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Pacific Lutheran University does not discriminate on the ba�is o f se , race,

creed, color or na tional origin in the education programs or acti vi t ies which it operates and is required by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and the regul ati ons ado pt ed pursuant thereto and Titl e V l I of Ihe Civil Rights Act of 1964 not to discriminate in slIch m a nner . The requirement not to discriminate in education programs and ac tivities extends to employm e n t therein and to admis ion thereto. Inquiries concerning the :Jpplication of said Title IX a nd publihed regulation' to this University may be ref m�d to the Uni versity's Eq ual E m pl o y m e nt Opportu nity O ff ic er s or to the Uire tor of the Office for Ci vil Riohts of the Departm e nt of Health. Edl cation and Welfar e. Pacific Lutheran University co mplies with the F a mily Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974.

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Volume LVI No.4 BuJletin of Pa c ifi c Lutheran University, JuJy 1976 Published six times annually by Pacific Lutheran University, P.O. Box 2068. Tacoma, Wa hington 98447. Second Class postage paid at TacomA, Wa hinglon.


Contents � 6 7

8

'

ACADEMI

CALENDAR

OBJECTIVES OF THE UNIVERSITY

GENERAL INFORMATION

SCHOOL AND DEPARTMEN TA L PRO l LES

5�

57

OPTIONS

ST UDENT LIFE

60 62

66

ADMISSION INFORMATION

FINANCIA L AID

COSTS

110S 11 2

HOOL OF NU RSING

68 7 0 7 2 77

ACADEMIC PROCEDURES

DEGREE REQ UIREMENTS

SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND CA REER OPPORT UNITIES

9 � 97

CO LLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

SCHOO L OF B U SINESS ADMlNIST RA nON

SCHOOL OF ED UCATION

10�

C HOO L OF FINE ARTS

SC HOO L OF PHYSICA L ED U ATION

11�

115

GRAD U ATE STUDIES

REGISTE R

130 132

CAMPUS G U ID E

INDEX


4

Academic Calendar 1976-77 SUMMER S ESSION 1976 iV/un day, June 21 . ... ... . Classes Begin, 7 :30 a.m. ..... Lldependence Day Holiday Monday, July 5... Wednesday, july 21 . ..... F irst Term Ends Thursday. JlIly 22.. . Classes Begin - 2nd Term . Summer Session CI ses Friday, August 20.. .. Wor hjp Service and Commencement Friday, August 20...

FALL S EMESTE R 1976 Sunday, September 5 to Tuesday, September 7.. . .. 11'edl1esday, September 8. . .. Friday, October 22... Wednesday, �ovember 24 .. Monday, November 29.. .. Friday, December 17 ...... .

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.

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Orientation and Registration Classe Begin, 7:30 a.m. Mid-Semester Break Thanksgiving Rece . Begins, 12:30 p.m. Thanksgiving Recess Ends, 7:30 a.m. Semester Ends

INT E R IM 1977 Monday, January J..... .. Begins Friday, January 28 .. ... . Ends .

SPRING S EMEST E R 1977 Wednesday, February 2. ... , Thursday. February 3... Monday, February 21 . . .. Friday April 1 . : ...... .. Monday, April 11........

R egistration Classes Begin. 7:30 a.m. Washington's Birthday H oliday Ea ter R eces Begin , 6:00 p.m. Ea. ter Recess Ends, 4:30 p.m. Friday, lV/ay 20......... Semester Ends ....... Worship Service and Commencement Sunday, May 22 .

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:

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5

Academic Calendar 1977- 78 (Tentative)

SUMMER SESSION 1977 Monday, ./une' 20 .. .. .... Cia es Begin, 7:30 a.m. Monday, July 4 . .... .. .. Independence Day Holiday Wednesday, July 20 .. ,. . First Term End. ..Clas e Begin - 2nd Term Thursday, Jllly 21 . Friday. August 19 .. . .. .. Summer Session Close Friday, AI/gil ( 1 9 .. . . . Worship Service and Commencement FALL S EMESTER 1977 Sunday, Septelilber 4 to Tucsday. September 6 ... . . Orientation and Registration Wedn ' )( e lber 7. . Classes Begin. 7:30 a.m. Friday, October 21 . .... . . Mid-Seme'ter Break Wedne claJ', ovel1l er 23 ... Thank giving Re e Begin 12:30 p.m. lYIollday. avember 28 . . . ..Thank giving Re s End, 7:30 a.m. Friday, December 16 ...... Semester Ends '

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INTERIM 1978 Monday, Jalll/ary 2 ...... . Begins Friday. January 27 . . . .. " Ends SPRIN G SEMESTER 1978 Wednesda}'!, February 7 .. Thursday. February 2 . lvla nday, Februar.v 20 . Frida)', March 17 ..... MonellY, March 17 ...... .

Rcgi tration Classes Begin, 7 :30 a.m. Washington's Birthday Holiday Ea fer Recess Begins, 6:00 p.m. Easter Rece Ends, 4:30 p.m. fi'iday, May J 9 .. Semester Ends SUllday, May;: J ......... Wor hip S rvice and Commencement


6

Object·ves of the University Pacific Lutheran Univer ity , born of tlte R eformation spirit, maintains the privil ege of ex ploration and learning in all area of the arts, ·c.iences, and re­ ligion. The basic concern of Martin Luther was religious but his rejec ti on f church tradition as primary author­ ity and his own free search for religious truth, served in effect to liberate the modern mind in its quest for all truth. The total impact of Luther's stand ha p rmanently shaped the modem world and helped provide the modem univers ity with its basic methodology. ,

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Pacui Lut her an Unive 'ity i a co m mu nity of professi ng Christian scholars dedicated to a philo ophy of liberal education. The major goals of the in titution are to incul ate a re­ spect for learning and truth, to free the mind from confinements of ignor­ :mce and prejudice to organize the powers of c lear thought and ex pre 'sion, to preserve and extend knowledge to help men achieve profess ional compe­ tence, and to establish lifelong habits of study, reflection and learning. Through lin emph asis on the liberating arts, the University eeks to develop creative, reflective, and responsible per ons. At the same time, the acqui sHion of pecialized infor mat ion and technical skill is recognize d as a con­ dition of uc essful involvement in the ,

,

­

modern wo rld. The University seeks to develop lhe ev �lI uat ive and spiri tual c apacities of the student and to ac­ quaint him hone tty \ ith rival claims to the true and the good. It encourages the pur ui t of rich and enn bling ex­ periences and the development f jg­ nificllnt personhood through an appre­ ciation of ma n's in teUectual, arti. tic, cultural, and n atur al surroundings. The Univer"Hy affinns its f unda mental ob­ Ugation t confront Iiher ally educated men with the challenges of Christian faitll and to instill in them a true sense of vocation '

.

By providing a rich va riety of socia.l experi enc , Paci fi c Luther an Univer ity seeks to develop in the student a joy in abunda nt living, a feeling for the -

welfare and personal i n tegrity of others good taste, and a seDse of social propriety tlTld adequacy. Dis­ tinguis hing b tween personal Christian ethic and normal social controls, the University adopts onJy such rules as seem neces ary f or the welfare of the educational community. ,

The physical development of the student i. reg,. rded a n integral part of his liberal education. Bence the Un.iv rsity encourages participation in phy 'ical activities and r es pect for health and fitness. Professing a conc rn for the enti re nature of man. the faculty of the Uni-

versity encourages wholesome d evelop­ ment of Christian faith and life by providing opportunities for worship and meditation, offering sy stemat ic studies of religion and enco uraging free investigation and discussion of basic religious quesfi ns. The Univer­ sity beli v s the essence of Christianity to be personal faith in God a Creator and Redeemer, and it beUeves that such faith born of the Holy Spirit gen­ e ra tes in tegrative po er c apable of !.!Uiding men to illuminating perspec­ tives and worthy purposes. The Univer­ sity c ommuni ty confesses the faith that the ultimate meaning and purposes po es of human life are to be dis­ covered in the pe rson and work of Jesus Chr i t. ,

As an educational arm uf the Church. Pacifi LULh ran University provides a locus for the fruitful inter­ play of Christian faith and all of huma n learning and cuJ ture and as such holds it a responsi bility to dis­ cover, explore and develop new frontiers. Bel ieving that all truth is God's truth, the University in ac h iev­ .

,

.

ing it educational and sp iritual goals, maintains the right and inde d the ob­ ligation of faculty and students to engage in an unbiased �earch for truth in all realms. Adopted, 1963.


7 HrSTO RY: P-')ciJlc Lutheran University wa, founded in 1890 by men and women of the Lutheran ChurcJl in the North­ west, and by Reverend Bjug Ha tad in parti ular. Their purpO'e wa' to es­ tablil'h an institution in whi.ch their people could be d uca l ed. Education was a ve nera ted part of the Scandina­ vian and German traditi ns from whi h these pio neers came.

The inst itu ti on o pened as Pacific Lutheran Academy, Growi ng in tature, PLA became a j un ior college in 1921. Ten years later, it was organized into a three-year norma l 'chool which beC<1me n college of education in 1939.

IN STI T UTION A L MEMBER S H IPS The University is a member of: Association of American Colleges merican Council on Educ tion National lutheran Edu ntional Conference Northwest Association of Private Colleges and Universities Independent Colleges of Wa hington, Incorporated Washjngton Friend' of Higher Education Wes t rn i nterstate Commission for Higher Educatio n

G ROUN DS

After 194 t. it e x panded as Pacific Lutheran College until it wa reorgan­ ized as a Univ rsity in 1960, retl ecting the growth of both its professional schools and liberaJ arts core.

Located in suburban Parkland, PLU has a picturesque 126-acre campus, truJ y representative of the natural grandeur of the Pacific Nor thwe t.

ACCR EDITATIO

2,571 full-time students 857 part-time students

1

Pacific Luther an University is fully accredited by the Northwest ;: ssocia­ tion of Secondary and Higher Schools as a fo m-y ear institution of higher edu­ cation and by the National Council for t he Accreditation of Teacher Education for the preparation of lementary and secondary teachers, principal� and guidance counselor' with th e Ma ter's degree as i he hig best degree approved. The U niversity is al'o approved by the Arneri�m Chemical Soci ety , TIle School of Nurs in g is accredited by the National league for Nursing. The School of Busin ess Administration is accr ed it ed by the American Assoc iation o f Co J Jegiate Schools of B u siness . The Social Welfare Program is accredited by the Council on SociaJ Work Education.

EN ROLLMEN T

F ACULTY 184 full·time faculty 65 part-time fa ulty

STUDEN T / F A C ULTY R A TIO 13.8:1

MAJO R F fELDS 27

ACADEMIC PROG R A M I n 1969, Pacific Lutheran University adopt d the 4-14 calendar which con­ sists of two fourteen-week semesters bridged by a four-week interim period. With thi! calendar adaptation, Ule transition wa made from the credit to course system. The course system re­ duces wasteful fragmentation of student and faculty time. With fewer courses (averaging 3-4 each semester, one course for the Interim) each stu­ dent is free to pursue independent re­ search and self education.

Course credit is computed by hours. The majority of courses are offered for 4 hours. Each undergraduate degree candidate is expected to complete 128 hours with an overall grade point average of 2.00. Degree requirements are specifically stated in this catalog. Each student should become familiar with these re­ qUirements and prepare to meet them.

IN TERIM The Interim provides time for inten­ sive and innovative study in an environ­ ment free of many traditional academic restraints. It allows both fa ulty and students to inquire into areas outside the reg u lar curriculum, to develop new methods of teaching and learning, to enhance their imaginative and creative talents, and to establish a stronger sense of identity and pride as a com­ munity of scholars. The study options are various: innovative courses, foreign studies, interdepartmental offerings and off-campu' exchange programs with other interim institutions.


8

Academic Structure COl L GE OF ARTS A N D S IEN CES

SCHOO L OF B USINESS ADMIN ISTRA T l ON

DivCiioll of Humanities

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

'nglish "oreign anguages Philo ophy

R

ligion

Division of Natural Sciences Biology the mist ry �Jrlh Sciences Engineering Ma lhema 1 ics Physics Division of Social Sciences Economics Hist ry Political Science Psychology Sociology, An 1 ilropology and Social W -Ifare

SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS Arl Comlllunicalion Arls Music

SCHOO L OF N URS I N G S HOOL OF P H YSICA L ED U CATION DIVISION OF GRAD U ATE STUDIES

D GR ES OFFERED Bachel rs Bachelor of Arts Bachelo f Science B3 helor of Business Admini tration Bachelor of Arts in Educa tion Bachelor of Fine Arts Bachelor of Music Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Ma ter .. !\-faster of Arts in Education Ma ter f Arts in Humanities Master of Art' in Social S iences Master of Bu ine's Administration Master of Music M ter of Natural Science Ma. ter of Public Admini tration


I I

In a time of rapidly cha n i n g concepts a n d a n almost doily eme rgen ce of ne w media. em phasis musl be p laced n a variety of experiences a n d ('realiv tle ibilitv. ' S tu dents w ith profes 'io nal oncerns mllst be prepared to III t the cha l l enges of the modern worl d w ith bot h techn ica l kil� and capa city for iL1JlOva tion . The program therefore slre, ses individua lized develop­ men t ra ther t ha n vocational tools which quickl y become ob. olete. There is a n e plicit relation ship between an art depa rt men t's fa dliti s a nd it quality of cu rr icu l u m. The spa cio lls studio area' of Lhe U niversity's Art Department affor d an ins t ruc­ tional ca pa bility w h ich is u npara lleled by a n y private insti tu tion i n the Pacific N orth­ west. These faci lities include: pain ling. tudio, dra w in g ·tudio p ri n tma k i n g s t udio, cul pl u re st udio, cera mic' tudio, gla:s: bl w in g w ork shop, tIlm ma king and photography w orks ho p de,'ign worksho p, wood shop, metal shop kiln ya rd, fou n dry, darkr o m seminar rooms, sl ide l ibrary, the Wekell Gallery and ,lu den l exhi bit ion a r as. ,

,

Keyes, ha i rma n ; E l w II, Kittleson, Rosko , Sch widder. Tomsic. Artists in re, idence: Cox a n d Torrens.

ST U DIO: Basic media courses may be repeated for credit for two or three semesters, or as approved. 160 Drawing 230 Ceramics I 250 Sculpture I 60 Life Drawing 2 6 Design 326 rilm Arts Photography/Film laking 330 Ceramics (( 335 Fibers 33R Class Blowing 341 Elementary Art Education 350 Sculpture II 365 Painting 370 Printmaking 394 Design Workshop 396 Cra phics Workshop 492 Studio Projects 499 B.F. ,Carldidacy Exhibition

mSTORY AN D THEORY:

110 280 294

382 383 384 385 440 487 490 497 597

'he Vi:.;ual Arts 20th Century Art 20th Century Design and Architecture Ancient Art Medieval Art Renaissance Arl Baroquc Art Seminar in Art Education Nineteenth Century Art Seminar Research in Art History Research

WORKSHOPS: Special courses offered on an occasional basis, 270 Sosaku liang,\: Japanese Wood eut 332 Raku: Japanese Pottery

333 374 401

Kiln Building Metal Plate Lithography Bronl.e Casting

INTERIM COU RSES OFFERED IN 1976 305 312

316 318

Crafts Workshop Non-Looll1 Textile Arts Film Animation Life Sculpture

Art


13

The Biology Department at Pacific Lut heran University is d dic;Jted to a teaching process, not just a delivery of fads. Fa 't· form the foundation of science but appro:lch infinity in number. herefore. the bi ology f"cully sIre-sse' the gathering. processing. retrieving and interpreting of the 'e rnels. The biology f.. lculty believe, in the notion lhat one of the most profound r quirements in science is learning to ask the right questions and to recogn i ze lhe answer. The department is therefore dedicated to permit· ting students to learn science in I he onl y way thaI it can be ff ctively made a pal'l of their thinking: to independently question it. probe it. try it out. exp ri ment with i t. experi nee it. Jensen, hairman: lexander, Bohannon, Carbon. Gee. Han. en. Knudsen. Lerum, Levy Mllin. Martin. McGinnis. Osten. on. Assisted by Matthi:.ls. ,

1 I ) 153 154 163 201 253 275 299 321 324 331 340 346 347

Biology

Biology anu Ivloucrn Man ( II Biol()�y rganislllal Biology FUlid ional Ilulllan Anatomy Introuuctory Vlinohiology l3iulogy of the Steady S tate \1icrohiology Introductory Clinical Physiology Ornithulo"y 'atural lfistnry of Vertehrates Genetics Plant Diversity and Distribution Cellular Physiology Cellular Physiology Laboratory '

357

Plant Form and Function

358

Plant Growth anu Developmcnt Comparative Anatomy oC the Vertebrates ,cncral En !omology

361 372 _

75

3RO 403 411 424

Biolll\rV of Parasitism

gy

Biolo Teaching Resources Growth anu Differentiation Histology ' E colog 425 13iolo icaIOce<lllllgraphy 426 ecolugy Lahol'atory 441 Vertebrate Physiulogy 475 Evolution 490 Seminar 491,492 (ndcpenuenl Study 597, 598 Gladuate Research

g

y

INTERlM COURSES OFFERED IN 1976 303 307

311

l3iolugil�al Photllgraphy Biological Self·Reco�nition: How Animals Respond Immunologically to Foreign C'lIs and Tissues The uturc or the Darwinian Revolution


15

Business Admi istratio SCHOOL OF

In concert with general university requirements, the business curriculum prepares gradual for responsible p sili ns in business, education and government"

Opli l1a I specializa tions are offered in the fields of acc unt­ ing and information system:, di. tribution and marketing. fUlance, industrial and personnel management. and the area of publi management. King. Dean: Bancroft, Carvey, D bbie Dunn, Freeman, Lauer. Martillu. McCarthy, Nibler. O'Neill. Peterson, Schafer, Woolley and Zulauf. Assisted by BrantJler, Harris Hutcheon, Kovanen. Lar on, Petrie, Pierce, Pre t gaard, and Utzinger.

230 241 243 281 2R2 350 364 365 366 370 38J

383 3�5 387 392 435 450 451 453

455 456 461 464 470 471 472 473 482 4 4 48 490 491 550 551 55 2

Law and Soc i e t y " Business COIl1Il1 unicatiuns Family in an ci al Plan nin g Financial A cc ount in g Accoull t in g [n form;]t ion Systems lanage ll1c n t Managerial Financc Real E tate Risk and Insuranc.e Management Market ing Systems [n termedia te !\ccount i n g I nc o m e Taxa tion Cost Accounting Data Pro ccssin g Systems In t ern sh ip Business Law lanufacturing Managcment Opera tions Ana l ysi s Pe rsonnel and Industrial Rela lions Business Policy Hon ors Seminar Financial A na ly sis Financia l Ma nagcll1en t Marketing Manageme n t a rke t ing Research :.Ind Conslimer Behavior Advertising and Sale s Mana ge men t Industrial Ma rketi ng and Purc hasi n g '

Advanced Accoull ling Auditing Systcms Analysi S and Design Seminar Directed S tu dy Organi/,alional Behavior and Environmcnt Se mina r in Operatiuns Mana gel11ent Appli�d Decision Analysis

553

555 557 564 5 7 570 5, I

C o nt e mpor a ry Issucs in Ma nagemcn t Business S t rate gy and Poli cy Se mi na r in Policy Sciences Scminar in Financial rVlanagemcnt S c mi nar in Gov e rnmenl Budgeting Se mi nar in Marketing 1a nagcmc nt S em ina r in Fillancial A c co unt i ng U

587 5 90

Thcory A ccoun ting InflHmation and un trol Govern mcn t Ac co unting Systems ,pecial Seminar

591 5 93 5 96

Independcnt Study 'hesis Research Colloquium

582

LNTERlM COUR ES OFFERED

IN 1976 305 307 09 590

bnager.' a t Work t rc e t Sense The Missing link to Jub Co mpe te nc e Money Ga me II Semin ar on Contemporary Issues in Ma na ge ment ,

'


17

The ad ance of man and civiLi1:ation is inseparable from the develqpment of chemistry. Chemistry influences our live' in many pr found ways. WbeUler in­ terested in chemistry as a profession. mole cul ar biology. or studying the influences of science and technology on the I1virorunent t1nd society students

103

104 108 115

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the American Chemical Society. Diversity in career planning is a key wo rd in the chemistry curril:ululTI. Program' are available wlllch are broadly appl ic able to the heallh-bio­ logical. physi c:}l en irorunental and the fundamental chemical sciences. A staff knowled geable in the man y arens of chemistry using modern equipment for teaching and research highlight thl' opportullitie available. .

Swank. Chairman: Anderson. Giddings, lIuestili. Layman. Nesset. Tobiason .

Chemistry or Lifc Envirol1l1lcn l:.li Chcmistry . Mankind and :-'1olecules encral Chcmistrv

116 Systematic Il1org,; nic Chemistry .321 Quantitative Analysis 331. 331 Organic Chemistry

333,334 Organic Chemistry Labora tory 336

.

will find program to meet l hei r needs. 'urriculum. faculty The c UI"e and facilitie. are approv ed by

Che...... ishy

ll11nors Organic Chemistry Laboratory

341.342 Physical Chemistry 343. 344 Physical Chemistry Laboratury 350 Instrul1lcntation for the I ire Sciences 404 Biochemistrv 435 I nstrumental Analysis 460 Seminar 490 Integrated Problems Approach 491 Independent Study 497 Research 5 97,598 Graduate Rescarch

lNTERIM COURSES 0 ·FER

IN 1 976

108 31 2

350

D

Mankind an d MoJc..;ules You Think You Are Iluman Instrutncntatiun lor the Life

. 0

Sciences


19

Communication Arts

The comlllunication Mts program is concerned with improving interpersonal. group and public communication through:1 mastery of basic rhetorical processes ::md a comprehension of the nature or t he mass media [IS well as of­ fering culluml and artistic opp()rtllnitie� in the field of theatre. The department offers a practical und rstanding of thi... human proce, s to all , tudelll� and prepares its majors for participation and teaching in the areas of jhealre. communi­ calion and broadcast/journalism. Wilson. Chairman: Bet ar. Email. Karl. Nordholm. Pnrker, Well', Wiles. As. isted by Christian. Douahly. MUlln, Rowe.

123

128 162 225. 235 241 250 251 271 272 275 283 326 333 336 344 352 354 356 35R 63 364 374

Fundalllcnt,ils 01 ral o III m U nicat ion ArguIllentatiun and Dehate History of American Fil m 42 -COI � lIl11lIlication Arts Practicu m Studies in Or�ani/ati()nal C omm un ic'ati�lIl Orallntcrprctation of Literature FUlldamentals oi" Acting Stage Tl.:ehnology Man, Media and Society The Broadcaster and Soulld Radio Production News Reporting ,rou p Discussion Founciations of COllllllunication Thcory Persuasion Adv<lnccdlntcrprctation of Li tera t LI rc Sccnic Design Play Dircction Stage Lighting dvanced Actill� llistory uf the Th eatre: Aeschylus Through Turgcniev History or the Thc,llre: Ibse n Through to the Prcsent � Television 1'1 ()ducti()ll

375 378 384 402

404 459 474 47S 490

Directing for Bruadcast Media Radiu-Television News Rt'porting Advanced News Reporting Coml1lunication Arts in the Elementary Classruulll Cummunication Arts in the Secondary School SUJ11mer Drama Workshop Television and thc Classroom Teal'ller SUIlll1ler Televisiun Workshop SeJ11inar in Broadcast/JournalisJ11

491,492,493 Special Studies in COJ11munication Arts 596-5 8 Research in COl1llllunication Arts

INT R M COURSES OFFERED IN 1 97 6 314 316 318

Workshop ill the Staging of Ihsen History of the American Him laster Class: The Art of Mime


21

The s t ud y of earth scien e: e, plore ' component · f m�H1 's phy-,ica l universe from the pJ.1 net� to the earth's crust. In a ddit ion to geology . oceano­ gra phy . a I ron my. meteorology, a nd geogra ph y . inte [-de parI menta 1 c opera t ion fa ilita t es specia l­ ized s t u dies in geoph y ics and geochemist ry _

Env ironmental problems n re a pproached through the earth ·ciences. ield trips gjve a renli. t ic u nder -tandin g of man" dependence on ea rth : phy. ica l resou rces : minera ls. fo: il fuel. , water. :oil . the ocean h is per. onal contact is funda ­ m Hta l for citizen understandino a nd for l ong term planning in environmental rises. _

o t nson, Chairman; Lowe . . s� ted by Batker, ' is k , H uesl i .

Earth Sciences

101 1 22 131

W or l d Geogra phy

1 32 1 36

H i s t orica l Geol ogy De c r i p t ive A s t ro n o m y

202 222 3 23 3 24

Gencra l Ocea n ogra ph y C o nse rva t i on o f N a t u ra l Resourccs M i n c r a l u gy Pe t ro l o gy

325

S t r u c t u ra l G ol ogy N a t u r a l H i s t ory o f t he Pac i fic lo r t hwcst .

35 1

I n t ro d u c t i o n t o Physica l M a n a n d t he Geologic En v i r o n l11 e n t

cicncc

3 60 3 65

G e o l ogy o f W e s t e rn Was h i n g t o n G l a c i a l Geol ogy 4 2 5 B i o l ogica l Occan ogra phy 490 Se m i n a r 49 1 t 492 I n de pe n d c n t S t u d y

U n iver ity o f Puget Sound Geology Com ' e 302 40 1

Pa l eo n t o l ogy S t ra t igra p h y a n d Se d i men t a t i o n

402

G o m o r p h o l ogy

I NT E RIM COU RSES O F F E R ED IN 1 976 307 323

Wa� h i I1gt o n ' s M i n e ra l ogy

a t u ra l W i n t e r


23

" Wall l is a gro wil/g gial l !

IV/W ill

!lie co a ! oj Ha r e \Vas ! l C I 'cr " /arge C'( / o l Igli !o co I ' CT

Ra l p h W a l d o F Ill c rs o ll

Econo m i c ' i, t he s t u d y of f he a l l rnll t ive WH YS 'ocie l y c h o se!i to u "e l i m i t ed resou rce, t o ITliI x i m i ze socia l w L I b e i n g -

The eco n o m i cs d i s c i p l i n e em brace, a b o d y of t e c h n iques a nd

,

D ru e , C h a i r m a n ; J ensen , M i l ler.

V i nj e , Wen t wort h .

321 33 1 3S I 352

.

conce p t u a l t o o l s w i t h w h i c h o ne ca n under. t a n d . a na l yze, a nd t o a d e g r ee foresee ftl t u're develo pment w i t h i n >Ur com pie s cial system . Ca reer av n uc: for J ra d u a t es are nu mero u s s i n ce t h e i r understand ing of t he e o l1 o m y . t h eir problem-so l i n g .md cri t i ca l . 'ons t ruet ive t hi n k i Jlg n\)i lit ies are a p p l i ­ cable t o a w ide ra nge o f a c t i vi t i es i n b u s i n e s a n d /o r govel' llmen t .

1 50 290

.'

61

36_ 4 2 434 486 490 49 1 . 504

Economics

Pr i l l c i p l e s 0 1" Ec oll o l l 1 i c s

C o n t cmporary Lconoll1ic Pro b I e i l l S i-i u l1 1 a n R e so u r ce E c o n o l l 1 i c s I n t e r n a t i o n � t I E C lll] ( ) l l 1 l C S I n t C l I l 1 c J i �1 te \'I a c r ll E C l l l l l l l l 1 i c Analysis I n t e r ll1cd i �J t c M il 'l l l E c o n l l i l l i c Analysis i'v l oncy a n d B a n k i n g Pu b l i c F i nance Urban a n d R;:gional ecuno lllics Guver l l i11C n t and t lie EconolllY Evo l u t i o n uf Econ lllllir T h o u g h t SClll i n a r 492, 493 I n d e p c n de n t S t u d y b: o n ll i l l i c A n a l y s i s a n d P o l i c y

Dec i s i o ns 54] Q l Ia n t i t a t i ve 1'1'1 c t l w J s :59 1 , 59 2 , 5 9 3 I n d e pe n de n t S t u d y 599 T h e s i s

I N T E R I M CO U R S E OFFE R E D I N 1 976 30 '

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L n t c rl11 c (ila t e A l ge b ra F i l1 l t c M J t i l e m a t i c s C o l l e ge f 1 ge b ra a n d T r l go n o mc t ry I n t r o d u c t i o n t o o m pu l e r S C l c n c e A n a l y t i l' G .;o m e t rv J n d C a l c u l u s n a l y t i c Ge o m e t r a n d C a l c u l u s D i re c t e d Re a d i n g Da l a S t r U c: ! l ll c s a n d Asse m b l y a n gu a gL' Progr�l In rl 1 i n g M lI l t i v a r i a b l e Ct l c u i ll s a n d D t l le r e n t l a l E q u a t i o n s G c o m c t rv M u d e r n t l e m c n t a r� M a t h e m a t i C s G e u m e t ry lor t h e lcme n t a ry S c h o u l Te a c h c I l i n e a r A l g e bra a n d C ' a l L' u l u s M a t h e m a t i c a l S t a t is t iCS Sys t c m s A n a l YS I S a n d S i m u l a t i o n , ' u m e r i ca l A n a l y s i s A p p l i e d M a t hc ma t i cs 434 M o d e rn A l g e b r a M a t h e m a t ics i n l l ie Secondary Sehoul 456 M a t hemat ical nalysis E l e m e n t a ry T o p o l o gy , e m l ll a r 49 2 I n d e p e n de n t S t u d y 598 G r a d u a t e Rese a r c h

y

I N T E R I M C O U R SES 0 I N 1 97 6

FERED

1 13

G e u m e t ry ReV i s i t e d

305

P h i l llSO p h y and Fac t s o r Space a n d Time

308

F l l1 a n c i a l M a t h e m a l i l' s C o m pu t e rs a n d C o m p u t i n g i n C Oll t e m po r a r y S o c i e t y

310 31 1

M a t h e m a t i c a l Puzz l e s a n d Paradoxes


37

The music d e pa r t men t o ffers programs fo r s t u d e n t s seeking i n l ensj e t ra i n i ng i n m usic h i t o ry a nd l i t erat u re, t he o r y a nd co m po:it io n . a c red music. a nd performance. Th c u r r i c u l u m i. a lso d esigned fo r s t u d e n t s pla n n ing ca reers in m u. ic educa t io n , as well as t h se s t u de n t s w ho w is h to incr a e t he i r general m usical k no w ledge a nd a p precia t i o n . Pa ci fic L u t he r a n U n ivers i t y Depa rtmen t o f M us i c is n o ted both regi o n a l l y and n a t i o n a l l y , for i t s perfo rmi ng e nsembles w hic h i n c l u d e : C ho i r of t he West , U n iversi t y Chorale , Concert h i r , U n ive 'si t y S i ngers. Un iver i t y U a nd . Jazz Ense m b l e . U n i v rsi t y S y m p h o n y O rchest ra , a n d Co n t e mporary D i re c t i o ns

101 1 23 1 24 1 25 1 26 131 1 32 223 224 225 226 23 1

Theory I V Ear T ra i n i n g I I I Ear T r a i n i n g I V M u s i c H i s t or y I I I M u sic H i s t o ry I V

232 24 1 -242 S t ri n g La l1 0 ra t o r y 243-244 Wo o d w i n ci La b o ra t o ry 245-246 B ra s s L a b o r a tory 247 Percu ssio n L a b o r a t o ry 249 E l e c t ro n ic M u sic L a b o r a t ory 323 L i n e a r i t y I 324 L i n e a r i t y I I 3 2 5 Keyboard l l a n n o ny 3 2 6 Orch e s t m t i o n oll1pos i t i o n 327 3J

332

E nse m b l e . Skon e s , C h a i r ma n : Da h l , Ga rd , G i l b e r t so n , H a nni e , H o ffma n , K n a p p , K r a ch t , M e y e r . R o b b i n s , Scho m berg , T re m a i n e . Assist ed by Abra ha mso n , Bergeso n . Cro kel t , D u b e . E d a rd s . H o l la n d , H o p p , H u s h , K en t . S . K n a p p , K n u t h , K o c h ma n n . M c Ca r t y . ďż˝ unso n . Nace , N e ff, N o r t h ru p , Po u l s h ck . K . R o b b i n s , S m i t h , S u nd q u i:l , Tay l o r , Tho mas. Tho m pso n , Ziege n felder.

I n t r o d u c t io n t o M u sic Theory I Theory I I E a r Tra i n i n g I Ear T r a i n i n g I I M u sic H i s t ory I Music I listory I I T h eory I I I

333 334 335 336 337 338 339 34 1 343 344 345 349 351 352 353 3 54 3 0 36 1 362 363 364 366 370 37 2 380 38 1 382 3 83 423 4 24 425

Music o f J o h a n n S e b a s t ia n Bach O rn a me n t a t io n and Pe r for m a n c e

Prac t i ces 0 1' t he B a roque T h e M u sic o f I la y d n a n d M o z a r t The M u sic o f Bee t h ov e n La t e J 9 t h C e n t u r y Ivl u s ic C h a m b e r �I usic L i t e r:J t ur e The I <J t h Ce n t u ry Art Song H i s t ory o f O pe ra H i s t o r y of .f azz S t y l e s M u s i c i n t h e E l e m e n t a ry School Voc a l .J au ech n iques hzz La b o r a t ory E n se m b l e Basic onducting El e c t r o n ic M u sic Prac t ic u m A c c o m pa n y i n g Orga n I m provisa t i o n

S o l o Vocal L i t e ra t u re Perfo rm e r's P r i m e r C h o i r o f t h e West Un iversi t y C h o r a l e Concert Choir n ivers i t y S i n ge r s M a d rigal O pe ra Workshup

n i v e rs i t y B a n d U n iv e rs i t y J azz E n s e m b l e

Un iversity S y m p h o n y O rc h e s t r a C h a m b e r E n se m b l e

C o n t e m po r a ry Direc t i o n s En s e m b l e T w o P i a n o E n s e m ble F or m I For m I I Form I I I

Music 426 43 1 433 434 435 436 437 438 44 1 443 444

Adv:lIlced Orche s t ra t i o n Hist ory of Pia n o L i tera t u re a n d Pe r formance M u s ic o f Bela Bartok Sca n d i n a v i a n M usic Music i n the United States: A Historical I n t ro d u c t ion Hist ory o f Organ B u i l d i n g a c re d M u sic Li terature H y m n o l ogy and the M u sic o f t h e Li tu rgy R.e c e n t Tec h n iques for E l e m e n t a r y 1'1'1 usic

Methods and rVl a t e r i a l s for S e c o n dary C horal M u s i c M e t hods and la terials for School I n s t ru me n t a l M u sic A d va n ce d C on d u c t i ng

44 5 45 1 Pia no Pedagogy 4 5 2 Organ Pe dagogy a n d R e pertoir e 453 Vocal Pedagogy 454 S t ri n g Pe dagogy 49 1 -492 I n d e p e n de n t S t u dy 527 C o m posi t i o n 532 M u s i c B i b l iography a n d Research

Tec h n iques S e m i n a r in Adv:: !I1 cecl C o n d u c t i n g : Con t e m po r a ry L i t e ra t u r e 590 G r a d u a t e S e m i n a r 596-59 Rese a r c h i n M usic

545

599

Thesis

Private and Class Instruction 2 0 2 ,402,502 203.403 ,503 204,404 ,504 205,405,505 206,406,506 207 ,407 ,507 208 ,408,508 209 ,409 ,509 2 1 0 ,4 1 0,5 1 0 2 1 1 ,4 1 1 ,5 1 1 2 1 2 ,4 1 2,5 1 2 2 1 3 ,4 1 3 ,5 1 3 2 1 4,4 1 4 ,5 1 4 2 1 5 ,4 1 5 ,5 1 5 2 1 6,4 1 6, 5 1 6 2 1 7 ,4 1 7 ,5 1 7 2 1 8,4 1 S ,5 1 8 2 1 9,4 1 9 ,5 1 9

Piano O rga n Voice V i o l i n / Vi o l a C el l o / Ba ss Flu t e O b o e / E ngl i sh H o rn Bassooll

larinet Saxophone T ru m p e t Fre n c h H o rn Tro m b o n e/ Bari t one Tuba Percussion

Guitar Harp H a r ps i c h o r d

I N T E R I M COU R S E S O F F E R E D I N 1 97 6

303 317

1\ C u l t ur al Expe r i e n c e i n t he A r t s in lew York C i ty I n t e n sive P e r for m a n c e


39

urSlng •

SCHOOL OF A n ur sing career o ffers great Opp(whmi t y for a ri c h a nd rew;lI:ding pro fessionn l life. I t afford ' virtua l l y unlimited c ho ic o f locatic n, en vironmen t , and type of ·('rviee. Ma n 's ph y:ica l , mental, ..o d al , and spiritua l health is of univ r [1\ conccrn ; a nd t hose prepared to main tain his �ood hcalth are i n constant d en�and . The School o f N ur 'iug is a profes ional school which combines professio nal and libe ra l a r t studi s i n a 'sistillg studen t s t o develop a sense o f responsibilit y for acquiring the � I ttitudes, k n o wledge a nd . kil l Ill' e, sary for meeti ng n ur.-ing needs o f t he co mmun i t y . Graduat s w ho suce _ ssfully complete the l a l e Board X3 m ­ ill a t i on s ( Regi s tered N urse ) are prepared for beginning position.' in pro fessio n a l nur 'ing a nd for ontil1uing t li ir educa t ion a l t he gradua te fevel. Under t he direct .' uperv i..i o n f ils faculty members. t he School uti lizes fa cilif ies of hos p i t a ls , heal th agen cies, a nd s chools i n t he community i n providing plimal dillical l arni ng experience for i ts t udents. Siu 'ke , Dir e t r : A cuff . Bergerson Burk, Car penter , a r per. one. Coombs. G ugh , Heft y , H ost et ter, l a w h o n , Johnso n . Lawre n ce , M.asO Il . O l son . Schult z, Zerwek h . A ssisted by Aiki n , Betlridge, M yra bo, Roediger, St iggelbou and Weirick.

214 228 334 344 354 384 394 424 434 444 464

ursi n g I : S o c i a l iza t i on t o iursing ' ur s i n g I I : H c a l t h Assess me n t N u rsi n g Ccn t r u m I \ I c a l t h Problcms N u rs i n g C c n t r u m \ I C l i n i ca l Pro b l e m s I N ur si n g Prac t i c u m I I lll' s i n g Cc n t r u m I I I Clinical Problems I I N u rsi ng I rac l i c u m I I N ur s i n g C e n t r u m I V

478 S c n io r Pra c t i c u m 491 . 492 I n d c pe n de n t S t u dy

INTERI M COU R S ES O F FE R E D IN 1 9 7 6 301 305 309 311

The Bolly B c a u t i i"u l He a l t h a n d \ I e a l i n g I ev o l u t i o n in A t t i t u de s T o w a rd De a t h a n d D y i n g Surgical l n t erv e l l t i o n


- I

41

[ n t his o lde · t a n d pare n t disci pUne o f t he a r t s a n d ilclences, t he l ud e n t pUl ue a crit ic� 1 a n d , 'yst e ma t ic 'lIl a l y!>b f basic i:sues i n a l l fields a nd a u n i fied view o f t he t o t a l i t y f e x perien e . The co u rse o f i n q u iry a cq ua i n t s each s t ud e n t w i t h rival w or l d v ie ws u n d v ' I u e s y s t e m s . encourages h i m i n a n a l y t i c a n d sy l e rna t ic t ho ug h t a nd ena bles him " to s e l i f t'ri l i ca l l y . a p precia l ively a nd w h o l e . " The d e part ment o ffers a progra m of d ist inct i ve q ua l i t y fo r t hose w ho seek t o a d d de p t h and p r­ spec t ive i n s u pport of t he i r work in s u c h a reas a s : sciences , la w , t h o logy. bll'mess , a n d t he hea l t h profe 'i o ns . I t o ffers a u n i q ue a n d w idel y rec gn ized co u rse of s t ud y for t hose who wish io pursue philoso ph i tself as a ca reer. r

o u rse par t icu la rl y us fu l fo r st re ngt hen i ng t he prepara t io n o f :t uden ts for variou . car . rs a re Ii ted bel ow .

22 1 233 24

32B

3]5

�;I o r a l P h i l os o p h y Logic Ph i l os o p h i c a l A n a l y s i s 0 1' S o c i a l Pru b l e ms Po l i t i c a l a n d e ga ! P h i l u s o p h y C u n t e m po r a r y Ph i l os o p h y

HE A LT H 22 1 385 393

395

SCI E NCES

M or a l Ph i l oso p h y Prob l e m s i n M e d i c a l E t h i c s P h i l oso p l l Y u f Rel i g i o n P h i l o s o phy o f S c i c n ce

N ATUR A L SC I ENCES 233 333

335 395 SOCI 3 24 328 37 1 38 1 39 5

Logic �'I o d e rn P h i l us o p h y C u n t e m po r a r y P h i l os o p h y P h i l o s o p h y o f S c i c n cc

L SC I ENCES P h i l o s o p h i c a l A n a ly s i s o f S o c i a l Pro b l e llls Po l i t i c a l and l .ega l P h i l o so ph y Ae� t h e t ics T h e o ry o f V a l u e P h i l u s u p h y u I ' S c i c n ce

TH EOLOGY 233 331 332 361

365 393

Logic A n c i e n t Ph i l os o p hy M e d ieval P h i l u so p h y O r ie n t a l T h o u gh t K i c rkcga a r d a n d e x i s t e n t i a l i s m Phi l o so phy 0 1' Re l i gi o n

BUSI N ESS B3 3 24 3 28 3RI

Logic P h i l o s o p l l i c a l A n a l y s i s or Socia l I'r o b k l 1l S P o l i t i c a l a n d Lcga l P h i l o s o p h y T h c o ry o r V a l u e

FINE A RTS est het ics 37 1 38 1

Theory o f Value

Arba Igh. C hairma n : H uber, love l l , Menzel . M yr bo .

201 12 1 2_H

3 24 3 2R

Ph i i oso p h i c a l l sslic s M o r a l Ph i l o s o p h y Logic P h i l o so p h i c a l A n a l y s i s o f S o c i a l Pro h l e m s Po l i t i c a l a n d Legal P h i l o s o p h y

3 I 332 333 335 361 3 65 37 1 381 385

A n c i e n t Ph i l oso p h y M e d i e v a l Ph i l oso p h y M o d c rn P h i l u s u p l l Y C o n t e m p o r a ry P h i l os o p l l Y O r i c n t , l i T h o Ll �h t K i e r k e�aard a l ; d L x i s t '; l l l i a l i s m ;\cs t he l i c s T h e ory o f V a l u e P ro b l e m s i n ;vI c d i c a l L t h i c s 393 P h i l os o p h y 0 1 ' Re l i gi u n 39 5 Ph i l osoph y o C \: i c n c c 427 Ph i l o s o p h y a n d C u rr e n t Pru b l c llls 435 dvanced S c m i n a r i n Ph i l os o p hy 49 1 . 49 2 I n de p e n d e n t R e a d i n g a n d Rese a r c h 49 3 Se n i o r I n de p e n d c n t S t u d y

I NT E R I M COU R S E S O F F E R E D I N 1 97 5 31 1

314

How o \V i n A J l A r gll l ll c n t B i o l ogy a n d E t h i c s v

I NT E R I M CO U R S ES O FF E R E D I N 1 976 20 1 305 309

I n t ro d ll c t i u n t o P h i l o so p hy Ph i l o s o p h y and Fa c t s of S pace a n d Ti me I:: x i s t e n t i a l i s m in S ca n d i n av i , l n Fi1 m


43

Physical Educat·o

SCHOOL OF

The U niversi t y's physical

educat ion progra m seeks to

ingr a i n in eac h s t u de n t a funda­ mental reo pect o r the role o f phy i cal at: t i i t y i n l iving. Pro fes 'iona l l y , it pr epares propect i e leaders for a reers in phy i a l educ, t io n , hea l t h , r c r a ti n , a t h l e t i c s , a n d corrective t herapy. I nst ru ct i o n is o ffered i n a p pro x­ i m a t e l y 30 d i ffere n t physica l educa tion a c t i v i t ies. The activi t y program is u ni q ue l y cha racterized by a t i me l y resp >us to s tuden t i n t e rests in recrea t i na l o p p r t u n i t ies ava i la ble in t he Pacific N o r t h wes t . O lson , D i re c t o r : A u pi ng, Beckma n , Broeker , Ca rlso n , Chase. Hose t h , Ki t t i l s b y , Lundga , rd . Offic r , West eri ng. Assi: led b y Anderso n , Ashe r , Be nso n . H a fe r , Hemioll . I verson , N ic h o lso n , Peterson , Ph i l l i ps, Thieman .

1 00

O r ie n t a t i o n to Phy sica l E d u c a t ion

200-299 I nd ividual a n d Dual A c t i v i t ies

230-239 A q u a t i c s 240-249 Rh y t h ms 250-259 A t h l e t i c Games 275 277

Wa t e r S a fe t y I n s t r uc t ion Fo u n d a t i o ns o f Physical Educa t i o n

281 282 283 284 285 287 288

I n j ury Preve n t io n a n d Thera p e u t i c eire Pro fessional A c t i v i t i e s : Dance Professional A c t i v i t i e s : Gymnastics Professional A c t iv i t ie s : Team Sports for M e n Pro fessional A c t i v i t ies: I n d i v i dual a n d Dual S p o r t s Profess i o n a l Ac t i v i t ie s : Recrea t i o n A c t i v i t ies P r o fessional A c t i v i t ie s : Team p o r t s for Women

F i r s t Aid School H e a l t h Physical Educat ion i n t h e El e me n t a r y School 3 24 Pe rson al Hea l t h 3 2 6 C o mm u n i ty l l e a l t h 3 28 Curricul u lll Deve l o pmcnt a nd A d m i n i s t ra t i o n 3 3 0 Rec rea t io n Pr o g r a m m in g 3 3 1 The Woman as a Compe t i t or 3 3 2 O ffi cia t ing for Women 334 Scic n t ific Basis for T r a i n i ng 360, 3 6 1 Professional rac t ic Ll m , ' o a c h i n g Prac t ic u lll 362 R h y t h m s a n d Dance 370-375 Coach i n g Theory 39 1 , 392 Therapeu t i c Exerc ise, A m b u l a t i on Te c h n i qu e s 4 7 8 Psy c ho l o gi c a l Con c e p ts o f Phy s i ca l E d uc a t i on a n d A t h l e t ics 481 Exerc ise Physi ology 292 295 322

4 2 4 3 484 485 49 1 597

Kinesio logy

Recrea t io n A d m i n i s t r a t i o n ?vleasuremc n t a n d Evalua t i o n on Physical E d u c a t io n B io mecha n i cs I n d e pe n de n t S t udy Gra d u a t e Re 'earch

I NT E R I M CO U R SES O F F E R E D I N 1 9 76

202 204 208 210 237 255 303 305 307 308 309 3I3 315

I n t e rme d i a t e and Advanced Gol f B ow l i n g Skiing S l i m na s t ics Sk i n and Skuba Diving 'o-Ed Volleyball Leadership for Ou t d o o r tvl i n i s t r ies Fa m i l y C e n t e red C h i l d b i r t h Exploring Wash i n g t o n 's . a t u ra l W i n te r S po r ts M o t i v a t i o n B o n d I ss u e s Ball Games a n d P . T . B a rn u m Drugs, Ergoge n i c A i d s , a n d t h e A t h l c te Pro fessional Recre a t i o n ,

Opportu n i ties

334 497

A. n.

Scien t i ric Basis for T r a i n i n g I n t e rn Programs Corrective Therapy I n t e rn s h i p Orien ta t i on t o T h c r a p y Programs


45

P h y s i c is a ba : i c scie n ce ho ld i ng t w o p ro m ine n t po s i ti o n i n cOI� t e m po r a r y societ y.

Phys·cs

.

'

F i rs t p h ys i cs is an i m p rI:m t l:OrnersI ne o f o ther d is c i p l i n s such as chemi 'try . ge o l o g y and biology ; and it b, t h e fo ull­ d a t io n fo r our fa m i l i a r t e c h ­ nologies o f co m lll u n i ca t i o n , t ran 'portcl t i o l l a nd energy conve r­ sio n . Seco n d l y . I h r o ug h i ts i n q u i r i n g p ri n ci pl e: and t in u gh t he revo l u l i o llaJ'y basic cone pts o f n a t u re i t i n t rod uces , p h y s i cs dra m a t ica l l y a ffec ts t he human vis i o n o f n a t u re a n d c r i t ica l p h iloso p h ica l t h o ug hf .

.

The ph y s i ( s maj or sequence offer� a c h a l lenging progra m e m pha' i z i ng a l o w s l uden t-teac her ra ti o with unde rgra d uate re, earch par L i i p. t i o n . Severa l s t u den t pu blica t io ns res u l t ing fro m s u c h research have a p pe a re d ill professi o n a l j o u rn a ls o f i n t ernat i o n a l re p u t a t i o n '

.

The engineeri ng/physic. degre prepare. t he s tu de n t s fo r a career ill a v a r ie ty o f ngi neeri ng d is i pli n es. The grad u at es u po n a p p ro va l of t he de pa r t men t , may a u t o ma t i c a l l y c a d mi t ted to t he brrad ua t e s c hool o f eng i neering a t e lu mbia Ullivcl' ' i L y i n N e w Y o rk City o r be admitted to o t her schoo ls s u c h as Sta n ford w i l h w h i c h P l U has co o pera Hve ,

pl'()gra ms.

The de pa r t m e n t al. 0 o ffer. a B . A . degree f o r science-oriented l i ber: d a rts s t u den t s , re q u i ri n g onl y s i x courses i n p h ys i c s A pec i a l l y d e s i gned c o u r. e fo r nO I1 -5c icl1 c maj rs ( M an and t he Phy:ical Univ rse ) :1 I1d ne f r m u i c majors ( M u:i cal AcoU't i cs ) i s a l 0 o ffere d. .

'

Jaco bs . Chai rman : A d a ms. H o u k . Nome. ' . Tan g . Assis ted b y

Heere n .

1 06 1vl a n a n d t h e Physical Un ive rse 1 2 5 . 1 26 Col lege P h y s i cs 1 47, 1 48 I n t ro d u c t o ry Pilysics I .abora t o r y 1 53 . 1 54 G e n e r a l PhYs ics _05 Muskal Acoust ic � 223 E l c m e n t a ry Modern P h y i c s 272 S o l i d S t a t e El ec t r o n i c Dev ices 331 E l e c t ro magne t i c Theory 332 E l e c t ro ma gn e t i c Waves a n d Physkal O p t ics 336 M e c h a n i cs 351 T h e r m o d y n a mics 3 5 4 Engi n o e r i n g A na lysis 35 . Tea c h i n g or Physics 3S M a t he m a t ical P h y s i cs 401 I n t ro d uc t io n to Q u a n t u m Mec han i c s 406 Advanced V i l odern Physks 421 , 422 A d v a n c e d Labora t ory ' 49 1 . 492 I n d e p e n de n t S t udy es e a r c h 497 . 49 X r a d ua tc Research 597. 598


47

The ' l u d y o f po l i t ica l science t ra i n , ' t he s t ude n t fo r t he exercise of his rights a mi d u t ies a ' a c i t i ze n by v i ng h i m a bel ter u nders t a nd i ng o f or d e mo cra t ic p o l i t ic a l processes and o f a l t erna tive s y s t e m s . The d epart men t provides pre-professio na l t ra i n i ng lea d i n g to ca re r i n tea c h i ng , law, govenuncn t a nd related fiel d s .

gi

The s t ude n t o f p o l i t ical scie nce pla n ing a career i n governmen t o r po L i t i cs has t he 0 PP r t u n i t y t o co m bi n e h i s academic s t u d y o f politics a n d gove rn men t w i t h pra c t i ca l e xperience by pa r t i c i pa t i o n i n o n e o f t he i n ternsh i p progra ms , ponsored b y t he depa r t me n t . A t prese n t t hese a re av a i la ble in p u bl i c a d mi n i足 'tra t i o n , p u b l i c a ffa i rs , a n t he legisl a t ive pro cess. Farmer, Cha i r ma n : Co l l inge, Spe ncer, U lbric h t . Assisted by B ri k e r , C h a n c e , Mo rk .

101 20(

251

282 325 331 336

A n I n v i t a t i o n t o P() l i t i c s T h e Po l i t i c a l I magi n a t i o n A me r i c a n Pol i t i cs Po l i t ics A b r u a d Po l i t i c a l T h o u g h t Pol i t i c s A m o n g N a t i o n s Po l i t ics o f I n te r n a t i o n a l

Political Science

C o o p e ra t io n

352 356 3 -7

36 1 363 364 368 37 1 41 1 426 43 1 432 456 4 57 458 4 59 461 4 64 , 466 47 4 483 484 487

Po l i tics in A me r i c a n S t a les Urban Po l i t ic s a n d Prob leills Pol i t ic s or thc Bureaucracy Po l i t ical Pa r t i e s Po l i t ic a l Co m ill u n i c a t i o n a n d Opinion T h e Legis l a t ive Process T i l e Pre s i de n c y Pu l i t i cs a n d t h e Legal Process S c u pe a n d M e t h o ds o r Pu l i t i l: a l S c i e n ce Rece n t Po l i t i c a l T h o u g h t I ssues i n I n t e rn a t i o n a l R e l a t i o n s E u ro pe a n I n t e gra t i o n T h e A d m i n i s t r a l i ve S l a t e T h e A d m i n is t ra l i ve E n v i r o n m e n t I n ternsh i p in Public A d m i n i s t ra l i o n T h e A d ll l i n is l r a t i v Purpose E t h n i c M i n o r i t ies i n t he Po l i t ical Pro cess 465 I n t e rnsh i p i n t h e Lcgi s l a t ive Process Le gisl a t i ve S t u d y and Prac t i ce T h e C () t1 s t i t u t i o n T h e West m i n s t e r M o de l S o v i c t Po l i t ic a l Sys t e m C o n t c m po r a r y Revu l u l i o n a r y ivI ovel11e n l s

I n depen dcn t Rea d i n g a n d R esea rc h 597 , 598 Grad u a t e Research 599 T h e sis

49 1 , 492

I NT E R fM CO U R S ES O F F E R E D IN I

317 3 19

76 C o n c e p l l l a l Rev o l u t i o ns C o n t e m po ra ry R e v u l u t i u n a ry tvI ()vcl11 c n l s


49

Psyc ology P'iy c ho I( gy is a s c i e n 1 i fi c !ot udy of t he. belHlVi or of l iv in g o rga n isms w i l h :I n em phasis o n lUlder l a nd ing h u m a n beha i o r . T h e maj o r p r o ides a ba ckgroulld pre pa ra t io n fo r a pro fe: i o n a l care r o r serves l h o I uden I: pla n n i ng 1 0 pllr� lIe rel a t e I voca l iOll\ i n hich psy chologica l i n sig h t is a v a l uable res o u r ce . "

A s a s u pplemen t t o a cad m i c lea rni ll!.! t he fa cu l t y seeks to pr v i d e � ppo rl u ll i li es fo r � l l I d n t s t o have e x per i e n ces o f a field-work na t til' i n CI wide va de t y o f se l l i ngs in t he grea t e r acoma a rea s u c h as : merica n La ke V e l ero n s H ospi ta l . We " te rn S l a t Hos p i t a l ( in cl ud i ng t he h il t! S t u d y a n d Trea t men t Cen t er ) . Casca - ia Diagn o't i c en t er (j u ven ile deli n q uen t s ) , Ra i n i er S t a t e Sc h o o l ( men t a l l y reta rded ) . Men t a l H ea l t h 'Iin ics, Speda l Services Depa r t men ts o f local sch o o l d isl ric ts , e t c. .

The l a bo r a t o ry classes o ffered b_ I he depa rt me n t a re � m a l l i n s i ze w i t h 1113 i m u m i m po r t a n ce a t t ached to i n d i v id u l iLed i n s t ruct i o n . Severt so n , Chairma n : Adach i , Be x t on , La rsgaard . LeJ c lI n M o ri t sligu . N o l ph . S t o ffer .

101 1 10

I n t ro d u c t i o n t u Psy c h o l ogy St udy Skills

22 1

Thc Psy c h o l o gy of A d j u s t llle n t S c ie n t i fic ... t l e t h od s S o c i a l Psyc h o l ogy

243 3. 0

335 340 403 405 410 4 20 421 450 460 490 49 J , 493

515 540 570 S77

590 596 597 599

De v cl o p m c n t : I n fa n cy t o 1 a t ur i t y I-I u lllan . 'e u ro psyc l w l ogy T h c Psy c h o l ogy or I n fa n c y a n d Chil uhood A d u lcsce n t P y c hol ogy F illo t i o n a n d M o t i v a t ion Psy c h ( ) l ogy o f Person a l i t y A b n or m a l I3c h a v i o r Psy c h () l og i c �i 1 Tcs t i n g Lea r n i n g : Re s e a r c h a n u T h e o r y l I i s t u r y and S y s t e m s in Psy c h o l ogy 492 I n u e pc n d c n t S t u d y Sc m i n a r Psy c h o l ogica l Assessmen t C o u n s e l i n g T h e o ry Pra c t i c u m i n C o u n se l i n g a n d i O !" Assc sslll c n t S u pe r v i s e d F i e l d W or k Seill i n a r : Psyclllliogy o f Le a rn i n g I n de p c n d e n t Re<;c a r c h Soc i a l S c i c n c e M e t h o ds Thesis

I NT E R I M I N 1 976

31 1

319

O U R S ES O FFE R E D

Psy c i lO l ugy of U n e x p l a i n e d Ph e n o m e n a

I n vo l v e me n t ill

COll l m u n i t y

a

T h e r a pe u t ic


51

The r ligi o l1s h e ri ta g o f m a n k i n d pa r t ic u l a r l y t he J uda e o Chri · t illn t ra d i t i o n is c ri t ica l l y e ':l m i ned fo r t h pur poses o f preserving a n d a p­ ,

131 ­

,

pl y i ng i ts a cc u m u la t i ng w i sd o m . The d e pal' t men t ' 5 progra m exami nes re l i g io u d imensions e n co u n t e red i n o t her d is c i p l ines and serve ' s t u d e n t s w h o e l ct religion a ' t he i r academic or voca t io n a l s pecia l l y . '

The P LU R eligio n D e p :u t ll1 en t ha res acade m ic co u r 'es a n d exclulIlges professors i n :l s des of co u rses o ffered a n d shmed b y Pacifi c L u t he r3 11 U n iversit y , S t . Ma rt i n 's Col leg , a n d t he U n iver'li l y o f Pug t S o u n d , as part of it- i J1Vo lv me n t Ul t h e ecu menica l movemen t and t h e u n i t y o f h u m a n fa m i l y . Lu t hera n I ns t i t u te fo r Theologi ca l E d uca t io n ( LI TE ) : The R e l igi o n D e pa r t men t a lso par i c i pa t s i n a progra m o f con t in u ing t i l o l ogical e d u ca t i o n fo r clergy a n d lai t y i n t he Pa ci fic N o r t hw es t . D r . Wa l t r Pilgri m of t he R e l i gion De pa rt men t d ireets t he LITE pl'ogro n . F o r (u rt her d e ta i ls '0 11 1 ac t Dr. P i l gri m .

hris t o p he rs o l , Chai rma n : Ek l un d , Gehrke, Go v i g . I ngra m , K n u t so n , Pet ersen , Pi lgri m . St ivers. Ass i s t ed b y B raswel l . S r . H ur s t , Lee .

Religion

485 490

J u daeo-C h ri s t ia n Life a n d Thought Re l i gi o u s E x pe r i e n ce B i b l i c a l L i t e r a t u re I n t ro d u c t i o n t o T h e o l ogy R e l i g i o n s of M a n M y t h , R i t ual , a n d S y m b o l O l d Te s t a m e n t S t u d ies New Tes t a me n t S t u d i e s T h e L i fe o f J e s u s C h r is t i a n E t h i c s P h i l o s o p h i c a l a n d Re l ig i o u s Trad i t ions o f I n d ia Ph il oso ph ica l and Rel igious Tra d i t ions o f C h i n a Ancien t C h u rc h H istory M o d e r n C h u r c h H i s t or y m e r i c a n C h u r c hes S t u d ies i n C h u r c h M i n i s t r y Christianity and the Social C r i sis Religious Experience Among American M i no r i t i e s Luther C h r i s t i a n C l assics C h r i s t i a n T h o u gh t a n d M o d e rn C o n sc i o u sness � C h r i s t ia n i t y a n d t h e A rt s Se n i or Seminar in Re l i gi o n

(a) (bl (cl (d) (el

H u m a n Sexua l i t y Rel i gion a n d Psy c ho l ogy R e l i gi o n a n d Po l i t i cs De a t h a n d D y i n g Li t e r a t ure a n d T h e o l ogy

1 32 24 1 251 26 1 262 341 342 343 351 361 362 37 1 372 373 38 1 381 383 39 1 392 45 1

(OfJl!lI 10 sl!lIiors alld grad!lall! .I'll/delll.v)

49 1 , 4 9 2 I n d e pe n de n t S t u d y 493 M a i o r C h r i s t i a n a n d O t he r R c i i g i o u s T h i n k e rs

I N T E R I M COU R S ES O F F E R E D I N 1 97 6 307 R e l i g i o n T h ro u gh S t or y a n d A r t 309 C r ea t Dea t h and thc S o u n d of 310 31 1 314 480

One Ha n d C l a p p i n g Religious A merica a t t he Bice n t c n n i a l M a r t i n Lut her K i n g , J r . T h e Quest for t h e H i s t or i c a l J esus M aj o r C h r i s t i a n T h i n k e r s : D i e t r i c h l3o n ho e ffe r


53

Socio ogy, Anthropo ogy & Soc · al We fare

Socio logy a n d socia l welfa re a re cOl1cerned w i t b t he de v elo p m en t o rga n iz.a t io n , a n d beha vio r f h u man gro u ps ; t he processe a n d u n i fo r m i t ies o f social beha v i o r ; t he n a t ure and rela t i 11. h i p o f gro u ps a n d i nst i t ut io ns ; a n d n specific graduate s e q u e nce in cri m i n a l j u . t ice to st i m u la te crit ica l a n d c 11. t ru c t ive a t t i t ude� t o w a rd socia l ch a nge a n d t t ra i n p I o ns w ho w i l l co n tri b u t e t o t he reso l u t io n o f . oeia l co nflict . A n t hro po logy explo res t he p reh ist oric devel o pmen t o f c u l t ure. a nd pa t tern ' f c u lt u ra l beba i o r i n co n t e m porary . n a t i ve a n d folk societie. .

.

53 ]

240 340 34 1

Oppo r t u n i t ies e xist for m o v i ng t h ro ug h t he la s ro o m a n d o u t i n t o t he comm u n i t y , Field e xperien ce ( SW 47 5-6 ) i ns ures t hi. for Socia l Wel fa re majo r b u t ' i m i l a r po. ' i b i l i t ies su rface d u ring t he I n t eri m , i n o ne-se me. tel' cou rse , a n d pred o m i na n t l y , i n w h a t i s t ermed Block Placement ,

34 2 343

344

' ,

440 44 1

442

44 3

,

Sch jJIer, Walter. Willi . Assi - ted by gue. t lec t u r r ,

52 1

1 30 I n t ro u u d i lJ n t o I l u m a n Socie t i e s 230 S m a l l Gr o u ps a n d S m a l l Soc i e t ies 33 0 Sociai l n q u i ry 33 1 ·334 P rsp ect ive s on E t h n i c G ru u ps 3 ] The A:;ian A m e r i c a n 332 T h e Black A m e r i c a n T h e M c x i L' a n merican 33 3 3 4 T he N a t ivc A m e r i c a n 4 3 0 Be l ie fs in u c i a l C o n t e x t 490 c m i n a r i n A n t h ru p o l ogySociology 49 1 [ n dc pc t l l!c n t S t u d y : n d c rg r a d u a t Rea d i n ns 4 9 2 I n d e pe n de n t t u d y : J n d e rgr a Liu a t e Field W o r k 5 0 1 Progra m S e m i n a r SO I O LOGY

.

J o bst . Chai rperso n : Chris to p he r Cla rke, Co rn i e , Dra k e . G i l bertso n H a n o n . Klei n , Oberho l t zer.

A NTHR OPOLOGY-SOCIO LOGY

.

49 1 49 2

501 503 505 51 1 51 513

A merica n Sucie t y V.. ri a n t L i Ce S t y l e s \3 u r ea u c ra c y a n d La rge Sca l e Orga n i za t i o n s T h e Fa m i l y C h a n g i n g C O ll 1 lll u n i t ies R a c e Rr l a t iolls and Con il i c l Re. o! u t ioll �)cia l i l. a t i u n a n d t he C risis o f l i fe Race . Revol u t i o n a n d t h e Deve llJ p i n g C o u n t r i es 'o c i a l Pol i c y a n d O r ga n i z �l t i o n

S o c i o l o g y o f E d u c a t i o ll I l l de p � l 1 d c ll t t u d y : U n de rgra d u a t e Re a d i n gs I n d e p e n d e n t St u dy : U n de rgra d u a t e F i e l d W m k Program Se m i n a r G ro u p Proce :; Soc i a l Scie nce M e t h o d s The C r i m i n a l J u s t icc S y s t e m R l:h a b i l i t a t i on M o d e l s S oc iulogica l T h eo r y a n d T h e C r i m i n a l J u s t i c e . y s t e l ll

54 1

590 595 597

( l c i a l S y s t e m s I n t c rv c n t i o n M i nority-M a j o r i t y R e l a t ions S o c i a l S t r a t i li c a l i o n i n S o c i a l Systems Scminar raLilIa t c Rea d i ngs Thesis

A NT H R OPOLOGY 220 C u l t ur a l n t l H o po l o g 221 Ph y s i c a l An t h ro p o l ogy .1 2 1 -3 24 C u l t l11 e a n d Pe l l p i c S e r i e s 321 A fr i c a .1 2 2 A � i a 3 2 3 Occ a n ia 324 S O ll t h / {, e n t r a l A m c r i c.a .1 29 E t h n o l o g y o f" lor t h A me r i c a n I ndians 4 2 0 Eco n o m i c A n t h r o po l ogy Ecol ogy a n d Social Orga n i z a t ion 42 1 49 1 I n d e p e n dc n t S t u u y : U n d e rgra d u a t e R e a d i ngs 49 2 I n dc p c n d c n t S t u d y : U n de rgra d u a t e F i e l d W o r k SOC I A L W E LFARE 222 C o m m u n i t y S e rvices I n t r o d u c t i o n 10 S o c i a l W o r k 27 1 3 6 5 S o c i a l I n t e rve n t i o n 44 2 Social P o l i c y a n d O rga n i z a t i o n 47 2 S o c i a l Work Pra c t ice 473 I n t e rviewi n g 47 5 476 F i e l d Ex perience 484 Soc. i a l Researc h 490 Sc m i n a r 49 1 I n d e p e n d e n t S t u dy 50 1 S e m i n a r in F a m i l y C ll l ll P T h e ra py 50 2 Fa m i l y T h e r a py Prac t i c u m


54

Options FOREI G N S T U D Y OPPOR UNI T I E S AT P L U

LU � ncourages students to expand . their VISion of the world by makino �vailable variou � opportunities to stud In other countries. The Foreign Studies Program Coordinator, Office of the Provost, has information on study , wor k , and travel in foreign countries and will gladly assist students in selecting � ppropriate programs. Faculty mem bers 111 the Depart ment of Foreion Lan guages are also pleased to talk w i h stu ents reg:l rd ing foreign study. The va nous ptlons for such st udy are de 'cribed bel o w .

;

t

lude n t s may choose to study o n a program called Independent Liberal Arts ol\eges Abroad . The program is sp o n s o r e d by Pa c i f i c L u theran University in consortium with four other coll eges in the Pacific No rthwest - Gon zaga Universit y , University of get Soun d , Whitman Coll ege , and WIUamette University. To date , the program s have been one-semester

programs during the fall in Lo n d o n . Programs in the future may he situated in

ther European countries or other of the worl d . PLU has also

parts

emphasi zed travel courses during the January Interim and the summer sessions. Ordinari l y t h ere are five o r six offerings each year dur i n g the Interi m and one or two offerings during the '!ummer.

approval will be required depart ment concerned .

affil iated with Central College an d w ith the C o un c i l for I n t e rn a t i o n a l Educational Ex change. Cent ral has p �ograms in Paris, Madrid , umd o n , V I n n a , and the Yucata n , and C l E E llas study centers in Pari s , Relmes, and Sevil le.

In all cases, a student who is consideril�g stu y in an ther country should fIrst diSCUSS plans with the Foreign Studies Program Coord inator (Office of the Provost ) and complete a Leave f Absence form from the Office ot t �e �egistrar before departing ( this . : Will lacil l tate return to the Universi t y at the conclusion of the foreign study

P

' T Jler), i l l a i l lakE'S IIzI! limils o r h i s o wn l'isiOIl for Ihe lilll ils o ( tlze world. " --Sc!lOpl?ll/;a l / l!r

I n order to make more foreion study options available to stude nts, L U has

I n addition to the above , the student may also pursue studies in locations t h r oughout the world hy special arrangeme nt with a variety of other programs for which PLU may arant acad emic c redit. However, in the c e of such programs with which PLU is not directly affiliated , the student should file a letter of intent with the chai rman of his major depart ment ,m d with tbe

a�

Provost prior to leaving PLU. The letter sho uld outl ine in broad terms what the student proposes to stud y , where and at what length of time, and how f o r e i gn experience relates to

the his

academic program. On the basis of this informatio n , plus a record of lectur attende and examinations completed , . acad emiC credit may be allowed, but no grade point average will be computed .

The

University reserves the right to . r e q u l re examinations covering the material studi ed. It is rec o m mend ed

that a sol i d foundation in the language of the cOlintry be acquired before embarking. Upo n return , the student wil l . with the assistance of the chairman of the Depa r t m e n t of Foreign Lan guages, prepare a writ ten request for academic credit. If st udies have been pursued in several academic fields.

from each

program ) . Attendance a t a foreion � . . ul1lv � rslty Joes 110 { waive graduation reqmrements of PLU.

RES ERV E O F F IC E R TRAINI NG C O R P S PROGRAM ( A IR FORC E ) A E ROS PAC E STUD IES Students enrolled at PLU who have been selected for the Air Force ROTC Commission Program and transferees qual ified for entry into the Air Force ROTC Prof essional Officers Course may enro l in Air Force ROTC Aerospace Studies courses at the University of Puget Sound. Applications are normally accepted during the fall semester p receding the expected date of entry mto the Professi onal Officers Course. Selecti( n for the course i s on a compet itive , be. t qualified basis.

Additional information about Air Force ROTC, its curriculum , admissions and procedures, may be obtained from th� PLU Office of Admissions or by . wntlllg the Professor of Aerospace Studies, University of Puget Ta oma, Washington 984 1 6 .

Sound ,


55 LA TE A F T E R N O O N A N D E V EN 1 N G C LASSES

To pro ' de for the professional growt h and cult ural enrichment of person ' unable to take a fuJJ-time college cOllrse, the Univ !'Sit,' conduct:' hlte-llfremooJ1 and evening classes. In addition to a wide v:uiety of offerings in t b e a�ts and sciences, there are specialized and graduate cour 'es for teach rs, administrators and persol in btl iness and industry. A special bul letin is printed each semester outlining the offering and is available from the Regi ' trar of t he University. S U M M E R S E S S I ON

A n e x t e n s i v e s u m m er school curriculum, of the same quality as th t offered during the regular academic year, is availabl to all qual i fied person . In addition, summer session is typically a t i me when the faculty offers innovative. experi mental courses which cover a broad range of contemporary issue� and perspecti\'es in many fields. TIle :ummer ession consists of two four and one-half week terms and begins in tbe midd le of J une. Designed for UJldergraduates and graduate students ulike, the program serves teachers and administrat ors seeking creden tial. and special c urses , freshmen desiring to i ni t iat college study , and o thers de-irillg special s t udies offered by the school.. and depurt ments. Tr' nsient students who enroll for the summer session need only submit a I I ter o f a c a d e m ic standing o r give other evidence of being prepared for college ;fudy. complete Summer Sessio / l Cara/og, out lining t he curriculum as well as s pe c i a l i n stitutes, workshops and semillars, is printed each . pring and is available from t he Dean of the ummer Session at the University.

K P LU-FM . F I N E ARTS

PU B LIC R A D I O

KPLU-FM . . . Stereo 8 8 . 5 m Hz . . . is licensed by t he F e d e ra l Communications Commission to the U n i v e rs i t y B o a r d o f R e ge n t s . Committed to serving the greater Puget Sound region, the University 's 40,000 watt nOll-commercial sta tion is charged with the responsibility of pre.'enting a pr gram service t hat provid s i s diverse c o m m u n i t i e s w i t h i n fo r m a t i o n , educat ion, and entertainment . K P LU-F 1 , on t he a i r 7 days a week , 52 \ eeks a year, is managed by a profes ional staff and operated by F C-licensed University students. The st udents who are employed by the station come from a variety of academic b a ckgrounds ranging f�om art to zool ogy. Employment is not restricted to broadcast/journalism majors so there is u true cross-section of interests and backgrounds. K PLU-FM programming consists of locally produced materials and national :Jll d intema tional presen tations made po� ible through its affilia tion with N a t i o n a l P u b l i c R a d i o , Mu tual B roadcasting System , United Press I n terna ti onal , Parkway Productions, Italian Radio, Deutsch Welle, und several other sources.

CHOlCE

Since 1 969 , CHOICE, Center for H u m a n O r ga nization in Changing Enviro nmen ts, has functioned as t he community service and ac tion-research arm of Pacific Lu t heran University. The acronym , CHOICE, conveys i ts funct ion and style : to ini tiate processes and programs which assist many segments of the increasingly urbanized society to participate in making choices which may lead to improved quality of life in the region. C HO ICE provides linkages with m any communi ty service agencies , provides channels for social involvement by fac ulty and students , and furthers the University's role as an agent of social change. C H O I C E provides organizutional development services to social service agencies, govemmental and military o r g a ni zations, school systems , businesses and churches through its network of skil led resource persons . It provides communicat ions and planning workshops and training programs for groups involved in social cbange in suc h areas as alcohol and d rug use , law e n f o r c e m e n t a n d c rrec t i o n s , minori ties , human relations und contlict resolution . Since 1 9 70, C H O IC E has purticipated i n a consortium o f colleges und television stations, The Puget Sound Coal it ion , a regi o n -wide ed uca tion-act ion project to develop increased public participation in the i'sues of t he environment and the criminal j u, tice s stem. CHOICE is linked to similar resou rce centers lIt o t her A LC-related colleges: A u g s b u r g , A u g u s t a n a , California Lutheran, Ca pi tal , Concordia-Moorhead, Lut her and Texas Lutheran .


57

Stude t Life TIle q u a l i t y of life c ul t iv a t ed and fostered wi t h i n t h e U n i ve rs i t y is an n l ial component o f t he academic c o m m u n i t y . 111e environment p rod u ce d i!> c on d'u c i v e to a l i fe of vigo rou ' and nea tive sc holarsh ip . I t also re c ogn i z e s I h'H l i beral educ at ion is fo r the t o tal pe rs o n and com plemen t ary rela t ionship exi ts bet ween the stude n t. ' i n t ellec t ua l d e v elopmen t and sa tisfac ti on o f heir other i n d ividual needs. I nterac t ion w i t h per on of d i f fe ri n g l i fe styles . a pp l i c a tioll of cla s sro o m k n o w led ge t o pe rs on a l goals a n d as pi ra l i o n s , and n o n - a e a d > m ic experiences are a1l i nva l uable and ital componen ts of education at P L U . I n a t i me when there is a n e e d for meaningful commun i ty . t he r e s i d e n t i al ca mp u s fa c i l i t a te s ge n u i n e relation, h i p a mong m m be rs of t he Un i versi t v , from dive rse rel i gio us , racial, and ul t ll ra l hac k ground!, . A l l o f t he servi ces alld faci li t ie. p rov i d ed are in tende d to compl emen t t he academic p r o gra m . At P L U , . t l l de n t s ha ve assumed increasing responsibility fo r their personal a nd , o c i a l behavior. The

S t ud e n t Life Office is i n te n d ed 10 fac il i t a te Ihe devel o pmen t of the st u d e n t i n w ha t e er d i rec t i o n he or she may wish to go . The servi es prov i de d re fl ec t c h a nging s t udent needs, and t he o ppo r t uni t i es fo r s t ud e n t pa rl ici pat i on i nc l ude vi r t u a l l y a l l aspects of t h e Universi t y . TIle Vice Presiden t f r Stude n t L i fe a nd his s ta ff are re s p o n s i b l e f o t' o r u a n l z l ng a nd programmin g reside nce halb, o rien t i ng new studen ts , a, si s t i n g fo reign s t u d e n t s , Hcting as l i ai s on to the Associated S tudellts of PLU ( tude n t go v rn men ! ) , and coordina ting o t h er s t ud n l a c t i \· it i e.... . I n d i vid u a f H l tcntio n b g i v n

to every snldent concern i n c l l l ding a variety of specific seryices o u tl in e d bel o w .

R ESPON S l B l L I T l ES O F COM M U N ITY L I FE Residential Hving is an in t egra l part of the e d uca t i on a l proc s at PLU lin d t h e r e i d en ee hnlls were cons t ruc te d wit h that in mi n d . The po l i c y re fl ects t he c o m m i t m e n t t o the resi dent ia l c o nce p t . All s t udents not l i ving a t home , jth pare nt ' , g ua rd i a n , or s po us e are re q u i re d t o l ive in a r e s id e n ce hal l u n t il a c h ie v i n g senior status or th e age of 2 2 years. The h a l l s v�ry i n size, b u t each i s o rga n i zed as a sepnrate en t ity wil h st ude n t g o e rn m e n t , s ta ff. and progra ms . So m e of t J1(' ha l b a re co - e d , while o t hers are reserwd for all men or all wo men .

