 1 8"00 am - 2:30 pm, W (M Hillis) - XAVR-20 1 Type or wrriculum organi za­ tions, programs and techniques of

curriculum development.

f'rerclJui�i le:.: Admissio ns to the

(CRN,

1 1 045 )

EOUC 562 - Schools and Society (3 cr) June 10 - June 28 8:30 am - 7225 pm, MNVRF

(e Lamoreaux) - ADMN-2 7 5

Indi v idual and cooperative study

ofthe sOQo-cultural and cultural, pol itical, legal, historical and phill'lSophical foundations of Cu rrent practices of schooling in

EeUC 5630 - Integrating Seminar: Issues of Child Abuse and Neglect and tile Law (1 cr)

June 1 5 and June 22 8:30 am - 4:30 pm, Saturday

- Registra-

concentration and

must be

a re expected

in

a

fin al

LO

ral

defend their theses

xaminati n

conducted by lh�ir committee. Prerequisite: Instruc tor's signature i ndependen t study card prior

(eRN: I 07 1 fl)

E DUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

child abuse and neglect. Includes

registration .

identification and reporting procedure .• and the legal Hnd professional responliihilities of the

educator. Prerequisi t e: Admission to M.A. with Certificatjon

(eRN; 1 1 200 - Regi tion Blocked) Regi tration hy Program

tra­

EDUC 564 - The Arts. M i nd and Body (2 cr)

EPSY 560 - Communkation in the Schools (3 cr) July 1 - Ju ly 1 9 8:30 a m - 72;25 pm, MTWRF (S Yerian) - ADMN-2 1 5

Study (If the theories a n d concepts of those he lp i ng skill, needed to facill tate problem-solving and persollal and a.cademic growth with appLicaliom to the cla)'sr(Jom

July 22 - July 26 8:30 am - 4:30 pm M71NRF (Staff) - £CAM-G YM Exploration of methods to

and to interaLlions with. prof< ' ­

faci litate creativity and mea.ning­

Registration BI eked) Regi.�tration

making in the classroom

through

visuai, musical, nun·verbaU

physical movemenl, and arts.

dramatic

invoLvement in direct arti�lic

and phys i c:al educatio n expe[i<'nccs provides the foundation for

understanding the teacher's role in enhancing children's thinking and concept expl()ration in the

da.o;sroom. Materials fee: $25. Prerequisite: Aclmi sian

[0

M.A./

CeIt Program. (eRN : J 0095 Registration

Blocked) Registration

July 29 - A ugust 24, TBA (St<Jff) - TBA

EPSY 566(02) - Advanced Cognition Development and Learning (3 cr)

June 25, July 2, July 8, July 9, July 7 " July 1 6 and July 1 8 8:00 am - 2:30 pm, MTR (L McGraw) - XAVR-20 1 See de5cription above. (eRN: 1 1044) EPSY 583(01) - Current Issues in Exceptionality (Urban Learners Cohort Group) (2 cr)

July 30 and 3 7, August 1 and 6 8:00 a m - 2:30 pm, TWR (Staff) - INGR- 1 1 58

The characteristics of exceptional st udent and cu rrenl issues involving the educator\ role i n dealing with their speClal

( 'RN:

approvell by the andidate's

i nstrun iun a l issu�'i conceming

Thj� course will focus on legal and

EDUC 598 - Studies in Educa­ tion (2 cr)

j 0535

EOUC 599 - Thesis (1 u) May 28 - August 24, TBA (Staff) - TBA The thes i problem w i ll be chosen from the candidate's maj or field of

to

the curre n t status f schools and the evaluation of the i r past, prese.nl, and future. Prerequisite:

,eRN:

lion. (GRN: 1 05311)

on

by Program Director.

ProgrllI!l.

the

InSli uetor's signatme on indepen ­ dent study card prior to regi lra­

(K Ger/achJO Breen) - ADMN-200

America. Bmphasis will be given to

Admission to the MA/Cert

of 26

graduate t:ommittce. Candidates

Program Director

( DUC 555 - Curriculum

graduate program .

Prerequis ite: Admiss.ion Lo the

- Registration Blocked) Regi t ra­

(eRN: 1 1 089

for communi 'ation pat terns in

explore

their publ ic school classrooms.

M .A.!Ccrt p rogram.

m i nim u m

student's advisor. Prerequisite:

ing t he i r professional educat ion in

school se'lli ng a.ml with associateu.

program; 544, 545;

M.A.; consultation with

media d igital portfolio document ·

Progra.m . They will als

s ites: Admission to the graduak

hours 0 coursework leading to the

th<' MA w ith Certilication

Knowledge and skill develapment

or project on a n educ.ltional

s i ona l col l eagues. Prerequ i site:

Ad mission H) M.A. with Certifica­ tion program. (CRN: 1 0083 -

1 1 1 65)

need�.

EPSY 583(02) - Cu rrent Issues in Exceptionality (Urban Learners Cohort G roup) (4 cr)

July 29 - August 9 ROO ilrn - 2:30 pm. MTlNRF (K Gerlach) - ADMN-208 See descrip t ion above. (eRN: 1 1 2(9)

SPECIAL E D U CATI ON ( SPED 301 - Assessment!

Evaluation in Special Education (3 cr)

May 28 - June 20 4:00 - 8.·00 pm, TR

(G. Williams) - ADMN-200

Examination of knowledge and

skill used in formal md i Momlal assessm e n t.

I ncludes examInation

of scoring procedures, issue· in validi t y and reliability. and We role of assessmenl in deci ion making.

(eRN: 1 1 148)

c

SPED 350 - Teaching Students with Moclerate Disabilities (4 cr)

May 28 - June 1 9

- 7:45 pm, MW (Staff) -- ADMN-208

by Progra m D ireClOr.

5:00

EPSY 566(01) - Advanced Cog nitio n Development and Learning (3 cr) July 29 - August 1 5 8:30 a m - 1230 pm, MTWR (L McGraw) - ADMN-200

E.x.am i nation of specific interven­

Study uf principles and current thought and ["('search in cognil ion , development and learning.

Application to tile organization,

Lions to enhance the acquisi tion or knowlellge and skills for students who need additional support to

meet

lheir l ea rn i ng p o ten t i a l . Includes 45 hour of (ielcl based work. (CRN. 1 1 092 )

SPED 399 - Practicum in Specia l

Prereqursite: Admj ·ion to the M.A.

Education (1 cr) June 24 - July 20, TBA (Staff) - TBA Experience w i t h speciill education

1 0 1 l1 - Regi!.tration Blocked)

supervised setting. 1 hour credit

planning. and the delivery of

instruction wil! be addressed.

with Certincarion Program. ( CRN: Registration by ProgTam Director.

children or adults is () IT<'red in given

to

a

�LlCCCSSfu) completion of

45 clock hours. Prerequisi te:

19


COURSE DESCR I PTIONS

flor infonnati n about Continuing Ed ucati on courses that will be

offered th is summer for edllcator , pll:'ase ph on e 253-535-7273 or check our website al www.plu.edll/-edllc for an updated listing. consent of i n s tru c to r. (CRN:

1 1 1 37 - Registration

B loc ked ) To

register ph on \! 535-7272. SPED 404 - Communication and Collaboration (3 cr) July 22 - July 26 830 am - 4 '30 pm, MTWRF (K. Gerlach) - ADMN-2 1 9

Focus o n knowledge and �kills necessary for effective collabora­

lion and s upe rv is io n with pa re nts,

professionals. and paraeducators.

(eRN : 1 1 1 3'5)

After the first day of c1as , we will tanlC)' Eleme n tary

[ndudes -L'l hours of field based

work. (eRN: 1 1 094) SPED 407 - Curriculum, Instruc­ tion. and Tech nology (4 cr)

July 29 August 23 9 1 5 am - 12. 1 5 pm. MTWRF (Staff) - ADMN-2 1 5 Kn mvledge a n d skills needed fo r teach ing academic. social, and a da p tive skil l s to

Incl udes 15 hours of field based wo rk .

(eRN:

1 1 246)

SPED 5 1 3 - Language and Literacy: Assessment and Development (4 cr) June 24 - July 1 9 2 '00 - 4:45 pm. MTWRF (J Lewis) - ADMN-204A Under tanding of a wi de variety of

SPED 405 - Teaching Students with Mild Disabilitjes (4 cr) June 24 - July 1 8 / '00 - 4:00 pm, TR (Sta ff) - ADMN-2 15

meet a l

" SPED 492 - Strategies for Early Leamers (2 er) May 28 - June 20 5. 00 - 7:00 pm, TR (Staff) - ADMN-204A

lea rners with

special needs. Includes writing IEP's, data based instruction. t ask

analysis. and co mputer assisted

instruction. Prerequisites: rolf

400 and SPED .�O l , 350, 355, 390 ,

39 1 . or 405, ( CRN: 1 0 ( 1 4)

SPED 408 - Transitions from School to Community(2 cr) June 24 - July 1 7 3.·00 - 5:45 pm, MW (Staff) - ADMN-200

Exa m in ation of knuwle cige and

skills related to caree r vocational transition and life adjust ment

(CRN: 1 1 145)

SPED 480- Issues in Child Abuse and Neglect (1 cr) Augusr 3 and August 1 0 8:30 am - 4 '30 pm, Saturday (K. Gerlach) - ADMN-200

Scope and p mblems of child abuse. n eg lec t . and family violence.

i ncluding behaviors exhibited by

abused and neglected c h i l dre n and adolescents Includes identificauon

and reporting procedures, and the

leg.!1 and p ro fessi o nal respomibili­

ties of the educator. Methods for teaching personal safety will be

addressed. (CRN: 1 0888)

st rategies anti toob for assessing and facilitatmg st ud en ts' develop­ ment

i n readmg, writing, J j stenillg,

:md speaking. Prerequi ite: EDU

5 1 0; h i ghly recom mended to be taken at the end of the track

se ss io ns . Cross l isted with ED 4 1 3/ 5 1 3 (eRN'! 10592) SPED 577 - Inclusive Classroom (U rban Learners) (2 cr) August 7. 8, 1 3 and 1 4 8:00 a m - 2030 pm, TWR (P Leitz) - ADMN-2 1 0 In trod uctioIl fo t he pri nc ip l es and

practICes of inclusive ed ucat io n .

PROJECT I M PACT For more information about Project I mpact program for educators see page 28. visit our website al WWw.plll.edu/-edll or contact:

Mr. Tony Aho

or

School of Ed ucat io n

allott@plludli

la",orew@pll1.edu

EN GLIS H

diary, 0 dass performance and several . hor. papers. (

ENGL 2 1 7 - Short Story: Native American Literature- A, LT (4 cr) July 29 -August 23 1 2: 30 - 3: 1 5 pm, MTWRF (D. Miranda) - ADMN-204A

bort prose and poetry from contemporary

alive American

N:

1 1 221 )

ENGL 251 - British Traditions I n Literature - LT (4 cr) June 24 - July 1 9 9:30 am - 1 2 . 1 5 pm, MTWRF rr Campbell) - ADMN-2 1 4 A tri p through 1 9th and 20th

authors. (eRN. 1 1 220)

Century British li ter ary hi sto ry

ENGl 227 - Imag inative Writing I - WR (4 cr) May 28 - June 2 1 9.30 am - 72: 1 5 pm, MTWRF (D. Seal) - ADMN-2 1 1 B

the "c r i t i cal " tradilion: wri ters wl:to

question ed orthodox values,

Students will work on variOtL�

sexuality. We'll read ear l y fem i ­

the lerm will comp lete one solid,

nist , rom an tic revolutionaries. ViLtorian aes t he te s, modem

focusing on what could be called

fiction writing tech n iq ue and over

successful s ho rt sto ry. Exerci e on character and plot devel opment.

SPED 598 - Studies in Special Education (2 cr) May 28- August 24 (Staff) - TBA

will co m p lem en t class workshops

and practice refining writing styles on students' work and individual

conference., with the in ·truetor. St uden ts will also keep a wr iter' s iournal.

(

RN:

1012 ) )

c h a l le nged exist i ng standards,

articulatl.·tJ alternative view o f

literature. Dature. ge nder, god,

iconoclasts, and post-modern revisionists.

(CRN;

1 0 1 23 )

E N G L 3 0 1 - Shakespeare - LT (4 cr) May 29 - July 24 6;30 - 9.30 pm, MW (S Jansen) - ADMN-200

The R�naissance is th .. Golden Age

of En gli sh Iiteralllre, the fh eate r it

ENGl 232 - Women Writers of the Americas - A. LT (4 tr) May 28 - June 2 1 9:30 am - 12 · / 5 pm, MTWRF (L Marcus) - ADMN-2 1 6

most remark1lblc l i terary fonn,

535-7272.) (eRN: 1 0 1 1 5)

A w071lall wizo

be read m g 3 rep rese ntat ive

SPED 599 - Thesis (3-4 cr) May 28 - August 24 (Staff) - TBA

mId dlildrerr alld islmllls IVl:!'en'r elJough; C1S ifmourners and gossips

The thCSIS problem i chosen from

Sire think:. slle alii

an ed ucat ion al ISsue selected

j o intly by the �Ludl:'nt

and the

gra d ua te adviser. I I will be

reviewed by the st ude nt's graduate

committee.

(To regi�ter ph o ne

writes Jefls 100 !nUcll, rhose rrances ami POrtetl/s! As if cycles

tlrld vegetables were never WflTIl

erJO llgh.

the >tars, A

the candidate's major field of

writer is esse rftial/y a spy. These

concent ration and must be

wo rds by Americall poet Anne

approved by the candidate's

Sexton hi ghligbt women's rich :md

graduat\:' committee. Candidate..� are

varied e:'qleriences as writer�. The

expected to defend their thesis in a

oou� will explore the writing of women across borders of land, water

finaJ oral examination conducted by their c;ommittee. (To register phone 535-7,m.) (CRN: 101 18)

and language; class, col or and kin. We will read a variety of texts from Cristina Sant iago'� Dreaming in

Cllban to Haitian immigrant Edwidge Danticat's Brentfr, Ej'f!S,

Memory; from Canadian Margaret Atwood's The Ha71dmaiden's 'flue to the diaries (and paintings) of surrealist Mexican painter Frida

Kahlu. Course work \YilJ i nc lu de II

20

of Education

253-535-8342

writ in g dialogue and descript ion,

be a research paper or project on

choo l

253-535-7276

(eRN: 1 1 1 M)

This culminating experience may

Dr. Doug Lamoreaux

and Shakespoare-perhaps-the

g reatest

f aU English author

.

