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Pacific Lutheran University Bulletin Vol. LlII, March 1973, Number 1 Published six times annually by Pacific Lutheran Un iversity P.O. Box 2068, Tacoma, Washington 98447 Second Class Postage Paid at Tacoma, Washington


3 Cal en da r 12 Spec i a l Featu res 16 E nv i rons 1 8 Sum mer Recrea t i o n 33 U n ivers ity I nformat i o n 35 Accreditati o n 37 Acade m ic I nformat i o n 37 Adm iss i o n 39 R egistrati o n 43 Costs 47 Stu dent Life 49 U n iversity H ou s i ng 54 Acade m ic Fac i l it i es 57 Teach e r Certificat i o n 60 G raduate Stu d i es 74 Cou rse D esc r i pt i o n s 152 Sem i na rs for E n richment of M i n istry 160 Adm i n i st ra t i o n , Faculty a n d Staff 177 Registra t i o n Forms

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SUMMER/1973 R egistration by m a i l or by person a l v i s i t to t h e R egistrar's Off i ce is t h e o n l y step requ i red p r i o r t o atte n d i n g cl ass. R egistration o pens for a l l s u m m er cou rses begi n n i n g M arch 1 5, 1973, a n d rem a i n s open u n t i I t h e fi rst day a course meets . Late registration is per m itted as l ate as t h e fi rst d a y t h a t short courses meet a n d the seco n d day for regu lar sum mer courses. Changes i n registration are per m itted, but t here i s a $5 charge. Pre-Session

. J u n e 1 1 to J u n e 15

Sess ion I Classes Begi n 7 :30 a . m . I ndependence D a y Holi day Last Day of F i rst Session Cl asses Session I I Cl asses Begi n 7:30 a . m . Last D a y o f Sec o n d Session Cl asses Com m en cem en t ( 7 : 30 p.m.)

3

June 18 to July 1 8 Mo nday, J u ne 18 Wednesday J u l y 4 Wed nesday, J u l y 18

·

J u l y 19 to A u gust 17 ·

·

T h u rsday, July 19 F riday, August 17 F riday, A u gust 1 7

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ACADEMIC YEAR 1973-74 Fal l Semester Inte rim Spring Semester

T h u rsday, Septem ber 6 to F riday, Decem ber 14, 1973 . . . T h u rsday , Ja n u ary 3 to Wednesday , Janu ary 3D, 1974 Tuesda y , Febru ary 5 to Sunday, May 26, 1974

Su m mer Schoo l Session I Sess ion II

. . M o n day , June 17 to Wednesday , Ju l y 17, 1974 . . T h u rsdaY, Ju l y 18 to Friday, A u gust 16, 1974

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A l i beral arts education is concerned with l i berat i o n . Pac ific Lutheran U n iversity see ks t o l i berate a studen t; l i berate h i m not fro m h i s heri tage, but from h i s i n adequacies; l i berate h i m not from h i msel f , b u t f o r h i mse l f and for other men. Pract i ca l l y spe a k i n g, l i beration tra n s lates i nto deve l o p i n g concrete person a l char acteri stics: competence i n research , clarity in thought, creativity in actio n , sen s i t i v i ty to the needs of other men , and a clear and adequate perception of rea l ity, i n c l u d i n g m a n 's relationsh i p with G o d . L i berati o n is an i n div idual awake n i n g to the h u man poss i b i l i t ies extant with i n h i m se l f . M an's i n te l l ectu a l heri tage is a h i story of a lternatives. Toda y 's stude nt struggles to make a statem e n t in re l at i o n to those a l ternatives. To do so , he m ust k n ow where he sta nds. Pac i f i c Lut heran U n iversity, as a n i ntegrated Christ i a n co m m u n ity, seeks to give its stu dents that foundati o n . T h rough e ncou nter i n g man's p h i losophies a n d la nguages, each person has the opportun ity to acqu ire perspective, insight and disci p l i n e that wi l l give h i s l ife di recti o n a n d purpose. T h e u n iversi ty exper i en ce aff i r ms the i nd i v i d u a l 's concept of sel f·worth by hel p i n g h i m concentrate h i s energies on explor i ng poss i b l ities f o r surviv a l and sel f·re a l izati o n , for h i mself and for h i s fel l ow man.

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Summer i s t h e season for a "u n i que" l ea r n i n g experience. Tradi t i o n a l barr i ers a r e dismantl ed i n favor of free exploration and exper i mentati o n . T h rough the years, PLU s u mmer sess i o n s have a cqu i red a dist i n ctive fl avor:' relaxed a n d casua l , y 'et productive and sa tisfy i n g, Su m m er learn i n g has become sy nony mous with self-express i o n , self-exten sion a n d renewal . Sum mer 73 co n t i n u es that traditio n , •

Consider the U n i vers ity . With fewer students enr o l l ed du r i n g t h e summer than i n the regu lar a cadem ic year ( 1968 in 72), the U nivers i ty is fr eer to be an i n tegr a l part of t h e com mun i t y . Besi des provi d i n g basic i n structio n a l courses, the fac u l ty a n d staff supply con t i n u i n g education to men and women of every persuasio n , rel ati n g new mater ia l s a n d ideas t o t h e i r profess ional areas. P L U , further i l lustrat i n g i tsel f a resource center for a l l var iety of i n di v i d u a l s a n d grou ps, p l a y s host t o n u m erous v i s i t i n g professors from cam puses arou n d the conti nen t who seek t h e un iversity to stage informative and creative l ectu res and cou rses. Consider the s u mmer studen t . The diverse offeri n gs attract a p l u ra l istic cross-section of i n dividuals w h i ch tran scends generat i o n a l a n d professional boundaries,

8


i n su r i n g a wide divergence of pel¡spective in c l assroom a n d coffee sho p . "Ty pica l " studen ts i n cl ude both graduate a n d undergraduate scho l a rs, c lergy a n d l a y m en seek i n g new theo lo g i ca l i n s i g h t , freshmen i n i t i a t i n g col l ege stu d y , teachers a n d adm i n i strato r s seek i n g crede n t i a l s, a n d men and women who are si m p l y exp loring new d i rections i n lear n i ng . Consi der the classes. The su mm er months are ty p i ca l l y a time when faculty offer i n n ovati ve, ex p l o rative cou rse contents, spa n n i ng a broad ran ge of con temporary i ssues i n every f i e l d . Often conven i n g their students o n grassy l awns or in the a ir con d i t i o ned l i brar y , pro fessors a r e a l so able to ta ke advanta ge of long summer days for f ield trips to l o c a l u rba n , aqu a t i c a n d w i lderness l a boratories. M oreover, t h e sma l l er c l a sses i n the su m mer natu ral l y prom ote greater dialogue and informal student-teacher rel ation ships.

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Con sider "Ha ppen i ngs". The U n i versity i n i t i ated da i l y happen i ngs to compl ement "boo k l ea r n i ng". D a i l y at 10: 05 a.m., Tuesday , Wedn esday , and T h u rsda y , the free-form even ts are designed to sti m u l ate d i sc u ssion a n d debate through such di verse aven ues a s poetry, music, theatre a n d worsh i p . W ed n es d a y s a re reserved f o r rel igio u s

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"Happe n i n gs". Sched u l ed for prod u ction on the shel tered veranda of the U niversity Center Coffee Shop, a n u m ber of "Happe n i ng" dates are s ti l l ava i l a bl e to a l low for studen t requests a n d i n pu t .

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Con s i der T acoma/Seattle. These two cos mo p o l itan c it i es offer a wide va r iety of educational and cultural dive rsio n s i n c l u ding profes s i o n a l and a mateu r theatre, dozens of gal leries and m useums, a selection of e legant a n d u nique restaurants, professi o n a l and a m a te u r spo rts and a host of other s pec i a l events and attracti ons.

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Consider the e n v i ronment. Located i n the heart o f the i n v i gorati n g Paci f i c No rthwest, the U n iversity spans a 126-acre area dom i n ated by h uge D o u g l as F i rs , l u s h green lawns, complemented by a m ajestic v i ew of Mt. R a i ni e r . C a m p u s recreat i o n a l fac i l ities, listed i n t h i s b u l l eti n , supplement the u ltramodern l ivi ng/study facil it ies which i n c l u de an agreeable cI i m ati c-contro l l ed l i brary. Consider a c o l lege which affords to a r t i s a n , env i ro n m enta l i st, theologi a n , and acade m i c adventurer a su i t a b l e n i che fo r self-di scovery and e n l ightenment th rough fu rther k n o wledge. An experience wh ich w i l l p rove

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reward i n g and e x h i l erati n g to you . . . . Consider summer 1973 at P L U .

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Cou rse des c r i ptions and meeti ng times are i n cl uded u nder the departmen t headi ngs.

Workshops: Sky and E a rth Workshop - J u l y 19-August 17 Workshop in Lithography - July 19-A ugust 17 Worksho p in G over n m en t Accou n ting - J uly 3-Au gu st 16 D rama Workshop - J u ne 18-J u l y 18 Televis i o n Workshop - J u l y 19-August 17 P i a n o Lite ratu re of B r a h m s - J u n e 18-22 Guitar i n the C l a ss room - J u n e 25-29

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T h i s B usi ness of Com m erci a l M us i c - J u ly 9-13 P i a n o Pedagogy - J u n e 18-22 Creativ i ty in M u s ic Th rough Compos i t i o n for the Elementary School - J u l y 2-6 Concert and March i ng Band Techn i ques - J u l y 16-20 Woodw i n d Instrument Pedagogy and M a te r i a l s - J u l y 16-20 Choral L i terature for Large a n d Smal l E nsembles J u ly 16-20 Stage B a nd Tech n i ques and Lite ratu re - J u l y 23-27 Kodaly M usic Method - J u ne 18-22 Practi cal A rrangi ng - July 30-A u gust 3 E l ec tron i c M us i c Workshop - A ugust 6-10

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Organ Workshop - August 6-10 Percussion Pedagogy and Literatu re - J u ly 16-20 O l y mpics B ackpac k i n g T r i p - J u l y 28-A ugust 4 Elem e n tary School Physical Education Workshop June 18-22 or J u ne 25-29 ( Ev e n i n g ) Physiol ogy a n d t h e Coach - J u ne 18-22 ( Even i n g ) Sports a n d M ot i vation - J u l y 9-13 ( Even i n g) Compe t i tive Ath l etics for Women - J u n e 18-22 Sports M e d i c i n e - J u l y 25-28 Sca n d i n av i a n Dance - J u n e 13-15 Footba l l Coachi ng C l i n ic - J u n e 25-29 ( Ev e n i ng) Mult i -M e d i a Sports Promot i o n - J u l y 23-27 Small Craft O rientation - J u ly 23-27 Eng l i sh Language Workshop - J u l y 19-A ugust 3 F ore i g n Language Workshop - J u n e 18-29 Sen i o r Sem i n a r i n H uman Sexu al ity - J u ne 18-J u l y 18 Natu ra l H i story of the Pac ific Northwest - J u l y 19-A u g 17 Expe r i mental Des i g n - J u ly 23-A u gu st 3 Psy cholog ical Probl ems of Late r M a tu ri ty - J u ne 18-J u l y 18 (Eve n i n g) The Psychology of Wa r - J u ly 19-A u gust 17 Women's L i beration M ovement - J u ne 18-22 Violence i n America n C u l tu re - J u ly 9-13 Commu n i t y Corrections - J u n e 25-29

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A l i e nated Youth a n d the F a m i l y - Ju ly 1 9-25 Affective Cl assroom Techn iques - June 1 1 - 1 5 Early Chil dhood/Kindergarten - Ju ne 13-29 o r t o Ju l y 1 3 Creative Activ ities for C lassroom - Ju n e 1 8-Ju l y 1 8 Adm i n istration S i m u l ation -Seco n dary - J u l y 9- 1 3 Adm i n istra t i o n S i m ulati o n - E l emen ta ry - J u l y 1 6-20 Games a nd S i m u l a t i o n - Jul y 1 6-20 Plan n i n g for Ret i re m e n t - July 1 6-20 In novations i n Teac h i ng Seco n dary Soc i al Studies July 1 9-August 3 Interacti o n Analysis - Ju I y 1 9-August 1 7 Systematic a n d Objective A n a l y s i s - June 1 8-July 1 8 I nstru cti o n a l Staff Deve l o pment - August 6-1 7 -

Lay Clergy I nstitutes:

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Impro v i ng Interpersonal Effect iveness - Jul y 9- 1 3 I mprov i ng Parish E ffectiveness - Ju ly 1 6-20 Theo l ogy Today: B e i ng H u m a n - J u l y 1 6-20 Organiza ti o n a l Behavior - June 1 8-Ju l y 1 3 Drug Use Educatio n , Phase I - J u l y 5- 1 8 Dru g Use Educat i o n , Phase I I - Ju l y 23-August 4 An Approach to Act i o n Cou nsel i n g - July 1 2- 1 8

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Special Study Programs for H i gh Schoo l Students: Al l-Star Sports Footb a l l Camp - J u n e 24-29 North west Summer Music a n d Art Camp - J u l y 1 5-21 Youth Organ Institute - August 13-1 7 Basketba l l Camps - J u ly 23-28, July 3D-August 4, August 6-1 1

Fore ign Study :

A,

Sca n d i navian Study Tou r - J u ne 1 3-J u l y 1 6 . Credit - 6 semester hours. Tota l cost, i n c l u ding credit, meals, trave l $1 , 4 1 5; audit cost - $1,355.

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PLU

blends easy access to the slopes and shores with

w e ll-a p p oin t e d combination

c am p us

affords

recreation

students

a

facilities.

complete

This

recreation

package. Capitalizing

on

recreation areas,

one

the

of

America's

University

most

beautiful

organizes group outings

tailored to meet varying interests of summer students. For the "do-it-yourselfer", rewarding experiences are available at

sandy

ranges,

ocean

beaches,

pic turesque

nearby

lakes,

and

Cascade and other

Olympic

Puget

Sound

attractions.

Outings Diverse

in nature and easy on the budget, weekend

outings are open to all members of the student body, faculty,

staff

transportation

and is

their arranged

families. by

To

minimize

pooling

autos

costs,

with

all

participants sharing the expense. More detailed information on each tour can be obtained from the School of Physical Education, extension

266. ( See

pages 18 to

24.) 16


Students attracted by the h i k ing, camping and backpacking listings are en cou raged to bring su itable clothing and equipment. Wal king shoes, a lightweight raincoat or poncho , and s l eeping bag are essentia l.


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The f o l l o w i n g slated events a re specia l l y coor d i nated through a su m mer school recreation a l d i rector. As studen t inte rest dictates, o ther ath letic a n d recreatio n a l a ctivities can be created such as m idday to u r n a me n ts in golf , raquet sports or other areas, via the program di recto r. A n y add itiona l i nformation of a recreational nature i n cl u d i n g outi n gs o r tourneys m ay be o bt a i n e d f r o m t h e School o f Physical Edu catio n , e xtension 266 . Saturday, June 23

U N D E R G R O U N D TO U R OF SEATT L E . An adventu re i n to Seattle's colorful past beg i ns near Pioneer Square, where the ter m "sk i d road" origin ated. The gu ide's commentary, as you tre k through un derground shops of a n earlier era, ex poses the fra i l ties o f Seattle's forefathers i n a humorous histo r i c a l h a ppe n i ng. Leave Olson Au dito riu m 11:00 a . m . , return 5:00 p.m. Cost, i n clu d i n g ticket a n d tran sportation, approx i m ate l y $1.7 5 . B r i n g a sack l u n c h .

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Sunday, June

24 900,000 30,000 acres of

MIMA MOUNDS H I K E. A topographic phenomenon, add your own theory to those already on record, why odd hillocks, up to seven feet in height, dot farmland survey

$1.25.

near

Tenino.

4:00

a.m., return

11:30

Climb the rounded humps and

hundreds more.

Leave Olson Auditorium

p.m. Transportation cost approx imately

Bring a sack lunch.

Satu rday, June 30

VICTO R I A, B R I T I SH

CO LUM B I A. Sail to picturesque

Victoria, called "A little bit of England" aboard Canadian Pacific's

"Princess

downtown shops,

Marguerite." or

renowned

Visit

museums,

quaint

Butchart Gardens. Boat

excursion through Puget Sound waters and Strait of Juan de

Fuca

7:00

originates

Auditorium

cost, auto and boat, lunch.

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11 :00 p.m. Transportation approximately $10.00. Bring a sack

and

ends

a.m., return

in

Seattle.

Leave

Olson

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Sunday, July 1

CAN O E I N G ON LAK E WASH I N GTON. The U n i versity of Was h i ngton A r boretum is di rectl y across the ship can a l from the boat hou se a nd, if you don't g e t swamped by a n 80 foot l u x u r y craft, you ' l l have a most enjoyable afternoon padd l i n g the i n l e ts and back-waters of the bota n i ca l garde n . Leave Olson A u ditori u m 10:00 a . m . , return 5:00 p . m. Cost, i nc l u di ng transportation a n d two hour canoe renta l , approx imately $2.20 . B ring a sack l u nc h . Friday, Saturday, & Sunday, July 6-8

R A I N FO R EST CAMPI N G T R I P AN D OCEAN BEACH ES. Camp on the shores of the Hoh R iver in the conifero u s r a i n forest where precipitation ex ceeds 150 i nches a n n u a l l y . Hike the n ature trai l s a n d v i s i t the H a l l o f Mosses, u n matched in green grandeur. Su nday, i t's wading, col l ect i n g roc ks a n d driftwood at R ia lto Beach on the b l u e Pacific. Leave O l son A u ditorium 4:30 p . m . F riday , return S u n day a t 10:30 p. m . Cost, i nc l uding tra nsportation and share of food, a pprox i mately $8.00 each.

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SaturdaY,July

14

G I G HA R BOR TO NAR ROWS BR I D G E BEACH H I K E. Once a sl eepy seaside fishing vi l l age, a n influx of quaint specialty shops has transfo rmed the nearby co m m u n ity into the N orth west's answer to Carme l , C a l if. H i ke the beach at low tide to the famed N a rrows B ridge wh ich l i n ks Tacoma to the Kitsap Peninsu l a . Leave Olson Auditorium 9:30 a . m., retu rn 4:00 p. m . Tra n sportation appro x i mate l y 50 cents. B ring a sack l unch. Sunday, July

15

HIKIN G AT TWANOH STATE PARK. One of Washington's l a rgest and most popu l a r state parks, Twanoh's front door is Hood Cana l . F rom the back door lies three miles of trails ove r forested hill and g l ade easily ranking as one of the area's most beautiful n ature walks. Leave O l son Auditorium 1 1 :00 a . m ., return 6:00 p.m. Transportation cost approxima tely $ 1 . 50. B ring a sack lunch and swim suit.

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Saturday & S u n da y , July 21-22

H U R R I CA N E R I DG E/MOOSE LAKE BAC KPACK T R I P. At the mid d l e of a string of g l acier-ba s i n l a kes in the h i g h alpine cou ntry near Olympic Nat i o n al Park's H u rricane Ridge, the trail obl i g ingly goes down hill on the way i n , when packs are u s u al l y heaviest. Distance i s 8% miles rou n dtrip. Leave O l son Audi torium 6:00 a . m . Saturda y , return 9:00 p. m . Su nday. Cost, including tra nsportation a n d share of food, approximately $7.00. Sa t u rday , July 28

PARAD ISE ICE CAV ES. A day on the slope of majestic Mou n t R a i n i er is a memorable experie nce as you explore the ice caves, wa l k the Wonder l a n d Trail, or just browse thro u g h the Vis i to rs Center . Leave Olson Auditoriu m 9:00 a . m . , return 7:00 p.m . Transportation cost approximatel y $2.00. Bring a sack l u nch.


Sunday, J ul y 29

CLAM DI G G I N G AT A N D E RSON ISLAND. A minus 2.8 foot t i de a t 1 1 :04 a . m . assures a great time i n pursuit of t h e wiley butter c l a m . Anderson Isl a n d , a tiny jewel i n Puget Sou nd, on ly a fifteen minute ferry ride from Steil acoom, has two fresh water lakes i n its inte rior. Leave Olson Auditorium 8:45 a . m ., return 6:00 p . m . Transportation cost, auto and fe rry , a p prox i mate l y $ 1 . 50. B ring a sack lunch and swim suit. Saturday & Sunday, August

4-5

MT. ADAMS G LAC I E R CAMP BACKPACK TR IP. Famous for i ts s u n rise a n d sunset v iews of St. H e l e n s and R ainie r, the moraine-and-meadow ca mpsite is at the 6, 000 foot lev e l o n M t . A d a m s a n d is used as a base f o r su mmit ascents. Great exp l oration opportu nities a b o u n d d u rin g this 1 0 mile rou ndtr i p. Leave Olson Au ditorium 6:00 a . m . Saturday, return 9:00 p.m . Sunday. Cost, i n cl u ding transportati on and share of food, approx im ate l y $7.00.

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Saturday, August 11

B L A K E I S LAND SALMON BAKE. A five路h o u r excursion, the exciti n g boat t r i p fro m the Seattle main l a n d to T i l l i cu m Vil lage a n d the scenery and s p l en do r o f this natural i s l an d locati o n a re but a prel u de to t h e d i n i ng exper i e n ce of a gen u ine salmon bake, pre pared by a u th e n ti c old I nd i an recipes. Leave Olson A u d i to riu m 11:00 a . m., ret u rn 8:00 p . m . Cost, i n c l u d i n g a u to tra n s portati o n , boat ride, a n d f u l l-course mea l i s a pprox i m ately $7 . 50.

