Issuu on Google+


The Information contained herein reflecL an accurate picture of Pacific lutheran Univeroity at the tIme of pubLcahon. Huwevt'r, the university reserves the right to make nl'cessary changes in proct'dures, policies, calendar. curriculum, and costs.

Pacific Lutheran University does not discrimi on the basis of sex, race, creed,

olor, national

e .

origin, age. or h a nd icapped condition in th e education programs or acti ities which it opera and is require d b

Title IX of the Education

Amendments of 1Q72 and the regulations adopte pursuant thereto, by Title VII of the Civil Righ > Act of 1 974, and by Sectio n 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of lQ7

not to discriminate i

su ch manner. The requirement not to discriminate in educa t ion programs and activities extends to employment therein and to admission ther to. Inquiries concerning the a ppU c at ion of said Title L and published regulations to thIS University y be referred to: 1. The Director of Personnel, Room G-Z8 Harstaa

Hall. Pacific Lutheran Unive rsity , t lephone 531-6QOO e xtension 397, for matters relatint employment polici es and practices, promoti fringe benefits, training, and grievance procedures for personnel employed by the university

2. The Executive A ss i s tan t to the Provost, Ro

A-100 AdministratIon B U ild in g, Pacific Lutheran University, telephone 531-0900 ex tension 43:' L-:>r

matters relating to student admissions, urriculum. and financial aid. 3. The

Director of Mmority Affairs, Room A-ll

Administration Building, Pacific Lutheran University, telephone 531-tl900 extension 44:

r

matters regarding administrati e policies relating to students, student services, cmd the st ude r g riev an c e pro ced ure . 4. Or the Director of the Office of Civil RightS;足 Department of Health, E duca t ion and Welf

.. 13

Washington, D.C.

inquiries

conc

erni ng the applicatio n of said

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act may be referred to; The Registrar, Room A-lOZ Admlnistration V olume L V III No.4 Bulletin of P ific Lutheran niversity, July 1Q7 Published six times annually by Pacific Luthera UniversHy. P.O. Box 2068, Tacoma, Washingto 98447. Second Class postage paid at Tacoma, Washington.

Pacific Lutheran Univerc;it , te leph one 531-6900 extension 2 1 3 Pacific Lutheran University com pu es with th family Education Rights and Priva y Act of 1 974.


PAC IFIC LUT H E R A N U N IVER SITY

Ire

Taco ma, Washing ton 98447 (206) 531-6900

tory

T h e u ni v e r s i t y is located at Sout h 121 s t S tr e e t and Park A v e n u e in s u b urban Parkla n d . Office h o u r s are from

8:00 a.m. to 5 :00 p . m . Monday t h r o u g h Frid a y . Most offices are closed for c h ape l on Monday, Wednesday, and

Friday from 10:00 to 10:30 a . m . d u ring the s chool year, and on Fridays d u r i n g J u ne, July, and A u g u s t all o ffices close a t 12 noo n . T h e u n iv e r s i t y also o bserves all legal holidays. The University Ce n te r maintains an i n form a tion d e s k w h ich i s open daily u n til 10 p.m. (11 p.m. on Friday and Sat u rday) . Visi tors are welcome at a n y t i m e . Special arra n g e m e n t s for t o u r s and appoi n tm e n t s may be made t h r o u g h the admissions office (extension 227) or the university relations office (extension 457 ) . FOR I NFOR M ATION A BOUT:

CONTACT T H E OFFICE OF:

General i n terests of the university, c h u rc h relations,

T H E PRES IDEN T

Academic policies and programs, fac u l t y appoin t­

T H E PROVOST

and comm u n i t y relations

m e n t s , c u r r i c u l u m d e v e l op m e n t, academic advising

- a n d assis tance, and foreig n s t u d y

College of Arls and Sciellces

Division of Humanities Division of Nalural Sciences Division of Social Sciences School of Business Administration School of Education School of Fine Arls School of Nursing School of Physical Educatiorl

G e n e ral

in formation,

a d m i s si o n

of

students,

T H E DIRECTOR OF ADM I S S IONS

p u blications for pros pective s tude n ts, fres h m e n class

-r e g i s t ration, and advanced plac e m e n t T ranscripts of records, s c h e d u l e s , registration, and

T H E REGI S T R A R OR THE

tra n s f e r s t u d e n t s

T R A N SFER COORDI N ATOR

Financial a s s i s tance, scholarships, and loans

THE DI RECTOR OF F I N A NCIAL AID

Fees, pay m e n t pla n s, campus park i ng and s e c u r i t y

T H E VICE PRES IDENT - F I N ANCE A N D

Residence

T HE VICE PRES IDENT FOR STUDE N T L I FE

s e r vices,

halls,

c o u nselin g

minority a ffairs,

and

foreig n

t es ting,

heal th

s t u d e n t s,

OPE RATIONS

and

extracurricular activities

_

Gifts, beques ts, gran ts, and the a n n ual f u nd

THE VICE P R ESIDENT FOR DEVELOP MENT

Work-s t ud y oppor tun ities, s t u d e n t e mploym e n t, and

T H E DI RECTOR OF CA REER PLAN N I N G A N D

caree r options Graduate progr a m s and s u m m e r sessions

�Con ti n u,ing edu cation oppor t u n i t i e s Alumni activities -Wors h i p s e r v i c e s and r e l i g i o u s l ife at the u ni v e r s i t y

PLACEMENT

T H E DEAN OF G RADUATE A ND S U M M ER S TUDIES

T H E DI RECTOR OF CON T I N U I N G EDUCA TION THE DI RECTOR OF THE ALU M N I A S SOCIA TION

THE U N IVER S ITY P A S TORS

1

C O R R E S P O N D E N C E DIRE CTO R Y


Cont nts Correspondence Directory 1

Communication Arts Earth Sciences

Academic Calendars Objectives

7

Student Life Admission

9

English

12 16

History

20. 22

Academic Procedures College of Arts and Sciences Departments and Schools

30

32

69 72 73

24 29

Mathematics

Business Administration

Music

44

79

87 93

Philosophy 39

76

Modern and Classical Languages 82

Nursing

35

Chemistry

57

Integrated Studies

Majors I Minors

Biology

52

55

Fine Arts

Academic Structure

Art

Economics Education

Financial Aid Costs

4 & 5

48

97

Physical Education Physics and Engineering

105

101


Political Science Psychology Religion

112

115

Environmental Studies Urban Affairs

118

Public Affairs Lay Church Worker Program

Sociology, Anthropology and _and Social Welfare 121 Statistics Program �

127

------

Graduate Studies

129

- Affiliate Resources

130

CHOICE _

WSCEE

-Study Abroad

131 132

Classics Scandinavian Area Studies Foreign Areas Studies Center for the Study of Public Policy Jazz

Pre-professional Programs 134 Law Theological Studies Air Force ROTC

138

Administrative Offices 140 The Faculty

143

Professors Emeriti Committees Part-time Instructors

_ Special Programs

Health Sciences

Board of Regents

Faculty Associates

KPLU-FM

_

Cross- Disciplinary Career Programs 137

The Collegium

152

Campus Guide

154

Index

156

Application Form

159


A adetnic Calendar 1978-79 SUMMER SESSION 1978 Monday, June 19 .. ...... .

.

.

.

.

.

.. Classes begin, 8:00 a.m.

Tuesday, July 4 . ........... .. Independence Day holiday .

.

.

Wednesday, July 19 .... Thursday, July 20 .... Friday, August 18 .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.... . First term ends .

.

... .... Classes begin - second term .

.. . .

.

.

... . Summer Session closes .

Friday, August 18 ............ .. Commencement .

FALL SEMESTER 1978 Sunday, September 3 to Tuesday, September 5 .

.

.

........ Orientation and regististration

Wednesday, September 6 .....

.

.

.

Classes begin, 8:00 a.m.

Friday, October 20 ..... ........ Mid-semester break .

Wednesday, November 22

.

.

.

.

... Thanksgiving recess begins, 12:50 p.m.

Monday, November 27 ...... ... Thanksgiving recess ends, 8:00 a.m. .

Friday, December 8 ... .. ...... Classes end, 6:00 p.m. .

.

Monday, December 10 to Friday, December 15 ............ Final examinations Friday, December 15 ............ Semester ends after last exam

INTERIM 1979 Wednesday, January 3 .......... Begins .

Wednesday, January 3 1 ........

.

.

Ends

SPRING SEMESTER 1979 Monday, February 5..... ....... Registration .

Tuesday, February 6 .. .. ...... Classes begin, 8:00 a.m. .

.

Monday, February 19 Friday, April 6

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

........ .

Monday, April 16 ...... Friday, May 18 ...... . .

...... .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Washington's Birthday holiday Easter recess begins, 6:00 p.m.

...... Easter recess ends, 4:00 p.m.

. ..... Classes end, 6:00 p.m. .

Monday, May 21 to Friday, May 25 . ... ...... ... Final examinations .

.

.

.

Friday, May 25 . ... ..... .... Semester ends after last exam .

.

Sunday, May 27

4

CALENDAR 1978-79

.

.

.

. . ...... .... Worship service and commencement .

.

.


Acadetnic Calendar 1979-80 SUMMER SESSION 1979 Monday, June 18 ........... Wednesday, July 4

.

Wednesday, July 18

.

.

.

.

......... .

.

....

.

.

... Classes begin, 8:00 a.m. .

.

.

Independence Day holiday

. .. First term ends .

Thursday, July 19 ....... ....... Classes begin - second term .

Friday, August 17 .. ... . . .... Summer Session closes .

.

.

.

Friday, August 17 .. .. ...... .

.

.

.

.

Commencement

FALL SEMESTER 1979 Friday, September 7 to Monday, September 10

.

.

.

.

.

.. .. Orientation and registration .

T uesda y, September 11 .. ...... Classes begin, 8:00 a.m. .

Friday, October 26

.

.

.

.

......

.

.

... Mid-semester break

Wednesday, November 21 .... . Thanksgiving recess begins, 12:50 p.m. .

.

Monday, November 26 ....... .. Thanksgiving recess ends, 8:00 a.m. .

Friday, December 14 ...

.

.

.

.

..... Classes end, 6:00 p.m.

Monday, December 17 to Friday, December 21 ............ Final examinations Friday, December 21 ............ Semester ends after last exam

INTERIM 1980 Monday, January 7 ... .

.

.

....... Begins .

Friday, February 1 . ..... ... .. Ends .

.

.

SPRING SEMESTER 1 980 Tuesday, February 5 .. ....... . Registration .

Wednesday, February 6 . Monday, February 18 ..

.

.

.

.

.

....... Classes begin, 8:00 a.m. ....... Washington's Birthday holiday

Friday, March 28 .......... . . Easter recess begins, 6:00 p.m. .

.

Monday, April 7 . ...... ... .

.

.

.

.

.

.

Friday, May 16 ... ...... .... .

.

.

. Easter recess ends, 4:00 p.m. .

Classes end, 6:00 p.m.

Monday, May 19 to Friday, May 23 ... Friday, May 23 Sunday, May 25

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

........ Final examinations

. . .... .

.

.

.

.

. .. .. . .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. Semester ends after last exam

.. Worship service and commencement

CALENDAR 1979-80

5


Objectives of the University Pacific L u theran U n iversity, born of t h e Reformation spirit, maintains the privilege of e x ploration a n d l ea r n i ng i n all areas of the a r ts, scie nces, and religion. The basic concern o f M a rtin L u ther was religious, but his rejection of c h u rc h t radition a s __ p rimary a ut h ority, a n d h i s o w n free sea rch f o r religiOUS t r uth, se rved in e f fect to liberate the mode rn mind in its quest for all t r u t h . T h e total i m pact of L u t h e r's stand h as permane n t ly shaped t h e modern world a n d helped provide the modern u n iversity with its basic methodology. Pacific L u theran Unive rsity is a comm unity of professing C h ri s t i a n scholars d.edicated to a philosophy of li beral education. The m a j o r goals of the instit u tion are to inculcate a respect for learning a n d t r u t h , to free the mind from the confi n e m e n ts of __ ignorance and prejudice, to organize the powers of clear thought a n d e x p ression, to p reserve and extend kn owledge, to help m e n a n d women achieve pro fessional compe tence, and to establish lifelong h a bi ts of s t udy, reflection, a n e! learning. Th rough an e m p hasis on the liberating ar ts, the University -- seeks to develop creative, reflective, a n d responsible pe rsons. At the sa m e time, t h e acquisi tion.of specialized i n formation a n d technical s k i l l i s recognized a s a condition of successfu l involvement i n the modern wo rld. The U n i versity seeks to __ develop t h e evaluative and spiritual capacities of the st udents a n d to acqu a i n t them honestly with rival c l a i m s to the t ru e and the good . It e ncourages t h e p u rsuit of rich a n d en nob'ling ex periences and the develo p m e n t of signific a n t personhood th rough a n a p preciation of h u m a nity's in tellectu al, a rtistic, -- cultural, and n a t u r a l surroundings. The U niverSity affirms i t s f u n d a m e n t a l obligation to confron t liberally educated m e n a n d w o m e n w i t h the challenges o f Ch ristian faith and to i ns t i l l in them a tr ue sense of vocation. By providing a rich v a riety of social ex periences, Pacific Lu theran U niversity seeks to develop i n the studen t a joy in a b u n d a n t livi ng, a feeling for t h e welfare and personal i n tegrity of others, good taste, and a sense of social p ropriety a n d adequacy. Distinguishingly between personal C h ristian ethics - and normal social con trols, the U niversity adopts only such r u les as seem necessary for the welfare of the educa tional com mu nity. The physical development of students is regarded a s a n i n tegral p a r t o f their l i b e r a l e d ucation. H e n c e the University -e n cou rages pa rtiCi p a tion in physical activities a nd respect for health and fitness. Professing a concern for h u m a n nat ure in its e n t i rety, the faculty of the Un iversity encou rages wholesome develo p m e n t of -- Christian faith and life by providing oppo r t u n i ties for worship and m e d i t ation, offe ring s y s t e m a t ic studies of religion and encou raging free in vestigat,ion and discussion of basic religious q u est ions. The U n iversi ty believes the essence of C h r i s t i a nity to be personal faith in God as Creator a n d Redeemer, and it -- be'lieves that such faith born of the Holy Spirit genera tes i n te g r a tive power capable of gu iding h u m a n beings to i l l u m i n a t i ng perspectives and worthy p u rpos e s . T h e U n i versity co m m u ni,ty confesses the faith that the u ltimate meaning a n d __ pu rposes o f h u m a n l i f e are t o be discovered in t h e person a n d w o r k of Jesus Ch rist.

As an educational arm of the Church, Pacific Lutheran U n iversity provides a locus for the fruitful in terplay of Ch rist i a n f a i t h a n d a l l of h u m a n learning and culture, a n d a s s u c h holds i t a responsibility to d iscover, ex plore, a n d develop new fron tiers. Believing t h a t all truth is God's truth, the U n i v e rsi ty, in achieving its educational and sp iritual goals, m a i n t a i n s the right and indeed the obligation of facu lty and students to engage i n a n u n b iased search for t r u t h in all realms.

HISTORY

Pacific L u theran U niversity was founded i n 1 8 90 by men and women of t h e L u t h eran C h u rch i n the North west, and by the Reverend Bjug H a rstad in particular. Their p urpose was to establish an inst i t u tion in which their people could be educated. E d ucation was a venera ted part of the Scandinavian a n d German t ra d itions from which t hese pioneers c a me. The institu tion opened as Pacific L u t h e ran Academy. G rowing in stat ure, PLA became a j u n i o r college i n 1 92 1 . Ten years later, it was o rg a n i zed i nto a t h ree-y e a r normal school which became a college of e d u ca tion in 1939. After 1 94 1, it e x p a nded as Pacific L u th e r a n College until it was reorganized as a university in 1 960, reflecting the growth of both its professional schools a n d liberal arts core .

ACCREDIT A TION

Pacjfic L u theran Uni versity i s fully accredited by the Northwest Associa t,ion of Schools and Colleges as a four-year institution of higher educat ion and by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Ed ucation for the p repa ration of elementary a n d secondary teachers, pri nCipals a n d guidance cou nselors w i t h the master's degree as the hig hest d egree approved. The u niversity is also approved by t h e A m erican C h e mical Society. The School of N u rsing is accredited by the N a tional Leag u e for N u rsin g . The School of Business Admin istration is accredited by the A merican Asse m bl y of Collegiate Schools of B usiness. The Soc i a l Welfare Program i s accredited by the Council on Social Work Educa t ion a t the baccala u re a te level.

INSTITUTIONAL ME MBERSHIPS T h e Un iversity is a m e m b e r of: A m e rican A s soci.ltion of Higher Ed ucation A m erican C o u nci l on E d u ca tion Association of American Colleges In dependent Colleges of Washington, I ncorporated L ut h e r a n E duca tional Conference of North A m e rica Na tional Association of S u m m er Schools Washington Friends of H igher E d u cation Western Association of Graduate Schools Western I n te rstate Comm ission for Higher Ed ucation

OBJE CTIVES

7


GROUNDS

Located i n s u b urban Parkland, P L U h a s a picturesque U6-acre ca mpus, t r u l y represen tative of the n a t u ral g ra n d e u r of the Pacific Northwest.

ENROLLMENT 2 , 5 6 8 f u l l - t i m e s t udents 660 part-time st udents

FACUL TY 1 98 full-time faculty 48 part-time facul t y

STUDENT/FACUL TY RATIO 13:1

ACADEMIC PROGRAM

In 1 9 6 9, Pacific L u t h e ra n U n iversity adopted the 4-1-4 calendar which consists of two fourte en-week semesters bridged by a four足 week interim period . Course credit is computed by hours. The majority of cou rses are offered for 4 hou rs . Each u ndergradu a t e degree candidate is expected to complete 128 hours with a n overall grade p O i n t average of 2 . 00 . Degree r equirements a re specifically st a t ed i n t h i s catalog. Each s t u d e n t should become familiar with these req uirements and prepare to meet them.

INTERIM

The in terim provides t i m e d u ring the m o n t h of January for focused, creative s t u d y in a non-t rad i t ional enviro n m e n t . It allows both f ac u l t y a n d s t udents to inquire i n t o ar eas outside the regular c u rric u l u m, to develop new methods of teaching and learni ng, and to e n h ance their imagina tive a nd crea tive talents. The s t udy options a re v a rious, including foreign study, i n terdepartmental s t udy, n u merous other on-campus programs, a n d exchange prog rams with other i n stitutio n s . Speci a l publications hig h l ig h t the in terim program.

LATE AFTERNOON AND EVENING CLASSES

T o provide f o r the professional growth a n d c u l t u ra l enric h m e n t o f persons u na ble to take a full-time college course, t h e un iversity c onducts la te-aft ernoon a nd evening classes. I n a d d ition to a wide v a riety of offerings in t h e arts and sciences, th ere are specialized and g rad uate courses for teachers, a d m i n i s t ra tors and persons in b u s i ness a nd indus try. A special b u lletin is printed each semester outlining the offerings and is av a i l a bl e from t h e regis t r a r of the un iversi t y .

8

G E N E R A L INF ORMATION

SUMMER SE SSION An ex tensive s u m mer school cu rric u l u m , of the same quality as t h a t offered duri ng the reg u l a r academic year, is available to all q u a lified persons. I n a d d i t ion, s u m m e r session typically is a time when the fac u l t y offers i n nova tive, experi m e n t a l cou rses which cov e r a broad range of contemporary issues a n d perspectives i n many fields. T h e s u m m e r session con sists o f two f o u r a nd one-half week terms a n d begins i n the middle of J u n e . Designed for undergradua tes and graduate students alike , the program serves teachers a n d adminis tra tors seeking cred e n t i al s and spec ial courses, fres h m en desiring to in itiate college s t ud y, and others d e siring spec i a l s t udies offered by the schools a n d depart ments. Transient s t udents who e n roll for t h e summer session need only s u b m i t a letter of academic standing or g ive other evidence of being prepared for college s t ud y . A c o m p l e t e Summer Session Cala/og, o u t l i n i n g the curriculum as w e l l as spec ial inst i t u tes, workshops and semina rs, i s prin ted each spring a n d is a v aila ble from the Dean of the S u m m e r Session at the unive rsi t y .


Student Life The q u a l i ty of life c u l tivated and fostered w i t h i n the un iversity is an essential component of the academic com m u n i t y . The environment produced is conducive to a life of vigorous and cre­ a t ive scholars h i p . It also recogn izes t h a t liberal education is for the total person and that a comple mentary relationship exists between � t uden ts' in tellectual development and the sa tisfaction of their other i ndividual needs. Inter act ion with persons of d iffering life st yles, application of classroom knowledge to personal goals and aspirations, and non-academic e x perie nces are all invalua ble and v i tal components of ed ucation a t PLU. In a time when there is a need for meaningful c o m m u n i t y , t h e reside n t i a l campus faci l i t a t es gen uine rela tion ships among mem bers of the u n iversity, from diverse religious, racial, a n d c u l t u ral backgro u n d s . All of the services a nd facilities provided are in tended to comple ment the academic program. At PLU, students have assumed i ncreasing respon si bility for their personal and soci a l behavior. The S t u d e n t L i fe Office i s in tended t o facilitate t h e develo pment o f the s t u d e n t in wha tever direction he o r she may wish t o g o . The servic es provided reflect c h a n g i n g student needs, a n d the oppo r t u n ities for s t u d e n t participation include v i r t u ally all aspects of the u n iversity. The Vice Presi den t for St ude n t L i fe and s t a ff are responsible for organizing and program m i ng residence ha lls, o r i e n t i n g new s t uden ts, a ssisting foreign s t uden ts, acting a s liaison to the Associated Students of PLU (student government), and coordi na t i n g other s t u d e n t activities. I n di v i d u a l a t te n tion i s given to every stud e n t concern i n cluding a variety of specific services o u t lined below.

RESIDENTIAL LIFE Resid en tial l iving is an in tegral p a r t of the educa tional process a t P L U a n d t h e residence h a lls were constructed with t h a t in m i n d . U n i v e r s i t y policy reflects the com mitment to t h e reside ntial concept. All students not living a t home with pare n t s, g u a rd i a n, or spo use are required to live in a residence h a l l un til achieving se nior s t a t u s or t h e age of 22 years. As a resid e n t ial c a m p u s, Pacific L u theran U n i v e rsity offers st udents a valuable e x perience in g ro u p living. The u n i versity recognizes the i m portance of non-classroom activi ties i n providing an education for the whole pers o n . The aim of residen tial living is to help s t udents g row a s h u m a n being s. C a m p u s residence halls aFe small. They a re organized i n to co m m u ni ties in whic h each individ u a l counts as a person. New k nowledge shared with friends in t h e residence halls t a kes on a very personal meaning. Men a n d women of many backgro unds and c u ltures l i ve on campus; theref ore, s t u d ents i n residence have a u n ique opport u n i t y to broad'en t h e i r cultur al horizons. The u n iversity cares about the q u a lity of l i fe on campus. The a t t r a c t ive a n d comfortable residence halls e n rich the quality of life and e n h a nce the learni ng process. The u niversity offers s t u d e n t s high-quality housi ng opportunities i n c l u d i n g s t u d e n t leadership experiences, formal a nd i n form a l programs, a n d peer associ a tions. The student governing bodies are s t rong a nd actively participate i n i mproving t h e program. A sdec tion of modern, a ttractive h a lls, each with i t s own tra d i tions and u nique advan tages, offer s t udents the opportunity to e s tablish a comfor t able l iv i n g pa ttern. All ha lls include i n formal lou nges, stu d y rooms, recrea tion a reas, a n d common kitchen and l a u n d ry facilities.

Most of the h a l ls are co-ed ucational. A l though they are housed i n separate wings, m e n a n d women i n co-ed halls shar e lounge a n d recrea tion facilities, a n d common residence government, and pa rtiCipate join t l y i n all hall. activities. AII-men's a n d a l l-women's h a l l s are reserved for t hose who desire t h is type of living ex perience . F u rther informa tion regarding res idence h a l ls can be obtai ned from the Reside n t i a l Life Office. In a d d i t ion to housing for single studen ts, the u n ivers ity m a i n tains 26 apartm ents on ca mpus for ma rried students. Two­ a n d th ree-bedroom units are availa ble. A pplication for these apartments can be made t h rough the Office of Genera l Services.

RE SPONSIBILITIES OF COMMUNITY LIFE I n the close living sit uation i n t h e residence h a l l s as w e l l as in the campus community at large, certain regulations are necessary a n d the u niversity admits s t u d e n t s with the u nderstanding t h a t they will comply with them. A l l st u d ents are ex pected t o respect the rights and i ntegrity of others. Conduct which i s detrimen tal to s t u d e n t s, their col leagues, or t h e university, or such conduct which v iolates civil law may be grounds for dis missal from the u n ivers i t y . Specific reg u l a t ions and g u i deli nes a r e ou tlined i n t h e Slude>l1 Handbook. which is available at t h e Student Life Office and is issued to accepted s t u d e n t s preced i ng their fres h m a n yea r.

RELIGIOUS LIFE Pacific L u t heran University by its very n a t u r e i s a place for the in teractio n be tween s t udies a n d t h e Ch ristian fa i t h . Oppo r t u n i t ies for t h e mutual celebration of t h a t faith o n c a mpus are rich and diverse. Chap el worship is held Monday, Wednesday, and Friday mornings d u ring t h e semester for all who wish to participa te. The University Congregation meets in regular worship a n d also celebrates the Lord's Supper each S u nday. Pastoral services of the U n iversi ty Pastors a re available to a l l students who desire t h e m . Several deno m i n a tions a nd religious g roups have in terest org a n i za tions on camp us, a n d t h ere are nu merous st udent­ i n i tiated Bible S t u d y a nd fellowship groups. The Cam pus Mi n i s t r y C o u n c i l , a n elec ted student a n d f a c u l t y committee, coord i n a tes t hese ac tivi ties in a spirit of openness and m u t u a l respect.

ACTIVI TIES The P L U Slud",1 Handbook e n u merates over 50 a c a d e m i c a n d non­ academi c organ i z a tions, clu bs, societies, and i n te r e s t g roups, which test ifies to the diversity of campus extra-curricular life. Social action, religious, and political org a n i z a t io n s; i n terest and sporting cl ubs; a n d service, professional, a n d acade mic socie ties are among the options from which to choose. The a r t s are flourishing at Pacific L u theran U n iversity. The Choir of the West, Concert Ba nd, the Univ ersity Symphony Orchest ra, a jazz ensembl.e, a renowned collegiate s tage, two a r t ga lleries, a n d the l i t u rgical Dance ensemble provide generous opport u nities for t h e performing student. Personal expression i s em phaSized i n d e b a t e , s t u d e n t gover n m e n t , c a m p u s r a d i o K P L U­ F M , t h e u n iversi t y yearbook, a n d t h e weekly st udent newspaper. O rga nized and i n dividual physical activities are for everyone. Recreational and compe titive programs include foo tball, cross cou n t ry, basketba l l, swimm ing, h iking, climbing, volleyball, tenn is, golf, wrest ling, paddleball, bowling, squ ash, hand b a l l, ping pong, baseball, softball, b a d m i n ton, field hockey, track and field, water polo, skiing, a nd rowi n g . Ath letics emphasize development of t h e individual rather t h a n t h e search f o r a th letic glory, yet t h e u n iverSity is p r o u d of its v a r s i t y c h a m pionsh ips i n m a n y spor t s .

STUDENT LIFE

9


STUDENT SERVICES "The Student Health Center retains the services of a ful l-time Mede and p. rt-tim e N u rs Practitioner with a backup phy sicia n a n d nurses for basic medical care or refe r r a l . All st udents are entitled to the s e rvices of the e n t e r . 'Health and Acddentlnsurance is offered b y the u n iversity o n a volulltary basis. The group ACCident a n d Sickness Medical E xpense Plan provides coverage 24 hours a day, 12 months a year, a n y where in the world. T his plan is available at fall, in terim, o r spring registration only . A brochure outli ning the program is available from the tu dent Life ffice. All foreign students mllst take o u t the school in u rance. "The COUDseling and Testing Center assists stude nts in coping with normal deveJopmental problems. Trained and e x per ienced co unselor5, in cluding a staff psychiatrist, offer grou p and I n divid u a l counse l i n g . A vanety of psychological tests a n d i n terest in ventories a re a v a i lable to assist stude nts with career plannin g, e d u cational adj ustment a nd personal problems. 'Details av i l a ble in the Studt'rIt Halldbook. The Acade.mic AdviSing and Assistance Center provides a cen tra lized s ource of advising information for s tudents, as wel l as a means by which they may further develop academic skills and rece ive i m mediate, practical help with short-term academic p roble m s . 1 n the Cen ter, i nformation i s readily available to students o n a l l P l U academic programs, policies, a n d procedures. D u ring working hours and weekday eve n i ngs, trained peer ad visers are available to assist students. The AAAC offers a two-credit study skills / read i ng class and a va riety of non-credit m i nicourses in basic acad mic skills : reading, time m anageme nt, note- making, term papers, exa m preparation, g r a m mar a nd usage review. The AAAC a lso provide s individualized help with term pape rs and study problems, acade m i c counseling, and private tutorials for m a n y PlU courses. The C e nter is located on the second floor of Mortvedt l i b rary. [t is open Monday through F riday 9 a . m . to 5 p . m . a n d Monday through Thursday e v e n i ngs from 7 to 10. Generally, AAAC services are without charge to PlU stude nts. The Minority Affair5 Office coord i n ates a special prog ra m which seeks to con t i n u a l l y provide for t he academic a n d social ne ds of mi nority students. Sup po rti ve services i n clude adm issions ass istance, scholarship and f i n ancial a i d assista nce, cou n s e l i ng, book fund, a n d convocation progra m s . The Foreign Student Office i s located in the Student life Office to provide for the various needs of foreig n students. Support services include ori en tation to the U . S. and PlU, the Host F a m i l y Program, a lia ison w i t h Immig ration, counseling, a n d advising the [nternational Stud e n t O rganization. The Career Planning and Placement Office seeks to fulfill the PlU com mitment to a develo ping p rogram of career and life pl a n n in g. S t udents are ass isted during their education in making meaningful a nd realistic decisions about their life a n d work after g rad uation t h rough conferences with professional staff, workshops and seminars, classroom and dorm presentations, and m a terials ho used i n the C a reers Reso urc Center.

10

STU D E NT LIFE

T h e Career Planning a nd Placemen t Office coordin.ltes all student part-time e mployment {i ncl u d i n g College Work-Study and off- c a m pus Work Study jobs!. lists pa rt-time a nd f u l l-ti me e m ployment opportu n ities, both on a n d off campus. The office also lists s u m m e r jobs, local and natio n-wide. The office staff assists stude nts a n d a l u m n i in developing job sea rch techn iques (also faculty a n d staff by special a r rangeme nt) . The office coord i n ates an on-ca mpus interviewing sche d u l e of recruiters from i n d ustry, b u s i n ess, gov e r n m e nt, and graduate schools. Food Service, owned and operated by Pacific luthe ran Unive rsity, i s available to all students, faculty, staff a nd their guests. Stude nts living on c a m p u s are re q u i re d to take their meals in o n e of two cafeterias. No deductions a re made for students eating fewer than three meals per day u n less a conflict e x i sts d u e to work. [n case of a conflict, a stude nt m u st obtain a p p roval for a d e d u ction at the Food Se rvice Office in the U n i v e rsity Center. Stu dents with special diets, approved in writing from a doctor, can in most cases be accomm odated by contacting the dietiti a n . This service i s provided a t no extra cost. Studen ts living off-ca mpus a re e n cou raged to select one of the two m e a l plans offered. O n e plan provides 20 meals per week, 3 meals per d a y Monday through S a t u r d a y a n d 2 meals on Sun d a y . T h e oth e r p l a n p rovides l unch o n l y Mon day through F r i d a y . Stude nts m a y sign u p fo r either p l a n a t the Food S e rvice Office. The Food Service ope rates two coffee shops. One is located on lower cam pus in C o l u m bia Center a n d the other i s located in the U n i versity Center. A discou nted meal card i s a v a ilable at the B us i n e s s Office and is designed to be used in either coffee shop by students. Visitors may eat in a n y of the facilities. Only the coffee shop i n Columbia C e nter is open du ring vaca tion periods. Scheduling Services a re maintained in the Univer sity Center. All u n i v e rsity activities m u st be scheduled through this office. Sch eduling student activities i s a joint re sponsibility of the Unive rsity Center Director and the Un iversity Sche d u li n g Com mittee. Student Government is a n i nteg ral part of student activities at Pl U . The associated stude nts elect a s e nate to govern their affa i rs a n d o v e rsee an exte nsive committee program that i n volves h u n d red s of students i n actively plan ning p rograms and representing student opinion on various university boards and com m i ttees. PlU Bookstore is owned a n d operated by Pacific luthe ran Un iversity for the benefit of s t ud e n ts, faculty, staff, and their guests. The bookstore sells the textbooks a n d su pplies that are required o r suggested by faculty members for the i r co urses. Addit ional read i n g matter, su pplies, gift items, greeting cards, c10thi ng, film process ing, toiletries, and other convenien t items are also availa ble.


TH E UNIVER SITY CENTER

ďż˝

The Un iversi ty Center is headquar ters f o r m a n y of t h e c a m p u s activities a n d is the p l a ce where st udents and facu l t y g a t h e r to e a t, enjoy t h e recreational faci li ties, and ex c h a n g e i d e a s . The g u ilding itself has an interior design wh ich fea tu res red a n d orange accenting the browns of N or t h w e s t timber and is a beautiful as w e l l a s fu n c tion al f acil i t y .

PROGRAM FOR COMMUTING STUDENTS --

Every effort is made to assure com m u ting students enjoy the s a m e well-rounded u niversity experience as those i n residence. First-year st ude n t s who will be a t home are invited to participate i n a special program which d e a l s w i t h en riching college f o r them. Of course, off-campus st udents are invited and encouraged to participa t e in the varied and frequent activities programs planned for all students.

ENVIRONS The u n i v e rsity's geographical s e t t i n g affords t h e s tudent a wide v a ri e t y of both recreational a nd cultural entertainment options. R e c reat ionally, t h e g randeur of the Pacific N o r thwest c o u n t r y encou rages participation i n h iking, camping, c l i m bi ng, skiing, b oa t i n g and s w i m ming. T h e most conspicuous na tural m o n u m e n t i n t h e a rea is Mt. Rai n i e r. I n addition to Ra i n i er , the d i s t i n c ti ve rea l m s of t h e Cascade - and Oly m pic m o u n t a i n ranges, and forests o f Douglas Fir com p l e te o n e of t h e most natura l l y t ranqu i l e n v i r o n m e n t s in t h e U nited S ta t es . S t u d e n t s c a n a l s o enjoy t h e a e s t h e t i c offe r i n g s o f nea rby S e a t tle _ a n d Tacoma. These city c e n t e rs host a v a r i e ty o f perfo r m i n g a ndl record i ng a r tis ts, dozens of galleries a n d m u s e u m s as well as u n i q u e s ho p p i n g and d i n i n g ex periences.

STUDENT L I F E

11


Admission Applicants for a d m ission are evaluated without regard t o sex, race, creed, color, age, national origin, or handicapped condition. Although there are no arbi trary entrance re qu ire m e n t s, a d m ission is selective. Applicants who present acad e m ic a n d personal tra its which o u r experience indicates will e n able them to s u cceed a t the university and benefit from its e n v i ronment will be offered admi ssion. The criteria considered include grade pOint average (2.5 or a bove), c l a s s ra n k (top half), transcript patte rn, test scores, and reco m mend a tions. It is strongly reco m m ended, b u t not required, that applicants complete a progra m in hig h school which includes: English, 3-4 years; mathematics, 2 yea rs (preferably a lgebra and geometry); soci a l sciences, 2 years; one foreign language, 2 yea rs; one laboratory science, 1 year; electives, 3 years selected from above areas but also such courses a s speech, debate, typing. Those who follow this preparatory progra m will find most curricular offerings of the university a v a i la ble to them. S t udents a re a d m itted to either the fall or spring seme ster. Acceptance to the fall term carries permission to a ttend the previous su m me r sessions. Spring acceptance a pproves enroll ment in the Ja n u a ry I n teri m . We suggest the following applica tion deadlines : Fall Semesler - June 1: Spring Semesler - January 1.

APPLICA nON PROCED URE: E NTERING FRESHMEN

St udents plann i n g to enter as fresh m e n may sub mit applica tion materials anytime a fte re completion of the j u nior year of high school . A d m ission decisions a re made beginning December 1 unless a request for Early Decision is received. Candidates are notified of their status as soon as their completed application has been received and evalu ated . Credentials required are : 1. Formal A pplicalion: S u b m i t the Uniform Ulldergraduate A pplicalion for

A d missioll 10 Four-Year Colleges and Ulliversilies ill Ihe Siale of Washington. Available from high school counselors or the PLU

A d m issions Office . 2. $15.00 A pplicalioll /i<uords Fee: A $15 fee m u st accompany your appl ication o r be mailed separately. This non-refun dable service fee does not apply to your account. Make checks or money orders payable to Pacific L u theran University and m a i l to the P L U Admissions Office. 3 . Tran scripl: The transcript you submit m us t include all credits completed through your j unior year of high school. If a d m i ssion i s offered, an acceptable final transcript which indicates satis­ factory completion of the senior year and attainment of a d iploma m u st also be prese nted. 4. Re( o m merldalions: Two recommendations must be prepared by p rincipals, counselors, pastors, or other q u alified persons. The P L U A d m issions Office will s u p p l y the forms . 5. Tesl Req"iremeni: All entering fre s h m en m u s t submit scores from eilher the College Entrance Examination Board, Scholastic Apti­ tude Test (SAT) or the American College Test Assess ment (ACT) or, for Washington State residents, t h e Washington Pre­ College Test (WPCT). Registration procedures and forms are available at high school counseling offices.

12

ADMIS S I ON S

EARL Y DECISION High school studen t s who have decided upon F L U a s their first __ choice may be offered a d m ission as early as Octo ber 1 of their senior year. Early Decision applications m u s t be m ade by November 15 of the senior year. S AT, ACT or WPCT scores from the previous May or J u ly are accep t a ble . Early Decision stude nts are given preferential treatment in campus housing a n d financial aid . An­ Early Decision form is a vai lable from the Admissi ons Office. If a n Early Decision i s unfavorable, a s t u d e nt may stiiJ b e considered for regula r a d mission .

EARLY AD MISSION

Qualified students i nte rested in accelerating their for m a l education may b e g i n w o r k toward a degree after completion o f the junior year or first semester of the senior yea r of high school. Exception a l s t udents wh o wish to enro l l before comp leting a l l re q ui red units i n h igh school m u s t have a letter submit ted by a recognized school official which approves early college a d m ission and gives as surance t h at a high school diploma will be issued a fter completion of specified college work. Only stude nts highly reco m m ende d for Early Admission will be considered. Generally th ese s t udents ra n k among the top studen ts in their class a n d present h i g h ap titude test scores.


__

HO NORS AT ENTRANCE

APPLICATION PROCEDURE:

PLU confe rs Honors a t E n trance to t h e m o s t h i g h l y q ual ified f re s h m e n w h o are offered a d m i s s io n . Ce rtificates are m a iled i n ea rly M a y to h ig h sc hools for p r e s e n t a t i o n to reci p i e n t s at an honors convocation o r an a s s e m bly o r d u r i n g t h e i r g r a d u a t i o n ceremony i t self. T h e g r a n t i n g of Honors a t E n trance recognizes outstanding h ig h school a c h i e v e m e n t and an ticipates supe rior performance a t t h e u n i v e r s i t y level. These awards have no m o n e ta ry valu e . (See Honor Progra ms, page 2 6 . )

TRANSFER STUDENTS

ADVANCED PLACEMENT OPPORTUNITIES 1 . CEEB Examinalio"s: S t u d e n t s i n teres ted i n s e e k i ng advanced place m e n t or c r e d i t toward grad uation t h rough t h e exa m i n a t ion p rogram of t h e CoUege E n t ra nce E x a m i n a tion Board should d irect i n q u iries for specific information to t h e d e p a r t m e n t or sc. h ool w h i c h offers t he aca d e m ic s u bject of t h e i r choice. General i n q u iries about t h e CEEB p rogram m a y be add ressed to t h e Office o f A d m i s s i o n s . 2. Deparlmenlal Examinalions: A n u m b e r of d e p a r t m e n t s a n d schools offer place m e n t exa m i nations i n order t hat s t u d e n t s m a y be advised as to the lev e l at which t h e y m a y mos t adva n tageously p u rs u e a given s u bject. C re d i t toward g ra d u a tion may be given i n c e r t a i n cases, d e p e n d i n g on the exa m i n a tion SCore a n d w h e t h e r t h e s u bjec t m a t t e r w a s nol p a r t o f t h e c o u r s e w o r k b y which t h e h i g h s c h ool d ip loma was earn e d . Again, i n q u i ries for s p ecific i n formation should be d i rected to the d e p a r t m e n t or school offering the p a r t i c u l a r s u bject.

S t u d e n t s w h o began t h e i r h i g h e r education at o t h e r accred ited colleges o r u n iversities a re welcome to a pply for a d m ission with advanced standing. Candidates m u s t have good academic a n d personal s t a n d ing a t t h e i n s t i t u tion last attended full-ti m e . Al t h o u g h i t does not g u a ra n tee a d m i ss ion, a C+ g r a d e poi n t a v e rage ( 2 . 2 5 ) i n all college work a t te m p ted i s r e q u i red for r e g u la r a d m i s si o n . T e s t scores may be req uired f o r a pp lica n t s w h o h a v e limi ted college e x p e rience. C reden tials required a r e : 1 . Formal A ppllcallOn: S u b m i t a U n i f o r m Undergraduate Application w i t h $1 5 . 0 0 non-refundable a p plica tion /records fee . 2. Trans(ripI5: Official t ra n s c r i p t s from a l l previous co llegiate i n s t i 足 t u t i o n s a t tended m u s t be s e n t by t h ose i n s t i t u t i o n s di rectly to the PLU A d m i s s i o n s Office. Official h ig h s c h ool t r a n s c r i p t s o f c r e d i t s a re necessary i f t hey a re n o t l i s te d on col lege transc r i p t s . 3 . Clearance Form: T h e Office o f t h e D e a n o f S t u d e n t s a t your mos t rece n t l y a t tended (full-time) i n s t i t u tion m u s t complete a cleara nce form (provided by t h e P L U A d m i s si o n s Office) . 4 . Recommwdalions: Two reco m m e n d a t i o n s m u s t b e p repa red b y i n s t ru c tor s , counselo rs, pas tors, o r o t h e r q u a lified p e r s o n s . T h e P L U A d m i s s i o n s O f f i c e p rovides t h e forms.

E V ALUA nON OF C RE DITS

1. The Reg i s t r a r evaluates all t r a n s f e r records and creates an advising booklet (Gold Book) i n d i c a t i n g completion of any core req uireme n t s and to tal hours acce p t e d . I n d i v i d u a l schools a n d depa r t m e n t s d e t e r m i n e w h i c h c o u r s e s s a t i s fy major require足 ments. 2 . Gene rally, college-level courses carrying g r a d e " C " o r a bove apply toward graduation. "0" g raded courses will be w i t h h e ld u n ti l a s t u d e n t has s u ccess fully completed o n e s e m e s te r's work a t t h e u n i v e r s i ty. 3. A c o m m u n i ty college s t u d e n t m a y t r a n sfer a max i m u m of 64 s e m e s t e r (96 q ua r t e r ) h o u r s of c r e d i t from the two-year i n s t i t u 足 t io n . 4 . T o q u alify a s a d e g ree candidate, a s t u d e n t m u s t t a k e t h e final 28 s e m e s t e r hours i n residence.

ADMIS SIO N S

13


UNACC REDITED EDUCATIONAL E XPERIENCES:

1 . Credits e a r n e d i n u n accred i ted schools are n o t transferable a t t h e t i me of a d m i s s i o n . Evaluation a n d decision o n s u ch courses will be made a ft e r the s t u de n t has been i n a tte nda nce a t t h e u n i vers i t y o n e s e m e s t e r . 2 . T h e u n i ve rs i t y a l lows u p to 20 sem e s t e r hours of U S A F I cred i t and u p to 20 s e me s t e r h o u r s f o r m i l i tary c r e d i t , provid i n g t h e t o t a l of t h e t w o does n o t e x ceed 3 0 semester h o u r s . 3 . T h e u n i versity does n o t g r a n t c r e d i t f o r coUege l e v e l C E O t e s t s . 4 . For i n fo rm a t i o n on t h e Col le ge L e v e l E x a m i n a t io n P rogram ( C L E P)' refe r to the section on Credit by Exa m i ,,,,tio,, (page 26).

PROCEDURES:

F O R M E R STU D E N TS

F u ll-time s t u d e n t s w h o have not b e e n in a t te n d a n ce for one semester o r more m a y see k re a d m i s s i o n by obta i n i ng a n a p p l ic a ti on for re- e n t rance f rom the Admissions O f f ic e u n less they have been a pproved, a t the time of last e n rollment, for a Leave of Absence. S tu d e n t s who have been d ropped for acade m ic or d i scip l in ar y reasons m u s t id e n t if y a facul t y member willing to a ct a s a s po nsor a n d adviser if re - a d m i t ted. Re-en tering s t ud e n t s w h o have a t te n ded another college i n t h e mea n t i me m u s t req uest that a t ra ns c r i p t be s e n t from tha t i n s t i t u t i o n d i re c t ly to t h e Director o f A d m i ssions.

PROC EDURES:

F O {W G N STU D E N TS

Fore i g n s t u d e n t s who are q u a l i fied aca d e mi c a l ly and fi nanCially a re e n c o u ra g ed to j o i n the u n iversi t y co m m u n i t y . I n f o r m a t i o n a n d application proced u res may b e obtained f ro m t h e D i rector o f A d m issions o r Foreig n S t u d e n t A d v i s e r .

14

ADMISSIONS

F IN ALIZING A N OFFER O F ADMISSI ON: 1 . Medi(al

Requiremcut: B e fo re final ma t r i c u l a t i o n , each new full­ t i m e u nde rg r a d u a te s t u d e n t ( t e n s e m e s t e r h o u rs o r more) m us t s u b m it a Medical H is tory a n d C o n s e n t Form acceptable to t h e P L U Heal t h Service. S t u d e n t s a re n o t f i n a l l y a d m i tted u n ti l t h i s f o r m i s a p p roved . 2. Advan(e Payment: A $ 75 . 00 Advance P a y m e n t is neces sary follow­

ing a n offe r · o f a d m is s i o n . T h i s p a y m e n t i s t h e s t u d e n t's a c k n owledge m e n t of accep t ance and b o t h g u a ra n t e e s a place i n t h e s t udent b o d y a nd reserves h o u s i n g on c a m p u s i f re que s t e d . I t i s credited to the s t u d e n t's accou n t and i s a p p l i e d toward e x p e n s e s of the f i r s t s emes ter. Fa ll applica"t5 offered admission befo re

--­

J'Vtay 1 musl s u b m i l lhe paymenl by J'Vtay 7 . If c i r c u m s ta nces necessi-

t a t e cance l la t i o n of e n ro l l m e n t a n d the Director of A d m i ssions i s n o t ified i n writing before M a y 1, t he $ 75 . 0 0 will be refunded. The refund d a t e for I n t e ri m is Dece m b er 15, a nd for s p r i n g semes ter, J an u ar y 1 5 . 3 . Two Fo rms: A S t u d e n t P e r s o n n e l Form a nd a Directory I n forma­ t i o n / Ho u s i ng Application Form m u s t be completed by a il s t u d e n t s a n d r etu rned with t h e adva nce p a y m e n t .


Financial Aid Recognizing t h a t many stud e n t s who want to a t t e n d Pacific Lutheran Univ ers i t y would be unable to meet aU expenses of enroll m e n t from personal o r family sources, the university a t t e m p ts to provide financial a s sista nce t o all eligible s t uden ts. Any student approved for enrollment or curren tly en rolled m a y request financial aid. Appro x i m a tely half o f the university's s tude n t s receive h e l p i n the form of g i ft a s si s t ance ( t h a t i s , scholarships, talent awar ds, or g r a n t s ) , low inte rest deferred loans, or e m ploy m e n t . In m a n y cases a financial aid a w a rd will be a com bi n ation of these forms of assistance. The qua n tity and co mposition of a n award is based upon d e m on s t ra ted financial need, academic achieveme n t , test scores, and other personal talents a nd in teres ts. Need is de termined from a n a lysis of the Financial Aid Form (FAF) ' which is a s t a t e m e n t o f f i n a n ci a l condi tion provided by t h e College Scholarship Service (CSS) , Analysis of the Financial Aid Form determines an e xpected con tribution for college expenses from the s tud e n t a nd pare n t s or guard i a n , " F i n a ncial Need" is d efined a s t he di fference between total student expenses for a n academic year and the expected s t u d e n t /fa mily con tribution and is a primary factor in determi ning eligibility for most a v a i l able aid. Financial assist ance is available to all qualified s tudents regardless of their sex, race, c reed, color, age, national origin, or handicapped cond ition.

APPLICATION PROCEDU RE : FRESHMEN AND TRANSFERS 1.

2, 3. 4. 5.

DEAD L I N E : All materials m u s t be i n t h e Fina ncial Aid Office by March 1 . Mail a Fi nancial Aid Form (FAF) to the College Scholarship Service b y February 1 . Be offered a d m ission by March 1. S u b m i t a white PLU Application ( t r a n s fers o n l y ) . S u b m i t a Financial Aid Transcript (t ransfers o n l y ) .

CONTINUING STUD ENTS

DEADLINE: A l l m a t erials m u s t be in t h e Fina ncia l Aid Office by April I . 2 . Mail a Fi nancial Aid Form (FAF) to the College Scholarship Service (CSS) by March 1 . 3 . Complete a white PLU App lication. Application for financial aid is encou raged a t a ll ti mes, but failure t o meet the preceding application da tes may res u l t in a denial of aid even though need is demonstrated. The Financ ial Aid Office will consid e r a l l applica n t s for a n y a w a rd for which they m i g h t be eligible. Aid awards a re for one year an d most are renewa ble, provided re-application is completed on time, financial need c o n tinues, a nd sa t i sfactory academic progress is maintained . Aid is not autom atica l ly renewed each year. 1.

NOTIFICATION OF AWARD DECISIONS 1. Award decisions f o r fres hmen a n d tra nsfer s t u d e n t s who m e e t t h e Ma rch 1 co m pletion d a t e w i l l b e made in M a rch, and actual notifica tion will be mailed April 1 . 2. E a rly decision s tudents who request fin ancial assista nce will be sent award decisions if their processed FAF is received from the CSS between J a n uary 15 and February 24. Fi nancial aid decisio n s for con t i n u i ng P L U stud e n t s a r e m a d e in April a n d notifications a r e s e n t out b e g i n n i n g i n May,

16

FINANCIAL AID

VALIDATING T H E A I D OFFER A i d offers mus t be validated by returning t h e sig ned F i n ancial Aid Award Notice and sub m i t ting the $75 Adva nce Paym e n t required by the unive rsity. T h i s should b e d o n e a s soon as possible but mus t be completed by May 1. Applic a n t s not retu rning t h e i r acceptance of an a w a r d by the reply d a t e specified will h a v e their awards cancelled . If a n a pplica n t later decid es to reapply, the application will be reviewed w i t h the group curr e n t l y being processed . Aid, with t h e excep tion of College Work-Study, is credi ted to the s tudent's accoun t when all pape rwork h a s been completed. One足 half of the a w a rd is disbursed each semester. Pare n ts a n d st ud e n t s a r e responsible f o r t h e c h a rges in excess of t h e a w a rd . In some cases aid i s a w a rded i n excess o f dir ect u n iversity c harges to help with livin g expenses . Th is money will remain on the s tud en t's accoun t u n l es s requested by the s t u d e n t t h rough the Busine ss Office after classes have begun. Under federal regulations, adjus t m e n t s to a n a w a rd package must be made if a s tudent receives additional a wards of a id from sources e x ternal to the univer s i t y . In every case, however, the F i n a n cial Aid Office will a t tempt to allow the st udent t o keep as m uch of the award package as possible. By t reat ing aid received from e x t e rnal sources in t h i s way, addi tional awards from the u n iversi ty's resources can be made to o t h e r qualified needy stud e n t s .

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIE S The basic respon sibility for financing an education a t PLU rests with s t u d e n t s an d their fa m il i e s . In addition to expected contributions from p a rents o r gua r d i a n s, s tude n t s a r e e x pected tv a s s i s t by c o n t r i b u t i n g from their savings and s u m m e r e a r n i n g s . F i n a n c i a l a s s i s t a n c e f r o m t he u n i v e r s i t y i s t h e r e fo r e suppleme ntary t o t h e efforts of a s t udent's f a m i l y . I t is provided for students who d e m o n s t rate need . Add i t ional rig h t s and responsibilities of financial aid recipients include: 1 . Signing and returning mch financial aid n o t ice recei ved. 2. Decl i n i ng a t any time any portion o f an award. 3. Notifying the Fina ncial Aid Office i n case o f a cha nge in cre dit hours a t temp ted; a change in residence (off-ca m p us or at ho me); o r rece ipt of a d d i t ional outside sch o l a r s h i p s . 4 . S i g n i n g additional docum ents in t h e F i n a ncial Aid Office a t t h e begi nning of each semester.

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENT S / SATISFACTORY PROGRESS

T h e policy of the Fin ancial Aid Office is t o a l low s tud ents t o con tin ue receiving financial a s s i s t ance as l o n g as th ey a r e i n good standing at t h e un iversity. To do ot herwise would cause a severe hardship on s tud ents who must devote t h eir e ffo r t s t o achieving s a t i s factory g rades. However, n o i n s t i t u t ional grants will be awarded to s tude n t s with cum ulativ e g rade point a v e rages below 2 . 00. To be g i ven priori t y for most types o f f i n a ncial aid, an applica nt mus t be en rolled a s a full-time stud e n t . For federal financial aid progra ms, a full-time s t u d e n t is defined as a n y person en rolled for a m i n i m u m of twelve credit hours or more per semes ter. Most fina ncial aid at P L U is based on an average of 32 cred i t hours for the aca d e m ic year. This includes t h e possibility of four hours during the I nterim. Ad justments i n an a w a rd may be made during the year if a n aid recipient has not enroll ed for the n u mber of cre d i t h ours shown on the fron t of the a w a rd no tice. [n every case, ful l - t i m e s tuden ts will be g i v e n p r i o r i t y f o r fina ncial a i d .


TYPES OF AID

UNI VERSI T Y GIFT ASSISTA N C E U N IVE RSITY SC H OL A RS H IP S a r e granted on t h e basis o f

academic achievement and f i n a ncial need. To b e considered, a fres h m a ll applicant must have a 3 . 3 0 seco ndary schoo l g rade point

average. Schol a s tic ability must a l so be reflected in tes t scores from t h e Scholastic Apti tude Tes t (S AT), or the American College Test (ACT), or the Washing ton Pre-College Test (WPCT). Trallsfer an d (orl l i ,, " i "g students m u s t h a ve a 3 . 0 cu mulative grade point a v erage to be quali fied for firs t - t i m e or renewal a w a rds . PLU is a sponsor of __ Nolio.,"1 Meril S(holarships. Students who earn semifinalist standing are e ncouraged to contact t h e F i n a n cial Aid Office for i n formation concerning a PLU Merit Scholarship. PRESIDE NT'S SCHOLA RSHlP S of $600 a re a w a rded to en tering fres h m e n in recognition of ollisianding acade m ic -- achieve ment in high school and in a n ticipation of s u perior p r f rm.mce at PL U. To be a candida te, a student must have a high school g.p.a. of 3 . 7 5 or h ig her, present h ig h tes t scores, a n d be offered admission by M a rc h 1 . Fina ncial "eed is .101 a delmn i n i "8 faclor __ a n d no a p plication is required. Only a l i m i ted n u mber o f s t udents w h o meet t he above req uirements are selected . The a w a rds, m a de in M a rch, are renewable if a 3 . 3 grade point average is maint a i n e d . ALU MNI M E R IT SCHOLARSH IPS o f $ 1 , 000 are available to x ceptional s tudents. Preference will be given to sons and -- d a u g h ters of PLU a l u m n i . To be eligible e n t e ring fres h m e n must have " c u m ul a t i ve high school g . p . a . of 3.5 o r higher. Non­ fres h m e n a n d renewal applica n t s m u s t have a m i n i m u m collegiate g . p . a . of 3.3 to be eligible. Financial need is not a determining factor __ a n d a .pecial application is requ i red. Merit scholarship applicants m us t be offered a d m ission to the u n i versity and must s ub m i t applica tions by M a r c h 1 of t he yea r p receding t h e i r enrol l m e n t . F ACU L TY ME RIT SCHOLARSH 1 PS ( 2 4 scholarships) a r e available t o t h ose st udents who h a v e completed a m i n i m u m of 4 5 -- s e mester h o u r s a t PL U . T h e $ 5 0 0 schola rship is n o t based on need. A r dpient cannot be receiving any other merit a w a rds of $500 or more. A faculty com m i t tee will evaluate recipi e n t s on the basis of t heir schol a s t ic achievem e n t , s pecific talents, a nd u n u s u a l s e rvice __ to the c o m m u n i t y o r the u n iversi t y . A I R FORCE ROTC SCHOLA RSHIP recipien t s (4-year, 3-year, or 2-year) may a t t end Pacific L u theran U n i v e rsity. A F R OTC classes are h e ld at the Aerospace S t udies Depa rtment on t h e UniverSity of Puget S o u n d campus, a b o u t 20 m i n u t e s d r i v i n g t i m e - from t h e F L U c a m p u s . TALENT AWARDS are granted to st udents with financial need w h o hav exc ptional ability i n t h e fields of forensics, drama, art, m u sic, or a t h letics. The candi date must make arra nge m e n t s w i t h _t h e school o r depa r t m e n t concerned for a n audition and/o r a personal i n terview. In some cases a tape or film will be sa tisfactory. A rec o m m e n d a tion from a f a c u l t y member must be on file before a s t u d e n t is considered for a T a l e n t Award. UNI VERSITY G RA NTS are a w a rded in combination w i t h loa n s --a n d e m ployment to s t u d e n t s w i t h fi n a ncial need w h o d o not qualify for scholarship assistance. Minorily Grallis are available for q ualified minority s t u dents i n addi tion t o all other types of financ ial aid described. Farrigrl Sl lIde,,1 Grn"ls are res t ricted t o those foreign __s t u d e n t . who have provided their own resou rces for at least one year of a t tendance. G r a n t s u s ually a m o u n t to less than one- t h i rd of the cost o f a t t e nda nce.

-

M I NISTER'S DEPENDENT G RA N TS a re avail able to u n m a r ried, dependen t c hildren of a res ularly on/airled. aclive m i n ister o r missionary of a C h ristian c h u rc h . The m i n i s ter's principal employment and primary sou rce of income must be a result of church work. The m i n i m u m a n n u a l gra n t is $200 b u t this may be i n creased to $700 i f t h e e l ig i b l e stude n t has a demonstrated financial need as determi ned from the F i n a n cial Aid Form. If a F A F is s u b m i t ted no special MDG applica tion is r e q u i r e d . J u n e 1 is the deadline for req uesting t h i s gra n t . Req uests received th ereafter wiJI be honored on,ly a s budgeted funds p e r m i t . S P E C I A L G R A NTS may be g i v e n to dependents of P L U fac u l t y and st aff. M a rried c h i ldren a r e n o t eligible. T h e a m o u n t will be d e t e r m i ned at the time of registra t io n . An application m u s t be s u b m i t ted to the Personnel Office. A L U M N I DEPENDENT G RA N TS o f $ 1 00 for spring semester are given to full-time s t udents whose pa rent(s) a t tended PLU (PLC ) for t wo semest ers or more . To be eligible the a l u m n i dependent must h a v e been a full-time s t udent the p revio us fall semester and complete a n a p plication in t h e Financial Aid Office by December 1 . GRA NTS in t h e a m o u n t o f $50 per semester s h a ll be g,iven to each of two or more f u l l - ti me s t u dents from t h e same family at tending PLU s i m u l t a neously, provided t h a t t h e main supp ort for both is from parents a n d provided they have not received any other u n iversity gran t o r a ward. M arried st udents are also eligible when both a re full-time st uden t s . An applica tion m u s t be filed in t h e F i nancial Aid Office a t registration or i m mediately therea fter. The grant will b e credited a f ter eligibility is established. In addi tion to i t s own schola rship f u nds, the un iversity h a s at its disposal t h e following restricted f u nd s, generally a w arded t o those students w ho complete reg ular application a nd who have finished t h eir fresh m a n year: Aid A5�ociation f o r L u t h e r.l n s Scholarships Aitrus.;l Club, Tacoma C h a p t e r Scholarship A l u m n i Scholarship Fund American Associ a t i o n of University Women Scholarship American L u t heran C h u rch - North Pa

fie D i s t rict Sc hol a r s h i p

Florence- Spi n n e r A n d e r s o n Memorial Scholarship Ada Kilan Annis Sc-holar:s h i p F r a n k 5 . Ba ke r Scholarship

Helen aUt Bell Schola rship B . E . R . C . Minority Schol.uship Binder Memorial ScholarShip Jorunn Breiland Scholarship Fund O. A. Brown Fund Dr. a n d Mrs. \'\I . B . B u r n s. Fund Bllrllaff Memori.ll Schola rship California S chola rs h i p Federation - Scholarship for S e a l b e J rl"fS Carl Falk Memorial Scholars:hip Cheney Fllundation Educational Scholarship Chev ron Merit Scholars Chdo-Liang Cho w Scholarship Cornerco Schol ars h i p Ida A . D a v i s F u n d

R. P a r c h e r E l l i n gson Schola r s h i p led E r i c k s o n Scholar�hip Faculty Memorial Scholarship Fund Faith luthc-ran C h u rc h o f Portland Scholarship F u n d

Hele.n Fr os t Scholarship Rebecca Schoenfeld Gardner J n d Joseph Gardner Scholarship Greater Puyallup Valley Ch.lmber o f Conlmerce Scholarship Olaf Halvorsen Sc h ola rship W.H. Hardtke Semin ary Student Scholarship Fund Vic Hurley Studen t Nurse Scholarship Fund Teny Irwin Scholanhip

FINANCIAL AID

17


J{('\,. Karl Kilian 't�morial F u nd Kinds m.ln A\.1o'.lrd (' morlal Sc-holJrs h i p Mdvin Klewetw L.ldi(>s of KI\,�la n is }\ wJ:nJ a l o n e l E r w i n T. Koc h A n n u a l A W ,H d Drs L M s o n \ leks. Reberg er .l n d E l d e r Scholarship t n !\<1edic.l1 Technology l u dvi,; <l n J C l a r,l Larson Scholdr"� h i p Mr. J n J M rs. W H i l d l n g U n d beq� E. n d o w e d S c ho l J r s h i p L u t e Club 5l' h olars h i p L u t h er ,) n Brotherhl)od L�g.ll Rtc'�crVt.' life I n s u ra n CE: Co. Schol.lrship Jot:.. v , 1a r("h mek Memori ,ll Scho l a r sh i p Fund M u Phi Epsilon. T,H:oma ['rpfM i(1O,)1 C h a p t f' r , S c h o l a r s h i p Fred ( . Muenscher hnd SiO .ltu - S h a k e ( iO P i n.l Pil r l o r s S c h o l d r s h i p M r . ,:md Mr".i . G u .s H . N I'I!! m d n M e m o r i J I Scholarship MJ Put:! N ist J J Memarldl ScholArship 1 J g n ll � N odt vtJ: d l Sch{ll.H s h i r

Selma a n d

Rot;er Pdell' l Mt!fOori.l1 Schulars h l p

B l a n c h e P f L H L rn Schola rship P L U F .ll : U l t y WI VI..·S Sc h ola rlh i p Portl,lnd A r t' l\ A l u m n ! Sch {')la rsh lp W o m e n uf Rotary S c ho lu'!i h l p D r s R i c h .l rd ,lOd lA'dlte.r Schwindt Scholarship

S ' q u , · I J n d Youlh Sc:h()lJ. r � h i p ( N�1 rth l'J.ci fil.: Dlslrict L ut h e r lea�ue)

S k i n n(·r foundation S(· hu I J r " � i p

Smith

I1Jowmt>nt Sc,:h ull1rsf,ip F u n d

G u y Stenneroddt'n M e rn o r l .ll

Re ... ,)nJ Mrs. H.llvor T h or modsga rd ScholMshlp. EVI:'lyn S. Ton·end 5ch o l . H � h i p ruber('ulo�ls As�od,lIt()n o f Pierce C ou n t y S c h ...,lclrs h ip EBen V <'tilt, � e m n r i ( d Scholarship Hopper Mt'mor i.ll Ols£'n Ml'm(lrt,ll Hedvig, A r t h u r Me m o n aI

Don.l l d :\

B r u n ner Me mo rial

·

Muk S .J l / m ,l n Mt'morl.ll

J.P. C M l s t r o m Schol,Hship

l.OIlIS ilnd Ll'ona Lamp Schot.. r s h i p

C o rd o n PeJfSOn Memori<11 \·Ya>il h i ngton Congre � of P a r l ' n t � . i t'.JCh(·r�, dnd St u d e n t �

G O V E R I M E N T A L G R A N TS

THE BASIC E DUCA nONAl OPPORTUNITY GRANT PROGR A M (BEOG) i s a federal progra m designed t o provide the " founda t io n" for a f i n a n cial aid package. I t is i ntended for st udents with high financial need. When completing t h e Fina ncial Aid Form (FAF) appl ica nt s s h ou ld indicate that t h e inform'a t ion is to be used for dete r m i n i n g their eligibility for the BEOG b y checking the appro priate bo x . I f t h e S t u d e n t Eligibi li t y Report (SER) you receive indicates eligibility, a ll t h ree copies should be sent to the Financial Aid Office. Basic Grants are avai lable in amounts up to $ 1 ,600 per year. . S U PPLEME NTAL E D U CATIONAL O P POR TUNIT Y GRANT S (SEOG) a re available to s t u d e n t s w h o have exc eptional financial need. G ra n ts r a n ge from $200 to $ 1 ,500 per year and cannot exceed o n e-half t h e total a m o u n t of financial aid. The S E OG must be ma tched with a t least an eq u iv a l e n t a m o u n t of other kinds of aid (grant, loan, or employ men t). E l i g i b i li t y i s determi ned b y federal gu ideli nes. Residents of t h e S tate o f Was h i n g t on who a t tend P L U may be eligible for a WASHI NGTON STATE NEED GRA NT, These g ran ts are i n t e nded fo r st u d e n t s with h ig h n e e d . On t h e b a s i s o f guidelines establ i shed b y t h e Council on Post-Seco n d a r y Ed ucation, s t u d e n t s w i t h specified need as co mpu ted from the F i n a n cial Aid Form are su bmitted to t h e State fo r considera t i o n . P r e s e n t procedure d o e s n o t req u i re a separat e applica t i o n . NURSING GRANTS t o a m a x i m u m of $2, 500 p e r year a r e availa ble, dep ndent on federal f u n d i n g . A w a rds usually average $500 per academic year. S tudents are eligible if accepted by or en rolled in the School of Nursing (not pre-n ursing prog ra m s ) . Fina ncial n e e d m u s t be demonstrated.

18

FI NANCI AL AID

lAW ENFORCEMENT EDUCATION PROG RAM (LEEP) G r a n t and loa n - L E E P is a federal prog ram for full-time in­ service law enforcement person nel. No Fi nancial Aid Form is requ i red. G ra n t s range up to $400 per se mester for t u i t i o n and books. Loa n s cover t h e cos t of tu ition and man da tory fees to a m a x i m u m of $2,200 per year. STUDENT EMPLOYMENT

There are employment opportunities on c a m p u s a nd in t h e com m u ni t y that can help s t u d e n t s m e e t college expe n s es. Prio rity for placement is given to t h ose s t u d e n t s who have demo n s t r a ted financial need an d have been a w a rded a work-st u d y e l ig ib i l i t y . O v e r 8 0 0 s t udents w o r k on campus e a c h y e a r . The u n iversity 's ann ual student pa yroll exceeds $500,000. The average o n -ca mpus job approx imates ten hours per week, and produces around $800 d u ring a n academic year. Ali s/uden/ place",,,,/< for

Ca rerr

oIl-campus

and

off-campus jOlJ5

a re ha ndled by the

A c t u a l assign ments fo r new s t u d e n t s are made a t the beg inning o f the school year and at other t i mes a s vacancies occ u r . The federal College Work-Study Program offe rs off-ca mpus employment with n o n - p rofit e mployers. To p a r t icipate, s t u d e n t s m us t be eligible for work-s t u d y . The State Work-Study P rog ram offers only off-campus work oppo r t u n i t ies with profi t - m a king and non -profit employers. Positions must be related to studen ts' academic in teres t s . To participate, s t u d e n t s must be eligible for work-s t u d y . Pla'lM Ing "1111 Placemen/

Office.

L O A NS

M a n y s t udents in vest in their future by borrowing educational funds. Low i n t e rest, deferred loans make i t possible to p a y some of ­ t h e cost of education a t a later t i m e . Loans are often in cluded with gift assistance and work to form a financial aid package. There are t h ree major sources of loa n s a t P l U : NA TIONAl DIRECT STUDENT LOAN (NDSl) - Eligibility is _ determi ned by the PL U F i na ncial Aid Office from the Financ ial Aid Form and is based on need. Most loans ave rage $800 ann u a lly, but c a n no t exceed $2,500 for t h e first two years of schoo'!, n o r an aggrega t e of $5, 000 for an underg r a d u a t e degree. No in terest accrues a nd no payments on principal a re necess a ry u n t i ll nine ­ m o n t h s a fter a recipient ceases to be a st uden t. Simple in terest is On 3% d u ring the repayment period. Up to 100% cancellation is available for teach ing the ha ndicapped Or in c e r t a i n low i n come areas. Repa y m e n t may be deferred beca use o f f u r ther full-time study o r service in the armed forces, V ISTA, o r the Peace Corps. Exit i n terviews are requ ired by t h e B u siness Office upon leaving PlU or tran scripts, grades, and diploma are w i t h held. NURSING STUDENT L OAN (NSt) - A federal loan program limi ted to students with need who are accepted for enroll m e n t or are e n rolled i n t h e School of N u rsing ( u s u a l l y not before the sophomore yea r ) . The N S L h a s provisions s i m ila r to the NDSL. Up to $ 2, 500 is avail able, dependent on ft!d eral f u n d i n g . Loans average $500. Repay m e n t beg i n s one ye ar a f t e r g raduat ion. P a rtial or full cancellation is possible u nd e r certain condi tions. FEDERALL Y I NS U RED STUDENT lOAN (FISt) - Under t h is program, s t u d e n t s may borrow from banks, cred i t u n ions, and savings a nd loan associa t ions. A separate application procedure is re q u i red and forms are available from t h e PLU Financial Aid Office. As m u ch as $2,500 can be borrowed each year but most lending i n s t i t u t ions a re l i m i t i n g loans to $ 1,500. Rep a y m e n t of principal is deferred until nine m o n t h s after a recipient ceases t o b e a s t u d e n t .


The i n terest rate is 7% but in cases where t h e family's adjusted income i s less than $ 2 5,000, i n terest is paid by t h e federal gove r n m e n t while the reci pien t is a t tending schooL Short term 10dns a re ava i l a ble from various rest ricted P L U loa" fu nds w h ic h include: A l u m n i A$soci,l t i o n l o a n Fund A m erican Lutht:run C h u r c h Women loan Fund Anton And�rson lOoln Fund j o h n S . Baker Loan F u n d

J , P . C a r l s t r o m Memorial Loan F u n d D e l t a Kappa Lily

.. arnma

S t u d e n t Loan F u n d

Ekern Fund

Marie H u t h Lo ... n rund Gerh.nd Kirkcbo Memorial Loan Fund Jcant.!lh ..' Ol!ir.>n

M

Dt.l n ,l Paul · Miriam Stool M e m o r i a l S t u d l m t Loan F u n d

J . f', Pflu€'Ster S t u d e n t lOiln F u n d

O , J . S t l J � n A l u m n i Lo,ln F u n d O . '-\' . Ting�lst,]d l o a n F u n d \·\\l m('n's. C l u b of T a m m a R e v o l v i n g L o a n Fund Ver n(� C r a h ,) m Loan FunJ

VETE RAN S AFFAIRS AND VOCA nO NAL REHABILIT A nON Pacific L u t heran University is approved by the Superi n tendent of Public I n s tructi on and the Veterans Administra t ion t o offer cou rses leading to a degree at the bachelor's a n d m a s ter's levels . Students who are eligible for veterans' or vocational ben e fits should contact the PLU Veterans A f fairs Office regarding regis tra tion in forma tion .

F I NANCIAL AID

19


Costs TUITION

S t u d e n t s a t Pacific L u theran University pay only for those courses i n which t hey are e n ro l led . Tui tion cha rges are d e t e r m i n ed by t h e n u m b e r of credit hours for which s t u d e n t s regi s t e r . The 1 9 78- 79 rate for one s e m e s t e r hour i s $ 1 0 1 . 0 0 . Most courses carry a v a l u e of f o u r semester hours. A few s pecialized courses, i.e., Physical E d ucation, A rt, and Private M u s i c Lessons m a y r e q u i re e x t ra cos t s which are lis ted w i t h each se me s ter's course offeri n g s .

SPECIAL FEES ( 1978-79 RATES) L a t e regi s t ra t ion clearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2 5 . 0 0 A u d i t per course . " . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25% o f t u i t ion C r e d i t by exa mina tion : Dep a r t m e n t a l e x a m . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25.00 S t u d' ent pa rk i n g : Yea r p e r m j t (when registered for 1 0 h o u r s o r more) . . . . â&#x20AC;˘ Y e a r p e rmit (when registered for less than 1 0 hou rs) . . . . S t u d e n t h e a l t h a n d accide n t i ns u rance (es t i m a te d

. . . . . . . . .

. . . . . .

fee; actual fee may b e h i g n e r) ( 24 hours, 1 2 m o n t h coverage, o p t i o n a l ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

12.00

. . 3.00 .

. . . . .

.