In t he close l ivi n g situation in th e res i d ence halls as w el l as in t he campu communit y at l a r ge , certain re gu l a t i o n s are necessary and t he Univers i ty a dmits st u dent ·' wi t h t he undenl t,m d ing t ha t they will comply w i t h tbe m . Al l st u d e n ts are e x p e c t ed to respec t t he rights and i n te grit y of ot h ers . Conduct which i, det ri m e nt al to th e student , h i ' co l l e a gu es , o r the U u ive rs i t y o r s uc h conduct w hic h vi lateS ci iJ law m ay be gr o u n d s for d i missal fro m the U n i ve rs i t y , Specific reguJ a ti o ns and gu i d el i n es for r idence hall Jiving are outli ned i n the Stlldcnt Handbook which i. a v ail a b l e a t the S t u d en t Life Office a nd is issued to acc e pt ed st udents prec edin g t heir freshman year .

ACT I V I TI ES The P LU St u d c II ! lIanclhook en u mera t es ov r 50 aGJdem ic a nd

n o n - a c a d e mi c orga nizations , cl ubs. so ciet ies and intere t gro u ps , which te tifies to the diversity of campus e x t ra-curricular l ife . Social action,

religious and pol i t ical organizatio ns ; i n te rest and porting clubs; and service. professional • nd academic societie. a.re a m ong t he optio ns fro m wh ich to choose. The arts a re no urishing at P-<lcifk Lutheran Univers i t y . The Choir of t he We.�t , Concert Band , t h e Un ivers i ty S y m phony Orche ' t ra , il re n ow ned ollegiale s tage , two art gallerie , Lit urgical Da nce e n se m b l e a J d fac ul t y a nd s t udent l ec t u res provide ge ne ro u. ° p po r t U Il i ties for t he performing Pe r, o n a l e x p ress i on is , t ud e n t . e m p h a s i z ed in d e b a t e , s t udent govern m en t , campus ra dio KP LU-F M . t h e University yea rbook a n d t he weekly st u de n t newspaper. Orga n ize d and individual physica l fire for ev ery o ne . Recreat ional ac t ivit i a ud c o mpet i t ive p rogra ms i nclude cro s ' football , country . ba ketba l l , swimming. hi k. in g , c l i m bi n g. volleyba l l , t e n n i s . gol f. w rest l i n g. pllddlebal l , bowli ng, 'q uash , h and ba l l , p i ng pong, baseba l l , softbal l , badminton , field hock y. track and fiel d , water pol o , s. k i i n g and rowi ng . A t hle t ic, emphasiz.e d e vel o pment of the individual I'l.l t her tl an t he sear c h for athleti c glory. yet t h e University is pro u d of il� va� i t y c h a m pionsh i ps i n many sports.

R E L I G I OU S L I FE Pa i fi c Lut hera n U n iversity by it very n a t u re is a pl oce for the i nteraction b e t wee n s t udies and r he Christ illll fa i th .

O p p o r t u n i t i es fo r t he m ut u a l celebra tion of t bat fa i t h on campus are r i c h a n d d iverse .

Chap I worship is hel d Monday, Wed nesday , and Friday m ornin gs d uri ng t h e se mester for all who wish to p a r t i c i I> a t e . The U 11 i v e r � i t y


SH Congregation meets in regular worship and also cele brates t he Lord's Supper each Sunday . Pastora l 'er i ces of t b Universi t y Ministers a re available to all st udent ' who desi re t hem. Several deno m inati ons and r l ig io us grou p ' have interest organization: on c a mpu , and there are n u merous s t u d e n t -in itiated Bible Study and fellowship group. . The Religious Life COllnc i l , an elected st udent !lJld fac ul ty commit tee, c oordinat es t hese llc t i vi t ie penne ss and mut ual in a s pir it of respect.

ST UDENT SER VICES "' T H E STUDENT R E A LT B CENTER ret ains t he s rvices of physician and nurses for ba ic medical c.1re or referral . All st uden ts are entit led to the services of the Center. *

H E A LT H

INSURANCE

AND

ACCI DENT

i offered by t he University 011 a ly) /untary ba. is . The group Accident and Si ckne ss Medical Expense Plan pro ' de. cov rage 24 hours a day . 1 2 mont hs a yea r , anywhere i n the world. This pLan is available at fal l , In teri m , or pring regi · t m tion onl y . A brochure outlining t he progrnm is ava il. b l e fr m t he General Se 'ices Office. All foreign t udents /IIUSf t ake ou t t he sc ho ol insumnce. *THE C O U N S E L I NG A N D T ESTI NG C ENTER ru;sists stude n ts in coping w i t h normal de elopmental problems. rained and experienced pe rs o nn el . i ncluding a taff psy chia t ris t . offer gro up a n d in dividual cou nsel ing. A "�I riety of psy c hol ogi ca l tests a nd in terest i nventorie ' a re availa ble t a ss is t s t ud n ts wit h c a re e r p l a n ni ng, educational a dj us tm e n t and personal p r ob l ems . * Details avail ab lt! HUlldbook.

in

l he

Studcllt

The LEAR N ING K I LLS SERVICE. located o n the second fl oor of t he Mort ved t Library, provides means by which st uden t may furt h e r dev lop th e i r academic 'kil ls as well as receive i mm ed iat e, prac t ical as:;i ·tance w i t h short-term academ ic proble ms.

LSS teaches a two-c red i t . t u d y Skil ls/reading cl a ss . a s well as nOll-c red i t speed reading classe and m i n i e urse in such basic learning s k ills a s ha n d li n g time, writing term papers, exam prel'arllti n, and no te-m ak i ng. Short review cl asses in math and Eogli h grammar and usage are al.,o o f f red . LSS a Iso o ffers a va rie t y of individ ual ized senr ic es : assistance wit h term pa pe rs . assi · tance w i t h s t udy problems, academic counseling, and pri va te t u t orials for most PLU courses. Most LSS services are fr of c harge to PLU students. M I N O R I T Y AFfA lRS OFF IC E coordinates a special program which 'eeks to c o n t i n uall ' provide for the academic and social n ed o f minority ludenL. Su pportive services include admis. ions assi. tance, s c h o l a rs hi p and financial lIid assista nce, counseling , book f u n d , a n d c o n voca t i on p rog r am . T H E CA E E R PLAN N I NG A D PLA CEM ENT OFF I C E seeks to fulfill the PLU commitment t o a develo p in " program of care r and l i fe planning . Students are assiste d d uring t he ir educ.1 t i()n in making meaningful and realist ic decisio ns concern i ng their L i fe and ork after grad uat ion t h ro u g h conferences with prof " ional . taff. workshops a nd seminars. classl'O o m and dorm prese n ta t ions , and material. hatted in ,) Caree -' Resource Center.

The Career Pla nnin g Office Ii t pilr t­ and ful l -t i m e e m ployment opport unities and summ r job opening f r ' t uden ts and alumni , assisv candida tes ill

devel oping job search t echn i q u es . and coordina tes an on-campus i n terview ing

sched ule of recrui ters from industry , business, governmen t , and grad uate s hools .

FOOD S E RVlCES are ava i l ab l e for all st uden ts. Resident students are required to take th ir m als in one of t he cam pus d i ning halls. No deductions are m:lde for st udents eating fewer than thr e meals per day . The Food Service is closed during vac a t i o n periods. St udents wi t h special diets can be accommoda ted at no extra cost. Students living off campus are enco uraged to eat their meals on campus. Visitors are invited to eat in either dining hall at the cash price. SCHEDULING S E R V ICES are maintained in the University Cen ter. All universi ty activities must be scheduled thro ugh this office. Sched uling st uden t act ivities is a joint respons i b i l i t y of the Univers i t y Cent r D irec t or and the Un iv ers i t y Sc hed uling Co mmi t tee. Studen t Govern ment is an in tegral part of st udent ac tivi ties at PLU. The associated st udents elect a se nate to govern t heir affai rs and oversee an e x tensive commit tee program t hat in olves hun dreds of st udents in ll c t i ve l y planning programs and represen ting : l lIdent opinion on variOll. Unive rs i t y boards and commi ttees. T h e U n i v e rs i t y C e n ter is headquarters for many o f t he campus activi ties and i� t he place where students and fac u l t y gather t o ea t . enjoy the recrea tional facil ities , and exchange ideas. The b u ild i n g itself has an interior design whic h features red and orange ll c ce n t ing the browns of northwest timber and is a bea utiful as well as fu nc t io na l facil i t y .


59 PLU BOOKSTORE is owned and operated by Pacifi c Lutheran University for the ben efi t of students, fa culty, s l a ff, and ( h ir guests. The bookstore ells the t ex tbooks and s up plies t hat are r e q uired or suggested by fac ul ty member.. f r t heir co urses. Add i tio n(ll read i ng m a i l er. suppl ies . gift items, gre tin2 cards. c l o t hing. fil m proces ing. toiletries. and ot her conven ien t i t ms are also available.

R ES I D E N T I AL L I F E As a residential n m pus, Pa cific Lutheran University o ffers students a valuable e. perience in gr u p l iving. The Unive rsi t y recognizes t he i m portance of n n-classr o m ac tivities in providing an ed ucatio n for the whole perso n . The a i m of resi dential li ving is to help t u dent ' gro w as h u man beings. Campus res i dence halls are smal l . They a r organ i zed i n t o communi ties i n which each individual counts as a per ( I l l . New knowledge shared wi t h frien ds in t h e residence hal l s takes o n a very personal meaning. Men and women o f many backgrounds and cul t llres live on campus ; the refore, studen ts i n residence have a unique opport uni t y t o broaden their c u l t ural horizons. The Universi ty cares about the quali t y of l i fe on cam pus. The a t tractive an d comfor table residence hal l s enrich the quality of life and enhance the leaming process. The University offers students h i gh-q u a l i t y hou ing o p po r t u n i t i e . in l u d ing s t udent l eaders hip experiences , formal and i n fo r m a l p r o gr a m s , and peer as ocia t ions. The student governing bo dies a re strong and activel y parlicil at i n i m proving t he pr gra m . A c' ele ct ion o f mod ern . a t t ra c t ive hal l s , each w i t h i t s own trad itjo ns and unique ad va nt ages. offer st udents the opport unity to es tablish a comfortable

l i ving pat te rn . All halls incl ude i n formal l o unges, study rooms, recrea tion areas, and common k i tchen and l a undry fac ili ties. Most o f the halls are co-educa tional . Al t hough t hey are housed in separate wings, men and women in cooed hal ls share 10 nge and recrea tion fac ili ties , and c o m mo n residence gove rn men t , and pa rticipate jointly in al l hall activit ies. Furth r i n fo r m a t i o n regarding residence hal ls can be obtained from the Residential Life Office. In addition to housing for single st udents, t he University main tains 26 apart ments on ca mpus for married students. Two- and t h ree-bedroom units are available. Applica t ion for these a partments can be made t h rough the Office of General Services .

E N V I RON S The Universi t y 's geographical sett ing a ffords th e student a wide variety o f both r e c re a t i o n a l and c u l t urdl entertainment o ptions. Recrea tiona l l y , the grandeur o f the Pacific Nortllwest coun t ry encourages p a r t i c i p a t i on in hik ing. camping, clim bing, kiing, boa t i ng and swi mming. The most c o nspicuous natura l monument i n t h e area i s M I . Rainier. I II addi tion to Rainier, t he distinct ive real ms of the Cascade and Oly m pic mountain ranges, and forests of Douglas Fir comp lete one o f t he most natma l l y tranquil environments i n t h e United Sta tes. Students can al " o enjoy t he aes t hetic o fferings o f nearby Sea t t l e and Tacoma. These city cen t ers host a variety of perfor m ing and rec ording artis t s , dozens of galleries and museums 3, well as unifl u e . ho p ping and dllllng e x periences.


60

Admission Euch a pplicant for admission is evaluated wi t hout regard to race, color, fa ith iJnd nationnJ or et hnic ori gin . A l t h o u gh lhere are no arb i t rary entrance requirement<;, ad m iss i o n is se l e c t i ve , Appl icants who presen t academic and personal traits which o u r ex perience indicates will enable t hem t o succeed at t h e Unive ity and benefit from i ts e nvironment w m be offered a dm issiol1 . The crit eria con 'idered incl udes grade point average ( 2.5 or above), class ra nk ( top half), t m nscript pa t t e r n , t est ' c o re s and rec o m me n d a t i on s . Students a re admi t t ed to eith r the fal l or spring . emester . Acceptance to the fall term carries pe rm ission t o o t tend the previous , ummer sessions. Spring accepra nce a p prove enro l l m en t in the Jan uary I nt e ri m , We s uggest t he follow ing a p plication deadl i n es : Fall SClI1esler Jll l l e / , Spring Sell/esrer - Jal l llary / . APPL ICATION PROC E DU R E : ENTER ING F R E S H M E N S t u dents planning to enter a fre s h m en may s u bm it application materia! any t i m e after com p let io n of t h e j Uluor year o f h igh school . Admission deC;, ion are made beginning December I unless a requ� t for Early Decision is received . Candidates are not ified of t heir statu a ' oon a lbeir completed a p pl ic3tion h3 ' been received anti evaluated. Crede n t ials required are : l . Fortnal A pp/icor iOIl: Submit the V I I i fo r ill VII d e r g r a d /I ll t e A ppliI'G I ion Fir /1 c/lllissiol1 to Fo u r - Y e a r Co l l e g e s alld Ullil'f!rsifies ill tILe State of

WoshillglO ll. AvajJable from high

chool counselors or the PlU Admission ' Office. 2. $ ! 5, (}O A pplication /Recorcis Fee: A S I S fee mll� l lie ompillly your or be mailed a ppl ication e p3ra t eJ y . This non-refundable service fee does not apply t o your account. Make check /molley orders payable to Paci fic LutJler3n University and mail to Director of Admi s ions , 3. Trallsl'I'ipr: TIle tr3J)script yo o submi t must incl ude a l l cred i t co mpleted thro ugh y o u r j unior year of high school . If admission i offered, an acceptable linal t r a n sc r i pt which i n c l u de s a l " factory completion o f the senior yeaI' and attainment of a djploma m ll". aI. be pre ented.

4 . R e c o m lll e ll t/ a l i O Il S : Two be re c o m m e n d a t i o n s m ll . t prepared by p r i n c i pa l s , c o u n s elor ' , past ors or o t her q u a l i f ied persOIl . TIle PLU Admi. sions Office will supply the form . S. Test Requiremen t: All entering fre lunell mu t 'ubmit scor from e i t h er t he Col lege Entrance Examination Board , cholastic A ptitude Te t (SAT) or the American College Test Assessment (ACT or [or Washington State residents, I he Washington P r e - C o l l e ge Test ( WPCT). Regi tration procedures and form ' are :lvn il able at high school cour� eling offices.

E A R LY D EC I S I ON I f II hi gh school s t udent Ita decided upon P LU 3S his firs t choice , he may be offered admis 'io n as early a October I of his senior year. Early Decision Appl ication mll t be made by November I S of your senior year. SAT, ACT or WPCT scores from the previous May or J uly are acceptable, Early Deci ion students are given p referen tial treatment i n campus hOllsing and flnan iaJ aid. An Early Decision form is avai l a ble from the Admissions Office . If an Early Dedsioll is un favorable, a . t uden t may :till be considered for regular admission . EA RLY A DMlSSL O N Q u alified- students interes ted i n a eel rating their f o rn a I education may begin w ork toward a degree after completion of the junior year or first seme."ter of the . nior year of lugh school . Exceptional students who wish to enroll before c mpleting all required units i n higb school mw t have :I letter submitted by a rec gnized 'chool official whi c h approves early col lege admission and gives assurance that a high school diploma will be is. ued after completion of spe ified college work. Only studen ts highly reco m mended for Early Admi ion will be considered. Generally these s tuden ts rank among the to p students in their class and presen t high aptitude test cores. HONORS AT E NTRANCE PLU confers 80nors at Entra nce in accordance with criteria established by t hose inst i t ution which are mem bers of the CEEB. H o nors a t Entrance recognizes out tanding higb school achievement and anticipates superior performance at the university level. TI1e e award have no monetary value. (See Honor Programs page 69)


61 Official h i gh school t ransc ri pts o f c re di I s a re nece'sary if they a re

A DY A N C E P L ACE M E N T OPPORTU N I T I ES �EB E ; A M I 'ATI NS; S t udent i n t l'rested i n �('eking advanced I' l a�('mcn t or cred i t to ward grad ua t ion t h rough l h e exam in a t ion program o f Ihe College E n trance Exa m i n a t i o n B o a r d shou ld d i re c t inqu iries for �pecific i n formation to t he depar tmt' n t Or chool w h i c h offers the 31:adern ic su bj ec t of t he i r choice. General i n q u iries about the fEn p rogram may be ad dres:.<:d to the I"ficc pf Au 111 is iOlls. 2. DEP RTMENTAl ,,"XM.f l N Tl ON S : n u m ber of d c p a r l me n I s and sehouls offe pl a n 'mllnt e x a m i ll a t ions in (Jrll r t h a t stude n ts may be aliviscd as 10 t h e l e v e l a t w h i c h they Ill ay m o s t advantageously pursue a gi v en su b i e c t . red i t toward gradua tion may b e given i n cer l a i n caSes. lie pe n d i ng o n t he- e x a m i n a ti o n SC Ofe and whether t h e su bjec t m a t ter w a s J i ( } 1 p a r t o f t h e (,(>lln;e wor k hy w h i c h t h e high school d i plo ma wa, earned. A ga in . i n q u i ries for spec i fi c i n for m a tio n should be d i rcclcu to Ihe depart m e n t or sc hool offering t he pa rt icul a.r u bject. I.

3.

i n s t i t u tio n m ust . Ill p l e t e a c l eara nc e form ( provi de d hy P Lll Admissions Office ) , 4. R. C C ( ) I I I II! (, I I i1 a { i o l l s : w t)

re c o m m e n d a t i o n s must be p re p a r e d hy i n s L r ll l' t U f S . c o u n : elors, past ors or ) I h er q ua l i fied pe r so n s . PLU d m i�. iom Office p ro v ide!' t he forms .

EY A LUATION OF C R E D I TS :

I.

APPLIC A T I O N P R OC E D U R E : T R A S F E R STU D E NTS St udents wh began their h i ghe r education at 01 her a cc red i l ed col l eges or uruversi t ies a re w kome 1 0 a pply for u dm is sio n wit h advanced ,ta ndi llg . Can dida tes m ll�t have good aC'l demic flnd per�()n:ll , tand in g a t t he i ns t i t u t i on las t a t tended ful l - t i me . Al t hough it d oes not guarantee admi 'sion , a C !,'Tade poi n t �lver3ge ( 2 .00 ) in al l coil 'gc wor k a t t e m p ted is req u ired for regu lar admi, s i on . Tes t scores /lilly be req u i red for applican� who ha ve l i m i t e d c o l le ge e x p fience . Creden tials required a re : I . ri)/'Ii !l1! A pjJfim / io l l .· Su bm i t a U n i fo r m U ll d e r g r a d u a t e ApPIicat i n wit h S I S .00 n o n - r e f u n d a b l e applica l ion / record:. fee , 2. TraJ l scrip / s : Offic ial tran. cri p l s from all p revious c o l l egi a te i n ' t i t u l ion at tended m ust be sell t hy t hose inst i t u tions d i rec t l y t o t he P LU A d m ' 'sions Office.

n o t l is ted on college t r:msc ri p t s . '!m/'il l i cc rr m l l .· The Office o f t he Dea n f S t udenh a t y ! I f most recently a t tended (ful l - t i me )

111 e RegiJ; t ra r evaluates a 1 l t ransfer records .lIld crea tes 1m ad vi s i ng book let ( Go l d Book ) i n d ica t i n g c o En p I e I i o n 0f a ny e o re re q u i re me n t s and total hours 'Iccepted . I nd i vi d ua l schools and de p 'I tt men ( � de t erm i ne � hi c h c o u rses s a t jsfy m aj o r

req u i rem e n t

.,

Gene.ral l · .

.

c o l l ege · 1

el

courses

carr ing grad hC" or a bove apply toward gra du a l ion. "D" graded courses will he wi l h held ull l il a

sludent h OI · s u c c ess f u l l y co m ple t ed one se mes ter'� work a t

the Univer.. i t y , 3 . A c o m m un i t y college � t U dt>l1t nwy t r :J Ilsfer :t m a x i m u lll of 64 se m ester 1 96 q uarte r ) hours of

credi I

from

t he

t wo - y

ilr

i n s t i t u t io n . 4. To qu.al i fy 3 :' H d gre.e candidate, a s t udell t m u. t take t he fin al 2X sem

Ler hou rs in r

i dence,

U N A C R E D ITE D E DUCATI ON A L E X PE R I E NC ES : I , Credits

earned in unaccredi ted schools are nol transfera hle at t he t i me of ad m iss ion . Eval uat i on 3Jld

dcc ision OJ 1 s uc h course" w il l be 1ll:lde a ft er t he s t ude n t has heen in a t t endance a t t he Un iv e .... ity ne �emesl r. 1. The Un ivel'iity allow� lip to 2 0 semesler II O U I'S o f USA F I cre d i t a n d up 10 20 �CIl1 � t e r hours fl) r m il i t ar y credi t . providing t he t O l al of I he two do es Dol e xceed 30 emestc\' ho urs,

3. The Un iver. i t y does n o t gra n l credit for c o J l e g [eve I G D tests . 4. For i n forma t i o n on t h e College Leve I E x a 111 i n a ( ioll Progra m ( C LEP). refer to se c t ion ()II ('ret/i! h v I:X!lll li!lll l iO I i (/Jilgc 0 ')).

PR OC E D U R E S : FOR M E R STU D E F u J I -t i m e studen l S w h o have 1I0t been in a t l clldnllce for one s em es ter o r more may . eek re-ad m issio n by o bt ai n i n g an appl ic ation for re - e n t ra nce from t he Admi� s i ()l1!\ Office unl ss t hey have heen a pprove d , a t I he t ime of Iusl

enro l l menl , for :1 Leave )f Ah�eJ1ce . St udenls who have hcen d ro pped for

:Jcadt'mic or d isci plinary rea�ons m u�t iden l i fy a a c u i t y m e m her w il l i n g t o act as II s p o n so r a n d ad v i ser i f re -a d m i t t ed . Re-i! n l ring s t ude ills who have a t l eud d ;m ot her 011 ge in t he in terim mu t requ st t hat a t ranscri pt be se n t frolll t h a t i n ' u t u l ion d i rec t l y I t he D i rect o\ o f A d m iss i o lls

"

.

P R OC E DU R ES: F O R E I G N STUD E T Foreign , tuden ts who art q ual ili d II c a d e m i ca l l y a nd fi n a ncial l y are e ncouraged to 10m the Univers i t y c O ll1 l1l u n i t y . I n fo r m a t i o ll and a p pl i ca t io n procedures m:.ty be o b t a i n ed

from t he Di rec tor of Admissions o r Forei gn St u dent Ad v i ser .


��� ��

F L I NG AN OFFER OF A DM ISSION:

,

l . M e d i cal Requiremellt: Before final matric ulation, each new full - l ime stud nl ( t en semester hours or more) must ubmit a Medical History and onsent Form acceptable to the PLU Heal t h Service . Student are not finall y admitted until t his fo r m is a pproved. 2 . A dpance Pay/nent: A $7 5 .00 Advance Pay ment is necessary following an ffer of admission. Thi payment is the student's acknowledgement of acceptance and guarante s him a place in the student body and reserves housing on cam pus if requested. I t is credi ted to t he . tudent's account and is a pplied toward expenses o f t h e first -emester. Fall applican ts ojfered admissio ll before May 1 /lllIst suh mit tlze paymel l t by May J. If ci rc u mstances necessi ta te cancellation of enrollment a nd the Director of Admissions is notified in writing before Ma y I , the 7 5 .00 will be re fwlded. The re f u n d d ate for Interim is December 1 5 , and for spring e ' mester January 1 5 . 3. Two Fo rms: A Student Personnel Fo r m and a D i rec t o ry lnformation/ Housing Appl ication Form mllst be comple ted by all student and returned with the advance payment .

62

Fina ciaI Aid Recognizing that many students who want to attend Pacific Lutheran would be unable to meet all expen es of enrollment from personal or fam ily sources, the Universi ty attempts to provide fi nancial assistance to all eligible students. Any student approved for enrollment or currently enrolled may request fi nancial aid. About hal f of our students receive hel p in the form o f gift a s s i st ance ( i .e . scholarshi ps , talen t awards, gran ts ) , low interest deferred loans or empl oymen t . In many cases a fi n a n c i a l aid a w ard will be a combination of these forms of assistance.

The quan t i ty and composi tion o f an award is based upon demons trated (inancial need, academic achievemen t , · test scores and o t her personal talents and interests. Need is determined fro m analysis of the Paren ts' Confidential Statement (PCS), or Student Financial Statement ( S F S ) , which are statements of financial cond i t ion provided by the C o lleae Scholarship Service (CSS). Analy is of the PCS or SFS determi nes an expected co ntribution for college expe nses from the student and parents or guardian. " F inancial Need" is detined as the d i fference between total student expenses for an academic year and the expected student/family contribution and is 3 primary factor i n determining eligibility for most available a i d .

A P P L I C An O N NOTI FI C A T I O N CONFI R M AT I O N : Application Proced ure : FRESHMEN

Mail

a

Parents'

Confidential Statement to the College Scholarship Service by February 1 . A p p ly for admission and receive acceptance by March 1 . A final/cial aid decision will IlOt be made unless YOII have been accepted by the Office of Admissions. The PCS is ava ilable from c o u n seling offices, CSS, or PLU Financial Aid Oftice. TRANSFERS - Follow the same procedure as above and submit a PLU F i n a ncial Aid Application and a Financial Aid Transc ript (available from PLU ) .

CONTI NUING PLU STUDENTS, RENEWALS - Ma,j\ PCS or SFS to the College Scho larship Service by March 1 . Submit PLU Financial Aid Application by March 1 5 . fhese steps must be taken each yea r . I N D E P E NDENT ( S E L F - S U P­ PORTING) STUDENTS are those who have established fi nancial i ndependence from their parents. A financially independent student is defined as one who : 1 ) has not received more than $600 from parents (or guardians) in the past 1 2 months, 2 ) was no t claimed as an income tax exemption by parents i n the previous calendar year, and 3 ) did not l ive with parents for more t han 1 4 consecutive days in the past 1 2 months . S tudents who meet t he above conditions should sub m i t a Student Financial Statement rather than t he PCS and o t h e r w ise foll o w a ppl ication procedures l is ted. Further evidence of independence may be required for


63 tudent under 23 years of age . N OT E - An a pp l i cat i o n for finan cial aid may be s u b mitted a t any t ime but fa i I urI? to sat' fy the a p p l i c a ti on deadlines m y res u l t in a d eni al even if financial need is dem onstrated . A wa rd s are for one yea r o n l y lmd req u es ts for renewal must be submitted an n ual l y .

aw ard decisions are m ade and no t i fications are sent beginning Ul Ma rc h . c'arly Decision students wjIJ recei e an . ward notice i n Jan u ary if their c o n fid e nt i a l �tate men t has been received . () 11 t il 7 l 1 ill ' P1_ U Stlldellt fm a n ial aid dec isio n are mad e and n o t j fica t ions sent o u t be gi n nin g in April . a nd

TrallS(er

ConfirnU ll g Aid Offer: A id o ffers are confi rmed by ret u rning l he signed F i nanc i a l Aid Award Notice a nd S U b m itti n g the $ 7 5 Advance Pay m e n t . This :ho uld be done as soon as a decision can be made but 1Il1./St be completed hy May 1. Any aid offer not acce p ted by May

ca n cell ed . AU

I

will

e

made ilfter May I m u t be accep ted within two weeks . Em"i)! Decisi() 11 Sruden ts must also a wa rd

school/departmen t concerned for an a u d i t ion an d/or personal i n terview. In some cases a t a pe or fil m will be satisfact ory . A recommend'l t i o n from a fa c u l t y member m ust be on file before a st uden t is considered for a Ta le n t Awa r d .

P R E S I DENT' S SCHOLA R S H IPS of

U N I V E RS IT Y G R A NTS a r e a warded in c o m b i n a t i on with l oa ns a nd employment to : t uden ts w i t h financial need who d o not q ual ify for Sc h o l a rs h ip assis tance. Mill(} rity Gran i s are avai l a bl e for q ua l i fied minority st ud en ts i n a d d i t i o n to all o t her t y pe of fi n anc i al aid descri bed . nm'ign 5'tudellt Grallts are rest ric ted to those fo reign st udents who have provided t heir o wn resources for at least one year of a t tendance. Gra n t s usual l y amou nt t o less t h a n one-th ird o f t h e c o s t o f a t lend�1I1ce .

$500 are awa rded to ent e ri ng fresh men

NotilicMion of A ward Decision : FreshllZan

qua l i fi ed for first time a nd / o r renewa l awa rds . P L U i s a sp onsor o f I {{tio llal Merit Sclwlarships. St uden ts who earn semifi nalist ta nd i ng are enco uraged to con tact the Fin a ncial Aid Office for in f rma t i o n concerning a PLU Meri t Schola . hi p .

respond within two wee k. of t he i r o ffer .

TY P ES OF A ID : U n iv e rsit y Gift Assista nce : UN IV E RSITY SCHOLARSH I PS are gran ted on the ba is of a ademic ac hievement and financial need . To be considered , a ji'cshl7lall a pplica n t mll t ha ve a 3.30 second.1ry sc h ool grade point a verage. Scholasti c abil i ty m u st also be refl ected in te t cores from the Scholastic A pt itude Test ( S A T ) , or t he A merica n Col l e ge Te t ( A CT ), or t h e W shlngto n Pre- o lle ge Test (WPCn. Tral1sfer and co ntilluillg s t uden t s must have a 3.0 c u mulat ive g.p.a. to be

in recognition o f outstanding a ca d e m i c achjevement in high school and in a n tic ipat ion of u perio r pe rfor m a nce a t PLU . T o be a canrud.1 te , II st uden t must

have a h igh sc lwol g.p.a . o f 3 . 7 5 or bette r, present high test . co res , and be offer d admissio n by M arc h I . Fil lan cial lIeed is / lo t a deterl llining factor and no a ppl icat i on is re q uired . On l y a li m j ted number o f t u dent who m e t t he a bo ve re q uiremen t s are selected . The awards, I �lde in M a rc h , are renewable i f a 3 . 3 grade p oin t i� maintained . A LU M N I M E R I T SCHOLA RSH IPS o f S I 000 a re available to e x c e p t i o na l st udents. Preference wil l h giv n to .·ons and da ughters o f P l U A l u m ni . To be e l igib le entering freshmen m ust h ave a c um ul ativ high sc h oo l g. p .a . o f 3 . 5 or be tte r. N o n-fr e s h m e n and renew al a pplican t · m u t have a minimum co U e gi ate g.p.a . of 3.3 to be e l igi ble. F ma n c i al need is not a determining fac t or and a 'pec ial app l ica tion is req ui red . A I R FORCE ROTC SCHOLARSA I rec i pien t s (4-year, 3-year, or 2· year ) may attend Pac i fic Lutheran . AFROTC c l a sse s are held al the Aerospace St udies D p a rtm ent on the Uni versity of Pug t So und camp us , about 20 min u tes d rivi ng time from th e PLU ca m p u . T A L E N T A WA R DS a re gra n t ed to . tudents with financial need w ho have excep t io na l a bility ill the fiel ds of f o ren. i cs , d r a m a , art, m usic, and a t h l etics. The candidate mu t make a r r a n g e m e n t s w i t h t h e

MINISTER'S D E P E N D E NT G R A NTS are available to un married , dependent c hiJ dren of a regularly ordaincd. ael ire mi ni s t e r or missionary of a Chris t i a n c h urc h . The m i n iste r's princ i pa l empl oymen t and p ri mary source of income must be a [es u l t of church work . The mi n i nl Um IInn u. 1 gra nt i� , 200 b ut t h is may be i n c rease d to S700 if t he eligible s t ude nt has a d e m o n t ra t ed f i n a n c i al need as determined from a Pare n t s ' Confidential Stateme n t . I f a pes is ' ub mil t e d 110 spec ia l M DG a p p l i c a t ion is req ui red . June ) i t he dea d l ine fo r req uestin g f h i� gra n t . Requests received t h erea fter w i l l be ho u or e d only as b ud get ed funds p mlil . SPECI A L G R ANTS may be given 1 0 d e p e n d e n ts of P LU fac u l t y /. t a ff. Married c h il dren are not el i g i b le. T he amo u n t wil l be de t erm ined at t h e time of registrat ion . An application mu t he s u bmi t t ed to t he Personnel Office. A LU M N I DEPE N DENT G R A NTS of S ) 00 for spri ng seme�ter are given to whose paren t ( s ) fu l I · tim e st udents


64 at tend d PLU ( PL C ) for (w 'ie mesters or more . To be eligi b l e t he al u m n i ' dependent mu t have be e n a fu l l - t ime �I udenl t he pre vi o ll fal l sem ·t r a nd co mplete a n a p pl ic at io n i n t he Fin anc ial i d Offic hy Dec m ber 1 .

G R A NT in t he am llllt 1)1' S50 P I' �e m es ter s ha l l be given to eac h of I wo o r more (uU -l i mc t ll den t · from t h e same fa mily a t tending PLU simll l t �l I! eollsly , provided t h a t t h e main support tor b o t h h fro m parents and provided t hey h a ve not re ce i ve d anv o t her Univers i l Y gra n t or award , Married students are also e l i gi b l e when both are ful l -l i me st udents. n a ppl ication m u · t be filed in 111e BlI�ine",., Office a i /o r fo llowing reoistration a n d t he grunt will be cr d i ted afler l igibil i ty i estll b l i h ed .

In add i t i n to i r s own sc ho larsh ip funds . t he Un ivel'l>i t y has a t its d i sposal the following re t rieted funds , genernll y awarded t t hose st u dents who complete re"ular aprlication and who have finished t heir rre hman y ea r : A id A. ' c ia tion for l u t heralL S rlH,lar s h i ps ,\J tru �l Clu il, Tacoma Cha p le r Sc ho la rs h i p Al u mn i cho l ars h i p F u n d \rn�rican Associa tion of U n i versity Women Sc h olarship

.\merican LUlhe ran Ch urc h - "I o r t h Pacific Dis t r i c t S c ho l a rs h i p I · lorenee S p i n n e r A n derson Memorial

Sc hOl arsh i p Atia K ila n An n is Scholarshi p Frank S. Baker St lHllars h i p H e l e n Clift Bell Sc hola rsh i p .I m I n " B rc- il a n d Sc holarsh i p hInd O.A. B r o w n Fu nd r. antl Irs. V .B. B u rns F u n d B u r71aff Me mo r iaJ cholar s hi p Cal iforn ia Sd wlarship Fed eration Scholar 'hip fo r calbc3TeT� Ca rl Fa l k Memorial � c h() l adl i p Chao-Lia ng Chow Scho l a rsh i p Ida A. Davis F u n d R . Pa r c h e r E l l ingson S c h ol a r s h i p leif Eric ' ( I n ScholaLSh i p faculty Me m ') rial Sclwlan; h i p F u n d Faith L u t he r a n Ch ure ll of l'orf l a m J Se h I JIsh i p Fund Hcl<" l1 F Tc» t Scholar shi p Re he cc<l SChoe n feld G a r tl n e r a n d J o�� p h (,3H\ ner Sc:l1I)1 r�h i p Greater Puy a l l u p VaJ ley C h a m ber o f o m me[ cc Sc ho lar�h i p ()/af Halvorse n Sc ho la rsh i p W.H. l lard t ke e m i nary St u de n t Sc ho l a r s h i p

hIll d

lerry I rwi n Sc h O l arsh i p Rev. Karl K il i a n Me morial Fund

K insman ,\ ward Mclvin K l e \\ c n o M�moriaJ Sch(J lar�h i p Ladies 01' K i wa n i ' Award Dr�. larso n , Wic ks, Rcbcrgcr and Elder chol:lr hip i n Medic' I Tec h n o logy L udv ig an d Clara la r.;on Schola n; h l p Mr. a nd Mrs. W. l li l d i n g L i n d berg Endowed

l'hl)larsh ip l u b S dlO l a rs h i p L u t heran Il ro t hc rh o o d Legal R e se r c Li fe I nsu ra nce Co. Sc h o l arsh i p Shirley Mc Kay Schol arsh i p

Lute

Mu Phi F pSUon . Tacoma P ro fe ssi o n a l Cha p t er . S c h o l a r s h i p Pred O. M llcn.-cher a nd ,'-, s o c i a tes S ha ke y 's PiLLa Parlors S ch o l a rs h i p Mr. and Mrs. ' us A . I'i c ma n M e m or i al Sc holarshi p Margaret Nislad Memorial S c h o larsh i p Sel m a and :\tagnu s Nod tved t S c h o l arslll. p P L U Fa c u l tv Wive. Sc holar�h i p PLlI J ou rn alism SdlU l arsh i p Women of Rotary Seholar. hip Drs. R ic ha rd li n d Wal ter S c h wi n d t Sc ho l a r s h i p Siqucland Y o u t h Sc ho l a r ship ( Nor tJl Pac i fi c District l u t her teague) Ski n ner F o u n d a t i oll Sc h o l arsh i p Dr. and Mrs. l.E. Sk i n ner c h o l arsh i p Tacoma Lu mbermen 's Sc h o l arsh i p Rev. a n d Mrs. l Ialvor T h orm o d sgar d Sc h o l a rs h i p Tu berc u losis Association of Pierce C o u n t y

S c h olarshi p

l Jo p pe r M e morial Olsen Memorial He d v i g Art h u r \1emorial D n a ld A. B r u n n e r Mem o r ial Mark SalLmall Memorial J .P. Carlst ro m Sc h o l arsh i p Louis and Leona l a m p Scholarsh i p Sha kev's Pizza Parlors Gord( ;n Pearson Memorial Governmen t al Gran t :

T I-J E BASIC E D U e A T 1 0N AL OPPO RT U N I T Y G R A N T PROG R A M ( BE OC ) is a Fede r al progTam d eSigned to provide the "fou nda t ion " for a fi n a ncial a id package . 1 / is in tended for �t uden ts wi t h h i gh financial ne d . Uigihility is t/cl erlllillecf h v .l1I!J / I l in illg a separil l C BLDG IIppfiC ill io l l direc tlv /I! a

Fc d e r a ll), co l i lrac/cd agel / c v . The application may be oh tained from your school or from PLU . Basic Grants are avai lable in amou n ts lip to S 1 400 [ler yea r .

SUPP LEM E N TA L E D UCAT I O N A L OPPORTU I T Y G R A N TS (S EOG ) :lr e to students who have a va i I a b I e except ional fi nanCial need. 'ney range from 200 to S 1 500 pe r year [Illd are l i mi ted to IlO more ( ha n l1e half t he total financial assist an ce given to 1 l1e st uden l . El i gibi l i t y is detemlined b y Federal guidel i nes . Residents f the S t a l e o f Washington who a t t end P L U may b e el igi ble for a W A S H I GTO STATE N E E D G R ANT. The e gra n t s are i n t nded for studen ts wi t h high need . On t he basb of guideline� e s t a b l is he d by 'nle Council on Po. t·Secondary Ed uc a t i o n , stud n ts w i t h . p e c i fied need as computed from the pes or SFS are 'ubmitted to t he State fo r c l) n s i d e ra t i n . Pres e n t proce d ur e does not req u i re a separate application. N U RSING GRA NTS to a ma. i m wn of $2000 per year are availil bl e to st uden ts w i t h high finan ial need who

are accepted by or emulled in the School of N ursing ( usually not before the S phomore yea r ) . L A W E N f O R C E M E N T E D ue A n ON PROG R A M ( LE EP ) lOllllS :llld grants for t lJl)�e iJl v o l ved i n or planning to p u . ue caree rs i n Law Enforcement a re a vailahle to studen ts . Studen t Employ m en t : There are employmen t o pport u n i ties on-campus and in the c o m m u n i t y that c a n hel l' st u den ts meet college expenses. Prio ril ) , .tf)" placell/eJ l t i ' given to those w ho have demOllstra ted s t uden ts fin ancial nee d . Over 600 s t udents work o n -ca m p u s ea c h year a nd t he Univers i t v 's a n n ua l s t ude n t payroll is a pproa hi n g S500,OOO. M!my jobs are tempo rary or occa�io nal . but a st ude n t ho works a n average of 1 0 ho I I rs per we k can t', ' pec t to earn 600 during a n a cade m ic year. ll1ere a r e l i m i t ed n u m ber of .tilfl-l illle SlI/l ll1ler il!!!s available. E m ploy men t a p p l i c a t i o ns are distri bu ted in the spri ng s ep ar a tel y o r \ ith Award No l ic s . A c t ual assign ment. are made a t t he beginning of t he school y ear and a t o t h e r t i mes a s vacanc ies occur. The

Fcc/eral

Cn llege

rllnrk-Sllidv

Program provides add i t ional flll1ds for

. jo bs on and off-ca n� p us . R ec i � len t s are . . FlIlancl::tl Aid OffI ce. des ignated by the

L{)ans : Many �t lldents inves t in t heir fu ture b v borrowillg educa t i o nal fu nds. Low iJ{t eres t , deferred loaD S make it po ssible to pay S<lme of the cost of ed ucation a t a l a ter t ime. Loans are often incl uded wit h gi ft <lssis t:mce and work to fo rm t he fiI�a ncial a i d package. There are U l ree major sources of loanS :1 t PLU : N AT I O N A L DI RECT STIJ DENT LOA N ( NDS L ) E l i gibi l i t y is determined by t he PLU Financial Aid Office fro m t h e pes or SFS a n d is ba. ed on I I ced Most Loans range [rom S600 to 1 200 mmuaUy b u t can no t xceed S2,5 00 for t he firs 1 two years of T hool , nor an aggrega t e of S 5 ,OOO for all u n d e rgra d ua t e degree. No i nterest accrues and 110 pa y me n t \; o n princ i pa l a re necess<try l U1 t i l n i ne months a fter a rec i p ien t ceases to be : st uden t . Si mp le interest is 011 .'S1r duri ng the repay menl period . Partial o r total cane l I a t i� n is . available t o m i l i ta ry persollnel �ervl1lg III a host ile area and to teac hers of han dica pped o r disadva n ta e d c hildren .


N U RSING S UDENT LOAN ( N S L ) A Federal loan progJ'a 111 l i m i t e d to s l udents with need who are Dccepted fo r n ro l l m ent or enroll ed in t h e School of N u rsi n g ( w tlally n o t before t he S u p lt o l11ore yea r ) . The NSl has provisions :. i m i l a r to t h e OSL. F E D E R A L LY I N S U R E D STUD ENT LO A N . ( F ISL) - Under t h is progra m , �t llden milY horrow from bDnk�, c redit unions. and s a v i n gs and l oa n :l 0 latIOns. A separate lI p p l i c a t i o n p r o ed ure i ' required a n d forms a re availabl e from t h e PlU Financial Aid Office . As m uch as S2500 can be borrowed ach yeM but most lending i ns t i t u t ions lire l i m iting loans to S 1 5 00. Repay ment of princ i pal i ' defe rred u n t i l n in e lU o n t ll� after II rec i pi e n t ceases t o b e a st uden t . T h e in tere. l rate is 7 ? " b u t i n cases of demonstrated need , i n ter st is paid hy the Federal Govern men t while t h e rec i pient is a t t en di n g �chool. Short Lerm l oa ns are avai la bl fro m vtl rious re�t ricted P l U I Otlll funds which i n c l ude : A l u m n i Association Loa n Fund Amer ica n LUlh emn Church Wom�n Loan

Fuml nton A nderson Loan Fund Joh n S. Bak'r Loan Fund

J .P . CarlSlwm M�morial Loan Fund Del t a Kappa Gamma Stude n t Loan lind Uly C. Ekern Fund Ma rie HUlh loan Fund Gerhard Kirkeb \lcmorial ) 8 1 1 Fund Jeane t te I 'on - Diana Pa ul · Miriam S toa M�morial S t u d e n l loan F u n d .l . P. Pflueger Sl li cienl loan Fund ..I . vluen Alumni Loan Fund O.A. Tingelslad Loa n Fund Wo me n'� Clu b of Tacoma Rcvol ing loan

Fund

VETER A N S A FFA J R S VOCATI ON A L R E H A BI LITATION CH APT E R 3 1 Benefi t s : A program to assi · t t h service disabled veteran acquire new \kilh to help overcome hi. flter i tra t i o n disabili t y . The Veteral1� Ad m i n s pays t h t rainee a monthly all wance ilnd pily� t he trainillg i ns t i t u t io n Lhe cost of t u i t i o n , fees, books. tl nd s up pl ies ;lOd o ther incidental �ervice:.. E l i g i b il i ty : To be el igible for voca t ional reha b i l itat ion the fo l l o w i n g co ndir ions m us1 be mel : tl . S uffered a service con nected disabil i t y in a C l ive service which en t i t ! s t h III to compem;a t io n , or wOllld do so but for recei p t of retirement pay. b . They were d ischarged or re leaNed u nder o t he r t h a n d isho norable condi t i on!. .

c. T h e

V

t e rnns d m i n � t ra t ion t ha t t hey need voca t i o n a l r e h a b i l i ta t io n t ov rcome t h handicap of t he i r disabi l i ty .

determ ines

App l ica t io n Proce dures : Applica tion is made o n V Form 2 2 · 1 900 ( Disa bled V teran. A ppl ication for Voca t i onal Re habil i t u ti on ) which is ava ila ble at the Veterans Affa irs Office . VET E R A N S E D UCATl O N A l ASSIST A N C E - CH APT E R 34

Benefi t : Monthly al l owance to a veteran or an active d il ly service perso n \ h ile e n rolled i n an approved ourse of l ra ining. Eligibi l i t y ; Any veteran Who served on aCli e d u ly for a period of more t lHm 1 8 0 days , any part of w h i c h occurr d a fter J an uary J I . 1 9 5 5 , and who was rei a I'd lind r condi t ion. ot her t han dis honorahle. Any person o n active duty i n t he Anned Forces who has s erved 011 a c t i ve duty for at least 1 I co n t i n uo us days. A p p l ication Proced ure : Veterans lUu 't u b m i t a copy o f t heir epanltion doc ument OD2 1 4 wilh 1 1Ie a pp lica t ioll, VA Form 2 2 - I 9 90 ( V e t e nl n Application for Progra m of Education or Tw ining). Active d u t y personnel mu t ubmit V A Form 2 2· 1 990a (Service mrllls Application for Program of Educa tion or Train ing) w i t h t he Educat i o n Services Office 's �igJl a t u re as well as t heir Co mma nding Officer's . BoL h forms are available at t he V terans Affairs Office. To receive t he add i tional allowance for dependents. veterans m us t submit a copy of t heir marriage cert i fica te . birt h cert i ficates a n d co pies of di orce decree'. If claiming a p:Jrent as a d pende n t , t he v t ran mw.t II bmit his birth cert i ficate whi c h . hows the names of the parents. Pay men t : Mon t h l y b e n e fi t s o r e(jucat ional all owance, 'uhsistenc will be prepaid each mon t h du ring t he e n rol l m ent for veteraru;. Pa yment for active d u ty perso nn I wil l be based on t he cost of the course (tuirion and f es) not to exceed th e mo nthly rate of a ve t era n wi t h 110 dependents. N i ne months e x tensi o n : Ln order to qualify for the addi tional nine mon ths all the following c o n d i ti ons m w;l be met : a . Veteran or in service �tlJde n l m us t have been origi n a l l y e n t i t led to 3 6 mon t h ' of ed ucational b e n fit .

b . Must have been e n ro l l e d i n a s t a n dard llildergrad uate college or first profe. siol1<ll degree progra m at a n i nst i t u t io n of h igher I arning at the I ime the o r i g i n al ent i tlement was exhausted. c . No chan ge of program or co urse O l her th an a normal progre'�io n from an Associat degree to a B a c h e l o rs d e gree or fi rs t p ro fe s-; i o lltl l degree ma be a ut ho rized e i t her ar a beginning o f o r d u ri n g th e n i n e m o n t h period from t he program p ursued \ hen the o ri gi n a l e n t i t l ement was

exhausted. d . The s t ud e n t h as not com pl e ted

t he req u i remen t · for a Bachelors degree or fir�t professional degree. Ei t her of these will serve IS a bar - r e gardl es. whether or nol he degree was u b t a i ned under the G l Bi l l .

Cha nge

of

progra m :

Each

veteran

m:ly mak e one chancre of progra m . One ad d i t ional hange may be a p pr ved if i t

is fo und t h a t t he program roposed i� s ui t able to t heir attitudes , i n t erests and a b i l i t i es . after ma ndatory coullse l i ng. Application for cha nge of program i<' made on VA Forlll 22- 1 99 5 ( Req u e st for C h llnge of ProgJ'a m or Place of Train i ng) . All fo rms are a v ai l a ble in the Vetera llS Affairs Office . DEPEND ENTS ED UCATIONAL ASSISTA N C E - C H A PTE R 35

Eligibil i ty : A c hi l d . w i fe, or widow o f a veteran who died of a �ervice connected d isahi l i t y . or who has a t o tal disnbiJity permane n t i n n a t ure re:ul ting fro m a service con nected di.sabi l i t y ; o r who died from a n y '3use while a total a nd p e r m an nt 'ervice connected d isabi l ity was i n existence. Tbe term i fe and widuw in clud s the hw band or widower of a female vetera n . Gener: I l y ed ucat ional assistance i s a v a i l a b l e t o ch ildren between Ihe a e s o f 1 8 and 26 . but not beyond t heir 3 1 sl b i rthday . A p pl icat ion : VA Form 2 2- 549 0 ( A p pl ica t i o n fo r Ed uca t i o n a l Asds tance) is filed by the eligi b le person i f I hey have reached legal age, ()therwi�e by t he paren t ' or guardian. After el igihility is determ ined. cou n�el i n g is provided to assist the el igible person i n d e v e l o p i ng a . ui l a ble ed uca t io nal progra m . V A Form 22·5490W ( W idows o r Wife Appl icafion for Educa t i nal Po!s i s tan ce )


66

is filed by a wife or widow coun seli ng i . opt ional on her part.

and

Paymen t : Payment is based on the rate of a veteran with no dependents. Change of pro gram: An initial change of progra m , r quested by the child with t he co currence of parent or guardian, may b approved, if the program is suita ble to their a p t i l ud s , int erests and abili t ies. A wife or widow will be permitted a change of program . An additional change may be permitted on the same bal i as for a child. App lication for a child is V A Form 22-5495 ( Request for Change of Program or Place o f Training, Sons or Daughte rs ) and for a widow is V A Form 22-5490W ( Request for Change of Program or Place of Training. Widower. Wife or Husband ) . All forms are available i n the Vetera ns Affairs Offi ce.

Costs AT THE TIME TH IS C AT A LOG WAS P RI NT E D , T U I T IO N , F E E S , A N D ROOM A N D BO A R D R ATES H AD NOT BEEN E S T A B L I SH E D FOR 1 97 6-7 7 . 1 97 5 -6 R ATES A R E QUOTED B ELOW . T U I TI ON Students at Pacific LAltheran pay only for those courses in which they are enroll ed . Tuition charges are determined by the nu mber of credit hours for which students register. The 1 9 75-6 rate charged for one semester hour is 575 .00. Most co urses carry a value of four semester hourďż˝. A few specialized courses, i .e . , Physical Ed ucation. A rt , and Private Music Lessons may require extra costs which are listed with each semester's course offerings.

SPECI A L F EES ( 1 97 5 -6 R AT E S )

' L1te registratio n clearance ( a pplicable after the fifth day o f the semester) Audit per hour . . . . . . . Credit by examin ation : Depart mental exam per course St udent parki ng: Year permit (when registered for 1 0 hrs . , o r more ) Year permit (when registered fo r less than 1 0 hrs . ) Student hea l t h and accident in�urance (24 hour, 1 2 month coverage, optional )

.525 .00 1 2 . 50

.

2 5 . 00 1 0.00 . 3 .00 42.00

ROOM A N D BO A R D ( 1 9 7 5 -6 R ATES)

Room a n d board . per semester, i s a s fol l o ws : Fall Semester Room and Board :

Room

Board

Double Occ upancy Room Single Occupancy Room

S3 1 0.00 4 1 0.00**

S300.00 300.00

Interim Room and Board : Con tinuing* Fall Semester St udents, Double Occupancy New Students, Double Occupancy

o

80.00

50.00

80.00

2 1 0.00 3 1 0 .00

300.00 300.00

*(C()n t in uing students must be taking cl asses or file a Plan of Action in order to remain on-campus during I n teri m ) Spring Semester Room a n d Board : Double Occupancy Room Single Occupancy Room

An appropriate fee will be assessed for rooms occupied during Christmas break and pring brea k .


67 **Only a F ery sm a l l number o f single rooms are availabl e. They are l i mited t o st uden t s wi t h medical/physical h a n d i ca ps which necessi tate a single roo m , a n d to upp rclass studen t s . Students new t o PlU normally do not receive single·room nssignment . The a b ove room and board rates j oc l u d e t h ree meals per day , Monday t hrough Sa t u rd a y , and brun h and d in ne r on Sund ay . Meals are no t p rov ided d uri ng Thank sgiving, h ris t m a.'i and Easter vacatio ns, nor aoy o t her day when t he re "idence hul l s are c lose d . On -c a m pu s s t u den t s a re re quj red t o eat in t he U n i v e rs i t y d i ni n g 1)3 I 1s.

St udents l iv i ng o ff-ca m pus are en c o u ra ged (0 ea l I he i r meals in t he Ulli en; i t y I n formatio n rega r d i ng board ra t s � n Illeal p l ans for o ff-campw; l ude nt s CaJl be o btained from t he D ire ct o r of Food Service in the Univers i t y

d i n in g h, I I

'.

Center.

M A R R l £D ST U D E N T H O U ST N G Two-bedroom ( 1 0 u ni(s), incl . water. per m o . Three-bedro m ( 4 uni t s ) , in cl . water, per 1110 .

. .

. .

.

.

.

. .

.S50.00 . 65 .00 . 9 5 .00

Evergreen Court ( 1 2 uni ts ) , two-bedroo m , i n c l . a l l l l t il i t ies

A de posi t of S50.0 0 m · t accompany a reservation for married s t u den t housing. This depos i t will be held by t he University until t he occupant vacales I h e a part men t , or ca n cel s t h reserva t i o n . One mo n t h " advance rent for apartments is requ i red .

PAYM

A DY A N CE P

NT

N e w st udents are req uir ed to m ak e a

Pay ment O pt i on s : I . Pa y ment by Semester. If t h is o p t io n is sel ec led , t he total est i mat ed costs of t he Se m es t e r nlll�t be paid prior I ) t he be gi n ni ng of classes.

2. The PlU

Budget Plan provjdes for prepaying t h e estimated an n ual costs in twelve i nst al l men t s from May 1 0 , 1 9 7 6 , t h rough A pri l 1 0 , 1 97 7 .

R EST R f CTI O N S TIle Un j vers i t y reserves t he r i gh t to i t h hold · t a l men ts of honora ble d i�mi al grade reports, t ra n sc ri p t o f records, or d i plo ma . u n t i l al l Univers i t y bills ha ve b e n pai d . S t uden t p a y checks may be a p pl i ed to unpaid balances. \

..

R EFUN D S Par t ial tuition refund w i l l b e made, when a l udent w i t h d ra w ' from the Un i v er ity, according t o t he fo l l o wi n g sched ule :

One week or less . . Beh een ne and I 0 week No ref u n d .after t\Vo weeks

. 90% . 80%

A pro-ra ta board refund will he made nece 'sary w i t h d rawal from t h e University . Board refunds wil l uo t be made for any Un iversity t ri p. , such as choir, c horus , band , orchest ra , a t h l et i c s , and so forl h . Refund ' 011 room will n o t b e made .

for

YM ENTS

$75 .00 Advance Pay m e n l in o r der to finalize t heir offer of a d missio n . For fa l l acceptance this i s not refundable after May 1 ( December 1 5 for interi m ; January 1 5 for s pring semes ter ) .

Al l re t u rni n g s t ud e n t s must m ak e a S7 5 .00 Advance Pa y men t p rior to early class regi s t ra t i on a nd /or reserva tion of a room for the next ac.1demic v ea r . This Advance Payment is no t (efundable after May I . St u dent s wi ll D t he perm i t te d t o fina l i z e reg i s trn t io n as long a s any b i l l rema ins un p a i d .


68

Academ ·c Procedures�

REG I STRATION

T H E GRADlNG SYSTEM

The n e mal ou r�e load for full-time student i s 1 4 1 0 17 hours pef se mest er incJudil\g phy sical ed u c a t i o n. A normal student load during the I n tcrim is fOUI hOUIS with a max i m u m of live h OllIS. The m i n i m u m sem steT load for a full' l i m e student i� ten hou rs, O n ly a s t u d c n t with a "8" (3 .00) a ve rage or be l ler m ay registe r for more than 1 7 hours per 'cme, tcr w i lho u t t h e conSCll 1 of the O ffice ( I' the Pmv st. A tudent engaged in much o u ts i de work for sel f·support m :ly be re ' trieted to II redutl.od acade mic load. New students, who have received notice of acce p tance from the Office o f Ad mission s, may reg ist er by mail. O t he r students must register on designated days; Iho c fa iling to do so may be c harged a latc regis t ra t ion fcc. In t h e spring semcst er, l u d e n ts who pla n to re turn in t be fall m a y p reregister b making a $ 75 . 00 depO it on ne,,! year ' tui tion. A studcll t must regis ter for each new �mester on the de ignaled days and is not officially unroUed u n til hi ' registrati on Itas b<.:en deared by t h e Busi ness Office and h i s Place vI' R e i dc n c form has been processed.

Stu den ts are <!fadeu according to the followi ng designations: A - 4.0 grade points per hour, credit given B - 3.0 graue points pe r hou r, cred i t given C - 2.0 grade poi n ts per hollI t-redit given D - 1 . 0 grade pOint pcr hour, retl i t given E - 0 grade points per hour, no credit given The grade: listed below are not lIsed i n c Icul ati ng grade point average. 0 grade points are earned u n d r these designations. H - credit given ( Honors) used only for courses u n ique to I n teri m P - c r e d i t gi v e n (Passing) f - 110 credi t given (Failure) I - no credit given ( I n c o m plete) IP no cred i t given ( I n Progress: applicable on ly 10 cerlain courses \ hose work 'x len ds beyond a regular tcrm) A U - no ned .i t given ( Au d i t) * W F n o c r e d i t g i v e n (Wi t hdra wal/ Failing) * W P n o c r e d i t g i v e n (Wit hdrawal / Pass ing) * M n o c r e d i t g i v e n (With drawal/Medical) *w ill appear as W on perman e n t record Incomplete ( I ) grades indicate 111;11 a s t u d e n t has been u n a b l e to c IlIplete his work becaUSe of 'ircum stances beyond his control. T rece.ive cred i t the in co m plete must be co nve rte d 10 a passing grade WTT H I N TffE PI RST S IX WEEKS OF HiE FOLLOWIN .. SEMESTER. Incomplete grades which are not cun ve r te d by removal become part of the pe011a n 11 1 record but are not comp u t ed into the grade poin t ave rage. Medical Wi t hdrawal (WM) is given when a cOllrse is not co mple ted due to medical cause. The WM does not affect the grade point average. In Progress (I P) signifies progress in a cour c which normally r u n s mOre th an one sem es ter to com plction. I n Progress carries no credit until replaced by a per mane n t grade. Any c( u rsc may be repea tcd by an undergraduate studen L The higheT of the fWO grades earned is u�ed in c om pu ling t h e c u m u l.at ive grade p o i n t average, b u t credit toward graduati n is allowed only once.

y

C H ANGES 11 R E GISTRA n ON A S5 .00 fee may be ch arged for ally

c ha nge Ihat results in a class being drop ped. Nee ssacy form ' arc o b t ain a ble from the Office .)1' the RegistraJ:. S t u dents hould no te t ha t there are 2-wcek and 4-wcek l i m i ts respec t i c1}' for adding or dropping courses. S t uden ts ()fficialJy wi thdJawing from a class aft� th e fou rth wee k will receive a WP ( w i t h dra w a l / p a s si ng ), a W F ( w i t h d ra w a l /fa i l i ng) o r a W M OT (wi Uldrawal/mcdicaI). Th ese gr;uJe� are used i n cal c u la ting grade point avcrage, but wiIJ appear o n the s tu de n t ' semes tcr grade II�P rl alllJ be included in review of academic statu '. The grade of W rc place WP, WF and WM on the transcript. I�n unofficial wi thd rawal frol1l a course will be recorded as E, 0 s i u de n t may w i t hdraw during final examination week.

WITH DRAWAL FROM TH E UN l V E RSITY Stud en ls wishing to wilhdr w from the Univcrsity m U S l obtain a wi thdrawa l for m from Ule Office o f t h e Registrar. I T I ALWAYS TO THE ST DE T 'S A D V A N T A G P TO W Il' H D R W OFFICI L Y. It' the student is wi thdrawing f r a specified p riod 0/' l i m e (e.g. one se mester to o ne year), a Leave of Absence form m ay be obtain ed. A stud en t is en t i tl e d to h on o ra b le dismissal from the Univcrsi ty i f the reco rd o f conduct i s satisfactory and jf all ' linancial obligatio ns are satisfied.

PASS-FAJL OPTION FOR UN DERGRADUATE STUDENTS The pass-faiJ option per m i t s st u de n t s to c"plorc su bj e c t aleas ou ts ide their known

abilities and to add a broader mngc of cou rses wi t ho u t be i ng forced to compete with majors who are spec ializ.ing in thosc areas of study. 1. The pa s-fail plion is l i m i t e d to a tot al of four cou rses ( 1 6 hours) and to no more t ha n two courscs (8 b O lUS) per academic year. 2. Com ·e s required for grad uation in a dcgre ' program may not be taken under this o p tion except when a fir$t course has been taken prior to a ded uration of a major.

3.

Pass-fail grades do not al ter the grade poi n t average, but credits earned cou n t toward grad uation. 4. The pass·fail option agreement M UST be filed with the instructor NO LATER than four weeks after the begi n n i ng of the semester. 5. Pass-fail students arc respo nsible for all cou rse work and exanlina tions. 6, An e n t ire course wiJi not be converted to the pass-fail option by student vote.

E X CLUSIVE PASS-F A J L C O U R S E S De partments o r schools may offcr cou rses in which oruy pass-fail grades are given. nH�se co u r s e s should pursue OlLIs primarily concerned with a p p r e c i a t ions, value comm itments, creative achievements, or the like. Decisions to offer exclusive pa s-fail cou rses are reported to thc ProV()st and t h i s fact b m a d e kno\ t o students before they rcgistl'r for these courses. . :l(cil.sive pas -fail courses may not be II sed to meet m aj o r or Universi ty requirement uruess they have been approved as su ch by the faculty. Taking ex l u sive pass-fail courses i n no way affects the student's personal pass·fail option.

INTE R I M G RA DLNG SYSTEM T h e instruc tor o f a 300-320 I n t erim cou rse will indicate i n the catalog description which o f two !,1J ading systems will be use d : a.. HOllo rs ( J-l) - for e , ce ptionaJ work; Pa (P): - no credit·-the registra t ion will not be recorded. (H and P do nOl affect the grade poi n t ave rage. ) b. The regular lel ler gr ade : A, B, C, D, F. (Such grade con tcibu te to t he grade poin t average.. ) he -tuden l in a "regular Icttee-grade' course may usc one of his or her four pass-fail options..

ACADEMIC PROBATION Warn ing sl i lls may be given to any s t uden t \ h o is doing ' 0 " o r .. E " work at t h e end of the sLx th week. A studcn t shall receive an acade mic w ar ni n g l ei ter i f he fails to keep his c u rrent grade poin t ave rage (immediately preceding semester) at or above 2.00. A s t u de n t is placed on academic probation wi th transc rip t notation if he fails to k�p his grade point average (c u m ul ativel y) at Or above 2.00. The student receives official noti e of such acti n. T h e probationary s t u d e n t may be a d v i se d 10 r e d u c his academic or extra- curric ular ac t ivities o r both. The cnrol l m e n t of a stude n t on proba tion who fails to earn II c u m ul 3 tive average of 2.00 by the end of his probationtuy semest er is terminated. A terminated stuuen t may apply for rei ns tatemen t by s ubmi t ting a let ter o f petition to t h e Registrar's Office a n d seclIring a fac u l ty sponsoI. The pe tition and sponsorship letters arc submi tled 10 Ule /"ac uity Com m i l lee o n Adm ission and R te ll­ lion of S tu de n ts for ac t ion.


69

A stu dent w h o se petition f r rcillStalcmcn l has been denied may a p ply for readm ission after t he ex p i ration of o n e .semester unless i n for m e d nt h rwi sc .

c

E LIG I B I L I TY FOR STU DENT ACTIV I T I ES Any re gul ar l y enrolled, fu ll · t i me studen t (tcn hours) is e l igi le for p ar t i c i p a t io n i:n u n iv ersi ty :lc t i v i l ies. Lim i t a t ions of a tuden l's a� tiy i t i · - based u p on aca de m i c pe rfo rman c e mny be set by i ml ivid u 1 sch ools, d e par t m e n t s r organ ization�. A stu e n l on acade m i c ro a t i on is not eligible for i n tersc holastic com e ti tion ; iJ n d may also be advised to c u r t ai l p a rt icipa l ion extra-curricular activi t ies.

b

:l

p b p

in

CLASSf F lC A TION OF STU D E N TS f' r e s h me n ; students who h a ve met entr nee requirement . So p h u m o re s : s t u d ' n l � w h o h ave c o m p le ted JO h o u rs a n d have earned 60 �'la d e poi n ts. .J u ni o r ; rcguiar s t u den t s w h o have fu l filled 10w4?r d iv isi on re q uire m e n ts and have complell'd 60 h o u rs a n d have earneu 1 20 gra de poin ts, S e niors : regu lar studen t s who have com p l e t e d 90 hours and have earned 1 80 grade poin ts.

HONORS PROG R A M S l Ionors courses arc o ffe red b y ce r t a i n d e p a r t m e n ts fur s t u d e n ts of su pe rior academ ic abi l i t y . Regi stra ti o n is by i n v i ta t ion unly. 1 he Sf'FCI AL HO. I RS PROGRA M for and 'cniors offer ' s t u d e n t s • n to d e v e l o p a t t al academ ic program to rellect their special i n terests and capabi l i t ies. Th,' st u d e n t will propose a tu t al of s t u d y for t h e tinH' r e m aini ng u n til th e gran ti n g of a degre e ; i t may incl ude any a m o u n t of the standard degree p rogra m . With t he a pproval of a facul ty sponsor and t h e l Ionors Counc il (in t h a t order), the pl a n i tself "h :11 1 become l h e degree req u i re m e n t of t h e Univers i ty in t h e case of lhis h nor studen t . Th ' e s e n tiat of a n y p l a n of st ud y arc a ell'ar tO i c r t i onal e an d si gn i fic an t work b eyo n d c o m p re h e nsi ve eXllm s, co u r ses reg u l r inde p cn d c n t s t u d y p r oj e c t s, in terdiJ;c ipl inary p a p e rs, b a c h e lor's degree t h es is , etc. In lerested S LUden ls sh ou l d i n q u i re a t t h e Provos t's O ffi e for further i n for m a t ion .

ju nior� opportuni ty plan

al a a

p

c

GRADUA

I O N HON ORS

a

Degrees w i t h honors of ,lim l u de , magna cum l a u de and su m m a 'um la u d e are gran t c d . A st ud e n t m u s t cam an average of 3 . 3 0 for cu m laude. 3 ,6 0 for magna c u m laude alld 3 . 90 for su mm cum laude. Physical edu a t ion ac t i v i ties are not inclu ded in the dc lNm i n in g o f h ono rs.

c

a

C R E D I T BY E X A M L N ATlON t u d m ts are pc rlll i t ted. w i t h i n limi ts, to oMain ('Ted i t by e x a m i n t ion in l i e u of regu l a r 0 more c n rollfllcn t and class a t t e n d a n ce . than 7'10 courses (30 se m es t e r h o u rs) may be co un tl' d toward grad u rl l i o n , w h e t h e r it be C l i ege le cl E;\. 30lination P rogram or any other exa m i n a tion. E x e pt i on s to t h is rule for ce r tain groups of s t ud ' n ts or programs may he made, subjec t to reco m m c n d a tiorl by t h e Ed u cat ional Politic ' Com m i t tee a n d approval

a

c

by the fac ulty . Credit by e . amination is ope n to formally adm i t ted, regu l sta tus stude nts on l y .

ar

Arrange m e n ts for d epar t me n ta l c r e d i t examinations must be m a d e by the sluden t with d ep art me n t l chairman, dean, or d i re c to r . Evidence of tltis al>pfOval and of pay men t o f t he fcc sh o u l d be presen t e d by t h e studcn t to the professor who will a d m i n ister t he ex a mi n a t i on . A st uden t may , w i t h the approval of tile i nst i uc tor or the depart me n t, gain credit for an audi ted cou rse which he has n o t prev iously t a k e ll for c r ed i t by p asj n g an examination set by t h e i n s tructor or de par tm e n t . The fee for such e x a m in a tion is t h e d i fference etwee n t h e a U d i t i ng fee and t h e t u i tion the student wo u l d normally pay for the cou rse . The v a r i o lls SC hools, t.liv isions and dep artme n ts shall de t erm ine t he s p e c i fi CLFP e ." m i n a t ions which may fulfill re q u i rem e n t s fo r m ajo r s , program s, or General U n i ve rsi ty R e q u i rem e n ts in t heir resp 'ctive acade m i c areas. T h es e examina tions are $ u b j c' c ! to r e c o m m e n d a t iQn by th e Educa tional Policies Co m m i t t ee a n d approval by the facu l ty . The m i n i m u m p a ssing level for CLEP e x ami n a t i on s t a ken at Pacific L u theran U n i ve rs i ty shall be the fiftieth pe[cen t ile. Tests re q u i r i n g h ighe r passing levels shall be ex pl ici tl y d esignated in our C re d i t by E.xamination b ro c h u r e. C L E F c red i t s gran ted by o t her u n iversities, coltcues and c o m m u n ity col lcues wh icb are cam :d e fo re en trance, shall be 1Onorcd by Pac i fic Lu t h e ra n . T b e a p p l i c a tio n o f those cre d i t s toward m ajors, programs, and Ge n e r al n iver si ty Requireme n t s s h a l l be c onsis te n t wi til sc h oo l, di isiona l , and depar t m e n t al policies and stand ards. The U n iv e rsity docs not gra n t credit for c ol l ege level G £ D tests.

a

b

b

1

I N F O R M A L STUDY

b

To e n c ou rage l i e ral l e a rni ng o f a l l kinds, over a n d e yo nd enrol l m e n t i n courses le ad i ng toward formal degrees, the n i versi ty offe r"s a vari ety of o p por t u n i t ies for informal st d y G EST or U N I V E RSITY STATUS:

b

U

U :

Tcachen and officials of other in s ti t u t ion s, visi t i ng scholars a n d artists, and o ther p rofessi ona l persons who wish to u�e u n iv e rs i ty fac ili ties for i n d e pe nden t s t u d y may a p p l y to t h e P ro vos t for cards des i gn a tin g them as G u e s ts of the n iv e rs i ty . S u c h p e rso n s , in their use of fa c il j ties, wiU de fe r to the needs of s t u d en ls and fac u l t y me m bers. A U OnlNG CO R S E S : To a u d i t a course is to enroll, w i th t he p e r m i ssi on of t h e instruc tor, on 3 no n -c re d i t basis. An 3uui tor is e n co urage d to par tici pate fully in class Ji c t iv i t i es hu t i s not held accou n t a bl e for e. m in a t i on s or other wri t ten work nor does he receive a gr ad e . If t he instructor 31)provcs, th e cmuse may be e n te re d u pon the transcri p t as "Audit." With t h e a p p rov al o f t h e instructor o r the departmen t. a s t u d e n t m ay ga i n credit for an a u d i ted c o u rs e by passing an ex a m in a tion set by t h e instruc tor or lhe d e part men t . Th e fee for such e " m in a t io n is tlle d i fference be t ween thc a u d i t i ng fee and th e t u i tion the s t u d e n t wou ld p ay for t h e course.

U

3

a


70 AC ADE M IC AD V I S I NG PROGRAM The academ ic advising program at P L i. t u p WiUl t wo major goals i n mi nd : ( I ) To ma irl lain a y " t m by which �tudcnts have an early contact wi t h a facu l ty m e m ber from whom Ihey r e c e i ve a good general introd uction to the valuc o f a l iberal arts educ a ti on and u : encou raged to explore the many fields of study open to them: and (2) To provide the option for a stud ent 10 receive advising fwm II facu l ty mem ber in a dlOsen ac ad e m i c arca of int erest. Fach freshma n student (and those transfe r students who wish) arc assigned t o an advising grou p with a fac u l ty member responsible for general advising. I f a student shows an interest in an academic area, that i n terest will be ex plore d and, if it seems advisable, an aIea adviser will be assigned to replace the general adviser,

F R E S H M A N COURSE SC H E DULE Student. shou l d study t he depar tmental or in terdepart men tal programs in which they intend to major. I f they do no! Ind specific sc hedule suggestions, or i f they have no tenta tive' major preference, they should select cou rses on the basis of the general guide below. Freshmen will receive help i n COU(se s e lec tio n from their advisers, generally chOOSing between 3 to 4 cou rses each semester. H E A L Til A i\ 'l) PH YSICA L EDUCATION (I hour eac h \emcstcr): P E 1 00 should be completed d u ring [he frc. hl1lan year but may be Ilrcl'eded by a 200-level ac[ivilie.,> course any I'll' those n u m bered t hrough 254. FO R E IGN LAN AGE (4 hours each semester): ither first or second year courses, de pending upon the student's preparation and whether or not h e wishes t o meet Option I or II o f t he College of Arts and Sciences. (A ppl ics only to students seeking a degrce io the College of Arts and Sciences.) OR ENG LI SH COMP S ITI ON PR FICI ENCY EXAM" A ION (4 hours) R E LIGIO (4 hours): Whenever possi ble, a re lig i on c u rs shou l d be i n d uded ill a student's freshman year program. The remainder of cou rses should be se lected fr m lower division o ffcrings in the tin e arts, history, l i terature, social or natural seiences or mathematics.

D EG R E E R EQ U I R EM ENTS BA C

L A U R EATE DEGR EES

Baccaillureate degrees a r c conferred on have comple tell a mi nim um of , ludenrs \\'h 32 cour "cs ( 1 2 8 semester hou rs) with a grade point ave rage of 2.00 (School of Business Ad ministration - 2.50; School of Education - 2.25) and who have met the following requjremen t s for graduation : 1. The comple tion or a majo r as detailed hy ca�h school or department, consisting of a m i n i m u m of (, t:ou r�cs ( 24 semester hours) with a minim u m of 2 ,ourses ( 8 semestcr h<)u ) in residence. 2 The wmple tion of a m i n i m u m of 1 0 cou rses (40 semeste r hours ) n u m bered 3 2 1 O f a bo ve.

3 . The comple tion o f two 4·semester-hour 3 00-320 I n terim cou rses. Only one 300-320 In te rim ("Ourse desi�,'lIated as "advanced" may be used t o meet tllis requirem e n t. (Junior and Senior transfer students m us t complete only one 3 00- 3 2 0 I n terim cou rse and i t m a y be one which is "advanced. " ) 4. The completion of seven cou rses ( 2 8 semestef hours) in residence during t h e senior year, (Special programs s u c h a s 3· J , 3·2, and Medical Technology excluded.)

BASIC CO R E REQUI R E M E NTS A LL B ACCA LAU R EATE DEGREES I.

ENG USH PROFICI ENCY s t u d en t may meet the English proficiency require m e n t in one of three ways: ( I ) by earning a swre of 3 or better on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination in Com position; ( 2) by earning a passing grade i n 1:nglish 1 0 1 or i ts equivalen t ; or ( 3 ) b y p assing the p r o fi c i e n c y examina tion ad mi nib tered each semester by the Un iversity Engli&h DepaItment. This examination tests UIC studcll t's knowledge of grammar and usage as well as his ability to commu nicate effectively i n a brief essay. Students who need hel p with the basic skills of E nglish arc encouraged to check with (he Coordinator of the Learning Skills Cen ter to receive necessary help. All students should ful[ill the proficiency requiremen t as early as possible, preferably during the freshman year, a n d lisually no later than the second semester of the sophomorc year. A j u n ior student who has not demonstrated proficiency wil l be granted only provisional status u n til he has successfully done so. Students will not be permitted to enroll for the senior year i f the proficiency require men t has not been met. A student w ho fails the English proficiency examination a second time must enroll i n English 1 0 1 . 2. VII . AR S - I course (4 hours) Met by a course in art, music or communication IIrts with the exception of the fo l l o w ing cour cs: Fine Arts teaching method courses, CA 1 23 , and journalism courses. 3. HISTO R Y A N D UTERAT R E ," I cou rse (4 hours) Met by a n y his tory course, any English cou rse (except J O L , 3 28 400 and 4 0 3 ) and any l iterature course in the Foreign Langu age departmen t. 4. PHI LOSOPI I Y - I course (4 hours ) M e t b y a n y philosophy cou rse except

A

logic. 5. R E L IGION - 2 COUTses (8 hours) I l\\'er division course should be taken before the end o f the sophomore year. The second course may be chosen from lower or u p per division offe rings or the Senior Seminar, an i n terdisciplinary offering that will help the studen t sec the relevance o f religious iSsues and thOUgllt to his major field. Transfer students e n tering a.s juniors or seniors meet [his requirement with one cou rse chosen from all offerings in the department. 6 . N A T U RA L SC I E N C E S AND M A T H E M ATICS - I course (4 hours) Met by any course from biology, earth science (except 1 0 1 ), chemistry, engineering, ph ysics or mathematics.

