Page 1

S

MMER

ESSIONS

when you

recycle?


N1EE1[» lHEL1P? 1H[]E1RJEt§ W1HE1RlE lrO) SnrA1Rlr All telephone numbers listed below are prefixed by area code 253.

ABOUT OUR THEME:

Summer on the park-like PLU campus tends to heighten our appreciation for the environment, so

what better time is there to tum our collective attention

to sustaining our surroundings through RECYCLING? We want to tell you about the good things PLU is already doing, and to highligh t needs and plans for future improvements. Did you know that PLU has an Environmental Services Department, located in Plant Services, with a full-time coordinator, a shared super visor, and 12 students working part-time? Well, we do! PLU students, staff, and faculty save and separate recyclable

ADMISSIONS OI'FICF.

.

.. ....

.. .. ...

.... .

535-7151

.... . . . .. .....

( UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE)

PRESIDENT ...... . ........... ............. .... ....... 535-7101 PROVOS1' ..... . .......... ..... .... .... . ........ ..... .. 535-7126

AMERICAN CULTIJRAL EXCHANG E l.A.,'<GUAGE INSTl11.rrE (ESL)

... ...

. ... .

...... .

... ....

. 535-7325

.... ...

ATIIUiTICS ....... ... ........ .... .... .. ....... .... ........ 535-7350

rnaterials at various locations around campus. Then,

COURT RF.SERVATIONS ................. .. ........ 535-7365

student workers gather, sort, and haul 4,000 pounds

FITNf:SS Cf"Vl'ER ............ ..................... . 535-8798

of recyclables each week, thus 16,000 pounds each month. That is equal to the weight of 4 cars each month! (\il/ow, we sure create a lot of waste . . .) Let's be aware of our environment and make the

GOLF COURSE . .... . . . ..... ... . . . .

.

BooKSIORE

connection between our daily habits of resource use and the amount of trash we create. Remember, if you are not part of the solution, you are part of the problem! To help you remember sound practices, think of the "New 3 Rs"-REDUCE, RE-USEAND RECYCLE. These three methods of waste management are simple and available to everyone, and can have an im mediate positive effect by diminishing what is referred as the "waste stream". Join us and feel refreshed, renewed, enhanced, and nutured while enjoying the excellence of our faculty, the beauty of the campus, and the warmth of our

�u,(?lM

campus community.

Judy Carr, Dean

Special Academic Programs and Summer Sessions

..

SWIMMING POOl. .. .... . . . . ..

..

. ....

.

...... ....

............ .. . 535-7393

...... . .... ...... . 535-7370

...

. ... .. . .

.

demic offerings. The summer schedule offers the advantage of condensed, full semester courses, flex­ ibility, and time to enjoy the summer sun. The 1999 summer school theme is Recycling. We hope you will attend the events that explore this topic, as well as the swnmer concerts, fruit festivals, and other special activ ities. Invite your friends and family members to join and savor the special atmosphere at PLU this summer. We wish you productive study during your days on

. .. ........ .... ... .. ..

. . .. .. . . 535-8317

VE'fERANS AFFAIRS

. .

.. .

(AND HOW TO

ACADEMIC UNITS CONTACf THEM.... )

HUMANITIES ............ ........... ......... ........... 535-7321

CAREER

. . .

....

. . . 535-7441

...... . . . ... ... .. ... .... . ... .

DEVEWPME."f

. . ......... ... . ...... ..... 535-7459

. . .

ENGUSH ... .. .

.

LANGUAGF_� CENTER FOR

INTERNATIONAL PRO GRAMS ..... 535-7577

INTERNA110NAL STUDf;NTS SERVICES .. . . 535-7194 . . .

S1'(ml' ABROM) .

...... ..... ............ ........ 535-7629

DJltECmRY AssISTANCE ............................. 535-7449 EMERGENCY

..............................

535-7911

GRAOL'ATE STUDlF.� .................................. 535-8312

KPLU

....................................................

535-7758

. . .. .. .. .. . . . . .. ..

..

.

LOST AND FOUND

.

....

... . . . .....

.. ... 535-7500

......

..

. .... ...........................

.

...

535-7441

...

... .. ... . .

..

.

. ..... ...

... . ..... .. 535-8786

.

..... . . . . . . 535-7321 ..

. ... . ..

... . . ...... .. . . . .. .

.

.. . ...

535-7220

..... .... .

RFllGION

.

. . ...

.. .. . .......... . ...

NATURAl. SCIENCES .. . . ... . . .. . .. .

.

.

. . 535-7317

... . . . .

.........

.... .. 535-7560 .

BIOLOGy ........... . .......... .......... ............. 535-7561

CHfMISI'RY ..

.. .

.... . ... ..... .. .... ..

..

. 535-7530

.......... ..

CoMPUTER ScIENCE AND ENGINEERING 535-7400 ..

GEOSCIENCES ........... .... ....................... 535-7563

. ... . ...

.. ..

....

....

. . ..

...... ....... 535-7400

PHYSICS ..... .... ............. .... ..... ........... . ... 535-7534 SOCIAL SCIENCES . .... . ... . ... .... .... .... ............ 535-7669 ANTIlROPOlOGY

.

.

.........

....... ........ ........ 535-7595

EcONOMIC.s ... ................ ..................... 535-7598

HI�mRY

. ... .... .... ......... .... ........ 535-7595

........ . . ..

POl.lTlCAl SCIF.NCE .............................. 535-7595

SERVICFS

Aumo VISUAL ........ ...................... ....... 535-7509 MEDIA .......... . .................... ................. 535-7509 PHOro

. .

.. ............

MATIlEMATICS LIBRARy

.

.... ..... .. ....

PHIWSOPHY ................. ... .. ........ .... .... .. 535-7321

....

.. .

...... ............. . ..... ........... . .. .. ... 535-7517

STUDENT SERVlCF.s (RffiISffiATlON, SnJDENT ACCOUNTS, FINANCIAl AID ) ................. 535-7161 SPECIAl ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

.

..... .....

....... 535-7129

SUMMER IN�TmJrE FOR TIlE GIFTED ... .

SUMMER SESSIONS

......

..........................

UNIVERSITI' CENTER . .. ....... ..

.

... .

GAMF.S ROOM ........

......

535-8549

535-7129

UPWARD BOUND . ... .. . . ...

.

. .... ..

.. ....... .

.

. ...

... 535-7294

FAMILY THERAPy .

.. ... .

... .

.. ......

535-7294/8782

SOCIOUX;Y ......................................... 535-7294 ScHOOI.s: Am

ART .. . .... .... .... . ........ ............ ........ ........ 535-7573

COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE . 535-776117762 .

MUSIC

.....

.. ......................................... 535-7601

EDUCATION ............................................ 535-7272

... .. ... . .

.

. . .... .... .. .. ......... .. 535-7498 .. .

.

.. . . . . 535-7454

. ... . . ..

...

. .. . .. .

..... .

BUSINESS ................................................ 535-7244

. . . . . . . . .... . .. 535-7457

... .

PSYCHOWGY

SocIAL WORK/MARRIAGE AND

1-800-756-1563

SUMMER CONffJlENCE5 ... . .. ...... ... . 535-7453

President

.... ............ 535-7177

CAMPUS SAFEly

INfORMATION DESK

Loren J. Anderson

.... . .

DIVISIONS:

campus. The faculty and staff stand ready to assist you in any way they can.

. ...

... .

BUSINESS OFFICE .. ........... .... ......... .... ........ 535-7171

MIDDI.E CollEGE

summer. Our faculty has prepared a full array of aca­

V.l� JoiNANCEAND OPERATIONS ... ....... . .. . 535-7121

v.P. DWEWPMEI\/T

.

(MESA ) ............................................ 535-7190

We are pleased you have chosen to study at PLU this

v.P. SfUDENTLlFE .. .. ................. ....... ... 535-7191

.. . .. . . . . .... ... 535-7665

MATII, ENGINEERING, SCIENCE ACH IEVEMENT

Welcome to Summer '99 at PLU!

UNlVERSITY OFFICERS

...

. 536-6085

. ... .................... .

NURSING

....

.. . . .

. . .. ..

......... . .

PHYSICAl EDUCATION

..

. . .. . . 535-7672

......... ..

. .. .. .

..... .

.

.

..

. ...... 535-7350

... ...... .


WELCOME

ABIT ABOUT PLU WHO

.. .... ............. ... ........................ ... .. ... .. .. ...

i71temati(mal fiJCtts and offerings PLU means service

AND WHERE WE ARE

WHAT WE DO

-

TEN SIMPLE STEPS

-

Our hist01J�

... .... .....

.

2

'

OlU

. ... .... ... . .......

.

....... ... .......... ... ...

5

To MAKE YOUR SUMMERTIME EASY

INFORMATION TO REGISTER AND P.AYYOUR BILLS DROP/ADD DEADLINES, REGISTRATION, COSTS

&

...

6

MORE

Ifyou are a continuing PLUstudent.

..

Summer at PLU offers you an opportunity to catch up, speed up, or round out your time at PLU. VVhether you are an undergraduate, graduate,

COURSE OFFERlNGS WOW. OVER

230

.

EXCITING

WAYS

10

)R TEACHERS, YOUNGERS

or non-matriculated student, there is a wide assortment of classes awaiting you. Summer has

TO LEARN!

a distinctly different flavor, one which past

SPECIAL PROGRAMS & EVENTS O�FERJNG� P

.

.............. . ........... . ... ............. ..... ....

&

........ . ... ........ . .. . ... ... .. . .

28

EWERS

students have compared to the semester as

1) at

least as challenging, 2) more pleasant, 3) more relaxed, and

4)

in which they learned more.

Summers at PLU are stimulating, relaxing, and

So MUCH TO DO, SO LITTLE TIME

fun. Thanks for joining us!

UNlVERSJTY SERVICES AND FACILITIES

.... .... ... ....

32

WE'RE HERE TO SERVr YOU

Ifyou are new to PLU... You have made a good choice! The park-like

LOCAL SI GHTS, SOUNDS, AND SITES

.. 34

...... . .... .........

campus is located close to mountains, forests, lakes, and Puget Sound in the beautiful Pacific Northwest.

RIGHTS AND RESPONSlBll..1TIES

........ . ... ... ... . ... ..... .. .

36

ver230 courses, numerous workshops,

and conferences and camps of all descriptions are offered. Look for special lectures, concerts,

INDEX

..... ..........................................................................

36

readings, and festivals. Faculty

are

informed and

accessible, facilities are excellent, and opportunities

CAMPUS MAP

.

.. .. . .. ... .. . .. .... ..... .... .... ... ... . ..........

.

..............

37

abound. Feel warmly welcomed, and let us know what we c.an do to enhance your learning experience with us.

Pllffi'OGRAPHY:

CHRIS TUMBUSCH , RAINIER OS

mVER/PG.35IlY nllAN DRISKI!l.


DID YOU

P)]L1U[��� Pacific Lutheran University is located in suburban Parkland, six miles south of Tacoma, 40 miles south of Seattle, and 20 miles north of lympia. Surrounded by the Cascade and Olympic ranges, Mt. Rainier, and Puget Sound, PLU's picturesque 160-acre campus is truly representative of the natural grandeur of the Pacific Northwest. Quite simply, it's beautiful here. Rarely do one university truly blend the liberal arts with professional programs, but PLU is such a jewel. Students are offered an insightful and challenging liberal arts foundation complemented by five professional schools (arts, business, nursing, education, and physicaJ education). What's so special about PLU? Perhaps its essence is best illustrated by this sentence from PLU 2000: PLU seeks to empower students for lives of thoughtful inquiry, service, leadership and care-for other persons,for the community and for the earth.

Thoughtful inquiry. Service. Leadership. Care. A PLU education is one richly steeped in an exploration of values, not simply facts. With an enrollment of 3,685 students and a full-time faculty of 285, learning is a personal, interactive process between students and faculty. Beautiful, a rare jewel, special-that's PLU.

Our history Pacific Lutheran University was founded in 1890 by a group of Scandinavian Lutherans. They were led by Reverend Bjug Harstad, who became PLU's first president. In naming the university, these pioneers recognized the important role that a Lutheran educational institution on the western frontier of America could play in the emerging future of the region. They wanted the institution to help immigrants adjust to their new land and find jobs, but they also wanted it to produce graduates who would serve church and community. Education­ and educating for service--was a venerated part of the Scandinavian traditions from which these pioneers came. PLU has been closely and productively affiliated with the Lutheran church throughout its history. It is now a university of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, owned by the more than six hundred congregations of Region 1 of the ELCA. The Scandinavian Lutheran tradition remains, yet the circle of understanding has widened. PLU receives international students from more than 20 countries and sends students off to study abroad programs in over 40 countries around the world. The diversity of the student population, course offerings, and perspectives continues to grow. Many influences and individuals have combined to shape PLU and its regional, national, and increasingly international reputation for teaching, service, and scholarship. A dedicated faculty has been an extremely important factor. The school has enjoyed a strong musical tradition from the beginning, as well as a noteworthy alumni achievements in public school teaching and administration, university teaching and scholarship, the pastoral ministry, the health sciences and healing arts, and business. At Pill the liberal arts and professional education are closely integrated and collaborative in their educational philosophies, activities and aspirations.

PL U looks beyond its borders and internationally... • Chinese landscape arti t and Beijing Art Institute professor, Wu Xiu, will be a

guest artist at PLU in June. Ask for details about the workshop he will offer, which will include a trip to the surrounding mountains to paint them in the Chinese landscape style.

KNOW?


Courses abr oad

this su mme r include:

c m:w Fulbright Schulars na med th.i� 51�ring pur�uins various projects, from studying art

Ttl!

Dr. Ed Inch. Associate P ro fes sor and Chair of Communications, will le a d a travel - ·tu d y

arc

course entitled "Communication Abroad: Understanding Culture" to Great Britain , exploring

in n:nnany [0 companngAw.u:ian and American

how we cornmunicateacross cultures. ( COMA 391- Session

Idea fth( ries regarding w men

1).

Dr. Mark Reiman, Associate Professor and Chair of Economics, goes to London, Vienna, and Prague to explore the policy legacies of the great economi sts in Europe. "In Their Footsteps: Contemporary Policies Fr om Dead Economists" is three weeks

of travel and

Dr. Doug 'Oakman, Associate Professor and Chair of the R e lig ion D e partment, tr a ve ls to Cana, about eight miles of modem N azareth in "Life of Jesus" (R.EI1332(02) -

Session

The

student l'u1bnght Scholdl'S to 48 sin� 1975.

immersion in

the lives and times of Adam Smith. David Ricardo, Karl Marx, Friedrich von Hayek, Joseph Schumpetcr, and John Maynard Keyne s. (ECON 491. - Session 1)

Week

in society.

new re..i pi 'nls bring Pl.U's towl number of

-

Workshop

L� III only independent university in the Northwest to be ranked among America' "

PlU

ubl.maiJlS colleges b

U.S. News & World

Repor t e�1.'f)· year �in 'the swvey b\.'gaJl

m

1983.

III).

• Off-campus courses in clud e : "Archaeology: The Field Experience" (ANTH 465) and "Geologic

Field Mapplng"(GEOS

4 25).

"' he ,()\tfricd and Mary \'uchs Organ was J�Ji ateJ NI)\f('mbcr 1998 al tour �old- Ut w nC'C ..I� .

• Courses with internat ional and intercultural fo us such

as:" ati ve North Americans" (ANTH 330), Geograp hy and World Cultures: Peoples, Places and Pro peets" (ANTH 354), "Managing Cultural Diversity" (ANTH 361), "Business Enterprise in a Global Perspective" (BUSA 201), "Theories "

" of Language Acquisition (LANG 446), M usi c for Classroom Teachers: World Cultures" (MUSI34 1) "Elementary Spanish" (SPAN 10 1 and 102), "Asian American Experience" (P SYC 405), "Religions of South Asia" (REtI 131), and "Religions of East Asia" (RELI 132) will be held on campus. "

,

TIlt� instnlmPl'l\,buill bY' rkl-rcnIlwnet1

organ builder and f'arkland n<lllVe Paul Fritt!o, is

111 J..u�·

t .1I·mMwicaJ organ In II university

,clling on the West Coa�l. Its setting unique in that

II

is h(\u.� in

;1

i> also

hall constructed

solely fiJr Ihe performance of music and has bl'eJ1 heraI letl the

orth

,neor the: 1

recording fuciJities in

.1.

• A group of about 30 Scandinavian t eache rs will spend much of July at PLU l earning more about

American culture..

'i00.000 gr,lnt from the \V,M. Kcck Foundation

• The Scandinavian Cultural

Center brin gs together individuals and ethnic organization' of the

to PI U and the nl\'� I

n .....f Naill ral

Pac ific Northwest to preserve the heri tage and cuJture of the Nordic co u ntr i es, to p rom ot e u n d er standi n g

of the immigrant experience, to strengthen ties with contemporary Scandinavia,

and to support Pacific Lutheran University's Scandinavian Studies Program and the Scandinavian

Immigrant Experience Collection located in Mortvedt Library. Public hours are as follows: June: Sundays 1-4 p.m., Tuesda ys and Wednesdays 11 a.m. - 3 p m. July and August: Sundays 1-4 p.m. .

only. Admissio n is

free. Call 535-7349 or 535-7532 for more information.

• Sch ool teachers - note the 'Teaching of English As a Second Language" endorsement offered at

PLU

through the School of Education (for information p hone 535-7272).

• Visit PLU's study abroad office in Harstad Hall and learn about our many programs througho ut

the world.

PL U means Service... The Center for Public Service connects the Pill campus to surrounding communities by providing oppo rtun it ies for faculty, staff and students to serve community needs in a variety of ways as part of their university experience.

There are many ways students can become involved in service at PLU. One is through the growing number of"service-leaming" classes, which assign various out-of.-class service projects

as

a kind

of "living text " in support of an academic subject ; students return to the classroom to discuss and

Directors

integrate their service experiences int o their deeper unders tanding ofthe topic. Another is through

� 'gU>n I 111T11't'lItion.

the Family and Children's programs, located at the East Campus building, which offer chances to work with children, adults and senior cilizens in such programs as First Plac e for Children, Adult Literacy, and the WeIlness Center. The PLU Volwneer Center, located in the Center for Public Serviceon the .first fo l or of Harstad Hall, room J 05, lists over 100 service opport un ities on and near

the PLU campus, ranging from one t im e "Go'n Do" projects to longer-term involvement

requiring training and skill. The Volunteer Center

also promotes and halls.

helps

di nate service

coor

projects organized by PLU student clubs and residence

For more info rmation about service opportunities at PLU, phone

the Center for Public Service al

535-7173, or come by the Center on the first floor of the Harstad Hall, room 105.

m>eiation (In

Sci ence will


l\'v}[ ][ N (0) lRl §

Anthropology Art BACHELORS

OF ARTS (B.A.)

Anthropology Art Biology

Chemistry Chinese Studies Classics Communication Critical Communication Studies

Biology Physics Political Science Psychology Science Social Studies Sociology Spanish Special Education Speech

Business Chemistry Chinese Studies Communication Computer Science Economics Education

Print/Broadcast Journalism Public Relations

BACHELORS OF ARTs

(B.A.P.E.)

Theatre

Computer Science Economics English French Geosciences German Hjstory Individualized Study Mathematics Music Norwegian Philosophy Physics Political Science Psychology Religion Scandinavian Area Studies Social Work Sociology Spanish BACHELORS OF SCIENCE

BACHELORS OF ARTS

Biology Chemistry Drama Economics nglish English/Language Arts French , eosciences German History Journalism Latin

Mathematics Music Norwegian Physical Education

RECREATION

Special Education

Electrical Engineering English

AnMINISTRATIO

(B.B.A)

Literature, Publishing and Printing Arts. Writing

English as a Second Language

Concentrations in:

�trepreneurship and New Venture Management Fmanclal Resources Management Human Resource Management International Business Marketing Resource Management ProfeSSIonal Accounting

BACHELORS or FINE ARTS (B.P.A.) Art

BACHELOR OF ARTs IN EDUCATION (B.A.E.) Art

I

BAOiELORS OF BUSTNES

(B.S.)

Cross Disciplinary Studies, Early Childhood Special Education, English as a Second Language, Instructional Technology. Reading,

(B.A.REc)

Applied Physics Biology Chemistry Computer Engineering Computer Science Engineering Science (3-2) Geosciences Mathematics Physics Psychology

Majors in: Anthropology

IN PHY ICAL ED CATION

Environmental Studies French Geosciences German Global Studies Greek History

Communication (Broadcasting, Theatre)

Information Science

BACHElORS OF MUSIC ( B.M . )

Latin

Piano Organ Voice lnstrumental Composition

Instructional Technology Legal Studies Mathematics Music Norwegian

BACHELORS OF M U 'IC EDUCATION (B.M.E.)

Philosophy

K-12 Choral K- 1 2 Instrumental (Band) K- 1 2 Instrumental (Orchestra)

Physical Education

BACHELORS OF MUSICAL ARTs ( B.M.A.) MEDICAL TECH, .oLOGY (B.S.M.T.)

BACHEWR.oF SCIENCE IN

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

IN

N U R S I NG

(B.S.N.) BACHELOR .oF SeLENCE [N PHYSICAL

EOU CATI .o (B.S.P.E.)

Concentrations in:

Exercise Science Health and Fitness Management Pre-therapy COMPLEMENTARY MAJORS

Environmental Studies Global Studies Women's Studies

Aquatics. Coaching, Dance. Exercise Science. Health, Health and Fitness Management, Recreation, Sports Administration

Physics Political Science Psychology Public Affairs Religion Sociology Spanish Special Education (non-teaching) Statistics T heatre Women's Studies


PIu-PROfF.

SIONAl.

ST DIES

Health Sciences

Ten

Simple Steps to Make Your Sum1nertilne Easy

Dentistry, Medical Technology, Medicine, Optometry, Pharmacy, Physical Therap)1 Veterinary Medicine

Law Military Science (Army ROTC) Theological Studies

1

WHERE TO PARK. In the summer, you do not need to register your car with Campus Safety.

Summer parking is easiest in the Library lot The entrance is on Wheeler St across from Trinity Lutheran Church. Parking is also available in other lots on both upper and lower campus. Campus Safety provides a free escort service for the PLU Commuter during all hours; the service includes all PLU facilities and an area within a designated wne off campus. For further information, call 535-744 1 .

MA - II'R'.; DEGREES MASTER 01' ARTS IN EDUCATION Classroom Teaching Educational Administration

2

Special Education IN

SOCIAL SLlEMXS

Marriage and Family Therapy

MA

01

fER OF

BUSINEsS AnMINlS fRATION Nl'RSING

Care Manager

3 4

Nurse Practitioner

orthwest A�sociation of Schools and Colleges R£lJIT :no

WHERE TO GET AN TO CARD. ID cards are made in the LuteCard Office, located at the

Information Desk in the University Center. It is important that you have a valid ID card to cash checks on campus, check books out of the library, access the computer lab and other university services. Please stop by to have your picture taken and card issued. For summer hours cail 535-8874.

WHERE TO EAT. Food service is available at the University Center Cafeteria(upper level), University

Center Coffee Shop (lower level), or the Columbia Center Coffee Shop (lower campus). Espresso carts in the University Center and Administration Building carry a variety of baked goods and pastry items as well as deli sandwiches and soups. The convenience store located in the bookstore offers drinks, snacks, and microwaveable products, among other foods.

UNIVERSITY Ac REDITATIO

PROGI{,\M ...1.

store hours are extended the first two days of each term: 8 am - 6:30 pm. Regular hours are during the summer.

Literacy Education

MAS 1 ER

software. There is an assortment of reference and general books, unique clothing, and gifts. Book 9 am - 5 pm, Monday - Thursday and 9 am. - 12 pm,Friday. The Bookstore is not open on weekends

Initial Certification

�\S'II-.R Of ARTS

WHERE TO BUY BOOKS AND S PPLIES. Besides selling required textbooks, the PLU Bookstore,

located in the University Center, stocks academic supplies at a reduced price, including computers and

's A D ApPRO I\U)

AACSB-The International Association for Management Education American Chemical Society Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy

5

6 7

Computing Sciences Accreditation Board, Inc.

HOW TO CALL When calling a campus phone number from a campus phone, simply use the last

four digits. If calling off-campus, dial "9" first. Our area code is (253).

WHERE TO PHOTOCOPY OR FAX. Copy machines are available for student

use

in Mortvedt

Library and Rieke Science Center. The facsimile machine (fax) is located in theLibrary. It is available for use by staff and students for a nominal charge. For further information, call 535-7500.

HOW TO FI

D OUT YOUR GRADE AND WHERETO GET A TRANSCRIPT.

Gl'IIfIeS: You may access your final grades by telephoning the new voice response system using

your touch-tone telephone. Simply dial the tele-registration number (253-535-893 5) and follow the directions to select the grade option. Grades will be available approximately 10 days after you

National Council for the Accreditation of

have completed the final.

Teacher Education

n·atlSc";'pt5: Unofficial (no charge) and official transcripts ($5.00 charge)

:-rational A sociation of Schools of Music

are requested in the

Student Services Center. If you are mailing or faxing (253-535-8320) your request, your signature,

National League for Nursing

social security nwnber, address and daytime phone nwnber must be included. The official transcript fee of $5.00 may be paid by cash or check if you apply in person at the Student Services Center.

Council on Social Work Education

Other wise, please include your Visa or MasterCard number and expiration date on your written transcript request. Allow 48 hours processing time. For further information, cailS35-71 3S.

8 9

WHERE TO HANG YOUR HAT. A 100mge has been especially designed for the corrunuter population.

Located on the lower level of the University Center, the lounge includes lunch space, a meeting area, and plenty of room for studying. Lockers to stow your books, bags,etc. are available in the Library.

WHERETO CASH A CHECK OR FIND AN ATM. Personal checks(minimwn$1 0,maximwn$50)

may be cashed at the Cashier's Wmdow in the Business Office (located in the Administration Building). You must have a valid PLU ID card (see item 3 above). The Cashier's Window is open Monday Friday,9 am. - 1 2:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. - 4 p.m. The University Center houses a Wells Fargo automatic teller machine (ATM). Bank cards are accepted from U.S. Bank, Key Bank, Seattle First, Pacific First, Security Pacific Bank, Armed Forces Financial Network, and all cards from the CIRRUS, THE EXCHANGE, PLUS, and ACCEL systems, in addition to VISA and MasterCard.

10

WHERE TO GET FRIENDLY A

SWERS. Contact the Office of Summer Sessions located in

the Administration Building,room 1 07,or cail (253) 535-7129. We'll be happy to answer your questions!

,......----.."""j


INFORMATION You WILL NEED TO REGISTER AND P AY YOUR BILLS ADMISS10N:

Enrollment in Summer Session is open to all students without regard to age.

disability, national r ethnic origin, or marital status.

sex, race, religion ,

olor. creed.

Non-degree .rtudentr. Non-degree students plann ing to enroll for the summer session only, without intention rom PLU or for a teachi ng certLficate, need not fLle a forma l application r of worki ng toward a degree [ su bmit transcripts from other schools attended Students may enroll in any course for which they have the necessary prerequisites. Non-degree st u de n t s may take a ma ximum of two courses (8 semester hours). U7JIlergJ'adf�ate degree :rtJlR.ents. Stud e nts who plan to work toward an undergraduate degree from PLU must complete a formal application for admission. The necessary forms may be obLained by contacting the Admissions Office, (253) 535-7151 or 1-800-274-6758. MnsQwJs degree stfldmts. Students seekin g admissi office at (253) 535-715 1 or 1-800-274-6758.

n

to Lhe master's program should contact Admissions

Teaching Certification muunts. Stu den ts seeking teaching certification should contact the School of Education aL (25 3) 535-7272. Vetera ns. To receive VA Ed ucational benefits, please contact Lhe VA representative ill the Student rvices Center at th e time of registration. To make an a p pointment. phone ( 253) 535-8317. Certification request

forms are available in Lhe Studenl Services Center.

Conrimlillg stllde1lts. Current P LU students who wish to enroll [or the summer session may simply register

by phone or web, following Lhe directions on page 7.

New sUldmts. First-time registrants will p ho n e the Summer Sessions Office at

(253) 535-7129 or

1-800-756-1563 to reg.ister for courses. Before calling the Summe r Sessions Office, be sure to rrod the �tration

informat ion on page 8. You will need to have certain in formatio n available before registering over the ph o n e

.

I nterested in becoming a full-tim PLU s tu d en t? Contact the PLU Admissions Office at 1-800-274-6758 for a cataJoganci appli cati on or send ina request by fux at (253) 536-5136 or e-mail at admissions@PLU.edll. Visit our home page at http://www.plu.edu.

REGISTRATION: Course registration for Summer Sessions is as easy as pushing the bULtons on your touch-tone p h on e or accessing PL 's homepage to register via the web. See pages 7-8 fo r Telephone and Banner Web registration instructions. RilGI RATION FOR ALL SUMMHR CO RSES BEGINS APRIL 13, 1999.

COURSE NUMBERING Course· at PLU use the follOwing number system: •

101-299

Lower division level

300-499

Open to both grad uate and upper divi.s ion undergraduates. Such courses may be a p r t of the graduate program provided Lheyare not specific requirements in preparatio n for graduate study.

5 00 -599

Graduate courses. Nonnally open to graduate students only. Upper divisi n undergraduate students may enroll in a SOO-level course if, during the last semester of the seni r year, a candidate for the baccalaureate degree finds it possibl e to complete all degree requirements with a registration of fewer than 16 semester hours of undergraduate credit. The total registration for undergraduate requirements and lective graduate credit shall not exceed six semester hours during any one summ er term. A memorandum stating that all baccalaureate requirements are being met du r i n g the. emester must be s i gned by the appropriate

department dlair or school dean and presented to the graduate tudies office at the time of such registration. This re gistration does not apply toward a hig he r degree urness il is later ap pro ve d by the sludent's advisor and/or advisory committee.

COURSE LOAD AND WAIVERS

The ma.'{imum course load for each summer term is six semester hours. Permissi on to register for more than six hours per session must be obtained from the Dean ofSummerSes ions.A-107, (253) 5 5 -7 1 30 . Graduate �1udents may not take mor e than ] 2 semester hours during the summer 10 count toward the master's degree at

Pacific Lutheran U n i vers ity.

JUNlOR REVIEW REGISTRATION HOLD Any student with junior status (those who had completed between 60 and 90 hours at the end of fall

1998) who does not complete the junior review and ubmit it to Academic Advising

March 26 w111 be blocked from registering for

ffice by

ummer 1999 and for fall 1999 classes. Contact the Office (x7131) or the academic Advising Office (x8786) with any questions.


REGISTRATION FOR CUR RENT PLU STU DENTS

Drop/Add

Current PL U stulknts mll1 register for summer by either Telephone R.egistmtion or Bllnner Web R&gistrlltion. Instruttionsfor both lire giflen below.

Dates

COH'YSeS

TELEPI I ON E

lGelrlnnl ][ May 24, 1999

May 28, 1 999

Classes begin - 8 am Last Day to Register or Add classes for Summer, Term I

Last Day to Drop a Single Class with a Full Refund for Summer, Term I June 1 , 1 999

Date to start obtaining Professor's Signature to Drop a Class (no tuition refund - W grade:

June

15, 1999

$50 Administrative fee per tran saction).

Summer, Term I Classes End

lGelrmnl J[ II June 2 1 , 1 999 June

25,

1 999

June 2 8, 1 999

PLU has a voice response system that is available twenty­ four (24) hours a day except when the machines are being maintained. You may add (register for) or drop da es using the voice response system through the dates indicated on the Drop/Add chart on this page. From offcamp� dial

(253) 535-8935 or from on campus dial 8935 usi ng any

touch-tone telephone.

BEFORE YOU BEGIN:

Final Day to Withdraw from Term I Class (no tuition refund - W grade: $50 Administrative fee per transaction).

June 1 8, 1 999

REGISTRATION

Classes begin - 8 am

You must determine your PIN (personal identification number). The voice response system requires you to enter your studen t ID number and your PIN (personal identification number). Your initial P IN is your birthday. Example: The PIN for a person horn June 16, 1978 is 061678. You may c hange your PIN at any time via the voice response system. We strongly encourage you to change yo ur PIN right away in order to prevent others from gaining unauthorized access to your regist rat ion.

Last Day to Register or Add Classes for Summer, Term II Last Day to Drop a Single Class with a Full Refund for Summer, Term II

The wait after ent ering each course request may seem a

Date to start obtaini ng Professor's Signature to Drop a Class

takes rime fo r th system to go out and find tne course

(no tuition refund - W grade:

$50 Administrative fee per transaction).

little long. but don't hang up or become frustrated. It

and come back with its respon

. BE PATIENT!!

July 1 4 , 1 999

Final Day to Withdraw from Term I I Class (no tuition refund - W grade: $50 Administrative fee per transaction) .

Be sure to save your registration before yo u hang up by

July 16, 1 999

Summer, Term II Classes End

not saw you r registration and listen to your schedule before you han g up you will losc it.

WORKSHOP WEEK

The system is set to give you up to 15 minutes to complete

July 19, 1 999

Classes begin - 8 am

J uly 20, 1 999

Last Day to Register or Add classes for Summer, Workshop Week

July 2 1 , 1 999

entering: ·#3 (asterisk, po u n d s ign , three). If you do

last Day to Drop a Single Class with a Full Refund for Summer, Workshop Week

After 1 5 minutes, you w il l be disconnected and your work will be lost unless you have saved it.

Date to start obtai ning Professor's Signature to Drop a Class

Clear up any financial holds with the Student Service

(no t uition refund - W grade:

$50 Administrative fee per transaction).

your registrat ion.

Center.

July 22, 1 999

Final Day to Withdraw from Workshop Week Class. (no tuition refund - W grade: $50 Administrative fee per transaction).