85.00

ROOM AND BOARD (1 978- 79 RATES)

R o o m a n d board, per s e m e s ter, is a s follo w s : Room F a l l S e mes ter Room & Board: Do u b l e Occupancy R oo m S i n g le Occupancy Room I n t e ri m Roo m & Board: C o n t i n u i n g ' Fall S e m e s te r S t u d e n ts, Do u b l e Occupancy New S t u de n t s ,

Board

$355.00 $455.00"

$380.00 $380.00

$0

$90.00

Do u b le Occupancy $65.00 '(Con t i n u i n g s t u d e n t s m u s t be t a king c l a s s e s o r

$90.00

f i l e a P l a n of A c t ion i n o r d e r to r e m a i n o n c a m p u s d u ri ng I n t e ri m . ) Spring S e m e s t e r Room' & Board: D o u b l e Occupancy Roo m

$255.00

$380 . 0 0

$ 3 5 5 . 00 $380. 00 S i ng le Occupancy Room An a p p ropriate fee will be a s s e s s e d for rooms occupied d u ri n g C h ri s t m a s break a n d s p r i ng break. " On l y a vay s m a 'l l n u m be r o f si ngle rooms are a v a i :l a b le. They are 'limi ted to s t u d e n t s with medical/physical h a n dicaps which necess i t a t e a single room, a n d to upperclass s t u d e n t s . S t u de n t s n e w t o P L U n o r m a l l y do n o t receive s i n g le-room a s s ig n m e n ts . The a bove room a n d board r a t es i n c l u d e t h r e e me als per d a y, Monday t h rough S a t u rd a y, a n d brunch a n d d i n n e r on S u n d a y . M e a l s are not p rovided d u ring Tha n k sgiving, C h r i s t m a s and E a s t e r vaca tions, n or a n y o t h e r d a y when t h e residence. halls a re clos e d . On-ca m p u s s t ud e n t s a re req u i red to e a t i n t h e u n i v e r s i t y d i n ing halls.

S t u d e n t s l i vi n g off-ca m p u s are encou raged to eat m e a ls on cam p u s . T w o p la n s a re offered; a l l meals, seven d ay s, or lunch only M o n d ay through Friday. Fall

Off-ca m p u s f u l l Off-ca m p u s l u nch 5 days

$380.00 $ 144.00

Of f- c a m p u s f u l l Off-ca m p u s lu nch 5 days

$ 90.00 $ 4 2 . 00

Off-c a m p u s full Off-ca m p u s lunch 5 days

$ 380.00 $144.00

hlttrim Spri"g

MA RRIED STUDENT HOUSING Two-bed room ( 1 0 u n i t s ) , p er m o n t h . . . . . . T h ree-bed room ( 4 u n i t s ) , p e r m o n t h . . . . . . E vergreen C o u r t ( 1 2 u n i t s ) , two-bedroom,

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. .

.

$ 65.00 . 80.00

. . .

includes a ll u t ili ties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1 1 5 . 0 0 A deposit of $65.00 m u s t acco m p an y a reserv ati o n f o r m a rried s tu d e n t housing. This deposit will be held by t h e u n i v ersity u n t i l the occ u p a n t v a c a t e s t h e a p a r t m e n t , or ca ncels t h e reservation. O n e m o n t h 's rent for ap art m e n ts i s req uired.

PAYMENTS:

PII YMENT O PTIONS

1. P a y m e n t by S e m e s ter. I f this

option i s selected, the t o t a l

e s t i m a t e d cos ts o f e a c h s e m e s t e r m u s t be paid p r i o r t o t he begi n n i ng o f cla s s e s . 2 . The P L U B u d g et Plan prov ides f o r prepaying t h e e s t i m a t e d an n u al co s t s i n twelve i n s t a l l m e n t s from M a y 10 t h rough A p ril

10. NOT E : E n rol l m e n t is n o t complete u n t i l payment is m a d e .

ADVANCE PAYME NTS New s t u d e n t s a re requi red to make a $ 7 5 . 00 Advance Payment in order to f i n a l i ze t h eir offer o f a d m ission . Fo r fall accep t ance t hi s is not refundable after M a y 1 (December 15 for i n terim; J a n u a ry 1 5 for s p r i n g s e m e s t e r ) . A l l r e t u r n i n g s t u d e n t s m u s t m a k e a $ 7 5 . 0 0 A d v a n c e Pay m e n t ­ prior to early class regi s t r a t ion and /or reservation of a wom for t he n e x t academic year. T h is Advance Pay m e n t i s n o t r ef undable a f t e r May 1. S tu d e n t s will not be p e r m i t t e d to f i n a l i ze registration a s l ong as any bill remains u npaid.

RES TRICTIONS T h e u n iversity reserves t h e rig h t to w i t h hold s ta te m e n t s of honorable d i s m is s a l, g rade reports , t ra n script o f records, o r d iplomas, u n ti l al l u n i ve r s i ty b i l l s have b e e n p a i d . S t ud e nt p a y check s m ay be a p plied to u n paid balances.

REFUNDS Full t u i tion r e f u n d (l es s $25.00 w i t h d raw al f e e ) wiLl be m a d e w h en a s t u d e n t w i t hd raws from the u n i v e r s i t y before t h e e n d o f th e second week; n o refu nd s are a llowed a f t e r t h e second wee k . A pro-rata board r ef u nd w i l l be m a d e for necessary w i t h d ra w a l from t h e u n i v e r s i t y . Board refunds will not be made for a n y u n ,i v e rs i t y t r i p s , s u ch a s choir, chorus, b a n d , orch e s t ra, a t h l e tics, an d so for t h . R e f u n d s on room will not be m ad e.

20

COSTS


Acad mic Structure C OLLE GE OF ART S AND SCIENC E S Di isio n of Humani t ies English Modern a n d Cla9'Sical Languages Philosophy Religion D ivision of Natural Sciences Biology Chem istry E a r t h Sciences Mat hema t i cs Physics a n d E n gineering Divi sion of Social Sciences Economics His tory Political Science Psychology Sociology, A n t h ropology., an d Social Welfare

S C HOOL OF B U SINE SS ADMINI STRA TION SCHOOL OF EDUCAT ION S C HOOL OF FINE ARTS Art C o m m u nication Arts Music

SCHOOL Of NURSING S C H OOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIE S DEGREES C'f FERED Bachelors Bachelor o f Bachelor of Bach elor o f Bachelor o f Bachelor o f B a c h e lor of Bachelor o f Masters M a s t e r of Master of M a s ter of Mas ter of Master of Master o f

22

A rt s Science Business Administra t ion Arts i n E d ucation Fine Arts Music Science i n N u rsing

Arts in Ed ucation Arts i n H u m a n i t i e s Arts in Social Sciences B u sin ess Ad mi nistra tion M usic Pu blic A d m i nistri' t io n

AC ADE MIC STRUC T URE

MAJORS A VAILABLE BACHELOR OF A RTS (B.A.) Anthropology Art Biology Ch emistry Clas sics Commu nication Arts ( B roadca s t /Jo urnalism, C o m m u n ica tion, Drama) Earth Sciences Econ o m ics English Frenc h German History M a t h ematics M u s ic Norweg ian Philosophy Physical E d uca tion (Conce n t ra t io n s : Rec rea t ion, Therapeutics) Physics Political Science Psychology Religion Sca ndinavian Area S t udies Soc i a l Welfare Sociology Spanish BACHE LOR OF SCIENCE (B.S.) Biology Chemis try Earth Sciences (Geol ogy Specia l t y ) En gineering Physics Mathema tics Physics BAC HE LOR OF A RTS IN EDUCATION (B.A.E. ) Concentrations i n : Art Biology Business E d ucation C h e m i s t ry C o m m u nication Arts E a rth Sciences Economics English French General Science German His tory Language Arts Mat hema tics Music Ph ysical E d uca tion Physics Poli tical Science Social Science Sociology Spanish Special Educa tion


BACHELOR OF BUSINESS A D M I N ISTRA n O N (B. B.A.) Conce nt rations in: - Accou n t i ng Finance Marketing O p e r a t i o n s Manage m e n t P e r so n n e l a n d I n d u s trial R e l a t i o n s

BAC HELOR OF F I NE ARTS (B.F.A.) Art C o m m u nication Arts

-

( B roadcas t lJou rnalism, C o m m u n ica tion, Drama)

BAC H ELOR OF MUSIC (B.M.) Pi a no Pe rforma nce

Organ Performance Vocal Pe r fo r m a nce -- I n s t r u m e n t a l Perfo r m a nce Theory and Co mposi tion

BAC H ELOR OF SCIENCE I N NURSI NG (B.5. N.) N ursing

- MIN OR S AVAILABLE A n t h ropology Biology B u s i n e s s A d m i n i s t ration -- C h e m i s t ry Classics (Greek a n d L a t i n ) C o m m u nication A r t s Broadcas t IJo u rnalism C o m m u nication Theory & Research ___ Theatre Dance E a r t h Sciences Economics -- E d u ca tion R e a d i ng Endorse men t

ďż˝

Learning Resource Specialist E ndorse m e n t Special Education English Litera ture E mp h a s i s W r i t i n g E mp h a s is

French Foreig n Area S t udies - German History M a t h e ma tics C o m p u ter Science M a t h e m a tics ( G e n e ral) Norweg i a n Philosophy P h y s ical E d ucation Coac hing Da.nee Heal t h Physics Political Science Psychology - Religion Sociology Span i s h S t a t i s t ic s

A C A D E MIC STRUC T U R E

23


Academic Procedures REG ISTRA nON

T h e 'n o r m a J course load f o r full-time st udents is 13 t o 1 7 h o u rs per semest er, includ ing physical education. A normal s t u d e n t load d ur i ng the Interim i s ' fo u r hou rs with a m a x i m u m of five hours. The min i m u m semester load for a full-time student i s t e n hours. On ly a s t ud e n t with a "8" (3.00) average or higher may reg ister for mo re than 17 hours per semester without the con s e n t of the provost. A s t u d e n t engaged i n m u ch ou tside work for self-support may b e restricted to a reduced acade mic load. In the spring semester, students who plan to ret u rn in the fall may preregister by making a $ 75 . 00 advan ce payment. Students m u s t reg ister for each new semester on t h e desig nated d ays a n d are not offici ally enrolled until t h e i r registration has been cleared by the 8usiness Office a n d their Place of Residence form has been processed.

EARL Y REGISTRA nON PROGRAM FOR FRESHMEN W e l l in adva nce of a rrival o n c a m p u s f o r t he first semester, aU accepted freshmen are sent reg is tration ma terials. Most stud e n ts have t h e oppo rtunity to work person a l ly with a n adviser as they plan th eir schedules. A l i mited n u mber of stu d e n t s register by mail, and their course selections are verified by a cou ns elor. Early registration for new fres h m e n occurs d u r i n g June or J a n u a ry, depending on whether st udents begin in the fall or spring semester. Early registration i s coordinated by the Office of A d m i ssions.

COURSE SELECTIONS FOR FRESHMEN

S t u d e n t s s h o u l d b e thorou g h ly acquain ted w i t h all registration ma terials, i nc l ud i n g the current catalog and special in for m a tion sent by the Admissions Office. It is i mporta n t also to study the requirements of all academic programs i n which one m ay eve n t u al l y declare a major. First semester fres h m e n a r e advised to plan a class sch edule that does not exceed 1 6 credit hou rs. A normal first se mester schedule will include th ree cou rses of 4 credit hours each, plus one or two of the follo w i ng : Physical Ed ucation activity course (1 credi t hou r), m u sic ensem ble ( 1 credit h o u r ) , o r a choice from amo ng several 2 credit hour cou rses . (NOTE : Unless otherwise stated in the cata log or class s chedule, most courses a re valued at 4 credit hours . ) I n order to i n s u re appropri ate academic progress, fre s h m en should plan to take an Interim course in J a n uary; and to complete 30 semester hours du ring t h e ir first year. T h e following will i l l us t r a te several typical first-year credit hour load s :

(1) (2) (3) (4)

24

Fall

Inlerim

Sprillg

TOTAL

13 13 14 13

4 5 5 4

13 13 13 16

30 31 32 33

ACADEMIC PR O C E D U R E S

The n u m b er of credit hours taken may vary from year to year, u s u a lly within a ra nge of 30 to 34. However, in order to complete the 1 2 8 hours req u ired for g rad uation within four years, a n average of 32 cred i t hours a year is neces sary.

1. PLU does rlOl h a v e p a r'liCtllar cOll rses w h i c h a r e required of all fres h m e n . The "General University Requ irements" (or core) m u st be completed before g ra d u a t i o n . A n d the English writing requirement m u s t b e fulfi lled before the senior year. 2. A l l sllIdenls are respollsi!>le for ,;eircliliS Iheir cou rses. Counselors and faculty advis ers are always available t o a s s i s t with pla n n i ng a n d to m a k e s u ggestions. 3 . Sluder/Is who a re s i l r e of Iheir major should Ill' caref"l lo illc/llde Ihose co" r"s which iTlsllre (omplelion of Ihal major w i l h i " fo u r years. Some depa rt足 m e n t s o r schools have prerequisite cou rses which must be taken before entering upon the major program i tself. 4 . SludeTlls who a r e ""decided II b o u l Iheir m a j o r course oj s l u d y s h o " ld fake f h e opporlunify 10 explore opliolls. A good way to begin is to take some courses that meet the General University Requirements while selecting several other s for exploration of special i n teres t s .

CHANGES IN REGI STRAnON

Stud en ts may add or d rop classes with full refund d u ri ng the first two weeks of a term. Necessary forms are available at the Regis t rar's Office . D u ring the first week there i s a grace period when no dropladd fee i s charged. A fter that a fee of $5.00 is c h a rged for a n y re gistration change that invo l ves the d ropping of a cla ss. Students may officially withdraw from a class after the first two weeks by obtaining the professor's sig n a t u re on the cha nge form. The grade o f W w i ll appear on a stu d e n t's grade report and t ranscript. Students may also com p l e tel y w i t hd raw for medical rea s o n s . Writ ten evidence f r o m a p h y s i c i a n must sup port a m e d i c a l w i t h d r a w a l . T h e g r a d e of W M will a pp e a r o n a s t u d e n t's grade report a nd transcript, An unofficial wi thdrawal from a course will be recorded as E, No s tu d e n t may withdraw d u ring final e x a m i n ation week.

WITH ORA WAL FROM THE TERM S tu d e n ts wishing t o w i t h d r a w from t h e t e r m m us t o b t a i n a withdrawal form from the Office of the Registrar. IT IS ALWA YS TO THE STUDEN T'S AD V A N T A G E TO WITHDRAW OFFICIALL Y. S t u d e n t s wi thdrawing for a specified period of time (for exa m ple, one semester to one year) may obtain a Leave of A bsence for m . Students a re en titled to honorable d i smissal from the u n iversity i f their record of conduct is satisfa c tory and if a l l f i n a n c i a l obliga tions a re sa tisfied.


THE GRAD1NG SYSTEM t u d e n ts a r g raded acco rdi n g to t h e following d e s i g n a t i o n s : A - 4 . 0 g rade p o i n t s per h o u r, credit g iv e n 6 - 3 . 0 g rade p o i n t s p e r h o u r, c redit given - 2. 0 g rade poi n ts per h o u r, credi t g iven D - 1 . 0 g rade point pe r hour, cred i t gi ven E -o g rade points per hour, no cred i t given The g rades listed below are not u s e d i n c a l c u l a t i n g grade poi n t a v e r a g e . N o g ra d e poi n ts a r e earned u n d e r t hese d e s i g n a t i o n s . H -credit g i v e n (Honors) u s e d o n l y for c o u rses u n i q u e t o

I n terim P-credit given (Pass i n g ) F-no credit given (Failure ) I -n o credit g i v e n (Incomplete) IP-no credit given ((n Progress; applicable only to certain courses whose work extends beyond a reg ula r term) A U -no c r e d i t given (Audit) W-no credit given ( W i t h d rawal) W M - no credit given ( Wi th d ra wal/ Medical) Incom p l e t e (I) g ra des i n dicate that students have bee n u n a ble to c o m pl e te their w o r k beca u se o f c i rc u m s t a nces beyond their con trol. To receive credit a n I n complete m u s t be conve rted t o a

EXCLUS I VE PASS-FAll COURSES

Depa r t m e n t s o r sch o ol s may offer courses in which o n l y pass-fail g ra d e s a re g i v e n . These courses should p u rs u e goals p r i m a rily conce rned with a p preci a t i o n s, value c o m m i t m e n t s , creative ach ieve men ts, or t h e l i k e . Decisions to offer e x c lusive pass-fail cou rses a r e repor ted to t h e p rovost and this fact is made k n o w n to s t u d e n t s before they reg i s t e r for these c o u r se s . Exclusive pass-fail courses may n o t be used to m e e t m a j o r or u n iv e r s i t y requ i r e m e n t s u n less they have b e en approved as such b y t h e fac u l t y . T a k i n g exclusive pass-fail courses i n no way a f fects t h e s t u d e n t's pe rsonal pa s s - fa i l o p t i o n .

INTERIM G RADING SYSTEM

T h e i n s t ru ct o r o f a 3 0 0 - 3 2 0 I n te r i m course w i l l i n dicate i n t h e c a t a log descri ption w h i c h of two g r ad i n g s y s t e m s w i l l be u s e d : 1 . Honors ( H) - for exceptionaJ work; Pass (P); no c r e d i t - t h e registra tion will not be recorded. (H a n d P do n o t a ffect t h e g rade poi n t a vera g e . ) 2. The reg ular letter grades: A, B, C, D, E. (Such g r ad e s contribute to t h e grade poi n t average.) Students i n a "regular letter-grade" course may u se one of their fou r pass-fail options.

ACADEMIC PROBATION

PASS-FA IL OPTI ON FOR UNDE RGRADUATE STUDENTS

Warning slips may be given to any s t uden ts who are doing "0" or "E" work at t h e end of t h e sixth wee k . S t u d e n t s s h a l l receive a n academic warning i f t h e y f a i l t o keep their c u r re n t grade point average ( i m m edia tely preceding s e m e s t e r ) a t o r above 2 . 0 0 . S t u d e n t s a re placed on academic p ro ba tion w i t h t r a n s c r i p t n o ta tion i f they f a i l t o keep their grade pOi n t a v e r a g e (cu m u l a t ively) a t or a b ove 2 . 0 0 . S t ud e n t s rece ive official n o t ice of s u c h a c t i o n . Probationa ry students may be advised to reduce their academic o r ext ra-curricular activities or b o t h . T h e e n roll m e n t o f a s t u d e n t o n p r o b a t i o n w h o f a i l s to e a r n a c u m u l a t ive average of 2 . 0 0 by t h e end of a probationary s e m e s t e r is t e r m i n a ted . A t e r m i n a ted s t ude n t may apply for reinstatement by s u b m i t t i n g a l e t ter of peti tion to t he Regis t ra r's Office a n d secu ring a f ac u lty s p o n s o r . The petition a nd sponsorship l e t t e r s are s u b m i t ted to t h e Faculty C o m m i t tee on Admission a n d R e t e n t i o n o f S t u d e n t s for a c t i o n .

The pas s - f a i l option permits s t uden t s to explore s u bject a reas o u t si d e their k no w n abili ties and to add a broader range o f courses without being forced to compete with majors who a re speci a l i z i n g

A s t u d e n t w h o s e p e t i t ion for rei n s t a t e m e n t h a s been d e n i e d m a y apply for readmission a f t e r t h e e x piration o f one s e m e s t e r u n less i n formed o t h e rwise.

p a s s i n g g rade W I T H I N T H E F I R ST S I X W E E K S OF T H E F O L L O W I N G S E M E S T E R . Incomplete grades which a r e not conver ted by r e m o v a l are changed to the g rade i n d i c a t e d by t h e i n s t ru c t o r w h e n t h e I n co mp l E: te is s u b m i tted. M edical W i t h d rawal ( W M ) is given w he n a COu rse is not completed d u e to m e d i ca l cause. The WM does not affect t h e g rade poi n t average. In Progress ( [ P) s i g n i f ies progress in a C o u r s e w h ich n o r m a l l y r u n s m o re t h a n o n e semester to co m p le t i o n . In Prog ress c a r ries no credit u n t i l replaced b y a perma n e n t g r ade . Any cou rse may be repeated by an u n d er g r a d u a t e s t u d e n t . The higher o f t h two grades earned is used in computing t h e c u m u lative g ra d e point average, b u t c r e d i t t o w a r d g ra d u a tion i s allowed only once.

in t h o s e a r e a s of s t udy. 1 . The pass-fail option is limited to a total o f four co u rs e s ( 1 6 h o u r s ) a n d to n o m o r e t h a n t w o courses (8 h o u r s ) p e r academic year. 2. C o u rses required for g raduation i n a degree program m a y not be taken under t h is option except when a first cou rse has been taken prior to a declaration o f a major. 3. Pa ss-fa i l grades do not a lter the g rade poi n t a v e rage , bu t credits e a r n e d count toward g raduation. 4 . The pass-fail option agree m e n t M U ST be filed w i t h t h e i n s t r u c t o r N O LA T E R than eig h t w e e k s a f t e r t h e begin n i n g of t h e s e m e s ter. 5 . P a s s - f a i l s t ud en t s are res p o n s i b l e for all cou rse w o r k a n d e x a m 足 inations. 6 . A n e n t i re c o u r s e wil l n o t be c o n v e r t e d t o t h e pass -fa i l o p tion b y student vote.

ELIGI BILITY FOR STUDENT ACTIVITIES

A n y r e g u l a r l y e n rolled, full- t i m e student ( t e n h o u r s ) i s e l ig i ble for pa rticipation in u n i ve r s i t y a c t i v i t i e s . Lim itations of a s t u d e n t's activities based upon a c a d e m i c p e r fo r m a nce may be set by individual schools, departmen ts, o r o rg a ni z a t i o n s . A s t u d e n t on academic probation is not eligible for i n t e rscholastic competition

a n d may also be advised to c u rtail participation i n extra-curricular activities.

ClASSIFlCAnON OF STUDE NTS Fres h m e n : s t udents who h a ve met e n t rance req uire m e n t s . Sophomores: s tudents w h o h a v e completed 3 0 hours a nd h a v e e a r n e d 60 grade points. J u n io r s : reg u lar st u d e n t s w h o have fulfilled lower d i v i s i o n req u i re m e n t s and have comple ted 6 0 h o u rs a n d h a v e e a r n ed 120 g rade poi n t s . Seniors: regu lar s t u de n t s w h o h a v e completed 90 h o u rs a n d h a ve earned 1 8 0 grade poi n t s .

ACADEMIC P R O C E D URE S

2S


HONORS PROGRAMS

Honors courses a r e offered b y cert a i n depart ments f o r s t u d e n t s of su perior acade mic abi l i t y . Regist ration is by invitation only. The SPE IAl H O N O R S PR O G R A M for j u niors and s e n iors offers s t u den t s �n opport u n i t y to develop a total academic prog ram to reflect their special i n te rests and capabilities. The student will propose a total plan of s t udy for the time r e m a i n i n g u n t i l the g r a n t i n g of a degree; it may incl u de any a m o u n t of the stan dard degree prog ra m . With t h e approval of a facu l t y sponsor and the Ho nors Council (in t h a t order), the plan itself s hall become the degree requ i re m e n t of t h e u n iversity in the case of this honor s t uden t. The e s s e n tials of any plan o f s tu d y are a clear topica� rationale and s i g n i f ican t work beyond re gular courses c o m p r e h e n s i v e E' . a m s , i n d e p e n d e n t s t u d y p r o j e c t s , interdiscipl inary bachelor's degree thes is, etc. I n t e r e s t ed st udents should inquire at the Provos t 's Office for further i n fo r m a tion.

GRADUA TION HONORS

Deg ree s with honors o f c u m l a ude, magna c u m l a u d e , a n d s u m m a c u m laude a re gran ted. A s tuden t m u s t e a r n an average o f 3 . 3 0 f o r c u m laude, 3 . 6 0 for magna c u m laude, a n d 3 . 90 for s u m m a u m laude. Physical education activities are n o t included i n t h e d e te r m i ning of honors.

CREDIT BY EXAMINA nON Students are per m i t ted, within l i m i t s , t o o b t a i n credi t by ex a min a t i on in lieu of reg ular e n r o l l m e n t and class a t te n d a n c e . No more t h a n 7\1, courses (30' sem e s t e r h o u rs) may be cou n t ed toward grad ua tion, w h e t h e r it be Co llege Level E x a m i n a tion Program or any other ex am ina tion. E x c eptions to t h is rule for certain g roups of studen ts·or programs may be made, s u bject to recommendation by the Ed ucational Policies Committee and approval by t h e facu lty. Cred it by l!xa m i n a tion is open to form a l ly a d m i t ted, re gular s t a t u s s t ud e n t s only. Ar rangeme n t s for departmental credit e x a m i nations must be made by s t u d e n t s with respec t i v e d e p a r t m e n t chairs, deans, or d i rectors. E v id e nce of approval a n d of payment of t h e fee s h ould be presen ted by a s t udent to t h e i n s t ructor who a d m i n i s t e rs the ex am inatio n . S t udents m ay, with t h e approv a l of the i n s t ructo r or the department, gain c redit for an a u d i ted course w h ich they have not prev iously t aken for credit by passing an exa m i n a t ion set by the i n s t ructor o r depa r t m e n t . The fee for s uc h e x a m i nation i s the d i ffere nce between the a u d iting fee and the t u i t ion s t udents would normally pay for t h e cou rse. The various schools, divisions and depa r t m e nts shall d e t e r m i n e t h e specific C LE P examina tions w h ich may f u l f i l l req ui re m e n t s for majors, programs, or General Univ ers ity Req uire m e n t s in their respectiv academic areas. These e x a m ina tions a re s u bj ec t to reco m m e n d a t ion by the Educational Policies Com m i t tee and approval by t h e facu l ty . T h e m i n i m u m passing level fo r C L E P e a m i nations taken a t Pa cific L u t heran UniverSity s h a l l b e t h e fiftieth perce ntile. CL EP credits gran ted by other universities, colleges, and com m u ni ty colleges , wh ich are earned befor" e n t rance, shall be honored by Pacific L u theran Un iversi t y . The application of t hose cr ed i ts toward maj ors, prog rams, and General University Req u i rem nts shall be consis t e n t with schooL d i v i sional, and department policies and standards. The university does not grant c redit for college level GED t e s t s .

26

ACADEMIC PR OCEDURES

IN fORM AL STUDY To encou rage liberal learning of a l l ki nds, over a n d beyond e n r o l l m e n t i n cou rses leading toward formal degrees, the u n iversity offers a variety of oppo r t u n i ties for i n formal s t u d y : G llest of Urliilersity Statlls: Teachers and officials o f other i n s t i t u tions, v is i t i ng scholars and a r t i s ts, a n d other profeSSional persons who wis h to use univers i t y fac i l i t ies for indepe n d e n t s t u d y may a p p l y t o t h e provost f o r cards designating them as Guests of t he U n i versity. S u ch persons, in t heir use of fac ilit ies, will d e fer to the needs of s t udents and faculty m e m bers. A uditirlg COll rse5: To a udit a cou r s e i s to e n roll, with t h e permission of the i n s tr u c tor, on a non -cre d i t basis. A n a u d itor i s encouraged to p a r t icipa te fully in c i a s s activities but is not held accou ntable for e x a m i na t io n s or other w r i t t e n work an d does not receive a grade. If the i n s tructor approves, the cou rse may be en tered upon the t ran script as " A u d i t . " With t h e approval of the i n struc t o r or t h e department, t h e s t ud e n t may g a i n credit f o r an audited course by passing an e x a m i n a tion set by the i n s t r uctor or t h e depa r t m e n t . T h e fee ,f o r s u ch e x a m i nation is t h e difference between t h e a u d i t ing f e e a nd t h e t u ition t he s tu d e n t would pay f o r t h e course. Visil i rlg Classes: Members of the academic c o m m u n i t y a re encouraged to visit classes which i n t eres t t h e m . No fee is charged for the privilege. Because regularly enrolled s t u d e n t s m u s t be gi ven f i r s t consideration, persons desiring to visit classes a re required to ask permission of the i n s t ructor. Visitors are g u es t s of the classes a n d m us t conduct them selves acco rdingly.

ACADEMIC ADVISING PROGRAM The academic advising program at PLU is set up with two major goa l s i n mind: ( 1 ) To m a i n tain a system by which students have an early con tact with a faculty memb er from whom they receive a good gene ral i n t roduction to t h e value of a l i beral arts ed ucation and are e n couraged to ex plore the many fields of st udy open to t h e m ; a n d ( 2 ) To provide t h e option for s t u d e n t s to receive advising from a facu lty mem ber in a chosen academic area of in teres t . Each freshman s t udent (and each t r a n s fer s t udent who wishes) is assig n ed to an advising group with a faculty m e m ber re sponsible for gene ral advising. If a s tudent shows a n i n terest in an academic area, that interest will be explored and, if it s e e m s advisa ble, an area adviser will be a s s igned to replace the genera l adviser.

DE G R EE R EQUIREMENTS BA C C A LA U R E A T E D EG R EES

Bacca l a u r e a t e degrees are conferred on s t u dents who have completed a m i n i m u m of 32 courses ( 1 2 8 s e m e s ter h o u rs ) w i t h a g rade poi n t ave rage of 2 . 0 0 (School of Business Admi nistration 2 . 50; School o f Ed ucation - 2. 2 5) and who have m e t t h e following requirements for gradu ation : 1 . The completion of a major a s detailed by each school or depart­ ment, co nsisting of a minimum of 6 cou rses ( 2 4 semes ter hou rs) with a m i n i m u m of 2 courses (8 semester hours) in residence. 2. The completion of a minim urn of 10 cou rses ( 4 0 s e m e s ter hou rs) n u mb ered 3 2 1 or above. 3 . The co m pletion of two 4 - s e m e s t er-hour 300-320 In terim courses. Only one 300-320 I n terim cours e designated as "advanced" may be used to m e e t this req u i re m e n t . (J unior a n d Senior t r a n s f e r s t u d e n t s m u s t comp lete o n l y one 300-320 I n terim course a n d i t may be one which is "advance d . ") 4 . The completion of seven co urses (28 s e m e s t e r hours) in residence d uring the senior yea r. (Speci al programs such a s 3 - 1, 3-2, and Medical Technology excluded.) 5. T h e completion of all co urses counted toward a major or a minor w i t h grades of C or higher.


G E N E RAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS <-- A L L CA N D I D A TES F O R BA CCA LA U R EA TE D E G R E ES M US T F U L F I L L THE F O L L O WING Iďż˝ E Q UlR E M E N TS

W RI T I N - 1 course (4 hours) - M e t by Eng l i s h 1 0 1 o r an eq u i v a l e n t p rose w ri ti n g c o u r s e . Because t h e a bi l i t y to w ri t e well is e s s e n t i a l for success in co ll ege, and l a ter, a l l students a re e x pected to fulfill this r e q u i r e m e n t a s e a r ly as possible - prefe rably i n t h e i r f i r s t o r second s e m e s t e r . S t u d e n ts w ho h a v e not s a t i s f ied t h e wri t i ng requ i r e m e n t m a y not be allowed to enroll for t h e s e n i o r year. P H Y S I C A L E DU C AT I O N - 4 h o u rs - Met b y f o u r 1 h o u r a c t i v i t y courses, in c l u d in g PE 1 00. This re q u i r e m e n t s h o u l d n o r m a l l y be fulfilled b y t h e e nd o f t h e sophomore y e a r . A l l activit ies a re graded on t h e basis o f A , Pas s , o r Fail. I N T E R I M - 2 courses (4 hours each) - Only courses n u mbered -- 300-320 s a t i s fy t h i s requirement. Junior and senior trans fer s tu d e n t s need to complete only o n e 300-320 I n te ri m cou r s e . In a d d ition to the foregoing general re q u i r e m e n t s , a l l bacca l a u re a te c a n d i d a tes m u s t complete a co re cu rricu l u m . ďż˝ S t ud e n t s have t h e option o f meet ing t h i s req u i r e m e n t b y com p l e t i n g e i t h e r t h e D i s t r i b u t i ve Core (im m e d ia tely following), o r b y t a k i n g t h e In tegrated S t u d i es Prog ram known as Core I I .

DISTR IBUT I VE CORE

-

28 hours

F I N E A R T S - 1 c o u r s e (4 h o u rs) - Met by a course i n a r t, c o m m u nica tion a rt s , o r m u s ic, a s follows: A r t - any cou rse e xcept t h ose i n teach ing m e t h od s . C o m m u nication Arts - a n y of t h e following: 1 5 1 , 1 6 2, 2 4 1 , 2 5 0, 3 6 3, 364, 4 5 8 , 4 5 9. - M u s i c - a n y cou rse e x ce pt t h o s e i n teac h i n g me t h o d s . H I S T O R Y / L I T E R A T U R E - 1 course ( 4 hou rs) - M e t by a n y course i n his tory, i n literatu re (Depa r t m e n t o f M o d e r n ;l n d C l a ssical L a ng uages), Or i n English (except 1 0 1 , 3 2 8, 4 00, 403). NATURAL S C I E N C E S / M A T H E M A T I C S - 1 course ( 4 h o u rs ) - M e t b y a n y cou rse i n biology, chemis t ry, e a r t h sciences (except 1 01), physics and engi neering, o r m a t h e m a t ics. P H I L O S O P H Y - 1 course (4 ho urs ) - Met by any phil o s op h y c o u r e e xcep t 1 2 1, 233, 328, a n d 385. R E LIGION - 2 courses (8 h o u rs ) - A lower d i v i s i o n course s h ou l d be taken before t h e end o f t h e sophomore y e a r . The second requ i red course may be chosen from either lower or upper d i v i sion offerings, o r from the i n t e rd i s c i p l i n a r y S e n i o r Seminar. J u n io r or __ s e n i o r t r a n s fe r s t u d e n t s need to co m plete o n l y one cou r s e . Only o n e of the following m a y be t a k en to fulfill t h e u n iversity core r e q u i renl e n t : 261, 361, o r 362. S OC I A L S C I E N C E S - 1 course ( 4 hours) - M e t by a ny course i n a n t h ropology (except 221), economics, po l i t ic a l s c i ence, --psychology (except 1 1 0 ) , o r sociology .

C O R E I I (INTEGRATED STUDIES PROGRAM) - 28 hours The I n t e g r a t e d Studies Prog ram is especially designed a s an -alt erna t i v e m o d e of satisfying the core c u rriculum req uire m e n t . Co n s i s t i ng of a co n s tellation o f i n t e rd isciplinary courses, t h e p rogram as a w h o l e explores a cen t ra l theme, " T h e Dyn a mics of C h a nge," f r om a v a rie ty of perspectives. A s tu d e n t who chooses C o re I I to meet t h e General U n i versity Requirements will begin with Sequence I, w i t h any two Seque nces chose n from I I , 111, o r I V taken s u b s e q uen t ly or c o n c u r r e n t l y, a n d conc l u d e t h e Prog r a m w i t h th e Se mina r w h ich would be t a k e n

after, or concurren t l y w i t h , completion of t h e l a s t cou rse i n t h e Sequences selected . I n d i v i d u a l co u rses in e a c h Sequence are e q u ivalen t to four s e m e s t e r h o u r s of credit e a c h . For f u r t h e r d e ta i l s see p a g e 76 of t h i s c a t alog. A b ro c h u r e is also availa ble from t h e Office of Ad m i s s i o n s o r the Regis t r a r . A brief s u m m a r y o f the program follows.

The Dynamics of Change ScqUe>lCt' 1 :

The Idea o f Progress I S 2 1 1 Course 1: N a tu re and S u pe r n a t u r e I S 2 1 2 C o u rs e 2: F r o m F i n i t e to I n fi n i t e

Sequerlce ll: H u m a n Respo n sib ility IS 2 2 1 Cou rse 1 : The Developing Individual

I S 222

C o u rs e 2: The B u rd e n o f Hu ma n R e s p o n s i b i l i t y O p t i o n 1 : . . . 20th C e n tu r y E u rope Option 2 : . . . 20th C e n tury Asia

Seq uence Ill:

Word and W o r l d : Exploring the C rea tive II m agina tion I S 231 Course 1: S y m bol, L a n g u a ge, M y t h I S 232 Course 2 : Model and M e t a p h o r : I n v e n ting t h e World ScqHence I V:

lli m i ts to Growth 11 5 241 Course 1: The Tech nological Society a n d t h e T h r u s t for G ro w t h I S 242 Course 2: The Tech nological S o c i e t y a n d t h e l i m i t s t o Growth Sem;Wlr:

IS 2 5 1

Seminar

LIMITATIONS - ALL BACCALAUREA TE DEGREES

1 . N o t more t h a n 10 courses ( 4 0 hours) e a r n ed i n One depart m e n t m a y b e applied t o t h e B . A . o r B . S . degree . I n t e r i m courses a r e excep ted . 2. Non-mu sic m a jo rs m a y c o u n t toward g r a d u a t i o n req u i remen ts not mo r e t h a n e i g h t s e m e s t e r hours i n m u sic e n s e m b les. 3 . A m a x i m u m of six courses ( 2 4 h o u rs) i n accredited correspondence o r e x t e n s io n s tu d i e s may be credited toward degree re q u i re m e n t s , c o n t i n g e n t on a p p roval b y the regis t r a r . 4 . A m a x i m u m o f 1 6 courses (6 4 s e m e s t e r h o u rs ) w i l l be a cce p te d by t r a n sf e r from an accredited c o m m u n i t y college.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQ U1 RE MENTS See u nd e r College of Arts a n d Sciences.

GRADUATION

S t u d e n t s ex pecting to f u l f i l l deg ree requ i r e m e n t s WITHIN THE ACADEMIC Y E A R a re r eq u ir ed to file a p pl ic at io n for grad u a tion w i t h t h e re gis t ra r . There are four degree-co mpletion d a t es (end of fall semester, i n terim, spring semester, a n d second s u m m e r session). Degrees a re formally conferred at May a n d A u g u s t Commencements. Statements o f co mpletio n are issued upon req u e s t t o s t u d e n t s who q u alify for gradua t i o n a t t h e e n d of fall semester a n d i n t e r i m . The a c t u a l d a t e o f graduation w i l l be recorded on the permanent record s . A s t u d e n t may be awarded more t h a n o n e bach elor's deg ree s i m u l t a neously, p r ov id ed t hat a t least 28 A D D I T I O N A L hou.rs are earned fo r t h e second degree. A total of 156 accepta ble hours are requi red for two s i m u l t a n e o u s baccal a u re a te degrees.

A C AD E MI C PROC E D URE S

27


S t ud e n t s who are w i t h i n 4 hours of meeting all req u i re m e n ts may participate in May C o m m e n c e m e n t provided a specific plan for earning remai n i n g credit w i t h i n ten weeks has been a p proved by the provo s t . Their s t a t u s will be desig n a t ed on the com m e n c e m e n t program an d their d iplomas will be d a t ed i n A u g u s t . S t u d e n t s w h o p l a n to transfer ba ck to Pacific L u t h e ran U n iversity f or a de g r ee ( m a t h , ph ysics, engi neering progr a m s ) m u s t apply f o r g r a d u a t i o n before or d u ri n g the f i r s t semes t er of their ju nior yeM so that deficiencies may be met before t h e y leave campus. A ttenda nce at commencement ex ercises is ex pected u nless t h e c a n d i d a te is e x c used by the provos t .

28

ACADE MIC PROCE DURE S


COL L E G E OF A R T S & SCIENCES

Division of Humanities English Modern a n d Classical L a n g u a g e s Philosophy R e ligion

Division of Natural Sciences Biol ogy C h e m i s t ry Ea rth Sciences M a t h e m a tics - Physics a n d Engineering

Division of Social Sciences Economics � History Political Scie n ce Psychology Sociology, A n t h ropology, and Social Wel fare

-

Degrees Offered Bachelor of A r t s Bachelor of Science

MAJOR REQUIREMENT A major is a sequence of courses in one area, usually i n one department. A major should be selected by the end of t he _ sophomore year. The choice must be approved by the department chair (or i n the case of special academic programs, the program coordinator). Major requirements are specified in this catalog. The quality of work must be 2.00 or better. 0 grades may be counted toward graduation but not toward a - major. Recognized majors are: mathema tics anthropology music art Norwegian biology p hilosophy - chemistry physical education classics physics com munication arts political science earth scien ces psychology � economics engineering religion English Scandinavian area studies F rench sociology social welfare German • Spanish - history Not more than 40 semester hours earned i n one department may be applied toward the bachel or's degree in the College.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE/ALTERNATIVE REQUIRE MENTS: In addition to meeting General University Requirements, candidates i n the College must meet the requirements of Option I, II or III: I. 16 semester hours in one foreign language " II. 8 semester hours in one foreign language" 4 semester hours i n logic, math, or statistics 4 semester hours i n history, literature, or language III. 4 semester hours i n history, literature, or language 4 semester hours i n social science, which may include geography 4 semester hou rs in natural science, excluding math 4 semester hours in logic, math, or statistics

"Option I may be satisfied by four years of high school s tudy in one foreign language. If students have less than four years, placement and credit should be determined by examination. Freshmen planning to con tinue i n a foreign language beg un in high school should take the College Board Placement Test offered during orientation. (This test is required of those fresh men who plan to study German, French, o r Spanish .) Continuation o f a foreign language should not be deferred. Students with 2-3 years of high school language who wish t o con ti n ue should register for t h e second year course. Students may receive credit for any language course i n whic.h they are placed without regard to h igh school credit. Final decision of placement is made by the depart ment of modern and classical llanguages. Students may not receive credit if they voluntarily select a course level lower than that in which the depart ment places them. The foreign language req uirement in Option II may be met by satisfactory scores on a proficiency examination or by more than two years of high school work in a single language. Two years are sufficient if the grade point average for the total units in that language is 3.00. Candidates for the B . A . in English, or for the B . A. in Education with concentration in English, must meet Option I. No course will be allowed to meet both General University Requirements and College requirements. Where possible, courses taken to fulfill requirements shall be in different areas. For example, students fulfilling the university history or literature requirement with a course in history, if they elect Option II, should choose a course in literature or lang uage to meet the requirement of the College.

C O L L E G E S OF ARTS & S CIE N C E S

29


DEPARTMENTS AND SC HOOLS S PEC IFIC DEG REE REQUIREMENTS AND COURSE OFFE RINGS L i s ted i n the following section a re course descriptions a n d s u m maries of degree requireme n t s f o r majors and progra ms i n t h e College of Arts and Sciences a nd t h e Schools of Business A d m i n i s t ra t ion , Education, F i n e A r t s, N ursing, a nd Physical Educatio n . Detailed degree req u i re m e n t s , often including s u p pl e m e n t a ry s a m ple programs, a re a va il able in the offices of the individual schools a n d depa rtments.

COURSE NUMBERINGS 1 00-200 Lower Division Courses: O p e n sophomores ' un less otherwise re s t ricted.

to fresh men a n d

300-320 I nterim Courses 3 2 1 - 4 99 Upper Division Courses: Generally open to j u niors and s e n iors u n less o t herwise specified. Also open t o g ra d ua te s t udents, a n d may be conside red p a r t of a graduate progra m provided they are n o t specific requiremen t s in prepara tion for graduate s tudy. 500-599 Graduate Courses: Normally open t o graduate s tuden ts on l y. Upper div ision s t u d e n t s may be permitted to e n roll with the perm ission o f t he chair, director, or dea n o f t h e academic unit offeri ng the course if a l l prerequisi tes have been met a n d the s t u d e n t has a n above-average academic record. ' U pon approval o f t i} eir adviser and course i n s t r uctors, lower division s t udents may be assig ned to u pper division courses if p rerequisi tes have been met .

COURS E OFfERING S

Most lis ted courses are offered every yea r. A system of alternating upper d ivision courses is practiced in some departments, thereby a s s u r i n g a broader cu rricul u m . The u n i versity reserves the righ t to modify specific course requirements, t o d i scon t i n u e classes i n which the reg i s t ration is regarded a s i n s u fficient, and to withdraw co urses.

EXPLANATION OF SYMBOLS '

Most courses have t h e value o f 4 semester h o u rs . Paren the tical n u m bers i m rnediately a ft e r the course descri p t io n s i n d icat e the semester h o u r credit given. Other s y m bols a re e x p la ined a s follows: I - Course offered first semester I I - Course offered second semes ter I. I I - C o u rse offered first a nd second semes ter in sequence I II

-

COUTSI' offered either semester

S - C o u rse offered i n t h e s u m mer a/y - Course offe red in alternate years als - Cou rse offered i n a l t e r n a t e s u m mers G oursI' m a y be used on grad u a t e programs a s a major

30

DE PARTM E N T S A N D S C H O O L S


Art In a time of rapidly changing concepts and a n al most daily e m e rg ence o f n e w media, e m phasis must be placed on a variety of experi e nces and creative flexibi'lity. S t ud e n t s with professional concerns m u s t be prepared to meet t h e challenges of the modern world with both technical skills a nd capacity for i nnovation. The prog r a m t h e refore s t re s ses i nd ivid ualized developmen t r a t h e r t h a n vocational tools w h i c h q uickly become obsole te. There i s an e x p licite relationship between a n art departmen t's facilities and i t s q ua l i t y o f c u r r i c u l u m . The spacious s t udio a r e a s o f the u n iversit y's a r t depa r t m e n t a fford a n i n s t r u c tional capa bility which is u n pa ralleled by any private i n s t i t utio n i n t h e Pacific Northwest. T h e s e facilities i n c l u d e : p a i nting studio, d m w i rlg studio, p rirl t m a king studio, sw lptll re studio, cera m ics studio, film m a k i rlg and photog raphy w o rkshop, design wo rks h op, wood s h op, metal shop, kiln y a rd, fOlmdry, darkroom , sem irt a r rooms, slide library, the Wekell Gallery, a ri d student exh i bition a reas.

FAC ULTY W. Tomsic, Ch a i r; Elwell, Keyes, Kitt leson, Roskos, Schwidder. Artists-in-Residence: D. Cox and Torrens.

The departm e n t has soug h t to m i n im i ze prerequisites, enabling stude n t s to elect courses re lati ng to their i nterests as early as possible. I t is recommended that s t ud e n t s i n terested in majoring i n a r t declare their major early to i n s u re proper advising. Trans fer s tudents ' s tatus s h a l l b e determined at their time o f e n trance. The department reserves t h e rig h t to retain, e x h i bit, and reproduce student work s u b m i tted for credit i n any of its courses or prog rams. Use of rna terials fee required i n certain courses.

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: Minimum of 28 semester hours, i ncluding 1 1 0, 160, 250, 230 o r 350, 365, 3 70, and 4 semester hours in art history. A m a x i m u m of 40 semester hours may be applied toward t h is degree. Candida tes are registered i n the College of Arts a n d Sciences and must complete all requirements. BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS: Minim u m of 56 semester hours, including 1 1 0, 1 6 0, 250, a n d 280 with a minir.lUm o f 8 hours in pictorial media (drawing, desig n, pri n t-makin g, painting, film arts), a m i n i m u m of 8 hours in materials media (sc u l p t ure, ceramics, jewelry, fibers, crafts) ' two pe riod courses in ar t his tory or theory, as approved, and electives in areas of emphasis to complete require ments. Courses in art teach i ng methods may not be i n cluded. S tudents a re encouraged to choose an area of emphasis b y their j u nior yea r in one of the pictorial or ma terials media, design, or a r t h i story.

32

AR T

BACH ELOR OF ARTS IN EOVCA TION: See School of Education.


C OURSE OffERING S Studio 160

_

DRAWI NG AND COMPOS ITION

A course dealing with the basic pictorial concerns of form, composition and color as well as tech niques and media of drawing. I I I (4)

215

C RAFTS

A studio su rvey of contemporary craft techniques . Assig ned problems in a variety of media including fused and leaded glass, enamel on metal and textiles. May be repeated - for credit. (4)

216

JEWELRY

A study of form and technique in t h e design and execution of jewelry objec t s . Includes s tone setting, fabrication, and casting . May be repeated for credit. (4)

230 ďż˝

C E RAMIC S I

Ceramic materials and techniques including hand-built and wheel-th rown methods, clay and glaze formation. Includes a s urvey of cera mic art. I II (4)

250

SC UL PTURE I

Various techniques a nd materials of sculpture and their - influence on three-dime nsional form . I ncludes study of the human figure. I II (4)

260

L IF E DRAWING

A multi-media exploration of human form. May be repeated - for credit. Prereq uisite: 1 60 or conse n t . I II (4)

296

DESIGN

Introduction t o design through t h e study of s u c h basic concerns as color, form, kinetics, tactility and ligh t as - applied to various areas within the field including illustration, graphics a n d industrial design. II ( 4)

326, 4 2 6

PHOTOG RAPHY I , I I

- A studio course i n photography as a n a r t form . Primary concen tra tion on camera tech niq ues a nd use of darkroom. Student production of slide and print portfolios, with an emphasis u pon creative and expressive e x pe rimentation. - 326 must be taken prior to 426; 426 may be taken twice. ( 4, 4)

328

FILM MAK'ING

A s tudio cou rse i n f i l m making as an a rt f o r m . A s t u d y of t h e -ma terials and techniques of f i l m making and t h e production of s t udent 8 mm. a nd 1 6 mm. films. Classic a n d experimental f i l m s w i l l b e surveyed. (4) _

33 0, 430

CERAMIC S II, III

Techniques in ceramic construction and experiments i n glaze formation. 3 3 0 must b e t a k e n p r i o r t o 4 30, and neither may be taken more than once. Prerequisite: 230. I II ( 4, 4)

335

FIBERS

E xploration and development of fiber structures and soft a rt forms. Alternating sections in non-loom work and loom weavi n g . May be repeated for credit . II (4)

341

ELEMENTARY ART EDUCATION

Various projects and media suitable for the instruction of art in elementary school; emphasis on developmental theory. I II (2)

350, 450

SCULPTURE II, III

Concentration on a particular medium of sculpture. Alternating semesters in metals, wood, or other media. 350 must be taken prior to 450; 4 5 0 may be ta ken twice . Prereq uisite: 2 50. I II ( 4, 4)

365, 465

PAINTING I, II

Media and techn iq ues of painting in oil or acrylics. 365 must be taken prior to 4 6 5; 4 6 5 may be taken twice . Prerequisite: 160. I I I (4, 4)

370, 470

PRINTMAKING I, II

Methods and media of fine art prin tmaking; both h a nd and photo processes involving lithographic, in taglio and screen printing. 370 must be taken prior to 4 70; 470 may be taken twice. Prerequisite: 160 or consen t . I II (4, 4)

380

IMAGERY AND SYMBOLISM

A survey of symbolic, pictorial, and plastic expressions in Western tradition, from the perspective of their philosophical and theological i m plications . Emphasis on the development of the Christian Cultus. (4)

390

DESIGN: G RAPHICS

Design and execution of printed m a terials; emphasiS on technical procedures and problems in mass com m u nication. Prereq uisite : 1 60. n ( 4)

395

DESIGN: RESIDENTIAL

Projects in residential design with pa rticular emphasis on planning procedures, logistical factors, and technical illustration . (2)

398

DESIGN: ILL USTRA nON

Projects in va rious types of illustration from story t o advertisi ng. Prerequisite: 1 60. ( 2 )

491

DESIG N : WORKSHOP

A tutorial course which may deal with any of several aspects of the design field with pa rticular concern for building a portfolio. Prerequisite: consent . (2)

492

STUDIO PROJECTS

A tu torial course with individual investigation of a particular medium, for major students only. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Senior status and consent of instructor and department chair. Materials or use fee where necessary. I II ( 4)

ART

33


499

497

B.F.A. CANDIDACY E XHIBITION

E xhibition of undergraduate work by B . F . A . candidates in studio areas; students are responsible for scheduling installation, publicity and final disposition of work. I II (no credit)

597

History and Theory 110

THE VISUAL ARTS

Western man's ex pression i n the visual arts seen t hrough the perspective of historical development. I II (4)

280

TWENTIETH C ENTURY ART

The visual arts in the twentieth century introduction to aesthetical theory. II (4)

294

with

an

20th C ENTURY DESIGN AND A RC HITECTURE

A study principally concerned with developments in a rchitecture and interiors in the twentieth cent ury, b u t including references to i ndustrial design and o t h e r related a reas. I ( 4 )

382

ANCIENT ART

A r t of the ancient N e a r E a s t , G reece, and Rome. I a / y (4)

383

M EDIEVAL ART

Western E u ropean s tyles from the decl i ne of Rome to the begi n n ing of the Renaissance. II a/y (4)

384

RENAISSANCE ART

E u ropean art of the fifteenth and s i x teenth centuries, with a n emphasis on Italian developmen t s . I a/y (4)

385

BAROQUE A RT

Styles in E uropean art from the late s ix teenth century t h rough the period of the Rococo. II a /y (4)

440

SEMINAR I N ART EDUCATION

A study of i n s truction in the secondary school including appropriate media a nd curriculum development. II (2)

487

NINETEENTH C E NTURY A RT

Art of the nineteenth century from neo-classicism through Post Impressionism. I (4)

490

S EMINAR

Selected topics conSidering some aspect of the visual arts. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consen t . (4)

34

ART

RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY

A t u torial course for major students with research into a particular period or area of art history. May be repeated for credit . Prereq uisites : senior status a nd consent of instructor and department chair. I II (4)

RESEARCH

For master of arts candidates who elect to write a research paper in art. I I I (4)

I NTERIM C OURSE S OFFERED IN 1 9 78 305 317 318 380

CRAFTS WORKSHOP THE GOLDEN D OOR: AMERICAN ART 1865-1914 LIFE SCULPTURE IMAGERY AND SYMBOLISM


Biology The Biology Department a t Paci fic L u theran University is dedicated to a teaching p rocess, n o t j u st a delivery of fac t s . F a c t s f o r m the fo unda tion of science but approach i n fi n i t y i n n u m be r . Therefore, the biology facu l t y s t r e s s e s the g a t h e ring, processi ng, retrieving and interpreting of these f a c t s . The biology fac u l t y believes i n the notion that o n e of t h e most p rofound require m e n t s i n science i s l e a rning to ask the r i g h t q uestions and t o recognize the a nswers. T h e depa rtment i s therefore dedica ted to permit ting s t ud e n t s to l e a r n s c i e n c e i n the o n l y way t h a t it can be effec tively made a part of their t h i n k i ng : to i ndepe ndently q uestion it, p robe i t, try i t o u t, experiment with it, experience it. In addition to diverse fac u l ty and balanced c urric u l u m , t h e d e p a r t m e n t provides n u merous facili ties for: i t s students, includi ng : herbarium, invertebrate and vertebrate m u s e u ms, gree n house, vivarium and s u r gery room, climate cont rol room s, g rowth chambers, vertebrate p h ysiology and cell physiology laboratories, a field s t ation located on State of Washington Parks land, and a boa t eq uipped for s t udies of Puget S o u n d . Qualified s t u d e n t s are invited to use th ese facilities in independent s t udy or p articipa tion i n o ngoing facu l t y researc h .

FAC ULTY Gee, Cha ir; Ale xander, J. Carlson, Crayton, Hansen, J. Jensen, Knuds en, Lerum, Main, D.J. Martin, Matthias, McGinnis.

Biology m a j o r s develop their academic program in con s u l t ation w i t h a departmental a d viser. A depart m e n t a l adviser must b e consul ted prior to completion of Biology 253, the final course in t h e i nitial three semester core courses requi red of all biology majors, for g uidance in the selection of a n appropriate upper division program of s t u d y . All biology majors are required t o take the Graduate Record Examination within two semesters before graduation.

BIOLOGY

3S


BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 28 semester hours, including 1 5 5, 156, 253, a n d 1 6 hours c hosen in consu l ta tion with depa r t m e n t a l adviser. Required s u pporting: Chemistry 1 1 5, 1 1 6, 331, 332, 333, 3 3 4, and M a th 133 or equiva l e n t . Add itional courses i n physics, earth sciences, and/o r mathema tics are recomme nded as a p propriate in cons u l t a tion with adviser. A m a x i m u m of 40 semester hours of biology Courses m a y be counted toward gradua tion. I n t e r i m courses (300-320) cannot be coun ted toward the major. BACH ELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: 40 semester hours, inclu ding 155 , 1 5 6, 253, and 2 8 hours chosen in co nsulta tion with departmental adviser. Required supporting: Chemistry 1 1 5, 1 1 6, 331, 332, 333, 334; o n e yea r o f ph ysics; a nd mathema tics through 1 5 1 . A m a x i m u m of 40 semester hours of biology courses may be cou nted for graduation . Interim courses (300-320) cannot be coun ted toward the major. BACH ELOR OF A RTS I N EDUCA nON: See School of Education. MINOR: A t least 20 semester hours selec ted from a n y biology courses except t h o s e nu mbered 300-320 ( I n t e r i m ) , in which a grade of C or higher is earned. Pass-fail courses may not be cou nted. Prerequisites must be met u nless a written waiver is obtained in advance from both the instructor a n d the department chair. Applicability of non- P L U biology credits will be determined by the department chair. Consult the chair for assig nment of a minor adviser.

COURSE OFFERINGS 111

BIOLOGY AND THE MODERN WORLD

A liberal arts course for non-biology majors; selected topics which relate to the history and future of hu manity and to h u m a n art and well-being; the environment, reproduction and birth control, population, heredity, evolution and biological controls. Lectures, laboratories, and discussion. I II ( 4 )

155

PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY I : POPULATION BIOLOGY AND DIVERSITY OF LIFE

INTRODUCTORY MICROBIOLOGY

T h e g r o w t h , c o n t ro l , p h y s io lo g y , i s o l a t i o n , a n d identification o f micro-organisms, especially those which affect human beings. Includes laboratory. Prereq uisites: 111 and Chemistry 103 or consent. This course is suitable for nurses and other non-science majors; not open to biology majors. I ( 4 )

205, 206 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY First semester: matter, ceJls and tiss ues; nervous, endocrine, skeletal , and muscular systems. Laboratory includes cat dissection and experiments in mu scle physiology and reflexes. Second semester: circulatory, respiratory, diges tive, excretory, and reproductive systems; metabolism, temperature regulation and stress. Laboratory includes cat dissection, physiology experiments a nd study of developin.g organisms. Satisfies General University Requirement, but does not count toward the biology major except with the permission of the departmen t chair. 205 prereq u ,i site to 206. (4, 4)

253

PRINC IPLES OF BIOLOGY UI: BIOLOGY OF THE STEADY STATE

The basic problems faced by plants and animals in m a i n t a i n i n g t h e ms elves; s t r u c t u r a l a d a p t a t ions, homeostasis, internal reg ulation, water and temperat u re control, gas exchange, vascular systems, and interaction between organisms. Req uired of all biology majors. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: 155, 156 and first-year chemistry. I ( 4 )

299

INTRODUCTORY CLINICAL PHYSIOLOGY

Functions and control mechanisms of the major human organ systems, with emphasis on clinical application and including some pharmacology. S u itable for nursing majors. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: 1 11, 1 6 3 (formerly, F unctional Human Anatomy), and Che mistry 103. I 19 7879 (4)

321

ORNITHOLOGY

Introduction to science and levels of organization in biology; Mendelian genetics and population biology; history and diversity of life. Required of all biology majors. Includes laboratory. Co-registratio n i n chemistry is strongly recom mended. I (4)

The study of birds with emphasis on local species; designed for students with hobby interests as well as for advanced biology students. Field trips. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: 253 or consent. II (2)

156

The structure , physiology, genetics, metabolism and e c o l o g y of m i c r o - or g a n i s m s . I n cl u d e s l a b o r a t o r y . Prerequisite: 2 5 3 or consent; one semester organic chemistry recom mended. H (4)

PRINCIPLES O F BIOLOGY I I : TH-[ CELL AND BIO-ENERG ETICS

Cellular and molecular levels of biological organiza t ion; cell ultra-s tructure and physiology, molecular genetics, energy transd uction; energy flow and nutrient cycles in ecosystems. Required of all biology majors. Includes laboratory. Assumes completion of one semester of college chemistry ( 1 0 4 or 1 1 5) . Prerequisite: 155. II (4)

36

201

BIOLOGY

322

324

MICROBIOLOGY

NATURAL HISTORY OF VERTEBRATES

Classification, natural history and economic i mportance of vertebrates with the e x ception of birds. Field trips and laboratory. Prerequisite: 2 5 3 aly 1979-80 (4)


326

-

ANIMAL B EHAVIOR

D e s c r i p t i o n , c l a s s i fi c a t i o n , c a u s e , f u n c t i o n a n d development o f the behavior of animals. Lecture will emphasize an ethological approach to the study of behavior focUSing upon comparisons a mong species, a s well as physiological, ecol'ogical and evolutionary aspects of behavior. Laboratory i s not rigidly scheduled and will consist of a behavioral investigation of the students' choosing. Prerequisite: 253 or consent of ins tructor. aly 1978-79. II (4)

331

G ENETICS

Basic concepts including consideration of molecular basis of gene e xpression, recombination, genetic variability, and - consideration of cytogenetics a n d population genetics. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: 253. I (4)

340

PLANT DIVERSITY A N D DISTRIBUTION

_ A systematic i n t roduction to plant diversity. Interaction between plants, theories of vegetational distribution. E mphasis on higher plant taxonomy. Includes laboratory and field trips. Prerequisite: 253. II (4) -

346

C E LLULAR PHYSIOLOGY

Deals w i t h how cells are organized to stay alive; enzyme kinetics and regu'latory mechanisms; structure and syn thesis of proteins and n ucleic acids; energy metaboli s m; -m e m b r a n e s t r u c t u re, p e r m e a b i l i t y a n d t r a n s p o r t p h enomena; functional u l t rastruct ure. Prereq uisites : 253 and Organic Chemistry. I (4)

347

C E LLULA R PHYSIOLO G Y LA BORATORY

- Accompanies Cellular Physiology; experience in techniques and types of instrumentation i ncluding cell fractionation, determination of meta bolic seq uences, u s e of radio tracers, protein assay, membra n e phenomena, u l t racentrifugation, - spectrophotometry, Warburg respirometry. May be elected only by s t u dents with a serious interest and need for this type of training. Corequisite : 3 4 6 a n d cons e n t . I ( 1 )

357

PLANT FORM AND F UNCTION

-Plant anatomy, function and reproduction; emphasis on seed -prodUCing groups. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: 253 and Chemistry 116. Organic Chemistry recommended . I (4)

358

PLANT PHYSIOLOG Y

Plant growth from seed to flower; seed germ ination, water r e l a t i o n s , r e s p i ra t i o n , m i n e r a l n u t ri t i o n , g r o w t h _reg u lators, p hotosynthes,i s a n d other light effects on plant cycles. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: 253 and Organic Chemistry. Cellular Physiology strongly recom mended. I (4)

361

COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF THE VERTEBRATES

Taught from a phylogenetic viewpoint, considers how and w h y living vertebra tes att ained their present structure . Attempts n o t only t o learn vertebrate anatomy, but also to u nderstand i t . Prerequisite: 253. I (4)

371

INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY

I nt rod uction to the form, function, natural history and phylogeny of the major phyla of invertebrates. Laboratory e x e rcises will incl ude dissections, field stud ies and collections. Prereq uisit e : 253 or consent of instructor. a l y 1 979-80 II ( 4 )

372

G ENERAL EN TOMOLOG Y

An introduction to insect anatomy, physiology, ontogeny and behavior. Laboratory includes gross dissection, field s t u d y and the collection and classification of insects. Prereq uisite: 253. a/y 1 9 78- 79. II (4)

375

BIOLOGY OF PARASITISM

Parasitism a s a mode o f life: the n a t ure o f the parasite a n d of the host-parasite association including host responses. The g a m u t of parasitic forms indudes viruses, other microorganisms, h el minths and insects a s they affect plan t a n d ani mal hos t s . Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: 253. a l y 1 9 78-7 9 I (4)

403

DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY

Consideration o f the development of multicellular o rga n i s m s, focusing on the molec u l a r b a s e s for development. Topics include morphogenetic movements, cell determina tion a nd differentiation, pattern forma tion, cell inte ractions in development, chemical messengers in develop ment, and genetic regulation of development. Laboratory includes e x perimental problems and descriptive embryology. Prerequisite: 253. II (4)

411

HISTOLOGY

Microscopic study of normal cells, t i s s u e s a n d organs of vertebrates. This study is bo th struct urally and p hysiologically oriented . Prereq uisite: 253. II (4) 424

ECOLOGY

Organisms in relation t o their environment, including o r g a n i s m a l a d a p t a t io n s , p op u l a t i o n g r o w t h a n d int eractions, and ecosystem st ruct u re and function. Prerequisite: 253. II (4)

425

BIOLOG ICAL OCEANOG RAPHY

The ocea n as environment for plant and a ni ma l life; an i n troduction to the structu re, dyna mics and history of marine ecosystems. Lab, field ,t rips, and term project in addition to lecture. Prerequisite: 253. II (4)

BIOLOGY

37


426

FIELD METHODS IN ECOLOGY

Sampling techniques and analysis of natura,l ecosystems. Independent project required. Prerequisites: 2 5 3 and 424 or consent of instructor. I I (2)

441

MAMMALIAN PHYS IOLOGY

F unctions of principal mammalian organ systems e m p h a s i z ing c o n trol m e c h a n i s m s and h o m e o s t a t i c relationships. Laboratory includes experiments with electrocardiography, endocrine functions, regulation of body fluids, and temperature regulation. Prerequisites: 253, C h emistry 332. Biochemistry recommended. II ( 4 ) 4 7 5 E VOLUTION Evolution as a process: sources of variation; forces overcoming genetic inertia in populations; speciation. Evolution of genetic systems and of life in relation to ecological theory and earth history. Lecture and discussion. Term paper and mini-seminar required. Prerequisit e : 253. I a / y 1 9 78-79 (4)

490

S E MINAR

Selected topics in biology based on literature and/or original research. Open to j unior and senior biology majors. ( 1)

4 9 1, 492

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Investiga tions or research in areas of special i n te rest not covered by regular courses; open to qualified j un ior and senior majors; students should not elect independent study unless they know in advance the specific area they wish to i nvestigate and can demonstrate a serious interest in pursuing i t . It is suggested that the student spend one semester researching the literature and writing a proposal (for 1 sem. hr. of credi t ) and the next semester actually carrying o u t the project (for another 1 sem. hr. of credi t ) . S tudents w i l l n o t be permitted t o use 4 91-492 f o r filling in a d e ficiency in their program. Prerequisite: written proposal for the project approved by a faculty sponsor and the departmen t chair. ( 1 - 4)

INTERIM COURSES OFFERED I N 1 9 78 307 308 309 311 313 318

38

SCIENCE AND POLITICS: THE C O NTROL Of TECHNOLOGY C URAT I N G BIOLOGICAL MUSEUMS INTRODUCTORY MICROTECHNIQUE NATURAL HI STORY O f PUGET SOUND S ELf-REGULATION AND BIOfEEDBACK CORAL ISLAND BIOLOGY, GEOLOGY

BIOLOGY


Business Adtninistration SCHOOL OF

'---0

I n concert wi th general u n iversity require m e nts, the busi ness c u rric u l u m prepares g ra d u a t e s for resp nsible pos itions in business, educa tion, a nd govern m e n t .

Option al conc e n t r a tions are of fered i n the fields of '-- acco u n t ing, finance, m a rketing, o perations ma nage ment, and person n e l and indu s t r ial re la tions.

FAC ULTY King, Dea n ; Aahy, Bancroft, Barndt, Barnowe, Brunner, Carvey, Crooks, Dunn, Freeman, W. Haueisen, Hutcheon, L auer, McCarthy, O'Neill, C. - Peterson, Schafer, Turner, Walton, Woolley, Zul auf.

A D MI SSIO N The professional Bachelor of Business Adminis tration degree _ program is composed of an upper d i vision business curricu l u m w i t h a strong base i n liberal arts. Undergradu a te students are admit ted to t he School of Business Administration upon the successful completion o f a t least 24 semester h o u rs with a cum ulative grade poi n t average - of 2 . 5 or above, and the declaration of business ad minis tration as the major field of s t u d y . Tra n s fer students are required to have main tained the grade poi n t average of 2 . 5 separately in both bus iness and non-business courses. The student ' s in terest _ to acquire a professional competence is d e s i re d a n d the assig n me n t of a busin e s s faculty adviser is required. St u dents considering graduate-level study s h ou ld seek early planning advice from the faculty conce rning appropriate undergrad uate course selection. Grad u a te st udents are a d m itted to the School of B usiness Adm inist ration when they meet the require m e n t s speCified in the procedures vailable from the Dean of Graduate Studies. A F F l L I A T10NS The School of Business Administration of Pacific L u t heran 路 Uni versity i s a m e mber of the American Assembly of Collegiate School s o f Business. B . B . A . and M . B . A . programs are na tionally accredited by the Accred ita tion Council of the AACSB. Pacific Lutheran University is accredited regio nally b y the Northwest Associa tion of Schools a n d Colleges. Th School of Business A d m inistration is also a member of the No rthwest Universities' B u siness Adminis tration Conference, the Western Associa tion of Collegia te Schools of -- Busi ness, and the Na tional Association of Schools of Pu blic Affairs and Administration.

DEGREE REQUIREME NTS Six ty-four semester hours or one-half of t he minimum total degree req uirements are taken in fields outside .the School of Business Administra t io n . At least 40 semes te r hours are taken in req uired and elective business s u bjects. The Bachelor of B u siness A dministrat ion deg ree program cons i s ts of 128 semester hours to be taken over a four-year period, a n d to be completed with an over-all grade poi n t average o f 2 . 5 or above a s w e l l a s a 2.5 grade pOint average separately in business courses. D grades i n business a d m i n istration core courses (includ ing the two upper division b u s i ness electives) will n o t meet the BBA graduation ,req uir em ents. In practice, the work can be accelerated by taking a heavier t h a n average load and by participating i n s u m m e r sessions. On t h e other h a n d , many students f i n d it useful to exceed the minimum requirements by including related or additional advanced work i n their u ndergraduate s tu dies. BACHELOR OF BUSINESS A DMINISTRATION: 230, 281, 282, 350, 364, 370, 453, 4 55, and 8 semester hours of upper div ision business electives. Required supporting: Econ 150, Math 128 (or 127 and 1 5 1 ) (or 151 and 3 3 1 ) , Stat 231, and one upper d ivision economics course. N O MORE T H A N 50 P E R C E N T O F T H E HOURS M A Y B E B U S I N E S S COURSES. The elective courses a re chosen to support the stu d e n t s' professional career objectives or graduate study plans. They m a y reflect business a d m inistration conce n t ration(s) or selections from en tirely d i fferent field (s). The lat ter may include work in other professional schools or prog r a m s . CONCE NTRATIONS: Certificates of co ncen tration are issued upon completion of specialized s t udies . The concentration is noted on the st udent ' s transcri p t . At least 1 6 hours of upper d ivision courses in a n area of speCializ ation must be completed with a 2.5 grade point average. Accounting - 38 1; 385; 387; 4 8 2; 383 or 4 8 4 . Finance - 364; 3 6 7; 4 6 4; 3 8 1 , 460 or 4 6 1 . Students m u s t t a k e E c o n 352 o r 361 a s an u pper d i vision economics elective. Marke/ing - 370; 4 72 or 4 73; 471; 4 70. 0l'era/ions Management - 350; 4 5 0; 451; 385. Person nel and Indus/rial Relations - 350; 453; 4 6 0; Psych 450. S tu d e n t s m u s t tke Econ 320 as an upper d ivision economics elective. MINOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: Econ 150; Math 1 2 8 (or 127 a n d 1 5 1 ) (or 151 and 331 ) ; Stat 2 3 1; BA 281, 350, 364, 370. MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINI STRATION: See Graduate Ca talog. MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION: See Graduate Ca talog.

BUSINE S S ADMINI STRATION

39


BUSINE SS ADMIN ISTRATION C OURSES Courses n u mbered 1 00-299 are available to a l l stude n t s . Cou rses n u m bered 300-499 a r e open t o s tu d e n t s w i t h j u nior s t a nd i n g and the required prerequisites. Courses n u m bered 500-599 are reserved for students i n the MBA a n d MPA programs and s t ud e n t s i n other graduate prog r a m s who have an approved field in business. The middle digit of t h e course nu mber ind ica tes the field of conce ntration: 3 - law 4 - gene ral s e rvice 5 - personnel a nd indus t r i a l ma n a gement 6 - finance 7 - marketing 8 - acco u n t i n g and i n fo r m a tion systems 9 - specialized a nd predom i n a n t l y independent studies.