7. SOC I A L SCI ENCES - .1 course (4 hours)

Met by any cou rse from economics, geogra phy, political science, psychology or sociology wi t h the exception of Psyc hology 1 1 0. 8. PHYSICAL EDUCATION - J course (4 hours) Met by four one·hour actiyities including PE 1 00 ; shoul d be met by the end of the sophomore year' all activi ties are graded on A, Pass or Fail basil!. 9. Candidates in the College of Arts and Sciences must meet a foreign language requirement under Option I , I I or I I I as described by that College,

L l M ITA nONS - ALL 8ACC A L A U R E ATE DEGREES I.

Not more t h a n 1 0 cou rses (40 hours) earned in one departme n t may be applied toward the bachelor's degree i n the Coll ege of Arts and Scien ces. 2. Non·music majors may coun t toward graduation no more than 2 courses (8 hours) in m u sk ensem bles. 3. A maxi m u m o f 6 cou rses ( 24 hours) correspondence and/or extension work may be cou n ted toward the degree. Any such cou rse must be ap proved by the Registrar. 4 . A m<Lx i m u m of 16 courses (64 semester hours) of credi t will be accepted from a community college any time d u ring the four·year baccalaureate program.

CO R E 1 1 - T H E I N T E G R A T E D STU D I E S PROG R A M Core I I is a prob'Tam especiaUy designed as an a l ternative means of satisfying the un i v e r s i ty's basic requirements (except Physical E d u c ation). Consisting o f a constellation of interdisciplinary courses, the program as a whole explores a cen t ral theme, "The Dynamics of Change," from a variety of perspectives. A student who chooses Core n to meet the Ge ne ral U niversity Requiremen ts will begin with Sequence I, fOl lowing this with any tw Sequences chosen from II, I I I , or IV, and conclude the Program wi t h the Seminar which would normally be taken i n t h e j u nior or senior year. I n d ividual courses in each Sequcnce are equivalent to four senlester hours of credit each. A brochure wi t h further details is aV:·i ilable from the Oftice of Adm issions or the Registrar. A brief s u m mary of the program follows, THE DY NAMICS OF C H A N

E

SEQUENCE I : The Idea o f Progress Course I : Natu re and Supernature IS 2 1 1 Course 2 : From Finite to I n fi n i te IS 2 1 2 SEQUENCE I I : Hu man Responsibility Course I : Developing Man IS 2 2 1 IS 2 2 2 Course 2 : T h e B u rd e n o f Human Responsibility: 20th Cen t u ry Europe SEQUENCE I I I : Word and World: Exploring the Creative Imagination I S 23 1 Course I : SymbOl, Lan guage, My t h I S 232 Course 2 : Metaphor and Model: Inventing the World


71 SEQ ENCE I V : Lim its to Gro w t h IS 24 1 Course I : T h e Technolo!,T ical Society and the Thrust for Growth Course 2: The Tech nologkal IS 24 2 Society a n d t h e L i m i ts to Growth SEMINAR: IS 25 I Se m i n ar R I·:GULATI O N S

J.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

GOV ERNING C O R £'

II

Sequence I is prerequisite t o all following sequences. A waiver of this sequence may be allowed for a stu dcn t whose previous work in l i beral stud ies is j u dged t o have been sufficiently broad and relevant to t h e principal ideas t o b e s t u d ied i n t h e re mainin g sequences. A com m i t tee o f t h e Program's facul ty w i l l eval u a te s u c h a waiver request. Sequences I I , I I I , or I V may be taken independ e n t l y of enrol l me n t in the Program as a whole, but will n o t satisfy any portion of t he General U niversity Requirem cllls. Cred i t will be given for such courses, however, and may cou n t as elec tive credi t or credit toward a m ajor if a course is specifically allowed by the appropriate dcpartmen t(s). If, for any reason, a s t u d e n t who enrolled i n the Program docs not complete it, a Transfer Co m m i t tee (com posed of t h e three Divisional Chairmen and t he Dean o f t h e Sc hool of F i n e A r t s ) w i / I evaluate h is work in t he light of its scope and in view o f t he General University Requirements a n d make a decision concerning w h a t area of study t he s t u d e n t must still take to satisfy t he normal General U niVersity Requirements. Enroll ment i n the conduding Seminar i s open o n ly to s t u de n ts who have completed Sequences I and any two of II·I V, or any two o f I I- I V with a waiver of Sequence I. Sequence I may be taken in t h e fresh man o r sophomore year, and any two of Sequences n·1 V may be taken in the sophomore, or sophomore and j u n ior years. Normally, t h c con d u d i n g Seminar will be taken i n the j u n ior or senior year.

S t u d e n ts enrolled i n the I n tegra ted S t u d ie s Program who f a i l to show proficiency i n w r i t i n g s k i l l s a s j u d ged by instructors i n t h e first sequence, will b e required t o e nroll in English 1 0 1 in a d d i t ion t o t h e courses comprising the Program in order to sa tisfy CO R E I I requirements. 7. S tuden t s succc�sfu l ly com pleting the components of this Program as o u tlined a bove will be regarded as h aving fulfilled all t h e General University Requirements except a course i n Physical Education and the I n terim requirement. 8. Since one of the e m p h ases of this Program is to develop t h e writing. critical and analy tical skills of students, participation i n t h e actual courSe work and discussion is essen tial. Therefore, com pon e n t courses in the Program may not be t a ken hy means of challenge examina tions, nor will CLEP credit, work·study or other acad e m ic experience be substitu table for course credit i n t h is Program.

9.

Pass-fail cwd i t may not be elected by t h e s t u d e n t enrolled i n this Program i n any sequence of cou rses after the first or in the Seminar. N o compone n t course may be offered by the instruc tional staff as an exclusive p ass·fail courses. J O. Since a seq uence of courses is especially designed as a consecu tive and interrelated whole, t h e first course i n each seq uence is prereq uisite t o the second. They may n o t , therefore, be i n terchanged.

THE I N TEGRATED STU DIES PROG R A M IS 2 1 1

NATURE A N D S UP E R N AT U R E

Study of the creative a n d real'lionary responses of t h e Renaissance, Reformation and c o u n ter·Reformation periods to the a u t h oritarian Medieval men tality. Lu ther, GaIiJeo, Kepler and Newton arc given special emphasis toge ther with developm e n ts from 1 5 00·1 700 in art and political h istory. Analysis of the e m e rging idea of progress. Prerequisite to 2 1 2 , From rin i te to I n fin i te .

LS 2 1 2

F R OM F I N I T I T O I N F I N IT E

Developm e n t s i n l i tera t u re, pol itics and indus trialization in the 1 8 th and 1 9t h cent uries. E m phasis is given t o t h e i n fluence of the E n l igh t e n m e n t on t h e develop ment of the idea of progress, and to t h e form ation of Darwinism, the Roman tic move ment and Marxism.

IS 2 2 1

DEVE LOPI N G M A N

IS 2 2 2

B U R D E N OF H U \lI A N R ES PONS I B J lHY

The developme n t o f moral vaiues and conscience are s t u d ied from a biological, p h ilosophical and sociological poi n t of view, in connection with con temporary moral issues. Particular atten tion is given to cri m inal behavior and gene m a n i p u l ation a n d the per t i n e n t JIl oral a n d social questions raised by these p henomena. Prerequisite to 2 2 2 , B u rden of Human Responsibility.

An exam ination of h u m a n responsibility on the social level in Europe d u r ing the first h a l f of t h e 2 0 t h century. The earlier explosion o f t e c h n o l ogy and t he deVelop ment of deterministic methods i n t h e social sciences arc explored, with e m p h asis on Social Darwi n ism and Marxism. The iconoclasm and moral despair of the age arc portrayed agai nst the background of the rise o f German N a t ional Socialism and the moral d ilemmas generated by World War I I.

IS 23 1

SYM B O L , LANG UAGE A N D M YTH

The phenomenon or language is examined t h rough a study o f its role in shaping knowledge, its h istory as a symbolic system, and its nature as a deposi tory of cult ural traits. The nature of symbolic systems general l y , includ ing n u merical systems, and t h e role of my t h as a genre for expressing "real ity" arc given emphasiS. Prereq uisite to 232, Metaphor and Mod e l : I n v e n t ing the World.


72 rs 232

M L T i\ P I I O R A N D M

D L L:

I N Ll 1 1 G II IE WO R L D An l'x !l m i n a t i n o f the creative IISC (ll' languag '. sy m bo l , alld m y UI in l i terat u rc. R 311ing� i n fllLk l i lera t ur e . Jnpan"�(.' A ojiki, l Iindu I'lii"!III(lS. youruha talc ', and Itelan<.l ic saga illu Irate Ihe social fundion of art and serve as ex am ples of t h e hasi� form s of epic. lyric. (Iram'l. These forms al l' p u rsued i n to l a ter l i tl'rary w(Jrks by such au t hors as Blake, Sh a kcsllcare, Sophocles. Brech t. and K afka. sedion on modern phy sics, "the work of art of Ihe Iwe n tielh ce n t ury" (Bronowski) shows that the creative imagi na tion is not l i lll i ted to HUH� arts. ,.

T i l L T EC I ] ! O LOG I C A L . SOC I E T Y A N D r i l E T i l l U T I : O R C Ro\ II An a n a l ysb of thl' impad of tech nology on lllo<.lern sodety and of thc emergent concept or secul ari�m is (kvdo l 'e<.l in an l'ffort to unders tand con temporary � u l lure. Problems of the in teTface of t ech nology wilh cul ture arc exa m i ned fmm ph ilosoph ical, religious. biological and e('ono m i c points of vicw. rrercquisile 1 0 IS 24 2 , The Tec hnological Society and the Limits to Growth.

IS 24 1

I S 242

TH[� TECHNO ( C ICA , l TS sO(' l n y I N D T I l E , \li TO G R OWTl I An e,vloration of c reat ive t'u t u re s bcyollu a technologica.1 soc iety. ' mp h as;", is given to a study of UIC limits 10 growth i.n connec tion with food prod u c t ion , eneQ,')', pol l u tion anu III a t e r ial resources. The moral choices itwolve<.l in al tern a t ive futures arc exam i ne<.l tog tlll'r with aes l h e t ic val ue. an<.l their irnpl it:a l ion� for fu ture social urdcr. G RADUATION

tuden ts expecting to fulfill degree T i l E A C A D E M IC req u iremen t.· W ITl I I ! YEA R arc req u i red to file appl i c a tion for gradua tion with the Registrar. There are. fOu r uegrcl'-co lll plelion dates (end of fall ,ellll'ster, i n teri m, spring semester, alld second S U llllller session). Degrees arc formall y " o n fcrred at May an<.l August Co rn rn encemen ' . Slll temcn rs of completion are i ' 'ued u p II request to studen t · who quillify f r graduation at the enu o f fall semester anu in teri m . The actual dale of grad u at ion wi ll be recorded on the permanent records. A s t u uen t may be 3 wardc<.l more t han onc hac helor's degree sim u l ra ne(Jusly. provide<.l that n t l eas t 2 R A DOI1'10. A I. hours arc earned for the second degrce. A iotal of 1 56 acceptable hou rs arc rpqu ired I'm I ,'() � i m u l tancous baccalaureatc degree . A shld!:n l who is w i t hin 4 hours of m ee t i ng aU req uire m e n ts may participate i n May 'ommentemenl IIfovi<.led a specific plan for earning remaining cre d i t w i t h i n ten weeks has been approvc<.l by the Provost. I-l is status w il l be lIcsi gna te<.l on the COlll menccmcn t program an<.l his u i pl o m a will be <.l a t e<.l i n Augu t St uden ts w h o plan to transfcr back to Pacific Lu theran niversity for a <.legree (math , physics, engineering programs) m u s t apply for a <.l u a tion prior t o or <.lu ring the tiTSl semester of their j u n ior year so t h a t

<.lcficiencics ma\' " be met before the s t ll u e n t leavcs campus. A t ll' lld ance at commcncemcnt e.x crciscs is r 'qu ired lllliess the eanlli<.late is c.x cuseu by II e Provos t .

SPEC I A L P R OG R A M S W A S H J NGTON STATE COUNC i L ON ECON O M I C E DUC T J ON

T h e W a s h i ngton tate C II ncil on Econ o m i c E u c a t i()Il is 3 state-wi<.le orga nilati II head q u artered a t P L • an<.l is <.l csigncd to raise the level of u n derstanJing c o n cern i n g e c o n o m i c p r i n ciples and proceu u rcs among teachers anu stu<.len ts i n the Pacific Northwest. T h c program indu <.les a Ce n ter for Economic [<.lucati n, an<.l is recogn i7e<.l n ationally hy the .I o i n t Council on Economic I'ducation. I ts fu nctions arc: I ) To o ffer special cours ' 10 noneconomics m ajors at PL • e. pccially 10 future teachers an<.l to �urrc n t lllclllbcrs of the tcaching profession. These courses elllph asize the role of cconomics among the social sciences an<.l i ts importance in all areas of life. 2 ) To <.levelop. in coopcration w i t h t1w scllo( I systems ()f this stall', teach i ng p lans anJ ai<.l s t h a t fac ilitate inl'orporation of econom ic ' into existing l'ur ricula. 3) To prov i<.le spea king an<.l co nsultrng services for � o lll m u n i ty orga n iza tion � i n t reste<.l in promoting p u blic undl, rstanuing o f eco w m i e principles unu isslles. The WSCEr is an edu�ational organ ization supporteu by a coali tion o f com munity g r oups represe n t ing education, business, l a b o r . agricu l t u re, and gove rn m e n t . I t operates a s a n i n dcpen <.l e n t non-profi t , non-partisan c d u e a t i o n a l organiLa tion <.leuica tcd 1 0 the principle that each citizen's a b i l i ty to recognize allll o/Jj('clirc/y analy z(' economi<.: issues is esse n tial to h is or her welfare an<.l Ihe cou n t ry's p rogress.

C LASSIC At PLlI the Classics Program is a cooperutive effort among the <.lcparlnlCn t of foreign l a nguag • h istory . philosophy, religion an<.l fine arls. Its goal is to u n i te the "heart of thc l i beral arts" wilh the mind, t h rough history an<.l philosophy, and Ule soul. throuoh religion, an<.l to e m bel l ish t h is Irin i ty of themes wi th the visual e x perience of art. This i n te r<.l parI men tal m ajor [e(lu ires Ule com pletion of 1 0 cou rses, indu<.ling a t least one year of OIlC of the Classical l.ang ages and two of the other (Greek and Latin ). The remaining cou rses arc selecte<.l from the l i s t helo\\' in consul ta tion w i t h the program coor <.l i n a tor. La t i n 1 0 1 - 1 02 La t i n 20 1 -202 Greek 1 0 1 - 1 02 Gree k 20 1 -202 Greek 4 2 1 -4 2 2

!�Ieml'n tary I n termediate Elclllen tary I n termcu iatc Masterpil'ces of Greek Li tera t u re Twe n t ieth Cen t ury Art A r t 280 nciell l Art Art 3 8 2 Art 383 1cd icval Ar t R � n a issance Art Art 3 84 Baroque Art Art 385 I'inc tcc n t h Cen t ury Art Art 4 8 7 Seminar Art 4 9 0 l IiS10ry 3 2 1 -3 2 2 C1ass i�al Civiliz ation Ancient Philosophy Phil 33 1


73 Rel i gi on 24 1 Ili blical L i ter a t u re Rel igion 34 1 Old Testame n t Stu d i es R el i gio n 342 l"e w Testam n t S t u d i es Religion 3 7 1 Ancienl Church His tury I nd e pe nd e n t S tu dy Co u r.;cs cl\'ded I n te ri m Cour 'es

grad u a te studies in nearly all engineering fields. Strength may he b u i l t in Electrical or Mechan ical E n g i nee ri n g Sciences. For m a ll. i m u lll ne.xibility in u p per d iv ision cou rses. s t u d e n t s sh o u l d schedule t h e i r first

nu: �t ud c n t is ex pe cte d to b ec o m e fam iliar wilh the r ea di ng lis! for t h a t part of t h e pr ogra m ( A r t , li terature . History, Philosop y o r Re l igi on ) in wh ic h his Or her in terest l ies. The program is d e si gned to II ' tle x i llie. I n consul ta t ion w i t h the Classics Com m i t tee, a student m ay del'! a course or cou rses n o t on !lIe Cl ass i cs course list. E N V ) RONMENTA L STU D I ES PROG RAM

Sociology

1 3 0,

230

or

24 0 ;

Bu-iness

Admini Iration 230; and one ap p roved upper d iviSIon coursc. sllc h as: Econom ics 362 or 4 3 2 ; l I is tory 460: Physical E d uca t i o n 326: Poli tical Science 352 Or 356; Psy c hology 3 3 0 : or Soc iol ogy 34 1 , 3 4 3 , or 430. H U MAN m ES - 20 semester hours: Art 29.J; English 1 0 1 ; Philosophy : two approved cou rse ',

sudl a ' : 2 2 1 , 3 24, 3 28, 385, 4 2 7 :

Religion : one approved course

such

as 2 6 I

45 1 . I N T E G R AT I VE

Fall

I':GR 1 5 l PHYS 1 5 3 \IAT I I 1 5 1 Basic Core lOlA L

S prin!! EG R u n

I'I I Y S 1 5 4 \I A T I I 1 5 2

Basic Corc

Students concerned about or wishing to e nter gra du;)te s t u dy a n d ca ree r p rograms i n �uch lields as e n v i ro n me n t a l science, environ men tal law o r resource management, may eIlroll in the En ironmen tal S tudies Program . certificate will be awarded � t u dents completing requ irements l isted b luw, together with a d ep ar t me n t al or scJlOol major program. A com m i t tee consisting of represen t a tives from each of the three major suhjed la t ter groupings will approve each student's co urse program and in tegrative e,' pericn ces . N AT R A L S C I E I ers AI D MATl I E M ATICS - 20 se me s ter hou rs : Earth ciences 222, S t a t istics 33 1 or Math 1 4 4: three add i t i oll nl approved cou rses, s uch a s : B iol of,'Y I I I , C he mi stry 1 03 , 1 04 , Earth Science 10 I, IJ 1, 202. SOCI AL SCl ENCES - 16 se m es t er huu r ' ; - c<>nomil:s 1 5 0 : Pol i tical Science 1 0 1 or 20 1 or

I vo years as indicated: Frc hlllaJ] Year:

EXPE R I EN C E

or

8

semester hours: DUring the I n terim and final semcster o f the senior y ea r , each student would p art ici pa te in a study-research-ac tion l rogra m dc, igned to draw upon the broad )ac kgrou nd of the above courses and the expert ise of h is own Illaj r field. Appropriate

I

will be iden t i fied in lhe I!lterilll ([tillog, Semester cou rses may i ncl ud e , h u t are n o t l i m i ted t o , a p p r o p r i a t e dep rtmen lal

l:UlI rses

sem in ar ; . ind pend n t study or researC'h cour 'cs: field expcrience a n d in t e r nsh i p progrums; employment or vol u n teer service wiillin com m u n i ty aclion agencies. E NG I N E E R I N G The 'nivcr 'ily offers two programs I �ad i ng to c a re e rs in e n g i n e e r i n g. Concell trations in El ec tri c al and Mechanical Engineering S ci en ces are possible in each offering. I n ei t h er p rogram. s t u d e n ts should h av e had I Ilgh School mathema tics at least through tr igon om e t ry . ENGI N EE R. l N G P H YSICS This progrn. m prepares students emp l oym en t in many d ivl� r se industries or

for for

TOT A L

2 5 4 4 15

4

5

4 4 17

Sophomore Year: I'all

'oCR 2 3 1 or 272 2 4 PHYS 223 \'I;\T I I 2 5 3 4 Basic C o re 4 TOTA L l4

Srrin�

U-; R 2 3 2 o r 272 leR 354 I ATl I 1 44

Basic Core

IO rA L

4 4

4 4

16

Other schedules arc possi ble and can be worked o u t in consul tation join tly w i t h the E ng i n e e r i n g and Ph ys ics De pa rt me n t s. hemistry 1 1 5 an d Mathematics 1 44 m a y be \. orked i n t o a schedule i n various places. .I u n ior and senior year sc hed u l e s are de term i ned by u p per division requ i re m nt:s and hy Ihe s tu d e n t s ' o bjectives. See sec tion " Ph y s i c s" for d e t a i l ed courses and reqnir men ts. 3-2 EI G i l I:.E R f NG A d u al-d egree 3-2 collaborative tie-in with

C o l u m bi a and Stanford Universities is designed 1 0 immerse an engineering stu d e n t i n t h e u niqueness of 1 \ 0 insti t u t ional se t t ings over a period of five year ' , t h ree at PLU and an a d di t i on al two a t Co l u m bi a or Stanford. S t udents out of this p rogr am have also gone 3-2 qu ite successfully with the 'niversity of Washington or olh 'r state universities in the

Paci fic Northwest. A smaUer un iversity set t i n g such as PLU is uniq uely sui ted to foster a studen t's personal developmcnt while m a k i ng a firm b u t not pre m a t u re c o m m i t m e n t t o profe ssi o n al a n d career goals. In t h is type of setti ng, i t is possible to clarify the social co n tex t i n which engi neers function. A major school of Engi neering such as hoth Stanford's and ol u m bia's emphasizes advanced stud ies, researc h , and in teraction with indus try. O ur 3-2 E ngin e er i ng Program gives s t u d e n ts t h e hest of t wo s et tinf'S , , breadth while a t P l U and t hen depth i n engineering s pec i a l ly a t Colu m bia o r Sta n ford. Durin g t h e first t h r ee years of the PL engineering IHogram, tile s t u de n t m u s t c o m plete all Basic Core Requirements ( H u mani ties), two I nterim , all basic science and m a t hematics requirements, and su fficien t e n gi neerin : 10 gain a clear sense of d i rec ti on before a rec o m m e n dation to ol u m bi a or Stanford cal] be gran ted. S pec i fi c courses are detailed i n t he " En gi n eer ing" se c t io n .

Twu

d e g rees

arc

earned :

B.S.

III

Engineering-Science by Pl at the end of the student's first ycar a t thc major school (fourth coUege year) and t he B.S. in an Enl,>i nee ri ng Specialty awarded by Col u m bia or Stanford a t Ihe e n d of hi<; second year ( fi ft h college year) at th e major scho I. Studen ts should make every effort to schedule their co u r ses in thei r first two yea r s in 3-2 Engineering 'imilar to tha t l ist d above for Engineering-Physks. O th e r schedules are possibl e d e p e n d ing U p O I] o n e's accomplishments in H igh School s ci en c e and mathema tics and can be worked ou t i n c nsul t ation with the Engineering Dc par t m en t.

LAW Most law sc hool s requ i re a t l ea st three yel!I1; of l i beral arts st ud i es ; however, they re ga rd four years of l i beral arts studies a n d a Bachelor of A rts de!,'l'ee as better p re p a ra t io n for t he study of law. I n addi t ion to meeting degree req uirements, the prospec tive law student is advised to complete four scmcster hours each of economics, history. p hi loso p hy , poli t ical $cicncc. psychology, sociology a n d spec h. The pre-law studen t is advised t o complete substantial wo rk in a c c ou nt i n g. The studen t should plan his course equence according t o re q u irem e n t s of the law school in \ hich he is in terested. S t u dents i n terested in law are urged to register at the Pre-law enter in the

Department of Pol i tical Science. I n formation

on the Law School Admiss iOll Test ( lSAT), a circ u lating l i brary of law school bu l l eti n s, and a newsletter, Tlie Pre-la\\! Adl'ocatc, and other resou rc e materials are available. I n addi t ion, the stude n t may wish to dis uss his program w i t h the pre-l.a w ad v i se r of the Poli t ical Science llepartmen t.

UR BA N A F F A l RS possibili ties in state and l o cal service_) For certification, successful completion of the fo llowing courses is required: 1'( litieal Sci e n ce 20 1 , 25 1 , 3 25 , 4 26 , 3 5 2 or 3 5 7, and 458: Economics 1 5 0 and 3 6 2; and Sociol ogy ( areer

governme n t

1 3 0 and 344.

PU B LlC A F F A I RS ( A d m i n is t r a t i

n

an d

l�aJeers i n public age nc ies .)

policy-planning

Re qu ired: 32 semester hours of Pol i t ical Science; 20 semester hours of Economics: plus 1 2 S(�me- ter hours of e l ec t iv e on advise men t.

LA Y C H U R C H WOR K E R PRO GR AM A student w h o seeks to fu l fi l l a C IHi s t ia n

vocation

of se rvi ce to the church and com m u n i ty as an u no r d a in ed professional may prepare for cl'rti ricalion by the ap proprial e church j ud i ca t o ry a� a church staff workN. Positions c u rren t ly filled by

such workers ind ude:

Church Busines: A d m i n istrator

Church Musician

Christian Educa tion Director Christian Day School Teacher

Parish Worker YOU !JI Work Direc tor A majo r ill Religion is norm ally required for this p ro !,'l'a rn wilh s u p p or ti n g work selec ted in the f i e l ll of Businc " administra l i o n , Education, Mu"it'. Social SCiences, and P hy sical Education.


74 Students enrolled in this proh'Tam will be advised 3S Lo those institu tions, boards, and agencies within the church that may assist them in planning educational programs and obtaining placement after graduation. The d partment designates one of its membcr ' as director of the program. This per on is a.\,�jsted by one facu l ty member from a supporting area and by a member of the adm inislraLion.

l1i E STUDY PROGRAM Required courscs i n Religion: 24 1 , 3 8 1 . Rio' ommcnded courses: 1 3 1 or 25 1 ; 1 3 2 or 2 6 1 ; 3 7 3 ; plus two courses selected from " Re l ig i o n , C ulture, Society, and the Individual" area. Recommended supporting areas: Busi ess Administration (Accounting, Management) Communication Arts Education Music Psychology Physical Education ( Recreation) Sociology

HEA LTH SCI ENCES A health scienl'cs comm ittee advises students asp iring to careers in the heal th sciences. During the first semester of altendance at PL , the studen t should contact the Health Sciences Com mittee oordinator, who will assist the student in obtaining the appropriate advisor. This adv iso r will provide the de tailed requirements and procedures for each l'areer. Briefly, the requirements for each area follow: DENT I S T R Y, MEDICINE E T E RI N A RY MEDl C IJ 'J E

AND

The overwhelming majority of studen ts entering the professional schools of these careers have devoted four years of study to SCl' ure the broad educational background req u i r e d . his background includes a thorou h preparation in the sciences in addition to study i n the social sciences and the hu manities. There are no pre-professional majors bill rather the student should select the major which is of in terest and which best prepares the siudent for an al ternative career. In addition to the General University Requirements and the requirements of the studen t's major, the fol lowing are required: Biology : 1 5 3, 1 54 , 253 ; Chemistry: 1 1 5 - 1 J 6, 3 3 1 -3 3 2 plus laboratories; Mathematics: at least one semester 1 3 3 or higher; Physics: one year course with l a boratory 1 25- 1 26 or 1 5 3 - 1 54. In addi tion to these mll1lmUm required science courses, most professional schools have their own specific requirements. (Check with your advisor.)

OPTOM ETR Y though two years of preoptometric study i th minimum required, most students accepted by a school or college o f optometry have completed t h ree years in an undergrad uate college. A large percentage of students accepted by the schools and colleges of optometry have earned a bachelor's degree. 'fhe requ irements for admission to the schools and colleges o f optometry vary. Uowever, all optometric schools and colleges require al lcasl two years of preoptometric study which should include:

Biology: 1 5 3 . 1 54, 253; Chemistry: 1 1 5, 1 1 6 ; Physics: 1 25 - 1 26 or 1 5 3 ; English Y2 to I year; College Mathema tics (including calculus): I year. In addition, each optometry school has its own set of requirements. (Check with your advisor.) MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY The minimum academic requirements for en try into clinical training as published by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAA CLS) are: A minimum of 1 6 semester u nits of Chemistry to include organic chemistry or biological chemistry, 1 6 semester u n i ts of biology to include m icrobiology, one course in ma thematics. The con ten t of chemistry and biology courses must be acceptable towards a major in those liclds of s tudy or the e quivalent; the mathematics requireme n t is met by courses recognized as prerequisites for admission to physics cou rses. In addition to these specific requirements, the studen t must have acqu ired a minimum of 90 semester un its of academic credit prior to adm ission to the clinical program. Alth ough the minimum requirements for medical technology are as outlined above, many of the clinical in ternship programs require or strongly recommend a bachelor's degree in biology or chemistry prior to ad mission to clinical training. Therefore, a student should consider first earning a bachelor's degree in either of these majors. The s t u de n t m u st complete a twelve-mon th medical technology in ternship in an A merican M edical Association a c c re d i t e d clinical l a b oratory. Upon completion of this i n ternship, the student is eligible to take the medical technology certification ex amination given by the Board of Registry of Medical Technologists of the Science in Medical Tech nology. The minimum required courses for the B.S.M.T. at PLU are: Chemistry 1 1 5 , 1 1: 6 , 32 1 , 33 1 , 3 3 2, 3 3 3 , 334 ; Biology 1 5 3, 1 54 , 275; M a thematics 1 3 3. Very strongly recom mended: Physics 1 25 , 1 26, 1 4 7 , 1 4 8 . Also recommend.ed: Biology 253, 33 1 , 346, 44 1 ; Chemistry 404. The rem ainder of the requirements for a major in biology or chemistry must also be fulfilled . ' PHARMACY Although the pre-pharmacy requirements for individual schools of pharmacy vary (check with your advisor), the following courses are usually required : G e n e ral chemistry, I year; organic chemis try with laboratory, I year; college level mathematics (mav include calculus). English composition and li terature, I year. Often required are microbiology, quan tita­ tive analysis, and in troductory �ourses in communication arts, economics, poli tical science. An example: The University of Washington School of Pharmacy has ap­ proved the following schedule as being equivalent to the first two years of their 5-year cou rse leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy: Fresh man year: (first semester) Chemistry I 1 5 , Mathematics 1 3 3 (may be omi tted if

trigonometry was taken in high schoo\), English 101, P.E.; (second semester) C h e m i stry 1 1 6, M a thematics lSI, Com m u nication Arts 1 23 , elective. Sophom ore year: ( fi r s t semester) Chemistry 33 1 , 3 3 3 , Biol ogy 1 5 3 , Physics 1 25 , 1 4 7 , elective, P.E.; (second semester) Chemis try 3 3 2, 3 3 4 , Biology 1 5 4, Physics 1 26 , 1 4 8 , P.E. DENTAL THERAPY

H YG I E N E

AND

PHYSICAL

Acceptance to schools of Den tal Hygiene and Physical Therapy has become increasingly competitive in rece n t years and you are strongly encouraged to con tact your advisor as early as possible and together determine the specific pre-requisites for the schools YOll are planning to attend. The minimum requirement in either p r o fessi o n a l track is 2 years of pre-professional work. Two examples: 1. M i n i m u m p r e -requ isites for the Physical Therapy p rogram a t the University of Washington : Biology : 1 6 3 , 20 1 , 299; Chemistry: 1 03 , 1 04 ; Mathematics: 1 3 3 ; Physics: 1 25- 1 26 ; Psychology 1 0 1 plus one addi tional course; English 1 0 1 , plus one additional course; plus electives in the humani ties and social sciences. 2. Minimum pre-req uisi tes for the Dental Hygiene program at the University of Washington : B i o l o gy : 1 53, 1 54 , 25 3 , 403 ; C h e m istry 1 15-1 16, 3 3 1 -3 3 2 ; Mathematics: 1 3 3 ; an introductory course in Speech, Sociology, and Psychology; plus electives i n the humani ties and social sciences. If you have q uestions regarding health science careers other than those listed above, ple ase con tact the H e a l th Sciences Coordinator.


77 S P EC I F I C D EG R E R EQU I R EM E N T S A N O CO U R SE O F F E R I N GS L i l e Ll In Ihis section arc course d e s n i pt ious and �ulll l1laries of dc"rce O requ iremen t s for maj ors and programs in t h e College t l f Ar t s and Sci nccs, and I h e Schools of D u sincs - A d m i n i s t r a t i o n , Lducati n , F i n e Arts. Phys i ca l Education, and :'Iiursing. . Detallcd .degree requiremen ts, often i n c l u d ing sup plemen tary sa m ple progra ms, are av ailable 111 t he offices of t he i nd i v i d u a l schools a n d uepa r t lllcn ts.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES Divi.-ioll of Hu m;lIl i ties !'nglish Foreign Languages Philosophy Religion

Division o f N a t ural Sciences Bi()l ogy C h e m i s t ry Ear t h Sciences lnoineering

COURSE N U M B ER I NGS 1 00·299 Lo we r Division Courses: Open to fres h m en and sophonwrcs" u n l ess o l h_er w ise

Mat hematics

Physics

r - ( ric ted.

300·320 I n t e r i m Coursc,\ 2 1 ·4 9 9 U p per D i v i s i on Courscs: enerally open t o jun ior: and seniors un less otherwise specified. Also open t o grau u a t e stud en ts, anu Illay b e consi dereu p a rI o f a gra d ua te program provided they arl' n o t speci fic req ui remcn t s i n preparation for grai.lu a t c stuuy , 500·599 Grad u a t e ourses: I 'ormally open to grad u a t e st uden t· only. pPl! r division students may be pe r m i t ted to enroll wi th Ihe per mission o f the c h .ti r m a n , di ret: tor or dean of t h e a c a d e m i c u n i t offering Ihe COUlse i f al l prerequisi tes have been m e t and the stuuc n t has an above·average academic record. * pon t he approval of his adviser n d I h e course in - t ruct or. a lower div ision s t u u e n t m a y be assigned t o a n u p ller d i v i s i o n coursc if prerc4uisites have been met.

COURSE O F ERI NGS M s t l isted c ou r se - arc off red every year. A -ystem If al l e rnat i ng u pper division cou rses

is p ra c t i ced in some dep a r t m e n t . , t hereby assu ring n broader c u rric u l u m . The U n iversity reserves the right to m odify spe c i fic course req u i remen ts. to discon t i n u e dru;ses in w h i c h the registrat i o n i s r ega r d ed as insu fficien t, a n d 10 wi thdraw courses.

EXPLANATION OF SYM BOLS Mosl courses have the v al ue of 4 semester hou rs. b.l'c p t ions have a pa re n t he t i c al n u m be r i m med i a tely after the course t i l l e i n d i c a t i n g t he semester hOUT crcd i t given. O t h er sy m bols are e x p l a i ned a s fol lows: I - Cour c offcf(�d first semester II - Cou rse offereu second semester I, II - Cou rse offered first and second semester in equence I I I - Cou rse offered e i t her semester S - COllrse offered in th • su m mer a!y - Cou rse offered in al ternate years at· - OUIse offered in al ternate s u m m ers G - C u rs.: may he used on gra d u a t e prvgrams a s a major

Division of Soc ial Sciences Economics l I i sto ry Poli tical Science P�'Y c holob'Y Sociology , A n t h ro pology and Soc i a l Wel fare

Degrees Offered Bachelor of A r ts Bachelor of Science

MAJ OR R E Q U I R E M E N T A major i s a sequence of cou rses i n one area, usually i n one dcpartmcn t. " major should be selected by t hc end o f t he sophom ore year. The c h oice m u st be approved hy t he depart men t ch airman (or i n t h e case of special acadcmic programs, t he program coo r d i n a t o r) . M :ljor re( l uiremcnU arc specified i n this c a t alog. The q u a l i t y of work must be 2.00 or better. "0" work may be coun ted toward gr a du a l ion h u t n o t toward the major. Recognized majors arc:

a n t hropology

m a t he m a t ic s m u sic

art biol ogy chemi. try d as si cs c m m u n i c a t ion a.cts earth 'cj nce ec nom ics engin ee r i n g Engl ish f'rench German h istory

]orwetTian phil [)s )hy

physkal educat ion ph y s i c s pol i t i t' a l science psychology religion soc io l ogy soc ia l wel fare Spanish

ot m or e than 40 ' e m c s t c r hours earned in one department may be applied loward t h e bachelor's degree in thc Col l egc. FOREIGN LANG U A GE/ A LTER N A · TIVE R E Q U I R E M El IS: In a d d i t i on to meeting University Requiremen ls, candid ates in the Co ll ege m u s l mee t t h e requirements o f Op lio n I , n or I I I : I.

11.

1 6 semcster language'" H se mes te r language*

hours

hours

in

One

foreign

in

one

fore ign

4 :e nll's t e r h o u rs in logic. math Or s t a t i s t ics 4 semester hours i n h istory, or English or l a nguage

I I I.

4 semester hours in history , or Lnglish or language semester h o u rs in social science. i n c l u ding geography 4 semester h Ol l rs in n a t u ral science 4 semester hours in l og i c . m a t h or s t a t is t ics

4

*Option I may he sat isfied by four ycars of h igh school s t u dy in one foreign l a ng u age. I f the s t u d e n t has less than four year, p l a c e m o n t and creu i t s h o u l d be determ i ne d by examination. Freshmen p l a n n ing to con t i n u c in a foreign language begun in high school shou l d t a ke the Col lege Roard Place ment Tes t offered d u ring orie n l a t i o n . (This t e s t is rcquired of those fresh men w h o p l a n t o s t u dy G e r m a n , French o r S p a n ish . ) Con t i n u a t ion o f a foreign la nguage sh o u l d n o t b e d e ferred. Students with 2·3 years of h igh school la ngu age and w i s h i ng to eon t i n u c should register for t h e second year cou rsc. A s t u d e n t m a y receive cred i t for any lan guage c ou r se i n w h i c h he is p laced w i t ho u t regard to h igh school cred i t . Final dec i s i o n of p l ac e m e n t is m a de by the Departmenl of Fo rcign Languages. A studen t may not receive cre d i t if he volun t a d l y sciects a cou rse level lower than t h a t in whi h thc de pa r t m e n t places him. The foreign language re q u i rement in Option II m ay be met by s� t i -fac tory scores on a proficiency e x a m i n a t ion or by more t h a n t w o y e a r s of h igh school work i n a single language. Two years are sufficient i f the grade poin t average for the total u n i ts i n t h a t langu age is 3.00. Candida tes for the B.A. i n English, or for thc B.A. in E d u c a tion w i t h conce n tration in English, m u s t meet Op t io n I . No course will be al lowed t o meel both Un iversity R e q u i r eme n ts a nd Coll ege Req uiremen ts. Wherc possible, cOu rses taken to fulfill req u ire men t s s h a l l be in d i fferen t areas. F o r e,a m ple. a s t u d II I fu l fi l l i n g h i s Univccsity history or l i te r a t u re requ i rem c n t w i t h a cou rse i n h i story, i f h e elects O p t ion I I , should choose a course i n English or l angu age to meet the rcquircmcn t of the Col l ege .

Biology All potenlial biology majors are u rged to co ns u l t a n a d v iser i n the depa r t me n t as early as possible in their co l le ge career. lot to do this could lead to cost l y delays in mc..'C t i ng major requircments. B "[LOR OF A RTS: 28 sC'mester hou rs in biology : 1 5 3 , 1 5 4, 25 3 ; 4 se mestcr hours from each o f t h ree corc groups listed helow; and one ap proved elect ive chosen in con s u l t a t i o n with a d v i ser. Required su ppo r t i ng: English 1 0 / ( English Proficiency Ex a m may not be su bs t i t u t e u ) : fore i gn la nguage ( O p t io n I or I I ) ; t wo years of c hem i s t ry (Che m i s t ry 1 1 5 , 1 1 6, 3 3 1 . 3 3 2 , 3 3 3 , 3 34 ) a n d �Iath 1 3 3 o r e q u iv al e n t . Strongly recommended: Ph y si c s 1 25 , 1 26, 1 2 7 , 1 28, and Mat h 1 5 1 . A maximum of 40 semester hours of biology c o u rses may be counte d !Oward gra d u a t ion. I n te r i m courses cannot be c o u n t e d toward a major.

CO RE G RO U PS cand idates ( Icc! a t from each):

for

bo t h

SA

and

BS

le ast 4 semeste r hours


78 Gro u p ( T his s h o u ld be take n immediately fol lowing 253 and prior to taking group I I or I I I cou rses): Biology 2 7 5 , 3 3 1 . 340. Group II: Biology 346, 403, 358. Chemistry 404 * . Group I l l: Biology 4 24, 4 75, An thropology 2 2 1 * . * Not given hiology credit b u t satisfies f,'TO U p requirements. Student would elec t a b i o l o gy r e p l a c e ment to fulfill major requiremellts. BACH 路.L O R O F SCI ENCE: 40 semester hours in hiology : 1 5 3 , 1 54 , 253; 4 semester hours from each of three core groups listed above and 12 semester hours of a p p roved ele l ives. Required supporting: English 1 0 1 ( E nglish Proficiency Exam may not he su bstituted) foreign la nguage ( O p t ion l or I I ) ; two years o f chemistry (required 1 1 5, 1 1 6, 3 3 1 . 3 3 2, 3 3 3 , 3 3 4 ) ; one year of physics; and math through 1 5 1 . A max i m u m of 40 semester hours of biology courses may be cou n ted for graduation. I n terim courses cannot be coun ted toward the major. B A C I I E L O R OF A RTS 1:-.1 EDUCATI ON: See School of Education.

I I I

B I O LOGY AND M O D E RN M A N

liberal arts course for non-hiology majors; selected t o p ics which relate to man's history and fu ture, his art and well-heing; the environm ent, reproduction and birth control, po pulation, heredity, evo l u t i o n and biolobrical c o n t rols. L e c t u re s , l a b o r a tories and discussion.

I S3

C E LL B I O LO G Y

An i n t roduction to ce ll ular a n d molec u l ar levels of b i o logical orf,'3 niza tion; cell u l t r a - s t r u c tu re and p hysiology, energy transd uction. m o l e c ular ge netics and biochemical development. Required of aU b i o l o gy majors. I n c l u d es lahoratory. Co-reg i s t ra t i o n in Olemistry strongly recommended.

1 54

ORGA

I SM A L B I O LOGY

n i n troduction to higher levels of biological organiz ation ; orga n i sms discussed in relat ion 10 their i n t e r a c t i n g o r gan systems, c l a s s i fi c a t i o n , e v olu tion and ecology. Required of aU biology majors. Includes lahoratory. Prerequisite: 1 5 3 . Co-registration in Chemis t ry strongly recommended.

1 63

F U NC T I ON A L H U M A N A N ATOM Y

253

B I O LO G Y O F T I l E S T E A DY S T A T E

T h e basic problems faced b y p l a n t s and a n i m al s i n maintai ning the mselves; structural adaptations, homeostasis, in ternal regulation. water a n d temperature control, gas exchange. vascular systems, orientation and navigation, a n d interaction between organisms. I ncludes lahoratory. Prerequisites: 1 54 and first-year che mistry.

27 5

M I C R O B I O LOGY

The s t r u c t u re. p h y s i o l o gy , genetics, meta holism and ecology of mic ro-organisms. I n cl udes laboratory. Prerequisite: 253 or conse n t ; one semester organic chemistry rec o m mended.

299

I N T R O D UCTO RY C L I N I C A L PHY S I O LOG Y

Functions and cont rol mechanisms of t he major h u man organ systems, with em phasis on clinit-al applica tion and including some phar macology. Sui table for n u rsing majors. Include s laboratory. Prerequisi tes: I I I , 1 6 3 and Chemistry 1 03 .

321

O R N I T H O LOGY

The study o f hirds with e m phasis o n local species; designed for stud ents with hobby in terests as well as for advanced hiology stu dents. Field trips. Inc ludes laboratory. Prerequisi t e : 2 5 3 o r consent. ( 2 )

3 24

N A T U R A L H I ST O R Y O F V E R T E I3 RA T ES

Oassification, nat ural history a n d economic importance of vertebrates with t he exception of h i r d s. Field trips and l a boratory . Prerequisi te: 2 5 3 . a!y 1 975-76

331

G E N ET I CS

The chemical n a t ure of t he gene, mechanisms and r e g u l a tion of genetic e x p ression, variations on chromosomal stru c t u re and nu mher, and population genetics. I nclu des lahoratory. Prerequisites: 2 5 3 and Chemistry 331.

340

PLANT D I V E R S I T Y A N D D I S R I B U T I ON

A systematic introductio n to plant diversi ty . I n teraction hetween plants, theories of v e ge t a t i o n a l d istribu tion, higher plant taxonomy. I ncludes laboratory and field tri ps. Prerequisite: 253.

346

C

LL

LAR PHYS I O LO G Y

Basic anatomy and physiology of t he hu man. laboratory includes dissection of the cat and experiments in muscle physiology, sensory mechanisms, respiration and circulation . Not open to Biology majors except hy permission from the department chairman. Lec t ure 4 hours/wee k ; laboratory 3 hours/week.

Deals w i t h h o w cells are organized to stay a l i v e ; e n z y me kinetics and regulatory mechanisms; struct ure and synthesis of proteins and nuc leic a c i d s ; ene rb'Y metabolism; m e mbr ane s tructure, p e r m eabil i t y and transport phenomena; functional ultrastructure . Prerequisites: 253 and Organic Chemistry.

201

347

IN ROD UCTO RY M I C RO B I O LOGY

The gro w l h , con trol, physiology , isolation and i d e n Ii f i cation of micro路organisms, especially t hose which affect man. I n c l u des labora tory. Prerequisites: I I I and Olemistry 1 0 3 or consent. ntis co urse is suitable for nurses and o t her non-science majors; not open 10 biulogy majors.

C E L L U LA R PHYS I O LOGY LABO R A TO R Y

Acco mpanies Cellular Physiolo gy ; experience in techniques and types of instrumentation including ceU frac tionation, de termination of metabolic sequences, use o f radio tracers, pro t e i n assay, mem brane phenomena, u l t r a c c n t r i fu ga t i o n , spec trophoto m etry. Warburg respirometry. May be elected only

by students with a serious in terest and need for this t y pe of training. Coreq uisi te: 346 and consen t. ( I )

3S7

PLANT FORM AND FUNCTION

Plant s t ru c t u re, function a n d reproduction; e m p hasis on seed-producing grou ps. Includ es laboratory. Prere quisites: 253 and Chemistry 1 1 6 . Organic Chemistry recommended.

35R

P L A N T G R OWT H A N D D E V E LOPr.,'I ENT

Plan t growt h from seed to flower; seed germination, water relations. respiration, m i n e ra l nu trition, g rowth regulators, photosynt hesis and other ligh t effects on plant c y c le s . I n c l u des l a b o r a t ory . Prerequisites: 2 5 3 and Organic Chemistry. Cellular Physiology s t rongly recommended.

361

C O M PA R A T I V E NATOMY O F T H E V E RT EB R A T ES

Taught from a phyloge n e t ic viewpo i n t , considers h o w and w h y l i v i ng vertehrates at tained their present structure . Attem pts not only to learn vertebrate anatomy, hu t also to understand it. Prerequisi te: 2 5 3 .

372

G E N E R A L E N T O M O LOGY

Classification and n a t u r a l history of insects with em phasis on laboratories, field studies and c o l l ec t i o n s . I n c l udes laboratory. Prerequ isite : 25 3 . a/y 1 9 76-7 7

375

I 3 1 0 LOGY OF P A RA S I T I S M

Parasitism as a mode of life; the nature of the parasite and of the host-parasite assoc iatio n ; studies within t h e gam u t o f parasi tic forms including viru ses, other micro-organisms and pl a n t and a n i m al parasi tism. I ncludes laboratory. Prerequisi te: 2 5 3 or conse n t . a/y 1 9 76-77

3RO

B I O LOGY TEAC H I N G R E S O U RC E S

Met hod s , m aterials a n d resources for preparing lecture, laboratory and field work in major areas o f biology; designed for all teaching levels. Special preparations required. Prerequisite: 253 or conse n t .

403

G ROWTH A N D D I F F E R EN T I A T I ON

Consideration o f the molecular basis of d e velopment o f mul ticelJ.ular organisms, including i n d u c t io n . m o r p h o ge n e t i c move ments, cell d i ffe r en tiation, n u c l e o c y t o p I a smic in teractions, pattern formation, intercellu lar communication, and genetic regu l a t io n of d e v e l o p m ent. Laboratory includes experimental problems and some d e sc r i p t ive e m b ry o l o g y . Prerequisites: 2 5 3 and Organic Che mistry.

41 1

H I S T O LOGY

Microscopic study o f normal cells, tissues and organs of vertehrates. TIl i s study is both struct urally and physiologically oriented. ' Prerequisite: 253.

424

ECOLOGY

Organisms in relation to their environ ment. including organismal adaptations, po pulation growth and interactions, and ecosystem structure and function. Prerequisite: 2 5 3 .


79 425

B I O LO G I C A L OC E A NOGRAPHY

The oc�an as environ m e n t fo r plan t ami animal life; an i n t ro d u c t ion to the structure, d y n a m ics and h i sto ry o f marine ecosystems. La b , field trips, and term proj e c t i n add i t io n Pre requ isi t e : 253.

1 0 l e c t u re .

4 16

ECOLOGY LABORATO RY

Field study of local ecosystems. Prerequisite:

253; 4 211 recommended. (2)

44 1

V E RT E B R A T E P H YS I O LO G Y

P rincipal vertebrate organ systems and f u n c tions e mphasizing homeostatic re l a t ion s h i p s ; laboratory includes experi m e n t s i n circulation, elect rocardiology, endocrine function, respiration, sensory mechanisms, b()dy tl uid chemistry, temperature regulation and an in trodu ctio n to a n i ma l surgery. P rerequisites: 253 and Chemistry 332. Cellular phy siology reco m menued.

475

EVOLUTION

Evolution as a process: sources of variation; fo r c e s o v e r c o m i ng genetic inertia in populations; speciation. Evol ut ion of genetic systems and of life i n re l a t io n to ec o logi ca l theory and earth history. L e c t u r e and discussion . Term paper and m i n i-seminar required. Prerequisit e : 253. 1 a/y 1 9 76-77

490

SEM INAR

Selected topics i n biology based o n l i terature and/or original resear c h . Open to j u n ior and senior biology majors. ( 1 )

49 1 . 4 9 2

I N DEPENDENT STUDY Investigations or research in a re as of special

in terest not covered by regular co u rse s ; open 10 q u a l i fied j u n ior or senior majors; a studen t should not elect independent study unless h e knows i n a d v a n c e the sp ec i fic area h e wishes 10 inves t igate and can demonstrate a serious in terest in pursuing it. It is s uggest ed that the s t u d e n t spend o n e semester researching the literature and writing a proposal ( for I sem . h r . o f credit) and the n e x t semester actually carrying o u t the project (for another I sem . hI. of credit). The st u d en t will not be permitted to use 49 1 -4 9 2 for filling in a de fic ie ncy in his program. Prerequisite: written proposal for the project approved by a fac u l ty sponsor and the uepa r t m c n t

chairman. ( 1 -2)

597 , 598

G RA D U A T E R E S E A RC H

Prereq uisi te : Graduate standing anu prior approval of the stllden t's graduate adviser.

(24)

Chemishy Any studen t contemplating a major in chemistry is i n v i t ed to discuss his in terests and plans wi t h members of the Chemistry facul ty. Students ueciuing to major in chemistry shoulu officially declare their i n t e n t after h aving completeu Chemistry 3 3 1 and after consultation w i t h a faculty auviser in the C he m i s t ry Depa r tmen t . Transfer s tuu e n ts de sir in g to major i n chemistry should con tac t a depar t me n tal auviser no later than the beginning o f the junior year. The courses. curricul u m . faCility and

facil ities of the Department of Chemistry are approved by the American Chemical Societ y .

Graduates completing the regular Bachelor o f Science program will b e certifieu as having met requirements of the American Chemical Society. BACHELOR O F A RTS: Chemistry 1 1 5 , 1 1 6, 3 2 1 , 3 3 1 , 3 3 2, 3 3 3 , 334, 34 1 , 342, 34 3 , anu 460. Req u i reu s u p porting : Physics 1 5 3- 1 56 ; mathematics through 1 5 2 ; German, Russian or French ( O ption l or I I) .

BACHELOR O F SCIENCE (3 al ternatives) I . Regular chemis try e m phasis (lcaus to ACS certifica t i o n ) : as above plus Chemistry 344, 435, 490, a n u 497. 2. B ioc hemistry e m phasis: Chemistry

1 1 5 , 1 1 6. 3 2 1 , 33 1 -334, 34 1 , 3 4 3 , 4 0 4 , 4 3 5 , a n d 4 6 0 ; Biology 1 5 3 , 1 54 , 2 5 3 , 3 3 1 , 346, anu 34 7 ; Physics 1 5 3 - 1 54 ; mathcmatks through 1 52 ; foreign language ( O p t ion I o r 1 1 ) .

3. Chemical Physics e m phasis: Chemistry 1 1 5 , 1 1 6. 3 3 1 -334, 34 1 -344. and 460; Physics 1 5 3- 1 54 ; 3 3 1 , 3 3 2, 3 36, and 356; mathematics 1 5 1 , 1 5 2. and 1 44 , foreign l anguage (Option I, o r 11).

In o r d e r t h a t curricula r and scheuuling conll i c ts may be avoiued, specific courses for the Bachelor of Science uegree shoulu be taken in the following seq uence: Freshma n : Chemistry J 15. 1 1 6; M a t hema tics l S I , 1 5 2 ; foreign lan guage Sophomore : Che m i s t ry 3 3 1 ·334; Physil:s

1 53- 1 56

J unior: Chemistry 3 2 1 , 34 1 -344 S e n i o r : Chemistry 4 3 5 , 460, 490, 4':17 Although n� more than 4 0 semester hours in chemistry may be a ppl icu towaru the 1 28 semester hour grauuation req uiremen t , the research requirement may be met by I hour credit during the academic year or by a summer research experience w i t h or w i t h o u t academic cre d i t . B A C H E L O R O F A R T S I N EDUCATIO N : Studen ts in terested i n this degree uevelop their c h e m istry program through the depa r t m e n t in conjunc tion with the School of

Euucation. See School of Education section.

1 03

C H EM I STRY O F L I F E

General, organ ic, and biochemistry per t in e n t to chemical processes in the human organism ; suitable for liberal arts studen ts, nursing stuuen ts, and prospective teachers. II

1 04

EN V I RON lvl E N T A L C I I E M I ST R Y

Basil: principles o f c h e m i cal struct ure and r e a c tions, with a p plica tions to human activities a n d the n a t ur a l enviro n m e n t . No prerequisite; stude n ts w i t ho u t high school chemis try are encourageu t o take 1 04 before taking 1 03 or 1 1 5. Den tal hygiene, physkal therapy , and mili tary n ursing programs requiring a year of chemistry should include 1 04 anu 1 03. Also suitable for enviro n m en tal studies, general science teachers, B.A. in earth science, and General U n iversity Requirements or Coll ege of Arts and Sciences Option I I I . I

1 08

M A N K I N D A N D ivIO LEC L! LES

The role par ticular

of science in society and i n fl ue n ce of chemistry on

th e our medicine,

c i v i l i z a t ion. Such topics as n u trition, food additives, petroleum prod ucts and chemical w a rfa re are discussed. A non-laboratory l i be r al arts based course w i t h no math b a c k g ro u n d . Meets General University Requirements.

1 15

G EN E R A L C H E M I ST R Y

The struc ture of malter. a t o m ic and molecular theory, q u a n t i ta tive relationships; designed primarily for students who w a n t to major i n biology, chemistry, engineering, geology, or physics. I n c l udes all premcu ica l , pred e n t a l . pharmacy, meuical technology stuuents. High school chemistry or permission of i n s t r uctor requireu. S t u u e n t with no high school chemistry or weak background should t a ke 1 04 before this cou rse. Corequisite: M a t he m a t k s 1 3 1 . I I I

116

SYST E M A T I C I N O R G A N I C C H E M I ST R Y S t u dy o f the elements grouped ac co r d i n g t o thc pcriodic table, c h emical eq ui l i b r ium , rauiochemistry, and inorganic Prerequis i te : 1 1 5. II

analysis.

321

quali tative

Q U A N T I T AT I V E A N A L Y S I S

Chemical methods o f q u a n t i t a tive analysis, i n clud ing v o l umetric. gravimetric, and selected instrumen tal methods. Prerequisites: 1 1 6 and Mathema tics 1 3 3 . I

33 1 , 332

ORGANIC C I l EM I STRY

A n i n t e rpretatio n of properties and real, t ions of aliphatic a n u aroma tic c o m po u l l u s on the basis of current chemical t h e o ry. P r e r e q u i s ites: 1 03 all u 1 04 or 1 1 5. Corequisites: 3 3 3 . 3 3 4 . I I I

333, 3 3 4 O RGAN I C C I I E M I ST RY L A B O R A T O R Y

Reactions a n d conven tional a n d mouern techniques of sy n t hesis, separation, anu analysis of orga n i c com po u n d s. M ust accompany 3 3 1 , 3 3 2. I I I ( 1 , 1 )

336

1 I0NORS ORGANIC C H E M I STRY LABO RATO R Y

Ad van ce d methods of sy n t hesis and property determination applied to organ ic cumpounus.

T e c h ni q ue s and a p pl i c a t ions from the literature to be e m phasized. May be taken by departmen tal invitatio n in place o f 334. I I ( I )

34 1 , 342 PI I YS I C A L ( , l I E M I ST R Y TIle relationship between s t ru c t u r e . ene rgy

con t e n t , a n d physical a n u chemical properties of che mical s y s te m s. Topics in thermod y n a m i cs, s t a t istical t hermod y n a m ics. quan t u m mechanics, atomic and mol e c u l a r structure, s pec t roscopy and kinetics are covered. Many e x a m ples are related to biological systems. Prerequisites: 1 1 5 . M a t h 1 5 2, Physics 1 54. I I I

PI I Y S I C A L 343 , 344 C H E M I ST R Y LABO RATO R Y Experim e n ts in t hc r mou y na m ics , solution

behavior anu molecular st ruc t u re designed to acqua i n t stude n ts with i n s t r u m e n t a tion, data h a n uling. correlations w i t h theory anu d a t a reliability. Computer usage is e n co u rage d .

Corequisitl' or prerequisite:

(1,1)

350

34 1 , 342. 1 11

I N S T R l M E NTATION FO R THE LI F E SC I E N C E S

Course desi gn ed to ex amine i n s t r u men ts from stan d poin t of hoI\' and why they wor'" a p plications, and l i m i ta t ion s. Some of t he instrumental te c h n i q u e s to be covereu are a tomic absorption, gas chromatography, II l t r a v i o l e t , v i s i b le and i n fr a r e u


80

spec l rop ho to me l ry , a n d !l a m e ph() t o m � t ry . I'rer� q uisite,: 1 66 a n d B io l o gy I -4.

404

B ! OC H E \l I S T RY

An o ver vie w o f t he fi e l d i n c l u d i n g mineral and ge n e r a l m e t a b o l is m , biochemical s l fl l t t u re. a nd d i s(; ll ss i() n of (l r ug s a n d pharmac()logy. Lahoratory i s d c� ign cd t o st im ul ate p ro b l c m - s () l v i ng t ll c h n i q ue .. Pre requisi tes: 3 3 2 and 3 34 . I

4J 5 I. ' ST R U � I L N T A L A N A LY ' I S Th e ory aml pradice ()f i n tru m e n ! a l me t hods a l o ng w i t h bas ic e1eclr�)n ics. S pec ial e m phasis \'i l l hl! pla<:c d on radiochemical. mass

s p c (' t r o m e t i c ,

c h ro m a togra p h i c ,

a nd

dcc trometric me t h od s. Prerequisites: 34 1 a nd 34 3, I I

460

SHI l l A R

Presen ta tion hy s t u llcn ts of know ledge gained hy personal l i brary or la bo r!l t or y research, supplemen ted with se m i n ars by prac tic i ng scien tists. Par t ici pa t io n of al l s nie r c h e mis try m a j o r' is re q u i r e J and all tl l h c r

che mis l ry -orie n lell · t u Je n t s a r c encouraged r o par ti cipa te , S e m i na r progra m w il l b e held d ur i n " the en tire vear bu t formal re " is t ra t i o n will b� in t h e spri�g se m es t l' r. I I I ( l

t

490

L'TEG R I\T E D PRO B U' \I S . PP RO

CH

Inv()lve men t w i l h t heore ti cal a n d app l ied pw ille mS fmlT! t he li te rature em ph as izing

research amI i n s lrllmcn ta l tec h n i q ues. Cou rse d esiglll' d 10 u n i fy a n d e .... tend t he s t uJcnt's p rev io us ed uca tion al bac k g rou n d, I (2)

49 1

I N D!:P Ll D U\ T S T U DY

Li brary ' nJ/or l a b o ra t ory s t u d y of t op i c s n o t i n c I u u <' u in regul r 1 y offered course.'. Proposeu project mll:;t be a p proveJ by de p a r t me n t c h a irman and s u pervisory [C5[l<Jnsibil ity accepted by an instructor. May be taken m or e t han unce. I I I ( I , 2 o r 4)

497 R E . ' I\ RCH Expe r im en t a l or t he o re t i cal inves t i ga t io n open to upper division studl'n ts \ i t h conse n t o f d e pa r t me n t c hair m a n . May be t a ke n more than <)nce. I I I ( I . 2 or 4)

597 . 59S

(, RADUA [ R ES F A RC H masll'r's degre can u i d ates only.

Open to P re r e q u i s i t e :

c o n se n t

c hairman. I I I ( 2 -4)

of

d e par t me n t

Earth Sciences BAC H E LO R OF SOE CE « (;EO LOG Y SPECI ALTY): At l eas t 40 se mester hou rs ill

geology , in cl uu i ng 1 3 1 , l J 2, 3 23, 3 24, 3 25 a n d one from 360, 3 6 5 . 49 1 . In ad d it io n . St rat igraphy /sed i m e n ta t ion (40 1 ) an d e i t h e r Paleon tology ( 3 (}2) or Geo mor phol ob'Y (402) - II) be t a ken a t t he U n jv c rsit y of Puge t So u n d . or e ls e W he r e , at. t) an approved U I m �' r e x perie n ce in field . tlldy techniq ues. Req u i re d s u ppor t in g : C he m i s t ry I I S . 1 1 6 : re com mendeu 34 1 , 34 2: Phy sics 1 2 5 , 1 26 ( 1 27, 1 2 8 labs) or 1 5 3 . 1 54 (and labs); r e c o nl m c n o ed : 2 2 3 ; M a t h e ma t ics 151 : re c o m m e n d e d 1 52: B i o l ogy c ou rses reconllnen dc d whcre Paleont ology i s e1ecteu. BACH ' L O R O F A RTS : Minimum of 3 2 sc mc:.lcr h u rs i n Ea r t h Sci.: nces , i nclud ing 1 3 1 , 1 3 2 , 1 36 , 202. 324, 3 25 , plus a t I cast

t\H) u p pe r d ivis ion Ea rt h Science cou rses. A

lield course wch as 3 5 1 , 360, or 365 i s TeC(Hll mended. ( d d i t ional cou rses availa ble in t h e Depart men t of Geology, Lniversity of Pu g c t So u n d . ) R e q u i re d s u p por t ing: herni s t ry 1 03, 1 04 or 1 1 5 . 1 1 6 : Ph y s ic s 1 25 , 1 26 ( a n d l a bs) or 1 5 3, 1 54 (and labs); Mat hemat ics l S I , with 1 5 2 re co m m e nd e d ; a p p ro p r ia te B i o l o gy c o u rses a l so rccommendeJ . Options refled a t u dcn t ' s Earth Science i n terests and a re di '� ussed w i t h h i s aO viser. B AC H I:. LO R O F A RTS It ED Sec Sc hool of Ed uc a t io n .

101

CAT10. ' :

\ O R l D G E OG R A P H Y

Pat terns of p hy s i ca l , c l i m atic anu el'ologica l feat ures and lheir rela tion to man. 1 0 1 d()es not meet ( he n a t u ra l science requ i re m en t. 1

1 22

I T ROtY ' T I O N TO P I I Yc l C A I . SC I I NC E

I

rvl A .

G I', O L

iD THE GIC E. I V I

RO� M [NT

A n in troductory course dea[jng w i t h m a n and his geologic h a b i t a t , bo t h a t present a n d as i t h a s uevelUl)cU t h rough t i m e ; materials of ear t h (and l unar) crusts. their deriva t ion through major earth pr oc e ss es a n d fo rmation of s u r face features - with e m p ha s i s on t he i r significance to h u ma n uevel o p m e n t a n d c iv i l i L a t io n ; l a bora tory s t u dy o f rocks. minerals, and geologic m a p ping; fiel d t ri ps arc arranged. I

1 32

I l l S TO R I C A l G EO LO , Y

,\. se q u el to 1 3 1 w h idl conc e n t ra tes on car t h his tory , p a rt icul a.r1 y t h e for m a t io n o f t he N ort h A m e ri c a n con t i n e n t : sed ime n ta ry rocks, foss i ls a n d stra tigraphic rec o r d arc related 10 te c t o ni c u p heaval a n d gro w t h : fie l d trips are a rr a n ged . I I

\ 36

D E SC R I PT I V E A S T R O N O M

1

The moo n , tht! solar sy s t e m . t he courd i n ate systems for loc a ting stellar objec t s amI characteristi(;, o f s tars.

202

( ; E N L R M. OC

A N OG RA P I I Y

Oceanography a n d i rs rela t i onshi p to o t her fie l J s ; p hy s ic a l , c h e mical , bi o l ogical , cli matic an d geological aspects of t he sea ; field t ri ps. U

222

C O N S E RVA T I O . ' O F N AT U R A L R SO RC E S I'rinci p l e s and problems o f p u bl ic a n d pri v a t e of o u r resources w i t h spec i al reference to t he Pacific o r t h wcs t. ( 2 )

stewardship

323

M I N l: R A LO G Y

Cry s t allogra phy anti mincralob'Y, both ore ­ a n Li r od , -fo r m i n g mi neral . Prercq llisitc,: 1 3 1 and high sc hool c h e m istry or conse n t . Ava ila ble pcriod ically . pr a l U PS. I

3 14

P ET RO LOGY

The occurrence and ciassifil'alion o f com mon rock t y pes: processes by w h i c h they were fu r me d with reference to t heore t ical p rin c iples. �'rl're q u i s i t es : 1 3 1 or consen t . I I

a/y 1 976-77

roc k

masses

and

an

i n trod u c tion

to

roc k

defoflTlll t i o n : cOn. i dera t i on of ba si c processes

to u n d e rs t and m o u n tain building and con t i n e n tal for m a t io n ; l a bora t o ry e m p h asizes p rac t i cal tech n i q u es which enable s t udents to analyze regio n a l s t r u c t u ral p a t terns. Prerc q u i s i k : 1 3 1 or conscnt. II afy 1 9 77-7 8 ,

351

N I\T U R A I I l S TO R Y o r T H E PAC I F I C O R T I IW E ST

A field and labora tory cou rse e .... a m in i ng regional n a t u ra l h istory; an o u tdoor wor k ' h o p designed for science teachers a t elementary and j u n i o r h i g h I (' vel s. Not to be coun ted towartl a major or gratl u u t e cre d i t in biolOgy. Prere q u i s i t e : consent. S (6)

360

An in teb'Tation of t he sciences of chemistry , geology , meteorology and physics which l'onsideTS t he physical n a t ure of t he ear t h : i t s m at e rials . processes, h is tory a n d en viro n men t ; in tended for s t u d e n ts w i t h no pre iou s bac kgro u n u i n chemis t ry , geology or physic s.

131

315 S T R U CT U RA L G EO LO G Y The form anu spa t i a l relations h i ps of va r io u s

C lO lO G Y OF W L ST E RN WA S H I I G TO N

T h e minerals, rocks and geological I t i s tory o f t h e region e :l. t cn d i n g from tile C ) I u m b i a Plateau to t h e Pacific O c ea n . I nchldes fielu trips. Prerequ i s i t e : one yea r of col lege laboratory science or conse n t . S 1 976, 1 9 78

365

C L A C I A L G E O LO G Y

G l a c i al ice, de po s i t s and land fomls resulting from t h e Pleistocene glaciation in North f le r i c, a. Field trips induded. Prereq u i s i te : o n e y e a r o f col l ege la boratory scienl'e o r

consen I. S 1 977

415

B I O LO G I C A L

O eL: N O G R A P H Y See Biology 4 2 5 490 S E M I N A R ( 1 -2 semester hours o f c re d i t ) 49 1 , 4 9 2 " D �p: ( 1 -4 s eme s te r h o u rs )

D I : ' H S T UDY

Economics BAC H E LO R OF A RT S : Mini m u m of 3 2 semester hours i n d u d ing 1 50. 3 5 1 . 3 5 2, 486. two u p pe r d ivision e � on om i c s electives, Stat istics 331 or 3 4 1 , and Busi ness Ad ministra t ion 2 8 1 . BACHELOR O F ARTS See Sc h oo l of E:: d ucation,

I

ED CATI ON :

1 50

P R I N C l P L [Z S O F H' O

290

CONTE -l PORA R Y lT O N O M I C P RO B l E

O M I CS

I n t rou u c t ion to the scope of economics Mano a n Li Micro Economics; i n d u d i ng .S. economic sy s te m : em phasis an alys is ' of on curren t econumic pol icy.

S

Curre n t

economic issues; unern ploy men t , i n fl a t i o n , pover ty , a n d poU ulion; In terests of c l a ss d e t e r m i n e p ec i fic top i c s . t he Prere q u isi t e : I SO or consen t .

321

I I LI 1 A !

R �SO LJ R(' E ECON O M I C S

The natuTe a n d t rea t men t o f hu m an resource p ro blem. in the nl tcu States; wage d e termina tion , u n i o ll i s m , c o l l e c t i v e b a rgai n i n g. une m ploy men t , p(>verty and tlisl'fi mination, i n ves t m I I I i n hu man c a p i t a l and man power poli c i e s . Pre re q u isite: 1 SO or conse n t .


81

33 1

INT

R

. T I ON

L EC ON OM I CS

Regio n a l and in ternational specialization. �( mparat ive cos , in tematil;lIlal payments allli c dl3ngc ra tcs : national policies which promo te or re stri e t trade. Prere quisi te : 1 5 0.

351

I T E R M E D I AT E MA RO ECON OM I C A. A L YS I S

Nati\lOal income determin a tion inc! ding policy i m pl i c at io n within the in ti t u t i on al fra mework of t he .S. economy. Prercqui i t : I SO. . 352

I . · T [ R.!\1 E r 1 TE M J ' RO EC ON O M I C A A L YS I S

The ory o f consum r behavior; p r o d u c t and fa · t or prices un der conditions of monopoly . c o m p e t i ti on and i n tcml cdia lc m3J'kets; welfare ec n m i c s. Prerequisite: I SO.

36 1

BA. K I G function of Illoney a n d credH

M O N E Y AND

'nle nature and insti tutions; relationship of money an d ban d eposi ts t o t h e n a t i o n a l economy. Prerequisi te : 1 50.

362 P B Ie F I A N C E Pu blic ta�tion a n d ex pe n d i t u re at a l l governmen tal levels; t he incidence o f taxes, the pUhlic de bt and the provi];ion of p u blic goods such a : national defense, education, pure ajr and wa.ter. Pre requisite : 1 50. U R BA AI D R EGI ON A L ECO OM I C S Economic growth p roce. s in d eve lo pin g

432

region�

of t he .S.; the inter-relationsh ip of political, e c on o m il: , cul tural and institu tional factors i n the gro wUl process. Prere quisite:

I SO.

OY RN M E T A D HI feO 0 I Y The relationshi p between p u hl i c a n d private sec tors in the U.S. economy.

434

486

EYOL TI ON OF E OI O M J C TH OUGHT uonomi ' thought from a n d e n t to m odem times; e m phasis on the period from Ada m Smith to .I . M. Key n es : lbe c l ass ica l economis t ', the socialists. t he marginalists. t h e n e o -c l assical economists. a n d the

Keynesians. 490

S EM I ' A R

Seminar i n eeo n m k problems and polic ies \vith empha.�is o n encouraging t h e tud e n t t o i n tegra te problcm-sol ing m et h odo logy \ itll tools of ccon mic analysis. Topic(s) s l e c te d by c1as p a. r t i c i p ant s a.nd in t ru tor. Pre req u is i te : consent.

49 1 . 492. 49 3 It I D EPE ST U DY Prerequisite: c onse n t . ( 1 -4) 504

T

Feo.

0 l i e A A I YSIS A N D PO L l Y DCCL IONS Bask c o n o m ic concepts ap l>lied to I' l iey

formation and

543

pe ra ti ng dec isions.

QUAN ' I TA T I Y , M ET H O DS

The conccp �s f proba bility, sampling, . sLatlstlCal deCISIon theory linear progra mming and ()lI�er lI · ter m i n i , tic modl,1 a pplied to managena! problems. Prereq u is ite: Statistics 33 1 or 34 1 .

I N DEPL

59 1 . 592. 593 ST U DY 99

( 1 ·4 )

DENT

SC H E DU LE O F COURSES h·C'.I' //lI/IJ/I VC'ar:

Fall

THESIS

EG R 1 5 1 PH YS 1 5 3/5 MTH 2 5 3 Basic Core

Engineering

TO AL Spring

DEGREES OFFE RED

EC R 1 8 2 PH YS 1 54/6 MTII 1 5 2 B3];ic Core

B.S. · ng/neering·Physics (4 year degree) (b) B . S . E n gi n e e r i ng·Science after one addi tional year in Dual Degree 3-2 ngineering \ i t ll Col um bia or Stanford {a)

3-2 DUAL DEGREE: D U>i 1 n.s. degrees fr m PLU a n d Colu mhia, tanrord Or o ther

ECPD accredited Engineering Sthool. Three full-t i me years al PLU plu ' 2 ad ll i li onal full-time years at ol u lll bia Or tanford. PLU B.S. in En!,>ineering·Science is gran ted after first year at Col u m b ia. or S tanford : B.S. in Engi neering S pecialty ( E.E., M . E. , etc.) gran ted by Col u m bi a or tanford at end of fifth coll ege year. PH VS: 1 4 cred its - 1 5 3, 1 54, 1 5 5 , 1 56 , 2 2 3 ; 3 3 1 ( o p t ional) EGR B S ICS: 10 credi ts - 1 5 1 , 1 8 2 , 354 !ZGR CONCENTRATION (3 selection .*) - 1 0 credits - Elec trical : 27 J , 27 2 3 5 2, 44 1 ; Mechanical: 23 1 , 23 2 (or P I I YS 3 36 ) , 3 5 1 . 44 2 .

" Courses selected career o bjective s .

011

hasis of the s tudent's

Addi tional courses beyond th e above m i nim u m arc possi bl e a n d may be desi,rable i n order t o strengthen t he stude n t's professional objectives. Con tinuing consultation with the Engi n ee r i n g Program Director for Specific r c c o m me n d a I i o n s concerning advanced te c h n i ca l eleclives and transfer requirements to Col u m bia, Sta n ford, or regio n al state universities is desirable and encouraged. Required supporting course': \fath 1 44, 1 5 1 , 1 5 2. 2 5 3 : Olcmistry 1 1 5. B _ S .

D E G R I;. E

E E R I 'C"PI IYSICS:

I N

Simil r

to

E. G I the

"

3-2

p rogra m w i th additional c urse work a t P U ngin ee ring and Physics; 4 years at .,L U.

in

PHYS: 24 credits - 1 5 3 . 1 54 , I SS, 1 56 . 2 2 3 , 33 1 ; 336 (optional): 356, 42 1 . 4 2 2 G R BASI CS : 1 0 cre d its - l S I . 1 8 2. 354 EGR CONCE TRATJ N (4 selec tions"' ) - 1 2 credits - 8cctrical : 27 1 , 2 7 2 . 352. 44 1 ; Mechanical: 2 3 1 . 232 (or P I I YS 3 3 6 ) . 35 1 , 442.

*Course� se lec ted on basis o f t h e student';

career ohjec tives

Additio nal collrs s may be desirable in order t o , trcngt ill.m I he studen t's profe sional objeclives. Cmltin u i n g con 'ullation with lhe Physics and E n gi nee ri n g Departmen ts for s p e c i fi c r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s conc e r n in g advanced tech nical cledives is desirahle a n d encouraged.

Required sup porting courses: Math 1 -t4, 1 5 1 , 1 5 2. 25 3 : Chem istry 1 1 5 .

TOTA

2 5 4 4 15 4 5 4 4 17

S()pilulI1IJrl' VilaI':

Fall

EGR 2 3 1 0[ 27 1 PHYS 223

MTH 2 5 3 Basic Core TOTA L Spri ng

FGR 2 3 2 or 272 EGR 354 '!TH 1 44

Basic COre TOT A L

2 4 4 4

14 4 4 4 4 16

Other schedu les are possible a n d can be wo rked o u t i n consul lation with the Engineering Program Director. hemistry 1 1 5 as well as Mathematics 1 44 m ay be workt'd into a schedule in various pl ac e s. l l igh school m a t h e m a t i c s t h ro ugh trigonometry is essential.

C o m p l e t i o n of t h e B a s i c C o r e Requirements a n d two I nterims, as well a s all Tec h n ical Courses ( EGR. PHYS, i\1T1'1, CHEM). wit h i n 3 years is required of 3 · 2 Dual Degree E ngineering students before a recommenda tion to Columbia or Stanford can be gra n ted. Students aspiring to the 4 year degree program in Engineering-Physics have. of cour 'e, the full 4 ye:lr ' in which to complete the Basic Core and I n terim Requiremen ts. Mathema tical Sy tems 1 44

I N T RODUC T I ON TO C Otvl P E R SCI NC E

See Ma thematics 1 44 344

SYST E M S A i A L YS I S A N S L I LAT I ON

See Mathematics 344 346

NU 1 E R I C A L A I A LYS I S

See Mathematics 346 Engineering Basics

1 5 1 YIS A L Tl il l K IN G Three di mensional visual iza tion , orthographic and isometric perspec tives. relationshi p of visual graphic thin king to the creative process, preli min3J'y design ; of value to 1I0 t only cnginecr� but also the science major w h o must be able to t h i n k three dimensionally as d e m a n d e d in mechanics or struc t ural chemistry. Emphasis upon tluent and t1exible idea prod uction. ( 2) I S2

M A N A N D \1/\T E R I A LS

F u n d a m e n t a l ' o f man-made materials ( i n s u l a t o r s . se m i c o n d u c t o rs . m e t a ls,


82 dielectrics, and optical materials). their relationship to chemistry and physics, and i m plications for modern technological man. Disc u ssion of what useful properties enďż˝,'i ncering materials have and how these properties can be a l tered by adjusting the i nternal micro-structure. A particularly useful starting point for the study of Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. Physics and Chemistry majors also may find the viewpoint of Materials Science of special value. Bac kgrou n d : one course in chemistry.

