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Music

2 ��������������� By Judy Davis

Th e r e 's A l ways S o m et h i n g Exc i t i n g

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Yo u r C o m m u n ity C e nte r h e F i n e A rt . . . A n d E nte rta i n m e nt

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A RTIST S E R I ES LECTU R E S E R I E S Oct. 7 - B i l l Evans Dance Co. i II Nov. 1 3 - Massenkoff c

R u s s i a n Folk Festival Ja n . 1 9 - Roger Wagner Chorale M a r . 6 - B i l l y Taylor, jazz p i a n i st

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c , ath Myster y Theatr e Oct. 1 - Paolo �ole r i , urban e nvironme nta l ist Ja n . 24 - Les Wi l l ia ms, jazz d a n c i n g a u t h or ity

Feb. 1 5 - Dr. Paul expert o n China

Un,

M a r . 1 5 - M i ke Mocar a, expert o n R hodesi a F R E E C O N C E RTS Oct. 1 1 - Brass Ensemble . Oct . 1 3 - Eve n i ng of Co ntemporary M USIC Oct . 1 8 - PLU Symphony Orc hestra Oct . 2 5 - Fac u lty C h a mber Series Oct . 26-27 - Jazz Ensemble Nov . 3 - Composer's For'u m Nov . 8 - Concert B a n d Nov. 1 7 - Fac u lty Woodwi nd E nsemble Nov . 22 - Fac u lty Cha mber Series Nov . 29 - PLU Symphony Orchestra . J a n . 1 2 - Eve n i ng of Contemporary M U S I C Jan . 1 7 - P L U Symphony O rch estra Feb. 5 - Choir of the West Feb. 22-23 - Jazz Ensemble Fe b. 28 - Fac u l ty Cha mber Se rjes M a r . 2 - Composer's For u m M a r . 7 - Concert Band M a r. 1 4 - PLU Sym p h ony O rch estra Mar . 1 6 - Woodw i nd- Brass E n semble M a r . 28 - U n iversity Chora l e Ma r . 3 1 - Faculty C h a m be r Series Apr 4 - Str i n g En se m b le . Ap r 6 - Eve n i ng of Co ntempora ry MUSIC . Apr. 9 - U n iversity Concert ChOir Apr. 1 1 - Fa cu lty Cha mber Series Ap r . 1 4- 1 5 - Eve n i ng of Dance Apr. 20 - Concert Ba n d Apr. 23 - Eve n i ng C hoi r Apr. 27 - Fac u lty Woodwi nd Q u i ntet May 2 - PLU Symp h ony Orch estra May 4 - Com poser 's Fo r u m May 20 - Gradu ation concert N u m ero u s fac u lty and stude nt recitals

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Oct . Nov. Jan. Ja n . Mar. Apr.

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20- 23 - Canterbury Ta les 1 7- 20 - M i racle Worker 28, Feb. 4 - Aladd i n (Ch i ldren's Theatre) 26- 28, Feb. 3-4 - B u tterf l i e s Are Free 8 - 1 2 - S u m mer And S m oke 28- 29, May 4-6 - The Beaux Strateg e m

S PEC IAL

Oct . 6 - Seattle Symp hony Oct. 31 - B . J . Thomas Nov . 5 - Va udevi l l e ' 7 7

Dec. 1 , 3, 9 , 1 1 - PLU Ch rist'm a s Festival Concerts Dec. 2 - PLU Luc i a Bride Fest iva l Feb. 2 1 - Roya l Lichtenst e i n C i rc u s Mar. 1 3 - D affod i l Corona tion Apr. 7 - Daffod i l M u s i c a l M a y 6 - PLU May Fest ival

ART

M or vedt and Weke l l G a l lery ex h i bits, feat u r i n g g u est, fac u lty a n d stu de nt works, a re ope n to the p u bl i c .

A N D M U C H M O R E A D D E D TO THE S C H E D U LE TH R O U G H O UT TH E Y EA R ! for newspaper announcements o r call PLU for additional details

Watch

PACIFIC UITHE RAN UNIVE RSI1Y

5 3 1 - 6 9 00

Artist Se r ies season t i ckets Lect u res, E ntert a i n m e nt M u s ic Drama . . .. . . .

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Tacoma , Wash i ngton 98447

C LI P T H I S AD FOR HAN DY R E F E R E N C E I

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The performance date is drawing near. a Rehearsals are more rigorou s ; the conductor is becoming more demanding. H i s standards are high. Like a pole vaulter, he keeps inching the bar upward. " A ga i n ! " he commands. "Again ! " "We must b e more than techni­ cians . . . we must develop musi­ cianship." When the rehearsal is over, the performers practice as soloists so they can blend with the ensemble. To passersby, the practice room in Eastvold Auditorium emit s a

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40 1 40 1 310 305

cacophony of dissonant sounds clashing together as the individua als practice their piece of the " whole. In the classroom, they study the music from an analytical perspec­ tive and from the standpoint of social and philosophical implica­ tions. They try to learn what the composer is communicating. In lessons with the faculty, they are encouraged to refine their skills. Practice more. Fuse their technique with musical interpre­ tation. Raise the bar a little higher. Their commitment to the up- a . coming performance IS tota l . Their perseverance is unswerving . . . sometimes painful be­ cause of sacrifices that must be made. The music infuses their mind, body, and spirit. When the night of the concert arrives, the performers' presence in the auditorium creates an am­ bience, even before the music begins. As the maestro and the performers await the audience's hush, they exude dignity and con- a fidence arising out of their know- ,., ledge they have prepared dili­ g e n t l y for months for this moment. During the concert, the musi­ cians rivet their attention on the c o n d u c to r w h o g u i d e s them through the nuances , shadings and colorings of the composition. Together, they crea te a masterful i nterpr etatio n of the m u si cal message. . The jumble of black notes on the score has been transformed into an enriching experience for both the performers and the audi­ ence. The musici an s are sati s fied w i t h their artistic accomplish­ ment. The bar can be ifted higher still. To Dr . Maurice Skones, these "mountain-top" experiences are crucial to the development of suc­ cessful musicians.

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"I also believe they must have these experiences on a recurring basis," said the chairman of the PLU music department. Choosing his words very care-

1977 v 57 no 1 3,5 6