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The data contained herein reflects n accurate picture of Paci fic Lutheran University

at the time of publication.

However. the University reserves the right to make necessary changes

in procedures, policies, calendar, curriculum and costs. Changes, if any, wi II be announced

prior to their effective date.

Pacific Lutheran Universily Bulletin Vol. 52, April

1972.

Number 4

Published six times annually by Pacific Lutheran University P.O. Box 2068, Tacoma, Washington

98447

Second Class Postage Paid at Tacoma, Washington

Thtl PLU catalog IS prrnted on 100% recycled paper.


table of content 3 Objectives of the University 5 Genera I it ies 10 Departmental Listings 55 Special Academic Programs 56 Options 59 Environs 69 Student Life 72 Academic & Service Facilities 74 Admission 76 Financial Aid 78 Costs 82 Academic Calendar 84 Academic Procedures 86 Degree Requ irements 88 Special Programs for Careers 90 Course Listings 130 'Register 148 Campus Map 151 Index


objectives of the university

2


Pacific Lutheran University, born of the

confront liberally educated men with the

Reformation spirit, maintains the

challenges of Christian faith and to

Pacific Lutheran University provides a

privilege of exploration and learning in

instill in them a true sense of vocation.

locus for the fruitful interplay of

religion. The basic concern of Martin

By providing a rich variety of social

and culture, and as such holds it a

all areas of the arts, sciences, and

As an educational arm of the Church,

Christian faith and all of human learning

Luther was religious, but his rejection of

experiences, Pacific Lutheran University

responsibility to discover, explore, and

church tradition as primary authority,

seeks to develop in the student a joy in

develop new frontiers. Believing that all

and his own free search for religious

abundant living, a feel ing for the welfare

truth is God's truth, the University, in

truth, served in effect to I iberate the

and personal integrity of others, good

achieving its educational and spiritual

modern mind in its quest for all truth.

taste, and a sense of social propriety and

goals, maintains the right and indeed the

The total impact of Luther's stand has

adequacy.

obligation of faculty and students to

Distinguishing between

permanently shaped the modern world

personal Christian ethics and normal

engage in an unbiased search for truth in

and helped provide the modern university

social controls, the University adopts

all realms.

with its basic methodology. Pacific Lutheran University is a

only such rules as seem necessary for the welfare of the educational community.

community of professing Christian scholars dedicated to a philosophy of

The physical development of the student

liberal education. The major goals of the

is regarded as an integral part

institution are to inculcate a respect for

liberal education. Hence the University

0f

his

learning and truth, to free the mind from

encourages participation in physical

confinements of ignorance and prejudice,

activities and respect for health and

to organize the powers of clear thought

fitness.

3

and expression, to preserve and extend knowledge, to help men achieve

Professing a concern for the ent ire

professional competence, and to establish

nature of man, the faculty of the

lifelong habits of study, reflection, and

University encourages wh ollesome

learning. Through an emphasis on the

development of Christian faith and life

I iberating arts, the University seeks to

by providing opportunities for worship

develop creative, reflective. and responsible

and meditation, offering systematic

persons. At the same time, the acquisition of special ized information and technical

studies of religion and encouraging free

skill is recognized as a condition of successful involvement in the modern

religious questions. The University

world. The University seeks to develop the evaluative and spiritual capacities

personal faith in God as Creator and

of the student and to acquaint him honestly with rival claims to the true

born of the Holy Spirit generates

and the good. It encourages the pursuit

integrative power capable of guiding men

investigation and discussion of basic bel ieves the essence of Ch ristian ity to be Redeemer, and it believes that such faith

of rich and ennobling experiences and the

to illuminating perspectives and worthy

development of significant personhood

purposes. The University community

through an appreciation of man's

confesses the faith that the ultimate

intellectual, artistic, cultural, and

meaning and purpose of human life are to

natural surroundings. The University

be discovered in the person and work of

affirms its fundamental obi igation to

Jesus Christ.

Dr. Eugene Wiegman. President


A I iberal arts education is concerned with liberation. Pacific Lutheran University seeks to I iberate a student; liberate him not from his heritage, but from his inadequacies; liberate him not from h i mself, but for himself and for other men . Practically speaking, liberation translates into developing concrete personal characteristics: competence in research, clarity in though t, creativity in action, se n sitivity to the needs of other men, and a clear and adequate perception of reality, including man ' s relationship with God. Liberation is a student awakening to the human possibilities extant within himself. Man's intellectual heritage is a history of alternatives. Today's student struggles to make a statement in relation to those alternatives. To do so, he must know where he stands. Pacific Lutheran University, as an integrated com munity , seeks to give its students that foundation . Through encountering man ' s philosophies a n d l anguages, each student has the opportu nity to acquire perspective, insight and discipline that will give his I ife direction and purpose. The university experience affirms the individual's concept of self-worth by helping him relate an understanding of man ' s heritage to conte mporary realities .

Thus, i mplementing the ideals expressed in our "Objectives of the University" statement is neither an exclusive n or a terminal process Administrators, faculty , regents and students share the ongo ing responsibi I ity for shaping that which comprises the U ni versity experience, and for preserving essential diversity now and in coming decades.

5


the child is father of the man Pac i f i c Lutheran U n iver s i ty was founded i n 1890 by fathers of the L uthe ran church in the N o rth west, and by R ev. Bju g Har stad i n pa rtic u lar. The i r pu rpose was

T he fact that a un iversity has worthy h i storical roots does not, of course, i n su re academ i c exce l l e n ce. A rep utation for exce l l ence is not a f u nction of

to establ ish an i nst i tu t i on in wh ich

l ongev ity,but rather, must be renewed

the i r peopl e cou l d be ed u cated. Edu cation

each year through ongo i ng preparation

was a venerated component of the

and d iscipl ine. Perhaps the greatest

Scand i navian a n d G erman trad i t ions from

legacy th ese p ioneers l eft us is their

which these p ioneers came.

exampl e of faith and hope i n what this Univers i ty Is,and what it is becoming.

The i nstitution opened as an academy a nd became aju n i or col l ege i n 1921. Ten y ea r s later, i t was organized i nto a three-year normal school wh ich became a col lege of ed u cat ion in 1939. I n 1941,st i l l a s ma l l and struggl ing i nst itut ion, i t assu med the necessary ro l e of a col lege of l iber a l arts. I t was then know n a s Paci fic Lutheran Col l ege u nt i I 1960 when, because of orga n izational restructu r i ng, it became

6 Pacif i c Lutheran Un i versity.

We recount t h is brief sketch because it represents a thoughtful a nd progressive evol u t ion. A great u n ivers ity is simply not brought i nto existence overn i ght. T h e U n iversity began the cent u ry a s a n academy. Today our 3,000 enrol l ed students may sel ect programs from the Col l ege of Arts and Scien ces, from Schoo l s o f B usiness Ad m i n istration, Ed u cation, F i ne Arts, P h ys ical Ed u cation,a nd N u r s i ng or fr o m t h e D iv ision of G raduate ,

Stud ies. As the ch i Id is father of the ma n , so the idea l s a nd persevera nce o f those who precede us weave a n h isto r i c a l fabric of which we can be ju stif iably proud.


academic openness If it is true, as H.G. Wells wrote , that "human history becomes mo re and more a race between educa t i o n and catast rop he", it then fol l ows that t h e content of edu cation is of cr it ical i mporta nce. F or th is reason , curricu lum review and attendant co m m i tment to acade m ic excell ence i s fundamental to Pac i f ic Lutheran's educa tio nal p h i losophy. A cademic matters are character ized by pract ical i n nova t i o n and openness. Because h i s wor l d is a strea m of consta n t l y accelerat ing events, today's student must be educated in the dyna m ics of cha nge. The U n iversity encourages students to cope w i th real ity , to conce ntrate their energies on explor i ng possib il i ties for surv iva l , for themselves and for ma n k i n d . I n 1 969 , fol low i ng a U n iver s i ty-wide review of instructiona l o bject ives and practices, the U n iversity adopted a new ca lendar . Com m o n l y called the 4- 1 -4 , the current ca lendar c o mpr i ses two fourteen -week semesters separated by a four-week i nter i m . Typ ica l l y, a n undergraduate enro l l s i n three or four cour ses eac h semester and in o n l y o n e course dur i ng at least t w o inter i ms. The inter i m calendar i s a i med a t ach iev i n g freedo m for t h e i nd iv idual . Students are a b l e t o concentrate o n fewer offer i ngs and ach ieve greater depth a n d competence i n a sma l ler nu mber o f better i ntegrated courses. An emphas is is given to pr omoting initiative on th e part of eac h person. Courses are pla nned with less emp hasis up on clock hou rs to al low fl ex i b i l ity i n i n d iv i dual student p rogra ms . In courses with fewer fo rmal contact h ours, faculty member s prov ide a greater a m ou n t of i nforma l co ntact.

The i nter i m month deserves particular attention because of its i nheren t openness and i ntensity. I nter i m offers students and facul ty t he opportu n ity to ma ke a clean break w ith academ ic r i tual . Students are free to develop and explore persona l i nterests and facu lty teac h i n areas a n d ways n o t ava i la b le duri ng t he regular semester. T he options are variou s: i nnovative sem i nars , foreig n stu d ies i n Central A mer ica , Europe a n d Asia, interdepartmental offer i ngs, area off-campus stud ies, and exchange progra ms with other i n teri m inst itutio ns. With freedom , however , comes respo nsibil ity . The faculty has comm itted itse l f to imag i na tive concepts a nd has accepted the chal lenge to keep courses respo n s ive and open-ended. Consequent l y , inter i m offer.ings are exper i m enta l a nd students are e xpected to i nvest more i n t h e courses than is simply required . The footnote should be added that Pac i f ic Lutheran's contemporary acade m ic perspec t ive is consta n t l y evolv ing. I n the sp ring of 1 97 1 , P L U's ninth pres iden t , Eugene W i egman , app oi nted a Com m ission on Academic Exce l lence. T h i s special faculty c o m m ission, staffed w i t h a n executive coor d i nator , has a mandate to study every facet of U n iversity l ife which relates to the l ear n ing s i tuat ion. The comm ission is empowered to make recom mendations on how best to p reserve and strengthen P L U's commitment to sc ho larsh i p and h igh academic standards.

7


'what a piece of work is man ďż˝ how noble in reasonďż˝ how infinite in facultyďż˝" Shakespeare

A l i beral arts curr i culu m , by def in i t io n , is dependent upon the integration of a var iety of v iable, leg i t i mate perspectives I f a cur r icu lu m is open to crea t iv ity , so l id in su bsta nce, d iverse yet d iscipl ined , then the facu lty must be equal to the chal lenge The Pa c i f i c Lutheran faculty is o n e

8 that's bala nced . I t s composit ion i n cludes

energet ic graduates and sea soned vetera ns, men a nd women of var ious acad emic i nterests and equal l y diverse p h i losoph ical persuasions, represen t i ng ethnic a n d cultural backgrounds f r o m E u rope t o the O rient. I n concert , the faculty represents an i nf i n ite potential for lear n i ng relationships, greater than that w h ich a student cou l d absorb i n o ne fou r-year span. "Th i s i nst i t u t io n ," P resident Wiegma n o nce remarked , "is not conservative and it's not I ibera l . I t's an i nst i tu t io n made up of peop l e who have vary i n g op i nions and l ife sty les. I t's a d iverse campus a nd that is someth ing we cher ish , someth i ng we w i sh to protect and encourage. " T h e acad e m i c ped i grees o f the facu lty are l i sted in th is volu me for your infor mat i o n . For the un i n i t iate d , the data reveals only that our 1 69 full - t i me and 50 part-time teachers possess

cr edentials from u n iversi t ies around the worl d . No ment ion is made of their publ i ca t i o ns, professio nal ar t i c l es, scho larl y research, co ncert perfor ma n ces or art e x hi b i t ions. T h e l ist i ng d o es not expla i n why a graduate of Pr i nceton (Colu mbia, M ich iga n , Ch icago, Stanford , Cambr idge, Harvard a nd so on ) would ded icate h i mself to a sma ll , N orthwestern l iberal arts un ivers i ty . But they d o . An i nst itut ion's total environ ment prov i d es co nsiderable rationa le fo r the qual ity of teachers it attracts. You may be i nterested in a few of those env i ro nmental factors: opportu nities f o r an i nterd i scipl i nary approach t o h igher education; th e respect that ex ists between schools and d epartments; the creative potential of the course system and i nter i m cal endar; a I i b rary with better than adequate ho ldings; the encouragement and recog n i t io n accorded t h eir p rofessional, scho larly stud ies; the e x cellent facil ities; the l a t i tude given those who i n i t iate i nnovative progra ms; and the ev ident Christia n co m m it ment to educa t i ng students for service. F i nal ly , each teacher derives sa t isfact io n from k now i ng students on a f irst-name basis. Pac i f ic Lutheran U n ivers ity is no megaversity. A professor at PLU shares i n t h e reso lut ion o f student p roblems on a one to one basis.


academic program

intense. Finally, the course syst em

course require ments in these areas: f i n e

reduced wasteful fragmentation o f student

arts, history o r l iterature, phi l o sophy,

When Pacific Lutheran adopted the interim

and faculty t i me. W i th fewer co urses a n d

religion ( 2) , natural sciences or

calendar in 1 969, it s i mu l tan eously made

fewer preparations (averaging t h ree to

mathematics, social scie nces, physical

the trans itio n from the credit to the

four courses each semester), each stud ent

educatio n , and, i n the College of Arts a n d

course system. I n practical terms, th is

was freed to pursue i n depend e n t research

Sciences, a foreign language or equivalent

change acco mplished a number of object ives

and self-educatio n.

requirement.

vvhich improved the students' opportunities at PLU and strengthened the U n i versity's

Each u n dergraduate degree candid ate is

co m mit ment to quality l iberal arts educatio n.

expected to co mpl ete 32 courses with an

First, the course system simp l ified the

ca n d i d ate must sim i l ar l y an nounce and

overa l l grade point of 2. 00. Each method of computing degree requ irements

co mplete a major, deta i l ed requirements

and student schedules. S eco nd, it led to

for which are separate l y specified by each

the estab l ish men t of a smaller n u m ber of

school and d epart ment.

better integrated courses in wh ich each

Requirem e n ts for degrees are spec ifica l l y stated in th is cat a l o g Pro spect ive students sho u l d beco me fam i liar with these requirements and prepare to meet them. I n the f i n a l an alysis, of course, each student's success is the product of his own i n i t iat ive. The U n i vers ity's academic structure is

student is expected to in vest re lat ively

A l l Baccalaureate degree candidates are

more t i me than under the credit system.

required to demonstrate proficiency i n the

Sciences, f i ve schoo Is and the 0 iv i sio n of

I n po int of fact, the courses are more

E ng l ish l a n guage, as wel l as to meet

Grad uate Stud ies, as follows:

comprised of the College of Arts and

ďż˝------

COLLEGE OF ARTS

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

AND SCIENCES

ADMINISTRATION

Division of Humanities E ng,l ish Fore ign Languages Phi l o sophy Re'l i g i o n

Division of Natural Sciences Bi ology Chem istry Earth Sciences Mathemat ics Physics

Division of Social Sciences Eco n o m ics History Po l itical Science Psychology Soc io logy, A nthropo l o gy a nd Social Welfare

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS Art Music Co m m unicatio n Arts

SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES

9


art Attitudes and sk ills wh i ch contr i bute to the real izat ion and expansion of a creat ive process. Curious students discover med iums for exp ression a nd development of their aesthet i c va lues; professiona lly or iented stud ents find sp ecial ized study in stud io and art history

Schw idder, Cha irman; Achepohl, E lwell, Keyes, K i ttleson, Roskos, and To m s i c , assisted by M etcal f .

ďż˝----- -------

HIS TO R Y A N D T H E O R Y 1 1 0 The Visua l Arts 280 Twent ieth Century Art 325 Habitat and Environment 382 Ancien t Art 383 M edieval Art 384 R ena issance Art 385 Baroque Art 440 S eminar i n A rt Education 487 Ni neteenth Century Art 490 Seminar 497 R esear ch i n Art H i story 597 R esearch

S TU DIO:

Basic med ia courses may b e repeated for credit for two or three semesters. 1 60 Draw ing 230 Cera m i cs I 250 S culpture I F igure 260 L ife Draw ing 326 F i l m Mak i ngPhotograp hy/ C inematography 330 Ceramics II 338 G lassblow ing 341 E l ementary Art E ducation 350 S culpture II: M etal slWood/ Mixed Med ia 365 Painting 370 P ri ntmak i ng: Ser iograph/ Lithography/Etch ing 492 Stud io Projects 494 Graph ics Workshop 499 BFA. Cand idacy E x h ib itio n

WO R K S H O PS: Specia l courses offered o n an o ccasio na l basis. 225 L ight Design 236 Tex t ile Design 270 Sosaku Hanga :Japanese Wood Cut 332 Rak u :Japanese Pottery 333 K i ln Bu ild ing 358 Plastik :Sculpture 40 1 B ro nze Cast i ng I N T E R I M C OU R S ES OFFE R E D IN 1 972: 303 The Pr inted Image 306 F i l m Mak i ng The Short F ilm 309 Fran ce: Style and the Senses 3 1 2 Furniture a s For m

11


iology T h rough a n exa m i nation of the objectives and p r i nc i ples of b iology, the f a cu lty broadens ea c h stud ent's u nd erstand ing and app reciat ion of l ife. B io logy and t h e a l l ied sc ience departments offer the exten sive p reparat ion requ i red for successfu I entry into t h e competit ive biolog i ca l , humanitarian and med ical arts professio ns.

Jensen, C h a i r ma n ; A l exander, Boh a n non Creso, G ee, H eyer, Kn udsen, L eraas, M a in, Ostenson, Sorenson.

ďż˝----ďż˝- 13 1 1 1' 1 53 1 54 1 61 1 62 20 1 253 275 32 1 324 331 340

346 347 361 364 372 375

B io l ogy a nd M od ern M a n C e l l B iology Organismal B io l ogy H u man Anatomy Human Physi o l ogy M i crob iology for Nurses B io l ogy of the Steady State M icrob iol ogy Orn ithology N at u ra l H i story of Vertebrates G enet ics Plant D iversity and Distr i but ion C e l l u l ar Physiol ogy C e l l u l ar Phys iology Laboratory Comparative Anatomy Vertebrate E mbryology G eneral Entomology B iology of Parasitism

380 41 1 424 425 426 435 44 1 444 475 490 49 1 , 597 ,

B io logy Teach ing Reso u r ces H istol ogy Ecology B iolog i cal O ceanography Ecology Laboratory Plant Form and Fu nction Vertebrate Physio logy Plant Physio logy Evolution Sem inar 492 I ndepend e nt Study 598 G raduate Research

I N T ERI M C O URSES O F F ER E D IN 1 9 72: H u ma n Ecology W i nter E cology of Wa shington M olecu les and M emory Embryo, F et u s and T h e i r Env i ro n ment Cora l Island B io l ogy and G eology

30 1 306 308 3)9 319


busn i ess admn i istrato i n Man's a lte red social , pol it ical and econom i c environment d i ctates that modern c u rric u l a reflects an apprec iat ion of the obl igat ions a nd serv ice opportu nities in commerce and i nd u stry . The execut ive or specia l i st m u st contend w i th sensitive decision-mak i ng as wel l as masteri ng analytical techniques and infor mation sy ste m s. I n concert with genera I un iversity requ irements, the bu siness curricu l u m p repares g rad uates for respo nsib l e statio ns i n b u siness, ed u cation and government .

King , Dea n; Bancroft, Carvey , Dir kse n , Hutcheo n , Stintz i , Lauer , McMaster, Marti l l a , Peterson , Watkinso n , Zu lauf , assisted by Jorgenson , Nichol so n , Kovanen . Consulting p rofessors: Leonard M. Guss , Joseph E . N o lan.

.------ 15 24 1 243 28 1 282 290 350 364 365 366 370 38 1 383 385 387 450 453 455 456 461 464 470 471 472

Business Com m u nicat i o n s F a m i l y F i nancial P la n n i ng F i na n c i a l Accou n t i ng Acco u n t i ng I nfor mat ion Systems Law and Society Ind u strial Management Manageria l F i na nce Real E state Risk and I nsu rance Ma nagement Marketing Syste ms I ntermed iate Accou nt i ng I ncome Taxat i o n Cost Account i ng Data Processing Syste ms M a n ufactu r i ng Management Person nel a nd I n d u stria l Relations Busi ness Pol i cy H onors Sem i nar I n vestments F i nancial Ma nagement Mark eting Management Marketing Resea rch and Consu mer Behavior Adver t i sing and Sa l es Ma nagement

47 3 482 484 488 49 0 49 1 49 5 550 55 1 555 564 570 58 1 582 59 0 59 1 59 6

I nd u st r ia l Market i ng and P u r ch a s i ng Advan ced Accou nt i ng Aud iting Systems Ana l y sis and Design Sem i nar Directed Study B u siness Law O rgan izat iona l E nv i ronment Sem ina r in I nd u strial M a n agement Busi ness Strategy and Pol icy Sem i nar in F i nancia l Management Sem i nar in Marketing Ma nagement Sem i nar in F i na n cial Accou n t i ng T heory Accou n t i ng I nformation and Control S pecial Seminar I ndepend ent Study Research C o l loqu i u m

I N TE R I M COURS ES O F F E RED IN 1 9 7 2 243 F a m i l y F i nanc ial P l a n n ing 31 0 H ea l th Care Delivery Systems 31 5 340 443 488 591 59 6

Law and Society Princip les of B u s i ness Ed u cation I nformation P rocessing System Analysis and Design I ndependent Study Research Col loqu i u m

BUS I N ESS A D V I SORY B OARD Edwin S. Coombs, Jr. , Presid ent Ra i n ier Brewing Company Kenneth W. H u ltgren, Treasurer Weyer haeuser Company Sta n l ey M. L itt le , Jr .. D irector of I nd ustrial a nd P u b lic Relations Boeing Company H oward O. S cott, President Un ited M u tua l Savings B a n k George Wad e, Presid e n t B rad y I n ter nat iona l L u mber Company


chemi try Our b i o nomic surv ival depends increasingly upon our knowledge and control o f the compo s ition, propert ies and react i o n s of chem ica I substances. C o n seq uently, the department seeks a broadened soph istica t i o n i n chem istry f o r all stud e nts. For the major stude n t , the courses, curriculu m, faculty and fac i l it ies are approved by the American Chem ical Society and together compr i se a program that prepares and cer t i fies graduates for f u l l part icipatio n in the chem ical professio n.

Hu estis, C ha irman; Anderson, G idd in gs, Nesset , Olsen, Swank, Tobiason .

.------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 7 103 104 115 132 142 152

C hemistry of Life Env ironmental C hemistry Genera l Chemistry Presentat io n of Exper imental Work Systematic Inorganic Chemi stry Systemat ic In organic Chemistry Honors

321 Quantitative Analy s i s 331,332 Organic C hem istry 333,334 Organic Chemistry Laboratory 341,342 Physical Chem istry 343,344 Physical C h emistry Laboratory 401 Orga n i c Qual itative Analysis 404 Biochemistry 422 Advanced Inorganic C hem i stry 432 Instrumental Analysis 491 I ndependent St udy 497 Research 597 , 598 Graduate R esearch

INTERIM C OURSES OFFER ED IN 197 2 301 Body and So u l 30 3 Alchemy and Astrology 308 Mo l ecules and Memory 310 Hea lth Care Del ivery Systems 311 Env iro nmental Co ncerns - An I nformat i o n/Actio n Approach


canrruication

arts

A p rogram concerned with i m p roving interpersona l , g roup and pu b l ic commun ication t h rough a mastery of basic rhetorical processes and a com p rehension of the nature of the mass med ia as well as offering cultu ral and art istic opportu nities in the f i e l d of theat re, T h e department offers a practica l u n derstand i ng of this h u ma n process to a I I students and prepares its majors for part icipation and teach i ng in the areas of theatre , pub lic address and b roadcasti ng,

Kar l , Chairman; Ca p p , Doughty , E man, Nordh o l m , Parker, ass i sted b y C h ristian , Eyr'es, Kn ig h t l inger, N ord lu nd,

--- 19 .,I NT E RIM COURS E S O F F E 'RED I N 1972: 123 F u ndamentals of O ra l Commu nication 351 Stage Technology 125,225,325,425 Com m u n ication Arts 128 161 226 232 235 236 241 250 271 272 275 283 284 326 327 333 335 344

Practicu m Arg u mentation and Debate I ntrodu ctioll to the T h eatre Pari iamentary Law Conte m porary O ra l D i scourse Stud ies in Orga nizationa l Com m u n i cation Persua sion Ora l I nterp retation of Literature F u ndamenta l s of Acting B roadcast Media - M a n and Society The Broadcaster and Sou nd Rad io Production Journal ism Journa lism - N ews W r i t ing G roup D i scussion Extem poraneous S p eak ing Foundatio ns of Commu n ication T h eory American P u b l ic Address Advanced I nterpr etation of Literature

Scen ic Desig n Play D irect io n S tage Ligh t i ng Advanced Ac t i ng 363 History of the T heatre 374 Tel evision Produ ction 377 Broadcast Manag emen t 380 Sp eech Science a nd Pathology 385 Jou r n a l ism - E ditorial Tech niq ues 402 Sp eech in the E l ementary C l assroom 404 Sp eech in the Secondary School 450 Chil dren's T h eatre Wor k shop 459 S u m mer Dra ma Wor k shop 474 T e l ev is i on and the C l a ssroom Teac her 478 Su mmer Telev i sion Work shop 491,492, 493 Special Studies i n Com m u n ication Arts 96,597,598 Research in Commu n i cation Arts 352

354 356 358

303 311

M u l ti-M edia Sports Promotion Chil dren'S T h eatre in M in iatu re


earth •

The components of man's physical u niverse , from p l anetary science to the earth's crust; the i nter-relatio nships between these componen ts; and the relatio nship between man and h is en viro nment. In add ition to an examinat io n of geology, oceanography, astronomy, meteorology and geography, inter-d epartmental cooperation Oste nson , Chairman; Lowes, assisted by

facilitates specia l ized studies in geophysics

Fisk, Huestis.

and geochemistry.

�------�- 2 1 101 122

World Geography I ntroductio n t o Physical Science Physical Geology

1 32 1 36 202 222

Historical Geology

131

323

324 325 351 360 365 425 490 49 1 ,

Oescr ipt ive Astronomy General Oceanography Co nservation of Na tural Resources Minera logy Petro l ogy Structural Geology Natural History of the Pacific Northwest Geology o f Western Washingto n Glacial Geo l ogy Biological Oceanography Seminar

492 I ndependent Study

INTE R I M COU RSES O F F E R ED I N 1 97 2

306 31 0

Wi nter Eco logy of Washin gton

319

Coral Island Biology and Geology

Oemo nstrat io n of Scient ific Concepts


economics •

Examinat ion of eco nomic issues and ph ilosoph ies to aid i n underst an d i ng the public and pri vate sectors of the Amer ican eco nomy and th eir relatio nsh ip to society's current eco nom ic, soc i a l and psycholo gical need s.

Miller, Chairman; Brue, Genda, Jensen, Kru se, Vinje.

--------ďż˝- 2 3 150 290 321 331 35 1

P r i n c iples of Eco no m ics C o ntempo rary Eco nomic Prob lems Human Resource Economics

INTERIM COURSES OFFERED IN 19 72 306 Current Economi c Issues 308 Exploratio ns in Economic Ph i l o sophy

Internat ional Economics Intermed i ate Macro Eco nom ic A n a l ys i s

31 1

352

Intermed iate Micro Economic

36 1 362 432 434 481 486

A nalysis Money and Bank ing P u b l ic F i nance Development Eco nom ics Government and the Eco nomy Statistical Methods Read ings in the Evolut i o n of Eco nomic Thought

490 491 , 504 543 59 1, 599

S em i nar

492, 493 I ndependent Study Manager ial Economics Quantitat ive Metho ds

592, 593 Ind epend ent Study Thesis

3 14

Environmental C o ncer n s - An I nformation/Acti o n Approach Eco nom ic Development of Low-I ncome Reg ions With in the U.S.


educatbn A school which contributes to the development of professional teaching personnel, grounded in Iiberal and scientific learning and dedicated to a person-centered frame of reference. The faculty encourages open attitudes which are flexible and reflect a realistic understanding of the social, tec hnological and psychological aspects of education.

Johnston, Dean; Baughman, DeBower, Fletcher, Jorgenson, Mathers, Napjus, Olson, Orvik, Pederson, Petty, Stein, Williamson, assistec by Adachi, Beal, Bertness, Breckenridge, Ehlers, Gray, Hanson, Holden, Keblbek, Leasure, Minetti, Moe, Nelson, Nokleberg, Smith, Warren.

25 Learner and Society: Growth and Development 321 Human Development 322 General Methods - Primary 323 General Methods - Upper Elementary 325 Reading in the Elementary School 326 Mathematics in the Elementary School

467 473 481 482 483 486 488 489

Evaluation Parent-Teacher Conference Statistical Methods Kindergarten Primary Reading The Gifted Child Reading Center Workshop Directed Teaching in Reading Centers

Workshops Language Arts in the Elementary School Science in the Elementary School Social Stud ies in the Elementary School Problems of Reading in the Secondary School General Methods - Secondary Student Teaching - Primary Student Teaching - Upper Elementary

496 497 501 545 550 552 554

Laboratory Workshop Special Project Workshops Methods and Techniques School Finance Public School Administration High School Organization and Administration Administration and Supervision Workshop Administrative Internship History and Philosophy of Higher Education Student Personnel Work in Higher Education Diagnosis and Remediation in Reading Curriculum Develol)ment Readings in Educational Issues and Problems Comparative Education History of Education Philosophy of Education Graduate Seminar Research Studies in Education Research Studies in Education

201

401 408 410 412 420 423 430 432

434 Student Teaching - Secondary 435 Professional Seminar 440-448 Specific Methods in Teaching Secondary School Subjects 451 Administration of the School Library 452 Basic Reference Materials 453 Processing School Library Materials 454 Selection of Learning Resource Materials 455 I nstructional Materials 456 Storytelling 457 Preparation and Utilization of Instruct ional Materials

555 558 571 573 579 580 583 585 587 589 590 596 597

599

Thesis

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 461 Group Process and the I ndividual 463 Guidance in the Elementary School 465 Guidance in the Secondary School 466 I ntroduction to Student Personnel Services 468 Educational Psychology 469 Vocational and Educational Guidance 560 Continuing Practicum 561 Counseling Theory 563 Practicu m in Group Process and Leadership 565 Seminar Non-Test Appraisal 570 Practicum and Field Work in Counseling and Guidance 572 Practicum in Student Personnel Work 575 Mental Health 578 Behavior and Learning Problems of Students INTERIM COURSES OFFERED IN 1972: 301 Body and Soul 306 Human Relations 308 Story Telling - For Fun and Profit 310 Exploring Vocational Possibilities for Minority Students 313 I nvolvement in a Therapeutic Community 497 Special Project 583 Readings in Educational Issues and Problems


englis1 Engl ish , as la nguage a nd as d i sc i p l ine, i n creases the student' s knowledge of his literary heri tage; sharpens his awareness of compet i ng la nguage patter ns; encourages competence i n writing, discernment in reading; a nd seek s to fu l l y develop i nherent powers of thought a nd expression un ique to ea ch i ndividual.

Joh nso n , Chairman; Bento n , B lomquist , Jones, Klopsch , Larson, Reig stad , Va n Tassel, assisted by Wi l l iams.

ďż˝--- 27 101 217 230 231 241 251 252 318 323 349 351 358 382 383 388 389 390

College E nglish S ho r t S tory I ntroduction to Co ntemporary Literature Masterp ieces of European L i terature I n t roduction to American Literature I n t roduction to E ng lish Literatu re Begi nnings to 1750 I n troduction to E ngl ish Literature: After 1750 Advan ced Composi t io n C h i Idren's Literature Modern Poetry Moder n Drama E ng l ish Literature: The Novel E nglish L i terature Chaucer E ng l ish Literature: S hakespeare E ngl ish L i terature: M ilton a nd H is Age E ngl ish L i terature: Satire and S ensibi l i ty E ngl ish Literature: The Romantics

391 392 400 403 441

E ng lish Literature: The Victoria ns E nglish Literatu re Twentieth C entury Linguistics Modern E ng l ish G rammar The American Renaissance, 1830-1870

American Literature: Rea1li sm a nd Na tura lism , 1870-1920 443 American Litera ture S i n ce 1920 450 Seminar i n American Literature 491,492 I ndependent Read i ng a nd Research 597 Graduate Resea rch 442

INTERIM C O URSES O F F ERE D IN 1972 301 The American J ewish Novel 303 Fict ion - Ita lia n S ty le �6 Read i ng Poem s 309 Mark Twa i n' s Amer i ca 310 The Comic Muse 312 The Fiction of D.H. Lawrence


foreign languages

Foreign language l earning prov i d e s an urge ntly needed e l e m e nt i n o u r d o mest i c and g l o b a l co m m u n ity the ab i l ity to co m m u n i cate effect ively w i th and w it h i n other c u l ture s, Thro ugh t h e med i u m o f la nguage , th e student i n creases h i s k nowledge of the contr ibut i o ns other peo p l es have made to c i v i lizat i o n , h i sto r y , l iterature a n d t h e arts a n d sciences, Because the past struggles of men to esta b l ish just i ce and atta i n w i sdo m prov i d e insight i nto t h e nature and p ro b l em s o f co ntemporary m a n , th e Departments o f Fore ign Languages, Histo ry , P h i l o sophy and Re l ig i o n coop erate i n offering a Cla ssics major, See page 55

Swenso n , C h a i r man; B l ubaugh , S Car l eto n , Fay e , M onro e , Ro b inso n , S p a n g l e r , Toven , Webste r , ass isted by E, Ca rleton , Payne, Wi l hel m , P etersen,

---

L I N G U I S T I CS 400 Stru ctura l L i ngu i st i cs FREN C H : E l e mentary F r e n ch 101,102 I ntermed i ate F r ench 201,202 321 C i v i l ization and C u l ture Compo sit i o n and Conversat i o n 351,352 Master p i e ces of F r e n c h 421,422 L i terature 442 H i story of Ro rnance Languages 445 M ethod o logy of Teach ing Foreign Languages I ndependent Study 491,492 G rad uate Researc h 597,598 GER M A N : E l e m entary G er m a n 101,102 I ntermed iate G er man 201,202 321 C i v i lization and Cu lture Composition and Co nversat i o n 351,352 421, 422 Masterp ieces of G er m a n Literat ure Twentieth Ce ntu ry Ge rman 431,432 L i terature 442 H i story of the G e r man La nguage 445 M ethod o logy of Teac h i n g F o r e ign Languages

491,492 597,598

GREE K 101,102 201,202 421,422 491,492

I ndependent Study G rad uate Research

E le mentary G reek I ntermed iate G r eek Masterpieces of G r eek L iterature I ndepend ent Stud y

"'JA PANESE: E l ementary Ja pan ese 101,102 201,202

I ntermed iate Japanese

LAT I N J01,102 201,202 491,492

E l e mentary Lat i n Intermed iate Lat i n I nd epend ent Study

N ORWEG I AN : E l e m e ntary N o rweg ian 101,102 Intermed iate N o rwegian 201,202 321 Civ i l izat ion and C u ltu re I ndependent Study 491,492 "'RUSS I AN : E l ementary Russian

10 1, 102

201,202

29

I ntermed i ate Russian

SPAN I S H: Elem entary Span ish 101,102 Intermed iate Spa n i sh 201,202 321 C i v i l ization a nd Cu ltu re Compo s i t i o n and Conversatio n 351,352 Master p i eces of Spa n i sh 421,422 L iterature Twentieth Centu ry Sp a n i sh 431,432 L i terature 442 H i story of Ro mance Lan guages 445 M ethod o l ogy of Teac h i ng Fore ign La nguages I ndependent Study 491 ,492 I N TER I M COURSES O F FERED I N 1972 300 Sp a n i sh C u l t u r e and Conversat i o n 303 310 311 315 316 319 320

M ex i can C u l tu re G e r m a n Con versat i o n Spa nish Conversation Norway , A Welfare State 7 The Contemporary F r e n c h N o ve l i n Translation G er m any Today M ed ieval G er man i c Legends and Epics

"Offered cooperat ivel y w ith the Un iversity of Puget S o u n d ,


gen ral engneem •

Yang, assisted by Brink , Lieb elt , Ta ng .

•

An educat ion of suff i cien tly fundamenta l na ture to permit rap id adap tation to new tech nica l problems and opportu nit ies; and of suff i c ie n t l y l ibera l scope to p rovide awareness of the broad social respo nsibilities implic i t in eng i neering.

----- 31 144 151 231 232 344 346 351 441 44L

I ntrod uct ion to Computer S cience E ngineer i ng Grap h i cs Statics M echanics of So l ids Syst ems Ana l ysis and S imulation Numerica l A na l y sis T hermod y namics Network A na l ysis Transport P henomena


history

Humane perspective the present understandable, the future possible,

Schnackenberg, Chairman; Halseth, Johnson, Martinson, Nordquist, Scharnweber, assisted by Carleton.

ďż˝---

107 , 1 08 History of Civilization 421 251 Colonial American History 252 Nineteenth Century American History 451 253 Twentieth Century American History 46 1 255 Pacific Northwest 471 321 , 32 2 History of the Ancient World 323 Med ieval History 492 324 Renaissance 494 325 The Reformation 495 326 European History from 1 658 to 1 798 496 327 The French Revolution and Napoleon 596 599 328 Nineteenth Century Europe 329 Twentieth Century Europe 331, 332 England 333 Russia 336 Colonial Latin America 337 Republican Latin America 340 Far Eastern History 356 History of American Foreign Policy

History of Ideas: European Civilization American Constitutional History History of the American Fr'ontier History of American Thought and Culture Independent Study Seminar American History Seminar: European History Seminar: History and Historians Graduate Research Thesis

INTERI M COURSES O F FERED IN 1972 303 The Hawaiian National Parks 306 The Radical Historians 31 1 The Pre-Modern European Occult

33


mathematics The departme n t's faculty i s com m itted to i nvestigat i n g man's attempt to establ i sh ord er i n his thin k i ng and i n h i s tech nolog i c al society through the med i u m of math emat i cs. The curr i c u l u m prov ides exp ert ise for the career-or ien ted or graduate-bound stud ent and prepares those who w i l l nfled m ath ematics as a tool i n bus i ness o r the mtu ral and soc i a l sciences.

J. H erzog , Cha i r man; Batke r , B r i n k , F i sk , G i ntz, Joh n son , Meyer, L ieb e l t , Peterso n .

---- 35 091 127 133 1 44 151 152 199 231 244 321 323 324

I nte r m ed iate A l gebra F i n i te Mathemat i cs Col lege Algebra and Tr igonometry I ntrod u ct ion to Computer S c i e n ce Analyti c G eometry and Cal culu s Ana l yt i c G eometry and Calcu l u s D ir ected R ead ing L i near A l gebra and Ca l cu l u s Data S tru ctu res and A 5semb I y Language P rogr a m m i ng Geometry M odern E l ementary Mathematics Geometry for the Elementary School Teache r

332 M u ltid i m ensional Cal c u l u s 341 Mathemati ca l Statist i cs 344 Systems Ana lysis 346 N u m er ical Analysis 351 App l i ed M athemat i cs 433,434 Mod e rn Algebra 446 Math emat i cs i n the Secondary S c h ool 455,456 Mathemat i cal Ana l ysis 460 Elementary Topol ogy 490 Sem i nar 491,492 I ndependent Stud y 597,598 Grad uate R e search

I NTE R I M C OU R S E S O F F E R E D IN 1972: I ntrod u ct ion to M od e r n Mathematics In terd iscip l i nary Mathemat i cs Math ematical Puzz les and Paradoxes Stat i st ical Princ i p les i n E x p er i m e ntal D esign

307 308 31 0 31 2


•

mu Ie Programs for those seek ing intensive tra i n ing in m u s i c theory an d composit ion , sacred music a nd voca l a nd i n strumental performance; for those p l a n n i ng careers in music education; and for those who w i sh to i ncrease their general m u sical k now l edge a nd app reciat ion .

Skon es, C h a i r man; Dah l , G i lbertso n , Ha r m i c , K i n g , C. Kna p p , Krach t , Mey er¡ , Rob b i ns, S a r e , assisted by Ba ntsa r i , Bergeson, C rock ett , D ryd en , Hopp , S. Knapp , Lep l e y , Locke, N ew n h a m , Su ndq u i st , Thompson, T re m a i ne.

------ 37 50 1 20

Student Rec i t a l M us i c S u rvey 1 2 3 T h eory 1 2 4 T h eory 1 41,142 S t r i ngs 2 11,212 H i story of M u sic 223, 224 Theory 243 , 244 Woodw i n d s Instru m e n ta l Laboratory 245 , 246 Brass I n str u mental Laboratory 247 P ercuss ion Laboratory 32 3 Contemporary T echn iques, Analysis, and L iteratu re 324 Contrap unta l W r i t i n g , Fo r m , Ana l y s i s and L i terature 325, 3 2 6 O r chestrat ion 327 C o m po s i t ion L I T E RATURE AN D P E R F ORM ANC E C h o i r of t h e West Un iversity Chora l e M ad r igal S i ngers and Vocal Ense m b l e 333 Univers ity Band 334 University O rchestra 335 Chamber E nse m b l e 3 3 6 T w o P iano E n semb l e 337 Accom pany ing 338 Contemporary D i rections E n se m b le 330 331 332

339 340 34 1

Basic Cond ucting M u sic in the Elementary School M u sic S k i l l s and M ethod s for E l ementary Teachers

PRI VATE I NSTRUCT I O N 350 P i ano 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 363 364 365 367 368 40 1 423 441 442 443 445

O rga n Voice V iol i n , V iola Cel lo Woodw inds Brass Percussi on History of P i ano L i terature and Performance H i story of O rgan B u i Id ing Voca l L iterature H y m nolog y a nd Sacred M u sic L i terat u re Worship a nd Lit u rgy Opera Wor k shop Advanced For m and A n a l y s i s Keyboard Ped agogy Voca l Pedagogy Organ Reper toi re a nd Improv isation Advanced Cond uct i ng , Tech n ique s

a nd Mater i a l s M u sic i n the Secondary School 49 1 , 492 I nd ependent Study 590 G rad uate Sem inar

447

I N TER I M COURSES OFF E RED I N 1972 301 M u sic L i terat ure and Concerts 30 2 L i v i ng C h u rch M u sic 30 3 Begi n ners i n Piano 30 5 I m p rovisat ion for P i ano 31 8 O pera Workshop 320 E u r opean Organ Tour 330 C h o i r of the West 331 University C h orale 334 Un iversity Orchestra


rursng •

A baccalaureate program wh ich comb ines professional and liberal arts studies in assisting students to develop a sense of responsib ility for acquiring the attitudes, knowledge and skills necessary for meet ing nursing needs of the individual and the community.

Stucke, Director; Bergerson, Carp er, Cone , Coutu, Gough, Hostetter, Jacobson, Leake, Lemieux, Menzel, Miller , Olson, Peterson, Ramey, Royce, Woehrle, assisted by Hemmen.

U----- 39 25 1 252 253, 254 255 256 36 1, 371, 41 0 446 450 451 452 49 1,

Mental Health N ursing Techniques 263 Disease E ntities Patient Health Teachin g Surgical Intervention Reha b i litation Nursing 362, 363 Maternal-Child Nursing 372 Psychiatric Nursing Trends in Nursing Community Nursing Selected C linical Problems I Selected C linical Problems I I Nursing Leadership 492 I ndependent Study

INTE RIM COURSES OFFERED I N 1 9 72 305 Com m unity I nvolvement in Preparation for Parenthood 3 1 0 Health Care Delivery Systems 3 1 5 B ody Language 3 1 6 Man and His Food


phibsq:>hy In t h is oldest and parent d i scip l i ne of the arts and sciences, the student p ursues a crit ica l and systemat i c ana lysis of bas i c i ssues i n a l l f i e ld s and a u n if i ed v ievv of the tota l ity of exper i en ce. The co u r se of i nq u iry acq u a i nts each student with r iva l wo r l d v i ews a nd va lue systems, encou rages h im in a na lyt ic and systemat i c thought a n d ena b les h i m "to see l ife cr i tica l l y , app rec iat ive l y a nd who le" .

Arbaug h , C ha i rman; Huber, Menz e l', M y rb o .

ďż˝---- 4 1 20 1 22 1 233 324 *328 33 1 333 335 361 365 *37 1 38 1 393 395 427

I ntroduct ion t o P h i loso p h y E t h ics Log i c M a n i n Society P o l i t i ca l a nd Lega l P h i loso phy A ncient a nd M ed ieva l P h i lo so p h y Modern P h i loso p hy Co ntemporary P h i losophy O r ienta l T hought K ierkegaard a nd E x istent ia l i sm Aesthet i cs T h eo ry of Value P h i losophy of R e l ig io n P h i losophy o f S c ience Boo k s , Ideas and Men : S em i nar i n P h i lo sophy *435 Advan ced Sem inar in P h i loso phy 49 1 , 492 I ndepende n t R ead i ng and R esearch

" 1 nd i cates that t h i s co u r se has b een app roved for i n c l u s ion i n the cata log o n a prov isiona l basis.

I N T E R I M C O U R S E S O F FE RE D I N 1 9 72 3 1 1 C iv i l D isobed ience and the Author ity of Law 3 1 5 Norway, A Welfare S ta te?


physical ducati A scho o l wh i ch seeks to ingrain i n each stud ent a fundamen tal respect for the role of physi cal act i v i ty in l iv i ng , It provides oppor t u n i t i es for the acq u i si t i o n of a var i ety of l e i sure-t i m e sk i l l s wh i ch enhance and are appro pr i ate to the ind i v id u al. Professi o n a l l y , it prepares

Olso n , D i rector; Bro eker , Carlso n , Chase, Danielso n , Ho seth , K i tti lsby , L u n dgaard ,

prospect ive leaders for the professio n s o f

Ph i l l i p s , Off i cer , Wester i ng , assisted by B a r ley , Benso n , Ho l m , M a l m i n , Seaman , Thie man.

physical ed ucatio n , hea lth , recreatio n , athleti cs, a nd co rrective therapy.

t---------------ďż˝------------------------------------------------------------ 4 3 PHYSICA L EDUCATION ACT I V ITIES P R OG R A M :

100 Or ientat i o n to Physical Ed u catio n 200-299 Ind i v i d u a l and Dual Act i v i t i e s

230-239 Aqua t i cs 240-249 R hythm s 250-259 Ath l et i c G a m es 275 Water Safety Inst r u c t i o n P R O FESS I O NAL P H YS I CA L ED U CATION P R O G R A M

277

Scie nt i f i c Fo u nd at ions of Physical

28 1

I n j u ry Prevention and Therapeu tic Care

284

Professional A c t i vit ies, Team S p orts for Men

285

Profess iona l Act ivities, I nd iv i d u a l and Dual S ports

28 6

Professional Act ivit ies , G y m n ast ics and Dance

288

Professio nal Act ivit i e s , Team S ports for Wo men

Ed u cation

292 295 322 324 326 328

F i rst A id School Health Physical Educat i o n i n the E l ementary Schoo I Perso na l Health Co m m u n ity Health Cur ricu l u m Deve lop ment and Ad m i nistrat i o n R ecreation Progra m m i n g The Wo man as a Co mpet it or

330 33 1 332 Off i c i at i ng for Wom e n 362 R hyth m s and Dance Pract i c u m in Teach ing and 360, 36 1 Coaching 370-37 5 Coach i n g Theory Correct ive Therapy 39 1, 392 480 H istory and Ph i l osophy o f Phy s i ca l Educat ion 481 Physiologi cal Basis for Motor Performance 482 Biom echan ic s of Hu man M o t i o n 48 3 R ecreation Ad m i n i strat i o n 484 Measurement and Evaluatio n i n

49 1 597

Physical Educat io n I ndepend ent S tudy G raduate R esearch

INTER 1 M COUR S ES O F F E R E D IN 19 72 Bo w l ing

204 205 208 2 10 222 237 255 .30 1

303 326 49 1 497

Beg i n n i ng Bad m into n S k i i ng S l i m nast i cs Handbal l , S q u a sh , and Paddleball S k i n and Scuba D iv i ng Co-Ed V o l leyball Plan n i ng Areas and Faci l ities for Physical Educat io n , R ecreation and Athlet i cs M u l t i-Med i a Sports Prom o t i o n Commu n i ty Hea lth I ndepend ent Study I ntern Programs A. Recreatio n I nternsh i p B , Correct i v e Therapy I nte msh i p C. Orientat ion t o Therapy Progra ms


physics As a part of the p h i l o soph i ca l revo l u t i o n t h a t i s reshap i ng t h e rel a t io n sh i p between man and the u n iverse, p h y s i cs e x p lores f u nd a me n t a l scien t i f i c co ncep t s to g ive stud e n t s a greater a p p r ec ia t i o n of t h e space and matter in wh i ch w e are i m mersed . P h y s i c s o p t io n s i n c l ud e a fresh ma n h o nors co ur se , m a j o r prog r a m s i n p h y s i cs and Tang ,

C h a i r man;

Adams,

Jacobs,

eng i neer i ng physics, and a spec i a l seq uence i n p repar a t i o n f o r teach i n g .

N o rnes.

r--- 45 101 1 02 111, 151 21 1 231 232 25 3 , 272 32 1 , 33 1 336 35 1 355 382 40 1 406

B a s i c C o ncepts o f P h y s i c s D i scovery P h y sics

1 12

Descr i p t ive Mod ern P h y s i cs Stat i c s Mechan i cs of So l id s 254 G eneral P h y s i cs E l ec t r i cal C i r c u i t s and I nstru men t a t i o n 322 Ad vanced Laboratory E l ectromag net i c T h eo r y M echan i cs T hermody nam i cs Teach i ng of P h y sics R ad io i sotope Tech n o l ogy I n t rod u ct i o n to Qu a n t u m M ec h a n i cs Advanced Modern P h y s i c s

42 1 , 422 44 1 442 456 49 1 , 49 7 , 59 7 ,

H o no r s P h ysics

E ng i neer i ng G r aph ics

Advanced Laboratory

N etwork A n a l y s i s T ra nsport P h enomena M a t he m at i ca l P h y s i c s 49 2 I ndependent S t udy 49 8 R e search 598 G rad uate R esea rch

I N TE R I M C O U R S ES O F F E R E D I N 1 9 72 30 1 Mathem a t i cs f o r S c i ent i st s


pdtical •

clence A so c i a l s c i e n ce w h i c h acq u a i n t s t h e stud e n t w i t h h i s i n herent po l i t i ca l freed o m s and respon s i b i l i t i e s by system a t i cal ly in vest igat i ng the democra t i c process a n d a l ternat ive systems. The department prov ides pre -professio nal Farmer , C h a i r m a n ; C o l l i ng e , C ro c k et t ,

t ra i n i ng for grad u a t e study and pos i t io n s

U l b r- i ch t , assi sted b y B r i c k e r , M o r k .

i n l aw , gove r n m ent a n d rel ated f i e l d s_

.----- 47 101 25 1 325 326 327 33 1 336 354

I nt rod u ct i o n to Po l i t i ca l S c i e n ce

48 1

S t at ist ical M ethods

I N TE R I M COU RSES O F F E R E D I N 1 972

A m er i can Nat io n a l G o ver n m ent

48 3

Po l i t i ca l Systems o f t h e B r i t ish

31 3

H i story o f Po l i t ical T h o u g h t R ecent Po l it i ca l T h o ug h t A m er i can P o I i t i ca l T h o ug h t I n t e r n a t io nal R el at i o n s I n ter nat i o n a l Organ izat io n A m er i ca n State a nd Local G o ver n ment

35 6 361

Prob l e m s i n Local Gover n me n t A m erican Po l i t i ca l Part ies

364 42 1

The Leg i s l a t i ve Process Trends in C o n t em porary Po l i t ica l T h eory

434 45 1 454 457 458 464

48 4 S o v i et P o l it ical S y stem 49 1 , 492 I ndepend e n t R ead i ng and

G over n m e n t a nd the E co no m y A m er i ca n C o n st i t u t i o n a l H i story A m er i can C o n st i t u t io n a l Law Pr i n c i p l es of Pub l i c Ad m i n istr a t i o n I n t e r n sh i p i n P u b l i c Ad m i n istrat i o n I nter n sh i p i n t h e Leg i sl at i ve Process

R e search

597 , 598

G r ad uate R esearch

Soc ial J u st ice and t he P r o cess of Law

Co mmo nwea I t h

318

The V i ew from Lo ndo n : Co mpa rat i ve Po l i t i cs


oo I gy

p

Scien t i f i c st u d y of t h e b e hav io r of l iv i ng organ isms w i t h an emphasis on u n derstand i ng human behav ior. T h e major p rovides a background p repara t i o n for a p rofess i o n a l career or serves those st udents p l a n n ing to pu rsue r e l a ted vocat i o n s i n w h i ch p sy ch o l og i cal i n sight i s a val uab l e resou rce.

Severtso n , Cha i r m a n ; Adach i , B e x t o n , N o l p h , Larsgaa rd , Webster , assi sted b y G i l b er t .

