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Volume

�VIV No.1 Bulletin of Pacific Lutheran University/Alumni Association

February 1979.

A I An unpre edented ef fort to broaden an d deepen PLU's ba eo/support

President William Ricke goes on the road.

Sharing in Strength. .......... 2 Facilities Priority Need. . . . . .. 3 A Vast Reservoir of Support ... 4

Laughing With One Eye . . . . . .. 6 IS,OOO-Mile Choir Tour .. ..... 9 'The Price Of Independence .. 12


haring in strengt PLU Launches $16.5 Million Capital Fund Campaign

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A five-year $ 1 6.5 million capital fund campaign is being launched this month by Pacific Luther an Uni ver sity, accor d­ ing t o PLU Pr esident Dr . Wil­ liam O. Rieke. N ear ly two year s in th e plan­ ning stages, the campaign is inten ded to r aise funds for a n ew $5 mil lion science building, a $3 million per for ming ar ts center, $ 1.5 mil li on for upgr ad­ ing of pr esent facilities, $S mi llion for scholar s hip an d main tenance endowment and $2 million to under gir d- the fi nancial stability of PL U, Dr . Rieke indicated. The fir st phase of the cam­ paign is beginni ng this month among the 280 congregat ions of th e N ort h Pacific Distr ict of the Amer ican Luthera n C hur ch. This phase, which continues thr ough October , is intended to r ais e a minimum of $3 milli on. A con curr ent campaign ef­ for t is being conducte d among the 1 1,500 member s of the PLU Alumni Association. This group is aimi ng at a $500,000 goal, acc ord ing to alumni dir ector Ronald Coltom. Futur e phases of the cam­ paign will be conducted among found a t i o n s , c or p or at i o n s , businesses and other chur ch bodies, Rieke said. Success of the chur ch and alumni campaigns will ulti­ mately depend on a " small ar ­ my of enthusiastic volunteer s ," said Luther Bekemeier , vice­ president for development at PLU. Bekemeier is the cam­ paign dir ector . The month of Januar y was spent r ecr uiting r egional and area chair man for both the chur ch and alumni campaigns, h e indicated. " Dr . Rieke and Coltom made the maj or ity of

PLU.

one of the country;s most beautiful college campuses but the facilities need is becoming critical. Insert: a typical faculty-student consultation in a crowded hallway of aging Ramstad Hall. .

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those per sonal contacts," Be­ kemeier said. They enjoyed ma­ jor assistance fr om adminis­ tr ator s Har vey N eufeld, Edgar Lar son and David Ber ntsen. The volunteer chair per sons r ecently have been involved in tr aining sessions and will be or ganiz ing local level campaign

volu nteer s. The ultimate goal of . the chur ch campaign, accor d­ ing to Rieke, is to get the message per sonally to individu­ al congr egational member s. Among the alumni, appr oxi­ mately half of whom live in the N or thwest, an equally per sonal campaign is planned. In addi-

Facts in Brief -' • Approved by 1977 North PaCific D i s t ri c t ALC Conv ntion • Timetable: November 1978 November 1979 .

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Three phases: ALC - North Pacific District Membership Campaign ( De cember 1978 - November 1979) ALe - North Pacific District Major Gifts Campaign (December 1978 - June 1979) PLU Alumni Campaign (Decemb r 1978 July 1l'17 ) • Goals ALC-NPD Membership . . . . . .. $2..0 mdli n . ...................... $1.0 milli }D ALC-NPD Maior Gif t s ..... PLU-Alumni . . . .. . . $ .5 million rth Pacific D i s t r i ct AL an i ev ry • Support base: every member of N alumni of PLU

tion to the N or thwest, eight A major " pockets" of alumni have . been identified, including M in­ nesota, Color ado, Monta na, Hawaii and four in Califor nia. Beyond those ar eas, solicitation will be by telephone and dir ect mail, Coltom indicated. Ho nor ar y campaign chair ­ per sons ar e Dr . Clar ence Sol­ ber g, ALC N or th Pacific Dis­ tr ict bishop; Mar v Harshman, Univer sit y of Washington b as­ ketball coach and a 1942 PLU alumnus; an d Gus Ander son, B ow, Wash. , busines sma n and farm er. Dr. Solb er g will head the ALC campai gn, Har shma n the a l umn i dr iv e and n der son t he major gi fts effor t. Th eme of the campaign i s " Shari ng in Str engt h."

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Science, Fine Arts Facilities re Priority PLU Needs Although Pacific Lutheran Un­ iversity is now in its 90th year,the PLU campus as it is known today was crea ed in less than 25years. Growth in enrollment and cam­ pus facilities virtually exploded ac oss the Parkland plains bet­ ween the end of World War II and 1970. Twenty-one of the 23 major buildings on campus were erected during that time. Enrollment in­ creased tenfold. Farsighted forecasts and pro­ jectsin the ' 50's and '60's brought revolutionary change at PLU in terms of academic excellence and facilities to accommodate a new level of achievement,according to PLU President Dr. William O. Rieke. Spiraling construction costs and le,ss spectacular enrollment pro­ jections contributed to a virtual halt in new construction after 1970, when the University Center was completed. "But the dynamic ener­ gy in the various academic depart­ ments could not be halted," Dr. Rieke said."New levels of academ­ ic achievement have contributed to a slower but steady enrollment increase in an era of widespread decline in private college enroll­ ments.More students and stronger programs have meant a greater demand,not just for more square footage, but better designed and equipped space,particularly in the sciences and fine arts." Dr. Rieke continued, "The day wben PLU must meet those de­ 'llands or face decline has arrived. - it can no longer be delayed." For that reason, the PLU Board of Regents and the Rieke administra­ tion have launched a five-year $16.5 million capital fund cam­ paign intended to provide the fol­ lowing:

old respectively. "Both venerated campus buildings will continue to be used, but in and of themselves they are no longer adequate for the tasks the university intends to accomplish," Rieke said. With completion of new facilities in the mid-'8 0's and various remod­ eling projects across campus, there will be a "domino effect" which will relieve increasing over­ crowding in various campus areas. In the sciences and fine arts, however, the need has been the most critical for the longest period of time,he indicated. Ramstad Hall,for instance,was designed for less than half the number of students currently en­ rolled in the sciences.The lecture rooms and laboratories are over­ crowded, there are increasing safety and design problems, and research space is virtually non­ existent. According to Rieke, continued inadequacies would be a serious deterrent in recruitment of both faculty and students and most certainly will be if present condi­ tions persist. "To date, however, the strong reputation of the PLU program has helped attract and retain highly qualified faculty members and has contributed to a stable enrollment," he observed. The music and drama programs at PLU are also paradoxical. The

'The dynamic energy in the academic de­ partments could not be halted' level of achievement and reputa­ tion continues to grow, but that very fact makes the problem of lack of classrooms, practice rooms,rehearsal rooms,perform­ ance areas and storage even more acute. A vision of the 21st century is guiding PLU planners as initial project steps are being taken. For

instance,a $138,555grant from th Murdock Charitable Trust of Van­ couver, Wash., is funding a com­ prehensive study of what science teaching could be like several decades from now. Experts from across the country are working with PLU science faculty members on both curriculum and facilities studies,and the findings will have a significant influence on the de­ sign of the proposed structure. According to chemistry profes­ sor Dr. William Giddings, chair­ man of the study project, some early proposals include extensive use of computers in science in-

'The day when PLU must meet demands or face decline has

Studies Center into the Performing Arts Center. Rieke emphasized that success of the capital fund drive will not only mean new buildings, but en­ dowment funds to insure their proper maintenance and additional endowment for student aid to in­ sure that qualified students will continue to reap the benefit of a quality education.Last, but equally important,is the need for addition­ al unrestricted funds to meet un­ predictable contingencies,such as the level of inflation, over which the university has no control. Simply stated,PLU needs addi­ tional facilities and funds to assure future stability and service,Rieke i n d i c a t e d . The "S haring in Strength" campaign is an unprece­ dented effort to achieve that goal by vastly broadening and deepen­ ing the university's base of support.

arrived' struction as well as studies related to computers themselves. Open laboratory concepts and greater emphasis on interdisciplinary courses for non-majors which would directly address world prob­ lems, particularly as they relate to science and technology, are also being explored. Similar planning steps are being taken in preparation for new fine arts facilities, and the need is equ a l l y great. Eastvold A u ­ ditorium was built when the stu­ dent population was 40 per cent of what it is today. Now music and drama activities take place in 13 different campus buildings. There is critical need for more intimate theater and recital facilities; practice, rehearsal and office space; plus less obvious intangibles such as improved ac­ oustics, safety and use of faculty and student time.All the latter are directly affected by available facilities,according to Dr. Richard Moe, dean of the School of Fine Arts. Early proposals also envision the inclusion of a Scandinavian

'A vision of the 21st century is guiding

PLU planners'

Luther Bekemeier Campaign director

* A $5million science complex

* A $3 million fine arts center *$1.5million to upgrade current facilities *$7 million for endowment, .including: -$2 million for endowed new facilities maintenance -$3 million to increase endow­ ment for student aid -$2 million to undergird the fiscal stability of the University. The two major new facilities will significantly complem ent the facilities in Ramstad Hall and Eastvold Chapel, 3 3 and 27-years-

SUMMARY OF THE NEEDS $5,000,000 ...for the new science building to replace inadequate facilities in Ramstad Hall $3,000,000 .

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for the new fine arts instruction center to replace inadequate facilities in Eastvold Chapel

$2,000,000 ...to create an endowment for new facilities maintenance $ 1,500,000 ... to upgrade current facilities $3,000,000 ...to expand the endowment for student aid w--

$2,000,000

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.to undergird the fiscal stability of the

University

SHARING IN STRENGTH. Pacific Lutheran University.Tacoma, Washington .(206) 531-6900


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ALe Churches Respond To PLU Capital Fund Campaign Plans

Avast reservoir •

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In an era of general austerity, is it realistic for an institution like Pacifc Lutheran University to undertake a S16.5 million capital fund campaign? PLU President Dr. William O. Rieke not only believes it is, he has publicly staked his presidency on it. His belief has been strongly reinforced by his personal experi­ ences during the past two months. Nearly two years of planning have already been invested in the campaign, but 1979 is the year it rolls. And when it's time for "the rubber to meet the road," it's the head man who is out on the high­ ways. Between Christmas and Jan. 20, Dr. Rieke made 61 personal calls to recruit volunteer campaign lead­ ers. Although many previously had not been actively involved with PLU, Rieke received an astonish­ ing 87 percent favorable response from lay leaders and 100 percent acceptance from pastors for lead­ . ership roles. "Even the few who said no were interested, but they either had conflicts or were already personal­ ly over-committed," Rieke said. "There is a vast reservoir of con­ cerned, committed individuals throughout the Northwest and even beyond, ready and willing to share their time, talents and re­ sources on behalf of PLU." He is already finding that the campaign theme, "Sharing in Strength," is more than just a motto. It clearly describes what is happening. The persons Rieke has recruited will serve as regional and area

campaign chairpersons in the vari­ ous conferences of the American Lutheran Church-North Pacific District. Those leaders, in turn, will recruit and supervise a small army of volunteers among the district's 280 congregations. The eventual goal is to get the PLU message to every ALe con­ gregation member personally by early next fall. The ultimate pro­ cedural objective of the campaign Rieke states in the form of a motto: "Every member is told the story; every member can decide." The basic elements of the PLU story are: (1) Pacific Lutheran University is owned and operated by the membership of the ALe North Pacific District. ''We are your university'" Rieke says. (2) PLU is a strong university today. It serves and is ready and willing to continue to serve the church in many different ways. To be able to continue to serve, and to be an institution in which its own­ ers and constituency can take

Other CampaignRelated Articles. •

Early Campaign Totals Already Exceed $400,000 More than $400,000 has been pledged toward the PLU "Sharing in Strength" capital fund cam­ paign during the early initial stages of the drive since the first of the year, President William o. Rieke announced Feb. 14. The total includes only the first SO or so leadership gifts together with some foundation and trust monies. ..It's t h e t i p of t h e iceberg," Rieke said. "The re­ spon s e h a s b e e n i m m e n s e l y gratifying." The gifts represent only the fraction of the campaign leader­ ship that have been involved in initial training sessions. More ses­ sions are to come, and the broad congregational and alumni drives have yet to begin, he indicated.

The Price of Independence

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pride, it must find major new sources of support. (3) Half of the PLU student body comes from district congrega­ tions. Investment in PLU is an investment in the futures of the children of the congregations. "This is a pivotal experience for PLU," Rieke points out. "This is the first time in its history that PLU, by itself, has made an organized, systematic effort to reach all the people in all the churches. The LIFE campaign ten years ago was not the same; it was a nationwide program on behalf of all ALC colleges."

Do You See The Potential PIle 14 He continued, "This is also uni­ que in the sense that PLU is the only senior Lutheran college in the Northwest. Our congregational owners are not in a competitive posture with other schools. And as important as money is at this time, equally important will be the in­ creased visibility and awareness, which will in turn inspire greater interest and involvement over a long period of time. "We have always received a strong feeling of affirmation," the president observed, "but we never had come talking dollars. Now we

are, and we are finding that the support is real." He cited some examples: * An Oregon man whose three children attended PLU and are all married to PLU alums asked, "When can we get started?" * A young alumnus, only three years out of school, at first won­ dered why he had been chosen. Then he responded, "I'm honored to be able to serve." *Out of 18 pastors called to serve, 18 accepted. *Out of 14 persons asked to t .... � a leadership role in the major gifts phase and pledge $5,000 or more, 11 said yes. *Few pastors have great means. Yet one said, "I'm pro-PLU but my church is also in the midst of a building program. I'm not sure what I can do." He sent a S1,5OO pledge. "That kind of warm feeling has been reflected all the way down the line," Rieke said. For Rieke, this initial campaign thrust meant 15-16 hour days, s... ven days a week through much � January. During one seven-day period he traveled to Bellingham, Port Angeles, Wenatchee, Ken­ newick and Walla Walla, making several calls on each trip, and still spent nearly two day on campus. Why are people so supportive of PLU? "Th e r e a r e s e v e r a l m ajor reasons," Rieke answered. "Some attended here. Some have had children or friends attend. Some believe in private higher educa­ tion, some in Christian privat higher education. "Most of them know that a school like PLU contributes something unique to society, perhaps in terms of ethics, morals, productivity or service. They want to perpetuate it. They don't want to see it die!" _


Honorary Fund rive Leaders Announced Three honorary chairman have a c c epted inv itations to head phases of the PLU "Sharing in Strength" campaign, according to PLU Pre s i d e n t D r . W i l l i a m a.Rieke. They are Dr. Clarence Solberg of Seattle, bishop of the North Pacific District of the American Lutheran Church; Gus Anderson of Bow, Wash., businessman and farmer; and Marv Harshman of Seattle, University of Washington head basketball coach. Dr. Solberg will head the cam­ paign effort within the 280 congre­ gations of the North Pacific Dis­ trict. Anderson, a 1948 PLU alum­ nus, is the major gifts chairman, a n d Ha r s h m a n , a 1 9 42 PLU graduate, will spearhead the alum­ ni drive. These initial phases, which have a combined goa of $3.5 million, will lead the way fo a five-year

Gus Anderson

effort to raise $ 1 6.5 million, Dr. Rieke indicated. The church phase will be aiming for $2 million; $ 1 million is anti­ cipated. from major gifts; and the alumni will be focusing at the $500,000 level. There will, of course, be some overlap among the "phases" as many of PLU's con­ stituents could conceivably be i­ dentified in all three categories, he observed. Dr. Solberg has served as presi­ dent and more recently bishop of the District since 1969. In that capacity he has also served as an ex-officio member of the PLU Board of Regents for 10 years. The District is corporate owner of the university. He previously served as execu­ tive assistant to the president of the ALC's North Wisconsin Dis­ trict for five years and as assistant director of home missions for the former Evangelical Lutheran Church. He has served as pastor of congregatio ns in Green B a y , Wisc.; San Bruno, Calif.; and Bison, S.D. Anderson, a blueberrY and rasp­ berry farmer, is a former teacher and trucking firm manager. He graduated from PLU with a degree in education. His wife, the former

Dorothy Nieman, is a 1 946 PLU graduate. Their four sons, Gerald, Don, Rich and David, have also attended PLU. The Edison Lutheran Church member said, "I am involved in the campaign because our family has been closely associated with PLU for many years. "Brothers and sisters, nieces and nephews have attended, as well as our immediate . family." Harshman has coached intercol­ legiate basketball for 35 years and is second in the nation among active coaches in terms of career" victories. His PLU teams won 236 games, five conference titles and made five trips to the NAIA nation­ al tournament between 1 946-58. In the past 22 years at Washington S t a t e a n d the U n iversity of Washington, Harshman's team s have won 282 games going into the current season. He received PLU's highest alum­ ni honor, Distinguished Alumnus, last fall, and was an Alumnus of the Year in 197 1 . A member of the National Association of Intercol­ legiate Athletics (NAIA) Hall of Fame, he was also honored as "Man of the Year in Sports" at the annual Seattle Post Intelligencer award banquet in 1 976.

Man Harshman

Dr. Claren�e Solberg

Sharing In Strength

Congregational Leadership Dr. Clarence Solberg (Seattle) Rev. David Steen (Olympia) �b & Leo Ellason (Olympia) -Aev. Keith Krebs (Walla Walla) Mr. Ole Halingstad (Walla Walla) Rev. Lionel Simonson (Klamath Falls, Ore.) Mr. Robert Shive (Sisters, Ore.) Rev. Grant Gard (Brush Prairie) Mr. Dave Radke (Vancouver) Mr. and Mrs. Donald Wick (Pasco) Rev. H.S. Babington (Kennewick) Rev. Ronald D. Martinson (Salem) Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Burchfield (Stayton) Rev. Paul Wuest (Wenatchee) Mr. Lawrence Hauge (Wenatchee) lev. Leonard C. Ericksen (Bellin­ gham)

Mrs. Onella Brunner (Mt. Vernon) Rev. Robert Gordon (Edmonds) Mr. Karl Forsell (Edmonds) Rev. E. Duane Tollefson (Beaver­ ton, Ore.) Mr. Dale Benson, (Portland, Ore.) Rev. Otto C. Tollefson (Poulsbo) M r . J a m e s W l d s t ee n (Port Angeles) Rev. James Berentson (Lewiston Id.) R ev. and Mrs. Fred Schnaible (Moscow Id.) Rev. Donald W. Taylor (Everett) Mr. George Thorleifson (Stan­ wood) Rev. John MUbrath (Portland, Ore.) Mr. Wesley Radford (Portland, Ore.)

Rev. David Wold (Puyallup) Mr. Ray Tobiason (Puyallup) Rev. Herbert Ringo (Seattle) Rev. Charles Mays (Renton) Mr. Richard Jackson (Renton) Rev. Gerald L Hickman (Kent) Mr. Curt Hovland (Seattle) Rev. and Mrs. Lothar Pietz (Twin Falls, Id.) Rev. Louis Brunner (Eugene, Ore.) Mr. Lyle Jacobsen (Eugene, Ore.) Rev. Robert Olsen (Almira) Mr. E. Robert Stuhlmlller (Edwall) Rev. Bernt Dahl (Spokane) Mr. and Mrs. John Krautkraemer (Spokane) Rev. John W. Adlx (Tacoma) Mr. Ray Highsmith, Jr. (Tacoma)

Architectural Firm Selected; 79 8 0 Tuition Approved By PLU Regents '

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A tuition ;increase of 9.9 per­ cent for the 1979-80 academic year was adopted Jan. 22 by the Pacific Lutheran University Board of Regents, according to PLU President Dr. William O. Rieke. The Board also approved the selection of the firm of Broome, O r!n g d u l p h , O ' T o o l e a n d Ru(folph of Portland for the preliminary requirements as­ sociated with the proposed new $5 million science building, Dr. Rieke indicated. He reported that PLU tuition for next year will be $1 1 1 per semester hour and room and board will be $1 ,635. Rates for the current year are $101 and $1 ,460. The 12 percent room and board increase reflects antici­ pated double digit percentage increases in a variety of budget items, including utilities, which are headed by a projected 65 pe rcent electricity cost in­ crease, he said. To assist students, the un­ iversity will increase student help wages by 16 percent, along with an increase in university­ funded student financial aid. Architectural work to be pre­ pared by the Portland firm is funded by a grant from the Murdock Foundation. Studies will include possible sites, costs and programmatic goals. As funding for the science building is developed, it is anti­ cipated that the firm will con­ tinue the architectural work through the construction phase, according to Rieke. The firm has completed many college p roj ects, including science facilities at Lewis and Clark, Reed and Concordia Colleges in the Portland area. A similar kind of preliminary planning effort by PLU art professor and designer Ernst Schwidder in anticipation of a future new fine arts facility on campus was also approved by the Board, Rieke said. Dr. Rieke told the Regents that PLU this year is second among Washington state pri­ vate colleges in enrollment of Merit Scholars. Whitman Col­ lege leads the list, he said. PLU also enjoyed a record January "Interim enrollment this year, Rieke reported.


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A-Daughter'sElegy

In Memory of Dr. Walter Schnackenberg

Laughing with one eye

Nightfishing The kitchen's old-fashioned planter's clock portrays A smiling moon as it dips down below Two hemispheres, stars numberless as days, And peas, tomatoes, onions, as they grow Under that happy sky; but, though the sands Of time put on this vegetable disguise, The clock covers its face with long, thin hands. Another smiling moon begins to rise. We drift in the small rowboat an hour before Morning begins, the lake weeds grown so long They touch the surface, tangling in an oar. You've brought coffee, cigars, and me along. You sit still as a monument in a hall, Watching for trout. A bat slices the air Near us, I shriek, you look at me, that's all, One long sobering look, a smile everywher But on your mouth. The mighty hills shriek back. You tum back to the lake, chuckle, and clamp Your teeth on your cigar. We watch the black Water together. Our tennis shoes are damp. Something moves on your thoughtful face, recedes. Here, for the first time ever, I see how. Just as a fish lurks deep in water weeds, A thought of death will lurk deep down will show One eye, then quietly disappear in you. It's time to go. Above the hills I see The faint moon slowly dipping out of view,

Sea of Tranquility, Sea of Serenity, Ocean of Storms .. You start to row, the boat .

Skimming the lake where light begins to spread. You stop the oars, mid-air. We twirl and float. I'm in the kitchen. You are three days dead. A smiling moon rises on fertile ground, White stars and vegetables. The sky is blue. Clock hands sweep by it all, they twirl around, Pushing me, oarless, from the shore of you.

Intermezzo Steinway in German script above the keys, Letters like dragons curling stiff gold tails, Gold letters, ivory keys, the black wood cracked By years of sunlight, into dragon scales. Your music breathed its fire into the room. We'd hear jazz sprouting thistles of desire, Or jazz like the cat's cry from beneath The passing tire, when you played the piano Afternoons; or "Au Claire de la Lune." Scarlatti's passages fluttered like pages. Sometimes you turned to Brahms, a depth, more true, You studied him to find out how he turned Your life into a memory for you. In Number 6 of Opus 118, Such brief directions, Andante, satta voce: The opening notes like single water drops Each with an oceanic undertow That pulled you deeper even as you surfaced Hundreds of miles from where the first note drew You in, and made your life a memory, Something that happened long ago to you.

And through that Intermezzo you could see As through a two-way mirror until it seemed You looked back at your life as at a room, And saw those images that would compose Your fraction of eternity, the hallway In its absolute repose, the half-lit room, The drapes at evening holding the scent of heat, The marble long-lost under the piano, A planet secretive, cloud-wrapped and blue, Silent and gorgeous by your foot, making A god lost in reflection, a god of you.

Walking Home 'Walking home from school one aftern�on! Slightly abstracted, what were you thmkmg of? Turks in Vienna? Lu ther on Christian love? Or were you with Van Gogh beneath the moon With candles in his hatband, painting stars Like singed hairs spinning in a candle fla�e? Or giant maps where men take, lose, reclarm Whole continents with pins? Or burning cars And watchtowers and army-censored news III Chile, in the Phillipines, in Greece, Colonels running the universities. Assassination , executions, coupsYou walked, and overhead some pipsqueak bird Flew by and dropped a lot of something that Splattered, right on the good professor, splat. Now on the ancient Rhine. so Herod heard, The old Germanic chieftains always read Such droppings as good luck· opening a,e door, You bowed to improve my view of what you wore, So luckily, there on the center of your head. Man is not a god, that's what you said After your heart gave out, to comfort me Who came to comfort you but sobbed to see Your heartbeat blipping on a TV overhead. You knew the world was in a mess, and so, By God, were you; and yet I never knew A man who loved the world as much as you, And that love was the last thing to let go.

Rome You held open the thousand year old door That I might enter in the cold, hushed, dark Cathedral's cave, that keeps the Bones and Ark, And, when the eyes adjust, Demon and Whore Rise on one wall, roaring for Beelzebub, And drag their fingernails through obscene crowds. But rings of saints chanting in frescoed clouds Gaze upward from the other wall, they rub Their fingertips on Mary's hem. You stood Alone a moment, your figure partly hid Among those figures; and seeing you amid That opulence of death, I understood The wooden crucifix with Christ portrayed Sagging in fear and in his downcast eyes His sudden knowledge that to recognize One's father, father, is to be afraid.


Returning North You bring your wife and daugh ters in your search To meet with your tradition face to face Above the Arctic circle where Norway's Relentless light keeps rising on the lurch Of our Volkswagen bus on goatpaths, north And north, asking directions as we drive. Your mother left in 1895, Her widowed farmer father setting forth To be a steerage class American. She clutched a copper teapot in the hold Her one possession. You're forty-six yea s old ' You come as a dead sister's only son.

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Your ancient aunt waits at a pasture gate ' Holding the letter you wrote months ago. She looks small, anxious, shy as the summer snow In patches at her feet. We see her hestiate ' Half-frightened by our bus, and overcome To see how you instantly recognize Her face, her hands, her raven hair her eyes So like your proud mother's, but he e becom A broken peasant from a fairy tale. You see your dead mother. She beckons us To follow her through meadows in our bus That she won't ride in. One by one we scale The ladder into her house above the bam Where pigs squeal, geese go gabbling to be fed.

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Inside a fierce-eyed man stares from his bed Of straw against the wall, propped on his arm, Then coughs and turns away. Out of respect, The scared, exhilarated family Hides in the kitchen, peeking in turns to see These rich A mericans. Their dialect Is difficult for you. We stay an hour, We eat fish, goat cheese, bread; and then their eyes, Their coughings strike you hard, you realize The little household is tubercular. Almost at onc� you say that we must leave, There in the mountains, days from anywhere, You say our family is expected somewhere Else, and soon, you ask them to believe Our visit has been good, we must go south. They do not understand; we drive away Slowly, painfully south, finding the way As tears will find their way into a mo uth, Hundreds of miles to Oslo, 101}g midnight days Of driving to the city of clean gold air And Lutheran chapels stark, narrow, and pure, And small, and white, so like your mother's face.

For 23 years before his un­ timely death in 1973, Dr. Walter Schnackenberg was a beloved and admired professor of his­ tory at Pacific Lutheran Un­ iversity. In his honor there is an annual lectureship presented on campus. On the 14th of February the 5th Annual Schnackenberg Memorial Lecture at PLU fea­ tured nationally known en­ vironmentalist and author, Dr. Roderick Nash. Thus it seems an appropriate time to share with Scene read-

You said lightly, Forget this incident, But, father, here, tonight, it comes to mind Or my mind comes to it as one will wind Through passageways cut through magnificent Sculptured hedges and, -stricken, come upon A waterfall suspended in white fros t And stand amazed and lost, so I am lost Remembering the fear your face took on.

"There are no dead" Outside a phoebe whistles for its mate, The rhododendron rubs its leaves against Your office window: so the Spring we sensed You wouldn't live to see comes somewhat late. Here, lying on the desk, your reading glasses, A nd random bits of crimped tobacco leaves, Your jacket dangling its empty sleevesThese look as if you've just left for your classes. The chess game is suspended on its board In your mind's pattern, your wastebasket Contains some crumpled papers, your filing cabinet Heavy with years of writing working toward A metaphysics of impersonal praise. Here students came and went, here years would draw Intensities of lines until we saw Your face beneath an etching of your face. How many students really cared to solve History's riddles?- in hundreds on the shelves, Where men trying to think about themselves Must come to grips with grief that won't resolve, Blackness of headlines in the daily news, And buildings blown away from /lights of stairs All over Europe, tanks in empty squares, The /laming baby-carriages of Jews. Behind its glass, a print hangs on the wall, A detail from the Bayeux Tapestry. As ignorant women gabbed incessantly, Their red, sore hands stitched crudely to recall Forests of ships, the star with streaming hair, God at Westminster blessing the devout, They ja bbed their thousand needles in and out, So metimes too busy talking to repair The small mis takes; now the centuries of grease And smoke that stained it and the blind white moth And grinning worm that spiralled through the cloth, Say death alone makes life a mas terpiece. There William at Normandy remounts his horse A fourth time, four times desperate to drive Off rumors of his death. His sword is drawn, He swivels and lifts his visor up and roars, Look at me well! For I am still alive! Your glasses, lying on the desk, look on.

ers an elegi_ac tribute to Dr. Schnackenberg written by his daughte r, Gjertrud (Trudy) Schnackenberg Smyth. A pro­ mising poet with some 50 publi­ cations already at this early stage in her career, she is presently working as an admis­ sions counselor at Mo unt Ho l y o k e Co llege i n Mas­ sa c h u s e t t s, w h e r e s h e graduated in 1975. The seven poems published h e r e a r e among 1 2 i n the entire elegy, which she wrote over a two­ year period, 1976-77.

Dr. Walter Schnackenberg


Notes When Falling Asleep In Class Could Have Payoffs

Environment Expert Fifth Schnackenberg Lecturer Dr. Roderick Nash, one of the country's most prominent environ­ mentalists, presented the Fifth An­ nual Walter C. Schnackenberg Memorial Lecture at Pacific Lutheran University Wednesday, Feb. 14, as Scene was going to press. The lecture in the PLU Universi­ ty Center was to deal with the topic of "Wilderness Management: A Contradiction in Terms?" Dr. Nash, the author of nine books and 85 articles on conserva­ tion topics , also participated in a public policy forum at PLU Thurs­ day. Others on the panel included Russ Dickenson, director of the Pacific Northwest Region of the National Park Service; Verne Hus­ er, Office of Environmental Medi­ ation, University of Washington; Larry Penberthy, president of Mountain Safety Research, Inc.; and Dr. A.D. Martinson, chairman of the PLU Department of History. Dr. Martinson is coordinator of the two-day event. The forum was sponsored by the PLU Center for the Study of Public Policy. Nash teaches American social and intelleatual history and pre­ sents environmental seminars at the University of California-Santa Barbara. He is presently complet­ ing a study of the world nature protection movement. In addition, he is recognized as an expert whitewater boatman, fly caster and guide. The Schnackenberg Lecture Series, co-sponsored by the PLU Department of History and the PLU Alumni Association, was insti­ tuted in memory of Dr. Walter Schnackenberg, professor of his­ tory at PLU for 23 years, who died in 1973. 0

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Notice Of

Nondiscriminatory Student Policies Pacific Lutheran University ad­ mits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admis­ sions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.

By Jim Erickson Tacoma News Tribune

Dr. David Sudermann

Prof. Awarded A.W. Mellon Fellowship Dr. David Sudermann, PLU foreign languages profes sor, has been awarded an Andrew W. Mellon Faculty Fellowship in the Humanities. Each year the Mellon Founda­ tion awards 10 to 15 such fel­ lowships to bring younger col­ lege educators from across the country to Harvard University for research and teaching. This year there were some 200 appl­ icants for the grants, Suder.­ mann estimated. The fellowship provides a full year's salary at Harvard, where S u d e r m a n n will become a member of the Department of Language and Literatures fa­ culty during the 1 97 9 - 80 academic year. He will teach one course and spend the re­ mainder of his time in research. Sudermann's specia l t y i s medieval religion as it affected literature of its time. His primary sources are 1 1th and 12th century epics, such as the "Song of Roland," which has contributed to the legend of Charlemagne. According to Sudermann, Christian beliefs in medieval times had a profound effect on history itself, as well as the way that history was recorded and literature was created. Such perceptions still have an effect on contemporary history, he said. S u d e r mann earned his bachelor's degree at Indiana University and both his advanc­ ed degrees at the University of Chicago.

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You can fall asleep in David Seal's class and not get in trouble. Unless, of course, you don't dream. The Pacific Lutheran University professor, who is teaching a class on dreams during the Interim, wants his students to learn how to tune in on an untapped source of creative strength. "We dream a full-length movie every night," Seal said. "But we probably remember just a few images, maybe even only one." Normally, a night's sleep consists of four dream periods - the' longest about an hour just before waking up. "Dreams are not psychic laetrile but they are extremely impor­ tant," said Seal, who has been studying dreams for about four years. "Those who are in tune with their dreams are more in touch with their emotional life." Seal noted that people frequent­ ly don't use every part of them­ selves in their jobs, but that dreams reveal "the whole person." People interested in dreams are people who are interested in them­ selves, he said. Students in Seal's class have been keeping journal in which they record and interpret their dreams. For a final paper, they will be expected to write an analytical paper on some aspect of their dreams or compose music to a dream or construct a dramatic 'encounter to stage. They've been dreaming about all kinds of things - from death, to reincarnation, to meeting Napo­ leon and actual happenings (i.e. plane crashes). Seal himself said he had a dream about Woody Hayes just two days after the former Ohio State coach hit a Clemson player in a bowl game and was fired. "I dreamed he was plowing up the football field," Seal explained. "Later, I dreamed about hitting my students. It was the first time I realized I had anything in common with Woody Hayes." Seal said he learned from that particular dream about anger. "Why was I angry? I didn't want to hit a student and get fired," Seal said. "It made me deal with my anger. I realized I was trying to do too much in class. So, I backed off and decided to let the students swim more for themselves." Seal said daydreaming is like night dreaming providing the day­ dream is a reverie, in which you catch your mind wandering. But he said he doesn't trust willed daydreaming. "I mean if I were to dream I was

found by Linda Ronstadt and loved," Seal noted. "That would be ego gratification." Still, Seal admitted even that type of dream might be beneficial for someone if it is realized for what it is and helps a person through a crisis. To help a person record a dream upon waking, Seal recommended staying in bed. "Don't get up to go to th bath­ room. Write your dream down (in book kept by your bed) and put the images in sensible words," Seal said. "Dreams are held by fragile memories. But if you don't get all of the dream down, don't worry. It probably will recur again." In other words, dream on.

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AAL Awards Minority Scholarships Five Pacific Lutheran Un­ ivers ity students have been awarded scholarships by the Aid Association for Lutherans American Minority Scholar­ ship Program. They are Beverly Green and Steve Ray of Tacoma, Lynn Bebelle and Bruce Driver of Los Angeles, and Cynthia Jone of Seattle. Aid Association for Luthe rans is a fraternal insuranc society with headquarters in Appleton, Wisc. Total amount of the scholarship grant to PLU students is $2,000 according to AAL manager James Hoyer.

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15,000 Mile Choir Of The West Tour Is One-Of-Kind The word unique is over­ used, but in this case it is p ro b a b l y a ccurate. During ' three weeks in January and F ebruary, members of the Pacific Lutheran University Choir of the West enjoyed a one­ of-a-kind concert tour which crossed North America no less than six times. The internationally-recog­ nized 64-voice choir and an accompanying 22-piece chamb­ er orchestra, under the direc­ tion of Dr. Maurice Skones, presented 19 concerts in eight states and Mexico. In order of performance, the choir visited Mis souri, Nebraska, Maryland, Virginia, Minnesota, S o u t h Dakota, Florida, Mexico, New York and Washington state. No, the choir' s budget is not unlimited and the choir memb­ ers are not scions of wealthy f�ilies. In fact, the 15,000"TIlle odyssey cost each choir .nember little more than the usual limited bus tour that both PLU and other choirs most often schedule. Tour plans began to come together early in 1978 after PLU choir tour manager Noel Abrahamson investigated East­ e� Air Lines' low 21-day excur­ sion fare, which permits unli­ mited travel during a three­ week period at a fixed cost. He also had the good fortune to schedule the choir tour be­ 'ore Eastern amended its ex­ cursion fare policy to limit the number of excursion travelers on each flight. That made it possible, in most cases, for the entire choir to travel as a group. According to Eastern officials, such tours are still poss ible for large

China Expert Raps U.S.­ China Moves Recognition of China by the United States came "30 years too late and five years too soon," a Stanford 'University professor of Chinese history said at Pacific Lutheran University Feb. 9. Dr. Mark Mancall, whose visit to PLU came on the heels of the Chinese Vice-Premier's visit to Seattle, said that "President Car­ ter, in playing his China card, has been unwise at best. China is laying its American card much ore skillfully. "Mr. Carter should have been

Music: Choir 0/ the West

By Peter G. Davis New York Times There are many superior college choral groups around the country, but not too many of them would probably care to tackle the demanding and musically rich program of­ fered by the Choir of the West in Alice Tully Hall Monday night. Under the direction of Maurice H. Skones, these young students from Pacific Lutheran University in Taco­ ma, Wash., not only surmount­ ed almost every challenge splendidly, but also did so while singing the entire con­ cert from memory. The first half of the evening was given over to Haydn's la s t m a s s , t h e " H a r ­ moniemesse." Accompanied by a willing and eager, if rather scratchy, chamber or­ chestra, the choir gave this noble work a far better per­ formance than one has heard from many professionals. The tonal blend was smoothly pro­ portioned, attacks precisely made, the diction was crystal clear and the musical re­ sponse could scarcely have been more vital or sensitive. The Haydn mass was in some respects a mere war­ mup for the major tour de force of the concert, Richard Strauss' German Motet, Op. 62. This a cappella score is very rarely performed, and

Choir Slates Bellingham Area Concerts

for good ' reason: it is 20 mi­ nutes long, the 16-part texture is cast in Strauss' knottiest chromatic style, the vocal range spans more than five octaves and, in the words of one choral director, the piece is quite simply "the hardest choral work, of a tonal nature, ever written." The music is also extremely lovely, composed during Strauss's prime middle years. No chorus will ever sing it flawlessly, but the Choir of the West brought a remark­ able degree of confidence, secure intonation and concen­ trated intensity to the task. Again the consistency of tonal beauty was astonishing, espe­ cially so in music of such complexity. After polishing off this ar­ duous assignment with honor, the Choir turned to lighter, if not exactly easy, music to close the program: Goffredo Petrassi's "Nonsense," a con­ temporary setting in Italian of five Edward Lear verses, and Debussy's delicate "Trois Chansons" to texts by Or­ leans. The performanc e s were technically immaculate and wonderfully responsive to the character and expres­ sive requirements of the music.

The PLU Choir of the West will present two additional concerts Sunday, March 11, in northwest Washington. The first will be held at the B e llingham High School Au­ ditorium at 3 p.m., sponsored by Bellingham Lutheran Churches. Tickets may be obtained from Dale Matson at Sehome High School. At 7 :30 p.m. that evening, the choir will perform in the Burling­ ton-Edison High . School Cafetorium. Skagit Lutheran Clus­ ter is the sponsor. Jerry Benson of Burlington has tickets.

Skones Takes Dunking In Atlantic Ocean

-February 7, 1979

groups like choirs, but in most cases they would have to split up on several flights. Abrahamson gave a great de­ al of credit to Eastern's district sales manager, Jack Webb, who , thoroughly investigated the PLU proposal and whose coop­ eration was primarily respons­ ible for making the tour poss­ ible. The trip, incidentally, cost each choir member less than $400 each, including s o m e ' hotels and meals. In many cases

they stayed in the homes of church members along the way in the tradition of most such choir trips. In some ways, this journey was as memorable, or mor� so, as the European concert tour 18 months ago, Abrahamson believes. Highlights included performances in Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center, New York City ; the Palace of Fine Arts in Mexico City; and Orche stra Hall in Minneapolis.

more cautious in negotiating terms of normalization," Dr. Mancall charged. For instance, he said, the United States should have held out for guarantees by China of the rights of the Taiwanese. But now the government doesn't even want to use the name, Mancall said, "as if 'Taiwan' is a dirty word." Lecturing at PLU under the au­ spices of the Foreign Area Studies Program and the International Stu­ dents' Organization, Mancall call­ ed the United States' change of policy on Taiwan unprincipaled. He said that Washington is panicky about the Soviet Union as a rival military and political power, a fear that may lead the United States into another cold war. The "big issues" are the United States' contributions to the growth and industrialization of China and

its military power and the Soviet reaction to that, Mancall said. "I think we should be helping the Chinese in every way possible with education and advancement," he said, "but not to enhance her military capability." He said that on its own, China won't be ready for a confrontation with the Soviet Union "for 25 or 20 , years." But as her military might grows, so does the likelihood of Russia "taking preemptive ac­ tion," he said. It is not impossible, he indicated, that eventually the U.S. would switch to ally with the Russians against the Chinese. The Teng visit to the U.S., he observed, was "the ultimate in media politics, the . same kind of affair as an election campaign. "It was a tremendous circus, but I don't think it accomplished much of anything," he added.

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When you sing some of the most difficult choral music ever written night after night for nearly three weeks, what do you do to relax? Vickie Pomeroy, a senior from Puyallup who was a featured sol­ oist on the recent Choir of the West concert tour, answered, "We threw Dr. Skones and his wife into the Atlantic Ocean with their clothes on!" The incident happened in flori­ da, , where the choir sang several concerts and also had an opportun­ ity to visit Disney World. "There wasn't much spare time on the tour. It seemed like we spent an awful lot of time in airports, but we did get to look around New York City and run up and down the Statue of Liberty," she added. "We can say we were in Acapul­ co because we landed there, but we didn't see it. We didn't get off the plane," Vickie added. It seems the Mexico City airport was closed temporarily as the Pope had landed just ahead of the choir and the PLU plane was diverted. Everyone in the PLU entourage was astonished that the choir re­ ceived standing ovations at every concert on the tour, including Mex­ ico City and New York City. These two metropolises also seemed to be the highlights of the trip for most choir members. "The Mexican people opened their arms and were really recep­ tive," Vickie added. "New York was good too. We expected them to be cold and not to accept us, but we got a standing ovation." She be­ lieved that many in the New York audience were sophisticated lis­ teners, including Juilliard music students.


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Assassination Of Kennedy Topic Of Interim Class by Jlm Erickson Tacoma News Tribune

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A Pacific Lutheran University professor says there is less reason to believe hat new acoustical evi­ th re was a second den e venfi a�sa sin than In eviden already ga h red ord , phtlosophy p of Jo u ht a PLU nterim class 11 ho Id th e r 10 1 n th B. sa all and laza along the Dallas pre id nt W wher t IT e ho chamb r" hal i a vi tual rder d by high buildings. lilt would be hard to determine where sounds came from," said Nordby who once aided the West­ ern Massachusetts Assassination Bureau in its study of the assassi­ nation. But Nordby still believes here were four sbots fi red and a conspi­ racy - possibilities raised recent­ ly with news of the new evidence presented to the Hause Assassina­ tions Committee. Nordby said the physical evi­ dence and testimony collected by the Warren Comm ission itself would have come to that logical conclusion_ But the commission determined that Lee Harvey Os­ wald acted alone in killing the president on Nov.22, 1 963, and tbat only three shots were fired - all from the book depositary. Testimo ny indicated, Nordby said, that the angle of trajectory of the bullet that killed Kennedy was an l l-degree inclination and that of the bullet that wounded Texas Gov. John Connelly was at a 27-degree declination. "No way could th same bullet have hit both Kennedy and Connel­ ly as the Warren Commission con­ cluded," Nordby said."The law of physics wouldn't allow it. " Nordby also not d evidence showe that copper-ja keted bul­ lets were fired from the book depository, yet X-rays of JFK indi­ cated lead particles in his neck. "There wouldn't have been any lead particles with copper-jack­ eted bullets," Nordby said. Furthermore, Connelly said he. heard a shot and turned to look toward the president in the back seat of the limousine. Nordby said Connelly wouldn't have heard the shot had he and Kennedy been struck with tbe same bullet, traveling at more than 2, 000 feet a second - faster than the speed of sound. Consequently. Connelly had to have been hit with another bullet, Nordby maintained. And evidence also revealed that a person firing from the book

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depository could not have gotten off a second round in the proper time span, Nordby said. According to a home movie film­ ed by Abraham Zapruder, Nordby said Connelly was hit somewhere between 1. 3 and 1.8 seconds after Kennedy. "The fastest anyone could have reloaded the rifle in the book depository was 2.3 seconds," Nord­ by said evidence showed. Yet, the Warren Commission concluded,Nordby said, that Con­ nelly probably didn't notice he was hit.

"When you got a bullet tearing through five ribs and leaving a hole in your he 1. I think you'r goin to

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nected with the Watergate burg­ lary. There are number of tlleories on who was responsible for Ken­ nedy's death. Nordby seems to lean toward the one linking the CIA, the underworld and Cuba. "First you have to understand how the CIA functions," Nordby said. "The left band frequently doesn't know what the right hand is doing. That's the way the CIA wants it." He also said one has to have some knowledge about how the CIA works with the underworld. Over the years,the unde world and the CIA have wor ed closely trading intelligence and pro Clio around

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pec l a h t - l ' c philosoph . But he en - e inve tigati n of Kennedy's a sassmation wa not handled like any other murder would have been handled, Nordby charged. Nordby cited some examples: brain normally would • "The have been fixed so it could be studied for damage. There is evi­ dence tb t this was going to be done with Kennedy's brain, but it never was. Why not? " • "The FBI received a tip of a plot to kill the president, quite possibly sent by Oswald, who had worked as an FBI informer.Why didn't the FBI act on that tip?" • lOA nurse gave an FBI agent lead particles removed from Con­ nell y's chest. The particles disap­ peared. What happened to them?" These are the types of questions Nordby said he would have tried to get answers to rather than those asked by tbe Warren Commission. "I mean, you ask simple ques­ tions, you're going to get simple answers," Nordby asserted. Nordby said the Warren Com­ mission wen t about its study "under the assumption that Os­ wald did it, now let's prove it" rather than compile a list of people with motives for killing JFK and working from there. "I think the Warren Commission did a disservice to the American people by publishing its report," Nordby said. "Anyone who reads it can see the difficulties in it. " For example, Nordby said that about the only thing in there on Jack Ruby, who killed Oswald, is "that he liked dogs and was kind to them ". There also was material in the report about President Thomas Jefferson's security precautions. Nordby said evidence showed that Ruby (his given name was Rubenstein) was linked to the Chicago underworld. "Ruby and all the other princip­ als in that drama most certainly were linked," Nordby said. Nordby said there is pretty good proof that two of three tramps arrested in boxcars sitting on rail­ road tracks near the grassy knoll and plaza were none other than Frank Sturgis and E. Howard Hunt, CIA operatives later con-

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the Bay of Pig fiasl.;o. Nordby noted that Kennedy wa . furious that the CIA lied to him about their invol vement in the Bay of Pigs incident and vowed to reorganize the CIA. Hence another motive,Nordby claimed. As time passes and people who might know something die, there becomes less and less possibility that the full story will ever come out. Nordby's purpose in teaching his class is not only to teach students how to use logic in explaining assassinatio n evidence, but to make them aware of what he believes to be the biggest political ·event of the 20th Century. Nordby cited the fact that Ken­ nedy just 2 0 days before he was killed ordered Secretary of De­ fense Robert McNamara to issue the order to withdraw the troops from Vietnam.

Music Dept. Earns NASM Accreditation

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The Department of Music at Lutheran University has been elected to as sociate members hip in the National Association of Schools of Mus­ i c , ac cording to depart ment chairman Dr. Maurice Skones. NASM is the offi cial profes ­ sional ac cre d iti ng agency in the fi ld of mll i rob r The r dit PI ogt a m c cdttati n 1 Olb c t fE cho I A m10l r . n lind r fa uate p g­ and th ra m in 0 ial ork. PLU election to memb rsh i p i n NASM c oin c i ded w ' tb that of Notre Dame thi s year. Accord­ ing to Dr. Richard Moe, Dean of Fi ne Arts, NASM membership i mplies adherence to a recog­ mzed high standard of academ­ ic endeavor, an thus i mean­ i n gfu l to both prospective stu­ dents and graduates appJ ying to grad ua te chools. Pa c i fic

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Members of Q Club Can Win Free Trip o Hawaii A round-trip for two to Hawaii and use of a luxury condominium at Waikiki for a week will be wor by a member of the PLU Q Club in a drawing to be held at the annual Q Club Banquet May 1 1 . . To qualify for the drawing, a Q Club member must either recruit another Q Cl ub member ($24 0/yr.) or convince a prospect or present member to become a Q Club Fellow ($l,OOO/yr . • according to David B erntsen, director of develop­ ment. Dates for qualification are from now through May 9. The goal, Berntsen indicated, is "SO new members in 1 0 0 days." New memb ers signing up between now an the deadline may also qualify by recruiting another member, he added. Berntsen may be contacted for assistance in dealing with new prospects, he said. The trip has been donated by a PLU alumnus who recently be­ came a Q Club member.

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Abigail Miles, 1 9, of Snohom­ ish, Wash., was crowned as PL U's 31 st Lucia Bride at the annual Lucia Bride Fes tival in Eastvold Auditorium Dec. 1. A sophomore majoring in educa­ tion at PL U, Miss Miles is the daugh ter of Barbara Miles of Snohomish.


College-Bound Students Can Benefit From Middle College

Health Care Topic Of PLU Communi y Forum Series How come the poor are not getting health care? Why is health care so expensive? How is the common belief perpetuated that medicine can cure anything? Is national health insurance needed? I s g o o d health a right or a privilege? These and many other questions will be tackled during a series of four community forums beginning next month at Pacific Lutheran University . The forums will be held in the PLU University Center at 7: 3 0 p.m. March 14, March 21, April 4and April 1 7. The free forums are co-s pon­ sored by PLU, the Pierce County Health Council and the Washing­ ton Co m m i s s i o n f o r t h e Humanities. Several nationally-known au­ thories will be participating, in­ cluding Robert Ball, former direc­ tor of the Social Security Administ­ ration, and Robert Hunter, chair­ man of the board of directors of the American Medical As sociation . Both will appear on the March 2 1 program on national health policy and cost control, along with Dr. Michael Bayle s , University of Kentucky professor of philosophy. March 14 keynoters are D r . Howard Luft, associate professor, Department of Health Policy, School of Medicine, University of California-San Francisco; and Dr. C harles Bodemer, professor of biomedical history, S chool of Medicine, University of Washing­ ton. The topic is "How Did We Get Here? Who Is Not Covered? " Cost of health care i s the April 4 topic, with speakers including Cecile Bostrom, past president of the Puget Sound Health Systems Agency; Dr. Orvis Harrel son, Weyerhaeuser Corporation medic­ al director; Dr. Jane Raible, execu­ tive director of the Northwest Institute of Ethics and the Life Sciences; and Dr. Albert Thomp­ son, past president of the Washing­ ton State Medical Association. Hard answers to many of the questions will be sought in the final program April 1 7 under the topic, "What Should Be Done?" Keynote speaker is Dr. Walter McClure, physicist and vice-president of In­ terstudy in Mineapolis. Dr. James Early of Tacoma, member of the board of the Washington State Medical Association, and Charles H. Knight, president of Concrete Technology Corp. in Tacoma, are program respondents. Further information is available from Carolyn Schultz, PLU School of Nursing.

Buckminster Fuller

Buckminst r Fu ler Slates PLU Lecture Buckminster Fuller, one o f the modern era's renaissance men, will visit Tacoma for five days in March at the primary invitation of Tacoma's First Congregational Church. The visit is being co-sponsored by PLU and the University of Puget Sound. Fuller's main public lecture will be held Tuesday, March 6, at 8:1 5 p.m. at PLU's Olson Auditorium. Fuller has been described as the modern Leonardo Da Vinci. He is an internati o n a l l y - k n o w n e n ­ g i n e e r , i n v e n t o r , desi gner,

PLU Receives $80,000 Gift Of Property A gift of pr oper ty valued in excess of $80,000 has been re­ ceived by Pacific Luther an Un­ iver sity fr om a for mer San Diego woman now living in Gig Harb or , Wash. The donor , who wishes to r emain anonymous, pr ovided th e gift in r eturn for a charit­ able gift annuity wh ich will provide h er with income for life, according to Edgar Lar son, dir ector of planned giving at PLU. The gift will eventually pr o­ vide an endowed scholar shlp at

mathematician and philosopher as well as a prolific author and l ec ­ turer. Topic of his public lecture is "Humans in the Universe: Can Mankind Survive?" Fuller is best known for his development of the geodesic dome. The principle of design that Fuller d e v e l o p e d m a k e s u s e of a mathematical method he calls "energetic synergetic geometry." Synergism in his context denotes the combination of structural units in such way as to afford greater structural strength than the units possess seperately. Fuller's proposals for the tech­ nological perfection of man and his world are expressed in his many books and articles. He will speak to classes at PLU on Tuesday and Thursday, March 6 and 8. The PLU portion of Fuller's visit is sponsored by the campus Lec­ ture Series committee.

PLU in honor of the donor and her late husband, Larson indi­ cated. The donor said that it was her desir e " to help futur e gener a­ tions of young people r eceive an education at a place like PLU. " The piece o f pr operty involv­ ed was a par t of an or iginal homestead in . the San Diego ar ea deeded befor e the tur n of the centur y. It is now located in a commer cial ar ea. Accepting the gift on beh alf of PLU , Dr. William O. Rieke, PLU pr esident, said, " I expr es s our deepest gr atitude o n behalf of PLU and its students. It is as a dir ect r esult of gener o.sity of thi s kind that PLU is ab le to cont 'nue to pr ovide a h i gh qual­ ity academic pr o gr a m i n a Ch ristian envir onment."

N ow ther e i s an oppor tunity for high school students t o "j ump the gun" o n their college education. Middle College is PLU 's si x week summer prog­ r am (July 5 to August 15) de­ signed to help students sh ar p en study skills ; ear n eigh t to ten tr ansfer able, r egular semester h our s; and have an unfor gett­ ab le summer , too . Professor Dick Jobst, Middle College coor dinator , believes the cour se of study can benefit high sch ool juniors and senior s wh o want to enhance th e i r lear ning skills i n pr epar ation for the univer sit y and fir st­ year college students who would like a mor e sti� ces sful ac ademic exper ience. Five pr ofessor s - three fr om s oc i a l s c i e n c e s , one from mathematics, and one fr om En­ glish - and college student tutor s wil l wor k closely with the student in a pr ogr am de­ signed to teach the tr iclts of the tr ade in academics. The cur ­ r iculum has its cor e i n the social sciences, but str on gly str esses wr itten and or al com­ munication and mathematics. Lear ning how to r ead a book without getting bogged down, picking the meat out of par ag­ r aphs, finding one's way ar ound a univer sity libr ar y, and other shor tcuts for study ar e what Middle College is about. Ter m paper s and or alr epor ts ar e par t of the cour se of study. Steve Fjelstad, a senior in the Histor y Department, believes in Middle College. " I was a tutor in the 1 978 pr ogr am and have kept tabs on the people in that session. They simply did not h a v e t h e usual social and academic adjustment pr oblems that most college fr eshmen have. The students had a cer ­ tain psyc hological r eadiness and moved smoothly into the college scenar io." An impor tant aspect of the pr ogr am is the individual test­ ing and counseling. The cost of Middle College depends on whether or not the student chooses to live on cam­ pus or commute. Tuition for eight to 10 hour s at $80 per semester hour r anges fr o m $640 to $800. Room and boar d, for th ose who can't commute" is $350. Financial aid, based pr imar i­ ly on need, is available . April 1 5, 1 979, is th e application dead · li ne. For more information wr ite Pr of. Dick Jobst, Middle College, Box 1 6, PLU, Tacoma, Wash.: 98447, or call (206) 53 16900, ext. 577


-

The Price Of Independence By Dr. William o. Rieke President Pacific Lutheran University As we launch the most intensive apital campaign in the recent history of Pacific Lutheran Un­ iversity, it is particularly impor­ tant that we and our constituent supporters cleal ly understand the goals we have set, as well as the economic and societal rea lities surrounding the achievement of those determined goals. We are a private, independent . institu tion of higher education. This means, simplistically stated, that all of the programs and assets we provide are maintained without recourse to or dependence upon ax monies. In other words, we pay our own way through tuition fees and gifts or grants from a broad range of donors. This independ­ ence guarantees the freedom to determine values and curriculum. There are three questions that get to the heart of our present and future conditions: How did private higher education become indepen­ dent in this nation? What is the value of being free? What does it take, dollarwise, to maintain inde­ pendence? A cursory review of the history of colleges and universities in our country begins with the founding of Harvard, long before we be­ came a nation, in 1636. It was privately supported and church­ related and set the pattern for the operation of all institutions of high­ er education in this country for the next 200 years: 100 percent of the colleges were privately owned and church-related. The first public college was founded shortly after the passage of the first Morrell LaUd Grant Act following the Civil War By 1900, there were enough public colleges developed that at­ tendance had changed from all students attending private col ­ leges to 75% attending private and 25% attending public. This shift in a t t n dance patterns co ntinued such that, by 1950, the ratio of students attending all higher edu­ cation institutions was half and half Today, in 1979, 78% of all college and university students attend tax-supported, while 22% are in private or independent in­ stituti ns. Both public and private sectors have increased in absolute enrollment since 1950, but the increasing relative costs of the private sector have contributed markedly to the shifting percen­ tage of students attending public as opposed to private.

Dr. William Rieke enrollment since 1950, but the increasing relative costs of the private sector have contributed markedly to the shifting percen­ tage of students attending public as opposed to private. Many private schools have pur­ posely decided to sever ties with their founding churches, primarily as a hedge against fiscal uncertain­ ties, in order to accept ever large amounts of federal money to meet their budgets; others are melded into the various state systems in order to continue to operate. A significant factor in threaten­ ing the solvency of many institu­ tions, second only to the unpredict­ able skyrocketing inflation rate of our national economy, is the enormous amount of money, time, and effort needed to respond to federal regulations of every kind. Does he stifling mantle of federal regula ions mean that we are not truly free; that we are federally controlled, that the government pulls all the strings ; that our academic mission is overpowered? The anwer is no: we are free to establish and determine our cur­ riculum; we are free to worship and hold high the cross of Christ on the campus; we are free to main­ tain the kind of supportive and motivated community that is ex­ pressed in the Christian faith. But mandatory compliance with Titles and regulations imposed has a very real and influential impact on costs. We must comply, not because we receive significant amounts of operating money, but because a large amount of federal money flows to the University

through student financial assist­ ance in the form of Student Educa­ tion aOpportunity Grants (SEOG), Basic Educational Opportunity Grants (BEOG), National Defense Student Loans (NDSL). Each year, Pacific Lutheran University re­ ceives about two and a half million dollars for such vital and essential assistance. With that kind of feder­ al funding, inevitably there are federal strings. All of the regula­ tions - more than 160 affecting college and universities - require staffing to monitor, report, imple­ ment, and enforce . Legal budgets in most institutions have doubled and even tripled in recent years in order to keep pace with mounting demand . We canno avoid the intrusion of the federal presence into our metho s of operation and into our budge s. None tbe less, we are free to teach, to worship) to offer the sacraments. We are free in that no person can attend PLU for any length of time witbout beiDg ex­ posed to tbe cross of Christ. There is a place that is free academically and free spiritually, and that place is Pacific Lutheran University. I want that message to reach every individual, every congrega­ tion - every owner of PLU - in the Northwest. Each person will have an opportunity to decide whether PLU is worth supporting - not just for the buildings we now find it imperative to have in order to maintain our academic quality, but for the sustaining strength of the future. The acceptance of this concept is as important as the dollars we raise. Secondly: What is the value of being free? Is it really worthwhile, particularly when our state institu­ tions are as strong as they are? Since coming to PLU in 1 975, following seventeen years of ser­ vice in the public sector of higher education, I am more persuaded than ever that the private sector must be maintained. What can a private school do that a public institution cannot? As illustration, there are two things the state schools cannot do, one because they are bound by law, and the other because of the restrictions inherent in the system. They can­ not, by law, officially engage in anything that has to do with instil­ ling faith and value. And they c annot respond to immediate needs of students for curricular changes because they a re intrins­ ical ly so well prote ted by strong bases of tenure . and internal pre-

ssures; ponderous systems cannot move rapidly. In private institutions, one the other hand, if the faculty and administration are not keenly aware of the students' needs and those are not met, students will not � remain at the institution. Being . tuition-dependent, the private schools must remain in the van­ guard of innovative and contem­ porary programing to provide answers for our changing society. It is interesting to reflect on the fact that, even though only 22% of the total student enrollment across the nation attends private institu­ tions of higher education, 40 per­ cent of the presidents and business executives of Fortune's top 100 corporations, more han half of the members of the las Congress, and two-thirds of the presidents of the � United States, were educated in . independent colleges and univer­ sities. The importance of this is seen in a remark from John W. G ardner forme r Secretary of HEW. who said "Virtually every far reaching social change in our history has come from the private sector." west in recent months, I have been keenly aware that among the lead­ ership in the churches and com­ munities, in schools, civic organi­ zations and businesses I have vi­ sited, a great proportion of PLU graduates is represented. (For ex- � amples, see pp. 15-17.) The service . orientation is part of the value system of students who attend church schools, and it pays im­ measurable dividends to the com­ munities in which they live. These dividends are compounded greatly when, as in the case of PLU alumni, the graduates have been prepared for and have attained leadership roles. Is it worthwhile? The response of a couple I had invited to assist in the current campaign merits quot­ ing: "Three of our children went to� PLU. They married three others. who were there. That makes six kids from PLU." Their pride and intense gratification with these children led immediately to the question, "When do we start? " That kind o f commitment says there is something worhwhile at PLU ! Now, thirdly: What really is the price of independence? What is the price of freedom in terms of dol­ lars? I comes high. The total budget for Pacific Lutheran University last year was a bo u t $ 1 4 . 5 m i l l io n . Of that amount, over 80% came from tui­ tion. Since we are so heavi y tui­ tion-dependent, our budgets must be computed and constructed with utmost care. A one or two percent error in estimating enrollment and credit hour production can tip the scales from black to red. Fortu­ nately, in recent years, we have been able, through vigorous re­ cruiting, conscientious efforts in retention, development of courses drawing students, and creative fiscal management, to remain within that narrow margin of accu­ racy. But the margin is altOgethel too tight. One of our goals over the

_


next few years is to enlarge our Endowment corpus in order to provide the cushion and fiscal . stability we need for unpredlctable budget demands. A longer ter� but even more important goal wlll be to increase the annual fund A (unrestricted yearly giving to . ., minimize dependence on tmtlOn increases as the only way to com­

bat inflation. The additional money for ex­ penses, not covered by tuition comes from a v ariety of sources. A very small endo wmen t ($1.3 mill­ ion) provides a very smaU portion. Gifts and grants from aI,l sources - churches. corporations , founda­ tions, Ind pendent Colleges of Washington, Q-Club, individuals, bequests - provides the remain­ der. For this kind of help we are genuinel y appreciative and grate ­ ful and I thank the countless loyal an new supporters who consis ­ te n t l y e c o u r a g e u s . A g ai n , thougb, the need to i n crease the annual fund becomes apparen t. With the Board of Regents ap­ proval, and with the sanction of t e . orth Pacific District meetmg m Conve ntion last J u n e , Pacific Lutheran University has been gi­ ven the green light to proceed with the first phase of a campaign that will result in $16.5 million in build­ ing, campus improve�ents, an en­ dowment. (The detaIls are ex­ plained in several articles in this sue of Scene.) That first phase has been centered on the Church. This is the first time in its history that PLU has brought a major fund effort with the intent of approach­ ing in an organized fashion every church in the District. PLU has never before presented its case to every member in every pew in order that each individual may consider s upporting the o n l y Lutheran senior college west o f the Rockies and north of Los Angeles. Are we really free? Is it really worth it? The answers are so �I"'''rlv affirmative. But the price of freedom is dear. What we need are not just build­ ings, not just a Science Building, or j ust a Performing Arts Center, or just an Endowment. What we real­ ly need in order to secure our freedom is for every person to become acquainted with PLU and afte r seriously considering its con­ tribution ask the question, "Is the University which we own worth supporting? I is worth worki ng for? In the face of many legitimate and worthy causes the critical h n"..,t-,nn becomes uls PLU important e no ugh to des e rve a rank somewhere in t he personal giving

d

of those who own it?" A lifetime of

endeavor as educator, scientist, a d ministrato r . and ch urchman persuades me that an affir� ative answer is pivotal in preservmg not ouly freedom, but freedom in the institution which continues to con­ tribute un iq u e l y t h r o u g h i t s graduates to church and society.

Q Club Giving

Passes $ 1/3 Million In '78 By David Berntsen Director of Developmen t

The PLU Q Club not only reached its $1/3 million goal in 1978, jt increa sed revenues 19 per cent over the previous year to $344,000. In addition, the club, which now lists 850 members and is aiming for 900 by May, passed the $1 million mark in total giving since organization in 1972. The club th l:1 s now plays a vital continuing rol e m . the university's fiscal well-bemg. (Most recent figures show t�e six­ . year total in excess of $1.3 milllon.) * * *

The Q Club banquet has been rescheduled to Friday, May 1 1 , to avoid conflict with another educa­ tion fund-raising organization in Tacoma, BASH. The May 11 date will also allow use of the spacious Commons dining room in the Un­ iversity Center, as the Q Club has virtually outgrown Chris Knutzen Hall! * * *

All Q Club members and other d on o r s w h o h o l d Lutheran B rotherhood insurance poli cies should be aware that LB has a new gift matching service. They will match gifts to PLU up to $100 annually. Many companies, includ­ ing Weyerhaeuser and Boeing loc­ ally, also have gift matching prog­ rams so it is possible that some dono s could see their gift tripled by taking advantage of these ser­ vices . We urge you to please contact us if you elieve your gift would qualify for matching.

;

*

The dedication of Q Club memb­ ers and Fellows is a tremendous source of strength and inspiration to me. I want you to know how than ful I am for ach one of you.

arents Corner B y Milton Nesvig Assistant to the President The big event is coming. Par�nts weekend is scheduled for Fnday through Sunday, March 16 to 18. The students are planning a variety of activities which will keep you busy from morning til night. There will be lu�cheons. a banquet, programs, partIes, recep­ tions . . . you name it. The welcome mat will be out for all you parents and we hope you can attend. Get your reservatio s in early for the banquet. It's always a sell-out. You will be receiving comple e details soon in the mail from the student committee. If for some reason you don't get a communica­ tion, l t us know and we will take care of you. Spokane is the site for th next � Parents Club dinner to whlch all friends of PLU are invited. Parents Council members John and Ruth Bley will host the event to be held April 25 prior to a concert by the University Chorale. Parents Council members Palm­ er and Beverly Gedde were hosts for a PLU dinner held Feb. 9 in Walla Walla. President Rieke was the speaker. Following the PLU­ Whitman basketball game that evening, the Rev. and Mrs. K ith � Krebs, whose daughter Nancy IS at PLU opened their home to PLUers for coffee hour. Handling local arrangements for the Walla Walla dinner were Dr. and Mrs. John Shannon and Mr. and Mrs. John Klingenberg. Rev. Palmer Gedde of Richland, Wash. is the author of a book on pasto al counseling, "On� P 1 l:1 s One," published recently 10 Mll­ waukee, Wis. , by Northwestern Press. His son Peter is a fre hroan at PLU and daughter Terri finished in '7 7. He and his wife have been on the Parents Cowlcil since its fOr­ mation in 1976. Marvin Meyer of Chicago is a pilot for United Air Lines and he father of Mike Meyer, a semor guard on the Lute basketball team. And thereby hangs a tale. Whenev­ er his schedule permits, and there is a PLU hoop game in a UAL city, Marv Meyer is in the stands. Many times he comes to Sea-Tac on the afternoon flight out of Chicago and returns home after the game on the "red eye special." And when she can get away from the family

The Time ' s They Are A-Changing

B y Ed Larson

Director of Planned Giving . .

"The times they are a-changin g "

Thi s phrase can be used in many

ways. When it comes to estate . planning, because of llfe , s con­ stantly changing situations, th � "changing times" mean that addI­ tional planning should take �lace. In the primary document 1D es­ tate planning, one's will, ·a review should take place from time to time in order to update items as needed. For example, when you move from one state to another, you should review the conditions of your will to make sure that laws in the two states do not differ to the degree that they affect the provisions of the will. Or, if a child has grown to adulthood since the will was draft­ ed, your provisions for that child . might be different. Or, If tax laws have changed (which they ha�e done in recent years ! ) , your wlll might need to be updated to reflect these changes. Any number of other possibilities might � ugg� st the reviewing of your wlll WIth your lawyer. As you re-think possible changes and updates to your will, you m�y wish to join numerous other� � n their consideration of Paclflc Lutheran University by remem­ bering the University in your wi l. Such a final gift can asslst PLU m providing a quality education in a Christian context . If you would like a copy of the b r o c h u r e " E s ta te P l a n n i n g , " please contact:

Edgar Larson Director of Planned Giving D velopment OffIce Pacific Lutheran University Tacoma, WA 98447

(206) 531-6900 Ext. 232

11 replies will be held in the

strictest confidence.

duties Mrs. Meyer comes along. The Meyers have been doing this for four years and we regret it is coming to an end. Other loyal rooters are the pa­ rents and grandparents of Dave Lashua, sophomore forward. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Anderson and Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Lashua, who live in Mary�vi1le, Wash., never miss a game at home or away.


Do You See The Potential? By Ron Coltom Alumni Director

What a gratifying experience it has been driving the past several weeks as I have talked to alums about helping with the capital campaign, "Sharing in Strength." My travels have taken me over 13,000 miles, which would be over half of the way around the world at the equator. My primary re­ sponsibility is to work with the "Outlying Region", eight areas outside of the North Pacific Dis­ trict of the American Lutheran Church that have large concentra­ tions of alumni.· Also, I have been helping Dr. Rieke recruit leader­ ship within the North Pacific Dis­ trict. What a positive response I have had! People have been enthusiast­ ic in their support. They are eag­ er to do what they can. They want to do their share to "in a small way repay what PLU meant to me." Sure there are some who are unable to help. But a very small few. And they have very legiti­ mate reasons as to why. One had just started a new business and was working 14-16 hours a day six or seven days a week. Another would be gone on business for several weeks during the main thrust of the Campaign and anoth­ er on vacation. But, the majority are more than ' willing to help. As a medical doctor told me, "I'm busy, but it's about time I do something for PLU because we really need all of these things." His "beeper" went off two or three times during our conversation. Another, a teacher who has a son who will be a freshman at PLU next fall, agreed to help and made a generous gift to the program. One alum told me, "I feel l owe it to the place. My wife and I both had an excellent experience there and I hope when my kids are

ready for college they will go there, " An alum who had j u s t graduated a few years ago and was still paying on a student loan said, "I've been wondering how I might begin helping so that others might have the same opport nity that I did. Sure I'll help, maybe this is just one small way." Still another said quite si mply, "Just plug me in where you need me and tell me what to do." As we get these people involved in the program they will in turn involve some others who will in­ volve still others. This is what excites me because many of these are new people who have never been active with alumni or PLU activities. This means that in the summer after the fund drive is finished we will literally have hundreds of alums involved in leadership roles, many of whom are newly formed. Next fall then we plan to con­ tinue with some fun and exciting activities in each of the areas we will be working with during the fund drive. Many of those active with the fund drive will meet with an area alumni planning commit­ tee to schedule a couple of ac­ tivities for their area for the year. Information on how to do this simply will be given to each of the areas to help them get started. So do you see the potential? Groups of alums who have been ex c i t e d by the " S h a r i n g i n Strength" program who i n turn get others excited. I'm excited ! How about you?

Dr. Ler s, professor emeritus of biology, bas ·written a series of PLU vignettes based on more than 34 years on the PLU faculty. We hope to publish them in Scene on a regular basis_

By Harold Leraas

Profiles From The Past Joseph Edwards

"There's only one Joseph Ed­ wards," they said. How true! Nev­ er a dull moment around this energetic young musician. Tall, slender and lanky, he could effec­ tively demonstrate to the students how to be a contortionist or how to drive a golf ball. Joe had a rather long face, or so it seemed because of his high forehead and receding hairline above his dark eyes. His face was one of the most expres­ sive ones you would ever want to see.

1978-79 Alumni Board Relent Repretlentadvel Dr. Ronal d Lerch '6 1 5611 w. Victoria Kennewick, WA 99336

Luella (Toso) Johnson '51 7 Thornewood Drive Tacoma, WA 98499

John McLaughlin '71 Suzanne. (Skubinna) Nelson 32631 39th Ave. S.W. Federal Way, WA 98002 '55 8701 IOSth St. S.W. John Jacobson, M.D. '60 Tacoma, WA 98498 514 Desert West Drive Rancho Mirage, CA 92270 Frederick O. Muenscher x'55 1 305 Ten-Mile Road Everson, WA 98247 Members-At-LarKe I-Yr. Appoi n tme n ts Dr. Dale Benson '63 6416 S.w. Loop Dr Portland, OR 9722 1 Esther Ellickson '58 2442 Denver St. San Diego, CA 92 1 10 Jennie (Lee) Hansen '34 4126 Analii Street Honolulu, HI 96821 Cmdr. Stewart Morton '56 789 Bonita Pleasanton, CA 94566 Harry L. Wicks '69 2 1 14 W yn koop Colorado S prl gs, CO 80909

TenDS Exp

re

May 1979

Donald D. Gross '65 6925 S. E. 34th Mercer Island, WA 98040

Terms Expire May 1980 Kenneth J. Edmonds '64 801 42d Av. N.W. Puyallup. WA 98371 Carol (Bottemiller) Geldaker 18525 S . Trillium Way West Linn, OR 97068

Carol (Haavik) Tommervik '40 820 S. 1 20th Tacoma, WA 98444

Terms expire May

1982

Karin (Pihl) Leander '66 1300 S. 11 th Street Mt.Vernon, WA 98273 Anita (Hillesland) Londgren '59 3101 North 29th Tacoma, WA 98407 Michael A. McKean '68 40 1 1 10th N W. . Gig Harbor, WA 98335

Rev. CharIes W. Mays '62 1 66 1 9 SE 147th St. Ken "Skip" Hartvigson ' Jr . '65 Renton, WA 98055 658 N.W. 1 14th Place Seattle, W A 98177 Ronald A. Miller, M.D. '65 721 Iowa Whitefish, MT 59937

Tenns

Executive Se<:retary Ronald C. ColtOJD '61 Alumni Di�tor PLU Tacoma, WA 98447

expire May 1981 Ex-Officio Student Rep.

Gayle (Severson) Berg '72 Lennep Road Martinsdale, MT 59053 Stephen M. [suc8on '76

18 1 8 N . 1 7 th B oi s e , I D 8 3 7 02

James Weyermann. President ASPLU

Past President

Jo Ann ( Nodtved t) Brisco ' 52 Eldon Kyllo '49 1 3 71 2 10th Ave. E. 6461 Reed Way Tltcoma, WA 9844 5 Anchorage, AK 99502

Full of youthful energy and aspi­ rations he had founded the Choir of the West in 1927. It seemed as if it was necessary to enlist everyone who could carry a tune in order to make up a choi.r atjirst. He was an effective recruiter. In 1931 choir traveled all the way into Midwest. They were a th Nation­ al Young People's Luther League Convention in Chicago and sang at the mass concert in the Chicago Stadium. Alumni remember that, when the choir gave a concert, the last number wa s traditionally "Beautiful Savior," and that form­ er choir members were regularly invit-ed to come forward and join the choir for this number. The Parkland Oratorical Society was the brain child of Professor Edwards and a few music lovers. The first venture, in 1935, was present Handel's "Messiah" a Christmas. Almost single-handed­ Iy he enlisted good singers from miles around. Some good soloist were made available, and the Soci­ ety was launched. The annual pre­ sentation of the "Messiah" a t Christmas continued for several years. Everyone was a friend to Profes­ sor Edwards. He was congenial, friendly, and always good for a lively conversation. Joe was a comedian all the way through, and especially gifted in making puns. ,At parties or programs, he wa !}a 'often the entertainment. An ac . complished pianist, he enjoyed re­ ally sounding out the Hungarian Rhapsody, which he sometimes dedicated to our Hungarian col­ league, Mich Franck. He had a "soft touch" for the ladies, since he had excellent manners and was quite liberal with sweet compli­ ments. Upon occasion, he might even kiss the lady's hand, or her cheek, and all loved it. The Edwards built a very fine home near the college. It nestled in among big trees, and overlook eca the neighboring area. The earl Y. 1930's were Depression times; the salaries were not raised and s me­ times not paid for a considerable time. Before long, the Edwards had to give up the new home and move into a smaller place. Adding more years to the Depression did not improve the situation. Finally, with much remorse and sadness the family decided to move elsewhere. In Fresno, CA they found a home where the desired employment was available, and where they could raise their son David. Joe if' still a friend of PLU and has a hos of friends among us to this day.


Berentson At Wash. House elm ; r. Boe Leads Orego State Senate

this fall's Republican success in the Evergreen State. In January 1978 the GOP leaders targeted 20 House seats where th ey judged the Democrat to be out of sync with the mood of the electorate. "Quite early we thought we could count 46 or 47 seats we realistically could take , so w e though t w e could win the House, but we couldn't make anybody believe that," Berentson observed .

really'

"We didn't care whether they did or not, and in fact, hoped they wouldn't." Berentson is a securities broker in B ur.Hngton and a past mem ber of the PLU a l u m ni board. Boe ' a R 61> rt optometnst who name PL Alumnu of th 1

73 h y

of the

is count rpart i s 1951 S m�te D r. Ja on B e of R e port O re., President of the Oregon State Senate for the past six years. Berentson, a -O-year-old legisla­ tive veteran, burst into the politic­ a l ] 'meJight a n d broad public a w a re n e s s w h e n W a s h i n g t o n House Republicans confounded political observers by gaining 13 h ouse seats this past fall to tie with the Democrats. This session each party holds 49 seats. Berentson thus be c a m e c o ­ Speaker, a position often called second in importance only to the governor. He is also considered to have been the central figure in the G OP coup. It took, he said, careful strategy sessions, study of the opponents, and hard work , traits he learned during his days as a bas­ ketball star at Anacortes High School and later under Marv Har­ shman at PLU . Bae also was a star high school athlete and was recru ited by the University of Southern California

Focus

On San Diego

Nesvig Works With Olympic Hopefuls Dr. David T. Nesvig '57 is pre­ sently serving as consultant and psychologist to the Athletic De­ velopment Program at the Olymp­ ic Games training camp, Squaw

Vall y, Calif. The associate director of the Center for Counseling Services and professor of psychology at San Diego State University. Dr. Nesvig has written a treatise on th proj ect e ntit l e d " U s e o f

t

.

1

0

he bee

m

n t

10 1

it e PLU President

Boe, Bricker Serve Nation's Legislators Oregon Senate President Jason Boe '51 is serving thls year as president of the National Confer­ ence of State Legislatures. Also serving on the 43-member NCSL execlltive committee is Jim Bricker '56, staff director for the Washington State Senate Research Center.

The executive committe e di­ rects and coordinates the activities and programs of the NCSL, beadG ro u p s t o I m prove Perform- . ance.' Squaw Valley, he explained, is one of two newly established sites for training and development of Olympic Games athletes. Camps are held in the summer and fall. The treatise, which describes he work of ps ychologists at Squaw Valley, will be included in a book, "Psychology in Sports : Methods and Applications," to be published in 1980. It is edited by Dr. Richard M. Swinn, professor and head of the Department of Psychology at Colorado State Un­ iversity. Dr. Nesvig is one of five PLU alumni holdin g faculty or ad­ ministrative posts at San Diego State, a school with an enrollment of nearly 40,000 students. Othe PLU alums include Paul Steen '54, general manager o f KPBS, Channel 15 and acting di­ rector of university affairs. D r . S t u a r t G i l breath '56, psychologist, a full professor in the Department of Public Ad­ ministration who is also a nation-

quartered in Denver. NCSL is the official representative of the na­ t ion's 7,600 state lawmakers and their staffs. It works to improve the effectiveness and quality of state legislatures, lobbies on their behalf at the federal level, and fosters interstate cooperation and communicatlon. Boe was elected to the Oregon State Senate in 1970 and has served 8S its president since 1973. Bricker has previously served as a part­ time PLU faculty member in publ­ ic administration. (Another former Lute, Denny MiJes, 34, is administrative assis­ tant for pllblic relations in the adminIstration of Oregon Gov. Vic­ tor Atiyeh.) ally-known consultant in organi­ zational development. Dr. Sam Gange '61 , a counseling psychologist in the Center for Counseling Services ; and Dr. John Shamley '65, chairman of the Department of Counselor Education. Among other PLU alums living in the San Diego area are Dr. William Ramstad '39, director of personnel for the San Diego Com­ munity College District; Bruce Nunes '61 , manager of the Mis sion Valley branch of Wells-Fargo Bank; P a t ri ci a Finn Gange '59, a teacher at the Cuyamoca Elemen­ tary School in El Cajon; and Dr. David Haaland '6 1 , an or­ thopedic surgeon.

Rep. Duane Berentson '51 was one of five Washington State legis­ lators to enjoy a dinner with PLU President Dr. William O. Rieke in Olympia Feb'. 15. Attending the dlnner, in addition tl) Berentson, were Reps. Wayne Ehlers and Phillis Erickson of P a r kla n d ; E a r l . T i l l y ' 5 6 of Wenatchee; and Walter Sprague of LynnwOod� who attended PLU in 1939. The dinner, an annual affair, provides two-way communication between the PLU campus and state governtnent. The invited legi s­ lators include PLU alums, suppor­ ters and · Parkland district repre­ sentatives.