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Olson Au ditorium O l so n A u d i to riu m, featu red in the J a n u a ry 1972 issue of Scholastic Coach Magazine, is a mUlti-purpose f a ci l i ty with U n i-Tu rf gym nasium fl oor and an Astro-Turf F iel dhouse . Open 8:30 a . m . to 6:00 p.m. M o nday through F r i day, a c t i v i ties i n c l u de basketba l l , voll ey ba l l , bad minto n , ha n d ball, paddleba l l , squash, we ight tra i n in g, a n d men's sa u n a . A wo m e n 's sau n a , i n nea r by Memori a l G y m , i s open fro m 4:00-6: 00 p . m . M o n day through F riday . Keys may be obtained i n the Phy s i ca l Edu cation Offi ce. While women are encou raged to m a ke u se of the O l son A udito riu m faci l i ties thro u ghout the wee k , a Co-Ed Recreatio n period is scheduled in the bu i ld i n g Wednesday even i n gs from 7 :00-9:00 p . m . There is n o charge for equipment chec k-o u t.

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Swi mming Pool The n a ta to rium is open d a i l y for recreatio n a l swi m m i n g . The swi m m in g area measu res 4 2 feet b y 7 5 feet; d iving sector, 30 by 35 feet w i th one and three meter boards; the poo l also has a sun bathing area, lockers and dress i n g roo ms. O pe n e x c l u s i v e l y for stude n ts, facu l ty and staff from 4 : 30-5: 30 p . m . dai I y , students are a l so el i g i bl e to swim - at no charge - d u r i n g publ i c swi m sessio ns: 1 :00-2:30 p . m . , 3: 00-4:30 p . m ., a n d 7 :00-8:3 0 p . m .

University Center Games Room The U n iversity Center, a h u b of student acti v i ti es, houses a modern si x - l a n e bowling a l l e y , b i l liards tables, table ten n is, and sh uffl e board.

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Golf Cou rse A part of the campus, the University-owned 2,77 0 yard, nine hole, par 35, golf course has a modestly-priced fee schedule for students, faculty, and staff: Monday through Friday

9 18 Saturday, Sunday, Hoi idays 9 18

holes holes holes holes

$ 1 . 50 $2.00 $2.00 $3.00

Golf clubs and carts may be rented at the pro shop for a small fee. Tennis Courts Six tennis courts (two lighted courts) are available on the lower campus. Use priorities are reserved for PLU students, facu Ity, and staff.

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N umero us recreatio n a l opportu n ities ex i st in cl ose pro x i mity to the campus. Spanaway Pa rk, l ocated o n a l a ke one mi le south of the campus, featu res canoe a n d rowboat ren ta l s in add i ti o n to swimm i n g , horseshoes, p i c n i ck i ng, go l f a n d fishing. (The publ i c Spanaway G o l f Course is a truly bea utiful championsh i p cou rse with wel l kept fa i rway s , greens, and traps.)

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Spri n ke r R ecreation Cente r , located i mmed i ate l y n orth of Spanaway Park, has exce l l e n t faci l i ties for ten n i s , track and fie l d , softba l l , base ba l l , basketba l l , archery , a n d apparatus act i v i ties.

,

D rama at PLU during the summer of '73 wi l l be performed at the Centuri o n Pl ayhouse i n cooperatio n w i th F ort Lewis a n d i ts profess i o n a l theatre staff. Performance dates and names wi I I be a n nounced a t a later date. A l l performa n ces are free a n d o pen to the p u b l ic.

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Location Pacific Lutheran U n iversity, the o n l y degree-grant i n g school o f t h e Lutheran Chu rch i n t h e Pa cific N orthwest, i s located i n T acoma, Washi ngto n , a city of a bo u t 1 60,000 i nhabita n ts _ The city is on Puget Sou nd and near M o u n t Rai n ier a n d O l y m p i c N a t i o n a l Parks_ The 126-acre U n iversi ty campus, s i t u a ted in the heart of the Evergree n p l ay gro u n d, boasts a he a l th f u l cl i mate and beau t i f u l scenery_ R a i l roads, buses a n d highways make the campus easily access i bl e from out l y i n g areas_ Sea-Tac I nte rna tio n a l Airport, a t hirty m i n u te drive f ro m PLU o n I nterstate H i gh way 5, p rov i des a con ve n ient feature for out-of-state students_

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Size Academic Year E n rol l ments Fu l l -ti m e 1969 2219 1970 2433 1971 2440 197 2 2498

Part-time 6 12 568 598 800

Total 2831 3001 3038 3298

2nd Term 587 6 16 620 6 56

Total 1542 1843 1902 1968

Sum mer Session E n ro l lm ents

1969 1970 197 1 197 2

!st Term 955 1227 1282 1312

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ACCREDITATION Pacific

Lutheran University is fully accredited by the

Northwest Association of Secondary and Higher Schools as a four-year institution of higher education. The University is accredited by the Washington State Board of Education and by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education for the preparation of elementary and secondary teachers with the Master's Degree as the highest degree approved.

This

graduates

clear

accreditation reciprocity

in

gives

Pacific

many

other

Lutheran states.

In

addition, the nursing program is accredited by the National League of Nurses, the chemistry program is approved by the

American

Business

Chemical

Society,

and

Administration

program

is

the

Bachelor

accredited

by

of the

American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business. Pacific Lutheran University recommends its graduates to the

State

Superintendent

of

Public

Instruction

for

certificates. The University is a member of the Association of American Colleges, the American Council on Education, and the National Lutheran Educational Conference.

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Admission Non -Degree Studen ts Non- Degree stude n ts who plan to e n ro l l for the summer sessi o n o n l y , w i thout i ntention of work i n g toward a degree from t h i s i nstitution or for a teach i n g certificate, need not file a formal a pp l i ca t i on o r s u bm it transcripts from other schools atten ded. I n stead, they may f i l e a letter of acade m i c standing from the last i nstitution attended o r give other e v i de n ce of being prepared for col lege work. They may e n ro l l in any course for w h i ch they have the necessary prerequ isites. Degree Students Students who p l a n to work toward a n undergraduate degree from Pac i f i c Lutheran U n ivers i ty must complete a for m a l a p p l ication for adm i ss i o n . The necessary forms may be o bt a i ned by contact i ng the Admissions Office. Those who have done work i n another accredited college w i l l be granted advanced stan di ng for previous work.

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Studen ts see k i n g admi ssi o n to the master's degree program sho u l d contact the D ivision of Graduate Studies. Those see k i n g teacher certification sho u l d contact the School of Educatio n . Cont i n u i n g studen ts of Paci f i c Lutheran U n iversity a re admitted u n der the rules that no rma l l y apply for a n y scho l asti c term or semester.

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Registration A D VA N C E R E GISTR AT I O N BY MAIL IS ENCO U R AG E D . Please see the a ppropri ate forms i n the back of t h i s cat a log. Alte rnatively , students may register on ca mpus J u ne 18 or duri n g the week of J u ne 1 1- 15 . Students w h o des i re a tra nscr i pt t o b e eva l ua ted and a progress chart created or brought u p to date shou l d make their request by ma i l or by personal appointment, prefera bly pri or to J u ne 11. Registration for the first sessi o n must be com pl eted by Tuesday , J u ne 19.

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Registration fo r the second sess i o n must be com pleted by F ri day , J u l y 20.

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Students p l a n n i n g to attend the entire s u mm er session shou l d com p lete registra ti o n for both sessions a t the time of the initial registra t i o n .

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Students w h o p l il n to grad uate i n A u g u s t must m a k e appl i cation f o r graduation no l ater than J u l y 20. Please refer to the calendar o n page 3 for o pe n i n g dates of classes.

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Student Load and Waivers A f u l l load for either term is generally considered to be 6 semester hours. G raduate students may not t a ke more than 12 semester hours du ring the s u m m er to count to ward the ir master's degree at Pacific L u thera n U niversity . Waiver re quests of academic require ments for graduatio n should be made on the a p propriate U niversi ty form with signatu res of a p prov a l from the adv ise r a n d the scho o l or depart ment head, a n d s u bmitted to the Dean of Summer St udies.


Change of Registration, Withdrawals A n y addition or withdra wa l from a cou rse m u st be made in the Registra r's Office. A fee of $5.00 is charged for a schedule cha nge made after com p l e t i o n of registration u n l e ss such chan ge is requested by the U n iversity authorities. Studen ts who register for fi rst sessio n o n l y a n d l ater decide to e n roll fo r the seco n d sessi o n may do so by a d d i n g t h e desi red courses a n d pay i n g the ba l a n ce o f t h e fu l l session fees. Students reg i stered for both sessio n s who decide not to con t in u e in the secon d sessi o n must make a n offi c i a l wi thdrawal from the secon d sessio n courses. Off i c i a l withdrawa ls, with a grade of "WP", w i l l be given any time during a session i f the student is doi n g satisfactory work. If a stude n t withdraws who is not doi n g sati sfactory work, he is given a W F However , the grade of "W" w i l l replace t h e "WP" o r "WF " a n d w i l l n o t be u se d i n computi n g grade p o i n t average o n the transcr i pt . D ro p p i n g a course at a n y t i me withou t i nform i n g t h e Registrar's Off i ce w i l l be classified on the record as a fail i n g grade, wh ich i s an "E". "

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Pass/Fail Option A Pass/Fail Agreement form is avail a ble to a l l un dergra duate stu d e n ts desiring a course o n t h e pass/f a i l option. Secure the form from the R egistrar's Office.


$4 5.00 1 0.00

Costs Tuition per credit hou r

(14

Audit fee, per credit hou r.

1

Private music lessons

one-half hou r lessons -

(2 in a room) (1 in a room)

semester hour)

Room, per session

(2 in

Room, per session Room, per day

10%

a room)

70.00 60.00* 85.00" . 4.00

··A student who takes room for both sessions will receive

a

reduction in room charges. Meal s are available at the

University Center on a cash basis. No food contracts will be offered.

206,

177

or by marking

the appropriate space on the application card -see page of this catalog.

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A housing application form can be obtained by calling the Office of Student Life, extension

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I nsurance Accident and h e a l th insu rance may be procu red at l o w cost f r o m the Unvi ersity B u s i ness Office a t the time o f registration. This insu rance is mandatory for foreign students and i s h i g h l y recommended for students engaged in recreation a l sports or phys ical ed ucation, especially PE 228, B asic Mou nta i neering, PE 40 1 , Ol y mp ics B ac kpac k i n g Tri p, P E 40 1 , Bowron L a k e s Wilde rness Canoe Trip, and PE 401, Lewis & C l a rk-Missouri R iver W i l derness Canoe Tri p .

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Refunds Partial tuition refund of fifty per cent may be made on l y du ring the f i rst week when withdrawal fro m t h e U n iversity res u l ts from sickness or causes beyond the con trol of the studen t. No room ref u n d is given.

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The diverse act i v ities of t he Student L ife Office com bine to se rve as "troubl e-shooter", "ombudsman", and "open ear" for students with special areas of concern. C o n s u l tatio n is readily ava i l ab l e with the Vice President a n d members of his staff for a ny person seeking a solu t i o n . Specific areas of responsibility for the Student Life O ff i ce i n c l u de resi den ce h a l l programming, p lacement, cou n se l i n g ce nter, hea l t h center, campus organ izations and activities, m inority student cou nseling, foreign student advising a n d the University Center. With the exception of the health center, these faci lities a n d serv i ces are avail a b l e d u ring s u m mer months. The f i na n cial aids officer, the U niversity m ln tster and academ ic advisers wor k c l ose l y with the Student Life Office. Correspondence and conferences with a n y membe rs of the staff are wel comed from either stude n ts or their pare n ts.

47

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Stuen H a l l , a comfortable, co-edu cati o n a l p l ace, i s a d j ace n t t o the Adm i n i stration B u i l d i n g a n d the uppe r-cam pus quadrangle. Stuen i s d i v i ded i n to two wings - north wing, women, south wing, m e n . Common l ounge , recreat i o n a l faci l ities, l au n dry , and ty p i ng a n d act i v i ty rooms encou rage new acqu a i ntances a n d friends h i ps. Students des i ri ng the fellowsh i p and conve n ience of a Stuen residence room for summer shou l d apply to t h e Stude n t Life Office . R ooms a re a ttractively decorated and furn i shed w i th s i n g l e beds, chests of drawers, study desks, l amps and cha i rs. Two students are assigned to a room u n l ess a specific request i s made for s i ng l e accommodations. A room depos i t i s n ot requi red but occu pa nts wil l be asked to s i g n a contract for the housing. Students pro v i de their own p i l low, bedd i ng, towe l s and other desired furn ishi ngs. Permi tted e lectrical a p p l i a n ce s i n cl ude clocks, radios, record p l ayers and typewrite rs. Such i tems as s u n l a m ps, h o t pl ates and other cooki ng appl i a n ces a r e n ot per m i tted. Also ava i lable to prospective students i s moderate l y price d off-campus housi n g, i ncl udi n g a partme n ts a n d sma l l houses for ren ta l .

49

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Since 1970, University Center has been celebrated as the "Student

Union

to suit all". Strategically

located,

the

Center's four levels unite lower with upper campus to justifiably earn its title as "hub of happenings" at P L U. Designed

of

rustic

Northwest

timber,

the

Center

environmentally complements surrounding scenery. Housed facilities include the information desk, which accumulates and

d isseminates

material

concerning

campus

and

community, meeting rooms, cafeteria, coffee shop, games room (six-lane bowling alley, billiards, cards, etc.), music listening

rooms and book

located

on

the

lower

CAV E,

a-conventional

store. level

a

An additional feature,

of

student

the run

Center coffee

is

the

corner

functioning as a conversational convent as well as providing evening entertainment. Top to bottom, balcony to CAVE, University Center reflects

the

necessary

as

spirit of a

students and faculty.

51

PLU; creative, contemporary and

congregational

core

of

fellowship

for


Food Service Stu dents desi ring f u l l mea ls may serve themselves through a "scramble" system in the commons, a beau tiful di ning hall located on the upper level of the Unive rsi ty Cente r. F o r a h a mb u rger, coke, cup of coffee, or l u nch, the Coffee Shop is located on the Center's lower level, which includes a shel tered o utdoor balcon y for fresh air e a ting. If you p l a n to l unch every day on campus, inquire in the Food Service Office abo ut special rates.

52


Columbia Center Coffee Shop I n addition to the Food Services ava i l able in the U n i versity Center, the Col u m bi a Center Coffee Shop on lower ca mpus wil l be ope n . The servi ce counter operates du ring pea k ti mes with a complete vending servi ce ava i l able whenever the Golf Pro Shop is ope n . U C Games Room L ocated in the U n iversi ty Center are six bow l i n g lanes, two table ten n i s tables, seven bi l l i a rds tables, a shuff le board, and other recreat ion a l games. Summer session students are i nv i te d to uti l i ze t h ese fine fac i l i t i es. D u r i ng the f i rst week of the sessions, one free l i n e of bow l i ng wi l l be gran ted each s u m mer session student a n d a n i ntroductory rate wi l l be offered those play i n g bi Iliards. Spec i a l events will be planned if enough i n terest IS shown. Those i n terested in e i ther a bowl i n g or a bill iards tou r n a m e n t shou l d s i gn u p a t the Games Room Des k .

53


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Campu s stru ctu res i l l u m i n ate the red- brick, s i m u l ated old-English arc h i tectual design, fu rn i s h i n g fee l i ngs of tradition, accreditation, persona l i ty , and warmth_

Tacoma-Pierce Administration Building (1960) h ouses university administrative off i ces, cl assrooms, facu l ty offices, studios and master control for closed ci rcu i t telev i s i on. The R o be rt A_ L Mortvedt Library (1966) , a i r-conditioned, multi -medi a learning center, conta ins over 145 ,000 publ i shed and recorded i tems and prov i des an opt i m u m learn i n g enviro n m e n t of comfort and privacy. I t a l so houses U n i versity Photo Services a n d the Computer Center. Xavier Hall ( 1937 re modeled 1966) houses classrooms, facu lty off i ces and Central Ser v i ces. R a mstad Hall (1947 re m odeled 1959) contains l a boratory , classroom, l i brary, museum, research and off i ce faci l ities for tl i e Departments of B i ol ogy , Chemi stry a n d Physics . Memorial Gymnasium ( 1947) provides cl assroom and act i vity areas for the Sch ool of Physica l Education and accommodates i ntram ura l a n d i ntercol l egiate athlet i cs .


Eastvold Au ditori u m ( 1 952) faci litates student wOl"shi p , con ce rts, special events and pl ays. I t also contains c lassrooms, wor k a reas, stage and a radio studio; studios, ensemble practice roo ms and i n d i v i d u a l practice rooms for the Music De partment; and a devotio n a l chapel . The Swimmi n g Pool (1965) encloses a swimming area 42 by 75 fee t a n d a d i vi n g a rea 30 by 35 feet as we l l as dressing room faci I i ties. Olson Physical Education Auditorium ( 1 969) faci l i tates campus recreat i o n al activities i n cl u d i n g lectures, the performing Artist Series, popu l a r entertain ment a n d athletic e ve n ts. Attractio ns include a U ni路Turf e d aud itori u m and an Astra-Tu rfed fiel dhouse ; h a ndba ll, squ ash, paddlebal l and sau n2 facilities; shower, locker a n d dressing rooms. Additio n a l physical education facilities incl ude lighted tennis cou rts, a nine-hole golf cou rse and numerous athletic fiel ds.

A I D A I NG RAM HAL L ( 1 955, remode l ed 1 97 1 ) houses art studios, offices a n d cl assrooms as well as offices a n d special facil i t i es fo r t h e Sc hoo l o f N u rs i n g .

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CERTI F I CATION IN T H E STATE OF WASH I N GTON Information Concerning the Standard Certificate and Renewal of the Provisional Certifi cate I.

Fifth College Year of the Program for the Standard Certificate:

The fifth col lege year of teacher education is to be plan ned caref u l ly i n the l ight of the teacher's first teac hing experie nce a nd/or professi onal goals. This year of study provides an opportunity for further strengthen i ng teaching competence and for specialized study. A. The fifth year of teacher education is to be completed fo l lowi ng a period of at least one year of i n i tial teach ing experience. The teacher may complete this study during a n a cademic year or summer sessions i n an approved institution of his cho i ce as fo l lows: 1. I n a Washington i nstitution with an approved teacher education program. The i nstitution chosen sha l l be responsi ble for reco mmending the teacher for the standard certif icate. 2. I n an approved o ut-of-state i nst itution. The teac her's p r e -s e r v ice in s t i tution sha l l be respo nsible for recommending h i m for the standard certi fica te. Prior a pproval of the teacher's program by h i s pre-service i nstitution is required to conform w i th the f ifth year pattern o f study outli ned in "B" below. B. The f ifth year pattern of study : 1. The teacher's fifth year program s h a l l be approved by the recommen d i ng institution:

57


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a . The pre路service instituti o n may designate f ifth year requ i rements to t he extent o f one-ha l f the program subject to the approval of the recommend ing i nstitut i o n . b. Specific course w o r k m a y b e recommended by the candi date's employ i ng d istrict. c. Study sha l l be i n both academic a nd profess ional fields. ( 1 ) The f ifth year sha l l i ncl ude a m i n i mum of 30 semester hours of which at least 50 per cent are i n studies o f t h e t h i rd , fourth, and post-graduate years. (2) N ot more tha n 8 semester hours of extension and/or correspondence study may be approved. (3) A m i n i mum o f o ne-half of the fifth year shall be taken in residence in the recommending i n stitution or in an approved out路of-state inst itution . Pacific Lutheran University requires 20 semester hours o f residence for transfer students.

(4) It is recommended that o n l y 1 0 of the 20 required semester hours be completed prior to or dur i ng the f i rst year of tea ching experience. d. Two years of sati sfactory teaching experience are required for the i ssuance o f the Standard Cert i f i cate. The candidate sho u l d request that letters verifying successful experience be forwarded to the SchoOl of Education, Pacific Lutheran U n i versity . C. Specific req u i re me nts and procedures: 1 . Spec ific course req u i rements for a l l Standard Certif icate cand idates be ing recommended by Pacific Lut heran U n i versity.

58


a.

Educ. 467

Evalua t i o n , or its equiva l ent. (Educ. 473

Parent-Teacher

Co nference

may

be

applied

by

e lementary candidates.) b.

Educ. 463

Guidance in the Elementary Scho o l , or

Educ. 465 Guidance in the Secondary Scho o l , o r the equivalent. c.

His!. 255 The Pacific Northwest, or its equivalent, is requi red of a l l secondary level teachers with a social science major and of all el ementa r y teachers except those recommended for teaching one subject through the elementary scho o l grades.

d.

C o u rses

ta k e n

concentration education

and

sh o u l d bui ld

background

as

s t r engthen the

well

student's

as

fill

a reas

of

general

needs in the

professio nal fie ld. This program of studies sho u l d be a cooperative effort

between the student, those who

have worked with him d u r ing the period of his initial teaching,

and

the

adviser

at

the

recommending

ins titut i o n . e.

The

student

shou ld

receive

approval

of

the

recommending institution for wo r k taken e l sewhere before the w o r k is begu n .

II. Renewal of Provisional Certificate: A. P rovisional certificates, based on satisfactory completion of a fo u r-year pre-service program, are issued for a period of three y ea r s upon r e commendation of teacher ed ucatio n institutions.

59

They

are

renewable o n ce through the

State

S u perintendent's off ice for a three-year period as follows:

1. On completion of 12 quarter hours (8 semester hours) of the fifth-year col lege program and one year of su ccessf u l

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teachi ng. 2. On appl ication for persons who have not taught during the three-year l ife of the cert i f i cate. I I I . Coordinating the F ifth-Year and Masters Degree

Students h o l d i ng a Provisional Cert i f i cate may coordinate the Master of Arts degree with the req u i rements for Standard Certif icat ion. Students combi n i ng the two programs must meet t he requirements of bot h . Appropriate course wor k taken as part of t he f if t h -year program may apply to the student's graduate program upon a pproval by the candidate's Graduate Advisory Comm ittee.

D I V I S I ON OF G RAD UATE ST U D I ES PURPOSE

The Division o f G raduate Studies is a n a l l -u n i versity d ivision coordinating and integrat i ng the work o f the schools a n d departments w h ic h provide graduate level wor k . Its general objective is to further the basic objectives of the U n iversity by provid i ng graduate level academic and professional wor k . Its specific objectives are : ( 1 ) to i n crease the breadth and depth o f u ndersta n d i ng of the graduate student i n t he l i beral arts; (2) t o increase t he student's knowledge of the research being d o n e i n h is field of concentration and to i ncrease his ability to read the professional j o urnals o f his area of interest; ( 3) to develop the student's abil ity to do i n dependent study and resea rch , and ( 4) to prepare students, through the upper d ivision and graduate divisio n , and through t h e U n ivers ity 's professional schools, t o enter i nto a vocat io n d i rect l y , or to enter other graduate schools for further advanced study leadi ng to the doctoral degree.