__

------------------------------� --------

1 01

I ntrod u ct i o n to Psych o logy Study S k i l l s T h e Psycho logy of Adjustment S c i e n t i f i c M et h od s Social Psycho logy 335 Ch i l d h ood and A d o l escence 340 The B i o l ogy of B ehavior 403 The Psy c h o l ogy of I nfancy a n d Ch i l d hood 405 Adol escent P sycho logy 410 E mo t i o n and M o t i vat ion 420 P sycho logy o f Perso na l ity 421 Behav ior D i so rde rs 450 Psycho log ica l Test i n g 460 T h e E x per i me nta l P sy cho logy o f L ear n i ng 48 1 S ta t i st i cal M ethods 490 H i story and S y st ems in P sycho logy 49 1 -49 3 I ndependent S t u d y 1 10 22 1 243 330

515 540 570 577 590 59 6 59 7 599

Psycho log i ca l A ssessment Co u n sel i ng Theory P ract i cu m in Co unse l i ng and Test i ng S upe rvised F i e ld Wo rk Sem i n ar : Psy ch o logy of Lea r n i ng I ndependent R e search I ndepend ent R esearch Thesis and Thesis Sem inar

49

I N T E R I M CO U R S E S O F F E R E D I N 1 9 7 2 : 309 T h e E x cept i o n a l C h i l d 31 1 31 3

U top ias I nvo lvement i n a Therape u t i c Co m m u n ity

�----- �


religion T h e rei ig i o u s her i t ag e of m a n k i nd , part i cu lar l y t h e Judaeo -Ch r i st ia n trad i t i o n , c r i t i ca l l y e x a m i ned for t h e pur poses of preserv i ng a n d a p p l y i ng its accu m u l a t i ng w i sd o m , T he d epartment exa m i nes re l ig io u s d im e n s i o n s e n co u n tered i n o t h e r d isc i p l i n es

G o v ig , C ha i r m a n ; C h r istoph erso n , E k l u n d , K n utso n , Petersen , P i lg r i m , assi sted b y

and serves students who el ect rel i g io n as

Mathre,

the i r academ i c or vocat i o n a l speci a l t y ,

--------ďż˝-- 5 1 1 03

J ud aeo-C h r i st i a n L i fe a n d T ho u g h t

I N T E R I M CO U R S E S O F F E R E D I N 1 9 7 2

* 1 05 R e l ig i o u s E x per ience

307

The H o l ocaust in J ew i s h L i tera t u r e

203

B i b l i ca l L i terature

309

M a n : R e l ig i o u s a nd H u m a n

325

C h r i s t i a n E d u ca t i o n i n a Secu lar

31 1

Jesu s a n d t h e R evo l u t io na r i es

S o c iety 327

A n c i e n t C h u rch H i story

328

M o d er n C h u r ch H i story

33 1

Wo r l d R el ig i o n s

341

Am er i ca n C h u rches

42 1

O ld Testament S t u d ies

422

N ew Testament S t ud ies

423

T he L i fe of Jesus

430

C h r i st i a n T ho u g h t a nd Modern

432

C h r i st ia n C l assi cs

436

C h r i st i a n i t y a nd the A rts

Co n c i o u sness

490

Senior S e m i na r : H u m a n Sex u a l ity

490

S e n i o r Sem i n ar : Psych o l o gy a n d Rel i g i o n

49 1 , 492

I nd ependent S t ud y

* I nd icates that t h i s course has been app roved for i n c l u s i o n in the cata l og on a prov i s io n a l b a s i s ,


soci

bgy, anthro po o l gy & soci al w !fan Obe rho l tzer , Cha i r m a n ; G i l b ertso n , H a n so n , Jobst , N e l so n , Sc h i l l er , Wa l t er assi sted by Ad ams, B r ig h t , G r ee n , J o h n s , W i n k l eb l eck

The d evelo p me n t , orga n i z a t i o n and b ehav ior of h u man gro u p s; the p rocesses and u n ifor m it i es of social behav ior; the nature a nd r"e l a t i o n sh i p of groups and inst i t u t io n s; and a spec if i c seq u e n ce i n cr i m i n a l j u st ice , ex p la i ned to st i m u late cr it i cal a nd co nstructive att itudes toward so c i a l change a nd to tra i n perso ns who w i l l co n t r i b u te to the reso l ut io n of so cial co nf l i c t . Courses i n a n thropo logy wh ich ex p lore the evo l u t io n of ma n , the preh i storic deve l o p m e n t of c u l t u re and patterns of c u l t u ra l behav ior i n co ntempo rar y , nat ive a nd fo l k so cieties. A seq uence a p p roved by the C o u n c i l of So c i a l Wo r k Ed uca t ion wh i c h p repares students for e m p lo y ment in so c ial work and related f i e l d s .

._------ 53 S OC I O L O G Y 1 11 Socio logy 21 1 G r oup Behavior 325 M i n o r i t i es 328 Deviant Beha v i o r 422 S o c i a l I n st i t u t i o n s 423 S o c i o l o g i ca l Thought 425 T h e F a m i l y 432 C o m m u n ity a nd Strat i f i ca t i o n 48 1 S ta t i st i ca l M ethod s 490 S e m i nar 491 I ndepe ndent Study 494 R esearch M ethod s 590 G rad uate Sem i nar 595 G rad uate R ead i ng s 597 G r ad uate R esearch

SOCI A L W E L F A R E : 271 I ntrod uct ion to S o c ia I Work 365 Social I n terve n t i on 463 Socio logy of Socia l We lfare 472

S o c i a l Wo rk Pract ice

473 I n terv iew i ng 475,476 F ield E x perie nce 491 I ndependent Study

ANTH R O P O L OG Y : 23 1 C u l tura l A n t h rop o l ogy 242 P hy s i ca l A n t h ropo logy E t hno l ogy of A m er i ca n I nd ia n s 341 352 E t hno logy o f Af r i ca 490 S em i n ar 491 I ndepen d ent Study

I

ďż˝


specal academic programs

E n v i ro n m e nta l Stu d ies Program

S tudents concerned about or w i shing to enter gr'ad uate study and career programs in such fields as env i ronmental science, env ironmental law or resource management, may enroll in the Envi ronmental Studies Pr·ogram. A certificate w ill be awarded students complet ing requ i rements listed below, together with a departmental or school major program. A comm ittee Cl a ssics consist ing of represen tatives from each of The Departments of Foreign Languages, the three major subject matter groupings History , Ph ilosophy and Reiigion coope rate will approve each student ' s cou rse program in offer i ng a Class ics area major . This and i n tegrative experiences. inter-departmental major req u i res Natural Sciences and Mathema t i cs completion of twelve cou rses selected from 5 Cou rses : Earth S cie n ces 222; Stati stical Methods the list below i n consultation with the 481 or Mathematics 1 44; three additional program coordinator, Mr . Carleton. For app roved courses, such as: Biology 1 11 , administrative pu rposes the Classics area Chemistry 1 03, Chem istry 1 04 , Earth major is a program of the Department of S ciences 101 , 1 31 , 202. Foreign Languages. -

The foundation of all majors is a language program in Lat i n and/or Greek : Latin 1 0 1 , 1 02 E l emen t ary Latin 2 0 1 , 202 Intermediate Greek 1 0 1 , 1 02 E lementary Greek 201 , 2 02 I ntermediate Greek 421 , 422 Masterpieces of Greek L iterature The balance of a major is derived from these courses: History 321 , 322 H istory of the Anc ient World Philosophy 3 1 1 Helle n i c Philosoph y Religion 203 Biblical Literature Religion 42 1 Old Testament Studies New Testamen t Religion 422 S t u d ies I ndependent Study Courses Selected I nterim Courses The student interested in Class i c Literature will want to consider' E nglish 2 3 1 , Masterpieces of European Literature. F urther descript ion of the above courses may be found in the parts of the catalog devoted to each department.

Soc ial Sci ences

-

4 Courses :

Econom ics 1 5 0; Polit ical Sc ience 101 o r Soc iology 1 1 1 o r 21 1 ; Busi ness Admin istrat ion 290; and one approved upper-d ivision course , such as: Econom ics 362, History 46 1 , Physical E d u cation 326, Political S cience 354 or 356 , Psy chology 330, Sociology 356 , 422 or 463 . Human i t i es

-

5 Courses:

Art 325 ; E nglish 1 0 1 ; Philosophy: two approved courses, such as 2 2 1 , 233, 324 , 422 o r 434; Religion : one approved course , such as 331 or 430. I ntegrative Experience

-

2 Courses:

America n E c o n o m y P rogra m The Ame r i can E conomy Program is designed to raise the level of understanding concerning econom i c p r i n c iples and proced u res among teachers and students in the Paci fic North'Nest. The program involves a Center for E conomic Edu cation recogn ized national ly by the Joint Council on E conomic Education and by the Northwest Council on Econom i c E d u cat ion. Its functions are : 1 ) To offer special courses to non-economics maj ors at P L U , espec ially to fu ture teachers and to current members of the teach ing profession. These courses emphas ize the role of econom ics among the social sc iences and its importance in all areas of life. 2) To develop, in coope ration with the school systems of this region, teaching plans and aids that facilitate incorporation of econom ics i nt o existing cur r i cu la. 3) To provide speaking and consulting 55 services for commu nity organizations interested in promo t i ng public underst anding of economic princ iples and issues . 4) To establish , in coopera t ion with the P L U Mortvedt Library , a special collect ion devoted to the teaching of eco.nom ics. Further information is available from the Program D i rector in the Department of Econom ics.

During the i n terim and final semester of the senior year , each student would participate in a study/research/act ion program des ig ned to draw upon the broad background of the above courses and the expert ise of h is own maj or field . Appropriate courses will be identified i n the In terim Catalog, Semester courses may i nclude, but are not l imited to appropriate depa rtmental sem i nars , independe nt study or research cou rses; field exper ience and i nternsh ip programs; employment or vol unteer service within communi t y act ion agencies.

�_________________________

______ _____________

J


options

T h e student should f i le a letter o f i n tent with the cha i rman of h is major department and t he provost p rior to leav ing P L U . The let t er sho u l d out Iine in broad term s w hat the st udent p roposes to study, w h ere and at what length of t ime, and how the foreign experience relates to his academic program. On t he basis of th is i nformation, p Iu s a record of lectures attended and exam i nations comp leted academic cr edit wi l l be a l lowed , b u t no grade po i nt average wi l l be compu t ed . T h e U niversity reserves the right to req u ire exami natio ns covering the mater ia l stud ied . I t is recommended that a so l id foundat ion i n the la nguage o f t h e cou ntry b e a cqu ired before embarking. ,

Foreign Stu d y Opportu n i t i es

56

As ev idenced by the U n iversity' s expa nd ing foreign i nter im offer i ngs, the faculty and adm i n i stra t i o n a re comm itted to pursu ing we l l -p lanned a cadem i c exper iences in other cul tu ra l sett i ngs. F oreign la nguage maj o rs, as wel l as t hose i nterested in t h e human ities a nd t h e arts, are e nco uraged t o co nsider an extended experience abroad . In t he recent past , st ud ents have p ursued stud ies in G ermany , A u stria , F ra n ce, a nd Mex i co under a variety of programs i n c l ud ing the Goethe-Institute, Central Col lege Prog rams i n Europe and L e Fr an cais in Fran ce. T hese and other opportu nities ar e avai lab le through cooperat ive arrangements with ex i st i ng p rograms. Broch ures and other i nformat i o n may b e obta ined from t h e Off ice of t h e P rovost a nd from the respect ive d epartments. The student is cautio n ed aga i nst beg i n n ing a program without first securing U n iversity approva l . The st udent may obtain a Leave of Absence form from t h e Office of the R eg istrar which w il l faci litate return to the U niversity at the concl u sion of his program abroad . Att enda nce at a foreign u niversity in no way waives the gr ad uatio n req uirements o f P L U .

Upon h is return, the stud ent w i l l , w it h t h e assista n ce o f t h e cha irman o f t h e Department of F oreig n Languages, p repare a w ritten request for a cadem i c cred it. I f h e has pursued h is stud ies i n several areas, he w i l l need the approval of ea ch depa rtment co n cerned .

faculty offers i n nova t ive , expe r imenta l courses w h i ch cover a broad range of contemporary issues a nd perspectives in many f ields. The S ummer S ession co nsists of two four a nd o n e half week term s a nd begins i n the m idd l e of June. D esigned for undergrad uates and grad uate st udents a l i k e, t h e program serves teachers a nd admi nistrators seeking cred e n t i a l s a nd special courses, freshmen desir ing to in itiate co l iege st udy, and ot hers d esiring specia l studies offered by the schoo ls and departments. Tr ansient students who enrol l for the summer session need o n ly to submit a letter of academ ic standing or give other evid ence of being prepared for co l l ege study . -

A comp lete S ummer Session catalog, out l i n i ng the curr i culum as wel l as specia l inst i tutes, work shops a nd sem i nars, i s printed each spr ing a n d i s ava il a b le from the Dean of the Summer S essio n at the U n iv ersity .

Late Afternoon a nd E ve n i ng C l a sses To provid e for the professio n a l growth and cul tural enr i chment of perso n s u na b l e t o take a f u l l-time co l lege co u rse, t h e U niver sity cond uct s late-after noon and even i ng cl asses. I n add it ion to a wid e variety of offerings in t h e arts and sc iences, t h ere are specia lized and grad uate courses for teachers, admi n i strators and persons i n busi ness and i ndustry. A special bu l let i n is p r inted ea ch semester out l i n ing the offer i ng s , and is ava i lab le from t h e registrar of the Univer sity .

Su m m er Session An extensive summer schoo l curri c u l u m , of the same qual ity as t hat offered d uri ng t h e reg u l ar academi c yea r , i s avai lab le t o a l l q ua Iified perso n s. I n addi t io n , summer sess ion is typica l ly a time when t h e

CHO I CE In 1 969, P L U estab lished a resear ch/ ed u cation /action arm , Center for Human Organization in Changing E nvi\onments. Its acro nym , CHOI C E , sig na l s its fu nct io n a nd sty l e: to i n itiate processes and programs wh i ch wi l l enable many segments of a n urbanizing society t o participate i n ma k ing choices which may l ead t o qua l ity of l ife i n the reg ion. C H O I C E serves a s t h e U n iversity's l i n k w ith commun ity act ion programs a nd agencies, p rovides channe l s for i n crea s i ng i nvo lvement b y facu lty a n d students i n t h e commu n ity, a nd a id s i n imp lemen ti ng t he U niversity ' s ro le as an agent of soc i a l ch a nge .

CHOIC E spo n sors commu nity comm u n i cation workshop s a nd t ra i n i ng programs for groups i nvo lved i n so cia l


change in such areas as d r ug use, prob lems of m i no r i t i es and d isadvantaged , hu man r e l a t io n s , and con t i n u i ng educat io n for c l ergy a nd l ay m e n . CHOIC E pro v ides a co mputerized resource referra l serv i ce for facu l t y and students w i sh i ng to co ntact agencies a nd organ izat ions in the area. In 1 970 and 1 9 7 1 , CHO I C E was a par t i c ipat i ng member of t h e Puget Sound Coa l it ion wh i ch received nat io na l attent i o n a s a demo nstra t i o n o f c i t izen part i c ipat ion center i ng o n q ua l ity of l ife. Dur i ng 1 9 72 and 1 9 7 3 , the Coa l i t i o n w i l l focus o n issues o f the l aw a n d J u st i ce system .

At i t s i n cept io n , the stat io n broadcast w ith a power of 1 0 watts. I n late 1 97 1 , t h e U n iversity was gra nted a construct i o n perm i t to i ncrease power to 25 ,000 watts. It i s ant icipated that w it h i n t h e year 1 97 2 , t he conversi o n to t h e i ncreased power w i l l have been accomp l i shed and broadcast t i m e w i l l have been extended fro m t h e present 9 to a proj ect ed 1 8 ho urs a day.

Reserve Officer Tra in i ng Corps P rogra m/ l A i r F o rce) Aerospace St ud i es

S tudents enro l led at P L U who have b een F u n d ed i n i t i a l ly by grants from t h e selected f o r t h e A ir Force R OT C Two-Y ear Board of C o l lege Ed ucat ion of the Amer i can Co m m issio n Program, and transferees Lutheran C h u rch , most of t h e projects of q u a lif ied for entry i nto the A ir Force R OTC C HOIC E are funded by mat c h i ng grants from Profess i o na l Off icers Cou rse , may enrol l i n state and federa l so urces, part i c u l ar ly A ir Force R OTC Aerospace S t u d ies cou rses the Wash i ngton S tate P la n n i ng and at the U n iversity of P uget S o u n d . C o m m u n i ty Affairs Agency. C H O I C E is App l ica t io n s are norma l l y accepted frorn l inked to si m i lar resource center s at th e sopho more students d uring t h e fa l l semester fol low i ng col leges a nd u n i versit ies: preced i ng t he expected date of entry i nto the Augsburg , Augustana , Conco rd i a ( Moorhead ) , Professional Off i cer s Course . Select ion for Lut her, Texas L utheran a nd C ap i ta l . t h e co urse is o n a compet it ive, best q ua l ified bas i s.

KP L U - F M , U n iversity R ad i o S ince 1 966, t h e U n iversity h a s owned and operated a non-co m m erci a l , freq uency mod u l a t io n rad io stat i o n . C o m m i tted to servi ng both the U n iversity com m u n ity and the Sout hern Puget Sound R eg i o n , the fac i l ity offers exten sive i n st r u ct ional opportu n it ies to st udents i nterested in broadcast med i a . Operat i ng o n a freq uency of 88.5 megacycles under l i cense fro m t h e Federal C o m m u n i cat i o n C o m m i ssi o n , t h e stat i o n prod u ces local programs as w e l l a s subscr i b i ng t o such networ k s a s Nat io nal Publ ic R ad io , Deutsche Wel l e R ad io of t h e F ederal Rep u b l i c o f G erman y , the Canad i a n a n d Br it ish Broadcast i ng Corporat i o ns and other program so urces.

Add i t ional i nformat io n about A ir Force R OTC , its curr i cu l u m , ad m i ssions and procoo ures , may be obta i ned by wr i t i ng t h e Professor of Aerospace S t ud ies , U niversi t y o f P uget Sou nd , Taco ma , Wash i ng to n , 984 1 6 .

57


enVirons •

59

Unti l recently, education was thought to transp ire within the confines of a physical campus. With the advent of accessible transportation, P LU 's campus spontaneously acquired an off -campus dimension, an occurrence coinc iding with studen t expectations for an education which is related to the community, the environment and the wor l d . Pacific Lutheran and its immediate environs provide a fascinating potential for "campus" ex pansion, the benefits of which are reaped by individuals.


E co l og i ca l l y , Puget S o u n d is a g reat p l ace to lea r n . Long befo re ma n ' s p h y s i c a l env i ro n me n t becamea popu l a r co ncer n, PL U ' s natu ral E u ropean t h eat re was a t tract i ng ad m i rers. The most consp icuo u s natu ral mo n u ment i n t h e area i s "the mou nta i n " O n a clear d a y , M t . R a i n i er ' s i n sp i r a t io n is se l f -ev i d e n t . T h e Cascades on the east , the rugged O l y m p i cs o n the west a nd co o l st a n d s of D o ug l a s F ir co mp lete o n e o f t h e most natura l l y tranqu i l env iron ments i n t h e U n i t ed States. The d u nes of the P a c i f i c a r e less than two h o u r s away.

61


Cont rast ing w i th th i s a ccessib le qu ietu d e , metropo l i tan Tacoma a n d nearby Sea ttle prov ide the c l a m orous lea r n i ng laborator ies native to contemporary u rb a n Amer i ca. Desp ite its relative youth , P uget Sound has not ent i rely escaped the congest io n , deca y , and socia l te nsions characte r i stic of our cit ies. At Pa c i f i c L u ther a n , u rb a n prob l e m -so l v i ng is a cornerstone o f o u r off-ca mpus d i mension. CH O IC E ( P LU's Center for H u man Organizat ion in Chang ing Env i ron ments) , student coa l i t ions, re l igiou s orga n i z at i ons and for mal cla sses find sat isfaction in co n f ront i ng urban b l ight w i th ex pert i se, patience and co nsider ab l e enth u s i asm.

63


F i na l l y , a q u a l i t y environment d e mands a cu l t u r a l d i me n s io n . Aga i n , P L U f i n d s herself i n a n advantageo u s p o s i t io n . P uget Sound is heavy w i t h " t h i n k " i n d u st r i e s and ed u cat io nal i n st i t u t io n s wh i ch generate co nsi derab l e i n terest and d ivers ity in f i n e a n d po p u l a r arts. A typ i ca l week end i n Tacoma/Sea t t l e rou t i nely i n c l ud e s o pera o r bal l et a t t h e Sea t t l e Cent er; a w i d e var i ety of profess ional a n d a ma teu r theatre; resident a n d v i s i t i ng sy m p h o n y o rchestras; d o z e n s of g a l l er i es a nd m u seu ms; a select ion of elega n t a nd u n i q u e resta u ra nts; a nd t h e fu l l co m p l em en t o f A m er i ca n a n d foreign f i l m s.

65


67

C l o ser to h o m e , camp u s en terta i n me n t i s p l en t i f u l a nd i n expensive. S tandard fare i n c l ud e s v i s i t i ng poets, lecturers, perfor m i ng a r t i st s and co mpan i es, a nd a n aggressive U n ivers i t y G a l l ery program . I n recent y ea r s , the U n iver s i t y A r t ist S er i es h as a t t racted perfo r mers o f n a t i o n a l reputat io n , i n cl u d i ng t h e W i n n i peg R oy a l B a l l et , Denver S y m p h o n y , t h e N at i o n a l S h a k espeare Co mpany , C l aude S t . D e n i s , C a r l o s M o n toya , a n d t h e Joffrey B a l l et. N o t t o b e o u td o ne b y c l assica l enthu siasts, rock and pop patrons have managed t o book t h e l i k es o f the T e m ptat io n s , B . B . K i n g , B r ead , I k e a n d T i na T u r n e r , t h e Asso c ia t io n , G o r d o n L igh tfoot a n d t h e Preserva t i on H a l l J a z z B a nd , t o name a few.


student life

The v i ce p r es i d e n t f o r student affa i r s a n d h i s staff are respo n s i b l e for

Act i vities

orga n i z ing and p rogra m m i ng I'esidence h a l l s , The P L U o r i e n t i ng new st udent s , assistin g foreign stud e n t s , act ing as a l i a i so n to the Asso ciated Stud en ts of PLU ( stu d ent gove rn ment) a nd coord i n at i ng o t h er stud e n t a c t i v i t ies. Of part i e u l a r no te i s the M i n o r i ty Affa i r s Coord i na to r , wh ose spec i f i c respo n s i b i l i t ies i n c l ude assessing

Student Handbook

en u merates

over 50 academ ic and n o n-acad em ic organ i z a t i o n s , c l u b s , soc i eties a nd i n terest g ro u p s , w h i c h testifies to the d iversity of ca m p u s ex t ra-cu r r i c u l a r l i fe. S o c i a l a ct i o n , rel ig i o u s and p o l i t i ca l o rgan i z a t i o n s; i n terest and sp o r t i n g c l u b s;

and ser v i ce , p rofessio n a l and acad e m i c and co m m u n i ca t i ng the a cad e m i c , so c i a l and so c i eties a r e a m o ng t h e o p t i o n s from w h ich re l ated need s of P L U ' s grow i ng m i no r ity to choose . co n t i ngents. The student affa i r s staff ,

from the v i ce pres i d en t to t h e assista n t head resid e n t s , i s geared t o pro v i d i ng

Poss i b i l i t i es for aesthet i c a pprec i a t i o n a r e

ind ivid u a l atten t io n to a l l stud ent

ava i lab l e both to part i c i p a n t s and aud ience

1 5 fore ign co u n t r i e s , P L U i s a resi d e n t i a l

prob l e m s wh ich are not spe c i f i ca l ly

by way o f m u s i c a nd the v isu a l and

ca m p u s T h e I'esid ent i a l ph i l o so phy

cUI- r i c u l a r i n nature.

perfo r m i ng ar ts. T h e C h o i r of the VI/est , Concert B a nd , and U n iver s i ty S y m p h ony

With stud ents represent i ng 3 8 states a n d

v i ew s t h e spacio u s l awns an d p l az a s , re sidence h a l l s , recreat ion a r eas a n d t h e ne w

U n iver s i ty Cen ter n o t as i n d iv i d u a l

i s l an d s , b u t a s co m p o ne n ts of a n i n tegrated

R esponsib i l ities of Com m u n ity Life

Orc hestra , a renow ned co l leg i a te stage, two

Beca u se resid en t i a l l iv i n g is an i n teg ra l

art ga l l er ies, fa c u l ty a nd stud e n t recita l s a n d t h e A r t i s t S e r i e s prov ide genero u s

l i v ing / l ear n i ng env i r o n m e n t . Ed ucat ion i s

part of the ed uca t i o n a l process and

opp o rtu n i t ies fo r t h e perfo r m i n g stud e n t ,

for t h e tot a l person a nd no n-acad e m i c

because 1 7 00 resident students co mpr ise a

Perso n a l e x p ress ion i s e m p h a s i zed i n d eb a t e ,

experien ce i s a s i n valuab l e a s i t i s

reaso n a b l y sizab le and co m p l ex co m m u n i ty ,

necessa r y .

the prospect ive stud e n t shou Id be aware of

student gover n me n t , ca m p u s rad i o K P L U - F M and the week ly n ew spaper.

T h e so c i a l deve l o p ment o f each stud e n t , h i s i n teract i o n w ith perso ns o f d iffe r i n g life sty l e s, h i s ap p l i ca t i o n of c l a ssro o m k now l edge t o h i s u n ique l iv i ng si t u a t i o n and t h e env i ron ment I n wh i c h th i s t y p e o f l earn i ng t a k e s p lace a r e e l e m e n t s i n t h e P L U l i b e ra l ed u cat ion . I n a t i m e w h e n

two facts. F i rst , stud ents sh o u l d recog n iz e t h e res i d en t i a l n a t u r e of the U n iversity . A stud e n t not l iv i ng at h o m e with h i s parents, g u a rd i a n o r spo u se i s req u i red to l ive i n a resid ence h a l l u n t i l he i s 2 2 y e a r s of age .

Org a n i z ed an d i nd iv id u a l p h y s i c a l activ ites are f o r everyone. R ecrea t i o n a l and co m p et it ive p ro g r a m s i n c l u d e footba l l , cross co un try , b as k etba l l , sw i m m i n g , h i k ing , cl i m b i n g , vo l l ey b a l l , ten n i s , g o l f , wrestl i ng , padd l eb a l l , b ow l i ng , sq u ash ,

there i s consid erab l e t a l k of mean ingfu l

Seco nd , t h e U n iversity ad m i t s students

co m m u n it y , t h e reside n t i a l camp u s

hand b a l l , p i ng p o ng , baseba l l , softba l l ,

with the u nde rstand i ng that they w i l l

bad m i n to n , f i e l d h o ckey , track and f i e l d ,

fa c i l itates genu i n e rel a t i o n sh i p a m o ng members of the U n i versi ty , reg a l'd less of

co m p l y w i th i ts regu l a t i o n s . A l l st udents are exp ected to respect the r ig h t s and

water polo , s k i i ng and row i n g . Ath l e t i c s

rel i g i o u s , rac i a l or. c u l t u r a l b a ckgr o u n d .

i n teg r i ty of other members of the

rather t h a n t h e search f o r ath l e t i c g lo r y ,

co m m u n i t y . C o nd u ct wh ic h is detr i m e nta l

y e t t h e U n ivers ity ' s many v a r s i t y

A s a r e s id e n t i a l ca m p u s , t h e U n iversity

t o t h e stud e n t , h is co I l eag u es ,

recogn i zes i t s o b I igat i o n to prov ide

U n ivers i ty , or wh ich transg r essed c iv i l l aw

ch a rn p i o nsh i p s a r e i nd i c a t i v e o f an

serv ices and fa c i l i t i es wh ic h co m p lement

is g r o u n d s fo r d i sC i p l i n ary act i o n wh i ch may

0r

the

the a cade m i c e n v i ro n m e n t . As s t u d ents have resu l t i n a perso n's sepa r a t i o n from the assumed i n creased respo n sib i l i t y f o r their

U n ivers i ty S pe c i f i c reg u l a t i o n s and

perso na l and so c i a l b e h av i o r , t h e Off i ce

reasonab l e g u id e l i n e s for reside nce ha l l

of Stud ent A ffa irs has t u r ned i n crea s i ng l y to estab l i sh i n g c o n t i n u ity between student

69

I i v i n g a r e o u t l i n ed in t h e Student

Handbook

w h i c h is mad e ava i l a b l e to

genera t i o n s and provid i ng serv i ces wh ich

accepted students d u r i ng the su mmer

ref l e ct chang i n g student needs.

preceed ing t h e i r fresh man year.

emphasi zes d evelo p m e nt of the i n d iv id u a l

above-average a b i l i ty o n t h e part of t h e stud en t bo d y .


R e i igious Life

70

The Uni versity not only acknowledges an acade m ic imperat ive to explore the religious dimension of life , h i story and culture in the classroom, but also seeks to g i ve expression to its own Christian heritage and values through the office of the University m i nister. The pastoral services of the m in i ster are ava ilable to all students who desire them . Whi le for ms of ministry may cha nge according to circumstances, the University recognizes the persistent need for the kind of healing , freeing and enabling spiritual force that challenges alienat ion and encourages authent ic relationship among all men , as well as between men and God. To be valid , the Chr i stian presence in higher education must be made meaningful to each generation through proclamation and celebratio n of the redempt ive Word in ter ms relevant to the realit ies of the present . Under the ausp ices o f the Student Congregation and the Rel igious L ife C ounc il a rich diversity of worsh ip opport unit ies is provided, through which the Un iversity aims to further a spirit of comm unity based on openness and mutual respe ct.

Specia l Stu d e n t Services THE UNIVERS ITY C ENTER, completed in PLACEMENT SERVIC ES are maintained 1 971, enhances the social and cultural through the Schoo l of Education and a com m unity which begins in the residence general place ment office. A $ 1 0 fee covers halls. Its services include food service the cost of credentials, records and fac i l ities, lounges, meeting roo m s , correspondence on the student's behalf. bookstore, bowling alleys, music listen i ng Positions are not guaranteed. roo m ,games roo m , private dining roo m s , Chr is Knutzen Fellowship Hall . student F OO D SERVICES are available for all governme nt offices, student publication students. Resident students are required offi ces, a coffee shop and "The Cave" , to take the ir mea ls i n one of the campus a free-form student coffee-house and dini ng halls. No deductions are m ade for discussion center. students eat ing fewer than three meals a day beca use food serv ice fees are based on the "THE STUDENT HEALTH SERV IC E fact that not all students eat all meals. reta ins the serv ices of physicians and nurses in the Student Health Center on campus. All A charge is made for guests. Off-campus students may board on campus on a semester full-t i m e stude nts are entitled to treatment basis. at the Center for minor diso rders and co m mon a ilments. "HEALTH AND ACCI DENT INSURANC E if offered by the Un iversity on a volun tary basis. The group Acc ident and Sickness Medical Expense Plan is available at very attractive rates and provides coverage twenty路four hours a day, twelve months a year, anywhere in the world. The plan is ava i lable at reg i strat ion only (fall or spr i ng ) . A brochure outlin i ng the plan i s sent to new students before registratio n . Copies of this brochure are ava i lable from the business ma nager. "THE C OUNSELING AND TESTING CENTER assists students in cop i ng with normal develop mental problems. A staff psychiatrist , trained and experienced personnel offer ing i ndividual and g roup counseling , and a variety of psychologi cal tests are available to assist stude nts with career planning , educational adjust ment and personal proble ms. " Details available in the Studen t Handbook .

SC HEDULING S E R V I C ES are maintained in the University Center . A II university activities must be scheduled through this office. Schedul ing stude nt acti v it ies is a jo int respo ns ibil ity of the Un iversity Center Director and the Soc ial Act ivities Board.


L i v i n g Accom modations/ R esid e n ce H a l l s The v i ce presid ent fo r stu d e n t affa irs

H arstad H a l l , a s i x -story , ivy -covered

d isda i n s the u se of t h e word " d o r m itory " .

b u i l d i ng w h i ch at o ne t i me hou sed t h e

for 392 students, i s d iv id ed i n to four

H i s d i st i nc t i o n b etween a "d o r m " a n d a

e n t i r e co l l eg e , provides a q u a i n t

d i st i n ct h o u ses, each h av i ng two f l oors

" residence h a l l " is more t h a n sem a n t i c ,

a l ternative i n res i d e n ce ha l l l i fe . I t s ir regu l a r- I y sha ped roo m s , h i g h cei I i ng s a nd

and n a m es as fo l l ow s : Cascade H o u se ,

t h e l a tter be i ng d i fferen t i a t ed b y

T i ng e l stad H a l l , a n i n e story reside nce

co nven i e n c e , co m fort a nd , most i m po rta n t l y , pane led wa l l s a r e rem i n iscent of l a t e 1 9 t h cen t u r y co l leg iate I i f e . C o m p l et e l y by a sen se of co m m u n i t y . E v ery effo rt i s

f l oors 2 a n d 3 ; I vy H o use , f loors 4 a n d 5; Evergree n , f l o o r s 6 a n d co m p r i s i n g

8

and 9 .

7;

and A l p i n e ,

made t o i n su re t h e rea l ity o f co m m u n ity

refu r n i sh ed i n r e ce n t y ea r s , H a rstad

fo r each resid e n t . A select i o n o f modern , attract ive h a l l s , each w i th its o w n

acco m mod ates 250 w o m en in s i ng le ,

Ca scad e , t h e second co -ed u ca t i o na l h o u se ,

double,

acco m modates w o m e n o n t h e second f lo o r

o r t r i p l e o c c u p a n c ies_

t r a d i t i o n s a nd u n iq u e adva n tag es, offers

a nd m e n o n t h e t h i rd . As w i t h S t u e n ,

each st u d e n t a m p l e oppor t u n i t y to esta b l i sh

Kre id l e r , H o ng a n d O r d a l H a l l s make u p

Cascade has co m m o n l o u ng e , recreat i o n a l a nd

a l iv i ng pattern in wh i c h he is co m for tab le

th ree sides o f t h e h o u s i ng q u ad r a n g l e o n

gover n m e n t a l act i v i t i es .

At the sa me t i m e , resid ents a nd freq u e n t

upper cam p u s. A I I o f recent co n str u ct i o n ,

vis i t o rs m a i n t a i n d iversity a nd e x posure t o

these modern h a l l s for w o m e n a re tastef u l l y

T h e rema i n i n g h o u ses ( I vy , E v ergreen a nd

d i ffere n t cu l t u res a nd sty les of l i v ing .

f u r n i shed a nd i n c l u d e attract ive l o u nge

A l p i ne) are men ' s res i d e n ces w i th lou nges, st u d y roo m s , and k i t chen fa c i l i t ies. Each

fac i l i t i es.

h o u se i s a co h esive u n i t w h i ch encou rages

R es i d e n ce h a l l s or t h e i r sub-d i v i s i o n s usu a l ly referred t o a s " ho uses" , have

S t uen H a l l , adjacent to t h e ad m i n i stra t i o n

part i c i pat i o n in i ntra m ura l , soc i a l a n d

st u d y roo m s , i n fo r m a l l o u nges a n d

b u i l d i n g a nd t h e u p per c a m p u s q u a d ra n g l e ,

academ i c prog ra m s .

recrea t i o n a r eas. K i t chen ettes a nd l a u ndry roo m s are ava i l a b l e a nd conve n i e n t .

i s o ne of t w o co - ed u ca t i o na l h a l l s o n cam p u s . St u e n is d iv id ed i n t h e m i d d I e , north w i ng w o m en , so uth w i ng m e n .

I n add i t io n to th ese f a c i l i t i e s , t h e U n iversity m a i n t a i n s 2 6 a pa rt m e n t s o n

so l id a r i ty . S t ue n i s usu a l l y reserved b y upper-c lassmen .

are p rocessed accord i ng to d a t e s rece ived .

ca m p u s fo r marr ied s t u d e n t s , b o t h two and Com mon l o u nge and recreat i o n fa c i l i t ies, a co m m o n residence gover n m en t , a nd co m m o n th ree-bedroom u n its. A p p l i cat ions for fam i l y apartments sh o u ld b e made t h rough act i v i t ies encou rage co n s i d erab l e h a l l

71

the O f f i ce o f t h e B u s i ness M anager , a nd

P f l u eg e r , a n att ract i v e b r i ck stru ct ure , is t h e o n l y w o m e n ' s resid e n ce on lower cam p u s . I t has a cco m m odat i o n s fo r 1 94 wo m e n . Foss H a l l , l ower ca m p u s , i s co m p r i sed o f 1 6-ma n l iv i ng u n its wh ich e n co u rage t h e estab l i sh m ent of perso n a l l i v i ng env i r o n m e n t s . T h e h a l l is d iv id e d i n to N o r d i c H o use ( no rt h h a l f ) a nd O l y m p i c H o u se ( so u t h h a l f ) , a n d pro v i d es c o n ve n i ent access t o t h e a t h let i c co m p l e x .

T h e Coed H o u s i ng C o m m i t t ee , t h e

H i n d e r l i e H a l l , o n t h e so u t h s i d e o f u p per

S t ud e n t A f fa i r s a r e i n vo l ved i n a n ongo i ng

R es i d ence H a l l C o u nci l a nd the O f f ice o f ca m p u s , is t h e o n ly resid e n ce h a l l in t h e

exa m i na t i o n of coed u ca t i o n a l h o u s i n g .

q u ad ra ng l e a r ea wh i ch i s excl u s i v e l y

Add i t i o n a l coed u n its w i l l beco me ava i l a b l e

men .

for

a s d em a nd a n d s i t ua t i o n d i ctate.


Eastvold C hapel ( 1952 ) facilitates student worship, concerts, spe cial events and plays It also contains classrooms, work areas, stage and a radio stud io; stud ios, ensemble practice rooms and individual practice rooms for the music departmen t; and a devotional chapel. The Sw i m ming Pool ( 1965 ) encloses a sw i m m ing area 42 by 75 and a diving area 30 to 35 feet as well as d ressing room faci Iit ies.

ACADEMIC AND SE RV IC E FAC I L I TI E S

72

Tacoma-Pierce Ad min i strat ion B u ilding (1960) ho uses university administrative o f f i ces, classrooms, facu lty o f f ices, stud ios and master control for clo sed c i r cuit television and a chapel-audito riu m . The Robe rt A . L . Mo rtvedt Library ( 1966) , a multi-media learning center , contains over 145 ,000 publ ished and recorded items and provides an optimum learning environment of comfort and pr ivacy . I t also houses U niversity Photo Services and the Computer Center. Xavier Hall (1937 remodeled 1966) , houses classrooms, fac u l ty o f fices and Central Services. Ramstad Hall (1947 re modeled 1959) conta i n s laboratory classroom, library, museum, research and o f fice faci l itie s for the D epartments o f Biology , C hemistry and Physics. I

Memo r ial Gy mnasium (1947) p rovides classroom and activity areas for the School of Phy sical Education and accommodates intramural and interco Ileg iate ath let ics.

Olson Physical Educat ion Aud itorium (1969) facilitates campus recreational activ i t ies includ ing l ectures, the performing Artist Series, popular entertainment and athletic events. Attractions inc lude a U ni-Turfed aud itorium and an Astro-Turfed fieldhouse; handbal l , squ ash, padd leball and sauna facil it ies; shower, locker and dressing rooms. Add it ional phy sical edu cation facilities include lighted tenn is co urts, a nine-hole golf cou rse and numerous athletic fie lds. The Nursing-Art Complex ( 1955 remod eled 1971) houses art studios, o f f i ces and classro o m s as well as o ffices and special facilities for the department of nursing The University Center (1970) includes food service facilities, lounges, meeting roo ms, bookstore, bowling alley s, mu sic listening. room, game rooms, p rivate dining rooms, Chris Knutzen F ellowship Hal l, student government o ffices, stu dent publ ications offices, cof fee sho p and "The Cave", a stud en t operated coffee house. Col u mbia Center ( 1962) contains a cafeteria, coffee shop, bakery and gol f pro shop Student Heal th Center ho uses o f fices f o r the University doctors and nurses, out-patient treatment areas and beds fo r day pat ients The Schoenfeld Greenhouse (acqu ired 1971) includes both cold and warm rooms and a potting area .


admission Each i n terested st udent w h o a p p lies for ad m i ss i o n i s con sid ered o n h i s meri ts, h i s ind i v id u a l ta l e n t s a nd ach ievemen ts, a nd rega rd l ess of race or faith _ We l o o k for acad e m i c a nd perso n a l t r a i t s w h i c h w i l l enab le h i m to su cceed a t the U n iversity. We ad here to t h e fo l lo w i ng cr iteria i n ev a l u at i ng st u d ents : G ra d u a t i o n fro m an accred ited h igh schoo l or ev i d e n ce of satisfactory w o r k in a n accred ited co l lege . 2 . C+ ( 2 5 ) grade po i n t average ( G PA ) a nd c l ass r a n k in the u p per hal f for h igh schoo I stu d e n t s. Tra n sfers m u st have a 2 . 0 co l l e ge GPA. 3 . Sat isfactory s cc res o n Co l lege E n t r a n ce Ex a m i n at i o n Board

1.

2.

1.

74

S c h o l a st i c A p t i tu d e T e st ( C E E B-SAT) or the American Col lege Test (ACT) . (Not requ ired of transfers.) 4 . Acceptab l e references.

Reco m me n d ed H ig h Schoo l Cou rse I t is recommended , but not req u i red , t h at the h igh schoo l preparat io n i nclude : Eng l ish , 4 u n its; elementary a lgebra , 1 unit; p l a ne geometry , 1 u n it; soc i a l stud ies, 2 u n i t s; o ne foreig n l a nguage , 2 un i ts; o n e laboratory science, 1 u n i t; ele t ives, 5 un i t s , i nclud i ng typ i ng .

F O R M A L APP L I CAT I O N : Subm it The Uniform App lica tion for A dm ission to Four- Year Colleges and Universities in the State of Washington . Ava i l ab l e from h igh sch o o l co u n se l o r s or the P L U Ad m iss i o n s O f f i ce.

A pp l i cat i o n mater i a l s may be submitted any t i me after c o m p l et i o n of yo u r j u n i o r yea r . Ad m ission d e c i si o n s a r e made after December 1 , u n l ess yo u req uest a n Ear ly Decis i o n. C a nd idates are genera l l y sent no t i ficat i o n wit h i n 1 0 days of our rece ipt of the cc m p l eted app l i cat i o n

$ 1 5.00 APP L I CAT I O N F E E : A $ 1 5 fee m u st accompany your a p pl i c a ti o n or be m a i led separa t e l y . T h i s non-refundab Ie serv ice fee does not apply to your a c cou nt. Make checks/mo ney orders payab l e to Pac i f i c Lutheran U n ivers i ty a nd mail to D irector of

I f a h igh school student has decided u po n P L U a s h i s f i rst cho i ce , h e may b e o ffered adm ission as ear l y as O ctober 1 of h i s

Ad m i ssi o n s.

3.

E D U CAT I O NA L T R A N SC R I PTS Yo u r h igh schoo l transcripts must i nclude al l work t h rough your jun ior yea r . I f you are a h igh school graduate when you apply , y ou must present comp lete academ ic reco rd s .

T w o 4. R E F E R E N C E S c h a r a c t er/academ i c eva luat io ns must be prepared b y p r i n c i p a l s , counselo rs, pastors or other q ua l if ied perso ns. The PLU Adm issio ns Off ice w i l l supply the forms.

Proced u re s : E nter i n g F r eshmen Students are ad m i tted for e i t h e r the fa l l

R EQU I R E M E N T : All enteri ng f reshmen must subm i t scores from either t h e Co l lege Board E xam i n a t io n E n t r a nce S c h o lastic Aptitude Test ( C E E B -SA T ) o r t h e A m erican

o r spr- ing se mester . A d m ission to the fa l l term car r ies perm i ss i o n to attend t h e p r' e v i o u 5 su m m er sess i o n s. Spr i ng accepta nce approves e n ro l lrne nt i n t h e J a n u a ry i n te r i m. We suggest t h e fo l l o w i n g a pp l i cat i o n d ead l i nes fa l l se mester Ju ly 1 ; spring semester - J a n u a r-y 1 . The fo l lowing creden t ia l s are requ ired :

Co l l ege Test ( ACT ). You are encouraged to sat i sfy the test requ i rement in the fa l l o f yo u r se n i o r yea r , espec ia l l y i f y o u p l a n to r eq u est fi nancial aid. R eg i stra t i o n proced u res a n d forms are ava i l able at h ig h school co u n se l i ng o ff i c es.

5. TEST

Early Decision

senior year. S A T or ACT scores f rom t h e previous May or Ju l y a r e acceptable. Early Decisio n students are given prefere n t i a l treatment i n campus housing a nd financial a i d . An E a r l y Decisio n form is ava ila b le f rom the Adm i ssio n s Off ice. I f a n Early Dec i sion is u nfavorab l e , a stud ent may st i I I be considered for regular adm issio n _

E a r l y Ad m i ssion Po l icy Q u a l i f i ed

s t u d e nt s i n terested in acce l erat i ng t h e i r ed u cat iona l p ro gra m may b eg i n work toward a d egree after co m p l et ion o f the j u n i o r year or f i rst sem est e r of the se n io r year in h igh scho o l . Cases of early a d m iss i o n a r e i n freq u e nt and eva l uated i nd i v i d u a l ly Min i m u m requ i rements : 1 _ R e com mendati o n from the sec足 o ndary sch o o l and assurance t hat a h igh sc hoo l d i pl o ma may be obta i n ed ( a nd in so m e cases after successful co m p l et i o n of spec if ied co l lege wo r k . ) 2 . C o m p l et i o n of all grad u a t io n requ i rements e x cept fu II resid ence. 3 . H igh schoo I r a n k in the top quarter. 4. C o m p l i a n c e with ge n e r a l adm iss i o n s proced u r es a nd po l i c i es of the U n iver sity.


Proced u res: Tran sfer Students

req u i re m e n t s accepted .

If

you

co l lege,

have you

attended may

have

good

stand i n g

at

the

d ep a r t ments w i I I d eterm i n e w h i c h

the

ad m i ssio n

cou rses

ex a m i na t i o n repo rt accepta b l e to

and

p r ev i o u s

perso n a l i n st i t u t io n .

U sua l l y , a C grade po i n t average

(2 .0)

2.

toward

APP L I CAT I O N FEE S u b m it a $ 1 5, n o n -ref u ndab le app l i catio n fee.

from

O f f i cia l all

3.

d i r ect l y

Ad m issio ns

O f f i ce .

schoo I

tran scr i pts

of

necessary i f they are not I i sted o n

4.

C L E A R A N C E F O R M T h e Off ice of the Dean of S t u d en t s at your most recen t l y attended ( f u I I -t i m e ) i n st i t u t i o n m ust c o m p l ete a clearance form ( p r o v i d ed by P L U Ad m i ss io n s O f f i ce) .

5.

T w o R E F E R E N C E S c h a r a c t er/academ i c eva l u a t i o n s m ust be prepared b y i nst ru cto r s , co u nselors, pastors or other q u a l i f i ed perso n s . P L U Ad m issi o n s Off ice p rov i d es t h e f o r m s .

reg istrar

t r a n sfer d egr ee

will

records progress

c o m p l et i o n

until a

work

at

ev a l uate

and chart

of

create

all a

i n d i ca t i ng

a ny

2.

com m u n i ty

or

j u n i or

co l l ege

(96

from

the

core

not

off i c ia l ly

accepted

two-year

and

is a p p l icab l e at the b eg i n n i n g

of

the

te r m .

If

c i r c u m stances

n ecess i t a t e

stud e n t m u st take t h e f i n a l seven

enr o l l ment

and

cou rses

Ad m issio ns

i s not i f i ed

sem ester

h o u rs)

until

A D V A N C E TU I T I O N PA Y M E NT $75 .00 advance t u i t i o n payment due fo l low i ng an o ffer of ad m i ssion. T h e pay ment is t h e s t u d en t ' s ack nowledgement of acceptance and g uaran tees h im a p l ace i n t h e st u d e n t body a nd

T o q u a l ify a s a d egree cand idate , a

(28

p h ys ica l

reserves h o u s i ng if req uested . I t is cred ited to the stud ent 's acco u nt

q u a r t er) ho urs

i n st it u t io n .

4.

a

A is

the

in

of

c a n c e l l at io n the

D i rector

of

i n w r i t i ng

before M a y 1 , t h e amou nt

residence.

wi

l l be

ref u n d ed . T h e f i na l refund d at e for i n t er i m

U n a ccred ited Ed u catio n a l Experi ences 1 . C red its earned in u n accred ited schoo l s are not transfer a b l e at the time of ad m issio n . E val uat i o n and d ec i s i o n on such cou rses w i l l be made after the stud ent has been i n attenda n ce at t h e U n ivers ity one semester. 2.

1 5 , and for 7 5

3.

TWO F O R M S : A S t u d e n t Perso na l F o r m a n d an I nformat io n and H o u s i ng Card m u st b e co m p l e ted and ret u r ned w i t h advance t u i t io n payment.

F u l l - t i m e stud ents who have not been i n

C o u nc i l o n E d u cat i o n .

attendance for o ne semester o r more may

Tran sfers a n d F resh m a n A p p l icants F i na l i z i n g Al l Offers of Ad m i ssion 1.

is Decem ber

3pr ing semeste r , J a n u ary 1 5 .

T h e U n i vers ity a l lows up to 5 co urses of U S A F I cred i t a n d u p to 5 cou rses for m i l i ta ry cred i t , provid i ng t h e total of t h e two d o es not exceed 7 '12 cou rses. The U n ivers i ty uses the cred i t reco m mendat ions o f t h e Amer ican

3 . T h e U n iversity does not gra n t cred i t for co l l ege l evel G E D tests.

Eva l uatio n of Cred i ts The

gr aded

"0"

be w i t h h e ld

semester ' s

cred i t

prov i d ed ,

t h e repo rt i s a p p roved .

h igh

cred its are

co l l ege t r a rlscr i p t s.

1.

are

co u r ses

grade C or ab ove a p p l y

of 64 semester

the P L U

Official of

col lege- l eve l

student m ay tra nsfer a max i m u m

prev io u s

to

A

form

t h e P L U H ea l t h S erv i ce. S t ud ents

U n ivers i t y .

i ns t i t u t i o n s m u st b e sent b y t h o se i nst i t u t ions

maj o r

st u d ent has successfu l I y co m p l eted

$ 1 5 .00

transcr i p t s

sat i sf y

grad u a t i o n .

courses w i l l o ne

F O R M A L A P P L I C AT I O N S u b m i t a f o r m a l a p p l i cat i o n for advanced stand i ng ( fo r m prov ided by P L U Ad m i ss ions O f f i ce) .

T R A NSC R I PTS

G e ner a l l y , carry i ng

is

T h e fo l l ow i ng credent i a l s a r e req u ired

3.

will

requ i rement s .

reg u lar ad m i ssio n .

2.

stud ent ( 2 % co u rses o r more) must su b m i t , at h i s ow n expense and o n

accred ited

requ i r ed in a l l attem pted co l l eg e w o r k for

1.

h o u rs

schoo l s a n d

for

Cand idates m u st

a cadem ic

tota l

an

app l y

w i t h adva n ced stand i ng

and

I nd i v id ua l

PHYSICAL

E X A M I N AT I O N

Before reg i strat i o n , each f u l l - t i m e

Readm ission of F o rmer Students

seek

read m ission

app l i ca t i o n

for

by

o b ta i n i ng

re-e nt r a nce

fro m

an the

Ad m iss i o n s O ff i ce u n l ess t h ey h a v e b e e n approved , at t h e t i m e of last enro l l m e n t , f o r a L eave of A b sence. S t u d ents w h o have b e e n d r- opped f o r acad e m i c o r d i sc i p l i nary reaso ns m u s t sub m i t a l etter


of pet I t l o n for re i n statement. Those dropped for academ ic reasons must iden tify a facu l t y member wi l l i ng to a ct as a spo n sor and adv i ser if read mitted . Re-entering students who h ave attended a nother co l l ege i n the i n te r i m m u st request that a tra nscr i p t be sent fro m that i n st i t ut ion direct ly to the d i rector of ad m issions. The resid ency requirement as stated for tra nsfer stud ents app lies a l so to re-entries.

Ad m i ssion of N o n - Degree Stu d e nts Persons e ighteen yea rs of age or o l d er desi r i ng to enro l l i n two courses or less may be ad mitted as non-degree stud ent s w ithout sub m itt i ng appl i ca t i o n for regular status. Cred its earned in t h is manner wil l be evaluated as to t h e i r acceptability if the stude n t beco mes a candidate for a degree. Non-d egree stud ents w i s h i ng to transfer credit s to anot her i nstitution will be i ssued 7 6 transcr ipts w h i ch i n d i cate t h e non -d egree status.

Ad m issi o n to the D ivision of G rad uate Stud i es Procedures are out Iin ed i n the Gradua te Ca talog.

H o n ors at E ntra n ce P L U confers Ho no r s at E nt ra n ce i n accorda nce with criteria estab lished b y those i n stitutio n s which are members of the C E E B. Honors at Entra nce recog n izes outstandi ng h igh schoo l achiev em e nt and anticipates superior perfor ma n ce at the u niversity l eve l . These award s h ave no i n t ri nsic monetary va l ue.

Ad va n ce P l acem ent Opportu n ities 1.

V I A T H E ADVANCED P LAC E M E N T PROGRAM OF TH E CE E B : Students receiv ing scores of 3 , 4 , or 5 o n Co l lege E n t r an ce E x amination Board

Advanced P lacement E x a minations may be g iven both adva nced p laceme n t and cred it toward g radua t io n . E x act prov isions are dependent upon the subj ect matter f ield I nquiries are we lcom ed by the Ad missions Office. 2. V I A LOCAL ADVANCED P LAC E M E N T EXAM I N AT I O N S A n u mber o f departments and s c hoo Is o ffer stud ents the opportu n ity to take p l a ce ment examinations so they may be accurately advised as to the level at w hich t h ey ca n mo st advan tageously begi n t h e i r studies. When a student receives a superior score on such an exam i nation, and when his stud y of the subject matter was not a necessary part of the course work which wo n him his h igh schoo l d i p loma , credit may be gra n ted toward g raduatio n. I nqu iries are wel co med by the acad e m i c deans and the provost.

financial aid T he U n iverS i ty p rovides fi nancial a i d to stud ents who wou ld b e unable to attend without assi sta n ce . The aid co n sists of sch o l arsh i p s , grants, t a l ent award s , loa n s a nd o p p o r t u n i t i es for p ar t -t i m e emp loy ment . E ligi b i lity f o r a i d i s b a sed pri m ari ly on f i na n c ia l need as d eterm i ned from i n fo r m a t io n sup p l ied o n the Co l l ege Scho larsh i p Serv i ce (CSS) Parents' Confidential S tatement ( PCS ) Need is the difference between tot a l stud ent expenses a nd the a mo u nt the stud ent and his fami ly ca n p rovide for ed ucation. Taken i n to co nsideratio n are i n co m e, assets, age of paren ts, number of ch i ld ren in the fam i l y , nu mber in co l lege , and other perti nent factor s . Aid is usual l y awarded i n t h e fo r m of a " package" co nsisting of any of the

opt ions l isted above. All g if t a id for wh ich a stud ent qua l if ies i s awarded f i r st , with any unmet need b ei ng met w i t h loan s and/or work .