COURSE Off ERINGS 230

LAW AND SOCIETY

A study of the legal system in the United Sta tes and the regulation of relationships between individual citizens, groups, and the governmental agencies and branches. Review of the rights and obliga tions of individual citizens and corporations, administrative law, and the procedures and practices of the courts in a modern society. I I I (4)

241

BUSINESS COMM UNICATI ONS

Development of applied writing skills and techniques in business communications. Included are letters of inquiry, orders and acknowledg ments, sales and promotional communications, claims and adj ustments correspondence, c redit and collections ledgers, briefing and business repor ts, resumes, and application letters. (4)

243

F AMIL Y FINANCIAL PLANNING

Consumer saving, spending and planning tech niq ues; intelligent buying and budgeting, estate and tax planning, ins urance and investment programs, retirement planning; e thical issues in government a nd business from the consumer viewpoint; consumer organization and influence i n finance, marketing and prod uction. ( 4)

281

FINANCIAL ACCO UNTING

An i n t roduction to accounting concepts and principles. Preparation and analysis of financial reports . I II (4)

282

ACCOUNTING INfORMATION SYSTEMS

I n t rod uction to management information systems. E mphasis on the analysis and interpretation of accounting a nd economic data and their use in planning and control. Applications utilizing computer terminal. Prerequisite: 2 8 1 . I II ( 4 )

40

B U SINE S S ADMINIS TRATION

350

MAN A G E ME NT

A critical examination of the principles and processes o f ad ministration. Management techniques and t h e functions of planni ng, organizing, direction, and control are disc ussed from both the cla ssical and the behavioral points of view. Study of the concepts and characteristics of the production function. Introduction to case analysis a nd problem-solving techniques. Prereq uisite s : Econ 1 50, Math 1 2 8 (or equivalent) (may be concurrent), Stat 231 (may be concurrent), and BA 2 8 1 . ju nior standing I II (4)

364

_

MANAGERIAL FINANCE

Concentrated study of the tools of financial a nalysis : F u n d s and c a s h flows, critical a nalysis of financial s t a t e m e n t s and other financial information, techniques of financial 足 planning and budgeting, and the concepts related to capital e x pe nditure budgeting, and the cost of capital. An i n troduction to financial strategies a nd decision-making for financing, expansion, a nd dividend policie s . Required for business majors. Prerequisi tes : Econ 1 50, Math 1 2 8 (or equivalent), Stat 231, and B A 2 8 1 . Ju nior standing. I II (4)

367

FINANCIAL MARKETS

370

MARKETING SYSTEMS

Analysis of the characteristics and determinants of an ef ficient financial system; pricing of capital as sets; s upply and demand for loanable funds and the level and structure of i n terest rates; saving s-investment process and financial intermediaries; i n s u rance and reinsurance markets; 足 commodity m arkets, and international finance. Prerequisites: Econ 150, Math 1 2 8 (or equivalent), Sta t 2 3 1, SA 2 8 1 , SA 364. (4) The flows of goods and services in the economy, economic and behavioral approaches to the a nalysis of demand; the role o f the ma rketing f u nctions in a bu siness firm. Determina tion of t h e marketing mix - product policy, p r i c i n g , c h a n n e l s of d i s t r i b u t i o n , a n d m a rk e t i n g communications. Prereq uisite s : Econ 1 50, Math 1 28 (or equivalent), Stat 2 3 1, and SA 2 8 1 . J unior standing. I II (4)

381

INTE RMEDIATE ACCO UNTING

383

INCOME TAXATION

Concent rated study of the valuation theories for assets and l i a b i l i t i e s . A n a l y s i s o f r e l a t e d effects On income determination. Prereq uisite: 281. I Il (4) Comprehensive study of income tax concepts, regula tions, and tax planning principle s. E mphasis on individual and corporate income taxation. Prereq uisite: 2 8 1 . (4)

385

COST ACCO UNTING

Basic and advanced concepts of costs in developing information for management use i n the determination of income, evaluat ion of capital investment alterna tives, a n d the measurement of performance. Prerequisites: 2 8 1 and 282. I (4)


387

DATA PROC E SSING SYSTEMS

""- A computer-labora tory-orien ted course which includes basic program and system a n alysis and flow cha rting, intensive s t udy of prog ram ming languages with emphasis on B A SIC, and the development of a working knowledge ďż˝ w i t h c o m p u t e r h a rd w a r e a n d s o f t w a r e s y s t e m s . Prerequisites: 2 8 1 a n d 282. I I I (4) 392

I NTERNSHIP

A program of full time experience closely rela ted to the - student's specific career and academic interests. The student i s e x pected to develop the internship opport unity with a firm or organ izatio n . Before reg i st ration, the stude nt, the organiza tion, and the School will prepa re a n - internship agreement. T h i s agreemen t identifies t h e problems t o be researched, ex perience t o b e gained, and related readings to be accomplished. Monthly progress reports and other measures of achievement will be used to - determine the grade. Not more than 2 hours of credit will be gra nted for a full month of i nternship, and not more than 8 hours of accumulated credit will be g ra n ted for the i n ternships taken. The i n ternship cannot be used to meet - the minimum requirement for 2 business administration elective courses, and it must be completed prior to the last semester before g raduation. Prereq uisites: B A 281, 282, 350; Econ 1 5 0; Stat 231; one additional course in the - student's a rea of concentration. ( 2 or 4) 4 35

BUSINESS LAW

Proced ures, contracts, agencies, negotiabLe instru ments, business orga nizations, property, trusts and wills, - t ra nsportation, insu ra nce and employment. I I (4) 450

MA N UFA CTURING MANAGE MENT

Principles of scientific management; planning products, physical facilities, equipment and materials for production; methods and techniq ues of supervision and control of personnel; prod uction control; purchasing and in ven tory management. The course i ncludes supervised student _ proj ects and major case studies. Prerequisite: 350. (4) 451

OPE RATIONS ANALYSIS

Introduction to and the exami na tion of selected decision sciences techn iques and their applications to accounting, _ fina nce, management, marketing, and prod uction. Topics i nclude modeling, i nventory control, resource a llocation, proj ect planning, forecasting, and logistics. Prereq uisites: S A 281, 282, 350; Econ 1 5 0; Stat 231. (4) - 453

PERSONNEL AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

Detailed examina tion of behavioral processes of individuals and g roups in business organizations. Emphasis on policy - issues and specific problems in managing human resources with focus on modern practices of industrial relations and p e r s o n n e l m a n a g e m e n t in i n d u s t ri a l and o t h e r organ izations. Prereq uisite: 350. I I I ( 4 )

455

BUSINESS POLICY

Formulation of policies to i n tegrate all functions of business. Social, ethical, religious, economic, educational and i n terna tional i m plications in the form ulation of business policies and objectives. Includes comprehensive case analyses. Required for business majors. Prereq uisites: Senior standing; 281, 282, 350, 364 and 370. I I I (4) 456 460

HONORS SEMINAR E MPLOYEE BENEFIT PLANS

I n t e nsive analysis of em ployee benefit plans; profit sharing plans, pension plans, g roup health and life i n s u ra nce; structure and effect of governmental regulation of various benefit pla n s . Prereq uisites: Econ 1 50, Math 1 28 (or equivalent), Stat 231, B A 281, B A 364. (4) 461

PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

Discussion of sound portfolio m a nagement techniques: Security se lection and construction of efficient asset portfolios; measuring investment performance; capital market efficiency; selected recen t developments in portfolio a nalysis . Emphasis on risk a nd return rela tionships of securities and portfoliOS. Prereq uisites: Econ 1 50, Math 1 2 8 ( o r eq uivalent), S t a t 2 3 1 , B A 2 8 1 , S A 364. (4) 464

FINANCIAL PLANNING AND CONTROL

I n te nsive analysis of major financial d ecisions; financial plann ing and budgetary con trol; mergers and acquisitions; prediction or corporate failu re; bond refunding; new equity issues; recent developments i n capital structure theory as a pplied to financial decisions. Emphasis on decision-ma king. Prerequisites: Econ 1 50, Math 1 28 (or equivalent), Stat 231, B A 281, B A 364. (4) 470

M ARKETING MANAGE MENT

Analytical a pproaches for the solution of marketing p r o b l e m s , developing s t r a t e g i e s , p la n n i ng a n d a d m i n i s t erin g c o m p r e h e n s i ve m a r k e t i ng p r o g r a m s; e v a l u a t i o n a n d c o n t ro l of m a r k e t i ng o p e r a t i o n s . Prerequisite: 370. I (4) 471

MA RKETING RESEARCH AND CONSUMER BEHA VIOR

Tec h niques and uses of marketing research in the business decision-making process. Emphasis i s placed on research design, various s urvey methods, research instruments, and sampling plans as they relate to marketing consumer products a nd services in a changing environment. Contempora ry behavioral science concepts to be examined a n d i n corporated in selected m a r k e t i n g p r o j e c t s . Prerequisite: 3 7 0 . ( 4 )

B U S IN E S S A D M I N I S TRATIO N

41


472

ADVERTISING AND SALES MANAGEMENT

Role of advertising and personal selling i n the marketing program; analysis o f market targets; developing market poten tials; media s ele c tion; designing the promotional me ssage; evalua tion and control of the promotional m i x . Prere q u is i t e : 3 7 0 . 1 n ( 4 )

473

I NDUSTRIAL MARKETING AND PURCHASING

Analysis of the industrial buying and selling process; purchasing pol icies and proce d u res; selection of sources of su pply; contract a nalysis and negotia tion; marketing problems of m a n u facturers of industrial goods; developing a nd i mp l e me n t i ng i n d u st ria l m a r k e t i n g s t r a t e g ie s . Pre requisites: 350 a n d 370. 11 (4)

482

ADVANCED ACCOUNTING

Comprehensive study of accounting for corpora tions, including the acco u n t ing aspects of consolidations and me rgers, and partnerships; treatment of incomplete data; specialized accounting con epts rela t ed to funds and cash flows, statement analysis, and accounting for estate and trusts. Prereq uisites: 281 a nd 3 8 1 . n (4)

484

A UDITING

'

The principles and procedures of audi ting as they apply to the maj or balance sheet and income a ccounts; generally accepted a u d i ting standards used by CPA's; profess ional ethics. Prerequisites : 2 8 1 , 381 and 482. 1 1 (4)

490

SEMINAR

Seminar on specifically selected topics in business. Offered on demand . Prerequisi te : consent of t he instructor. (4)

491

DIRECTED STUDY

Individual studies; readings on s elected topics approved and s upervised by the ins t ructor. Pre requ isi te: consent of the i nstructor. (1-4)

501

FUNDAMENTALS OF ACCOUNTING AND F I NANCE

Fundamental a s s um p tions, principles, a n d proce d u re s underlying accoun ting; t ra nsaction analysis and the fundame ntal acco u n ting model; matc hing of expenses with revenue; measure ment and reporting of income s ta tement a nd balance sheet accounts; consolidated statements; and using and i n terpreting financial statements. Theoretical fra mework for financial decisions; decision theory relative to working capital ma nagement, short- and i n termediate足 term financing, capital investments and valua tion, capital structure and dividend policy, and long-term financing. (4)

502

F UNDAME NTALS OF MANA G E MENT AND MARKETING

PrinCiples and processes of administration. Techniq u es and f u n c t i o n s of p l a n n i n g, o rga n i z i ng , d i r e c t i n g a n d con trolling. The flows o f goods a n d services i n the economy; economic and behavioral approaches to the 足 analysis of demand; the ma rketing functions in business firms. Determination of the marketing mix. (4)

550

ORG ANIZATIONAL BE HAVIOR AND ENVIRONMENT

The study of open sociote chnical systems within which a manager must operate. It encompasses three major perspectives: the ex ternal orga nization environment, including legal, ethical, social, economic and political i n fluences; the organiza tion itself as an entity; and the internal orga nization environment. Prerequisite: 350 (or 502) . I II (4)

551

SE MINAR IN OPERA TIONS MANAGEM ENT

Analytical approaches to operational management; the relationship of production to other functions and external factors; case st udies o f modern techniq ues/ methodologies as applied in selected situations and industries; quantitative models, systems design and compute rs. Prerequisites: 350 (or 502), 550, S tatistics and Econ 543. I " (4)

552

A PPLIED DECISION ANALYSIS

Use and application of selected decision science techniques to projects. The focus is on the examination of managerial decision situations and the development of decision analysis methods for the manager. Applications include forecasting, resource a llocation, projec t planning, data analysis, and simulation. Prerequisite: Econ 543. (4)

553

C ONTEMPORARY I S S U E S IN MANAG EMENT

Investigation of the roles of managers in the modern society. The ex ploration includes, but is not limited to the topics of corpora te responsibility, e thical issues in management, and the i m pact of technological change on orga nizations and society. The workshop approach to these topics combines the use of cases, readings, discussions, and simulations. Prerequisites: BA 550; Econ 504, or equivalent. (4)

555

BUSINESS STRATE G Y AND POLICY

557

SEMINAR IN POLICY S C I ENCES

Management functions of pla n ning, organization and contro!' Prerequisites: 551, 564 a nd 570. I " (4) Integrate conceptual elements and decision-making techniques . Development and implementa tion of specific strategies appropriate to public sector program s . Case studies and field work used to e xplore important policy issues and management interfaces to formulate managerial im provements. Prerequisites: 5 5 1, 567, P S 457. (4)

42

B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION

_


564

SEMINAR IN FINANCIAL MANAGEM E NT

Managemen t's role in framing financial policies; case studies i n the determination of needs, sou rces and uses of f u nds; the development of fina ncial structures, evaluation of alternative financial pla ns and allocation of fund s within '--- the firm, the control of financial resources . Prerequis ites: 3 6 4 (or 501) and 581. I II (4)

567

SEMINAR IN PUBLIC F INANCIAL MANAGEMENT

- E xploration of budgeting concepts and procedures in the p u blic sector . Considera tion of rece n t developments and the changing functions of public budgeting; the roles of participa nts i n the budget process; and stra tegies and counterst rategies in developing and gai ning approval of budgets. Financial management topics i nclude: cash, debt, revenue and e xpenditure manage m e n t; e xpenditure control progra ms; evaluation of perfor mance . Prerequisite: - B A 587 or 582. (4)

570

SEMINAR IN MARKETING MANAG EME NT

M a rketing management policies and programs; interrelated elements of the marketing mix a nd the relationship of marketi ng to other i n ternal fu nctions; changing social and legal environ ment, innovation and modern marketing philosophies. Prereq uisites : 370 (or 502), and Econ 504. I II (4)

581

SEMINAR IN f i NANCIAL ACCOUNTING THEORY

593

THESIS

Research study to meet Thesis Option req uirement for elective i n the M B A or M PA degree programs. (4)

596

RESEARCH COL LOQUIUM

Research approaches and uses in the administ rative decision making process. E m phasis is placed on the various aspects of research design : secondary data sources, s urvey methods, research instruments, sa mpling plans, data analysis, and reporting of results. Both q ualitative and q uan titative research approaches are examined in terms of their applica tion to e xplora tory, descriptive, ca usal and problem - solving studies. Prerequisites: Sta tistics and two 500-level business courses. (4)

INTERIM COURSES OFFERED I N 1 9 78 305 310 315 456 553

MANAGERS AT WORK f iNANCIAL MANAGEMENT FOR THE HEAL TH CARE ADMIN ISTRATOR BUSINESS-GOVERNME NT RHA TlONS WORKSHOP HONORS SEMINAR SEMINAR ON C ONTEMPORARY ISSUES I N MANAGEMENT

Advanced accounting concepts and standards; current _problems and trends reflected i n accounting literat u re; d esigned for professional accountants. Prerequisite: 4 82 or consent. (4)

582

ACC OUNTING INFORMATION AND CONTROL

Applications of accounting i n formation, services and systems to management problems. Students e xcused from this course are e xpected to complete 581 or other advanced -accounti ng studie s . Pre requisi te : 281 (or 5 0 1 ) . (4)

587

GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS

Management information systems; acco un ting and economic d a ta a nd their use i n government agencies. -Recent trends in fund accoun ting, a n d analysis of accounting requirements and techniques i n program ma nagement. Case s t u d ies. Prereq uisite: Econ 504. ( 4)

590

SPECIAL SEMINAR

Selected advanced topics; offered on demand. (4)

591

IND EPENDE NT STUDY

Individual reading a n d s tudies on selected topics; m i n i m u m _ supervi sion a f t e r ini tial planning o f student's work. Prerequisite: consent. ( 1-4)

B U S I NE S S ADMI N I S T RATI O N

43


Chetnishy The adva nce of c i v i l i z a t i o n is i n s eparable from the d e v e l o p m e n t o f c h e m i s t ry . C h e m i s t r y seeks to u n d e rs t a nd t h e f u nd a m e n t a l n a t ure of ma tter, c h a n g e s in i ts composition, and the e n e r g y c h a n g e s accompanying these c h a n g e s . U t i l i z a tion o f t h i s k nowledge i n fl u e nces our lives i n m a n y profo u n d w a y s . W h e t h e r i n te re s t e d i n c h e m i s try a s a p rofession, m o l e c u l a r biology, or s t u d y i n g t h e i n fl u en c e s o f s c i e n c e and technology on t h e e nviron m e n t a n d society, s t u d e n t s will f i n d prog rams to meet t h e i r need s . The courses,

c u rri c u l u m , faculty, a n d facili ties are a pproved b y t h e A merican C h e m ical Soc i e t y . Divers i t y i n c a r e e r p l a n n i n g i s a k e y w o rd i n t h e c h e m i st ry c u r r ic u l u m . Progr a m s a re available w h i c h are b ro a d l y a ppl ica ble to the health足 biological, p h ysical, enviro n m e n ta l and the f u n d a m e n t a l c h e m ic a l sciences . A s taff k nowledgeable in t h e many areas of c h e m i st r y u s i n g m o d e r n equ i p m e n t f o r t e a c h i n g a nd resea rc h h i g h l i g h t t h e oppo r t u n i t i e s available.

Major research and teaching equipment incllude s : n u clear magrletic res o n a nce, i rlfra red, u l tra-violet, v is i b le, a t o m ic a bs o rptio rl , fla me photometry, e m ission a n d electron spin res o n a rl ce spectrometers, X- ra y crys ta llog raph ic diffracto meter, gas a n d l i q u id ch ro m a tographs, p recision refractometer, dipolometer, scirztillation counter, zone refi ner, a nd a comp lex m icroprocessor syste m .

F a c u l t y researc h proj ects involving s tu d e n t participa tion a r e i n progress i n m a n y i mportant fields of c h e m i s t ry . Some of the g e n e r a l a r e a s a r e : polym e r struct u re a n d propert ies, syn thesis of heterocyclic compou nds, struct u ra l and m agnetic stu dies of i rl O rg a n ic co m p lexes, o rg a n ic ki rletics, p h otochem ical reactions, a n d drug effects on b i rt h contro l .

FACUL T Y C. Anderson, Ciz a i r; Giddings, Huest is, Layman, Nesset, Swank, Tobiason.

Degrees i n chemistry a re the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science for students wishing to structure their undergraduate education around a full chemistry major. The B . A . program is the m inimum preparation suitable for further professionat studies and is often combined with ex tensive study o r a second major in an allied field. The B . S . program involves additional chemistry courses and serves both s tudents going directly into employment o n g raduation and those going into g raduate programs. I t is offered with emphasis in che mistry,

44

C HE MI S T RY


biochemistry, or che mical physics. The first option is a n A merican C h e m ical Society certified prog ram. The latter two options are offered in cooperation with the biology a nd physics departmen ts for stude n ts wishing to work a t the in terfaces between che mistry and biology or physics. Students contemplating a major i n chemistry are i n vi t ed to discuss their i n t e rests a n d plans with m e m bers o f the c he m istry faculty. Stud e n ts deciding to major in chemistry should officially declare their i n tent a fter h a v i ng completed C h e m istry 3 3 1 and after co nsultation with a faculty adviser in the chemistry depart m e n t . Tran sfe r students desiring to major in c h e m i s t ry should contact a departmental adviser no later than t h e begi n ning of t h e j u n ior year.

BACHElOR OF A RT S IN EDUCATION: S t udents i n t e rested i n this degree develop t h eir chemistry program though ,the depa r t m e n t in conjunction with the School of Education. See School of Education section.

BACHElOR OF ARTS MAJOR: Chemistry 1 1 5, 1 1 6, 3 2 1 , 3 3 1 , 3 3 2 , 3 3 3 , 3 3 4, 3 4 1 , 3 4 2 , 3 4 3, a n d 4 6 0 . Required supporting: Physics 1 4 7, 1 4 8, 1 53, 1 54; Math 1 5 1, 1 52.

General, organic, and biochemistry pertinent to chemical processes in the h u man organism; suitabe l for liberal arts students, nu rsing s tudents, and prospective teachers. II

BACHElOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR (three alternatives): �l . Gmeral - A merican Chem ical Society certifica tion: C he m i s try 1 1 5,

1 1 6, 321, 3 3 1, 3 3 2, 333, 334, 34 1, 3 4 2, 343, 3 4 4, 4 35, 4 50, 460,

and 4 90; Physics 1 4 7, 1 4 8, 1 53, 1 54; Math 1 5 1, 1 52. 2. Biochemistry emphasis: C h e m i stry 1 1 5, 1 1 6, 3 2 1 , 3 3 1 , 332, 333, 334, 3 4 1 , 3 4 3, 4 04, 4 3 5, 460; Biology 1 5 5, 1 5 6, 253, 3 3 1 , 346, 3 4 7; Physics 1 4 7, 1 4 8, 153, 1 54; Math 1 5 1, 1 52. 3 . Chem ical - physics emphasis: Chemistry 1 1 5, 1 16, 3 3 1, 3 3 2, 333, 3 3 4 , 34 1 , 342, 3 4 3, 344, 460; Physics 1 4 7, 1 4 8, 1 5 3, 154, 331, 3 3 2, 336, 356; Math 1 5 1, 1 5 2, 253. Generalized Chemistry Curriculum for the B.S. Degree FALL

Fresh m a n C h e rn . 1 1 5 Math 1 5 1 Foreign language (or core course) PE 100 or activity ( 1 3 h o u rs)

SPRING

Chern. 1 16 Math 1 5 2 Foreign language Core course PE 100 or activity ( 1 7 hours)

Sophomore Chern. 331, 333 Physics 1 4 7, 1 5 3 Foreig n language PE activ i ty Core course ( 1 5- 1 9 hours)

Chern. 332, 334 Physics 1 4 8, 154 Foreign language PE activity Core course ( 1 5 - 1 9 hours)

'unior Chern. 3 4 1, 3 4 3 Chern. 3 2 1 Core course Elective

Chern. 3 4 2, 3 4 4 C o r e course Elective Elective

--,enior C h e rn . 4 60 C h e rn . 4 90 Electives

C h e rn . 4 3 5 Electives

M I N OR: 22 semester hours, i ncluding 1 1 5, 1 1 6, 3 2 1 , 3 3 1 , 3 3 2 , 3 3 3 , a nd 334, completed w i t h grades of C or higher.

C OURSE OFF ERI N G S 103

104

CHEMI STRY O F LIFE

ENVIRONM ENTAL CHEMISTRY

Basic prinCiples of chemical structure and reactions, with a p plications to human activities and the natural environment. No prerequisite; s tudents w,ithout high school chemistry are encouraged to take 104 before taking 103 or 1 15. Physical therapy and military nursing programs requiring a year of chemistry should include 1 0 4 a n d 103. Also s u itable for environmental s tudies, general science teachers, B . A . in earth science, and General University Requirements or College of Arts and Sciences Option III. I

108

MANKIND AND MOLECULES

T h e r o l e of science in society a n d the particular i n fluence of chemistry on our civilization. Such topics as medicine, nutri tion, food additives, petrole u m products, and chemical warfare are discussed. A non-laboratory liberal a rts based cours e with no math background. Meets General University Requirements.

1 1 5, 116

GENERAL CH EMISTRY

First semester topics include t he structure of matter, a tomic and molecular theory, states of matter and quantitative relationships. Second semester topics include kinetics, chemical equilibrium, the rmochemistry study of the elements grouped according to the periodic table, radiochemistry and i norganic q ualita tive analysis; designed primarily for students who want to major i n biology, chemistry, engineering, geology, or physics. Includes all premedical, predental, pharmacy, medical technology students, and s t udents planning to transfer to some u niversity dental hygiene program s . High school chemistry or permission of instructor required. S t udents with no high school chemis try or weak mathematical background should take 104 before this course. A n honors laboratory is available to s tudents by selection of faculty during the spring. Corequisite: Mathematics 133. Prerequisites : 1 1 5 for 1 16; I for 1 15, II for 1 1 6 . ( 4 , 4)

C H E M I S T RY

4S


210

BASIC NUTRITION AND PHARMACOLOG Y

350

Basic m e t abolism processes, basic endocrinology, use of d rugs to mod i fy, supple ment, enhance, or block biological processes, psychologica l / be ha vioral aspects of d rug use. The discussion of n utri tion will include topics of "the bala nced me al ph ilosophy," food p r e p a r a t ion a n d re t e n t io n / d e ve l o p m e n t o f n u t r i t i v e v a l ue, a nd e nviron m ental /societal influences on diet and nu trition. Prereq uisite: Chemistry 1 03 or equivalent; d e sig ned for b i olo gy, chem istry, psychology, social welfare, sociology, n u rsing, health and physical education majors, continuing education n urses. I (experimental course to be offered fall 1 979) (2) 32 1

Chemical m ethods of q ua n titative analysis, including volumetric, gravimetric, a n d selected instrumenta l methods. Prerequisi t e s : 1 16 a nd Mathe matics 1 3 3. I 331, 332

ORG ANI C CHEM ISTRY

An i nterpretation of properties a n d reactions of aliphatic and aromatic compounds on the basis of current che mical theory. Prerequisites : 103 and 104 or 1 1 5 . Corequisi tes: 333, 334. I I I

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

333, 3 3 4

Reactions and conventional and mode rn techniques of syn t hesis, separation, and a nalysis of organic compounds. Must a ccompany 331, 332. I I I (1, 1) 336

HONORS ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

Advanced m e t h o d s of s y n t h e s i s a n d property determina tion a pplied to orga nic compounds. Techniques a nd applica tions from the literature to be e mphasized. May be taken by departmental invita tion in pia e of 334. 1I (1) 341, 34.2

PHYSICAL CHEMI STRY

The relationship be tween s tructure, energy content , and physical a n d chemical properties of chemical systems. Topics i n thermodynamics, statistical thermodynamics, quan t u m m echanics, a tomic a n d molecular s tructure, spectroscopy and kinetics are covered . Many e x a m ples are related to biological syste m s . Prerequisites: 1 1 5, Math 1 52, Physics 1 5 4 . I II

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY L ABORATORY

34 3, 344

.

C HE MI STRY

,

404

BIOCHEMI STRY

An overview of the field including m ineral a n d general metabolism, biochemical structure, and discussion of drugs and pharmacology. Laboratory is d e signed to s ti mulate problem-solving techniques. Prerequisites: 332 a n d 334. I

I NSTRUMENTAL A NALYSIS

Theory and practice of instru men tal methods along with basic electronics Special e mphasis will be placed on radiochemical, mass spectrome tic, chroma tog raphic, and electrometric method s . Prereq uisites : 3 4 1 and 343. Il .

450

INORGANIC CHE MISTRY

Tech niques of structura l d e te r mi na tion (JR, UV, VIS, N MR, X-ray, E PR), bonding principles, non-metal compounds, c.oordi na tion chemistry, organometallics, donor /acceptor concep ts, reaction pathways a n d bioche mical a pplications are covered . Laboratory will i nclude syn thesis a n d an indepth e xploration of the physical properties of non-metal, coordination and organometallic com pounds.' Prereq uis i tes : 331, 332. (to begin 1 9 79-80) (3) 460

SEMINAR

Presenta tion by students of knowledge gained by personal library or labora tory resea rch, supple men ted with seminars by practicing scientists. Participation of all senior chemis try majors i s required and all other chemistry-oriented students are encouraged to partici pa te. Seminar progra m will be held d u ring the en tire year b u t formal registra tion will be in the spring semester. I II ( 1 ) 490

I NTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH

A course designed to introduce the student to laboratory research techniques, use of the che m ical lite ra ture, research proposal and report w ri ti ng . E m phasis will be on the student developing and making progress on an independent chemical research problem chosen in consultation with a member of the chemistry faculty. I (2) 491

E x periments i n thermodynamics, solution behavior, and molecular structure designed to acquain t students with instrumentation, data handling, correla tions with theory, and data reliability. Computer usage is encouraged Corequisite or prerequisite: 341, 342. I II (1, 1)

46

Course designed to examine instrumen ts from the s tandpoint of how and why they work, applications, a n d l i m i ta tions. S o m e of the instru mental te h niques t o be covered are a tomic absorption, gas chromatography, ultraviolet, visibl e and infrared spectrop ho t om e try a n d flame photo metry. Prerequisites: 1 1 6 a n d Biology 1 5 5 .

435

Q UANTITA TIVE ANALYSIS

INSTRUME NTATION F OR THE LIFE SCIENCES

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Library and/or labora tory s t ud y of topics not included in regula rly offered courses. Proposed project m u s t be a pproved by depart ment chair and supervisory responsibility accepted b y an instructor. M a y b e taken more than once . I I I (1, 2 or 4)


497

RESEARCH

I....- E x pe ri me n tal o r theo retical inves tiga tion open to u p per division s t u d e n t s with consent of depa r t m en t c h a i r . May be taken more t h a n once. Gen erally will cons i s t of an e x panded s t udy of the research project develo ped in 490. I II (1, 2 or 4)

-- 597, 598 Open

G RADUATE RESEARCH

to mas ter's degree c a n d i d a t e s only. Prer e q u i s it e :

consent o f depa r t m e n t chai r. I II (2-4)

INTERIM COURSES O F F E R E D IN 1 9 78 - 300 303

-

307 3l2

BUSIN E S S AND THE E N V I RONMENT THE WORL D OF E L EC TRON I C S TECHN OL O G Y PO L YMERS AND BI OPOL Y M E R S O N B E C O M I N G HUMAN

C HE M I S T R Y

47


Communicatio Arts T h e c o m m u nication arts program i s concerned w i t h i m proving i n terperso nal, g ro u p , a n d pu blic c o m m u nication t h rough a mastery o f basic

r h e torical proc e s s e s and a c o m p r e h e n s i o n of the na ture o f t h e mass media as weB as offer,ing c u l t u ral and artistic opportu n i ties in the field of t h ea t r e . The depa r t m e n t offers a practical u nd e r s t a n d i n g of this h u m a n process to all s tu d e n t s and pre pares its majors for participation and teaching in the areas o f thea tre, c om m u nication and b roadcas t lj o u rnalis m.

FACULTY Wilson, C h a i r; Becvar, Doughty, Nordhol m, O'Dor, Parker, Spicer, Wells; assisted by Rowe.

All s t u de n t s in c o m m u nication ar ts will p a r t icipate i n some p h as e of drama tic, forensic and broadca s t i n g co-c u r ricu lar activi ties, a n d will be req u i red to tke two prac t i c u m s .

BACHELOR OF A R T S MAJOR: A t lea s t 3 2 s e m e s t e r hours p l u s 2 p r a c t i c u m s i n o n e o r a combi n a t io n of th e t h ree a reas of conce n t rat ion of w h ich Co m mu n ication A r t s 1 23 i s req ui r e d : Broadcas t /J o u r n a l i s m : Required course s : 1 23, 1 71 , 2 72, 275, 3 7 4 , 283, 3 8 4, p lu s 10 semester h o u r s selected i n con s u l t a tion with advise r . C o m m u nica tion : Requi red cou rse s : 1 23, 233, 3 2 6 pl u s 2 0 s e m e s t e r hou rs selected i n con s u l t a tion w i t h a d v i s e r . Dra m a : Req u i red cou rses : 1 23, 1 5 1, 2 4 1 , 2 5 0 , plus 1 6 s e m e s t e r hours selected i n cons u l t a t ion w i t h a d v i s e r . In add i t io n to req u ire m e n t s l i s ted above, c a n d i d a t e s for t he B . A . deg ree m u s t m e e t t h e foreig n language req u i r e m e nt i n the College of A r ts and Sciences.

BACHElOR OF FINE ARTS M AJ O R: At least 5 2 s e m e s t e r hours p l u s 2 prac t i c u m s i n one o r a com b i n a t io n of the t h ree areas o f conce n t rat ion of which Co m m u n ication A r t s 123 i s requi red . Broadcast/Journa,ii s m : Requi red co urse s : 1 23, 1 7 1 , 2 7 2, 275, 374, 283, 384, p l u s 2 4 s em ester hou rs selected i n co ns ul t a t ion w i t h adviser. C o m m u nication : Requirements same as Bachelor of Arts p l u s a n add i t ional 4 0 semester 'h o ur s selected i n consultation with adviser. Drama: Req uired c o u rse s : 1 2 3, 151, 2 4 1 , 2 5 0, 363, 4 5 2 or 4 5 4 , p l u s 28 s e m e s t e r hou rs selected in c o n s u l t a t ion w i t h a d viser.

BACH ElOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: See School of Educa t i o n .

48

C O M M UNIC ATI O N A R T S


MI NORS PROGRAMS Broadcas t /J o u r n a l i s m : 18- 1 9 semester hours, including 1 7 1 , 27 5, 283, 374, a n d one course f r o m 3 7 8 , 384, and 4 75. o m m u nication Theory and Researc h : 20 semester hou rs, including 1 2 3, 2. 33, and t hree Course s from 1 2. 8, 326, 4 35, and 436. T h e a t e r : 20 semester hours, I nc l ud i ng 1 5 1 , 2 4 1 , 250, 3 5 8 , a n d 454. The Dance M i n o r is cross-referenced w i t h t h e School o f Ph ysical Educa ti o n . See the descript ion of the Dance Mi nor in that school ' s ,-- section of t his catalog. Only t h e following courses from Commu nication Arts may be lIsed to meet t h e General University Req uirement in Fine A r t s : 1 5 1 , 1 6 2, 2 4 1 , 2 5 0 , 3 6 3 , 364, 4 58, 4 5 9 . All Communication A r t s ma j ors should fulfill the General University Requirement with a - co u rse from another depar t m e n t in the School of Fine Arts.

_C OURSE OFFERINGS 1 23

FUNDAMENTALS OF ORAL C OMMUNICATION

Founda tions course dealing with basic theories of oral comm unica tion. Emphasis on group activity with some platform work. I II S (4) -

128

ARGUMENT A TION

Methods for evide nce research, argumentation, proof and t h e a d a p t a t i o n and a p pl i c a t i o n of a r g u m e n t t o comm unication. Various debate models, their preparation -a nd presentation are used. I (4)

151

STAGE TECHNOLOGY

Basic theory and proced ure of technical aspects in set building, costume construction, basic drafti ng, scenery, the assembling, handling, management of the stage, and e x tensive shop work. I (4)

162

HI STORY OF AMERICAN FILM

_Concentrate s on the develop ment and growth of the motion picture in the Un ited S t a tes from 1 8 95 to the orese nt. Emphasis i s placed on the film di rector, whose Implemen tation of film technique and theory serves as the formative a r tistic force in the cinema. Socie ta l influences ďż˝ such a s economic factors, p u blic a t titudes and mores, and political pOSitions reflected in the United States throughout :he past 75 years which provide the film media with shape lOd thematic focus will provide parallel points of reference.

-(4)

17l

MASS MEDIA IN CO NTE MPORARY SOCIETY

Survey of the mass media, incl uding newspapers, magazines, books, television and the cinema. History, organiza tion and mechanics of prin ted and electronic media. Role of the mass communication in developing the political, socia\, and economic fabrics of a d emocratic society. Analysis of the journalist's a udience, journalistic vocations a n d social and legal responsibilities of the media. I

(4)

225, 425 COMMUNICATION ARTS PRACTIC UM One semester hour credit may be ea rned each semester, but only 4 semester hours may be used to meet un iversity requirements. Majors are req uired to take at least two practicums in one or a combination of the three areas of in terest. Inst ructor's consent required. I II

233

FOUNDATIONS OF C OMMUNICATION THEORY

Conte mporary theories on the nature, processes and effects of individual and mass communication behaviors . (4)

241

ORAL I NTERP\tET A TION OF LITERATURE

250

FUNDAMENTALS OF ACTI NG

The a rt of comm unicating the esse nce of a piece of 'literature to a n audience, interpreting it experientially, l o g i c a l l y , a n d e m o t i o n a l l y . I n d i v i d u a l and g r o u p perform ance. I I I (4) An e x a mination of the work of actors a n d actresses, their na tural and learned skills; exercises i n memory, imagination, and observation; improvisations and scenes from modern plays; t heory and practice of stage make-up. I

(4)

272

THE BROADCASTER AND SOUND

275

RADIO PRODUCTION

283

NEWS REPORTING

The theory and st ructure of sound for the broadcaster; in struction and practice in the use of typical aud io-control equipment in radio, TV and recording studios. I (2) Elements of radio production; analysis of program design, writing for radio and prod uction tools and techniques. Lecture and laboratory. '1 (4) Techniq ues of basic news and feat u re writing for the media. Newspaper and broadcast-media, news organization, procedures and libel. Preparation of varied stories, analysis of news sources, techniques of i nterviewing and essential fact g a t h e r i n g . T y p i n g a b i l i t y h i g h l y p r e f e r r e d . Prerequisite: 1 7 1 o r concurrent enrollment. Student must register for Newspaper or Radio News practicum laboratory at the same time. I (3)

C O M M UNICATION ARTS

49


326

GROUP COMMUNICATION

Survey and an alysis of small group communication theory and research. II (4)

344

ADVANCED INTE RPRET A TION Of LITERATURE

Projects and exercises directed toward program planning. Adva nced skills in the commu nication of the expe rie nce of a piece of literat ure through performance. Prerequisite: 2 4 1 . I I (4)

356

STAGE LIGHTING

S tage lighting from the basic developmen t of electricity and lighting instruments to the complete design o f lighting a show. II (4 )

358

A DVANCED AC TING

Study o f the work of a n actor; character a nalysis a n d e m bodiment, using i mp rovisations and scenes f r o m plays; includes s tyles of acting. Prerequ isite : 250. II (4)

363

HISTORY Of THE THEATRE: AESCHYLUS THROUGH TURG ENIEV

Theatre as it evolved from i t s pri mitive origin through r e p r e s e n t a t i v e soc i e t i e s ; A n c ,i e n t G r e e c e , R o m e , Renaissance, modern E u ropean a n d Americ a n . E m phasis is upon religious, philosophical, and political thought as reflected in the drama of each period. I (4)

364

HISTORY OF THE THEATRE: IBSEN THROUGH TO THE PRESENT

Theatre as it evolved from its primitive origin through r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s o c i e t i e s ; A n c i e n t G re e c e , R o m e , Renaissa nce, modern Eu ropean a n d American. E mphasis is upon religious, philosophical, and political thought as re flected in the drama of each perio d . II (4)

374

TELEVISION PRODUCTION

Analysis of program design, writing and production tools and techniques, lect u re and labora tory; extensive use of KPLU- TV studios. I (4)

3 78

RADIO-TELEVISION NEWS REPORTING

Provides s tudents with some o f the basic techniques and problems o f radio and television journalism. The course provides funda mentals u pon which further study in Broadca s t /Journalism can build. It is a n advanced journalism course assuming prior proven ability in news writing and reporting. Prereq uisite: C A 283. II (4)

384

ADVANCED NEWS REPORTING

In-depth reporting, investigative news writing and practice in handling advanced news reporting assignments i n the envi ronment of the newsroom . Typography, headline writing, copy editing as well as printing processes. Typing at 40 words per m i n u te required. Prerequisite s : 1 7 1 a n d 283. II ( 3 )

50

C O MMUNICATION A R T S

402

C OMMUNICATION ARTS IN THE EL EMENTARY CLASSROOM

C o m m unication arts proble m s and opportunities which confront the teacher in grades one through eight. I ( 2 )

404

COMMUNICATION ARTS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL

Cu rric u l u m construction, comm unica tion arts philosophy; co-curricular activities; ad m i nistration of drama, radio and forensic activi ties. I ( 2 )

435

ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION

C o m munication systems and studies within formal orga nization. Focused o n theory and research of infor mational and directive commu nication as related to channels, structures, s tatus, involve ments, morale and leadership. Prerequisite: 233. (4)

436

PERSUASION

Analysis and evaluation of the dimensions o f persuasion in commu nication emphasizing con temporary theoretical models and re searc h . Inves tigation of how research a n d models may b e applied i n contemporary settings . Prerequisite: 233. ( 4 )

452

SCENIC DESIGN

Artistic and technical development of abilities i n designing scenery, cos tumes and make-up for plays of all periods; various styles and periods as well as prepa ration of models, renderings, working drawings a n d scenic painting. Prerequ isite : 251. II (4)

454

PLAY DIRECTION

The role of the director, historically a n d cri tically; an intensive study that is both practical and theore tical in its a pproach to the art of the play director. Many different directing philosophies are st udied and each student i s req u i red t o direct scenes f r o m plays representative of all periods of theatre history. Prereq uisites : 2 50, 2 5 1 , and j unior status. II (4)

458

CREATIVE D RAMATICS

T h i s course is designed to acquaint t h e s t u d e n t with materials, techn iques, and theories of creative dramatics. S tudents willi partiCipate in creative drama tics. This cou rse is intended for elementa ry and j u n i o r high school teachers o r prospective teachers; theatre majors, religious leaders, youth and ca m p counselors, d a y care workers, social and psychological workers, and community theatre leaders interes ted i n working with children. S (4)

459

SUMMER DRAMA WORKSHOP

One session of intensive work in drama, acting, stage management, lighting instruction and all other phases of prod uction. S (4)


474

TELE VISION AND THE C LASSROOM TEACHER

Television as a teaching tool; general criteria for technology in teach ing and specific criteria for the use of television in the cla sroom. II (2)

-4 75

DrRECTING FOR B ROADC A ST MEDIA

An analysis of the s tructure, form, and technique of directing for the Broadcast Media - extensive use of Radio and TV stud io facilities. I I (4)

478

SUMMER TELEVISION WORKSHOP

C r e a t i ve and p r o d u c t i o n t e c h n iq ues of television progra mming; extensive use of KPLU-T V s tudios; for the _mat ure student. 5 ( 4 )

490

S EMINAR IN BROADCAST/JOURNALISM

Selected topics i n BroadcastlJournalism. Departmental permission. (2)

Prerequisite:

-49 1, 492, 4 93 SPECIAL STUDIES IN C OMMUNICATION A RTS Invest igations or research i n area of special i n terest not covered b y regular courses; open to qualified junior or -senior students. A s t udent should not begin registration for independen t s t udy u n til the specific area for i nvestigation has been approved by a departmental sponsor. (1-4)

_59 6-598 RESEARC H IN C OMMUNICA TION ARTS For graduate students only. ( 1 - 4 )

-INTERIM C OURSE S OFFERED I N 1 9 78 300 305 310

I NDIVIDUALISM AND HUMAN VALUES IN THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY AS PORTRA YED ON FILM NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION: I SEE WHAT YOU ARE SAYING TELEVISION SCENERY AND G RAPHIC S DESIGN AND C ONSTRUCTION

C OMMUNICATION ARTS

51


Earth Sciences E a r t h Sciences expl ore the compon e n t s of the p hysical universe from h u m a n i t y's e x i s t i ng h a b i t a t to t h e fo und ations of the ea rth, a nd beyond to t h e p l a n e ts a n d t h e s ta r s . A prog ram of studies in these fields acq u a i n t s s t udents with their physical world and provides perspective on hu man d e velopm e n t in time and space. Enviro n m e n ta l problems a l s o are approached through t h e e a r t h sciences, which i m p a r t a realistic apprecia tion o f society's dependen ce on earth's physical r e s o u rces. I n providing such a perspective, the d epartme n t f u l fi l l s t h e needs of a variety o f s t u d e n ts seeking to b roaden their liberal a rt s e d ucation, a n d also p rovides more specialized k nowledge in s u pport of several fields, parti c u l a r l y for minor o r major s tudies leading to careers i n resources and e n viro n m e n tal m a na g e m e n t or scien tific res earch. S it u a t e d between the Olympic Mountains and the Cascade Range, the depa r t m e n t is ideally located to e x a m i n e geologic a nd m a rine e n viron men ts, which are u n s u rpassed for teaching a n d learni ng purposes.

FACULTY Lowes, Chair; Chauff; assisted by Churney, Fisk, and Huestis.

T h e department's progra ms re main flexible, allowing fairly easy sched uling of courses. However, students should notice t h a t upper division courses a r e offered on a two-yea r cycle. Early declara tion of majors or m i nors in earth sciences will facilitate development of individual prog rams and avoid conflicts.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (GEOLOG Y SP'ECIAL TY) MAJOR: 40 semester h o u rs in geology, including 1 3 1 , 1 3 2, 323, 324, 325, 327, 328, and a t least two courses from 326, 360, 365, a n d 4 9 1 ; also required ,is approved experience i n field study techniques. Necessary supporting courses include: Chemistry 1 1 5, 1 1 6; recommended for petrologists are Chemistry 34l., 342; Physics 1 2 5, 1 2 6, 1 4 7, and 1 48 (or Physics 1 5 3, 1 5 4 a nd Ilabs); recom m e nded - Physics 223; Mathematic s 1 5 1 , 1 5 2; biology courses are recommended where paleon tology i s e'lected major i n tere s t . BACHELOR OF A R T S MAJOR: 3 2 semester hou rs, including 1 3 1 , 1 3 2, 1 36, 202, 324, 327, plus at least two upper div ision earth science courses. A field course such as 351, 360, or 365 is recomme nded. Requi red supporting courses include: Chemistry 1 0 3, 104 or 1 1 5, 1 1 6, Physics 1 25, 1 2 6, 1 4 7, 1 4 8; Math ema tics 1 5 1 , recommended 1 5 2; appropria t e biology courses also r ecommended. Options reflect a student's earth science i n terests a n d are discussed with an adviser.

52

EARTH S C I E NC E S


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: See School of � Education . M I N O R: 20 semester hours of earth science courses, excluding 122 and Interim courses, completed with g rades of C or higher.

-

INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL SCIENCE

-A n i n tegration of the sciences o f chemistry, geology, m eteorology and physics which considers the ph ysical nature of the earth : its materials, processes, history and environm e n t; intended for students with no previous -background in chemistry, physics, or geology. I (4)

131

EARTH PROCESSES

An i ntroductory course dealing with the human geologic habi tat, both a t present and as i t has developed through �ime; m aterials of earth (and lunar) crusts, their d e rivation th rough major earth processes and for m a tion of s urface Features - with e m phasis on their significance to c ul tural development and civiliza tion; laboratory s tu d y o f rocks, i ne raJs, and geologic mapping; field t rips a re a rranged. I (4)

132

HISTORICAL GEOLOGY

A sequel to 1 3 1 which concentrates particula rly the formation o f the continen t : sedimentary rocks, fossils record are related to tectonic u pheaval trips a re a rranged . II (4)

136

on earth history, North A merican and stratigraphic and' growth; field

DESCRIPTIVE ASTRONOMY

The m oon, the solar system, the coordinate systems for locating stellar objects and characteristics o f stars. (4)

20 2

-

GENERAL OCEANOG RAPHY

Oceanography and i ts relationship t o other fields; physical, :hemical, biological. climatic and geological a s pects of the ;ea; field trips. II (4)

-2 2 2

324

325

WORL D G EOGRAPHY

Patterns of physical, climatic, and ecological features and their relationship to the development o f human cul t u re s . 1 0 1 d o e s not m e e t the natural sciences c o r e require m e n t . I (4)

122

MINERALOGY

C rystallography and mineralogy, both ore- and rock­ forming minerals. Prereq uisites : 1 3 1 and high school chemistry or consent. Available periodically, or at U P S . I (4)

PETROLOGY

The occurrence and classifica tion of common rock types; processes by which they were formed with reference to theoretical principles. Prerequisites: 1 3 1 or consent. II a ly (4)

C OURSE OFFERIN G S 101

323

C ONSERVATION OF NA TURAL RESOURCES

Principles and problems of public and private stewardship )f o u r resources with special reference to the Pacific -Northwest. (2)

STRUCTURAL G EOLOGY

The form a n d spatial relationships o f various rock masses and an i ntrod uction to rock deformation; consideration of basic processes to understand mountain building and continental formation; laboratory emphasizes practical techniques which enable students to analyze regional structural patterns. Prerequisite: 131 o r consent. II a l y 1 979-80 (4)

326

OPTICAL MINERALOGY

Theory and practice of mineral studies using the p e t r o g r a p h ic m i c r o s c o p e , i n c l u d i n g i m m e r s i o n oil techniques, production of thin sections and determination of minerals by means of their optical properties. This provides an introduc tion to the broader subject of petrography. I (4)

327

STRATIGRAPHY AND SEDIMENTATION

Formational principles of s u rface-accu mulated rocks, and their incorporation i n the s t ra tigraphic record. This subj ect is basic to fie<ld m a pping and s t ructu ral interpretation. I a l y 1 978-79 ( 4 )

328

PALE ONTOLOGY

A systematic study of the fossil record, combining principles of evolutionary development, paleohabitats and preservation, with practical e x perience of specimen identification. These studies are fundamental to the understanding o f stra tigraphy and the geologic time scal e . I a ly 1 979-80 (4)

351

NATURAL HISTORY OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

A field and laboratory course e x a m i ning regional n a t u ra l history; a n ou tdoor workshop designed f o r science teachers at elementary and j unior high levels. Not to be counted toward a major or g raduate credit in biology . Prerequisite: conse n t . S (6)

360

GEOLOGY OF WESTERN WASHINGTON

The minerals, rocks and geological history of the region e xtending from the Columbia Plateau to the Pacific Ocea n. Includes field trips. Prerequisite : one year of college laboratory science or consent. S 1 978

E ARTH S CIE N C E S

53


365

GLACIAL GEOLOGY

490

SEMINAR

Gl.acial ice, deposits and land forms resulting from the Pleistocene glaciation in North America. Field trips included. Prerequ i s i t e : one year of college laboratory science or conse n t . S

( 1-2)

491, 492

( 1 - 4) 597

INDEPENDENT STUDY

G R ADUATE RESEARCH

(1-8)

INTERI M COURSES OffERED IN 1 9 78 318 323

S4

CORAL IS LAND BIOLOG Y, GE OLOG Y MI NERALOG Y

E ARTH S C I E N C E S


Econom· cs " Wll n t is

II

g ro w i rlg g i ll n t w h o m t h e COllt of Hilve

� lllrge OI o ug h to cover. "

-

Wfl5

never

R a l p h W a l d o E m erson

E c o n o m i c s is t h e s t u d y of how people es t abl i s h soc i a l a r ra n g e me n t s for prod u c i n g a nd d i s t r i b u ti n g � good s a n d se rvices to s u s t a i n a n d e n h a nce h u m a n l i f e . I t s m a i n obj e c t i ve is to d e t e r m i n e a wise u s e of l i m i t e d economic resources so that people receive the m a x i m u m poss ible be n e f i t a t the lowes t cos t . - T h e economics d i sc i p l i n e e m b races a body o f tech n i q u es a n d concept ual toO'i s t h a t a re useful for u n d e r s t a n d i n g a n d a n a l y z i n g our c o m p l e x econ o m i c s y s t e m . C a r e e r a ve n ues f o r g ra d u a tes a r e - n u m e r o u s si nce t h e i r u n d e r s t a n d i n g of the economy a n d their p roblem-solving a n d t h i n k i n g a b i l i ties a r e applicable to a w i d e r a n g e of a c t i v i t ies _ i n b us i n e s s a nd /or govern m e n t .

FACULTY R. J ensen, C lw i r; Ankrim, Brue, Miller, Vinje, _Wentworth.

BACH nOR OF ARTS MAJOR: M i n i m u m of 3 2 semester hours includi ng 1 50, 3 5 1 , 352, 486, t wo u p per divisio n economics e lectives, S t a t i s t ics 2 3 1 or 341, a n d Business A d m i n i s t ration 2 8 1 . -

MINOR: 20 se,mester hours, i ncluding

I S O,

3 5 1 , 352, one

elective i n economics a n d one elective in economics or s ta t i s t i c s .

BACH ELOR OF ARTS I N EOVCA TION: S e e School of E du c a tion .

COURSE OFFE RING S 150

PRINCIPL E S OF EC ONOMIC S

Introduction to the scope of economics, including Macro _a n d Micro Economics; analysis of U . S . economic system; emphasis on current economic policy. (4)

290

CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC PROBLEMS

- C urre n t economic i s s ues; unemployment, i nflation, poverty, a nd pollu tion; in terests of the class determine specific topics. Prerequisite: 150 or consent. (4)

321

331

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Regional a n d in ternational specializa tion, compara tive costs, i n ternational payments a n d excha nge rates; na tional policies which promote or restrict trade. Pre req uisite: 1 50. (4)

343

OPERATIONS RESEARCH

Qua ntitative methods for decision problems. E m phasis on linear progra m ming a n d other deterministic model s . Prerequisite: Statistics 2 3 1 or e q uivalent. ( 2 )

344

APPL IED REGRESSION ANALYSIS

Si mple a n d m ultiple regression analysis a s investigative tools . Course stresses construction of ele men t a ry linear m o d e l s a n d i n t e r p re t a t i o n o f r e g r e s s i o n r e s u l t s . Prerequisite: Statis tics 2 3 1 o r eq uivalent. (2)

351

INTERMEDI ATE MACRO E CONOMIC ANALYSIS

National income determination including policy i mplications Within the institutional fra mework of the U . S . economy. Prerequisite: 1 50. (4)

352

INTERMEDI ATE MICRO E CONOMIC ANAL ysts

Theory of c o n s u m e r beha vior; prod uct a n d factor prices u n d e r c o n d i t i o n s of m o n o p o l y , c o m p e t i t i o n a n d intermediate m a rkets; welfare economics. Prerequisite: 1 5 0 . (4)

361

MONEY AND BANKING

The na ture a n d function of money a n d credit instit utions; rela tionship of money a n d bank deposits to the na tional economy. Prerequisite: 150. (4)

362

PUBLIC FINANCE

Public taxa tion a n d expenditure a t all governmental levels; the incidence of taxes, the public debt and the provision of public goods s uch a s national defense, education, p ure a i r a n d w a t e r . Prereq uisite: 150. (4)

381

COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

An a nalysis a n d comparison of major conte mporary economic syste m s . Includes an e x a mina tion of capitalism, m a rket socialism, centrally pla nned economies, a n d systems used in selected countries. Prerequisite: Economics 1 5 0 or consen t . (4)

432

URBAN AND REGIONAL EC ONOMIC S

Economic growth process in developing regions of the U . S . ; t h e in ter-rela tionship o f political, econo mic, cultural a n d institutional factors i n t he growth process. Prerequisite: 1 5 0. (4)

HUMAN RESOURCE E CONOMIC S

- The nature a n d treatment of h u m a n resource proble ms in the Uni ted S ta tes; wage determ i n a tion, u nionism, collective bargaining, u ne mployment, poverty and discrimina tion, investment in h u m a n capital and ma npower poliCies. - Pre requi site: 150 or consent. (4)

ECONOMICS

SS


INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION AND PUBLIC POLICY

434

An analysis of the s t ructure, conduct, a nd performa nce of American indus try and the public policies that foster and alter indus trial struc t u re and behavior. Topics i nclude the economics of firm size, motivations of the firm, conce ntration, mergers, paten ts, an titrust, public u tility regulation, p u blic e n t e rprise, and s u bsidization. Prereq uisite: Economics 1 50 or consent. (4)

486

E VOLUTION OF E CONOMIC THOUGHT

Economic though t from ancient to modern times; emphasis on the period f rom Adam Smith to J . M. Keynes; the classical economis ts, the socialists, the marginalists, the neo足 classical economists, and the Keynesi a n s . ( 4 )

S E MINAR

490

Seminar in economic problems and policies with emphasis on enco uraging the student to in tegrate problem-solving methodology with tools of economic a nalysis. Topic (s) selected by class participants and i nstructor. Prerequisite: conse n t . (4) 4 9 1, 4 9 2, 4 9 3

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Prerequ isite: conse n t . ( 1 - 4 )

APPLIED STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

500

An intensive introduction to statistical methods for gradu a te students who have not previously taken In troductory S ta tistics. E mphasis will be on the application of i nferential s tatistics to concrete situations. Topics covered will include: meas u res of loca tion a nd variation, probability, estima tion, hypothesis tests, and regression. (4)

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS AND POLICY DECISIONS

504

Basic economic concepts applied to policy forma tion and opera ting decision s . ( 4 ) 543

QUANTITATIV E M ETHODS

The concepts of probability, sa mpling, sta tistical decision theory, linear prog ramming and other deterministic models applied to ma nagerial proble ms. Prerequisite: Statistics 2 3 1 or 3 4 1 . ( 4 ) 5 9 1, 5 9 2, 5 93

INDEPENDENT STUDY

( 1 -4) 599

THESIS

(1-4)

INTERIM COURSES OFFERED IN 1 9 78 150 30 2 309

56

PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS A SAMPLING OF ASSET PURCHASES: A N ECONOMIC PERSPECTIVE S MALL, IS IT BEAUTIFUL?

E C O N O MIC S


SCHO OL OF

The School of E d u c a tion offers prog r a m s of s t ud y - l e a d i n g t o certification f o r e l e m e n t a ry a n d secondary teac h e rs, c o u n s e lors, n u rses, a n d a d m i n i s t r a t o r s . The c u r r i c u l u m is desig ned to

provide g r a d u a tes w i t h a b 'i e n d i n g of the libe ral -a r ts and a variety of practical e x p o s u r e s to g uided

field experiences beg i n n i n g early i n t h e e d u c a tional s e q u e n c e . The faculty i s c o m m i t ted to the _ d e ve l o p m e n t of ed uca tional personnel sensitive to the vari ed i n divid u a l needs of l e a r n e r s .

F ACUL TY Johnston, Dea n ; Baughman, Brochtrup, Churney, L. Cox, DeBower, F letcher, M. Han son, Mathers, Minetti, Moe, Nokleberg, f. Olson, Pederson, Rickabaugh, Smith, Stein, Wentworth, _Williamson; assis ted by BeaL Ehlers, Gray, Ramsey, and Yetter.

Educatio

S t u d e n t s who have earned a bach el o r's degree at P L U or an o t h er i n s t i t u tion, a n d who contemplate meeting certification requirem e n t s a re e x pected to meet t h e same require m e n t s for admi ssion a nd certification . The certification sequence will norm ally req u i re a s um mer session and two or three semesters.

BAE and/or CE RTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS S t u d e n t s become candidates for certification when they have s a t i s fied t he followi n g : 1 . Have a c u m u.ia tive G P A of 2 . 2 5 2 . Have com pleted the Professional Education Seq uence. 3 . Have com pleted a p proved teaching major(s) or concen t rations

(see requiremen t s as listed under Academic Preparatio n . ) 4 . Complete PE 2 9 5 . 5 . Complete a l l courses i n educatio n a nd i n major a n d m i n o r fields

with grades o f C o r higher. G rades o f D are applicable toward a degree b u t n o t for excess h o u rs toward fifth year prog ram s .

T E A C H E R CERTIFICATION Guidelines for t h e preparation a n d certification of teachers have been es tablished b y t h e State Board of E d ucation . The reco mme n d ed program pattern includes: broad libera l ed u cation, 3 5 per cent; professional s t udy, 20 per cent; and e rectives, 10

per cen t. The four-year curricull!lm leads to the Bachelor o f Arts in

The School of E d ucation i s accredited by th e National Cou ncil for Accreditation of Teacher E d ucation ( N C ATE) , the Northwest Asso-ciation of Schools and Colleges, and the - Wash ington State Board of Education for th e prepara tion o f e l e m e n tary and secondary teachers, principals and guidance coun selors, with the Mas ter of Arts, th e highest degree approved . The accred i tation gives PLU graduates reciprocity in _twe n t y-eigh t s t a t e s . Programs f o r the preparation o f school Hbrarians, school n u rses, school c.o u n selors, a d m i n istra tors, su pervisory personnel, and special education teachers are available. The School offers course work toward the conversion, renewal or -rei n st a t e m e n t of teachin g certifica tes. The School of Education offers graduate degrees in Ele men tary Educa t ion , Secondary Education, Reading, School A d m in i s t rat ion, a nd C ou n seling and Guidance. In formation -regarding these programs i s available through the Dean of Graduate S t udies.

ADM ISSION REQUIREM ENTS I n t he sophomore year, s t u d e n t s with a cu mula t ive grade _point average of 2 . 1 5 or above may regis t e r for Ed. 2 5 I . S t u d e n t s will make ap plication for a d mission to t h e School of Education d u ring the semes ter e n rolled in Ed. 2 5 1 . Prior to Ed. 2 5 1 s t ud e n t s s.hould meet the following require m e n t s : 1 . T h e y m u s t h a v e "C" or b e t t e r g r a d e s i n E n g l i s h 1 0 1 a n d

Psychology 1 0 1 or Sociology 1 0 I . 2 . They m u s t have co m pleted C A 1 2 3 .

Trans fer s tu de n ts who m a y have h a d education co urses in other i n s t i t u t io n s s hould m e et with a n ed ucation a dviser f o r __eva l u a t ion of work completed and m u s t arra nge f o r screen i n g i n to the School of Educa tion .

E d uca tion degree and the Provisional Certificate, a n i n i t ial license to teach, iss ued for a period o f three years. P L U reco m m e n d s candida tes f o r their f i r s t teaching position on t h e b as is of their prepa ration. S t u d e n t s may earn a baccalaureate degree i n a n academic field a n d q ualify for a teaching credential upon completion o f teacher certification require m e n t s . These req uire m e n t s include a major as described under " Academic Preparation" (majors and minors) a s lis t ed in t h i s section o f t h e catalog .

ELEMENTARY PREPARATION I n addition to t h e general u n iversity courses req uired in all cu rricula, certain specific require m e n t s i n general education must be m e t :

1 . H i s t o r y 4 6 0, required o f all ele m e n t a ry teacher candidates. 2 . E S 1 0 1 , World Geography, or A n thropology 1 0 1 , req u ired of all

element ary teacher candidates. 3 . Prospective elemen tary teachers u s u a l ly meet t h e science

general education requirem e n t by compl e t i ng Biology 1 1 1, or another life science course, and E S 1 2 2 . A year course in one laboratory science may be s u b s t i t u ted by those who have adequate high school background in science.

Professional Sequence Ed. 251 Ed. 322

Lear n er a n d Society General Methods (Primary Level)

or Ed. 323 or

General Methods ( U p per Elemen tary Level)

E d . 324

General Methods ( E l e m e n tary Education Model) Septem ber E x perience

E d . 430 or Ed. 432

S t u d e n t Teaching (Primary Level) 10 h o u r s

Ed. 435

S tu d e n t Teaching (Upper E lemen tary) 1 0 h o u rs Professional Seminar (to be taken co ncurre n t l y w i t h E d . 430 or 4 3 2 ) 2 h o u r s

EDUCATION

S7


Professional Subject Minor (Required of all elementary candidates) Requi red E d . 325

-

E d . 326

M a t h ematics in the Elementary School (2) (Prereq uisite: Math 323 or equivalent)

Art 3 4 1

Elementary A rt Ed ucation ( 2 )

Elre/ives

-

Ed. 408 Ed. 4 1 0 Ed. 4 1 2 Ed. 457

Music i n t h e Elemen tary School ( 2 ) 4 semester hours

Language A r t s i n t h e Elementary School (2) Science i n the Elementary School (2) Social Science i n E l e me n t a ry School ( 2 ) Preparation a n d U t i l i z a t i o n of M e d i a (3)

Primary Reading ( 2 ) Ed. 483 English 3 23 C h ildren's Li tera ture PE 322 PE in the E l e m e n t a ry School Additional c hoices in consultation with education adviser. SECONDARY PREPARATION Professional Sequence (minimum of 24 hours) Ed. 251 Learner and Society (GPA 2 . 1 5 requi red; sophomore

EdPsy 468 E d . 425

E d . 434

E d . 467

level course; prerequisites: Psy 1 0 1 , CA 1 2 3 . C A 1 2 3 m a y b e taken concurrently) ( 4 ) Eduational Psychology (prereq uisite: E d . 2 5 1 ) ( 4 ) General Methods - Secondary (prereq uisites: Ed, 251, Ed Psy 468) (2), and E N G L I S H use E d . 4 4 4, Eng. i n Sec. School (2); or S C I E NCE use Ed. 447, Sci. i n Sec . School (2); or S O C I A L STUDIES use Ed. 448, Soc . Stud. in Sec . Sc hool ( 2); or up to 2 semester hours may be taken o u tside of the School of Education in t h ose academic majors other t h a n the above (Eng . , Sci., Soc . ScL). Student Teac hing - Secondary (GPA 2 . 25 requi red; prereq uisites: Ed . 251, Ed Psy 468, Ed. 425, a nd Special Methods) ( 1 0) Evaluation (prereq uisite: Ed. 425; may b e taken conc urre n t l y with Ed. 434) (2) Professional Semester (Senior Year) - S t udents m u s t contact t h e School of Education for applica足 tion procedures. Applica tions m u s t be s u b m itted no later t h a n six weeks before the end of the preceding semester.

SPEC IAL PR OGRAMS The following specialized endorse m e n t s in educa tion are avail able to all s t u d e n t s pursuing teac her certificHi o n . Students desiring to work toward a specialized endorsement s hould consult an adviser i n t h e Schoo l of Education for assistance in planning th eir program. R E A D I N G - 1 4 semester ho urs Prereq u i s i t e : E d . 325 Reading in the Elementary School Required Ed. 4 0 8 Ed. 483

Language A rts in the Elementary School (2) Primary Reading (2)

E d . 479

Diagnosis and Pract icum i n Reading

'E lectives - m i n i m u m of 6 semester hours

58

CA 4 0 2

E DU C A T I O N

Perceptual Motor Skills ( 1 ) C o m m u n ication Arts i n t h e Elemen tary Classroom (2)

8 semester hours

Reading i n the E l e m e n t a ry School

or M u s ic 3 4 1

P E 401

Storytelling ( 4 ) Ed. 456 English 32 3 Ch ildren's Literature (4) ' O t h e r similar co urses may b e u s e d a s elec tives i f approved by the program adviser before registration is completed. SPEC IAL IE DUCATI O N - Teaching major: 30 semester hours. Teaching minor: 1 6 semester hours. See page 61. L E A R N I N G RESOURCE SPEC I A L I S T (Preparation of School Librarians) 16 semester h o u rs S t u d e n t s i n terested in preparing for the respo n s i bi l i t y of admini stration of a school l i b rary may meet suggested standa rds t h rough the following prog r a m : Select a m i n i m u m of one course from each of the following divisio n s : Book a n d Media Selection

Ed. 456 Storytelling (4) Selection of Learning Resource Ma t e r i a l s (2) Ed. 454 E n g l i s h 323 C hildren's Literature ( 4 ) Adnri1l;:;tralion Ed. 451 Ca/aloging

Administration of the School Library (2)

Ed. 4 5 3

Processing School Library Materials (2)

Referenre

E d . 452 Basic Reference Materials (2) Media Utiliza/ion and Productio" Ed. 457 Preparation a nd Utilization of Media (3-4) Curriw /um

E d . 580

C u rriculum Development (2)

A C A DE M I C PREPA RATION A major from those listed must be completed. Completion o f a teach i ng maj o r / minor in a second academic area i s st rongly recommended. ( S t udents do not major in educatio n . ) Teaching majors are offered in the following areas: art, biology, business ed ucation, chemis try, com m u n ication a r t s , earth and genera l sciences, economics, E nglish, French, German, hist ory, language arts, mathemat ics, m u sic, physical educat i o n , p h y si c s , political science , social sciences, sociology, a n d Span i s h . PREPARATION F O R EL EMENTARY TEA C H I N G : A student preparing for elementary school teaching must complete 24 semester hours i n a major teac hin g area, and two m i nors co nsisting of 1 2 semester hours each. One of t h e minors must be in the profeSSional subject s and one i n a teaching field other than that covered in the 24 semester h o u r conce n tr a t i o n . The courses included i n t h e two m i n o r s a re to b e determined i n consultation with t h e School of Educ a t i o n . PREPARA T I O N F O R J U N I O R HIGH TEACHI N G : Students preparing for teaching On the j u n io r high level are required to complete a teaching major of appro x i ma t e l y 24-32 semester hours. A teac hing minor i s also req uired. S t ud e n t s must consult a n educa tion adviser regarding teaching major and m in o r combi n a t i o n s .


PREPARATION FOR SENIOR HlGH SCHOOL �TEACHING: Students preparing for senior high teaching must

COMMUNICATON ARTS Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours requi red : 16

compl e t e approxi m ately 44-48 s e m ester hours i n the academic area i n which they plan to teac h . A minor i n a second teaching area i s recommended. S t udents may also find i t advantageous to t heir career goals t o I } develop skills i n one or more coaching - areas in response to Title IX legislation, and 2} develop competencies in special education i n response to federal special education legislation. I n all cases, students must discuss t h eir program with an adviser from the School of Education. PREPARATlON FOR K-12 TEACHING: Students preparing for K- 1 2 teaching in art, mu sic, o r phy sical education must have student teaching e x perience on both the elemen tary a nd secondary levels. Detailed informa tion regarding K - I Z certification is available in t h e School o f Educa tion office.

semes ter hours of Communication Arts 1 2 3, 1 2 8 or 250, 2 4 1 and 4 0 4 , p l u s 1 2-29 semester hours chosen in consulta tion with t h e major adviser. Supporting classes: Al ternative of 1 6-20 semester hours i n English or modern or classical language. Junior High Teaching Major: 24-28 semester hours required: 12 semester hours o f Commu nication Arts 1 2 3, 1 28 or 250, 2 4 1 and 4 0 4, plus additional 8 semes ter hours in Com mun ication Arts. Addi tional 8- 1 2 semester hours to be determined with department and School of Education. Teaching Minor: 1 6-20 semester hours req uired: Communication Arts 1 2 3 a nd 2 4 1 , plus 8 - 1 2 elective semester hours. E1el11 e ntary Teaching Major: 24 semes ter hours required: Communica tion Arts 123 and 402, plus 8 semester hours in Commu nication Arts and 8 semester hours i n English. Teaching Minor: 1 2 semester hours to be determined i n consulta tion with the School of Education.

ART Senior High Teac h i n g Major: 46 semester hours· required:

Art l I O, 1 60, 230, 250, 365, 370, 440, two courses i n art history plus electives. - Junior High Teaching Majo r: 30 semester hours req uired: Art 1 1 0, 1 6 0, 230, 250, 365, 440 plus electives. Teaching Minor: 20 semester hours required : Art 1 1 0, 1 6 0, 230, 250 and 365. Elementary Teaching Major: 24 semester hours required: A rt _ 1 1 0, 1 6 0, 250, 341, and eight se mester hours of 230, 365 or 370. Teaching Minor: 1 2 semester hours a s determi ned by the . School of Educa tion. ·Up to th ree supporting courses may be recommended. _BIOLOGY Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours requi red :

Biology 155, 1 56, 253, 322, 340; a choice of four semes ter hours from Biology 324, 371, or 372 and four semester hours fro m Bio log y 346, 358, or 4 4 1; 12 semester hours in Chemistry ( 1 1 5, -3 3 1 , 332, 333, 334); M a th 1 33. Recommended: Chemistry 1 1 6, Earth Scie nces 1 3 1 , 1 32, Math 1 5 1 . Elementary Teaching Major: 24 semester h o u rs req uired: Biology 155, 1 56, 253; Chemistry 1 15, 1 66, plus electives. Teaching Minor: 12 semester hours: 155, 1 56, 253. BUSINESS [OUCATION Senior High Teaching Major: 4 8 semester hours required:

Econ 150, Ed. 450, S A 230 o r 4 3 5, 24 1, 243, 281 and 2 semester hours of Advanced Typing; elect 4 se mester hours from BA -350, 364, or 370; elect four h o u rs of emphasis: Accou nting: BA 381 plus 4 hours of upper division accounting; or Shorthand: one year of adva nced shorth and . ( S trongly recom m e nded: t h e followin g courses not taken d u ring the four-year program -should be included i n the fif th-year: B A 350, 364, 3 70, 387, and 488.) Also Ed. 3 0, and 441 or 442. Typing and shorthand are not offered o n ca mpus; these courses may be taken to meet degree requirements a t Fort Steilacoom Community College for transfer cred it a nytime - d uring the four-year program. CHEMiSTRY Senior High Teaching Major: 49 semester hours req uired :

Chemistry 1 1 5 , 1 1 6, 321, 331, 332, 333, 334, 3 4 1, 34 2, a nd 343; -PhYSics 147, 1 48, 153, a nd 1 54; Math 1 5 1, 152. Elementary Tuching Major: 24 semester hours required: 1 6 h o u r s of approved chemistry and 8 h o u r s as determined by t h e School of Education. Teaching M i n o r : U hours as determ i ned _b y the School of Educa tion.

EARTH SCfENCES Senior High Teaching Major: (Earth Sciences) 44 semester

hours required: including 1 31 , 1 3 2, 1 3 6, 202, 324 or 325; plus one additional course i n ES, preferably a field course s uch as: 351, 360 or 365. Required supporting: Chemistry 1 03, 1 04 or 1 1 5, 1 1 6; Physics 125, 1 26 (and labs) or 1 5 3, 154 ( and labs); Math 1 3 3; appropriate biology courses . Addi tional supporting courses should be discussed wi th adviser. J u nior Hjgh Teaching Major: ( Earth Sciences) 28 semester hours required, including : 1 3 1 , 1 32, 1 36, 202, 324 or 325; plus one additional course in ES. A field course such as 351, 360 or 365 is recommended. Suggested supporting: Chemistry 1 04 or 1 1 5, 1 1 6; Physics 1 25, 1 26 (and labs) o r 1 5 3, 154 (and labs); Math 1 33; appropriate biology courses. Additional supporting courses s hould be discussed with adviser. Elementary Teaching Major: ( E ar t h Sciences) 24 semester hours required: ES 1 3 1 , 1 32, 1 3 6 and 202; Chemistry 104 or 1 1 5 and one upper division science course. Teaching Mi nor: 12 semes ter h o u rs i n earth and physical sciences. ECONOMICS Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hou-rs requi red : Economics 150, 3 5 1 , 352, 4 86; 12 semester hours from the

following: Econ 321, 331, 361, 362, 434; H i s tory 460 plus 1 2 s e m e s t e r hours dis tributed o v e r areas of sociology, political science, o r anthropology. (Recommended: Ed. 448 to meet professional education req u i rement.) Junior H i g h Te aching Major: 28 semester hours required : Economics 1 50, 434, 486; 4 hours from: Econ 3 2 1 , 331, 3 5 1 , 3 6 1 , 4 3 2 ; H i s tory 460 p l u s 8 semester hours distributed over areas of sociology or political science. Teaching Minor: 1 2 semes ter h o u rs required: Econ 1 50, p l u s 1 2 h o u rs o f upper division economics. Ed . 448 to meet professional education requireme n t . Elementary Teaching Major: 24 semester hours required: Economics 1 50, 434, 486; 4 semester hours fro m : Econ 3 2 1 , 331, 351, 352, 3 6 1 , 362, 432; His tory 460, 4 semester hours from the areas of sociology or political science. Teach ing Minor: 1 2 semester hours required: Economics 150 and 8 hours o f u pper division economics. Ed . 412 to meet professional education requiremen t .