60


ADM I SS I O N

Students holding a Bachelor's degree from a n accredited co l lege or u n iversity who atta i ned an u ndergraduate scholastic hono r-po i n t ratio of 3.0 may b e admitted a n d granted regular status i n t h e Division of G raduate Stud ies. Students a l ready holding graduate degrees or students who have done satisfactory graduate work at another institution may be admitted on regular status. Those students with an average of less than 3.0 will not be considered for regular status u n t i l they have demo nonstrated the i r ability to do graduate work by a m i n i m u m of 1 2 semester hours work with a grade po i n t average of 3.0. These students may be granted prov isional status.

Appl i cants are eva l uated in terms of their schOlastic qua l i f ications and preparation for their proposed major field of study. A scho lastic average equivalent of "B" or better i n an acceptable undergraduate program is required for regular status. The Dean of G raduate Studies or the prospective major division or school may deny admission if the a ppl icant's scho lastic record is und ist i nguished , if his preparat ion is j udged i nadequate as a fo u ndat ion for graduate work, or if the faci l ities are already f i l led to capac ity. Appl i cants for the Master of Business Administration degree w i l l be requ ired t o t a k e t h e Admission Test for Graduate Study in Busi ness, and appl ica n ts for the Master of Arts degree i n Education will be requ i red to take the M i l ler A n a logies Test. Other test scores must be submitted o n l y if they are specifica l l y requested by the Dean of G raduate Studies.

61

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F u rt her support ing evidence i n the form of perso n a l reco mmendations w i l l be required f r o m those persons named by t h e appl i cant o n t h e appl icat ion form. Students apply ing for admission to graduate study shou ld submit the completed appl ication blank (ava i lable from the Graduate Office) plus an official copy of transcri pts of a l l previous col lege work . This sho u l d be done before the f i rs t semester o f registration in graduate co u rses. I n order to i n sure consideration for ent rance in a given term, appl ications sho u l d be made by July 1 , December 1 and April 1 . A ten-do l lar no n 路ref undable application fee should accornpany the application . This is a service fee and is not appl ied to the student's acco u nt . C h ecks o r money o rders should be made payable to Pacific Lutheran U n iversity and sent to the Dean of G raduate Stud ies.

Approval o f admission to the Division of Graduate Studies does not i mply admission to ca ndidacy for the degree. F i nal admission approval is determ i ned by the Dean of G raduate Studies in consultation with the appropriate Graduate Council Committee. I n summary , the fol lowi ng items must be o n f i l e before a n app l i cant may b e considered for admissi o n : (1 ) (2) (3) (4) (5)

The completed a p p l icatio n form. The $ 1 0.00 no n-refu n dable appl icat ion fee. A n off icial copy o f transcripts o f all previous col lege work . Test scores when specif ically requested. a . Adm ission Test for Graduate Study in Busi ness scores ( Master of Busi ness Administration appl icants o n ly ) . b. M i l ler Analogies Test (Master of Arts i n Education appl icants o n l y ) .


MASTE R 'S D E G R E E S O F F E R E D MAST E R O F A RTS ( 1) E D UCAT I O N a . E l ementary o r Secondary School Adm i n istration - The student who wishes to qualify for the provisional or standard principa l's credential (elementary or secondary or genera l ) w i l l take a major i n t h i s field a n d complete courses i n a supporting academic area of the U n iversity . Students may major in this field without qua l ifying for a principa l 's credential . b. Counse l i n g and Gu idance - For students who wish to qualify as public school counselors (elementary and secondary) o r student person nel workers i n higher educat io n . c . E l ementary C l assroom Teaching - Th is program i s designed for students who desire advanced work in e le mentary classroom teaching o r who wish to qualify as elementary school supe rvisors or consultants. Along wit h the major i n t h is field the student i s req u i red to complete courses i n a support i ng academic a re a . d . Secondary C l assroom Teaching - Th is program is f o r those students who wish to i n crease their preparat ion for teach i ng in an area of social science.

( 2)

H U MA N I T I ES This degree program is designed for l i brarians, clergymen, teachers and others who wish to extend and broaden their understa nding and appreciation of the various f ields of the h u ma n i t ies.

( 3)

SOC I A L SCI E N C E S This degree program is designed f o r perso n ne l workers i n i ndustry, welfare workers, workers i n t h e broad area of

63

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corrections, librar ians, clergy me n , teachers, and others who wish to extend a nd broaden their understa n d i ng and appreciation of the various f i e l ds of the social sciences. A " H u ma n Relations" component o f this degree is offered at Fort Lewis, with m i l itary perso nnel given priority admission cons iderat i o n .

MAST E R OF B U S I N ESS ADM I N I ST R AT I O N T h i s degree program i s desig ned to provide, th rough education , a founda t i o n for respo nsible leadersh ip in busi ness.

M AST E R OF M U S I C This degree program i s inte nded for qua l i f ied students who desire a conce ntrat i o n in music educatio n, performance, or theory足 co mposition.

MASTE R OF N ATU R A L S C I E N C ES This degree program is designed especially for teachers who need to extend a nd broaden their knowledge i n the fields o f scie nce a n d mathematics.

64


ADV I SE R , ADVISO R Y COMM I TT E ES, APPROVAL O F PROG R AM U po n adm ission to graduate study , an adviser s h a l l be appointed fcr each

graduate student.

The adviser,

in cons u l ta t i o n with his

advisee, sha l l deter m i n e a program of study and give f i n a l approval to his advisee's ini tial registratio n . ( I f the student registers fo r o n l y one cou rse [4 semester hours]

in his i n it i a l registra t i o n , t h e adviser

sha l l give f i na l approval to the second registration as wel l . ) D u r i n g the semester i n which t h e student is t a king the second cou rse i n h is master's progra m, the student, in co nsultation with his adviser shall i n i t i ate a request for two add i t i o na l faculty members to serve o n h i s advisory

comm ittee.

nor ma l l y

consisti n g of the adviser as c h a irman and two faculty

members,

will

The

proceed to

newly-formed

advisory

co mmi ttee,

meet with the student a s soon as is

poss i b l e to give f i nal approval to the student's ent ire program of studies. Th ree copies o f t h e approved program s h o u l d be signed by t h e members of the advisory co m m ittee. T h e student s h o u l d k e e p o ne copy for h i s f u t u re use, give o n e copy to h i s adviser, and d e l iver o n e copy t o the Graduate S t u d i e s Office.

HOURS R EQU I R E D FOR THE M ASTE R 'S D EG R E E A

m i n i mu m

of

32

semester

h o urs

is

req u i red .

I n dividual

programs may req u i re more t h a n the m i n i mu m n u mber o f courses, dependi ng upon prior preparat i o n . Any prerequisite courses taken during

65

the

graduate

program

min i m u m degree req u i rements.

may

not

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f u lf i l l i n g

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.


TRANSF E R OF CR E D I T E ight semester h o u rs of graduate work may be taken a t another institution and tra nsferred, provided that approval has been given by the student's advisory co mmittee. I n degree programs requiring wor k beyond thi rty-two semester hours , more than eight semester hours may be transferred, but i n a n y case, the student must complete a t least twenty-four semester hours of h i s degree program at Pacific Lutheran U n iversity.

STA N DAR DS OF WO R K The m i n i m u m sta ndard acceptable for the master's degree i s a grade po int average of 3 . 0 in the major f ield and an overa ll average of 3.0 in al l graduate wor k . A student whose grade po i nt average falls below 3.0 i s subject to being dropped from the program. I n such insta n ces, the reco m mendat ion for dro p o r cont i n uance is made by t h e student's advisory comm ittee.

66


RESEAR C H R E QU I R EM E N TS As an i m portant part of the master's program , the student is requ i red to provide written evidence tha t he can do i ndependent research. The manner of f u l f i l l ing t h i s req u i reme nt w i l l be determined by each student's advisory comm ittee in consultation with the student. If a thesis is written, the origi nal copy must be subm itted t o the Office of G raduate Studies along with an abstract of 1 50 words or less. The or igi nal copy w i l l be m icro f i l med by U n iversity M i crof i l ms and then bound for the permanent col lecti o n of the Pacific Lutheran U n iversity L i brary . I f the research requ i rement is f u l f i l led by w r i t i n g papers other tha n a t hesis, one copy o f each approved paper must be submi tted to the Office o f Graduate Studies. A l l wor k wh ich i s subm itted as having f u l f i l led the research req u i rement must be in the Office of G raduate Stud ies no later than two weeks pr ior to the commencement at which the student is to rece ive his degree.

U N I V E R SI TY M I C R O F I LMS Begi n n i ng in 1 97 2 , graduate policy requ i res that a l l students who f u l f i l l the research req u i rement by wr i t i ng a thesis must submi t the i r original thesis copy for microfi l m i ng by U n iversity M icro f i l ms of A n n Arbor , M ichigan. I n add itio n , an abstract of 1 50 words or less must be submi t ted for publ i cation i n Masters Abstracts. The fee for microf i l mi ng , publ ish i ng the abstract, and b i n d i ng the origi nal thes i s i s to be paid by the student. The fee (subject to change) i n 1 97 3 i s $ 1 8. 7 5 . This po l i cy i s mandatory for students adm itted after March 1 , 1 972 and o pt i o na l for students adm itted prior to March 1 , 1 9 7 2 .

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EXAM I NAT I ONS A written comprehensive examination a n d/or o r a l examinat i o n over t h e student's program of studies, as wel l a s a n oral examination o n the thesis or research papers, is req u i red. These exam inations over the student's program of studies are u nder the di rection of the major adviser and/or the student's advisory committee and must be successfully passed not later than four weeks prior to commencement. The oral examination over the thesis o r research is under the d irection of the student's advisory comm ittee a nd must be completed not later than two weeks prior to commencement.

TIME LIMIT All

requirements for the master's degree must b e completed

with i n seven years. The seve n-year peri od covers a l l wor k submitted for the completion of the master's degree regardl ess of whether t h e work was t a k e n as a provisional status student or a regu lar status student, as w e l l as credit transferred from a nother i n stitution, comprehensive exa m ination, research, and f i nal oral exa m i n ation.

R ES I D E N C E R It QU I R EM E N T A l l cand idates for t h e master's degree must complete a m in i mum of 24 semester hours at Pacific Lutheran U niversity. This requ i rement may be f u l f i l led by either o ne full acade m ic year i n attenda nce, three f u l l summers, o r the completion o f equ iva lent study as a part-t ime student.


COU RSES ACCEPTABLE F O R G R ADUATE CR EDIT The cou rses of study are l isted in the General Catalog. Selected courses n u m bered 300, 400, and 500, un less otherwise designated, may be accepted for graduate credit. All courses acoepted for the master's

degree

are,

however,

subject

to

the

approval

of

the

student's adviser and/or advisory co m mittee.

LIB R A R Y USE The Un iversity Library i s open

daily except S u nday ( 7: 20 a . m . l .

A l l registered students have t h e privi lege o f a li brary card. Admitted graduate students who are not currently enrolled may obtain a free temporary

library

card

a n d , t h u s , have

complete acoess to the

library for one semster. I f not enro l led for more than one semester, library

use i s possible, but only

upon

payment of the standard

library fee for non-students.

I N T E R V I EWING OF APP L I CANTS Before admission to the graduate program, i t i s advisable for an applicant to seek a n i nterview with a professor i n h is subject area. The Division o f Graduate Studies will assist in arran ging an interview with the aRPropriate perso n .

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C LASS I F I CATION OF STU D E N TS ( 1 ) Those students approved for u nq u a l i f i ed adm ission to graduate study by their respective G raduate Cou ncil Committees are granted regula r status. Students who fa i l to q u a l i f y for regular status may be granted provisional status. (2) Students who wish to pursue course work w i t h no i ntention of q ua l i fy i ng for an advanced degree, a n d those who are transient reg istrants, will be class if ied as non-degree students.

CHANGE OF STATUS F ROM PROVISIONAL TO R EG U LAR T h e change of status f r o m provisional to regu lar sha l l be jeter mi ned under the f o l lo w i ng provis i o n s : ( 1 ) Satisfactory f u l f i l l m e n t o f course deficiencies. (2) Satisfactory co mpletion of 12 semester ho urs of graduate wo r k with a grade point average of 3.0 o r better. (3) Satisfactory completion of departmental or school req u i rements. A l etter i n dicating cha nge of status wi l l be forwarded t o the student, with a copy to h is adviser.

7n


SUMMA R Y O F PROCE D U R ES FOR MAST E R 'S D E G R E ES Procedures:

Under the Directio n of:

Appl ication for admission to Dean of Graduate Studies the D ivisio n of G raduate Stud ies Date: Before the f i rst semester of registrat ion Approval o f admission

Dean o f G raduate Studies and G raduate Council Committee Date: Before the f i rst semester of registrat ion

Approval o f degree program and submiss ion o f a copy of that program to the G raduate Office Date:

Student's Advisory Committee

D u ri ng the f i rst or second semester of registration

Major Adviser Approval o f each registrat ion Date-: During the official reg i stration dates Select ion a nd approval of thesis Student's Advisory Comm ittee or research papers Date: Not later than t h e semester before the commencement in which student takes h is degree Major Adviser Progress reports on thesis or research papers Date: Periodic eva l uation and approval

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Registrar's Office Registration for thesis o r resea rch papers Date: Not l ater than the l ast registrat i o n dates before the semester in which student takes his degree Registrar's Office Appl i cation for graduation Date: At the beg i n n i ng of the semester in which student expects to earn h is degree Major Adviser and/or Comprehensive written a nd/or Student's Advisory oral exa mi n ation over student's program of studies Committee Date: During f i nal year but not later than four weeks before commencement Student's Advisory C o m mittee F inal oral examination on thesis or research papers Date: Duri ng f i na l year but not later than two weeks before commencement Graduation Fee Busi ness Off ice (academic hood rental) Date: Duri ng f i nal year but not later than four weeks before commencement

a

G raduate Office Submission of thesis or research papers Date: N ot later than two weeks before commencement Recommendation to the faculty Dean of Graduate Studies for the award i ng of the degree Date: Not l ater than two weeks prior to commencement

72


COU RSES O F I NSTR UCTION Courses n u m bered 1 0 1 -299 are co n s i d ered l o wer d i v i s i o n subjects. Courses n u m bered 300-499 are regarded as u pper division subjects. Upon the a pproval of h is adviser and with the co nse n t of t h e i n structor, a lower d i vi sio n studen t m a y b e assigned to a n upper division course if the prerequ is ites for the cou rse have been met. Courses nu mbered 500 o r above are graduate courses. Courses nu mbered i n the 300's a n d 400's are o pen both to graduates a n d upper d i vision undergrad uates. S u c h courses m a y be a part of the graduate program provided they a re not spec i f i c requ irements i n prepara t i o n f o r graduate study. Upper d iv i s i o n students may be enro l l ed i n a 500-level course i f , at t h e t i me of registra t io n , they provide written permission f ro m the C h a i r ma n , D i recto r , o r Dean of t h e academic u n i t that offers the course. It is u n derstood t h a t any student g iven such permiss i o n w i l l have m e t a l l assumed or spec i f ica l ly i n d icated prereq u i s i tes a n d w i l l have a n above-average academic record. I ndependent study may be au tho rized in certa i n spec ific cases if arra nged by the department and ap proved by the C h a i r ma n , D i rector, o r Dean concerned. A n i n depen dent study reg ist r a t i o n for m is a va i l a b l e i n t h e Registrar's Office. The U n iversity reserves the right to modify specif ic course req u i rements, to disco n t i n u e classes i n wh ich the registra t i o n is regarded as i ns u ff i c ie n t , a n d to withdra w courses. Schedule changes ma y occur but o n ly upon a pproval o f the Dean of S u m mer Studies.

74


A l l classes meet da i l y except when spec ified. The n u mber i n parentheses after the course title i n d i cates the number o f semester h o u rs o f cred it given.

A SYSTEM C O D E N U M B E R PR E C E DES P L EASE I N D I CATE T H I S N U M B E R O N R E G I STR AT I O N .

E A C H COU R S E . EACH COURSE

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L i br a ry


Session I 0404 230 C E R AM ICS I (4 ) Ceramic mate r i a l s and tech n i q ues i nc l u d i n g ha nd-bu i l t a nd wheel-thrown met hods, clay a n d g l aze fo rma t io n . I ncludes a survey of cera m i c art. Studio fee $ 1 0 . 8 : 50 a . m. to 1 2 : 00 noo n . I N - 1 44 M r . Keyes

0408 326 F I LM MA K I N G -PH OTOG RAPHY (4 ) Theory and practice of photogra p h y as a n art f o r m . S u mmer section i n st i l l photogra p h y o n l y . May be repeated for cred it. Mr. E l well Studio fee $20. 1 : 1 0 to 3 : 40 p.m. I N - 1 34A

04 1 6 330 C E R AM I CS I I (4) Adva nced t e c h n i q ues in cer amic co nstruction a n d e x peri ments i n g l a z e formatio n . May be repeated f o r cred it. Prereq u i site: 230. Studio fee $ 1 0. 8 : 50 a.m. to 1 2 : 00 noo n . I N -1 44 M r . Keyes


0424 336 T E XT I LE D ES I G N ( 4 ) Methods a nd tec h n i ques of texti l e design i n clud ing weaving a nd fa bric dye methods. Studio fee $ 1 5. 8 : 50 a .m. to 1 2: 00 Mr. Metcalf noo n . I N -1 34B

0428 338 G LASSBLOW I N G ( 2 )

Wo rk ing tech n i q u es a n d i n d iv i d u a l expression in b lown glass . M a y b e repeated f o r cred i t . Prereq u is i t e : o n e semester o f ceramics a n d co ns e n t . Studio fee $25. 1 : 1 0 to 2 : 20 p . m . plus studio work to be arra nged. I N - 1 40 M r . Keyes

0436 341 E L E M E NTA R Y ART E D UCAT I O N ( 2 ) Various projects and media suitable for the i nstruction of art i n the e l ementary schoo l ; emphasis on developmenta l t h eory. Studio fee $ 1 2 . 1 : 1 0 to 3 : 00 p . m. I N - 1 34 B M r. Metcalf

0444 490 S E M I NAR IN ART CU R R I CU LA ( 1 )

J u l y 1 6 to 20 A n i nvestigat i o n i n to forms of art cu r r i c u l a with part icu lar emphasis o n the relatio ns h i p of h igh school and co l l ege programs. Meet ing t i me to be arranged. Mr. Schwidder

77


Session I I 5364 358 SKY AND E A R TH WOR KSHOP (2)

D ra w i ng the landscape. A studio co u rs e e x plori n g the i n herent poss i b i l it ies of nature as a generative force for the a rt is t . Studio fee $ 2 .50. 1 : 1 0 to 3 : 00 p .m. I N -1 26 Staff

5372 365 PA I N T I N G (4) M e d ia and tec h n i ques of pa i nt i n g w i t h emphas i s on a n i n d i v i d u a l ized express i o n . May be re peated for cred i t . Prereq u isite : A r t 1 60 . Studio f e e $ 2 . 5 0 . 8 : 5 0 a . m . to 1 2 : 00 Mr. Tomsic noo n . I N -1 38

5380 374 WOR KSHOP I N L I T H O G R AP H Y (2)

P r i n t m a k i n g i n l ithogr a p h y w i t h emphasis o n metal plate tec h n i q ues. Studio fee $ 1 0 . 8 : 5 0 a . m. to 1 1 : 40 a .m . I N - 1 24 Staff


5384 388 CH I N ESE ART (4) A survey o f t he maj o r per iods of C h i nese Art i n c l u d i n g bronzes, scu l pt u re a n d pa i n t ing. 8 : 50 t o 1 1 :40 a . m . M s . F u l der I N · Lecture H a l l

5392 490 SEM I N AR IN S U N G DY NASTY P A I NT I N G ( 2 ) A study of the great masters of Ch i n ese l a ndscape pa i n t i n g o f t h e S u n g D y nasty . 1 : 1 0 to 2 : 2 0 p . m . I N · Lecture H a l l M s . F u lder

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N AT U R A L H I S T O R Y OF THE PAC I F I C N O R THW EST (6) A n e n v i ro n mental study of t h e area fro m t h e Pacific to the Co l u mb i a Bas i n based O n f i e l d t r i ps , laboratory studies and l e ct u res . Espec i a l l y for teachers of science at ele mentary a n d

j u n i o r h i g h levels. N o t t o b e counted toward a ma j or i n b io l o gy .

E n ro l l men t l i m ited . Prereq u i s i te : At leas t o n e l i fe

sc ience co urse and consent of i nstructor. noo n ,

1 : 00 to 3 : 20 p.m., I v y A.

9:00 a . m. to 1 2: 00 M r . Ostenson

80


Session I

365

051 4 R E A L ESTATE (4) Land use p l a n n i n g and commerc ial devel o p m e n t ; de mand factors, gover nme ntal control i n zo n i n g and reg u l a tio n , real estate i n vestment a n a l y s i s. M TW R , 7 : 3 0 to 1 0 : 00 a . m . , M r . Peterson A-22 1 .

370

051 8 MAR K E T I N G SYSTE M S (4) J u ne 19 to August 16 The flows of goods a n d services in the eco nomy; eco n o m i c and behavi ora l ap proaches to demand a na l y sis; marketi n g f u n c t i o n i n a busi ness f i r m ; determ i n atio n of t h e marketing mix: Product po l i c y , pricing, cha n n e l s of di str i b u tio n , marketing com muni cat i o ns. D u r i n g fi rst sess i o n : TR , 1 0 : 30 a . m . to 1 : 00 p . m . , A-2 2 1 . D u r i n g second sessi on : T R . 1 0 : 30 Mr. Chadwick a. m . to 1 : 00 p . m . , A-213.