Retu r n your medical histor y form with p roof of required immunization to the Health Center to clear

July 23, 1999

Summer, Workshop Week Classes End

an immunization hold.

WHEN TO REGISTER: Tele-registration is available for summer registrations

l[";elFlnnl ][ ][ ][

beginning 8:00 am on Tuesday, April 13, 1999. Please refer to the Add/Drop Date Chart for the last day to

July 26, 1 999

Classes begin - 8 am

July 30, 1 999

Last Day to Register or Add Classes for Summer, Term III

August 2, 1 999

Last Day to Drop a Single Class with a Full Refund for Summer, Term III

Ready? Relax and let's go!

Date to start obtaining Professor's Signature to Drop a Class

Before you actually use the telephone registration system. take a few moments to complete the course registration

(no tuition refund - W grade:

$50 Administrative fee per transaction).

Final Day to Withdraw from Summer, Term III Class.

August 1 7, 1999

(no tuition refund - W grade: $50 Administrative fee per transaction).

August 20, 1 999

drop or add courses without financial penalty.

Summer, Term III Classes End

worksheet on the next page. When you are ready to register, have your completed worksheet at the phone fo r reference.

The registration process is easy! You must use a push­

NINE-WEEK COURSES Note: Fot· nine-week courses, the last day to drop or add courses without jinlltuffll penaltTy is the close ofbusi1U1SS on Friday of the second week ofclass.

button phone with tone-dialing. When you dial the access number. you will be gi.ven a list of options and will be gu i ded through t he registration process.

DROPPLNG

WITHOUT

ANY FINANCIAL PENALTY FROM ANY COURSE WITH

THOSE OUTLINED ABOVE MUST BE NEGOTIATED WITH THE

(253) 535-7 1 30.

D EAN

OF

A SCHEDULE DIFFERENT FROM

S UMMER S ESSIONS, A-I 07, AND

To access registration by telephone, enter this number from a touch-tone phone:

( 2 53 ) 535-8935.

Follow the

Voice instructions to get to Registration. Tenn� available are:

Summer 1999 and Fall 1999

You will be asked to enter your student 10 n u m be r, and

PASS/FAIL DEADLINES The last d ay to take the p ass/faiJ option is halfway through the course. For example, a four-week course deadLine would be at the end of two weeks, a one-week workshop deadline would be 12 noon on the th i rd day of class.

your PIN (personal identification n umber) , and the course request numbers (CRNs) of the courses you are adding or dropping. If you enter any invalid data, the system alerts you to the error and prompts you for the correc t in formation. .

cont1-mud on next pRge

1


You have 15 minutes to complete your call-the -system will hang up on you when you reach your time limit. Don't forget, you will lose all courses that have not been saved!

[ N D EPEN DEI T STUDY

Before you hang up. you mu�t save the courses you have added or droppe and listen to your schedule. This may

I n dependent study or studio projects may be

lake a few mmutes-be patient! If you hang up or w ill I

�e

are

timed out before you have saved your new courses. you

your work.

TH e fll t �o

by t h e instructor and ,he chairperson or dean concerned. An independent study registration card is available outside the Student Services Center.

'ING Rf G IS T RATl O l'i � MUST 81- DONE I N PERSON AT THE STUDENT SERVICf:S CENTER:

As w i t h o th e r s u m mer classes. register fo r

Audit ..t cnurse (no credit) - instructor's signature required

To register for a course requiring approval - authorized signature required Registering for more than 6 hours in one session. Course Overload Fonus must be filled out av,lilable in the Summer Sessions Office (Admin. 107). Wailhsling courses: Waitlist forms a r c located in t h e Student Services Center. 'rUE

authorized in certain specific cases if approved

inde pendent study before the session begins. -

THE [S Thesis and research projects must be submitted to the office of Graduate Studies in the Libra ry, Room 33 1 no later than July 30, 1 999.

THE REGISTRAR'S OFFICE: Indepcnd nt study and cooperative education courses

fOl LOWTNG R f. G I STR.H IO 'S MUST BE DONI: I N PERSON AT

GRADUATION/COMMEN

.EMENT

Students who plan to complete requirements

B A N N E R WEB

for a degree during the summer of 1 999 should

REGISTRATION

Find Banner Web. Using the most current version of your Web browser, find Banner Web by accessing the PLU homcpage and sel ecting Academic. From the Academic page, select Banner Web.

Main Menu. C"n der the heading of Main Menu, select Registration. Under Student Main Menu, select Regi tTation Menu.

ummer 1 999 or Fall 1 999. Then click on the Submit Term button.

applications should be returned to the Registrar's

7. 1999. Graduate to the Student

Services Ce nter no later than May 7, 1 9 99. Co m m e n c e m e n t cere m o n i e s are S a t u rd ay, August 2 1 , 1999 at 10:30 a.m. in OL<;()n Auditorium.

Check Your Registration Status . Scroll down and select View Registration Holds. If you have regist ration holds, you need to stop and contact the Student Services Lenter to clear the hold before registering. If YOli do not have any holds. you may co nt i nue by clicking Menu.

G RADES You may access yo ur final grades by telephoning the voice response system using your touch-tone

Registration Menu. Select Register/AddlDrop Classes.

telephone. Grades will be available on the system

Add Classes. Scroll down to the Add Class section. I n this section you will enter a CRN (course reference number ) for ea ch class you would like to take. Remember that if your class requires a lab, you must enter a CRl'J for the lab as weU. When finished, select the Submit Changes button to continue. When your request is finished proce. ing. you will be returned to the Register/Add/Drop page. schedule. Make sure

thaI you lo ok al the status box to see if you are currently registered. If you have a contlict of .some sort, the system will notifY you undl.T thesection called Registration Errors. You should see the appropriate person to deal with these matters.

Studcnl Detail Sch edule. Once you have finished selecting your courses for the term, scroll down to the bottom of the screen ilnd select the Student Detail Schedule text. Your schedule will appear on the screen. If you would like a copy. 'elect the Print button on the top of the screen. Make sure that when you have finished registering, , u LO G OUT and close your dpplication. Th· i� important so that no one else can make any changes to your schedule.

R E G I ST RAT I O N F O R NE W P LU STU D E N T S Registration begi ns April 1 3, 1 999. I f this i s the first time you are registering for classes a t PlU you will not be abI.: t o u � c te lep h o ne r e g i s t r at i o n or t h e B a n n e r Web . I n s te a d , p l e a s e c a l l ( 2 5 3 ) 5 3 5 - 7 1 29 o r 1 - 800- 756 - 1 563 t o sp eak t o a rep resentative from the Summer Sessions O ffice, who will ask for yo u r name. a d d ress. date of b i r t h , tele p h o n e l1 u m ba, s o c i al s e c u r i ty n u m b e r, rel i gious p reference a n d eth n i c o rigi n ( t h e latter t w o a r e o p t i o n a l ) . Yo u will also need the five- d igit C R N ( course registrati on number ) which can be fou nd al the end of each course de s c ri p t ion . Yo u may wish to complete the wor 'shee t below before calli n g t h e Summ er Sessions Office. IM PORT NT: To avoid bei n g c h a rged for classes YOll d o not a t t e n d , you m u s t n o t i fy t. h e S t u d e n t Add/ Drop Date Chart for t h e last day t n drop co u r 'es Without fi n a n c i a l p e n al t y.

Service Center of yo u r i n tent to cancel. Please refer t o t h e

Program Contract with major/ minor signed off by the chair of the department. Undergraduate

applications should be returned

Make sure that the term in the text box reads the appropriate term for which you are registering-

In this next screen, you will have to scroll down to see your CLUrent cia

s tudents also need to ru rn in their Academic

Office no later than May

Registration Menu. Select Check your Registration Status.

Current Schedule.

Applications are available in the hallway in front of the Student Services Center. Undergraduate

Log In. Lug i n by using your PLV 10 number as yo ur user 10. Enter your PIN (Personal Identification Number). Once you click on the lug-in button, the system will ask you to verilY your P IN one more time for safety purposes.

Select Term.

fill out an Applicatio n fo r Graduation form.

approximately ten days after you take your finaL Simply dial the telephone regist ration number

(535-8935) and follow the directions to select the grade option. In addition, we lllail a copy of your grades to your mailing address at the end of all the summer sessions. An unofficial transcript may be requested at no charge at the Student Services Center.

TRANSCRIPTS If you need an official transcript of your PLU work, submit a written or fa.xed (253-535-8320)

request to the Student Services Center, and $5 per transcript. Be sure to include your social security number. signature, address and daytime phone number. You may include

a Visa

or MasterCard

number and expiration date on your written or faxed request to cover the $5.00 charge. Term 1lI grades are processed and transcripted approximately ten working days after bei.ng s ubmitt d by the fa cult y ( Septem ber

3).

Please take this i n to

consideration when requesting transcripts for school d.istricts. Transcripts cannot be ent for students with unpaid accounts at the university.

10

CARDS

I t is important that you have a valid lD card in order to use the library, to cash checks on campus, access t h e comp uter lab and to obta i n other u niversity privileges .. Students here for the first time and continuing students who need their cards validated, should request their fD

ards at

t h e U n i ve r s i t y Cen ter, l o c a t e d next to t h e I n formation Desk. It only takes a moment to have a card made, costs nothing, and it will make life on campus much easier.


eRN

DEPT.lCOURSE #

UMBER

DDDDD Doo DD DooDD o DD DD

_

COURSE TITLE

CREDIT

TIME

DAY(S)

OATES

-- ----

------ - --- ---

_ _

INSURANCE

Sickness and Accident Insurance is avaiJable to all students on a voluntary basis. The Health Service strongly urges all students to have medica! insurance. The Group Accident and Sickness Plan offers coverage 24 hours a day, 12 months a year, anywhere in the world. A brochure outlining the program is available from the Business Office, Student Life Office, and/or Health Servi ces. Phone: (253) 535-7 1 9 \ .

TU lTlON A N D FEES

Students at Pacific Lutheran Un iversity pay for only those courses in which they are enrolled. Tu ition charges are determined by multi plying the number of credit hours for which a student registers by the appropriate tuition rate. Summer tuition is $335 per semester hour unless stated otherwise in the course description. Students are advised that some courses will require additional or incidental fees. Information concerning these fees can be found in the course description. Please check with the instructor of the course if you have questions concerning additional fees listed.

NOTE: All students are required tofill Ollt a "Stal/dard Paymellt Agreement" with Pacific Lutheran in Hm.ge Admi/listration Building, room 1 03.

University. Theseforms can be obtained in the Student Services Center

TUITION CHARGES FOR SUMMER 1 999 ARE AS FOLLOWS:

Undergraduate Tui tion

(except Nursing)

$335 $490 $335 $490

per semester hour

Undergraduate Nursing per semester hour raduate Tuition per semester hour (except MBA, Nursing and MASS) raduate Tuition per semester hour for Nursing, MBA, and MASS Private Music Lessons in addition to tuition

(13 half-hour lessons = 1 semester hour of credit) [ semester hour credit $ 1 50 $225 2 semester hours credit $335 Audit, per hour Advanced Placement Institute Courses per 2 semester hours (includes materials) $670 HOUSING: The following charges arc for currenl PLU students who will be staying on campus (in Hong or Kreidler ) d u ri n g the summer.

ROOM CHARGES ARE AS FOlWWS:

DAllY

Regular Double Room

$ 1 0. 7 5 $14 $ 1 2.50

Single/Double Room Designed Si ngle Room

FOOD: Su mmer meal plans arc available

20 meals per week

$7 [ .75

10 meals per week

$57

as

WEEKLY $75.25 98 87.50

follows: 15 meals per week any 5 meals per week

$65 $32

PAYMENT fNPORMATION

Tuition and fees are due on or before the first day of the session in which the classes fall. Unpaid balances are subject to late charges

as

stated in the "Pacific Lutheran University Undergraduate and Graduate

Catal og." Payments may be made via cash, check or credit card as follows:

Cash Payments -

Remit in person at the Business Office Cashier Window.

Check Payments - Make payable to "Pacific Lutheran Un iversi ty". Write your full name and Social Security number on the check to ensure proper credit to your student account. r-.<1ail directly to: Pacific Lutheran University, PO Box 2 1 [ 67 , Seattle, WA 98 1 1 1 -3 1 67 or, remit in person at the Business Office Cashier Window during business hours or, deposit in Business Office Payment Drop Box after business hours. Credit Card Pay me nt s - VISA or MasterCard payments may be made in person at the Business

Office Cashier Wmdow or, via our secured bankcard telephone line at (253) 535-8376. Business Office Cashier Wmdow: HOl�rs: 9 am to 1 2 :30 pm and 1 :30 pm to 4 pm, Monday through Fri day. LJcation: Room 1 l O, Administration Building, PLU campus Regis tration must be with drawn through the Student Services Center. Contact the Student Services Center for questions regarding your student account at (253) 535-7 1 6 1 or (800) 678-3243.


YMBOL

A

D COD

8t'l1 D1.· CODES: 1" fiml tilt' /t'w rIOIl' (If rl'c"e IJ(cildm�), Uk' " l< r,lIrlplI$ trltlp t m /Ill back (Vver. \! )\1, I UHR :"fRRC ."WID EVTD Of, I AI ,\1(, 'M Ec \M IRS [�.\I INC"I RCTR kNOll \A\'T,

DJ!PAKTMENT & CO URSE

NO.

AIITL) loW . ceramics I

Hau� Aolm ll1il.tr:t1 inn lIwldiDg l lhrary /ll.lCV alrer RussdJ lusk Cl!nter Math . uildtn ' r...... tvoIJ Ol,,'11 Auditllri lim Memorial Ea.t C.unpw 1 1.1r�tad Hall !tlm,tall HaJJ 1 ngram Hall Itld: . ·i ..nc.: C<?f1� Kno rr 1 ·l o use X.wier Hall

NO. O F · f.I>lllSTUi

CREDIT HOURS

Co

R

Ttn.E

t H Krull )

' tal' _01 fill , / I!. �:(I0· 10. ·15(/1/1 . •\flU W "" .,. ; I '(;«. / /, Introduction to ceramic media. Product ion of both functional and

sculptural objects using handbuilding and wheel techniques. Includes presentations on clay and glazes. St udio fee: $45. (CRN: 10007)

COURSE D"'T� DAYS & TIMES INSTRUCTOR &

ClASSROOM

FE.eS J.N AOOITIONTO ru mON COURSE

REGISTRATION

NUMHER (CRN)

II \ \ COl li ': \1 � ,\ I" , , ' \ \

1 - 1 " '1 ' "

1 999 S U M M E R COURSES THAT M E ET DIVERSITY REQU I R E M ENT:

ALTER N Alll'F PfRSPECIlI'E: NTI-l j 0: Cul ture:; and Peoples f at ive North America ANTH 36 1: Managing C u l tural Dive rs i ty [Due 205; Multicult ural Perspectives in th ' Classroom J nSf 359: H istory of Wo men in the U.S. PSYC 405: Asian American Experien -e SIGN J O I : Si g n Language SIGN 102: ig n Language ROSS-

UO'l'RAL

ENGL 2 16: iUSI 120: RELJ 1 3 1 : REll 132:

P FRSPE< nv c

Sh o rt Stories from A frica and the Caribb ean Mus i c and C u l t u re Religions o f South Asia Re ligions of East Asia

ANT H RO PO tOGY ANTH 220 - Peoples of the World: The China of

Mao and the China of Deng (2 CREDITS) July 26 - AI/gust 20, 4:30 - 6: I S pm, MTWR (S. R inenberg) - ADMN-200 An insiders report on how Chinese-styl Com munism gave way to Ch inese· style capitalism. in structor Sidney Ritten be rg is an Ameri an who jo i n ed the C o m m u n i st Revol u t i on i n Ch i n a in the late 1 940s and was Th e Ma n Who St aye d Behi nd , as his autobiography puts it, as China was transformed by Maoist Communism. T h is class gives students an understanding of cultural change at its most basic level of personal in teraction and workplace organ iza­ tionasdle transfomlations ofChinaberween the 1 950s and 1 990s are reviewe d, a n a lyze d , and criti qm'd. After serving a Jong stretch in solitary confinement on fa lse charges of be i n g an Am eri ca n spy, M r. R i ttenbe rg emergetl to becom both a st ron g cr itic

\" - \\' ' ' ' ' 1 ' ' ' \\

1< - 1 1 1 1 1" 1 ' \ \

of t h e Chinese system as well as one of the m o st pok es man for a �trengthened US-China econo m ic and cultural relationship. ( CRN : 10604)

energetic

ANTH 330 - Cultures and Peoples of Native North America (4 CRl!DrTS) May 24 - Jtlne 18. 9:30 am - 12:15 pm, MTWRF

(L. Kleill) - ADMN-21 7

A comparative study of Nat ive No rth A me ri can c ul­

tures from thei r arrival on the continent through today. Examination 0 US. and Canadian laws, policies, a nd co nflic ts, issues of sovere ignty, and I-eligious rights. Ful fi lls alternative line in the perspectives on Diversity equirement. (CRN: 1 0502)

ANTH 354 - Geography and World Cultures: Peoples, Places and Prospects (4 CREDITS) May 24 - JUlie 18, 3:30 - 6: J 5 pm, MnVR F U. Peel) - A DMlll-208 Explorations of how societies in orth America and around the world have dapted to their varied human and physical enviro nments . Ca ses will be drawn from wi de l y di fferent e nvironme n ts- fro m the

desert to temperate woodlands to t he arctic to urb n neighbor hoo ds. Global patterns of variation in li festyles and ocial opportunities will he stresse d and used forprojections of futu re world patterns. Knowldge o f locations and map reading will be emphasized.

1 - 1 1< 1 " "

S -S , " " " "

ANTH 465 - Archaeol ogy: The Field Experience

(2 CllI!DrTs)

July 19 - july 23, 8:00 a.m. · 5:00 p.m. M7VvRF (D. HuelsIJeckJ - Off- ampu5

In thi class, students l ear n ab ut archae.ology by

doing archaeology. We will be focusing our efforts

on th e archaeological remains of the Sauk River Lwnber Company. Operating from 1923 u ntil 1 954, the company used a portable camp that was moved on railroad ars as loggi ng p rogresse d. Many workers were h ired directly from orth Caro l in a. We will 100 fo r and map fcatures related to logging a nd the l o gg i ng camps and

onduct test excava tions to assess the information

pot ntial of the archaeological deposits for research questions rela ted to logging history, ethnic groups,

the everyday life of loggers, tc. Stu dents will learn

survey, recording, and excavatio n techniques and

methods of i nterpretation. Lectures and reading will provide ba ckgr o u nd . Th class will meet off-campus for the e nti re week. A $50.00 lab fee will cover most of th expenses rel a ted to the class except for fo od. Forest Service housi ng should be

available in Darri ngton. Prerequisite: permission of

instructor. Note: this class is part of a project that will continue into August. Additional course credit can be arranged. (CRN: 10005) Telephone registration is blocked. Please p hone ( 2 53 ) 535-7 1 96 t

register.

PrmxJ.uisite: 102 orconsent of instructor. (CRN: 10004) ([ ANTH 361 - Ma naging Cultural Diversity

(2 CREDITs) May 24 - Jtme 18. 6:00 - 9:00 Pili, MW

(G. Guldin) - ADMN-2 1 2 Practical guidelines on how to approach people of other c ulture; with �itivity and empathy and with an eye toward mutually mvarding interaction. Learn how to av id negative attitudes toward cultural diversity and develop a positive curiosity about the global diversity represented in workplaces, schools, and neighborhoods. This course fulfills the alternative line in the Perspec­ tives o n Diversity req ui menL (CRN: 1 0003)

ARTD 1 8 1 - History of Westem

Art II

( 4 CREDITS) june 21 - Jllly 1 6, 1 J :00 (lin - 2:00 pm, MWF

(J. Hllllam) - !NCR- U5B A lIrvey of Wes te m art from the Re na issance to

the 20th century. Special summer ofli>rin utilizing digital i mage r y on D- ROM and the In tern et in the Macintosh lab. Limited enrollment so early registration recommended. Satisfies GUR, majors in art and art education, minor in art his to ry. Studio fee: $20 (CRN: 10508)


ARID 226 - Photography: Black and White (4 CREDrrs) jl/ly 26 - August 20, 12:30 - 3: 1 5 pm, IvlTWR

365 in another media (oil, acrylic)

Studi class in p hotography as an art form. Primary co ncentrat ion will be in basic camera and darkroom techn i ques. S t udents wi l l pro duce a por tfol io of prints with an em p h as i s on creative expression and experimentatio n. St udio fee: 550. (eRN: 1 0006)

(CRN: l OO I l )

(8. Geller) - INGR- 1 34

AlITD 230 - Ceramics I

(4 CREDrrs) May 24 - June 18, 8:00 - 10:45 am, MTR

(D. Keyes) - INGl�- I44

Introduction to ceramic media. Production of bot h functional and culptural obje ts us i n g handbuildi ng a nd wheel techniques. Includes presentalions on c lay and g laze . 'tudio fee: $45 . (eRN: 10007) ARID 330 - Ceramics II

(4 CREDrrs) May 24 - jllne

18, 8:00 - 10:45 illll, 1TR (D. KeyesJ - INGR- J 44 Advanced and in d ivid ualized projects i n ceramic

art. Further experiments in gIaze formulati on are explored. Studio fec: $45. (CRN: 1 0008)

or by advanced wa­ terco lor tudents. Studio fee: $50 (t cover the cos t of paper, some brushes and paint). Students should be repared to take several dayloog pa inti ng excursions.

BlOL 206 - Human A natomy and Physiology

Margins

(4 ClUIDns) Juiy 26 - August 20,

(4 CRtJ)rrs)

(T Carlso/l) - RerR- J 1 5

ARTD 390 - Women in the Arts: Creating from the

lil lie 2 I

- July 1 6, 12.-30 pm - 3: J pm, M1WRF (B. GellerlB. Frehse) - INGR-I34 Worn n in the Arts focuses on the influence and contributio ns 0 women artists p artic ul a rly those workin g in the fields of painting and p h otogra phy. The class will exam ine the psychologi cal issue , ideals, myth s and fantasies that women ar t ists have e xplore d in their work, as well as the social constructions of sex. r a ce and gentler that h ave become important themes for many con t e mporary women artists. The class is lU1ique in tha t it rombines art history pres en tati o ns and sem i n a r topics wi th parall el stud io experien ces in pho togra p hy, painting

and mixes media. Student presentatio ns will provide an oppo r t u nity to combine research with studjo art tec h n i q ues. Studio fee: $50. (CRN: 10509)

B IOLOGY

(4 ClUIDrn)

JUlie 18, 8:00 -

BTOL I I I - Biology and the Modern World

1 0:45

am,

MTIZ

(D. Keyes) - IN IR- I44 See above course descri ption . S tudi o fee:

$45.

(CRN:I 0009) ARTD 34 1 (0 I ) - Elementary Art Ed u cati on

(2 CIU!DrJ'S)

May 24 - jllne 18, 9:30 am - 12:15 pm, MW

(5. Watts) - INGR - 1 26

Prepares tea chers to teach art i n the elementary classroom and to integrate art inl the curriculum. Reviews the clemenLS and principles of art, t cl,es the development of th e child in art, highl ights aesthetics and art criticism, and tearnes the design of art lessons and curricul um. Particular focus is pl ace d on the es se n ti al a c a d e m i c le a r n i n g re q u i r e m en t s for Lh arts in Wash in gton Sta� , personal deve l op ment in the studio, and student assessm ent in th arts. Additional at ten tion is gi ven to teaching art to students with disabilities, safety in the dassroom, and an integrated, multicultural focusthrough theart.�. Studio lre: $20. ( RN: \059 1 )

(4 CREDITS) May 24 - JUlie

18, 8:00 am - l2: 15 pm, Mn,VRF

(D. ]. Ma rtin) - RCTR-I22 In troduction to biology, p r i mar il y d es ig n e d for non-biology majors. Fundamental concepts are ch osen from all areas of modern biology inducting the enviro n me nt , population, physiology, genetics, evolution, and biological control . Includes laboratory. No prerequisites; satisfies G U R. Lab ee: $40. (CRN: 1 00 1 2) BIOl 20 I - Introductory Microbiology

(4 CREDITS)

!fay 24 - june 18, 8:0U - 1 0:45 lim, MTWRF

(A. Alexnnder! - R '!R-21O "Lab: 1 1 :15 wn - 12:30 Pill, MTWR

(A. Alexilnder) - RCTR-I28

jlJly 26 - Augll,f 20, 9:30 a m - 12: 15 pm, MW

The �tructure, m tabolism, growth, and genetics of microorganisms, especially bacteria and viruses, wi th emphasi.'i on their roles in human disease. Laboratory focuses on cul tivation, ide nt ification, and control of growth of bacte.ria. Prerequisite: HEM 1 05. Lab Fee: $40 ( Lecture CRN: 100 1 4) (Lab CRN: 100 ( 5 ) Please note: you m ust register or bOLh the lecture and th la b. Use both co urse registration numbers (CRN) when registering for this class.

- rNGR- 126 Seeabovedesaiption. Studio fee: $20.

BIOL 205 - Human Anatomy and Physiology

ARTD 341 (02) - Elementary Art Ed ucatio n

(2 CREDrrs) (s. Watts)

(CRN: 10010)

ARTD 365 - Painting IIWatercolor (4 CREDrrs)

Jlme 2 t - luly 1 6, 9: 15 am (Friday open studio)

12:15 pm,

MTWR

(D. Cox) - INGR- I26 Exploration of watercolor as a painting/drawing med iu m . Students will be expos ed to a variety of sty les and t ch n i q ues-fro m clas i tradition to co nt mporary inn ovation. the Ck'1SS will involve a mix. of slide lecture; in- class d emonstr ati on (by fac u l ty and guest artists); and predomina.n t ly hands on with prac tica.l application f techniques d is c ussed . Prerequisites: Drawing 1 60. ARTD 465 may be taken by students I aving had ARTD

8:00

a.lII.

- 10:45 a.m., JvfTWR

�Lab: 1 1 :30 a . m . - 2:30 p.m. TWI< ( T Carlson) RCfR- 1 1 6 Continuing class from B[OL 205, H uman Anatomy and P h ys i o l o g y, or i t can be t a ken i ndependently if 11le prerequ isite is met. It is identical in con t e n t to Lhe sprin semester R I O L 206 class . Lecture topics incl ude: ci rc u l a to r y, respirat ry, digesti ve, excretory, and reproductive sys tems ; metabolism;

temperature regulation; stress: hu man devel opmen t Labo rato ry incl udes: cat dissection; phys iology experi men ts; study of developi ng o rg a n i sms . Prerequisite: BlOL 205, Hllman Anatomy and Physiology, or equivalent Lab Fee: $40. (Lecture CRN: 1 00 J 8) ( Lab eRN: 100 (9). Please note: you must regist e r for both the 1el.'tU.rc and thelab. Use both COLm>C regist ratio n nu m bers (CRN) when registering fo r Lhis class. BIOL 326 - Animal Behavior

ARTD 430 - Ceramics IU May 24 -

40. Lecture eRN: IOO ! 6} ( Lab C RN : 1 0 0 1 7 ) . Please note: you must regi ste r for both the lecture and the lab. US<! both coun,e registration nu mbers (CRN) when registeri ng for Lhis lass.

(4 Cll..llDI1S) June 2 1 - July 1 6, 8:00 am - 10:45 am, MTWR (J. Lenllll) - RCTR-1 J 5 'Lab: 1 J :30 a . m . - 2:30 p.m., TWR (]. Lerum) RCTR- J I 6 Identical in c ntent to the fall seme ter BlOL 205 da.<>s. U:cture topics indude: matter; cells and tissues; nervous, endocrine, skeletal, 3.nd mU5cular systems. Labora tory includes: human ske letal sy tern; cat muscle dissect ion; experiments in muscle physiology and h um an reflexes; special se nses . Required for nursing and physical education c urricu l a. One hour exam from 1 1 :30 a m - 12:3 0 pm on June 28 and July 1 2th. Final exam from 9:00 - 1 1 :00 am on Tuly 1 6th. Limited to 20 students. No prereqUISite. Lab Fee:

(4 CREDrrs) June 21 - filly 1 6, 8:00 am (0.]. Marlin) - [(CTR-122

1 :00 pm, MTW RF

This class wiU include descriptio n, dassification, cause, function, and development of the behavior of animals. lalt.treS emphasize an ethological approarn to the study of behavior focusing o n comparisons among species, as well as physiological, ecol ogical, and evolutionary aspects of behavior. Laboratory and fieldwork will be incl uded . Prerequisi te: Biology 323 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Lab fee: $4U (CRN: 1 0517) BIOL 35 ) -

atural History of the Pacific Northwest (4 CREDITS) lime 21 - jllly 1 6, 8:()0 am - 4: 00 pm, MHVRF (R. McGinn is) - RCf R- 124 An introduction to the natural historyand literature of Lh e Pa cific No rt hwest: geology, c l i matology, oceanography, ecology, comm on l i fe fo rms, and h uma n impact from the ont.inental Shelf to the Columbia Basin . The course incl udes one-d ay Geld trip to Puget Sound and the Cascades, as well as th ree-day trips to the O lympia Peninsula and to the Columbia Gorge and Basin . Travel fee: S 120.00. For further information contact Rid,al' McGinni.\ (253) 535- 7570. (CRN:

10020)

BlOL 503 - Advanced Pl acement Institute: Biology

(2 CREDITS) July 19 - july 23, 9:00 am - 4:00 pm, MTWRF (M. Fischer) - R C..'TR j 15 & R TR- 1 1 6 Designed fo r high school learners preparing to

offer

Advan Placement Biology. It addresse:; conten t for an advanced placement course, theadvaru::ed placement test, review of text materials, and an overview oftypical coUege general biolob'Y courses dc.-,igned ror potential b iology majors. A major emphasis is labo ratory; pa rt ic i pa n ts carry o ut exercises suitable rorAdvanced Placemen t ai.ology courses. The institute isconducted by college fuculty with experience teaching general biology, and by high school tearners who currently offer Advanced Placement courses. Course fee: $670, includes tu i t ion and ma ter ia l fee . (CRN: 1 0245 ) Tele p ho ne regis trat i o n is blocked. Please call (253) 535-7 1 29 to register.


contextof changing internal and external demands and

BUSI NESS

expectations, with a strong emphasis on competencies and practices, which enhance teamwork. (CR : 1(024)

BUSA 201 - The Business Enterprise in a Global Perspective

(4 awms) ivlay 24 - JIINe 18, (8. Ahna)

/ :30 - 4:45 pm, MTWR

- ADMN-2 1 7

Introduction to the study of how business interacts with its environment. Designed for students who are taking a first look at the role of business in society and who have not had extensive study in economics, business law. or political science. (CRN: 100 2 1 )

BUSA 202 - As e.�sing and Managing Financial Performance 1

(4 CREDITS)

May 24 - JUlie 18, 9:00 11m - 1 2:25 Pili,

(4 CREDITS) May 25 - JlIly 15, 6: 00 - 9:00 pm, TR (M. SimpsolI) - ADMN-2 1 7 Study of managing organi7.ations from the perspec tive

o f s t r a t e gi c d e c i s i o n ma ke rs. For m u la t i o n , i m plementation, and assessment of s tTat gies and pol icies aimed at i n tegra ting all organizational functions in support of major objecti es . Satisfies the Senior Semi nar/Project requirement. Prerequisites: MATH 1 28 (or MATH l S I and 230); CSCI 220; ECON 1 5 1 1 1 52; STAT 23 1 ; B S 202, 302, 305, 306, 307; senior st andi ng. (CRN: 1 0587)

(4 CR£DITS) July 7 - Augllst 1 1 , 6:00 - 1 0 : 00 pm, MW (S. Thrasher) · ADMN-21 9

Study of the process required fo r developing a new p ro d u c t or service. Prerequ i s i te: BUSA 506. Tu i t io n : $4 90 per semester hour. (CRN: 10033) II BUSA 574 - Advanced Service and Manufacturing

Delivery Systems

(2 CREDrrs) JIII)1 8 - AJlgust 12, 6:00 (Staff) - ADMN-22 1

10.' 00 pm, R

Managerial and operational challenges of advanced service and manufacturin g systems. Prerequisites: BUSA 506, 507. Tuition: $490 per semester hour. (CRN: 1 0505)

MTWn

(G. Va7l 1-11ylw) - ADMN-2 19 IntegTa ti o n of accounting and finance topics from the perspec t ive of external investors. O rigins and uses of financial information; accounting concepts and principl j logic, content, and format of financial statements; nature of market values; valuation theories in the U.S. and other nations. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. (CRN: 10022)

BUSA 302 - Assessing and M a n a gi ng Fi nancial Performance II

(4 CREDrrs) j llTle 21 - July 16.

II BUSA 490 - Capstone Seminar: Strategic Management

<[ BUSA 566 - Developing New Products and Services

9:00 am - 12: 15 P11l, A,ITIVR

(G. Va nWyhe) - ADMN- 219 Persp ective of managerial decision makers. Princ ipl es and procedures pertaining to business investment activity. financial decision-making, financial statement analysis, valuation, financial planning, ca pi tal asset acquisition, cost of cap i tal, financing strategies. Prer q u i s i t cs : 202 and CSC1 220. ( RN: I0023)

B A 305 - Creating and Lead ing Effective Organ izal ions

(4 CREDrrs) /tl/le 21 - July 15, 1 : '0 - 4:45 Pill, MTVvR (D. Krac!Jtovil) - A DMN-2 I 7

A stud}' of how to organize and manage in today's

BU A 495 - In Their Footsteps: Contemporary Policies From Dead Economists

(4 CREDITS)

See Econ 49 1 for details.