PLU Alumni Hold Top FP District Posts Three PLU graduates were ap­ pointed principa ls of Franklin Pierce Elementary Schoois (Taco­ ma) at the beginning of the current school years. The men and their schools in­ clud e : Stephen Kvinsland, '65, Harvard; Larry Poul s e n , ' 6 2 , Brookdale ' , and Alan Hokenstad, '64, Christensen. Eldon Kyllo, '48, is principal of Parkland school, Del Schafer, '49, is principal of Washington High; and Ed Brown, '52. is principal of Franklin Pierce High. Leo Gaume, '52, returned last fass as principal of Elmhurst after two years as d i r e c t o r of the Internationa l School at Abidjan, Ivory Coast. Jim Hill, '59, is principal of Morris Ford Junior Hi gh, and Edward Pedersen, '4 1, is principal of Keith­ ley Junior High.

Leslie Storaasli, '49, is on leave from Franklin Pierce distict the next two years, to direct the school at Abidjan.


Misfortunes Multiply, But Knutson Can Still Smile By Howard Ferguson Tacoma News Tribune One of David Knutson's most tender remembrances is the way his family rallied to support him when he lost his eyesight. "I can remember that the kids would read to me. This one day Kristofer, who was in the fifth grade, was reading to me and he suddenly became very surprised to realize that he was reading out of a college textbook." KNUTSON'S LAUGHTER came naturally. It is surprising that he can laugh at all, can come on a gentle, intelligent, happy man when you consider all the things that hap­ pened to him in a short period of time. In four and half months last year, he had open heart surgery - two bypasses - a leg was amputated and he was declared legally blind. On Feb. 7, he turned 42. Yet, he could sit at the table in the antique-filled room of the home he and his wife, Marilyn, maintain in Parkland near the Pacific Luthe­ ran University campus and easily talk about what has happened, how he has adjtlsted, and he could speak c onfidently of continuing his teaching career in the religion department of PLU. "You have to remember," he explained, "that I have known I was a diabetic since I was 14. But,

actually, I enjoyed good health until I was about 35." Diabetes is the foundation of Knutson's problems. It caused him to lose the sensa­ tion in his feet. When his right leg deteriorated and was injured, it ulcerated, "I didn't know it right away because I couldn't feel any­ thing." HIS BLINDNESS, which has progressed over several years, is also diabetes-oriented. "I can see that you are there," he explained. "But I can't see your features. I know you wear glasses, because I had seen your picture in the paper before I went blind." During a 1976 sabbatical leave from PLU to study in California, he had the heart attack. "At first it didn't seem to be too serious. But it was." Then the dramatic events hap­ pened. He had the heart operation last May 26. The leg was ampu­ tated in July. In October, he be­ came blind. How does he handle all this? "Well, he answered, still smiling, "I think there are several things that help. "I have always been sort of an reflective person. So, I could anti­ cipate what was going to happen. "THEN THERE was a lot of support - my wife, the two kids, parents, friends, faculty members, students, the Puget Sound Blind Foundation and the Washington Commission for the Blind. He hesitated for a moment. "It is hard to put into words. It is a paradox. You have to take yourself seriously, but not too seriously. "It is sort of like mourning. Not exactly like mourning a lost life. But I did, for a time, mourn the loss of my leg. "Which is OK. You have to go

Kittilsby Earns TNT Honors For Excellence Jim Kittilsby '60, assistant PLU athletic director and sports infor­ mation director, was recently honored by the Tacoma News Tribune. He was named "Athletic Administrator of the Year," an annual honor traditionally reserv­ ed for athletic directors in the Puget Sound region. Kittilsby serves a variety of roles at PLU, including baseball coach. PLU athletic director Dr. David Olson, said, "Jim is the kind of person who makes the show run well. He is so valuable to our program that an honor of this sort is very appropriate. PLU sports are certainly the better because of him." Former University of Puget Sound athletic director, now an independent media executive, said, "Jim has our total respect. Because of his efforts I believe

David Knutson is back in the classroom.

though that, you have to experi­ ence it. But what you have to do is come out the other end of the situation as a better person. "You have to realize that there are a lot of challenges in your new situation." Knutson has met challenges most of his life. His education credentials in­ clude study at PLU (class of '58), at Union Seminary in New York City and Luther Theological Seminary He received a master's degree from the University of Chicago Divinity School and has pursued doctoral studies. "I have everything I need to be ordained, but I haven't been. My thing has always been teaching." And teach he fully plans to continue doing. "Since our Interim ended, I've taken a leave of absence. It has been sort of a hectic year and I want to get things straightened out. Retool. "I'm learning braille, and I have begun building a tape library to replace my book library. I fully

U of W To Honor PLU Alum Foege

Jim Kittilsby

PLU ranks first among all the small colleges in this area in ath­ letic-media relations. I know how time-consuming and varied his duties are and I marvel at his excellence. " Kittilsby has served at PLU since 1970 after working in ad­ ministrative capacities for sever­ al professional baseball organiza­ tions, including the San Francisco Giants and old Seattle Mariners.

There are those who find it hard to believe, but it is a fact that smallpox, a disease that once killed millions, has been eradicated from the face of the earth. The last known naturally occur­ ing case was recorded 16 months ago in Somalia. The surveillance-containment strategy which was the key factor in the global eradication effort was developed and demonstrated by Dr. William Foege, a 1957 PLU alumnus. D r . F o e g e d e v e l o p e d the strategy while serving in Africa as a medical missionary and a consul­ tant for the World Health Organi­ zation. Much of the global effort took place during the past 12 years, during which time he was as­ sociated with the Center for Desea-

e

intend to teach again in the fall." He wanted to make the conversation lighter. "Along the way, a lot of funny things have happened. "For instance, Paul Benton, PLU English prof, and I taught a course on the films of Ingmar Bergman during the past Interim." He grinned, letting that sink in. "We had planned for the course last summer when I could still see. "Well, then the films were shown, I couldn't see them, I couldn't read English subtitles, and I don't understand Swedish. _ "BUT IT worked out OK. Paul ., read the subtitles to me and we put them on tape. We have been thinking about teaching the course again next year.J' He ended the conversation with something he felt he really should get over to other people. "One of the things you find out is that self pity tends to be a pretty futile kind of emotion. "You have to remember that you have to live in the fullness of today, not with regrets of the past."

se Control, Atlanta, Ga., and work­ ed with WHO. He is now assistant surgeon general and director of CDC. This coming May, Foege will be honored as the first Distinguished Alumnus of the University of Washington of Medicine. He is a 1961 graduate. Foege received an identical hon­ or from PLU in 1976 when the smallpox eradication effort was on the threshold of complete success. He was also a 1978 recipient the Joseph C. Wilson Award for achievement in international af­ fairs. The award is presented by the Xerox Corporation in honor of the late chairman of the company. Foege now also serves as visit­ ing professor at Harvard School of Public Health and at Emory Un­ iversity School of Medicine in Atlanta. Another PLU alum, Dr. M. Roy Schwarz '59, headed the medical alumni board of trustees which selected Foege for the UW honor. Schwarz is associate dean of the � med school and director of its .. innovative WAMI medical out­ reach program.


Chancel At Peace Luth. In Silvana Create d By Jens Knudsen By Becky Walker Stanwood News

Dr. Norman O. Forness

Forness Writes Hymn For New Lutheran Hymnal Norman O. Forness '58, profes­ sor of history at Gettysburg Col­ ege, is the author of a new hymn, .'Rise Up 0 Saints of God," publish­ ed in the new Lutheran Book of Worship. The project began as a rewrite when he found out that the popular "Rise Up 0 Men of God" was going to be dropped from the new hym­ nal because of its "sexist" lan­ guage. He eventually redid the entire hymn to make it legally his work.

_

eAccredit�tion Association Elects Rieke

PLU President Dr. William O. Rieke has been elected to a three-year term as a member of the Commission on Colleges of the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges. The announcement was made by James T. Bemis, executive director of the association. In its 61st year, the associa­ tion is recognized as the ac­ crediting agency for schools and colleges in eight northwest­ ern states. Its role includes determination of consistent q uali ta ti ve educational stan­ dards for its membership. It also deals with general educa­ tional philosophies, objectives and program suitability.

What began as a search for Indian artifacts ended up as a unique and special chancel for Peace Lutheran Church of Silva­ na, Wash. Dr. Jens Knudsen, professor of biology at Pacific Lutheran Un­ iversity and a 1957 PLU alum, borrowed several Indian relics for use in his classes from Silvana residents who also happened to be m e m b ers of Peace Lutheran. Knudsen first saw the new church building last January when it still had a dirt floor. He then began to picture the complete chancel in his mind and saw "movement." Kn udsen later sent drawings and cassette tapes explaining his design ideas for the chancel. A com mittee from the c h u r c h traveled to Tacoma to view Knud­ sen's artistic panoramas of life at the Point Defiance Aquarium , which have amounted to over 8,000 hours of work. Following that visit, an agree­ ment was made - Knudsen would design and build the chancel and the church would establish a scholarship fund in memory cif Knudsen's son, Jimmy, who died in 1973 at age 13. The Jimmy Knudsen Memorial Scholarship Fund is for junior and senior students at PLU in finan­ cial need. Thus far Peace Luthe­ ran has raised $3,000. Contribu­ tions may be sent to the church or to PLU. After much research, study and planning, Knudsen began to work in his two-car garage in Tacoma. His first project was the 1-foot altar, made entirely of mahogany and, like the rest of the chancel, is rich in Christian symbolism. The pulpit is also contained in the right side of the altar. Pastor James Nyborg explained that the congregation wished to have a distinctive place from which the Word of God would be proc­ laimed, while leaving the chancel open enough for all to see the altar. On the left side of the altar are the symbols for the sacraments of Holy Communion and baptism,

Chancel, Peace Lutheran Church, Silvana

Rev. James Nyborg (PLU '61) examines new Peace Lutheran baptismal font created by PLU's Dr. Jens Knudsen.

and the center panel, Nyborg said, "is a rural scene that shows where we live." Knudsen's artistry with wood extends to the Christ figure sus­ pended above the altar. The larg­ er-than-life figure of the Ascend­ ing Jesus 'was carved to sym­ bolize prayers ascending to God, and the other descending with an olive branch to symbolize ' Peace Lutheran Church and the Holy Spirit. The Cross of Triumph is made of bronze sheeting ove r ' wood. When Knudsen was in high school he learned the sand casting process of pouring bronze. The skill enabled him to create the candelabra, missal stand and the Communion chalice which stands on top of the altar. He had to learn to pound copper especially to make the baptismal font, which took mOre time than any other single object. "Through the objects created by Dr. Knudsen the entire life of 'Christ is shown," Nyborg said. '''The detail put into each piece is ;amazing. We have had many 'visitors who have come just to see 'our chancel."

Alum Accepts Role In Fund Campaign Alvin Fink '53 of Odessa, new ALC representative to the PLU Board of Regents, has accepted an invitation to serve as one of the regional chairmen for the major gifts phase of the "Sharing in Strength" capital fund campaign. A complete list of major gifts phase leaders will be included in a later issue of Scene . Our apologies for incorrectly identifying Alvin as "Albert" in a December Scene story announcing h i s e lection to the Board oj Regents.

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Former Faculty Dr. and Mrs. Sjoding retired this past summer and hve now moved to Rt. 3, Box 336, Sequim, Wash., and will welcome a visit from old friends. Dr. Sjoding was a profes­ sor of education at PLU before taking a similar position at the University of Miami. Mrs. Sjoding was a secretary in the School of Education and a member of the string section in the University Orchestra. Dr. Sjoding directed research activities for the school of Education at the University of Miami.

Class And Era Representatives The following are Class and Era Representatives. They are your liaison to the Alumni As­ sociation and any newsworthy notes or ideas you may have can be sent to them or to the Alumni Office.

PRE 20's Theodore Gulhaugen 864 Polk South Tacoma, WA 98444

20's

Clarence Lund 400 Wheeler St. South Tacoma, WA 98444

1959 Mrs. Anita Landgren (Hillesland) 3101 North 29th Tacoma, WA 98407

1960 Mrs. Lais White (Anderson) 1081 Lynn wood N.E. Renton, WA 98055

1961 Stan Fredrickson 14858 203rd S.E. Renton, WA 98055

Early 30's

Late 30's

Christy N. Ulleland, M.D. 15424 9th A ve. SW #2 Seattle, WA 98166

Otis J. Grande 1 1 1 1 14th A ve. Fox Island, WA 98333

Early 40's

Mrs. CArol Tommervik (Haavik) 820 S. 12Oth Tacoma, WA 98444

1947 Edroy Woldseth 921 Tule Lake Road Tacoma, WA 98444

1948

A/ton Schafer (Hjelm) 781 9 25th A ve. E. Tacoma, WA 98408

1949 Lester Storaosli 4 1 16 East 88th Tacoma, WA 98444

1950 Delbert Zier 914 19th Stru, N. W. Ptlyailup, WA, 98371

1951 Howard Shull 416 21st Sf. N. W. Ptlyallup, WA 98371

1963

1964 Mike MCIntyre 12402 138th E. Ptlyallup, WA 98371

1965 Mrs. Connie Hildahl (Haan) 315% Martin Steilacoom, WA 98388

1967 William Young 7129 Citrine Lane SW Tacoma, WA 98498

1968 Michael McKe-an ·�Ol 1 10th N. W. Gig Harbor, W,4 98335

1969

1971

Mrs. Kristi Duris (Harstad)

1972

1953

12158 "A " Street Tacoma, Wa 98444

1954

Mrs . Karen (Fynboe) Howe 136A Is/and Blvd Fax Island, WA 98333

Oscar Williams 471 7 17th St. N.E. Ptlyallup, WA 98371

L. Scot t Buser

1956

Phil Nordquist

721 S. 1 15th Tacoma, WA 98444

1957 Doug Mandt

Route I, Box '470

Sumner, WA 98390

1958 G. James Capelli 10214 DeKoven Dr. SW Tacoma, 98499

After 17 years at Placentia, Calif., VIVIAN (Hurtig) WALZ and her husband, Erwin, have moved to Mountain View, Calif., where Pastor Walz has accepted a call to Los Altos Lutheran Church in Los Altos, Calif. Their daughter. GAY LE WALZ '76 remains in the Placentia area, working as an R.N. at Placenti -Linda Hospital in Ful­ lerton, Calif.

John Bustad 1 1513 Wood/arId A ve. Puyallup, WA 98371

LeRoy E. �itzer 3139 SohalJ Dr. Bre merton, WA 98310

S. Erving Severtson 921 129th South Tacoma, WA 98444

Rev. H. J. WESTBERG, a form­ er Eugene, Ore. resident and pas­ tor of the Calvary Lutheran Church in Junction Cityuntil I 1f2 years ago, has returned to the Eugene area as pastor of Lakeside Chapel, Dexter. The Westbergs are again living in Eugene. They have given lecture shows on Bibl­ ical prophecy, current events and their trips to the Middle East at Lakeside Chapel.

1966

1952

1955

1949

Dennis Hardtke 19 Fife Heights Dr. E. Tacoma, WA 98424

Mrs. Cindy Jackson (Johnston) 1 107 South 4th Renton, WA 98055

Mrs. Barbara Thorp (Carstensen) 810 1 1 9th South Tacoma, WA 98444

PAUL POLILLO retired this past summer after 30 years of service in the Naselle-Grays Riv­ er Valley School District. Paul and his wife Sona were honored with a retirement reception in June when 150 former students, pa­ rents of students, friends and co­ workers were on hand to wish them well. They haven't any spe­ cial plans for retirement, just going to enjoy a rest, and do whatever they like. They have a daughter and two granddaughters residing in Olympia.

1962 Rev. Charles Mays 16619 S.E. 147th St. Renton, WA 98Q55

Mrs. Ella Fosness (Johnson) 2405 62nd A ve. N. W. Gig Harbor, WA 98J35

1948

19 0

1973

B U E H L B E R E N T S O N of Anacortes, Wash., has opened a real estate office there. He is a native of Anacortes, but spent 17 years in Washington, D.C. as ad­ ministrative assistant to U . S . Congressman Jack Westland. DU ANE BERENTSON of Burlington, Wash., was elected Republican speaker of the House in the Washington State Legislature. He has been in the House since 1963 and is best known for his membership on the Transportation Committee. GILBERT ANDERSON, who was principal of a Baptist high school in Ethiopia for many years, is living in Seattle where he is administrative assistant in the office of the Columbia Bap­ tist Conference.

10024 Lexing ton SW Tacoma, WA 98499

1975 Richard C. Finseth 25919 Orting-Kapowsin HIllY E. Graham, WA 98338

1 916 Steve Ward 5930C Hanna Pierce Rd. W. Tacoma, WA 98467

1977 .

Dr. Calvin Watness DR. CALVIN M. WATNESS 'SO of Lakewood, Wash., an associate dean at Fort Steilacoom Com­ munity College, has been named Washington State's outstanding adult educator of 1978 by the Washington Continuing Educa­ tion Association. The award was presented at the association's an­ nual conference Dec. 1 and 2 at Lake Wilderness. Calvin has been at Fort Steilacoom since its in­ ception in 1967, and currently manages the Basic Education, Community Service and Military programs.

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1953 VERNON A. LESTRUD has been appointed Dean of the Faculty at Qusculum College in Greenville, Tenn. He formerly served as executive assistant to the president, Idaho State University in Pocatello, Idaho. BEVERLY A. BANCROFT (Be­ verly Allen) is living in Traverse City, Mich., where she is coor­ dinator for elementary media centers, Traverse City Public Schools. She has developed Pro­ ject Starburst, a self-help rural poverty program in Me costa County. She was a delegate to Michigan Whitehouse Confer­ ence on Library and Information Services and has just completed a workshop on school media ser­ vices in rural ares for the State D e p a r t m e n t of E d u c a t i o n , Raleigh, N.C. She has three children, Leslie, 19; Glenn, 15; and Molly, 14.

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1954 DR. DAVID K. ROE is spend­ ing this academiC year in West Berlin, Germany working 011 a chenustry project to "trace metal ions and solar energy conversion by electrochemical devices" at the Fri [Z Haber Institute of the Society with Dr. Max Pl a nc Heinz G erischer . David has been on the staff at Portl and State University in Oregon for the past six years where he has been participating in the Environmen­ tal Sciences Scientific Exchange

Visit Recipient to the Bul garian Academy of Science, In titute of Physical Chemistry tLfarch 1973 and September 1975), he worked on electrocrystallization of metals. His daughter, Natalie, is attending the Free University in West Berlin and his wife, Janet, and two sons j oined him in January. the boys are attending the John F. Kennedy School in West Berlin. This past winter David's pa­ rents, Pastor and Mrs. Kelmer Roe of Parkland, Wash., visited him in Germany and also visited

1914

Leigh Erie 1 025 Neil St. NE OTympia, WA 98506

1951

a number of other places in Europe. EDWARD H. DAUGS has been named to head the newly estab­ lished Engineered Systems Prog­ ram Office of Kaman Sciences Corporation, Colorado Springs, Colo. Edward, a vice president at Kaman, will be responsible for focusing the company's efforts on existing and future contracts for the design and manufacture of digit:!l radiation monitoring sys­ tems for nuclear power plants.

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e.

1960

NANCY (Thompson) SEITZ and husband, Steve, adopted three children on Dec. 2 1 , 19n, Christine, 9, Christopher, 7, and Kathleen, 6. Nancy is head nurse on orthopedic and teenage wards t Emanuel Hospital. They live in Beaverton, Ore.

1961

D R . M ARIE (Peters) GAASHOLT is with her husband on sabbatical leave from the Un­ iversity at Aarhus, Denmark, and is busy writing up research in the area of special education and educational psychology. MORRIS J. HAUGE has moved from Eugene, Ore., where he was associate rector of St. Mary's Episcopal Church and Episcopal Chaplain at the University of Oregon, and has moved to New­ port, Ore., where he has opened a store "Land's End Gifts" as a partnership venture. GARY KIRK is manager of the Boise-Cascade retail plant in Kennewick, Wash.

1962

DENNIS SCHMIDT was re­ cently promoted to manager of Commercial Lines Development for Policy Management Systems (PMS). PMS is a computer soft­ ware insurance processing sys­ tem based in Columbia, S.C. De­ nnis Lives in Lexington, S.C.

1 964 DAVID and LIN DA (Osmund­ son '65) MONSEN are living in Puyallup, Wash., where David is currently 10 his fourth-year in­ ternship program for a master's of divimty degree fl'om P�.T.S. - Berkeley. He is assign d to Good Samari tan Hospital and Christ the King Lutheran Church in Sumner, Wash. Unda is involv­ ed in day-care work and keepmg M i chael Jon, 6, and A ndrew D uvid, 4, in line. MIM TOWNSEND ( STELLA CUMMINGS) are lbe parents of a son, Steven Patrlck, bam July 1 3 , 1978 a t MinneapolIs Fairview H o p l l a J . He joins a brother, Wayne. 4. Stella is working at St. M a r y ' s J r . Coll ege in Min­ . n s, implementing a fully i n d l v i d u l i z e d , c ompetency­ based system of instruction in medical-record technology. ED BRANNFORS and w i fe, Angela, together with their two sons, John Erik, 5V1, and Mark An ders. 3 V1 , recently moved from the Los Angeles area to New England and are now living in Boxford, Mass.

1965

ROE and BEV (Thompson '66) HATLEN are living in Spring­ field, Ore., where Roe is vice president of finance for Kings' Tables, an international restaur­ ant chain. They have three chil­ dren, 8, 4112, and 18 months. FRAN ECKLAND is living in Seattle, Wash., where she works for a CPA firm, Moss Adam &: Co. Last year she went to Japan and met with MARTY GEYSLER and DEANN MARLO, also from the class of 1965. LARRY and KAREN (Manson '65) CARLSON live in Gig Habor, Wash. Larry teaches history at Peninsula High School and Karen is home with their two children, ages 9 and 7. STEVE and MARY (Olson '65) CORNILS are living in Palo Alto, Calif. Steve has accepted a call as pastor there and Mary is at home with their three daughters, ages, 8, 4, and 1 year old.

CLARICE (Reinertson) BATES and her husband are Hvin8 in EUgene, Ore. Clarice teaches nursing at Lane Community Col­ lege ' and her husband is an attor­ ney for the State of Oregon. They have three children, ages, 10, 8, and 7.

1966

MIM MARK ANDERSEN '67 (BONNIE McMASTERS '66) are the parents of a son, Sterling Houghton, Born July 14, 1978 in Napa, Calif. H. GERALDINE FIVELAND returned in June 1978 from a year's travel in Europe and Afri­ ca,. While spending the Christ­ mas Season (19n) with family . friends temporarily living in Kenya, she has the oppourtunity to visit briefly with Barak Mba­ jab Seda of the class of '67. She has now resumed her position as the family planning program coordinator at the Tacoma Pierce County Health Department. In Feb. 1978 ARDEN K. BAR­ DEN accepted a call to Triangle Community Ministry in Madison, Wis. Triangle Community Minis­ try is a specialized ecumenical ministry to an urban housing pro­ ject area of Madison's central city. Arden and his wife, CAROL GILBERT x'68, have two chil­ dren, Jeremy, 8, and Leah, S. DAVID J. EKBERG has been reassigned to Williams Air Force Base outside of Phoenix, Ariz. as of ,January 1979. He will be com­ mander of the 700-man Field Mainlenance Squardron. He was promoted to major in October 1978.

1967 S U SAN ( M c G e e ) JOHNSON ha moved from Seattle to Olym­ pia, Wash.. where her husband, Glen, is beginning a dental prac­ tice After 11 years of teaching, Susan is staying home for a few years to have more time with daughter, Erika, 61f2, and son, Bjorn, 18 months. They are e pecting another addition to their fa mily In January . Susan plans to continue graduate work at PLU now that they live close enough for her to commute. JACK KINTNER has been ap­ pointed adjunct faculty in liberal Studies at Western Washington University, Bellingham. He has been the Lutheran campus pastor at Western . Washington Universi­ ty since 1976. He resides in Bel­ lingham, Wash. DIM LARRY LARSON are the parents of a daughter, Emily Kay, born Aug. 13, 1978 in Minot, N.D. MIM DRAKE EVANS (REBEC­ CA OLSON '67) welcome a son, Robert Spencer, into their house­ hold on Aug. 16, 1978. They spent Christmas holidays in Japan and plan to go to the Philippines at Easter. Becky is an 8th Grade guidance counselor and Drake works with the Submarine Squad­ ron-Pacific Fleet in nuclear en­ gineering. Captain CRAIG R. BJORK­ LUND has been .assigned to duty at Hill AFB , Utah. Craig, an ex­ ecutive support officer with a unit of the Tactical Air Com­ mand, previously served at Lor­ ing AFB , Maine.

DAVJD L' PEARSON; assistant professor of biololY ' at Penn State University is currently in­ volved with establishing a large national park in eastern Ecuador and conducting ecological re­ search each summer in southeast Arizona. He live in State College, Pa. KATHY (Farnham) and Marty ELLISON are parents again, a daughter, Katherine Suzanne, was born Sept. 21, 1978. She joins Dana Elizabeth, 2111. The whole family is looking forward to a move back to Seattle in the spring. Marty is a pilot with Western Airlines and Kat hy hopes to return to teaching (high school English).

1968

A N N E T T E ( L evorson) MACOMBER and husba n d , Daniel, are conducting "Adven­ tures in Attitudes" workshops, product of Personal Dynamics Institute of Minneapolis, in the Seattle-Tacoma area. The focus is on positive attitudes and com­ munication. Annette has been certified by the University of LaVerne in southern California to give college credit for the work­ shop. Alumni are welcome to par­ ticipate. The Macombers live in Federal Way, Wash.

1969 MJM WILLIAM LINDEMAN ( SUSAN l\UCKELSEN '69) are the parents of a son. Nathan Wil­ liam, born Aug. 2. 1978. He joins sisters, Kirstin, S, and Alissa. 3 Bill is a dairy farmer in a family farming op ration. They live in Winlock, Wash GARY D O W N IN G with hi$ wtfe PATTY (Neseth - attended PLU) and 21-month old daughter, K a t i e h a ve moved from La Grande to Portland, Ore. Gary is now managing the Beaverton of· fice of Benjamin Franklin Sav­ ings and Loan. They are making their home in northeast Portland.

1970 STEVE and ARDIE (Goldbeck '70) BERG are the parents of a daughter, Laura Ann, born on July 26, 1978. She joins her three­ year old brother, David. Steve (Ph . D . ) received a gra n t o f $40,000 from the United Stated Department of Agriculture to study the relationship between chloroplast membrane structure and photosynthetic efficiency. He continues his research and teaching at the University of Denver. DENNIS and SHARON (Rod­ key '71) SMITH moved from Tacoma to Omaha, Neb. in Aug. ' 1978, where Dennis assumed the full-time position of minister of music at First United Methodist of Omaha. Sharon is teaching private voice, and hopes to be teaching elementary music in the schools soon. First Methodist has a member­ ship of over ' 3,000, and Dennis directs four youth and one adult choir. Their daughter, Minda Jo, will be two years old in March and has already found many friends in their new Omaha Neighbor­ hood.

1971

LAURIE A. (Taplin) PEEK is

living in Leavenworth, Wash., where she teaches part-time in a Montessori school, teaches Span­ ish to a small group of adults and English as a second language to migrant workers during the har­ vest season. Their daughter, Jen­ nifer is two years old. MARY (Howard) DORGAN and husband, Michael, are the parents of a daughter, Julie Katherine, born Sept. 19, 1978. She joins twin Siblings, Bryon and Colleen, age 3. Mary resigned from teaching kin­ dergarten prior to the twins birth three years ago, and plans to stay at home for awhile with her chil­ dren. Michael is a fifth-grade teacher in the Clover Park School District in Lakewood (Tacoma) where they live. MIKE EBY is manager of the Kennewick, Wash. plant of the Walla Walla Farmers Coop. CAROL ELLISON and J i m Cozad were married Aug. 26, 1978. Carol received her master's in German education from Western Washington University in 1976 and is presently in her eighth year of teaching high school German. Her husband is a high school teacher and head track coach as well as J.V. basketball and fresh­ man football coach. They live in Bellingham, Wash. JOHN D. AAKRE and wife, Linda, have just moved into thei first home in Seattle. Wash. ohn is se rving as director of financial development for LOMA (Lutheran Outdoor Ministry Association). Linda works as a marketlng sup­ port representative for IBM in Seattle. JANICE LYNNE BREKKE and Loui Robert San Marco. J r. of West Haven. Conn. were married in Scobey, Mont. on November 25, 197 They are makIng their first home in Huntsville, Tex.

1972 MlM BURTON (CATHY WIITA­ LA) are the parents of a daughter, Kristina yun, born Nov 16, 1978. Bill and Cathy live in Redmond, Wash. MIM DANIEL GEHRS '73 (RO­ BIN GEORGE '72) are the parents of a daughter, Jennifer Robin, born June 26, 1978. They live in the Santa Cruz Mountains, where they have a small winery. One of their wines, a 1977 California semillon, took a gold medal at the recent Los Angeles County Fair. DIM KARL NELSON (LINDA HANSEN '73) are the parents of a son, Brian, born Sept. 22, 1978. They live in Voorheesville, N.Y., where Karl is presently an NIH post-doctoral fellow at Albany Medical School, Albany, N.Y. He received his Ph.D. in physiology from Loyola/Stritch-Chicago in October 1978. Linda is home tak­ ing care of Brian. LEE DAWSON and DAVE HAN­ SEN opened a new dental office together in Kent, Wash. Lee took his training at the University of Illinois ( 1976), and Dave took his training at the University of Washington ( 1978). They began their practice in November 1978. They are having a good time doing dentistry in their new office as well as running and skiing during some free time. They both would like their friends to stop by when in the area.

1913

JULIE (Tobiason) BECKLUND lives in Tacoma, Wash., where she has been teaching special educa­ tion at Larchmont Elementary School. She is presently on mater­ nity leave for the birth of Kristin Marie, born Sept. 19, 1978. Her husband, Steve, a graduate of U.P.S., is with New York Life Insurance Company. R I C HA R D L. J O H N S O N graduated from the University of Oregon Health and Science Cent­ er, Sehool of. Dentistry, Portland, Oregon on June 9, 1978. He has opened his practice in Preventive Dentistry at the Hall Blvd. Profes­ sional Village in Tigard, Ore. TERRY '71 and KATHY (Berg '73) KNAPTON of Grand Coulee, Wash., are the parents of a son, Nicholas Ross, born Oct. 2 1, 1978. Terry is assistant vice president and assi stant manager of the Grand Coulee office of Security Bank of Washington. Kathy has her own dental practice in Grand Coulee. LINDA STONE and F r a n k Mettler were married i n Seattle, Wash., on Oct. 14, 1978. Linda is in her sixth year of teaching in Eatonville, Wash. Her husband is a timber manager for Pacific Lumb­ er and Shipping in Morton, Wash. They live in Glenoma, Wash. MfM SCOTT PEEBLES ' 7 2 (NANCY RICHARDS '73) are the parents of a son, Adam Lowell, born Dec. 1, 1 978. Thy Jive in Olympia, Wash. CLAUDIA (Barnes PIERSON an d husband r cently returned to the States from a year's stay 10 Korea. Tbey are now stationed at Fort Stewart Ga. SARA QUIGLEY and DAVE W I C K '73 were m rried in Bremerton, Wash. on Aug. 6, 1978. They now live at Havelock (Cher­ ry Pt.), N.C.

1974 Rev. PAUL BODIN was Ins tall­ ed a . pastor for Chinook Lutheran Church on Oct. I S, 1978. Paul and hiS wife. Cherie, will be living in t h e c h u r c h ' s p a r " on a g e i n Chinook. Paul received hiS master of divinity degree from Wartburg Theological Seminary in Dubu­ que, IA. JIM BRIGANTI MA '74 has settled on the Willapa Harbor to head the county's juvenile proba­ tion office, following a stint at the Pierce County equivalent. (Cont. on p. 20)


Notes

20 ������ SCOTI "Scooter" BUSER and

his wife, KATHY FYNBOE x '74

have resided in Lakewood (Taco­ ma) for the past 31f.t years. In May 1978 Scoote r received his mas­ ter's degree in Guidance and Counseling and is currently emp­ loyed as career counselor in the Peninsula Youth program in Gig · Harbor, Wash. Kathy has been employed with Allied Stores for the past nine years. Scooter has also been involved in officiating sports, baseball, basketball and football for the past four years with Washington Officials �ssoci­ ation.

BONNIE GWYNNE and Dennis B. Townsend were married Jan. 20, 1979 at Moffit Naval Base in San Jose, Calif. He is a pilot in the Army and stationed at Ft. Ord, Monterey, Calif. Bonnie is work­ ing at Carmel Community Hospit­ al in ICU and CCU. They live in Marina. PAUL ALAN SKONES and Arni Jill Scobba (student at PLU) were married Nov. 25, 1978 in Camas, Wash. Paul is a teacher and Arni will graduate from PLU in May. They will make their home in Tacoma, Wash. Rev. THOMAS and KATHRYN (Fredstrom '74) BECK are living in Worland, Wyo. Tom graduated from Wartburg Theological Semi­ nary, Dubuque, Iowa in May 1978 and accepted a to be pastor at Grace Lutheran Church in Wor­ land. He was ordained in Lodi, Calif., on July 23, 1978 and install­ ed at Grace Lutheran on July 30, 1978. They have a three-year old daughter, Sarah.

call

1975

Dick Downie DICK DOWNIE has been pro­ moted from assistant manager to general manager of the Clinker­ dagger, Bickerstaff & Pett's Publ­ ic House in Beaverton, Ore. GENE SHARRATI MA '74 is instructing the third grade at Southworth Elementary this year, filling the gap of grades from one­ to-five that he has taught. He taught secon d gra de in Olympia, Wash., and the first grade in Stavanger, Norway for two years at a private American schooL E L I Z A B ET H L. FRY a n d Richard D . Dorsett were married Nov. 25, 1978. They live in Taco­ ma, Wash. M A R K S . a n d KATHRYN (Adams '74) JOHNSON are living in Federal Way, Wash. Mark is director of research and evalua­ tion at TacomalPierce County Comprehensive Mental Health Center and Kathryn is a graduate student at the University of Washington School of Work in Seattle. ELLEN (Hieber) and DALE (at­ tended) ROWLEY are living in Sumner, Wash_ Dale is working for Brown Truck and Equipment and they have a two-year-old son, Jason.

Social

MARY KAY (Schmedake) ESS­ WEIN received her master of science degree in nursing in De­ cember at California State Un­ iversity, Long Beach, Calif., where she completed pediatric nurse practitioner program last May and is currently working at Orange County Health Depart­ ment as a pediatric nurse practi­ tioner. Her husband, Dan, is emp­ loyed at Fluor Corporation as a cost and scheduling engineer. They live in Long Beach, Calif. KIM and NANCY (GIRVAN '75) ESTRADA '74, are the parents of a daughter, Amy Margaret, born Sept. 24, 1978. Nancy is an English teacher at Curtis Sr. High School in Tacoma, Wash., and Kim is currently in sales management. They live in Olympia, Wash. DEBRA C. EISERT and LYNN R. KAHLE, MA '74, were married Aug. 19, 1978 111 a church built by the bride's father. They were married at Tabor Heights United Methodist Church in Portland, Ore. The newlyweds spent a week at Mt. Hood and the Oregon beaches before leaving for Ann Arbor, Mich, where they will make their first home. BECKY (Olson) LETTERER and husband, AI, have relocated in the Seattle area. Becky is working as a critical-care nurse in Seattle. GRO STYRMO x'75 and Richard Levandowski were married Aug. 18, 1978 in Oslo, Norway. RANDY WALLENBERG and Del Rene Davis were married this past year in Centralia, Wash. Ran­ dy is employed by the Rainier School District as a secondary English teacher and Del Rene is a nursing student at PLU. LINDA HOUSH, '75, is living in Kihei, Maui, Hawaii and is an entertainer at the hotel Inter-Continental Maui. BETH (Klavano) WEIGAND re­ ceived her master's degree in special education from the Un­ iversity of Texas in July 1978. She was married to Nell Wiegand on July 29 at Trinity Lutheran Church, Pullman, Wash. They will make their home in Austin, Tex., where Bech is teaching elemen­ tary resource room and Neil is an electrical engineer with IBM. SUSAN (Creaver) CLEMENTS and husband, Jim, are the parents of a girl, Wendy June, born June 26, 19n. Sue, after coaching at

FERN

MA

Tacoma Community College for two years is now selling real estate for University Realty in Tacoma. Jim has his own construction firm, Clements Construction, doing re­ sidential building in the Pierce County area. They own a home in Port Orchard, Wash. LONNIE LEE LANGDON was married to Joan Elaine Mercurio of Sarasota, Fla. on Nov. 25, 1978. They ilow live in Culver City, Calif..,' where Lonnie is working for BaDk of America in Los Angeles and specializing in equip­ ment finance, primarily leasing of industj:ial equipment. He is also attending the University of South­ erri Q1lffornia in .the MBA night program. His wife works for Fed­ eral Deposit Insurance Corpora­ tion (FDIC) as a trust specialist. She covers all the western states and travels extensively.

1976

SUSIE ADAMS and Philip Stutz­ man were married Oct. 8, 1978 in the First Christian Church in Cor­ vallis, Ore. The couple will make their first home in Columbia, Mo., where Philip is an auditor with the State of Missouri. . CYNTHIA RUNBERG and Jeff Caldwell were married Jan. 21, 1978 at Our Saviour's Lutheran Church in Bremerton. They both graduated from the Seattle Police Department's Academy in May of 1977 and have been assigned as patrol officers. They live in Lynn­ wood, Wash. CRAIG A. FOUHY is head foot­ ball coach at Coupeville High School, Coupeville, Wash. Prior to going to his new position he was social studies/physical education teacher and head football coach at Lake Roosevelt in Coulee Dam. MIM GORDON McCABE x'73 (CHERI LOILAND '76) are the parents of a son, Daniel Wayne, born April 17, 1978. Cheri is a substitute teacher and Gordon is employed with Digital Company in Bellevue, Wash. They live in Tacoma, Wash. SANDRA SUE OLSON and DAVID ALAN JOHNSON '78 were married Sept. 23, 1978 at Bethel Lut heran Church in Hamilton, Mont. The couple is making their first home in Great Falls, Mont. JUDITH ANITA REINHARDT and BARRY DEAN NUPEN were married in Aug. 1978 at Prince of P e a c e L u t h e r an C h u r c h i n Lakewood (Tacoma). They will make their first home in Waynes­ ville, Mo. BRUCE V. RILEY and Peggie L. Tingler were married in Soldier's Chapel in Big Sky in ' Bozeman, Mont., where they will make their . home_ . J�T ' .SAARELA is teaching English . and· drama and directs' school ' plays in the Hermiston; ' Ore. School ·District. Prior to her · p1-esent' position she taught in Taiwan and at Mercer Island near Seattle. . . MlM SCOTI TEMPLETON '75 (SUE ANDERSON '76) are the parents of a daughter, Hannah Elizabeth, born Nov. 10, 1978. They live in Auburn, Wash.

MARY' WELLER and Rick Souza were married Nov. 11, 1978 in Spokane, Wash. They are now living in Honolulu, Hawaii where Rick is a graphic artist and Mary is a nurse. MARK CLINTON and Jana Mil­ ler were married in Nov. 1978 in Yellowstone Boys Ranch Chapel, Billings, Mont. Mark is football coach at Rocky Mountain College in Billings. SUSAN NORWOOD is living in Seattle attending the University of Washington alid working on her master's degree in maternal-child nursing. JON LACKEY is in Washington, D.C., where he is .a melll ber of the U.S. Air Force presidential Sup­ port Team, working as an enter­ tainer at the White House, Senate and Congress. He tours frequently with the U.S. Air Force band traveling to all corners of the globe as the "musical ambas­ sadors for the United States." He has also begun graduate studies at Catholic University of America. LOREEN FERRERO is current­ ly taking part in a nine-month training program with the Agape Force, a Christian missionary fel­ lowship based in Lindale, Tex. After training she will be able to spend a year interning and then apply for full-time work with them in the U.S., Mexico, Canada, or New Zealand. Loreen spent the past two years teaching elemen­ tary music in the Franklin Pierce School District in Tacoma, Wash. DENISE (Olsen) MILLER and husband, Jacob, are living in Rome, N. Y., where Denise is work­ ing as a public health nurse for Oneida County Health Dept. Her husband is a captain in the U.S. Air Force at Griffiss . He is division chief of management sys­ tems division.

AFB

PETER and CARRIE (Gordon) ANSINGH of Laramie, Wyo., are the parents of a daughter, Caitlin Elizabeth, born Jan. 3, 1979. Captain EDWARD J. McCLURE, Jr. MA '76 has been assigned to duty at Randolph , Tex. Ed is an executive support officer with a unit of the Air Forc Manpower and Personnel Cente and previously served at McChord , Wash.

AFB

EIA rW

AFB

1977

KAROLINE (Karoljane) JOHN­ SON and DAVID L. COLOMBINI were married on Sept. 16, 1978 at Central Lutheran Church in Port­ land, Ore. Dave is teaching at Quilcene High School, Quilcene, Wash., and is also the head football coach there. Karoljane received her teaching certificate from Portland State University in June 1978. She is doing substitute teaching in the Port Townsend area where they live. WALTER L. KOOPMAN is em loyed as a fiscal accountant for th Navy Finance Office Puget Sound, located with the Naval Shipyard at Bremerton, Wash. STEVE and MOLLY (Fischer '76) LEE are living in Springfield, Ore., where Steve is creative di­ rector for an ad agency in Eugene and Molly is assistant district health nurse for the Springfield School District. CYNTHIA LEE SOVEREIG N was married to Glen Walter Luebke in Tacoma, Wash. on Aug. 26, 1978. Cynthia is a first-grade teacher at Heritage Ch ristian School ill Tacoma her husband is a firefighter for the City of Puyallup. They are making their home in Puyallup, Wash. BARBARA PETERSON an Gary D. Thompson were married at Christ Lutheran Church in Lakewood (Tacoma), Wash. on Nov. 11, 1978. STU and KATHY (Koenig '77) RIGALL celebrated their first wedding anniversary Aug. 6, 1978. Stu is teaching elementary vocal music in Banks, Ore. Kathy is a legal secretary for the State Jus­ tice Department of Oregon. They live in Portland. HOLLY TWEDT of Rockford, I l l . , recently completed her M.S.W. at the University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign and hopes to be working soon. PAMELA SUE HANSON an JOHN MARION HUNTER '76 were married at Emmaus Luthe­ ran Church in Bloomington, Minn. on Aug. 26, 1978. They are making their first home in Los Angeles, Calif.

p-A eW

and

_ �

_

John Knoff . JOHN H. KNOFF .is a second lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force . and has graduated .from the navigator training program at Mather , Calif. John will now go to George , Calif., for flying duty with a Unit of Tactical Air Command.

AFB

AFB

JANICE FINDLEY and JAN KIKUCHI have spent the last seven months investigating re­ ported sightings of U.F.O.s in the Sedro-Woolley, Wash. area in con­ junction with the U.F.O.N.A. A book telling of their first-hand experiences is due out in the summer of 1979. Both Janice and Jan are now .residing in the Seattle area.


Second Lieutell1lnt CARLA K . SMITH has been named outstand­ ing junior officer of the quarter at McConnell AFB, Kan. A contingent of PLU alums took a recent trip to the sun and surf of Waikiki Beach during the Christ­ mas vacation. PLU grads in­ cluded: TERRI GEODE, DAVE DOROTHY, KEN (Rock) QUERY, DAVE EMMONS, DEB A N D DIANE OTTERBY, and LYNNE MOEHRING. They were accom­ panied by Pete Gedde, current PLU student, Jackie Gedde, Paul Ydstie, and Kurt Otterby, all past attendees of Concordia Lutheran College in Minnesota, and Debbie Davis, a friend from Bremerton, Wash. Once there, the group was joined on many occas ions by Paul "Kanaka" White who makes his home on Oahu. The White family hosted the whole group for dinner one night and a whole evening of genuine Hawaiian hospitality was enjoyed.

1978 KEITH COOK and Karen Neils were married Aug. 19, 1978 at St. John Lutheran Church in Libby, Mont. Following a wedding trip to Mexico they are making their first home in Federal Way, Wash. Keith is employed by Burroughs Corp. in Tacoma, Wash. USA GUTSCHMIDT is teach­ ing elementary music, fourth, fifth, and sixth grade band, high school chorus, high school band, and kindergarten in the Creston School at Wilbur, Wash. JEFF HALL and Margy Waag were married Aug. 26, 1978 at Bothell First Lutheran Church, Bothell, Wash. The couple is now at home in Puyallup, Wash., fol­ lowing a wedding trip to Whidbey Island and Canada. Jeff is emp­ loyed at Boeing. WADE R. DIETER and Dinah OIdemeyer were married Aug. 12, 1978 at the Naval Chapel of the Naval Air Station on Whidbey Island, Wash. Wade is attending the University of Bergen, Nor­ way, where he is working on a master's degree in languages. MARY RENNEBOHM of Silver­ ton, Ore. is an elementary physical education specialist in the Silver­ ton School District. She also coaches girl's basketball at the junior high school. ANN STEFFEN is women's bas­ ketball coach at Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, Wash. This is Ann's rU'St year of teaching. Pacific Lutheran University is mentioned in "LightsI Camera! Action!," an article in the January Seventeen Magazine. The article, written by 1978 communications major, GREG VIE, comically de­ tails the ups and downs of making a class film. PLU senior Peter Bennett and junior Karen Cham­ berlin, who starred in the silent - movie, are also mentioned by first name. "Lightsl Cameral Action!" is Vie's second article to appear in $epenteen within the year.

DEBORAH LYSO and MUR­

�Y E. ROUSE were married this now making .,:;:st summer and are

their home in Spanaway, Wash. LYNDA RAMSEY is working for a local CPA firm in Federal Way, Wash., as a junior accoun­ tant. Her work includes constant travel throughout the nation. EDYTHE S. MARSH and Glen E. Stribbling were married Aug. 19, 1978 in Oregon City, Ore. Edythe is working as an RN at St. Joseph's Hospital in Tacoma, Wash., and Glen is a music major at PLU.

n Memoriam MARIE LOUISE (Vandinburg) FORSBERG of Edina, Minn., pass­ ed away Dec. 2, 1978 after a lingering illness. She is survived by her husband, CARL, a daugh­ ter, Mrs. Dallas (Maetha) Nord, a son, JAMES, one sister and one brother, six grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Marie retired from Sheridan Elementary School in Richfield, Minn. in June 1976 after 21 years of teaching. She was a member of Diamond Lake Lutheran Church in Minneapolis, M in n.

BYRON SCHERER '60 passed away Nov. 1 1 , 1977. He was a younger brother of Milo and David Scherer '56 and husband of Ida (Batterman x'62) Scherer. Dr. EARL B. GERHEIM, former professor in the department of biological sciences at PLU, died at his home in Long B each, Calif. this past summer. His wife, Julia, died the preceding year.

DR. VERNON A. trrzINGER, 77, professor emeritus of speech died Dec. 6, 1978 in Tacoma in a car-school bus collision. He came to PLU in 1950 and retired in 1969. He served as Tacoma postmaster from 1953-1957. Dr. Utzinger was active in edu­ cational, community and church activities. For many years he was president of the World Affairs Council of Tacoma. Funeral services were held Dec. 9 with Dr. Robert Mortvedt, presi­ dent emeritus, participating. Dr. Utzinger survivors include his wife, Alice, of the home in Tacoma, and two sons, Dr. John G. of Ellensburg and WUdred E. of San Francisco. Mr. James (CAROLYN SEVEREID) Mills, class of 1949, died Nov. 21, 1978 in Pasco, Wash. in an automobile collision. She was 55 and lived in Kennewick.. Funer­ al services were held Nov. 25 in First Lutheran Church, Ken­ newick, where she was a member. Survivors include her husband, James, Class of 1949, a son Jay and two daughters, Nancy and Julie, all of Kennewick. DR. EDGAR R. GAMM , class of 1949, died in Park Rapida, Minn. , Jan. 6 as a result of a heart attack suffered while playing racquet­ ball. Funeral services were held . Jan. 10 in Park Rapids. Gamm was a letterman in bas­ ketball at PLU and met his wife, nee Rumohr Gulhaugen on campus. Dr. Gamm, age 53, was a graduate of the University of Minnesota Medical School and practiced medicine in Trimont, Minn., and Park Rapids for over 2S years. He was active in church and community affairs and in 1969 received Park Rapids' community service award . , He is survived by his wife, his mother, three sons, two daugh­ ters, three sisters and three grandchildren.

GARY ST. MARIE, ciass of '77, died suddenly in his Tacoma home Dec. 25 at the age of 23. A communications arts major, St. Marie was an announcer for radio station KLAY, Tacoma. While at PLU he worked for KPLU-FM.

Survivors include his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Rosaire St. Marie of Tacoma. ANNE TONETTE (NETTIE) LARSON, member of the PLU faculty in the early part of thi s century, died in Seattle Jan. 12 at the age of 93. She was an instruc­ tor in typing and shorthand. She was born in Harmony, Minn., and came to the Paci fic Northwest in 1900. She is survived by two sisters, M rs . August (Mathilde) Bushmann and Mrs. Henry C. (Thea) Laville, both of Seattle. MRS. H. L. (ELISE) FOSS, widow of the former chairman of the PLU Board of Regents after whom Fos s Hall is named, died Dec. 25 in Seattle at the age of 84.

A na tive of Bothell, Wash., she was married to Dr. Foss in 1919 and they served parishes in Washington until he became dis­ trict president in 1932.

Mrs. Foss is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Patricia Svare of

Kirkland, Class of 1950, and by two grandchildren, Scott and Kris­ tin Svare. BURTON D. THORPE, class of 1 943, died of cancer Nov. 22 in Arcadia, Calif. at the age of 45. Thorpe served as a Navy officer in World War II. In 1950 he received a Juris Doctor degree from Southwestern University. He joined the Union Oil Company in 1948 and at the time of his death was manager of Administrative Services of the Union Internation­ al Oil Division. He was chairman of the Board of Regents at California Lutheran College, and had served as presi­ dent of several Lutheran congre­ gations through the years. He was on the board of Arcadia Methodist H o s p i ta l , a member of the Jonathan Club and other groups . He is survived by his wife, Helen, one son and three daugh­ ters. Thorpe was raised in Parkland where his father was pastor of

Mrs. Davis came to Tacoma as a child when her father, the late Rev. Johan Hougen, was called to serve a local Lutheran church. She has lived here ever since . For 18 years, until 1943, M rs. Davis was assistant business manager at PLU. She then served for about 18 years as office manager for the Parkland Light and Water Co. until she retired. Her sis ter, Mrs. Agnes Stuen, age 95, who survives her, has lived with her in the Davis home for many years. Mrs. Davis is survived by a son George L. Davis, Jr., of G ig Har­ bor, vice-chairman of the PLU Board of Regents; a daughter Virginia Pifer Johnson of Seattle, two sisters, four brothers, five grandchildren and four great­ grandchildren.

Trinity Lutheran Church for many years.

Minority, 3rd World Women Are Topics Of Conference Over two dozen resource per­ SODS from Washington state and

British Columbia will be featured during a two-day "Minority and Third World Women's Confer­ ence" at Pacific Lutheran Univer­ sity Saturday and Sunday, March

3-4. The PLU committee sponsoring the program includes representa­ tives from Black Alliance Through Unity (BANTU), Feminist Student Union, Foreign Area Studies Prog-

Adm. Russell Named Q Club Director

Admiral James S. Russell (USN-ret.) of Lakewood has been unanimously elected as a director of the Q Club at Pacific Lutheran University, club pre­ sident Clare Grahn announced. According to Grahn, also of Lakewood, Russell will play an active role in the leadership of the 840-member PLU patron's organization, which has raised over 51.2 million for university unrestricted funds and scholar­ ships since it was organized in

1 972.

MRS. GEORGE (ESTHER HOUGEN) DAVIS died Jan. 26 i n Tacoma at the age of 82 .

Russell, who retired from the U.S. Navy in 1965 after 33 years of service, is former vice-chief

ram, Foreign Student Advising Of­ fice, International Students Or­ ganization, Minority Affairs Of­ fice, and Women's Stu�s Group, all campus organizations. Topics to be discussed include gaining self-confidence, women in the black church, American Indian women, cultural perspective on sexuality, health care, internation­ al women and students in the U.S., leadership, women-headed house­ holds, child care, job skills, dom­ estic violence and spouse abuse, human rights and many others. Dr. Kathleen Blumhagen, assis­ tant professor of sociology and program coordinator, said, "Our objective has been to build a prog­ ram which is as inclusive of diffe­ rent perspectives and groups as possible." Over 100 persons are expected to attend the conference, which begins at 9 a.m. Saturday in the University Center. Further information is available from Dr. Blumhagen at PLU.

of naval operations and com­ m a n d e r- i n - c h i e f of NATO forces in southern Europe. He is also active in the Taco­ ma Area Chamber of Com­ merce, Puget Sound Area USO, Pierce County Chapter Ameri­ can Red Cross and other milit­ ary and service organizations. Q Club members contribute a minimum of 5240 per year to PLU.

Wilma Rudolph To Lecture At PLU

Wilma Rudolph, former Olympic women's track star, is scheduled to lecture at Pacific Lutheran Un­ iversity Friday, Mar. 16. The program, sponsored by the PLU Lecture Series, will be held in the University Center at 8:15 p.m.


Mental Muscle Mat Mentor's Main Message B y Jim Kittilsby

From left, top: Bjorn Melsom, Gro Styrmo; bottom: Ole Kjorref­ jord, Bent Bjercke, · Hilde Bjorhovde.

· · · ·· ··

Norse Impo'rts Dazzle Yank' . ki Colleague s

S

··

.

. . In skiing parlance, nordic is synonymous with cross c{)un­ try. At PLU, nordic is a symbol of excellence in both downhill and cross country racing . . . Four Norwegians currently active in coach Jin Thieman's PLU ski program have made more than a sitzmark impres­ sion. Senior · Ole Kjorresfjord · .put on one of the most dazzling exhibitions in the annals of the Lute slat progra m in l a t e J a nuary when h e w o n the sla l o m , g i a n t s l a l o m , ·. a n d skimeister (outstanding skier) award at Schweitzer Basin, Idaho. " . "It's the first time in my 1 1 y e ar as sociation with PLU men's skiing that we've had a racer win two events," declared Thieman. One of three Oslo imports, Ole is a business administration major, .in his first and final season Cat PLU after a year and a . half stint in New York working for the Export Co unc i l o f Norway. Hilde Bjorhovde, a j u nior broadcast major from Oslo, is an accomplished cross country racer. She's also a talented writer and serves as correspon­ dent for the school newspaper, The Mooring Mast. Illness has limited the par­ ticipation of Berit Bjercke this season, but the Oslo junior, who By Jim Kittilsby

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divides her time between com­ munication arts and German, put points on the board for the Lutes last year in cross country. Bjorn Melsom hails from Lar­ vik, a couple of hours south of Oslo . A junior in business ad­ ministration, Bjorn was Ole's predecessor at an Export Coun­ cil of Norway position in New York. His cross country credits include first place at the 1978 PLU Invitational. A recent visitor to the PLU campus, Gro Styrmo was on hand when the Norwegian dele­ gation assembled, appropriate­ ly enough, at the Rune Stones. Although she was but a one term racer, in 1 975, the Oslo based nordic competitor left an indelible mark on Lady Lute racing charts. They flippantly call them­ selves the Norwegian Mafia.

$5000 Kilworth Gift Supports Track Proj ect A $5,000 gift has been pre­ sented to Pacific Lutheran Un­ iversity by the Florence Kil­ worth Foundation of Tacoma, according to Puget Sound Na­ tional Bank trust officer T.H. Pendleton. The gift is to be applied to the cost of PLU's new all-weather track facility. Funding for the $1 38,000 proj ect, which in­ cludes viewing stands and aux­ iliary equipment, is 85 percent completed, according to a PLU spokesperson. A spring dedication of the track is anticipated.

While attired in New York Mets doubleknits, pitcher Tug McGraw intoned the "You gotta believe" PMA message for posterity. A disciple, PLU wrestling coach Dan Hensley has an elon­ gated version of the theme. " We believe we can win, and further, win matches that other teams don't expect us to win. " The positive pronouncement, from the man who directed the Lutes · to a second place NWC finish in his first season, isn't wat e r e d d o w n w i t h generalities. Hensley, a former Pac - 8 c h a m p ion and s ixth place NCAA finisher at Washington State, got down to specifics as he sized up the conference tournament. . "If . · we do things right, we have a good chance in six weight brackets, with an out­ side shot in a seventh." Hensley's "best chance" con­ tingent includes Paul Ginovan­ nini (134), Kevin Traff (142), Hoby Shelton (150), Karl Dun­ lap (158), Tom Wahl (1 77), and Tim · Judkins ( 1 90). A recent a d d it i o n , f r e s h m a n heavyweight Greg Rohr is un­ tested in collegiate tournament competition. A 240-pounder re­ lying on strength, Rohr faces formidable opposition from . Linfield ' s d e f e n d i n g N W C champion, who placed sixth at N AlA nationals. Giovannini, a sophomore pre­ med student, is perhaps PLU's brightest hope for national re­ cognition. The Puyallup grappl­ er, 24-4 as a freshman, won his first nine dual match bouts before losing a decision, under rarely used international frees-' tyle rules. at Simon Fraser.

Jim Zorn Featured At Fitness Gala Seattle Seahawk quarterback Jim Zorn will be making a pitch for fitness when he emcees the Friday night Gala, a feature at­ traction at the February 2 3-24 Northwest Regional Clinic on Physical Fitness and Sports at Pacific Lutheran University. On the receiving end at the 7: 3 0 p.m. show will be professionals in physical education and related fields from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Alaska, and Brit­ ish Columbia. The Gala, which features de­ monstrations of physical educa-

Pa ul Giovannini

_

Northwest Conference run­ nerup in 1978, Giovannini and Dunlap represented PLU at the N AlA national tourney, but neither placed. Dunlap, PLU's lone NWC defending champion, has seen just limited action this year because of a shoulder muscle tear. "Paul (Giovannini) has been a c o n s i s t e n tly hard w o rk e r through his high school career at Rogers and here at PLU," stated Hensley. "He epitomizes the second effort message we preach to all our wrestlers. Pau just doesn't let down." Hensley, who doubles as a math teacher at Clover Park High School, is a tireless work­ er who refines the technique of his grapplers, on the mats, in the first person. While organized workouts av­ erage about two hours, many of Hensley's zealots have self-im­ posed routines which may take four to five hours daily. "We've l ined up a tough s chedule, but our wres aren't in awe of anyone, ce ly not intimidated just because the opponent may represent a so-called big-time school." It sounds just like a page out of a Frosty �estering speech.

_

tion skills performed by elemen­ tary and secondary students from Puget Sound area schools, is open to the public. Admission is $2. 0 0 family, $1. 0 0 adults, and SO cents for children. Performers include the Tacoma Youth Symphony, Olympia Hig School Chorus, Tacoma Publi Schools Y o u n g A m b a s s a d o r s (gymnasts), Royal Scottish Danc­ ers, Shelton's South Side Jumping Jills, Puget Sound School of Gym­ nastics, Olympia School District W illows Exercise Group, Washington Karate Association, Capital High School Aerobic Drill Team, and the Summer Freestyle Trampoline Group. The two day fitness clinic, under the auspices of the Presi­ dent's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, gets underway at 9 a.m. Friday, with former Ne a Mexico Governor Jerry Apodac l delivering the keynote address.

� �


ute Cagers Vie for NWC, District Titles In a n evasive moment, Lute basketball coach Ed Anderson jocularly appraised the 1978-79 hoop outlook as "win a few, lose a few . " While the accent has been on he Lute s d i d t he former, march, d uring one stretch, to the win-lose-lose-win-lose-win beat. As the sun begins to set on the schedule, a second strai ght orthwest Conference title is within reach . The elite e ight of NAIA Dis­ trict 1 will again settle the nsas City issue with a post­ ason playoff. In the playoff point pict ure, PLU could oc­ cupy the fourth chair in the octette. While he Lutes stayed sever­ al digi ts over the . 500 mark after a modest start, PLU was, ' n Anderson's own words, "con­ s ' sten Iy inconsistent." This Lute lullaby, a periodic respite which 'n minutes could turn a he fty lead into a nail­ biter, was usually corrected. Usi ng a hero-a-day farmula on offense, combined with a �icky combination defense, a end of the zone and man-to­ man, characterized by a full court press, the Lutes rarely failed to excite the denizens of Olson Auditorium. Dave Lashua, a 6-7 sopho­ more from Marysville, was the

PLU Athletes Anticipate op Sprin g Sports Season Spring ahead is a helpful hint when adjusting a chronometer at daylight savings transition time. In addition, spring ahead apt­ ly fits men's track and field at PLU, which got an early jump the March equinox sport s son, competing in a mi d­ anuary Portland indoor meet. Spring, of the elastic variety, is PLU's principal asset. High j umper Steve Kingma, with a 6-7 vertical best, sopho­ more transfer Paul Johnson in the pole vault, and freshman hurdles standout Kelley San­ ders, are high on coach Paul Hosetb ' s spring stock. PLU women will cavort on the new 400 meter a l l -weat her track with s t rength in t h e prints and improvement fore­ st in the 800 to 5000 meter nts.

chairman of the board, so to speak The burly bl ond re­ bounded in double figures, col­ lecting a mod e r n h i g h 2 4 caroms against Lewis & Clark. In addition, Lashua maintained a scoring average in the 14 point vicinity. Senior Ric Clark set a school standard with an 1 1 for 1 1 c h a ri t y line demons tration against Willamette. Team free throw proficiency, 13 in a row, preserved the 83-82 home court win against the Bearcats. . Butch Williams, a 6-7 junior, who hasn't reached his poten­ tial, according to Anderson, must have gotten at least a sneak preview before the Pacif­ ic game. Averaging 5.8 points a game at the time, Butch canned 25 points, added 15 rebounds, and was a human fly swatter on defense. PLU scores thru Feb. 6 : 8 3 S t . Martin's 84 63 Seattle Pacific 54 52 Centra! 59 94 Simon Fraser 84 70 Simon Fraser 84 87 Cal Baptist 82 74 Eastern 54 73 Linfield 58 73 Willamette 58 67 Hawaii 69 45 Lewis & Clark 65 77 Linfield 65 47 Central 53 78 Lewis & Clark 67 59 Pacific 66 88 Whitworth 65 83 Willamette 82 105 Pacific 72 83 Alaska-Fairbanks 79 73 Eastern 67

Senior tennis j ewel D a v e T r a g e s e r , a t wo - t i m e All­ American, who captured the MVP award at the national runnerup in singles, has an All­ A m e ri c a doubles partner in Mike Hoeger. Color Mike Ben­ son's court outlook bright. Feature performer for the women's asphalt aggregation is Kathy Wales, 1 7-3 last year in singles. Tennis coach Alison Dahl enjoyed high retention and a good recruiting year. The Lady Lutes were 1 1 -7 in 1 978. Motown-here-we-come is the emanation from the Lute wo­ men's rowing team, which is looking ahead to the 1 979 na­ tional women's rowing champ­ ionships in Detroit. Sixth in senior fours at the 1978 nation­ als, PLU will have a veteran s q uad s t ro k e d b y R u th Babcock. Defending Meyer Cup and Seattle Pacific Invitational ti­ tles in eights, Dave Peterson's male rowers can fill the bulk of t h e seats with experienced oarsmen. Dirk Reese and Bob Kratzke are seaworthy seniors. Coming off a 1 6-1 6 season, PLU's best in twelve years, Lute baseballers may be a trifle shy in long ball power, but could make up for it with defense and pi tching.

Jim Johnson

Johns on Fills u dd en Swim Coach Void Pacific Lutheran has dipped into the municipal pool ranks to fill an aquatics director void, created when first-year coach Pete Kennedy resigned sudden­ ly on Dec. 14. Jim Johnson, 30, who has six years of pool managem ent and coaching experience , most re­ c e n t l y as s w i m m i ng pool manager for the City o f Boze­ man, Montana, took over as Lute admiral on Jan. 3. J o hnson, who hail s from

Olson Earns NAIA Award Of Merit PLU Athletic Director Dave Olson will be presented the National Association of Inter­ coll egiate Athletics (NAIA) Award of Merit at the March 1 5 Annual Hall o f Fame luncheon in Kansas City, Mo. Olson, a member of the NAJA executive committee, is being recognized for outstanding s_r­ vice as NAIA District 1 chair­ man, a post be held prior to his selection 0 the national gov­ erning body. The Hall of Fame luncheon i s held i n conjunction with the NAJA national basketball tour­ nament. Olson'., article on Educatio n­ al Athletics, which first ap­ peared in the December , 1977 is sue of Scene. wa featured in the November·Decern ber na­ tional NAIA News magazine.

Hopkins, Minn. , wilt" oversee University and public instruc­ tion programs in addition to his duties as Lute men's and wo­ men's swim coach. Kennedy, on th e PLU scene for just three months, cited the need to return to the family home in Waterbury, Connec­ ticut, where his father is seri­ ously ill.

Zamberlin Name d AP All-American For t h e first time i n 1 3 years, Pacific Lutheran University can lay claim to an Associated Press first team Little All­ America football player.

Oft-honored senior lineback­ er John Zamberlin, who attract­ ed scouts from 13 National Football League clubs to the PLU campus last fall, was cited by two All-America selection committees , Associated Press and the NAIA. The 6-2, 235pounder was also a first team choice on the NAIA squad.

Zamberlin is the first Lute footbaIler tabbed by the AP, the world's largest news gathering agenc y , since c e nt e r M a rv Peterson was selected for first earn honors in 1 965.

PLU claimed another line on the AP All-America roster, Wlth· ' sophomore tight end Scott Wes, tering an honorable mention pick. Previous PLU fi rst team AP selections were defensive back Ron Billings ( 1 952), center Don D' Andrea ( 1 947), and halfback Marv Tommervik, a t wo-tIme recipient ( 1 940 and 1 941).


24

23-24

Opera Workshop, Eastvold Aud., 8 : 15 p.m. President's Council on Physical Fitness, Olson Aud.

24 27 28

Basketball, St. Martin's at PLU, Olson Aud., 7:30 p.m. Recital, Student Chamber Series, Univ. Center, 8 : 15 p.m. Tacoma High School Basketball Playoffs, Olson Aud., 8 p.m

1-3 1

Art Exhibit, Photography by Mark Morris, graphics by Mike Frederickson, Mortvedt Gallery

2 3-4 5-30

Reci ai, Organist Da vid Dahl, Univ. Center, 8' 15 p.m . . . Tlurd World Women's Conference. Univ. Center Art Exhibit, Jewelry, enamels, ceramics by Helen Greg­ ory, Paul ' chaels, Marcia Jartun, Bill Rhea, Wekell Gallery

6

Recital, Faculty Chamber Series , University Center, 8 : 15 p.m.

11

Recital, Faculty Woodwind Quintet, Univ. Center, 8:15 p.m.

12

Daffodil Festival Coronation, Olson Aud., 8 p.m

13

Recital, Soprano Barbara Poulshock, Univ. Center, 8 : 15 p.m.

15

Concert, Evening of Contemporary Music, Univ. Center, 8 : 15 p.m.

16 16- 17, 22-24 20 22-24 25 30-3 1

1 �30 1 2- 0 3 5 18 24 27-29

What' s ew Board of Rege nts With You ? Name Address

__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ _

City

State

zip, O Please check this box if ad­ dress above is new. Attach old label below. Class Spouse Class, __

__ _ _

__

Spouse maiden name

Tacoma Dr. T. W. Anderson Mr, George Lagerquist Mr. M.R. Knudson, Chairman Dr. Richard Klein Mr. Richard Neils Mrs. Suzanne Nelson Dr. W.O. Rieke, president

Seattle

Rev. Dr. A.G. Fjellman Mr. Paul Hoglund Mr. Clayton Peterson Mrs. Oscar Rolander Dr. M. Roy Schwarz Rev. Dr. Clarence Solberg Rev. Warren Strain Dr. Christy Ulleland, Vice Ch. Dr. George Wade

Western WasbinatOD

Rev. Charles Bomgren Mr. George Davis

Eastern Washington

Lecture, Wilma Rudolph, Univ. Center, 8 : 1 5 p.m.

University Theatre, "Blood Wedding," Eastvold Aud., 8 : 1 5 p.m. Concert, PLU Symphony Orchestra, Eastvold Aud., 8 : 15 p.m Rotary Youth Leadership Awards Artist Series, Penns ylvania Ballet, Olson Aud., 8 p.m. An Evening of Dance, Eastvold Aud., 8 : 15 p.m.

Art Exhibit, Alumni Exhibition, Mortvedt Gallery Concert, PLU Concert Choir, Eastvold Aud., 8 : 1 5 p.rn Art E

p.na Recital, Faculty Chamber Series, Univ. Center, 8 : 15 p. m� Concert, PLU Band Homecoming, Eastvold Aud., 8 ' 1 5

Recital, Faculty Chamber Series, Univ. Center, 8 : 15 p.m . Recital, Student Chamber Ensemble, Univ. Center, 8 : 15 pm

Unive rsIty Theatre, "Under Milkwood, " Eastvold Aud., 8: 15 p.m.

Mr. Roger Larson Dr. Ronald Lerch Albert Fink Rev. Robert Quello Oreton Dr. Kenneth Erickson Mr. Galven Irby Rev. John Milbrath Dr. Casper (Bud) Paulson Montana Mr. Roland Grant Mr. Sterling Rygg Idaho Mrs. Dorothy Schnaible

Alaska

Mr. Martin R. Phil MlnnelOta Mr. Robert Hadland

ibit, Ceramics by Barbara Minas, Wekell Gallery

Advisory

Rev Alan Hatlen, ALC Dr. Joann Jensen, Dr. Erving Seve t· son, and Dr. John Herzog, faculty Dr. Ronald Matthias. ALC Mr. Perry Hendricks, Jr., treasurer Rev. Llano Thelin, LCA Dr. Richard So berg, LCA Three student representatives

Editorial Board Dr. William O. Rieke . . . . . . . . . . President Lucille Giroux . . . . . . . . Pres. Exec. Assoc. Ronald Coltom . . . . Dir. Alumni Relations James L. Peterson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Edit�James Kittilsby . . . . . . . . . . . Sports Edit Kenneth Dunmire . . . Staff Photograpbe. Linda Walker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. Asst. O.K. Devin, Inc . . . . . . . . Graphics Design

Mr. Fred Muenscher Rev. David Wold Pacific Lutheran U ni versity BuHetin Second Class Postage Paid at Tacoma, Washington

Mail to: Alumni House Pacific Lutheran U. T coma, VVash. 98447

Pacific Lutheran University I Alumni Association


H RIN

I

A n unprecedented effort to a and deepen PLU'

President William Rieke goes on the road.

Pacific Lutheran University

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SIRENGlH

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Special Campaign upplement

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Sharing in strength PLU Launches $ 1'6 .5 Million C a pital Fund Campaign A five-year $16.5 m illion capital fund campaign is being launched this month by Pacific Lutheran University, accord­ ing to PLU President Dr. Wil­ liam O . Rieke. Nearly two years in the plan­ ning stages, the campaign is intended to raise funds for a new $S million science building, a $3 million performing arts center, $1.5 million for upgrad­ ing of present facilities, $5 million for scholarship and maintenance endowment and $2 million to undergird the financial stability of PLU, Dr. Rieke indicated. The first phase of the cam­ paign is beginning this month among the 280 congregations of the North Pacific District of the Ame rican Lutheran Church. This phase, which continues through October, is intended to raise a minimum of $3 million. A concurrent campaign ef­ fort is being conducted among the 1 1,500 members of the PLU Alumni Association. This group is aiming at a $500,000 goal, according to alumni director Ronald Coltom. Future phases of the cam­ paign will be conducted among fou n d at i o n s , c o r p o ra t i o n s , businesses and other church bodies, Rieke said. Success of the church and alumni campaigns will ulti­ mately depend on a "small ar­ my of enthusiastic volunteers," said Luther Bekemeier, vice­ president for development at PLU. Bekemeier is the cam­ paign director. The �olunteer leadership re.-

PLU . . one of the country;s most beautiful college campuses but the facilities need is becoming critical. Insert: a typical faculty-student consultation in a crowded hallway of aging Ramstad Hall. .

cently has been involved in training sessions and will be organizing local level campaign volunteers. The ultimate goal of

the church campaign, accord­ ing to Rieke, is to get the message personally to individu­ al congregational members.

Congregational Leadership Dr. Clarence Solberg (Seattle) Rev. David Steen (Olympia) Barb & Leo Eliason (Olympia) Rev. Keith Krebs (Walla Walla) Mr. Ole Halingstad (Walla Walla) Rev. Lionel Simonson (Klamath Falls, Ore.) Mr. Robert Shive (Sisters, Ore.) Rev. Grant Gard (Brush Prairie) Mr. Dave Radke (Vancouver) Mr. and Mrs. Donald Wick (Pasco) Rev. H.S. Babington (Kennewick) Rev. Ronald D. Martinson (Salem) Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Burchfield (Stayton) Rev. Paul Wuest (Wenatchee)

Mr. Lawrence Hauge (Wenatchee) Rev. Leonard C. Ericksen (Bellin­ gham)

Mrs. Onella Brunner (Mt. Vernon) Rev. Robert Gordon (Edmonds) Mr. Karl Forsell (Edmonds) Rev. E. Duane Tollefson (Beaver­ ton, Ore.) Mr. Dale Benson, (Portland, Ore.) Rev. Otto C. Tollefson (Poulsbo) M r . J a m e s W i d s t e e n (Port Angeles) Rev. James Berentson (Lewiston Id.) Rev. and Mrs. Fred Schnaible (Moscow Id.) Rev. Donald W. Taylor (Everett) Mr. George Thorleifson (Stan­ wood) Rev. John Milbrath (Portland, Ore.) Mr. Wesley Radford (Portland,

Ore.)

Rev. David Wold (Puyallup) Mr. Ray Tobiason (Puyallup) Rev. Herbert Ringo (Seattle) Rev. Charles Mays (Renton) Mr. Richard Jackson (Renton) Rev. Gerald L. Hickman (Kent) Mr. Curt Hovland (Seattle) Rev. and Mrs. Lothar Pietz (Twin Falls, Id.) Rev. Louis Brunner (Eugene, Ore.) Mr. Lyle Jacobsen (Eugene, Ore.) Rev. Robert Olsen (Almira) Mr. E. Robert Stuhlmlller (Edwall) Rev. Bernt Dahl (Spokane) Mr. and Mrs. John Krautkraemer (Spokane) Rev. John W. Adix (Tacoma) Mr. Ray Highsmith, Jr. (Tacoma)

Early. Campaign Totals Already Exceed $400,000 More than $400,000 has been pledged toward the PLU "Sharing in Strength" capital fund cam­ paign during the early initial stages of the drive since the first of the year, President William O. Rieke announced Feb. 14. The total includes only the first SO or so leadership gifts together with some foundation and trust monies. "It's t h e tip of t h e iceberg," Rieke said. "The re­ spon s e h a s b e e n i m m e n s e l y gratifying. " The gifts represent only the fraction of the campaign leader­ ship that have been involved in initial training sessions. More ses­ sions are to come, and the broad congregational and alumni drives have yet to begin, he indicated.


cience, Fine Arts Facilities Are Priority PLU Needs

e

Although Pacific Lutheran Un­ iversity is now in its 90th year, the PLU campus as it is known today was created in less than 25 years. Growth in enrollment and cam­ pus facilities virtually exploded across the Parkland plains bet­ ween the end of World War II and 1970. Twenty-one of the 23 major buildings on campus were erected during that time. Enrollment in­ creased tenfold . Farsighted forecasts and pro­ jectsin the '50's and '60's brought revolutionary change at PLU in Aerms of academic excellence and "acilities to accommodate a new level of achievement, according to PL U President Dr. William O . Rieke. Spiraling construction costs and less spectacular enrollment pro­ jections contributed to a virtual halt in new construction after 1 970, when the University Center was completed. "But the dynamic ener­ gy in the various academic depart­ menits could not be halted," Dr. Rieke said. "New levels of academ­ ic achievement have contributed to a slower but steady enrollment . crease in an era of widespread .ecline in private college enroll­ ments. More students and stronger programs have meant a greater demand , not just for more square footage, but better designed and equipped space, particularly in the sciences and fine arts." Dr. Rieke continued, "The day when PLU must meet those de­ mand s or face decline has arrived. It can no longer be delayed. " For that reason, the PLU Board of Regents and the Rieke administra­ tion have launched a five-year 16.5 million capital fund cam­ ign intended to provide the fol­ lowing: * A $5 million science complex * A $3 million fine arts center * $ 1 . 5 million to upgrade current facilities * $7 million for endowment, in­ cluding: -$2 million for endowed new facilities maintenance -$3 million to increase endow­ ment for student aid -$2 million to undergird the fiscal stability of the University. The two major new facilities will significantly compl em e n t t h e facilities in Ramstad Hall and Eastvold Chapel, 33 and 27-years-

old respectively. "Both venerated campus buildings will continue to be used, but in and of themselves they are no longer adequate for the tasks the university intends to accomplish," Rieke said. With completion of new facilities

in the mid-'80's and various remod­ e l i n g proj ects ac ross campus, there will be a "domino effect" which will relieve increasing over­ crowding in various campus areas. In the sciences and fine arts, however, the need has been the most critical for the longest period of time, he indicated. Ramstad Hall, for instance, was designed for less than half the number of students currently en­ rolled in the sciences. The lecture rooms and laboratories are over­ crowded, there are increasing safety and design problems, and research space is virtually non­ existent. According to Rieke, continued inadequacies would be a serious deterrent in recruitment of both faculty and students and most certainly will be if present condi­ tions persist. "To date, however, the strong reputation of the PLU program has helped attract and retain highly qualified fac u l t y members and has contributed t o a stable enrollment," he observed. The music and drama programs at PLU are also paradoxical. The

'The dynamic energy in the academic de­ partments could not be halted' level of achievement and reputa­ tion continues to grow, but that very fact makes the problem of l a c k o f c l a s s rooms, practice rooms, rehearsal rooms, perform­ ance areas and storage even more acute. A vision of the 2 1st century is guiding PLU planners as initial project steps are being taken. For

instance, a $138,555 grant from th Murdock Charitable Trust of Van­ couver, Wash., is funding a com­ prehensive study of what science teaching could be like several decades from now. Experts from across the country are working with PLU science faculty members on both curriculum and facilities studies, and the findings will have a significant influence on the de­ sign of the proposed structure. According to chemistry profes­ sor Dr. William Giddings, chair­ man of the study project, some early proposals include extensive use of computers in science in-

'The day when PL U must meet demands or face decline has arrived' struction as well as studies related to computers themselves. Open laboratory concepts and greater e mphasis on interdisciplinary courses for non-majors whic h would directly address world prob­ lems, particularly as they relate to science and technology, are also being explored. Similar planning steps are being taken in preparation for new fine arts facilities, and the need is equ a l l y g r e a t . E a s tv o l d A u ­ ditorium was built when the stu­ dent population was 40 per cent of what it is today. Now music and drama activities take place in 13 different campus buildings. There is critical need for more i n t i m a t e t h e a t e r and recital facilities; practice, rehearsal and office space; plus less obvious intangibles such as improved ac­ oustics, safety and use of faculty and student time. All the latter are d i rectly affected by available facilities, according to Dr. Richard Moe, dean of the School of Fine Arts. Early proposals also envision the i nc l u s i o n of a S c a n d i n a v i a n

Studies Center into the Performing Arts Center. Rieke emphasized that success of the capital fund drive will not only mean new buildings, but en­ dowment funds to insure their proper maintenance and additional endowment for student aid to in­ sure that qualified students will continue to reap the benefit of a quality education. Last, but equally important, is the need for addition­ al unrestricted funds to meet un­ predictable contingencies, such as the level of inflation, over which the university has no control. Simply stated, PLU needs addi­ tional facilities and funds to assure future stability and service, Rieke i n d i c a t e d . T h e " Sharing in Strength" campaign i s a n unprece­ dented effort to achieve that goal by vastly broadening and deepen­ i n g t h e u n i v e r sity's base of support.

vision of the 21st century is guiding PLU planners ' 'A

SUM'MARY OF THE NE EDS --- $ 5, 000, 000

.--

.

.

.

for the n e w scie nce b u i lding to replace i nadeq u a t e faci l i ties i n Ra m s t a d Hall

$ 3, 000, 000

. . .

for t he n e w f i ne arts i n s t r uct ion ce n t e r to replace i n ade q u a t e faci li t i e s i n E a s t vold C h a pe l

$ 2, 000, 000

. . .

to c reate a n e n d o w m e n t f o r n e w faci l i t ies ma i n te n a nce

$ 1 , 500, 000

. . .

to u pg rade c u r r e n t fac i l i t i e s

$3, 000, 000

.

t o e x p a n d the e n dow me n t f o r s t u d e n t aid

$ 2, 000, 000

. . .

. .

to u nd e rg i rd t h e fiscal s t a b i l i t y of th e U n i v e rs i t y

SHA R I NG I N STR E NG TH - Pacific L u t h era n U n i ve rs i t y - Tacoma, Wa s h i ngton - ( 206) 5 3 1 -6900


ALe Churches Respond To PLU Capital Fund Campaign Plans

Avast reservoir •

In an era of general austerity, is it realistic for an institution like Pacifc Lutheran University to undertake a $16.5 million capital fund campaign? PLU President Dr. William O. Rieke not only believes it is, he has publicly staked his presidency on it. His belief has been strongly reinforced by his personal experi­ ences during the past two months. Nearly two years of planning have already been invested in the campaign, but 1979 is the year it rolls. And when it's time for "the rubber to meet the road," it's the head man who is out on the high­ ways. Between Christmas and Jan. 20,

Dr. Rieke made 61 personal calls to recruit volunteer campaign lead­ ers. Although many previously had not been actively involved with PLU, Rieke received an astonish­ ing 87 percent favorable response from lay leaders and 100 percent acceptance from pastors for lead­ ership roles. "Even the few who said no were interested, but they either had conflicts or w�re already personal­ ly over-committed," Rieke said. "There is a vast reservoir of con­ cerned, committed individuals throughout the Northwest and even beyond, ready and willing to share their time, talents and re­ sources on behalf of PLU."