E o u e A TION

59


E N GLISH Senior High Teac hing Major: A minimum of 32 semester hours, 16 of which are to be upper d i vision, i s required beyond 101 and with the following distributio n : (a) one course in A m erican l i teratu re; (b) two courses i n B ri tish literature (one before 1 70 0 and one after); (c) one cou rse in advanced composition, English 328; and (d) one course from 382, 400 or 403. All majors must presen t two years of one foreign language a t the college level or show equivalent proficiency. Ed. 4 4 4 is required to meet professional ed ucation require m e n t . Recommended: C A 404 or M C l 445 a n d Ed. 4 2 0 . Junior High Teaching Major: A minimum of 32 semester hours in English beyond 101 as stated in Senior High Teaching Major above including t he d i s t rib ution require m e n t s . Majors m u s t present two years of one foreign lang uage at the college level o r show equivalent p roficiency and must take Ed. 444 to meet professional education require m e n t . Elementary Teaching Concentration: 2 4 semester hours; 1 2 h o u r s in E n g l i s h distr.ibuted as in ( a ) a n d (b) u n d e r S e n i o r High Teaching Major above, and ] 2 additional hours in E ng lish as determined b y the School of E d ucation . Reco m m e nded : English 323. Teaching Minor: 12 hours required, as determine d by the School of Education. F R E N CH Senior High Teac hing Major: 44 semester hours required: French 2 0 1 , 202 (or equivalent), 3 2 ] , 351, 352, 4 4 5 and 1 2 additional hours; 445 will meet part o f the professional ed ucation elective require men t. Supporting courses: 12 hours in related areas selected with the approval of the depart m e n t . Junior High Teaching Major: 28 semester h o u r s required a s l i s t e d for s e n i o r h i g h preparation; supporting courses c h o s e n i n cons ultation with m a j o r adviser. Secondary Teaching Minor: 1 6 s e m e s t e r h o u rs above 200 l e v e l . Elementary Teaching Major: 24 semester hours required, including 20 hours in French a n d 4 additional h o u rs selected in consultation with the depart me n t and the School of Education. Teaching Minor: 1 2 hours required, as determined b y the department a n d t h e School of Educati o n . G E N E R A L SCIE N C E ( S e e adviser.) GERMAN Senior H i g h Teaching Major: 4 4 semeste r hours required : German 201, 202 (or equivalent). 321, 3 5 ] , 3 5 2, 445 a n d 1 2 additional hours; 4 4 5 will meet part o f t h e professional education elective req uire m e n t . Supporting courses: 1 2 semester hours in related a reas selected w i t h the approval of the depart men t . Junior High Teaching M a j o r : 28 semester hours required a s listed fo r s e n i o r high preparation; supporting courses chosen i n consultation w i t h major adviser. Secondary Teaching Minor: 1 6 seme ster h o u rs above 2 0 0 level. E l ementary Teaching Major: 24 semester hours required, including 20 hours i n German and 4 additional hours selected in consu l tatio n with the depart m e n t and the School of Education. Teaching M i nor: 1 2 hours requi red, as determined b y the department and t h e School of Education .

60

E DUCATION

HISTORY Senior High Teaching Major: 4 4 semester hours requi red : History ] 0 7 or 1 0 9; ] 0 8 or 1 1 0; 8 h o u rs of 2 5 1 , 2 5 2 and 2 5 3; 4 6 0 and 1 2 additional upper division hours in history including a senio r seminar. Su pporting courses : 1 2 additional semester hours selected from economics, geography, political science, psychotogy, and sociology. Recommended: Ed. 420, Ed. 4 48 to meet professional education requirements. l A NGUAGE ARTS J unior High Teaching Major: 32 semester hours req uired: English 328; 4 hours o f English 403 or linguis ti!:s 400; 4 hours of uppe r d i vision litera t u re (in addition to course taken to meet general education req uirement); CA 24] or 326, and CA 404; Ed. 444 and 1 2 semester hours from areas o f E ng lish, journalism, C A or foreign languag e beyond fresh m a n level (at least 8 of the ] 2 hours must be .i n t h e s a me discipline, and 4 hours m u st be upper division). Teaching Minor: 16 semester hours required, selected from offedngs in E ng l ish, journalism, CA o r foreign language beyond fresh man level; E ng lish 328 i s required. Recommended: Ed. 420. Elementary Teaching Major: 24 semester hours required: Engli sh 328, one of English 403 or Linguistics 400; English 323, C A 402 and one of C A 241 or 3 26 or 436; 2 courses selected from one of the fO'lowing areas: English, CA or foreign language beyond freshman level. Teaching Minor: 12 semester hours requi red as determined b y the School of Education . Engl ish 328 is required. M A THEMA TICS Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours required i n addition to Math 4 4 6. Prerequisite: M a t h 1 3 3 or equiva'le n t . Required: M a t h 140 or i[ 4 4, 1 5 1 , ] 52, 3 3 1 , 4 3 3 , 4 4 6; 3 2 ] or 4 3 4 or 455; fo ur additional upper division hours i n m a t h; eight hours o f c h e m i s t ry or physics; and fo u r additional science hours. J'unior High Teaching Major: 24 semester hours required. Prereq uisite: Math 1 3 3 or equivalent. R e q u i red : Math 140 or 144, 1 5 1 , ] 52, 3 3 1 , 4 3 3, 446. Teaching Minor: 1 6 semester hours required in addition to M a th 4 4 6 . Prerequisite: M a th 1 33 or eq uivalen t . Required : Math ] 5 1 . 1 5 2; 1 27 or 1 44 or 3 3 1 ; 3 2 ] or 433; 446. M a t h 1 4 0 i s recommended if 1 4 4 i s n o t taken. Elementary Teaching Major: 24 semester hou rs. Required: Math 133 o r eq uivalent; ] 2 7, ] 5 1, 1 5 2; 323 or equivalent; 324 or equivalent. Math 1 4 0 or 1 44 is also strongly recom mended. Teaching M i nor: 1 2 semester h o u rs. Required: Math 323 o r equiv alent; 324. M a t h 1 4 0 is strongly recom mended. MUSIC Secondary Teaching Major - Choral: 4 9 semester hours required: Music 1 2 3, 1 24, 1 25, ] 26, 223, 2 2 4, 225, 226, 2 3 1 , 2 3 2 , 3 4 3 , 366, 4 4 5, 4 5 3 , e i g h t hours of large ens emble, four hours o f piano lessons ( m i n i m u m class level 6)*, six hours of voice lessons, a n d two hours of guitar lesso ns. Mu sic 3 4 1 and 44] a re required in the Professional Education sequence for Certifica t io n . Secondary Teaching Major - Inst rumental: 5 ] semester hours requi red : M u sic 1 2 3, 1 24, 1 2 5, 1 26, 223, 224, 225, 226, 2 3 1 , 232, five h o u rs from 2 4 1 / 2 42, 2 4 3/244, 245/ 246, and 2 4 7; ten hours of large e nsemble, two hours of piano lessons (minimum class level 4 ) * , seven hours of private i n s t r uction on p rincipal i nstru ment, 345, 445. Music 444 is required for the Professional Education sequence for Certificati o n .


Junior High Tea(hing Major: 28 semester hours required: - Music 123, 1 24, 1 25, 1 26, 223, 224, 225, 226, 231, 232, 345, two hours o f large ensemble, two hours of piano lessons (minimum class level 4 ) * , and two hours private lessons on principal instrument o r voice. Two to fou r semester hours of Music 4 4 3 and 4 4 4 a re required in the Professional Education sequence for '--c ertificatio n . Teaching Minor: two to four semester hours from Music 3 4 1, 441, 443 and 444 plus 20 hours to be determined in consultation with the School of Educatio n a n d t h e Depa rtment of Music. Elementary Music Specialist - Choral : Music 1 23, 1 24, 125, 1 26, 223, 224, 225, 226, 231, 232, 345, 4 53, eight hours of large ensemble, four hours piano lessons (minimum class level 8)', six hours voice lessons, two hours g u i t a r lessons. Music 34 1 and 4 4 1 are required in the Professional Education sequence for --Ce rtification. ' See Department of Music Handbook for descriptions of class piano levels. Elementary Music Specialist - Instrumen t a l : See Secondary Teaching Major - Instrumental above. Elementary Teaching Major: Two to four semester hours from Music 3 4 1 , 4 4 1, 4 4 3, a nd 4 44 plus 20 hours to be deter mined in consultation with the School of Education and the Depa r t m e n t of M usic. Elementary Teaching Minor: Two to -four semes ter hours from Music 341 and 4 4 1 plus 1 2 hours to be determined i n consultation with the School of Education a n d t h e Depa rtmen t of M usic. __

PHYSICAL E D U CATION - Secondary Teaching Major (44 hours): Required ( 24 hours) : PE 277, 3 2 8, 478, 4 8 1 , 4 8 2, and 485; Biology 205-206; participation i n a varsity or club sport. E L ectives: 20 h o u rs from among the following: P E 275, 282, 283, 284, 285, 287, 288, 332, 360, 362, 484, and 4 9 1 . S tudents desiring K- 1 2 Certification must complete PE 283, 322, 362, and 284 or 288 in addition to meeting req uire men ts as set forth by the School of Education. Secondary Teaching M i nor ( 1 8 hours): Required: PE 277, 3 3 4 , a n d 4 85 a n d 1 2 hou rs of electives from a mong t h e follow ing: PE -282, 283, 284, 285, 287, a nd 328. Elementary Teaching Major (24 hou rs ) : Required: P E 277, 284 o r 288, 283, 322, 334, 362 and 4 hours of electives in physical education with approval of school director. Elementary Teaching Minor ( 1 2 hours): P E 322 and 8 hours -from a mong the following : 284 or 288, 283, and 362. K-6 Physical Education Specialist and K-6 C l assroom Teacher (32 hours): Required : PE 277, 283, 284 or 288, 322, 481, 482, 4 85; Biology 205-206. -- Elementary School Physical Education S pe d ali s t : Required: PE 277, 2 8 3, 284 o r 288, 322, 360, 481, 4 82, 484, 4 85; Biology 205-206, and eight hours o f electives (Education 4 57 and M usic 3 4 1 are recom mended . ) _PHYSICS Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours required: Physics 1 06, 1 4 7, 1 4 8, 1 53, 154, 205, 223, 355, 4 2 1 (2 semester hours); Math 1 5 1 , 1 52; 4 hours of che mist ry . J u n ior High Tea(hing Major: 2 8 semester hours required: -Physics 1 06 o r 355, 1 25', 1 26', 147, 1 48, 205, 223, 272, 421 (2 semester hours), and 8 hours from the followi ng : 1 06, 205, 223, 272, 355.

P h ysic s 1 5 3 and 1 5 4 may be taken instead of 125 and 1 2 6, _with concurrent or prior registration in Math 1 5 1 or 1 5 2 . '

POLITICAL SCIENCE Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours required : Political Science 1 0 1, 1 5 1, 3 3 1 , plus 16 hours of political science electives; History 460; 1 2 hours from the following supporting areas: economics, geography, h istory, sociology, anthropology, o r psychology. Ed . 448 to meet profeSSional education requi re ment . SCIENCE (GE NERAL) See Earth Sciences. SOC IAL SCIENCE Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours required : 4 hours from History 251, 252, 253; History 460; 4 h o u rs from each of the following areas : a n t h ropology, economics, geography, political science, psychology, a nd sociology; 12 upper division hours from two of the following a reas: economics, political science, and sociolog y . Ed . 448 t o meet professional ed ucation require ment. J u n i o r H i g h Teaching Major: 2 8 semester hours required: 4 hours from History 25 1 , 252, 2 5 3; History 460; 4 h o u rs from th ree of the following a reas: a n t h ropology, economics, geography, political science, psychology, and sociology; 8 upper division hours from two of the following areas: economics, political science, and sociolog y. Teaching Minor: 1 2 hours required: 4 hours from History 2 5 1 , 252, 253; History 4 60; and 8 h o u rs from economics, political science, a n d sociology . Ed. 448 to meet professional education req uiremen t . Recomme nded: Ed . 4 20. Elementary Teaching Major: 24 semester h o u rs required : 4 hours from History 2 5 1 , 252, 2 5 3; History 460; and 16 hours from the followi ng: a n t hropology, economics, political science, psychology, sociology, and geog raphy. Teaching Minor: 1 2 semester hours required, a s de termined b y the School of Education . Ed. 4 1 2 to meet professional education require m e n t . SOCIOLOGY Senior High Teaching Major: 4 4 semester hours required: Socioi ogy 101 or 331; 24 hours of sociology; History 4 60; 12 semes ter hours distributed over th ree a reas of other social sciences. Ed. 448 to meet professional education require m e n t . NOTE: S t u d e n t s may elect o n e of t h e specialized a r e a s in sociology. SPANISH Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours required : Spanish 201, 202 (or equivalen t ) , 321, 3 5 1 , 352, 445 and 1 2 additional hours; 445 will meet part of the profeSSional education elective requiremen t . Supporting course s : 12 hours in related a reas selected with the approval o f t h e departmen t . Junior High Teaching Major: 28 semes te r hours required: as listed for senior high prepara tion; supporting courses chosen i n con sulta tion w i t h major adviser. Secondary Teaching Minor: 1 6 semester hours above 2 0 0 level. Elementary Teaching Major: 24 semester hours required, including 20 hours in Spanish a n d 4 addi tional hours selected in consultation with the department a nd t h e School o f Education. SPECIAL E DUCATION This 30 semester hour teaching major must be taken in conj unction with another academic teaching major. The screening process for the teaching major in special educa tion m u s t be completed in addition to the screening procedure in t he regular education prog ram. S t udents should make application for ad mission to the special education progra m during the first

E D UCATION

61


semes te r of the training sequ nce . This should occur d u r i n g matriculation in Ed. 4 9 0 or 4 9 2. . Application forms may be obtained from the School of Ed ucation. Prerequisites: Elementary - Ed. 2.51, 32.5, 32.6, 32.2., 32.3, or 32.4; Math 32.3; Psychology 1 0 1 . Secondary - Ed. 2.5 1 , 32.5, 32.6; 4 2. 3 or 4 25; Math 32.3; Psychology 1 0 1 . Student teaching i n regular ed ucation m u s t b e t a k e n before s t u d e n t teaching in speci a l educa tion. Elementary Major - 30 semester hours t ot a l . 2.2. semester h o u rs req u i red : Ed. 4 7 3, 4 90, 492., 493, 4 94 , and 4 9 9 . 8 semester hours of elective s from Ed. 4 79, 4 9 5 , or 498. Secondary Major - 30 semester hou rs total. 2.6 semester hours requi red : Ed. 4 73, 490, 4 9 2., 493, 4 9 4 , 4 9 8, and 499. 4 semester hours of electives from Ed. 4 79 or 4 95. Minor - 16 semester hours t ot a i. 4 semester hours required from Ed. 4 9 0 or 492.. 12. semester hours of electives from E d . 4 73, 4 7 9 , 4 9 0 , 4 9 2., 4 9 3 , 4 94, 4 9 5 , 498, a nd E d P s y 578. F1FTH-YEAR AND STANDARD CERTIFICAnON

The fifth-year of teacher educa tion is to follow a period o f o ne year o f i n itial teaching experience. S t u d e n t s m u s t complete a mini m u m of eight semester hours applicable toward the fifth year, before the begin ning of the fourth year of teac h i n g . Thirty semester hours i n an approved program m u s t be completed before the beg i n ning of the seventh year of teaching . Students may choose the institut ion i n which they wish to take advanced work as follows: 1. If they choose to work a t PlU or any other of the teacher ed ucation institutions in the State of Washington, that i n s t i tu­ tion shall be responsible for recommending them for the Standard Certificate upon completion of the fifth-year progra m . 2.. I f P l U g raduates wish t o undertake t h e fifth year in a n out-of­ s tate institution, PLU will be responsible for reco m mending them for the Stan dard Certificate. Students must secure ge neral approval of their plan from the u niversity in advance. There re four provisions governing the fifth-year pattern of work, according to State Board Regulation s : 1 . T h e fifth year m u s t include a m i n i m u m o f 30 semester hours o f which a t least fifty per cent must b e upper division andlor g radua te courses. 2. . No more than t h ree semester h o u rs of correspondence study m a y be approved a s a part o f t h e 3 0 semes ter hours in t h e s t uden t's fifth-year prog ram . 3 . P L U graduates m u st take 1 5 semester h o u rs o f the fifth year i n residence a t PLU. A non-PLU student who wishes t o be recommended by PLU must take a m i n i m u m of 2.0 semester hours in residence at PLU. 4 . Studen ts may take 15 of the required 3 0 semes ter hours prior to or d u ring the first year of teaching experience w i t h prior perm ission of the School of Education. Following are req uirements and procedures for the approval of fifth-year programs of work at P L U : 1 . Specific course req u i rements are: ElementaIY a. Req u i red cou rse : Ed 467, Evaluation ( 2. h o u rs) b. One required from the following ( 4 ho urs) : EdPsy 535, Founda tions of G uidance; EdPsy 578, Behavioral Problems of Students; EdPsy 575, Mental Healt h .

62

E D UCATION

h o u rs from t h e following suggested courses: E d 4 73, Pare nt-Teacher Relationsh ips; Ed 5 0 1 , Sex Role Stereo­ typing i n Education; EdPsy 4 75, Reality Discussion Tech niq ues; EdPsy 4 74, Affective Classroom Tec hni ques; 501 Workshops, fo r e x a m ple, Discipline in the Classroom, Encouraging Process. Secondary a. Required courses ( 4 hours): Ed 4 2.0, Problems of Reading in the Secondary School; Ed 467, Eva luation. b. Electives ( 4 hours) : G roup A - 2. hours - courses i n a t h eoretical or i n terpersonal framework - Ed 473, Parent­ Teacher Relationships; Ed 501, Sex Role Stereotyping in E d ucation; EdPsy 475, Reality Discussion Techniques; or appropriate substitutions; G roup B - 2. hours - courses i n a methodological or i nstructional framework - Simulation, Film, I n t e raction Analys is, Program Ideas i n the J u nior High SchooL Pla n t s of the Pacific Northwest, etc. 2.. Any courses recom mended for t h e individual stude n t prior to t h e granting of the bachelor's degree m u s t be completed. Thesl may be reco m m e nded by eit her the u nderg rad uate adviser or the School of Education. 3 . A n y cou rse work required by the undergradua te institution and lor the employing school dis trict must be completed. 4 . Courses taken should s t rengthen areas of concentration and build stronger generat ed uca tion background as well as fill needs i n the professional field. This prog ram of st udies is to be selected by students with the guida nce of those who have worked with them d u ri n g their period of ini tial teac h i ng and the advisers a t t h e recommending instit utions. 5 . St udents secure a pproval of the reco m m e nd i n g insti t u tion for work taken elsewhere before the work is beg u n . S o m e of t h e w o r k t a k e n d uring t he f i f t h y e a r may also apply toward a mas ter's degree. Graduate s t udents may undertake a prog ram coord inati ng require ments for standard certification and the master's degree upon the a pproval of their committee chair and t h e coordinator of fi fth-year progra m s . c.

2.

PRINC I PAL'S CREDENTIALS·

Candida tes for t h e principal's c.redentials will be guided by the followi ng: 1 . They m u s t meet g raduate s t a nd a rd s for the master's degree. 2.. They m us t complete course and in ternship req uirements for t h provisional princ.paJ's credentials a t their chosen level. To receive this they m u s t have completed work for their Stan dard Teach ing Certifica te plus six semester hours. 3 . They m u s t complete ex perience and study requirements for the Standard Principal's C red e n t ia l at their chosen level. To receive this they need to have ( 1 ) had administ rative ex perience, (2.) earned a m i n i m u m of eig h t more semester hours since issua nce of the Provisional Certificate, and ( 3 ) earned their mast er's degree. Stud e n ts who i n tend to work toward t h e master's i n the field of edllcation must apply for ad mission to the G rad uate Division and meet the requirements o u t Li ned by that division. Candidates shouLd see t h e course requI rements as set forth i n the Graduate Catalog . " " " Details o f the program a re available a t t he School of Education upon request. " " Available a t t h e office of the Dean of Graduate St udies upon request.


C E RTIFICA nON REQUIREME NTS FOR SCHOOL COUNSE LORS AND SCHOOL NURSES (Subject to new certification requirements as of October 1973) Educational Staff Associate certifica tion fo r school counselors o r school n u rses i s individua lly designed t h rough a consort i u m consisting o f a school district, related professional as sociations, and Pacific Lut heran Universi t y . Add i t ional informa tion on t hese prog r a m s can be ob t a i ned b y contacting the Dean of t h e School o f Educa tion.

COURSE OFFE RINGS 251

LEARNER AND SOCIETY: GROWTH AND DEVEL OPMENT

Orientation to con temporary schools; human development _i n relation to ind ivid uals and groups in a n ed ucational setting . Public school observation required weekly with students responsible for their own transporta tion . Prerequisite: Psychology 1 0 1 or Sociology 1 0 1 . (4)

-.3 2 1

HUMAN D E VE LOPMENT

326

MATHEM ATIC S IN THE EL EME NTARY SCHOOL

Basic mathematical skills and abilities needed by elementary school teacher; recent developments and materials. Prerequisite: Math 323, 324, or e q uivalent. (2)

340

BUSINESS EDUCATION

401

WOR KSHOPS

408

LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

First part includes the objectives of high school business prog rams, the bu siness cur riculum, layout and faci.lities planni ng, the evalua tion of business teachers and com petence for business occupations. Also i ncluded is the examina tion of information resources and cu rrent thought in business education. The second part of the course concentrates on the application of research findings and psychological principles to the teaching of typewriting a nd bookkeeping in secondary schools. Requi red for business education majors. Prereq uisite: Advanced Typi ng and BA 281 or equivalent. (4) Workshops in special fields for varying periods of time. (1 -6)

E m o t i o n a l , s o c i a l , i n te l l e c t u a l and p h y s i o l o g i c a l :levelopment from infancy through adolescence. A weekly two-hour observa tion of .the pu blic school i s required. """"'; I ndividually ass igned.) S tudents responsible for their own transportation . Prerequisite: Psychology 1 0 1 or Sociology 1 0 1 . (4)

The functional teaching of comm un ication skills, grades K6; a reas include: oral and written expression, listening, reading, literatu re, dra matization, spelling, gramm ar, handwri ting, childre n's language and language study, vocabu lary development and lexicography. (2)

GENE RAL METHODS - PRI MARY

The obj.ectives, ma tedals and methods of teaching science. (2)

322

-Competencies will be developed for teaching in grades K-3; with observation a n d participa tion i n public schools. '?rerequisite: 251 or 32 1 . (4)

323

GENERAL METHODS UPPE R E L E ME NTARY

Competencies will be developed for teaching in grades 4-6, -vith observation and participa tion in public schools. Jrerequisite: 251 or 3 2 1 . (4)

324

G ENERAL METHODS EL EMENTARY MODEL

::: o mpetencies wiD be developed for teaching i n grades K-6. _:xtended e xperience and participation i n pu blic school classroom s will be provid e d . Prerequisites: 2 5 1 or 321 , Math 323, and conc urrent enrollment in E E M block 'ourses, 325, 32 6, 4 08, 4 1 0, 4 1 2 . (4)

---J 2 5

READING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Teaching reading in elementary grades, including modern ' pproaches, rna terials, methods, tech niques, proced ures .nd some diagnosis of readi ng difficulties. Prerequ isite: 250 -lr 3 2 1 . ( 4 )

410

SCIENCE IN THE EL EMENTARY SCHOOL

412

S OC IAL STUDI ES I N THE E L E MENTARY SCHOOL

Objectives, m a terials and methods of teaching the social studies, recom me nded to student teachers and ex perie nced teachers. (2)

420

PROBLEMS OF R EADING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL

Teaching secondary readi ng in conte nt areas; at tention to developmental reading problems; materials, methods, techniques, proced u re s and some observation and diagnosis o f r e a d i n g d i f f ic u l t i e s . P r e r e q u i s i t e : 2 5 1 ; t a k e n concurrently with 4 2 5 a n d 4 3 4 . (2)

425

G ENERAL METHODS - SECONDARY

Curriculum, ma terials, and methods of secondary teaching; observation and discussion. Prerequ i si t e : 2 5 1 , 468. (4)

430

STUDENT TEACHING - PRIMARY

Teaching in the pu blic schools u nder the direction a nd su perVISIOn of classroom and u n i versity teachers. Prereq uisites: 2 5 1 or 321, 3 2 2 or 324, and 325; concurren t e nrollme n t i n 435. (1 0)

E D UCATION

63


432

STUDENT TEACHING UPPER EL EMENTARY

Teaching in the pu blic schools under the direction and s u perVISIOn of classroom a n d u niversity teache r s . Prereq uisites: 2 5 1 or 3 2 1 , 323 or 3 2 4 , a n d 3 2 5 ; concurrent enrollment in 435. ( 1 0)

434

STUDENT TEACHING - SECONDARY

Teaching in the public schools under the direction a n d s u perVISIOn of classroom a n d university teachers. Prerequisites : 2 5 1 , 4 68, a n d 4 25 . May be taken concurren tly with Ed. 467. ( 1 0)

435

PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR

An opportunity for students to share experiences with a n exchange o f i d e a s on pupil behavior, c urric u l u m practices, a n d wa ys of i m proving teaching performa nce. ( Taken concurrently with 430 or 432.) ( 2)

436

A LTE RNATE LEVEL STUDENT TEACHING - ELEME NTARY

A course dlesigned to give some knowledge, understanding, a n d study of children, s u bject m a t te r field s, a n d materials i n t h e student's alternate teaching level p�us s t u d e n t teach i ng on that 'level. Students who have completed secondary preferred level student teaching should enroll i n this course. ( 4 )

437

A LTERNATE LEVEL STUDENT TEACHING - SECONDARY

A course designed to give some k nowledge, understand ing, and study of children, subject m a tter fields, a n d m a terials in the student's alternate teaching level plus student teaching o n tha t leve l . S tudents who have completed elementary pre ferred level student teaching should e n roll i n this course. ( 4 )

440-448 SPECIAL METHODS IN TEACHING SECONDARY SCHOOL SUBJECTS C u rriculum, methods a n d ma terials of instruction in a variety of s u bjects; m a y be taken for gradu a te credit.

440 441

SEMINAR IN SECONDARY ART EDUCATION (2) TEACHING SEC RETARIAL SUBJECTS

The a pplica tion of resea rch findings and p s ychological. principles to the teaching of shorthand, office practice, a n d related s u bj ects in secondary schools. Intended f o r business ed ucation majors . Prerequisites: Advanced Shorthand, Advanced Typewriting, SA 2 4 1 a n d SA 340 or equivalen t . ( 2)

64

E D U CATION

442

TEACHING GENERAL BU SINES S SUBJECTS

The application of research findings a n d psychological principles to the teaching of general business, cons u m e r economics, economics, b u s i n e s s law, b u siness m a thema tics, and b u siness c o m m unica tions s ubjects in secondary schools. Pre requisites: SA 241, 243, 290 or 4 95, 350, Economics 1 50, or consent of the ins tructor. (2)

443

C HE MI STRY IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (2)

444

ENGLISH IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL

Development of teaching aids and methods; demonstrations of method a n d s tra tegy o f m a s ter teachers . ( 2)

445

METHODS IN TEACHING FORE IGN LANGUAGES

Theory a n d techniques of foreign langu ag e teaching; ­ special problem s in the studen t's major language, emphasis o n aud iolingual techniques. G (2)

M A THEMA TICS I N T H E SECONDARY SC HOOL (2) 4 4 7 SCIENCE IN THE SECONDARY SC HOOL (2) 448 SOCIAL STU DIES IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (2)

446

451

ADMINI STRATION OF THE SCHOOL LIBRARY

Library orga nization and a d ministration in the elementary school. G (2)

452

BASIC REFERENCE MATE RIALS

Those services of a school libra rian rela ted to the preservation of all m a te rials which form the sources of reference . G (2)

453

PROCESSING SC HOOL LIBRARY MATERIALS

Classification, ca taloging m a teria ls. G ( 2)

454

and

technical

processing 0 1

SELECTION OF LEARNING RESOURCE MATERIALS

Criteria, professional l i terature a n d tech niques ot evalua tion of library m a terials (print and non-print); the libraria n's responsibility to faculty, students and thE general public. G (2)

455

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

Audio and visual m a terials a n d aids, their use, organiza tion . and a d minis tration. G (2)


S TORYTELLING comb ina tion of discovery and practicum in the art of storyte lling. Investiga tes the values and background of �toryteUing, the various types and forms of stories; =chniq ues of choosing and of telling stories. Some offampus practice. De monstra tions and joint storytelling by and with instructor. (4)

56

I

DffiECTED TEACHING IN READING C E NTERS Directed observa tion a nd teaching in summer remedial classes in public schools; to be taken concurren tly with 488. Prere quisite: teaching experience. S G (4) 489

PREPA RATION AND UTI LIZA TION Of M E D I A 'he production and use of a variety o f in structional rna terials, flat pictures, charts, maps and the 35mm camera; -a rticipants produce items useful in inst ruction. $ 1 0 .00 lab =e is charged. G (3 or 4)

I NTRODUC TION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION Definitions, cha racteristics and psychological aspects of all categories of exceptionality. Federal and state legislation. Curre nt issues and practices in delivering services to ha ndicapped people. The classroom teacher's role in mains treaming. Practicu m required. Prerequisites: Ed 251, 325, 326, and Ge neral Methods. (4)

6 7 EV ALUA nON Eva luation of school experiences; problems in connection 'ith development, orga nization and a d ministration of tests , ta ndardized and teacher-made). Required of fifth-year ---st uden ts. Prere quisite: st udent teaching or teaching experience. Ed 251 - EdPsy 468. May be taken concu rrently 'ith student teach ing. G (2)

C HARACTERISTICS Of L EARNING DISABILITI ES Current issues, practice5 and research in learning disa bilities. Emphasis will be on special instructional techniques to accommodate this type of child's special needs. Practicum required. Prerequisites: Ed 251, 325, 326, and General Methods. (4)

73 PAR ENT-TEAC H E R R E LATIONSHIPS An e x a mination of the philosophy and implementation of oarent-teacher confere ncing. Rela ted issues such as the uental role in ed ucation, home visits, and the role of the udent in the conferencing process a re also considered. Listening and co mmunication skills useful in conferencing are studied and practiced. Provisions for the needs of lrents of the handicapped will be studied by students in Ie special education progra m . Prerequisite: student Teaching or teaching experience. (2)

LEARNING D ISA BI LITIES: D I A G N OSTIC PROC EDURES A broad range of scree ning a nd diag nostic proced ures will be studied. Data from other professionals such as the school psycholog ist, comm unication disorder specialist, occupa tional thera pist, and medical doctor will b e used to prepare a hypothesis rega rding the child's disa bilities. Various educational tests, formal and teacher-made, wiH be used to determine where a child is f u nctioning academically. Practic um required. Prerequisite : Ed 490, or 4 92, or concurrent enrollment, or permission of inst ructor. (4)

'57

_

SPECIAL T E C HN I Q U E S IN R E A D I N G Idividual diag nostic assessment of reading problems using th formal and informal testing techniques. Special i n structional methods for remediation for both Title I and S o e c i a l E d u c a t i o n c h i l d re n . P r a c t i c u m r e q u i r e d . ďż˝ erequisite: Ed 325 or eq uivale n t . (4)

479

-rl3 PRIMARY READING Materials and methods of the primary reading program and J relation to other activities. Prerequisit e : teaching : perience. G ( 2) THE G i f T E D C HILD A study of the gifted child, characteristics and problems, ld school procedures designed to further devel opment. G )

4B5

488 READ I NG C E N T E R WORKSHOP Clinical study of reading problems and suggested corrective eas ures; to be taken concurrently with 489. Prerequisite: _aching experience. S G (2)

490

492

493

LEARNING DISABILITIES: P R O G R AMMlNG Diagnostic informa tion is used as the basis ,for writing a n IEP (individua lized educational plan). Course includes behavioral objectives, task analysis, learning sequences, behavior modific ation, and evalua tion of learning using precision teach ing techniq ues. Practicum required. Prerequisite: Ed 493 or permission of instructor. (4) 494

LANGUAG E PROBLE M S Of E X C E PTIONAL CHILDREN P r i n c i p l e s of r e c e p t i v e and e x p r e s s i v e l a n g u a g e development including speech, word meaning, dialect, and reading . Assess ment and remediation strategies from ea rly childhood t h rough adolesce n t . Course is designed for reg ular and special educa tion teachers. Prereq uisite : Ed 2 5 1 . ( 4) 495

E D UCATION

6S


496

LABORATORY WORKSHOP

Practical course using elementary-age children in a c l a ssroom situa tion working out specific problems; provision will be made for some active participation of the u niversity students. Prerequisite: conference with the instructor or the Dean of the School of Education . G

497

SPECIAL PROJECT

Individual study and research on educational problems or a d d i tional l a bo r a t o r y e x pe rience i n public s c hool classrooms . Prerequisite: consent of the Dean. G ( 1-4)

498

C URRICULUM FOR E XC EPTIONAL STUDENTS IN THE S ECON DARY SCHOOL

C urriculum content and planning including academic subj ects, life adjustments, and career counseling for e xceptional adolescents and a d u l t s . Foc u s of the course will be for the learning disabled and other mildly handicapping conditions . Prerequisites: Ed. 490 o r E d . 492. (4)

499

SPECIAL EDUCA lJON: STUDENT TEACHING

Teaching in public schools Special Educa tion class rooms under the direction and supervision of classroom and university teachers .. Prerequisite : E d . 4 9 4 . (4)

501

WORKSHOPS

G raduate workshops i n special fields for v a rying lengths of time. ( 1-4)

525

C UR RENT PRACTICES AND ISSUES IN READING

550

SCHOOL F INANCE

Local, state and federal contributors to school finance, iL philosophy and developme n t; the development and administra tion of a school budget. (2)

552

PUBLIC SC HOOL ADMINISTRATION

Administration and supervision of school personnel, planr and progra m; the s t ructure and organization of the school system. Prerequisite: teaching experience or consent of th, Dean. (3)

554

HIGH SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION

Planning and organizing the higlh school c u rriculum scheduling, e x t ra-curricular activities, teachers' meetings public accounting and control, finance and reports. Prerequisite: 552. (2)

555

ADMINISTRATION AND S UPERVISION WORKSHOP

Projects discussed determined by the class; typical projects include c u rriculum planning and adjustment, publi� relations progra ms, personnel employment and i n-servic training; financing building and educa tional program� Prerequisite: one course In adminis tration and/or supervision. (2)

558

ADMINISTRATIVE INTERNSHIP

In ternship i n school administra tion pla nned with th" School of Education in ·cooperation with selected school a d ministrators. Prerequisite: course work i n schoc ' administration and admission to the g raduate prograrr (2-4)

To examine c u rrent practices and issues in the field of reading as described through educational research. Th e resea rch findings will be appl ied to c urrent classroom practices . Students will be e ncouraged to pursue specific areas of interest within the broad area of reading i ns truction. Prerequis i t e : 3 2 5 or equivalent and teaching e xperience. (2-4)

Historical perspective and current status; deve,lopment 0 functions and structures; issues in cu rricul u m; phillosophy of administration; case studies. ( 4 )

527

573

PSYCHOLOGY OF READING

Principles of reading, perception, word recognition, concept development and meaning i n reading will be explored . The psychological a nd physiological aspects of the reading act will be exa mined i n rela tionship to successful reading achieveme n t . Prerequisite: 325 or equivalent and teaching experience. ( 2 )

545

METHODS AND TECHNIQUES OF RESEA RCH

Seminar in research me thods and techniques i n education with emphasis on designing a research project i n the student's area of i n te rest. Required for M . A . Prerequisite : Consulta tion with student's adviser and a d mittance to the graduate prog ram. (2)

571

HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF HIGHER EDUCATION

STUDENT PERSONNEL WORK IN HIGHER E DUCATION

S tudent personnel services i n higher ed uca tion; use o f personnel d a t a ; co-c urricular a c tivities; s t u d e n t wel.fare· contemporary trends in counseling problems related tl student life. (4)

579

DIAGNOSIS AND REMEDIATION IN READING

Causa tive factors relating to reading difficulties; som opportun,ity to apply remediation techniques; open to thos�­ with teaching experience. (2)

580

CURRICULUM DE VELOPMENT

Types of curriculum organizations, programs techniques of cu rriculum development. (2)

583

ani

E DUCATIONAL ISSUES AND PROBL E MS

Individual reading, investigation, research and/or practic u m experience i n school or agencies . ( 1 - 4 )

66

EDUCATION


585

C OMPARA TIVE EDUCATION

466

Comparison a nd investiga tion of certain material a nd cultural systems of education throughout the world. (2)

586

S OC IOLOGY OF E DUCATION

The nature o f functioning of the educa tional system will be examined from a sociological perspective. Topics will i nclude: education, s t ra t ification, and social cha nge; school as a complex organiza tion; the school as a social i n s titution; and the sociology of learning. (4)

- 58 7

HISTORY OF EDUCATION

Great e d uca tors, educa tional theories and educa tional systems from an tiquity to the present. (2)

_ 58 9

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION

Ph ilosophical a n d theoretical foundations of educa tion. (3)

590

GR ADUATE SEMINAR

A workshop for all Mas ter of Arts candidates in the School -o f Ed uca tion which provides a forum for exchange of research ideas and problems; candida tes should register for this seminar for assistance in fulfilling requirement. No credit is given, nor is tuition assessed. (0) 596 RES EARC H S TUDIES IN E DUCATION For Master of Arts candidates who elect to write two research papers instead of a thesis. (One paper may be in the candidate 's minor field u nder the s upervision of the minor ad viser.) Candidates will be required to review their resea rch pape rs before their Graduate Committee (see Grad uate Ca talog) . ( 1 )

-

_5 9 7

RESEARCH STUDIES IN E DUC ATION See Ed ucation 596. ( 2)

599 THES IS For Master of Arts candidates who elect to write a thesis - instead of two research pape r s . The thesis problem will be chosen from the candidate's major field of conce ntra tion and must be approved b y the candidate's G ra d u a te Committe e . C a ndidates will be e x pected to defend their -thesis in a final oral examination .conducted by their committee. (3-4)

EDUCA TIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 6 1 GROUP PROC E S S AND THE INDIV1DUAl -A h u m a n i n teraction laboratory to facilita te the e x ploration of the self concep t through the mechanisms of i n terpersonal interactions and feedback. Emphasis placed on the acquisition of skill in self-exploration, role _ide nt ifica tion and climate-making. G (2)

I NTRODUCTION TO STUDENT DE VELOPMENT IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Introduction to the concept of student developmen t in higher e d uca tion; e x posure to s tudent personnel se rvices offered by colleges and universities; familiariza tion with the literat ure i n the field; field trips to s tudent personnel operations at local post-secondary institutions. G (2)

468

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOG Y

Principles a n d research in human learning a nd their i m plications for c u rricul u m and instruction. Pre requisi te:

251. (4)

469

CAREER GUIDANCE

A s tudy of careers, theories of choice and guidance techniques. (4)

474

AFFECTIVE C LA S SROOM TECHNIQUES

This course will e x plore v a rious techniques designed to facilitate understanding of self and others; methods for working with s tudents. Prerequisite: s t ude nt teaching or g raduate status. Laboratory ex perience as a rranged. G ( 2)

475

REALITY DI SCUSSION TECHNIQUE S

The use of Reality Therapy in a helping relationship schools, social agencies, mental health clinics, university residences, etc. L a bora tory experie nce as arranged. G (4)

490

INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION

( Sa me a s Education 4 90)

501

WORKSHOPS

Graduate workshops in special fields for v a rying lengths of time . ( 1-4)

535

FOUNDATIONS OF GUIDANCE

The focus is on developing a n understanding of the services and processes available to assist individuals i n making plans and decisions according to their own life pattern. G (4)

560A

C ONTINUING PRACTICUM

A practical e x perience i n the techniques of counseli ng; e nrollme nt limited to students begi nning the master's programs in Counseling and Guida nce and Student Personnel Administration i n Higher Education, and is a prerequisitie to admission to the Counseling and Guid a nc e master's program; practicum makes use of counseling sessions with clients utilizing verbal a nd non-verbal a ttending behavior. ( 1 )

560 B

CONTINUING PRACTICUM

A practicum e x perience in individual counseling to assist students to in tegrate cognitive a nd a ffective learnings. Opportunity for problem identification, cont,ract and decision making. Prerequisite : 560A. ( 1 )

E D UCATI O N

67


560C

CONTINUING PRAC TICUM

Experience in individual counseling with emphasis on Gestalt therapy techniques. Prereq uisites; 560B a n d EdPsy 561. (I)

560D

C ONTINUING PRACTICUM

Expe rience in s m a l l group se ttings, following Adlerian psychology consultation model. Prerequisites; 560C and 578. ( I )

560E

CONTINUING PRACTlCUM (ADMINISTRA TIVE)

E x pe rience working in an administrative setting i n student personnel for 5 - 1 0 hours per week. E x posure to the li tera ture associated with the specialized field chosen. May be taken twice, with experiences to be in different se ttings each time. Prereq uisites; 4 66, 560A. ( I )

561

PRACTICUM IN G R O UP PROC E S S AND LEADERS HIP

A h u m a n i n teraction laboratory w hich ex plores i n terpersonal operations i n groups a n d facilitates the development of self-insight; emphasis on leadership and development of skill i n diagnosing individ ual, group and or g a n i z a t i o n a l b e h a v i o r p a t t e r n s a nd i n fl u e n c e s . Prereq uisite; 4 6 1 . (2)

565

SE.MINAR: NON-TEST APPRAI SAL

Assessment of personal characteristics and behavioral patterns to better understand the individual; use of non足 test data (sociometric scales, case studies, au tobiog raphies, i nterviews, i n teraction a n alysis) . Prereq uisites; student teaching, gradua te status. (4)

570

PRACTICUM AND FIELDWORK IN COUNSELING AND G UIDANCE

A culminating practic um of field experience in schools or agencies using theory, skills and techniques previously learned; a varie ty of work experiences with i ndividual groups. Seminar included. Prerequisites; 560C 469, E d . 5 4 5 , Psychology 450. ( 4 )

572

PRACTICUM IN STUDENT PERSONNEl ADMINISTRATION

A c u l m i na ti n g p r a c t i c u m of s u pe rv i s e d collegiate exper,ience in reside nce halls, administrative offices, service agencies, research on projects associated with practicu m . (4)

68

SEMINAR I N STUDENT PERSONNEL ADM INISTRA nON

Student personnel services i n higher education; use of personnel data; co-curricular activities; student welfare; conte mporary trends in counseli ng problems rela ted to student life. (4)

575

MENTAL HEALTH

Basic mental health principles a s related to i n ,terpersonal relationships . Foc us upon self understanding. Laboratory experience as a rranged. (4)

578

BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS OF STUDE NTS

A d l e r i a n concepts provide b a s i s for observation, motiva tion, modification, and life st yle assessment. Skills for assisting students develop responsibility for their own behavior is .focus . Laboratory ex perience as arranged. (4)

B A S I C RELATIONSHIPS IN COUNSELING

A study of the theory, process, tec hniques a n d charac teristics of the counseling relationship. A basic course for M . A. students i n the Counseling and G uida nce program. (Formerly Counseling Theory ) . (4)

563

573

E DUCATION

INTERIM C OURSES OFFERED IN 1 9 78 307 . 320

CRE ATIVE MEDIA INDEPENDENT STUDY


English A s a discipline E ng l i s h a s s i s t s s tu d e n t s in achieving e x ce'llence in w r i t i n g , discern men t in read i n g , a p p r e c i a t i o n of h u man e x p e ri e n c e a n d a e s t h e t i c v a l u e s , and an u n d e r s t a n d i n g o f t h e processes o f c r i tical and creative e x p re s s i o n . The E ng l i s h d e p a r t m e n t o f f e r s a f u l l s e m e s t e r in L o n d o n i n t h e fall, and often a s t ud y t o u r o f the B r i t i s h Isles du ring i n te ri m . A special prog r a m e x p l o r i n g careers in p u b l i s h i ng w i t h a s u m m e r i n te r n s h i p w a s b e g u n in 1 9 75.

FACULTY Van TasseL Chair; Benton, Bergman, L. Johnson, Jones, Klopsch, D.M. Martin, Reigs tad, Seal.

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 28 to 40 semester hours of E n glish beyond English 101, including: 4 hours i n A merican literature, 4 hours i n British literature before 1 700, and 4 hours in British literature after 1 700. At least 16 hours should be upper division. Individual progra ms are designed by s t udents and their advisers, w i t h approval by t he full department i n a review during the j u n ior year. Advanced courses in writing or grammar may be required. All E n glish majors must complete a t least two years of a foreign language at the college level, or t h e equivalent. MINOR: 1 6 semester hours, excluding courses for I n terim credit, of which a t least 8 hours should be upper divisio n . These courses s hould include 4 hours i n American literature, 4 hours in British literat ure before 1 700, and 4 h ours in British litera ture after 1 700. MINOR (EMPHASIS ON WRITING): 1 6 semester hours, excluding course s for Interim credit, of which at least 8 hours should be upper division. These courses should include 4 hours i n British literature before 1 700, 4 hours in American or British literature after 1 700, and 8 hours i n writing courses d rawn from 327, 328, and 403. Al l English minors must complete a 路t least one year of a foreign language at t h e college level, or t h e equivalen t . BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: S e e School o f Education.

C OURSE OFFERI N G S 101

COLLEGE ENGLISH

Develops a s tudent's powers to read, think, a nd write critically. (Students whose English skills are weak are encouraged to work in the skills programs of the Academic Advising and Assistance Center before registering for English 1 0 1 . ) I II (4)

E NG L I S H

69


217

SH ORT STORY

221

L ITERARY FORMS AND AN ALYSIS

Themes a n d techniques in short fiction. II (4) Designed to familiarize students with forms of literature (poe try, fiction, drama), with basic literary terms, and with major cri tical approaches. II (4)

I NTRODUCTION TO C ONTEMPORARY LITERATURE

230

Emphasis on American fiction since 1 950. I ( 4 )

MASTE RPIE CE S OF E UROPEAN L ITERATURE

231

Representa tive works of the li terature of Western E u rope, especially classical, medieval, and Renaissance. I (4)

I NTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN LITE RATURE

241

The continuity of themes and forms i n American prose, poetry, and fiction from colonization to the First World War. Emphasis on major works of the 1 9th century. I II (4)

INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH L I TERATURE: BEG INNINGS TO 1 750

251

E mphasis on the continuity and variety of English literature from Beowulf through Neocla ssicis m . I (4)

INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH LITERATURE: AfTER 1750

252

English literature, especially poetry, f r o m t h e emergence o f ro manticism t o t h e 2 0 t h centu ry. I I ( 4 )

323

CHILDREN'S LITE RATURE

32 7

I MAGINATIVE WRITING

An i ntroduction to a ri h literary tradition to guide re ading and book selection in the schools and the family. I II (4) A workshop in writing poetry and short fiction. Includes practical study of techniques and forms to develop critical standards and an u nderstanding of the process of composition . I I I (4)

328

ADVANCED C OMPOSITI ON

341

FREE-LANCE WRI TING

A study of rhetorical principles used in writing persuasively a n d i maginatively. Required for certification by the School of Educa tion. I II (4) A course in writing for publication, with primary emphasis on the feat ure article. I ntended to help students develop research and editorial. skills; to help them produce writing that is clear, informa tive, and exp ressive; to enhance their sense of audience; and to introd uce them to procedures for submi tting for magazine publication. ( 4 )

349

MODERN POE TRY

Emphasis on American poe try since 1 950. II (4)

70

ENGLISH

351

MODERN DRAMA

A study of modern classics from Ibsen to lonesco: Scandinavia n, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Russia n, E nglish, Irish, and Americ a n . II (4)

358

THE BRITISH NOVEL

382

CHAUCER AND HIS AGE

A study of the form from Defoe and Fielding to La wrence, Joyce, and the moderns. II ( 4 ) A st udy of Cha ucer's major works, especially The Canterbury Tales, i n their lively 1 4 th-cent ury setting. Includes a n i n t roduction to the development of the English langu age. I (4)

383

SHAKE SPE A R E

388

MI LTON A N D H I S AGE

'

T e n to twelve representa tive plays. Recommended a s background: 2 5 1 . I ( 4 ) A s t u d y o f Milton's work, especially Paradise Lost, a n d the work of other major a u thors (Donne, Herbert) of the 1 7th centu ry, the golden age of religious poetry i n England. II ( 4)

389

ENGLISH SA TIRE A D SENSIBI LITY, 1 660-1 800

A study of neo-classic writings and the developing social awareness o f the pre-romantic age : Dryden and Pope to Johnson and Blake. I (4)

390

THE ENGLISH ROMANTIC MOVEMENT

391

LIFE AND LETTERS IN VICTORIAN ENGLAND

A s tudy of the romantic awakening in Engla n d : Blake, Word sworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Byron, and others. I (4)

Selected a u thors a n d topics from a period of rapid and momentous social change. II ( 4)

392

TWENTIETH CENTU RY BRITISH LITERATURE

Selected pla ywrights from Shaw to Beckett; poetry of Yeats, Thomas, and Auden; fiction of Joyce, Lawrence, Greene, and others. II (4)

400

LINGUISTICS

403

MODERN ENGLISH GRAMMAR

See Modern a n d Classical Languages. A study of three major approaches to g ra m ma r : the traditional, the s tructural, and the transformational. Includes in trod uction to the history of the English language. I (4)

- 4 41

AMERICAN ROMANTIC L ITERATURE, 1 82 0- 1 880

S tudies in literary romanticism from Cooper to Jam es, with emphasis On the Age of Eme rson. Readings i n Thorea u, Whitman, Poe, Melville and Ha wthorne for upper division students. I (4)


142

AMERICAN REALISM AND NATURALISM, 1 880- 19 1 5

Fiction and criticism in the vears o f America's urbaniza tion md emergence as an i n d ustrial power: Twain, James, :::: r ane, Norris, Dreis e r . (4)

443

A MERICAN LITERATURE SINCE 1 9 1 5

Introduction to the modern tradition i n poetry ( F rost, Williams, Pound) and fiction (Fi tzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkne r) for upper division students . II (4) _

491, 492 INDEPENDENT READING AND RESEARCH

A n i ntensive c o u r s e of reading. May ind ude a thesis. ntended for upper division majors. I II (2-4)

597

GRADUATE RESEARCH

'2- 4)

INTERI M COURSES OFFERED IN 1 9 78 �01 301 303 305 307 -3 0 9 310 312

COLLEGE ENGLISH POETRY A N D T H E MYSTICAL EXPERIENC E REFLECTIVE READING: FAULKNER'S ABSALOM, ABSALOM! G ROWING UP IN THE NOVEL WOMAN AS WRITER: THE F E MALE IMAG INA TION THE INTERPRETATION OF FAIRY TALES EUROPEAN MUS IC DR AMA, CULTURAL TOUR THE WORLD O F THE BOOK

E NG L I S H

71


SCHOOL OF

Fine Arts The Sc hool of F i n e Arts o f Pacific L u t h e ra n University i s a com mu nity o f a r tists dedica ted : to provide e n ergies and facilities for the focu sed refi ne m e n t of creative activi t y; to operate in the vangu ard of a r tistic u nd e r s t a nding and to a s s u m e a n additive rather than imita tive position r e l a tive to that u n d e r s t a n ding; to pu rsue s t u d y of bo t h the historical and t h eoretical aspects of our crea tive legacy; to recognize change in artis tic criteria without devaluing the traditional conce p t s of discipline, crafts m a n s h i p, and academic professionalism; to fos te r a c tivity free from the cap rice of the marketplace b u t, b y virtue of i t s s u b s ta nce, not aloof from nor incompa tible with practical concerns; to a n im a t e and " h u m a nize" the academic cli m a te of Pacific L u theran University via the cre a t i ve p resence by s ponsoring a rich a n d varied program of even ts in the arts; and to provide the s t u d e n t s of Pacific Lu theran University a n oppor t u n i ty to e x perience first hand the u nique "chemis try" of t h e creative p rocess. FAC ULTY

Moe, Dea n : faculty members of the departments of art, communication arts, and music.

Degrees offered by the School of Fine A,rts include the B . F . A . (Bachelor o f F i n e A r t s ) i n a r t or i n commun ication arts, the B . M. (Bachelor of Music). a nd the M . M . ( Master of Musicl足 Stude n ts m a y a l so earn the B . A. (Bachelor of Arts) b u t t h is ' degree is awarded through the College of Arts a n d Sciences. Candidates for the B . F . A . a n d B . M. a s well as for the B . A . in art, commu nication arts, or mu sic must meet ge neral u niversity requirements and the specific requirements of the depa rtments of art, com m u n ication arts, or m usic. For details about the B . A . E . (Bachelor of A r t s in Education) i n art, commu nication arts, o r m u sic, see the School o f Ed ucation. For course offerings, degree req uire ments. a n d progra ms i n t h e School of Fine Arts, see : ART COM M U N I C ATION A RTS MUSIC

72

FINE ARTS


istoty The depa r t m e n t is in terested i n p rovi d i n g s t ud e n t s w i t h the tools of c r i t i c a l t h o u g h t a n d approp ria te

m e t hods for fin d i n g a n d t e s t i n g his torical evidence, for weig h i n g v a l ues, a n d for discoveri ng t r u t h . The h i s tory faculty p u rsues t h e s e goals t h ro u g h

courses a n d directed research bo th on a n d o f f c a m p u s , t h ro u g h j o i n t fac u l t y -s t u d e n t proj ec t s , a n d t h r o u g h p u blic workshops, l ec t ures, a n d o t h e r eve n t s .

A s a n academic i nq uiry which e m p h a s i zes t h e developm e n t of a n a l y tical s k i l l s , t h e s t u d y of h i s t o ry d e p e n d s on t h e avail a b i l i t y of a wide va r i e ty o f p r i m a ry a n d secondary s o u rce m a t e r i a l . H i s to r i c a l h o l d i n g s i n t h e Robert A . L . Mor tved t L i b r a ry a r e s trong a n d diverse, i n c l u d i n g

s i g n i fic a n t r e s o u r c e s i n A m e ri c a n , E uropean, a n d n o n - W e s t e r n field s . R e g i o n a l a r c h i v a l m a t e r i a l i s h o u s e d i n t h e N i s q u a lly P l a i n s R o o m of t h e Library.

FACULTY Martinson, C h a i r; Browning, Halseth, D. Johnson, Nordquist, Rozanski.

BACHELOR OF A R T S MAJOR: Mini m u m o f 32 semester hours, i ncluding 4 hours - American field, 4 hours E u ropean field, and 4 hours - non-Western field. Students are expected to work closely with the depart ment's faculty advisers to insu re the most personalized progra m s and instruction possible. Majors are urged to meet the foreign la nguage requirements of the College of Arts a nd Sciences under either Option I or Option I I . Those majors who are preparing for p u blic school teaching can meet the state h i s tory certification requirement by enrolling i n His tory 460. All senior majors are requi red to take four hours of seminar credit. MINOR: 20 semester hours, 1 2 hours from courses nu mbered above 300. The minor in h i s tory e m phasizes a "prog ram focus" and a "program plan," which is arranged by the student in co nsulta tion with a departmental adviser. BACH ELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: See School of Education.

C OURSE OFfERINGS American Field 251

COLONIAL AMERICAN HISTORY

American institutions from colonial times to the 1 790's; the growth of the colonies and their relationship to the British i m perial system. ( 4 )

HISTORY

73


252

NINETEENTH CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY

From Jefferson to Theodore Roosevelt; in terpretation of eras from sodal, political, economic, and biographical viewpoin t s . (4)

253

TWE NTI ETH CE NTURY AMERICAN HISTORY

Trends and events i n domestic and foreign affairs since 1 900; affluence, urban grow t h, and social contrast s . (4)

356

HI STORY OF AME RICAN FOREIGN POLICY

T h e practice, function, and structure of America n foreign policy with particular emphasis on the twentieth cent ury. (4)

451

AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY

460

WEST AND NORTHW EST

Dimensions of American law as it relates to changing h istorical period s . (4) The American West in the 1 9th and 20th centuries. Frontier a nd regional perspectives. Interpretive, illust rat ive h i s tory, and opportunities for off-campus researc h . (4)

471

HISTORY OF AMERICAN THOUGHT A ND C ULTU RE

328

NINETEE NTH CENTURY EUROPE

329

TWE NTIETH CENTURY EUROPE

332

ENG LAND: TU DORS AND STUARTS

T h e expansion o f European civilization from 1 800 t o 1 9 1 4 . (4) World War I; revolution and ret urn to "norm alcy"; depression and the rise of fascism; World War II. (4) Political, social, economic, legal, and cultural developme n t s . (4)

334

MODERN G E RMA NY, 1848-1945

341

SEVE NTEENTH CENTURY FRANCE

T h e Revol utions of 1 84 8 and un ification o f Germany; Bismarckian a n d Wilhemian e m pires; Weimar Republic a n d the r i s e of National Sociali sm ; the Third R e i c h . ( 4 ) Structure of society, develop ment of absolutism, protest o f popular classes, role o f Fra nce in i nterna tional affairs, origins of the E nlightenment. ( 2 )

342

THE FRENCH REVOLUTION

Structure of society, origins and course of the Revol ution, and its impact on France and E u rope. (2)

495

SE MINAR: EUROPEAN HISTORY

(4)

Dimensions of American social and i n tellectual history. (4)

494

SEM INAR: AMERICAN HISTORY

(4)

HISTORY OF EA STERN CIVILIZATIONS

1 0 9, 1 1 0

European Field HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZA TION

1 0 7, 1 0 8

Analysis of institutions and ideas of selected civilizations. Mesopo tamia, Egypt, the Hebrews, Greece, Rome, the rise o f C h ristiani ty, and Medieval E u rope in the first semester; Europe from the Renaissa nce to the present in the second semester. I II (4, 4 )

321

CL ASSICAL CI VILIZATION

The a ncient Mediterranean world with emphasis upon Greek a n d Roman civilizations. (4)

323

THE MIDDLE AGES

E u rope from the disin tegration of t h e Roman Empire to 1 300; reading and resea rch in medieval ma terials . (4)

324

R ENAISSANCE

Eu rope in a n age of transition - 1 300 to 1 5 00. (4)

325

RHORMA TION

Political and religious crisis in the 16th century: Luthera nism, Zwinglian ism, Anglicanism, Anabaptism, Calvinism, Roman Catholic reform; Weber thesis, the beginnings of Baroque art. (4)

74

Non-Western Field

HISTORY

The historical evolution of the civilizations of China, Japan, and India. First semester focuses on cultural, political, and social developments; second semester examines western imperialism, the rise of Asian nationalism and colonial revolution, and Asia's communist and non-com munist roads to modernization. I I I (4, 4)

333

REVOLUTIONARY RUSSIA

Post-Peter the Great Russia; the establishment of Czarist a utocracy; the Great Reforms of the 19th century; t h e rise of the revolu tiona ries; Bolshevism, Lenin, and the Revolutions of 1 9 1 7; the consolidation of the Soviet s t a t e . (4)

335

LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY

340

MODERN CHINA AND JAPAN

A s u rvey of the major aspects of Latin American h i s tory from colonial to modern times. Spanish and Portug uese institutions, inter-American relat,ions, and case st udies of Mex ico, Argen tina, Brazil, and Cuba. (4) Tile modern transformation of E a s t Asia: Western im perialism and dynastic decline; Japan's "miracle" modernization; China's semi-colonialism, nationalism, a nd Republican revolution; the rise of Mao and communist revol u tion; Japa n's militarism and the road to Pearl Ha rbor. (4)


_Relevant To All Fields 492 (1-4) 496 - ( 4) 596

( 1 -4) -599

( 4)

INDEPENDENT STUDY S E MlNAR: HISTORY AND HISTORIANS G RADUATE RESEARCH THESIS

-I NTERIM C OURSES OFFERED IN 1 9 78 301

-;306

312

-:31 3 31 5

THE BODY BEAUTIfUL HOLOCAU ST: THE DESTRUCTION OF THE EUROPEAN J EWS JIMMY C ARTER'S SOUTH: THE S OUTH SINCE 1 92 5 CHINESE C ONVERSATION, CALLIGRAPHY, AND CUISINE THE PICTURED WORD: EMBLEMS, C OA TS-OF-ARMS, DEVIC E S, MASQUES

H I STORY

7S


Integrated Studies Program The In tegrated S t u d ies Prog ra m is especially designed as a n altern a tive mode of s a t isfying the Core c ur ric u l u m r e q u i rem e n t . Con sisting of a constellation of i nterdisciplin a ry courses, the progr a m as a whole e x plores a central theme, " The Dyna mics of C h a nge," from a variety of perspectives.

FACULTY Huber, Di rector; selected facul ty from the disciplines of the arts and sciences, including Anthropology, Art, Biology, Chemist ry. Communication Arts, Economics, English. History. Mathematics. Modern and Classical Languages. Philosophy. Physics. Political Science, Psychology. Religion, and Sociology.

A student who chooses Core I I to meet the General U n i v e rsity Require m e n t s will begin with Sequence I, with any two Sequences chos e n from II, 1II, o r IV taken s ubseq uent.ly or concurrently, a n d conclude the Program with t h e S e m i n a r w h i c h would be t a k e n after, or concurrently with, completion o f the last c o u r s e i n t h e Sequences selected. I n d i v i d u a l courses in each Sequence are equivalent to four s e m e s t e r hours of credit each . A brochure with further details is available from t h e Office of Admissions o r t h e Registrar. A brief s u mmary of t h e prog r a m follows.

THE DYNAMICS OF CHANGE S E QU ENCE I: The Idea of Progress IS 2 1 1 Course 1 : N a ture a n d Superna t u re IS 2 1 2 Course 2: From F i n i t e to Infinite SEQUENCE II: Human Responsibility IS 221 Course I : The Developing Individual IS 222 Course 2: The B u rden of Human Respo nsibility Option 1 : . . . 20th C e n t u r y E u rope Option 2: . . . 20th C e n t ury Asia SEQUENCE I II: Word and Wor l d : Exploring the C reative Imagination IS 231 Course 1 : SymboL Language, Myth IS 232 Course 2: Model a n d Metaphor: Inventing the World

76

INTEG RATED ST UDIE S


SEQUENCE I V : L i m i t s to Growth IS 241 Course 1 : The Tec h nological Society and the Thrust for Gr.owth I S 2 4 2 Cou rse 2: The Technological Society and the Limits to Growth E MINA R : IS 2 5 1 Semi nar REGULA n O N S GOVERNING C O R E II 1 . Sequence I is prerequisite or coreq uisite to all following sequences. A waiver of this sequence may be al lowed' for a student whose previous work in liberal s t udies i s j udged to have been sufficiently broad and relevant to t h e principal ideas to be s tudied in the remaining sequences. A com m ittee of the Program's faculty will evaluate such a waiver req uest . 2 . Sequences I I , I I I , o r IV m a y be t a k e n independently of enrollment in the Program as a whole, b u t will not satisfy a n y portion o f t h e General University Requirements. Credit w i l l be g iv e n for such courses, however, and may count as elective "-- credit or credit toward a major if a course i s specifically allowed by the appropriate departm e n t ( s ) . 1 . If, f o r any reason, students who e n rolled in t h e Program d o n o t complete it, a Transfer C o m m i t tee (composed o f the t h r ee Divisional Chairs and the Dean of the School of Fine Arts) will evaluate their work in t h e light of i t s scope and i n view of the General University Require m e n t s to make a decision concerning what areas of study such 9tudents must still take to satisfy the reg ular General U n iversity Requireme n t s . E n r o l l m e n t i n the concluding S e m i n a r is o p e n o n l y to students who complete Sequence I and a n y two of II-IV, or any two of 11IV with a waiver of Sequence I. â&#x20AC;˘. Sequence I may be taken in the fresh m a n year, and a n y two of Sequences II-IV may be taken in t he fresh men, sophomore, and lor j u n ior years. The concluding Seminar may be taken after or concurrentl'y with the last course i n t h e Sequences. ' . S t udents successfully completing the compon ents of this Program as outlined above will be regarded as having fulfilled all the General University Requirements except courses in Writing and Physical Education and the Interim requirement. ďż˝ Si nce one of the e m phases of this Program is to develop the writing, critical and an alytical skiUs of students, partiCipa t ion in '---- the actual course work and discussion i s essential. Therefore, component courses i n the Program may not be taken by means of chaUenge examinations, nor will CLEP credit, work-study o r other academic experience be substitutabl e f o r course credit in t his Program. --0 . Pass-fail cred it may not be elected by students e n rolled in this Program i n a n y sequence of courses after the first or in the Seminar. No co mponent course may be offered by the i n s t r uctional staff as a n exclusive pass-fail course. , Since a sequence of courses is especially designed as a consecutive and i n terrelated whole, the first course in each sequence is prerequisite to the second. They may not, therefore, be in terc hanged .

IS 2 1 1

NATURE AND SUPERNA TURE

Study of the creative and reactionary responses of the Renaissa nce, Reformation and counter-Reformation pe riods to the a uthoritarian Medieval mentality. Luther, Galileo, Kepler a n d New ton are given special e m phasis together with develo pments from 1 500- 1 700 in art and political history. Analysis of the emerging idea of progress. Prerequisite to 2 1 2, From Finite to Infinite. (4)

IS 212

FROM FINITE TO I NFINITE

Develop ments in litera t ure, politics and indust rialization in the 18th and 19th centuries. E m phasis is given to the influence of the Enlighte n m e n t on the development of the idea of progress, and to the formation of D a rwinism, the Romantic movement and Marxism. (4)

IS 2 2 1

THE DE VELOPING INDIVIDUAL

The development of moral values and con science are studied from a biological, philosophical and SOCiological point of view, in connec tion w i t h conte mporary mora! issues. Particular attention is given to criminal behavior and gene manipula tion and t h e pertinent moral and social questions raised by these phenomena. Prereq uisite to 2 2 2, Burden of H u man Responsibility. (4)

IS 2 2 2 THE BURDEN OF HUMAN RESPONSIBIL ITY Option 1 : . . . 20th C E NTURY EUROPE Topics in h i s tory and literature selected from the sequence of events from industrialization to the Second World War are examined. Emphasis lies on the crisis of values posed by rapid industrialization and technological g ro w t h . Naive deterministic notions of progress are con trasted with the experience in the coal mines of Northern France and the trenches in World War I. Two contrasting Marxist models of revolution, those of Lenin and Rosa Luxem burg, are studied . The cultural experimen ta tion of the Twenties is shown to be a search for new va lues; the iconoclas tic work of artists and writers reveals itself as a n exercise of responsibili t y . Fina lly, the moral dilem mas posed by German National Socialism a n d World War I I are considered. a / y (4)

Option 2: . . . 20th C E NTURY ASIA The moderni zation of Asia is critically exa mined, using the life s t ruggles of "para digma tic individuals" such as Gandhi and Mao Tse-tung, and em phasizing their efforts to transform India a n d China. Japan will be t reated s i m ilarly. Domina nt the mes include colonialism, westerniza tion versus moderniza tion, the rise of na tionali s m and revolu tion, national in tegration and the i n dividual i n tension between p a s t and future . a / y ( 4 )

I N T E G RATED S T UDIE S

77


IS 2 3 1 SYMBOL, LANG UAG E A N D MYTH The phenomenon of language is exami ned through a study of its role in shaping k no w ledge, its history as a symbolic system, and its nature as a d e p ository o f c u l tu ral trai ts . The na ture of symbolic systems generally, including n u merical systems, a n d the role of myth as a genre for e x pressing "reality" are given emphasis. Prereq uisite to 232, Model and Me taphor: Inventing the World. (4)

MODEL AND METAPHOR: INVENTING THE WORLD

IS 2 3 2

This course takes the language, number, symbol and ri tual discussed in IS 2 3 1 and s hows how they ca n be used to construct larger structures of thought, feeling, and perception tha t not only describe the world, bu t to some e x te n t i nvent i t . Model and metaphor are seen a s tools which, through the practice of va.ri us disciplines (socia\, mathemati al and a rtis tic) ' give us a variety of perspectives upon selves a nd worlds which are seen increasingly to be in terpretive rather than give n . (4)

THE TECHNOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE THRUST FOR GROWTH

lS 241

A n analysis of the im pact of technology on modern socie ty and o f the e m ergent concept of secularism is d e ve lope d i n a n effort t o understand contemporary c u l ture . Problems of the in terface of technology w i t h c u l t u re are e x amined from philosophical, religious, biological and eco nomic poin ts of vie w Prereq uisite to IS 2 4 2, The Technological Society and the Limits to G rowth. (4) .

THE TECHNOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE L I MITS TO G ROWTH

IS 2 4 2

A n explora tion of reative fu tures be yond a tec hno l og i ca l society. E mphasis is given to a study of the l i m its to growth i n connection with food prod uction, e nergy, poll ution a n d ma terial resou rces. The moral choices involved in al terna tive futures are examined toge ther with aesthe tic values and their implica tions f r future social orde r. (4) IS 251 (4)

78

SEMINAR

I NT E GRATE D STUDIE S


Mathematics M a t h e m a tics is a m a n y face ted subject that i s e x t re mely useful in i ts application, b u t a t the same time i s fascinating a n d beautiful i n the abs tract. It is a n indi spensable tool for i n d us try, scienc e, go vern m e n t , and the busi n e s s world, while the --- e legan ce o f its logic and b e a u t y of form have in trigued scholars , ph ilosophers, and artists since earliest times. _ The m a t h e m a tics prog r a m a t Pacific L u theran University i s designed to s e rve five main ob jec t i v e s : ( 1 ) to p rovide backgro u nd s for o t h e r di sciplines, (2) to provide a comprehensive - preprofessiona l p rogra m for those d i rectly en tering t h e fields of teaching and applied m a t h e m a tics, (3) to provide a nucleus of essential cou rses which will d evelop the breadth and m a t u r i t y of m a th e m a tical - th ou g h t for con ti n u e d s t udy of m a t h e m a tics at the gr a d u a t e level, (4) to develop the m e n tal skills necessary for the creation, a n alysis, and critiq u e o f _m a t he m a tical logic w i t h in the conte x t of m a t h e m a tical topics, a n d ( 5 ) to provide a view of m a t he m a tics a s a part o f h u m a n i s t i c endeavor.

fAC ULTY -C. Peterson, Chair; E. Anderson, Batker, Brink, Fisk, Herzog, Liebelt, N.C. Meyer, Yiu.

The founda tion of t he m a t h e m a tics progra m for majors is t h e four semester calculus a n d linear algebra sequence, M a t h 1 5 1 , 1 5 2, 2 5 3 , a nd 3 3 1 . T h e s e courses a r e usually t a k e n i n sequence t h e firs t four semesters. S t udents with a caIculus backgro und i n h i g h school m a y receive a d v a nced placemen t i n t o t h e a p propriate course in t h e sequence. Uppe r division work __ Includes courses in modern algebra, a n alysis, s t a tistics, a pplied mathema tics, and topology. There is a basic core of courses in the computer science area s u ch as FORTRAN, BA SIC, a sse mbly language, and n u merical a n a lysis. Students m a y e a rn a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of --Science degree in the College of A r t s a nd Sciences majoring in mathematics o r a Bachelor of Arts in E d u c a tion degree majoring or m i noring in m a t h e m a tics. Minors in mathema tics, computer science, or s tatistics are also a v ailable. During th eir sophomore yea r, students in tending t o major in ma t h e m a tics should comple te a n application form a v a ilable from the departmental secretary. If acce p t ed , t h ey will be assigned to an adviser on the m a t h e ma t ics faculty. BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: Minimum of 28 semester - hours i n courses nu mbered above 150, i n clud ing 331, 433, 455, 4 86, a n d e i t h e r 434 or 4 5 6 . The 434 or 4 5 6 choice may be replaced by taking eig h t se mester hours from 321, 34 1 , 3453 4 6, 351, and 460 . Eight semester hours i n physics are st rongly

recommended. Students planning to do graduate work in mathe ma tics should complete both 434 and 456. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: 4 0 semester hours, including 331 a nd 4 8 6 a nd a t least 20 seme ster hours of upper d i vision courses. Twelve hours of t he u p per division requirement must come from 433, 434, 455, a n d 456. Required sl1ppo rt ing: 8 semester h o u rs i n physics. Physics 356 m a y be substituted for one course of u pper division m a t hematics. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: See School of Educat ion . MINORS: Two minors a re ava ilab'fe in t h e m a t h e m a t ics depart men t . A statist ics minor is a lso available. M A THEMA TICS MINOR: 20 semester hours, including 1 51 , 1 52, 253 a n d two upper divi sion courses. Interim courses a nd 323, 324, and 446 may not be counted toward the mathema tics m inor. COMPUTER SC I E NCE MINOR: 20 semester hours, including 144, 1 5 1 , 1 5 2, 244, 345 and four semester hour s from 1 40, 3 4 6, B usiness Ad ministra tion 387, Engineering 352, or other c o m p u ter-related courses a pproved by the Mathema tics Depart m e n t . NOTE: O n l y 1 5 1 a n d 1 5 2 m a y be counted towards more t ha n o n e m a j o r or m i n o r i n the Mathema tic s Department. S TA T1STICS MINOR: See sta tistics section of this c a talog. COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS Pacific L u theran University has cooperative prog r a m s w i t h t w o o t he r u niversities. A 3-2 program in Engineering/Computer Science is described i n the Physics/E ng.ineering section of this ca talog and i n teres ted s t u dents s hould cons ult with t h e engineering professors in regard t o t h i s prog r a m . The Mathema tics Department has t wo cooperative programs in Computer Science and in Applied Mathema tic s in cooperation with Was hington State University . ( 1 ) a 3-1 program leading to a B . A . or B . S . degree in Mat hema tics/Computer Science or Applied M a t h e ma tics from P L U; a n d ( 2 ) a 3 - 2 program l e a d i n g t o a B . A . or B . S . degree i n Mathema tics f r o m P L U a n d a B . S . or M . S. degree i n Compu ter Science o r Applied M a t hema tics from Was hington Stat e U n iversity. Students in these programs must satisfy t h e PLU requirements for a B.A. degree in M a t he m a tics except for the Senior Semina r. The requ ired courses together with recomme nded semesters and years for taking them are as follows: Math 1 5 1 : A n alytic Geomet r y a n d Calcu'lus - F r I Mat h / Eg r 1 4 4 : I n t roduction to Computer Science - Fr I Math 1 5 2 : A n a l ytic Geomet r y a n d Calculus - Fr I I Math 253: M u l t iva riable Calcu lus and Differential E q u a t i o n s So I Phys 1 5 3 : General Physics - So I Math 3 3 1 : Linear Algebra and Calculus - So II M a t h 2 4 4 : Data Structu res a nd Assembly Lang uage Progra mming - So II (or F r II) Phys 154: General Physics - So II Math 433: Modem Algebra - Jr I Math 3 5 1 : Applied Mathema tics - Jr I

MA THEMA TIC S

79


M a t h l E gr 345: In troduction to N u me rical A n a l y s i s - J r I (or So I) MathlEgr 346: N u m e r i c a l A n a l y s i s - J r I (or So I) E g r 354: Engineeri n g A n al ysis - J r I I M a t h 1 4 0 o r B u s i n e s s A d m i n i s t ration 387 is a ls o requi red a n d can be sched u 'ed as appropriate.