How can any \'lriler live up to this reputa t ion? fn this course we will

sampling of S h ake sp eare's plays

(comt!dy, tragedy. hi.�tory, romance) as well as tackling so me of the plays that presen t "prob­

l ems " for contemporary a ud iences/

readeTS. rn addition to

ur reading,

we will lncorporate a number of

film versions of the plays into the course so tha t we c an see h ow

hakespeare's work ha.� been "staged," reinterpreted and even

reinven ted b y modem directors fOT contemporary audiences. And we'll ask how and whether, after

aU, Shakespeare does live up to his

rep u t ati on . (eRN: ( 0 1 25)


Be

ENGl 3 1 3 - The Art of the Book

1 - (4 cr)

May 28 - June 2 1 9'00 a m - 12:00 pm, MTWR

(Friday open studio) (P Temple-Thurston) - INGR- 1 22

This course is a hand.� -on, studio introduction to the traditional

s u re to

check www.plu.edul-summer for u pdated cou rse i nformation

ENGL 503 (01) - Advanced Placement Institute: Eng l i sh Literature (2 0)

July 22 - July 26 9. 00

am

- 4.'00 pm, MTvVRF

(L Balra) - XAVR-20 1

Suitable fer experienced or inexperienced AP teachers, both

aesthetics of the printed word and

Lirer.tture and Composition !f<lchers

the creative world of arl ist�' books,

or

Language and Composition

an imaginat ive �nd expressive

teachers. Although the AP Examin.1-

gen re that co m b i nes language,

tion unites teachers and students in

imagery, innovatiw bookfonns,

a common

and distinctive materials. TItis class

is differen t. This weekIong CQufSt�

will place special empha.�is on

enables teadlers

creating personal illu trated books.

diverse experiences. All

Cross-listed with ARID 33 1

encouraged to bring materials, and

Studio fee' $J() (eRN: 1 1 264) E NGl 327 - Imaginative Writing II - WR (4 cr) May 28 - June 22 9:30 am - 12: 1 5 pm, MnNRF

(0. SeaQ - ADMN·2 1 1 B Studt:nts will work on various

fiction writing techni q ues and over

the

lerm

will complele one �olid,

uccess[u] hart story.

Exercises all

character and plot development, writing dialogue and description. and practice refining writmg styles wlll complement lass workshops on students' work and individual co.nferen,e� with the instructor.

StUJ:knts will also keep a writer'h

journal. (CRN. l O L 22)

ENGl 403 - The E ng l is h Language (4 �r)

June 24 - July 20 9:30 am - 72: 7 5 pm, MTWRF (1. Beech) - RAMS-206 Studies in the- structure and h istory of English, with em phasis o n syntactical anaiy b and issues 01 usage..

(CR.i'!: l 1 l 24)

for S�andjnavjan Nurses (2 cr) "ENGL 501

-

Writing

June I B - lLlly 9 1 30 pm - 5:00 pm, TWR (Staff) - ADMN-2 1 7 A Advanced English compositioD and conversation in the English Language. Emphasis on English competence using American

health care agencies for analYSIs and discussion. Open to summer MSN student... and all Scandina­ vian studen4;. Cost: $554 per semestu hour. (CRN: 10869 Registration Blocked) RegistnLtion by department only.

endeavor, every AP class to

share their are

aJl leave with a wealth of new ideas. In addition, the instructor has organized sessions on a Shakespeare play, a short story, selected poems,

and a change Lo work with English

Vertical Teams. All of these sessions employ VlIrious model· of collabora­

live learning and some brief writing assi gnments. Although a variety of

writing a�lgllments are d iscussed through the week, tht:re i' also a

H I STORY

�tudents more successful in the dass and an the AP exami nation . This week we come together as 3 learnjng community to sec how we can make AP Language more

i nclusive and Ies.� exclusive to our student populatio n . We will discuss

the ba,ics of the examination. what i t look.� like, and how it is scored.

We will also partiC1pate in a train i ng sess ion, which simulates the t raining of the teacht:I� who read and

core

the anl'll for The

College Board. Most importantly we will discuss strategies for analyzing style in literature. Course ftc: $675, includes tuition and materials fee . (CRN: I I t 4 1 -

ENGL 503 {03} - Advanced Placement Institute: English Vertical Teams (2 cr)

that AP Englis.h .should

Examination. In

isolated course but

be an

rather a planned

participants learn t read and grade

progrnm of teaching skills and

an essay question llSi ng actual AP

concepts owr several years and that

standards. Course tee: $673, includes

a

planned program is best achieved

pbune 253-535-7 119 to register.

coordinatL' their tcaching tfforts.

ENGl 503 (2) - Advanced

Placement Institute: English Language and Composftion (2 a) July 22 - July 26 9.00 am - 4�00 pm, MTWRF (J. Narron) - XAVR- 1 50 Prose Style 8nalysb is the focus of

thi course.. We will do a variety of close reading strategies of literatme and ess.1y. We will look at the construction of idea/theme/motif and how that constru tjon creates meaning. We never get away from the intent of the author. What WI'

will do is e:cam ine how the author develops meaning th rough style. I

wiU share with you many models of

prose style analysis, and the

institute will be very hand�-on. You will take away from the week of discussion and writing, specific st:rategie an d )dections that you can USe in yOUT class rooms in September. There is no one nght

way to teach Advanced Placement

English, but

there dIe many skills

and strategie:; to help make our

size

and membership; team leadership; and how to evaluate the tearn's

�uccess. Course fee:

$675, includes

tui tion alld matenals fee. (elm: 1 l l42- Registration Blocked) Please

phone 253-535-7129 to register.

GEOSCI E NCES GE05 1 02 General Ocean­ ography - NS, SM (4 cr) May 28 - J une 2 7 B:OO am - 12:20 pm, MTWRF (5. Benham) - RCrR- / 09

Oceanography and its relationship

chemical, piological, climatic, and geological to other fields: phYSIcal,

aspect� of the sea. Includes lab and field tri ps. Lab fee: $50 (CRN: J J 251 )

war with the U.S., and the i mpact

of the war on contempOT1lTY Japan and its social and economic

(CRN: 1 1 226)

HIST 381 - The Vietnam War and American Society - S1 (4 cr)

of American elected officials in W;1Shington, D. . . , tbe North and South VietnaDlc

c,

John Q. Public

\Io'litchlng the war I".'ery night on

TV, and the average Gf fighting the l;lighlands and jungle,

1 1 227)

10

(CRN'

HIST 399 - Internship (1

TIns course will cover such topics as establishment at the team; tearn

the role- of the challenge of the

West in that hange, t he industrial­ i za t ion of Japan, the reasons for

Vietnam War from the perspective

writirlg requittd by the AP

by the wnical cooperation of teachm working together to

modem �miracle" in East Asia. Primary focu.� on traditions thaT enabled Japan to change rapidly,

Multifal;t"ted exam ination of the

session devoted to the sort of limed

tuition and materials fee. (eRN: I J 140 - Registration Blocked) Please

(C Benson) - ADMN-20B

Study of how Japan became the

June 24 - July 20 T 2. 1 5 - 3:30 pm, MTWRF (IN. Carp) - XAVR- / 50

July 22 - July 25 9:00 am - 4.00 pm, MTWRF (K Morrella) - XAVR-250 nOl

9. 1 5 am - 1 2· 15 pm, MTWR

in.>u: ilutions.

Blocked) Ple;)Se phone 253-535-7 l 2.9 to register. Registration

The concept of English Vertical Te3JTlJl (EVD;) incorp(')rates the id£3

the fInal session.

HIST 340 - Modern Japan - C, S1 (4 cr) May 28 - June 20

-

May 28 - August 24 (A Martinson) - Tf3A

6 cr)

An academic proJect requi ring a Cooperative Education Learning

Agreement, the faculty span and

an

o r,

employer base. Prospective

students need to discuss the

internsbip with the

mstrudor

dming Spring Semester. Ideal for

history major<; but open to others. FaT further

information and to

register phone 253-535-7595.

(CRN:l 08'17 - Regi Blocked)

trarion

HIST 401 - The Civil Rights

Movement - S1 (2 July 22 - July 26 9:00 am - 4:00 pm,

cr)

MTlNRF (8. Kra;g) - ADMN-208 This 2-credit course will employ the film series "Eyes on the Priu," assigned readings, lectures, and

class discussions to outline and analyze the Afri can American

:itruggle for civil rights m the 1 950s

and 1 9605. Key issues to be addressed i nclude the effect iveness of non-violent protest, schisms

21


COU RSE DESCRIPTIONS

within the movement, tardy federal responses to calls for legislative change, leade r hip f selected A mca n

Arneri ans, and �ubse4ucnt effe cts on civil rights movements for ot her groups. This courst· is espec ial ly app rop ria te ror history tuden , social ience teach ers. and those i n te rested i n Afr ic an ­ America.n studies. Through pre­

,lrrangement wi t h the i nstructor, an additional 2-cmlit i n depcn de r u

study on civil

rights history can be completed in conjunction wi.th this cour e. (CRN: 10834}

LANGUAGES

applications. S pec ial attention given

to the needs of differenl

FREN 221 - French Literature and Film of the Americas - C, IT (4 cr) July 29 - August 23 9.00 am - 72:00 pm, M7WRF (R Brown) - ADMN-2 '/ 6

Through l i terature and fi l m , a study of the c.xperirnce of migratiun. in tegrat ion, conflict, and ethn ic i ty in the Americas from

a I-rancophone perspective. To

A d irected ,

individuali1..ed s'tudy i n

parts with each pari due at the end of �ch of the th ree summer terms.

Required orientation sessions the week of May 2 l -25. Pre l i m i n a ry iniormati n available in the His tory Office by March 30. Meets teacher cert ification req uireme n t and ell'ctive choices. Open to junio r. and ab�we. (CRN: 1 0876Registration Blocked). CaU 253535-7595

to

req uest enrollment

pe rm issio n from the instructor.

H IST 503 - Advanced Place­ ment Institute: American H istory (2 ctl July 22- July 26 9'00 am - 4 00 pm, MTWRF (R Clemo) - ADMN-22 1 Main ideals and intcrpretatiom of A merican h istory from co l o n ia.l time� through

the early 1 990s are

economic talu of Frcnch and

and North America. Jass

con d uc ted in P n g l is h . All l i lerature

translated into English; films with English subtitles. (eRN: 1 1 2 1 9)

LANG 445 - Methods for Teach ing Foreign Languages and English as a Second language (4 tr) June 24 July 1 8 2:00 - 4:45 pm, M7WR (B Reisman) - ADMN-208

Theories an d related tech nique lor tea c h i ng l an guages K- 1 2 within their cultural co nte>: includi ng direct methods, content-based imtrUl.:tion, prot'iciency orienta­ tion and lhe integ rat ion of •

•.

technologies. Attention given to var iati o n s in approach for those

teaching Engl i�h a a econd language. No p rere q ub i tes .

ReqUIred for teacher certifica t ion in

Exami nation of c u rricul u m , assessment, and instruction in

bllingual leam ing-teal.hing c ntext . C r i tica l a n al ysis of language teach i ng methodology. implementation of m a ter i als, and assessm e n t designs. pecial e mph a. is on the h istoncal and socio-political contexts 0 ESI. instruction and is ues o f lan guage d iscrimination releva n t LO literacy i nstruction. Cross-listed with EDUC 470. (CRN: 1 0 596) SIGN 101 - Sign language - A

(4 cr)

May 2lf - June 20 6:00 - 9:30 pm, M7WR (G Curtis) - ADMN-204B

This course is an introduction to the s l ruc t u re of Amencan ign

language and to the culture of the hearing-impaired. 1t covers basic signing kills and v cal ulary, finger s pe ll ing, and the particula.r need nd p robl e m s of de.1( course mete rial IS

presented through demonstra.­

a language and for minor in Engli�h as a Second Language. Strongly

eadl day devoted to a pe r iod of

recommended tor e lementary

,1l1d discussioru;. Especially

major in a langu age. Cross-listed with £DUe 445. (CRN: 1 0594)

valuah1e to teache r , �ocial

used for discussions on o rganizi ng

the Advanced PI.tce.ment COUT e, teaching methods, rea d i ng loads, w rit te n ass ign m e n ts and other

issue ' taced by AP History teachers. Participant who bave had some experie nce tea chin g All Hi tory are enco u (aged to bring with them samples uf their teachmg materials to share with the da . Collr�e fee' $675. indudfS tui t ion and malenals

fee. (eRN: 1 1 144 - RegistratIOn Please pho ne 253-535-

Blocked )

7 1 29 to reg i...rer.

tions, drill , mime, recitals. lecturcs,

workers, n urse an d

uther who need to work w i th tho. e in Ule deaf community. (GRN: 1 0 1 37)

LANG 446 - Theories of Language Acquisition (4 cr)

June 24 - July 1 9 1 1 . 00 am - l :45 pm, MTWRF (R. Swenson) - ADMN-200 Lingul ti cs i the selen tille an a lysi s

o f languagl'i like any other

discipline that we might wish to study, language aLs hJS a "system" or truct ure. and the thrusl o f this .;ourse is to a t te mp t an examination of l angu age in general . and of Engli!ih in particuldJ'. This course will cover princi ples of language acquisition with �pedfic classro

22

8:00 a m - 2:30 pm, 7WR (E. Coghlan) - ADMN-202

the focus of this course. Morni ngs are organized chronologically with American history_ Aft.ernoons art!

a

LANG 470 - Curricul um, Materials and Instruction for Teaching Eng l ish as a Second language (4 cr) July 2, 3, 9, 1 0, 1 1, 1 6, 1 7 and 1 8

people. The

m

SIGN 1 02 - Sign language - A

(4 cr)

June 24- July 1 8 6:00 - 9:30 pm, M7WR (G. Curtis) - ADMN-2048 Additional practice

- E lementary Spanish

May 28 - June 2 1 9:30 am - 1 2. 1 5 pm, MTWRF (T Williams) - ADMN-206 in trod u ct o ry C{lurse. Esse n t ials of

,L�

Second Lan guage. (CRN: 1 0 1 45)

SPAN 101 (4 cr)

An intensive first-semester

No prereqUIsites.