3 54

EN G I N E E R I N G AN A LY S I S

Introduction t o vector a n d tensor calcul us, fu nctions of a complex variable, Laplace and Fou r i e r t r a nsforms, and undetermined m u l tipl iers. Comprehensive and illustra tive I!xamplcs from the fields of electromagllctism, waves, tran 'port, vibrations, and mechanics. May be take n as a package with PHYS 356. Re quirements: Mathematics 25 3 .

Elec trical Engineering Science 27 1

E L E CT R I C A L C I RC U I TS

Fun da mental concepts of electrical science and its ut iliza t io n in circuits, components, and devices. R e q u i re m e n t : C u r re n t registration i n Physics 1 54 . ( 2)

272

S O L I D STATE E L ECTRON I C D EV I C ES

Useful properties of semicon ductors as related to electronic devices; pn-j u n ction diodes and transistors; FET and MOS structures; solid state lasers. Requiremen t: Engineering 27 1 .

352

AN A LOG A N D D I G I T A L E L ECTRON I C C I RC U I T S

Active solid state circuits. Analog: AC-DC c on verts, a m plifiers, oscillators. Digital: Boolean algebra, scquen tial logic cu-cuits, switching n e t wo r k s . Requirement: Engineering 27 1 o r 2 7 2.

44 1

N ETW O R K A N A LYSI S

An alysis of electrical circuits in transient and steady-state modes; for mulation of n e t work equations and theorems, i m pe d ance matching and fu ndamen tals of network topology. transfer functions, developmen t of Laplace transforms and Fourier series; time- and fr e quency-domain analysis. Require m e n t : Engineering 2 7 1 . a/y

491

1 1 D E PEN DENT STUDY

351

TH E RM O DY N A M I C S

C o n c e p ts and e q uations of classical, m a c r o s c o p i c t h e r mody na mics; thermodyn amic cycles, flow a n d non-tlow systems, p r o p e r ties and mathema tical relations of pure su bstances, mixtures and solutions, phase transition and chemical r e a c tions; an elementary treatment of s tatistical thermodyna mics. Requirement: Physics 1 54 .

442

T R A N S PO RT : M O M ENTUM , EN E RGY A N D M ASS

Unifying concepts o f the transport of m o me n t u m , energy, and mass i n planar, cylin drical, and s p herical geometries; mcthematical aspects of tlu i d mechanics; b o u n d a r y l a y e r s ; t r a n s p o r t coefficie nts-viscosity , thermal conductivity, mass diffusivi ty ; an elementary treatment of turbulent flow. Require m e n t : Engineering 35 1 or conse n t of instructor. a/y

492

I N DEPE N D E NT STUDY

Select e d topics of m u t ual in terest to student an d i n st r u c tor. Enrollment i s limited a n d open o n l y t o students who have discussed a proposed topic or course of study in considerable depth with i n s t ru c tor. Requirement: m u t ual interest. 0 -4)

English BACHE LOR OF A RTS: 28 to 40 semester hours of English beyond English 10 I , incl u d ing: 4 semester hours i n American literature, 4 semester hours i n British l i terature before 1 700, and 4 semester hours i n British l i t erature after 1 700. At least 1 6 semester hou rs should b e u p per divisio n. In dividual programs are designed by a student and his adviser. w ith a pproval by the full department in a review d u ring the junior year. English 1 0 1 is recommended, since even good writers benefit from i n tensive practice and criticis m : a n honors section is offered for qualified studen ts. Advanced co urses in writing or grammar may be required. All English m ajors must complete at least two years of a foreign langu age a t the coll ege level, or t he equivalent. BACHELOR OF ARTS I N EDUCATI O N : See School of Educatiun.

1 01

COLLEGE ENGLISH

Selected topics of m u t u al in terest to student and instru c tor. Enroll ment is l i mited an d open only to students who have discussed a proposed topic or course of study in considerable depth with i n s t ru c tor. Requirement: m u t ual i n terest_ ( 1 -4 )

Develops a student's powers t o read, t h i n k , and \\<Tite critically. (Students whose English skills arc weak are en couraged to work i n the Learning Skills Service progra ms before registering for English 10 I . ) I I I

Mechanical Engineering Science

Themes and techn iques in short fiction. I I

23 1

STAT ICS

Fu nd a mental engineering statics using vector algebra ; conditions for equi libriu m, resultant force systems, c e n troid and center of gravity, m e t h ods of v i r tual wor k , f r ic tion . Require ment: Physics 1 5 3 . (2)

232

M I:-.CI-:\AN I C S OF M A T E R I A LS

M e c h a n ics of defor mable solid bodies: de formation, stress, constitu tive equations for elastic materials, thermoelastidty, lension. flexure, torsion, stability of equilibrium. Re quireme n t : E n gi n eering 23 1 .

217 221

S H O RT STO RY

LITE RARY FORMS A N D ANA LYS I S

Designed to familiarize students with forms of literature (poetry, fic tion, drama). with basic l i terary terms. and with major critical approaches. II

230

I N TRODUCTION TO CONT E M PO R A RY L IT E R A T U R E

Em phasis o n American fiction since 1 950. I

231

MA STE RPI ECES OF E U ROPEAN L I T E RATURE

Represe n tative works o f t h e literature o f Western Europe, especially classica l , medieval, and Ren aissan ce. I

24 1

I NTRO D UCTION TO A M E R I C A N LI T E R A T U R E

TIle continuity o f themes and forms i n American prose, poetry, a n d fic tion from colonization to the First World War. Emphasis o n major works of the 1 9t h c e n tury. I I I

251

I NTRODUCTI ON TO ENG L I S H L I TERAT U R E : B EG I N N I NGS TO 1 7 50

Emphasis o n the c o n t i n u i ty a n d variety of English literature from Beowulf through Neoclassicism. I

252

I N TRODUC T I O N TO E N G L I S H L I T E R A T U R E : A FT E R 1 7 5 0

English lite rature, especially poetry, from the emergence o f romanticism to the 20th c e n t u ry . I I

323

CHI LDREN'S

L I T E RATURE

327

I M A G I NATIVE W RITING

328

A D V A N C ED COM PO S I T I ON

349

M O D E RN POETRY

351

M O D E RN D RA M A

358

TI-I E B R I T I S H NOV E L

382

C H A UC E R A N D H I S AG E

383

S H A K E SPEARE

388

M I LTON A N D H I S A G E

389

E N G L I S H SAT I R E AN D S EN S I B I LITY. 1 6 60- 1 800

An in troduction to a r i c h L iterary tradition t o guide reading and book selection in the schools and the family. I I I

A workshop in writing poetry a n d short fiction. I n cl udes practical study of techni ques and forms to develop critical standards and an understanding of the process of com position. I II

A study of rhetorical principles used in w r i t i ng p e rsuasively and imagina tively. Required for certification by the School of Education. I 11

E m phasis on American poetry since 1 950. I I

A study of modern classics from Ibsen to l o n esco: Scandinavian, German, French, I t al i a n , Spanish, Russian, English, Irish, and American. I I

A study o f the form from Defoe and Fielding t o Lawrence, Joyce, and the moderns. 11

A study of Chaucer's major works, especially The Can terbury Tales, in their lively 1 4 th-century setting. I n cl udes a n in trod uction to the development of the English language. I

Ten to t we l v e r e p r e s e n tative Recommended as backgrou nd: 25 1 . I

plays.

A study of Milton 's work, especially Paradise Lost, and the work of other major au thors (Donne. Herbert) of the 1 7th century, the golden age of religious poetry in England. 11

A study of developing

neo-classic wri't ings social a w a re ness

and of

the the


83 Dryden pre-romantic age: Johnson and Blake_ I

390

and

Pope

to

T H E ENG L I S H RO M A NT I C M O V E M E N T

A s t u d y of the roma n ti c awake ning in E n gland: Blake, Wordswort h , Coleridge, Shelley, Keats. Byron, and others. I

391

L I F E AN D L ETTERS IN V I C TO R I A N ENG L A N D

Selected authors a nd topics from a period of rapid and momentous social change. ( I n 1 97 6 : Dickens, Hardy, Tennyson). \ I

392

TWENT I ET H C EN T U R Y B R I T I S H L I T E R AT U R E

Selected playwrights from Shaw t o Bec ke t t ; poetry o f Yeats, Thomas, a n d A u den ; fic tion of Joyce, Lawrence, Greene, and others. II

400

LI

G U I S T I CS

See foreign languages.

403

M O D E RN ENG LISH G R A M M A R

A study o f three major approaches to grammar: the traditional, the struc tural , and

the transformational. Indudes in troduction to the history of the English l a nguage. I

44 1

AM E R I C A N ROM A N T I C L I T ER AT U R E , 1 8 20¡ 1 880

S t u d i e s in literary ro mant icism from Cooper to J ames, w i t h emphasis on the Age of Emerson. Readings in TIlOreau, W h i t m a n , Poe, Melville a n d Hawthorne for u p per division students. I

442

A M E R I C AN R E A L I S M A D N A T UR A L I S M , 1 8 80- 1 0 1 5

Fiction and criticism in the years o f America's urbanization and e merge nce as an industrial power: Twa i n , J a mes, Crane, Norris, Dreiser.

443

AM E R I CAN L I T E RA T U R E S I N C E 1 0 1 5

I n troduction to the modern trad i t ion in poetry ( Fros t , Williams, Po und) a n d fiction ďż˝ Fi tzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner) for upper division studen ts. \I

450

SEMI N A R I N A M ERICAN L I T E RATURE

Selected themes, a u t hors, a n d criticism.

49 1 , 492 I N D EPENDENT R E A D I N G A N D RESEA RCH An in tensive course of reading. M a y i nc l ude a thesis. I n tended for upper division majors. I \ I ( 2-4)

597

(24)

G R A DUATE R ES EA R C H

Foreign Languages There arc no departmental prerequisites for t he s t u dy of foreign langu ages. Potential majors are, however, encouraged to obtain as much high school preparation as possible. Plac e m e n t of studen ts with previous experience is determined by a test which is given d uri ng orientation days at the begi n ning

o f the school year. Major programs are a v a i l able in Classics, French, Germ a n , N o r w eg i a n , and Spanish. For further i n formation i n Classics, consult the Special Academic Programs section of this catalog. B A C H E L O R OF ARTS: M i n i m u m of 3 2 semester ho urs beyond 1 0 1 - 1 02, incl u d ing 20 1 , 202, 3 2 1 , 3 5 1 . 352, plus u p per-division electives, incl uding at least four se mester hours of literature. See special requirements for Norwegian. BACHELOR O F ARTS I N E D UCAT I O N : Students enrolled i n this program a r c rcquired to t a ke Foreign Langu age 4 4 5 . For further dctails, sec School o f Educatio n .

1 00

E N G LI S H AS A F O R E I G N LAN G UA G E

A cou rse adapted t o t h c needs o f students whose nativc language is not English. Course co n tent will em phasize i d i o m , especially A m e r ic a n u sage , vocabulary building, comprehension, a n d i n tonation. Considerable oral practice, with goal o f i m prov ing fluency in speaking. (4)

400

S T R UC T U R A L L I N G U I ST I C S

The study o f t h e n a t u re of languallc; principles and tcchn iqucs of dcscripllvc langu age analysis; elcme n t ary application of linguistic analysis to selected m a terials. No prerequisites. (4)

445

M ET H O DO LOGY OF T E AC H I N G FO R E I G N L A N G U A G E S

Theory a n d tec h niques of foreign l a n gu age teaching; special problems i n the student's major language; em phasis on audio-lingual tech n i ques. ( 2)

F R EN C H 1 0 1 . 1 02

E L E M ENTARY F R EN C H

20 1 , 202

I N T E R M E D I AT E F R EN C H

Esse ntials o f pronunciation, i n tonation a n d str u c t u re ; basic skills i n liste n ing. speaking, rcading a n d writing. Laboratory attendance required. I 1\ (4) A con t i n u a tion o f elcmentary French; reading selec tions which retlect the French cult ural heri tage as well as con t e m porary m a terials. Laboratory a t tendance required. I \I ( 4 )

20 5 , 206

F R ENCH

CON V ERSA T I O N

Offers the oppor t u nity for practice in French conversation i n an i n formal setting du ring t he noon l u n c h hour. All s t u de n ts with a basic k n o w l e d ge of French are invited to participa tc. Conversation may include recen t ncws cvents, contemporary life, or other topics of student i n terest. Pass/Fail only. I 1 \ (I)

321

C I V I L I ZA T I O N A N D C U LT U R E

Presen t-day France a s reflected in c u rren t literature, periodicals, television and fil ms; w ri t te n compositions and oral reports; conduc ted in French. Prerequisite: French 202. (4)

3 5 1 , 352 C O MPO S I T I ON AND CONVERSATION

Advanccd

grammar,

stylistics,

composition

a n d conversa tion ; writ te n composItIons on c u l t u rc a n d civilization; conversations on c u rren t t o pics; conductcd in French. Prereq uisi t e : 202. I 1\ (4)

42 1 , 422 M A ST E RP I E C ES O F F R EN C H L I T E RAT U R E

Au thors reprcsentative o f m ajor periods from thc Middle Ages through the nineteenth c e n t u r y ; thc style and structure and t h c moral and artistic i n tcntions of such a u t hors as R a b elais, Mon taigne, Mol ierc, Corm'ille, ,P a s c a l . Voltaire, Rousseau, Hugo and Baudelaire. Prerequisite: 202. I I I a/y ( 4 )

43 1 , 432 TW ENT I ET H C E N T U R Y F R EN C H L I T E RA HI R E

Major twentieth cent ury writers; emp hasis on the period since World War I I . Prerequisitc: 202. I I I a/y (4)

442

H I S T O R Y OF ROMANC E L A N G U A G ES

The historical deVelopment of Ro m a n c e L a n g u a ges with reference to curre n t languages; same a s Spanish 4 4 2. 1 \ a/y (4)

49 1 , 492

I N DEPENDENT S T U D Y

597 , 598

G R A D U A T E RES E A RC H

( 2 -4 ) (24)

GERMAN 1 0 1 , 1 02

E L E M EN T A R Y G E R M A N

2 0 1 , 202

I N T E R M ED I A T E G E R M A N

I n troduction to the German language. Basic skill s of oral and written commu nication in classroom and laboratory practice. Use of materiab reflecting con te m porary German life. Meets five hours weekly. I U (4) Con t i n ued practice i n oral a n d written comm unication i n classroom and laboratory. Use of materials which reflect con t e m porary l i fe as well as the German c u l tural heritage. Concurren t enrollment in German 205 ( 206) i s encouraged. Meets four hours weekly. I I I (4)

2 0 5 . 206 G E RM A N C O N V E RS A T I O N

Offers t h e oppor t u n i ty for practice i n German conversation i n an informal setting d u r i ng the noon l u nch hour. All stud e n ts with a basic k n o wledge of German are invited to participate. Conversation may i n c l ude recent news even ts, contemporary life, or other topics of s tude n t i n te rest. Pass/Fail only. I I I (I)

321

G E RM A N C I VI L I ZATION

German c u l t ural and linguistic history fro m the 1 7 t h ccn t u ry to the prcse n t . Aesthetic and historical consideration of rcprcsenta tive works from the Enligll t e n m e n t , the Age of Goethe, the 1 9t h and 20th centu ries. Prcreq u isite: 202 o r equivalcnt. II a/y ( 4 )

35 1 , 352 C OM POS I T I O N AND CONVERSATION

I n te n sive review of grammar w i t h e m phasis o n idiomatic usage ; use of contemporary au thors as models of style. Conversation on topics of stude n t i n terest. Cond uc ted in Ger m a n . Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent. 1 1 1 ( 4)


84 42 1

20 1 , 202

G E RM A N L I T E R A T R E : Ti l E G E o r- G O E T H E

Represe n t a t ive works from the E n l igh t e n m en t to Goethe's lIc a t h , circa 1 7 5 0- 1 8 3 2 . i nc l uding S t o r m a n d S t r e s s . C la s s i c i s m a n d Roman ticism. Prere q u isite: 202 or equival e n t . I aly (4)

422

G E R.v1 N LI T R AT li R E : T H E I ' l l ' ET I :.EN T H C E NT

RY

Reprcse nlat ive works from the va nous li terary movcments of the n i n e t ee n t h c n t tl r y . 1 8 20- 1 890. i n d ud i ng Bicdermeier, Young crm a n y and Realis m . Pre regliisite: 2 0 2 or q uiv ai c n t. II a l y (4)

43 1

G E R. 1 N LITER T RE: T I l E TW FN T I ETH C E NT U R Y

Represent a t ive works of German l i te r a t u re fro m N a t u r a l i sm to E x p re s s i o n is m , 1 890- J 92 5 . Prerequisite: 2 0 2 or e q u ivalenl. J

aly ( 4)

43 2

T E M P ORA R Y C GERMA I T E R AT U R E

Represc n t a tive works from 1 9 2 5 to the p r ese n t ; a u thors from East and West Ge r m a n y , A ust ria and S w i t l: e r la n d . Prere q u isite: 2 0 2 o r equivalen t. n aly ( 4 )

442

I-I ]S1 0 R Y O F HI E G - RM A N L

!

G

AGE

Historical dev elopment of German with fe re n c e to c o n t e m p urary language; w n d u c ted i n German. Prerequisi te: 202. I I al y ( 4 ) r

49 1 , 4 9 2 ( 2-4 )

I

597 , 598

GRA

VATE STUDY

GREEK

1 0 1 , 1 02

E L EM Ft TA RY G R E E K

201 , 202

I N T R M E D I AT L G R E : K

Selected "nille r ailings from He llenistic Greek l i terat ure w i t h major emph a. i ' o n the New Testament. I I I

M A STE R P I E C E S 01EK LI T E R AT U R E t h rough consu l ta t iun \ it ll

Available dl!pa rtmc n l. Prerequisites: 1 0 1 . 1 02 . I I I

49 1 , 492 (2 4 )

I

thc

0 PE�DE IT STUDY

LAT I N ('lmen t l v l l l'i'c red University l l l' Pu:;ct

coopera t i ve ly w i t h I he So u n d on o ur c a m p u s .

1 01 . 1 02

E L E rvl E NTA RY LAT I N A N D E C; U S H W O R D B U I L D I I ' G Basic s k i l l s i n reading La tin; cxcursions i n to Roman his tory a n d m y t ho l ogy ; English oca bl,ll ary h u i l d i ng from

I N D EP E N D EN T ST

DY

(24)

NO RWEGIAN The r e q u i re ments for the Norwegian Language Major arl': a m i n i m u lll of 3 2 semester hours, incl u d ing Norwegian 1 0 1 . 1 0 2. 20 1 , 202. 3 5 1 , 3 5 2 a n d a t least one of the 400-level l iterature cou rses. The cou rse offerings to he made available are the fol lowing.

1 0 1 , 1 02

E L E M E T A RY IO RW E G I A N

I n troduces t he s t u de n ts t o t h e pleasure o f speaking, read i n g a n d writing a foreign language. lllcse skills are developed t h rough a conversa t io n al approach. using songs and ot hl'r cult ural m atcnals. as well as a u d io-visual med ia. I 1 1 ( 4 )

20 1 . 2 0 2

I N T E R.\1 L D I A T E N O RWEG I A N

Deve lops t hc st udents' c o m m a n d o f the language while fu rther ac qu a i n t i ng them with the Norwegian c u l t ural heritage. Rea d i n g selec tions i n t r oduce the s t u de n t s to Norwegian short stories. po ' t ry . novels. a n d plays. 1 1 1 (4)

321

322 o fkred c o o pe r a t i vc ly w i t h tile uf PU)!ct S o u n d o n ' o ur cam pus.

Basic skilJs in read ing Classical. Koine ;lnd Pa tristic G ree k. I I I

4 2 1 , 412

49 1 , 492

V I K I N GS AND E M I G R A N T S

lIi ghl igh ts of S c andinavian, l'spccially Norwegian history, from the begi n n i ng to t h e prese nt. Em phasis on periods a n u ways i n which Scandinavia h a s c o n t r i b u ted t o world history. Read i n gs in Norwegi a n for majors: class c o n d u c ted in English. I aly ( 4)

D E P EN D E I 1 S T U D Y

( 2-4)

u r r c n t ly Un ive r s i t y

I N T E Ri\ I E D I A T E LAT I N

Lyric and epic poe try. its translat ion and adapt a t ion by English and American poe t s : t h e second semester ind udcs the read i n g of a n I talian a u t hor. I I I ( 4 )

Latin and Enoli'h

wort! construdion from Latinate prefixes . nd suffixes arc emphasized. I II (4)

M O D ER" I O RW E G I A N C I V I L I ZAT I O N

Norwegian c u l t u ral history frolll the disso l u tion of t h e u n ion w i t h De n m ark t o t h e we l farc s t a t e o f the prese n t . Discussion of l itera t u re , m usic, visual arts, and t heir backgro u n ds, a s well as social a n d poli tical issues. Readi ngs i n Norwegian for majors: dass co n d ucted in English. II aly ( 4 )

51

( j ' V E RS AT I O� A N D COM POS I T I O N : F O L K I A L L S '

Develops t h e stUdents' a h i l i t y t o e x p ress t h emselves wel l i n t he la nguage. orally and in writing. Selected fol kt a l es and o t her material w i l l be use d as models o f style a n d usage. Prerequisite: 202 or equiva l e n t . I ( 4 )

352

A D V A N C E D C ON V E RS A T I O \ A N D C O M PO S I T I ON : B A L LADS A N D POET R Y

Develops t h e stu den ts' c o m m a nd o f the language by emphasizing finer pOints of stru c t u re , s t y l e , a n d good taste. The suhject matter will he sel e c t e d poetry frolll the begin ning to the present. Prereq u is i t e : 3 5 1 or e q u ivalent. II ( 4 )

I BSEN A 0 I-l I S CO T E M PO R A Rl LS Selected a u t hors fro m the rom a n t i c 421

and realistic periods i n Norwegian l i tera t u re. Readings in Norwegian for majors; class

cond ucted i n Engl i s h . I a/y ( 4 )

422

C O N T E M PO R A RY N O RWEG I A N L I TE RA T U R E

Litera t u re i n a l l genres. retlec t i n g curre n t t rends a n d issues i n Norw a y . Read i n b 'S i n Norwegian for majors; class co n d ucted i n English. I I aly ( 4 )

49 1 , 49 2

I N D LPFN DENT STUDY

( 2 -4)

SPANI SH 1 0 1 . 1 02

L L HI E t-; T A R Y S P A N I S I l

Esse n t ials of pronu nc i a t io n , i n tun a t ion and stru c t u re, basic s k i l l s in l istening. speaking, rea d i ng and writing. Lahoratory a t tendance req u ired. I I I ( 4 )

2 0 1 , 202

I N T L R VI I'. D I A T E S PA N I S H

A c ()n tinua tion of e l e m e n t ary S pa n i s h ; read ing selections which reflect t he Hispanic c u l t u ral heritage as well as contem porary materials. Laboratory at tendance require d . I II ( 4 )

205. 206

SPAN I S I I C ON V E RS A T I ON

Offers t he o p port u n i t y for practice in S panish conversa t io n in an i n fo r m at ion se ttin� d urin" t h e noon l u nch hour. All s tuden ts w i t � a hasi� k n o w ledge of SpaniSh arc i n v i ted to participate. Conversa tion may incl ude recent news cl'l' n t s, c o n t e m porary life. or other topics o f s t u d e n t i n terest. Pa�s/Fail only. I II (I)

321

C I V I L I ZAT I O N A N D C U LT U R E

Historic a n d a rt i s t ic elements which have shaped Spanish t h o ught and behavior from the begi n n ings to t he presen t: c o n d ucted in Span ish. Prere q uisite: 202. I (4)

322

L A T I N A M I ' R I C AN C I V I LI Z AT I O N A D C U L T

RE

Historic, a r t istic. l i terary , sociological a n d geogr aphic clemen ts shap ing t he development of t h e S pa n ish-spea k i ng 1\'cw Worl d . Both Hispanic a n d non-Hispanic c l e m c n ts will be s t u d ied. Prere q u is i t e : 202 or fo ur )'l'ars of h igh school Spanis h . 1 1 ( 4)

35 1 , 352 COMPO S I T I O N A . I D C O N V E RS A T I O N T() pics o f c u rrent i n t e rest as a basis for i m p roved ora l and written e x pression : conducted in Spanish. Prereq u isite: 202. I I I

(4)

42 1 , 4 2 2 M A S T E R P I EC ES or I l ! S I ' A \ I C LI T E R A T U R E All genres o f m ajor l i terary works fro m the POl'lI/(! dc! ( 'id. t o 1 898; forces which produced the l i tera t u re; appreciation of literat ure as a wor k of art . Prereq uisi te: 202. I 1\ aly (4)

43 1 , 4 3 2 TW E I - lE'f H C E T U R Y f I l SPAN I C L I T E R AT U R E The first semester deals w i t h the l i terature of Spain from the "General' ion de '98" to t h e prese n t . The second semester deals with t h e literature o f Spanish America from t he modcrnista movemen t ( 1 888) to the present. E m phasis Oil period w i l l vary.


cSS 441

313

I lL TORY OF ROMANCE L

l\ G U A G E S

Historical d\!velopment of Romance l anguages w i t h refere nce t o c u rre n t language : same as French 442. 11 a /y (4)

49 1 . 49 1

I N D E I' E

D E N �I

S T U DY

( 2 -4)

Lower division cou rses, His tory 32 1 , 3 2 2 a n d I n terim courses m a y b e ta ken b y a l l s t u de n ts in good s t a n d i ng. Sophomores who have the ins truc tor's per m ission a n d all o t her s t u d e n t s who have at least j u n ior stand ing may enroll i n courses n u m bered 323 and above. Majors are urged to meet the foreign la nguage req u i rements o f the Coll ege of Arts a n d 'ciences u nder e i ther O p t ion I or Option n. Those majors who are preparing for p u b l i c school teaching a r c req u i red to e n r o l l in H i sto r y 460. Because work i n t h e senior sem i n a r will ex tend t h rough the acade m ic year, senior majors are asked to enroll in t he req u i red sem in a r in September. Consu l t a t ions wi th adviser and i n s t r u c tor are esse n t ial i n t h i s m a t ter. BI C H E L O R OF A RTS : A m i n i m u m of 3 2 semester hours i n c lud i ng 4 semester hours from Group A ( 1 07 . 1 08. 1 09, 1 1 0 ) : 4 semester hours from Gro u p B ( 2 5 1 , 2 5 2 , 2 5 3 ) ; senior se m i n a r ; elec t ives b y adv i se m e n t . BAC H E L O R O F A RTS I N ED UCATI ON : See School of E d u c a tion.

1 0 7 , 1 08

H I ST O R Y O F

Analysis of i n s t i t u tions a n d ideas of selected c i v i l i ;,: a t i o n s : Mesopotamia. Egy p t . t he l I e b r e w s, Greece, R ome. the r ise of Christianity. and Europe in the Middle Ages arc dea l t w it h in the first semes t e r : E u rope from the Renaissance to the prese n t i n the second semcster. I "

WO R

LD

C I V I L I Z ;\ T I O N S

A broad survey o f O r i e n t a l a n d civiliLa lions from ancien t t i mes prese n t. I II

25 1

Western to the

C O L ON [ A L A M E R I C A N H [ ST O R Y

A merican i nsti t u t ions from colonial ti mes t o t h e 1 790's: t h e gro w t h o f t h e colonies and theiT relationship to the Br i tish i m perial syst e m .

252

N [ I E T E EN lll C E I T U R Y AM E R I C AN H I S T O R Y

to Theodore Roosevel t : .From J efferson in terp r c t a t ion o f eras from social, pol i t ical, economic, and biogra phical v iewpoin ts.

2 5 _�

TWE I T I E T [-I C EN T U RY MH. R [ C A I H [ ST0 1< Y

Trends and events in domes t i c and foreign affair� since 1 900: affluence, urban growth and social con trasts.

321 , 312 C L AS S I C A L CI V J L I Z A T I O N

T he ancie n t Medi terranean world wi t h e m p hasis u po n Gree k and R o m an civilizations: may be repeated when subjects vary. Open to freshmelJ and sophomores. I I I

45 1

RENAISSANCE

Europe 1 5 00.

i n an age o f transition

-

1 300 to

R E FO R M A T I O N

Pol i t ical and religious crisis in the s i x teen t h c e n t u ry : Lutheranism , Z w i n g li anis m , Angl i canis m , Anabaptism, Ca lvinism, Roman C.a t holic refor m ; Weher thesis, t he begi n n i ngs of Baroque art.

326

E U RO P E A N H I S T O RY F ROM I M R 10 I ?iI ()

Dcvelopmen ts d ur i n g the early modern and scie n t i fic age: the enligh ten men t , the Old Regi me.

3 27

R L VOLUTION A N N A PO L E ON

D

Revol u t ionary Europe Congress of Vienna.

3 1S

from

1 7 89

to

the

N I N ET E E N T H C EN URY E U RO P E

The e x pansion o f European civilization from 1 8 1 5 to 1 9 1 4 .

329

TW E NT I ET H

n:

T U R Y E U RO P E

Even ts and trends s i n ce 1 9 1 4 .

ENGLAND

Pol i t ical, social, economic, legal an d c u l t ur a l develo pmen ts in t he B r i t i s h Isles. I I I

333

RUSSIA

Russia from earliest t i mes; t h e collapse o f Czarism. t he rise of co m m u n is m , prese n t world rela tions.

334

MOD E R N

G E R M A N Y , 1 848- 1 ') 4 5 T h e fai l u re o f t h e Revol u t ion of 1 84 8 a n d the u n i fication of Ger many : the Bismarekian and Wilhelmian E m p i res: the Weimar Rep u bli c an d t he rise of N a t i on al Social ism : a n d the Third Rei c h .

336

C O L O N I A L L;\ T I N A M E R I C ;\

The conquest, se t tlemen t a n d develo pmen t o f Lat il) Ameri ca ; Span ish a n d Por t u �luese poli tical, economic, and religious i n s t i t u tions.

337

R · P U B LI C A N L ;\T I N A M E R I C A

From i n d e pendence t o t he presc n t : e m phasis u pon Mexico, Arge n t i na, J3raz i l and Cu ba.

340

F A R EASTERN

H [ ST O R Y

Life and t hou gllt from a ncien t t i mes : conce n t ration on China, J a pan a n d I n d ia .

3 56

H I ST O R Y O F A M E R [ C AN FO R E I GN PO L I C Y

T h e prac tice, fu n c t ion a n d s tru c t u re o f American foreign policy wi t h particular e m p hasis on the t we n t i e t h century.

421

1 1 I ST O R Y OF I D EAS

Lea d i n ·7 ideas in w o r l d civilization s i n c e t he disinte ra tion of Rome.

g

M vl E R I C A N CONST[T TIONA L

H I STORY

T h e developmcn t o f t he cons t i t u t ion from colonial ti mes.

460

W EST A

D N O RT H W E S T

In terpretive a n d com parative h i s tory of fro n t ier a n d regional topics i n t he 1 9 t h a n d 2 0 t h cen turies.

47 1

H I S T O RY OF Arvl E R I C A N THOUG HT AND C U LT U R E

D i m e n sions of A m e r ican social and in tellec t u a l his tory ; ideas as t h e y relate. t o historical periods a n d e t h n i c b'TO U PS.

D EN T S T U D Y

492

I N D EPEN

494

S EM [ N A R : A MER[CAN

495

SEMINAR:

496

S E tvI l N A R : H I STO R Y A N D H I S TO R I A N S

H I STORY

EUROPEAN H I S T O R Y

T H E F R EN C H

33 1 . 332

C [ V I L I Z A T I ON

1 09 , 1 1 0

324

325

Histoty

T H E M I D D L E A G ES

Europe from the disin tegra tion of the Ro man Empire to 1 3 00: reading and research i n medieval materials.

596

G R A D U A T E R E S E A RC H

599

T I I ES I S

Integrated Studies Please see page 7 1 for course l i s t ings.

Mathematics During the sophomore year, a s t u de n t i n tend i ng t o major i n m ath em a tics should co m pl ete an applica t i on form available from the depar t m e n tal secre tary . If accepted, t he s t u d e n t will be assigned to an adviser on the mathematics fa c u l ty . B AC H E L O R O F A RT S : M i nimu m o f 28 semestcr h o urs n u m bered above 1 50 i n c l u d i ng : 3 3 1 , 4 3 3 , 4 5 5 , and e i t her 434 or 456. T he 434 or 456 choice may be replaced by t a ki ng two of 3 2 1 , 34 1 , 344 , 346, 35 1 , and 460. Eigh t semester hours in physics arc s t rongly recom mended. S t u d e n t s planning to do grad u a te wor k in ma t he m a t i cs sho u l d comple t e bo t h 434 and 4 5 6 . B AC H E LO R O F S C I E N C E : 4 0 semester hours i n c l u d ing 3 3 1 and at least 20 semester hours of u p per division co urses. 12 hours of the u p per division req uire me n t must come from 4 3 3 , 4 3 4 , 455. and 456. Req uired supporting: 8 semester hours i n p h ysics. Physics 3 5 6 may be subs t i t u ted for one course of u p per division m a t h e m a t ics. B AC H E LO R OF A RTS I N E D UC A TI O N : See School o f Ed uca tion .

101

I N T E R M E D I AT E A LG E B R A

A thorough review o f first year high school algebra and con t i n u a tion beyond q u a d r a t ics. .I (no credi t )

1 27

F I N I T E M ATI I L M AT I C S

T r u t h t a bles, se ts, elemen tary probabili t y , matrices, linear progra m m i ng, markov chains, m ath em at ics of finance. Prereq u is i tes: high school alge bra and geometry. I " S

1 33

C O L L E G E A LG F B R A

A N D T R I GONOM ETRY Se t s , p r o g r e s s i o ns, complex n u mbers,

binomial t heore m , l ogar i t h ms, radian


86 m e a s u re, solution of triangles, inverse functions, graphing, identities. Prerequisite: 2 years of high school alge bra or consen t. I I I

1 44

I NT RO D UC T I O N TO OM PUTER S C I ENC E

Computer science and a working knowledge of FORTRAN as applied to scien tific p r o b l e m s ; c o m p u t e r c l a s s i fi c a t i o n , organization, data structure, algorithms, flow charts and FORT RAN IV. Prerequisite: 1 27 or 1 33 or' consent. I I I

1 51

AN A LYTIC E O M ET RY A N D C A LC U LUS

n a l y t i c geo m e t r y , functions, limits, derivatives and integrals with applications. Prerequisite: two years o f high school algebra, trigonometry or 1 3 3 or equivalent. I I I

I 52

AN A LYTIC G O M ET RY A N D C A LCU LUS

In tegration, applications and techniques of in tegration, transccnden tal functions, polar coordinates, im proper in tegrals, L'Hospital's Rule, infinite series. Prerequisite: 1 5 1 . I I I

1 99

D I RECTED R E A D I N G

244

D ATA STRUC T U R E S AND AS S E M BLY LANGUAG E PROG R AM M I N G

Supervised study o f topics selected to meet the individual's needs Dr interests; primarily for students awarded advanced placement. Admission only by departmental invitation.

C mputer structure, COMPASS assembly language, instruction execution, add ressing technjques, represen tation Df data, macro definition, program segmen tation and lin kage. Prere q uisite: 1 44 or conse n t. II a/y 1 976-77 (2) 253

M ULT I VA R I A B LE C A L U LUS A N D D I F FE R ENT I A L EQUATIONS

An introduction to vectors, multidi mensional calculus, and differential equa tions. Emphasis will be on using these topics as tools for SOlving physical problems. Prerequisite: 1 5 2. I n

321

G EO M E T RY

FDundations of geometry and basic theory in Euclidean, projective and nDn- Euciidcan geometry. Prereq uisite: 1 5 2 or consent. I a/y 1 97 6-7 7

323

MODERi E L E M ENTARY M AT H E M AT I C S

Concepts underly ing t r a d itional c o m p u ta tional techniques; a systematic analysis of arithmetic ; an in tui tive approach to algehra and geo metry . Intended fDr elementary teaching majors. Prerequisite tD Ed. 326. Prerequisite: consent. I II S

324

G E O M ET R Y F O R T H E E LEM ENT A R Y SC H OO L T E A C H E R

A review of elemen tary geometry from a mat ure p oint of view usmg modern vocabulary and notation; the i m portance of m e asurement, o bservation, i n t uitive and i n d u c t i ve reasoning as useful learning techniq ues. Intended for elemen tary teaching majDrs. Prerequisite : 3 23. II (2)

331

LINEAR A LG E B RA A N D C A LC U LUS

Vectors and vector spaces, matrices, quadratic for ms, linear transfor mations, mul tivariable calculus. Prerequisite: 1 5 2. II

341

M A T H E M AT I C A L STAT I S T I C S

344

SYSTEMS A N A L YS I S AND S I I\t\ U LAT I O N

Elemen tary probability theDry , discrete a n d functions. C D n t in u o u s d i s t r i b u t i o n i n t r o d u c t i 'On to sampling theory and hypot hesis testing. Prerequisite: 1 5 2. I I a/y 1 9 76-77

Application o f topics from matrix algebra, probability theory, statistics, optimization theory and computer science to problems of science, industry and society ; mathematical modeling. Monte Carlo techniques, error analysis, stochastic processes and computer simulation. Prerequisite: 144 and 1 5 2. II a/y 1 9 75-76

346

N U M E R I C A L A N A LY S I S

Numerical theory a n d applications i n the areas of sol u tion of equatiDns and linear systems, d i f fer e n t i a t i D n , i n t e gration, approximation, matrix theory and solu tion of d i ff e r e n t i a l e q u ations. Prerequisite or Coreq uisite : 253 and limited knowledge of or consent. I a/y computer programming 1 9 77-78

351

APP L I E D M AT H E M AT I CS

Ordinary differential equations including series solutiDns, the Laplace transform, partial differential equations, orthogonal functiDns. Prerequisite: 253. I

433, 434

M O D E RN A L G E B R A

Linear Algehra, groups, rings, modules, fields, field extensions. Prerequisite: 3 3 1 , 4 3 3 offered I each y e a r ; 4 34 offered I I a/y 1 97 5-76.

446

M ATH E M A T I C S I N T H E S ECON D A RY SCHOO L

Basic mathematical concepts; principles 'Of n u mber operation, relation and proof, postulational systems of Euclidean geometry and materials in secondary school teaching. Prerequisi te : 253 or 3 3 1 equivalent. 1 ( 2)

455, 456 M ATH EM AT I C A L A N A LYS I S

Extended treatment of topics intrDduced i n elementary calculus. Prerequisite: 2 5 3 . 4 5 5 offered I each year; 4 5 6 offered I I a/y 1 97 6-77.

460

E L EM ENTARY TOPOLOGY

An introduction to point-set topOIDgy. Prerequisite: CDnsent. II a/y 1 97 5-76

490

SEM I N A R

Prereq u isi te: chairman. (I -4)

CDn sen t

0

f

department

49 1 , 492

I N D EP E N D ENT STUDY

5 9 7 , 598

G R A D UATE R E S E A RC H

Prere q u i s i t e : C D n sen t chairman. I I I ( 1 -4 )

of

department

Open to Master's degree candidates only. Prere q u isite : c o n s e n t o f department chairman. I I I ( 1 -4 )

Philosophy The University requirement of one course in philosophy may be satisfied by any course offered by the department except PhilDsophy 233 ( Logic) Dr Philosophy 385 ( Problems in Medical Ethics). The initial cou rse in the subject is customarily Philosophy 201 or 2 2 1 , though neither Df these courses is a prerequisite for any other course. 300-level courses are especially suited for students with particular in terests. Departmental c'Onsent may be required for some courses. BACHELOR OF ARTS : A mini m u m of 28 semester hDurs including PhilDsophy 233 and 4 9 3 , and 8 semester hDurs from : 3 3 1 , 332, 3 3 3 , 335. In addition to course requiremen ts, all majors m us t complete a presc ribed reading program (described in a s pe c i a l broc h u re a v ailable from the department). Consultation with departmental faculty is important in planning a meaningful major program and should be sought as early as possible. Courses in the department are designed to meet the needs of a variety of students: ( I ) those who desire some knowledge of philosophy as a basic element in Iihcral education ; (2) those who wish to pursue some special in terest in, for example, ethics, science, religion, or the history of thDUght; (3) those who wish an understanding of philosDphy to support their work in other fields, e.g., literature, history, or the sciences; (4 ) thDse who plan to use a major in philDsophy as a preparation for graduate study in another field, e.g., theology or law; and (5) those who plan to do graduate work in philosophy itself, usually with the intention of teaching in the field.

20 1

PHI LOSOPH I C A L I SS U ES

221

M O R A L P H I LOSOPHY

233

LOG I C

324

PH I LOSOPH I C A L A N A LYSIS O F SOCI A L PROBLEMS

Perennial philosophical issues, systems and thinkers; the nature Df knowledge, the function Df science, values, h u m an nature and its social implications, religion a nd knowledge of God. Development of critical and systematic philosophical thinking about all issues. I II Major moral systems of Western civiliza tion ; in tensive examination of some contemporary moral theories; critical app lication to selected moral problems. I I I Principles of argu ment and prDof: deduc tive, induc tive and sy m bolic logic; the nature and functions of 'language, problems of semantics, the philosophy of logic. I

Philosophical bases of social institutions ; the nature of man , values and problems of social existence. I a/y

3 28

PO L I T I C A L AND L EG A L P H I LOSOPHY

The nat u re and justification of the au thority of a democratic sta te ; the role of human rights in li miting that authority ; the nature of judicial reasoning abou t constitu tional rights and their relationship to moral rights and to social justice; the justification of legal punishment and disobedience to law.


87

33 1 A N C I F N T PI I I LOSOPI I Y The developmen t o f philosophic thought a n d m e t h o d from t he Presoc ratic period to t h e end o f the fourth cen t u ry A . D . Special e m phasis is I,,;ven to the philosophies o f Plato and Aristotle. I a/y

h e a l t h , t ru t h-tell ing a n d confid e n t iality, genetic counse l i ng a n d screening. etc. For the general studen t as \\'ell as students in t he health sciences. Not for General University Require ment. Prerequisite: Conse n t o f t he i n s t ru ctor. II a/y

332 I E T E VA L P H I LOSO P H Y The d e velo p m e n t o f philosophy from Augustine to Ockham. Scru t i n y of the sources 311 nat ure o f the Thomistic sy n t hesis, a n d thl' reaciion to i t in the w o r k o f Duns Sco tus a n d William Oc kham. I a /y

393 PI \ I LOSO P H Y OF R E L I G I O N Classical a n d con t e m porary views o f tradi tional rel igious proolems: t h e ex istence of God, religious ex perience, revelation, i m mor tality and others. I I

3 3 M O I ) l: RN PI I I L O S O P I I Y The develo p m e n t of philosophy from the

seventeenth through the carly n i n e te e n t h centuries: continental rationalism, British em piricism a n d Ger m an i dealism ; Desc artes, Sjlinoza, Leibn iz. Loc ke, Berkeley , Hu me, K a n t , Fichte, Schopen hauer and Hegel. II a/y

335

CONTEMPO R A R Y P1 1 I LO S O P I I Y The develo pment o f philosophy from the late nineteen t h cen t u ry to t he prese n t ; may i nclude p ragmatism, e m piricism, process philosophy, exis te n t ia l ism and analysis as developed by M il l . J a mes. Dewey. Whitehead. Sartre, Russell. Ayer and Wit tge nstein. II a/y O R I £: T A L T I I O U G H T Major philosophic syste ms of I n d ia , China a n d .l apan ; related li terature, art, religion a n d general c u l t ur e of the Orie n t .

361

365

K I E RK E G A A R D A N D E X I ST EN T I A L I S M Modern exis t e n tialism, its main themes a n d t he i r relation to o ther philosophical t rad i t ions; its i m pa c t on such flclds as l i terat u re and psychology ; l ife and thought of two key figures: Soren Kierkegaard and Jean-Paul Sartre ; related t hi n kers i nc l u d i ng N ie tzsche. Heidcgger. Jaspers, Berdyaev, Una m uno and M a rcel . I a/y 37 1 A ES T I l ET I C S Analysis o f t h e ae sthetic e x pcrience a n d i ts rela tionship to t he fine arts, l i terat u re , science and morali t y ; the criteria a n d concepts employed in artistic ex pression and aesthe tic val u a t io n . 1 1 a/y 381 T H ," O RY OF V A L U E TIlC n a t u re o f h u m a n values; contem pora�ry discussions concerning the subjective or objectivc , abso l u te or relative charac te r of such val ues as the good and t he right, the bea u t i fu l a n d t he hol y : t he origin of values. their place in a world o f fac t , man's knowledge of them, t he character a n d use of the l a nguage o f eval uation. II a/y PROB L E M S I . M E D I C A L ET H I C S An an alysis o f selected moral proolems i n medical re lat ionships. using basic d is t i n c t ions and n o r m a t i v e t heories developed i.n ph ilosophical e t hics. General issues o f the value of l i fe a n d t he disvalue of su fferi ng. t he necessary co n d i t ions of human rights, the distinction oct ween wrongs o f commission and wrongs of om ission. except ions to rules, a n d assess men t of risks for o thers. Specific pro blems of i n formed conse n t , e u t h anasia, allocation o f scarce medical resources. rights (0 heal th care, patient responsibility for

38 5

3 9 5 PH I LOSOPI I Y O F S C I E N C E 111e general character, fu n da m ental conce pts, methods a n d significance of modern science; some at tention to specific areas o f science; physical, biOlogical, social ; t h e i m plications of science a n d sc i e n t i fic methodology for et hical, aesthe tic and religious values. I a/y 427

PH I LOSO PI-I Y A N D C U R R E N T P RO B LE M S A rea d ing a n d d iscussion cou rse conducted by one or more staff m e m bers. Students wil l read i n t o pical areas of current in terest i n which philosophical l i terature has been developed for com pari�on and a n alysis. Topics envisioned are sllch as free en terprise, ecology and enviro n ment, affirmat ive action and d iscrimination. public a n d private education, democratic pluralism a n d the prohlem o f a u t hority . 435

ADVANCED

S E M I N A R I N P H I LOSOPHY T o p i c to o e an nounced a t t he time t he cou rse i s o f fe r e d , normally some a s pect of c o n te m porary philosophy. Prerequisite: conse n t . I a/y 49 1 . 492 I N DEPENDENT R E A D I N G A N D R E S E A RC II Prerequisite: De partmen tal conse n t . I 1 1 ( 1 -2) 493

SEN I O R I N D E P E N D E N T STUDY Pre paration for a com prehensive senior examina tion and the wri t i ng of a major research paper. Pre paration of the research paper con s t i t u tes two-thirds of thc course; reading for t he com prehensive examination the re maining third. Paper d u e November I or March 1 5 ; examination to be taken hy Dece mber I or April 20. For phil osophy majors only. Prercqubite: at least 4 courses in philosophy. I I I

Physics

B ACH F L O R OF SCI E N C E : 32 semester hours: 1 4 7 , 1 4 8, 1 5 3 . 1 54 , 2 2 3 . 3 3 1 . 3 3 2 , 3 3 6 , 3 5 6 , 4 2 1 j- . 4 2 2-;- . Eight additio n al semester hours may be desi ra hle, d e pe n d ing on t h e student's professional objectives. For e x a m p l e , it is recom mended t h a t pre·Ph.D. students t a ke Physics 401 and 406. Cons u l t t llC departmen t for specific reco m mendations. Requ ired supporting courses: Math 1 5 1 . 1 5 2 , 25 3 : Engineering 3 5 4 ; Chemistry 1 1 5 ; plus e i t her Chemistry 34 1 o r Engineering 3 5 1 . B A C H E L O R Of' ARTS: 24 semester hours : 1 4 7 , 1 4 8, 1 5 3+, 1 54+, 223, plus 1 0 semester hours from the following: 3 3 1 , 3 3 6 , 35 1 , 354, 355. 356. 42 1 , 422. Required supporting courses: Math 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 ( 2 5 3 strongly recommended); Chemistry 1 1 5. S C I E N C E B A C H E L O R O F ( E NGI N E E RI N G PHYSICS): 44 semester hours: 1 4 7 . 1 4 8, 1 5 3 , 1 54 , 2 2 3 , 3 3 1 , 3 36 , 356 (optional). 4 2 11 , 4 22. Engineering Basil'S: 1 5 1 . 1 82, 354. Engineering Concentra tio n : * 1 2 semester hours selected from 23 1 , 2 3 2, 2 7 1 , 2 7 2 , 3 5 1 , 3 5 2 , 44 1 , 4 4 2. Additional courses may be desirable i n order to strengthen the s t u de n t's professional ohjec tives. Con t i n u i ng eonsu l t a t io n with t he Physics and Engineering De part ments for s p e c i fi c r e c o m m e n d a t io n s con cerning advanced technical electives is desirable and encourage d . Required s u p porting courses: Math 1 4 4 , 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 , 25 3 ; Chemistry 1 1 5 . f 4 9 7 , 498 may be substituted for 4 2 1 . 4 2 2 with conse n t o f the d e par t me n t .

+ Under special c ircumstances 1 25 , 1 26 may be substituted for the 1 5 3 sequence. This requires the conse n t o f t he depar t m e n t . A d d i t i o n a l courses m a y be desirable, depend ing on the student's professional ohjectives. Consu l t the departme n t for specific recommendations. *Collrses are selected on the basis of the s t ll d e n t ' s c a r e er objec tives: Electrical, Mechan ical or Com bination. See Engineering section.

a U TUN/:. B AC H E LO R O F SC I E NCE I N P H YSICS f R ES H M AN l a ll :

Sprin�:

T he department offers t wo courses designed for the non·science major: M A l\; A N D TH E PHYSICA L U N I V E R S E and M US I C A L ACOUSTICS. For the Science major, two in troduc tory sequences arc offere d : C O L L E G E P H Y S I CS and G EN E R A L P H YSICS. These sequences differ in the level of mathe matics used as stated i n t he course descriptio n . They also d i ffer somewllat in em phasis, with G E N E R A L PHYSICS involving more com prehensive a nalyses. A student wishing to major in physics or engineering is encouraged io contact t he depart m e n t early in his col le"e career " preferably prior to his en tering as a Freshman E arly consulta tion will provide grea ter l1exi hility in one's program.

:

( ; e n c r a l P h �Y s ics La b 147 \I a t h 1 5 1 A na l y t i c ( ; c ( ) Inc t rv and � C;l IclIllIs 1 54 Gene ra l P h �y s i c s 1 48 Lab M a t h 1 5 2 A n a Iv t i c C ; e o Il1e t rv - and C;l I e li l u s

1 53

SOPHOM O RE Fall:

S pr i n ).! :

E l e mc n t a l ), M o d e rn Physics \Ll t h 2 5 3 M l I l t i ;a r i a b le Ca i e u l u s a n d Di lTclT n t ia l ' -Lq u a t io n s 1,'I1 l.: i n c c r i n !:2. S t ilt.ij:� 23 223

1

336

354

Mechanics

I ':nt'in cc ri n � Ana l y s i s


.I LL lO R ra il :

l : k l' l rO Il1a�I1l' l il' T h e o r y �b l hc l n:l l icrl Phy s i c s T h c r l l l o d Y l l a ll l i c s

331

356

". 35 1

or

C h c lll 3 4 I P h y s ica l C h c l l l i.s l r ) · S p , i ll � .

223

l " le-c l r< l I n a � ll l' l il' \\'�IVL'S �l ll d Ph ' s i c a l O p l ic s L l e- e l r i c a l C i r c ll i l s a l l d I n s l rll llll'll t;l I i O Il

331

EN IOR rail

() ll�l ll t ll l11 A d l' ; l l l l','ti AJvanccu A tiv;l l l C C ti

'AO I 421 " A O (' 422

S p r i ll�'

\' \ e l' l l a ll i l's L a b o r ;l l ( ) \,\' M ( ) c i L' r n P l l ' s i c s

(

Llbora l o ,,'

" O p t i O ll;r1 ';::" O p t i o ll a l .

reCl l 1 11 I 11 C llcied

l or

sci Hl l l l Gi lld ici:l l c s

I L E M I ' TA R Y PH Y S I CS

\ l O I J l:- R ,

;

,; 1 7 2

generation in m u s i ca l instru men t s : physiology of hearing; ar c h i te c t u ral acous tics : elec tronic record ing and re pro d u c t ion. La bo ra tory and gr ou p lours. Nu pre re q u isi te courses i n e i t her m a t h e m a t ic s o r phy s i c s a r c ass u m ed .

�r;l d \l : l k

This co u rse covers t he various pile.nomena where c la s s i c'll ml� t hods of p h y s ics fai L . Co n t e m p o r a ry i n terpr e t a tions of t hese phenolllen a are developed at n il el e m en t a ry level. P rereq u isi t e : I S4 or 1 26 or conse n t of

i n s l ru e tor.

272 Sec

S O LI J ) ST A T E E l ' C T R O N 1 C DEVI C ES

E ngi n eer i n g 2 7 2.

E LE C T IW:'-I A J J ' : T I C T I I I:.O I� Y Electrosta t ics. di pul e f ie l d s . f ie l ds i n d i e l e c tri c' m a t e r i a l s . e i e c t r o m a g n t' l i c i nd uc t i on .

33 1

O U 'l'usr BAC H E LOR O F A RTS I N PHYSICS Gcnera l P h 'v s il's r ClI I : 153 Lab 147 \ b t h l 5 1 !\nall' l ic ( ; C ( ) l11l' t r .v

ma gne t i c propcrtie� o f m a t t e r . genera t io n a n d pro pag,ali o n o f el ec t ro m agn e t i c waves wi t h a n em phasi on the rei n t io ns h i p w i t h physk'al o p t i cs. Prereq uisite : 1 5 3 . 1 54 : eorcquisite : 3 5 6 or c on s en t .

Sjlrill�:

332

<1;1<1

Ca l c u l u s (;cllc' ra l P h y s i c s L:lb \L1 t h I 5 2 A n a ll' l ic ( ; (' o l11l' I [I' . a llli Cr l c u l m I k l1 1 e n Ll rl' \-r ockl'll 223 P h y s i ,' 1 54 1 4H

L1 1 I

;

P L U S 1 0 a d d i t i o n a l semester hOllrs from t h e fo l l o w in g : P h \' . sics

L k c t rU lll:J U l1 e t i l'

331 336 35 1 354 355

1 06

T h C \l !'I' . \kdwllil T h l' r lllo d Y lla l n i c s I -' n � i nl' e r i n u A n a l v s i s ' TC, I l' i r i n e I ' I1 I ' s c s

<

356 4 2 1 .4 2 2

\;1'

\

\-Li t hc lll;l l icCl I I;hysics

AdV:l11lTd

L;lhu , a l u ry

A n i n troduction t o t he mea n i n g and st ru c t u re of physics pr i m a ril y for l i beral arts studen ts. A lIun-lllathctical description of the physical universe: and t h e s i gn i fic an c e and roil' of p h ys i cs i n o t her fields a m i so ci e t y .

C O L L E G E PHYS I C S

This cUlirse lro vi d es a n i n tro d u c tion t o t he fu n d a m e n t l t o p i cs of phy si c s . It is a non -ca l c ul us s e q u e n c e , i n volv i ng only t h e use of t r i go n o m e t ry and coll e ge algebra. Co nc u rr e n t regis t rat ion I n 1 4 7, 1 4 8 is

a

I

requ.ired.

I NTIWO 'CTORY PH YS I C S L A B O R A T O R Y

a exper i m e n t s a r c pe r formed in c o n j u n c t iun with the General a n d Co l l ege Ph y s ic s s e q u e nces. o n c u rr c n t registration i n 1 25 . 1 26 o r 1 5 3 . 1 5 4 is re q u ired . Basic l b or a tory

1 53 . 1 54

physics.

of

i n c l u d i ng classical medIan ies. thermodyn amics. el e c t r i c it y and m agnet i s m nnd o p t ics. Co n c u rren t regi st ra t io n in 1 4 7 . 1 4 8 a nd prior or concurrent regist r a t io n i n Math l S I . L 5 2 is required.

205

MUS I C A L

ACOUSTICS m usical sou.nd using

s t ud y o f phy si c s met hod s : v i br a t i n g sy s te m s : simple harmonic m o t ion w a ve m o t i o n : c o m p l ex w av e s wav e

A

:

336

:

\V A V E S

\\ CC I I A ' I C S

Fundamental m e c h a nic s : mathematical for m u l a t i on of physical problems; motion of pa r t icles i n une. two or t h ree dimensions; motions of systems of p a r t i c le s ; dy n a m i c s 3ml s t a t i cs of rigid bodies: m ov ing coord i n a te y t e m� l. a g r a n g e ' s eq u a t ion s and l I a m i l tonian forlll u l a t i n o f mechan ics. Co re quisi t e : 3 S4 or conse n t .

351

:

T I I L R M O D Y I AM I CS

Sec E n g i n c er i n g 3S 1 3 54

E N G I N EF R I � ( ; A N A LY S I S

See Engi ncering 354

355

T L A C I I I NG O F P H Y S I CS

New d ev d o p m c n t s in second ary c urric u l u m . It'aching techni ques a n d t ea ci' M n g med ia in t h e physica l scie n ce s ; c o u n ted toward a deb'J"C.c· for only those s t u d l'n t s rcceiving c e r t i fic a t i o n .

356

1 47 , 1 4R

G EN E R A L PI I Y S I S A c al c u l u s-i ev el s u rvey of t he ge ne r al field

J N LT I C

A s t u d y o f t h e ge ne r a t io n and pro pa ga t io n o f ele c t romagn e t i c waves. The m a t h e m a tical dcs c r i pt ion and t he physical u tlde r s t a n d i ng of e k c tro magndic rad ia tion arc discussed w i t h an e m pha.s is on i t � rela tionship w i t h physical o p tics. Pre.rc'q uisi t e : 3 3 1 ,

S

M ;\ N A "i l ) T i l L PI I YS I C A L U i l V t R S L

1 2 5 . 1 26

F L EC T R m'L\

A , I ) I'I I YS I C A L OPTI C S

, l AT H J:: M AT I C A L P H YS I C ' S

Bo u Illla ry val uc p r o b l e ms. special fu n c tions. mat rices and t e nso rs . probab i li ty theory . c i g e nv a l u e problems. com plex variables. c'o n to u r i n tegra t io n a n d t h e i r a p pl i ca t i ons to p h y s i c s.

40 1

I I T R O DUCT I 0 1\ TO Q U T U M \ 1" C I I

The ideas and tec h n i q u cs of q u a n t um mechanics a rc' developed. Various q ua n t u m mechanical sy s tems a n d phenomena arc s t u d ied in order to d e m u n s t ra t e t hese ideas and tech n i q ul's.

406

AUVA 1C - 0 M O l L R. ' P1 I Y S I C S

Modern theories arc used t o describe topics of con te mporary i m por t an ce such as a t o m i c a n ll suh-atomic phcnolllcna. plasmas. sol ids, a n d

astro p h y s i cal ev en ts. The a p pl i ca t io n o f q u a n t um III c c h a n i c a I t e c h n i qu e s are e lll pha si z e d when a p propriate. Prerc·qu isi t c : 40 1 .

4 2 1 , 422 AUV ! 'C E D L A B O R ATO R Y ( I ) DE I

[NDEPE

49 1 , 492 ( 1-2)

DY

49 7 . 498

RF [ A RC I I ( \ -2)

59 7 , 598

eRA

ATE RESEAR

'H

O p cn 10 las(er" degree c a n d i d a te s o n l y . ( 1 - 2)

Political Science Th re arc no p r ere q u i s i te s for pol i t k a l science cour.scs. e. ' cepl as noted. Courses i n p l i t i ca l science above the "i n trod u c t �)fY " le �; 1 are a rr a nged, in I! vc fi� l d s , W I t h one , survey and scveruJ ' se m i n a rs III ea ch field. Prior c o nsu l t a ti o n with (he i n st r u c t o r of any advanced c o u r se is desirable. 'BAC I l E LO R O F A RT : A s t u d e n t with a in po l i t i c a l science w i l l m ee t the foUowing require m e n t s : ( I ) a m i n i m u m of 32 sem e s t e r h o u rs in p o l i t ica l :cienee: (2) P_S_ 20 1 or e q uiv al e n t : ( 3 ) I'.S. 3 2 5 Pol i t ical Though t : a nd (4) two seminar courses in one field for which he has co m p l eted a survey course. major

For s tudents w i , h i ng to prepare themselves , pc 'i fi c a y for career possi bili ties in p u bl it' affairs a n d po l i t i c al l i fe . t he de p a r t m e n t d e sign a t e s t h re e special programs:

U

Urhan Affairs. Public Affairs a n d Pre- Law. Fo r further i n formali o n sec Career P ro gr ams . and the depart men tal broc h ur e .

II C H E L O R OF A RTS I N EDUCATI O� :

Sec School of Education.

I N TR O D UCTO R Y CO U RS E S 1 01

i\ 1 I N V I T A [ ON T

POLl T 1 C L L I F E

P O LI T I C S

A n explora t i o n of poli t i c a l c o n ll i e t . power. a n d decision. stabi l i t y and change. s t at e s m a n s h i p . s t ru c t ure and free d o m . ( W i l l meet t h c social science core requiremen t.)

crisi '

201

TH E P IMAGI

POLI TICAL

UTI AL AII O

'ALYSlS

I n trml u d ion to theories and s t y les of pol i t ical ex p l an a t i o n . Selected readings and ex er c is e s in the anal sis of p ol i t i cal phe n o m e n a. ( Re q u i red of pol i tic al science m ajors ; helpful to those plann ing rel a te d careers: i.e., pol i t i cs. law. journalism o r e d u c a t i o n . )

S U RV

Y COU RSES

A" " s u r v e y " c o u rs c s w i l l s c i e l l l'c � " rc req u i rc m c n t .

251

meet

A M E R I C AN POLI T I C

t ir c

soriai

. ATl O N A L POLITICAL PROCESSES A survcy of t he consti t u t io n al fou n d a t ions of the American pol i t i c al system and of i n s t i t u tions and proc ess e s rel a t i ng to pol i t ical


89 participation, decision-making, policy i n America. 282

POL I T I C S A B ROAD

325

POLI T I C A L TI- I O

and public

XAMINATI ON o r POLI TICAL SYSTEMS FROM A COMPARATI VE PERSPECTI VE Principal focus is on contemporary issues, the sociel3l setting and policy formation in selected European anti non- European systems. HT

A SU RV�Y OF POLITICAL THO GHT FROM PLATO TO MA RX rigin and evolution of major political cOTlcepts from their classical fou ndations in ancient, medieval and early modern times. Such ideas as the state, obligation, authority, comm unity, law and freedom will be studied d eve I opmentally. (Re.quired of political science majors.) 331 PO I T I C S AMO G N A T I ONS AN LYSIS OF INTERNATI ONAL

RELATIONS AND FO REIGN POLICY Concepts and vocahulary of in ternational relations; foreign policy of the major world po w e rs and contemporary i n ternational problems. 3 57

POL I T I C S O F T H E B U R EAUC R A C Y

PRI Cl PLES OF PUBLIC AD I I N ISTRATION AN D PUBLIC POLICY Managemen t as occurs in the a ffairs of state; t h e n a t u re of h u m a n h e h a vior in o rg a n i z a t i o n s ; a d mi nistrative law and quasi-judicial practices; civil service, hudget a n d f is c a l c o n t r o l , c e n t r a l i z a t i o n , co ruination, in tegration in administrative area . ( Requ irement in PUBLIC AFFAIRS curriculum; recommended for PRE-LAW program.)

363

THE PUBLIC WI LL AND PUBLIC POLICY The form ation, expression, transmission, m e a s u rement, and effects of political attitudes and opinions; particular attention to political culture, public opinion polling, the media, and government secrecy and opinion manipulation. 364

352

POLITICS I N AMEI I C A N STATES

PROBLEMS OF GOVERNING AT THE STATE LEVEL Atten tion to political structures, processes, and public policy at the state level. Specific topics will be treated as appropriate; field tudy may be arra nged. Concentration on the State of Washington. 356

URBA N PO tTl S A

D PROBLEMS

PROBLEMS O F AM ERICAN POLITICAL CO MM U I T Y AT THE LOCAL AND M ETR POLITAN LEVEL General problems of planning, economic developmen t and investment, pover ty, crime and environment will be considered in Ie tures and discussion; specific topics will be treated as appropriate; field study may be a rranged. (Recommended for PRE-LAW p rogram.) 36 1 PO L l T 1 C A P A R T ) " AN EXA."' INATION OF A M E RICAN

POLITICAL PARTI ES IN TH. EORY AND J'RACTI E Ca m p aigns and voting heh�vior; party lea dership and recru itmen t ; public opinion, political socialization and participa tion .

484

S O V I E T P O L I T I C A L SYST E M S

487

CON T E M P O R A R Y R - V O L UTI ONA RY MOV EM EN TS

A N APPRAISAL OF SOVI ET POLITICS At'l D GOVE RNM ENT Examination of the political system in the USSR, ideology, role of the Co mmunis t Party, the nature o f the constitution , administrative agencies and nationality policy.

THE L E G I S L A T I V E P R OCESS

CONFLICT, STRUGGLE AN D COMPROMISE IN THE LEGISLATIVE A RENA Congressional organization anti procedure; s t a t e I egislative polities; lobhying and legislative behavior. I ncludes an examination o f t h e o r i e s o f l e g i s l a t i ve a n al ysis. ( Recommended for PRE-LAW prof,'Tam.)

AN EXAMINATION OF STYLES OF POLITICAL CHANGE C a u se s , go a l s and tactics; thc term "revolutionary movement" to include both successflil and u nsuccessful challenges to ex i sting sovereignties and constitu tional structures.

368

Political Theory and M e thodol ogy

T H E P R E S I DENCY

TH E WORLD'S MOST POW ERFUL POLITICIAN Exami ned i n terms of the roles, mystique, and e x p e c t ations of the office, styles of leadership, the divergent requirements of image and substance, and decision-making. 46 1

ETH N I C M I N O R IT I ES I N T H E PO L I T I C A L PROCESS

AN EXPLORATION OF THE HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY RELATIONSH I P Minority groups in the American political process; em phasis in this course will be on the e m e r ging poli tical consciousness among non-white minorities, its consequences and im plica tions. Comparative Pol i tics and In ternational Rela tions 336

S EM 1 N A R S American Government and Pol i tics

PO L I T I C A L COM M U N I C A T I ON AND OPI N I O N

THE P O L I T I C S O F I N' R ' AT I O NA L COOPERATION

INTE RNATIONAL ORGANI ZATION AND LAW T h e web of i nterdependence and its institutionaliza tion. Issues before the United N a t i o n s a n d t h e C o m m o n M a rket. Cooperation an d the principle of national self-determination. International rule-making. ( Recommended for PRE·LAW curricu lum.) 43 1

I S S U E S IN I N T E RN A T I ON A L R E LATIONS

A VIEW OF PROBLEMS ARISI NG IN POLITICS AMONG N ATIONS Major factors in for m ulation and execution of policy ; contemporary developments in world p o l i t ics; selected problems of conflict resolution, develo pment, trade politics and modernization. 432

E U R O P E A N I N T EG R A T I O N

THE IOVEMENT TOWARD A POLITICAL UNION OF E U ROPEAN STATES National, international, and supranational elements in the law and politcs of the European Com m unity. 483

THE WESTM I NS T E R M O D E L

POLITICAL SYSTEMS OF T H E BRITISH COMMONWEALTH Con temporary govern men tal and political institu tions of England and the British Commonwealth states including Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

41 1

SCOPE A N D M ETHODS OF PO L I T I C A L S C I E N C E

THE DISCI PLINE OF POLITICAL SCIENCE Relation to other sciences; types of approac h ; r e s e arch methods and techn iques; bibliography. ( Recommen ded for students c o nsidering grad uate study in political science.) 426

RECENT PO L I T I C A L THOUGHT

POLITICAL THOUGHT A N D I DEOLOGY IN THE MODERN WORLD An examination on democracy, conservatism, capitalism, socialism, anarcho-syndicalism. comm unism. racial and political elitism, nationalism, liberalism, Christian political thought and con temporary problems. Public Affai rs 37 1

POLITICS AND THE L E G A L PROCESS

THE LEGAL SYSTEM FROM A POLITICAL SCI ENCE PERSPECnVE Deals with the concepts of law, professional recruitment, judicial behavior, and the mu tual impacts of law and the political system. ( Recommended for PRE·LAW program.) 456

THE A DM I N I ST R AT I V E STATE

THEORY I N THE ST U DY OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND POLICY Readings and discussions in the two worlds of " o rganization theory." Explanations of administration. bureaucratic behavior and policy-making, and explanatory schemes for social process and social organization based o n b u r e a u c r a t i c a n d policy models. ( Re q u i re m e n t i n P U B L I C A FFAJRS curric ulum.) 457

THE ADM I N I STRATIVE E N V I RON M EN T

PROBLEMS OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION I n tensive case analysis of such admi nistrative problems as public person nel manage ment; i n t e r a ge n c y r iv alry ; puhlic budgeting; executive/legislative and public relations. Field research and/or special projects may be arranged. (Require ment in PliBLIC AFFAIRS curriculu m.)


90 459

T\ I � A DM I N I ST R T I V l: P U R PO S I� P ROB L E M S IN P B U C

P O ICY FO R M AT I ON Readi nw; a n d d iscus�ions 01' major te c h n ical probl e m u re3S of poli 'y fo r m u lation: plan n i n g. b u d g e t i ng. i n fo r m a t i o n devel o p me n t a nd con trol, i n l eragency cooperatio n ; a n d in-de p th case analysis of speci m n p liey d 'dsi ns at local, tatc and naLional level�. ( Require ment i n P S L I C AFFAI RS curri c ulu m .)

474

T I l E CON ST I T UT I ON

TH A M F RICA O. TI T U TI O I FROM PO LITI C A L T H E P E R PECf I V ES 0 SCif. CE A N D LA\ D i s c u ss i ons will consider concepts of Cede l i s m, separa t ion of po weIS, due process and civil lib r ries. The l ogic and developmen t of onst i t u Lional princi ples will be developed I h rougb analysis or selected case lines. (R c rnmcnded for PR E- LAW and requ i red in P B LJe A FF A I RS c u rriculum.)

I NTERN S H I PS 458

I T'R SHIP I N P U B IC A DM I N J S

RATION

PRACTICAL E X P E R I ENCE I AN A DM I ISTRATIVE AG E C Y An in km,hi p w i t h a de part men t f locul or stat e govern men t ; planned and su perv ised J l n t ly by a , u pervising gov ern men t official and a mem beT of the pol i tical science faCil i ty . ( By c O nsent o f the Political Scicnce de partmen t ; r e q u i rement in PUB LI C AF FAI R S curric ul um . )

464 , 465 I TEl SH I P I t H E L G I S LAT I V E P RO ESS PRACfI CAL EXPE R I E 'CE WI TH TItE W

H I NGT N STATE l EGISLAT R E L n tern ' h ip w i t h a member o f t h e Washington Slale Legisl a t u re ; planned :lnd supervbetl by the legisl a ture; plan n ed and .ioi n t ly supervised jointly by the legisla tor and a member of the Pol i t i cal Science faculty. ( By permi:sion of the department o n l y . )

466

EGI ' LA T I V E T U DY A N D P RACT I C E

O F F E N-ED r N COORDIN TIO WITH P.S, 465 SclcLled re ad ing); , discussion, :md wri t i ng design d 10 i n tegrate in tern experiences wi t h academic a n d theoretical perspec tives. ( By permission o f the departmen t only.)

RESE A R

H

I ND · ENDE T 49 1 . 49 2 READIN AND R DARen B y con se n t o f the De pa r t ment Chairman.

598. 599

RADUATL RESEAR 'H

Open t o ma ler's degr e c:lOdida les only.

599

HESIS

Psychology BACH lOR 0 RTS: 32 semester hours induding 1 0 1 , 243, 340. 460, 490, In add i t i ( n, Statistics 3 3 1 i� re'l u i red. Cou r ses at th e 500 level arc c.'e lusively for graduate students.

101

c h ' n ge and t ec h n iques of pe r l R l ity. Prcrequisite: 1 0 1 . 1 1 1

I ' ROD CT I Ol ' TO PSYC I I O LOGY

An in trod u c t io n to the scien ti fic · t u d y I' behavior; scie nlifi c methods for s t u dy i ng the beh v ior of l ivin", r ga n ism ' ; to pic SUt'h as moti vat io n , lea m ing, e mo tion . intellige nc , perso n a l i t y . adj u s t m e n t . a n d social behavior. I II

1 10

ST

Y S K I L LS

To assist in the i mpro e m e n ! of re a d i ng skills ami o lher t ec h n i q ues for effective s t ud y ; class vork ' u p ple m 'nted by individ ual � . unscling. ( 1ay no t be �ou n le d ift t he major.) I 1 1 ( 2)

22 1

T H E PSYC I I O LOGY o r A DJ USTM ENT

Problems in personal adjustme n t in everyday living. Pre requis ite : 1 0 \ ( Ma n o t be coun ted in t he major.) I 11 (2)

243

S , I I� JT I Fl e M ETHO ,

Ba.sic experimental a n d research design w i t h s p ec i f i c a p p l i c a tions to sensory and perceptual processes. Lecture aftd laboratory. Majors must take the fou r-credi t·hour o p t ion. Prerequ isi te: 1 0 1 . I I I ( 2 or 4)

330

Ocr A L

PSYCHO LOGY

Research nd t heory concerning t he in terac tio n b e t w een groups and l he i n d ividual : a t t i t udes, val ue . , role behavior and re l a te d t o p i cs c ami ned i n the light I' in terpersonal relations and gro u p l>rocesses. Pre re q u i si te : J 0 1 . I I

335

D E V E LOPM NT : I N F A N C Y TO M A T

R I TY

Physical , i n tellec tual, social, a n d e mo ti onal growth from i n fancy through ad lescence to m a turi t y. Prere q u isite: 1 0 1 . I n

40

H

AI

N EU RO PSYC HO LOG Y

T h e study of brain-behavior rela tionsh i ps. To p i c s include n e u ro a n atomical and meehan-isms underlying neu ro physiololP cal human behaVior; p 'ychological effects of hrain dama e; physi logical correla te ' of I nguage, se nsory a n d m tor fu nc t ions, and f t he brain. mo tion; ele ' trical stimul ation Pre r eq u isi te : 243. r

403

T H E P S YC H O I OGY O F I N f A t Y A N D C I 1 1 L DH OO D

421

ABNORM

450

P YC H

460

LEAR I NG : R E S ' A RC H A

m asuring

l . B ; I IAVI O R

E t iology and trcatm nl of abnormal be[lavior. Prereq uisi te : 1 0 1 . I I I

LO

I CA L T E S T I N G

Survey o f st a nda r d ize d tests; m thods of develo pment , standa rdiz.aLi on : l i m i ta tions a n d i n t e r p r e t a t ions o f t ests, Prere q u isi te : 2-l3 o r a COUTSe in , tali�tic . I

D HI [

Y

Experimen t al st udies and t heori ' of learni g. ledur and lal)orat ory . Prere qu isi te: a m i n i m u m f 1 2 hour.; in psy(;hoJ gy inclu i ng 243, I

490

H I TOR Y A I I ) SYST .iMS I N PSYC H O OGY

A seminar i n historical dev lopmen t vi t h con. iderati n of cunent trends. For junior o r senior m aj r s a n d graduate students: o t her ' by departmental consent. I

49 1 , 491

I N D P E N D E N T ST U DY

A supervbed readin", field or research project o f s p ecial i n t e rest for advanced undergraduate or gr a d u a t e s t u d e n t s. P re r e q u i s i t e : departmental conse n t . I It ( 1 -4 )

493

SEMI ' A R

515

PSYC HO OG I t' A L A S S ES M E.:. T

S e l e c t ed topic iJ Psy chology to be announced. Prerequ i s i te : inst u l:l o r' s ('on e n l .

I n t e l l e c t ual and pen;onaJity assessme n t ; for the form T p art , the s tu dy of such test. a, the tan dard-Binet, the Wechsler Pwschool and Primary Scale of I n te l l igen c e, t he Revised Wed} ler I n tel ligence Sca l e for Ch ildren , and the Wechsler Adult I n tell ige nce Scale; for lhe l a t ter, in terv iew tc<.: hnique ', self-r 'porI tests 'uch as the M M PI and projective methods. PrerequiSite: 450. I 1 I

540

C

570

PRAC T I(, LJ M I C O ll N S !:: A! D/ O R A ' S ESSM E T

' E L I , 'G T H E O R Y

ounseling theories a n d techniques. I I I

I

Physical , i n tellect u al . e m otional a n d social develo p me n t o f Ihe i n d ividual from the pre-na tal period to adolescence ; p ro bl e ms f b havior and adj u s t ment . Prerequisite: 3 35 .