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ORGAN I ZAT I O N A L B E HA V I O R WOR KSHOP (4)

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J u ne 18 to J u l y 1 3 E x perimental works h o p i n i n d i v i d u a l a nd organ izational deve lopmen t and behavi or. E m phasis on case and s i tuat i o n a l laboratory experi ments a nd case a na l y s i s b y sma l l teams. ( Pass- F a i l basis; i f taken for regular grade, it may be s u b st ituted for B.A. 453 : Perso n n el and I ndustrial Re l a t i o ns by Busi n ess A d m i n i strat i o n majors ' ) Sponsored by the Center for H u man O rga niza t i o n in Changing E nviron ments CHO I C E. Dail y , 9 : 00 a.m . to 1 : 00 p. m . A-21 3 a n d A-21 7. M r . K i ng and M r. Menze l

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0534 582 ACCO U N T I N G I N F O RM AT I O N AN D CONT R O L (4) J u ne 5 to J u l y 1 7 Appl i c a t i o n s of acco u n t i n g i nformation, services and systems t o management problems. Students excused from this co urse a r e expected to complete 581 o r other advanced accou n t i n g st u d ies . Prereq u i s i t e : 281 or eq u iva l e n t . T h i s c o u rse i s part o f t h e year-ro u n d sched u l e a t B remert o n a n d h a s t h e regu l a r academic y e a r t u i t i o n . T R , 5 : 1 5 t o 8 : 00 p . m . , R o om 300, M r . Peterson G reat Northwest B u i l d i n g , B remerto n .

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590A SEM I N AR I N G OV E R N M E N T ACCO U N T I NG (4) J u ly 3 t o August 1 6 S h ort review of gover nmental f u nd accou n t i n g ; f o llowed by a wor k s h o p f o r a. concentrated study of rec e n t t r e nd s a n d new tech n i q u es i n gover nm enta l accc u n t i ng . ( E l ective graduate course . ) Sponsored by the Center for H u man Organization in C h a n g i n g E n v i ro n m e n t s - C H O I C E . T R , 6 : 1 5 t o 9 : 00 p.m. A-2 1 7 M r. D i rksen and M r. W i l k i n

0546 590B WO R K SHOP I N GOVE R NM E N T ACCO U N T I N G ( 3 ) J u l y 3 to August 1 6 T h e B . A . 590A Seminar above m i nus the review of basic f u n d acco u nt i ng p r i n c i ples. Sponsored by C H O I C E . TR , 6 : 1 5 t o 9 : 00 p. m . A-21 7 M r . D i r ksen a n d M r . W i l k i n


Session I I 5484 350 MANAG E M E NT (4) J u l y 1 9 to A ugust 1 6 A d m i n i stration i n industrial a nd other orga n i zations; classical a nd behavioral perspective on management tech ni ques, plan n i ng , o rganization, d i rect i o n and contr o l ; case a na l y s i s a nd problem-solv i ng tech niq ues. M T W R , 7 : 30 to 1 0 : 00 a . m . A-22 1 . M r. Werner

5492 387 DATA PROCESS I N G SYST EMS (4)

A computer l a bo r atory course; basic program and system a nalysis and f low chart i ng; program m i ng languages, emphasi s on F O R TR A N ; computer hardware a nd software systems. Prereq u i si t e : 282 or consent. M W F , 7 : 30 to 1 0 : 00 a . m . Lectures, A-2 1 9 ; T R , 7 : 3 0 t o 1 0 : 00 a . m . Laboratory , Libra ry Calcu lator Room. M r . W. Joh nso n

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-5550 550 ORGAN I ZAT I O N A L E N V I R O N M E N T (4 )

Ju Iy 1 9 to August 30 Management, exp lored in relation to contr ibutions from i nd ustr i a l psychology and sociology; external and i nternal social and eco nomic envi ronmental changes as related to plan n i ng ; groups and wo r k teams as related to the f u nctions of di recting and cont r o l l ing. Major case studies. Prereq u i si te : B . A . 350 or equivalent. T h i s course is part of the year-round schedu l e at Bremerton and has the regular academic year tu i t i o n . TR , 5: 1 5 to 8 : 00 p . m . , Room 300, G reat N o rt h west B u i l d i ng , Bremert o n . Mr. K i ng

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C h e m ica l methods of q u a n t i tative a na l ys i s , i n c l ud i ng v o l umetr ic, gravi met r i c , and sel ected i nstru mental methods. Prerequis ites : General C h em istry, C o l l ege Algebra. Lecture: Daily , 1 0: 3 0 to 1 1 : 40 a . m . in R - l 0a. Lab: Daily , 1 : 1 0 to 5 : 00 p.m. i n R -31 2. M r . Olsen


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Session I 0644 1 23 F U N DA M E N TA LS OF O R A L COMM U N ICAT I O N (4) Fou nda t ions course dea l i ng with basic theories of oral commun ica t i o n . E m phasis o n group acti v i ty w i th some M r . Capp platform wor k . 8 : 50 to 1 1 :40 a . m . EC-1 22

0648 402 SPE ECH I N THE E L E M E NTARY C LASSROOM ( 2 )

A survey of speech problems and opportu n i ties w h i ch confront t he teacher in the classroom, grades o ne t h rough Mr. Karl e ight. 7 : 30 to 8 : 40 a.m. E C- 1 22

0706 459 SUMM E R D R AMA WOR KSHOP ( 5 )

The Dra ma Workshop w i l l be operated in conj u nct ion with the Centur ion Playho use at F o rt Lewis, Was h i ngto n . Their i nstr uction and faci l i ties will be used. A n i ntensive session o f w o r k i n acting, stage management, l ighting, costume a nd make-u p , c u l m inating in a product i o n of at least three performances. 9 : 00 a.m. to 1 2 : 00 noo n and 1 : 00 to 4 : 00 p.m, a n d by arrangement. P L U campus a nd Fort Lewis Cent urion P l ayhouse. M r . Karl a nd Cent u r io n Pl ayhouse Staff

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Session I 0724 365 G L ACI A L G E O LOGY (4)

Th i s course provides a n i n troductory study o f glacial ice, glacial deposits and land forms resu lting from the P l e i stocene glaciatio n in North A merica. E x tensive f ie l d t r i ps take advantage of the excel lent glacial featu res d isplayed in western Wash i ngto n , i n c l u d i ng act i ve glaciers such as those on Mount R a i n ier . Students sho u l d a n t i c ipate a l l 路day f i e l d excursions a n d two t r i ps o f 2-3 days, i n volvi n g overn ight campi n g . Prereq u isite: previous i n struction in Earth Scie nces, or per mission of i nstructor. Lectures and laboratory sess ions are sc hedu led TW R F f ro m 8 : 50 to 1 0 : 00 a . m . and 1 : 00 to M r. Lowes 4 : 00 p.m. G-1

Session I I 5464 351 N AT U R A L H ISTO R Y O F THE PAC I F I C NORTHWEST (6) (See Biology 3 5 1 )

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Session I 0744 501 F GAMES A N D S I M U LAT I O N WOR KSHOP FOR SOC IAL STU D I E S TEACH E RS ( 1 ) J u l y 1 6-20 T h i s wo r k s h o p w i l l focus on the identif icat i o n of ga mes a n d s i mu l ations t h at are usef u l f o r tea c h i n g s o c i a l studies a t both the el ementary and secondary levels. V ideo-taped episodes o f classes u s i n g games and si mulations w i l l b e viewed and evaluated. Several games and s i mu l a t i o ns w i l l be used in c l a ss . Wo rkshop part i c i pants w i l l deve l o p eva l uation tech n i q ues to rate the va l ue o f part icu l a r games a nd supplem ental materials to use with games and si m u l a t i o ns i n actual classroo m sett ings. T h i s wo r k sho p is part i a l l y f u nded by a grant from t h e American Economy Program. A l i mited n u mber of part i a l t u i t i o n scho larsh ips a r e a va i l able t o qualif ied teachers. P l ease contact Dr. Dona ld Wentworth, Department of Economics, 5 3 1 -6900 , ext. 294, f o r scho larsh i p i n formatio n . 1 : 00 to 4 : 30 p.m. A-204 M r . Wentwort h

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5592 328 THE E CO N O M I CS OF WAG E A N D PR ICE CON T R O LS ( 2 )

August 6-1 7 A n examination of wage and price contro ls, designed espec i a l l y for teachers o f so cial studies. The course w i l l i n cl ude background mater ial a n d d i scussion o f s u c h topics a s when co ntrols a r e needed, how they work to sta b i l ize t h e eco nomy , and how effective they have bee n . E mphasis w i l l be o n t h e cu rrent use o f wage a n d price controls. N o M r. Jensen prerequ isite. 1 : 1 0 to 3 : 40 p . m . A-21 9

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6050 481 STAT IST I CAL M ETHODS (4)

Descr ipt ive statistics: measures of po S i t i o n , dispersion a n d proport ions. I n ferent ial statistics: est i mation and test i n g o f h y potheses by parametric and n o n parametric techniques, regression and correl ation analysis. N o prereq u isite. 1 0: 3 0 Mr. Jensen a . m. to 1 : 00 p . m . l i b rary Stati stics lab

6 1 74 501 A I N N OVAT IONS IN TEACH I N G SECON D A R Y SOCI A L STU D I ES (4)

J u l y 1 9 - August 3 ( P l ease see Sess ion I I : Education 501 A for description.)

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A survey o f tea c h i ng read i n g i n t h e elementary grades, i n c l u d i ng the programs in the newer a pproaches. Mate r i a l s , metho ds, t ec h n i q ues , procedu res and so me d i agnosis of rea ding d if f i cu l ties. P rerequ i s i te : E d ucation 201 . 1 0 : 30 a.m. M i ss Orvik to 1 2 : 1 5 p.m. A-1 1 7

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08 1 6 - 3 08 1 8 - 5 401 , Section A E A R LY C H I L DHOOD/K I N D E RGARTEN (3-5)

June 1 3 to 29 o r to July 1 3 A course designed to study t he needs o f y o u n g c h i l dren , their ways of lear n i ng a nd mater i a l s for learn i ng , emphasis upon activities deve l o ped for 4- to a-year o l ds. To observe a n d become i nvolved with c h i l dr e n a n d to become aware of t h e needs a n d deve l opmental stages of t h e c h i l dren uS i ng methods to f u lf i l l t hese needs w i t h i n the capacity of each c h i l d's growth pattern . 9 : 00 a . m . to 1 2 : 00 noo n . W i l l meet i n A-204 o n J u n e 1 3 . Rema inder o f course schedu l ed t o meet at Mrs. L. Johnson Cherrydale School i n Steilacoom.

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0826 401 , Section B C R E ATIVE ACT I V I T I E S F O R TH E CLASSROOM (3) A course designed to explore opportu n ities to faster fl uency and variety in c h i ldren's responses through creative in storyte l l i n g a nd creative dramatics. experie nces Ed. 456 : that students register for R e c omme nded Storyte l l i n g , in conjunction with this course. Monday , Wed nesday, and F ri day, 1 0 : 30 a . m . to 1 :00 p . m . A-200 Mrs. Mathers and Mrs. Napjus

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J u ly 5 to 1 8 ( A n of fer i n g of the Center for H u ma n Orga n i z at i o n i n C hanging E nvironments - C H O I C E o See page 1 56.)

401 , Section D AN APPR OACH TO ACT I ON COUNS E L I N G ( 0-2)

July 1 2 t0 1 8 ( A n offer ing o f the Center for H u ma n Orga n iz ation i n Changing E nvironments - C H O I C E . See page 1 57 . )

0834 408 LAN G U A G E A R TS I N THE E L E M E N TARY SCHOO L ( 2)

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A course designed to give the elementary teacher, ki ndergarten through s i x , a n un derstandi ng of how to teach the co mmu nicatio n s k i l l s in a fun ctional ma nn er. The areas i n cl uded w i l l be in the fields of oral a nd writte n express i o n , l i terature, dramatizati o n , spe l l i n g , I i s t e n i n g , reading, grammar, handwri t i ng, ch i l dren's la nguage a nd language study, voca bulary develo pment, and lexicography. Open to experienced teachers or those who have completed student M iss O rv i k teach ing. 7 : 30 to 8:40 a.m. A-1 1 7

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A course designed to acquai nt the student with objectives, materi a l s , and methods of teac hi ng the soc i a l studies in an i ntegrated program. Open to experienced teachers o n l y . 8 : 50 Mr. Ramsey to 1 0: 00 a . m . A-202

0846 456 STO RYTE L l i N G ( 2 ) Practice i n selection, classification a nd t e l l i ng of sto r ies suitable for elementary grade children. Some work o n stories for ado lescents. Recommended t hat students register for E d . 401 , Section B : Creative Activities for t h e C lassroo m , i n conj u nction with this course. Tuesday and Thursday, 1 0 : 3 0 Mrs. Mathers and Mrs. Napjus a.m. t o 1 : 00 p.m. A路200

0904 457 P R E PA R AT I O N AND U T I L I ZATION O F I NST R UCTI O N A L MATE R I A LS ( 3 )

A course designed to hel p t h e i ndividual participants become fami l iar with the production and use o f a variety of instruct ional mater i a l s . Each person should br ing pictures, charts, ma ps and a 35mm camera with h i m . Participants w i l l produce items useful in instructio n . A t least o n e field t r i p a n d guest speaker w i l l a id i n fam i l i arizing t h e gro u p with orga nization and use o f available instructiona l media. A $ 1 0.00 lab fee w i l l be charged, to be paid in t h e Business Off i ce no later than the f i rst day o f class. 1 0 : 30 a.m. to Staff 1 2 : 1 5 p.m. Library Graphics Lab

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July 9 to 1 3 ( An offering of the Center for H u ma n Orga n izat i o n i n Changing Envi ronments - C H O I C E . See page 1 52.)

0908 EdPsy 461 G ROUP P R OCESSES AN D TH E I N D I V I D U A L ( 2)

· A human i nteraction laboratory to facil itate the exploration of the self concept through the mechanisms of i n terperso nal interactions and feedba ck. Emphasis will be pl aced on the acquisition of s k i l l i n self-€xploration, ro le identi ficatio n , a n d climate ma king. Open to graduate students in School Admin istration and Counse l i ng a nd Guidance. Ava ilable o n Pass- Fail o n l y . J u n e 1 8 t o 2 8 , 1 0 : 0 0 a . m . to 1 2: 0 0 noon; June 29, 1 0 : 00 a . m . to 1 0 : 00 p.m.; and June 30, 1 0: 00 a . m . M iss F l etcher t o 5 : 00 p.m. A-202

09 1 6 EdPsy 463 G U I DANCE I N T H E E LE M E N TA R Y SCHOO L ( 2)

An introduction to the concept of elementary schoo l gu idance and t h e ro le of gu idance services to pupils, teachers, admi nistrators, and parents. 8 : 50 to 1 0 : 00 a.m. A-200 Ms. Ha m l i n

0924 467 EVALUAT I O N ( 2 )

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Eval uation o f t h e outcomes o f school experiences. Problems that arise in connection with development, organ ization, a n d ad m inistration o f tests ( both standardized and teacher made) will be studied. Requ ired of a l l secondary fifth year students. 7: 30 to 8:40 a . m . A -2 1 3 M r . Richardson

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0936 473 PAR E NT-TEAC H E R CON F E R E N C E ( 2)

A study of the princi ples a nd tech niques of parent·teacher co nferences. P rocedu res for i ntrod u c i n g a pare nt·teacher confere nce program to the school and com m u n i t y . Eva luation o f various gra d i n g systems. Open o n ly to experienced teachers and students who have completed or are t a k i ng student teachi ng. 1 1 : 50 a . m . to 1 : 00 p . m . A·21 9 Ms. Ham l i n

0944 474 A F F ECTIVE C LASSR OOM TECH N I Q U ES ( 2)

J u ne 1 1 to 1 5 This course deals with basic techniq ues and activities designed to fa c i l i tate understand i n g of se l f and others, and i n exploring ways t o wor k with students. 9 : 00 a . m . t o 4: 00 M iss W i l l iamso n p . m . A·1 1 7

0948 483 P R I MARY R EAD I N G ( 2) A study of the material s and methods of the modern pri mary rea d i ng program a nd its relation to other activi ties. Open to experienced teachers o n l y . 8 : 50 to 1 0: 00 a.m. A ·2 1 5 Mrs. Napj us

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1 406 486 TH EO R I ES OF E A R L Y CH I LDHOOD (3)

A n opport u n i ty to explore many i n novative programs i n ea rly chi ldhood education a nd t o identify t h e phi losophies and theories u po n wh ich these are based. 8: 1 5 to 1 0 : 00 a . m . X-1 07 M rs . Mathers

1414 ' 492 LEA R N I N G D I SAB I L IT I ES I N T H E C LASSROOM (4) A n i n troductory course to prepare the regular cl assroom teacher to ident ify and to accommodate children with moderate learni ng d i sa b i l ities within the classroom. Cu rrent d i agnostic techniques, methods, and materials usef u l i n i ndividua l i z i ng i nstructio n f o r t h e learning d isab l ed c h i l d w i l l be emphasized. 1 0 : 30 a . m . to 1 : 00 p . m . X-203 M rs . G . Joh nson

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F ocus: I mprovement o f classroom i nstructio n . T h i s is a program designed by the N o rthwest Regio nal Educational Laboratory, Port l a n d , Orego n , to help teachers at all grade leve l s i m p rove their classroom i nstructi o n . The course cons ists of laboratory experie nces to help the participants i ncrease their u ndersta n d i n g o f com m u nication s k i l l s a n d interperso nal relations. M icro-teaching w i t h i n t h e group a s wel l a s observations o f s u mmer session c lasses i n the p u b l i c scho o l s wi l l give o ppo rtu n ities to p l a n f o r ins truct i o n , t o take mea n i ngful data from observat ions , and to give and receive feedbac k . N ew and more effective teach i n g strategies resu lt from ident i f y i n g and adapt i ng a l ternate teaching patterns to techniques of i nstructio n . (Tu ition : $205.50) C l ass w i l l meet from 8 : 00 a.m. to 2 : 00 p. m. da ily. The f irst sess ion w i l l meet M r . Warren a n d Staff on J u ne 1 8 in A-1 01

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1 424 501 , Section C SCAN D I NAVIAN STU D Y TOUR (6)

J u ne 13 to J u l y 1 6 A m u l t i -d i sci p l i n ary approach to the study o f Norway, Sweden, and Den mark - h i sto rica l l y , cu l tura l l y , po litical l y , econo m i ca l l y, geograph i ca l l y , sociolog ica l l y , a nd a wide acqu a i n tance with the educational systems. C l assroom i n struction w i l l focus o n i mprovement o f i nstruction. V i a Sca n d i navian A i r l ines, economy class, Seattle t o Bergen a n d retu r n Copenhagen Seattle. Total cost, i n c l u d i n g cred it, meals, travel .41 Aud i t cost - 5 1 ,355. F o r travel broch ure and a I lona i nforma t i o n , please write to: M r . Ray Warren School of E d ucation Paci f i c Lutheran U n iversitY Tacoma, Washington 98447

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1 428 501 , Section D ADM I N I STRAT I O N S I M U LAT I O N SECON DA R Y ( 1 )

J u l y 9 to 1 3 The Janus J u n i or H igh School Pri ncipalsh i p S i m u la t i o n Workshop. Through t h e use of various media a nd discussions, participants wi l l be i nvolved i n the decision-mak i n g process i n a n i n ner-city j u n i o r h igh scho o l . T h e issues a nd problems i ncluded reflect most j u n ior h igh schoo l s regardless of l ocat i o n . The source of the materials i s the U n iversity Council for Educat ional A d m i n i strat i o n . Lab F ee: $5. 1 : 00 M r . DeBower to 4 : 30 p.m. A -1 1 7 For further information, please contact: Dr. Carrol DeBower Scho o l o f Educat ion Paci f i c Lutheran U ni vers ity Tacoma, Was h i ngton 98447

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J u ly 1 6 to 20 The Abraham L i ncoln E l ementary Scho o l P r i n cipalsh i p S im u lation Workshop. T h e general rationale a nd materials f o r the L i ncoln Simu lation pa r a l l e l those for the Janus Workshop. Most identif ied issues a re found i n most e lementary school settings. Aga i n , the U C E A developed the mater i a l s. Lab Fee: $5. 1 : 00 to 4 : 30 p.m. A-1 1 7 M r. DeBower F o r f urther inf ormati o n , please contact: D r. C arrol DeBower Scho ol o f Educati o n Paci f i c Lutheran U n iversity Tacoma, Washi ngton 98447

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J u l y 1 6 to 20 E s p ec i a l l y d e s i g n e d for Was h i ngton teachers and adm i n istrators or other sa laried perso n n e l . Comparative investment plans and y ields. R et i rement hazards i nclud i ng i n f latio n , healt h , and death and suggested preca utions. 1 : 00 to 4: 30 p.m. A-21 1 M r. C. Peterson

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This practicum i s designed to promote personalized d i a g n o stic tea c h i ng for varied styles o f classroo"m orga n izatio n . E m p hasis on i n structional a l ternatives rather than a s i ngle method to release o pt i mu m pote ntial o f learner. Permi ts experi enced teachers to develop competencies i n prepar i n g and us i ng a va riety o f resource mate rials for respect ive level : ea r ly c h i l d hood , elementary or m iddle schoo l . I n cludes lectures, d iscussion, m u l t i -med ia and active participation by those attending. 8 : 50 to 1 0 : 00 a . m . A- 1 1 7 M iss Orv i k

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Sem i n a r i n social science research methods and tech n i q ues with i l l u st ra tions d rawn pr i ma r i l y from the f ields of educat io n and psycho logy; seco ndar i ly from such f i e lds as soc io logy , h istory , and po l it ical science. Practice i n des i g n i n g a feas ible research project i n the student's a rea o f i nterest. R eq u i red for Master of Arts candidates, and should be taken ea r l y in the degree program to prov ide backgro u nd f o r ful f i l l i n>l the resea rch req u irement. Prereq u is i te : Admittance to the graduate progra m . Students w i l l be expected to co mplete t h e i r paper d u r i ng the second sess i o n . 1 1 : 5 0 a . m . to M r . R i chardson 1 : 00 p . m . A-2 1 5

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Goa l s , rela tio n s h i ps, and theories are pursued by i ndependent and sma l l group wor k . 7: 30 to 1 0 : 00 a .m. A-2 1 1 M iss F l etcher

1 528 EdPsy 565 SEM I N AR : NON-TEST APP R AISAL (2)

Assessment o f perso nal characteristics and behavioral patter ns to better u nderstand the i nd ividual; u ti l ization of n o n -t e s t d a t a ( s o c i o m et r i c s c a l e s, case studies, autobiogra phies, i nterviews, etc.! . 1 0: 30 to 1 1 :40 a . m . A-223 Mr. R ichardson

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Students who desire t o pursue a special l i ne o f i n d ividual read i n g , i n vestiga t io n , or research may do so for cred it, receiving he l p and g u idance from the faculty member best qua l i f i ed to assist in the particular problem. 7 : 30 to 8:40 M r. Beal a . m. A-208

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Session I I 6064 326 T H E TEACH I N G OF AR I T H M ET I C ( 2 )

A n over a l l study of t h e bas ic mathematical s k i l l s a n d abi l i ties needed by the teacher i n the e l e mentary schoo l . Recent developments and materials are considered. Prerequ isite: Math 323 o r co nsent of instructor. 8 : 50 to 1 0: 00 a.m. A-1 1 7 M r. DeBower

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8 1 80 - 0 8 1 84 - 2 401 , Section A DRUG USE ED UCAT I O N, PHASE I I (ADVAN C E D ) (0-2) J u l y 23 to August 4 ( A n offer i ng of the Center for H u ma n Orga n ization i n Changing Envi ro n ments - C H O I C E . See page 1 56.)