Requ i red for minor in Engli�h

Creole � pea ker� in the Ca r ibb ean

one's h ometown. Course has t h ree

struct ures of languages ESI encounter.

May 28 - August 24

(A Martinson) - TBA

Comparison of sound y terns an d

teachers art': most likely to

indude today'$ geographical areas of Quebec, Nova S otia, Un ited tates, Haiti. Mnrt i n ique, and t; uadeloupe. S pec ia l attention given to issues of gender, .;olor. hi 'torical heritage, language, and

HIST 461 - History of West and Northwest - S1 (4 cr)

language groups in acquiring English .

of skills learned in SIGN 1 0 1 . See caur (: d esc ri pt io n above. Prerequisite: SIGN 1 0 1 . ( CRN: 1 0 1 38 )

pronunciation , intonat ion , and

structure; basic skills in l is ten n i g.

speaking, read i ng , and writing. Lab atlendance required . (CR 1 0 1 40 )

SPAN 1 02 - Elementary Spanish (4 cr) June 24 - July 7 9 9:30 a m - 1 2. 1 5 pm, M7WRF (P Martinez-Carbajo) - ADMN-2 7 2 A continuation of Ele me n ta ry

is design ed to deVelop basic communic,ltive proficiency in l ist e n i ng, speaking, read ing and writing. (eRN: 1 0 1 39)

, pan ish 1 0 1 , the course

SPAN 503 - Advanced Place­ ment Spanish (2 cr) July 22 - July 26 9:00 am - 4:00 pm, M7WRF (L. Zinke) - ADMN-2 1 2

fhe purp ose of thiS course is to ptepa re , assist ami support teacher tha t wish to prepare their st ud enl:.� for the Advanced

Placement Spanish Lan gu age E

am.

D u r i n g l he course of this

in t it u le teacher� will plan, discuss,

review and prepare ma terials a freshmen level coll ege langllllge course, Co u rse participants \\Ii1l e xa m i ne current practices, t rend s and m et ho d o lo ­ gies. They will also discuss .lpp rop r ia te for

Advanced Placement course

planning, textbook select ions, d eve lopm en t of all rOllr es sen t ia l �kill aJ'eas and tech ni q ues and activities per ti ne nt for successful

Advanced Placement preparation. Partic i pan ts will revtew; study and corc previou released exam and establ i sb an appropriate lime

fra me for i mplementation in the classroom. The i n co rpo ra t i on

and

use o f technology, Ulf' eva luat io n ot c u rr en t �otr. are and the use of t he I nternet will also be t h o r­ oughly discussed. The i.n.:orpora­ l ion of l itemture and the new components of the revised AP panish Literature exam will

briefl}' be evaluated and d iscussed.

New and e. perienccd AP teacher are en courage d Lo o.t len d. Course Lee: $675, includes tuitton and malerial fee.

(CRN :

L 1248 -


Be sure to check www.plu.edul-summer fo r u pdated course i nformation

Registration Blocked) Please p hone

253-535-7 129 to register.

MARRIAGE A N D FAM i lY TH ERAPY MFTH 505 - Social Science Research Methods (4 cr)

t1ata. gathering techn iques, analysis of data, and lbeory construction . Empha.si wi l l be on understanding and evnluation rather than cond ucting research. Tu ition: $554

1 0 ( 87)

May 22 - June 26 3:00 - 6.20 pm, W (also Friday, June 7 all day) (C YorklC Storm) - ECAM-027 Professio n a l ethics and Wa hing­

Lon State law , w hich affect clinical studied i ncluding

fa.mily law, legal re�l1(1nsibilities,

rules (If (Jn udentiality, and inrer­ professioual cooperation. Further

study ex:plo[es l icensi ng, certifica­

tion and the ro l e of professionill

organization . "Ai&o meets Friday,

June 8, 8:30 a. m . - 4:30 p.m . In

attend cou r t for

are

13

reqUIred

hours. Tuition:

$554 per semester hour.

1 0 1 88)

to

(CRN:

M FTH 5 1 9 - Practicum 1 (2 tr) May 2 I - AU9ust 25, TBA

(C YorklC Storm) -TBA The Four semesters of practica are part of ;} continuol!.'; proce� toward developing !!pecific therapeutic competencies in work with marriage

and families. The practica present a

competency-ba ed program in which each stude.nt is evaluated

regarrung: ( 1 )

case

management

skills; (2) rela tionship skills; (3)

perceptual skills; (4) conceptual

skills; and

(5)

51 ructuring skills.

PracLic;J requirements include 1 00 h o urs o f 'upervision of S OO client

contact hours. PacuJryare AAM Fr approved supervisors and use live su pervisi on and video tapes of �tL1de-nt session

as

the primary

methotls of clinical � upervisiun.

Prerequisite: a qualifying

M FTH 520 - Theory I (2 cr) May 2 1 - JUly 27, TBA

depth study o f one approach of

marriage and f:am Uy therapy w i t h an emphasis on applyins theory in

prac.tke. Tuition: $554 per semester hOUf. Must be admitted

equ ivalent.

research, critical t h inki ng and presenta tion skills. Requires no

score on

or a

of C elr h igher in Malh I I I

grade

(eRN: I l l nO)

May 28 - June 2 1 9:00 am - 7 2:00 pm, MTWRF

(0 Wu) - MBW- / 12

Functions, limits, derivatives and integrals with applications. on

derivatives. Prerequ i­

s ite: MaLh analys is

()r

precalruJus

�chool or Math J 40 or

in h igh

MFTH 521 - Practicum 11 (2 cr) May 2 1 - A ugust 25, TBA

MATH 503 - Advanced Place­ ment Institute: Math - Calculus (2 credits) JUly 22 - July 26

See descr i p t i on under MFll-1 5 1 9.

Tuition: $554 per emesler hour.

Must be admilled to MFTH .raduale Program 10 register.

(CRN: 10 1 9 1 )

MFTH 522 - Theory JI (2 cr)

May 2 1 - July 27, TBA (C YorklC Storm) - TBA

Tuition: $554 per semester hour.

Must be admitted to M FfH Graduate Program t o rebristcr.

( eRN: I O l 92)

(C Storm) - TBA

Thition: $554 per semester hour. Must be adm itted to MFrI I Graduate Program to Register. (CRN : 1 1225)

MFTH 599 - Thesis (4 credits) May 2 1 - August 23, TBA (C StormlC York) - TBA Tuition: $5511 per semester hour. Must be admit ted to /l!1fTH Graduate Program to register.

tCR

: L ( 194)

MATH MATH 1 23 - Modem Elementary Mathematics - MR, NS (4 ct) May 28 - June 2 1 9:30 am - 1 2 1 5 pm, MTWRF

(C Dorner) - OGYM- J 04

Concepts undl'rlying traditional computat ional techn iqut's;

a

system ati c analys i s of arith metic; .In

intuitive approilch

- 4 '00 pm, MTWRF (S. Cade) - MBLO- 1 1 2 9'00 am

The Institute is designed for i n ­

to

algebra

course

for 1 24, 1 30.

(CRN: 1 1 ( 0 1 )

MUSI 201 - 2 1 9 - Private Instruction - AR (1-4 cr) May 28 - August 23, TBA

(Staff)

The DeparrmeI1l of Music offer private i n struct i on i n a variety of

Offi� for lesson, credit and tuition details at 253-535-7602.. Privale lesson fee: $ 1 63 for one credit,

$300 for J:\.V() cred it, (in

MUSI 341 - Music for Class­ room Teachers: World Cultures (2 cr)

July 22 - July 26

high school. Selected top.ics from

(L Jessup) - MBRC-322

10 practical applicatiorlli will be discussed along with strategies for the effective teaching of these topi

Ihe

�.

Thi

COllfse

will focus nn

ma j or aspects of design i ng and

course

with emphasis on cont�t,

pacing, and preparing for lhe AI'

( 1)

The InstituLe will focus on

,ontent,

(2)

pedagogy, and

(3)

the calcu lus refoml movement.

Course fee: $675, i ncludes tuition 1 1 1 45 Regist ration Blocked) Please

and materials fee. ( eRN:

phone 253-535-7129 to register.

addition

to tuition).

service secQndary mathematics teachem who are teaching o r planning t o teach AP Calculus in

exam.

See description under MFTH 5 1 9.

prerequisite

availability. Contact the Musk

teaelling a sllcccSl;ful AP Calculus

MFTH 52S - Practicum IV (4 cr) May 28 - August 23, TBA

music majors and m inors;

media, subject to i nstructor

equivalent (eRN: 1 1 239)

single-variable llkulus which lead

See description under MITH 520.

fulfill the general uruver ity (cross-cultural.) Required for

MATH 1 5 1 - Calculus 1 - MR, NS (4 cr)

Emphasis

previous music experience and requireIU.:nts in arts and diversi ty

or

to MFTIT Graduate Program to register. (CRN: 1 0 1 90)

(C YorklC Storm) -TBA

MFTH 5 1 2 - Professional Studies in Marriage and Family Therapy (3 cr)

addition, students

t he math pJocemenl te�t

taken i n conjunction with MFTH

luclies. 1bpiCi include formulating

are

(CR : 1 0332 )

Graduate Program to register.

5 1 9, 52 1 , and 523 constitute an i n ­

mseardl qurstions, re:;eardl designs,

p racti ce,

elemerrtary teach i n g majors.

The th reI.' semester of th ory

Basic research concepts applied to laboratory, field, and bibliographic

and geometry. I n tcmkd fo r

M1.ISt be admitted In MFTH

(C YorklC. Storm) - TBA

June / 8- August 8 3.00 - 6:20 pm, TR (J Schiller) - ECAM-02 7

per credit hour. ( RN:

Tuition: $554 per semester hom.

9:00 am - 4:00 pm. MTW{fF Music in a global frantework,

cross-culturally and

as

a pan of

the fabric of daily life, as compared to an isolated sc hoo l curri c u l u m

subjecr. Pmctical and teachable

ffi1.lSic anti a rt activities which can be used as part of language Arts, Social Studies, and other academic subjects

or

fOT das ·room music

instruction are demon.slr.lled. The

focu is on world music, w i th emphasis o n the major culture

areas of the world. Otlerlld for students preparing f! r elementary classroom teaching

(non-music

education majors) . Prerequisite: muc

39 1 . Taught concurren tly

M USIC

wi(h M USI SO l e . (CRN: I O l 42)

MUSI 1 20 - Music a n d Culture AR. C (4 cr) June 24 - July 20 9. 20 am - 12:30 pm, MTWRF (G. Youtz) - MBRC-322

M USI 402-42 1 - Private Instruction - AR (1 -4 cr) May 28 - AuguSt 23, TBA The Department of Music offer

Int roduction to

p riva1l' instruct ion in

ethnomusicologicn1 consider­

media, subJect to Instructor

ations, focusing on stedband and

availability. Contact the M1.ISic Office for lesson , cred i t and tuition

calypso of Trin idad .md Tobago,

and traditionll Ch i n�1' court musIc- E;..::a m ination will be made through hands-on performance

(Staff)

a

variety of

delails a t 253-535-7602 . Private

Lesson Fee: $ 165 for one credit,

$300 for two credits,

experience witb instruments and re�eaIch and presen tal ion of

SOCIal, economic and relig i ous a�pects ..., f music. whiLe developing

23


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

MUSI 501 C - Graduate Music. Specialists: World Music ( 1 cr)

July 22 - July 26 9:00 am - 4:00 pm, MTWRF (L Jessup) - MBRC-322

This course explores mus ic: in a

NURS 47 1 - Nursing Synthesis Seminar - SR (1 cr) May 28 - August 23 1 :00 pm - 5 '00 pm, F (P George) - RAMS-205

Cr itical evaluation o f roles as

NURS 526 - Nursing Leadership & Management (3 er) June 1 7 - August 1 6 8:00 a m - 3:00 pm, F (C Schultz) - RAMS-203

I n trod u ction to p licy, organi2a ­

(CRN:

1 1 1 1 8 - Registration BLocked) Regi tranon by departm\!ll t only.

NURS 532 - Care & Outcomes Manager Practieum II (5 er)

global framework, cross-culturu.lly

professional nurses using

lion, and fi nancing or health care.

and as a part of the fabric of daily

empi rical , aesthetic, pe rso n al , and

Preparation for provision of quality

life, a com pa red to an isol ated

ethical knowledSl" of so ial and

cost-effective care, p artici pati o n in

June 1 7 August 7 6 8:30 am 4:30 pm, WR (Staff) - RAMS-20S

scbool curriculum subjecL

th� design anu implementation of

Direct care or indirect clinical

Practical and teachable music and

po litical realitie . Prereq uisites: Prior or con c urren t enrollmenl in

care,

arts activities, which can be u�ed as

475 and 476. Tuition: $554 per

leadersh ip role

part of L anguage Arts, Social

semester hour and a $ 1 00 L�arning

resources. Tuition $554 per

Resou rce tee. (CRN: 1 0556)

semester hour. (CRN: 1 L240)

rudil!S, and othc r academ i c

an d a..;sumption of the

in man aging

subj ects or for classroom basic instruction, an: demonstrated. The

fuC\L\ is on world musIC, with emphasis on the major culture areas of th e world. Specific ties with cumnt textbooks provide te;\chers with. materi al to use in the classroom and assist them in

d evelopi n g materials to fit their specific teaching situation. Open to classroom teachers and music specialists. Taugh t in conjunction with MUST 34- 1 . ( CRN : 1 0609)

N U R S 312 - Introduction to Perioperative Nursing (4 cr) June 24 - July 1 9 6:30 a m - 4:30 pm, MTWRF (S Aikin) - TBA - Off-Campus

Thi course is a patient-centered st u dy of the nursing care required for

an

' u rg

individual undergoing

icaJ intervention. The course

would assist the student to develop knowledge of aseptic techn ique and goals of surgica l care as it rdates to the patient in surger y. The .. tudent will gain

an

standing of their role

as

under­ a member

of the per iop erative heal dl team, as well a' an awareness of the role

NURS 475 - Social and Political Contexts for Health Care (2 cr)

N U RS 527 - Evaluation and Outc.omes Research (3 cr)

MQy 28 - August 23 8:00 am - 1 2:00 pm, F (p. George) - RAMS-205

June / 7 - August 1 6 8:00 a m - 3:00 pm, M (Staff) - RAMS-203

cha nge . and eval uate advanced

nUl':.ing practice fo cu sed On dient­

Examination of the theory and

centered, dinically demon strable

p ractice of curriculum plann ing,

del ivery. Prerequisites for majors:

care. Tuition: $554 per semester

d evelo pme nt , and evaluation.