An opport u n i ty 10 develop counseling- and/or assessm c nt skills in a :;e t t i n g in which t h 'sc pTofessiollaL services are offe red . Prerequ i site : 5 1 5 and/or 540. 1 1 1

405

Physical development. mental traits. ocial chara teristics and i n teTests of adolescents; adju s t me n t s in home, sc hool a n d c o mm wl i t y . Prer q u i s i t e : 3 35. I I ( 2)

A n oppo r t u n i ty for the student t o \'Ork in Ull! ' rea s o f (;!)unseling a n d/or assessment in a se t ting apart from the Univcr i l y campus ILll der t h Sli p rvisi()n of a psyc hol ogis t an d l r cou n' cl Or. Prcrcqlli. i l l' : 5 7 0. I I I

410

590

(2)

5i7

A DO LE CENT PSYC H O LO G Y

EM OTl O ' A N D MOT I VAT I O

Characteristics o f emolion and motivation; their role in d e l e r m i n i ng hl,havior. Pb y s i o logical , cognitive. and hehavioral orientations are ernphasized. Prere 'l ui ite: 243 . I I

420

P YCI J O LOG Y o PE R . O A L I T Y

urrenl t hl'Orics of th e dy na mic ' and devel p me n t of personal ity ; research on t h e caus" of i n d iv id u a l d i fferences; person ality

S U P E R V I S :D

F I E LD WO R K

SEM I A R : PSY I I O I G Y O F L E A R [ N G Princ iples of learnjng and their applicati n to

pathological learning p robl ems such condi tions. Prere q u i s i te : a m i n im u m of 1 2 hours i n p yell lOgy above t h e lOO-It!vcl induding 460 or departmental consent.

596

I N D E PE N D E N T RES E A R H

Su pervised i n dependcnt s t u dy chosen in an area by the graduate s t u d e n t . Departmental conse n t re{l u i red. I I I ( 1 -4)


91 597

SOC I A L SC I

considere d

C E M ET H O DS

Basic reseaIC'h co n ce p t s applied to laborat ory, field, Bnd bibliographical stu dies. Top ic s i n cr u d e rormulaLing researc h questions, research des igns, da ta-ga t hc ri n g techn i q u es , analy is of data and theory construction. Emphasis is pl ace d on understanding and eval u atin g ratber than cond ucting research. Ad mission by c n ent of t he studen t 's gradua te cOmmil tee.

599

TH - I S Dev el op me n t of a thesis p ro bl em chosen f£om

the cand id a te's major area of concentration. The thesis d es ign may e nc om pass original laborat ory , field or b ibliogra ph ic research with the specific for ma t t be approv ed by th candidate'� gra d u a te comm i ttee. The t hes is will b e defe nd ed in a final ora l examination condu c ted by the c m m i t tee.

Religion U N I VE R S I T Y

se m es ter

R EQUlREM ENTS:

I)

hOll[s for studen 1.$ en tering as freshm en r so pho m ores . our lower division bOUTh shall be taken before the e nd of the sophomore ye ar. The second 4 hou rs may be selected from mos t o f the ot h er offeri ngs i n Ute religion curri culum . Tra n sfe r s t ud e n t . en te rin g as junior r �eniors are req uired to take 4 se mes ter h urs of r e ljgion unle s pre, en ti n g eigh t t ra nsfer hours (If religio n from oUl er accredi ted col leg , or universi ties. BACHELOR

OF

A RTS: 28 se m este r hours \ hh 1 2 concen trated in one of five a re a , ( B i b l i c al S t u d i e s ; H i 'Iory of Ql risti a n ity History o f Religions; T h eol ogy anti Ethic. ; and Religion, Cul ture, So ci e ty , and the I ndividual), and 16 distrihu tetl so t h a t at least 4 h u r are taken i n each of two other areas. (an'fe r majors m u s t take at leas t 1 2 hours in re�idence. S ! lIdenlS may apply for the Con tract M ajo r, wi th u t prev io us l y pec i li e d requirements, deSigned to encouragc student freedo m . in i ti a t ive . and responsibi l ity. See Chairman for details on t he five areas or th e contract major . Majors 'hould plan their p r og r a m e a rly in c o n s ul tation wit h departmen tal facul ty. 00 ely rela ted courses t 3 ugh t in other d parlm nt may be considered t apply toward die maj r in c nsu H a tion ,v it h the staff.

131

J UD EO-C I L RI ST I A LI F E AND T H OUGHT

B i bl ical ,

fou ndation iss ue s.

h i storical and t h e o l og i c al with r fere nce to contem porary

1 32 R E U G I OUS XP E R I E C de cription of re l igi on as a pervasive aspect

of h u m a n hi'tory and experience; forms of ritual and mysticism espe cially i n Chris tian and selected traditions other Ihan hristian ; symbols of fai th in art, m u s i c . and l i terature.

24 1

B I B LI C AL L1TE RAT

RE

Litcrary, historical a n d t heological di me nsion s of the Bible. i n cl ud j n g perspec tive on con tempora ry prob le m. .

TRODU T I O I o I I E O LOCY Basic que�tloru. of [ h e ehri tian fait h approac hed to pical ly . Questions such as \ ha t does Clui, ti a ni ty mean by "God" will be

25 1

I

t1uo u gh Biblical , historical and contem porary resou rces. So m e attention give n to c ha l len � s to the Christian fai th and its i n teraction With other pe rspec tives .

26 1 F M Al'll R UGIO S The religions of man. A c ri ti cal i n t roduction to the s t u d y o f the religions o f man kind emphasizing hi. torical origins and c ultura l tl ev el o p men ts. R ea di n gs cen tered u pon primary sources in translation. M YT H , RITUA A D S Y M B O L A n e x a m ina ti on o f f h e nat ure of m y t h and i ts 262

p re, ion t h r ugh symbol a n d ritual. Allen t i o n give n [0 pre-l i t era t e my th ology , Asian mythology, and Occidental mythology and the role these my t h ol ogi cal traditions have played i n the d ev el o pm e n t of mod ern man's ethical. social. and religious v al ues..

e,

T E ST A M EN T ST UDI

34 1

0 D

342

N EW T E e

S

Major areas of inq uiry : arch aeology an d the Bibl " the Prop hets, o r the Wisdom Litera ture. Pre req u is ite : 24 J or consent of instruc tor.

AM ,NT STUD I ES

M a j o r a reas o f i n q u i r y : such In terteslamental, Synoptic, J oh ann i n e Pauline l i terature. Prerequ isi te: 24 1 consen t of instruc tor.

343

Ti lE

UF

;

as or or

OF J E SU::,

Gospel con ce rn ing the l i fe and teachings of Jesu ' : 3 his to r ic al survey of " Life of Jesus" r ese arc h , form and re d uc t i on criticism of the Go s pe l nadi tion: the rel igious di mensions of Jesus' l ife and t ho ugh t. Prer equ isi te: one I wer di v i sion cou rse or conse n t of in stru c tor.

Prerequisite: one lower division con se n t of i n structor. I a/y

C H U RC I I

course

372

M O D E RN

373

A M , R I C A N C I I U RC H ES

or

H I STORY

Begi nning with the Peace of West ph a li a ( 1 648), in teraction of t he Christian faith w i t h modern p olit i c s , science an phil osop h y : expansion in t h e world, modem movemen ts. Prerequisite: Religion 1 3 I or c o n se n t of ins true lor. I I The de ve lo p me n t and trends of Christianity in the United States. Pr ere q u isi t e: Religion 1 3 1 or consent o f instru ctor.

381

ST U D I ES I N CH RC H M I N I S ' R Y Toward a functional v ie wpoi n t o f t he church's ministry: worsh i p and ed u c atio n , programs for the you th and the elderly, counselling, and ad m i n istration. First-hand obs er v a t i o n of selected m i n i s t r i es . Pr ereq u isi te : one lower division course or consenl of instructor.

382

C H R I ST I A N I T Y A 1 0 H E S C I A L C R I SI .'

A n in tensive, in-depth exploratJon from the pe rs pe c tiv e of Ouistian theology and ethics of one or t wo cu ne n t s ocia l issues. Pre r equ isi te : one lower d ivision course o r consen t of instruc tor.

383

R E LI 10 S E XP E R I ENC E A M O I A M E R I C AN M I I O Rl TL ES Concen trating on t he relil,,jous ex periences

ethical dimensions of Christian li fe an d t h o ught with aUen tion to pri mary theolOgical p os i t i on s and specific problem are as. Prerequisite: one lower division course or consent of instmc tor.

and contrihutions of t hose sectors i n American society Illat h ave a m i no r i ty identity and are often not included in the usual s t udy of American churches. th is cOurse wil l in different semeste rs focu on differe n t m inori t ie s s uc h as B l a c ks , In dians, Chicanos. Prere<Tuisi te: one lower divi�ion course o r consen I o f i n st ru c tor.

361

39 1

C H RJSTI AN E H I C A n i n tro d u c ti on to the pe r so n al and social 35 1

PHl LOSOP1 I I C A A N D R U C I OU S T R A D 1 1 0 S OF I N DI A

on Vedic and panishadic E m p h asis traditions, B H AG VAD-GI A, " ix orthodox s c h ools," Buddhism , and contemporary I n d i a n p ll i l o s o p h i c a l a n d r el i g i o ll s d evelo p m en ts. R eadi ng' cen t e r ed on pri m ary sources in t r ansla t ion. Prerequisite: Rel igion 2 6 1 Of co n se n I of instructor.

362

PHI LOSOPI I I C A L A I D R E L I G I O US TRADlT I O S OF C l l I I A Classical a n d modern phil osop h ical and religious tudi t i o ns of China ( t he s ix "c l ass ical schools," the n e o- Taois t. and nco-Confucian tra d i ti ons ) , Ch i n ese B ud dh is m , and how these

s c h ool s relate t o contemporary China's M a rxi s t - c o m m u n i s t ideology. Readings centered on p ri ma ry sources i n translati n . Prerequisite: Religion 26 1 o r consen l of instructor.

37 1 ANC I E T C I I U RCH HISTO RY The o ri gi ns , t hought and e x pa n ' i n of thc

Christi an Church ; rise of the Papacy, expansion in Europe and the grO\ th of hristiao in vo lv men t in cul ture: to the end of t he Papacy of Gregory I (604).

LT

HER his ti mes , with major

'nle man and

mphasis n his wri tin� and crea tive t heology, such as the radical c en tra l i ty of the Gos pe l and fai t J I , t h e Wor d and Scripture , t he sacra ments, Church and State. Pre requisite : one lower division course or c on se n t of instructor. II al y

392

C H R I ST I A N C LASSICS

45 1

CHRIS I M D�R

Christian l i terature: devotion. biogra p hy , theology , poe t r y ; Augu s tin e, Thomas a K empis, D an te . Lu thlrr, Ca lvi n , Pascal, Wesley , Kierkegaard and oUuw; group c or e plus se minar reports. Prere q u isi te: one lower division course or consen t of i n st r u c tor. It a /y

N HO GHT ND C O I S I OUSN ESS

Co n t e m po rary i ss ue s and probl ems i n t h eology w i t h reference t o Biblical a n d hi torieal re' u rces and recent u n derstandings of man and his world. Readin gs elected from Barth, Bonhocffer, Buber, B u l t m an n. C " , Mol l man n t h c N ie bu hrs. Ro binson. T il hard de Charmn a n d Til/ich. Prereq uisi t e : on e lOwer div' 'ion course or consent of instructor.

C H R I STI A I Y A N D T H E A RTS Re l a t i on s hi ps of Ch ri st i a n

485

fo rms

and

contents

though t to the o f various m e d i a o f


92 art ist j c c reati vi ty .

490

I I aly

reco mmended in A-S

S [ N I O R S l\Hl A R I N R E LIGION

( Open only to seniors and graduate students.) (a) HIIlIlaJl SPX[J(l/ily TIlt' psy l.'llO l ogical, sociol o gi ca l , ethical and t h eological dinlcn�i I s o f sexuality. (b) Nl'ligio/l alld [";yC/IO/Ogy An i nvest i ga ti o n of psy chological studies II h ie)l wnverge on an u n derstanding of human persona l i ty from the viewpoi n t of reLigion and I he hristian view of man ; the i n fl u e n c e of p s y c h o l ogy in t he self-u nderstanding o f man. (c) Religio / l UIlU POliTics An inquiry i n t how these disciplines relate to each other wi t hi n U le life of the the l i fe of Un� state, and in chuTc h churc h-state relationships. ld) Dmllt alld Dyi/lg Human death xumined from a variety of perspec tives w i t h special emphasis on theological dimension . (e) !.i/(:ral1lre (Jlld Tlt eology A study o f significant literature from both a l iterary allli a thcolo 'cal perspective. Basically directed toward 1 9 th 31ld 20th ce n t u ry A m e r i c a n a n d E u ropean

literature.

49 1 , 492

rNO - P ' N D '

STUD '

In tended for r ligion m ajor ', advanced and grad uate students; consent o f the department i s required.

493

M AJ O R I 1 RI ST I AN AND 0 H E R R E LI G I OUS T H IN K E R S

The in-depth and intensive study of one or two major figures i n Chri tian theol ogy or ther rcJigiou th ought, e.g., Augus tine, Buber , Bllllmann, Niebuhr, Bon hoeffer, Radllllkrishnan, Tillich. Prerequis.ite: one IOWCT division cou r:e or eonsen l of instructor.

SOciology, Anthropology & Social Welfare BACHELOR OF A RTS I N SOaOLOGY, A N T ... R P O L O G Y-SOCI O L GY , ANTHROPOL G Y : Majors in An thropol ogy A n t h r o p ology -Socio logy ( A -S) or (A), Sociology (5) are required to take a minimum of 32 semester hours for graduation . One eOUIJIe. Anthropology-Soc iology 3 30, Social I nquiry, i' re quired for all majors be{(Jre the e n io r y ea r , although it is not an "i n trOdu ct o ry " course. With this in mind, the requirements for majoring in A, A-S, and S are as follows: AN K ROPOLOGY ( A) -S 3 3 0 , Social I nquiry 7 courses in An thropology , induding on rec o mm e n de d in A-S ANTHROPOLOGY-SOCIOLOGY ( A-S) A-5 330, So ial I n q uiry 2 course in A-5 I course in A n thropology I course in SOciology 3 cour ' cs in any combination from 1\ , A-S, and S I O lOGV A-5 3 30, Social I n q u i ry 7 courses in Sociology, i ncluding one

B C l I E LOR OF A: RTS IN SOC I A L WELFA R E : Mi nim m of 3 2 semester hours i ncllld ing 2 7 1 , 365 , 442 , 4 7 2 , 4 7 3 , 475, 476 and 484, in addition to electives from supporting fields chosen in consu l tation wi th social welfare facul ty. The departmen t holds accred itation in the Council o f Soc i a l Work Education. nless otherwise stated. 2 7 1 or consent is a prerequisite fOr all courses in social welfare.

BAC H E LOR OF RTS IN EDUCATION: See School of Ed uca t i on . C RI M I T A L J USTIC E COURSES: The departmen t a lso offers graduate cou rses related specifically to the field of corrections and law enforcemen t. Supportive courses in sodology and other fields should be chosen in consultation with departmental faculty_ STATI STICS: See Statistics 3 3 1 , 34 1 l isting under Statistics ( I n terdepartmental listing). Ei ther one may be coun ted toward the 32 hour major in Sociology. Statistics is especial l y appropriate for those con sidering graduate work in Sociology .

ANTH RO PO LOGY SOC I O LOGY 13

I NTRODUCTION TO H U M AN SOC I ETI ES

Study of the conceptual tools useful in understanding the development, structure and functioning of human societies and c u l t ures from small to post-industrial societies_ liuman Societies ( A-S) i s recommended as the survey course to meet the Core Requirement in Social Science. Although taking this coursc does not preclude majoring in the Department i n one of three tracks, it is recommended that prospective m ajors begin with a 200 or 300 course in their i n terest area.

230

S M A L L GROUPS A N D S M A LL SOC I ET I ES

An e.· am ina tion cross-cul turally of the structure of small groups including the mutual effects f mali groups, small societies and their environments on each other.

330 SOC I l N Q I RY An inves tigation of the ways in II h ieh theory

and method unlo k a sociological and ant hropological understanding of various h u man societies_ Required of all majors before the senior year.

33 1 -334 PERSPEC T I VES OJ

ETHN I . G RO UPS

An examina tion of the history, c u l t u re and p roblems of various ethnic groups in A m e rican S oc i e ty ; the n a t u re of m a j o r i t y - m i n o rity relations; modes of adaptation among et hnic groups.

33 1

332

PERSPECTI VES 0 I E T H IC G R OUPS : T H E ASI AN A M e R I CAN PERS PECT I V E S O t ET HNI C G R OU P S : T H E B LA K A M E R I C' A

333

PER S P EC T I V ES ON ETH N I C G R OUPS : T H E MEXICAN A M RICAN .

334

P E RSPEC TI VE S O N ETHN I C G R OUPS : T H E N AT I V E A M E R I C AN

430

B E I E FS I

490

SEMINAR I ANTH ROPOLOGY-SO I O L OGY

SOCI A L CONT XT

A m u lti-cul tural investigatioll of religious and other beliefs within Western and n on-Wes tern societies with particular a t tention t o their c u l t u ral determinants.

Student or facu l t y ini tiated Seminar in one o f f u n d a m e n t a l a r e a s i n f o u r Nlthropology-Sociology ; ( a ) Contemporary Issues and Problems; ( b) Social Process and Change; (c) Social Stru c t ure ; and (d) Theory and Method. Prerequisite: Departmental consent. ( 1 -4)

49 1

I N D EPEN DE T S T UD Y : UN D E R G RAD UATE READI N G S

Prelequisite: Departmental consent. ( 1 -4)

492

I N D E P E N D N T ST D Y : UN D E RG R ADU AT . F I E L D WORK

Prere quisite: Departmental consent. ( 1 -4 )

SOCI O LOGY 240

A M E RIC;

340

V A RI ANT L I F E STYLES

34 1

B U R E A UC RACY AND L A R G E SC A L E O RG A N I ZATIONS

SOC I ET Y

A n analysis o f pol i tical, economic and social institu tions in the United States. Includes a look at current social problems such as unemployment, poverty an d discrimination. Offers explanations of how the social system works and the fu t u re directions for American Society.

An exploration of representative adolescent and adult n o n - c o n f o r m i ty s u ch as delinquency, s t reet crime, drug use, homosexuality, white collar crime and cultic religion with particular alten tion to the dialectical process of i ts gradual emergence and its social rejec tion.

An a ly sis of structures and processes i n l arge o r ga n i z a t i o ns; their effects upon the i n dividual and the organiza ti on as a system; the interrelationship bet ween society and the orgJnization.

342

THE F AI'A I LY

343

CHANGI N G COMM

An analysis of the family as a system of i n teracting roles. A look at i ts relationship to other institu tions in society and an a t t e m p t to understand variant forms of the fa mily su c h as communes, swinging and group marriages_

T i T l ES

The causes and consequences of the changing pat tern in American commun i ty l i fe ; incl uding such aspects as changing i n terpersonal rela tionshi ps, concentra tion of bureaucratic power and tren d.� toward mass society.

.


93 344

RACE R E LAT I O N S A, D CON L 1 C T Rb, OL UTI ON

51 1

THE RI MI 'AL J US I e . SYS EM

F a c t ors accou n t i n g for interracial and i n t e re t h n i c tensions. r n te r pen o n a l , n a tional a n d i n terna tional i n t e rglo u p . m · thods of resolution. One co urse from the Perspec tives on Ethnic G ro u p s Series (A-S 3 3 1 -334) is recommended as a p rerequisite.

Exa m i n a tion of the in ter-relationships of . tructure and processes of t he various segments o f the criminal justice system i n r e l a t i on to c r i m e preve n tion , con trol, correction a n d re ha bil itation.

S OC I A LI Z A T I ON AN D T.HE C R L ES C F L I F E basic understanding of (he con t in uous

S t u d y of various Illodels t h a t strive to help offenders return to a productive role in soc iet y : ins ti t u tional ila tion models, social aebon models, c o m m un i ty based models, etc .

440 A

process of social learning t hroughout life, uSin g ·u h ex periences as job changes, m arriage, child bearing and aging as situation s f p otential crisis for the in dividual. Emphasizes how conl3d w i t h various groups, organi z.at io ns and ins t i t u tions affects the learning of appropriate roles_

44 1

RA t . REVOLUTION A N D T H E

DEVE LOPI G C( U N T Rl E An investiga tion of racism and stra tification

processes w i t hi n the developing coun tries and between the developed and developing co un t ries; its consequences a n d i m p lications; Ule significance of American non-white m i norities.

442

Oel A L POLlCY A l D ORGAN I Z AT I ON

Analysis of how societies have defined social an d personal needs and developed and organ ized responses to those needs. S pe cial emphasis will be given to the response of American society_

443

SOC I O LOGY OF

' D UC AT I O N

The nature and functioning o f t h e educational system will be examined from a sociological perspective. Topics will include: education, stratification and social change' education as a c mplex organilation ; the school as a social in li tu tion ; education and the sociol ogy of occupalions; an d the sociology of learning.

491

D EPE D NT S TUDY: DERGRADUATE READ! I

I

Prerequisite: Depa r t men tal conscnt. ( 1 -4)

49 2

512

S13

R E H A B I L I T A T I O N M O D E LS

SO < I O lOG I A L T l I E O R Y A N D C R h 1 1 N A L J U ST I C E SYST E M

Varieties of sociological theories w i l l be applied to problems wnfron ted in the criminal justice system wi th special em phasis o n achieving the goals o f hel ping offenders to return to society as productive members.

521

SO ' I A L YST E ivlS IN TERVE T I O N

A survey o f the processes o f social cha nge, including an e . · a m i nation of social conditions which create the need for i nterven tion. Offered i n the Human Relations Prvgram.

53 1

M I N O R lT Y - M RELATIONS

J O R I TY

T h e history 3 m l cul ture o f minority gro u ps i n American Society, examined w i t h i n the con te. t of the i n t e r ac t ion betwe 'n m i nor i ty -majority groups and population and composition and move ment of these groups. Offered i n the Human Relations Program.

54 1

SOC I A L STRATI I I N SOC I A L SYSTE

TION S

The econom i<:, social, and pol i t ical systems in America arc e. plored to gain some basic understanding of how class, status, and power operate in society_ Offered i n the Human Relations Progra m.

590

SEM I N

initiated

se min ar

in

RADUATE R E A D I I G S Independ en t 'tudy card required . ( 1 -4)

595

T H ESrS

50 1

PROG RAM SE M I N A R

A n analysis o f social explanation and the social scien tirie frame o f referen ceo Offered in the Human Relations Program.

503 I RO fP PROC ESS t\ h uma n in teraction la boratory to fac i l i tate

the exploration o f the self concept through the mechan i. ms of i n terpersonal in teractions an d fe edbac .

505

SO

IAL S .r

C E M E T I IODS

Basic research cone pts applied to laboratory, field and bibliogra phic studies. Topics include

fo nn ula ting research questions, research designs, data-gathering tec hn iq ues analysis of dam an d t heory construction_ Emphasis is placed on understan ding a n d evaluating rSlher Ihan c nducting research_

A N T H R OPOLOGY 220

C U LT U R A L

I

TI-l R O P

L GY

The prehistoric dev lopmen t of c ul t ure ; a c o m p a r a t i ve study of c o n tem porary small-scale societies; describing, in terpre t i n g and expla.ining h uman behavior with reference to environmental setting-;, cult ural traditions and outside ( n on-traditional) intluen ces.

221

C L'I U R E A N D PEOPLE OF A F R I C A

322

C ,

3 23

PI IYS I C A L A N T H ROPOLOGY

Human biology in evol u t ionary perspt! c tive; evol u tio nary theory, fossil evidcnce of human develo pmen t, the living non-hu man primates, present-day h u man as a biological creature. Does not meet Social Science General University Re q u iremen t .

3 2 1 -3 24 C LT U R E A D PEOPLES S E R I E S

L T U R E A ]\ D P L ES O F A S I A

C U LT U R E A N D PEOPLES O F O C E

IA

324

C U LT R E A N D P I.:. PL ; S O F S O U T H/ C E T R L A NI ER I C A

3 29

E T I -! 1 0 LOG Y 0 I OR I I AM E R I C AN J

I IA

S

A comparative study of A merican I n di a n cultures a t the t i m e o f European contact; l h e effec ts of white contact u p o n tradi t i onal American I n dian c u l t u re:'; I n d ians in contem porary North America.

4 20

E C O N O M I C A NT H ROPO LOGY

An investigation o f the economic system in small scale societies with spe mc a tten tion to gdthering-hunt ing and triba l and peasan t technologit:al systems. It will examine the relation o f modes of production a n d e x c h ,l n g es t o fam il y a n d comm u ni ty structure.

4_ 1

ECOLOGY A N D SOCI L O R AN I ZATI ( i

An investigation of the exten t to which social organization and mall's behavior arc a result of h i s e v o l u t i o n a. r y a d a p ta t i o n 10 environ ment. The social organization of OIh r animals will be exam ined as they h e l p understand this question.

49 1

IN ;p N D ENT ST UDY : L . D E RG R A D ATE R E A D I NGS

Prereq u isite: Departmental consen t . ( 1 -4)

492

I l D EPE 1 0 I T T DY: U , ' DJ:RG R A D U TE FI ELD W O R K

Prerequisi te: Departmental conse n t ( 1 4)

I n dependent Study card required. Pre requisite: Departmental consent. ( 1 -4)

32 1

R

Student or facu l ty selected areas.

597

of each area ; the majOT themes that have concerned ant hropologists working in the area; the position of the traditional cul tures of the area i n the modern world. One or two of this series will be offered ea ch year.

A general survey of the peoples a n d c u l t ures

SOC I A L W

L FA R E

222

I I TY S E RV I CeS

COMM

Designed to provide a n op portunity for fresh man and sophomore level s tudents to test their in terest i n the field of social welfare through a five to ten hour per week pa rtici pan t-observation experience i n a local age ncy _ The pu rposes are t o provide opportu ni ty for a self-evaluation of one\ aptitude for and i n t erest in the field, a n d secondly, to i n t roduce the i dea o f evaluating the effectiveness of the agency in terms of a c h ieving i ts stated goals_ Prereq u isite: d e p artmen tal consen t . (2-4)

27 1

I N T R O D UCTION TO SOC I A L WO RK

The history, philosophical root , prac tice meth ds and "se t tings" (i.e_, ad pti on�. publ ic schools, p u blic assistance, correttions. p sy c h i a t r i c h o s p i tals and c l inics) o f


94 profe ssi o nal '0 ' i al work; op p ortu ni ties for observa ti ona l c '-peri ences. ; 0 prer eq ui i te. I II

365 S I ;\ L I NTE RVEN I O N PrOt: , sc.' of social change; so ' ial conditions which creal Ihe need for in tc rY e n l i n. t he dynamks of ch an ge in i nd i illuaJs an d groups.

fun tion f soci a l movemen ts in a ffedi ng change: i n tervention methods, tac ics and tra tegies. May he a pplied (oward sociology m aj r. Pre req ui si t e : 27 1 or conse n t . I I I

442

OCI

L POLI C Y

AND O R GA N l l

SOC I A L WO RK PRA T I C E

The pr ofe ssio n o f soc i al work exam ined within the group of he lp i ng profes sions ; the kn w l edgc base principles, m e t hods and values generic to social wo rk practice; observalion of problem-solving s tru c t u res and pr o ce sse ' Prerequ isites : 27 1 and con s e n I. II

473 I T E RV I E W I I G Co n c ep t , pr i nc iples and te chn i'l ues in t rin sic I i n tervi ewing ; " he l p ing," p roble m·solving, or "clini al" i n te rviewing; for person s i n tlle hel ping p r o fcssions: so ial work/social we ll·arc, clergy , n u rsi ng, phy sic ians , par i s h worker", personnel officers. Open to j u niors and niors only. 0 prcT' q u isi tc .

475 , 476

FI

LD � XPL R I E

CE

Supcrvi c d ficlll work w i t h i n a n age n c y o r i n · t i t u t i t) n · a p p l i c a t i o n /in tegra tion of knowlcdge, theory a nd und rst an di n g; d vclO"pme nt of t ec hn i q ues COm mon to the g()cial welfare field. Pre re q u isi te : 2 7 1 a nd consen t. I II

484

S O C I A L R ES E A R H

Pri n c i ples of research design a nd as� c ss ll1c n t re se a rc h methods. [valuation f various [csear I will be given s pec i al al len tion. Primary em pb as is \\�II be plac ed upon un derstandin g and c r it ica l ly ex a m ining actual research.

490

EMINAR

Prere q u i si te: Departmental

e n t . ( 1 -4)

c on s

I N DEP N DENT ST UDY Prere qu isite: De part men l ;U consent. ( 1 ·4)

49 1

50 1

.' M I N A R I , AM I LY GRO

TIlis se minar seeks t o examine the currc n t fa mil y orientation as i t relates to be hav ioral science theory an d practice w i t h fa mil ies th rough an an al y sis of t h e theoretical and pract ical c on sid er ati on s that shape de l ivery of services to families. The r l a li o n he t w ee n the t hi n k i ng :t.nd doing in fa m i ly thera py will be ci;uified and e,· p!l n de d upon.

502

'A I LY THERAPY PR C T I C

.1

TItis seminar seeks to provi d e st uden ts wit h a mea n ingfu l process and struc tu re by which fa mil y th era py L� learned at tllC pra c ticll m level . The rel ical concepts will aJso be ex amined i n th e terms of dia gn o s is and

the

delivery

of

Statistics S t a t i s t i c s,

a

branch

of

a pplied

3 1 It e m a t i c s , i s becoming increasi ngly po pu J ar as 3J1 area of i n q uir y. Tltis 3Tea of III

stu dy deals with methods of collec ting alld su m m ari Ling d a t a and m a ki ng gen eralized on the b as i s of sample s ta te men ts information.

33 1

TIO

. how soc ieti e s have defined soc i al "n3lysi and personal ne ds and d evclope d and organ iz e d respon 'cs to t h o. e needs. Special e m ph a si s will be gi ven to the response of American socie ty.

472

trea t m e n t i m p l i cati ons in s rv i c es to fa mil y �y · tems.

I I TRODUCT ORY STATIST I S

Descr i p t iv e statistics: mca ures of ce nt ral ten de nc y and d ispcT"ion. In ferc n t ial t atistic : g e n c r a lil.ations abou t populations fmm sa m p l es by parametric and non-parametric tcchniques. Methods covercd will include estima tion, h y p o t h e s i s · testing, simple correlation a nal ysi s, linear expre. 'ion and c h i sq uare a n a l y si s . ( o t a p pl ica bl e to ma UWIllBlics cT e di t. ) I I I

34 1

MAT I I E M A

I C A L S A T I S nCS

Elem n tary probability tbeory, discr cte a n d con tinuous Jis tri bu tion functions, sampl i ng theory and hypo he sis·t es ti ng. Cred it can n I be gr an t ed for bo t h S tatist ics 3 3 1 and 34 1 . Pre requisite: Mathcmatics 1 52 . ( M ay be applied 10 rnatllematics cred i l . ) II a/y

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ADl l l S S I O N The professional B ac he lo r of B usiness Ad mi n i t ra lio n degree program is com po ed of an upper division busi n ess curricul u m vith a stron� base in l i beral arts. n de rgradu a i e stud n t s are admit! d 10 the Schoul of B u si il e S Ad m in i s l ra ti n upon the successful completion of at le as t 24 sem cs t er hours wi t h 3 c u m u l at ive gr;Ide po i n t average of 2.5 or a b ove, and the declaration of busin e " ad m inist ra t ion as the m aj o r field of study. Trans fer s tu de n ts a re rc q u i Ie d 10 hav e main tllined the grade poin t average of 2 . 5 s e p a r ately in both bu.i ncss and non-business co rses. The st u d e n t s in t e re st t acq uirc a profe ssi o nal c mpetence is de ir ed and Ihe assign m e nt of a business facul ty advi cr is required. St udents considerin g grad uate·level s t udy should scck early plan ni ng advice from t h e facu l ty concerning appropriatc undL,rgrad uate course selection. raduate students are a d m i t ted to Ule Sc hoo l of Business Administration when they mcet the re q u i re men ts s pecifi ed in the avail abl e from the Dean of pro ced u res Graduate S t u di es.

AF F L L I AT I O NS The School of Business Administration of Pacific Lu t he ra n U n iversity is a member of the Amcrican Assembly o f Collegiate Schools of B u si ncss. The u ndergrad uate p rogra m is nationally accredited hy t h e Accrcditati n Council of the AACSIJ. an d the SdlO I of 8usin e ss Ad ministration sub r i bes to all sta.ndard · of the A merican Assemhly of Co l legiate Schools of B usiness. Pacific Lutheran U n i v ersi t y is a c cred i te d regi nally

by the ort l m e t Association of Secondary and Higher Schools. The SchOOl of Bu · n ess Admin istration is also a m�mber f the orlhwest Un ivers i t ies' Bu siness Admin islIation Confere nce, tJIC Western Association of C I IL-giat e Schools of Business and th e National Assoc iat ion of Schools of Pu blic Affairs and Administration . .

D E G R E E R EQU I R E M ENTS Six ly-foUT s e mes t er hou rs or one·half of t h e m i n i m um total degree re q ui re me n t s are taken in fields uu tside the School of B us i ness Adminis tra tio n. As m an y as 24 se mest er hours can be c ho en in any field wi t hou t res triction ( frc electives). At l ea. t 40 se mes t e r hours are taken i n requ ired and elec tive busi ness su bj e d . The Bachelor of Busine dmini. tration degree program i ' accredi ted by the Ame rica n Assembly of Collegiate Scho Is of Business. I t consi ts o f 1 28 semest r hours t o be t a 'en ove r a fou r-y ea r p ri o d . and to bc completed with an over·all grade po i n t average of 2.50 or abovc, 0 grades i n usiness admini '!ralion core courses (in cl u ding the two u ppe r division business cledives) wil l n o t meet th e DBA gra d u a tion re q ui remen t s. In prac tic e , this work can be accelerated by laking a h avier t h a n average load a n d by participating in summer scssions. On the other hand. man st u de n t: find i t use fu l 1 0 e:\ce 'd t he m i n i m u m i ncl ud ing related or r e q u i re m o n t s b y a d d i t io na l a dvanced work in their undergraduatc s t u d i '. B A C H E L O R A D M I ISTRAT I O N :

O F

B U S I N ESS

230, 281 . 282 350, 364, 370, 453, 455, and 8 se01ester hours of u p per d iv i ion b u si n ess electives. Req u ired SuppO[ling� Economics 1 5 0 md one u pper division economics course; Math 1 27 or J 5 1 ; Statis tics 3 3 1 . A total of 28 se m es ter hours ( othe r t han tile 36 se mes t e r hours of General

Un i versi ty Requiremen ts) a.re required o u ts ide Business Administration. The elec tive eourses are c h o s en 10 sup por t the students' professional career obje'tives Or grad ua te study pl3J1s. They may fened busin ess a d m i n i s t ra t i o n c o n c e n l r a l i o fl ( s) or s lee ti n O from en t i rely different fiel dO. The lalter may inclUde work in other professional schooh or programs.

M S T E R B U S I N E S S O F AD M l N ISTRA TIO N : See Gradu a t e C at alo g. B L I C P O F M A S T E R ADMINISTRATIO N : Sec Graduate Cataiog.

SA MPU PROGRIIIH FOR THE BACHELOR O F BUSIN ESS ADM I NISTR A nON D EG R E E This is a d e ma n din g m i n i m u m program of" 1 28 se m es te r hours designed to me e t t he

needs of a s tu de n t preparing for gra<.luate leading to the Master of B us.i ness Ad mini. tration degree or the J uri.� Docto[ degree.

st u dies


95

I - R I:. S H M A .

YEAR

In Icri !11 S p r i n � S c me s t e r

SO PHOM O R E Y E A R r ai l Sc nic: s t l'r

I n tcri lll prin� SC llll' s l l'l'

350

2K I 1 _ 1! SIa l 3 3 1

B

behavioral

364

M " l h;,d�

365

N I O R YEAR

I " l l Se m c s t e r

I n terim

S p r i n !-,

SemcSIl'f

SE

lOR YEAR

rail

Scme· , l c r

S p r i n u S':lll<.:slcr

P h i l 324 S<lC 3 6 5 Jji\ 4 5 3 ( A 374 Rei 490

Courses n u mhered J 00-299 are avail abl e to al\ s t u de n ts. Courses n umhered 300-499 arc pen tl) 'tudell t. with junior . tanding and I he req u i re d pr requisi tes. Co u rse ' n umhen:d 500-599 arc reserved for stud n ts in the M B A and M PA programs and st u den t s in other gnduatc programs who have a n a pproved "ield in busi ness. 1lle middle digit of the cour e n umber indicates field of conl:entra tio n : 4 - general service 5 - persolllH'1 a n d i n d ustrial managcn en t 6 - finance ami related su bjed ' 7 - marketing a n d djstributi n 8 - ac c o u n t i ng and information systems 9 s pc ialiftd and rn: do m i n a n t1y i n de p e nde n t s tu di e s For fu rther i n formation on sugges te d c;ours.es for areas of concen t ration , co nsul t t he Dean of the S c Jl O o l of B usiness Administration .

230

LAW

D SOC I E Y

366

' t ully of the legal system i n t h e United State: an d t he regu lation of relntionships het we('n indiv i dual c i t i zen -, groups, and the govern men ta l agenc ies and bran�hes. Review of t he rights and o bl igat io ns of i nd iv i uaJ ci t izens a n d corporatiollS, ad mi nistrative l a w , a n d t he procedur a n d pract i ce, ()f tIle courts in a rnotlo.lm socicly . I II

2 1 lkv

370

B U S I N ES, C O M M

N I C A IONS

lopment of applied wri ting s k i l l s and t e c h n iqu e� in business c o m m un i ca t i on:. I n d ud ed are lelter� of inquiry. o rd e r s a n d acknowl dglm'n ts, 'a les a n d promotional com mun ications cl a i ms and adjust men ts and c() l Ie � t io n s c o n e . \lo n dcn\:e, credit I e d ge r s, briefing and bu,- incss reports. resu me s, and a p pl ic ati on let ters. I

243

F AM I LY F I N

PLAN

NCI

L

INC

Con. umer �vin g, spe n d i ng a n d pl a n n ing t e c h n i q ues; i n telligen t b u y i ng a n d budgeting, estate a d ta"X planning, in s u rance and in est menl programs, retiremen t planning; ethical issues i n !,'O vernmen t and business [rom the con�lImcr vie wpoin t ; wns u me r o r ga n iza tion and i n fl ucl1I:e in fi na n ce , mar ' ting a n d production. I I I

28 1

T i t (;

An in u-od u!.; ion to a c co u n ti ng conce pts and p r i n c i pl e s. Pre pa ration and anaJysis of fj n a nc ia l repOTts. I I I

282

Of

the

MA IACEl l A L FINA CE

RE

L E ATE usc pl a n n i n g

R I S K A N D I S RA C E M AN AGEM ' T

An i n t rodu!.;t ion 10 the p rln ci pl c s ()f ri 'k and i n s u rance man agemen t An a ly t i cal rc ic\ of mai n fu n c t io n s and in s t itut ion s of the i nsu r an c e bu i ne' 1 1

B u s i n e ss Po l i c v S u c i a l P h i losophy S o c i a l I n l c rv<: n t iull l'e r, u n n c ! ;r n d Industrial R l' i a l io n s Te l e v i s i o n P ro d u c t i o n Scnior SC lll i n a r

BUSI NESS A D M I N I STRATI ON COURSES

tudy

and co mme r ci a l devclollmcnt of l a n d . Th f()cu is on de ma nd factors, govern men t control in zoning a n d regu la t ion, a n d real e:tale investment analy j • 1

Psl'ch Bli

455

view.

Study of la n d

M a na�c lll c n i � l ark�t inu Sy � l c ll1s Ma na�ni:r1 l i n a m'" B 364 I n l ro d u c t ion to l)s\' l: I]()lo�1' I () I " i ncss A U lll i n i s t ra t i on I n t e r i m ' B ,\ 387 Ll;, ta i'rocessin>! Sn t c ms l.con 4 3 4 � o v e rn ml' n t a ilu ih e i : c o n o n l Y 1),\ 4 0 0 Sys t e m s A n a l y sis a nd \)csi!,n -

SA 3 50 B A 3 7 ()

IlA

()f

()ncent"-oIted st udy o f Ihe tools of financial an al y si s : Funds and cash !lows, cri t ical anal ysis of finan cial statements and () tlter fi nancial i nfor m a tiO n , te c h n i q u c s of f i n an c ia l pla n n i ng and bu d ge t i ng, a n d Ihe conce pt<; rela t e d to capi tal e\pe n d i t ur budgeti ng, and the cost o f capital, An i n t roJ u dion t o fi na nci al s t ra tegies and ded. ion-making for I1 na ndng. e;o.pansion, and dividcnd policies. Re q ui r e d for busi ness majors, Prerequisi tes: 2 8 1 , 282 and Econ 1 5 0. I U

Sllldent sh llltl . c hedu le fou r one-hour \:ourscs in PE activitit' during the /lrst tW() year '

J

poin t s

co n c e p t anti charact eristics of l he produl'lion fu n c t io n . In !rodu l'lio n 10 c� analysis and problem-solving techniques. I "

I :ina n ci a l

tat

tAG I:.M E NT

processes o f a d m i n i , tralion. Ma n age men t te c h n iques and t he functions of p la n n i ng , o rga n i z i ng. dhedj()n, and con t rol are d isc sed from b o t h the cia, s i c a l an d t h e

L' C O l i ll t i n>! • La\ ' a n u So L'il' t I' i s t i ca l i\b t h 1 5 1 n a l y t icil ;co IllL' t ry a nd Cakll i u s P h i lostll' h ) I n I c r i ll1 !\ccLl u n l i n l! I n i'o r I na t iu ll S v s t c m s B A 2H2 I n l rud u c t i,\ n to Co n t c m p,;ra r y L i t c ra t u rc L n � 230 Pr i n c i p l e s ul P h i losophy pilil 20 I \1;l t h 1 5 2 A n a l y t i c a l ( ; c ( } !11 c l ry a n u Lr l c u l u s

I�

M

A c r i t i ca l examina tion of the pri n ci p les a n d

I linda m e n u !s 0 1' O r a l ( ' o ill m ll ll ica l i oll CA I 2 3 C o l kgc I n" l i s h i 'n � 1 0 1 SOl' i o l o�\' S o � 1 30 .I u d a c , ,-C' l n i s t i a n Llt"c and Thu u,, 111 Rei ( 3 ) Ph i l o so p hy I nt e r i m Pri'H:ipies 0 1 ' I ' c o n tl ll1 i cs Lcon I S O I ' i ll i t c M a t h c lll;r l i c s l a t ll 1 2 7 Or;r1 I n t e r p re t a t ioll u i' l . i t era t ure ( ' A 24 1

" I II SC11lC s t l: r

A CO UN T I N C I ' FO R M AT I O N SY TI.: 1'-

I n t roduction 10 management informa tion sy stems. I:.m phasis on the analysis a n d in terpretation of acco u n t i ng and eco n o m i c da ta and t heir use i n pla n n i ng a n d con trol. A pplications u t il i zing computer te r m inal. Prere q u i s i te : 2 8 1 . I I I

M A R K ETI NG S YS T E M

The flows Ilf goods aOlI servi c ' in th ec o n o my , e c on o m i c and b e h a v ioral approaches to I he analysis of dema n d ; the role of the marketing fu nct ions in a b us i n ess fi rm. Determination o f t he mar ke t i ng mix c ha n n el ! of product policy , pricing, dis tribut ion, and ma r ke t i n g c m municatio[ls. Stat 3 3 1 s t ron gl y rec() m mended. I II

381

I NTE RM EDI AT E ACCOUNT I N G

Con �en l ra tcd st udy o f t he valuation theori " for asset. and l iabi l ities. Analysi� 01' re la teJ e ffee Is on i n co m e d e t e r m i na t i o n . Prerequ is i t e: 28 1 . I I I

383

I NCOM E T

XA TI

N

Comprehensive study of i n co me tax concepts, reglilations, and tax pl3J1 n in g prrnciple . Empha�i,� on i n d iv i d ual a n d corpora te income taxa t i( ) n . Prere qu isi te: 28 1 . I I

385

OST ACCOUN I N C

Ba.�i c and advanced coneI' pts of costs ill de ve lopi n g information for m a n age me n t Il'>C in t he d e te rm i n a ti o n f income, e a l u at io n o f capi tal i n vest m e n t alternative ', and t he m ea s ure m e n t of performance. Prere q u isites: 28 1 a n d 282. 1

3 87

DA A PROC ESS I N G SYST EMS

A co m pu tcr-Ia borat orY-Q rie n ted ' urse whi\:h incl udes basic pTOgram allJ �1rstem analysis and tlow c hart ing. i n tensive s t udy of progra m min g l a ngu ages wi t h em phasis on FO R T RA N and CO D O l , a nd the developm en t o f a w ()r k i n g kno w l ed ge with co mputer h ardware and so ftware systems,


96 Prerequisites: 2 8 t and 282. I It

392

IN

ERNS H I P

A program o f full time experience closely rel ated to the student's specific career and acade mi c interests. The student rs expected to develop the internship opportunity with a fum or organization. Before registration, the stude nt , the organization, and the School will pre p are an internship agree ment. This agreemen t identifies the problems to be re earched, ex perience to be gained, and rel ated readings to be accom plished. Monthly progress reports and other measures of achieve ment will be used to dctermine the grade. Not more than 2 hours of credit will be granted for a fuH month of in ternship, and not more than 8 hours of accumulated credit will be granted for the in ternships taken. The internsh ip cannot be used to meet the minimum requirement for 2 business administration elective courses, and it must be ďż˝'Ompleted prior to the last semester before graduation. Prerequisites: BA 28 t , 282, 350; Economics 1 50; Statistics 3 3 t ; one additional course in the student's area of concentration. (4)

435 B U S I N ESS LAW Procedures, contracts, agencies, negotiable ins tru men ts, business organizations, property, tru ts and willi , transportation, insurance and mployment. II 450

M f N U FACTURI NG M A N A G EM ENT Principles of scien tific management; planning products, physical facilities, equipment and materials for production ; methods and techniques of supervision and control of perso n nel ; production control; purc hasing and inventory manage m e n t. The course includes su pervised studen t projects and major case studies. Prerequisite: 350. I OPERATIONS A N A LYSIS 45 1 In troduc tion to and the examination of selected decision sciences techniques and their applications to a c c o u n t i n g, finance, managemen t, marketing, ' and production. Topics include modeling, inven tory control, resou rce allocation, project plann ing, forecasting, and logistics. Prerequisites: BA 28 t , 2 8 2, 350; Economics 1 50 ; Statistics 3 3 1 . PERSON E L A N D I DUST R I A L R E LATIONS Detailed examination of behavioral processes of indivi duals and groups in business organizations. Em phasis on policy issues and s p e c i fic problems in managing human res u rces with focus on modern practices of i n d u s trial relations and p e r so n n e l m a n a ge m e n t i n i n d ustrial and other organ izations. Prerequisite: 3 50. I II

453

455 B U SI N ESS PO L I C Y Formulation o f policies to integrate all f u n c t i o n s of business. Social , ethical, r e l i g i o u s , e c o n o m i c , edul,ational and in ternational im plications in the formulation of business policies and o bjectives. Includes comprehensive case analyses. Required for b u siness m aj o r s . Prerequisites: Senior standing; 28 t , 282, 350, 364 and 370. J L 1 456

HONORS S E M I N A R I I

461 F I N A NC I A L ANA LYS I S Study o f financial policies a n d the analytical framework for sup pliers and users of private ind ustrial capital. In tensive studies of selected companies and industries. Prerequisites: 2 8 t , 282, 3 6 4 and Econ 1 50. I 464 F I N ANC I A L M A N A G EM ENT Problems of working capital management, planning the financial struct ure, issue of new securities, and major financial policies. I n tensive and ex tensive use of cases and advanced rc,adings. Prerequisites: 28 1 , 282 , 364 a n d Econ 1 50. I I 4 7 0 M A R K ET I N G M A NAG EM ENT Analytical approaches for the solution of marketing problems, developing stra tegies, planning and administering com prehensive marketing progra ms; evaluation and con trol of marketing operations. Prerequisite: 3 70. t 47 1

M A R K ET I N G RES E A RC H A N D CONS UM E R B E H A V I O R Techniques a n d uses o f marketing research in the b u s i n e s s d e c i sion¡making process. Emphasis is placed on research design, various survey methods, research instrumen ts, and sa m pling plans as they relate to marketing consumer products and services i n a changing e n v i ro n m e n t . Co ntem porary behavioral science concepts to be examined and incorporated in selected marketing projects. Prere q u i s i t e : 3 70. Stat 33 1 strongly recommended. I

47 2

A DV E RT I S I NG A N D S A L E S M AN A G E M ENT Role of advertising and personal selling in the marketing program ; analysis of market targe ts' developing market poh!ntials; media selection: designing the promotional message ; evaluation and control of the promot,ional mix. Prerequisite: 370. I I I 473

I N DUSTR I A L M A R K ET I N G AND P U RC H AS I N G Analysis o f t h e indus trial buying a n d selling process; purchasing policies and proced ures; selection of sources of supply; contract analysis and negotiation, marketing problems of m a n u facturers of indus trial good s; d e v e l o ping and im plementing industrial marketing strategies. Prere quisites: 3 5 0 and 370. II 482 A DVANC E D ACCOUNT I N G Co mprehensive study of accounting for corporations, including the accounting aspects of c o n s o l i d a t i o n s a n d mergers, and partnerships; treatment of incomplete da ta; specialized accounting concepts related to funds and cash flows, statement an alysis, and accounting for estate and trusts. Prerequisites: 2 8 1 and 3 8 1 . II 484 A U D I T I N G The principles a n d procedures o f auditing as they apply to the major balance sheet and income accoun ts; generally accep ted auditing standards used by CPA's; professional ethics. Prerequisites: 2 8 1 , 3 8 t and 482. I I 488

SYST EMS A N A LY S I S A N D D ES I G N Com p u t e r - o r i e n ted-Iaboratory study of system design and analysis. Emphasis on systems documenta tion, the auditing of

c o m p u te r ized systems, t h e u s e of . m a t h e m a t i c al models III systems and simulation techniques. Prerequisites: 28 1 , 28 2 an d 3 8 7 . "

490 SEM I N A R Seminar on specifically selected topics in business. Offered on demand. Pre requisite: consent of the instructor. 49 1 D I R E C T E D STUDY Individual studies; readi ngs on selected topics approved and su pervised by the instructor. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 5 50

ORGAN I Z A T I O N A L B EHAVIOR AND ENV I R O N M ENT The study of open sociotechnical systems within which a manager must operate. It encom passes three major perspectives: the ex ternal organization environment, including legal, ethical, social, economic and political intluences; the organization itself as an e n tity; and the in ternal organiza tion environmen t. I It 551

SEMINAR I N O P E R A T I O N S M ANAGEM ENT A n a l y t i c a l a p p ro a c hes to operational manage ment; the relationship of prod uction to other func tions and external factors; case stud ies of modern techniq ues/me thodologies a s a p p lied in selected situations and i n d u stries; quan titative models, systems design and compu ters. Prerequisites: 350, 550, Stat 3 3 1 and Econ 543. I II 552 APP L I E D D EC I S I ON AN A LY S I S USC a n d application o f sclectcd decision science techniques to projects. The focus is on the examina tion of managerial decision situa tions and the development of decision a n aly sis m e th o d s for t h t) manager. Appl ications include forecasting, resource allocation, project plann ing, data analysis, and simulation. Prerequisite: Economics 543. 553

CONTEMPORARY I S S U ES I N M AN A G EM ENT I nvestigation of the roles of managers in the modern society. The ex ploration includes, bu t is not limited to the topics of corporate responsibility, ethical issues in management, and the impact of technological change on organizations and society. The workshop approach to these topics com bines the use of cases, readings, discussions, and simulations. Pre requisites: BA 550; Economics 504, or equivalent. 555

B U S I N E SS STRATEGY AND PO L I C Y M a n a ge m e n t f u n c t i o n s o f p l a nning, organization and con trol. Prerequisites: 55 1 , 564 and 5 7 0. I I I 557

SEM I N A R I N PO L l C Y SC I E N C ES I n tegrate conceptual elements and decision-making techniques. Developmen t and i m p l e m e n ta ti o n of s p ecific strategies


97 appropriate to public sector programs. Case studies and field work used to explore i m portant policy issues and management i n t e r fa c e s to for m u l a t e m a n a g e r i al improvements. Prerequisites: 55 1 , 567, PS 457, and PS 4 5 9.

564

SEMINAR IN F I N ANC I AL M AN A G E M ENT

Managemen t'. role in framing financial polic ies.; case studies in the determina tion of needs, sources and uses of funds; the developme n t of f i n a n c i a l structures. evaluation of alterna tive financial plans and allocation of funds within the firm, the cont rol of financial resources. Prerequisites: 364 and 582. I J ]

567

S EM I ' A R I N G V E RN i\'t ENT BUDGET I N G

Exploration of budgeting concepts a n d procedures in the government sector. Federal, state and local budget systems. Distinctions between budgeting i n the private and public sectors basic steps in govern mental budgeting ( including the approval phase), development of program structure and mul ti路year plans, display for mats (with respect to financial information), budgetary refor m , and the changing functions of budgets. Case studies. Pre requisitll : BA 587 or 582.

570

S EM I N A R I N I A R K CT I G M A N A

. i E. T

Marketing manage ment policies and programs; i n terrelated elemen ts of the marketing mi:l. and the relationship of marketing to other in ternal functions; changing sociat and legal e n v i ro n m e n t , i n n ovation and modern marketing philosophies. Prerequisites: 370 a n d hon 504. I II

5 I

S MI A R IN F I I ANC I A L A COUNTI NG T H E O R Y

Advanced accounting concepts and standards; current problems and trends rellected in accounting l i te r a t u r e ; d e s i gn e d for professional accountan ts. Prerequisite: 482 or con.c nt. I

582

AeCO N T I N I N F O RM A T I ON AN C O l TROL

A pplications of accounting information, services and systems to management problems. Students excused from this course are expec ted to complete 5 8 1 or other advanced accounting stud ies. Prerequisite: 28 1 . I I I

587

G O V E R I M E I 'T T I NG SYSTEMS A er O

Manage ment information systems; accounting and economic dat a and their use in government agencies. Recent t rends in fund accounting. and analysis o f accounting requjrcments and techniq ues in program 01 a n agement. Case studies. Prerequisite: Economics 504.

590 S P EC I A L S E M I N A R Selected advanced topics; offered o n demand.

59 1

I I DEP ' I f) - N T

STUDY

Individual reading and studies on selected topics; mini m u m su pervision after initial planning of student's work. Prerequisite: consent.

593 THESIS Research s t u d y to m e e t Thesis Option requirement for elective in the M BA or \lPA degree programs. (4) 596 R E S E A R C H CO LLOQUI UM R e search approaches and uses ill the a d m i n istrative decision ma king process. E m phasis is placed on the various aspects of research design : secondary data sources, survey m e t h o ds, research instru men ts, sa mpling plans, data analysis, a n d reporting of results. Both qual itative and quan titative research approaches are examined in ter ms of their application to exploratory, desc riptive, causal and p r o b l e m 路 s o l v i n g s t udies. Prerequisites: Stat 3 3 1 and two 500路level business courses.

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION The School o f Education is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the Northwest Association of Secondary and Higher Sc hools, and the Washington State Board of Education for the preparation of elementary an d secondary teachers, principals and gu idance counselors, with the Master of Arts, the highest degree approved. The accreditation gives PLU g r a d u a t e s r e c i -procity in twenty-eight states. Programs for the preparation of school librarians, school n u rses, school counselors, administrators and su pervisory personnel are available. The School offers course work toward the conversio n, renewal or reinstatement of teaching certificates. The School of Education offers graduate degrees in Elementary Ed ucatio n , Secondary E d u c a t io n . School Administration, a n d Co u n s e l i ng and Guidance. I n formation regarding these programs is available through the Dean of Graduate Studies.

A D M IS S I ON REQUI R E M ENTS I n the sophomore year, students with a cumulative grade point average of 2. 1 5 or above may register for Ed. 25 1 . The student will make a p plication for adm ission to the School of Education during the semester enrolled in Ed. 25 1 . Prior to Ed. 25 1 , the student should meet t he following requirements: I. Students must have "C" or better grades in English 1 0 1 and Psychology 1 0 1 or Sociology 1 30. 2. Have com pie ted CA 1 23. Transfer students who may have had education courses in other institu tions should meet with an e ducation adviser for evaluation of work completed and must arrange for screening i n to the School of Education. Students who have earned a bachelor's degree at PLU or another institution , and who contemplate m e e t i n g c e r t i fi c a t i o n requirements are I'xpected to meet the same requirements for admission and certification. The certification sequence will normally requirc a s u m mer session and two or three semesters.

B A E and/or C E R T I F I C ATION R E QU I RE M E NTS S t u de n ts

become

c a n d i d a tes

certification when they have satisfied the foll owing: I . Have a c u m ulative GPA of 2.25 2. H a v e c ompl e ted the Professional Education Sequence. 3. Have completed approved teaching m aj o r ( s ) or c o ncentrations (see requirements as listed under Academic Prepara tion). 4. Complete PE 295.

T E A C H E R C E RT I F I CATION G u i delines for t h e preparation a n d .certification o f teachers have been established by the Statc Board of Education. The recommended program pattern includes: b road liberal educatio n , 35 per cent; professional study, 20 per cen t ; and electives, 10 per cent. The four路year curric u l u m leads to the Bachelor of Arts in Education degree and the Provisional Certificate. an initial license to teach, issued for a period of three years. PLU recommends the candidate for the first tea<:hing position on the basis o f his preparation. Students may earn a baccalaureate degree in an academic field and qualify for a teaching c redential upon completion of teacher certification r e q u i r e m e n ts . These rl'quirements include a major a s described under "Academic Preparation" ( majors and minors) as listed in this section of the Catalog.

E L E M E N TA R Y PREPARA TION I n addition to the general University courses req uired. in all curricula, certain specific requirements in general education must be met: I. History 460, required of all elementary tcacher candidates. 2. ES 101, World G e ography or Anthropology 220, required of all elemen tary teacher candidates. 3. P r o s p e c t i v e e l e m e n tary teachers usually meet the science general e d ucat ion requirement by completing Biology I I I , or another life science course, and ES 1 22. A year course in o n e l a b oratory science may be s u b s t i t uted by t hose who have adequate high school bac kground in science.

Professional Sequence Ed. 2 5 1 Ed. 322 or Ed. 3 2 3 or Ed . 3 24

Ed. 4 3 J or Ed. 4 3 2 Ed. 4 3 5

Professional Subject M i nor ( Required of all el ementary candidates ) Required 8 semester hours Ed. 325 Ed. 326

for

Learner a n d Society General Methods ( Primary Level) General Methods ( U pper Elemen tary Level) General Methods ( Elemen tary Education Model) September Experience Student Teaching (Primary Level) 10 hours Student Teaching ( U pper Elementary) 1 0 hours Professional Seminar ( to be taken concurrently with Ed. 430 or 4 3 2) 2 hours

-

Reading in the Elementary School Mathematics in t he Elemen tary School ( 2 ) (Prerequisite: Math 323)


98 ElementllfY Art l d u ca tion ( 2 ) Art 34 1 or Mu ' id4 1 M u ]; i c i n the 71crmm lary Sc h oO l ( 2 )

lciel'/il'c.\'

4 '('/I/('.\'ICf hOllr.\'

Ed. 408

Langu age A r t in the Elemen tary Sc hoo l ( 2 ) Science i n I h e Elemen tary Sc h oo l ( 2 )

Ed . 4 1 0 Ed.

4J 2

Social Sc ie n te in E le men tary School (2) Prepara tion and U t i l i z. a t io n of I nstruc tional Material]; ( 3)

Ed. 4 5 7

Ed . 4 Pri mary R ea d i ng ( 2 ) £:.ng . 3 2 3 Oli l d r en 's Li tc rnture �� 3 2 2 P E .ill the. Elem.. n lary Sehuol Add l Uonal dtOlces 1 11 consul tatiu n wil h education a dviser.

SPEC I A L EN DORSEM E NTS Thc folluwing specialized e n d u rse m e n ts in are awil a ble to all s t u d e n t '

ed uca t io n p u rs u ing

certifica tion. Students t o w ar d a s p cc i aLiLed endorse men t should consult an adviser in the Sell,ool of E duca ti on for assi sta n c e in pla n n ing desiring

teacher

to

work

t heir program .

RE

Oil G

S chool

l�nguage Arts in t h e

� . 4 83

Prim ary R e ad in " ( 2) Diugno.�is and Prac t i c u m i n

Elementary Schou l ( 2 )

4N

Reacting cctivcs - minimum 0 1" 4 s mester ho urs Pe rc pt ual '-1otor Skills ( 1 ) I'E 4 0 1 CA 402 Speech in lhe Ele me n ta ry Sc hOOl ( 2) lli:I. 4 5 6 Story tel l ing (4)

Eng. 3 2 3 Ol ildre n ' l i te r ature (4) ;\ R Y CHl LDI-IOOD E OUCAT IO N - 1 8 hou rs Prereq uisi te :

Ed. 25 I Ed. 3 2 2 Re q uired Ed. 4 8 2

Learner a n d Soc ie ty Pri mary Methods

C u rri c ul u m Enrith men t Early ChiJdhood ( 3 )

ill

Prac ticum in Early Olildhood (4) Ed . 483 Pri mary Read i n g ( 2 ) Ed. 4 87 Theor ies o f &lrly Ch i ld hood ( 3 ) Behavioral Pr b l e ms of Ed Psy 5 7 8

Ed. 496

Sluden is

Eh:ct i w ' - min i m um of 4 semester hours Ed. 5 0 1 K i n dcrga rh.'l1 Workshop ( 2 ) d . 4 50 Slorylelljn� ( 2) Ed. 474 Affective Ed u Clll ion ( 2 ) W rksho p - Pt'rceptua l Motor P 40 1 S ki l ls

SPEOAL EDUCATlON Req uire d Ed. -192

Ed. 493

Ed. 494

-

1 6 semester hou rs

Le a rn i ng Di 'abilities i n the C1ass.roo m (4) ( Pre re q uisi te : Ed. 2 5 1 or equivalen t) Learn i ng Di a lJili tie : Di agnost k

Procedu res (4)

16 semester hours Stu dents interested in preparing for the respo nsi bil i ty of �dm i n i tralil)n o f a schOOl library may meel �uggested standards t hrough 1IIe fo l l uwi ng progra m : Bo k nd media sele c tion Ed. 455 I n ' t r u ' tionl1l btcrials ( 2) Ed. 456 - Storytelling ( 2 ) Engli:h 3 2 .3 - Children ', literature Ca t aloging Ed. 4 53 - Proc ess i ng School Librarv Materials ( 2 )

Reference

Ed. 4 5 2 - Basic Rererence Ma terial,

urri ulum Ed. 580 - Curri c ul um Development

Ed. 40

Ed.

Pre parat ion of S c h ool Li brarians IN RESO RCES SPECIA LIST) -

(LEAR

Media u tilization a n d productio n Ed. 4 5 4 - Selection or Learni ng Resource M ate r i a l s (2)

I'rcrequisite: td. 325 Rea d i n g in lhe Req ui re d

I nstruc tor) Elec tives - m i n i m u m of 4 'emester h o u rs Ed. 495 Learn ing DisabiIi ties: Developing ea her Effectiveness (4) ( Prere q uis i te : Ed. 494 O r perrni ion of insuudor) Ed.Psy. 490 Psy c hol ogy of the Ha n di ca pped Chi l d Ed . Psy . Behavioral P r bl e m s of Students 578 tudents ( 2)

( 3)

- 1 4 semes te r hours

E le me n tary

Programs (4) (Pre[eq uisite: Ed. 493 Or pe r missio n of

(Prere qu isi te :

Ed. 4 9 2 o r per mission of i ns t ru c tor) Learning D isa hi l i tie s : D ev e loping Ed u ca t ional

( 2) Administration E d . 45 1 Administr31ion of School Li br ary ( 2) SECON DARY PR£PARATlO Professional Sequen c e Ed. 2 5 1 L�mer and defy Sopbomore Year) September

Ihe

xperience (4)

Ed uc a t ion a l Psy chol ogy ( u n io r Year) (4) Professional Se mes ter ( 1 4 h ou rs) (Senior Year) - Students m t contact Sc hoo l of EdUcation ror appli cati o n proced ures. Ed. 4 20 Te ac h i ng of Re adin g (2) Ed. 4 2 3 .eneral te t hod (Sec ndary)

Ed. 468

Ed . 4 34

(4)

Stlld nt Te ac h i ng ( 8)

Spedfic m e t h tis in major a n d minor (J u n io r or Senior Year ) St ude n t must wm plete 24 hour� professional education course work.

in

ACA D E M 1C PREPARATION A major from Iho 'e l is t e d must he c o m p i e t ed . Com ple li n of a te c h i n a major/minur in a seco nd a ademic area i� strongly recom me n ded . { t u den t ' do n I m ajor in education.} Teac h i ng majurs are offered in the follu wi ng areas: art. biology, b u sin ess education, ch e m is t ry , commu nication art , ea rt h and general

sciences,

e c o n o m ics,

Engl ish,

French,

German history, lan guage arts. mathe m a t ics. music. physical ed ucation, p hy sics political sc i e n ce , social sciences, sociology an d Span ish.

PREP RATI N FO R !:.L E M E N T RY T A C Il I t G : A stud"n! pre par ing for I leaching m ust om plete N ele men tary seh se m es t er hours in a major t e a c h i n g (I rea, a n d two minors conSisting of 1 2 se mester hours

each. One of t he minors m U ' I b e in the profeSSional subj ec t and one i n a l e ach ing fiel d other than tJ1at cove red in the 24 se mes te r hOUT conct'ntratior . The courses indud d i n the two minors are to be dete r m ined in c nsultation wit h the School o f Ed u ca tio n . PREPARATIO FOR JU lO R I UGII TEA I I I NG: S tu d en ts preparing for teaching on Ihe junio r high level are req u ired to com ple te a tea c h ing major of approximately 24 ·3 2 sem e s ter hour,'. A teac hin g minor is also requ ired. Students must consu lt an education adviser regarding teac h i n g major and m inor combinations. PR ' PA R ATIO. FOR SENIOR mGI:I

SCHOOL T E AC H l N G : Student ' preparing for t a c h in g must com ple te � c n i o r. h i g h approxi ma tely 4448 semestcr hours in tbe ac ad e m i c area in w h i ch they plan to teac h . A rn i n o r in a second te a c hi ng urea is rec om me n ded . In a U cases, stlldents must discuss t heir program with an adviser fro m !he School o f Education. PREPARATION FOR K - 1 2 TEAClHNG: Students preparing for K - 1 2 teac h i ng in Arl, Musi <;, Or Phy sical Ed uc.ation must have teach mg e ' pcrien ce on both the e le me n tll ry and secon dary Icvel�, Detailed i n formation regarding K · 1 2 cer ti fi ca t ion is av a i lab le in the School of Education Offi ce .

ART Sen ior H igh Teac h i ng Major: 46 semester hours* required: AIl 1 1 0 , 1 60. 230, 250. 365 , . 370, 440, t \\lV \:ourses in art history p l us

electives.

J un i o r H ig h Tea chin g Major: 30 se m est e r hours required: Art 1 1 0, 1. 60, 230, 250, 365, 440 p l us electives. Teaching Minor: 20 se mt,stc r hou[s required: Art 1 1 0, 1 60' 230, 250 and 365. Elemen tary Teach ing Major: 24 'e me ter It urs require d : Art H O, 1 60 250. 34 1 , and 'ight semester hOIilli of 230, 365 or 3 70. T aching , M i nor : 1 2 'em t er hour ' as de te r mi nc d by the Schoul of Education. * Up to lIuee �-u pporti ng cour 'cs may be recum me nded.

BI OLOGY Senior High Te a c hing Maj r: 44 semester hours re q uired : Biology 1 53, 1 54, 2 5 3 , 2 75, 340, 38 0, (taken for Education credi t as professional elective) and 3 c h oi c e of four : semester hours from eac h grou p : Cro u p Bwlogy 33 \, 346, 403 C11em is try 404 * ; Group 8 : Biology 424, 4 75, A n t h ro 22 1 * ; Qlem is t ry 1 1 5 , 3 3 1 , 3 3 2, 333, 3 34 ; MatJl 1 3 3 (recolllmended supporli n a : t a th 1 5 I ); Physics 1 25, 1 26 , 1 17 . 1 28: 1 3 t , \ 3 2. 01cmistry 1 1 6. Addi tion al, cou rses : select fo ur se m e ste r h IUS fr m Biology 3 24 . 3 7 2• .J 2 5 Or 3 2 1 -4 26 (combinl1tion). One or these biology courses sh uld be el ec ted as part of t he [iflh-year wo r k i f not taken as p3rt o f major program . " No t taken for biology c re(ti t b ut sati fies gro u p requirement. Elec t an approved biology co u rse in i ts place. E.le men t ary T eac hi ng Major : 24 se m ester hOUI r eq u ired: Biology 1 5 3 , 1 54 , 2 5 3 ;

'Es

Chemistry l i S, 1 1 6 , pl lL� electives. Teaching Minor: 1 2 se mes ter huurs: \ 53 1 54, 253.

BUSINESS E DUCATION Seni r High h ours required :

each ing Major: 48 se mes te r con 1 50, Ed. 450, BA 2 3


99 or 435, 24 1 , 243 28 1 and 2 semester hou rs of Advanced Typing; elect 4 scmc.� ter h ou rs from BA 350, 364, or 3 70; clect fou r hOurs of em phasis: Accoun l t ng: BA 38 1 plu$ 4 hours of upper division t!ccounli ng; or Shorthand : One year of advanced shorthand. ( S t rongly recommended: the foil wing c lJf"es not taken during the four-year progIa m should be incl uded in the fifth-y ear: B A 350. 3M, 370, 3H7 and 488.) Also Ed. 340, and 44 1 or 442. l y pi ng and shorthand arc not offered on mpus! these cour e may be laken to mee t degree requirements at ForI teilacoom Com m u n i ty Co l lege for transfer credit any ti me during the four- ear pr gra m .

C H E M I STRY Seni r IUgh Teaching Majo r : 4 9 sem · t e r hours requ ired: Chemist ry I J 5, 1 1 6. 3 2 1 . 33 1 , 3 3 2, 333, 334 , 34 1 , 342. and 343; Phy ics 1 53, I 4, I S S n d 1 56 ; Mat h 1 5 1 ,

1 52.

Eleme n tary Teachi ng Major : 24 -em ester hours required : 16 hours of a pprov ed chemistry and 8 hours as determi ned b y the School of Ed uca tion. Teach i ng Minor: 1 2 hours lI5 determined by t h e Sc hool of Educa tion.

COM M UN I CATION ARTS enior High Teachin g M aj or : 44 !remcster hours · required: 16 semester hours of Com m un ic a tion Arts 1 2 3, 1 28 or 250, 24 1 and 404, plus 1 2·29 semester hours chosen i n C O II S U I t a t i o n wit h t h e major adviscr. Supporting classes: Alternative of 1 /\-20 sernest r hours i n E n gl i h r mod em or classical language. J u n ior HigJl Teaching Major : 24-28 semester hour required: 1 2 semester hour of Com m unication Arts 1 23, 1 28 or 25 0, 24 1 a n d 404, plus additional 8 sem ler hours i n Co m m u n i c a t ion Arts . Additional 8-1 2 seme�ler hours to be delernlined with d e p a rtment and School of Educa tio n . T caching Minor: J 6- 20 emester 110urs required: Co m m un i ca tion Arts 1 23 and 24 1 , plus 8- 1 2 elec tive 'c mester hOIUS. Elemen tary Teaching Major: 24 Scm - te r hour required: Co m m un ica tion Arts 1 23 and 402, plus 8 'e mester hOurs i n Co m mu n i ca tion Arts a n d 8 se mester h ur in English. Teaching linor: 1 2 semester h u rs to be determined in c()nsultation w i t h the School of Education .

EARTH SCI ENCES Senior High Teadling \{ajor : ( Eart h Sc i e nces) 44 'e mester hours r quire d : induding 1 3 1 , 1 32, 1 36, 202, 3 24 o r 3 2 5 ; plus O n e additional wursc in E S preferably a field COIlJ" e such as: 35 1 . 360 or 365. Required support i ng: Chemistry 1 03, 1 04 or 1 1 5, 1 1 6 ; Physi cs 1 25, 1 26 (and labs) or 1 5 3 , 154 (and l a bs); M a th 1 3 3; appro pr ia te B i o lo g y COUTSes. Additional s u pporting courses should be llisc u seld with allvi r . J unior Uigh Teaching Major: ( Earth S c ie n ces) 2 8 semester hours require d, incl uding: 1 3 1 . 1 32 , 1 36, 202, 324 or 3 2 5 ; p l u s o n e additi n a l cOUI¥! in ES. A field cou e ' such :L�: 35 1 , 360 o r 365 is re c m men ded . S u gge s t e d S U P llorting: Chemistry J 04 or 1 1 5, 1 1 6 ; Physics J 26, 1 27 (and labs) or 1 5 3. 1 54 (and l a bs); Math 1 3 3 ; a p p ropriate B iology courses. ddjtional supporting courses hou l d be d iscussed with adviser.

E l e m e n t ary

Teaching

Major:

( Earth

Sciene ' ) 24 semester hour required: ES 1 3 1 , 1 32 , 1 36 and 202; Chemistry 1 04 o r 1 1 5 and

one u pper d.ivi�i n science Minor: 1 2 semester phy 'ica! scien ce .

COUr5C. Teaching

hours

in

earth

and

ECONOMICS Senior High Teaching Maj r : 44 eme ter hours requ i red : Economics 1 5 0, 3 5 1 35 2, 486; 1 2 mester hour fro m tIlC following: Econ 321 3 3 1 , 36 1 , 362, 434: L listory 460 pl us 1 2 seme '(er hours dil.t r i bu led ovcr area� of s o c i o l o gy , p l i t iesl science or anthropology. ( Recommended Ed. 448 t o me t professional edu ation requirement.) J u nior High Teaching Major: 28 se mester hOllrs required: Economics I SO, 434, 486; 4 hours from : Econ 3 2 1 , 3 3 1 , 35 1 , 36 1 , 4 3 2 ; History 4 6 0 pillS 8 semester hOUIS llistribu ted over a reas of sociology , pol iti cal science. Teaching Minor: 1 2 sem ter hours required : Econ I SO. pi us 1 2 hours ,f upper d i ision economics. ( Reco m mended : Ed. 448 \(I meet professional e d u cation requ ire me n t.) E.lementary Teac hing fajor: 24 'cmester hOllTS req uired: Econom ics 1 SO, 434, 486; " semester hours fro m : Econ 3 Z 1 , 3 3 1 , 35 L . 352, 36 1 362, 432; History 460, 4 semester hours ('rom (he areas of sociology or pol i t ic al s<:icllce. Tea c h i ng Minor: 1 2 semester h O urs required: Economics I SO and 8 ho u r of u pper d ivision eeon mies. (Recom mende d : Ed. 4 1 2 t meet pro fessional education req uire men t )

E N G USH Senior Bigh Teac hing Major: A m ini m u m of 32 semester hours, 1 6 of whi 'h are to be upper dillision, i� required b�yond 1 0 1 and wi t h the following distribu tion: (3) one COurSe i ll American l i terature; ( b) t wo courses in Brili'h l i terat ure (one before 1 7 00 and one after); (c) one c U[SC in advan ced com posi tion , nglish 328; a n d ( d ) ne cou rse from 31l2, 400 or �03. A l l maj rs mllst prese n t two years of olle foreign language at t h (' c o l lege level or show equivalen t proiicien cy. Ed . ..44 is r�qll i red to meet p ro fe s s i o n a l education r e q u i r e m e nL Reco m men ded : CA 404 or R. 445. J u nior High T'achi ng Major: A min i m u m o f 3 2 scme t r ho urs in English beyond 1 0 1 as stated i n Sen i r High T 'aching Major above i n e l u d i ng t he d. istribu t io n requirements. Majors m t presen t two years of one foreign language a1 the college level or !'how eq u ivalent llToficiem;y and must take Ed . 444 to meet professional educa tion require ment. le men tary Teacbing Concen tratio n : 24 En gi isil se Ill es l er hours; 1 2 hour� in dis t r i b u ted ill> i n (3) and (b) under Senior Digh Teach i ng Major ab ve, a n d 1 2 addili nal hours in English 3$ determined by t he Sc hOol of :ducation. Recommended: English 3 2 3. Tt'a c h i n g Minor: 1 2 hours rel/u ire d, as determined by t he School of Education .

FR E NC H Senior High Teaching Major: 44 se mester h ours required : rench 201 . 202 (or equivalent). 3 2 1 . 35 1 , 3 5 2, 445 a n d 1 2 addi t ional hours; 44 wiu meet part of the profc: ional education elective requ irement. Su pporting COU[scs: 1 2 hours i n related areas selecled w i t h t he approval of the depart ment . J u nior H i g h Teac hing Major: 28 se mestcr hours required as listed for senior high

preparation ; s u pporting c urses cho�cn in c nsu l tatjon w i th major adviser. Secondary Teaching Minor: 1 6 seme-steT hours above 200 level. Fl l! me.n ta ry Teaching Major : 6 courses re-quir d: 5 aPI)roved Fren t:h cour 'e s and UUl' addition.:!\ course 'elected in consu l t a t ion w i t h de part m ent an d Sc hool ()f E d u(;.3 1ion . Tend ' n g M inor: 3 course ' required : as dete rmined by depart men t and School of Education.

G E RM A N • enior High Teaching Major: 4 4 semes ter hours r q uired: GermaJl 20 1 , 202 (or equivalent), 3 2 1 , 35 1 . 3 5 2. 445 and 1 2 addit ional hours; 445 will meel part of the professional education elective requiremen t. Supporting courses: 1 2 semester hou rs in related areas selec ted w i t h I he a ppcoval of thc departmen t. J u n ior High Teaching Major: 28 semester hour: required a� l isted for senior high preparat io n : supporting cour cs chosen in c n u l l a lion ",ith maj r adviser. SecOndary eaching Minor: 1 6 scm!Ster hours a vc 200 level. l:.iemen tary Teaching Major : 6 courses required: 5 a p proved German courses and one addit ional CO lrrse selected in consul tation with de partmen t and School of Ed uca t ion . Teaching finor: 3 co urses r quircd: 3S d e t e r m i ned b department and ScitC)j,1 of Ed ucation.