S E N I OR Y E AR AT W AS H I NGTON STATE U N I VERSITY: Computer Science Option: 6- 1 2 hours o f math, i n c l u d i n g Advanced C a l c u l us, a n d 1 2 h o u r s of C o m p u t e r Science . Applied Math Option: 6 - 1 2 h o u r s of m a t h , i nc l u d i n g Adva nced C a l c u l u s , a n d 1 2 h o u r s o f s upporting applied courses. The remaining courses a t PLU must be ch osen to f u l f i l l Ge nera l U n i v e r s i t y R e q u i re men ts, I n t e r i m r e q u i r e m e n ts, a n d one o f the th ree f o r e i g n l a n g u a g e o p t i o n s . S t u d e n t s i n t h i s prog r a m m u s t s c h e d u l e t h e i r cou rses carefully a n d a re u rged to contact t h e M a t h e m a tics Depa r t m e n t e a r l y in their college caree r, prefera bly i n t h e i r first seme ste r, to design an a p pr o pria te sched u l e .

C OURSE OFFERI N G S 101

INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA

A thorough review of first year high school algebra and material beyond q uadratics. Does not count toward u niversity core , requirements, I II (2)

112

PLANE TRIGONOMETRY

Radian measu re, trigonometric and i nverse trigonometric functions, i d e n t i t ies, graphing, solution of triangles, and complex n umbers. Prerequisite : two years of high school algebra, Students with only one year of high school algebra should take 1 3 3 , I II (2)

BASIC COMPUTER LANGUAGE

144

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE

Computer science and a working knowledge of FORTRAN is applied to scientific problems; computer classification, org a nization, data structure, algorithms, flow charts and FORTRAN IV, Prereq uisite: 1 2 7 or 133 or consen t . I II (4)

151

ANALYTIC GEOM ETRY AND CALCULUS

Analytic g eometry, functions, limits, de riva tives and i nteg rals with applica tions, Prerequ isite: two years of high s c h o o l a lg e b r a a n d t r i g o n o m e t ry (or c o n c u r re n t registration i n 1 1 2) o r 1 3 3 o r equivalent. I I I (4)

152

ANALYTIC G EOMETRY AND CALCULUS

I n tegration, a pplications and techniques of integration, transcendental functions, polar coord inates, i mproper i n tegrals, L'Hospital's R ule, infinite series. Prerequisite: 1 5 1 . I II (4)

199

DIRECTED READING

Supervised study of topics selected to meet the individual's needs or i n terests; primarily for students awarded advanced placemen t . Admission only b y departmental invitation. ( 1 - 2)

244

DATA STRUCTURES AND ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROG RAMMING

Tru t h tables, sets, efementa ry probability, matrices, linear progra mming, Markov chains. Prerequisites: high school a lgebra and geometry, I II (4)

Computer assembly language, instruction e xecution, addressing techniques, representation of data, macro d e f i n i t i o n , program segm e n t a t io n a nd Ii n k a g e . ­ Prerequisite: 1 4 4 or consent. II a / y 1 978-79 (2)

128

253

127

FI NITE MATHEMATICS

M A THEMA TICS F O R BUSINESS AND THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

Review of algebra, matri x t heory and linear progra mming, probability theory, i ntroduction to differential a n d integral calculus. Concepts are d eveloped intuitively with applications. The use of mathematical tools is stressed throughout the course, Prerequisite: high school algebra or 1 0 1 , I II (4)

1 33

COLLEGE ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY

Solving e q ua tions, f u nctions, e xponen tials, logari thms, radian measure, trigonometric identities, graphing and other topics such as complex n umbers. Prerequisites: two years of high school algebra or 101 or consen t , I II (4)

80

140

The BASIC computer language is a pplied to problem, occurring i n business, science, social science, a nd o t h e r fields in a conversational m o d e . Topics include data, expression formation input/output, t ra nsfer comma nds, arrays and subprograms, Prerequisite : high school algebra. I II (2)

MA T H E M A TIC S

MUL TIV ARIABLE CALCULUS AND DIFFE RENTIAL E QUATIONS

An i ntrod uction to vectors, m ultidimensional calculus, a n d differential equations , Emphasis w i l l be o n using these topics as tools for solving physical problems. Prerequisite: 1 52. I II (4)

321

GEOMETRY

Foundations of geometry and basic theory i n E uclidean, projective and non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite: 1 5 2 or conse n t , a / y 1 9 78-79 ( 4 )

323

MODERN ELEMENTARY MATH EMATIC S

Concepts u nderlying tra d itional computa tional techniques; a systematic ana lysis of arithmetic; a n i ntuitive approach to algebra and geometry, I ntended for elemen ta ry teaching majors, Prerequisite to Ed. 326. Prerequisite: consen t , I II S (4)


324

ALGEBRA A N D GEOMETRY F O R THE E L E MENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER

Properties of real nu mbers, linear and q uadra tic e q u a tions and inequal ities, complex n u mbers, polynomials, alge braic str uctures, functions; a study of i n formal geometry from a � mature viewpoint using modern voca bulary and notation. Geome try topics include congruence, s imilarity, symmet ry, properties of geometry fig ures such as quadrilaterals a n d circles, a n d relationships a mong geometrical figures. _ Prereq uisite: 3 2 3 or by place ment e x a m . U (4)

331

-

LINEAR ALGEBRA AND CALCULUS

Vectors and vector spaces, ma trices, quadratic forms, linear tran sformations, m ultivaria ble calculus. Prereq uisi te: 152. II (4)

334

ANAL YSIS OF VARIANCE AND E XPERIMENT AL DESIGN

Random sa mpling, factors w h i c h destroy experimental -d e s ign, one-way a nalysis of variance, two-way ana lysis of variance, factored design, block a nd latin square design. S tudents will also critique p ublished experiments and perform a n experimental design project. Prerequisites : -Statistics 231 or equivalent. II (2)

341

MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS

Probability theory, discrete a n d continuous distribution functions, mome nt generating functions, sampling -d istributions and hypothesis-testing; i ntrod uction to regre s s ion, corre l a tion, a n d a n a l y s i s of v a r i a n c e . Prerequisite: Math 1 5 2 . I I aly 1 978-79 (4)

_3 4 5

INTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL ANALYSIS

Numerical t heory and applications i n the a reas of solutions Jf e q u a t i o n s , l i n e a r s y s t e m s , i n t e r p o l a t i o n , a n d _3pproxi m a tion . Prereq uisite: 1 5 2 a n d ( 1 4 4 o r 1 40) or conse n t . I a l y 19 79-80 (taught d uring first h a l f of se mester) {2}

346

NUMERICAL ANALYSIS

ontinuation of 345, including n u merical theory a n d applications i n t h e areas of matrix t heory, n u merical :lifferentiation and i ntegration, and solution of differential �quations. Prerequisite: 253 a nd 345 or con s e n t . I aly 1 979�OO (taught d uring second half of semester) (2)

351

446

MA THEMATICS IN THE SE C ONDARY SCHOOL

Methods and materials i n secondary school math teaching. Basic mathematical concepts; principles of numbe r operation, relation, proof, a n d problem solving i n the context of arith metic, algebra, and geometry. Prerequisite: 253 or 331 or equivale n t . I (2)

4 5 5, 456

MA THEMA TICAL A NALYSIS

E x te n d ed tre a t m e n t of topics i ntroduced in elementary calculus. Prerequisite : 253. 455 offered I each year; 456 offered II a l y 1 978- 79 (4)

460

E L E ME NTARY TOPOLOGY

A n introduction to point-set topology. consen t . I I aly 1 979-80 (4)

486

Prerequisite:

SE NIOR SEMINAR

Presen ta tion by students of knowledge gained i n research under the direc tion of an assigned professor. Required of all senior math majors seeking a B . A . or B . S . degree. Seminar prog ram will be h e ld both semesters, but formal registration will be i n the spring semester. Prerequisite: senior math major or conse nt of department chair. I I (I)

490

SE MINAR

Prerequisite: consen t of department chair. ( 1-4)

491, 492

INDE PENDENT STUDY

Prerequisite: consent of department chair. I II ( 1 - 4 )

5 9 7, 598

GRADUATE RESE ARCH

Open to master's degree candidates only. Prerequisite: consent of department chair. I II (1-4)

INTERIM COURSES OFFERED I N 1 9 78 308 312 316

FINANCIAL M A THEMA TICS MATHE MATICAL PUZZLES AND PARADOXES C OMPUTE RS AND SOCIETY

APPLIED MATH E MATICS

�eal, ordinary differe n t i a l equations. Theory o f functions )f a complex variable, power series and a treatment of -second order linear differe n t i a l equations on a compl ex plane, Orthogonal function s. Prerequisite: 253. I (4)

1 3 3, 434

MODERN ALG EBRA

_�inear Allgebra, groups, rings, mod u l e s, fields, field e x tensions. Prerequisite: 331, 433 offered I each year; 434 offered II aly 1979-80 (4)

MATH E MATIC S

81


Modern and Classical Languages Foreign la n g u a g e learning provides an u r g e n t l y needed elem e n t i n our domestic and g l o b a l com m u ni t y : t h e a bi l i t y to c o m m u n i c a t e e f fectivel y w i t h a n d within o t h e r c u l t u r e s . Th roug h t h e m e d i u m o f la n g u a g e , s t u d e n t s i n c r e a s e th eir knowledge of the con tribu tion s o t h e r peoples h a v e made to civiliza tion, h i s tory, litera t u re, a n d t h e a r t s a n d scie n c e s . Th e D e p a r t m e n t of M o d e r n a n d Cla s sica l Languages i n cooperation w i t h s e v e r a l E u ropean universities p rovide s s pecific s t u d e n t s with a n oppo r t u n i t y to s t u d y a b road in France, S p a i n , Ger m a n y, A u s t ria (Vienna), a n d Sca n d i n a v i a . FACULTY

Spangler, C h a i r; Carleton, Faye, Payne, Pred more, Rasmussen, Sudermann, R. Swenson, Toven, Webster; assisted by Pilgri m.

There a r e n o departmental prerequisites for t h e study of foreign languages. Potential majors are, however, encouraged to obtain as much high school preparation as possible. Students with previous experience may qualify for place men t i nto i n termediate o r advanced courses. To determine the appropriate level students a re encouraged to take the language place m e nt exami nation at the beginning of the fall s emes t er or to consult with a depa rtmental adviser. Those qualifying for advanced place men t may also receive credit toward the major for work completed in high school, thus enabling them to pursue a second major. Major and minor programs are available in Classics, French, German, Norwegian and Spanish. Depar t men tal courses are a primary component in the interdisciplinary major,; offered in Classics a n d Scandinavian Area Studies. Minors are also offered in Greek and Latin.

BACHELOR OF ARTS: Major in French, German or Spanish - Minimum of 3 2 semester hours beyond 1 0 1 - 1 0 2, ,i ncluding 2 0 1, 202, 3 2 1 , 351, 352, plus upper-division electives, including at least four semester hours of literature. Span ish 3 2 2 may be substi tuted for Spanish 3 2 1 . Major i n Norwegian - M i n i m u m of 32 s e m e s t e r h o u r s , includin g 1 0 1 . 1 0 2, 2 0 1 , 2 0 2 , 3 5 1 , 3 52 , and at le as t o n e o f t h e 400-leve l literature courses from Scandinavian Studies.

82

M O D E R N & C LA S S l C A L LANG U AG E S


Major in Classics - 40 semest er hours, i ncluding eig h t � semester hours o f G reek a n d eight semester hours of L a t i n a n d a n additional eight h o u rs o f either Gree k or La t i n . Remaining courses are selected in con s u l t a t ion with t h e Cla ssics Coordin a t r. Major in Scandin a v i a n Area S t ud ies - 40 s e m e s t e r hours, including sixteen semester hours in Da n i s h , � Norwegian, or Swedish a n d f o u r semester h o u r s each i n Sca n d i navian l i terat u re a nd Scan d i n avian history. Re maining courses are selected i n con s u l t a tion with t he program coord inator. See the Sped I Programs section of this cata log for addi ti on a l in for mation a bo u t the inte rdepar t m e n tal major p rog ra m s i n Classics and Scandi navian A rea S tudies.

2 0 1 , 202

II

COURSE OFFERINGS ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE

STRUC TURAL LING UISTICS

-The study of the na ture of language; principles and techniques of descriptive la nguage analysis; elementary 3 p plication of linguis tic analysis to selected materials . No prerequ i s i t e s . (4)

-4 4 5

METHODOLOGY OF TE ACHING FOREIGN LANGUAG ES

Theory a n d tech niques of foreign lang uage teach ing; ;pecial problems in the stude nt's maj or language; em phasis -on au dio-lingual techniques. (2)

_French 1 0 1, 1 02

F RENCH CONVERSATION

Offers the opport unity for practice in French conversa tion in a n informal setting d uring the noon 'l unch hour. All st udents with a basic knowledge of French are invited to participate. Conversation may include rece nt news events, contemporary life, or other topics of student interest. Pas s / Fail only. r I f ( 1 )

321

CIVILIZATION AND C ULTURE

Pres ent-day France as reflected i n current literat ure, periodicals, television and films; written compositions and oral reports; cond ucted in Fre n c h . Prerequisite: French 202.

(4)

351, 352 COMPOSITION AND C ONVERSA TI ON A d v a n c e d g r a m m a r , s t y l i s t ic s , c o m p o s i t i o n a n d conve rsation; wri tten compositions o n c u l ture and civilization; conversations on current topics; conducted in French. Prerequisite: 202. I II (4, 4)

421, 422 MASTERPIECES OF FRENCH LITE RA TURE

A course adapted to the needs of students whose native lang uage is not English. Course content will emphasize --.Jdiom, especially American usage, voca b ulary buildi ng , co mpre he n sio n, and in to nation. Considerable oral practice, with goal of im proving fluency in speaking. ( 4)

400

(4, 4)

205, 206

MINOR IN fRENCH, GERMAN, NORWEGiAN, OR SPANISH - 24 semester hours, i n cl u d i ng 101, 1 0 2, 201, 202, 351, and one other upper division cou rse . MINOR I N CL ASSICS (GREEK O R LATIN) - 2 0 se mester hours which ma y i n c l ude 1 0 1 - 1 0 2 . Courses i n a l l minors programs will be chos e n in consultation w i t h a departmental adviser. Advanced place men t may be gran ted. BACHELOR OF ARTS I N EDUCATION: tudents e n rolled in this program a re req uired to take 445. For f u r t h e r details, see School o f Educa tion .

1 00

I NTERME D IATE FRENCH

A contin uation of elementary French; reading selections which reflect the French cult ural heri tage as well as con temporary ma terials. Labora tory attenda nce req uired. I

Au thors represen ta tive of major periods from the Middle Ages through the nineteenth cen t u ry; the style and s tructure and the moral and artistic in tentions of such au thors as Rabelais, Montaigne, Moliere, Corneille, Pascal, Vol taire, Rousseau, Hugo and Baudelaire . Prerequisite: 202. I II a / y (4, 4)

43 1, 432 T WENTIETH C ENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE Major twentieth cen tury writers; emphasis on the period si nce World War 'l l . Prerequisite : 202. I U a / y (4, 4)

442

HISTORY O F ROMANCE LANGUAGES

The historical development of Romance Languages with reference to current languages; same a s Spanish 442. II a/y

(4) 4 9 1, 492 (2-4)

INDEPENDENT S TUDY

5 9 7, 598 (2-4)

G RAD UATE RESEARCH

E L E Mf: NTARY fRENCH

Esse n tials of pronunciation, intonation a nd struct ure; basic ,kills in listening, speaking, reading and wri ting. ----':"' a boratory attendance req ui red . r I I (4, 4)

German 1 0 1, 102

ELEM ENTARY GER MAN

In troduction to the German language. Basic skills of oral and written communication i n classroom a n d laboratory practice. Use of materials reflecting con temporary German life. Mee ts five hours weekly. I I I (4, 4)

M O D E R N & C L A S S I C AL L A N G U A G E S

83


2 0 1, 2 0 2 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN Continued practice in oral and written communication in classroom and laboratory. Use of materials which reflect contemporary life as well as the German cultural heritage. Concurrent enrollment in German 205 (206) is encouraged. Meets four hours weekly. I II (4, 4) 2 0 5, 206 G ERMAN CONVERSATION Offers the oppor t u n i t y for p ractice i n G e r m a n conversation in an informal setting during the noon lunch hour. All students with a basic knowledge of German are invited to participate. Conversation may include recent news events, contemporary life, or other topics of student interest. PasslFaii only. I II (I) 321 GERMAN CIVILIZATION German cultural and linguistic history from the 1 7th century to the prese.nt. Aesthetic and historical c o n s i d e r a t i o n of r e p r e s e n t a t i v e w o r k s f r o m t h e Enlightenment, t h e A g e o f Goethe, t h e 1 9th a n d 20th centuries. Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent. I I a ly (4)

COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION

35 1, 352

Intensive review of grammar with e mphasis on idiomatic usage; use of contemporary authors a s mod els of styl e . Conversation on topics of s t u d e n t interest . Conducted in German. Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent. I I I (4, 4) 421

GERMAN LITERATURE: THE AGE OF GOETHE

Representative works from the Enlightenment to Goethe's death, circa 1 75 0-1 832, including Storm and Stress, Classicis m and Romantici s m . Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent. I a ly (4) 422

GERMAN LITERATURE: THE NINETEENTH C ENTURY

Representative works from the various literary movements o f the n i n e t e e n t h c e n t u ry, 1 82 0- 1 8 9 0, i n c l u d i ng Biedermeier, Young Germany and Realism . Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent. II a l y (4) 431

GERMAN LITERATURE: THE TWENTIETH C E NTURY

Representative works of German literature from Naturalism to E xpressionism, 1 890- 1 925. Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent. I aly (4) 4 3 2 CONTEMPORARY GERMAN LITERATURE Representative works from 1925 to the present; authors from East and West Germany, Aus tria and Switzerland. Prerequisite: 202 or equivalen t . II a l y (4)

84

442 HISTORY OF THE GERMAN LANGUAGIE Historical development o f German with reference to c o n t e m po ra r y l a n g u a g e ; c o n d u c t e d i n G e r m a n . Prerequisite : 202. I I a l y (4) 491, 492 (2-4)

INDEPENDENT STUD Y

5 9 7, 598 ( 2-4)

G RA DUATE STUDY

Greek Cu rrently offered cooperatively with t h e University of Puget Sound on our campus.

1 0 1, 102 ELEMENTARY GREEK Basic skills in reading Classical, Koine and Patristic Greek. I II (4, 4) 2 0 1, 2 0 2 INTERMEDIATE GREEK Selected koine readings from Hellenistic G reek literature with major emphasis on the New Testament. I I I (4, 4)

MASTERPIECES OF GREEK LITERATURE

4 2 1, 4 2 2

Available through consultation with the department. Prerequisites: 1 0 1, 102. I II (4, 4) 491, 4 9 2 (2-4)

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Latin Cu r rently offered cooperatively with the University of Puget Sound on our campus.

ELEMENTARY LA TIN AND ENGLISH WORD BUILDING

1 0 1, 102

Basic skills i n reading Latin; excursions i n to Roman history and m ythology; English vocabulary building from Latin and English word construction from Latinate prefixes and suffixes are emphasized. I II (4, 4) 2 0 1, 202 INTERMEDIATE L ATIN Lyric and epic poetry, its translation and adaptation by. English and American poets; the second semester includes the reading of an Italian a uthor. I I I (4, 4) 491, 4 9 2 (2-4)

MODERN & C L A S SI C A L L A N G U A G E S

I NDEPENDENT STUDY


422

� Norwegian 101, 102

ELEMENTARY NORWEGIAN

In troduces the s tudents to the pleasure o f speaking, reading and writing a foreign language. These skills are developed through a conversational approach, using songs and other cultural ma terials, as well as a udio-visual media . I II (4, 4)

20 1, 202

INTERME DIATE NORWEGIAN

Develops t h e s tudents' command of the language while - further acquainting them with the Norwegian cultural heritage. Reading selections introduce the students to Norwegian short stories, poetry, novels, and plays. I I I (4, 4)

351

CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION: fOLKTALES

Develops the students' ability to express themselves well i n the language, orally a n d in writing . Selected folktales a n d other material will b e u s e d as models o f style a n d usage. - Prerequisite: 202 or equivale n t . (4)

352

ADVANCED CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION: BALLADS AND POETRY

Develops t h e students' command of the language by em phasizing finer points of struc ture, style, and good taste. The subject matter will be selected poetry from the beginning to the presen t. Prerequisite: 351 or equivalent. _ (4)

L

491, 492

INDEPENDENT STUDY

(2-4)

Literature i n all genres, reflecting current trends and issues in Scandinavia. Readings in the original for majors; class conducted in English. aly (4)

491, 492

Spanish 1 0 1, 102

VIKINGS AND EMIGRANTS

_ Highlig h t s of Scandinavian h i story, from the beg inning to the present. E m phasis on periods and ways in which Scandinavia has contributed to world history. Readings i n the original for majors; class conducted in English. I a l y (4)

MODERN SCANDINAVIAN CIVILIZA TION

Scandinavian cultural history from the beginning to the prese n t . Discussion of literature, music, visual arts, a n d - their backgrounds, as w e l l as social and political issues. Readings in the origi n a l for majors; class conducted i n English. aly ( 4 )

421

ELEMENTARY SPANISH

Essentials of pronunciation, intonation and structure, basic skills in listening, speaki ng, reading a n d writing. Laboratory attendance required. I II (4, 4)

201, 202

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH

A continuation of elementary Spanish; reading selections which reflect the Hispanic cultural heritage as well as conte mporary material s . Laboratory attendance required. I II (4, 4)

205, 206

SPANISH CONVE RSATION

Offers the opportunity for practice in Spanish conversation in an informal setting d u ri ng the noon lunch hour. All students with a basic knowledge of Spanish are invited to participa te. Conversation may include recent news eve n t s, contemporary life, or other topics of student interest. PasslFaii only. I II (1)

C IVIL IZA nON AND C ULTURE

Historic a n d artistic elements which have shaped Spanish thought and behavior from the beginnings to the present; conducted in Spa n i s h . Prerequisite : 202. I (4)

Sc andinavian

- 322

INDEPE NDE NT STUDY

( 1-4)

321

321

CO NTE MPORARY SCANDINAVIAN LITERATURE

IBSEN, STRIND BE RG, AND THEIR CONTE MPORARIES

Selected au thors from the romantic and realistic periods i n Sca n d i navian literature. Readings in t h e origi na l for majors; class conducted i n English. a l y (4)

322

LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION AND C ULTURE

Historic, artis tic, literary, sociological and geographic elements shapi ng the development of the Spanish-speaking New World. Both Hispanic and non-Hispanic elements will be studied. Prerequisite : 202 or four years of high school Spanish. II (4)

3 5 1 , 352 COMPOSITION AND C ONVERSA TION Topics of cu rrent i nterest a s a basis for i m proved oral and written expression; conducted i n Spanish. Prerequisite: 202. I II (4, 4)

4 2 1, 422 MASTERPIECES Of HISPANIC LITERATURE All ge nres of major literary works from the Poema del OJ, to 1 898; forces which produced the literature; appreciation of litera ture as a work of art. Prerequisite: 202. I II aly (4, 4)

M OD E R N & C L A S S I C A L L A N G U A G E S

85


431, 432 TWE NTIETH CENTURY HISPANIC L I TE RATURE The first semester deals with the litera ture of Spain from the "Generacion de '98" to the presen t. The second semester deals with the li terature of Spanish America from the modernista movement ( 1 888) to the presen t. Emphasis on period will vary. (4, 4) 44 2 H I STORY Of ROMANCE L A NG U A G E S His torical development of Romance languages with refe rence to current language; same as French 442. II a/y (4) 4 9 1 , 492 (2-4)

INDEPE

DENT STUDY

INTERIM C OURSE S OFFERED IN 1 9 78 31 3 315

317 319

86

I NTRODUC TION TO SPOKEN G E R M A N T H E PICTURED WORD: E M B L E MS, COA TS-OF-A RMS, D E V I C ES, MASQUES SCANDINAVIAN LITERATURE I N F I L M THE C ONTEMPORARY LATI N A M ERICAN NOVEL IN TRANSLATI O N

M O D E R N & C L A S SICAL L A N G U A G E S


Music The m usic depa r t m e n t o ff ers program s for - s tu d e n ts seeking in tensive tra i n i ng in m usic his tory and lite rat u re, theory and com posi t i o n , sac red m usic, a n d pe rfo r m ance .

ďż˝

The c u rr i c u l u m is also desig ned for s tu d e n t s plan ning c a r ee r s in m u s i c ed ucation, as w e l l a s t hose s t u de n t s who w i s h to i n c rease their g e n e r a l m u sical k n o w l e d g e and appreciat i o n .

ďż˝ Pacin c L u t heran Universi t y Depart m e n t of M u sic is noted both regiona lly and national ly, for its pe r fo rm i ng e n s e mbles, which incl u d e : Ch oir o f t h e Wes t , Unive r s i ty Ch o r ale C o ncert Ch o i r , Un ive r si ty S i ngers, Vocal J a z z Ense m bl e , Univers i t y Wind E ns e m ble, University Con c e r t Band, Jazz E ns e m ble, U niversity S ymphony - Orc hest ra, and Conte mporary Di r ect ions Ense m b l e . ,

----'

FACULTY _ Skones, C h a i r; Dah l, Farner, Gard, G. Gilbertson, Harmic, Hoffman, Knapp, Kr a ch t , L. Meyer, B. Poulshock, Robbins, Tremaine; assisted by S. Anderson, Bergeson, Byrnes, Crockett, - Frohn mayer, Knu th, Kruse, McCarty, Moore, Pedersen, S. Peterson. N. Poulshock, Schind ler, Smith. Storaasli, Thompson, Ziegenfelder.

_

Students i ntend i n g to major in music should begin the major music sequences i n the first year. Failure to d o s o may mean an ex tra semester or year t o com plete the major program . Music majors should fill out a declara tion o f major form du ring their first semester of enroll ment i n the prog ram and be assig ned to a m u sic faculty adviser. Only grades of "C" or be tter in music courses may be counted toward a music major. Courses i n which the student receives lower than a "C" must be repeated unless s ubstitute course work is authorized by t h e department.

BACHELOR OF A RTS MAJOR: Maximum of 4 0 semester h O U IS including 1 1 1 , 1 23, 1 2 4, 1 25, 1 2 6, 1 3 1 , 1 3 2 , 2 2 3, 224, 225, 2 2 6, 2 3 1 , 2 3 2 plus 4 hours of ensem ble; 6 hours of literature/t heory electives from 3 2 7-339, 4 2 6- 4 38; 8 hours of private ins truction, _ piano (minimum class level 2). In addition to requirements listed above, candidates for the B . A. degree must meet the foreign lang uage requ ireme n t i n the College of A rts and Sciences.

BACHElOR O F ARTS I N EDUCATION: Consult t h e School o f Education, and the Department of Music Handbook.

The department o f m usic also offers the following degree progra m s : 1 . BacheloT of M u s i c in Piano Performance 2 . Bachel I' of M u sic i n Organ Performance 3 . Bachelor of Music in Vocal Performance 4. Bachelor of Mu sic in Instrumental Performance 5 . Bachelor of Music in Theory and Composition 6 . Bachelor of Arts in Education - Elementary Music Specialist 7 . Bachelor of A rts in Education - Secondary and Elemen tary Instrumental 8. Bachelor of Arts in Education - Secondary Choral 9. Master of Music Education Consult t h e Department of Music Handbook, available i n the music office for complete details concerning required courses, recommended four-year programs by the semester, progress charts and other pertin e n t information. Consult the G raduate Catalog for details of the Master of Music program .

C OURSE OFFERINGS 101

INTRODUCTION T O MUSIC

Introduction to m usic literature with emphasis on listening, s t ructure, period and style. Designed to enhance the enjoyment and understanding of music. Not open to majors. ( 4 ) 1 1 1 MUSIC SURVEY A n overview of musical language, m u sical forms, and the evolution of m usical style, the course provides an opportunity to evaluate music a s a possible major and career. The entire m usic faculty will be u tihzed to help provide a foundation for all other m usic courses. Open to majors and prospective majors, and req uired for entering fres h men who will be continuing in any m usic curriculum. (2) 123

THEORY I

The st dy of m usica l terms, funda mentals, notation, melody writi ng, and harmonization through analysis and writing. (2) U 4 THEORY II A con tinuation o f Music 1 23. ( 2 ) 125

EAR TRAINING I

Development of aural skills in simple rhyth mic dictation, intervals, sight-singing using progressive exercises consi s ting of short m e lodies. (1) 126 EAR TRAINlNG n Continued development of aural skills in sight-singing, m e lodic and rhythmiC dictation. Elementary harmoniC dictation. ( 1 )

M U SIC

87


1 3 1 MUSIC HISTORY I The evolution of Western m usic from the early Christian era through the Middle Ages and Renaissance. (2) 132 MUSIC HISTORY II The evolution of m usic i n the Baroque Era ( 1 600- 1 750). (2)

C L A S S I NSTRUCTION: PIANO (1) PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: PIANO (1-4)

201 202

PRI VATE I NSTRUCTION: ORGAN (1-4) PRIVATE AND CLASS I NSTRUCTION: 204 VOICE: (1-4) 205 PRI VATE I NSTRUCTION: VIOlIN/VI OLA

203

(1-4)

PRIVATE I NS TRUCTION: CELLO/BASS

206

(1-4)

PRI VATE I NSTRUCTION: FLUTE (1-4) PRIVATE I NSTRUC TION: OBOE/ENGLISH HORN (1-4) PRIVATE I NSTRUCTION: BASSOON (1-4)

207 208 209

225 EAR TRAINING III Advanced aural skills t h rough e xtended rhythms and melodies. E mphasis on harmonic dictation. (1) 226 EAR TRAINING I V Sight-singing, including pan-tonal melodies. Harmonic dicta tion of mod ulatory chord progressions involving chromatic alteration. Advanced rhythmic dictation. ( 1 ) 2 3 1 MUSIC HISTORY I l 1 The evolution of music in t h e Classic a n d Romantic Eras (1 750- 1 910). (2) 232 MUSIC HI STORY IV Literature of the 20th century: Early development and current trends. (2) 2 4 1 - 2 4 2 STRING LABORATORY Methods and materials of teaching and playing string instruments in the public schools. (1, 1 )

210

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: CLARINE T (1-4)

211

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: SAXOPHONE

2 4 3 - 2 4 4 WOODWIND LABORATORY Methods and materials of teaching a nd playing woodwind instruments in the public schools. (1, 1)

PRIVATE I NSTRUCTION: TRUMPET (1-4) PRIVATE I NS TRUCTION: fRE NCH HOR N

245-246 BRASS LABORATORY Methods and materials of teaching and playing brass instruments in the public schools . (1, 1)

(1-4)

212 213

(1-4)

215

PRIVATE I NSTRUC TION: TROMBONE/BA RITONE (1-4) PRIVATE I NSTRUCTION: TUBA (1-4)

216

PRIVATE I NSTRUCTION: PERCUSSION

214

(1-4)

PRIVATE AND C L A S S I NSTRUCTION: G UIT AR (1-4) PRI VATE I NSTRUCTION: HARP (1-4)

217 218 219

PRI VATE I NSTRUCTION: HARPSICHORD

(1-4)

One half-hour private, or two one-hour class lessons per week in addition to daily outside practice. Students receiving permission to register for two semester hours of credit will receive two one-half hour private lessons per week. Stude n ts in piano, voice and g uitar may be assigned to class instruction at t h e discretion of the music faculty. Special fee in addition to tuition.

223 THEORY III Systematic study of emergent theoretical constructs from the 18th and 1 9th century as represented in literature of that period. (2)

88

2 2 4 THEORY IV SystematiC s t udy of emergent theoretical constructs from the 20th century as represented in l i terature of that period. (2)

MUSIC

247 PERCUSSION LABORATORY Methods and materials of teaching and playing percussion ins truments in the public schools. ( 1 ) 249 ELECTRONIC M U SIC LABORATORY A laboratory experience dealing with materials and methods of elementary electronic m usic synthesis. Real足 time experience in the Electronic Music Studio, a s well a s discussion of various popular synthesi zers, electronic music aesthetics, and the use of electronic instruments in secondary education. (1) 323 LINEARITY I Linear-structural analysis of literature of the 20th and 1 9t h cen turies; i ntroduction to Schenkerian analysis; writing and performance experience in the contrapuntal styles of these periods . (2) 324 L INEAR ITY II Linear-structural analYSis of literature of the 18th and 16th centuries; further refinement of analytical techniques, writing and performance experience in the contrapuntal . s t yles of these period s . Prerequisite: Music 323. (2) 325 KEYBOARD HARMONY Development of a functional use of harmony a t the keyboard . Improvisation and score reading. aly (2)


326 ORCHE STRA nON T h e r a n g e , t r a n s p o s i t i o n, s o u n d and t e c h n i c a l characteristics of instrume nts. Notation, scoring and arranging for conventional and unique instrument groupings. Prereq uisite: M usic 224. aly (3) 3 2 7 C OMPOSITION A s y s t e m a t ic a p p r o a c h t o c o n t e m p o r a r y m u s i c a l composition; s t udents create a n d notate works for 5010, 5mall and large ensembles. May be repeated for additional ....... credit. (1-4) A I l m u s i c literature courses n u m bered f r o m 3 3 1 to 3 3 9 a r e open to all u n iversity e n rol lment without prerequisite.

-3 3 1 MUSIC OF J OHANN SEBASTIAN BACH A s t udy of selected works representing each of the primary ueas of the creative genius of J . S . Bach. aly (2) 332

ORNAMENTATION AND PERFORMANCE PRACTIC E S Of THE BAROQUE

343 VOCAL J AZZ TECHNIQUES Methods, literature, style and technique for the vocal jazz e nse mble . E mphasis on the acquisition of skills necessary for teaching vocal j a z z in the secondary school . ( 1 ) 344 JAZZ LABORATORY ENSE MBLE Rehearsal and study of representative jazz literature, designed for s t udents unfamiliar with jazz idioms. Prereq uisite : Consent of the Instructor. (1) 3 4 5 BASIC CONDUCTING Introduction to basic patterns, gestures and conducting t e c h n i q u e s ; a p pl i c a t i o n t o a p p r o p r i a t e voc a l a n d instrumental scores . (2) 349 ELIECTRONIC MUSIC PRAC TIC UM Application of electronic techniques t o compositional process. For non-composition majors only. Assigned studio time on a regular basis. Prereq uisite: Music 249. (1)

A practical study of vocal and instrumental ornamenta tion l S i t evolved in the 17th and 18th centuries. a ly (2)

351 ACCOMPA NYING Practice i n accompanying: representative vocal instrumental solo literature from a l l periods. (1)

3 3 MUSIC OF HAYDN AND M OZART Score analysis and study of the historical significance of �elected works of Haydn and Mozart. aly (2)

3 5 2 ORGAN I MPROVISATI ON Basic techniques of improvisa tion, particularly a s related to hymn t unes. aly (2)

334 MUSIC OF BEETHOVEN -A general survey with in-depth study of selected works. aly (2) 335 LATE NINETEE NTH CENTURY M USIC A survey of selected m usic of Wagner, Bruckner, Mahler -and Strauss. a l y (2) 336 C HAMBER MUSIC LITERATURE A general s urvey with in-depth s t udy of selected chamber _works for representative genres. a ly (2) 3 3 7 THE NINETEENTH C ENTURY ART SONG A study of selected art song litera ture of Schu bert, Schumann, Brahms, Wolf, Strauss, Beethoven, Faure, -De bussy, and DuParc. Style analysis and interpreta tion with performance in class. aly (2) 338

HI STORY OF OPERA

A general s urvey with in-depth study of selected opera

-scores. aly (2) 339 HI STORY OF J AZZ STYLES A s urvey of the evolution of jazz from 1900 to presen t, _ ncluding early development and trends. aly (2) 341 MUSIC IN THE ELEM ENTARY SCHOOL Methods and procedures for the classroom teacher in :leveloping the various music activities in the elementary -3chool. Offered in the Fall Semester for students preparing to become Music Specialists. Offered in the Spring Semester for those students preparing for elementary :lassroom teaching. (2)

and

353 S OLO V OCAL LITERATURE Survey of solo vocal literature. (2) 354 PERFORMER'S PRIMER Techniques of stage presence and procedures for performing vocal and instrumental m usic. Includes the historical aspects of performance, program planning, wardrobe, stage poise and memorizing. aly ( 1 ) 3 6 0 C HOIR OF T H E WEST A s t u d y of choral literature and technique through rehearsal and performance of both sacred a n d secular m usic. A uditions at the beginning of Fall Semester. ( 1 ) 361 UNIVER SITY C HORALE A study of choral literature and technique through rehearsal and performance of both sacred and secular music. E mphasis on individual vocal development through choral singing. Auditions at the beginning of Fall Semester. (1) 362 C ONCERT C HOIR A study of choral literature and technique through rehearsal and performance of both sacred and secular m usic. E mphasis on individ uall vocal devellopment through choral singing. Auditions a t the beginning of Fall Semester. (1)

M USIC

89


363

UNIVE RSITY SINGERS

408

A study of choral literature and technique through rehearsal and performance of both sacred and secular m usic. Emphasis on individual vocal development through choral singing. Open to all students in the University and interes ted community musicians regardless of previous m u sical experience. ( 1 )

364

MADRIGAL

409

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: BASSOON (1-4)

410

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: CLARINET (1-4)

411

PRIV A TI INSTRUCTION: SAXOPHONE (1-4)

412

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: TRUMPET ( 1-4)

413

PRIVATE INSTRUCTI ON: FRENCH HORN (1-4)

Stage prod uction of opera, c hamber opera and opera scenes. Participation in all facets of produc tion. Prerequisite: Consent of the I n s truc tor. (2)

414

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: TROMBON E/BA RITON E (1-4)

415

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: TUBA (1 -4)

370

416

PRIVATE I NSTRUCTION: PERCUSSION ( 1-4)

417

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: G UITAR (1-4)

418

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: HARP (1-4)

419

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: HARPS ICH ORD (1-4)

A s tudy of secular performance. (I)

366

part song through

reading

and

OPERA WORKSHOP

UNIVE RSITY BAND

Study of selected wind ensemble literature th rough rehearsal and performance. M e m bership by audition. (I)

372

UNIVERSITY JAZZ E NSEMBLE

Study of selected j a z z litera ture th rough rehearsal and performance. Membership by aud ition. ( 1 ) Section A - Inst,r umental; Section B - Instrumenta l; Section C - Vocal .

380

UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Study of selected orches tral literature through rehearsal a nd performance. Membership by audition. ( 1 )

381

C H A M B E R ENSEMBLE

R e a d i n g , r e h e a r sa l and p e r f o r m a nc e o f s e l e c t e d instrumen ta l chamber music. Prerequisite: Consent of Chamber Music Coo rdinator. ( 1 ) Section A - S tring; Section B - Brass; Section C Woodwind

382

C ONTE MPORA RY D IRECTIONS ENSEMBLE

Public and laboratory performance of contemporary music.

(1)

383

TWO PIANO ENSEMBLE

Tech niques and practice in the performa nce of t wo-piano and piano duet literature; includes sight reading and program planning. (1)

402

90

PRIVATE INS TRUCTION: OBOE /E NGLISH HORN (1-4)

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: PIANO (1-4)

403

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: ORGA N (1-4)

404

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: VOICE (1-4)

405

PRIVATE INST RUC TION: VIOLIN/VIOLA ( 1-4)

406

PRIVATE INS TRUCTION : CELLO/BASS (1-4)

407

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION : FLUTE (1-4)

MUSIC

One half路hour lesson per wee k. Students receiving permission to regi ster for 2路4 semester hours of credit will receive two one-half hour private lessons per week. Special fee i n addition to t u i tion. All 40 0 series private i n struction requires permission from t h e M usic Department before regis t ra t io n .

423

FORM I

Advanced anal ysis of literature from Classic, Early and Middle Romantic styles in representat ive genre s and media. a l y ( 2)

424

FORM II

425

FORM III

Advanced analysis of literature from late Roman tic, Impressionist and Nationalistic styles in representative genres and media. Prerequisite: Music 423. aly (2) Adva nced analysis of literature from Modern and Contemporary styles in representative genres and media. Prerequisite: Music 423. aly (2)

426

ADVANC ED ORCHESTR ATI ON

Directed study and scoring of selected piano works for la rge ensemble; independent st udy, may be repeated for additional credit. Offered on demand. (2) All m u sic litera t u re courses n u m b ered from 4 3 1 to 438 are open to all university e n rollment without pre r equisite.

431

HI STORY OF P I A N O LITERATURE AND PE RfORMA NC E

A study of representat ive piano compositions of all period s . a ly ( 2 )


433

MUSIC OF BELA BARTOK

�A study of represen tative works of various periods of Bartok. aly (2)

434

SCANDINAVIAN MUSIC

445

ADVANCED CONDUCTING

Re finement of patterns, gestures a n d conducting t e c h n i q u e s ; a p p l i c a t io n to a p p r o p r i a t e v o c a l a n d i nstrumental scores. Prerequisite : Music 345. (2)

A

451

435

Teaching techniques for prospective teachers of piano, including techniques of private and class piano instruction. Methods and materials from beg inning t h rough advanced levels. (2) Section A - Basic; Section B - Lower Elementary; Section C - Upper Elemen tary; Section 0 Advanced

su rvey of selected music of variou s Scandinavian composers; folk music influences and nationalistic element. aly (2)

MUSIC I N THE UN ITED STATES: A HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION

A survey from the Colonial period to the pres e n t covering both the cultivated and the vernacular traditions. aly ( 2)

436

HISTORY OF ORGAN B UILDING

-A two-fold study, involving both the tec hnical evolu tion of the pipe organ, (key-actions, windchest designs, pipework larieties and construction, the organ case) as well as the lis torical evolution o f the various concepts of tonal design s these rela te to the performance of organ literature. aly (2)

:13 7

SACRED MUSIC LITERATURE

<\ survey of churc h mu sic primarily through the study of

-representative major works. a ly (2)

138

HYMNOLO G Y AND THE MUSIC OF THE LITURGY

_\ survey of Ch ristian hymnody, considered from both a m usical and poetic viewpoin t . Also considered will be the roncept and performance of music for the liturgy, both listoric and contemporary, primarily from the Roman, \ngli an and Lutheran traditions. a ly (2) �

441

RECENT TECHNIQUES FOR ELEME NTARY M USIC

rhe concern of the upper elementary and m i ddle school -,nusic teacher, including Orff and Kodaly techniques. ( 2)

452

453

454

4 9 1 - 4 92

I NDEPENDENT STUDY

Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor. May be repeated for additional credi t . (1-4)

502

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: PIANO ( 1-4)

503

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: ORGAN (1-4)

504

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: VOICE ( 1-4)

506

he organization and administration of the secondary school music curriculum with particular attention to t h e 'leeds of t h e instrumental program. Organization, nanagement, teaching methods, rehearsal techniques and nstrumen tal litera ture appropriate for the various age and experience levels of students i n grades 4-12.

STR I NG PEDAGOGY

The physiological and psychological approach to s tring playing a nd t e a c h i n g . I n c l u d e s d is c u s s i o n a n d demonstration of instrument and bow techniques, private lesson approach and m a terials, general and specific string problem s . aly (2)

rhe organiza tion and administration of the secondary school music cu rriculum with particular a t ten tion to the needs of the choral program. Organization, management, eaching methods, rehearsal techniques and choral i terature appropriate for the various age and experience levels of s t udents in grades 7-14. (2)

METHODS A ND MATERIALS F O R SCHOOL INSTRUME NTAL MUSIC

VOCAL PEDAGOG Y

Physiological, psychological and pedagogical aspects of singing. (2)

505

144

ORGAN PEDAGOGY AND REPERTOIRE

Methods and techniques o f private organ instruction, including supervised practical experience. A survey of organ literature represe n ta tive of all major composers and style periods . aly (2)

METHODS AND MATERIALS F O R SECONDARY CH ORA L MUSIC

443

PIANO PEDAGOGY

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: VIOLIN/VIOLA (1-4)

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: CE LLO/BASS (1- 4) 507 PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: F L UTE (1-4) 508

PRIV ATE INSTRUCTION: OBOE /ENGLISH HORN (1-4)

509

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: BASSOON (1-4)

510

PRIVATE I NSTRUCTIO N: CLARINET (1-4)

511

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: SAXOPHONE (1-4)

512

PRIVA T E INSTRUCTION: TRUMPET (1-4)

513

PRIVATE INSTRUCTIO N: FRENCH HORN ( 1-4)

MUSIC

91


514

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: TROMBONE /BARITONE (1-4)

515

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: TUBA (1-4) PRIV A TE I NSTRUCTION: PERCUSSION

516

(1-4) 517 518 519

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: G UITAR (1-4) PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: HARP (1-4) PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: HARPSICHORD

(1-4)

One half-hour lesson per week. Students receiving permission to register for 2-4 semester hours of credit will receive two one-half hour private lessons per week. Special fee i n addition to tuition. All 500 series private instruction requires permission from the Music Department before registration.

527 C OMPOSITION A s y s t e m a t ic a p pr o a c h to c o n t e m p o r a ry m u s i c a l composition; s tudents create, notate a n d perform works for solo, small and large ensembles. May be repeated for credit. (1-4) 532

MUSIC BIBLIOGRAPHY AND RESEARCH TECHNIQUE S

Survey of the main research tools available for advanced work in m usic. Course conte nt can be adapted to needs of students in m usic ed ucation, theory or performance. a l y (2) 545

SEMINAR IN ADVANCED C ONDUCTING: CONTEMPORARY LITERA TURE

Directed study of selected contemporary scores containing conducting problems unique to rece n t compositions in a wide range of genres and media, including electronics, controlled improvisation, multimedia, and texture for large and small ensembles, vocal and instrumental. (2) 590

GRADUA TE SEMINAR (1-4) RESEARCH I N MUSIC (1-4) THESIS (2-4)

596- 5 9 8 599

INTE RIM COURSES OFFERED I N 1 9 78 THE MUSICAL E XPERIENCE BEGINNERS BAND E UROPEAN MUSIC DRAMA, CUL TURAL TOUR 3 1 7 INTENSIVE PERFORMANCE

301 303 310

92

MUSIC


SCHOOL OF

A n u r s i ng career o f f e r s g r e a t oppor t u n ity f o r a rich a n d rewarding profe s s i o n a l li fe. I t affords v i r t u a l l y u n l i m i ted c h oice o f location, e n v i r on m e n t, a n d type of service . The ph ysical, m e n tal, social, and s p i r i t u a l health o f people is o f u n i v e r s a l oncern, a n d those p r e p a r e d to m a i n t a in t h e i r good h e a l t h a re in con s t a n t d e m a n d . The School o f Nu rsing i s a p ro f e s s i o n a l school which c o m b i n e s p rofessional a n d li beral a rts s t u di e s i n a s si s t i ng s t ud e n t s t o d evelop a s e n s e o f respo n si b i l i t y for a c q u i ri n g t h e a t t i t ud e s , knowledge, a nd skill nece s s a r y for m e e t i ng n u rs i ng n e e d s of t h e c o m m u n i t y . The g e n e r i c program i s d e s i g n e d f o r s tu d e n ts w h o h a v e h ad n o previous prepara tion i n n u rs i ng, a n d g ra d u a t e s of t h i s prog r a m who s uc c e s s f u l l y � complete t h e State Board e x a m i n a t i o n s (Reg i s t e red Nu rse) are p repared for begin n i ng posi t i o n s in profes s i o n a l n u r s i n g . The School a l s o offers a _3pecial program to reg i s t ered n u rses who wish t o c o m p l e t e require m e n ts for t h e B a c h e l o r o f Science ; n N ur s i n g a n d prepare for leadership posi t i o n s . G r a d u a tes from e i t h e r prog r a m a re p repared for -co n t i n u i ng t h e i r formal e d u c a t i o n a t t h e g r a d u a t e level.

The Sc hool o f N ur s i ng i s accred i ted b y t h e Was hington S t a t e B o a r d of N u rs i ng a n d b y t h e Na t ion a l L e a g u e f o r N u rs i n g . I t is a c h a r t e r m e m b e r of t h e Western C o u n c i l o n High e r Ed u c a t i o n for N u r s i n g . �Under t h e d i re c t s up ervision o f i t s f a c u l t y m e m bers, the School uses f a c i l i t i e s o f hospitals, �le a l t h agencies, a n d s c h ool s i n t h e c o m m u n ity in oroviding optimal c l i nical l e a r n i ng e x perience for -I t s s t u d e n t s .

fAC ULTY �tuc ke, Director; Acuff, Aikin, Bradford, Carpenter, �arper, Carter, Cone, Gillett, Gough, Hefty, Hostet ter, Jacobson, E. Johnson, lawrence, Mason, � . Olson, Page, Roediger, Schultz, Stiggelbout, �torlie, Weirick, Zierath.

ADMISSION AND CONTINUA nON POLICIE S Students seeking admis sion to either the generic program or 'he special program for registered nurses m us t make formal Ipplication to bot h the university and the School of Nursing. �\pplications for admission to the School of Nursing are to be

Nursing

submitted between January 1 and February 15, and are considered for the following academic year only if the applicant has been offered admission to the university and has provided transcripts and Allied Health Professions Admission Test scores as requested by the Admissions Com mittee. Information about the Allied Health Professions Admission Test may be secured from the School early in the fall. When there are more qualified applicants than the School can accept, selection is made o n a competitive basis. In making the selection, the School of Nursing Admissions Committee uses grades as the major means of evaluation, but also considers such other relevant factors as selected scores received on the Allied Health Professions Admission Test, prior experience in nursing, previous study at PLU, significant co-curricular activities (schoo!, community, church, etc.) and other pertinent extenuating or extraordinary circumstances. Generic students are admitted to begin their nursing program in either the fall or spring semester, and selection for both terms is made the previous spring, generally by May 1 . Insofar as possible, s tudents are admitted for the term of their choice. When there are too many desiring a given term, determination of which students will be admitted for faIl and which for spring is made by random selection. Time normally required to complete requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing is six semesters from the time of enrolling in the first n u rsing course regardless of the number of college credits earned previously. The School of NurSing reserves the right to request withdrawal of a nursing student who fails to demonstrate competency or who fails to maintain professional conduct. Mi nimum criteria for admission to or continuation in the School of Nursing are a s follows: 1 . Admission to the university. Applicants must have been admi t ted to Pacific Lutheran University prior to March 1 of the year in which they wish to have their application processed. However, admission to the university does not guarantee admission to the School of Nursing. 2. Completion of or current enrollment in Psychology 1 0 1 ([ntro­ d uction to Psychology) and three of the following: Biology 1 1 1 (Biology and the Modern World), Biology 2 0 1 (In troductory Microbiology), Chemistry 1 03 (Chemistry of Life). and Sociology 101 (Introduction to Sociology). (The remaining courses will be completed after enrolling in the nursing progra m . ) 3. Completion o f a minimum of 2 6 semester credit hours. Some of t hese may be in progress at time of application. 4 . A minimum grade of 2.00 in all required nursing and prerequi­ site courses. A student receiving a grade of less than 2.00 in any course which is a prerequisite for a nursing course may not continue in that nursing course until the prerequisite course is repeated with a grade point of 2.00 or above. 5 . A minimum cumulative g.p.a. of 2. 00. 6 . Physical health and stamina necessary to withstand the demands of nursing. 7 . E motional stability sufficien t to cope with the stresses inherent i n 'learning and practicing nursing . Registered nurses are admitted to begin their nursing program in the fall semester, and are enrolled full time for a total of sixteen months. The registe red nurse student must have completed all non-nursing course prerequisites a nd a minimum of 24 semester credits of the core requirements and electives for a total of 56 semester credits. Other mini m u m

NURSING

93


criteria for admission to or continuation in the nursing program are as outlined above for the generic st ude n t . The registered nurse who is considering making application for admission to the nursing program is advised to contact the School of Nursing for advice about prerequisites to be completed, other requirements to be met, a nd the program to pursue after admission , HEALTH The nursing student is responsible for maintaining optimal health a nd is a teacher o f health, Physical examination, x-rays, and immunizations are required before admission to the clinical areas and periodically thereafter and are the responsibility of the s tude n t , Each student must carry personal health i nsurance . ADDITIONAL COSTS In addition to regular university costs, s t udents are to provide their own transportation between the university campus a nd the clinical laboratory areas beginning with the first nursing course, Available public transportation is limited, so provision for private transportation is essential. Students are required to carry professional liability insurance during all periods of clinical experience. This is available under a group plan a t a nominal cost to the s tudent, Health examination fees, student u niforms (approximately $70,00)' a nd equipment (wristwatch, scissors, stethoscope) a re also the responsibility of the stud e n t , C E RTIFICATION F O R SCHOOL NURSING Educational Staff Associate Certification for school nurses is individually designed through a consortium consisting of a school district, related professional association and Pacific Lutheran University, Additional information o n this program can be obtained by contacting the Dean o f the School of Education or the Director of the School of Nursing, RESOURCES AND FACILITIES Good Samaritan Hospital, Puyallup, WA ( 1 7 0 beds) David K. Hamry, M,H,A" ErecutiDe Director Mary Jane Troeh, R , N" Director of Nursing Lakewood General Hospital, Tacoma, WA 11 00 beds} James Helland, M , B , A .. Administrator Peggy Dawson, R , N , . D irector of Nursing Madigan Army Medical Cen ter, Tacoma, WA ( 5 3 6 beds) Brigadier General William R, Dwyer. M, D" Commanding Officer Colonel Essie Wilson, R. N,. B,S, N,. M,S,. Ch ief. Department of Nursing

Mary Bridge Children's Health Center, Tacoma, WA (68 beds) Frederick A, Pritchard, M , B , A . . Administrator Kare n Lynch, R,N . . B , S, N. . Assistant Admin istrator for Patient Services Puget Sound Hospital, Tacoma, WA ( 1 4 5 beds) Cliff Gorak, M, H,A" Adm i n istrator Syd Purdue, R,N" B , S, N Director of Nursing St. Joseph Hospital, Tacoma, WA (2 5 0 beds) Daniel Russe ll, B , S , . M, H , A .. Admin istrator Hazel Hurst, R , N, . B , S , . M, N,. Assista n t Administrator for Nursing .â&#x20AC;˘

SerDice

St, Peter Hospital, Olympia, WA ( 1 5 0 beds) David L. Bjornson, M, H. A .. Admi nistrator Ann Bertolin, R . N" B . S , N . . Director of Nursing Service Tacoma General Hospital, Tacoma, WA (2 9 9 beds) Eugene K, Prentice, B , S" M, S , H , A " President Betty Hoffman, R . N, . B , S, N, . Director of Nursing Service Tacoma-Pierce County Health Depa r t ment, Tacoma, WA

94

NURSING

Walter R, Herron, M , D . . M , P , H , . Director. Tacoma- Pierce County Health Department

Nancy Cherry, R , N. . M, P, H . . Co-Di mtor. Tacom a - Piew County Health Department

Tacoma Public Schools, Tacoma, WA Roger Meyer, M,D,. M. P, H , . Adm inistratiDe Director. DiDision of Health

Donna G , Ferguson, R , N. . M,N,. Supervisor of Nursing Services. Divison of Health

The Doctors Hospital, Tacoma, WA ( 7 0 beds) Frederick A. Pritchard, M, B , A .. Administrator Harriet Huffman, R,N .. Director of Nursing Veterans Admi nistration Hospital, Tacoma, WA (904 beds) Robert B, Rynearson, B , S .. Director Joan Stout, R , N .. B , S , N .. M, N,A .. Ch ief. Nursing Service Western State Hospital, Steilacoom, WA ( 9 5 0 beds) Giulio di Furia, M, D .. Superintendent Charles Ruell, R , N" B,S . . M,S" Director of Nursing BACHELOR OF SCIENCE I N NURSING The curriculum plan and its implementa tion are designed to bL growth-fostering and to encourage i nitiative and self-direction o n the part of the studen t , In addition to the nursing requirements, the student is expected to meet university requirements, Nursing courses are sequential in nat ure a nd all have prerequisites, A student in terested i n the Bachelor o f Science in Nursing degree should contact the School of Nursing and begin the course sequence upon entrance to the university, For spring semester enrollment the curriculum generally follows the fall semester format with modifications as necessary to assure completion of all prerequisite courses by the time they a re needed, A schedule of courses is developed individually with each student who begins the nursing courses in the spring semester. Nursing courses must be taken concurrently and in sequence as indicated in the sample curriculum, and normally extend over six semesters, A sam ple curriculum for the student accepted for fall semester enrollment is as follows: FIRST YEAR - Pre-Nursing FaJ.l Semester 'Biology 1 1 1 Biology and the Modern World " Religion elective Introduction to Psychology 'Psychology 1 0 1 Personalized Fitness Programs " P, E , 100

.. 1 1 .-

Interim Elective 4 Spring Semester Chemistry 103 " 'English 1 0 1 'Sociology 1 0 1 P,E, Activity

Chemistry of Life College English Introduction to Socio'iogy

4 1 L


S E C O N D YEAR Fa l l Se mester Biol ogy 201 Biology 205

COURSE OFFERINGS

' Psychology 335

or Education 3 2 1 N u rsing 2 1 4

In troductory Microbiology Hu man Anatomy a n d Physiology I Develo pm e n t : Infa n c y to Maturity Human Development Nursing I : Socialization to Nursing

4 4 4

4

P . E. Activity 17 I n terim Elective

4 4

Spring Seme s t e r Bio logy 206 " " Ele tive Nursing 228 P. E . Activity

H u m a n Anato my a nd Physiology I I N u rsing 11: Healt h Asses s m e n t

4 4 8 1 17

rHIRD YEAR �all Semes ter N u rsing 334 Nursing 344 " ' Fine Arts elective _

" Philosophy

Nursi·ng C e n t r u m I Health Problems Elective

4 4 4 4 16

Tnterim Optional elective

0-4 0-4

Spring Semester Nur sing C e n t r u m II N u rsing 354 Clinica� Problems I N u r sing 384 Nursing Practicu m I N ursing 394 ' ' ' Literat ure or History elective

4 4 4 4 16

'OURTH YEAR 'all Se mes ter Nursing 424 Nursing 434 Nursing 444 " Religion elective

N u rsing C e n t r u m III Clinical Proble ms m Nursing Practicum II

4 4 4 4 16

Interim Optional elective

0- 4 0-4

pring Semester Nursing 464 Nursing 4 7 8

Nursing Centrum IV Senior Practicum

4 8 12

" M a y be taken ei ther semester " May be taken either fre s h m a n or sophomore year ' " " Ma y be taken any time

-

214

NURSING I: SOCIALIZA nON TO NURSING

C o n c e p t s reg a r d i n g sel f a n d s o c i e t y , r e l a t i o n s , commu nications, learning, a n d levels o f wellness. In troduces historical milestones of nursing and trends in nu rsing education. Prerequisites : Psychology 101, and prior or concurrent e n rollment in Sociology 1 0 1 and Biology 1 1 1 . (4)

228

NURSING II: HEALTH ASSESSMENT

Assessment of health status of individuals, fa milies, a n d communities. A ttention i s given t o the u tilization o f health resources, the i n fluence of the eco-s ystem, a n d the role of the heal t h team i n m a i n taining wellness. Includes selected clinical experiences with the newborn, well child, adolescent, and elderly. E mphasis is on beginning techniques and assessment as p a r t of the nursing process. Prerequisites : Biology 205, Chemistry 1 03 a n d Nursing 2 1 4, and prior or concurrent registra tion in Psychology 3 3 5 ( o r Education 3 2 1), Biology 2 0 1 a n d 206. ( 8 )

334

NURSING CE NTRUM I

An i ntrod uction to the less complex medical - s u rgical situa tions of c hild ren a n d adul ts, the preg n a n t family, and preve ntive aspects of psyc h ia tric nursing. Drug and diet therapy and theories of physical and psychosocial development are included. Prereq uisites : Biology 206 a n d Nu rsing 2 28, and concurrent registration in Nursing 3 4 4 . (4)

344

HE ALTH PROBLEMS

Medical-surgica,l problems of a l e s s s tressful na ture a n d appropriate nu rsing actions to facilitate adaptation. Includes experience with a pregna n t fa mily t h rough the perinatal period, and application of principles of crisis i n tervention in dealing with health problems i n selected clinical experience s. Prerequisites: Biology 206 and Nursing 2 28, and concurre n t registration in Nursing 334. (4)

354

NURSING C E NTRUM II

The more complex medical-surgical a n d psyc hiatric situations. Emphasis is placed on the pathophysiological and psychopathological aspects and their application to the nu rsing process in the care of children and adults. Prerequisites: Nursing 334 a n d 344, a n d concurrent registra tion in Nursing 384 and 394. (4)

384

CLINICAL PROBLE MS I

Psyc hia tric and medical-surgical problems of a stressful n ature with the appropriate nursing actions to facilitate adaptation or restoration to a higher level of wellness. Prerequisites: Concurren t registration in Nursing 354 and 3 9 4 . (4)

NURSING

9S


394 NURSING PRACTIC UM I Clinical application of Nursing 3 5 4 and 384 . The student is ex pected to apply theoretical principles based on pathophysiological and psychopathological concepts in the clinical setting, u tilizing interpersonal a nd technical skills. Prerequisites: Co n current registration in Nursing 3 5 4 and 384. (4) 4 2 4 NURSING C ENTRUM III In troduction to acute deviant behavior patterns and to life threatening medical-surgical problems of children a nd adults. Emphasis is placed on complex pathophysiological and psychopathologic.al aspects and their implications for the nursing process. Prerequisites: Nursing 354, 384, and 394, and concurrent registration in Nursing 434 and 4 4 4 . (4) 434

CLINICAL PROBLEMS II

In troduction to nursing actions appropriate to s tressful medicaL s urgical and psychiatric problems and to the newer parameters of nursing . Issues in n ursing and changes in h e a l t h care s y s t e m s a re e x a m i n e d . Prereq u i s i t e s : Nursing 354, 3 8 4 , a n d 3 9 4 , a n d concurrent registration i n Nursing 424 and 4 4 4 . ( 4 ) 4 4 4 NURSING PRACTIC UM II C l i n i c a l a p p l i c a t i o n of p a t h o ph y s i o l o g i c a l a n d psychopathological concepts i n critical care nursing, including u tilization of interpersonal and sophisticated technical skills. Prerequisites: NurSing 354, 384, and 394, and concurrent registration in Nursing 424 and 434. (4) 4 6 4 NURSING C ENTRUM IV Prepara tion for f u ture professional roles of the nurse in the health delivery system. Emphasis is on leadership and management skills, professional j udgment, decision making, and the n urse as a change agent. Students examine legislation, economic security, professional growth and the utiliza tion of health and welfare resources. Prere q uisites: Nursing 4 24, 4 34, and 444 and concurren t registration in Nursing 478. (4) 478 SENIOR PRACTICUM Clinical application of professional and technical skills in primary or secondary nursing settings. Each studen t is ex pected to function in a s taff nurse role and progress to a leadership role. Prerequisite: Nursing 424, 4 34, and 444, and concurrent registration in Nursing 464. (8) 491, 4 9 2 INDEPENDENT STUD Y Prereq uisite: Permission of the Director. ( 1 - 4)

96

NURSING

INTE RIM C OURSES OFFERED IN 1 9 78 301 305 309 311 314

THE BODY BEAUTIfUL HEALTH CARE IN THE C RI MINAL JUSTICE S YSTEM C HILDREN AND HEALTH CARE E XPERIENCES SURGICAL INTERVENTION TRANSCULTURAL AWARENE SS: A N E XPERIENTIAL WORKSHOP I N HAWAII


hilosophy Philosophy is the parent acad e mic discipline which gave birth to today's variety of arts and sciences . It analyzes basic issues i n all fie lds and seeks to u nderstand the interconnections a m ong the various facets of h uman life and ex perience . Areas of concern include the scope and c h a racter of h uman knowledge; moral aesthe tic, and religious values; h um a n n a t ure and its place in the universe; and the ultimate nature of reality . A course of s t udy in philosophy acq uaints s t udents with major rival world views and value syste ms, encourages them in the habit of analytic and syste matic thought, and helps t h e m to see life cri tically, appreciatively, and w h ole. F A C ULTY Arbaugh, Chair; Huber, P. Menzel, Myrbo, Nordby.

USES OF PHILOSOPHY Courses in philosophy are designed to meet the needs of a variety of students: ( 1 ) those who desire some knowledge of

philosophy as a basic element in a liberal education; (2) those who wish to pursue some special interest, for exa mple, in ethics, science, religion, the history of thought, or the ideas of particular men or peoples; (3) those who wish to s upport their work in ot h e r fields, for exa mple, literature, history, religion, the sciences, education, or business; (4) those who plan to use a major in ph ilosophy as preparation for graduate or professional study in another field, for exa mple, theology or law; and (5) those who plan to do graduate work i n philosophy itself, usually with the intention of teaching in the field. Undergraduate study in philosophy does not train one specifically for a first job. It does provide essential perspectives, as well as basic skills in analysis and interpretation, thought and problem solving, resea rch and writing . These - us ually coupled with specialized training i n other disciplines - fit one for a great variet y of positions of vocational respon sibility. Persons with the greatest upward mobility in fields such as business management, law, education, engineering, operations research, data processing, or social work, are gen erally not those with the most specialized training, but those with broad perspectives, flexibility and depth, and skills in thought and communication. SUPPORTING PROGRAMS I N PHILOSOPHY FOR OTHER FI ELDS Philosophy provides a solid foundation for a va riety of studies and careers. St udents using i t to support primary work in other fields may elect a minor or major or some other combination of courses of intere s t . Those with double majors m a y request a modification or reduction of the requirements for the standard major.

PHIL O S OPHY

97


Recom men ded programs of study i n philosophy to s upport work i n a variety of other disciplines and for a variety of careers are described in separate broc h u re s available i n the departmentl office. These i n c l u de b u siness, educa tion, health p rofessions, law, parish minis try and theological studies, social work, fine arts, h u m a n ities, a nd social and natural scie nces.

A QUALITY PROGRAM P L U 's department of philosophy offers a d i s tinctive course of p h i losophical st udies. The members of the depart m e n t all hold the d octorate, h ave studied a t leading i n s t i t u tions in this country and abroad, a n d h a ve pa rticipa ted i n professional programs in the U n i ted States a nd Europe. The excellence of the depa r t m e n t is evidenced b y g r a n t s received and by the success of its graduates at major graduate and professional schools t h roughout the country. The departme nt s t rongly e m ph asizes a nd has received recog nition for t h e q u a l i t y of its teach i n g . All s tudents, but especially .those with major or minor prog rams, rece ive s u bstan tial in divid ual a t te n tion and a s s i s tance in the p u rs u i t of t heir studies. I N TERIM OffERINGS Spec.ial i nterim courses at PLU explore a variety of topics a n d c u l t ural perspectives. C ul t u r a l s t u d i e s have been cond uc t ed in foreign coun tries such as Greece, italy, Spain, a n d Norway. On足 campus studies h a ve been concerned with themes of social a n d legal philosophy, game t h eory, w a r a n d moral i t y , j u s tice, love, capitalism a nd bu siness, a nd bio-medical ethics. The Genera l University Require ment of one cou rse in p h i losophy m a y be satisfied by a ny course offered except 1 2 1, Critical T h i n king a n d Writing, 233, Log ic. 328, Philosophy 0{ Law, or 385, Health Care Ethics. The i n i ti a l course in the s ubject is customarily 201 or 221, though neither of these courses is a prerequisite for a n y other course. 300-level courses a re especially s u ited f o r s t udents w i t h partic ular i n teres t s . Depa r t m e n t a l consent m a y be required for some courses.

M 1 N OR: 1 6 semester hours. A minor in philosophy consi s t s of four approved courses. S t u d e n t s conSidering a m i n o r should discuss t h eir personal goals with departme n t a l fac ulty. If they elect a minor in the field, they sho uld for m a l ly declare this with the registrar and the depar t m e n t chair. Minors may either choose for the mselves or be assigned a n a d v i ser, in consultation with whom they should plan their prog ram. BACHELOR OF A RTS MAJOR: M i n i m u m of 28 semes ter hours. Students i n tending to major in p h i losoph y m u s t formally declare this with the reg istrar a n d the department chair. They may either choose a departmental a d viser or be a ssigned one and s h o u ld plan their programs i n consult ation with this adviser. A person majoring in the department will: 1 . complete a minimum of six reg u l a r courses in phi losophy, i n c l u d i ng one course in logic and a ny two of the four courses i n t h e h istory of philosophy sequence ( 3 3 1 , A n c i e n t Philosophy, 3 3 2, Medieual PI,ilosophy, 333, Modern Philosophy, 335, Contemporary Ph i losophy!.

2. complete 493, Senior Independent Study, which i nvolves writing a research paper under the supervision of one or more fac ulty members a n d taking a comprehensive senior e x a m i n a t io n . The exa mination is largely diag nostic i n n a t ure, and it i s not

98

PHILO SOPHY

necessary for a s t u d e n t t o achieve a specified level of perfor mance to complete the major or to graduate. Performance on this e x a mi n a tion will de termine one third of the s t ude nt's g rade in the Senior Independent Study. 3. complete the depa rtmental reading progra m. Quality programs in the arts a nd sciences d o not rely excl u sively on lecturing and group s t u d y or on secondary works, but also o n one-to-one t u torial i n s truction i n primary sources. Majors in philosophy at Pacific L u theran Univers i t y are expected to read and disc u s s a num ber of classical works under the personal s u pervisio n of various mem bers of the departmental facu l t y . Not a l l works will be add itions to course ma terials; some will also be covered in reg u l a r courses, and these may be read a n d discussed sim u l taneously with class s t u d y . With departmen tal approval, t h e s t a n dard l i s t m a y be modified in accordance with special needs or i n terests, or reduced for those with double majors. The list s ho u l d be secured a t a n early date from t h e departmental office, a n d one's reading program should be developed in co n s ul t a tion with a n adviser. I t i s best t h a t t h e reading program n o t be concen trated into a single semester but p ursued at a l e i s u rely pace over a n e x tended period. It is recommended that students familiarize th e mselves with main themes of the his tory of western p h ilosophy and with major schools of philosophical though t, for exa mple, pragma tism, realism, linguistic analysis, positivism, d ialectical ma terialism, a n d existentialism. For this purpose s t udents should make use of major histories a n d other seco n d a r y sources such a s the Encyclopedia of Philosophy. It i s also expected that they will meet reg ularly but informally with both faculty and o t h e r advanc ed st udents t o discuss and t h ereby facili tate and enrich t heir work in t he fiel d .

COURSE OFFERINGS 121

CRITICAL THINKI NG AND WRITING

This course is designed to develop the ability to evaluatt explanations critically; to distinguish acceptable hOlT defective explana tio ns and to organize and write. straigh tforward, clear, direct, simple English. The course will focus on a critical evaluation of the JFK assassination events i n the Berm uda Triangle, U . F . O . phe nomena, an, other popular topics. The course will sati sfy the genera. university req uirement i n writing but will not sa tisfy the general u niversity requireme n t i n philosophy. I II ( 4)

201

PHILOSOPHICAL ISSUES

Perennial phil osophical issues, systems and thinkers; the n a t ure of knowledge, the function of science, values, human nature and its social implications, religion anc' knowledge of God. Develop ment of critical and systematic philosophical thinking about all issues. I II (4)


2 2 1 MORAL PHILOSOPHY Major moral systems of Western civilization; inte nsive examination of some contemporary moral theories; cri tical application to selected moral problems. I II (4) LOG I C "- 233 Principles o f a rg u ment a n d proof; deductive, induc tive and symbolic logic; the nature and functions of language, problems of semantics, the philosophy of logic. I (4) PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS OF SOCIAL PROBLEMS An examination of fundamental concepts of social thought: hu man nature, society, a u thority, community, libe rty, equality, justice. Application of these concepts in a discussion of contemporary social institutions and their problems: wa r, racism, poverty, crime. (4) 324

328 PHILOSOPHY OF LAW The nature and j u stification of legal authority and legal obligations; "natural law" and "legal positivism"; theories of natural rights and social justice; the relation of those theories to co urt decisions relating, e.g., to affirmative -action, sex discrimination, welfa re, freedom of speech, a nd educational financing; the justification of disobedie nce of law; the rationale of legal punishment and of particular practices of capital punishment, legal liabilities for the --- i nnocent, and the insa nity defense. Not for General University Requirement. (4) 331 ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY The development of philosophic thought and method from �the Presocratic period to the end of the fourth century A.D. Special emphasis is given to the philosophies of Plato and Aristotle. I a/y (4) 332 MEDIE VAL PHILOSOPHY The development of philosophy from Augustine to Ockham. Scrutiny of the sources and nature of the Thomistic synthesis, and the reaction to it in the work of Duns Scot us and William Ockha m. I a/y (4) 3 3 3 MODERN PHILOS OPHY The development of philosophy from the seventeenth through the early nineteenth centuries; continental rationalism, British empiricism and German idealism; Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hu me, Kant, Fichte, Schopenhauer and Hegel. II a/y (4) 335 CONTEMPORARY PHI LOSOPHY rhe development of philosophy from the late ninetee nth century to the present; may include pragmatism, �mpiricism, process philosophy, existentialism and analysis I S developed by Mill, James, Dewey, Whitehead, Sartre, Russell, Ayer and Wittgen stein. II a/y (4)

365 K I E RKEGAARD AND E XISTENTIALISM Modern existentialism, its main themes and their relation to other philosoph ical traditions; its impact on such fields as literature and psychology; life and thought of two key figure s : Soren Kierkegaard and Jean-Paul Sartre; related t h i n k e r s i n c l u d i n g N i e t z s c h e , H e i d e g g e r, J a s p e r s , Berdyaev, Unamuno a n d Marcel . I a / y ( 4 ) 3 7 1 A E STHE T I C S Analysis o f t h e aesthetic e xperience a n d its relationship to the fine arts, l i terat ure, science a n d morality; the criteria and concepts employed in artistic expression and aesthe tic evaluation. I I a/y (4) 381 THEORY OF VALUE The nat ure of hu man values; contemporary discussions concerning the s u bjective or objective, absolute o r relative character of such values as the good and the right, the beautiful and the holy; the origin of values, their place in a wodd of fact, man's knowledge of them, the ch aracter and use of the la nguage of evaluation. II a /y (4) 385 HEALTH CARE ETHICS An analysis of selected moral problems in medical relationsh ips, using basic distinctions and normative theories developed in philosophical ethics. General issues of the value of life and the disvalue of suffering, the necessary conditions of h uman rights, the d istinction between wrong s of commission a nd wrongs of omission, exceptions to rules, and assessment of risks for others. Specific problems of informed consent, eutha nasia, allocation of scarce medical resources, rig hts to health care, patient responsibility for heal th, truth -telling and confidentiali ty, genetic counseling a nd screening, etc. For the general student as well as students in the health sciences. Not for General University Requirement. Prerequisite : consent of the in structor. II a/y (4) 393 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIG ION C las sical and contemporary views of traditional religious problems: the existence of God, relig.ious experience, revela tion, immortality and others. II (4) 395 PHILOSOPHY OF S C I E NC E The general character, fundamental concepts, methods and sig nificance of modern science; some attention to specific areas of science; physical, biological, social; the implications of science and scientific methodology for ethical, aesth etic and religious values. I a/y (4)

PHI L O S O PHY

99


4 2 7 PHILOSOPHY AND C URRENT PROBLEMS A reading and discussion course conducted by o n e or more staff members. Students will read in topical areas of current interest in which philosophical literature has been developed for comparison and analysis . Topics e n visioned a re such as free enterprise, ecology and environment, affirmative action and discrimination, p ublic and private education, democratic pluralism and the problem of a uthori ty. ( 4 ) 435 ADVANCED SEMINAR IN PHILOSOPHY Topic to be a n nounced at the time the course is offered, normally some aspect of contemporary philosophy. Prerequisite: consent. I aly (4)

I NDEPENDENT R EADING A ND RESEARCH

491, 4 9 2

Prerequisite : departmental consent. I II ( 1 - 4) 493 SENIOR INDEPENDENT STUDY Preparation for a comprehensive senior e xamination a nd the writing of a major research paper. Preparation of the research paper constitutes two-thirds of the course; reading for the comprehensive examination the remaining third. Paper d u e November 1 or March 1 5; examination to be taken by December l or April 20. For philosophy majors only. Prerequisite: at least 4 courses in philosophy. I II (4)

INTE RIM COURSES OFfE RED IN 1 9 78 221 300

100

MORAL PHIL OSOPHY MORALITY AND THE PROFIT MOTIVE THE DILEMMAS OF SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN A BUSINESS-ORIENTED SOCIETY

PHIL OS OPHY


Physical Education

S C HOOL OF

The universi ty's physical e d u c a tion progr a m seeks - to ingrain in each s tu d e n t a f u n d a m e n t al respect for the role of phys ical a c t i v i t y i n living. Profess ional ly, i t prepares p rospective leaders for c a reers i n physical e d uc a tion, h e a l t h , recreation, - a t h l e tics, a n d the rape u t i c s . I n s truction is o f f e r e d i n approx i m a tely

30

different

physical ed u c a tion a c t i v i t i e s . The a c t i v i t y prog ram is uniquely characte rized by a ti mely response to s t u d e n t i n t e r e s t s i n rec r e a t i o n a l oppor t u n i t i e s a v a i l a b l e i n the Pacific N o r t h w e s t . ,-

F AC UL T Y

D. Olson, D i rector; E. Anderson, Auping, Beckman, R. Carlson, Chase, Hoseth, Lundgaard, McGill, Officer, Westering; assisted by Asher, Benson, - Dahl, Hemion, Iverson, Jarvis, Kit tilsby, L overin, Mazzoni, Nicholson, Phillips, Peterson, Steil berg, Thieman, and N. Tomsic.