425, 454, 461 ,464. lndu ive of RN/

hour. (CR

:

I I J 19)

MSN candidates. Tuition; $554 per

NURS 476 - Nursing Synthesis SR (6 er) May 28 - August 23, TBA (P. George) - OFF CAMPUS

NURS 529 - Care Manager Roles (3 cr) June 1 7 - August 1 6 8:00 am - 3:00 pm, M (Staff) - RAMS-205

Advanced practice role develop­

critical thinking, decision making,

ment, education, consultation and

princi ples of the teac.h.ingllearrting

and tedlnical and leadershIp

research. Scandinavian Nur ing

proce ss . Analysis of adult teaching

Educators Summer Exchange

strategies and the process of self

co m pet encies in nursing situations mentored by a p eofe sional nurse

precepto r. Prerequisites: 425, 454, 46 J . 464. Tuition: $554 per semester hour. (CRN: 10558)

NURS 525 - Theoretical Foundations (3 er)

Progr4Jl1 Tuition $554 per semester hour. Open to elIgible MSN

Candidates upon approval (CRN: 1 0848 - Re gistra tion Blocked)

Registration by department only. NURS 53 1 - Care and Outcomes Manager Practicum t (3 er)

June 1 7 - August T 5 8:00 am - 3:00 pm, R (Staff) - RAMS-207 use,

critique and

,.,.hich cover the course content.

theories and approaches Lo health

seminars. Emphasis wlll be on direct patient care in a ddined

Grading based on theory and

care common to USA and

nursing specialty, maoagerial skill

candinavian countries . Emphasis is on evaluation and outcomes modeling. Scandinavian Nursing

experience will involve on-line

sets, or teaching competencies depending upon a tudent's

predetermined focus. Eval uatio n

Recolllml!lfdeci Practices: Meeker,

Educators Summer Exchange

and outcome measures frame the

M. & Rothrock,

Program. Tuition $554 per

learning objectIVes to be completed

semester hour. Open to elJgible

before the oext PLU summer

lion f Tunior r of School of u rsillg. Tuition: $554 per

semester hour. (CRN: L 0879)

M

Ca ndidate upon approval.

( CR : 1 0844 )

semester hour. (Cm

:

1 1 243)

NURS 593 - Advanced Specialty Practice (1 cr) May 28 - August 24, TBA

requirements. Tuition: $554 per

8:30 - 4:30 pm, WR (Staff) - RAMS-203

analyses are done u s i ng n u rsing

ive

and tude nt eval uations, Cohort

depe n dent . Tuit ion: $554 per

(T. Miller) - WeI/ness Center Applicatio n of advanced practice

clinical practice.

�omparat

Theoretical and philosophical

June 1 7 - August 1 6

(our weeks. Exams will be given

Ed.

July 1S - A ugust 13 8:00 am - 3:00 pm, T (Staff) - RAMS-205

ment inducling nursing manage­

pm daily. five days per week for

0.r the Panell t in Surgery', J 1

NURS 549 - Teaching in Schools of Nursing (2 cr)

Synthe is of n ursin g knowledge,

be arranged in Norway. This

C.v. Mosby. Prerequ isite: Comple ­

Cohort dependent. Tui t ion : $554 per Sen1l!Ster hour. (CRN: 1 1 242)

the student's educational goal will

tl;

T

trends in health policy and ethical

admini [ration, research and

J. Alexander's Care

June

issues relevant to health care

u. cd in nursing ed ucation ,

2002 Standards of

NURS 548 - Curriculum Development for Nursing (2 cr)

i nfluence health care, i nd ucti n g

o r clinical area 6:30 am to 4:30

,

(eRN: 1 1241 )

1 7 - July 9 8:00 am - 3:00 pm, (Staff) - RAMS-203

of new knowledge to provide,

A practical experience fOC\lsed on

urse

538. Tuition: $554 per semester hour.

Prep aration for the criti q ue and

evaluation of a range of theories

Room

interventions, outcomes. and

use

peri operative arena o f care.

texts: Associa tio n of O perat ing

by implementing approaches.

legal , and economic fac.tors that

Preparation for

clin ical performance. Required

education to achieve client goal

Analysis of the social, p ol i tical,

of the profession al nunt in the tudents will be in theory dasses

management, supervision, o r

eval uation methods. Prerequisite:

scmester hoUL (CRN. 10557)

N U RSING

24

Candidates upon approval.

session. Scandin avian Nursing Educators Summer Exchange Program. Tuition $554 pe r semester hour. Open to eligible MSN

nursing in clinical specialty practice.

Prerequisite: completion of ail core

semester hour. (CRN: 1 09 1 9)

NURS 596 - Scholarly Inquiry in Nursing Practice (4 cr)

June 1 7 - August

76 8:00 a m - 5:00 pm. F (Staff) - RAMS-207

Development and submission of p rofess i onal paper or p roject related to one's area of specializa ­ tion based on an evaluation and outcome� model. Co-requisite or prerequisite: 532. Capstone course for care and outcomes manager con centration. Tu ition: $554 per semester hour. (CRl

:

1 1244)


Be sure to check www.plu.edul-summer for

NURS 599 - Thesis (1 cr)

underlytng values and assumptions

May 28 - A ugust 24, TBA (Staff) -- TBA Faculty gu iued J ppl i (al i on of the

e.g. • employer-employee relations,

research process. May involve

environmental and social r�"pon i­

replication of previous study, second.lry analysis of research data, an evaluation project. or an origlllal invesugation. Prerequiitt'l. completion of core COllTses, ,on�enl of adviser. Thitlon: pet semester hour_

(eRN:

554

1 0920)

P H I LOSOPHY

in speciflc busifle�s cases involving, advertising, workplace conflier, and bilities.

(CRN: 1 1 2 1 5 )

PHYSICAL EDUCATION P H E D 1 00 - Personalized Fitness Program - PE (1 tr)

May 28 - June 2 1 1 1 :00 am - 12. T 5 pm, MTWR (5c. Westering) - OGYM- 702 Health and rltness related issues

PHIL 1 0 1 (0 1 ) - Philosophical Issues - PH (4 cr)

are covered as well as functional .lnd per onally de igned programs

May 28 - June 2 1 9:00 am - 1 2;00 pm, MTWRF (K. Cooper) - ADMN-2 10

related to physical activity. (CRN.

Introduces ph ilosophy by surveying

PHED 151 - Beginning G o lf - PE (1 cr) May 28 - June 2 1

several imp rlant topics from the history uf philo ophy. The issues we

discuss may Include: is belief i n God reasonable? How do we know what we know' Axe all human act ions p hysically detem1ined? What makes an action righ t or wrong? The goal of the course is not

sO

much 10 provide anS\'I'ers to

these questions as to understand the issues and options and to learn how to employ dear, criticul, and charitable th inking about them. ( CRN: 1 1 1 1 4)

8:00 - 9: 1 5 am, MTWR (L Marshall) - OG YM-Aeldhouse Activity course for men and

women. Activity fee: $20 ( CRN: 1 0 1 55)

PHED 186 - Step Aerobics - PI: (1 cr) May 28 - June 2 1 1 2:30 - 1 045 pm, MTWR (Su. Westenng) - OGYM­ Freldhouse Activity course for men and

PHIL 101 (02) - Philosophical Issues - PH (4 cr) June 24 - July 1 9 9:00 a m - 1200 pm, MTWRF (P. Kaunn) - ADMN-2 1 6 See cour e description above. (eRN.

1 0 1 54)

1 12 14)

PHIL 125 - Moral Philosophy ­ PH (4 cr) May 28 - June 2 1 9:00 am - ' 2:00 pm, MTWRF (G_ Johnson) - ADMN-2 12

An introduct ion to major moral theories of We. tern civilization, including contemporary moral

theories such as feminist care ethics. There is also critical application to selected moral

abortjon, pornogra­

regi tcrl (CRN; 1 0 1 59)

PHED 200 (02) - Individualized Swim Instruction - PE (1 cr)

July 22 - August

16 9:00 - 9:40 am, MTWRF (1 Johnson) - POOL

See above description. lCRN: 1 0 1 6 1 )

PHED 2 1 2 ( 0 1 ) - Conditioning Swimming - PE (1 cr)

, PHIL 325 - Business Ethics -

Activity course for men and

PH (4 cr)

women. Advanced swimming skills

May 28 - June 27 6:00 - 8:00 pm, MnNR (D. Amold) - ADMN 2 1 0

requi red. (CRN: 1 1 1 03)

Application of moral lheorie and perspectives of relevance to business practices. Examinauon of

June 3 - June 1 4 6 00 - 9:00 pm, MTWRF (J. Poppen) - ECAM-Gym

PHED 217 - Ufe Guard Training - PE (1 cr)

p rogram for grades K-6; sequential

tration of a tlevelopmt'nlal

May 28- June 1 4:00 - 9:00 pm, TWRF (9.00 am ­ S-OO pm Saturday) (J Johnson) - POOL Be a lifeguard this summer! Red

Cross Lifeguard Training includes community first aid and

PR for

and progressive programming; large repertoire of aaivities. For elementary education majol'l>. (CRN:

1 0 1 65)

PHED 360 - Professional Practlcum ( 1 -2 cr)

bon. Must be able to swim 500

May 28 - August 24 (A Evans) - TBA Oppo rtun i tie. to develop,

yards non-stop using front crawl,

I mplement .

the Professional Rescuer Certifica­

ide troke and breaststroke. Certific3tion fee requi red.

$6.

(CRN: 10203)

interest. In addition to interacting with university faculty. tudent·

PHED 234 (01) - Relaxation Techniques - PE (1 cr) June 1 0 - June 14 9.'00 a m - 1 2:00 pm, MTWRF (M McGill) - ECAM-Gym The obvious benefits of relaxation are relieving stress and mental ten

and evaluate skills

associated with their professional

ion . But n.:-w, long-term

research indicates a s trengthening

will also work With site supervi­ sor�. (CR

: 1 0 1 70 - Blocked ) (To

Tegister phone 535-7638.)

P H E D 401 - Community First Aid (1 cr) 0(

June 3 - Ame 7 6'00 - 9:00 pm, MTWRF (J. Thomas) - OGYM- 7 06

Thls course meets requirements

of the immune system warding off

for the American Red Cross

disease. lowering blood pressure

Standilrd First Aid and Per ona!

and cllolesterol levels. We w i ll

stress! Clothing: wear comfortable,

Beginners espec ially encouraged to

1 PH ED 322 - Physical Educa­ ti on in the Elementary School (2 cr)

Learn orga nization and admi n is­

PHED 200 (01 ) - Individualized Swim I n st ru ct i on - PE (1 cr) June 24 - July 1 9 9:00 - 9:40 am, M TWRF (1 Johnson) - POOL An levels of swimming instruction.

course information

1 1 1 04)

explore progressive relaxation ,

June 24 - July 1 9 7'00 - 7:45 am, MTWRF (1. Johnson) - POOL

as

July 22 - August 1 6 7:00 - 7:45 am, M7WRF (J. Johnson) - POOL See above uescriptlOn. (CRN:

woruen. (eRN: 1 0 1 57)

phy, and rape. (CRN: 1 0855 )

issues such

PHED 212 (02) - Conditioning Swimming - PE (1 cr)

u pd at ed

yoga, guided i magery, acupressure and new method of relieving loose fItting-clothes. (CRN:

1 0564)

Satety. Lab fee: aid/CPR card.

$ 1 0 for cost of first

(CRN: 1 1 238)

PHED 480 - Exercise Physiology (4 cr) May 28 - June 2 7

PHfD 234 (02) - Relaxation Techniques - PE (1 cr)

9:30 am - 1 2. 1 5 pm, MnNRF (A. Evans) - OGYM-205 tudy the scientific basis and

June 1 7 - June 2 1 9:00 am - 1 2:00 pm, M7WRF (M. McGill) - ECAM-Gym

phySIOlogical effect of physical

See COUlSe description above.

lecture and discuss i on emphas- i i directed toward practical applica­

(CRN: 1 1 1 50)

tion of prin c iph ::s and wncepts of

PHED 275 - Water Safety Instructors Course (2 cr) May 28 - June 7 8:00 am - 1 2:00 pm, MTWRF (J Johnson) - POOL You will learn to i Dstruct Red Cross courses

ill

water safety and

swimming. Course will be theoretical as well as practical as

you will teach various leveL� of swimming to local elementary school students. Upon successful completion you will b e certified by Axnerican Red Cross as a Water afety I nstru ctor ( WSI ) . (CRN:

10164)

ctivity on the human body.

exercise physiology in chools, clinic and corpo rate environments. Lab opportunities art! provided to help you apply clas material Prerequisite: BIOL 205-206 or instructor consent. (eRN: 1 0 1 67)

PHED 491 - Independent Study (1 - 4 cr) May 28 - AUgust 24 (A. Evans) - TBA (ndependent investigations may be made into areas of �pedal interest to tbe student whICh are not covered by cou rses in the regular graduate program. The type.� of projects undertaken vary in length

25


COURSE DESCR I Pn ONS

and content and nre determined i n consultation with a facullY advisor.

PHYSICS

POLITICAL SCI ENCE

( To

PHYS 1 1 0 - Astronomy - NS. SM (4 cr) June 24 - August 1 5:00 .- 7025 pm, MTIt1I (K. Larson) - RGR-2 1 0 Lab. 7030 - 9:00 pm, MT - RCTR20 1

, POLS 326 - Recent Political Thought - 51 (4 crl May 29 - July 24 6:30 - 9"30 pm , MW

regi tef phone 535-7638.)