How to App l y 1 . Sub mit

a Paren t s' Co nfidentia l S tatement (or S t ud e n t F i na n ci a l S t a t e m e nt) to the Co l l ege Scho larship Service no later t h a n F ebruary 1 for maximum co n siderat io n . (Avai lab le fro m high school coun se li ng o r co llege cou n se ling offices, the Col l eg e Scho l a rsh ip Service, o r the P L U F i n a n cia l A id Office ) 2. App l y a nd be offered admissio n to t h e U niversity. 3 . S u b mi t a P L U F i nancia l Aid app l ication ( no t req uired of fresh m e n ) ) .

Types of Aid 1 . President's Scho l a r s h i p s : Begin ning in the 1 9 7 2- 7 3 acad e m i c yea r , the

U n iversity w i l l award 40 President's S cho l arsh i p s of $500 each to students i n recog n it ion of outstand足 i ng academic ach ievement i n h igh school a nd i n ant i c i pat ion of superior performance at the co l lege leve l . T hese scholarsh ips are made w ithout regard to f i na n c i a l need mak i ng all qua l i f i ed students el i g i b l e . To be co nsidered , a student must have a 3.7 5 h igh schoo l G PA and be offered ad m i ssion to the U n iversity. T hese awards are renewa b l e if the stud ent qua lif ies for the Dea n's List ( 3 3) each year 2.

G ift Aid : S cho larship s, ta lent award s , U niversity gra nts, minor ity gra n t s , foreig n student grants, Educatio n a l O p po rtunity G rants (federa l ) and nursing grants. I n additio n to i t s ow n scho larship funds, the U niversity has at its


d i sposa l the f o l low i ng Ir est r i cted f u nd s , genera l l y awarded to those

Women o f R o t ary S ch o l a rsh i p

I f a f i na n c i a l n eed is d e m o nstrated t h rough the C o l l ege S c h o l a rsh ip

stu d e n ts who have co m p leted t h e i r

S i q u e l a nd Y o u th S cho larsh i p ,

S e r v i ce ,

Wa l ter R eed N u r s i ng S cho larsh i p

f r esh m a n y ea r : A id A sso c i a t i o n f o r L u th era ns

A l u m n i Scho larsh i p F u nd A m er i ca n Asso c iat i o n o f U n iversity W o m e n S eho larsh i p H el e n C l i f t Bell S cho l a r sh i p s Jo r u n n B re i l a nd Scho larsh i p F u nd O . A . Brow n F u nd

Carl D a l k M e mo r i a l S cho larsh i p C hao-L i a ng C how S ch o l a r sh i p I d a A . Dav id F u nd F a c u l ty M e mo r i a l S ch o l a rsh ip F u nd F a i t h L u t h era n C h u r ch of P o r t l and

R e c o g n i zed

T eag l e Fo u ndat i o n

i nc l u d i n g

R e v . a n d M r s. H a l vor

fac u l ty /staff members may receive

P i erce Co u nty Scho l a rsh i p W o m e n ' s A u x i l i a ry o f P i erce

reg i stra t i o n .

of

the

time

of

$50 per

Techno logy

Stoa M e m o r i a l S t u d e n t L o a n F u nd J . P . P f l ueger S t ud e n t L o a n F u nd

M r . a nd M r s. W . H i ld i ng L i n d b erg E ndowed S cho l arsh ip Lute C l ub S c h o l arsh i p ( s) L u thera n Bro t h erhood L eg a l R eserve

at

a nd p rov i d ed they

students are a l so e l ig ib l e to receive t h i s grant when b o th a r e e n ro l led as f u l l - t i me stud ents.

These grants must be applied for in the Business Office a t or fo llo wing registration and will b e credited a f ter el igib il i t y has been establish ed.

F u nd

L ud v ig a nd C l a ra Larson S cho l a r sh i p

the

have no t received any other U n iversity gra n t o r award . Marr ied

L i ly C E k ern F u nd

J eanelte O l so n- D i a n a P a u l - M i r ia m

sc hoo l

main su p po r t for b o th is g i ven b y

D e l t a Kappa G a m m a S t udent L o a n

E ld er S c h o l a rship i n M ed i ca l

stu d e n ts from attend i ng

t h e i r p a re n ts

J o h n S . B a k er Loan F u nd

M a r i e H u th Loan F u nd

fa m i l y

the sa me t i m e , p r o v i d e d that the

J . P . C a r l stro m M e m o r i a l L o a n F u nd

G er h a rd K i rk ebo M emor i a l Loan F u nd

5 . St u d e nt E m p loyment : O ff-ca m p u s a nd u n iversity e m p loyment i nc l u d i ng t h e wor k /stu d y prog ram . 6. Law

E n forcement

Loans

and

Ed ucatio n

grants

for

O . J . S t uen A l u m n i Loan F u nd

Program :

O . A . T i ng e l stad Loan F u nd

t h o se

Wo m e n ' s C l u b of Taco ma

p u rsue careers in l aw en forcement

i n vol ved

i n or p l a n n i n g to

R ev o l v i ng Loan F u nd

L i fe I n su ra n ce C o m p a ny

P L U F a cu l ty Wi ves S cho larsh ip

two o r m o re same

Wo men Loan F u nd

Drs. Larso n , W i c k s , R eberger a nd

S ch o l arsh ip

at

Grants i n the amount of

A nt o n A nd erson Loan F u nd

R ev. Kar l K i l ia n M e mo r i a l F u nd K i n sman Award s Lad ies of K iwa n i s Award

S e l m a a n d M ag n u s N o d tved t

( not

ch i ldren)

spec ia l gran ts, the amo u n t to be a n n o u n ced

A l u m n i A sso c i a t i o n Loan F u nd

W . H . H a rd tk e S�m i na r y S t u d e n t S cho lar sh i p F u n d

M a rgaret N istad M e mor i a l S c h o l a r s h i p

d epend e n ts

m a r r ied

T u b ercu l o s i s A sso c iat i o n o f

A m e r i ca n L u t h era n C h u rch

J o seph G a rd n er S cho l a rsh i p O laf H a lvorson S cho larsh i p

Pro f essio n a l C h ap ter , S c ho l a rsh i p

enr o l l ed

Tacoma L u m ber m e n ' s S c h o l a r s h ip

3 . Loa ns : i n c l u d i ng N a t i o n a l Defense S t ud e n t Loan ( N D S L ) , N u r s i n g S t u d e n t Loa n , F ed e ra l l y I n sured S t ud e n t Lo a n a nd v a r i o u s rest r i cted u n i vers i t y loa n funds wh i ch i ncl ude :

R ebecca S choenfeld G a rd ner a nd

M u P h i E p s i lo n , T a c o m a

be

$700.

semester sh a l l b e g i v e n to each of

S ch o l a rsh i p F u nd

S c h o l arsh i p s

may

A stu d e n t m u st be f u l l - t i me to be e l ig i b l e .

M ed i ca l S o c iety S ch o l a r sh i p

D r . a nd M rs. W . B . B u r ns F u nd

S ch o l a rsh ip f o r Sea l b earers

i n crea sed to a m a x i m u m o f

T h o r m od sgard S ch o l a rsh ip

F r a n k S . B a k er S cho larsh ip

B u r z la f f M e mo r i a l S ch o l a rsh ip

grant

T h e A m er i ca n L u t h eran C h u rch

S cho larsh i p

C a l i fo r n ia S ch o l arsh i p F ed erati o n -

D istr i c t L u t her League o f t he D i v i s i o n o f C h a r i t ies,

A l trusa C l u b , Taco m a C h ap ter

the

C o n f id e n t i a l

S tate m e n t ,

S o c i a l S er v i ce S c h o l a r sh i p F u nd

S cho larsh i p

Parents'

sp o n sored b y N o rth P a c i f i c

Co m p lete

4.

M i n ister's Dependent a nd Spe c i a l

G ra nts : A n a n n u a l g r a n t o f $ 2 0 0 " m i n i m u m " w i l l b e ava i l a b l e u po n a p p l i ca t i o n to all u n ma r r i ed dependent c h i ld ren ot a regu la r l y orda i n ed , act ive m i n ister or m i ssio nary of a C h r i s t i a n c h u r c h .

d eta i l s

on

pr oced u r es

and

p a r t i c u lars o f t h e f i na n c i a l a i d p rogram are ava i l a b l e f r o m the F i n a n c ia l A i d O f f i ce at t h e U n ivers i t y

Vetera ns Affai rs The

U n ivers i ty

IS

approved

by

the

77


Veterans Ad m in istration a s a n i n stitution of higher education for veterans and invites veterans to use its facilities in acq u i r i ng and completing their educatio n . Forms are availabl e in the Registrar 's Office . Stud ents including any new transfer st udents, who will come under Publ ic Law 634 ( Orphans B ill) or the Veterans Readiustment Benefit Act of 1 966 (New G I Bill ) , must co ntact the Veteran s Ad ministration Regio nal Office first for a cert ificate of eligibility and be guided by them thereafter. This should be done as soon as possible after accepta nce by the University and before arrival on campus. D u r i ng registratio n all recipients of aid through the Veterans Admin istratio n should fill out the q uestionnaire provided by the Registrar.

78

In order to obtai n full subsistence , undergraduate veterans and eligible o rphans of veterans must carry three courses. Graduate veterans should consult the Registrar co ncerning load for full subsistence, as thi s may vary . Orphans must carry at least o ne and one-half cou rses to cla i m subsiste nce. For information regarding evaluation of credits, see U naccredited Ed ucational Exper iences in Ad m issions area of catalog .

costs

72-73 73-74 The University mai ntains its high ed u cational standard s at the lowest possible cost . Contribut ing friends o f the U n iversity , both individual and corporate, ancj the support of cooperating Lutheran churches are instrumental, in maintaining I'easonable tuitio n rates. In reality , the i ndividual student pays o nly about 75% of the actual cost of his education . A n

extensive f i nanc ial a i d prog ram , o u t I i ned in this catalog , assists stude nts in meet i n g U niversity costs. Tuition

A student at Pacific Lutheran pays only for those courses i n which he enrol ls . Tuition charges are determined by the number of courses for which a student registers. Depending upon his fina ncial situation , his career goals and his aptitude , a student may arrange his program in a variety of ways. No student is penalized for either accelerating or delay ing his progress toward a degree. I n every case, the studen t pays o nly for those courses he needs or desires to fulfill his requirements. The charge for one full cou rse is $250 .00 ($62 .50 per quarter course which translates to one se mester hour) for up to three cou rses within a semester . Beyond three courses within a given semeste r , the rate is $200.00 per course ($ 50 00 per quarter course). The sched ule of tuitio n rates is as follows: Courses

(Semester Hours) 1 -1 1

y'-2%

(62.50 $ per quarter course)

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

3 3Y. 3)1, 3% 4 4Y. 4)1,

above 4)1,

Costs

above 1 8

750 .00 800 .00 850.00 900 .00 950.00 1 ,000 .00 1 ,050.00 (50 .00 per quarter course)

(Interim tuition is at the $62 50 per quarter course , student may register for 1 Y.. same rate as for one cou rse:

same rate of except that a courses at the $250 .00)

Special Fees * U n i versity Center co nstruct ion fee, per semeste r , charged students e n ro l l ed in 2)1, . . . . . . $ 1 0 .00 courses or more . . . . . . . 50 .00 Aud it . . . . .

.

Credit by exam ination , per course u n it of credit sought : Departmental exam i n ation 2 5 .00 .

.

•

.

.

.

.

. . . . . . . 1 5 .00 CLEP . . . . . . . . . . . . Late registration (appl i cab le on a n d after the . . . 1 0 .00 f irst day of classes Change of registrati o n . . . . . . . . . . .5 .00 Master's thesis m i crof i l m i ng a nd b i nd i ng , . 1 8 .75 per copy . . . . . . . .

Placement . . . . . . . 1 0 .00 Graduate n u rse examination . . . . . .8 .00 N u rse locker fee deposit to be pa id in clin i ca l area ( r ef u ndable) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 .00 Bowl ing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 0 .00 Sk i i ng (off-campus) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40.00 Student pa r k ing, f u l l -t i m e , year per m i t . 1 0 .00 Student parking, part-t ime, year permit 3.00 Student health and accident i n surance ( 24 hour, 1 2 month coverage) , optiona l (fee subject to change by underwriter) . . . . . 39 .00 * Author ized by Associated Students, P L U . 1 972-73 fee w i l l complete A S P L U pl edge and fee w i l l not be assessed i n 1 973-74 . .

.

_

.

.

Private Music Fees F u l l-time students - M u s i c Maj o rs Pr ivate i n struct io n fee i n c l uding use of practice rooms, per semester . . $ 60 .00 F u l l-t i me students - N o n Mu sic Majors Private i nstru ct i o n , in clud ing use of practice roo m , per semester : One th irty-m i n ute period per week 75 .00 One sixty-m i n u te per iod per week 1 2 5 .00 Board and Room Room w ith telephone and board is f ur n i shed to a resident student, per semester, as fol lows:

1 972-73

1 97 3-74

$530 * Fall semester $51 0 * I n ter im (board o n ly ) * * 60 70 4 30 410 Spr i n g semester * I nd ivid uals w h o graduate i n December 1 9 72 (fa l l o n l y ) w i l l be charged $41 0. ( $ 430 i n 1 9 73) . * ' A room fee of $50 .00 is charged those students req u i ring rooms who did not reside o n campus i n t h e fa l l semester.

Stude nts rooming off campus will be fur nished board i n, the U niversity dining hal ls at $300 per semester. The above rates in clude three meals per d ay , Monday through Satu rday , and brunch and din ner on Sunday . Meals are not served d u r ing Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter vacat io n s, nor any other days when the resid ence halls are closed. Si ngle room occupancy, when avai lable , i s by special arrange ment w ith the Director of Housi ng. The additional charges will be an nounced at the time of regi stration.


F a m i l y Apart ments : Two bedroom

(10

un its) i nc l u d i ng water,

per month . . . . . . . . . . . . $45.00 Three bedroom (4 u n its) i nc l uding water, per month . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 .00 Evergreen Cou rt ( 1 2 apts.) two bedroom i ncluding a l l ut i l it i es , per month . . 90 .00 Fam i l y apartment deposit . . . 50.00 .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

A deposit of $50.00 m u st acco mpany a reservat io n for fa m i l y apart m ents. T h i s deposit w i l l be h e l d by t h e U n iversity u nt i l the occupant vacates the apartme nt, or cancels his reservation . O n e mo nth's advance rent fo r apartments is req u i red . Payments S emester b i l l s are d ue and payab l e at the time of reg istra t i o n u n l ess the opt iona l PL U Budget Plan (descr ibed be low) is selected . A late charge of 1 % w i l l be made if any pay ment is not paid when d ue. Students rece i v i ng sch o l arsh ips, grants or loans m u st co m p lete all necessa ry arrange ments well in advance of reg istrat i o n . Students who are securing a loan fro m f i na ncia l i nst i t u t i o n s o r agencies (e.g . a federa l l y i n s u red ban k loan) w h ich may st i l l be pend i n g at the t i m e of reg i strat io n , m ust have a 'letter o f co m m i t ment f r o m the lender acceptab l e to the U n iversit y . Sched u .l e of Tuition Deposits New students are req u i red to pay a $ 7 5 .00 deposit on tuition after accept a n ce and before May 1, . Th is is not refu ndable after May 1 fo r fa" , December 1 5 for i n ter i m , and J a n uary 1 5 fo r spr i n g semester app I icat ions. R etu r n i ng st udents are req u ired to pay a $ 7 5 .00 deposit on tu it i o n wh ich is not refu ndab le after May 1 or January 1 5 for spr ing semester appl icat io ns ex cept for those who e n ter the armed serv ices. PLU Budget Plan A n al ternat ive method of m eeting th e total ed u cational costs is the PLU Budget Plan W h ich may be er ected by a l l st udents. T h e P L U Budget Plan consists of eq ual m o nt h l y payments beg i n n i n g

M a y 1 0 , 1 9 72 o r 1 9 7 3 a nd con c l u d ing Apr i l 1 0 , 1 9 7 3 o r 1 9 74. S c h o l arsh i p s , gra n ts and l o a n s w i l l be deducted i n arr i v i n g at t h e balance req u i red t o b e met in th e eq u a l pay ment p l an. C o m p lete deta i l s , together with ex amp les of how the plan operates, are ava i l a b l e from the Bus i n ess Office.

be draw n o u t at t h e req u est of t h e st u d e n t . Personal Property The U n iversity is not respo nsi b l e fo r perso n a l property of the stud e n ts or the fac u lty m embers. T h e U n iversity can n ot be h e l d acco u nta b l e for a ny losses.

Restrictions The U n iversity reserves the r i ght to w i t h h o ld stat ement of h o no rab l e d i sm i ssa l , transcr i pt of records, or d i p l o m a , u n t i l a l l U n ivers i t y b i l l s have bee n paid, or until sat i sfactory arra ngements have been m ade w i th the Busi ness Off i ce . S t ud e nts w i l l not be perm itted to reg ister for a new semester unt i l a l l b i l l s are pa id fo r the previous ter m . Cred it for fut u r e servi ces t o b e rend ered to the U n iversity by the st ud e n t ca nnot be u sed to meet t h e i n i t i a l pay men t . Mo ney due f o r w o r k performed w i l l b e g iven o n l y if t he st udent's account is curren t . Refunds Par t i a l t u i t i o n refund may be made w h e n w i t hdrawa l f r o m t h e U n ivers ity results fro m s i c k n ess or causes occu r r i ng beyond the co ntro l of the stud en t . I n no case w i I I fees b e ref u nd ed . R ef u nd may be made i n the fo l l ow ing pro portions. . . . . . . . . 90% One week or less . . . Between o ne a nd two weeks . . . . . 80% Between two and three weeks . . . . . 60% B etween three a nd four weeks . . . . 40 % Between fo ur a n d five weeks . . . . . . 20% .

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No refund after five weeks.

R ef u nd s o n board w i l l not be m ad e for co n t i n uous absences of less than one week and n o refund w i l l b e made for the first wee k ' s absence. A pro-rata refund w i l l be mad e for necessary w i thdrawal fro m the U n iversity . No refu nd w i l l be made for a n y U n iversity tr i p s of a ny k i nd , such as cho i r , cho rus, band , orchestra, ath letics, and so fort h . Depository for Students Students desi r i ng to leave cash in the B u s i n ess Office may do so . Th i s cash may

79


80


academic calendar 72 73 Summer Session 1 972 Monday , J u ne 1 9 Wed nesday, J u l y 1 9 T h u rsd a y , J u ly 20 F r id ay , Aug u st 1 8 F r iday , Aug u st 1 8

Classes begin 7: 30 a . m . First term ends Classes begin - 2nd term Summer Session closes Wor sh i p Service and Commencement

FaJi Semester 1 972

82

S u nday , September 3

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Wed nesday, September 6 T h u rsd ay , September 7 October 13 15 Wed nesd a y , November 22 -

Mo nday . November 27 F r id a y , December 1 5

Orientati on and Registration Classes begin 7: 50 a . m . Homecoming Weekend Thanksgiving Recess begins 1 2 : 20 p.m . Thanksgiving Recess e nds 7: 50 a . m . Semester ends

Interim 1 973 Wednesd a y , Janu ary 3 T u esd a y , January 30

Begins Ends

Spr i ng Semester 1 973 M o nday, F ebruary 5 T uesday , February 6 M o n day February 1 9 F r iday , Ap r i l 1 3 M o nday, Apr i l 2 3 F r iday . M a y 2 5 S u nday, May 27

Registration Classes begin 7: 50 a.m. Washington 's Birthday Holiday

Easter Recess begins 6:00 p . m . Easter Recess ends 4 : 30 p . m . Semester ends Worship Service and Com mencement


73 74 Summer Session 1 973 Monda\" J u n e Wed nesd ay, July Thursd ay , J u l y F r id ay , A ugust F r id ay , A ug u st

18 18 19 17 17

Classes begin 7: 30 a.m. First term ends Classes begin - 2nd term Summer Session closes Worship Service and Commencement

Fall Semester 1 973 S u nday , September 2

Wed nesday , September 5 Thursday , Seprember 6 14 O cto ber 1 2 Wednesday , November 2 1 Mo nday , November 2 6 F r iday , December 1 4

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Orientatio n and Registration Classes begin 7: 50 a.m. Homecoming Weekend Thanksgiv ing Recess begins 12: 20 p.m. Thanksgiving Recess ends 7: 50 a . m . Semester ends

I nterim 1 974 Thursd ay , Jan uary 3 Wed nesday , Jan uary 30

Begi ns Ends

Spring Semester 1 974 M o nday , February 4 T u esd ay, February 5 M o nday , F eb ruary 1 8 F r iday , A p r i l 5 Monday , Ap r i l 1 5 Friday , M a y 24 S u nday, May 26

Registration Classes begi n 7: 50 a.m. Washington's Birthday Hol iday Easter Recess begins 6:00 p.m. Easter Recess ends 4: 30 p .m . Sem ester ends Worship Service and Commencement

83


ACADEM I C P R OC E DU R ES

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Registration

The norma I course load for f u l l-time students i s 3Y> to 4 courses per semester i ncluding physical education . A nor � l l nterim load is

one cou rse with a maximum of 1 � . The m i nimum load for a fu l l t i m e student is 2Y> courses a semester. O n ly a st udent with a B (3.0) average or better may register for more tha n 4 courses per semester without the consent of the Off i ce of t h e Provo . A student engaged in m u ch outsid e wor k for sa lf-support may be restr icted to a reduced academic load . New stud ents, who have received notice of a ccepta nce from the Off i ce of Admissions, may register by ma i l . Other students must reg i ster on designated days; those fa i l i ng to do so w i l l be charged a late registration fee. In the spring semester, students who plan to return in the f a l l may pre-reg ister by m a k i n g a $75 .00 deposit on next year's tu it i o n . A student m u s t register f o r each new semester on t h e deSignated days and i s not offi cia l ly enrol led u flt i l his registrat ion has been cleared by the B u siness Off i ce and his Place of ReSidence form has been processed .

Changes in Regi stration

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AU ­ ·WF *WP ·WM -

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R egistrat ion changes may be made d u n ng the f i rst week of the semester without charge . After the first week changes i n registrat ion are subj ect to a $5 .00 fee. N ecessary forms are obta i nab le from t he Office of the R egistrar. Stud ents sho u ld note that there are 4 week and 6 we k l i m its respective ly for adding or dropp i ng courses. Students officially withdrawing from a class after the fourth week will receive a WP (withd rawal/pass i ng ) , a WF (withdrawa l /fa i l i ng) o r a W M (withdrawal/ med ica l ) . Th ese grades are not used i n ca lculating grade point average, but w i l l appear o n the st udent's semester grade report and be included in review of academ i c status. T he grade of W replaces WP , W F , and WM on the transcr ipt . A n unofficial withdrawe l from a co urse will be recorded as E. No student may withdraw d u r i ng f i n a l examination week.

Withdrawal from the University

Students wishing to withdraw from the U n iversity m ust obtain a withdrawal form from t h e Office of the R eg i strar. It is a lways to the student's advantage to make hili w ithdrawal official . If he i s withdrawing f o r a specified period of t im e (e.g. ona semester to one year) , h e may wish to obtain a Leave of Absence form . A student I S titled to honorable dismissal from the U niversity i f his record of conduct i s satisfactory and if he has satisfied f i nancial obligations.

The Gradin g System

. . . Students are greded accord ing to the fol lOWing deSignations: 4.0 grade points per course, credit given A 3.0 grade points per course, credit giyen B 2 .0 grade po i nts per course, cred it g iven C1 .0 grade point per course, cred it g iven D0 grade points per course, no cred it given E -

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The grades l i sted below are not lISed in ca lculating grade point average. cred it given ( Honors: Used o n l y for courses u n i q ue to H I nterim) credi t g iven ( Pa ssing) P­ no credit g ivan ( F a i l ing ) F ­ no credit given ( I ncomplete ) l ­ no c r ed i t givan ( I n Progress: App l icable on l y to certa i n IP courses i n w h i c h work extends beyond a reg u la r ter m )

no cred it given (Audit) no credit given (Withdrawa l / F a i l ing) no cred it g i n (Withdrawal/Passing) no credit given (Withdrawa l/Med i ca l ) ·Wi l l appear a s W o n permanent record .

I ncomplete ( " I ") grades i nd i cate that a student is passing but has been unable to complete h i s work because of circumstances beyond his control. A n I ncomplete Report Form must be f i led for each i ncomplete given. To secure cred i t , the incomplete m u st be converted into a passing grade within six weeks of the f o l lowing semester of residency, un less an official exception is granted by the provost. After a lapse of two years, i ncomplete grades cannot be converted . I ncomplete grades wh ich are not converted by removal become part of the permanent record but are not computed i nto the grade point average. M ed i ca l withdrawal ( " W M " ) is g iven when a course is not co m pleted due to m ed i ca l ca u se . The "WM " does not affect the grade point average. I n Progress ( " I P") signifies progress in a course wh ich normally runs more than o ne semester to co mp let ion . In Progress carries no cred i t u nt i l replaced by permanent grade. Any course may be repeated by an u ndergraduate student . The higher of t he two grades earned is used in computing the cumu lative grade poi nt average, but cred it toward graduation is a l lowed o n ly once.

Pass/Fail Option for U ndergraduate Students The pass-fa i l option permits students to explore subj ect areas outside their known abil ities and to add a broader range of courses without being forced to compete with majors who are speci a l iz i ng in those areas of study. 1 ) The pass-fa i l option is l imited to a total of four co urses and to no more than two courses per ca lendar year. 2) Courses required for graduation in a degree program may not be taken under t h is option except when a first course has been taken prior to declarat ion of a major. 3) Pass-fa i l grades do not alter the grade point average, but cred its earned count toward graduat io n . 4 ) The pass-fa i l option agreement must be f i led with the instructor no later than two weeks after the b eg i n n ing of the semester. 5) Pass-fa i l students are responsible for all course work and examinations. 6 ) A n entire course w i l l not be co nverted to t he pass-fa i l option b y student vote.

Exclusive Pass/Fail Courses

Departments or schoo ls are authorized to offer a course exclusively on a pass-fa i l basis. Such a course should pursue goa ls primarily co n cerned with a ppreciat ions, va lue co mmitments, creative achievements, or the l i ke. Decisions to offer exclusive pass-fa i l courses are reported to the provost and this fact is made known to students before they reg ister for these courses. Exclusive pass-fa i l courses may be used to meet major or U niversity requirements provided they have been approved by the facu lty . Taking exclusive pass-fa i l courses i n no way affects the student's perso na l pass-fa i l opt i o n .

Academ ic Probation Warn ing s l ips are given to any student who is doing " D " or " E " work a t the e n d o f t h e sixth week.


A student is placed on academic probation if he fails to keep his grade point average (cumulatively and for the immed iately pre ceding semester) at or above 2 .0 . The student and h i s parents (if the stud ent is under 21 ) receive official notice of such act io n . The probationary student may be advised to reduce h i s academic or extra-curricular activities or both. The enro l l ment of a student on probation who fa i l s to earn a cumulat ive average of 2.0 by the end of h i s probationary semester is automat i ca l ly term inated . He may , however, apply for reinstatement to the Academic Status Committee through the provost. To be consid ered for reinstatement, a student must secure a facultY sponsor. This agreema nt must be presa nted in writing to the committee. A student whose petition for rei nstatement has been denied may apply for readmi ssion after the expiration of one semester un less info rmed otherwise.

Evidence of this approval and of payment of t h e fee should be presented by the student to the professor who w i l l admin ister the exam inatio n . A student may, with t h e approva l o f the i n structor o r the depart ment, gain cred it for an audited course which he has not previously taken for cred it by passing an examination set by the instructor or department. The fee for such examination is the difference between the aud iting fee and the tuition the student would normal ly pay for the course. Subj ect to departmental cond itions (as presented in paragraph two l . the University also a l lows cred it through the Col lege Level Examination Program ( C L E P) sponsored by the College Entrance Examination Board. Further in q u i r ies as to fees and procedures shou ld be made to the Counseling and Testing Center of the U n iversitY . The U n iversity does not gra nt cred it for co l lege level G E D tests.

E ligibility for Student Activities A ny regularly enr o l led , f u ll-time student (2% co urses) is e l igible for par t i cipat ion in U niversitY activities. L i m itat ion of a student's activities, based on academic performa nce, may be set by i nd ividual schools, departments or organizations. A student on academic probation is not eligible for i nterscholastic competition; he may a l so be ad vised to curta i l part icipation in extra -curricular activities.

Informal Study To encourage liberal learning of a l l kinds, over and beyond enrollment i n courses leading toward formal degrees, the U n iversity offers a variety of opportunities for i nformal study : Guest of the University Status. Teachers and offi c ia l s of other institutions, visiting scholars and artists, and other professional persons who wish to use Un iversity fa cil ities for independ ent study may apply to the provost for cards designating them as Guests of the U n iversity. Such persons, in their use of facilities, wi l l deter to th e needs of students and faculty members. Auditing Courses. To a udit a course is to enro ll, with the permissio n of the instructor, on a non路credit basis. An a ud itor is enco u raged to part i cipate f u l l y in class activities but is not held accountable for examinations or other written work nor does he receive a grade. I f the instructor approves, the course may be entered upon the transcript as an "Audit " . With the approval of t h e i nstructor or the department a student m a y ga in credit for a n audited co urse b y passing a n examin ation set by the instr uctor or th e depa rtment. The fee for such exa m i nation is the difference between the a ud it i n g fee and the tuition the st udent would norma l l y pay for the co urse. Visiting Classes. Members of the academ ic community are encouraged to visit classes which interest them for whatever length of t i me they desire (students, a ud itors, faculty and staff perso nn e l , regents, alumn i , Guests o f t he Un iversity , a n d spouses and mature chi ldren of these persons.) No fee is charged for the privi lege. Because regu larly enrolled students must be given fi rst consi derat ion, persons des iring to visit classes are req ui red to ask permission of the instructor. Visitors are guests of the classes and must conduct themselves accord ingly.

Classification of Students Frashmen : Students who have met t h e entrance requirements. Sophomores : Students who have completed 7% courses and have earnad 1 5 grade points. Junior"s; Regular studants who have f u lf i l led lower d ivision re q u i rements and have completed 1 5 courses and have earned :J) grade pOints. Seniors : R egular students who have completed 22% courses and earned 45 grade po ints. Honors Courses, Graduat ion Honors Ho nors cou rses are offered by certa in departments for students of superior academic ab il ity . Freshmen in the upper ten per cent of their high school classes and with acceptab le co llege aptitude test scores are el igible for consideration. R eg i stration in honors courses IS by invitation only_ Degrees with honors of Cum Laude, Magna Cum Laude and Summa Cum Laude are granted . A student must earn an average of 3.30 for Cum Laude, 3.60 for Magna Cum Laude and 3.90 for Summa Cum Laude. Physical education activities are not included in the determining of honors.

Credit by Examination Students are permitted, within l imits, to obta i n cred it by exa mination in l ieu of regular enrollment and class attendance. The max imum amount of cred it wh ich may be earned in t h is way and applied toward a bachelor's degree is 7'10 courses (30 semester hours) . I nd ividual departments or schools are responsible for determin ing acceptab le test scores as well as the app licabi l i ty of such course cred its toward the f u l f i l lment of specific degree req uirements with in academ i c major programs. Arrangements for departmental credit examinations must be mal1e by the student with departmental cha irman, daa n , or d i rector.

F R ESHMAN COU RS E SCH E D U L E Students shou ld stud y the departmental or interdepartmental programs in which they intend to major. If they f i nd no more specific schedu Ie suggest ions, or if they have no tentative major preference, they should select courses on the basis of the general guide below. Freshmen w i l l receive help in course select ion from their adv i sers, genera l l y choosing between 3 to 4 co u rses eac h semester. Health and Physical Education ( Yo cou rse each semester) : PE 1 00 should be completed during the freshman year but may be pre<..-eded by a 200-level activities course - any of those nu mbered through 254. Foreign Language (one course each semester ) : Either first or second year courses, depending upon the student's preparation and

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whether or not h e w ishes to meet Option I o r I I o f t h e Col lege o f Arts a nd Sciences. E n glish Composition or Proficiency (one course) Religion (one course ) : Whenever possible, a rei igion course shou Id be i ncluded i n a student's freshman year progra m . The remainder o f courses should b e selected f r o m lower d iv i s i o n offerings i n the f i n e arts, h isto r y , l iterature, social or natural sciences or mathematics.

D EG R E E R EQU I R EM E N TS Baccal aureate Degree Bacca laureate degrees are conferred on those students who have completed a mi n i mu m of t h i rty-two approved courses ( 1 28 semester hours) with a grade point average of 2 .0 (School of Education 2 .25) a nd who have met t h e fol lowing requirements for grad uat ion : 1 . The completion of a major as deta i led by each school or department, consisting of a m i n imum of s i x courses, at least three of w h i ch must be taken in the j u n ior and senior years a nd a m i n i m u m of two in residence on t h i s campus. 2. A minimum of ten courses nu mbered 300 o r above. 3. Two interim courses, at least one of w h i ch is outside tile major area of study. 4. A m i n i m u m of one year in residence on the campus and comp letion of at least seven courses during the senior year.

Basic Core Requirements - All Bacca lau reate Degrees 1.

E nglish Proficiency A student may meet the Eng l i sh proficie ncy requirement i n one of three way s : ( 1 ) b y ea r n i ng a score of 3 o r better o n the C E E B Advanced Placement Examination in Compositio n ; (2) by

86

ea r n i ng a passing grade in E ng l i sh 1 0 1 (or its equiva le n t ) ; or (3) by passing the proficiency examination a d m i n i stered each semester by the U n iversity Department. This Eng l i sh examination tests t h e student's knowledge o f gremma r and usage as well as his a b i l ity to commu n icate effectivel y i n a b r ief essay. It is recommended that students entering with a C E E B Verbal score of less than 500 take E ng l ish 1 0 1 d u r i ng the f i r st semester of the freshman year. Other students should f u l f i l l the prof icie ncy requirement as early as poss i b l e , preferably d u ri ng the freshman year, a nd u s u a l ly no later tha n the second semester of the sophomore year. A j u n io r student who has not demonstrated proficiency w i l l be granted o n l y provisio nal status until he has successf u l ly done so. No student will b e perm itted to enro l l for h i s senior year if he has not met the proficiency requ irement. A student who fails the Engl ish proficiency exa m i nation a second t i me must en ro l l i n English 1 0 1 .

2.

3.

4.

Fine Arts (1 course)

Met by a co urse in a r t , music or co m m u n i cation arts with the exception of the fol lowing courses: F i ne Arts teach i ng methods courses, CA 1 2 3, CA 380 and journal ism courses. Hist or y and L i t er at ure (1 course, in cl ud i n g foreign literature) Met by a course from these departments with the exception of H i storv 225; E ng l i sh 1 01 , 3 1 8 , 400 and 403. Ph iloso ph y (1 coursel Met by any p h i losophy course except logi c .

5. Religion (2 courses)

A lower-d ivision course shou ld be taken before the end of the sophomore year . The second course mav be chosen f rom lower or u ppe r -d i v ision offer ings, or may be th e Senio r Seminar, a n i n terdiscipl inary offering that w i l l help the student t o see the

relevance of rel ig ious issues and thought to h is major field. Transfer students entering as j u niors or seniors meet this requirement with one course from a l l offerings i n the departm en t .

6. Natural Sc i en ces a n d Mathematics ( 1 course)

Met by a course from th ese departments with the exceptio n of Earth Scien ces 1 0 1 .

7. Socia l Sciences ( 1 course)

Met by any course from eco no m i cs, geograp h y , po l itical scien(.'8, psychology o r sociology with the exception of Psycho logy 1 1 0 . 8 . Physical Ed u cati on (1 course) Met by four Y.. -cou rse activities i nc l ud i ng P E 1 00; should be met by the end of the sophomore year; a l l activities are graded on A, Pass or Fa i l ba sis.

9 . Cand idates i n the Col lege of Arts and Sciences must meet a foreign language requirement u nd er Option described by that Co l lege.

I,

I I

or

I I I

as

lim itations - All Baccala ureate Degrees 1 . Not more than 1 0 courses earned in one department may be appl ied toward the bachelor's degree i n t h e Co llege of Arts and Sciences. 2. Non-music majors may count toward graduation no more than two course u n i ts (8 hours) in music e n sembles. 3. A maxi m u m of six courses (24 hours) of correspondence a nd/or extension work may be counted toward the de gree. Any such courses m u st be approved by the registrar. 4 . The max i m u m n u mber of courses a ccepted from a j u nior college IS 1 6 (64 semester hours) . No j u n ior co l lege credit w i l l be accepted after a student has completed 1 6 courses (64 hours) from a l l in stitut i o n s attended.

Graduation Any student expecti ng to f u lfi l l degree requirements within the calendar year is requ ired to f i le his application for graduation with the reg istra r . T here are four degree-completion dates (end of f a l l semester i n t e r i m , spring semester , and second summer sessio n ) . Degrees are' formally conferred at May and A ug u st Commencement s. Statements of completion are issued upon request to students who q u a l ify for graduation at the end of fa l l semester and i nter i m . The actual date of grad u at i o n w i l l be recorded on the permanent records. A student may be awarded more than one bachelor's deg ree simu ltaneously provided that at least 7 additional courses are earned for the second degree. A total of 39 acceptable courses would be necessary betore the second degree cou Id be award ed . A student who is within one course of meeting a l l requirements may part icipate in May Commencement provided a specific plan for earn ing rema i n ing credit w i t h i n ten weeks has been app roved by the provost . H is statu s w i l l be designated o n the commencement program and his d i p loma w i l l be dated i n August. Students who plan to transfer back to Pa cific Lutheran U niversity for a degree (engineering programs) must appiy for grad uation prior to or d u r ing the f irst semester of their j u n ior year so that deficiencies may be met before the student leaves camp us. Attenda nce at commencement exercises is req u i red u n less the cand idate is excused by the provost.

SPE C I F I C R E QU I R EM E N TS College of Arts and Sciences Comprised of these departments and divisio n s :


Division of H u ma n ities E nglish Foreign La nguages Philosophy Relig io n D ivision of Natura l Scie nces B iology Chemistry Earth Sciences General E n g i n eering Mathemat ics Physics Division of Social ScienCtls Economics H i story Politi ca l SCience Psychology Sociology, Anthropology and Social Welfare Degrees Offered : Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Science

Foreign Language/Alternative Requireme nts . I n addition to meeti ng U niversity R eq ui r ements , cand .idates In the College must meet the requirements of Option I, I I , or I I I : I. Four courses i n o ne foreign language路 II. Two oourses i n one foreign languag e * O n e oou rse in logic, math o r stat istics One course in h istory , or one in Engl ish or la nguage One course i n h isto ry, or one i n English or language III. One course in socia l science , i nclud i ng geography One cour se in nat ural science One course in logic, math or statistics 路Option I may be sat isfied by four years of high school study in one foreign language. If the stud ent has less than four years, placement and credit would be determi ned by exa m ination. Freshmen plan n i ng to continue i n a foreign language begun i n high school should take the College Board P laceme nt Test offered d u r i ng orie ntatio n . (Th is test is requi red of those freshmen who plan to study Germa n , French or Spa ni sh . ) Continuation of a foreign language should not be deferred . Stud ents with 2-3 years of h igh school la nguage a nd wish i ng to co ntinue should register for the second-year oou rse . A student may receive credit for any language course in wh ich he is placed w ithout regard to h igh school cred it. F i nal decision of placement is made by the Department of Foreign Languages. A student may not receive credit i f he voluntarily elects a lower-level course than that i n which the departme nt piaces h i m . T h e fo reign la nguage req u ir ment i n Option I I m a y be met by sat isfactory scores on a prof iciency exami nation or by more than two years of h igh school work I n a sing le language. Two years are sufficient if the grade point average for the total u nits in that language is 3.00. Cand idates for the B . A . in Education who w i l l be majoring in Engl ish are req u ir ed to f u lfi l l a two-year fore ign language requir ement o r demonstrate equivalent prof iciency. N o course w i l l be a llowed to meet both U n iversity Requ i rements and College R equ irements. Where possible, oourses taken to ful f i l l requ irements sha ll be i n d ifferent areas. F o r exa mp le, a student f u lf i l l ing his U niversity h istory or literature requirement w ith a

course in h i story if he elects Opt i o n I I , should choose a oourse i n E ng l i sh or language to meet t h e requirement of the College.

Major R equirement A major is a sequence of courses in one area , usua l l y in one departme nt . A major shou ld be selected by the end of the sophomore year. The choice must be approved by the depart ment chairman (or in Classics by the program coordi nator ) . M jor requirements are specified in this catalog. The quality of work must be 2 .0 or better; "D" work may be counted toward graduation but not toward t he major. Recog n ized majors are: art French physi ca l education physics earth sciences bio logy chemistry German political science classics h i story psychology commu nication arts mathematics rel igion econ omics mu sic sociology E ngl ish Span ish philosophy ( Not more than 1 0 courses earned i n one department may be appl ied toward the bachelor's degree i n the College.)

SCHOO L OF BUSIN ESS AD M I N I ST RATION Degrees Offered : Bachelor of Busi ness Ad ministration Master of Busi ness Ad min istration (for deta ils, see Grad uate Catalog) Areas of concentration in bachelor's degree: acoou nting and systems, fi nance, market i ng, and perso nnel and i ndustrial management. Requ irements: Undergraduate candi dates are enrol led in the College of Arts and Sciences for at least one year of pre-busi ness studies. They may then transfer to the School of Busi ness Ad ministration after a successfll ily comp leted freshman year. Students considering graduate level study should seek early pla n n i ng advice from the faculty concer n i ng appropriate undergraduate course select i o n . Acaeditation: T h e u ndergraduate program i s accredited b y the American Asso ciation of Collegiate Schools of Business and the Northwest Association of Secondary and H igher Schools. The School I S affil iated with the American Associat ion of Col legiate Schools of Business as a member of the Assembly of the A.A.C .S.B., the Northwest U n iversities' Busi ness Ad min istration Conference, the Western Associat ion of Graduate Schools and the Wester n Association of Collegiate Schools of Busi ness. For admission requirements, degrae orograms and curricula, see the SchOol of B usi ness Admin istration sect i o n .

SCHOOL O F ED UCAT ION Degrees Offered : T h e u ndergraduate curricula lead ing to the Bachelor of Arts in Education meet the cert ification pattern in the state of Washingto n . See Education section and Graduate Cata log. Accreditatio n : The Northwest Association of Seoondary and H igher Schoo ls, The Washington State Board of Education and the preparation of elementary and secondary teachers, pr i nc i pals and guidance counselors, with the Master of Arts, the h ighest degree approved . The accred itation g ives PLU graduates reciprocity in twenty-eight states. Programs for the preparation of sd100l librarians, school nurses,

87


schoo l counselors, ad ministrators and supervisor personnel are ava i la b l e . The School offers work toward the conversio n , renewel or reinstatement of teach ing certif icates. For admission requirements, degree programs and curricu l a , see the School of Education sect io n.

SCHOO L O F F I N E A RTS

Comprised of these departme nts: Art Music Comm u n icatio n Arts Degrees offered : Bachelor of F i n e Arts Bachelor of Music Cand idates for the B .M . a nd B.F .A. degrees must meet U n iversity requirements and the specific requirements of the Departments of M usic, Art or Com m u n i ca t i o n Arts. For admission requ irements, degree programs and curricula, S8e the respective departmental S8ct io n s .

SCH OOL OF N UR S I N G Degree offered : Bachelor of Science i n N u rsing Accreditation: Washington State Board of Nursing and the Natio na l League for Nursmg. Graduates successf u l l y completing the State Board Examinatio ns (Registered Nurse) a re qua l ified to f i l l first level staff nursing positions i n health agen cie s. For admission requireme nts, degree programs and curricula, see the Nursing S8ct io n of t h i s cata log.

SCHOO L OF PHYSICAL E DUCATION

88

For program deta i l s , degrees offered and Physical Education sect ion of t h is catalog.

curricula, see

the

D I V ISI ON OF G RADUATE STUDI ES

The Division of Graduate Studies is an a l l -un iversity d ivision coord inating and i ntegrating the work of the schools and departments which provide g raduate level work. The U n iversity offers the following grad uate level programs * :

Ma ter o f Arts 1 . Education a.

E lementary or Secondary School Adm i n i strat i o n : For those wishing to qua l ify for the provisional or standard principal's cred ential (elementary, secondary or genera l ) . Students may major in t h is field without q u a l i f y i ng for a principal's credential. b. School Counselor Progra m : For those wish i ng to qualify as public school counselors (elementary and secondary) or stude nt personnel workers i n higher education. c , E lementary Classroom Teach i ng : For those wish i ng advanced work i n elementery teach i ng or wish i ng to qua lify as elementary school supervi sor s o r consultants. d. Secondary C lassroom Teachi n g : For those wi sh i ng to increase their preparat io n for teaching i n an area of social science.

2. Humanities A degree program designed for librarians, clergymen, teachers and others who wish to extend and broaden their u nd er sta ndi ng a nd appreciation of the various fields of the humanities .

3. Social Sciences

A degree program designed for perso n ne l workers in i nd u stry, welfare workers, l ibrarians, clergym e n , tea chers and others

wish i ng to extend and broaden their understand ing and appreciation of the various fields of the social sciences.

Master of Busin ess Ad m inistration A degree program designed to provide a thorough foundation for responsible leadersh i p in b u s i ness.

Master of Music A degree program designed to provide adva nced study in three basic areas: music education, performance, theory a nd composit ion .

Master of Natural Sci ences A degree program designed especi a l ly for teachers who need to extend and b roaden their knowledge in the fields of science a nd mathematics. *Deta i l s of these programs, i n clud ing admission requirem nts, proced ures, degree and research requirements, are conta ined i n the Graduate Catalog which i s available from the office of the Dean of Graduate Stud ies.

SP EC I A L P R OG RAMS FOR CA R E E RS Engineering The U n iversity offers two programs lead ing to careers i n engineer i n g . O n e, a four-year progra m, leads to a Ba chelor of Science in Engi neering Physics; the other is a pre-eng i neering program for students who w i l l transfer to an engineering schoo l . The engineering physics program prepares students for emp loyment in many d iverse i ndustries or for graduate studies i n o n e of m a n y areas of engineering. Optional courses at the j u n ior-se nio r level have been selected to f i l l the needs of students with special interest in civil engi neering, e lectr i ca l e ng i nee r ing, mecha n i ca l engineering and others. A more complete description of the E ng i neering Physics program is given i n the Physics secti o n of the catalog. The primary program for transfer stud ents, referred to as the 3-2 program, may a l so lead to a degree from Pacific Lutheran U n iversity. Students spend three years on this campus studying subject matters basic to all engineering fields and basic U n iversity core courses in humanities and social sciences. Two add itional years of f u l l路t i me study in a spec ific engineering d i scip l ine at another engineering school w i l l be required to beoome eligible for an engheering degree. After successful completion of the equivalent of 32 courses including the general U n iversity core requ irements, normally after one year at the other engineering school, students may apply for the B . S . degree from Pac ific Lutheran U n iversity. U nde r some ci rcumstances, qua l ified students may be accepted into the 2-2 plan by which they may transfer to an eng i neering school after spend ing two years at Pacific Lutheran U n iversity . Two more years at the engi neering school lead to the B .S. degree from that engineering schoo l . To facilitate transfer o f engineeri ng students, P L U current ly mai ntains 3-2 cooperative plans w i t h a number of major state and private engineering schools both wit h i n and outside of the state of Washington . All pre-e ng i neering students should apply for ad m i ssion i nto the program as early as poss i b l e and not later than t h e i r sophomore y ea r . They should co nsult the pre-eng ineering adviser to formulat e t h e i r p l a n s both with respect to t h e t y p e of e ng i neer i ng t h e y w i sh to study and the engi neering schoo l to w h i ch they plan to transfer.

Law

Most

law

schools

require at

least three years of

l iberal arts


studies; however, they regard four years of l ibera l arts studies a nd a Bachelor of Arts degree as better preparation for the study of law. In addition to meeting degree requ irements, the prospective law student is advised to complete at least one year of acco u nt ing and one course each of economics, history, philosophy, po l i t i ca l science, psychology, sociology and speech. The student should plan h is course seq uence accord i ng to requirements of the law schoo l i n wh ich h e i s i nterested . Students i n terested in law are u rged to reg i ster at the Pre-law Center in the Department of P o l i t i ca l Science. information on the Law School Admission Test ( LSAT ) , a circulating library of law school b u l let ins, a nd a newsletter, The Pre-Law Advocate, circu lated by the Center a nd other useful materials are ava i lable. I n add i t i o n , t h e student m a y w i s h t o d i scuss h i s program w it h the pre-law adviser, or w it h o ne of the law school professors and deans who visit from time t o time.

Medicine and Dentistry

Students desiring to enter the medica l or dental professions shou Id plan to devote not less than three years and preferably four years of study to secur i ng the broad ed ucational background req u i red . Professio na l schoo ls in these fields requ ire a thorough preparation i n science. They also recommend extensive study in other areas i n clud i ng t h e social sciences and h u ma n it ies. Early in the f irst semester of attendance at P L U the student should consult with the pre-med i ca l /pre-dental advisers i n t h e B i o logy Department . The pre-med ical and pre-dental curricula ere not majors i n themselves. The student should se l e ct Whatever major is of i nterest to h i m and shO u ld f o l low the requ irements for that maj or. I n addition t o whatever other major req u i rements t h e stude nt ma y have , he should complete t h e fol lowing courses: B iology 1 53, 1 54 , 253; Chemistry 1 1 5 , 1 42 , 331 , 332 , 333, 334; Math 1 33 (or equiva le n t ) , 1 51 (and preferably 1 52 ) ; Physics 1 0 1 , 1 0 2 ; E n g l ish 1 0 1 (a coa rse m u st be taken; the exa m i nation is not sufficient) ;_.Foreign Language (students who enter the University with two years of a modern foreign language may el ect to take a seco nd year course in the same language d u r i ng the freshman year. They should register for 201 , 202 . )

Bachelor o f Science in Medical Technology

Students plan n i ng careers as med ica l techno log i sts in hosp ita ls, physician's offices, o r pub l i c health bureaus shou ld consider ear n i ng a bachelor's degree in chemistry or biology. A student must t h e n complete a twelve-month internship i.l a n Amer i ca n M ed ical Associat ion accred ited hospital laboratory. U po n complet ion of t h i s internsh i p , t h e student i s e l ig ible to t a k e the exa m i nation given by the Board of R eg istry of Med ical Technologists of the American Society of C l i nical Patholog ists for cert i f i cation a s a n MT (ASCP) and to receive a second degree, the B .S . i n Med ical Technology. Early i ,l the f i rst semester of attendance at P L U , students should confer With the med i ca l technology adviser in the B io logy Department . The fo l lowing courses are requ i red : C hem istry 1 1 5 , 1 42 , 321 , 331 , 332 , 333, 334; B io logy 1 53 , 1 54 , 275; Mathemat ics 1 33. Very strongly recommended: Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 . Also recommended : B i ology 331 , 346, 441 ; Chemistry 404. Students must refer to their major department for the rema inder of major requirements.

Parish Work

Students desiring to enter plrisn work are encouraged to obtain a Bachelor of Arts degree . A parish worker is requested to perform duties in more than one f i e l d . Respo nsib i l it ies may be centered i n

o n e or more o f these areas: congregat iona l educat ion work, guidance of youth activities, home visitation , office and secretarial work, or conducting musical orga n izations. Students co nsideri ng church vocations are i nvited to confer with the chai rman of the Department of Religion or the assi�1:ant to t h e president for church relat ions.

Pharmacy

A student may take a sequence of courses at P L U in preparat ion for further work in pharmacy . The following schedu Ie has been approved by the School of Pharmacy at the U niversity of Wash ington as being equivalent to the first two years of their 5 ¡year course lead ing to the Bachelor of Science Degree i n P harmacy. Freshman year: (first semester) Chemistry 1 1 5 , Mathematics 1 33 (may be o m itted if trigonometry was taken in high schoo l ) , E ng l ish 1 0 1 , P . E .; (second semester) Chemistry 1 42 , Mathemat ics 1 5 1 , Co m mu n icat ion Arts 1 2 3, Religion 1 03 ( 1 03 w i l l transfer as a n elective ) . Sophomore year: (first semester ) Chemistry 331 , 333, B i o logy 1 53, Physics 1 0 1 , elective, (second semester) C h em i stry 332 , 335, Bio logy 1 54, Physics 1 02 , P . E .

Social Welfare

Students p la n n i ng grad uate social work study or employment i n 50cial work, soci a l welfare or other related h u ma n services should work out t h eir program In consu ltation with a social worker in the Department of Sociology, Ant hropology and Socia l Welfare. The social work sequence is open to any student and co nsists of Social Welfare co u rses 2 7 1 , 365 , 472, 475, and 476. T h i s sequence should be preceded by f o u ndat ion courses in the h u ma n i t ies, natural sciences, and socia l sciences. This w i l l be f o l lowed by an appropriate sequence of support i ng cou rses i n economics , pO l i t i ca l science, psychology and sociology. Cou rses should be selected in consulta t ion with a social worker i n the department. Choice o f foundation a n d supporting courses is based on t h e g u id e l i nes provided by the Cou n c i l o n Social Work Educat ion .

Theology

Pre-theo logical students should complete the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Besides the general degree requi rements, the American Associat ion of Theo logical Scho o l s recommends the fo l low i ng : E ngl ish - l iterature, composit io n , speech and related stud ies. At least 6 semesters. H i story - a ncient , modern Eu ropean a nd Amer i ca n . At least 3 semesters. P h i losophy - orientat i o n i n h istory, cont e n t a nd method . At least 3 semesters . Natura l Sciences preferably physics, chemistry and biology. At least 2 semesters. Social Sciences - psycho logy, sociology , economics, pol itical science and educat io n . At least 6 semesters, i nc l u d i ng at least 1 semester of psycho logy . Foreign Languages - o ne or more of the fo l lowing: Lat i n , Greek, H ebrew, Germa n , French. Students w h o anticipate post-graduate stud ies are urged to u ndertake these discipli nes as early a s possi b l e . ( At least 4 semesters.) R e l igi o n - a thorough knowledge of B ib l ica l content togeth er with an introd uction to major raligious traditIons and t heologi cal problems in the context of the principal aspects of human culture out l i ned abovs. The st udent may wsll seek co u nsel from the semi nary of h i s cho ice. At least three semesters. Of the possible majors, E ng l i sh , phi losoph y, religion and h istory are regarded as the most desirabl e . Other areas are, however , acceptable. _.

89


A facu lty adviser w i l l assist the student in the select i o n of courses necessary to meet t he req u i re men t s of the theo l o g i c a l scho o l o f h i s choice. Please co nstl it the cha ir ma n of t h e Department o f Religion .