6072 451 ADM I N ISTRAT I O N OF THE SCHOOL L I BRARY (2) Orga n i zation a nd admin istrat ion of the school l ibrary i n t h e e l ementary a n d secondary schoo l . 1 0 : 30 t o 1 1 :40 a.m. L-1 06 Mr. E h l e rs

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6080 S i mp l i fied proced ures for t h e classificat i o n , cat a loging, a n d tech n i cal process i n g of school l i brary mat e r i a l s . 7 : 30 to 8 : 40 M r, E h l e rs a . m. L-1 06

6084 454

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PROCESS I N G SCHOO L L I B R A R Y MATE R I A LS (2)

4 53

S E L E CT I O N OF L E A R N I N G R ESO U R C E MAT E R I A LS ( 2 ) C r i te r i a , professio n a l l i terature a n d techn i q u es o f eva l uation of l i brary mater i a ls (print and n o n -print) ; t h e l i brarian 's respo n s i b i l it y to facu lty , st udents a n d the ge n e ral publ ic, M r . E h l ers 8 : 50 to 1 0 : 00 a . m . L-1 06

6092 463

G U I DANCE I N TH E E L E M ENTA R Y SCH OO L (2) An i n t roduct i o n to the con cept of e le me n tary schoo l guida nce a n d t he role of guidance servi ces to p u p i ls , teachers, admin istrators, and pa rents. 1 0 : 30 to 1 1 : 40 a . m , A-2 1 5 M r, R i chardson

6 1 50 465

G U I DANCE I N T H E SECO N D A R Y SCHOOL ( 2) An i n troduct i o n to some of t h e major o ri e ntation t o g u i d a n ce a n d to study h o w t h ese aspects c a n be t ra nslated into a n o pera t i o n a l program in the sch o o l sett i n g. 8: 50 to M r , R i chardson 1 0 : 00 a . m , A-2 1 5


6154 467

EVALUATION ( 2 ) Eva l ua t i o n of t h e o utcomes o f school experiences. Problems that arise in connection with development , orga n i zation, a n d a d m i n istrat i o n of tests ( both standardi zed and teacher made) w i l l be stud ied . R eq u i red of a l l f ifth year students. 7 : 30 to 8 : 40 a . m . A-1 1 7 M r. F . Olson

6 1 62 473

PAR E NT-TEAC H E R CON F E R E N C E ( 2) ( See Session I description . ) 7 : 30 to 8 : 40 a . m. A-21 5 M r . R ichardson

61 70 487

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C U R R I CU LUM E N R I CH M E N T I N EAR LY C H I LD HOOD E DUCAT I ON (2)

Development and enrichment of programs for 3- to 8-year old chi l dren based on developmental characteristics and needs. 8 : 50 to 1 0: 00 a.m. X - l 07 M rs. Erlander

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501 WOR KSHOPS 6 1 74 501 , Section A I NN OVATIONS I N TE ACH I NG S ECON D A R Y SOC I A L STU D I ES ( 4 )

J u l y 1 9 t o August 3 This wo r ks ho p wi l l examine newl y publ ished curri c u l u m projects a n d mater i a l s for teach i ng social stud ies at t h e secondary leve l . T h e materials w i l l b e eva luated accordir1jJ to educational phi losophy, teaching strateg ies, content focus, and potent i a l for attracting student i nterest. Some of t h e projects t o be evaluated a r e the Harvard Social Studies Project, the Socio logy Project, the J ustice i n A merica Series, the H igh Scho o l Geography Project, t he A merican Po l it ica l Behavior C u rr i c u l u m , the Fenton Proj ect, and other ava i lable materials. Some special attention will be devoted to materials dea l i ng with economic i ssues. T h i s workshop i s partially f u nded by a grant from the A merican Economy Program. A l i mited n umber of partial t u i t i o n scholarships are ava i lable t o qual ified teachers. Please contact Dr. Donald Wentworth, Department o f Economics, 531 -6900, ext. 294, for scholarship i nformation. 7: 30 a . m . to 1 2: 00 noon A-206 M r . Wentworth

1 06


6182 501 , Section B I NT E R ACTI ON ANALYSIS (3)

T h i s co u rse provides an i ntroduct i o n to F landers' System o f I nteraction. I t i s designed to g i v e t h e teacher a greater awareness o f the d ifferent k i nds of verbal i n teraction in the classroom. It wi l l assist the teacher i n deve l oping wider variety i n teaching styles. 1 0: 30 a.m. to 1 2 : 1 5 p.m. A-221 Mr. F. Olson

6190 501 , Section C I NSTR UC T I O N AL STA F F D E V E LOPM E N T (2)

A ugust 6 to 1 7 The pu rpose of the I nstructional Staff Development Workshop is to provide experie nces for teachers to i n crease their abi l ity to ex h i b i t behaviors wh i ch lead to i nq ui ry ski l l deve lopment i n students and experiences for supervisors and adm i n i strators wh ich w i l l enable them to i mp lement staff development programs designed to assist teachers i n ut i l iz i n g i n q u iry behaviors i n t h e classroom. 1 : 00 t o 4 : 30 p.m. A-221 Mr. Seagren

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6 1 94 E NV I R O N M E N TA L SCI E N C E E D UCAT I O N FOR E L E M E N TARY AND J U N I O R H I G H (4)

51 1

The class wi l l learn t o use materials produced by t h e E lementary Science S t u d y a nd wi l l develop their own u n its usi ng o utdoor locat ions commo n l y found in the area. Photography and darkroom tech niq ues wi l l be developed that can be used in the classroo m. There w i l l be f i e l d trips d u r i n g class, some eve n i ng t r ips, and a n overn ight wee kend marine ecology t r i p ea rly i n A ugust; fa m i l ies are welcome. The class w i l l lea rn to use science as one aspect of the envi ro n ment and to i n tegrate i t with art, E ng l i s h , and soci a l st u d i es. 9 : 00 a.m. M i ss Chu rney to 1 2 : 00 noon R-209

6252 550

SCHOOL F I NA N C E (2)

Loca l , state, a nd federal contribut ions to schoo l fi nance, its phi losophy and development. Special emphasis o n t he deve lopment and adm i n i strati o n of a school budget. TWR, 7 : 00 t o 9 : 00 p . m . A-1 1 7 Mr. G ray

6260 552

PUB L I C SCHOO L AD M I N I STRAT I O N (3)

Adm i n istration a n d supervision of school perso n n e l , plant, and program; the structure and o rga n i zation of t h e school system. Prereq u isite: Teach i ng experie nce or by special permission of the Dean of the School of Educat i o n . A 51 0 lab fee for use of s i m u l at ion materials w i l l be ch arged to be pa id in the Busi ness Office no later than the f i rst day of class. 1 0 : 30 a . m . to 1 2 : 1 5 p.m. A -1 1 7 Mr. DeBower

1 08


6264 558

A DM I N I STRAT I V E I NT E R NSH I P (2) (See Session I description) By arrangement.

M r . K . Joh nston

6272 EdPsy 578 B E H AV I O R AND LEA R N I NG P R O B L EMS OF STU D E N TS (2) A study of the ph i losophical and practical i ssues i n volved i n the educat i o n o f students with " e motional prob l e ms". Topics will i n c l u de def i n i t i o n , early i dent i f icat i o n , causes, preven t i o n , and treatment. E mphasis w i l l be pl aced on t h e role of t h e teacher a n d of educational special ists i n the Mr. Ada c h i scho o l s . 8 : 50 to 1 0 : 00 a . m . A-21 1

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6280 580

CU R R I CU LU M D E V E LOPM E N T (2)

A study of types of curri cu l u m orga n i zation and programs a nd techniques of curricu l u m development with a view of prepa r i n g the student for h i s own work on curriculum problems. 8 : 50 to 1 0 : 00 a.m . A -2 1 3 M r . Goldenstein

6284 587

1 09

H I STORY OF E DUCAT I O N (3)

G reat educators, educational theories and ed ucational systems fro m a n t i q u ity to t h e present. 1 0 : 30 a . m . to 1 2 : 1 5 p . m . A-2 1 1 Mr. Golde nste i n

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1618 " 322 F I CTION, POETRY, AND L I T E R A R Y C R IT I C I SM

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OF D_ H_ LAW R ENCE (4) 1 0 : 3 0 a . m. to 1 : 00 p.m. A-21 0

M r . Re igstad

C H I L D R E N 'S L I T E R ATU R E (4)

A study of c h i ldren 's l i terature as a rich co l lectio n i n itself and as a gu ide to boo k selectio n in the publ ic schools. 1 1 : 50 M i ss B l omquist a . m . to 2 : 20 p.m. A-206

1 634

340

T H E ETE R N A L T R I AN G L E ( 2 )

Author, reader, publ isher tensio n s as exempl ified in the writings of Herman Melvi l l e , Mark Twai n , Tho mas Wo lfe. M r . E l l iott 8 : 50 to 1 0: 00 a.m. A-208

1 638 351

MOD E R N D R AMA (4) Selected plays represen t i n g the development of drama fro m real ism to the theatre of the absurd. 1 : 1 0 to 3 : 40 p.m. A-208 Mr. Klopsch

1 646 383

E N G L ISH L I TE R ATU R E: SHAKESPE A R E (4)

Focuses o n n i ne great p l a y s b y the B a r d a n d features a n excursion t o t h e Sha kespeare Festival i n Ashland, Orego n . M r . Van Tassel 7 : 30 t0 1 0: 00 a . m . A-206

1 10


Session I I 6370 321

CAN A D I AN L I TE RATU R E : F I CTION - A (4)

S el ec t ed novels and short stories which represent developments in the twentieth century. C lass may visit V ictoria, B .C . bookstores a nd l ibraries. 1 0: 30 a .m. to 1 : 00 M rs . J o h nson p.m. A-2 1 0

6374 442

AM E R I CAN L I T E R ATU R E : R EA L ISM AN D N ATU R A L ISM, 1 870-1 920 (4) A study of the d i sappeara nce of Nature and God from the f i ctio n of a new i ndustrial society , as novels l i ke H uck F i n n, Silas Lapham, The Ambassadors, Maggie McTeague, The F inancier, and The J u ngle explore the power of the rich, the

i m potence of the poor, and the a nguish in mind and soul of t hose caught between. 7 : 30 to 1 0 : 00 a .m. A-2 1 0 Mr. Benton

6382 50 1 A ENG L I S H LAN G UAG E WOR KSHOP (4)

July 1 9 to August 3 L i ngu istics, grammar, and rhetoric for j u n i o r col lege a nd secondary teachers of E n g l i s h ; i n-service and pre-se rvice. Tra i n i ng i n the "scien t i f i c " approach to the study o f langua ge ( l i n g u istics and grammar) with a practical trans i t i o n to the "art" of language ( rheto r i c , l iterary cri t i c ism, and l iterature) . L i m i ted to 20 students. 7 : 30 a . m . to 3 : 40 p.m. A-202 M rs. Johnson and M r . Swenson

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I NT E R M E D I ATE G E RMAN

(4)

C o n t i n ued practice In l i sten i n g a n d spea k i n g . Read i n gs based on selectio ns that reflect the cu l tural her itage as well as contempo rary materials that a re of interest to the col lege student. Laboratory attendance i s requir ed. 7 : 30 to 1 0 : 00 M rs . W i l h e l m a . m. A-2 1 2

I-t\ 1 72 6 V · 405 I NT R O D U C T I O N TO MOD E R N G E RMAN Y (4)

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A n i n troduction to the German nation in modern t i mes, emphas izing developments o f the past twenty-five years. H istory , po l itics, l i terature a n d music wi l l be covered i n lecture and discussio n . Works b y Mozart , Goethe, t h e G r i m m brothers, Marx, N i etzsche, Bol l a n d Grass. I nstruction a n d readings in E n g l i S h . This class w i l l be of i nterest to the general studen t a n d to teachers assembl ing material for a socia l studies unit o n Germa n y . 7 : 30 to 1 0 : 00 a . m . A -223 M r . Webster

1 7 34 501 S U M M E R I N STITUTE FOR TEAC H E R S OF F R E N CH, G E RMAN A N D SPA N I S H

(4)

J u n e 1 8 t o 29 The major thrust of the workshop w i l l be in the areas of ( 1 ) how to teach spea king ( i nc l u d i n g structure and l i ngu istics) and ( 2 ) how to tea ch c u l t u re and cultural awareness . The morning session ( 9 : 00 . 1 2 : 00) will be devoted to one area and the after n o o n sess ion ( 1 : 30 · 4 : 00) w i l l be devoted to the

112


ot her. G uest lecturers and speakers w i l l supplement t h e i n structio n. Co nsidera ble e mphasis wi l l b e placed o n tec h n iq u e s o f u s i n g the language laboratory i n foreign l a n gu age teac h i ng ; t h e m a i n resou rces f o r the discussions w i l l be contemporary wri t i n gs. C u l t u ral e n r i ch me n t activities w i l l a l so be discussed a n d evaluated. 9 : 00 a . m . t o 1 2 : 00 n o o n a n d 1 : 30 to 4 : 00 p.m. R - 1 03 Staff

Sess ion I I 6450 202 I N T E R M E D I ATE G E RMAN (4) (See Sess i o n I descri ptio n ) 7 : 3 0 to 1 0 : 00 a . m . A -2 1 2

Staff

6454 325 THE CO NTEMPO R A R Y F R E NCH NOV E L I N TRANSLAT I ON ( 2 ) The novels w i l l be discussed agai n st the backgro und o f mo d e r n F ra n ce , w i t h part i c u l a r e mphasis on t h e destructive forces let loose by two world wars. Although all wo rks w i l l b e read i n t r a n sl a ti o n , students w i t h a reading k no w l edge o f F rench w i l l be encouraged t o read a t l east two novels i n t h e M r s . Mo n ro e origina l . 1 0 : 3 0 t o 1 1 : 40 a . m. A-208

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PAC I F I C NO RTHWEST H I STO R Y (4)

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A study of the Pac i f i c Northwest as a regio n . Sel ected h istorical d i mensions. E mphasis on di rected research a n d discussions. 7 : 30 to 1 0: 00 a .m. X -201 Mr. Martinso n

CONTEMPO RA R Y WOR LD P R O B L EMS (4)

J u ne 1 8 to 29 A study of the i mportant issues i n E u rope. M i d d l e Eas t . Africa. Asia a n d America i n a revo l u t i o na ry a g e . 1 2 : 00 n o o n Mr. Schnackenberg to 6 : 00 p.m. X -1 1 2

181 6 338

R EVO LUTION IN TH E TH I R D W O R LD: THE W ESTE R N H EMISP H E R E (4)

A n exa m i na t i o n of revo l u t i o nary responses to poverty a n d explo itation i n Lat i n A merica, w i t h the Mexican Revo l ut i o n of 1 9 1 0 a n d t h e Cuban Revolution o f 1 9 59 serv i n g a s princ ipal focal po ints. ( W i l l f u l f i l l o n e course of the Teacher Cert if ication American H istory req u i rements.) 7 : 30 to 1 0 : 00 Mr. D . Johnso n a .m. X-203

1 14


1 824 350 AM E R I CAN P R E S I D E NTS: GOOD, BAD, I N D I F F E R E NT ( 4 )

July 5 to 1 8 A critica l examination o f se lected America n presidents, i n cluding Jefferson, F i l l more, L i ncol n , G rant, Harding, the Roosevelts, Truman, Kennedy, and N i xon. Stud ies w i l l i nvolve a n investigation of biographical materials, official messages and papers, president i a l speeches, etc. (Will f u l f i l l one course o f the Teacher Certi f i cation American H i story requirementsJ 1 2 : 00 noo n to 6 : 00 p . m . X-1 1 2 Mr. H a lseth

Session I I 6480 332 TUDOR A N D STUART E N G LAN D (4)

T h e Tudor Revo l ution i n gover nment, Henry V I I I , t h e R eformation i n England, Ph i l ip I I and " B loody Mary," " E l izabeth of Good Memory," the E l i zabethan R ena issance, the A rmada , the Stuarts, Civil War, the Puritan " R evo l u tion". Mr. N ordquist 1 0: 30 a . m . to 1 : 00 p.m. X-1 07


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Session I 1 844 323 MOD E R N E L EM ENTARY MATH EMATI CS (4)

An i n t roduction to the mathematical concepts u nder l y i n g the traditional computational techn iques, and offering a systematic ana lysis of arithmet ic and an i n t u i tive approach to a l gebra and geometry. I n tended for elementary tea ch i ng majors. Must be taken before Education 326. 7 : 30 to 1 0: 00 M r . G. Peterson a . m . 0-1 03

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1 848 381 MATH EMAT I CA L PUZZ LES, PA RADOXES, AND D IV E R SI ON S ( 2)

T h e mathematics u nder lying m a n y puzzles, card t ric ks, appare n t paradoxes, etc., w i l l be stud ied. How to use recreational math as a motivation for h i gh school students will be considered. 7: 30 to 8 : 40 a . m . 0-1 04 M r. H e rzog

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TOPO LOGY 14)

June 1 8 - J u l y 27 A n i ntroduction to po i nt-set topology. Prereq u i s i te: Consent. M r . Herzog 8: 50 to 1 1 : 40 a . m . 0-1 04

1 16


Session I I

6552 1 27 F I N ITE MATHE MAT I CS (4) Truth tab l es, modulo systems, elementary proba b i l i t y , Bool ean Algebra, matrices, l i near program mi ng. Prereq u i si t e : H igh sch ool algebra and geo metry. 1 0 : 30 a .m. t o 1 : 00 p . m . M r . W. Joh nson A-223

6560 401 WO R KSHOP IN EXPE R I M E N T A L D E S I G N ( 2)

J u ly 23 to Aug ust 3 I ntended primari l y to give i n sight i nto design a nd statistical tools fo r decision-ma k i n g to those wh o : ( 1 ) i n te nd to do exper imental research i n the behavioral sciences and educat i o n , and (2) will be u s i ng journal articles and res u l ts of behavioral research i n decisi on-ma k i n g a n d pol icy setting. Some k nowl edge o f statistics i s des i ra b l e but high school a l gebra is s u f ficient backgro u nd. 9 : 00 a . m. to 4 : 00 p.m. M � Bmk� A�1 7

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1 926 336

TWO P IANO E NSEMBL E ( 1 )

Two piano and piano duet literature from a l l periods; open to majors and non-majors. To be arranged. Mr. Knapp

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1 934 337

ACCOMPA N Y I N G ( 1 ) To assist the pian ist in gai n i ng experience and k nowledge i n accompany i ng l i terature from a l l periods. To b e arranged. Mr. K na pp

1 938 340

MUS I C I N T H E E L E MENTARY SCHOO L ( 2 )

Tec h n iques and procedures for the music progra m o f the first six grades. The rote song, c h i l d voice, r h yt h m activities, Kodaly method, and the l i ke. Prereq u isite: concurrent registration with Music 341 o r equivalent background. 1 0 : 30 M r. G i l bertson to 1 1 : 40 a .m_ E-228

1 946 341

MUSIC S K I L LS FOR E L EM E N TA R Y TEACH E R S (2)

A study of the rudi ments of music, i ncluding rhyth ms, sight rea d i ng, elementary keyboard experience a nd creative music. M r . G i l bertson 8 : 50 to 1 0 : 00 a . m. E-228

118


2404 P R I VATE LESSONS - P I A N O ( 1 )

350

N i ne weeks: m i n i m u m of 1 4 lessons * . To be arranged.

Staff

2408 351

P R I VATE L ESSONS - ORGAN ( 1 ) N ine weeks: m i n i m um o f 1 4 lessons ' . To be arranged.

Staff

241 6 352

P R I VATE L E SSONS - VO I C E ( 1 )

N i ne wee ks : m i n i m u m of 1 4 lesson s* , To be arranged,

Staff

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2424 353

P R I VATE L ESSONS - STR I N GS ( 1 )

N i ne weeks: m i n i mum of 1 4 less o n s 路 , To be arranged,

Staff

2428 355

P R I VATE LESSONS - WOODW I N DS ( 1 )

N ine weeks: m i n i mum of 1 4 l essons * , To be arranged.