PHED 495 - Internship- SR (2-8 cr) May 28 .- August 24 (A Evans) - TBA Pre-professional experiences

dtlsely related lO student's career

and academic interests. Prerequi ­

sites; declaration of major, at least sophnmore Status, and completion

4:

Stars and their evolution, galaxie and larger structures, cosmology,

and the

olar system . Some

of at least J t) hours in the major. ( To regIster phone 535 -7638. )

evening obser.... ation ses�iuns may

P H ED 499 - Capstone/Intern· ship (2-8 cr)

required) . No prerequisite courses

May 28 - August 24

(A Evans) - TBA (Th reg i ster phone 535 -7638.) PHE D 5 9 1 - I ndependent Study

(1 cr)

extend beyond 1 0;00 pm (one late ­ mght observation sessIOn IS in science or mathematics are needed. Fulfills Gl1R Science

( Lecture 1 0553)

requi rement. Lab fee; $50.

CRN: 1 0552 )

( Lab eRN :

Please note: you m ust register for both the lecture and the lab. Use

both course registration numbers

May 28 - A ugust 24, TBA

(A Evans) - TBA See PHED 49 1 above. (To register phone: 535-7638.) R ECR EAnON

(CRN) when regilitering for this

class. PHY5 1 2511 3 5 - College Physics - NS, SM (4/ 1 er)

June 1 7 - Ju/y 1 9

May 28 - August 24

(A Evans) - TBA Students work under the

upervi­

si n uf a (oach, teachl"I, recreation supervisor,

or

health care provider.

Prerequisite; departmental approval. (To regi�ter phone: 535-

7638.)

RECR 4 9 1 - Independent Study ( 1 -4 cr) May 28 - A ugust 24 (A. Evans) - TBA

of the dean. ( 10 regi.�er phone: 535-76311. ) Prerequisite: consent

RECR 495 - Internship (2-8 ctl May 28 - August 24 (A Evans ) - TBA

Pre-professional experiences

closely related to studen t's career and academic interests. Pre requi

sites� declaration of major. at leasl sophomore status, and completion of n t lea�t 10 hours in the major. (To re.gisler phone: 535-7638.)

RECR 499 - Capstone: Recreation Administration - SR (2-8 cr) May 28 - August 24 (A Evans) - TBA (To register phone: 535- 76311 )

(E. Ford) - RCTR-2 1 0 Lab: 1 .' 00 - 4:00 pm, MW - RCTR20 1 (eRN. 1 0907) or Lab. 1 : 00 - 4.' 00 pm, TR - RCTR-

20 1 (eRN' 1 09 7 6)

This course provides an IDLroduc­ tioo

to

the fundamental topics of

physics. It is a non-calculus

sequence, involving only the

of trigonometry and cont?ge algebra. use

Prerequisites: Math 1 40 (or equivalent by placement

exam)

1 0906 ) (Lab CRN: 10907 or 1 09-16 ) Use both course registration numbers (ClUIof) when (Lecture eRN:

registering for this class. Lab Fee:

$50. PHYS 1 26/ 1 36 - College Physics - NS. SM (411 er) July 22 - August 24 9:00 - 7 , :30 am. MTVVRF (£ Ford) - RCTR-220 Lab. 1 '00 - 4:00 pm, MW - RCTR20 1 (CRN: 1 09 1 7) or Lab. 1 :00 - 4:00 pm. TR - RCTR20 1 (eRN 1 0909)

Continuation of Physics

1 25.

Prerequisites: Math 1 4 0 ( o r

equivalrnt b y placement e..'CaIIl ) and

Physics

1 25. (Lecture CRN: 1 0908)

( Lab CRN: 10909 or 1 ( 9 1 7 ) Use

both course registration numbers

(CRN) when registering for this class. Lab Fee: $50.

1 0 1 75 )

(D. OJufs) -XAVR- / 50 A critical examination of the major ideol og ies of the modern

world. This

summer we wiU

emphasize U.S. ideo logy in its global contexl, and tne contribu­ tIons of leminist polit ical thougbt

contemporary liberalism. (eRN: 1 1 23 l )

to

POLS 363 - Politics and the Media - S1 (4 crl May 28 - June 2 1 9:30 a m - 12. 1 5 pm, MTWRF (W Spencer) - ADMN-2 1 9

PSYC 354 - Social Psychology ­ S2 (4 crl June 24 July 1 9 1 230 - 3: 1 5 pm, MTWRF (M Rosell) - XA VR-250

Research and theory concerning the in teraction betwee n group$ and the individual. Language, attitudes,

ames ion, leadership, person perceptiun, and reillted topic; are examined and their relalionship to

various types of social change and

influences are discussed. Prerequi ­ site 1 0 1 .

(CRN:

1 L 228)

The role o f mass media in American gove.rnment, politics, and policy. Attention to political

surveys, press freedom and

presented to familiarize Muden ts

culture, public opin ion, polli. and responsibility. and government regulation, s{'Crecy, and manipula­

(eRN' 1 1 230)

with the Asi an corrunun i ty in the area. The class will examine historical, -Qcioiogical

and

Asian experience and will provide students with a perspective on one

PSYCH OLOGY PSYC 348 - Cognitive Processes - 52 (4 cTl June 24 - July 1 9 930 a m - 12: 1 5 pm. MTWRF (W Shore) - ADMN-209

The study of human mental activity. Thpics include attenUon, perception.

consciousness, memory, language. concepLual behavior, and develop­ mental aspec of (og!lilion, inclividual differences, and

applications. Prerequisites: 10 L 242 (Qr equivalt:llL); or consent of instructor. (CRN; 108 58)

PSYC 350 - Personality Theories - S2 (4 er) May 28 - Jun e 2 1 9:3Q a m - 12: '5 pm, MTWRF (J Moritsugu) - XA VR- 1 50 Strategies for the study of personality. Review of theories and

research. D]scu$S.ion of implication for counseling. Prerequisite:

(eRN: 1 0568)

Lectures, tours ,md meals will be

psychological material on the

10 L

of the more et.lmically diverse minority communities in the Northwest. Coverage includes Japanese. Chinese, Vietnamese, and Filipino I=Ultural groups. Course fee: $60 for meals, field trip

and guest lecturer This course fulfills 2 credits of the alternative

perspective Line of the cliver it y requirement. (eRN: L 0256 ) PSYC 461 - Psychology of Work - S2 (4 cr)

May 28 - June 2 7 9:30 am - 7 2 1 5 pm, MTWRF (C Hansvick) - ADMN-200

Integrating career plmming into the study of human be.havior in work settings. Application and

exknsion of psychological principles to the individual operating withm an organizational context-including measuring and

facilitating job perfor mance .

worker motivation, human factors. group processe.:.. (CRN: 1 089 1 )

PSYC 352 - Development: Infancy to Maturity - S2 (4 cr) June 24 - July 7 9 9:30 a. m . - 7 2: 1 5 p. m., MTWRF

(M Brown) - ADMN-206 Physical, intellectual, sodal

and

emotional growth from infanq' through adolescence to maturity.

26

1 0 1 . (CRN:

P5YC 405 - Asian American Experience Workshop - A. S2 (2 cr) July 22 - July 26 1 0.'00 am - 4 00 pm, MTWRF (J Moritsugu) - XAVR-2 1 7

tion.

9.'00 - 1 1 30 a m, MTWRF

RECR 360 Professional Practicum ( 1 -2 cr)

Prerequisite: PSYC

PSYC 493 - History and Systems of Psychology - SR (4 cr)

May 28 - June 2 1

72:30 - 3: 1 5 pm, M7WRF (K. Goedert) - XA VR-250 HistoricaJ development, contempo­ rary founs, and basic assumptions


Be sure to check www.plu.edul-summer for updated cou rse i nformation

I.lf the major psychological theories and traditions. Meets the senior eminar/project requirement when a p rojecUp ol per is added. Prerequi­ sItes: 1 0 1 ; 242 (or equivalent); one of 340. 342, 346. 348; one of 350.

o n the l Ife and early w ri t ings of Martin Luther. As the key figure in

the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century. Luther leads into some exploration of other h risti;m movCIDl!nts of his time

352, 354. ( CRN: 1 0 1 77)

and ours. Video resources are al

RELIGION

process. (CR

RELI 131 - The Religions of South Asia - C, R3 (4 er)

RELI 227(02) - Christian Theology Topic: God in the Modem World - R 2 (4 cr) July 29 - August 23 1 1 :00 am - 1 :45 pm, MTWRF (L Lundeen) - INGR- l 00

0

i ncorporated into the learning

May 28 - June 2 1 8:00 - 1 0:45 am, MTVVRF (P. Ingram) - ADMN-2 14 Hinduism. Budd h ism. lainism.

and Siklsm - thei r origin s and

deVelopment, expansion. and contemporary issues - provide focus for this course on religions of South Asia. Empha is will be on primary sources i n traD btion . This course fulfills line 3 of the GUR religion requirement and the cross-cultural perspectives line of the d iversity require m e nt. ( ,RN: 1 0 1 80)

RELI 1 32 - The Religions of East Asia - C, R3 (4 cr)

June 24 - July 1 9 8:00 - 1 0:45 am, M7WRF (P. Ingram) - ADMN-200

Confu iao ism . Taoism, Chinese

and lapanese Buddbism, Shin to und the "new religions" of Japan­ their rigins, development. and contemporary issues. (CRN: 1 1 1 09) REU 212 - Religion and Uterature of the New Testa­ ment - R1 (4 cr)

JUne 24 - July 1 9 2:00 - 4:45 pm, M7WRF (D. Oakman) - ADMN-2 1 6

:

1 1 1 1 1)

Traces the impact of modem culture on understanding God. Uses a historical framework to explore how Renaissance hum a n !l' . C • Ism, 1 6 Century Relormaoons and modem sc ience shaped new alternatives widl respect to freedom. auth rity and knowl­

edge. The Hebrew/Chri tian heritage will be the central focus for tbi inquiry. Methods indude lecture , di ussion, reading and some significant movies for reflective input. ( CRN; 1 1249) REU 364 - Theological Studies: Theology of Nature - R2 (4 cr)

May 28 - June 22 2:00 - 4. 45 pm, M7WRF (S Torvend) -ADMN-208

including perspectives on contem­ porary issues. (CRN: 10570) RELI 225 � Faith and Spi rituality - R2 (4 cr) May 28 June 2 1

9.30 am - 12.' 15 pm, MTWRF

(L GrosslR. Stivers) - ADMN-209 Retlection on

h risti:tn life tyle ,

beliefs, and commitments. ( .RN: 1 1 1 1()) REU 227(01) - Christian Theology Topic: Martin Luther - R2 (4 cr) June 24 - July 1 9

1 7 OO am - 1 45 pm. M7WRF (L Lundepn) - ADMN-20B

Central co n cepl� of Christian tl,eolugy will be tudied focL1$ing

community resoW'ces for healing

site: Backgro un d equivalent to a

grief. disenfranchised grief in youth;

care for caregivers; te�ching and currirnlar connections with loss and grief, and complicated grief intervention�. OilSS activities include mini lectures, group dialogues, guest presentations, 4-5 field trips to

community rcsoW'ces (i.e., Mary Bridge Children's Hospital. Bridges

..neving Center. fimcral home and cemetery), major films and personal

interview: and outside readings. Class projects wiU be individualized to each student's field of interest (Le., education, ocial work,

sociology and nursing). Cross-listed with EDUC 503A. (CRN: 1 0903)

ource

exam ined in light of the common creation story. (eRN: 1 1 274 )

are

SOCIAL WORK SOCW 399 - Intervening with Grieving Children, Adolescents, and Adults - 52 (4 cr) June 24 - July 79

930 am - 72. 15 pm. MTVVRF (T. Johnstone) -. XAVR-250

This course will explore the impacts of k}ss and the resultant grieving process that occurs within young people. Losses explored will he: dying and death, divorce and detaciunents (i.e., moving­ including toster care and adoptions,

Life cycle cllanges, physical disabili­ ties and injuri l's). We will covc.. developmental aspect: of grieving in dying, deatb and divorce; interven­ tions that support grieving at chool,

variance- Not applicable to mathematic.� cred it. t udents will be expected to compl ete several

Excel based lab sessions. Prerequi­ pre-calculus course.

(C[U\I:

10 198)

STUDY ABROAD IMPORTANT: For

/IIl'r!'

m!MTIIIl'1011

(11'f'iimIWfI

<111

(}!f.o(II/IIPUS Rem/Oil,

'1/(1

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,',

III" L' Chilrr)'

Jor Il11t'/rtnlifl/ml

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Prvgrallls, ['11�rvold 2 15.. l'hm/, _'iJ5 ;- 7,18

"

t'1l1l1il lll!llSIOd@pllLt'du

'lilt Cc'/IIc!r jor TJI r.�/lllloI1111 I'm 'mills will f(' 'isrer slIItiellfs far

off-,11111['113 (O/l� Ill1ks; Ilh�:rll'i " >

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SOCIOLOG

SABR 1 00 OF1 - Study Abroad Granada. Spain (4 er) May 28 - July 2. 2002

SOCI 296 - Social Stratification

202, 30 1 , or 40 1 dependmg on

Credits awarded for SPAN 20 I . - 52 (4 cr) May 28 - June 20 8:00 - 1 0:45 am., M7WR

(I Higginson) - XAVR-250

An examination of the forms,

stratification. The course focuses on

Uterary, historical. amI theological

dinleruiom of the New Testame n t ,

l ion analysis , linear regression. chi ),qUaIt' ana ly is and analysis of

caUSE'S, and consequences of soci al

This co urse is designed to help students explore Christian perspectives on the natural world, in particular the contemporary environmental project. Biblical. hi torical. and theological

home and in the co mm un ity; gender commonalties and similari­ ties; when grieving visit the school house; rituals of healing; ethnicity and cultural impacts on the grieving journey; the fine arts in grieving;

i nequality based on class. race. and

gender, exp loring how and why

individuals have different access to society's valued resources, services, and positions. and the conse­ quences of these opportunities (or

hlocked. oppo rtuni ties ) for different

gr ups of people. Prerequisite: 10 I or 240. (CRN: 1 1 229)

SPECIAL EDUCATION Special Education courses are

student's level. May be take.n as SPAN 32 1 -

Civilization <lOd fee yet to be

Culture. Program

determined. Contact Professor James Predmore for more information 253-535-7243 .