BUSA 503 - Underst a n d i n g and M a n a ging F i n a ncial Re sources (4 CREDITS) May 29 - July 1 0, 8:00 alii - 5:00 pm, Saturday

Pox) - ADA1N-2 1 7

Integrated study of financial decision-making variables (both book and market), the relati nships among them, and relevant decision theories/models. Primary p er s pec t ive is that of the manager, rather than the accountant or the external investor. Tuition: $490 per semester hour. Note: Saturday Program Class. Special permission is required to register. Priority is given to students in the Saturday MBNTlM p rogram. Evening MBA students may take Saturda}'classes on a space-available basis. (CRN: 1 0504 - Blocked phone 535-7250 to register.) II BUSA 504 - Legal and Ethical Environment of

Business

(4 CIlI!DlTS) /tIIy 7 - AUgllst 11, 6:00 - / 0:00 pm, lvl W (c. Petersoll) - ADMN-2 1 7 Backgro und for understanding and acting upon the legal and ethical issues decisi.on makers in the business world face today. Tuition: $490 per s e m es te r hour. (CRN: 1 0029) II BUSA 505 - Managing Effective Organizations

(4 CB.I!DITS) May 24 - Jllne 30, 6:00 - j 0:00 pm, MW (D. Kratocilvil) - ADMN-2 19

E.xamines how leaders manage four sets of factors to achieve organizational effectiveness: the organiZAtion's internal envirorunenl, the organization's envlt'onmen­ tai conteJ(t, cultural differences, and ch ange. Tuition: $490 per semester hour. (CRN: 10030) II BUSA 5 1 0 - St rategic Management

Orga n i zational Approach

(4 CRIDITS)

MaJ' 27 - Jllne 2(), 6:00 - 10.'00 pm, R; and 9:0011111 - 5:()O pm, S (also meets 611, 6:00 - 10:00 pm) (K. Sylvester) - ADMN-2 19

M(lY 24 - July 18

(5.

II BUSA 595A - Seminar i n N e go t i a t i o n : An

of

(4 cREDITS) May 24 - lillie 30, 6:00 - 1 0:00 pm. M W (J. Albers) - ADMN-2 J 7

Technology

Conce p ts a n d meth o ds for fo r m u l a t i n g a n d i mple ment ing com p e t i t i ve st ra tegy in a global context. Addresses how to integrate technology with the firm's strategy, and the key internai an d external forces that determine the evolution of strategy. Prerequisites: 503, 504, 505, 50b, 507. Tuition: $490 per semester ho LIf. (C : 1003 1 )

Introduction to basic negotiation concepts, procedures, a n d strat gics that produce more efficient and p roductive organizations. The co u r se a p p r o a c h e s t h e s u bj e c t fr o m an organizational perspec tive. Individual concerns are automatically addressed, since the whole is only as strong as its individual parts. Tuition: $490 per semester hour. ( CRN: 1 050 - Blocked phone 535-7250 to register.) BUSA 595B - Seminar in Electronic Commerce

(4 CREDITS) july 1 0 - August 1 4, 8:30 am - 4:3U pm. (c. Lee) - ADMN-21 3

atttrday

The rapid evolution and development of electronic commerce has posed many challenges fo r all organizations in today's new world of information, knowledge, and networks. This course will explore electronic commerce as a critical delivery system for products and services throughout the entire value creating system. Discussion topics incl ude the operation of i n formation econo my, electronic c o m merce strategies, lnt met business models, Intranet and E.'d:ranets, electronic payment systems and t ransaction security, et hical a n d privacy cons idera t i o ns , a n d o th er m a n a g e r i a l and p o licy issues in electron com merce. Tuition: $4 90 per semester hour. Note: Saturday Program Class. Special permission is required to register. Priority is given to students in the Saturday MBN TIM program. Even i ng MBA students may take Saturday dasses on a space-availab le bas is . (CRN: 10507 - Blocked- phone 535-7250 to register.)

CHEM ISTRY CHEM L04 - Environmental Chemistry

(4 CREDITS) Jurre 2 1 - j/l/y ] 6, 9:30 a", - 12: 15 pm, MHVR (P. Gersllllmrn) - RCTR 224 �Lab: 1 :00 - 4:00 pm, TR - R CfR-20 1 Basic principles of chemical structure and reactions,

with applications to hu man activit ies and the natural environment. 0 p rerequisite; students without high school chemistry are e n c o u ra ge d to take 1 0 4 b e fore taking 1 0 5 or 1 20. Also su itable fo r environmental s tudies, general


science te a chers , B.A. in geosciences, and gen e ral u niversity core req uirements or cllege o f Arts and Scien ces O ption III Students must nK'et the Llniversity ntrance requirements in mathemati cs befure enroll mg m the conrsc. Lab fee: $40. ( Lect ure CRN: 1 05 1 0) La b CRN: 105 14) Please note: you mus t register for both the lecture and the lab. Use both course regist ra t i on n u mbers (CRN) when re gi ste rin g fo r this class. HEM l OS - Chemistry of Life

(4 CREDfrs)

*Lab: 1 .'00 - 4:00 Pill, IvITWR - RCTR-20I

organiza tional settings. Students deal with interpersonal

Chemical methods of quantitative analysis, incl uding

commtmication, in terv i ewmg techniques, mformative

volumetric, gravimetric, and selected instrumental

and persuasive speaking, working in groups, and

methods. Includes lab oratory. P rere q ui sites:

basic business writing skills. (CRN: 1 0 043)

1 20

or 1 2 5 and M ATH

140. Lab fee: $40. ( Lecture C R : RN : 1 0039) Please note: you must register fo r both the lecture and the lab. Use both course registration numbers (CRN) when registering for th is class. 1 0038)

(Lab

CH E M 503 - Advanced Placement In s titu te : Che mistry

([ COMA 336 (02) - Com municatin g in Business and the Professions

(4 owms)

May 24 - Jllly 21, 6:()0 - 8:00 pm, MW (f. DavidsolJ} . fNGR- 1 09 See above description. (CRN:

10042)

A'fny 24 - jlme [8, 9:30 am - 12;00 p m, MTWR (P. Cerstmalln) - ReTR-220 ' Lab: [:00 p.m. - 4:00 p. III. , TR - RCTI(·201

Jllly [ ( . Jldy 23, 9;UU a m - 4:UO Pill, MHVRF

Basic organic and bioche mistry applied to chemic..ll

Instruction in chemi stry can range from extre m el y

a rts students, nursing st u d en ts, and prospective

theoretica.l approaches to veryqualitative p resen tatio ns.

Introduces the theories, methods, and practice of

The wide ra nge of methods has caused considerable

pub l ic relations. Emphasizes technical and analytical

teachers. St udents who have not comple ted hi g h

discussion within the discipline in rece nt years. The

skills. Pre req uis i : Com munication core or consent of

school hemistry should take

H E M 1 0 4 before taking HE I 1 05. Lab Fee: $40. ( Lecture CRN: 1 05 12) ( Lab CRN: 105 1 3 ) Please note: you must r e gist er fo r both the lec t u re and the lab. Use b o t h co u rse reg istration n u mbers ( CRN) when

excessive tilt towards theory has been the main issue. The I nstitute w i l l fo cus on the d i vers i t y of the d i s c i pli n e and te ac h i ng approaches . Together, we

instructor. (CRN:

reg ister i ng for this class.

c o m m u n i t i e s in s c ien ce, and

processes in th human organism; suitable for liberal

(2 CRllDITS)

(D.

Swank)

- RCT l<-224

will explore s eve ral categories in clu ding:

( I ) course

content, (2) current teaching me thods, (3) learning

( 4 ) t h e role of

experimentation in chem is try. Desi gned fo r those

COMA 385 - I ntroduction to Public Relations

(4 CREDITS) July 26 - Allgllst 20, 9:30 am (c. Sp icer) - lNCR- l ISB

/2: 1 5 pm,

MTWR

1 0044)

COMA 391 - Commun ication Abroad: Understanding C u l t ure

(4 CRl!DITS) - JIIIIE Hi, 9:30 am - 1 2: 15 Pill, MTWRF (E. Jncll) - TNCR- / ISS - OFF CANfPUS

May 24

CHEM L lO - General Chemistry

te a ch i ng or pl a. nnin g on teaching AP chem istry.

(4 CREDITS)

Sig nifi ant t i m e w i l l be devoted to laboratory

This course has two component parts. Tht: first par t will be held on campus where we will discuss and

jlllle 2 1 - Tuly 16, 9:0n am - 12:00 pm, MTWn (D. SlVank) . RefR-220 'Lab: LOG - 4:UUpm, TR - RCJR-20[ I n t r o d u c t i o n to t h e fu ndamen tal n a t u re o f chemistry. Top i cs include energy a n d m a t t er, atomic and molecular theo ry, peri odi c properties, nomenclature, states of matter, d1emical cakula tions, solution properties,acids and bases,equilibriwn, and kineti cs . The maj o r emph a s is of the lecture and laboratory w ill be the a p p l i ca t io n f chemical prin ipl es and theory on a need to know basis. Designed prima r i ly for students who want to major

in chemistry, biology, engineering, e n v i ron m e ntal science, geology, or physics. Th.:se and other majors who a re i n terested in the health sciences (t:.g., p r e me di a l , pre de n t a l , prephar macy) would

usually begin chemistry with this course. One year of hig h school chemistry is required. Students with no high school chem istry or a "'leak mathematical

background should lake Chem i stry 104 b fo re this

course. Lab fee: $40. (Lecture C

: 10034) (Lab CRN: 1 0035) Please note: you must register for both the l ec tu re and the lab. se both co u r se r gistrati o n numbers (CRN) wh en registering tor this class.

CHEM 2321234 - Organic Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratory

experi m e n ts fo r Al) chemistry. In addition, sharing

develop how communication functions in various

experiences and sa m p l e s of teaching materials will

cultural co ntexts . The second part of the course will

be e n co u r aged . Em phasis will be on techniques that

involve a trip to Great Britain where we will study

have been successful and on the use of active learning

how communication funct ions to create, sustain, and

a pp roach es . Course fee: $670 mcludes tuition and

in fo rm cultural beliefs an d awareness. S p ec ifically,

Tel ep hone registration is blocked. Please ph o ne (253) 535-7 1 29 to re gi ster

we will visit Parliament, the Old Bailey, Wes tminster

materials fee.

(CR :10040)

in the hope of developing an und e rs tanding of how

COMMUNICATION & TI IEATRE ([ COMA 271 - Media Li te ra cy

(4 CREDITS) May 2'1 - july 2 [ , 6:3U - 9:30 pm, MW (I. Lisosky) - INGR - 1 1 5B Study about how mas media influence our values and perspect ives in the global village. Discussion w i l l fo c u s on h o w a h a n d fu l o f m e g a - m e d i a c o r p o r a t i o n s control both the co n d u it a n d the content of the world's communication syste ms ; how media have become o lIT cultural and moral instructors;

and how society has been influenced by an expanding advertismg env iro nmen t . I n addition, con troversial issues like how media a ffec t edu ca t ion , pol itics and b us i ness will be explored. F i Id trip s will also be arra nged to local mass media oUl lets like KSTW-TV and The ews Trib une. ( CRN: 1 0523)

(411 CREDIT) May 24 - June 1 8, 9;00 am - 1 2:00 pm, Mn VR (c. Fryille - RCJR- J 02 ' Lab: ] -00 - 4:00 pm, TR - ReTR-2OI

COMA 326 - Group Communication

I nterp re ta tio n of p� perties and reactions of aliphatic com pou nd on t he basis of curren t chemical Lhc()JY. Prerequi�ite: CHEM 1 20 0r 1 25. Corequisite: CHEM 234 ( lab mllst accompany 232 ) . Lab fee: $40. ( Lec tu re CRN: 1 0036 ) (Lab N: 10037). Please n o t e: you mw;t re gis t r for both the l ect ure and the lab. Use both course registration numbers (CRN) when reg is ter i ng fo r this class.

Stud ies how people interact in groups. Introduces

CliEM 338 - Analytical Chemistry

(4 CREDITS) May 24- Jlme 18, 8:00 - J 0:45 am, MTWl� (L Hllestis) - RCTR-224

Abbey, and the Tower of London among other sites

(4 CREDITS) August 20, 3:30 - 6: 15 pm, MTWR (M. Bartllnell) - ING/�- 1 09 lilly 26 -

theoretical con � tru ct s regardi ng the role o f groups in o rg a n i za t i o n a l and social settings. I ro vides n p e rience in a n a lyzing a n d i m p rovi n g g r o u p

mstitutions sha pe messages, bel iefs, a nd practices.

Estimated cost at time of pu blication: $2500. (CRN: 1 0525) Telephone regi stration blocked. Please phone (253) 535-7628 for cost confirmation and to apply for program.

COMA 395 - Corporate Communication Writin g

(4 CREDITS) May 24 - JUlie 18, 2;()U - 4:45 Pili, MTWRF (L. Elliott) - lNCR- I ISB In Public Rel a tions Wri t ing, students will learn new approaches and concepts that build on the fow1dation of jou rnalistic skills gained in COMA 283. The course will help students become more proficient and versatile writers who can handle a wide range of public rela tions tasks with confidence. S tu dent s will wr ite fo r a variety of media outkts. As they prepare materials, students will examine the i nterests of the a u d i e n ce fo r w h o m they a re wri ting�media gatekeepers, consu mers, employees, investors, and others. Lab fee: $20 ( CR."I: 1 0045)

COMA 490 - Communication Capstone

(2 CREDITS) JlIly 26 - Allj{USt 20, 12:30 - J: 15 pm. MW (M. BarT/men) - LNGR- I09

This course fulfills t he capstone requirement for all

communication deg ree s offered in the Department of

perfo r mance and interaction. (CRN: 10524)

Communication and Theatre. These i nc lu de BA i n

COMA 336 (0 I ) - Communicating in Business nnd

Journalism, Broadcasting, Cri t i cal Communication Studies) and BFA m Broadcasting. The sem i na r will provide students with the opportunity to participate in an in ter nsh ip and co m p lete a senior p roje c t that w i l l i n c l u d e a p o r t fo l io and s e l f-asses s m e n t .

the Professions

(4 CREDITS) May 24 - Jlllle 18, 9:30 am (D. Homey) - [NCR- J O�

- 12: IS pm, MTWRF

Focllses on the nature of communication processes in

Co m m u n ication (emphasis areas Public Relations,

(CRN: 1 0 526)


([ COMA 500 - Effective Communications

(2 CJU:orrs) july 6 - ill/gust 10, 6:00 - 1 0:00 pm, T (E. [/lch) - ADMN-221 A l ook at communication processes in organizations with development of specific co m m wuca t io n skills; includes pub l ic s peaki ng tec h n i q ues. informative a n d pers uasive co m m u n icatio n , i n t ervieWing strategies, and tht: role of listening. This COW"Se fulfills the SBA-MBA requirement. Tui t io n : $490 per semester ho ur. ( CRN :

10046)

basic p rinciple of comp uter security. Du ring the first su m m e r session, the Department of Almputer Scie nce and Engin eril1g will offer a special course designed to introduce our students to this important

field of study. The course will co

TIle construction of ciphers; Methods for breakin g co d es and c i phers; r:

Methods for protecting databases and Opetathlgsystems; Access controls; How a computer irus works, and Protection from viruses. The only prerequisite for the class is esCE 144. This class will satisfy the general ele ctiv' require men ts of a CS or C major. For more i n formation contact D r . Ri hard Spi llman at

2 5 3 - 535-7406. (CR : 105 19)

THEA 458 - Creative Dramatics

(4 ClUIDrrs)

jlme 21 - Ju ly ] 6, 9:30 a m - J 2: 15 Pili, MTWRF (w. Parker) - TNGR- I09 esign ed to acq u ain t the st.ud e n t with materials, techniques,and thoories ofcreative dramatics. Students participate in creative dramatics activities. It is intended for elementary and junior h igh schoo l tea ch e rs or prospective teachers. th ea t re maj o rs , religio us leader , youth and amp ounselors, day care workers, social and psychological workers , and community t hea t re leaders interested in \\Iorkingwith children. Srudents will be expected to purchase a ticket to one play (est. cOst $ 1 0.00) . (CRN: 1(047) design and

ECONOMICS ([ ECON 1 5 1 - Principles of Macroeconomics

(4 CREDrrs) June 2 / - lIlly 1 6, 6:00 - ]():OO pm, MWR (D. Vinje) - A DAm-200 introduces the economy as a whol e and major issues such as in fla t io n , unemployment. economic growth, and in ternational trade. (CRN: 1 005 1 ) ECON 491 - in Their Footsteps: Co ntem porary

(4 CR£Orrs)

and non-n umerical applications. an d the use of files are central foc i of lh is co u rs e . Prereq uisite: either

MATI ! 140, Pun lions and Analytic Geometry; or MATI-I l28 Linear Models a nd /calculus; or four years of h ig h school math, or e qu ivalent. (eRN: l 0 4 8 9) CSCE 220 - Comp uterized Info rma ti on Systems

(4 CR£Drrs) - lillIe 18, 12:30 - 3:45 Pili, MnVR (L MurpllY) - UCTR- I 36

M�1y 24

Introduction to co m p uters including management info rm ati o n systt!ms development, tdecommuni­ cations. opera ling systems, preadsheets , graph ics , and database management. I nc l u de s a computer l abora tory co m p o ne n t . Prerequisite: MATH L 2 8 1 40 or equivalent. (CR : 105 1 8)

or

CE 270 - Data St r uct ures

(4 CREDrrs) lIlly 6 - August 1 3. 8:45 (j. Brillk) - MCYM-J02 Cont inuat ion of

11 :30 am,

June 1 8,

2:00 - 4:45 Pili, MTWRF

(N. Petersoll/M. ReinumlD. Wentworth) -

(4 CREDrn) May 24 - JIIiy 2, 8:45 - 1 1 :30 (11/1, NmtIfR (G. Hauser) - MG\rM- 1U2 An i n troduct ion to computer science i n c l ud i n g algorithm design, structured program mi ng, numerical

MTWR

rogramming techn iques and a

study of basic daLa slructures in c l uding lists, stacks,

queues. and lrees. Applications of Lhese fo r ms to sorting. searching, and data s to ra ge aTe maul'.

Prerequisite: esC! 1 44 , In troducrion to Com pute r Science, or equi valent. ( RN: 10490)

CSCE 400 - Computer Security and Cryptology (4 Cll.EDrrs)

May 24 - JUlie J 8, 8:00 - 1 0:45 am. MTWRF (R. pilimalJ) - RCTR-22 1

TIle explosive worldwide growth of computer systcm� has created a large de ma n d for compu t er scientists, engineer , and mathematicians who understand th

SUMMER TI'\'CliEIl.'> A(..A OI'.Ml · (Gifted EtJIIClltioll alld Altemntjve Educatioll for AI-Risk tlldlmt.»

G I FTED E DUCATI O N : E ue 485 EOUe 555 (0 1 ) HPSY 565

E

L

E N O O RSEMEI\T:

HOUe 445

rmUC 470 EDUC 4 7 5

May 24 -

CSCE 1 44 - Introduction to Computer Science

TIle following Selmol of EdIlCIltio" Co/Jurt1, Academic and Certificates rpill be olft,'ed at Pacific LutiJcJ'(W Un i vn'1ity this Slimmer. Pluw' fi1ld CMrsC dem ·iptions fJ7Id drtllils list;cd ntmtc f'ically ill thc Educatioll COIIYSe section, ReffJ' to pagf; 29 fo r fu rther infor­ mntio1J 1m these prog/'/HIIS.

AT- R I SK : ED C 470 EDliC 555 (02) EPSY 5 60 ( 0 2 )

Policies From Dead Economists

COMPUTER SCI ENCE

EDUCATION

OFF CAMPUS Explore the polic y legaci es of the g rea l economists

in E uro pe this sunlmer. The course begins with a three-day o n -ca m pu s i ntroduction to the hist r i cal

E D U C 503 5 L A N G 446

E D UC 427/527

SPECIAL Eou ATION £. DOR EMENl': SPED 40 1 SPED 40Z PE

396

SPED 404 SPEO 520/ 5 2 1

and intellect"UaJ develop me nt of economics. Students

SPED 292

will then p art i cipa te in three-weeks of tra e1 and im m ersi o n in the lives and times of dam Smith,

PED 407

D av i d Ricardo, Ka rl Marx. Knut Wicksell, Eli Maynard Keynes. The itinerary fo r t h e co urse for the cour e in .1udes London, Ca m b r i dge , d t nburgh , and S toc k holm. Visits to h i st orical sites and cu rren t "trunk tanks" witi all ow stude nts to observe firsthand how the influen tial

Heckscher, and John

i d e as of t h e s e wo rldly p h i lo sop he rs i n for m can temp rary policy proposa.ls. In-c unLry class timewili be structured to com bi ne mo rni ng sessions with local experts and histori cal site visits with free lime in r1le afternoons for i n depe n dent exploration of th se culturally rich European ci t ies. Evening deb riefi ngs of each day! (onomist and p o li cy topic will provide o p p o rtuni t i es [o r l i ve l y and fo cused d i scussio n about tbe day's events. Estima t ed ost at

time of publication: $3500. (CRN: 1 0515) Telephone regist ration blocked. Please pho ne (253 ) 5 5-76_8 for cost confinnalion a n d t ap pl y tor pr gram.

([ ECON 500 - Applied Statistical Analysis (4 CREDITS) May 24

- july 2, 6:00 - 1 0:00 pIn, MIN CU. Jensen) - ADMJ.J-204A An intcn ive i n t rod uct io n to statistical methods. Emphasis on the ap p l i c ati on of inferential methods. Tuition: 490 per semester hour. (eRN: 10200)

REAf)(NG EN DORSEMENT: roue 490 1 5 1 .eI1 U C 505 EDUC 4 1 1 / S I I EDUC 4 1 31 5 1 3 EDUC 4291529 muc 4 281528

rouc 4381 5 38 SCHOOL LIHRAltV

MEJ11AlLLRS ENO()R5E.\11

•. \

Roue 407

EO C 509 roue 537 lID C 538

MASTER OF ARTS EoU(;KIlON AD�1INISTRAnON PROGRAM:

EDU 550 ED C 551 EDUC 559

MASTER 01' AR.TS WITH

I,

ITIAL CERTIFI ATlON:

INTEGRAl ION AND COLlABORATIO, . EDUC 562 HOUe 563

EDUC 563C LOUe 564

EP Y 560 ( O J )

EPSY 5116

LUSIVE

CL \S

RDUe 545 (O t ) SPED 55:­

SPED 588

ltOOM:


ED

C 205 - M u lticultu ral Perspectives i n

the Cl ass room

(4 OWlITS) May 24 - june 1 8, 8:30 - 1 1:00 am, (L. McGraw) - RAMS-203 A co urse w h ic h c re a te

TWR

3 n awaren ess a n d

issues such as ethni ity, gender, disabili ty, racism or pover ty. There is

a

service c om ponent that

involves tutoring students for a minimum of 12 ho urs over the pe riod

f the course. Mee ts the Alternative Perspectives ofthe Diversity requirement (CRN: 10528 ) E D U C 4 1 1 / 5 1 1 - S t ra te gie s fo r L i t er acy D evel opment in the Classroom

(2 oumrrs)

lil lie 21 - July 2, 8:00 - 10:45 am, tvm¥RF (lvT. Walker) - ADlvfN-206 The d e v elopme ntal n ature of li teracy learn ing with emph as is on the vital role of languagc and the i n terrelate dnes s and i nterdepen d ence of

lis tening,speaking, read i ng, and writing as language processes.

Preferred to take after EDUC 5 1 0 .

(EDUC 4 1 1 CRN: 1(097) (EDUC 5 l !

CRN: 10098)

E D U C 4 1 3/ 5 1 3 - la nguage a n d L i teracy Development: As essment and I nst r uct ion

(4 CRfDns) My 26 -At/grISt 20, 2:00 - 4:45 pm, MnVRF (J. Lewis) - ADMN-215

Understa n ding of a wide va r iet y of st rate g i es and tools CO T assessing a.nd facilitating studen ts ' devel opment in reading , writing, l iste ning, and speaking. Prerequisite; 5 1 0 ; highly recomme nded to be take n at the end of the t rack se55ions. Cross Listed with SPED 5 1 3. (EDUC 4 1 3 C RN : 10099) ( EDUC 5 1 3 CRN: 1 0 1 00) EDUC 427/527 - Multiculturnl Children's literature

(2 CREDITS) July 19 - July 23, 8:30 a m - 4:30 pm, MTWRF

(Staff) - ADMN-2 I 5

Exploratio n of multi-cultural issues in theoont xtof chil dren's literature. There will be opportunities to rcad

variety of texts ae ro gcn res, and i ncorpor a te a va rie ty of strategies for use of mult i -c ultu ral texts in teach in g and le a rn i ng . (EDUC417CRN: 1(089) (EDUC 527 CRN: 1 0090) a

£DUC 428/528 - Child ren's Literature in the K-8 Curriculum

(2 CREDns) JlIly 26 - AlIgl/St 20, 9:30 am - 12:30 pm, MWF (c. Yetter) - ADMN-2 1 7

Investigation of g nres of contemporary ch ildren's l itera ture and development of a personal rep rtoire fo r classroom

use.

mDUC 428 CRN : 1 0582)

( EDUC 528 CRN : 1 0 583) EDUC 429/529 - A d ole cent Literature in the Secondary Cu r ri cu l um

(2 CR1IDns) July 26 - At/gmt 20, 2:00 - 4:45 pm, ,\1WF

(c. Yetter) - ADMN-209

Genres in adole cent literature and exploratio n of strategies for integration of young adult materials across the middle and secondary school curriculu m.

( EDUC 429CRN:

10578) (ED

EDUC S03A

(2 CRfDns) May 2<1 - JurI' 1 fl, TBA (Distallce [.e{1millg)

( 2 CR1IDns) July 1 9- July 23, 8:30 alll - 4:30 Pili, MTWRF (K. Strand) - A DMN 209 -

u nders ta n d i ng o f diversity, directly address ing

C 529CRN: 10579)

- Using Computers in the Classroom

E D U C 438/538 - Strategies for Whole literacy I nst ruction K - 1 2

(P. McGee) - UCTR- 140

This course will meet two times on canlpUS. This

The use of language as a t 01 for learni ng across the

course will focus on effective use of co m p uters in

b of la ngu age in all kinds of

the classro om . Students will examine curricular

curriculum, and the

r

teaching and learning in K- 12 classroo ms. t rategi ' for reading/ wr iting i n conte nt areas, thema t ic teach­ ing, topic study, and int grating curriculum. ( ED UC 438 CRN: 1009 1 ) (EDUe 538 eRN: 10092) E D U C 445 - Methods for Teachin g Forei gn

La ngu ages and English as a Second la ng u age (3 OWlrrs) July 26 - Atlgll5t 20, 10.' 00 am - 1 2:0U pm, MTWRF (Staj!) - ADMN-208 Theorie$ and related techniques for teach i n g lan­ guages K- 1 6 with n their c ultural context, incl uding i

direct methods, content-based instruction, proficiency orien tatio ns, and the i nt eg ra t io n of technol g i es. Atte n t ion given to variations in approach for those teaching English as a second la ngu age. No prereq­ uisites. Required for teacher certification in II language and for minor in En gl ish as <l Second Langu age. S tron gly recom mended for eleme n tary major in a language. Cross-listed with LANG 445. (CRN: 10593) ({ EDUC 470 - Curriculum, Materials and Instruction fo r TeadUng English as a Second Language

(4 0UIDns) May 24 - /tme 1 8, 4:30 - 7:00 pm, MTWRF

(K. hail/Oil) - ADMN-204B

needs and s i sues, instructional settings, and instructional practices to determin ' the ways in which technology can su p p or t learning. This course will be offered via distance le a rn ing using e- mail, www-based tools, and tel eph o n e. The tint class sess i o n will m et on campus (Monday, May 24). P rerequisite skills: how to se nd , receive, and reply t e-mail ; h Vol to use a www browser ; how to word process .

(CRN: 10588)

EDUC 503B - Culture and Learning for ESL

(2 CRl!Dns)

JUlIe 2 1 - lIlly 16, 1 1 :00 am - 1 2: 1 5 pm, MTWR1= (Staff) - A DMN-206 Designed to acqu ai n t students with the influences of cultural backgrounds, p erce pt ual systems, so ial organiz.1tion, language, and nOTl- erbal messages i n inte rcultural commun icati

n.

(CRN: 1 0599)

EDUC 505 - Current Issues in Literacy Education

(2 CRfDrrs) June 21 - JlIly 16, 2:00 - 4:45 pm, TR

(]. Lewis) - ADMN-209

initial course requi red for all s tudents in the master's

program in l iteracy education. Overview of historical and current theory, practice, definitio ns, and research in language and literacy acquisition and development

E xa mi na t i o n o[ c u rri c ul u m , asses sme n t, a n d

in and oUL of chools. Required of any t rack option

i nstruction

selected. (

in bilingual lea rn i ng -teaching contexts.

RN: 10580)

Critical analysis of language teach ing methodology, implementation of materiu.ls, and assessment designs.

Special emphases on the historical and socio-pol itical contexts of

SL i n s tr uc tion and issues o f language

discrimination rele ant ro l it e r a c y instruction.

S HOOL LIIJRARY MmIA/LLRS Ef><DORSI!MENT The foll owing courses toward an endors mcnl will be offered in the summer of 1999.

ross-listed wiLh LANG 470. (CRN: ( 0595) E D U C 475 - Practicum in Tea c hi n g En gl i s h as a Second La nguag e

(I CREDns) May 24 - IUlle 18, 9: 0 - 10:45 am, MTWRF (K. S/wmul1) - TBA Extended experi nee and participation in an assigned SL se tt i n g . C ro s s - l i s ted w i t h LA N G 47 5 . P rereq uisite: LANGIED 445 (concurrent with LANG/EDUC 470).

(eRN:

l0597)

EDue 485 - The Gifted Chlld

(2 CRl!Drrs) July 1 2 - July 23, 8:30 am -

12:00 Pili, MTWRF

(M. HiUislE. McNeal) - RAMS-204 A study of the gifted dlild, characteristics and problems, and school proced ures designed to further develop ment (CRN: 105 2 ) ({ E D U C 490/5 1 0 - T h e Acq uisition and Development of language and L i ter acy

(2 CRfDns)

May 24 - JUl1e 1 8, 5:00 - 8:30 p1ll, MlV (M. Roach) - ADMN-209

r D ue 507 - P ri nc ip le s of l o iorma tion Orga n i z a t ion, Retrieval, a n d Service

(2 CR£I)rrs) !IIIU: 21 - lilly 16, 8:00 am -

/2:15 pm, TR

(Stllff) - A DMN-l11

E;.,.'ploration of a broad range of cia

and informati

n

in pr i m ary and se c o nd ary s o u rc es , including

de cum nls, bibliography, fl.lU-te:.;t, statbti and recorded forn1ats. (CRN: 1 0584)

EDUC 509

-

al, vi

ual,

o un d a t i o n s of CoUect i o n

Devel o p m e n t

(2 CRrnrrs) IIIIIe 21 - July 16, 8:OU mlf - 12: 15 pm, MI,/ (StlljJ ) - ADMN-212 The philosophical bases an I paraml1:ers of collection development i n the school library media center. (CRN: 1 0585 )

£DllC 537 - Media and Technology for School Library Media Specialists

(2 CIll!DrTS) July 26 - AllgllSl 20, 9:30 Illtl

- 12: 15 P"10 TR

(Sw(fJ - rBA

Investigation of how young children acquire their first

The managemen t of media and technology services

language and what they know as a result of this learn­

pec ial t'mphasis used in - 1 2 instr uction al program ( CD-ROM, i n terac tive video, distance learning, and computer technologies ) . ( RN: 1 058 1 )

ing. (EDUC490CRN:

10067) (EDUC 5LO CRN: 100(8)

in the school l i b rary m e d ia center.

on emergi ng technologi

5


£DUC 530 - Children's Writing (2 CR£OITS) JIIly 6 - li l ly 16, 8:00 - 10:45 am, MI'WRF (J. Bates) - ADMN-215 Current theory and practice in the teaching and learn­ ing of writing in elementary classrooms. (CRN: 10424)

rouc 544 - Rese-ardl and Program Evalu ation

(2 CREDITS)

lutlc 2 I - Jllly 16, 12: 0 - 1:45 pm, MTWRF (R MlIlder) - ADMN-209

Knowledge o f evaluation techniques, including portfolios, and or research design; ability to interpret educational research; to identify, locate, and acquire typical research and related literatures; to use the results of research or evaluation to propose program changes and write grants. (CRN: 1 0078) £DUC 545(0 1 ) - Methods and Techniques of Research (2 owm ) lime 2 I - July 16, 3:30 - 4:45 pm, MI'WRF (L. McGraw) - ADMN-22 I Seminar in research methods and techniques in education with emphasis on designing a research project in the student's area of in terest. Required for M.A. Prerequisite: Consultation with student's adviser and admittance to the graduate program. ( RN: 1 0079)- Telephone registration blocked. Registration by program director. ED C 545(02) - Methods and Teclmiques of Research

(2 CREDITS)

Mrly 24 - jllllc 18, 4:30 - 5:45 Pili, A1TWRF (M. Hillis) - ADMN-2 19 Se e above course description. ( RN: (0605) -Telephone

registration blocked. Please phone (253) 535-7272 to regi ter. ([ EDU

55 0 - Principalship I

(3 CRlIDns) June 2 - july 21, 5:3 0 - 8:00 Pill, MW (M. Baughmall) - ADMN-215 Int roduction to the role and function of the principalship, with emphasis on team building and interper nal professional relationships and ethical decision-making. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate progranl or permission of graduate adviser. (CRN: 10069)

([ EDUC 5 S I - Educational Law

deals with the broad categories of creation and hero stories from a range of cultures, and explores ways of handling and thinking about the more ambiguous aspects of these stories when using them in the curriculum. The third unit deals with resources (including internet) and curriculum development, in which the participants can begin to formulate their own plans for using materials for their own needs; this material is presented as part of a final project. Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program. ( CRN: 10533) EDUC 555(02) - Curriculum Development

(2 CRlIDITS)

JUlie 21 - july 2, 12:30 - 3:30 Pill, Mn VRF (M. Collay) - ADMN-200 Types of curriculum organizations, programs and techniques of curriculum develop ment. Special attention will be given to working in at-risk youth. Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program. ( RN: 1 0534) ({ EDUC 559 - Personnel Management

(2 CREDITS) Jllne 2 - JlIly 24, 5:00 - 8:00 pm, TR (also Sanlrdays 6/19, 6/26, 7/1 0, 7/17 allci 7124, 8:30 11m - 3:30pm)

(L Camey/]. Siegel) - ADMN 209 -

Knowledge and skill development in working with personnel issues, including legal principles in hiring, firing, in-service and staff development, support services, and contract negotiation. Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program, 544, 550, 553. This course is taught concurrently with EDUC 55 1 . (CRN: 1 0080) EDUC 562 - Schools and Society (3 cr) JUlie 14 - JlIly 2, 8:30 u m - 12:30 pm, M TWRF (D. Lamoreaux) - ADMN-200

Individual and cooperative study of the socio-cultural and c u l t u r a l , p o l itical, l e g a l , h i s t o rical a n d philosophical foundations o f current practices of schooling in America. Emphasis will be given to the current status of schools and the evaluation of their past, present, and future. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A./Cert Program. (CRN: 10535) Telephone registration is blocked. Registration by program director.

regulations, and case law and their application to public and private schools ( K - 1 2 ) . Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program. This course is taught concurrently with EDUC 559. (CRN: I O l lO)

EDLIC 563 A - IntegratiDg Seminar: Legal and Statistical Issues in Education (1 CREDITS) Nlay 24- JWIe 4 , 2:00 - 5:30 pm, TR (L. Reisberg) - ADMN-lOO An overview of legal and statistical issues as they relate to public school teachers. Prerequisite: Admission to MA with Certification Program. (CRN: 1 0536) Telephone registration is blocked. Registration by program director.