Staff

2436 356

P R I VATE L E SSONS - B R ASS ( 1 )

N ine weeks: m i n i m u m of 1 4 lessons * , To be arranged, Mr, Meyer

2444 357

1 19

P R I VATE LESSONS - P E R CUSS I O N ( 1 )

N i n e weeks: m i n i mum of 1 4 lesson s ' . To be arranged. Mr. Robb i ns


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2448 358

P R I VATE L ESSONS - G U I TAR ( 1 )

N ine weeks: m i n i m u m of 1 4 lessons路. To be arranged. M r. Burch

* Before yo ur reg istration for private lessons is f i na l ized, you must register at the Music Department Office, E-21 5

W O R KSH OPS

401 2506

401 , Section A P I AN O L I T E R ATU R E O F BRAH MS ( 1 )

J u ne 1 8 to 22 A brief study of the l ife and piano works of Johan nes Brahms. His contributions and tech n iques w i l l be studied. Open to music teachers and to those i nterested i n f urthering their appreciation o f music. 1 : 30 to 5 : 00 p.m. E-227 Mr. Knapp

25 1 4 401 , Section B P I A N O PE DAGOGY ( 1 )

J u ne 1 8 to 22 Lectures, d iscussions, prescribed readi n g i n methods of teaching piano. Practical a pproach to teaching beginners and i ntermediate piano students. E mphasis o n tec hni ques a n d mater i a l s . Open t o p i a n o teachers and those i nterested i n teac h i ng music i n t h e schoo ls. 9 : 00 a . m . to 1 2 : 3 0 p . m . E-206 Mr. Knapp

1 20


25 1 8 401 , Section C KODALY M US I C METHOD ( 1 )

June 1 8 to 22 This workshop i ncludes mater i a ls and techniques of presentation of the Kodaly Method o f teach i ng music. 1 : 30 to 5 : 00 p.m. E-228 Ms. Abernethy

2526 401 , Section D G U I TA R I N THE C LASSR OOM ( 1 )

J u ne 25 to 29 F undamental tec h n i q ues of play ing and teac h i n g fo l k gu itar. Special atte nti o n w i l l be given to the use of the guitar in the classroom. 1 : 30 to 5 : 00 p.m. E-227 Mr. B u rch

2534 401 , Section E C R E AT I V ITY I N M U S I C T H R O U G H COMPOSITION I N T H E E L E M E NTARY SCHOO L ( 1 ) J u l y 2 to 6 ( no class July 4) Act ivities and i deas w i l l be discu ssed in the areas of co mposing proced ures, eva l uation tec h n iques, and practical suggestio ns given i n achieving creativity i n the elementary M iss Da l l man schoo l . 1 : 1 0 to 5 : 30 p.m. E -227

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2538 401 , Section F TH IS BUS I N ESS OF COMM E R C I A L M US I C ( 1 )

J u l y 9 to 1 3 The i nterpreta tio n a n d a na lysis o f commercial mus i c t h rough compos i t i o n , arrangi ng, performance, and reco rd i n g. 1 : 30 to M r . Wagner 5 : 00 p.m. E -227

2546 401 , Section G WOODW I N D I N ST R U M ENT P E DAGOGY AND MATE R I A LS ( 1 )

J u l y 1 6 to 20 Devel opment of workable courses of study for woodwi nd i n str uments ( beg i n n i n g t h rough co l lege leve l ) with a n exami natio n o f relevant performance l i terat u re . 4 : 00 t o 6 : 00 Staff p.m. E-207

2604 401 , Section H C H O R A L L I T E RATU R E FOR LARGE AND SMA L L E N S E M B L ES ( 1 )

J u l y 1 6 to 20 Class a n a l ysis a n d read ing of new chora l l i terature. Some t i me w i l l be devoted to l i terature for sma l l ensembles and swing M r . H a rmic cho irs. 4 : 00 to 6 : 00 p.m. E -2 1 6

1 22


2608 401 , Section I PE R CUSSION P E DAGOGY AND L I T E RATU R E ( 1 ) J u l y 1 6 to 20 An i n路depth expl oration of the i nstruments, sounds, and requisite m usicianship of the band and orchestra's most neglected a n d misu nders t ood sectio n . The evo l u t i o n of sty l e and instru me n ts wi l l b e discussed through representative l i terature with spec i a l emphasis o n contemporary works. 4 : 00 to 6 : 00 p.m. E-228 Mr. Robbi ns

261 6 401 , Section J CON C E R T A N D MARCH I N G BAND ( 1 )

J u l y 1 6 to 20 Trends and methods i n concert and march ing band teach i n g and rehearsal tec h n iques. Open t o both graduate a n d undergraduate students. 4 : 00 t o 6: 00 p . m . E路227 M r. C u rt i s

2624 440 I MP R OV ISAT I O N FOR PIANO (2) Study and practice i n i mprovisat i o n . I n cl uded wi l l be a study and j a z z h a r mo n i za t i o n , and classical melody of i m provi sat i o n . Contemporary i d i o m s a nd tech n iques w i l l b e studied . 7 : 30 t o 8 : 40 a . m . E-227 Mr. Knapp

2628 445 ADVANCED CON D UCTI N G ( 2) 1 23

A study o f l iterature w i th emphasis upo n i ts teach i ng a n d conducting problems. Prereq u i s i te : Music 3 3 9 . 8 : 50 t o 1 0: 00 a . m . E-227 Mr. Skones

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A study o f l iterature with emphasis upon its teac h i ng a nd co nd ucting problems. 8 : 50 to 1 0: 00 a . m . E-227 M r . S k o n es

2644 5 1 2 L I T E RATU R E OF THE C LASSI CAL P E R I O D (4)

Score a na l ysis; historical sig n i f i cance, social i m pl ications o f s i g n i f icant wo r k o f se lected composers from Sta m i tz , H a y d n , to e a r l y Beethoven. The l iterature seminars described u nder M usic 590, Sections A, B, C , 0 are synony mous with t h i s course, but a l low students to elect o n l y cert a i n periods i f Mr. Skones t h e y s o desire. 1 0: 30 a.m. t o 1 : 00 p . m . E-227

590 L I T E R ATU R E S E M I N A R S 2648 590, Section A THE MAN N H E I M SCHOOL ( 1 )

J u n e 1 8 to 2 2 Performance sty l e , score ana lysis. and h i storical s i !) n i f i ca n ce of the M a n n h e i m Schoo l . 1 0 : 30 a . m . to 1 : 00 p.m. E路227 Mr. Skones

1 24


2706

590, Section B TH E MUSIC OF H AY D N ( 1 ) J u ne 25 to 29 The music of Haydn, score ana lysis, h i storical signif ica n ce of selected works of Haydn. 1 0 : 30 a . m . to 1 : 00 p. m . E-227 Mr. Sko nes

27 1 4

590, Section C TH E MUSIC O F MOZART (1 ) J u l y 2 to 6 The music of Mozart, score analysis, h i storical s i g n i f i ca n ce of selected works of Mozart. 1 0 : 30 a . m . to 1 : 00 p . m . E -227 M r . Ska nes

27 1 8

590, Section D T H E E A R LY M US I C O F BE ETHOV E N (1 ) J u l y 9 to 1 3 The early music of Beethoven, score analysis, h i storical s i g n i f i cance of s e l ected works of Beethoven. 1 0 : 30 a . m . to M r . Sko nes 1 : 00 p . m . E -227

2726

590E G RA D UATE S E M I N A R I N R E H E A R SA L TECH N I QUES ( 1 ) J u l y 1 5 to 21 tec h n iques o f rehearsal of analysis and Observation Northwest S u m mer Music Camp conductors. F i rst meeting: Mr. Meyer Su nday, July 1 5, 6 : 00 p. m . E-306

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6594 401 , Section K STAGE BAN D TECH N I QU E S A N D L IT E R AT U R E ( 1 )

J u l y 23 to 27 A study of l iterature and rehearsal techniques i n stage band. G raduate or u ndergraduate c red i t 1 : 30 to 5 : 00 p.m. E-228 M r . M u tch ler

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7052 401 , Section L PRACT I CAL A R R AN G I NG ( 1 )

J u l y 30 to Aug ust 3 Voca l and i nst rume ntal writing for smal l and large groups. Some emphasis on pop a rranging, but i nd ividual freedom of i nterest, l evel and media w i l l be give n . 1 : 30 to 5 : 00 p . m . Mr. Wagner E-227

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7060 401 , Section M E L E CT RO N I C M U S I C WOR KSHOP ( 1 )

A ugust 6 to 1 0 A n i ntroduction t o the tech n iques and aesthetics of electro n i c music sy nthesis. Real-time experience in the Pac i f ic Lutheran U n iversity Electro n i c M usic Stud io. Speci a l emphasis o n t h e pedagogic potential o f t h i s new med i u m . 1 . 30 t o 5 : 00 p . m . E-227 Mr. Robbins

7064 401 , Section N ORGAN WOR KSHOP ( 1 )

August 6 to 1 0 H y m n tune i mprovisation. Basic tech niques usef u l for creating hymn i ntrod uct i o ns , free accompan iments, a nd h y m n preludes. Master class i n performance including reperto i re , registrati o n , service playi ng, new l i t u rgies, contemporary hymns. 1 :30 to 5 : 00 p.m. F irst class meet i ng Mr. Da h l i n E-228

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H I G H SC HOO L P R OG R AMS Northwest Sum mer Music and Art Camp July 1 5 to 21 For further information, contact Dr. Lawrence Meyer Department of Music Pacific Lutheran University Tacoma, Wash i n gton 98447 Youth Organ Institute August 1 3 to 1 7 For further information, contact Mr. David Dah l Department of Music Pacific Lutheran University Tacoma , Wash ington 98447


Tu ition For Each N ursi ng Course is $250 Session I 2804 446 COMMUN I TY

N U RS I N G

June 4 to j u l y 1 3

(4)

G u ided experie nces i n giving n u r s i ng care i n the h o me a n d community

with

emphasis

on

the

role of

the

nurse

in

wor k i ng w i t h patients a n d fam il ies a n d i n t h e u t i lization o f hea l t h a n d welfare reso urces. Prereq u is i t e : Sen ior standi ng a n d N ur s i n g 363 and 3 7 2 . To be arranged. I N -1 06 M rs. Bergerson a n d M rs. Coombes

Session I I 7092 363 MAT E R N A L-CH I LD

NURSING

(4)

(MATE R N I T Y ) Care to fa m i l ies duri ng t h e c h i l d-bear i n g process; observation a n d care of mothers and newborn in hospital wards, c l i n ics and related commu n i ty agencies. Prerequisites: N u rs i ng 254, 255, 256 and Psych 335 or Education 201 or 321 or Soc 445 or 325. Class - 8 : 00 to 1 0 : 00 , 1 0 : 30 to 1 2: 30, 1 :30 to 3 : 3 0 t h e f i rst Thursday a n d F r i day i n I N - 1 1 1 D . F o r t he remainder o f the ter m, C l ass - 8 : 00 to 1 0 : 00 , 1 0 : 30 to 1 2: 3 0 o n Mondays i n I N - 1 1 6. Laboratory - 7 : 00 a . m . t o 3: 30 p.m. o n Tuesday, Wednesda y, T h u rsday a nd F r i day , C l i n i cal Area. Staff

1 29


7 1 50 446

COM M U N I T Y N U R S I N G (4) J u l y 19 to August 29 (See Sess ion I description) To be arranged. I N-1 06 M rs. Coombes

7 1 54 450

S E L ECTE D C L I N I C A L P R O B L EMS I (4) A study of selected c l i n ical problems i n t h e nurs i n g care of medical-surgical patients. Among the problems d iscussed a re n u rsing assessment, criteria for deter m i n i ng priority of patient needs, princi ples for p l a n n i ng n u r s i n g care for gro u ps of patients, emergency and resuscitative nursi ng meas ures, and current trends in co mmun ity and hospital pla n n i n g for emergency nurs i n g activities. Prerequ isites: Senior standi ng and N u rs i ng 363 and 372. Class - 8 : 00 a .m . to 1 2: 00 noon Mondays a n d F ridays; 1 : 00 to 3 : 00 p . m . M o ndays, I N-1 22. Laboratory - 7 : 00 a.m. t o 2 ; 30 p . m . Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Staff Thu rsdays. C l i n ical A rea

1 30


Sess ion I 2824 352 TOWA R D A PROG RAMMED SOC I E TY: SK I N N E R 'S V I EW OF L I F E "BEYOND F R E E DOM" (2)

A n exa mi nation of B . F . S ki nner's social psyc hological theor ies from a philosophical perspective. 8 : 50 to 1 0 : 00 a.m. M r . H u ber A-2 1 9

2828 41 1 TH E AN ATOMY OF R E L I G I O US B E L I E F (4)

The evidence and logic i n claims of rel igious k n o w l edge. 1 0 : 30 a .m. to 1 :00 p . m . A-21 1 Mr. H u ber

Sess ion I I 7 1 82 357 CONSC IOUSN ESS I I I AND UTOPI A N ISM ( 2)

An e xamination of the " n ew consciousness" in l ight of its relati onship both to traditional an d to recent Utopian Mr. MYrbo thought. 8 : 50 to 1 0 : 00 a . m. A-208

7 1 90 377 F R E E DOM, R E ASON A N D R I G H T (4)

Deals with basic issues that a rise i n ethics, with part icu l ar emphasis u pon freedom a nd its relations h i p to what is right. M r . Myrbo 1 0 : 30 a .m. to 1 :00 p . m . A-207

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Sess ion I 2848 201 B E G I N N I N G G O L F ( 1 )

Activity course for men a nd women. 7 : 30 to 8 : 40 a.m. Olso n F ield House Mr. D . Olson

2906 205 B E G I N N I NG TE N N I S ( 1 )

Activity course for men and women. 1 0 : 30 to 1 1 :40 a.m. Olson F i eld House Mr. Benson

291 4 228 BAS I C MOUNTA I N E E R I N G ( 1 )

Activity course for men and women. A l l day each Saturday. I nformation relative t o mo untain safety and equipment, basic rock c l i mbing, bas ic snow c l i mbing, f i rst aid and mountaineering techn ique is presented. F ive mou ntain c l i mbing expeditions are included. I n itial meeting i n 0-1 04 at Mr. P h i l l i ps 7 :30 p.m. o n J u ne 20.

29 1 8 237 SKI N A N D SCU BA D I V I N G ( 1 )

ActivitY course for men and women. 1 1 : 50 a . m. to 1 : 00 p.m. Mr. Chase Pool

1 32


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2926 295 SCHOO L

H EA LTH

( 2)

Prese ntation a n d discussion of hea lth concepts that relate to the total school health program, i nc l u d i ng instruction, services,

and

environment.

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to

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the

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401 WOR KSHOPS 2934 E L E M E N T A R Y SCHOO L P. E . - PR I MA R Y G R ADES (1) J u ne 1 8 to 22 A one-week workshop designed pr i mar i l y for elementary school classroom teachers. Emphasis wi ll be on creativity, individualization a nd the movement education approach to elementary school (pri mary g-ades) physical educat i o n . 7 : 00 to 1 0 : 00 p.m. O-Balcony M r . Poppen

2938 401 , Section B

E L E M E N T A R Y SCHOOL P.E. - I NT E R M E D I ATE G R AD E S (1 ) J u ne 25 to 29 A one ¡week worksho p designed s i m ilarly to P E 401 A, except the

presentations

i ntermediate grade levels.

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2946 401 , Section C PHYS I O LOGY AND TH E COACH ( 1 )

J u ne 1 8 t o 2 2 A course designed to provide for the coach a physio logical basis for plann ing a physical tra i n i ng program. The practical appl ication of exercise physiology w i l l be di scussed i n relation to interval trai n i ng, inj ury preve n t io n , and weight tra i n i ng. Topics such as diet and athl etic t ra i n i ng, drug use i n athletics, and preparati o n o f the athlete for c h ampionsh ip compet ition wi l l be di scussed. 7 : 00 to 1 0: 00 p.m. 0-1 03 M r . Chase

3404 401 , Section D SPORTS A N D MOTI VAT I O N ( 1 )

July 9 to 1 3 Sports a nd Motivat i o n i s a st i mu lating and in terest i n g workshop specifically designed fo r today's at hletic coach O r a nyone i nvolved i n athletics. Sports a nd Motivat ion is based on many new developments i n psychol ogy a nd ath l et ics. Many w i n n i n g ideas and tec h n i q u es are p resented o n motivat i n g in dividua l s a nd teams, assessing strengths a nd weaknesses 'of i ndiv idual players and teams as we l l as methods of knowing a nd better u ndersta nding the attitudes and behavior of today's ath lete. Sports and Motivatio n is the key in assist i ng the athlete to strive for h is max imum potenti a l . 7 : 00 t o 1 0 : 00 p . m . 0 - 1 02 M r . Westering

1 34


3408 401 , Section E SCA N D I NAV IAN DANCE ( 1 )

J u ne 1 3 to 1 5 An i ntensive t hree-day workshop in trad itional dances of Scandi navi a, conducted by one of the world's foremost authorities in Scandinavian dancing and music. Teach i n g methods w i l l b e emphasized. 9 : 00 a . m . to 1 2: 0 0 noon a n d 1 : 00 t o 3 : 00 p.m. Memor ial G y m M r. Tracie

341 6 401 , Section F FOOTBAL L COAC H I N G C L I N I C ( 1 )

J u ne 25 to 29 This is a u n ique footba l l c l i n i c designed to stimu late t h e t h i n k i n g of today's footbal l coaches a t a l l l evels. C l i n ic sessions i nclude : orga nizatio n , execution a n d evaluation of the offensive, defensive and kicking games. The i n novative ideas and materials presented i n t h i s c l i n ic w i l l assist the coach in plan n i n g and orga n iz i n g their program for the coming footba l l season. 7 : 00 to 1 0 : 00 p.m. 0¡1 03 M r . Westeri ng

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3426 401 Section M LEWIS & C LA R K - M I SSO U R I R I V E R W I L D E R N ESS CAN O E TR I P (2) ,

J u ne 9 t o 1 7 A fa ntast i c canoe expedition through natural w i lderness beauty. A fee of $1 50 i ncl udes food, canoe, ca mping gear, and guide service, plus tuition cost of $ 34 for 2 semester hours of credit w i l l provide participants with u npara l leled opportu nities to commune with nature i n a most relax i n g a n d educati onal wa y . For f u rther i nformation and data sheet, please contact the School of Physica l Educati o n , Pacific Lutheran U niversity .

1 36


3428 482 B I O M E CH AN I CS O F HUMAN MOT I O N (4)

The k i nesiological and mechanical aspects of h u man movement; a n a l ysis of various activities. Prerequisite : P. E . 2 7 7 . Recommended: Bio logy 1 6 1 . 1 0 : 30 a .m. to 1 : 0 0 p . m . Mr. D . Olson a n d M r. Chase 0-1 02

3436 490 R E C R EAT I ON PRACT I C U M (4) Designed t o test and a p p l y recreation principles through practical experiences relating to recreational methods, l e a d e r s h i p t e c h n i q u e s , s u p e r v i sory practices a n d program m i ng. Conducted i n cooperation w i t h Metropo litan and P ierce County Parks. 1 0 : 30 a . m . to 1 : 00 p.m. Spanaway Park. Additional required hours to be arranged. I nitial meeting on Monday. June 18, i n 0-1 03 M r. Lu ndgaard

Session I I 7262 201 BEG I N N I N G G O L F ( 1 )

Activity course for men a nd wo men. 7 : 30 to 8 : 40 a . m . Olson F i eld House Mr. Moe

7270 205 BEG I N N I NG T E N N I S ( 1 ) Activity course for men and women . 1 0 : 30 to 1 1 : 40 a . m . O lson F ield House Staff

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40 1 WOR KSH OPS 7274 401 , Section H M U LTI-M E D I A SPORTS PROMOTION ( 1 ) J u l y 23 to 27 A one-week workshop on tech n i ques, methods a n d materials used by the coach, p u b l icist and press to promote the a t h letic M r. Kitt i l sby program. 7 : 00 to 1 0 :00 p.m. 0·1 04

7282 401 , Section I SMA L L C R A F T O R I E NTATION (1 ) J u l y 23 to 27 An introd uction t h ro u g h demonstration and practical application to various types of sma l l crafts and their r e c r ea t i o n a l va l u e, l i mitation s of use, and safety requ i rements. The crafts w i l l i nc l ude the rowboat, canoe, ka y a k , sa i l boat and power boat. 9 : 00 a . m . to 1 2 : 00 n oo n . M r. Chase 0-1 05 -

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7290 401 , Section J SPO R TS M E D I C I N E (1 ) j u l y 25 to 28 A t h ree-day workshop for coaches and a t h l etic trainers emphas i z ing the la test techniques in preventive and t hF!rapeutic aspects of athletic t r a i n i n g . A special on e-day feature for h igh school students, p l a n n ing to assist with athletic training, wi l l be conducted on J u l y 28. 9 : 00 a . m . to M r . Lee 1 2 : 00 noon and 1 : 00 to 3 : 00 p.m. 0·1 02

1 38


7294 401 , Section K O LYMPICS BACKPACK I N G T R I P (2)

J u l y 28 to August 4 A s i xty-five mile, seven day backpack ing experience i n deep forests, along r ivers, on a l p i ne ridges and through mounta i n meadows. Students wi l l h i ke t h rough o ne o f the West's most beautiful national parks. Wilderness use and care w i l l be studied. Backpacking and ca mping ski l ls w i l l be presented. Students must be prepared for vigorous phys i ca l act ivity, complete a physica l examination and furnish camping equi pment, A complete eq u i pment l ist w i l l be sent to ' registrants. I n i t i a l class meeting in 0-1 03 , July 1 9 , at 7 : 30 p.m, The hi king party w i l l leave on J u l y 28 a n d return o n August 4. Class i s open to m e n and women. M a x i m u m enro l l ment i s 1 5 students. Mr. P h i l l ips

7 350 401 , Section L BOW RON LA KES WI L D E R N ESS CANOE T R I P ( 2)

August 1 2 to 26 A fantastic canoe exped ition through wilderness beauty. A fee of $ 1 85 i n c l udes food, canoe, camping gear, a nd guide service, plus tuition cost o f $34 for 2 semester ho urs of credit w i l l provide participants with unparal leled oppo rtu n ities to commu ne w i th nature i n a most rel a x i ng and educational way. For further i n fo rmation and data sheet, please contact the Scho o l of Physica l Education, Pac i f i c Lutheran U n iversity.