Bishop Solberg Honorary Fund Drive Chairman The Rev. Dr. Clarence Solberg of Seattlf(, bishop of the North Pacific District, of the American Lutheran Church J has accepted honorary chairm.nship of the district capit­ a l a n d e n d o wment campaign launched this month by Pacific Lutheran University. The announcement was made by PLU President Dr. William O. Rieke. The ALC drive, which is aiming at a goal of $3 million, is one of several campaign phases, Rieke stated. Gus Anderson of Bow, Wash., is heading the major gift phase of the district drive, and University of Washington basket­ ball coach Marv Harshman is the honorary chairman of a concur­ rent alumni drive. Harshman and Anderson are PLU alums. The initial phases will lead the way for a five-year effort to raise $16.5 million. There will be some overlap among the phases as many of PLU 's constituents could conceiv­ ably be identified in all three categories, R· eke observed. Dr. Solbert has served as presi­ dent and more recently bishop of

. Dr. Clarence Solberg

the district since 1969. In that capacity he has also served as an ex-officio member of the PLU Board of Regents for 10 years. The district is corporate owner of the university. He previously served as execu­ tive assistant to the president of the ALC's North Wisconsin Dis­ trict for five years and as assistant director of home missions for the f o r m e r E v a ngelical Lutheran Church. He has been the pastor of c o n g r e gations in G reen Bay, Wisc.; San Bruno, Calif. ; and Bison, S.D.

He is already finding that the campaign theme, " Sharing in Strength," is more than just a motto. It clearly describes what is happening. The persons Rieke has recruited will serve as regional and area campaign chairpersons in the vari­ ous conferences of the American Lutheran Church-North Pacific District. Those leaders, in turn, will recruit and supervise a small army of volunteers among the district's 280 congregations. The eventual goal is to get the PLU message to every ALC con­ gregation member personally by early next fall. The ultimate pro­ cedural objective of the campaign Rieke states in the form of a motto: "Every member is told the story; every member can decide." The basic elements of the PLU story are: (1) Pacific Lutheran University is owned and operated by the membership of the ALC North Pacific District. "We are your university! " Rieke says. (2) PLU is a strong university today. It serves and is ready and willing to continue to serve the church in many different ways. To be able to continue to serve, and to be an institution in which its own­ ers and constituency can take pride, it must find major new sources of support. (3) Half of the PLU student body comes from district congrega­ tions. Investment in PLU is an investment in the futures of the children of the congregations. "This is a pivotal experience for PLU," Rieke points out. "This is the first time in its history that PLU, by itself, has made an organized, systematic effort to reach all the people in all the churches. The LIFE campaign ten years ago was not the same; it was a nationwide program on behalf of all ALC colleges. " He continued, "This is also uni­ que in the sense that PLU is the only senior Lutheran college in the Northwest. Our congregational owners are not in a competitive posture with other schools. And as

important as money is at this time, equally important will be the creased visibility and which will in turn inspire greater interest and involvement over a long period of time. "We have always received a strong feeling of affirmation," the president observed, "but we never had come talking dollars. Now we are, and we are finding that the support is real. " H e cited some examples: * An Oregon man whose three children attended PLU and are all married to PLU alums asked, "When can we get started?" * A young alumnus, only years out of school, at first dered why he had been chosen. Then he responded, "I'm honored to be able to serve." *Out of 18 pastors called to serve, 18 accepted. *Out of 14 persons asked to take a leadership role in the major gifts phase and pledge $5,000 or more, 1 1 said yes. *Few pastors have great means. Yet one said, "I'm pro-PLU but my church is also in the midst of a building program. I'm not sure what I can do." He sent a $1 pledge. "That kind of warm feeling has been reflected all the way down the line," Rieke said. For Rieke, this initial campaign thrust meant 15-16 hour days, se­ ven days a week through much of January. During one seven-day period he traveled to Bellingham, Port Angeles, Wenatchee, Ken­ newick and Walla Walla, making several calls on each trip, and still spent nearly two day on campus. Why are people so supportive of PLU? " Th e re a r e s e v e r a l major reasons," Rieke answered. "Some attended here. Some have had children or friends attend. Some believe in private higher educa­ tion, some in Christian private higher education. "Most of them know that a school like PLU contributes something unique to society, perhaps in terms of ethics, morals, productivity or service. They want to perpetuate it. They don't want to see it die ! "


Eastvold Auditorium rose window - a campus landmark since 1952 is now a university symbol.


By Dr. William O. Rieke President, Pacific Lutheran University

As we launch the most intensive capital campaign in the recent history of Pacific Lutheran Un­ iversity, it is particularly impor­ tant th at we and our constituent upporters clearly understand the goals we have set, as wel as the economic and societal realities surrounding the achi evement of those determined goals. We are a private, independent institution of higher education. This means, simplistically stated, that all of the programs and assets we provide are maintained without recourse to or dependence upon tax monies. In other words, we pay our own way through tuition fees and gifts or grants from a broad range of donors. This independ­ ence guarantees the freedom to determine values and curriculum. There are three questions that get to the heart of our present and future condition: How did private higher education become indepen­ dent in this nation? What is the value of being free? What does it take, dollarwise, to maintain inde­ pendence? A cursory review of the history of colleges and universities in our country begins with the founding of Harvard, long before we be­ came a nation, in 1636. It was privately supported and church­ rela ed and set the pattern for the operation of all institutions of high­ er education in this country for the next 20 0 years: 1 0 0 percent of the colleges were privately owned and church-related. The first public college was founded shortly after

ce

ce PLU, its owners and constituents, must make some fundamental decisions about their part in the future of the university the passage of the first Morrell Land Grant Act following the Civil War. By 190 0, there were enough public colleges developed that at­ tendance had changed from all students attending private col­ leges to 7 5 percent attending pri­ vate and 25percent attending publ­ ic. This shift in attendance pat­ terns continued such that, by 1950, the ratio of students attending all higher education institutions was half and half. Today, in 1979, 78 percent of all college and universi­ ty students are tax-supported while 22percent are in private or independent institutions. Both public and private sectors have increased in absolute enrollment since 1950, but the increasing rela­ tive costs of the private sector have contributed markedly to the

reflection

culture

friendship

study

shifting percentage of students attending public as opposed to private. Many private schools have pur­ posely decided to sever ties with their founding churches, primarily as a hedge against fiscal uncertain­ ties, in order to accept ever larger amounts of federal money to meet their budgets; others are melded into the various state systems in order to continue to operate.

A significant factor threaten­ ing the solvency of many institu­ tions, second only to the unpredict­ able skyrocketing inflation rate of our national economy, is the enormous amount of money, time, and effort needed to respond to federal regulations of every kind.

Does the stifling mantle of federal regulations mean that we are not truly free; that we are federally controlled; that the government pulls all the strings; that our academic mission is overpowered The answer is no: we are free to establish and determine our cur­ riculum; we are free to worship and hold high the cross of Christ on the campus; we are free to main­ tain the kind of supportive and motivated community that is ex­ pressed in the Christian faith. But mandatory compliance with Titles and regulations imposed has a very real and influential impact on costs. We must comply, not because we receive significant amounts of operating money, but because a large amount of federal money flows to the UniversitvA through student financial assist-­ ance in the form of Student Educa­ tional Opportunity Grants (SEOG), Basic Educational Opportunity Grants (BEOG), National Defense Student Loans (NDSL). Each year, Pacific Lutheran University re­ ceives about two and a half million dollars for such vital and essential assistance.With that kind of federal funding, inevitably there are federal strings. All of the regula­ tions - more than 160 affecting colleges and universities - re­ quire staffing to monitor, report, implement, and enforce. Legal budgets in most institutions have doubled and even tripled in recent years in order to keep pace with mounting demands.We cannot avoid the intrusion of the federal presence into our methods of oper­ ation and into our budgets. Nonethele ss, we are free to teach, to worship, to offer the sacraments. We are free in that no person can attend PLU for any length of time without being ex­ posed to the cross of Christ. There is a place that is free academically and free spiritually, and that place is Pacific Lutheran University. I want that message to reach every individual, every congrega­ tion - every owner of PLU - in the Northwest. Each person will have an opportunity to decide whether PLU is worth supporting - not just for the buildings we now find it

_


imperative to have in order to

� aintain our academic quality, but

-for the

sustaining strength of the future. The acceptance of this concept is as important as the dollars we raise . econd ly: What is the value of being free ? Is it really worthwhile, particularly when our state institu­ tions are as strong as they are? Since cOming to PLU in 1975, foilowing seventeen years of se r­ vice in the public sector of higher education, I am more persuaded an ever that the private sector u st be maintained. What can a private school do that a public institution cannot? As illustration, there are two things the state schools cannot do, one because they are bound by law, and the other because of the restrictions inherent in the system. They can­ not, by law, officially engage in anything that has to do with instil­ ling faith and value. And they c a nnot respond to immediate needs of students for curricular changes because they are intrins­ ically so well protected by strong bases of tenure and internal pre­ ; ponderous systems cannot move rapidly.

._�

In private institutions, on the other band, if the faculty and administration are not keenl y aware of tbe student's needs and those needs are not met, students will not remain at the institution. Being tuition-dependent, the pri­ vate schools must remain in the vanguard of innovative and con­ temporary programming to prO­ vide answers for our changing society.

It is interesting to reflect on the fact that, even though only 22 of the total student enroll­ ment across the nation attends private institutions of higher edu­ cation, 40 percent of the presidents and business executives of For­ tune's top 100 corporations, more than half of the members of the last Congress, and two-thirds of the presidents of the United States were educated in independent col­ leges and universities. The import­ ance of this is seen in a remark from John W. Gardner, former Secretary of HEW, who said "viratually every far reaching social hange in our history has come fro m the private sector." In traveling around the North­ west in recent months, I have been keenly aware that among the lead­ ership in the churches and com­ munities, in schools, civic organi­ zations and businesses I have vi­ si ted, a great proportion of PLU graduates is represented. The ser­ vice orientation is part of the value system of students who attend church schools, and it pays im­ measurable dividends to the com­ munities in which they live. These dividends are compounded greatly when, as in the case of PLU alumni, the graduates have been prepared for and have attained leadershp roles. Is it worthwhile? The response of a couple I had invited to assist in the current campaign merits quot­ ing: "Three of our children went to PLU. They married three others

who were there. That makes six kids from PLU." Their pride and intense gratification with these children led immediately to the question, "When do we start?" Now, thirdly: What really is the price of independence? What is the price of freedom in terms of dol­ lars? It comes high. T h e to tal budget for Pacific Luthe r an University last year was

'Is PL U important enough to deserve a rank somewhere in the personal giving of those who own ° '? ' 1t 0

a b o u t $ 1 4 . 5 m i ll i o n . Of that amount, over 80 percent came from tuition. Since we are so heavily tuition-dependent, our budgets must be computed and constructed with utmost care. A one or two percent error in es­ timating enrollment and credit hour production can tip the scales from black to red. Fortunately, in recent years, we have been able, through vigorous recruiting, con­ scientious efforts in retention, development of courses drawing stu­ dents, and creative fiscal manage-

ment, to remain within that narrow argin of accuracy. But the margin is altogether too tight. One of our goals over the next few years is to enlarge our Endowment corpus in order to provide the cushion and fiscal stability we need for unpre­ dictable budget dem ands. A longer term but even mo e important goa] will be to increase the annual fund (unrestricted yearly gi vi ng) to minimize dependence on tuition increases at the only way t com­ bat inflation .

The additional money for ex­ penses, not covered by tuition came from a variety of sources. A very small endowmen t ($1 .3 mill­ ion) provides a very small portion. Gifts and grants from all sources - churches, corporations, founda­ t ions, Independent Colleges of Washington, Q-Club, individuals, bequests - provided the remain­ der. For this kind of help we are genuinely appreciative and grate­ ful, and I thank the countless loyal and new supporters who consis­ tently e n c o u r a g e u s . Again, though, the need to increase the annual fund becomes apparent. With the Board of Regents ap­ proval, and with the sanction of the North Pacific District meeting in Convention last June, Pacific Lutheran University has been gi­ ven the green light to proceed with the first phase of a campaign that will result in $ 1 6.5 million in build­ ing, campus improvements, and endowment. That first phase has

been centered on the Church. This is the first time in its history that PLU has brought a major fund effort with the intent of approach­ ing in an organized fashion every church in the District. PLU has never before presented its case to every member in every pew in order that ea c h individual may co ns i d er suppo rtin g the o n l y Lutheran senior college west o f the Rockies and north of Los Angeles. Are we reall y free? Is it really worth it? The answers are so clearly affirmative. But the price of freedom is dear. What we need are not just build­ ings, not just a Science Building, or just a Performing Arts Center, or just an Endowment. What we real­ ly need in order to secure our freedom is for every person to become acquainted with PLU and after seriously considering its con­ tribution ask the question, "Is the University which we own worth supporting? It is worth working for? In the face of many legitimate and worthy causes the critical question becomes "Is PL U impor­ tant enough to deserve a rank somewhere in the personal giving of those who own it? " A lifetime of

endeavor as educator, scientist, administrator, and ch urchman persuades me that an affirmative answer is pivotal in preserving not only freedom, but freedom in the institution which continues to con­ tribute uni q u e l y t h r o u g h i t s graduates to church and society.

Pacific Lutheran University Sources of Revenue 1954-79

Church

Friends, foundations, government

16.5 % 15.7%

14.3%

11.4%

8.1%

4.2%

lit

1953-54

1958-59

II

1963-64

1968-69

1973-74

85.0%

80.0%

86.8%

1978-79

StudentslParents 81.5%

85.5%

82.9%


Commentary

PLU Belongs To You ! Will You Respon To The Challenge ? You own Pacific Lutheran Un­ iversity! PLU is corporately owned by the North Pac ific District of the American Lutheran Church and that portion of the Rocky Mountain District west of the Continental Di ide. Pastors and congregational dele­ gates, your representatives at the annual district convention, also funct'on officially as the PLU Cor­ po ration at the special corporation meeting held during each conven­ tion. The corporation deals w i t h broad university policies. I t also elects, as its represen tatives, members of the PLU Board of Regents, who in turn direct the operations of PLU through thei r elected executive, the university president. Thus. in both a real and a philosophical sense, PLU is not just a Lutheran school that happens to be conveniently located in the

Rev. Dr. Clarence Solberg, honorary chairman •

Rev. David Steen (Black Hills) Leo & B rb Eliason Rev. James Braaten Rev. Orv Jacobson • Ray H ighsmi th (Tacoma West) Rev. John Adix Dennis Helset h Rev. Martin Gulhaugen • Rev. Ott o Tollefso n (Olym pi c)

Jim Widsteen

Rev. Howard Fosser Rev. Leslie Foss Rev. Richard Holmes • Re v. David Wold (Raimer) Ray Tobiason Rev. John B riehl Rev. Delbert Zier Rob ert K la vano · Rev. Grant Gard (Lower Columbia) Dave Radke Rev. Douglas Tbor Rev. LouIs Brunner (Southwest Oregon) Lyle Jacobson Dennis Vettrus Mr. & Mrs GeorgeCarlson • RoiJeTt Shive (Central Oregon) Rev. Lionel Simonson

Dan and Mary Isensee Rev. Hans Nordmar

Rev. John Mllbratb (portland) • Wesley Radford (poTtland) Bob Dressler R v. Frank Brucker C.T Reve Rev. Carl Oberwold Theodore Thurberger Rev. DeWayne Bey Mr. & Mrs. Jesse Herbst Galven Irby Leo Vilstrup Erik Engebretsen * Rev. Ron Martinson (Mid-WUlamette) Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Burchfield Rev. Roy Johnson Rev. Arnold Anderson Dr. leRoy Gilge *

*

Rev. Duane Tollefson (North Willamette) Dale Ben son Rev. Gerald Fosen Warren Erickson Rev. Armin Reitz Rev. William Foege

Coaference Chairmen

Pacific Northwest. It belongs to you. lt became one of your personal assets when you became a member of one of the ALC's 280 northwest congregations. PLU was founded nearly 90 years ago by virtually the same nucleus of dedicated Scandinavian p i o n e e r s w h o o r g a n i z e d the Norwegian Lutheran church in the Northwest. PLU's founder, Rev. Bjug Harstad, was sent out by the Norwegian Lutheran Synod i n America specifically to found a school. The saga of the relationship between the church and its unive sity is rich with stories of individu­ al dedication and sacrifice. The strong personal commitment to both religion and education which motivated the pioneers has COIl­ tinued through nine d cades and is still characteristic of Northwest Lutherans.

heritage PLU alumni records show illust­ ration s of thre , even four genera­ tions of Lutheran families who have attended PLU. Due in great measure to this long heritage of commitment, PLU not only survived through many years of struggle, but, primarily since World War II, has evolved rapidly to become one of the more highly respected private universities in the cou ntry . By virtually any academic measure it can be ranked among the top two or three inde­ pendent schools in the northwest, and in some areas is comparable to the major state u iversities.

Congregational Leadership II *

Onella Brunner (North Puget Sound) Rev. Leonard Erickson Rev. Neal Snider Rev. Edward Fritschel Rev. Ralph Fischer Mike Norris Georgia Bailey * Geo rge Thorleifson (Port Gardner) Rev. Donald Taylor Rev. James Nyborg George Anderson Stanley Ford Rev. Silas Erickson • Re v . Herb Ringo (Central Seattle) Rev. Olaf Anderson ary Baughn Peter Wicks, Jr. • Re v . Robert Gordon (North Seattle) Karl Forsell Rev. Dan Selman Bob Alexander • Ri chard Jackson CEast Seattl e ) Rev. Charles Mays Charles Fallsrrom Rev. Robert Lester + Rev. Gerald Hic kman (South Seattle) eattle) • CUTI Hovland (South Jan & Ray Osterloh Richard Weisner Rev. Ken 01 on Rev. Lowel K nutson Ted & Doreen Johnson • Rev. Paul Wuest (No rth Central) LarryHauge Rev. John Finstuen Bob Monson � Robert StuhlmlUer (Sollth west Spokane) Rev. RobeTt Olson Dr . • John Collins Rev. Phil Falk Rev. Fred Ahrendt Rev. Wayne Olson • Rev . Sam Babington (Mid-Columbia) Mr. & Mrs. Gordon Moen Mr. & Mrs. Donald Wick Rev. Dan Comsia Rev. Roland Wuest * Fred & Dorothy Schnaible (Palouse) Rev. Jim Berentson Lief Dahl Rev. William Moos Loeda Reil Rev. Ed Silrum Rich & Joan Hamlin Mikkel Thompson Adolph Timme

*

Rev. Bernt Dahl (Spokane Falls) Mr. & Mrs. John Krautkraemer Rev. Don Ree. e Fred Stewart Rev. Jerry Dittrich • Carolyne Pietz (Snake River) Rev. Lothar Pietz Rev. Wayne Haas • Rev. Keith Krebs (Bl ue Mountain) Ole Halingstad Rev. Philip Nesvig Paul Tews

Major Gifts Leader hip Gus Anderson, chairman

Region I (Seattle)

Robert Neiman, chairm an

• Otis Ramstad (Port Gardner) Sig Finstad • G e rald Benson (N. Puget Sourui) Jobn Johnson • Paul Askland (E. Seattle) • Donald Tboreson (Cent. Seattle) • Frnn1c J ennings (S. Seattle)

Gerald Roloson

Region II (E. Washi

gt on ) Al FinkJ chairman Jerald Sheffe! (rural Spokane)

Vince No�'ak Spokane) Carl Ogren • B ob Q uell o (Pal ous e) • Robert Storch ( Blue Mounta i Don Peterson

Region II (O rego n)

Melvin Pihl, chairman •

Ken Guenther (Portland ) Ken Klarquist * Bill Davis (N. Willamette) * Marvin Bolland (Mid-Willamette) Dr. John Stevens Bill Latimer * Cecil Dammen (SW Oregon) * NeiJ R. Bryant (Cent. Oregon) • Larry Hobbs (Lower Columbia) Ken Ellertson

Re gion IV (Tacoma)

Dr. Richard Klein, chairman •

Dr. Charles Evans (Rainier) Dale Dillinger Ron Gratias * Leroy Spitzer (Olympic) * Robert Huesel'S (Tacoma West)

dramatically broaden its base of support to maintain not only its

present high level of quality but to remain competitive and a source of pride to its owners into the '80's and beyond. But the campaign is also some­ .thing more. It is an opportunity to renew acquaintance and interest solidify support, build new bridge� of communication and understand­ ing, and share common concerns. It is an exciting challenge. PLU is reaching out to you. Will you respond?

------------- . =-=

����

-----------------------------

Proven academic quality. Plus ·­ an intangible quality, the defini­ tion of which is always elusive, but touches, in some degree, virtually everyone who steps onto the PLU campus. This quality has to do wit faith, with values, with commit­ ment to service, with a caring for p�ople, with personal integrity, WIth a generally positive and friendly attitude - and e en, in this age of strikes, demands, and labor negotiations, some personal sacrifice. To a large extent, those who serve at PLU strive for excellence, for achievement, for productivity. They do it out of a sense of personal pride and dedication to a worthy cause in spite of less than adequate equipment and often crowded and outdated facilit ies , a n d e v e though many could earn higher salaries elsewhere. Many of PLU's constitutents : alumni, parents, donors, friends of all kinds, have also sacrificed personally and financially, on b� half of he university. PLU's presi­ dent, Dr. William O. Rieke, has called the se supporters PLU's " People Endowment. " It means much more than donations of money. For instance, PLU con­ tinues to count on the church for half of its annual student enroll­ ment. In many ways, perhaps primari­ ly through individual and small group relation ships , u ni v ersity and church have remained re­ markably close and faithful to one another through he years. But perhaps also in a broader sense, each has come to take the other too much for granted. The PLU "Sharing in Strength" capital fund campaign is the un­ iversity' first comprehensive, or­ ganized appeal for funds to its owners, the district membership, in its 89-year history ! The appeal ' made now because PLU IDus t -...;


Volume LVIV No. 2 BuUetin of Pacific Lutheran University/AJumni Association

April 1979

'LU spring scenes

2 PubUsbed six times annuaUy by the office of University Relations. Pacific Lutberan University, P.O. Box 2068, Tacoma, WA 98447 (USPS 417-660). Second class postage paid in Tacoma, WA


......

2

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Old Main, now Harst(ld Hall, as it appeared at the turn of the century. The then imposing structure, built in the

PLU Yesterday

A

middle of a rural prairie, was the only campus building for many years.

One cannot long be associated with Pacific Lutheran University, study its past, experience its pre­ sent, or ponder its future, without becoming captivated by a special ambience that is rooted in the past but is still vigorously alive today. PLU stands today as the dynamic realization of what may have seemed a preposterously ambiti­ ous dream stated 86 years ago; it stands today as a tribute to the w i s d o m of an educational philosophy stated 50 years ago; and its stated objectives and standards remain essentially un­ changed over the past 15 years. In spite of the vast changes that have occurred 10 American society and throughout the world, in the physical appearance of the PLU campus, in its academic program in the composition of the faculty and the student body - certain beliefs, attitudes and goals remain inviolate and cherished. Nor is PLU out of step with the times; time has simply proven that the value on which PLU was found-

ed are as they were nearly nine decades ago. PLU's eventual campus was first viewed by its founder, Rev. Bjug Harstad, in 1890. Before school doors first opened in 1894, the then PLA (Pacific Lutheran Academy) Board had declared that the new insititution would be "dedicated to the glory of God and the edification of man." The present PLU administration affirms those sentiments. The mission of the pioneers w A "to build a great institution """Jf' learning which would rise to be­ come a rallying point for Lutheran­ ism in the West and a spiritual and cultural center for all Scandina­ vians in the area." Today PLU not only remains committed to that stated mission but has gone far beyond to offer its educational , spiritual and cultural resources to persons from a l l heritages and walks of life. In his inaugural address in 1928, President O.A. Tingelstad stated that at PLU "education must ta place in a Christian setting liberty, basic to the discovery of freedom, tolerance and fairness. Today, a half century later, few at PLU would disagree wi th his mission definition. It embraces the essentials of the current Universi­ ty O bjectives. Again, 1 5 years ago, President I'


Robert Mortvedt reaffirmed the PLU mission as that of " seeking all truth - both truth which has been r ealed and truth that can be discovered - within the framework of a Christian vision of life." Today' university motto sounds startlingl y similar, if a bit more c ncise: Quality education in a Christian ontext. Wha t many PLU scholars have struggle to explain down through the years is that PLU is a unique place where reason and faith are encouraged to exist side by side. It is a concept that is at the heart of Lutheranism. B ut it is not easy to d fine or maintain. There are many pressures to lean one way or the other. PLU University Pastor Ron Tellefson said recently , "If an institution is a religious Bible col­ lege with a clear narrow outline of beliefs, it is not so difficult to define. We are a university which explores several disciplines broad­ ly and deeply. We are not a church, but we contain a church." On the other hand, according to President William Rieke, PL "Secularity falls apart by itself. You ca 't cut out one realm of e xistence (Le. the spiritual) and pretend it doesn't exist." He added that both reason and faith are necessary for a rounded ou tlook. " Yet there will always be tension between the two," he ob­ served .. "It's the nature of a col­ lege to look at things that the church doesn't. O ne further axiom has echoed from the days of the founders down through PLU's history: the value of a single individual. Each major PLU building today c o m m e m o r a t e s an individual whose efforts, commitment and sacrifice made PLU what it is today. Books could be written ab-

The PLU campus as it appeared in the late '50's before the closure of Wheeler Street, construction of the out the lives of Harstad, Xavier, Hong, Hinderlie, Stuen, Kreidler, Ordal, Foss, Pflueger, Tingelstad, Eastvold, Ramstad, Olson, Mort­ vedt, Aida Ingram and Hauge. And there have been thousands of others. Their individual con­ tributions were not motivated by fame or fortune but by service - to other individuals and to mankind as a whole.

administration building and the addition to the science building.

Today, one of PLU's greatest strengths is the continued willing­ ness of PLU faculty and staff to offer- whatever individual atten­ tion, guidance and caring is neces­ sary to insure that students re­ ceive a well-rounded education. In many cases, that education encom­ passes far more than what is taught in the classroom. Dr. Rieke alludes to the value of

the individual by emphasizing PLU's "people endowment," as much a part of PLU as earth, bricks, books and trees. It is the people, people bound together by a purpose larger than themselves , that give Pacific Lutheran University the vitality, the special ambience, that is de­ fined differently by each individu­ al but which is felt by all.

_.

1', nnis courts were located on the south side of Harstad Hall during the

early part of the century. The original gymnasium was south of the courts, out of the picture at the right.

Dr. and Mrs. Philip Hauge posed at the campus entrance for this 1931 photo. Dr. Hauge, for whom the administration building is now named, served at PLU for over so years. Daughter Janet, now Mrs. Ralph Carlson of Centralia, Wash., is a 1950 PLU graduate. \


PLU Today

-

A Synopsis

Vision, vigor, •

and

Intellectual and moral vigor characterize PLU as it steps for­ ward into the 1980's, its 10th de­ cade. All acro s the campus one finds scores of new programs and options designed to better prepare students for lives and careers s p a n n i n g w e l l into the 2 1 st century. There is proof of vision, vitality and quality in every academic unit with programs focusing on both people needs and professional needs. " The School of Business Ad­ m ini s t r ati on has both its BBA and MBA programs accredited by the prestigious Ameri an Ass embly of Collegiate Schools of Business. It is one of the smallest schools in the nation to be so honored. The School empha sizes the en­ tire spectrum of busi ness concerns rather than the more common concentratioll OIl personnel and accounting . Special projects give students extensive practical ex­ perience in the field and close ties with the regional business com­ munity offer students frequent contact with professionals . *The strong reputation of the PLU School of Education goes back nearly a half century, to the days when PLC was a teachers' \.,;ollege . Although the teacher market is currentl depressed, there are still many opportulllties each year for talented, mobile, welI-tra i n e d educators . Special minors i n Education (early childhood, reading, learning disabilities etc.) givoe students an additional edge and assist in keep­ ing the PLU rate of teacher place­ ment high. * Academy Award-winning com­ poser Miklos Rosza last year called the internationally-known PL U Choir of the West "one of the best in the world" and selected the choir to record an album of his works. The choir is the best known, but by no means the only ac­ claimed organization within the School of Fine Arts

.

The Art Department features a faculty of regionally and national­ ly-known professional artists and the best facilities in relation to number of students of any school in the northwest. Communication Arts (drama, forensics, radio-TV, journalism) graduates are hi g h l y v i s i b l e throughout the entire West Coast. And PLU has served, in a year, more music majors than any other northwest college or university or Lutheran school nationwide. In addition to professional train­ ing, there is strong emphasis in all areas on extra-curricular partici­ pation by all students in various performing groups and campus radio and TV. "The School of Nursin g features a new, personalized curriculum

that emphasizes one-on-one teach­ er-student relationships, step-by­ step subject mastery and "compet­ ition with one's best self. " There is a growing number of career op­ tions in the nursing field today, particularly in the area of disease p revention, and the new cur­ riculum is geared to prepare stu­ dents to be ready to consider these options. * The focus in the School Physical Education is participation of the whole studen t body, not just top athletes. 0 er 3,700 students enrolled in 30 lifetime sports last year: intramurals attracted 2,000 ; and intercoll giate athletics in­ volved over 400 men and women. The worn n's program is one of the best among small colleges ; the orthwe st men have taken the onference all-sports trophy for six straight years. The academic progra m include. emphasis o n modern s iences such as exercise physiology, kinesiology and bio_ • mechanics. " Recent emphasis acros s cam­ p u s on inter isciplmary studies (tying many facets of knowledge togethe r into a c herant whole) received much of its initial im­ p etus from the D i vi sion of Hu mani ties. The Inte gra t e d Stucli e s Program offer both an alternative to the traditional core courses or an opportunity for stu­ dents to sample this uncommon learning experience at any stage during their campus career. New majors in Norwegian and Scandinavian Studies and nume � ous off-campus and internationaw learning experiences reflect a con­ tinuing dynamism in a grouping of disciplines that traditionally offer the basic essence of the liberal arts experience. * Health sciences, computer sci­ ences and engineering continue to be among the most glamourous of the careers of the future, and the Division of Natural Sciences of­ fers highly successful, innovative programs in all three areas along with its traditional disciplinary a programs. PLU annually places more tha rW twice the percentage of medical and dental school applicants as the national average. The flexible computer science program, which can be taken on its own or with tie­ ins to business or mathematics or with advanced study at Washing-

oe


5

ton State University, also offers the advantage of a sound liberal arts background. The highly unusual engineering­ physics major, which provides a blend of the practical and theoret­ ical, also offers the option of ad­ vanced study at Columbia or Stan­ ford U n i v e r s i t i e s u n d e r 3 - 2 cooperative agreements . The Division of Social Sciences is literally bursting with new prog­ rams in recognition of the fact that academic pursuits and societal concerns can and should be closely related. There are study oppor­ tunities, in some cases academic specializations, in areas such as criminal justice, law enforcement, adult probation and parole, the family, women's studies, minority

or ethnic studies and foreign area studies, along with the broad gamut of courses in history, polit­ ical science, economics, psycholo­ gy, sociology anthropology and social welfare. There is a brand-new Legal Studies Program, uncommon ac­ ross the nation, which gives exten­ sive background for the many career fields that require know­ ledge of law short of attorney status. And a wide-ranging expe­ riential education program gives students practical field experience in many areas. * The PLU 4-1-4 calendar, now in its 1 1th year, is a proven innova­ tion. It features a one-month January Interim between 14-week semesters, during which students select one course for concentrated study. The classes are exciting and innovative, featu ring activities and topics often quite different from traditional course offerings. They may include travel, national­ ly or internationally, or intensive examination of current topics or i ssues. Independent study projects are also encouraged.

A. School of Business Administ ration B. School of Education

C. School of Fine Arts D. School of Nursing E. School of Physical Educatio n F. Division of Humani ties

G. Division of Natural Sciences H. Division of Social Sciences


Views: Educator Describes What He Believes PLU Is 'Real y Like'

By Walter Youngquist

Pacific Lutheran University claims to have a concern for stu­ dents, a quality faculty, and a sense of values. As parents of PLU stu­ dents or as friends, you would probably like to know what PLU is really like. For the fall term 1976, and the academic year 1977-78 I was visit­ ing professor of Earth Sciences at PLU. I am not a PLU graduate, and I do not expect again to be part of the PLU faculty. I viewed PLU in the context of some 18 years of university teachin g experience elsewhere. Let me give you an objective view of the REAL PLU. I can do this very quickly. The real PLU is as PLU claims to be. But let me add a few notes. In the numerous faculty sessions I at­ tended at least half of the concerns were directly student related. Indi­ vidually also, the faculty, be they full professors or instructors, are a ways accessible to students. The faculty is high quality and ould compete anywhere academ­ ically. As a matter of personal cur iosity I randomly asked a number of the faculty just why they were at PLU because most if not all of them could do better financially elsewhere. The answ­ ers reduced to the fact chiefly that the faculty wanted to be where

they could relate directly to the students, something which is dif­ ficult to do in secular schools where the freshman lecture clas­ ses may be up to 500 and more students and upper division clas­ ses correspondingly large. The faculty is a quality group, drawing their academic training from Harvard, the Big Ten schools and the Pacific Coast schools just as many excellent faculties across the nation are drawn. The faculty also does research like other facul­ ties, but the difference I saw between PLU and the secular schools was that research came second and students came first at PLU. If you have not been in the reverse environment you cannot appreciate what an important point that is. And what of values ? It has been encouraging to hear recently from the general public the lament that we appear to lack both the com­ mittment and the capabilities of teaching values in our secular schools. It is becoming clear to all that our most basic problems can only be partly (if at all) solved by technological means. The classic example of the fact that technology is not the ultimate answer is that given by the two noted atomic scientists, Wiesner (now president of MIT) and York, who point out that when one milit­ ary side builds an atomic bomb, the other side builds a bigger bomb, whereupon the first side builds a still bigger bomb, etc., etc., etc., etc. The solution to this problem is not technological but is in the human heart and soul. This sort of basic concern can be and is ad­ dressed at PLU. Furthermore, at PLU traditional values are not destroyed with no substitute of­ fered. We have seen in the United States the past decade too many instances where this has not been the case. Established and time­ tested norms of conduct have been scorned, and nothing has been offered in their place. In some instances what has been offered is simply the concept of "whatever you can get away with is right." In a very elementary example of contrast at PLU, one of the things which was early pointed out to me

Dr. Walter Youngquist

was the fact that laboratories and classrooms can remain unlocked and the equipment does not disap­ pear. As one faculty member re­ marked "you can leave a $20 bill on the lab table in the fall and it would still be there next spring." I be­ lieve it, and that simple story tells volumes of the values and attitudes at PLU. Where do these values and at­ titudes come from? In large part, of course, they have come from the homes in which . these students have been raised. But these boys and girls of yours are entrusted to PLU at a very impressionable and formative age. As a university profe ssor I have been keenly aware of the fact that I probably have had more influence on a student, and that the student would listen to me more readily than would the student to his or her own parents. Now the fact is that I was probably telling the student the same thing the parents would say, but the student listened to me. It is a great responsibility which faculty have in this position. But the faculty in good part really reflect the tenor and tone of the campus at large. Where is that tone set? It must come primarily from the president. In this regard PLU is especially fortunate. Prior to coming to PLU, I had known Dr. Rieke only briefly and casually. While at PLU I had a chance to observe him in many situations, and to know him better. Dr. Rieke makes it a practice to visit divisional faculty meetings on a fairly regular schedule. I have never seen a university president do that before. At such occasions a faculty member can explore in detail any problems or concerns he or she may have. If a faculty member does not want to do this before colleagues the faculty member can drop over to see the president privately. Many are a bit diffident about doing this but the opportunity is clearly there. I tried it myself a few times just

to see if it would work. It does. Unless Dr. Rieke is in the midst of some meeting, he is always ready to talk with anyone. I can sum up all these observations about PLU's president by stating that I have served under a number of univer­ sity presidents, but none better than William Rieke. The Rieke years will be good ones at PLU. Like all privately supported schools, however, the president needs help to do the job. Recently you wrestled with IRS form 1040. I � is complica�aed, but one of th ea sImplest entrIes to make, with. happy deductible results, is a charitable contribution, and with taxes and inflation as they are and apparently will continue to be - the cost to you of such a tax deduction is becoming less and less. Why not write a larger check to PLU and a smaller one to the IRS? Somewhere along the road of life each of us would like to leave some sort of monument. Henry Adams once said "a teacher affects eterni=a ty." I would modify that to say thaI. a teacher and Pacific Lutheran affect eternity. I have given you an inside but objective view of Pacific Lutheran University. PLU may cost more than some other educational alter­ natives, but in my considered view, dollar for dollar, it represents a greater value, for the stated image of PLU is indeed the true face of a fine university with a dedicated, competent faculty, and a great president. /


7

Views: Volunteer Leaders Analyze Campaign Goals Awareness - potential - excite­ ment - support - a special kind of education. The impressions were offered by four men who perhaps per­ sonify the many volunteers pastors, laymen and alumni who are playing major roles in the Pac i f i c L u t h e r a n U n i v e r s i t y "Sharing i n Strength" capital fund campaign. The campaign, announced publ­ icly in February, is intended to raise $ 1 6.5 million over the next Ie years for new science and fine rts facilities and strengthened endowment and scholarship prog­ rams at PLU. The four men are Alvin Fink of Odessa, Melvin PihI of Canby, Ore., D r. Richard Klein of Tacoma and Rob rt Nieman of Mercer Island. They ar s rving as regional chair­ men in the major gifts phase of the campaign. Although the purpose of the campaign is to raise signifi n t amounts of mon e " alJ four men tend to consider the actual dollars as just one fact of a broader, more bjective pic tu re. Dr. Klein, who Ii es only a few miles from PLU, foresees a greater awareness of PLU among its con­ stituency in the Northwest as well as in the Tacoma-Pierce County com m unity. " It's an opportunity to plant

seeds," he said. "The PLU story will be getting out. Lay persons will be telling other lay persons about it. The campaign gives us a reason to tell so many more people about PLU. " All o f the leaders felt that broad­ based involvement was an impor­ tant key. Nieman, particularly, ex­ pressed the concern that for too long PLU has attempted, and the constituency has probably expect­ ed, the university to do most of the work for itself. The campaign offers a signific­ ant reason to reach out and inspire, moti v a t e a n d m o b i l i z e t h e thousands of church people and alumni who have been supportive but not necessarily involved in the past, they believe. Fink reflected the thoughts of PLU's out-state constituency. "Ex­ penditure of dollars causes people to seriously assess, to take a close look," he said. "It creates greater war nes and a great r sense of responsibility. It's making things exciting." A l l of the leade r s s tress ed awa re n e s s . Nieman a s s e r t e d , "Members of ALC churches have to become more aware of the university that they own. " Klein added, "The church a s a whole has had little awareness of PLU in the past." He also indicated that the campai gn would inspire a

greater awareness of PLU's role in its immediate community. The "special kind of education" that PLU represents was a key for Pihl, although his family's educa­ tional history has been more close­ ly tied with Oregon State Universi­ ty. He is extremely active in the church, in the Scandinavian com­ munity and in youth projects, all interests which help him identify closely with PLU. He is particularly interested in the various Scandinavian heritage projects in which PLU is involved, and feels a strong sense of respon­ sibilty to the school "because it is owned by the North Pacific Dis­ trict . " The leaders all voiced their per­ sonal support of PLU President Dr. William Rieke and the direction he has established for PLU. They seemed to echo, in various ways, the remark made by PibI : " I wou dn't say 'no' to anything Rieke wou d ask." Pihl's previous assoc iation with PLU has been that of an active Lu heran churchman. Nieman , a 1950 PLU graduate, has had "a brother, sister, cousin, nephew, niece, son or daughter" at PLU continuously since 1946. Fink, a 1953 alu mnus, is a new member of the PLU Board of Regents. Dr. Klein has served on the board for the past six years.

Weyerhaeuser Gift Boost To Campaign A $ 40 ,0 0 0 gift from the Weyerhaeuser Company Founda­ tion to Pacific Lutheran University in March put the PLU "Sharing in Strength" developmental fund campaign above the half million dollar mark. The gift is intended to be used to assist in the improvement of the undergraduate science instruction program at PLU, Dr. Mary Hall, vice-president and general manag­ er of the foundation, indicated. "We are also hopeful that this grant will serve as a stimulus to the successful completion of PLU's major dev elopment campaign," she said. The first public phase of the five­ year $16.5 million campaign began in February. Its purpose is to significantly improve the universi­ ty's scholarship and endowment programs and to provide new fa c i l i t i e s a n d i n str uct iona capabilities, partioularly in the natur I scie nces an fine arts . Respon ding to the Weyerhaeus­ er gift, PLU President Dr. William O. Rieke said, "The support of the Weyerhaeuser Company Founda­ tion is not onl y of direct financial assistance, but it will be a valuable asset in presenting the case of Pacific Lutheran others."

University

to

PLU Artist's Print In National Show " I n Defense I , " an intaglio print by PLU printmaker and artist-in­ resi den e Dennis Cox, will be in­ cluded in a national show on ex­ hibit through May 1 1 at the Min­ nesota Museum of Art in Min­ neapolis. The work was selected by Wil­ liam F. Woolfenden, director of the Archives of A me rican Art i n Washington, D . C . , for the exhibit, which will later tour the United States for two years. It is the first of ten limited edition prints interpreti e of law themes commissioned by the Un­ i versity of Puget Sound Law School. The Minneapolis exhibit is based on the theme, "West '79/The Law," and is sponsored by the West Publishing Company of St. Paul, Minn.

'In Defense I'

Dennis

Cox

displays 'In Defense II'


8

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·ch with iversit Tokyo St dent Finds Living Fascinating I think that I shall neVf�r see A poem as lovely as a tree A tree whose hungry mouth is prest Against the earth's sweet flowing breast A tree that looks at God all day And lifts her leafy arms to pray - Joyce Kilmer Atsuko Hayama, 23, n.9t only thumbs th rough the pages o f books, but can be seen gazing at the plum blossom trees on PLU's cam­ pus grounds. "We don't have trees," she says. Atsuko is from Tokyo, Japan which is much like cosmopolitan New York. "The blossoms are lovely. I don't know what they are I'm just glad they blossomed," she reflects.

Atsuko Hayama

Smiling she adds, "I enjoy al­ most everything - tennis, swim­ ming, basketball, baseball, study­ ing and eating. I love to eat because when you're eating with someone you can . . . " "Chat? " "Yes, chat." Pausing, she adds, " I don't like it when people expect me to know everything about Japanese culture . . . cookery. The s tereotyping bothers me. I'm a human being. "I feel a culture is like a mother which you can love and hate. The more I stay here the more I miss Japan." " . . . Can't cut off your mother because you're from the womb. I can't deny who my mother is." "You know . . . one thing about Japanese culture is that we respect age. I think it's nice to be old . . . my dream is when I reach 50 I will have a smile on my face. "I respect my parents. They raised me. " "Life is amazing. "

Harold

Music Lover Frequent s PLU Campus "Che - bel - Ia - co - sa - 'na - iur - na - tae - so - Ie . . . " "Che bel la what?" " Singing at this time of day?" "Who is he? ? ? " It's Harold standing i n the sec­ ond floor corridor of the administ­ ration building rehearsing a song for a Campus TV (Knight Shorts) taping. Harold is from West Tennessee and started visiting the PLU cam­ pus about four years ago. For those who have encountered him, Harold is a source of delight, amusement, and curiosity. Harold was born just after the turn of the century. January 3, 1906 to be exact. He loves music and even as a child developed a love for opera. He chuckles at the thought of

singing at the age of six while his mother played the piano. Harold studied music at the American Conservatory School of Music and at the University of Southern Cal ifornia. "PLU gives zest to my life be­ caus the people make me feel home," he say . "I am doing what I enjoy doing." He makes donations to PLU and to its Choir of the West. "I am not asking for credit," he says, "but I do participate in the music program. " Harold sometimes s i n g s a t chapel, a t nursing homes and even in the Cave in The University Center. When he isn't singing he plays tennis and "shoots a few baskets. " A t one time h e even played semi pro baseball. Harold was raised in a ChriSti home and is the oldest of eil children. "I missed some opp'O tunities because I was primarily helping my other brothers and s i s te r s t h ro u g h coll ege , " he recalls. Harold does not have a degree but says that he appreciates what others go through in getting theirs. He has worked a number of jobs, including blood processing for the R d Cross during the war, clerking in a department store and working in his uncle's lumber yard. According to Harold, each eration has its own "in" Smiling impishly, he says "in my day we smoked cornsilk." On virtually any subject he will offer a viewpoint. On religion: ' Can't force a par­ ticular brand of religion on anyone - but can start with what we have in common . . . I thank God because I am fit physically, morally and mentally." On wisdom: "The secret of all wisdom is to have faith in God." On people: "95 percent of people are good. We just hear about t five percent that gets publicize On laughter: "Comes from ha ing a cheerful nature." On jealousy: "Phase we all go through . . . requires a constant effort not to be." On worry: " It's from not having faith . . . I don't worry." On gardening: "Hard to keep the potatoes separa t e d f r o m t h e rocks." On education : "Never get too old to learn." On PLU: "Recommend this as the best . . . so much talent here."

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t


Milit ary Nurs e Finds Schoo l A 'Challenge'

Lelia Cornwell

About The Author . . . The PLU campus today is popu­ lated by students with a rich diver­ 'ty of heritages and experiences. One such person is Lelia Corn­ wei , 28, a PLU senior who will graduate this spring with a degree in communication arts. Ms. Cornwell's favorite pastime is people, and she likes nothing better than to chat with students from as many backgrounds as possible. Lelia has authored all of the student profiles on these pages. H s 1 is light-hearted and in­ formal. She makes no serious at­ tempt at biography - rather she looks for clues to personality and ttitudes which are reflected often random quotations. Through Lelia's eyes , however, one sense' the flavor of a s udent body representing many cultures and life styles. Ms. Cornwell is a 1968 graduate of Frankli n-Pierce High School in Tacoma. She worked for the Taco­ ma Urban League and as a model before beginning her col l e g e career at Stanford i n 1 97 1 . She attended there for three years. She also attended San Jose State and Washington State before en­ lling at PLU last fall. A series of e urring medical problems have del yed her academic career she ' indicated.

Physics Prof Earns Grant For Research D . Donald Haueisen, assistant professor of physics at PLU, has "'een awarded a $9,835 Research Jrporation grant funded by the .J. Murdock Charitable Trust of Vancouver, Wash. The grant is intended to support a research program described as "two-photon resonant, degenerate four- w a v e m i x i n g i n a t o m i c , vapors . " The Murdock Trust uses the established grants procedures of the Research Corporation of New York City to support basic re­ search in the natural sciences and medicine in the greater Northwest.

Abdul-aziz Alsudiary

Samir Shakour

audi Students See Roles As Ambassadors

she is the only one who makes the generations. As one poet puts it, 'The mother is a school - if you prepare her you prepare a nation with good soil. "Now getting back to our pa­ rents. Our parents stay with us when they grow older, because our parents concentrated their lives on helping us grow up. They give us what we want . . . they love us. When they become old we in turn take care of them. " Samir adds, "I love that we eat together, pray together, and stay together." Among other brief impressions left by the two students were, "Not everyone from Saudi Arabia has money - inflation is killing people there - the Saudi government is trying to eliminate poverty - the crime rate is low - the schools are difficult and very competitive. "

"My family i s one o f the oldest and largest famil ies in Saudi Arabia," says Abd u l - a z i z A l ­ sudiary, a PLU student. Describing Saudi Arabia he says there is "nothing fancy, not much greenery - just d ad fact reality . - desert. And it's beautiful be­ cause I belong there. "I have been in the United States three long years and have two more longer years to go, En sha AlIa (If God permits)." He added, " It's been difficult for me here because I came expecting cowboys . . . I suppose it would be just like one coming to my country expecting camels and tents." A second Saudi Arabian student Samir Shakour, explained, "We not only have camels and horses, but German cars, English cars, Ameri­ can cars and some customized cars as well . " Family life in Saudi Arabia cent­ ers around the Islamic religion. "There is a lot of respect between young and old especially among family," Abdul said. "We don't joke with our fathers. First he's our father. We are his sons. Our moth­ ers spend most of the time with us. That's why we want our wives to be like our mothers. " H e adds, "The woman is respect­ ed by religion and society because

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Abdul added, "We are like am­ bassadors - messengers from our country. Students here should get to know us for the experience, so we can share experiences. Too often people stereotype - this guy is an Arab - and that's as far as it goes."

Ann Morey does not fit the stereotype of a military woman. She is barely 100 pounds, and is 5'4". The wife of Ron Morey, and a mother of two sons, Brian, 3, and Wade, 15 months, Morey is very secure in her role as a woman. At 34, she is a registered nurse enrolled in the nursing program at PLU, specializing in obstetrics and gynecology. Morey says that her husband Ron agrees fully with her going to school and having a career. "Though I call him a chauvinist he helps with the household chore � . . . without his support, I wouldn't be able to keep up my studies," she says. "I �lways liked studying, so after workmg for 1 2 years, I decided to return to school. It is a real chal­ lenge and a good feeling to be able to keep up with students fresh out of high school." "The pressure is different than work. I am under les s pressure now than when I was working a 10 hour day," Morey added. "As a practitioner, I had little idea what kind of patient was going to come in." At home she escapes the school routine and climbs trees with her sons. Her typical day start s when she rolls out of ed at the last minute. "But I do like to live by a schedule - I eat when I'm hungry, sleep when I'm tired, play when 1 want to, and work when I have to." "My children are used to having babysitters with Ron and me traveling for the Air Force " she continued. "I have been fortunate that my children love them. It's important that my kids are satis­ fied. " Morey concluded, "Maturity has made me more outspoken. I feel I'm entitled to voice my opinion. To the students here there is an old saying . . . a degree does not mean you know everything."


ent Cooperation, Effort Keys To Retaining P U 'Essence' By Dr. William O. Rieke President Pacific Lutheran University

Elsewhere in this issue of Scene is an article by editor Jim Peterson which claims for PLU a "special a m bience. " The term intrigued me when I read it, for it is both appealing and elusive. Yet I know from long per onal experience - first as an Wldergraduate in the mid-fifti es, followed by twenty years of ser­ vice in various state educational systems in teaching, administra­ tive, and political roles, and then a return to my alma mater as Presi­ dent in 1975 that there is indeed an unmi stakable presence about the e nte rprise we call Pacific Lutheran University. First and most important to the successful service of any educa­ tional institution is the soundness of its academic program. We are in the business of transmitting and exploring knowledge. Quality is the result of constant, careful, and realistic appraisal of every depart­ m ent, every course, every profes­ sor to provide the most positive environment for learning to take place. Change and improvement are corollaries to honest evalua­ tion . This has been a particularly vis 'bl e effort over the past two years as we have been engaged in a total self-study in preparatlon for our ten-year accreditation. The 1 2person, three-day site visit from -

the accrediting team has recently been completed. It was encourag­ ing to have affirmation from its members that our progress has underscored and enhanced the quality of our program. In addition, course content and new curricula are studied in week­ ly meetings of the faculty-elected Educational Policies Committee. Credit hour production, class size, teaching loads, student contacts are continually studied by indi­ vidual faculty members and de­ partment s . The integrat ion of teaching, learning, personal rela­ tionships, and community living is consciously nurtured in the PLU experience. Since PLU, like other private institutions, is not profit oriented, motivation for our existence must be defined in clearly understood terms. In 1963, the faculty reaf­ firmed t h e d i r e c t i o n of t h e academic endeavor in the extant " Statement of Objectives." This has been and continues to be our guidepost. When an entire teach­ ing staff subscribes to a common objective, there is ound to ema­ nat a force - or ambience - that marks a University. As we came to grips with s etting direction for the school for the future, our first concern - long before the determination of bricks and mortar - was to reconsider our purpose. The mission state­ ment which follows and which introduces our five-year master plan offers a concise affirmation of the University's Objectives and suggests no departures from our historical role. Long committed to providing an education distinguished for quality in the context of a heritage that is Lutheran and an environment that is ecumenically Christian, PLU con­ tinues to embrace its prima r y mission: the development of kno wledgeable persons equipped with an under­ standing of the hUman condition, a critical awarenes s oj h umane and spiritual I'alues, and a capacity fOT c lear and ef!eclive self-expre sion. F r all ho choose to seek a PLU deg ree, the U niversity offers oppor­ tunity to pursue variety of prog­ rams of academic worth and excell­ ence. Us standards of perfor mance demand a finely trained faculty as well a highly skilled admini strative an d suppo rt staff. In its institutional emphasis on scholarship, the Un­ iversity views liberal arts as provid-

Stephen Rieke and father President and Mrs. William O. Rieke. He served as a member of the ASPLU Student Senate t past year.

Rieke Elected President At PLU (Again)

David Siburg of Puyallup was elected ASPLU vice-president; the new comptroller is Lisa Guenther of Portland, Ore; and Alan Harbine of Spokane is program director.

Stephen Rieke o f Tacoma, a j unior at PLO , was elected student body president in electi n held in late February Rieke, a classical and modern languages major, is the son of PLU

New members of the ASPLU Student Senate are Robert Gum ul­ kiewicz, Cindy Michael, Brad Jen­ son, Laura Crawford, K ry Knud­ sen, Kelly Allen, Cheryl Goldberg and Drew Nelson.

mg the necessary and essential fou ndation for the technica l train­ ing and educatio n i n the professions whi h modern society requires. The University aims to cultivate

perience coupled ith c l ar recog nition of the integrative impulse in eac h is the essenc of P LU. Within a supportive comm unity, there is a fuller, more confident development of the individual. It

the intellect, not for its wn sake mereJy, but as a tool of conscience and an instrument for service. The diversity and variety of cultural programs and personal services offered by the University are in­ tended to facilitate this positive development of the student as a whole person, in order that students m i g h t function as r e s p o n s i b l e members of society. In other words, PLU affirms that realization of one's highest poten­ tial, as well as fulfillment of life's purpose, arises in the joy of service to others. To aid its students in sharing this understanding, the Un­ iversity seeks to be a community in which there is a continuing and fruitful interaction between what is best in education and what is noblest in Christian edification This deliberate and simultaneous attention to the standards of scho­ larly objectivity and to the religious dimension of the total human ex-

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has been the president's privilege this year to have a unique vantage point from which to view the impact of the institution upon the student through the growth of his son as a student leader. The same values which have sustained generations of students are valid and fresh on today's campus. This essence - or ambience - is indeed very real at Pacific Lutheran University.


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Free Hawaii Gift Ann uity Provides Tax ­ Trip Sparks Recruiting Free Inco me B y Ed Larson Director of Planned Giving

By David Berntsen Director of Development

Many people have told me. "I would like to support Pacifi c Lutheran University with a gift, but I still have certain income needs." In such a case, a charitable g i ft a nn u ity provides in come ( ome of it tax-free) to an individu­ ales) for their lifetime, with im­ mediate tax benefits, and with an eventual gift to the University. Here is how such an arrange­ ment w rks : Mr. Donor, age 72, establishes a Charitable Gift Annuity in the amount of $ 10,000. He will receive each year an annuity payment in the amount of $710 (7. 1 %) for as long as he lives. Of that amount, only $ 1 85 is taxable income. In addition, he receives an immediate charitable contribution deduction of $4,329. The rate of return on a gift annuity is based strictly on the age of the beneficiary. The older the beneficiary, the higher th return. For example, while someon who is 62 years old will receive an annual return of 6.0%, someone who is 82 years old will receive 9 . 6% . Charitab e gift annuities can be . written for more than one life f desired. There is also a way i n which a person can provid e income for a designated beneficiary for that person's lifetime , with an eventual gift to Pacific Lutheran University. If you would like to know the rate of return, amount of tax-free in­ come and tax benefits of a charit­ able gift annuity for yourself or for someone you know, please co-n tact:

For the past 10 weeks, through April 1 6, members of the PLU Q Club have had an added incentive for soliciting new members . Every m e mb e r who re cruits a n e w member between Jan. 3 0 and May 1 1 , the date of the Q Club banquet, becomes eligible for a drawing which will select the winner of a one-week vacation in Hawaii, plus travel expenses. The trip has been donated by a club member. Winner of the round trip for two and use of a luxury condominium at Waikiki will be selected at the banquet which features Admiral James S. Russell as guest speaker. It begins at 6: 15 p.m. in the Univer­ sity Center. Since the competition began, 30 new names have been added to the Q Club roster. They have been recruited by 15 different Q Club m embers. S u c c e s s ful recruiters include John Herzog (4), Jerry Benson (3), Ken C h ri s toph e r son (3), Clare Grahn (2), Thora La son (2), Ad­ miral Russe ll, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Berntsen, E l do n Kyllo, Lo r i n G i nther, Carol Leonard , Betty Gj u rash, Gary H abedank, Mr. and Mrs . Dale Dilli nger, Iral Toven, and Mike McKean. As of this writing, just under a month remains to recruit an addi­ tional 20 members to reach our contest goal of 50 and membership goal of 900. There are well over 800 members who have yet to qualify for the drawing. It is easier than may be suspect­ ed. Myself and the other members of the Development Office staff will help you in any way we can. Please feel free to call me. There are still a few days left to qualify for the free-trip drawing ! A special word of thanks to Olga Grahn and Thora Larson, co-chair­ men of this year's banquet. I am so very grateful to them and to all of the club volunteers whose help is so essential to our continued growth and service to PLU.

Edgar Larson Director of Planned Giving Pacific Lutheran University Office of Development Tacoma, WA 98447 (206) 531-6900, ext. 232

All replies, of course, will be strictly confidential.

Parents Corner B y Mil ton Nesvig Executive Associate to the Presi dent

Parents and friends of PLU in the fnland Empire, please note. There will be a PLU din ner Wednesday, April 25, at 6 p.m in the Fern Room of the Gateway Hotel, E. 923 Third Ave. , Spokane. President and Mrs. W'lliam O. Rieke will be guest of honor at a reception to be held preceding the dinner at 5:30. Dr. Rieke will speak at the dinner. The program will end in time for the concert by the PLU Chorale to be held at 8 p.m. in the Central Lutheran Church, 309 W. 5th St. Co-hosts for the dinner will be Mr. and Mrs. John BIey (509) 4481429, and Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Ruehl, (509) 624-8745. Reserva­ tions should be made at once at either of these numbers. Checks in advance may be sent to John Bley, 2528 Casper Drive, Rt. 3, Spokane, Wa., 99203. cost is $6.00 per plate. A PLU luncheon for all friends of

PLU will be held in Great Falls, Mont. at the Sheraton Hotel Satur­ day, May 19, at noon in connection with the annual convention of the Rocky Mountain District of the American Lutheran Church. The writer gf this column will be pre­ sent to give a report on the Univer­ sity. Parents Weekend in mid-March was a gala event. The banquet was held in Olson Auditorium with some 600 persons in attendance, the largest turnout since the Pa­ rents Club was organized in 1975. The next meeting of the Parents Council will be held Saturday, May 26, in connection with Commence­ ment weekend festivities. If you have any matters which you wish discussed notify the co-chairmen, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Hopp. In our last column we mentioned parents who follow Lute basket­ ball. Another pair of loyal rooters are the parents of Rick Clark, starting senior guard. Mrs . Clark has not missed a game in which Rick has played since his j unior high school days. And h r husband has made as many games as his work would permit him getting a w a y . M r s . C l a rk h a s p u t thousands of miles on the fa mily car traveling all over the Pacific Northwest the past four years. Many PLU parents are playing an active role as committee memb­ ers in the Sharing in Strength program. They are involved in the church and alumni phases of the $ 1 6 . 5 m i l l i o n c a m p a i g n now underway . Another pair of avid rooters are Don and Devena Thomsen of Taco­ ma who followed their son Tim , senior starting center, to most of the games he competed in the past four seasons.

The PLU Parents Council held its meeting March 1 7 in connection with the Parents Club annual gathering. Those seated are, left to right, Milton Nesvig, PLU representative, and his wife, Hazel; Irene and Ernest Hopp, co-chairmen from Puyallup; Dr. William O. Rieke, PLU president, and his wife, Joanne; and Beverly Gedde of Richland; second row, Bob and Connie Brog, Bellevue; Albert and Marilyn Hanson, Portland; Bethel and William Tennesen, Bremerton; Ruth and John Bley, Spokane; Lucille Giroux, PLU; and the Rev. Palmer Gedde.


PLU Group Plans Tour Of China A 21-day study tour of the Peo­ ple's Republic of China is being offered this summer by the Pacific Lutheran University Foreign Area Studies Program (FASP). The tour, which will leave Seat­ tle for Hong Kong July 22, includes visits to five cities and surround­ ing areas. Peking, China's capitol and center of political and cultural change, is the nucleus of the tour, a c c o r d i n g to D r . Mo rdechai Rozanski. Dr. Rozanski, assistant profes­ sor of Chinese history and director of FASP at PLU, said that the Peking stay includes visits to the Forbidden City, Ming tombs, the Great Wall and the University of Peking. Tour participants will also visit industrial sites, agricultural com­ munes and archaeological excava­ tions in and near Canton, Nanking and Shanghai, he indicated. Two bi-lingual representatives of the Chinese government will

a

Many U.S. Companies Match Gifts To Colleges Four Pacific Lutheran University students will travel to Miami Beach, Fla., in May for the International College Bowlfinals. The recent winners of the northwest regionals, sponsored by Association of College Unions­ International, are from left, David Keller, Scott Kronlund and Douglas Anderson of Tacoma and Robert Kratzke of Camas, Wash. They competed in Eugene, Ore., against teams from Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana.

accompany the group. Sessions to acquaint travelers with Chinese history and society are also plann­ ed, Rozanski pointed out. Four semester hours of credit in history may be earned by tour participants. There are grants av­ ailable to defray a significant por­ tion of the tuition, he added.

A deposit of $600 is required to reserve one of the few remaining tour seats, he added.

Air transportation may be ex­ tended to Japan or Hawaii at no additional cost up to 14 days after the close of the tour.

A detailed itinerary and addi­ tional information is available by calling or writing Dr. Rozanski at PLU, 531-6900.

Becton. D i c k inson & Co.

AMAX . I n c

Col gate- Palmo l i ve Co

A M F Inc

Earth Resou rces Co

Eastern Gas & Fuel ASSOCiates

Collins & Aikman Corp

Association

BemiS Co

ESB I n c .

The Coca·Cola Co

Bell Federal SaVIngs & Loan

T h e ColOnial L i f e I n s u r a n ce Co of

Inc

Bernd Brecher & A ss o c . Inc

Easton Car & Construction Co

Ealon Corp

America

The BendIX Corp

"The purpose of the tour is to promote better understanding of modern China and its social and economic transformation," Rozanski said.

Colonial Parking I n c

Egan M a c h i n ery Co

Aobolt Laboratortes

Belhlehem Steel C o r p

Col u m b i a Gas S y s t e m . I n c

Emery I nd u s t r L e s . Inc

A S Abell C o F o u n d a l l o n . Inc

T h e B l o c k a r01hers T O b a c c o Co

T h e Col u m b u s M u t u a l L i f e

Emhart Corp

ABARCa. I n c

Abex CO , !>

Blue Be l l . I n c

Ae,ogllde Corp

BOise Cascade Corp.

Aeroret·General C o r p

Borg-Warner Corp

A.eln a Insuranc e C o

T h e Bowery Savings Bank

A!d Assn

Brakeley. John Price Jones. Inc

Aelna ute & Casually

'or Lutherans

Com m e r u a ! Cred l l Co

Bnstol-Myers Co

AireD. Inc

BrOCkway G l a s s Co , I n c

Aklona, Inc

Brown-Forman D i s t i l l e r s C o r p

A ! leghcny L u d l u m I n d u stnes. I n c

B r u nSWick Corp

Comme r c I a l U n i o n Assurance Co

E t h l c o n . Inc

C o n n e c t i c u t General I n s u r a n c e

Ex·Ce l l - a Co'p

ConneCllcut Light & Power Co Co

B u c keye Internationa l , I n c

C o n so l i d a ted Foods C o r p

Buflalo Savings Bank

C o n s o l i d a t i o n Coal C o

AI IIs ·Cha l mers Corp

B u n k er-Ramo Corp.

C o n t a i n e r Corp

A l lstate I nsurance

B u r l i n g t o n I n d u s t r i e s . Inc

Pe n n sylvania

America n BrandS. Inc

Amencan B roadtastmg Co , .nc. American Can Co

American E x press Co American Homes Products Corp American Motors Co rp American National Bank

American Nationa l B nk & Trust Co o f ChIcago

Ame ric an Optical Corp American Standard. I n c American States Insurance American Steflllzer Co

Amertcan Slack Exc hange I n c

American Telephone & T elegraph Co

A�flcan U n ited Life I n s Co

AmOLo r uundc:ltion, I nt.. . Amstaar Corp

T he Anaconda Co The Andersons Arkwnghl-B oston Manufacturers

M u t u al Insurance Co

Arm c o S I IM! I C o r p

Armstrong C o r k C o

Burroughs Wellcome C o America

c

A t h a s S t ee l & A l u m i n u m I n c

Afianllc Richfield C o

Ll)p l e y N e w s p d p c r l,

FinanCial Corp

T h e Copley P r e s s . I n c

CNA FinancIal Corp

C o p o l y m e r R u b b e r & Chemical

CPC International Inc

Corp

Cabol Corp California ElectrOnic Manufacturing Co . Inc T h e Callanan R o a d I m p rovement Co Campbell Soup C o .

Canadian General E l e c t f l c co

Ltd

The Carborundum Co Carpenter Technology C o r p

Carner Corp { Carter-v-,· allace. Inc.

Caslle & Cooke. I n c Cavalier C a r p

Cenlr al & S o u l h W e s l C o r p

C e n t r a l illinoIs L i g h t C o

Central l t t R A � s u r a n c e C o / � Central NcwspJpers F u u nd a t i o n

Ce rtaan-Teed Products Corp C h a m pIon Spark Plug Co The Chase Manhallan Bank. N A C h e m ic a l Bank Chemtech Industries. Inc Chtcago Pneu mat ic Tool Co C h I c ago TIlle & Trusl

Chubb & Son . I n c Clhcor p

C i ties SerlJlce Co T he J E

Baker C o

Bancrofl-WMney Co Ban k of Ameflca

Crompton C o

Inc

The C i t izens and Southern Corp

Crllm & F CJfsl e r I n s u r a n c e C o

Cut ler-'�am"ner I n c Cyprus M i n e s C a r p

d Dalla C o r p Dayton Malleaolc I n c

T h e O .J y l U n T i ft: ,Hld R u b b e r C u rn r,lf I v De �re & Co Dee r l n q M i l l i ke n . I n c Del M o n l e C o ' p

Depo':'11 G U ') f a n t y N a l i o n a l B a n k

A W G Dewar I n c

T h e D e x t e r Corp D i a m o n d Crystal Salt Co

A B D I c k Co

Dickson Elec t r o n i c s Corp Ddco Laboratofles Digital EqUipment Corp D I l l I n g ha m Cor p

Donaldso n . L u f k i n 6. Jenrette. Inc

R . R Donnclley & Sons Co

Dow Badlsche Co

The Dow C h e m I c a l Co Dow Corning Corp

C,hzenS F,deloly Bank & TruSI Co

Wilbur B. Draver C o

Bank

Rank of California. N.A

Clark Equlpmenl Co

The Cleve land-Clllls Iron Co

The Bankers Lofe Co.

Cleveland E lectnc illuminating Co

Barnes & Roche. Inc

Cleveland Institute o f Electronics

Bec�lol d Co.

Coals & Clark. Inc

Clow Corp

Dresser Industries. Inc D u n & Bradstreet Co . . I n c

e E-B Industnes. Inc

Corp

USA

Exxon Corp

1 ! ll l l () s. b ( · ' ; Te.epr'I ,' ,f' C "") . ! t l n e)I'.f Ton i 1.....·. { J r k �, : r, c;, I n d u s t r i a l I n c e rn n l t 'l C: c

I n d u st f l a l Nat ional B.:nk r)f I1 n o�1( Island

HlP e l r t � t ! f' Co G l l d r r ; T I ,h! I3 cl n �.

Ingersoll-Rand Co I n l a n d Container C u r p

f

I n t egon C o r p

.'

Research Corp Federa l - M o g u l Corp Federal N a t i o n a l M u n g aqe ASSOCiation Federated Department Stores i n c Ferro Carp ThE' F i d e l i t y Bank F i d UCiary Trust Co

Fireman s F u n d A m e r i c an I n s u r a n c e Co

F i reman s M u t u a / Insurance Co

The F l festone Tlfe & R u b b e r C o

F i r s t & Merchants National Bank

F i r st C h icago Corp

First HawaIIan Bank The F a r s t National Bank at Miami F i rst N at i o nal Bank o f M i n n eapolis F a r s i National Ban k of Oregon The F i rst National Bank of SI Paul F a rst NalLonal Baston Corp The F a rSi New Haven National Bank F l u o r Corp Fund

F o r d M a l o ' Co 01 Canada. LId Farly-EIght I n sulations. Inc F o s t e r G r a n t Co , I n c Faster W h e e l e r Corp H B F u l ler Co

F u l ton Federal Savings & L o a n AsSOC iation

g

E & J G a l l o W , n e ry

Frank E Gannett Newspaper Foundat i o n . I n c

_ 'I

Griswold-Eshleman l'0

' ' '' k CO'P

G u l l States U l l l l 1 l e s C C'

T h e G u n n Group I IlC

J

h

1 <1: 1 1 .... ,COIpur.J{iun .](�!!ersun-Pllot Broadcasting Co

H a l i l b u rt u n Co

JOhn Hancock M d l U .l 1 L i t .. 1 I .·.)UI . I ' . 1 Co

Hanes Co, p

The Hanna M I n I I1�j (�( l

HarriS C o r p

i t i1 J" �...., C o r p : ' i f '. ..., , , I ;w q h l l n St e l C o r p

Harrl':i T r u SI & S':I'J I ' I�'- fl·L llk

I 'llhl

General Mills, Inc

Jeller 50 n · PI'ot Corp.

, I e r �e 'f Cen t r a � Power 8. L i g h t [.0 Jewel Co I n r.

: - i · � . ) h l \�()f�

H a! :iCo Carl'

H a r t . S c t l d f l n f" & "..1,11 '

t

I " rl n se r oS. H , q g l n s !nI H " , JrI , � J ; · � l n s o n a. S u n . I n c

1'1'

Harper & R o w P : J l l . -; I \ , -r ·-.

,

The H a r t l U I r:1 � r l 'c- l i i d l I · , · ( j r O t l P

Hartford Natl(H l d l Ua n k . w o : T n e Hartlord S f e a l r"l A t J d f · t In'l pect'on & I n s u r d ' l �

Hask i n S & Sells

t< . J I 1' - (

Ct.'

Steel Corp

· di' d r n c y - N a t l o n a l l n c .

I tin Kenda!l Co

HawaIIan Telephone Co

I\c n n a rn e t a l . I n c

H J Hei n l Co

I(o n" ecolt Copper Corp

H e r c u les I n c Hershey Foods Heubletn I n c Hewlett-Packard Co H I l i Acme Co Hoerner Waldor! C o r p Hoffman·La Roche. Inc Honeywell, Inc Hooker C h e m i c a l C o r p

Haughton Chemical Corp.

General Learning Corp.

I nt e rpace Co, p I n vestors DlverslfLed SerlJlces. Inc I r v l:'1g I rust Co

G u lf all C a r p

General Cable Corp.

General Foods. LId

Corp

l , r u ITI LT"l ,jn C u r r o l ,il l U l l 1 he Gua rdian L i fe I n � \ J : d n (" ... ( , ) G u l l & Western In<1IJstrtC� I n c

T h e Hoover Co

Gener al Foods Corp

"'I a t i o n a l Mu ll ltoodS Coro

. nternallonal Paper Co I n t e rnational Telep h o n e & Telegrapt:

G r i n n e l l M u tl..oal R e ' , , .. I ,H I ' eo r ·

The Hat l to r ,1 E : p l . ! r l l

Cr."

I : l t e r n a t l o n a l N i c k e l C o . , Inc

Green G,an t Co

Hooker Chemicals and PlastiCS

General Electrtc Co

Inl

:

The Gales Rubber Co Gt'f1C'f.tl "tom i , C o m p J n y

General D y n a m i C s Corp

I nt e r n atio n al BUSiness M a c h l ne�

I n t e r n a t i o n a l Minerals & Chern,Gd l

ol'

Gardner Denver Co

General A t r o n l c s Corp

I n t e r n at I O n a l BaSiC E c o n o m y CUI O

I'

Corp

G r eat Nonhe rt) I'-jpk\-,n·

FMC CO ' P F a c t o r y M u t u a l Enginee r i n g

, ' I

!

I nt e r n a l lon .I I Fl.dvor5. & Fragran("�s

G r a p n l c Arb M u t Lo

Thr. Graph l(' Pr l " t · 1 J

Ford M o l a r Co

I

li(·nc.d i l· l c p l 1 o n e L,III: Pol.l , 0 1 C .. i1 i l lH l ' i J Gen�:""al T e- I e p h o n e & I£' C I ' onlC<; Corp T hp. General T i r e S. H l1 :...,tJ(" C o M A, lJe.iller 01 1 1 11 1 1 (.. 1 ' . I . e G e ! T y 0 . 1 Co

SaChs r.. Cr, B F (Juud- IC t'. C[) 1 It' C l l ' l u \ t:d l I \' . : ' � Gould I n c W R Grac.l'- & L c Alexdnder G t a n ! � ;

Diamond S h a m rock Corp

The Citizens & Southern N a l l o n a l

T h'! 8an k of New York

The Bat1on·G,llel Co

Cornlnq Glass Works C r o u s e ·Htnds Co

California Pors. (;he A u d i , I nc ,

Chrysler � o r p .

The Badger C o . I n c

C o n i t nental l i li n o i s N a t i o n a l BanK

Cooper I n d u s t n es Inc

CIBA-GEIGY Corp

AshlaM 0,1 I n c

A l i a s Rlggong & Supply C o r p

Inc

The Cook F o u n d a t i o n . Inc

Champion I nternational Corp

ASSOC iated Sp'lng C o r p

T he Conttnental Group

C o n t i nental ad Co

A r row-Han. I n c

ASSOCiated B o x C o r p

The C o n t i n e n t a l Corp

and Trust Co

C e r r o Corp

A r1 h u r Andersen & C o

Contmt.:rHJI C J n Comp.lny

BUSiness M e n · s Assurance C o 0 1

C.I T

01 America

S .... q I ;_ '�

GenCf;}1 Pu b l i C Ut"Lt,

G e n e r a l R e i n s u r a n c e C ') < p

G o l tl m a r'

C o n n t->c t l c u f Mutual L i f e I n S u ra n C e

A l i led Chem i c a l Corp

Al uminum Co of America

Elhyl C o r p Exxon Co

Co'p

Allenda!e Mutual Insurance Co

American Bank & Trust Co ot

the Un ited States E q U I table o f Iowa

Connectlcul Ban k & Trust Co

G A Brakeley & Co . Inc

A!r Products & Chemicals. I n c

E q u L t able Life Assurance Society a t

I n s u r a n c e Co C o m b u s t i o n E n g l neenng Inc

Many companies across the Un­ ited States match charitable gifts made by their employees to educa­ tional institutions. Following is a list of 648 com­ panies that will match employee's gifts to colleges, including Pacific Lutheran University. If you are employed by one of these companies, your gift to PLU can be doubled by contacting David Berntsen c/o the PLU Office of Development. The Development Office will contact your employer. In addition, donors who bold Lutheran Brotherhood insurance policies can have their gifts match­ ed up to $100 (per policy per person) by the Minneapolis-based fraternal benefit society. This may also be accomplished by contact­ ing th e Development Office with names and policy numbers. Thus it is possible in some cases to have a gift to PLU tripled !

Corp Geo A Hormel & Co Houghton M I f f l I n Co

Household F inance C or p o ra t io n J M. Huber Corp

Hutsey-Nico laldes ASSOCiates. Inc . Hughes Aorcrafl Co

Hughes Ton! Co.

r h p K c r o t e Co K(,rn Co u n t y L a n d Co

Kl'rr McGee Carp K e r s t i n g B,own a Co . Inc

Waller K I d d e & Co

K I dder. Peabody & Co . Inc

K i m b erly-Clark Corp

Kingsbury Machine Tool C a r p The K i pli nger WaShington E d i tor s . Inc.

Richard C Knight I n s u r ance Agen'·. Koehrtng Co H

Kohns.amm Co . I n c

Koppers Co . . Inc Krallco Corp

I

The Lamson & Se:;s,ull� Ca.


sweets, pastries, romegrat and oth­ er specialties. Participating organizations in­ clude Daughters of Norway, Nord­ landslaget, Western Association of Rosemalers and the PLU Norsk Klubb.

May Festival Activities At PLU Planned

The traditional PLU campus Mayfest program, now in its 45th year, will be held Saturday, May 5, in Olson Auditorium at 8: 15 p.m. The program features performances by the PLU Mayfest Dancers and the coronation of the 1979 May Queen.

Norwegian crafts, displays, food and entertainment will highlight the fifth annual May Festival at Pacific Lutheran University Satur­ day, May S. The free five-hour-Iong festival begins at 11 a.m. in the PLU University Center. Featured performers include the Roving Musicians, led by Sylvia Soraaslik and the Leikaring Danc­ ers, led by Sigurda Aamot. The musicians will perform at 1 and 2 p . m . ; the dancers will perform at 1 : 30 p.m. Norway Day films will be shown at 12 noon and 3 : 30 p.m.; an Arts of Norway slide show is scheduled for 2 : 30 p.m. Crafts on display include rosem­ aling, woodcarving, stitchery, fid­ dle-making and costumes, with d e monstrations of rosemaling, stitchery and lefse-making also featured. Norwegian foods available in­ clude chee ses, lefse, cookies,

Molorola, Inc.

Penlon Publishing Co

Securily Pacific Corp.

Lehigh Portland Cemenl Co.

Murphy Oil Corp.

Phelps Dodge Corp.

Securily Van lines, Inc.

L..... ' Brolhers Co.

The M\llual Life Insurance Co. of

The Lawyers Co,o," ,.I ..e Publish ing Co.

L cn k u n , Inc .

L.... ' SI,.uU & Co.

Liberty Life Insurance Co.

LI9gei G, oup. In c. Lillie. Brown & Co.

Loews Corp.

l ou ,slana Power & Ughl

Loyal Prol.ctive lile Insurance Co. "Tne Lu b,ilOI Corp. Corp.

Lud lO

Lukens 51

C.

I (,0.

E Lummus

Pelro·Tex Chemical Corp

MUlUingwear, Inc. Mulual Benefil Life Insurance Co. New York

Mulual of Omaha-Uniled of Omaha

n

N . C R . Corp

POlarOid Corp.

NL Induslries, Inc.

Prelormed Line Products Co.

NabiSCO, Inc. Nalion�1 Cish RORist.r Co.

Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Price Brothers Co.

Nalco C h m lcal Co.

Price Waterhouse & Co

Musachusetts MlIlual Llle

New E n g lan d Gas

EI cIne Assoc.

Bank

I n surance

Co

New E ng land Pelroleum Corp. New Y Olk S a n " 101 SaVings The New Yo rio.

Times Co

The New Y or �e r Magaz i n e , I n c .

The 1 9 07 F oundalion N o rdson Corp.

Nort h Am. ,ican Car Corp

Northeast Utilities SerVIce Co

Northern Natural Gas Co. N orther n Trust Co.

In$ urance Co. The Maytag Co.

NorthweSlern Bell

McDonald's Corp .

Northweslern Nalional Lile

Maadville Corp.

No'rton Co.

McCormick ' Co . . Inc McGraw· Hill Inc.

Medusa Corp.

"'ello n Bank N.A. Men•• h a Corp. Merck & Co., Inc. Melropohlan Edison Co. Melropolilan life Insu rance Co. Melller InSlru menl Corp M IC higan Gen ral Corp. M I(Idle Soulh Services. Inc. Middlesex Mulual Assuranc" Co. Midland Muwal L,le Insurance Co. Mldl. nd·Ro�� Corp. M t ehle·GQ$So Dex ler Inc.

Milton Brad'-y Co Mlnneapohs Slar & Tribune Co. MlIInesola Mi ni n g & Manu la Cluring Co

The M,nnnoia Mulual Life Insurance Co.

Mobil

0,1 Corp.

Mohasco Corp.

MO<\roe AUIO Equipmenl Co.

Monlgomery Ward & Co., Inc. Monumenlal Corp. Moog. Inc.

Moreland Chemical Co . . Inc. Morgan Con"ruclion Co

Morga n Guaranly Trust Co. of New York

Si mmons Co.

The Singer Co. Skelly Oil Co.

SmlthKline Corp. Sony Corp. of America Soulh east Ban king Corp. So ulheasl First Bank 0 1

Southern Nalural Gas Co.

cksonville

T h e Sperry & Hu tchi nson Co.

New Or�ans P u b l I C Selvlce I n c .

Co

Signode Corp.

The Square 0 Co.

atton wlae Mulu!)1 ' n 'iUriin C e Co

Manu f'C1 u'e� Hano,e' T,ust Co. Ma,atho" a,l Co

Man,n Malletta Corp

Shu lton, Inc. The Signal Co .. Inc.

Provident Nat ional Bank

National Slee l Corp.