SABR 1 00 OF2 - Nordic Approaches to Democracy and Development. Hedmark, Norway (4 a) June 17 - July 12, 2002 Credits awarded for Scandinavian Studies, Poli t ical Science, [nterna­ lional

ore, or Economics.

Program fee yet to be detenn ined . Contact Professor Ann Kelleher for

more i nformatio n 253-535-7687.

Listed under the EDUCATION section of t he catalog.

STATIS ICS STAT 23 1 - lntroductory Statistics - MR (4 a)

May 28 - June 2 1 8:00 - 1 0:45 a.m., M7WRF (R Jensen) - ADMN-2048

Descriptive statistics: measures of central tendency and dispersion; and inferential tati ·tiq;; generaliza­

ti ons about populations from samples by parametric and non­ parametric techniques. Method covered will indude e t imation,

hypotbesis testing, simple correla-

27


S p ec · a Prog a m PROGRAM

discuss.i on and a c ti vi t i es. In the afternoon,

FOR

students engage in hands-on com pu te r

YOU NG PEOPLE

project in digita l and visual imag�ry from which they will learn how to cont nbute

PLU M I DDLE COLLEGE H igh School

their ideas to our visual wo rld .

incommg seniors and '02

graduales, get an earl y start on a ucce 'fut o:o\lege career thi su m mer at PLU! Called

Middl . Col lege, lhi

ix-week 'ummer

h arpen learnin g skills wh ile earning seven lo nine regular, LTansferable seme ter hours

Middle C liege help ' to make college-level study easier. Within a framework of inte resung, contem pora ry topi cs, it emph.1Sizes bask sk ill so i m por­

or college c redil .

tant in college-wri ten and oral commumca­

tion, study skills, and mathe matic.� . There to

:u

sciences, mathematics, En ghsh , geoscien ces. and art, a cow1Scior, and tutors who live in the res id ence hall with you. You receive individual co unselin g and aptitude or skills testi ng. And, you l � how to find and use i nto rm a ti O u at lhe Uruver­ sity. Classes are small, flexible, and informal, giving you an opportu n ity to get acquainted with both instructor and feUow students. Middle College isn' t ju t tudy. There is

plenty of opportunity for play, taking

Youth Leadership

p lanne d for 'ummer 2002. Program and

regi tration infor matio n is ava ilable (rom the Un i vers i ty CenL r 253 - 535- 7450 .

ho ur credit) . $ 1 85 (workshop only - n o

call 253 -535 -7 l 50.

Summer Scholars is a th ree- week residen ­

tial enrichment program for ac ad emica l ly

talented student in grades four thro ugh eleven. Ea ch student designs their own

personalized p rogra m from a wide vari ety of courses inc l uding Math Games, I ntro­ duction to Algebra, Multimedia

Comp ut­

ers, I nt ro duct ion to Chemist ry, Robotics, Creative Wr iting , I ntrod uction to Ph il oso­ phy, C omp uter Programll1in�, P i losophy, Al geb ra I llTrigonometry, ArtIfiCLal

L ntelligcnce, Debate, M icroelectronics, Printmaking , Dance, Art Potpo ur ri, PbCitogr!l ph y, Magic, wimming, Fencin g . Golf and Chess. Sp eci al evening activities will be held with trips and leisure act ivi ties cheduled for the weekends. The Progr am

$ 1 850 includes board and room, excludes

May 3 1 , 2002. Por more information, call or write the

Office of Adm issio ns. Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA 98447, or call Dr. Kathy Ru ssell , M iddle College Di rector, at

253-535-7643. or e-mail russelkz@PLU.edu.

A program d esig ned to complement hig

01 tudies and p rovide an o pporturut y to experience college and obtain co lle ge credit. The 2002 um mer P roj ect Preview topic is: DIDthatl ( Digital lmagery and Design Wor ksh op ) . As the world becomes inu ndated wi th visual i nlages via tradi­ tional media and the I nternet, a s ignifican t por tio n of ou r conscious and unconscious u nd ersta nd ing of our wo rld and oursel ves i� fram ed by visual imagery. Throu gh di c ussion and activitie'. the mo r n i ng p or tio n of this workshop p rovid es a . foundati n in visual literacy from which to view and di cover our worl d via cla ssroo m

campers.

ERS

PROGRAMS FOR TEA

SUMMER SCHOLARS AT PLU

if optional for For additional in form ation cal!

weekends. Weeken d stay

dcadlin for Middle College application is

28

and Football. Northwcsi

and Holy Commotion workshops arc al 0

Cost: $235 ( workshop plus o ne semester

includes board and room and weekends;

facilities. Live on-campus or commute, althou gh-campus ho usi ng is st rongly recom mended for this p rogr am. The

sm

Open en rol l men t camps are p la n n ed far basketball, softba l l , wrestling, vo lleyba ll,

8- 1 9, 2002, 9:00 a. m. - Il:OO p.m" M -F.

dates are July 21 to August 10. Cost: $ 1 950

advan tage of PLU's e."Xcellent recreational

PROJECT PREVIEW

Dales: J uly

SPORTS AND ACTIVITY CAMPS

credit) . For registrati on and informauon,

program (June 2 1 -Augu51 2) help s you

help you are five professo rs �om soci

an

253-535-8549 or 1 -800-756- l563 . E-mail: su mscllOl@plu.edu . Website: www.plll.edu! -sumschol

INNOVATIVE , ALTERNATIVE PATH ­ WAY S TO TEACH ER CE RTIFICATION Th e School of Education offer in novative alternative pat hways to teacher certification

the needs or i. ndiv id ual who po se s a un iq u e set of acade m ic and that meet

pro fes ional qualifications. All p rograms are performance based and requi re candidates to demonst rate that they meet

standards of excellence esta blished by the

state of Was hingIon. by the I nterstate New Consortium ( INTASC). and by the National Co u neil for

Teachers Assessment

.

the Accred itatio n of Teach e r Education (N CATE). Further, all programs are aligned with the

principles articulated by the

National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS).

The p remie r alternative route to teach er certification o ffered by the School o f Education is its Master of Arts wi t h Resi den cy Certification Program. E n teri n g its ninth year, this program has an estab­ l ished track record of excellence. The Master of A r ts with Residency Certificat ion program is des igned for

RAINBOW OF G I FTS

individuals who have a baccalaureate

By the year 2020 nea rly half of the pop u la­

degree from an acc redited university.

tion in the ELCA Region I will be pe opl e of

Features include:

color. One of the best ways to prepare fo r

this m ult icultural world is to train young

leaders who

will help

exciting future!

u embrace th i s

Rail/bow of Gifts is a special

mult icultural youth leadership-training

will be held July 28 August 1 at PLU, and ponsored jointly by p rog ra m whidl

ELCA Region r and PLU. The program bega n three years ago and has been a

smashing success. You ng people ages 1 5-25 are invited to work togeth er pray and

worshi p together, an d enjoy thc special

additional 4- 1 2 or K- 1 2 endor eme nts; •

additional e ndorseme n t in conlent area

(4- 1 2 ) ; F inan c i al aid in clud ing grad ua te assistant hip' available; d isc ount to PLU •

grad ua tes; •

ELCA Region I office al l -800- 75 5-583 1 or

Candidates eam an MA with K-8

res ide n cy certificate and have the option of

leader , and music from around the world.

206-624-0093 .

a team of

colleagues in an urban middle school;

speakers, n at i on al and region al ELCA To register or reques t information , call the

Full- ti m e, 1 4-month, cohort structure; Year- long internship with

. June start, sp rin g admissions deadline;

Outstanding p lac e me nt re cord;

Learning group structures that p rOvide engaging, active, integrated o pp ortun i t ies t o prom o te powerful learning for all

students;


I magination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is l imited. Imagination encircles the world. ALBERT EINSTEIN

setting. Features of this p rogram i nclude:

aturdays. There i the potential of

Cour ework and instruction that

p repares teachers to guide student as they

additional coursework during the econd

meet Wa hington tak . tandards.

summer to complete certification and/or

Beginning in the spring of 2002, in partnership wIth the Auburn, Clover Park, Franklin Pierce, Puyallup, Sumner, and Tacoma School Districts and with t he Green River Community CoUege, the chool of Education is also offering three additIonal alternative routes to teacher certification.

hold Associate

f Arts degrees, who have

three years of experience as paraeducators, are

comm itted to working in special

education, who are currently employed in a Washington State school, and who have the sponsorship of their districl. Features of Route I include: •

tanding

pract il i ncr ; •

education, reS idency certification in elementary ( K-8) and a primary endorse­ m nt in special education upon successful •

f all program requ irements;

Candidates participate in an intensive,

mentored internship i n their spon oring district; •

Candidates must demonstrate-through

performance and the construction of a portfolio--that they meet all state, Univer­ sity, and School of Education standards; •

Learning group structures that provide

engaging, active, i ntegrated opportunities to promote powerful learning for all students; •

Cour ework and instruction prepare

teachers to guide student as they meet Washington State and Council for Excep­ ti nal Ch ildren (CEC) Standards. Route [[ i a pathway for individuals who hold a Bachelor of Arts degree ( or h igher), who have three years of experience as non­ certificated school employee, and have the sp nsor hip of their district. Special preference for admi si n may be given to individual committed to and qualified for teaching in hortage areas. Features of this program include: •

Candidates must demonstrate-through

performance and the construction of a portfolio-that they meet state, University, and School of Education standards; Learning group tructures that provide

engaging. active, integrated opportunities to promote powerful lcarning for all students; •

Coursework and instruction p repare

Wash ington State

An intensive full-time summer program

followed by a mentored internsh ip with some coursework i n the evenings and on

the academic year with some coursework In the evenings and on Saturdays. There is the potential of additional coursework during the second summer to complete certifica­ tion and/or endorsement requirements; •

Candidates earn residency certification

in either elementary or secondary educa­ tion and appropriate endorsements; •

Candidates must demon trat�through

performance and the construction of a portfolio--that they meet aU state, Univer­ •

tandards.

Learning group structures that provide

engaging, active, integrated opportunities to

Route III is a pathway for individuals who hold a Bachelor of Arts degree (or higher) Washi ngton state school district. Special preference for adm ission may be given to

fI r

teach ing in hortage areas and who have had experience in s me instructional

An intensive full- time summer program

followed by a mentored internship during

sity, and School of Education standards;

teachers to guide student as they meet

individuals committed to and quali fied

Candidates earn a Bachelor of Arts in

completion

tion and appropriate endorsements; •

and who have the 'pon orship of a

A structured 2 1 -month pr gram of tudy

taught by PLU faculty and ou

Candidates earn residency certification

in either elementary or secondary educa­

Route I i a pathway for individuals who

who

endorsement requirements; •

promote powerful learning for aU tudents; •

Coursework and instruction prepares

teacher to guide students as they meet Wash ington Slale Standards.

PROFESSIONAL AND NATIONAL BOARD CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS Ln Augu t 200 1 , lhe School of Education wa.� authorized by the Washington State


Reason can a n swer questions, but imagination has to ask them . RAlPH GERARD

Board of Education to offer a progra m to

expcriences--en ntled "Profess i onal

s u pport teachers seeking t he Washington

Ed u ca tor I" center th e heart of ow' enler­

State Professional Ccrti fLcate. The PLU

pr ise--on learning, teaching, leader h ip , and

Profe sional Certificate Pro gra m has the

i nquiry. They offer all partici pan ts in

foUowing features:

advanced �lA programs the opportunity to

Cu tomizcd program buill around

candidates' Professional Grow th Plans; Learning group structu res to create

su pportive professional communi tie ;

Affordab le cost

structu re al l wing

can d id a tes to ear n continuing education/ dock hours and/or credit toward a ma ters' degree; Activ i ties cofmec ted directly to stu dents'

and teacher ' lives and nee ds; 'oeus on worklng with fa milies ,lOd

c

mmunities.

wo rk together on issues related to poverty, diversity, exccptionaiities, second-language learning, l itera cy fo r a l l you n gsters, and

working with families and communities to ensure b� ttcr futures for children. In the summer of 2002, MA sUl den ts in

Professional Educator I

for EDUC 556 ,lOd EP followed by

was chosen as the first independent coUege in the state to be a higher education partner

Teac h i ng Standards ( NBPTS ) certification. Beginning in summer 2002, the School of

will offer programs for NBPTS candidate tha t feature the fo il wing: Ed ucation

mized p rogram facilitated by PLU

faculty and Nati onal Board Certi fie.d tem;hmi •

Learning group st ructures to c reate uppo rtive pr fess ional communities;

Affordable cost stru lure that allow

candid.lles to earn co ntin u i ng education/ clock hours and/or credit towa rd

a

rna lers'

degree; •

Acliv i t i

s

ai med

di reetly at meeti ng

NBPTS standard; •

Consis te nJ focus on ensuring powerfu l

l earn ing for every student; ·

Ongoing upporl for candidates who

"bank" score ; •

headi ng f Professional Educat r

il.

and II co u rsework , MA cand id ate will have

Opportunities to become a PLU fa(ulty/

OUTSTANDING MASTERS' DEGREE PROGRAMS FOR EXPERI E NC E D EDUCATORS Beginning in the summer of2002, all ed llcators seeking advanced masters' degrees

will have the opportu nity to

parti(ipat� in a

tructure.cl set of leam ing experien ces focused on creat i ng a community of professional cd ucat rs wh o. thro ugh leadcT6hip and artful tcaching, transform

schoo\ ·. dassroom and the lives of studen ts

and their families and com munities. These

fol low a program of

the opportu ni ty t

study focused on one of the fo l l owing : Urban Learners •

Ed ucational Administration

r educator

om mitted to working effectively with cally, have not been well -served by our sch ools . Candidates in the Urban Learners

emphasis work with students. families, and corn mwlities to tackle poverty, racism, and viole nce within and outside of sc hools . Urban Learners candidates develop their own " t uden ts' academic and cultural l iteracy and work with colleagues

to

ad dres s school di. £rid, and community barri ers to lea rni ng as they actively f the pre

have taugh t for at least three years and

who wish to earn a principal/program admin is trato r certificate. This exciting

program develops leaders who ca n lead Leachers, parents, and the communi ty a

they work together to ensure iliat al l youngsters succeed. Features include: •

·

2 year, cohort structure; Program requi rements a l ig ne d with state

and nat ion al standards; ·

l nternships ensure develop ment of

co mpete nce in key a reas; •

Competiti ve p rog ram pricing with

additional discount for PLU grad uates; •

Cert i fication only option available fo r

persons who al ready hold an MA de gre e; J une start , �pri ng admission deadl ine;

Ou tstan d ing pl acement record and

reptl Lation .

ch ild ren and you ng people who. histori­

investigate some

tional Administration is for individuals who

Literacy Education

Compet itive pr icing with additional

The Master of Arts with a focus on Educa­

The Urban Learners foc us is

ing problems

The Literacy Education focus" is de igned for those i ndivi duals who wi h to develop as teachers who can promot academic and

cul tural literaL'Y for

all '1t udents . Candic.i.1tc have the 9pti on of

within the Literacy foCU!

e mphas izi ng reading, English a. a crond Lang uage, and the Library and M edia

Services. Features i ncl ude: •

Option of additional endorsements in

readi ng, ESL. or L ibrary and Media Services; •

Cou rses taught by PLU faculty and by

ou tstan di ng practitioners WIth specialized exper tise; •

Emph as is on the teach ing of reading in

we face in schooL;. Features of the Urban

the content areas an d the devel opmcol of

Learners focus include;

literacy for seconda ry ed ucat ion st udents;

facilitator u pon complelion of the program.