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7352 478 PSYCHO LOG I CA L CONCE PTS I N PHYSI CAL E DUCAT I O N AND ATH L E T I CS (4)

A study of the i m portant psychological factors ( methods of commun i catio n, use of teac h i ng aids, lear ning strategies, motivations, etc.) in the learning and teachi ng of gross motor s k i l l s. 1 0: 30 a . m . to 1 : 00 p.m. 0-1 03 M r. Westering

H I G H SC H OO L P R OG R AM S All-Star Sports Footbal l Camp J u ne 24 to 29 A o ne-wee k footba l l camp for j u n ior and se n ior h igh school students. The camp wi l l feature N F L footba l l stars, P L U's Head F ootba l l Coach, F rosty Weste r i n g, p l us h igh school and col lege staff m e m be rs. For further i nformation, p l ease con tact the Ath letic Department, Pac i f i c Luthera n U n i versity. Basketbal l Camps Basketba l l i nstruction and game compet i o n for j u n i o r and sen i or h igh school boys_ E x pe r i e n ced col lege and h ig h school coaches w i I I serve as i nstructors a n d cou nselors for three, one-week sessions on the P L U campus. J u l y 23 to 28 July 30 to A u gu st 4 August 6 to 1 1 R ecreati onal activities i nc l ude bow l i ng, swi m m i n g , golf, handba l l , paddl e ba l l , squas h , badm i nton, ten n i s , baseba l l , a n d we ight trai n i ng. F o r further i nforma t i o n , please contact the School of Physical Educati o n , Pacific Lutheran U n i vers i ty . 1 40


Session I 3508 251 AM E R I CAN NAT I ON A L GOV E R NM E N T ( 2)

A study of the American nat ional government including the federal constitution and t he distribution of gove rnmental powers. Su rvey of structure and procedure of nat i o n a l government w i t h special attention to practical o peration a n d co ntemporary reforms. 1 1 : 50 a.m. t o 1 : 00 p . m . A-204. ( F i rst Mr. Crockett meeting only i n X-201 .l

35 1 6 327 AM E R I CAN PO L I T I CA L THOUGHT (4)

The sources, development and contemporary trends in American pol i tical thought and the im pl i cat i ons of ideas for political action. 7 : 30 to 1 0 : 00 a.m . X -1 1 2 M r . Crockett

Session I I 7382 326 REC ENT PO L I T I CAL THOUGHT (4)

A critical e x a m i n ation o f the majo r p h i losophies of the m o d e r n wo rld; Democracy, conservatism, capitalism, social ism, a narcho-syn d i ca l ism, commu n i s m , racial and p o l i t ical elitism, nationalism, libera l is m , C h ristianity. Co ntemporary problems. 7 : 30 to 1 0 : 00 a.m. X -1 1 2 Mr. Fa rmer

7390 486 PO L I T I CA L SYST EMS OF SOUT H E R N A F R ICA ( 2)

141

A critical analysis of the po l itica l systems of South Africa, South West Africa, R hodesia, Botswana, Lesotho, Swaz iland, Zambia, Ma lawi and the Portuguese territories. 1 1 : 50 a.m. to 1 : 00 p.m. X-1 1 2 M r . Fa rmer

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WOR KSH OPS

The application of behavior pri n ciples to academic and soc ial problems of chi ldren, yo u t h , and adults. Tuesday a n d M r . Severtson Thursda y , 2 : 30 to 5:30 p.m. A·2 1 0

401 , Section B THE PSYCHOLOGY OF F R I E N DSH I P AN D LOVE ( 2) Examination and evaluation of t he major theoretical views of friendship and pass ionate love from Freud to Behaviorism. Review of research in the area of interperso nal attraction that bears upon problems and opportunities in the deve lopment of friendships and love rel ationships. I mplications of both theory and research for perso nal growth i n a b i l i ty to experience and offer f ri e ndsh i p and love. Monday a n d Wed nesday, 2: 3 0 to 5: 30 p.m. A-21 0 M r. Underwager


3606 405 ADOL ESCENT PSYCHO LOGY ( 2)

An advanced cou rse deal ing with phys ica l develo pmen t , mental traits, social characteristics and i n terests of ado lescents. Adjustment in home, schoo l and co mmun ity; a n d study o f adolescent rei igious deve l opment. Prereq u i sites: Psychology 1 01 and one o f Educatio n 321 , Psychology 335 Mr. Underwager or 401 . 8 : 50 to 1 0 : 00 a.m. ' 0-1 05

361 4 420 PSYCHOLOGY OF PE R SO N A LITY (4)

C u rrent theories o f the dynam ics and deve l o pment o f personal ity ; research o n the causes of i ndividual d i fferences; perso n a l i ty change a n d tec h n iques of measuring personality. PrereqU isites: Psychology 1 01 and at least one ful l course beyond the 200 level. 1 0: 30 a . m . to 1 : 00 p.m. A-21 2 Mr. Severtson

361 8 481 STATIST I CA L METHODS (4)

The use a n d i n terpretation of e l e mentary statist i ca l tech n iques; graphic representat i o n ; measures o f central tendency ; simple correlation a na l yS is, sampl i ng t heory, i n ferentia l a n d n o n -parametric statistics. 7 : 30 to 1 0 : 00 a.m. M r . Bexton l i brary Statistics Lab

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501 , Section A PSYCHOLOGI CAL PROBL EMS O F LATER MATU R I TY (2) This course wi l l deal with adjustment i n later matur ity to problems such as retirement, health, recreation and i nt e l l ec t u a l i nterests. Lectures and discussion. N o prerequisites - open to a l l i nterested individuals in the community. Monday and Wednesday , 7 : 00 to 1 0: 00 p.m. M r . Bexton A·21 0

Session I I 7464 330 SOC I A L PSYCHOLOGY (4) A study o f research f i n d i ngs concerning t h e interaction between groups and the individu a l . Attitudes, val ues, ro l e behavior, a n d related topics will b e examined i n the l ight of interpersonal relations and grou p processes. Prerequ isite : Psychology 1 01 . 1 0: 30 a.m. to 1 : 00 p . m . A-21 2 M r. N ol p h

401 WO R KSH OPS 7472 401 , Section C TH E PSYCHO LOGY OF WAR FAR E (2)

T h e r o l e of i ndividual motivation and attitudes i n the orig i n and conduct of war. Emphasis o n t h e nature o f h u ma n aggression a nd t h e relation of war t o other behavior. 2 : 30 to 3 : 40 p.m. A·21 2 Mr. N o l p h

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Session I 3708 203 B I BL ICAL L I T E R ATU R E (4)

A study of l iterary, h istorica l , and re l igious d i mensions o f the Bi ble i ncluding perspectives and con temporary rel igious problems. 1 0 : 30 a .m. to 1 : 00 p.m. A-208 Mr. J. Petersen and M r . P i l gr i m

40 1 W O R KSH OPS 3938 - 0 3946 - 2 401 , Section A THEOLOGY TO DAY: B E I N G HUMAN ( 0-2)

July 16 to 20 ( A n offer i n g of the Center for Human Organization i n Changing Enviro n ments - C H O I C E . See page 1 53.)

4404 - 0 4408 - 0 401 , Section B I MPROV I N G PAR ISH E F F E CT I V E N E SS: N E W MO D E LS FOR M ISSION ( 0-2)

J u l y 1 2 to 20 ( A n offer i ng of the Center for Human O rga nization in Changing Enviro n ments - C H O I C E . See page 1 54 . )

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37 1 6 490 S E N I O R S E M I N A R : H UMAN S E X U A L I TY (4)

T h e bio logica l , psycho logical , eth i ca l , and theological d i mensions of se x ua l ity i n human life. 7 : 30 to 1 0 : 00 a.m. Mr. J. Petersen A-207

Session I I 7560 321 J ESUS AND THE R E VOLUTION AR I ES ( 4 )

A historical study o f t h e relationship between Jesus a n d the revol utionary/political forces of his t i me. Spec ial attention will be given to the Zealots, t he Roman su ppressors, Jesus' confl ict with Jewish author ities, and the po l i t i ca l -social i mp l i cations of certain teachings and actions recorded in the Gospels. I mpl ications will be drawn for contemporary C h ristian discipleship i n a revo lutionary age. 7 : 30 to 1 0 : 00 a.m. A-204 M r . Pi lgr i m


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Sess ion I 3804 Sociology 359 R AC I SM I N AM E R I CA (4)

A study of the historic background and the sociological implications of the distinctive American in stitution o f r acism. The particu lar focus of the study will be o n the dominant culture and the b l ack m i n ority, f ro m African o r igins to the present day, The cont i n u i ng conf lict between th ese two cultures wi l l be exami ned i n its po l itical, eco nomic, and soci a l ramifications. After tracing the h istorical background, the study wi l l move into presen t trends and make an attempt to chart development of black-white relationships in the M r. Nelso n future. 1 0 : 30 a . m . to 1 : 00 p.m. A-207

SOC I O L OGY 401 WO R KSH OPS 3808 401 , Section A WOM E N 'S L I B E RATION MOV E M E N T ( 2 )

June 1 8-22 An examination of the development and presen t natu re of the women's libe rat io n movement. 1 2: 00 noon to 6 : 00 p.m. X-1 07 Staff

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J u ne 25 to 29 A brief but thorough introduction to the theory and practice of commun itY corrections, i nvestigating the needs to which community based efforts speak, the obstacles to i mplementati o n , a n d the spec i f i c programs wh i ch are showing the way. This wi l l be mi xed with critica l eva l uat ion both of the movement toward co m m u n itY corrections i n general a n d the i ndividual programs designed to effect reha b i l itat i o n o f the crim i n a l . 1 2: 00 noon to 6 : 00 p.m. X-1 07 Staff

3824 401, Section C V I O L E N C E I N T H E AME R I CAN C U LTU R E (2)

July 9 to 1 3 A n analysis of the i ncidence a nd f u nction of violence i n American culture and social cha nge. 1 2 : 00 noon to 6 : 00 p.m. M r . S c h i l l er X-1 07

Socia l Welfare 401 WOR KSH OPS 441 6 - 0 4424 - 2 401 , Section C D R UG USE E DUCAT I O N , PHAS E I (0-2)

J u l y 5 to 1 8 ( A n offer i ng of the Center for H u ma n Organ ization i n Changing E nvironments - C HO I C E . S e e page 1 56.)

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4428 - 0 4436 - 2 401 , Section D AN APPROACH TO ACT I O N COUNSE L I N G ( 0-2)

J u l y 1 2 t0 1 8 ( A n offering of t he Center for H uma n Organ ization i n Changing E nviro n ments - C H O I C E . See page 1 57 .l

3828 Sociol ogy 445 M I N O R I T I E S (4)

The h istory and cu lture o f minority groups i n American society, exami ned w i t h i n the context of the relatio nship among m i n o r i t y - m a j o r ity groups, their popu lation composition, a nd the movemen t of these groups. 7 : 30 to 1 0 : 00 a.m. A-2 1 0 M r . Schiller

3836 Social Work 475 F I E LD E X P E R I ENCE ( 2-6)

Supervised field wo r k within an agency or i n stituti o n ; a p p l i c a t i o n / i n t e g ra t i o n o f k nowledge, theory and u n dersta nd i ng ; development of techn iques commo n to the social welfare f ield. Prerequisite: Consent of the i n structor. To be arranged. M r. W. G i l bertson

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The process of deviance and social control, exa mined with attention to specific forms of youth and adult behavior such as juven ile deli nquency , white-co l l a r crime, drug addiction, homosexuality, menta l i l lness and abort i o n . 7 : 3 0 to 1 0: 00 Mr. Jobst a.m. A-207

Sociology 401

WOR KSHOPS

7 594 401 , Section D A L I E N AT E D YOUTH A N D THE FAM I LY ( 2 )

July 1 9 t o 2 5 A study of pre-ado l escent parent-ch ild a n d peer group relationsh ips. Problems of drug abuse, sexual devi a n ce, and a n ti-social behavior will be examined in terms of personality development with i n the fam i l y mat r i x . 1 2: 00 noon to 6 : 00 p.m. A-208 M r . Nelson

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Social Welfare 40 1 WO R K SHOPS 8 1 80 - 0 8 1 84 - 2 401 , Section A D R U G USE E D UCAT I O N , PHASE I I (ADVANC E D ) (0-2)

July 23 to August 4 (An offer ing of the Center for H u ma n Organ ization i n Changing Environ ments - C H O I C E . See page 1 56.1

8052 Anthropology 321 ANTH ROPO LOGY FOR TEAC H E R S ( 2) This course assumes few or no forma l co u rses i n anthropology. I t wi l l cover the quest i o n o f t he relevance of a n t h ropology for elementary a n d secondary levels; t he basic concepts ( e .g. adaptation, cultura l relativism, the holistic view) w h i ch should under l ie the teach ing of any eth nographic specifics; eval u ate available curriculum materials; consider methodology for teach i ng anthropo logical material at a l l levels; provide sou rces o f ethnograp h i c i nformat i o n a n d local resources for teachers. ' 7 : 30 to 8 : 40 a . m . A路21 3 Ms. Brown

8060 Anthropology 345 C U L T U R E AND PE RSONA LITY (4)

151

Culture and personal itY dea l s with the relationship of the i n dividual to his culture. The course will cover the basic concerns of t h i s subdiscipl ine of anthropology, such as perso n a l itY formati o n , social izat ion, national character, psyc hologica l disorders, and cognition in non-Western Ms. Brown cu ltu res. 1 0 : 30 a.m. to 1 : 00 p . m . A 路204

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SE M I N A R S F O R E N R IC H M E N T O F M I N I ST R Y For C lergy and Laity Offeri ngs of the Center for H u man Organ i zation i n C hanging Environments (CHO I C E ) . For registration information for C H O I C E worksho ps , see page 1 55. 39 1 8 YOU A N D Y O U R V A L U ES: A V A L U E O R I E NTAT I ON WOR KSHOP

July 5 to 7 ( 6 h o u rs da i l y l A n enab l i n g experience wh i ch wi l l a i d participa n ts i n using one's va lue system i n mak i ng dec isions. A n i n d ividual experien ce with sma l l gro u p i n teract i o n . 8-1 2 part icipa n ts. $45 Fee - no credit . • • . . . • . . . . . . . Faculty : John Recher, M . Div.; George Lusk, M . Div.

3926 0 3934 - 2 IMPROV I N G I NT E R P E RSONAL E F F E CT I V E N ESS ( Education 460) -

J u l y 9 to 1 3 Designed to lead participants toward more faci l i tative leaders h i p and open i nterpe rsonal relati onsh ips - i n one-to-o ne situations, wor k i n g with f a m i l ies a nd small groups, and to make possible a more o pe n sty l e o f f u nction ing i n l arger groups. A n experiential labo ratory with a focus on commun ication a n d group process s k i l ls. V ideo tape feedback and supervised gro u p leaders h i p. E ight h o u rs da i l y , plus pla n ne d eve n i n g experiences. 1 6-36 participan ts. $75 Fee - no credit . . . . • . . . . . . . . . F e e - 2 semester hours credit . . . . . . . . . $90 Fac u l ty : R o n a l d D. Jorgenson, Ed. D.; Branton K. H o l m berg, EdD. 1 52


I

3938 0 3946 2 T H E O LOGY TODAY: B E I N G HUMAN ( Religion 401 , Section A) -

-

July 1 6 t o 20 The fourth a n n ua l Theology Today course w i l l focus on the h uma n side of the Gospel that speaks to the h u ma n l i ves of people. The class wil l part icipate i n two lecture-<Jiscussions each mo rning and ma y select one of two e l ectives each after no o n . Six hours dai I y with some schedu led eveni ng activi ties . Fee - no credit . . . . $60 Fee - 2 semester hours credit . . . . $90 Faculty : Gordon Lathrop, Doctorandus Theo l . , PLU Campus M i nister "The Gospe l , Rite and Man" E xploring ways in which worshi p responds to questions and problems of human l i fe. M i chael D. Anderson, Ph .0. " Being H u man and Creative i n Systems" C h ristian theological a nd ps ychological resou rces for d ea l i n g with problems of be i n g h u ma n i n organ izational systems . Alene H . Moris, M .A., I ndividu a l Deve l o pment Center, Seattle Elective A: "Mascu l i ne/ Fem i n i n e : A Study of H u ma n Li berat i o n " I nterdiscipli nary i n t roduction t o huma n l i berati o n with emphasis on questions raised by the women's moveme nt.

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John Fabi a n , S.T.M ., Pastoral Counselor E lective B : "The Human Potential Movement and the Church" Explori ng relati o n s h i ps between a major sociological phenomenon a nd the message a nd wor k of the church.

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4404 - 0 4408 - 2 IMP ROV I N G PAR ISH E F F E C T I V E N ESS: N EW MOD E LS FO R M ISSI ON ( Religion 401 , Section B)

July 1 6 to 20 Orga n i zational development for parishes and organizations i n a laboratory setting, exploration o f solving problems, m a n a g i n g c o n f l ict, defi n i n g roles, clar ifying goals. Prerequisite: Education 460 or equivalent. Eight hours daily plus planned even i ng activities. 1 6-24 participants. Fee - no credit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7 5 Fee - 2 semester hours credit . . . . . . . . . $90 Facu l t y : Do nald Smith, Ph.D., Consu l tant to C l ergy; Robert K . Menze l , M .S .T., Director, C H O I C E

1 54


Al l courses except "You a n d You r Va l ues : A Va l u e Orie ntati o n Wo rkshop" will be offered for 2 se mester h o u rs cred i t or fo r no credit. Pa rt i cipants can e n ro l l i n only o n e course from July 1 6 to 20. Roo m a n d Boa rd: $40. Participants are urged to l ive o n campus. Scho l a rsh ips are available from the Amer ica n Lut heran Church and f rom membe rs o f Aid Assoc i at i o n for Lutheran s . Apply to C HO IC E . Wri te for brochure with further i nformation to: Ro bert K . Menze l , D i rector CHOI CE Pacific Lutheran U niversity Taco ma, Was h i ngton 98447 To register, complete the regist rat i o n forms on page 1 77 . Please i n dicate whether o r not credit i s des i red.

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C H O I C E-SPONSO R E D WO R KS H OPS 441 6 - 0 4424 - 2 D R U G USE ED UCAT I O N , PHASE I ( Education/Social Welfare 401 , Section C)

July 5 to 1 8 E x p e r i e n t ial laboratory emphas i z i ng com m u n ications, i n terpersonal and teach i ng s k i l l s a nd resources for wor k i ng w i th youth in t h e classroom, commun ity "rap" groups, church programs, and law enforcement. Lectures o n drugs and youth. Approved by Pi erce Cou n ty Drug A l l iance and Drug Action Coord i na t i ng Cou nci l . 8:30 a.m. to 1 2: 30 p.m. F i rst meet i ng in A-1 0 1 路 $60 Fee - n o credit 路 $90 Fee - 2 semester hours credit Staff

8 1 80 - 0 8 1 84 - 2 D R U G USE E DUCAT I O N , PHASE I I ( ADVANCED) ( Education/Social Welfare 401 , Section A)

J u l y 23 to August 4 Phase I I of a sequence to prepare para-professionals i n work ing with youth and parents, and to i ncrease the s k i l ls o f teachers a n d youth leaders i n the affective area. I ntensive e x pe r i e n t i a l l a b e m p h as i z i n g personal grow th , comm u n i cation s k i l ls, cross-cu lture encounter, role-play, non -verbal comm u n i cation. Cooperating with commun ity age n cies. 4 : 00 to 9 : 00 p.m. A-206 Fee - no credit $75 路 Fee - 2 semester hours credit 路 $90 Staff

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4428 0 4436 - 2 AN APPROACH TO ACT I O N CO UNSE L I N G ( EdPsy/Social Welfare 40 1 , Section 0 ) -

J u l y 1 2 t0 1 8 Participants w i l l study a nd practice current counse l i ng a n d psychotherapy s k i l l s which fol low from major theories. E m phasis o n flex i b i l i ty, breadth and ble n d i n g of helpi ng s k i l ls from behavioral and experimental approaches. A n action approach to basic h e l p i ng ski l l s for promoti ng u nderst a nd i ng, comfort, and active probl em-solving. To provide opportunities for renewal of t h e pa rticipa n ts through a lear n i ng co mmunity and p l a n n i n g for i mproving their helping s k i l ls. 2 : 00 to 9:00 p.m. A¡200 Fee - no credit . . . . . â&#x20AC;˘ . . Fee - 2 semester hours credit Faculty : Lawrence M. Brammer, Educat i o n , U n i versity o f Washi ngton

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OTH E R WOR KSH OPS SPONSOR E D BY C H O I C E : O RGAN I ZAT I O N A L B E H AV I O R WOR KSHOP (4) June 1 8 to J u l y 1 3 (See Busi ness Admin istration 490,

page 81 .1

SEM I N A R IN GOVE R NM E NT ACCO U NT I N G ( 3-4) J u l y 3 to August 1 6 (See Busi ness Admi nistration 590A and 590B, page 82.1

A STUDY OF G E N E RAT I ONS (0) J u ne 1 9 , 26, and July 3 or J u ne 21 , 28, a nd July 5 The most comprehensive study ever made of a rei igious group in the U .S . is full of surpr ises for your pa rish on the generation gap, prej udice and attitudes toward C h r istian beliefs, politics and social issues. These se minars are i n tended for lay leaders concerned with youth and C hristian education, and for pastors. Each se minar consists of 3 sessions on consecutive Tuesdays or Thu rsdays betwee n J u ne 1 9 a nd J u l y 5. 7: 00 to 1 0: 00 p.m. A-204 Fee - per person, no credit . . . . . . . . . $1 0 Fee - for groups of 3-6 from a parish . . . . . $25 Facu ltY : R a l ph U nde rwager , Ph.D., Staff Member at Youth Research Center and Professor, St. Olaf Co llege.