UNIVE RSITY REQUIREME NT: Four one-hour courses, including PE 100, a re required for graduation. Eight one-hour activity cou,rses m a y be counted toward graduation. Students are encouraged to select a variety of activities at appropriate skill levels. All p hysical education activity courses are graded on the basis of "A," "Pass," or "Fail" and are taught on a coed uca tional basis. BACHELOR OF ARTS (Recreation Concent ration): 4 0 s e m e s t e r hours, including PE 2 7 7 , 330, 4 8 3 , 4 9 7, Psychology 335; 4 semes ter hours of PE 481, 482, 4 85, 284-288; 1 0 hours '-- of: Art 230-330, 250 or 350, 326, 3 4 1 , 365, 370, Music 3 4 1, PE 292, 322, 365; 8 hours of: BA 230, 281, 350, Political Science 356, 457, Psychology 243, 340, 4 1 0, Sociology 260, 336, 342, 344.

-

BACHELOR OF ARTS (Therapeutic Concentration): 4 8 semester hours including PE 2 77, 292, 360, 3 9 1 , 392, 4 78, 4 8 1 , 482, 484, 4 8 5, 497; Biology 205-2(')6; Psychology 1 0 1, 2 2 1 , p l u s t w o h o u r s of a psychology elective.

HEAL TH MINOR: (20 semes ter hours) The following courses '-- are required: Biology 205-206, PE 292, 295, 324, 326.

_

COACHING MINOR (Men and Women): 1 8 semester hours including : PE 2 77, 281, 334, 485, participa tion i n a varsity or club sport, and a minimum of 10 hours selected from among the following: PE 3 3 1 , 361, 370, 3 7 1 , 372, 373, 3 74, and 478. In terim and s um mer courses may be included as electives with t he approval of tne di rector.

DANCE MINOR: 20 hours req uired: PE 362, 282 or 491, four hours from the following: PE 240, 242, 243 (may be repeated), 244, and eight hours from the following: PE 308, 360, Music 1 3 1 - 1 32, Art 1 l 0, 280, and Biology 205-206. The dance minor is cross-referenced with Com m u n ication Arts. B.A. IN EDUCATION - SECONDARY SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHING MAJOR (44 hours): Required: (24 hours ) : PE 277, 328, 478, 4 8 1 , 482, and 485, Biology 205 and 206, and participation i n a varsity or club sport. Elective s : 20 hours from among the following: PE 275, 282, 284, 285, 287, 288, 3 3 2, 360, 362, 484, and 491. Students desiring K - 1 2 Certi fication must complete PE 283, 322, 362, and 284 or 288 i n addition to meeting requirements as set forth by the School of Education. B.A. IN EDUCATION - E L EME NTARY SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHING MAJOR (24 hours): The following courses are required: PE 277, 283, 284 or 288, 322, 334, 362 a nd 4 hours of electives in physical education with the approval of the director. SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHING MINOR (I8 hours): The following courses are required: PE 277, 334 and 485 and 1 2 hours o f electives from among the following: P E 282, 283, 284, 285, 287, and 328. E L E M E N TARY SCHOOL TEACHING MINOR (12 hours): PE 322 a nd 8 hours from among the following: 284 or 288, 283 and 362. K-6 PHYSICAL EDUCATION SPECIALIST AND K-6 CLASSROOM TEACHER (32 hours): The following courses are required: PE 277, 283, 284 or 288, 322, 481, 482, 4 8 5 and Biology 205-206.

EL E MENTARY SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION SPECIALIST: The following courses are required: PE 277, 283, 284 or 288, 322, 360, 4 8 1 , 482, 4 84, 485; Biology 205-206; and 8 hours of electives (Ed. 457 and Music 341 are recommended).

C OURSE OFFERINGS Courses i n t h e School o f Physical Education are offered i n the fo'lJow ing areas: HEA LTH EDUCATION 281 INJURY PREVENTION AND THERAPEUTIC CARE 2 9 2 FIRST AID 295 SCHOOL HEALTH 324 PERSONAL HEALTH 326 COMMUNITY HEALTH RECREATION 330 RECREATION PROGRAMMING 483 RECREA TION ADMINISTRATION

PHYSICAL E DUCATION

101


PHYSICA L EDUCATION 2 7 5 WATE R SAFETY I NSTRUCTI ON 2 7 7 FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2 8 2 PROFESSI O N A L ACTIVITIES: DANCE 2 8 3 PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITI E S: G Y M NASTICS 2 8 4 PROFESSION AL ACTIVITIES: TEAM SPORTS FOR MEN 285 PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITI E S: INDIVIDUAL AND DUAL SPORTS 287 PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES: RECR EATION AC TIVITIES 2 8 8 PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES: TEAM SPORTS FOR WOM E N 3 2 2 PH YS IC A L EDUCA TlON IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 2 8 C R RICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND ADMIN ISTRA TlON 3 3 1 THE WO MAN A S A COMPETITOR 3 3 2 OffI C I ATING 334 SC IE NTIFIC BASIS FOR TRAINING 360, 361 PROF ESSIONAL PRACTI C U M, COACHING PRACTICU M 3 6 2 RH YTHMS AND DANCE 370-375 COACHING THEORY 391, 3 9 2 THERAPEUTIC E X E RC I SE, AMBU lA TION TECHNIQUES 4 0 1 WOR K SHOPS 478 PSYCHOLOGIC�L CONCEPTS OF PHYSICAL EDUCA TION AND ATHLETICS 481 E XERCIS E PHYSIOLOGY 482 KINESIOLOGY 484 MEASUREMENT AND EVALU ATION I N PHYSICAL EDUCATION 485 BIOMECHANICS 491 INDEPENDENT STUDY 501 GRADUATE WORKSHOPS 597 GR ADUATE RESEARCH

100

PERSONALIZED FITNESS PROG RAMS

To s timulate student interest in functional personally­ designed prog rams of physical ac tivity; assess ment of physical condition and skills; recom mendation of specific programs for maintain ing and im proving ph ysical health. Should be taken as a fres h m a n . I II ( 1 )

200-229

INDIVIDUAL AND DUAL ACTIVITIES

201 (Beginning Golf), 202 (Intermediate and Advanced Golf) , 203 (Archery), 204 (Bowling), 2 0 7 (Beginning Gym nastics), 208 (Skii ng), 209 (Intermediate Gymnas tics), 2 1 0 W ( Sl i m nastics), 2 1 1 (Beginning Badminton), 2 1 2 (Intermediate Badminton), 2 1 3 (Personal Defense), 2 1 4 (Beginning Tennis), 2 1 5 (Intermediate Tennis), 2 1 6 (Beginning Ice Skating), 218 (Bac kpacking), 2 1 9 (Canoeing), 222 (Handball, Squash, and Racketball), 223 (Squash and Racketball), 225 (Aerobics), 227 (Weight Training), 228 (Basic Moun taineering), 229 (Equitatio n ) . ( 1)

1 02

PHYSICAL E DUCATION

230-239

AQUA TICS

2 3 0 (Begi nning Swimming), 2 3 1 (Inter mediate Swimming), 2 3 2 (Advanced Swimmi ng), 234 (Advanced Life Saving), 236 (Synchronized Swim ming), 2 3 7 (Skin. and Scuba Diving). (1)

240-249

RHYTHMS

240 (Beginning Modern Dance), 242 (Intermediate Modern Dance), 243 (Advanced Modern Dance), 244 (Folk and Social Da nce). (1)

2 5 0- 2 5 9

TEAM ACTIVITI E S

2 5 1 W (Volleyball a n d Field Hoc key), 2 5 2 W (Basketball and Softball), 253M (Soccer and Volleyball), 254M (Basketball a n d Softball) . ( 1 )

275

WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTION

The A merican Red Cross Water Safety Instructor's Course. Prereq uisite : 234. II ( 2)

277

F O UNDATIONS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION

The relationship of physical education to education; the biological, sociological, psychological and mechanical principles underlying physical education and a thletics. Should be the initial profeSSional course taken in the School of Physical Education. II ( 2 )

281

INJ URY PREVE NTION AND THERAPEUTIC CARE

Preven tion, treatment and rehabilita tion of all common injuries sustained in a thletics; physical therapy by em ployment of electriCity, massage, ex ercise, light, ice and mechanical devices. I ( 2 )

282

PROFE SSIONAL ACTIVITI,ES: DANCE

Planning, teaching and eva luating dance. E ncompasses specific movement education activities, conditioning e x ercises, and the development of modern, social a n d folk da nce skill for elementary school age and older. Prerequisite : Intermediate skill level or completion of a beginni ng activity cou rse, PE 277. II a/y ( 4 )

283

PROFE SSIONAL ACTIVITIES: GYMNASTICS

Includes skill devel opment, teaching expertise, course planning, and safe ty techniques in gymnastics. The course is designed for both elemen tary and high school ages. Prerequisite: Intermedia te skill level or completion of a beginning activity course, PE 277. I ( 4 )

284

PROFESSION AL ACTIVI TI ES: TEAM SPORTS FOR MEN

Pla nning, teaching a n d evaluating t e a m activities: basketball, volleyball, soccer, speedball, wrest ling, touch foo tball, softba l l . Prereq uisite : PE 2 77. II ( 4 )


285

PROFE SSIONAL ACTIVITIES: INDIVIDUAL AND DUAL SPORTS

Planning, teaching and evaluating these activi ties: tennis, badminton, track and field. Prerequisite: in termediate s ki�l level or completion of a beginning activity cou rse, PE 277. I � (4) 2 8 7 PROFESS IONAL ACTIVITIES:

RECREA TION A CTIVITIES

Plann i ng, teaching and evaluating the following: archery, bowling, golf, ou tdoor education and various recreational s ports. Prerequisite : PE 277. II (4) 288

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES: TEAM SPORTS FOR WOMEN

- Planning, teaching and evaluating these activitie s : baske t ball, field hockey, soccer, s peedball, volleyball, softbal1. Prerequisite: PE 277. II (4) 2 9 2 FI RST AID This course meets req uirements f o r t h e American Red Cross Standard First Aid and Pe rsonal Safety. II (2) 295 SCHOOL HEAL TH - Health concepts which relate to the total school health program, including instruction, se rvices and e nvironment; the re lationship between health and all levels of ed ucation. Not recommended for fres h m e n . I II (2) - 322

PHYS ICAL rnUCA TION IN THE ELEME NTARY SCHOOL

Organization program for - programming; recommended.

and administration of a developmental grades K-6; sequential and progressive large repertoire of activi ties. PE 277 is I ( 2 or 4)

3 2 4 PE RSONAL HEALTH Practical application of health knowledge to daily l iving; a foundation for u nderstand,ing health behavior. Prima rily designed for health minor students. II a /y (4) 3 2 6 C OM MUNITY HEAL TH Orga.nizations associated with public health and their i mplications to community health problems. Prima rily designed for health minor students. II a/y (4) 328

CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND ADMINI STRATION

Organization and administration of physical education and a thletics ( 7- 12); c u rriculum developme n t implementation . Prerequisite : 2 77. I (4) -- 3 3 0 REC REATION PROGRAMMING Supervising and administeri ng recreational programs for the school or comm unity. I ( 4 )

3 3 1 THE WOMAN AS A COMPETITOR The psychology of coaching, coaching technique and methodology; training; sociological implications of athletic competition for women; designed for t hose interested in coaching women's competitive teams. Not recommended for freshmen. II a /y (2) 332 OFFICIATING Rules and officiating techniques of volleyball, basketball; designed to train qualified of.ficials. Recommended as an elective for majors and minors . I a/y (2) 3 3 4 SCIENTIFIC BASIS F OR TRAINING Presents physiologic and kinesiologic applications physical training. Topics include the developmen t muscular s trength and endurance, and the rel a tionship n u t rition, environment, sex, age and e rgogenic aids athletic performance. Prerequisite: PE 2 77. I (2)

to of of to

PROF ESSIONAL PRACTICUM, C OACHING PRACTI CUM

3 6 0, 3 6 1

Assistant coaching teaching expe riences; planning and conducting i n te rcollegiate athletics and physical education instruction; s tudents work under s u pervision of the head coach or physical education instructors . Prereq uisite: one course professional activities, departmental approval. I II (2) 362 RHYTHMS AND DANCE Historical background, establishment and conduct of dance program, teaching techniques and accompaniment, planning and presentation of dances; modern dance techniq u e s . II a/y (4) 3 70 - 3 7 5 COACHING THEORY Techniques, systems, training methods, strategy and psychology of coaching; 370 (Basketball), 3 7 1 (Football), 372 (Track and Field), 373 (Baseball), 374 (Wrestling) . I II a /y (2)

THERAPEUTIC E XERCISE, AMB ULA TION TECHNIQUES

391, 3 9 2

A corrective therapy, clinical-training prog ram including lecture, laboratory experiences and clinical practices. Prerequisite: departmental approval (maximum enrollment 5 ) . I II 401 WORK SHOPS Workshops in special fields for varying period s . ( 1- 4) 478

PSYCHOLOGICAL C ONCEPTS OF PHYSICAL ED UCATION AND ATHLETICS

A s t udy of the important psychological factors (methods of communicating, use of teaching aids, learning strategies, motivations, etc.) in the learning and teach ing of gross motor skills Prerequisite : PE 277. I ( 4 ) .

4 8 1 EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY Scientific basis for training and the physiological effect of exercise on t h e human body. Prerequisite: Biology 205-206. I (2 or 4)

PHYSICAL E D U C ATION

1 03


482

KINE SIOLOG Y

Deals with the s t ructural and mechanical function of the msculoskeletal system. The kinesiological applica tions of ana tomical informa tion is given prime consideration. Pre requisite: Biology 205-206. II (2)

483

RECREATION ADMINISTRATION

The o rg a n i z a t i o n , m a n a g e m e n t a n d d i r e c t i o n of recrea t i o n a I s e r v i c e s : l e g a l ba s i s , ad m i n i s t r a t i ve proced ures, financial a spec ts, personnel management, facilities and i n ternal organization. II (4)

484

MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

The selection, co nstruction and i nterpretation of evaluatory techniques related to the physical educa tion program . II a/ y (2)

485

BIOMECHANICS

An application of physical laws to sports activities. Principles of motion, force, and equ ilibrium are stressed. Analyses of various sports skills a re made. II (2)

491

INDEPE NDENT STUDY

Prerequ isite: consent of the d i rector. I II 5 ( 1 -4)

501

WORKSHOPS

Grad uate workshops i n special field s for varying period s. (1-4)

597

GR ADUATE RESEARCH

Open to graduate 3t udents whose mi nor i s i n the field of physical education. Prerequisite: consent of the instructoL I II 5 ( 1 - 4)

INTERIM COURSES OFFERED IN 1 9 78 202 204 208 210 212 225 237 245 301

1 04

INTERMEDIATE AND ADVANCED GOLF BOWLING SKI ING SLIMNASTICS ADVANCED BADMINTON C O-ED VOLLEYBALL SKIN AND SCUBA DIVING SQUARE DANCING T H E KINGDOME, POWER, AND THE GLORY

PHYSICAL E D UCATION

303 304 308 309 310 313 315 316 497

LEADERSHIP FOR OUTDOOR MlNI STRIE S CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS ASSESSMENT AND PRESCRIPTION SPORTS MOTIVATION ORIENTATION TO HO SPITAL REHABILITATION DANCE CHOREOGRAPHY INTRO T O INTRA: WHY, WHAT, WHEN, AND WHERE OF INTRAMURAL SPORTS PROFESSIONAL RECREATION OPPORTUNITI ES C OACHING THEORY O F VOLLE YBA LL CORRE CTIVE THERAPY INTERNSHIP


hysics and Engineering Physics is a bas i c sci e n c e h o l d i ng two p r o m i nen t posi tion s i n co n temporary s o ci e t y .

F i r s t , physics is a n i m p r t an t cornerstone of other disci.pH n e s s u ch a s ch e m i s t r y ge o l og y and bi ology; and it is the fo u n d a t io n for our fa m ilia r t ech nolog i e s of com m u nica tio n , t ra n s p o r t a tion and ,

,

,

energy convers i o n . Secon dly, t hrough i t s i n q u i r i n g pri nciple s a n d t h ro ug h the re vo lu t ionary basic c oncep t s of n a t u re it i n t rod uces, p h y s i c s d ra m a t i c a J l y aff cts t h e h u m a n v i s i o n of n a t ure and c r i bcal ph i l oso p h ica l t houg h t . I n i t s e n g i n e e r i n g p r og r a m t h e depa rtmen t i s

t o p r ovide a n education of s u fficien tly f u n d a m e n ta l n a t ure to p e r m i t rapid ad a p t a t i o n t o n e w tech nica l p ro b l em s a n d oppo r t u n ities a n d o f s u f ficien t l y l i be ral scope to provide a ware ne ss of t h e b ro a d social respon s i bi lities i m pl i c i t i n e n gi n ee ri n g . The dep art m e nt seeks to promote the i n te raction between h u ma n val ues and t h e tech n ical works o f h u mankind a n d t h e fundame n t a l engineering sci ences . c om m i t t ed

The depart m e n t o f f e r s B. S. level degree work i n e n g i n eering-physics and a 3- 2 engin eeri ng d ual degree progra m j o i n t l y with the School s of E n g i ne e r i ng a n d Applied Scie nce of C l u m bia Uni ve rsity a n d Stan fo rd U ni versi t y . Ad m i s s i o n to C o l u m bia i s au tom a t ic upon recom menda tio n ; ad m i ss i on to S t a n f o r d h owever, is competiti ve . Conce n trations i n e l e c t r i c a l a n d m e ch a n i c al engineering sciences are a v a i l a b l e w i t h i n each degree progra m . ,

FAC ULTY Heeren, Cha ir; Adams, Clark, D. Hau eisen, Narnes, Tang.

8 . 5 . physics major sequence offers a hallenging program izing a I w st ude nt- teacher ra t io with u ndergrilduate research participation. everal s tuden t publica tions resulting from s u c h r earch have a ppea red in profeSSional journals o f interna tio n al repu tati n . T w o in troductory sequences are offered t o majors: College Physics and Generni Physics. The s e sequences di ffe r in the level of mathematics used, as s t a ted i n the c o u r s e descriptions. T h e y a l s o differ somewh t in e m p hasis, The

e m pha

PHYS1C S & E N G I N E ERING

105


with Geneml Ph ysics in volvi ng more comprehensive analyses. The department a lso offers a B . A . degree in physics for science-orien ted liberal a r ts s t ude nts, requiring only six courses in p h ys ics . A specially desig ned cou rse for non-science majors, The Physical Un iv",se. and one for mu sic majors, lvtusical Acousti(s. are also offered. Students i n tending to major i n the depa r t m e n t are advised early to take note of the i n terrelationships between t he career fields of science (physics), engi neering, and technology (also cal led e n g i neering-tech nology). Scienti sts are m o t iva ted by raw cu riosi ty. They ask t h e "why" questions a n d strive to a n swer t hem; their concern is with t he natural world. Pure scie nce is dedicated to acquiring new knowledge, which may in i t self have no i m mediate application. E ngi neering is basically concerned with using scie n t ific k nowledge for the benefit a nd comfort of people. While science, pa rticularly physics, deals with the natural world, engin eering focuses upon the world constructed by people. Mathema tics i s the language of com m unica tion in both physics and engineering. Without scientists, engineers would have no acc u m ulated storehouse of scientific knowledge f ro m which to d ra w in creating engineering d e s ig n s, a nd without engineers scientific knowledge would seldom be applied to solve practical proble m s . Engin eers take the insights, facts, and formulas discovered by scie ntists a nd use them i n i nventing designs to solve problems posed in the co n t e x t of our socio颅 economic- technical socie ty. PLU has degree prog rams in scientific fields as well 'as prog rams in e ngineering. However, PLU has no academic program in engineering-technology, a career field conce rned w i t h h a nds-on aspects of rou t i n e testing, cons t ruction. a nd m a i n t e n ance o f h a rdware designed by engi nee rs.

PHYSICS PROGRAM BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: 3 2 semester hours: 1 4 7, 1 4 8, 1 5 3, 1 54, 223, 331, 332, 336, 356, 4 2 1 , 422. 497-498 may be subs t i t u ted for 4 2 1 - 4 2 2 with consen t of the department. E i g h t additional semester hours may be desirable, depending o n the s t uden t's p rofession.}1 objectives. F o r e x a mple, i t i s recommended t h a t pre-Ph. D . s t udents t a k e 4 0 1 and 406. Consult the department for specific recommendations. Required supporting courses: Math 151, 1 5 2, 253; Engi neering 354; Chemistry 1 1 5; plus eit her Chemistry 34 1 or Engi neering 3 5 1 . BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 24 semester hou rs : 1 4 7, 1 4 8, 153, 1 54, 223, plus ten semester hours. Under special circumstances 1 25-126 may be substitu ted for the 1 53- 1 5 4 sequence. T h i s requires the cons e n t of the department. Additional courses m a y be desirable, depending on the studen t's professional objectives. Consult t h e department for specific reco mmend a tions. Required supporting courses: Math 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 . MINOR: 22 semester hours, i ncl uding 1 4 7- 1 48 (one-hou r la bs), 1 53, 1 5 4 (or 1 25, 1 26); t h ree additional courses, of which at least two must be u pper division.

106

PHYSICS & E NGINE ERING

ENG INEERING PROG RAM 3-2 DUAL DEGREE: Dual B.S. degrees from P L U and Columbia, Sta nford or other ECPD accredited Engineering School. Th ree full-time years a t PLU plus 2 additional full-time years a t Colu mbia or Stanford. PLU B.S. i n Engineering-Science i s g ra n ted after first year at Columbia or S ta n ford; B.S. i n E n g i n eering Specialty ( E E . , M . E , etc.) g ra n ted by Columbia o r Stanford a t e n d o f fifth college yea r.

PHYS: 14 hours, 1 4 7, 1 48, 1 5 3, 1 5 4, 2 23. EGR BAS I C S : 10 hours, 1 5 1, 1 8 2, 354 . E G R CONCENTRATION (3 selec t ions'): 10 hours Electrical: 2 7 1, 272, 3 5 2, 'I 'l l; Mec h anical: 2 3 1 , 232 (or PHYS 336), 351, 4 4 2 . 'Courses selected o n basis of the student's career objectives. Required supporting courses: Math 1 4 4 , 1 5 1 , 1 5 2, 253; C h e mi s t ry l I S. B,S, DEGREE I N E N G I N E ERING-PHYSICS: Similar to the 3路 2 progra m with additional course work a t PLU in engi neering a n d ph ysics; 4 years at PLU. PHYS: 24 hours, 1 4 7, 1 48, 1 53, 1 54, 223, 331; 336 (op tiona l); 356, 4 2 1 , 4 22 . EGR BASICS: 1 0 hours, 1 5 1, 1 8 2, 3 5 4 . EGR CONCENTRATION (4 selections'): 1 2 hours Electrical: 271, 272, 3 5 2, 4 4 1; Mec h a n ical: 2 3 1 , 232 (or PHYS 336), 351, 4 4 2 . 'Cou rses selected on ba sis of t h e studen t's career objectives. Required supporting courses: Math 144, 151, 1 5 2, 253; C h e m i s t ry 1 1 5 . S tu de n ts wishing t o m a j o r in physics or eng ineering a re encouraged to contact the department early in their college career, preferably p rior to e n tering as fresh men. Early consultation provides g reater flexibility i n desig n ing o n e's program.

PHYSIC S PROG RAM O U TLIN E :

BACHELOR OF SC IENCE IN PHYSICS

fRESHMAN Fall: 153 147 Math 151 Spring : 154 148 Math 152 SOPHOMORE FaH: 223 M a t h 253

Spring :

Engineering 231 336 354

General Physics Lab Analytic Geometry and Calculus General Physics Lab Analytic Geo metry and Calculus Elementary Modern Physic s Multivariable Calcul'us a n d Differential Equations S ta t ics Mechanics E ng ineering Analysis


UNIOR =all:

----3 pring :

;ENIOR _=all: Spri n g :

331 356 '351

Electromagnetic Theory Mathematical Physics Thermodynamics or

Chern 3 4 1 332

Physical Chemistry Electromagnetic Waves and Physical Optics

'272

Solid S t a t e Electronic Devices

" 401 421 " 406 422

Quantum Advanced Advanced Advanced

Mechanics Laboratory Modern Physics Laboratory

'Optional, recommended for graduate school candidates

O U TLINE: BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PHYSICS 1 53

Spring:

-rail:

General Physics Lab

147 Math 1 5 1 154

A n a lytic Geometry and Calculus

148 Math 152 223

Lab Analytic Geometry a n d Calculus Elementary Modern Physics

General Physics

PLUS 10 additional semester hours

COURSE OFFERINGS -106

-

Physics

THE PHYSIC AL UNIVERSE

A non-mathematical introduction to the meaning and ctructure of physics th rough a discussion of the large-scale 'rder of the u niverse. Intended primarily for the general _ iberal arts student. Selected topics i nclude cosmology, relativity, nuclear energy, and stellar evol ution. (4)

- 2 5, 1 26

COLLEGE PHYSICS

�his course provides an introd uction to the fu ndamental opics of physics. I t is a non-calculus sequence, involving only the use of trigonometry and college algebra. '::oncurrent registration in 1 4 7, 1 48 is req uired . (4, 4)

. 4 7, 1 4 8 I NTRODUCTORY PHYSICS LABORATORY Basic laboratory e x periments are performed in conj unction �ith the General and College Physics sequences. :oncurrent registration in 1 2 5, 126 or 1 5 3, 154 i s req uired. \1)

153, 1 5 4

G ENERAL PHYSICS

I. calculus-level survey o f the general fields o f physics, _ 1c1uding classical mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism and optics. Concurrent registration in 1 4 7, 148 and prior or concurrent regi stration i n Math 1 5 1, 1 5 2 is equired. (4, 4)

MUSICAL ACO USTICS

223

E LEMEN TARY MODERN PHYSICS

This course covers t he various phenomena where classical methods of physics fail. Contemporary interpretations of these phenomena are developed at an elementary level. Prerequisite: 154 or 126 or consent of instructor. (4)

272

'Optional

'all :

205

A study of musical sound using physics method s: vibrating systems; simple harmonic motion; wave motion; complex waves; wave generation in mu sical instruments; physiology of hearing; architectural acoustics; electronic recording and reproduction. Laboratory and group tours. No prerequisite courses in either mathematics or physics are assumed. (4)

SOLID STATE ELE CTRONIC DEVICES

S e e Engineering 2 72.

331

E LECTROMAGNETIC THEORY

Electrostatics, dipole fields, fields in dielectric materials, electromagnetic induction, magnetic properties of matter, generation and propagation of electromagnetic waves with a n e m phasis on the relationship with physical optics. Prerequisite: 1 5 3, 1 54; coreq uisite: 356 or consen t . (4)

332

E LECTROMAGNETIC WAVES AND PHYSICAL OPTICS

A s t udy of the generation and p ropagation of electromagnetic waves. The mathematical description and the physical understanding of electromagnetic radiation are discussed with a n emphasis on its relationship with physical optics . Prerequisite: 3 3 1 . (4)

336

MECHANICS

F u ndamental mechanics; mathematical formulation of physical problems; motion of particles in one, two or three dimensions; motions of systems of particles; dynamics and statics of rigid bodies; moving coordinate systems; Lagrange's equations and Hamiltonian formulation of mechanics. Corequisite : 354 or consent. (4)

35 1

THERMODYNAMICS

See Engineering 351.

354

ENGINE ERING ANALYSIS

See Engineering 354.

355

TEACHING OF PHYSICS

New developments in secondary curric ulum, teaching techniq ues and teaching media in the physical sciences; cou nted toward a degree for only those s t udents receiving certifica tion. (4)

356

MA THE MA TICAL PHYSIC S

Boundary value problems, special f unctions, matrices and tensors, probability theory, eigenvalue problems, complex variables, contour integration and their applications to physics. Continuation of Engineering 354. (4)

PHYSICS & E N G INEERING

107


401

I NTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM MECHANICS

T h e ideas and techniques of quantum mechanics are developed. Various quantum mechanical systems and phenomena are studied in order to demonstrate these ideas and techniques. (4) 406 ADVANCED MODERN PHYSICS Modern theories a r e used to describe topics o f contemporary importance s uch as atomic a n d sub-atomic phenomena, plasmas, solids, and astrophysical events . The application of quantum mechanical techniques are em phasized when appropriate. Prerequisite: 401 . (4 ) 421, 422 (1)

ADVANCED lABORATORY

49 1, 492 ( 1 -4)

INDEPENDENT STUDY

4 9 7, 498 ( 1 - 4)

RESEARCH

ENG INEERING PROG RAM A smaller u niversity like P L U is uniquely suited to foster a student's personal development while making a firm but not premature commitment to professional and career goals. Such a setting also helps a student to clarify the social context in which engineers function. A major school of engineering like Columbia or Stanford emphasizes advanced studies, research, and interaction with industry. Thus, PLU's 3-2 program gives students the best of two settings - breadth at PLU and depth in an engineering specialty at Columbia or Stanford. Students have also been i nvolved in 3-2 programs a t the University of Washington or other state universities i n the Pacific North west. During the first three years of this program students must complete 1 ) all general university core requirements, 2) two interims, 3) all basic science and mathema tics requirements, 4) and six courses in engineering. Once a clear sense of direction within an engineering speciality is gained, a recom mendation to Columbia or Stanford may be granted. Admission to Columbia is automatic upon recom mendation; admission to Stanford, however, is competitive. Details of transfer admission are made available i n the fall of the third year. Normally two additional years are necessary to finish engineering speciality courses at Columbia or Stanford. PLU also offers a four-year program in engineering-physics. Because the university does not offer a standard engineering degree, students electing to remain at PLU throughout their college career, or for whom the 3-2 engineering program is inappropriate though they are drawn to a n engineering career, find this program attractive. It is more practical than a physics degree while a t the same time more theoretical than the usual engineering degree. The B.S. degree in engineering-physics prepares students for employment in many diverse industries or directly for graduate study in nearly all fields of engineering, Strength may be built in electrical or mechanical engineering sciences b y careful selection of upper division courses. Students are urged to develop a minor in either mathematics or computer science, particularly if aspiration to graduate study in engineering is part of their career pla n , A minor i n business

108

PHYSICS & E N G IN E E RING

administration i s particularly appropriate for working in industry immediately after graduation , For maxi m u m flexibility i n upper division courses, s t udents aspiring t o the engineering足 physics degree should schedule their first two years identically to those for dual degree 3-2 engineering, Junior and senior year schedules are determined by upper division requirements and by students' objectives, A suggested schedule is shown below, Regardless of eventual speciality, both EGR 231 Statics and EGR 271 El,ctrical Circuits should be taken, These should be followed by EGR 232 M,chan ics of Solids for students in the mechanical e ngineering concentration o r by EGR 272 Solid Stat, Elutronic Dtvias for those with interest in electrical engineering, The natural sciences core requirement is automatically satisfied by engineering students as i s the second part of option 11 of t he foreign language requirement in the College of Arts and Sciences. Unless they automatically qualify for fulfilling option I of the foreign lang uage requirement on the basis of their high school work, students are encouraged to satisfy this requirement by means of option II. Hours freed by satisfaction of the foreign language requirement on the basis of high school work may profitably be used for taking another core requirement (e,g., historyiliterature or social sciences) or for taking mathematics beyond calculus (e, g " MTH 244 Assembly LAnguage, MTH 331 Linear A lgebra, MTH 3 4 5 Introduction to Nu merical A nalysis, or MTH 351 Applied Mathematics). Particular attention should be given to the Integrated Studies Program, known as Core 11, and to its applicability for engineers in our technological society. Students with strong preparation (A's and ,B's) i n high school mathematics at least through trigonometry/functions as well as in science through physics and with SAT math scores no lower than 550 should schedule their classes as indicated below, Those with less adequate preparation in mathema tics and sciences, particularly mathematics, should consider strengthening their background with community college work in t he s ummer before enrollment at PLU and should postpone t he physics sequence until: their second year, An appropriate first year schedule includes: FALL - EGR 151 Visual Thinking. MTH 151 Calculus. CHM 1 1 5 Chem istry, a general univerSity core requirement, and PE 100 or a PE activity course; SPRING - EGR 1 82 Materials. MTH 152 Calculus, MTH 1 4 4 Computer Science, a core requirement, and a PE activity course (or PE 100),

OUTLINE: BACHELOR OF SC IENCE in Engineering-Science (3-2) and Engineering-Physics FIRST YEAR Fall: EG R 1 5 1 P H Y S 153 PHYS 1 4 7 MATH 1 5 1 CORE PE

Visual Th inking General Physics Laboratory Calculus

2 4 1 4 4 1 16


ipring: EGR 182 PHYS 1 5 4 PHYS 1 4 8 MATH 152 C OR E PE

Intro. Materials General Physics La boratory Calculus

4 4 1 4 4 1

;ECON D YEAR

CORE

2 4 4 4 4 __ 18

'pri n g : EGR 272 E G R 354 MATH 144 CORE PE

Solid State Eng. Analysis Compo Science

4 4 4 4 1 17

Mechanical Engineering Concentration all: EGR 2 3 1 Statics P H Y S 223 Elem. Modern MATH 253 Calculus C ORE CORE

2 4 4 4 4 __ 18

Spring: EGR 232 EGR 354 MATH 144 C OR E

Mech. o f Solids Eng. Analysis Compo Science

4 4 4 4

PE

1

__

17 -. HIRD YEAR 3-2 Engineering

C OR E PE

2 4 4 4 1 15

Spring: C OR E CORE C OR E

4 4 4 12

Engineering-Physics Fall : PHYS 331 PHYS 356 E G R 35 1 or E G R 352

EM I Math. Phys. Thermo

4

A I D Circuits

4

Statics Gen. Chern.

4

Spring: PHYS 336" or P H Y S 332" CORE

Mecha nics EM II

CORE

4 4 4

F O UR T H C O L L E G E YEAR 3-2 Engineering Junior engineering standing a t Columbia, Stanford, or a regional state university. Admission to Columbia is a u tomatic upon recommendation by the depa rtmen t . Admission to Stanford is competitive. 28 additional semester hours in upper division engineering speciality courses at Columbia or Stan ford (e .g., E . E., M.E., C . E . , e t c . ) to qualify f o r a degree of B . S. in E ngineering-Science from PLU. The degree is awarded after presentation of a signed gold book and a transcript from Columbia or Stanford. Engineering-Physics Fall: PHYS 421 EGR 441" or EGR 4 4 2 "

Adv. Lab. Networks

1 4

Transport 4

Spri n g : PHYS 4 2 2

all: - CHM 115 CORE

Elec. Circuits Gen. Chemistry

C OR E

I'lectrica·l Engineering Concentration EGR 231

EGR 271 CHM 1 1 5 C OR E C ORE PE

18

:Jectrical Engi neering Concentration �all: EGR 271 Elec. C i rcuits PHYS 223 Elem. Modern MATH 253 Calculus CORE

_

Mec hanical Engineering Concentration Fall:

2 4 4 4 1

__

15 Spring: CORE

4

CORE - C OR E

4 4

Adv. Lab.

CORE

4

CORE

4

F I F T H C O LLEGE YEAR 3-2 Engi neering Complete engineering speciality (E.E., M . E ., C . E . , etc.) at Columbia, Sta nford, or a regional s t a te university thereby earning t h a t school's B . S . degree. At Stanford it is also possible to be admitted to a coterminal M . S . program and earn a ma ste r's degree in an engineering speciality Simultaneously with t h e bachelor's degree. "Optional

12

PHYSIC S & E N G I N E ERING

109


C OURSE OFFERINGS Engineering Mathematical Systems 144

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE

See Mathematics 1 4 4 345

INTRODUCTION T O NUMERICAL ANALYSIS

See Mathematics 345. 346 NUMERICAL See Mathematics 346.

ANALYSIS

Engineering Basics 1 5 1 VISUAL THINKING Three d i mensional visualization, orthographic and isometric perspectives, relationship of visual graphic thinking to the creative process, preliminary design; of value to not only engineers but also the science major who must be able to think three dimensionally as demanded in mechanics or structural chemistry. Emphasis upon fluent and flexible idea production. (2) 182

INTRODUCTION TO MA TERIALS SCIENCE

Fundamentals of synthetic materials (dielectrics, semiconductors, magnetics, alloys, polymers), their relationship to chemistry and physics, and implications for modern technological society. Discussion of what useful properties engineering materials have and how these properties can be altered by adj usting internal micro­ structure. A particularly useful entry poin t for the study of electrical and mechanical engineering. Background: one course in chemistry. ( 4 ) 3 5 4 ENGINEERING ANALYSIS Introduction to vector and tensor calculus, functions of a complex variable, Laplace and Fourier transforms, and unde termined multipliers. Comprehensive and illustrative examples from the fields of electromagnetism, waves, transport, vibrations, and mechanics. May be taken as a package with PHYS 356. Requirements: Mathematics 253. (4)

Electrical Engineering Science 2 7 1 E LECTRICAL C I RC UITS Fundamental concepts of electrical science and its u t i li z a t i o n in c i r c u i t s , c o m p o n e n ts, a n d d e v i c e s . Requirement: Current registration in Physics 1 54 . (2)

110

PHYS I C S & E N G I N E E RI N G

2 7 2 SOLID STATE E LE CTRONIC DEVICES Useful properties of semiconductors as related to electronic devices; pn-j unction diodes and transistors; FET and MOS s tructures; solid state lasers. Requirement: Engineering 271. (4) 352

A NALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS

Active solid state circuits. Analog: AC-DC converters amplifiers, oscillators. Digital: Boolean algebra, sequentia :­ l o g i c c i r c u i t s , s w i tc h i n g n e t w o r k s . R e q u i r e m e n t Engineering 271 or 2 72. ( 4 ) 4 4 1 NETWORK ANALYSIS Analysis of electrical circuits in transient and steady-statE modes; formulation of network equations and theorems, impedance matching and fundamentals of networl< topology, transfer functions, development of Laplace transforms and Fourier series; time- and frequency-domair analysis. Requirement: Engineering 2 7 1 . aly (4) 491 INDEPENDENT STUDY Selected topics of m utual interest to student and instructor ­ Enrollment is limited and open only to students who havl discussed a proposed topic or course of study in considerable depth with instructor. Requirement: m utua' interest. ( 1 - 4 )

Mechanical Engineering Science 231 STATICS F undame ntal engineering statics using vector algebra conditions for equilibrium, res ul tant force systems-,­ centroid and center of gravity, methods of virtual work, friction. Requirement: Physics 1 5 3. (2) 232 MECHANICS OF SOLIDS Mechanics of deformable solid bodies; deformation, stress,con s t i t u t iv e e q u a t ions for elastic m a t e ria ls, thermoelasticity, tension, flexure, torsion, stability 0 equilibri u m . Requirement : Engineering 2 3 1 . ( 4 ) 3 5 1 THERMODYNAMICS C o n c e p t s and e q u a t i o n s of c l a s s i c a l , m acroscopic thermodynamics; thermodynamic cycles, flow and non flow systems, properties and mathematical relations 0 ­ pure substances, mixtures and solutions, phase transition and chemical reactions; an elementary treatment of statistical thermodynamics. Requirement: Physics 1 5 4 . ( 4


�42

mANSPORT: MOMENTUM, E N E RGY AND MASS

Unifyi ng conce pts of the transport of momentum, energy, md mass in planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries; n a thematical aspects of fluid mechanics; boundary layers; ra nsport coe fficien ts-viscosity, thermal conductivity, mass diffusivi ty; an elemen tary treatment of t u rbulent flow. \equireme n t : Engineering 3 5 1 or consen t of inst ructor. a /y

4)

-492

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Selected topics of m u tual i n t e rest to student and instructor. :nrollmen t i s limited and open only to students who have liscussed a proposed topic or course of study in considerable depth with instructor. Requireme n t : m u tual i n terest. ( 1 -4)

PHYS I C S & E N G I N E E RING

111


Political Science Polit ica l science addresses on e o f t h e m o s t d i fficult, yet fundamentally i m portan t h u man ende avors, the gove rnance of people and of socie ties. The s t u d e n t of poli tics seeks to understand how gove r n me n ts are org a n i zed and s tr u c t u red, how pol itica l proces s e s a re employed, and t h e relationship of s t ru c tures a n d processes t o socie tal pu rpos es . Recog n izin g that govern ment and political ac tivity may embody and reflect the full range of h u m a n values, t h e s t u d y of politics m us t end eavor to understand the realities o f poli tics while a t the same time asking how well poli tical s y s t e m s work, what p u r p ses are and ought to be s erved a nd what effects r e s u l t from poli tica l p h e n o m e n a . Pol i tical science e ncourages a critical unders tanding of government a n d poH tics i n the belief t h a t a knowled geable, i nteres ted, a n d aware ci tize n r y is the root s t reng th a n d necessity of a democratic society. ,

FAC ULTY Ulbricht, Cha ir; Atkinson, Farmer, Spencer; assisted by Bricker and Mark.

The study of political science helps to prepare students for the exercise o f their rig h ts, duties, and opportunities a s citizens _ by giving them a be t ter understanding of American political processes and of alternative systems. Courses in political science explore various topics in American government a nd politics, international relations and foreign policy, comparative govern ment and a rea studies, political philosophy and theory, and public policy and law. The department provides pre足 profeSSional training leading to careers in teaching, law, government, and related fields. For the non-major, political science courses provide useful study for any student generally i n terested in public affairs and the workings of govern m e n t . Moreover, the study o f politics is support ive of any discipline or professional progra m whose substa nce becomes a matter of public policy. As such, political science complements such fields as the natural s ciences, sociology, b u siness, education, and economics. The study of politics touches upon oth er disciplines which inquire in to h u man behavior and development, ranging from history a n d phil os ophy t o psychology, communication, and cross-cultural studies . Students of political science have the opportunity to combine the academic s tu d y o f government and politics with practical experience by participation i n one o f the internship programs sponsored by the department . At present these are available in public administ ration, public law, and t h e legislative process. The department of political science is affiliated with several organizations providing for a variety of student involvement. These orga nizations include the Model United Nations, Cen ter

112

POLITICAL SCI ENCE


for thl' Study of Public Policy, and Political Science Student -Association. The department further sponsors or otherwise encou rage s active student participation i n political life t h rough class acti vities and t h rough s uch campus organizations a s the Young Republicans and Young Democrats. The political science faculty at Pacific L u t heran University sh are a breadth o f experience in teaching a n d research, i n professional associations and conferences i n t h e United States a n d ab road, a n d i n governmental decision making from the local t o the interna tional l e v e l . There are no prerequisites f o r political science courses, except a s noted. Prior cons u l tation with the ins tructor of any advanced course is i n vi ted. Students wishing to pursue a major or minor i n political science are requested to declare the major or minor __ with the department chair as soon as possi ble. BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: M i n i m u m o f 32 semester hours, including 101, 1 5 1 , a nd 325. Major programs are planned tn consulta tion with a departmental adviser. MINOR: Minimum o f 20 semester hours including 101 or 1 5 1 . Minor programs are planned i n con s u l tation with a departmen tal adviser.

MlNOR in International Affairs (a thematic module within the Foreign A re u Studies Program): 20 to 24 semester hours

from three different disciplines, including (requ i red) 331 or 338 and ( o ptional) 384, 386, H i s tory 335 or Spanish 322, History 340, Economics 331 or 381, and Independent Study. For stud ents wishing to prepare the msel ves specifically for _: areer possibilities in public affairs and political life, the depa r t m e n t designa tes three special programs: Urban Affairs, Public Affairs, and Pre-Law. For further i n formation see the J re-professional and career programs sections o f the catalog. � BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: See School of

Education.

OURSE OFFERINGS L01

INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCI ENC E

-A n in troduction to the major concepts, theories, ideas and fields of study relating to politics and governmental ,ystems. Ex plores governmental s tructu res and processes, )oliticai power and au thOrity, conflict, decision-making, -pol icy, and stability and change. (4) 1 5 1 AMERIC AN GOVERNMENT � survey of the constitutional fo undations of the American

_,ol itical system and o f institu tions, processes, and practices relating to p a rticipation, decision-making , and public policy in Ame rican national government, (4)

:82

COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT

-.... xamina tion of political systems from a comparative perspec tive, Principal focus is on contemporary issues, the ocietal setting and policy formation in selected cou ntries a,t arious stages of political and economic development. (4)

321

SCOPE A N D METHODS O F POLITICA L SCIENCE

An exa mination of analytic frameworks, research methods and techniques, and information sources in political science. (4)

325

POLITICAL THOUGHT

A su rvey of the origin and evolution of major political concepts in ancient, medieval, and early modern times. Such ideas as sta te, obligation, a uthority, community, law and freedom will be studied developmentally. (4)

326

RECENT POLITICAL THOUGHT

A cri tical examina tion of the major ideologies of the modern world: democracy, conservatism, capitalis m , soci alism, anarcho-syndicalism, comm u nism, racial and political elitism, na tionalism, liberalism, Christian political thought, and contemporary ,problems. ( 4)

331

INTE RNATIONAL RE LATIONS

A n a lysis of conce pts and vocabulary of international relations; contemporary i n terna tional problems and foreign policies. (4)

336

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION AND LAW

Cooperation and conflict in i n ternational institutions. Issues before the United Na tions a n d other i nternational orga nizations. The role of interna tional law in i n terstate relations. (4)

338

AMERICAN F OREIGN POLICY

The role of the United States in international affairs. An analysis of the major factors in the formulation and execution of United States foreign policy and its impact on other powers. (4)

345

GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC POLICY

An i n tegrated approach to the nature of public policy, with emphasis on substa n tive problems, the development of policy responses by ,political institutions, and the impacts of policies. Special a t tention t o policy at the American na tional or subna tional levels, in international politics, or from a comparative perspective, as announced by the department. (4)

352

AMERICAN STATE GOVERNMENT

Study of governmental structures, processes, problems, and pu blic policy a t the state level. Special topics and field study may be arranged as appropria te, Particular a t tention to the state of Washington. (4)

356

URBAN GOVERNMENT AND POLICY

E x amina tion of American government a t the community and met ropolitan level, political structures and processes, ur ban problems a nd policies, and relations hips with other levels of government. S pecial topics and field study as appropriate. (4)

POLITICAL SCIENCE

113


361

AMERICAN POLITICAL PARTIES

An examination i n theory and practice of American political parties and i n terest groups; special attention to party leadership and recruitment, individual poli t ical socialization and participa tion, ele ctoral processes, and to the role of interest groups in American politics. (4)

363

POLITICAL COMMUNlCA TION AND OPINION

Inquiry into the relationship between public will and public policy in Americ a . E x a m ines de mocratic values i n the contexts o f opinion forma tion, expression, and effects. Particular a t ten tion to political culture, p u blic opinion polls, the mass media, and governmental secrecy and informa tion manage m e n t . (4)

364

THE lEGISLATIVE PROCE SS

A study of the theory, organization, and procedure of the Congress and other legisla tive bodies in the United S tates; special emphasis on the dynamics of conflict and compromise in the legislative arena i ncluding citizen and in terest group participa tion and lobbying. (4)

368

THE AME RICAN PRESIDENCY

Study of the na tion's highe s t political office in terms of the roles and ex pectations of the office, styles of leaderships, Presidential decision-making, the powers and limitations of the office, and the interaction of personality and institution.

(4)

371

JUDICIAL PROC ESS AND BEHAVIOR

An exa mination of the nature of law, j udicial organization, and judicial roles . Particular emphasis is given to the poli tical nature of the judiciary and the m u tual im pacts of law and the political system. (4)

372

CO NSTITUTIONAL LAW

The constitutional basis of governmental powers i n the United States with special e mphasis given to j udicial review, separation of powers, federalism, and i n terstate commerce. Includes an e x a m ination of the pol itical and constitutio nal restrictions on governmental power. (4)

373

CIVIL LIBERTIES

Constitu t ional rights and liberties with special attention given to freedom of ex pression and association, religious freedom, rights in criminaI procedure, due process and equal pro tection. (4)

383

THE WE STMI NSTER MODEL

An examination of the evolu tion of t he political system of the United Kingdom a nd its transplanta tio n to the states of the British Commonwealth including Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. (4)

384

COMMUNIST POLITICAL SYSTEMS

Comparative examination o f Marxist political systems, particularly the U . S . S . R . , eastern E urope, China, and Cuba. Special attention will be given to ideology and to the role of the Communist Party. (4)

114

POL ITI CA L SCIENCE

386

AFRICAN POLITICAL SYSTEMS

401

SEMINAR I N POLITICS

Comparative examination of the political systems of su b足 Saharan Africa. Exposition of pre-colonial, colonial, and contemporary influences with special attention to problem: of decolonization, na tion-bui ldi ng, and development. (4)

Selected topics i n the study of govern ment and politics as announced by the depa rtment. (4)

457

PUBLIC ADMI NISTRATION

458

I NTERNSHIP IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRA TION

Management as occurs in the affairs of s tate; the nature of human behavior i n organiZations; a d m i n i s trative law and quasi-judicial practices; civil service, budget and fisca control, centrCllization, coordi n a tion in administrativI areas. (4)

An i n ternship with a department of local or sta t ..足 government; planned and supervised jointly by a supervising government official and a member of th.足 political science facu lty. (By consent of the departmen only.) (4-1 2)

464

I NTERNSHIP IN T H E LEGI SLATIVE PROC ESS

Direct involvem ent w i t h the Washington S t a te Legislatur An opportunity to study the process from the inside by working with legislative participants . (Open o n l y to ju niors and seniors with at least one year at P L U . By consent of th department only. Political Science 364 prereq uis ite or take I concurrently.) (4- 1 2)

471

INTERNSHIP I N PUBLIC LAW

An internship with a s tate or loca l govern ment uni engaged in public law enforce ment and li t i gation. (B, consent of the department only.) (4-12)

4 9 1, 492 INDEPENDENT READING AND RESEARCH (By consent o f t h e department only.) (1-4)

5 9 7, 598

G RAD UAT E RESE ARCH

(Open to master's deg ree candidates only. Consent of th department required.) (1-4)

599

THESIS

( O pen to mas ter's degree candida tes only. Consent of he department require d . ) ( 4 )

INTE RIM COURSES OFFERED IN 1 9 78 304 307

464

THOREAU AND fiRST AMENDMENT fREEDOMS SCIENCE AND POLITI C S : T H E C ONTROL OF TEC HNOLOGY INTERNSHIP IN THE lEG ISLATIVE PROCESS


Psychology Through i t s c u rricul u m , use of com m u n i ty resources, a n d resea rch prog r a m s , t h e psy c hology de pa rt m e n t prov ides s t u d e n t s w i t h a comprehen s i ve a nd ba l a nced expos u re to ps ychology a s a d i Scipline, a science , a n d a profess ion . The ma j o r prepares st u de n t s for gr a d u a te work i n psych ology or for i m mediate e m ployme n t after g r a d u a tion in a wide v a riety of s e t t i n g s . In a d d i t i o n the psychology m ajor i s p u r s ued by s o m e s t ud e n t s w h o plan to do graduate work i n fiel ds o u t s i d e of p s ychology s uch a s social work, la w, b us i n e s s a d m i ni stration, o r t heology . T h e m i no r i n psych ology is designed to b e a s u p ple m en t to anot h e r major in the liberal arts or to a degree p rogra m in a profe S S i on a l school. The p s ychology depart men t also offers a broad range of courses which can be i nd i v i d u ally selected by a s t ude n t once the I n t roduction to Psycholog y course h a s b e e n comple ted . As a s u pp lem en t to aca d e m ic lea rni ng, the depa r t m en t o f fers oppor tu nj t ies for s t u de nts to have e x pe riences of a field-work na t u r e i n a wide v a r i e t y of settings in the gre a t e r Tacoma area, such as: A merican Lake Vete r a n s Hos pi tal, Wes tern State Hospital (i ncl ud in g the Child S t u d y and Tre a t m e n t Center)' Ca sc a dia Diagnostic Cen ter (j uvenile de linq ue n ts ), Rai n ier State School (men t a ll y re t arded ) , m e n t a l h ea l t h cli nics, special se rvices depa r t m e n t s of l ocal school d i s t ricts, and s o on . The laboratory classes offered by the depart m e n t are s m a l l in s i z e with m a x i m u m i mpor tance a ttached to individ ualized i n s t ruct i o n .

FAC ULTY Severtson, Chair; Adachi, Fiedler, Larsgaard, leJeune, Moritsu gu, NoLph, Stoffer.

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 32 semester hours, including 101, 243, 340, 460, 490. In addition, Statistics 231 is required. MINOR:

20 seme st e r hours.

1 1 0 and 221 may n t be counted toward the major o r minor. Courses at the 500 level are primarily for graduate students; however, they may be take n by advan ed undergraduates who receive the instructor's consent.

P S YC H O L O G Y

115


COURSE OF FERINGS 101

I NTRODUCTION TO PSYC HOLOG Y

An introduction to the scientific study of behavior; scientific methods for studying the behavior of living organisms; topics such as motivation, learning, e motion, intelligence, personality, adjustme nt, and social behavior. I II (4)

110

STUDY SKILLS

To assist in the improvement of reading skills a n d other techniq ues for effective study; class w o rk supplemented by individual counseling. (May not be counted in the major or minor.) I II (2)

221

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJ U STMENT

Problems in personal adjustment i n everyday living. Prerequisite: 101. (May not be counted in the major or minor.) I II (2)

243

SCIENTIFIC M ETHODS

Basic research design and theory const ruction; applications to both labora tory and field. Special e mphasis is placed on perception and cognition. Lecture and laboratory. Majors must take four credit hour option. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 . I II (2 . or 4)

330

SOCIAL PSYC H OLOGY

Research and theory concern ing the in teraction between groups and the individual. Language , attitu des, aggression, leadership, person perception, and related topics a re e x a mined and their relationship to various types of social change and infIl!lence are discussed. Prerequisite: lOL l! (4)

335

DEVELOPMENT: INFANCY TO MATURITY

Physical, in tellectual, social, and emotional growth from infancy through adolescence to maturity. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 . I U (4)

340

HUMAN NEUROPSYCHOLOGY

T h e s t u d y o f brain-behavior relationships. Topics include ne uroanatomical and neurophysiological mechanisms underly ing human behavior; psychological effects of brain damage; physiological co rrelates of la nguage, sensory and motor functions, and emotion; electrical stimulation of the brain. Prerequisite: 243. I ( 4)

401

WORKSHOP

Selected topics in psychology as announced.

403

THE PSYCHOLOG Y OF INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD

Physical, intellectual, emotional and social development of the individual from the pre-natal period to adolescence; problems of behavior and adjustment. Prerequisite: 335. (2)

405

ADOLESCE NT PSYCHOLOGY

Physical develop ment, mental traits, social characteristics and interests of adol.escents; adj ust ments in home, school and community. Prerequisite: 335. II (2)

116

PSYCHOLOGY

410

EM OTION AND MOTIVATION

Characteristics of emotion and motivation; their role in _ determining behavior. Physiological, cognitive, and behavioral orientations are emphasized. Prerequisite: 243. (4)

420

PERSONALITY THEORIES

Strategies for the s tudy of personality and for the formulation of personality theories. Techniq ues of measurement and i m plications for counseling and/or psychotherapy. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 . I II (4)

421

ABNORMAL PSYC HOLOG Y

Etiology and treatment of abnormal behavior; special e mphasis on psychosocial factors . Prerequisite: 101. I II (4)

450

PSYC HOLOGICAL TE STING

Survey of standardized tests; methods of development, standardization; limitations and interpretations of tests. Prerequisite: 243 or a course i n statistics. I (4)

460

LEARNING: RESEARCH AND THEORY

E xperimental studies and theories of learning. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: a minimum of 1 2 hours in psychology including 243. I (4)

490

SYST'EMATIC THO UGHT I N PSYCHOLOG Y

Historical develop ment, contemporary forms, and basic assu mptions of the major psychological theories an traditions. Primarily for advanced majors and gra d u a te students. I (4)

491, 492 I NDEPENDENT STUDY 颅 A supervised reading, field or research project of special interest for advanced undergraduate or graduate stu dents Prerequisite: departmental consent. I I I ( 1-4) 493

SEMINAR

"-

Selected topics in psychology as announced. Prereq uisite: instructor's consent.

505

SOCIAL SCIENCE METHODS

Basic research concepts applied to laboratory, field, and bibliographical studies. Topics include formulating research q uestions, research designs, data-gathering techniques analysis of data and theory construction. Emphasis is placec on understanding and evaluating rather 路than conducting research. Ad mission by consent of the student's g r a d uate committee. (4)

515

PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT

Intellectual and personal ity assessment. For the forme; part, the study of such tests a s the Stanford-Binet, thE' Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, thE Revised Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, and thf_ Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale; for the latter, in terview techniques, self-report tests such as the M MPI and projective methods. Prerequisite: 450. II (4)


540

COUNSELING METHODS

- Cou nseling process from i n i t i a l c o n t a c t through t e r m i n a t i o n . E m p h a s i s o n case c o n c e p t u a l i z a t i o n , communication skills, a n d instruction in commonly used techniques. Prerequisite: 420. I II (4)

-5 5 0

GROUP COUNSELING

Counseling theories and methods applied to the group con text. Prereq uisite: Psychology 540. (4)

570

PRACTI CUM I N COUNSELING AND/OR ASSESSMENT

An opportunity to develop counseling a n d lor as sessment skills in a setting in which these professional services are offered. Prerequisite: 515 and /or 540. I II (4)

_

577

ADV ANC ED PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING A ND /OR ASSESSMENT

An opportunity for the more advanced student to work in �the areas of counseling and /or assessment in a setting in which t h e s e p ro f e s s i o n a l s e r v i c e s a r e p r o v i d e d . Prerequis i t e : 570. I II (4)

590

GRADUATE SEMINAR

-Selected topics in psychology a s announced. Prerequisite: instructor's consent. (1-4) .

596

GRADUATE RESEARCH

�S u p e r v i s e d i n d e p e n d e n t r e s e a r c h . departmental consent. I I I ( 1-4)

599

P r e re q u i s i t e :

THESIS

Development of a thesis proble m chosen from the -::andidate's major area of concentration. The thesis design may encom pass original laboratory, field or bibliographic ,esearch with the specific format to be approved by the :andida te's g radu ate com mittee. The thesis will be _:lefended in a final oral exa mination conducted by the committee. (4)

NTERI M COURSES OFFERED IN 1 9 78 309 -3 1 3

PSYCHOLOGY AND THE LAW S E LF-REGULATION AND BIOFEEDBACK

PSY CHOL OGY

117


Religio The re l i g i o u s h e ri tage o f h u ma n i ty, pa rticu l ar ly t h e J u daeo- C h ristian tradition, i s c r i t i c a l l y e x a m i ned for t h e purposes of preserving a n d a p p l ying i t s acc u m u l a t i n g w i sdom . The depa r t m e n t's progr a m e x a m i n es religious d i m en s i o n s e nco u n te red i n o the r d iscip li nes and s e rves s t u de n t s w h o elect religion as t h e i r aca d e m ic or vocat i o n a l spec i a l t y . The P L U Rel i g ion Depa r t m e n t s h ares acad e m ic courses and exchanges p rofe ss o rs in a s e ries o f cou rs es offered a n d s hared by Pa c i fic L u th e r a n U n ive r sity and St. Marti n 's College a s p a r t of i t s in v ol vement in t h e ecu menical m o v e m e n t a nd t h e u nity of the h u m a n f a m i l y.

L u t h e ra n l n s ti t u te for Theological Ed ucation

( L I TE) : Th e Religion Depa rtme n t also pa r t i c i p a tes

i n a program of con ti n uing t h eo logic al ed ucatio n for clergy and la i t y i n t h e Pacific Nort h wes t . D r . Wal ter Pilgrim of t h e Rel ig i o n Depar t m e n t d i re c t s t h e L I TE prog ra m . For f u r t her d etai l s c o n t a c t Dr. Pi lgri m . FAC U LTY

Petersen, (hnir; Christopherson, Eklund, Gehrke, Govig, Ingram, Kn utson, Pilgrim, Stivers.

UNIVE RSITY REQUIREMENTS: 8 s em e s t e r hours for s t ude n t s entering as reshmen or sophomores. Four lower division ho u r s shall be tak e n before the end o f the sophomore

year. The s econ d 4 hou rs m a y be se lected from most of the o t h er offerings i n the reli ion c u r ri c u l u m . T r a n s fe r s tu d e n t s e n teri ng as j u n io r s or seniors are re q u i r e d to take 4 se mes ter h o u rs of re l i g i o n u n le s s pres e n t i ng e ig h t t ran s f e r h o u rs o f ..eligi o n from o t h e r accre.di ted colleges or u niversit ies.

BACHELOR OF A RTS MA JOR: 2 8 s e m e s t e r hou rs, with 1 2 concen t rated i n o n e o f five a r ea s ( B i blical Studies; History o f Christia ni ty; History o f Religions; T h eology and Ethics; a n d Re l igio n , C u l t u re, Society, a n d the In d i v i d u a l) , a nd 1 6 d i s t ribu ted 5 0 t h a t a t le a s t 4 hours a re taken i n e a c h of twu

ot her areas . Transfer m ajo r s must take a t l e a s t 12 hours i n res iden c e . Students m a y a p p l y f o r t h e Con tract M ajo r, without previously specified require m e n t s , d es i g n e d to encourage s t udent freedom, i n i tiative, and responsibility. See depa r t m e n t ' c h a i r f o r details on t h e five areas o r t h e con t ract major. Majors s h o u ld plan t heir p rogra m e a rl y i n consu lt ation wi h depa rtmental fa c u l t y . Closely related courses taught in o t h e r departments may be considered to a pp l y toward the ma j o r in consultation with the s ta ff .

MINOR: 16 s eme s t e r hours, with no m o r e than 8 h ou r s in one o f the five areas l is t ed ab o v e .

118

R E LI G I O N


-

351

C OURSE OFFERING S 131

lUUAEO-CHRI STIAN LIFE AND THOUG HT

----B i b l ical,

h istorica l

a nd

theological

reference to contemporary issues. ( 4 ) 204 1

foundations

with

361

BIBLICAL LITERATURE

i t erary, h i s t orical a nd theological dimen sions of th e B i ble, o n contemporary proble m s . (4)

-rncl uding perspective

251

INTRODUCTION TO THEOLOG Y

3a sic q u es tions of the Christian fai t h a pproached topically .

_::;)ues tions s u c h as what does Christianity mean b y "God" will be cons idered thro ug h Bib lical, his torical and r o n te m pora r y resou rces . Some a t tention given to ' hall e nges to t h e C hristian fai t h and i t s inte raction with _>t her perspectives. (4)

261 Norld,

e mphasi zing

h is torical

of the religions of the

origins

and

c u l t u ral

----Je ve lopme n ts . Readings centered upon pri m ary sources in t ra ns l ation. (4) 'II O TE: Only

o n e of the following courses may be taken to ul fi ll t h e G e neral University Req u i re m e n t : 261, 361, or

""""""-3 6 2. 2.62

MYTH, RITUAL AND SYMBOL

<\ n exa m i na t i o n of t h e na ture of myth and its expression hrough symbol and ri tual. Atten tion given to pre-literate -m y thology, Asian mythology, and Occidental m y thology a n d the role t hese mythological traditions have played in .he d eve l o p m e n t of m odern ethical, social, and religious fal ues.

341

(4)

OLD TESTA MENT STUDIES

Major areas of inquiry: the Prophe t s, Psa lms and Wisdom l ite ra t Ul" e or Mythology a nd Theology . Prerequisite: 241 or "oosent of

__

342

instructor . (4)

NEW TESTAMENT STUDIE S

\!Iajo r a r e a s of i n q u i r y : such as I n tertesta me n tal, Syn optic, ohann ine or Pa uline litera ture. Prere q u i s i t e : 241 or ---c o n s e n t of in s tr u c to r . (4)

343

THE LIFE OF JESUS

<\ s t u dy of the life and t eachings of Jesus; a historical s u rvey

)f "Life of Jesus" research, form and redaction criticism of �he Gospel t radition; the religious dimensions of Jesus' life and thought. Prereq uisite: one lower division course or

:onse nt of i n s tructor. (4)

PHILOSOPH IC AL AND RELIG IOUS TRA DITIONS OF INDIA

E m p h a s i s o n Ve d i c a n d U p a n i s h a d i c t r a d i t i o n s , B H A G A V AD-GITA , "six orthodox schools," Buddhism, and contemporary Indian philosophical and religious developments. Readings centered on primary sources in translation. Prerequisite: Religion 2 6 1 or consent of i n s tructor. (4) NOTE: Only one of the following courses may be taken to fulfill the General Univers i ty Requireme n t : 261, 361, or 362.

362

RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD

L\ cri t ica l int roduction to the study

C H R I STIAN ETHICS

A n introduction to the personal and social e thical dimensions of C hristian life and thought with a ttention to pri m a ry theological posi t ions and specific problem areas. Prerequisite: one lower division course or consent of i ns tructor. (4)

PH ILOSOPH IC AL AND RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS OF C HINA

Classical and modern philosophical and religious traditions of China (the six "cla ssical schools," the neo-Taoist, and neo-Confucian traditions), Chinese Buddhism, a nd how these schools rela te to con temporary C hina's Marxist­ commu nis t ideology. Readings centered on primary sources i n translation. Prerequisite : Religion 2 6 1 or conse n t of i n struc t or. ( 4 ) NOTE : O n l y one of the following c o u r s e s m a y be taken t o

fu lfill the G e n e r a l University Requireme n t : 261, 3 6 1 , or 362.

367

J UDA ISM

F a i t h a n d commitment, structure and dynamics, as e xpressed i n this major Western religion; i ncluding s tudies of i n te rpreta tion of the Hebrew Bi ble, theological e mphases, religious observances, h i s torical developments, modern groups, and Jewish-Christian dialog u e . (4)

371

ANC I ENT CHURCH HISTORY

The o rigins, thought and expansion of the C hristian C h u rch; rise of the Papacy, expansion in E u rope and the growth of Christian involvement i n c u l t u re; to the end of the Papacy of G regory I (604). Prereq u i s i t e : one lower division course or consent of instructor. I aly (4)

372

MODERN CHURCH H ISTORY

Beginning with the Peace of Westphalia ( 1 6 48), i n teraction of the C hristian faith with modern politics, science and philosophy; expansion i n the world, modern movements. Prerequ isit e: Religion 131 or consent of instructor. II (4)

373

AMERICAN CHURC H E S

The de velopmen t and trends o f C hristianity i n the Uni ted States. Prereq u is i t e : Religion 1 3 1 or consent of instructor. (4)

RELIGION

119


381

STUDIES IN CHURCH MINISTRY

Toward a functional viewpoint of the church's ministry : worship and education, programs for t h e youth a n d the elderly, counseling, and administration. First-hand observation of selected ministries. Prerequisite : one lower division course or consent of instructor. (4)

382

CHRISTIANITY AND THE SOCIAL CRISIS

An intensive, i n -depth ex ploration from the perspective of Christian theology and ethics of one or two current social issues. Prerequisite : one lower division course or consent of instructor. (4)

383

RELIGIOUS E XPERIENCE AMONG AMERICAN MINORITIES

C o n c e n t r a t i n g o n the r e l i g i o u s e x p e r i e n c e s a n d contributions o f those sectors i n American society that have a mi nority identity and are often not included in the usual study of American churches, this co urse will in d ifferent semesters focus on d ifferent minorities such as Blacks, Indians, Chicanos. Prere q uisite: one lower division course or consent of instructor. ( 4)

391

LUTHER

The man and his ti mes, with major emphasis on his writings and creative theology, s uch as the radical centrality of the Gospel and faith, the Word and Scripture, the sacraments, Ch urch and State. Prerequisite : one lower division course or consent of instructor. I I aly (4)

392

CHRISTIAN CLASSICS

Christian literature: devotion, biography, theology, poetry; Augustine, Thomas a Kempis, Dante, Lu ther, Calvin, Pascal, Wesley, Kierkegaard and others; group core plus seminar reports. Prerequisite: one lower division course or consent of instructor. II aly (4) 451

CHRISTIAN THOUGHT AND MODERN CONSCIOUSNESS

Conte mporary issues and problems in theology with reference to Biblical and historical resources and recent understandings of humanity and ,the world. Readings selected from Barth, Bonhoeffer, Bu ber, Bultmann, Cox, Moltmann, the Niebuhrs, Pannen berg, Teilhard de Chardin, and Til lich. Prerequisite: one lower division course or consent of instructor. (4)

485

C HRISTIANITY AND THE A RTS

Relationships of Christian thought to the forms and contents of various media of artistic creativity. II aly (4)

120

R E L I G I ON

490

SENIOR SEMINAR IN RELIGION

(Open only to s eniors and graduate students.) (4) a. H u m a n Sexualily The psychological, sociological, ethical a nd theological dimensions of sexuality. b. Religion and Psychology An investiga tion of psychological studies which converge on an understanding of h u man personality from the viewpoint of religion and the Christian view of h u manity; the influence of psychology on human self足 understanding. c. Religion and Polilics An inq uiry into how these d i sciplines relate to each other within the life of the church, the l i fe of the state, and in church-state relationships. d. Dml" and Dying Human death e xamined from a variety of perspectives with s pecial emphasis on theological d i mensions and the meaning of death. e . Lileralure and Theology A study of significant literature from both a l i terary and a theological perspective. Basically directed toward 19th and 20th century American and E u ropean literature.

491, 492

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Intended for religion majors, advanced and graduate studen ts; consent of the department is required .

493

MAJOR C HRISTIAN AND OTHER RELIGIOUS THINKERS

The in-depth and intensive study of one or two major figures in Christian theology or other religious thought, e . g . , Augustine, Bonhoeffer, S u ber, Bul tmann, Niebuhr, Radhakrishnan, Tillich. Prerequisite: one lower division course or consent of instructor. (4)

INTERI M C O URSES OFFERED IN 1 9 78 131

JUDAEO-C H RISTIAN LIFE AND THOUGHT 300 THE BOOK OF GENESIS 34 7 THE LAND OF THE BIBLE 375 THE UNFI NISHED REFORMATION: 16th CENTURY DI VISION AND 20th C ENTURY REUNION 493 MAJOR C HRISTIAN AND OTHER RELIGIOUS THINKERS: THE LIFE AND THOUGHT OF PAUL TILLICH


Sociology, Anthropology & Social Welfare The depa r t m e n t of sociolog y, a n t hropology, and social welfare a i m s to p rovide students with knowledge about the s t r u c t u re, r e q u i r e men ts, and p u rposes o f the respective disciplines w i t h i n i ts domai n . Its overall goals a re to p roduce s tu d e n t s who c a n u n d e r s t a n d t h e m s e l v e s , society, a n d t h e w o r l d , the r e l a t i o n s h i p a m ong t h e m , a n d the m o ral c o n t e x t o f t h a t relation s h i p . By e x p a n d i ng t h e i r k nowledge and d eveloping t h e i r s k i l l s , s t u d e n t s e n h a nce t h e i r a b i l i t y to make i nf o r m ed decisions, to e x e rc i s e t h e i r capacity for s e l f-cr i t i c i s m a nd sel f-eval u a tion, to function e ffectively as k nowledgeable and responsible c i t i z e n s , to k n o w a n d accept t h e m selves with t h e i r s pecial s tr e n g t h s and limitations, to e x h i b i t i n te rp e r sonal and i n t e r c u l t u ,ral tolerance, a n d to display their a c q u i s i t i o n o f both basic and sophi s ticated academic skills. The depart men t's c u rricul u m is fle xible and responsive t o individual, u n i ve r s i t y , a n d societal n e e d s a n d c h a n g e s . It reflects lliberal a r t s p u rposes, is planned to develop skills a n d achieve e xcellence,

a n d seeks i n te g ration while s p o n s o ri n g d i v e r s i t y . Through a d i s t i n g u i s h ed fac u l t y who a re w i l l i n g not only to i n f o r m o t h e rs b u t also 1 0 be i n f o r m e d , t h e depa r t m e n t a i m s fo'r region a l r e c o g n i t i o n of i t s e f f o r t s a n d s t re n g t h s . FACULTY

Jobs,t, Cha ir; Biblarz, Blumhagen, Briar, Brown, W. Gilbertson, V. Hanson, Oberholtzer, SchiU er, Walter, Willis.