New England Mulua' Lil

Ma rsh ' M cLennan Ma nagem enl

Sherwood Medical Indust"es. Inc.

NaUonal Life Insu,ance Co.

MaC:Lean·Fogg Loc� Nul Co Mal h nckrO!l1 Inc:. P R MallOry & Co . . Inc

Martne M idland BanI<

The Sherwin.Wiliiams Co.

Provident Life & ACCident I nsurance

New E n g lan d Mercnanl, Na ho na l

Bank.

Selon Co.

Provident Mutual Life Insu rance Co

rhe No

h_stern Mutual Life

I nsurance Co.

Insurance Co. W. W. Norton & Co., Inc. John Nuveen & Co., Inc.

o

Oakile Producls. Inc.

Oklahoma Gas & EleClric Co. Old Slone Bank Olin Corp.

Ortho Pharmaceutical Corp

Owens·Corning Fiberglas Corp. Owens·lliinols, Inc.

p

Co.

01 Philadelphia

The PruCl ,ntial l nsuranc" C o 01 Amen a

Pu l l man I n c .

q

Quakor C t emical Corp. The Oua�e, Oats Co.

r

Rand McNally & Co.

Raytheon Co.

Reliance Electric Co. Reliance Insuran ce Co. Rex Chain bolt Comp.n y Rexham Corp. Runord, Inc.

R . J. Reynolds Induslries. Inc.

Rich's Inc.

R i c ha rdson , Gordon & Associates Richardson·Merrell, Inc.

R iegel Textile Corp.

Rochesler Germicide Co.

The Rockeleller Brolhers Fund, Inc. Rockeleller Family & A ssoclales The Martha Baird Rockefe ller Fund lor Music, Inc.

Rockwell inlernalional Corp 'lohm & Haas Co.

RuSI Engineering Co.

s

Th. S '" H Com pany SCM Corp.

PPG Induslries, Inc.

SKF Induslri••

PaC ific Mulual l,l. Ir.s�rance Co. ro n-Ameri can Lift I n surance Company

51. Joe Minerals Corp 51. AegiS Paper Co. Salomon B rolhe rs

Park er·Hannilin Corp.

Sandoz. Inc.

Panhandle Easlern Pipe Line Co

Ralpt1 M . Parso ns Co

Sanders Associates, I n c . Schering·Plough Corp.

Peal. Marwic k. Mllchell & Co

The SCh l egel Corp.

Pennsylvania EleClric Co.

Joseph E. Seagra m & Sons. Inc.

Pechiney Ugine Kuhlmann Corp Pennsylvania P'.)wer & Ughl Co. Pennwal! Corp.

Pennzoil Co.

Sou thern New England Telephone The Soulhland Corp Spruce Falls P ower & Paper Co. Squibb Co rp.

51 ckpole Carbon Co .

aper Co. scon P

Sealrighl Co., Inc.

G . D. Searle & Co.

Saallle·First National Bank

Jody Roberts, a PLU junior from Lake O swego, Ore . , has been s elected editor of the student newspaper, the Mooring Mast, for the 1979-80 school year. Roberts, a 1976 grad uate of Meadowdale High School in Ed­ monds, Wash., is a political science major. She plans to pursue a career in journalism. Roberts, 20, has been serving as news editor for the Mast. She has also worked as an intern reporter for the Pierce County Herald in Puyallup and was assistant to the public information officer at Fort Steilacoom Community College last summer. This spring Ms. Roberts has also been serving as an assistant in the legi slature in Olympia.

Siandard Oil Co. ( I ndiana) Slanda r d D t l Co. (N w J e rsey) The Standard Oil Co (OhiO) Slandard Oil Co. of C ahfor n ;a

The Stanley WorkS 5 1 uller Ch emical Co

Steel Heddle Mig. Co. Sleriln g Drug. Inc

Ralslon Purina Co.

Jody Roberts

Security Pacific National Bank

Nalional Central F ina ncial Corp

MFB Mulual l nsu,ance Co

The Manne Corp & SubSidiary

Pickands Malher & Co.

Plainlield Cylology Laboralory, I n c .

m

Ma,eor S""" CI! Corp

Phoenix Mutual life Insurance Co

PillSburgh Nalional Corp.

Nalional Distillers 11 Chemical Corp.

M.ck Trucks. Inc.

Phillips Pelroleum Co.

Pitney Bowes. Inc.

Nalional Can Corp.

"'CA ine

Philip Morris Inc.

The Pillsbury Co.

LUlhe,.n M U l u .1 Ltl. I '!su rance Co

"'&T Chemicals I n c

Phi ladelphia Quartz Co.

Jody Roberts New Mooring Mast Editor

Union E lec: l rtc Co

Un,on 0,1 Co. o f Call tornia U n i royal, Inc Uniled Sank 01 Denver Untted Brands Co.

J . P. Stevens & Co., I n c .

Unite j·Csrr I n c .

S t o n e & Webs"'r. Inc.

U n ited E ng ineers & Constructors . Inc.

Subu rban Propane Gas Corp. Sun Life Assurance Co. 01 Ca nada Su n Co , Inc Sybron Corp. Synlex Corp.

t

United Fruil Co. United G S Pipe Line Co. Uniled lile & ACCiden t Insu rance Co. U n iled Parcel Service Uniled States Borax & Chemical Corp.

S1ah�5 Trust Co. of New York

United

TRW Inc. Tektronix, Inc. Teledyne, Inc.

C . Tennanl, Sons & Co. 01 New York Tenneco. Inc.

Texas Eastern Transmission Corp. Texas Inslrumenls Inc. Texasgulf, Inc.

Texlron, Inc.

The Thomas & Belts Corp. J . Waller Thompson Co. J . T. Thorpe Co. Time, Inc.

The Times Mirror Co.

Times Publishing Co. &

Congressional Quarterly

The Torrington Co.

Uniled Technologies Corp.

United Virginia Sank Shares Inc. The Upiohn Co.

Urban I nveslment and Developmenl Co .

Ulah Inlernalional lnc. Ulica National Insurance Gro�p

v

Varian Associales

ViCla,Wc Co. of Americ'l

Vulcan Maleri als Co.

w

Wash Ington National tnsurance Co Wat kin s- Johnson C o . C . J Webb. I n c

W....d e n & Co.

Welch Foods Inc. Welltngton Manage ment Co.

Wells Fargo & Co.

Wcsr Sand & G ravel Co., I n c Weslern Publ i sh i n g Co , I n c

Westinghouse E leclric Corp. Weyerhaeuser Co

W h irlpool Corp

While Motor Corp. John Wiley & Sons, I n c. Willamet1e I n d ustries, Inc. Williams & Co.

Wlnn-Dixie Stores. Inc.

WisconSin Telephone Co

Wolverine World Wide. Inc

Th o Worlhington COf'1pany BASF Wyandotle Corp.

x

X e rox Computer Services Xerox Corp.

y

Arthur Young and Co.

Wi lham E . Young & Co.

Young & Rublcam International, In.c.

Transamerica Corp.

Wa lla ce- Murray Corp. ' The Walllng lord Sleel Co. . Warnaco

The Travele,s Insurance Co.

Warner & Swasey Co.

TOTA L :

Towers. Perrin , Forster & Crosby. Inc.

Tra", World Airlines Treadway Co . • Inc.

Warner-Lambert Co

648

com pantes

Trusl Co. 01 Georgia

Turner Construction Co,

u

Union Camp Corp.

Union Commerce Bank

CASE The N ational Clearing H o u se for Match ing G i ft Programs © Co py right

1 97 7


Dr. Schwarz Accepts Colo. Dean Post

The Joy Of Giving By Ronald Coltom Alumni Director

Many of you are probably saying "He's got to be crazy. How can there be a joy in giving? At least on my income. Giving is for the rich." It has been said that most of us are poor, just at different levels. Well, I like to look at it on the positive side and say that we are all rich but at different levels. Rich for our loved ones - the family and friends that we have. Rich for a country that gives us the opportun­ ity to become what we wish. Rich for a G od that gives us a freedom but a responsibility that goes with it. Rich for a Unive 'sity that has enriched all of our l i ves at least in some s mall measure . In return then for the associa­ tions we had with various faculty, for the friends we met while at PLU - erhaps a spouse, for the knowledge we gained , however little or great, or for the degree we may have attained; we give to an alIlla mater that has meant some­ thing to a1 of u s . We also give because the University needs our fi nancial support. We have been fortunate during the past several years to be able to maintai n a budget in the black . This is not ea sy in times of heavy i nflation nor wi h over 80% of our operating budget derived from tuition dollars, but w i th c areful fi nancial ma n a ge­ ment i t has bee n possi ble. Annual Fund Income is a vital necessity to insure a continued ualit for which PLU has become known. Even tho th e Univers ity is presently engage d in a $ 1 6.5 mi1I­ ion ca ita! campaign for new build­ i ngs and scholarship endowmen t to conti nue quality for a growing student body. we must not forget the Annual Fund tha undergirds the operations of th University. Just ike a church doesn' quit taldng the Sunday morning offer­ i ng d uring a special building cam­ p a i g n . PLU needs its a n n u a l

income. We thank those of you who have already given so generously and ask the over 85 per cent of the remainder of our alumni if you won't consider j ust a small part of your "riches" as a gift to the annual fund before the university fiscal year ends on May 31?

Dr. M. Roy Schwarz '59, as­ sociate dean for academic affairs at the University of Washington School of Medicine, has accepted a post as dean and professor of anatomy at the University of Col­ o r a d o S c hool of Medicine i n Denver. Dr. Schwarz, a member of the PLU Board of Regents, former PLU Alumni Association president and Alumnus of the Year, will take

over his new duties JUly 1 . H e has earned international re­ cognition as the first and only director of the WAMI (Washing­ ton, Alaska. Montana and Idaho) program for medical education at the U of W. The program, started in 1970, uses campus classes, courses at four other universities, training programs in clinics in the students' home areas and even satellite­ beamed teaching sessions to train medical students from states that do not have a medical school. The PLU magna cum laude graduate has also served at U of W as professor of biological struc­ ture. He graduated from the UW Medical School with honors in 1963 and has served in various positions there for the past 15 years.

Dr. M. Roy Schwarz

Joyful Noise, Spirtborne Plan eunlon •

Members of the Stime family had a reunion at the March 2S dedication of Providence Heights (Issaquah), new home of Seattle's Lutheran Bible Institute. The Rev. Dr. Eugene V. Stime, center, retired LBI president, gave the dedicatory address. On the left is Dr. Nathan Stime, Class of 1964, Deer Park, Wash., physician; and right is Randy Stime, Class of 1963, Kirkland business man. The father is a former PL U regent and has an honorary doctor of divinity degree from PLU.

1978-79 Alumni Board Regent Repre enlatives Dr. R naI d Lerch ' 6 1 56 1 1 W . Victoria Kennewick, W 99336 Suzanne (S ubinna) Nelson '55 8701 108th St. S.w. Tacoma, WA 98498 Frederick O. Muenscher x' 5 1 305 Ten-M ile Road Everson, WA 98247

Luella (To so) Johnson '51 7 Tho rn ewood Drive Tacoma, WA 98499

Carol (Haavik) Tommervik '40 820 S. 120lh Tacoma, WA 98444

John Mc Laugh li n ' 7 1 32631 39th Ave. S.W. Federal Way, WA 98002

Terms expire May 1982

Joh n JaCo bson, M . D . '60 514 D · ert West Dri ve Rancho Mirage, CA 2270 Term� Explr

May 1980

Kar in (Pihl) L ander '66 1 300 S. 1 1 tb Street Mt. Vernon, WA 982 73 Anita ( Hillesl nd) Londgren

·59

3 1 0 1 North 29th Tacoma, WA 98407

Members-AT-Large I-Yr. Appointments

Kenneth J. Edmonds '64 80 1 42d Av. N.w. Puyallup, WA 98371

Dr Da le Ben 'on '63 641 6 S . W Loop Dr Portland, OR 97221

Carol (BottemilIer) Geldaker 18525 S. Trillium Way West Linn, OR 97068

Esther EIlickson '58 2442 Denver St. San Diego, CA 92 1 1

Ken "Skip" Hartvi gson,Jr. '65 658 N.W . 1 l 4th Place Executive Secretary Seattle, WA 9 8 1 77 Ronald C. Coltom '61 Ronald A. Miller, M.D. '65 Alumni Director PLU 72l Iowa Ta oma, WA 984'17 Whitefish, MT 5993i Ex-OfficiO Student Rep. Terms expire May 1981 Stephen Rieke Gayle (Severson) Berg '72 President ASPLU Lennep Road Martinsdale, MT 59053 Past President

Jennie (Lee) Hansen '34 4726 Analii Street Honolulu, HI 96821 C mdr. Stewart Morton '56

789 Bonita

Pleasanton, CA 94566 Harry L. Wicks '69 2 1 1 4 Wynkoop Colorado Springs, CO 80909

Terms Expire May 1979

Stephen M. Isaacson '76 1818 N. 17th Boise, ID 83702

Donald D. Gross '65 6925 S.E. 34th Mercer Island, WA 98040

JoAnn (Nodtvedt) Briscoe '52 6461 Reed Way Anchorage, AK 99502

Michael A McKean '68 40 1 1 10th N W. Gi g Harbor, WA 98335 Rev. Charles W. Mays ' 2 1 6619 SE 147th St. Renton, WA 98055

Eldon Kyllo '49 13712 10th Ave . E. Taco ma, WA 98445

The first all-member reunion of the Joyful Noise and Spiritborn e singing groups will be held in Tacoma June 2-3. ' All of the mol' than 80 pe pI wh o h a ve performed with the groups during the pa t eight years are inv·ted. Fam ily members are welcome as well . Festivities will beg i n t Spana­ way Park, kitchen no. 5, a 1 1 a.m . Saturday and continue unday at Christ Luthe ra n Ch u r c h i n Lakewood. In case of bad weather, all activities will be held at the church. Inquiries may be directed to Dave and Joy Liezen, 1 1 802 South "c" St., Tacoma. 98444 ; (206)5375300.

St. Regi Adds Pledge Of $20,000 St. Regis Paper Company has pledged $20,000 to the Pac i fic Lu the ran University " Sha ring in S trength" fund campaign, accord­ ing to PLU Pres iden t Dr. William O. Rieke. The campaign, whi ch was o ffi­ cially announced in February, is int ended to ra ise $ 1 6. 5 m illion over five years for capital improve­ ments and endowment, Rieke indi­ cated. I ncl uded in PLU's capital plans are a new $5 million science facili­ ty and a $3 million performing arts center.


Adult Alumna Immersed In Broad Variety f Proj ects

NASC Begins Accreditation Evaluation

By Lelia Cornwell DAISY - a name given to many f l o w e r s , me a n i n g da y ' s eye . Daisies usually open their blos­ soms in the morning and close them at night. But not this Daisy. Daisy Stall worth is in full bloom at all times. Eyes smiling, hair wrapped in a black scarf, wearing a long robe and brown bobby socks she bub­ bles as she describes herself. "I'm determined, I'm organized. too organized." she said. like challenges, and I enjoy dev eloping concepts and working on them until they come into actu­ ality . "You know it seems to be a part of my nature to be organized. I function better personally at home and on the job. Even as a child in sharing my room with my sister my side of the closet was meticul­ ous. I had my sweaters, blouses, slacks, and skirts separated organized. " Daisy is a senior program de­ velopment specialist employed by the city of Tacoma. "A mouth full," she says, "but what I basically do is program c o m m u ni ty d e v e l o p m e n t a c­ tivities, write grants and at times work on special projects . " A s coordinator, she works with the city manager and various de­ partments, agencies, and commun­ ity groups. Daisy is also a member of the Tacoma Area Chamber of Com-· merce physical planning commit­ tee. She finds that participation in this committee is "not only re­ but a way to find out how city of Tacoma functions." As a committee representative to the Task Force for a regional Urban i D e s i g n Assistance team study, Stallworth enjoyed observing the professionals who came from dif­ ferent parts of the United States to assess what Tacoma was like and to observe its needs. Stallworth came to Tacoma in 1967 from Ardmore, Okla. She says she likes the Pacific Northwest because of the mountains and sees it as "a nice place to raise a family." She has two daughters in allege and a son who is a car­ penter. "I also see Washington as a good place to work on my own personal development and growth. While barriers do exist for minorities and women, I strongly feel that one can achieve personal goals. As a mat­ ter of fact I feel that it is the other person's problem, not mine, if he or she cannot deal with me because of my age, sex or race," she said. Stallworth also believes that if

Daisy Stallworth

you live in a community, you must attempt to make a contribution toward that community's quality of life. Her contribution is working with young women through the Afro Pageant and show. She is in her sixth year as coordinator of the Afro Pageant, "A pageant spon­ sored to instill pride, encourage high achievement and foster the idea 'I am somebody' in young black women in the Tacoma Pierce County area. " Recently Stall worth was ap­ pointed to the District Court Citi­ zen's Advisory Committee, an ap­ pointment which will give her an opportunity to learn about the judicial system. According to Stallworth, "I am constantly evolving. I appreciate me now more than ever. There are many things that I would like to do. Currently I am considering going to law school or pursuing a masters in business administration" (she received her bachelor's degree from PLU in 1976) or, she says, "go back into business for myself." Her first business, a boutique specializing in wigs and retail wear for women was simply "an expen­ sive lesson." The parent com pany of the franchise went bankrupt, sales were not enough to cover the loan from the Small Business Administ­ ration and the location of the business did not lend itself to profit. For relaxation Stallworth enjoys swimming, the theatre, music, dancing or just curling up with a good book like Games your Mother Never Taught You.

Stallworth says her mother, a successful business woman, is a great example of what assertive­ ness is all about. "My mother has had the most influence on my life and some of my basic philosophies came from my grandmother and mother. Not only is mom very assertive but very smart." Stallworth feels very strongly that education is the key t o achievement and success. To be­ come educated, however, does not necessarily mean attending a four-

year institution. "In today's com­ plex society, we need people from garbage coll ectors to doctor s , lawyers and engineers," she said. "Blacks," she says, "should put forth their best effort at whatever they are attempting to endeavor. We don't have time to emulate what's in vogue as far as status symbols today. "Since we don't have any control over our own economic resources, we have to try harder to achieve. I do not view having to work a little harder as being bad. The challenge and eventual reward is worth the effort." Stallworth was 3 0 when she en­ tered college. " It seemed as if it took me forever to finish." she said, adding, "a college degree gives you credentials, but you must open the door yourself. The PLU graduate encourages students to be "involved in student government and concerned about curriculum and their community." Stallworth sees young people today as confused. "There doesn't seem to be as much strong family support. Some of the young people are smarter today perhaps be­ cause of our technological society where books are mass produced, where life can be instantly played back on the movie screen, and the world is reduced in size and travel accessible to many," she observed. Stallworth admires Barbara Jor­ don, Yvonne Braitwaite Burke, Shirley Chisholm and Ba rbara Walters. Also on her list is her husband Leroy who has taught her how to use her "discretionary" time. "I must make a statement about women in general," says Stall­ worth. "Women should set their own standards and shouldn't have to use the male as a role model. Women should bring their own uniqueness to their jobs or whatev­ er activities they are engaged in." As Daisy stands with a serious look on her face she says, "If you don't have a dream, don't have a vision, you never can become." And in Daisy's fashion she breaks into laughter.

An accreditation eva l ua t i o n committee o f the Northwest As­ sociation of Schools and Colleges visited PLU in early April. The 1 2-membe r c o m m i t t e e , comprised of top college educators from throughout the Northwest, evaluated individual PLU schools and departments and the universi­ ty as a whole to determine whether it is meeting its own stated educa­ tional goals and objectives, accord­ ing to PLU President Dr. William O. Rieke. A committee report, including findings and recommendations , will be issued in the next several months, he said. Every member of the NASC, which includes all secondary and post-s econdary schools in t h e Northwest, receives accreditation reevaluation every ten yea r s , Rieke pointed out. One of the important benefits of the accreditation process is a re­ commended in stitutional self­ study, which serves as both a guide-line for evaluators and the university itself, the president ob­ served. Such a self-study has been underway at PLU for two years under the directon of a ten-memb­ er steering committee coordinated by Dr. Robert Menzel, director of the PLU Center for Human Organi­ zation in Changing Environments (CHOICE). The study has resulted in a 588page report to which every univer­ sity unit has contributed both its present status and concerns, per­ ceived strengths and weaknesses, and its future plans, according to Menzel. Internally, the self-study will serve as a guideline for future planning and decision-making, and contribute to a better understand­ ing of both individual academic units and the university as a whole by both the faculty and administra­ tion, he indicated.

Union Pacific Awards Grant A $7 0, 0 0 0 grant for installation of energy-saving equipment on campus has been awarded to Pacif­ ic Lutheran University by the Un­ ion Pacific Fooodation. The grant, according to PLU officials, will finance the installa­ tion of automatic precision timing control units in four major campus buildings: Olson Auditorium, Un­ iversity Center, Hauge Administ­ ration Building and Mortvedt library. The equipment will reduce ener­ gy consumption and costs to an extent sufficient to amortize the equipment in less than three years.


Oass Notes Former Faculty

Class And Era Representatives The following are Class and Era Representatives. They are your liaison to the Alumni As­ sociation and any newswo rthy notes or ideas you may have can be sent to them or to the Alumni Office.

PRE 20's Theodore Gulhaugen 864 Polk Soutl. Tacoma, WA 98444

20's Clarence Lund 400 Wheeler St. South Tacoma, WA 98444

Early 30's Mrs. Ella Fosness

(Johnson)

2405 62nd A ve. N. W. Gig Harbor, WA 98335

Late 30's

Otis J. Grande 1 1 1 1 14th A ve. Fox Island, WA 98333

Early 40's

Mrs. Carol Tom mervik (Haavik) 820 S. 120th Tacoma, WA 98444

1947 Edroy Woldserh 921 Tule Lab ROGd Tacoma, WA 98444

1948

Afron Sc hafer (Hjelm) 781 9 25th A ve. E. Tacoma, WA 98408

1949 Lester Storaasti 4 1 1 6 East 88th Tacoma, WA 98444

1950

DeLbert Zier 914 1 9th Street N W.

Puyallup, WA 98371

1951 Howard Shull 416 21st St. N. W. Puyallup, WA 98371

1952 LeRoy E. Spitzer 3139 Sahali Dr. Bremerton, WA 9831 0

1953 Mrs. Barbara Thorp (Ca rstensen) 810 1 1 9th South Tacoma, WA 98444

1954 Oscar Wittiams 471 7 27th St. N E. Puyallup, WA 98371

1955 S. Erving Severtson 921 129th South Tacoma, WA 98444

1956 Phil Nordquist 721 S. 1 15th Tacoma, WA 98444

1957 Doug Mandt Route I, Box '470 Sumner, WA 98390

1958 G. James Capelli 1 0214 DeKoven Dr. S W Tacoma, 98499

1959 Mrs. Anita Londgren (Hittesland) 3101 North 29th Tacoma, WA 98407

ROBERT A. DUNN has been appointed marketing manager for the Cabinet Divi­ sion of International Paper Company. He will be responsible for worldwide market­

1960

1 961 Stan Fredrickson 14858 203rd S.E. Renton, WA 98055

Lutheran Church. George's wife, Andrea, is staying home with Amelia 9, Annette 8 ' and Christopher 4.

headquarters in Longview, Wash. Bob was

JOHN TEMPLIN has been named sales manager for the Seattle Division of S & W

assistant professor of marketing and man­ agement sciences at Pacific Lutheran Un­

1966

Fine Foods . He was formerly associated with Scott Paper Company and Pacific Food

will tour Israel w i th German conductor Helmuth Rilling and the Israeli Philhar­

Products. He l ives in Redmond, Wash. ROY H. HELMS has moved from Alask� as executive director of Sta te Arts COl1nci� to executive director of National Assembly

monic. They will be performing Back B Bra h m 's 'Requium ' and

of State Arts Agencies inWashington, D.C.

Minor Mass and

1967

Schickalslied.

B r u c e a n d N a n c y Pearson (NANCY JURGENSEN) are the parents of a SOli, Erik Jurgen, born Oct. 27, 1978. Erik is their first

1952 Mrs. JASON BOE (KATHRYN REULE)

1954

1962

Rev_ GEORGE BEARD and family have moved to Nampa, Idaho where George has accepted a call to be pastor of Trinity

ing of IP's Long-Bell cabinets, including domestic, national accounts and export sales. He will be based at Cabinet Division

iversity from 1 975 to 1 977.

Mrs. Lois White (Anderson ) 1081 Lynn wood N E. Re nton, WA 98055

1964

Rev. Charles Mays 16619 S.E. 1 4 7th SI. Renton, WA 98(}55

child. They live in Edmonds, Wash. PAUL BENSON recently \ ed a group of 26 students to Peru where they studied the Inca culture and religion. Highlights in­

1963

cluded stops at Lima, Cuzco, and Machu

Christy N. Ulleland, M.D. 15424 9th A ve. SW #2 Seattle, WA 98166

Picchu. Paul teaches religion and literatur at Mt. View College in Dallas, Tex., where

1964

he lives with his wife, Gail, and daughter, Rob i n.

Mike MCIntyre 12402 1 38th E. Puyallup, WA 98371

1969 PAMELA E. BRAUNER (Casaday) and husband Ca � 1 are living in C?lumbus, Ohit:" where Pam IS director of SOCial service SL"

1965 Mrs. Connie Hildahl (Haan)

Ann' s Hospital in Columbus. They hav� an adopted daughter, Amanda Elaine, born May 6, 1977.

1966

LEE and PAM (Bach) KLUTH are moving to Kirkland where Lee will be pastor of Holy Spirit Luthel n Church beginnin g April 1,

31S¥.r Martin Steilacoom, WA 98388

Dennis Hardtke 19 Fife Heigh ts Dr E. Tacoma, WA 98424

1979. They are the parents of a new baby boy, Erik Berent, born Nov. 25, 1978. He

1967

joins

William Young 7129 Cit rine Lane SW Tacoma, WA 98498

Michael McKean 401 1 10th N. W. Gig Harbor, WA 98335

C.

1969 John Bustad l l S13 Woodla nd A ve. Puyallup, WA 98371

C. ERIC ELLINGSON of BedfOl'd, Mass.,

1971

1972 Mrs. Kristi Duris (Harstad) 12158 "A " Street Tacoma, Wa 98444

1973 Mrs. Karen (Fynboe) Howe 136A Island Blvd. Fox Island, WA 98333

1974

Control Division of the MITRE Corporation. Eric joined MITRE i n 1 959 as a member of the technical staff. He was named a sub­ department head in 1965 and a department head in 1969. He has held numerous elective and appointive offices in Bedford where he presently serves as chairman of the Board of Selectment. Eric was honored in 1973 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). He is married and the father of two children.

1955 Dr. ELLIS R. FRENCH is assistant prin­ cipal for curriculum at Lindhurst High School i n the Marysville Joint Unified

L. Scott Buser 1 0024 Lexington SW Tacoma, WA 98499

School District, Marysville, Calif.

1956 Pastor HENRY R. HERGERT and wife

1975 Richard C. Finseth 25919 Orting-Kapowsin Hwy E. G raham, WA 98338

1976

1977

Eric Ellingson

has been promoted t o associate technical director of the Tactical Command and

Mrs. Cindy Jackson (Johnston) 1 107 South 4th Renton, WA 98(}55

Leigh Erie 1 025 Neil St. NE O(ympia, WA 98506

brother, Ryan Christoper, who i

S.

married in July 1978 at Wells B each, Main .

1 968

Steve Wa rd 5930C Hanna Pierce Rd. Tacoma, WA 98467

a

VERNELL MUNSON a n d Gary Alie wel'e

W.

Bonnie, have returned to Tacoma, Wash.: where Henry is currently missionary edu­ cational consultant and working with cam­ pus ministry at Temple Baptist Church. He spent three years in missionary work in Africa and five years in France returning to the United States in 1972. He received his master's degree in instructional develop­ ment from Michigan State University in 1976 and his master of divinity degree from Los Angeles Baptist Seminary in 1965.

1960 DENNY B. NELSON, Ph.D., has been promoted to Manager, Technical Depart­ ment, Lemon Products Division of Sunkist Growers, Inc., with offices located in Coro­ na, Calif.

1963 MlM Wayne Schutz (NANCY KROGEL) became the parents of a son, Justin Matth­ ew, born on Feb. 10, 1979. They live in Spokane, Wash.

is now residing in Hampton The coup I Beach, N . H . 'ernell is workin g on hel· Ph.D. in education at Boston University and expects to receive her degree in May. Gary is a pilot with American Airlines. MARG ARET (Christensen) CORNELL recently g ve a harp sichord recita in Port Angeles, Wa h., where she lives. Marg a re t­ teaches a harpsichord class at Peninsu .. College and gives private instruc ion in piano and harpsichord. She plays the violin and organ professionally, appearing in concerts throughout the state, including a recent appearance at a Bach festival in Spokane. A violinist with the Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra, she has also performed as a harpsichord soloist with the Sym­ phony. She is a concertmaster with the Seattle Bach Emsemble and performs on both violin and harpsichord with the Peninsula Chamber Players. I n addition to playing the piano, organ, violin and harpsichord, Margaret also plays some wind instru­ ments, including the flute and the recorder. She averages about four concerts a month.

1970 DAVE VRAVES of Puget Sound Mutual Savings Ban,k was recently promoted to manager of the newly remodeled Burien branch. Dave has been with Puget Sound Mutual for two and one-half years. He is also active with the American Institute of Banking and Mortgage Bankers.

1971 JANICE LYNNE BREKKE and Louis Robert SanMarco were married in Scobey Lutheran Church, Scobey, Mont., in Dec. 1 978. Janice is head nurse in the special care unit at Huntsville Memorial Hospital in Huntsville, Tex., where they are making their first home. Her husband, Louis, is completing work towards a Ph.D. in crimin­ al justice at the Institute for Contemporary C or r ection

and

the

Social

Sciences

in

Huntsville. VIRGINIA

(Willis)

CORDTS and hus­

band, Stu, live in Kent, Wash., with their two children, Jared, 3 V2 , and Ann, 1 %. Virginia is a homemaker and also active in children's orthopedic. Her husband i s attending the University of Washington working on his master's in industrial hygiene through the Air Force. M/M Joe Peak, (BETH SUNDET) are the parents of a son, Joseph Cody, born Jan. 19, 1979. He joins a sister, Amy, 6. Beth is a public health nurse with the Home Health Agency of Marion County in Salem, Ore. Joe has his master's degree as a physical education specialist. They live in Salem.

_ ..


Oass Notes 1972

J OHN BECK is the first and only editor of F. TS (For All The SRints), the official newspaper of the ALe's Luther League.

RONALD A. GLAUS received his Ph.D. degree in counseling and psychology on March 9, 1979 and is now employed at Polk County

Mental

Health Clinic as clinical

FATS celebrated its third anniversary in January. LINDA SUZANNE (McConnel) BURT

psychologist in adult program. He lives in

Bud her husband, Larry, have been residing

fourth year at the University of Washington

Salem, Ore. KIMBERLY D. GREEN is starting her

i n the Palo se Hills of Pullman, Wash ., for the pa t four years. Currently, she is on the facult of the Agricultural Economics De­ partment at Washington State University

as the head physical therapist/a t h l et i c trainer for the women's intercollegiate athletics. She will be the women's trainer

conducting r search i n commodity nd re ource economics . A g raduate of Calif01'­

City in August and September 1 979. JOY E. (Tuff) LIEZEN and husband,

ni. Polyte hnic State Uni ersity in Pamona, Larry is finishing his doctorate in farm management and finance at WSU. They pi 11 to travel an photograph the Yukon Terri tory and Alaska for her p otography usine88, Photographic Arts Unlimited KlRK an .TAN ( nyderl S , NDBURG have moved fl'om C o lorado to Bend, Ore . , w here Ki l'k is pr esent ly 1l1e rec reat ion director at the I nn of the Seventh Mountain, private fami ly resort, ,rnd Jan is the I cal advertising agellt for the Inn . a

M r. and Mrs. Ro n Delane y (KRL TV

NVD R) are the parents of a daughter, Kari Tiffany. born Aug. 11 , 1978 . She join a sister, Amy Kristina, who w s bo rn .Tu e 6, 1 976 . Kri : t y a d R n both work for Tiffany Drugs , Kristy is a buyer and Ron is pe rsonnel manager. Th y live in Eugene, Ore.

1 973

CLAUDIA (Barnes) P IERSON

nd her

husband are presently stationed t For Stewart, Ga . , where C audia is substitute leaching a n d at tendi ng Armstrong State College, working on he certification for elemen ry education. G REG GURSKE is dir tor of student . ervices at Olympia Technical Community Colle >e in Olympi , Nash. He lives in

Tumwater, Wash. PAU

GOO DE, LCSW, is wo rking for

Kail. l' Permanente medical group as a psychotherapist and pursuing a Ph.D. in l j n i c a l p s y c h o l o gy. H e maITied .rudi Thompson, a graduate of the School of Social Work, University of Michigan. They live i n Highland, Calif. Mr. and Mrs. DAVE BENNETT are the parents of a daughter, Carissa Marie, born Aug. 29, 1978. They live in Tacoma, Wash. SUZANNE (Eklund) BUSSEY and hus­ band, Douglas, are living i n Hillsboro, Ore., where Suzanne

is

working

as a social

worker at Kaiser-Sunnyside Hospital. Doug i s an employee with Columbia Hardwood and Moulding Company. On Jan. 16, 1979 they became the parents of a daughter, Andrea Nicole. EVERETT "Pat" WINSBERG i s liV I ng in Seattle, Wash., where he is teaching English as

a

second

language at the

Intensive

English Language Institute on the Seattle Pacific University campus.

1974

HOWARD McGEE has left International Health Services where he was a medic design specialist after receiving his mas­ ter's i n instructional technology and is now t eaching high school driver education in Redwood City, Calif. for the Sequoia High School District. He is also coaching vol­ leyball and softball. PATRICIA A. McCULLOUGH, MA '74, has been named administrator of ALCENAS Hospital, an 82-bed free-sta nding alcohol­ ism treatment facility in Kirkland, Wash. She resides in Redmond, Wash. JOHN T. 73 and LINDA (Lee) NILSON are living

m

Regina, Sask., Canada, where

for the World University games i n Mexico

David, have been living in Parkland, Wash., for the past 3 112 years. David has been working and attending PLU off and on and Joy substituted and taught h igh scho ol Spanish each for a year. She is now at home with son, Matthew, now 21 months old. PAU L '75 a n d JILL ( T a l l m a n ' 7 4 ) SCHROEDER are the parents o f a son , Garret t Paul Raymond, born Fe . 17, 1979. Paul gradu.ates from medical schoo! in June and will begin his residency program m Phoenix, Ariz. imm ed iatel y folio ing his grad uation. At pres nt they are living in Portland, Ore. WILMA appointed

ZIEGLER, MA to

the

sta ff

of

74, the

has been Ph ysical

Therapy and Rehabilitation Services

of

Burien and Federal Way, Wash. Wilma will be nursing home consultant for the agency and will be developing a J'ehabilitation program for the Burien Terrace Convales­ cent Center. Capt. R BERT B. BRADY has eamed the second award of the U.S. Air Force Com­ mendation Medal for meritorious service at Minot AFB, N D. Captain Brady, a social actions officer, was presented the medal at U p p e r Heyford RAF Station, England, where he now serves � ith a unit of the U.S . Air Fore s in Europe.

1975

DIANE V. LUND and KEITH DAVIS 77

were married Dec . 30, 1978 at OUl' Savior Lutheran Church in Issaquah, Wash. They are residing in Washington, D.C. where Diane transferred from Bellevue as an interviewer for Social Security and Keith c o n t i n u e s m e d i c a l school at G e o r ge Washington University in D.C. JODY (Sutton) NYVALL received a direct commission i n the United States Air Force after graduation and served 2% years as hospital squadron commander at Mountain Home AFB, Idaho. While in the service she met and married Chris Nyvall, DDS. Jody and Chris have located in Spanaway, Wash., where Chris has opened a practice of general dentistry. Chris and Jody are the proud parents of a daughter, Marisa Estelle, born Jan. 14, 1979. SONJA M . STRANDHOLM has been living in Port Angeles, Wash., since the fall of 1975. She is engaged to be married to David L. Brown of Port Angeles on October 27, 1979 in Portland, Ore. Sonja i s employed as the office manager in a dental office and her fiance i s employed at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church. JAIME SEABURG MA 75, and Ann Nagel of St. John, Wash., were married Jan. 6, 1979 at the First United Methodist church in St.

John. The couple will make their first home

in Spokane, Wash., where Jaime is a school psychologist with the Educational Service district. Ann i s employed in the Neonatal Intensive Care unit of the Deaconess hospit­ al in Spokane. NYDAH L. ELLET-WILLIAMS is living in Earlyeville, Va., where she is attending the University of Virginia Medical Technical

1976

BETTY LOTT i s living in Tumwater, Wash., where she is still employed by the State in the Department of Licensing. She has recently taken an accounting assistant position in Gasoline Tax Refunds. DONALD PAUL TOMMERVIK and Kari Lee Mulvihill were married Jan. 20, 1979 in Zion Lutheran Church, Kent, Wash. CAROL (Martin) STEVENS and husband, MARK, MA 74, are li ing i n Gig Ha rbor, Wash., where Carol is director of employee education at Harrison Memorial Hospital in Bremerton, Wash. Mark is a school coun­ selor at a junior high school in Port Orchard. He is also president of his local education association. CHERYL LILJEBLAD IS living in Fresno, Calif., where she i s head charge nurse in the neonatal intensive care unit and a member of the neonatal transport team at Valley Children's Hospital in Fre -no. Cheryl trans­ ported the Siamese twins las Ju y and triplets las t week to thei r un i t . Her father passed away Dec. 21 from can r. .JO HN WINSKILL has been ace p ed in the University of Washington Dental School for the Fall f 1979. He and his wife, JAN r, NORTH 76, currently reside in Gig Har Wash., hut will be moving to Seattle in the fall. N STEVE and KRIS (Ringo '78) I are now residents of I dah where Ste e is an area rep resentative for Safeco Credit Company and Kris is working for a savings and loan . They are enjoying the skiing and

the home th y have purchased there. Th y are bo th a live in the ALC mission church i n Boise. MARK S. and PEGGY (O'Neil) WILLIS

ar' the parents of a son, Todd Howard, born Nov . 1 1 , 1978. Mark is loan officer at Olympia Federal Savings & Loan, and Peggy is a part-time surgical nurse. They hav

resided in Olympia for the pas t 2112

years. MARIE SCHAUER is living in B erkele y , alif., where sh is a gra uate stud nt in mineral engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. She is specializing in geological engineering and

groundwater

hydrology. Previously she was employed for two years as a geologist with Golder Associates, a geotechnical and mining en­

previously served at Myrtle Beach AFB, S.C.

1977

KEITH DAVIS and DIANE V. LUND 75 were married Dec. 30, 1978 at Our Savior Lutheran Church in Issaquah, Wash. They are residing in Washington, D.C. where Keith continues medical school at George Washington University in D.C., and Diane transferred from Bellevue as an interview­ er for Social Security. KATHERINE ANN LORENTZ SEN and JEFFREY ROYAL .JOHNSON '76 were married Dec. 29, 1978 in Saint Stephen's Lutheran Church in West Saint Paul, Minn. STEVE CRANTZ has been promoted to the head of the commercial leasing division for a California-based real estate syndicate. He is currently living in Houston, Tex., but travels extensively through the West. ANDREA E. KLETT and Robert J . Lynch were married March 1 7, 1979 in Palo Alto, Calif. They are making their first home in Belmont, Calif. Andrea i s working in the cian in San Mateo County.

1978

N A N C Y B E R E N T S O N i s l i v i n g in Beaverton, Ore., where she is working in

ledical School in June 1978. She will complete a one-year rotating internship in

1978 in First Baptist Church, Everett, Wash. Cheryl is a teacher at Silver Lake Elemen­ tary School i n the Everett School District. MARY WAAG is beginning her second year as a Peace Corps nurse in Popayan,

ing address: Calle Gnorte #7-49, Popayan, COlombia .

KATHY DOWNS and Charles Noon were married Feb. 3, 1979 at the First United Methodist Church in Escondido, Calif. Nan­ cy Holmes Milliron 77 of Salem, Ore., was an attendant Following a wedding trip to Maui, the couple is living in Mesa, Ariz., where Chuck is undergoi ng pilot training at Williams Air Force Base . KAREN HANSEN i s teaching second grade at Butler Acres Elementary School in Kelso, W s h . THOMAS M . TVEIT I S a Marine second lieutenant and has graduated from The Basic School. The Basic School is l ocated at the Marine Corps Development and Educa­ tion Command in Quantico, Va. ROGER KEVIN REED is teaching high school in Tong , outh Pacific with the Peace Corps. He has b en there since Nov. 20, 1 978 and began his t aching in February of this year. His addl'ess i s : Nuku'Alofa, Kingdom of Tonga, South Pacific.

In Memoriam DOROTHY JANE SKOGEN '33 passed away Feb. 14, 1979. Memorial services were held on Feb. 17, 1979 in Seattle, Wash. VIRGIL HUGHES, 63, member of the food service staff the past 1 2 years, died Jan. 6 from a heart attack suffered when he arrived for work in the University Center. A retired Army sergea nt, Hughes had lived in Tacoma

sInce

1958. H

is survived

by his wife, Erna, son, Bill uf Auburn, two brothers and two sisters. ART PEDERSON, 54, a development officer at PLU from 1965-70, died March 1 1 in Houston, Tex., as the result of a stabbing at his home March 8. He had been serving as pastor of Park Place Lutheran Church in

son, Wayne, a.nd daughter, Lynn.

phototypesetting field and Bob is an electri­

d e n t :; i n the s m a l l h o s p i t a l s around Popayan. Mary will welcome correspond­ \! ce from former classmates at the follow­

were married Jan. 7, 1979 in the Stim son­ Green Mansion.

traffic control operations officer with a unit of the Air Force Communications Service,

CHERYL DIANE GREENSTREET and Michael John Swain were married Dec. 23,

Colombia. She is working with a nursing school there a s an instructor and currently travels to coordinate supervision of stu­

Bellingham, Wash., where John is currently attending Western Washington University. LORI SUE WAT K I N S o f Red mond, Wash., and Charles Edward Kitchin, JR.

Houston. A World War I I veteran, he was buried March 14 at the National Cemetery in

school. She will finish there in August 1979.

Regina i n ,June 1979 at which time she will

1978 in the Anacortes Lutheran Church, Anacortes, Wash. The couple will live in

gineering consulting firm in Seattle, Wash., and Vancouver, B.C., Canada. Captain THOMAS J . POPE is on duty at Kunsan AB, Republic of Korea. Tom, an air

John is a member of the British Columbia bar and the Saskatchewan bar. He is presently working as a barrister and sol­ icitor for MacPherson, Leslie, & Tyerman, a Regina, Sask. aw firm. Linda graduated from the University of British Columbia

be eligible to practice as a general practi­ t ioneT . 'he plans to do one year o f internal medicine at the Plains Hospital in Regina first.

DEBBIE MARIE TRAFTON and John Kenton O'Neil, Jr. were married Dec. 1 9,

[he intensive care unit as an RN at St. Vincent Hospital in Portland, Ore. Last July she spent a month i n Norway visiting relatives and enjoying the Norwegian hos­ pitality.

Houston. He is survived by his wife, Geri, a MRS. ,HENRY RIEKE, mother of PLU President Dr. William

O. Rieke, passed

away in Seattle April 4 at the age of 89. Mrs. Rieke is survived by three sons, Luvern of Seattle, Robert of Burien and PLU's presi­ dent, as well as 1 1 grandchildren. She was buried in Pacific Lutheran Cemetery in Seattle.

Nine PLU Faculty Earn ALe Grants Nine PLU professors are the recipients of 1979 Faculty Growth Awards presented annually by the Division for College and Universi­ ty Services of the American Luthe­ ran Church. Grants are intended to support graduate study or research pro­ jects. This year DCUS awarded 83 grants totalling $55,620. Campus recipients are Charles Bergman and Dan Van Tassel, English: James Brink, mathemat­ ics; Richard McGinnis, biology; Paul Menzel, philosophy; Sara Off­ icer, physical education; Joan Stig­ gelbout, nursing; Robert Stivers, religion; and Donald Wentworth, economics.


Lutes Seek 7th Straight NWC AII­ Sports Trophy Retention of the Northw st Con­ ference All-Sports Trophy, etched wi th PL U engravings annually since 1 973, is resting in the hands of Lute spring sports aggregations. I n tennis, PLU looms as the favorite to repeat as NWC kingpin for the fourth straight year. Mike B e n s o n ' s netters overwhelmed NAIA foes in the early going, with A l l - A m e r i c a n Dave Trageser coasting to three straight wins. The Lute swat squad crushed 1 978 district runnerup Eastern 8-1 in a show of strength.

Men's track fared best in relays and the jumping events. Stev Kingma cleared 6-6 in the high jump for three straight meets . In his PLU debut, sophomore Dave Johnson soared 1 4-0 in the pole vault, then was grounded with a leg injury. Golf was a later starter, but the Lutes tuned up for the Northwest Small College Classic with Win over Tacoma Community Colleg and University of Puget Sound.

.

In baseball, PLU got off to a sluggish 1-9 start, although five of the reversals were against NCAA foes. One of the bright spots for the Lutes was the .367 plate work of sophomore third baseman John Gordon, who also carried a vac uum cleaner glove. Rowing, without conference ties, had just a taste of action in March. The Lute men have designs on an appearance at the Western Sprint Regatta in May.

e

D. Harshman Aids Michigan State Titlists

PL U cagers returned to the scene of past glories for one game this season. A scheduling conflict in Olson Auditorium placed the PL U-Eastern playoff game in Memorial Gymnasium, the first men 's intercollegiate clash there in 10 years. Ric Clark (12) and Butch Williams (32) helped the Lutes maintain the gymnasium 's whammy on opponents. PL U won 72-56.

Central Wash. Thwarts PLU Kansas City Plans Again B y J i m Kittilsby

"After a IS-year absence from Kansas City, it was certai nly disap­ pointing not earning the trip to nationals, but the 1978-79 season was a good one in many ways " So spoke Pacific Lutheran bas­ ketball coach Ed Anderson, putting the lid on a 19-9 season which euded with a 75-53 setback to Central Washington in the NAIA

District 1 title game. PLU , Northwest Conference champion for the second straight year, reached the runnerup level in the district for the first time since 1971, when the Lutes lost to Central in a best two-of-three format. In moving up the playoff ladder to the Central showdown, PLU knocked off Eastern 72-56 and St. Martin's 73-68. Memorial Gym, whose walls har­ bor the memories from the storied golden era of PLU basketball, was acti ated for the Eastern game, because of an O lson Auditorium scheduling confUct. I t marked the first men's game on the maples i n ten year . "This was my best PLU team," declared fourth year coach Ander­ son. " Our record was a shade better (19-7) in 1977-78 , but w had a tougher schedule this year. " Dave Lashua led the Lutes i n scoring with a 1 4 point-per-game ave rage. In addition, the 6-7 sopho­ more pulled down 289 rebounds, the most for a Lute leaper in 1 1 years.

A scion of one of PLU's most legendary athletic figures has emerged as a highly respected coaching aide on a national champ­ ionship team. Dave Harshman, who served as a PLU assistant in both basketball and baseball while pursuing a mas­ ters degree in 1 973 and 1 974-, has moved up through the coaching ranks to become an assistant with 1 979 NCAA basketball champion Michigan State University_ The son of Marv Harshman, University of Washington hoop mentor, who gained fame as a Lute athlete and coach, Dave graduated from Washington State University in 1 970. The younger Harshman, who played for his father, was also a three year Cougar standout in baseball. Following his PLU apprentice­ ship, Dave mi grated to Spokane

Lute Wrestlers Pinned Early At Nationals Faul Giovannini and Tom Wahl were first round mat victims at the NAIA national wrestling tourna­ ment, while teammate Tim Jud­ kins survived until the second plateau. Giovannini, a 1 34-pound sopho­ more, undefeated in NAIA frees­ tyle action prior to the Wheeling,

Dave Harshman

e

Falls Community College, Wher he directed the hoop fortunes for two years. Prior to joining Jud Heathcote, his father's WSU assis­ tant, now MSU mastermind, Dave served stints as an assistant at Iowa State and Nebraska.

W . Va. to rney, was pinned in 7 :40 in his firs t match. Wahl, a sophomore, lost on a 1 :06 fall in the i nitial round of the 177 competition. Judkins, a 190 junior, won by default in the openin round, then fell 1 0-7 to Mike Wilsey of Pacific, whom he bad defeated i n the Nortbwe s t Conferen ce tourney_ Giova nnini, 22-1-1 for the sea­ son, and Judkins, 17-3, captured Northwest Conference titles ear­ lier. Wahl, 13-5, was NWC run­ nerup.


,

-,

e track, With the completion of the new 400-meter all-weather rubberized asphalt PLU's lower campus sports complex has become a beehive of activity, drawing fans for tennis, baseball and track, in some instances,

e

all a t the same time. This early March scene, with the PL U golf course in the background, is a visual reminder of the phrase from the PLU school song, "'Neath lofty trees and mountains grand. "

Lady's Spring Sports Spark Optimism

Lute Women Join Athletic Conference

Wakefield Is All-American For 4th Time

Performa nce has given cre­ dence to outlooks of optim ism voiced by coaches of women's s pring sports . Lady Lute te nnisians pounded out four wins in their first five engagem ents. Senior Kathy Wales wa the guiding light at number one s ingles. School records, which remained intact last year, had several re­ wrItes in track. Performing at home for an unprecedented five straight meets PLU wasted little time in building an entourage of N C W S A q u a lifiers. Fre hman Dianne John son bettered t h e school 1500 meter standard and tied the 3000 meter mark. Debbie Tri, Heather Schiltzl Johnson, and Kathy Groat shaved the 4 X 800 mete relay standard in a dual meet win ov r Central. Distaff rowers , dire,cting their efforts towa rds t h e n a t i o n a l championshi ps in Detriot. were impressive in a lone early season engagement at B urnaby Lake, B.C.

Pacific Lutheran will join the Women's Conference of Indepen­ dent Colleges, a six-school sports alliance, beginning next fall. Member WCIC schools, all af­ filiated with AIAW Divi sion III, are George Fox, Linfield, Lewis & C l rk, Willamette , Pacific, and PLU. "We 'll play home-and-home in most sports and compete for an all sports trophy," said PLU women's athletic coordinator Sara Officer. WCIC sports include cross coun­ try, field hockey, basketball, swim­ ming, track, and tennis . "PLU will continue Hs affiliation with the Northw st College Wo ­ men's Sports Association," added Officer. "Just as the men have a conference (Northwest) and reg­ ional ( NAIA Dist. 1) structure, so will we have a league (WCre) and regional ( NCWS A) format. "

PLU's Bruce Wakefield earned an A l l-America scroll for the fourth straight year when he fin­ ished fourth in the 100-yard back­ stroke at the NAIA national swim­ ming meet in Huntsville, Ala. Lute tankers, who placed 15th, g o t a l l t h e i r s c o r i n g from Wakefie l d , a Spokane ( S had le Park) senior. H wever, all five PLU entries improved on their season bests. Wakefield slipped through the water jn 54.99, bettering his 100 back season best of 56.3. Bruce wa ninth in the 200 back, 19th in the 200 1M. On the women's front, Bellevue senior Tami Bennett was the top point-get ter for the Pac1utes at the AIAW small college champ ion­ ships in Reno. Bennett storked to fourth in the 100 butterfly, sixth in the 200 fly. and 18th in the 500 fly. PLU, in 3 1st place as a team, got a ninth place fini sh from freshman Jenny Millo in the 50 breaststroke.

Bruce Wakefield


9 10 11 27-28 28 29

U n i ve rs it y Th e a tre p . rn

,

Under MUkwood , ' Eastvold Aud . , 8: 1 5

Recilal, Faculty Woodwind Q u in tet, Vniv. Cemer, 8 1 ::; p . m . University Theatre, " Under M i lkwood ," E a tvold A ud . , 2. 1 5 p.m. R e c it al , Fac u l ty Chamber eries, Univ . Center, 8 : 1 5 p.m_

13 19 26 27 30

1

PLU Q Club Banquet. Un iv. Centel, 6: 1 - p . m . Recital, organist David Dahl, Trinity Lutheran Church, g p. m . Concert, University Singers, Eastvold Aud., 3 p m . Concert , Student Chamber Ensemble, Univ Center, 8 p.m. ChiJdr n's Th ea tre , "Little Mermaid," East vo l d A ud . , 2 p.m.

Nurses' Pinning Ceremony . Unrv . Center, 1 p.m. G raduation Concert, Olson Aud ., 8 . 1 5 p . m . Co mmenceme nt Worship Se vi es , Olson Aud., 9:30 a . m , Commen ement Exercis s, Olson Aud. 3 p.m . Marc h of Dimes Youth Heal th Seminar, Olson Alld .• 9 a. m .

Conferences, conventions

Concen, C o mposer 's Forum, U fU\, . Center, 8: 1 5 p.m. Public FOl"u m, Fa m i l ies in C risis, Uni . Cente .. , 9 a . m .

Op e ra Wo rk s hop . I ng ram Hal l , 8: 1 5 p . m University Theatre, "Under Milkwood," Eastvold p.m.

5

ud., 8 ; 1 5

May Festival, Univer l l y Center, 1 1 n.m .-4 p m . Mayfest Dancers, Olson Aud., 8 : 1 5 p.m.

5-6 6

Medieval Fail', Eastvold Square, al l day Univer ity Theatre, "Under M i lkwo d," Eastvold A u d . , 2 : 1 5 pm Nurse ' Capping C r mony, Trimty L th eran hW'ch, 2 p.m.

8

PLUTO Awards Banquet. Univ. Center, 5:30 p.m Co n ce rt, U n i ve r s it y Sy m pho ny Orchestra, Eastv ld Aud., 8 : 15 p.m.

8-9

PLU Art Guild sale, Umv. Center, all day

What's New With You? Address ______

Stat e

__

Zip

__

OPlease check this box if address above is new. (attach old mailing label be w. ______

1-3 1 1 - 15 13- 19 14-17 1 8-30 1 8-7/13 21-23 21-24

ni led Ministne PLU Summer Sessions Pre- Se ss ion West e rn u.s. Re gio nal Wl'esiling Training Camp

Unit d Methodist Ch u rch PiliOO Workshop Fi rst FLU S ummer Session (Secont.! Se g10n July 23-Aug

Sp ou se CJass__

Spouse maiden name

._---_ ._-------

Tacoma and Vicinity Dr. T.W. Anderson Mr. George Davis Mr. M.R. Knudson, Chairman Dr. Richard Klein, Secretary Mr. George Lagerquist Mr. Richard Neils Mrs. Suzanne Nelson D r. W.O. Rieke Rev. David Wold Seattle and Vicinity Rev. Charles Bomgren Rev. Dr A . G . Fjellman M r . Paul Hog l u n d h.>1r. Clay ton Peterson Mrs. Doris Rolander Dr. M. Roy Schwarz Rev. Dr. Clarence Solberg Rev. Warren Strain Dr. Christy Ulleland. Vic Ch. D r . Geo rge Wad e

1 7)

Bellevu e S take Youl h C o nfere nce

National Afriliatlon

for L1teracy Advl£Ilt.:e

a

Note: Due to occasional cancellations, postponements and dat change after publication, it is suggested that Scene readers consult more current sources or cal PLU to confirm even t dates. 531-6900 ext. 40 1 .

..

Board of Regents

N a m e ____________

Class

Concert, PLU Win d Ensemble, Eas t vol d Aud .. B ' 1 5 p.rn

Homecoming Concert, U n i versity Choraie, EastvoJd Aud., 8; 15 p m.

3 4 4-5 4-5

C i ty

Concert, Student Chamber Ensemble, Dniv Center, 8 p. rn..

Bellingham Mr. Fred Muenscher Eastern Washington Mr. Roger Larson Dr. Ronald Lerch Mr. Alvin Fink Rev. Robert Quello Oregon Mr. Howard Hubbard Mr. Galven Irby Rev. John Milbrath Dr. Casper (Bud) Pa ulso n Montan a Rev. Roland G rant

Mr. Sterling Rygg Idaho Mr . Dorothy Schnaible - Alaska Mr. Martin Pihl

Minnesota Mr. Robert Hadland

A dvisory

Mrs. Loleta Espeseth, ALC/NPD Dr. Ronald Matthias, ALC Dr. Richard Solberg, LCA Rev. Llano Thelin, LCAIPNWS Perry B . Hendricks, Jr., treasurer Faculty: Drs. John Herzog, Joanne Jensen, Erving Severtson Students: Steve Rieke, Dave Siburg, Matt Morris PLU officers

Editorial Board Dr. Wil liam O. Rieke . . . . . . . . President Lucille Giroux . . . . . . . . Pres . Exec . Assoc. Ronald Coltom . . . . Dir Alumni Re lations James L. Peterson . . . . . E d i to r James Kittilsby . . . . . . . . Sports Editor Kenneth Dunmire . . . Staff Photographer Linda Walker . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. Asst . O.K. Devin, Inc . . . . . . . . G raphics DesigL _

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Pacific Lutheran University Bulletin Secend Class Posta g e Paid at Taco ma . Washington Mail to: Alumni House Pacific Lutheran U. Tacoma. Wash. 98447

Pacific Lutheran University I Alumni Association

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spring scenes

S ecia PLU Ca paign u pleme It I Fo

PD Con r gat 路 ODS


P U Today - A Synopsis

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and vitality

Intellectual and moral vigor characterize PLU as it steps for­ ward into the 1980's, its 10th de­ cade. All across the campus one finds scores of new programs and options designed to better prepare students for lives and careers s p a n n i n g w e l l i n t o t h e 2 1 st century. There is proof of vision, vitality and quality in every academic unit with programs focusing on both people needs and professional needs. *The School of Business Ad­ ministration has both its BBA and MBA programs accredited by the prestigious American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business. It is one of the smallest schools in the nation to be so honored. The School emphasizes the en­ tire spectrum of business concerns rather than the more common concentration on personnel and accounting. Special projects give students extensive practical ex­ perience in the field and close ties with the regional business com­ munity offer students frequent contact with professionals. "The strong reputation of the PLU School of Educa ti on goes back nearly a half century, to the days when PLC was a teachers' college. Al though the teacher market is currently depressed, there are stilI many opportunities each year for talented, mobile, well-trai n e d educators. Special minors in Education (early childhood, reading, learning disabilities etc.) give students an additional edge and assist in keep­ ing the PLU rate of teacher place­ ment high. * Academy Award-winning com­ poser Miklos Rosza last year called the internationally-known PL U Choir of the West "one of the best in the world" and selected the choir to record an album of his works. The choir is the best known, but by no means the only ac­ claimed organization within the

School of Fine Arts. The Art Department features a faculty of regionally and national­ ly-known professional artists and the best facilities in relation to number of students of any school in the northwest. Communication Arts (drama, forensics, radio-TV, journalism) graduates are h i g h l y v i s ib l e throughout the entire West Coast. And PLU has served, in a year, more music majors than any other northwest college or university or Lutheran school nationwide. In addition to professional train­ ing, there is strong emphasis in all areas on extra-curricular partici­ pation by all students in various performing groups and campus radio and TV. * The School of Nursing features a new, personalized curriculum

that emphasizes one-on-one teach­ er-student relationships, step-by· step subject mastery and "compet­ ition with one's best self." There is a growing number of career op­ tions in the nursing field today, particularly in the area of disease p revention, and the new cur­ riculum is geared to prepare stu­ dents to be ready to consider these options. *The focus in the School of Physical Education is participation of the whole student body, not just top athletes. Over 3,700 students enrolled in 30 lifetime sports las year: intramurals attracted 2,000; and intercollegiate athletics in­ volved over 400 men and women. The women's program is one of the best among small colleges; the men have taken the Northwest Conference all-sports trophy for six straight years. The academic program includes emphasis 0 1 modern sciences such as exercis physiology, kineslOlogy and bio­ mechanics. *Recent em phasis across cam­ n interdisciplina ry studies pus (tying many facets of knowledge a together into a coherant whole) .., received much of its initial im­ p e tus from t h e D i v i sion o f H u m a n itie s . T h e I n t e g r a t e d Studies Program offers both an alternative to the traditional core courses or an opportunity for stu­ dents to sample this uncommon learning experience at any stage during their campus career. New majors in Norwegian and Scandinavian Studies and numer­ ous off-campus and international learning experiences reflect a con­ tinuing dynamism in a grouping of disciplines that traditionally offer the basic essence of the liberal artsA .., experience. * Health sciences, computer sci­ ences and engineering continue to be among the most glamourous of the careers of the future, and the Division of Natural Sciences of­ fers highly successful, innovative programs in all three areas along with its traditional disciplinary programs. PLU annually places more than twice the percentage of medical and dental school applicants as the national average. The computer science program, which can be taken on its own or with tie­ ins to business or mathematics or with advanced study at Washing-


ton State University, also offers the advantage of a sound liberal arts background. The highly unusual engineering­ physics major, which provides a blend of the practical and theoret­ �al, also offers the option of ad­ �anced study at Columbia or Stan­ f ord U n i v e r s i t i e s u n d e r 3 - 2 cooperative agreements. The Division of Social Sciences is literally bursting with new prog­ rams in recognition of the fact that a cademic pursuits and societal concerns can and should be closely related. There are study oppor­ tunities, in some cases academic specializations, in areas such as criminal justice, law enforcement, adult probation and parole, the family, women's studies, minority

or ethnic studies and foreign area studies, along with the broad gamut of courses in history, polit­ ical science, economics, psycholo­ gy, sociology anthropology and social welfare. There is a brand-new Legal Studies Program, uncommon ac­ ross the nation, which gives exten­ sive background for the many career fields that require know­ ledge of law short of attorney status. And a wide-ranging expe­ riential education program gives students practical field experience in many areas. *The PLU 4-1-4 calendar, now in its 1 1th year, is a proven innova­ tion. It features a one-month January Interim between 14-week semesters, during which students select one course for concentrated study. The classes are exciting and innovative, featuring activities and topics often quite different from traditional course offerings. They may include travel, national­ ly or internationally, or intensive examination of current topics or issues. Independent study projects are also encouraged.

A. School of Business Adminis tra tion B. School of Education

C. School of Fine Arts D. School of Nursing E. School of Physical Educatio n F. Division of Humani ties

G. Division of Na tural Sciences H. Division of Social Sciences


Weyerhaeuser Volunteer Leaders Analyze Cam paign Goals Gift Boost To Campaign

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Awareness - potential - e cite­ ment - support - a special kind of education. The impressio ns were offered by four men who perhaps per­ sonify the many volunteers pasto rs, laym n and alumni who are playing major roles in the Pa c i f i c L u t h e r a n U n i v e r s i t y "Sharing in Strength" capital fund campaign. The campaign, announced publ­ icly in February, is intended to raise $ 16.5 million over the next five years for new science and fine arts facilities and strengthened endowment and scholarship prog­ rams at PLU. The four men are Alvin Fink of Odessa, Melvin Pihl of Canby, Ore., Dr. Richard Klein of Tacoma and Robert Nieman of Mercer Island. They are serving as regional chair­ men in the major gifts phase of the campaign. Although the purpose of the campaign is to raise significant amounts of money, all four men tend to consider the actual dollars as just one aspect of a broader, more subjective picture. Dr. Klein, who lives only a few miles from PLU, foresees a greater awareness of PLU among its con­ stituency in the Northwest as well as in the Tacoma-Pierce County community. "It's an opportunity to plant seeds," he said. "The PLU story will be getting out. Lay persons will be telling other lay persons about it. The campaign gives us a reason to tell so many more people about PLU." All of the leaders felt that broad­ based involvement was an impor­ tant key. Nieman, particularly, ex­ pressed the concern that for too long PLU has attempted, and the constituency has probably expect­ ed, the university to do most of the work for itself. The campaign offers a signific­ ant reason to reach out and inspire, m ot i v a t e a n d m o b i l i z e t h e thousands of church people and alumni who have been supportive but not necessarily involved in the past, they believe. Fink reflected the thoughts of ut-state constituency . "Ex­ PLU ' penditure of dollars causes people to seriously assess, to take a close look," he said. "It creates greater awareness and a greater sense of responsibility. It's making things exciting ." A l l of the leaders stres sed awareness. Nieman a s s e r t e d , "Members o f ALC churches have to become more aware of the university that they own." Klein added, "The church as a whole has had little awareness of PLU in the past." He also indicated that the campaign would inspire a greater awareness of PLU's role in its immediate community.

Robert Nieman

Dr. Richard Klein

Melvin Pihl

Alvin Fink

The "special kind of education" that PLU represents was a key for Pihl, although his family's educa­ tional history has been more close­ ly tied with Oregon State Universi­ ty. He is extremely active in the church in the Scandinavian com­ ' munity and in youth projects, all interests which help him identify closely with PLU. . He is particularly interested In the various Scandinavian heritage projects in which PLU is involved, and feels a strong sense of respon­ sibilty to the school "because it is owned by the North Pacific Dis­ trict." The leaders all voiced their per­ sonal s upport of PLU President Dr. William Rieke and the direction he has establi hed for PLU. They seemed to echo, In various ways, the remark made by Pihl: " I wouldn't say 'no' t o anything Rieke would ask." Pihl's previous association with PLU has been that of an active Lutheran churchman. Nieman, a 1 950 PLU graduate, has had "a brother, sister, cousin, nephew, niece son or daughter" at PLU conti uously since 1946. Fink, a 1 953 alumnus, is a new member of the PLU Board of Regents. Dr. Klein has served on the board for the past six years.

Con gre gati ons Organize For PLU Capital Campai gn Development o f PLU capital campaign organizational frameworks within individual dis­ trict congregations has been the target of campaign workers during April and May. Goal of the conference chairper­ sons and their task forces is to bring the PLU campaign message to every congregational memb.er. Toward that end, the campaIgn teams are each visiting three to five church councils. There are 280 congregations within the district . . The PLU "Sharing in Strength" capital fund campaign, announ �ed in February, is intended to ra� se $16.5 million during the next fIve years to provide for new science and fine arts facilities on campus and to strengthen the university's scholarship and endowment funds. Objectives of the campai gn . teams' visitations are to ( 1 ) receIve a favorable response to an every family visitation program, (2) to

A $ 4 0 , 0 0 0 g ' ft fr o m t h e Weyerhaeuser Co m any Founda­ tion to Pacific Lutheran University in March put the PLU "Sharing in Strength" de velopme ntal f�nd . campaign above the half mIllIon dollar mark. The gift is intended to be used to assist in the improvement of �he undergraduate science instructIOn program at PLU, Dr. Mary Hall, vice-president and general manag­ er of the foundation, indicated. "We are also hopeful that this grant will serve as a stimulus to the successful completion of PLU's major d evelopment campaign," she said. The first public phase of the five­ year $16.5 million campaign began in February. Its purpose is to significantly improve the universi­ ty's scholarship and endowment programs and to provide new f a c i l i t i e s a n d i ns tr uction al capabilities, particularly in the natural sciences and fine arts. Responding to the Weyerhaeus­ er gift, PLU President Dr. William O. Rieke said, "The support of the Weyerhaeuser Company Founda­ tion is not onl y of direct financial assistance, but it will be II valuable asset in presenting the case of Pacific Lutheran University to others."

help councils determine a cam­ paign dollar goal for their congre­ gations, and (3) to assist the c �m­ gregations in forming executive committees which will coordinate the campaign within the congrega­ tions. Never in the history of the North Pacific District has every member had the opp ortunity to affirm sup­ port of PLU, accord in g to Universi­ . . . ty President Dr. WIlham O. RIeke. Reaching the 47,000 households in the district will make possible the raising of a minimum of $3 million toward the $16.5 million "Sharing in Strength" campaign goal, he indicated. . It will also create other benefIts, according to Dr. ieke. " There will be in creased awareness and inter­ est in PLU; the uni ers 'ty-church relationship will be st engthened; and more of the sons and daughters of the church will become aware of the educational opportunities at PLU," he said. The campaign will also have a positive long-range effect in terms of on-going university support, Rieke pointed out. During the past three years Dr. Rieke has devoted a major portion of his time to personal visits and communication within the congre� gations of the North Pacific Dis­ trict. Members of the NPD are the corporate owners of PLU.


Volume LVlV No. 3 Bulletin of Pacific Lutheran Universlty/AJ umni Association June 1979

Commencement '79 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Global E ucation . . . . . . . . ďż˝ . . . . . . . . . . 5 Norway's Leaders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 .

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Summer Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9 New Master's Program . . . . . . . . 10 Conscious Conscience . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 .

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Published six times annually b y the Office o f University Relations, Pacific Lutheran University, P.O. Box 2068, Tacoma, WA 98447 (USPS 417-660) Second class postage paid in Tacoma, WA

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Retired Biologist Irene Creso Receives Honorary Degree Biologists and students studying the flora of Pierce County for many years to come will benefit from more than 30 years of exhaus­ tive effort by Pacific Lutheran Uni ver sity biolo gy p r o f e s s o r emeritus Irene Creso. Since the mid- 1960's and particu­ larly since her "retirement" in 1 975, Mrs. Creso has collected, preserved and verified over 6,000 specimens of plants now located in the PLU Creso Herbarium. In recognition of this effort, as well as her authorship of a book and several other botanical publi­ cations, PLU awarded her an honorary doctor of humane letters degree during May 27 Commence­ ment exercises. A Tacoman since childhood, Mrs. Creso earned bachelor's and master's degrees at University of Puget Sound before her teaching career began at PLU in 1947. From 1956-65 she was back at UPS as c u ra t o r i n the P u g e t Sound Museum of Natural History. Dur­ ing that time she also collected or verified some 6,000 specimens. Thus her total efforts at both universities involve more than 12,000 specimens. The PLU collec­ tion specializes in lower plant groups; at UPS the emphasis is on flowering plants. Since 1965, Mrs. Creso has been teaching and working with stu­ dents at PLU, either officially, or unofficially since her retirement

PLU Honors

Hellyers For Service To Community

Dr. and Mrs. David T. Hellyer, leaders in th e Tacoma community for nearly 40 years, were present­ ed Distinguished Service Awards at Paci fic Lutheran University Commencement exercises May 27. The awards were conferred by Dr. William O. Rieke, PLU president. The Hellyers have become wide­ ly known in the Northwest since 1971 when they donated 600 acres near Eatonville to the Tacoma Metropolitan Park District for a wilderness and wildlife park called Northwest Trek. Dr. Hellyer pre­ sently serves on the boards of both Northwest Trek and Northwest Trek Foundation. In 1973 the Hellyers were hon­ ored by the Washington State Legislature for "donation of this irreplaceable land to the people of Washington. " It was one of many honors they have received during

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four years ago. Though her first love has been botany, she taught wherever needed in the biology department, whether the subject was anatomy, zoology or biology. Since retirement she has under­ taken a floristic study of Pierce County vegetation, which involves collecting, identifying and mount­ ing voucher specimens and map­ ping collection sites of all plant species in the county. That and a related manuscript are in the final stages of publication. Among the documents support­ ing her degree nomination were letters from Dr. David Wake, di­ rector of the Museum of Verte­ b ra t e Z o ology, University of California- B e r k e l e y , a n d D r . Ronald Heyer, a curator at the Smithsonian Institution. Both are Mrs. Creso's former students.

Dr. William Rieke with Irene Creso

commencement their decades of service. Both have long been active and have served in leadership roles in the Tacoma Zoological Society. Their particular interests, in ad­ dition to wildlife prese rvation, have been youth and the fine arts. Dr. Hellyer, a retired pediatrician, received a state award for disting­ uished service to youth as volun­ teer of the year in 1955. Mrs. Hellyer, in addition to Girl Scout and 4-H leadership roles, for many years has offered special musical and wildlife programming for both school children and youngsters in hospitals and institutions. Mrs. Hellyer was a founding member of Tacoma Allied Arts, which she served for more than 10 years, and was a member of the Tacoma Philharmonic board for 20 years. This past year she served on the Pierce County Landmarks Pre­ servation Committee. Dr . Hellyer participated i n PLU's Design for Progress project in 1966, the TacomalPierce County Growth Policy Conference in 197273, and the Citizen's Advi sory Council for Tacoma Public Schools in 1976. He was the honorary chariman of the Mary Bridge Children's Hospital fund drive in 1976. For the past two years he has served as chairman of the PLU Collegium, an academic advisory organization .

Dr. and Mrs. David Hellyer


Arbaugh Selec ed As 1979 PLU Regency Professor

Dr. George Arbaugh accepts Regency Professorship from President Rieke.

616 Graduates Join PLU Alumni Ranks Commencement exerci s e s a t Pacific Lutheran University May 27 honored 616 bachelor's and master's degree candidates. Among them were 498 bachelor's degree candidates and 1 1 8 master's degree candidates . The PLU Class o f '79 included 1 75 bachelor of arts candidates, 108 candidates for bachelor of arts in educa ion, 88 in busllless administ­ ration, 39 in nursing, 41 bachelor of science, 38 in fine arts and nine in music. Among the candidates for mas­ ter s degrees were 66 in social sciences, 27 in business administ-

PLU Awar ds Honors To 166 Graduates One hundred and seventy-six students, just over a third of the senior class of 498, graduated with

ration, 21 in education, two in public administration, and one each in humanities and music. There were five PLU bachelor's degrees and four master's degrees c o n fe r r e d at M c N e i l I s l a n d Penitentiary Commencement Ex­ ercises May 16. One McNeil stu�� dent, Melvin Hall, received both BA and MA degrees. Commencement Weekend ac­ tivities began Saturday, May 26, with the annual Senior Nurses' Pi nning Ceremony at Trin i t y Lutheran Church. The president's reception for graduates, parents and faculty was held at the Gonyea House. It was co-hosted by the PLU Parent's Club and Alumni Board. The major university musical ensembles presented the annual G r a d u a tion Concert Saturday evening. Worship and Communion for graduates and their families was held in Olson Auditorium Sun­ day morning.

honors during PLU Commence­ ment exercises May 27. T h e p e r c e n ta g e of h o n o r graduates (35%) was identical with the percentage of honors grads at PLU over the past three years, and was down from 37 percent in 1978. Five graduates earned perfect 4.0 grade averages. They were Marilyn Fenn, an English major from Curtis, Wash.; Rebecca Haig, a San Jose, Calif. , nursing major; Robert Kratzke, a biology major from Camas, Wash. ; Steven King of Oak Harbor, Wash., a business administration major; and Nancy Van Vassen, a chemistry major from Longview, Wash. Six additional seniors graduated summa cum laude, with highest honors (3.9). They are Laureen Eerkes, engineering; David Keller, chemistry; Evelyn Cornwall and Pamela Stubsten , business ad­ ministration; Jodine Carr and Dan Anderson, education. S i x t y - s i x seniors graduated magna cum laude (3.6) and 99 graduated cum laude (3.3).

Philosophy and ethics can be applied to many of the concerns and issues of ev ryday living . Throu ghou t h i s c a r e e r , PL U philosph y professor Dr. George E. Arbaugh has addressed many of these issu s. Dr. Arbaugh has been selected as PLU Regency Pr fessor for 1 979. The award conferred annual­ ly since 1971 by the PLU Board of Regents, is the uruversity' u hi ghest faculty honor. It was presented to Dr. Arbaugh d uring PLU Com· mencement exercies May 27. The Regency Professorship is intended to recognize "demons­ trated excellence and contribu­ tions to a field of learning or public affairs." It includes a stipend fund­ ed by the Regents and special leave to allow time for recipients to pursue scholarly projects of their own choosing. Dr. Arbaugh, who has completed his 21 st year of teaching at PLU, has been recognized throughout his career for scholarship relating to the Danish philosopher Kier­ kegaard. In 1 968, the year he was named "Distinguished Teacher" at PLU, he published a 430-page book, "Kierkegaard's Authorship," with

his father, Dr. George B. Arbaugh, then chairman of the religion and philosophy department at Au gus­ tana College, Rock Island, Ill. He recently con ributed a series of articles to a Kierkegaard ency lopedia neari n g publ i cation i n Denmark . Duri ng the pas ev ral years, Dr. Ar a ugh has dealt specifically with ethical problems relating to business and the large issue of the capitali stic system, and a similar focus on the field of engineeri ng. The first resulted in PLU interim courses team-taught with business executives; the latter involved a series of short courses at Oregon Center for Graduate Studies and a workshop at Tacoma Community College. Relating philosophy to "a variety of essential human concerns " he will soon target on "The Anat omy of Love," the theme of his 1 980 Interim clas s. Arbaugh, who is completing his 1 5th year as chairman of the PLU philosophy department, earned his bachelor's degree at Augustana College and both his master's and doctor's degrees at the University Df Iowa.

President William Rieke presents 2S-year service citation to music professor Gordon Gilbertson.


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Year-En d Scenes At

LU


Notes Toward A Global Perspective

Grant Su pp orts Ex pan d e d International Stu d ies Program

L Ca p ital und Cam p aign 1 Mi ion Mark rrotals Pa

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Confirmed pledges to the PLU "Sharing in Strength" capital fund campaign officially passed the $1 million mark in early June, accord­ ing to campaign director Luther Bekemeier. The figures, as of June 15, were $ 1,033,1 57. They include a guaran­ teed minimum net i ncome of $50,000 from a producing oil well in Oklahoma and a $100,000 pledge ,armarked for science facilities cons truction. Income from the well could exceed a quarter million dollars, Bekemeier observed. Both donors wish to remai n anonymous. Campaign totals still only reflect a relatively small number (245) of donors as virtually all activity is s t i l l concentrated among the volunteer alumni and church lead­ ers who are being trained to reach out to their constituencies on be­ half of PLU later this summer and fall. Church councils of the 280 North .>acific District c o ngregations have been visited during May and June by 60 trained volunteer pas­ tor-layman teams. Purpose of the team visitations is to help the councils set goals and develop campaign orga nizati o n s within

their congregations . During the summer as many as 1,400 volunteers will be pledging their support and learning how to conduct the campaigns within their congregations. The goal of the congregational portion of the campaign is $3 million. Between late April and early June, 26 alumni banquets were held in cities as far south as San Diego, west to Honolulu and east to Minneapolis. A telephone cam­ paign will follow as the alumni work toward their goal of $500,000. "Sharing in Strength" is a five­ year $1 6.5 million campaign in­ tended to provide funds for new science and fine arts facilities at PLU as well as increased endow­ ment and student aid monies.

Pacific Lutheran University is responding rapidly to the vital n e e d f o r m o r e i n t e rnational studies and is becoming a show­ case for global education, accord­ ing to officials of the U. S. Office of Education International Studies Division. The Division, mandated by Pre­ sident Jimmy Carter to broaden the global perspectives of educa­ tion, last month awarded a two­ year grant to the three-year-old PLU Foreign Studies Program. Including first-year funding of $35,100, the two-year total could reach $90,000, according to FASP director Dr. Mordechai Rozanski. It is the eventh major grant, along with several lesser ones, awar ed to FASP. The PLU program is one of ten funded by the Division this year. "They ar looking for programs that are practical to serve as mod els for other in titution s, " Rozanski explained. "We are sti l l among the few who are making an effort to develop these kinds of programs." Purpose of the 1 979-80 grant is to de velop new cours es and revise existing courses to create new curriculum concentrations. This coming year a " regiona l" cl uster dealing with Europe and a "topic­ al" cluster on modernization and development are planned, Rozans­ ki indicated. FASP presently offers Asian and Third World concentrations. An African specialization is expected to be developed a year from now with the assistance of a Fulbright­ Hays Scholar from Africa, the FASP director said. Selected concentratiqns, plus an introductory "global p e r s p e c ­ tives" course and final indepen­ dent study or travel, qualify a student for a minor in foreign area studies. Courses cross disciplinary l i nes and in volve foreign lan­ guages and history as well as political science, literature, fine arts and others. Students are recognizing the im­ portance of awareness of interna­ tional inter-relationshops, accord­ ing to Rozanski. FASP has already become one of the largest minors

Fulbright-Hays Grant _ Awarded To PLU Prof Rochelle Snee, an instructor in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages at Pacific Lutheran University, has been awarded a Fulbright-Hays Fellow­ ship for summer study. The award provides all expenses for participation in the six-week Summer Seminar in Classical

Studies at the American Academy in Rome, Italy, plus two weeks at the Vergilian Society's Classical Summer School near Naples, Italy. Ms. Snee is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Washin gton where she received her master's degree. She is a graduate of the University of Maryland.

on campus with over 40 students enrolled. "Forty percent of every dollar earned today is related in some way to international trade," he said. "It's a shrinking world, and leaders of the 21st century will have to understand complex global issues, both in their professio ns and as informed citizens. "To date, public consciousness and knowledge has not kept pace with the changes, nor have educa­ tional i nsti tutions adapted as rapidly as they should have, " Rozanski ad ded. In add ition to academic de elop­ ments, the grant will make poss­ ible lectures by visiting scholars, sympo sia, a film series and an i nternati onal festival next year. Others active in the FASP prog­ ram deve 0 ment are an thropolo­ gy professor Dr. Carolyn B rown, and religion professor Dr. Paul Ingram. The new grant will sub­ stantially i ncrease PLU staff and faculty involvm ent.

Cover

Brass Quintet Wins Emmy The Emmy award, National As­ sociation of Television Arts and Sciences symbol of excellence, was recently presented to PLU's Washington Brass Quintet and Tacoma's KTPS-TV (Tacoma Publ­ ic Schools Channel 62). The award paid tribute to a half­ hour television program produced last summer. Entitled "Beauty and the Brass," the program featured a concert by the quintet high on the slopes of Mount Rainier. Members of the quintet were Roger Gard, PLU music professor, trombone; Dennis Hanthorn, form­ er PLU music faculty, French · horn; Wayne Tim merman and David Leavens, trumpet; an d Richard Byrnes, tuba. Kathleen Vaught is currently the quintet's hornist. The program was made possible in part by a grant from the Taco­ ma-Pierce County Civic Arts Com­ mission. Also cooperating in the effort were the Tacoma Area Chamber of Commerce, the Taco­ ma Public Library and the Tacoma Mountaineers.