30

Y 563. This will be

in q u iry on exper ience d uring

the academic year that comes under th e

in the Washingt on In itialive to p repare teachers for National Board for Pro fessional

eus

cries will register

In addition to the Professional Educator I

in November 200 1 , the chool of Ecl ucation

·

an

lhe

disco unt for PLU graduate

Inquiry focus, learni ng group struc ture; ApplicatiOIlli to peeific classrooms and

schools; •

Emphasis on tcachi ng of read ing and the

development of acad em ic and cul tural

literacy for all youngsters; •

Sp ecial attention to assessment

and

trategies fo r creati n g safe learn i ng environments; •

I sue ' a ddresse d incl ude working with

Rich exploration of children and ad oles­

cent l iterature with foci on multicultural,

contemporary, and cia ic literature and engendering a love of reading.

E N DORSEMENT PROGRAMS IN S P ECIAL EDUCATION, READING, LIBRARY AND MEDIA S E RVICES, ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE, AN D CONTENT AREAS

families a nd communities, poverty a nd

Pacific Lutheran Univer ity also offe r '

homelessness, second language l earners,

range of options for praL1ICing teacher '

and race and racism;

who wish to add endorsements inclu ding:

Strong commitment to eq uity and

excellence and to ensuring that all young­ sIers Icam in powerful ways;

Endorsement programs in

3

horta e area

i ncluding: special education , reading,


Second Language, and library

CREATING SAFER SCHOOL

EXCITING ARRAY OF CONTINUING

lABO RATORIES

EDU CATION OPTIONS

si nal certificate programs built on

July 22-26, 2002 A t Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA

evaluations of tran crip ts, proven compe­

array of continuing education oplions for

August 5-9, 2002

educators tbat allow teachers to earn clock

EngLish a a

and media ervi •

Custom ized endorsement and profe -

tencies, and profess ional e xper ien ces F r more information about PROJ ECT

-

-

A t Whitman College in

Walla Walla, WA

hours while they develop as professionals.

Safe laboratory management practices fo r

IM PACf programs for educators vi sit the

teachers of K- 20 education. I ncludes

School of Educat ion web ite www.plu. edll/

i nventory management, spill response.

-Mile o r contact

state and federal regulations,

Mr. Tony Aho

Dr. Do ug Lamoreaux

School of Education

School of Education

253-535-7270

253-535-8342

alJou@plu.edu

lamoreed@Plll.edu

HAZWOPER Level l trammg, and more. Emphasis on pre ve n t itt i ve measures. One semester hour of credit is available ( no

cost) at PLU for the

Pacifi Lutheran U niversi ty offers an exciting

first 25 participant · to

Continuing t:ducation opportunities during the summer of 2002 indude: Workshops and sem inars addressing topics such as "Teaching with Multiple I n telli­ gence ," "Empowering Educator ;' and "Cro s Curriculum Teaching." For more information. call 253-535-7273.

reque t it. Clock hours will at. 0 be

Advanced Placement In tilute'

available th rough Washington Sc ience

PLU offer; nine gradU<lte-level lnstilu tes

Teachers Association Co t: $425 for (lu t ­

for beginning or experienced AP teachers

summer of 2002. They indude

of-state residents. To register CI)Uta,t:

in the

Linnaea Mittmt,ldl at pagll imlj@plu.edu

A mer ica n Gove rnment, Biology, Chemist ry,

I>r

253-535-7 1 1 6.

Englis h Literature, English CompositlOn, English Ver tical Team

I

Spanish Lmguage,

U.S I I is t o ry, and An Calculus. The ft:e of $675 includes tuition for two 'emester

hOllr l)( gradlliltc level credit and many teaching materials. For inti mla t ion Jnd registrat ion, phone

253-535-7 1 29 o r visit !Jur website at www.plu.edul-apiust.

31


ummer a t PLU offers countless activities and

Brunch Jazz Cruise Series. Cruise dates are

events for the whole family. From outdoor

June 30, July 1 4 <lnd 28, Augu·t I t and 25.

concerts and sport canlpS to educational

The cruises bring together the best of the

VI

rkshops and conferences, everyone is sure

Northwest in one wonderful event: great

to find many stimulating opportunities to

music, great Sunday morning brunch, great

quench their urnmertim needs. Check our

views, and a great pnce while upporting

web ite for up-to-date information about

the station. This i the p rfect event for out-of-town guests, family and friends.

events: www.plu.edul-slimmer.

Gr up rates arc also available, but book

FRUIT FESTIVALS Always a favorite are PLU's frui t festival . held once a month i n Red Square, where families enJoy fresh frui t, ice cream and l ively entertamme nt. The offices of

Summer Sessions, Conferences and Events. and Food Services are pleased to co­ sponsor three noontime fruit festivals, celeb rating the harvest of each variety. trawberry Festival

June 1 9 July 24 August

14

Raspberry Festival Peach Fe tivaJ

early; the cruises seU

uL weeks in advance.

Reserve your SeaL by calling KPLU at 1 -800677-5758 or on-line at KPLU wiU also

www.kplll.org.

be involved with dle

duMaUJer Jazz festival in Vancouver, BC the last week of June, the Centrum Blues Festival last weekend in June, Centrum's Summer Jazz Festival latc July. Bumbershoot at the Seattle Center on Labor Day Weekend, and m311Y more events yet Lo be announced. Stay tuned I SUMMER CONFERENCES AT PLU

OUTDOOR CONCERTS

2002 will be another busy summer of

Summer is the perfect Lime for concerts and

conferences at PLU. Among the group�

ther performances outside on Red Square

hoLding c nventions, camp� and workshops

will be Summer Sch lars, Frosty

or in the Mary Baker Russell ( MBR) Amphitheater. Don'l miss the Jazz Under

Westering's Football Camp. Bruce

the tar , casual Thursday evening gather­

Haroldson's Basketball Camps. PLU

ings in the MBR amphitheater, from July L l

Wrestling Camp , PLU Softball Camps,

-

August 1 5, 7:00 p.m., featuring live local

PLU Volleyball Camps, J ostens Yearbook.

jazz talent. Phone 253-535-7602 or check

ELCA Evergreen Youth TV, ELCA Holy

out our web ite aL www.p(u.edu.

Commotion, ELCA Leadership Training Seminar, ELCA SW Synod United Church

THE UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY Stop by the University Gallery in [ ngram Hall and browse anytime between 9:00 a.m . and 4:00 p.m., Monday- Friday.

of Christ, Lutheran Women's Missionary League, School of the Arts Film Camp. Lutheran Marriage Encoun ter, South Sound Jazz Camp. NW Boychoir, Pacific Regional School, N rthwcst Youth Leader­

KPLU SUMMER AalVrTlES PLU i home to one of National Public Radio's top member stations, KPLU "NPR News & All that Jaz7.." Recognized for it programming excellence, KPLU 88.5, NPR is one of the nation's leading public radio 'tations. KPLU broadcasts National Public Radio ne\v , Noriliwest new and jau Lo

ship Conference, Covenant Celebration Chanlpion Youth. Professional Kicking ervices. National Teen Leadership Program, Summer lnstilUte of Theology and J. Robinson's I n tensive Wrestling Camp. ContacL Conferences and Events for further information at 253-353-7450 .

over 280,000 listeners per week. The KPLU ncw leam files hundreds of stories for naLional broadcast with NPR each year. kplu.org streams its exclusive, award winning mi.x of jazz and blues 24 hour a day worldwide at kplll.org. S ummer offcrs lots of festivals and petial events and KPLU is involved with many of them. Stay tuned LO KPLU for details, visit the web site, or check our jazz hotline at 206-292-JASS.

This ummer

KPLU will present our 1 2th Annual

32

unday

Our imagination is the only limit to what we can hope to have in the future. CHARLES FRANKLIN K ETIERING


SE RV ICE S

During summ er, we offer limited tutoring.

are: 8:00

Plea e call the Academic Assistance Center

textbook needs at other times, please

ACADEMIC ADVISING OFFICE

at 253-535 -75 1 8 for more information or

253-535-7665 or visit us at MVW.futeworld.

TIle Academic Adv ising Office p rov ides general advising services for undergraduatc tudents during s u mmer sessions. I t offers i nr nnatioo 0 0 general university require­ ments and procedures, and helps student

choose and plan educational programs.

the months of J une and July, hours arc Monday thr ugh Tbur 'day, 9:00 am Lo During

5:00 pm, and Friday, 9:00 am to 1 2:00 p m .

Por h elp, come t o the office, Ramstad I l l , or

phone 253 -535-8786.

THE ACADEMIC ASSISTANCE CENT E R

The Academic Assi stance Center offers free tutoring help, in the major academic fields, to any regi stered u n dergradllate student at PLU. OUf stlldent peer tutors, recom­ mended and approved by facllity and departments. are chosen

as

much for their

interpersonal skills as for their academic

�trengtbs. Th y are t rained and certified through the College Reading and Learning A ociation (CRLA) .

e- mail the AAC at iearningctr@plu.edu. Visit us on our home page

for i nfonnation

am

- 6:30 pm. If you have pee i fic

phone

p fu.edll, PLU' Offici al Online Store, and arrangements wi l l be made to serve you.

and weekly updates on study sessions:

The Bookstore p r ides itself on providing

www.p l.udul-Q(lSt/.

cheerful special services.

BOOKSTORE

THE PL U NORTHWEST STORE AND

The PLU Books tore offers a variety of

SCANDINAVIAN GIFT SHOP, only one

educat ional and perso nal produclS from

block away, located at 407 Garfield Street,

Maci ntosh and PC computers to batteries

provides gift ideas which depict Northwest

and videotapes; all priced below suggested

places and themes. Pottery. food. books, art

retail You will also find all your required

textbooks and reference materials, plus a large selection of general reading matter. Any book or item that is not carri ed can be speci al ordered at no additional charge. P LV- impri nled clothing and memorabilia are

also ava i lable. Housed with i n the

can both satisfy a sweet tooth and supply the toothpaste to wash it away. Summer hOllIS are: Monday Thursday, 9:00 am 5:00 pm and Friday 9:00 am - 3:00 pm. Extended hOllIS for the first two days of cach term Bookstore is

a

-

convenience store that

-

and clot h i ng

can

be

found in this unique

shop. The PLU B ookstore and PLU

Northwest are owned and operated by Pacific Lutheran Un iversity.

CAMPUS MINISTRY Pacific Lutheran University is a place for the

interaction of academic study and the

253-535-7464 for details of worship opportunitie . The Christian gospel. Pleas call

University pastors are available for cOllversa­ tion and pastoral care in the Campus

Ministry office of the Univer ity Center.


Imag i nation w i l l often carry us to worlds that neve r were . But without it we go nowhere. CARL SAGAN

TRINITY LUTHERAN CHILD CARE

Many PLU students, faculty and staff use the Trinity Lutheran Child Care Center at 1 2 1 1 5 Park Avenue So uth. Located across the street from the University. Trinity Lutheran accepts children on either a full­ time or part-time basis; no daily drop- in care is available. Children from twelve month5 of age through Kindergarten

receive exce l lent su pervision and nutritious meals and snacks. Although there is no summer pre- 'chool program, there are educati nal activi ties scheduled for all ages. Visitors are welcome if you would Like to come by and observe, or phone 253-5352699 for further i n formation.

and mock

in terviews to resources whidl

can

assist

you

in deci ding which major is right for you or what work you might choose after gradua­

staff is knowledgeab le helpful and ,

eager to assist with your employment needs. We are

al

0

proud to offer our services,

including current job openings (internships

and full-time professional) on line via plu.erecruiting.com. Drop

by our office to activate your account or call 253-535-7459. CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS

The Center for International Programs coordinate 00 - and off-campus interna­ tional

a ctiviti es,

study abroad programs.

PLU sponsors a range

of programs

worldwide, and student are encouraged to include

international experience

in their college career. Localed in Eastvold 2 1 3. Phone 253-535-7577 for further i n forma­ an

tion.

UBRARY AND COMPUTING SERVICES InfoIDlation Resources (IR) - computing

and library brought together in one organization is bere to help you be -

uccessful

as a

student. Most IR services are

desk in the

lower level of the Library, call the stu dent help desk at 253-535-5398, email them at comptelc@plu.edtl, or visit www.p lu.edul-compteld.

For h elp obtaining the best information on a topic or learni ng effective research strategies, go to the reference desk on the main level of the library, call 253-535-7507, •

rej@plu.e.du, or visit www.plu.eduJ-librllibitlfolre[.1ltnlf.

send email to

For assis tance w ith m ultimedia collec­

535-7509, send email to

medin@pfu.edu, or

vis i t wWIII.pfu.edlll- me.dia.

Computer accounts are essential for all PLU set up for new students, including an account user name and password. After receiving the account name and prelinlinary password activate the account and change .

the password to one of your choosing. You then have access to PLU's ePass system,

use of email, an expanding set of online student services, a rich collection of electronic research sources and tools. and

which enables

other ervices and resources for the exclusive

PLU community.

computer in addition to ePa

s

access.