E D U C 555(0 1 - I ntegra t i n g Mythology and Folklore Across the Curriculum in K- 1 2 Classes

Abuse and The Law

(2 CRE.DITS)

JUlle22 - July 24, 5:00 - B:OO Pili, TR (also Stlhmia)'S f)/1 9, 6/26, 7/10, 7/1 7 and 7/24, 8:30 am - 3:30 pm) (L Camey/I. Siegel) - ADMN 209 Study of contemporary federal, state, and local statutes,

(2 CREDITS) luly } 2 - JlIly 23,

12:30 pm - 3:30 pm, MTWRF

(E. Ne/so ll) - ADMN-200 My thology and Folklore taught for the needs and concerns of K- 12 teachers who wish to incorporate t raditional stories into andJor across the curriculum. The cour c is divided into three sections. The first deals with the history of the d i s c i p l i n e a n d i n t erp re t a t i o n of traditional stories assist the instructor understand the context of interpretive daims made for myths and folklore. The second

EDUC 563C - Integrating Seminar: Issues of Chjld

(J CREDITS) JUlie 8 - jlltle 1 7, 2:00 - 5:30 Pill, I'R (K. Gerlach) - ADMN-200 St udents work cooperatively and individually to integrate education coursework, field experiences, and individua'l perspectives throughout the Master of Arts in education with initial certification program. This course will focus on legal and instructional issues concern ing child abuse a n d neglect. I n cl udes identification and reporting procedures, and the legal and professional responsibilities of the ed ucator.

Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. with Certitlca­ tion Progran1 (CRN: 10589) Telephone registration is blocked. Registration by program director. EDUC 564 - The Arts, Mind an d Bo dy (2 CRWITS) Jllly 26 - july 30, 8:30 am - 4:30 pm, MI'WRF

( taffY - ECAlvl- G )'?I1

Exploration of methods to facilitate creativity and meaning-making in the classroom through visual, musical, non-verbal/physical movement, and dramatic arts. I nvolvement i n direct artistic and physical education experiences provides the foundation for understanding the teacher's role in enhancing children's thinking and concept exploration in the classroom. Materials fee: $25. Prerequisite: dmission to M.A.lCert Program. (CRN; 10095) Telephone registration is blocked. Registration by program director. EDUC 585

-

Comparative Education

(3 CRI!DITS) JUIl 21 - Jllly 16, 9:30 (/111 - 12:15 pm, A1Tvl')� (M. Ballgll man ) - ADMN-209 Comparison and investigation of materials and cu ltural systems of education throughout the world. Emphasis will be on applying knowledge for greater understanding of the diverse populations in the K- 1 2 educational system. (CRN: 1 0082) EDU

597

-

I

Independent Study

(1-3 CR.I!DITS) May 24 - Al/gust 2 i, I'SA (Staff)

This is an opportunity for projects of varying length related to educational issues or COllcerns of the individual participant and must be approved by an appropriate faculty member and the dean. Prerequisite: Instructor's signature on independent study card prior to registration. EDUC 598 - Studies in Education

(2 0UlD1TS) May 24 - A I/gllst 21J, TBA (Staff) This culminating effort is a research paper or project on an educational issue selected jointly by the student and the graduate adviser. Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program; 544, 545; minimum of 26 hours of coursework leading to the M.A.; consultation with the student's advisor. Prerequisite: Instructor's signature on independent study card prior to registration. £DUC 599 - Thesis

(3-4 OU!DITS)

May 24 - August 20, TBA (StailJ

The thesis problem will be chosen from the candidate's major field of concentration and must be approved by the candidate's graduate committee. Candidates are expected to defend tl1cir theses in a final oral exam ination conducted by their committee. Prerequisite: Instructor's signature on independent study card prior to registration.

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY EPSY 560 ( 0 1 ) - Communication in the Schools

(3 CREDrrs) filly 6 - july 23, 8:30 am - 12:30 pm, MTWRF (5. Yeriall) - ADMN-200

Study of the theories and concepts of those helping skills needed to facilitate problem-solving and personal and academic growth with applications to the dassroom and to interactions with professional

I


ro1Ieagues. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. with Certification program. (CRN: 1 0083 -Blocked) Registration by program director. RPSY S60 (02) - Communication in the Schools

(3 amrrs)

JuJU! 21 - July 2, 8:30 am - 12'00 pm. MIWRF (M Hillis) - ADMN-217 See course description above. Special attention will be given to working with at-risk yo ut h in this section . Registration by program director. EPSY 565 - Advanced Human Development

(4 amrrs) July 26 - August 20, 9-30 am - 12:15 pm, M1WRF (M. Hillis) - ADMN-206 A comparative study of human development at various levels through observallonal assessmenlS using n o n -standardized i nstruments: e.g., so ci o me t r i c sca.les,autobiographies, intCIYiews, interaction a nalysis , and other appropriate measurements. A practicum (a minimum of one hour each week) is req uired in a school or appropriate agency. Prerequisite: Fifth year or graduate status. Special attention will be given to

working in gifted education programs. (CRN: ]0540) EPSY 566 - Advanced

and Learning (3 CEDns)

Cognition

Development

August 2 - 20, 8:30 am - 12:30 pm, Mn"IRF (L McGrow) - ADMN-200

Studyof principles and current thought and research in cognition. devclopment and learning. Applica­ tion to the organization, planning. and the delivery of instruction will be addressed. PJ:erequisire: Admission to the MA. with Certification Program. (CRN: 101 12- Blocked) Registration by program directoL

(G. Williams) - ADMN-209

SPED 394 - Practicum with Behavior Disorders (1 CREDml) July 26 - August 20, TRA (G. Williams) - TBA Experience with c:lriIdren and youthwho have behavior problems will be provided. Must complete 45 dock bours in an educa ti onaJ setting and taken with SPED 393. (CRN: 1(059) SPED 396 - Students with SpeciaJ Inclusive Qassroom

Needs in the

(2 CREDm) July 6 - July 16, 9:00 am - 12:1 5 pm, MIWR (StafJ) - ADMN-208

techniques that pTOmole positive classroom environments within indusionary special educati on settings. (CRN: 1(088)

SPED 399 - Practicum in Special Education (1-2 camm) June 21 - July 16, TRA (StafJ) - TBA

Experience with special education children or adults is offered in a supervised setting. 1 hour credit given to sucx:essful completion of 45 dock hows. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (CRN: 1 000000 Blocked) (To register phone 535-7272.)

( SPED 401 -

Instruction for Learners with Mild

Disabilities

(3 camns) May 24 - June 18, 4:00 - 7:30 pm, TR; and Saturday 8:30 am - 4:30 pm (P' lLitz) - ADMN-215 (Saturday dnsses will meet in ADMN-209)

milddisabilities. Prereq� SPED292. (CRN: 10060)

SPED 292 - Assesen sm t i n Special Education (2 01EDm) July 19 - July 23. 8:30 am - 4:30 pm, MTWRF (G. Williams) - ADMN-217 Knowledge and skills used in fonnal and informal

� tests and pl'<Xl!dures.. Indudes the role of asc;essment in eligibility and program planning.

(CRN: 1 00(6)

SPED 390 - 1ostructional Strategies fur Lcamers

SPED 402 - Practicum: Disabilities

Learners with M ild

( 1 OlEDrr)

May 24 - June 18, TBA (P' lLitt) - TBA Experience with children and youth that have mild disabilities. Must com plete 45 clock hours in an educational setting and taken concurren tly with SPED 401 . (CRN: 100(1)

with Moderate Disabilities

(2 CIlEDns)

SPED 404 - Communication and Collaboration

June 21 - July 16, 3:00 - 5:45 pm, MW (S. Nourse) - ADMN-21 9 Examina tion ofspecific interventions to enhance the acquisition ofknowledge and skilli for thoscstu­ dents who need additional .support to meet their

learning poten tial

(CRN: 1054 1 )

SPED 391 - Practicum:

Learners with Moderate

Disabilities

(l amons) June 21 - JlJly 16. TBA (S. Nourse) - TBA

Taken amcurrentiy witb SPED 390. (CRN:

( SPED 393

-Teaching Students with

Disorders

( 2 CREDO'S) July 26 - August 20, 4:15 - 7:15 pm, TR

10542)

Behavior

neglected children and adolescents. lndudes identifi­ cation and reportingprocedures,and the legal and pro­ fessional responsibilities of the educator. Methods for teachingpersonalsafctywill beaddressed. (CRN: 100(5) «

SPID492 - Strategies (or TeadUng Early l.eamers (2 amm) May 24 - JUlie 18, 4:00 - 7:30 pm. MW (Staff) - .tWAlN-206

Early chlldhood methods, materials, curriculum. and lechniqnes tor teaching children with speciaJ needs. Prerequisite: SPED 490. or consent of instructor(s).

(CRN: 1 0062)

Examination of specific

Examination o f knowledge and skilli needed for academic instmction and remediationofstndenlSwith

S PECIAL EnL·c.\TJO:,\

- lssues in Child Abuse and Neglect (I CUDm) June 12 and June 19. 8:30 am - 4:30 pm. SalUnIily (K. Gerlach) - ADMN-202 Scope and problems of child abuse. neglect, and fumily violerur. mduding behaviors exhibited by abused and

SPED 480

Knowledge and skills related to the instruction and management of leamers with behavior disorders. Must be taken with SPED 394. (CRN: 1 (058)

(3 CRmITS) lIme 21 - lIlly 2, 9;00 am - 12:15 pm. MTWR (K. Gerlach) - ADMN-208 Focus on knowledge and skills necessary [or eflKtive collaboration and su p e rv isi o n with parents, p rofess io nal s. and paraeducators. (CRN: 101 13)

SPED 407 - Cuniculwn.lnstmction. and Technology (4 C1lmns) July 26 - August 20, 9:30 am - 12:15 pm MTWRF (P. Leit:z/L. Riesberg) - ADMN-215 Knowledge and skills needed for teaching academic, social, and adaptive skills to learners with special needs. lndudes writing IFJ>'s, data based instruction. task analysis. and computer assisted instruction . PJ:erequisites: £DUC 4{)0 and SPED 292, 390. 391 or 393, 394 and 40 1 . (CRN: 1 0 1 1 4)

SPED 513 - Language and Literacy Development: Assessment and lnstn.Iction

(4 CJW)11S) July26 -August 20, 2:00 - 4:45 pm, MTIVRF (J. Lewis) - ADMN-215 Understandin g of a wide variety of strategies and tools for assessing and fa c ilit ati n g students' development in rcadi ng, writing . listening. and speaking. Prerequisite: 5 1 0; highly recommended to be taken at the end of the track sessions. Cross li ted with EDUC 413/5 13. (CRN: 1 0592) I: SPED 520/52 1 - Teaching Students with Special Needs in H1ementarylSecondary Classrooms

(2 CUDns) May24 - June J 8, 4:30 - 6:30 pm, A>ffi"IRF (Staff) - RJ\MS..2(Xi

Introduction and overview of services for st udents with speciaI needs in clementary/secondary programs.

Includes procedural and substantive legal issues in special education, program modification, and cIa$room. management. (SPED 520 CRN: 106(6) (SPED 521 CRN: 10607)

SPED 555 - Supervising Paraeducators in Schools (2 CJUlDm) My J 9 - July 2.3, 9:00 am - 4:00 pm, MTWRF (K. Gerlacll/Fnmch) - ADMN-22 1

&amincs the roles and respon.�ilities of supervisors of paraeducators and support staff. Emphasis on

ethical. professional, and legal responsibilities of the supervisor. Discussion ofadministrative practices that improve leamwmk and staff development Open only tolndusivcOassroom cobort (CRN: 10543 -B.Iockfd) (To register phone 535-7272.) « SPED 588 - Legal, Ethical, and Administrative Issues in Special Education (3 aw)Os)

May24 - June J8, 5:30 - 8:30 pm, W (plus two Saturdays) (P. LeitT/G. Williams) - ADMN-221 Investigation of special educat ion administrative practices, pupil placement procedu:res, student staffing, program reimbursement procedures, and federal funding models. Open only to Inclusive Classroom Cohort. (CRN: 1 0544 - blocked) SPED 595 - Special Education Internship

(J -4 CllIDns)

May 24 - August 20, TBA (Staff) - TBA Projects of varying length related to issues in special education. (To register phone 535-7272.)


AN"J'H llO ANTH3JO ANTH 354

ANTlJ 361

ANTII 465 ARTD 1 8 1 ARTD 226 ARTD 230 ARTD 330 ARTD 430 ART D 34 1 (0 1 ) ARTD 34 1 (02) ARTD 365 ARTD 390 810l I I I 810l1Dl 810L 205 8101. 206 810L326 BIOLJ"

810L 5D) BUSA 20 \ 8U5A 202 8USA302 BUSA305 8USA49D BUSA 503 BUSA 504 BUSA 505 BUSA 5 1 0 BUSA 566

BUSA574 USA 595A BUSA 595B ClrEM 104 CH£M IDS CIlE.M 1 20 CHFM 2321234 CHEM l38 CHEM503 COMA 27 1 COMA 326 COMA 3 36 (01) COMA 33 6 (02 ) COMA 385 COMA 39 1 CO MA 395 COMA 490 COMA 500 THEA 4S8 CSCE U 4 CSCE220 CSCE 270 CSCE 4.oo ECON 151 ECON 49 1 ECON 500 I!I) C 20S I!I)UC 4 1 1IS1 I I!I)UC 4 11/51] I!I) UC 4 2 7/S27 I!I)Ue 428/S28 Iill UC 429/S29

rouc (3815)8

eoUC «s wue 410 WUC 475 BDUC485 W UC 49015 10 ED UC 503A W UC 50311 wue sos W UC 5D7 ED UC S09 W UC S)7 W Ue 530 EDUe 544 BD UC 54.S(O I ) EDUC 545(02 ) eoUC 550 wue 551 W UC 555(0 l ) EDUC 555(02 ) eo UC S 59 IIDUCS62 RDUCS63A RDUC S6)C ED UC 564 ED Ue S8S EDUC S97 WUe s98 EDUC 599 IaPSY 560 (0 1) IaPSY 560 (02) laP Y 56S EPSY 566 PED 292 SPRD 390 SPED 391

PRD 39l SPW 394 PW 396 SPW 399 SPED 401 SPED 402 SPED 404 51'£0407 SPIlIH80

----------•••- - , UN E II MAY 14 MAY 14 ----------- .-.-- J UN E 1 8 .-- ----- •• --. , UNE 1 8 MAY 24

' UNE 21

J ULY 26 -------------------------- AUGUST 20

,ULY 19 ------------ , ULY 23

---· -----···------------·----- JULY 1 6

··

MAY 14 ----• ••••••••---••••• , UN E 1 8 ••••---- ,U NE 1 8 MAY H •••- •••• ------. J U NE 1 8 MAT H • ••••••••••- ' UNE 18 MAY 24

JULY 26 ------------------------- AUGUST 20

,ULY 26 -.... ---.-..-------....... AUG UST 20 ,U NE 21 -------------·---····· - ----------·-- ·---- JULY 16 JUNE 11 - ---- ---···---·- ·----------·------··- JULY 1 6 MAY 24 ---- -· -- ·· -· , UN E 1 8 .- .--. --.-•••• JUNE 18 MAY 14 JUNE 21 •• - . - - ---------.--••---- .----------•• J ULY 16 JULY 26 ----.---..........-•••-- AUG UST 2 0 ,UNE 21 -.--.------------------------ ,ULY 1 6 ,UNE 21 ---·· ··---·------ ------------- 'ULY 1 6 JULY 19 ----------- MY 23 ••••. - ,UNE II MAY 24 ·---·-···· IUNE II MAY 24 ,UNE 2 1 .--- - -- -••- -- -.---------.-------- ,ULY 1 6 ,U NE 2 1 - -·· -----·------- -·-------------- ,ULY I S ------- ---. -••• ••- - ••••-- ---------------. , ULY 1 5 MAY 2 5 MAY 29 ---. -.- --- -•• .•--- ••••• - ----.- .--- , ULY 3 ,ULY 7 ------------------------------.--- AUGUST I I MAY 14 ------••-. -- •.-. -.-- .-••--.-- ,UNE 1O • • •--- •• - -----.----.- ,U NE 50 MAY 14 , ULY 7 ---------------------------.------- AUGUST I I , U I.Y 8 ----------------------.--------. AUGUST 1 2 MAY 27 -- -- --.--. -- - ••- - ----- - --- - - 'UNE 26 JULY 10 -------------------------------- AUGUST 14 'UNE 21 - -- ---- ---- -.-.-----.--------------- 'ULY 1 6 MAY 24 ----.- .----• •• • • --. , UN E 18 ' U NJ! 11 -- ---------- -·--·- -·- -- ---- ---------- 'ULY 1 6 ,UNE 2 1 ···------ ----- -------------------- ,ULY 16 -- .---- ,U N E 1 8 MAY 2 ,ULY 1 9 ----------- ,ULY 2 J • ••------•• ---- - -. -- --------- --- -- ,ULY 2 1 MAY 24 ---,ULY 26 ---------------·-----------AUGUST 20 M 24 -----••••-•••••-. - , UN E 1 8 ••- ----.- -- -------. - ------ ---.----------------- , ULY 21 MAT 24 ,ULY 26 ------------.--·-····-·-·.-AUGUST 20 -- · -· -· ·· · - - JUNE I 8 MAY H --- --- - .- - ••• , UN E 18

MAY 24

'ULY 26 -·------------------------AUGUST 20 ,ULY 6 ---------- ------------.------ AUGUST 1 0 , UNE 21 .-------- .------••--- - -- --- - --••--.-. JULY 1 6 MAY 14 ---- ••• --------- .-- ••••••• -. ---- --- -• ••--- JULY 2 ••••-••-------- JUNE 1 8 MAY 24 ,ULY 6 --.-----.-----••----------------. - A UGUST I ] MAT 14 ----•• • ••• • ----- JUN E 1 8 JUNE 11 --· ---·--··--···- ---·------···- JULY 16 --- ••---- J UNE 1 8 MAY 24 ---•••••---------••• --------- JULY 2 MAT 24 ----•••• •--- JUNE 1 8 MAY 24 IUNU1 ----------••--. JULY 2 JU LY 16 -------·----------·--AUGUST 20 JULY 19 ------------ J ULY 2J JULY 16 ---------·---------------AUGUST 20 JULY 26 ------------------------AUGUST 20 JULY 19 --------.--- JULY 23 JULY 16 --· ------·-----·--------- AUGUST 20 MAY 14 ---- -····-- -··--- - , UNE 18

MAY 24

MAY 14 MAY 24

--.---

-•••-- ,UNE II

JULY 12 ------.--.-- JULY 2 3

,UNE 1 8 -- . ---- •. - ,UNE 1 8 E 2 1 ------------ -·----------------·----- ,ULY 1 6 ,UN E 21 --· ----- - - - - - ------------------- ,ULY 1 6

--- -···- -- -

I UNE l1 ·--· -··- --·--·-· ----·- -----------· - - ,ULY 16 , UNE 21----------------------------------- ,ULY 16 ,ULY 26 ---------·--------·--·-----A UGUST 20 ,ULY 6 ------.------ ,ULY 16 'UNU I ----· ------------------------------ JULY 16 , UNE 2 1----·---------------·----------------- JULY 1 6 MAY 24 ---- --.-- . -.------ ,UNE I I ,U NE 2 -·-------------------------------------·-·-- ,ULY 2 1 'ULY 8 -----------.---------.---------- AUGUST 6

JULY 1 2 ---------.- ,ULY 23 ,UNE 21 ----- - -- ----.------ ,UlY 2 ,ULY 8 ----------------------.---------- A UGUST 6 J UNE 14 --•••----. ------ . -- ----- ,ULY 2 MAY 14 ----.---- -- -- - •••• --•• --.--- -------- - -••--- , ULY 2 , UNE 8 -.-- •••• • _-. ,UN1I 17 ,ULY 26 ------------ JULY 30 JUNE 11 ·-··--- -·-·--·---·-- ·-·----------------·---- J ULY 16 - --. --. ------ ---.---. -- - -- ------.- ••-.-•••-------------------.----------------------.----- AUGUST 20 MAY MAT _ ----.--.------.-----.-.-- -- •• -.-.-- .--- -•.---.-------.-------------•••----------------------- - AUGUST 20 --- -- . ------- - ---. -- - . --. --- - ------------------- -•• -- -- -----·--·---- -------------------------- A UG UST 20 MAY 24 ,ULY 6- ---------- ,ULY 2 J ,UNU 1 - -- - ---••----.--- ----- JULY 2 'ULY 26 -------------------------AUGUST 20 AUGUST 2--- AUGUST 20 ,ULY 19 ----.-.----- ,ULY 2J , UNE 21 ·-· ------ -- ··--------------·-- ,ULY 16 ,UNE 21 --- ·-- -- ----·-- -·----·---------··-- , ULY 16 ,ULY 26 -------------------------AUGUST 20 ,ULY 26 -·---------------------·---AUGUST 20 ,ULY 6 ------------- JULY 1 & ,UNE 21 --·----··· ··-·-··----------------·--- 'ULY 16 MAY 24 ---- - - - - -- ••- ,UNE I I -- - - ---.-•• ,UNE 18 MAl J4 ,UNE 2 1 ----- - -- ----.--• •---- ,ULY 2 ,ULY 26 ··---- ------------------AUGUST 20 JUNE 1 2 AND ,UN E 19


Ala)"

(C 1L A § § lE § SPlOO 492 SPED 5 1 3 SPHD 555 S PED SlUI

PED 59S SPED S96 SPIID 597 PIlI> 598

SPHD599

IIDUCSOIA

EDUC 50 1 ENGL 2 16 ENGl 225

ENGl227/327 ENG l 2S 1 EN G l 30 1

ENGl S0 3 ( 0 1) ENG!. SOl (02)

ENVT 50) GOOS 1 0 2 GEOS 425

1iEI!D 292 HIST359

H"lS1' 385

H I ST 399 HlST 46 1 HIST 503

CLAS 250 LANG 445 LANG 446 LANG 470 LANG4?5 SIGN 10J SIGN 102

SPAN 102 PAN 20 1

MFrH 505

MFrH51 2 MFTH 5 1 9 M FllI 5 20 MfTH 5 2 1

jZt l1 C

M AY J4 --------------- - JUNE 1 8

Jtt ly

A ugust

J ULY 26 ------------------------------- AUGUST 20

JULY 19 ------------ JULY 23 -----------.- J UNE 18 ...........- ...... .......--....- .. .. .. . .....---.. -......--.-----••-......-......------.- ••------.-•• -------- AUGUST 2 0

MAY :14 MAY 24

JUNE 2 1·--···----······-···---·-·········-·----·····--- JULY 1 6 •••---•••-•••••••• --• • ••-••• - • • • -••••••-•••••-• • ••••••••••••••-••••• ----•••••••• --•••••••- ----.....-----..... AUGUST 2 AY :14 0 . .. -.......... ---....---.-.-..-...-- ....-..---........-..-................-..-........---......------....-- AUGUST 20 MAY 24 MAY _- ---.... - - .. ...- .--. .-.- ........--------........--...-..----- .....-----....... ------.... ---- ......------••••----- AUGUST 20

JUN E 24 .......- -........- .. -....----.... --..------... J ULY 1 4 JULY 1 9 -- -- -.... --- JULY 23 J ULY 26 ------....--------..---.. --... AUG UST 20 ... --... --... JUN MAY 24 ----E 18 JULY 26 ...... ....--......------....--- AUG UST 20 JUN E 2J----.. ·-..·-- ·· .. ····--....·---.. •....----·.. IU lY 1 6

-- .-........-.............................. --.... -----.... JULY 2 1 MAY :14, ----.. JULY 1 9 ........•. .• JULY 23 JULY 1 9 .. -. .......- JULY 23 JULY 1 9 ...... --.. -. JULY 23 M AY :14 --- - . -...---. . ... JUNE 18

JULY 1 9 .. -----·.... --. .--- .. .. ---···.. • ..----· ... .----- AUGUST 20 J UN E 7 •••••• ••••••• - J UNE I I JUNE 2 1·····.. --.. ··-·-······. . • .. •. .• . . ----···..• . .- JULY 1 6 JUNE 2 1·-........ ·--·-· ......·-- .. -·-------..--. . --- JULY 1 6 M AY 2 4· ---- -··--··---·----· -·---·--- ..--·--..·----- -· ------------..-------------·--·. .------------••--.--------. ---- AUG UST 20 . .... .. --- ... --.----- ....----.-.--••• -.--....--•• ----.--•• ------ ... --.---.. -- .. -- .. -- •• ------- •••• ---- AUGUST 20 M AY 2 J ULY 19 ----.--....- JULY 23 M Y24 ---- - -----• • ----. JUNE 1 8 JULY 26 .----- ---- ...------.. -----.... AUG UST 20

24

. .-- ......- JUN !! 1 8 .. .-- JlINE 1 8 --. ---.--... - JUNE 1 8 MAY 24 MAY :14 --- -----•• -.. .----.- JUNE 18 JUNE 2 1 ·....·---......·----·---·-··. . . .. .---·-......- JULY 1 6 ,UN E 21 .. .. --·· . .- .. --....- . ............. • ..• J ULY 1 6

MAY

MAY 2 4

. . . ...-.-.. JUNE 1 8 JUNE 22 .. . .-...----.... - . . - -• •--... -..------.....----..-..... ------....--------..-------... ---- AUGUST 1 2 ....---.... ---...... - .. --• • JlINE 30

MAY 24

MAY 26 Y 24--.

M fT H 522 MfTH 523

- ..--.......-------....... -.....--.....----...... ---- .......----.-.....---...... ------... -----... AUGUST 20 M AY 24__ .--. -..---.-.. --.......-.--..... ----....-.. ----.--....----......-----..-... -----..... ------....--------. . AUG UST 20 M AY 14---- -·-·- ·......--·-··. .• . . -···· ..·-- .. •... .··-----....·------·-...----........------....------.....------.... AUGUST 20 .- .... -...... -.--.... --...... -.---.....-.. ---........---........---..-...----..-----..-...--- AUGUST 20 M AY 24--. . . - ........--....-....-....... - - .--.-.-.-......----...... -----.....----....-.-------.-.---------.--- AUGUST 2 MAY 2 0

MI'TH 599

MAY 14

MFrH5 24

MATH

1St

MAY �.-•• -.- ..- - . .-.--....-.-. . . ...- . . . . . . . . . .- ----••-- ---.... -....---.-..-.----...... ------. --.---------------- AUGUST 20 ..... . .. _ _..._ .. _ . .. ... . _ •• _._ .. .. . .__ ....__ ••••••• _____m• •_ . __ .....___...... ---- .. -....----- •• AlIGUST 20

M ATH 223

MAY :14

MATH 311

M AY 24

MATH H I

MATI1 50)

MUSI 1 20 M US I 202 - 2 1 9

MUSI 3 27 MUSI 34I A

M US J 402-41 9 M USI SOI A MU SI 5 0 1 8

NURS471

NURS415

NURS 476

NUllS 591 PHil 1 0 1 (0 1 ) PHI L 1 01(02)

PUll 228 PHl1 325 PllID 1 00 PIlED 1 5 1

PI:!ED 162

PIlED 165 P HlID 1 17 PlfED 186 PHED 1 91

PHED 200 (oIl PI:!ED 100 (02) PHED 2 1 7 PlIED 134 (01) PHED 234 (02)

PHEDl1S PRlOO 322 ( 01 )

I'HED 322 (02) PliED )60 PHt;D(OI

I'Hl'.O 480 PllElH91 PH£D 499 PtrnD 591

P}lED 599 PRYS 1 1 0

POLS 1 0 1 1'OLS 368 POLS 503

PSYC 350 PSYC 35 2 PSYC 40 5

PSYC «O PSYC 462

PSYC 493 REU III REU 132 RI!U 2 1 2 REU 215 RELl 1 3 2 (01) R.EU H2 (02) IU,Ll 364

SO C W 390

SOCI HO

SOCI 336 STAT 2 3 1 STAT Z41

JUNE 22

-

--

....-...--.---- .......- ...--- -.-......-......... ----........ ---. .... -- --.......- ...-.... AUG UST 1 9

.--..- .... ---. J UN E 18 J UNE 21 .. ·---..-....-..• . . ·-· .. .. --- --·....---..- JULY 1 6 .-...-.. . . J UNE 1 8

JU LY 1 9 --- "''''-- JULY 23

JUN E 2 1 - .. .... .. -. . -........--·-··----....--·- JULY 16 ... _.. .. .. . . _.._ ... . . _ .... .. .. _._ .. _______......_ .. __.........__... m._m. .... .. .. ---.......... -..... AUGUST 20 . -- .. --...........- ..................---......... --........---......-----... -----...... --- .. --.... -- AUGUST 20 JULY 1 9 .. -- ........ JULY 23

M AY 2 t MAY 1 4

MAY 24__--- ... ..-.......-... -.... -... -.-... -...... -,-.....-.--.......------.....----...... .-.......-------....------- AUGUST 20 JULY . -..-...... --- JULY 9 JULY 6 ------..----. JULY 9 . . .. . .-. . .-• • ---. .. ... ...-.-- .----••--.... ....-----...-..---.. . - ..---....-m______.... _ ...• .... • AUGUST 1 MAY 26 8 .... --.. · 6 . . · U .. NE 1 MA 111 ----·-- -.. J

.._.._ ...__......_ _ ____. . . . . . . . . . . ._._.._...__ •____m.... _______.. _____••••----- .......----- A UGUST 1 8 .......... .. ..--..-.. J U N !! ] O

__ ...

M AY 16 M AY 24 MAY 24

....--- -- - . . . . . .-..-.. -- ........ ------ ....-••- JULY 2 1

JUNE 21--. .• ..·- ..•..·-- ... . •.. ·---·..... ...- JULY 1 6 JULY 26 --.-..-. .----.....------....-- AUGUST 20

M AY 14 .- .--- -. . J lINE 4 MAY :14 -.--.--.. --..... ,UNE 1 8 MAY 24 ---· - . . • ......·-- .. JUNE 1 8 ...-- ...... JUN E 1 8 MAY 14 -- . M AY :14 .- -.-.......... -... JUNE 1 8 M AY 24 -- -- .. - ..... ... ... JUNE 18 .-..-.... J UN E 1 8 M AY :14

MA 15 - .• MAY 29

'UNE 21·- .. .. ----........-·. .···-...... --·· ....• JULY 1 6 J lINE 21 .. ·-.. -. .. .- ..- - ..--. .. .. .--. .----- .. .. ..• JULY 16 'U lY 19 --------.-- .. ---.... ---....... AUGUST 1 3

JUNE 7 .--... -....- ... JUNE I I JUNE 21 ... --.. .-...... JUNE 25 JlINE I - .-- -........ JUNE I I JUNE 21 .....--.--.-..........--................. JULY 2 JULY 6 ----.....- --- J ULY 1 6 M AY 2_- .. -·--·--·.. • .. ... .. .....• .-.. - .. ...... -• • . -.--- ........... -.......----....... -........... -........... ---... AUGUST 20

AUGUST 1 6 - AUGUST 20 M AY 24 -- .--- .... - . .. ..... JU NE 1 8 .-.--- ..-- ............. -.---.............-.-....----....... -----.....----.......----... --------.... --.. -- AUGUST 20 M AY 2 M AY 2 4- . . ·--. . --..-.. ·-..·--.. ·--···--···.. -··-· .-... -.....------... ------......-----.... ------ .....------....-------- AUG UST 20

---..... -........... --...-.......... --... ---- ....... ----........ ----......----.......-.....-.--.---.. AUGUST 20 MAY 24 - ... ... . . . . . . ..--... -............-.-... -........----......... --........ ---- ......----..........-....... -----..... AUGUST 20 MAY :14-JlIN t: 21 ...-........ -.....-. .-..... ---.-.....---.. JULY 29 .. ..---.-.. -.......... --.... -.-...--...........-----. JULY 2 1 MAY 24 . .- --·. .·-· 'UNE I 8 .. Y 24

JULY 19 ......·----- JULY 23

MAY 24 --.--...-.. -... -- .....- JUNE 1 8 JUNE 2 1 ...... ·--..--· .... -·-----......·---.. JULY 1 6 JULY 19 --.. --...... JULY 23

JULY 26 .-.-----.- .. ------.... ----- AUG UST 19

JUNE 2 1 .. -··-......·-.. -- ..·-. .•. . •. .·-------...... JULY 1 6 -.. -- -.. JUNE 1 8 M AY 2<11 . .-- . . .-..- J UNE 1 8 M AY 24 ..-.......-.-.-...-... ........-.-.-.............--.. JULY 2 1 MAY :14 M AY 24 -

----

JUNE 2 1 -.... ......- .... --..... -........-----... JULY 1 6 .- .......- JUN E 1 8

J ULY 26 ..-------.. ------.... ----- AUGUST 20 JULY 1 9 . --- ..-.--....... -... -.-------....-.. ---- ........ --.....------......-----.... --------... AUGUST 2 7

JULY 6 .... ------....-.-----..--------..-.-------.-..- AUGUST 1 3 JUNE 2 1 -....•..--....·-----.. ·-. .- -··. .··------.. JULY 1 6 MAY 24 ... -••- --- ... -. .-. ." 'liNE 1 8 JUNE 2 1 .. . .• •... .-·-··--.. ·---·-.... ·- . ... ----..•••• JULY 1 6

MAY 14 - - . -.-.......-.. -.. - .. ...... JUN E 18 JUNE 21 .. -. . -· .. ---·-·... .·-- . .. .• .. -----......---- JULY 1 6


SPED 596 - Technology and Special Education

(2 CU'.Dns)

JUM 2 1 - July 16, 1 1:00 am - 12:15 pm, M7WRF (Staff) - UCfR- I40 Examines tedmological advancements as they apply to the education of learners with special needs. Open only to Inclusive Classroom Cohort. (CRN: 1 0545 Blocked, To register phone 535-7272.) SPED 597 - Independent Study

(l..( amns)

May 24- August 20, TBA

(StajJ)

Projects ofvarying length related to trends and issues in special education are available, and must be approved by an appropriate faculty member and th e dean. (To register phone 535-7272.)