H I STORY Senior Higll Teachi n g Major: 44 se mester

required : I IIstory 1 07 or 1 09; 1 08 or 1 1 0; 11 hou rs of 25 1 . 252 a n d 2 5 3 ; 460 . n 1 2 addi tional u p pe r dil'i 'ion hou rs in hi s tory

hours

i nclulli n g a .'cn ior seminar. Supporting cou rse ' : 1 2 a ll d i t i n al sc m ' ter hOllrs selec ted f ro m E c o n o m i l:s, Geography, Poli tical Science, PSYc h logy a n d Sociology .

LANGUAGE A RTS J un io r I Ilgh Teaching Major ; 32 se mester hours re quired : English 3 28; 4 hour' f Engli. It 403 o r L i nguistics 400; 4 hOur of upper division t i te rature ( i n addi tio n to cou.rse t a ke n to mee t ge n e r a l e d u c a t io n A 24 1 or 3 26, and 404; require ment) ; Ed . 444 a n d 1 2 . e rnester hours from areas of Engli- h , journalism, C or foreign l anguage beyond fresh man l evel (at Ic3ltt 8 or the 1 2 hours mllst be i n the same ll isciplint!, and 4 h()urs must be uppe.r d i vision). Tea hing Minor: 1 6 se mester hour cequirell : lectell from ol'ft'ri ngs in English Journalism, A Or foreign anguagt' beyond freshman level : English 3 2 8 i requi re d. E1enH!ntary Teaching Major: 24 semes ter f Engli h hours required: En gl ish 3 28, one 403 ( l r Linguistics 400; Engli h 3 23, CA 402 and one of CA 24 1 or 327 or 336; 2 courses selected from one of t he foll o w i n° " areas: English, CA or Foreign language beyond freshman level. Teaching Minor: 1 2 semester h ( urs req u ired as d e termined by the School of Ed ucation. English 3 28 is req u ired .

MATHE MATICS Senior Bigh Tea c h i ng Major: 44 seme ter hours requ ired (in add i t ion to Mat h 446 ) : P r e r e q u isite: Math 1 3 3 o r cquivalen t . Required : Math 1 44 , l S I , 1 5 2, 3 3 1 , 433, 446, 321 o r 434 o r 4 5 5 ; 4 additional u p per


1 00 division hours; 8 hours in Chemistry or Physics amI 4 additional science h o u rs. J u n io r High Teaching Major : 24 semester hours: Prerequisite: Math 1 3 3 or e q u ivalent. Req ui red : Math 1 44 , 1 5 1 , 1 5 2, 3 3 1 , 4 3 3 , 446. Teaching M i n o r : 1 6 semester hours r e q u i red (in addi tion to Math 446 ) : P r e r e q u isit e: Mat h 1 3 3 o r e q u ivale n t . Requ ired : l at h 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 ; 1 2 7 or 3 3 1 ; 446 ; 4 3 3 or 3 2 1 . Elementary Teaching Major: 2 4 semester hours: Math 1 3 3 or equ ivalen t ; 1 2 7 , 1 5 1 , 1 52; plus math elec tives. Teaching M inor: 3 2 3 ; 324; 8 add i t ional hours d e termined in con su l tation wit h depar tmen t and School of Ed ucation.

MUSIC Secondary Teaching Major - Choral : 49 ) semester hours required : M usic 1 23 , 1 24. 1 25 , 1 26, 2 23, 224. 225, 226, 23 1 , 2 3 2 . 343. 366, 445, 4 5 3 , eight hours of large ense m bl e , fou r hours o f piano lessons ( mi n i m u m class level 6)*, six hours of voice lessons, and two hours of guitar lessons. Music 34 1 , a nd 44 1 are required in t he Professional Education sequence for Certification. Secon d a ry Teaching M aj o r I ns t r u me n tal: 5 1 semester hours req u ired : \tusic 1 2 3, 1 24, 1 2 5 , 1 26 , 2 2 3 , 224, 2 25, 226 , 23 1 , 2 3 2 , five hours from 24 1 / 2 4 2 , 24 3/244 , 245/ 246, and 24 7 ; t e n h o u r s o f luge ense m ble, two hours of p i a n o lessons ( min i m u m class level 4)*, seven hours of private ins truc tion on pri n c i pal ins t ru m en t , 34 5 , 445. Music 444 i s required for the Pr o fe s s i o n a l Education seq uence fOr Cer tifica tion. .I un ior High Teaching 'Iajor: 28 semester hours req uired : M usic 1 2 3. 1 24, 1 25 , 1 26 , 223 , 224, 2 25 , 226, 23 1 , 2 3 2 , 345, t w o hours of l arge ense m ble, two hours of piano lessons ( mi n i m u m class level 4 ) * , and two hours plivate lessons on principal i n s t r u m e n t or voice. Two to four semester hours of M usic 443 and 444 are required in the Professional E d u cation s e q u e nce for Certification. Teac h i ng M i n o r : t wo to four semester hours from M u.'i ic 34 1 , 44 1 , 4 4 3 a nd 444 p l u s 20 hours to be deter m i n ed i n consul tat ion with t h Sehool of Education and the Depart men t of Music. Elementary Music S pecialist - Chora l : �{usi c 1 2 3, 1 24, 1 25 , 1 26 , 2 2 3 , 2 24 . 2 25 , 2 2 6 , 23 1 , 2 3 2 , 34 5 , 4 5 3 , eigh t hours of large ense m b l e , four hours piano lessons ( m in i m u m d a s.s level 8 ) * , s i x ho u rs voice lessons, t wo hours guitar lessons. M usic 34 1 , a nd 44 1 are r e q uired in the Professional Education sequence for Certification. '�See Departmen t of Music H a n d book for descri ptions of class piano levels. E l e m e n tary M usic S pe c i a l i s t Instr u men tal : Sec Secondary Teaching Major - Instrumental above. Ele men tary Teac h i ng Major: Two to four semester hours from M usic 34 1 , 44 1 , 443, and 444 pl us 20 ho u rs to be determined in consul ta tion with the School of Ed ucation and the Departmcn t of Music. Elemen tary Teac hing Minor: Two to four semester hours from Music 34 1 , and 44 I plus 1 2 hours to be determined in cons u l t a tion with the School of Education and the De pa r t m e n t of Music.

PHY S I C A L EDUCATION

Secondary Teaching M ajor (44 hours): Req u i red ( 24 hOurs): P E 277, 3 28, 4 7 8 , 4 8 2 and 4 85 ; Biology 1 63 ; participa tion in a

varsity or d u b sport. Electives: 20 hours from among the following: P E 2 7 5 , 282, 283, 284, 285, 287, 288, 3 3 2, 360, 3 6 2 , 4 84 and 4 9 1 . S tude nts desiring K- 1 2 Certification m u s t complete PF. 3 2 2, 362, 283 and 2 8 4 or 2 8 8 in addi tion to m eeting req u irements as se t forth by the School of Education. Elemen tary Teaching Major ( 24 hours): Required: PE 277, 284 or 2 88, 283, 3 2 2 , 3 34 , 3 6 2 a n d 4 hours elect ives in physical educa tion with approval o f depart m e n t chairperson. E lemen tary Teaching 1\·l inor ( I 2 hou rs) : PE 3 2 2 and 8 h o urs from among the following: 284 or 288, 2 8 3 , and 3 6 2. Secondary School Teaching Minor ( 1 8 hours): Req u ired : P E 2 7 7 . 334 and 485 and 12 hours of electives from among the following: PE 282. 283, 284, 285. 2 8 7 and 3 2 8. K-6 Physical Education Specialist and K-6 Classroom Teacher ( 3 2 hours): Req u ired : PE 277, 283, 284 o r 288. 3 2 2, 4 8 1 , 482, 485 ; Biology 1 6 3 . Elemen tary School Physical Education Specialis t : Required: PE 2 7 7 , 283, 284 o r 288, 3 2 2, 360, 4 8 1 , 482, 484. 4 8 5 ; Biology 1 6 3 and e igh t hours of elec tives ( E d ucation 4 5 7 a nd M usic 34 1 are recom mended.)

PHYSICS Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours required: Physics 1 06 . 1 5 3, 1 54 . I S S , 1 56 , 205, 2 2 3, 3 5 5 . 4 2 1 ( 2 semester hours ) ; Math 1 5 1 . 1 5 2 ; 4 hours o f Chemistry. J u nior High Teaching Major: 28 s e m e ster /to urs req u ired : Physics 1 06 or 355, 1 2 5 * , 1 26 * , 1 27 * , 1 28*, 2 0 5 , 2 2 3 , 2 7 2 , 4 2 1 ( 2 hours). Teaching Minor: 2 0 hours required: Physics 1 25 * , 1 26 * , 1 2 7 * . 1 2 8 * , 4 2 1 (2 hours), a nd 8 h o ur s from t he following: 1 06 , 205, 223, 272, 355. * Physics 1 5 3, 1 5 4, I S S , 1 5 6 m a y be taken instead of these courses, with conUlrren t or prior registration i n M a th 1 5 1 or 1 5 2.

POLITI CAL SCI ENCE S e nior Hi g h Teaching Major: 44 semester hours rcquired: Pol i tical Science 1 0 1 or 20 I . 2 5 I , 3 3 1 p l us 1 6 hours of Political Science electives; History 460; 1 2 hours from the I' 011 0 w i ng s up porting areas: economics, geography, history, soc iology Ian thropology. or psychology. ( Ed 448 to meet professional educa tion requ iremc n t . )

SCIENCE ( G E N E R A L) See Eart h Science

SOCI A L SCIENCE Senior High Teaching Major: 44 scmes ter hours req u i red : 4 hours from History 25 1 , 2 5 2, 2 5 3 ; H is tory 450; 4 h o u rs from each o f t h e following areas: a n t hropology, economics. geography, political science, psychology and sociolo!,,), ; 1 2 upper division hours from t wo of the following areas : economics. polit ical sciem:e a nd sociology. ( Reco m m e n ded : Ed 448 to meet p r o fe s sional education req u iremen t.) J un ior Hig h Teaching Major: 2 8 semester hours required: 4 hours from History 25 I , 2 5 2, 25 3 ; History 46 0 : 4 hours from three o f t h e fol lowing areas: a n t h ropology, economics. geograp h y , pol itical science, psychology a n d sociology ; 8 u p p e r division hours from two o f the fol lowing areas: economics, pol itical science a nd sociology. Teaching Minor: 1 2 hours r e q u i re d : 4 hours from History 25 .1 ,

2 5 2 , 2 5 3 ; History 460 and 8 hours from: economics, poli tical science and sociology. ( Rewnunended : Ed. 448 to mee t professional e d m:a tion requircmen t.) Elemen tary Teac h i ng Majo r : 24 semester hours re q uire d : 4 hours from History 25 1 , 25 2, 2 5 3 ; History 460 ; and 1 6 hours from t h re e of the following: a n t hropo l ogy, economics, po l i tical science, psychology a n d sociolo!,,),. Teaching M i n o r : 1 2 semester hours requ ired: as deter m i ned by t he School of Education. ( Recommended E d . 4 1 2 to meet professional ed uca t ion req u i rcmen t .)

SOCI O LOGY

Senior High Teach i ng Major: 44 semester hours required: Sociolo!,,), / A n t h ropology 3 3 0 ; 24 hours of sociology electives; His tory 460; 1 2 semester hours distrihu ted over three areas of o t her social sciences. ( Recommended Ed. 448 to meet p r o fe s sionaJ ed ucation require m e n t . )

SPA N ISH Senior High Teac hing Major: 44 semester hours req u ired : Spanish 20 1 , 202 (ur eq u ivalen I). 3 2 1 . 35 1 , 352, 445 and 1 2 addi tional hours ; 445 will meet part o f t he pr()fessional ed uca tion elective requirement. S up porting courses: 1 2 hour� in related areas selected w i t h the ap proval of t he depa r t m e n t . J u n ior High Teaching tajo r : 2 8 semester hours requ ired: as listed for scnior high prepara tio n ; s u p po r t ing courses chosen i n co nsul tation w i t h major adviser. Secondary Teaching M i nor: 1 6 semester hours above 200 level. Elemen tary Teaching Major: 6 courses required: 5 approved S panish courses and I addi tional seleded in consultation w i t h dcpa r t m e n t a n d School of E d ucation.

F I FTH-Y E A R AND STA N D A R D C E RTI FI CATION The fifth-year of teacher education is to fol low a period of one year of i n i tial teaching experience. The student m us t co m plete 3 m i n i m u m of eigh t semester hours appl icable toward t he fifth year, before t he begi n n i ng of t he f o ur th y ear of teaching. Thirty semester hours in an a p proved program must he co m p l e ted before begi nning the seve n t h year of teaching. The s t uden t may choose the institu tion i n which he wishes to t a ke his advanced work as follows: I. If he c hooses to work at PLU, or any o t her o f the teacher education i n s t i t u t ions in t his state, that insti t ution shall be responsible for rec o m mending hi m for the S tandard Certificate u pon co m pl e t ion of t he fifth-year program. 2. If the PLU graduate wishes to u n dertake t he fifth year in an o u t -{)f-state i n s t i t u tion, P L U will be responsihle for recommending him for the Standard Certificate. The s t u den t must secure general ap p roval of his plan from t he U n iversity in advance. There are four provisions govern ing the fifth·year pat tern o f work, according to S t a te Board Regu lations: I . The fifth year must include a m i n i m u m of 30 semester h o ur s of whit'h at least fifty per cen t must be u p per div ision and /or graduate courses. 2. No more than th ree semester hours of correspondence study may be approved a s a part of the 30 semester h o u r s i n t he studen t's fifth-year program.


10 1 graduates must take 1 5 semester 3. PL hours of th fifth year in residence at PLU. A non-PL student who wishes to be reco mmended by PL must take a minjmum of 20 seme. ter hours in residence at PLU.

4. The student may take 1 5 of the required 30 semester hours prior to or d u ring the

first year of teaching experience with prior pe rm ission of t he School of Education. P ol l p w i n g arc r e q u i r e m e n t s a nd procedures for the ap roval of fifth-year pro gr ams of work at PLl : 1 . S pec ific course requirements arc: (a) Ed. 467, or its equivalent. (Ed. 473 may be used by elemen tary teachers.) (b) Ed. 463 ( Elemen tary), or Ed. 465 (SecoodaJ:Y ) · 2. A n y courses reco m mended for the in div idual student prior to the granting of t he Bachelo r's degree must be completed. These may be recommended by either the u n dergraduate adviser or the School of Education. 3. Courses taken should strengthen areas of cODcentration and build stronger general education background as well as fill needs in the professional field. This program of st Jdies is to be selected by the student with the guidance o f those who have worked with him during his period of initial teaching and Ihe advisers at the recommending insti tu tions. 4 . The st uden t secures approval of the recommending institu tion I'OJ work taken elsewhere before the work is begun. Some of the work taken during the fifth year may also a pply toward a master's degree. Graduate students may undertake a program c o o r d i n a ting requirements for standard cettification and Ihe master's degree upon the approval o f their com m i t tee chairman and the coor-d ina tor o f fifth·year programs.

PR I NC IPA L'S C R ED ENTl A LS * candidate for t h e principal's credentials will be guided by the following: I . He must meet graduate standards for the master's degree. 2. He must complete course and internship re q u i re m e n t s for the p r o v i sional principal's credentials at his chosen level. To receive this he must have com p leted work for Ius Standard Teaching Cerllficate plus six semester hours. 3. l ie must complete experience and study requirements for the Standard Principal's Credential at his chosen level. To receive t h is he n e e d s t o have ( I ) had admini�trative experience, (2) earned a mini mum of eight more semester ho urs since issu ance o f the Provisional Certificate, and ( 3 ) earned his Master's degree. St utlents who intend to work toward the maste r's in the field of education must apply for a d mission to the Graduate Division and meet the requirements ou tlined by that division. Candida tes should see the cou rse requirements as s e t forth in the Graduate Ca talog. * * * Details of the program a r e available a t rhe School or Education upon request. * * Available at the office o f the Dean of Graduale S t udies upon request.

The

CERTIF I C ATION R E Q U I R E M ENTS FOR SC HOOL COUNSELORS A N D SCHOOL N U R S ES (Subjec t to new certifica tion requirements as of October 1 9 7 3 ) Educational Staff Associate certification for school counselors or school nu rses is individually designed through a consortium consisting o f a school district, related p r o fe s s i o n a l a s s o c i at ions, and Pacific Lutheran University. Additional information on these programs can be obtained by contading the Dean o f the School of Education.

251

LE A RN E R A N D SOC I ET Y : G ROWT H A N D D E V E LOPM E N T

s chool bu�iness programs, the business curricu l u m , layout and facil i ties planning, the e v a l u a t i o n o f b u s i n ess teachers and competence for business occupations. Also included is the examination of information resources and current thought in business educalion. The second part of the course concentrates on the applica tion of research findings and psychological principles to the teaching of typewri ting and bookkeeping in secondary schools. Required for business education majors. Prerequisite: Advanced Typing and BA 28 1 o r equivalent.

40 1

WORKSH OPS

408

L A N G U A G E A RTS I N T H E E L EM ENTARY SCHOO L

Workshops in special fields for varying periods of time. ( 1 ·6)

Orientation to co nte m porary schools; h u man develo pment in relation to individuals and groups in an educational setting. Public school observation required weekJy with students respo nsible for their o w n transportation. Prereq uisi t e : Psychology 1 0 I o r Sociol ogy 1 1 1 . (formerly Ed. 2 0 1 )

The fundional teaching of communica tion skills, grades K·6 ; 3J:eas include : oral and w r i t ten e x p r e s s ion, listening, reading, literature, dramatization, spelling, gra mmar, handwriting, children's language and l anguage s t u dy, vocab u l ary d e v e l o p me n t and lexicography. (2)

321

410

H U M AN

DEVE LOPM ENT

Emotional, social, in t e l le c t u a l a nd p hysiological development from infancy through adolescence. A weekly two-hour observation of the public school is required. ( I n dividually assigned.) S t u de n ts responsible for their own transportation. Prerequisite: Psy cho logy 1 0 1 or Sociology 1 1 1 .

322

GENERAL M ET HO DS - P R I M A R Y

Competencies will be developed for teaching in g r a d es K·3; with observation and p3J:ticipation in pu blic schools. Prerequisi te: 25 1 o r 3 2 1 .

SC I EN C E I N T i l E E LE M E N T A R Y S C H O O L

The objec tives, materials a n d teaching science. ( 2 )

412

methods

of

SOC I A L S T UD I ES I N T H E E LEM ENTA RY SC HOOL

Objec tives, materials and methods o f teaching the social studies; recommended to studen t teachers and experienced teachers. (2)

420

PROBLEMS O F R E A D I N G IN THE S EC O N D A RY SCHOO L

323

Teaching secondary reading in con ten t areas; a t tention to developmental reading problems; ma terials, methods, techniq ues, procedures and some observation and diagnosis of readjng d i f fi c u l t i e s . P r e r e q u i site: 25 1 ; taken concurrently with 4 2 3 and 434. (2)

part icipation in pub lic schools. Prerequisite: 25 1 or 32 1 .

423

G E N E R A L M ETH O DS UPPER E L EM E N T A R Y Competen cies will be developed for tcaching in g r a d e s 4·6, with observation and

3 24

G E N RAL M ETHODS ELEM ENTARY MODEL

Competencies w i l l b e developed for teaching i n �rades K·6. Extended experience and partlcipa tion in public school classrooms will be provided. Prerequisites: 25 I or 32 1 , Math 323, and concurrent enrol lment in E E M block cou rses, 325, 326, 408, 4 1 0, 4 1 2.

325

READIi G I N THE E L E Iv'I ENTA RY SC H O O L

Teaching reading i n elementary grades, i neluding modern approaches, materials, methods, techniques, procedures and some diagnosis o f reading d i fficul ties. Prereq uisite: 25 I or 3 2 1 .

326

M A T H E M AT I C S I N T H E LEM E N T A R Y SCi-I O O L

Basic mathematical skills a n d abili ties needed by c l e m e n tary school teacher; recent developments and ma terials. Prerequisite: Math 3 2 3 or consent (2)

340

First

B U S I N ES S EDUC AT ION

part includes

t h e objectives of high

G EN E R A L M ETHODS - S E CON D A RY

C U r ric u l u m , materials and methods of seco n d a r y t e a c h i n g ; o b servation and discussion. Prereq uisi te : 25 I or 3 2 1 ; taken concurrently with 420 and 434.

430

STUDENT T E AC H I NG - P R I M A R Y

Teaching i n t h e pu blic schools under the direc tion and su pervision of classroom and university teachers. Prerequisites: 25 1 or 32 1 , 322 or 3 2 4 , a n d 3 2 5 ; concurrent enrollment in 435. ( 1 0)

432

STUDENT T E AC H I N G -UPPER E L E M ENT A RY Same course descrip tion as 4 30 except 323 should be taken in place of 3 2 2 ; concurren t enrollment in 435. ( 1 0) 434

STUDENT T E A C H I N G - S EC O N D A RY Same course description as 430 except Prerequisites: 25 I or 32 1 , taken concurrently with 4 20 and 4 2 3. (8) 4 3 5 PRO F ESS I ON A L S E M I N A R All opportunity for stu dents to share


1 02 c'perien 'c ' w i l h an exchange of itl 'as on pu p i l 'havior, c u rric u l u m pracliclls, and ways of improv ing Icaching performance, (Taken concurrently wilh 430 or 4 3 2. ) ( 2 )

436

A L1 [ R N J\ T L E V E L ST U D E I T TEA HI N G L[M ENT

437

LT I.:. R N A L EV E

1 [An ti IG

[ I

,N SE 0 DARY

440-44 � S P E C I A L { [T I l DS I TEA . H I . G S ECO 1 0 R Y 1 1 0 0 1 S B.f t ' T S

C u r ricul u lll , met ho d, and materials of inst ruc tion in a vari'ty of subjet:!S; may be take n fOr grad ualc nctl i L

440

SE 1fNAR r S : CON DA R Y A R ( 2)

44 1

L

C A T I ON

The a(lplica tion of research findi ngs and psyt: hologicaJ principle to th teaching of uffic pract i ce, and related ' h urlhalld, ubje Is in secon dary �cI! Is. In tended for business ed u ca tion majors. Prcrcq ui 'i te, : Advanced Shorthand, Advanced Ty rewriling, B 24 1 and BA 340 or equivalcn t. ( 2)

442

TEAC H I G EN E R A B Sf N ESS S BJ ECT a p plica t ion of rescarch findings and

The psy \.OhologicaJ principles 10 the tcad ling of ge n e r a l b u siness, consu mer econom ics, e c o n om i cs, business law, b u si ne s s maUlcma!ics, and business communications subjects i n econdary school:. Prl'requisiles: B 24 1 , 24 3, 290 or 495, 350, E.q)nomics 1 50, r 'onscnt of t he inst r uctor. ( 2 )

443

' 1 I 1': M I STRY I I I · LC N DA RY SCI IOOL

(2)

444

E G Ll S H I T H E SE '0

448

DARY

C I IOOl

Deve lo p men t of teach.ing aids and me t hods; demon [ra tions o f method and stra tegy of master teac hers. ( 2)

44 5

M :TI IOD I N T L AC I I I G F O R E I GN LA G AG ES Theory a n d tech n i q ues of foreign language

teachi ng; special (lroblems in the s t utl en t 's major language, l' mpltasis n audiolinguul te c h n i q ues. G (2)

DARY

SOCI A L T i l E S I N TI l E S ECO ' D A K Y S C i I OO L (2)

A D M I N I ST R A T I ON OF I I E SC I IOO L I BR A R Y Library o rga n i / a l io n a n ti administration i n the elell1e n tary c hool. G (2) 452

BA I C R IJ F R L I C t M TL R I LS Those services of a dlO I librarian rcla ted to the preservation of all materials which form the sources of reference. G ( 2)

453

PR C ES I L I B R ARY

G C' J I O L . A T L R I A LS

C i a " i fi c al ion, ,a talugin g proce,-� ing of ma terials. G (2)

and

t c c h n i ·at

454 S E L 'CT I ON

OF L E A R r G RESO URC E M AT E RI A LS

I ON A L M A T E IU

LS

Audio and vi ual mat 'rials and aid:, t heir Ulie, rgllnil3tion and admi nistration. G ( 2 )

456

STORYT E l L h G

A combination I' discovery an d prac ticu m in the aTl of �1:ory lelling. I nvestigates the values and backgruund of siory tel li n'7, (he vario us types and for ms of storie'; tl:e hn iq lua: of choosing and of t llin stories. Some off,carn p uli (lraclicc. Dem()nstra.tion� and joint story telling hy and w ith instluct r. ( 2)

457

P R E PA R A T I ON A D UT I L I Z A n O N O F I NST R T I O( A l M AT ' R I A LS production and usc of a variety of

The instruclional m aterials flat p ictures, c harts, maps and the 3 5 m m camera; participant. pr duce items useful in instrucli n. S I 0.00 l ab fee is c harged. G (3)

467

VAL

T I OI

Eval uation of school cx pericllL'es; problems in connec tion w i l h developmen t , orga u izaliOI1 and administration of test� (standardized Jnd Required of .nh·year te a l' l l l' r- m a d e ) . students. Prereq uisite : studen t teaching Or leaching exp rience. G (2)

47 3

P A R E NT·T I CON F E R N

CI I F R r

4�2

An c:\.3mination of the philo�()phy 3nd Of p a re n t · t a c h e r i III p i c m e n t a t i o n c n l'eren cing. Related issue� s u� h ru the parental role in ed ucation , home visit�, and he role ul' the s t u ue n t i n t he co n ferencing process are also c(lnsidered. Listening and

C U R R I C U LU M FN R I [ I M F . T I N E A R LY (' I I I L DHOO D c O U C AT I ) ,

This C{ ur e is de-signed for persons i n terested in early c h ild hOod cu ucali n. It \ 'ill e . plore rrogram� l itat a t t e m p t to meet t h e in terCl>ts. needs and l'a pabil it ies of each chil li t h rou gh an i n tegrated c u rr ic ul u m. ( 3)

483

PRI I A RY R ' A DI . ·C

Ma terials amI methods uf the primary reading program and i ts relation to other a<:t ivities. Pre requi ite: teachin e'perience. G ( 2)

4RS

T i l : CI FTcD C l I I L

The giflcd child, his dmrac teristic ' and problems an d pr ced u res; designt:d to further devel o p ment. (2)

487

Cri teria, profl'ssio nal l i tera lu re a n d techniques of eva l u a tion of l i brary ma teria l� ( p'ri n t and nun·pri n t); the l i brarian's res po nS i bil ity to facul ty, st ud� n ts and t he ge n eral public. G ( 2)

L STRU '

DI A ; ' '-1. A 0 PRAC T I C 1 I N R [ A D I NG

nli� w ursc is design d to prOvide insight and c!< perience in diagnosis t hrough olrervatio n, teacher tests, stan dardi zed tc�ts anti lest:; of pecit'ic skills. I:ach part icipant will be e'pccted to t u to r a c h i l d i n reading. ( Formerly 579)

SCI IOOL

451

455

T 'ACI J I NG S' ' T A R I A L S U BJ l.C rs

S ' I E N . .' 'f i l e EC (2)

RY

cUUlSe desib'lled to give some knowledge, undemandi ng, and s t udy of ch ildren. :uhjcct mat ter field:;, and ma terials in Ihe s t ud e n t's al ternate teac h i ng level plus s t utle n t teach ing on t h a t level. St uden t who have c m pl eted elementary preferred level st uden t teaching shuu l d en ru ll i n Ulis course.

A

479 447

cou rse dC 'igned t u give some kilo vl edge, lInder� t anding. and 't udy of children , s u bject matter lici t.! , anti ma terials in the � tutlenl's a lter na te teaching level plw; st uden t teaching o n t ha t level. St udents who have co m p leted sccun dary (lreferred level studen t te ach ing should enroll in t hi s e ursc.

comm unication skills u ·eful in confcrencing are s l udied a nd prac ticed.

TICS TN I DI\ R Y SC l lO O L

446

(-( EO R I E S OF E A R LY ' H f L D(-(O O D E D UCAT I O

This cO urse i ' designell to e.'pl ore the vadous rograms an d practices i n early c h i l tlhood educa tion. I den tification u f the {hcoreti�al and p hiioso ph.i caJ basis u pon w hich eac h is based win be s t u died. (3)

488

READr G e E l T E R WO R K S I IOP

O i n ical s i udy o f reading problems and suggested correc tive measures; to be taken concurrently with 4 89. Pre re q u i s i t e : teaching experience. S G ( 2 )

489

I R I:CT E I T E A C H L G I N R E A D I G C EN T E RS

Directed observa tion an d leaching in s u m mer rcmediaJ classes i n public schools; to be laken conc urrently with 488. Pre requisi t e : teac hing e" perience. S G

491 An

l l A RN I I

I

THE

I D I S A B I L I T I ES lA • R O t

i nt rod udu ry course to pre pare the teacher tu iden tify and 10 a c co m m o d a t e c hildren willI moderate learning disabil ities in the classroo m. Curren l (tiagno tic teChn iques, me thods , and materiaL llSCfu[ in in tl ividualizi ng i ns l nldi(1 n fOr the lea m ing di:;ahled child will be e m phasized. Prac t i 11m inclUded. Prerequisite : 2S 1 or equivalen L c I aSSToom

493

L E A R N I G D I S A B I L I T I ES: Dl A G N O TIC PROC E D U R ES

The course is de igned to familiarize the 'tudent wilh a broad range f Trc ning anti diagnostic proct!d ure: thruugh 'tudy and prac ticu m e . perillnce. T hc studen t w i l l learn t(l organ il.e data (rom such person ' as the school psyc hologist , OCCl! pat ional ther3(1i [ , speech therapist a n d medical doctor, and to for m 3 h y po l hesis regarding the child's disabilities. Various edu cational tests, formal and teacher·made, will be u, cd to determine


1 03 where a c hil d is um:tion iog academically. Pra lic u m i ncl udt!d. Pre requisi te : 492 or permi ion of I nst ru lOr.

494

!::A RN I NG D I S A Bt I T I ES : D [ V E lOPI NG E DUC' A 1 0. A t . PROG RAl\4S

The student lIses dlagnos l i t i n formation as the basis fo r be h a vioral l)bjccti�c" task an aly 'i�, lellming sequence and ' kcting a p p ropli:l Ic melh()d.� a n d m a t · rials. Pracl icu m in �ludcd. Prerequisite: 493 or permission of Instructor.

495

LEA R N l G DlSABI L l T l ES : D ' V ' lOPI G TEA H E R E F F E Trv - N ESS A co u rse designed to hel p the teac her bridge

the gap from U1COry into practi ce thro ug/t develo p i ng organiLationai kills. Outstanding Icachers wi th workable sy tem of i nst ruction and organiLation • hall be called upon to , hare e'\ pe rtise. S tud ents w i l l develo p their own �y�tem for organization for in truclion. Prerequ is it e : 494 or permission uf Instructor.

496

ABO RATORY WO R K S HO P

Practical course usi n g ele mentary ·age c hildren in a classroom situa tion wurk ing out specific p ro bl e ms ; prov isio n will be madc for some active participation o f thc un ivcrsity st ud en ts. l'rcrequi i Le: conference w ilh Ihe i nstruc lor or the Dean of t he School of Education. G

497

ECT

SP[C [ A L PROJ

I n divid ual �tlldy alld research on educati on al pro ble ms or ad dili nal la bora'lory ex perience in public sc hool lassrooms. Pre re quisi te : consent of t he Dean. G

501

WOR K S I IOP

545

M ETHOD TECI I I

raduate work hop' in s pecia l varying lengthS of l i me. ( 2-4)

A

fields

for

R E S E A RC H

Seminar i n rese arch methods anti tec hn iques n designin g a in ed uca tion with emphasis researdl proje ct in Ihe tilden t' area of inter sl. Requiretl for M.A. PrercquiSite: Cons u l tation " i t h student', adviser and admi t tance to t he graduate prugram_ 2)

550

SC IlOO L r l N A

CE

LOcal. stale and federal con lrib u tors to SdlOOI finance, i ts ph i losophy and deve l o p men t : the dev elop men t and administration of a seh,) I budget. ( 2)

P U B LI C SC HOO L A DM i t I S T R A T I O Admi n istration and superv ision or sch OO l

552

person nel , pla n t and progra m ; Ihe struc t u re and o rgan ization of Ih SdlUOI system. PrerequL�i te: teal'hing c. peri nee or con ' e n t o f I h e Dean. (3)

554

HI J I I

C I [OO L O R G A . [ ZA 1 0, AND AD:Vl l N t T R A nON

'

Planning and orga n i z i ng the h i g h school c u r ri c u l u m , s c h eduling, ex l [3 -c urricu lar a c t i v i t i es , t e a c h e rs' m e et ings, publ ic accoun ting and control, finan ce and reports. Prerequisite: 552. ( 2)

A O M I N I ST RA I I A '0 l E R VT [0 WO RKSHOP

Projec ts discussed determined by the class; typi cal projects i n d ude curr ic u l u m pl a n ni ng and atlj ust ment, pUblic relations progra ms, persounel e m ploy men t and i n-scrvi�e lrain in" : financing b uildin g and edu ca t i nal programs. Prereq uhilte: onc cOl1rse in aumini tration and/or supervision.

55R

ADM I N I STRAT I V L I NT E RNS H I P

I n ternsh i p in school administrati n planned wi th t he Sc hool of fuu 'al ion in coopera t ion with sele c te d sc hool a tl m i ni traior . Pr e r e q u i s i t e : c o u rse work in school administration and a dm ission tu the grau uatc progra m.

57 1

I l l STO R Y A N D P I-I l l SOPl l Y O F f l l G l I E R E DUCA I O N

Historical perspedive amI developml'n t of funct ions issues in c l u r i c u l u rn ; admini ' tra tion ; case studies.

573

ST DENT P E R SON ! J.:: L W I I I G I I E R E DUC

curren l status; and str uct ures; phi losophy of

I K IN

TIO

Student p e r s IJn nel serv ices in higher education : use of personnel data; co-c urricular activities; student wei [are ; con tem porary trends in co unseli n ' problems rela ted to s t udent life.

579

lAG 0 I A N D R E1'.tII::. O I A T l O _ I N

RE

DING

Ca usa t ive f a c t ors relalin � to readi ng difficul ties; some pportumly 10 apply re meuiation techniques ; upen to those w ith tea !ling e'\ pcrien ce . 2)

580

D

ES OF

555

C

RR I C U l

M DFVElOPMENT

Types of currk u l u m or�anizations, p rogfll m s anti

(2)

techniques of cllrrtculum deve l o p me n t .

596

(' 1 i O l For Master o f Arts �andid.a tes \\ ho cled tu write two resea rch p3pt!rs instead of a thesis . (One pa per may be in Ihe cand i date 's mino r field untler the su perv ision uf the m i nor adviser.) The candidate will be requjred t rev iew his research paper before his Gratluate Co m m i t tc.e (see Cratl ua t Catalog).

597

R E S EA R C I I STUD I ES IN E DUC AT I O , Sec Ed u ca t ion 596 (2) 599

EDUCATI ONAL PSYCHOLOGY 46 [ G ROUP P RO ESS ND THE L DI VI D U A L

A h u ma n in terac tion la bora tory to fac ilitate the cxpl ration of tbe sel f conce pt through the mechanisms of i n terpersonal i n terac tions and feed bac k . Emphasis placed on Ihe ac q u isi ti on of skil J i n self-e:l. ploration, role iden tmca tion and cli mate-making. ( 2)

463

5S

0

,t P

R AT l V t::

ED

CATION

Co mpa rison a n ti investigation o f certain ma terial and c u l t ural systems of edu ca tion th rougho u t the world. (2)

587

H I STO R

OF

589

P H I LO OPHY O F

EDU . ATlON

Grea l e,lu ca tors. e Ll u ca iiona i the rics and educatJ(1031 �)' · tem, from an liquify tIJ Ihe prese n t. (2)

cLl u ca t io n. ( 3 )

- D C ATI ON

Philoso phical and theoretical foundations of

5 9 0 G RA D U A T E SEM I N A R A IVorkl; hop for a l l Master of Arb etlndi da te ' ill Ihe School of Eu u ca tl on wh it-h provitlcs a

ro r u m for ':\,change of research itleas and pro blem '; candidat · houltl re� s ter for this 'cminar for a ' i � t a n cc In f u lfil lin g requir- eme n L No credil is given, nUr is tuition asse sed. (0)

G U I DA, C E I N TI I F E L EM EN

A

Y SC HOO L

Major orie n tat ion to guidance and. how they translate in to operation al pT gr a ms in the school scHing. l>rere qui�i t e : Stude n t leaching ur grad uale stafus. laboratory expcrienc as arranged. ( 2)

465

G U I DANC E I N S ECO, DA R Y SC I I D O L

TI lL

Major o rien tation 1 0 gu id a n ce and h w they transla te into opera tion al prugrams in the selloul sett i ng. . ( 2)

I.

P

B I> M S individual readi ng, investigation, resea n: h and/or a' prad i c u m ell.pcrience in school or agen cie�. ( 1 -4)

T H ES I S

For Ma ler o f Arl cand ida les w h el ect to \ itc a t h esis ins tca tl of twu research papers. The t h esis pr oble m will be chosen from the can Li idate's major fieltl u f concentra tion anti m ust be a p p ro ved by his Gratluate Co m m i t tee. The candidate wil l be expectetl tu d fend his thesis i n a final oral examina lion conLluc ted by his (' m m i l tee. (3-4)

466

5R3

R S e A RC H s r U OI Es I N E D

T RaDUCT I O N ST U D E T ' RSON"-l E L S E R V I CES

D

Stud n t �rsonnel servi ces offereLI by l:olleges and universities; famil iari zation with literature in t.he field; C ' posure to local serv i ce agencies and s tudent government. G (2)

468

I:. DUC AT I ONA L rSYCI l O LO , Y

Pri n ciples and research i n h u m an learning anti Ihei! i m l ications for curric u l u m and i ns tr u c ti n. Prerequisite: 25 1 . C

469 C A R C E R G I D ANC E A st udy of ca reer�, th eories of choice and gui tla n ce tech n iques.

474

A " EC T I V E CLASSROOM T EC I I N ! QU ES This cour e will c:l. pl re various tech niques

designed to fa d l i t ate u nderslanding of sell' and otherS; methods for wor ki ng w i t h st u den ts. Prerequisite : stu den t tl'aching o r grad u a te stot us. laboratory experience as arrnngctl.

475 The

R E A L I T Y T H E R APY usc

uf

Reality

herapy

in

a

hel pi n g


1 04 rel a t i onship - schools, social agencies, mental heal th clinics, University residences, etL Laboratory ex perience as arranged,

490 S tudy

PS Y C I J O L OG Y O F T I -I I: I I AN D I (' APP E D C H I LD

of the .psychological state of the h a n d i c a p pe d child and his societal environ men t . Con cepts of s t a t us and roles are pursued. A focus will be made upon the c h a r a c l cr i , t i cs necessary for faci l itative personnel. Practicum included.

50 1

W O R K S H OPS

Graduate workshops in special �arying lengths of ti me. (2-4)

560A

for

CONT I N U I N G P R A C T l C LJrvl

CON T I N U I N G PRAC T I C UM

A p ra c t i c um experiencc in individual counseling to as.� ist s t u de n ts to integrate cognitive and affec tive learnings. O p port u n i ty for problem iden tification, contract and decision making. Prere quisite: 560A ( I )

560C

CONTI N U I NG PRACT I C U M

560D

CON T I N UI N G P RACTI C U M

Experience in individual counseling with em phasis on Gest a l t therapy techniq ues. Prerequisi tes : 560B and Ed Psy 56 L ( I )

experience in small group set t i ngs, following Ad lerian psycho logy consultation model. Prere quisites: 560C and 5 78. ( I )

56 1

BASIC R E LA T I O N S H I PS IN C O U N S E L I N G

A s t u dy o f t h e theory process, techniqucs a n d characteristics o f t he counseling relationship. A basic cou rse for M_A. studen ts in the Counseling and Guidance program. (Formerly ounscling Theory).

563

PRA T l C U M IN G R OUP PROC SS AND L E A D E RS H I P

A h u man i n teraction laboratory which ex plores i n terpersonal operations in groups and facilitates t he development o f self-insight ; emph asis on leadership a n d devel opment of skill in diagnosing i n dividual, group and o r ga n i z a t i o n a l b e h a v io r patterns and intluences_ Prereq u isite: 46L (2)

565

S E M I !' A R : N O N -T EST APP R A I S A L

Assess ment o f personal characteristics a n d behavioral patterns t o be t te r understand the i n d ividual; util ization of non-test data ( s o c i o m e t ri c sca les, c a se s t udies, a u t o b i o g r a p h i e s, i n terviews, i n teraction analysis).

570

572

P R ;\ CT I C U M AN F I E LD WO RK I N C O U ' S E L I N G A N D G U I DA N C E

c u l m i n a ting practieum o f field experience in schools or agencies utilizing theory, skills and techniq ues previously learne d ; a variety

P R AC T I C U M I N STUDENT P E RSONN ' L W O RK IN H I G H ;R EDUCATION

A culminating practicum of supervised collegiate experience in residence halls, a d m i n i s t rative o ffices, service a gencies, resea r c h on p r ojects with associate d prac t i c u lTI.

573 fields

A practical ex perience in t he techniques of coun seling; enrol l m e n t l i m i ted to s t u de n ts beginning the Master's Program in Counseling and Guidan ce, and is a prerequisite to admi,,;sion to t he progra m; prac ticum makes usc o f counseling sessions with clients ulililing verbal and nonverbal at lending behavior. ( I )

560B

of work e x periences w i t h individual groups. Prerequisites: 560C, 469, PSy dlOlogy 450.

ST U D E N T P E R S O N N E L WO RK IN H I G H E R EDUCATION

Student p e r s o n nel servi ces in higher educatio n ; usc of personnel d a t a ; co-curricular activities; st udent welfare ; c o n t e m porary trends i n counseling problems related to student l i fe.

575

M ENTA L H E A LT H

57 8

B E H A V I O R A L PRO B L E M S O F STl I D ENTS

Basic mental heal th principles a s related to i n t e r pe r s o n a l r e l ationships. Laboratory experience as arranged.

Adlerian concepts provide basis for observation, motivation, modification and l i fe style assess ment. Skills for assisting st uden ts develop responsibility for their own behavior i s focus_ Laboratory experience as arranged.

( 2)

SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS

Arts i nc l u de the B . F.A. - Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art or i n Co m m unication Arts. t he B . M . - Bachelor of M usic, and the M j l . Master of M usic. Students may also earn the B.A. - Bachelor of Arts. but t h is degree is awarded through the College o f Arts and Sciences. Candida tes for the B. F.A. and B.M. as well as for the B . A _ i n Art, Communication Arts or Music must meet University requirements and the s pec i fic requirements of the Departments of Art, Communication Arts, or M usic.

Art Thi,,; department does not adhere to formal prerequisites for e n t rance ; rather st uden ts arc encouraged to select courses relating to t heir i n terest as early as possible i n order to reasonably determine a p t i tude a n d s u i t a b i l i t y for this alea of s t udy. Transfer students wishing advanced standing must submit a portfolio of previous work to the chairman o f the department. The depa r t mc n t reserves the right to retain , exhibit, and reproduce s t u de n t work su b m i t ted for credit in any of its cou rses or programs. Usc or ma tcrials fce required in certain courses. BACHELOR OF ARTS: M i n i m u m of twenty-eight semester hours incl uding: 1 1 0, 1 6 0, 250, 230 or 350, 365, 370 and four semester hours in art history. A max i m u m of forty semester hours may be a p plied toward t h is degree. Candidates arc registered in t he College of Arts and Sciences and must complete all requirements.

B A C H E L O R OF F I N E ARTS: M in i m u m A RT D E PARTM ENT COMM UNICATr O N A RTS D EPARTM ENT o f 56 semester hours i n cl uding 1 1 0, 1 60 and 250 with a m i n i m u m of eight hours in M USIC DEPARTM ENT pic torial media ( 260, 3 26, 365, 3 70, 396 or as TIle School of Fine A r t s o f Pacific L u theran University is a commun i ty of artists dedicated: to provide energies and facilities for t hc focused refinement of that most elusive o f h u man i m peratives. creatiw activity; to operate on the leading periphery of artistic underst anding and to assume an additive rather than imita tive posi tion relative to that understanding; to pursue study of both thc histori cal and t heoretical cons t r u c t s t ha t surround our legacy of creativi t y ; to recognile t h e ongoing, self-defi ning, self-a u t h e n t icating nature of artistic cri teria w i t ho u t d e v a luing the t radi tional concepts of discipline, c r a f t s m a nship, a nd academic profession'l l is m ; t o foste r act i�'ity u n fe t t e red b y the caprice o f the market pl ace but, by virtue o f i ts su bstance. not aloof from nor incompatibl e w ith pragma t i c concerns; to a n i m a te and "humanize" the academic climatt' of Pacific Lut heran University via the creative presence by sponsoring a rich and varied program of events in the Arts; a n d to provide the studen ts o f Pacific L u t heran University a n o p portu nity to e x perience first hand the unique " chemistry" o f a u t onomous imagining. Degrecs offered by

t he School of Fine

a p proved), a minimum of eight hours in materials media ( 2 30, 3 3 0, 3 3 5 . 3 3 8 , 350 or as ap proved), three period cou rses in art history, and clectiv(·s in areas of em phasis to c o m plete requirements. Courses in art teaching methods may not be i n c l u ded. S t u de n ts are encou raged t o choose an area of emphasis by t heir j u nior year. Areas i n c l u d e : Pictorial Mcdia ( d r a w i n g, p a i n t ing, printma king, photography), Materials Media ( sculp ture, ceramics, fibers, glass, metals)_ . Design ( i n t eriors, illustration, graphics), or Art History. Candidates are registered in the School of Fine Arts and m us t complete all requirements of that schooL Foreign language i s not requ ired i n programs w i t h studio emph asis_ For art history e m phasis, French and/or German is required as determined by the student's adviser. B A C H E L O R O F ARTS IN EDUCATI O N : See School of Education.

STUD I O Basic media courses m a y be repeated for cre d i t as noted, for two or three semesters or as a pproved.

1 60

D R AW I N G

230

C E RAM I CS I

A course dealing with thc basic pictorial concerns o f for m , com position and color as well as techniques and media of d rawi ng. I II

Ceramic

materials and techniqu es incl uding


1 05 hand-b u i l t and wheel-thrown methods, day :mu glaze forma tion. I n c l u des a survey of c ram ie art. I I I

250

SC

PH R E I

Various techn i q ues a n d materials of scul pture and their influence on three-dimensional form. Ind udes s t u dy of the human figure. I II

260

LI F E D R AW I N G

A m u l t i-media ex ploration o f h u man form. May be tepeated for c re d i t . Prereq u i si t e : 1 60 or consent. r I I

296

D ES I G N

I n t ro d uction t o design t hrough t h e st u dy o f �uch basic concerns a s color, f o r m , ki netics, tactility and light as a p plied to various areas withi n the field i n c l u d i n g illustration, graphics lind i n dustrial design. I I

3 26

FI

'1 A RTS

Theory and practice o f photography as a n art for m . A l t ernat ing sections in still photography and cinema togra p h y . May be re peate d for credit. I II

330

C LRAMICS I I

Advanced techniq ues in ceramic construction a n d e x periments i n glaze formation. May he r epea ted for ned. i t . Prerequisite: 230. I I I

33S

F I B E RS

E. p loration and development of fiber struct ures and soft art fo rms. Alternating sections in non-loom work and loom weaving. � May be repeated for cred i t . I I

338 G LASS B LOWI N G \ orking techniques a n d i n dividual ex pression in blown glass. May

34 1

be repeatcd for credit.

E LE M E N T A R Y A RT : D U C AT I ON

Various projects a n d media s u i table for t he instruc tion of art in elementary school ; em phasis on devel o p m e n t a l t heory. I n (2)

350

S C U L PT U R E I I

Concentration on a particular mcdi u m of s · ul pt ure. Alternating semesters in metals, woo d , or other media. May he repeated for credit. Prereq uisite: 250. I I I

365

PAl

TING

Media and techniques o f pai n t i ng i n oil or .lI n ylics. May be repeated for cred i t . Prerequisite: 1 6 0. I I I

370

PRI NTM A K I N G

Methods and media o f fine art pri n t making. Both hand and photo p rocesses involving lithographic, in taglio and screen prin ting. May be repeated for cre d i t . Prere q u i si t e : 1 60 or conscn t. I I I

394

D ES I GN WO R K S I I OP

Projects in various design fields i n d u ding il l u s t rat i o n , package design, i n d u s t rial design a nd i n terior architec t u re. Emphasis on tedlnique: and procedures. May ht\ repeated for credit. Prereq uisites: 1 60 and 296. I

39

G R A PH I C S W O R K S H OP

Design and exec u t ion of prin ted materials; em ph a. is on technical procedures and p r o blems In m a ss commu nicat ion. Prerequisite: 1 6 0. I I

492

STUD I O P RO] ECTS

A tu torial course w i t h i n d i v i d ual investigation in a particular medi u m , for m ajor s t udents only. M ay be repeated for cred i t . Prere q u i s i t e : s e n i o r sta tus and consent o f i n s t ru c tor a n d department c h a i r m a n . I I I

499

UTA. C A N D I DACY E X H I B I T I O N

Ex h i b i t ion of undergraduate work by B . F . A . candida tes in st udio areas; st udents arc respon sihle for scheduling installa tion. publicity and final disposition of wor k . I I I ( n o cre d i t )

HISTORY A N D THEORY 1 10

T H E V I S U A L A RTS

280

TW EN T l E T l l C EN T U R Y A RT

294

20th C E N T U R Y D E S I G N A N D A RC H I T E C T U R E

Western m a n ' s ex pression in t h e v i s u a l arts seen through the perspectivc of historical develop men t. I II The visual a r t s in the t w e n t i e t h ce n t u ry with an i n trod uc tion to aesthetical theory. II

A study p r i n c i p a l ly concerned with developments i n architecture and i n teriors i n the t w e n t i e th century. but i n d u d i ng references to i n d ustrial design and other rela ted areas. I

382

A l\ C I ENT A RT

3 83

;"U-: D1 E V A L A RT

384

R E N A I S S A NC E A RT

Art of the ancient Rome. I a/y

�ear

East, Greece and

Western European sty les from t he decline of Rome to the begi n n i ng of the Renaissance. I I aly

European art of tbe fiftcen t h and sixtee n t h cen t u ries, with an emphasis on I talian developments. 1 a/y

385

B A R OQ U E A R T

Styles i n European a r t from the late six tee n t h cen t u ry through the period of the Rococo. I I aly

440

S F M l i AR I N A RT E D U C AT I ON

A study of instruction in the second ary school inclu ding appropria te media and curric u l u m develo p m e n t . II ( 2)

E T E U, T f I

CENTU R Y A RT

Communication Arts All s t u dents in Com m u n ication Arts will partici pate in some phase o f dramatic. fo r e n s i c and broadcasting co-curricular a c t ivi ties, and wiJl be req ui red to take two prac t i c u llls. B A C I I ELOR OF ARTS: At least 3 2 semester hours plus 2 prac t i c u ms in one o r a c o m b i n a t i o !) of the three areas of conce n t ratio n : o f whidl Co mmunication A r t s 1 23 i s req u i re d : Broadcast/J ournalism: Required courses 1 2 3, 27 1 , 272, 275 or 374, 283, 3 84 , 375, plus 14 se m e s t e r hours selected in consultation w i t h adviser. Co mm u n i cation : Required courses: 1 2 3 , 24 1 , 3 3 3 , p l u s 2 0 semester hours selected in consultation w i t h adviser. Drama: Required courses: 1 23 , 24 1 , 250, 25 1 , plus 1 6 semester hours selected in cons u l t a tion with adviser. I n a d d i t io!) to requirements l isted above, can d i da tes for the B.A. degree lIlust meet the Foreign Language re q u i rement i n the College of Arts and Sciences. B A C H E LO R OF F I N E A RTS: At least 52 semester hours plus 2 practicums in one or a combination of t he three areas of concentration of which Co mm unicatio n Arts 1 23 is requi rt·d. Broadcast/Journalism: Required courses: 1 23, 27 1 , 272, 275 or 374, 283, 384, 375, plus 24 semester hours selected in cons ul t a t ion w i t h adv iser. Co m mu n i c a t i o n : Requirements same as Bachelor of Arts plus an additional 40 semester hours selected i n con sul t a tion w i t h adviser. Dra m a : Required courses: 1 23 , 24 1 , 250, 25 1 , 352 or 354. 363, plus 28 semester hours selected in consul tation with adviser. B AC I I E L O R O F A RTS I N EDUCATl O l" : Sec School o f E d lIca tion.

1 23

F U i\ D A M E N T A LS O F O R A L COrvI M U N I C AT I Ol'\

F () unda tions course dealing w i t h basic theories of oral com mu nication. Emphasis on group activ i ty with some platform wor k . I I I S 128

A RG lFvl l: 'IT A T l O N A N D DEBATE

Argu mentation, evidence, proof a n d the adaptation and application or argu ment to v a r i o LI S types of oral com mun ication; e m p hasis on forms of debate, the i r preparation a n d prese nt ation. I I

487

NI

490

S EM I N A R

497

R ES I A RC I-I I I ' A RT H I S T O R Y

Concentrates o n t h e development a n d growth of the motion pic t u re i n the United States from 1 8 95 to the present. Emphasis is placed on the film director, whose im plementat ion of film techn i q u c and theory serves as the formative artistic forcc in the cinema. Societal i n fluences such as economic factors, p u b l ic a t ti tudes and mores, and pol itical positions reflected in the United S t a te s throughout the past 75 years which provide the film media with shape and themati c foc us will provide parallel poi n t s of reference.

R E S E A RC H

225 , 425 (' O M M U i\ I C A T I O N A RTS I ' R A CT I C U M

Art of t he ninetee n t h cent ury from neo-classicism through Post I m pression i s m . I

Selected topics considering some aspect of the visual arts. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent.

A ttl torial course for lIlajor s tuden t s wi th research i n t o a par ticular period or area of art h i s t o ry. May be repeated for cred i l . Prerequisites: senior status a n d consent o f instructor a n d d e p a r t m e n t chairman. I I I

597

For master o f arts c a n d i d a tes who elecL to write a research paper in art. I 1 1

1 62

I 1I STORY O F A M E R I CA N FI LM

One semester hOllr credi t may be earned each


1 06 semester, hut only 4 �emester hour: may he L1se d 10 meet univ er �i t y rl'quircmcnt�. Majors ;tre re q u i Te d to t a k e at teast t wo prac t i c u m s in onc Of a omhination of t he three areas of i n t eres t . In ullclor's consent re ql1 i re d I I I

.

235

ST

DI ES 1

01 AN I Z A T I O A L IC A T I OI ! COMl o m m u n icalion systems and s t u d ies w i t h i n

formal organization. Fo c used on theory a n d research of in fonllationa l and d i rective c o m mu n i c a t ion a. related to c h a nnels, slnlt tml's, stalus, invol vemen ts, morale and leadersh.ip. I

O R A L I N T E R P R ET A T I O N OF L l T E R A T R E The art of com m unicating t h e essence of a piece of li t era t ure 10 :lJl a u d ie n c e, i n t e r pre ti n g it e. pe n c n t ia ll , logically, and emot ion a l l y . I nd iv id u al a n d group performance. I I I 24 1

... U If )A r>.I l: I T A LS or A C T!. G The at'for. h i � w ork, his n a tural and learned sk i lls ; exercises ill memory, i magination and observatio n ; i mprovisa tions and scenes from modern pl ay s ; theory and practict' of sta ge mak e-u p. I 150

25 1 Basic

STAGI

T E C I I N O LO , Y

t he'lf antI procedure of technical aSp('ds in set b uil ding, costU IllC cOllstru c t i o n . ba�it: drafting. scener , the asselllhii ng, h3 dling, managcment of the stag>, :lnd e ' t cns iv e s h o p work. I

MA , M E DI A , A f) SOC I LTY u r vcy of t he m a ss media, ill c l u d ing newspapers, ma ga zi n es . hooks. television and 27 1

t he c i nema. mechan ics of

l I istory,

organi za tiun

and

prin te d and clc 'trollic m e d i a. mass com munication in Role o f the dCb'l?l ollioi]JlC Theal, s o c ia . 31111 ceonomll' fa rI s of a !le mn m t i e SQdlo!ly. AliiiTy .'i� of I c journalist s a u d iem;e . jou rn alistic vocations and social and l e g al respo nsi bil it ies of thc media. I

272

Ti l E B R OAD AST I AN D SOU 10 The theory a n d struc t u re of sOlln d for the broadcaster; instruction and prac tice ill the of typical a u dio-control e q u i p me n t radio. TV and r cco r tli n g studios. I ( 2)

use

275

R

flcments

in

0 1 0 P R OO UCT I O , of radio prod uction : analy sis of desib'11, writing for ra d io aJ1l1

program p rod u c t i on tools and techniques. Lec t u re and labora to ry . E.xtensive usc of KPL -FM s t u d io fac i li t ies and e q uipmen t. I

283 N EWS R E PORT I I G Techn iq ues (If hasic news and fea t ure wri t i ng for t he me d i a . N e w s p a pe r and b r oa d c a s t - Ine d i a , n e w ' o r ga n i z a t ion, p roce d u re. a n d l i bel. Preparation or v aried sto ries, analysll; o f news so ur ces t e hni que' of in teTVicwing anti essen tial fact ga t he r ing. Ty pi n g abil i t y highl y pre fe rre d . Prerequisite: 2 7 1 or c on cu r r e n t enH)lI mcn t . St ud nt must regist er for N e w spa p e r M K ad io News Prud i c u lll la boratory at t h e same li me. I ( 2)

,

316

G ROUP DI S C US S I O N

Pr inc iples of g ro u p d i s c u s s i o n in ro b leln -solv ing and learn.ing situations, developme n t of i n d ivid ual � k il l s in u isc ussio n, parlidpa tion and leadershi p. I n cl u ded i. a l i m i t e d e m phasis on parliamentary law bascd on Robe r i I ules of Order. I I

FO DA I O N S OF COVI M U , I C A T I ON T1-I I:: O R Y C O Ill ln u ni c a t i on pr inciples, theo ries and research releva n t t o bo t h the speaker and the l is t e ne r . I 333

3 3 6 P � R, L1 AS I O l The deci, ion-ma king process i n contemporary socie t y ; methods of a p pe a l i ng t o hu man m ot ivations and their a pplication in pla tform x p cri e n ce . I I ADVA ' C E O I T E RP R E TIO O F LI T ·' R ATUR E P r ojects and e xer ci s es directed toward progTam p l a n n i ng. Advanced skills in t l1I' co m m unica tion of the ex per ie n c e of a piece of l i t e r a t u re t h ro u g h p e r f o r m a n ce. Prerequisite: 24 1 . 11 344

' I::: N I C DE I

352

N

Artistic and technical development of ahilities in design i ng scenery , cost um es and make-u p for plays of all periods; various styles and peri o ds a s \\ el l as pre pa ra t i o n o f models.

render ings, worki n g drawings and p a i nt i n g. P re rcq u i i t e : 2 5 1 . I I a/y

3 54

P LAY 01 R L '

scenic

"

j

a ll'

E L1GI I T \ . G 356 S T Stage ligh ting from I he basic devel o p me n t ()f elec ricity and ligh ting instru m en t ' to the co mplet e design of lighting a sho\\'o II a/y

358

ADVA St udy of I h e

('

:

AC T I N G

work of an actor; character and e m b o d i men t, u si n g i m p rOvisations and scenes ff m plays; inc l udes styles of ac ting. Pre requisite: 250. II analysis

a/y

363

I I i STORY 0

T i l E T H E AT R E :

A E S C H Y L U S T H RO U G H l EV TURC Theatre as it evolved from i t s p rimi tive o r ig i n t h r ough represen tative soci e t ies ; Ancient Greece, Kome, K c n a i s s ance. modern European and American. ' m phasis is u p o n religious phjlosophical, and pol i t ical t ho u g h t as reflected in the d r a m a of each period.

) 3 64

374

I I I ' T O RY Or: T i l E f H E A T R E : I B S E N TlI R O U G H TO T H E PRESENT Theatre as i t ev olv ed from i t s primi tive orig.in throllgh represen t a t ive societies; Ancient reece , R o m e. . R e n a i s s ance, modern E\lr (lea n and meric 3I1. Emphasis i s upon

TE L V I SI O N PRO D UC T I O N

,

Analysis of program de sign writing and prod u c t ion tools and techniq ues, lec ture and l a boratory ; extensive use of K PLU-TV s t u d ios. I

375

D I R ECTI NG FOR B R O A DC A ST M E D I A analysis o f the s t r u c t u re fOLm and t ec h n i q u e o f directing for the Broadcast Media extensive usc of R...dio and TV s t u d io facili t ies. "

-

R A D I O-T E L E V I S I O N N EWS REPOR T I I G Provides s t u d e n ts w i t h some o f the basic techniques and problems o f radio and television journalism. The cou rse provides fu n d a m e n tals upon whjch fu r t her s t u dy i n Broadcast/Journalism can build. I t i s a n

378

advanced journalism course assuming prior proven ability i n news writing and reporting. Prerequisite: CA 283.

ADV ANC ,0 N EWS R EPO RTING In-depth reporting, investigative n e ws writ­ ing and practice i n handl ing advanced news reporting assignments in the environment of 384

the newsroom. Typography, headline writ­ ing, copy editing as well 3 S prin t i ng pro­ cesses. Typing at 40 words per m i n u te r eq u ired . Prerequisites: 27 1 a n d 283. II (3)

402

ION

'rhe role o f t h e director. hist rically and cri tica ll y , an i n tensive study that is bo th practical and theoretical in its approach to the arl o f the play director. Many differe nt d i re t' t i n g philosophies arc studied and each stu dent is req uired to d i re c t scenes from plays rcprc sen tat ive of al l periods of thcatre hist(Jry. Prereq uisites: 250. 25 I . and u n ior

stat liS.

religious, philosophical, and polilical thought

as reflected in the drama o f cach p er i od .

CO M M UN I C A T I O N ARTS IN T i l E E EM T A R Y C L ASS ROOM

Co m m u n i c a t i o n Arts p ro b l e m s and o p p o r t u n i ties which confront the teacher in grades one t hrough eigh t . I (2)

404

COM M l'N IC A T I O . ' A R TS T H I:: .' EC O N D A R Y S C H O O L

II

Curric ul u m cons t ruction, communication arts p h i l o so p h y ; c o -c u r r i c u l a r a c t i v i t i t.' s ; a d m i n i s t ra tion o f drama, radio a n d forensic

activities. r ( 2)

459

S

'I M E R D R A M A WORKSHOP

One session o f in tensive work i n drama. acting, s tage manage m e n t , lighti n g instruction and all o t her phases of production. S

T E LEVI S I O\J A. f D T H E C L ASSROOM T E AC H E R Television as a t ea ch ing tool; gen eral criteria for technology in te aching and s pe ci fic criteria for the use of television in the classroom. U (2) 474

478

SUMMER T E L EVI S I O N WO RK SI I OP and p ro d u c t ion t e c h n i q u es C reative of t e le vi sion progr a m mi ng; extensive use of KI'LU-T V s t ud ios: for the mat u re s t u d e n t . S

490

S Ni l

AR I N

BROADC AS /J

Selected

R ' A LlSM

topies in Broadcast/Journalism. Prerequisite: Departmental permission. ( 2)


1 07 49 1 , 4 9 2 , 493 SPEC I A L ST U I I E S I N ' M M U I CATI ON A RTS !ll\'estiga tion� or rese arch in area of special In tcrest not covered by regular courses; o pen to qUlllified ju nior or senior st uden ts. A stude n t should nol begin registration for independent study lIntiJ the specific area for inves t iga tion h.as been a p p roved by a depart men t al sponsor. ( 1 4 ) 596 -59& R ES E RCH I N COl 1 M N I CATION A " o r g rallua te st udents only . ( 1 -4)

TS

Music S t udents intending to major i n music should begin the majo r mu ic sequences in the fir t year. Failure to do so may mean an ex tra semester or year to complete the major program. �l usic majors should fill o u t a declaration of major form during their first semester of cnrollment in the pro!,<rum and be 3.- 'igncd to a m usic faculty adviser. Only grades of " or bet ter i n music co ur.�es may be cou n ted toward a music majo r. Cour in which the student receives lower than a "C' must be repeated u n less sub� titu tc course work is au thorized by the depar tme nt. •

BACH -LOR OF A RTS ; M;e, i m u m of 40 em ter hours including 1 2 3 . 1 24, 1 25, 1 20, 1 3 1 . 1 3 2, 22 3. 224, 2 25 , 2 26, 23 1 , 2 3 2 pl us 4 hourof c n e m b le ; 6 hours of Literat ure/Theory lectives from 3 2 7 -339, 426-43 8 ; 8 hours f private instruct ion , piano ( minimu m class Icvcl 2). I n additi on to req u i re mcnts li.stell a bove, candidatcs for the B.A. degree must meet the Foreign Language requirement in the College 01' Arts and Sciences. F A RTS IN E DUCAT I ON : Consul t the ('hool of Education, a n d the Depa rt mcn t of tusic Hand book.

understanding of mu sic. Not open to majors. (4)

1 2 3 T ! l EO RY I The s t udy of musical terms, fundamen tals. notation. mclody writin g, and harmon ization t h rough analysis a n d writing. ( 2) 1 24 TI l O R Y I I A con t i n ua tion of Musil' 1 2 3. ( 2) 1 2 5 E A R T R A I N I N G' I Ocvclo � men ! of a u ral skills in simple rh y th !lIlC dictatIOn. In tervals, sigh t-singing usmg progressive exercises con sisting of short melodies. ( I ) 1 2 6 E A R T R AI N I N G I I Co n ti n ued dcve lopment of aural skills in sigh t'singing, mclodic and rhy th ntic dict a tion. Elementary harmonic d ictation. ( I ) 131

of Western music from the early Christian era through the Middlc Ages . a n d Renaissance. ( 2)

1 3 2 M U S I C H I S TO R Y [ 1 The evol u tion of music in t he Baroque Era ( l 60a- 1 7 50). ( 2 ) 202

P R I V AT E A N D C L ASS I I ST R L!CT [ O N : P I A l 0 ( 1 -2)

203

P R I V A T I: I N S T R U CT I O N : O RG A N ( 1 -2)

204

P R I V A T E AND C L ASS 1 1 S T R UCT I O N : VOI C L ( 1 - 2)

205

206

BACII ELO R

The lIepartmcn t of Musil' also offers the follo\\ ing degree programs: I . Bachelor of Musil' in Piano' Perfllrmance 2. Bachelor f M usic in Organ Performance 3 . B ac h e lo r of Music in Vocal Performancc 4. B a 0 h e ll)r of Music i n I nstTli 111 cn tal Performance 5. B a chelor of M usic in Theory and Com posi tio n 6. B a c h elo r f Arts In Edu ca t ion Elemen tary M usic Specialist 7. Da ' h elor of Arts in Education I n strumen tal S cOnd.ary and Elcmentarv ' 8. B a c h elor of AIts in Education Secondary horaJ 9. Master of Mu ic Education Co n s u l t t he DcparIlIlC/1/ o r ,VllIs;c I-/o/l(/hook, available in the M usic Office for 'omplete de t ai l s conccrning re quired courses, reco m mcn ded four-year pmgl1lms by the 'ernesleT, progress charts and ot her pertinc n t informa t ion. Consult the GradUOI C C'ala/oK for details of thc Master of Music program.

1 T RODUCT I ON TO 1 US [ (' I n t r o d u c tion to mu. ic l i terature with rmpha 'is o n I i tening, st r uct ure , period and , tyle. Designed t o enhance the enjoymen t a n d 101

M US I C I l L O R Y I

TIle evolu tion

207 20R 209

P R I V AT I ' S T R UCTI O N : V I O LI . � / V I O LA ( 1 -2)

P R I V A T E I I, T R U CT I O N : C E LLOf BASS ( 1 -2) P R I V AT E I 'SIR H l 1:( 1 -2 )

(,TI ON:

P R I V A T E I N T R UCTI O O B O E / E I G 1 .I I I [-l O R N ( 1 -2) P R I V AT ; I i ST RUCT[ O N : B ASSOO ( 1 -2)

210

P R I VAT I N S T R UCT I O N : C L A R I N ET ( 1 -2)

21 1

SA XOPHON E

P R [ V A T ' I NS T R UCTI ON : ( 1 -2)

21 2

P R I V AT E [ NS T R UCT [ O N : T R U I P E T ( 1 -2)

213

P R [ VAT E [ N S T RUCT I O N : P R E ' (, H H O R . ( 1 -1)

214

P R I V A T[ [ N ST I LJC T l O N : T R O t mOl i E/ B A RI T OI E ( 1 - 2)

21 5

PI I V ATE I N S T R UCTI O N : T U E A ( 1 -2)

216

P R I V A T E I N .T R eTI O N : P E RC I S S I O N ( 1 ·2)

217

PRI VATL A N D C L S I T R UCTI O , : C U l T A R ( 1 -2) •

218

P R I V AT E I N S T R U T I O N : H A RP ( 1 ·2)

219

PRI VAT E I NS T R UCTI O N : H A R PS I C H O RD ( 1 -2)

One half-hour private, or two one-hour class I(>ssons per week in a d d i lion to daily . ou tSide p r a c t i. c e . S t u d e n t s receiving pernllsslOn to register for two semes!cr hours of credit will receive two one-half hour private Icsson � per week. Studen ts in piano, � OIce and gu i t ar may be assigned to class Instruc l ton at the discretion of thc mu sic fac u l ty . Special fee in add i t ion to tuition.

223 T I I EO R Y I I I Syst(>rnatic study of e mergent t heoretical constructs from the 1 8 t h and 1 9 t h ce n t ury as rcprescntell in l i terat ure of t h a t pcriod. ( 2) 224 T H E O R Y I V Syste matic s t u dy of emergent theorctical c o n structs from the 20th ccn tury as represen ted in li terature of that period. ( 2 ) 225 EAR TRAI IJNC I I I Advanced a u ral skills th rough e.x ten ded rhy thms anll melodies. Emphasis on harmonic dicta tion. ( l ) 226 E A R T R A I N I I I G I V Sight-singing, including pan-tonal melod ies. Harmonic dictation of modulatory chord progressions involving chromatic alteration. Advanced rhy thmic dictation. ( 1 ) 23 1 M US I C H I S T O R Y I I I Thc evol u tion of m usic i n the Class ic and Roman tic Eras ( 1 750- 1 9 1 0). ( 2) 232 M U S I C HISTORY I V Litcrature o f t he 20th ce n t u ry : development a n d curre n t t renlls. (2)

Early

24 1 -242 S T R I N L A B O R A TO RY Methods and materials of teaching and plaYing s t Tlng Instruments i n thc public schools. ( I , I ) 243-244 WOODWI D LABO RATORY Met holl.� a n d materials o f teaching a n d playing woodwind instruments i n the public schOOls. ( I , I ) 24 5-246 B RASS L A B O R A T O R Y Methods a n d materials of teaching a n d play ing brass instrume n t s in t hc public schools. ( 1 , 1 ) 247

P RC $SI ON L A BO R AT O R Y

Methods and matcrials of leaching and playing percussion inst ruments in t he public schools. ( I )

249

F L ECT R O N I C M US I C L A BO RA T O RY

A l a b o r a torv experience dealing with rn a t e r i als a n d !l1e t hods of elementary elec t ronic m u sIc sy n t hesis. Real· t i me experience in t he Electronic Music Stu dio, as


1 0k w e ll as discussion of various popular sy n t lwsllcrs, electronic m usic aesthetics, and the use of electronic instru ments i n secondary education. ( I )

323

U

LARITY I

Linear-st r u c t u ra l analysis of l i tera t u re of t h e 2 0 t h and 1 9th cen t uries; in trodu c tion to S c h c n kerian analysis; writing and perfocm a nce ex perience i n the con t ra p u n t a l , styles oj t hese periods. Prereq u is i t e : M u sil' 3 23. a!y ( 2)

324

U

lARI

325

K [Y B O A R D

326

OR C l l l S fR A T I O N

I I A RMONY Devel o p m e n t o f a func tional usc of harmony at the key hoard. I m provisa tion and score rea d i n g. aly ( 2) Thl' range, t r a n s position. so u n d a n d technical c harac teris t ics o f i n s t r u men ts. Notation, sl'( � ring a n d arranl,.Jng for conven tional and u R l q u e In s t r u men t grou pings. Prerequisi t e : Musil' 2 24. aly ( 3)

C O M PO SI T I O N

sy stematic app r o ac h to contem porary musICal com posItIOn : studen t s c re a te a n d n o t a t e w o r k s for solo, small and large ensem bles. May be repeated for add i t ional cre d i t . 1 1 -4 ) A l l music l i te r a t u re courses n u m hered fr()m 33 1 to 339 are open to all university enrol lment w i t h o u t prerequisite.

33 1

ivI , I OF J OI � A N N S E B A STI A N B A C I I

. study of selected works re prese n ting each ot the primary areas of t he creative ge n i u s of J .S. Bach. aly ( 2)

332

OR AM E N T A TI O N A N D PE RFO R M A C E PRACTlCES

o

Ti l L BAR

QUE

A practical s t u dy o f vocal a n d ins t r u me n t al ornamen tation as it evolved in tIle 1 7t h a n d I H t h ce n turies. a l y ( 2)

.B 3

MUSIC OF 1 1 /\ Y I N A N D M OZ A RT

Score analysis and study of the historical significance of selected works of Hay d n a n d Moza rt. a / y ( 2)

3 34 YILiS le O F B [ ET I I O V E N ;\ general su rvey with in -de p t h study of selected works. a!y ( 2 )

335

LAT c I I ( N LT E L:: Ti l C [ N T U RY M U S I C

survey o f selected music o f Wagner, Bruc kner, �ta h l e r and S t rauss. a/y ( 2 )

336

C I I A !vl B E R M U S I C L1 T I: R /\ T U R l:

A general su rvey w i t h in-de p t h study o f selected cha m be r works for represe n t a t ive ge nres. aly ( 2)

T i l E N I N ET E E N T I I C b U R Y A RT SONG

338

I I I STO R Y O F O P E R A

A general s u rvey w i t h in-de p t h sele c ted opera scores. aly ( 2 )

of

I I I S TORY O F J A Z Z STY LFS

MUSIC I N T i l E L L L M E N T A R Y S C I IOO L

Met hods a nd procedures for t he classroom teac her in deve loping the various music a c t i v i l ies i n thc elemen tary schoo\, Offered in the Fall Semester for st u d e n t s preparing to become MUSIC SpeCIalIs ts. Offered in the Spring Semester for t hose s t udents preparing for elemen tary classroom leac h i ng. ( 2 )

3 43

V OC A L J A Z Z T EC I I N I QUES

Methods, l i.terature, style and techniqlle for the vocal JaLZ ensem ble. E m phasis on t he acqu isi t i on of s ki ll s necessary for teac h i ng voca l . Jazz In the secon dary schoo\, Prcrl'qu lsi Ie: Consen t of the I n s truct o r . ( I )

344

JAll L A B O R ATO R Y l� N S I:: : M B I . I :

Rehe arsal a n d study o f represe n t a t ive jazz h te r a t ure, designed for st u d e n ts u n familiar w i t h jazz i d i o m s. Prerequisite: Conse n t of t h e Instructor. ( I )

345

\ 3 A S I C CON D UCT I N G

I n t ro d u c tion to basic pa tterns, ges t ures a n d c o n d u c t i ng .t e c h n i q u es ; a p pl i ca tion to a p p ro priate vocal and i n s t r u m e n t a l scores. ( 2)

349

E L ECT RON I C M USI C PR ACT I C U M

A p p l i ca tion of elec tro n i c t e c h n iques to COlll posl tlOnal process. I'or non-composition majors o nl y . Assigned st udio time o n a re"u lar 0> basis. Prerequisi te: �Iusic 2 4 9 . ( .\)

351

ACCOMP A N Y I \(;

Practice in acco m panying: represe n t a tive vocal and instrumen tal solo l i terat ure from a l l period s. ( I )

3 52

O R G AN I M P R O V I S A T I O N

B a s i l' techniques of i m p r o v i s a t i o n, p a r t I c u l a rly as related to hYllln tunes. aiy ( 2)

353

SOLO VOC A L L 1 Tl' R AT U R I : ( 2)

Survey of solo vocal l i t e ra t u re.