I II I. I I I II

Urban Affairs

S

Students wish i ng to prepare themselves for career poss i b i l i t ies i n state and ioca l government may w ish t o enro l l i n t h e Urban Affa i r s Program . Admi n i stered i n the Department of P o l i t ical Science, t h e program co nsi sts o f a n i nterd iSCip l i nary concentra t i o n of eleven caur·ses. For further i nformat i o n refer to the description u nder P o l i t ica i Science.

COU R S E O F F E R I N G S : SCH OOLS AN D DEPARTM E N TS L i sted

in

this

sect ion

a re

co u rse

summa r ies of d egree requirements

descr i pt io ns

for majors

a nd

and programs

in the Co l l ege of Arts and Sciences, and t h e Schoo l s of Busi ness Ad m i n istrat io n ,

Educat i o n ,

F i ne

Arts, Physica l

Ed u cation a nd N u rs i ng . Detailed degree requirements, often

including supplementary sample programs, are available in each studen t's personal advising booklet which he receives as a freshman. T h e U n iversity ad v i s i n g system i s d esigned to faci l i tate o pt i m u m exposure between the st udent a nd h i s adv i ser f o r t h e purposes o f ta i lor i ng degree programs t o the

90

i nd i v i d u a l student's needs a r.d i n su r i ng that a l l U n iversity and departmenta l req u i rements are met w i t h i n the st ud ent's projected tenure at the U n iversity .

Course N u mberi ngs 1 0 1 -299 Lower Di v ision Courses: sophomores" u nless otherwise restr i cted .

Open

to

fres h m e n

and

300-499 U pper D i vision Courses: Genera l ly open to j u n iors and seniors u n i ess otherwise specified . A lso open to graduate students, and may be co nsidered part of a gra d u 81 e program provided they are not speci f i c r eq u i rements i n p re pa ra t i o n for graduate study . 500-599 G raduate Courses: N o r ma l l y open to gr a duate students o n l y . Upper d i v i sio n students may be permitted to en ro l l with the pe r m i ssion of t h e chairma n , d i re ct or or dea n of the acad e m i c u n it o fferi ng the COlJrse if a I prerequ isites have been met a nd the student has an above-average academic reco r d . · Upo n the approval of h i s adviser and the cou rse i nstructor, a may be assigned to an upper d ivision course if prereq u i sites have been met. 'ower d i v ision student

Course Offerings

Most l i sted courses are g iven every yea r . A system of a lternating upper d ivision courses is prqcticed in some departments, thereby a ss u r i n g a broader course offering. The U n iversity reserves the right to modify specif i c course r eq u i rements , to d i s co n t i nu e classes i n

which the

regi�ra t ion

is

regarded a s i nsufficient , and t o

withdraw

co u r ses.

Expl anation of Symbols

T h e number af t er the course t it l e i nd icates course cred it g ive n .

U n less otherWise specified , each u n it h a s credit . Symbols are e x p l a ined as f o l lows:

the

value of one course

a/y als

G

Course Co u rse Co u r s e Course Course Co u r se Course Cour se

offered tirst semeste r second semester first and second semester i n sequ e n ce either se m ester in the summer in a lternate yea r s in a lternate su m m er s u sed on grad uate programs as a major

offered offered offered offered offered offered may be

Co n se nt I n a co u rse rest r icted "co nse n t " , consu ltat i o n with t h e c o u r se i nst ructor IS requi red p r i o r to e nr o l l m e nt , u n l eSS o t h erw ise

specif i ed .


91


ART No formal entrance standards a r e ma i ntained by this departme n t . Students are encouraged to select courses relating t o t h e i r i nterest a s e a r l y as possible i n order to reasonably determine aptitude and suitab i l ity for this area of study . Transfer students w i s h i ng advan ced sta n d i ng m ust submit a portfo l i o of previous work to the cha i rman of the depart ment . The depart me nt reserves the right to reta i n , e x h i b i t , and reprod u ce student work sub m i tted for credit i n a ny of its courses or progra ms . Use or mater i a l s fee requi red in certa in courses. BAC H E LO R OF ARTS : M i n i m um of seven art courses i n cl u d i n g : 1 1 0 , 1 60 , 2 50 , 230 or 350, 365 , 370 and a course i n art history . A max i m u m of ten courses may be applied toward t h is degree. Candidates are registered i n the Col lege of A rts and Sciences and must complete a l l its requirements.

92

B AC H E LO R O F F I N E A RTS : M i n i m u m of fourteen art courses i n cl ud i n g : 1 1 0 , 1 60 , 250 , 260 , 2 30 or 350, 365, 370, 499 ( if required ) , three add itional courses in art h istory , and electives i n area of emphasis to complete requirements. Courses i n a r t teaching methods may not be i n cluded . Students are encou raged to choose a n area of emphasis by their j u n ior year. A reas i n clude: P i ctor ia l Media (drawi n g , pa i n t i n g , pr i ntma k i ng ) , Mater ials M ed ia (sculpture, cera mics, g lass, meta ! s ) , M u l t i -Media, or Art H istory . Candidates are registered i n the School of F i ne Arts and m u st com p l ete all its requirements. Foreign La nguage i s not req u i red i n programs w i t h �1 ud io emphasi s . For a r t h istory e m p h a s i s , F r ench a n d / o r G e r m a n is required as determined by the student's adviser. BAC H E L O R Educat i o n .

OF

A RTS

IN

E D UCAT I O N :

See

School

330

C E R AM I CS I I Advanced techniques in cera m i c co n struction and exper iments i n glaze form at i o n . May be repeated for cred i t . Prerequ i s i t e : 2 30 . I I I

338

G LA SSB LOWI N G Working techniques and i nd i vidua l expression i n blown glass. May be repeated for credit . Prerequ isite : o ne semester of cera m i cs and consent . I I I

341

E L EM E NTA R Y ART E D UCAT I O N ( y, ) Various projects a n d media suitable f o r the i n struction of art i n the e l ementary schoo l ; emphasis o n developmental theory . I II

350

SCU L PT U R E I I Concentration on a particular m ed i u m of scu lpture. A lternating semesters i n metals or wood, or other media on a n occasional bas i s . May be repeated for cred i t . Prerequisite : 250. I I I

365

PA I N T I N G Media a nd techn iques o f pa i n t i ng w i t h emphasis o n a n individual ized expressio n . May be repeated f o r cred it . Prerequ isite : 1 60 . 1 1 1

370

P R I N TMA K I N G M ed ia a n d methods of pr i n t ma k i n g , w it h a lternating semesters i n planographic techniques o r i ntaglio tech n iques. May be repeated for cred i t . Prereq u isite : 1 60 . I I I

492

ST U D I O P R OJ ECTS A tutorial course w i t h i n d iv id u a l investigation in a particular m ed i um , for major students o n l y ; media and instructors w i l l be a n n o u n ced each semester . May b e repeated for cred i t . Prerequisite: S e n i o r status and consent of i n st r u ctor a n d department cha irma n . I "

494

G R A P H I CS WO R KS H O P (Y,-1 ) Design and execut ion of p r i n ted mater ials under the d irect i o n o f the u n iversity graph i cs coordinator ; emphasis o n technical procedures and problems in mass com m u n i ca t io n . Prerequ isite : consen t . I " B .F A . CA N D I DACY E X H I B I T I ON ( no cred it) E x h ib i t i o n of undergraduate wor k by B . F .A . candidates i n studio areas; students are responsib l e for sched u l i n g , i nsta l la t i o n , p ub l i city a n d f i n a l d isposition o f wor k .

of

STU D I O Basic media co u rses may b e repeated for credit a s noted, for two or th ree semesters as approved.

1 60

D R AW I N G Tech n iques and composit i o n . I "

media

of

drawing

w ith

emphasis

on

230

C E R A M I CS I C er a m i c materials and techniques i n c l ud i ng h a n d -b u i l t and wheel-thrown methods, clay and g laze for ma t i o n . I ncludes a survey of cera m i c art . I I I

499

250

SCU L PT U R E I Various techn iques and materials of sculpture and their i n f l uence o n three-d i mensional for m . I ncludas study of the h u m a n f igure. I I I

H I ST O R Y A N D T H E O R Y

260

326

L I F E D RAW I N G A m u l t i -media exploration o f h uman form . May be repeated for cred i t . Prerequ isite : 1 60 or consent. I I F I LM M A K I N G Theory a n d practice o f photography as a n a r t for m . A lternating sect i o n s i n st i l l photography or cinematograp h y . M a y be repeated for cred it . I I I

1 10

T H E V I S U A L A R TS Western ma n's expressio n in t he visual arts seen through t he perspective of h i storical development. I I I

280

T W E NT I ET H C E NT U R Y A R T V isual a r t s i n the twentieth century, w i t h a n introduction to aesthetical theory . I I

32 5

H A B ITAT A N D E N V I R O N M E N T H uma n habitats a nd sett lements socio-c u l t u ra l i nf l u ences. Emphasi s

as express i o n s of on contemporary


environmental problems as they relate to individual life styles and community planning. I 382

A N C I ENT A RT Art of the a ncient Near East , Greece and Rome. I a/y

383

M E DI EVA L ART Western European styles from the decline of Rome to the beginning of the Rena issance. I I a/y

384

R E N A I SSANCE A RT European art of the fifteenth and sixteenth cent uries with an emphasis on Italian developments. I a/y

385

B A R OQUE ART Styles in Eu ropean art from the late si xteenth century through the period of the Rococo . I I a/y

440

S E M I N A R I N ART EDUCAT I O N (!4) A study of i nstruction in the secondary and higher schools including appropriate media and curriculum development. I I

487

N I N ETEE NTH C E N T U R Y ART Art of the ni neteenth century from neo-classicism through Post I mpressio nism . I

490

S E M I N A R (%-%) Selected topics consider ing some aspect of the visual arts. May be repeated for cred it . Prereq u isite: consent_

497

RE S EA RCH I N ART H I STORY A tutorial cou rse for major students with research into a particular period or area of art h istory _ May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Senior status and consent of instructor and department chairma n . I I I

597

R ES E A R C H F o r Master o f Arts paper in art . I I I

cand idates w h o elect to write a research

and four approved electives. Required support i ng : E nglish 1 0 1 (The English Proficiency Exam may not be substituted ) , foreign language (Option I or I I ) ; two years of chemistry (required: 1 1 5 , 1 42 , 331 , 332, 333, 334); one year of physics ( 1 0 1 , 1 02) and math through 1 5 1 _ A ma x imum of 10 bio logy courses may be counted for graduatio n. CORE G ROUPS: Candidates for the B_A. or B _S . in B iology must take one course from each of the following groups : GR OUP I : Bio. 275, 340, or 364; GROUP I I : B io . 331 , 346, 444 o r Chem . 404*; GR OUP I I I : Bio_ 424, 475 or Anthro . 242 * . satisfies group but credit biology given "Not requirements_ Student would elect a b io logy replacement to fulf i l l major requirements_ B AC H E LO R Educat ion. 111

OF

A RTS

IN

E D UCAT I ON :

See School

of

B I OLOGY AN D M O D E R N MAN A liberal arts course for non-biology majors; selected topics w h i ch relate to ma n 's h i story and future, his art and wel l -being; the environment, reprod uction and birth control, popu lation, hered ity , evol ution and b iological contro ls. Lectures, laborato ries and discussions.

* 1 53 C E L L B I OLOGY A n i ntroduction to ce l lular and molecular levels of biological organizat ion; cell u ltra -structure and physio logy , energy b iochemical and genetics molecular t r a n sd u c t i on . development. R equired of all biology majors. Prerequ isite : co-registration in Chemistry or consent of department cha irma n . ( F ormerly l isted as 1 52 ) . * 1 54 OR GAN ISMAL B I OLOGY An introduction to h igher levels of b io logical organizations; organisms d iscussed in relation to their interacting organ systems, classification . evo lution and ecology_ Required of a l l biology majors. Prerequ isite: 1 5 3 and co-registration i n Chemistry or consent of department chairman . ( Formerly l i sted as 1 5 1 ) .

B I O L OGY

"1 61

A student wishing to major in bio logy is requ ired to apply in writing to the department. T h is may fol low satisfactory completion of Biology 1 5 3, 1 54 or approved equivalent. Transfers may apply for major status only after completion of one bio logy course at P L U . Each student must submit a propo sed course of study and should secure assistance of a faculty adv is.er for t h i s purpose. Students accepted for major status w i l l be notified_

H UM A N A N ATOMY Gross and m i cro-anatomy of the h u man body; d issect ion of the cat and other mamma l ia n organs. Not open to majors except by special permission from department cha irman. Prerequisite : one b iology course.

*1 62

H UMAN PHYS I O LOGY Functions of major human organ systems; emphasis on control and regulatory mecha nisms. Designed for physical education and correct ive therapy majors. Not open to bio logy majors except by permission of department chairma n. Prerequ isite: 1 61 .

*201

M I C R O B I O LOGY FOR N U R S E S T h e growth , contro l . physio logy , isolation a n d identification of micro-{)rga n i sms. especia l ly those wh ich affect ma n . Prerequisites: 1 1 1 and Chern. 1 0 3 or consent.

B A C H E L O R OF ARTS D E G R E E : Seven biology courses: 1 53, 1 54, 253; one cou rse from each of th ree core groups listed below; and one approved elective_ Required supporting : E ng lish 1 0 1 ( E nglish Proficiency Exam may not b e substituted ) ; foreign language (Option l or I I ) two years of chemi stry (Chem_ 1 1 5 , 1 42 preferred for one year, Chem. 331 , 332 , 333, 334 requi red for other year) and Math 1 33 or equivalent. Strongly recommended : Physics 1 0 1 , 102 and Math 1 5 1 . A maximum of 10 b iology courses may be counted toward graduation. BACH E LO R OF SC I E NC E DEG R E E : Ten biology courses: 1 53, 1 54, 253; one course from each of three core groups l i sted below;

93

*253 B I O LOGY OF T H E STEADY STATE The basic problems faced by plants a nd animals i n mainta ining themselves; structural adaptations, homeostasis, internal regulation, water and temperature control. gas

I

*Denotes laboratory session s.

I

ďż˝


the host-par site association; studies within the gamut of para sitic f orm s i n cl ud i ng vi r uses , oth er miao -<lrgan l sms and pl ant and a mma l p ra sltes . Prerequisit e : 25 3 or co nse nt .

e xchange , vascu lar systems, orientation and navigat ion, and i nter act io n between orga n is m s. Prereq u isite: 1 54; f i rst year chemistry recommended.

"275 M I CROB I O LOGY

*380 B I O OG Y TEACH I N G R ESOU RC E M ethods, ma ter ia l. and resources for preparing lecture, la bo ra to r y and field work in maj o r areas of b io logy ; designed for a l l teaching levels . S pecia l prepar ations required . Prerequ i site : 253 or consent .

The structure, physio logy , genetics, metabo l ism and eco logy of m i cro -o r gan i sm s. Prereq u isite : 253 or consent; o ne seme st er o rg a n ic che m i st ry r eco mmend ed .

' 32 1

* 324

ORN ITHOLOGY (V,} The study of birds with emphasis on local species; designed tor students with hobby interests a s w e l l as for advanc ed biology students. F ield tri p s . Pr erequisi t e: 253 or consent. N AT U RA L H I STORY O F V E R T E B R ATES his to r y and eco n o m i c importance of vertebr ates w it h the exception of b irds. F ield t r ips. Prerequ isite; 253. a/y 1 9 72-73 Classificatio n , natural

"331

-41 1

424

94

PLANT D I V ERS ITY A N D DISTR I BU T I O N A systemat i c i ntrod u ct ion to p la nt diversity. I ntera ct io n between plants, theor ies of vegeta t io nal d istributio n , h igher plant taxo no my . Prerequ isite: 253.

347

+361

' 364

C E L LU LA R P H Y S I OLOGY LABORATORY A ccompanies Cel l u lar Physio logy; exper i e nce i n techniques and types of instrumentation i nclud i ng ce l l fractionat ion, deter m i nation of metab o l i c sequences, use of radio tracers, protein assay , membrane phenomena, u ltracemrifugatio n, spectrophotometr y , Warburg respirometry. M a y be e lected o n l y by students with a serious i nterest and need fo r this type of t ra i n i ng . Co-requisite: 346 and co n se n t . COMPA RAT I V E ANATOMY A comparative study of vertebrates with d i ss ect ion representative forms. Prerequ isit e : 253. V E RT E BR ATE E M B R Y O LOGY Vertebrate

embryo

development

from

germ

cell

of

th r oug h

a/y 1 9 73-74

*375

B I OLOGY OF PARAS ITISM Parasitism as a mod e o f l ife; the nature of the parasite and of

'Denotes laboratorv sessions.

to

th eir

of

environment.

'

253; 424

P LANT F O R M AND F U N CT I O N P lant str ucture, f u nction a n d reproduct io n ; e mph as i s on sced

producing groups. Prereq u isites: 253; C hemistry 1 42 . Orga n i c Chemi stry I'!;commer.ded. ·441

V E RTE B RATE P H YS I O LOGY Pr i n ciple vertebrate o rga n systems a nd functions empha s i z i ng homeostatic relationships; lab o ratory i ncludas ex per ime nts I n c i r c u lation, electrocardiogra p h y , endocrine function, r es p i ra t io n , sensory mecil an isms, body f l u id chemistr y , temp e rature r eg u l at io n and a n i ntrod uct io n t o a ni ma ! surgery . Pr ereq uisites' 2 5 3 a n d Orga n i c Chemistry . Cell ul ar P h y s io lo gy recommended.

" 444 P L ANT PH YSI O LOG Y P lant growth from seed to f lower; seed germ i natio n , wat e r r e l a t io n s , r e s p irati o n , gr owth , growth regulators, p hotosy nthesis and other l ight e ffect s on plant l ife cycles. Prerequisites: 1 52 and Orga n i c C h em i �ry; Cel l u lar Physi ology stro ng l y recommend ed . 475

EVO LUT I O N li v i ng organ isms ch a nge i n relat ion t o their env i m nrnent; mechan i sms of popu lation a da ptat i o n and speciation which led to the present d iver s i ty f life. P r er equ i s it e : 253.

490

SEM I NA R (X ')

G E N E R A L ENTOMOLOGY Classification and natura l h i story of i n sects w ith emphasis on laborator ies , field studies and co l l e cti o n s. Prerequisite: 253.

relat ion

orga n s

ECOLOGY LABORATORY (V,) F i eld study of l o c a l ecosystems. Prere q u isit e : reco mmended .

embryological states u n t i l birt h . Prereq uisite : 253.

'�2

in

and

426

C E L L U LAR P H Y S I O LOGY Dea ls with how cel ls are organized to keep a l ive , enzyme ki net ics and regulatory mechanisms; structure and synthesis of proteins and nucleic acids; energy metabol ism; membrane structure, permeab i lity and tran sport phenomena; fu nctio na l u ltra st ructure. P rerequ i si te : 253 and Orga n i c C he m ist ry .

ECO LOGY Liv ing org a n i sm& PrereqUisite: 253.

t i ss u es

B I O LOG ICA L OC EANOGRAPHY The ocean as e nvir o nm e n t for plant a nd a n i ma l l i fe; waves, curre nts , tides a nd oth er physical fa ct o r s ; natura! l ife zones of the ocean, t h e i r chBr a cter ist ic� i ncl ud i ng fauna and flora, a nd ad a pti ons of the biota tc the z o n e . F i eld trips. Prereq u i s i te 253.

*435 *346

study of norma l ver teb rates . Prereq uisite. 253.

*425 G E N ETICS The chemical nature of the gene, mechanisms and regu lation of genetic expressi o n , variat ions in chr o moso ma l structure and n u mbe r and po pu l atio n genetics. Pr ereq uisite : 253 and Orga nic Chemi stry. ,

"340

H I STOLOGY

M i croscopic

How

Selected topi cs In biology based on l iterature a nd/or origi lat r esflarch. Open to j un i or and se nJ or b i o logy majors.

491 , 492 I N D E P E N D E NT STUDY (y.-% ) I nv e st iga t io ns o r research i n areas of special i nterest n ot *Denotes la borator y ses si o n s.


covered by regular courses; open to qua l i f i ed j u n ior or se n ior majors; a student should not el ect independent study u n l ess h e k nows i n advance the specific area he w i shes to i nvestigate and can demo nstrate a seriolls interest in pursu i ng i t ; it is suggested that the student spend o ne semester researching the l iterature and w r i t i ng a proposal (for Y. cred it) and the next semester actua l l y car ry i ng out the project (for another Y. cred it ) . The student w i l l not be permitted to use 491 -492 for f i l l i ng in a deficiency III h is progra m . Prereq u i s i t e : written proposal for the project approved b y a facu lty sponsor and the department chairma n . Obta in appropriate form from t h e chai rman . 597, 598 GRA DUAT E R ES EA R C H (Y2-1 ) Prerequ isite: Graduate standing and prior approval of the student's graduate adviser .

letters o f i nquiry, ordars a n d acknowledgement sales and promot ional commu n i cat io n s , cla ims and adjustments correspo ndence, cred it and co l lections letters, brief i ngs a nd busi ness reports, resumes and application l etters. 243

- 28 1

BAC H E L OR OF B US I N ESS A D M I N I ST R AT I O N : 281 , 282, 290, 350, 364, 370, 453, 455, and two upper division electives. Requ ired support ing : Economi cs 1 50 , 481 a nd one upper d ivision eco n o m ics co urse; Math 1 27 or 1 5 1 or eq u iva len t . A total of sixteen courses outside Business Admi n i stration is r equ ired . B A C H E LOR OF ARTS I N E D U CAT I ON : See School of Educatio n . MASTER OF BU S I �J E SS A D M I N I ST R AT I O N : S e e M . B.A. broch ure. B US I N ESS AD M I N I ST R AT I O N COURSES: Courses numbered 1 00-299 are avai lable to all students. Courses n u mbered 300-499 are open to students with j u n ior standin!1 and the requ ired prerequ isites. Cou rses numbered 500 -599 are reserved for students i n the M . B .A . program and students i n other graduate programs who have an approved support i ng fie ld in busi ness. Consent of the Dean is required for ot her �tudents. The midd le digit of the course nu mber ind icates field of con centration : business education and general service 4 5 personnel and ind ustri a l management 6 f i na nce and related subj ects marketing and d istribution 7 8 account ing and information systems 9 specia l ized and predo minantly i ndependent stud ies

F I N A N C I A L ACCOUNT I N G An i ntroduction t o accou nting concepts preparation and analysis of f i nancia l reports.

princip les;

282

ACCOU NTI NG I N F OR MAT I O N SYSTEMS Management information systems; accounting and economic data, tileir use in plan ning and contro l . Prereq u i s it e : 28 1 or a complete course i n accounting princ iples.

290

LAW A N D SOC I ETY Governmenta l r egu lation of relationships between indiv idual citi zens, groups and the governmenta l agencies a nd branches; the rights and ob l igations of indivi dual citizens and corporations; ad m i n i strative law and the procedures and practi ces of courts.

- 360

MANAG E M E NT Admi n i stration in ind ustrial and other orga n izat ions; classical and behavioral perspective on management techniques, pla n n i n g , orga n i zatio n , d irect ion and co ntro l ; case ana lysis and problem-solving techniques.

BUS I N ESS ADM I N IST RATI ON U ndergraduate students are ad mitted to the School of B u s i ness Ad m i n i stration upon successful completion of at least six courses in arts and sciences with a cu m u lative grade po i nt average of 2 .0 or above, a nd declarat i o n of bu sine ss adm i n i stration as a major in the reg i stration process. Transfer students are expected to have maintai ned the grade po i nt average of 2 .0 separate l y in both busin ess and non-business courses. Assignment of a b u s i ne ss fac u lty adviser is required. Graduate students are admitted to the School of B u s i ness Ad mi n i str<lt lo n whan they maet t h e requirements specified in the procedu res of the Division of Graduate Studies.

FAM I LY F I N AN C I A L PLA N N I N G Consumer saving , spending and plann i ng techniques; intel l igent b u y i ng and budget i n g , estate and tax plan n i ng, i nsurance a nd i nvestment progra ms, retireme nt p llln n i ng; ethical issues in government and busi ness from the consumer v iewpoint; consumer orga n ization and i n f l uence i n fina n ce, market i ng and productio n .

- 364

MANAG E R I A L F I N A N C E F i na ncia l a na l ysis: f u nds and cash flows, f i nancial statements and other f i nanci a l informat ion ; f i na ncial p l a n n i ng and budge t i ng, capital expenditure budget i n g , cost of cap ita l ; fina n cial strategies a n d d ecisio n -ma k i ng ; expansion and d ividend p o l icies. Prerequisites: 282 or equ ivalent a nd Economics 1 50 and 48 1 .

365

R E A L ESTATE Land use pla n n i ng and commercial development ; demand factors, gover nmenta l control in zo n i ng and regulat i o n , real estate i n vestment analysis.

366

R I S K A N D I NS U R A N C E M A N A G E M ENT The ma in fu nct io n and i n st itutions of the i nsurance business. This is a consumer-interest course desig ned to i ncrease the student's u ndersta nd ing of t h e a lternat ives available to him in l ife and hea lth i n sura nce as wel l as in property and l iab i l ity insurance. W h i l e the primary emphasis is o n ins urance from the consumer's point of view, some attent ion i s accor ded the theoretical basis for the i n surance fu nction .

- 370

M A R KE T I N G SYSTEMS The flows of goods a nd services in the eco nom y ; economic and behavioral approach es to demand analysiS; marketing fu nct i o n in a business f i r m ; determination of the marketing m i x : product policy , pricing, channefs of d i stribut i o n , marketing communications.

-

-

-

-

-

241

B US I N ESS COMM U N I CA T I ONS Appl ied s k i l ls and tech n i ques i n busi ness co mmun i ca t io n ;

95


38 1

I NT E R M E D IATE ACCO U NT I N G V a l uation theories for assets and l iab i l it i es; related effects o n i ncome determinatio n . Prerequ isite: 28 1 or a complete course in accounting pri nciples.

383

I N COM E TAXAT I ON I n come tax concepts, regulat ions and tax pla n n i ng pri nciples; i nd ividual a nd corporate i n come taxation . Prereq u i site: 281 or eq u ivale nt.

385

96

COST ACCOUNT I N G Concepts o f costs i n dev eloping i nformation for management; the determ i nation of i ncome, evaluation of capital investment a lternatives and the measurement of performance. Prerequisite : 282.

470

M A R K E T I N G MANAG E M E N T Ana lyticai approaches t o marketing prob lems; market i ng strateg ies; pla n n i ng and ad ministering comprehensive marketing programs; eva luation and contro l of marketing operations. Prerequisite: 370 or equ ivalent.

471

M A R K E T I N G R ESEARCH AND CONSUM E R B E H A V I O R Marketing research i n t h e d ecision-mak ing process; research desig n , su rvey methods, research i n struments and samp l i ng plans as they relate to market i ng consumer products and serv ices in a changing environment; co ntemporary behavioral concepts examined and i n corporated 1 0 se lected projects. Prerequ isite: 370 a nd Economics 481 or eq u i valent .

472

A DV E R T I S I N G AND SA LES MAN AG E M E N T Advertising a n d persona l sel l i ng i n the market i ng progra m ; market targets; developing market potent ials; media select i o n ; designi ng the promot iona l message ; eva luation and control of t he promotional m i x . Prerequ isite: 370 or equ ivalent or consent.

473

I N DUSTR I A L MA R K E T I N G AND PURCHAS I N G T h e industrial buy ing and se l l i ng process, purchasing po l i cies and procedures; selection of sources of supply; contract a na l ysis and negoti at ion ; marketing problems of manufacturers of industr ia l goods; developi ng and i mplementing industrial marketing strategies. Prerequ isite : 350 and 370 or eq uiva lent.

387

DATA PROCESS I N G SYSTEMS A computer laboratory course; basic program and system ana lysis and flow cha rt ing; program m i ng languages, emphaSis o n F ORTR A N ; computer hardware a nd software systems. Prereq u i site: 282 or consent .

450

M A N UFACTU R I N G MANAG E M ENT Scient i f i c manageme nt; pla n n i ng prod ucts, physical fac i l i t i es, eq u i pment and mater ials for product i o n ; supervision and control of perso n ne l ; prod u ction control ; pur chasing a nd inventory management. Supervised student projocts a nd major case stud ies. Prerequisite : 350 or eq u iva lent .

453

P ERSON N E L A N D I N D USTR I A L R E LATI ONS Behavioral pro cesses of individua ls and groups in busi ness orga nizations; po l i cy issues a nd speci f i c problems i n managing h uman reso urces; i nd ustrial relations and perso nnel management in i ndustry and other orga n i zations. Prereq u i site: 350 or equ iva lent.

482

A DV A N C E D ACCOU NT I NG Comprehensive accou nting for corporations; acco u n t i ng aspects of consol idations, mergers and partnersh ips, treatment of i n complete da ta ; specia l i zed co ncepts related to funds and cash f lows, statement a na lysis, estates and trusts. Prerequ isite: 381 or equivalent.

455

B US I N ESS PO L I CY Formu lation of pol icies to integrate a l l f u n ctions of b u s i ness; soci a l , ethica l , rel igious, economi c , educat iona l , international i m pl i cations in t h e formu lation of policies a nd objectives; co mprehensive case ana lyses. Prerequ isite: Sen ior sta nding with thorough knowledge of busi ness funct ions or consent.

484

AUDITING Aud iting as appl ied t o major balance sheets and income accounts; standards used by CPA's; professional ethics. Prerequ isite : 482 or equiva lent.

488

SYSTEMS A N A LYS I S AND DESI G N Sy stems theory, i n cl ud i ng : simple a nd complex operat ing systems; too ls of systems analysis and contro l ; a student-selected project on a systems related topic such as: the nature of contro l , teals of systems analy sis, a study of a specif i c system or computerized i n format ion systems design.

490

S E M I NA R Specif i ca l l y sel ected business topics; offered o n demand. Prerequisite : consent .

49 1

D I R ECT E D STUDY Supervi sed i nd ividual consent.

456

H O NORS S E M I NAR M anagement theory and related subjects to meet object ives simi lar to 4 5 5 . Prereq u i site : 3.0 GPA i n at least four busi ness courses, i n c l u d i ng : 281 , 282, 290 , 350. Other st udents admitted o n l y by faculty i nvitat ion . Students who complete this course may be ex cused from 455 by the Dean .

461

I N V ESTM E NTS Types of stocks and bonds; various i nvestment r isks; securities markets and market fluctuations; examination of macro-econom i c considerations and i ndustry characteristics; i nvestment analysis of corporations a nd appraisal of their securit ies. Prerequ isite : 364 or consent.

464

F I N A N C I A L MANAG E M ENT Problems of working capita l management , plann i ng the f i nancial struct ure, issue of new securities, major f i nancial policies; cases and advanced read lOgs. Prerequ i site: 364 or equivalent.

495

study

and

read i ngs.

Prerequ iSite:

BU S I N ESS LAW Proced u res, contracts, agency, ntJgotiable busin ess organizations, property, trusts tra nsportat ion , i nsurance and employment.

i nstruments, and w i l ls,


.. 550

ORGAN I ZAT I O N A L E N V I R O N M E N T Management, exp lored in relation t o contributions from industrial psychology and sociology; externa l and internal social and economic environmental changes as related to plann ing; groups and work teams as related to the fu nctions of di recting and contro l l ing. Major case studies. Prereq u i site : 350 or equ iva lent.

551

SE M I N A R IN M A N A G E M E N T So l utions f o r operat ional management; t h e relatio nship o f production t o other fu nctions a n d extern a l factors; case studies of mod ern tech niques/methodologies as appl ied i n selected situations and industries; quantitat ive mod e l s , systems design a n d computers. Prerequ isites: 350, 550 a n d a work ing knowledge of quantitat ive methods.

_

- 555

BUS I N ESS STRAT E G Y AND POL ICY Management functions of planning, orga nization and contro l . PrereqU isite: Thorough graduate level knowledge of a nalyt ical methods and funct iona l fields of busi ness management, last semester stand i ng in the M . B .A . progra m.

- 564

S E M I N A R I N F I N A N C I A L MANAG E M ENT Management's role i n framing f i na ncial po l icies; case studies in the deter mination of needs, sources and uses of fund s; the development of financial structures, evaluation of a l ternative financial plans and a l location of fund s with in the firm, the control of financial resources. Prerequ isite: 364, 550, 582, or equivalent .

- 570

S E M I N A R IN M A R KETI N G M A N AG E M E N T Marketing management pol i cies and progra ms; interrelated elements of the marketing mix and the relationship of marketing to other i nternal funct ions; changing social environment, i n novation and modern marketing ph i losophies. Prerequ isite : Strong econo m i cs background and 370 or equivalent.

581

SE M I N A R I N F I N A N C I A L ACC O U NT I N G T H E O R Y Advanced account ing co ncepts and sta ndards; current problems and trends refl ected in accounting l iterature; de signed for professional accountants. Prer equisite : 482 or equivalent or consent.

_

582

590

591

596

ACCOU NT I NG I N FORMATION A N D CONTROL Applications of accounting informatio n, services and systems to management prob lems. Students excused from t h i s course are expected to complete 58 1 or other advanced accounting stud ies. Prt:requ isite: 281 or equivalent. SP E C I A L SEMI NAR Selected advanced topics; offered on demand. Prerequ isite: consent. I N D E P E N D EN T STU DY I nd i vidual reading and stud ies on sel ected topics; m i n i m u m superv i s ion after initial planning o f student's wo rk. Prerequ isite : co nsent. R E S EARCH COLLOQU I UM Supervised i nd ividual intensive study of either the case co I l e ction process and prob lem-so lving approaches

(completion of case research, i n cludin g a comprehensive commentary and literature summary, acceptable for inclusion i n I nterco l legiate Case Clearing House B i b l iograph y ) , or a formal research study for a thesis . Registration for a m i nimum of one semester is required for a ! 1 M . B .A . students. Prerequi site : Last semester standing in M .B . A. progra m .

C H EM I STRY The courses, curricu l u m , faculty and faci l it ies of the Department of Chemistry are approved by the Amer i can Chemicai Society. Graduates co mpleting the prescribed program w i l i be certified as having met req u i rements of the American Chemical Society for entry into the chemical profession .

II

BAC H E L OR OF A RTS : 1 1 5, 1 42 or 1 52, 321 , 331 , 332 , 333, ' 334 , 341 , 342 , and 343. Req u ired support i ng : Two courses in physi cs; math ematics through 1 52 ; German (Option I o r I I ) , R ussian or French.

I

BA C H E LOR O F SCI ENCE : As above plus Chemistry 344, 49 7, and one of 401 , 404 , 42 2 , or 432 . The foreign language requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences should be f u l f i l led under Option I by the study of German, required for Amer ican Chem i ca l Society certif icat i o n . R u ssian or French are acceptable substitutes for the Bachelor of Science degree; with permission of the department, Option " may be accepted for the Bachelor of Arts degree. To receive ACS cert ification, a student must complete 422 , 432 and an additional upper d iv ision course i n chemistry, mathematics or physi cs. Although no more than 1 0 courses in chem i stry may be appl ied toward the 32 course graduat ion requirement, the research requ irement may be met with a half course d u r i ng the academ ic year or by a summer experience without academic cred it . In some cases students earning ACS cert ification w i l l need more tha n a tota l of 32 courses to the extent that chem istry course credit exceeds 1 0 courses.

! 97

BAC H E LOR OF ARTS I N E D UCAT I O N : See School of Educatio n . 1 03

C H E M I STRY O F L I F E Ge nera l , organic and b iochemistry pertinent to chemical processes in the h u man organ ism; suitable for libera l arts students, nu rsing students and prospect ive teachers. I

104

E N V I RONME NTA L C H E M I STRY Basic aspects of chemical bond i ng and descriptive inorga n i c ch emistry; chemical a spects o f environmental po l lut ion. May f o l low 1 0 3 or 1 1 5 for students desiring a second chemistry course. I I

115

G E N E RAL C H E M I STRY The structure of matter, atomiG and molecular theory, quantitative relationsh ips; su itable for science majors and others. Prereq u isite or corequi site: Mathematics 1 33. I

1 32

P R E S ENTAT I ON OF E X P E R I M E NTAL WOR K (Y., 11" or 1 ) An honors course i n chemica l laboratory pract ices i n volving i nd ividual projects supervised by faculty members; ora l a nd written reports. Prerequisite : one course in co l l ege chemistry and invitation of the department.

I

I

I I


1 42

SYSTEMATIC I N ORGA N I C C H EM I STRY Study of the elements grouped according to the periodic table, chem i ca l equ i l ibrium, radiochemistry a nd inorganic qualitative analysis. Prerequisite : 1 0 3 and 1 04, or 1 1 5. "

1 52

SYSTEMAT I C I NO R G A N I C C H E M ISTRY H ONORS Chemistry of the elements i nclud i ng chem i ca l eq ui l ibria and k i netics, coord ination compounds, electro a nd nuclear chemistry, quali tative a n a lysis and an individ ua l project ; honors level study which replaces 1 42 for selected students. Prerequisite : 1 1 5 . Corequ isite: Mathematics 1 5 2 . " QUA N T I TATI VE A N A LY S I S Ch emical methods o f quant itative ana lysis, i ncluding volumetric, gravimetric, a nd selected i n strumental methods. Prerequ isite: 1 42; Mathemat ics 1 33. I

321

331 , 332 ORGAN I C C H EM I STRY An interpretation of properties and reactions of a liphatic and aromat ic compounds on the basis of current chemical theory. Prereq u i site : 1 03 and 1 04 , or 1 1 5 . Corequ isite: 333, 334. 1 " 333, 334 ORGAN I C C H E M I ST R Y LABORATORY (Y., Y. ) Conventional and modern techniques o f synthesis, separat io n, reactions, and analysi s of orga n ic compounds. Must accompany 331 , 332 . I " 34 1 , 342 P H Y S I CA L C H E M ISTRY The relatio nsh ip between structure, en ergy content, and physical and chemical properties of chemical system s. Prerequ isite: 1 1 5 ; Math 1 52 ; Physics 1 02 or 253. I I I

98

343, 344 PHYS I CAL C H E M ISTRY LABORATORY (Y. , Y.) Methods and i n terpretati o n of measurement and calcu lation of physical and chemical propert ies. One semester required for B .A . , both semesters for B . S . Corequisite or prerequ isite: 341 , 342. I " 401

ORGAN I C QUA L I TAT I V E ANALYSIS Methods for the isolation and ident ificat ion of orga n i c compounds, i n cluding modern spectrophotometric and chromatographic techniques; systemat ic pro ced ures for sea rching the chem ical literature. Prereq uisite : 332 and 334. I

404

B I OC H E M I STRY Chemistry of biological systems, includ i ng methods. Prerequisite : 332 and 334. "

422

ADVANCED I NORGAN I C C H E M I STRY Moder n i n orga n i c theory i n cluding atomic and molecular structure, period ic trends, and coord ination compo u nds; advanced laboratory techniques for inorganic synthesis. Prereq u i site or corequ isite : 342 and 344. I I

432

I NSTRUME NTA L A N A L Y S I S Theory a n d practice o f instrumental methods f o r chemica l a n a lysis and mJlecular structure determinat ion. Prerequisite: 32 1 , 341 , 343; 342 and 344 are either prerequ isite or corequisite. I I

49 1

497

investigat ion

597, 598 GRA DUAT E R ES E A R C H ( V, to 1 ) Open to master's degree candidates consent o f department chairman .

co mpr ising

only.

Prereq u i site .

COM M U N ICAT I O N A RTS A l l students majo r i ng in Communicat io n Arts w i l l participate in some phase of dramatic, forensic and broadcasting co-curricular act i vities. B AC H E LOR OF ARTS : At least eight courses i n one or a comb i nation of the t h ree areas of concentration: of which Communication Arts 1 2 3 is required : Drama: Suggested courses: 241 , 250 , 344, 351 , 354, 363, plus one elective in drama, a l l selected in consu ltation with the adviser. Publ ic Add ress: Suggested courses: 1 28 , 232, 241 , 327, 333, 335, 344, selected in consultation with the adviser. Broadcasting: Suggested cou rses : 1 2 3, 241 , 272 , 275, 374, plus three CA electives, al l selected i n conj unction with the adviser. BAC H E LO R OF F I N E ARTS : At least t h i rteen cou rses in one or a comb ination of the three areas of co ncentratio n : of wh ich Communication Arts 123 is required : Drama : Sugg ested courses: 241 , 250, 344, 351 , 35 2 , 354, 356, 358, 363, 374, plus at least one dramatic l iterature course and o ne elective , a l l selected in consultation with the adviser. P u b l i c Address: Suggested cou rses : 1 28 , 232 . 236, 241 , 327, 333, 335, 344, plus four C A electives, all selected in consultation with the adviser. B roadcast i n g : 241 , 2 7 1 , 272, 275, 283, 284, 344, 37 4 , 377 , 385, plus two C A electives, all selected i n consultation with the adviser. BAC H E LO R Education. 123

laboratory

I N D E P E N D E NT STUDY ( Y. , V, or 1 ) Library and/or laboratory study of topics not incl uded in regularly offered courses. Proposed project must be approved by department chairman and supervisory respon sibility accepted by an i n structor. May be taken more than once. I I I R ES E ARCH (V, or 1 ) Experimental or theoretical

previously unpub l i sh ed work. Open to upper d ivision students with consent of depa rtme nt cha i r ma n . May be taken more than once. I I I

OF

ARTS

IN

E DUCAT I ON :

See School of

FUN DAM ENTALS OF ORAL COMMU N I CA T I O N Foundations course dealing w i t h basic theories of oral co mmunicat ion . E mphasis on group activity with some platform wor k . I I I

1 25 , 225 , 325, 425 COM M U N I CAT I ON ARTS P RACT I C U M (Y.) Forensics Competitio n , Drama Practicum or Broadcasting Practicum. Y. course credit may be gained each semester, bu t o n ly 1 course total may' be used to meet u n iversity requirements. Majors are required to take at least two pract icums in the major area of interest. Departmental consent required . I I I 1 28

ARGUM ENTAT I O N A N D DE B AT E Argumenta t i o n , evidence, proof a n d the adaptation and app l i cation of argument to various types of oral commu n icat ion; emphasis on forms of debate, their preparation and presentat io n . I I

1 61

I NTRODUCTI ON TO TH E TH EAT R E Theatre a s a f i ne art and i t s co ntribution to the culture o f a people; the correlation between playwright, designer, actor, d irector and their infl uence in relation to one another. I


226

232

236

241

PA R L I A M E NTARY LAW (y,) Parl iamentary law based on practica l work predom i nates. I I

Robert's

Ru les

of

Order;

CONT EMPORARY O R A L D I SCOURSE The sig n i ficance of rheto ric ("the process o f adj ust ing ideas to people and people to ideas") d u r ing various stages of Western c u lt u re from t he classical period to the present; rhetoric of contemporary issues i ncluding: war, poverty , religion and civ i l r ights; emphasis on independent i n vestigat ion , classroom reports and d i scussion. I I P E R SUASI ON The decision-making process in contemporary society; methods of appealing to human motivat ions a nd t h e i r appl icat ion in platform experience. I I OR A L I N T E R P R ETATION O F L I T E R ATUR E The art of reading l iterature to an audience, i nterpret ing i t experientia l l y , logically and emotiona l ly; ind ividual a n d group read i n g s . I I I

250

F UN DA M E NTALS O F ACT I NG The actor, h i s work , h i s natural and learned sk i l ls; exercises i n memory , imagination a nd observat ion ; i mprovisations and scenes from modern plays; theory and pract ice of stage make-up. I

271

B ROADCAST M E D I A - M A N A N D SOCI ETY H istorica l , p h i losophical and sociolog i ca l aspects of the media; its i mpact on man and society . Lecture and laboratory . I

272

T H E B R OADCAST E R AND SOUN D (y,) The theory and structure of sound for the broadcaster; i n struction and practice in the use of typica l audio control equ i pment in rad i o , TV a nd record ing stud ios. I I

275

R A D I O PR ODUCTION E lements of radio productio n ; analysi s of program design, writing for rad io and prod u ction too l s and techniques. Lecture and laboratory. Extensive use of KPLU-FM studio faci l ities and eq u ipment . I

283

284

327

JOU R N A L I S M ( y, ) News co mmun ication f o r pr i n t and electro nic med ia ; analysis of the journa l i st's aud ience, representat ive med ia , journa l i st i c vocations; social a n d legal responsibilit ies o f the n ew s writer. I JOU R N A L I S M / N EWS WR I T I N G ( y, ) Journa l ist ic reporting o f community a nd state affairs; interaction of news media and government; copy ed iting, headline writing, news display , i l l ustration, typography , print ing processes. Prerequ isite : 283. I I EXTE MPO R A N E OUS S P EA K I N G Platform work p redo m i nates; special emphasis on gathering mater ia l , methods of preparation and del ivery . Prerequ isite: 1 23 or departmental consent . I

333

F O U N DAT I ON S OF C O M M U N I CA T I O N TH EO R Y Commu nication pri nciples, theories and research relevant to both the speaker and the l istener. I

335

A M E R I CAN P U B L I C A D D R ESS Critical study of selected American speeches, speakers and controversy from Jonathan Edwards to t he present. Effectiveness of methods and stYles exami ned w it h i n h i sto rical context. I

344

A DVAN C E D I NT E R P R ETAT I O N OF L I T E RAT U R E Projects a n d exercises d i rected toward progra m pla n n ing; advanced sk i l ls in read ing a loud; the art of mak i ng l iterature l ive. Prereq u i site: 241 . II

351

STAGE T E C H N OLOGY Basic theory and proced u re o f techn ical aspects i n set b u i ld i ng , costume construct i o n , basic drafting, scenery , the assembl ing, hand l i ng , and management of the stage . I

352

SC E N I C D E S I G N Artistic a n d tech n ical development o f ab i l ities in designing scenery, costumes and make-up for plays of all periods; various styles and periods as well as preparation of models, renderings, working drawings and scenic pa i nting. Prerequ isite: 35 1 . I I

354

PLAY D I R E CT I O N T h e role o f t h e d irector , h i storica l ly and cr itica i l y ; an introduction to play d irect i ng i n which each student d irects and produ ces a o ne-act play , accompan i ed by a n an notated d i rector 's script and a theoretical/practical ana lysis. Prerequ isite : 250 , 351 and j u n ior statu s . I I

356

STA G E L I G HT I N G Stage l ight i ng from t h e basic development o f electricity and l ighting i n struments to the complete design of l ighting a show. I I

358

ADVANC ED ACT I N G Study o f the work o f a n actor; character analysis and embod i me n t , using i m provisations and scenes from plays; in cludes styles of a cting. Prerequ isite : 250 . I I a/y

363

, I r I

! 99

f

H I STORY O F THE TH E AT R E T h eatre and drama in representative societ ies: early Greece and Rome, Asia, Renaissance and modern E urope, America a nd others; ind ividua l research a nd participation. I a/y

37 4

TE L EV I S I O N PR ODUCT I O N Analysis of program desig n, w r i t i ng and product ion too l s and techniques; lecture and laboratory; extensive use of K P L U-TV st ud ios. I I

377

BRO ADCAST M A N A G E M E NT (y,) Factors in station management, programming, labor relations, po l i t ical and lega l considerat ions, stat ion pro motion and commun ity relations. I

380

SPEECH SC I E N C E A N D PATHO LOGY Anatomy, physiology a nd phy sics of the speech process; phonetics a nd the prod u ct io n of a l l sounds in the Eng l i sh language; basic principles and therapy of speech correct io n;

i

I

!


remed ial procedures designed for articulat io n , voice, stuttering a nd language d i sorders; rehab i l itat ion of the bra i n damaged a n d cleft palate handica pped . I I

385

JOU R N A L I S M/E D I TOR I AL TECH N I QU ES ('h) Workshops to include: advanced newswriting, pub l ic relat io ns writing, maga zine writing a nd design. Prereq uisite or corequ isite : 283 or 284. I "

402

SPEECH IN T H E E L E M ENTARY CLASSROOM ( 'h ) Speech problems a n d opport u n it ies w h i c h confront the teacher, grades one through eight. I I

404

SPEECH IN TH E S ECON DA R Y SCHOOL ('h) Curriculum construct ion, speech phi losophy; co-curricular activities: adm i n i stration of drama, radio and forensic activities. "

450

1 00

CHI L O R E N 'S TH EATR E WOR KSHOP Forma l dramatics, kindergarten through h igh school; product i o n of a th ree-act play or equivalent; student i nvolvement in di rect i o n , stage management, ligh t i ng and all other phases of productio n . S

459

SUM M E R DRAMA WO R KSHOP One session of intensive wo rk in drama; acting , stage management, lighting i n struct ion and a l l other phases of product i o n . S

474

T E LEVI S I ON A N D T H E CLASSROOM T EA C H E R (y,) Television as a teach i ng too l; general criteria for technology in teaching and specif ic criteria for the use of television in the classroom. I I

478

SUM M E R T E L E V I SI O N WO RKSHOP C r eative and production techniques of television programming; extensive use of KPLU-TV studios; for the mature student. S

49 1 , 492 , 49 3

S P E C I A L ST U D I E S IN COMMU N I C AT I O N ARTS (Y., 'h , 1 )

59 6, 597, 598

environment; int ended for students with background in chemistry, geology or physics. I

P H Y S I C A L G E OLOGY Concepts of large-sca le processes: sea-f loor spreading, co nt i n e nta l forma t io n , formation of the earth's physiographic features; laboratory study of rocks, minera ls and geolog i c mapping; field trips are arranged. I

1 32

H I STO R I CAL G E O LOGY A sequel to 1 31 which concentrates on earth h istory, part icu larly the forma t i o n o f the North American continent: Sedimentary rocks, fossils a nd stratigraphic record are related to tectonic up heaval and growth; field trips are arranged. I I

1 36

DESC R I PT I V E ASTRONOMY The moon , the solar system, the coord inate systems for locating stellar objects a nd characteristics of stars.

202

G E N E RA L OCEANOGRAPHY Oceanography and its relatio nsh ip to other fields; physical, chemica l , b iologica l , climatic and geological aspects of the sea ; field trips. "

222

CONSE RVATI ON OF NATU R A L RESOURC ES ( y, ) P r i n ciples a n d problems o f pub l i c a n d private stewardship of our resou rces with special reference to the Pacific N orthwest .

323

324

PETROLOGY The occurrence and classification of common rock types; processes by which they were formed with reference to theoretical princip les. Prereq u isite: 1 3 1 or consent. " a/y

325

STRUCTU R A L G EO LOGY The form and spat ial relationships of var ious rock masses and an introduction to rock deformation; considerat ion of basic processes to understand mountain bu ild i ng and co nti nental formation; laboratory emphasizes pract ical tech niques which enab le students to analyze reg io na l structural patterns. Prereq u i site : 1 31 or consent. " a/y

351

NATURAL H I STO R Y O F T H E PACI F I C N O RTH WEST ( lYz ) A field a n d laboratory course exa m i n i ng regio na l natural h istory; an outdoor workshop designed for science teachers at elementary and j u nior high levels. Not to be counted toward a major or graduate cred it in biology. Prerequ isite: consent. S

360

G EOLOGY OF WEST E R N WASH I N GTON The minerals, rocks and geological h i story of the region extending from the Columbia Plateau to the Pacific Ocea n . I ncludes f ield tr ips. Prerequ isite : O n e year of college laboratory scie nce or consen t. S

365

GLAC I A L G E O LO G Y G lacial ice, deposits and

SC I ENCES

each of two other natural science fields. BACH E LOR Education 101

1 22

OF

ARTS

IN

E D UCAT I O N :

See School of

WOR LD G E OG RA P H Y Patterns of phYSica l , climat i c a n d eco logical features and their relation to man. 101 does not meet the natura l science requ irement. I I N TRODUCT I O N TO PHYSICAL SCI E NCE An i ntegration of the scien ces of chemistry, geology, meteorology and phy sics which co nsiders the physical nature of the eart h : its materials, processes. h istory and

M I N E R A LOGY Crystallography and mi nera logy, both ore and rock forming m i nera l s . Prerequ isite : 1 31 and high school chemistry or conse nt . "

R ESEARCH I N COMM U N I CATION

BAC H E LO R O F ARTS : M i n i m um o f s i x courses i ncluding 1 31 , 1 32 , 202 , 324 ( ES) 325 plus an additional course i n geology. ES 360 or 365 recommended . Requi red supporting: At least two courses i n

previo us

1 31

ARTS (Y. , 'h , 1 )

EARTH

no

land forms resulting from the


P leistocene glaciation in North America. F ield tr ips included. Prerequ isite : O ne year of college laboratory science or consent. S

425

B I O LO G I CAL OCEANOGRAPHY See B io logy 425

490

S E M I N A R (Y. or y, )

432

434

GO V E R N M E N T A N D T H E ECONOMY The relationship between p ub l i c and private sectors i n the U .S . economy . I

�481

STAT I STICAL M ETHODS Descript ive stat istics: measures of posit ion, di spersion and proport ions. I nferential statistics: est i mation and test ing of hypotheses by para metric and nonparametric techniques, regression and correlation analysis. I I I

491 , 492 I N D E PE N D ENT STUDY ( Y.-1 )

ECONOM I CS BAC H E L OR O F ARTS: M i n i m u m of eight cou rses i ncluding

1 50 , 35 1 , 352 , 4e1 , 4B6, two upper d ivision eco nomics el ectives and BA 28 1 . Economics 481 and BA 281 are excluded from the ten course l i mit in the major . BACH E LOR Education.