SPED 598 - Studies in Education

(2 amns)

uses f tedmo1ogy to enhance YI)ur fureign langw!,'l! curriculum. The maj rily of the time will b spent witll hands· on development of materials that you can take \vitb )'Ou at the end of the coucsc- No PI1!\'wU!> experience with technology is reqUIred. For more information, t:ontact Bridget Yaden (253) 53r--8330. hrn

(2

f

\

OUSUOI'

HOtmS)

UJU 501 - Jwle 28 - July 2 This workshop would lOcus on individual as.essment ami menl ring in ma thematics WIth a focus on NCfM Standards and Washlngton FARCs Participants will p ractice new ways of diagno�ing each sturumt's understanding of math concepts such as place value. operations tratt:glcs, fractions, and decimah. Then they will develop appropriate learning approaches to support thei ntudents in imp roving their under­ standing and skill.s in mathematic.\. Co l: 300. Fur information, contact George Gagnon (253) 535-7287.

May 24- August 20, TBA (Staff) This culminating experience may be a research paper or projea on an educational issue selected jointly by the student and the graduate adviser. ]t will be reviewed by the student's graduate commitlee. (To register phone 535-7272.)

Caribbean

(3 camns)

May 24 - Augu..<t 20, TllA (Staff) The thesis problem is chosen from the candidate's major field of concentration and must be approved by the candidate's graduate committee. Candidates are expected to defend their thesis in a final oral exa m i n ation cond ucted by their com m i t tee. (To register phone 535-7272.)

CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSES f r informalio about other Continuing Education courses that will be offered this summer, fur more information, please phone (253) 535-727 T", MACoMMUNnY REsolJRU1 \ ORKSIIOP (witl! the Taco",Q-Pj� County a,umber uf Qmmlt:TCc) (9 Q urn CllEDrr lIotJllS) lID C 50I A )un " 4 - My 14 The Ta oma Community Re.soul'CC'i Workshop i a continuingeduC3tion nincquarterhouroolllliC de;j� t acquaint the educator:. of Pierce CounlY ..... ith an array of businCS! and industry resources that they might integrate into kaming cxpcnences 6 r studen\3 at all grade level . TIle three-week course meEt:iclaily and oonsists of multiple field trips to local bru.incsses. Slucit:nlSwiIldevel p curricuIar modulr!S for thcirown c1as.'iCS as well as engage one .moth .:r In refit: tion a nd discussion of their understanding of t h e c;;o m positi()n, diversity, operation , and economic impract of business and industry iu their rommunity. (.A)s!.: . 545. Contact Judy rIydcn at (253) 862-6877 for more information and for registration. J

FORDe. lA!' . TJ mJtIR) ) /11/ ' 19 1

lDIiY I.

(4 QUU1D EDUC 501

THE

ENGL 2 1 6 - Short Stories from Africa and the

(4 atmos) July 26 - August 20, 2:00 - 4:45 pm, MTWRF (8. Temple-Thurston) - ItDMN-2IO

SPED 599 - Thesis

E:\GI.1SH

a

CJ

ROO I

Thi' i a one-week workshop designed primarily for junior and senior high c;;h ool foreign language teachers. Teachen; of other courses, such as S<x:ial Studies, thaI also integrate foreign languages into their curricul um are welcome as welL We will explore

Learn more about Africa and the Caribbean through reading and discussing short stories written by writers from different parts of these areas. We will fiuniliarize ourselves with aspects of their cultures and "hearing the people tell their own stories" we will better understand t heir perspec tives on issues a nd relationships that affect their 1iv15. Our understanding will be enhanced by some video presentations to give US a sense of the history and landscape of the regions. We will also understand more about the shorl story itself. Why write short stories rather than novels or poetry? And what makes a short story good? After enjoying and rommenting on the stories we read in class, our task will be to write a short story owselves

using what we have learned about story writing through readi ng. (eRN: 10600) ENGL 225 - Autobiographlcal Writing

(4 CREDns) May 24 - June I8, 9:30 am - 12'15 pm, MTWRF (D. Seal) - ADMN-21 1A Reading autobiography and writing parts of one's own, with an emphasis on how writing style and per­ sonaI identitycomplement each other. (CRN: 1 0527) ENGL 227/327 - Imaginative Writing I - Fiction! Imaginative Writing n - Fiction

(4 CIlI!Dns)

July 26 - August 20, 2:30 - 5:20 pm, MTWRF (Staff) - ADMN-211A

Students will work on various fiction writing tech­ niques and over the term will complete one solid, sua:e;sfuI short story. Exercises on cbaracter and plot development, writing dialogue and description, and practice refining writing styles will romplernent class workshops on students' work and individnaJ ronferenceswith the instructor. Students will also keep a writer's journal. (ENGL 227 CRN: 1 0 1 2 1 ) (ENGL 327 CRN: 1 0 1 22)

ENGL 251 - Traditions in British literature

(famm) June 21 - July 16, 9:30am - 12:15 pm, MTWRF (T. Campbell) - ADMN-204A A trip through 1 9th and 20th Century British literary history focusing on what could be called the "critical" tradition: writers who challenged existing sl:3Ddards, questioned orthodox values, articulated alternative view5 of literature, nature, gender, god, sexuality. Weill read early feminists, romantic revolutionaries, Victorian aesthetes, modem iconocIasts, and post-modern revisionists. (CRN: 1 0 1 23 )

� ENGL 30 I - Shakespeare

(4 awms)

May 24 - July 2 I, 6:30 - �.30 pm, MW (S.L Jun.sen) - ADMN-214 Th

Renaissance is the Golden Age of English

literature, the theater its most :remarkable literary foml, and Shakespeare---perhaps--the greatest of

all English authors. How can any writer live up to this reputation? 1n this course we will be reading a representative sampling of Shakespeare's plays (comedy, tragedy, history, romance) as well as tackling some ofthe plays that present "pmbtems" for rontemporary audiences/readers. In addition to our reading, we will inrorporate a Dlllnber of film vemons of the plays into the course so that we can see how Shakespeare's work has been "staged," reinterpreted and even reinvented by modem direaon; furcontemporaryaudienas. And we'll ask how and whether, after aU, Sbakespeare does 1M up to bis reputation. (CRN: 1 0 125) HNGL 503 (0 1 ) - Advanced Placement 1nstitute: English Literature

(2 CREDmi) July 19- July 23, 9:00 am - 4:00 pm, MTWRF (F McQwule) - ADMN-208

Suitable for experienced or inexperienced AP teachm, both literature and Composition teachers or Language and Composition teachers. Although the AP Examination unites teachers and students in a common endeavur, every AP dass is diflerenl This week-long course enables teachers to share their diverse experiences. All are encouraged to bring materials, and all leave with a wealth of ncw ideas. In addition, the instructor has organized sessions on a novel . a short story, a film, selected poom, and a Shakespeare play. All of these sessions employ various models of collaborative learning and some brief writing assignments- Although a variety of writing assignments are discussed through the week, there is also a session devoted to the sort of timed writing required by the AP Examination. In the final session, participants learn to read and grade an essay question using actual AP standards. Course fee: $670, includes tuition and materials fee. ( CRN: 10246 - Blocked) To register phon e (253) 535-7U9. ENGL 503 (02) - Advanced Placement Institute:

English wguage and Composition (2 CREDm) July 1 9 - July 23. 9:00 am - 4:00 pm, MTWRF (B. James) - ADMN-2 16

Prose Style analysis is the focus of this coun;e. We will do a variety of dose reading strategies of I.iter.rture and essay. We will look at the construction of idea/theme/motif and how that ronstruction creates meaning. We never get away from the intent of the author. What we will do is examine how


the author develops meaning through style. I will share with you many models of prose style analysis, and the institute will be very hands-on. You will take away from the week of discussion and writing specific strategies and selections that you can use in your classrooms in September. There is no one right way to teach Advanced Placement English, but there are many skills and strategies to help make om students more successful in the class and on the AP exam ination. This week we come together as a learning community to see how we can make AP Language more inclusive and less exclusive to our student population. We will discuss the basics of the examination, what it looks like, and how it is scored. We will also participate in a training session, which simulates the training of the teachers who read and score the exam fo r The College Board. Most importantly we will discuss strategies fo r analyzing style in literature. Course fee: $670, includes tuition and materials fee. (C RN : 1 0247 - Blocked) To register phone

(253) 535-7 1 29.

ENVTRONMENTAL SCI ENCE ENVT 503 - Advanced Placement Workshop Environmental Sdence

(2 CRJIDJJS)

JlIly /9 - July 23, 9:00 11m - 4:00 pm, kmVRF (Stam - RCTR- 1 08 The institute is designed to help teachers prepare Advanced Placement Environmental Science (A.P'E.S.) COmscs. The focus of the workshop is to pro ide guidelines, which will enable teachers to effectively plan and present a cohesive, comprehen­ sive, and engaging course. All aspects of this new AP COUnie will be explored in detail, including the goals of the COurse, planning and organizing the course, an outline of the course content, techniques and strategies for teaching the course, textbooks and lab manuals, laboratory and field investigations, equipment, ,,1Iabussuggestions, field trip suggestions, and other resources which will enhance each teacher's environmental science program, such as book�, journals, videos, software, agencies and orga­ nizations. Participants will also be introduced to many laboratory exercises and will actually perform ten to twelve of these labs during the week. In addition to methodologies, strategies, and laboratory suggestions, tin1e will be devoted to consideration of the AP exam, relating course content and course design to the exam. Course fee: $670, includes tuition and materials fee. (C : 10249 - Blocked) To register phone (253) 535-7129

GEOSCI ENCES GEOS 1 02 - General Oceanography

(4 CRJIDns)

May 2"' - jW1C 18. 8:00 11m - 12: 1 5 pm. MTRWF (5. Benham) - RCTR- 109 The course is an introduction to oceanography. We will examine the biological, geological, physical, and chemical relationships in the oceans; and discuss how plate tectonics affects change to the cont inents and the ocean basins. We will also examine the origin of estuaries. coastlines, and continental shelves, and d iscuss why natu ral disastenicauseso much damage to some coastiines, but not others. Yo u will d iscover the coastal

surroundings of Washington through laboratory studies and field trips to Puget Sound and the Straits of Juan de Fuca. Field trips are required. Lab Fee: $40. (CRN: 10360)

GEO 425 - Geologic Field Mapping

(5 CREDrrs)

Jllly l Y - AI/gust 2(), 8:00 mn -6:0U pm, J'vlTWRFS (B. Lewes) - TBA Designed fo r students with a serious interest i n mapping and i n terpreting rock depositional envi ronments and geologic structures. Combines a survey of regional field geology with a series of local mapping, cross section, and air photo interpretation projects in the Puget Lowland, Cascades, and Columbia River Basalt Plateau. Th1s course is designed for undergraduate geology majors. Graduate students without prior summer field camp experience are also welcome. Bring sleeping bag, towels, toiletries, etc. Non-refundable registration fee of $5 0.00 is fully applicable toward tuition. For further details, contact Dr. Brian Lowes, Paciflc Lutheran University, Tacoma,WA 98447-0003. (CRN: 10202) Telephone registration blocked. Please phone (253) 535-7377 for registration information. *Involves special fees and costs: $545. Other fees may include an optional PLU dorm room or meal card. Please note: students will be off campus for several days to two weeks on field trips.

HEALTH EDUCATION <[ H.EIID 292 - First Aid (Sport Safety)

(I CRJIDn's) jlme 7 - Jllne 1 1 , 6:30 - 9:30 pm, MMRF ( . NirllO!SCIIl ) - OGYM- 1 02 Meets requirements for the American Red Cross Standard First Aid and Personal Safe ty. Activity Fee: $ 1 0. (CRN: 1 0 1 53 )

H I STORY HlST 359 - History of Women in the U.S.

(4 CItlIDITS) Jlml? 2 1 - Jldy 1 6, INS - I I :30 alll, MTWR

(B. Km ig) - ADMN-202 A focused, thematic examination of issues and evidence related to women's experiences from the colonial period to the present. (CRN: 1 0546) H IST 385 - Twentieth-Century Russia, 1 890-2000

(4 CRJIDrrs)

July 28 - AJigust 22, 9:30 11111 (J. Morris) - RA}'!{S-204

12: 1 5 pm, MTWRF

This course will cover the most important political, so­ cial, and economic developments in Russian history during the twentieth century. Topics to be covered in­ dude the Russian Revolution and Civil War, the rise to power ofienin and Stalin, Russia's role in World War II, the emergence of the Cold War, and the collapse of the Soviet Empire. (CRl'l: 106 1 2) HTST 399 - Internship

( 1-6 CREDrrs)

May 24 - August 20, TBA

(A. Martinson)

Arrangements must be made with instructor prior to May 1 5; students must have completed one course in history and one year in college; tally card signed by instructor must accompany registration. Internship

work and study processed through Cooperative Education. (CRN: I 0 1 3 6 - Blocked) For fu rther information and to register phone (253) 535-7648.

- History of Wes t and Northwest ( 4 CIU!Drrs) May 24 - AI/gust 20, TBA (A. Mllrtinson) - Nisqllally Plllil1.S Rvonz (Lill R-207) HIST 461

Individualized study i n hometowns. Requires extensive research time in the hometowns. Orienta­ tion sessions during last week of May. Course meets teacher education requirements. By instructor's permission only. Restricted enrollment. (CRN: 1 0 1 35 - Blocked ) . For further information and to register phone (253) 535-7648. HIST 503 - Advanced Placement Institute: History

(2 CRJIDrrs)

July 1 9- JlIly 23, 9:00 11. m. - 4:00 p. 711., MTWRF (E. W Carp) - ADMN-206 Main ideals and interpretations ofAmerican history from colonial times through the early 1 990s are the focus of this course. Mornings are organized chrono­ logically with each day devoted to a period ofAmerican history. Afternoons are used for informal discussions on organizing the Advanced Placement course, teaching methods, reading loads, written assignments and other issues faced by AP History teachers. Par ticipants who have had some experience teaching AP History are encouraged to bring with them samples of their teaching materials to share with the class. Course fee: $670, includes tuition and materials fee. (CRN: 10243) Telephone registration blocked. Please phone (253) 535- 7 1 29 to register.

LANG UAGES - Classical Mythology (4 CREDITS) May 24 - Jlllle 18, 9:3U 11 III - 12: 15 pm, lvfTWRF (E. 'elsoll) - ADMN-2 1 O CLAS 250

A study o f mythology originating i n the texts of such Greek and Roman authors as Homer, Hesiod, virgil, and Ovid. All readings are in English, but students with other language abilities are encouraged to use them. Subjects covered will include: kinds o f t raditional stories, systems o f interpretation, creation myth, heroic myth, and major myths of the Greek and Roman pantheon. Students will do work with both texts and on the internet; evaluation will consist of reading , qu izzes, a writing portfolio developed from the readings, and a final project in comparative mythol­ ogy involving a culture of their choice growing from the writi.ng assignments. (CRN: 10547)

LANG 445 - M e t h o d s for Tea ch i n g Foreign Languages and English as a Second Langu age

(3 CREDITS) july 26 - Augllst 20, 1 0:00 am (51 if) - ADMN-208

12:00 pm, MTWRF

Theories and related techniques for teaching languages K- 1 6 within their cultural context, including direct methods, content-based instruction. proficiency orientations, an.d the integrat,ion of technologies. Attention given to variations in approach for those teaching English as a second language. No prereq­ uisites. Required for teacher certification in a language and for minor in English as a Second Language. Strongly recommended for elementary major in a language. Cross-listed with EDUC 445. (CRN: 10594)


LANG 446 - Theories of Language Acquisition

(4 C1tE1>1l:S ) May 24 - june 18, 8:00 - 10:45 am, MTWRF (R. SwclIsorl ) - A DMN-2 12

i n l i s t e n i n g , s p e a k i n g, rea d i n g, a n d w r i t i n g . ( C R.!'J'; 1 0 1 40 )

Linguistics is the scientific analysis of language; like any olher di ci line that we might wish to study,

langua ge also has a "system" or struct ure, and the thrust of this course is to attemp t an examination of language in general, and of E nglish in particular. This course w i l l cover p ri n iples of languag e a c q u is i t i o n with speci.fic classroom applications.

PAN 1 0 2 - Elemen tary panish (4 CREDITS) Jrme 21 - full' 1 6, 9:30 mn - 12: 1 5 Pill, MnVRF (L. Mer/zinger-Sjoblom) - ADMN- 2 1O A continuation of Elementary Spanish 1 0 1 , the course is designed to develop basic communicative proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. ( CRN: 1 0 1 3 9)

Speci al attention given to the needs o f diffe rent

language groups in acquiring English.

Comparison of

sound systems and s tructures o f languages ESL

teachers a te most likelyto encounter.

0 prerequisites.

Required for minor in English as a Second Language. ( RN: 1 0 1 4 5 )

([ LA N G 470 - Curriculum, Materials and lnstruction for Te achi ng English as a Second Lmguage

(4 CIU!Orrs)

lB, 4:30 - 7:00 pm, MTWRF (K. lUll/tOil) - ADMN-204B

May 24 - june

SPAN 201 - Intermediate Spanish

(4 CREDITS) - June 1 8, 9:30 - 12: 1 5 am, MTWRF (B. Yaden) - ADMN-208

May 24

A continuation of elementary Spanish; reading selections which reflect the Hispanic cultural heritage as well as contemporary materials. Lab attendance required. (eRN: 10548)

MARRIi\G £ & FAMILY THERAPY

Exami n a t i o n of cu r ri c ul um , assess ment, and instruction in bilingual learning-teaching contexts. Critical analysis oflanguage teaching methodology,

MFTH 505 - Social Science Research Methods

Special emphases on the h i storical and socio­

(4 CREDUS) June 22 - August 12, 3:00 - 6:20 pm, TR (f. Schiller) - ECAM-027

language disaimination relevant to literacy instruction.

and bibliographic studies. Topics include formulating

implementation of materials, and

assese sm nt

designs.

pol i ti c al contexts of ESL instruction and issues of

Cross-Ii ted with EDUC 470. (CRN: 1 0596)

Basic research concepts applied to laboratory, tleld, re earch questions, research designs, data gathering techniques, analysis of data, and thcoryconstru tion.

LANG 475 - Practicum in Teaching English as a Second Language

(1 CREDITS)

May 24 - lime 1 8, 9:30

(K Sltalltoll) - TBA

-

Prerequisite:

LANG/EDU

445

(co ncurrent \\�th lANGIEDUC 470). (CRN: 1 0598)

« SIGN

rather than conducting research. Tuition: $490 per credit h ur. (CRN; 1 0 1 87)

1 0:45 (lin, MTWRF

Extended experience and participation in an assigned SL setti ng .

Emphasis will be on understanding and evaluation

1 0 l - Sign Language

(4 CREDITS)

MFTH 5 1 2 - .Professional Studies in Marriage and Fam.ily Therapy

(3 CRFJ)ITS)

May 26 - june 30, 3:()0 - 6:20 pm, W (also Friday, JUl1e 1 8 all day) (c. York) - ECAM-027

Professional ethics and Washington State laws, which

lime 18, 6:00 - 9:30 pm, MTWR (1. Curtis) - ADlvIN-21O

affect clinical practice, are studied including ram ily law,

This course is an introduction to the structure of American Sign Lang u a ge and to the culture of the hearing-impaired. It covers basic signing skills and vocabulary, finger spelling, and the particular needs and problems of deaf people. The course material is presented through demonstrations, drill, mime, recitals, lectures, and discussions. Especially valuable to teach ers, social workers, nurses and others who

inter-profess ional woperation. Further study explo res

MFTH 519 - Practicum I

need to work wilh those in the deaf communi ty.

(2 CREDITS)

MlIY 24

-

This course fu lfills the alternative line in the Per­

spectives on Diversity requirement. ( RN: 1 0 I 37)

l e g a l respo n s i b i l i t ies, r u l es of confidentiality, and licenser, certification and the role of p rofessional organizations. *Also meets Friday, June 1 8, 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. In addition, students are required to attend court fo r

1 3 hours. Tuition: $490 per semester hour.

(CRN: 10 1 8 8 )

May 24 - Al/glI.st 20, TBA (T. McDowell! ' StonnlC.

York) -ECAM-027

The four semesters of p rac tica are part of a continuous process toward devdoping specific therapeutic compe­

([ SIGN 1 02 - Sign Language (4 CREDrrs)

jllne 2 1 - july 16. 6:00 - 9:30 pm, !vlTWR (L. Curtis) - ADMN-21O

tencies in work with marriage and fa milies. The practica present

a

competency-based p rogram in

which each student i s evaluated rt!garding: ( 1 ) case

(2) rdationship skills; ( 3 ) per­ (4) conceptual skills; and (5) structuring

Additional practice of skills learned in SIGN 1 0 J .

management skills;

See course description above. This course fulfills the alternative line in the Perspectives on Diversity requirem nt. ( CRN: 1 0 1 3 8)

ceptual skillS;

SPAN 1 0 1 - Elementary Spanish

and video tapes of student sessions as the primary

skills. Practica requirements include 1 00 hours of supervision of 500 client contact hours. Faculty are

MFI approved supervisors and use live supervision

(4 CREDITS) May 24 - jllnt! J 8, 9:30 am (J. Predll1ore) - ADMN-206

12: 15 pm, A1TWRF

This i n t roductory class addresses ess entials of pronunciation, intonation, and structure; basic skills

methods of clinical supervision. Tuition: $4.90 per semester hour. Must be admitted to MFTH Graduate Program to register. (CRN: 10189)


MFfH 520 - Theory I

MATH 241 - Ap pl i ed Statistics for Scie n tists

(4 CJW)JTS) Jutle 21 - Jllly 16, 9:30 am (D. Wu) - MGYM 101

(2 CREDJTS)

May 24 - Augu5t 20, TBA

(Staff) -ECAlvl-027 The three semesters of theory taken in conjunction

with MFfH 5 19, 52 1 , a nd 523 oonstiMean i n -d e ptl1 study of ont! approach of marriage and fumil)' therapy with an t:m pha sis on appl)'ing theory in practice. Tuition: $490 per semester hou r. MLlSt be admitted to MFfH Graduate Program to register. (CRN: 1 0 1 90) MFTH 521

-

Practicum II

(2 CRfJ)JTS) May 24 - August 2(), TBA (T J\lfcDowelllC. SlOrmlC. Yor'k) -£CAM-027 ee descript ion under MFTH 5 1 9, above. Tuition: $490 per semester hour. Must be admitted to MITH Graduat e Program to register. (CRN: 1 0 1 9 1 ) MFTH 522 - Theory II (2 CREDITS) May 24 - August 20, TBA (Staff) - ECAM-027

See description under M FTH 520, above. Tu ition:

490 per emester h ou r. Must be admitted to

MFrH

raJuate Program to register.

(CRN: 10 192)

MFT'H 523 - Practicum lIT (2 CIlBDITS) J\I/ay 24 - AI/8l1.St 20, rBA

(T McDawelllC.

SrornllC.

York) - ECA M-027

See description under MFI1-i 5 1 9 above. Tuition: $490 per semester hour. MLlSt be admitted t o MFTI-I Graduate Program to register. (CRN: 10573)

MfTH 524 - Theory III

(2 CREDJTS)

Mlly 24 - Atlgllst 20, TBA

(Staff) - ECAM-027

See descr ip ti o n UJ1der MFI1-i 520 abo Tuition: $490 per semester hour. Must be admitted to MFTH Graduate Program to register. (CRN: 10576)

1 2: 1 5 pm. MTVI'RF

This course is an introduction to the basic techniques of statistical analysis with application to the biological and ph)'sical sciences. [t covers probability, data organization and summary, random variables, d is tributions. hypothesis tests, nonparan1etric methods, linear regression, and analysis of variance. Case studies in different disciplines will b us d to illustrate the application of each top ic. N!INTD\B statistical software wil l be used. Cross-listed with STAT 24 1 . Prerequisite: Math 1 40 or Math 128. (CRN: 10550) MATH 32 1 - Geometry

(4 CREDITS)

May 24- JUrle 18. 3:30 - 6: 15 pm, MTWRF (B. Dorner) - MGYM- J O J Foundations o f geomet ry and basic theory i n Euclidean, projective, and non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite: MATH 1 5 2 or consent of instructor. ( RN: 1 0129)

MATH 503 - Advanced Placement I nst it ute: Calculus (2 CREDUS) Jllly 1 9 - JlIly 23, 9:!JO (1m - <I. OO p m, M1WRF (K.M.

Das) MBLD- 1 12

The lnstitute is designed for in-service secondary mathematics teache.rs who are t each ing or planning to teach AP Calculus in high school. Selected topics from single-variable calculus which lead to practical applications will be d iscussed along with strategies for the effective teaching of these topics. This course wm focus on the major aspects of designing and teaching a successful AP alculus course with emphasis on content, pacing, and preparing for the AP exam. The Institute will focu on ( 1 ) content, (2) pedagogy, and (3) llie calculus refo rm movement. -ourse fee: $670, includes tuition and m a teri al s fee. (eRN: 1 0248) Telephone registration blocked. Please phone ( 253) 535 - 7 1 29 to register.

(4 CREDrrs) (e.

August 2(). TBA Storlll/ . YorJ.:JT. McDowell) -

uition: $490 p e r semester h o u r. Mu 't be

admitted

to

MITH

(No CREDrr) July 18 - Jldy 23, 8:00 am - 5:00 pm, MTWRF (R Bradley)

The fifth annual Pacific Lutheran University Northwest Band Camp for senior high school studentS will feature PLU's own Raydell e. Bradley, Director of Bands. Daily classes and private lessons will be included. Each d ay will end willi a concert performed by camp faculty members. For brochure, write : PLU Northwest Band Camp, Music D ep a rtment, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA 98447. (253) 535-7602. MUS! 1 20 - MLlSic and Culture

(4 CREDmi) /rIl7C 21 - Jldy 16, 9:30 am - J 2: 1 5 pili, MTWRF (G. Yo utz) - MBRC-322

Introduction to ethnomusicological considerations, focusing on steelband and calypso of Trinidad and Tobago, and t raditional Chin ese court music . Examination w i l l b e made through hands-on performance experience with instruments and research and presentation of social, economic and religious aspects of music, while developing research, critical lliinkillg and prese.ntation skills. Requires no previoLlS music experience and fulfills the general university requirements in arts and diversity (cross-cultural.) Required for music majors and minors; prerequisite course for 1 24, 1 30. (eRN: 1 0 1 4 1 )

202 - 2 19 - Private Instruction ( 1-4 CR.I-.DITS)

MUSI

May 24 - August 20, TBA

(Slam

The Department of Music offers private instruction in a variety of media, subject to instructor availability. Contact the Music Office for lesson, credit and tuition details at (253) 535-7602. Private lesson fee: $ 1 50 for one credit, 225 for two credits (in addition to tui tio n ) . MUSI 327 - Private Instruction: Composition

( 1 -2 CR£DITS)

May 24 - AUg/lSI 20, TBA

(G. Youtz) A system a t i c approach to contemporary musical

MFfH 599 - Thesis Muy 24

MUSl - Northwest High School Band Camp

,raduate Program to register.

(eRN : 1 0 1 94 )

MUSI - South Sound Jazz Camp

(NO CREDrr) July 26 - Jllly 30.

9:00 am - 4:(}() pm, MTWRF

(D. Immel)

« MATH 1 5 1 - Introduction t o Calculus

(4 CREDITS)

lime 22 - August 1 9, 6:3() - 9:3() pm, TR (D. WIl ) - MBLD- I l l Fu ncti ons, limits, derivati.ves and i n tegral s with applicatio n�, with an emp hasis on derivatives. Prerequisite: Math analysis or pre, calculus in high Scl10 I or MATH 140 0r equivalent. ( eRN: 1 0 1 28)

Intensive study in the a reas of jazz improvisation, jazz t h eor), and s mall combo perfo r m ance. Mastercla sses and p r iva te instruction given by pro minent Northwest pro fessi onal musicians. ombos grouped acoording to ability. This se.minar is open to all high school and university instrumental musicians. Brochures a ailable. Call (253) 535-7602 or write South Sound Jazz mp, Pacific Lutheran n ivers ity Music D e p a rt m e n t , Tac o m a , WA 98447-0003. MUSt - Piano Performance Institute

MATH 223 - Modem Elementary Mathematics

(4 CREDITS) M'1Y 24 - ]rille 1 8, 3:30 - 6:15 pm, MTWRF (C. Dorna) - MBLD-J 12

oncepts underlying traditional computational techniqucs; a system atic analysis of arithmetic; an inluiti approach to algebra and geometry. Intended for elementary t aching majors. Prerequisite; co nsen t f instructo r. (CRN: 10549)

(No cREDrr) June 28 - July ]6, 8:00 am - 5:00 pili, MTWRP (c. Knapp) For junior and senior high school students. For brochure, write: Dr. Calvin Knapp, Coordinator, Piano Performance Institute, Music Department, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA 98447. (253) 535-7602.

composition; students create and notate work..� for solo, small and large ensemble . May be repeated for additional credit. Special fec: $ 1 50 for one credit, $225 for two credits (in addition to tuition). (To register phone 535-7602.) M USI 34 1 - MLlSic for Classroom Teachers: Wo rld Cultures

(2 CREDITS) luiy 1 9- Jilly 23, 9:00 ( J m - 4:00 pm, MTWRF (L. Jessup) - MBRC-322 Music in a global framework, cross-culturally and as a part of the fabric of daily life, as compared to an isolated school curriculum subject. Pr act i cal and teachable music and arts activities which can be used as part of Language Arts, Social Studies, and ollier academic subjects or for classroom music instruction are demon s tra ted. The focus is on world music, wim emphasis on me major culture areas of the world. Offered for students preparing [or elem ntary classroom teaching ( non-music education majors) . Taught concurrently with MUSI SO l e . Lab fee: $5.00. (CRN: 1 0 1 42)


music. Students from Summer Piano Performance Institute will be involved in this workshop and will play in a masterclass setting. Members o f the class who desire to perform music from any period will be welcome to play. Open to piano teachers and those who wish to enlarge their knowledge of piano literature. (CRN: 10555) M U S ) sO l e - G r a d u a te M u si c S p e c i a l i s t s :

World M usic (1 CREOrrs) luly 1 9 - July 23, 9:00 am - 4:00 pm, MTWRF (L. Jessup) - MBRC-322

This course explores music in a global framework, cross-culturally and as a part of the fabric of daily life, as compared to an isolated school curriculum subject. P ractical and teachable music and arts activities, which can be used as part of Language Arts, Social Studies, and other academic subjects or for classroom basic instruction, are demonstrated. The focus is on world music, with emphasis on the major culture areas of the world. Specific ties with current textbooks provide teachers with material to use in the classroom and assist them in developing materials to fit their specific teaching situation. Open to classroom teachers and music specialists. Taught in conj unction with MUSI 3 4 1 . Lab fee: $ 5 .00. (CRN: 1 0 609)

MIlY 24 - August 20, TBA

(Staff)

The Department of Music offers private instruction in a variety of media, subject to instructor availability. Contact the Music Office for lesso n, credit and tuition details at (253) 535-7602. Private Lesson Fee: $ 1 50 for one credit, $225 for two credits. M USI SO IA - Piano Pedagogy Workshop

( 1 (''REDITS) JlIly 6 - July 9, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm, TWJIF (e K/Japp) - MBRe-334

A review of teaching theory and keyboard harmony to piano students. Part of the class time will be spen t on observing the class session of the S u mmer Piano Performance Institute for Junior and Senior High School students. There will be sessions and discussion on the first lesson; technique; rhythm; sight reading; phrasing; and repertoire for beginning through advanced level students. Open to piano teachers and those desiring to further their musical knowledge. ( RN: 1 0554) MUSI 501 B - Piano Literature Workshop

( 1 CREOrrs) July 6 - /Illy 9. 1:00 - 4:00 pm, TWRF (e. Knapp) . MBRC-334

T h i s wo rkshop w i l l cover the five p e r i o d s o f piano l i terature: Baroque, Classical, Romantic, I m pressionistic, and 20th Century. This workshop will cover appropriate piano l i terature, study the difference of piano techn iques and compare the stylistic differences affecting the interpretation of the

( I CRlIDITS) May 26 - AugmT 1 8, 5: 3 0 (F. George) - RAMS-20S

- 6:30 pm,

W

Critical evaluation of roles as professional nurses using empirical, aesthetic, personal, and ethical knowledge of social and political realities. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment i n 475 and 476. Tuition: $490 per semester hour. (CRN: 1 0556) NURS 475 - Social and Political Contexts

(2 CR.IlDHS)

May 26 - June 16, 9:00 am - 4:45 pm, W (L. KIlp la n) - RAMS-204

Focuses on the social and political milieu in which nurses practice. Emphasis on analysis of current is­ s u e s a ffe c t i n g h e a l t h care a n d the n u r s i n g p r o fession. Prerequisites: 425, 454, 46 1 ,464. Tu­ ition: $490 per semester hour. (CRN: 1 0557) NURS 476 - Synthesis

(6 CREDITS) Mel), _6 - Augus t ( P. George)

1 8, TBA, SllIlday -Satllrday

597 - Computer Application

in Nursing

Research

(1 CR£llITs) Jllne 30. 6:00 - 8:00 P ill, (8. Johnson) - RAMS-3 1 9

May 24 -

This course introduces philosophy by surveying several of the most important topics in the history of philosophy. The issues we discuss may include: Is belief in God reasonable? How do we know what we know? Are all human actions physically determined? What makes an action right or wrong? The goal of the course is not so much to provide answers to these questions as to w1derstand the issues and options and to learn how to employ clear, critical, and constructive thinking about them. Fulfills the GUR in Philosophy. (CRN: 1025 1 ) PHIL 1 0 1 ( 02 ) - Philosophical Issues

(4 CREDITS) JIII/I;: 2 1 -JIl/y 1 6, 9:30 am - 12: IS pm, (£ Ridtards) - ADMN-216

MTWRF

See above description. ( RN: 1 060 1 ) PHIL 228 - Social and Political Ph il osophy

PHIL 325 - Business Ethics

(2 CRfDITS) May 24 - June 4, 1 1:fXJ am - 1 :45 pill, (D. Arllo/d) ADMN 2 1 2 -

MTWRF

-

Application of moral theories and perspectives of relevance to business practices. Examination of underlying values and assumptions in specific business cases involving, e.g., employer-employee relations, advertising, workplace conflict, and environmental and social responsibili ties. Not for philosophy core requirement. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 , 125, o r 225/226. (CR1'-l: 10257)

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (No te: Health Education courses are listed under

Synthesis of nursing knowledge, critical thinking, decision making, and technical and leadership competencies in nursing situations mentored by a professional nurse preceptor. Prerequisites: 425, 454, 46 1 , 464. Tuition: $490 per semester ho ur. ( CRN: 1 0558) « NURS

« PHIL 10 1 (0 1 ) - Philosophical Issues (4 CREDITS) May 24 - Jllly 2 } , 6:00 - 9:00 pm, NfW (G. Myr/Jo) - ADMN-2 I 6

(P. Kaurin) - ADMN-204.B An examination of major social and political theories of Western philosophy (including Plato. Hobbes, Lock, Rousseau, Mill, Marx). Includes feminist and non-Western contrib utions and critiques. (CRN: 1056 1 )

(( NURS 47 1 - Senior I I Seminar

MUS1 402-4 1 9 - Private Ins tr u ction

PHILOSOPI IY

(4 CR£Drrs) JlIly 26 - AIIgllSI 20, ] 2:30 - 3: 15 pm, AffiVRF

NURSING

( J -4 CREDITS)

Tuition: $490 per semester credit, plus $ 5 5 learning resources fee. (CRN: 10603)

\IV

Decision-makingand use of selected software programs for data mallagement and analysis relevant to clinical practice and nursing research. Prerequisite: NURS 527.