354

P E R F O R M E R'S P RI \I E R

' �echniques . o f s tage presence and procedures tor performlllg vocal and i n s tru mental m usic. I n c lu des t he historical aspects of , pcrtorm � nce, progra m p l a n n ing, wardrobe, stage pOIse and m e m orizing. aly ( I )

360

C I I O I R O F TI- I E W E ST

througll rehearsal and pcrformance o f bot h sacred a n d sc cular m u sic. Empha sis on i n d iv i d ual vo�'�1 deve l o p m e n t through c horal sIngIng. A u d l l lons at t hc begi n n i n g of Fall Semesler. ( I )

362 study

A survey o f the evol ll ti o n of j a z z from -1 900 to presen t , i n c l u d i ng early devel o p m e n t a n d tren ds. a / y ( 2)

34 1

U N I V E RS I T Y C I I O R A L E A s t u d y o f c horal l i te r a t ure and technique

36 1

A s t udy of selected a r t s o n g l i terat ure o f S c h u be r t , S c h u m a n n , Brah ms, W o l f . S t ra uss, Beethoven, Faure, Debus.>y, and D u Parc. S t y le an alysis and i n terpre t a t io n with performance i n class. a l y ( 2 )

.B 9

Y II

Linear-s t ruc t ural analysis o f l i terat ure o f t he 1 8 t h a n d 1 6 t h ce n t u ries; f u r t her refine ment o f . a n a l y t i c al (echniques, wciting and I'l'rtormance ex perience i n t he con tra p u n tal styles f t hese periods. Prerequisite: M usil' 3 2 3. a ly ( 2)

3 27

3 37

A study of choral l i t e r a t u re and Il'chnique t h rough rehearsal and perfo r m a n ce o f bo th sacred a n d secular m usic. Audi tions at the begi n n i ng of Fall Semester. ( I )

C O NC E R T C I I O I R

A study of choral l i te r a t u re and techn i q u e t h r o u g h rehearsal and performance o f both sac�cd and secular m usic. Emphasis o n u.l d l V l d ua l I'm'al deve l o p m e n t t hrough c h oral slnglllg. A u d l l lons a t the begi n n ing of Fall Semester. ( I )

363

UN I V E RS I T Y S I N G E R S

A s t u dy of choral l i te r a t u re and technique t hrough rehearsal a n d performance of both sacred a n d se cular m usic. E mphasis on Ill d lvldual vocal dcvclo p m e n t t hrough choral slnglllg: Open to a l l s t u d e n t s in t he Un iversity and I n t e re s t e d c O lll m u n i ty musicians rega rdless o f previOllS m usical experience. ( I )

3 64

M A D R I GA L

A s t u d y of secular part song t h ro ugh reading . and pertormance. ( I )

366

OPE RA W O R K S I I O P

S t age prod u c t io n of opera, c h a m ber opera a n d opera scenes. Par ti c i pa tion i n all facets of prod u c t i o n . Prerequisite: Consen t of the Inst ructor. ( 2)

370

UN I V E RS I T Y B A N D

372

U N I V E RSITY J A Z Z EN S E M B L E

S t u d y o f selected w i n d ensemble l i ll'rature t h rough rehearsal and p e r f ormance. Me m he rs h i p by a u d ition. ( 1 )

S t udy of se l ec te ? jazz literature t h rough reh � arsal and pertormance. Memhershi p by a u d l l lo n . ( I )

3S0

U N I V E RS I T Y S Y M P H O N Y O RC H E S T R A

S t udy o f selected orchestral l i t c r a t u re through rehearsal and performance. Membership by a u d i tion. ( I )

38 1

C I I A M B E R t..: N S E M B LI �

382

C ON T E M PO R A R Y D I R LCT I O N S ENS Uvl B L L

Reading, rehearsal and pe rfor mance of sel e c t e d i n s t r u m en tal c h a m ber m u sil'. Prerequ isi t e : Conse n t of Cham ber Music Coordinator. ( I ) Section A - String; Sec tion B - Brass ; Section C - Wood wind

P u b l ic and l a bo r a tory contem porary music. ( I )

3 S3

performance

TW O P I A N O E N S E \1 B L E

of

T �"'hnilJue s a n d practice i n the performance . ot two'plano a n d plano duet l i te r a t u r e ' incl udes s.ight reading and program p l a n n ing: (I)

402

P R I V A T E I N S T R U C T I ON : P I A N O ( 1 -4)

403

P R I V AT L I N ST RUCTI O N : O R G A N ( 1 -4 )


1 09 works for large ense m ble ; independent s t u d y . may b e repeated for a d d i t iunal ue dit. a f y (2)

404

P R I V A T E I N S T R UC T I ON : VO I C E ( 1 -4 )

405

P R I V A T E I NST R UCTI O N : V I O I N / V I O L A ( 1 -4)

406

P R I V A T E I N S T R UCT I O N : C E LLO/ B A SS ( 1 -4 )

43 1

407

P R I V A T E I N S T R UCT I O N : F L U T E ( 1 -4 )

A s t u dy o f represen tative piano compositions of all periods. afy ( 2)

408

P R I V A T E I N S T R UCT I O N : 0130 路 j E N G L l S H 1 l 0 R N ( 1 -4)

433

409

410

411

412 413

P R I V A T E I NS T RUCT I O : B A SSOON ( 1 -4 )

P R I V TE I N S T R UCTI O N : (,LA R I l E T ( 1 -4)

P R I V A T E I N S T R UC T I O N : T R U M P E T ( 1 -4) P R I V T E I N S T R UCT I O N : F R EN C I I H O RN ( 1 -4) P R I V A T E I NS T R UCT I O N : T R O M B O N E/ B A R I TON E ( 1 -4 )

415

P R I V f\ T E I N ST R UC T I O N :

TUB

417

( 1 -4 )

P R I ATE I N ST R UCT1 0 N : P E RC U S S I O N ( 1 -4) P R I V A T E I NST R UCTI O N : G U I T A R ( 1 -4)

418

P R I V A T E I N ST R U C T I O N : H A RP ( 1 -4)

419

P R I V A T E I N S T R UCTI O N : I I A RPS I C H O R D ( 1 -4)

One h a l f-hour lesson p e r w e e k . Stude n ts receiving permission to register for 2-4 semester hours of cre d i t will receive two one-half hour private lessons per week. Special fce i n addit ion to t u i t ion. All 400 series private instruc t ion requires permission from the M u sic D e p a r tment before registration.

423

FORM I

Advanced analysis of literat ure from Classic. E arly and Middle Roman t i c styles in represe n t a t ive genres and media. afy

4 24

FORM I I

dvanced anal ysis of li terature from late Roman tic, I m pressionist and Nationalistic styles i n represe n tative genres and media. afy

( 2)

425

FORM I I I

Advanced analysis o f l i terature from Modern and Con tempo rary styles in represen tative genres and media. afy ( 2)

426

ADVANC ED O RC H ES T R A T I O

Directed study a n d scori ng of selected piano

H I STO R Y O F P I A N O L I T E R AT U R E AND PERFORMANCE

445

M U S I C OF B t:::L A B A RTOK

A study of represe n t ative works of various periods of Bartok. afy ( 2)

434

SCANDI NAVIAN M USIC

A survey u f selected m usic o f various Scandinavian c o m pose rs; folk music i n tl u enccs and national istic clemen t. afy ( 2 )

435

P R I VATE I N STRUC TI ON : S A XO P H O I E ( 1 -4 )

414

4J6

All music li tera t u re courses n u m bered from 4 3 1 to 438 are open to all university enroll ment w i t h o u t prerequisite.

M US I C I N T H E UNITED STATLS:

A survey f r o m t he Colonial period to t h e prese n t covering both t he c u l tivated a n d t he vernacular traditions. a fy ( 2)

H I ST O R Y O F O RG A ;-.J B U I L D I N G

437

S AC

E D M US I C LI TE RATURE

A survey o f c h urch music p ri m arily t h rough the s t u dy of represen tative major works. a/y

( 2)

438

I I Y Ml\' O LOC Y A N D M US I C OF T I l L L I T

TI l E GY

A survey o f Christian l Iy mnod y . considered from bot h a m usical and poe tic viewpoi n t . Also considered w i l l he the concept and performance of m usic for t he l i t urgy , bot h historic a n d contem porary, primarily from the Ro m a n . Anglican and L u t heran traditions. afy ( 2 )

44 1

R EC E N T T I::. C 1-I N I Q U ES F O R E L E M E N T A R Y M US I C

The concern o f t h e u p per elemen tary and middle school m usic teacher. i n c l u ding Orff and Kodaly tec h n i q ues. ( 2 )

443

M ET I I O DS A \, D M AT E R I A LS f O R S ECON DA RY C I I O R A L M U S I C

The organization a n d a d m i nistration o f the secondary school music c u rricul u m w i t h particular a t ten tion to t h e needs o f t h e choral program. Organization, manage m e n t , teaching methods, rehearsal t e c h n i ques and choral l i terature a p p ropriate for the various age and experience levels of stude n ts in grades 7- 1 2.

( 2)

444

451

M ET I I O D S A I D M A T E R I A LS F O R SC I-I O O L I NS T R U M E NT A L M U S I C

The organization and admi nistrat ion o f the

C T l i\ G

P I A N O P E D AGOGY

Teaching tec h n i q ues for prospective teachers uf piano, including techniques of priva te and class piano i n s t r u ction. Methods and materials from hegi n n i n g through advanced levels. ( 2) Section A - Basic Section B - Lower Eleme n tary ; Section C - U p per Elemen tary ; Section D - Advanced

O R G A N P 路 DA G O C Y A N D R E P E R TOI R E

Methods and te chn ique s of private organ i n s t r u c tion . i n c l u d i ng su pervised practical experience. A su rvey of organ literature represen tative of all major com pusers and style periods. afy ( 2)

453

A t wo-fold s t udy, i nvolving bot h the t e c h n ical evolu tion of t he pipe organ, ( key-actions. windchest designs, pipcwork varieties and construction, t he organ case) as well as the historical evolution o f t h e various concepts of tonal d e sign as t hese relate tu the performance of organ li terature. afy ( 2)

ADVANCED COND

R e fi n e m e n t of pat terns, gestures and co n d u c t i n g t e c h n i q ues; a p pl ication to ap propriate vocal and instrumen tal scores. Prereq uisi t e : Music 345. ( 2)

452

i\ I I I ST O R IC A L I N R O D UCTI ON

436

secondary school music curric u l u m w i t h particular a t ten tion to t hc needs of the i n s t r u men tal p r og r a m . O r g a n i z a tion, manage men t , teach i n g methods. rehearsal t e c h n i q ucs a nd inst rumen tal l i terature appropriate for t he various age and e :\. pcrience levels of students in grades 4- 1 2. (4)

VOC A L P E DAGOGY

Physiological, psyc hological a n d pedagogical aspects of singing. ( 2)

4 54

ST R I N G PE D A G OG Y

The physiological a n d psyc hological a p proach to string playing and teaching. I n cl udes discussion and demon s t ration of instru men t and bow kchniq ues, private lesson ap proach and ma terials, general and specific string problems. a/y (2)

49 1 -49 2 I N D E P L N D E N T S T U DY Prereq uisite: Consent of t h e Instru ctor. M ay

be repeated for a d d i t ional cred it. ( 1 -4)

502

P R I V A T E I N ST R UC T I O N : PI A NO ( 1 -4 )

503

P R I V A T E I N S T R UC T I O N : O R G A I ( 1 -4 )

504

P R I V A n: I ! S T R U CT I O ;,\ : V O I C E ( 1 -4)

505

P R I V A T E I NS T R U C T I ON : V I O L l N j V l O LA ( 1 -4)

506

P R I V ATE I N S T R UCT I O N : C E L LO/ UASS ( 1 -4 )

507

PRI V A T E I :,\ S T R U C T I O N F L UT E ( 1 -4 )

508

P R I V AT E I N S T R U C T I O N : O B O E/E N G LI S H 1 I0 R N ( 1 -4 )

509

P R I V A T E I ' S T R L!CT I O N : B ASSOON ( 1 -4)

510

P R I V A T E I N S T R UC T I O N : C L A R I N ET ( 1 -4 )

51 1

P R I V A T E I "! ST R U CT I O N :

S A XOPHON E ( 1 -4)


1 10

512

P RI V A T E I N ST R

SCHOOL OF NURSING

TION:

R U M P H ( 1 -4 )

513

P R I V AT E I N S T R UC T I ON F R E I (' 1-1 I I O R I ( 1 -4 )

514

1 R01.,,\I3 0,

515

P'RI VATE I N T R UCT I O n TUB ( 1 -4)

516

P R I V A T E l ST RUC T I O N : P : R( ' USSI O N ( 1 --4)

517

518 519

P R I VATE I ' ST R UC T I O N : E/ B A R ITON E ( 1 -4)

PRl VAT

G U I TA R

I N ST

lICT I O N :

( 1 -4)

I R I V A T E I NST R UC T I O I I I ARP ( 1 -4 )

P R l V A T E IN T R LJC T I Ol I I A RP I C I -I O R D ( 1 -4 )

O n e haJf-hour lesson p N week. S t u d ents receiving perm is.�ion to register for 2-4 :;em stor hours f credit will receive two ne-half hour private lessons per week_ Spe ' i aJ fee in addition to t u i tion. All 500 series private instruction requires permission fro m the M usic D e p a r tme n t be fore registration.

5 27 COMPOS I T I O I A wstematic approach

to contemporary musical co m p ositio n ; st udents create, notate and perform works for solo, small amI l a rge ensembl es. May be repeated for c redit. ( 1 -4)

532

M US I C B I B LI OG R A P I l Y AN lJ R l::S E A RC I I T E C I I N I Q U E S Survey of th mai n research tools availa ble for

advanced work in m usic. Course content can be adapted to needs of s t udents in m usic education. t heory or performance. a/y ( 2)

545

SEMI R I, DV I C E O CON D eT I I G : CONT ' M PO R A R Y LlTE R AT U R l

Directed sludy o f selected contem porary . cores containing con d u c ting problems unique 10 recent com positions in a wide range of genres and media. i ncludi ng electronics, co n trolle d i m provisation, mul timedia, :md te� t ure for large and small ensembles, vocal and in,lrumen tal. ( 2)

590

C R A l J U A T l S E VI I ! A R ( 1 -4)

596-59 8 599

R I : S l A RC I I

T I -l S I S ( 2-4)

I

!vi

IC

( 1 -4)

ADi\f 1SSION A N D CON TIN UATION POLIC I ES Students seeking ad mission to the n u rsing major m us t make formal a p plication to the School of Nursing. Application forms may be secured from the Nursing Office and are to be submit tt)d between Jan uary I and February I S . Applications are considered during the Spring Semester for adm ission to the following Fall and Spring Semester classes. When there are more qualified a p p licants than the School can accept, selection IS made on a competitive basis. Students are a d m i t ted to begin their nursing courses in eith er the Fall or the Spring Semester. Time normally req u i re<l t o c o m plete requirements for the Bachelor o f Science in Nur ing is six semesters from t he t i me of enrolling i n the first n U Jsing COurse regardless of the n u m ber o f col lege credits earned. The Suhool of Nursing reserves the right to request wit hdrawal of a n ursing student who fails to demons t rate competency or who fails to maintain professional con d uc t. M in i m u lll criteria for admission to or con ti n u ation in the School of N ursing arc as follows: I. A d m i s s i o n to the U n i versity. Applicants must have been admitted to Pacific Lutheran niversity prior to March I of the year in which they wish to have their a p plication processed. However, admission to the University <loes not guarantee admission to t he School of N u rsing. 2. Completion o f o r curre n t e n ro l l m e n t in aII prerequisite courses, i n c luding Psy c hology 101 and t w o of the following: B iology I I I ( B iology and Modern Man). B i o l og y 201 ( M icrobiology), C h e m i s try 1 03 (Chemistry of L i fe) a n d Sociology 1 30 ( H u m an Societies). 3. Completion of a m i n i m u m of 26 semester credi t hours. Some o f these may be in progress at time of a p pl i c ation. 4. A mini m u m grade of 2.00 in all r e q uired n u rsing and prcrequisite co urses. A student receiving a grade of less than 2.00 i n any course which is a prerequisite for a n u rsing c o u rsc may not c o n t inue in that nursing course u n t il the prerequisite course is repeated with a grade point o f 2.00 or above. 5. A m i n i m u m c u m ula tive g.p.a. of 2. 00. 6. Physical Ilea l t h an<l stamina necessary to wi thstand the demands of n ursing. 7. Emotional stability suffident to cope with t he s t resses in herent in learning and prac ticing n ursing.

H EALTH

The nursing student is responsible for maintaining o p t i mal heal th and is a teacher of he31 t h . Physical exa mination. x-rays and i m m unizations are required prior to ad missio n to t he clinical areas and periodically thereafter and are the responsibility of the student. Each s t u<le n t should �arry personal he alth insurance.

ADDITIONAL COSTS I n addition to regular niversity costs, st udents are to p r o vide their own transportation between the University cam pus an<l thc clinical laboratory areas begin ning w i t h the sophomore year. S t u de n ts are r e q uired to carry profes�ional liability insurance d u ring all periods of clinical experience. T h is is available under a gro u p plan a t a nominal cost t o the s t u d nt. Health examination fees. s t u de n t u ni forms ( a p p roximately 570.00) and e q u i p ment ( wris twatch, scissors, stethesco pe, etc.) are also the respons ibil ity of the st ulient.

RESOURCES A N D FACI LITIES

Under the direct s u pe rvision of i t s fac ulty members, the School u t il izes facilities of hospitals, health agencies, and schools in the community i n an effort t o provi<le o p timal clinical learning experience. Libraries and classrooms arc available in these facilities as well as on campus. Clinical laboratory learning is <l irected by regular university fac ulty members i n the following health agencies: Good Samaritan Hospital, Puyal l u p , Washington (I 7(J hcds) lJavid K. l-Ia IInl', M. IL·L, lc>,eclllil'e Dire c l O r Mary J a lle Trueh, R. N , DireClor of .Vun- il lg L a ke w o o d G e n e ral Hospital , Tacoma, Washington ( 1 00 beds) .I a lli e s l l e l l a n d , M. B. A . . Adlllinisl ralm Pq!gy Dawso n . R. N. f)ireclor of !\'u!'s illg Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma. Washington (530 beds) llriga<l i c r C;eneral S pe n c e r B. Reid. M. D. . C ()IIIIII(JJ 1(Iing Oflicer Lt. Colonel B a r bara Costello, R. N . B. S. N. . M S . Chief Departlllen l of Nursillg M a ry Bridge Children's Heal t h Center, Tacoma, Washington (68 hcds) l ' re d c r i c k A. P r i t c h JT d . M. B. /! . . Adlllinisl rator Karen L Y l l c h , R. N. . IJ S N. . A ssislanl A ilrnillistrator for Pat ie ll t Serpices Puget Sound General Hospital. Tacoma, Washington (287 heds) C ha ric s i l l 0 r r IJI a n , )1. 1-1. A . . A dmillistrato!' (;arv Trosk ie . R. N. . B. S. N , M. P. H . lJireclOr Of (Vu!'sing St.

St.

Joseph Hospital, Tacoma, Washington (!50 /)('(/.1') Daniel Ru ssell, B . S. . M. If. A . . A d lIlinisl ra lor M a ry Mc l l q u i s t , R. N. , B. S. !\'. , Direclo!' of /\'unillg ScrJ'ice Peter

Hospital,

Olympia,

Washington

(1 50 h eds) David L. B i u r nsllll, M. H. A . , AdlllillislralOr ;'\ n n \3c r t (il i n . R. i\'. . H S N , Director oj' Nunillg

Taco ma General Ho s p i t a l . T a c oma, Washington {:3(j3 beds} LugellL' K. Prell t ice , H S , A1. S. 1-1.4 . . Presidenl Bc t t y l lo tlman . ILV. . B. S.. \'. . [)ireclo!' oj' N'ursillg Scrl'ice


I I I Tae rna-Pierce Cou n t y I Ical l h Depa r t m e n t , Tacoma, Washington :I!. P. H., Director of Pa u l M L' , ' u t t , M. D . . .

flealtil

'laney C i lnry. R V . .\'ursing

.

M. I'. II. . Director of

T;u;oma Public Schools, Taco m a. Washington Do n n a G. I ' e r b u s o n , R . N. . M.N. .

SUI}('I' I 'is(ir o f Nursing SerFices, [Ica/til ,)'avice.l· Depart illellt

The Doc tors l Iospi tal , Taco ma, Washington ( 7() Iwds) I :red A . Prit c h a r d , M. [l. A , Adlllini.ltraror Harrie t I lu tTm a n , R . :V.. [)irector of Nursing

Veterans Ad minis tr ation Hospi tal, American Lake, Was h i ngton (904 heds) Ro be.rt B. Ryn�ars o n , B. S. , Director J o a n B. S t o ll t , R . N. , Ii. S. N. , M. N A . ( 'hier: .Nu rsing ScrriCi' .

BACHELOR OF SCI ENCE I N NURSING

A sample c u rric u l u m for the stuele n t accepteel for F a l l Semester e n rollment is as follows: 1'1 RST Y EA R - Pre-N ursi ng Fall Se mester Chemistry of Life * Chemistry 1 0 3 * * Rl'ligion cll:ctivc * P�y c hology 1 0 1 I n t roduc tion to Psychology P. E. Activity

13

I n t erim Elec t i v e Spring Semester Biology a n el �lodeTll Man " Biolob')' I I I Co mposition 'i- English 1 0 1 (st uelcn t may be exempt on basis of proficiency) or Elective

"' ociology 1 30 P. E . Activity

I l u m a n Societies

SECOND Y E A R Fall Se mest er Biolo!,,}, 2 0 1 " Psychology nr

3 35

b..l u c a t i o n 3 2 1

+ Philosophy u r s in g 2 1 4 P.E. A c t i v i ty

Micru biology

h i l hood and r'l dolcscencc

H uman Devel opmen t N ur�ing I: Socialization to N ursing

.

for pring Semester cnroU mcn I the c u r r i c u l u m generally 1'0 110\\ the Fall S�mcste r fOJ'lIlat wilh m o el i fications as necessary t ) assure completion of all prerequjsite cour�es by t he time tlwy arc neceled. A '",he dulc of co u rses is dcvcluped i nelivi duul ly w i th each st udent I ho hc�-ins (he nursing c o u rses in the Spring Semester. ursing courses must he taken concurren tl y and i n sequence a s i nd icated i n t h e sa mple curriCUl u m , and normally . ' Icnel over six

CERTl FICA no N URSING

I

4 4 4

4 I 13

The curriculum plan and i ts i m ple m e n t a t i o n a rc d e signed to De growth-fostering and to encourage great er init iative on the part of the studcnt. In addition to the Nursing core req u i re ments, the stud en t is c ,," pected to meet Unive r ' i ty ursing courses arc 'cquen tial rcquircmen ts. in n a t u re and all have prerequisi tes. A . tudent in terestcel i n t he Bachelor o f <.;ien 'e i n ' ursing elegree �huulel co n tact t he SchOOl o f N u rsin g a n d begm t he course seq uence u po n cntran�� 1 0 t he Universi ty .

se mes te rs.

4 4 4 I

FOR SCHOOL

E<iuc.a tional Staff Assoc iate ertificati on for school IllUseS is inelividuaJly designed through a consortium consisting of a school district, related professiona l associalion and nivcrsitv. L u thera n P a c i fic dditional infor mation on this p(()gram can be obtained by con tac t ing the Dean of thc SchOOl of I:.ducation or the Director of t h e School of ursing.

4 4 4 4 I 17

I n terim Electi ve Spring Scme:ter Biology 1 6 3 f Eledive Nursing 2 2 8 P.E. Ac tivity

4 F u n ctional ursing

1·l u man Ana tomy

£ I : Health Assess ment

4 4 I 17

T I I I R D Y EA R Fall Semester Biology 299 N ursing 334 'ursing 344 t Fine Arts eicctin

I n trOlh l c lion to Oi n i cal I'hys iology ' u rs ing Ce n tr u m I I Il.!allh Problems

4 4 4 4 16

In (crim O p tional e l ec t ive Spring Sc mcsler 'ur,ing 354 N U rSIIll! Ce n t r u m II O i nical Pro blems I N u rsing 384 \Ir�ing I'racticll m I N u rsing 394 t Litera t u re or History elective

0-4 4 4 4 4 16

FO L RTH Y [-. A R Fal l Semester Nu rsing 424 N ursing 434 N u rsing 444 t Rdigion

"ursi n ar Cen trum I I I O i n icaT Problems I I ' u rs ing Pra c t i c n m I I

.� 4 4 4 16

I n terim Optio n a l elec t i v e Spring Se mcstcr Nursing 464 N u rsing 478 " ;'-lay be taken ei t he r semester * * �1a y be taken e i t h e r so phomore year + \Iay be taken any time

0-4 Nu rsing Cen t r u m I V Senior Prac t i c u m

4 H 12

fres h m a n

or


1 12 214

N U R S I NG I : SOC I A LI Z A TI O N TO II R S I G

All orien tation to the philosophy and objectives of the n ursing program and a comparison with various t y pes of programs avail able i n n ursing educa tion. I n t roduces co ncepts regarding self, d y n a m ics of feelings and c o m m u n ication, of sat isfactory peer a n d teacher relationships and group process, as wcll as principles of learn i ng. Also i n t roduces the com::ept of levels of well ness and i l l ness. l li�tlHical m i lestones i n n ursing are i n c l u d e d to b� ve perspective t o prcsent day tren ds i n nursing. Prerequisi tes : Psy chol ogy 1 0 1 , a n d prior or concurre n t enro l l m e n t i n Sociology 1 30 and Biology I I I .

22S

N U R S I NG I I : I I L A LTH AS S ES S M L N T

An i n troduction to the d i fferent te ch niques involved in the assess men t of heal t h needs o f the clie n t . Atten tion i s given to fu n c tioning as part of the heal t h team i n well-c hild c l i nics and other related com m u n i ty agencies. ga i n i ng understanding of the util ization of resources i n the hea l t h d e l ivery sys t e m . and developing an understa nding of the family and the i n tl uence of t he ceo-system on thc heal t h necds of soc iety. I n c l u des selected ex periences regarding stress and adapta tion i n heal t h facili ties. Prere q uisites: Chemi stry 1 03 a n d N ursing 2 1 4, a n d prior or concurre n t regi s t r a t ion i n Psy chol ogy 3 3 5 ( o r Education 3 2 1 ) , Biology [63 and 20 1 .

33 4

N U R S I N G C E N T RUM I

An i n t ro d u c t ion to the less complex medical-surgical situa tions of chil dren and adults, the u n c o m rl icated pregnant fa m ily , and preventive aspects of psy c h i a t ric n ursing. T h co ries of physical and psychosocial cleve l o p m e n t as well as drug and d ie t therapy are i n c l u d ed. Prere q u i si tes: N u rsing 228. concurren t registra tion in N ursing 344, and prior or conc u rren t registration i n Biology 299.

344

lIE

LTI -l I ' R O B L E1vI S

Medical-Surgical problems o f a less stressful natu rl' and ap propriate nursing acti ons to facil it ate a d a p tation. I n c l udes c;l. periencc w i t h a pregnant family t h rough t h e pren atal, n a ta l , and postnatal periods. and a p plication of pri n c i ples of crisis in terve n t ion in dealing with heal th pro bl e m s in s elected c l inical ex p ericnccs. Prerequisites: N u rsing 228, concurrent regist ration i n iXursing 334. and prior or concurre n t registration i n Biology 299.

354

N U R S I ;\ G C EN T R U M I I

The more com plex medical -surgical si t u a t ions of children and adul ts, c o m p l ications of prcgn a n c y , an d p s y c h i a t ric disorders. Em phasis i� placed on the pa thoph ysiological and psychopa thological aspects and their a p p l i c a t io n to t he n u r s i ng process. Prerequ isites: Nursing 3 34 and 344, and con c u r re n t regist ra tion in N u rsing 384 and 394.

3 84

C L I N I C A L P RO B LE M S I

Psy c hia tric and medical-surgical problems of a stressful nat ure with the a p propriate n u rsing ac t ions to faci l it ate adaptation, including in t c rve n i ng in psy chopa thology on an i n terpersonal level and e x a m i n i ng t he effects of pol i t ico-socio-cconolllic s t ress on the

clien t, fa m i l y , and co m m u n i ty as it rc[ates to their l e vcls of well ness. Prercquisi tes: Co nc urrent registration in :-';ursing 354 and 394.

394

N U RS I NG I ' R A C T I C l Hvl I

Cli n i cal a p plication of N u rsing 354 and 384. The s t u den t is ex pected to a pply t heoretical principles based on patho physiological and psy chopatho logical concepts in the c l inical se tt ing u t i l i zing in ter perso nal and techn ical skills. Prerequisites: Concurren t regis tration i n Nursing 354 a n d 3 84.

424

N U R S I N G C EN T R U rvl I I I

I n troduc tion to acute devian t behavior patterns and to l i fe t h re a t e n i n g m e d ical-surgical problems o f c h i l d ren a n d adults. E m p hasis is placed on com plex pathophy siological and psy chopa thological aspects and their i m pl i cations for the n ursing process. Prere q u isites : Nursing 354, 384, 394 and concurre n t registration in N ursing 4 3 4 and 444.

434

C LI N I C A L P RO B L E M S I I

I n t roduction to n ursing ,i c t ions a ppropriate to stressful medical , surgical and psy c h ia t ric problems and to t h e newer parameters of n ursing. Issues i n nursing and cha nges in he a J t h c a re systems a re e x amined. P r erequisites: Concurrent regis tration in N u r s i n g 4 24 a n d 444.

444

MJ RSI N G P R ACT I C Uivl I I

Clinical a ppli ca t ion o f p a t h o p hysiologicaJ a n d psy chopa t hological con cepts i n critical care nursing, i n c l u d i n g u t i lization of i n tcrpersonal and sophisticated techn ical s k i l ls. P r erequisites: Concurrent registration in Nursing 4 2 4 a n d 4 3 4 .

464

N U R S I N G C E NT RUM I V

Pre paration for future professional roles of thc n urse in the heal t h delivery sy ste m . E m p h asis is on leaders h i p a n d manage m e n t skills , professional j u dgmen t , decision m a king, stra tegies for deal i ng wit h t he future, and t he nurse as a c h ange age n t. S t u d e n t s examine legisla t ion , econo m i c securi t y , cont i n u i n g education, professional growth and t he u t il il.ation of heal t h and welfare resources. Prerequisites: N ursing 4 24 , 434, and 444 and concurre n t registration i n N u rsing 478.

478

S E N I O R P R;\ CT I CL Jrvl

Clinical a p pl ication of professional and techn ical s ki l ls in pri m ary or secondary nursing s c t t i n g.�. Each s t u de n t is expected to function i n a staff n urse role and progress to a leadership rol e . l>rereq u i s i t e : Concurrent regis tration i n N ursing 464.

49 1 , 492

I N D E P E N D F . T ST U D Y

Prereq uisill' : Pe r m ission of t h e Director.

SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION UN I V ERSIT Y R E Q U [ R E M ENT: S t u den ts are enco uraged to com pl e te the physical educa tion requirement (four one-h o u r courses incl u ding PE 1 00) d u r i n g the fresh m an a n d sophomore years. Eig h t one-hour activity courses may be coun ted toward gra d u a t i o n . Stude n t s are enco uraged to s e l e c t a v a r i e t y o f activities at a ppropriate s k i l l levels. A l l physical education activity courses a r e graded on an " A," " Pass" or " Fail" basis.

B A C H E LO R OF ARTS (Recreation Co ncen tration) : 40 semester hours, including P E 277, 3 3 0, 483, 4 9 7 , Psy c hology 335; 4

semester hours of PE 4 8 [ , 4 8 2 , 4 85, 284-288; i 0 hours of: Art 230-330, 250 or 3 5 0, 3 26, 34 1 , 365, 3 70, Music 34 [ , PE 292, 322, 365; 8 hours o f : B A 230, 28 J , 3 50, Political Science 356, 4 5 7, Psy cholo gy 243, 340, 4 1 0, Sociology 21 [ , 230, 3 28, 340, 3 4 2, 344, 3 4 3 , 365, 4 25 .

B AC H E L O R OF ARTS (Corrective Therapy Co ncen tra t ion ) : 4 8 semester hours i n c l u d ing PE 277, 292, 360, 3 9 1 , 392, 478, 48 [ , 482, 4 84 , 485, 4 9 7 ; B iology [ 6 3 ; PsychOl ogy 1 0 [ , 2 2 1 , plus two h ou rs o f a psychology elect ive. H EA LT H M[NO R : ( [ 8 semester hours) The following courses arc required: Biol ogy 1 6 3 , I'E 292, 295, 3 24 , 3 26, a n d 2 hours of elec t ives (with a p p ro v a l of Heal t h Coordina tor). COAC H I NG M [ N O R (Men and Women) [8 semester hours i n c l u d i n g : P I:: 277, 28 1 , 3 3 4 , 485, puticipation o n a varsity or c l u b s p o r t , and a m i n i m u m of 10 h o u r s selected from among the following: PE 3 3 1 , 36 1 , 370, 37 1 , 3 7 2 , 3 7 3 , 3 74, and 4 7 8. In terim and summer cou rses may be i n c l u d e d as electives with the approval of the department c h a i rperson. DANCE M I N O R : 20 hours required: PE 362, 282 or 4 9 1 , four hours from the fol lowing: PE 240, 242, 243 ( may be repeated), 244, and eight hours from the fOllowing: PE 308, 360, Music [ 3 1 · 1 3 2, Art [ [ 0, 280, and Biology [ 6 3. T h e dance m i nor s i cross-refere nced w i t h Com m u n ication Arts. BACH E LO R O F A RTS [ N EDUCAT I O N : B.A. I N E D UCATI O N - S EC O N D A R Y SCHOOL P H YS I C A L E D U C AT [ O N TEAC I I I NG 'I AJ O R (44 hours) : Required (24 hours): PE 277, 328, 478, 48 1 , 482, and 485, Biol.ogy 1 6 3 and participation in a varsity or club sport. Elel:tives: 20 hours from among the following: PE 275, 282, 28 3 , 284, 285, 287, 288, 3 3 2, 360, 3 6 2, 484, and 4 9 1 . Studcn ts desiring K- 1 2 Certification Illust complete PE 283, 3 2 2, 3 6 2, and 284 or 288 in addition to meeting req u i rements as set for t h hy the School o f Education.

B . A . I i': EDUCATI O N - ELEMENTA R Y SCHOOL P H YSICAL E DUCAT[ON T E A C H [N(; M AJ O R ( 24 hours): The following courses arc require d : PE 277, 284 or 288, 283, 322, 3 34, 362 a n d 4 hours electives in physical education with a p p roval of de part men t c hairperson .


1 13

E L E M E N TAl Y S C H O O L T EACH I N G MJ ' O R ( 1 2 hours ) : P I " 3 2 2 a n d il hours from

a mong the fol lo w ing: 3 6 2.

284

or

2ilil, 2 il 3 and

S EC O N A RY SCHOOL TEACHING l I N O R ( l il h o u r s ) : T h e fol lowing courses a r e

required: PE 2 7 7 , 3 3 4 and 4il 5 a n d 1 2 hours of el ectives from among the fol lowing: PE 2 il 2 , 2 8 3 , 2il4. 2il5, 28 7 . and 3 28.

P I I Y S I C A L E D U C A TI O N ' S I' C I A L I S T A. D K·6 C ASS ROml K · 6

TE;\C H I: R ( 3 2 h o u rs) : The following courses a r e req uired : P E 2 7 7 . 283, 2il4 o r 2il8, 3 2 2 , 4 8 1 , 4 8 2, 4 8 5 and Biology 1 6 3.

1 00

O R I [NTATION TO P H YS I C A L L D U C A T I ON

To �t i lll ulat(' s t uden t i n terest i n func tional

pcrsonally ·designl'd programs of p hysical ac t i v i ty ; assess m e n t o f physical cond i tion and skill�; recom mendation of specific progr ams for maintaining a n d i m proving physical heal t h . Should be taken as a freshman. I I I ( I )

200-299 A

INDIVI DUAL D D U A L A(,T I V I T I IS

2 0 1 ( Bef,ri n n ing Gol f ). 2 02 ( I n termedia te a n d A vanced G ol f), 203 ( Archery ), 204 lBowling), 207 ( Bl'),ri n n ing GYlll nastics), 20il ( S k i ing), 209 ( I n terme d i a te Gym n astics), 2 1 0W (Sli m n ast ics), 21 I ( Beginning Ba d m i n ton), 2 1 2 ( I n termediate B a d m in ton), 2 1 4 ( Beginning Tennis), 2 1 5 ( I n terme d i a te fen n is), 2 1 8 ( B ac k packing) , 2 1 9 (Canoeing), 222 ( H a lHlball. Squash an d Racke tball ) , 2 2 3 (Squash a n d Rac ke t ba ll), 2 2 5 ( Aerobics), 2 2 7 ( W eigh t Training), 2 2 il ( B a s i l' M o u n taineering), 2 29 ( Eq u i ta tion). ( I )

230-239 A Q U A T I C S 1. 3 0 ( B.. g i n n i n g S w i m m i n g) ,

23 I ( I n te r m ediate Swim ming), 2 3 2 ( A dvanced Swinuning). 2 3 4 ( A dvanced L i fe Saving), 2 3 6 (Synchronized S w i m ming), 2 3 7 ( S kin and , c u ba Diving). ( I )

240-249 R I I Y T I I \'1 S 240 ( B e g i n n ing Modern Dance), 242 ( l nlermedia(e Mo dern Dance). 2 4 3 ( Advanced Modern Dance). 244 ( :olk and Social Dance) . (I)

250-259

A Tl I L r Tl C (; A M ES

25 1 W ( Vol ley ball a n d Field Hockey), 25 2W (Baske tball and Soft ball) , 25 3 M (Soccer and V Ilcyball), 2 5 4 \-1 ( Baske tball and Softba l l ) .

(I)

275

W 1 [R S A r ETY I N S T R U T I O N

The American R e d Cross Water Safety I n struc tor's Course. Prereq u isite : 2 3 4 . I II ( 2 )

277

FOUNDAT I O N S OF P l lYSI C A L ' DUCATION

The relations h i p of physical ed uca tion to education ; t he biological, sociologica l , p s y chological and mechanical principles underlying pbysical edu ca tion a n d a t h l e tics. Should be the ini t i al professional cou rsc taken in the School o f Physical E d u c ation. I I ( 2)

28 1

I N J U RY P R E V - NT I ON ND I H E R A P E UT I C C A R L;

Preve n t i on , trea tmen t and reh a b i l i t a t ion of all common inj mies sustained in athletics:

physical t h l' f a py by e m ploy m en t of electricity, massage, exercise, l ig h t, icc a n d mechanical dev i ces. I I ( 2 )

daily living; a fo u n d a t ion for u nderstan d i ng heal th behavior. Primarily designed for h e a l t h m i nor studen t s . 1\ a/y

282

3 26

P R O F ES S I ON A L ACT I V I T I E S : D A. N C L

Pl anning, teac h i ng a n d ev aluating dancc. Encom passes specific movement e d u ca tion activitit,s, condi tioning exercises. and the develop men t o f modern. social and fo l k dance skill for elemen tary school age an d older. Prere q u isite : I n termediate skill level or completion o f a begi n n i ng activ i ty course, PF 277. II a/y

283

P R O F E S S I Ol\' A L A C T I V I T I ES : G y ,vl i\ A S T I C S

Incl udes skill d e v e l o p me n t , teaching e x p e r tise, course plann ing, and safety techniques in ),,)' mnast ics. The co urse is designed for both el e m e n t a ry and high school ages. Prere q u is i t e : I n termediate skill level or comple tion of a begin n ing a c t iv i ty course, PE 277. I

284

I ' R O F E SS I O\' A L A CT I V I T I E S : T I: :, A ivl S P O R T S F O R ,vI EN

Pla n n i ng, teach in g and eval u a t i ng team a c t i v it ies: baske t ball, volley ball, soccer, spee dball, wrestling, touch foo t b a l l , softball. Prere quisite: P E 277. I I

285

P R O F ESS I O N A L ACT I V I T I E S : I N D I V I D U A L A� D D U A L S P O R T S

Pla n n i ng, teaching an d eval uat ing these activi ties: tennis. bad m in ton. track an d field . Prere q u isite : in terme d i a te skill l evel or complet ion o f a be),ri n n i ng activ i ty course, PE 277. I

287

P R O F E S S I O N A L A CT I V I T l lOS: R EC R E A T I O N A C T I V IT I E S

P l a n n i n g, teaching and eval u a t i ng the following: archery, bowling, gol f. o u tdoor e d u c a t ion an d various recreational sports. Prere qu isite : P I-: 277. I I

2 88

PROFESS I O � A L ACTI V I T I L S Tr Nvl SPO RTS F O R W m.I F N

Pl a n n i ng, teaching a n d eval uati ng these activ i ties: baske tball, field hockey, soccer, speedball, volley ball, softball. Prere q u i s i t e : P E 2 7 7 . II

292

F I RST A I D

This course meets req u ire men ts for the American Red Cross Standard Firs t Aid and Personal Safety. I I

295

S C I I O O L H E A LT H

Heal th conce p ts w h i ch relate t o t he total school heal th progra m , i n c l u d i n g i n s t ru c tion, services and enviro nm en t ; the rela tionship between heal th and al l levels o f e d u c a t i o n . N o t recommended for fresh m e n . I I I ( 2 )

322

PH Y S I C A L E D UC A T I O N j i\ T i l E E LE \I E N T A RY S C H OO L

O r g a n i z a t ion and a d m i n istration of a deve lopme n ta l program for grades K ·6 ; seq u e n t ial and progressive progr am m i ng ; large repertoire of a c t i v i ties. PE 277 is recomme nde d . I 1 1 ( 4-4)

3 24

P l RSO � A L H E A L T i l

Practical a p pl ication o f heal t h knowledge to

COlvl VI U N I TY I l L A LT H

Organ izat ions associated w i t h p u b l i c heal t h a n d their i m pl i ca tions to com m u n i ty health problems. Primarily designed for health m inor studen ts. I

32S

C U R R I C U L U M D E V E LOPM E N T A N D A D M I N I S T R A T I O\'

Organiza tion and ad m i n i s t ra t ion of physical ed ucation an d a t h l e tics ( 7· 1 2 ) ; curric u l u lll development i m ple m e n t a t io n . Prere q u is i t e : 277.

330

R F C R E AI I ON P R OG R A M M I N G

S u pervising an d ad m in istering recrea tional programs for the school o r com m u n i ty . I

331

T H E WO M A N A S A C O �l P ET I TO R

The psychology of coaching, coaching technique and m et hodol ogy : tra i n i ng, care an d prevention o f selected athletic injuries: sociological implications o f a t h l e tic com pe t i tion for women : designed for those in terested i n coaching women's competi tive teams. Not recom mended for freshmen. I ( 2)

332

O F F I C I A T I N G F O R WO M EN

Rules an d officiating techniq ues of volley bal l , baske t bal l ; designed to t r a i n q u a l ified wom e n officials ; o p e n to all women. Recommended as an elec tive for majors and m inors. 1 ( 2)

3 34

SC I EN T I F I C B A S I S F O R T RA I N I NG

Prese n t s p h y s i o l o g ic and kinesiologic appl ications to physical trai n i ng. Topics i n c l u de the development of m uscular strength and en d u rance, and the rela tionship of n u tr i tion, enviro n m e n t, sex, age a n d ergogenic aids to a t h l e tic performance. Prereq uisite: P E 277.

P R O F E SS I O N A L I'RAC T I C U M . C O AC l l l N G P R A CT I C U M

360, 3 6 1

A ssista n t coaching teaching ex perienccs; p l a n n ing and con d u c ting i n terCOl legiate ath letics and physical ed u ca tion i n s t ru c t ion : studen ts wor k under supcrvision of the head coach or physical educa tion instruc tors. Prereq uisite: one c o urse professional activi ties, departmen tal a pprova\. I I I ( 2)

362

R H Y T H M S A N D D A \' C E

Historical backgro u n d , establish m e n t and con d u c t of d a n ce progra m , tcaehing techniq ues a n d accompanimen t , p l a n n i ng and p r e se n t a tion o f d a n ces ; modern d a n ce tec h n i q ues. I a/y

370-37 5 C OA C H I N G T l l I : O R Y T e l' h n i ques, systems, tralll l ng methods, stratef,,)' a n d psych'Jlogy of coaching; 3 7 0 ( Baske t bal l ) , 3 7 1 ( Football), 3 7 2 (Track a n d Fiel d ) , 3 7 3 ( Base ball), 3 7 4 (Wrestling) . I I I ( 2)

3 9 1 . 392 T H E R AP HJTl C E X E RC I S E , A M 13 U LA T I O N T E C I I N I Q U ES

A

corrective therapy , c 1 inical · training program including lec ture, l a boratory experiences a n d clin ical pra c t i ces. Prerequisite: departmcn t a l approval ( max i m u m enroll ment 5). I II


1 14 478

PSY C l l O lOC I C A L CO\JC E PT S OF PI I Y S I C A l E CA f l , A D A T I l L : T I CS

A study of the i m por t a n t psychological fa tors ( methods of cO Dlmunicating, use of te:H:bing aids, learning s trat�gies, motivations, elc.) in the learn ing and teaching of gross motor skills. Prerequisite: PE 277. II aly

48 1 L ' E RC I S E PH Y S I O LOGY Scie n t i i i c hasis for training and

the physiological erred of exercise on t he h u ma n body. Prerequisite: Biology 1 63 .

482

K I I [ I O lO

Y

483

REC R E AT I Ol\ A MI ISTRATION

Deals with Ule s t r u c t ural and mechanical fu n c tion of l he musculoskeletal system. The kinesiological applications of ana tomical information i ' given prime consideration. Prereq uisit : Biology 1 6 3. n

'nlC organization, management and direc tion

of re c re a t i o n a l s e r v ices: legal basis, a d ministral ive procedures, financial aspeds, person nel management, facilities a n d i n ternal orga niz a lion. II

484

M E AS U R E 1>.'t ENT AJrD E V A L U AT I O N I N PlfY I C A l ďż˝ D C ATI O,

The selec tion, l'o n s t ru c lion and in terpretation of evaluatory tech n iques related t o t he physical education program . I I aly (2)

485

B I OM EC H A N I C S

An application of physical l a w s to sports activi ties. Principles of motion, force, and equ il i bri um arc stressed. Analyses of various sports skills are made. II ( 2)

49 1

I

D EP F NDE IT ST DY

Prerequisite: conSl: n t of t he director. I II S

( 1 -4) 597

Counseling and G u idance: A program designed primarily for studen ts who wish to qllal ify as public school cOllnselors (elementary and secondary) or s t lldent person nel workers in higher education. c . Elemen tary Classroom Teaching: A prog ram for clemen tary teachers who desire advanced work i n elemen tary c l assroom teaching or who wish to q u a l i fy as elemen tary school s u pervisors o r consu 1 13n ts. Along w i t h the major field, the student i s reqll ired to com plete cou rses in a sll p por ting aC:ldernic area. d. Secondary Classroom Teaching: A program for j u nior high and h i gh school teachers who wish to increase their preparation for leaching in a n academic area tallgh t i n the secondary school. 2. H u mani ties A degree prol,'Tam designed for l i brarians, clergy men , teac hers and o thers who wish to ex t e n d and broaden their understanding and a p p recia tion of Ihe variolls fields o f t he humanities. 3. ocial Sciences A degree program designed for personnel workers i n industry, welfare workers, workers in the broad area of correction s l ihrarians, clergy m e n , teachers, and o thers who wish ( 0 extend and broaden their understanding and appreciation of the variolls fi Ids of the social sciences. I t i ncl udes the Human Relations Prooram offered at Ft. Lewis and Me hord AFB.

M ASTER OF BUSIN ESS A D M I N ISTRATION This degree program is designed 10 p rovide,

through educa tion, a fou ndation responsible leadership in business.

for

M ASTER OF P U B LI C A DM I N ISTRATION

,R!

U A T E R E S E A RC l I

Open to grad uat e s t ll d e n t s whose minor i s i n t h e freld of physical edllcation . Prereqllis i t e : conse n t o f t h e director. I I I S ( 2-4)

DMSION OF GRADUATE STUDIES The ivision of Gradllate S t lldies is a n a l l,"niversity d ivision whidl coordinates grad u a te level work. The University offers the following rad uate level programs: *

MASTER OF ARTS I.

b.

Ed llc a tion a. E l e men tary or Secondary School A d m i n istration: A program i n tended for teachers who desire t o en ter the field of school a d m i n istration. The s t u d e n t who wishes to <Iualify for the provisional or standard principal's credential (elemen tary or secondary or gencJal) w i l l take a major in this field and complete courses i n a supporting academic area of the University. S t u d e n t s may m ajor i n lhis field w i t hou t q l l al ifying for a principal's credential.

This degree p rogram is i n tended to provide, t h rough ed u c a tion, a founda tion for rcsponsihlc leadership in the managemcn t o f public agenl:ies.

MASTER OF M U S I C A degree program intend ed for q u al ified studen ts who desire a concentration in m usic education.

MASTER O F N A TURAL SCIEN CES A degree program designed especially for teachers who need to extend and broaden their knowledge ill the fields of science and m a t h e m a tics.

* De t a i l s of these programs, including adm ission re<jlliremt, nts, procedures, degree and research req u i re m e nts. are contained i n the (;radual" Caia/oK which i s available from the office of the Dean of rad uate S t udies.


1 16

e Board of Re ent OWNERSHIP. S UPPORT, GOVE R N M E NT

The University is owned and operated by P a c i f i c Lu t h e r a n U n iversi ty, Inc., a Washington corporation whose purpose is to main tain a Christian institu tion of higher learning. Membership of this corporation coincides with membership of the North Pacific District of the American Lutheran Church and the membership of that portion of the ALe's Rocky Moun tain District which is located in Idaho and Montana, west of the Continental Divide. The ann ual meeting of the corporation is held in conj unction with the annual convention of the North Pacific District. Voting members include the members of the Board of Regents, and the pastors and lay delegates of congregations in the constituent area. The University receives regular financial support from the American Lu theran Church, the Pacific Northwest Synod of the Lutheran Church in America and from the Pacific Lutheran University Alumni Association. In addition to Church assistance, the University r e c e i v es c o n s i d e r a b l e s u p p o r t from individuals, organizations, and businesses throughout the nation and wodd. The pOlicy-making and governing body of the University is the Board of Regents. On the basis of reco mmendations made by the President, it charts a course for the developmcnt of the total program of tile University and strives to provide essential funds. The University corporation's constitution provides for not more than 30 regents elected for three-year terms. Fifteen regents represent the North Pacific and Rocky Mountain Districts of the American Lutheran Church, six are chosen by the Pacific Northwest Synod of the Lutheran Church i n America, three represent the PLU Alumni Association, and not more than 6 regents-at-Iarge are chosen by the Board of Regents. The President of the University, the Presiden t of the North Pacific District (ALC), and the President of the Pacific Northwest Synod ( LCA), are regents by virtue of their position. The student body and the facu l ty have non-voting representatives who meet with the Board.

O F F ICERS

M R. THOMAS W. ANDERSON, Chairman MR. RICHARD KLEIN, Vice Chairman MR. LAWRENCE H A UGE, Secre tary EX-OF F I CIO 2007 Third Aven u e , Sea t tle, Washing ton 9 8 1 2 1 , A I.C BISHOP A.G. FJ ELLMAN, 5 5 1 9 Phinney Ave nue N o r t h , Sea t t le, Wa sh in gto n 98 1 0 J ,

BISHOP CLARENCE SOLBERG,

I.CA

Presid e n t , P L U , Tacoma, Washington 9844 7 . PI. U

DR. WILLIAM O. RIEKE, 1 9 73- 1 9 76 TERM

MR. THOMAS W. ANDERSO N, 7 5 25 H egra I{ o a d . T a c o m a , W a s h i ng t o n 9846 5 , R exell/-a/- I.arge

6 5 05 Al fare t t a S. W. , Tacoma, Was h i n g t o n 98499, A lulI/lli MR. PAU L HOGL UND, P.O. Box 1 8 6 9 , S c a t t i c , Washi n g t o n 9 8 1 1 1 , rCA DR. RICHARD KLEIN, 96 1 8 - 5 9 t h Avenue S . W., Tacoma, Washi n g t o n 98499, A L C DR. JESSE PFLUEGER, 6 0 8 We s t Division, Ep h r a t a, Was h ingto n 9 8 8 2 3 , A I.C REV. ROB ERT QUELLO, P.O. Box 465 , P u ll m a n , Washington 9 9 1 6 3 , /I L C REV. D R . A LFRED STONE, 1 604 N . E. 5 0 t h S tree t , Sea t t l e , Washington n l 0 5 , LCA REV. F. WAR REN STRAI N, 6 7 20 East Grcenlakc Way North Se a t t l e , Washin"ton 9 8 1 03 , A L C â&#x20AC;˘ , " REV. DONALD TAYLOR, Box 4 1 l A , R o u t e O n e , Guemas I s l a n d , An ac o r t es , Washington 98 2 2 1 , ALC DR. GEORGE A. WADE, 1 9 1 0 Fairvicw Eas t , Seat tle, Wa s hi n g t o n 9 8 1 0 3 , Rexell l -a/- Large

MR. CARL FYNBOE,

1 974- 1 977 T E R M

M R. THEODORE C. CARLSTROM , 1 5 5 6 We bster S t ree t , Pa lo Al t o , C alifor ni a 94 3 0 1 , A lulI1l1i

M R. ROBERT HADLAND, 255 \;Iaple H ill Road , H o p k i ns, \;I i n n e s o t a 5 5 34 3 , R egen/-a/-Large

MR. EMERY HI LDEBRANDT, 3 6 5 5 N.W. l I ig h l a n d Drive, Corvallis, O regon 9 7 3 J O , L eA

MR. MELVIN R. KN UDSON, 6 9 28 - 1 00 t h S treet S . W. . Ta c o m a , W a sh in g to n 98499, A LC


1 17

\IR. J ERROLD KO EST ER. 4 1 05 N o r t h �'I o r n i n !.! S t ree t , Corva l li s , Oregon 9 7 3 3 0 , " I. L/I MRS. DOROT H Y SCHN A I B L E , 1 1 1 1 Fast ' i rs t, M o sco w , I d a ho 8 3 8 4 3 , A I. C M R . RICHA RD N E I LS , 1 1 9 2 1 C ra ve l l y Lake Orive S.W., Tacoma, W a sh i n g t o n 9 8 4 9 9 , Re�elll -" 1- l.arKe M R: ST E R L I N G RYGG, Box 4 2 9 , K a l i s p e l l , Mo n tana 5 9 9 0 I , /II.C M R. G E RA L D SC H I M K E, 2 24 7 P resco t t A v e n u e S . W. , Sea t t le, Washin!1ton 9 8 1 26,

A rC

DR. ROY SCHW A RZ, 1 00 3 9 - 4 1 st S e a t tic, Wa s h i ngton 9 8 1 2 5 , A I.e

N.L.,

1 975- 1 97 8 TERM M R. G EO R G E L DAVIS, J R., 4 7 1 3 Pe t e rson Orive N . W. , C ; i� I l a rb o r , Washin�ton 9 8 3 3 5 , Regelll-al- LarKe M R_ R. GENE G R ANT, 2035 One Washington Pl a z a , Ta c o m a , Wa s h i ng t o n 9 8 4 0 2 , Regenl-al- I.arge MR. LAWRENCE H A U GE, I S O No. 1 6 7 , C O II r t H ouse, We na tc h ec , W ;, s hi ng t o n 9 8 8 0 I , /l/lIIlllli M R. G A L V EN I RB Y , 1 4 3 4 3 N . r. A l to n , Por t la n d , O r e g o n 9 7 2 20, A I.e M RS . R UTH J E FFRI ES, 181\ North Ilenne t t Tac o m a , Wasllin)',ton 9 8 4 0 6 , I.CII M R. RO G ER C. LARSON, 205 S.W. S k y l i n c D r i v e , Pu l l ma n , Washington 9 9 1 6 3 , A I. C MISS F L O R EN C E O R V I K , 4 7 1 2 Sou t h Napa S tree t , Spokane, Washing t o n 99203, L CA M R. C LAYTON B. PETERSON, 1 64 28 l3 al de r Lane, B o t h e l l , \Va s h i n � t o n 9 80 1 1 , /I I. C DR. C H R J STY U L L E L A N D, 1 5 4 24 -9 t h Ave n u e S . W. , Sea t tle, Was h i n g t o n 9 8 1 66,

,1 /.('

REV. DA V I D WOLD, 3 7 1 9 2 1 s t S t ree t Puy a l l u p , Wa s l l. i n g t o n 9 8 3 7 1 , /I I. C

N.L,

A DV ISORY M R.

PE R R Y

Pre sident

B.

H E N D RICKS, J R. , V ice I : i n a n ce & O p e r a t i o n s , 1'L.l) ,

li'easlIrc:r DR. RICHARD J UN G K UNTZ, Pruvost, l' L. li ,

AUlllillislral i,!c DR. PH I L I P B E A L, V i cc Pres i d e n t for S t u d e n t L i fe , P LU M R. HARVEY N E U F E L D, D i rect or of' Collegiu m , P L U 'iRS. L UC I L L E G I RO U X, D i r ec t or 01 U n ivers i t y Re l a t i on s, PL.U DR. PHILIP A. N O RDQUIST, Depa r t me n t 01 H is tory DR. DAVID O LSON, S c h o o l o f P h y si ca l E d u c a t io n D R . DWIGHT Z U L A U F , S c h o o l or Business Ad rn i n i s t r a t ion M R. RON B ENTON, ;\ S P L LJ P re s iden t , Swdelll MR. JIM N I E MAN, A S P LLJ E , e c u ti v e V ice Pr es i de n t MR. G E O F F R E Y STRAJ'II G E, Rl.sidencc H a l l Co u nc i l Chairman

CHURCH O F F I CI A LS A M E RICAN LUT H E R A N CH URCH General DR. DAVID W. PREUS , Presiden t , 4 2 2 Sou t h F i f t h S t ree t , M in nca poUs, M .i n nesota 5 5 4 1 5 M R. N . B U RDETT E N E LSON, Treasurer, 422 Sou t h Fifth S t re e t , M i n n eapol is, ·Minnesota 5 5 4 1 5 M R. A RN O L D M ICKE LSON, Secretary, 4 2 2 Sou t h hrt h S tree t , M i n ne a p o l is, M i nnesota 554 1 5

North Pacific District DR. C L A R E NCE ( B ishop), 2()07 Wa shington 9R 1 2 1

SOLB ERG, President A v e n u e , Se a t t l e ,

Third

DIV ISI ON FOR COLLEGE A N D U N I V E RS I TY S E RVI CES REV. RO B E RT G . BORGWARDT, 3 1 2 Wis<.:onsin Avenue, \'lacJison, Wiscons i n 5 3 7 0 3 ( t e r m e x p i res 1 9 7 6 ) M RS. S Y L V I A I . BOSS E , 8 6 5 6 Bay b e r ry D r iv e N . r . , Warre n . O h i o 44484 ( 1 97 6 ) M R. C H A R L E S R . B R U N ING, 2 5 0 0 Sea bury l\ v e n u c, \'I inneapo l i s , \'I i n n cs o t a 5 5 406 ( 1 9 78) M RS. FAITH (JOSHI-I) B U RGESS, 3 8 West B ro ad w a y , C ; c t t y sb u rg, Pe n n s y lv a n i a 1 7 3 2 5 ( 1 978) MR. OTIS G R A N D E , I I I I - 1 4 t h A v e n u e, I :ox Island, Was h i n g t o n 9 8 3 3 3 ( 1 9 7 6 ) R E V. DENNIS V . G R i f F I N , 3 2 7 Sou t h D a k o t a Ave nue, S i o u " hI lls, S o u t h D<J k o t a 5 7 1 02 ( 1 978) MR. EDWI N W. G U N B E RG , 7 70 1 Win t c rbcrry Place, B e t h esd a , �Iary l a n d 2 0 0 3 4 ( 1 97 6 ) M RS. M E R L I N E (THOMAS) MCCLOUD, 1 99 5 5 La ud e r , Detroit, M i c h i)!an 4 8 2 35 ( 1 978) RE V. J O H N N . PARBST, 9 7 4 H a l l A v e n u e , West S t . Pa u l , M i n n e s o t a 55 1 1 8 ( 1 9 7 6 )

LUT H E R A N C H URCH I N AM E R IC A , PA CIF IC NORTHWEST SYNOD DR. A.G. F.l EL L M A N , Preside n t , 5 5 1 9 Phinney A v e n ue No r t h , Sea t t le, Washington 98 103 ' The Pacific Northwest Synod of the Lu theran C h u rch in America h as accepted Pacific Lu the ran University as one of thc inst i t u t ions o f higher education w h i c h it endorses and supports. The Synod has representa tion on the Universi ty's Board of Regents, b u t does not sharc ownership o f the inst i t u tion.

REPRESE NTING BOARDS OF COLLEGE E D UCATION MR. CL IFFORD JOHNSON, Acting Execu t ive D i r e c t o r , Division fo r C o ll c ge and U n iversity S er v i ce s , The ;\ meri can Lu t h eran C h urch DR. RICHARD SOLBERG, becllt ive S e c re t ar y , Board o t' Co U e gc Fd ucation and C h u rc h Voca tio n s , L u t heran Church in A ' l l c i-ica


1 18

O F F I C E OF T H E P R ES I D E N T Will iam O. Rieke Charles Brennan Lucille Giroux James L. Peterson Paul Porter Kenneth Dunmire Mil ton L. Nesvig James Beckman Donald Jerke

Presiden t Execu t ive Associate A ss i s t a n t t o Preside n t , U n ivers i t y Re l a t io n s D i re c t o r o f Pu b l ic I n fo rm a t ioll D i rec t o r of G r a p h i c s a n d P u h l i c a t io n s C h i e f P h o t ogra p h e r' Assi s t a n t t o t h e Preside n t U n ivers i t y M i n i s t e r U n ivers i t y r",l i n is t e r

O F F I C E OF T H E P RO VOST Richard Jungkuntz Sue Clarke Curtis E. Huber John Herzog James Halseth Gundar J. King Kenneth A. Johnston Nan Nokleberg Richard A. Moe Noel Abrahamson Doris G . Stucke David M. Olson James Van Beek Ph illip Miner Donald Yoder Albert Perry Charles Nelson Loleta Espeseth J udd C . Doughty David Christian Victor Nelson Rob rt Menzel Frank Haley

Pro v o s t A d m i n i s t r a t ive Assi s t a n t C h a i r m a n , Division o f H u m a n i t i es C h a i r m a n , D iv i s i o n of N a t u ra l S c iences C h a i r m a n . Division of S o c i a l Scie nces Dea n , School o f B u s i n ess Administration De a n , S c h o o l o f E d u c a t i o n D i re c t o r , Teacher Place m e n t a rHl F i ft h Year C o o r d i n a t o r De a n , Sch ool of F i n e A r t ' Coordina t o r of Public Even t s D i r c t or , S c h o o l o f N u rs i n g D i re c t o r , S c h ool o f Physical Education Dire c t o r o f A dm issions Assoc i a t e D i rec t o r o r A d m issions Assis t a n t D i rector o r A d m issions Direc t or or F i n a n c ia l Aid Regis t ra r Assis t a n t R gi s t ra r D i r e c t o r o f B ro a d c a s t Se rvices a n d I ns t r u c t i o n a l M a terials C h i e f E n gi n e e r , R a d i o a n d Televis i o n S t u d i o O p e r'a t i o n s S u p e rvisu r . R a d io a n d Television O i r-e c t o r o f C l IO I C E Lihrarian


1 19

OFFI

E OF F I N A N C E A N D O P E R AT I O N S Perry B . Hendricks, Jr. Bet ty Gj ura 'h Ann Wa l ton Dawn Hill Patricia Hill s Howard L. Vedell Larry lien Richard Shaver Fnmces Logan Ervin Marlow Edrice Addleman James B . Phillips James Barlow Melvin Solheim Weldon Moore Le oy Dave Bradley Mu nn Robert M. Torrens Mary Hegtved t Lynn Isaacson Darlene Ca m p be l l David M . Olson James Ki t tilsby

Vice Presiden t . F i n a n c e a n d O p e r a t ions A c t i n g C o n t ro l l e r D i rec t o r o f Acco u n t in g M a nager o f S t u d e n t Accou n ts Federal Loan A d v i s o r D i rec t o r , General Services D i re c t o r , C e n t r a l Services C h i e f o f Se c u r i t y C h i e f Te l e p h o n e Opera t o r Manager of G o l f Cou rse Direc t o r . C o m p u t e r C e n t e r a n d I n s t i t u t i o n a l Rese a r c h D i re c t o r , Physic a l Plan t M a i n t e n ance F o r e m a n H o u se ke e p i ng F o r e m a n Crou n d s Foreman Chief E n gineer D i rec t o r , Pe rs o n n e l D i rec t o r , F o o d Serv ices Assist a n t D i r e c t or , D i e t i c i a n Dire c t or , Hoo k s t o re Assis t a n t to Director D i r e c t o r o r A t h le t ics Assi s t a n t D i re c t or of A t h l e t i c s

O F F I C E O F D E V E LO P M E N T Da i d B mten Ronald C. Col t o m Edgar Larson Jane Shanaman

D i rector Director Di rec t o r Direc t o r

of of of ur

Deve i o p m e n t A l u m n i Asso c i a t io n Deferred Giving Special G i v i n g Programs

O F F l C E OF STU D E N T L I F E Philip E . neal J eremy Stringer Ethan Allen Gary M i net ti

Richard French Ricl13rd Seeger Harold Gamble Margaret Wickstrom Marvin Swenson

Vice Preside n t and De a n , S t u d e n t L i fe D i rec t o r . Reside n t ia l Li fe Assis t a n t D i rec t o r , Reside n t ia l Li fe Ac t i n g Dire c t o r , C o u n s e l i n g a n d Te s t i n g e n t e r ; Di rec t u r , H e a l t h Services D irec t o r , C a r e e r Planning a n d P l acemcn t Learning S k i l l s C o o rd i n a t o r Direc t o r . M i n or i t y A ffa i r s D i re c t or , F o re ign S t u d e n t s a n d S pecial Programs D i re c t u r , Un iversi t y C e n t e r


1 20

The : �aculty W l L LI A M O. R I E K E , 1 9 7 5 - , P res i d e n t , B . A . , P:l c i fi c L u t h e r a n U n iv e rs i t y , 1 9 5 3 : I . D . , U n iv e r s i t y o f W a s h i n g t o n S c h o o l o f \-k d i c i n c , 1 9 5 8 . M A T H IL D A S . AC U F F , 1 ') 7 4- , I n s t ru c t o r o f N u rs i n g : B . S . N . , M e d i c a l C u l l e ge o f V i rgi n i a , 1 ') (, 5 : "I . S . , V i rg i n i a C o m m o n w e a l t h U n iversi t y , 1 9 7 4 . S ElIC H I ADACHI, 1 ') (' 7 - . A ssoc i a t e Professor o f Psy c h o l o g y , C o u n se l o r , C o u n se l i n g a n d T es t i n g Service: B . A . , J a m e s t o w n C o l lege , 1 9 4 CJ : B . D . , M cC o r m i c k Se m i n a r y , 1 95 1 , M . ;\ . , Ed. D., T e a c h e r s C o l le g e , Colu m b ia n iv c r s i t y . 1 9 5 7 , 1 % 0 . H A R R Y S . A D A M S , 1 9 4 7 - 1 9 5 1 , 1 % 2 -, Pro fessnr n f P h y s i c s ; B . S . , M . S . , K a n s a s State n iv c rs i t y , 1 9 4 5 , 1 9 4 7 : P h . D . , U n iv e r s i t y o f M i n n e so t a , 1 9 6 2 . S H I R L E Y A I K I N , I 'J 7 5 - , B . S . N . , B . A . , P a c i f i c L u t h e ra n U n iv e rs i t y . 1 9 7 1 . A N G E L I A G . A L E X A N D E R , 1 9 7 1 - , A s s i s t a n t Pro fessor o f B i o l ogy , B . S . , J u n i a t a C o L l eg e , 1 9 6 2 : 1vI . A . , U n iv e rs i t y o f C a l i f o rn ia a t D a v i s , 1 ') 6 6 . C H A R L E S D . A N D E R S O N , 1 9 5 9 - , P ro fe s s o r o f C h e m is t ry : B . A . , S t . O l a f C o l l e g e , 1 9 5 2 ; ;\ . M . , P h . D. , l I a rv a r d U n iv e rs i t y , 1 9 5 4 , 1 9 5 9 . G E O R G E F . A R B A U G H , 1 9 5 9 -, P r o fe ssor o f P h i l o s o p h y : B . A . , ;\ u g u s t a n a C o l lege ( R o c k I s l a n d ) , 1 9 5 5 ; M . A . , P h . D . , U n ive r s i t y of I o w a , 1 l) 5 8 , 1 9 5 1) . C A R O L A U P I N G , 1 'J 7 4 - , I n s t r u c t or o f P h y s i c a l E d u c a t io n : U n iv e rs i t y . 1 9 6 9 ; M . b! . , K e n t S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y , 1 9 7 4 .

D.

B.S.,

V a l para iso

S T U A RT B A N C R O FT , 1 9 () 7 - 6 9 , 1 9 7 1 -, A s sis t a n t Pro fessor o f B u s i n e ss A d m i n i s t ra t io n ; B . S . , 1\-I . B . A . , A r i z o n a S t a t e U n ivers i t y , 1 9 6 3 , 1 9 6 5 : P h . D . , n iv e rs i t y

o f Pcnnsylva n i a ,

1 973.

K E N N E T H E . B A T K E R , 1 9 6 6 - , A ss u c i a t e P r o fe s s o r o f M a t h e m a t i c s : B . A . , W a r t b u r g C o l l e g e , 1 ') 5 7 ; M . A . , P h . D . , U n iv e rs i t y o f C o l o ra d o , 1 9 6 1 , 1 9 7 1 . M Y R A 1 . B A U G H M A N , 1 9 7 0- , A s sis t a n t Pro fe sso r o f E d u ca t io n ; B . A . , P a c i f i c L u t h e r a n U n i ve rs i t y . 1 9 6 2 : M . tel . , W e s t e rn W a s h i n g t o n S t a t e Co l l ege . 1 9 6 9 ; E d . D . , U n iv c rs i t y o f N e b ra s k a , 1 ') 7 5 . P H I L I P E . B E A L , 1 9 6 8 -, A s s i s t a n t P r o fessor o f E d u c a t i o n , V i ce Pres i d e n t a n d D e a n f o r S t u d e n t L i fe : A . B . , C o rn e l l C o l l ege' , 1 9 5 7 : M . A . , N o r t h w e s t e r n U n iversi t y , 1 9 6 1 ; P h . D . , U n i v e rs i t y o f O rego n . 1 9 6 5 . K A T H E R I N E B E C K M A N , 1 9 7 2- , A ss i s t a n t Pro fessor o f P h y s i c a l E d u c a t io n ; A . B . , S t a n fo r d U n ivt'rsi t y , 1 9 6 7 ; M . A . , U n iv e r s i t y o f S o u t h e rn C a l i fo r n i a . 1 9 7 0 . W I L L I A M B E C V A R , 1 9 7 3 - . A ss i s t a n t Pro fessor o f C o m m u n i c a t io n A r t s ; B . A . , U n iv e rsi t y o f N o r t h e r n I o w a , 1 9 6 1 ; M . A . . S t a t e U n ive r s i t y o f S o u t h D a k o t a , 1 9 6 4 : P h . D . , K a n sas U n iv e rs i t y , 1 9 7 5 . i' P A U L F . B E N T O N , 1 9 6 9- , Assoc i a t e P r o fess o r C o l l e g e . 1 9 6 5 : P h . D . , P r i n c e t o n U n iv e rs i t y , 1 ') 7 0 .

of

E ng l is h ; B . A . , W h i t w o r t h

L O I S M . B E R G E R S O N , 1 9 7 0- . A sso c i a t e P r o fessor o f U n iv e rs i t y , 1 9 4 6 : !\-I . N . . U n iv e rs i t y o f W a s h i n gt o n , 1 9 5 2 .

Nursing:

B.S.,

Loyola

F E R N B E TT R I D G E , 1 9 7 5 -. A s s i s t a n t Pro fe s s o r o f N u rs i n g : B . S . N . , M . S . , U n iv e rs i t y of U tah, 1 95 2 , 1 9(A. W.

H A RO L D U n iv e rs i t y ,

B E X T O N , 1 9 6 5 - 1 9 7 6 , Pro fessor o f P s y c h o l o g y : B . A . , M c M as t e r 1 9 3 5 ; M . A . . U n iversi t y o f Saska t c h e w a n , 1 9 5 0 ; Ph . D . , M c G i l l U n i v e rs i t y , 1 9 5 3 .

+ Sa b ba t icai Leave, 1 '0 7 6-7 7


1 21 G A Y L E B L O M M E , 1 9 7 5 -, A s s i s t a n t Pru fessor of E n glis h ; B . A . , Oak l a n d U n i v e rs i t y , 1 9 6 7 ; M . A . , P h . D . , U n i v e rs i t y o f 1vl i c h iga n , 1 9 6 8 , 1 9 7 3 . G R A C E B L O M Q U I ST , 1 9 3 9- 1 9 7 6 , Pro fessor o f E n g l i s h ; B . A . , Co ncor d i a Co llege ( M uo r h e a d , M i n n . ) , 1 9 3 4 ; .'vI . A .. S y ra c u s e U n i ve r s i t y , 1 ') 3 9 . =

R A N D O L P H F . BO H A N N O N , 1 9 69-. A ssocia t e Professur o f B io l u gy ; B . A . , S l . O l a f Cu lkge, 1 9 6 5 ; P h . D . , P u r d u e U n ivnsi t y , 1 9 6 51 .

J A M E S E. B RIN K , 1 9 7 0-. Assis t a n t Pro fesso r o f \ i 'l a t he l ll u t ic s : A . B . , H o p e C o l l ege, 1 9 6 5 : iI·I . S . , P h . D . , l u w a S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y , 1 9 6 7 , 1 9 7 0 . W I L L I A M A. B RO C H T R U P , 1 ')7 S-. A s s i s t a n t Pru fessor o f E d u c a t iu n ; B . A . , U n i v e r s i t y u f C a l i f o r n i a a t L o s A n geks, 1 9 () 2 ; M . A . , C a l i fu rn i a S t a t t' Co llege, 1 9 7 0 ; P h . D . , U n i v e rs i t y o f W as h i n g t o n , 1 9 7 4 . H . J O S EP H B R O E K E R , J R. , 1 9 6 6-, Assi s t a n t Pru fessor o f P h y s i c a l E d u ca t i u n ; B . A. , M . S . , W a s h i n g t o n S t a t e U n iv e rs i t y , 1 9 6 5 , 1 9 6 7 ; P h . D. , U n i v e r s i t y o f Orego n , 1 9 7 5 . C H R I S TOP H E R B R O W N I N G , 1 ') 7 4-, A s s i s t a n t Pro kssor o f H i s t o r y ; A . B . , O h e r l i n C o l l ege, 1 9 6 7 ; M . A . , U n iv e rs i t y o f Wi s c o n s i n , 1 % 8 ; P h . D . , U n iVl'rsi t y o f Wisco n s i n , 1 9 7 5 . S T A N L E Y L . B R U E , 1 Sl 7 1 - , Ass ist a n t Pro fessor o f Ecu n o m i c s ; B . A . , A ug u s t a n a Col lege ( So u t h D a k o t a ) , 1 9 6 7 : Ph . D . , U n i v e r s i t y o f I e b r a s k a , 1 9 7 1 . R O B E R T J . B U R K , 1 97 3- , I n s t ru c t o r o f N u rsi n g ; B . S . , Pa c i fi c L u t he r a n U n i v e rs i t y , 1 97 3 . S A M U E L B. B . C A R L E T O N , 1 9 6 9 -, Ass i s t a n t P ro fesso r o f F o re ign L a nguages l Greek and La t i n ) ; B . A . , U n iv e rs i t y o f the S o u t h , 1 9 5 Y ; M . A . , J o h n s H o p k i n s U n i v e rs i t y , 1 9 6 1 ; P h . D . , U n i v e r s i t y o f T e x a s l A u s t l n ) , 1 9 7 3 . J O H N T . C A R LS O N , 1 9 7 5 - , Assis t a n t Pro fessor o f B io l ugy ; B . A . , C a r l e t o n C o l l e g e , 1 9 6 6 ; Ph . D. , U n i v e r si t y o f M i n n eso t a , 1 9 7 5 . R O Y E . C A R LSO N , 1 9 6 2 - , Assis t a n t Pro fessor o f P h y s ic a l E d u c a t io n ; U n i v e rs i t y o f Wash i n g t o n , 1 9 4 8 ; M . S . , W a s h i n g t o n S t a t e U n i v e rs i t y , 1 9 6 2 .

B.A.,

M A R Y I VA C A R P E NT E R , 1 9 7 4- , A ss i s t a n t Pro fessor o f N ur s i n g : B . S . , W h i t w o r t h C o l lege, 1 9 5 6 ; M . S . , S y ra c u s e U n iv e rs i t y , 1 9 6 0 . C L A R A C A RPER, 1 9 7 2 - , I n s t ru c t o r i n N ufs i n g ; B . S . I'\ . , U n i v e r s i t y , 1 9 5 7 ; M . N . , U n ivers i t y o f W a s h i n g t o n , 1 ') 5 9 .

W a sh i n g t o n

Sta Ie

D A V I S W . C A R V E Y , 1 >,) 7 1 - , Asso c i a t L: Professor o f B u s i n e ss A d m i n i s t r a t i on ; B . B . A . , M . B . A . , P a c i fi c L u t h e ra n U n i ver s i t y , 1 9 6 5 , 1 9 68 ; D . B . A . , T e x a s Te c h n i c a l U n iv e rsi t y , 1 9 7 2 . G A R Y A. C H A S E , 1 9 7 0-, A s s is t a n t P r o fe s s o r o f P h y s i c a l E d u c a t io n ; B . S . , M . S . , W a s h i n g t o n S t a t e U n i v e rs i t y , 1 ') 6 2 , 1 9 6 4 . ST E F A N C . C H R I ST O P H E R , 1 9 7 5 -, Assu c i a t e Pro fessor o C S o c i o l o gy ; B . A . , U n i v e r si t y o f W a s h i n g t o n , 1 9 () I ; M . S . S . , I n s t i t u t e o f S o c i a l S t u d i es, T h e H ague, 1 9 6 0 ; Ph. D . , U n i v e r s i t y of W a s h i n g to n , 1 9 6 6 . K E N N E T H E. C H R I S T O P H E R S O N , I ') 5 8 -, A ssoc i a t e Professo r o f R e l ig i o n ; B . A . , A u g u s t a n a Co lkge, 1 9 4 6 ; B . T h . , L u t h e r Theol o g i c a l S e m i n a ry , 1 9 5 0 ; I ' h . D . , U n iv e rs i t y o f M i n n e s o t a , 1 9 7 2 . M A R I E C H U R N E Y , I '! 7 4- , W a s h i n g t o n S t a t e C o l l ege. 1 9 7 0.