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Continuing Education One High ight Of New PLU Five-Year PLan Further development of continu­ ing education programs designed to meet multi-community needs is one of the goals highlighted in a five-year planning document ap­ proved in April by the Pacific

Lutheran University B oard of Regents. The document, which forecasts economic trends, relationships with constituencies and a variety of academic goals, also encourages

PL U President William o. Rieke and Mrs. Rieke, left, greeted Norwegian Prime Minister Odvar Nordli in Seattle June 19. A rrangements for the lu ncheon honoring Nordli and his wife, right, were spearheaded by PL U regent and former vice-presid�nt for d�velopment Clayton Peterso�, center, president of the Norwegl � n-A � ncan Chamber of Commerc� I Seattle. Nordli was on a natIonwIde tour to promote Norwegian Ame rica n trq.de.

a creative new academic advising system that would assist liberal arts students in exploring a broad spectrum of career choices, ac­ cording to PLU President Dr. Wil­ liam O. Reike. He indicated that the new em­ phasis would more closely coordi­ nate career planning and place­ ment functions with academic ad­ vising. PLU will also seek to develop creative linkages between discip­ lines, as has been accomplished through the Integrated Studies Program for several years and more recently between social sci­ ences and business administration, he said. To facilitate planning, the docu­ ment forecasted a modest five percent enrollment increase over the next five years and reaffirmed the university's relationship with both its Lutheran and community constituencies. In a related action, the Regents expressed a vote of confidence in Dr. Reike by extending his ap­ pointment five years to 1985. That appointment according to board chairman Melvin Knudson, is intended to correspond with the duration of the approved long­ range plan and the recently an­ nounced $16.5 million "Sharing in Strength" capital fund campaign. The board also approved the establishment of the Helen Long Mem orial Continuing Education Program within the PLU School of

Nursing in honor of the late Tacoma resident and PLU benefactor. Donald Jerke, who has served as acting vice-president for student life for the past year, was appoint­ ed vice-president and dean for student life. Tom Anderson and George Wade of Tacoma were re-elected to their fourth and third terms respective­ ly as regents-at-large. Their elec­ tions were ratified at the annual PLU Corporation meeting in JunA The resignation from the boaI. of Dr. M. Roy Schwarz '58 was accepted. Dr. Schwarz, who has served as associate dean and pro­ fessor of anatomy at the Universi­ ty of W a s h i n gt o n S c h o o l of Medicine, has accepted a post as dean of the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver. The board also gave final ap­ proval to the 1979-89 university budget. The $17.8 million budget represents a 1 1 .9 percent increase over last year. The PLU board also approved a revised retirement policy whi would correspond with guidelin of the Equal Employee Retirement Income Security and Age Dis­ crimination in Education Acts. Clifford Olson, who served as PLU coach and athletic director during the late '20's, '30's and '40's but left the university before reaching retirement age, was hon­ o r e d w i t h t h e t i t l e fac u l t y emeritu s. The board also approved crea­ tion of a new Department of Social Work under the chairmanship of Dr. William Gilbertson. The prog­ ram was previously offered in Department of S o ciology . A thropology and Social Welfare.

cA P

'79-'80 Budget Reflects Pressures Of Inflation The 1979-80 Pacific Lutheran University consolidated budget of $1 7,785,1 94 represents an increase of 1 1 .9 percent over the 1978-79 fiscal year, PLU President Dr. William o. Reike reported follow­ ing the April 30 meeting of the PLU Board of Regents. The document reflects a small

France Honors Retired SAS President

Norway's new Ambassador t o the United States, Knut Hedemann, and his wife visited with Norwegian students during their visi � to the PL U campus in May. The Hedemanns were guests at a speCial luncheon hosted by PL U President William Rieke.

Knut Hagrup, recently retired president of the Scandinavian Air­ lines System, has been awarded the French Legiun of Honor medal for his lifetime of outstanding contributions in the field of avia­ tion. The award was presented re­ cently at the French embassy in Oslo. PLU presented an honorary doc­ tor's degree to Hagrup in April of last year.

increase in personnel for new programs next year, but primarily is the result of inflationary pre ­ ssures, Reike indicated. Such factors include faculty an staff salary increases according to a formula which averages seven percent for the campus as a whole, with larger increases going to employees in lower-paid positions, he said. Significant increases were noted in utility rates and equipment re­ placement costs. Reike also explained that stu­ dent employment budgets were raised 16 percent and there was a one percent increase in the percen­ tage the university contribut towards fringe benefi ts. The ne� rate is 19.5 percent. Earlier this year PLU reported a 9.9 percent increase in tuition and a 12 percent raise in room and b o a r d c o s t s f o r t h e 1 979-80 academic year, as well as an in­ crease in university funded stu­ dent financial aid. The PLU budget for 1978-79 was $1 5,892,445.

,


P U College

owl Tea Competes In National inals

Mrs. Joa nne Rieke, left presented a bouquet of roses to PL U's 1979 May Queen, Debo.rah Johnson of Shelton, Wash., during the 45th a nnual M�y Festi val �t PL U. Ms. Johnson, a senior, graduated May 27 wrth a degree m elementary education.

PLU Student

Journalists Earn Awards PLU student journalists were the recipients of a series of p rofession­ al awards this spring. Th e Mooring Mast student news­ paper earned a Medalist award (bighest possible) from Columbia Scholastic Press Association a ' third-place from Washington State Sigma Delta Chi professional jour­ nalism society, and an honorable mention from Region 10 SDX. In state competition the Mast was edged out only by two diffe­ ·ent submissions from the Univer­ sity of Washington Daily. Mast s u b m i s s i o n s i n c luded papers edited last year by Mark Dahle '78 of Anchorage, Alaska, and Allison Arthur '79 of Kapowsin, Wash. Mark Morris of Seattle earned a first place in Region 10 for his Mast photography, and Debra Barnes of Richland was a Region 10 third-place winner for her work wi th KPLU-FM.

A team of students from Pacific Lutheran University traveled to M iami B each, Fl a . , early this month to participate in the national College Bowl finals. The final four rounds of national competition were taped for July t e l e v i s i o n b r o a d c a s t by t h e H u ghes Network and October radio broadcast by CBS. Members of the PLU team were David Keller, Scott Kronlund and Douglas Anderson of Tacoma and Robert Kratzke of Camas, Wash. The PLU team was one of 16 teams nationally to earn a place in the championship tournament by defeating opponents in regional intercollegiate playoffs. Others include Harvard, Cor­ nell, Rutgers, Marshall, Oberlin, University of Wisconsin, Notre Dame, Tulane, Davidson, Em ory, South rn Illinois, Uni versity of Iowa, Washington (St. Louis) and San Francisco State. College Bowl has been one of the most popular game shows in his­ tory . It was originally broadcast on NBC radio from 1953-57. It was telecast from 1959-70, first on CBS, then NBC. Art Fleming, former emcee of "Jeopardy," hosts his year's prog­ ram. A PLU team previously a p­ peared on a College Bowl televi­ sion program in 1970.

PLU Student Prize Winner At Spokane Music Festival Raymond Kimura of Tacoma, a sophomore at Pacific Lutheran Un­ iversity, was the Young Artist's Prize winner at the annual Greater Spokane Music Festival in April. Kimura, a PLU music major, was a featured soloist with the Spokane Symphony, May 3 as a result of his victory. He performed Tchaikovs­ ky' s "Piano Concerto in B-Flat Minor. " The W i l s o n H i gh S c h o o l graduate has been studying with PLU music prof e s s o r C a l v i n Knapp for seven years. H e i s the son of Mr. and Mrs. Yosh Kimura, 1615 Firlands Dr. , Tacoma.

Allison Arthur

Stephen Fjelstad

Senior Ea os Bavarian Fellowship Stephen Fjelstad o f Wenatchee a '79 PLU graduate, has bee� awarded a Bavarian Government Fellowship of a full year of study at the U n i v e r s i t y o f M un i h , Germany. The fellowship came as a result of �is Fulbright Scholarship appli­ cation and was accompanied by a Fulbright-Hays Travel Grant. This past spring Fjelstad was one of four sen iors serving as Student Fellows with the PL U Center for the Study of Public Policy, Division of Soc ial Sciences. His three colleagues also received attractive post-graduate scholar­ ship opportunities. Darlene Conley of Tacoma earn­ ed a fellowship for graduate study in sociology at Northwestern Un­ iversity. Suzanne Jaedicke of Stan­ ford, Calif., received a fellowship to study agricultural economics at the University of California-Davis . Jean Kunkle of Corvallis, Ore., has been accepted at the University of Oregon Law School. Their experiences as Center Fel­ lows gave them valuable training and experience with professionals in social sciences career fields according to Fjelstad. They ali attended the Western Social Sci­ ence Association Conference at Lake Tahoe earli er this year where Fjelstad presented a paper : They also participated in and helped coordinate se veral public forums on campus this past spring.


8

LU Sponsors, Hosts Variety Of Events During Summer More than 1 ,500 youth are ex­ pected at PLU this summer to participate in a variety of summer camps which range from sports to m usic to specialty programs. Six one-week camps feature soc­ cer instruction by the Seattle Soun­ ders. There are two week-long wrestling camps, a footbal l kicking workshop an d four bas ketbal l programs. The basketball camps include a girls' stay camp, a morning day camp for beginners and a day and stay camp for persons wanting more intense instruction. In addition to the annual North­ west High School Summer Music Camp there is a piano workshop for music students. Cheerlead ing, yearbook plan­ nin g and a special pre�college program for students who will be enrolling in college this fall found out the program. Church�I'elated workshops begin with the UTE-sponsored Summer Institute of Theology beginning July 2 The Chorister's Guild spon­ sors a program for people who work with children's choirs July 22-27, and on Jul y 27 a La y Theological Workshop on "The Ca echism's Challenge to the Christian and the Church" begins. This is followed by a 10·day Word and Witness Conference, and in mid-August the ALe and Aid Assoc iation for Lutherans sponsor a Worship and Music Conference.

_

Energy Topic f Teac hers' Workshop Th i r t y - five Northwest hi gh school teachers are being selected to partic ipate in a three-week "energy workshop" at Pac ific L utheran University beginning June 25. According to workshop di ector Dr. John Herzog, the sessions will

Summer at PLU United Ministries and the United Methodist Churc es met at FLU earlier this month. Other groups meeting on campus this summer are National Affiliation for litera­ cy Advance, the Northwest Wri-

equip teachers with the under­ standing and techniques to i nclude . energy sec ons in their courses and to ser re as energy resource persons to other teachers in their schools. A $22,000 grant from the Depart­ ment of Energy allows the work­ shop to be offered tuition-free with reimbursement to participants for travel and lodging, Herzog indi­ cated. The workshop may be taken for fou r semester hOUrs credi t . The workshop covers the t chn­ ical details of various energy re­ sources as well as social, political and economic ramification s, he said. There will also be an introduc­ tion to materials. availabl e for clas­ sroom use and instruction in opera­ tion of the popular Energy-Envi­ ronment Simulator, a special com­ puter available to teachers on a loan basis from PLU. Dr. Walter Youngquist, a geolog­ ist with vast experience in energy­ related areas, joins Dr. Herzog on the workshop faculty. Guest lec­ tures and field trip s are also scheduled, the director said. Immediate application is vital to be considered for a limited number of remaining workshop openings. More i n formation is available from Dr. Herzog at PLU.

ter's Conference and the American Association of University Women Twelve high schools held gradu­ ations at PLU in May and June. Further information is available from the PLU Convention Center.

Law Workshop To Be Held At PLU In J ly Freedom of expression, privacy and discr1mination will be among the topic of a Summer Workshop on Law at Pacific Lutheran Univer­ sity July 2-20. The workshop will be conducted by Dr. David Atkinson, associate professor of political science and coordinator of the PLU Le gal Studies Program, and Dr. Carrol DeBower, professor of education. While the workshop may be of particular interest to teachers, the courses are appropriate for any­ one des iring a better understand­ ing of civil liberties in the schools, according to Atki nson. Participants may earn four or

five emester credits in either political science or education. Two courses are offered : " Civil Liber­ ties and the Public Schools," a four­ credit course; and a one-credit cours , "Law-Related Materials," in which there will be an examina­ tion of materials for use in clas­ sroo ms from k i ndergar L en through high school. Meals and room s are available PLU. Tuition is $80 per ClP1'1npo;:: tplll credit hour. For more information contact Dr. Atkinson at PL U .


9

Proj ect Aims To Relieve Fuel, Parking Shortages

A campaign intended to save students money and gas and to help relieve campus parking difficul­ ties began at PLU in mid-June . The Tacoma Transit director and other transit personnel have been work­ ing with FLU officials to encour­ age greater student use of public transportation to campus. S t ude nt s b eginnin g s u m m e r classes June 1 8 were exposed t o a series of videotaped messages, both promotional and information­ al, according to Dr. Richard Moe, dean of summer sessions at PLU. In addition, informational mate­ rials and schedules are now avail­ able at the University Center. Moe also plans to propose build-

ing an attractive s he lter at the campus bus stop. " ft's a matter of changing attitudes," he explained. ' Students might not have been receptive in the past, but I believe that now they will be, with gas shortages and high prices. "I've only been looking in to it re c ent l y , but my attitude has changed," he continu ed . " I ' v e found that I can take the bus a a downtown lu ncheon and sa ve on gas and parking with surprisingl y little lost time if I watch the schedules. The bus takes less than a half hour, and it takes that long to drive and park . " Moe also observed that busy working students would be able to use their travel time "studying or

10th Annual High School Sumnler

New Church

Music Camp To Be Held In July

Staff Training

The tenth annual Northwest Summer Music Camp for High School Students at Pacific Luthe­ ran University July 1 5-21 offers a week of intensive instrumental and choral study to students in grades nine through 1 2, according to Dr. Larry Meyer, camp director. Larry Curtis, music director at California State University-Long Beach, returns to the camp faculty for the eighth year and will con­ duct the band, Meyer indicated. Edward Harmic, director of the PLU University Chorale and other campu s choral ensembles, w�ll di­ rect the camp choir. C. Irvin Wright, conductor of the Tacoma Youth Symphony and an Olympia music educator, is the camp orchestra director. Daily music camp events include choir, band and orchestra rehear­ sals, keyboard, ensembles, clinics, jazz band, individual practice time, lessons and programs. In addition, a student variety night, evening recitals, special programs and seminars are plann­ ed. Solo and ensemble contests are scheduled throughout the week. The orchestra, band, choir and piano ensembles will be featured at a final camp concert scheduled for Saturday afternoon, July 2 l . Further information i s available from the PL U Department of Music.

Program Begins In September

C. Irvin Wright

To prepare students for voca­ tions as church staff workers, a four-year training program begins at PLU in September under au­ spices of the Department of Re­ ligion. T h e n e w p r o g r a m is b oth academic and practical according to p r o g r a m c o o r d i n a t o r D r . Stewart Govig, professor o f relig­ ion. In addition to a religious studies curriculum, students will take courses in church music, education, business admin istra­ tion and social work. A one-year internship in a local congregation will complete the student's program. Dr. Govig stated that the prog­ ram meets requirements of the American Lutheran Church policy for non-ordained commis sione d staff ministries. It can and will also serve students wishing to meet s i milar requirements in other church organizations, he indi­ cated.

Mini-Course For Larry Curtis

Teachers Covers Freeholder Topic Freeholders and county charters are the focus of an Aug. 13-16 mini­ course for civics and Washington history teachers. "Changing Forms of County Government" is the title of the course taught by political science professor Dr. Wallace Spencer. The four three-hour sessions will be held at the Board of Education Building in Tacoma. The course will prepare teachers to present units on county govern­ ment and change through the freeholder process.

Edward Harmie

talking to new friends instead of fighting traffic. " Moe also encouraged FLU sum­ mer facu lt y to spend a few minutes the first day of classes to a s s ist commuting students in setting up car pools. "Several may live in the same neighborhood and not know it unless the subject is brought up," he said. Succes s of the campaign would also m ake -a significant difference i n the parking situation near cam­ pus, which has created problems for both PLU officials and nearby residents. Moe is optimistic that with analysis and further planning the campaign can be intensified for the fall semester.

Cheerleader Camp To Be Held At PLU

A week-long cheerleader camp, sponsored by the All-Star Cheer­ leader Conference, will be held at Pacific Lutheran University July 30-Aug. 3. Camp directors are varsity cheerleaders from colleges and universities across the country, including Penn State, Nebraska, Eastern Kentucky and others. The camp is open to all skill levels from j unior high through college. Instruction includes new c h e e r s , gymna stics, rout ines, fund-raising, uniform selectio n and other subjects. Participants may commute or reside on campus. Further information is available from the PLU Conference Center.

Worship, Music Conference To Be Held At PLU One of a series of Lutheran Conferences for VVorship and Music will be held at Pacific Lutheran University Aug. 121 7. The conference will include courses for pastors, parish or­ ganists, adult choral groups and other parish worship groups. Participants will study worship education, worship services, and educational mini-courses centering on new ideas and resources for planning worship within congregations. The conference series is funded by a $34,000 grant from Aid Association for Lutherans.


News Notes

10�������������������������������. Multi-<iisciplinary approach

ew Masters Program Offers

road, Practica l Knowledge

PLU To Host Fulbrigh t ­ Hays Professor Pacific Lutheran University has been awarded a Fulbright -Hays Vi siting Profe ss o r sh i p for the 1980-8 1 academic year, according to Dr. Mordechai Rozanski, dire t o r o f the PLU Foreign Area Studies Program. A scholar from Africa, probably Tanzania or Nigeria, will be select­ ed later this year to assist in de veloping a cluster of Third Worl d-r e lated courses at PLU

under the auspices of the FASP program, Rozanski indicated. In addition to consulting and tea hing responsibilities at PLU, the scholar will be available for a v ar iety of community events which would contribute to greater un d erstanding of Third World countries, he said. Rozanski explained that the Ful­ bright-Hays Visiting Scholar prog­ ram approved awards nationwide of only four professorships from Africa for 1980-81 . Final selection of the scholar also involves the U.S. State Department, he said. This will be PLU's first Fulbright Visiting Professor since the early '50's when two Norwegian scholars participated in the program at PLU.

B oth a breadth and a depth of knowledge and ability are needed to deal with the complexities of today's social problems. A mas­ ter's degree program at Pacific Lutheran University has been de­ signed to meet that need. The new PLU master of arts in social sciences program departs from the academic tradition which demands the narrowing of one's focus as advanced degrees are pursued. T h e r e is s p e c i a l i zation, of course, observes the program di­ rector, Dr. John Schiller. What is new, he indicates, are a multi­ dis cipli nary approach and em­ phas is on applications to the realities of public and professional life. "A traditional MA in one discip­ line did not seem to be the best way to meet the needs of our students," Schiller noted, alluding to the near­ ly three years of analysis invested in development of the new prog­ ram by the Division of Social Sciences. "Problem-solving in society does not recognize disciplinary boun­ daries," he continued, "and most of our students are going directly into a problem-solving career rather than further advanced study." Three of the nine courses in the program are multi-disciplinary: introductory courses on theory and research methods, and the concluding research project. The remaining courses are taken in one of five specialized subject areas, or "tracks." The tracks include Criminal Jus­ tice, Human Rela t i o n s , I n d i ­ vidualized Study, Marriage and Family Therapy, and Psychologic­ al Counseling. Each track already has a track record of success at PLU. "A criminal justice program for persons interested in probation and parole has been offered here for eight years," Schiller said. "A human relations program has been successful for seven years." Stu­ dents have also been attracted previously to marriage and family therapy and psychological coun­ seling graduate programs. The lat­ ter, particu larly, serves a large pool of governmental agency per­ sonnel - vocational rehabilitation, employment security and others. The individualiz d study track services primarily teachers who previously sought a fifth ear of study in a -program which permitt­ ed concentration in two discip­ lines. The new program takes advan­ tage of the proven strengths of the former programs while adding broader and more practical dimen­ sions. Each track gives a student a choice of courses in at least two social sciences, and participating faculty members represent all of

PIUSe

the social scie�ces disciplines business administration. The in­ troductory courses expose stu­ dents to the methods of six social sciences. The multi-disci plinary effort was not easy. Most educators can empathize with the comment by Dr. Kathleen Blumhagen, chair­ person of the committee that con­ structed the research methods course. "It required an intellectual stretch by all of us. We :OUJ,UIt;U1JIJt#. seemed to be speaking differen languages. But the process has resulted in valuable faculty de­ velopment, and t e a c h i n g t h e course will too," s h e said. The chairperson of the theories c ourse construction c0mmittee, Dr. Arturo Biblarz, agreed. adding that there also had to be "allo­ wance for different ages and ex­ periences of students ." The three years of program preparation have included review of masters programs in social sciences nationwide, evaluation of markets served, examination of,A existing PLU programs and 1 3W alternative program models, and consultation with the director of the Teaching Sociology Project of the American Sociological Associ­ ation, Dr. Hans Mauksch. "The PLU social sciences divi­ sion has chosen to be on the move," Mauksch observed, "when it could have opted for a stance of caution and alienation as I have seen in other places ." He also cited faculty enthusiasm as "a precious com­ modity deserving to be nurtured and continued ." The symbol of the new progra ma is the shell of the chambere dW' nautilus with its separate chamb­ ers building into a balanced whole. "To me the shell suggests the interrelatedness of social systems and their fragility," explained divi­ s i o n a l c hai rman D r . James Halseth. "We sometimes tend to think of social institutions as awe­ somely monolithic and rigid. But upon further study, we learn how vulnerable they can be, just like a single human relationship." Further information on the new graduate pro gram is availa from the Division of Social Sci­ ences at PLU.


County Survey PLU Human Relations Program Pro ect Earns Begins Second Year In Bremerton Natl0n al H 0 nor

A Community Needs Asse s s ­ ment Project (CNAP), conducted for Pierce County by Pacific Lutheran University, is a 1979 National Association of Counties achievement award winner. The awards are presented to counties that have developed new programs which enhance or\. ex­ pand county services to citizens, accordi n g to NACO Pre sident Charlotte Williams. CNAP was sponsored by the county board of commissioners with strong backing from Commis­ sioner Joe Stortini. Purpose of the project was to provide public agen-

Following a promisi ng first year, the Pacific Lutheran University master's degree program in human relations is gearing up for its second year in Bremerton, according to Dr. William Hutcheon. Hutcheon is director of the unique graduate program which has been offered at Fort Lewis and on the PLU campus for seven years and began a second-year cycle of courses at Olympic College in Bremerton April 30. "People seeking a master's degree are attracted to this program because it deals specifically with the most common roadblocks to successful corporate or military careers," Hutcheon said. "In addition, supervisors are also often interested in a person's educational goals; sometimes a graduate degree is a promotion prerequisite," he added. The PLU Human Relations program can help meet both of these needs, he indicated. "We have seen the course of many careers changed for the better as a result of the program," he observed.

The program focuses on ways of working effectively with people in an organizational environment, leadership and management techniques, as well as research and counseling skills, social interven-

Dr. A rturo Biblarz

cies and p rivate organizations with information about the needs and concerns of county residents. Dr. Arturo Biblarz, PLU sociolo­ gy p rofessor, directed the project, which invol ved training of 160 CETA work rs in interviewing, supervisory an d office skills . The workers surveyed nearl 20,000 randomly selected county house­ bolds, reaching nearly 20 per cent of the county population outside Tacoma. The survey was designed by PLU facu1ty m mbers. Training of the CETA workers r

was a major project objective. Many of them had been unemp­ loyed for long periods of time. The skills they learned improved their employability. "Nearly SO per cent found permanent employment be­ fore the project ended, and more obtained jobs soon afterward," Biblarz observed. Results of the survey have been partially analyzed and have been used by the ounty's Office of Com m uni ty Deve lopment as a basis for allocating fede ral fund s. Other agencies will soon be using CNAP findings to improve deliv­ ery of services. The project was under the super­ vision of PLU 's Center f Human organization in Changing Enviro n­ ments (C HOICE), directed by Dr. Robert K. Menzel Funding came from Pierce County Manpower Planning, the Office of Communi ty Development and PLU. PLU President Dr. William O . Rieke underscored the universi ty role "because it highli ghts PLU's strong commitment to community service ," he said . "This project will contribute to the improvement of the quality of life for the cou nty as a whole, " he added.

Dr. William Hutcheon

tion, self-awareness, race relations and corporate and social behavior, according to the program director. Depending on how one uses opportunities, a mid- manage men t position can be a stepping stone to success or a dead-end, he indicated.

Critical Care Nursing Topic Of New Book The first volume of a three-part in-depth study of "C ritical Care Nursing," authored by PLU nurs­ ing professor Celeste Mason and independent critical care clinician Joan Davis, was published in May by Van Nostrand Reinhold Publish­ ing Company. According to the authors, both the first book and the ones to follow are the first of their kind to deal exclu sively with critical care nurs­ ing topic. The first volume dea s with neurological critical care. Planned volumes will cover cardiovascular and respiratory critical· care, ac­ cording to Mrs. Mason. The book is targeted at critical care clinicians parti cul arly, as wel l as n u rsing students and emergency and special care clini­ cians . Mrs. Mason has served in the PLU School of Nursing for six years after 15 years of clinical nursing. She holds a bachelor's degree from the Catholic Univers­ tiy of America and a master's degree from PLU.

Among the hundreds of persons who have participated in the program are educators, federal employees, career service personnel, and members of local governmental, corporate or industrial organizations. "We have found that the program does make possible career development and advancement opportunities," Hutcheon said. "It increases leadership effectiveness by improving abilities to manage people and to resolve conflicts. What often results is improved job performance, greater motivation and more job satisfaction. "Human Relations has also been successful because it is not a highly specialized course of study; persons from many walks of life can take advantage of it," he said. "We have found increasingly that organizations are looking for generalists with a knowledge of organizational behavior and individual behavior as it relates to organizations," Hutcheon observed. "Most important, organizations need people who have the ability to work with other people. " Each of the mne Human Rela. . tlons cours� s meets two veI1lngs a week for eIght weeks. , Th� prog. ram can be om �le ed m as lIttle as , 18 months, he mdIcated.

Student Rates Park Service Internship A PLU chemistry-biology major bas won an internship with the National Park Service at Stehek in Valley North Cascades National Park . Vicki Corbin of Sumner, Wash., will take part in a two-year alter­ n a t i n g w o r k - s t u d y p ro g ra m cooperatively sponsored by PLU and the National Park Servi ce . Dr. A.D. Martinson, PLU history professor in his ixth year of supervising the interpretive prog­ ram at Stehekin Vall ey, will super­ vise Ms. Corbin's work in the field and on campus. Another PLU studen t, J e nny Freed of Kent, Wash. , is in her final year of a similar i nternship at C rat er s of the Moon National Monument in Idaho.


News Grant S purs Develo p ment Of Coo p erative Education By Gayle Blomme

Marv TommeT11ik

Tommervik Heads PLU Q Club Marvin Tommervik o f. Parkland has been elected president of the :Pacific Lutheran University Q Club, a 900-member university patron's association, according to David Berntsen, PLU director of development. Tommervik, who served as vice­ president of the organization last year, succeed s Clare Grahn of Lakewood, who served as presi­ d ent for three years. Mrs. Thora Larson of Parkland was elected vice-president and Mrs. Inez Weir was re-elected secretary-treasure r for the third year. Newly elected Q Club directors are Mrs. Irene Alskog of Tacoma, Kenneth Christopherson and Bart Payne of Parkland, Lorin Ginther of Puyallup, Ralph Julin of Gig Harbor and Grahn. The new officers were inducted at the annual PLU Q Club banquet at the PLU University Center, May 11.

Moe Reelected As Augsburg Board Chairman Dr. Richard Moe, dean of the School of Fine Arts at Pacific Lutheran University, has been re­ elected chairman of the board of directors of Augsburg Publishing House in Minneapolis. Augsburg annually publishes mor'3 than $15 million worth of books and church supplies for the n a t i o n a l A m e r i c a n L u t h e ran Church. Dr. Moe, who has been a member of the Augsburg Board for 1 1 years, last year became the first layman in the 141-year history of the board to serve as board chairman.

Bridging the gap between the campus and the work-place will be a much-expanded opportunity for Pacific Lutheran University stu­ dents next year as the result of a $54,230 grant awarded to PLU by the U.S. Office of Education for development of the Cooperative Education Program. The program is designed to help s t u d ents perceive the relation­ ships between subjects studied on campus and experiences on the job - drawing connections , for i nst­ ance, between ethics as studied in a philosophy class and ethics in the office, or between roles people play as studied in a sociology class and role relationships at work. "Our goal is to place 100 students in employed situations during the first year," says Vern Hanson, associate professor of social work and acting director of the program. "Developing work si tuations that relate to students' career in­ terests will be a primary focus of the project," adds Hanson. " Stu­ dents will have many work situa­ tions to choose from, since the Office of Education grant supports intensive job developmen t ef­ forts. " Cooperative Ed ucation students will be able to choose from two main schedules of study. One is an a lt e r n a t i n g w o r k a n d s tu d y schedule in which four-six months at work is followed by four-six months on campus. For example, PLU has a three-year-old contract with the National Park Service which has involved several stu­ dents in work at national parks in Washington and Idaho alternating with study at PLU. Concurrent work and study is the second schedule students may choose; this schedule too is already in use by some students. "One difference the Cooperative Education Program will bring to work-study options now in exist­ ence is to help students integrate what is learned on the job and in the classroom in a more syste matic way," Hanson says. Under consid­ eration for students interested in coope rative education are in­ troductory courses that present work-related themes for several academic disciplines and weekly

or bi-weekly seminars for students during their work phase. "The Coopera tive Education Program is based on our assump­ tion that the traditional split bet­ ween liberal arts and vocation 01' career is fal se and unnecessary," says Hanson. "Work makes up a major part of the lives of Ameri­ cans, and many studies show that mean ingful work promotes the worker 's emotional and physical health. Our program will help stu­ den ts make connections between their college studies and their work, to help them find meaning in their work and indeed to identify the work that is most satisfying and meaningful for them" The U.S. Office of Education grant supporting the program in­ cludes the possibility of additional funding for a five-year period.

Vern Hanson

10 Freshmen 'Messiah' To Are National Be Performed Merit Scholars In Fou Citie Handel's "Mes siah" will be per­ formed by the PLU Choir of the West and University Symphony Orchestra next December in Taco­ ma, Seattle, Portland and Salem. The "Messiah" is one of two separate Christmas programs be­ ing presented by PLU this year. A C h r i s t m a s F e s t i v a l C o n c e rt, featuring the University Chorale, Singers and Concert Choir, will be performed on campus. Under the direction of Maurice Skanes, the "Messiah" will be pre­ sented in Tacoma at the downtown Assembly of God Church Nov. 30 and Dec. 1. A Seattle Opera House Program is scheduled for Dec. 2, and the Portland Opera House is the site Dec. 8. On Dec. 9 the Choir will appear in Salem with the Salem Symphony Orchestra, and returns to Eastvold Auditorium on campus for Dec. 14 and 16 concerts. The Christmas Festival Concert, directed by Edward Harmic, will feature well-known Christmas music. It will be held in Eastvold Dec. 8, 9 and 1 5. Further information is available from the PLU D epartment of Music.

Te n new National Merit Scholar­ ship winners are expected to enroll as freshmen at Pacific Lutheran University this fal l , according to J� mes VanBeek, d a n of admisSlOns. These students represent, schol­ astically, the top half of one per cent of high school seniors who graduated across the nation this spring. Each scholarship is worth bet­ ween $2,000 and $6,000 during four years at PLU, depending on the individual winner's financial need. This year's winners are: Scott Aaseng, St. Louis Park, Minn. ; Barbara Anderson, Edina, Minn .; Peter Anderson, Tacoma; David _ Bullock, Tacoma; Cynthia Delton, .., Buckley; Mary Gale, Wenatchee; Gregory Lamb, Seattl e ; Joyce Bowers, Marshall, Minn.; David Peterson, Kingsburg, Calif.; and Lisa Siebert, Ephrata. These students will be among the 675 or more freshmen joining the PLU student body in September. Added to returning National Merit Scholars, more than 35 students with this unique distinction will be enrolled in the fall.

e


Caste Marr· ages In India Focus Of Prof's Field Study Are many small castes in I ndia convinced that they are under­ populated, even as the country as a whole is seriously overpopulated? A grant from the Indo-American FellowshIp program is making it possible for PLU anthropology professor Dr. Carolyn B rown to spend the 1979-80 academic year in India, studying the paradox first­ hand. Estimated to be valued well in excess of $20,000, the fellowship was one of 13 awarded this year. There were 200 applicants. The project is an outgrowth of Dr. Brown's field work among the East Indians of Fiji. That r search was for her doctoral thesis, which led to her Ph.D. from the Universi­ ty of Washington last year.

Math Office Facility Under Construction

Castes are rigid social units in botb India and Fiji, according to Dr. Brown. "If the caste is small, as is often the case In Fiji, incest avoidance rules force members to marry outside the caste," she said. "Such may also be the case in India." she hypothesizes. "Even though a region may be crowded, individual castes may feel they are underpopulated. Efforts to achieve population control. very much de­ sired by the Indian government, may be doomed to failure among such groups." Her planned study of smal l caste marriage patterns may lead to new ways of dealing with the country's population proble m.

Dr. Carolyn Brown

New Regents Elected By PLU Corp .

Pier Two, Tacoma waterfront, in 1922

Local G roup T o Prepare History Of Waterfront A written, illustrated history of the Tacoma waterfront is the goal of a community project beginning in July. Dr. A.D. Martinson, professor of history, represents PLU on the planning committee, which in-

eludes representatives of the Port of Tacoma, Tacoma Longshore­ m a n ' s U n ion, Tacoma Public Schools, University of P u g e t Sound, Tacoma Community Col­ lege and private industry. The project will make research internships available to Tacoma college students. Research will include collection of oral histories a nd adminis tration of a ques­ tionnaire designed by Dr. Mar­ tinson. The questionnaire will gather detailed information based on the personal memories of area resi­ dents, Martinson indicated. The book will feature biog­ raphies and lifestyles of people who grew up with the port, port development and the role of the Longshoreman's Union. It will be available for purchase in 1 980.

Four new members of the PLU Board of Regents were elected at the annual meeting of the PLU Corporation June 15. They are Tacoma physician Roy V i rak ; Helen B e l g um , retired educato r from O cean Shore s ; David Steen, pastor of the Luthe­ ran Church of the Good Shepherd in Olympia; and Alvin Fink, an Odessa farmer. All were elected to three-year­ terms. Six regents were re-elected dur­ ing the session, which was held in Portland in conjunction with the annual convention of the American Lutheran Church, North Pacific District. Thomas Anderson, president of Concrete Technology Corporation of Tacoma, was re-elected to a fourth term. George Wade, a Seat­ tle lumber company president, and Tacoma dentist Dr. Richard Klein received third terms. The re-elections of Rev. Charles Bomgren of Bellevue and Paul Hoglund of Seattle by the Pacific Northwest Synod of the Lutheran Church in America were ratified. Anderson and Wade are regents­ at-large nominated by the board. Virak is the representative of the PLU Alumni Association. The re­ maining regents represent the ALC NPD.

A mathematic department fa­ culty office building is being con­ structed this summer neal' Ivy Hall on PLU's lower campus. The facility will include semi­ nar, computer terminal and read­ ing rooms in addition to eight faculty offices Mathematics fa­ culty. housed for several years In a wing of Tingelstad residence hall. expect to be able to move by September. The move will provide additional student housing in Tingelstad and give the math department more space. Much of the construction work i s being done by PLU maintenance department personnel to hold d9wn costs. The facility will be valued at $100,000 and is being f u n d e d by t h e " S h a r i n g i n Strength" capital fund campaign.

PLU Honors Bremerton Executive R aymond L. Soule of Bremerton, president and chief executive off­ icer for Great Northwest Federal Savings and Loan Association, has been inducted as an honorary member of Beta Gamma Sigma at Pacific Lutheran University. The announcement was made by Gundar King, dean of the PLU School of Business Administra­ tion. Beta Gamma Sigma is the only honorary society for business re" cognized by the American Assem­ bly of Collegiate Schools of Busi­ ness, of which PLU is a member. Soule, 43, holds a bachelor's degree from the University of Washington and a master's degree from PLU. He began his career with Great Northwest as a teller in 1960.


ent Conscious Conscience : The Absolute Truth

-

An address delivered by Pres ide n t William O. Rieke at the Commence­ m e n t Ex e r c i s e s fo r Charles Wrigh t Academy in Tacoma. I do not propose today that you should receive that which you might expect from a University president - that is, some lengthy discourse on a contempora r y world issue. O r even what you might expect from the educator that is in me - that is, an admoni­ tion to continued education at some great college or university. Rather, I want to express the g e n uine thrill I experience whenever I a m privileged t o ad­ dress able, eager young men and women; those who, in the most compelling sense, are both an im­ portant part of today's society and, in truth, all of tomorrow's. This thrill - plus the responsibility that is mine to do what I can to enable each of you to reach your max­ imum potential, to live life in its fullest and happiest state, whether your future education be in one of our great postsecondary educa­ tional institutions or less formally in the "school of hard knocks" this thrill and this responsibility lead me to invite your thinking for a few moments in a light-hearted way about a profound subject, "What do I really know about the real world and myself as a human being in it?" This sounds like a very heady topic. Moreover, the words por· tend yet one more rehash of a topic which stems from antiquity , has never had a satisfactory answer, and has far too m uch in it. But it a1 0 is inescapable, for it rears its head at every point of decis ion, a nd with every quiet moment of reflection. (Looking in the mi rror, the eyes that look back cannot get beyond those lack

notion of absolutes. This year 1979 - is the one-hundredth an­ niversary of the birth of Albert Einstein. Though now dead for nearly a quarter of a century, he truly crushed the notion of the great absolutes in the world of . science. Albert Einstein was an interest­ ing person. He did not speak until age three. He was rebellious and undisciplined in the German lower schools which he attended. His teachers said he was "a lazy dog" who would never amount to any­ thing. He failed an admissions exam to the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich. He finally reapplied, and was admitted, but he was still rebellious. He bor­ rowed heavily from the notes of a classmate by the name of Marcel Grossman, and finally graduated, only to find himself frozen out of any university post. He took a job as a patent clerk in Zurich. Yet even as a patent clerk he published two remarkable papers in 1905 that laid the basis for what later became known as his Theory of Special Relativity. This theory among other things completely eliminated the previously inviolate notion that time was absolute. In one of his fa mous "thou�ht experi­ ments," he constructed a situation in which an observer standing by a railroad track observed two bolts of lightning strike the track at points equidistant to the west and to the east from the observer. To this observer, the bolts appeared to strike simultaneously. B u t to another observer on board the train rapidly moving from west to east the bolt on the east struck first. Which observer is wrong? Neither; for time is relative, not absolute. It is relative to the mind of the observer. As if that were not a great enough blow to many of the sacred absolutes, Einstein struck again just a little over a decade later when his writings on general re­ lativity pictured the cosmos, not in the universally accepted three di­ mensions, but in four - the fourth being a time-space continuum where neither was absolute and where peculiar properties existed . These properties allowed the time­ space continuum to be warped by large gravitational masses so that even massless light would be bent toward such masses . "Preposter­ ous ! " said the people of the da y. "It is an absolute that pure energy, which is what light is, has no mass and therefore cannot be attracted by a gravitational field.

Dr. William Rieke

holes, the pupils. The experience for me is similar to that which Prin c e t o n c o s m o l o g i s t , J o h n Wheeler, calls t o mind when he described the mysterious inters­ tellar "black holes ." What is in them, and what lies behind the pupils reflected in the mirror? Moreover, the topic need not be onerous, for something of value can be learned by considering only two brief questions: 1) Where ultimately are the abso­ lutes in life; and 2) If these absolutes relate to humankind, what ideally should be the interaction between them and persons - between the "real world" and you and me? Most often we teach and behave as if we alway could recognize and were dealing with absolute truths. For instance, in the clas­ sroom, mathematical equations, problems , and solutions deal with precise figures; we learn the struc­ ture of foreign language through tense, gender. Our behavioral and speech patterns are governed by "certainties" which we accept. But these are very imit d at best and in fact are rather arbitrary abso­ lutes, fo they are dependent on rules we make and can change. They are not absolutes at all. In fa ct, when one looks for more general absolutes in the world the great cosmic and universal certainties - we encounter at once the fact that he great truths seem not to be absolute, but rather seem to be relative. The twentieth cen­ tury has been very hard on the

'Ultimately, absolutes are in the consciouness of humans'

But then in 1919, British as­ tronomer Eddington, under condi­ tions of total eclipse, proved it. And today, M.I.T.'s Shapiro bounces radio waves off solar masses be­ hind the sun and finds them bent by the sun when they return to earth. When asked what he would have done had he been wrong in his theory Einstein said, "I would feel sorry for the poor Lord, for the calculations are correct." _ Even as willing and able a ,:w Einstein was to accept the relative rather than the absolute nature of things, he met his "comeuppance" when, in trying to develop one theory called a unified field theory which would unite and explain all physical, mathematical, and chem­ ical knowledge, he encountered the work of a young German physi­ cist by the name of Heisenberg. Heisenberg, working on quantum mechanics, which had to be in­ cluded in any unified field theory, had described the so-called "un­ certainty principle. " This principle held that it was impossible eve in principle to know the exact position or velocity of any particle because the very act of observing the particle would change it. At this Einstein, who was quite used to uncertainty, had had too much. " God does not play with dice ! " he exploded. There must be some order, some absolute somewhere ! Yet even that seems incorrect, for the fascinating studies of Cam­ bridge physicist Stephen Hawkins in the last four y ears indicate that at least in many places in the .. un iverse, namely those mysterious . black holes of space, ju st the opposite of order exists - rather perfect entropy or complete ran·· domness . In these black holes, Hawkins say s, "God not only plays with dice, but He sometimes throws them where you can't see them." ow if all of this hasn't done som ethin g t o make u s question the notion of absolutes I invite you to play a simple game with me that I used to play with freshmen medic­ al students who were finishing t h e i r y e a r o f n e u r o ­ anatomy / n e u r o p h y s i ol o g y under me when I was o n the Iaculty of the Uni ver sity of Washington Medical School. "Prove," I would say, "Prove absolutely that I am as I appear to be." They of course would attempt to prove it b y noting that they could see me, and each time they looked I appeared t be the same as the time before (that is , the visual impression was consis-


,

15

(Cont. from p. 14) tent). It was always intriguing then for me to point out that neither they, nor anyone else, had actually seen me. What they "saw" was the light reflected from me, and more accurately what that light did to photoreceptor cells in the eye, to electrical patterns on the optic nerve, and finally to the brain. They only assumed they "saw" me ! And there is the key - the only absolutes that exist are real be­ cause of the consciousness of hu­ man b e i n g s . To the que stion, "Where ultimately are absolutes?" we must respond, "In the con­ sciousness of humans." Humans are conscious. And for those of us who believe that it is impossible to derive something from nothing, we would add that our consciousness, our awareness, is a model of and exists only because it has derived from the supreme consciousness that we recognize as God. But humans are not the only beings that are conscious. Humans are set aside from other conscious beings by having a further charac­ teristic called conscience. This is that which accuses and excuses us. It is that through which our God communicates to us. Conscience is an undeniable experience which, unlike our friends in the lower order of mammals, allows humans to know right and wrong and e nables us to choose between them. H umans, then, are conscious conscience - aware and posses­ sing power to choose the better over the worse. In this remarkable state we mirror, albeit imperfect­ ly, the supreme person and charac­ teristics of our God. If this be so, what then should be the interaction between the abso­ lutes - those other conscious con­ sciences (that is, the other hu­ mans) - and ourselves ? Summed up simply, we as con­ scious consciences need to step forward to be unafraid to dare . : . willing to lead . . . eager to em­ brace . . . Today as never before our society, not to mention our r e s p onsibility to God, requires these tra its. An un erstanding that the na­ ture of absolutes is totally depen­ dent on the conscious conscience that is humankind, a commitment [0 the belief that this is real only . because God s real, and a conse­ quent dedication to being unafraid to dare, willing to lead and , above all eager to embrace, will see each of us successfully into his or her future.

Annual Fund Participation Vital In '79

Insurance Is A Charitable Gift Option

B y David Berntsen Direct�r of Development

By Ed Larson Director of Planned Giving

An important objective for Q Club members this year is the encouragement of PLU Annual Fund participation, at the Q Club level ($240/yr. or more) hopefully, but all gift amounts are needed and welcome! It's vital that we keep the Annual Fund strong, even as many of us are devoting both time and re­ s o u r c e s to t h e " S h a r i n g i n Strength" capital campaign. The Annual fund provides scho­ larships for students and contri­ butes to the ongoing operation of the university. * * *

We made it! The sign on our office door announces that our 900th Q Club member joined May 9 at 9 : 09 a.m. The momentum of the last 90 days of the drive brought the total to 906 by the hour of the annual Q Club banquet, where some 400 members enjoyed pre­ sentations by emcee Ed Larson, President William Rieke and Ad­ miral James Russell. The success of the drive is a tribute to our members. Our usual growth rate is two members a week; to reach our goal we realized 14 per week during the last three weeks ! During the drive John Herzog recruited seven, Clare Grahn and Ken Christopherson brought in five each, Jerry Benson signed four new me mbers and Lorin Ginther and Thora Larson logged three each. In all, 29 members recruited 62 during the final 100 days. Thor Tollefson and Herzog, both Q Club directors, were winners of Hawaiian vacations resulting from a drawing at the banquet. Tollefson won the previously publicized do­ nated Waikiki trip. Herzog was the winner of a recently donated stay at a luxury Maui condominium. T h o r a La r s o n a n d Gary Habedank were picked a s alter­ nates. Included in the drawing were names of members who re­ cruited new members during the 100 days' drive.

Insurance - for what purpose? To provide for funeral expenses? To provide a cushion for support of a surviving spouse? To provide liquid dollars to pay possible estate taxes? These are but a few of the reasons people purchase life insur­ ance . However, there is another use of life insurance that often is overlooked; namely, as a means of charitable giving. Within the last month two indi­ viduals have given life insurance policies to PLU. By making a relatively small annual premium payment, these people have begun the process by which PLU will one day receive a sizeable gift. (This is but one method of several that may be used to provide a charitable gift by using life insurance.) By making the University the owner and beneficiary of t h e policies, the donors are able t o deduct the full amount o f the premium payment as a charitable deduction. In addition, the donors have the opportunity of designat­ ing where they would like the gift to be used. For further i nformation on l ife insurance as a charitable gift, either contact your personal insur­ ance representative or Eltpr LarSQD Director of PIBDned Giving Office of Development Pacific LutherBD University Tacoma, WA 98447 (206) 531-6900 ext. 232

Boeing Company employe es : Boeing will match gifts of their employees to PLU (it was not on the list of matching gifts companies in the April Scene.) If you have donated, please get a matching gift form from your personnel office.

Parents Corner By Milton Nesvig Executive Associate to the President S u mmer potluck su ppers for new and returning students, pa­ rents, and friends are being plann­ ed for the Portland, Spokane and Seattle areas. At this writing the Portland gathering has been set for Aug. 15. No dates yet for the others. Notification as to date, time and place will be sent to those living in those areas. Parents Council members, as­ sisted by other parents in the Tacoma area, will serve as gree­ ters to new and returning parents and students when the residence halls open for the fall semester Friday, Sept. 7. They will also assist as hosts at a reception for parents and students at 3 :30 p.m. that day in the University Center. Parents, alu mni and friends from Montana, Idaho, and Wyom. ing attended the Parents Club lunc­ heon May 19 in the Sheraton Hotel, Great Falls. The Rev. Palmer Geo­ de, Parents Council member, ad­ dressed the group of 140 persons who were present. He was accompanied by his wife, Beverly, also a member of the Council. Parents Darlyn and Olaf Magis of Great Falls did a great job of handling local arrangements for the luncheon. President and Mrs . William Rieke were at the Spokane area Parents Club dinner April 25. Dr. Rieke delivered a message on the state of the university and held an open forum discussion . After that the group went to Central Lutheran Church for a oncert by the Un­ iversity Chorale. Hundred s of parents were on c a m p u s for C o m m e n c e m e n t weekend, May 25-27. Among them from were Mike Meyer's famil Chicago. His father flew his own plane out so that he would be s ure to be present. The Choir of the West will be performing Handel's "Messiah" in December. In conjunction with three of these concerts, the Pa­ rents Club will sponsor dinners. They will be held in Seattle, Dec. 2; Portland, Dec. 8; and Salem, Dec. 9. 1


s

Thank you, PLU

B y Ronald Colton Alumni Director

During the past several years that I have served as Alumni Director at PLU we have periodic­ ally received letters, or more fre­ quently heard from alums in per­ son or on the phone, sharing their feelings about what PLU meant to them. Following is such a letter that I feel exemplifies these many unsolicited responses : Dear Alumni Club: Larry and I would like to thank you for the financial aid you gave us during our time of need & crisis. Do you like to hear stories about students ? Well, there we were, Larry's junior year of col­ lege, his first at PL U, and I had a new job. Four months later we found out (to our surprise) we were going to have a baby. All went well and we saved like mad - until at 5 months along I had to quit my job, at doctor's orde rs, due to false labor. Now what ? Larry applied for financial aid and between BE06, you and my parents (whom we 've paid back) we made it. We feel very strongly about making your investment pay off. Would love to send you a check for $300, but now Larry is in graduate school (and hopefully we 're not expecting). We are enclosing a small gift this year. Hopefu lly we will be able to increase it gradually over the next few year. Thank you ever so much, Larry, Ca thy & Melody Williams

I have taken the liberty of chang­ ing the names but this could be one of any of many alums, and the story is essentially the same for all of them. The school and all that goes with it - faculty, curriculum, activities, friends, was there at a crucial time for this couple and it

left its mark and I am sure that

they left their mark. Now they are ready to begin doing what they can in a tangible way of repaying that intangible thing called an educa­ tion from Pacific Lutheran Univer­ sity.

Tour Accompanies Lutes To Hawaii In December A six-day holiday trip t o Hawaii Dec. 1 1-16 is being planned in conj unction with a series of PLU basketball games in the Islands,'

Experience; Commitment

that has led to the development of Sharing in Strength." You and I must consider mak­ ing a commitment to P.L.V. 1 realize the needs and desires of daily life all too often call upon s carce resource s for fulfill­ ment, but I am also very aware of what I believe and how P.L.U. helped me confirm and develop my sense of reason and right . This reflection always pro vides me with the spirit and commit­ ment to bring P.L.U. into my financial planning. I have heard alu ms a n d

friends of P.L.U . say, " My gif would be s mall, the University probably would not even miss it." I can only remind you that in the early history of the Univer­ sity its administration, faculty and staff took very h um ble jobs in the comm unity along with their P.L.U. responsibilities to help il keeping the ins titution strong. There are no gifts too s mall . It takes all of us together to help provide the stre ngth to . carry on P.L .U.'s excellence. ., Please join me in a commit­ ment to P.L.U.

By John McLaughlin

President, PLU Alumni Association

I am sure you know what I am talking about when I speak of an experience in Collegiate Educa­ tion at P.L.U. The experience refers to three elements which I believe are the cornerstones from which P.L.U. provides its following with the opportunity to grow. The first element is to afford the individual 's total being to grow. A strong academic envi­ ronment is coupled with the social, cultural, physical and spiritual aspects of life to allow a more complete pursuit of reason and right. The second cornerstone is founded in P.L. U . ' s atmo s ­ phere. There exists an unusual spirit of openness and concern among students, faculty and staff providing a unique atmos­ phere for teaching and reflec­ tion. T he fi nal cornerst one of P.L.U. is you and I. We have experienced what P.L.U. has and have carried the sense of reason and right to our families, spiritual life, community and vocation. It would . seem we have just about completed the circle. However, there is one last item we must consider. Now that you and I have left the physical place we must assist P.L.U. in continuing on in its effort to help provide for those who are in P.L. U.'s future. I am sure you are aware P.L.U. is deeply involved in a program known as "Sharing in Strength." P.L.U. believes "its continuing strength and dedica­ tion to service have great im­ portance for the quality and spiritual fiber of American life. It is to affirm and assure both according to alumni dire c t o r Ronald Coltom. Alumni, parents, friends and stu­ dents are invited to participate. The $315 (approx.) cost covers round trip air fare and five nights at the Park Shore Hotel on Oahu. The Lutes play Brigham Young­ Hawaii Dec. 12 and the University of Hawaii Dec. 14-15. Further information is available from the PLU Alumni Office.

Former May/est Dancers plan reunion

Mayfest Dancers Plan Homecoming Reunion Nov. 3 The Mayfest Dancers have been a popular tradition at PLU for 45 years. PLU Homecoming '79 Saturday, Nov. 3, will pay tribute to the hundreds of stu­ dents, past and present, who have kept that tradition alive.

1 979-80 Regent Representatives Suzanne (Skubinna) Nelson '55

All of the returning dancers will participate in the featured part of the alumni banquet program in Olson Auditorium Saturday evening. Rehearsals will begin in Olson at 8 a.m. • Other reunions include th� classes of '74, '69, '64, '59, '54, '49, '39, '29 and the Golden Years Club. The 1 : 30 p.m. Homecoming football game pits PLU against Willamette. An August alumni mailing will provide further details.

Alumni Board

Carol (Bottemiller) Geldaker �7 West Lin'n, Ore.

Anita (Hillesland) Londgre

Ken "Skip" Hartvigson, Jr. '65 Seattle, Wash.

Michael A. McKean '68 Gig Harbor, Wash.

�9 Tacoma, Wash.

Tacoma, Wash. Frederick O. Muenscher x'55 Everson, Wash. Roy H. Virak, M.D. '52 Tacoma, Wash.

Members-At-Large One-Year Appointments Esther Ellickson '58 San Diego, Calif. Jennie Hansen '34 Honol ulu, Hawaii James Kauth M.D. ' 53 San Francisco, Calif. Michael Ford '68 Portland, Ore. Martha Miller '77 Seattle, Wash. Terms Expire 1980 Kenneth J. Edmonds '64 Puyallup, Wash.

Ronald A. Miller. M.D. '65 Whitefish, Mont.

Terms Expire May 1981 Gayle (Severson) Berg '72 Martinsdale, Mont. Stephen M. Isaacson '76 Boise, Idaho JoAnn (Nodrvedt) Briscoe '52 Anchorage, Alaska Carol (Haavik) Tommervik '40 . Tacoma, Wash.

Terms Expire May 1982 Karin (Pihl) Leander '66 Mt. Vernon, Wash.

Rev. Charles W . Mays '62 Renton, Wash. Terms Expire May 1983 Otis Grande '38 Fox Island, Wash. Karen (Fynboe) Howe '73 Fox Island, Wash. Paul Kusche '70 Gig Harbor, Wash. George Nowadnick '52 Snohomish, Was h. Executive Secretary Ronald Coltom '61 PLU Ex-Officio Student Rep. Stephen Rieke, President ASPLU Past President John McLaughlin ' 7 1 Federal Way, Wash.

qA

.,


7

No. 1 Life Insurance Agency Go al Of Alums

Ron Miller

Karen Howe (Fynboe)

Carol Geldaker (Bottemiller)

George Nowadnick

• Alumni Elect

New Board Members

e

Dr. Ronald A . Miller ' 6 5 o f Whitefish, Mont., has been elected pre.. ldent of the PLU Alumni As­ sociation for the 1 979-80 academic year, according to alumni director Ronald Coltom. Miller, a family physician, also erves as cl inical instructor in famiTy practice at the Uni versity of Washington and is educ ation cbairman of the Montana Ac�demy of Family Physicians. Carol (BottemiUer) Geldaker '57, a substitute teacher, tennis coach, playground aide and Girl Scout leader from West Linn, Ore., is first vice-president. S e c o n d v i c e - pr e s i d e n t i Mic hael McKean '68 of Gig Har­ bor. He is currently general cou n­ sel for the Forest I nvestm en t C o r p o r a t i o n a n d i s fo r m e r Washington State assistant attor­ ney general. Roy Virak '52, a Tacoma family physician, represents he alumni on the PLU Board of Regents. He is a former alumni association presi­ dent. New directors elected to four­ year terms are Otis Grande '38, Karen (Fynboe) H we '73, Paul Kusche '70 and George Nowadnick '52. Grande is a retired junior high school principal presently serving on the ALC board of the Division

Mike McKean

Roy Vtrak

Paul Kusche

for College and University Ser­ vices Both G rande and Mrs. Howe, a homemaker, live on Fox Island, Wash . Kusche, an operations director for Nalley Fine Foods in Tacoma. was president of the Redeemer Lutheran Church council last year. Nowadnick is principal of Snohom­ ish High School in Snohomish, Wash., and is president-elect of the AsSOCIation of Washmgton State Principals. Appointed to one-year terms as board me mbers-at-large w e r e Esther Ellickson '58 of San Diego and Jennie Hansen '34 of Honol ulu, incumbents ; Dr. James Kauth '53 of San Francisco, Michael Fo rd '68 of Portland, and Martha Miller '77 of Seattle.

Two former PLU Alumni Associ­ ation presidents are the keys in the rapid development of a life insur­ ance "superagency. " T ey are Robert Nistad '53 of Seattle, who headed the alumni board in 1 968-69, and LeRoy Spitz­ er of Bremerton, the association 's president three years ago. Nistad heads the Seattle-based Lutheran Mutual Life agency that he describes as having been "re� bo rn" two years ago. At one time the agency ranked 38th in the nationwide firm; last year it was among the company leaders and was aiming for number one. Spitzer, the agency's leading agent, accounted for nearly $5 m i l l i o n i n p roduction, w hich placed him among the top agents in the country. While last year's $16 million agency production was a banner year for the Nistad agency, it is expected to be only the beginning. "We have a plan to give us $84 million in .1 984," Nistad explained There were 13 full-time persons on the staff this past year; the plan call for 4S full-timers in the two 21-person units, he indicated. Nistad ran the agency alone for many years before beCOming con­ vinced that expansion of the man­ agement team would spur growth. He made Frank Stark, one of his best agents, upervisor in 1977. and Stark recruited eight new agents over the next two years. Nistad then moved Stark up to unit manager and selected Ed Scrivner as his supervisor. The three now

work as a management team , and the concept has led to far greater agency efficiency and production. Spi tzer is the firm' s perennial leading agent. Nistad said, "The best way to build an agency is to get a LeRoy Spitzer and build a shop around him. "He is the kind of super agent that managers and general agents dream about - the kind that i not only productive, but cooperative and interested in [be growth of his associates It happens that Stark was re­ oruited by Spitzer four years ago. The "rebirth" of the Nistad agen­ cy rated a feature article in the May issue of Manager's Magazine. .••

Former PLU Professor Earns Pulitzer Prize Joseph Schwantner, former as­ sistant professor of music at Pacif­ ic Lutheran University ( 1968-69) has been awarded the 1979 Pulitzer Prize for music. His winnin g composition, "Af­ tertones of Infi nity," was first performed las t Jan. 29 in New York City.

Schwantner is presentl y tea h­ ing at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, N Y .

Graduation Ends 2S Years Of Knutsons At PLU The graduation of Dean Knutson last month brought to an end a quarter century during which four members- of the Knutson family of Bellevue, Wash.. have attended PLU. David Knutson, now a PLU relig­ ion profes 'or, was the first. He enrolled in 1954 and graduated in 1958 after serving as student body presi dent. Denn ' s enrolled the following year and graduated in 1 962. He is now a dermatologi. t and chairman of the board of directors of Great Plains Clinic in Sioux Falls, S. D. Jean, now Mrs. Frank Greif of Seattle, attended PLU from 196466. There followed a 10-year lag before Dean enrolled in 1 975 (though David joined the faculty in '69). His degree is in business administration. A second generation skein could start soon. Kari, the oldest daugh­ ter of David and Marilyn (Force '59), is 14. Mother and father of the Knut­ son clan are Ruth and Bud Knutson of Bellevue.

Mr. and Mrs. Bud Knutson of Bellevue applaud their four children, all PLU alumni. They are from left, Jean x '68, Dennis '62, David '58 and Dean '79.


18

Former Faculty

1936 Mrs. EVA HARDTKE (Neva Olson) retired this past year. She

l.n

taught

K n ne w i k ,

Wash.,

1978

from 1950 t o a n d prior to that taught in Midland School in the Franklin Pierce Di5tri t In Tacoma, Wash. H er h u s b a n d , Ralph, will ret ire from the Ken­ newick School 1979. They traveling in

District

in May

hope to do some their retirement

years. They have two children,

both of whom went to PLU; De­ nnis '66 of Tacoma and Judy Robbins x'61 of Woodland, Calif.

1939 Rev. ALFRED M. KARLSTAD has been serving as pastor of the Lutheran Church of the Cross in Sacramento, Calif., since October 1977. He has previously served congregations of the ALC in San Francisco and Auburn, Calif., and in Tacoma and Poulsbo, Wash., as well as Sierra Vista, Ariz. Four of their children have also attended PLU; Janice (Karlstad '66) Fosen is now a pastor's wife at Beaver­ ton, Ore. Curtis '67 i s a U. S . Army

C haplain

located

at

Ft.

Ril e y , Ka n . ; Judy ( K a r l s t a d ) F l a s h e r u d living in Renton, Wash.,

Cliff and Ella Olson An open house celebrating the 50th wedding anniversary of Clif­ ford and Ella Olson will be held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Cook (their daughter) Sunday, Ju­

and

Debby

( Ka r l s t a d )

Saethre, whose husband is a stu­ dent at Luther S e m i n ary, S t . Paul. Minn.

1940

Paul, Minn. The

WALT

SIMONSO N

retired

ly 22. It is co-hosted by their son, James Oberg. Former PLU coach nd athletic director, Cliff was r e c e n t l y accorded faculty

June (Apland x'47) live in Sac­

michael, Calif. He and his wife,

emeritus rank by the PLU Board

ramento.

of Regents. He ha d left PLU employ before retirement age

1948

J im i s currently president of

Meritorious Service Medal has been awarded to Chaplain (Lt.

the Washington Vocational As­ soc iation. He works with all sec­

Col.)

o n d a ry voca t i on a l e d u c a t i o n , career ducation a n d industrial

EARL

Lackland

W.

of

MILBRATH

AFB,

Tex.

Earl

at

now

arts programs for Clover Park

was honored for outst anding duty performance at Upper Heyford RAF Station, England.

staff member of Clover Park Vo­

MILTON C. HANSON i s living

Colorado

Department

of

Social Services in Denver.

1954

Pas t o r

and

in

Mrs .

have

JOHN

H.

p u r c ha se d

Bismarc k,

N.D.

a

and

have moved from the parsonage of Trinity Lutheran Church. John has served 24 years at Trinity Lutheran and has been in the ministry for 27 years. The first years

he

N.D.

spent

Their

at

Dunn

oldest

son,

Randall, was urdained last Aug. 29 and is now a pastor at Epping,

his

activities

sented a duo-piano recital with colleague Julia Hennig on May 6, 1979, at Concordia College, River Forest, Ill. She has been selected to appear i n 1979-80 edition of Who's Who o f American Women .

1956

adaptable

TERRANCE R . BROWN is vice president and assistant superin­ tendent of instruction at Lassen College, Susanville, Calif., where he lives with his wife, CORKY (Han tala '60).

1958 BASEHORE

heads

the

Circle Theater Acting Company at Indio High School in Indio, Calif. He was instrumental in the construction of drama facilities the

among

high the

school.

finest

They

are

high

s c h oo l

JAMES

CAPELLI,

super-

.s o r o f vocational a n d career education K-12 in Clover Park School Dist. 400, has been award­ ed a Professional Service Award for 1 979 by the Washington State Association for Supervision and C urriculum

Develo p m e n t

(WSASCD) . Special recognition of Jim by the association is based on his contribution toward comprehen­ sive programs and the improve-

entire

life has

been

his wife, Martha, still serves as a cook with PLU Food Services.

infusing

curriculum, meets basic educa­ tion act requirements, and estab­ In

J uly

1979

BRUCE

ELLIS

will receive his master of public administration degree in Health S rvices Management. For the past fourteen years Bruce has been employed by the Cou nty of Riverside, Calif., in both the So­ cial

Serv i c e

Department

D e p a r t ment.

The

an d past

several years he has been direc­ tor of Riverside County's Crippl­ ed Children Services. Recently he was promoted to social work supervisor of the Inland Counties Developmental

Disabilities

Ser­

tor of nurses at Desert Hospital, Palm Springs, Calif.

1959 Dr. SETH E . ANDERSON, JR., recently opened his own clinic in Santa

Barbara,

Cal i f.

He

had

served for many years i n the U. S. Navy and at the time he left active duty was Chief of Internal Medicine at the U. S. Naval Hos­ pital, Bethesda, Md.

WILLIENA M . ( B o o n e ) A U ­ SHERMAN is materials special­ ist for Skills For Consumers Ap­ plied Today (SCAT) in the Osceo­ la County School District of Kis­ simmee, Fla. SCAT started when an Osceola County School Board m e m b e r s a i d y e a rs ago he thought students needed more education.

Because

teachers materials weren't

available, the county schools ag­

ing as the administrative assis­

reed to create them. The state Department of Education ga e its blessing and federal funds for

tant to the director of the Los A n g e l e s C o m m u n i t y C o l l e ge Overseas, which serves t he milit­

rooms on the Beaumont Middle

innovative education. The SCAT staff

started

working

in

spare

ary personnel o f the Air Force, Marines, Navy and Army. She

S c h o o l campus. Now that the booklets are rea d y , the s t a f f

has served as secretary to the president of PLU for almost five

liena and

won't disband immediately. Wil­

Portland

State

University;

ROBERT

and

Community College in Seattle. Besides this she has disting­

have

Wash.,

which IS made u p o f two-thirds J a p a n e s e a n d a bout one-third foreign women. She has served

in

two

G r ayland,

where

he

works

in

re­

program management for the 767 division of the Boeing Company. He joined Boeing in 1956 as a mechanic, graduated from PLU in 1960 and is now responsible

to have a Japanese president of

for planning and implementation and monitoring plans and sales

the group with a vice president from each of the Japanese and t h e f o r e i g n gr o ups, but t h e

commitmen ts program.

Japanese strongly suggested that the policy be cha n g e d . T h u s , Isabel became the first from the American-Foreig n side since be­ fore reversion back to Japan in

Isabel (Harstad)

1 972.

Watness

church

purchased

bogs

forestration. NEIL ST ANDAL is director of

as v i c e - p r e s i dent, leading the foreign (mainly American side) and is presently the president of the organization. The policy was

is directing the l o c a l choir in Okinawa.

and

Wash. Bob is currently employed by W e y e r h a e u s e r - R ay m o n d ,

Club

Besides these activities, Isabel

ERICKSON

recen t l y

cranberry

uished herself in leadership of an intercultural group, the Okinawa Women's

E.

his wife MERRI ( N e l s o n ' 6 2 ) have left the active mini stry and

curriculum advisor at the Central

I n t e r n a t i o nal

a co-worker will be­

come program trainers, conduct­ ing teacher workshops.

years; secretary in the Lutheran Student F o u n d a t i o n o ff i c e at

for

1961 Mter six years i n Fort LaudeT­ orking as pu blic rela­

dale, Fla . , tions

director

ith

the

N orth

Broward Hospital District, MEG CARTER recentl y a cepted a position in B irmingham, A a., as

associate director of corporate public relatiOI s for B rookwood Health Services, Inc., a hospital operatIOn and management firm currently owning 01" managing ttlll hospi tals and three alcoholism r ecov er y c e n te rs in s i x s tates, which means that Meg spends a lot of time going to and from airports.

_ _

Her younger daughter, Patty, is finishing the 9th grade at Ves­ taruchi Hills High School in Bir­ mingham (Kathye

nd d aughter Kathleen Carter) has

just com­

pleted her freshma n year at PLU Meg has r ceived a master's degree i n administration supervi­ sion, curriculum and instruction and is currently working on her Ph.D. in hospital ad mini stration and allied health services prog­ rams at the University of Birmin­ gham School of Public & Allied Health. KAREN (Sahlstrom) NICKEL, Ph. D . , took on a new job and is now assistant director of endocrinology

at

BioScienc e

_ _

Laboratories, Van Nuys, Calif. Her husband, Phil, also a Ph. D . , is c h a i r m a n of D e p a r t m e n t of Biological Sciences, C a l i for n i a L u t h eran College in Thousand Oaks, Calif., and is completing his tenth year there. They have two children.

1962 BILL

SISSEL

x'62 , has

appointed director of

been

urchasing

for Teledy NE Wah Chang Al­ bany Corporation i n Albany, Orc. They are manufactu rers of rare

1960

and

in Okinawa, Japan. She is work­

Ed's

of

booklets, well-organized courses

is having a very interesting time

day.

system

vices. His wife, Dorothy, is direc­

ISABEL (Harstad) WATNESS

closely associated with PLU, and

de­

career education into the existing

Health

1946

Ed Hinderlie, long-time PLU groundskeeper, now retired, re­ cently celebrated his 75th birth­

been

velopment of a unique teachers' manual which provides an easily

consumer

Ed and Martha Hinderlie

has

lishes a means of evaluation.

EVANGELINE RIMBACH pre­

at

District. He has been a

cationa l-Technical lnstitute since 1969 and has had the K-12 voca­ of

in Littleton, Colo., and currently is supervisor, C h i l d r e n ' s S e r ­ vices,

School

tional assignment since 1976 One

1950

facilities in Calif.

N IC OLAI

Center,

a wa r d

serves at Lackland with a unit of the Air Training Command. He

G

house

second

ment of instruction which .results 1 n effective and efficient student learning.

the

ROD

from teaching i n 1975 after 20 years at Starr King School, Car­

three

N.D. SOil, Steven, i s a first-year student at Luther Seminary i n St.

the

767

m eta I s people.

a nd

employ over

1600

EN·­ ­

MARILYN GAY (Kindred) a pu b lic

GLISH is employed as health

researc I nurse with the

Departm e n t

of

E p i d e m i ol og y ,

School of Public Health, University of Washington. Marilyn and daughter,

Disa,

reside

in

Bel­

levue.

1963 LOIS M . (Fi scher) HUTCHINSON and Rev. Robert S. Hutchinson, were married July 15, 1978. Bob's daughter, Dawn, gave birth to a daughter on May 5 1979 so Lois and Bob are now randpa­ rents. Other children at home are Randle, IS, Steve, 12, and Scott, They live in Hillsboro, Ore.

g

8. _ _


1968

1965 Lt. Col. and Mrs. Henry L. H o w e ( PE GGY OGDEN) have moved from Stuttgart, Germany to Ramstein AFB, Germany near Kaiserslautern. They have been on

50

volksmarches,

walking

over 550 km. Peggy practices the organ and is active in Protestant

PHIL FORMO, his wife an

d a u ghters, Carrie,

Jean

6,

an

d

KrIsta, 4, are living in Hebron,

Neb., where Phil is serving his Luth er Theological Seminary in­ ternship at St. Paul's Lutheran Church. Jean is a free lance ar­ tist and calligrapher.

Women of the Chapel. She is also a Brownie leader. They have two

the

EU GENE W. B LACK has been appointed manager in the person­ al l i nes d e p a r t m e n t a t t h e P ho en ix, . Ariz . offi ce o f The Travelers Insurance Companies. He joined the companies i n 1963 as a service representative at Seattle, Wash., and in 1965 was t r a n s ferr ed CalIf., sociate ye a r.

to

Los

Ange l e s ,

here he was named as­ underwriter l a t e r that He

subsequen tly

served

Curriculum annual,

Dev elop­

a

manager. I n 1970 he was assign­

IS

In

th� area West of the Mississippi. Mike and Linda reside in Mission Viejo, Calif., with daughter Liza

me same capacity. He

married

and

they have

for Airstream. Mike is headquar­ tered in Southern California and will be responsible for Argosy A i r s t ream Motor-homes s o l d through more than 100 dealers in

ed to Torrance, Calif., as district manager, transferring to Phoenix in 1972

MICHAEL K. WOODS has been named Western Director of Sales

and son Chris.

two

Rev. JOHN BIERMANN is now

children.

pa s t o r of St. Luke's Lutheran Church in Federal Way, Wash. St.

Luke's is one of the largest con­

1 964

gregations in the area and the sa me church John attended as a boy.

ARLEEN J . ( B ryant) GREEN was promoted to casework super­ Visor, DSHS, Tri-County office

0

in March. She has moved onto 2 acres near Colville, Wash., and has a beautiful view of the valley.

She hopes friends will visit her this summer. Her address is Box 36A, Aladdin Star Route, Colville, WA 991 14 .

Paul Hartm an PAUL HARTMAN, a n Anchor­ age, Alaska P.B .S. executive, was recently named executive direc­ tor of Spr ingfield Community Television, KOZK-Channel 2 1 in Springfield, Mo. Paul was select­ ed from among 56 applicants by the KOZK board of directors . He is experienced in nearly all pro­ cesses

of public

television,

in­

cluding financial and personnel

Dr. J. Mark Lono

m a nagement,

J. Mark Lono. secretary of the Unive rsity of Tampa, Fla, since

development

J� nuary,

1 9 78,

was

appointed

. vice president for public affairs at the University of Tampa, ef­

fective July I , 1979. Mark will be re sponsible for University d e ­

v�lopment.

admissions, financial

aId, commumty relations, alumni affaIrs,

pu bl ications and public

mformation.

ramming,

production,

public

relations

a n d will

prog­ and

bring

to

KOZK an impressive knowledge of the workings of public televi­ sion. Paul is married and they have two sons. CAROL J. KASTEN is a person­ nel officer for the Federal Gov­ ernment at Ft. Ord, Calif. MIM TIM SHERRY (MARCIA WAKE '67) are the parents of a daughter, Colette Danielle, born Feb. 23, 1979. She joins brothers Cooper, 6, and Peter, 3. They live . in Tacoma, Wash. M a j . MERLIN C. SIMPSON JR., MBA '67, has been reassign :

ed to Vandenberg AFB, Calif., as chief of Missile Communication­ s/Instrumentation.

Navy Lt. DARRELL W. JONES, has reported for duty aboard the

aircra t

carrier

USS

M i d w ay ,

operatmg from Yokosuka , Japan. He joined the Navy in May 1970. JULIE A. LILLEBO was mar­ ried

to James

M.

Gearhead

in

July 1977. Julie is teaching fifth grade in Puyallup, Wash., and Jim works for the Washington State Department of Game. SANDRA L. and

husband,

(Wallace) Larry,

and

KING son,

Matthew, born Nov. 16, 1978, live in Tacoma, Wash. Sandra is on leave from the Tacoma School District. JEFFREY R. HIGHLAND has just completed his second year as assistant professor of political science at St. Mary's College in Minnesota and has been appoint­ ed chairman of the division of social

and

behavioral

sciences

for 1979-80. St. Mary's is a liberal arts college run by the Christian Brothers.

1970 JOHN M. and JOANN P. (Ber­ �hoft '68) BECKMAN are Jiving m Aurora, Colo., where John is personnel representative for De­ nny's Restaurants in the Rocky Mountain States. They have two children, Eric, 1 1 , and Angelina, 8.

JEAN-MARI E

( O l s en

'72) WOOD

moved

from Tacoma to Eaton­

have just

ville, Wash., where they built a new home. George is a pattern maker in Tacoma and Jean-Marie is teaching in the Tacoma School D i s t r i c t.

The

first

four

years

were spent teaching elementarv

music, the last three years sh � has been teaching first grade. CLAUDIA (Frieden) LEACH is

doing work for a legal office at home. H e r h u s b a n d , George,

her

master

of

social

L i b r ary

of

Congress

in

parents of a daughter, Elizabeth Ann, born April 26, 1979. She joins four-year-old twin sisters Kristin and Anna. Jan worked as an educator consultant-director at the Yakima Herald Republic until Beth was born. BONNIE O HRT has a new home and a new job. She is an EDP analyst for Seattle First Na­ tional Bank.

1971 Dr. and Mrs. William B. Dab­ ney (JANET MILLER) are the parents of a daughter, Grace Elizabeth, born Dec. 28, 1978. She joins brothers, Ma tthew Nelson ' 3 % , and Nathaniel WiIliam ' 2 . They live in Yuba City, Calif. M/M PHIL GOLDENMAN '69

1969

Edmonds, Wash. GEORGE and

sion, City of Portland, Ore. She

SON) of Wapato, Wash., are the

and Airstream travel trailers and

tbat office as underwriter, assis­ t a n t m a n a g e r , a n d d i s t rict

to

daughter, Erika Oline, born April 1, 1 97 9. She joins a brother, Nathan, 20 months. They live i n

home enjoying caring for her son Jason M i c hael who was born January 28, 1979. Claudia is also

the

also attends added classes each

1967

Philippines

Washington, D.C. MIM Hollingbery (JAN SWAN­

teacher a t Lincoln School. Judy

job, which entails giving special attention to children with lan­ guage difficulties .

wife

� ccePted. a position as library mformatIon systems specialist at

third-grade

year to better prepare for her

and

JO FRANCES CALK recently

state-wide

;

is

PURVIS

'

work degree from the University of Washington in 1977.

significant contributions to educa­ Judy

Seattle

Dr. MARK A. SWANSON '68 and MRS. SWANSO T (WENDY LIDER '71) are the parents of a

CATHI UNSETH is serving as director of Case Management·

received

award is presented to teachers parents, and administrators fo tion.

in

Training and Employment Divi:

Educators" by the Washington State Association For Supervi­ The

lives

assist in teacher training in indi­ genous languages.

three recognized as "Outstanding

and

She

summer for the

Mount Vernon School District in

ment.

Seattle

ern Mexico and plan to leave this

Mount Vernon, Wash., was one of

sion

greater

month training course in South­

1966

Eugene Black

the

NORMAN

married a n d they have two chil­ dren, Summer, 6, and Trevor, 8.

of

in

area. She is also a member of Venture, a professional women's s e r v i c e organ i z a t i o n , a n d a member of Queen Anne Lutheran

Patti, recently completed a four :

Group in Roseville, Calif. He i s

M E R C H ANT

perties

Church.

ROBERT SANDERS, D.D.S. is partner in Roseville D e n t a l

JUDY

Lynnwood, Wash., office. She i s s pecializing i n residential pro­

Wash.

children, Eric, 1 1 , and Tricia, 7 . a

KATHY MELL has re c e n tly jomed the firm of Wallace & Wallace, Inc. real estate at their

(PE G GY LEMEN ' 7 1 ) are the pa­ rents of a daughter, Heidel Kirs­ ten, born in October 1978. She joins a sister, Marissa, 31h. They live in Granada Hills, Calif. LINDA GRAY marri ed Robert Spremulli in August 1978 in St. P et e r ' s L u t h e ran C h u rc h in Manh attan. Linda retained her own nam e . She i s a fac u lty member in the Department of

passed away suddenly last Octob­ er from pneumonia. She and Ja­ son are living in their home in San Jose, Calif.

1972 DIANNE M . BECHTOLD is a captain in the Army Nurse Corps stationed at Tripier Army Medic­ al Center where she is clinical h�a nurse in the pulmonary/GI clImc. One of her recreational activities is long ..distance r u n ­

ning. S h e belongs t o t h e Honolulu Marathon A s s o c i a t ion and i n M a r c h 1 97 9 ran t h e M a ui Marathon i n 3 hrs, 4 6 minutes and 21 seconds. She lives in Aiea ' Hawaii.

RICHA D KIENE is an analyt­ . Ical chemist for Arlantic Rich­ field. He is assigned to th e Cher· ry Point Refinery at Ferndale

Wasb., a refinery constructed t handle crude oil from the north slopes of Alaska. M/M JOHN MC LAUGHLIN '71 (LINDA CRAFT) are the parents of a daughter, Melessa Ann , born May 2 1 , 1979. She joins a brother, Jeffrey, 3. The family lives in Fed �ral Way. John is currently

preSident of the Alumni Associa­ tion

and

is

em plo yed

Weyerh aeuser. R e v . and Mrs.

JAMES

PUTTLER

G R AY

(LINDA

at D. ' 7: )

are the parents o f a uaughter Krista Maren, born Jan. 22, 1979

:

She is their first child. Jim will be delegate to LC-MS convention

Physical Therapy at New York University. Robert is a securities

in St. Louis in JUly. Linda is selling real estate for Century 21

a n al y s t for Standard & Poor. They live in New York City.

Frontier Brokers in Prosser Wash.; Jim i s pastor of Calva r

DA V I D and LINDA (Barker '71) HALSTEAD are the parents

Lutheran Church in Sunnyside, Wash. , where they reside.

of a

son,

Michael

David

;

born

April 14, 1979. He joins a b other

Jeffrey Stewart, 2 % . David ha been voted president-elect of the Northwest D i s trict Secondary

Principals Association. They live in Nooksack, Wash . M/M

Peter

Keller

(JOYCE

M/M

AR THUR

SPURR ELL

(LAURA G U STAV ' 73 ) h a v e moved to Aloha, Ore., where Art is working in marketing for IN­ TEL. Laura is spending her time at home with Cyndi, now eight months old, in their new home in Oloha.

BANGSUND) are the parents of a son, Kurt Norman, born Jan. 3 1 ,

BOB HARTL is a software en­ gineer for General Dynamics in

1979. They live on a small farm near Stanwood, Wash. Joyce i s

diff, Calif.

working i n M t .

Vernon

Valley Hospital care unit.

in

the

Skagit critical

ALYSON (Sproule) NICK and children, Heather and Louis, will be

moving

back

to

Virginia

Beach, Va., this summer a s her husband, Lou, a Navy Lieutenant Commander, is being transferred from t h e P e n t a g o n to U S S Eisenhower,

the Navy's newest

nuclear aircraft carrier.