Health Educa tion)

PHED 1 00 - Per onaI ized Fitness Program

( 1 CREDITS) May 24- JUlie 18. 1 1 :00 am - J 2: J 5 pm. MTWR (Sc. Westerillg) - OGYM- J 02

Health and fitness related issues are covered as well as functional and personally designed programs related to physical activi ty. (CRN: 1 0 1 54)

PHED 1 5 1 - Beginning Golf (1 CREDrrs) May 24- June 1 8, 8:00 - 9: 1 Gill., MTI!I/R (L. MllrSha li) - OGYM- Fic/dllO!lSC Activity course for men and women. Activity fee: $20 (CRN: 1 0 1 55)


PHED 162 - Beginnin g Tennis ( 1 Clwms) May 24 - lIme 18, 7: 00 - 8: 15 am, MTWR (M. Benson) -MG)'A1- 100

ctivi ty course for men and women. Activity fee: $5 (CRN: 1 0 1 56) PHED 1 65 - Racquetball/Squash

( I CR.EDITS) May 24 - JUlie 18, 9:30 - 1 0:45 om, MTlNR (L. Marshall) - Racquetball CO llrt cti . ty course for men and women. Activity fee: $5 (CRN: 10562) PHED 1 77 - Weight Training

(1 ClWlITS) May 24 - jllne 1 8, 9:30 -

1 0:45 am, MTWR (Sc. Wesrerirrg) - PitilesS Gel/ler

Activity course for men and women. (CRN: 1 0563)

PHED 234 (02) -Relaxation Techniques ( 1 CREDITS) JUlie 21 - j/.lne 25, 9:0U a l l / . - 12:00 pm, JlyfTWRF

(M. Sml) - ECAA1- Gym

See above course description. (CRN: 1 0564) PHED 275 - Water Safety Instructors Course

(2 CREDrrs) /IIIU.' 1 - jlme 1 1, 9:00 a.lI1. (J. JOIIIISOII) - POOL

12:UO pill. MTWRF

You will learn to instruct Red Cross courses in water safety and swimming. Course will be theoretical as well as practical as you will teach various levels of swimming to local elementary school students. Upon successful com pletion you will be certified by American Red Cross as a ''''a ter Safety Instructor (WSI ). (CRN: 1 0 1 64)

I ) - Physical Education in the Elementary Scho ol

(( P H ED 3 2 2 (0

PHED 1 86 - Step Aerobics ( 1 CREDITS) May 24 - J/I/IC 18, 12:30 - 1:45 p. m., MTWR

(2 ClWlITS) Jlllle 2 J - july 2, 6:00 - 9:00 pm, MTIVRF If. Poppen) - HCAlvl-Gym

PHED L 92 - Intermediate Tennis

Learn organization a n d a d m i n i stration of a developmental program for grades K-6; sequential and progressive programming; large repertoire of activities. For undergraduates. (CRN: 1 0 165)

(Su.. Westering) - OL,on Bilicony Activity course for men and women. (CRN: 1 0157) ( I OUIDITS) Jzme 21 - JlIly 16, 7: 00 - 1l: 15 al/1, MTWR

(tv!. Benson) - OGY'M-FieldhOlLSc Activity course for men and women. Activity fee: $5 (CRN: 1 0 1 58)

PHED 200 (01 ) - Individualized Swim Instruction ( l CREDrrs) lune 2 1 - Ju/y 16, 9:00 - 9:40 I111!, MTWRF

O. julmsolJ) - POOL

All levels of swimming instruction. Beginners especially encouraged to register! ( RN: 1 0 1 59) PHED 200 (02) - Individualized Swim Instruction

( 1 CREDrrs)

lilly J 9 - Augllst 13, 9:UU - 9:40 <1m, MTWRF (f. Juhnsoll) - POOL , ee above descrip tion. (CRN: 1 0 1 6 1 ) ([ PliED 2 1 7 - life Guard Training

( J CR.EDITS) May 25 - May 2 9, 4:00 - 9:00 pm. ThrRF (als() aturday, 9:00 am - 5:UO pill}

O. Joll nSOIl) - POOL Be a lifeguard this summer! Red Cross Lifeguard

Training revised 1 994 course includes first aid and CPR cou rse. Must be able to swim 500 yards non stop using front crawl, sidestroke and breast stroke. $5 certification fee required. (CRN: 1 0203) PHED 234 (0 1 ) -Relaxation Techniques

( I CR.EDITS) lillie 7 - 1111111 J i, 9:00 am. -

1 2:00 pm, MnI\fRF'

(M Se,I]) - BCAM -Gym The bvi us benefits of relaxation are relieving stress and mental tension. But new, long-term resear h indicat s a strengthening of the immune system warding off disease, lowering blood pressure

and chole terol levcls. We will explore progressive relaxation, yoga, guided imagery, acup!'C$..'; ure and new methods of relieving stress! Clothing: wear comfortable, loose fitting-clothes. (CRN: 1 01 6 3 )

([ PH E D

322 (02) - P h y s i c a l Educa tion in the

Elemen t a r y S c h o o l (2 CREDrrs) JIIly 6 - July /6, 6:00 p.m. - 9: 00 p.m., MTVIRF U. Poppell} - ECAM-Gym See above course description. (CRN: 1 0 1 66 ) PHED 360 - Professional Practicum

(1-2 OUiDITS) May 24 - AlIgllSt 20, TBA (A. Evalls) Opportunities to develop, implement, and evaluate skills associated with their professional interest. In addition to interacting with university faculty, students will also work with site supervisors. (CRN: 1 0 1 70 Blocked. To register phone 535-7638.)

- Curriculum Worksh o p /Sport Education Model (1 CREDrrs) Augllsr 16 - AuKust 20, 8;OU mn - 12: 1 5 pm, MTWRF (D. Talillehill) - MGYNI-IOO A workshop desi gned to i n t ro d uce the Sport Ed ucation Curriculum and Instruction model. Pa rticipants will experience Sport Education through an interactive "hands-on" workshop. Time will be devoted to discussing the place of sport in education, physical education, and recreational settings. A major workshop outcome for each participant will be development of a Sport Education "season" for implementation in your selected setting to include instructional materials and strategies. (CRN: 10565) P H E D 401

PHED 480 - Exercise P hysiology (4 CREDITS) May 24 - june 1 8. 9:30 am - 12: 1 5 pm, MTVVRF (A. EVa/IS) - OGYM- 1 06 Study the scientific basis and physiological effect of physical activity on the human body. Lecture and discussion emphasis is directed toward practical application of principles and concepts of exercise p h ysiology in schools, c l i n i c a n d corporate environ men ts. Lab opportunities are provided to help you apply class material. Prerequisite: BIOL 205-206 or instructor consent. (CRN: 1 0 1 67)

PRED 491 - Independent Study ( 1-4 CRJIDrrs) May 24 - August 20, T BA ( . Evans) Independent investigations into areas of special interest to the student which are not covered by courses in the regular program. The types of projects undertaken vary in length and content and are determined in consultation with a faculty advisor. (To register phone 535-7638.)

PRED 499 - Internship (2-8 CREDITS) May 24 - August 20, TBA

(A. Evans)

Provides graduate students with practical opportuni­ ties for new experiences in your professional field. Your placement and experiences are predetermined by you, your faculty advisor and the on site field supervisor. Your grades are based on the successful completion of all internship assignments which include written and seminar projects. Secure internship application from School of Physical Education. You are expected to apply for your internship one semester ahead of registration. (To register phone 535-7638.) PHED 591 - I ndependent Study

(1-4 CREDrrs)

May 24 - August 20. TBA

(A E1'al1s)

Independent investigations may be made into areas of special interest to the student which are not covered by courses in the regular graduate program. The types of projects undertaken vary in length and content and are determined in consultation with a faculty advisor. (To register phone 535-7638.) PHED 599 - Internship

( 1 -4 CIUlDITS) May 14 - August 20, TBA

(A Evans)

Provides graduate students with practical opportu­ nities for new experiences in your professional field. Your placement and experiences are predetermined by you, your faculty advisor and the on site field supervisor. Your grades are based on the successful completion of all internship assignments which include written and seminar proj ects. Secure intnnship application from School of Physical Education. Your are expected to apply for your internship one semester ahead of registration. (To register phone 535-7638.)

PHYSICS ([ PI-IYS 1 1 0 - Descriptive Astronomy

(4 CR.EDrrs)

June 21 - JlIly 29, 0:30 - 8:3U Pill, MTWR Lab: 8:30 - WOO pm, IvfW - RCTR-201 (D. RusIJ) - RCTR· ] (I3

Stars and their evolution, galaxies and larger structures, cosmology, and the solar system. Some evening observation sessions may extend beyond 1 0:00 pm. No prerequisite courses in science or mathematics are needed. Fulfills GUR Science requirement. Lab fee: $40.00. (Lecture CRN: 1 0552) (Lab CRN: 10553) Please note: you must register for both the lecture and the lab. Use both course registration numbers (CRN) when registering for this class.


PSYC 352 - Development: Infancy to Maturity

POLITICAL SCIENCE

(4 CREDrrs)

(4 ClUIDITS) May 24 - Jltly 21, 6:0() - 9:00 pm, MW

june 2 1 - JIIly 1 6, 9:30 (l . m. - 12:15 p. III. , MTWRF (f0. Brown) - RAMS-205 P hys ical, intelle tual, social and emotional growth from i n fancy t h ro ugh ado lescence to matu rity. Prereq u i ite: P SYC 1 0 1 . ( CRN: 1 0 1 75 )

ideas, and fields of study rel a t i ng to politics and

PSYC 405 - Asian American Experience Workshop

({ POLS 1 0 I - Introduction to Political Science

(D. Oluft) - RAMS-2()4 An i ntro duct ion to t he major concepts, theories, governmental systems. (CRN: 1 0566) POLS 368 - The American Presidency

(4 CREDITS)

May 24 - lUIlt! 18, 9:30 am - 1 2: 1 5 Pili, MTWRF ( HI: Spellcer) - RAMS-2 0() Study of the nation's h ighest p olitic al office in terms of the rol es and expec tation of the ofnce, s tyles of le adership, Presidential decision-making, p owe rs and limitatjons, and the interaction o f p e rso nal ity

(2 REDITS) Jllly 19 - Jilly 23, 1 0:()O am. - 4:00 pm., MTWRF (J. N!oritstlgu) - ADMN-2 12 L ctures, t o u rs and meaL will b p resente d to familiarize s t u d e n t s with the Asian community in the area. The class will examine historical, sociological

and psych ological material on the Asian exper i ence

and will provide shldents with a p erspective on one

line

of the diversity requirement.

(eRN: 1 0 256)

PSYC 440 - Psychology of Language

tuition and materials fee . (C : 10244) Te le p h o ne registrati on blocked. Please phone (253) 535-7 1 29 to register.

(4 CREDITS) July 26 - Aligust 19, 8:45 (Jill (c. Moon) - RAMS-205

- 12:15 pm, 11'fIWR.

The study of language as a means of communication and structured h u ma n behavior. Topics in

lude:

biolo gical foundations of language, psycholinguistics, speech perception and production, sentence and

dis

ursecomprehension, nonverbal communicatiol1,

la nguage acquisition, bilingualism, language disorders.

policy and ethical iss u es . We will de velop

RELI 2 1 2 - Religion and Literatu re of the New Testament

(4 CREDITS)

jllne. 2 1 - jul)' i 6, 1 2:30 - 3: 15 pm, lvfTWRF (D. Oakmiln) - ADMN-21 6 Lit rary, historical, and theological dimensions o f the Nell' Testament, including perspectives on

(4 CREDITS) May 24 - Jlllle 18, 9:30 11m - 12: 15 pm, MTWRF (L. GrosslR. Stivers) · ADlvfN-2 i6

a

list of

as we script a n d st ar in) video advertisements for a se lec ted product. C lass will be

own enjoyment

dynamic, skill b uilding,

and

feedba ck-oriented.

Prer e quis ite : 1 0 1 . (CRN: 1 0 1 76)

PSYC 493 - History and Systems of Psychology

(4 CREDITS)

May 24 - lillie 1 8,

9:30 am - 12: 15 pm, MTWRF

(J. Nolph) - ADMN-209

Historical

development, con te m p o rary forms, and

PSYCHOLOGY

basic asswnptions of the major psychological theories

PSYC 350 - Personality Theories

re quire m e n t wh n a proj ect/paper is

counseling. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 . (CRN : 1 0568)

dhism, Shinto, and the "new religions" of Japan their origins, d e ve lopmen t, and contemporary issues. This course fulfills line 3 of the GUR religion requirement and the cross-cultural pcrspe tivesline o f the diversity requ irement. (CR : 1 0 1 8 1 )

REU 225 - Faith and Spirituality

Internet resources for these issues and create (for our

and traditions. Meets the senior seminar/project

Pr

requi s ite s : 101; 242 (or

342, 346, 348;

of

re­

REt! 1 32 - Religion ' of East Asia

PSYC 462 - Consumer Psychology

AJ:e advertisem nts on television and in teen magazi nes making us want things we d on' t need? Do we really p y attentio n to all the ads on TV? What are the implications of a dve rti s i ng the Washington Slate Lottefyor products which increase (or do not decrease) environmental or h ea l th risks? Pocus on consumer attitudes and behavior "in c l u d ing perception of advertisements, influence of reference group media factors, and karning"while exploring related public

t heories and research. Discussion of implication for

of the diversity

: 1 0 1 80)

contemporary issues. ( RN: 10570)

JIII1.f 21 - Jllly 16, 1 2 :JO - 3 : 1 5 pm , M T WRF (c. Hansvick) . ADMN-206

May 24 - June 18, 9:30 am - 12: 15 pm, MTWRF (f. Moritsugll) - ADMN-22 1 Stra tegies for the study of personal ity. Review

qu i re me nt . (C

Prerequisite: 1 0 1 . (CRN: 1 0602)

(4 CREDITS)

(4 CR£Drrs)

cross-cultural perspectives line

Confucianism, Thoism, Chinese and Japanese, Bud­

course fulfills 2 cre d i ts of the alternative perspe ctive

and experi en ced AP te'dchers. Tuition: $670, includes

mary so u rces in tr an latio n. This co urse fulfills l ine 3 of the GUR religion requirement and the

fee: $50 fo r meals, field trip and guest lecturer. This

POLS 503 - Advan ced P l acement Instit ute: American Go ve rnmen t

intensive co u rse fo r high school faculty i nvolved in teac h i ng AP Am er i ca n Government courses. It is designed to aid both the new AP tea che r

Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sil<ism their origins and devel opment, expansion, and con­ temporary issues - provide foctL� fur this course on religions of South Asia. Emphasis will be on pri­

(4 CREDrrs) May 24 . July 2 1 , 6:00 - 9:00 pili. MW (P. Engram) - ADMN-2()2

Vie t namese, and Filipino cultu ral groups. Course

This is an

131 - Religions of South Asia (4 CREDITS) M£ly 24 - June 1 8, 8:00 a. nL - 1 0:45 a.m., MTWRF (P. Ingram) - ADMN-20

({ REU

in the Northwest Coverage includes Japanese, hillese,

of the more ethnically diverse min rity communities

and institution. (CRN: 1 0567)

(2 CRlIDITS) July 19 - july 23, 9:00 II.nt. - 4:00 p.m., M7WRF (D. G/IIM . ADMN-204A

REl.lCION

added. equivalent); one of 340,

one of 350, 352, 354.

(CRN: 1 0 1 7 7)

Re tlection on various Christian li.fi tyles and their expression and understandi n g of co m m itm ent and discip le'hip.

qu e st i on . What

Jesus?

ters aro un d the theological

does it mean to be a follm er of

This course fulfills line 2 of the lUR religion requi rement. (CRN: 10 1 83)

332 (0 1 ) - The Life of Jesus (4 CREDITS)

RELI

july 26 - AIIgl1St 20, 9:.30 a m - 12:15 pm, MTWRF (, . Govig) - ADMN-202 Biblical, historical, and systematic s tu dies of Jesus includ ing archaeological evidence. Atten t i on also upun accounts of huma n disab ili ty and healing in the Gospels, and the " Christ-figure" in litera ture and film. This co u rs e ful.filb l i n l o th GUR religion requirement. No prerequisite necessary.

(CRN: 1 0 1 85 )


REU 332 (02) - The llie of Jesus

dying, death and relationship 10

(4 ClU'JJ rrs)

!Illy 1 9 - Augusr 27, OFF-CAMPUS (D. OakmalJ ) - TBA

es

such as divorce

and break-ups. The social, emotional. behavlOral and spiritual dimensions of grieving will be studied as the

. S t u dy the l i fe a n d teachings of Jesus w ile

class focuses on topics such as: children and youth

experi t:ncing th

the dying pr

excitement of archaeoJ ogl Ca.l

excavations in Galilee (http://www.ups.eduJreliglOnJ cana/canahome.htm). Some course-work must be co mp leted at P L . Prerequisite: one Lower divi­ sio n course in religion or consent of instructor.

Estimated cost : $4500 (CRN: 10 1 84) Te lepho ne registration blocked. To apply for this program,

please phone (253) 535-7628.

<l REU 364 - Theological Studies: Theolog y

of Nature (4 CREDTrs)

}lIly 6 - August I , 4 : ] 5 - 7: 15 p m, MTW (5. Torl'emt) - ADMN-2 08

This course is designed to help students explore

Christian perspectives on the natural world, in part icular the contemporary environmental

project. Biblical, historical, and theologiCal sources are examined in ligh t of the common creation story. This c o urse fulfills line two of the Core I Religion

requir ments.

( RN: 1 0586)

SOCIAL WORK SOCW 390 - G r i e f Is s ues for Chil dren, Adolescents and Adults (4 R£Drrs) June 2 I - Jllly 16, 9:30 am - 12: I 5 pm, MTWRF

(T ]ohm/otlc) - ADfvfN-2 1 4

Tllis cla

will explore grieving processes for all

ages Lhat r suit from the major loses of physical

Educa tion courses a re listed EDUCATION sec tio n of the catalog.

.mder the

grieving support in school and at home, dealing with cess, ethnic/cultural aspects of gn �g, community resources for grieving support and Cn5IS/

t r a u m a s u p p o r t st rate g i es in the co m m u I1lty.

Lea rn i ng a c t i v i t i es will include fie d trips to . community resoI.IJces, guest presentatlOns, major film viewing, seminar style discussions and readmgs.

(eRN: 10590)

(4 CREDITS) May 24 - June 18, 1 :00 - 4:45 pm., MTWR (A. Biblarz) - ADMN-2l 4

. Analvsis of the changing nature of the family as a f social positions and role . It examines the

family from a socio-historical and cross-cultu ral per­

p ctive. Topics include love relationships. m �iage, family roles, family types. parenthood, socialllAtlOn, retirement. divorce, and remarriage. ( RN: 1 0 1 97)

SOCI 336 - Deviance (4 CREDITS)

JUlie 21 - July 16, 9:30 am - 12:15 pm, (J. Higginson) - ADMI -2 l 1A

STAT 23 1 - Introductory Statistics

(4 CRIlDITS) May 24 - June 18, 8:00 - 1 0:45 t1. m (R. !e/lSen) - ADMN-204B

••

MTWRF

Descriptive statistics: measures of central tendency

SOCI 330 - The Family

syste�

STATISTICS

and dispersion; and inferential statistics: general� 7..ations about populations from samples by parametnc

SOCIOLOGY

MIWRF

. A (Jeneral introduction to a variety of nonconforrnmg,

u S j ally secretive, and il legal beha� ior, s uch � s . corporate crime. drug dea1incr. prostitutIon, mdu�tnal spying, child abuse, and suicide, with em ph�s � on

the conflict of values and life-experiences withm a

society. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 or consent of instructor.

(CRN: 1 0577)

DID YOU KNOW?

SPECIAL EDUCATION

Special

and non-parametric techniques. Methods covered will include estimation, hypothesis testing. simple correlation analysis, linear regression, chi square analysis and analysis of variance. Not appl icable to m a t hematics credit. S t udents will have the opportun ity to spend some time s Iving problems on the compoter. Prerequisite: Background eqUlvalent to a pre-calculus course. (CRN: 1 0 198)

STAT 24 1 - Applied Statistics for Scientists

(4 Cll.EllITS) JUl/e 21 - !l.ly 16, 9: O a m (D. Wu) - MGYM- IOl

12: 1 5 pm,

MTIVRF

This course is an introduction to the basic techniques of statistical analysis with application to the biological and ph)'sical sciences. It covers probability, data orga n iza tion and s u m ma ry, random va[lable , � di stributions, hypothesis tests , nonparametnc methods, Linear regress ion, and analysis of variance. Case studies in different d isciplines will be llsed to illustrate the appl.ication of each topic. statistical software wili be used. Cross-listed With MATH 24 1 . Prerequisite: Math 1 40 or Math 1 28.

�INIT�

( RN: 1 05 5 1 )


for young people PLU M I D

LE COLLEGE

High School incoming seniors and '99 graduates, get an early start on a successful college career this summer at PLU' Called Middle College, this six-week

summer program (June 1 9-July 30) helps you sharpen learning skills while earning eight to ten regular, transferable semester hours of college credit.

Middle College helps to make college-level study easier. Within a framework of interesting, contemporary topics, it emphasizes basic skills so important in college-written and oral communication, study skills, and mathematics. There to help you are six professors from social sciences, mathematics, English, Geosciences, and communkations, a full-time counselor, and tutors who live in the residence hall with you. You receive individual counseling and aptitude or skills testing. And, you learn how to find and use information at the University. Classes are small, flexible, and informal, giving you an opportunity to get acquainted with both instructors and fellow students. Middle CoLlege isn't just study. There is plenty of opportunity fo r play, taking advantage of PLU's excellent recreational facilities. Live on-campus or commute, although-campus housing is strongly recommended for this program. The deadline for Middle College application is May 3 1 , 1 999. For more information, call or write the Office of Admissions, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA 98447, or call D r. Richard Seeger, Middle College Director, at (253) 535-8786, or email seegerra@PLU.edu.

UMMER I N STIT UTE FOR THE G I FTED

Academically talented students in grades 4- 1 1 will converge on the campus July 25 - August 14 for The Summer Institute for the Gifted (SIG). PLU is the first and only West Coast university selected to host SIG, a unique and prestigious three-week residential, coeducational program. The institute provides more than 80 academic, cultllral and recreational COlliSes inclucting educational evening entertainment, weekend off-campus trips and on-campus creativity events. Other coLleges o ffering the institute are Vassar, Bryn Mawr, Oberlin, Denison University, George School and Drew University. The academic program is central to the spirit and structure of the summer institute. Students are expected to perform at the upper level of their capabilities through exams, quizzes and homework. Students will have the use of PLU's library and research facilities. SIG enters its 16th year in 1999 with sessions offered on the East Coast, Midwest and now the West Coast The program has grown from a single session at Blair Academy in Blairstown, NT., serving 1 3 2 students in 1 984, to the current six sessions. The anticipated enrollment in 1 999 is more than 1 ,500 students nationwide. Prospective students and their parents are invited to PLU for a SIG Open House on April 17. It will include a formal presentation, buffet luncheon and an informal question-and-answer period. A tOlli of the university's academic facilities, classrooms and dormitories will follow. For further information about the S ummer Institute for the Gifted at PLU, call (253) 535-8549.

RAJ

.BOW OF GI FTS

By the year 2020 nearly half of the population in the ELCA Region I will be people of color. One of the best ways to prepare for this multi-cultllral world is to

train young leaders who will help u s face this exciting future! Rainbow of Gifts is a special multicultural youth leadership training program which will be held August 1-5 at PLU, and sponsored jointly by ELCA Region I and PLU. The first year, summer 1998, was a smashing success. Young people ages

15-25 are invited to work together, pray and worship together, and enjoy the special speakers, national and regional ELCA leaders, and music from

around the world To register or request information, call the ELCA Region I office at 1 -800-755-583 1 or 206-624-0093.

M E SA ( MATHEMATIC S, ENGINEERING, SCIENCE AC H I EVEMENT ) Tacoma/Pierce Country MESA is a pre-college program which provides enriching opportunities in mathematics, engineering, and science for underrepresented students (African Americans, Native Americans, Hispanics, and women) in grades 6-12 through the use of exemplary materials and instructional approaches. The program is located at Pacific Lutheran Universi ty. Phone (253) 535- 7 1 90 for further information.

N O RT H W EST BAND CAM P Continuing the tradition of excellence, PLU's offering one of the finest and most unique band camps of its kind in the Pacific Northwest from July 1 8-23, 1999.

Students of high school age are welcome to apply. The Northwest Band Camp is unique among traditional music camps in the following ways:

• • • • •

Featu res RaydeLl Bradley, Conductor, Director of Bands at PLU; Offers an opportunity to attend classes in music history, music appreciation, jazz, reed-making, instrument repair, and conducting; Offers a concert experience each evening of the camp; Offers an. outstanding faculty and staff to help with individual instruction; Held in the beautiful new Mary Baker Russell Music Center and Lagerquist Concert Hall.

The Northwest Band Camp is comm itted to limited enrollment so that excellent individualized attention to the needs of the student musician is offered. An e).:perienced staff provides recreational activities to supplement students' musical endeavors. Also, July is a wonderful time to enjoy

PL 's bea utiful park-like campus. For information about the Northwest Band Camp and registration materials, contact the Music Department,

Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA 98447, or call (253) 535-7602.

SOUTH SOUND JAZZ CAM P 1 999

July 26 - July 30,

The South Sound Jazz Camp is offering intensive study in the areas of jazz improvisation, jazz theory and small combo performance. (Combos are grouped according to ability.) Master classes and private instruction are given by prominent Northwest professional musicians. The semin ar, to be held July 26 - July 30, is open to all high school and university instrumental musicians. Call (253) 535 -7602.

SPORTS AND ACTIVTTY CAMPS Open enrollment camps are planned for Basketball, Soccer, Softball, Wrestling, Volleyball, and Football. Band Camp and North West Youth Leadership, Rainbow of Gifts, and Holy Commotion workshops are also planned for summer '99. Program and registration information is available from the University Center (253) 535-7454.

SUMMER P I A N O PERFORMA CE I N STITUTE This piano institute is an offering for junior and senior high school students. Classes include History of Piano Literature, Style and Interpretation, Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation, and two private lessons a week with Dr. Knapp, professor of Music a t Pacific Lutheran Un iversity. The Institl! te is June 28

- July 16. For more information, contact Dr. Calvin Knapp, Pacific Lutheran University Department of Music, Tacoma, WA 98447 or phone (253) 535-7602.


for teachers �,�I."U M M E R TEACHERS ACADEM IES

fn response to Washington State's Educational RefonTIs, PLU's School of Education is initiating a summer Teacher's Academy to assist Washington educators in implementing the Essential Academic Learnings, The focus of the academies in summer 1 999 will be Gifted Education and Alternative Education for at-risk students. Alternative fOnTIS of assessment and curricular strategies appropriate for the Washington State Essential Academic Learnings will be the centerpiece of the course work. Teachers will be able to complete requirements for a Certificate of Specialty Area Studies in Gifted or At-Risk Education at PLU this summer. For additional information and registration, call (253) 535-8342, TEACIil

G E

DORSEMENTS

Teachers can complete 16 semester hours in one busy summer to earn an endorsement in one of three areas: English as a Second Language, Special Education, and Reading. The program runs from May 24-August 3 1 , and tuition is reduced for those who complete it in one summer. For more information, call (253) 535-8342, SCHOOL L I B RARY MEDIAl LLRS ENDORSEMENT

PLU, in partnership with area school districts, will sponsor a cohort endorsement program for those certificated educational professionals wishing to prepare for a leadership role in school library media menegement The two-summer program begins with Summer Sessions 1 999 and concludes with Summer Sessions 2000, Each swmner will offer a specified sequence of core library media courses and several options to satisfy the children and adolescent literature requirements. During summer 1 999, participants will enroll in EDUC 507, EDUC 509, EDU 537, and EDUC 538. Literature courses include EDUC 528 and ED C 529. During summer 2000 participants will enroll in EDUC 506, EDUC 508, and EDUC 597. Literature courses will include EDUC 527, EDUC 528, of £DUe 529. Students will participate in a related project during the academic year as part ofEDUC 597. Several seminars during the academic year will be scheduled with participant input. For further information, please contact Lori Vermillion, School of Education, (253) 535-7273. Faculty advisor. Dr. Cathleen Yetter. Courses are subject to cancellation by May 15 in the case oflow enroUment, so registar early. MA T E R OF ARTS I

ED

CAT I O N WITH I

l T I A L CERT I F ICATION

Pacific Lutheran University'S School of Education offers an innovative teacher education program leading to the Master ofArts. Classroom Teaching degree with an Initial Washington State Teaching Certificate with endorsements in grades K-8 (Elementary Education) and grades 4- 12 (Subject Matter Specific). The 14-month program, which begins in June of each year, is designed for those who have completed a baccalaureate degree in the liberal arts and who are committed to a career of service as teachers in Washington schools. A strong emphasis in the program is placed on developing the skills necessary for the integration of curriculum at the primary, intermediate, and middle school levels. Working together in a cohort, program participants also learn the art and practice of collaboration with peers, university faculty, and public school educators. Course work in the program is taught by a team of PLU faculty who meet regularly to plan and integrate learning experiences across the curriculum, Admission to the M.A. with Certi.fication Program is competitive. Applications are due by February I , and are reviewed be faculty, and selected candidates are invited to the campus for personal interviews. At that time, they also complete an on-campus writing sample. For further information, contact Dr. Douglas Lamoreaux, Director, M.A. & Certification Program, (253) 535-7272. MASTER OF ARTS EDUCATIO

AL IN AD M l N I STRATION

If you are looking for a move to Education Administration, c nsider PLU's unique cohort program designed to meet your needs: •

Portfolio documentation that you have met principalship standards

v eeld y learning community and monthly professional seminars

• Designed and delivered by professors, students and school leaders

Collabo rative learning and competitive program pricing The coursework for this cohort spans two summers. Applications are due March 1 for classes that begin June 1 , 1 999. For further information and applications call (253 )535-7287 or contact gagno ngw@plu.edu.