S OC I O L O G Y I ANTHROP O L O G Y I S O CIAL WELFARE

121


Sociol o 2 v

BACHElOR l>'t ARTS : General Major: 3 6 semester hours, including 1 0 1 or 331; 4 hours at the 200 level; 8 hours at the 300 level; 8 hours at the 400 level; 399 (2 hou rs); 4 1 0; 4 70; and Statistics 2 3 1 . Major w i t h Specialization in Crime and Society: 3 6 semes ter hours, including 101 or 331; 336; 8 hours selected from 240, 340, 456, 3 3 1 ; 336; 8 hours selected from 240, 340, 456, 460, 4 93; 399 (2 hours); 4 1 0; and 470; plus 12 hours selected from A n t h ropology 440; History 451; Political Science 336, 371, 372, 3 73; Psychology 421 or Social Welfare 442. Major with Special ization in Family and Gender Studies: 36 semes ter hours, including 101 or 331; 342; 8 hours selected from 260, 381, 406, 4 9 3; 399 (2 hours); 4 1 0; and 4 70; plus 1 2 hours selected from Anthropology 334, 430; Psychology 335, 403, 405, 420; or Social Welfare 442. Major with Specialization in Social Organization; 36 semester hours, including 101 or 331; 8 h ou rs selected from 343, 422, 430, 4 4 3, 456, 465, 493; 399 ( 2 hours); 4 1 0; a nd 4 7 0; plus 12 hours selected from Anthropology 4 1 5, 440; Economics 432, 434; Political Science 345, 361, o r Social Welfare 442. Major with Specialization in Ethnic and Minority Structures: 36 semester hours, including 1 0 1 o r 3 3 1 ; 364; 8 hours selected from 280, 344, 390, 444, 493; 3 9 9 (2 hours); 4 1 0; and 470; plus 12 hours selected from A n t hropology 321, 322, 323, 324, 326, 4 1 5, 420; Economics 29tl, 3 2 1, 331, 3 8 1 ; History 4 7 1 ; Political Science 386 or Social Welfare 442. NOTE: 1 0 1 or 331 recommended prerequisite to all 300 and 400 level courses. MINOR: 1 6 semester hours, i ncluding 101 o r 331, one course at t h e 300 level, one course a t the 400 level. and one additional course chosen in consultation with the department. BACHElOR OF ARTS I N EDUCATION: See School of Education. C R I MINAL JUSTICE COURSES: The depar t m e n t also offers g raduate co urses related specifically to the field of corrections and law enforce ment. Supportive courses in sociology and other fields should be chosen in consul tation wi th departmental faculty.

C OURSE OffERING S 101

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

A n i ntroduction to the p rinciple s, co ncepts, a n d areas o f soc i ol o gy as w e l l as t h e a n a l y si s tools u s e d i n studying social behavior. (4)

240

SOCIAL PROBLEMS

A n a ly si s o f various theories a n d social responses to several c u rrent social problems. Topics i ncl ude : mental health, poverty, crime, fam il y d i sorga n iza ti on, and wo rk

alienation. (4)

1 22

S OC I O L O G Y

260

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS AND G ROUP BEHAVIOR

A n e)(aminati n of proce sses of in teraction that the person ex peTiences in s mall grou p settings a n d the implications that has for in t e rp e r so n a l behavior and self - co nc e p t ion s . (4)

280

INTRODUCTION TO RACE RELATIONS

Th e history of A m e r i c a n race relations. Factors acco u nting for c ha n ge s in relationsh ips between wh ite s and non足 whites. Critical area9 of c o n fl ict among the races . (4) 3 3 1 PRINCIPLES Of SOCIOLOGY A n advanced i n t roductory course s t res si ng the major c o n cep ts and fu ndamental processes operative i n all areas of social relationships . Not open to students who have taken 1 0 1 or i ts equi valent . (4) 336 DEVIANT BEHAVIOR An ex pl o ra t i on of nonconforming behavior such a s drug use, h o mo sexua l i ty , cultic religion wi th p ar t i cu la r a ttention to the dialectical process of its gradual emerg e nce and i ts social rej ec tio n . (4)

340

C RI M E AND DELINQUENCY

Analysis of adult crime and j uvenile delinq uency with attention to t h e i r social roo ts, develo pment , and social i mpact . (4)

342

SOCIOLOGY OF THE f AMIL Y

Ana lysi s of the fam ily as a system of social roles and a social i n s ti t ution . Topics include : c our t s h i p, marriage and parenthood, p e rs on a l it y develop me n t, changing famil y role patte r ns , a nd alternate fa mil y forms . (4)

343

SOCIAL MOVEMENTS A ND CHANGE

An e )(amination o f the theories o f social change i n the understandi ng o f socia l movements; factors accounting for the emergence and persistence of social move ments; e mphasis on poli tical processes and cha nges . (4)

344

CONFUCT RESOLUTION

accoun ting for interpersonal and in tergroup t e n s io n s . I n t e r p e rs o n a l , i n t e rg ro u p , n a t i o n a l , a n d in ternational m e thods o f resolution. (4) Factors

345 SOCIOLOGY Of AnalysiS o f s t ruc tures,

ORGANlZA TIONS

processes, and change i n bureaucratic orga niutions; their effect s u p o n the i n d ivi d u al and the orga n iz a t ion ; i nte rre l a t io n shi ps between society a nd orga nizations . ( 4 ) 364 ETHNICITY IN PLURAL SOC I ETIES A n examina tion of the nature o f ethnic groups (racial, tribal, cultural, etc.); th e structure of eth nic groups in plura l sotieties, the manipula tion of s y m b ol s by ethnic groups, eth nic d i vision of labor, ethnic p ol i tic s , and the effects of colonia l a n d po s t - col on i a l in ternational systems on eth nic relation s . (cros s -referenced with A n t h . 364) (4)


381

SOCIA LIZATION

442

SOCIAL POLICY AND ORGANIZATION

An exa mination of how individuals learn social roles and r o l e c o m p e t e n c y t h r o u g h the soc i a l i z a ti o n a n d resocialization proce ss. Emphasis on a dolescent a n d a d u l t ; oc i a l i z a t i o n w i t h i n t h e c o n t e x t o f i n s t i t u ti o n s , rganizations, a nd society. (4)

Analysis of how societies have defined social a nd personal needs and developed and organized responses to those needs. Special e mphasis will be given to the response of A merican society. (4)

390

The nature a nd functioning of the educa tional system will be examined from a sociological perspective. Topics will include: e ducation, stratification, and social change; the school as a complex organization; the school as a social institution; and the sociology of learning. (4)

SOCIOLOG Y OF POVE RTY

;ources of inequality; a nalysis of lifestyles and beha vior of �roups in society which e xperience inequality. (4) _

399

I NTERNSHIP

'}e monstration of the implications of sociology, combining m site work with in class learning. The artful skill of u sing heory to solve problems and of h a n d ling the practicalities of working in agencies and burea ucracies. Place ments: '')[obation work, courts, planning agencies, social agencies, ocal and state governmental agencies, ind ustries, a n d social -lction research. Prerequisite: departmental consent. N OTE: M ajors are required to register concurrently for 399 ( 2 hours) and 4 1 0, preferably in their j u nior year. ( 1-4)

�06

SEX ROLES AND SOCIETY

-A n exa mination of the roles performed by men a nd women

in society. Treatment of . both traditional and non­ raditional roles and the cu ltural variables i n fluencing this Issignment. Particular a ttention to current changing sex -,'oles for both men and women and how institutions such as t he family, church, and schools a re involved in these hanges. ( 4) no

APPLIED SOCIOLOGY

ntroduction to the various methods of sociological a nalysis and research. Methods considered: social su rveys, .articipant observation, interviewing, data presentation nd in terpre tation. N OTE: Majors are required to register concurrently for 399 (2 hours) a nd 4 1 0, preferably in their j u n ior year. (2)

22

SOC IOLOGY OF OCCUPATIONS AND PROFESSIONS

An ex amina tion of the nature of work in society a s a social role a n d as part of the social structure . Analysis of job a tisfaction, unemployment, use of leisure, a n d trends in _abor force composition. (4)

430

SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION

.. m u lti-cultural investigation o f religious experience, e lief, and ritual in relation to their social settings with articular attention to new form s of religion in America. (4)

441

RACE, R EVOLUTION AND THE DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

.n investigation of racism and stra tification processes -Within the developing coun tries and between the developed and developing countries; its consequences a nd nplications; the significance of Am@rican non-white linorities. (4)

443

456

SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION

SOC IOLOGY OF LAW

An exa mination of the social control functions of law and legal institutions; the influence of culture a nd social org a nization on law, legal change, and the administration of j ustice. (4)

460

PENOLOG Y AND CORRECTIONS

An examination of historical and contemporary systems of a d j u d ica t i o n and i n s t i t utionalization of offenders. C � nsideration of recent alternative non-institutional and d iversionary programs. (4)

465

SOCIOLOGY OF MEDICINE

An e x a mina tion of the social processes affecting conditions of health and d isease and of the cluster of social relationships and organizations that comprise the instit ution of medicine. (4)

470

SOC IOLOGICAL THOUGHT

Basic sociological concepts and theories. Primary e mphasis on contemporary conceptual approaches to social behavior and their historical antecedents. (4)

491

I N DEPENDENT STUDY

Readings or fieldwork in specific areas or issues of sociology under supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite : departme ntal consent. (1·4)

493

SE MINAR IN SOCIOLOGY

Student or faculty initiated seminar i n one o f four fundamen tal areas in sociology: (a) Contemporary Issues and Problems; (b) Social Process and Change; (c) Social Structure; and (d) Theory and Method. Prerequis i te : departmental consent. ( 1 - 4 )

501

PROGRAM SEMINAR

An analysis of social e x plana tion and the social scientific frame of reference. Offered in the Human Relations Program. ( 4 )

503

GROUP PROC ESS

A human interaction laboratory t o facilitate t h e exploration of the self concept through the mechanisms of i nterpersonal interactions and feedback. (4)

SOCIOLOGY

123


505

SOCIAL SCIENCE METHODS

Basic research concepts applied to laboratory, field and bibliographic studies. Topics include formulating research questions, research designs, data-gathering tech niques, analysis of data and theory construction. E m phasis is placed on u nderstanding and evaluating rather than conducting researc h . (4)

511

THE C RIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

Sociological analysis of the segments of the criminal j u s tice system, their interrelationships, and their relationships to crime prevention, social con trol, correction, and rehabilitation. (4)

512

Anthropology BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 32 semester hours, including 220, 221, 222, 4 70, and 16 additional hours in anthropology chosen in consultation with the department. NOTE: 1 0 1 or 2 2 0 recommended prerequisite to all 300 and 400 level courses. MINOR: 1 6 semester hours, i ncluding 101 or 2 2 0, one course a t the 300 level, one course a t the 400 level, and one additional course chosen in conslJ'itation with t h e department.

C OURSE OFFERIN G S

REHABILITATION MODEL S

Study of various models that strive to help offenders return to a productive role in society: institutionalization models, social action models, community based models, etc. (4)

101

513

Survey of the main sub-areas of anthropology (cultural a n t h r o p o l o g y , p h y s i c a l a n t h ro po l o g y , a r c h a e o l o g y , linguistics), using the concepts of physical and cultural evolution. Brief survey of genetics and primate evolution, including evolu tion of proto-humans into modern homo_ sapiens; early cultural beginnings in the Paleolithic Era; Neolithic developments; archaeological methods and major discoveries; the development and dis tribu tion of basic social and cultu ral institutions; the evolution of complex social_ forms from simpler ones. (4)

SOC IOLOGY O F HUMAN SERVICE SYSTEMS, PLANNING AND CHANGE

Analysis of h u man service systems such as correctional institutions, probation and parole agencies and social service agencies to understand planning processes and change. (4)

521

SOCIAL SYSTEMS INTERVENTION

A su rvey of the processes of social change, including an examination of social conditions which create the need for intervention. Offered in the Human Relations Program. (4)

531

MINORITY-MAJORITY RELATIONS

220

E VOLUTION A N D CULTURE: A GEN ERAL INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY

WORLD ETHNOLOGY

The history and culture of minority groups in American Society, examined within the context of the interaction between minority-majority groups and population and composition and movemen t of these grou ps. Offered in the Human Relations Progra m . (4)

A survey of the major culture areas of the world, analysis and comparison of economic, social, political, and religious足 systems from a variety of societies, inclu ding our own. Not open to fre shmen. (4)

541

Human biology in evolu tionary perspective; evolutionary theory, fossil evidence of h uman development, the living non-human primates, present-day human as a biological creature. Does not meet Social Science Ge neral University Requirement. (4)

SOCIAL STRATInCATION I N SOCIAL SYSTEMS

The economic, social, a nd political systems in America are ex plored to gain some basic u nderstanding of how class, status, and power operate in socie ty. Offered in the Human Relations Program. (4)

590

SEMINAR

S tudent or faculty initiated seminar in selected areas.

595

(1-4)

GRADUATE READINGS ( 1-4)

Independent s tudy card require d .

597

THESIS

Independent Study card required.

124

(4)

SOC IOL OGY I ANTHROPOL OGY

221

222

PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

A RCHAEOLOGY AND THE EVOL UTION OF C ULTURE

The development of culture, emphasizing the adaptive role of culture in a variety of environmental settings. The rise of the s tate in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Asia, Middle and Sou th A merica. The theory and methods of archaeology. (4)

321

C ULTURES AND PEOPLES OF AFRICA

A comparative s tudy of the Black African cultures south of the Sahara; the effects of the colonial era on traditional African culture and the position of these cultures in the modern world. (4)


322

430

CULTURES AND PEOPL ES OF ASIA

Survey of South, Sout heast, and East Asia, with emphasis o n the social institutions of the regions - societal, economic, political, and religious in light of contemporary social science theory. (4)

-3 23

C ULTURES AND PEOPLES OF THE PAC IFIC

S u rvey of the peoples and cultures of Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia includi ng native Hawaii; comparison of social institutions t h rough s t udies of -eth nographies; an examination of theoretical issues which have arisen from field studies i n Oceania. (4)

324

C ULTURES AND PEOPLES OF SOUTH/CENTRAL AMERICA

326

440

ANTHROPOLOGICAL INQUIRY

A systematic study of the theoretical foundations of sociocult ural anthropology; research methods; how theory and method are used to establish a nthropological knowledge. (4)

491

CULTURES AND PEOPLES OF NA TIVE NORTH AMERICA

POLITICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

The s t udy of political structures and processes in t raditional society; theories of the evolution of political forms; traditional concepts of power, a u thority, and law; political competition a mong ethnic groups i n new states. (4)

470

Beginning with the ancient Maya, Aztec, and Inca empires, this course is a comparative s t udy of the traditional folk :ultures of Latin America and an examination of the _ ?osition of these cultu res in the modern world. (4)

PSYCHOLOG ICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

A review of the basic concepts and contributions of this sub­ field of anth ropology; the influence of culture on the development of personality; investigation of recent work in cognition, including taxonomic systems, componential analysis, and the relationship between cultu re, cognition, and behavior. ( 4 )

I NDEPENDENT STUDY: UNDERGRAD UATE R EADINGS

t\ comparative study of American Indian cultures at the -lime of European contact; the effects of white contact upon traditional American Indian cultures; a n exa mination of �ontem;porary Native American issues, including tribal ;overeignty, treaty-based fishing rights, and Indian law. (4)

Reading in specific areas or issues of anthropology under s u p e rv i s i o n of a f a c u l t y m e m b e r . P r e r e q u i s i t e : departmental consent. ( 1-4)

-3 3 4

Study of specific areas o r iss ues in anthropology t h rough in-field methods of analysis and research supported by appropriate reading under supervision of a faculty membe r . Prereq uisites: Anth. 4 70 a n d departmental conse n t . ( 1-4)

KINSHIP AND MARR IAGE

C ross-cultural study of the family i n its many forms; the �Iaborations of larger kins hip units and the functions of ;uch groups in society; the role of kinshi p and marriage as �n underlying p rinciple in s tructu ring society; the analysis of kinship terminology. (4)

�64

ETHNICITY IN PLURAL SOCIETIES

'\.0 examination of the nature of et hnic groups (racial,

_

tribal, cultural, etc.); the structure of ethnic groups in plural societies, the manipulation of symbols by ethnic groups, !thnic division of labor, ethnic politics, and the effects of :olonial and pos t-colonial i nternational systems on ethnic relations. (cross-refe renced with Sociology 364) ( 4 )

115

THE DYNA MICS OF SOC IOCUL TURAL CHANGE

_�nth ropological approaches t o the s t u d y o f social, economic, and cultural change, with particular emphasis on the impact of the western world on non-western societies. 4)

20

492

493

I NDEPEND E NT STUDY: UNDERGRAD UA TE FIELD WORK

SE MINAR I N ANTHROPOL OGY

Student or faculty initia ted seminar in one of four fundamental areas in anthropology: (a) Contemporary Iss ues and Problems; (b) Social Process and Change; (c) Social Structure; and (d) Theory and Method. Prerequisite: departmental consent . (1-4)

Soc ial Welfare BACHELOR O F ARTS MAJOR: 4 4 semester hours, including 271, 333, 365, 4 4 2, 472, 475, 476, and 484, a nd 12 additional hours chosen from each of the following three areas: (1) either Political Science 101 o r 3 73; (2) either Economics 1 50 or 321 or 362; (3) either Psychology 335 o r Sociology 3 8 l . Unless otherwise stated, 2 7 1 or consent i s a prerequisite for all courses in Social Welfare.

E C ONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY

Theoretical approaches within anth ropology to the study I f economic systems in pre-literate and peasant societies, nd to the effect of colonialism on those systems. (4)

COURSE OfFERINGS 222

COMMUNITY SERVICES

Designed to provide an opportunity for freshman and sophomore level s tudents to test their interest in the field of social welfare through a five to ten hour per week participant-observa tion ex perience in a local agency. The purposes are to provide opportunity for a self-evaluation of

ANTHROPO L O G Y I SOCIA L WE LFARE

125


one's aptitude for and interest in the field, and secondly, to introduce the idea of evaluating the effectiveness of the agency in terms o f achieving i t s s ta ted goals . No p r e r e q u i s i t e s . W i l l not m e e t G e n e r a l U ni v e r s i t y Req u i rements. (2-4)

271

I NTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK

The history, philosophical roots, practice methods and "settings" ( i . e . , adoptions, p u blic schools, pu blic a ssistance, corrections, psychiatric hospitals and clinics) of professional social work; opportunities for observational experiences. No prerequisite. I II (4)

333

INTERVIEWING

Concepts, p ri nciples, a n d tech n i q u e s i n t r i n s ic to inte rviewing: "helping," problem-solving, or "clinical" interviewing for persons in the helping professions: social work/social welfare, clergy, n ursing, physicia ns, parish workers, personnel officers. No prereq uisites. (4)

365

SOCIAL INTERVENTION

Processes of social change; social conditions which create the need for intervention, the dynamics of change in ind ividuals and g roups, function of social movements in affecting change; intervention methods, tactics, and stra tegies. Prerequisite: 271 or consent . I II (4)

442

SOCIAL POLICY AND ORGANIZATION

Analysis of how societies have defined social and personal needs and developed and organized responses to those needs. Special emphasis wi.ll be given to the response of A merican society. (4)

472

SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE

The profession of social work e xamined within the g roup of helping professions; the knowledge base, principles, methods and values generic to social work practice; observation of problem-solving structures and proces ses. Prerequisites : 271 and consent. II (4)

475, 476

FIELD E XPERIENCE

Supervised field work within an agency or institution; a p p l ic a t i o n / i n t e g r a t i o n of k n o w l e d g e , t h e o r y a n d understanding; development o f techniques common t o the social welfare field. Prerequisite: 271 and consent . I II (4, 4)

484

SOC IAL R E SEARCH

Principles of research design and assessment of various research method s . Evalua tion research will be given special attention. Prima ry emphasis will be placed upon understanding and critically exa mining actual research. (4)

490

SEMINAR

Prerequisite: departmental consent . ( 1- 4 )

491

I NDEPENDENT STUDY

Prerequisite: departmental consent. (1-4)

126

S OCIAL WELF ARE

501

SEMINAR IN fAMILY G ROUP THERAPY

This seminar seeks to examine the current family orientation as it relates to behavioral science theory and practice with families through an analysis of the theoretical and practical considerations that shape delivery of services to families. The relation between the thinking and doing in famHy therapy will be clarified and e xpanded upon. (4)

502

fAMILY THERAPY PRAC TIC UM

This seminar seeks to provide s tudents with a meaningful process and s t ructure by which family therapy is learr'ed at the practicum level. Theoretical concepts will also be exa mined in the terms of diagnosis and treatment im plica tions in the delivery of services to family systems. (4)

INTE RIM COURSES OFFE RED IN 1 9 78 300 303 306 309 312 475,

THE CORPORATION AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY THE HUMAN SERVICES DOES ETHNIC ITY HAVE A fUTURE? LIBERATED LIfE STYLES SOC IOLOGY O f ETHNIC HUMOR 476 FIELD E XPERIENCE


Statistic s Program Statis tics, a branch of a pplied mathema tics, has become, and i s expected to continue as a n i n creasingly i mportant a r e a of inqu iry. As society becomes more complex, the a bility to ga ther, s u m m arize, and evalu a te data beco mes more necessary for e ffici e n t and in telligent decision making.

fAC ULTY Selected faculty from Departments of Economics, Mathematics, and Psychology.

STA TISTICS MTNOR: A m i n i m u m of 16 semester hours, consisting of S t a t i stics 231, Math 3 4 1, either Math 1 4 0 or 1 4 4, plus e lectives selec ted from the remaining courses i n statis tics. Students i nterested in statis tics should contact t h e respective heads of the Depart m e n t s of Economics, Mathema tics, or Psychology.

COURSE OFFERINGS 140

BASIC COMPUTER LANGUAGE (Math 1 40)

The BASIC computer language is applied to problems occu rring in business, science, social science, and other fields in conversa tional mode. Topics include data, ex pression forma tion, input/output, transfer commands, arrays and su bprograms. Prerequisite: high school algebra. I 1I

(2)

144

INTRODUCTION TO C OMPUTER SCIENCE (Math 1 44)

Computer science and a working knowledge of FORTRAN as app lied to scien tific problems; computer classification, orga nization, data structure, algorithms, flow charts a n d F O RTRAN I V . Prereq uisite : 1 2 7 o r 1 33 or consent. I II ( 4 )

231

INTRODUCTORY STATI STICS

Descriptive statistics: measures of central tendency and dispersion. I n feren tial statistics : generaliza tions about populations from samples by parametric a n d non足 parametric tech niques . Methods covered will include estima tion, hyp t hesis-testi ng, sim ple correlation analysis, linear ex pression a n d chi sq uare analysis. (Not applicable to mathematics credit.) I I I (4)

STATI STICS

127


ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE AND E XPERIME NTAL DESIG N (Math 334)

334

Random

sa m pl i n g ,

fac tors which

destroy ex per i m e n ta,1

d e s i g n , one-way a n a l y s i s of v a ri a n c e , two-wa y a n a l y s i s o f variance, fac tored design, block a n d l a t i n s q u are desi g n . Stude n t s w i l l a l s o c r i t i q u e perfor m

an

231

S t a t i s t i cs

p u b l i s hed

expe r i m e n t s a n d

e x peri m e n t a l d e s i g n proj e c t .

Prer e q u i s i t e s :

or e q u i v a l e n t . II (2)

MATHE MATICAL STATISTIC S (Math 341)

341

Pro b a b i l i t y theory, discrete a n d con t i n u o u s d i s t r i b u t i o n functions,

moment

d i s t ribu t i o n s regress i o n ,

and

generating

c o r re la ti o n ,

Prere q u i s i t e : M a t h

functions,

hypothesi s - t e s t i ng;

152.

and

II a / y

s a m pl i n g

i n t roduction

a na l y s i s

of

to

variance.

1 9 78-79 (4)

OPERATIONS RESEARCH (Economics 343)

343

Q u a n t i t a t i v e methods for decision probl e m s . E m ph a s i s o n l i n e a r progra m m i n g a n d o t h e r d e t e r m i n i s tic Prere q u i s i t e : Sta t i stics 231 or eq u i v a l e n t . ( 2 )

m od e l s .

APPLIED REG RESSION ANALYSIS (Economics 3 44)

344

Sim ple and m u l tiple regression a n a l y s i s a s i n vestiga t i v e tool s . C o u r s e s t r esses c o n s t r u c t i o n of e l e m e n t a r y l i n ea r models

and

i n t e r p re t a t i o n

Prere q u i s i t e : S t a t i s tics

231

of

reg r e s s i o n

o r equiva le n t .

results.

(2)

491 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-4) sao

APPLIED STATISTICAL AN AL YSIS (Economics 5 00)

( Will

not

cou n t

for

S t a tist ics

M i n or)

An

i n te n s i v e

i n t ro d u c t i o n t o sta tis tical m e thods f o r g r a d u a t e s t u d e n t s w h o h a v e not previo u s l y t a k e n I n trod u ct o r y S t a ti s t i c s . E m phasis will be on t h e a p plication o f i n fere n t i a l s t a t i s t ics to

concrete

situations.

Topics

covered

will

include:

m e a s u r e s o f loc a t i o n a n d varia tion, probabili ty, e s t i m a t i o n , hypothesis t e s t s , a n d regre s s i o n .

1 28

S TATISTICS

(4)


Divisio of Graduate Studies The Division of Graduate St udies is an aU­ � u n i ve rs i t y division which coordi nates graduate level wor k. The u n i v e r s i t y offers the following g r a d u a t e level progra m s : *

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINI STRATION This degree prog ram is designed to provide, t h rough educa tion, a fou nda tion for responsible leadership i n b u s i n e s s . MASTER O F P U B L I C ADMINISTRATION This degree program is i n t e nded to provide, t h rough education, a founda tion for responsible leadership i n th e ma nage m e n t of public agencies.

MASTIR OF ARTS _ 1. Education a ) E lementary or Secondary School A d m i n i s t ration: A program in tended' for teachers w ho desire t o e n ter the field of schoo l administr ation. Th e student who wishes t o q u a l i fy for the provisional or standard principal's creden tial (elemen tary or secondary or general) will take a major in t h i s field and complete courses in a s u p porting academic area of t h e u n iversity. St udents may major in this field without qualifying for a princi­ pal's creden tial.

0...---

MASTER OF MUSIC A degree prog r a m intended for q u a l i fied students who des i r e a conce n t ra t io n in mu sic education. ' D e t ails of these programs, inc luding a d m ission re q u i rements, procedures, degree and research requ iremen ts, are c.on tained in the Graduale Calaiog which is a v ailable from the office of t h e D e a n of G r aduate S t udies.

b) Counseling and G u i d a n ce: A program deSigned primarily for s t u d e n t s who wish to qualify as public school cou nselors (elementary a n d second a r y ) . c) S t u d e n t Person nel Administ ration: A program designed for s tudents who wish to qualify as s t udent personnel workers in higher ed ucation. d) Elemen tary Class room Tea ching: A program for elementary teachers who desire advanced work i n elementary classroom teaching or who wish t o q ualify as elementary school super­ visors or con sultants. A long with the major field, the s t udent i s requi red t o c o m p l e t e c o u r s e s in a s upporting academic a rea. e ) Secondary Classroom Teachi n g : A program for j u nior high a n d high school teachers w h o w i s h to increase their preparation for teaching in an academic area t a u g h t i n t h e secondary school. f) Reading: A program for elementary o r secondary teachers who wish to achieve a concent ration i n reading.

H u m a n i ties A degree program designed for librarians, clergy, teachers and

o t h e rs who wish to e x t e n d and broaden t h eir u nde rstanding a n d appreciat ion of t h e various f i e l d s o f t h e h u m an i t i e s . 3 . Social Sciences A degree program designed for personnel workers in indus t ry , welfare workers, workers i n the broad a r e a of corrections, libra rians, clergy, teac hers, and ot hers who wish to e x tend and broaden their u nderstanding and appreciation of the various fields of the social sciences . It inc ludes t he Human Relations Program offered a t Ft. lewis, McChord A F B, and Bremerton.

G R A D U A TE S T U D IE S

129


Affiliate CHOICE

Si nce 1 969, C H OIC E, Cente r f o r H u m a n Orga n i z a tion in C h a nging E n viron ments, has functioned a s a co m m u n i t y service and a.c tion -research arm of Pacific L u t h eran Universi ty. The acron y m , C H OI C E , conveys its function a nd style: to i n i t i a t e p rocesses a n d prog rams b o t h on and off c a m p u s which assis t people t o participate in m aking choices w h ic h may lead to i m p roved q u a lity of l i fe . C H O ICE has assis ted many com muni ties caug h t up in the t u r moil of urba n ch ange by providing l i nkages w,i t h com m u n ity service agencies a n d offering c h a n nels for social i nvol vement by fac ulty a n d st udents. Increasi ngly, C H O I C E has been i n s t r u m e n t a l i n c a t a l y z i n g needed processes of c h a nge o n c a m p u s i n o r d e r t o effect b e t t e r u s e of the u ni v e r sity's resources. Through a network of s k i lled professionals from the fac ulty a n d t he com m u n i ty , C H OICE provides organizati onal develo p m e n t services, com m u nications and planning works hops, and training p rogra ms for those i nvolved in social c hange, h u man relations, a n d conflict resol u t ion, a s well a s curricular a n d program development a n d evaluation. C H O ICE i s l i n ked to similar reso u rce centers a t oth er ALC­ related colleges: Aug sburg , Augustana, Ca lifornia Luth er an, Capital, Concordia-Moorhead, L u t h e r, and Texas Lutheran.

WASHINGTON STATE C OUNCIL ON ECONOMIC EDUCATION T h e W a s h i ngton State Council on Economic E d u ca tion i s a state­ wide orga nization headquar tered a t P L U , and i s designed to raise the level of u n ders t a n d i n g concerni ng economic principles a n d procedures among teachers a n d s t u d e n t s in t h e Pacific N o r t h w e s t . The program i n cludes a C e n t e r fo r Economic E d u c ation, a n d i s recog nized nationally by t h e Join t Council on Economic Ed ucatio n . I t s functions a re: 1) To offer special courses to non-economics majors at PL U, especially to future teachers and to cu rrent members o f the teaching p rofession. These courses em pha size the role of economics a m ong the social sciences a n d its i m porta nce in all a reas of life. 2 ) To develop, in cooper a t ion wi th t h e school systems o f t h i s state, teaching p l a n s a n d aids t h a t faci l i t a t e incorporation of economics i n to e x i s t i n g c u r ricula. 3) To provide speaking a n d consulting services for com m u n i t y organizations i nt e rested i n prom oting public un derstanding o f economic principles a n d ·i ssues. The W S C E E is an ed uca tional organiza tion s up p o r t ed by a coalition of c o m m u n ity groups rep resen ting educat ion, business, labor, agricult ure, and gove r n m e n t . It operates as an independent non-p rofit non-partisan educatio n a l organ ization dedicated to t h e p rinciples that each citizen's a b i l i t y to recognize a n d objectively analyze economic issues is essential to his or her welfare and t h e coun t r y 's progress.

130

AFFI LIATE R E S O U RC E S

KPlU-FM, PUBLIC RADIO K PL U - F M ... Stereo 88.5 m H z . . is licensed by the Federal Com m u n ications Commission to the Uni versity Board of Rege nts. K P L U- FM presents to t h e audie nces of the Puget Sound region a p rogram service pu rposefully designed to en rich ho mes, to i n form persons, to ente rtain, to educate, and to serve as an alternative broadcast syste m . KPLU-FM, o n t h e a i r seven days a week, 5 2 weeks a year, is managed by a professional s taff a n d operated by u n i versity s t u d ents. Student e. mployees represe nt a va riety of academic back grou nds ranging from art to zoology. K P L U - F M progra mming consists of classical m u sic, jazz, news, and pu blic a f fairs. The Cleveland Orchestra, Boston Symphony, and New York Phil harmonic are a mo ng the perfo r m i ng groups heard weekly in conce rt over the s ta tion. Program sources include Mutual B roadcasting System, Parkway Prod uctions, L i brary of Congress, N a tional Public Radio, a n d Radio Canada In ternationa l.


Study Abroad 'Every man lakes Ih, lim ils of his own vision for Ihe / i m ;/5 of Ihe war/d. " - Sc hope n h .l u e r P L U e n courages s t u de n t s to e x pa n d t h e i r v i s i o n o f the world b y n a k i n g available various oppor t u n i t ies to s t udy in ot her co u n t r i e s . rhe foreign s t udies prog r a m coord i nator i n the office of t h e )Covost has i n fo r m a tion on s t udy, w o r k , a nd travel i n foreign count ries to a s s i s t s t udents in sele ctin g approp riate prog r a m s . M a n y fac u l ty m e m be r s w h o h a v e s t ud i e d or worked a b road, for ' x a m ple, t hose i n the depa r t m e n t of m o d e rn and classical anguages, are also available t o d iscuss foreign s t u d y op p o r t u n i t ies ith s t u d e n t s . The v a rious options for such study fall int o t h ree m a i n categories, a s described below,

1) PL U-SPO N SORED PROGRAMS S t u d e n t s may choose to s t udy u n d e r a program called �'I ndependent Liberal A r t s Colleges Abro a d . " The program is sponsored by PLU i n consortium with five other schools in the 'acific Northwest - Gonzaga University, t h e University of Puget o u n d, Whitman Coliege, W h i tworth College, and Willa m e t t e �n i v e rsity. To date, prog r a m s have been held in London, with plans for prog ra m s i n France and G e r m a n y and possibly other parts of the world.

The London Program: The London p rog Tam, a one-se m e s t e r rogram offered f o r t h e first t i m e i n 1975, i s n o w well established. Offered i n both t h e fall and spring, i t provides s t u d en ts with experience i n one of the most ex'c i ting cit ies in t h e world. Courses IUght both by Northwest professors with experience i n London nd by n a tive British professors make e x te nsive use of the --m useu m s , cultural activities, a nd sites o f Londo n . Stude nts live w i t h B ri t i s h fa milies a nd com m u t e by s u bway to classes. Several x c u rsion s take s tuden ts ou tside London for a look at othe r parts of ngland, __

C o u r s e offerings f o r the L o n d o n program i n the 1 9 78 f a l l

se mester a re a s follo w s : A r t 386 - A r t a nd Archi tecture i n London f r o m t h e T u d o r s to Twentieth Ce n t u ry C o m m . A r t s / E n g l i s h 3 5 1 - Modern Dra m a - E n glish 392 - Twen t i e t h C e n t u r y B ri ti s h Litera t u r e : London and t h e Mod e r n Novel Englis h / H is tory/ L a t i n 338 Aesop in England : The rotectorate as Seen in C o n t e mporary Fables (This course m a y � u n t toward partial f u l fill m e n t o f t h e foreign languages I'

req u i r e m e n t o f the College of Arts and Scien ces . ) H i story 3 2 1 - The R o m a n s i n B r i t a i n a n d t h e i r Legacy H i s tory 332 - E n g l a n d : Topics in B r i t i s h History Sociology 363 - Sociology of Modern B ri t a i n

Interim a n d Summer Programs: P L U a lso emph asizes travel courses d u r i ng the J a n u a ry i n t e r i m and t h e s u m m e r session s. I rdi na rily t h e re aTe five or s i x offerings each year d u r i ng t h e I t erim a n d o n e or two offerings d u ri n g the s u m mer.

(2) PLU-AFHLIATED PROG R A M S I n order t o make more foreign s t u d y options availabl e to s t u d e n t s, PLU has affiliated with Central College a nd with the Council for I n t e r nati onal E d uca tional E x change. Central College has progra m s i n Pa ris, Madrid, London, Wales, Vienna, a nd t h e Yucatan, and C I E I has s t u d y c e n t e r s in Paris, Ren nes, a n d S e v i l l e . C r e d i t from th ese programs is easily t r a n s ferred to P L U .

(3) PROG RAMS BY SPECIAL A RRANG E M ENT I n add ition, s t u d e n t s may a l s o pursue s t ud i es in locat ions t h roughout t h e world by special a r range m e n t with a variety of other programs for which P L U m a y gr,l n t academic credit. However, i n the case of such programs w i t h which PLU is not d i r ectly affiliated, s t u d e n t s should file a le t t er of i n t e n t with t h e c h a i r o f t h e i r respect ive m a j o r depa r t m e n t s and w i t h t h e foreign s t u dies program coordinator i n the office of the provost before leaving P L U . Such a l e t t er should ou tline i n broad terms what t h e y propose to s t udy, w h e r e and f o r w h a t l e n g t h of ti me, and h o w t h e foreign experience r e l a t e s t o t h e i r acad e m ic prog r a m , On t h e basis of this i n forma tion, plus a record of lectu res a t t ended a n d e x a m i nations completed, a ca d e m ic c r e d i t m a y b e a l lowed, b u t n o grade point ave rage will be c o m p u t e d . In o t h e r words, s t u d e n t s s h ould s a ve aU i n forma tion (ex a ms, n o t e s , or o t h e r ma terial) w h i ch pertains to c1asswork. The u n i versity a l s o reserves t h e rig h t to r e q u i re ex a m i nations covering the s u bj ec t (s ) s t u d i e d , It is recom mended t h a t, before e m b a rking, s t u den ts acquire a solid founda tion in the language of t h e c o u n t ry w h e re they w i l l be stud ying, Upon ret u r n , s t u d e n t s will, w i t h the a s s i s t a n ce of the cha i,r o f t h e department o f modern a n d classical la nguages, prepare a written request for aca d e m ic cred i t . I f s t udies h a ve been pu rsued i n several aca d e m ic fields, approval will be required from each depa r t m e n t concerned.

F INANCIAL AID F i n a n ci a l aid is available to q u alified s t u dents who are s t u d ying on P L U-sponsored prog r a m s . Gov ernment loans can apply toward the affiliated prog r a m s and prog r a m s by special arran g e m e n t .

G E N E RAL INf OR MA nON I n a l l cases, a s t u d e n t w h o is consid e r i ng s t u d y i n anot h e r country s h o u l d fir s t d i s c u s s p l a n s with the foreign s t udies prog r a m coord i n a t o r i n the office o f t h e provost a n d , before departi ng, c o m plete a Leave of Absence form from the office of the re gistrar. This will facilitate ret u r n to PLU at the conc l u sion of a foreign study progra m . Attenda nce t o a foreign u niversity does nol waive graduation r e q u i r e m e n t s o f PLU. S t u d e nts i n t e r es ted i n foreign study s h o u ld also cons ult the Special Prog rams section o f this catalog for i n fo r m a tion about the Sca ndinavian Area S t udies major a n d t h e Foreign A rea Stud ies m i nor prog r a m s .

STU D Y A B R O A D

131


Speci I CLASSI CS

At P L U the Cla ssics Program is a cooperative effort a m ong t h e depart m e n ts o f modern a n d class ical lang uages, his tory, p h i losophy, religion, and art. Its goal is to u n i t e the "heart of the liberal a rts" with the mind, t h rough history a n d philosophy, a n d the s o u l , t h rough relig ion, a n d to e m bellish t h i s t rinity of the mes with the visual experience of a r t. This i n terdepartmental major req uires the completion of 1 0 courses, i nduding a t least one yea r of one o f the c lassical lang uages a n d two o f the other (Greek and L a t i n ) . The rema inin g courses a re selected from the :tist below in consulta tion with the program coord inator. L a t i n 1 0 1 - 1 0 2 - Eleme ntary L a t i n 201 - 20 2 - Intermediate Greek 1 0 1 - 1 0 2 - Elementary Greek 2 0 1 - 202 - I n termediat e Gr eek 4 2 1 - 4 2 2 - Masterpieces of Gr eek Li terature Art 280 - Twe nt ieth Cent ury Art A r t 3 8 2 - Ancient A r t A r t 383 - Medieval Art A r t 384 - Renaissance Art Art 385 - Baroque Art Art 487 - N ineteenth Cen t u ry Art Art 4 9 0 - Seminar History 3 2 1 - Classical Civilization Philosophy 3 3 1 - Ancient Philosophy Relig ion 24 1 - Biblical Literature Religion 341 - Old Tes t a m e n t Stu dies R e lig ion 342 - New Tes tament Studies Religion 3 7 1 - An cient C h u rch History In dependent Study Courses Selected In terim Courses S t u d e n t s a r e expected to become familliar with the read i n g list for that part of the program (art, l iteratur e, history, philosophy, or religion) i n which t h e i r interest lies. The prog ram is designed to be flexible. I n consulta tion with the Classics Commit tee, a student may elect a course or cou rses not on the classics cou rse l i s t .

SCANDINAVIAN AREA STUDI E S T h e Scandi navian Area Studies major re qu ires t h e completion o f t e n courses ( 4 0 semester hours), including t w o years of eithe r Danish, Norweg i a n , o r Swedish language courses, o n e course i n Scandinavian l iterat ure, and o n e course i n Sca nd i n a v i a n hist ory. The remaining four courses a r e selected from the list below in consult ation with the program coord i n ator. Economics 331 - S-I n terna tional Economics Economics 381 - S-Com parat ive Economic Systems E n g l ish 2 3 1 - S-Maste rpieces of E u ropean Literature E n g'iish 351 - S-Modern D r a m a History 323 - S-The M i d d l e Ages History 3 5 1 - S-Reforma t ion History 4 95 - S-Seminar: E u ropean History Mod & Classical Lang / Hi story 370 - Scandinavia i n the Twentie t h C e n t ury

1 32

SPECIAL PROGRAMS

rams Mod & Classical L a n g / His tory 4 70 - Scandinavian I m mi g r a t ior to America Music 4 3 4 - Scandinavian Music Norwegian 1 0 1 / 1 0 2 - Eleme n t a ry Norwegian Norwegian 2 0 1 / 202 - I n termediate Norwegian Norwegian 351 - Conversation and Compositon: Folkta les Norwegian 352 - Advanced Conversation and Composition: Ballads a n d Poetry Philosophy 365 - Kierkegaard and Existentialism Political Sci 282 - S-Comparative Government Religion 3 7 2 - S-Modern C hu r c h His tory Scandinavian 321 - Vikings and E m ig r a n t s Scandi navian 322 - Modern Sca ndinavian Civilization Scandinavian 421 Ibsen, St rind berg, and their Con temporaries Scand inavian 422 - Co nte mporary Scandinavian L i t e r a t u re S can d i navian 4 9 1 - 2 - Indep endent S t ud y ( 1 - 4 ) Sociology 3 4 2 - S-Sociology of t h e F a m ily I n terim courses approved by the Scandinavian S t udy Commit te, may a l so be included as electives. Courses indica ted by the prefix �­ in the title a r e reg u l a r departmental offe rings in wh ich readings and work assign ments to a significant e x t e n t a re focused 01' Sca n d i n a vi a for those students en rolled in the Sca ndinavian Are; Studies major . Students are encou raged to spend o n e year in Sca n d inavia, though this is not required to f u l fill major requireme nts.

fOREIGN AREA STUD IES

Students i n terested i n di verse cul t u res and regions ( s u c h a s A f r i c a , A s i a, Latin America, a n d other similar foreign a reas), rna' undertake a cross-disciplinary minor prog ram designed to refle � t h e i r geographic, t h e m a tic, or discipli nary i n terests. An e x a m p l e 0 ,­ one such prog r a m designed around a t h ema tic module is the minor in I n ternational A f fairs, listed below. T h e m inor p rogram consist" of a minimum of 20 a n d a maximum of 24 semes te r hours (5 to I courses) cnosen from a t least three d i fferent disciplines amon) those listed below. Students a re encou raged to take an independen t study course as their sixth course. Supervised by their chosen p rogram advi ser, this course will be a "special project" in tegratin) their particu l a r p rogram. Students desiring to u ndert ake this progra m must first mee'r with the program coo rdinator, who will a s s i s t t h e m in selecting an adviser a n d approve their program. Courses credited toward a minor cannot be credited toward . major. In terim and new courses may be credited to this program i approved by the s t u den t' s adviser a n d the program coord i n a tor. Cou rses approved for the Foreign Area Studies minor i nolude: Anthropology 220 - World Ethn ology Anthropology 222 - Archaeology a nd the Evolution of C u l t u r Anth ropology 3 2 1 - C u l t u res a n d Peoples o f Africa A n t h ropology 322 - C u l tures and Peoples of Asia A n th ropology 323 - Cul t u res and Peoples of the Pacific A n t h ropology 324 - C u l tures a n d Peoples of Sou th/Centra A m erica A n t h ropology 326 - C u l t ures and Peoples of Native North A merica


A n t h ropology 4 1 5 - The Dynam ics of Socioc u l t u ral C hange A n t h ropology 420 - Economic A n t h ropology A n t h ropology 430 - Psychological A n thropology Economics 3 3 1 - In tern a tion a l Econ omic s Economics 3 8 1 - Comparative Economic Systems His tory 1 0 9, 1 1 0 - Hist ory of Eastern Civilizations His tory 333 - Revol u t ion a ry Ru ssia History 3 3 5 - Latin A merican History Hist ory 3 4 0 - Modern China a n d Japan His tory 356 - H i s tory of A m e r ican Foreig n Policy I n teg rated Studies 222 - The B u rd e n of H u m a n Responsibility: 20th C e n t u ry Asia I n tegrated St udies 2 3 1 - Sym bol, Languag e a n d Myth I n tegrated Studies 2 3 2 - Model a n d Metaphor: I n v e n t ing the World -- In teg rated Studies 242 - The Tec h n ologica!1 Society and t h e L i m i t s to C rowth Political Science 2 8 2 - Compara t i ve Cove r n m e n t Political Science 3 3 1 - I n ternational Relations Politic.al Science 336 - I n t e r na tional O rganization a n d Law Political Science 338 - A merican Foreig n Policy Poli tical Science 383 - The Westm i n s t e r Model Political Science 384 - C o m m u n i s t Political Systems Poli tical Science 386 - African Political Systems Religion 2 6 1 - Religions of the World Relig ion 262 - Myth, R i t ual and Symbo l Religio n 361 - Philosophical and Religious Traditions o f I nd ia Religion 362 - Philosophical and Re ligious Traditions of C h i n a Sociology 3 4 4 - Con flict Resolu t i o n '-Sociology 4 30 - Sociology of R e l igion Sociology 441 - Race, Revolu tion, a nd t h e Developing =ou n tries Spanish 3 2 2 - Latin A merican Civiliza tion a nd C u l t u re

International Affairs: Thema t ic Module Within Foreign Area Studies Minor With t h e approval of the coo r d i n a t o r of this modu le, a stu dent nay select from a m o n g the following t o form an I nt e r n a t ional ---.U fairs thematic m i n or consisting of a m i n i m u m of 2 0 and a max i m u m of 2 4 semester hours ch osen fro m at le a s t t h ree cl iffere n t disciplines.

--

:equired: _i/he r Pol i tical. Science 3 3 1 - I n terna tional Re l a t ions, or

Poli t ical Science 338 - A merican Foreign Policy

0ptional: Political Science 384 - Communist Polit ical Syste ms Poli tical Science 386 - African Poli t ical Systems E i / h e r History 335 - Latin A m erican His tory, o r Spanis h 322 - Latin A merican Civilization and C u l t ure Hist ory 340 - Modern China and Japan i/her Economics 331 - In ternati onal Economics, _ Economics 3 8 1 - Comparative Economic Systems Independe n t Studies

CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF PUBLIC POLICY The C e n t e r for t h e Study of Pu blic Policy is a u n iversi ty-wide org a n i za tion devoted to a better understanding by stud en t5 and fa c u l t y of the public policy issues t h a t confront con temporary society. The center is housed in the Division of Social Sciences and operates u n der the di rec tion of the c e n t e r committee. A student advis ory c o m m i t tee works in co n j u nction with t h e center and is open to a l l students who have an i n teres t in the s t u d y and discussion of p u blic policy q u estions. The center sponsors activity d i rected at a wide variety of topics w i t h i n the field of publi c policy. Specifically, the c e n t e r u nderwrites s t u d e n t / fac u l t y research p rojects, student fellowship a w a rd s , workshops, pu blic fo ru ms, a n d symposia activi t y . I n the past, t h ese activities have been di rected at topics ranging from the world food crisis to the problem of aging; from issues associa ted w i t h urban d e velopment to t h e proble m s faced by women e n t e ri ng trad H ionally m a le-dominated profession s . I n addition t o i t s own activity, t h e c e n t e r has fos t e red the developme n t of a n u m b e r of study groups. The study groups are cross-disciplinary teams t h a t un dertake activities direc ted a t specific fields w i t h i n t h e a rea o f p u blic policy. C u rrently, st udy g roups are addressing t h e public policy issues in volved in the fields of fo reign area studies, family policy studies, wome n's studies , experien tial ed ucation s t u dies, a n d h u man ri g h t s .

JAZZ

T h e M u sic Depa r t m e n t provides b o t h acad e m ic course work a n d perform a n ce opportu nities f o r students i n terested in j a z z fields. Regular j a z z- r'elated dep a r t m e n t course offe r i n g s include M u s ic 339, His/Dry of JaII S/lfles; 343, Vocal Jazz Techniques; 344, Jazz Lnhom/ory EnSt'mhl,,; 3 7 2, Un iversity Jazl Ellsemble; and 4 9 1 - 2, llldependent Study. In a d d i t ion, private i n s t ruction is available in jazz i m p rovisation. In su pport of a n y s t u dent's study of j a z z, the re mainder of the m u sic curric u l u m provides s u b s t a ntial backgrou nd work in theory , compositi on, orche s t ra t ion, history, e a r t r a i n i ng, and private i n s t ruction. S t u d e n t s at F L U benefit from e x t e n sive e x posure to a n d pa rticipation in a very a c t i v e Northw est j a z z scene. M a n y c u rrent s t u de n t s a re me mbers of jazz ensembles with active performance sched ules. Any st u d e n t s in terested in j a zz can capitalize on u n l i mited oppo rtu n i t ies to affiliate w i t h N o rth west organizations su pporting jazz m u s icians (Victory Music, Puget Sound Trad i t io na l J a z z Society, N o . 1 1 7 Local M u s ician's U n ion ) .

SPE C IAL PROG RAMS

133


Pre-professional Programs HEAL TH SCIENCES

A h e a l t h sciences com mit tee a d vises s t udents aspiring t o careers

i n t h e health sciences. D u ring t h e i r first semester of at tendance at P L U, students should complete a Health Science I n terest For m . (Th is form i s available i n Ra m s tad H a l l Room 1 0 2 . ) A n appropriate adviser will t h en be appo i n t e d . This adviser will provide the req u i reme nts a n d procedures for t h e v a rious careers. In a d d i t ion to t h e brief req uirements for each a rea l i s ted below, more de tailed i n formation i s available in the reserve sect ion of M o r tved t Library ( u n de r "Health Sciences Resources").

Dentistry, Medicine and Veterinary Medicine The ove r w h e l m i ng majority of s t udents e n tering the professional schools of t h ese careers have devoted four years of study to sec u re the broad educational background req u i red. T h is background inc ludes a thorough prepara tion in t h e sciences in addi tion to s t u d y i n the social sciences a n d the h u m a n ities. There a re no pre-professional majors b u t rather students should select t h e major which is of i n terest and which best prepares them for an a l ternat ive career. I n addi tion to t h e General Un iversity Req u i rements a n d t h e 1"eq u i re m e n ts of t h e s t uden t's major, the following are req uired: B iolog y : 1 5 5, 1 56, 253; C h e m is t ry: 1 15 - 1 1 6, 33 1-332 plus laboratories; Mat hematics: at least one semester, 133 o r h i g h e r; Physics: one year course with labora tory, 1 2 5- 1 26 or 1 5 3- 1 5 4 . In a d d i tion to these minimum required science courses, most profeS Sional schools have their own specific r e q u i re m e n t s . ( C. h e c k w i t h your adviser.) Optometry A l t hough two years o f preoptometric study is the m i n i m u m req u i red, m o s t s t u d e n t s accepted b y a sc hool o r college of optom etry h a v e completed th ree years in a n u n d ergra d u a t e college. A la rge percentage of s t u d e n t s accepted by t h e schools a n d colleges of optometry h a ve earned a bachelor's degree. The req uiremen ts for a d m ission to the schools and colleges of optometry v a ry . However, a l l optometry schools and colleges req u i re at least two years of preoptomet ric study which should include: Biology: 155, 1 5 6, 2 5 3; C he m i s t r y : 1 1 5, 1 1 6; Physics : 1 251 2 6 or 1 5 3; English liz to 1 year; College M a .t he matics (including calc u l u s ) : 1 year. In a d d i t ion, each optometry school has i t s own set of req u i re m e n t s . (Chec k w i t h your adviser.) Medical Technology The m i n i m u m academic req u i r e m e n ts fo r e n t ry into clinical t rain ing a s pnblished by the N a t i ona l Accred i t i n g Agency for Clinical L a boratory Sciences (NAACLS) a r e : A m i n i m u m of 16 seme ster u n i t s of che mistry t o include organic chemistry or biological chemistry, 16 semester u n i t s of biology to include microbiology, one course i n m a t h e ma t ic s . The con tent of c h e m i s t r y a n d biology co urses must be acceptable toward s a m a j o r in t h ose f i e l d s of s t u d y o r t h e equivalen t; t h e m a t hema tics req u i r e m e n t is m e t by cou rses recognized as prereq u isi tes for admi ssion to p h ys ics courses. I n addition to these specific req u i rements, t h e student must have acquired a m i n i m u m of 90 semester u n i ts of academic cred i t before a d m is sion to the clinical program .

1 34

PRE-PROFE SS I ONAL P R O G R A M S

A l t h ough t h e m i n i m u m requirements for medic al tech nology are as o u t l ined above, m a ny of the clinical internship prog r a ms require or st rongly reco m m e n d a bache lor's degree in biology or chemistry prior to a d m ission to clinical t r a i n i n g . Therefore, a student s h ou ld consider f i r s t earning a bachelor's degree i n e i t h e r of these majors. The s tu d e n t must complete a twelve- month medical tech nology i n te r nship in an Ame rican Medical Associ a t io n accredited clinical laborat ory. Upon comple t ion o f thi s in ternship, the student is eligible t o take t h e medical tech nology certifica t ion examina tion given by the Board of Registry o f Medical Technologists of the A m erican Society o f C l i nical Pa t h o logists and to receive t h e degree o f Bachelor of Science i n Medical Technology. The m i n i m u m required courses for the B . S . M . T . a t PLU a re: C h e m i s t ry 1 1 5, 1 1 6, 321, 331, 332, 333, 334; Biology 1 5 5, 1 5 6, 3 2 2; M a t h e matics 1 3 3 . Very strongly reco m m ended: Physics 12 5, 1 2 6, 1 4 7, 1 4 8 . Also reco m m ended : Biology 253, 3 3 1 , 3 4 6, 4 4 1; Chemist ry 4 0 4 . The r e m a i nder of the requirements for a major in biology o r chemist ry m u s t also be fulfilled.

Pharmacy A l t hough t h e pre-p h a rm acy req uir ements for i n d i v i d u a l schools of pharm acy v a ry (check with your adviser), the following courses are usually req u i red : General c h e m is t ry , 1 year; orga n i c chemistry with labora tory, 1 year; college level mathematics (may i nclude足 calcul us); E ng li s h composition a n d l i t e r a t ure, 1 year. Often requi red are m icrobiology, quantitative anal ysis, and i n t roductory courses i n com mun icati on a r ts, economics, political science . An e x a m ple: The U niversity of Washington School of Pharm acy 足 has approved the following sched ule as being equivalent t o the first two years of t h e i r 5-ye a r course leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree in P h a r m acy: Fres h m a n yenr; (first semester) Chemistry 1 1 5, Mathema tics 1 3 3 ( m a y be omit ted i f t rigonometry was ta ken i n h i gh school), E n glish 1 0 1 , P . E . ; (second semester) Chemistry 1 1 6, Mathema tics 1 5 1, Co m m unication A r t s 1 2 3, el ective. Sophomore year: (first semester) C hemis try 3 3 1 , 333, Biology 1 5 5, Physics 1 2 5, 1 4 7, el ective , P . E . ; (second semester) C h e m i s t ry 3 3 2, 334, Biology 1 56, Phy sics 1 26, 1 4 8, P . E . Physical Therapy Accepta nce to schools of p h ysical t h e rapy has become increasingly compe titive in recen t years and st u d e n t s are s t rongly encouraged to c o n t a ct their adviser as early as possible and together determine the specific prereq u isites for t h e schools t h e y m a y be p l a n n ing to a t t e n d . T h e m i n i m u m req u irement is tw o years of pre-professional work. An exam ple: Min i m u m prerequisites for the p h ysical therapy prog ram a t t h e Unive rSity of Was hington: Biology 201, 205, 206; C h e m i s t ry 1 03, 1 04; M a t h e m atics 1 33; Physics 1 2 5 - 1 26; Psychology 1 0 1, plus one a d d i tional course; English 1 0 1 , plus one addition a l course; electives in the h u m a n i ties and social sciences. St udents who have questions regarding health science careers other than those listed a bove s h o u ld contact their hea l t h sciences adviser or check in the libra ry reserve m a t e rials on "health sciences resou rces


AIR FORCE ROTC (AEROSPACE STUDIES)

LA W

Most law schools require at least t h ree years o f liberal arts stu dies; however, t he y regard four years of liberal arts studies a nd a Bachelor of Arts degree as be t t e r p reparation for the s t ud y of law. In addition to meeting degree requirements, p rospective law students a re advised to complete fou r semester h o u rs each of ""- economics, h istory, p hilosophy, political science, psychology, sociology and speech . Pre-law s tudents are advised also to complete substantial work i n acco u n ting. S tudents should plan t h ei r cou rse sequence according to req uiremen ts of the law school in w h ich they are i n terested . Students i n terested in law a re urged to register at the Pre-law Center i n the Depa rtment of Political Science. Information on the Law School Ad mission Test (LSA T), a circulating library of law school buJ letins, a nd a newsletter, The Pre-law Ad"ocale, and other -- resource ma terials a re available. In addition, s tudents may wish to d iscuss t heir program w i t h the pre - l a w adviser in the Depa rtment of Political Science.

_

THEOLOG I C AL STUDIES Pre-theological s t u d e n t s should complete the req u i rements for the Bach elor of Arts degree. Besides the general degree req u i rements, the Association of Theological schools recommends t h e following: English - l i teratu re, composition, speech and related s tudies. A t l e a s t six semeste rs, History - ancient, modern E u ropean and American. A t least three semesters. Philosophy - orientation in h istory, co ntent and me thod s. A t least three semesters. Nat u ral Sciences - preferably p h ysics, chem istry, and biology. _ A t least two semesters. Social Sciences - psychology, sociology, econo mics, poli tical science, a nd education. At least six semesters, including a t least one semester of psychology. Foreign Languages - one or more of the following : Latin, G reek, - Hebrew, German, Fre n c h . Students who an tici pate post-graduate s tudies are u rged to undertake t hese disciplines as early a s possible (at least four semesters). Religion a thorough knowledge of Biblical con tent toge t h er with an i n t roduction to major religious t raditions and t h eological proble m s in the context o f the p ri n cipal aspects o f hu man cultu re as outlined above. A t least t hree semesters. Students m a y well seek counsel from t h e seminary of their choice . Of t h e possi ble majors, English, philosophy, religion, a nd the - social sciences a re regarded as the most desirable. Other areas a re, howeve.r, accepted. A faculty adviser will a ssist s t udents in t he selection of courses n ecessary to meet the req u i re m ents of the t heolog'ical school of t h eir choice. A t the p resen t time, increasing nu mbers of women a re enrolling at selected Prote s t a n t seminaries in pursuit of the Master o f Divinity degree. Consult the Relig ion Department chair for further i n formation. _

'---

-

__

Rapidly advancing technology i s daily transforming the human environment. Lnnovations a m plify h u m a n i ty's abilities to comprehend and cope with scie n t i fic and technological developments. Revolu tionary advanceme nts in weapon systems, in space technology, and i n management tech niq ues are some of the most remarkable results. These advances are changing the oFFice r requirements in today's Air Force. The Air Force proFeSSional oFFicer corps m u s t have spec i a l abili ties i n a wide range of s kills. But whatever the specialty of individ u a l oFFicers, t hey must also be imaginative leaders and resourceFul managers to succeed i n t heir proFession. The objec tives o f A i r Force ROTC a re to motivate, educate, and commission highly q u alified students for active duty as officers in the Un ited S ta tes Air Force. Air Force ROTC i s offered to PLU students through an ag reement with the University of Puget Sound. The lowe r division courses are open to all students and do not req u i re a milita ry commitment For non-AFROTC scholarship cade ts. The upper d ivision cou rses a re open to qualifie.d upper division and graduate s tudents on a competitive basis. Financial assis tance, in the form of schola rships and $100 per month sub sis tence, is available to qualified applicants in the Air Force ROTC prog ram. Two and t h ree-yea r scholars h i ps a re available to qualified students. T h e scholarships cover full t u ition, books, and laboratory fee s . There a re also scholarship opportun ities for students i n n u rsing, pre- medicine, pre足 optom etry, and pre-ve terinary medicine s tudies. S tudents who s uccessfully complete the Air Force ROTC p rogram and receive an academic degree From the university will be offered com missions as second lieutenants in the U.S. Air Force Reserve. Additional i n Formation on the A i r Force ROTC program may be obtained by writing the Professor of Aerospace Studies, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA 984 1 6, or by calling (206) 756-3264. Facuity: Maj. Taylor, Capl. Gliasea, Capl. Church. The curricu l u m offered b y this p rogram is divided into t h ree courses: a General Military course and a Professional Officer course taught on the Unive rsit y of Puget Sound campus, and a Field T raining course conducted a t selected Air Force bases. The General Military Course (GMC) consists o f one hour of academic i n s t ruction and one h o u r of military training per week each term o f the fresh man and sophomore years. Students are eligible to e n roll in this COurse i n their fresh man year, There is no m ilitary commitment For nonscholarship cadets i n the G M C . The ProFessional Officers Course ( P O C ) c o n s i s t s of t h r e e hours of academic i n s t ruction and one hour of mili tary training per week each term of the j u nior and senior years G raduate s t udents a re also e ligible to compete For e n t ry into the Professional OFFicers Course. T h e Field Training Course is either Fou r or six weeks in du ration, depending upon whether the s t udent is pa rtiCipating in the four or two year prog ram. Satisfactory completion of this course is a p rerequisite for entry into the Professional Officers Course for studen ts who have not completed the General Military Course. A 25-hour fl ight i n s t r uction program is offered to senior cadets in the Professional Officers Course who are qualified for A i r Force pilot training . All A i r Force ROTC students a re fu rnished A i r Force un iforms and necessary tex t books for Aerospace Studies cou rses.

PRE-PROFE S SIONAL PR OG RAMS

135


General M i l i tary Courses 1 1 0, 1 1 5 The Developmenta' C rowth of A i rpower Development of air power from the begi n nings of flight i n to post­ Vie t n a m era; a v a riety of eve n t s, elements in his tory of airpower s tressed, especiaHy where these provide sign ,ifican t e x a m ples o f the i mpact of airpower on s t rategic thought. (2) 2 1 0, 2 1 5 The Un ited 5tC/t�s A i r Force Today The m ission, organiza tion, weaponry of Air Force u n its. Strategic offensive, strategic defensive, some general purpose, aerospace support forces. (2) 325 Field Training Field training during the sum mer months at selected Air Force Bases for students selected for the Air Force ROTC Professional Officer Course. The areas of study include academics, j u nior officer t rain ing, aircraft and aircrew orie n t a tion, career orie n t a tion, survival training, base functions and env iron m e n t, and physical t ra i n i n g . ( 4 ) Professional Officers Courses 330, 335 National Security Forces i n Contemporary A m erican Society Armed Forces as an i n tegral ele m e n t of society; broad range of A m e rican civil-military relations, environ mental context in which defense policy is formulated. ( 4) 4 1 0, 4 1 5 Concepts of A i r Force Management Management fundamen tals, th rough m anagerial strategy and tac tics and their application to decis ion-making, both in a civilian and m i li tary context. Leadersh ip research, including styles of great leaders, application of leadership concepts to Air Force s ituation s . Review of m ilitary j us tice system. ( 4) 4 2 1 Flight Instrllctio" Program Flight ins truction i n light, single engine, land aircraft, requires 8 hours 5010 and 1 7 hours dual in struction plus a final check ride. Approval of i n s t ructor required. (4)

1 36

PRE-PROFE S S I O NA L PROGRAMS


Cross-Disciplinary Career PI grants _E N VIR ONM ENTAL STUDI E S PROGRAM Students concerned about o r wishing to enter graduate study a n d ca reer programs in su ch fields as e n v i r o n m e n t a l science, environ m e n t a l law, or resource ma nagement, may e n ro l l in the E n v i ro n m e n t a l S t ud i es Prog ra m . A certificate will be awa rded �-s t u d e n t s co m pleting req uirements listed below, together w i t h a departmental or school ma jor progra m . A c o m m i ttee consis t i ng of repres e n t atives from each of t h e t h ree major s u bject m a t t e r groupi ngs w i l l approve e a c h studen t's course prog ram a n d __ i n tegrative experienc es. Natural Sciences and Mathematics - 1 8 semester hours: Earth Sciences 222; S t a t i stics 2 3 1 o r Math 1 4 4; three additio n a l approved :ourses, su ch as: Biology 1 1 1 , C h e m i s t ry 1 03, 104, E a r t h Sciences 101. 131, 202. So cial Sciences - 1 6 semester hours: Economics 1 5 0; Political Science 1 0 1 or Sociology 1 0 1 , 240, or 260; Busi n e ss A d m i n i s t ra tion 230; a n d one approved upper divisi on course, s u c h a s Economics 362 o r 432; H i s tory 460; Physical Education 326; Political Science �352 or 356; Psychology 330; or Sociology 343, 345, or 4 30. Humanities - 1 6 semester hours: A r t 294; Philosophy: two approved co urses, s uch as: 324; 328, 385, 395, 4 27; Religion: one Ipproved course, s uch a s : 351, 382, 451. In tegrated S t udies 241� 4 2 m a y apply as p a r t of t h e H u ma n i t ies compo n e n t w i t h adviser' s '-- a pproval. Integrative Experience - 8 semester h o u r s : D u ri n g t h e in terim md final se mester of the s e n ior year or at another approved time, 111 s t u d e n t s would part icipa t e i n a s t ud y - research-ac tion prog ram __lesigned to d raw upon t h e broad backg ro u n d of t h e above courses ilnd the expertise of their own major fields. Appropria t e courses may be i d e n ti fied in the Inlerim Calalog. Semester courses may n cl u d e, bu t are not l i m i ted to, appropriate depa r t m e n t a l or n terdiscipl inary semin ars; indep e n d e n t s t u d y or research courses; -iield experience and in terns h ip progra m s; employm e n t or v o l u n teer service wi t h i n c o m m u n i t y action agencies.

LAY CHURCH WORKER PROGRAM A s tu d e n t who seeks to fulfill a C h ris tian voc a t ion of service to t h e ch urch a n d com m u n i t y a s a n u nordai ned professional may prepare for certification by the appropri a t e c h u rch j u d icatory as a c h u r c h staff worker. Po sitions c u rre n t l y filled by such workers include: Ch urch Business A d m i n i s t r ator C h u rc h M usici a n C h ri s t i a n E d uc a tion Direct o r Christian D a y School Te acher Parish Worker Youth Work Director A major in religion is normally req u i red for this prog r a m with suppo r t i n g work selected in t h e fields o f b u s i n ess administra t io n , educati on, m u s ic, social sciences, a n d physical education. S t u d e n t s e n rolled i n this program will be advised as to those i n s t i t u tions, boards, a n d agencies within the c h u rc h t h a t may assis t them in p l a n ning educa tional prog r a m s a n d obtaining place m e n t a f t e r graduatio n . The d e p a r t m e n t designa tes one of i ts m e m bers as director of t h e progra m. This p e r s o n i s assis ted by one facult y m e m b e r from a s u pp o r t i ng area a n d by a member of t h e a d m i n i s t ration .

The Study Program Requ ired courses in Religion: 2 4 1 , 3 8 1 . Recomme nded co urses: 131 or 2 5 1 ; 261; 373; p l u s two courses selected from "Religion, C u l t ure, Society, and the Individual" area. Recommended su pporting a reas: Business A d m i n i s t r ation (Acco u n ting, M a n ag e m e n t ) Commu nicat ion Arts E d ucation M u s ic Psychology Physical E d ucation ( R ecreation) Sociology

-,JRBAN AFFAIRS ( C a r e e r possibilities i n s t a t e a n d local gove r n m e n t service . ) For certification, successful completion o f the following courses s requ ired : Politica� Science 1 0 1 , 1 5 1 , 325, 326, 352 or 457, a n d 4 58; ,cono mics 1 5 0 a n d 362; a n d Sociology 1 0 1 a n d 3 4 4. _

>UBUC AFFAIRS (Ad m i n i s t ration a n d policy-planning careers i n p u b l i c agencie s . ) Required: 3 2 semester h o u r s o f political science; 2 0 semes ter hours of economics; plus 12 semester hours o f electives on ,dvisem e n t .

-

CROSS -DISCI P L I NARY S T UDIE S

137


The Board of Regents OWNERSHIP, SUPPORT, GOVERNMENT he u n i v e r s i t y is o w n e d a n d o p e r a t e d by Pacific L u t h eran U n iversity, Inc., a W a s h r ng t on corporation whose p u rpose is to m a i n tain a C h ri s t i a n i n s t i t u t ion of h i g h e r l e a rn i n g . M e m b e rs h i p o f t h i s corporation coincides w i t h me. m b e r s h i p o f t he North Pacific District of The A m e rican L u t h eran C h urch and t h e m e m be r s h i p of that portion of t h e AL 's Rocky M o u n t a i n Dis t rict w hi c h is located in Idaho and M o n t a n a , west o f the C o n t i n en tal Divide. The a n n u a l m e e t i ng o f t h e co rpo r a ti o n i s h e ld i n conjunction w i t h t h e a n n ual convention of t h e North Pa ci fi c D i s t r i c t . Vot i ng m e m b e r s i n c l u d e t h e members of the Board of Regents, and t h e pastors a n d la y d legates of congregations i n the cons t i t u e n t a rea. T h e u n i versity receives regular financial support from T h e A m e rican L u theran C h u rch, t h e Pacific N o r t h we s t S y n od of t h e L u t h e ran C h u rc h i n Am erica and f r o m t h e Pacific

L u t h e r a n U n i v e r s i t y Alumni As oci a t i o n . I n addition t o c h urch a s s i s t a nce, t he u n iv e r s i t y receives co nsiderable s u p po rt form i n d i v i d ua ls, orga niza tions, and busi nesses t h ro u g h o u t the n a t i o n and world. T h e policy- m a k i n g and g o v e r n i n g b o d y of the u n iv e rs i t y i s t h e Boa rd of Rege n t s . O n the b a s i s of reco m m e n d a t i o n s made by t h e p res ide n t, i t c h a r t s a c o u r s e for t h d e v e l o p m e n t of t h e t o t a l p rogram of t h e u n i v e r s i t y a nd s t rives to provide e s s e n t i a l f u n d s . T h e u ni v e r s i t y corpora t ion's cons t i t u t i o n p rovides f o r not m o re t h a n 30 regents elected for t h ree - y e a r t e r m s . Fi fteen rege n t s repre s e n t t h e N o r t h Pacific a n d R ocky M o u n t a i n D i s t r ic ts of The A m e rican Lutheran C h u rch, s i x a re c h o s e n b y t h e Pacific Nort h we s t S y nod of t h e L u t h e ra n C h u rch i n A me rica, t h ree represent the PLU A l u m n i Association, a nd not more than 6 r e g e n t s - a t - l a rg e a re chosen by t h e B o a rd of Rege n t s . The p re s i d e n t of t h e u n i v e rsi ty, t h e pre s i d e n t of t h e orth P a c i f i c Dis tric t ( A l ), a n d t h e president of t h e Pacific N o r t h wes t S y nod ( L C A ) ' are reg e n t s by virtue of their pos itio n . T h e s t ud e n t body a n d the facu l t y have n o n - v o t i n g representatives w h o m e e t with t h e board.

OFFICERS

M R . M E L V I N R . K N U D SO N , C h a i r m a n M R . GEORGE L. D A V I S , J R ., V i c e C h a i r m a n MR. L A W R E N C E H A UGE, Secretary

E X-OFFICIO

B I S H O P C L A R E N C E S O L B E RG, 2 0 0 7 Th ird A v e n u e , S e a t t le, Wash ington 9 8 1 2 1 , A Le

B I S H OP A . G . FJ E L L M A N , 5 5 1 9 P h i n n e y Aven u e N o r t h , S e a t t le, W a s h i n gton 981 03, L e A D R . WI L L I A M O . R l E K E , Pre s i d e n t , P L U , Taco m a, W a s h i ng ton.

9 8 4 4 7, PLU

1 975- 1978 TERM

MR. G O R G E L. DAVIS, J R . , 4 7 1 3 Peterson D r i v e N . W., Gig Ha rbor, Wa s h i n g to n 98335, Regrn t - a l - L a rge M R . R. G E N E G RA N T, 16 Co u n t ry C l u b D r i v e S . W . , Tacoma, Was h i n g ton 98498, Regenl-al· Large M R . L A W R E N C E H A U G E , Wenatchee School Dist. No. 246, 235 S u n s e t , Wena tchee, Wash ington 98801, A lu m n i MR. G A L V E N I R BY, 1 43 4 3 N. E . Alton, Po rt la n d, Oregon 9 7 2 2 0,

A Le

M R S . R U T H J E F F R I E S , 1 8 1 1 N. B e n n e t t , Tacom a , W a s h i ngton 9 8 4 0 6, LeA

MR. R O G E R C L A R S O N , 205 S . W . S k y l i n e Drive, P u l l m a n, Wash i n gton 981 63, A L e M I S S F L R E N e E O R V I K , 4 7 1 2 S o u t h Napa S t reet, Spokane, Wash ington 9 9 2 0 3, LeA MR. C L AYTON B . P E T E R S O N , 1400 - 1 1 2 t h S . E . , Suite 100, Bellevue, W a s h i n g t o n 98004, A L e D R . C H R I STY U L L E LA N D, 1 5 4 2 4 Wash ington 981 66, A Le R E V . D A V I D W O L D, 3 7 1 9 W a s h i n gton 9 8 3 7 1 , A L G

-

9th A v e n u e S . W . , S e a t t le.