San Diego and is living in Car­


Oass Notes

20

1973

1974

PEDER and LINDA (Edlund) KITTELSON '7 1, are the parents of a son, Kalle Galt, born May 27, 1979 in Urbana, Ill. He is their first child. Peder is assistant pas­ tor at St. Matthew's Lutheran Church and Linda is an instructor in public health nursing at the University of Illinois College of Nursing in Urbana. MlM Bob Draggoo (JANET KUSCHE) are the parents of a daughter, Kimberly, born on Dec. 1 1 , 1978. Janet was a legal secret­ ary for two years until the birth of Kimberly. Bob works for 3M National Advertising in Eugene, Ore., where they reside. RIM JACK KILCREASE J R . (MAXINE WALLENDER '73) are the parents of a son, Jack Dennis Kilcrease III, on March 17, 1979. They live in DeSoto, Tex. D ON and JULIE (Kvinsland '72) POIER are the parents of a daughter, Katie Ann, born Jan. 21 , 1978. They live in Fair Oaks, Calif., where Don is sports direc­ tor for RCRA-TV in Sacra mento,

ELAINE L. JAMES is living in the Panama Canal Zone and working in Gorgas Hospital on the medical ward. Robert and Susan Peck (SU­ SAN SCHWARZ) are the parents of a son, Robert Clinton, born April 24, 1979. They live in Aber­ deen, Wash., where Susan taught u n t i l the b i r t h of their son. Robert is an attorney in Ho­ quiam, Wash. DOUG and SUSIE (Ekelund '74) PERSHALL are the parents of a son, Aaron Israel, born Jan. 27, 1979. They have moved to Wilsonville, Ore., a small com­ munity near Portland. SALLY (Ingalsbe) and Michael RITCHIE are the parents of a daughter, Laura J a n e , b o r n March 13, 1979. They live i n Portland, Or ., where Michael works for Sears and Sally will be staying home to care for Laura. B O B and LINDA (Harkness '76) AARELA have re ce ntly b ee n t ran s fe rred to De nver, Colo., where Bob has been named a s s i s t a nt man ger of CoUins Hardwood, a new branch of Gen­ eral H ardwood in Tacoma. Linda also stayed with her same emp­ loyer after the move - GMA Research Corporation. She is now vice-president of client services and is hea i n g up G MA Re ­ search's new Denver area office. They will live ill Littleton, Colo M/M R A N D Y S. SATR U M (ALICE M. STAVLO '74) are the parents of a son, Karl James, b rn Marc h 2 1 , 1 9 7 9 They moved t o Anchorage, Alaska two years ago. Randy is a transporta­

Calif.

M/M Jerry Johns on ( ANCY LARSON) are the parents of a daughter, Julie AnD, bani April 28, ] 979. She is their fi rst c hild. U ntil the birth of J ulie Ann, Nan­ cy had be en teaching seventb grade a t Spanaway Jr . H i g h Scbool. J rr y s assistant manag­ er for Mark-It Foods in Universi­ ty Place , Tacoma, Wash ., where they make their home. R Y M 0 1 ' n L. S O U L E o f Bremerton, Wash., president and chi e f e xecutive officer of Great Northwest Federal Savings and Loan Association, has been in­ ducted as honorary member of Beta Gamma Sigma, honorary bUsiness society at Pacif c Luthe­ ran University. MlM JIM DONOVAN (GLEN­ DA OSTREM '73) are the parents of a son, Mark Louis, born April 6, 1 979. He j oins a b rother, Michael, 20 months. Jim is re­ ceiving a degree in special edu­ cation from Portland State Un­ iversity this summer. He will be an extreme learning problems teacher in the Centennial School District in Portland in the fall. Glenda is busy being a homemak­ er and mothe r . They live i n Gresham, Ore. JIM HACKETT is a systems analyst for Paccar, Inc., in Re­ nton, Wash. He received his MBA from the University of Washing­ ton in 1976 and lives in Redmond, Wash.

tion agent for Northwest Airlines and Alice is currently on leave from her job as an RN in the intensive care unit at Providence Hospital. The U.S. Air Force has pro­ moted JOH� M SKAR, MA '74, to the rank of major. John is studying with the Air Force Insti­ tute of Technology education w i t h industry program at the McDonnell-Douglas Corporation, St. Louis, Mo. JAMES D. SMITH is presently living in Billings, Mont. with two children, David, 2, and Lori Ann, 4. He is a social worker with Yellowstone County Social Ser­ vices. His w ife, A. LYNNE (Rowe '76) is a major in the U.S. Army and is stationed in Korea. M/M R O DNEY E . STE D J E (MICHAL ANN ENGEL '74) are the parents of a daughter, Emily Lauren, born April 16, 1979. She is their first child. Rod is emp­ loyed by Stedje Brothers, a farm equipment dealer. Michal Ann teaches 3rd grade at Ronan Elementary. They live in Ronan, Mont. KATHERINE (Huang) CHEN h a s moved from Louisiana to Minnesota. She has enrolled in a computer programming and op­ eration course and enjoys getting back to books again.

1975 1st Lt. PAUL R. DANERER, JR. has been decorated with the U.S. Combat Readiness Medal at Grand Forks AFB, N.D. Paul is a missile launch control crew com­ mander with the Strategic Air Command and was awarded the medal for professional perform­ ance as a combat ready crew member. He is married to the former Kim Woolhouse of Puyal­ lup, Wash.

JAMES and KATHY (Trondsen '75) FLADLAND are living in rural Sumner, Iowa where Jim is pastor of St. John Lutheran C h u r c h . He graduated f r o m Wartburg Theological Seminary in May. Kathy graduated from the University of Iowa also in May and received her master's in library science. KAREN (Prai l ) FOLTZ and husband, Craig, moved from An­ chorage, Alaska, to the L o s Angeles area where Craig i s a pilot with United Airlines. They are the parents of a son, David, born Jan. 28, 1970. Karen plans to return to nursing on a part-time basis in a few months. They live in Rancho Palos Verdes. ADRIAN KALIL is working as a staff anesthetist at Vacouver Memorial Hospital in Vancouver, Wash., having completed a two­ year course in a n e s t h e s i a at Thomas Jefferson U n i versity Hospital in Philadelphia. She is currently living in Portland, Ore. DUDLEY LUTTON and h i s wife, Dawn, a r e living in Billings, Mont_ , where Dud is going IOta his fourth year at Rocky Moun­ tain ollege. He is head football coach and part-time admissions cowlselor Both Dud and Dawn are resident coullselors at the girls ' dorm on campus. P ET E R E . A D PA MELA (Blair '75) OL ON are living in Tacoma, Wash., where Pete is assist-dDl branch manager at the home office of Queen City Sav­ ings and Loan in Seattle, Wash. Pam is working in the pr sident' office at PL U . They are expect­ ing the birth of their first child about the end of June. JAME C. OCKIM graduated from San Diego State University this spring with a master's in social work with specialties in gerontology, administration and planning. He returned to Taco­ ma, Wash. this month where he has accepted a po s i t ion as a caseworker doing individual and family therapy. TOM KRATZKE received his master's deg ree in m a t h a t W a s h i n gton State U n i v e rsity, Pullman, Wash., and is working at Boeing Computer Services in Richland, Wash.

1976 DAVE ANDERSON, head foot­ ball coach at Billings Central High School for the past three years, has resigned from that position to return to PLU where he has accepted a position for a graduate counseling program. He will also assist with the football program at PLU. His wife, KA­ REN ANDERSON will also attend PLU in order to finis h h e r bachelor's degree. CRAIG A. DAHL is living in Billings, Mont., where he i s assis­ tant football a nd head t ra c k coach a t Central High School. He a l s o teaches American history and advanced physical education.

STEVE and TERESA (Lund '76) CONRAD are in the process of moving from Federal Way, Wash. to New Bern, N.C., where Steve has been transferred by Weyerhaeuser. He will be work­ ing in production management. Teresa has been teaching in the Clover Park School District in Tacoma, Wash. JOYCE E. HODGES is working as a part-time pre-college teach­ ing assistant with Bend Commun­ ity College (out of Washington; Moses Lake) overseas program. She is editor of a volunteer "newsletter" The Gieb which has a circulation of 1200, Brownie Scout leader, Army Community S e r v i c e v o l u n teer, G e r m a n­ American Wives Club, Kinder­ Kastle Nursery Board and tours Europe in her sparetime. DA V I D L E E r e c e iv e d h i s bachelor's i n Broad cast Co m ­ m u n i c a t i o n f r om W e s t e rn Washington Univers i t y i n D e ­ cember 1978. MARLAI N E MARS f i n i s hed student teaching Spanish at Ken­ newick High School in March and is now teaching Migrant Re­ SOUTce Room grades 3-8 at Pros­ s r Heights Sc hool in Prosser, Wa s h . S h e p r o v i d e s i n d i ­ vidualized instruction in reading, math, aod Eugllilh as a second language. DONJ\TI K. SHIMIZU and wal· ter F. Heidenson were married tltis spring in Spokane, Wash. They will live in Spokane where Doni is a registered nurse at Deaconess Hospital and Walter is teaching history and physical education and is tennis coach at Spokane Cum munit y College. He also is a tennis pro at Spokane Racquet Club. BOB SPEICHER, CPA, is work­ ing for Brink and Sadler in Taco­ ma, Wash. JO A N K A T H E R I N E T O L ­ LESHAUG and Marry L . McClin­ tock of Sunland, Calif. were mar­ rie d March 3, 1979 in Kelso, Wash. He is employed in con­ struction and both are involved in Youth w i t h a M i s s i o n i n California.

NANCY KAY (Penning t o n ) ZANESKI w i l l b e d i scharged from the Navy Nurse Corps at the end of June and her husband will be discharged from the U.S. Navy in October. They plan to move to Seattle in the fall of 1979. They have been stationed in Philadelphia for the past 3 years. Nancy plans to continue her nursing career in neonatal nursing and her husband plans to att e n d t h e U n i v e r s i t y o f Washington.

_ ,.,

1977 DAVID L. BENSON was re­ cently commissioned an Army second lieutenant upon graduat­ ing from the Officer Candidate School in Ft. Benning, GA. STEVEN L. CHESTNUT and Kellie Joy Clark of Cashmere, Wash. w e re married F b. 17, 1979. They will make their home in Wenatchee, Wash. where both are teachers. LORENE HAAS and DO UGLAS GIROD '78 were married June 1979 in Lake Oswego, Ore. Doug is coachin g football, basketbal l and track and teaching in Harper High School, Harper, Ore. PAUL HEWETT received his master's degree in mathematics from Claremont Graduate School in Claremont, Calif in May 1979. LINDA (Anderson) and R IDGE H OTTLE '78 were marri d .J uly 29, 1 9 7 8 at Calvary Lutheran Church in Federal Way, Wash. Linda now works for Statewide

,

Escrow Corporation in Seat t l e and Ridge is workmg on his MBA at the University f Washington. They live in Federal Way, Wa sh. PAMELA R. LAPP is employ d at Neighbo rhood House Child Care Services in Seattle, Wash. as a social worker/parent involvement coordinator. She lives in Kent, Wash. ALTON A. LEWIS has been reassigned to Madrid, Spain and performs management audits at Air Force installations through­ out Spain and northern Italy. K A T H E R I N E A . LORENTZSEN of St. Paul, Minn., and JEFFREY R. JOHNSON of Kelso, Wash., were married Dec. 29, 1978 in St. Stephen's Lutheran Church in West St. Paul, Minn. They are making their home in Salem, Ore., where Jeff is a sec­ ond-year student at Willamette Law School. KIRK and CARLA (Nelson '77) PARKER '76 are the parents of a son, B e n j a m i n Hudson, born March 16, 1979 at home. They live in TacolJla, Wash. Lt. Col. GUENTER J. TISSON, MA '77, has successfully com­ pleted the Air War College Semi­ nar Program. This program is designed to expand the know­ l e d g e a n d u n d e r s t a n d i n g of senior officers and civilian emp­ loyees, and to prepare them for high command and staff posi­ tions. He will be stationed at Ft. Sam Houston, Tex.

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21

DAVID KERR '76 and KATH­ LEEN STUR GEOI were married June 23, 1979 at Anacortes Luthe­ ran Church, An' cortes, Wash. Af­ ter the 'ummer in Seattle they will reside in Pullman, W a s h . w h e r e D a v i d w i l l c o n ti n u e graduate studies in med icinal chemistry at Washington State University. POLLY (Hawkins) and David J. Stish were married June 9, 1979. David is an agriculture teacher at Little Falls Community High School in Royalton, Minn. Polly teache s s c i e n c e in the same school. They live on a farm out­ side of Royalton. ANI\'E (McLuskei) HAFER and husband, Randy, are now living in New Haven, Conn., where An­ ne works as an assistant in re­ search in the Computer Science Department at Yale, and is inter­ ested in public and private man­ agement . PEGGY CHAN is working to­ wa rd a master's degree in man­ agement technOlogy at George Washington University. Washing­ t o , D . C . She s p e n t s e veral months touring Europe before going to Washington. Dr . JOHr . DO HERTY, MA has been appointed to the t of W a s h i n g t o n S t a t e and supervisor of the Division of Animal Industry for the State of Washington. John received his doctorate in Veteri­ nary Medicine from Washington State University in 1957.

1978 SHARON (Enyeart) AN D E R ­ S O N is teaching second grade i n Chehalis, Wash. KAREN (Enyeart) BEYER is t eaching in B e n d , O r e . S h e teaches third grade and her hus­ and teaches sixth grade at Pilot utte Elementary. CLARK W. D O NNELL a n d Elizabeth Beeksma were married Feb. 10, 1979 in Oak Harbor, Wash. They will make their first home in Mount Vernon, Wash. KIM HORN and Mike Acres were married March 15, 1979 at t h e F i r s t U n i t e d Methodist . Church i n Oak Harbor, Wash. Both are employed by the Cent­ ral Kitsap School District and reside in Silverdale, Wash. MARK MUMM was a recipient of a Rotary Graduate Fellowship and will be leaving for a year of study in Brisbane, Australia. He be pursuing a master's de­ in social work. He has work­ ed the past year as a tour guide for West Tours in Anchorage, Alaska. 2nd Lt. THOMAS TVEIT is working at the Marine Corps Headquarters at the Pentagon do­ ing a project for the Department of Defense. In August 1979 he will be going to Pensacola, Fla. to start flight school. He is engaged to Jackilyn Kennish, a nursing student at PLU. She will graduate in Aug. 1980.

l

Profile s Fro m The Past Margo Holm

Dr. Leraas, professor emeritus of biology, has 'written a series of PLU vignettes based on more than 34 years on the PLU facu l ty W hope to publish them in Scene on 8 regular basis_ .

MARGO HOLM, MAE '78, has been promoted to the rank of associate professor at the Un­ iversity of Puget Sound, Tacoma, Wash. She has been employed by the university since 1976. JEFF MAGIN is teaching at Kalles Junior High School in Puyallup, Wash. in the Title I program of individual math in­ struction. KEN LAUFMANN is working for the telephone company in Seattle, Wash. MIKE FLORIAN is planning to attend PLU this summer and be­ gin graduate work in school ad­ ministration. He and his wife, Debra, are living in Poulsbo, Wash. LAURI JONES received an as­ sistantship at Western Washing­ ton Unive rsity in Bellingham, Wash. this past year. GLORIA WEBER is teaching in Kentridge High School, K e n t , Wash.

1979 LISA FRANKLIN and Fred Behrmann were married in Taco­ ma, Wash. earlier this year and are now at home in Milton, Wash. following a honeymoon in Palm Springs, Calif. TRISH KAMPS , MA '79, i s program director for CAPRI Cardio Pulmonary Research In­ stitute - a medically supervised exercise program for those with heart a n d lung ailments. The newly opened CAPRI is locatd in Bremerton, Wash. DAVIN L. THOMPSON a n d TERRY M. TENNESEN ' 7 5 were married June 2, 1979 in Saint Paul Lutheran Church, Fairfield, Mont. PATRA JACOBSON has been teaching math to seventh and eighth grades part time at Ballou Junior High School in Puyallup, Wash. She will work full time this fall . D O U G L A S J O H N S ON and CATHY COOK '77, were married in July 1978. Doug has been stu­ dent teaching at Franklin Pierce High School. BRUCE WAKEFIELD received the NAIA District Scholar-athlete award for swimming this year.

By Harold Leraas

ELVIN AKRE

Out of the Dust Bowl came a number of good things including this teacher at PLC. Elvin Akre and his vivacious young wife did much to pull us through some rather dull years, and they deserve some credit. Few can appreciate the job of the Dean of Men like those who have had it and lived right in the boys' dorm. Elvin and Magdelyn did thi s for several years. The south half of Old Main, second and third floors, housed the boys. The girls were in the north half, secure­ ly walled off in this first-of-its-kind "Coed Dorm." It was a jolly bunch of boys that lived up there. Mostly they had big noisy shoes and rauc­ ous voices and laughter. They also had an uncanny sense of hearing and managed to be gone or very quiet by the time the Dean got up there. He was very patient and

In Memoriam

Mark Guidos MARK GREGORY GUIDOS, age 22, was killed in Seattle on May 26 in a one-car automobile accident. He was driving alone, returning from work, when his vehicle hit a parked truck a few blocks from his home. Mark would have received a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering at Com­ mencement May 27.

kind so he could tolerate the boistr­ ousness of these young PLC-ites. Mr. Akre taught a variety of classes in areas of history and languages. But he also was Direc­ tor of the College Band. Consider­ ing the small size and the limited talent of the student body, he produced a very creditable music­ al organization which played for many school functions. In later years, he became a full-time teach­ er in the History Department. The students lil<:ed him very much, and affectionately referred to him as "The Aak." For one year Professor Akre was a Fulbright scholar in Norway. The Akre home stood two blocks from the campus. It was one of the large, 2-story homes from the e�r­ ly days. Completely modernized, it became a most cheerful and invit­ ing place. Their friends gathered there often to sit around the firep­ lace to chat and have a cup of coffee. It was always a cheerful place and a fun place to go. The Akres became good campers, and would frequently spend weekends or whole weeks in State Parks with camping gear. In time they extend­ ed their travels up and down the West coast and ipto the Midwest. Retirement was great for these folks. They secured a lot above Cushman Dam, where they did their own thing. They erected a good-sized, comfortable log-cabin home there in the woods. They were like pioneers, chopping out trees, sawing wood, building paths, landscaping the yard, and building a driveway. In a short time, the place was beautiful, but they con­ tinue to find more things to do and enjoy it. Their friends find great pleasure in visiting the forest re­ treat often, and they likewise are free to visit and travel more than ever. They are content as bugs in a rug and have certainly found a good way to face retirement. Mark was in the 3-2 electrical engineer­ ing program the past year and studied at the University of Washington. At PLU, he was active in Mayfest for three years and in other student activities. Funeral services were held May 29 in First Lutheran Church of Richland Beach where he was a member. Survivors include his parents, a brother, Michael, who will be a junior at PLU in the fall; and a sister, Sherry, a high school senior.

PAITI A. HOLSTROM '67, a welfare examiner, died April 1 1 , 1979 and funeral services were held on April 14. ALTA PIERSON, former housemother, passed away in Illinois. Her funeral was on April 16, 1979. CHUNG JIN KIM '60 passed away in Hawaii this past spring. ROBERT EHLY '69, of Beverton, Ore. passed away in April 1 979. He was a retired Marine Corps master sergeant and had had overseas assignments in Japan, Korea, Okinawa and at the American Embassy in Madrid, Spain. He was employed as an accounts receivable manager for a Bever­ ton firm at the time of his death. Survivors include his wife, Bonnie; two sons, Robert, Jr., of Beaverton and Timothy of Jackson, Tenn.; a daughter Kristy Chambers of Summerville, S.C., two brothers and two sisters and four grandchildren.


Inks Patriot Pact

Zamberlin 10th Lute To Get Pro Try By Jim Kittilsby PLU's John Za mberlin, who drew the close scrutiny of both professional football and baseball se ut during a distinguished Lut e athletic care er, was selec ed by the New E n gland Patriots in the fiftb round of the May 3 Nationa Foot­ ball League draft. Z a m b e rl i n , a 6-2, 2 3 5 -pound senior linebacker who prepped at Tacoma's Wilson Higb School, was the 1 37th iek in the country. A first team Associated Press Little AU-America and NAIA All­ America selecti on , Zamberlin was claimed in a lower round than any gridder in Lute history. Virtually every NFL organiza­ tion was in contact with Zamberlin during the 1978 season. Thirteen clubs sent scouts to the PLU cam­ pus last fall to interview and test the physical education major. With 440 pound bench press s trength co mplemented by 4.8 speed in the 40 yard dash, Zamber­ lin displayed his wares at a special Patriot rookie orientation camp in mid-May. John reports to the regu­ lar training camp July 1 5. Zamberlin's selection resurrect­ ed names of other once-heralded Lute footballers who had a taste of the professional game. In reyerse chronology, quarter­ back Rick Finseth was passed over by U.S. clubs in 1 975, but had a brief trial in his native Canada with the Calgary Stampeders. Ira Ham­ mon, a favorite target of Finseth's on the 1972 PLU squad, had a look­ see with the Washington Redskins, then performed as a running back in 1975 with the short-lived Port-

PLU Soccer Rates Varsity Status In Fall Pacific L u theran soccer will shed the club sport tag in favor of varsi ty status commencing this fall. At the May 5 meeting of the Northwest Conference, soccer was added as the league's tenth sport, joining football, cross cou ntry, basketball, wrestling, swimming, track, golf, baseball, and tennis. Dave Asher's Lute boot schedule will include Pacific (home, Oct. 13), Linfield (away, Oct. 20), Lewis & Clark (home, Oct. 27), Willamet­ te (away, Nov. 3), and Whitman (home, Nov. 10). The NWC's other member school, Whitworth, will not participate. As a result of the NWC action, PLU will drop out of the Northwest Collegiate Soccer Conference.

PLU Coaching oster Takes On New Look The PLU athletic department' s staff directory readerboard wa s a picture of disarray in early Jun following a series of coac hi ng addi ti ons, deletions and reaSSign­ ment . Jon Thieman packed up after 1 1 seasons a s cross country and ski coach to pUl'Sue a careel" in ac­ counting. Al ison Dahl adds t he distance sport to her women' s tennis assignment. The new ski tutor is Gro Styrmo. Norwegian slat standout at PLU in the mid­ '70's. Onetime Lute first baseman Jim Girvan takes over as ba s e b a l l coach, but will retain h i s teachin position at Tacoma's Curtis Hig School, where he has served as diamond boss since 1976. A 1 968 PLU graduate, Girvan replaces Jim Kittilsby, who remains as a s s i stant athl etic director and sports information director. With w o m e n ' s athletic coor­ dinator Sara Officer on sabbatical leave, Colleen Hacker will join the PLU staff as field hockey coach and physical education instructor. Hacker, who will earn her master's degree in July from the University of Arizona, hails from Lititz, Pa. Cross country and track coach Carol Auping will handle Officer' a d m i n i strative r e s p o n s i b i l ities during her absence.

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Award winners from left, Tami Bennett, Vieci White, Ric Clark, John Zamberlin and Dave Trageser.

land Thunder of the World Football League. Ross Boice, a defensive end, was drafted in the 16th round in 1971 by the Los Angeles Rams. A late pre­ season cut victim, Boice had a stint with the British Columbia Lions of the CFL. Rick Johnson, 250-pound tackle, passed up his final PLU season, 1971, to sign as a free agent with the Dallas Cowboys, surviv­ ing until the final cut. Two PLU centers, All-Ameri­ cans during the Marv Tommervik coaching tenure, had cups of cof­ fee with NFL squads. Rick Daniels, a 195-pounder, was judged to be too small by the Rams in 1 952. Don D'Andrea, a 280-pounder, quit the Rams during the training camp in 1948. The Los Angeles club de­ cided to convert him to tackle, but D' Andrea balked because he had never played the position. Sig Sigurdson, class of 194 1 , was the first PLU gridder to ink a profe ssional contract. A glue fing­ ered end, Sigurdson played both offense and defense for the Balti­ more Colts in 1946. A two-time All-American, Tom­ mervik riddled the air for national passing and total offense records from 1 938 through 1941 as a con­ temporary of Sigurdson. Drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles after the 1 94 1 season, a potential play­ for-pay career was aborted by World War II. Following his discharge in 1 946, Tommervik passed up two more Eagle overtures to c o m p l e t e graduate school and take on the PLU coaching duties. The "Tom­ mygun" did find time to play for the Seattle-Tacoma Indians of the triple A caliber Pacific Coast League in 1946. Tommervik, who led the short-term circuit in pas­ sing, was joined on the Indians by Marv Harshman, whose football achievements as a triple threat halfback are buried beneath his basketball honors.

PLU Honors Top Athletes At Banquet Five oft-honored seniors were on the receiving end when the major awards were presented at PLU's ninth annual All Sports Banquet May 8. F o o t b a l l All - A m e r i can John Zamberlin and his tennis counter­ part, Dave Trageser, both subjects of recent Scene articles, were tabbed as joint winners of the Jack Hewins Senior Award. Swimming All-Am erican Tami Bennett was cited as PLU's Woman of the Year in Sports . A four year regular at nationals, Bennett earn­ ed six All-America certificates in individual events and claimed se­ ven other scrolls in relays. Basketballer Ric Clark was tabb­ ed for the George Fisher Scholar A thlete award. The accounting ma­ jor was an All-NWC pick in 197879. The women's George Fisher Scholar Athlete award went to Vicci White. A physical education major, White participated in vol­ leyball for four years.

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PLU owers Notch Spring Victories

"

Different strokes for differen fo lks , but PLU rowers handle theirs with speed and precision . Awaiting a mid-June engage­ ment at the nation a l r o w i n g championships i n Detroit, the Lady Lutes shelved the Lamberth Cup in the annual eight-oar splashdown with University of Puget Sound, plus a pair of eight-with-cox vic­ tories at the Portland Rowing Club Centennial Regatta. Dave Peterson's men brought home the Meyer Cup for the four­ teenth time in sixteen races wit UPS. After a runnerup finish in �ights at the LaFromboise Cup race, PLU won its heat at the Western Sprints in Los Gatos, California. In the finals for the first time in five years, the Lutes cruised to a third place finish.


LU All-Sports Reign

Men's Doubles Team Reaches National Finals

Ends After Six Years

May was crate-up time for the John Lewis All Sports trophy, sym­ bolic of overall athletic excellence in the Northwest Conference. T h e l a r g e c u p , w h ich h a d gathered dust during PLU's unin­ t e rru p t e d s ix -year reign, was

David Johnson

headed for Willamette. The Bear­ cats nudged the Lutes by seven points in cumulative nine sport standings. In NWC spring sports, Lute men flourished in golf and tennis, but floundered in baseball and track. Roy Carlson's fairway fellows, fourth in the Northwest Small College Classic, cut 24 strokes from their previous best one round score to capture the NWC title, their sixth in seven years. Junior Jeff Peck led the Lute linksters and earned all-conference honors. In tennis, Dave Trageser walked off with his fourth consecutive NWC and NAIA District 1 singles titles as PLU dominated both tour­ naments (see related story). For the Lutes, it was a fourth straight team title at each level. Collectively, PLU pitchers had a 7 . 39 earned run average, which greas e d the skids for a 5 - 2 7 baseball finish. Posting a respect­ able .289 team batting average, the NWC cellar dwellers had five play­ ers above the .300 swat mark. A late starter, Jeff Nellermoe hit

ady Lutes Debut At Net Nationals A PLU first was recorded in women's tenni s, while on the dis­ taff track scene, the number of f'rsts was l i mited , but records fell th abandon. Lady Lute netters made their debut at AlA W nationals, following a s cond pla ce finish at the NCWSA regional tourna m e n t . While PLU, 1 2-5 on the year, did not place at the June 6-9 Denver tour­ ney, ei ther collectively or indi­ vidually, coach Alison Dahl viewed the experience as invaluable for her young squad. PLU graduated o nly one player, singles ace Kathy Wales, who posted a 1 7-4 record. School standards were rewritten weekly in track. Carol Auping's ' kers etc hed three of the marks the NCWSA regional test, where PLU was 14th in a gathering of 1 7 schools. Teddy Breeze zipped through 1 00 meters in 1 2 .38, while the Lute 400 meter relay unit synchronizeq for a 48.93 reading. Freshman Dianne Johnson's final carving of her own 5000 meter mark was 17:5l.2.

Jeff Peck

.348, Kevin Brown .333, Guy Elli­ son .320, Chuck French .318, and Blane Berry .310. Thinned by illness and injuries, the Lute track squad plummeted to the bottom of the NWC. One of the bright spots was the performance of sophomore pole vaulter Dave Johnson. Bettering the school re­ cord with a 15-6 hoist, Johnson picked up the premium hardware at both the conference and district meets.

PLU, which boasted a national runnerup plus a tenth place team finish at the 1978 NAIA tennis tournament, numerically bettered its lot June 2, claiming two runner­ sup (doubles partners) at Kansas City as well as ninth place in team scoring. Puyallup senior Dave Trageser, who advanced to the singles semi­ finals befo re t a s t i n g d e f e H t , teamed with Sioux Falls, S.D. sophomore Mike Hoeger in dou­ bles. The duo, seeded third, slipped by fourth ranked Dave Puc and Mike Kraus of Flagler College in the opening set of the champion­ ship round, but were denied a national crown when the Floridans scrambled to 7-6, 7-6 advantages in the second and rubber frames. Trageser, the top-seeded singles player in the tournament , a n d Hoeger were both named t o the NAIA All-America first team. It was the third citation for Trageser and the second for Hoeger. Wrapping up his Lute career with a 34-2 singles season, Trages­ er had a four spring 126-12 ledger. Hoeger, who progressed up the singles ladder to the fourth round, had a 26- 1 2 singles slate.

Mat, Grid, Cage And Boot Cam p s Kee p Youth Busy

Kathy Wales

Not all of Washington's summer "camping" will take place on the beach, in the mountains, or at the woodlands. PLU's scenic 126 acre campus will be the site of six summer sports camps. Cham pions Wrestling Camp, headed by Lute coach Dan Hens­ ley, will have two sessions. A regular session July 30-August 4 is tailored for boys in grades six through twelve. This live-in or commuter camp is followed by an advance camp Aug. 6-1 l . Ed Anderson, who mastermind­ ed PLU to the 1979 Northwest Conference basketball title, and Roger Iverson, an NAIA Hall of Famer, head the ninth annual Pacific Lutheran Basketball Camp. The July 9-13 session is a morn­ ing camp for boys and girls ages eight and up. Boys grades seven to nine will be greeted July 16-20 in a day camp. The third camp, for boys grades 10-12, July 22-27, is struc­ tured as either a commute or stay session. PLU football maestro Frosty Westering will team up with form­ er Washington Redskin kicker Ray

Pelfrey in a professional kicking clinic July 13-15. Dottie McCrea, Stanford Univer­ sity hoop coach, is the director of the Pat Kennedy Invitational Bas­ ketball Camp slated for July 1 -6. The camp is open to girls from age nine through high school. The Seattle Sounders will con­ duct six week-long stay camps for boy and girl soccer players ages 91 7. Sessions are July 8-1 3, July 1 520, July 22-27, August 5-10, August 1 2-1 7, and August 1 9-24. With a day or stay option, the All­ Star Cheerleader Camp is scheduled at PLU from July 30 to August 3. For further information on the camps, contact the PLU Athletic Department.


24

August

July 2-6

American

2-10

Word and Witness Conference

5-10

LITE Summer Institute of Theolog y

8-13

1 -2

5-8

Institute of Foreign Studies

Champion Sports Conference Sounder Soccer Camp #4 Re a c hin g Your Pot en tial Workshop

8-10

/15

Middle College

8-13

Sounder Soccer Ca m p #1

8-14

DeMolay Conference

12 .. 1 7 ALC Worship and MUSIC [ nstitute Sounder Soccer Camp #s

9-13

Anderson A M. Basketball Camp

17

1 2 - 1 4 Pre-College

1 3 - 1 5 American Association of U ni ve rs i ty Women Punting Clinic

Workshop

Sum mer Commencement Exercises, Eastvold Aud . • 7 :30 p . m .

1 8 -2 1 Pan-American ]n s ti tule 19-2

4 Sounder Soccer Ca mp #6

1 5 - 20 Sounder Soccer Day Ca m p # 2 Anderson Day Basketball Camp

23-26 LDS Women

l S - 2 1 Northwest High School Summer Music Cam p

24- 2 6 Dahlia Show

2 2 - 2 7 Sounder S occe r Camp #3 Chorister's G uild

28 .. 3 1 PLU Foreign Student Orientation

23-27 Andel'son Stay Baskelball Camp 258/1

Kimetsu

6- 1 0

Orientation and Registration

27 -28 Tetrathalon

8

Football, Alumni at PLU . FP Stadium, 7'30 p.m.

27... 29 Lay Theo logiCal Conference

1 1·

26- 2 8 Pacific Northwest Writer'

Conference

298/1

Champlon Wrestl i ng

Con ference

208/3

Cbeerleader Camp

hange. arter Note : Due to occasional ca ncellations, po&tponement and d- I publication, it is suggested that Scene reader COD ult more current source. or call PLU to confirm event d ate 53 1 ·6900 e ' 1 . 40 1. ,

Tacoma and Vicinity

_ _ _

.

Address

City

_____

S ta te

_

_

Zi p

DPlease check this box if address above is new. attach old mail ing label below .) Class

D r T.W. Anderson Mr. George Davi M r. M .R. Knudson, Chai rman Dr. Richard Klein, Secretary Mr. George Lagerquist Mr . Richard Neils Mrs. Suzanne Nelson Dr. W.O. Rieke Dr. Roy Virak Rev. David Wold

_____

Spouse maiden name

S po us e Cla ss_

Seattle and Vicinity

Rev. Charles Bomgren Rev. Dr. A.G. Fjellman Mr. Paul Hogl und Mr. Clayton Peterson Mrs. Doris Rolander Rev. Dr. Clarence Solberg Dr. Christy Ulleland, Vice-Ch. Dr. George Wade

Scene Mall to: AJum.uI House Pacific

Lutheran

U.

Taco�, Wasb. 98447

Pacific Lutheran University / Alumni Association

a.m.

Football, PLU at Moorhead S tate

16

Recital. pianist Mldori Howell, Univ. Center, 8 : 15 p.m.

18

Recital, pianist Richard Farner, Eastvold A ud . , 8: 1 5 p.m.

22

Faculty Wives Ffl1J. Luncheon. U niv, Cenlt:r,

27

A ud u bon Film Series Univ. Center, '7:30 p.m.

Ii' ot ba ll . PLU at U n i v e r ity

(Minn.)

1 2 noon f Puget Sound, Bakel Stadium, 1 ;30 p.m.

2 8-29 Concerr, "Music You Hate to Love,

Eastvold Aud . ,

: 1 5 p.m.

�agu" Da y Football, Central Wa hingtoD at PLU, FP Stadium, 1 : 30 p.m.

Board of Regents

What's New With You?

Aud., 10

15

29

Name

Clas es Begi n Opening Convocation, Olson

Western Washington

Ml' . Helen Belgum M . Fred Muenscher Rev. David Steen

Eastern Washington

Mr. Roger Larson Mr. Alvin Fink Oregon

Mr. Howard Hubbard Mr. Galven Irby Rev. John Milbrath Dr. Casper (Bud) Paulson Montana

Rev. Roland Grant Mr. Sterling Rygg Mrs. Dorothy Schnaible Alaska

Mr. Martin Pihl Minnesota

Mr. Robert Hadland

Advisory

Mrs. Loleta Espeseth, ALCINPD Dr. Ronald Matthias, .A�C Dr. Richard Solberg, LCA Rev Uano Thelin, LCAIPNWS Perry P. Hendricks Jr., Treasurer Faculty: Drs. John Herzog. Joanne Jensen, Erving Severtson Students : S teve R i e k e , D a v e Siburg, Matt Morris :. PLU officers

Editorial Board Dr. William O . Rieke . . . . Pre ident Lucille Giroux . . Pres . Exec. Asso '. RonaldColtom Oil'. Alumni Relations James L. Peterson . . . . . . . . . EditOr James Kittilsby . . . . Sports Editor Edith Edland . . . . . . . . . Class Notes Kenneth Dunmire Staff Photographer Lind Walker . . . . . . . . . Tech. Asst. O.K. Devin, Inc. Graphics Desigr Pacific Lutheran Unive rsi ty B u l letin Second Class Postage Paid at Taco ma Wa s h m gt on ,


-volume LVIV No.

5

October 1 979.

Bulletin of Pacific University/Alumni Association

Profile: Dr. Rieke

. . . . . . . . .

2

Tacoma News Tribune reporter J i m Eri ckson recently analyzed the mood of the PLU campus as Presi dent William R i eke embarks on his fifth year at the campus helm .

Momentum Builds

. . . . . . . . . . .

3

PLU's "Sharing i n Strength" ca pital fund campaign is gaining momen­ tum with participation and sup­ port from congregations a nd indi­ viduals throug hout the N o rth ­ west

Mead-Fiedler

. . . . .

6

Two honored A me rica ns died this past year, Margaret Mea · and Arthur Fiedler. Two PLU profs reflect on their personal experi­ ences with their rev e r e d col ­ leagues.

Homecoming

. .

·

.

14

Several distinguished al u mn i and former Mayfest Dancers will be honored during Homecoming 79 Nov. 3 .

Cover Bal my September weather ap­ propriately reflected both the ad­ m i n istrative and e d u c a ti o n a l mood o n campus - one of confi­ dence and optimism. (page 4)

Pu bl ished six times annually by th e Office of U n ivers i ty Relations. Pacific LutheraC1 univerSity P O Box 2068, Tacoma INA 98447 ( USPS <1 1 7-660l Second c l ass pt)stage paid I n Ta co ma , WA 9844 7


2 profiles

In Rieke 's Fifth Year Campus Future Bright

Pre Id nt Intalns Campus ony By Jim Erickson Tacoma News Tribune

W i l l i a m O . R' eke says a philosophy passed on by his father helps him meet challenges as president of Pacific Lutheran U n ­ iversity. "It's better to laugh than cry when trouble comes along, " Dr. R i e k e s a i d , a d d i n g , tho u g h , "Sometimes that's hard to do." When Rieke was inaugurated as president nearly five years ago � he said he sensed a strong fO rWard movement on the part of the u n iversity and com munity. He vowed at the ti me to continue that movement. Today, Rieke believes PLU is still on that path, providing quality p rograms. He credits the universi­ ty with many fine departments and added that PLU is not current­ Iy having any enrollment prob­ lems. For the past few years, enrollment has consistently been between 3 ,350 and 3.400 stu­ dents. "The applicant pool is down but our total rate is up," Rieke said . "That tel ls me people are being more selective about the college they go to and means we m ust be doing something rig ht. " Rieke, of course, does his p rt to s _1I the university, but he sa id , ' ' I ' m paid to d o that. People expect m e to do that . " "What cou nts most with stu­ dents is what other students or former students say. Peers listen to peers . " With Rieke at the helm, the PLU ship of state is sailing smoothly, a nu mber of PLU sources reported Milton Nesvig, assistant to the president. said he believes the facu lty "thi nks the world " of Ri eke . "He doesn't try to force a ny­ thing on th e m ," Nesvig con ­ tinued . "Still, he's a no -nonsens e fellow. "

R i ke h a s t h e res pect o f everyone, Nesvig saId. "He's a Isquare shooter. YoU know where he sta nds. He has the pastoral consltuen 5 beh ind him like no one In years ."

PLU is own ed by a corporation made up of 307 Lutheran congre­ gations in the Northwest. Dr. Jerome Lejeune, psycholo­ gy professor, said it is his impres­ sion that Rieke is a "warm , open man who always makes you feel comfortable when you 're ta lking to him." While he cannot speak for all the faculty, Lejeune said, he has heard few negative th ings about Rieke . "He's a very capable admi nis­ trator," Lejeune said. "He down­ plays his own involvement and recog n izes contributuions of everyone, including students ." M elvin Knudson, a Tacoman who is chairman of the P LU board of regents, said Rieke has "natural gifts" that enable him to excel at oral and written commu nication. Dr. William 0. Rieke

" Maybe even more so is his commun ication through posture and attitude," Knudson said . Knudson said Rieke projects "an image of high i nterest" in whatev­ er is being discussed. Rieke also solicits i nput into problems and frequently includes all perspec­ tives in the solution, Knudson added . "And then he makes -every ef­ fort not to identify himself with the solution:' Knudson said. "He gives others credit for solving the problem." Problems facing PLU in the :uture revolve around the chang­ I n g "market" and maintaining quality progra ms. Rieke said PLU will try to be more sensitive to the ma rket, i ncludig efforts to do more with the adult population. That would mea n, he

said, taking persons with no col­ lege or those w ho didn'tfi nish a nd giving credit for 'work equiva­ lent." PLU also will attempt to do a better job of definrng the market Rieke added, and try to get tI1e word out better about programs. On the latter point, he noted that the university radio station KPLU ­ FM will be able to assist that effort wh e n it g o es to 100,000 watts this fall. As a resu lt the station will have a range from Vancouver, B.C. to Vancouver, Wash . Rieke also sees PLU strengthen ­ mg its ties with the Lutheran Church. He said he feels the importa ce of religion in this complex society. He cited a Carnegie Commission su rvey i ndicating that 82 percent of college and universtiy students polled felt that morality should be a consequence of education and 93 percent said values for a life­ time should be developed duri ng the years in college. "That ties into our mission " Rieke said. "I don't th in in o � r place to say, ' Here's our story, fall in line: but 1 feel Christia nity has much to contribute to human needs ." . Rieke said the value of religion is Intermeshed in the belief that "You don't have to merit worth ­ Christ wants you for what you are, not what you do." While each PLU student is re­ quired to take a couple of religion courses i n order to g raduate, religion isn't pushed on students. R i eke noted that som eone could walk into any phys cs class, for exa mple, and find it no diffe­ rent th a n any other private school . Public foru ms frequ ently are held to discuss religion , but there a re n o atte m pts to co nvert anyone. "They're to sti m ulate discussion and challe nge students to think things throug h, " Rieke said . Anot. er direction PLU is going is expa nsion . PLU is involved I n a five-year, $1 6.5 million campa ign to p rovide fu nds for new science and fi ne arts facilities, as well as to boost e n d o w m e n t a n d student-aid fu nds. The drive, wh ich Wili con­ tinu e th rough 1 983 , already has passed the $'1 .5 million mark. U nlike the highly pu bl ic cam­ paign of cross-town University of Puget Sound, PLU's ca mpaign has b� en low-key . That's by design, Rieke said . "we want to approach the own­ e rs first. the 307 congregations, then we'!! l au nch a drtve to the com mu nity and friends," Rieke said . If PLU appears happy with the physician and former medica l ­ schoo! admin istrator w ho now serves as president, RI eke 15 not less pleased with PLU . A 1 953 PLU a lu mn u s himself, Rieke d e s c r i b es the past five years as " the happiest time" of hiS life . ,


Development

By Jim Peterson

The Pacific Lutheran Un iversity "Sharing in strength" capital fund ca m paign is off to an encouraging sta rt with over $1 .5 million in confirmed g ifts and pledges as of mid-Septem ber. Nearly half of the total reflects adva nce pledges from the north­ west ALC church cam paig n , in­ cluding major gifts, with the re­ mainder coming from alu m n i , corporations and foundations. Further dramatic results a re ex­ pected between October and De­ cember as more cong regations tu m i n their pledge reports to campaign headquarters. This pro­ cess was beginning in Aug ust and September following six months of orga nizations development, volu nteer trai ning and personal visitations . Since last February, nearly 700 pastors, ch urch re resentatives and a l umni have become actively involved in the campaign, accord­ ing to Luther Bekemeier, PLU vlce­ president for development and campaign director. Over 90 per­ c ent of n o rthwest A merica n Lutheran C hurch c ngregations have indicated their willing ness to support the ca mpaign, he re­ ported . Already over half of the more than 300 cong regations have indi­ cated a firm pledge goal or are actively working to determine that goal and get com mittee activities underway. About 85 add itional congregations have voiced sup­ port, but because of pastoral vacancies or other i m mediate congregational priorities will be delaying participation until next year, Bekemeier indicated . The u ltimate goal of the $3 million church campaign has been to reach all of the 90,000-plus members personally with the PLU message. A significant n u m ber of cong regations are involved in "ev­ ery member viSitation" programs; others are form ulating alternate campaign efforts which reflect their own capabilities, the vice­ president pointed out. With the church phase of the five-year $1 6.5 million campaign off and ru nning, PLU officials will begin spearheading add itional ef­ forts during the 1 979-80 academic year. A new special thrust this year will be among the ca mpus consti­ tuency - regents, faculty, staff and students, according to Be­ kemeier. "Initial campaign thrusts among LU's owners (the church) and campus constituencies will help 'mmeasu rab ly In l ater efforts among businesses, corporations and he com mu nity , " h e ex­ plained . "They want to know, 'What a re your own peo p l e doing? ' " Meanwhile, proposals have al­ ready been made to major foun­ dations and corporations with many more to come. Major gifts

PL U Officials Encouraged by Church Response; Over 90 Percent Voice Support

Capital Effort t m have been received from the M u rdock, B u rl i n gto n - Northern and Cheney Fou ndations and such corporations as Weyerhaeuser, st. Regis and ASARCO . A formal pre­ sentation was recently made to The Boeing Company. The a lumni cam pa ign has re­ corded 229 leadership pledges totaling nearly $1 20,000 or 24 percent of its goa l . "One of the problems in fairly reporting alum­ ni totals is that alumni are involved so heavily in the church and major gifts phases of the ca mpaign," Bekemeier said . More than one-thi rd of the chu rch campaign volu nteers a re alums; an alum, for example, re­ c e n t l y s o l i c i ted a $ 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 anonymous major gift, and there have been at least two alums who have given major gifts of $20,000 or more. The PLU Alumni Association board of di rectors in September unani mously resolved their per­ sonal financial support and active involvement in the solicitation ef­ fort, highlig hts of which will be projects later this fall in San Diego and Hawaii. The u niversity recently received its fi rst seven-fig ure bequest. Though conservatively estimated at $1 million, the gift will not be included in ca mpaign totals or formally annou nced until the es­ tate has been settled . Another major gift, income from a p rodUCing oil wel l , i s guaranteed a t $50,000, but has a potential value of over a quarter million dollars . Not to b e lost. however, a mong the many facets of the ca pital campaign is the need to maintain a strong Annual Fund, Bekemeier emphasized . Last year the PLU Annual Fund exceeded $1 1 mill­ ion, including a record of $% million from the 900- member PLU Q C lub . " It's comparable to a church's buildi ng fund campaign and on­ going stewardship pledges, " Be­ kemeier sa id. "There must be adequate support of both. " here i s reason for gratitude and opti mism with the prog ress of the ca mpaign as it enters its eighth month , he said . "But there is a great deal of hard work ahead ," he added . "We're very

thankful for the h undreds of dedi ­ cated people helping us. Without them, an ambitious multi-m illion dollar goal would be impossi ble." "Sharing in Strength" funds a re

earmarked for construction of new science and fi ne arts facil ities, extensive ca mpus remodeling and strengthened endowment a nd scholarship programs


4

Campus

Faculty Tenure. Promotions Ann unced

Academic Year Opens On Optimistic Note

The promotion of nine profes­ sors was annou nced at P LU ' s Openi ng Convocation Sept. 1 1 . Attaining the rank of full profes ­ sor were Carrol DeBower, educa ­ tion ; Gordon Gilbertson, music; A rth ur Martinson, history; and Gary Wilson communication arts. New associate professors are stephen Barndt. b si ness ad ­ m i nistration; Christopher Brown ­ Ing, history; Li nda Cox, education ; Vernon Hanson. social work; and Gary Minetti. education . Tenure was granted to Brown ­ i ng , Cox and Wilson along with Clara carper, n ursing; oger Card. m usic; Ralph Gehrke and Paul Ingram. rel igion; Jerry Lej e une , psychology; Richa rd M cGi n n is , biology-o n leave; Eldon Schafer, busi ness a d m i n istrati on ; A n n Tremaine, music; and Don Went ­ worth, economics-on leave New department chairmen are Gehrke in religion, Joh n Ma1l1 in biology, Ernst Schwidder, a rt; a n d William Gilbertson SOCial work

I ncreased financial and academ­ ·ic strength contributed to an optimistic mood as Pacific Luthe­ ran U niversity opened the 1 979-80 academic year uesday, Septemb ­ er 1 1 . Accord ing to PLU President Dr. William O . Rieke, the university this year IS on the soundest financial footi n g , h a s t h e stro n g e s t a cademic p ro g ra ms, a n d the strongest faculty, staff and stu ­ dent body In the five years of his presidency. The PLU preSident's comments came at the annual PLU Openrng Convocation, attended by approx­ I mately 2,500 students, faculty, staff a n d members of the com ­ munity. Rieke pOinted out to the predo­ m inantly student audience that educationa! costs WQuid continue to climb with i nflation, but with increases In funding from 0 her sou rces . "The percentage for �mifv i ncome dollars for tuition has not gone u p " The academ ic strength of the student body was illustrated bv the average high scho I g rade point 3 4, of the entering fresh­ m3n class, One of every fo u r PLU freshmen earned Ho nors at Entr­ a nce, or above 3 75 high s hoa l g p.a. Specia l recog nitions at the con­ vocation included Carl Hoaglum. a senior chemistry major from Taco­ ma, who has received a $ 5,000 scholarship from the Allenmore Fou ndation of Tacoma . He qual­ ified on the basis of this academic performance in pre-med studies; M a rk Chesn utt, a Portl a n d sophomore. earned the Emma Storaasli Johnson Award as the top scholar in last year's freshman class; Among 1 1 National Merit Final­ ists entering PLU as freshmen this fall is Rosalund Jenkins of Auburn, who has been recognized u nder a new National Merit Corp. program which specifically honors minority students. Promotion of nine PLU p rofes­ sors was announced . Granted the ran k of full professor were Carrol DeBower, education; Gordon Gil­ bertson, music; Arthur Martinson, history; and Gary Wilson, com­ munication a rts. Twelve professors were g ra nted ten u re. Twenty-eight new memb ­ ers have jOined the P L U faculty for the 1 979-80 academic year.

1 80 Honored A PLU Summer Commencement More than 1 80 bachelor's and master's deg rees were awarded at Pacific Lutheran U niversity Sum­ mer Commencement exercises, August 1 7. PLU President Dr. Wil­ l ia m O. Rieke co nferred th e degrees. Paul Dugger of Graham, Wash., spoke on behalf of the master's deg ree ca ndidates . Dugger earn­ ed a bachelor's deg ree i n earth sciences from PLU in 1 972 and retu rned to earn a master's de­ gree in education (school ad­ ministrationl. Speaking on behalf of the bachelor's deg ree candidates was Kristi ne Kra b be n hoft of S a c ­ ramento, Ca l if. She earned a bachelor of science degree in n u rsing. Seventy master's degrees and 1 1 8 bachelor's deg rees were awarded . Master's degrees i n ­ cluded 37 i n social sciences, 2 9 in education, two in music and two in humanities. There were 38 recipients of bachelor of science degrees i n n ursing, 33 bachelor of arts de­ grees, 18 in business administra. tion, 14 in education, ten bachelor of fine arts, three bachelor of scie n ce/med . tech . , a n d two bachelor of sciences .

Arthur Martinson

Carrol DeBower

Gary Wi/son

Gordon GlfOertson

High SchOOl Students study Foreign Tra e Local high school juniors and seniors will join faculty members at Pacific Lutheran U niversity this fall to achieve a better under­ standing of foreig n trade, which is this year's National Debate TopiC f o r h ig h schools across the country. International trade is the cur­ rent theme of PLU's Project Adv­ ance. a course designed to g ive interested high school students an early taste of college life and the chance to earn college credit as they explore one of the issues challenging modern SOCiety. A reduced tuition of $ 1 0 for the one-credit class is made possible through scholarships provided by P LU a n d l o c a l c i v i c - m i n d e d businesses. Beginning October 1 0, facu lty members from economics, polit­ ical science, hj story, SOCiology,

b u s i n ess a d m i n i stration and philosophy will offer a six-week series of lectures, to meet on Wednesdays from 3 : 30 to 5:30 p.m . in Room 1 08, Ramstad Hall . The course will give an overview of U .S. trade policies as well as discus­ sion of special topics, including the role of underdeveloped cou n ­ tries of Africa a n d South America in international trade; moderniza­ tion and trade in the People's Republic of China; and concerns about human rights as they affect international trade. "High school debate coaches have been profuse in their thanks for last year's program, in which 50 students participated, " reports Dr. Arturo Biblarz, Project Advance coordinator. "The program is not restricted to debaters, though, and it doesn't teach debating techniques-but it does provide a considerable body of information useful to debaters and other stu ­ dents . " I nterested students may call PLU for information (531 -6900, Ext. 289) or contact counselors or debate coaches at the a rea high schools.


Campus

Regents Select Size. Site For New Science Building The site and size of the antici­ pated new Pacific Lutheran Un­ iversity s ience building have been formally approved by the PLU Board of Regents. The action, which calls for a 77,OOO-square foot facility to be located just north of Olson Au­ ditorium, was taken at the Re­ gents annual fall retreat, con­ cluded Wednesday. According to PLU president Dr. William Rieke, the site and size specifications were a part of a master plan prepared by the Port­ land architectu ral firm of Broome, Orindulph, O'Toole a nd Rudolph . The board reviewed the entire plan, which proposes that future development of the campus fol­ low a loop/cluster concept, with a cademic buildi ngs on the periphery and residence halls clus­ tered near the heart of the campus. The selected location necessi­ tates relocation of frame mainte­ nance shop buildings as soon as possible, Rieke i ndicated. The board action is consistent with a major facil ities expansion timetable established in 1 97 7 , according to Rieke. That timetable antiCipates building design follow­ ing selection of an architect in J a n u a ry 1 980. Groundbreaking could follow as early as 1 981 . " This action constitutes a major step in the realization of physical needs of our academic prog ram , " Rieke said. The board also considered a proposed site for a futu re fi ne arts facility on the west end of the campus, also a location consisten with the loop/cluster concept. In other action, the Regents approved the annual award of up to five Regency Advancement Awards to faculty for professional

development. Provision was made for up to $ 3,000 stipend per award. The present Regency Pro­ fessorship, awarded annually since 1 97 1 , will now be given no more frequently than every three years with variable fiscal amounts. PLU enrollment is up slightly over last year to 3.488 full-time

and part-time students as of Wed­ nesday, Rieke reported. "This is pleasing because it affirms ou r stated plans for a one per cent increase each year over the next five years," he said. ' At present, PlU residence halls are a full capacity with 23 students in temporary quarters at present. Board officers elected unani m ­ ously for the coming year are Melvin Knudson of Tacoma, chair­ man; Rev. David Wold of Puyallup, vice-chairman; Perry Hendricks of Tacoma, treasurer; and Dr. Christy Ulleland of Seattle, secretary.

23 PLU Gathe ri ngs Pla nned

A series of PLU gatherings for alumni, parents of students, pros­ pective students and friends of the University will be held around the nation during the 1 979-80 school year. You will receive notification as to time and place of the meeti ng in your area Set aside the date . now. The list of gatherings follows: Date

Day

Location

Sept. 1 5 Sat. Moorhead Ashland Sat. Oct. 6 Oct. 14 Sun . Walla Walla Nov . 29 Thu rs. Anchorage Sat. Fairbanks Dec. 1 Sun. Dec. 2 Seattle Portland Sat. Dec. 8 Sun. Dec. 9 Salem Honolulu Dec. 1 1 Tues. st. Louis Jan. 1 5 Tues. Jan . 19 Sat. Longview Bellingham J a n . 22 Tues. Jan , 24 Thurs. Los Angeles Jan . 25 Fri. Palm Springs Sat. Jan . 26 Phoenix Jan . 28 Mon . San Diego Fri . Feb. 1 Sacra mento Feb. 2 Sat. Palo Alto Feb. 2 Sat. Long Island Spokane Sat. Feb, 9 Kalispell Mar. 1 7 . Mon. Mar. 1 8 Tues. Billings Other cities in which meetings are being contemplated in the sp ring include Eugene, WE?natch­ ee, Denver and Minneapolis.

Dr. Gordon Lathrop, left, liturgy professor at Wartburg Theolo�ic.al Seminary and former PLU campus minister, anq chl!rch music speCIalIst Carl Schalk from Concordia Teachers College In RIver Forest, Iff, were featured during the 2nd Annual James Beckman Memorial Lectureship at PLU Sept. 30-0ct. 1.

Susan Briehl

P LU Campus M i n istry N a m es N ew Vica r Susan Briehl of Spanaway has been appointed as a vicar assigned to the Campus Ministry office at Pacific Lutheran U niversity, ac­ cording to PLU President Dr. Wil­ liam O. Rieke. Ms. Briehl, who will be serving with u ni vers i ty mi nister Rev . Ronald Tellefson, will have variety of responsibilities, including cou n­ seling, teaching preach ing and student congregation activities. A g ra d uate of Bethel H igh School. Briehl is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Washington State Un­ iversity where she also earned a master's degree in literary history and criticism. She was both a g ra d uate a n d u nd e rg rad uate teaching fellow at WSU . She studied for two years at Pacific Lutheran Theological Semi­ nary in Berkeley, Calif . She served last year a an intern pastor for Elim Lutheran (LCA) and First Lutheran (ALC) Churches in Port Orchard . The former Daffodil Princess from Bethel High is the daughter of Rev . and M rs. John L. Briehl of Spanaway Lutheran Church. She was married earlier this month to Martin Wells, also a seminary stu­ dent, formerly of Anchorage, Alaska .

N ew Tra nsfer Pol icy Aids LSI G rad u ates Students desi ring a Bible School experience as well as a university baccalaureate deg ree received strong encouragement this fall with the announcement of a new cooperative transfer policy involv­ I ng PLU and the Lutheran Bible Institute of Seattle. Under provisions of the new prog ram, an Associate in Biblical Studies diploma from LBI now qualifies for 48 semester hours of credit at PLU, according to PLU President Dr. William O. Rieke. The program offers new alter­ natives and incentives for our Lutheran students and affirms the u n i v e rs ity ' s d es i re to w o r k cooperatively with LBI in the inter­ est of all students, he indicated . The PLU provost's and regis­ trar's offices and the office of academic development at LB I finalized details of the program in August following a thorough cur­ riculum review. Accord i n g to P LU Reg istra r Charles Nelson, a typical LBI transf­ er student's academic program at PLU would include 1 2 semester hours of general university re­ q u i rem ents, i ncl uding writing, physical education and I nterim; 24 semester hours of core cou rses, . including one religion course; 1 6 hours of lang uages and 28-32 hours in the student's chosen major. The student's LBI grade poi nt average would not affect their university g . p. a . but would be a factor in the admissions deciSion, he i ndicated.

P LU Offers

N e\N Course I n Spoken Swed ish "Spoken Swedish" i s the title of a new evening course being of­ fered this fall as part of the Continui ng Education Program at Pacific Lutheran University . The class is taught by Marianna Forssblad . A native of Gothen­ burg, Sweden, Ms. Forssblad has taught Swedish at the University of Wash i ngto n , Bel levue and Green River Community Colleges and the Swedish Club in Seattle. This fall she is also teaching Swedish Poetry at the U of W. Currently preparing doctoral dis­ sertation of "Walt Whitman in Sca n d i n a v i a , " s h e h o l d s a bachelor's degree from Hollins College and two master's degrees from U of W. The PLU course is available for either credit or audit.


Americana

I New PLU Prof Reflects

Margaret Mead: :4 Woman of Overwhelming Humanity By Gayle Blomme

She brings to life several pic­ tures of the late anthropologist Margaret Mead - as an observer sitting quietly in Bali, n otebook i n hand; a s a matria rch -scholar o n h e Tonight Show, with a walking staff ta ller than she was; as a w ma n of "overwhel m i ng u­ manity, " greeting all the children she met as her gra ndchildren. Dr. Laura Klein IS a new faculty member in anth ropology at Pacif­ IC Luthera n U niversity. Nine years ago stle met with Marga ret Mead and talked with her on several occasions Personal recollections now add to her profession a l a p preciation of Mead 's stature . In November, to recognize the first anniversary of Mead's death, she will offer a short evening course at PLU to review her con­ tributions to American life and to the study of comparative culture. "I me Margaret Mea d a t her 70th birthday pa rty," r members Or Klein. "I had known her name for years . In fact, when I first made up my m i nd to e an anthropolog ­ ist, the reaction I a lmost alway recei ed was, 'Oh Like Ma rga ret Mead?' Then at graduate school I was awarded a fellowship that Mead had a rranged for the en­ coura gement of you n g schola rs . when I chose a research n di rector, I discovered that her resea rch director had been Mar­ ga ret Mea d . I almost felt as if she was my g ra nd mother . " "Grandmother" a nd " g ra n d ­ da ug hter" sha red a similar love for the study of d ifferent cultures, and their careers took some simi­ lar turn s . Fifty yea rs before Klein did her g raduate work at New York University, Mead had studied an­ thropology many blocks uptown at Columbia University. Both left the classroom a n d the libra ry for field research . Mead left New York in the 1 920's to go to Samoa, and I ter to other island cultures such as New Gui nea and Bal i ; in the early 1 970's Klein conti n ued her study of No rthwest Indian cultu re with a year in Alaska living with the Tl i ng it tribe. "I was particu la rly i nterested i n studying sex roles a mong the Tlingit; I d iscovered that women have considerable power in the tribe. But even so fa r away from Margaret Mead, she had a l ready hel ped my research - si nce in severa l books such as 'Sex and T e m p e r a m e n t i n P r i m itive Societies' a nd ' Male a n d Female' . she had beg u n to build a store of i nformation a n d analysis of sex l roles i n d ifferent cultures, long

miserable." Based on her observa­ tions in Sa moa, Mead's a nswe r was "No." According to what our culture teaches us about adolesc­ ence a n d adulthood, we may learn to be miserable. But we may also learn from people l i ke the Sa­ moans how to avoid the anxiety a nd distress we too easily assume is "natura l " for teen -agers. " Mead bel ieved i n anthropolo­ gy, " says Dr. Klei n . "She once told me, 'If you u n dersta nd a town of

500 people, you u n dersta n d the worl d . ' I may not com pletely be­ lieve her," laughs La ura Klein, " b u t I appreciate her point o f view . " Mead had one major disa ppoint­ ment as an a nth ropolog ist never to be offered the chair of the Department of An h ropology at olumbia U niversity, the school from wh ich s e had gra duated . idely beli eved that bei ng a " It's woman is what kept her from receivmg that offer," says Klei n . "That's IroniC, because in h er field experience and my own i t seemed a real advantage to be a wom a n .

Margaret Mead

before many other a nthropolog ­ ists saw the topic's I m porta nce. " It's clear that Klei n a d m i res many of Mea d 's alms and accom p­ lishments . "She was a practi cal person, a n d a lways I n studying a d ifferent cultu re she wa nted to bring back someth ing that could be of use to America . " When she went to samoa, for exa m ple, "she wanted to learn if In all cultures to be a tee -ager means to be

For some prim itive peoples, the i mage of he w hite m a n is as­ sOCIated with colonia ! rule . A wo­ man doesn't seem as th reateni ng a nd may win th e trust of the

g ro u p s h e is studyi n g m o r e qUIckly . " "I don 't want to idea lize Mar­ garet, " says Klein. "At ti mes she was domineeri ng, a n d critics were ofte n p rovok e d by h e r p ro­ n o u n ce m e nts on s u bj e cts i n which she wa s not expert. But her best qua lities were that she really

Arthur Fiedler

PLU Prof Recalls Influence of Boston pops Maestro By Kathleen A. vaught

I am fortunate to have had the opportunity to work with Arthur Fiedler, late conductor of the Boston Pops. Few musicians have ach ieved or deserved the level of world-wide recognition that Fied l ­ er did, or maintained their place i n the public eye for so m a ny years. The Boston Pops is a tradition i n Boston a nd across the country. The Pops has g rown from its first seas o n of occasional concerts i n 1 895 to a sum mer- long series of 72 concerts by 1 976. The Fiedler era lasted from 1 9 30 to 1 979 and was m a r k e d by c o n t i n u o u s growth. Much of this expansion is attri butable to Fiedler's efforts and sense of style, aided by radio and television broadca sts a n d sales of tapes and records . I began my association with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Boston Pops in 1 970, working occasiona lly as an extra player, or as a su bstitute. Then in 1 976 there was a horn vacancy in the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra, and I

beg a n spen d i n g s u m me rs i n Boston . M y strongest memories of Ar­ th ur Fiedler are of a vibra n t and demanding man on the pod i u m . He always knew what he wa nted from the m usic and the musicia ns; and over the years pieces that were played repeatedly at Pops g rew to have his sta m p , which frequently became the accepted interpretation. The key to Fiedler's fame may be found in his personality. He was a m a n of extreme vitality, a lways exploring new ways of reaching the public. H is u n ique progra m ­ ming, combining a revival of the light music of earlier days with standard orchestral literature a n d current popula r m usic a ppealed to a wide spectru m of the popula ­ tion . Among m usicians, Fiedler is respected a nd loved for the op­ p o rtunities he gave prom ising young soloists. Without his spo n ­ sorship many of today's best­ known musicians would have had considerable difficulty establish­ ing thei r careers. As advancing years and the relentless dema n ds of rehearsals

cared about people and that she always stood up for what she believed i n . The last ti me I heard her talk, she was studying the effects of fl uorocarbons on the atmosphere. She thought it was· a bsurd for Americans to injure themselves while ig nori n g t h e danger. But s h e thoug ht i t was. worse that harm to the atmos­ phere would endanger other peo­ ples such as the Samoans - 'who never had anythi n g to d o with it. ' " Her death was a n nounced at an a nthropology conference I was attending last November," Klei n reca lls. "Though m a ny there had sometimes disagreed wi th Mead, er i m ­ they seemed to realize portance as anthropology's repre­ sentative to the worl d . Or, as one sch olar pu t it. 'We h ave lost our pUblic relations person . ' "The elde rly women I once overheard as we waited in line at a Margaret Mead film series offered a different kind of memoriaL On e mentioned being I n Mead's class at olumbia a year ahead of her; a nother said that her daughter had gone to g ra m ma r school witll Mead's daug hter. "It seemed to me that ten tho u sa nd people were a l l Mar­ g a ret M ead 's neigh bors . "

Or. Klein 's ourse on the many faces of Margaret Mead is part of a series of short evening courses on g r ea t p io n eers of m o dern thought to be offered in the Interface program at PL U during the fall and the Interim. Others in the series include Freud, Einstein and Marx. and concerts took their tol l , Fiedl ­ er refused to lig hten his sched ule. Often his strength would lag d u r­ i ng rehearsal and pain woul d be visible in his face, but when con­ cert ti me drew near his step would quicken and his smile blaze as he approached the pod i u m . T h e pervasiveness of h i s spirit was evident a mong the Boston Pops Orchestra mem bers on the evening of his death, July 1 0, 1 979. When I a rrived at Symphony Hall for the concert that night there were few smi les, a n d the usua l backstage chatter was subdued . But everyone was there; after 49 years of Fiedler's direction it was u nt h i n ka b l e that the concert woul d be ca ncelled . The assista nt conductor, Harry Ellis Dickso n , had the u n ha ppy task that night of ta king the maestro's place. Tributes to Authur Fiedler were endless in the media for severa l weeks after his death, but surely the most moving and a ppropriate was the Memorial Concert on J u l y 1 5. That performa nce, g iven out­ doors at the Hatch Memorial Shell beside the Charles River i n Boston, recreated one of Fiedler's greatest tri u m phs, the J u ly 4, 1 976 Bicen­ ten n ial Concert, which was the largest live concert of classica l m usic i n recorded history. Ms. Vaught is an assistant professor of music at PW.


The World

PLU Profs Attend World Conference On Faith, cience ·

Is the gap between the world's nations i ncreasing? rich and poor ' Are third world countries dump­ ing grounds for the pollution of industrialized nations? Are poor cou ntry populations being used as test cases for new medicin es? These and many other concerns were raised at a World Council of Churches conference at the Mas­ sachusetts Institute ofTechnology for 1 2 days in July. The theme was "Faith, Science and the Future: The Future of Science and Tech­ nology i n the Struggle for a Just, Participatory and Sustainable Soc­ iety. " Four PLU faculty members, an a l u m na and a student we re among the 900 participants that 'represented Western and Eastern Europe, North America, and the Third World. Religion professor Dr. Robert Stivers was an official re­ presentative of the U nited Pre­ sbyterian Church . Dr. William Giddings, chemistry, and Drs. K.T. Tang and Sherman Nornes from physics were i nvited from PLU by the American Luthe­ ran Chu ch because of the import­ ance of conference themes on the Murdock Science Study Project being conducted at PLU . They were "accredited visitors . " Katheri ne Mancke Kidd, a '71 alumna from Allentown, Pa ., at­ tended, and PLU senior Joan Lof­ g ren was a steward. " Equal emphasiS i n participant selection was given to representa­ tives from science and tech nolo-

gy, social philosophy, economics and politics," Giddings explai n ed. "The 59 countries represented included all regions of the world except China . " There was analysiS of ethical problems caused by technology, i n c l u d i n g n u c l e a r w e a po n s , genetic engineering and h u man experimentation, and energy re­ sources and their social and en­ viron mental consequences. These problems prompted a resolution from Third World coun ­ tries denouncing some of tech­ nology's negative i mpacts on their societies, such as dumping of pollutants and use of citizens for testing of medicines. "There was also a u nanimous resolution for worldwide nuclear disarmament and ratification of Salt II by all powers," Giddings reported . "The overall i mpact of the con ­ ference was almost overwhelm­ ing," Giddings said . "The challenge of world opinion was felt deeply. The historical and current use of science and technology was por­ trayed as having brought g reat sufferings to people of the third world . " He added, "Not only the self­ defi ned goals of science, but its actual Impacts upon h u man lives, both beneficial a nd destructive, must somehow be understood by

This past summer the PLU Foreign Area Studies Program (FASP) sponsored a study tour of the People's Republic of China. A comprehensive account will appear in the December issue of Scene. FASP is planning a tour of Russia during January Interim.

us and communicated to our students.

Oslo Gathe"ri ng

"The challenge will be to incor­ porate ethical dimensions, not as a separate part of the curriculum but within all our departments."

About 5 0 alumni, parents, stu­ dents and friends of PLU met at the American Lutheran Church in Oslo July 1 . Milton Nesvig, execu­ tive associate to the president at PLU, and his wife, Hazel. hosted the event, assisted by H i l d e Bjorhovde and Berit Bjercke, PLU students from Oslo. Al The group i ncluded from left, The Rev. Victor Andersson, Oslo; Janet Peterson '78, working i n Oslo; D r . Knut Hagrup, retired Scandinavian Airlines president; I n ­ g rid Kvaale of Oslo, a PLU freshman this fall; and Torstein Grythe of Oslo, d irector of Norway's famous boys' choir; Bl Bjorn Melsom of Larvik, right, a PLU senior, his father, Odd, left, and Dagny Hovi, an Oslo physical education student who attended PLU in 1 977; Cl Members of the PLU Advisory Council in Oslo give guidance and counsel to the Sca ndi n a vi a n Studies program at the u niversity. They are from left, Alf Bjercke. business leader and Norwegian Rotary governor-elect; D r . Johan Hambro, ecretary-genera l for the Norseman's league; and Reidar H useby, public relations director for the Norwegian Broadcasting System : D J From left. PLU senior Hilde Bjorhovde, M rs. Ture Hailo, Ole Kjorrefjord '79. now a Harvard g raduate student, Tone Holo a nd P LU freshman Ann Hoilo .


The President

W;ih., � ftlk/ IwJ. E nte ri n g The 1 980' s With Pu rpose And Confid e n t Stre n gth : A Ti m e To M ove Vi g o ro u s ly Ahead "The measured steps of the serious mind working its way by geometric advances, the slow progress into the n ucleus of the cell, the dragging trains of thought into ethical and philosophical enigmas, the programs that store and retrieve and solve economic and political puzzles, the God-doubts and leaps of faith that afflict our lowest moments and illuminate our highest and most metaphysic­ al ones, the administrative postures that hold the coats of both the learners and the learned, the flights of fancy: these are creative acts. "Only the deadening, the deterring and defeating, the threatening and discouraging, those things which make h uman existence poorer, h a rder, and hopeless, are outside creativity . "Only things alive, lively and life-giving, supporting life and continuing it, making it easier, more meaningful, full, better, and happier, are creative. " Those paragraphs by Doris Grumbach i n The Chronicle of Higher Education (Sept. 1 7, 1 979), so clearly describe the dynamics set i n motion on a u niversity campus each Sep­ tember. As we opened the 1 979-80 school year at Pacific Lutheran University with a series of important events ranging from Faculty Fall Conference to O pening Convocation to the Board of Regents meeting, there were many opportunities to reflect on what has been, where we are, and what we can anticipate in the futu re . The past year, i ncluding the recently concluded summer session, was especially strong and productive. The Summer prog­ ram finished almost exactly on target both with respect to academic programs and budget. For the entire year, total credit hour production - the key, the single most important element to the U niversity's fiscal health - rose from 87,339 in 1 977-78 to 89,1 25 in 1 978-79. These figu res indicate not the 1 % increase projected in the Five Year Plan, but a 2 .04% increase in the first year of the i mplementation of that plan . The year was particularly energetic as judged by the annual reports of the Schools & Divisions. Each of the three divisions i n the College of Arts & Sciences, and all five of the professional schools showed strong evi ­ dences of faculty vitality. In educational efforts, the cornerstone of the liberal arts remained central. N umerous new cou rses were developed to meet com m u nity needs; faculty engaged in meaningful research ; efforts continued for better eval uation of . teaching effectiveness; contributions of stu­ dents both individually and in g roups were recognized . A road scope of faculty professional activi ies demonstrates that contributions to respective fields of knowledge are made on

regional and national levels. Along with these significant activities, the reports carried a definitely positive, upbeat characteristic, which u nderlies the best in creativity and productivity. Paralleling the academic program was measureable accomplishment in planning for long - ra n g e fac i l ities i m p rovement. Through a generous gra nt from the Murdock Fou ndation, the faculty from the Natural Sciences Division have engaged in exhaustive studies of the programs and building needed for the future. Similarly, the School of Fine Arts faculty has studied curricul u m and facilities which would allow maxim u m de­ velopment of the departments of art, com - · m u nication arts and music. During the summer months, a master plan for physical develop ment of the campus was stu d i ed cooperatively by representatives from all academic areas . A series of recom­ mendations concerning the science portion of the plan was presented to the Board of Regents at its Sept. 1 8 meeting, and was approved. (An a rticle related to the plan appears elsewhere in this issue.l In addition, major remodeling and enlarg ­ ing of existing facilities i s either completed or u nder way. The KPLU-FM studio i n Eastvold has been expanded and improved; Memorial Gymnasiu m now houses offices and a clas­ sroom for communication arts; Tingelstad has been returned to its original status as a residence hall and the mathematics faculty have temporary quarters in a new building. The Alumni House addition accommodates the Collegium and Church Relations offices; Olson Auditorium has a completed dance studio; the lower level of the U niversity Dr. William D. Rieke

Center provides offices not only for Campus Ministry and Career Placement & Planning, but currently i n the completion stage is a small but effective and attractive office for our new Cooperative Education Prog ram . The Hauge Administration Building has been remodeled to house the Person nel Office to expand and i mprove the services of the School of Education, Student Life, Admis­ sions and Financial Aid, and we have begun i nstallation of a n elevator in the lobby to aid our handicapped students . Hardly any build­ ing on the campus has not been touched in a n effort to place and i mprove teachi ng and service facilities. A major accomplishment has been the granting of u nqualified reaccreditation by the Northwest Association of Schools & Colleges . This vote of confidence from the accrediting agency means that. in the judg­ ment of their trained evaluators, PLU is clearly achieving its stated mission through excel­ lent programs and adequate staffing and support to demonstrate progress toward those goals. It means further that. barring an unanticipated reversal, there will be no need to document the quality of our programs for another ten years. Part of the support which allowed reaffir­ mation of accreditation derived from the capital and endowment cam paig n . Although the thrust has not reached the business/cor­ po rate/co m m u n ity constituency, several foundations and bequests have brought our gifts total to a record high. The emphasis of the campaign in this first phase has been mainly in the chu rches of the North Pacific District of the America n Luthe­ ran Church. The results are especially en­ cou raging. Early responses indicate that the goal of $ 3 million dollars from the congrega­ tions likely will be reached and perhaps surpassed . Moreover, the percentage of supporting congregations is far greater than is normal ly encou ntered . Of the 3 07 churches, more than 60 percent have pledg­ ed their support, with only 3.5 percent electing not to participate. Of even greater importance, the visibility and i ncreasing interest in the congregations a mong the 50,000 households carries g reat people, student and program implications for the future And then the "bottom line" of what has been - because of all of the productivity of the past year in academic and development areas - the fiscal year, as interpreted by our auditors, ended solidly i n the black. Although the margin is remarkably slim, with the budget being managed to within 0.1 percent of projected operations, all is financially well . This is particularly gratifying in a year when the salaries of our full professors were raised to ach ieve a number two rating in the AAU P scale (which represents having attained the


9

Comments

o Club

Over 1 50 Years f Service

PLU Ca n Aid A l u m s , Friends Estate Pla n n i n g By Edgar Larson Director Of SpeCial Giving

Pacific Lutheran university desires to assist its alumnr and friends 111 their estate planning . There is a n ongoing need for looking at one's estate picture in light of changing family situations shifting economic patterns and tax laws that are u ndergoing contin ual changes. People often wonder how estate planning techniques can help to accumulate and co serve their assets, as well as to provide growth. Also, there are those alu m ni a nd friends who choose to share a portion of their estate with charitable organizations such as Pacific L theran U niversity. In this regard planning giving techniques can be used to provided a minimum of shrinkage to the estate while at the same time offering the maximum amount of tax savings. Each of us has an estate that poses a challenge and an opportunity. The challenge is to properly manage these assets which are ours. The opportunity is to creatively share a part of these assets for the good of others. Write: Edgar Larson DIrector of SpecIal (lIving Pactflc Lutheran UnIversIty Tacoma, WA 98447 (206) 531-6900

(cant. From P. 8)

60th percentile nationally} ' Other ranks have not yet reached that desired level, but efforts are in progress. I n addition, our endowment has shown a modest increase and the plant fun , from which we build, has been en­ larged. Leaving the reflection 0 the past year to anticipate the coming opportu ities, l believe the year ahead has every promise of being a.n especially good one. The enrollment for thiS fa ll together with the credit hour total are slightly above pr jectons . As of this date, last year's total enroll me t of 3,348 has increased to 3. 488 which agai demonstrates slightly more than the 1 percent growth cal/ed for by the Five Year Pla n . Our residence halls are

TO PLU

Parent's Club

B y David L. Berntsen Director of Development

A We l co me

This fall ha a special meaning for me because my oldest son, ChriS, beginS hi fresh man year here at PL . Ironically, he lives In i nderli Hall, named after hi great g rand parents who started working at PLU In 1 924. His great g randfather Hlnderlie retired 3 1 years later. His g randfather, enrv Berntsen, worked here 26 years. retiring 'n 1971 one year after I was hired as Director of Development at PLU in 1 970. All together mv relatives have worked over 1 50 total years for PLU . I n addition mv mother. Ida Hinderlle Berntsen , g raduated from PlC In 1 9 3 1 , a n d my Wife Carolee a nd I graduated here in the late 1 950 s. It IS my clear i mpression that both the Quality of PLU ' academic program and the C hristian environ ment continue to improve through he years. PLU's contributio to the students, hurch, and comm ni ies of today and th us the future is much greater and more valua ble than most people imagine. This school year we want to emphasize both the new capital/endowment d rive "Sharing In Strength" and the vital ongoing Annual Fund (Q Club, an niversary associates, and gifts of all sizes) that are either unre­ stricted or for scholarships. We are going to organize four telephone teams of six members each who will once a month (for 6 months) make calls for two hours to encourage additional new gifts. If you have suggestions for people to call � r would like to help, please contact me. We Will be calling both alumni and friends. We a re particularly anxious to find first-time donors. If you are presently in the Q Club, I cannot overstate how essential and appreCiated are your faithful and up-tO-date g ifts. PLU's financial pOSition and service to students depend on your generous support. Please volu ntarily renew and increase your gifts. During the past summer we have been saddened by the deaths of several of our members. Their deep concern for the univer­ sity has been reflected by their bequests and memorial gifts from their survivors. One of the bequests will be in five figures and another may exceed seven figures. I thank God for the many who offer their time, good words a nd gifts to help Pacific Lutheran U niversity, a very special place, grow in both qua ntity and Quality. filled. I ncreases in student fina nCial aid through loans and work study funds will provide greater assistance to students. . At a recent officers' retreat. I explored I n depth the past five year history of PaCific Lutheran U niversity a nd made the following statement. which I genuinely believe: "The recent Ilistorv of PLU has evidenced growth, setback, team bUilding at all levels, and now tremendous promise for the future While nothi ng ever is assured, I nonetheless believe we have the ability, even th ugh n ot t e certai nty, for the greatest progress ever i n our hist rv in terms of mission, program , and facilities." I believe this because the leadership and

To New PLU Parents By Milton Nesvlg Executive ASSOCiate To The President

With this 'ssue we welcome the pa rents of the 1 ,OOO-plus new students who have enr lied at PLU thi s fall . Glad to have you aboard You jo i n a throng of seve ral thousand Parents Club members. You are automatically a member of the Clu b because a member of your family is in he student body. Soon you will be getting a membership letter describing the ac­ ce ificate and tivities of the cl ub. When parents of new students came 0 campus Sept. 7, they were met bV Parents Council members who pi nned "Proud PLU Parent" buttons on them. The Council i s comprised of six couples plus President and M rs . William Rieke (whose son is ASPLU PreSident), Lucille Giroux (the preSident's executive associate) and the writer of this column . The parent who ca me the farthest was Sonja Evans who brought her daughter, Carol. all the way from Madrid, Spain. Carol's father, Harold Evans, Class of 1 949, is superi n ­ tendent of America n Dependent Schools i n Euro pe a n d has over 1 ,000 teachers under his supervision. Council members AI and Marilyn Hanson of Portla nd hosted a potl uck supper in their church (St. Andrew's Lutheran) August 1 5 for new and retu rning students, parents and friends. Close to 1 00 persons attended. Mrs. Paul Baughman hosted a similar group in her Spokane home August 8. ASSisting her was Mrs. Benjamin Ruehl, and council memb­ ers John and Ruth Bley. Parents, fa milies, alumni and friends at­ tended a PLU gathering in Oslo, Norway, J uly 1 . About 50 persons were present. The gathering was hosted by the writer and his wife, Hazel. (See p. 7)

talent across the campus are in place, s upport from the outside is g rowing, and the time is right to move vigorously ahead. Above all else, the mission of the University is affirmed and endorsed i n the University com mu nity, and by continuing demand of our students. The heart of that mission continues to be "the development of know­ ledgeable persons equipped with an under­ standing of the human condition, a critical awareness of hu ma ne and spiritual values, and a capacity for clea r a nd effective self­ expression . " With recommitmen to that mission, a d operati 9 from a solid but sensitive financial base, PacifiC Lutheran U niversity enters the 1 980's with purpose and confident strength.