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATIO

: THE I

CLU S I V E

LA S ROOM

PLU in collaboration \vith educators from Pennisula School District sponsors a site-based Master's in Education program focusing on the Indusive Classroom, Candidates complete degree requirements in 2 1 months. Those interested in information about future cohorts should contact Douglas Lamoreaux, Pacific Lutheran University School of Education, (253) 535-8347, ADVANCED PLACEMENT INSTITUTES

offers eight graduate-level Institutes for beginning or experienced AP teachers in the summer of 1 999. They include American Government, Biology, hemistry, English Literature, English Composition, Environmental Science, American History, and AB Calculus, The fee of $670 includes tuition for two semester hours of graduate level credit and many teaching materials, For infonTIation and registration, phone (253) 535-7 129, PLU

TACOMA COM MUN I TY RESOU RCES WORK S H O P

The Tacoma Community Resources Workshop is a 6-semester hour (9 quarter hour) continuing education course designed to acquaint the educators of Pierce County with an array of business and industry resources that they might integrate into learning experiences for their tudents at all grade levels. The three-week course (june 24 - July 14) meets daily and consists of multiple field trips to local businesses. Students will develop curricular modules for their own classes as well as engage one another in reflection and discussion of their LIl1derstanding of the composition, diversity, operation, and economic impact of business and industry on their corrununity. The program cost is $545. Contact Judy Hyden at 253-862-6877 for more information and for registration. TECHN OLOGY L TH E FOR E I G N LANG UAGE

LASSROOM

This is a one-week workshop designed primarily for junior and senior high school foreign language teachers. Teachers of other courses, such as Social Snldies, that also integrate foreign languages into their curriculum are welcome as well. We will explore uses of technology to enhance your foreign language curriculum. The majority of the time will be spent with hands-on development of materials that you can take \\<ith you at the end of the course. No previous experience \\<ith technology is required, For more information, contact Bridget Yaden (253) 535-8330, MATH ASSESS ME

T W O R KSHOP

This course (june 28-July 2) will focus on individual assessment and mentoring in mathematics \\<ith a focus on NCfM Standards and Washington E.ARLs. Participants will practice new ways of diagnosing each student's LIl1derstanding of math concepts such as place value, operations strategies, fractions, and decimal . Then they will develop appropriate learning approaches to support their students in improving their understanding and skills in mathematics. Contact George Gagnon at (253) 535-7287,

continued on next page


for teachers OF INTEREST TO PHYSICAl EDUCATlON TEACHERS T h is workshop is designed to in tro duce the Sport Education Curriculum and Instruction model. Participants will experience Sport Education

tbro ugh an interactive "hands-on" workshop. Time will be devoted to d i s cussing the place of sport in education, physical edu ca t ion, and recreational settings. A major workshop outcome for each pa r ticipant will be development of a Sport Ed ucation "season" for implementation in your selected setting to include instructional materials and st rategies . For more information, contact Deborah Tannehill (253) 535-7 1 73.

M USIC OPPORTUNITIES FOR TEACHERS AND STUDENTS Workshops that will be offered throughout the summer include:

Mtliter Teachers ofMusic (undergraduate) July 19 - 23: World Cultures

(L. Jessup) - explores music in a global framework, cross-culturally, and as a part of the fabric of daily life, and presents practical

and teachable music and arts activities which can be used as part of Language Atts, Social Studies, and other academic subjects.

Northwest High School Band Camp (R. Bradley) - July 1 2- 1 7: Fourth annu al PLU band camp for senior high school students featuring PLU's own Raydell Bradley, \vith daily classes and private lessons.

High School Piarw Perjomulnce Institute (c. Knapp) - June 28 - July 16: Offers the junior and senior high school pianist an opportunity for concenb'ated study with a master teacher, including two lessons weekly and daily classes devoted to pian o literature, keyboard harmony

chinese landscape paintingfor all Renowned Chi11ese Landscape Artist, Wu Xiu, also p rofessor at the Beijing Art Institute, will be a guest of PLU this summer. He will offer a week-long workshop on techniques of Chinese landscape painting, \'lith different portions geared for novice pain ters, experienced Summi painters, K- 1 2 teachers, and other i nterested community members. Included will be a trip to the mountains to capture o u r surroundin g Northwest beauty through Chinese landscape painting styles. June 2 1-25 is the date for the workshop. Call 253-53 5-7 1 29 for further i n formation and registration .

for the yo ung at heart E LD E R H O STEL This world-wide program offers seniors (55 a.nd over) a week-long collegiate experience o fclasses and dorm life. Complete information is available through the Center for Public Service (253) 535-7 173. Regis tration materials and catalogs may be obtained from Elderhostel, 80 Roylton St., Suite 400, Boston , MA 021 16.

eve n ts Summer at PLU offer

countless activities and events for the whole fam ily. From outdoor concerts and sport camps to educational workshops

and conferences, everyone is s ure to find many stimulating opportun iti es to quench their su mmertime needs. Check our website for up-to-date information abo u t events: www. pl u . ed u /home/s u mme r

FRUlT FESTIVALS a favorite are PLU's fruit festivals, held once a month in Red Square, where fam ilies enjoy fresh fruit, ice cream and lively entertainment. The Office of Summer Studies and Food Services are pleased to co-sponsor three noontime fruit festivals, celebrating the harvest of each variety.

Always

June 1 6 - SCMWllEIU1.Y Fr:S'[1vAL

â&#x20AC;˘

July 21 - RASPBERRY FESTIVAL

OUTDOOR CONCERTS Summer is the perfect time for concerts and other pe r formances ou tside on Red Square or in the Mary Baker Rus ell (p.-IBR) Amphithe a ter.

Watch for a we e kly update on events or call (253) 535-7 1 29 or

1 -800-756- 1 5 63. THE UN lVERSITY A RT GALLERY The University Art Gall ery ummer exhibition will eature work that illumina tes the summer sessions

theme of recyc l in g . Stop by the University Gallery in 1l1gram Hall and browse anytime between 9 a.m. and 4 p. m . , Monday-Friday.

â&#x20AC;˘

August 11 - PEACH FE.'>'TIVAL


even ts KPLU SUMMER ACTIVITIES PLU is ho me to one of the National Public Radio's top affi l i a tes, K P LU 118.5 FM . KPLU th e fegi n's pr em in

nL

public radio station, with more than a

quarter million listeners each week throughout the region. KPLU is nationally recogn ized fo r it's commitm nt to daily news, and it's jazz and blues. As you

enjoy summ er on campus, or exploring the northwe t, yo u can always hear Nation a l Public Radio, local and regional news, and great jazz and !llues throughout the region at 8 8 . 5 FM, or o u r n etwork of tr anslators. KPL

is also now avail able on the World Wide Web at www.KPLU.oq�.

Summer offers lots of festivals and speci al events and KPLU is involved with many of them. Stay tuned to KPLU for de tails , visit t he web site , or check our jazz h tHne at ( 206) 292-JASS. This su m mer K P LU, in partnership with PCC Nat ur al Markets, will present our Ninth Annual S unday Brunch

Ja72 Cruise Series .

Cruise dates are July I I and

I S. August 1 5 and 29, Septemb e r 1 2 a n d 26, and October 3. The cruises bring toge th er the best of the Northwest in one wonderful even t: great m usic, g re a t S u n d a y m o r n i n g b ru n ch , great v iews and a g re a t price wh i l e supp o r t ing the station. This i s t he per fec t event for out of town guests, family and friend.<;. G ro up rates are also available, but book early, the cru ises sell out weeks in ad ancc. Reserve your seat by cal ing KPLU at 1 -800-677- 5758. KPLU will also be involved with the Northwest Folklife festival on Memorial Day Wee ke nd, The d uMau ricr Jazz fest ival in Vancou er BC, the l a�"t week of June; The Centrum Blues Festival, J une 25 and 26, Centrum's Summer Jazz F stival, July 24 and 25; Bumbershoot at the Seattle Center on Labor Day Weekend, :lnd many more events yet to be a n nou n ced. Stay Tu nedl FREE OFFER: At home or on vacation, as you travel around the Northwest, yo u'll find KPLU's program guide w i t h o u r list of translators very handy. If your plans in lude t ravel beyond wes tern Was h i ngton and southwest B.C. , we also have cop i es o f the t rave ler's gu ide to NPR around t he United States. For your free copy of K PLU's program guide or N P R's list of memb r station:;, call KPL

at 1 · 800-677 -5758.

ALUMNI AND PARENT RELATIONS SUMMER EVENTS OF 1 999 The Office of Alumni and Parent Relations sponsors everal events each summer. In August, they a re pl anning to help cele b rate the opening of the new

home of the Seattle Mariners , S a feco F iel d , by re n ting a suite and hos t i ng an venl for PL U Al umni, Parent and Friends. If you would be i nterested in this or other alumni events, please con tac t the OftleC of Alumni a nd Parent Rel atio ns at 2 5 3 -535-7203. SUMMER CONFERENCES AT PLU

1 99 9 will b e an ot he r busy s u m m e r of c o n ferences a t PLU.

A m o n g th e g ro u p s h o l d i n g c o nven tions, camps and

ork hops will b e the Frosty

Westering Footba l l Camp, Haroldson Basketball Camp, PLU Wrestl i ng Cam p , P LU oftball Camp, P LU Volleybal l Camp, PLU Soccer Ca m p, United Soccer

Acade my, Was hi n g ton Jou rnalism Education Association, St uden ts Equipped to M inister to thei r Peers ( ' EM P), Summer I nst i tute for the G ifted, Piano earbook, Scandinavi an Teachers Instilut , Northwest Band Camp, Jazz Cam p, ELCA Evergreen Yo u t. h TV, ELCA Rainbow f G i fts, E LCA Holy Commotion, NW boys Choir, NW Photo Workshop, Elderhostel, and Summer Lnstitute for Theology.

Camp, Jostens

DID YOU KNOW?


Univeristy

§ IE RV 1I C 1E§ ,,& lFAC ][ lLlI T lI 1E§

Services ACADEM I C A D V I S J

G Of fiCE

TRI

week during each term. A variety of software

ITY LUTH ERAN C H 1 L D CARE

The Academic Advising Office provides general

M any PLU students, faculty and staff use the Trinity

programs are available fo r the systems.

advising services for undergraduate students during

Lutheran Child Care Center at 1 2 1 1 5 Park Avenue

un iversity has adopted standard software including

summer sessions. It offers information on general

South. Located across the street from the University,

word processing and spread sheets for PCs and

university requirements and procedures, and helps

Trinity Lutheran accepts children on either a full-time

Macintosh computers, and data bases and statistical

students choose and plan educational programs.

or part-time basis; no daily drop-in care is available.

software for PCs.

During the months of June and July, hours are

Children from twelve months of age through Kinder­

Wormation regarding telephone services, computer

Monday through Thursday, 9 am to 5 pm, and Friday, 9 am to 12 pm. For help, come to the office, Ramstad I l l , or phone (253) 535-8786.

garten receive excellent supervision and nutritious

software standards and policies, and u.c. Lab

meals and snacks. Although there is no summer

hours can be obtained by contacting Computing and

pre-school program, there are educational activities

Te lecommunication Services' main office at

The

scheduled for all ages. VIsitors are welcome ifyou would

( 2 53) 535-7525, or visiting our departmental home

ACADEMIC AS r STANCE: THE

like to come by and observe, or phone (253) 535-2699

page at PLU's web site: http://www.plu.eduicats/.

LEARNING CENTER

for further information.

The intentional, unauthorized entry into a computer system is a crime under the laws of the State of

The dictionary defines peer as "a person who has

T

equal standing with another, as in rank, class or age."

CAREER DEVELO P M E

At the Academic Assistance Center we like to use the

Want someone to rev iew your resume? The staff in

unage of the peer tutor

Career Development can help. Located in Ramstad

as

the learning guide, meaning

that peer tutor and tutee alike both bring a measure

Hall, room

Washington. Computer security programs and

1 1 1 , the office houses the Career Library

devices are used to manage and control access to programs and data. In the event of computer trespass, university officials are autho rized access to

of ability, expertise, and information to the encounter.

which contains books, reference materials, videos,

all data and messages associa ted with the incident for use in its resolution.

During the academic year, students use our program to

directories, occupational and employer information, and

i ncrease their knowledge, supplement classroom

a computerized career information program as

Voice messaging systems fall under the Telecommu­

activities and develop efficient learning and study

resources available to students. Complete listings

nications Act which makes tampering with another person's voice mail, or making prank and obscene

strategies. All services are free to registered PLU

are also available to students interested in full-time

studen ts. Tutoring usually takes place in the Academic

professional employment after graduation as well as

calls, illegal. The un iversity vigorously prosecutes

Assistant Center, Ramstad 1 1 2. Limited services are

part-time off campus positions. Stop by or phone

these violations both criminally and via the student

available during the summer months. Please check with

(253) 53 5-7459.

conduct system.

the Center regarding your specific needs, or c.c1ll (253)

acadcenter@plu.edu.

ENTER

Current

CENTER FOR I NTE RNATI ONAL PROG�S

INFORMATION DESK - UNTVERSfIY

information on tutoring and group sessions is also

The Center for International Programs coordinates

The"WoDesk"also maintains current information

available on the home page at http://www.plu.edulaastJ

on- and off-campus international activities, study

regarding events held on campus and is happy to

abroad and international student services.

PLU

assist with directions to campus services and

BOO KSTORE

sponsors a range of programs worldwide, and students

personnel. Summer Hours: 7 a.m. - 8 p.m. daily.

The PLU Bookstore offers a variety of educational and

are encouraged to include an international experience

(253) 535-7457.

personal products from Macintosh and IBM com­

in their college career. The International Student

535-7 5 1 8 or e-mail

puters to batteries and video tapes; all priced below

Services assists with questions of visas and immi­

D I N IN G SERV I C ES

suggested retail. You will also find all your required

gration matters, enrollment confirmation, validation

Dining Services strives to provide choices fo r

textbooks and reference materials, plus a large selection

of 1 -20 forms and employment opportu nities/

restrictions for students with F- IIJ -1 status. Located

board and non-board students with options suited

of general reading matter. Any book or item that is not carried can be special ordered at no additional charge.

in Harstad Hall. Phone ( 2 5 3 ) 535-7577 for further

The Unive rsity Center is the primary dining hall

PLU-imprinted clothing and memorabilia are also

information.

for summer students on campus. Espresso carts

store that can both satisfy a sweet tooth and supply the

COMPllTlNG AND TELECOMM UNICATI ONS

Building carry a variety of baked goods and pastry

toothpaste to wash i t away. Summer hours are:

SERVlCES

,items

Monday - Thursday, 9 am - 5 pm and Friday 9 am -

Computing and Telecommunication Services provides

University Center and Columbia Center Coffee

available. Housed within the Bookstore is a convenience

12

to a wide range of tastes and a variety of schedules.

in the University Center and Administration as

well as deli sandwiches and soups. The

pm. Extended hours for the first two days of each

for campus-wide communications and computing

Shops have a full service deli and grill. A variety

term are: 8 am - 6:30 pm. If you have specific textbook

needs. The main offices are located in the southeast

of meal plan packages are available through the LuteCard office. Ifyou have any questions please call

needs at other times, please phone (253) 535-7665 and

corner of the lower floor of the Mortvedt Library

arrangements will be made to serve you. The Book­

building. The facility houses the University's central

(253) 535-8874. A schedule of hours of operation

store prides itself on providing cheerful special services.

computing systems, including DEC Alpha systems. The

for our services is available in the Dining Services

Alpha systems are used primarily for academic purposes

office in the University Center.

TIlE PLU

and provide access to the Internet. Additionally, each

O RTHWEST STORE, only one block

away, located at 407 Garfield Street, provides gift

residence hall room is equipped with a special data

T H E M O RTVEDT LIBRARY

ideas which depict Northwest places and themes.

jack This allows students with their own computers to

Pottery, food, books, art and clot'hing can be found

connect to the campus data network without a

The Mortvedt library is the reference/research library on campus. Students may check out books,

in this unique shop. The PLU Bookstore and PLU

modem . Through the campus network, students

periodicals, and media equipment with a valid

orthwest are owned and operated by Pacific Lutheran

have access to the PLU library's on-line public access

ID card. Other library services and resources include:

University.

catalog (as well as others throughout the worl d ) ,

Internet access, online databases, interlibrary loan

electronic mail a n d other Internet research tools.

services, group study rooms, copy machines, typewriter rental, book lockers, research assistance,

C A M P US M I NISTRY

Each residence hall room is also equipped with a

Pacific Lutheran University is a place for the interaction

digital telephone and voice mail service. Students

database searches, workshops on library electronic

of academic study and the Christian gospeL Please call

will need an e-mail account for access of university

resources and research skills, multi-media preview

(253) 535-7464 for details ofworship opportunities. The

databases. Take your PLU ID card to the Computer

rooms, listening/viewing lab, Language Resource

University pastors are ava ilable for conversation and

Center during normal business hours.

Center, fax services, multi-media equipment/software

pastoral care in the University Center.

A large computer lab, located in the University Center,

ch ecko ut, and university archives and special

provides access to the Alpha, I B M - P C s , and

collections. Phone ( 2 5 3 ) 535-7500 for further

Macintosh computers. This lab is open seven days a

information.


Recreational Facilities

PLU offers a broad variety of recreational 0 p po r­ tunities for summer students. Exceptional facilities are available for most popular sports and astimes! Free use of the Names Fitness Center, Olson Audi­ torium and the Swimming Pool is available by presenting your student ID card (available from the LuteCard Office). Reservation of racquetballJsquash courts is madeby calling (253) 535-8798. Schedules for use ofall recreational facilities are available in the School of Physical Education office in Olson Auditorium.

p

M U LTl -ET H N I C RESOU RCES/STUDENT f NVOLVEM ENT A N D LEAD ERSH I P Peer advisors in the Multi-Ethnic Resources assist

students with general matters as well as provide information of specific interest to each student and student groups. The focus of the office is to aid students in becoming an integral part of campus life and in developing their potential on campus and beyond. Student Involvement and Leadership coordinates informal seminars and consultations to familiarize students with the campus resources. Located in the University Center # 1 53. Phone (253) 535-7195 for further information. RES I D ENTIAL L I F E AND HOU SING

Campus living continues to grow in popularity as an economical, convenient answer to housing needs during summer school Rates remain below the standard monthly rental for an apartment; and new, flexible summer meal plans enhance economy and convenience. C a m p u s living also fac i l i ta tes o u t- o f- class interaction with faculty and other students. Single rooms are limited and are assigned on a space-available basis. Students and staff initiate and coordinate residence hall programs. Many programs take advantage of the natural resources of the Puget Sound area: mountains, lakes, recreation areas, and the ocean. All programs are designed to enhance yo ur summer school experience. You may obtain campus housing by contacting the Residential Life Office at (253) 535-7200. TUDE T L I FE TheStudent LifeOffice is the administrative umbrella

for PLU's Student Life organization. It gives overall direction to a variety of student services and acts as a central resource for students in formation and assistance. Departments within Student L i fe l n clude: Campus Safety; Career Development; Counseling and Testing Services (which also serves students with disabilities) ; Health Services; Residential Life; and S tudent I nvolvement and Leadership (which indudes the Multi- thnic Resource Center). Student Life, through its services and programs, promotes a campus enwonrnent wherein students may explore, develop, and learn in both academic and co-curricular contexts. StopbyAdministration J05 0rphone (253) 535-7191 and get acquainted.

ESS CENTER contains the latest in weight training and other conditioning/fitness equipment, including an indoor jogging track.

NAMES FIT

OLSON AUDITORIUM is a multipurpose facility

featuring a hardwood gymnasium floor and an Astroturf fieldhouse. Activities include basketball, volleyball, badminton, handball, racquetball, and squash WlMMlNG POOL offers a swimmln g area, diving pool, sunbathing area, locker and dressing rooms. Swim lessons a re available for ages 4 through adult. Call (253) 535-7370. UNIVERSITY CENTER GAMES ROOM features

pool tables, table tennis, shuffleboard, and coin­ operated table games. U N I VERSITY GOLF COURSE is a 2,770 yard,

nine-hole, par 35 layout with a reduced fee schedule for students. ; Numerous recre­ ational opportunities exist close to the campus. Spanaway Park, located by Lake Spanaway, two miles south of campus, features canoe, rowboat and paddle boat rentals in addition to swimming, horseshoes, picnic facilities, golf and fishing. The public Spanaway Gol f Co urse is a beautiful championship course with well-kept fairways, greens and traps. Sprlnker Recreation Center, also located two miles south of campus, has excellent facilities for tennis, track and field, softball, baseball, basketball, broom hockey, racquetball, and an ice skating arena. Sprinker also has a sun-bathing area, and locker and dressing rooms. For program days and times or court reservations, phone (253) 5 37-2600.

Building ( 1 966): Houses university administrative offices, clas rooms, stuclios and master control for closed circuit television. The office of Special Academic Programs and Summer Sessions is in A- 107.

Hauge Administratioll

RobertA L Mortvedt Libmry(l 966): An arr-conclitioned

multi-media learning resource center containing over 400,000 books, perioclicals, microfilm, and auclio­ visual aids, and on-line computer record-search capabilities. The building also houses the Computer Center, University Archives, and Photo Services. Xnvier HaD ( 1 937, IT!IIlOdeletl l966) : Houses classrooms

and offices for faculty of the Division of Social Sciences.

J 984): Houses the School of Nursing, the Writing Center, AURA, Academic Advising, Counseling and Testing Services, Career Services, and classrooms.

Ramstad Hall ( 1 947, remodeled

Memorial Gymnasium ( 1 94 7. remodeled 1 984):

Provides classroom and activity areas for the School of Physical Education and the Theatre Program. Eastvold AuditoriulII (1952): Accommodates concerts,

special events and plays. It also contains classrooms, stage and ensemble practice rooms for the Music Department and the Communication Arts Department as well as the KPLU-FM radio studio.

OPF-CAMPUS RECREATIO

Buildings

University Center (1 970): The family room of the

campus for students, staff and guests. The University Bookstore is housed in the "UC", as are the cafeteria, coffee shop, Information Desk, and leisure time games room. Other offices located in the Center include SIL (Student Involvement and Leadership), Campus Ministry, studen t government, and the student meclia. Also the computer user room is located here. Scandinavian Cultural Center ( J 989): Located in the

Univer ity Center, the Scanclinavian Cultural Center maintains public hours for exhibit viewing. Special programs and craft demonstrations are scheduled throughout the year.

Aida Ingram Hall ( 1 955, remodeled 1 971 arId 1 986):

Houses studios, offices and classrooms for the School of the Arts, the Art Department, Communication and Theatre Department, University Gallery for outside exhibitors and Wekell Gallery for student works. William O. Rieke Science Building (1 985): Provides administrative offices, laboratories, and classrooms, along with a 200-seat lecture hall for Biology, Chemistry, Geosciences and Physics Departments.

PWEast Camplls (1 914, acqllired ill 1982, remodeled 1984):

Houses classrooms, a child care center, a gymnasium, and offices for Special Education, Marriage and Family Therapy, and Social Work staff. Community outreach programs such as a Wellness Clinic, Second Wind (for senior citizens) and family counseling operate with PLU East Campus as base. Mary Baker Russell Music Cellter February, 1 995): Its

grand feature is the 520-seat Lagerquist concert hall, the only concert hall in the region designed solely for the performance of music. Located in Lagerquist is the brand new Fuchs organ, second largest organ west of the Mississippi. Also houses classrooms from the Percussion Studio to the Early Music Room. Glasswork designed by Dale Chihuly will be on permanent display.


Local Sights, Sounds, and Sites Nestled between the shores of Puget Sound and majestic Mt Rainier, Tacoma and its environs offer something for everyone. 1ake your pick - museums and

galleries, historical �ites.live productions, miles of hiking and biking trails, endless beaches - all are in and around Tacoma and PLU. Don't forget to sample su perb Northwest cuisine or the many ethnic restaurants in the area. Beverages arc also exemplary - fine Washington wines and micro beers, and the wide range

of coffee selections. ARTS A N D ENTERTAI NMENT Tacoma-Pierce County hosts some of the world's best e ntertainment at the Tacoma Dom.e and B roadway Theater D is tric t The Tacoma Dome, the world's largest wood-domed arena, features sports, exhibitions, and 8 wide variety of performances ( 2 53) 572-3663. The Broadway Center fo r the Performi ng Arts incl udes the Pantages Theater, Ria lto Theater, Thea t re on the Square and the Rehearsal Hall (253) 59 1 5890. Several small local theaters are gaining recognition for their well-crafted productions - Tacoma Little Theatre (253) 272-228 1 and Tacoma Actors Guild (253) 272-2145, Tacoma Musical Playhouse (253) 5656867. Th e Amphitheater presents the outdoor "Jesus of Nazareth" from July through Labor Day ( 2 5 3 ) 848 - 34 1 1 Watc h for free outdoor s u m m er concerts b y the Tacoma Symphony ( 2 5 3 ) 272-7264. .

.

MUSEUMS AND H ISTORIC SITES

Tacoma-Pierce Co unty was created by the Oregon Territorial Legislature in 1852. The county was named for Franklin Pierce, who had just been elected 14th presiden t of the United States. The Washington State H istory Museum is a 1 00,000-squ are- foot museum connected by a courtyard

and amphitheater to the historic Union Station. The Hal J of Washington History contains a traditional Coast Salish plank house, a Hoo ve rvill e shack, and a full-size Boeing B- 1 7. Multimedia presentations enhance the exhibits . ( 253) 2 72 -3500

The Tacoma Art Museum has an impressive permanent collection, including the sculptured glass exhibition by internationally-known Tacoma artist Dale Chihuly, as wen as revolving exhibits. The ArtWORKS Gallery is open to children and adults to create their own art inspired by current exhibitions. (253) 727-4258. The Tacoma Narrows Bridge, com ple ted in 1 950, is the fifth longest suspension bridge in the world and spans the narrowest point ofPuget Sound. The 5,979 foot brid ge replaced the original s tructure known as "Galloping Gertie," which collapsed during a wind storm in 1 94D. A small park and a museum recall the tragedy. Hwy. 1 6

Union Station, now a federal courthouse, is a Tacoma landmark which has been restored to its turn of the-century eleganc . It features a spectacular exhibition of glass by the internationally known artist Dale Chih uly. Free p ublic tours are available Thursdays and Fridays at 1 :00 pm. (253) 572-93 1 0 -

­

Some other sights and si tes to discoller: where Tacoma put down its roots in 1 864.

Old Town Historic District

Children's Museum of Tacoma

H istoric Fort Nisqually - a full -scale rest ration of Hudson's Bay trading post.

camp 6 - depic ts the history of steam logging.

-

(253) 627-603 1 .

Steilacoom Historical Museums - Steilacoom is the state's oldest incorporated town, 1 854.

Steilacoom Cultural Center and Museum - features the history and contemporary lifes tyles of the

Puget Sound Mariner's Museum in Gig H arbor - an astonishing collection of marine information

Fort Lewis Military Museu m - Northwest military history from the Lewis and Clark Expedition in 1 803 to present day (253) 967- 7206.

Steilacoom fndian Tribe (253) 584-6308. and artifacts (253) 858-SAll'.

McCho rd Air Museum - a look at military aircraft, uniforms and equipment (253) 984-2485.

Ezra Meeker Mansion - built in 1 890 by famous pioneer, Ezra Meeker (253) 848- 1 770.

P ioneer Farm M us e u m

- a

look back i n t o the life of an 1 88 7 home s tea der - good family f un

(360) 832 -6300.

Mount Rainier Scenic Railroad - take

• Eva ngelische lutherische K irche

-

S H O PPING Like t o shop? Take your pi k - there

a

ride on a 1920 stearn locomotive ( 360) 569-2588.

in Elbe, this pi ct uresqu e church is only 18 x 24 feet (360) 565-26 1 4 .

are sev

ral large malls and numerous specialty shops in the area.

The Taco ma, Lakewood, and South H ill malls are meg a-malls, all accessible by bus. Try Freighthouse Square. Procto r Shop pin g District, S tad i lUTI District and Tacoma's Antique Row. Don't miss the open-air market in downtown Tacoma on Th ursdays and in Puyallup on S at urdays through o u t the swnmer. Along South Tacoma Way you will find a large variety of Korean stores and other Asian stores are scattere d

throughout th e Taco ma- P ierce Coun ty area.

PA RKS AND RECREATION You will not want to miss the wide assortment of p arks and recreational areas that surround you!

Point Defiance Park is one of the largest urban parks in the country, combining the best in Northwest scenic beauty with formal gardens, historic sites, a world-class zoo and aquari um. Within the park are Fort Nisqually, Camp 6, Never Never Land, many picnic sites, and miles of beach front.


Local Sights, Sounds, and Sites Northwest Trek Wildlife Park on the way to Mt. Rai nier, is a place to experience native Northwest animals as they roam freely on 600 acres of forest and meadow land. To ur the park on an tram in the company of an expert naturalist. Within about

an

hour's drive of the campus is Mount Rainier National Park, about 400 square miles of stunning vie\o\'S; hiking, camping, and natural trails;

wildflower meadows and forest; glaciers, rivers, and waterfalls.

The Jistgoes on and on • Ruston Way Waterfront Park - on Commencement Bay; a great place for walking, skating, biking, slNimming, picnicking • Commencement Park and Marine Park - also on the shoreline downtown • Gog-l.e-l-li-Te Wetland - 9.5 acres of estuary wher the Puyallup River meets Commencement Bay, with abundant plants, fish, waterfOl\'l .md animals • Snake Lake Nature Center - 54 acres of Wetland and forest with nature walks, i nterpretive center, and wildlife • Wrig ht Park - a wealth of tree varieties, along with the historic W.W. Seymour Botanical Conservatory • Wapato lake park • American Lake Park • Penrose State Park • Kopachuck State Park • Spanaway Lake Park • Fort Steilacoom Park • Dash Point State Park • Lakewold Gardens • Titlow Beach There are so many parks to "see and do." All the above are within an hour of PLU, and most within thirty minutes' drive. You won't get bored!

SOME AREA SUMMER EVENTS J UNE •

Farmers Markets throughout the summer: Gig Harbor, Puyallup, Tacoma, Graham, and Proctor (253) 627-2836

• •

Concerts in the Park ( Thursdays, June th rough August): (253) 584-4 133

• •

Meeker Days Hoedown & Bluegrass Festival (253) 840-263 1

Sound to Narrows Run: Point Defiance Park along Five-Mile Drive: (253) 597-8560

Gig Ha rbor Parade: (253) 851 -6865

JULY • •

Seafirst Taste of Tacoma: Point Defiance Park (253) 232-2982 Fourth of July Festivities throughout the area: (253) 627-2836

• Tacoma Old Town Blues Festival (253) 627-1 290 • Ethnic Fest Tacoma's Wright Park (253) 305 - 1 036 • Children's Museum of Tacoma's "Party in the Park": Theater Square (253) 627-6031 • Gig Harbor Arts Festival (253) 8 5 1 -6865 AUGUsr • Pi ree County Fair: P ierce County Fairgrounds in Graham (253) 847-4754 • Fort Nisqually Brigade Encampment: Point Defiance Park (253) 591 -5339 • Family Scavenger Hunt: Children's Museum of Tacoma (253) 627-6031 • Latino Heritage Festival in Wright Park (253) 565-2535 • ZooSOlUlds at Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium (253) 59 1 -5337

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(located ill Unn...,rsity CmtuA,u/Adminislrm;oIl 8I1i/Jing)

50 CENTS OFF A LArrE .did wlIh PLU I D. Gmt. Ofltr socxI: l\lay 24- ugust :>.o. 1m -

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Index

Upon registration, the student and his or her parents or legal guardian, as the case

ACADEMIC .\DVISING OFFIC!!, II

LANGUAGES, 2 1 , 2 2

ACADEMI

LIBRARY,

ASS !5TA NCE CENTER, I I

may be, agree to accept the responsibility a nd legal obligation and to pay all tuition costs, room and meal charges, and other special fees incurred or to be incurred for

AfJM ISSIO N, 6

ADVANCE PLACEMEIfI" INSTITUTES. 29

ALOMIII SPECIAL EVENTS, II ANI1fROPOLOGY. I O ART, 1 0, 1 1

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT, l 4

the student's education. The University, in turn, agree

MAJORS A ND MINORS. 4, 5 MARR IAGE AND F AMI LY THERAPY, 22.2J

O

�IIDDLE C L LEGE, 28

MUSIC, 23,14

benefits & scn>ices, to include statements of honorable dismissal, grade reports, transcript of records, diplomas, or pre-registrations. The student shall also be denied admittance to

classes and the use of University facilities. All account� 60 days delinquent arc routinely reported to a credit bureau.

N�TURAL SCIENCE,

Pacific Lutheran University does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, creed , color,

NO RTHWEST BAND CAMP, 28

CA:.f PUS hIlNIST RY,

University bills shall

release the University of any obligation to continue to provide the applicable educational

N AlotBS FITNESS CElITER,

BUSI � 12

A failure t o pay all

applicable and as described in the catalog.