OF

ARTS

IN

E D UCAT I ON :

See School of

- 1 50

P R I NC I P L E S OF ECO N O M I CS I ntroduction to the scope of economics, i n cluding Macro­ and M i cro-Economics; analysis of U .S. economic system; emphasis on current economic policy. I I I

290

CONT EMPORARY ECO N O M I C P R O B L E MS Current economic issues: u nemployment, i n f lation , poverty, and po l l utio n ; interests of the class determine specif i c topics. Prerequ isite : 1 50 or consent. I I

321

H UMAN R ESOURCE ECON O M I CS The nature and treatment of h u ma n resource problems in the U nited States: wage d eter mination, u n ionism, coHective bargai n i ng, u nemployment , poverty and d i scrim inatio n , investment i n h u ma n capita l a n d manpower po l icies. Prerequisite: 1 50 or co nsent. I

331

I N T E R N AT I O N A L ECON O M I CS R eg ional and international specialization, comparative costs, international payments a nd excha nge rates; national policies which promote or restrict trade. Prereq u isite : 1 50 . I

351

I NT E R M E D I AT E MACRO ECONOM I C ANAL YSIS National i n come determination includ i ng policy implications within the i n stitutional framework of the U .S . economy. Prereq uisite: 1 50 . I

352

361

362

I N T E R M E D I AT E M I C R O ECO N O M I C ANA LYS I S Theory o f consumer behavior; produ ct and factor prices under cond itions of monopoly, competition and intermediate markets; welfare economics. Prereq u isite: 1 50 . I I MO N E Y A N D BAN K I N G The nature and function o f money and credit institutions; relationship of money and ba nk deposits to the national economy . Prerequ isite : 1 50 . I I P U B L I C F I NA N C E Public taxation a n d expenditure at a l l governmental levels; the incidence of taxes, t he pub l ic debt and the provision of public goods such as national defense, educat ion , pure air and water. Prerequ isite : 1 50 . I

D E V E LOPMENT ECO N O M I CS Economic growth process in developing regions of the U .S. and abroad; the interrelat ionship of po l it ica l , economic, cultural and i nstitut io n a l factors in the growth process. Prerequ i s ite: 1 50. I I

486

R EA D I N G S I N TH E E VOL U T I O N OF ECO N O M I C THOUGHT Economic thought from ancient t o mod ern t i m e s ; emphasis on the period from Adam Smith to J . M . Keynes: the classi ca l economists, the socia l ists, the marg i na l ists, the neo-classical economi sts, and t h e Keynesians. I I

490

S E M I N AR ( Y. to 1 ) Seminars on selected eco nomic topics are circumstances warrant. Prerequ isite : Consent.

offered

as

49 1 , 492 , 493

I N D E P E N D E N T STUDY (y'-1 ) Prereq u i site: conse n t .

- 504

MANA G E R I AL ECO N O M I CS Basic economic concepts appl ied to po licy formation and operati n g decisions; reference to such problems as cost, demand , pricing and i nvestment . Prerequisite: 1 50.

_ 543

QUANT I T I V E METHODS The concepts of probab i l ity, sa mpling, and statistical decision theory appl ied to managerial problems. Prerequ i site : 481 .

591 , 59 2 , 593 599

,

/

1

I

I

!

! I

I N D E P E N D E N T STU DY

T H E S I S (Y. to 1 )

EDUCAT I ON Admission I n the sophomore year, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2 . 1 5 may register for Ed . 201 and w i l l at that t i me make application for admission to the Schoo l of Ed ucatio n . Students become cand idates for t h e Bachelor o f Arts i n Edu cat ion degree when they have met t h e fo l lowing requirements: 1 ) Have earned a cumu lative of 2 .25 after completion of Ed . 201 and prior to adm ission to the professio nal sequence courses. Students must have C or better grades in E ng l i sh 101 and in Psych. 1 0 1 or Soc. 1 1 1 . 2) Have completed CA 1 23. 3) Have ideals and personal ity qua lit ies w hich make for su ccessf u l teach ing. 4) Have a clearly defi ned purpose or goa l . 5 ) Have selected a preferred level o f preparation and the area or

i I

i

I

I : I


areas of co ncentration to be fol lowed. 6) Have completed satisfactorily the screen ing program. 7) Have received approval during a n i ndividual conference with representat ive(s) of the School of Ed. The cand idate i s required to maintain these sta ndards in order to reta i n his stand i ng i n the Schoo l . Students who have taken the Bachelor's degree at P L U or another institution and who co ntemplate meet i ng certification requ irements are ex pected to meet the same requirements for admissio n . The cert ificat ion seq uence will normally require a su mmer session and two semesters. or three semesters.

Curricu l u m Requirements I n add ition to the general Un iversity courses req uired in a l l curricula, certai n specific requirements i n general education must b e met : 1 ) H istory 255 , requ ired of a l l elementary teacher cand idates, and a l l secondary candidates with a major or mi nor in a social science. 2 ) ES 1 0 1 required of all ele mentary teacher cand idates. 3) Prospective elementary teachers usually meet the science general educat ion requirement by completing Bio. 1 1 1 , or other l ife science, and ES 1 22 . A year course in one laboratory science may be substituted by those who have adequate high school bac kground in the other sciences. 4) P E 295 is requ ired of a l l teacher candidates.

1 02

C E R T I F I CAT I ON G u idel ines for the preparation and certification of teachers have been establ ished by the State Board of Education . The recommended program pattern i n clude s : broad l iberal edu catio n , 35 per cent; subject matter specia lization , 35 per cent; professional study, 20 per cent; and electives, 10 per ce nt . The four-year curricu l u m leads to the Bachelor of Arts i n Education degree and the Provisional Certificate, a n i nit ial l i cense to teach , issued for a period of three years. P L U recommends the candidate for the f irst teach i ng position on t h e basis of h i s preparatio n . Authorization for elementary teaching requires student teaching i n the elementary schoo l , three cou rses of professional ized subject matter, and n i ne courses of subj ect matter specia lizatio n . Authorization for secondary teaching requires student teaching in the secondary school and eleven to twelve courses of subj ect matter special ization i n a pproved teaching areas. Authorization for elementary and secondary teaching req u i res student teaching at both leve ls. Students who el ect to change levels w i l l be expected to meet the m i n i mu m requirements as given above for the new level. Any teacher may comp lete h i s preparat io n for a new level during the fifth year of college.

Fifth Year and Standard Certification ' The fifth year of teacher edu cat ion i s to fol low a pe:'ind of one year of i n i tial teaching experience. The student must comp lete a m i n i m u m of two courses app licab le toward the fifth year, before the beg i n n i ng of the fourth year of teaching. Seven and one-half courses must be completed before beg i n n i ng the seve nth year of teaching. The student may choose the institution i n wh ich he wishes to take h is adva nced work as fo l lows : 1 ) I f he chooses t o work at PLU, or a n y other o f the teacher education i n stitutions in this state, that i n stitution sha l l be responsible for recommending him for the Standard Cert ificate upon su ccessfu l completion of the f ifth year progra m .

2) If t h e PLU graduate wishes t o undertake the fifth year i n an , out-of-state institut ion, PLU wi l l be respo nsible for recommending h im for the Standard Certificate. The student must secure general approval of h is plan from the U n iversity in advance. There are fou r provisions govern i ng the fifth year pattern of work, according to State Board Regulations: 1 ) The fifth year must include a m i n im u m of 30 semester hours (seven a nd one-na lf co urses) of which at least fifty per cent must be upper division a nd/or graduate courses. 2) No more than eight semester hours of extension a nd/or correspondence study may be approved as a part of the 30 semester hours (seven and one-half courses) i n the student 's fifth year program. 3) Graduates must take 1 5 semester hours (t hree and three-quarter courses) ot the fifth year in residence at P L U . A transfer student who wishes to be reco mmended by P L U must take a m i n i mu m o f 20 semester hours (five co urses) i n residence at P L U . 4 ) T h e student may take 1 5 of the required 30 semester hours prior to o r du ring the f i rst year of teach i ng exper ience with prior permission of the School of Ed. Fol lowing are requirements and procedures for the approval of fifth year programs of work at P L U . 1 ) Specific course requirements are: (a) Ed. 467 , or its equivalent. ( Ed . 47 3 may be used by elementary teachers.) (b) Ed. 463, ( E lementary) or Ed . 465 , (Secondary ) . 2) A ny courses recommended for the ind ividual student prior to the granting of the Bachelor's degree must be take n . These may be recommended by either the u ndergraduate adviser or the School of Ed. 3) Courses taken should strengthen areas of concentration arid b u i ld stronger general education backgro und as well as fill needs in the professio nal field. This program of studies is to be selected by the student with the gu idance of those who have worked with him duri ng h i s period of i n itial teaching and the advisers at the recommend i ng institutions. 4) The student secures approval of the recommending i n stitution for work taken elsewhere before the work is begun. Some of the work taken duri ng the f ift h year may also apply toward the M .A. Graduate students may undertake a program coord inating req u i rements for standard cert ification and the M .A. u pon the approval of their committee cha irman arid the coord i nator of fifth year programs.

Principa l 's Credent ials* The candidate for the principal's credentials will be guided by the fo l lowing : 1 ) He must meet graduate standards for the M .A . degree. 2) He must work toward the prov isio na l principa l 's credentials at his chosen level . To receive this he must have completed work for his Standard Teach i ng Cert ificate plus SIX semester hours (one and one-half courses). 3) H e must complete experience and study requirements for the Standard Principa l 's Credential at his chosen l evel . To receive this he needs to have ( 1 ) had ad m i n istrative experience, (2) earned a m i n i m u m of eight more semester hours since issuance of the Provisional Certificate, and ( 3 ) earned h is M .A . Students who intend t o work toward the M .A . i n the f i eld of


edu cation must apply for adm i ssion to the Graduate Division a nd meet the requirements ou t l i ned by that D ivision . Cand idates should see the course requirements as set forth in the Master of Arts broch ure. * * D etai l s of the program are ava i lable at the School of Education upon request. va i lable at the office of the Dean of Graduate Studies upon request. *

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Certificat i o n Requ i rements for School N u rses Prov i s i o nal Cert ificate: 1 ) R eg i stered n u r se l i ce nsed i n the State of Wash i ngton, and 2) Bachelor's d egree in a program accred ited (or approved) for fi rst·level positions in p ub l i c health nursing , or Certificate i n Pub l i c H ea lth N ursi ng (or equiva lent) with three years of successful supervised experie nce in a pub l ic health program which includes experience i n school nursing. 3) Complet ion of a m i n imu m of ten semester hours (two and one-half courses) of professional education courses incl uding practice teach i ng or d i rected laboratory experie nces in a school situation. Standard Cert if i cate: 1 ) Two years of successf u l experience in school nursing as a school nurse under the Provisio nal Certificate and 2) Master's degree with a major in school nursing or its equivalent in Public Health N u rsing. Professional Edu cation Cou rses for School Nurse Certificate Professional education courses recommended for meeting t h e requirement of a m i n i m u m o f 1 0 semester hours (two a nd one-half co urses) are as follows: Ed.' 201 or 321 ; 463 o r Soc. 422 or 465; 552 ; 575 or 585 . Laboratory experiences i n a school situation w i l l be provided o n a n i nd ividual basi s . Preparation of School Librarians ( L earning Resources Specia l i st ) Students i nte rested i n preparing f o r the respo nsi b i l ity o f ad min istration of a school library may meet suggested sta ndards through the fo l lowing progra m: 1 ) Book and media selection Ed . 455 I n structional Mater ials . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . 'h course Ed . 456 Storytel l i ng . . . . . . . . . 'h course E ng l ish 323 C h i ldren's Literature . . . . . . . 1 course 2) Cata log i ng 'h course Ed . 453 Processing School L ibrary Materials 3) R eference Ed . 452 Basic Reference Materia l s . . . . . . . % co urse 4) M ed ia u t i l ization and produ ction Ed 454 Selection of Learning Resou rce Mater ials Y, course 5) Curricu lum E d . 580 C u r r iculum Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . y, course 6) Ad ministration Ed 45 1 Admi n i stration of t he School Library . . . . Y, course -

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Profess i onal Course Req u i rements 201 ; 322 (pr imary ) or 323 (upper elementa ry) or 423 (secondary ) ; 325 (elementary) o r 420 (seconda ry ) ; 4 30 (primary ) o r 432 ( u pper elementa ry ) or 434 (seconda ry ) ; 435 (requ ired for students enrolled

in 430 or 432) a nd professional education courses in subj ect area methods and g u idance (1 Y, courses) secondary . I n add i t io n , there are specific requirements in the area of laboratory experience: (a) Sept ember Experience During at least one September fo l lowing the su ccessf ul comp letion of Ed . 201 , and prior to Student Teach ing, the student i s requ ired to observe and to participate i n act ivities d u r i ng t he open i ng days (preferably two weeks) of schoo l . This September Experience may be either i n h i s home town or in the loca l area. P lans and d ef i nite assignments must be approved by the School of Ed . before the end of the preced i ng spring semester. (b) Student Teaahing A su ccessf ul experience in student teach i ng is vital to the student's career . I t i s th erefore recommended that the student carry not more than four courses d u ring h is student teach ing semester. It is a lso expected that outside work or co l lege activity w i l l be kept to a m i n i m u m . Exceptions to these recommendations are al lowed only by special permissio n . P R O F ESSIO N A L I Z E D SUBJECT MATT E R Elementary School Teach ing I n the area of Professio nalized Subj ect Matter a m i nimum of 3 courses is required from the fol lowing co u rses: Art 341 *; CA 402; Ed . 325 * , 326<', 408 * * , 41 0 , 4 1 2 " * , 455, 45 7 , 483 * * , 597; English 323; M u sic 340 " ; PE 322 . *Required of a l l elementary teacher candidates. HOpen to student teachers or exper ienced teachers o n l y .

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ACAD E M I C P R E PA R AT I O N Teach ing Area s : Business Education; F i ne Arts (art o r music); Physical Educat i o n ; Language Arts includ ing E ng l ish ( compos i t i o n , literature ) , foreign language, commun icat ion arts ( i nclud ing drama ) , and journal ism; Science and Mathematics includ ing biological and physical sciences and mathematics; Social Sciences includ ing hi story , socio logy , pol itical science, economics, geography and psycho logy . Preparation for Senior High Teach ing: 1 1 to 1 2 Cou rses A student preparing for senior h ig h school teach in g must complete approximately 1 1 courses in the area in wh ich he plans to teach. T h is norma I ly consists of a tea ch i ng major of 6-8 courses of study in one department, supported by 4-5 courses in related departments. A student, with the approval of h is academic adviser, may elect to complete a departmenta l minor of 4 to 5 cour�-es in another area appl icable to teaching in the senior h igh schoo l. I n either case, the adviser from the major area will assist t h e student in pla n n i ng his program. Teaching maj ors are offered in the fo l low ing fields: art , bio logy, business ed ucat i o n , chemistry, commu nicatio n arts, economics, Eng l is h , French, Germa n , physical ed ucatio n , h i story , mathematics, music, physics, political science, science (general and earth sciences), social sciences, sociology , and Span ish . Preparation for J u nior H igh Teaching: 1 1 to 1 2 Courses A student prepar ing for j u n io r h igh school teach i ng norma l ly must complete a teaching major of 6 to 8 courses a nd a mi nor of 4


to 5 courses in another area. Students p lanning to teach on the iu nior h igh school level should confer with the School of Ed . regarding comb inations of teaching fields which would be most appropriate. An adviser from the major area assists the student in pla nn ing h is program. Teaching majors and m i nors are offered in the general areas of f i ne arts, physical education, language arts ( i nclud i ng E nglish, journa l i sm , commu nication arts, German, French, and Spanish ) , science ( i nclud i ng biology, chemistry, physics, general science, and earth sciences) and mathematics, and social sciences.

Preparation for Elementary Teach ing: 1 2 Courses A stude nt preparing for elementary school teaching normally must complete 6 course s in a maj or teaching area, and two minors consisting of 3 cou rses each . One of the m inors must be in professi ona lized subj ect matter; and one in a teach ing field other than that covered in the 6-course concentrat ion. In genera l , the tea ch i ng major (6 courses) for eleme ntary school teachers f o l lows the teaching major required for ju nior h igh teach i ng . The courses included in the two mi nors are to be determined in consultation with the School of Ed . ART Senior High Teach ing Major : 1 1 14 courses · requi red : Art 1 1 0 , 1 60 , 21ie, 260, 230 , or 350, 365, 370, 440 , two courses i n art history plus electives. Junior High Teaching Major : 714 courses requi red : Art 1 1 0 , 1 60 , 350, 365, 440 p l us electives. Teaching M inor: 5 courses requ ired : 1 1 0, 1 60 , 235 , 230 or 350, and 365 .

• 2 30 or

1 04 .J: lementary Teaching Major : 6 courses •, 34 1 and two of 2 30 , 350, 365 or 370.

required : Art 1 1 0, 1 60 ,

Teaching Minor : 3 courses 85 determi n ed by School of Ed. *Up to t h ree supporting courses may be reco mmended.

BI O LOGY Senior High Teaching Major : 1 1 courses required : Bio. 1 5 3, 1 54, 253, 275, 340 , 380 (taken for Ed . credit as professional elective) and a choice of one from each group: Group A: Bio. 331 , 346, Chem. 404* ; Group B: Bio. 424, 475, Anthro . 242 *; Chem. 1 1 5 , 331 , 332 , 334; Math 1 31 . (recommended support i ng : 333, Math 1 51 ; Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 ; E S 1 3 1 , 1 32, 222 ; C h e m . 1 42 . Additional courses: select one from B i o . 234, 372. 425. o r 32 1 -426 (comb inatio n ) . One of these courses should be elected as part of the fifth-year work if not taken as part of major program . · Not taken for b iology credit but satisfies group requirement. Elect an approved bio logy course i n its place. Junior High Teaching Majo r : 6-7 courses req u ired : Bio. 1 5 1 , 1 52 and five courses approved by the department. R equ ired supporting: Chem. 1 1 5 . 1 42; Math 1 33. (Recommended : Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 or ES 1 31 . 1 32 . ) Teaching Minor: 5 courses required : 3-4 B i o . courses and ES 1 31 . El ementary Teaching Major : 6 courses required: Bio. 1 5 1 , 1 52; Chem. 1 1 5 , 1 42 plus electives. Teeching Minor: 3 courses as determined by School of Ed .

BUS I N ESS E D U CAT I O N Senior H ig h Teaching Major; 1 2 course- required : Eco n . 1 50; BA 241 . 2B l . 1 90 or 49 5 . 340, 387 or 488 . 441 or 442 , 443 and 14

course i n Advanced Typing; elect one course from BA 350 , 364 or 370; e lect one area of emphasis: Accounting: BA 381 plus one upper d ivision accounting co urse; or Economics: Econ. 351 plus one upper d ivision Econ. course; or Shorthand : o ne year advanced shorthand. (Strongly recommend ed : the following courses not taken during the four-year program should be included in the fifth-year: BA 350, 364, 370, 387 and 488 . ) * *Typing and Shortha nd are not offered on campus; these courses may be taken to meet d egree requ irements at Fort Steilacoom Commu nity Co l l ege for transfer credit anytime duri ng the fou r-year progra m .

C H E MI ST R Y Senior High Teaching Major: 1 1 % courses required: Chem. 1 1 5 , 1 42 , 321 , 331 , 332, 333, 334, 341 , 342 , and 343; Physics 1 0 1 , 1 0 2 o r 253; Math 1 5 1 , 1 52 . Junior High Teaching Major: Same a s for senior level above. Teaching Minor: 514 cou rses requ ired : Chem. 1 1 5, 1 42 , 32 1 , 331 , 332 , 333, 334; Math 1 33 or equ iva lent. Elementary Teaching Majo r : 6 courses required: 4 approved Chem. courses and 2 courses as determined by School of Ed . Teaching Minor : 3 courses as determ i n ed by School of Ed .

COM M U N I CATION A RTS Senior H igh Teaching Major: 1 1 courses req u ired : CA 1 2 3, 227, or 250, 241 and 404; 3 to 5 courses in co nsultation with major adviser; supporting courses: o ne of the fo l lowing: 4-5 courses in E ngl ish approved by major adviser; 4-5 courses in modern or classical lang uage . Junior High Teaching Major : 6-7 courses required : CA 1 2 3, 227 or 250, and 241 ; plus two add itiona l courses in CA; add itional 2·3 courses as deter m i ned by School of Ed . Teaching Minor : 4-5 courses in CA 1 2 4 and 241 , plus 2-3 electives. Elementary Teaching Majo r : 6 co urses required: CA 1 2 3 and 402 ; 2 courses in CA; 2 cou rses in English. Teaching Minor: 3 courses as determined by School of Ed . and department.

E A R TH SCI E NCES Senior High Teach ing Major :( General Science) 1 1 courses required: Bio. 1 5 1 ,1 52; Chem. 1 1 5, 1 42 ; Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 ; ES 1 3 1 ,1 32 ; Math 1 33,1 51 plus electives. Sen ior High Teaching Major: ( Earth Sciences) 1 1 co urses required: ES 1 31 , 1 32, 324, 360 or 365 , 49 1 , 49 2 ; Math 1 5 1 ; Chem . 1 5 1 , 1 42 ; Physics 1 0 1 , 1 0 2 . (S uggested support i n g : Bio . 1 5 1 , 1 52 and add itional courses in Chem. and Physics.) Junior High T88ching Major: (General Science) 6-7 courses req u i red : Bio. 1 5 1 and 1 52 or 1 1 1 ; Chem. 1 1 5, 1 42; PhYSics 1 01 , 1 02 ; Math "33; ES 1 31 . Teaching M inor: 4-5 cou rses. (Cour ses selected and total courses subject to approval of science departments and w i l l vary dependi ng upon high school background. Junior High Teaching Major : ( Earth Scie nces) 7 courses required: ES 1 31 , 1 32, 324, 360 or 365; Chem. 1 1 5 , 1 42. (Suggested support ing : Math 1 5 1 ; Bio. 1 5 1 , 1 5 2') Teaching Minor: 4-5 courses in eart h and ph ysical sciences.


Elementary Teaching Major : (General Science) 6 courses requ ired :

Elementary School Teaching Major: 6 courses required : 5 approved

( I nd ividual programs planned by science department in consultation with School of Ed .) Teaching Minor: 3 courses r eq u i red : As determined by School of Ed .

French courses and one additional course sel ected in consultation with department and School of Ed . Teaching Minor: 3 courses requi red : As determi ned by department and School of Ed.

Elementary School Teaching Major: ( Earth Sciences) 6 courses required : (Prereq uisite: Trigonometry and h igh school B iology . ) ES 1 3 1 , 1 32 , 324, 360 and 365; Chem . 1 1 5 , 1 42 . Teaching Minor: 3 courses in earth and physical sciences.

ECONOM I CS

G E R MAN Senior H igh Teaching Major: 1 1 courses required: German 201 , 202,

321 , 35 1 , 352, 445 a nd three add itional courses; 445 may count i n either Ed. or German, not i n both . Supporting Courses: 3 cou rses i n CA, Engl ish o r another foreign language.

Senior High Teaching Major : 1 1 courses requi red : Econ. 1 50 , 35 1 ,

Junior High Teach i ng Major : 7 courses required: as l isted for senior

352 , 486; 3 courses from the fol lowi ng: E co n . 321 , 33 1 , 361 , 362, 434, 48 1 ; H istory 255; plus 3 cou rses distrib uted over the areas of Soc., Pol . Sci., or Anthro. (Recommended: Ed . 448 to meet Prof. Ed . requ ireme nt.)

high preparat ion; supporting courses chosen in consu ltat ion with major adviser. T ea ch i ng Minor: 4路5 approved cou rses i n Germa n .

Junior High T ea ching Major : 7 courses requi red : Econ. 1 50 , 434,

486; 1 course from: Eco n . 32 1 , 331 , 35 1 , 352, 361 , 432, 48 1 ; H i story 255; plus two cou rses distributed over areas of Soc., Po l. Sci. Tea ching M i nor: 4 courses requ ired : Econ. 1 50 plus 3 upper division E co n . courses. ( R ecommended : Ed. 448 to meet Prof. Ed. requ irement.) Elementary School Teaching Major: 6 coursps requ ired : Econ. 1 50 , 4 34 , 486; o ne course from: Eco n . 32 1 , 331 , 351 , 35 2 , 361 , 362, 432; H istory 225; one course from the areas of Soc. or Po l . Sci. Teaching Minpr : 3 courses requ i red : Eco n . 1 50 and two upper division Econ. courses. ( R ecomme nded : Ed. 445 to meet Prof . E d . requirement.)

ENG LISH Senior H igh Teaching Major : 1 1 courses requi red : English 241 , 25 1 , 252 and 383; electives to total eight courses i n ad dition to Engl ish 1 0 1 ; at least 4 must be upper divisio n . Distribut i o n Requ i rement : 1 course from 382, 400 or 403; 31 8 or proficiency as determined by the E ngl ish Department. A l l majors must present two years of o ne foreign language at the college level or show equivalent proficiency. (R ecommended : Ed . 444 to meet Prof. Ed . requ irement. Recomme nded : CA 404.) Junior High Teach ing Major : 8 cou rses requi red : 8 Engl ish courses

as l isted u nder Sen ior H ig h Teach i ng Major above, i nclud ing d i stributio n requirement a nd two years o f foreign language or equivalent proficiency. ( R ecomme nded : Ed . 444 to meet Prof. Ed. req u i rement. R ecommended : CA 404. ) Elementarv School Teaching Concentration: 6 cou rses required : 4

Engl ish courses as l i sted under Senior H igh Teachi ng Major above, and two additional courses as determined by School of Ed. Teach i ng Minor : 3 courses requi red : As determined by School of Ed .

F RENCH Senior High Teaching Major: 1 1 courses req u i red : French 201 , 202,

32 1 , 35 1 , 352, 445 a nd three addi t i o na l courses; 445 may co u nt i n either Ed . or French , not i n both. Supporting Courses: 3 courses in CA, Engl ish or another foreign language. Junior High Teaching Major: 7 courses requ ired : a s l i sted for senior

high preparatio n; supporting courses chosen in consultation with major adviser . Teaching Minor: 4路5 approved French courses.

Elementary School Teaching Majo r: 6 cou rses req uired : 5 .app roved German courses and o ne add itional course sel ected i n consultatio n with department and School of Ed . Teaching Minor: 3 cou rses required : As determined by department a nd School of Ed.

H I STO RY Senior High Teaching Major : 1 1 courses requ ired : H istory 1 07 , 1 08 ,

251 , 252 a nd 253, 255 p l u s 3 courses i n history i nclud i ng Senior Sem i nar; Supporting Cou rses: 3 courses selected from Eco n . , Geo . , Po l . Sci . , Psych. and Soc. I n add itio n : A major shou ld meet t h e foreign language requirement u nder either Option I o r Opt ion I I a s requ ired by t h e Col lege o f Arts a n d Sciences. Prior to the Tha n k Sgiving recess o f the ju nior year, a h i story major w i l l take an examination i n E ng l ish proficiency. Arrangements for taking the examina t i o n should b e made at the off ice of the D i rector of Testing. In either the fi rst or second semester of the senior year, a h istory major w i l l enro l l i n one of the fol lowing three seminars: 494, 495 , 496. I n September o f the senior year, a h istory major w i l l take a n oral examinat ion, based o n the student's work i n the f i e ld o f history.

LAN GU AGE ARTS Ju nior High Teaching Major : 8 courses requ ired : Engl ish 318; o ne of

Engl ish 403 or Linguistics 400 ; one upper-d ivision literature course ( i n add i t i o n to cou rse ta ken to meet general ed ucation requ irement) CA 241 , or 327 or 336 and 404; Ed. 444 and 3 courses from areas of E ngl ish, Journalism, CA or Foreign Language beyond freshman level (at least 2 of these 3 cou rses must be in the same discipline, and 1 of the 3 must be upper-d ivisio n ) . Teaching Minor: 4 courses required : selected from offerings in E nglish , Jour na l i s m , CA or Foreign Language beyond freshman level; Engl ish 318 is requ i r ed . (Recommend ed : Ed. 444 t o meet Prof. Ed . requ i rement . ) E le ment a ry Teaching Major : 6 courses required : Eng l ish 31 8, o ne of

E ng l i sh 403 o r Linguist i cs 400 , Engl ish 323, CA 402 a nd o ne of CA 241 or 327 or 336; 2 courses selected from o ne of the follow i ng areas: E ngl ish . C A . or Foreign Language beyond freshman level ( 1 cou rse must b e upper divisio n ) . Teaching M i nor: 3 courses req u i red : Selected from offerings in English, Journa l ism, CA or Foreign Language beyond freshman leve l ; Engl ish 31 8 i s required.

MATH EMATICS

courses requi red ( i n add ition to Math 446 ) : Prereq u i site: Math 1 33 or equivalent. Required : Math 1 5 1 , 1 5 2, 231 , 433, 446; 321 or 434 or 455; one additional upper-d ivision course; 2 cou rses in Chem . or Physics a nd 2 add itional science courses. Senior H igh Teaching Major: 1 1

1 05


Junior High Teaching Major : 6 courses required : Prerequisite: Math 1 33 or equivalent. Required : Math 1 51 , 1 5 2 , 231 , 433, 446. Teach ing Minor : 4 courses requi red (in add ition to Math 446) : Prereq u i site : Math 1 33 or equivalent . R eq u ired : Math 1 5 1 , 1 52; 1 2 7 or 231 ; 446, 433 or 321 . Elementary Teaching Major : Prereq u i s it e : 1 33 or equivalent; Math 323, 324 o r 321 ; 4 add it ional courses. Requi red : 1 5 1 , 1 52 ; 1 27 or 321 or 433; plus math electives. Teaching Minor: 323, 324 or 321 ; 2

Elementary Teaching Major : 6 courses requ ired : PE 2 7 7 , 286, 284 or 288, 322 a nd 2 courses from P E courses numbered 300·400. Teaching Minor : Req u i red : PE 277, 286, 284 or 288 and 322.

MUSIC

Special Secondary Progra ms:Athletic Coaching Minor : 3 courses required : PE 2 7 7 , 481 and 482 ; and 3% courses from the follow i n g : P E 370, 37 1 . 372 . 373. 374. a n d 361 ; a n d part icipat i o n in a t least one i nterco l leg iate or extramura l sport. Health M i no r : Req u i red : PE 295 , 324, 326; B i o . 1 61 and 1 62 .

1 24, 21 1 , 2 1 2 , 223, 224, 323, 325, 339 * * , 340 * " , 442 , 445 * * , 447 + � , two courses private voice lessons, % course pr ivate piano lesso n s and 2 courses of Lit. a nd Perform . ; 1 course musical

Senior High Teaching Major: 1 1 courses required : Physics 1 01 . 1 02 , 21 1 , 253, 354, 2 7 2 . 32 1 , 322 and 355; 1 Chem . course; Math 1 5 1 . 1 52; (add itional suggested courses: PhySics 331 , 336 ) .

add i t ional courses determi ned in consultation with department and School of Ed. Senior High Teaching Major : * E mphasis on Choral Music: 1 4V, courses req u i red (Prerequ isite: Music 1 23 or equ iva le n t ) : Music 50,

elect ives. Senior H igh Teaching Major : * E mphasis on Sacred Choral Music: 1 4% courses req u i red (Prereq u i site: Music 1 23 or equiva lent ) : M us i c

50, 1 24, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , 223, 224, 323, 339 * * , 340 * * , 367 , 368 , 445 * ' , 447 * * ; 2 courses of private i nstruct i o n in major perfor m . medium (voice or piano and/or orga n ) , Yo course in m i nor perform. med i u m (vo i ce o r p i a n o and/or organ ) ; 2 courses o f L i t . and Perform.

Senior High Teaching Major : * E mphasis on I nstrumental Music: 1 4V, courses req u i red ( Prerequ isite: M u sic 1 23 or equiva lent ) : Music

1 06

for senior h ig h major plus o ne elective from PE courses numbered 300·400 . Tea ch i ng Minor: 4 courses requ ired : PE 2 7 7 , 286, 284 or 388 , and 481 or 482.

50 , 1 24 , 1 41 , 1 42 , 21 1 , 2 1 2 , 223, 224, 243, 244, 245 , 246, 247 , 323, 325, 326, 339 * * , 445 " * , 447 u ; 2 courses private in struction earned in student's major i nstrument plus V, course piano; 2 courses

of L i t . and P erfor m.

Junior High Teachi ng Major: 7 courses requ ired (Prereq u isite: Music 1 2 3 or equ ival e nt ) : Music 50, 1 24, 21 1 , 2 1 2 , 339 " * , 340 H , 445* *; V, course private piano , V, course seco ndary instrument or voice, 1 course of L i t . and Perform. a nd V, cou rse music electives. Teaching Mino r : 5 cou rses requ ired : Mu sic 1 20 , 339 , 341 plus V, course private piano, V, cou rse private instruction in voice or seco ndary m�trument ; 1 course of Lit. and Perform. and V, course electives in music. Elementary Teaching Major : 6 courses requ ired : Music 1 20 , :}39 , 341 plus V, course private piano and V, course private voice; 1 course music ensemble and 1 V, courses of electives in music. Teaching Minor: 3 courses requ i red : As determined by department and School of Ed.

"Students desiring certi f i ca t i o n in K·1 2 must student teach o n both elementary and secondary levels. * Appl ies toward Prof.' Ed . requ irements. *

PHYSICAL E D U CAT ION

Senior High Teach ing Major : 11 courses required : PE 277; 2 professional act ivities courses; 481 , 482 , and 1 of 322 or 328 ; 3V, cou rses elected from P E courses nu mbered 300-400; Bio. 1 61 , 1 62; participation i n at least one intercol legiate or extramural sport; 1 activity elective (V, course) in Aquatics. (Students desi r i ng K·1 2 cert ification must complete PE 322 and student teach o n both elementary and secondary level s.) Junior H igh Teaching Majo r : 7 courses required : 6 courses as l isted

PHYSICS

Junior High Teaching Majo r : 6 V, courses required : Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 , 21 1 , 253, 254, 272, 321 and 322 .

PO L I TICAL SC I E N C E

Senior High Teaching Major : 1 1 courses required : Po l . Sci . 1 0 1 , 251 , 331 p l us 4 electives; ( suggested support i ng : Eco n . 1 50 ; ES 1 0 1 ; H istory 251 , 252 , 253, 255; Psych . 1 0 1 ; Soc. 1 1 1 ) . ( Recommended: Ed . 448 to meet Prof. Ed . requirement . )

SC I E NCE ( G E N E R A L ) Se e Earth Sciences. SOC I A L SC I E N C E

Senior High Teaching Maj o r : 1 1 courses required : 1 course from H istory 251 , 252 , 253; H i story 255; 1 course from each of the fo l low i ng a reas: Anthro . . Eco n . , Geo .. Po l . Sci . , Psy ch . and Soc . ; 3 upper -d ivision courses from two of the areas of Eco n . , Po l . Sci . . and Soc. (Recommended : Ed . 448 to meet Prof . Ed requirement.) Junior H igh Teaching Major : 7 courses required : 1 course from H istory 251 , 252 , 253; H i story 255 ; 1 course fro m t h ree of t h e fol lowing areas: Ant h ro . , Econ., Geo . , Po l . Sci ., Psy c h . , a n d Soc.; 2 upper-d ivi�ion courses from two of the areas of Econ .. Pol . Sci . , a nd Soc. Teaching M inor : 4 cou rses required : 1 from H istory 251 , 252, 253; H istory 255; and 2 courses selected from Eco n ., Po l . Sci . , a nd Soc. ( R eco mm ended : E d . 448 to meet Prof . Ed . requiremen t . ) Elementary Teaching Major : 6 courses requ ired : 1 course from H istory 251 , 252 , 254, H i story 255 ; and 4 courses from t hree of t he follow i ng area s : A nt h ro . , Eco n . , Po l . Sci . , Psych . , and Soc. Tea ch i ng Minor: 3 courses: As determi ned by School of Ed. ( R ecomme nded : Ed . 445 to meet Prof . Ed . requirement . )

SOC I O LOGY

Senior High Teaching Major: 1 1 courses required : Soc . 1 1 1 , 423, 494, 4 Soc. E l ectives; 4 courses di str i buted over t h ree a reas of other social sciences. ( Reco mmended: E d . 448 to meet Prof. E d . req u i rement .)

SPA N I S H

Senior H igh Teaching Major : 1 1 courses req u i red : S pa n . 201 , 202 , 321 , 351 , 352 , 445 a nd 3 add it ional courses. (445 may count i n Ed. or Foreign Languages, not i n both ) ; suggested suppor t i n g : 3 courses


in C A , E ngl ish or a nother foreign langu age.

420

P R O B L E M S OF R EA D I N G I N TH E SECON DARY SCHOOL ()I,) Teach i ng secondary readi ng; attention to developmental r eading problems; materials, methods, tech n iques, procedures and some observat ion and d iagnosis of read i ng d ifficulties. Prerequ isite : 20 1 ; coreq u isite : 420, 434.

423

G E N E R AL M ETH ODS - SECON DARY Curric u l u m , materials and methods o f secondary teach i ng ; observation and d iscussio n . Prereq u i site: 201 or 32 1 ; coreq u i site: 420 , 434.

430

STU D E N T T EACH I N G - P R I M A R Y (216) Teaching i n the pub l i c schools under the d irection and s upervision of classroom a nd un iversity tea chers. Prerequ isite: 201 or 321 , 322 and 325.

432

STU D E N T T EACH I N G - UPPER E L E M ENTA R Y (2)1,) Same as 430 except 323 for 322.

434

STU D E N T TEACH I N G - SECONDARY (2) Same as 420 except Prerequ isite : 20 1 or 32 1 , Corequ isite: 420 and 423.

435

P R O F ES S I O N A L S E M I NA R ()I,) A n opportunity for students to share experiences with a n exchange of ideas o n pupil behavior and curr iculum practices; to project ways and means of improving teaching performance. (Taken concurrently w ith 430 or 432 . Students enro l led i n 430 partic ipate in a group process experience for 1 hour per week during the sem ina r . )

Junior H igh Teaching Major : 7 courses as l i sted for senior h igh preparat ion ; support i ng courses chosen in consultation with major adviser .Teaching M i nor: 4-5 approved S pa n. courses. Elementary Teach ing Major: 6 courses req u i r ed : 5 app roved Spa n . courses and 1 add itiona l selected i n consultation with department and School of Ed .

EDUCAT I O N COU RSES 201

321

L EA R N ER AND SOC I ETY : GROWTH A N D D E V E LOP M E NT O r i e ntation to contemporary schools; human development in relat ion to i nd ividuals and groups in an educational sett i ng . Publi c School observat ion req u ired weekly w ith students responsible for their own transportation. Prerequ isite : Psych . 1 0 1 or Soc. 1 1 1 . H U MAN D E V E L OPMENT E mot io na l , socia l , intellectual and physiological development from in fancy through adolescence. Two-hour pub l i c school observation requ ired weekly , individuall y assigned; students respo nsible for their own transpo rtat io n . Prereq u isite: Psych. 1 0 1 or Soc. 1 1 1 .

322

G E N E R A L M ET H O DS - PR I M A R Y Process and content o f g u i d i ng a nd facilitating learning i n grades K-3 w i t h observat i o n a n d participatio n i n pub l i c schools. Prerequ isite: 20 1 or 32 1 .

323

G E N E R A L METHODS - UPPE R E L E M ENTARY Process and content of teaching grades 4-6 w ith observat ion and partici pation in pub l i c schools. Prereq u isite : 20 1 or 321 .

325

R EA D I N G I N T H E E L E M ENTARY SCHOOL Teach ing reading i n elementary grades, i n c l ud i ng newer approaches; mater ials, methods, techniques, procedures and some d iagno sis of read ing difficulties. Prerequ isit e : 30 1 . I I I S

326

M AT H E MAT I CS I N T H E E L E M ENTARY SCHOOL ()I,- 1 ) Basic mathematical s k i l ls and ab i l ities needed by the elementary school teacher; recent developments a nd materials. Prerequ isite: Math 323 or consent. I I I S

401

WOR KSH OPS (%-1 ) Workshops in special f i elds for vary ing periods of t i me. ( G )

408

LANGUAGE ARTS I N T H E E L E M ENTARY SC H OO L ()I,) The functio nal teach ing of co mmunicatio n skills, grades K-6; areas i nclude: oral and written e x p ressio n , l isten ing, read i ng , l iterature, dramatizat ion , spel l i ng, grammar, handwr i t i ng , chi ldren's language and language study, vocab u lary development and lexicograph y .

410

SC I E N C E I N T H E E L E M ENTARY SCHOOL ()I,) The objectIves, mater ials and methods of teach i ng science.

41 2

SOC I A L STU D I E S I N TH E E L E M E NTARY SCHOO L ( Y.) Objectives, materials and methods of teaching t h e social studies; open to exper i e n ced or student teachers o n l y .

440-448 SPEC I F I C M E T H O DS I N TEACH I N G SECON DARY SCHOOL SU BJECTS Curricu l u m , methods and mater ials of instruct i o n in various subjects; may be taken for graduate cred it. 440

ART I N T H E S ECON DARY SCHOOL (%) See Art 440.

443

C H EM I STRY I N TH E SECON D A R Y SCHOOL ()I,)

444

E N G L I S H IN THE SECON DARY SCHOOL Development of teach ing aids and methods; demonstrat ions o f method and strategy by master teachers.

445

M E THODS I N T EACH I N G F O R E I G N LANGUAGES ()I,) T h eo r y a n d techniques of foreign language teach ing; special problems in the student's major language; emphasis o n audio-lingual tech n iques. (G)

446

MATH EMATICS I N TH E S E CON DARY SC HOOL ()I,)

447

SC I EN C E I N THE SECON DARY SCHOOL ( )I, )

448

SOC I A L ST U D I ES IN TH E S E CON DARY SCHOOL ()I,)

451

A DM I N I STRATI ON OF TH E SCHOO L L I BR A R Y ()I,) Library orga n i zat ion and admin istration i n the elementary scho o l . ( G )

452

BAS IC R E F E R EN C E MATE R I ALS ()I,) Those services o f a school l ibrarian

related

to

the

1 07


presentation of a l l materials which form the sou rces of reference. ( G ) 453

PROCESS I N G SC HOOL L I B R ARY MAT E R I ALS ( y, ) C lassification, cataloging and tech nical processing materials. (G )

454

SE LECTION OF L EARN I N G R E SOURCE MAT E R I A L S (y,) Criter ia, professional l iterature and techniques of eva l uation of li brary materials (print and non-print) ; the l ibrarian's respo nsibil ity to faculty, students and the general pub l i c. ( G )

455

I N ST RUCT I O N A L MAT E R IALS ( y, ) Audio a n d visual materials and aids, their u se, orga n ization and adm i n istratio n . ( G )

456

STORYTE L L I N G (y,) An i n vestigation of the values of storytel l i ng; background read ings on the various types of stories and their origins precedtls pract i ca l work in select i o n , classificat ion and t e l l i ng of stories su itable for elementary; some stories for adolescents.

D I R ECTED TEACH I NG I N R E A D I N G C E NTERS D i r ected observation and teach i ng in summer remedial classes i n pub l i c schools; to be taken concurrently w ith 488. Prereq u i site : Teaching exper ience. S ( G )

496

LABORATORY WOR KSHOP Practical course using elementary age ch i ldren in a classroom situation wor k i ng out a specif i c prob lem ; provision w i l l be made for some active participation of the university students. Prerequ isite: con ference with the i n structor or the Dean of the School of Educat io n . ( G )

497

S P E C I A L PROJ ECT (%-1 ) I nd ivid ual study and research on edu cational problems or add itional laboratory experience in public school classrooms. Prerequ isite: consent of the Dea n . ( G )

50 1

WO R KSHOPS ( %-1 ) Graduate workshops in special f i elds for vary i ng lengths of time.

545

M E THODS A N D TEC H N I QU E S O F R ESEARCH (y,) Seminar in social science research methods and techniques; i l l ustrations primarily from educat ion and psychology; seconda r i ly from fields such as sociology, h istory and po l i tical science; the desig n i ng of a research proj ect in the student's a rea of i n terest. R eq u i red for M .A . and should be taken early in the degree program . Prereq u i site: Admittance to the graduate progra m .

550

SCHOO L F I NA NCE ( y, ) Loca l , state a n d federal contributors t o school f i nance, its phi losophy a nd development; the development and admi n i stration of a school budget.

552

P U B L I C SCHOOL ADM I N ISTRATION ( 'Y.. ) Ad m i n istrat ion and supervision of school perso nn el , pla n t and program; the structure and orga nization of the school system. Prerequ isite: teaching experience or co nsent of t h e Dea n .

of

457

P R E PARAT I O N AN D UTI L I ZATION O F I N ST RUCTI ONAL MAT E R I ALS ( 'Y.. ) The prod u ction a nd u se of a variety of instructional materials, flat pictures, charts, maps and the 35mm camera; participants produce items usef u l i n i nstruct i o n . $1 0 .00 lab fee is charged . ( G )

1 08 467

EVALUAT ION ( y, ) Eva luation of school experie nces; problems i n co nnection with developme n t , organ ization and admin istration of tests (standard ized and teacher made) . Requ ired of fifth year students. Prereq u isite: student teaching or teaching experience. ( G )

473

489

PAR ENT-TEAC H E R CO N F E R ENCE ( y, ) Pri nciples a n d tech niques o f parent-teacher conferences; i n troduction of such programs to school and communit y ; evaluation o f various grad i ng systems. Prerequ iSite or corequ isite : student teach i ng o r teach i ng experience. ( G )

48 1

STAT ISTICAL M ETHODS See Psycho l ogy 481 . ( G )

482

K I N D E RGARTEN ( y, ) The k i ndergarten child a n d h i s adjustment activities and procedures for his development. (G)

483

P R I MA R Y R E ADI NG (y,) Materials a nd methods of t he primary read i ng program a nd its relation to other activities. Prerequ isit e : teaching experience. ( G )

problems;

485

TH E G I FTE D CH I L D ( Y, ) The gifted chi ld , h i s characteristics a nd problems and procedures designed to further developmen t . ( G )

488

R EA D I N G CENTE R WO R KSHOP ( y, ) C l i n ical study o f reading problems a n d suggested corrective measures; t o be taken concurrently with 489 . Prerequ isite: teaching experience. S (G)

554

H I GH SCHOOL ORGAN I ZAT I O N A N D A DM I N ISTRATI O N

(y,)

P la n n i ng and orga n lz l Og the h igh school curricu lum, sched u l i ng , extra-cu rricular activities, teachers' meetings, public accou nt ing and contro l , . f i na nce and reports. Prerequ isite : 552 . 555

ADM I N I STRATION A N D S U P E R V I S I ON WO R KSHOP Projects discussed determined by the class; typ i ca l projects i nclude curricu lum p la n n i ng and adj u stment, pub lic relations programs, perso nnel employment and in-service trai n i ng; f i na ncing b u i ld i ng and educational programs. Prerequ isite: one course i n ad mi nistration and/or supervisio n .

558

AD M I N I STRAT I V E I N T E R NSH I P (Y,-1 ) I nternsh ip in school administration planned with the School of Edu cation in cooperat ion with selected school ad m i n istrators. Prereq u isite: Course work in school admin istrat ion and admission to graduate program.

571

H I STORY AND P H I LOSOPHY OF H I GH ER E D UCATION H istor i ca l perspective and current stat us; development of f u n ctions and structures; issues in curriculum; ph ilosophy of admi nistrat ion; case studies.


573

STU D E N T P E RSO N N E L WOR K I N H I G H E R E D UCAT I O N Student perso n nel services i n h igher ed ucat ion; use o f perso nnel data; co-curr icular act ivities; student welfare; contemporary trends i n cou nse l i ng problems related to student l ife.

Emphasis placed on the i nteraction s and feedba ck. acqu isitio n of sk i l l in self-exploration, role ident ification a nd c l i mate ma k i ng. ( G ) 463

D I AG N OSIS A N D R E M E D I AT I O N IN R E A D I N G (y,) Causative factors relating to read ing difficult ies; some opport u n ity to apply remed iation tech niques; open to those with teach i ng experience.

G U I DANCE I N T H E E L E M ENTARY SCHOOL ( Y, ) Major orientations t o guidance a n d h o w they are translated i n to operational programs in the school setting.

465

G U I DANCE I N T H E SECONDARY SCHOOL (Y,) Major orientations to guida n ce and how they translate i nto operational programs in the school sett i ng. ( G )

580

C U R R I C U L U M D E V E LOPM ENT (y,) Types of curriculum orga nizations; programs and techniques of curricu l u m deve lopment. I

466

I NTR ODUCT I ON TO STU DENT P E RSON N E L S E R V I CES ( Y, )

583

R E A D I NGS I N E D UCAT I O N A L ISS U ES AN D P R O B L E MS (Y.-1 ) I ndividual read ing, investigation or research for cred it; guida n ce provided by the facu lty member best qualified in the area sel ected . Credit varies with project .

585

COM PARAT I V E E D UCAT I ON (y,) Comparison a nd investigation of certa i n materia l and cultural systems of education throughout the wo rld.

587

H I STOR Y O F EDUCAT I ON (y,) Great ed ucators, educat ional theories systems from antiqu ity to the prese nt.

579

a nd

468

469

ed ucat ional

589

P H I LOSO P H Y O F E D UCAT I O N (짜o) Philosophical and theoretical foundations of educat ion.

590

G RA D UATE S E M I NAR (0) A workshop for a l l Master of Arts candidates i n the School of Educat ion which provides a forum for exchange of research ideas a nd problems; candidates should register for this seminar for assistance in fulf i l l i ng requ irement. No credit is given , nor is tuition assessed.

596

R ESEARCH STU D I E S I N E D UCATION ( Y. ) F o r Master o f Arts cand idates who elect to write two research papers instead of a thesis. (One paper may be i n the cand idate's m i nor field under the supervision of the minor adviser . ) The candidate will be required to review his research papers before h is Graduate Committee (See Graduate Cata log ) .

597

R ESE ARCH STU D I E S I N E D UCAT I O N (y,) (See Education 596)

599

TH ES I S (짜o-1 ) For Master of Arts candidates who elect to write a thesis instead of two research papers. The thesis problem w i l l be chosen from the candidate's major field of concentration and must be app roved by his Graduate Committee. The candidate w i l l be expected to defend his thesis in a f i na l ora l exa m i nation conducted by his Committee.

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 461

Student personnel services offered by col leges and universities; fam i l iarization w ith l i terature i n the field ; exposure to local service agencies and student gover nment. (G)

G R O U P P R OCE SS AN D T H E I N D I V I DUAL(Y,) A h u ma n interact io n laboratory to fa c i litate the exploration of the self concept th rough the mechanisms of i nterperso nal

E D UCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY ( 1 ) Princip les and research i n huma n learning implications f o r curriculum a nd instructio n . ( G )

and

the i r

VOCAT I ON A L AN D E D UCAT I ON A L G U I DANCE ( Y, ) A study of vocational theories and occupat ional choices for M.A. students in Cou nsel ing and Gu idance. (G)

560A CONT I N U I N G PRACT I CUM A practical exper ience in the techniques of counsel ing; enrol lment l i m ited to StUdents begin n i ng the Master's Program in Counseling and Gu idance, and is a prerequisite to admission to the program; pract icum makes use of cou nseling sessions with cl ients u t i l izing verba l a nd no nverba l attending behavior. 560

CON T I N U I NG PRACT I C U M A pract i cum experience condu cted i n a small group setting t o h e l p the stud ents i ntegrate cog n itive a nd affective learnings from other courses a nd co unsel ing experiences into an individual ized counseling mode l ; students enrol led i n the M .A. program in Counse l i ng and G u idance, i nclud i ng elementary, secondary a nd h igher education, are req u ired to register for a total of three semesters; opportu ni ties for developing styles of co un sel ing and selected experiences from fam ily counsel ing, play therapy and psychodra ma .

561

COUNS E L I N G TH EORY Goa ls, relationships, and theories are pu rsued by independent and sma l l group work .

563

PRACT I C U M IN G ROUP PROC ESS A N D L E A D ERS H I P (Y,) A human i nteraction laboratory which exp lores interpersonal operations in groups and facil itates the development of self insight; emphasis on leadership and development of sk i l l i n d iagnosing ind iv id ual, group a nd orga n i zational behavior patterns and influences. Prerequ isite: 461 .

565

S E M I NAR : NON-TEST APPRAISAL (Y,) Assessment of personal character istics a nd behavioral patterns to better understand the i nd ivid ual; ut i l ization of studies, case scales, ( s ociometric data n o n -t e s t autobiographies, interviews, etc . ) .

1 09


570

572

573

PRACT I C U M A N D F I E L D WO R K I N COU N S E L I N G A N D G U I DANCE . A cu l m i nating pract icum of f i eld exper ience in public schools u t i l i zi ng theory , skills and techniques previously learned; a variety of work experiences with i nd ividual students and where possible, with severa l groups of students; practicum may be extended through two semesters. P RACT I C U M I N STU DENT PE RSON N E L WO R K I N H I G H E R ED UCAT I O N A cu lminat ing practicum o f supervised collegiate experience in residence halls, admi nistrative offices, service agencies, research on projects associated with practicum . STU DENT P E RSON N E L WO R K IN H I G H E R ED UCATION Student perso nnel serv i ces in h igher education; use of personnel data; co-curr icular activities; student welfare; contemporary trends in counseling problems related to student life.

575

M ENTAL H EA LTH ( Yz ) Basic mental health principles a s related t o i nterpersonal relat ionships.

578

B E H A V I O R AND LEARN I N G P R O B L EMS OF STU DE NTS (Yz) Psychosexual causes of emotional and behavioral problems, the child's mistaken goals a s they affect behavior and learning. The course w i l l provide opport u n ity for practice i n active listening and reflective co mmunicatio n .

1 1 0 E N G L ISH BAC HE LOR OF ARTS : M i n imum of eight courses beyond 1 0 1 ; 241 , 251 , 252 , 383 plus four electives, th ree of which must be upper-d ivision. A l l majors, i nclud ing t hose enrolled i n the School of Educat io n , must present two years of one foreign language at the college level or show equ iva lent proficiency. B ACHE LOR EJu cat i o n . 1 01

OF

ARTS

COL L E G E E N G L I S H Develops a student's cr i t i ca l ly a nd wei l . l I I

IN

E DUCAT I ON :

See School of

powers t o read , th i n k

and write

21 7

S H O RT STORY Themes and tech niques i n short fict io n . I I

230

I NTRODUCTION TO CO NTEMPORARY L I T E R ATUR E Selected contemporary works - chiefly America n , E ng l ish or Continental - since World War I I . I I I

231

MAST E R P I ECES OF EUROPEAN LI TERATURE Representative works of the l iterature of Western Europe, especia lly classica l , med ieval and Re naissance. I

241

I N TRODUCT I ON TO A M E R ICAN L I TE R ATU R E Major a uthors from Edward Taylor to Stephen Crane; req u i red of majors.

251

I N TRODUCT I ON TO ENGLISH L I TE R AT U R E : B EG I N N I N GS TO 1 7 50 Emphasis on the co nt i n u ity and variety of English literature

from Beowulf through neoclassicism; requi red of majors. I 252

I N TRODUCT I ON TO E N G L I S H L I T ERATU R E : AFTER 1 750 English l iterat ure, especially poetry, from the emergence of romanticism to the twentieth cent ury; req u i red of majors. I I

31 8

ADVAN C E D COMPOS I T I ON A study of rhetorical principles. ( R eq u ired of E ngl ish majors enro l led in the School of Education un less exempted by the E ngl ish Department.) I I

323

CHI LDR E N 'S L I TE R AT U R E Chi ldren's l iterature a s a r i ch col lect ion in itself a n d as a gu ide to book selection i n t he public schools. I I

349

M O D E R N PO ETRY Poetry, especia lly Amer i ca n and British, si nce World War I. I I

35 1

MOD E R N DRAMA Sele cted plays represe nting the development of drama from rea l i sm to the theatre of the absurd.