10 The Arts

1979-80 PLU Artist Series Spotlights

Performers From Around The World

Performers from a round the world are featured during the 1 979-80 Artist Series season at Pacific Lutheran U niversity. They include internationally ac­ claimed Hungarian pianist Lili Kraus and soprano Cynthia Clarey as solo artists, as well as the Baya nihan Philippine Dance Company; Opera Piccola from Vancouver, Canada; Fana Mannskor, a Norwegian male choir from Bergen; a nd the Pre­ servation Hall Jazz Ba nd. Fana Mannskor opens the sea­ son Tuesday, Oct. 9, in Olson Auditori u m . Currently on its third tour of the United States, the 60voice choir has been acclaimed in both Norwegian and i nternational choir competitions . It was found­ ed 38 years ago . Soprano soloist Angum Skage will perform with the choir. A n ot h e r s o p ra n o , C y n th ia Clarey, appea rs at PLU Nov. 7 in cooperation with the Tacoma­ Pierce County Civic Arts Comm is­ sion . U nder the auspices of the commission, she is being spon­ sored as an affil iate artist by the Sea�-Roebuck Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. She has performed with n umer­ ous opera companies, i ncluding the New York City Opera, and has appeared as a symphony soloist in major east coast cities and in England. Her concert will be held in the PLU U niversity Center. Hungary's Lil i Kraus, scheduled for an Olson Auditorium appear­ ance Nov. 28, is considered the foremost living i nterpreter of the keyboa rd masterpieces of the Vien nese classical school, particu ­ larly those of Mozart. A 90- minute National Educa­ tional Television special, "Lili Kraus and the Mozart Piano Concerti, " has been shown around the world . The enchanting and eye ravish­ ing Bayanihan Philippine Dance Company was the highlight of the 1 970- 71 PLU Artist Series season. Since that time the troup has performed in countries around t e world· Europe, the Soviet U nion, the Middle East, South America, and the Far East. as well as the U nited States. Featu ring 28 dancers and 1 3 musicians, the company will per­ form in Olson Auditorium Jan. 1 7 . Opera Piccola will perform on PLU 's Eastvold Auditorium stage Feb. 8. The program will I nclude Rossini's " The Marriage Contract" and Walton's "The Bear, " a farce i n an English setting a n d a satire with a Russian setting.

Liti Kraus

The Vancouver-based troupe, directed by Pierrette Alarie, fea­ tures a cast of six, accompanied by a fou r- piece instrumental en­ semble. The Preservation Hall Jazz Band, appearing in Olson Auditorium April 1 5, has also performed previ­ ously at PLU and has built an appreciative following in several Northwest appearances. These are the musicians that made musical history with New Orleans jazz and have been playing it for 50 years. PLU Artist Series season tickets are available at the PLU University Center for $ 1 5 . For further infor­ mation call 531 -6900, ext. 403 . Bayanihan Philippine Dance Company

Fana Manns/(or


11

The Arts

Calvin Knapp

Andrew Schulman

PLU Orchestra Slates Series Of Masterworks Masterworks by the world's fin ­ est orchestral composers will be performed by the Pacific Lutheran U niversity Sym phony Orchestra during the 1 979-80 season. The series begins Monday, Oct. 8, with an all orchestral program featuring Beethoven's "Eroica" Symphony, Wagner's " P relude and Love- Death" from Tristan a nd Isolde, and "Death and Transfig­ uration Op. 24" by Stra uss. Dr. Calvin Kna.pp, a music pro­ fessor at PLU since 1 959, is the

Kathleen Vaught

featured artist for the second concert Tuesday, Nov. 1 3. Knapp will perform Brahms' "Piano Con­ certo No. 2 i n B-flat major. " Other works o n t h e p ro g ra m a re Mozart's "Symphony No. 40 in G­ Minor" and "La Mer" by Debussy. Dvorak's " N ew World Sym­ phony" is the featured master­ work during the third concert Tuesday, March 1 8 . The prog ram also spotlights guitarist Andrew Schulman, who joined the PLU faculty last year.

TwO SpeCia l Concert Series H i g h l ig ht Of PLU Ch ristmas George Frederick Handel's "The Messiah" Featuring the Choir of the west and members of the u niversity Symphony Orchestra Dr. Maurice Skones, directing Nov. 30 Dec. Dec. Dec_ Dec.

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Assembly of God Ch urch, Tacoma, 8:00 p . m . $4 (S. 1 8th & Union) Assembly of God Church, Tacoma, 8:00 p . m . - $4 8:00 p . m . - $5, $4 $3 Opera House, Seattle 8:00 p . m . - $5, $4, $3 Civic Auditorium, Portland 3:00 p . m . - (u navaiU Smith Auditorium, Salem (featuri ng Choir of the West accompanied by Salem Symphony Orchestra) 8:1 5 p . m . - $5, $4, $3 Eastvold Auditorium, PLU 4:00 p . m . - $5, $4, $3 Eastvold Auditoriu m, PLU

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Christmas Festlmal Concert Dec. 8 Dec_ 9 Dec. 1 5

Edmard Harmlc, directing

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All seats reserved, all concerts � price for senior citizens, students and children. Tacoma - Bon Marche, mail orders to PLU Tickets: Seattle - Bon Marche outlets, Augsburg Publishing House, ma�1 orders to fLU Portland - Civic Auditorium, downtown oultets, or mail to Chnstmas FestIval Concert, 64116 SW Loop, Portland, OR97221 (ph. 245-2956) Salem - (unavailable)

Send self-addressed, stamped envelOpes and check or money order to: PLU Christmas Festival conce rt pacific Lutheran University Tacoma, WA 98447

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Other works on the program a re "EI Salon Mexico" by Copela nd and "Concierto del sur" by Ponce. Hornist Kathleen Vaught, also a second-year faculty member, per­ forms Hayd n's "Horn Concerto No. 1 in 0 Major" during the season's final concert Tuesday, May 1 3. The program also features Mahler's "Sym phony No. 1 In 0 Major" and a new work, Boleem's "Commedia . " Members of the University Sym­ phony Orchestra participate in the Handel's "Messiah" series in De­ cember and accom pany the annu­ al Student Soloist concert Friday, Apri l 1 1 . Dr. Knapp, widely known in the Northwest for solo piano concerts and i n duo recitals with his wife, Sandra, is also a noted accompan­ ist and adjudicator. Sch u l m a n has stu di ed with Leonid Boloti ne i n New York City and Abel Carlevaro in Uraguay on scholarships. Ms. Vaught, a summer member of the Boston Pops Orchestra for several years (see story p. 61. has also performed with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and other orchestral orga nizations on the East Coast. According to conductor Jerry Kracht. the orchestra is dedicated to the performance of the finest orchestral literature. While seek­ ing to strengthen the skills of its student mem bers, the orchestra also enjoys partiCipation of PLU faculty members and a nu mber of dedicated community musicians.


12

The ArtslThe Campus

Ove r 60 Booths Featu red At Y u le Bou ti q ue The Faculty Wives of Pacific Luthera n University an nually spon ­ sor an event which involves over 60 additional non-profit organiza­ tions from the Tacoma/Puget Sound area . The PLU Y ule Boutique will be held again this year at Olson Auditorium on Saturday, Nov. 1 7 , from 1 0 a . m . to 5 p . m . At the event thousa n d s of h an d ­ crafted items a n d homemade foods for Christmas giving are presented for sale, including can­ Idles, home decorations, knitted, crocheted and woven garments, jewelry, dolls, and toys. The pro­ ceeds from these sales benefit the

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Opens Stage Season

charities designated by the par­ ticipants. Last year the PLU faculty Wives granted 1 2 college scholarships from their portion of the Boutique proceeds. The scholarship capabi­ lites of the group have increased rapidly over the eight -year history of the Y u le Boutique. In addition to the hand-work available, the Faculty Wives offer a variety of Scandinavian delicacies for sale, i ncluding aebleskiver, lefse, cookies and pies, with de­ monstrations of the art of lefse­ makin g . Another portion of the Bouti­ que features Puget Sound artists and craftsmen, Pottery, sculpture, rosemaling . leaded glass. painting and other artistic creations are available.

Rates N . Y . Ti mes Review "Two of the most extraordinary poems are pictoral and dramatic and accessible in a way that we have all but ceased to expect from contempor ary poetry. "One is Gjertrud Schnackenberg Smyths's portrait of her late fath ­ er, a professor of history . . . Thus wrote John Romano, an English professor from Columbia ' u niversity, in the poetry review section of the Sept. 2 New York Times. He was referring to poems I P ublished in The Pushcart Prize I IV' Best of the Small Presses, an an nual poetry anthology edited by Bill Henderson and published by Pushcart Press . The poem to which he referred, "Walking Home, " is from her 1 2 poem "Laughing With O n e Eye" elegy to her father, PLU history professor Dr. Walter Schnacken­ berg, who died in 1 973. It was among seven of the elegy poems published in the February 1 979 issue of Scene. Among Romano's other com­ ments: "disti n g u i s h ed by the paradox of a preCise, clear-seeing nostalgia . . . "; "What matters in " La u g h i ng " is that something 'happens to people. . . "; " . . . insists on the centrality of action and character, and that's going to seem down right unpoetic if you have been immersed in , , . (such as John Ashbery or Robert BIy)"; "But it's useless to argue esthetics .with such poems as Smyth's once you've felt its power, and indeed it stirs in us the recognition of something important: that once upon a time novels took over action-and-character from poet­ ry. Therefore poets have a heredit­ ary right to those riches. "

'Sound of Music'

"The Sound of Music, : Rodgers a nd Hammerstein 's award-win­ ning, record-smashi ng m u s ica l hit. offers a spectacular open ing for the 1 979-80 stage season at PLU . The production, directed by drama professor Bill Parker with musical direction by music profes­ sor David Robbis, will be staged in Eastvold Auditorium at 8:15 p.m. each evening. A 2:15 p.m. matinee concludes the ru n on Su nday, Oct. 21 . The School of Fine Arts spon ­ sors the production. Along with the popular musical, the drama season also rpovides a broad range of comedy, satire and tragedy. It features scripts by John

New Names Added to PLU Faculty List Five faculty members each in business administration and n u rs­ ing head a list of 27 new persons teaching at PLU this fall . Sixteen hold doctor's degrees. N u rsing additions are Patricia Biggs, Susan Boots, Sylvia Novak, Carol Somonlani and Maren Stavig . Larry Hegstad, David McNabb, Thomas Sepic, Glenn VanWyhe and Cynthia Walton jOin the businesss administration faculty, Other new professors include Gary Anderson in mathematics; Bryan Dower, math and computer science; Martin Bartenau, com-

munication arts; Keith Benson and Ronald Smith, biology; Sheri Ton n , c h e m i s t ry ; R o b e rta B row n , French; and Silke Reavis, Germa n . Also Ernest Dumor, sociology; Gregory Guiding and Laura Klein, anthropology; Christine Ansvick, psychology; Jerry McKain, social work· and Susan Randall, history; Colleen Hacker and Katharine Hemion, physical education; and Marilyn Marti n , assistant reference libraria n , Virtually a l l are filling vacancies created by departing colleagues.

Why not give a gift of music? PLU Choir of the west record albums 1 977 European concert Tour (no. 8)

Lord, Thou Hast Been Our Refuge Sixty-Seventh Psalm . . . . . . . . . . . o Tad, Wie Bitter Bist Du Motette op. 1 1 0 no . 3 . . . . A Riveder I e Stelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Set Down Servant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Beautiful Savior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R. Vaughan Williams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . Charles Ives . . . .

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Max R�er Ing a r L hOI m Ro e . F. M. ns lansen

Three Choral works by Miklos Rozsa (no. 7) To Everything There is a Season, OP. 20 The Vanities of Life, OP. 30 23rd Psalm, Op. 34

$8.00 (mail) $9.25 (gift) � rough � $6.00 (malll $7,25 (gift)

Also available: Choir of the west records No. 3

(RecOrd no 9 a Chr1stmas album. anticipated In DeCember) (Indicate quantity) TO order pie se send your check to: NO. 6 NO. ! __ CHOIR OF THE WEST RECORDS Rozsa NO. 4 __ paCific Lutheran University Tacoma, WA 98447 Tour · NO. 5 __

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Mall records to:

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Guare, J ules Fieffer and Alan Ayck­ bourn as well as two Children's Theatre productions. "The House of Blue Leaves" is a Guare satire on modern society revolving arounda middle aged Tin Pan Alley "leftover " It ru ns No. 29-Dec. 1 at 8:1 5 plm. with a matinee Dec. 2 . The director is William Becvar. Alpha Psi Omega's Lisa Johnson directs Fieffer's fast-paced como' edy, "Hold Me!" A series of vignet­ tes dealing with men and women and their often mystifying rela­ tionships spark the production, runs Feb. 7-10 with a Sunday matinee. Parker directs "Ghosts," an ac­ claimed Ibsen work which runs March 1 3-1 5 and 21 -22 with a matinee March 2 3 . This family tragedy deals movingly with ques­ tions of soca i l a n d person a l "ghosts" as the sins of the father return to haunt a moterh in the destruction of her son . Ayckbou rn's wild comedy, "Ab­ surd Person Sing ular," comes to the PLU stage on the final two weekends of the school year May 8-10 and 1 6-1 7 with a May 1 8 matinee. Bill Becvar directs this insightful, humorous examination of 20th century concerns with prosperity and position. Christmas parties on three successive years provide the setting. Eric Nordholm marks his 25th year at the helm of the PLU Children's Theatre program. On Ja n . 2 6- 2 7 he d i rects p u b l i c matinee performances of "Yank­ ee Doodle," an Aurand Harris script which chronicles many of the large and small events in Amercian history from Paul Re­ vere to Charles Lindberg . P u b l i c performances of Tol­ kein 's popular "The Hobbit" will be presented by Children's Theatre April 1 9 -20. Phil Holte directs the stage adaptation fo the revied classic. All PLU dra ma productions fea­ ture reduced rates for students a nd senior citizens, All perform­ a nces are held in Eastvold Au­ ditorium at 8:1 5 or 2:1 5 p,m. Further information is available from the PLU Department of Communicaiton Arts.


13

The A rts/Alumni

A

'Life Synthesis'

Performa nce In Jeru sa l e m Th ri l l s Al u m na Soloist By J u dy Davis

For Kathryn Boe '52, singing with a German choir for a Jewish audience in Jerusalem during the Easter and Passover holidays was a "musical. spi ritual. political experi­ ence . " The Reedsport, Ore . , resident said the occasion was, in a sense, "a synthesis of the predominent Interests in my life." Mrs Boe, whose husband, Ja­ son, is president of the Oregon State Senate, sang with the 90member Fra nkfurter Kantorei and the Israeli Philha rmonic Orchestra at the invitation of Helmuth Rilling , an internationally known German maestro who travels widely as a guest conductor of sym phony orchestras . (Rilling is a friend of Dr. Mau rice Skones, director of PLU's music department.l "Rilling was the first German to conduct the Isaraeli Philharmon­ ic," noted Mrs. Boe, a violinist and pianist as well as a vocalist. When Rilling was musical direc­ tor of a summer musical festival at the U n iversity of Oreg o n i n Eugene, Mrs Boe sang i n choirs directed by him.

While i n Israel, the German choir's repertoire for the 1 3 sell­ out concerts they presented in­ cluded Bach's "B Minor Mass" and Brahms' "Schicklsalsied" and "Re­ quiem . " "As you can imagine, there are many philosophical aspects con­ nected with a German choir, a German cond ucto r, a deeply Ch ristian Bach work and a primarily Jewish audience and orchestra all involved in the emotions of Pas­ sover and Easter - in Jerusalem," said Mrs . Boe. Although the musicia ns and au­ dience shared a u n ity created by the music, their disparaties were evident to Mrs. Boe . "As I looked out over the audi­ ence, I saw a sea of skull caps and broad-brimmed hats worn by conservative Jews," she recalled. During one concert, she observ­ ed an elderly man holding his head in his hands. "His face was so contorted, at first I thought he was ill," she said. Apparently aware of her con­ cern, he looked u p and smiled . After the concert, wh ich ended in a thunderous standing ovation, the old man came up to Mrs . Boe. "He grabbed my hand, kissed it

Jull Holla nd Ea rns European Acclaim In Tough Wagner Role By Galen Johnson

Lyric- coloratura soprano, Juli Holland 75 settled back into her chair and pushed an errant lock of black hair away from her eyes . "Somehow, a n ideal performance has a kind of magic that goes beyond all technical considera­ tions. And it doesn't always have to do with how beautiful the sound may be. I guess I could call it inspiration, for lack of a better word, that can lift a performance above the dull and commonp­ lace." This Boise-born soprano recent­ ly made her professional debut in Wagner's Tannhaeuser in Geneva, i n t h e "pa nts" role of t h e Shepherd, where she had to sing from high up on the stage a

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capella. With a famous and high­ powered cast surrou nding her, one might think that no sopra no could make an im pression in such a role. But here is what the Aug ust Opera News had to say: " . . . the delicious, exquisite Shepherd of Juli Holla nd, . . . created, in an u n ­ promising setting, a special at­ mosphere." Music critics, especially E u ro­ pean ones, do not often mete out such praise, least of all on a small role. But Juli Holland has been garnering accolades for her sing­ ing since her teens. She took her undergraduate degree in vocal performance at Pacific Lutheran U niversity, where she also taught a year. She recently wound up two years of graduate study in voice at the University of Washi ngton under Leon Lishner. Along the way, she's won just about every prestigious scholar­ ship available - the Brechemin, the Metropolitan Opera North­ west Regional Auditions and Seat­ tle Opera's Sch ulz Auditio n . Local ­ ly, she has sung Adele in Fleder­ maus, Maureen in Don Pasquale and Belinda' i n Dido and Aeneas. Holland i s also an accomplished

Kathryn 80e

and said with great feeling, 'I have not heard music like that since I left Germany in 1 928 . . . while you were singing, I was weeping for joy.'" For Mrs . Boe, the reaction of the old man was representative of the "overwhel ming, beautiful accept­ ance of the symphony and the aUdience." She continued, "It was comfort­ ing to realize the Jewish members of the audience could forgive, interpreter of the Lieder and art song repertoire, and it was in this capacity that renowned baritone Gerard Souzay and accompa nist Dalton Baldwin first heard her. The result was a scholarship to study French a rt song in Europe and the role in Tannhaeuser. "Pardon the cliche, but singing in a big European production was a real learning expeience," Holland said. "I real ly didn't know what the 'big wide world of opera was like from my experiences here. It was frightening and exhilerating at the same time. "You know, people are some­ how called by their talents - we cannot help but respond. I don't really know why I sing, I only know I have to. You have to find the music within you rself - then you have to give to the audience. The task of the singer, I think, is to serve music, the composer and the audience, all equally. And last. one must serve oneself - you m ust have faith in your own abilities in the face of the incred­ ible competition. " I asked her about the difficulties

forget and understand that the Germans on stage were not the same Germa ns who drove them from their country during World War 1 1 . " Even critics praised the per­ formances; the Jerusalem Post described one of the concerts as a "performance which transcended all material things . " Besides providing her with an opportu nity to Sing with the Ger­ man Choir and Israeli orchestra, the tri p to Israel gave Mrs. Boe the chance to meet friends she had made in 1 976. That year, Mr. and Mrs . Boe were among 1 0 state legislators and their wives who had traveled to Israel as representatives of the National Conference of State Legislators. "My husband was then presi­ dent of the 7,OOO-member or­ ganization", said Mrs . Boe, mother of three grown sons. Frequently, Mrs. Boe's thoughts go back to the experiences she had in Jerusalem since "they were so impressive in so many ways. "As the home of the world's great religions, Israel is the center of what's going on in a religious and political sense. My trip made me realize that country - about the size of the state I live in - is at the core of what happens in our daily lives. "

of leading a "normal" life when faced with the demands music makes on a performer, and she feels it is possible to have a full, well-rounded life within music. "I dorl't think it's necessary to give up every shred of you r human identity to be a singer, as some assert. But I must say that when I do my best singing, I'm the most fulfilled and happy . " Future pla ns include a n aUdition tour of Germany this fall, a poten­ tial ly grueling round of small and large houses, good and bad im­ presarios - but with the cha nce for the .one break that could really set her operatic career rolling. "After a l l , " she co ncluded, "striving to be a better singer is the same as striving to be a better person ."

Reprinted by permission, Seattle Openings, Fall-Winter 1 979-80.

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14

Alumni

Docto r's Ca ri ng Refl e ctio n Of

PLU Experience B y Ronald Coltom AJumnl Director

Following is a letter received from a 1 973 graduate i n response to a letter and article in a recent issue of Scene that I feel is worthy of sharing wIth you .

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Dear Mr. Coltom: I'm writing In response to your editorial in the recent edition of the Scene about how alums feel about PLU. I 'm not surprised to find that many others share feelings similar to mine. However, I'd like to share my recent experience with you and add my vote to the many others you must have for PLU to keep up the good work. Also, I'd like to add a special thanks to you for the part you played In helping me come to PLU. A t the time I applied as a high school junior, you were financial aid director. With­ out the financial aid, I could not have attended PLU no matter how many times they accepted my application. My recent experiences, however, are not directly related to the financial aid, but to the part that my four years at PLU played in making me the person I am. I received my M. D. in Dec. 78 and needed to work the next six months before beginning my four- year residency program here. For part of this time I taught a human anatomy course at an institution of higher learning in Denver. This was the first time I had taught a course of this depth on my own and I naturally relied upon my past experiences of teachers and teach­ ing methods that I had seen as a student. My professors at PLU come to mind first as those that I would most like to emulate. During the course, I was faced with many unexpected obstacles. Perhaps one of the first things that shocked and amazed me was the discovery that a faculty member from a certain department whose students were required to take my course had called a private meeting of students of my class to discuss ''What to do about me " since it had become clear that I would not allow cheating and that they would not pass the course without being able to demonstrate that they had learned what I felt they should. At first I was very disgusted to see people in such "respectable " positions behaving in this manner. Then I began to suspect that I had been spoiled by the consideration and attitude of working together that is prevalent at PLU I felt lucky to have been spared this . ugliness as a student. Fortunately, the chairman of the department, for whom I was teaching, backed me up and several "stu­ dents " dropped the course. The next surprising experience came a little farther along after I had had a chance to get to know some of the students better. At PL U I had seen the biology department faculty work together to help students who had all sorts of personal problems, such as insecuri­ ty when they would confidentially discuss the student with other faculty members and then each work on helping the student to build self-confidence. The student was not aware of the consideration behind this and usually responded as the group of concerned faculty had hoped they WOUld. I only became aware of this "underground concerned faculty network" after I became a biology teaching assistant and spotted some prob­ lems which I discussed with Mrs. Creso, only

to discover that she was way ahead of me and faculty members were already working to help the student. Never was a student's confidential conversation revealed, but the basiC need was communicated so that the student received maximal help. I again considered it part of my responsibil· ity as an instructor to pay attention to the personal needs of my students. When I needed to communicate with other staff members regarding these problems, only a few did not act surprised that I was concern­ ed about the students as developing young adults as well as how well they were learning anatomy. A couple of times problems seemed to indicate a talk with the student. I began by saying, "I'm concerned about. . . , " and discovered that I had to fet the students recover from the surprise that a prof would be concerned before they could hear what else I had to say. One student said, " I've never had a prof who cared before/" Then the Scene came with an article about the goals of PLU and the acceptance of these goals by each faculty member. At first I thought these sounded pretty idealistic. . Then I realized that they were very similar to my own goals as a faculty member even though I was no longer at PLU I felt very proud to be a PLU graduate who was carrying on the PLU tradition of caring. Hopefully a little of it might rub off on the people with whom I came in contact. It sounds like the job of the disciples to spread the word of Cod. and I'm not so sure it's all that different. I suppose there 's always the possibility that I would have had the same goals without being a PLU graduate, but my experiences at PLU certainly helped to reinforce these values. It's taken me a long time to share some of the experiences that have recently made me more proud than ever to be a PLU graduate. I wanted to write earlier but didn 't really know to whom to write. Your column made me think perhaps you were the one. If anyone starts wondering if those goals are really getting through to the students, please reassure them that you know of at least one student who sincerely appreciates growing for four years in this type of an atmosphere at PLU. Sincerely, A n n Nedrow, M.D.

'Com i ng Ba ck' To PLU Ronald A . Miller, M . D. preSident, PLU Alumni ASSOCiation

Having just returned from the annual fall meeting of the Alu mni Board, ! have had time to pause and once more reflect on what PLU has meant to me . While at PLU, I received a high Quality education i n a Christia context which paved the way for the development of my profes ­ sional career. Through extra-curricular ac tivities, j was a llowed to develop talents and interests in other areas. And. like many other alumni of PLU, I met my spouse on campus, The basis of my education is rooted in service to my fellow man, and PLU reminds me not to lose sight of that objective in my day-to-day involvement in my profession . The Alu mni Association was formed to promote the welfare of PLU and its alumni, and its many programs and services are aimed at that dual objective. Just as the one leper came back to give thanks to Christ, we need to "come back" to PLU out of our gratefulness for the bleSSings and oppor­ tunities we received, and continue to receive, from PLU . That "coming back" can take many forms. It may mean presenting the story of PLU on an individual basis to prospective PLU stu­ dents or parents. It may mean taking an active part i n PLU 's "Sharing-In-Strength" drive to help assure that PLU wi" continue to be a vital institution of Christian higher education . It may mean keeping PLU in your daily prayers. It may mean continuing finan­ cial support for the Annual Fund (and perhaps membership in the "Q" Club). It should mean cond ucting our daily lives as a witness to others that we believe in the ideals of P . L. U .-service to mankind out of thankfulness for God 's love for us in Christ. I challenge you to "come back" to PLU this year, this week, this day-that PLU may continue to serve our community, our nation, our world, and our Lord .

Mayfest Dancer Reunion Highlight Of 1 979 Homecom ing For more than 4 0 years the Mayfest Dancers have been an i ntegral part of campus life and tradition at Pacific Lutheran U niversity. On PLU Homecoming Saturday, Nov. 3, a" former Mayfest Dancers have been invited to a reunion which wi" culminate with a per­ formance at the Homecoming Dinner Satur· day evening. The first Annual LUTERU N 5000, a 3.1 mile "run for fun " wi" take place at 10 a . m . The nostalgiC trek of the ca mpus wi" have divisions for all age groups including depen­ dents of alumni. Other Homecoming highlights i n c l u d e reunions for the classes of 1 969, 1 964, 1 959, 1 954, 1 949, 1 939, 1 929 and Golden Years. The Recent Alumni Club (1 974-79) wi" meet following the football game at the Raintree Inn. The Homecoming Game at Franklin- Pierce

Stadium pits the Lutes against Wi"amette. PLU has won five of seven from the Bearcats under coach Frosty Westering but have been u pset twice in the past three years. The game begins at 1 :30 p . m . Mayfest Dancer rehearsals begi n at 8 a . m . in Olson Auditorium a n d will Include a continental breakfast. The Homecoming Din­ ner will also be held i n Olson beginning at 5 :30 p.m. Thirty, 4 0 and 50-year reunion classes wi" gather for a Homecoming Brunch in the U niversity Center at 1 1 a . m . Other reunions at 8 : 30 p . m . (fo"owing the dinner) include 1 969-Sherwood Inn; 1 964-Nendel's Motel; and 1 959 and 1 954 at the PLU Faculty House. Reservations for the following should be sent to the Alumni House before Oct. 26: Continental breakfast, $ 1 .75; Homecoming brunch, $4.00; Footba", adults $ 2 . 50, juniors $ 1 .50, and children $ .50; and the Homecom­ ing Dinner, $ 5 . 50.


15

Alumni

Distinguished Alumni, Alums Of Year TO Be Honored At Homecoming M. Roy Schwarz

The recently-appointed dean of the U niversity of Colorado School of Medicine is a 1 959 PLU alu mnus w h o has been o n e of PLU 's strongest alumni supporters for many years. I n recog nition of his career achievements. Dr. M . Roy Schwarz '59 has been selected as a 1 979 PLU Distinguished Alumnus for education . Dr. Schwarz. who is also serving professor of a natomy at the U niversity of Colorado, has served for the past nine years at the U niversity of Washington School of Medicine as associate dean of aca d e m ic affairs, professor of biological structure and director of the WAMI program for medical education. Schwarz has earned i nternation­ al recognition as the first and only director of WAMI (Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho). The U.w.-based progra m uses campus classes, courses at fou r other niversities, training progra ms in a , W inics in students' home areas and eve n satellite-beamed teaching sessions to trai n medical students mostly from states that do not have a medical school . Since his g raduation from PLU magna cum laude, Schwarz has maintained close contact with his alma mater. He has previously served as president of the Alumni Association board of directors, is a Q Club Fellow, and was a member of the PLU Board of Regents at the ·me he accepted the Colorado st. He is also a previous PLU lumnus of the Year. A close friend and colleague of PLU President Dr. William O . Rieke. he co-authored several published research papers with Rieke d u ring the '60's when Rieke was also a professo r at the U .w. School of Medicine Schwarz is ma rried to the form­ er Thelma Nygaard '56.

f

Or. Roy Schwarz

Peter C. C. Wang

U l t r a - s o p h i s t i c a t ed t e c h ­ nologies play a dominant role in the maintenance of U .S. and "free world" security. One such tech­ nological method is called the Wang Theory of Threat Fore­ casting . The theory is named for Dr. Peter C . C . Wang, a 1 960 PLU g raduate who has been selected to receive a 1 979 Distinguished Alumnus Award for science/tech­ nology. Dr. Wang , who earned a BA deg ree in physics and mathemat­ ics from PLU, is currently an associate professor of mathemat­ ics and national security affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif. In addition Wang serves as chair­ man of the engineering automa­ tion section a nd as an executive board member of the American Defense Preparedness Associa­ tion . He also serves as director of research a nd adjunct professor in policy sciences at the Monterey Institute of Foreign Studies and as executive director and fou nder of the Institute of Policy Sciences in Pebble Beach, Calif. Many of his 30-plus research publications have dealt with tech­ nological threat forecasting and long-range planning studies . In relation to this research interest. he serves as principal investigator and project director on research projects sponsored by a variety of U .S . naval research and intelli­ gence units. He has been involved in 1 5 such projects in the past eight years. Amidst all of his research ac­ tivities he has followed in the tradition of his PLU mentors by continuing to be heavily involved in teaching and has recently serv­ ed as advisor to more than 30 g raduate students. A native of Taiwan, Wang origin­ ally came to the United States with what was diagnosed as termi nal Dr. Peter C.C. Wang

cancer. He was fortunately cured, and entered PLU upon the en­ couragement of Rev. Luther Wat­ ness '49 of Seattle. He later earned masters and doctors degrees at Wayne State U niversity in Detroit. He has taught at Wayne State. Michigan State, U niversity of Iowa and Stanford .

Paul Steen

One of the nation's outstanding professionals in the field of public broadcasting will receive a PLU Distinguished Alumnus Award for com m u n ications at the 1 97 9 Homecoming Dinner. Paul Steen ' 54 of San Diego, Calif.. is in his sixth year as g enera l manager o f KPBS-TV/FM a nd pro­ fessor of telecommunications and fil m at San Diego State U niversity. In that position he has won a variety of national public broad­ casting awards. His major awards include Na­ t i o n a l E d u ca t i o n a l Televis i o n Award or Excellence (1 970) a s director of the progra m "Troubl­ ed Waters, " as well as five Golden M i ke Awards. Affiliated with KPBS-TV since 1 967, he has also been serving for the past two years as acting director of u niversity affairs at San Diego State. During the past year he has also served as president of the Association of California Public Television Stations and as a memb­ er of the Public Broadcasting Service Board of D irectors. Prior to beginning the Califor­ nia-based phase of his career, Steen was an assistant professor of telecommunications at PLU for seven years. After receiving his degree in music-speech from PLU he earned a master's degree in television at Syracuse University.

son ' 5 1 of Burlington, Wash., Was h i n gton State Rep u b l i c a n Speaker of the House, and Brian Jennings (Ken Doggett 7 1 ), news director for KXL Radio in Portland, Ore. Berentson, who has served i n the Washington State House of Representatives for 1 6 years, has received widespread public recog­ nition the past two years, first as Republican leader in the House and this past year as co-speaker of the House. He has been men­ tioned as a possible Republican candidate for Washington State governor in 1 980. Berentson has also served as chairman of the House transpor­ tation com mittee. Doggett, who is known profes­ sionally as Brian Jennings, has been acclaimed nationally several times in the past two years for a series of hard-hitting investigative news programs. This past year he received a Sigma Delta Xi Disti ng u ished Ser­ vice in Journalism Award for a series of more than 20 i nvestiga­ tive reports on aviation safety which raised questions that had a nationwide impact on Federal Av­ iation Agency regulations. He was honored by the South­ ern Baptist Radio-Television Com­ mission with a merit award in 1 977 for a series on senior citizens and federal red tape. In 1 978 the com mission nominated him for a n Abe Lincoln Disting uished Broad­ caster Award for a series on causes of air pollution . Duane Berentson

Duane Berentson Ken Doggett Two persons whose activities have had a significant impact on public policy in Washington and Oregon will be honored as 1 979 Alumni of the Year by Pacific Lutheran U niversity. The citations will be presented Saturda y, Nov. 3, to Duane BerentPaul steen

Ken Doggett


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Alumni

1959

Class Notes

. DICK and CLiNTINA (Wells '60l OLSEN are living in Albany, Ore. They have purchased a home there and have done extensive remodeling to restore it to its original state. It has been so outsta nding that BUILDING AND RE­ MODELING magazine featured their home in the July 1 979 issue. Dick holds the office of mayor in Albany i n addi 'on to his occupation as chemical engi n eer With the U.S. Bureau of M i n es .

1 948 MAY NARD J MOEN is pastor of Messiah Lutheran Church in Cypress, Tex. H is son, Meri l , is a jun ior at Texas A & M at College Station, Tex , and daug hter Valerie just graduated from Cy-Fair High Sch ool and is currently a reception ist at U n ited Jewelers of H o u ston , Tex.

1 949

1 960

E LDON K YLLO , former p n n dpa l of Parklan a Elem e ntary SChool i n Taco­ ma . Wash , was a m e d a s s i sta n t su perin te ndent of t he Fra nklin Pierce Sch ool Di strict effective JU ty 1 1 979. Eldon is a past president of the PLU Alum ni As s oci ation and l ives in Park ­ land w ith his wifE , cppy , ( H elen Ramstad ' SOl

YVO N NE BRAU N E of the Tacoma Public Utilities Department has been el ected preSident of the Tacom a Chapter American C;ociery of Women Accou ntants .

1 961 Rev . a nd Mrs . D V I D R GA ENIC KE have moved to Taft. calif, where David IS pas tor of Peace Evang elical Lutheran C hu rch located 40 mIles wes t of Bake rsfield Pastor nd Mrs . Gae n i cke com pleted their m r n istry In Germany last September (1 978) after 5 % great years serving the Oerman church of N euenstadt, W Germany. They have th ree ch i ldren, ngela, 1 1 ; ndrew, 1 0'12 ; a nd Miriam. 3% .

1 950 SAMMY and EUNICE ( McNara more x '53) FIFE are l iving In Y um a, Ariz. Last March they were i n Fresf")o, Calif. and v is ited wi h Mr a n d Mrs. Ed Stu rgeon ( Vo n nie Denson '49) It has been 30 years in e hey had seen each other Together they vis ted Y ose mite Pa rk a n d attended church there.

1 954 LEN N E LSON of Lakes High School, Tacoma, WaSh., has been elected president of the newly organized state high school golf coaches' association. The new organization will provide better in put for suggesti ons to the Was h i ngton Inter-scholastic Activities Association .

1 956 Dr. TERRANCE BROWN has been na med assista nt superintendent-vice president of Lassen College in Susan ­ ville, Calif. He received his doctorate in science education at Oregon State Un ivers ity and in addition to his work at Oregon colleges, he was instructor of science and math, a science coor­ di nator, vice principal and a coach i n t h e Tacoma School District, Tacoma , Wash ., for many years. He and his wife, Corky, (CORDELIA HANTALA '59), have four sons, Michael, Jeffery, Patrick a nd Scott. DICK BROWN and MARY ALICE lOrex­ el '56) BROWN have a new daughter­ in -law. Thei r son, Mark Raymond, was married to Linda Jean Taylor of Walnut Creek, Calif . , on June 1, 1 979. Dick and 'Ma ry Al ice live i n Danville, Calif.

1 957 Rev. 1. L. G ROTJOHN has recently moved to Canton, Mich . , where he is now assistant to the president for co ngregational life and mission, Michi­ gan District. The American Lutheran C h u rCh . He is fin di ng his new calling to be interesting a n d challenging

Or Willam i Foege

D R . WILLIAM H . FO EGE, directo r of the Center for Disease Control of the U . S. Public Health Service, was award­ ed an honorary Doctor of Science' degree at Wartburg College's open ing convocation on September 6, 1 97 9 . Above, he is hooded b y Dr. Douglas W . Stee ples, vice president f o r academic affairs and dean of the faculty. Watch­ ing i s Irvi ng R . Burling , chairman of the college'S Board of Regents and preSi­ dent of ' the Lutheran Mutual Life Insurance Company of Waverly, Ohio. Dr. Foege, who also del ivered the address at the outdoor ceremony, is credited with being one of the key figures in the eradication of smallpox. CAROL ( 8otte mi ller) GEL DAKER is assistant volleyball coach and girls' ten nis coach at West Linn High School In West Linn, Ore. Carol also serves as a member of the PLU Alumni Associa ­ tion ' s boa rd of directors and holds the office of fi rst vice-president.

1 958 JON C . SOI N E , a commander in the Supply Corps, Un ited States Naval Reserve, recently completed a two­ week Defe nse Strategy Seminar while on active d uty for training at the National Defense U niversity. The De­ fense Strategy Seminar, held annually since 1 959, is a profeSSional military education program for senior Reserve and National Guard component offi c­ ers. The program focuses on the study of national security, the formulation and conduct of national strategy , and the relationsh ips between resou rce management and policy objectives . J o n l ives in Belli ngham, WaS h . , where he is president of Soine's Shoes. M . D EA N BJORN SE N has been pro ­ moted to distri ct manager for 29 J ,e . Pen ney stores, indu dlng four in Neva­ da , 13 in northern Cali f., and 12 in Oregon . H is district office is located in Portlan d , Ore. He and his wife, Na ncy , have four children.

1 962 NANCY LEE of Long Beach, Calif . , i s the co-author of two books i n the field of multicultural education Hands on Heritage and Tacos, Tempura and Teem Gok, A n American Heritage Cookbook. These bOOkS a re designed as teaching tools, a n d they conta i n a world of information on the arts, crafts, food, games, holidays a n d music o f various cultures. Hands on Heritage, features a trili ngual preface o u tl i n i n g teaching tech niques for teachers, paraprofessionals a n d pa­ rents i n English, Spanish a nd Chi nese. Nancy works as a part-time aide i n the Long Beach Un ified School District's Multicultural Education Program ZA N E WILSON is Chief of Police for the city of Lake Oswego, Ore. He has a master of public administration de­ g ree from Illinoi s Institute of Tech­ nology. DAVID L. "Spike" SHINE is pastor at Calvary Lutheran Church in BelOit, Wisc. He formerly served a parish i n Wilto n , Wisc.

1 963 Mr. and Mrs. JAMES OLSEN of Port­ land, Ore . , are the parents of a son, M ichael Ja mes, born June 1 8, 1 97 9 . He joins a brother, Donald Robert, 3'12 . Jim teaches heari n g - i m paired stu ­ dents in Beaverton, Ore . , and writes a s i m p l e - l a n g u a g e cu rrent events newspaper and radio program .

DICK BAKKEN has just had a book of poetry published by st. Andrews Press in North Carol i n a . A signed copy can be obta i ned from Dick for $5 .00. Dick Bakken, clo E . 1 4622 Valley W Spokane, WA 992 1 6 . He will soon h 'another book of poetry out from L House in Massach usetts. He has had poems published in Poetry NOW, Poetry North west, Colorado State Re­ vie w, st. Andrews Review, Iron Coun­ try, Red Hand Book, The MississipPI Mud, and ma ny othe r . RAMO NA (M ona) SAWY ER-WATSON is working as a p rivare consultant In employee relations after eig ht years of h ig h sch ool vocatIO na l g uidance cou n · sellng and teach ing Ramona lives i n Costa Mesa , Calif , .vim her 1 2-year .l d This cast s u m me she son , Sco traveled to Norway 1:0 viSit re 2tIVE� and criends n Haugesund and Oslo. She also VISIted - ngland . Denmark a a Germany •

t

1 964 M/M John Nielsen ( RUTH DANI E L' SO N ) of Kl rI<land , Wash . , are the pa­ rents of daughter, Emily Maja, born May 1 , 1 979. S h e joins a brother Ma hew who is 4 . STEVE and J ERRI (jacobs on '64) SETIE RLUN D are living in Bur lington, Wash , wh re Steve is a ma rket in g representative for Colligate PaCific Co mpan y in the Pacific Northwest. Prior to movi ng to Burl i ngton he was an elementary school principal in the southern California area. Jerri is dlr ­ tor and teacher of the First Luthe Pre-school in M ount Vernon, Was . They have th ree chil dren, Jeanne, Janet and Tod d . A former elementary teacher, J E R ­ R Y DUNLA P, has been named acting director of Clover Park District's com­ mu nity schools, outdoor educati on, and volunteer programs . Among Jer­ ry's duties during the 1 979-80 school year will be the coordination of th ree terms of commu nity school classes. This leisure time learning prog ram , which began i n 1 973 and last year operated at 14 elementary schools, uses volunteer instructors to prov ' d crafts, recreati on, a n d se/f-impro ment skills for about 7,000 perso ns. lives i n Tacoma, Wash . JON MALMIN has joined the Luther College faculty as assistant professor of chemistry. For the past four years Jon has served as science department chairman at the Hong Kong I nterna ­ tional School. He and his wife, Jea n , have th ree children, Kristi n , age 1 0; Sara, 6; and Lisa, 3 .

.

1965 FRED R. EATO N , former acting ad­ m i nistrator of Providence Med ica l C e n ter, Sea ttle, WaSh . , has be named vice president and administ tive officer for the Presbyterian Hos­ pital Division of Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco, Calif.

1 66 B RENT OLSEN is worki ng as a n i nformation officer for h e state su perintendent of public instruction in Olympia , wash . , a position he as­ su med i n January 1 979 . He l ives i n Parkland, Wash , with his wife, Reba , a nd 2% year old daughter, Sa n n a .


17 Alumni

Hillesland Family History Traces Clan Back To 1 3th century Richard Londgren '59

. "Now I have greater apprecia­ tion for what Alex Haley went through , " said Anita (Hillesland '59) Londgren of Tacoma, Was h . , w h o recently published a 200page. history of her family. Th i s N o rweg i a n ve rs i o n of "Root? " begins in 1 268 A.D., and it chronicles the Hilleslands through 21 generations. "The Hillesland Family H istory" lis of ancestors in Norway and on four brothers who Immig rated to the U nited states late last century a nd settled in North Dakota . The bulk of their descenda nts still live in the Mid­ west. but the migration pattern has continued. Many live in other parts of the country, with nearly 200 of the clan now on the West Coast. �he book features maps, illust­ rations, photos, anecdotes and historical information , as w'ell as the usual genealogical i nforma­ tion. With a n eye to the future decided on a three- ri n g nder so yearly update sheets can easily added to keep the history current. Though it does n 't have the dept of Haley's "Roots," the scope of this saga is just as broad and has been in the works just as long . Mrs. Londgren's u ncle Anton H ! "esland, an educator wh o began hiS career in the Midwest after g raduating from st. Olaf but even­ t a lly migrated to the State of Washington, started on the proabout 20 years ago. He pub­ a n initial version in 1 960. Actually, some of his research bega n in 1 92 3 , when his thesis for a master's degree at the U niversity of North Dakota i ncluded i nter­ views with many i ndividuals about pioneer life in the Red River Valley a rea. When he died in 1 973, he had pia s for a more extensive family history. M rs. Londg ren, who had helped a nd encouraged him, be­ cam e the unofficial family ar­ chivist _ "Editing and adding to the fami­ _ history was tougher than I �xpe�ted , " said M rs. Londgren, but It was exciting to learn more about my a ncestors. " "Our research showed, for inst­ ance, that there's a one-in-four chance we're related to George Washington, who also had ances­ tors from the Norwegian island of Karmoy. The Viking explorers who discovered America were original­ ly from that part of Norway, too. In fact, o � e of their la nding points on what IS now Baffin Island was narryed 'Helluland,' which is an arller spelling of 'Hilleslan d . '

" And what a conversation piece the book has turned out to be! " she contin ued. "During our layov­ er in the Minneapolis airport en route to the annual Hillesland family reu nion i n North Dakota last s u m mer, a M i n nesota woma n noticed the book. It turned out t� at she was working on a family history too, and we had a vaulable exchange about how and where to get information . "Our whole family pitched i n on the publishing," M rs . Londg,en said . "My husband, Richard , used his antiq ue printing press to pro­ duce covers and chapters dividers and designed a family symbol. ' "Our teenagers lent a hand too. Eric took photos, and he, Kristin and Karin helped assemble some of the 300 books we produced ." Though the project took alot of time and effort (in putting the books together, they h a n d l e d some 30,000 pages), Anita found that the rewards easily offset the frustrations. "I literally worked night and day at the end to meet our publishing deadline - the family reunion," she admitted . The book is a hit in the clan, and it has "hel ped many of us get better acquainted . " "Do it! " she advises others who are considering such a publishing venture. " I t could be a n enriching experi­ ence for fa milies even if they never got beyond collecting da­ ta, " she states. "The history could be g reatly scaled down in n umber of genera ­ tions and n u m ber of pages and still be i nvaluable." However, she urg es the inclusion of a necdotes - from old letters, reminiscences of older relatives, and from news­ paper clippings and other printed sou rces - to add spice to the

usual family tree. "Rea� ers of our history really appreCiated the g ra p h ics that broke up pages of text,' she also added . "It isn't hard to do. Most of our pages were printed at a 'quick­ copy' shop on a Xerox 9200 so drawings, maps and charts p re­ pared with black ink were pasted in p lace with typed information . They reprod uced quite well . '.'Artists in your family might enJoy the opportunity to partici­ pate," she said . But she added a warning : "Don't clip pictures or � aps from publications for past­ Ing - it's against the law! " "Highlig hts of H istory" is anoth ­ er hel pful technique in the Hilles­ land history book. "Because we were gOing back to the 1 3th Century with our chronology, we felt some reference points a bout world history would be interesting to readers," said Anita . "For inst­ ance, while some of our ancestors were relocating along the fjords of NOrw�y, Marco Polo was traveling to China. Later highlights i ncluded M a rtin Luther starting the Refro­ mation, Galileo revising the theory of the u niverse, Gustavus Adol­ phus dying during the 30 Years War, J .5 . Bach composing m usic, and man walking on the moon . " � ur book has a printed photo section , " she said, "but a simpler alternative would be to paste pictures, as in a photo albu m . If you don't have a volunteer with a darkroom, you can get snapshots duplicated inexpensively in quan­ tity many places." As a sign that the results were well worth t h e w o r k A n i t a �on.dgren is ready for m o re pub­ IIshln � challenges. "This project � as stimulated interest in record­ Ing the histories of other parts of our family a lso, and we've already sta rted c o l l ecti n g d a ta a n d photos. " A copy of the H illesland fa mily . history has been donated to Mort­ vedt Library at PLU .

From left. PLU librarian John Heussman, Anita Landgren.

1 967

(Cont. from p. 1 61

Rev. F. PHILIP STRAIN was married N ov. 1 3, 1 97 6 to Carolyn La ncosof Fox . River G rove, ilL After serving the . Herreid Yoked Parish in Herreid, South Da kota for 3% years, he accepted a call to serve E m ma n uel Lutheran C h u rch I n Groton, S . D . and Trin ity Lutheran C h u rch i n Houghto n , S . D . They live in Groto n . ROLF OLSEN x ' 67 has accepted a position as coach at the club level i n Oslo, Norway. H e w i l l assist HANS ALBE RTSSON x'65 in coaching the Norwegian national basketball tea m . Hans, a native of Sweden , h a s been Norway's coach for five years but has been able to work with the team i nfreq uently because he lives in U psa­ la, Sweden, several hours from Oslo . Rolf now will tra i n the tea m, with Hans coaching i n competiti o n . CRAIG VISTA SVARE i s p resently a P h . D . s t u d e n t at t h e G ra d u a te Theological U n ion, Berkeley, Calif. He is currently partiCipating in the J uried Show in Los A ngeles, Calif. The a rtists represented there are as far as South Dakota.

1 968 RONALD LU N D and Celinda L Wil­ . liams of Bozeman, Mont. were mar­ r! ed May 1 9, 1 979 i n the Fi rst Presbyte­ nan C h u rch in Bozeman . The couple is at home at 8480 1 3th Aven ue, B u r­ naby B . C . '

1 969 KRISTIAN ERICKSON a n d wife Mel i n ­ da a re livi ng i n Auburn, Wash . where : . Knst�a n I s editor of Co m m u n ity Chapel . Publications. They have pioneered a �o � puter word - processing a n d pub­ lishing system which will be of help to � a n y C h ristian organizations. This winter they will spend several weeks old i ng evangelical teaching seminars I n SWitzerland i n local n o n -denomina­ tional, cha rismatic churches . Lt. DARRELL W. J O N ES has been awarded the Navy Expeditio nary Med ­ aL He is an officer assigned to the aircraft carrier USS M idway, operating from Yokosuka, Japan . Darrell re­ ceived the � edal for his participation . In cruises I n the Indian Ocean a n d Arabian G u l f in response t o t h e turmoil I n I ra n and North Yemen . P H I LI P PETRASEK has been called to be the pastor at Peace Lutheran C h u r c h - W e st Seatt l e . LI N D A (Simu ndson ' 70l is d o i n g part-time work a s a "lea rn ing disa bilities" teach­ er i n the Highline School District. They have one child, two-year old KarL Lt. & M rs . J EFFREY W. TO M PKINS ( LY N ETIE LARSEN 70l recently retu rn ­ ed fro � th ree years in Japan, and will be making their home i n Oak H a rbor Was h . where Jeffrey is serving as � lieu ten ant in the supply corps at . Whldbey Isla n d Naval Air 'Statio n . On Dec. 24, 1 978, Jeffrey a nd Lynette beca me the parents of a daughter, Koren Lynette. She ioins a sister Shon' da Elayne, five years old . CY NTHIA ( Bialik) RADFORD is a recital­ ist and soloist with the Radford Con­ cert Ensemble and has performed I n opera and musicals. She a n d her h usband, Richard, live i n Rio Vista ' Calif. RICH HOLM ES beg a n flying as second officer for Western Airlines in Aoril 1 979. He flys Boeing 72Ts from L os Angeles . He lives in Sa n Diego but also :nalnta l n s a residence in Los Angeles.

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Alumni

1 970

I

MlM ROBERT P KLAVANO '69 mYR­ NA ROWBERG 70) a re the parents of a daughter, Diane Carol, born June 9 . They also have a daug hter, Sarah A n n , five yea rs old . B o b is a n attorney i n Tacoma a n d Byrna works pa rt-time as a medical tec h nologist M/M DAVE RICHARDT '69 (MARGIT HOKENSTAD 70) a re the pa rents of a daughter, Karen Anne, born sept 20, 1 978. Dave teaches drama at Rogers High School, in Puyallup, Was h " and is active i n Tacoma Actors Guild . Marg it has a new job as language arts specia l ­ ist with Puyallup Schools. Dave h a s a maste r's degree in theatrical direction from Western Washi ngton U n iversity M/M A N DY STUEN a re the parents of a son, John Andrew, bo r n April 1 5 . He joins a sister, Sally, two years old, They a re busy rebuilding their house in Gig Harbor a nd Andy sti ll works as owner­ Itech nician at Harbor Dental Lab in downtown Gig Harbor. WILLIAM T. N U N LEY , formerly deputy comm issioner of the Melbourne, Fla " office of the state insurance c o m m i s s i o n e r , has been n a med bureau c h ief of field operations i n Ta llahassee, and will d i rect the 2 1 service offices t h roughout the state as well as five regional d i recto rs'offices, He will be making his home in Tal­ lahassee. MlM Michael C ross (J U LI E RADFORD) a re the parents of a daughter, Sara Janelle, born June 2 9 . She is their first c h i l d . J ulie is assistant chief medical tech n o log ist i n a hospital la b in A na hei m , Calif. She received her mas­ ters' deg ree i n med , tech . i n 1 97 7 , Her husba nd is a n engineer with Xerox. They live in LaVerne, Calif . M/M Tom Carr (J U D ITH WILUS) are th e parents o f a son, Benja min C h ris­ topher, born Jan. 8 . He is their first child. Judy continues her position as resea rch a s s i sta n t p rofe s s o r o f pediatric i m m u nology a t the U n iversi­ ty of Washington School of M edicine and Tom is head of Special Litigation D ivis ion i n the office of the Attorney Genera l in Olym pia, Was h , They live i n Puya llup, Was h . M / M Sta nley Tarr (CYNTHIA L HART­ MANN) a re he parents of a d a u ghter, Ama nda N icole, born May 7 . She joins her sister, Jennifer who is four years old. They live in Kent, Wash , where Sta n is employed with K e n w o rth Northwest of Seattle,

1 971 ARUS M , ADOLF is living in Denver, Colo" where she has finished residen­ cy and one-year of teaching fellowship in family medicine. Arlis is now ope n ­ i n g a practice i n family medicine with two other doctors. Thei r practice IS a lso the base p ractice for a netwo r k of rural p ractices wh ic h will utilize their's for back - u p when they need tertiary medical services. She also has an a p pointment as cli n ical instructor in the epa rtment of fa mily medicine at the U niversity of Colorado Med ical Schoo l . M/M M e l Nova k ( li N DA TURNER 7 1 ) are the pa rents of a son , Jeremy J oseph , born Feb . 8 He jOins a sister, Lynnell C hr isti ne six years a ld . Linda

' Day Room G i rls' Enjoy Reu n ions For many years at PLU there was a special room for girls who lived off campus. They would go there between classes, eat their lu nches, and rest They were known as Day Room Girls, In 1 929 the coeds organized u nder the name Delta Rho Gamma (DRG's) with Ida Hin­ derlie Berntsen as president and Evelyn Olsen treasurer. The day room was located in the basement of Harstad Hall u ntil 1 954 when Hinderlie Hall was opened where s pecial facilities were included for the off campus g i rls. The organization faded out later in the 1 950's when the College U n ion Building was erect­ ed and the g irls preferred to hang out in the coffee shop and other rooms, Some 25 alumni who were in the original DRG g roup meet monthly a nd call themselves the " Lu nch Bunch. " In July they had a potluck picnic at the home of Katheryn Kelso in Ollalla , Two came from California , . , Evelyn Anderson from Pasadena; and Clara Behr­ man from Pebble Beach. The August meeting was a lunc­ heon in a Gig Harbor restau rant followed by a program and social hour in the Berntsen home i n nearby Cromwell. The ladies re­ minisced over old Sagas and large g ro u p p i ct u re s w h i c h w e re brought out from U niversity Arc­ hives by David Berntsen, d irector of development. He also showed a film about PLU, narrated by Presi­ dent William Rieke.

Ilas been teach ing for five years but took last year off to take care of tne baby She will be dOing su bstitute teaching this fa l l . T O D BRANDOFF o f Missoula, Mont, is servi ng i n finance and a d m i n istra­ tion at Com m u n ity Covenant C h u rcn and is president of the Full Gospel Busi ness Men's Fellowship i n Missoula, DIM RALPH A . STAIANO of Sa linas, Calif . , are the pa rents of a third son, Gianni Raffaele, born June 2 1 . He joins b rothers Mauro, 7%; a nd Renzo, 5. Dr. Staiano i s assistant chief, department of Ob-Gyn at Ft Ord, Calif.

1 972 LI N DA ( McConnell) B U RT a n d h us­ ba nd, La rry, have both joined the Oregon State U n iversity faculty Both will liave positions with the Oregon State Exten ion Service stationed at th U niversity in Corvallis where they reside. BO B and KATHY ( Bu rwash 74) HAS­ S E LBLAD are living in St Hele ns , Ore , whe r e Bob is in busi ness with h iS father, Haselblad Lu m ber Sales ( office wholesalers) . They have two chil d ren , Isaac, age 6, and Sara h , age 4 . They are active in ttJe Fi rst L utlieran C h urch in St Helens.

MICHAEL and LIN DSAY ( Lorenzen 73) JACKSON are l iving i n Taco ma, Was h " where M ichael is cu rrently quality control inspector for Atlas Fou ndry, Lindsay is n u rsing instructor for med­ s u rgery i n the Tacoma Commu nity Col lege two-yea r R , N , progra m . They have a son, C h ristopher, age 3 . M/M Marvin Stunkard (SUE BAnAL­ ION) a re the parents of a son, M ichael Willia m , born May 2. Sue comp leted her master's in education in August 1 978 and is teac hing and coaching Kindergarten throug h eighth grade in Knappa, Ore. BOB a n d DIANE ( Bergston '72) VER­ NON of Rialto, Calif . , are the pa rents of a daug hter, E m i ly Elaine, born April 23, Emily joins a brother, Jeff, age 3%. Bob is working as a medical tec hnologist i n t h e chemistry department of t h e lab at San Bernardino Community Hospit­ a L Diane is no longer teaching but is a fu ll -time homemaker a n d mother, JANET E LIZABETH Y EAGER and Wil­ liam Gerard Myers, Jr., were ma rried A u g . 25 at st. John's Luthera n C h u rch i n Helena, Mont.

1 973 M/M DAVID W . A N D ERSON (GLORIA FRY '75) are the parents of a daughter, Kirsten M arie, born Feb . 2 1 in Olso, Norway, David is studying theology at Menighetsfaku ltetet, a Lutheran sem i ­ nary in Oslo w h e n Kirsten w a s born , They have since retu rned to the U nited States. David grad uated from W a rt b u rg Theolog ical Sem inary in Dubuque, la" a n d accepted a call to O u r Savi o r ' s l u t h e ra n C h u rch in McCook, Neb. His ordi nation was July 8, 1 979, at St Timothy Lutheran C h u rc h in Lakewood, Calif , and he was 2. i n stalled at Our Savior's o n Aug Thei r new add ress i s 602 West 3rd, McCook, Neb, 69001 . ALLICE BERRY was married to Ken­ neth Sanders at a h ome wedding in Spokane, May 5 , Allice is emp loyed by Holl ister -Stier Laboratories as assistant p u rchasing agent. Ken is a free lance artist and is employed as a real estate sales representative. They will live i n Spokane MARK BUCHANAN and wife, Elaine, have a new addition to the fa m i ly, Alison Brooke, born Jan. 2, They are living in a new home at l£lke Tapps i n Sumner, Wash, Mark works i n Kent for C o n t m e n ta l H a rdwood C o m pa ny, where he has been employed as a sales rep for the last couple of years, A N N ( Ned row) and WILLIAM FRAZIER moved to U niontown, Ohio, i n J u ne 1 97 9 . They live about half-way bet­ ween Ca nton and Akron. Ann began her diagnostic radiology residency at Alutman Hospital in Ca nton July 2 . Bill plans to work part-time w h i le he attends Akron University this fall to continue h is studies in mecha n ica l engineeri ng a n d business administra­ tion , MlM PHIUP K, F U RTH 75 ( LEAN N E S C H A R F 73) a r e t h e parents of a son , J o h n Michael, born J Uly 8. He joins a

brother, Paul C h ristian, age 3 % , and a sister, Sarah C h ristine, age 2'12 . Phil is em ployed in Puya l l u p , Was h . , as a physicia n's assistant a n d Leanne is c u rrently on leave from her job as a n RN i n the i ntensive care u nit a t G Sama rita n Hospital in Puyallup. live In Auburn, Was h .

<:� Trw

MARC JOHNSON is living i n Los Alamos, N M , where he is cu rrently a second-year medical student at the U n iversity of New Mexico - Albu­ querque . M/M Rod Lang (TANA K N U DSON) are the parents of a daug hter, Shawna Rae, born June 1 1 . She joins a Sister, Kari Lea n n , who was two on J u n e 1 6 . Rod is still ra nching a n d they a re both enjoying their girls. M / M M I C HA E L W . M A RTIN a n d daughters, Jen nifer a n d Darcy have moved to Leba non, Ore" where M i ke will be teaching elementary m usic. He finished his master's this s u m mer _ ,., the U n iversity of Wash ingto n . MARK W, REINER a n d his wife, Jody, have moved to Louisville, Ky, where Mark is manager of the computer software division for J . e . Albertson and Company, Inc., a real estate appraisal a n d syndication fi rm. SAM U E L TORV E N D has been ap­ poi nted for the com i ng academic year adm inistrator of the ecumenical con ­ sorti u m at the Schools of Theology i n D u buque, l a . J E F F WOLCOn is participating i n a teacher exch ange for the 1 979-80 school year. He will be teach i ng sec­ ond grade in the pu blic school i n H a m i lton, OntariO, Canada . T h e Cana ­ dian government will send a teac lA to take his class at McAlder Element � in Sumner, Was h . B A R B A RA S W E N S O N h a s b e e n n a m e d p r i n C i p a l of S u n n y H i l l s Elementary i n the lssaquah School District. Issa q ua h , Was h . She formerly was prinCipal at Pine Lake J u nior High also i n Issaqu a h GEORGE K N U DSON was o rdained into the min istry of the American Lutheran C h u rch, Sept. 1 6, 1 979, i n his home con g regation in Kla ma th Fa l ls, Ore, A May, 1 979, graduate of uth er Theolog ical Seminary, st. Pa ul, George C h urch, is serving Grace Luthera Browntown, M i n n . M I KE WILLIS was recently appoi coord i nator of hig h school relations a n d assistant basketball coa c h a t Green River Community College H e h a s also pu rchased a trophy a n d si lkscreen operation i n Kent, WaS h . , with two other partners. They c a l l it West Coast Awards. Mike would a p ­ preciate hearing from friends, H i s address i s 25305 1 51 st Place S . E . , Kent, WaS h " 98031 ,


Alumni

1 974 KRIS LA N D LAN has recently m oved to Blacksburg, Va . , where she is a li brarian at Virgi nia Polytech mc Insti­ ute and State U n iversity. BECKY (Wulf) HARRISON and her hu sband resigned their U . S. Army commissions i n June and have just com pleted the su pport course orien ­ tation for Wycliffe Bible Translators. H usband, Bob , will be a pilot with the J u ngel Aviation & Radio Service branch of Wycl iffe and Becky hopes to put her ski lls as a physical t:tIerapist to use on. the m issi on field. Their address is: clo JAARS, Box 248, Waxhaw, NC 281 7 3 . D A N a n d WENDY (Wilcox 75l N E P ­ TUN have moved to Seattle, Was h . , wh ere Da ni el has been com m issio ned an ensign in the U . S Coast Guard a nd IS stationed i n the Federal B u i ld in g in

_

CLARENCE ( B utc h) Zl ESKE is te ach i ng

sdence a nd ph ys ical educa tion and

servi ng as head girls a d boys basket­ bal l coac h at Ba i nville H ig h SChool, BainVi l le, Mont He is married and they have two daughters, Brook, th r ee years aid and Cat nna , one year a la WILLIAM H . R U DO LPH and family have moved from Anch orage, Alaska to Madison, Wise , where he will be studying atthe Univers ity of Wisconsin laW School His fa mi ly i ncludes h is wife, catherine, a n d daughter , Kerry Mega n . They are expecting thei r sec ­ ond child I n October. A �J N (Balerud) STU M P a n d h usband, n, just moved from Berkeley, Calif. , buquerque, N . M . where A n n is !n St Joseph ' s Hospital ICU th ree eveni ngs a week and Brian is at Kirtla nd AFB work i ng in the weapons lab , They have one so n , Kevin, 1 '1. years old. KRISTI N E ( Rebholz) U KAYLI and rlus­ band , Mu stafa, an� livi ng in D h a h ran. Sau di Arabia, wh ere Mustafa is teach­ I ng g eolog y at the U n iversity of Pet­ roleu m and Minerals . They have one su n , Hani M u stafa. born Nov. 1 2 , 1 978. KATH LEEN S. KEELE received her M BA from PLU In Aug ust. Following her g raduation she will take a two­ onth ca mping tour of Western rope and then return to do some h unting. ELLEN ( Re i n ha rdt) BRIDGES, received h er master's in nursing degree from the U niversity of Texas Health Science Center at Sa n Antonio in May, 1 979. KENNETH M . WAAG was ordained into the m i n istry of the American Lutheran C h urch Ju ly 8. 1 979 at First Lutheran C h u rch of Bothel l , Wash. He graduated from Luther Theological Seminary in st. Paul, M i n n , May 27 with a master of divinity degree. Kenneth will be moving to Casper.

Wyo .. where he will serve as associate pastor of O u r Saviour's Lutheran C h u rch . RON CAR LSON recently beca me the co-host with Marti Scholl of "Su nday Morning" on Channel 2 ( KATU-TV) in Portla nd, Ore. Not only wi ll Ron have the weekly duties of h osting "Sunday , M orning" and doing taped reports. he will also work as one of the co -h osts on KATU-TV's new fall program called "City Lights " He received h is master of a rts degree in public relations and radlofTV from Ball State U n iversity in M u ncie, Ind . , a n d has been a news d i rector at a station in LeWiston, I da , a reporter. anchor and news producer at stations in Boise and Spokane . M/M David Petersen 73 (DEBBIE ERICKSON 74l are the pa rents of a son. Stefan Davi d, born M a r. 1 1 T hey live i n La nder, Wyo , where David i s teach ing math at Lander valley H i g h School. KIRK and MARY ( Lorentzsen 7 5 ) NESVIG have bo ugh t a house in Torr ­ a nce , Calif. Kirk is working fo r Conti ­ nental Airlines as a p u rchasing and M a ry is starting her seco nd year of teaching kindergarten and en loyi ng it. THEODORE B . G U LHA UGEN , son of the Rev. and Mrs Martin Gulh augen of Taco ma, was ordain ed i nto the Ch ris ­ tian minist ry, Su nd ay, Sept. 2 3 . at Gloria Dei Luthera n C tl u rc h , Tacoma Ted is the fifth generation to ente r the ministtrv. as h is g rea t·g reatg ra ndfath ­ er, the Rev Emile Christensen . and his g reat-grandfather. the Rev. Martin A. Ch ristense n , were pion eer pastors in the Tacoma a rea His gra ndfathe r, the Rev . Theodo re Gu lha ugen, who re­ ti red in 1975 as visitatlon pastor a t Tri n ity Lutheran i n Pa rf(land a fter 54 years of serving congreg ations on the west coast. preached the o rdination sermon. Ted's father was the or ­ dinator. Ted grad uated from Wart­ burg T heologica! Semi nary in Dubu­ que. la. He was married to Anna Koch of Du buque in 1 978. He beg a n his ministry Oct. 1 at Bowdon, North Dakota .

1 975 Lt. Col . WI LLIAM L. ARENT has been assigned d uty at Scott Air Force Base, Belleville, I I I . Bill is an a i r operations officer and is serving with a unit of the Mi litary Airlift Command. KATH RYN (Zulauf) HARRIS and h u s­ band, Geoffrey, g raduated from the U n iversity of Washington Medical School June 2. For the next th ree years they will be at Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, R . I . , doing internships and residencies i n internal medicine. M ELAN I E J ECHORT was ma rried to Larry Kolano on J une 30. at Mt. Zion Lutheran C h u rch in Tacoma. Wash . , Mela nie teaches at Woodlawn High School. Wood lawn, Wash . and Larry teaches at Kessler Elementary in long ­ view. Was h . They will live in longview. LOUIS C. R E D IX. J R . graduated from the University of California - Irvine. Medical School i n J u n e . He was the recipient of the Huma nitarian Award which is the highest honor conferred u pon a student for patient care a nd outstanding individ ual performance He i s now doing surgical i nternship at Highland General Hospital in Oakland, Calif. RUTH SCHE PMAN of Twin Fa lls. Id . was guest organist June 1 for the ded icatory service i n Ru pert of Trin ity Lutheran Ch urch's newly acquir ed church orga n . Ruth pla ns to study

with internationally-renowned organ­ ist Paul Manz in Minneapolis, Minn . . this fal l . When former Vale. Ore. resident. PA U L W. SCHROEDER graduated from the U n iversity of Oregon Hea lth Sci­ ences Center in c o m m e n c e m e n t c e rem o n ies J u ne 8 . a doctor of medicine degree was not the only honor he received . I n the School of Medicine Convocation Pa ul beca me the thi rteenth rec ipient of the Edward S. Hayes Gold Headed Cane Award. the hig hest honor given a Sch ool of Medicine grad uate of the Health Sci­ ences Center. He resides in Phoe n ix. Ariz. wi th his family, where he is beginning a flexi ble/surgical inte rn ­ ship at Ma ricopa County General Hos­ pital VIRGI N IA WID grad uated wj th hon ­ ors, receivi ng a Bachelor of Fi ne Arts, from Art Center College of DeSig n i n Pasadena, Calif . in May 1 97 9 . She is now em plo yed as assista nt art di rector in the advertising -d es ig n depa rtment of F oote . Cone & Belding of Phoenix , Ariz. CRAIG FE;NSK E has resigned his pOSi­ tion as Pac ifiC Co u nty extensio n agent to accept a job as th e 4- H Club coordinator of Watcam County e r al9 an d his wife, Faye, will live In Bel ling 11 a m , Was rl . STE P H E N SME TAD i s e mployed with I FG LeaS i ng Company, Grea r Fails, Mon t . assistan t I n the IFG co l lecti on s d ep a rtment. MIM Mars hburn (JAN E M . l are the pa rents of a daugt1ter, Lau ra Marie, born Julv 1 6 . Sh e joins a sister, J on i . They l ive i n Cu perti n o , Calif. BERNARD C. BOnENS and Sandra Lynn Mu el l er were married J uly 1 . 1 979 at the luthe ra n C h u rch of the Resur­ rection in Portland. Ore -

1 976 DUANE and NANCY ( Kuss x78l KLOTZ are buying a new home in Sartell. M i n n . Duane received a promotion to assistant personnel manager at Sa rtell St. RegiS Paper Mill in Ju ly Na ncy g radu ated from Eastern Michigan U n ­ iversity in August 1 978 with a BSN degree. VICKI HAGEN and PATRICK M IC H EL were married A pri l 7. 1 979 at Trinity Lutheran Church in Pa rkla nd, Wash . Pat comp leted his master of musi c degree at P L U in Aug. and w i l l teach a t Washi ngton High School i n t h e F ra n k ­ lin Pierce School District. Vicki teaches at Tillicum Elementary School in the C lover Park School District. They live i n Tacoma. Was h . KATHY RONEY and Ross Ferg uson were married on June 23 at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Billi ngs, Mont. After a honeymoon trip to Canada they returned to Melbourne, Australia to make their home. CHR ISTON C. SKI N N ER received the Doctor of J u risprudence degree from Willamette U n iversity College of Law on May 1 3 . While pursuing his law

studies, Chris had the honor of being · elected to the Willamette Law Review staff, serving as comment editor h is fi nal year. I n 1 978. he was the secretary to the Student Ba r Association . Active in Moot Court activities. Chris took second place in the Northwest Reg­ ional Mock Trial com petiton. I n add i ­ tion, h e was the win ner of the Interna ­ tiona Academy of Trial Lawyers Award presented to a third-yea r studentwho disti nguished h i mself or herself i n the field of cou rtroom advocacy. DARCIE ANN EBERG was married to Steve Fulkerson of Seattle on Aug. 1 2 at O u r Savior's Lutheran C h urch i n Aberdeen. Wash. After a honeymoon in Hawaii, they are at home rn Auburn, Wa s h . D a rCie teaches elementary music in Puyallup and Steve teach es mathematics, also i n the Puyallup D istrict. STEVE and J IL L (Gjertson 78) BR OWN spent fo ur and a h alf weeks i n JunE' and July tr aveli ng i n E u rope, around the conti nen t and G reat Britian . Steve will beg i n his fou rth yea r teac t1 ing jUnior hig h science and math at Col­ umb ia Crest School near Mt. R a i nier Na ti onal Park_ He will continue to coach basketba ll and track a nd is also assista nt football coa ct-I at Ea ton ville Hig h Schoo l. This Will be j i l l ' s second year at Colum bia C rest. w h ere she will teach grades 5 an d 6 i n the morning a nd kindergarten In the afternoon . LESLIE J . J ENSEN and Mic hael E . Harmon were married M a y 5 at Trin ity Lutheran Ch urch i n Everett. Wa sh . leslie IS em ployed as a cou n selor for DSHS at G r ee n Hill School i n Chehallis, Wash , and M ichael is em ploy e d as a mental health therapist at G reater Lakes Mental Health C l in iC In Tacoma , Wash, Thev are making tneir first home in Olympia . Wash , half-way between Ct1ehallis and Tacom(1 BERNARD T. STARK, MA 79 is a pilot for U n ited Air Lines in Washi n gto n , D . C . He i s also a captai n i n t h e USAF Reserves a n d retu rns to Tacoma period ically to fly with the USAF Re­ serves at McChord Air Force Base. JAMES A . and TINA ( Roberts x77) C RARY are living i n Anch orage. Alaska, where Jim is i nterni ng with the An ­ chorage M u nicipal Attorney's office. They plan to return i n early January to San Diego where he will finish his law school at the U niversity of San Diego and Tina will graduate from San Diego State Un iversity. PETER ANSINGH and family have moved back to the Northwest and are living in Tumwater, Wash . Peter com ­ pleted his master's deg ree i n chemis­ try from the U n iversity of Wyom ing. He also received his teach ing cred en­ tials and is now teach ing in Curtis. GARY a n d CATHY (Coke 76) POWELL have moved to Washington, D . C . , where Gary is enrolled i n a special fall semester program at Wesley Theoiog­ ical Seminary. Following completion of the fall semester they will be returning to Denver. Colo . , where Gary will com plete h is Master of Divin ity degree at the Il iff School of Theology in May 1 980. Cathy is currently working as an administrative assistant for Computer Sciences Corporation on a special proj ect with the d e pa rt m e n t o f energy.


Alumni

1 977 GARY A. CROCKETI is in his third year of teach ing math and co m p uter math at Was h i n gton/Mon roe High School i n Portla nd, Ore . H e i s also coachin g varsity footba l l and varsity girls ten n is . AL LEWIS, a n i nternal a uditor with the Air Fo rce in Madrid, Spai n, recently was a war ded the su stained superior performa nce award, and was also prom oted to journeyman auditor (GS1 1 ) In J uly AI travels throughout Spa i n a nd Italy perfo rming internal audit assig n ments at Air Force i nsta l latio ns. MARTHA M I LLER and STEVEN WARD 76 were married Aug . 26, 1 979 in River Forest, I I I . They now reside in Kent, Was h . Steve is branch manager of Dial Finance in Puyallup a nd Ma rtha is a tech nical represe ntative for SeaFirst Computer Services i n Tukwila, Wash . JAN ELLE L. M U NSON and Clair Brian Troftg ruben were married June 2 at Emerald Ba ptist C h u rch i n Eugene, Ore. They a re mak ing their home in Tukwi la, Wash . , where Clair is a com p u ­ ter systems ana lyst at Boeing a nd Janel! is an elementary school teacher. J O H N OLAFSON is living i n Seattle, Was h . , a n d is workIn g as a CPA for Phillip Carli ngton a n d Company in Taco ma. LOREN M E LTO N , who recently co m ­ pleted First National Ba n k of Oregon's management tra i ning program, was assigned to the Roseburg branch as a co nsumer loan officer. MARLE N E SELE N E and GREG KLEVEN were ma rried J u ne 9 i n Olympia, Was h . Greg i s attending U nion Theological Seminary i n New York City and this year is servi ng his internship at Nativity Lutheran C h u rch in Allentown, Pa . Marlene is working in the s u rgical intensive care u n it at Mt Sinai Hospital i n New York City a nd co m m utes to Pennsylva n ia o n her days off. J O N AT H A N H O R N E R h a s b e e n selected for the position of head footbal l coach for 1 979 -80 in the Klona- Benton City Schools, Prosser, Was h . He will also teach mathematics in the Ki - Be M iddle School in addition to his coaching responsibi lities. LARRY o. JOECKS of Port Orchard, IWas h . , and Rachel Faith Norbo of hree H i lls, Alberta, Canada were mar­ Ti ed J u ly 1 4 . Larry is prinCipal a n d teacher a t Betha ny Lutheran Elemen­ tary School i n Port Orchard. KATH LEEN MARY STU RGEON a n d DAVID EDWARD K E R R 76 were ma rried J u n e 23 in A n acortes Lutheran C h u rch, Anacortes, Was h . David is employed as a research assistant i n the chemi stry depa rtment at Washi ngton State U n ­ iversity where he i s a P h . D ca n d idate in medicinal chemistry. The couple will live in Seattle, Was h . JAN IS ARLENE WICKLU N D a n d Paul Smith were ma rried J u ne 30 i n First Lutheran C h u rch in Seattle , Was h .

......

HOLLY TWEDT i s back living i n Taco­ ma, Was h . , a n d is l ooki ng for e m ploy­ ment in the social work field. She wo uld l i ke to h ea r from some of her social welfare classmates. Her add ress is 1 0229 Ainsworth Ave . S . , Taco ma, Was h . 98444. J I M C LY M ER received his master's degree in interpersonal and pu blic com mun ications from Bowling Green State U niversity, Bowling G reen , Ohio. He is now working toward his Ph . D . i n organizational com m u nications . Last year he coached debate a nd public speaking tea ms to fou rth place i n the nation .

1 978 DAVID A. BAUGHMAN is working fo r a CPA firm in Ritzville, Wa s h . JOAN M . M I N G E ta ught first grade i n Centra lia, Was h . tnis past year and has moved to California this past summer to work a nd p u rsue a master's of business admin istration at California State U n iversity - Sacramento. KAREN ( Holt) POTWI N is living in The Dalles, O re . , where she is tra i n i ng in the IC U - CC U u n its at the Dal les General Hospita l . This fall the hospital will send her to Salem, Ore., for critical care cou rses - all expenses paid plus wages. Co ntinued education is her major goal i n life, a nd she says "m uch thanks to PLU . " M ELIN DA VAN N OY a n d MARTIN EIDBO were married J u n r 1 6 i n Trinity Lutheran C h u rch, Taco ma, Was h . They are making thei r first home i n Puya l ­ lup, Was h . Melinda i s a fifth -grade elementary teacher and M a rtin is a lu mber sales agent CH RIS JO H NSON and RICH SWANSON 7 7 were ma rried Sept 1 i n Trin ity Lutheran C h u rch i n Coeur d 'Alene, Id . C h ris is employed as a registered n u rse at Sacred Heart Medical Center in Spokane. JON RIVE N B U RG , a graduate student at Col u m bia U n iversity in m usic and highe r educational administration, has been g ra nted a n admin istrative i n ­ terns h i p with the College o f Arts and Sciences, Queens College, State U n ­ iversity of New York. KRISTIN SCOLMAN is servi n g with the Peace Corps i n the Philippine Islands. She is working i n the rural youth development prog ra m . VICKI FLAGG h a s been h i red b y the Toutle Lake School District, Castle Rock, Was h . to teach third g rade. C H ERYL DAEHLlN and Glen D u n h a m were ma rried i n Gary, Mi n n . , on J u ly 7 . Cheryl is a registered n u rse i n Tacoma, Wash . , a n d Glen is a senior at PLU m a j o r i n g in p h y s i c s , m a t h a n d chem istry. ANGELA MARIE ROMAIN and Timothy John Dwyer of Fairfield, Mont., were ma rried May 1 7 in St Cha rles C h u rch, W h i t e f i s h , M O h t . T h e co u p l e ho meymooned o n the Pacific Princess ( " Love Boat") taking a two-week Pana­ ma Canal cruise which stopped at Acapulco, Cartagena, Colum bia, Aru­ ba, M a rti nique, St Thomas and Sa n J u a n , P u e rto Rico besides going through the Pana ma Canal . They are living on Cross Creek Ranch and their add ress is: Box 2 1 29, Havre, MT. 59501 . KE N N ETH L. ORTON is an ensign in the u .s . Navy. He completed training at officer candidate school, Newport, R . I . , J u ly 1 3 a n d is cu rrently on board the USS TRUXTON as a damage control officer. The USS TRUXTON ia a n uclear­ powered cruiser (small warsh ip), carry­ ing torpedoes, g u ided missiles, g u ns and anti-submarined eq uipment

'30'5, '40'5 Al u ms E njoy Port O rcha rd Picnic Each summer many g raduates and friends get together for pot­ luck picnics, etc. This past su mmer the following enjoyed a g reat day of visiting, re m i nisci n g , good food, and fu n at the lovely beach home of Margaret Kvinsland, Port Orchard, Wash . : Kay Joh nson McClary '34; Evelyn Eklund and Volly Norby Grande, '36; Kathryn Anderson Harding '37; Eugenia Spencer Kvinslan � , Dee Lauge Swa n dstro m , E n i d Blake Webber and Helen Stark Anderson from the class of '38; Margaret Thompson Holland, Mil­ dred Tollefson Krueger and Judy Gerdy J u rgensen, class of '39. Also attending was Eleanor Hoss Stephens, Carol Haavik Tommer­ vik, Virginia Jahr Strand, Caroline Hoff Anderson, Doris Nesvig Ash ­ leman, Marge Delin Fallstrom and Margaret Heggem Kvinsland from the class of '40; Lenore Rasmussen Taylor, Bernice Eklund Peterson and Nina Anderson Larson from the class of '41 ; and Dorothy Larson Harshman from the class of '42. , Next summer they a nd their friends will have a potluck lunc­ heon at Volly Grande's home, Thursday, July 1 1 , 1 980. Volly and Otis have sold their home on Fox Island and have purchased a home at 1 91 2 No. Puget Sound Ave. in Tacoma, Wash . JANET GORDON was married to Alan D . Pearson, J u ne 2. Ala n is from Jacksonvi l le, Ala , He is a lieutenant i n t h e U S Army a n d they are moving to San Antonio, Tex., for a three-month military course. Jan is cu rrently a homemaker. BRIAN D. PICKENS and Merrie Kay Phi llips of Everett, Wash . , were mar­ ried J u ne 1 6 at First Lutheran C h u rch i n Bothell, Was h . Brian grad uated from the U n iversity of Washington in A U ­ g ust with a degree i n aeronautical engi neering .