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O F F I C E OF THE P R E S I D E N T President, E u ge n e Wiegman Administrative Assistant, Luc i l le G i roux Alumni Director, Harvey J . Neufe l d Assistant to the President for Church Relations and Pu bl ications, M i lton L. Nesvig Director of Athletics, Dav id M . O l son Photographer, Kenneth D u n m i re Publications, Associate Editor, G a i l H a begger Public Information Director, James L. Peterson University Minister, G ordon L a t h ro p O F F I C E O F T H E PROVOST Provost, R ichard J u ngkuntz Administrative Assistant, Sue C l arke Chairman, Division of Hu manities, Paul M. R e i gstad Chairman, Division of Natural Sciences, W i l l iam P. G id d i n ďż˝ Chairman, Division o f Social Sciences, Johan nes A . Sch i l l e l Dean o f Graduate & Summer Studies and Director, Schoo l of Fi ne Arts, R ichard D. M oe Dean of School of Business Administration, G u ndar J . K i n Dean of School o f Education , Ken neth A . Joh nston Placement Director and _5th Year Coordinator, John S . Hanson Director, School of N u rsing, D oris G . Stucke 1 6(


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Director, School of Physical Education, Dav i d M . O l so n Administrative Assistant, James K i tt i ls by Director of Admissions, J a m es Van B eek Associate Director of Admissions and Director of Financial Aid , R on a l d C. Co l tom Assistant Director of Admissions , Ph i l l i p M i ne r Assistant Director o f Admissions, AI bert W. Perry Director of Broadcast Services and Instructional Materials Production, J u dd Doughty Chief Radio/TV Engineer , Dav id Christian Radio/TV Engineer , Terry Den broo k Studio Operations Superintendent, V i cto r N e l son Director of CHOICE, R o bert K . Menzel Staff Associate, A n i bal Mej i a Coordinator of Pu blic Events, Noel A brahamson Librarian, F rank H. H a l ey R eference Li brarian, M i ri a m Beckman Registrar, Charles T . Nelson Assistant Registrar, Loleta G. Espeseth O F F I C E O F B U S I N ESS AND F I NANCE Vice President - Business & F inance, A . D . B u chanan Busi ness Manager, Howard L. Vede l l Chief Accountant, Betty G j u rash Central Services Manager, Larry R. A l l e n 161


Director of Computer Center and I nstitutiona l Research, E dr ice Addleman Systems & Program ming Manager, No rman N est i n g Personnel Director, B radley M u nn Plant Manager, James B . Ph i l l i ps O F F I C E O F D E V E LOPM E N T V i ce President for Development, Clayton B . Peterson Director of Development, David L. Berntse n Director of Estate Planning, Edgar M . Larson O F F I C E OF STU D E N T L I F E Vice President - Student Life , Ph i l i p E . Beal Assistant and Director of Housing, Eric G odfrey Coordinator for Minority Students, H arold G a m ble Dean of Students, Ph i l i p E . Bea l Associate Dean of Students, Ma rgaret D . W i c kstrom Director of Counsel ing and Testing Center, Sei i ch i A dachi Counselor , Judith Baker Learning Skills Coordinator , R i chard A. Seeger Director, University Center, Marv i n Swenson Assistant Director of University Center and Director of Placement, T i m B rooks Bookstore Manager, Ly nn I saacson Director of Food Service, R o bert M. Torrens Assistant Director of Food Service, M a ry Hegtvedt 1 62


1 1

. 1

Sum mer Session

- 1 973

Eugene Wiegman , 1 969, Presi dent, E d . D . , U n ivers i ty of Kansas, 1 96 2 . Seiichi Adach i , 1 96 7 , Associate Professor of Psycho logy and Ed ucati o n , D i rector of Coun sel i ng and Test i n g Cente r , Ed . D . , Col u m bi a U n ivers i ty , 1 960. Kenneth E. Batker , 1 966, Associate Professor of Mathematics, E d . D . , U n i versity of Col orado, 1 97 1 . Ph i l ip E. Beal , 1 968, Assistant Professo r of Educati o n , Dean f o r Student L i f e , P h . D . , U n i vers i ty of O regon , 1 965. Paul F. Benton, 1 969, Assistan t Professor of E n gl i s h , P h . D . , Princeton U n i ve rs i ty , 1 9 70. Lois M. Bergerson , 1 970, Ass i stant Professor of N u rs i n g , M . N ., U n ivers i ty of Wash i ngto n , 1 95 2 . W . Harold Bexton, 1 965, Professor o f Psych o l ogy , Ph . D ., McG i l l U n iversity, 1 953. Grace E. Blomquist, 1 939, Assoc iate Professor of Engl i s h , M.A . , Sy racu se Un i versity , 1 939. G. R i c h a r d C a pp , 1 97 0 , Ass i stant Professor of Com m u n i ca t i on Arts, M .A . , B a y l o r U n iversity, 1 96 7 . Gary A . Chase, 1 9 70, Assistan t P rofessor o f Physical Education, M .S . , Wash ingto n State U n iversity , 1 964. 1 63

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Esther Coombes, 1 97 2 , I nstructor of N u rs i n g , M . N ., U n i ve rs i ty of Wash i ngto n , 197 1 . Richard W. Crockett, 1 97 1 , Ass i stan t P rofessor of Pol itical Science, M .A . , U n ivers i ty of I l l i n o is, 1 965. David P. Dahl , 1969, Ass i sta n t Professor of M u s i c , M .A . , U n i vers i ty o f Wash i ngton , 1962. Carrol E. DeBower, 1964路68, 1970, Associ ate P rofessor of Educat i o n , E d . D . , U n iversi ty of N ebr ask a, 1964. Charles J. Dirksen Jr., 1 97 1 , Ass i sta n t P rofessor of Busi ness Adm i n i strat i o n , M . B .A . , U n iversity of O regon , 1 96 7 . Judd C. D o u ghty, 1 962, Assista nt Professor o f Com m u n i cation A rts, D i rector of B roadcast Serv ices a n d I nstruct i o n a l Mate r i a l s Producti o n , M . A . , Pac i f i c Lutheran U n i versi ty , 1964. George R. Elwe l l , 1959, Assista n t Professor of Art, M . A . , N ew York U niversity, 1955. Donald R . Farmer , 1955, Professor of P o l i t i c a l Science, Ph . D . , U n ive rs i ty of M i n nesota, 1 954 . M. Josephine Fletcher , 1 963, Associate P rofessor of Educati o n , Ph . D . , U n ivers i ty of Was h i ngto n , 1 97 2 . Gordon O. G i lbertson , 1954 , Assoc iate Professor of M us i c , M . M . , N orthwestern U nivers i ty , 1942. William G i l bertson, 1968, Associ a te Professor of Soc io logy, M .S.W., U n ivers i ty of Washi ngton, 1956. James A. Halseth, 1966-68, 1970, Assistant P rofessor of H istory , M .A . , E astern New Mexico U n ivers i ty , 1 963. 1 64


Edward Harm ic, 1 97 1 , Assistant Professor of M u s i c, M . M . , U n i ve rs i ty of A r i z o n a , 1969. John O. Herzog, 1 967, Professor of M athematics, Ph. D . , U ni v e rs i ty of N e braska, 1 963. Curtis E. Huber, 1 964, Professor of P h i losophy, P h . D . , U niversity o f W iscons i n , 1 962. Robert J. Jensen , 1 968, Ass i sta n t Professor of Economics, M .A . , U n i vers i ty of N e braska, 1 967. Richard J. Jobst, 1 967, Ass i stant Professor of SOC i ol ogy, M.A., U n i vers i ty of Cal iforn i a, 1967. David W. Johnson , 1970, Assistant Professo r of H istory, Ph . D . , U n ivers ity of Ka nsas, 197 2. Luci lle M. Johnson, 1953, Professor of E ngl ish, E d . D . , U n i vers i ty o f M o n t a n a , 1 967. Will iam L. Johnso n , 1 969, Assoc iate Professor of M athematics , Ph . D . , U n ivers i ty of Cal iforn i a at Los Angel es, 1 964. Kenneth A. Johnsto n , 1 964 , Professor of Educa t i o n , Dean of the School of Ed ucati o n , E d . D . , Wash ington State Un iversi ty , 1 964. Ronald D. Jorgenson, 1968, Assista n t Professor of Educa tion , E d . D . , B a l l Sta te U n i v e rs i ty , 1 968. Richard P. Jungkuntz, 1970, Professor of R e l i g i o n , Provost, Ph. D . , U n ivers i ty of Wiscons i n , 1961. 1 65

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Theodore O. H. Karl , 1 940路42, 1 94 8, Professor of Com m u n i cation A rts, M .A . , G ustavus Ado l ph u s Col l ege, 1936. David T. Keyes , 1 969, Assistan t Professor of A rt, M . A . , O h i o State U n ivers i t y , 1966. Gu ndar J . King, 1 960, P r o fessor of B us i ness Ad m i n istra t i o n , Dea n of School of B u s i ness Adm i n istrati o n , Ph . D . , Stanford U n ivers i ty , 1963. Raymond A. Klopsch, 1 953, Associ ate P rofessor of E n g l i s h , Ph . D . , U n i vers i ty o f I l l i no i s, 1 962. Calvin H. Knapp , 1960, Assoc iate Professo r of M us i c , M . S . , Ju l l iard Sch o o l of M u sic, 1 950. Brian E. Lowes, 1 968, Ass i stant Professor of E arth Scien ces, Ph . D . , U n i ve rs i ty of Was h i n gt o n , 1 97 2. Gene C. Lundgaard, 1 958, Assistan t Professor of Physical Educat i o n , Coach of B as ke tba l l , M .S . , U n iversi ty of Wash i ngto n , 1964. Arthur D. Martinson, 1966, Associ a te Professor of H i story, Ph . D :, Was h i n gton State U n ivers i ty , 1966. Marjorie Mathers , 1 964路66, 1 968, Ass istant Professor of Educat i on , M .A . , Central Was h i n gton State Col l ege , 1 96 1 . Robert K. Menzel , 1 969, D i rector of Center for H u man O rgan i zation in Cha n g i n g E n v i ron ments ( C H O I C E) , M.S.T., Pac i f i c Lutheran Theo l ogica l Sem i n ary, 1963. Lawrence J. Meyer, 1 969, Professor of Music, Ed. D . , 1 66 Col orado State Col lege, 1 964.


1

Christine W. Miller, 1 97 1 , I n structor in N u rs i n g, B . S . N . , Paci f i c Lutheran U n ivers ity, 1 970. Gary L. Minetti , 1 970, Assistan t Professor of Educa t i o n , M . A . , Pac i f ic Lutheran U n i vers ity, 1 967. Richard D. Moe, 1 965, Professor of Educa t i o n , Dea n of G ra d u a te a n d Summer Studies; D i recto r, Schoo l of F i n e Art s , E d . D ., U n ivers i ty o f Colorado, 1 962. Katharine E. Monroe, 1 967, Associate Professor of F o reign Languages ( F rench ) , M . A . , M i d d l e bu ry Co l l ege, French 1 94 2, E ngl i s h 1 95 1 . Gunnulf Myrbo, 1 970, Assistant Professor of P h i l osoph y , Ph. D . , Oxford U n i v ersity, 1 972. Alice J. Napjus 1 963, Assistant Professor of Education, M .A . , U n i vers i ty of Was h i n gton , 1 965. Neale E. Nelso n , 1 970, Assis tant P rofessor of Sociology, Ph. D . , Un iversity of Uta h , 1 970. Jesse D. Nolph, 1 968, Assistant P rofessor of Psychology, Ph . D . , Corne l l U n i vers ity , 1 971 . Philip A. Nordquist, 1 963, Professor of H i story, P h . D . , Un ivers i ty o f Was h i n gton , 1 964 . Robert C. Olsen, 1 947, Professor of Chem istry, Ph. D ., M i ch i gan State Uni versity , 1 936. David M . Olson, 1 968, Professor of Physical Educatio n , D i recto r of t h e School o f Physical Education , Athletic D i rector, P h . D . , U n i ve rs i ty o f I owa, 1 966. 1 67

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Fran klin G. Olson, 1 97 1 , Assista n t Professor of Educati o n , Ed. D . , U n iversity of N ebraska , 1 97 1 . Florence A. Orvik , 1 967, Assista n t Professor of Educati o n , M .A . , Eastern Wash i n gton State Co l l ege, 1 96 1 . Burton T. Ostenson, 1 94 7 , Professor of B i o l ogy a n d Earth Sciences, P h . D . , Un ivers i ty of M ic h igan, 1 94 7 . John E. Petersen , 1 967, Associ ate Professor of R e l i g i o n , Ph . D . , New Y o r k U n ivers i ty , 1 970. C harles A. Peterson , 1 9 59, Professor of B u s i ness Ad m i n i stra t i o n , Ph . D . , U n iversity of M i n nesota , 1 956. Gary D . P e t erson, 1 96 7 , Ass istant Professor of Mathe m a t i cs, M . S . , Western Wash i ngton State Co l lege , 1 967. Walter E. Pilgr i m , 1 97 1 , Ass i stan t Professor of R e l i gion , T h . D ., Pri nceton Theologica l Sem i n ary, 1 97 1 . Pau l M. Reigstad, 1 94 7-48, 1 958, Professor of E n g l i s h , Cha i rman o f t h e D iv i s i on of H u m an ities, P h . D . , Un iversity of N ew Mexicďż˝, 1 958. David P. Robbins, 1 969, Assistant Professor of Musi c, M . M ., U n iversity of M ich iga n , 1 970. Johannes A. Schiller, 1 9 58 , Professor of Soc i ol ogy, Cha i rm a n of the D iv i s i on o f Soc i a l Sciences, Ph . D . , U n iversity of Wash i n gton , 1 967. Walter C. Schnackenberg, 1 942-44, 1 952, Professor of H istory , Ph . D . , Wash i n gton State U n iversity, 1 950. 1 68


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Ernst C. Schwidder, 1 967, Associ ate Professor of A rt, M.F .A., U n ivers i ty of Wash i n gt o n , 1 955. S. Erving Severtson , 1 966, Associate Professor of Psychology , Ph . D . , U n i vers i ty of Uta h , 1 966. Maurice H . Skones, 1 964, Professor of M usic, D i rector of Choral Music, M . M . E d . , Montana State U n i versity, 1 957 . Rodney Swenson, 1 968, Associate Professor of F orei gn Languages ( German ) , P h . D . , U n ivers i ty of M i n nesota, 1 96 7 . Walt Tomsic, 1 970, Ass i stant Professor o f A rt a n d U n i versity G ra p h i cs Coord i n a tor, M . F . A . , U n i versity of Col orado, 1 96 7 . Dan iel E. VanTassel , 1 970, Assistant Professor o f Engl i s h , Ph . D ., U n i ve rs i ty of I owa, 1 970. Pau l M. Webster, 1 969, I nstructor i n F o re ign La ngu ages ( German ) , M .A . , U n ivers i ty of C a l i f o r n i a , 1 96 7 . Donald R. Wentworth , 1 97 2, Assistant Professor of Econom i cs, P h . D . , U n i ve rsity of M i n nesota, 1 97 2 . Frosty Westeri ng, 1 97 2 , Associate Professor o f Phys ical Educati o n , E d . D . , Col orado State Co l l ege, 1 966. E . Jane Will iamson , 1 964, Professor of E ducati on , E d . D ., Colorado State Col lege, 1 959.

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V IS I T I N G FACU LTY AND LECTUR E RS Lauren Abernethy , M . M . E . , E l e mentary M us i c D i rector, Seatt le P u b l i c Scho o l s . Michael D. Anderso n , P h . D . , Pastor of U n iversity Place U n i ted Presby teria n Church, Taco ma. Mike Benso n , Lecturer i n Physical Educa t i o n , Pacifi c Lutheran U n i versity . Carolyn H. Brown , M .A . , C a n d i da te for Ph . D . John N . Burch, M . M . , I nstructo r o f M u s i c , Tacoma Com m u n i ty Col lege . Ronald S . Chadwick, M . B .A . , Pres ident of New Age Recy c l i n g Center, Tacom a. Marie Ch urney, E d . D . , Teacher at R o gers H ig h Schoo l , Puya l l u p. Larry G. Curtis, M . M . , D i recto r of Bands, Cal iforn ia State Un iversi ty at Long Beach . Ruth Dall man, E d . D . , Music Spec i a l ist, Denver P u b l i c Schoo l s . Wayne H. Ehlers, M . L . , L i brar i a n , Wash i n gton H i gh Schoo l , Pa r k l a n d . T . Leslie E l l iott, B .A., Man ager of North west R e g i o n a l Office, Harpe r & R ow. Karen Erlander, M . E . , C l assroom Teacher, F ra n k l i n 路 P i erce Sch ool D istrict. 1 70


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John Fabian , S . T . M . , Pasto r a l Counsel o r , Pac if i c L utheran U n iversity . Elizabeth Fulder , C a n d i date for Ph . D . , U n ivers i ty of Ca l ifor n i a , Berkeley. Erwin H . Goldenstein, Ph . D . , Professor of Educatio n , U n i versity of N e br a s k a . Harold F. Gray , M .A . , Ass istant Superi ntendent-B usi ness Serv i ces, Clover Park School D istri ct. Bette Hamlin, M . E . , Cou nselor, Puy a l l u p School D i strict. Branton K. Holmberg, E d . D . , Assoc iate Professor of Psycho l ogy , Centra l Wash i n gton State Col lege . Gera ldine Johnson, M . S . , D iagnostic Cons u l ta n t i n Lea r n i n g D isa bi l it ies, Tacoma P u b l i c Schoo l s . Luella Johnson , M .A . , K i n derga rten Teacher, C l over Park Schoo l D istrict, Tacoma. James Kittilsby, B .A . , Assista n t Ath letic D i rector, Pacific Lutheran U n i versity. Gordon Lathro p , Drs. Th., U n iversity M i n ister, Paci f i c Lutheran U n ivers ity . Warren Lee, M . A . , Athletic T r a i n e r , U n ivers i ty of Arizona. George Lusk , M . D i v . , Lutheran Pasto r , F ed era l Way. Larry Metcalf, M . F .A., Associate Professor and Ch ai rman of Art D e partmen t , Seattle Paci f i c Col lege. Alene H . Moris , M . A . , I n d i v i d u a l Deve l o pmen t Center, Seattle . 171

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Ralph Mutchler , E d . D . , C h a irman of the Department of M u s i c , O l y m p i c Com m u n i ty Col lege, B re m erton . James Phi l l i ps , Tacoma H iker a n d Cl i m ber. Jerry Poppen , M .A . , Physica l Education Spec i a l is t , F ran k l i n E lementary Schoo l , Tacoma. Jerry V. Ramsey , M . Ed . , Soci a l Studies Spec i a l ist a n d 6th G rade Teacher, Down i n g Schoo l . John Recher , M . D i v . , Lutheran Pastor, F edera l Way. Duane Richardson, Ed. D., Counsel o r , L i n coln H igh Sch oo l , Tacoma. Alan T. Seagren, Ed.D., Assoc i ate D ea n , Teachers Col l ege, U niversity of N e braska. Donald Smith , P h . D . , Lutheran Consu l t a n t to Clergy, Seattle. Gordon Tracie, B.A., D i rector, S k a n d i a Fol k D ance Society, Seat t l e . Ralph C. Underwager, P h . D . , Associ ate Professor o f Psycho logy , St. O l af Col lege. George Wagner, B . M . , Professi o n a l M u si c i a n . Ray Warren, M . A . , Lecturer i n Educatio n , Su perv isor o f Student Teachers, Pacifi c Lutheran U nivers i ty . Joseph A. Werner , M . B . A . , Chairman o f D ivision of Busi ness, G reen R iver Commu n i ty College , A u bu rn . Wera Wilhel m , M .A . , Lecturer i n German, P L U . Gary Wilki n , M . B .A . , I nstructor o f B u s i n ess, O ly m p i c Com m u n ity College , B re merto n . 1 72


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MAI L R E G I ST R AT I O N Simply m a i l your completed registra tion card a l o n g with a check, money order , or B ank Americard number to: Regist rar Pacific Luthera n Un i v e rsity Tacoma , Washington

P L E AS E

Ma i l

NOTE:

9844 7

Registrations

must

reach

the

U n iversity n o later than June 8, 1973.

Student Housing: Students

desiring

Director

of

board a n d

Hous i n g.

ava ila b l e on page

room,

Details

sho u l d contact t h e

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are

49.

174


PAY M E N T I N F O R MATION 1.

Pay ment must be by check or money order, payable to Pacific Lutheran U n i v e rs i ty . D o not encl ose cash.

2.

Sh o u l d you want to have y o u r tu ition charged to y o u r Bank Americard n u m ber, s i m pl y i nd i cate your bank card n u m be r in the space pro v i ded on the registration card. M a i l registra t i on to be charged to Ban k A m e r i ca rd w i l l be processed i m mediately in the R egis tra r's Office . H owever, the U n i ve rs i ty will not b i l l t h e ban k prior t o J u ne 1 , 1 973.

3.

I n order to co mplete registration for one or both ses sions, you must pay at least one-half of the total charges if you are carry i n g o n l y 1 semester h o u r . I f y o u register f o r m o r e t h a n 1 semester h o u r, y o u must p a y a t least Yo of t h e total charges w h e n y o u register a n d a n o t h e r Yo o n t h e f i rs t d a y of classes.

4.

The ba lance must be paid by J u l y 6 for fi rst term e n ro l l ment a n d no l ater than August 3 for second term e n ro l l me n t .

5.

Any class changes after y o u h a v e returned y o u r registration must be accompl i s h e d i n person u n d e r establ ished U n i vers i ty procedu re .

1 75


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Compute Your Charges from this Table: Hour Va l u e

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

T u i tio n Charge

$

45 90 1 35 1 80 225 270 31 5 360 405 450 495 540



1973 Summer Session