358

E N G L I S H L I T E R ATU R E : TH E N O V E L Selected novels which represent developments from the eighteenth century to the present.

382

ENG L I SH LITE RATU R E : C H A U C E R Especia lly T h e Canterbury Tales; i ncludes deve lopment of the English language. Recommended as backgro und : 25 1 . I

383

E N G LISH L I T E R ATU R E : SHAKESPE A R E T e n t o twelve representative plays; req u i red o f majors. Recommended as background : 251 . I

388

ENG LISH L I T E R ATUR E : M I LTON AND H I S AGE M i lton, Donne, and their co ntemporaries. Recommended as backgrou nd : 251 . 1 1

389

E N G L ISH L I T E RATU R E : SAT I R E AND SEN S I B I L I TY S w i ft , Pope, Johnson and their contemporari es. R ecommended as backgro u nd : 252_ 1 1 a/y

:Il0

E N G L I SH L I T E R ATU R E : T H E ROM A N T I CS Representat ive works from the Romantic Recommended as background : 252 . I

period.

:Il 1

E N G L I S H L I T ERATU R E : T H E V I CTOR IANS I ncludes poetry of Tennyson, Brow n i ng , Arnold and the Pre-Raphaelites; prose of Macaulay, Carlyle, Newma n , M i l l a nd Ruskin; and several representative novels. Recommended as background : 252. I I

:Il2

E N G L I S H L I T E R ATU R E : TWE NTI ET H CE NTURY Selected f ict ion of Joyce, Lawrence, Forster, Greene and Amis; wor ks of major twentieth-century Brit ish playwrights and poets.

400

L I N G U I ST I CS See foreign languages.

403

M O D E R N E N G L I S H G R AM MAR Modern Engl ish grammar util izing the approaches of the


three ma jor theories: transformat iona l . I 441

442

trad it i o na l ,

structural

and

T H E A M E R ICAN R EN AISSAN C E , 1 830·1 870 Transcendenta l ists, Emerson, Thoreau , Whitman, D i ck i nso n; Poe, Hawthorne, Melvi l l e. Recommended as background : 241 . I I A M E R I CAN L I TE RATUR E : R E A L I S M A N D NATU R A L I SM , 1 870·1920 Howel ls, Twa i n , James; Crane, Norris, Londo n , Dreiser; Rob inso n , Frost. Recommended as background : 241 . I

443

A M E R I CAN L I T E R ATU R E SI NCE 1 920 Emphasis on the novel up to 1 950. I I

450

S EM I NAR I N AM ER ICAN L I T E RATUR E For advanced English majors. A review of themes and forms in American literature and preparation of an extensive critical paper o n a major v�or k . I nc l udes independent reading and weekly sem i nars. Prerequ isite: consent.

49 1 , 492 I N D E PE N D E N T R EA D I N G A N D R ES E A R C H (%-1 ) For senior majors who plan graduate work in English; a n intensive, planned COlJrse o f read ings. I I I 597

G R A DUATE R ES E A R CH (%-1 ) I II

FORE I G N LANGUAG ES There are no departmental prerequ isites for the study of foreign languages. Potential majors are, however, encouraged to obtain as much h igh school preparat ion as possib l e . Placement of students with previous experience is deter m i n ed by a test which is given during orientation days at the beginning of the school year. Major programs are ava i lable i n Classics, Ger ma n , French a nd Spa n ish. For further information in Classics, consult the SPEC I A L ACAD E M I C P R O G R AMS section o f this catalog.

201 , 202 I NT E R M E D I AT E F R E N C H A continuation of elementary French; read ing selections which reflect the F rench cultural her itage as well as contemporary mater ials. Laboratory attendance required. I I I 321

C I V I L I ZAT I O N A N D C U LTUR E Present-day France as reflected in current l iterature, period i ca ls, television and f i l ms; written compo sitions and ora l reports; co nducted i n French. Prerequ isite: French 202. I II

351 , 352 COMPOS I T I O N A N D CONV ERSAT I O N Adva nced grammar, stylistics, composition, conversation a nd phonetics; written compo sitions on culture and civi l ization; conversations o n current topics; conducted in French. Prerequisite: 202. I I I 42 1 , 422 MASTE R P I ECES O F F R EN C H L I T E R AT U R E Authors representative o f major periods from the M iddle Ages through t he ni neteenth century; the style and structure, and the morClI and artistic intentions of such authors as Rabelais, Monta i g n e , Mol iere, Corn e i l l e , Pasca l , Voltaire, Rousseau , H ugo a nd Baudela ire; co nducted in French. Prerequ isite: 202 . I I I a/v 431 , 432 TW E N T I ETH C E N T U R Y F R ENCH L I T E R ATU R E Major twentieth century writers; emphasis on the period since World War I I ; conducted in French. Prerequ isite: 202. I I I a/y 442

H I STORY OF R OMANCE LANGUAG ES The h i storical development of Romance Languages with reference to current languages; same as Spanish 442. I I a/y

445

MET H O DO LOGY O F TEACH I N G FO R E I G N LANGUAG ES (%) Theory and techniques of foreign language teach i ng ; special problems in the student's major language; emphasis o n audio - l i ngual techniques.

49 1 , 492 I N DE P E N D EN T STUDY (Yo-1 )

BAC H E L OR OF ARTS : M i n i mu m of eight courses beyond 1 0 1 - 1 0 2 , i nc l u d i ng 201 , 202, 32 1 , 351 , 352 plus upper-division electives.

597 , 598 GRA DUAT E R ESEARCH (%·1 )

BACHELOR Educat ion.

101 , 1 02 E L E M E NTARY G E R M AN Essentials of pronunciation , intonation a nd structure; basic s k i l l s in l i sten i ng, speaking, reading and writing. Laboratory attendance required. I I I

OF

ARTS

IN

E D UCAT I O N :

See School

of

L I N G U I ST I CS 400

STR UCTURAL L I NG U I STICS The study of the nature of language; principles and techniques of descript ive language a nalysis; elementary application of l i nguistic ana lysis to selected materials. No prerequisites. I I

FRENCH 1 0 1 , 1 02 E L EM E NTA R Y F R ENCH Essentials of pronunciation, intonation and structure; basic skills in l iste n i ng, spea k i ng, read ing and writing . Laboratory attendance req u i red. I I I

G E R MAN

201 , 202 I NT E R M E D I AT E G E R MAN A continuation of e lementary German; reading selections wh ich reflect the German cultural heritage as well as contemporary materials. Laboratory attendance required. I I I 321

C I V I L I ZAT I O N AND CU LTUR E H isto rical and artistic el ements wh ich have shaped German culture from the beg i n n i ngs to the present; emphasis on forces which have inf luenced American culture a nd l ife; cond ucted i n German. PrereqU Isite : 202. I

351 , 352 COMPOS I T I O N A N D CONV ERSAT I O N Refinement o f basic language skills; emphaSis on fi ner points

1 11


I

of structure, sty le and good taste; composit ions and conversat io ns o n current topics; conducted in German . Prerequ isite: 202 . I I I 421 , 422 MAST E R P I ECES OF G E RMAN L I T ERATUR E Major literary works, in a l l the genres, from the early period to 1 900; examination of those forces which prod uced l iterature; literature as works of art; conducted in Germa n . Prerequisite : 202. I I I al y 431 , 432 TW ENTI ETH C E NT U R Y G E RMAN L I TERATU R E Major contemporary l iterary works with emphasis o n t h e last decade; all l iterary forms considered; conducted i n German. Prerequisite: 202. I I I al y 442

445

H I STORY OF TH E G E RMAN LANG UAG E Historical development of German with reference to contemporary language; condu cted in Germa n. Prerequ i site: 202. " aly M ETHODO LOG Y O F TEACH I NG F O R E I G N LANGUAG ES (%) Theory and tech niques of foreign language teach ing; special problems i n the student's major language; emphasis o n audio-l i ngual techniques.

49 1 , 492 I N D E P E N D ENT STUDY ( y.-1 )

1 0 1 , 1 02 E L E ME NTAR Y LAT I N Designed to enable t h e student to r ead Lat i n a s so o n as poss ible; basic readi ng text: the Vulgat e of St. Jerome; excursions into Roman history and myt ho l ogy. I " 201 , 202 I NT E R M E D I AT E LAT I N Lyric and epic poetry , its translation and adaptat ion b y Engl ish and Amer i ca n poets; the second semester i ncludes the read i ng of a n Italian author. I " 49 1 , 492 I N D EP E N D ENT STUDY ( y" - 1 ) NORWEG I A N Currently offered cooperatively with t h e U niversity o f Puget Sound on our campus. 1 0 1 , 1 02 E L E M E NT A R Y N O RWEG I A N Essentials o f pro nu n ciation , intonation a nd str u cture; basic sk i l l s in l i sten i ng , spea k i ng, rea d i ng and writ i ng . Laboratory attendan ce requ ired. I " 201 , 202 I NT E R M E D I ATE N O RWEG I AN A cont in uation of elementary Norwegian; read ing selections which reflect the Norwegian cultural heritage as well as contemporary mater ials. Laboratory attendance required. I " 321

597 , 598 G R ADUATE R ESEA RCH (%-1 )

112

LAT I N

G R E EK Currently offered cooperatively with the Un iversity of Puget Sou nd on our campus. 101 , 1 02 E L E M ENTARY G R E E K Designed to enable the student to read Greek a s so o n as possible; choice of read i ng each term is determined by a particular theme. I I I 201 , 202 I NT E R M E D IATE G R E E K Selected koina readings from Hel len istic Greek l iterature with major emphasis on the N ew Testament . I I I 42 1 , 422 MAST E R P I ECES O F G R E E K L I T E RATU R E Ava i lable through consultation with the depart ment. Prerequisite : 1 0 1 , 1 02 . I "

491 , 492 I N D EPEN DENT STUDY (Y.. -1 ) RUSS I AN Currently offered cooperat ively with the U niversity of Puget Sound on their campus. 1 0 1 , 1 02 E L E M E NTARY R USS I A N Essentials of R ussian grammar and teaching o f graded texts. I

"

201 , 202 I NT E R M E D I AT E RUSS I A N A cont i n uation o f elementary R u ssia n ; reading of suitable texts, review of grammar, composition. I I I SPAN I S H

49 1 , 492 I N D E P E N D ENT STUDY (%-1 )

JAPAN ESE Currently offered cooperat ively with the U niversity of Puget Sound on their campus. 1 01 , 1 02 ELEM ENTARY JAP ANESE I ntroduction to spo ken Japanese; construction grammar and kana sy l labaries. I I I

CI VI L I ZATI O N A N D C U LT U R E H i s t o r i c and artistic elements which have shaped Scandinavian culture from the beg i n n ings to the present; emphasis on those forces which have i nf l uenced American l ife and cult ure. No prerequisites. I

patterns,

201 , 202 I NT E RM E D I ATE JAPAN ESE I ntroduction to character w r i t i ng; read i ng and translation of Japanese. I I I

1 0 1 , 1 02 E L EM E NTARY SPAN ISH Essentials of pronunciation, intonation and str u cture; basic skills i n l i ste n i n g , speaking, reading and writing . Laboratory attendance requ ired. I " 201 , 202 I NT E R M E D IATE SPAN I S H A continuation o f el ementary Spani s h ; readi ng selections which refl ect the Spanish cultural heritage as wel l as contemporary materials. Laboratory attendance required. I " 32 1

C I V I L I ZAT I O N A N D C U LT U R E H i storic a n d artistic elements which have shaped Span i sh thought and behavior from the beginn ings to the present;


emphasis on forces which have i n f luenced Amer ican life and culture; conducted i n Spa n i s h . Prerequ isite: 202. I

351

T H E RMO DY NAM I CS Concepts and equations of classica l , macroscopic thermodynamics; thermod ynamic cycles, flow a nd non-flow systems, properties a nd mathematical relations of pure substances, mixtures and solutions, phase transition and chemical react ions; a n elementary treat ment of stat istical thermod ynamics. Preroquisite : Physics 253, 254.

441

N ETWOR K ANAL Y S I S An analysis o f electrical circuits conta ining active a n d passive elements for transients and steady state cond itions; formulation of network equat io ns, network theorems, impeda n ce match i ng and fundamentals of netwo rk topology. Prerequ isite: Physics 272, 331 . I I a/y

442

TRANSPORT P H E N OM E NA The u n ifying concept of the transport of mass, heat and momentum; general aspects of f l u id mechan ics and transport coeff icients. Prerequis ite : 35 1 . I I a/y

351 , 352 COMPOSI T I ON A N D CO NV E RSAT I O N Topics o f current in terest a s a basis for improved oral a nd written expression; conducted in Spanish. Prerequ isite: 202. I II 42 1 , 422 MASTERPI ECES O F SPAN IS H L I T E R AT U R E A l l genres of major l iterary works from the ea r ly period to 1 900 ; forces which produced the literat ure; appreciating literature as a work of art; condu cted in Spanish. Prerequ isite: 202. I I I a/y . 431 , 432 TWE NTI ETH C E NTURY SPAN ISH L I TE RAT U R E Major contemporary literary wo rks; emphasis on the last decade; Spanish and Lati n American authors co nsidered; conducted in Span ish. Prerequisite: 202. I II a/y

442

HI STO R Y OF ROMANCE LANG UAG ES H istorical development of R o mance languages with reference to current language; same as French 442 . I I a/y

445

M ETHODOL OGY OF TEAC H I N G F O R E I GN LANGUAGES (Y:.) Theory and techniques of foreign language teach i ng; special problems i n the student's major language; emphasis on audio-lingual techniques. 49 1 , 492 I N D E P EN D E NT STUDY (Yo-l )

GE N E RAL EN G I N E E R I N G Descriptions of the pre-e ngineer ing programs and the Engi neeri ng Physics program are contai n ed i n t he sect io ns "Special Progra ms for Careers" a nd "Physics"'flHpective l y . 1 44

I NT R O D UCTI ON TO COMPUTER SC I E NCE See Mathematics 1 44.

1 51

E NG I N E E R I N G G RAPH ICS (Y:.) Descriptive geometry : aUXiliary views, true rovo l utions and developments, str i k es and dips.

231

232

344 346

size view,

STATICS ( Y:. ) F u ndamental engineer i ng statics using vector algebra; cond itions for eq u ilibr ium, resultant force systems, centroid and center of gravity, methods of virtual wor k , friction and k i n ematics of particles a nd rigid bodies. Prerequisite: Physics 253. M E CHAN ICS OF SO L I DS Machanics of deformable solid bodies; deformation, stress, const itutive equations for elastic materia l s , thermoelasticity, tonsi o n , f l exure, torsion, stab i l ity of eq ui librium. Prer equisite: 231 . SYSTE MS ANA LYS I S AN D S I M U L AT I O N See Mathematics 344. N U M E R I CAL ANALYSIS See Mathematics 346.

H I STORY During the sophomore yea r , a student intending to major in history ( Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Arts in Ed ucation) should fill out an application which is available i n the department office. If accepted , the student will be assigned to a member of the h i story faculty who w i l l serve as his adviser. I n additio n : A history major should maet the foreign lang uage req u irement under aither Option I or Option I I as requ ired by the College of Arts and Sciences. Prior to the Thanksgiving recess of the j u n ior year, a history major wil l take an examination in E ngl i sh proficiency. Arrangements for taking the examination should be mada 8t the office of the Di rector of Test i ng . I n either t h e fi rst or second semester o f t h e senior yaar, a history major will enrol l in one of the following three se mi nar s: 494, 49 5 , 496. I n September of the sen ior year , a history major w i l l take an oral examination , based on the student's work i n the field of history. BAC H E LO R OF ARTS : Eight cou rses including 1 0 7, 1 08; two of 2 6 1 , 252 and 253; sen ior seminar; p l u s electives. BAC H E L OR Edu cation.

OF

ARTS

IN

E DUCAT I O N :

See

School

of

1 07, 1 08 H I STORY OF C I V I L I ZAT I O N Analy sis of in st itutio ns and id eas of selected civiiizat ions: Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Hebrews, Greece, Rome, the rise of Christianity and Europe in the M iddle Ages are dealt with in the fi 'st semester; Europe from the Renaissance to the present in the second semester; sel ected research and writing. I II 251

COLON I A L AM E R I CAN H I STORY American i n stitutions from colonial t i mes to the 1 790's; the growth of the colo nies and their relationship to the British i mperi a l system.

252

N I N ETE ENTH C E NTURY AMER I CAN H I STORY The ea r l y national period to the 1 890's; t he interplay between chang i ng historical co nditions and various groups i n society , i n clud i ng minorities.

1 13


253

TWENT I ETH C E NTURY AM E R I CA N H I STORY Trends and events in domestic and foreign affairs since 1 900: affluenc.e, urban growth and social contrasts.

337

R E P U B L I CAN LAT I N A M E R I CA From i ndependence to t he present; emphasis upon Mexico, Argentina a nd Brazi l . Prereq u i site: 336 or conse n t .

255

PAC I F I C N O RTHWEST An i nterpret ive h istory w i t h i n the context of the American West; social, economic and political developments w h ich reflect regio na l and national characteristics.

340

FAR EASTER N H I STORY Life and thought from ancient ti mes; concentrat ion C h i na, Japan and I ndia . Prerequisite: consent.

356

H I STO R Y OF A M E R I CAN FOR E I G N P O L I CY The practice, function and structure of American foreign policy with particuler emphasis o n the twe n t i et h century. Prerequisite: two courses from 251 , 252, 253 or consent .

421

H I STORY OF I D EAS : E U R O P E A N C I V I L I ZATI O N Lead ing ideas in Western civil ization since the d isi ntegration of R o me . Prerequisite: consent.

451

A M E R I CAN CONST I TUT I O N A L H I ST O R Y The constitution from colonial times. Prereq uisite: consent.

1 300 to 1 500. Prereq uisite:

461

T H E R E FO R MAT I O N Po litical a n d religious CrISIS i n the sixteenth century: Lutheranism, Zw i n g l i a n i s m , Anglican i s m , Anabaptism, Calvinism, Roman Catholic reform; Weber thesis, t he b eg i n n in g of Baroque art. Prerequisite : 1 07 , 1 08 or consent.

H I STORY O F THE A M E R I CAN F RONTI ER P r i n cipal "frontier s" w h i ch cha racterized t h e westward moveme n t , especia lly in t he nineteenth ce ntury. Prerequisite: Any two courses from 25 1 , 252, 253 or consent.

471

H ISTO RY OF AM E R I CA N THOUGHT A N D C U LT U R E D i mensions of American social a n d i nte llectual h i story; ideas as they relate to historical periods and ethnic groups. Prerequ isite: Any two courses from 251 , 252, 25 3 or consent.

492

I N D E P E N D E N T STUDY

494

S E M I N A R : AM E R I CA N H I ST O R Y

TH E F R ENC H R E V O LUTI O N AN D N A P O L E O N Revolut ionary Europe f r o m 1 789 t o the Congress o f Vienna. Prerequi s i t e : 1 0 7, 1 08 or consent.

495

S EM I N AR : E U ROP EAN H I ST O R Y

496

SE M I N A R : H I STORY A N D H I STO R I A NS

N I N ETE E N TH C E NTURY E U R O P E The expansio n of European civil ization from 1 8 1 5 to 1 9 1 4. Prerequisite : 1 0 7 , 1 08 or consent.

596

G RA DUATE R ESEARCH

599

THESIS

TWE NTI ETH C E NTURY E U ROPE Events and trends since 1 9 1 4. Prerequisite: 1 07 , 1 08 or consent. I I I

MATH EMAT I CS

32 1 , 322 H I STORY OF TH E A N C I ENT W O R L D T h e ancient Mediterranean world w i t h emphasis u p o n Greek and Roman civilizations: may be repeated for credit when subjects vary. Prerequ isite: consent. I "

323

324

325

326

114

327

328

329

M E D I E VA L H I STOR Y Europe from the disintegratio n of the Roman 1 :JX>; read ing and research in medieval Prerequis ite: 1 07 , 1 08 or consent . R E NA ISSANCE Europe in an age of transition 1 07 , 1 08 or consent .

-

Empire to materia ls.

EUROPEAN H I STORY F ROM 1 648 to 1 789 Developments during the early modern and scientific age; the E n l ig hten me nt; the Old Regime. Prerequisite : 1 07 , 1 08 or consent.

331 , 332 E N G LA N D Pol i t ical, socia l , economic, legal and cultural developments i n the Brit ish Isles. Prerequ isite. 1 07 , 1 08 o r consent. I "

333

R USSIA R u ssia from earliest t i mes; the co l lapse of Czarism, the rise of commu nism, present world relations. Prerequisite: 1 0 7 , 1 08 or conse nt .

336

COLON I A L LAT I N AM E R ICA The conquest, sett lement and development of Latin America; Spanish and Portuguese po lit ica l , eco nomic and religious institutions. Prerequisite: Any two courses from 1 07, 1 08, 251 , 252 or con sent.

on

During the sophomore yea r , a student intending to mejor i n ITSthematics should complete an app l i cation form ava ilable from the departmental secretary. If accepted, the student w i l l be assigned to an adviser on the mathematics faculty. Students not qualifying for 1 5 1 upon entrance should register for 9 1 andlor 1 33 and then take both 1 52 and 231 in the first semester of t he sophomore year. BACH E L O R OF ARTS: M i n i mu m of saven courses nu mbered above 1 50 i n cluding 332 , 433, 455 and either 434 or 456. The 434 or 456 choice may be replaced by taking two of 321 , 341 , 344, 346, 351 and 460. Two courses in physics are strongly recomme nded. Students pla n n i ng to do graduate work i n mathematics should complete both 434 and 456. BACH E L O R O F SC I E NCE : Ten courses including 332 and at least five upper division courses. Three of the upper division courses must come from 433, 434, 455 and 456. R eq u i red supporting: Two


courses in physics. Mathematical Physics 456 may be substituted for one course of u pper division mathematics. BACH E LO R Educat ion.

OF

ARTS

IN

E D UCAT I ON :

See School of 324

F I N I TE MATH EMAT I CS Truth tables, modulo systems, elementary probab ility, Boolean Algebra, matrices, l i near progra mm i ng. Prerequisites: H igh school a lgebra and geometry. I l i S

GEOMETRY F O R T H E E L E M E NTARY SCHOO L TEAC H E R (%) A review of elementary geometry from a mature po int of view using moder n vocabulary and notat ion; the i mportance of measurement, observation, intuitio n , and inductive reasoning as useful learning techniques. I ntended for elementary tea ching majo rs. Prerequisite: 32 3. I I

332

COLLEGE ALGEBRA A N D T R I GONOMETRY Sets, progressions, bi no mial theorem, complex numbers, determinants, radian measure, solution of acute and oblique triangles, inverse functions, graphing, identities. Prerequ isite: 2 years of high school algebra or consent. I I I

M U LTI D I M E NSIONAL CALCULUS Continuation of multivar iable calculus concepts in troduced in 231 . Partial d ifferentiation and differential equations, l i ne integrals, Green's theorem, infi nite series. Prereq uisite: 231 . II

34 1

MAT H E MATI CAL STATISTICS E lementary probabil ity theory, discrete and continuous distribution functions, i ntroduction to sa mp l i ng theory and hypothesis test ing. Prerequ isite: 1 52 . / I a/y

344

SYSTEMS A N A LYSIS A N D S I M U LATION Application of matrix a lgebra, probabi l ity theo ry, stat istics and computer science to problems of science, industry and society; mathematica l mod eling, Monte Carlo techniqu�s, error analysis, stochastic processes and computer simu latio n . Prerequisite: 1 44 a n d 1 52 . I a / y

34 6

N U M E R ICAL ANA LYSIS Numer ical theory and app l i cations in the areas of so l ution of equations and l i near systems, differentia tio n , integration, approximatio n , matrix theory and solution of d ifferential equations. Prereq u isite or corequisite: 231 and l i m ited k nowledge of computer programming or consent . I I APP L I E D MATH EMAT I CS Ordinary differentia l equations includ i ng series so lutions, the Laplace transform, part ial differential equat ions, orthogonal functions. Prerequisite: 332. I

091

I NT E R M E D I AT E ALGEBRA ( no cred it) A thorough review of fi rst year h igh school a lgebra and cont inuation beyond quadratics. I

1 27

1 33

1 44

syste mat ic analysis of arithmetic; an intuitive approach to algebra and geometry. Intended for elementary tea ching majors. Prerequisite to Ed . 326. Prereq uisite: consent. I I I S

I NTROD U CT I ON TO COMPUTER SC I E N C E Computer science a n d a working knowledge o f F O RTRAN as applied to scientific problems; computer classificat io n, organ izat io n , data structure, algorithms, flow charts and FORTRAN IV. Prerequisite: 1 27 or 1 33 or consent. I I I

151

ANALYTIC G EOMETRY A N D CALCULUS A na lytic geomet ry , fu nct ions, l i mits, derivat ives and integrals with applications. Prerequ isite: Two years of high school algebra, tr igonometry or 1 33 or eq uivalent. I I I

1 52

ANALYTIC G EOM ETRY A N D CALCULUS I ntegrat io n , applications and techniques of integration, transcendental functions, polar coord inates, improper i ntegra ls, L'Hospita l's Rule, i nfi nite series. Prerequisite: 1 5 1 . I II

1 99

D I R ECTED R E A D I N G i%-)ďż˝ ) Supervised study of topics selected to meet the individual's needs or in terests; pr imarily for students awarded advanced placement. Admission only by departmental i nvitat ion.

351

231

LI N EA R ALG E B R A A N D CALC U LUS determinants; matrices and algebra, vectors, Linear d ifferen t ial equations, solid analytic geo metry; introduction to multivariable calculus. Prerequisite: 1 52 or consent of department chairman. I I I

433, 434 MOD E R N ALG E B RA Li near algebra, groups, rings, modules, fields, field extensions. Prereq u isite: 2 3 1 . 433 offered I each year; 434 offered I I a/y.

244

DATA STR UCTUR ES A N D ASS EMBL Y LAN G U A G E PROGRAMM I NG ( % ) language, assembly COMPASS structure, Co mputeT i n struction executio n , addressing techniques, representation of data, ma cro definitio n , program segmentation and l i n kage. Prerequ isite: 1 44 or consent. I a/y

32 1

G EOMETRY Fou ndations of geometry and basic theory i n Euclidea n , projective and non-Euclidean geometry . Prereq uisite: 2 3 1 or consent. I a/y

323

MO D E R N E L EM E NTARY MATH EMAT I CS Concepts underlying traditional computational techniques; a

446

MAT H E MAT I CS I N TH E SECO N DARY SCHOOL (%) principles of number, concepts; Mathematical Basic operatio n , relation and proof, postulational systems of Euclidean geometry and materia ls in secondary school teach ing. Prerequisite: 231 or equivalent. I

455 , 456 MATHEMATICAL A NALYS IS Extended treatment of topics introduced i n elementary calcu lus. Prerequisite: 332. 455 offered I each year; 456 offered I I a/y o 460

ELEM ENTARY TOPOLOGY An introduction to po i nt-set topology. Prerequisite: Consent. I I a/yo

115


490

enjoyment of mu s i c . Not open to majors. I "

S E M I NAR (y"-1 ) Prereq u i s i t e : Consent of d e pa r t m ent ch a ir ma n .

1 23

THEORY F undamentals a n d notation o f m u s i c through elementary part wr it ing; appl ication t h r ough keyboard , sightsinging and ear tra i n i n g . I

124

THEORY Co n t i nu ed par t wr i t i n g , mod u lat i o n i ntrod u ctory work in analysis. "

49 1 , 492 I N D E P E N D E NT STUDY (y"-1 ) Prereq u isit e : Consent of Department chairman. I " 59 7 , 598 G R A DUATE R ES EA R CH ( %-1 ) Open to Master's degree candidates Consent of department chairman . I I I

only.

Prereq u i site:

Sludent� i n t end i ng to major in music shou ld begin t h e major mu sic sequences in the first year. Fa i l ure to do so may mean an extra semester or y ea r to co mplete the major p rogra m . Music majors must fi l l out a dec l ara t ion of intent during t h eir first semester of e n r o l l ment in the pro g ra m and renew t he declaration each se m e st e r in attendance. B AC H E LOR O F ARTS: Ma xi mum of t en courses i n clud ing 50, 1 2 3, 1 2 4, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , 223, 224, 323 p lu s one course in L iterature and Parformance an d two co urses of pr i vate lessons includ i ng o ne-ha lf course in private piano . OF

ARTS

IN

E D UCAT I O N :

See Scho o l o f

The Depart me n t of M u sic a l so offers the fol lowing d eg re e p ro gra ms :

'1 1 6

1.

2. 3

4. 5 6. 7. 8 9.

10. 11. 12. 1 3. 1 4.

15

1 6.

Bachelor Bachelor Bachelor Bac hel or Bachelor

of of of of of of of of

M u sic in Piano Performance Music in Organ Performa nce M usic in Vocal Performance M u sic i n I nstr u me nt a l Performance M usic in Sacred M us i c M us i c in Theory and CompoSition Arts in Education Secondar y - C horal M usic Arts in Education Seco nd ar y - Sa cre d Cho ra l

Bachelor Bachelor Bachelor M usi c Bachelor of Al'ts in Education Seco nda ry - I n st r u me nta l M us i c Bachelor of A rt s in Ed ucat ion E l ement a ry - M us i c S p ec i a l i st Master of M u s i c in Piano Pe" orma nce Master o f M usic i n Or ga n Perfor ma nc e Master of M u s i c i n Vocal Performa nce Master of usic in I nstrumental Perf o r ma n ce M a ster of M usic Education Master of Music in Theory and Composition

Consult t he Music Department Handbook , avai l able in t he Music Oftice, for complet e deta i l s co ncern ing requ i red cou rses, recommended fou r·y ear progra ms by the se mest er , progress charts and other pertinent i nfor mat ion . 50

1 20

ea r

t r a i n i ng ;

1 4 1 , 1 42 ST R I N GS ( Y.. , Yo) I nstr u me n tal laborato ry . I I I a/y

M USI C

B ACH E L O R Ed u cat io n .

a nd

21 1 , 2 1 2 H I STORY O F M U S I C Music from ancient civ i l i zations P r er e q u i site : 1 24 or con se nt . I I I

mod ern

t imes.

223, 224 T H E O R Y Comp leted study i n t ra d i t i ona l harmony a n d ear t ra i n ing; i n troduction to co u nt e r -po i n t and compos i t i o n ; a p p l icat i o n of harmo n i c pra ctices t h rou g h a n al y sis , wr i t i n g , k ey boa rd and ear t r a i n i n g . I I I 243, 244 WOO DWI N DS I NSTR U M E NTAL LABORATO RY ( Y. , Yo) M ethod s and pro b l e m s of teach i n g and p l a y i n g woodwind i ns tru ments. I I I a / y 1 972-73 o

245 , 246 B R ASS I N ST R U M E NTAL LABO RATO R Y [ Y.. , Y.) M et h od s a nd prob lems of teachi n g a nd p l a y i n g brass i n st r u me n ts . a / y 1 973·74 247

323

324

PERCU SS I O N LABORATORY ( Y.. ) M ethods and problems of tea ch in g i n struments. I a / y 1 9 72-73

and

p la y i n g percu ss i on

CONT EMPORARY T ECH N I OU E S , A N A L Y S I S A N D L I TERAT U R E Co m pos i t i on a l t e c hn i q u e s , ear l y developments a nd trends. I

cu rr en t

CONTRAPUNTAL W R I T I N G , F O R M , A N A L Y S I S A N D L I TERATU R E R e v i ew u f no n- h a r mon i c tones; melody wr i t i ng ; species co u nterpo i nt ; two an d three-part inventi o n ; fugue; forms; l i st e n i n g ; m e l od i c and harmonic d icta t i o n . " a/y 1 9 72-73

325 , 326 ORCH ESTRAT I O N ( Y" Y,) The range, transpo sition, sou nd , technical a b i l i t i e s, I i m i ta ti o ns and notation of i n struments; sc o r i ng a nd a rra ng i n g for convent ional and u n ique i n stru ment grouping. I I I a/y 1 9 72·13 327

STU D E N T R E C I TAL ( No Cred i t ) Wee k l y student recitals. Registr'ation and attendance requ ired o f a l l music ma j or s ; music majors expected to perfo rm in recital once each semester . I I I M US I C S U R V EY T he m u sic l iterature of Western Civi l izatio n ; form a nd mea n i n g of mu s ica l masterpieces; designed to en hance th e

to

COMPO S I T I O N ('1. -1 ) A syst e m a t i c approac� to co ntemporary mu sical co m po sit io n ; s t u d e n t s crea t e , notate a n d perform works tor so l o , s ma l l a nd lar g e ensem b l e s . M a y b e r epea ted for a d d it i o n a l c r ed i t. L I T E R A T U R E AND P E R FORMANCE

330

C H O I R OF TH E WEST ( Y.) A u d i t io n s at the beg i n n i ng of each fa l l se me ste r ; sacred a nd secular m u s i c , w i t h a n d w ithout accompa ni ment. I "


331

U N I V E R S I TY C H O R A L E (%) Aud i tions at the beginn ing of each fa l i semeste r; sacred and secu lar music with and without accompan i ment. I I I

332

MA DR I G A L SI G E R S A N D VOCAL ENS E M B L E (%) Membership by auditi o n ; sacred and secular music. I I I

363

H I STOR Y OF PIANO L I T E R AT U R E A N D P E R FO R MANCE ( V. ) Representative compositions from a l l per iods of piano i iterature; open to majors and non-majors. a/y 1 9 72-73

364

H I STORY OF O R G A N B U I L D I NG (V.) H i storic end contemporary trad it i o ns of organ bu i ldin g; tonal design , acoustics, arch itecture and playing mech a n isms; basic tech niques for tuning and maintena nce ; exa m inatio ns of seve ral organs and two organ bui l d i n g shops. Prerequ isite : consent. a/y I nterim 1 9 74

365

VOCAL L I T E R ATUR E ( V. ) So lo v o ca l l iterature from antiqu ity through the present. I n-class performance . I a/y 1 9 7 3-74

333

U N I V E R S I TY B A N D ( % ) Membersh i p b y audit ion . I I I

334

U N I V E RS I TY ORCH ESTRA ( X ,) Membership b y a u d i ti o n . I I I

335

C H AM B E R ENS E M B L E ( Y.) Prerequ isite: Consent. I I I

336

TWO P I ANO E N S E M B L E ( Yo ) Two piano and piano duet I iterature from a l i periods; open to majors a nd non-majors.

367

337

ACCOMPANY I N G ( % ) To assist t h e pianist i n gain ing experi ence a n d knowledge i n accompa nying literature from a l l periods.

H Y M N O LOGY AN D SAC R E D M U S I C L I TERAT U R E C hr istian hymnody with an analysis of poetry and music; principles u nder l y i ng effective worship music and a survey of anthem, cantata and orato rio l iterature. I I a/y 1 9 7 3-7 4

368

338

CONTEMPO R A R Y D I R ECT I O N S ENSEM B L E ( Yo ) Public and l a b o ra tory performance experience contemporary music; membership b y auditio n .

WORSH I P A N D L I T U R G Y The nature a n d scope of Christian wors hip; m a i n l iturgies beg i n n i ng with temple and synagogu e , Eastern OrthOdox, Roman Catho l ic, Lutheran , Ca lvin ist and A ng l i ca n ; special conSideration of Lutheran . I I aly 1973-74

401

339

B A S I C CON DUCT I N G (Y:, ) Basic techn ique o f read ing and conducting scores; practice i n i nstrumenta l and vocal co nd uct i n g . I I I

OP E R A WO R KSHOP (%-1 ) Stage prod u cti on of operas. Prerequ isite : Consent.

423

A DV A N C E D F O R M A N D A N A LY S I S Harmonic and structu ral analysis o f l iterature, classical through contemporary periods. Prerequ isite: 224. I

441

KEYBOAR D PE DAGOGY ( V.-*) Teachi ng tech niques for prospective instructors of beg i nn i ng and advan ced piano and orga n ; opportu n ity for practical a p p l i cation.

442

VOC A L PEDAGOGY (V.) Clear, concise approaches to teaching vocal tech n ique based upon physio logical and aco u stical laws which govern singing; comparision of texts on voca l product io n , in -class demonstrat io ns and a project in student teach ing; dictio n , phonet ics, i nterpretatio n. I I

443

O R G AN R E P E R TO I R E AN D I M P R OV ISAT I ON (V.) Organ l iterature and its relationsh ip to organ de sign and sty l i stic performance; techn iques in pra ct ical i mprovisation; emphasis o n liturgi ca l hymn tune i mprovi sat i on for i ntroductio ns, interludes and free acco mpa ni men ts. Prerequisite: Consent. ( l i mit 1 0 ) . a/y 1 972-73

445

A D V A N C E D C O N D U CT I N G , TEC H N I QU E S A N D M AT E R I A L S (V.) L iteratu re, its teaching and conducting Prereq u is ite . 339 . I

in

340

M U S I C I N THE ELEM E N TA R Y SCHOOL ( V. ) Techniques a n d procedures for t h e e'ementarv school program; the rote so ng , child voice, rhythm activities, Kodaly method . Prereq u i s ite : 1 2 3 or equivalent music background . I II

341

M US I C S K I L LS AND METHODS FOR E L E M ENTARY TEAC H E R S T h e rud i ments o f music; rhvthms, sight read ing, elementary keyboard experie nce and crea tive mu sic; te chniques and procedures for the elementary music progra m . I I I

PR I V ATE I N STRUCT I O N 350

P I AN O (%-1 )

35 1

ORG AN ( Y. -1 )

352

V O I C E ('1.-1 )

353

V I O L I N , V I O L A ( % 路1 )

354

C E L L O ('1.-1 )

355

WOODWI N DS ( %- 1 )

356

B R ASS (%-1 )

357

P E R C U S S I O N (%-1 )

447

M U S I C I N TH E S E C ON DARY SCHOOL (V.) The orga nization and admi n i strat i o n of the secondary school music program. I

49 1 , 492 I N D E P E N D ENT STU DY (%-1 ) 590

problems.

GR A DUATE S E M I N A R (%-1 ) Offered on demand.

1 17


N U R S I NG A D M ISS IO N A N D C U R R I C U L U M R E QU I R E M E NTS Students are admitted to the n u rsing program on a space ava i lable basis after successf u l complet ion of prescribed pre-n ursing courses. To be eligible for admissio n , the st udent must evidence a physi ca l , emot ional and intellectual aptitude for nursing, a nd have a mi n i mu m cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in col lege work as wel l as a mi n i mum grade of 2.0 in each course req u i red for the program as ind icated in the curricu l u m . Standa rds required for ad missio n must be maintai ned throughout the progra m . If a student receives a grade point of le ss than 2.0 in any course which is a prerequ isite for a nu rsing course, she may not cont inue in that nursing course u n t i l the prereq u isite course is repeated with a grade point of 2 .0 or above. A cand idate who has attended some other i nstitution, i n cluding graduation fro m a n approved school of nursing, may receive cred it toward a degree in nursing provided she meets the general r q u i rements for admissio n to the School of N ursing. Transferable credits are evaluated on a n individua l basis. The graduate nurse applicant Illay receive credit by examination in selected n u rsing and related courses i n accordance with the Advanced Placement policy of the U n ive rsity. The student w i l l fo ll ow the curricu lum outl i n es for t he Bachelor of Science in N ursing in regard to cou rse req u i rements, sequence of co urses and prereq u isites. The School of N ursing faculty reserves the right to request the withdrawal of a nursing student who fails to demonstrate competency or who fa i l s to ma i nta i n professional conduct.

1 18

A D D I T I O N A L COSTS Students provide their own transportat ion between the University campus and the c l i nical laboratory areas. Car poo ls are often established in the sophomore and j u n ior years. Each student must have access to a car for ind ividual use during the sen ior year. Students are required to carry professional liability i nsurance during the sophomore, j u n ior a nd senior years (ava i lable under a group plan at a nomina l cost to the student) . Health exa m i nation fees and student u n iforms (approximately $70) are the respo nsi b i lity of the student. H EA LTH The nursing student is responsible for maintammg her own health and is a teacher of h ealth . Physical examinations, x-rays and immunizations are req u ired prior to admission to the clin i ca l areas and period i ca l l y thereafter, and are the respo nsib i l ity of the student. Students should carry personal health insurance.

RESOURCES, FACI L IT I ES AND S E R V ICES Doctors Hospital , Tacoma, Washington (70 beds) C .B . R itch ie, M . D . , Ad ministrator Harriet Huffma n , R . N . , Director of N u rsing Good Samaritan Hospita l , Puya l l u p , Wa shi ngton (96 beds) David K. Hamry, M H .A . , Ad mi nistrator Jean Short , R . N . , B .S . , M . N . , Director of Nursing Service La kewood General Hospita l , Tacoma, Washington ( 1 00 beds) Harry Sa nislo, Ad min istrator Walter Wilhel m, B .S . , Assistant Ad min istrator Orpha J. Lucas, R . N . , D i rector of N ursing

Mad igan General Hospita l , Fort Lewis, Washington (536 beds) B r ig. General John Boyd Coates, J r . , M . D., Hospital Commander Colonel Margaret E. H ughes, R . N ., M .A . , A . N .C . , C h i ef Nurse Maple Lane School for G irls, Centra l ia , Washington (1 50 beds) R i chard Barrett, Superi ntendent Mary B r idge Children 's Hospita l , Taco ma , Washington ( 68 beds) Fred A. Pritchard, M . B .A . , Ad ministrator Karen Lynch , R. N . , B .S . N . , D irecto r of N u rsi ng Service Puget Sound General Hospita l , Tacoma , Washington (287 beds) Robert H uesers, M .S .H .A . , Admi n i strator Gretchen Breza rich, R . N . , D i rector of N ursing Service St. Joseph's Hospital , Tacoma, Washington (250 beds) S i ster Margaret Hudo n , O .S .S . , Admin istrator F lorence Reidinger , R . N . , D i rector of N u rsing Service Tacoma General Hospita l , Tacoma, Wa shington (263 beds) Robert F lynn , M.H .A . , J . D . , Admin istrator Betty Hoffma n , R . N . , B .S . N . , Director of N u r sing Service Taco ma-Pierce County H ea lt h Department Pa ul McNutt, M . D . , M . P . H . , D i rector of Health Nancy Mead, R .N ., M . N ., Chief of N u rsing Divisi on Tacoma Pub l i c Schools Donna Fergu so n , R . N . , B .S . , M .N ., Assistant in Pupi l Perso nnel Service Veterans Ad ministration Hospita l , American Lake, Wa shi ngton (904 beds) F lorence Naske, R .N . , B.S., Chief of N ursing Anna K. Heinzelma n n , R . N . , B .S . , Associate C h i ef, N ursi ng Service for Education Thomas March, M . D., Hospital Di rector

BAC H E LOR OF SC I E NCE I N N U R S I NG : In ad d ition to the nursing core requ i rements l i sted below, the student i s expected to meet University req u i renlents. N u rsing courses are sequ ential in nature a nd all have prerequ isites. A student i nterested i n t he Bachelor of Science i n Nu rsing degree should contact the School of N u rsing and beg i n the course sequence upo n entrance to the Un iversity. A sample curricu l u m in nursing is ava ilable u p o n request from the School of Nursi ng .

T h e School of Nu rsing has been involved i n a n intensive study o f i t s curricu l u m and is i mplementing t h e first year of the new curricu lum beg i n n ing in September , 1 97 2 . The new requ irements will be made available on a yearly basis. Students enter i ng the first year of the curricu l u m i n 1 972 w i l l enroll f o r the following courses: Chem. 1 03, B i o . 1 1 1 , Psych. 1 0 1 , Soc. 1 1 1 . Students currently enrol led i n the nursing program and students transferring in with advanced standing w i l l fol low the curr iculum a s outlined below: First Year : ( 1 9 71 路72 only) Bio. 1 61 , Chem. 1 03 , Psych. 1 0 1 , B i o . 1 62 , B i o . 201 , Soc. 1 1 1 . Second Year : ( 1 9 72-7 3 only) N sg . 251 , 252, 253, 254, 255 , 256, 263, and Soc. 445 or 325 .


Third Year: ( 1 972-73 and 1 973-74 only) Psy c h . 335, Nsg. 361 -362-363, Nsg . 37 1 -372. Fourth Year: ( 1 972-73, 1 97 3-74, and 1 9 74-75 o n l y ) Nsg. 410A, 41 0 B , 446, 450 , 45 1 , 452.

446

C OM M U N I TY N U R S I NG N u rsi ng care in the home and comm u n ity; wo rk ing with pat ients a nd fami lies, utilization of health and welfare resou rces. Prerequisites: 363 , 372, Sen ior status. I I I

251

M ENTA L H EA LTH ( Yo ) Mental health con cepts; formation o f self-concept and other concepts related to effective i nterpersonal relationships. Prerequ isite: Soc. 1 1 1 , Psych. 1 0 1 . I

450

252

N UR S I N G TE C H N I Q UES Practice of basic nursing tec h n iques; scientific princi ples unde r l y i ng these techniques. Prereq u i site: B i o . 1 6 1 , 1 62 , 201 ; Chem. 1 03. I

S E L ECTED C L I N I C A L P RO B L E MS I Sel ected c l i nical problems in nursi ng care of med ical-surgical patients; nu rsing a ssessment, criteria for determi n i ng priority of patient needs, nursing care for groups of patients, emergency and resuscitative mea sures; current trends in community and hospital plan n i ng for emerge ncy nu rsing activities. Prerequ isite: 363, 372, Senior statu s . I I I

451

S E L ECTED C L I N I CA L P R O B L E M S I I Selected cli n ical problems i n nu rsing care of acutely i l l med ical-surgical patients and patients with complex nursing needs; introdu ction to new parameters in n u rsing. Prereq u i site : 363, 372, Senior status; prerequisite or corequisite: 450 . I I I N U R S I N G LEAD E R S H I P Principles of leadersh i p and nursing team leade rship; u t i l ization of nu rsing personn e l , in -service educatio n , the i n terd iscipl i nary health team, and basic co ncepts of n u rsing management . Prerequ isite : 363, 372 , Sen ior status; prerequi site or corequisite: 45 1 . I I I

25 3, 263 D I S EASE E N T I T I E S a d u lts; etiologica l , Common d i s eases a f f e c t i ng pa thophysiologica l and therapeutic regimes. Prereq u isite: Bio. 1 6 1 , 1 62, Chem. 1 0 3. 1 I I 254

PAT I ENT H E ALTH TEACH I N G ( Yo ) Pri nciples of teaching and lear n i ng , problem solving and critical think ing as related to assessment of health needs, exercise of judg ment in pla n n ing for patient teaching, a nd application of princi p le s and development of basic teach i ng s k i l l s . Prerequisite: 25 1 , 252 , 253. I I

452

255

S U R G I C AL I N T E R V E N T I O N (Yo) N u rsing care for patients having surgical i nterventio n , i n cluding c l i n i cal experience i n a l l areas of surgical care, pre-operative preparation , nursing techniques in the operating roo m , recovery room and post-operative care. Prereq u isite: 2 5 1 , 252 , 253. "

49 1 , 492 I N D EP E N D EN T STUDY (}-H ) Prerequ isite: Consent of Director.

256

R E H A B I L ITAT I O N N U R S I N G (Yo) Var ious types of n u rsing problems common to patients in n eed of rehab i l i tatio n , decision-making i n this area, and l i mited experie nce in admin ister i ng necessary n u rsing care. Pr erequisite: 251 , 262 , 2 53. I I

361 , 362, 363 MATERNA L-CH I LD N U R S I N G Care to famil ies durin g chi ld-bea r i ng and chi ld-rearin g processes; healt h promot ion and care of t he sick; observat ion and care of mothers and chi ldren in hospital wards, clinics and related community agencies. Prerequisite: 254, 255, 256; prerequ isite or corequ isite: Psych. 335 or Education 201 or 301 and Soc . 445 or 325 . I I I 37 1 , 372 PSY C H I ATR I C N U R S I N G Major concepts of mental health and psychiatric nursi ng related to the total therapeuti c m i l ieu of psychiatric patients; personal needs and behavior patterns of adj u stment. Prerequ isite: 254, 255 , 256. I I I 41 0

TR E N DS I N N U RS I N G The professional heritage o f nursing , nursing orga n izations, employment opportunities, problems and responsib i l it i es in n ursing; preparation for n u rsing , eco nomic secur ity, legislation , organizational structure, profesSiona l nursing roles, continued education and professional growth , the future of nu rsing . Prerequisite: Sen ior statu s . Half t he course offered each semester.

P H I LOSOPH Y The University requirement o f one course in phi losophy may be satisfied by any course offered by the department except Philosophy 233. The i n itial course in the subject is custo marily Philosophy 201 or 22 1 , though neither of these cou rses is a prereq u isite for any other course. 3)0 level courses a re especia l ly suited for students with particular interests or preparatio n . 400 level co urses have the specific prereq u i sites l i sted in their descriptions. BACH E LOR OF ARTS : A m i n i mu m of 6 courses i ncluding Philosophy 233, and any two of the fo llowing : 331 , 333, 335. In add ition to course requirements, a l l majors mllst ( 1 ) complete a prescribed read i ng program (described in a special brochure ava i la b le from the department ) , and ( 2 ) take a departmental examination before beg i n n ing their final semester i n residence. Consu ltat ion with departmental faculty is important in pla n n i n g a mean ingf u l major program and should be sought as ear l y as possible. Courses i n the department are desig ned to meet the need s of a variety of students: ( 1 ) those who desire some know ledge of ph il osophy as a ba sic element in l iberal educatio n ; ( 2 ) those who wish to pursue some special interest i n , for example, et h ics, science, rel ig ion , or the history of thought; (3) those who wish an understa nding of phi losophy to support their work i n other f i elds, e.g. l iterat ure, history, or the sciences; ( 4 ) those who plan to use a mai.or in philosophy as a preparat ion for grad uate study in another field , e.g . theology or law; (5) those who plan to do graduate work in philosophy itself, usua l l y with the intention of teach i ng in the field . 201

I NTRO DUCTI ON TO P H I LOSOPHY Pere n n ia l phi losophica l issues, systems and t h in kers; the nature of knowledge, .the function of science, va lues, human

1 19


nature and i t 5 soci al i mp l i cat ions, religion and k nowledge of God . Deve lopment of critical and systematic philosophical t h i n k i ng about all issues. I II

221

ETH I CS Major moral systems of Western civil izatio n; i ntensive exa m i nation of some contemporary moral t heories; t he principles of Christ ia n ethics. I I I

233

LOG I C Principles o f argument a n d proof; deductive, i n ductive and symbo l i c log i c; t he nature and fu nct ions of language, problems of semantics, t he phi lo sophy of log i c . I

324

MAN I N SOCI ETY P h i l o sophica! bases of socia l in st itutions; the nature of ma n , vailles, a n d problems o f social existence. I a/y

- ·328

PO L I TI CAL AN D L E G A L PHI LOSOPHY Moral just i f i cation of the democratic state, the ro le of human rights i n justifying and l i mit ing t he obl igat ion to such a state, t he relationship of t he concept o f moral j u st i ce to the rule of law, the authority of jud icial decisions and specific arguments about the j u st:fication of disobedi e n ce of law . I a/y

331

1 20 333

335

ANCI ENT AN D M E D I EVAL P H I LOSOPHY Western phi losophy from the Presocratic period to t he end of the fourteenth cen tury; the work of Plato, Aristotle and major C h r i st ian phi losophers of the Middle Ages such as August i n e , Aquina s and Ock ham . I M O D E R N PH I LOSOPHY P h i l o sophy from the seventeenth ni neteenth centuries; co n t i nental empi r i ci sm and German idea l ism; Leibn i z , Locke , BerkeleY , H u me, Ka n t , and H egel . I I

co ncepts employed eva lua t i o n . II a/y

in

artist ic

expression

a n d aesthetic

381

T H E O R Y O F VA L U E T h e nature o f human values; contemporary d iscussions concerning the subjective or objective, abso l ute or relative character of such values as t he good and the right, the bea u t i f u l and the holy; t he orig in of values, the i r place in a world of fact, man's knowledge of them, the character and use of the lang uage of eva luation . II a/y

393

P H I LOSOPHY OF R E L I G I O N Classical and contemporary views o f trad i t io na l re l igious problems: t he existence of God , the religious experience, revela t i o n , immorta l ity and others; an acqua i ntance with the principal tenets and the world view of the Christian rel igion is assumed. I I

395

PH I LOSOPH Y OF SC I E NCE The general character , fu ndamental concepts, methods and significance of modern science; some atte ntion to specific areas of science; physica l , biologica l , soc i a l ; the i m p l i cat io ns of science and scien t i f i c methodology for et h i ca l , aesthetic and rei igious values. I a/y

427

BOOKS, I D E AS AN D M E N : S E M I NAR I N PH I LOS OPHY A read i ng and d iscussion course conducted by ol1e or more facu lty members; the student reads selected works in phi losophy , hears and reflects on d ifferent in terpretations of the ideas i nvol ved , and part i cipates actively in ana l ysis a nd argument. Works st ud ied rT\'3y be on any number of annou nced topics such as ethics, aest hetics. religio n , knowledge, science, h istory o f ideas. I a/y

435

ADVAN C E D S E M I N A R I N P H I LOSOPHY Topi c t o be announced at the t i me the course is offered, nor mal l y some aspect of contemporary philosophy. Prereq u i site: Consent . I a/y

through the ear ly rationa l i s m , Brit i sh Descartes, Spinoza, F i c hte, Schopenhauer

CONTEMPORARY P H I LOSO PH Y Issues and methods from the late n ineteenth cent u ry to t h e prese nt; may i n clude pragmat ism, emp i r i c i , m , process ph i lo soph y , ex i stential ism and analysis as develo ped by M i l l , James, Dewey , Wh itehead , Sartre , Ru ssell , Ayer a nd Wittgen stei n . I I

49 1 , 492 I N D E P E N D ENT R EA D I N G AN D R E SEARCH (Y.s-%)

361

O R I E NTAL T H O U G H T Major phi losophic systems of I nd i a , China and Japan; related l iterature, art, rel igion and general cu lt u re of t he Orient.