1 979 EVELYN CORNWALL is an accountant with Ernst & Ernst in Taco ma, Was h . Evelyn majored in busi ness a d m i n ist­ ration and will work on the ma nage­ ment consulting staff of the Taco ma fi rm. J O H N H ESLA has been selected for membership in the Arete ' Honor Soci­ ety, a branch of Phi Beta Kappa at PLU. John will enter the u niversity of Washi ngton Medical School this fall under the WAMI Progra m . , MARl KAREN HUSETH 79 and DAVID BRIAN MISTEREK 78 were ma rried June 24 in Central Lutheran Ch urch , Eugene, Ore.

PAMELA STU BSTEN. a business ad ­ ministration grad uate, has been emp­ loyed by the Seattle offi ce of Peat, M arwick, Mitchell and Compa ny, a world-wide accounting firm . NANCY VAN VESSEM is attending St louis U n iversity Medical School in _ Louis, Mo . , where she will study ,., become a doctor. CATHY McRAE and DAN DAVISON 79 were ma rried Aug. 19 in the Kelso Methodist C h u rch, Kelso, Wash . DOUG BEC KE R is working for a s u bsidiary of the Col u m bia Gas System as a co-ownership and partnership acco u ntant i n Houston, Tex. TERESA LEE TRI M B LE and Den n is Thompson were married Aug. 2 5 . Teresa i s employed b y St Peter' s Hospital, Olympia, Wash . , as a regis­ te red n u rse. He is employed as a shop su pervisor for the Department of Natural Reso u rces. RUTH MARIE PORTER a nd Kirk Bri Wool pert of Corvallis, Ore., were m ried June 9 in Mason U n ited Methodi C h u rch in Taco ma, Wash . Ruth is attending Oregon State U niverSity, where she is majoring in n utrition . She is a member of Sigma Kappa sorority. Kirk is studying at Oregon State U n iver­ sity for his master's degree in business admin istration. After a honeymoon at San Diego they are making their home i n Corvallis, O re . DARIN LORRA I N E THOM PSON and TERRY MARK TE N N ESEN 75 were mar­ ried June 2 at St. Pa ul Lutheran C h u rch near Fairfield, Mont The couple are at home i n Tacoma, Wash . , after a wed­ d i ng trip to Nevada and California . Terry received his master's deg r from Rhode Island School of Desig 2 n d Lt. DWI G H T C . DA N I E LS I stationed at Malmstrom AFB, Mt. He entered the U.S. Air Force In July through the ROTC prog ram Dwight will be worki ng as the PI Officer i n charge o f t h e newspaper, radio a n d TV progra ms. KEVIN DAVIS is teach ing third g rade at Shadow Lake Ele mentary in the Ma pl e Valley School District . He will li ve i n Kent, Wash . KATHRYN E LLE R BY has been hired by the Port Angeles School District, Port Angeles, Was h . She is an elem enta ry teacher . CATH E R I N E JEAN BRAN DT and KE A N ETH LEE LAU FMAN N 78, were ma r­ ried in J une at Peace Lutheran Church, G reat Fa lls, Mont. Catherine is i ntern ­ i n g at Child ren's O rthopediC Hospital in Seattle, and Ken is an associate ana lyst for Pacific N o rth west Bell Tele­ phone Company in Seattle. The couple will live i n Federal Way, Wash KATHERI N E M. HOYLA N D and Lt. DAVID J . FOSTER, USAF, MA 79, were u n ited in marriage J u ne 9 in First Lutheran C h u rch , Dillon , Mont After a honeymoon in New Orleans David is o n a ctive duty at Lackland AFB, San Antonio, Tex . , where the couple will make their first home.

,

W


21

Alumni

In Memoriam

Several PLU alumni who are members of the Western Washington Officials Association officiated at the Varsity-Alumni game sept. 8. From left, Larry Tommervik, stan standifer '59, Scott Buser 74, Mike Burton '69. Bob Peterson and Dave Wytko '65. (Cont. from p. 20) PARK E BlUNDON [s a sa lesma n for Northwestern Mutual Ufe. H e is wo rk ­ ing out of the Thomas D. O' Brien Ag e ncy i n S eattle Was h DAWN REN E J ERGENSON and HOW ­ AR D RICHARD CARLSON , 79 were mar· ned J u ne 23 in Bremerton. Wash. , at Sylv.a n Way Ba ptist Churcl, h e cou p i e honeymooned in Hawa I and a re ma k · I n g their fIrst h ome In Seattle Wash DEBORAH C. BAR N ES has been emp­ loyed a s news dlrec or for KlAD RadiO in Kl am ath Falls, Ore JU LIE MARI E JOHNS E N and DAVID J HENSLEY 78 will be married Oct 6, 1 979 . David is manager of th e Lyn n ,

wood. Wash , Ski pper's Re staura nt RICHARD , C lA RK and Nancy Lynn R uds e r were married J une 9 at Kent Lutheran Church R ichard IS a certified p l J biie acco un ta nt with Ern st and Whinney Accounting, Tacoma, They will reside In Ke nt. Wast KE NNETH P ETER B U EH N and Ma rll'ln Lee Brandenburg were married July 6 at hE" First Reformed Ch u rch Oak Harb or, Wash . Ken is presently attend­ Ing fHgh t rain ing i n the Air Force 3S second lieuten ant. DA N AND ERSON w il l t€ach at Maza­ ma Hi g h School in he Kla math Falls Sc hool Dlst. this yea r

1 979 -80 Al u m n i Boa rd OFFICERS. o nald A M i l lar. M . D. '65 P reSident Whitefis h , M ont Carol (8ottemi llerl Geldaker '57 Fi rst Vice President Wes Li n n Ore

,

Carol fBottemilierl Geldaker '57 West Li nn , Ore.

Ken "Ski p" Ha rtvi gson , Jr. '65 Seattle , Was h . Ronald A. Mi l ler , M D . '65 Whitefish, Mont

Michae l A . M cKea n '68 Second Vice President Gig Harbor, Was h .

Terms Expire May 1981

Joh n M CL au gh l in 71 Immediate Past President Federal Way, Wash.

JoAnn (Nodtvedtl Briscoe '52 Anchorage, Alaska

Ronald Coltom '61 Executive ecreta ry P L U

Regent Representatives Suzanne (Skubinna) Nelson '55 Tacoma, Wash. Roy H . Virak, M D . '52 Tacoma, Wash.

Members-At- Large One-Year AppOintments Esther Ellickson '58 San Diego, Calif Jennie (Lee) Hans en '3 4 H o nolu l u , Hawa i i

Gayle (Seve rson) Berg '72 Martinsdale, Mont

Stephen M . Isaacson 76 Boise , Idaho Carol (Haavikl Tommervik '40 Tacoma, Wash.

Terms Expire May 1 982 Karin (Pihll Leander '66 Mt Vernon, Wash . An ita (Hilleslandl Landgren '59 Tacoma, Wash. Michael A . McKeen '68 Gig Harbor, Wash. Rev. Charles W. Mays '62 Renton, Wash.

Terms expire May 1983

Michael Ford '68 Portl and, Ore.

Otis G ra nd e '38 Tacoma, Wash.

James Kauth, M D . '5 3 San Francisco, Ca lif .

Karen (Fynboe) Howe 73 Fox Island, Wash .

Martha (Millen Ward 77

Paul Kusche 70 Gig Harbor, Wash .

Tenns Expire 1 980

George Nowadnick '52 Snohomish , Wash.

Kent, WA 98031

Kennet h J . Edmonds '64 Puyallup, Wash .

Ex-OfficiO Student Rep. Stephen Rieke, President ASPLU

BURTON MALAKOFF, MA 76, passed away J u ne 1 , 1 979, in Olympia , Wash . . Prior to his death he was active in radio a nd television broa dcasti ng i n Seattle and Tacoma before moving to Olym ­ pia in 1 968. He was a member of the Toastmasters I nternatio na l for 1 ? years, serving a s past district governor and receiving the Distinguished Toast­ master Award. Amo ng his su rvivors are h is Wife, Ma rg a r et . two daughters : Su zanne a nd Ca r rie, bot h at h o m e ; three sons Kim and DaVId , at home; and Mor ris , In Seattle; and h is moth er, Bessie Malakoff, Seattle. ARN OLD TOM M ERVIK '37 p a s s e d away J u ly 2 3 , 1 979 . A rn old (Ti m) was wei r k now n i n the Park la nd a rea where he had been a l o n g ti m e high school coach and a dm i n istrator Mr. To m ­ mervi k was head bas ketball c oach at Ejma Hig h School before becoming the first football coach at F ranklin Pier"e H i gh School. In 1 97 he reti red as a seMol pri nci pal i n the Fra n kll r Pi erce SchOol DI stnct. He was a memb ­ er of the E ag l es , Kiwanis and Elks . Survivors i n clude his wife, G enev i eve ; one son , Larry of Fe d era l Way; (hree d a ug hters , Gloria Greeley of TaCOMa Carol Pa rker of B rem erto n , a n d SUs.:! n Tom mervi k of Bellingha m ; two broth­ e�, Marv of Parkland and Bob of Kent, one sist er, Mrs. JaCK Wells of Seattle; and twO grandchi ldren OYARS LAUKERS '66 p assed away I n Tacom a Au gust ?, 1 979 . e was born I n Latvia and had resided r Ta co ma for 30 years. Mr. La ukers was an In ven tor y co ntrol s u pervi s o r for s t. Regis Paper Co . He was a m em b er of the A meri ca n Association of Accou ntants, tile Lat­ vian Fraternity Latonia a nd the Latvia n Association . Surviv ors I nc l u d e h i s daughter, Sylvia of Spanaway; his mother, Mrs . Fricis ( E mma) Shifers of Tacoma; a brother, Edmund of Seattle; and two stepsisters , MARVIN H. HA NS EN '35, a long-time Tacoma resident, passed away Sept 7, 1 979. Mr . Ha nsen was born i n Tacoma. H e was operator/owner of Tacoma Pump and Drilling, Inc. until he retired to Shaw Island in 1 976. Survivors include his wife, Jerene; four daugh­ ters, Lynne Farren of Spanaway, Lissa Herl itzka of Parkland, Kim Nichols of Lopez and Kathy Ha nsen of Seattle; th ree sons, Mark of Seattle, Jon of Eatonville and Eric of Spanaway. and 15 g ra ndchildren .

Profiles From The Past

R hoda Yo u ng Gives Mayfest Dancers sta rt By Dr. Harold Leraas

The first full -t me Physical Edu­ cation for Women teacher at PlC was Rhoda Young. After complet­ ing a n advanced degree in Physic a l Education at the U niversity of Wa sh ington , she retu rned to her alma mater where she proceeded to develop a program in th is area. It was not so much at fi rst, but yea r by year it grew until it became really ful Hledged . At first. it was mostlv a matter of seei ng that th e girls met P E reqUirements for graduation. The "daffodil bloomers" will long be remembered Gradually sports ac­ tIvities were added, field hockey. base ba ll archery and basketball. There were eve n powderpuff football games P E . had Its academic side, too, to Include a knowledge of the purposes and rules of the games Mrs Young taught a course in H eatth Educa· tion for several years which was in some ways more valuable than the exercise dasses, s i n ce It pOinted up the fundamentals of health which students should knew Du ring her many y ars at PLU , Mrs . Young directed the Mayfest Dancers . This group of selected dancers rehearsed weekly, all year, in preparation for the Annual Mayfest. The occasion grew from a rather simple Maypole da nce on the ca mpus lawn to a gala affa ir conducted in the gymnasium o n an evening close to May 1 . The folk dancing groups that have per­ formed over. the years have been truly outstanding. Campus life would never have been quite the same without the leaven that came from M rs , Young. She was one who "spiced" things a bit, and made living more interesting. The students cou ld turn to her for advice or with problems, and be sure to get a sympathetic hearing. Colleagues from the faculty enjoyed their visits with her. She could be serious and contemplative, or she could be nonsensical and hilarious depending on the mood and the occasion . People always enjoyed her presence, In recent yea rs Rhoda has suffered from illness which has prevented her from contin uing her physical education activities. We are happy that she is still in the com munity and that we ca n enjoy talking to her and listening to her hearty laug h, .


22

Sports

Looking a head to the October 1 3 Northwest Conference football i naugural, PLU is not likely to clutch a security blanket woven by a n 1 8th place NAIA national pre­ season ranking . The NWC com petitive balance leaves no room for complacency. Arch rival Linfield occu pied the n umber three position in the same poll, while Willa mette, which surprised the Lutes 23-8 last year, is loaded with veterans. However, there is an air of o pt i m i s m a t P L U , b e c a u s e strategist/scribe Frosty Westering can pencil 16 returnees onto the sta rting lineup from a list of 29 letter winners . I n addition, the Lutes, NAIA District 1 champions, 6- 3 last year, picked u p seven tra nsfers and a host of freshmen. On offense, nine of eleven star­ ters are back, g raduation claim­ i ng a tackle and a fullback Defen­ sively, PlU has six o f the front seven retu rn ing , but five deep backs departed The offensive l ine, which Wesering considers one of his finest In eight years, includes all-district tight end Scott Westering (220) and Cory McC uliock ( 1 85), both ju niors ju nior tackle Mike Peter­ son (228) and senior Steve Pinning (205) Another all - d i strict first team pick, senior Jo h n Schultz (220), is planted at center. All - d i strict q ua rterback Brad Westering (1 96), a senior co-cap tain, is the holder of three school passing records and a threat to b rea k two m o re . Westering's throwing show, 3348 yards in three years, is complemented by the run ning game, which features senior Jeff Cornish (1 75), junior Guy Ellison (1 70), senior Jeff Baer ( 1 95), and sophomore Mike West­ miller (1 95 ) The quartet had 5 .9, 4.4, 3 .8, and 5 . 1 yard per carry stats respectively last year. On defense, the Lutes have two all-district first teamers at end in seniors Steve Kienberger (21 6), a co-ca ptain, and Roy C h a p m a n (21 5) Senior Phil Earley (205), injured last year, is another skilled end. Tackle talent includes sopho­ more Greg Rohr (235), and senior Kris Morris (200) . Transfers aug­ ment the deep back sentry sys­ tem, which has sophomores Jay Halle (1 75) and Mike Lester (1 75) among the retu rnees . Transfers i nclude sophomore offensive tackle Dave Knight (225), from Ida ho State; sophomore g u a rd D a ve R ee p ( 2 2 0 ) , via Spokane Falls CC; junior defensive tackel Jay Freisheim (225) , U of Ci ncin nati; j u nior linebacker Glen Roh r (21 5), Puget ound; junior safety Scott Kessler (1 90), U of Pacific; sophomore corner back Chris utt (1 85), Washi ngton State.

veterans Hold Key

Lutes Aim fOr Top �n In NAIA

Fullback Jeff Baer takes a Brad Westering handoff for up- the· middle yardage against University of Puget Sound Sept 22.

Lutes split Pair Of Tough Early Season Crid Battles There was both tri u mph and disappointment for PLU's promis­ ing Lutes during the first three weeks of the football season. Following a 30-0 victory in the a nnual Varsity-Alumni clash, the Lutes ventured into the u nfamiliar midwest to face Moorhead State, a highly-touted squad that had de-

Rowers Place 5th In National Regatta Pacific Lutheran rowers, in their strongest s h owing ever, took home a pair of fifth place trophies at the National Women's Rowing Association Regatta, sta ged i n mid-J u ne at Rochester, Mich. The Lady Lutes picked up a fifth in lig htweight pairs, a swan song for g raduating seniors C h ris Carl­ son and Gayle French. PLU's midweight fou r, rowed from bow to stern by French, Carlson, Lori Huseth, and Ruth Babcock, with Annie Gerber at coxswain, also claimed fifth place. Two other shells, the elite pair and senior fou r, narrowly missed qualifying for finals.

feated last year's NAIA Division II champs, Concordia (Moorhead), the previous week. It was expected to be, and was, a tough assig nment, but PLU came home with a well-deserved 25-23 victory which vaulted them to No. 9 in the national polls. All-purpose back Guy Ellison, the Westering brothers and fullback J eff Baer p rovided offen sive punch. Ellison emerged from the game as NAIA punting co-leader (52 -yard average), returned a punt 57 yards for a touchdown, rushed twice for 55 yards and caught a pair of passes. Meanwhile, quarterback B ra d Westering broke Rick Finseth 's 1 971 -74 career passing yardage record . His 1 04-yard effort gave him 3 .452 with eight ga mes to play. Brother Scott caught two touchdown passes among his five tota l a n d b locked a potential game-winning Moorhead State field goal with 40 seconds left. The Lutes had lead 25-7 early in the fourth quarter. The a n nual University of Puget Sound- PLU encounter once again spelled disappointment for the Lutes. They led at the end of the first quarter 8-7 and eclipsed the Loggers in first downs and total

yardage. But turnovers and field position were the keys . Kick a nd i nterception returns and reco­ vered fu mbles sparked the Logger 29-14 victory.

Soccer Team Sets Sights On NWC Crown Pacific Lutheran, shy on goals of foot and forehead impetus last year, have just a singular goal for 1 979 - supremacy in the first season of Northwest Conference soccer. Dave Asher's Lute booters, hav­ ing cut ties with the Northwest Collegiate Soccer Conference, will shed the club sport tag for varsity status in the NWC . PLU, 7 ·1 1 -3 in 1 978, will be i nexperienced at cen er forward, strong on the fullback and half­ back lines, and improved at goalie. Retu rni ng team captain Dave Westbu rg , a fullback, a nd half­ backs Harold Kutz and Dave Daugs, will back up a forward line of Chuck Bragg , Jeff Nellermoe, a nd Paul Swenso n . sher's outlook brightened with the return of goalie M a rk Leeper, who sat out last season. Two Saudi Arabians, a Swede, and a Norwe­ gian give an i nternational flair to the Lute kick squad.


Sports

Kin-etlc Energy Drives Lute Grid Machine B y J i m Kitti lsbv In that decade devoid of disco, the B rothers Four warbled heir wa y to the h it parade pinna cl e , A P LU talent show of another ilk c ou l d be called, in a namesake spi noff the Four P a ir, While siblings occasionally surface on the football field, the Lutes are currently outfit­ ting fou r sets of brothers! The Westering duo of senior q uar­ terback Brad and J unior tight end Scott are maki ng an assault on a myriad of PLU passing records. Both earned all-district acclaim in 1 978, Defensive tackle Greg Rohr, who pocketed the frosh MVP awa rd last year, will play for the first time with older b roth e r G l e n n , a j u n i o r linebacker who transferred from U n ­ iversity o f Puget Sound, G reg prepp­ ed at nea rby W a s h i ngton High School, Glenn at Bethel. A third brother, Kevin, played as a frosh two years ago, but now devotes full time to his engineering studies at PLU , Younger brother (Bob Ripley, are you ready for this?) Jeff, a highly regard­ ed fullback at Washington High, could amplify the PLU Rohr to fou r in 1 980, In a rare share-the-position situa­ tion, backup center Scott Davis, a junior, will find a familiar face vying for playing time in brother Todd, a freshman . The Davis pai r prepped at Tacoma 's Foss High School . Ing raham High School i n Seattle h s been a spawning ground for may PLU athletes, in cluding Bob and J i m Dol ha nyk , Bob, a senior tackle, and Jim, a g uard of sophomore academic standing a n d freshman eligibility, now toil shou lder to s h o u l d e r on the pra cti ce field , From the close knit fam i ly, Brad and Scott Westering have stro ng football ties d at ing back to th e ir passer-receiver days at Wash i ngton " In both our personal and footbal l re Jationstlip, I don ' t view Scott a s a yo u nger brother, " stated B rad , "He's so talented I n football that I feel fortu nate to have him on the same t a m , O n and off the field, I really love him a lat." Glenn Rohr, at 24 the elder spokes­ man for his football family, recalls a few years back when he cal led G reg " fat boy", While Glenn is a stu rdy 6-0, 2 1 5 pounds, Greg has a brick wall 6- 1 , 235 frame a nd now rates an a dm i ring "big brother" salute from Gl e n n , " Our entire family is pleased to have us united at PLU," said Glenn ' 'We've never played tog ether be­ fore . " declared Scott Davis "Now with Todd and me side by side, it's created a lot of excite ment for our whore fam ily, It's easiest on Dad, who only has to attend one game a we ek . " "Jim a n d I were three years apart,

Women Debut in New Conference Finding the b ig hitters is not only a cho re for the baseball coach, but a task for PLU women's vol l eyb al l and field hockey men­ tors as well , Coming off a 23-1 5 sea son , Kathy Hemion'S Lady LUte vol­ leybal l squad will make its debut in · the Women's Conference of In de pendent Colleges with five re tur ­ nees, PL U 's strength is defense, dig ­ ging u p h its, while offensive pow­ er and height are in short supply, veterans i nclude J i nee La nge, Luann Maca n , Pat Shelton, Lori Hanson, and Robin Koch. Brothers "four" from left, top: Scott and Brad Westering, Greg and Glen Rohr Below.- Jim and Bob Dolhanyk, Todd and Scott Davis. With a new coach, in a new league, PLU's avant-garde stick­ smiths hope to paint a fresh j ust like the Davis brothers, so this is a picture in field hockey, which had t h r i l l for u s , " c h i pped i n B o b a 3 - 1 7-4 smudge in 1 978, Dolhanyk, " I more or less opened the Colleen Hacker, who served last door. for Jim to come to PLU and I year as assistant coach at the want so m uch to see him do wel l . " U niverstiy of Arizona, takes over a When the Four P a i r were posing squad which must rely heavily on for photog raphs, all-district defen­ newcomers, sive end Steve Kienberger sided up to Lute teammates in 1 974, Dave Hacker's whackers include Sha n ­ the group , With phonetic emphasis Anderson and Larry Green have n o n Robinson, Marjie Anderson, on his last name, he tongue-in­ retu rned to PLU as assistant foot­ and Tami Fiebelkorn . cheeked: "There is always a place in ball coaches u nder Frosty Wes­ the PLU family for a next of kin , " tering , Both Anderson, head coach at Billings Central Hig h School (Mont.) from 1 97 6-78, and G reen, head defensive coach at Rocky Moun­ tain College in 1 97 6 and 1 977, are pa rt-timers at PLU while pursuing graduate deg rees, Literally speaking, John Zamber­ Anders o n was an all-district lin has moved on fro m PLU to the linebacker for the Lutes i n 1 974, graduate school of hard knocks, Cross country season takes on a whlle Green earned NAIA firstteam An All-American linebacker for different twist for both genders at All -America n recognition in 1 975 the Lutes in 1 978, Zamberlin is P LU, a ne w affiliation for women as a d e fe n s i ve tack l e , Both toili ng with the New England Pat­ and a new coach for the m e n . coaches were Lute team captal 5 riots of the National Football Ca rol Auping's Lady Lutes will as seniors, League make their debut in the Women's

Anderson. Creen Return As Coaches

Road Gangs Are Conference Contenders

Conference of Independent Col­ leges, which has AIAW Division III ti es , after yea rs of chasing a rea NCAA powers, While g raduation a nd relocatio cut deep i nto the PLU roster, the Parkla nders a re expected to be among the favorites in the WCIC chase, where scoring is based on the school's top three run ners, Sophomore Dia nne Johnson, who had a lock on the Lute lead last year, is PLU 's most distinguished hamer. Lute men will march to a kiwi beat this fall as New Zealand-born Alison Dahl makes her debut as harrier honcho Sen ior Mick Zieg ler, ni nth in the NWC test. 1 8th In the district derby, heads the returnee delega­ tion , The Lute road gang, third in the NWC i n 1 978, includes steve Kastama, Randy Yoak u m , a n d Brandt Groh, Rusty Crim, and Kai Bottomlev,

Zamberlin Toils For New England Patrl ts

Coaches gUiding Lute grid fortunes this fall inciude Dave Ande(';on 77, head coach Frosty Westering, Paul Hoseth and Larry Cree n 76.


ealen Boa rd of Rege nts

Tacoma and Vicinity

October 1

Dr T W Anderson Mr. George Pavis M r M R . Kn udso n . chall'man Dr Riclwd Klein Mr . George La erqu ist Mr Richard Nel ls M rs . Suzanne Nels on D r . W . 0 Rieke O r Roy Virak Rev David W ol d . vice-chairman

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Seattle and Vicin Ity

James Beckman Memorial Lectu reship Northwest Woodwind Quintet, U n iv. Center, 8 : 1 5 p . m . Lectu re, Norweg ian Lt Gen ­ eral Wilhelm M ohr, U niv. Center, 8 : 1 5 p m . Football, PLU a t South ern Oregon

Decem ber 1

Mr Gary Ba ugh n

Rev Charles Bomgren Rev. D r , A. G. Fjellman M r . Paul Hoglund Mr. Clayton Peterson Mrs Doris Rolander Rev. Dr. Cla rence S Olberg Dr. Christy UI e la n d. secretary Dr . Ceorge Wade

November 2

M rs . Helen Belgum Rev 0 vld Steen

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Eastern wash ington Mr oge r Larson Mr. Alvin Fink

Mr. H ow a r d Hubbard Mr Galven I rby Rev . John M i l b rath D r. Casper ( Bud ) Pa ulson

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Montana

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Rev. Roland G ra n t Mr Sterling Rygg

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M rs . Dorothv Schnaib!e

Alaska

Mr. Martin PI hi

M innesota

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AdVisory

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Mr. Robert Hadland Rev Gordon Braun ALC/NPD D r Ronald Matt�lias. ALe Or . Richard Solberg. LCA Rev. Llano Thelin. LCAlPNWS

Perry Hendricks Jr .. treasurer Drs. J o h n Herzog, Joa n n e Jensen, Fran k l i n O lso n . faculty Steve Rieke, Dave S i b u rg , Matt Morris ' students PLU officers

Editoria l Boa rd

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What·s N ew With You ?

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Name Address C!tv ----- State---Zi p_ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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Please check thiS box if address above is new. (Attach old mailing label below,) o

Class

Concert, U niverSIty Sym­ phony Orchestra, Eastvold Aud , 8 : 1 5 p m . Artist Series, Fana Ma nnskor ' orso n Aud . , 8 : 1 5 p.m. Entertainment Series, C j Coltraine, Olson Aud . , 8 : 1 5 p m Con cert. PLU Jazz Ensemble ' U . C Commons, 8: 1 5 p . m . Football, PLU at Pacific Con cert, Be hesda C hoir Trinity Luthera n Church 4 p.m Lila Moe Memorial Scholar­ ship Benefit, pian ist Richard Farner, U n iv. Ce n ter, 8 1 5 p.m Recita l, Knapp piano stu­ dents, U niv. Center, 8: 1 5 p . m .

1 7- NOV. 1 0 Wekell Gallery,

Dr. William O. Rieke . . . . . President Lucille Giroux . . . Pres. Exec. Assoc. Ronald Coltom Dir. Alumni Relations James l. Peterson . . . . . . . . . Editor James Kittilsby . . . . . sports Editor Edith Edland . . . Class Notes Linda Walker . . . . . . . . . Tech. Asst. O.K. Devin, Inc. . . . G raphiCS Design .

design by Sara Little Mus i ca l . "Sound of Music " ' Eastvold Aud . , 8 : 1 5 p . m . Footba ll, Dad 's Day, Linfield at PLU, Fra n kli n - Pierce Stadium ' 1 : 30 p . m . Musical, "Sound of M usic " ' Eastvold Aud . , 4 p . m . Concert, U n iversity Wind En­ semble, Eastvold A u d . , 8: 1 5 p.m. Concert, Contemporary Di­ rections Ensemble, U niv Center, 8 : 1 5 p m Norweg ian Folk Dancers, Olson Aud . , 8.1 5 p.m Footba l l , PLU at Lewis and Clark Concert, Washin gton Brass Q u i ntet, U n iv. Center, 8 : 1 5 p.m.

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A l u m n I Dinner, Olson Aud . , 5 : 30 p m Recital , g u itarist Andrew Schulma n , lngram Hall, 8: 1 5 p.m. Con cert, Northwest Wood­ wind Qui ntet. U n iv. Center, 8: 1 5 p .m . Artist Series, soprano Cynthia Clarey ReCital, Doppman n - Robb i ns piano- percussion, Eastvold A ud . , 8:1 5 p . m Jazz Ensemble Festival , East­ void Aud. & U nlv. Ce ter, a . m . Football, PLU a t Whit­ worth Concert, U n iversity Singers, Eastvo!d Aud. , 3 p . m Concert, U n iversity Sym­ phony Orchestra, Eastvold Aud ., 8 : 1 5 p m . Entertain ment Series, Ka lapa · na, Olson Aud . , 8 : 1 5 p . m Facu lty Wives Y ule Boutique, Olso n Aud . , 1 0 a . m . Master's Voice ReCita l, Paul Plew, U niv. Center, 3 p . m . Concert, U n iversity W i n d En­ semble, Eastvold Aud . , 8 : 1 5 p.m. Concert, Wash ington Brass Qui ntet, Univ. Center, 8 : 1 5 p.m.

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Homeco m i ng Song fest, Olson Aud . , 7 p . m . Recita l, Cellist David Hoffman ' Eastvold Aud . , 8 : 1 5 p . m . Footba ll, Wlilam ette at PLU Fra n kli n - Pierce Stadium,

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Artist Series, pian ist LUi Kraus ' Olson Aud . , 8 : 1 5 p . m . U n iversity Theatre, "House of Blue Leaves," Eastvold Aud . , 8:1 5 p. m .

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( H a n del's " MeSSiah , " C h ristmas Festiva l Concert Series, see page 1 1 . ) U n ivers it"y Theatre, " !-louse of Blue Leaves, " East\lold A ud . , 8:15 p m U n iversity Theatre, " House of Blue Leaves, Eastvold Aud , 2:15 p.m. Concert, Faculty Trio, Eastvoid Aud , 8: 1 5 p . m . En tertain m e l Series. J o hn Fisher, Olso n Aud . . 8 1 5 p. m . Concert, Conte m porary Di rections E nsemble, U n iv Center, 8. 1 5 p m Luda Bride Festiva l , Eastvold Aud" 8 1 5 p . m . Basketball, Seattle Pacific at P LU , Olson Aud , 7: 30 p . m . Recital, sopra n o Ba rbara Poulshock. Eastvold .A.ud . , 8. 1 5 p.m

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PLU honors Irene Creso

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see page 2

Special

LU C mpaign Supplement IV

For NPD Congregatďż˝ ons


Old Main now Harstad Hall, as it appeared at the turn of the ce tury. The then imposing structure, built in the

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PLU Yesterday

A special

ambience

middle of a rural prairie, was the only campus building for many years.

One cannot long be associated with Pacific Lutheran University, study its past, experience its pre­ sent, or ponder its future, without becoming captivated by a special ambience that is rooted in the past but is still vigorously alive today. PLU sta nds today as the dynamic realization of what may have seemed a preposterously ambiti­ ous dream stated 86 years ago; it stands today as a tribute to the w i s d o m of an edu cational philosophy stated SO years ago; and its stated objectives and standards remain essentially un­ changed over the past 15 years. In spite o f the vast c hanges that have occurred in American society and throughout the world, in the physical appearance of the PLU campus, in its academic program, in the composition of the student body - certain beliefs, attitudes and goals remain inviolate and cherished.

About The Cover Irene Creso, PLU professor er­ mi tus of biology, received an hon­ orary doctor of humane letters degree during PLU's 81st com­ mencement exercises May 27. The degree was conferred by PLU President Dr. William O. Rieke, one of Mrs. Creso's former students. Since her retirement in 1 975, Mrs. Creso has been involved in

many scholarly rojects. Chief among them is her almost single­ handed development of the 6,000s p ecimen Creso Herbarium at PLU. Also honored at commencement were Dr. and Mrs. David T. Hel­ lyer, founders of Northwest Trek Wilderness Park, philosophy pro­ fessor Dr. George Arbaugh and

mu sic professor Gor d o n G i l ­ bertson. The Hellyers received PLU's Distinguished Service Award. Ar­ baugh is the university's 1979 Re­ gency Professor, and Gilbertson received a 25-year service cita­ tions. A total of 616 bachelors and masters degrees were conferred during the ceremonies.

inviolate and cherished. Nor is PLU out of step with the times; time has simply proven that the value on which PLU was founded are as they were nearly nine _ decades ago. ,., PLU's eventual campus was first viewed by its founder, Rev. Bjug Harstad, in 1890. Before school doors first opened in 1894, the then PLA (Pacific Lutheran Academy) Board had declared that the new insititution would be "dedicated to the glory of God and the edification of man. " The present PLU administration affirms those sentiments. The mission of the pioneers was "to build a great institution of _ learning which would rise to be- '" come a rallying point for Lutheranism in the West and a spiritual and cultural center for all Scandina­ vians in the area. " Today PLU not only remains committed to that stated mission but has gone far beyond to offer its educational, spiritual and cultural resources to persons fro m all heritages and walks of life. In his inaugural address in 1928, President O.A. Tingelstad stated that at PLU "education must take place in a Christian setting of liberty, basic to the discovery of freedom, tolerance and fairness." Today, a half century later, few at PLU would disagree with his mission definition. It embraces the essentials of the current Universi­ ty Objectives. Again, 15 years ago, President


Robert Mortvedt reaffirmed the PLU mission as that of "seeking all truth - both truth which has been revealed and truth that can be d is covered - within the framework of a Christian vision of life." Today's university motto sounds startlingly similar, if a bit more concise: Quality education in a Christian context. What many PLU scholars have struggled to explain down through the years is that PLU is a unique place where reason and faith are encouraged to exist side by side. It is a concept that is at the heart of Lutheranism. But it is not easy to define or maintain. There a re many pressures to lean one way or the other. PLU University Pastor Ron Tellefson said recently, "If an institution is a religious Bible colege with a clear, narrow outline of beliefs, it is not so difficult to define. We are a university which exp ores several disciplines broad­ ly and deeply. We are not a church, but we contain a church." On the other hand, according to President William Rieke, 'Secularity falls apart by itself. You can't cut out one realm of existence (i.e. the spiritual) and pretend it doesn't exist." He added that both reason and faith are necessary for a rounded outlook. "Yet there will always be tension between the two," he ob­ served .. "It's the nature of a col­ lege to look at things that the church doesn't. One furthe r axiom has echoed from the days of the founders down through PLU's history: the value of a single individual. Each major PLU building today c o m m e m o r a t e s a n i ndividual whose efforts, commitment and sacrifice made PLU what it is today. Books could be written ab-

The PLU campus as it appeared in the late '50's before the closure of Wheeler Street, construction of the out the lives of Harstad, Xavier, Hong, Hinderlie, Stuen, Kreidler, Ordal, Foss , Pflueger, Tingelstad, Eastvold, Ramstad, Olson, Mort­ vedt, Aida Ingram and Hauge. And there have been thousands of others . Their individual con­ tributions were not motivated by fame or fortune but by service - to other individuals and to mankind as a whole.

administration building and the addition to the science building.

Today, one of PLU's greatest strengths is the continued willing­ ness of PLU faculty and staff to offer whatever individual atten­ tion, guidance and caring is neces­ sary to insure that students re­ ceive a well-rounded education. I n many cases, that education encom­ passes far more than what is taught in the classroom. Dr. Rieke alludes to the value of

the individual by emphasizing PLU's "people endowment, " a s much a part of PLU a s earth, bricks, books and trees. It is the people, people bound together by a purpose larger than themselves, that give Pacific Lutheran University the vitality, the special ambience, that is de­ fined differently by each individu­ al but which is felt by all.

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Tennis courts were located on the south side of Harstad Hall during the early part of the century. The original gymnasium was south of the courts, out of the picture at the right.

Dr. and Mrs. Philip Hauge posed at the campus entrance for this 1931 photo. Dr. Hauge, for whom the administration building is now named, served at PLU for over SO years. Daughter Janet, now Mrs. Ralph Carlson · of Centralia, Wash., is a 1950 PLU graduate.


Views: Educator Describes What He Believes LU Is 'R ally Like' alter Youngquist Pac ific Luthe ran Univers ity claims to have a concern for stu­ dents, a quality faculty, and a sense of va lue . As parents of PLU stu­ dents or as friends, you would pro ably like to know what PLU is really like. For the fall term 1976, and the academic year 1977-78 I was visit­ ing professor of Earth Sciences at PLU. I am not a PLU graduate, and I do not expect again to be part of

By

Capital Fund prive Foell es On Volu tee s In Churches Church councils of the 280 North Pacific District congregations are being visited during May and June by 60 trained vol unteer pastor­ layman team on behalf of the PLU "Sharing in Strength" capital fund campaign. "Sharing in Strength" is a five­ year $16.5 million campaign in­ tended to provide funds for new science and fine arts facilities at PLU as well as increased endow­ men and student aid monies. Purpose of the team visitatIOns is to help the councils set goals and develop campaign organizations wi th in their congregations, ac­ cordi ng to campaign director Luth­ er Bekem ier, PLU vice-president for development. By June 1 the visitation effort was nearly 75 per cent completed, he saId. "We're extremely gratified by the response," B e ke meir said. " Th e con g regations have been very open to PLU." During the summer as many as 1 ,400 volunteers will be pledging their support and learning how to conduct the campaigns wi thin their congregations. The goal of the congregational portion of the campaign is $3 illion. As of June 1, gifts and pledges from the church, alumni, trusts, foundations and cor orations to­ talled $785,409. A concurrent ef­ fort to reach 2,000 PLU alumni is also being co nducted this summer.

the PLU faculty. I viewed PLU in the context of some 18 years of university teaching experience elsewhere. Let me give you an objective view of the REAL PLU. I can do this very quickly. The real PLU is as PLU claims to be. But let me add a few notes. In the numerous faculty sessions I at­ tended at least half of the concerns were directly student related. Indi­ vidually also, the faculty, be they full professors or instructors, are always accessible to students. The faculty is hi gh quality and could compete anywhere academ­ ically. As a matter of personal c u riosity I ra ndomly asked a n umber of the faculty just why they were at PLU becau e most if not all of them could do better financially elsewhere. The answ­ ers reduced to the fact chiefly that the fac ulty wan ed t be where they could relate di rectly to the students, omething which is dif­ ficult 0 do in secular schools where the freshman lecture clas­ ses may be up to 500 and more stude ts and upper division clas­ ses correspondingly large. The faculty is a quality group, drawing theIr academic training from Harvard, the Big Ten schools and he Pacific Coast schools j ust as many excellent faculties across the nation are drawn. The faculty also does research like other facul­ ties, but the difference I saw between PLU and the secular schools was that research came second and students came first at PLU. If you have not been in the reverse environment you cannot appreciate what an i m po rtant point that is. And what of values? It has been encouraging to hear recently from the general public the lament that we appear to lack both the com­ mittment and the capabilities of t aching values in our ecular chools. It i becoming clear to all that our most ba ic problem ' can on ly be partly if at all) solved by technological means. The classic example of the fact that technology is not t he ultimate answer is that given by the two noted atomic scientists, Wiesner (now president of MIT) and York, who point out that when one milit­ ary side builds an atomic bomb, the other side builds a bigger bomb, whereupon the fir t side builds a still bigger bomb etc. , etc. , etc . etc. The solution to this problem is not technological but is in the human heart and soul. This sort of

Dr. Walter Youngquist

basic concern can be and is ad­ dressed at PLU. Furthermore, at PLU traditional values are not destroyed with no substitute of­ fered. We have seen in the United States the past decade too many instances where this has not been the case. Established and time­ tested norms of conduct hav been corned, and nothing bas been offered in their place. In some instances what has been offered is simply the con ept of "whatever you can get away with is right. " In a ery elementary example of c ntrast at PLU, one of the things which was early pointed out to me was the fact that laboratories and classrooms can remain unlocked and the equipment does not disap­ pear. As one faculty member re­ marked "you can leave a $20 bill on the lab table in the fall and it would still be there next spring." I be­ lieve it, and that simple story tells volumes of the values and attitudes at PLU. Where do these values and at­ titudes come from? In large part, of course, they have come from the homes in which these students have been raised. But these boys and girls of yours are entrusted to PLU at a very impressionable and formative age. As a university professor I have been keenly aware of the fact that I probably have had more influence on a student, and that the student would Ii ten to me more readily than would the student 0 his or her own parents . Now the fact is that I was probably telling the student the same thing the parents would say, but the student lis ene to me. lt is a great responsibility which faculty have in this position. But the faculty in good part really reflect the tenor and tone of the campus at large. Where is that tone set? It must come primarily from the president. In this regard PL U is especially fortunate. Prior to coming to PLU, I had known Dr. Rieke only briefly and casually. While at PLU I had a chance to observe him in many situations, and to kn w him better.

Dr. Rieke makes it a practice to visit divisional faculty meeting on a fairly regular schedule. I have never seen a university president do that before. At such occasions a facul y member can ex lore in detail any problems or concerns he or he rna have. If a fac u lty member does not want to do this b e fore colleagu e s the facu lty member can drop over to see the president privately. Many are a bit diffiden about doing this but the opportunity is clearly there. I tried it myself a few times just to see if it would work. It does. Unless Dr. Rieke 1S in the mids of some meeting, he is always ready to talk with any ne. I can sum up all these observations about PLU's president by stating that I have served under a number of univer­ sity president , but none better than William Rieke. Th e Rieke years will be good ones at PLU. L i k e all p r ivately supported schoo s, however, the president needs help to do the job. Recently you wrestled with IRS form 1040. It is omplicataed, but one of the simplest entries to make, with happy deductible results, is a charitable contribution, and with taxes and inflation as they are and apparently will continue to be - the ost to you of such a tax deduction is becoming less and less. Why not write a larger check to PLU and a smaller one to th IRS? Somewh re along the road of life each of us would like to leave some sort of monument. Henry Adams once aid "a teacher affects eterni­ ty. " I would modify that to say that a teacher and Pacific Lutheran affect eternity. I have given you an ins ide but objective view of Pacific Lutheran University . PLU may cost more than some other educational alter­ natives, but in my considered view, dollar for dollar, it represents a greater value, for the tated image of PLU is indeed the true face of a fine univerSity with a dedicated, competent faculty, and a great president


Volu me LVIV No. 6

December 1 979

Pacific Lutheran U niversity Bulletin (USPS 41 7 - 660)

C h i na : An Ana lysis

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Historv professor Dr. Mordechai Rozanski reflects on the paradox that is the People's Republic of China todav.

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Religion professor Dr Ralph Geh r­ history student Mark An­ derson had wide IV d rtTenng reac­ tions to their experience in China.

ke and

Lutes In ay

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34-14 victory over California Lutheran put PLU w ith i n two games Of t h e national NAIA Divi­ sian " grid title A

President's A n n u a l Report Prog ress, academicallv and flna ­ ci I IV, is the picture pai nted bV u niversity officers i n their 1 978-79 a nnual report. Section 2

Cove r Te m p l e of Heaven i n Peking, where the Emperor was taken each New Year to inaugurate the agricultural season. Gold and mar­ ble are dominant architectural featu res. Photo bv M ordecha i Rozanski.

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Published six times a n n ually by the Office of Un iversity Relations, Pacific Lutheran U niversity, P O . Box 2068, Tacoma, WA 98447 (USPS 41 7 ·6601. Second class post­ age paid in Tacoma, WA. Postmaster: Send address changes to Development Data Center, PLU, Tacoma, WA 98447.


The World

Smelli 9 lowers orse ack By Dr. Mordechal Rozanski

A three week summer visit to the People's Republic of China is a n insufficient base for writing the definitive report on this rapidly changing, dyna mic society. China is a constantly eng rossing, perp­ lexing, and even a h umbling ex­ perience, particularly for someone like myself who has been studying her so assiduously for years. Not surprisingly, many w h o have journeyed there have retu rn­ ed somewhat disconcerted and confused but nevertheless ab­ s orbed by her revolutionary trans­ f o r m a t i o n . This was eVi d e nt among our group of 50 P LU students, faculty, alums and oth ­ ers who toured China d u ring J Uly and August. it wasn·t that Canton, Foshan, S h a n ghai, Nanking and Peking were mysterious, o r t h at t h e schools, factories ind ustrial ex­ h ibits, museums, a nd agricultural communes were enigmatic, or, finally, that the people in their variety and number were "inscrut­ able . " China, we quickly d:5CO­ vered , is both comprehensible and "scrutable." The problem, instea d , involves dimension and deg ree. China is vast. her people and regions di­ verse and, most i mportantly, her h istorical and contemporary re­ cord, a complex, often tragic panorama of cycle and change. As a result. our fa miliar processes of comparison and analysis were oc­ casionally inadequate to the task, l i mited by cultu re-bound assump­ tions and inappropriate yardsticks. Nevertheless, it would be un­ natural, even impossible, not to pass judgments, or to evaluate what one has experienced and observed . The thoughtful reflec­ tions of several of our tour par­ ticipants presented elsewhere in this issue manifest such judg­ ments and evaluations. They a re partly representative of many oth­ ers. All have been incisive, pro­ found, sincere, but. for the most part, polarized around the con ­ f l i ct i n g s e n ses o f h o p e a n d despair. Can it be that th i s diversity of ·viewpoint is errant or naive, or that China is, as stereotype contends "an enigma wrapped in a puzzle? " I would say n o . These diverse views are all aspects ofa complex society in profo und flux. They are, howev­ er, also testimony to the hazards of judging a revolution in prog ­ ress. The Chinese, with their lacon ­ ic hu mor, have aptly dubbed such

attempts d uring galloping visits such as ours a case of "smelling flowers from horseback. " Nevertheless, having cultivated my olfactory powers over several years (aided by a prominent pro­ boscis), let me mount my steed and venture some tentative ob­ servations as a context for the different i mpressions of China that follow later. pervading Paradox

Paradox pervades China today. At times, it seems to be a land of cynicism, anger, and discontent. But. at other times, it appears to be a land of hope emba rked on a road of u n p recedented soci a I , political. and economic prog ress. The discontent and disillusion ­ ment h ave been evoked by years of ideological combat. a rbitrary authority, cycles of political and personal vengence, contradictory manifestos, capriCIOUS absent jus­ tice, economic reversals, and ar­ cane processes of decision-mak­ ing by a n ever changing guard of leaders a nnointed and defrocked by the Olympian Chairman Mao Zedung. This assault on normalcy and certitude reached its nadir during the now officially condemned Cul­ tu ral Revolution of the latter 1 960s and early 1 970's, an ideological c a m p a i g n now, a lso, officially blamed on the "notorious Gang of Four" ( Mao's widow J iang Qing and her th ree cohorts)' While in China, we observed sardonic Chin­ ese frequently adding a bobbing thumb to join the four fingers they had raised to symbolize the

rom

Gang of Four. Few miss the point. How cou l d t h ese p re v io u s l y glorified four pillars of state have carried the Chinese nation so far without Mao as a "fifth col u m n ? " China i s , however, simultane­ ously a land of sanguine hope because some correction of these past abuses seems to be occuring under the present "pragmatic" leadership of the earthy Deng Xiaopi n g . And although their com­ plete eradication is far from cer­ tai n , the present tolerance of limited expressions of dissent. particularly via "large character posters" at the so-called "Democ­ racy Wall" i n Peki n g , represents a positive first step. While its ultimate purpose may be politically expedient. a nd its du ration shortlived, this policy of tolerating controlled criticism of the abuses of the past seeks to give vent to the deep seated discontent smoldering in Chi nese society. Its purpose is also to re­ energize popular participation in society, to counteract apathy and, by sponsoring a policy of very limited liberalization , to mobilize su pport a nd enthusiasm for a stagnating Revolution. Bla ming Mao

Deng has attributed China's pre­ sent problems to Mao's dogmatic assertion that ideological goals, that is, the inculcation of socialist co nsci o u s n ess, e q u a l i ta rianism and selflessness had to supercede economic development. Mao was co n v i n ced that e m ph a s i s 0 n economic development and tech­ nological change without a pre-

liminary restructu ring of social values wotlld lead to a revival of class diversions witl, the manage­ r i a l a n d tec h n ical l e a d e r s h i p emerging as a new exploiting elite over urba n and rural workers. As a result. Mao's policies fo­ cused on ideological campaig ns to inculcate this socialist conscious­ ness, even at the expense of economic prog ress and social a nd political order. His zig -zag g i n g policies and ideological ca mpaigns - particularly the Cultural Revolu­ tion - sought to mobilize the "masses" against entrenched par­ ty functionaries who he feared placed economic and material go­ als above ideological purity. And to prevent his revolution from suc­ cu mbing to the historical pattern of conservatism and ossification that followed revolutionary vic­ tory, Mao u nleashed a ra mpaging mob of millions of youthfu l "Red Guards" to root out the compla­ c e n t a n d to revive and i n ­ stitutionalize revolutionary zeal. Tile cost to society was stagger­ in g . The suffering and devastation in h u ma n and materia l terms was monu mental; it al most destroyed the revolution and nation, if pre­ sent accounts a re to be believed. From 1 966 u ntil the mid-1 970's China devou red herself in civil and ideological war. Government. in­ dustry, educati o n , ag riculture, tra n s portation a nd cu ltu re re­ treated i nto a chaos that lasted u ntil very recently. Some of the scars of this period were still evident d u ri n g o u r tour this su m mer.

This Peking revolutionary poster exhorts support of the Four Modernizations.' ag­ riculture, industry, national defense and science/technology. The Chinese hope to achieve world parity in these areas by the year 2000.


The World

Exa m ples

Let me cite some concrete ex­ a mples: • Disruption in agriculture a nd transportation resulted in inade­ quate food supplies for a popula­ tion that today a pproaches one billion . G ra i n and m eat w e re rationed; beggars reappeared in some cities i n Western China. This past summer, Chinese officials admitted that 95 million people were underfed i n China. Food production went from 6 1 4 1bs. per capita i n 1 957 to 607 1bs. per ca pita in the mid 1 970's. • Disruption of industry, the lack of promotions or incentives, in­ adequate quality control, absent coordi nation and planning (a con­ sequence of ideological struggles and the displacement of manag ­ ers and technicians) led to down­ turns in steel a nd coal production, a nd, i n turn, contributed to the esti mated 20 million unemployed admitted this past summer. Many of the u nemployed a re students a n d d e m o b ilized soldiers who could not be abso rbed i nto the weakened economy. Several de­ monstrations witnessed by our tour members this summer in­ volved the unemployed demand­ ing jobs. One g roup of demon­ strators picketed the M i nistry of Textile nea r our Peking hote l . In a nother Peki n g locati o n , d e ­ mobilized soldiers without jobs or housing had set up a shanty-town awaiting help. • Attacks on education, particu­ la rly the elimi nation of entrance exams, grades, and considerations of merit (ostensibly to reduce the disadvantages of rural youth), and the replacement of q u a l i fied teachers with ideologues or " pro­ leta rian instructors," led to the closing of many schools, depriving C h i na of the talents of a genera­ tion of educated youth . Red Guard youth overflowing city streets were " sent dow n " to com mu nes where they interfered with peas­ a nts. Eventually ma ny sneaked back into cities or in desperation escaped China via Hong Kong . These former Red Guards have formed the generation of mis­ gu ided misfits China must reab­ sorb today. The problem of education is mag nified by a still i nadequate educational plant lacking suffi­ cient schools or teachers for the close to 40% of the population which is under 1 5 years of age. More ominous is the fact that with only a few U niversities reopened (we saw one in Nanking empty a n d i n shambles from the C u ltural R ev o l ut i o n ) , t h e re a re o n l y 300,000 university slots for the o v e r 7 m i l l i o n h i g h sc hool graduates appearing each year.

Crime and Protest

Is there any wonder that Chin­ ese society has become dispirited, angry, cyn i c a l a n d a pathetic? Some have tu rned to crime or

protest; but worst of all for the Revolution , some have retreated from pa rticipation in politics a nd society . A revealing and very popular, self- d e p recati n g joke during our stay in China intimated that after one was bitten by a snake one instinctively fled at the

to reject Marx's injunction about the necessity of capitalism a nd economic and technological de­ velopment as the essential prere­ quisites for a "feudal society's progress i nto socialism . " After all. socialist sharing requires the "soc­ iety of plenty" that productivity

Western technological, technical, financial and managerial assist­ a nce - pa rticularly from advanc­ ed capitalist nations. Deng evinces no public fear that this will erode his socialist goals, claiming that the exploitive aspects of capitalist economic practices can be pre­ vented by socialist "guardianship" and ideological constancy. Chinese youth a re being sent a broad (though in smaller numb­ ers than first a nnou nced), and China has emba rked on several joint ventures with Western and Japanese enterprises, even estab­ lishing free-trade zones for West­ ern i nvestment. No wonder Mao is s h r i n k i n g i n h i s c rysta l s a r ­ cophagus. I nternal Cha nges

A showcase agricultural station is located near the great Yangtze River (background). The Chinese. according to Rozanski. are more "gardeners " than "farmers. "

sight of a rope i n one's path . Is t h e re a ny wonder that Mao's policies and his Gang of Fou r hei rs had to be changed when the opportu nity presented itself after his death in September 1 976. I ronically, this litany of abuse offers some sense of hope. The present Chi nese leadership's ad­ mission of past errors, their wil­ ling ness to tolerate protests and to redress g rievances a re all tenta­ tive steps towards looking at prob­ lems in a more objective, less i deological way. And facing prob­ lems is the first stage in solving them. None of this is a guara ntee of turnaround or long term com ­ mitment to "liberalization," but for the present it is sig nificant. More significant is the present leadership's com m itment to the " Four Modernizations" progra m : 1 ) Industry, 2) Ag ricultu re, 3) Sci­ ence and Technology, and 4) Na­ tional Defense. The goal of this progra m is to bring China i nto the front ra nks of the industrialized nations by the year 2000. It is a n ambitious program that w i l l be very difficult to realize. Neverthe­ less, its general d i rection a n d actions t o date a re very e n ­ cou raging . It must be u nderstood that China' s ultimate goal is still social­ ism in China - this is not the opening sig nal of the deliberate capitalist or democratic tra nsfor­ mation of China . Deng a nd his colleagues are no less com munists than were Mao and his supporters. The differences involve a question of means and specific goals. In one sense, Deng can be proclaimed the more orthodox Com munist because Mao seemed

and tech nology make possible. Mao soug ht to skip an i mportant stage - for fear of its associated devisive and class perils - to leap directly i nto socialism . Volunta r­ ism, h u ma n will and conscious­ ness, Mao believed, could ulti­ mately su rmount material condi­ tions, a very utopia n even Chinese viewpoint, b ut deci dedly less Marxist. Economic Transformation

Deng, on the other hand, be­ lieves that China can and must undergo a n immediate economic transformation, if not for M a rxist orthodoxy, then to p reserve the nation and the revolution. With over 40 divisions of Soviet troops on China's northern borders, with a popu lation that is projected to reach 1 . 2 billion by the year 2000, (at the present low one percent annual rate of g rowth), a nd with more than 50 percent of her population under 21 years of age, China is sitting on a series of demographic, economic, social, political and secu rity time-bombs that will surely affect us all. Productivity must be increased at all costs. Den realizes that modernization and its concom it­ ant of li mited "liberalizing" are essential not only as emergency programs of restorative develop­ ment, but as evocative symbols for mobilizing national reintegra­ tion among China's various disaf­ fected or apathetic constituen­ cies. In pursuit of these " pragmatic" goals, Deng and his colleagues have embarked on some remark­ a ble a n d rat h e r controversial policies. These have i ncluded the deliberate policy of borrowing

Equally i mportant. and more i mmediately relevant to our dis­ cussion, are the internal changes effected and proposed by Deng and his followers. Most hopeful for the Chinese people - if pre­ sent policies and leadershi p a re sustai ned - is a new attitude that harkens back to Mao's pre-1 949 days when he won his mass sup­ port. Deng and his followers ap­ pear to have accepted the notion that the Chinese people desi re predicability in politics and requ i re economic and social rewards as part of the revolutionary process. People will not participate in socie­ ty and the economy nor produce nor support the socialist cause unless they personally prosper as well as survive. Practical manifestations of this new attitude have included a new series of legal codes promising due process, protection against a rbitrary arrest and the guaran­ tees of open court trials. In addi­ tion, i ncentives have been i n ­ troduced into factories a n d ru ral agricultu ral communes. Produc­ tivity and quality are now to be rewarded, and absenteeism con­ demned. Prices paid to peasants for their g rain have been raised by 20 percent, resulting in a 50 percent increase in productivity over ta rget this year alone. Com­ pa rable increases i n i ron and coal have also occu rred . Peasant in­ comes have risen by close to 1 8 percent. Not all has gone smoot h l y . There h a s been considerable foot­ d ragging, even outrig ht opposi­ tion by middle and lower level bureaucrats who fear retribution if a " radica l " takeover succeeds Deng . This attitude, a legacy of past vacillations, is the very prob­ lem Deng seeks to eliminate. Watermelons

O ne i ncident reported in Peking this summer shows this problem g raphically. An old -line com mu ne pa rty leader, resisting instructions to allow a decentralization of plan­ n i ng , ran into conflict with the lower level production teams over (Cont. p. 4)


4 The World

(Cont. from p. 3) pla nting policy. The official i nsist­ ed on a cotton crop, while the peasants, reacting to a new policy wh ich allowed them to sell directly to ru ral a nd urban ma rkets, want­ ed to raise watermelons for thi rsty summer customers. The peasants' production team petitioned the government a nd were sustained against the old line official. This was well publicized in the press to encourage similar lower level i n ­ volvement a n d the prod uctivity it generated, elsewhere. Not only had the peasants grown waterme­ lons, but cotto n , i n addition No wonder we saw watermelon everywhere in China thi s sum mer and had it often ourselves. Ap­ propriately, this incident became known as the watermelon Wa r. A final exam ple of changed policies i nvolves the case of the family of Fan Zaigen, a co mmune peasant lauded in the press this summer while we were in Peki ng It involved a new policy for rural commu nes w h i c h p e r m i tted peasants and their families to profit both from private "garden" plots cultivated d u ring off-hours, and from sideli ne activities such as fishing and raising chickens or ducks. The p roduct of these sideline activities could be sold at rural or u rban markets at what were eu phemistically called "one man collectives . " According to the Peking Daily, Fan 's family of nine had worked diligently on their commune and ea rned an annual i ncome of $133 per person based on a system of work points. But Fan's nine-member family also had a "garden" plot which they tended after hours (ten hours on their commune job, six on thei r own), They g rew vegetables, fish­ ed i n a nearby river, raised 50 ducks for thei r eggs , bred sheep for their wool and la mbs, raised and sold eight pigs, and even sold their menageries manure as fer­ tilizer back to their own com­ mune. Selling their produce in the city at prices higher than the government controlled shops freshness deserved a premiu m ­ they amassed a profit of $422 per person ! When reported to the authorities, they were congratu ­ lated i n the press for having served t e commune a n all soci­ ety with their exemplary produc­ tivity. A Single step It is time I dismounted my horse befo re I am thrown However,

severa) fin a l pOints should be made. There is no doubt th at C hi na is poor and, as her leaders attest. a backward society with i mmense problems any one of which overwhelm and disillUsion us. These problems will conti n ue for many years to come. BUt. to b o rrow a phrase from Mao , tra ns­ forming a nation with 25 percent of the world's population from poverty and weakness to wealth and strength is like a 1 0,000 mile

trip that must begin with a single step. China has taken many steps, some of them In the right and some of them i n the w rong d i rection. Where she will go in the f u t u re i s u n certa i n ; p resent policies if continued and im ple­ mented offer some prospect of hope. What is Ultimately most hopeful about China's condition today is that her many troubles have given b i rth to a new political cultu re . With Mao's death and reevalua­ tion, awe of demi -gods has been undermi ned . Cynicism has sti m u ­ l ated a healthy sense of critical judgment and politics and doc­ trine, power and truth have been shown to be sepa rate and some­ times un related elements. This realization represents a new liber­ ation for China, on top of her self­ proclaimed 1 949 Liberation, and it has im portant i m plications for her future political development. For while it is one thing to liberate a people, it is quite a nother to rule a liberated people. 11

21

CHINA: Sanguine or Jaded? By J i m Peterson

"Ma ny chu rches and C hristians cou ldn't care less about the poor of the worl d . No wonder the oppressed turn to false saviors l i ke comm unism," observed Dr. Ralph Ge h rke. A PLU professor of religion, Geh rke partici pated in the tour of the People's Repu blic of China sponsored last summer by the PLU Foreign Area Studies Progra m .

He i s a world traveler, having previously v'sited virtually every continent a nd major country ex­ cept mainland China. "Ch ristianity," he explain ed, "is associated in the Chi nese mind with western exploitation of the 1 9th and ea rly 20th centu ries . So it is something political , not the GospeL" Ch ristianity has not retu rned to China (former Christian churches a re now warehouses), but Geh rke marveled at the extent to which China is once again accepting Westerners, particularly Ameri ­ ca ns. He recalled the descriptive phrases used i n recent years by the Chinese to describe Ameri ­ ca ns. "When relations fi rst began to thaw in the early 70's we were called 'capitalist run ning dogs: " he sai d . "Then we beca me 'capital­ ist frien d s ' Now we are just friends. " Members of the tour g roup were accepted , honored , even adu lated at times, he ind i ­ cated . with which to be fasci nated and impressed. The G reat Wall and thE four- mile-Iong Ya ngtze bridge at Nanking, the trains and air-con­ ditioned buses, the food, medical care in the factories and irrigation systems, as wel l as th e many historical poi nts of interest. He also noted that "C ina's travel service was pu nctual, open ­ hea rted and pleasant; I've never had better treatment. China, with ­ out com puters but with plenty of h e l p i n g hands, was the most efficient in processing." Yet it also seemed at times that one was stepping back centu ries in time - fa rmers using water buffalo in the rice paddies a n d virtually everything d o n e b y h a n d . "O nce they get modernized and mechanized , they hope by the year 2000, great changes will be i n store, not only for China but the entire world," he suggested . O bs ervi n g the dense population (a nt-hill im pression, the cou n ­ try i d e wou ld be u rban by o u r sta ndards), he wa s all the more impressed by "how Itttle violence, agg ression and tension we saw i n this densely-packed land . " It was hard to believe that it wasn't 10 9 ago that Mao's Red Guards a nd l ater the backers of Mao's wife and other member. of the Gang of Four roamed the streets and the cou ntryside, seek­ ing to destroy all remna nts of


5

The World

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su medly realistic attitude toward the historical relationships of the Chinese people, a certai n li mita­ tion of personal liberty a nd ambi ­ tion , even a deg ree of violence among one or a few more genera­ tions as unavoidable cond itio ns in a nation working toward a utopian futu re . " D u ring his visit Anderson did in fact sense "purity, a cooperatio n , respect a n d friendly attitude bet­ ween people." But he also noted, with "disap­ pointment." a dispirited attitude, a sleepy lack of energy, a nd a "tired lack of enthusiasm" in many pa rts of China. Then he described Hong Kong . "Conditions for the people there are not better tha n those in China," he recalled . "Certainly life is unpleasant in Hong Kong for the less than wealthy, and no doubt it is possible to sink much lower in Hong Kong tha n one ca n in China. Hong Kong is a sordid, jealous, competitive place . " H e found hi mself wrestling with the question, "Why is Hong Kong a so much more lively and energetic place?" His own answer was, "Hong Kong is a city of individual hope and possibility. Personal adva nce­ ment. or deg radation, are visibly possible, while advancement i n China I S tied to the simulta neous advancement of one billion fel ­ lows and therefore both actually and psychologically remote." He concluded, "My rational sup­ port for the revol ution in China as not been wholly lost. Along with the impression of a lack of national enth usiasm, I also saw many apparently happy and ex­ uberant people, and the cooper­ ation a nd u nity among the people

Western or traditional Chinese influence. Tour participa nts met several people who had been involved i n those activities. They are now a part of the "mai nstrea m" and are disillusioned with the causes they espoused in their youth. "The Chinese people are still very traditional," Gehrke said . "Modernization will take some time." He used fa miliar U .S. cities as examples in characterizing the major cities visited in China. "Pek­ i ng IS their washi ngton, D.C. Shan­ ghai is cosmopolita n , like New York city. Canton is very tradition­ al. And Nanki n g , " he said, "is a quiet. rural city. Sort of like Lincoln , Nebraska . " For centuries, utopian thinkers and plan ners have tended to em­ brace various forms of collec­ tivized societies as their u ltimate Ideal. There seems to be, deep within many of us, a longing for a n o rderly, secu re, perhaps even serene world. There is a desire to somehow equalize, to mini mize the often g reat inequ ities of op­ portunity, inco me and lifestyle that seem a part of the human condition . This idealism is usually most obvious among the young . Thus it was pe haps among the young that the rea lities of the contrast between free and regi mented societies, experienced by the PLU China tour participa nts, was most shocking. That contrast was most obvious duri ng both entrance into a nd exit from the People's Re­ public through Hong Kong. Mark Anderson, 21 , a PLU junior majoring i n history, described his im pressions. "I have long been i nclined to look upon the Chinese revolution as a great experi ment, an uncom pro mising struggle by a u n ifo r m ly idea li stic people to overco me the inequities and ex­ ploitation of the past and build i stead, despite great hardship, a prog ressive society dedicated to the best Interests of its people. " As a dista nced and impartial observer," he conti n ued . "it was possibl to accept, with a n as-

4)

1) Tour partiCipants: (foreground) Tour leader Mordechai Rozanski, Sandra and Donald Jerke and Ken Christopherson Back row: Ralph Gehrke, fourth from left. Mark Anderson (cap), fourth from back 2) An unrestored part of the Great Wall of China. Paradoxically, the wall "never effec­ tively kept out a barbarian, " Rozanski observed. T'ienan Men Square in peking can accommodate up to two million people. statue to heroes of the revolution !left! and Mao's Mausoleum (right) are in back­

3)

ground.

4) A portion of the restored Great Wall 40 miles north of peking near Mongolia. Markings on bricks are Chinese graffiti.

.

What is the "real " China ? Old or ne w? Industrious or lethargic? Industrial or agricultural ? Democratic or authoritarian ? Free or regimented ? Urbane or simple ? Op timistic or cynical ? According to accounts by PL U China tour particip ­ ants, it seems to be all of the abo ve, and more.

evidenced from an appreciation for the personal hardship, even tragedy, that is accompanying the progress. "The quality of life has improved for the majority, but it is nonethe­ less fraught with frustration for each i nd ivid ual whose destiny is inextricably tied to the necessa rily letha rg ic revolution of one billion people, p recluding any possibility of a personally directed course in life. "

Photos by A I Curtice

Tour Participants PLU students, facu lty, ad minis­ trators and alumni partiCipating in the 1 979 C hina tour included the following: Chris Browni ng, Talis Colberg, Curtis Bevolden, Betsy Sta hler, Mark Anderson, Mrs. Alene Yui, Grace Jungkuntz, Doug HolSinger, Ralph Gehrke, Mrs. Evelyn Le­ Jeune, Don and Sa ndra Jerke, Art Gee, Ken neth and Polly Chris­ topherson, Ms. Solveig Lee, Lori KrUll, Rev. James Florence and tou r leader Mordechai Rozanski .

f

11 I \


6

The Campus

Board Of Regents Selects Site For Fine Arts Building Progress toward eventual con ­ struction of a new fine arts facility at Pacific Lutheran Un iversity was reflected in meas u res approved by the PLU Board of Regents Nov, 19, According to PLU President Dr, William 0 , Rieke, the Regents ap­ proved the site of the future structu re, wh ich will be built on the northwest corner of the cam ­ pus near the present Ing ram Hall, The Board also authorized the PLU administration to establish procedures for interviewing po­ tential architects for the build i n g , Results o f t h e interviews a n d an a d m i n i strative recommendation will be presented to the Board or its executive com mittee as soon as possible, Rieke indicated , The approved fine arts building site was a part of a large campus master plan prepared by the Port­ land architectural firm of Broome, Oringdulph, O'Toole and Rudolf. The plan proposes not only sci­ ence and fine arts building sites, b u t f u t u re o rg a n i z a t i o n o f academic and residential centers, traffic patterns and ca mpus ex­ pansion, At its most recent meeti ng in September, the PLU Board of Regents approved the site and

size of the anticipated new cam­ pus science building which will be located just north of Olson Au­ ditoriu m , The science and fine arts com plexes a re the major facilities objectives of PLU's five-yea r $ 1 6, 5 m i ll i o n " S h a r i n g i n Strength " ca pital fund ca mpaign, which be­ gan in February, In other action the PLU Regents a pproved financing and acqUisi­ tion of a Digital Equipment Corpo­ ration VAX 1 1 -780 computer, i n ­ cluding terminals and software, To be operational by m id-summer, the com puter will be used for administrative, i nstructional and research fu nctions. "It brings PLU on-line with a whole host of im proved services to students, faculty and parents," Rieke said, "and it will cost less than our present service, " A new direct-dial telephone sys­ tem was also approved and will be installed by Pacific Northwest Bell by Septem ber, Rieke indicated , Further action i ncluded i ncrease of summer school tuition from $80 to $88 and accepta nce of Gary Baug hn of Seattle as a member of the Board , Baughn is vice-presi ­ dent o f operations of Nordstrom, Inc.

Memorial Service Honors PLU Regent Richard Neils "There i s a process i n life where­ by throug h suffering one learns endurance; end u rance produces character and character produces Hope," Richard Neils "was a witness to the meaning of Christan Hope . " Neils, a Tacoma, Wash" business executive and lay church leader, d ied Oct. 9 at age 57 after a seven­ year struggle with cancer, The words describing his cou rage and inspiration to others were spoken at his funeral by his pastor, the Rev, Dr. Luther Kriefall, pastor of Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, Tacoma ,

Mortvedt HOnored P resident Emeritus R o b e rt Mortvedt received an Outstanding H u manitarian Award from Luthe­ ran Social Services of Washington at a banquet in Tacoma Oct. 5 , H e was cited for his distinguish­ ed career in education and the chu rch. He has been a member of the board of Lutheran Community Services ( Pierce County) and is president of the board of the Lutheran Home and Retirement Community in Tacoma. Perry Hend ricks, PLU's vice- pre­ sident for fina ncial affairs, made the presentation to D r. Mortvedt. Hendricks is treasurer of LSSW.

Also participating in the service were Rev. Luther Bekemeier, vice­ president for deve l o p ment a t Pacific Lutheran U niversity, the officiant; and Dr. Richard J u ng ­ ku ntz, PLU provost. Neils had served for the past five years as a member of the U niversity's Board of Regents, Bekemeier gave tha n ks to the Lord for "givi ng to us Richard Neils, to know and to love, a companion on our pilg r i m a g e through life , " Jungku ntz said, "We spend o u r lives as a tale t o b e told; h i s i s a tale that will continue to hearten us in the retelling of it. " Neils was vice-president and general manager of the St. Reg is Paper Company's Lu mber a n d Plywood Divisio n , Born in Libby, Mont., he was the g randson of the founder of J . Neils Lumber Com­ pany which merged with St. Regis in 1 957 . He was an active member of Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, Tacoma . Survivors include his wife, Shir­ ley, five sons, Scott, Ral ph, Ward and Allen, all of Tacoma, and Kurt of Alaska; his mother, M rs . Alma Neils of Libby; two brothers, Ed­ wa rd of Tacoma and Herbert of Libby; and a sister, M rs, Marilyn Parke of Fort Collins, Colo,

For the first time in many years, a Queen and King presided over Homecoming at Pacific Lutheran University Reigning over festivities were Queen Ke/lie Johnson, a junior biology and elementary education major from Snohomish, and King Steve Ray, a senior majoring in history, religion and classics, Ray is a Mount Tahoma (Tacoma) High School graduate,

Glimpse Of PLU Centennial Inspires Heritage Projects As PLU's 1 990 Centennial begins to be more freq uently considered, one early preparation for the celebration now under way is the attempt to preserve PLU's history and the experiences of the many women and men who have contri ­ buted to the institution over the years, " PLU 's Heritage - Preserving the Past" will be offered as a one­ credit class, meeting four Wed­ nesday evenings January 9-30, by Dr, Susan Randall in the Depart­ ment of History and Dr. Lau ra Klei n i n t h e D e p a rt m e n t of Sociology/Anth ropology. Its a i m is to en large PLU's collection of historical materials and to train participants in the general skills of researching a n d docu m e nti n g local history, This course precedes a series of spring workshops training those who attend in a variety of skills for researching Washington history. A special attempt will be made to 'preserve the heritage of women and minority ethnic g roups some­ times underrepresented in tradi­ tional histories, Another PLU local history pro­ ject, under the direction of Dr, Janet Rasmussen of the Depart­ ment of Modern and Classical Lang uages, aims at preserving and interpreting the Scandi navian ex­ perience in the ' Northwest. The Scandinavian Heritage Project is interested in oral i nterviews with anyone who i mmigrated from one of the Nord ic cou ntries prior to World War I I . Those wishing to b e trained i n techniques of researching local history and those who are inter­ ested i n sha r i n g m e m o r i e s , photographs o r other materials

with local history resea rchers, may call Dr, Randall at 531 -6900, ext, 326 or Dr. Klei n, ext. 328.

English Language Study Program Begins at PLU A prog ram of i ntensive English lang uage study and academic skills development will beg i n at Pacific Luthera n U niversity in February, The prog ram is specifically de­ sig ned for persons of recent f o reig n extra ction, particula rly those who intend to pursue col­ lege level study in America , It will be conducted by the American Cultu ral Exchange, a n o n - profit org a n i zati o n w i t h headquarters in Seattle, The progra m is i ntended to develop all essential language skills - c o m p re h e n s i o n , r e a d i n g , speaking and writing. I n addition, students will be prepared for r e g u l a r u n iversity - l evel study through introduction to American educational systems, study skills and curricu l u m plan n i n g , Classes are o rganized according to proficiency level, and may i n ­ clude audit o f a regular u niversity course, Though i nstitute students are not formally admitted to PLU, they will be encouraged to take advantage of PLU facilities and participate i n activities, according to Institute vice-president for spe­ cial programs Sa m Shepherd , Two seven-week sessions are offered per semester with a n eight-week session in the s u m ­ mer. The first session begins Feb. 4, Deadline for a pplication is Jan. 1 5,


The Campus

New Department of Social Work Created At PLU Social work has become a de­ partment at PLU - after a 20-year history and enrollments which have g rown over the years to include 64 majors. A few social welfare courses offered in the Department of Sociology began this progress in 1 959. Six years ago social work g rew i nto a fully developed major and one of the three under­ g raduate p rog rams in the state accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. "In addition to students who ave come to PLU as f resh men , we have attracted increasin g numb­ ers of tra n sfer students who were seeking an accred ited program ," reports D r Willia m Gilberts o n , chaIr of the newly designated departmen t. This g r owt h was a major factor leading to the crea· tlon of a separate five- member departme nt.

'Establ ishing a se p a rate depart­ ment also acknowledges the spe­ cial features of social work as a di sci pl in e says Dr. Gilbertson. "

"Social work is an applied social science, with a commitment to joining theory with practice. As well as helping clients identify and understand problems, we as social workers want to be able to help them pla n toward constructive change . " Applying what i s learned in the classroom to problem-solving i n work situations is a n opportu nity for social work majors even before they graduate. Two semesters of field experience are requIred for the major, and past placements h ave i n c l ud e d m e n t a l hea l th facilities. h ospitals, schools, state and loca l agenci es . "We have a general program that prepares students for entrY­ level social work positIons in a vanety of settings, " says Dr. Gil­ bertson . "In addition, many of our majors go on to g raduate school. Our accredited program makes it po ss ib le for g raduates to ente r accelerated Master of Social Work programs. often e a rn i ng the MSW in three s e meste rs rather than the tra d i ti o na l two years "

PLU Alum Earns Rotary Fellowship For Study In England Nancy Meader of Tacoma , a 1 979 Pacific lutheran University g radua te, has been awarded a Rotary International Graduate Fel· lowship by the Rotary Foundation of Rotary International. Ms . Meader. who g raduated from PLU magna cum laude with a ma l or in psychology, has recently been serving as a teaching assis­ ta nt for the visually i m paired and behaviorally d isabled in the Taco­ ma Public Schools. Her studies emphasis at PLU was in develop­ mental disabilities. She pla ns to study developmen­ tal and clinical psychology at the U n iversity of Nottingham, Eng­ land. d u ring the 1 980-81 academic year. U pon her return. she i ntends to work on her doctorate and become involved in researching, developing and i m p l e me nti n g therapeutic prog rams for disabled children . At PLU, Ms. Meader directed an adaptive aquatics progra m and was also i nvolved i n student gov­ ernment. syn chro n i zed swi m ­ min g and vol u nteer organizations . She has been selected for "who's Who Among Students in American U niversities and Colleges" a n d PW 's Arete Society fo r honor stu d en ts. She received honors at PLU for both student gove rnment work as a senator and as "i nspira­ tional synch ronized swimmer." The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Meader of Littleton, Colo. , i s o ne of more than 1 ,000 stu -

Micki Hemstad

Phil Mmer

Bla k Public Offcials Honor PLU Administrator Phi l l i p M iner. asSOCiatE d i recto r of admiSSions at Pacifi c: Luthera n U ni ve rsi ty has been selected as a Potential Black Community Leader

for the '80'5 by the Nortllwest Conference of Black Public Offi­ cia ls . The annou ncement was mad e by Seattle City Cou ncilman Sam Smith . Miner and selectees from other Northwest co m m u n ities were honored Oct 20 in Seattle. Miner has served on the PLU admissions staff since his gradua­ tion from Pacific U n iversity, Forest Grove, are .. in 1 972 . He is active in several community organizations.

Allenmore Awards $5000 Nursing Scholarship •

Nancv Meader

dents worldwide to receive scho­ larships valued at over $ 1 2 .8 mill­ i o n . T h e Rota ry F o u n d ation awards u nderwrite the full cost of study abroad. intensive language instruction. travel, lodging and food, in addition to tuition. books. and lab fees. A characteristic of the educa­ tional awards is that the recipient has oppo rtu nities to speak to Rotary Clubs and other groups i n t h e study country as well as the home country As a result. applic­ a nts a re evaluated o n their ambas­ sadOrial as well as scholarly poten­ tia l . M s . Meader was sponsored by the Rotary Club of Pa rkland. one of more than 1 8,000 clubs In 1 52 co u n tr i es a n d g e o g ra p h i c a l regions.

An a n nual $ 5 ,000 scholarship for n u rsing students has been pre­ sented to Pacific Lutheran U n iver­ sity by the Allen more Medical Fou ndation of Tacoma . The announcement was made by Dr. Stanley Durkin on behalf of the fou ndation . He indicated that the scholarship has been named i n memory of Henrietta Button, ad­ ministrator at Doctor's Hospital and Lutheran (now Good Samari­ tan) Hospital i n the early '50's. S aring the proceeds of the scholarship this year will be Karra Campbell of Montesano and Kath ­ leen O'Leary of Portla nd. are. Both are PLU ju niors majoring in n u rs­ ing. Thei r selection was an nou nc­ ed by Dr. Doris Stucke, director of the PlU School of N u rsing.

icki Hemstad New Chairman Of PLU Collegium M ick i Hemstad, a free- lance ar­ tist and desig ner from Olym pia, Wash . , has been elected chairman of the Collegium at Pacific Luthe­ ran U niversity. C urrently in her fou rth year as a member of the PLU advisory or­ g a n izati o n , M rs . Hemstad serves on t he advisory co m m ittee to the Schoo! of Fine A rts a n d was vicehairman last yea r g raduate of st. O la f College i n

Northfield, Minn , M rs. Hemstad specia lized in oil and acrylic paint­ ing, sculpt re, fa b ri c and com ­ mercial desig n projects She is a member of the State Capitol M useum Board and the Fort Worden Centrum Founda­ tion, Po rt Townsend. Mrs. Hemsta d su cceeds D r . David Hellyer of Tacoma a s Col­ legi u m cha i rman. She sees the organization focusing during the coming year on increasing