Assi s t a n t 1 96 1 ;

Professor

M . Ed . ,

of

E d u c a t io n :

B.A.,

Western

E d . D . , U n i v e rs i t y o f F l o r i d a , 1 96 5 ,

ANTHONY C L AR K E , 1 ') 7 3 -, Assis t a n t Pro fes sor o f S o c i o logy , Ed u c a t i o n , C o o r d i n a t o r o f E t h n i c S t u d i es ; B . A . , U n i v e rs i t y o f Orego n , 1 9 7 1 ; M . E d . , P h . D . , U n i v e rs i t y o f ' e h ra s k a , I Sl 7 I , 1 9 7 3 . F R A N C I S B . C O L L I N G E, 1 9 7 1 - 1 9 7 (1 , Asso c i a t e Professor o f Pu l i t i c a l S c i e n c e : B . A . , M . A . , U n i v e r s i t y of C a l i Co rn ia a t B e rkeley , 1 9 5 8 , 1 9 6 0 ; P h . D . , U n i v e rs i t y o f W a s h i n g t o Il , 1 9 6 4 . M I C H A E L C O M T E , 1 9 7 3 - , A ss i s t a n t Pro fessor o f S o c i o l u gy ; :\'I . A . . Port l a n d S t a t e U n i v e rs i t y , 1 9 7 0 . DO R O T H Y M. C O N E , 1 9 6 1 - , Asso c i a t e U n ivers i t y o f M i n n e s o t a , 1 9 5 6 . 1 9 5 9 .

Pro Cesso r

of

N u rs i n g ;

B.S. N.,

M.Ed ..

D E N N I S C O X , 1 9 7 2 - , A r t i s t in R e s id e n c e ; B . A. , P a c i f i c Lu t h e ra n U n i v e rs i t y , 1 % 6 ; 1v1 . F . A . , Wa s h i ng t o n S t a l l: U n i v e rs i t y , 1 9 7 2 . LI

DA C O X , 1 '1 7 5 - , Assis t a n t Pro f'essor o f E d u ca t i o n : B . A . . K a nsas Wesl e y a n ol lege , 1 9 6 5 ; M . S . , P h . D . , U n i v e rs i t y o f Ka n s a s , 1 9 6 8 , I 'n o .

=Sp �cial Leave, 1 9 76- 7 7


1 22 "( DA V i D P. D A H L, 1 9 69- , Assis t a n t Pro fessor of M u s i c : B . A . , Pac i fi c L u t hL� r a n l J n i v e rs t t y , 1 9 6 0 ; M . A . , r nive rs i t y o f Wash i n g t o n , 1 9 6 2 . CARROL , D E B O W R , 1 9 64 - 6 8 . 1 ') 7 0-, Asso c i a te Professor o f Ed u c a t i o n ; B . S . , M id l a n d Co llege, 1 9 5 2 ; 1>U� d . , E d . D . , U n iv e rs i t y o f N e b raska , 1 9 5 9 . 1 9 6 4 . J O H N W . DO B B I E , 1 9 7 3 - , ,sist a n t P r o fessor o f B u si n ess A d m i n i s t r a t io n ; B . A . S c . , M . B . A . , Un i v e rs i t y o f B r i t i s h Co l u m h i a, 1 9 5 1 , 1 9 6 5 ; P h . D . , U n ive rsi t y of C a l i fo rn i a , 1 9 7 2 . J lID D C . D O U G H T Y , 1 9 6 2-, Ass o c i a t e Pro fessor o f o lll ill u n i c a t i o n A r t s . D i rec t o r o f Bro a d c a s t S e r v i c e S" a n d I n s t. r u c t i o n a l M a t e r i a l s Pro d u c t i o n ; B . A . , J\!I . A . , P a c i f i c L ut heran n iv e r - i t y , 1 9 5 5 , 1 9 6 4 . H A R R I NG T O N M A X D R A K E , 1 9 7 3 -, A s sista n t Professo r S o c i o l o g y / n t h ro­ rology ; A . B . , San D i ego S t a t e C o l l e ge, 1 9 5 4 ; M . A . , Ph . D . , U n i v e r i t y of o r t h Carol i n a , 1 9 6 1 , 1 9 7 4 . RO B E R T A. D U N N , 1 9 7 5 -, Assi s t a n t P r o fessor o f B u s i n e ss A d mi n i s t r a t i o n ; B . S . , Oregon S t a t e U n i versi t y , 1 9 6 3 ; M . B . A . , P h . D . , Un i v e rs i t y of O r ego n , 1 9 7 0 , 1 974. + E M M ET E. E K L U N D , 1 9 64-, Pro fessor o f R e l ig i o n ; B . A . , B e t ha n y C o l lege, 1 9 4 1 ; B D . , I u g ust a n a S e m i. n a r y , 1 9 45 ; M . A. , U n iv e rs i t y of C h i c a g o , 1 9 5 8 ; P h . D . , B o s t o n U n i v e rs i t y , 1 9 6 4 . .

t G E O R G E R . E L W E L L, 1 9 5 9 - , Asso c i a t e P r o fessor o f A r t ; Un i v e r s i t y , 1 9 49 ; M . A . , N e w York U n i v e rs i t y , 1 9 5 5 .

B . S . , Y o u n gs t o w n

"' VI RG I N I A A N N E M A N , 1 9 7 1 - , Assis t a n t P r o fessor o f C o m lll u n ic a t i o n A r ts ; B . A . , K e a rn e y S t a t e C o llege, 1 9 6 9 ; M . A . , C o l o ra d o S t a t e U n iv e r s i t y , 1 9 7 I . + DO N A L D R. F A R M E R , 1 9 5 5 - , P r o fessor o f Po l i t i c a l S c i e n ce ; B . S . E d . , Ph . D . , U n ivers i t y o f M i n n e so t a , 1 9 44, 1 9 5 4 . t LO U I S E S . F A Y E , 1 9 6 9 - , Asso c i a t e Professor o f Fore ign L a n g uages ( S p a n i sh ) ; B. A . , M . A . , F l o r i d a S t a t e U n iversi t y , 1 9 4 9 , 1 9 5 1 ; P h . D . , U n ivers i t y of N o r t h C a ro l i n a , 1 9 5 8 . 'j' R O B E RT S. F I S K , 1 9 6 8 - , Assist a n t U n ivers i t y o f W y o m i n 1 9 60, 1 9 6 2 .

Pro fessor

of

Ma t he m a t ics;

B . S. .

M.S.,

,

M.

J O E P H I N E F L ET C H E R , 1 9 6 3 - , Asso c i a t e P r o fessor o f Ed u c a t i o n ; B . S . N . , N o r t h Park C o l l ege, 1 9 6 0 ; M . S . , D e P a u l U n i v e rs i t y , 1 9 6 3 ; M . A . , Pacific L u t h e r a n U n i v e rs it y , 1 9 6 9 ; P h . D . , Un i v e r s i t y o f W a s h i n gt o n , 1 9 7 I .

SCOTT A . F R E E M A N , 1 9 7 5 - , Assist a n t P r o fessor o f B u s i n ess A d m i n is t ra t i on ; B . A . , l I i r a m . o l lege , 1 9 6 7 ; II'I . B . A . , W righ t S t a t e U n iv e rs i t y , 1 9 7 0 ; D. B . A. , K e n t S t a t e U n ivers i t y , 1 9 7 4 . RO G E R G A R D , 1 9 7 4-, Assis t a n t Pro fessor o f M u sic ; B . A . , L u t h e r C o l le g e , 1 9 6 1 ; M . M . , U n i v e rs i t y o f W i s co n s i n , 1 9 7 2 . + A RT H U R G E E , 1 9 6 8 - , Asso c i a t e Pro fessor of B io l ogy ; B . S . , M . S . , P h . D . , Pu r d u e U n i v e rs i t y , 1 96 2 , 1 9 6 4 , 1 9 6 9 . R

LPH

G EHRK E,

1 97 5 -, Asso c i a t e Pro fessor o f R e l igio n ; B . A . , N o r t h we s t e m L u t heran Theolog i c a l S e m i n a r y , 1 9 44 ; P h . D . ,

Col leg 1 9 4 1 ; B . D . , Eva n ge l ica l U n i v c L i t y o f C h icago, 1 9 5 9 . •

+WILLIAM P. GI DDI NGS, 1 9 6 2-, Pro fessor o f C h e m is t ry ; U n iv e rs i t y , 1 9 5 4 ; A . M . , P h . D. , H a rv a r d U n iversi t y , 1 9 5 6 , 1 9 5 9 .

B.A.,

DePauw

GO R D O N O . G I L B E R T S O N , 1 9 5 4 -, Ass o c i a t e P r o fessor o f v r l u s i c ; B . A. , C o n c o r d ia Co llege ( M oorhe a d , M i n n . ) , 1 9 3 7 ; M . M . , N o r t h w e s t e r n U n iv e rs i t y , 1 9 4 2 . WI L L I A M G I L B E R T S O N , 1 9 6 8 - , Assoc i a t e P r o fessor o f S o c i o l o g y / S o c i a l W e l f a r e ; B . A . , U n iv e r s i t y of P u ge t S o u n d , 1 9 5 4 ; M . S . W . , U n ive rs i t y of Wash i n g t o n , 1 9 5 6 . F E R N A . G O U G H , 1 9 7 1 - , Ass.i s t a n t Rro fessor o f N u rs i n g ; B . S . N . , W h e a t o n Co llege, 1 956; M , U n ivers i t y of Wa s h i n g t o n , 1 9 6 1 . .

.

ST E W A RT D. G O V I G , 1 9 5 8 - 6 0 , 1 9 6 1 - , Professor o f R e l ig io n ; B . A . , S t . O l a f o l l egc, 1 9 48 ; B . T h . , Lu t h e r T h e o l o g i c a l S e m i n a r y , 1 9 5 2 ; M T h . , P r i n ce t o n T h e o l ogical S e m i n a ry , 1 9 5 4 ; P h . D . N e w Y o r k U n ivers i t y , 1 9 6 6 . .

,

J A M E S A . H A L S E T H , 1 9 6 6- 6 8 , 1 9 7 0- , Asso c i a t e Professor o f l l is t ory ; B . A. , Co n c o r d ia College ( M o o r hea d , M i n n . ) , 1 9 6 2 ; M . A . , Ea s t e r n N e w M e x i co U n iv e rs i t y , 1 9 63 ; P h , D . , Te x a s T e c h n o l o gi c a l Co l l e ge , 1 9 7 3 .

+Sabbat ical Leave , 1 9 7 5 - 7 6 " Sahbat ical Leave, 1 9 7 6-77 " S pecial Leave, 1 9 75-7 6


1 23 D A V I D H. H A N S E N , 1 9 7 4 - , Assi s t a n t Professor of B io l ogy ; B . S . , O regon S t a t e U n i v e r si t y , 1 9 68 ; M . S . , U n i v e r s i t y o f U t a h , 1 9 7 0 ; P h . D . , U n ivers i t y o f C a L i f o r n i a a t I rv i n e , 1 9 7 4 . V E R N O N R . H A N S O N , 1 9 7 0-, Assist a n t Pro fessor o f Sociology / S o c i a l W e lfare ; B . A . , Pa c i fic L u t h e r a n U n i v e r s i t y , 1 9 5 5 ; B . D . , L u t h e r S e m i n a r y , 1 9 6 2 ; A . M . , Un i v e rs i t y o f Ch icago, 1 9 7 0 . E D W A R D H A R M I C, 1 9 7 1 - , A ssist a n t Professo r o f M u s i c ; B . A . , P a c ific Lu t h e ra n n i v e rs i t y , 1 9 6 2 ; M . M . , U n iver s i t y o f Arizo n a , 1 9 6 9 . R O B E RT H E E R E N , 1 9 7 3 -, Assist a n t Pro fessor o f E ng i n e e r i n g ; B . S . E . E . , P u rd ue n i vers i t y , 1 % 0 ; M . S . , P h . D . , U n ivers i t y of I l l i n o is, 1 9 6 2 , 1 9 6 8 . LUELLA H E FTY, 1 9 7 3 -, I n s t ru ct o r o f N u rs i n g , B . S . N . , U n i v e r s i t y , 1 9 6 9 ; M . A. , n iv c rs i t y o f W a s h i n g to n , 1 9 7 3 .

Pa c i f i c

L utheran

J O H N O . H E R Z O G , 1 9 6 7 - , Professor o f M a t h e m a t i cs ; B . A . , C o n c o r d i a C o llege ( M oo r he a d , M in n . ) . 1 9 5 7 ; M . A . , P h . D . , U n iv e r s i t y of N L' b rask a , 1 9 5 9 , 1 9 6 3 . D A V I D L . H O F F M A N , 1 9 7 5 - , Assis t a n t Pro fessor o f M u s i c ; B . M . , N o r t h w e s t e r n n i v e rsit y , 1 9 6 7 ; M . M . A . , Y a l e Un iversi t y S c hool o f M u s i c , 1 9 7 1 . t P A U L E . HOS E T H , 1 9 6 8 - , A ssis t a n t Professor o f H c a l t h a n d P h y s i c a l E d u c a t i o n ; B . A . , C o n c o rd ia C o l lege ( M o o r h e a d , M i n n . ) , 1 9 6 6 ; M . S . , S o u t h D a k o t a S t a t e n iv e rs i t y , 1 ':16 7 . TH E L M A M. H O S T E T T E R , 1 9 7 1 -, A s s is t a n t Professor o f N u rs i n g ; B . S . N . , U n i v e rsi t y o f C a l i fornia a t Berke l e y , 1 9 5 7 ; M . S . N . , U n ivers i t y o f I l l i n o i s , 1 9 6 9 . T H E O DO R E L . H O U K , 1 9 7 2 -, A ssista n t Professor o f P h y s i c s ; B . S . , U n iv e rs i t y o f Wash i n g t o n , 1 9 5 7 ; B . A . , H o n o u rs, Ox ford U n i v e rs i t y , 1 9 5 9 ; M . A . , P h . D . , l I a rvard U n iv e rs i t y , 1 9 6 2 , 1 9 6 7 . C U RT I S E . H U B E R , 1 9 64-, Profes s o r o f P h i l oso p h y ; B . A . , M . D i v . , C o n c o rd i a S e m i n a r y . 1 9 5 0 , 1 9 5 3 ; II-1 . A . , P h . D. , U n i v e rs i t y o f W i sco n s i n , 1 9 5 8 , 1 9 6 2 . L A U R E N C E D. H U E S T I S , 1 9 6 1 - , Professo r of C h e m is t r y ; B . S . , Ph. D . , U n iv e rs i t y o f C a l i fo r n i a , 1 9 5 6 , 1 % 0 .

WILLIAM R. H UT C H E O N , J R. , 1 9 67-, A dj u n c t Profess o r of B u s i ness A d m i n i s t ra t io n , D i r e c t o r , l I u man R e l a t io n s Progra m ; B . S . , U n iv e r s i t y o f R h o d e I s l a n d , 1 9 5 3 ; M . B . A . , P h . D . , U n ivers i t y o f W a s h i ngto n , 1 9 6 3 , 1 9 6 9 . P A U L O . I N G R A M , 1 9 7 5 -, Assi s t a n t Professor o f Re ligio n ; B . A . , C h a p m a n C o l l ege, I % I ; Th . M . , S c ho o l o f Theology a t C l a r e m o n t , 1 9 6 4 ; P h . D . , C l a r e m o n t Grad u a t e S c h o o l , 1 9 6 8 .

tC L A R E N C E

G . J A C O B S , 1 9 6 9 -, Assoc i a t e Professor o f P h y s i c s ; B . A . , Concor d i a

Co l l e ge ( M o o r h e a d , M i n n . ) , 1 9 64 ; M . S . , U n iv e rsi t y o f M i n n e so t a , 1 9 6 8 ; P h . D . , U n i v e rs i t y o f I o w a , 1 9 (, 9 .

L O I S E. J A C O B S O N , 1 9 6 6-, A ssist a n t U n ivers i t y o f W a s h i n g t o n , 1 9 5 9 , 1 9 6 9 .

Pro fessor

of

N u rs i n g ;

B.S.,

M.S. N.,

"'J O A N N J E N S E N , 1 9 6 7 - , A ss o c i a t e Professor o f B i o l ogy ; A . B . , P a c i f i c L u t h e r a n U n iversi t y , 1 9 5 4 ; M . A . , U n ivers i t y o f S o u t h e r n C a l i fo rn i a , 1 9 5 7 ; P h . D . , I o w a S t a le U n i v e rs i t y , 1 9 6 1 . + RO B E RT

J.

J EN S E N , 1 9 6 8 - , Assist a n t P ro fessor L A . , U n i v e rs i t y o f Nebrask a , 1 % 7 .

of

E c o n o mics ;

B.A.,

Da n a

C o l lege , 1 9 6 4 ;

R I C H A R D J . J O B S T, 1 9 6 7 -7 3 , 1 9 7 3 - . A ss i st a n t P ro fessor o f Socio logy ; B . A . , U n i v e r s i t y o f S a n F ra n c isco, 1 9 6 4 ; M . A . , U n i v e r s i t y o f C a l i fo rn i a , 1 9 6 7 . D A V I D W. J O H N SO N , 1 9 7 0 路 , Assoc i a t e Pro fessor o f l l i s t o r y ; B . A . , l I a m l i n e U n ivers i t y , 1 9 6 1 ; M . A . , S t a n fo r d U n iversi t y , 1 9 6 3 ; P h . D. , U n i v e rs i t y o f K a nsas, 1 972.

E DI T H J O H N S O N , 1 9 7 4 - , Assi s t a n t Professor o f Nursi n g ; B . S . N . , U n ivers i t y of P h i J a d c l p h i a , 1 9 5 1 ; M . A . N . , T e a c h e r ' s C o l l e ge, New York , 1 9 5 8 . LUCI L L E M . J O H N S O N , 1 9 5 3-, Professor o f "nglish ; B . A . , C o n c o r d i a College ( M o cH h e a ci , M i n n . ) , 1 9 4 0 ; M . A . , W a s h i n g t o n S l a t e U n i vasi t y , 1 9 4 3 ; E d . D . , U n iversi t y o f M o n t a n a , 1 9 6 7 . K E N N E T H A. J O H N S T O N , 1 9 64-, Professor o f E d u c a t i o n , D e a n o f t h e Sc h o o l o f E d u c a t i o n ; B . A. , W e s t e rn W a s h i n g t o n S t a t e C o l lege, 1 9 4 7 ; M . A . , S t a n fo rd U n i vers i t y , 1 9 5 3 ; E d . D . , W a s h i n g t o n S t a t e Un i v e rs i t y , 1 9 6 4 . R l C H A R D P . J O N E S , 1 96 9- , Assis t a n t P ro fessor o f Engl i s h ; B . A . , l I arvard , 1 9 6 4 ; M A . , M , F. A . , U n iv e rs i t y o f M assachuse t t s , 1 9 6 9 .

t Su bbatical

Leave, 1 9 7 6 - 7 7

+Sabbatic,LI Leave, t 9 7 5 - 7 6


1 24 R I C H A R D P. J U N G K U N T Z . 1 9 7 0- . Professor of R e l igio n , P r ov os t ; B . A . , o r t h w\.'s[ e rn Co l k <>e, 1 9 3 9 ; B . D W isc o n s i n L u t h e ra n S e mi n ary , 1 9 4 2 ; 'L A . , Ph . D. , U n iver s i t y o f W is co n s i n , 1 <) 5 5 , 1 9 6 1 . .•

T H E O D O R E O. H . K A R L , 1 <)40- 4 2 , I <) 4 8 - , P r o fessor o f C o m m u n ic a t i o n A r t s ; B . A . , M . . , , u s t a v u s A d o l p h u s Coll ege, I <) 3 4 , 1 <) 3 6 . D A V I D T. K E Y E S , r iz o n a . 1 9 6 4 ; �1.

1 <) 6 <) - . ssist a n t Prof.:ssor of . , O h i o S t a t e U n i versi t y , I <)(l 6 .

Art ;

B.F.A.,

U n ive rs i t y

of

G U N D A R J . KI N G , 1 9 6 0- . Pro fessor o f B u sin ess A u m i n i s t ra t:.io n , D e a n o f t h e c h v o l of Bu si ne s s A d m i n i s t ra ti o n ; B . B . A. , U n iv e rs i t y o f O rego n , 1 9 5 G ; M . B . A. , P h . D . , S t a n for d U n i v e rs i t y , 1 <) 5 8 , 1 9 6 4 . •

LA R S E . K I T T L E S O N , 1 9 5 6- , Ass o c i a t e Professor o f A r t ; B . S . , U n iversi t y o f W i sc o n s i n a t M i l w a u k e e , 1 9 5 0 : M . A . , U n iv e r s i t y o f Wisco n s i n , 1 9 5 1 : M . F . " t 1 l1 i v c r� i t y of S o u t h e rn C a l i forn i a , 1 9 5 5 . A L A N M . K L E I N , I <) 7 5 - , Assis t a n t Professor o f S o c i o l ogy / A n t h ro p o l o g y ; B . A . , M . A . , P h . D . , S t a t e U n ive rs i t y o f e w Y o r k a t B u f fa l o , 1 9 7 0 , 1 9 7 2 , 1 9 7 5 . R A Y M O N D A . K LO P S C H , 1 9 5 3 -, Pro fess or o f ' n gl i s h ; B . S . , I l l i n o i s I n s t i t u t e of Te c h n o l o gy , 1 9 49 : M . A . , P h . D . , U n iversi ty of I l l i n o i s , 1 9 5 0 , 1 % 2. C A L V I N H . K N A PP, 1 9 GO-, Asso c i a t e Pro fessor o f M u sk ; B . S . , S c h o o l o f M u s i c , 1 9 4 9 , 1 9 5 0 : E d . D . , Col u m bi a U n ivers i t y , 1 9 7 3 .

M . S . , J u illiard

J E NS R. K N U D S E N , 1 9 5 7 -, Pro feS ' o r o f B io l ogy , Rege n c y Professor, 1 9 7 3 ; B . A . , Pa c i fi c Lu t he r a n U n i ve r s i t y , 1 9 5 2 ; M . S . , P h . D . , U n i v e rs i t y o f S o u t h ern C a l i fo r n i a , 1 9 5 4, 1 9 5 7 . D A V I D R . K N UT S O N , 1 96 9 -, Ass i s t a n t Professor o f L u t h e ra n U n i v C f s i t y , 1 9 5 8 ; B . D . , Lu t her T h e o lo g i c a l U n i v e r s i t y o f C h i c ago D i v i n i t y S c h o o l , 1 9 6 6 .

R e L igio n ; B . A . , P a c i fi c Sem i n a r y , 1 9 6 2 ; M . A . ,

J E R R Y D. K RA C H T , 1 9 6 7 - 6 8 , I % 9-, A ss i s t a n t Pro fessor o f M u si c ; B . M . , M . A. , M . F. A . . n . M . A . , U n ivers i t y o f I o w a , 1 % 3 , 1 9 6 5 . 1 % 7 , 1 9 7 5 . J O H N O . L A R S G A A R D , 1 9 7 0-, A ss i s t a n t Pro fessor o f Ps y c h o l o gy ; B . A . , Paci fic u t h c r a n U n ivers i t y , 1 9 44; B . T h .. L u t h e r T h e o l o g i c a l S e m i n a r y , 1 9 4 7 ; S . T. M . , I' a c i fi c S c h o o l o f R e l i g io n , 1 9 6 5 ; P h . D . , U n ive rs i t y o f Wa s h i ng t o n , 1 9 7 1 . D A L E A. L A R SO N , 1 97 1 -, I n s t r u c t o r o f Engl i s h ; B . A . , Paci fic L u t h e r a n U n ivers i t y , J <) 6 h . A NT HO N Y J . L A U E R , 1 9 69-, A s s i s t a n t Pro fessor o f B u s i n e s s A d m i n i s t r a t io n ; J . D . , L o y o l a U n i v e r s i t y , 1 9 5 5 ; M . B . A . , P a c i fic L u t h e r a n Un iversi t y , 1 9 6 9 . C O R A L A W R E N C E , 1 9 7 3-, A ss i s t a n t Professor of u r s i n g ; A. A . , S t e p he n s C o l lege, 1 9 4 5 ; B . . . . U n i v e rs i t y o f Ch i c a go , 1 9 4 7 ; B . S . N . , J o h n s H o p k ins U n iversi t y , 1 9 5 0 ; M . . , P h . D. . U n i vers i t y o f W a s h i n g t o n , 1 9 5 9 , 1 9 7 2 . LA W R E N C E B . L A Y M A N , 1 9 74-, A ss i st a n t Professor o f o c i d c n t a l Co l l e ge, I Y 7 0 : P h . D. , I n d i a n a U n i versi t y , 1 9 7 4 .

C he m i s t r y :

A.B.,

* DO U G L A S V . L EI S T E R . 1 9 7 3 - 1 9 7 6 , V i si t i ng Assi s t a n t P r o fessor o f B u s in e ss A d m i n i s t ra t i o n : B . A M . B . A . , U n i v e rs i t y of Wash i n gl o n , 1 9 6 5 , 1 9 6 6 ; D . B . A . , U n i v e rs i t y o f Oregu n , 1 9 7 1 . .•

J E R O M E P. L EJ E U N E , 1 9 7 2 -, A s si s t a n t I'ro kssor o f P s y c h o logy ; B . A . , C;o nzaga U n iversit y , 1 9 6 4 ; M . . , Ph . D . , U n ivers i t y of V i c t o r i a , 1 9 7 0 , 1 9 74. J E R R O L D L E R U M , 1 9 7 3- , A ss is t a n t Pro fe s s o r o f B i o l ogy ; B . A . , L u t h e r C o l lege, ( <) (1 4 ; M . S . , U n ivers i t y of W i s c o n s i n , 1 9 6 5 ; Ph . D . , Nort h w e s t e rn U n i v e rsit y , 1 973, P A U L 1... L E V Y , 1 9 7 5 -, Ass i s t a n t Professor o f B i o l o gy ; B . S . , P h . D . , C i t y U n i v e rs i t y of \l e \\ Y o r k , 1 9 6 3 , 1 <) 7 2 . P A U L B. LI E B E L T, 1 9 7 0- , A sso c ia t e Pro fessor o f M a t h e m a t i c s ; B . A . , C o n co r d ia Co l l ugL' ( M o o r he a d , M i n n . ) , 1 9 5 5 ; M . A . , U n ive rsi t y of N e b r a s k a , 1 <) 5 7 . DAV I D G .

LOV E L L,

1 9 74-.

As si s t a n t

Profess o r o f P h i l o s o p h y :

B . A . , Carle t o n

'olkgc , 1 9 6 8 ; P h . D . . U n i v e rs i t y o f W i sco n s i n , 1 9 7 5 . t B R I A N E . L W E S, ( 9 (, 8 - , Assi s t a n t Professor o f E a r t h S c i e n c e s ; B . S . . U n ivers i t y of London, 1 9 5 7 : M . S . , Q u e e n s U n i ver s i t y , 1 9 6 3 ; P h . D. , U n i vers i t y o f

Was h i n g t o n , 1 9 7 2 . " G E N E C. L U N D G A A R D , 1 9 5 8 -, A s s i s t a n t Pro fessor o f P h y sica l E d u c a t i o n ; B . ElI . , P:l c i fi c L u t h e r a n U n iv e rsi t y , 1 9 5 1 ; M . S . , U n ive rs i t y o f W a s h i n g t o n , 1 9 (A . J O H N L. M A I N , 1 <) 7 1 -, "oc i a t e Professor o f B i o logy ; B . S . Eli . , M . S . E d . , C h a d r o n S l a t e Co l l ege , 1 % 5 , 1 96 6 ; P h . D. , U n ivers i t y o f W as h i n g t o n , 1 9 7 0 . J O H N A. M A R T I L L A , 1 9 69-, A ss o c i a t e Pro fess o r o f B u s i n e ss A d m i n i s t ra t i o n ; B. B. A. , ('a(; i fi c Lu t h e ra n U n i v e r s i t y , 1 9 6 3 ; M . B . A . , Ph . fl . , U n iv e rs i t y o f Or ego n , 1 966, 1 969.

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1 25 D E N N I S J. M A RT I N , 1 9 7 5 - , As sis t a n t P rofessor of B i o [ ogy ; B . S . , [ ] [ i ll o is S t ate U n iv e rs i t y , [ 9 6 9 ; 1.S., U n i v e r s i t y of New M e x i c o , [ 9 7 1 ; P h . D . , U t a h S t a t e U n ivers i t y , [ 9 7 5 . A R T H U R D . M A R T I N S O N , [ 9 6 6-, Assol' i a k P r o fessor o f H i st o r y ; B . A . , P a c i f i c L u t h e r a n U n ivers i t y , 1 9 5 7 ; NI . A. . , P h . D . , Wa s h i ng t o n S t a t e n iv e rs i t y , 1 '.> 6 1 , 1 96 6 . C E L E ST I N E M A S O N , 1 9 7 3 -, i n s t r u c t or o f N ur s i n g ; B . S . N . , C a t h o l ic A me rica, 1 9 5 8 . M A R JO RI E J . M A T H E R S, 1 9 6 4- 6 6 , 1 ') 6 8 - , A ss i s L a n t Pro fessor o f M . A " C e n t r a l W a s h i n g t o n S t a t e C o [ l e g e , 1 9 5 3 , 1 '.> 6 1 .

niversity of

d u ca t i o n ; B . A . ,

FRANKLIN L. MCCARTHY, [ 97 5 - , Asso c i a t e Pro fesso r of Busi ness A d m i n i s t ra t i o n ; A . B . , H o pe Co l legl: , 1 '.> 5 9 ; M . B . A . , U n i v e rs i t y o f C h icago , 1 96 2 ; P h . D . , U n ivers i ty o f M i n n eso t a , 1 9 7 1 . R I C H A R D M C G I N N I S, 1 9 7 2-, Assi s t a n t P r o fessor o f B io [ ogy ; B . S . , P a c i fi c L u t he ra n U n i ver s i t y , [ 9 6 3 ; P h . D . , U n i v e rs i t y o f S o u t h e rn C a l i fo r n i a , 1 9 7 4 . PA U L T . M E N Z E L , 1 9 7 1 -, As ' ist a n t Professor o f P h i [ o s o r I1 Y ; B . A . , Woosll.'r C o [ l e g e , 1 9 64 ; B , D . , Y a l e U n iv e rs i t y , 1 9 6 7 ; P h . D . , V a n d e r b i lt U n iv e rs i t y , 1 9 7 [ . LA W R E NC E J. M E Y E R , 1 %9-, Professor o f M u s i c ; B . A . , C o l o r a d o S t a t e C o l lc.ge, 1 9 5 4 ; M . M . , U n i v e rs i t y o f rego n , 1 9 5 5 ; E d . D. , C o l o ra d o S t a t e C o l lege, 1 964. N . C HR I S T I A N M E Y E R , J R . , 1 97 0- , Assis t a n t Professor o f M a t h e m a t i c s ; B . A . , R e e d C o ] [ege, 1 % 6 ; M . A . , P h . D . , U n ive rsi t y o f Orego n , 1 % 7 , 1 9 7 0 . M A R LEN F. M .l L L E R , 1 97 0- , A ssoc i a t e Professor o f E c o n o m i c s ; B . S . , M . S . , P h . D . , n ivers i t y o f M i n n e s o t a , 1 % 2 , 1 % 5 , 1 % 7 . G A R Y L. M I N E T T I , [ 9 7 0- , Assi s t a n t Pro fe ssor o f E d u c a t i o n , D i re c t or o f C o u n s e l i n g a n d Tes t i n g ; B . S . , Wash i n g t o n S t a t e U n iver s i t y , 1 9 () 0 ; M . A . . P a c i f i c L u t h e r a n U n iv e rs i t y , 1 9 6 7 ; Ph . D. , U n ivers i t y o f Wash i n g t o n , 1 9 7 6 . R I C H A R D D . M O E , 1 9 6 5-, P ro fessor o f E d u c a t io n , D e a n o f Gra d u a t t' a n d S u m m e r St u d i es , D e a n o f S c h o o l o f F i n e A r t s ; B . A . , Co n c o r d i a (,o llege ( M o o r IH.!ad . M i n n . ) , 1 9 5 1 ; M . E d . , E d . D . , Un ivers i t y o f Co[orad o , 1 9 5 3 , [ 9 6 2 . K AT H A R I N E E . M O N R O E , 1 9 6 7 -, Asso c i a te Pro fessor o f Fon; ign La nguages ( ren c h ) ; B . A . , L o n d o n U n iversi t y . 1 93 2 ; M . A . , /\'I i d d ! c b u r y Co l le g e , V c n n o n t , F r e n c h - 1 9 4 2 , E n g l ish- 1 9 5 I . J O H N N. M O R I T S U G U , 1 9 7 5 -, Assi s t a n t Pro [\'ssor of Ps y c h o logy ; B . A . , U n i v e rsi t y o f H a w a i i , 1 9 7 1 ; M . A . , Un i v e rs i t y o f R o c h e s t e r . 1 9 7 4 . J E SSICA D . M Y R A BO, M a r y la n d , 1 9 7 0 .

[ 9 75-,

I n s t ru c t o r

of

N u rs i n g ;

B . S . :-.J . ,

U n ive rsity

of

G U N N U L F M Y R B O, 1 9 70-, Assis t a n t f'ro fes�o r o f Ph ilo so p h y ; B . A . , U n iv e rs i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a , [ 9 6 2 ; P h . D . , Ca m b r i d g e , E n g [a n d , 1 ') 7 2 . +C H A R L E S N E L SO N , 1 9 6 7 - , Regist ra r ; B . S . , D a k o t a S t a t e C o l l e ge , 1 % 3 ; \1 . 1\ . , A d a m s S t a t e C o l lege, 1 9 6 4 . B U R T O N L. N E S S E T , I % 7 - , Asso c i a t e Pro fessor o f C h e m i s t r y ; B. A . , S t. O b f C o l l e ge , 1 ') 5 7 ; M . S . , P h . D . , P u r d u \.: U n iv e rs i t y , 1 96 0 , 1 % 2 . M I LTON L. N E SV I G , 1 l) 4 7 - S I , 1 9 5 3 -, Assi st a n t P r o fessor o f E n g l i s h . ss i s t a n t t o t h e P r e s i de n t ; B . A . , S I . O la f C o l l e ge , 1 ') 3 7 ; C a ll 1i . T h e o ! . , L u t h e r n l \.: o l o g i c a l S e m i n a r y , [ 9 4 2 ; r-.-I . 1\ . , U n ive rsi t. y o f M in n e so t a , 1 9 4 7 . ROG E R N I n L E R , [ 9 74 -, Assi s t a n t Profe ss o r o f B u si n e ss A d m i n is t ra t i o n ; B . S . , M . B . A . , Oregon S t a t e U n ivers i t y , 1 9 6 3 , 1 ( 1) ; D . B . A . , U n iV e rs i t y o f Ok l a h o m a , [ 974. J E S S E D . N O L P H , I ') 6 8 - , A ss i st a n t Professor o f Psy cho logy : W a s h i n g t o n U n iv e r s i t y , 1 9 64 ; P h . D . , C o r n e l l U n iver s i t y , 1 9 6 8 .

B.A . .

George.

E R I C N O R D H O L M , 1 9 5 5 - , Asso c i a t e Pro fessor o f C o m ll1 u n i c a t i o n A r ts ; B . F . A . , J\ r l l n s t i t u t e of C h icago , [ 9 5 1 . P H I L I P A. N O R DQ U IST, 1 % 3 - , Professor o f I l i s t o r y ; B . A . , P a c i f i c n iversi t y , 1 9 5 R ; M . A . , P h . D . . U n i v e r s i t y o f Was h i n gt o n , 1 9 6 0 , 1 9 6 4 .

Lu t h e r a n

S H E R M A N B. N O R N E S , 1 9 5 9-6 1 , 1 96 5 - , Asso c i a t e P r o fessor o f P h y s i c s ; B . A . , C o n c o r d i a Col lege ( M o o r h e a d , M i n n . ) , 1 <) 5 [ ; M . A . , Un i v e rs i t y o f \] o r t h Da k o t a , 1 9 5 () ; P h . D . , Was h i n g t o n S t a t e U n iversi t y , 1 9 6 5 . W.

DW IG HT O B E R H O LT Z E R , [ 9 6 9-, Asso c i a k l'ro !essor o f S o c i o l ogy ; A . B . , W i t t e n berg U n iv e r s i t y , 1 9 6 1 ; M . D i v . , L u t h e r a n S c h o o l or T h eo logy a t C h i cago, 1 9 6 5 ; P h . D . , Gra d u a t e T h e o l o g i c a [ U n i o n , U n iver si t y of C a l i fo r n i a , Ij c r k L' l e y , 1 9h9.

+S;J blJatical Leave, 1 9 7 5 -76


1 26 S A R A A. O F F I C E R , 1 9 6 7 - , SSls t a n t Professor of P h y s i c a l E d u c a t i o n ; B . S . , Oregon . t a t ďż˝ U n i v ersi t y , 1 9 5 8 ; M . S . , I n d i a n a U n ive rsi t y , 1 9 6 5 . DA V I D M. OL SON, 1 9 6 8 - . Pro fessor of P h y sical E d u c a t i o n , Direc t o r of t he S c h o o l f P h y sical E ci u c a t io n , A t h l e t i c D i re c t o r ; B . . , C o n c o r d i a Col lege ( M O o r he a d , M i n n . ) , 1 9 5 () ; M . A _ , U n iversi t y o f Ivl i n n e s o t a , 1 9 5 7 ; P h . D . , U n iversi t y o f I o w a , 1 9 6 6. F R A N K L I N C. O L S O N , 1 9 7 1 - , A ssociate Pro fessor o f E d uca t i o n ; B . S . , U n ivers i t y o f S o u t h D a k o t a , 1 9 5 8 ; M . S . , Oregon S t a t e U n iversit y , 1 9 6 4 ; E d . D . , U n iv e rs i t y of ebraska, 1 9 7 1 . t Ll D A M. OLS O N , 1. 9 6 7- Asso c i a t e Pro fessor o f N u rs i n g ; B . S . . , M . . ,

,

U n iveI"i t y of W a s h i n g t o n , 1 l) 5 9 , 1 9 6 4 .

MJCHAE . O' N E I LL, 1 9 7 5 - Adj u n c t Pro fessor of B u s i ness A d m i n i s t r a t io n ; B. A. , U n i versi t y of Washingt o n , 1 9 7 0 ; M . B. A . , B u si n e s s A d m i n i s t ra t i o n , 1 <) 7 4 . B U R T O N T . O S T E N S O N, 1 9 4 7 - , Professor o f E a r t h S ci e n c e s ; B . A . , L u t h e r C o l l eg e , 1 9 3 2 ; I . S . . P h . D . , U n i v e r s i t y o f rVl i c h igan, 1 9 3 4 , I lJ 4 7 . WI L L I A M E. P A R K E R , 1 9 7 0- , Assi s t a n t Pro fessor of C o m m u n i c a t i o n A r t s ; B . S . , m p h i s S t a t e U n ivcrsit y , 1 9 6 6 ; M . S . , P h . D . , S o u t hern I l l i n o i s Un iversi t y , 1 9 68 , 1 974. B EV E R L Y P A Y N E , 1 9 7 5 - , I n s t r u c L o r o f Fore ign La nguages ( F ren c h ) ; B . A . , M . A . , U n i v ersi t y o f W n s h i ng t o n . 1 9 6 3 , 1 9 6 6 . t A R N E K. P E D E R SO N , 1 9 5 6 - . Assoc ia t e Pro fessor o f E d u c a t i o n ; B . A . , B . E d . , M . . , P a c i fic L u t h e r a n U n ivers i t y , 1 9 4 9 , 1 9 5 3 , 1 9 5 6 . + J O K N E . P E T E R S E N , 1 9 6 7 - , Ass o c i a t e Professor o f R e l igio n ; B . A . , S t . O b I' ol l cgc, 1 9 5 8 : B . D " L u t h e r T heological Se m i n a r y , S I . Paul , 1 9 6 3 ; M . A . , P h . D . , N e w Y o rk U n ivers i L y , 1 % 5 , 1 9 7 0 . C H A R L ES A . P ET E R S O N , 1 9 5 9- , Pro fessor o f Bus in ess A d m i n i s t ra t ion ; B . S . , K a Ilsas S t a t e T e a c hers C o l l ege, 1 9 5 1 ; M . S. , U n iv e r s i t y o f Ten nesse e , 1 9 5 2 ; P h . D. , U n i v e rsi t y o f M i n neso t a , 1 9 6 6 ; C . P . A . , S t a t e o f Wash ingt o n . G A R Y D. P ET E RS O N , 1 9 67-, Assoc i a t e Professor o f M a t h e m a t ics ; B . S . , I o w a S t a t e n i versi t y , 1 9 6 0 ; M . S " W e s t e rn Wash i n g t o n S t a t e Col l ege , 1 9 6 7 ; P h . D . , n i v e r s i t y o f K a n sas, 1 9 7 3 . W A L T E R E. P I LG R I M , I Y 7 I - , Associa t l' Pro fessor o f R e l igio n , D ire c t o r o f L u t heran I n s t i t u t e o f Theological E d u c a t io n ; B. A . , W a r t b urg College, 1 9 5 6 ; B . D . , Wa r t b u rg Theo logical S e m i n a r y , 1 9 6 0 ; Th. M . . T h . D . , Prin c e t o n S e m i n a r y , 1 9 6, 1 9 7 1 . PA U L M. R E I G S T A D , 1 9 47-48 , 1 9 5 8 -, Professor o f E n glis h ; B . A . , S l . O l a f College, 1 94 3 ; M . A . , P h . D . , U n ivers i t y o f New M e x i c o , 1 9 5 6 , 1 9 5 8 . K A R L R. R I C K A B A U G H , 1 9 7 5 - , Assi s t a n t Professor o f Ed u c a t io n ; B . S . , M o n t a n a S L a te Col lege , 1 9 6 3 ; M . S . , Ph . D . , U n ivers i t y o f U t a h , 1 9 7 0 , 1 9 7 5 . D A V I D P. R O B B I N S , 1 96 9 - , A ssis t a n t Professor o f o f M i c h i ga n , 1 9 6 8 , 1 9 6 9 .

'I u s i c ; B . I\'I . , M . M .

,

G. A. ST. J O H N R O B I N S O N , 1 9 7 0- , A ssist a n t Pro fessor o f Fore ign ( S p a n i s h ) ; B . A . , M . A . , L o u is a n a S t a t e U n i v e rsi t y , 1 9 6 6 , 1 9 7 0 . J E A N E TT E R O E D I G E R , 1 97 5 - , ssis t a n t Professor of N u rsing; B . S . U n iversi t y , 1 9 6 5 ; M . . , U n iv e rsi t y of Washing t o n , 1 9 7 1 .

U n Iv e rsi t y Languages .

Seat t l e

G EO R G E R O S K O , I l) S O- , Asso c i a t e Pro fessor of Art ; B . S . Art E d . , Y O lJ n g s t o w n Universi t y , 1 9 4 9 ; M . . , U nivers i t y of I o w a , 1 9 5 0 . E L D O N S C H A F E R , 1 97 5 - , Pro fessor o f B u s i n e ss A d m i n is t ra t i o n ; B . S " M . A . , P h . D . , n i ver i t y o f ebrask a , 1 9 5 3 , 1 9 5 7 , 1 9 6 3 ; .P . A . , St a t e o f Ne b raska. W I L L I AM M . SC H A R N B E R G , 1 97 5 - , I n s t r u c t o r o f M u sic; B . M . , M . A. , U n ivers i t y o f I owa, 1 97 1 , 1 9 7 3 . +rJ O H A N N E S A . S C H I L L E R , 1 9 5 8 -, Professor o f Socio logy ; B . A . , C a p i t a l U n iversi t y , 1 945 ; C a n d o T h e o! . , Eva nge l i c a l L u t h e r a n The ol ogical S e m i n a r y , 1 94 7 ; M . A . , U n iv e r s i t y o f K a n sas, 1 9 5 9 ; P h . D . , Un ivers i t y of W a s h ingto n , 1 % 7 . C A ROLY W . SC H U LT Z , 1 9 74-, I n s t r u c t o r o f u rs i n g ; B . S . N . , U n ivers i t y o f I l l i no i s, I 68 ; M . A . P a c i f i c L u t h e r a n U n iversi t y , 1 9 7 4. + E R N ST C . S C H W I D D E R , Wash i n g t o n , 1 9 5 3 , 1 9 5 5 .

1 9 6 7- , Professor o f A r t ; B . A . , M . F . A . , U n i vers i t y o f

RI C H A R D S E E G E R , 1 9 7 3 - , L e a rn i n g Sk ills U n i v e r s i t y o f W a s h i n g t o n , 1 9 66 , 1 9 6 8 , 1 9 7 4 .

Coord i n a t o r ;

B.A.,

M.A.,

Ph . D . ,

S . E R V I N G S E V E R T S O N , 1 9 66-, Professor o f Psychology ; B . A . , Pacifi c Lu t h l! r a n U niversi t y , 1 9 5 5 ; B . D . , Lut her T h e o l ogical S e m i n a r y , 1 9 5 9 ; M . A. , U n iversi ty o f W y o m i n g , 1 9 6 0 ; P h . D . , U n ivers i t y o f U t a h , 1 9 6 6 . +Su b b a t i ('al Leave. 1 97 5 -7 6 ';' Sa b b J tical Leave, 1 976-77 +rSabbat ical Leave, 1 9 7 5 -7 6 ,

Regency Professor, 1 9 7 6 -77


1 27 + M A U R I C E H . S K O N ES, 1 9 6 4 - , P r o fessor of M u s i c , D i r e c t o r of C h o r a l M u sic ; B. A . , C o n c o r d i a C o llege ( M oo r h e a d , M i n n . ) , 1 9 4 8 ; M . M . E d . , M o n ta n a S t a t e U n ivers i t y , 1 9 5 7 . C A R L D. S PA N G L E R , 1 9 6 1 - 6 2 , 1 9 6 3 -, Associ a te Pro fessor o f Foreign L a n guagcs ( F renc h ) ; A . B . , Grove C i t y C o l lege, 1 9 5 8 ; M . A . , P e n n s y l v a n i a S t a t e U n iv e rs i t y , 1 96 1 . W A L L A C E SPENC E R , 1 9 7 4 - , Assis t a n t Professor o f P o l i t i c a l S c i e n c e ; B . A . , M . A . , U n ivers i t y o f Arizona, 1 9 6 3 , 1 9 68 ; P h . D . , U n iversi ty o f Washing t o n , 1 97 0 . + LY N N S. S T E I N , 1 9 6 1 -, Professor o f Educa t io n ; B . A. , N o r t h D a k o t a S t a t e Teachers C o ll ege, 1 9 3 7 ; M . A . , U n ivers i t y o f M o n t a n a , 1 9 5 2 ; Ed . D . , M o n t a n a S t a t e U n ivers i t y , 1 9 6 1 . J O A N STI GG E L BO U T , 1 9 7 3-, I n s t r u c t o r o f N u rs i n g ; B . S . N . , W a y n e C o l lege . J 9 5 4 ; M . N . , U n iversity o f Washingt o n , 1 97 2 . * V E R N O N L. S T I N T Z I , 1 9 64-, Asso c i a t e Professor o f B u s i n e ss Ad m i n i s t r a t i o n ; B . A . , Coe Co llege , 1 9 3 7 ; M . B. A . , A r iz o n a S t a t e U n ivers i t y , 1 9 6 4 ; P h . D . , U n ivers i t y o f Washi n g t o n , 1 9 7 0 . R O B E RT L. STI V E RS, 1 9 7 3 -, Assis t a n t Professor o f Religio n ; U n ivers i t y , 1 9 6 2 ; M . Div. , P h . D . , C o l u m b i a U n iversit y , 1 9 6 9 , 1 9 7 3 .

B.A. ,

Yale

G E R A L D R. ST O F F E R, J 9 7 3-, Assis t a n t P r o fessor o f P s y c h ology ; B . S . . Wa s h i n g t o n S t a t e U n iversi t y , J 9 6 9 ; M . A . , P h . D . , U n iversity o f M o n t a n a , 1 9 7 1 , 1 973. J E R E M Y S T R I N G E R , 1 9 7 3 - , D i r e c t o r for Res id e n t ia l L i fe ; B . A . , S o u t h e r n M e t h o d i s t U n ivers i t y , 1 9 6 6 ; �I . A . , P h . D . , U n iv e r s i t y o f W i s co n s i n , 1 9 6 8 , 1 9 7 3 . DO R I S G . STUC K E , 1 9 6 7 - , Pro fessor o f Nursing, D i rector o f t h e Sc hool of Nu rsi n g ; B . S . , A m erican U n ivers i t y , 1 9 4 9 ; M . I�d . , U n ivers i t y o f M i nneso t a , 1 9 5 6 ; E d . D . , Tea c h e rs C o llege, C o l u m b i a U n iversi t y , 1 9 6 7 . D A V I D P. S U D E R M A N N , 1 9 7 3-, Assis tan t Pro fessor o f Foreign La nguages ( G e r ma n ) ; A. B . , I n d i a n a U n iversit y , 1 9 6 5 ; M . A . , P h . D . , U n ivers i t y of C h icago , 1 96 7 , 1 9 73. RO G E R SUNDBERG' 1 9 7 5 -' Assis t a n t Professo r of f" o re i "n Lan"ua"cs' ( N orwegia n ') ; B . A . , S t . O l a f College, 1 9 6 4 ; M . A . , U n iv�rsity f W a sh i g t n , 1 973.

;

� �

D U A N E D. S W A N K , 1 9 70-, Asso c i a t e Professor o f C h e m is t r y ; B . S. , Washlngton State U n iv e rsi t y , 1 9 6 4 ; Ph . D. , M o n t a n a S ta t e U nivers i t y , 1 9 6 9 . +RODNEY N. SWENSON, ( Ge r m a n ) ; B . A . , B e m i dj i M i n n e s o t a , 1 9 5 6 , 1 9 67 .

1 9 6 8S t a te

,

Asso c i a t e Professor o f For e i g n L a nguages College, 1 9 5 2 ; M . A. , I'h. D . , U n iv e r s i t y o f

* K W O NG-T I N T A N G , 1 9 67 -, Professor of P h y s i c s ; B . S . , M . A . , Wash i ngt o n , 1 9 5 8 , 1 9 5 9 ; P h . D . , Col u m b i a U n ivers i t y , 1 9 6 5 .

U n iversity

t r F R E D E R I C K L . T O B I A S O N , I 9 6 fi-, Pro fessor o f h e lll i s t ry ; B . A . , L u t he ran U n iversi t y , 1 9 5 8 ; P h . D . , M ic h ig a n S t a t e U n iv e rs i t y , 1 9 6 3 .

of

Pacific

W A L T E R L. T O M S I C , 1 97 0- , Assis t a n t Professor o f Art ; B . S . E . , Arkans as S l a t e U n ivers i t y , 1 9 6 5 ; M . F . A . , U n iv e rs i t y o f C o l o r a d o , 1 9 6 7 . T H O M A S N. TO R R E NS, 1 9 7 4 - , A rt i s t in R esid e n ce ; B . S . , I n d i a n a S t a t e U n iversit y , 1 ';)7 1 ; M . F. A . , Washi ngton U n ivers i t y , J 9 74 . A U D U N T . TOV E N , 1 9 fi 7 - , A s si s t a n t Pro fessor o f Foreign Langu ages ( N o rwegia n ) ; B . A . , U n iversity o f O s l o , 1 9 6 4 ; M . A . , U n ivers i t y o f Wash i n gt o n , 1 % 7 . A N N K . T R E M A I N E, 1 9 7 2- , Assis t a n t P r o fesso r o f M u sic ; B. M . , U n ive rsi t y o f O rego n , 1 9 5 I ; M . M . , U n iversity o f W a s h i n gt o n , 1 9 7 2 . t P A U L W . U L B R I C H T , J 967-, Associ a te Pro fessor o f Po l i t i c a l Sc i e n c e ; B . A . , M . A . , P h . D . , U n iv e r s i t y o f W a s h i n g t o n , 1 9 5 9 , 1 9 6 0 , I CJ 6 5 . D A N I E L V A N T A S S E L , 1 9 7 0-, Asso c i a t e Pro fessor o f English ; A. B . , S t . Olaf College , 1 9 6 2 ; M . S . , U n i ve r s i t y o f I o w a , 1 9 6 4 ; P h . D. , U n i v e rs i t y o f Iowa, J 9 7 0 . D A V I D L . VINJ E , 1 9 7 0-, Assis t a n t Pro fessor o f Eco n o m ics ; B . S . , N o r t h D a k o t a S t a t e U n iv e rs i t y , 1 9 6 2 ; M . S . , Ph. D . , U n iversity o f Wisconsin , 1 9 64, 1 9 7 0 . * G E O R G E F. W A L T E R , 1 9 7 0-, Assist a n t Pro fesso r of S o ciolo gy / A n t h r opology ; B . A . , M . A . , O h io S t a t e U n ive rsi t y , 1 9 6 7 , 1 9 7 0 . P A U L M . W E BS T E R , 1 9 6 9-, Assis t a n t Pro fess o r o f Foreign La nguages ( Ge r m a n ) ; B . A . , M . A . , U n i versity o f C a l i fo rn i a , 1 9 6 4 , 1 9 6 7 . L E N O R A W E I R I C K , 1 9 7 3 - , I n s t r u c t o r of N u rs i n g ; B . S . , F ra n cisco, 1 9 5 8 ; M . S . . . , W a s h i n g t o n U n ivC[s i t y , 1 9 6 2 . t S a b b a t ical Leave, 1 9 7 6 -7 7 +Sabbat i c a l Leave, 1 9 7 5 - 7 6 ' S pecial Leave, 1 9 7 5 ·76 t r Rcgency Professor, 1 9 7 5 -7 6 , Sabbatical Leave , 1 9 7 6- 7 7

Un ive. rsity

of

San


1 28 R I T A W EI SB R O D , 1 9 7 5- , Assis t a n t Pro fessor o f Sociology ; B . A . , M . A . , U n iversity o f Nl i n n s o t a , 1 9 5 5 , 1 9 5 9 ; P h . D . , C o r n e l l U n iv e r s i t y , 1 9 7 1 . R I C H A R D W E LLS, 1 9 7 5 - , I n s t r u c t o r of C o m m u ni c a t i o n A r t s ; B . A . E . . C e n t r a l Was h i n g l o n S t a t e C o l k ge, 1 9 7 0 ; M . A . , U n iversi t y of Wisc o n s i n , 1 9 7 4 . . DO N A L D R. W E N TWO R T H , 1 97 2- , Assis t a n t Professor of E c o n o m i c s ; B . S . , M . A _ , U n iv e rs i t y of M i n neso ta, 1 9 6 5 , 1 9 7 0 ; M . A . , U n iversity o f I ll i n o i s , 1 ') 7 1 ; P h . D . , U n iversi ty o f M i n n e s o t a , 1 9 7 2 F O R R E ST W E ST E R I N G , 1 9 7 2 -, Asso c i a t e Professor o f P h y s i c a l E d u c a t ion ; B . S . , U n iv.e r s i t y o f O m a h a , 1 9 5 2 ; . M . , Ed. D . , C o l o rado S t a t e Col lege, 1 9 6 0 , 1 9 6 6 . M A R G A R E T W I C K S T R O M , 1 9 5 1 -, Assis t a n t Pro fessor o f R e l igio n , Director, Foreign S t u d e n ts and S p e c i a l Progra ms; B . A . , Augustana C o l l e g e , 1 9 3 7 ; M . R . E . , Bibl i c a l S e mi nary of N e w Y o r k , 1 95 I .

P A R T T IM E I NSTR UCTO RS

( 1 9 7 5-76 )

DIV ISION O F H UM A N I T I E S ENGLI S H Pa t Brewer T. Leslie Elli o t t Phyllis A n n Harrison Ka thryn J _ Keller

FOREIGN LANGUAGES Silke A. Reavis

J E F F W I L ES, 1 9 7 5 -, I n s t r u c t o r o f C o m m u n i c a t ion A r t s ; B . A . , M . A . , U n iversi t y of Oreg o n . 1 9 7 4 , 1 9 7 5 .

PHI LOSOPHY

"' M A RG A R ET W I L L H I T E , 1 9 7 3 - , Assi s t a n t Professor o f So ciology ; B . A. , M . A . , Univer. ity of Washingt o n , 1 9 6 7 , 1 9 7 1 .

David Lovell

E-

J A N E WI LLIA M S O N , I %4-, M a r y l a n d , 1 94 3 ; M . A. , New C o lorado U n ive rsi t y , 1 9 5 9 .

Professor of E d u ca t i on ; B . S . Ed . . U n iv e rs i t y of York U n iven; i t y , 1 9 4 7 ; E d . D . , N o r t h w e s t e rn

G A R Y B . W I L S O N , 1 9 7 5 -, Associa t e Professor of Co m m u nication A r t s ; B . S . , en t r a l M i c higan Univers i t y , 1 9 6 0 ; M. A. , C a l i fo r n ia S t a t e U n iv e r s i t y , 1 96 6 ; Ph. D . , M i c h igan S t a t e U n ivers i t y , 1 9 7 1 . K E N N ET H WO O L L E Y , 1 9 7 4-, Assis t a n t Pro fessor of B u siness A d m in is t ra t io n ; B . S , U n i v e r s i t y o f C o l o ra d o , 1 9 4 2 ; M . B . A . , P a c i Jic Lu t h e ran U n iv e r si t y , 1 9 7 4 . C H ANG- L l Y I U , 1 9 7 3- , Assi s t a n t Professor of M a t h e ma t i c s ; B . S . , T u nghai U n iv e r si [ y , 1 9 6 2 ; M . S . , Tsinghua U n iversi t y , 1 9 6 5 ; Ph D. , C o l u m bia U n ive rsi t y , 1 97 2. J O Y C E V. Z E R W E K H , 1 9 7 4- , A ss i s t a n t Pro fessor o f N u rs i n g ; B . S . , S t . Olaf College, 1 9 6 6 ; M . . , N e w Y o rk U n i v e rs i t y , 1 9 6 9 . D W I G H T J. Z U L A U F , 1 94 9- 5 3 , 1 ') 5 9- , Professor o f B u s i n es s A d m i n is t ra t io n ; B . S . , U n iver,ity of O r e g o n , 1 9 4 8 ; M . S . , Colu m b ia U n ivers i t y , 1 9 4 9 ; Ph. D. , U n iversity o f r-"t inneso t a, 1 9 6 5 ; C. P . A . , S t a t e of Wash i n g t o n .

Melinda Andrews

R E LIGION William H . Braswell Thomas Robert Lee

DIVI SION OF NATU R A L SCI E NCES BIOLOGY Dixie Lee M a t thias

MATHEMA TICS Margaret Herz og

DIVIS I O N OF SOCIAL SCI ENCES ECO NOMICS David R_ Seymour Garry Crane Vincent Roscelli Lynn M ichaelis

F AC U LTY ASSO C I ATES E D R I C E A D D L E M A N , Di r e c t o r of Co m p u t e r C e n t e r and I n stit u t i o n a l Research ; B. A. , Agnes S c o t t C o l lege, 1 9 4 9 ; B . A . , G e o rgia S t a t e C o ll e g e , 1 9 6 4 ; iVI. E d . , U n ivers i t y of G e o rgia, 1 9 6 9 ; Ed. D . , East T e x a s S t a te U n i v e rs i t y , 1 9 7 2 . RI C H A R D F R E N C H , Director o f Career Plan ni ng a n d P l a c e m e n t ; B . A . , Washington State U n ivers i t y , 1 9 5 4 ; D i p . The o l . , U n iversi ty o f O x fo r d , 1 9 5 7 ; M . D i v . , Ch urch D i v i n i t y School o f t he P a c i fi c , 1 9 5 9 ; M . E d . , Gon zaga U n iversit y , 1 9 6 9 . H A R O L D G A M B L E , Dire c t o r o f M i nori t y A ffairs; B . A . , U n iv e rs i t y o f W a s h i n g t o n , 1 972. RO B E RT K. M EN Z E L, Direc tor of C H O I C E ; B . A . , iVL D iv . , Co ncordia S e m i n a r y , t . L o u i s , 1 9 4 1 , 1 9 4 4 ; M . S . T . , Pacific Theological S e m i n a r y , 1 9 6 3 .

David V inje

HISTORY Nailene Chou M ichael Doyle Robert Erickson

POLITICAL SCI E N C E J. Arnold Bricker Char les W. Chance Melvin S . Jackson

LI B R A R Y

Erling O. Mork

F R A N K H A MIL T O N H A L E Y, L i b raria n ; B . A . , W i l l a m e t t e U n ivers i t y , 1 9 3 5 ; B . D . ,

PSYCHOLOGY

Drew

n ivers i t y , 1 9 4 6 ; i\.. B . L . S . , U n iversity o f Washingto n , 1 9 5 0 .

R I C HA R D W A R R E N G R E F R A T H , University, 1 9 6 8 ; M . A . , Te m p le laryland, 1 97 2 .

Rcfen; n c e U n i v e rsi t y ,

L i b raria n ; B . A . , N e w York 1 97 2 ; M . L . S . , U n iversity of

S U S A N M C D O N A L D, D e p u t y L i b rarian a n d Assis t a n t t o t h e Libraria n ; B . A . , M . L. S . , U n iversity o f Wash i n g t o n , 1 % 9 , 1 9 7 0 .

Henry Bertness David Kanofsky Herbert A. M arra Michael Quirk

SOC I OLOGY Ed ward J. Biren Thomas R. Egnew Donald Johns Ronald D. J o rgenson Jeremy R. Kunz Daniel Lanier, Jr. Joe Lehman Michael Mic klin Raul Pequeno O' Baya Layne Winklebleck Robert Yamas hita

' S pecial Le ave , 1 9 7 5 - 7 6

Charles D. York


1 29

SCHOOL OF BUSI N ESS A D M I N I STRA n O N Pa u l F. B r a n tner

W il l i a m G regory Dan i el Harris John C. J a m es J ohn Larson Phylli

Larson

Rolan (\ Mala n Erik Prestegaard Vernon A . U tz inger

SCHOOL O F EDUCA nON G a ry Barbour Annette B a r t o n C l e m D6nald C. G l a be Harold G r a y Arnold J . Hagen Marlis H anso n Sharel Sue H u n t Gary Mine t t i J u dy Sm it h Ca t h y Y e t t e r

SC HOOL O F FINE A RTS

m

Torrens

Mary H e l en T h o m pson D o ris Ziegen felder

SC HOOL OF PHYSI

COM M U N I CATION A RTS David C hr i s t i a n M. Bradley M u n n C l i fford Rowe Cla ude St. D e n is

AL EDUCATION

Ed A nderson Rev. Frank Brocker

S i d W i l l ia ms

PROF ESSORS E M E R ITI ELY M A RTI N A K R E 1 9.1 7. 1 9 70. B EC K M A N ,

1 9 M.

N e ft'rel/ee Uhrariall

liis/orl'

1 9 73.

I R E N E O. C R ESO, 1 955. I I) 7 1 . Biology I I L 'ON, I Wj IJ. 1 'H> 9 . Diree/or 0/ AdlllissiOiIS

J A SPE R OCH

M ELVII

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ELISE

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,

1 955.

HAUGE,

1 9 20.

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1 940.

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1 9 71 . 1 % 8. 1 %9.

1 949.

1 % 9.

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1 1) 70.

h'l/glish

Fran c is A. W i lson

HA RO L D .I. LFRAAS, I 'i4 7: 1 9 74. Biology lil Li E FLiSE UTILE, 1 94 6 . 1 9M .

M U SI C

G

Terry Benshoof Robe rt Bergeson J ul ie C. Brye Laura C a r t er RlI.';sel l Croc k e t t R a y m o n d J . Downey Daniel Dube Pa u l M . Edwards Laila S t orch F r i e d m a n n Mira Froh n mayer B ruce Grainger J u l i Holland Irene Hopp L in d a Fern Housh Mary Kent Don a l d W. K n u t h Constance K os c h m a n n J o r gen K ruse Randall J ay M c C a r t y Jane W. Moore Ronald L e e MUllson R ic h a rd O. Nace J a mes N e ff Robe r t Nor t h rop B a r ba ra Po ulshoc k K a t hryn J. R a m m

(;t:nllilll

N NA R JOHAI ES M A L M I , 1 9 3 7. 1 1) 6 9, ;Ililsie. ratill alld :\ol'lvegiall KATH A R I N E MO N R O E , I <j(, 7: 1 9 75 . l'I'clleiz R O B E RT A . L. M O RT YEDT, I I)() 2. 1 96 9 . pre� id(!1lI

ALI E l. N APJ US, 1 (1 (13. 1 9 75 . I;ilucatio/l FREDRJCK LAlJ Rf:NCE N EW N n A M . 1 950, 1 % 9. Music R O B E RT C. OLSEN . 1 1)4 7. 1 9 73. A

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ATH LETIC: 3 I'a c u l t y , J

Carolyn Ph i llips

Physics

1 939.

FACULTY STA N DI NG COMM ITTEES AN D OTH E R U N I V ERS ITY COMMISS I ON S , BOA R DS . 1 97 6-77

A RTIST S ERI E S : me m b e r s .

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Mike Benson

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advisory

advisory m e l l1 b e rs. O M M I TTEE 0 A D M ISSI N AND R ETENTION O F STUDE T S : 4 facu l l y . 5 a dv is o r y m e m bers. C O M M IlTEE 0 O M MITTEES: J fa c u l t y Illeill be r s , CO M M I1T£E ON STUDENT STAN DA R D S : 3 fac u l t y , I a d v i s o r y me mbe rs. EDUCAT I O N A L PO L I C I E S : 8 fac u l l y , I advis< J ry . 2 s t u d e ll t adviso r y m e m bers. FAC ULTY A FAI R S : 6 I·a c u l t y . 4 ad v i s o r y , 3 fac u l t y represen t a t i v e s to Board o f Rc�c n ts. I NTE R J M : 4 fa c u l t y , 2 s t u d e n t s . I n te r i m -o ord i n a t o r ( n o n -v o t i ng) m c m be rs. J U D I C I A R Y : .> fa c u l t y m e m bers. LECT U R E A N D CONVOCATI O N : 3 fac u l t y , 3 s t ud e n ts, 3 advisory m c m bers, 'PUBLICATIONS: .> facu l t y . 3 adv isory m e m bc r:;. R A N K AND TEN { E : 7 fa c u l t y (4 k n u r c d , 3 n o n - t c n ur e d ) , J adviso r y . 2 s t u d e n t advisory m e m be rs. R ELI IOUS U F ' : 3 fa c u l t .v . 3 advisorv . m e m bcrs. STUDE IT ACf1VITIES A N D W E L F A R E : 3 fac u l l y , 3 s t u d e n ts. 3 c,,-olliei<J m c m b e rs. l I V ERSITY CO M M IT T E E ON A D MJSSIOI S AND F ETE NTJON STUD E NTS : 4 (acuity , J studcn ts. 5 a d v b o rv IJl c in bc r s , UNI V E RS IT Y R E L I r o u s LIFE CO U N CI L: , fac u l t y , 6 s t u d e n ts, 2 a d m i n i s t r a t e r s . UN I V E RSITY ST UENt I' B LiCATlON : 3 fac u l t y , 4 s l u d c n 1>. 6 ad visory me m b e r s . UN I VE RSITY C E NT E R BOAR D : U n iversi t v Cc n t e r D ir c c t o r , 4 ' t u d e n t s . 2 fac u l t y , '1 �L d vis or y me m b e rs.


1 30

Campus Guide

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Pa r k i ng Lo t s A B Bl C o E F G H I J K L M N o

Library Lot Harstad Lot Visitors Only University Cent r Lot Tingelstad Lot Columbia Center Lot Ivy (2) Lot Ivy Lo t Swimming Pool Lot Olson Lot Olson Annex Lot Wheeler Lo t West Administration Lot Northwest Administration Lot East Administration Lot Health Center Lot


131 PA 1 F T

L U TH E R AN U N I V E R S I T Y

B u i l d i J1gs

1) T a c o m a

Pie rce County A d m i n is t ra t ion B u i l d i ng : A d m i n i stra! iull

o l'fi e c s ,

Cae u l t v

o f fi c c s . c i a s s ro o i l l s .

2 ) M o r t ve d t s t·a c k s ,

c 1 a � s r( ) o l 1 1 s a n d o r fi ccs U n i v e rs i t y

L i h ra r y ;

a rc h i v e s .

photo

lab.

s t udy

cllll l pu t e r

c a r r e l s.

cen t e r

and

o lli ec ' .

) M.1in E n trance 4) Xavier Hall : C i a s s \"( ) ( ) l ll s . fa c u l t y u f fi ces. ce n t ra l s e r v i c e s . c a m p u s

S)

pos t

0

fi c e .

Harstad Hall : 2:4 women. 6) U n i v e r s i t y U n lver,i ty t i c ke t

Res i d e n c e

unit

Ce n l e r :

Houses

i n Cm m a t i u n

o llice .

d i l l i l1 �

F c l l o �vsh i p o C fi c e s :

C hris

I iall:

b o o k store;

7 ) Ra ms t� d HaJ I : c l a s r o o Ill S ,

fac i l i t i e s :

S c i e n c e l 'l b u r a t mic:s. o f f i ce s ,

t ec h n ical

I . 2 3 � p e r s o n s for c u l t u r a l cuncerl

and

plays:

c ! a$Sf O O J1 l S . s t u d i o s f o r s pe e c h a llli music depart Illenls.

contests:

T( )wcr

C h a pe l .

9 ) Hong Hal l : C o - c d r e s i d e n c e u n i t for 1 1 '\ mcn a 1 1 ll w o l11c n . 1 0 ) HioderJie Hall : Res i d e n c e u n i t fur 1 30 men.

l o ) - fo o t

s t ,l g e :

slJu a s h ,1 I l ei h a n d b a l l c o u r t s : we i g h t t r d i n i n g

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Swimmino Pool : I n d o o r s w i m m i n g PU l l l . l oc k e r a n d s h o w e r r U U J11 s .

1 1 ) M e m o rial

G y nula.i u m :

arena, sauna and

S ) East vol d Auditorium : A u d i t m i u l1 1 p r o gl-a m s ,

a l h l c l ic

SIIOp:

l i b r a ry a n d m u se u m . sea t i n g

1 4 ) Haavik Hous 1 5 ) Ordnl HaJL C o - c d r e s i d e n c e u n i t Fur I � 5 I 1 I U I a n d 1V0 m e n . 1 6 ) Stuen Rail : C u- e d re s i d e n c c u n i t fur I 1 0 J11cn a n d w o m c n . 1 7 ) Music Annex I R ) Majnt enance Building 1 9 ) Cli fford O ls on Aud i tori u m : S ca t i l 1 � f ur 3 , s OO i n a u d i t or i u m ,I n d fu7

gove r n m e n t

r e cr e a t i o n a l

rl.

1 3 ) Rams y House : N u rs i n g o lliccs.

private

blllV l i n � a n d h i l l i ,n d s .

fu r S c h { ) o l

o f N u r s i n g a n d D e p a r t me n t u l

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c o lTee

student

1m

boo t h .

Commons:

r O O Ill S ;

I I ) KreidJ . Hal l : R e s i d e n c c u n i t for 1 2 :2 IVUJ l l en . 1 2 ) Aida Ingram H al l : Lcc t u re h a l l .

moms.

S pu r t s

w ( ) 1l1 c n ' s l u c k e r

2 2 ) Fos ' Hall :

C o - c d r e s i d e n c c u n i t for

1 8 H men a n u w o m e n . 2 3 ) Pfl ueger Ha.II : Resi d e n c e u n i t for 200 w u m e n . 24 ) Tingelstad H o lI : Co-cd re s i d c n cc u n i t for 3 ')() men a n d w o m e n , 1 5 ) Columbia Center : C a fe t e r i a . c o ffee s h o p , b a k e ry , go l f p r o s h o p for t h e n ive r s i t y 's n i n e-li l l i e go l f c u u r s e .

2 6 ) I v y HalL a c u i t y o ffi ces. 17) Della Hall : C o - c d res i d e l1 ce u n i t I'm 40 men a n d W O J 1 1 c n . 2 8 ) Evergreen 'ourt : 1 a rried s t u d c n t

29) 30)

hOllsing.

A l umni

Hou ' e :

R e l i gi o lls

L i fe

O I"I·icc . A l u m n i o ff i c e s .

Student Heal th Center 3 1 ) Park Avenue Hou, e 3 2 ) U n i ve i l y Scholars ( Faculty owned )

Associa tion


1 32

Ac ade mic A dvi ' i ng 70 Academic Organizat ion 7 cademic Pro ba ti o n () 8 cad e ni ic Structure 8 Accrecli ta l i o n 7 Activitie 5 7 Administrativ Officers 1 1 8 Adm is ion In fo r ma t io n 6 U Advllitced Placement Progra m 6 1 Early Admissions Policy 6 0 Early IJ\!cision Policy () () Foreign Stud n ts () I Honors at En t ra n c e 6 0 Re-ad missio n of Former Studen t ' 0 1 Air Forc e Reserve Offit r ' Tra in in g Program 54 Art J I, 1 04 Arts and Scien ces , College o f, Degree Requirements 7 7 Audit ing o f Co u rses ( 1) Bncbelo r's Degrees Ofr red 8 Bachelor's Degree , Second 72 Bio l ogy 1 3. 7 7 "Board and Roulll I n formatiull M Board of Regents I I () Bookstore 5 9 Busine ' Administra tion, Sc h oo l of 1 5 . 1)4

Calendar 4 Ca m pus Gu ide 1 31! Career Plann ing and Pl acement 58 Career Progra m s 72 Center, Un i ve rs i t y 58 Ch e m i try I 7. 7fJ CHOICE - Center for H u m a n Organization i n Cbanging Environ ments 55

Cburch Officials

II 7 Students 0 <) Classics Progra m 72 C o l l ege Entrance Ex:munation Board Te'ts /i O Communication Arts 1 9, 1 05 Core Req u i re m e n t s 70

Cfassification (;f

Costs : Tu ition , Special Fees, Room and Board fi COllJl.�eling and Tes t i n g Services 5 ) Cred i t by E xa mi llll t i on M

Dru p ping Courses

(, 8

Earth Sciences 2 1 , 80 Economics 23, SO Educ a t ion , School of 25. I) 7 Emeritus Professors 1 2 l) Employ men t , Student n 4 Engineering 2 7, 8 1 English 2 9. 82 Entrance Requirements ( See Admissions) 6 0 Environmental Studies Pr og ram Environs 5 9 Evening Classes 55 Expenses ( ee Costs) Ofi

Fac ul ty 1 20 Fac u l t y Comm i t tees 1 2 9 Financial A i d 0 2 Appl ication 6 2 Grants 63 Loans 6 4 Sc h ol a rs h ips 6 3 Ve t era n A ffairs 05

73

Fine Art ' , School of 1 04 Food Service 58 Fo rei gn Study Opport u n i t i es 54 French 3 1 . 83 Fresh man Course Schedule 7U Ge ograph y ( Earth Sciences)' 2 1 . 80 German 3 1 . S.i Grades 6 8 Gradua te Studies, Division o f 1 1 4 Grad uation Requ irements 70 Greek 3 1 , 84 Guest o f the Univers i ty () l) Hea l t h Center 58 Hea l th I ns u ra n ce 58 Hea l t h Sc ie nces 74 De n t al Hy giene 74 De n t i s t ry 74 Medical Technology 74 Medicine 74 Op t omet ry 74 Ph a rm ac y 74 Phy ical Therapy 74 Veterinary M e d i c i n e 74 History 33, 85 History of th e University 7 Honors Progra ms Housing 5 9

0 I)

Inco m plete Grades fi 8 I n formal Study () I) I nsti t u tional Memberships 7 I n tegra t d Stud i es Progra m 70. 85 In terim 7


1 33

KPLU¡FM University Radio Station

55

Late Afternoon and Evening Classe ' 55 Latin 31, 84 Law En forcemen t Education Program 64 Learning Ski l ls Service 58 Linguist i s 3 J, 83 Map J 30 Married Students' Housing 5c), () 7 ďż˝ sters Degrees Offered 8, J 1 4 Mathematics 35, 85 Minority A ffairs Office 58 Music

3 7, 1 0 7

Norwegian 3 1 , 84 Nursing, School of 3Y, J 1 () Object ives of the University 6 Own rs.hip and Support 1 1 6 Pari ' b Work 73 Pass/ Fail Courses 68 Payments 6 7 Philosop hy 4 1 , 86 Physical Education , School of 43, 1 1 2 Physics 45, 8 7 Placement , Career Planning 58 Pol it ical Science 4 7, 88 Pre-Profes, ional Programs 72 Engineeri ng 73 Health Sciences 74

Law

73

Theol gy 73 Psychol gy 49, Y O Pu blic A ffairs Program

73

Radio Sta tion ( KP LU-FM ) 55 Refunds 6 7 Registration 6 8 Re ligion 5 1 , Y 1 Religious L i fe 5 7 Req uirements, Entrance Residence Halls 5 Y Resi ential Life 5 Y

fl O

S hedul i ng Services 58 Sociology , A nth ropolog and Social W I fare 53, 92 Spanish 3 1 , 84 Sta t is t ics Y4 Studen t Li fe Office 5 7 Summer Session 55 Sym bols for Courses 7 7

Teacher Education /Certification C) 7 Testing Service 58 Theological Studies Pr gram 73 Transfer Students 6 1 Tuition 6 6 University I n formation 7 University Ministers 58 Urban Affairs Program 73 Veterans Affairs 65 Visiting Classes 6 <) Washingtoll State Council 011 Economic Education 7] Withdrawal from the University

68


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