" I nd icates t hat this course has been app roved for in clusion i n t he catalog on a provisional basis.

365

K I E R KEGAAR D AND E X I ST E N T I A L I S M Modern existen t ia l ism, its main themes and t he i r relat ion to other p h i losophical trad i t io ns; its i m pa ct on su ch fields as l ite ra ture a nd psychology; l i fe a nd t hought of two key figures: Soren Kier kegaard a nd Jean-Paul Sartre; related t h i n kers i n clud ing Nietzsche, Heidegger, Jasper s, Berd yaev, U namuno and Marcel . I a/y

"371

A ESTH ETICS Analysis of the aesthet ic experience and its relat ionship to the f i ne arts, literatu re , science and mora l it y ; the cr iteria and

Prerequ isite : Depa rt menta l consent. I I I

PHYSICAL EDUCAT I ON U N I V ERS ITY R EQU I R E M E N T : Students are encouraged to complete the phySical ed ucation requ irement (4 one-quarter co ur ses including PE 1 00 ) during the fresh man and sophomore years. Eight one-quarter act ivity courses may be counted toward graduation . Students a r e encou raged to select a variety of activit ies at appropr iate sk i l l levels. Most physical ed u cat i o n a ct ivities are offered on a co-ed u cational basi s . All physical ed u ca t io n activity courses are graded on an "A, Pass o r Fail" ba�is. BACH E LOR OF ARTS ( Re crea t ional Co ncentratio n ) : Ten courses, i nclud i ng 277, 330, 483, 497 , Psych. 335 ; o n e course (4


semester hours) of: PE 481 ( Yo ) , 482 or 284-88; two courses (8 seme�1er hours) of: Art 230-330 , 2 35 , 350, 326, 341 ( Yo ) , 365, 370, CA 450, Music 340, 341 , PE 292 (Yo) . 322 or 365; two courses (8 semeSter hours) of: SA 281 , 290, 350 , Pol . Sci . 356, 457, Psych. 243, 340 , 4 1 0 , Soc. 2 1 1 , 32 5 , 328, 365, 425 o r 432 . BACH E LO R OF ARTS (Corrective Therapy Concentration ) : Twelve courses, i ncluding P E 2 7 7 , 292 , 360, 39 1 , 39 2 , 484, 497; plus one course of P . E . elective; B i ology 1 61 , 1 62 ; Psych. 1 0 1 , 221 plus Yo course Psych . elective. H EALTH M I NO R : Five courses: 295 , 324, 326:, and Bio. 261 , 1 62 .

pool management and operatio n . Prerequ isit e : 2 34. 277

SC I E NTI F I C F O U N DATIONS O F P H Y S I CA L E D UCAT I O N T h e relat ionship o f physical education to ed ucation ; the bio logi ca l , sociologica l , psycho logical and mecha nical princi ples under lying physical ed ucation and a t h l etics. I

28 1

I NJ U R Y PR E V E N T I O N A N D TH E R A P E U T I C Prevent io n , treatment and rehab i l itation o f InJunes susta ined in athletics; physical employment of elect r i city, massage, exerci ses, mecha nical devices. I I

284

PRO F E SS IONAL ACT I V I T I ES, TEAM SPORTS FOR M E N Planning, teach ing a nd eval uating team act ivities: basketba l l , volleyba l l , soccer, speedbal l , track and field, wrest l ing, touch footba l l , softba l l . II a/y

285

PRO F ESSIONAL ACT I V I T I E S , I N D I V I DUAL A N D DUAL SPORTS P lan n i n g , teach i ng and evaluating t h ese activiti es: t en n is , badminton, archery , g o l f a n d bow l i n g . I

286

PRO F ESS I O N A L ACT I V I T I ES, G Y M N ASTICS A N D DAN C E P la n n i n g , teaching and eva l uat i n g g ymnastics and dan ce . I I

288

PROF ESS I O N A L ACT I V I T I ES , T E AM SPORTS F O R WO M E N Plan ni n g , teach i n g and eva luating basketba l l , f ield hockey, soccer, speedbal l , vo l l eybal l , softbal l , track and field. II a/y

292

F I RST A I D ( Yo ) This course meets requirements for the American Red Cross Standard and Advanced Cards. I

295

SCH O O L H EA LTH (Yo) H ealth concepts which relate to the total school health program, including instruct i o n , services and enviro nment; the relationsh ip between health and a l l levels of educatio n . I II

322

PHYSI CAL EDUCAT I O N I N TH E E L E M E N TA R Y SCHOOL ( %-1 ) Orga nization a nd adm inistrat ion of a deve lopmental program for grades K-6; sequent ial and progressive programming; large repertoire of act ivities. Prerequisite: 2 7 7 . I I I

324

P E R SONAL H E A LTH Pract ical appl ication of hea lt h knowledge to daily l iving; a foundation for understanding health behav i o r . I I a/y

326

COM M U N I TY H E A LTH Orge n izations associated with pub l ic health impl ications to com mun ity health problems .

ATH L ET I C COACH I N G MI NOR : 2 7 7 , 48 1 , 48 2 ; and three courses selected from 370, 37 1 , 372 , 374 or 361 ; and part icipation in at least one i ntercol legiate or extramura l spo r t . ATH LETIC COACH I NG M I NO R F O R WOM E N : 277 ,331 , 48 1 , 482 ; and two courses se lected from 332 , 361 , and 370-375; and pa rticipation i n at least one intercol legiate o r extramura l sport . BAC H E LO R Education .

OF

ARTS

IN

E D UCAT I O N :

See School of

PHYS ICAL E D UCATION ACT I V I T I ES PROGRAM 1 00

O R I ENTATI O N TO PH YSI CA L EDUCAT I O N (%) To stimul ate stud ent i nt e r est in f u nctiona l , personal ly�esigned programs of physical act ivity ; a ssessment of physical cond it ion and sk i l l s ; recommendation of specif i c prog rams f o r mai ntaining and im provi ng physical health. Should be taken as a fresh man. I I I

200-229 I N D I V I D U A L A N D D U A L ACT I V I TI ES (%) 201 ( Beg inning Gol f ) , 202 ( I ntermediate and Adva n ced Gol f ) , 203 (Archery ) , 204 (Bowl i ng ) , 207 (Gymnast ics) , 208 (Sk iing) . 209 ( I ntermediate Gymnast ics ) , 2 1 0W ( S l i mnast ics), 2 1 1 (Begin n i ng Bad minton ) , 2 1 2 ( I nter med iate Bad m i n to n ) , 2 1 4 (Begi n n i ng Te nnis) . 2 1 5 ( I ntermediate Tenn is) , 2 1 8 ( Backpack i ng ) , 2 1 9 (Canoeing ) , 222M ( Ha ndba l l , Squash and Padd leba l l) , 2 2 3W (Squash and Padd !eba l l ) , 225 (Aerobics) , 227M (Weight Tra i n i ng ) , 228 (Basic Mountai n eer i ng ) , 229 ( Eq u i tatio n ) . 230-239 AQU AT I CS ( % ) 2 30 (Beg i nning Swimming ) . 2 3 1 ( I ntermediate Sw im ming), 232 (Advanced Swi mm i ng ) , 234 (Se n ior Life Sav i ng) , 236 (Synchro ni zed Sw i m m i ng ) , 237 ( S k i n and Scuba Diving ) . 240-249 R H YTHMS ( % ) 240 ( Fo l k a n d Social Dance ) . 2 4 1 (Modern Dance ) , 242 ( I ntermediate Modern Dance ) . 250-259 ATH LE T I C GAMES (%) 2 5 1 W (Vol leyba ll and F i eld Hockey ) , 252W ( Basketba l l and Softba l l ) , 253M (Speedb a l l and Vo l leyba l l ) , 254M ( Basketba l l and Softba l l ) . PRO F E SS I O N A L PHYSICAL ED UCA T I O N P ROGRAM 275

WAT E R SAF ETY I NSTR UCT I O N ( Yo ) The American Red Cross Water Safety I nstructor's Course;

CARE ( y, ) a l l common therapy by I ight, ice and

and

their

328

CU R R I CU L UM D E V E LOPM ENT A N D ADM I N I STR AT I O N Orga n ization a n d adm in iStration o f physical ed ucation a n d a t h l et i c s (7-1 2); c u r r i cu l u m d e v elopment and implementat i o n . Prerequ isite : 277. I

330

R EC R E AT I O N P R O G RAM M I N G Supervising a n d administering recreational programs for the school or comm u n i ty . I

1 21


331

332

T H E WO MAN AS A COMPETITOR ( Yo) The psychology of coac h i n g , coa ching tec h n i q ue a n d methodology; tra i n i n g , care and prevention of sel ected i nj u ries路 socio l og i ca l ; mp l i cations of a t h letic compe t i t i o n for women; designed for wo men physica l educat ion majors a n d m i nors i n terested i n coach ing competitive tea ms. I I O F F I C I AT I N G F O R WO M E N ( Yo ) R u les a n d off i ciat i ng tech n i q ues o f t h e common team sports: soccer, field hockey, volleyba l " basketba l l a nd softba l l ; designed to tra i n qua l ified women off i cials; open t o a l l women - r ecommend ed as an e l ective for majors and m i nors. II

360 , 361 PRACT I CUM I N T EACH I N G A N D COACH I N G ( Yo y, ) Student-assistant coach i ng teaching experiences ; pla n n i ng a nd co nduct i ng intercollegiate athletics a nd physical education instruct i o n ; students work u nder su perv ision of the head coach or physica l educa t i o n i nstructors. Prereq u i site: o ne course professional act iv i t i es , depa rtmenta l approva l . I I f 362

1 22

R H YTHMS A N D D A N C E H i storical backgr o u n d , esta b l i s h ment a n d co n d u ct of dance program, teaching tech n i ques and accompan i me n t , p l a n n i n g a nd presentation of dances; modern d a n c e tech n iques. I a / y

370-375 C OA C H I G T H E O R Y ( Each Course - Yo) Tech n i ques, systems, tra i n i ng methods, strategy and psychology of coach i ng ; 370 ( Basketba l l ) , 371 ( F ootba l l ) , 372 (Track a nd F i eld ) , 37:3 ( Baseba l l ) , 374 (Wrest l i ng ) . I I f 39 1 , 392 CO R R ECT I V E T H E R APY ( 1 , 1 ) A corrective therapy c l i n ical tra i n i ng program i n cl u d i n g lecture, laboratory, exper ience s and c l i n i ca l practices. Prerequisite: Departmental approval ( m a x i m u m enro l lment 5). 1 I I 480

H I STO R Y A N D PH I LOSOPHY OF P H YS I C A L E D UCAT I O N Physica l educat io n from a ncient through modern t i mes; h i stor i ca l , phi losophica l and psychologica l bases of physica l edu cat i o n ; special attention to current trends. Prereq u isite : 2 7 7 . I I a/y

481

PHYS I O LO G I C A L B A S I S F O R MOTO R P E R F O R MA N C E ( Yo ) Scientific basis f o r train i n g a n d t h e phy siologi cal effect o f 277. Prerequ isite : bod y . h u man the on exerc ise Recommended : B i o logy 1 62 . I

482

B I O M E CH A N I CS OF H UM A N MOT I O N T h e kinesiologica l a n d mechan ical aspects of h u ma n movement; analysis o f various activities. Prereq u i s ite: 2 7 7 . Recommended : Biology 1 61 . I f

483

R EC R EAT I O N A D M I N I ST R AT I ON The orga nizati o n , ma nagement and d irect ion of recreat ional services: legal baSIS, ad m i n istrative proceduras, financial aspects, personnel management, fa ci l i ties and i nternal organization . I I

48 4

M EASU R E M E NT A N D E V A L U A T I O N I N PHYS I C A L E D UCAT I O N ( Yo ) The select i o n , construction and i nterpretat i o n of evaluatory

tech n iques related to the physical education progra m . I f 49 1

I N D E P E N D E N T STUDY (%-1 ) Prereq u i s ite : Consent of t h e d i rector . I I I S

597

G R A D U A T E R ES EA R C H ( Yo-1 ) O pen to graduate students whose m i nor is in the field of physical educa t i o n . Prerequ isite : Consent of the di recto r . I I I S

PHYS ICS T h e department offers a n honors course at the freshman level prov i d i ng spec ial cha l l e nge for students demon strat ing superior apt itude, as determ ined by the departmen t . After co mpletion of the honors cou r se , students go d irectly i nto the j u n ior seq uence w h i ch offers the opport u n ity to pa rticipate i n the u ndergraduate research program one year ea rlier. Part i c i pation i n a n ongoing research project i s encou raged for students who demon strate a n a b i l ity to profit from i ndependent resea rch . Those i n v ited to part i c i pate are not req u i red to f u lf i l l the regular lab oratory req u i rements and w i l l earn equiva le nt cred i t . B AC H E LOR O F A RTS : M i n i m u m o f seven a n d one-ha lf courses i nc l u d i n g one-ha lf co urse in advan ced laboratory and/or resea rch . BACH E LO R OF S C I E N C E : Ten courses i n c l u d i n g 1 0 1 , 2 5 3, 254, 272 , 331 , 336, 40 1 , 406, 456 and one course i n advanced laboratory a n d/or resea r c h . Requ ired suppo r t i n g : C h e m . 1 1 5 p l u s either Chem. 3 4 1 or E ng i neer i ng 351 a n d Math t h rough 351 . BAC H E LOR O F S C I E N C E ( E ng ineer i ng Physi cs) : Ten-course co re p l u s two electives as f o l lows: Physics 1 0 1 , 253, 2 5 4 , 2 72 , 331 , 336, and o n e course u n i t in advan ced laboratory ( u sua l ly 32 1 , 322, 42 1 , 422 ) ; E ng i neer ing 1 5 1 (Yo cou rse) , 231 (Y, course ) , 2 32 , 351 pl u s two courses chosen from Physics 40 1 , 406, 456, E ng i neering 441 , 442 . * R eq u i red supporti ng : o ne course in che m . a nd math through 332 .

*Courses are chosen on the basis of the studen t 's career obj ect ives : electrical engineering : E ng i neer i ng 441 a n d Physics 4 5 6 ; engineering mechanics: E ng ineer i ng 442 and Physics 456; n u clea r engi neerin!J : Physics 401 and 406. BACH E L O R OF ARTS IN E D UCAT I O N : Because their needs d i ffer fro m the needs of students prepar i ng for graduate stud ies, t h e department offers a course seq u ence spec i f i ca l l y f o r students prepa r i ng for careers in teach i ng . E xtensive prior work in scie nce or mat h i s not a prereq u is i te for t h i s sequence. For deta i l s , see School of Educati o n . 101

B AS I C CONCE PTS O F P H Y S I C S Tile i ntel lectual i mportance and excitement of physics; the character of physica l laws; re lationsh ip between physics a n d mathemat ical principles, conserva t i o n fields; other phi l o sophy; atomic picture of nature ; concepts of relativ ity and of quantum mechanics; for majors a nd non-majors; mater ia l described in general terms; no laboratory . No prerequ isite.


1 02

D I SCOV E R Y P H Y S I CS A laborato ry-oriented course for non-majors. Ex per iments I n mecha nics, heat, so u n d , el ectr icity, optics a n d modern physics. Prereq u isite: 101

336

M EC H A N ICS F u ndamental mechanics; mathematical formu la tion o f physica l problems, motion o f particles i n one, two o r three dimensions, mot i o n s of systems o f particles dy na m i cs and statics of r i gid bod ies , moving coordi nate systems. Lagrange's equations and Hami ltonian fOflnt.latio n of mechanics. Coreq u isite : Math 332.

351

T H E R M O D Y N A M I CS See General E ngi neer ing 351 .

355

T EACH I N G OF P H YS I CS N ew developments in secondary curr ,cu l u m , teaching tech n iq u es a n d teaching media i 'l t h e phYSical sciences; counted toward a degree for o n l y t hose nudenu ecelvlng certif ication .

382

RAD I O I SOTOPE TECH N OLOGY Characteristics of nuclear radiat ion detection and measurement methods and equipment; theory or n uclea r d i si ntegra t io n s and appl icat ion to prob lems in physics and chemistry . Prereq u i s i te: 1 02 or E' qu ivalent

401

I N T R O D U C T I O N TO QU ANT UM M EC H N I CS The origin of quantu m theory, pa rt i cl e s and waves, Schrodi nger equat ion , motion of particles in one d i mensi o n , u ncerta inty p r i n c i p l e , wave mecha n i ca l reatment o f Ihe harmonic osci l l ato r , propert ies of wave functions, perturbation theory of non-deg nerale and degenerate systems, the exclusion pr i n ciple, n nv electron system5, co l i ision problems, ang u la r momentum and electron spi n , Zeeman effect and Stark effect, hyd"ogen fine structure end hyperf i n e structure and quantum number a nd the period i C tab le.

1 1 1 , 1 1 2 HONORS P H Y S I C S Translational and rotational mot i o n , particle dynamics , wor k , energy, t h e conservation laws, col l ision theory , simple harmo n i c moti on , thermodynamics and k i n etic t heory of gases, elect r i ca l fields, Gauss's law, electric potentia l , circuit components and analysis, magnetic field, in ductance, magnetic properties of matter, el ectromagnetic waves, geometric and physi ca l optics, d iffract i o n , spectra a nd quantum physics; i n cludes laboratory on a n independent study basis.

151

ENG I N E E R I NG GR A P H ICS ( Y: ,) Sep. General Engineering 1 51 .

21 1

DESCR I P T I VE MO D E R N P H YS I CS Ato m i c , n u clear and e lementary physics for h igh school teachers and biology , chemistry and geology majors; radiation laws, radiation effects on l iv i ng organisms, natural and artificial rad ioact i v ity , structure of solids, Bohr and R u therford theory of the atom, X-rays, gamma rays, beta e m i ssion , alpha em issio n , elem entary particles, cosmic rays, particle accelerators, lasers, emission and absorpt ion spectra. I ncludes laboratory . Prerequisite: 1 0 1 and 1 02 or equ iva lent; col lege a lgebra .

231

STATICS ( y, ) S e e General E ngineer ing 231 .

232

M E C H A N ICS OF S O L I DS See G eneral Engi neer ing 232.

406

253, 254 G E N E R A L P H YS I CS The u n ified view of physics; topics in mechan ics, mo lecular physics, wave moti o n , l ight, electromagnetism . Prereq u is ites: 1 01 or consent , Math 1 51 .

272

E L ECTR I C A L C I R C U ITS AND I N STR U M E N TATI O N E l ectronic devices a n d their app l i cation ; A-C a n d D-C circuit analysis; physics of transistors and vacuum tubes and their c i rcuits; A-C and D-C ampl i f iers, power supplies, a nalog and digital computers. I nc l udes laboratory. Prereq u isite : 253, 254 or consent.

441 , 442 A DV A N C E D LABORATORY (y"-y,) 441

N ETWO R K A N A L Y S I S S e e General Engineering 441 .

Demonstration of fundamenta l principles b y experimental tech n iques; modern end classi ca l experiments which familiarize the student with modern measuring too ls. Req u ires knowledge of the d igital computer. Prerequ isite:

442

TRANSPORT PH E N O M E N A S e e General Engineer ing 442.

272.

456

M AT H EMAT I C A L P H Y S I CS Bounda ry va l u e problems, special functions, matr i ce and tensors, probab i l i ty theory , eigenval u e problems. complex variables, contour intagrat io n and thair applicat iOn! to physics .

321 , 322 ADVANCED LABORATORY ( Yo )

331

ADVANCED MODERN PHYS I CS Appl ication of quantum mechanics; X路ray spectra molecular b i nd ing, molecular rotat ion and vibrat ion , spe if,c heat o f 8 diatomic gas, specific heat of :io l ids, !he free-el ctron theory of meta l s , the band theory of so l i d s, nuclear r'!Bct lons, radioactivity, nU Clear models, nuclear forces, neutron production and nuclear f ission , particle acce lerator. end nuclear reactors, h i g h energy physics, strong and weak Intera ct ions, pions, muons, leptons, and hadro ns .

E L ECTR OMAG N E T I C TH EORY E lectrostatics, d i pole f ield s , f ields i n d i electric mater ials, e l ectro-magnet ic induct i o n , magnetic propert ies of matter, generat ion and propagation of electromagnetic waves with an emphasis on the relat ionsh ip w ith physical opt ics. P rerequ i site : 253, 254; corequisitp. : Ma t h 332 .

49 1 , 492 I N D E P E N D E N T STU DY (Yo-1 ) Prerequ isite: consent of department chai rman ,

1 23


governmental response. I I a/y

4Q7 , 498 R ES E A R C H ( % -1 ) Prerequ isite : consent of department cha irma n .

361

AM E R I CAN PO L I T I CA L PART I ES Party h i story a nd organ izations, no m i nations a n d elections, campa igns and conventions, electoral problems and admi n i stration , bossism i n local po l itics, pressure groups, platforms. I a/y

364

THE L E G I S LATI V E PROC ESS Theory, organization and procedure of legislative bodies i n the U nited States; contemporary Congress and Wash i ngton state legislature. II a/y

42 1

T R E N DS I N CONTEMPO R A R Y P O L I T I C A L TH EORY I nte rdisci p l i nary developments, the theories of political and cultural conf l i ct , socia l i zation and comm u n ica t io n ; models a nd explanatio n s in Social Science. I I I

434

G O V E R N M ENT A N D T H E ECO N O M Y See Economics 434.

461

A M E R I C A N CONSTITUTI O N A L H ISTO R Y See H i story 451 .

454

AM E R I CA N CONST I TUT I O N A L LAW Sign ificant issues in the l ight of co ntemporary Co nst itutional i nter pretat io n : Church -state relations, civ i l rights, free speech , due process, reapport ion ment . I I

457

P R I N C I P L ES OF P U B L I C A D M I N ISTRAT I O N Management as applied to t h e affairs o f stat e ; t h e nat u re of h u ma n behavior in orga n i zations; admi n i strative law a n d quasi-judicial practices; c i v i l service, budget a n d fiscal contro l , centra l i za t io n , coord inatio n , integration in admi n i strat ive areas . I

697 , 598 G R A D UATE R ES EARCH (%-1 ) Open to master's degree can d idates o n l y .

P OL I T I CA L SC I E N C E B AC H E LO R OF ARTS: Seven courses i n cluding 1 0 1 , 261 , 326 a n d 326. U R BAN A F F A I RS P R OG RAM : For students wish i n g to prepare themselves specifica i l y for career poss i b i l i t i es in state and local government. For cert ificat io n , successf u l completion of the following cou rses is required : Po l . Sci . 1 0 1 , 25 1 , 325, 326, 254 or 356, 457 a n d 468 ; Eco n . 1 50 and 362 ; Soc. 1 1 1 and 325. BACH E LO R O F ARTS IN E D UCAT I ON : See School of Educati o n . 1 0 1 i s the prerequ isite for a l l other courses in the department.

101

251

1 24

I NT R O D UC T I O N TO PO L I T I C A L SC I EN C E The scope, method a n d vocabulary of p o l i t i ca l science, po l i t i ca l behavior and gover nmental organizat i o n ; problems of political theory and comparative methods of studying political i nstitutions. I I I A M E R I CAN NATI O N A L G O V E R N M E NT The federal co nstitution and the d i stribution of the governmental powers; structure and proced ure of national government; practical opera t i o n and contemporary reforms. I II

325

H I STORY O F PO L IT I CA L T H O U G H T Nature and ro l e o f the state from ancient t o modern t i m e s . I

326

R EC E N T PO L I T I CA L T H O U G H T M a j o r modern phi losoph i e s : Democracy , conservatism , ca pita l ism, soci a l i s m , anarcho-synd i ca l is m , co mmu n i sm, racial and po l itical e l itism, nat iona l is m , l i bera l ism, Christ ia n ity ; contemporary problems. I I

458

I NT E R NS H I P I N P U B L I C A DM I N I ST R AT I O N An inter n s h i p with a department o f local o r state government; planned and supervised j o i nt l y by the supervi s i ng govern ment official and a member of tile political scien ce facu lty . Prereq u isite : consent . I I I

327

A M E R I CAN PO L I T I CA L T H O U G H T The sources, deve l o pment a nd contemporary trends in Amer i ca n po l itical thought and the i mp lications of ideas for polit ical act io n .

464

I N T E R N SH I P I N T H E L E G I S LAT I V E PROCESS I nternsh i p with a member of the Was h i n gton State Legislature; planned and supervised j o i nt l y by the leg i slator and a member of the political science facu lty . Prerequ isite: consent. I nterim II a/y

331

I NT E R N AT I O N A L R E LAT I ONS Co ncepts and vocabu lary of i nternationa l relations; forei g n po l i cy of the major wor l d powers a nd contemporary i nte r national prob lems. I

481

STAT I ST I CA L M ET H O DS See Economics 48 1

48 3

PO L I T I CA L SYSTEMS O F T H E B R IT I SH COMMONWEALTH Contemporary gover nmental a nd political i nstitutions of the U n ited Ki ngdo m , Canada a nd other British commo nwea l t h states. I a/y

484

SOV I ET PO L I T I CA L SYSTEM USSR po l i t ica l system; ideology, role of the Co mmun ist Party, the nature of the const itu t i o n , a d m i n istrative agencies and national ity po l i cy . I I a/ v

336

I NT E R N AT I ON A L O R G A N I ZAT I O N A N D LAW The U n i ted Nations and its agencies; other international organizations; the h istorical deve l o pment, nature and princi ples of international law. I I

354

A M E R ICAN STATE A N D LOCAL G OV E R N M E NT A comparative study of state and local gover nments with special attention to the Pacific Northwest . II a/y

356

PRO B L E MS I N LOCAL G O V E R N M ENT U rbanization and regional growth stud i ed

i n relation to

491 , 492 I N D E P E N D ENT R EA D I N G A N D R ES EA R C H (%- 1 ) Prereq u isite : consent of t h e department chairma n .

I II


59 7 , 598 G R ADUATE R E SEARCH ( V- -1 )

O pen to master's degree departmental co nsen t . I I I

candidates

only .

41 0

EMO T I O N A N D MOTI VAT ION (lI,-1 ) Characteristics of emotion and mot ivat ion; their role i n determi n i ng behavior. Lecture and laboratory . ( L ecture may be taken as a half-course.) Prerequisite: 1 0 1 , 243.

420

PSY C H O LOGY O F P E R SONAL ITY Current theories of the dynamics end development of persona l i ty ; research on the causes of individual differences; perso nality change and techniques of measu r i n g persona li ty. Prerequ i sites: 101 and at least o ne f u l l course beyond the 200 leve l .

421

B E H A V I O R D I SO R D E R S Etio logy a n d treatment o f behavioral d isorders. Prereq uisite: 101 and at least one fu ll course beyond the 200 level.

450

PSYC H O LOG I C A L T E ST I N G Survey of standardized tests; methods of deve lopment, standardizati o n , l i mitations a nd interpretat ions of tests. Prerequ isites: 243 or a course in statistics; one course beyond the 200 level.

460

T H E E X P E R I M EN T A L PSY C H O LOGY O F L EA R N I N G Experimental st ud ies and theories of lea m i ng . Lecture and laborator y . Prerequisite : At least three full psychology courses i n cl ud i ng 243.

481

STAT IST I CAL METHODS El ementary statistical techniques; grap h i c representatio n ; measures of central tendency ; simple correlat i o n analysis, samp l i ng theory, inferential and non-parametric stat istics.

Prerequ isite :

PSYCH OLOGY BAC H E LO R OF ARTS: Eight courses i n cluding 1 0 1 ; 243; 340 or 4 1 0 ; 460 ; one of 330 , 335, 420 or 42 1 ; 490 p l u s two f u l l electives. A course i n stat ist ical methods is also req ui red . 1 1 0 and 221 may not be counted in the majo r . 101

I N TRODUCTION TO PSYC HO LOGY An i ntroduction to the scient i f i c study of behavior; scientific methods for studying the behavior of l iv i ng organisms; problems such as motivat ion , learn ing , emotion, int e l l igence, personality and adjustment . I I I

110

STUDY S K I L LS (lI,) To assist in the improvement of reading sk i l l s and other techn iques for effective study; class work , supp lemented by individual counseling and special trai n i ng in read i n g skills. No prerequ i site . I I I

221

TH E PSY C H O LOGY OF ADJUSTM ENT ( % ) Problems i n perso nal adjustment i n everyday Prerequ isit e : 1 0 1 . I I I

243

330

335

l iving.

SC I E N TI F I C M ET H O DS ( % - 1 ) Basic experimental a n d research design wi th specific a ppl ications to sensory and percept ual processes . Lecture and laboratory. Prereq u isite: 1 0 1 . SOC I A L PSYCHOLOGY Research find i ngs concer n i ng the interaction between groups and the ind ividua l ; attitudes, va l ues, role behavior and related topics examined in the light of i n ter personal relat ions and gro u p processes. Prerequisite : 1 0 1 . CH I L D H OOD A N D ADO LE S C E N C E ( lI, -1 ) deve l o pment from concept i o n through I nd i v i d u a l adolescence; genesis of behavior and its deve lopment through factors such as learning and social i nfl uence . Lecture and laboratory. Lecture may be taken as a half-course. Prerequ isite : 101 .

340

TH E B I O LOGY O F B E H AVI O R ( lI, -1 ) The relationship between anatomy and physio logy and behavi o r . Lecture and laboratory . Lecture may be taken as a half -course. Prerequ i site: 243.

403

T H E PSY C H O L O G Y O F I N FANCY AND CH I L D H O O D ( lI, ) Physical, intellectua l , emotional a n d social development of the individual from the pre-natal period to adolescence; problems of behavior and adjustment . Prerequi site : Two or more psychology beyond 1 0 1 .

405

A DO L ESCENT PS YCHO LOGY ( lI, ) P h ysical development, mental traits, social characteristics and i nterests of adolescents; adjustments in home, schoo! and commun ity . Prerequisite: 101 and one of 335, 403 or Education 321 .

490

H I STORY A N D SYSTEMS I N PSY CHO LOGY A seminar in historical development with consideration of current trends. For sen ior majors or graduate students; others by departmental consent.

491

I N D E P E N D E NT STUDY (Yo-1 ) A supervised read ing or research project of special i n terest for sen ior or graduate students. Prerequisite : departmental consent. I I I

492

See 491 .

493

See 491 .

51 5

PSYC HO LOG I C A L ASSESS M E NT I ntel lectual and personal ity assessment , theory , a nd practice; for the former part, the study of such tests as the Stanford- B i net, the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of I ntell igence, the Wechsler I nte l l igence Scale for C h i ldre n , and the Wech sler Adult I nte l l igence Sca l e ; for the latter, self-report tests such as the MMPI and projective methods. Prerequ isite : 420 . 45 0 ,

540

COUNS E L I N G TH EORY Counse l i ng theory and tech niques. Prerequ isite: 450.

570

PRACT I C U M IN COUN S E L I N G A N D T E STI NG Thi s cou rse is not part of the regular master's program with a major in psy chology , un less the student has completed e leven courses (44 hours) in psycho logy, fo u r of which courses ( 1 6 hours) are for graduate cred i t . Prereq uisite : 450 , 540 .

1 25


577

SUP E R V I S E D F I E LD WO R K T h e Studem in a job situation under the supervision qualified counselor or psychologist . Prerequisite: 570.

590

203 SEM I N A R � PSYCH O LOGY OF L E A R N I N G Princi ples a n d app li ca t io ns of leerning; current developments. Prerequ isite' At least th ree courses above the 200 level or depanm!lntal co nsent .

B I B L I CAL L I T E R AT U R E L iterary , h istorical a n d religious d i mensions o f t h e Bible including perspective on contemporary prob lems.

325

I N D E P E N D E NT R ESEA RCH (]4.1 ) Supervised independent study in ereas not i ncluded in the c urr iculum. Prerequisite: departmental consent.

CHR IST I A N E D UCAT I O N I N A SECULA R SOCI ETY Toward a functional Christian viewpo int for the educational min istry of the Church in confrontation with secular man.

J27

AN C I E NT CHURCH H I STORY The origins, thought and expansion of the Christian Church; rise of the Papacy , expansion i n Europe and the g rowth of Christian i nvolvement in culture; to the end of the Papacy of Gregory I (604) . I a/y

J28

M O D E R N CHURCH H ISTORY Begin ning with the Peace of Westphalia ( 1 648 ) , i nteraction of the Christian faith with modern politics, science and ph ilosophy; expansion in the world, modern movements.

331

WO R L D R E L I G I O NS H istory , bel iefs and pract ices of l iving religions of the world : Primitive, H i nd u , Buddhist, C h i nese a nd Japanese reirgions,

696

Christian and selected non-Christian traditions; symbols of faith in art, music, and literature.

of a

597

See 596.

599

T H E S I S A N D T H E SI S S E M I NAR Development of a thesis problem chosen from the candidate's major aree of concentration and approved by his graduate committee; the candidate w i l l defend his thesis in a final oral e){aminatlon conducted by h i s committee; whi l e registered for tha thesis and unt i l it is completed , the student is required to attend the the is seminar. I I I

RELIGION

1 26

U N I V E RSITY R E QU I R EM E NTS : Two courses for students enterrng 8S fresh men o r sophomores. A lower d ivi Sio n course sha l l be taken betore t h lf e n d of t h e sophomore year . T h e second course may be ,8nother lower d ivision course, en upper d ivis i o n cou r se , or thl senl � r semi na r . Transfer students entering as j u n io r s or seniors fe reqUIred to take one course.

Judaism, I slam, with references to Christianity. I "

341

A M E R ICAN C H U R C H E S T h e development a n d trends of Christianity i n t h e U nited States. I

BACH E LO R OF ARTS: SIX courses . Majors should p l an their I»"Ogram early In co ns u l tat io n with departmental faculty . C losely related courses taug ht i n other departments ma y be considered to apply toward the major i n consultation with the staff .

42 1

O L D TESTA M E N T STU D I ES

The department share, academic cou rses and exchanges profeS50rs in THE PAX L E A G U E .. a fellowship of ChriStian peace for modern ma n . A serle$ of courses is offered and shared by three schools. PeClflc Lutheran U niver sity, St . arti n 's College a nd the University of Puget Sound, as a contribu t i o n to the thoughtfu l unity of the human fam i l y. roposed Pa){ L eag ue courses for 1 972·73

422

N EW TESTA M E NT ST U D I ES Major areas of inquiry ; I ntertestamenta l , Synoptic, Joha n n i ne or Pau line l i terature. Prerequ isite: 203 or equivalent.

423

THE L I F E OF JESUS Gospel trad itions concer n i ng the l if e and teachings of Jesus; a h istor i ca l survey of "L ife of Jesus" resea rch, form and redaction criticism of the Gospel trad itio n ; the religious dimensions of Jesus' l if e a nd thought.

430

CHR IST I A N THOUGHT A N D M O D E R N CO NSC I OUSNESS Contemporary issues and problems in theology with reference to B i b lical and h istor i ca l resources and recent understandings of man a nd h i s world. Read ings sel ected from Bonhoeffer , Buber, B u ltman n , Cox, Moltmann, tha N iebuhrs, Robinson, Tei l hard de Chardin a nd T i llich . Prerequ isite: One lower d ivision course or equivalent.

4J2

C H R ISTIAN C LASS I CS Christian literature: d evotio n , biography , theology. poetry ; Augustine, Thomas a Kempis, Dante, Luther, Calvin , Pasca l ,

Major areas of inquiry : archeology and the Bible , the Prophets, or the Wisdom Literat u r e . Prerequisite: 203 or eq u ivalent.

include;

1. 2. 3. 4.

"C H R ISTIAN MONAST I C I SM : THE SAC R E D D R O P O UT" "MAJOR R E L I G I O US T R AD I T I ON S O F I N D I A , C H I NA AND JAPA N " "CH R ISTIAN E D UCATI O N I N A S E C U L A R SOC I E TY " "THE T H I N K I N G M AN 'S APPROACH TO GO D : R E L I G I O N A N D M O D E R N THO UGHT" For data"s of the

Pax League progra m , consu lt

the semester class

schedule.

1 03

· 1 05

JUDAEO--cH R I STI N LI F E A N D THOUGHT Biblical, historical and theological foundations with reference to contemporary I SSU es. R E L I G I OUS E X P E R I ENCE A desalption of religion as 8 pervasive aspect of human h j5tory and e){perience; forms of ritual and mysticism , in

· ' nd i cates that t h i s course has been approved for inclusion i n the catalog on a provisional basis.


Wesley, reports.

Kier kegaard and other ; group

core plus seminar

21 1

G R O U P BE H A V I O R The effects of social interaction upon individual behavio r ; col lective attitudes a n d behavior as prod ucts of group experience; analysis of fash ion, fads, crowds, mobs, publics, social movements; the signif ican<'"e of social control in society a nd the methods used by individuals and groups to control others. No prer equ isite. I

325

M I NO R ITI ES The h i story and culture of m i nority groups in American society, examined w it h i n the context of the i nteract ion b etween minority-majority groups and popu lation composition and mOl/ement of these groups. I I

328

491 , 492 I N D EP E N DE NT STUDY I ntended for religion majors, advan ced and graduate st udents; consent of the department is required .

D E V I ANT B E H A V I O R The process o f deviance a n d social control, examined with attention to specif ic forms of youth and adult behavior: juve n i le del inquency , white-co l lar crime, drug addict i o n , homosex u a l ity , menta l i l lness a n d abort ion. I I

422

SOC I OL OGY , A NTH ROPOLOGY A SOC I A L W E L F A R E

SOC I A L I NST ITUTI ON S The origins and development of major inst itutions: economic, educati ona l , fami l ia l , pol it i ca l and rel igious; i n stitutiona l change, both evolutio nary a nd revo l utiona r y . I I

423

SOC I O LOG I C A L THOUGHT Socio logical thought from Comte to the present . I

425

TH E F A M I LY The fa mily as an i nstitutio n; cross-cu ltural exa mination of fa m i l y l ife, historical treatment of the Western fa m i ly a nd a contemporary anelysis of the American fa m i ly in its developmental steges and i n its relat ionsh ip to other institutions. I

436

490

C H R IST I AN ITY AND THE ARTS Relationships of Christian thought to the forms and contents of various media of artistic creativity. SEN I O R SEM I N A R IN R E L I G I O N : H U M A N S E X U A L ITY The psycho logical, socio logical , ethlcsl and theological di mensions of sexua lity . Open to seniors and graduate stud ents. R E L I G I ON AND PSY C H O LOGY The relationship between religion and psychology with particular attention to the psychology of religion and the Christian view of ma n . Open to seniors and graduate students.

D

BAC H E LO R O F ARTS : M i n i m um of seven courses i n clud i ng 1 1 1 , 423 and 494. The rema i n i ng four courses should be chosen i n consultatio n with the departme n t . Courses i n anthropology and social work do not count toward a major in sociology u n l ess otherw ise stated i n t h e individual course descriptions. U nless otherwise stated 1 1 1 (or consent) is a prereq uisite for a l l courses with in t h e department. Courses a r e open t o challenge by exa m i nation. BAC H E LO R Education.

OF

ARTS

IN

EDUCAT I O N :

See School

of

SOC I A L W E L F A R E The department holds co nst it uent membersh ip i n the Council on Social Work Education, which i ndicates the Council's approva l of the department's progra m. Students i nterested in social welfare should work out their program i n consultation with a social wor k er in the department. The social work sequence is open to any student. Deta i ls may be found under the SPEC I A L ACAD E M I C PROG R A MS section of t h e cata log . C R I M I N A L JUST I C E COURSES The departme nt a l so offers graduate courses related speC Ifica l l y to the f ield of corr ect ions and law enforcement . The courses i n C r i m i na l Justice i nclud e : Seminar i n the Cri minal Justice System (590a ) , Seminar in Corrections (590b ) , Semi nar in Probation and Paro l e (590c) , Group Process ( 590d l . and Semi nar in Sociological Theory a nd the Cri m i nal J u st i ce System (590e ) . I ndependent stud ies are a l so avai lable. Supportive courses i n sociology a nd other fields should be chosen i n co nsu ltation with facu lty members.

432

COM M U N I TY AN D STRAT I F I CAT I O N R ural-urban interpenetration ; systems of social ra n k i ng . theories o f stratificat io n , power. prestige, culture and styles of l i fe of various social classes; social mob i l ity a nd its consequences for socia l structures. I I

481

STAT I ST I CAL M ET H O DS See Psychology 481 . No prerequ isite. I I I

490

S E M I NAR (X,-1 ) Prerequ isite : Departme nta l consent.

49 1

I N D E P E N D E NT STU DY ( X, - 1 ) Prerequ isite: Depart me ntal con sent.

494

R ESEARCH M ET H O DS Types of research and their basic methodology . I I

590

G R AD U ATE SEM I N AR (%-1 ) 590a - Seminar in C r i m i na l Justice System, 590b - Seminar in Corrections, 590c - Seminar i n Proba t io n and Parole, 590d -- Group Process, 590e - Seminar in Sociology T heory and the C r i mi n a l Justic:e Syste m . Prerequ isite : Departmental Consent .

SOC I O LOGY 111

SOC I OLOGY B sic principles i n u nd ersta nd ing SOCial relatio nsh ips; processes and structures existing in human relationships. I I I

595

G R A DUATE R E A D I NGS Pre,equ isite: Departmental consent.

1 27


597

A

23 1

242

H ROPOLOGY CULTURAL ANTH ROPOLOGY The preh istoric development of cu lture; a co mparat ive study of contemporary sma ll-scale societies; describing, interpreting and expla ining h u man behavior with reference to environmental settings, cultural trad itions and outside ( non-trad it iona l ) i nfluences. May be applied toward sociology maj or requirements. No prereq u isite . I PH Y S I CAL ANTH ROPOLOGY H u man biology in evo lutionary perspective; evo lutionary theory , fossil evidence of h u ma n development, the l iving non-human primates, present-<lay h uman as a b io log ica l creature. No prerequisite. I I

341

ETH NOL OGY O F A M E R ICAN I N D I AN S A comparative study o f American I nd ian cultures at t h e time of European contact; the effects of white contact upon t r a d i t ional American I nd ia n cultures; I nd ians in contemporary North America. Prerequis ite: 231 or consent . I

352

ETHNO LOGY OF A F R I CA The peoples of Africa south of the Sahara; native African cu ltura l areas; the position of traditional cultures i n the modern world Prereq uisite : 231 or consent . I I

1 28 490 49 1

and va lues generic to social work pract ice; observation of prob lem-solving structures and processes. Prerequi sites: 271 and consent. I I

G R A D U AT E R ES E A R C H R esearch chosen w i t h t h e approval o f t h e student's graduate committee. Prerequ isite: Departmental consent.

S E M I N A R ( '/.. - 1 ) Pr erequ isite : departmenta I co nsent . I N D E P E N D E NT STU DY Prereq ui site: Departmental consent .

SOC I A L W E L F A R E

27 1

I N T R O D UCTION TO SOC I A L WO R K The h i story , ph i losophica l roots, practice methods and "sett ir'9s" ( i .e. , adoption s , pub lic sch ools, pu blic assistance, correct ions, psychiatric hospita ls and clin ics) of professional social wor k ; opport u n i t ies for obseNat io na l experiences. No prerequisite. I I I

365

SOC I A L I NT E R V ENTION Processes of social change; socia l cond itions which create the need for i n terventio n , the dynamics of change in ind ividua ls and groups, function of social movements in effect i ng change; intervention methods, tactics and strategies. May be a pplied toward sociology major. I I I

463

SOC I OLOGY OF SOC I A L WE L F A R E H o w societies have defi ned social and persona l needs and their responses and solutions; concepts of culture and social inst itutions; contemporary welfare structure s. May be appl ied toward socio logy major. I

472

SOC I A L WOR K P R ACTICE The profession of social work examined within the group of helping professions; the knowledge base, principles, methods

473

I NT E R V I EW I N G ('h) Concepts, principles and techniques intri nsic to i nterviewi ng ; "helping ", problem-so lving, o r "cl i n ica l " i nterviewing; for perso ns in the helping professions: social work/social welfare, clergy, nursing, physicians, parish workers, personnel officers. Open to j u n iors and seniors o n l y . No prereq u i s ite.

475 , 47 6 F I E L D E X P E R I ENCE Supervi sed field work within a p p l i c a t i o n/i ntegrat ion of u nderstanding; development of soci a l welfare f ield. Prerequisite : 49 1

an agency or i n stitut io n ; knowledge, theory and techniques common to the consent. I I I

I N DE P E N D ENT STUDY (Y.-1 ) Prerequ isite: departmental consent.


the board of regents F "b l i id ry ,

1 97 2

Ownership, Support, Government The U n iversiry is ow ned and J pera t ed by Pa cif i ,' L u t h eril n U n i versit y , I ri C is to

n

,

Wash i ngto n co r' pa ril t i o n whose pu rpose

a i nta i n a C h r i q ld n i n st i t ut i o n

Mernbersli i p o f

f h i g he r lea rn i n g ( embersh i p

h i s ( o rporatio n co i nc i des w i th

o f the N o r th Pac i f i c D i st r i c t 0 1 the A meric n L u t heran C hUich dnct the rTltlrrbE-Jr sh p o t that por t i o n of the A Le's R o J, V t-1u unt'li n [; Istr i , t w h i ' h i s Ineated i n I d ah o and Mo n ta na west o t the L o nt i nental D i v i de . T h e a nmi d l nl�li flg of t h e w rporat iurl is held i n ( o ni u m.l io n w i t h the ann ua l m nven t io n of the North PaCif i c D istr i ct . Vut l ng ITlembers i n c lude t h e members o f t h e Buard o f

1 30

R egen t s , .Jnd the pastors and lay d eleg ates I') f co n g regat ion s in t h e ( o l" s t i tue n t area T h e U n iversity r ec.. ei 'es reg u la r f i lla nr;Ja l <;�pport frorl the A

I t;; 1 < .<.111 Lu theran C h u r c h , t h e o f the L u thera n C h ur ch i n A I I.er i ca 3 nd f rom the P;r i t l c L u theran U n ivers it y A. l u m n i A' o c iat i o n . I r l i1dd i u o n tn C h u l ell aSS istance , the Ij n lvers i l Y rer�ives c:o nside rJ b l e support fro m ind iv i d ua l s , o r g a n izat io ns a n d b u s i ne�6e5 th rougho ut the na t l u n and wor l d .

P a I t t c N o rthwest SYrl')

rr ak i ng a nel govern i l1g bod y of t h e U n i versity i s tl18 Board of R egen ts O n l h L baSIS o f ret o rn rn end at ions mad r_ b y the Pres id e n t , i t Lh a rt s a co u rse f o r the deve lo p m en t f the lOtal program o f the U n iver s i t y and t r ives to p rov id e e sent i 1 f u nd s.

The po l i cy

T he lI n i v rSl ly !.orporalio n s' l.o nst i t u t io n prov ides for not more t han 30 regents el ected for three-year ter ms . F i fteen regents represent the f\! o rt h Pacltlr: and R o ck y M o u n t a i n D I t r i o t of the A rner i tal) L u t h e rrl n C h l ll Ch , s i x are chosen by t ile Pac i f i . No rthwest Sy nod of the L u t h eran C h urch i n A meri ca , t hree re presen t I he P L U A l u m n i A. sso c l a l i o n . and not mure t h an G regen ts·at-I arg e a re c h o sen by the Board of R egents. T he President of tne U rl ivers i t y , the P '- 8 s i d em of the N o rt P J ( if ic D ist r i t't (A LC ) . nd the Pres iden t of t h e P c.ifc. Nonhwest Sy nod ( L A ) , Jre regents by v i r t u e o f t heir pO'iit lo n . The student bod y and the facu l t y h ave represefll d t l es \Nho me8t w i th the Board .


Officers Michael Dederer , C ha i l路man Thomas W. Anderso n , V i ce C ha i rman Donald E . Comell , S ecretary

Ex-Offi cio Dr. Claren ce So lberg , 2007 T h i rd Aven u e , Seatt l e , Wash . 981 2 1 , /\ L C Dr. A.G. Fjel lman, 55 1 9 Phi nney Av enue 1\1 S eatt l e , '-Na sh . 98 1 0 3 , LCA Dr . EUgene Wiegma n , Pacif ic Lut heran U n ivers i ty , Taco ma , Wash. 98447 , P L U ,

131

1 969-1972 Term Dr. Carl Ben ett , 1 1 1 21 S . E . 59 th S t . , B e l l evue, Wash . 98006, A LC Dr. Kenneth Eri ckson , 885 P io neer Cour t , E ug en e , Ore. 97401, LCA Mr . Ga lve n Irby , 1 4343 N . E . A l ton , Port land , Ore. 97220 , A L C 6928 1 00t h S t . S W , Taco ma , Wash . 9849 9 , A LC Mr. Melvi n Knudso Mr. Victor Knu tzen , 2649 S o u t h 304t h , F ederal Way , '-Nash . 98002 , Al um n i . Rev . Phi l i p Natwick, 1857 Potter, E ugen e , Ore. 9 7403,A L C ,

-

Mr John Nel son , 22 2 7 West Raye S t reet , Seatt l e , Wash . 98 '\ 9 9 , LCA Mr. Howard Scott , 11611 Wood b i ne Lane S . W . , Taco m a , Wash . 98499 , R egent-at- I arge Rev . E. Duane Tol lefson , 1 0390 S.W. Canyo n R d . , Beaverto n , O re. 97005,A LC 1 970路73 Term Mr. Dr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr.