21st

S t re e t

N.E.,

P u y a l l u p,

1 9 76- 1979 TERM

DR. T H O M A S W. A N D E R SO N , 7525 H e g ra Road, Tacoma, W a s h i n g to n 9 8 4 6 5, Regerr l·al·Large R E V . C H A R L E S B O MG R E N , 9625 N . E . 8th S t reet, Bellevue Wa s h ing t o n 98004, LeA M R . P A U L H O G L U N D, P . O . Box 1 8 69, Seattle, Wa s h i ng t o n

981 1 1,

LeA

DR. R I C H A R D K L EI N , 96 1 8 W as h i n g ton 98499, A Le

59th Aven u e S . W . , Tacoma

DR. RONALD LERCH, W as h i n g t on 99336, A lu m n i

West

5611

Victori�,

K e n n e w ick,

D R . J E S SE P F L UEGER, 6 08 W . Divis ion, E p h r a t a, Wa sh i n g to r 98823, A L e

M R . M A R T I N P I H L , 2 7 2 0 - 7 t h A v e n u e , K e t c h i k a n, Alaska 99901, ALe R E V . R O B E RT Q U E l L O, P . O . B o x 4 5 5, Pullman, W a s h i ngtor 9 9 1 6 3, A L e

F . W A R R E N S T R A I N , 6 7 2 0 E a s t Greenlake W a y N . , S e a t t le, W a s h i ng t o n 9 8 1 03, A L e

REV.

D R . G E O R G E A . W A D E , 1 9 1 0 F a irview E . , S e a t t le, W a s h i ng t Ol9 8 1 03, Regerll·al· La rge

138

BOARD O F R E G E N T S


1 9 77-1980 TERM D R . K E N N ETH E R ICKSON, 885 Pioneer Ct., E ugene, Oregon 9 7 4 0 1 , LUI

N o r t h Pacific District DR. C L A R E N C E S O L B E R G , Pres ident (Bishop), 2007 Third Aven ue, Seatt le, W a s h i n g ton 9 8 1 2 1

MR. R O B E RT H A D L A N D, 255 Min nesota 55343, Regent-at- La rge

DIVISION FOR COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY SE RVIC ES

Maple Hill

Road,

Hopkins,

M R . M E L V I N R . K N U D S O N , 6928 - 1 00th S t reet S . W . , Tacoma, Wash ington 9 8 4 9 9, ALe

-

REV. J O H N M I L B RATH, 7312 N . E . Alameda Drive, Portland, Oregon 972 1 3, ALe MR. R I C H A R D NEILS, 1 1 92 1 Gravelly Lake Drive S . W . , Tacoma, Washington 984 99, Regent-at-Large

-

M R S . S U Z A N N E N E L S O N, 8701 - 1 0 8 t h Street S. W., Tacoma, Wash ington 984 98, A lumn; D R . C A S P E R F. P A U L S ON, J R . , Teac h i ng Research Division, - Oregon SSHE, Monmo u t h , O regon 9 73 6 1 , LeA M R . S T E R L I N G R Y GG, P O Box 4 29, Kalispell, Montana 5 9 9 0 1 ,

ALe

M R S . DOROTHY S C H N A I B L E, 1 1 1 1 E a s t F i rs t, Moscow, Idaho -838 4 3, A L C D R . R O Y S C H W A R Z, 1 0039 - 4 1s t N . E . , S e a t tie, W a s h i ngton 9 8 1 25, A L C - ADVISORY M R . P E R R Y B . H E N D RICKS, J R. , Vice Presid e n t - Finance & Opera tions (Treasurer), P L U -

-

R E V. L UT H E R B E K E M E IE R , Vice Presid e n t for Devel opment, PLU D R . R I C H A R D J U N G K U NTZ, Provost, P L U D R . P H I L I P B E A L , V i c e P resid e n t for S t u d e n t Life, P L U

R E V. M I L T O N N ESVIG, Assis t a n t to the Presid e n t, P L U _R E V. H A R V E Y N E U F E L D, Execut ive Di rector o f T h e Collegium, PLU M R S . L U C I L L E GIR OUX, Assistant to t h e Pre sident, U niversity R e l a t io n s, P L U -

D R . JO A N N J E N S E N, Department o f Biology, Faculty DR . DAVID O L S O N , School of Physical, Ed ucation, Faculty

D R . ER VING S E V E RT S O N, Dep a r t m e n t of Psychology, Faculty MR. J A M E S W E Y E R M A N N, ASPLU P resident, Student _MS J E A N K U N K L E, A S P L U Vice Presid ent, Student M R . D A V I D P E R R Y , Residence Hall Coun cil Chairman, Stur/",t

CHURCH OFFICIALS I\MERICAN L UTHERAN CHURCH

eneral DR. DAV ID W. PRE US, Presid e n t , 422 'vI i n neapolis, M i n nesota 5 5 4 1 5

South

Fifth S t reet,

ďż˝ E V. FR E D M E U S E R , Vice President, 2 1 9 9 E. Main S t . , Columb ia, --.Jhio 4 3 2 0 9

R E V . R O B E RT G. BORGWAR DT, 312 Wisconsin Mad ison, Wisconsin 53703 (term e x pires 1 9 82)

Aven ue,

M R S . S Y L V I A iJ. BOSSE, 8656 Bayberry Drive N . E . , Warren, Ohio 44484 ( 1 9 80) MR. C H A R L E S R . BR U N I N G , 2 5 0 0 M i n n eapolis, M innesota 55406 ( 1 978) M R S . FAITH (JOSEPH) BURG E S S , G e t t ysbu rg, Pennsylvania 1 7 325 ( 1 978) MR. OTIS j . G R A N DE, W a s h i ngton 98333 ( 1 9 80)

38

S e a b u ry

Avenue,

West

Broadway,

1 1 1 1 - 1 4 th Aven ue,

Fox Island,

REV. D E N NIS V. G RIFFIN, 324 South Dakota Avenue, Sioux F a l l s, South Dakota 5 7 1 0 2 ( 1 9 78) M R . EDWIN W . G U N B E RG, 7701 W i n t e rberry Place, Bet hesda. Maryland 20034 ( 1 982) R E V. G U ST A V KOPKA, JR., 1 0 20 S. H a rrison Road, East L a ns i ng , Michigan 4 8 8 2 3 ( 1 9 80) M R S . M E R L I N E (THO MAS) M C C L OUD, 19955 Lauder, Detroit, Michigan 48235 ( 1 978)

L UTHERAN CHURCH IN AM ERI CA, PACIFIC NORTHWEST SYNOD

DR. A . G . Fj E L L M A N, Presid e n t , 5519 Phinney A v e n u e North, Sea t t le, Washington 9 8 1 0 3

The Pacific N o r t h w e s t Synod of the L ut h eran C h u rch i n America h a s accepted Pacific Lutheran Un iversity as one o f the i n s t i t u t ions of higher education which it endo rses a n d supports. The Synod has representation o n the University's Board of Regents, but does not share ownership of the i n s t i t u t i o n .

REPRES ENTING BOARDS OF C OLtEGE EDUCATION

D R . R O N A L D F . MATTHIAS, 422 South Fifth Street, Minn eapolis, M i nnesota 5 5 4 1 5, Division for College and Univers it y Services, The American L u the ran C h u rch

DR. R I C H A R D S O L B E R G , 231 Madison A v e n u e, New York, N e w York 1 00 1 6, Executive Secretary, Board of College Education a n d C h u rch Vocations, Lu thera n C h u rch i n Am erica

REPRESENTING CO MMITTE ES ON HIGHER EDUCATION

R E V . W A LTON BE RTON, 5800 N . E . 1 1 2 th Avenue, Vancouver, Washington 98662, The A m e rican L u theran C h u rch R E V. L L A N O THE LIN, P.O. Box 2 4 8, Port l a nd, Oregon 97207, L u theran C h urch in America

M R . A R N O L D MICK E LS O N, Secretary, 422 South Fifth S treet, '\t1i nneapolis, Mi nnesota 5 5 4 1 5

B OARD OF R E G E NTS

139


Administrative Offices Of FICE Of THE PRESIDENT

William O. Rieke luci lle G i roux

James L. Peterson PauJ Porter Kenneth Dunmire M i l ton L . Nesvig Harvey Neufeld Donald Jerke Ronald Tellefson

Preside"t Assisla"t to Ih, Presidellt. U n i versity Relatiolls Di reclor of Pul,lic I"formalioll Director o f Graphics a",{ Pub licatiolls Ch ief Photographer

Assi;I",,1 10 the Presidenl Exull tive Director of The Col/,)( ill"'/ Cll llrch Relations U" iversity Pas lor U"itJersity Pastor

OFFICE OF THE PROVOST

Richard P. Jungkuntz Sue K. C l arke David C. Yagow Kenneth E. Chris topherson John O. Herzog James A. Halseth Gu ndar J. King Kenneth A. Johnston Nan Nokleberg Richard D. Moe

Provosl Admi"istralive Assisla "t Exu"tit" Assistant Chair. Division Chair. Division Chair. D i v ision Denll . School of Deall. School of

of Hu",a" ities of Nalural Scie" ces of Social Sciellas Busi"ess A dm i ll islration Educatioll

Director. Teacher Plaamnll and Fifth Yenr Coordillator Dea " . Graduale a"d Su m m er Stlldies; Dea " , School of Fille A rts

Noel Abrahamson Doris G. Stucke Dav id M. Olson John W. Heussman James Van Seek Phi l i p M i ner Don a l d Yoder Albert Perry Charles T. Nelson lolet a Espeset h R i chard Seeger Judd C. Doughty David Christian Victor Nelson Robert K. Menzel

140

ADMINI STRATIVE OFFIC E S

Coordillator of P"blic Events Director, School of N u rsillg Director, School of Physical Educalion D i rector of Ihe Library D irector of A d m issiolls Associate Director of Admissiolls Assistalll Director of Ad",issio"s Director of Fillallcial A id Registrar Assistallt Registrar D i rector, Academic Advising a ll d Assistance Dimtor, Office of Radio alld Televisioll Services C hief Ellgillter, Radio a"d Television St"dio Supervisor, Televisioll Studio D i mtor, CHOICE


OFFI CE OF FINA NCE AND OPERATIONS

Perry B. Hendricks, Jr. Ted A. Pursley Betty Gjurash Dawn Hill Pat ricia Hills Howard L. Vede l l La rry Allen Richard Shaver Frances Logan Ervin M a rlow Edrice Reynolds James B . Ph i l li ps James B a rlow Melvin Solheim Weldon Moore LeRoy Davis Nathan l. Walker Robert M . Torrens Mary Hegtvedt Lynn I s a acson Darlene Campbell David M. Olson James K i t t ilsby

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT Vice President

-

Finance and Operations

Dimtor. Fi sc a l Affa irs

Controller Ma,mger of Student Accounts Federal Loan Adviser Director, General Services D irector, Central Services Ch ief of Sec urity Clrief Trlep"on, Operator Manager of Golf Co urse D i rector, Computer Center Director, Ph ys ic a l Plant MaintnlanCf Fore m c w Housekrrpins Fore man Grounds Fore man Ch ief Engin"r Director, Prrso" n,1 Director, Food Se r v ices Assistant Director, Dietitian

Luther W. Bekemeier Jane Shanaman David Berntsen Ronald C . Collom Edgar Larson Molly Edman

OFFICE OF STUDENT LIFE

Phi l i p E. Beal Jeremy Str inger Ethan A llen Gary Minetti Richard French Anita McEntyre

Vice Preside nt for Development Assistant Vice Presiden l for Development Di rec tor of Drvrlopme"t Di rrctor of A l u m " i AS50ci"t ion Director of Defe r red Givins

Coordinator of De v e lo p me nt Research

Vice President and Dean for St,,,ient Life A5sociale Dra,,; Director, Reside"tial Life As so c ia le Director, R es id ", l i a l

Lile

Di rrct or, COIH15ding and Hea l / I. Services

Dirt'cior, Career Pla nn ing and Pla crme n t Assista,,1 D irector, Career PI",,,,inil a n d Placement

H a rold G a mble Marvin Swenson G a ry McDonald

Director, Minorily Affai rs Director, Univrrsity Cenler

A;sislant D irector, UniPfrsily C",ler

Di rec t o r , Boo kstore Assistant to the D irector Director of Atlrletics Assistant D ire cto r of Athletics

ADMINIS TRATIVE O F F I C E S

141


The Faculty NILLIA M O. RIEKE, 1 9 7 5-, Presi dent; BA Pacific L u theran -Jniv e r s i t y, 1 953; M . D . , U n i v e rs i t y of Was h i n g t on School of Med icine, 1 958. 'l,jILS-ERIK

AABY,

1 9 7 7- ,

Ass;sta n t

Professor

of

BLlsi"r55

, d m i ,, ,stration; B . B . A . , M . B . A . , University of Wyoming, 1 973, 1 974;

�) h . D ., University o f Ne braska, 19 76.

MA THILDA S. AC Uff, j E l l CHI ADACHI, Counsrilllg

a"d

1 9 6 7 ·,

1 965;

Associate

M . S .,

Professor

Virginia

of Psychology,

Testing Serl>ice; B . A . , J a m e s t o wn College,

1 946; B , D . , McCormick S e m i nary, 1 9 5 1 ; M.A., Colu m bia J n iversity - Union T heological Seminary , New York, 1 9 5 7; E d . D . , ,- eache rs College, olu mbia U n i v e r s i t y , 19 60.

- rlARRY S. ADAMS,

1 9 4 7-5 1 , 1 9 6 2 · , Professor of Physics; B . S . , M . S . , K a n s a s S t a t e University, 1 9 45, 1 9 4 7; P h . D. , U n i v e rsity of • A i n nesota, 1 9 62 ,

;RIRLE Y E. AIKIN,

1 9 74 - , Instrllctor of Nursing; B . 5 . N . , B , A . ,

-.,.'aci fic Lutheran Univ ersity, 1 9 7 1 .

*ANG ELIA G . ALEXANDER,

1 9 7 1 -, .!\.;sistant P,ofmor of

niology; B . 5. , J u n i a t a College, 1 9 6 2; M . A . , University o f C a l i fornia,

)avis, 19 66.

'HARLES D. ANDERSON,

1 9 5 9· , Professor of Ch em istry,

I-farvard Unive rsity, 1 9 54, 1 9 59. B . A . , University U n i versi t y o f U t a h , 1 9 6 4 . h ysical

EdLication;

ER NEST M. ANKRIM,

1 9 75-,

of

Assistant

Montana,

Profmor of

1954;

M.S.,

1 9 7 6-, IIssistant Professor o f Economics;

1 9 7 6-, IIssociate Professor of Political

-:5cience; B . A . , University of Puget Sound, 1965; P h . D . , University of Maryland, 1 972. 1 9 74-,

IIssistant

Professor o f Physical

B . A . , Val paraiso University, 1 9 6 9; M . Ed., K e n t State _' n iversit y, 1 9 7 4 . lucatio n :

D. STUART BA NC ROFT,

1 9 6 7- 6 8 , 1 9 7 1 , lIssociatr Professor of

B . S . , M . B. A " Arizona S t a t e U n iversity, 1 9 6 3, 965 ; M . A ., P h . D . , Univers i t y of Pennsylva nia, 1 9 7 1 , 1973.

0 "sine5s II dministration;

_

TEPHEN E. BARNDT,

1 9 7 8 - , IIssistant Professor of Business

II d m i nistratio n : B . S . , Washi ngton State Un iver sity, 1 95 7; M . B . A . ,

Ph ,D . , O h i o Stat e U n iversity, 1 967, 1 9 7 1 .

THADDEUS BARNO WE,

1 9 l i - , Assistant

Professo r of

.si" m II dm inistration; B . A . , University o f San Francisco, 1 966; M . A ., P h . D . , U n i ve rsity of M ichigan, 1 9 7 1, 1 9 73.

K E N N ETH E. BA TKER,

1 9 6 6 - , Professor of Mathematics; B . A . , l a r tburg College, 1 9 5 7; M . A . , P h . D . , University of Colorado, }61, 1 9 7 1 .

�YRA J. BAUGHMAN,

WILLIAM BE CVAR,

1 9 7 3 -, Associate Profmor of Com m " "icatio"

B. A., U n i versity of Northern Iowa, 1 9 6 1 ; M . A ., S t a t e U n iversity of South D a k o t a , 1 964; P h . D. , K a n s a s Unive rsi ty, 1 9 7 5 .

II rt;;

L UTHER

W.

BEKEMEI ER,

Vice

1 9 7 6-,

Preside,,/

for

Development; B . A . , M . Div., Concordia Semi na ry, S t . Louis, 19 49,

1 9 73 .

PAUL F. BENTON,

1 9 6 9-, IIssociate Professor of English: B . A . , W h i t w o r t h College, 19 65; P h . D., Princeton U n iv e rsity, 1 970.

CHARLES A. BERG MAN,

1 9 7 7· , IIssistant Profmor of E "gl ish;

B . A . (Economics), B . A . (English), University of Washington, 19 69, 1 9 70; M.A., P h . D . , University of M i n n e sota, 1 9 73, 1 977.

A RTURO B IBlARZ,

1 9 7 7-, IIssis/ant Professor of Sociology; B . A . , M . A . , P h . D . , University of Califo r n i a , L o s Angeles, 1 955, 1960, 1 9 68.

ROBERT M. B LOMGREN,

1 9 78·,

IIssis/an/

Profcss", of

ollege, 1 960; M . S . , Ph. D . , Univers ity

of Minn esota, 1 963, 196 8 .

G A YlE BARNES BtOMME,

1 9 7 5 - 7 8, IIssista"t Professor of

Michiga n, 1 968, 1 973.

KATHLEEN

IIssistant Profes s or

E ORGE E. ARBAUGH, 1 95 9-, Professo r of Philosophy; BA, Aug us t a n a College, Rock I s l a n d , 1 955; M . A . , Ph.D., University of ) w a , 1 958, 1 9 59.

--: AROL A. AUPING,

1 9 7 2 - , Assista"t Professo r of

English; B.A., Oakland Uni versity, 1 9 6 7; M . A . , Ph D., Uni versity of

,, 5. , Will m e t t e University, 1 972; M . S . , P h . D . , University of )regon, 1 9 75, 1 9 76.

)A VID M. ATKINSO N,

KATHERINE D. BECKM AN,

Physical Edllcotion; A .B . , St an ford U n i versity, 1 9 67; M . A . , U nivers i t y

Mathemat ICs; B . 5 . , N o r t h Park

Re$ency Profes$(Jr, 1 9 7 4 - 75; B . A . , S t.. Olaf College, 1 952; A . M . , Ph.D.,

:DW ARD W. ANDERSON,

1 9 68 -, Vice Pm ide,,/ and Dean for Stlldent Life;

. B ., Cornell College, 1 9 57; M . A . , N o r t h western University, 1 9 6 1 ; P h . D., University of Oregon, 1 9 65.

of Sou t h e rn California, 1 9 70.

1 9 74-, Assistan t Professor of N u rsi"g ;

B. S . N., Medical College of Virginia, :ommonwea l t h University, 1 9 74 . Co " nselor,

PH iliP E. BEAL,

1 9 70-, lI"ociale Professor of Edll catio n;

B . A . , Pacific L u t h e ra n University, 1 962; M . E d . , Western - - '.1 s h ington State College, 1 969; Ed . D . , Un iversity o f Nebraska, ncoln, 1 97 5 .

O'CONNOR

BL UMHAG E N,

1 9 7 7 -,

of So c iol ogy ; B . A . , S t a n ford U n iv e rs i t y , 1 9 6 8; M . A . ,

P h D . , Washington University, S t . L o u i s , 1 9 7 1 , 1 9 7 4 .

ESTHER BRADFO RD,

1 9 7 2 - 74, 1 9 7 8- , Ins! rllclor of

Nlmi"�;

B . S N . , M . N . , University of Washington, 1 9 6 9, 1 9 7 1 .

K ATHARINE H . BRIAR,

1 9 7 6 - , Assista n t Professor of Socia l

B . A . , C o n necticut College for Women, 1 966; M . S . W., Col u m bia UniverSity, 1 968; 0.5. W . , University of C a l i forn ia, B e rkeley, 1 9 7 6. Welfare;

JAMES E . BRINK,

1 9 7 0-, Associate Professor of Mathemalics; A . B . , Hope College, 1 9 65; M . S . , P h . D . , Iowa S t a t e University, 1 967, 1 9 70.

WILLIAM A. BROC HTR UP,

1 9 7 5 · , IIssistant

Profmor 0/

Ed"cotiOlI; B . A . , Univers i t y of C a lifornia, Los A n geles , 1 962; M. A.,

California State University, Washington, 1 9 74.

1 9 70;

H. JOSEPH BR OEKER, JR.,

Ph.D.,

Uni versity

of

1 9 6 6 - 78, IIssocia!e Professor o f

Ph ysical Education: B. A., M.S., Washington S t a t e University, 1 965,

1967; PhD., University of Oregon, 1 9 75.

CAROL YN HENN ING BROWN,

of

1 9 7 7 -,

Assista,,!

Professor

B . A ., Seattle Pacific Wash ington S t a t e U n i versity, 1 9 7 0; Wash ington, 1978.

College, 1 964; M . A . , Ph . D., University of

CHRISTOPHER BROWNING,

1 9 74-, Assis!an t Professor of

II nthropology;

History; A . B ., Oberlin College, 1 967; M . A . , P h . D ., U n iversity o f

Wisconsin, Madison, 1 968, 1 9 75.

*ST ANtEY L. BRUE,

1 9 7 1-, IIssociate P rofess or of E co no m ics ; B . A . ,

A u g u s t a n a College, S i o u x N e braska, 1 9 7 1 .

F alls,

1 96 7;

Ph . D.,

U n i v e rsity o f

FAC U L TY

143


CHARLES E. BRUNN ER, 1 9 7 7-, Assislanl Professor of Busin", Admin islralion; B . A . , Pacific Lutheran U n i versity, 1 966; M , B . A . ,

Washington U n i v e r s i t y, 1 967.

P h D . , Un i v e rsity of Oregon, 1 9 67, 1 973,

*SAMUEL B.B. CAR LETON,

1 96 9-,

Associale Professor of

Moden, a n d Classical La"guages (Greek a n d Lalin); B , A . , Un i v e rsity of the

Sout h , 1 9 5 9; M . A " Johns Hopkins U n iversity of Texas, A u s t i n , 1 9 73,

JOHN T. CARLSON, Carleton College, Min neapolis, 1 9 76,

1 966;

ROY E. C ARL SON,

Ph.D.,

1 9 6 2 -,

Un iversity,

1 961;

Ph.D.,

U n iversity

of

M i n n esota,

Associale Professor of Physical Educalio,,;

B . 5 " University of Washington, 1 94 8; M . S . , Washington State Un iversi ty, 1 9 6 2 ,

MAR YIV A CA RPENTER,

1 9 7 4 - , Assislanl Professor of Nursing;

B .S . , Whi tworth College, 1 956; M , S "

CLARA L. CARPER, Wa s h i n g ton State Washington, 1 9 5 9 ,

1 9 7 2 -,

Syracuse Univ ers i t y, 1 960.

Assisla,,1 Professor of Nursi"g ; B , S , N.,

Universi ty,

DAVID P . DAHL,

1 9 6 9- , Associale Professo r of A;fusie; B . A . , Pacific Lutheran Un iversity, 1 960; Associateship, A m erica n G ui ld of Orga nists, 1 9 6 1 ; M . A . , U n iversity o f Wash i ngton, 1 962,

GARY S. DAIN ES,

Assislanl Professor of Biology; B . A .,

1 9 7 5 -,

WILLIAM M. CROOKS, 1 9 76-, Adj'H1cl Professor of Busi"ess Admin islralion; B . A . , Un iversity of Washington, 1 9 49; M . A . , George

1 9 5 7;

M.N.,

U n iv e r s i t y

of

1 9 78,

I"slruclo r of Com m u " icalion A rls; B . F . A . ,

M . F . A . , Un iversity of U t a h, 1975, 1 977.

CARROL E. DE BOWER,

1 9 6 4 - 6 8 , 1 9 70-, Associale Professor oj Educalion; B . S . , Midland College, 1 9 5 2; M . E d . , E d D . , University of

Nebraska, L incol n, 1 9 5 9, 1 9 64.

JUDD C. DOUG HTY,

1 9 7 7-,

Northeast Misso u ri State Teachers Un iversity of Was hing ton, 19 76,

Inslrue/or of N u rsi"g;

College,

1 9 68;

B.S., M,N.,

+ROBERT A. DU NN,

1 9 7 5 -,

U n i v e rsity of Oregon, 1 9 70, 1 9 7 4 . 1 9 64-,

LOLETA G. E S PESE TH,

B , S " M , S " Washing t on State Un iversi ty, 1 962, 1 9 6 4 .

KARL M. CHAUFF,

B.5" Nicholls State Un iversity, 1 9 7 1 ; M . S . , Washington U n iversity, S t , Lou is, 1 973; PhD., U n iversity of Iowa, 1 9 78.

KEN NETH E. CHRISTOPHERS ON,

1 9 5 8 -,

Professor of

Rcii8ion, C h a ir, Division of Humanilies; B . A . , A ug u stana College, Sioux

Falls, 1 946; B , Th . , L u t h e r Theological Semina ry, 1 9 50; PhD., Un iversity of M i n n esota, 1 9 7 2.

MARIE CH URNEY,

1 9 74-, Assislanl Professor of Educalion; B . A . ,

B . S . , Western Washingto n S t a t e College, 1 96 1 , 1 964; M , Ed . , E d . D . , University of Florida, 1 966, 1 970,

ROY W. CLARK,

1 9 7 8-,

Assislanl Professor of E"gi neering; B.S., St.

Lawrence Univers i ty, 1 9 7 3; M , S. , E ng . ScD., Colu m bia U n ivers i t y , 1 9 75, 1 978.

A NTHONY CL ARKE,

1 9 7 3 - 7 8 , Assisla nl Professor of Sociology and Educalio", Coordinalor of E l h n ic Siudies; B , A " M . E d ., U n i v e rsity of

O regon, 1 969, 1 9 71; P h . D., U n i versity of Nebraska, 1 9 73.

DIANE E. CO MSIA,

1 9 7 6 - 7 8 , I"slruclor of Malhema lics; B . A . E . ,

Pacific L u t h e ra n Universi ty, 1 9 74.

DOROTHY M. CONE,

1 96 1-,

DENNIS L. COX,

1 9 7 2 - , A rlisl in Residence; B . A . , Pacific L u t h e ra n Universi ty, 1 967; M . F . A . , Washington State U n iversity, 1 9 72. 1 9 7 5 -,

Assislanl Professor of Educalio,,; B , A "

Kansas Wesleyan College, 1 965; M . S . , P h , D " University o f Kansas, 1 968, 1 9 7 0 ,

MICHEL E A. CRAYTON,

1 965-,

1 9 7 7-, Assisl.,,1 Professor o f Biolo8Y;

B . S ., M . S " Un iversity of M i ssou ri, Kansas City, 1 9 67, 1 969; PhD" Oregon State Uni versi ty, 1 974,

Regency Professor,

1 9 7 1 - 72 :

Professor o f Polilical Science

1 95 5 - ,

1 944, 1 9 5 4 . Assislanl Professor of Music:

1 9 7 6-,

B . M . , Oberlin College, 1968; M . M., University o f Michigan, 1 9 7 4

LOUISE SAND FAYE,

1 9 6 9-, Associale Professor o f Moden, a m Ciassical Language> (Span ish); B . A . , M , A . , F l o r i d a St ate U n i v e rsity,

1 94 9, 1 95 1 ; PhD., University of North Carol i n a, 1 95 8 .

PHYLLIS E. FIE DLER,

1 976-,

Assislanl Professor of Psychology

B , A . , Knox College, 1 9 70; P h . D . , Un iversity of Washington, 1 9 76

ROBERT S. FISK,

1 9 68-,

Associale Professor of Malhem a l ics; B . S . ,

M . S . , P h D., U n iversity of Wyoming, 1 960, 1 962, 1 9 77,

M. JOSEPHINE FLETCHER,

1 9 6 3 -,

Professor of Educalion

B . S , N., North Park College, 1 960; M . S . , DePaul Universi t y, 1963 M , A ., Paci fic Lut heran U n i versity, 1 9 6 9; PhD., U n i v e rsity or Washi ngton, 1 9 7 1 .

SCOTT A. FREEMAN,

Assislanl Professor of Bus;""

1 9 7 5 -,

Adminislralion; B . A . , Hiram College, 1 967; M . B . A . , Wright Stat,

ROGER GARD,

1 9 74 - , Assisla ,lI Professor of Music; B . A . , L ut h er College, 1 962; M . M. , University of Wiscon s i n, Mil waukee, 1 9 7 2

ARTHUR GEE,

1 9 6 8- ,

Associale Professor o f Biology; B . S . , M . S .

P h . D . , Purd u e U n i versity, 1 962, 1 964, 1 970.

RALPH

D. GEHRKE, 1 9 75-. Professo r of Religion; B . A . , Northwestern College, 1 94 1 ; B . D . , Wisco n s i n Lutheran S e m i n a r y 1 944; P h D . , University of Chicago, 1 9 5 9 .

WILLIAM P. GI DDINGS,

1 9 6 2 - , Professor of Chem islry, B . A . D e P a u w U niversity, 1 9 54; A . M ., P h D . , H a r v a rd University, 1 9 56, 1959.

GORDON O . G I L B E RTSON, B . A ., Concordia College, Nort h western University, 1 94 2 .

F AC ULTY

B,A.,

B . S . E d " Ph . D " U niversity of Min nesota

RICHARD A. FARNER,

Music;

144

Assislanl Regislrar;

Concordia College, Moorhead, 1 9 4 2 .

Un iversity, 1 9 7 0; D. B . A . , Kent State U n iversity, 1 9 7 5 . Associale Professor of Nursitlg;

B . S . N ., M . E d ., University of M i n nesota, 1 956, 1 9 5 9 .

LI NDA S. C O X,

1 9 5 9-, Associale Professor of Arl; B . S . Youngstown U n iversity , 1 94 9; M . A ., N e w York University, 1955 _

DONALD R. FARM ER,

1 9 7 8 - , Assislanl Professor of Earlh Scien ces;

Regencb

1 9 7 8 - 7 9;

1 968; D . B . A " Texas Tech Un iversity, 1 972. Associale Professor of Physical Education;

Professor o f Religion,

B . A " Bethany College, 1 94 1 ; BD. , Augustan;, Semina ry, 1 9 4 5; M.A., U n iversity of C h icago, 1 9 58; PhD., Boston Uni ve rsity, 1 96 4 .

Professor,

GEO RG E R. ELWELL,

1 9 7 0-,

Assislanl Professor o f Busi "ess

Adminislralion; B. S., Oregon State Univ ersity, 1 963; M . B . A . , PhD.,

*DAVIS W. CARVEY, 1 9 7 1 -, Associale Professor of Busi".ss Adminislrali",,; B , B . A . , M . B . A . , Pacific L u t heran Unive rsity, 1965, *G AR Y A. CHASE,

M,A.,

Pacific Lutheran Universi ty, 1 955, 1 9 6 4 .

EMMET E . EKLUND,

BARBARA J. CARTER,

Associale Professor of Com m u n icalio"

1 9 62-,

A rls, D iree/or of I h e Office of Radio a nd Televisio" Services; B . A "

1 9 54-,

Associale Professor

Moorhead,

1 937;

0

M.M,


' W I L L I AM H. G I L B E RTSON,

DA VID L. HOFFMAN,

B . A . , U n iv e rs i t y of Puget Sound, 1 9 54; M . S . W . , Un iversity o f Was h i n g t o n , 1 9 5 6 .

1 9 7 5 -, Assist a n t Professor o f Mus ic: B . M ., N o r t h western U n i versity, 1 9 67; M . M . A., Yale U n iverSity School of Mu sic, 1 97 1 .

�ATRICIA A. GI L L E TT,

P A UL E . HOSETH,

Jocial

__

1 96 8 - , Associate Professor of

Welfa re;

1 9 7 7 -, Instructor of Nursing; A . D . N ., :)nondago Co m m u n ity College, Syracu se, 1 9 7 2; B . S . N . , Syracuse

�Universi ty,

1 9 74; M . P. H ., Un iversity of North C a ro l i n a , 1 9 7 7 .

F E RN A. G OUGH,

1 9 7 1 -, Assistant Professor o f Nursing;

D a k o t a S t a t e U n iversity, 1 9 6 7; E d . D . , U n ivers i t y of Oregon, 1 9 77.

B.S. N.,

1 9 5 8 - 6 0,

1 9 6 1 - , Professor of Religion;

'l . A . , St. Olaf College, 1 9 4 8; M . Di v . , L u t h e r Theological Semi na ry,

1 9 5 2; M . T h ., Princeton Theological Sem i n a ry, 1954; Ph . D., N e w

Y o r k U n i ve rs i ty, 1 966. 1 9 66-68,

1 9 7 0-. A.ssociate Professor of

-iistory, Chair, Divisio" of Social Sci,nces; B . A . , Concordia College, - Mo or head, 1 9 6 2 ; M . A . , E a stern New Mex ico Univers i t y , 1 9 6 3; P h . D., Texas Tech UniverS i t y , 1 9 7 3 .

"JA VID H. HANSEN,

1 9 7 4 -, Assistant Professor o f B iology; B . S ., )regon S t a t e University, 1 9 6 8; M . S . , U n ivers ity of U t ah, 19 70; 'h . D. , Unive r s i t y of California, I rvine, 1 9 7 4 .

MARL I S M. HANSON,

1 9 7 1 -, Instructor o f Eduwtion; B . S ., 'Jn iversity of Minnesota, 1 9 5 3; M . A . , Pacific L u t h eran U n iv e r s i t y,

'. 9 7 5 .

RNON R. HANSON,

1 9 7 0 -,

Assistant Professor of Social

B . A . , Pacific Lutheran U nivers i t y, 1 9 55; B . D. , L u t h e r Theological S e m i n a r y , 1 9 6 2; A . M . , U n i v e r s i t y of Ch icago, 1 9 70. Welfare;

JENNIS W. HANTHORN,

B . 5 ., _ iou t h west Misso u ri S t a t e Un iversity , 1 9 7 5; M . M . , Universi t y o f Wisco n s i n , M a dison, 1 9 77 .

f: D WARD R . H A R M IC,

1 9 7 7 - 7 8, Inst rllctor of Music;

1 9 7 1 -,

U n i v ersity,

ONALD C. HAUEI SEN,

Assistant Professor of Music;

1 9 62;

M. M.,

UniverSity of

1 9 7 7 -, Assi.lia"t Professor of Physics;

B . A . , College of Wooster, 1 967; Ph . D. , C o r n e l l Uni versi ty, 1 9 7 2 .

'VILL IAM D. HA U E I S EN,

1 9 7 7 -, A"istallt ['rofesso r o f BIIsilless

Idministratio,,; B . A . , C a pi t a l U n i versity, 1 966; M . Div., Lu theran

---r h eol ogical Seminary, Columbus , 1 9 70; M . A . , Ph . D. , O h io State U n i ver sity, 1 9 74, 1 9 7 7 . 1 9 7 3 -, Associate Professor of Enginccrillg;

: . S . E . E ., Purdue U n i versity, l i n o i s , U r b a n a , 1 9 6 2 , 1 96 8 . roacific L u theran Vash i n g t o n , 1 97 3 .

1 9 6 0;

M . S . , Ph . D . , U n i vers i t y o f

Professor of Philosophy,

1 9 6 4-,

Director,

Illtegrated 5t lldies Program; B . A . , M . Div., Concordia Seminary, S t .

University,

1 9 6 9;

'ERRY B. H E N D R I C KS, JR.,

M.A.,

1 9 7 3 - , Vice Preside n t - Filla"ce

&

Operatiolls; B . S . , Iowa S t a t e U n i v ers ity, 1 9 4 5; M . B . A . , U n iversi t y of Denver, 1 9 66; Certified A d m i n i s t rat ive M a nager, 1 9 73 .

OHN O. H ERZOG,

1 9 58, 1 96 2 .

LA URENCE D. HUE STIS,

1 9 6 7-,

Professor o f Mathematics, Chair,

livisioll of Natural 5cifllCfs; B . A . , Concordia College, Moorhead, 1 9 5 7;

P h . D . , U n i v e rs i t y of Nebraska, 1 9 5 9, 1 96 3 .

D. SHARON HI LL,

1 9 7 6 - 7 8 , Assista"t Professor of Edllention; B . A ., ,rizona S t a t e Un iversity, 1 966; M . S . , Sou t h e rn Illinois U n iversity, :arbondale, 1 970.

L VIN ARLAN HINCHEE,

1 9 7 7 - 7 8,

Assistant Professor of

Biology; A . B . , California State Univers i t y a t Ch ico, 1 9 6 4; P h . D . ,

I n iversity o f Washington, 1 9 7 6 .

B . S .,

1 9 6 1 - , Professor of Chem istry,

U n i versi t y of Cali fornia, Berkeley, 1 9 5 6; Ph. D., U n i v ersity of Cal ifornia, Davis, 1 9 6 0 .

WILLIAM R. HUTCH EON, JR., Business

Administratio",

Director,

Human

1 9 6 7 -, Adjunct Professor of

Rdations

B.S.,

Progra m ;

U n i v e r s i t y of Rhode Island, 1 9 5 3; M . B . A . , Ph . D . , Uni versity of Washin gton, 1 9 63, 1 9 6 9 .

PAUL O. I N G RAM,

1 9 7 5-, Associat, Professor of Religio,,; B . A., Chapman College, 1 9 6 1 ; Th . M . , School of Theology a t C l a r e m o n t, 1 9 64; P· h . D . , C l a r e m o n t G ra d u a t e School, 1 9 68.

MA RGARET

IRWIN-BRANDON,

1 9 7 6-78,

Assist""t

Professor of Mllsic: B. A . , Pacific Lutheran University, 1 9 6 0; M . M.,

N e w England Conserva tory, Boston, 1 9 6 5 .

LOIS E . JACOBSON,

B . S .,

1 9 6 6 -, Assista n t Professor of Nursing;

M . S . N . , University of Washington, 1 9 59, 1 9 6 9 .

J O A N N S. J ENSEN, Pacific Lu theran

A . B . , M . A., University of

1 9 6 7 -, Professor of Biology;

Uni versity,

1 9 5 4,

1 9 7 7;

M.A.,

Southern Cali fornia, 1 9 5 7; PhD., Iowa S ta t e University, 1 9 6 1 .

ROBERT J. J E N SEN,

1 9 6 8 -, Assistallt Professor of EcorlO",ics;

B.A.,

D a n a C o llege, 1 964; M . A ., U n iverSity of N e b r a s k a , 1 96 7 .

RI CHARD J . J O B ST,

1 9 6 7-,

Associate Professo r of Sociology,

Associate Dirrctor, Huma" Rel"tioll' Program; B . A . , Univers i t y of San

Francisco, 1 964; M . A . , Un iversity of C a lifornia, Davis, 1 96 7. 1 9 7 0-, Associale Professor of History;

B . A . , H a m l i n e Univer sity, 1 96 1; M . A ., Sta nford Universi t y , 1963; Ph.D., University of K a n sas, 1 97 2 .

EDITH E. JOHNSON, B . S . N ., University of

1 9 7 3 -, Assistant Professor of Nursing;

__

"-!VI . A .,

Associate Professor of

U n i v e rsity of I l l i n ois, C h icago, 1 9 6 9 .

C U R T I S E . H UBER,

DA VID W. JOHN SON,

10B E R T G. HE EREN,

LUELLA V. HEFTY,

1 9 7 1-,

Louis, 1 9 5 0, 1 9 5 3 ; M . A . , P h . D . , U n iversity of Wiscon s i n , M a d i so n ,

l A M E S A. HALSETH,

I . A . , Pacific Lu theran \rizona, 1 9 69.

THELMA M. HOSTETTER,

Nursing; B . S . N., U n i v e r s i t y of C a l ifornia, Berkeley, 1 9 5 7; M . S . N . ,

Wheaton College, 1 9 56; M . N . , Un iversity o f Washi ng ton, 1 9 6 1 .

, T E W A R T D. G OVIG,

1 9 6 8 - , Associate Professor of Health alld Physical

Edllcation; B . A . , Concord i a College, Moorhead, 1 966; M . S ., S o u t h

1 9 74-,

Assista"t Profe5sor of Nursing;

B . S . N ., University of Pennsy lvania, 1 9 5 1 ; M . A . , Teachers College, C o l u m bia U n iversity, 1 9 59.

L U C I L L E M. JOHNSON,

1 9 5 3 -, Professor of English; B . A ., Concord i a College, Moorhead, 1 9 4 0; M . A., Wash ington S t a t e Uni versity, 1 9 43; E d . D . , U n i v e r s i t y of M o n t ana, 1 9 6 7 .

*KEN NETH A. JOHNSTON,

1 96 4 - ,

Professor of Educatio",

B . A . , Western Washington S t a t e College, 1 9 4 7; M.A., S t a n f ord U n i v ersity, 1 9 53; Ed.D., Wash ington State U n i v e r s i t y , 1 9 6 4 . Oeall of the School of Educa tioll;

RICHAR D P. JON ES, Harvard U n iv e rs i t y, Massac h u s e t ts , 1 96 9 .

B . A., University of

1 9 6 9-, Assista,,1 Professor of English;

1 9 64;

M . A .,

RICHARD P. JUNG KUN TZ,

M . F . A ., 1 9 7 0 -,

Professor of Religio",

B . A . , Northwestern College, 1 939; B . D . , Wisconsin Lu theran Seminary, 1 94 2; M . A . , Ph . D. , Unive r S i t y of Wisco n s i n, Mad ison, 1 95 5, 1 9 6 1 ,

Provost;

FAC U L TY

145


KA THRYN J. K EL L ER,

1 9 7 7- 7 8, Ills/ruc/or of English; B . A . , M . A . , U ni v e r s i t y o f Puget Sound, 1 972, 1 97 4 .

DA V I D T. K E YE S,

Associale Professor of A r/; B . F . A.,

J 96 9-,

J O H N L. M A I N,

1 9 7 1 -, Associale Professor of Biology; B . S . E d . ,

M . S . E d . , C h a d ro n S t a te College, 1 965, 1 9 66; P h . D . , U n i versi ty o f W a s hi n g t o n , 1 9 70.

U n i v e r s i t y of A rizona, 1 964; M . A . , Ohio State Univers i ty, 1 96 6 .

D E N N I S J . MARTIN,

G U N D A R J. K I NG,

I l l i nois S t a t e University, 1 969; M . S . , U n i ve r s i t y o f N e w Mex ico,

1 9 6 0-, Prof"ssor o f Bus illess Adminislralion,

1 9 7 5 -, /I"is l a n l Professor of Biology; B . S . ,

Dean of t h e School of Business AdminiSlralion; B . B . A ., U n i versi t y of

1 9 7 1 ; P h . D., U t a h S t a t e U n ivers i t y, 1 97 5 .

O regon, 1 9 56; M . B. A . , P h . D . , S t a nford U n ive rsity, 1 9 5 8, 1 964.

D E N N I S M. MARTIN,

* L A R S E . KITTL E S O N,

E d i n bo r o S t a t e College,

1 9 5 6-, Associale Profmor of A rl; B . S . ,

1 9 7 6-, A»islOl,I ProFessor of English; B . S . ,

1 9 64; M . A . , P u r d u e U n iv e r s i t y , 1 9 6 6;

U n i v e r s i t y of Wisco nsin, M i l wau kee, 1 9 50; M . A. , U ni v e r s i t y o f

P h . D . , University of California, Los Angeles, 1 9 73.

Wisco n s i n ,

ARTHUR D.

Madison,

1 95 1 ;

M . F.A.,

University

of

Sou thern

California, 1 95 5 .

Hislory;

* R A YMOND A . K L OPSCH,

1 9 5 3 -, Profmor o f English; B . S . ,

B.A.,

M A R T I N SO N,

Pacific

C EL E S T I N E B. M A S O N ,

I l l i n ois, Urbana, 1 9 50, 1 9 62.

B . 5 . N .,

M . S . , Jui/liard

1 9 5 9 -, Associale Professor of Mllsic; B . S . ,

School o f M usic,

1 94 9,

1 950;

Ed . D . , Teachers

Coll ege, C o l u m b i a University, 1 9 73.

J E N S W. K N UDSEN, 1 9 7 3 - 7 4;

A5Sociale Professor of

1 9 57;

M.A.,

Ph . D . ,

Wash i ngton S t a t e U ni v e r s i t y, 1 9 6 1 , 1 966.

Ill inois I n s t i t u t e of Technology, 1 9 4 9; M . A . , Ph . D . , U n i v e r s i t y o f

CAL V I N H . K N A PP,

1 9{) 6 - ,

L u t h e r a n U ni v e r s i t y ,

Cat holic

U n i versity

1 9 7 3 -, Assis/anl Professor of Nursing;

of

Ame rica,

1 9 5 8;

M . A.,

Pacific

L u t h era n U niversity, 1 976.

M A R J O R I E I. MATH E R S,

1 9 6 4 - 6 6 , 1 9 6 8-, Associale Professor

of Educalion; B . A , M . A ., C e n t ra l Was h i ng t o n State College, 1 9 53,

1 9 5 7- , Professo r of Biology, Regency ProFessor,

B . A . , Paci fic Lu t h e r a n U n iversity, 1 9 5 2; M . S., P h . D . ,

1 9 6 1 ; M . A . , Pacific L u t he r a n Un iversity, 1 9 74.

D I X I E MATTHIAS,

1 9 75-, Inslrurior of Biology; B . S . , Pacific

U n i v e rs i t y of S o u t h e r n California, 1 954, 1 9 5 7 .

L u t h e r a n U n i v ersity, 1 962; M . S . , U n i v e r s i t y of W a s h i n g t on, 1 96 5 .

DA V I D R. K NUTSON,

F R A N K L I N L. MCC ARTHY,

1 9 6 9 -, Assislanl Professor of Religion;

1 9 7 5 -, Associale Professor of

B. A . , Pacific L u t h e ra n U n i ve rs i t y, 1 958; B . D . , L u t her Theological

Busi ness A d m i nislralion; A B . , Hope College, 1 959; M . B . A ., U n i versity

S e m i n a ry, 1 962;

of C h icago, 1 962; Ph . D ., U niversity of Mi nnesota, 1971; M . B . A . ,_

M . A . , U n i v e rs i t y of C h icago D i v i n i t y School,

1 96 6 .

Golden Gate U n i versity, Seatt le, 1 9 77; C . P. A . , S t a t e of Idaho.

J E R R Y KRAC HT,

1 9 6 7 - 6 8.

1 9 6 9 -, Associale Professor of Music;

B . M . , M . A., M . F . A , D . M . A . , University of Iowa, Iowa City, 1 9 6 3, 1 965, 1 967, 1 97 4 .

MAUREEN Educa l ion;

E.

B . F . A.,

M C G I LL,

U n iversity

of

1 9 7 7-, Inslruc/or of Physical U t a h , 1 974; M . A . , We stern

Washington State College, 1 977.

J O H N O. L A R S G A A R D,

1 9 7 0 · , Assisla n l Professor o f Psychology;

B . A . , Pacific L u t h eran U n iv e rs i t y, 1 944; B . T h . , L u t h e r Theological S e m i n a ry, 1 94 7; S .T . M . , Pacific S c h ool o f Religion, 1 965; Ph . D ., University o f Was h i ngton, 1 9 7 1 .

* A N THONY J . LAUER,

R I C H A R D MC G I N N I S, B.S.,

Pacific

L u t h e ra n

University,

1 963;

1 9 7 1 - , Associale Professor of Ph i/osophy; B.A .. College of Wooster, 1 964; B . D., Yale U n i versity, 1 967; Ph . D .,­

Vanderbilt U n i v e r s i t y, 1 97 1 .

L A W R E N C E J . M EY E R,

1 9 73 - , Assislalll Professor of Nll rsing; A A . ,

1 9 6 9 - , Professor of Music; B . A . , E d . D .

U n iv e r s i t y o f N o r t h e r n Colorado, 1 9 54, 1 9 64; M . M . , University 01

Stephens College, 1 9 45; B . S . , U n i versi t y of C h icago, 1 9 47; B . S . N . ,

O regon, 1 9 5 5 .

Jo h n s Hopkins University, W a s h i n g t o n , 1 9 59, 1 9 72.

N. C H R I STIAN M E YER, JR.,

Chem iSlry;

R.

A. B.,

1 9 50;

LA YMAN,

Occ idental

M . A.,

Ph.D.,

U n iversity o f

Mal hemalics; B . A 1 9 74-,

College,

A5sis/anl

1 970;

Profe,sor

Ph . D. ,

of

Indiana

Un iversi ty, 1 9 7 4 .

J ER O M E P. L E J E U NE, B.A.,

Gon zaga

U n iversity,

1 9 72-, Assislanl Professor of Psycholo�y;

1 96 4 ;

M . A.,

Ph.D.,

U n iversity o f

1 9 65; P h . D., North w este rn U niversity, 1 973. 1 9 70-, Associale Profmor of Malhemalics;

B . A . , Conco rd i a College, Moorhead, 1 955; M . A , U n i v e r s i t y of Neb raska, 1 9 5 7 .

BRIAN E. L O WES,

1 9 6 8 - , Associale Professor of Earlh Sciellces; B . S . ,

M A R L E N F . M I L L ER, GARY

L.

M I N E TTI,

1 9 7 0-,

DireClor of Cou llse/illg and Health

.•

Un iversity 0<

Assislanl

Srrvices;

Professor of Educa l i o n

B . S . , W a s h i n g to n S t a t ,

U ni v e r S i t y of W a s h i n gton, 1 976.

R I C H A R D D . M O E,

1 9 6 5 -, Professo r of Educalion, Dean of Graduale

and Sum mer SIudies, Dean of Ih, Schoo/ of Fine A rls; B . A . , Concordi.

College, Moorhead, 1 95 1 ; M . Ed., Ed . D . , U n iversity o f Coloradc 1 9 5 3 , 1 962.

JOHN N. M O RI TSUG U, B . A .,

U n i v e r s i t y of

Hawaii,

U n iv e r s i t y of Wa s h ington, 1 97 2 .

J E S S I C A D . MYRABO,

G E N E C . LUNDG A A RD,

1 9 5 8-, Assislanl Professor of Physical

Educalion; B . Ed., Pacific L u t h eran University, 1 9 5 1 ; M . S . , University

1 9 75- , Assisla n/ Professor of Psychology;

1 9 71;

M . A . , P h . D . , U ni v e r s i t y c

1 9 7 5 - 78, Inslrllc/or of Nursing; B . S . N ., ­

Un ivers i t y of M a r y l a n d , WRAIN E x t e n s i o n , 1 9 70.

* G U N N U L F M Y R B O,

1 9 7 0-, Assislanl Professor of Philosop h !

B . A ., Un ivers i t y o f B ri t i s h C o l u m bia, 1 962; Ph . D . , U n iversity c C a m b ridge, England, 1 9 72.

F A C U LTY

Ph.D

1 9 70-, Professor of Economics; B . S. , M . S .,

Rochester, 1 974, 1 977.

146

.•

Oregon, 1 9 67, 1 9 70.

Un iversity o f London, 1 9 5 7; M . S., Queens U n i versity, 1 963; Ph . D .,

of W a s h i n g ton, 1 9 6 4 .

1 9 7 0-, Associal( Professor of

Reed College. 1 966; M . A

U n i v e rsity, 1 9 6 0; M . A . , Pacific L u t h e r a n 'U n i versity, 1 9 6 7; P h . D . 1 9 7 3 - , Associale Professor of B iology; B . A .,

L u t h e r College, 1 963; M . S . , U n i versity of Wisco n s i n , M a dison,

* P A U L B. L I E B E LT,

.•

Ph . D., U n i v e r s i t y of M i n nesota, 1 962, 1 965, 1 967.

Victo ria, 1 9 70, 1 9 7 4 .

J E RROLD L E R U M,

U niversity of

PAUL T. M E NZEL,

1 9 6 9-. Assislanl Professor of Busin'"

Pacific L u t h e ra n U n i versi ty, 1 9 69.

LAWRENCE

Ph.D.,

­

S o u t h e r n Cali fornia, 1 9 74.

A d m illislralioll; J . D . , Loyola U n i ve r s i t y, Los Angeles, 1 9 5 5; M . B . A . ,

C OR A L A W R E NC E,

1 9 72-, Associale Professor of BioIogy;


C H A R L E S T. N E L S O N,

1 9 6 7-, Regislrar; B . S . , Dakota State

B U RT O N L. N E S SET,

JOHN E. PE TERS E N,

1 9 6 7-, Associale Professor of Chemislry;

1 962.

-

1 94 7 - 5 1,

1 9 5 3 -, Assislanl Professor of

+CHARLES

A.

P E T E R SON,

1 9 5 9-.

Professor of Business

English. Assis lanl 10 I h e Presidml; B . A . , S t . Olaf Coll ege, 1 937; C a n d o

Admi" islrntiorl; B . 5 . ,

T h e o ! . , L u t h e r Theological Semina ry, 1 9 4 2; M . A . , U ni v e rsi t y o f M i n n esota, 1 9 4 7 .

U n i versity of Tennessee, 1 952; P h . D . , U n iversity o f M i n nesota,

H A R V E Y J. N E U F EL D,

GARY D. PETE R S O N,

1 96 5 -, Execulive Dimlor of Th e Colleg ium;

B . A . , Paci fic L u t h e r a n U n iversity, 1 954; M . D i v . , Luther S e m i nary, 1 957;

C e r t i f i c a t e o f G ra d u a t e S t udies,

Vancouver

School of Theology, 1 9 7 4 .

JESSE D. N O L PH,

Kansas S t a t e Tea c h e rs College, 1 95 1 ; M . S . ,

1 966; C . P . A . , State o f W a s h i n g t o n . 1 9 6 7-, Associate Professor of Mathemalics;

B . S . , Iowa S t ate University, 1 960; M . S . , Western Washington S t a t e College, 1 9 6 7; P h . D . , Uni versity of Kansas, 1 973.

*WALTER E. P I L G RIM,

1 9 7 1 -. Associale Professor of Religio",

1 9 6 8-, Associale Professor of Psychology; B . A . ,

Direclor of Lutheran Instilule of Theological Educalion; B . A . , W a r t burg

George Wash i ng t on U n i v e r s i t y , 1 964; Ph . D. , C o rnell U n ivers i t y,

College, 1 9 5 6; B . D. , Wartburg Theological S e m i n a ry, 1 9 6 0; Th . M . , Ph . D., Princeton Theological Semin ary, 1 9 6 6, 1 9 7 1 .

1971.

J O N J . N O R D B Y,

1 9 7 7-, Assisla n ! Professor of Ph ilosophy; B . A . , S t .

O l a f College, 1 9 7 0; M . A . , P h . D . , U n i versity o f Massac h u setts, _ 1 9 75, 1 977.

B A R B A R A POULSHO CK,

1 9 5 5 -, Associale Professor o f Com m u n icalion

1 9 76-. Instruclor of Music; B . M . ,

Pacific L u t heran University, 1 9 77.

J A M E S R. P R E D M O R E,

E R I C NORDHOLM,

_.

1 9 6 7 -. Associate Professor of Religion; B . A .,

5 1 . O l a f College, 1 958; B . D. , Lu ther Theological Seminary, 1 9 6 3; M . A . , P h . D . , New York U n i versity, 1 965, 1970.

M I LTON L . N E S V IG,

Saskatoon,

-

1 9 5 6 - . Associate Professo r o f Education;

B . A . , B . E d . , M . A ., Pacific Lutheran U n i versity, 1 94 9, 1 9 5 3, 1956.

B . A . , S t . O l a f Col lege, 1 9 5 7; M. S., P h . D . , Purdue U n iversity, 1 9 6 0,

_

A RN E K . P E D ER S O N,

College, 1 9 6 3; M . A . , Adams S t a t e Coll ege, 1964.

1 9 7 7 -. Assisla"t Professor of Modern and

Classical La"guages (Spanish); B. A . , S w a r t hmore Co'iIege, 1 9 6 7; M . A .,

A rls: B . F . A . , Art I n s t i t u t e of Ch icago, 1 9 5 1 .

Middlebury College, 1 9 6 9; P h . D . , University of W a s h i n g to n , 1 977.

*PHILIP A. N O R D Q U I ST,

J A N E T E. R A S M U SSEN,

1 9 6 3 -, Professor of Hislory; B . A . ,

Pac ific L u t heran U niversity, 1 9 5 6;

M . A . , Ph . D., U n iversity o f

Classical

L"" guages

1 9 7 7-. Assislant Professor of Modern

(Norwegia n );

B . A.,

1 95 9- 6 1 , 1 9 6 5-, Associale Professor of

Physics; B . A., Concordia Col lege, Moorhead, 1 9 5 1 ; M . A . , U nivers ity

P A UL M . R E I G S TAD,

1 9 4 7 - 4 8.

U n i v e rs i t y o f New M e x ico, 1 956, 1 95 8 .

W. D W I G H T O B E R H OL TZER,

KARL

R.

Education;

B.S.,

A. B.,

1 96 9 -, Associale Professor of

W i t t e n berg U n iversity, 1 9 6 1 ; M . Div., L u t h e ra n

School of Theology a t Chi cago, 1 965; P h . D . , G r a d u a t e Theological Union, Berkeley, 1 96 9 .

R I C H A R D E. O' D O R,

III. i nois,

1 9 7 7 -, Inslruclor o f Comm u n icalion Arls;

1 95 8 - . Professor of English.

Regency Professor. 1 9 7 7 - 7 8; B . A., St. Olaf College, 1 9 4 3; M . A . , Ph. D.,

o f North Dakota, 1 956; P h . D . , Was h i ng t on S t a te U n ivers i t y, 1 965. _

Sociology:

U n i vers i t y of

Urbana, 1 9 70; A . M ., P h . D . , Harvard U n iversity, 1 9 7 2, 1 975.

W a s h i n g t on , 1 960, 1 9 6 4 .

S H E R M A N B. N O R N E S ,

a rId

R I C K ABAUG H , Mon tana

State

1 9 75-.

Assist"nt

Professor

Un iver s i t y, 1 9 6 3; M . S . ,

of

Ph . D .,

Un iversity o f Utah, 1 9 70, 1 9 75.

D A VID P. R O B B I NS,

1 9 6 9-. A ssociale Professor of Music; B . M .,

M . M . , U n iverSity of Mic higan, 1 968, 1 969.

B . A . , M . A . , Unive rsity of Missou ri, K a n s as C i t y, 1 975, 1 976.

J E A N IETTE R O E D I G E R ,

SARA A. OFFI CER,

B . S . N ., Seattle U n i v e r s i t y , 1 965; M . N . , U n i v ersity of Washington,

1 9 6 7 -, Associale Prof"sor of Physical Educalion;

B . S ., Orego n S t a t e Unive rsity , 1 9 5 8; M . S . , I n d i a n a Univers i t y, - 1 965.

DA VID M . OLSON,

1 968-, Professo r of Physical Educalion, Direclor

1971.

G E O R G E R O SKOS, MORDECHAI

College, Moorhead, 1 9 5 6; M . A . , Un iversity o f Minne sota, 1 9 5 7;

Hislory;

1 9 7 1 - , Associale Professor of Eduwlion;

B . S . , U n i versity o f S o u t h Dakota, 1 958; M. S., Oregon S t a te U n iversity, 1 9 6 4 ; E d . D ., U n i versity of Nebraska, L i n c o l n , 1 97 1 .

N. O L SON,

1 9 6 7-,

Associate

Professor o f Nursing;

Adm illislration;

B . A.,

Univers i t y

1 9 75 -,

of

Adjunct Professor of Busi ness

W a s h i ngton,

1970;

M.B.A.,

Pacific L u t heran University, 1 9 7 4 .

PH Y L L I S

A.

PAGE,

1 9 76-,

IlIslructor

of

Nursing;

B . S . N .,

U n iversi t y of M a r y l a n d , 1 9 7 1 ; M . N . , University of W a s h i ngton, 1 9 77.

_'WILLI A M

E.

P A R K E R,

1 9 7 0-,

Associale

Professor

of

Communication A rls; B . 5 . , M e m p h i s S t a t e Un iversity, 1 966; M . 5 . , Ph . D ., Southern Illinois U niversi t y, Carbondale, 1968, 1 9 7 4 .

BE V E R L Y J . P A Y N E,

ROZANSKI,

M c G i ll

U n ivers i t y,

ELDON L. S C H A F E R, B . 5 .,

M . A . , Ph . D.,

1 9 7 6 -,

1 9 68;

Assislant

Ph.D.,

Professor

University

of

of

1 9 7 4 - , Professor o f Business Administration;

University o f Nebraska,

1 953,

1 9 5 7, 1 9 63;

C . P . A . , S t a t e of Nebraska.

J O H A N N E S A . SCHI LLER, Social Welfare. Regency Professor.

B . S . N., M . N . , U n iversity o f Was h i n g t o n , 1 9 59, 1 9 6 4 .

M I C H A E L P . O' N E I LL,

B . A.,

Pennsylvania, 1 9 7 4 .

-Ph . D ., U n i v e r s i t y of Iowa, 1 9 66.

-+ L I N DA

1 9 5 0-. Associate Professor of Arl; B . 5 . Art

Ed., Youngstown U n i versit y , 1 94 9; M . A . , Uni versity o f Iowa, 1 9 5 0 .

of Ihe School of Physical Education, Al hletic Direclor; B . A . , Concordia

* F R A N K L I N C. O L SON,

1 9 7 5-. Assistanl Prof,;sor of Nursi"g;

1 9 5 8 -, Professor of Sociology a rI d

1 9 7 6- 7 7; B . A . , C a p i t a l U n iversi t y,

1 9 4 5; C a n d o Theo ! . , E v a n gelical L ut h eran Theological S e m i n a ry, 1 9 47; M . A ., Univers i t y of Missou ri, K a nsas City, 1 9 5 9; P h . D ., U n i vers i t y of Washington, 1967.

C A R OL YN

W.

SC HULTZ,

1 9 74-,

Assist",,1

Professor

of

Nu rsing; B . S . N . , Univers i t y of I l l inois, 1968; M . A . , Pacific L u t h e ra n

University, 1 9 7 4 .

E R NST C.

S C H W I D DER,

1 96 7-,

Professo r of A rt;

B.A.,

M . F . A . , U nivers i t y o f Washington, 1 9 5 3, 1 9 5 5 .

1 9 7 5 - , Assislant Professor of Modern and

:lassi(01 Langu ages (French); B . A . , M . A . , University o f Washington,

1 963, 1966.

-

F A C ULTY

147


DA VID O. SE AL,

1 9 7 7-, Assislanl Professor of English; B . A . , S t . Olaf College, 1 968; A . M. , P h D . , University o f Chicago, 1 969,

R O G E R SUNDBE RG,

1 9 7 5 - 7 8 , Assisl a n l Professor of Modern and

Classical Languages INorwegian); B.A., S t . Olaf College, 1 9 64; M . A.,

U n i v e r s i t y o f Washington, 1 97 3 .

1 977.

RICHARD S E E G E R,

D imlor.

1 9 7 3 -,

Academic Advising and

Assislance; B . A . , M . A . , P h D " Universi t y of Washington, 1 9 66, 1 9 68, 1 97 4 .

S. E RVING S E VERTSON,

1 9 6 6-, Professor o f Psychology; B . A . , Pacific Lutheran Univers i t y, 1 9 55; B D . , L u t h er Theological S e m i n a ry, 1 9 59; M . A . , Univers i t y of Wyoming, 1 9 6 0; P h D . , U n ivers i t y of U t a h , 1 9 66; D i p l o m a t e i n C l i n i c a l Psychology, American Board of Professional Psychology, 1 9 7 7 .

MAURICE H. SKONES,

1 9 6 4 - , Professor of Mlisic, D irerlor of

*DUANE D. SWANK,

MARVIN S WENSON, Campus Aclivilies;

Univers i t y o f University, 1 9 7 2 .

RODNEY N. SWEN SON, M.A., PhD"

KWONG-TIN TANG,

SM ITH,

Inslruclor of

1 9 7 1 -,

Educalion;

B . A .,

Pacific

DALE E . SODEN,

UniverSi t y of M i n n esota, 1 9 5 6, 1 9 6 7 .

1nslruclor of Hislory; B . A . , Pacific

L uthe ran Un ivers i t y, 1 9 73; M . A., U n i ve r s i ty of Washington, 1 97 6 .

CARL D. SPANG L E R,

1 9 6 1 - 6 2,

1 9 6 3 - , Associale Professor of

1 9 6 7-, Professor of Physics;

UniverSity of Washing ton, Un iversity, 1 96 5 .

JON THIE MAN,

1 9 7 7 - 7 8,

1 9 6 8 -, Associale Professor of Modern

and Cla»ica l Languages (Germalll; B . A . , Bemidji S tate College, 1 95 2;

Montana S t a t e U n iversity, 1 9 57; D. M . A . , Univ e r s i t y of A rizona, Tucson, 1 976. L u t h e ran U n i versity, 1 96 4 .

1 9 6 9 -, Direc/or o f Ihe University Cenler and

B . S . , Montana S t ate Un ivers i t y , 1 95 0; M . S . , M i nneso ta, 1 9 54; E d . D . , Washing ton State

Choral Mllsie; B . A . , Concordia College, Moorhead, 1 948; M . M. E d . ,

JUDY

1 9 7 0 -, Associale Prof",or of Chem islry;

B . S . , Washin gton State University, 1 9 6 4 ; PhD., Montana State University, 1 9 6 9 .

1 95 8 ,

1 9 7 7 - 7 8, IlIslruclor of Physical Educa lion;

F R E D E RICK L TOBIASON,

1 9 6 6 -,

Ph . D., Michigan Stat e University, 1 96 3 .

WALTER L TOMSIC,

B . A . , M . A. , U n i.v ersity of A rizona, 1 963, 1 9 68; Ph. D., University of Wa s h i ngton, 1 9 7 7 .

Science;

CHRI STOPHE R H. SPICER,

1 9 7 8 -,

Assislanl Professor of

THOMAS N. TORRENS,

1 9 7 4 - , Arlisl in Resid,' nce; B . 5 . , I n d i a n a S t a t e Uni vers i t y, 1 97 1 ; M . F . A . , Washington Uni versity,

1 974.

AUDUN T. TO VEN,

B . A. , Dic ki nson S tate College, 1 9 37; M . A . , U n iversity of Montana, 1 952; Ed. D., Montana S tate Universi ty, 1 9 6 1 .

JOAN

D.

S T I G G E L BOUT,

B . S . N. , Wagner Washington, 1 9 7 2 .

College,

N u rsing;

1 9 73-,

1 954;

Assisla n l

M.N.,

Professor

University

of

of

1 9 6 7-, Associale Professor o f Moden, and

Classical Langllages (Norwegian); B . A . , U n ive rsity of Oslo, 1 964; M . A . ,

U n iv e r S i ty o f Washington, 1 96 7 .

ANN K. TREMAINE,

1 9 7 2 - , Assis lanl Profrssor of Music; B . M . , U n iversi t y of Oregon, 1 9 5 1 ; M . M ., U n iversity o f Was hin g ton,

1 974.

A N D R E W L TURNER,

ROBERT L STIV E R S,

B.A., Yale Universi t y , 1 9 6 2; M . Di v . , Union Theological Seminary, New York, 1 9 69; PhD., Colum bia Univ ersity, 1 97 3 . 1 9 7 3 - , Associale Professor o f Religion;

GERALD R. STOF FER,

1 9 7 3 - , Assisla nl Professor of Psychology;

1 9 76 - , Assisl a n l Professor of Business

Adm illisl ralion; B . B . A . , Pacific L u t h e ra n U n iversity, 1 9 7 3 .

PAUL W . ULBRICHT,

1 9 6 7 -,

1965.

M. JAMES VAN BEEK,

FRANC E S J . STORLIE,

DANIEL E. VAN TASSEL,

1 9 7 7 -, Associale Prefessor of Nursing;

J E R E M Y STR I N G E R,

1 9 7 3 -, Associale Dean for Siudeni Life and

B . A ., S o u t he rn M e t h odist U n iv e r s ity, 1 9 66; M . S ., P h D . , University of Wisconsin, Mad ison, 1 9 68, 1 9 7 3 .

Dimlor for Reside nlial Life;

M I LE S E . STRUXNESS,

1 9 7 7- 7 8, Inslruclor o f Arl, B . A . , University o f Redlands, 1 973; M . F . A . , University o f Puget Sound,

1 97 5 .

DORIS G. STUCKE,

1 9 6 7-, Professor o f Nursing, Direclor of I h e

School of Nursing; B . S . , America n U n iversi ty, 1 94 9; M . E d . , Univers i t y

o f M i n n esota, 1 95 6; University, 1 9 6 7 .

Ed.D.,

DA VID P. SUDERMANN,

Teachers

Coll ege,

Colu mbia

1 9 7 3 -, Assislanl Professor o f Modem

P h . D., University of Chicago, 1 967, 1 9 7 3 .

F AC UL T Y

1 9 6 3-, Dimlor of Adm issions;

B . A . E .,

M.A., Pacific Lu theran Un iversity, 1 960, 1 969. 1 9 7 0 - , Associale Professor of English;

B . A ., S t . Olaf College, 1 96 2; M . A . , P h . D . , U n iv e rs i t y o f Iowa, 1 96 4 , 1 9 70.

*DA VID L VINJE,

1 9 7 0 - , Associale Professor of Economics; B . S . , N o r t h Dakota S t ate U n iversity, 1 962; M . S . , P h . D. , U n iversity o f Wisconsin, 1 9 6 4 , 1 9 7 0 .

GEORGE F. WALTER,

1 9 7 0 -, Assisla,, 1 Professor o f A n l h ropology;

B . A . , M . A ., Ohio State U niversity, 1 967, 1 970. + ANN

H.

Adminislralion;

WALTON,

1 9 7 7 -,

Assisla n l

Professor of Busilless

B . A . , M . B . A ., Pacific Lu theran University, 1 9 69,

1 9 73.

P A UL M. WE BSTER,

1 9 6 9 -,

Assislanl Professor of Moderll and

Classical Langllages IGmnan); B . A ., M . A . , Universi ty of C a l i fornia, Los

and Classical Languages IGerman); A. B . , Indiana University, 1 9 65; A. M . ,

148

Associale Professor of Polilical ­

Science; B . A . , M . A ., PhD., U n iversity of Wa s h i ngton, 1 959, 1 960,

B . S ., Washington State University, 1 969; M . A . , P h D . , Un iversity of Montana, 1 97 1 , 1 97 3 . B . S . N., M . S . N ., U n iversity of Oregon, 1 964, 1 9 67; P h D . , Portland State University, 1 9 7 6 .

-

1 9 67.

U n iverSi ty of Texas, 1 9 75, 1 9 7 8 . 1 9 6 1 -, Professor of Educalion;

Professor of Chemisl ry,

1 9 7 0 -, Associale Professor of A rl; B . S . E . , A r k a n sas S t a t e University, 1 9 6 5; M . F . A . , Un iversity o f Colorado,

Co m m l",icalion A rls; B . A . , University of Virginia, 1 970; M . A . , Ph . D . ,

LYNN S. STEIN,

B.A.,

Regency Professor, 1 9 7 5 - 7 6 ; B . A . , Pacific L u t h e ran Uni versity, 1 9 5 8;

1 958; M . A . , Pennsylvania Stat e University, 1 9 6 1 . 1 9 7 4 - , A;;islanl Professor of Polilical

B.S., M.A., Col u m bia

Wartburg College, 1 968; M . S . , Universi t y of Washington, 1 9 77.

Modem a n d Classical Languages (French); A . B . , Grove C i t y College,

WALLACE H . SPENC ER,

Ph. D . ,

1 9 5 9;

Angeles, 1 9 64, 1 9 6 7 .


LENORA B. WEI RICK,

Assistant Professor of Nursing;

1 9 7 3 -.

B . S . N . , University of San Francisco. 1 958; M . S . N ., Washington Universi ty, S t . Louis, 1962.

JUDEE ANN WE LLS,

1 9 7 8 - . Visiting Assistant Professor of Business

A d m i n i,tration; B . S . , Sou t h w est Missouri State Uni versity, 1 9 72;

J . D., University of Texas, 1 9 77.

RICHARD K. WELLS,

1 9 7 5 - , Instrue/or of C o m m u ll ication A rts;

B . A . E . , Cent ral Washington S t a te College, 1 970; M. A., U niversity of Wisconsin, Madison, 1974.

DONALD R. WENTWORTH,

1 9 7 2 - . Associate Professor of

Econom ics and Education; B . S . , M . A . . P h . D . . Un iversity of M i n nesota,

1 965, 1 9 70, 1 9 72; M . A . , U niversity of Illinois, 1 9 7 1 .

fORREST WESTE RING,

1 9 7 2 - . Associate Professor o f Physical

Educalion; B . S . , Un iversity of Nebraska, Omaha, 1 95 2; A . M., EdD.,

Univers i t y of Northern Colorado, 1960, 1 966.

JANE WILLIAMSON,

1 9 6 4 - . Professor of Education; B . 5 . Ed . , Univers i t y of Maryland, 1 943; M . A . , N e w York University, 1 94 7; EdD., No rt hwes ter n Colorado University, 1 959.

- MARGARET WIL LIS,

1 9 7 3 -,

Assistant Professor of Sociology;

B . A ., M. A., PhD., U n ivers ity of Washi ngton, 1 9 67, 1 971, 1 9 76.

GARY B. WILSON,

1 9 7 5-,

Associate Professor of Com m u n ication

A rts; B . S. , Central Michigan Uni versity, 19 60; M . A . , Califor nia _

State Un iversity, U n iversity, 1 9 7 1 .

Long

Beach,

KENNETH WOOLLEY,

1 9 66;

P h . D. ,

Michigan

Stat e

1 9 74-. Assistant Professor of Business

Admin istration; B . S . , University of Colorado, 1 942; M . B . A . , Pacific __

Lu theran University, 1 9 74.

CHANG-LI YIU,

1 9 7 3 -. Assistant Professor of M