Modems

are needed only for off-campus connections. For information on setting up a computer for resi dence hall access to the network ( ResNet ) , follow instructions in the Re Net handbook io your room or contact the sludent help desk. Ethernet card for mo t computers are available a th PLU Bookst

reo

Ofl-mlt/pus studellts need a modern and an service provider in add i tion to the

Internet

PLU ePas . An [SP usually entails a monthly

charge. Additional information on

connecting to the PLU network from off c ampus can be found 00 the CATS website. CENTER The LuteCard and Information Center

maintains current

information regarding events held on campus and is happy to as ist with directions to campus entices and personnel ill cards are also obtained at this office . Summer Hours: 7:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. Monday-Friday and 9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p. ro., Saturday and Sunday. 253-535-7457.

DINING SERVICES Dining Services strives to provide choices

for board and non -board students with options sui ted to a wide range of ta tes and

Check out books and multimedia collectiotl5 & eq llipmerzt with your student ill card. Th is card with the barcode on the back serves as your PLU library card.

Computer rooms are Jocated throu gho ut campus. The largesr is in U nivers i ty Center

and may be viewed through

ne twork com munication software on your

LUTECARD AND INFORMATION

students. "ePass" accounts are automatically

use of the

network, you need an Ethernet card and

a

live webcam.

The l ibrary has concentrations of comput­

well, especially the Haley Center for clectronic in formation re­ sources, the Language Resource C e nter for fo reign language lear ning and the multi­ ers as

work with

,

media Jab for working with digital. web,

a variety of schedules. The University

Center is the pr imary dining hall for summer students on campus. E pres

0

locations in the University Center and Ad ministratio n Building carry a variety of baked good and pa try items as well as deli sandwiches. The Unive.rsity Center and Columbia Center

Coffee Shops have a full of m eal plan pa kages are available th rou g h the service deli and grill. A variety

Lu teCard office. If you have any questions p lease ca.ll 253-535-8874. A schedule of hours of operation

f<

r our crvices is

available in the D i n i ng ervices office in the

in Monvecil Library, but the main pu b l ic computer room is on the lower level

audio, and video technologies. Business,

University Center.

of University Center, and Television

ogy. Nursing, Co mputer Science, Math ·

MULTI-ETH NIC RESOURCES/STUDENT INVOLVEM E NT AND LEADERSHIP

located

Services and Audio Services are located on

the second floor of Administration. Personalized assistance in computing, library, and multinledia services can be obtained from 1R iIlformation professioIlsls in

a

variety of ways. Here are some good

sta rting poi nts:

34

Telecommunication Services (CATS) help

tions, equipment, and services, c.ill 253-

Services offered by Career Development

tion. Our

software, and related resources, stop by the Co mputing and

CAREER DEVElOPMENT range from resume cri tiques

For assistance with computer accounts,

cma.i l , suppor ted

Communication and Theatre. Art, Psychol­ em atics, Rieke dence Center, and Educa­

maintain other computer labs and technology-rich classrooms, for which access may be limited to specific depart­ tion

ments or programs.

Residellce Iml/ rooms all have Ethernet network connections. To connect to the

Peer advisors in the Mu l ti -Ethnic Resources

assist stud ents with general matters as

weU as

provide infOrmation of speci fic interest to

each student and student groups. The focus

of the office is to aid tudents in

becoming an integral part of campus life and in developing their potential. on campu and


beyond. Student Involvemenl and leader­ ship coordinates informal seminars and consultati ns to familiarize students with lhe campus resources. Located in the University Center # 1 53. Phone 253-5357 1 95 for furlber information. RESIDENTIAL U FE AND HOUS ING

Campus living continues to grow i.n popularity as an economical, convenient answer to housing needs during summer school. Rates remain below the standard monthly rental for an apartment; and new, tle:xible summer meal plans enhance economy and convenience. Campus living also facilitates oul-oC-class interaction Wilh faculty and other students. Single rooms are limited and are assigned on a space­ available basis. Students and staff initiate and coordi­ nale residence haU programs. Many programs lake advantage of Ibe natural resources of the Puget Sound area: m unlains, lake . recreation areas, and Ibe ocean. All programs are designed to enhance your summer school experience. You may obtain campus housing by contacting the Residential Life Office at

STU DENT LIFE

The Student Life Office is the administra­ live umbrella [or PLU's Student Life organization. It give overall direction to a variety of student services and acts a� a cenlral resource for students information ami assistance. Departments within Student Life i nclude: Campus afetyj Career Development; Counseling and Testing ervices (which also serves students with disabilities); Health ervices; Residen­ tial Life; and Student Involvement and Leadership (which includes the Multi­ Cultural Resource Center) . Student Life, through its services and programs, promotes a campus environment wherein students may explore. develop, and learn in both academic and co-curricular contexts. Stop by Hauge Administration Room 1 05 or phone 253- 535-7 1 9 L and get acquainted. Check OU! website at www.p lu.edll/-slif

253-535-7200 .

35


Live out of your imagination. not your h i story. STEPHEN

R. COVEY

RECREATIONAL FACI LITIES

Olson Auditorium is a multipu rpose

shoes, picnic facilities, golf and fishing. The

fac ility featuring a hardwood gymnasium

public

Iloor and an Astrotmf fieldbouse. Activ ities

championship c ur e with well-kept

PLU offers a broad

include basketball, volleyball, badminton,

fairways, g reen s and trap . Sprinlce.r

varie ty

of recreational

opportunities for summer students .

�x ep t ion a l facili l ies are availa ble or most popular sports and pastimesl Free

use

of

handball, racquetball, and squa h. Swimming Pool offers a swimming area, diving pool, un bathing area, locker and

the Names Fitness Center, Olso n Audito­

dressing rooms. Swim lessons are available

rium and the Swi mming Pool is available

fur ages 4 through adult. Call 253-535-7370.

by p res ent ing your student lD card (available from the LuteCard and Informa­ tion Desk in the Univ ersity Center) . Reservation

of racquetballf squa

h courts is

made by calling 253-535-7365. Schedules for use of all recreational facilities are available in the School of Pbysical Educa­ tion office in Olson Auditorium. Names Fitness Center contains the late t i n weight training and other conditioning! fitnes equipment, including an indoor

University Center Games Room features pool tables. table tennis, shuffleboard. and coi n -op erated table games . Open June 1 8 August 1 7. 1 1 :00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m., Monday­ Friday University Golf Course i a 2.770 ya rd , nine- bo le, par 35 Layout with a reduced fee schedule for students.

Call 253-535-7393.

Off-Campus Recreation.: Numerous recreational opportunities exist dose 10 the

jogging track. Call 253-535-8798.

cam p us . Spanaway Park, located by Lake

Memorial Gym, adja cent to Names F itness

featu res canoe, rowboat and paddle boat

Center, provides additional pace for basketball and volleyball.

Spanaway, two miles $outh of campus, rentals in addition to swimming, h orse -

panaway Golf Course is a beautiful

Recreation Center, also located two miles south of campus, has excellent facilities for ten njs, track and

field, softball, baseball,

basketball, broom hockey, racquetball, and an ice skaGng arena. Spri n kc r also has a

sun-bathing area, and locker and dressing rooms. For program days and times

r

court reservations ph nc 2 53-798-4000.


it

5

Nestled bctvvcen the shores of Puget Sound

and majestic Ml. Rainier, Tacoma and it environs offer omething tor everyone.

Take yo ur pick - museums and galleries, his torical sites, live productions, miles o f hiking a n d biking trails, eneUe s beaches ­ all a re i n and a ro un d Ta oma and P LU. Wondering where the best pla ce to dine, �bop or take a ccruc drive? Anyone on campu will be glad Lo help give you a recommendalion and d irec t ion

,

or call the

Summer Sessions office al 253-535 - 7 1 29. For more detailed information about summer events in the Pierce County area,

please check out the Tacoma-Pierce Co u n ty website at www. tpctourism. orgl

events. lltm or call 253-627-2836.

Imagination Is the one weapon in the war against real ity. JULES DE GAULTIER

Policies. Student Conduct System. Univer­

Vpon registration. the st u dent and his or

her parents or legal gua rdian agree to

sity Guidelines and U ni versit y PoLicy.

accept the responsibility and legal obliga ­ tion and to pay a ll l uition costs, room and meal charges, and otheT special fees

incurred or to be incurred for the stu dent s '

education . The university agrees to make available to the stud ent certain educational

programs and the use of certain un iversity facilitie

as applicable and as described in

the catalog. A failure to pay when due all university bills shall release the university of any obJjgation to continue to prOvide the applicable educational bene fi ts and services

including. but not limited to, statements of

honorable dismissal, grade reports,

tnn cript of records. cliplomas, or

preregistrations. The l udent shall

also be

denied admittance to classes and the use of university facilities in the event of defa u l t. For a copy of the Pacific Lutheran University policies and procedures. please go to our website at

www.plu.edu for

information on Academic Integrity,

FER PA EDUCATIONAL PRIVACY STATEMENT In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, popuLarly

known

as

the "Buckley Amendment" and

carrying the ilcronym "FERPA," Pacific Lutheran University has adopted a policy to

of education records. This act also estab l ishe the rights of

protect the privacy

parents and cu rren t l y enrol led. eligible

COMPLIANCE STATEMENT Pacific Luthefan Unive rsiL y is committed to providing equal opportunity in e d uc a tio n for all students w itho u t rega rd to a person 's

race. color. national origin, creed, religIOn, age, gender, marital status, sexual orienta­ tion, mentaJ or physical disab i l ity. or any other status protected by law. The u niver­

sity com m un i ty will not toleTate any discr imi n at ion harassment. Of abuse of or ,

toward any member of tbe university community.

students to insp ect and review their

DISCLAIMER STATEMENT

education records; and p rov ides gu ideline

The information contained herein reflects

for the cor rect io n of inaccurate or mislead­

an accurate picture of Pacific Lutheran

ing data through iufo nnal and formal

University at the time of p ublical ion .

hearings . Parents and currently enrolled,

However, lhe Uni ve rs ity reserves the right

eli gible

to make necessary changes in proced ures,

students will b e notified of their

FERPA righ t , annually by publication in

lhe Student

Handbook. Interested parties

policies. calendar. curriculum, and costs.

may review the policy in the Office for Student Life, Hauge Administration Building. Room 1 05.

Academic Procedures. Computer Use

37


In

ex

A Academic Advising Office . . Academic Assjsta nce Center AddlDrop Admission Advanced Placement Institute . . . .. .. . . Anthropology .... . . . . . . . .... ... . . .. . .. . . . . .. Art ATM . . . . . . . .. . . .

...

33

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I nformation Desk . I nsurance Independent Study . I nternational Programs

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531 -6900

Ca mpus Phone Information ........

535-7449

Harstad Residence Hall ........ ...... . . . . . . ......... 26

Tirigelstad Residence H a l l .... . . . . . . . . . ...... . .... . 5 1

Hauge Ad min istration Bui l d i n g

Tri n i ty House . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. ... . 1 6

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Hea lth Center ........ ............. . ........ . . .......... 6

Trinity Lutheran Church ... ..... . . . .. ........ . .... .. 1 5

Ca mpus Safety (24 h rs.) . . . ............ 535-744 1

H i n derlle Residence H a l l . ............. ........ . . .. . 24

U n iversity Ce nter . . . . . .. . .... . . . . .... . . . . . . ... . . . . .. . . . . 34

Academic Assistance . . .. .... . ...... . . .... 535-75 1 8

Hong Residence H a l l

Admissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........ . 535-7 1 5 1 .

Alumn i & Pa r ent Relations ........... 535-74 1 5

535-7 1 7 1

Business Office . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . .

Chu rc.h Relations ......... ..... ..... . .. . . . . . 535-7423 Co nferences & Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535-7453 .

Development and University Relations . . 535-7 1 77

Eme rge ncy ................ .................... 535-79" E ve n i n g Student Liaison . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

535-7 1 3 1

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Health Servic.es . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 535-7337 .

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LuteCard Information DesklTickets .. 535-7457 News and I nformation Services .... 535-7430

President .

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Student Life . . . . . ......... ...... .. . . ..... . ..... 535-7 1 9 1 Student Services Center . . . . . . . . . . . . .... 535-7 1 61

Registrar

Transfer Coord i n ator .. .... . . ........... . 535-7 1 3 8 B U ILDING LEGEND

. . .. 3 Btlokstore . .... . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . .... .. . . . . . . . . . 34 Center for Learning & Technology (future) . ...

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U niversity Printing & Publ ications . . . . . . . . . . 29 .

Human Resou rces ......... . ........ ................ . . . . 3S I ngram H a l l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . 1 0

Warehouse ...... ...... . ............ ..... . .. ......... . ..... 29

Keck Observatory ........ . . . . . . . . . . .................... 53

Women's Center

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Mary Baker Russell Music Center . ............ 1 9 Math. Computer Science, and Computer Engi neering B u i ld ing . . . .... . ..... . . . .......... . . .. 49

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University of

Parking Legend Accessible Park i n g

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South, Tacoma.

Visitor Parking by Perm it

Ord a l Residence H a l l

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east side of Pacific at 1 2 1 65 Pacific Avenue

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Olson Auditorium ......... .. .................... . .. 40

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Garfield Street and Pacific Avenue on the

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Financial Aid

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Reserved Student Parking

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Reserved Faculty/Adm i n.lStaff Parking

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Special Permit Parking Vistor/Public Parking by permit

Vistor parking by perm i t on ly. All visitors must obtain a visitor parking permit at Campus Safety located in the b aseme nt at the no rt h end of H a rstad H a l l . Reserved

parking sl ots may be used by visito rs (5 p.m -7 a.m.)

d u ring non-work i ng hours

a n d on weekends (some 24 h r. exceptions a re indicated by signs) . If you plan an extended v i sit. you may obta i n a temporary permit from Campus Safety.


Non Profit O(g

PACIFIC

U S Postage

IJIIHE RAN

Tacoma, WA Permit No

UNIVERSITY S u m m e r Sessions Tacoma, WA 98447-0003

Term I May 28-J une 22 Term I I J u n e 24-J u ly 20

Workshop Week J u ly 22-27

Term I I I J u l y 29-Aug ust 2 3

Registration begins April If you wou l d l i ke further information: Cal l

Email

Check our website �&6r,·�.lI ""'H

mer

17

416


2002 Summer Sessions