MATHEMATICS. 23

BIOLOGY, I I BOOKSTOR!!,5

make available to the

MASTER'S DEGREES,

MULTI·ETHNIC RESOURCE CENTER, BACffELOR'S D EGItW.

to

studt:n t certain educational programs and the use of certain University facilities, as

national origin, age, or handica ping condition in the educational Prob'f3JTIS or activities

NURSI N G, 24

which i t operates and is required by Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972

r.EIfI"ER FOR CAREERS AND EMPLOY· OLSO. AUD ITORI UM,

and the regulations ad.pted pursuant thereto, by Title vn ofthe Civil Rights Act of 1974,

Ca<TER FO R PUBUC SERVICE,

PARKING, s

11

CHEM I STRY, 12, 13

PA.RKS

MEIIT,

and by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 not to discriminate in such manner.

CElITER fOR INTERNATIONAL

P10GIWI.>.

CHILD CA.RE,

D

RECREATION, l4

said acts and published regulations to this University may be referred to:

PASS/FAIL, 7

COMMENCEMENT, 8 COMMUNICATION AND TffEATRE,

PAYMENT IN FO

RMATION ,

requirement not to discruninate in educational programs and activities extends to

employment therein and to admission thereto. 111quities concerning the application of

9

1,

PHILOSOPHY, 24 PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 24.25

1l,14 COMPUTER SCI ENCE, 14 COMPUTING !c TEUCDMMUNICA· nON SERVICE-S,

The Director of Human Resources, Pacific Lutheran University, telephone (253)

535-7 1 85 , for matters relating to em ployment policies and grie\'ance

POLITICAL SCIENCE, 26

p rocedures for personnel employed by the University.

PSYCHOLOGY. 26

2.

PHYSICS, 25

The Associate Provost, Room 1 04, Hauge Administration building, Pacific Lutheran University, telephone (253) 535-7 125, for matters relating to

COSTS. l l COURSE LOAD AND WA I VERS, COURSE NUMBERING,

N S

COURSE OFFERI G , 10

students admissions and curriculum.

RAINBOW OF GIFTS, 28 RECREATIONAL FACILITIES, l 4

3,

REGISTRATION, 6 , ) , 8

The Student Life Office, Room 1 05, Hauge Admin istration Building, Pacific

RELIGION, 26, 27

Lutheran University, telephone (253) 535-7 1 9 1 , for matters regarding

DINING SERVICES,

RESIDENTIAL LIFE,

administrative policies relating to student and student services.

DIVERSITY REQUIREMENT,

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES, l6

DROP/ADD, 7

ECONOMICS, 14

SOCIAL WORK. 27

EDUCATION, 1 4 , 15, 1 6

SOCI OLOGY, 27

4. The D irector of Counseling and Tes t i ng Services, Roo m 1 06, Ramstad Hall, Pacific Lutheran University, telephone (253) 535-7206, for matters

SHOPPING, l4

relating to the application of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.

S. The Director of Multi-Ethnic Resource Center, Pacific Lutheran University,

W UCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, 16, 1 7

SOUTH SOUND JAZZ CAMP, 28

ELOERH OSTEL, lO

SPECIAL EDUCATION, 17,20

telephone (253 335- 7 1 59, for matters relating to the student grievance

ENGlISH, 20, 21

SPOR1S AND ACTIVITY CAMPS, 28

procedure.

ENVIROME!>lTAL SCIP.NCE, 21

STATISTICS, 27

6. Or the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education,

STUDENT UFE, II

Switzer Building, 330 C Street SW, Washington D.C. 20202.

SUMMER CONFERENCES, I I FOOD, S,9 FRUIT FfSTIVALS, lO FOR TEA HERS, 29, lO

SUMMER INSTITUTE FOR THE GI

S /tiMER PIANO PERFORMANCE INSTITUTE, 2&

GUDES. 5 , 8 (;lWlUATlON, 8

Pacific Lutheran University complies with the Family Education Rights and Privacy

SUMMER SCHOLARS,

Act of 1974. Inquiries concerning the application of this act and published regulations

SWIMMING POOL,

to this university may be referred to the Adm ini!.trative Associate to the Vice President and

TEACHING ENDO RSEMENTS, 15

University, telephone (253) 535-7 1 9 1 , or the Family Education Rights and Privacy

GEOSCIENCES , 2 1 GOlf COURSE,

PTE D, 28

Dean for Student Life, Room 1 05, Hauge Administration Building, Pacific Lutheran TElE· REG ISTRATION. 7, 8 TRANSCRIPTS, 5, 8 TumON AND FEES, 9

Office, Department of Education, 330 I ndependence Avenue SW, Washington, D.C.

2020 1, telephone (202) 245-0233.

IiEALTff EDUCATION, 21 H!5TORY, 2 1

UNIVERSITY FACILITIES, II

HOUSING, 9

UNIVERSITY SERVICES, 32, II

ID CARDS. 5, 8

I ERPA EDU

lIONAl PR IVACY S :ATLM ENT

In accordance with the Family Educational

Righ ts and PrivilCY Act of 1974, popularly

known as the "Buckley Amendment" and carrying the acronym "FERPA," Pacific

INDEPENDENT STUDY, 8

Lutheran University has adopted a policy to protect the privacy of education records.

INFOR MATION DESK,

This act also establishes the rights of parents and currently enrolled, eligible

INScRANCE,

students to inspect and review their education records; and provides guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through infonnal and fornlal hearings.

KPLU SUMMER ACTIVITIES, 3 1

Parents and currently enrolled, eligible students will be notified of thdr FERPA rights annually by publication in the Student Handbu Ie. Interested parties may review the policy in the Office for Student Life, Hauge Admini tration .Building, Room 105.

DI eLAJ Lf.R ST TE[\tENT The informatiun contained herein reflects an

accurate picture of Padfic

Lutheran

University at the time or publication. However, the University reserves the right to

mak necessar y changes in procedures, pol icies, calendar. curriculum, and costs.


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• SELECTED CAMPUS CONTACTS University Center . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

University Switchboard .......... . . . . ................ 5 3 1 -6900

Foss Res idence Ha.lI . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............. 27

Campus Phone Information . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . ....... 535-7449

Haavik House ............................................................. . . . 8

University Printing

Campus Safety (24 hrs.) .................. ............ 535-744 1

Harstad Residence Ha.ll ............ .......... . . ......... . . ............. 2 5

Warehouse . . . . ....................................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2

Academic Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . ........ . . . . .. . . . . . . 5 3 5 -7 5 1 8

Health Center . . . . . . . . . . . ....................................................... 6

Women's Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Admissions . . . ............. . . . . . . ..... . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . . . . . . . 535-7 1 5 1

Hinderlie Residence Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Xavier Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

& Parent Relations . . . . . .................... 535-74 1 5

Hong Residence Hall . . . ............................ . . . . . . . . . . . .......... 2 1

Alumni

Business Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . 535-7 1 7 1

Human Resources . . . . ....................................... .............. 3 0

Church Relations ......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . 535-7423

Ingram Hall .............. ......... ..... . . . . . ..... ......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... 1 0

& Events Center .......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535-7453

Knorr House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ........... 5

Development ........... . . . . . .. . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . 535-7 1 78

Kreidler Residence Hall . . . .. . .. ......................... . . . ......... . . . 20

Conference

Emergency ........................ .......................... 535-79 1 1

Lagerquist Concert Hall . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Evening Student Liaison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535-7 1 3 1

Lee House ( ROTC) ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............................. 7

Health Center . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535-7337

Mailroom

Information Desk/Tickets . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535-7457

Mary Baker Russell Music Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... 1 9

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .

32

& Publications . . . . . . ........................ 32 I

PARKING

� o

VISITOR/PUBLIC PARKING STAFF/FACULTY PARKING

o STUDENT PARKING 6. HANDICAP PARKING

KPLU 88.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . 535-7758

Math Building .......... ........... . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . ......................... 39

& Information . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . ................. 535-7430 President . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . ..................... 535-7 1 0 I

Memorial Gymnasium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Regular visitor parking is indicated on the map. Reserved

Mortvedt Library/Computer Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ......... 1 4

parking slots may be used by visitors during non-working

News

Student Life . . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535-7 1 9 1

Names Fitness Center ......... . . . . . . . ................. . . . . ............ 36a

Student Services Center ................ ............. 535 - 7 1 6 1

Nesvig Alumni Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Financial Aid

Olson Auditorium , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,, , , , , , , , , , ,,,,,,,,,,, 34

Registrar

Ordal Residence Hall ............................................. . . . . . . . 1 1

Summer Studies . . ........................................ 535-7 1 29

Park Avenue House (ACE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .... 2

Transfer Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535-7 1 3 8

Pflueger Residence Hall . . . . ........... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . . . . . . . . . 37 Lewis House ....... . . . . . . . . . ...... . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . .. . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

BUILDING LEGEND

Plant Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . . . . . . . . .......... 3 1

Administration B u i lding ( H auge) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . 1 3

PLU Northwest ( g i ft shop) . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . 45

Blomquist House """""""""""""""""""""""""'"'' 3

Ramsay House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... 9

Bookstore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Ramstad Hall . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... ................ . . . .. . . ......... 28

Clmpus M a i l ...... . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ......... . . . 3 2

Rieke Science Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Columbia Center . . . . . . . . . . ................... . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . 40

Rosso House . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . . . . . . . ......... 18

Delta Hall ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... 43

Scandinavian Cultural Center . . . . . . . . .............................. 29

hours (5pm-7a.m), and on weekends (some 24 hr. exceptions are indicated by signs). If you plan an extended visit, you may obtain a temporary permit from Campus Safety (Harstad Hall). ... To downtown Tacoma and Seattle

East Campus . . . ................ . . . . . . . . . . ............................... 17

Stuen Residence Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2

Eastvold ChapeVAud itorium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Swimming Pool . . . . . . . .. . . . ............. . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . . . .. . . ........... 3 5

PACI F I C

Evergreen Court . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . ... ............ 44

Tingelstad Residence Hall . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1

LUTH ERAN

Faculty House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....................... . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Tri n i ty House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 6

UNIVERSITY

Trinity Lutheran Church ................................ . ............. 1 5


NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE

PAr D

TACOMA, WA PERMIT NO.

T E. R M I

May 24 - June 1 8

TERM 2

June 2 1 - July 23

Work

hop

TERM 3

July 19- 23

July 26 - August 20

REG ISTRATION BEGINS APRlL 13. If you would

like further information or a course

catalog, please call

• (253) 535-7 1 29 . 1 (800 ) 756 - 1 563 • e-mail: spacsummer@plu.edu • wViw.plu.edu/home/summer

Ifyou have received more than one copy ofour Summer Sessions

, •0

1999 Catalog, please pass one

to a friend.

• •

• •

PLU i,< home ojaward­

willllillg KPW·FM 88.5, Jazz and Nat;otlQ,1 Public Radio

are all around you

P R I N T E D

O N

R E C Y C L E D

P A P E R

416


SUMMER SESSIONS

Attention Educators Paci

in the summer!

K- 1 2 TEACHERS, ADMINIST RATO RS AND EDUCATl O NAL STAFF ASSO CIATES Pacific Lutheran University offers the mosďż˝ comprehensive curriculum for the advanced preparation and professional growth of educators in our area. Whether you want to pursue a master's degree, an additional endorsement, a certificate, or just take a course to expand your professional skills, P LU provides a special atmosphere in the summer---challenging yet relaxed. pleasant, and rewarding. The legacy of excellence in education continues at PLU, described

in PW2000 in the tOllowing way: PLU seeks to empower students for /jyf!.5 of thoughtful lnquily, service, leadership, and care-for

I)tiJer persons. for tire community, ami for tire earth. CHECK OUT OUR WEB PAGE WWW .PLU.EDU/-EDUC

SEE INSIDE FOR INFORMATION ABOUT SUMMER COURSES AND SEVERAL "NEW PROGRAMS BEGINNING SUMMER 1999. Contact the

School ofEducation at PLU (253) 535-7272

-

((It)s not just a call, it)s a calling. ))


Pacific Lutheran University is delighted to announce the selection of our new Dean in the School of Education:

Welcome, Dr. Lynn Beck! Lynn Beck received her Ph.D. in Education and Human Development from Vanderbilt University. She holds a BA in English from Belhaven College, an MA in English from the University of Mississippi, and an Associate Degree in Nursing from Belmont College. Dr. Beck comes to PLU from the University of Alabama, where she was Professor and Chair of Administration and Educational Leadership in the College of Education. She also served as Interim Director of Alabama University's Educational Policy Center. Before assuming these responsibilities, Dr. Beck held several leadership positions in the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at UCLA, including the co-directorship of Center X with Professor Jeannie Oakes. Center X oversees pre-service teacher preparation, doctoral programs for educational leaders, and professional development activities for teachers. Dr. Beck has been actively involved in a number of u niversity-school partnerships including UCLA's School of Management Program, the California Center of School Restructuring Program, and The Center for Leaders of Alabama Schools Leadership Initiative. Dr. Beck's research interests include ethical issues and leadership and educational reform efforts. She is the a u thor of a n u mber of books including: Reclaiming Educational Admin istratioll as a Caring Profession and, with Joseph Murphy, Ethics in Educational Leadership Programs: An Expa nding Role, The Four Imperatives of a Successfu l School, and School-based Mallagemellt as a Reform Strategy: Taking Stock,

and ( forthcoming) The Productive High School: Empirical Foundation.

PLU's School of Education offers: MASTERS DEGREES IN:

Masters of Arts in Education with Certification Classroom Teach ing Ed ucation Administration Literacy Education Special Education Inclusive Classroom ENDORSEM NTS IN: 38 areas ranging from Chi nese to Chemistry, Anthropology to Speech including the endorsement in English as a Second Language ( ESL)

Regi strati o n for summer courses beg i ns on April 1 3, 1999. Tu ition in the summer is d iscounted: $33 5/cr. ($490/cr. in 1 998-99). To register, or for further i nformation and a course catalog, ca l l (253) 5 3 5- 7 1 2 9 or 1 -800-756- 1 5 63. Fax: (253) 536- 5 1 03. E-ma i l : spacsummer@plu.edu Call (253) 53 5-7272 with q u estions about specific School of Ed ucation courses or check out our web page at www.plu .ed u/-educ


Summer Teachers Academies In response to Washington State's Education Reforms, PLU's School of Education is initiating Summer Teachers' Academies to assist Washington educators in implementing the Essential Academic Learnings. The focus of the academies this summer will be: Gifted Education -

This special program, designed to enhance the skills of educators in challenging gifted students in their classrooms, is offered in conjunction with the Summer Institute for the Gifted. July 12 Allgust 20. -

EDUC �85; THE GlHEll CH I LO EDUC 555(0 1 ): CUR RlCULUM U�VELOPMhNT EPSY 365: AOVANCED HUMA DEV�LOPME T

Alternative Education - The focus of this academy is to enhance the skills of educators in challenging at-risk students in their classrooms, and in alternative forms of education. May 24 - July 2.

EOUC 470: CURRICULUM, M ATE R I ALS AN"D INSTRUCTION 1l0UC 555(02): CURRICULUM DmLOPMENT EPSY 560: COMMUNICATION IN THE SCHOOI.S.

IN

ESL

IIltrrnaril'e forms of assr'ssmetlt lind curriClllar srmtegies appropriate for tire Washillg/orl State Esselltial Leanlillgs will be tlte wltapiece of lire cOlme work. Teadrers will be able to complete requirements for a Certificate ofSpecially Area Studi!'> in Gifted or At-Risk EdllCiltioll at PLU this SlImmer. For additional information {Illd registratioll, call Dr. Doug Lamoreaux ar (253) 535-7292 REDUCED RATES FOR SUMMER COHORTS IN THRlffi ENDORSEMENT AREAS

Students opting to complete all 16 hrs. of one of the following three endorsement areas, during the summer of 1 999, will not be charged for the last 2 hrs of the 16. .

ESL EDUC 427/527

.!:I.Q.J.l.!!.S

COURSEmLE

M u lticultural Children's Lit

2

LANG 446

Theories of Language Acquisition

4

LANG/ED U C 445

Methods of Tea<hing Foreign Language and ESL:

3

E D U C 503B

Assessing ESL Students i n the Content Areas

2

LANG/E D U C 470

Curricu l um, Materials and Instruction for Teaching E S L

4

LANG/E D U C 475

Practicum i n Tea<hing E S L

( / Ins program r s dfllgm·d 10 en/rdnet' rile skills of botll regular aud spwui �ducalOrs rn order lo.facilrrare rlre SUCCfSS­ lui ;nc/rrs;ml 01 srudellts lor wllom linglish is ,/ SrcDtld Language. ) SPECIAL EDUCATION

COURSE TITLE

S P E D 40t

Instructional Strategies for Learners with M i ld Disa b i l ities

S P E D 402"

Practicum i n M i l d Disa b i l ities

16

TOTAL

l:t.Q.U.Ri 3

(1)

S P E D 396

Students with Special Needs i n the Incl usive Classroom

2

S P E D 404

Commu nication and Colla boration

3

S P E D 520/52 1

Teaching Students with Special Needs in ElementarylSecondary Classrooms

2

S P E D 292

Assessment in Special Education

2

S P E D 407

Curricu l u m , Instruction, and Technology

4 TOTAL

READING

COURSE mLE

16

.I:iQ.U.RS

E D U C 490/5 t O

Acquisition and Development of Language and Literacy

E O U C 505

Cu rrent Issues in Literacy Instruction

2

E D U C 4 t 1 /5 t t

Strateg ies for Literacy Development in the Classroom

2

E D U C 4 1 3/5 1 3

Language a n d Literacy Development

4

E D U C 4381538

Strategies for Whole Literacy Instruction, K- 1 2

2

E D U C 429/529

Adol escent Literature

2

E D U C 428/528

C h i l d ren'S Literature i n K-8 Curricu l u m

2

2

TOTAL

16


MI , A . CO IHI O Rlr§ MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION If you are looking for a move to Education Administration, consider PW's unique cohort program designed to meet your needs •

Portfolio documentation that you have met principalship standards Weekly learning community and monthly professional seminars Designed and delivered by professors, students and schoo.l leaders Collaborative learning and competitive program pricing

The coursework for this cohort spans two years including two summers and one year-long internship. Applications are due May 1 for classes that begin June 1. 1999. For further information and applications call (253) 535-7287 or contact gagllongw@plu.edll.

MASTER OF ARTS WITH INITIAL CERTIFICIATION: INTEGRATION AND COLLABORATION Pacific Lutheran

University's School of Education offers an innovative teacher education program leading to the Master of Arts:

Classroom Teaching degree with an Initial Washington State Teaching Certificate with endorsements in grades K-8 (Elementary Education) and grades 4-12 (Subject Matter Specific). The 14-month program, which begins in June of each year, is designed for those who have completed a baccalaureate degree in the liberal arts and who are committed to a career of service as teachers in Washington schools. Admission to the M.A. with Certification Program is competitive. Applications are due by February 1 . and are reviewed b y faculty, and selected candidates are invited to the campus for personal interviews. At that time, they also complete an on-campus writing sample. For further information, contact Dr. DOllglas Lamoreaux, Director, M.A. & Certification Program. (253) 535-7292.

MASTER OF ARTS IN E D U CATIO N : TH E INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM PLU in collaboration with educators from Pennisula School District sponsors a site-based Master's in Education program focllsing on the Inclusive Classroom. Candidates complete degree requirements in 21 months. Those interested in information about future cohorts should contact Dr. Doug Lamoreaux, Pacific Lutheran University School of Education, (253) 535-7292.

CHINESE ART WORKSHOP Noted Chinese landscape artist Wu Xiu, professor at the Beijing Art Institute, will exhibit his work and present a week of workshops, including a day specifically for K- 1 2 teachers. Also included i n t h e week will b e a trip t o the mountains to capture the beautiful Northwest in the style of Chinese landscape painting. June 2 / -25. Call (253) 535-7 1 2 9 or 1 -800-756- 1 563 for information. Don't miss this extraordinary opportunity!


CON T ]( N U ]( N G IE D 1U[ C AT Il ON C O O R §. IE§. TACO MA

COM MUNITY RESOURCES WORKS HOP (with the Tacoma-Pierte County Chamber of Commerce)

(9 quarter credit hours) EDUC S O I A - June 24 July 14 -

The Tacoma Community Resources Workshop is a continuing education 9 quarter-cred it hour course designed to acquaint the educators of Pierce County with an array of business and industry resources that they might integrate. into learning experi­ ences for their students at all grade levels. The three-week course meets daily and consists of multiple field trips to local businesses. Students will develop curricular modules for their own classes as well as engage one another in reflection and discussion of their under­ standing of the composition, diversity, operation, and economic impact of business and industry in their community. Cost:

$545. Contact judy Hyden at (253) 862-6877 for more i nformation and registration. TECHNOLOGY IN THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM (4 quarter credit hours) EDUC SOlD - July 1 9 - 23 This is a one-week workshop designed primarily for junior and senior high school foreign language teachers. Teachers of other courses, such as Social Studies, that also integrate foreign languages into their curriculum are welcome as well. We will explore uses of technology to enhance your foreign language curriculum. The majority of the time will be spent with hands-on development of materials that you can take with you at the end of the course. No previous experience with technology is required. For more information, contact Bridget Yaden (253) 535-8330.

MATH ASSES S M E NT WORKSHOP (2 semester hours) WUC 50 I E - June 28 - July 2 This workshop will focus on individual assessment and mentoring in mathematics with a focus on NCTM Standards and Washington EALR's. Participants will practice new ways of diagnosing each student's understanding of math concepts such as place value, operations strategies, fractions, and decimals. Then they will develop appropriate learning approaches to support their students in improving their understanding and skills in mathematics. Cost: $300 For more information, contact George Gagnon (253) 535-7287. For information about other Continuing Education courses that will be offered this summer, please phone (253)

535-7272.

OF I N TEREST TO P HYSICAL E DUCATION TEACHERS Sport Education Workshop: P H E D 401 - Aug ust 16-20 (I credit hour) This workshop is designed to introduce the Sport Education Curriculum and Instnldion model. Participants will experience Sport Education through an interactive "hands-on" workshop. Time will be devoted to discussing the place of sport in education, physical education, and recreational settings. A major workshop outcome for each participant wiU be development of a Spon Ed'ucation "season" for m i plementation in your selected setting to include instructional materials and strategies. For more information, contact Deborah Tannehill (253) 535-7173.

OF I NTER E ST TO M U SIC EDUCATORS Music for Classroom Teachers · World Music: MUSI 501 - July 19 - 23, 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., M-F

I ( l cred i t hour)

This workshop explores music in a global framework, cross-culturally, and as a part of the fabric of daily life, and presents practical and teachable music and arts activities, which can be used as part of Language Arts, Social Studies, and other academic subjects.

Northwest High School Band Camp: Fourth annual PLU band camp for senior high school students featuring PLU's own Raydell Bradley, with daily classes and private lessons. July 12- 1 7. Pillllo Performance Institute, Piano Pedagogy Workshop, Illld Piano Literature Workshop

South Sound ja2Z Camp: Open to all high school and university instrumental musicians. Intensive study in the areas ofjan. improvisation, jazz theory and small combo perfo rmance. july 26 july 30, 9:00 am - 4:00 p.m., M-F. -

For more information about any of the above music workshops, please call (253) 535-7602.

continued �


OF I NTEREST TO KIDS (253) 535-7 1 90 for more information. (Jllne 21 - July 30) I\'urtures academic deveJopment of 'high potential. students from low income fa milies through high school and into college. Call (253) 536-6085 for more information. Middle College Ullne 19 - July 30): Helping srudents successfully bridge high school and college. CaD (253) 535-8786 for more information. Summer Institute for the Gifted Utl/y 25 - August 14) Residential Co-Educational Academic Camp for gifted srudents grades 4- 1 1 . Contact (253) 535-8549 for more information. Note also the Teacher's Academy for Gifted Education, which is linked to the SIG program. MESA: Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement for minority students. Call

Upward Bound

Reg istration for summer begi ns April 1 3, 1 999. Till1�' .1I1d dalc, l o r lile,e (1llIrS�' 111.1) h.lvc cil.lIliled s i nce t h e r r i ll t i ll� III Ihi, bru.:illlrc. Fur all 1 -800-756- I Sb.\ ur h i I [': II W\\,W-" I tJ.ed IIIi1Uf1lcl'lIIII Il1cr.

1II'd.I1�,

c.1 I 1

L J Please note that those dates shaded within the scheduled Tenns below have different starting/and or ending dales-

COURSlE OffERfNG§

Day Codes: M (Monday). T (Tuesday). W (Wednesday). R (Thu"day). F (Friday) and S (Saturtlay)

Term I {May 24 - June 18}

CREDrrs

CLASS TIME

DAYS

INSTRUCTOR

DATES

E D U C 205

M u lticultural Perspective in the Classroom

4

8:30- 1 1 am

TWR

L. McGraw

5/24-61 1 8

E D U C 470

Curriculum, M�terials and Instruction for ESL

4

4:30-7pm

MTWRF

5/24-61 1 8

E D U C 475

Practicum in Teaching ESL

9:30-10:4Sam

MTWRF

K. Shanton K. Shanton

EDUC 490/5 1 0

Acquisition and Development of Language

S-8:30pm

MW

M. Roach

5124-6/1 8

EDUC S03A

Using Computers in the Classroom

TBA

TBA

P. McGee

5/24-6118

E D U C 545

Methods and Techniques of Research

4:30-S:4Spm

MTWRF

M. Hillis

5/24-6118

*EDUC 550

Principalship I

5:30-8pm

MW

M. Baughman

6/2-7121

*EDUC 563A

Integrating Seminar - Legal and Statistical Issues in Educ.

2-5:30pm

TR

L. Reisberg

5124-6/4

*EDUC 563C

Integrating Seminar - Issues of Child Abuse and The Law

1

2-5:30pm

TR

K.

SPED 401

Instruction for Learners with Mild Disabilities

3

4:00-7:30pm

TRS

P. Leitz

TBA

P. Leitz

5124-6/ 1 8

K. Gerlach

6/1 2-6/1 9 5/24-611 8

2

SPED 402

Practicum for Learners with Mild Disabilities

TBA

S P E D 480

Issues in C h i ld Abuse and Neglect

8:30am-4:30pm

Gerlach

5/24-6/1 8

618-6/ 1 8 5124-6/1 8

SPED 492

Strategies for Teaching Early Learners

2

4-7:30pm

MW

Staff

SPED 520/521

Teaching Students with Spec. Needs in Elem.lSec. Class.

2

4:30-6:30pm

MTWRF

Staff

5124-6118

SPED 588

Legal. Ethical and Administrative Issues in SPED

5:30-8:30pm

W

P. Leitz

5/24-61 1 8

Term II (June 21-Jul

16)

CREDrrs

CLASS TIME

DAYS

INSTRUCTOR

DATES

8-1 0:4Sam

MTWRF

M. Walker

l l am-12:15pm

MTWRF

Staff

6/2 1 -711 6 6/2 1 -711 6

E D U C 4 1 1 /5 1 1

Strategies for Literacy Development in the Classroom

E D U C 503B

Culture and Learning for ESL

2

E D U C 505

Current Issues i n Literacy Education

2

2-4:4Spm

TR

J . Lewis

EDUC 507

Principles of Info. Organization, Retrieval and Service

8:00am-1 2: 1 5pm

TR

Staff

612 1 -71 1 6

E D U C 509

Foundations of Collection Development

8:00am-12:1 5pm

MW

S t aff

612 1 -7/1 6

612 1 -7/2

EDUC 530

Children'S Writing

8 - 1 0 :4Sam

MTWRF

J . Bates

E D U C 544

Research and Program Evaluation

1 2:30-1 :4Spm

MTWRF

R. Mulder

E D U C 545

Methods a n d Techniques of Research

2

3:30-4:45pm

MTWRF

L. McGraw

6/2 1 -711 6

*EDUC 551

Educational Law

2

5-8pml8:30-3:30

TRIS

L. Carney

6122-7124 7/12-7123

716-7/1 6 6/2 1 -711 6

EDUC 5 5 5-01

Integrating Mythology and Folklore Across the Curriculum

1 2:30-3:30pm

MTWRF

E. Nelson

*EDUC 5 5 5-02

Curriculum Development

1 2 :30-3:30pm

MTWRF

M. Col lay

6121 -712

* E D U C 559

Personnel Management

5-8pml8:30-3:30

TRIS

l. Carney

6122-7/24

* E D U C 562

Schools and Society

8:30am-12:25pm

MTWRF

D. Lamoreaux

EDUC 585

Comparative Education

9:30am-12: 1 5pm

MTWR

Staff

8:30am-12:2Spm

MTWRF

S. Yerian

3-5:45pm

MW

S. Nourse

6/2 1 -7/1 6 612 1 -7/16

* E PSY 560

Communication in Schools

SPED 390

Instruct. Strat. For Learners with Mod. Disabilities

2

6/1 4-7/2 612 1 -711 6 7/6-7123

SPED 3 9 1

Practicum: Learners w i t h Moderate Disabilities

TBA

TBA

S. Nourse

SPED 396

Students with Special Needs in the Inclusive Classroom

9am - 1 2 : 1 5 pm

MTWR

Staff

7/6-7116

SPED 399

Practicum in Special Education

TBA

TBA

Staff

6/2 1 -711 6

SPED 404

Communication and Collaboration

9 a m - 1 2 : 1 Spm

MTWR

K.

SPED 596

Tech nology and Special Education

l l am - 1 2 : 1 Spm

MTWRF

Staff

Gerlach

6/21 -7/2 6/2 1 -7/16


Workshop Week (July 19-July 23J

EDUC

427/527

DATES

DAYS

INSTRUCTOR

8:30am-4:30pm

MTWRF

Staff

7/19-7/23 7/1 9-7/23

CREDITS

Multicultural Children's Literature

CLASS TIME

EDUC 4381538

Strategies for Whole Literacy Instruction, K-12

2

8:30am-4:30pm

MTWRF

EDUC 485 SPED 292

K.

The Gifted Child

2

8:30am- 1 2 pm

MTWRF

M. H i l l i s

7/1 2-7/23

Assessment in Special Education

2

8:30am-4:30pm

MTWRF

G. Williams

7/1 9-7/23

SPED 5 5 5

Supervising Paraeducators

9:00am-4:00pm

MTWRF

K.

7/1 9-7/23

Term III (,lui

26-August 20

CREDITS

CLASS TIME

DAYS

Strand

Gerla ch

INSTRUCTOR

DATES

EDUC!5PED 4131513 EDUC 428/528

lang. and Literacy Development: Assessment and Instruction

4

2-4:45pm

MTWRF

J. lewis

7/26-8/20

Children's Literature in the K-8 Curricul u m

2

9:30am-12:30pm

MWF

C. Yetter

7/26-8/20

EDUC 429/529

Adolescent Literature i n the Secondary Curriculum

2

2-4:45pm

MWF

C.

7/26-8/20

E D U C 445

Methods for Teaching Foreign lang. a s a Second lang.

3

1 0a m - 1 2 p m

MTWRF

Staff

E D U C 537

Media and Technology for School Library Media Specialists

2

9:30am-1 2: 1 5pm

TR

Staff

7/26-8/20

* E D U C 564

The Arts, Mind and Body

2

8:30am-4:30pm

MTWRF

Staff

7/26-7/30

Yetter

7/26-8/20

* E PSY 560

Communication in Schools

3

8:30am- 1 2:00pm

MTWRF

M. H i l l i s

6/21 -7/2

* E PSY

Advanced Human Development

4

9:30am- 1 2 : 1 5pm

MTWRF

M. H i l l i s

7/26-8/20

3

565

* E PSY 566

Advanced Cognition, Development and learning

S P E D 393

Teaching Students with Behavior Disorders

S P E D 394

Practicum with Behavior Disorders

SPED 407

Curriculum, Instruction and Technology

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7/26-8/20

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G. W i l liams

7/26-8/20

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9:30am-1 2: 1 5pm

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7/26-8/20

THESE COURSES ARE AVAI LABLE ONLY TO STUDENTS ACCEPTED INTO SPEaFIC MASTER'S COHORTS.

ANTHROPOLOGY 220

People of the Wor l d : The China of Mao and the China of Deng (*Specia l guest professor Sidney Rittenberg)

ANTHROPOLOGY 354

Geography a n d World Cultures: Peopl es, Places a n d Prospects

ANTHROPOLOGY 361

M a n a g i n g Cu ltural Diversity

ART 341

E l ementary Art Education

ART 390

Women in Arts

BIOLOGY 3 5 1

Natural History of the Pacific Northwest

COMMUNICATIONS 500

Effective C o m m u n i cation

ENGLISH 216

Short Stories from Africa and the Caribbean

HISTORY 359

H i story of Women i n the U . S .

HISTORY 385

Twentieth Century Russia, 1 890-2000 (*Special guest professor J o h n Morris)

HISTORY 461

H istory of West and N o rthwest

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 322

PE in the El ementary Schools

PSYCHOLOGY 405

Asian American Experience

PSYCHOLOGY 462

Consumer Psychology

SOCIAL WORK 390

Grief Issues: Child, Adolescence and Adults

TH EATER 458

Creative Dramatics

I F Y O U WOULD L I K E TH E F U L L CALL 1 -800-756- 1 56 3 .

PLU

S U M M E R SESSIONS C ATALOG,

McGraw

Reisberg

8/2-8/20


NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE

PACIFIC

UJTHERAN

PAI D TACOMA, WA PERMIT NO. 4 1 6

UNIVERSITY Summer Seesions Tacoma, WA 98447-0003

CAll (253) 535·7272 WITH QUESTIONS ABOUT SPECIFIC SCHOOL OF E DUCATION COURSES. It's easy to get more information a bout PLU Summer Sessions and a complete course catalog:

Ca l l

(253) 535-7 1 29

or

1 -800-756-1 563

http://www. P L U . edu/ home/summer

e-m a i l : spacsummer@plu.edu

fax:

(253) 536-5 1 03

TERM 1 MAY 24 TERM 2 JUNE 21

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-

WORKSHOP JULY

· B

TERM 3 JULY 26

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JUNE

18

JULY

16

19 - 23 AUGUST 20

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Summer

P R I N T E D

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R E C Y C L E D

P A P E R

1999 Summer Sessions