Thomas W. Anderso n , 7 5 25 H egra R d . , Taco m a , Wa sh . 98465 , Vice C h m . , R egent-at-Iarge Paul Bondo, 1 1 723 E. B i ngham Ave. , Taco m a , Wash . 98446, A LC Goodwi n Chase , P . O . B o x 1997,Tacoma, Wash . 9840 1 , R egent路at -Iarge Donald Cornell , 1 019 E . 9 t h S treet , Port Angeles, Wash . 98 362 , Secretary , ALe Mic hae l Dederer, 1008 Western Aven u e , Seattle, Wash . 98 1 0 4, Chairman, Regent-at - I arge Ronal d E . Douglass , 1 2 1 2 F Street S . E . , A u b u r n , Wash . 98002 , LCA

Rev . Fr ank L. Ericksen , P . O . Box 1 1 0 , I ssaauah , Wash. 9802 7 , A L e Mr earl T. Fyn boe , 827 Tacoma Ave. N . , Tacoma , Wash 9840 3 , A l u m n i Mrs . Jesse E . He rbert , 3924 N . E . 34th Aven u e , Port la n d , O re . 97 2 1 2 , A L e Dr. Jesse P . Pfl ueger , 608 West D iv is io n , E p h rata , Wash . 9882 3 , A L C Dr. Alfred Sto ne, i 60 4 N . E . 50th , Seatt l e , Wash. 98 1 05 , Le A


1 97 1 路 1 974 T rm Mrs. AHred Aus, 1 674 Las Canoas R d . , Santa Barbara , C a l . 9 3 1 05 , A l u m n i Mr . E . Lee Barton, 5520 S . C u ster , Spo k a n e , Wash . 99203 , A LC Mr . John Bustad , 1 020 R iverside D r . , M t . Ver no n , Wash . 98273, LCA Mr . Douglas Gonyea , 1 61 8 Puget S o u nd B k . B ldg . , Taco m a , Wash . 98402 , R egent-at-Iarge . Chester Hansen , 1 25 N iem i R oad , Longv iew , Wash. 98632 , A LC Rev Glenn Husby, 8 1 2 North F ifth , Coeur d ' A lene, I d aho 838 1 4 , ALC Mr . Warren Peterson , 2200 O ne Wash i ngton P l az a , Taco m a , Wash . 98402 , LCA Mr . Gerald E . Schi mke , 2247 Prescott Ave. S W . , Seatt l e , Wash . 98 1 26 , A LC Dr . Roy Schwarz, 1 0039-41 st N . E . , S eatt l e , Wash . 98 1 25 , ALC Advisory

Ilk. A Dean Buchanan, V i ce President-Busi ness & F i nance, P L U , Treasurer Dr. G eorge E. Arbaugh , Department of P h i lo sophy , Faculty A lternate : Dr . S. E rving Severtso n , Department of Psycho l ogy 1VIr . Donald Yoder , AS P L U President , Student Alternate, Mr . Samuel Torvend , AS P L U E x ecut ive V ice President Rev. Walton F. Berton , 4330 N . E . 37th , Port l a nd , Ore. 972 1 1 ( Co m m iss i o n on H igher E d u cat io n) , A LC Rev. P. Ivar Pih l , 2 32 4 Lombard Ave . , Everett , Wash . 9820 1 , ( C o m m ission o n H igher E d ucatio n ) , LCA

Dr. Louis Almen , E x . Sec. , 2 3 1 Mad i so n Ave. , N ew Yo r k , N . Y . 1 00 1 6 ( Board of C o l lege Ed ucat io n ) , LCA Mr. Norman Fi ntel , E x . D ir . , 422 So. 5th S t . , M p ls. , M i n n . , ( B oard of C o l lege E d ucat ion ) ' ALC

1 32


Church Officials American lutheran Ch urch General D r . Kent S . Kn utso n , Presid ent , 422 S . F ifth St. , M i n neapo l i s, M i n n . 5541 5 Rev. David W. Preus, V i ce-Pres id e n t , 422 S. F i fth S t . , M in neapo l i s , M i n n . 55 4 1 5 Mr. N . B u rdette N e l so n , T reasurer, 422 S. F i fth S t . , M i n neap o l i s , M i n n . 55 4 1 5 M r Arno l d M i cke l so n , Secretary , 422 S . F ifth S t . , M i n n eapo l i s , M i n n . 5541 5 North Pacific District

1 33

Dr. C larence So lberg , President (B ishop) , 2007 T h ird Ave. , Seat t l e , Wash. 98 1 2 1 R ev. T heo. P . Brueck ner , E x ecut ive Assista nt to the D i st r i ct President ( B ishop) , 2007 T h i rd Avenue, Seatt i e , Washi ngton 98 1 2 1 Dr. L . V . R i ek e , Ch urch C o u nci l Rep resentative, 5525-60th Avenue N . E . , Seattle, Wash i ngto n 98 1 05 Board of College Edu cation M r . Charles R . B ru n i ng , 2500 Seab u ry Ave . , M i nneapol is, M i n n . 554 0 6 ( t erm exp i res 1972) M r . O t i s J. G rande, 1 1 1 1 - 1 4th Ave. , F o x I s land , Wash. 98333 ( 1 9 7 6 ) Rev. Marcus G ravd a l , 2525 So. M a i n , S ioux Fa l l s , S . D . 57 1 05 ( 1 97 2 ) R ev. Roald A . K i ndem , 9 1 8 Garfield Ave. , A lbert Lea , M i nn. 56007 ( 1 9 7 2 ) M r . Pau l C . Larsen, 8 1 3 Second Ave. W . , D i ck i nso n , N . D. 5860 1 ( 19 7 4) R ev. John N . Parbst , 37 41 - 1 7th Ave. S . , M i nneapo l i s , M i n n . 55407 (1976) Mr. Edward A. Sageb i e l , Box 431 , Segu i n , Tex . 7 8 1 5 5 ( 1 9 7 4) R ev. Robert L. Vogel , 9 1 5 E. N i nth Ave . , Denver , C o lo . 802 1 8 ( 1 9 7 6) R ev. E r l i ng H . W01d , 723 Reeves D r . , G rand Fork s , N . D . 582 0 1 ( 1 9 74) lutheran Church in America, Pacific North west Synod Dr. A . G . F j ei l ma n , Presiden t , 55 1 9 P h i nney Ave. No . , Seatt l e , Wash . 9 8 1 0 3 Mr. Gordon J . S toraas l i , Assistant to the Presid ent , 5 5 1 9 P h i n ney Ave. No . , Seatt le, Wash. 98 1 03 T he Pac ific Northwest S y nod of the Luthera n C h u r ch in Amer i ca has accepted Pa c i f i c L u theran U n iversity as o ne of the i nst itutions of h igher ed u cation wh ich it endorses a nd supports. The Synod has representat i o n on the U n iversity's Board of Regents , but does not share ownersh ip of the inst itut i o n . Representing Boards of College Education Mr. Norman F i ntel , E x ecut ive D i rector, Board of Col l ege Ed ucat io n , The American L utheran C h u rch Dr. L o u i s T. A l me n , E x ecutive Secreta ry , Board of C o l lege Ed ucat ion and C h u rch Vocations, Lu theran C hurch in A merica


O F F I C E OF T H E P R E S I D E NT Eugene Wiegman Lucille Giroux Harvey J. Neufeld Milton L. Nesvig David M. Olson

Presi dent Ad m i n i strative A ss i st an t A l u m n i D i rector A ss i stant to t he President for C h u rch R el at i o n s a nd P u b l i cat ions D i recto r of At h l e ti cs

Kenneth Dunmire

Photog rapher

Roger Gruss James L. Peterson Gordon Lathrop

P ub l i cat io ns , A ssocia te Ed it o r

Pub l i c I nformat ion D i rector U n iversity M i n ister O F F I CE O F T H E PROVOST

Richard JUngkuntz Sue Clarke

1 36

Provost Ad m i n istrat ive A ss i st a n t

Paul M . Reigstad 01a irman , D i v i sio n of H u m a n i t i es Willia m P. Giddings Chairm a n , D ivision of N at u ra l S c iences Johannes A. Schiller C h a i r m a n , D iv i sion of S o c i a l Sc iences Richard D. Moe Dean o f G r a d u at e & S u mmer Stud ies, D i recto r , S c hoo l of F i ne A rt s Vernon Stintzi Dean of Schoo l of B u s i ness Ad m i n istrat ion Kenneth A. Joh nston D ea n of School of E d u cat io n Doris G Stucke D i r ecto r , SchOOl of Nursi ng David M. Olson James Van Beek

D i recto r , S choo l of Phy sical E d u cation D i rector o f Ad m iss i o ns

Ronald C. Coltom Bruce Alexander

Assoc iate D i rector of Ad m i ssions and D i rector of F i nancia l A id Ass i stant D i re ct o r of Ad m is s i o n s

Anthony l. Lister Albert W. Perry

Ass i st a n t D i re cto r o f Ad m i ssions Assista n t D ire ct o r of A d m issions

Charles T . Nelson Loleta G . Espeseth Judd Doughty David Christian Terry Danbrook Victor Nelson

R eg i strar Assistant R eg istrar D i rector of B road cast Serv i ces and I n st r u ct io n a l Materials P ro d u ct ion C h i ef R ad io/TV E ngi neer

Rad io/TV E ng i n eer Stud i o O pera t io n s S u p ert ntendent

Robert K. Menzel

D i rector of CH O I C E

Frank H . Haley Noel Abrahamson John S. Ha nson

Librarian Coord i nator of P u b l i c Events Placement D ir ecto r and 5th Yeal路 Coord i nator

James Kitti lsby Ad m i n i s t rat ' ve A ss i sta nt , P h y s i ca l Ed uca , i o n


O F F I C E O F BUSI N ESS & F I NA N C E A.D. Buchanan Howard L. Vedell Thomas Kruse

Vice President, B u si ness & F i n ance B u si ness Manager D i rector of I nst itu t io n a l Research

Larry R. Allen Betty Gj urash Harry Adams Charles T. Nel son Norman Nesti ng Bradley Munn Ja mes B. Phillips

Central Serv ices Manager Ch ief Accountant D i rector of Co mputer Center D i rector of Data Process i ng Systems & Progra m m i ng Ma nager Perso n nel D irector Plant M a nager O F F I C E OF D EVE LOPM ENT

Clayton B. Peterson David L. Berntse n Edgar M . Larson

V ice P resident for Deve lopment D i rector of Deve lop ment Di rector of E state Pla n n i ng O F F I C E OF STU D E N T A F F A I RS

Daniel R . Lea sure Eric Godfrey Lawrence Griggs Ph ilip E . Beal Margaret D. Wickstrom Sei ichi Adachi Jud ith Baker G ladys Bergum Marvin Swenson Robert Lu ndy Lyn n Isaacson Robert M. Torrens Mary Hegtvedt

Vice President, Student Affairs Assistant and D i rector of Housing Coord inator for M i no r ity Students Dean of M en Dean of Women D i rector of Cou nsel ing & Test i ng Center Cou nselor D irector, H ealth Center D i recto r , U n iversity Center Assistant D i rector of U n iversity Center and D i rector of P l a cement Boo kstore M a nager Director of Food S erv ice Assistant D i eti t ian

1 37


faculty

*

7 1 -72

Eugene W. Wiegm a n , 1 969- , Presid ent , E d . D . , U n ivers ity of Kansas, 1 962 . Keith Achepoh l , 1 9 69 - , D i rector of E x h i b it i o ns , Asso c iate Professor of Art , M . F .A . , U n iversity of I ow a , 1 960. Sei ichi Adachi , 1 967- , AssociClte Professor of P sy ch o l ogy and Ed u cat io n , D irector of Counsel i ng and Test i ng C enter , Ed . D . ,

Co l u mb ia U n iversity , 1 960. Har ry S. Adams, 1 9 47 -5 1 , 1 962- , Professor of P h y s i cs, P h . D . , U n iversity of M i nnesota , 1 9 62. Angelia G . Alexander , 1 9 7 1 , Assistant Professor of B io l og y , M .A . , U n iversity of Cal i forn i a , Dav i s , 1 9 66. Charles O . Anderso n , 1 959- , Professor of Chem istry , Ph. D . , Harvard , 1 959 . George Evans Arbaugh , 1 959- , P rofessor of P h i losophy , Ph. D . , U n iversity of I owa , 1 959 . O. Stuart Bancroft , 1 9 7 1 - , Assistant P rofessor of Busi ness Ad m i n i strat io n , M .B .A . , Ar izona S tate U n iversity , 1 9 65 . Kenneth E . Batker , 1 9 66- , Associate Professor of Mathemat i cs , Ed . D . , U n iversity o f Colorado , 1 97 1 .

1 38 Myra J . Baughman , 1 970- , Assistant Professo r of E d u cat i on , M . Ed . , Western Wash i ng to n S tate C o l leg e , 1 9 69 .

Philip E. Bea l , 1 9 68 - , Assistant Professor of E d u cat ion , Dea n of Men , P h D . , U n iversity or Oregon, 1 965 . Paul F. Bento n , 1 9 69 - , A ssistant Professor of Engl i s h , Ph.D . , P r i nceton U n iversity , 1 97 0 . Lois M . Bergerson , 1 970-, Assistant Professor o f N u rs i ng , M . N . , U n iversity of Wash i ng to n , 1 952 . W. Harold Bexton , 1 9 65 - , Professor of Psycho log y , P h . D . , M cG i l l U n ivers i t y , 1 953. Grace Eleano r Blomqu jst , 1 9 39 - , Associate Professor of E ng l i sh , M .A . , S y racuse U niversity , 1 939 . Glenn L. Blubaugh , 1 969- , Assistant Professor of Foreign L a nguages ( German ) , M .A . , U n iversity of C o n nect icu t , 1 963.

Randolph F . Bohanno n , 1 969- , Assistant Professor of B io logy , P h . D . , Purd ue U n iversity , 1 969 . James E . Bri nk , 1 970- , Assistant Professor of Mathematics, P h . D . , I owa State U n iversity , 1 97 0 . Herman Joseph Broeker, 1 9 66-, Assistant Professor of P h ysical E d u cat io n , M . S . , Wash i ngton S tate U n iversity , 1 967. Stanley Leonard Brue , 1 9 7 1 -Assistant P rofessor of E conom i cs, P h . D . , U n iversity cf N eb rask a , 1 97 1 . G . R ichard Capp , 1 970-, Assistant Professor of C o m m u n i cat ion A rts, M . A . , Baylor U n iversity , 1 967 . ++Samuel B.B. Car leton , 1 9 69 - , I nstructor in Foreign Language ( G reek ) , M . A. , John Hopk i n s U n ivet'sity , 1 9 6 1 . Roy E. Carlson , 1 9 62- , A ssistant Professor of Physica l Educat i o n , Coach of Wrest l i n g , M .S . , Wash i ngto n S tate U n iversity , 1 962 . Clara Carper , 1 972-, I nstructor in N u rsing , M . N . , U n iversity of Wash i ngto n , 1 9 59 . Davis W . Carvey. 1 9 7 1 - , Assistant Professo r o f B u s i n ess Ad m in i strat io n , M . B .A . , Pacific Lutheran U niversity , 1 9 68 . Gary A . Chase. 1 9 70- . Assistant P rofessor o f P hysica l Ed ucat ion , M .S . . Wash ington State U n iversity , 1 964. Kenneth E . Ch ristopherson , 1 958-, Associate Professor of R el ig io n , B. T h . , Luther Theo log ica l S em inary, 1 950. Francis B . Col linge, 1 97 1 -, Asso ciate P rofessor o f Po l it ica l S c ience , Ph D . , U n iversity of Wash i ngto n , 1 964. Dorothy Tol lefson Cone . 1 9 6 1 - , A ssociate Professor of N u rs ing , M . Ed .. U n iversity of M i nnesota . 1 959 . Margaret M. Coutu , 1 969- , I nstructor i n N u rsing , M . Ed . , C o l o rado State U n iversity , 1 966. Richard W. Crockett , 1 97 1 - , Assistant Professor of Pol it i cal Sc ience, A . M . , U n iversity of I l l ino i s , 1 9 65 .

* Date after name i nd i cates beg i n n ing o f term o f serv ice. ++O n leave 1 972-7 3


David P. Dahl , 1 9 69-, A.A . G .O . , Assistant Professor of Mu sic. M.A . , Un iversity of vVash ington, 1 962 . Barbara Dan ielson , 1 97 1 - , I nstructor in Physical Ed ucation, M.S., Un iversity of Wash ington, 1 97 1 . Carrol Elvin De Bower, 1 9 64-68; 1 970-, Associate Professor of Education, Ed. D., University of Nebraska, 1 9 64. Charles J. Dirksen , Jr., 1 97 1 - , Assistant Professor of Business Admini strat ion, M.B .A., University of Oregon, 1 967. Judd C. Doughty, 1 9 62-,Assistant Professor of Commun ication Arts, Director of Broadcast Servi ces and I nstru ct io na l Materia ls

Production, M.A., Pacific Lutheran U niversity, 1 964. +Emmet E . Eklund , 1 9 64-, Professor of Relig ion, Ph .D., Boston University, 1 9 64 . George R . Elwell , 1 9 59-, Assistant Professor of Art, M.A., New York University, 1 955. Virginia Ann Eman , 1 9 7 1 -, Instructor in Communication Arts, M.A., Colorado State University, 1 97 1 . + Donald R . Farmer , 1 9 55, Protessor of Polit ical Science, Ph .D., University of M i nnesota, 1 9 54. Regency Professo rship, 1 9 7 1 - 7 2 . Loui se S . Faye, 1 9 69 - , Associate Professor o f Foreign Languages (S panish ) , P h . D., U n iversity o f North Carol ina, 1 958 . +Robert S. Fisk , 1 968-, Assistant Professo r of Mathemat ics, M.S., U niversity of Wyoming, i 9 62 . M . Josephine Fletcher , 1 9 63-, Asso ciate Professor o f Education, M.S., DePaul University, 1 963. Arth", r Gee, 1 9 68-, Associate Pro fessor of B iology, Ph D . , Purdue University, 1 969 . Ronald W. Genda, 1 9 67-, Assistant Professor of Economics, M.A., Purdue University, 1 967 . Wil liam P. Giddings, 1 9 62-, Professor of C hemistry, C ha irman of the Division of Natural Sciences, Ph.D., Harvard University, 1 959 . Gordon O. G i lbertson , 1 9 54-, Associate Professo r of Music, M M., Northwestern Un iversity, 1 942. Wil l iam Gilbertson , 1 9 68-, Associate Professor of Sociology, M.S.W., University of Wash ington, 1 956. I ngrid Knutzen Gintz, 1 97 1 -, I nstructor in Mathematics, B .A. Ed., Pacific Lutheran University, 1 970. F er n A. Gough , 1 9 7 1 -, l nstructor in N ursing, M.S .

. , U niversity of Wash i ngton, 1 9 6 1 .

+-r-Stewart D. Govig , "1 958 -60, 1 96 1 -, Associate Professor of Religion, Ph. D., N ew York University, 1 966. James A. Ha lseth , 1 966-68, 1 9 70 - , Assistant Professor' of Hi story , M.A., Eastern New Mex ico University, 1 9 63. Vernon R . Hanson , 1 970-, Assistant Professor of So ciology, M.A., University of C h i cago, 1 97 0 . Edward Harmic, 1 9 7 1 , Assistant Professor of Mu sic, M . M . , University o f Arizona , 1 9 69 . John O. Herzog , 1 9 67-, Professor ot Mathematics, Ph.D., U niversity of N ebraska, 1 9 63. W. Ronald Heyer , 1 9 70-, Assistant Professor of Biology, Ph . D., Univt;rsity of Southern California, 1 9 68 . Pau l E. Hoseth , 1 9 68-, Assistant Professor of Physical Education , M.S ., South Dakota State University, 1 9 67 Thel ma M. Hostetter , 1 9 7 1 , Assistant Professo r of Nursing, M.S . N . , University of I llino is, 1 969 . Curtis E . Huber , 1 9 64-, Professor of Philosop hy, Ph . D . , University of Wi scon sin, 1 962. Laurence D. Huesti s , 1 9 6 1 -, Associate Professor of C h emistry, Ph.D., University ot California, 1 9 60 . William R . Hutcheon, Jr . , 1 967-, Assoc iate Professor of Business Administrat ion, D . B . A., University o f Washington, 1 9 69 . Cl arence G. Jacobs , 1 969-, Assistant Professor of Physics, Ph.D., University of Iowa, 19 69 .

+On l eave 1 9 7 1 -7 2 . ++On leave 1 9 72-73

1 39


Lois Elam Jacobson , 1 966- , Assistant Professor of N u rsing, M .S . N . , U n iversity of Wash i ngton , 1 9 69 . .k> Ann Jensen , 1 9 67- , A ssociate Professor of B io logy , Ph . D . , I owa State U n iversity , 1 9 6 1 . Robert J. Jensen , 1 968- , Assistant Professor of E co no m i cs, M . A. , U n iversity of N ebrask a , 1 9 67 . Richard J . Jobst, 1 9 67- , Assistant Professor of Socio logy , M . A . , U n iversity of Cal ifo r n i a , 1 9 67. David W. Johnso n , 1 9 70- , Assistant Protessor of H i sto ry , M . A . , Stanford U n iversity , 1 9 63. Lucille Marguerite Johnson , 1 9 5 3- , Professor of E n g l i s h , Ed . 0 . , Un iversity of Mo ntana, 1 9 67 . Will iam L. Jo hnson , 1 9 69 - , Associate Professor of M athema t i cs , P h D . , U n iversity of C a l iforn i a at Los Angeles, 1 9 64. Kenneth A. Johnston , 1 9 64- , P rofessor of E d ucat io n , Dean of the School of Ed ucat io n , Ed . 0 . , Wash i ngton State U n iversity , 1 9 64. Richard P. Jones , 1 9 69- , Assistant P rofessor of E ng l ish , M . A . , M . F .A . , U niversity of M a ssachusetts, 1 9 69 . Ronald D . Jorgenson , 1 968- , A ssistant Professor o f Ed ucatio n , E d . D . , B a l l State U n iversity , 1 968. Richard P. Jungkuntz, 1 970-, Professor of R e l ig io n , Provost , Ph D . , U n iversity of Wisco ns i n , 1 96 1 . Theodore Oscar Henry Karl , 1 940-42 , 1 9 48 - , Professor of C o m m u n ication Arts, M .A . , G ustavus Ad o l p h us Co l l ege , 1 9 36. David T. Keyes, 1 9 69 - , Assi stant Professor of Art , M . A . , O h io State U n iversity , 1 9 66. +Gundar Julian King , 1 9 60-, Dean , S choo l of Busi ness Ad m i n istrat io n , P h D . , Stanford U n iversity, 1 9 63. ++Vivian C . King, 1 9 69 - , Assistant Professor of M u s i c , M .M . , U n iversity of Southern Cal ifo rn i a , 1 9 69 . Lars E. Kittleson , 1 95 6 - , Associate Professor o f Art, M . F .A . , U n iversity o f Southern Cal i fo r n i a , 1 95 5 . +Raymond A. Klopsch, 1 953-, A ssociate P rofessor o f E ng l ish , Ph. D . , U n iversity of I l l in o i s , 1 9 62 . Calvin H. Knapp , 1 9 60- , Assoc iate Professor of M usic, M .S . , Ju l l iard S chool of M u s i c , 1 950. ++Jens W. Knudsen, 1 95 7 - , Professor o f B io l ogy , P h D . , U n iversity of Southern C a l ifor n ia , 1 95 7 . David R . Knutso n , 1 969-, Assistant P rofessor of R e l ig io n , M .A . , U n iversity o f C h i cago D i v i n ity Schoo l , 1 9 66 . Jerry D . Kracht, 1 9 67-68 , 1 9 69 - , Assistant Professor of M us i c , M . F . A . , U n iversity of I owa , 1 9 67 . Thomas E. Kruse, 1 97 1 - , Assistant Professor of Econo m i cs, D i rector of I nst itutional R e sear路ch , M .A . , U n iversity of I owa , 1 9 67 . .k>hn O. Larsgaard , 1 9 70- , Assistant Professor of Psychology , P h D . , U n iversity of Wash ingto n . 1 9 7 1 . Dale A. Larson , 1 9 7 1 - , I nst r u ctor in E ng l ish , B . A . , Pac if i c Lutheran U n iversity , 1 9 66.

1 40 Anthony J . Lauer, 1 9 69 - , A ss i stant Professor of B u si ness Ad m i n istrat io n , M . B . A . , Pa c i f i c Lutheran U n ivers ity, 1 9 69. Penny Y. Leake , 1 9 69- , I nstructor in N u rs i ng , B . S . N . , Pac ific Luth era n U n ivers ity , 1 968 .

Daniel R . Leasure, 1 966-, Professor of Ed ucat io n , V ice P resident - Student Affa irs, E d D . , Pennsy lva n ia State U n iversity , 1 96 1 . Nona C. Lemieux, 1 970- , I nstructor in N u rsing , B.S . N . , Montana State U n iversity , 1 9 66. Harold J. Leraas , 1 9 35-42 , 1 947- , Professo r of B iology , P h . D . , D . D .S . , U n iversity of M ich iga n , 1 9 35 , 1 946. Paul B. Liebelt, 1 970- , Assistant P rofessor of Mathematics, M . A . , U n iversity of N ebrask a , 1 95 7 . Brian E . Lowes , 1 9 68- , Assistant Professor o f Earth Sc iences, M .S . , Queens U n iversity , 1 9 63. Gene C. Lu ndgaard , 1 958-, Assistant P rofessor of P hysica l E d u cation , Coach of Basketba l l , M . S . , U n iversity of Wash i ngto n , 1 9 64. John L. Mai n , 1 97 1 - , Assistant Professor of B io l ogy , P h D . , U n iversity o f Wash i ngto n , 1 970. John A. Marti lla , 1 9 69- , Assoc iate P rofessor of B u s i ness Ad m i n istrat ion , D . B .A . , U n iversity of Oreg o n , 1 9 69 . Arthur David Martinso n , 1 966-, Assoc iate Professor of H i sto ry, P h . D . , Wash ingto n State U n iversity , 1 9 66 . Marjorie Mathers, 1 964-66; 1 968- , Assistant Professor o f Ed u ca t io n , M . A . , Centra l Wash i ngton State C o l lege, 1 9 6 1 . Keith Wendell McMaster, 1 967- , Assistant Professor of Busi ness Ad m i n istrat io n , D . B.A. , U n iversity of Orego n , 1 97 0 . Barbara Menzel , 1 9 7 1 - , I n st r u ctor i n N u rs i ng , B . S . N . , Vanderb i l t U n ivers ity , 1 970. Pau l T. Menzel , 1 97 1 - , Assistant Professor of P h i losophy , P h D . , Vanderb ilt U n iversity , 1 9 7 1 . Lawrence J. Meyer , 1 9 69 - , Professor of M u s i c , E d . D . , Co lorado State C o l lege, 1 9 64 . . Christian Meyer, Assistant P rofessor of Mathemat ics, P h D . , U n iversity of O rego n , 1 970. Christine W. Miller, 1 9 7 1 - , I nstructor i n N ursi ng , B .S . N . , Pa c i f i c Luthera n U n iversity , 1 970. Marlen Mil ler , 1 9 70- . Assoc iate Professor of Econo m i cs, Ph . D . , U n iversity of M i n nesota, 1 9 67 . Gary L. Mi netti , 1 970-, Assistant Professor of Ed ucat io n , M . A . , Pac i f i c Lutheran U n iversity , 1 9 67. R ichard D . Moe , 1 9 65-, Professor of E d ucatio n , Dean of G raduate and S u m mer Stud i es; D irecto r , S choo l of F i ne Arts, E d D . , U n iversity of Co lorad o , 1 9 62 . Katharine E . Monroe, 1 967 - , Associate Professor o f F o reign Languages ( F rench ) , M .A . , M id d l ebury C o l l eg e , F rench 1 9 42 , E n g l ish 1 95 1 . Gunnulf Myrbo , 1 970- , Assistant Professor of P h i lo sophy , B . A . , U n iversity of B r it i sh C o l u mb ia , 1 9 62. ++Al ice J . Napjus, 1 9 63-, Assistant Professor of E d uca t io n , M . A . , U n iversity o f Wash i ngto n , 1 965. Charles T . Nelson , 1 9 67 - , Assistant Professor of Ed u cat io n , R eg i st ra r , M .A . , Adams State C o l l eg e , C o lorad o , 1 9 64 .


Neale E. N�so n , 1 970- , Assistant Professor of Socio logy , Ph . D . , U n iversity of Utah, 1 9 70. 1 Burton L. Nesset , 1 967-, Asso ciate Professor of C hemistry , P h . D . , Purdue U n ivers ity , 1 9 62. Milton Luther Nesvig, 1 947·5 1 , 1 95 3- , Assistant Professor of E ng l i sh; Assistant to the President for Church Relat ions and P u b l ications, U n iversity of M i n nesota , 1 947 .

Jesse D . Nolph, 1 9 68- , Assi stant Professor of Psycho logy , P h . D . , Cornel l U n iversity , 1 97 1 . Eric NordhohTl , 1 955- , A ssociate Professor of C o m m u n icat io n Arts, B . F .A . , Art I nst i t ute of C h i cago , 1 9 5 1 . Philip A. Nordqu ist , 1 963- , Professor of H i story , P h . D . , U n iversity of Wash i ngto n , 1 9 64. Sherman B. Nornes, 1 959- 6 1 , 1 965- , Associate Professor of Physics, P h . D . . Wash i ngton State U n iversity, 1 9 65. W. Dwight Oberholtzer, 1 9 69-, A SSOC iate Professor of S o c io log y , PhD . , G raduate Theo log i ca l U n i o n , Berkeley , Cal ifo r n i a , 1 9 69 . +Sara A. Officer , 1 9 67 - , Assistant Professor of Physical E d u cat i o n , M .S . , I nd i ana U n iversity , 1 965. Robert C. Olsen, 1 9 47 - , Professor of C hem istry, Ph . D . , M ich igan State U n ivers ity , 1 9 36. David M. Olson, 1 9 68 - , Professor of Physical E d u cat io n , D i rector of the Schoo l of Physica l Ed ucat ion , Ath let i c D irector , Ph . D . , U n iversity of I ow a , 1 9 66.

Franklin G . Olso n , 1 97 1 - , A ssistant Professor of Ed ucat io n , Ed . D . , U n iversity of Nebraska , 1 97 1 . Linda . Olso n, 1 9 67-, Assistant Professor of N u rsing, M . N . , U n iversity of Wash i ngto n , 1 9 64. Florence A. Orvik, 1 9 67 - , Assistant Professor of Ed ucat i o n , M . A . , Eastern Washi ngton State Col lege, 1 96 1 . Burton T. Ostenso n , 1 9 47 - , Professor of B io l ogy and E a rth Sciences, Ph . D . , U n iversity of M i chigan , 1 9 47. Wil l iam E. Parker, 1 970- , Assistant Professor of C o m m u ni cat ion Arts, M . S . , So uthern I l l i nois Un iversity , 1 968 . Arne K. Pederson , 1 9 56- , A ssoc iate Professor of E d u catio n, D i rector of Teacher Corps, M.A. , Pacific Lutheran U n iversity , 1 9 56. John E . Peterse n, 1 967-, Associate Professor of Rel ig i o n , P h . D . , N ew York U n iverSity, 1 9 70. Charles Arthur Peterson . 1 959-P rofessor of Busi ness A d m i n i strat io n, P h . D . , U n iversity of M i nnesota, 1 956. +Gary D. Peterso n, 1 967- , Assistant Professor of Mathematics, M . S . , Western Wash ington State Col l ege, 1 9 67 . ++Wilma E. Peterson, 1 9 65- , A ssistant Profe5sor of N u rsing , M .S . , Boston U n iversity, 1 953. +On l eave, 1 97 1 -7 2 . ++O n l eave 1 972-73

41


Rodney W. Petty , 1 9 69 - , Asso c iate Professor of Educat io n , D . Ed . , U n iversity of O rego n , 1 9 64. Ca rolyn M . Phillips, 1 9 68-, Assistant Professor of P h y s ical Ed ucat io n , M . S . , U n iversity of Washi ngto n , 1 9 64 . Walter E . Pilgrim , 1 9 7 1 - , Assistant Professor o f R e i igio n , T h . D . , P r i nceton Theo logica l Sem i nary, 1 9 7 1 . B. Jean Ramey , 1 9 7 1 - , I nstructor i n N u rs i ng , B . S . , Col lege of N u rsing and H ealth , C i n c i nnat i , 1 9 69 .

1 42

Paul M. Reigstad , 1 9 47-48 , 1 9 58-, Pr ofessor of E ng l i sh , C h a i rman of the D i v isi on of H u ma n i t i e s , Ph . D . , U n iversity of New Mex i co , 1 9 58 . Dav id P. Robbi ns, 1 9 69 - , Assistant Professor of M u s i c , B . M . , U n iversity of M i chigan , 1 968 . George A. St. John Robinso n , 1 9 7 0- , I nstructor in Foreign Languages (Span ish) , M .A . , Lou isiana State U n ivers ity, 1 97 0 . +George Roskos, 1 9 50- , Associate Professor o f Art, M . A . , U n iversity o f I ow a , 1 950. Joan G . Royce, 1 970- , I n Sti"uctor in N u rsing, M . S . , U n iversity of Pennsy l van ia, 1 9 60 . Wi l l iam B . Sare , 1 9 68 - , Assistant Professor o f M u s i c , M . M . , I nd iana U n ivers ity , 1 9 69 . Wi l l i a m H. Scharnweber, 1 9 70- , I nstructor in H isto ry , M . A . , Wash ington State U n iversity , 1 9 68 . Johannes August Schi ller , 1 958 - , Professor of Socio logy , Chairman of the D ivi sion of Social Sciences, P h . D . , U n iversity of Wash i n gto n , 1 9 67


+Wa lter Charles Schnackenberg, 1 9 41-44, 1 952-, Professo r of H i sto ry , P h D . , Wash i ngto n State U n ivers i ty , 1 950. Ernst C. Schw idder , 1 967- , A ssoc iate Professor of Art, M F A , U n iversity of Wash i ngto n , 1 955. S . ElVing Severtson , 1 966- , Asso c iate Professor of P sycho logy , Ph D . , U n iversity of U tah , 1 9 66. Mau ri ce H . Skones, 1 964-, PI'ofessor of M u sic, D i rectO r of C horal M u s i c , M .M . Eel . , Mo nta na State U n iversity , 1 957 . Ruth M. Sorenson , 1 9 68- , Ass istant Professor of B i o l ogy , M .A . , U n iversity of C o l o rad o , 1 9 67 . Car l D. Spangler , 1 96 1 -62 , 1 9 63- , Assistant Pro fessor of F o reign La nguages ( F ren ch ) , M .A . , Pen n sy lvan ia State U n iversity , 1 9 6 1 . '- Lynn S. Stei n , 1 9 6 1 - , P rofessor of Educat ion , Ed . 0 . , Montana S tate U n ivers i t y , 1 9 6 1 . Vernon L. St intz i , 1 9 64- , A ssoc iate Professor of B u s i ness Ad m i n istrat io n , D . B .A . , U n iversity of Wash i ngto n , 1 970. Doris G . Stucke , 1 9 67- , PI'ofessor of N u rsi ng; D i rector- of the Schoo l o f N u r s i n g , Ed D , Teachers C o l l ege , Co l u m b ia U n iversity , 1 9 67 . Valerie L. Sul l ivan, 1 972- , I n structor in H ea l t h and P . E . , B . S . , U n iversity of W i sco n s i n , 1 9 61 Duane Swan k , 1 970- , Assista nt Professor of Chem istry , P h D . , M o ntana State U n ivers i t y , 1 969 . Rod ney Swens on , 1 968-, Asso c iate Professor of F o re i g n Languages ( G erma n ) , P h D . , U n iversity of M i n nesota , 1 96 7 . Kwong-Ti n Tang, 1 967- , Professor of Physics, P h . D , Col u m b i a U n ivers i ty , '1 9 65 . Frederick L . Tobiaso n , ' 9 66- , Associate Professor o f C h em istry , Ph . D . , M i c h igan State U n iversity, 1 9 65 . Wal t Tomsic , 1 970-, Ass i stant Professor of Art a nd U n ive:-sity G ra p h ics Coord i nator, M . F .A . , U n iversity of C o l o rad o , 1 9 67 . Audun Try e Toven , 1 9 67 , Assistant Professor of F o re i g n La nguages ( N o rweg ia n ) , M . A . , U n iversity of Wash i ngto n , 1 9 67 . Pau l Wolfgang U l bricht, 1 9 6 7 - , Asso ciate Professor of Po i i t i c a l S c i e nce , P h . D . , U n iversity o f Wash i ngto n , 1 965 . Daniel E. Van Tassel , 1 970- , Assista nt Professor of E n g l ish , P h D , U n iversity of I owa , 1 970. David Lee Vinje, 1 970-, Ass i stant Professor o f E conorn ics, Ph D . , U n iversity of W i sco n si n , 1 970. George F . Walter , 1 970-, I nst r u ctor in Soc iolo gy ( A nt h ro po l ogy) M . A . , O h io Stale U n ivers ity , 1 970. -

W. Gra nt Watk i nson , 1 970- , Assi stant Pro fessor o f B u si ness Ad m i n istra t i o n , D . B . A . , U n iversity of Orego n , 1 9 7 1 . Mary M . Webster , 1 970-, I nstr u ctor i n Psycho l og y , M . A . , U n iverSity of C a l i for n i a , 1 9 65 . Pau l M . Webster , 1 969- , I n structor i n Foreign Languages ( G erm a n ) , M .A . , U n i versity o f Cal iforn i a , 1 9 67 . Forrest E. Wester i ng, 1 9 7 2 - , Associate Professor of Phys i ca l Ed ucat i o n , Coach of Footba l l , M . S . , Co l o rado State Col lege, 1 9 60 . Margaret D . Wickstrom , 1 9 5 1 - , Assistant Professor of Rel ig io n , D ea n of Wo m e n , M R . E . , T h e B i b l i ca l Sem i nary of New Yo r k , 1 95 1 . E . Jane Williamson , 1 9 64- , Professor of Ed ucat i o n , Ed D . , C o l orado State Co l lege , 1 9 59 . Margaret I . Woehrle, 1 97 1 - , I nstructor in N u r s i ng , M .S . N . , U n iversity of Wash i ngto n , 1 9 70. Jefferson Yuan-Sheog Ya ng, 1 970- , Assistant Professor o f E ng i n eer i ng , P h . D , U n iversity of U tah , 1 970. ++Dwight Judson Zulauf. 1 9 49 - 5 3 , 1 959 - , Professor of B u s i ness Ad m i n i stra t i o n , P h D . , U n ivel'sity o f M in n esota , 1 965.

+ O n leave , 1 97 1 -72 . ++O n leave, 1 972-7 3. ==S pec ial 2-year leave.

1 43


FACUl TV ASSOC IATES lawrence Griggs, 1 9 7 0- , Coord i n ator of M i nor ity Affa irs; B .A . Pac i f i c L u theran U n ivers ity , 1 9 69 . Robert K. Menzel , 1 9 69 - , D i rector of Center for H u man Orga n i zation i n a Chang i ng E nviro n me n t , (CH O I CE ) , M D iv . , Concord ia Sem i nary , S t . Lo u i s , 1 9 5 7 . CONSULT I N G PROF ESSO RS Leona rd M . Guss, 1 9 7 1 - , President of Leonard G u ss Assoc iates, I n c . , P h D . Oh io State Un iversity , 1 9 60 . Joseph E . Nolan, 1 9 7 1 - , R et i red sen ior vice'president/ad m i n i strat ion o f Weyerhaeuser Company , P h D . Harvard Law Schoo l , 1 9 32 .

L E CTU R E RS Clara Bantsari, M u s i c , B.A , San Jose State 19 65. Cheryl Barley , Physical E d ucat i o n . . Michael L. Benson , P hysical E d ucat io n , B . A , Pac i f i c L utheran U n iver s ity , 1 9 69 . R i chard Bergeso n , M u s i c , B . A . , U n iversity of Wash i ngton, 1 9 6 1 . Henry J. Bertness, E d u cati o n , PhD . , U n iversity of M i nnesota , 1 9 55. Euge ne H . Breckenridge, Educa t ion; D . H . L . , Wh itworth , 1 9 69 . J. Arnold Bricker, Ed u ca t io n , M . P.A , U n iversity of Wash i ngton , 1 9 62 . John Bright, Socio logy , L . L . B . , U n iversity o f Wash i ngto n , 19 67 . Carol Capp, Co mrn u n i cation Arts , M . A. , Bay l o r U n iversity , 1 9 68. Elaine Carleton , La t i n , M . A . , U n iversity of Texas, 1 9 69 . 1 44 David Christian , Co m m u n icat ion Arts, B . A . Western Wash i ngton State Co l lege, 1 9 60 . Ma r i e Churney, Ed u ca t i o n , Ed . D . , U n iversity o f F lo r i d a , 1 9 70 . Irene O. Creso, B io logy, M S , U n iversity o f Puget Sound , 1 9 47 . Russell Crockett , M u sic, M . M . , U n iversity o f I d a h o , 1 9 66.

Nadine Dryden , M u sic. Wayne H. Ehl ers, E d u catio n , M . L . , U n iversity of Denver , 1 9 67 . John G . Eyres, Co m m u n i cation Arts, M .A . , Central Wash i n gton State College, 1 9 59 . Grant O. Gi lbert , P sychology , B .A . , Pac i f i c L u theran U n iversity , 1 9 69 . Harold F. Gray, Ed ucation, M .A . , U n iversity of Puget Sound , 1 9 5 0 . Robert Green , Soc io logy , M . S .w. , U n iversity of Uta h , 1 9 58 . Marli s Hanson, Ed ucat io n , B . S . , U n iversity o f M i nnesota, 1 9 45. Theresa E . Hem men , N u rsing, M . A . , Pac ific Luth eran U n ivers ity , 1 9 7 1 . Ma rgaret A. Herzog, M athemat ics , M . A . , U n iversity of N ebrask a , 1 9 59 . leonard W . Holden , Ed ucat ion , Ed . D . , Stanford U n iversi ty , 1 9 59 . Irene Hopp , M u s i c , B .A . , U n iversity of P uget Sound , 19 47 . Ruth Lynch Jeffries, Teacher Corps, M .S . P . H . , North Caro l i na C o l l ege at Durha m , 1 9 49 . Eunice Johnso n , Socio logy , B . A , A labama A and M , 1 9 52 . Harold E . Johnston , Ed ucat i o n , M S . E d . , B lack H i l l s State, 1 9 64. Jack Jorgenson , B u s i ness Ad m i n istrat i o n , M . B . A , Paci f i c L utheran U n iversity , 19 7 1 . Margaret A, Keb lbe k , Educat i o n , M . A . , Central Wash i ngton Col l eg e , 1 9 5 6 . Ja m es Kittilsby, H ea l th and P . E . , B . A , Pa c i f i c Luthera n U n iversity, 1 9 60 . Sandra Knapp , M u sic, M .S . , J u i l l i ard School o f M u si c . Theodore Knightlinger, Co m ďż˝ u n icat ion Arts. Archie Kovanen , B u s i ness Ad m i n istrat io n , B . A , U n iversity of M i nnesota, 1 9 59 . Marjorie J . Lepley , M u s i c , M . M . , U n iversity of Wash i n gto n , 1 9 7 0 . David W . Locke, M u si c , M . M . , Northwestern U n iversity , 1 9 6 7 .


1 45

Lawrence G. Mathre, R el ig i o n , M . A . , Ph i l l i ps U n iversity , 1 9 62 . Larry Metcal f , A rt , M . F . A . , U n iversity of Wash i ngto n , 19 67 . Erling O. Mork , P o l i t i cal Sci ence , B . S , Wash i ngton State U n iversity , 19 57 . Frederick L. NewnhClm , M u s i c , Royal A cad emy of M us i c , Londo n , 19 62 . Athyleen F . Nicholson , B u s i n ess Ad m i n istrat ion , M . E . , U n iversity of P uget So und , 19 63. Nan G. Nokl eberg, Ed u cat io n , B . A . , U n iversity of Wash i ng to n , 1953. Carmen Nord lu nd , Commun icatio n A rts, M . A . Ed , Pac i f i c L u theran U n iversi t y , 1 9 67 . Beverly J . Payne , F t路ench , M .A . , U n iversity of Wash i ngton , 1 9 63. Duane Richardson , E d ucat io n , Ed . D . , Wash i ngton State U n iversity, 1969 . Judith Smith , Ed ucat ion , B .A . E d . , Pac i f i c Lutheran U n ivers ity , 1964. Lou is J . Souza, P h ysical E d ucat ion , M .S , S p r i ngfield C o l l ege . Donald Su ndquist, M u s i c , M . E . , Western Wash ington State Co l lege, 1 9 64. Jon Th ieman , Physical Ed ucat i o n , B .A . , Wart b u rg Co l l ege, 1 9 68 . Mary Helen Thompso n , M u s ic, B M , Ober l i n C o l lege , 1940. Ann K . Tremai ne, M u s i c , B . M . , U n iversity o f Orego n , 195 1 . Ray Warre n , E d u cation , M . A , U n iversity of Wash i ngto n , 19 3 7 . Wera Wilhel m , G erman , M A . , U n iversity of Wash i ngto n , 19 68 . Barbara W i l liams , E ng l i sh , M . A . , U n i versity of N ebraska , 1963. Layne Winklebleck , Soc iology, M . S .W . , U n iversity of Denver, 19 68 .


LIBRARY Frank Hamilton Haley, 1 95 1 - , L i brar i a n , A . B . L .S . , U n iversity o f Wash i ngto n , 1 9 50. Miriam Ruth Beckman , 1 9 64- , Reference L ibraria n , M. L i b r . , U n iversity of Wash i ngto n , 1 9 64 . TEACH E R CORPS TEAM LEADERS Daniel Mark ly. B . A. Ed . , Western Wash ington State Col lege , 1 9 68. Kathleen Carter, B . s . , Johnson C. S m ith U n ivers ity, 1950. Richard O. Disney, B .A . E d . , Eastern Wash i ngton State College, 1 9 58 . David A. Gabrielson, B . A . , Pac i f i c L utheran U n ivers ity, 1 9 60 Constance S. Lassiter, M . Ed . , F lor ida A and M U n iversity , 1 9 68 . Teresa M. Tuel , M .A . E d . , U n iversity o f Puget Sound , 1 9 5 7 . EM E R I TI

1 46

Elvin Martin Akre , 1 9 37 , Assoc iate P rofessor E mer itus of H i story , 1 9 7 0 . Irene O . Creso , 1 9 55-56, 1 9 68 , Associate Professor E meri t u s o f B io logy , 1 9 7 1 . J . E . Daniel son , 1 960 , D i rector E m er itus of Ad m i ssio ns, 1 9 69 . Arnold Jasper Hagen , 1 955, Professor E mer itus of Education, 1 9 7 1 . Phi lip Enoch Hauge, 1 9 20, Professor E m er it u s of Ed tlcati o n , 1 9 68. Olaf Melvi n Jordah l , 1 940, Professor E mer itus of Ph ysi c s , 1 9 69 . Erich Carl Knorr, 1 9 49 , Professor E m er itus o f Soc iology , 1 9 70. Ann Elise Knudson , 1 9 46, Assoc iate Professor E m er itus of E ng l i sh , 1 97 0 . Ott ilie Elise Little , 1 9 46-5 1 , 1 952, Prof essor E mer itus o f German, 1 9 66. Gunnar Johannes Mal min , 1 9 37 , Professor E mer itus of M u s i c , La t i n a nd Norweg i a n , 1 9 69 . Eline Kraabel Morken , 1 9 53, Assoc iate Professor E m er itus of N u r s i ng , 1 9 67 . Robert A.L. Mortvedt, 1 962 , President E mer itus, 1 9 69 . Frederick Laure nce Newnh a m , 1 9 50 , Professor E m er itus of M u s i c , 1 9 69 . Anders William Ra mstad , 1 925 , Professor E m er itus of Chem istry , 1 9 6 1 . Herbert Robert Ranso n , 1 9 40, Pro fessor E m er itus of E ng l i sh , 1 9 68. Kelmer Nelson Roe, 1 947 , Associate Professor E m er itus of R el ig io n , G r eek , 1 9 67 . Josef E m i l Running , 1 9 48 , Assistant Professor E meritus of M athemat ics, 1 9 6 1 . Vernon Alfred Utzinger, 1 9 50-5 3 , 1 9 5 7 , p ,'ofessor E mer itus of Speech , 1 9 69 . Paul G . Vigness, 1 9 56, Associate Professor E mer itus o f R e l i g i o n and H istory , 1 9 65 .


FACULTY STAND I N G COMMITT E ES AND OT H E R UN IVE RSITY COM M I SSIO NS, BOARDS, 1 9 7 1 -72 The Pres ident is an ex -officio member of all co m m ittees. ADM I SSIO NS : 3 faculty and 2 students, 3 adv i sory members. ARTI ST S E R I ES : 3 fa c u l ty, 3 ad v isory members. ATH L E T I CS : 3 faculty, 3 adv i sory members. COM MITTEE ON COMMITTE ES: 3 faculty. E DUCAT I O N A L PO L I C I E S : 9 faculty, 1 advisory and 2 student ad v i sory members. FACU LTY W E L F ARE : 3 fac u l t Y , l adv isory. F I N AN C I A L ASSISTAN C E : 3 faculty, 3 ad v i sory and 2 student ad v i sory members. COM M I TT E E TO PROMOTE G R ADUAT E STU DY : 3 faculty, 3 adv i .;ory members. I N T E R I M COMM I TT E E : 4 faculty and 2 students. LECTU R E AND CONVOCATI O N : 3 faculty and 3 students, 3 advisory members. LI BRARY : 3 faculty, 3 adv isory members. PU B L I CAT IONS : 3 faculty, 2 advisory. RAN K AND TENU R E . 7 faculty (4 tenured , 3 no nten u red ) , 1 advisory and 2 stud ent advisory members. R E L IG IOUS ACT I V I T I ES : 3 faculty, 2 advisory. SO C I A L : 3 faculty and 2 students, 1 advisory. STA NDARDS : 3 faculty d nd 3 students. ST UDE N T ACADEM I C STAT U S : 5 facu lty, 5 advisory. ST UDENT ACT I V I T I ES AN D WE L F AR E : 3 faculty and 3 students, 5 ex-officio members. STU D E NT PUB L I CAT IONS : 3 faculty and 4 students, 7 adv isory. ALL- U N I V E RS I TY COMMISSI ON : 5 facu lty, 1 ad v isory, 6 st u d ents, 2 adm i n i strat ive and 4 staff members. U N I VE R S I TY C E N T E R BOARD : D i rector, Un iversity Center, 4 stud e nts, 2 facul ty, 1 alumni.

1 47


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Paci fit; L u t heran University is located in Tncorna Washington, a metropoli tan area wit h a po pulation of over 250,000, o n t h e southern reaches of Puget Sound R a i lways and highways make the Univer s ity easily accessible. Seattle-Taco ma International Airport is a t h irty ,m in ute drive from the University on Interstate 5 Tacoma city buses r u n regularly to and from downtown a nd stop i n front o f the camp u s

I"'=� The ca mpus, which is seven miles so u t h of the c i t y center, is sit uated in Parkland , one ot Taco ma's unincorpo rated sub urbs. The rna in campus i s bo u nded by So uth 1 2 1 st Street on t he no rth and South 1 2 7th Street On the so uth, by Park Avenue on t h e east, and S o u t h "I" Street on the west

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Most of the University build ings are located o n what is " " termed the " u pper ca mpus " L ower t;s mpus , below a slight h ill to the so uth, is the setting tor t h e a t h let ic m m p l ex, residence halls fo r men, mar r ied student housing and the golf course. The U n i versity Center, l o cated on the hi llside, is accessible from up per o r lower cn rn p u s , t ying the ..: ...�BliIl!!bI!i.:..=�od...:!:.. two areas together, L_....L


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1 49


stat istical summary

R E L I G I O US A F F I L I ATI ONS

GEOG R APH I CA L

Fall 1 9 7 1

D I STR I B U T I O N O F ST U D E N TS

Lutheran

Washington Oregon California

The ALC LCA

1 ,00 7 296 LC-MS 1 50 Unclassified 29 Total Lutherans 1 ,572

Montana Alaska Idaho Minnesota Hawaii

Other Deno minations Pr esbyterian 1 54 Methodist 1 25 Catholic 1 38 E piscopalian 68 Baptist 1 03

Colo rado North Dakota I llinois Michigan Texas

Congregational 23 Other Affiliations 195 No affiliation 660 Total 1 ,466

Utah Arizona New Jersey New Mexico Ohio So uth Dakota

G R AN D TOTAL 3,038

1 50

E N R O L LM E N T

1 970-7 1 Graduates Seniors Juniors Sophomores Freshmen Specials Total R egular School Year Summer Session Enrollment, 1 970 Net Total F A L L 1 97 1 Graduates Seniors Juniors Sophomores Freshmen Specials Tota l Fa l l 1 9 7 1

Men

Women

Tota l

362 244 224 2ďż˝ 31 1 44 1 ,424 632 2 ,043

259 270 207 336 452 43 1 ,567 798 2 , 334

62 1 514 43 1 575 763 87 2 ,99 1 1 ,430 4,42 1

Men

Women

Tota l

329 258 277 270 31 4 27 1 ,475

196 264 275 355 450 23 1 ,563

525 522 552 625 7 64 50 3,038

Virginia Florida Iowa Louisiana New York Wisconsin Indiana Kansas Massachusetts Oklahoma Pennsylvania Wyo ming Con necticut District of Co l . Maryland Missouri Nebraska Nevada Georgia South Carolina Foreign Total

2 ,07 1 268 267 98 47 33 34 24 17 14 17 5 6 8 8 7 4 3 4 4 3 5 1 4 3 2 2 2 2 3 2 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 59 3 ,038


index

79 R ef u n d s 79 R e st r i ct i ons 79 S c h ed u l e of T u i t ion Deposits 78 Specia l F ees 78 T u it io n 70 Cou nsel ing and Test ing C enter Course Listi ngs

A cad em ic a nd S erv i ce Fa c i l i t ies Acad e m i c Ca l endar - 72/73 Acad em i c Ca l endar - 7 3/7 4 A cadem i c Orga n i z a t i o n Acad em i c Probat i o n A cad e m i c Proced u r es 1 52 Accred i ta t i o n 69 Act i v i t i es 1 34 Ad m i n i strat ive Off icers 72 82 83 9 84 84

Ad m i ssion

76 Ad m i ss i o n o f N o n- Degree S t ud en ts 76 Ad va n ced P lacement Opport u n i t i es 76 Early Ad m i ss io n Po l icy 76 Ear ly Dec ision Po l i cy 74 Pro ced ures: E nter i ng F r eshmen 75 Proced u res: T ra n sfer Stud ents 75 Read m i ssion of F o rm er Stud ents 57 A ir Force R eserve O ffi ce r s Tra i n i ng Corps 85 Aud i t i n g 1 30 Board of R eg ents 1 4 8 Ca mpus Map 56 CH O I C E 1 33 C h urch O f f i c ia l s 86 Co l l ege of A r t s a nd S ci en ce s Costs

78 Board a nd R o o m 79 Depos i tor-y fo r S t ud e n ts 78 Pay m ents 79 Perso n a l Property 79 PLU B udget P la n 78 Private M u s i c F ees

92 93 95 97 98 100 101 101 1 10 111 111 111 1 12 112 112 1 12 1 12 112 113 113 1 14 1 16 118 119 1 20 1 22 1 24 1 25 1 26 1 27

Art B io logy B u s i n ess A d m i n istra t io n C he m istry C o m m u n icat ion A rt s Earth S c iences E co n o m i c s Ed u cat i o n E ng l ish Foreign L a ng uages路 F rench G er- man G r ee k Japanese Lat i n Norweg i a n R ussian Span ish General E ng in ee r ing H i story Mathemat ics Music N u rsi ng P h i lo so ph y Physica l E d u ca t ion Physics Po l i t i ca l S ci en ce Psycho l og y R e l ig i o n So c io logy . Ant hropo logy and Social Welfare

85 86 88 85 1 46 59 1 38 1 47

C red i t b y E x a m i nat ion Degree R eq u irements

D i vision of G r-ad uate S t ud ies E l ig i b i l i t y E mer i t i E n v i rons Facu lty R eg i sterFacu l ty Com m i t tees F i n a n c i a l A id

76 A p p l icat ion 76 Types of A rd

70 87 56 85 84 86 70 85 86

Food Serv ice Foreign Lang uage R eq u irement Foreign S t ud y O p p o rt u n i t ies

F resh m a n Sched u l e G r ad i ng G raduation H ea l t h and Accident I nsurance I n f o r m a l Stud y I nterim

57 56 71 87 88 69

KPLU-FM Late After noo n and Even i ng C lasses L i v i n g A cco m modatio ns/ R esidence H a l l s Maj o r R eq u i rement M ast er s P r og ra m s

87 88 88 88

School School S chool Schoo l

'

M i no r i t y Affa i r s Coord i nator 1 30 Ow n ershi p and S up po r t 84 Pass/ Fa i l O pt i o n 70 P l a cement Services 84 R eg istrat ion 70 R e l ig i o us L i fe 70 Sched u l i ng S ervices 76 Scho l a rsh i p s 8 7 School o f B u s i n ess Ad m i n istrat ion

of of of of

E d u cat i o n F i ne A r ts N u rsi ng Physica l E d u ca t io n

Spe c i a l Acad e m i c Programs

55 A m er i ca n E co no m y Prog r a m 55 C la ss i cs 55 E nv i ron mental S t u d ies Program Spe ci a l Programs for Careers

88 89 89 89 89 89 89 90 70 1 50 70 69 56 89 86 77 84

E ng i nee r i ng Law M ed ica l Techno log y M ed i c i n e/d ent istry

P har m acy Social W e l f ar e Theology Urban Affa irs Pro g r a m S p e c i a l S t ud e nt Serv ices Stat ist i cs Student H ea l t h Serv i ce Student L ife S u m mer Sess i o n S y m bo l s U n iversity R eq u i rernents Veteran Affa irs Withdrawal

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Accred itation and I nstitutional Memberships Paci f i c L u t h e ran U n iver sity i s f u l ly accred i ted by the N o r t h west Asso c i a t i o n of S e co ndary a nd H ig h er S c h o o l s as a f o u r year i n s t i t u t i o n of h ig h e r ed u l.a t i o n a nd by the Wash i ng t o n S ta t e Board of Ed ucat i o n for tea cher ed uca t i o n . T he U n iver s i ty is accred i t ed by the N a t io n a l C o u n c i l for the Accred itat i o n of Teacher E d ucat i o n tor the prepara t i o n o f e l e m e ntary a nd seco n dary teach ers, p r i n c i p a l s and g u idance co u nsel o r s w i t h t h e M a ster ' s d eg r ee as t h e h ig hest d egree approved . The School of N u rsi ng i s accred i t ed by the N a t i o na l League for N ursi ng T h e U n iver s i t y i s ap proved b y t h e A m er i ca n A sso c i a t i o n of U n i ver s i t y Wo men a nd b y t h e A m e r i ca n C h em i ca l Society . T h e S ch oo l o f B u si ness i s accred i t ed b y t h e A m erica n Asso c i a t i o n o f C o l l eg i ate S ch o o ls o f B u s i ness. T he U n ivers ity I s

a

me mber of the A s so c ia t i o n of A m er i c a n C o l l eges,

the A meri ca n C o u n c i l on Ed ucat i o n , the N a t iona l L u t h eran E d u ca t io n a l Conference, the N or t hwest A ssociation of P r i vate C o l l eges and U n iver sit ies, the I ne! ependent C o l leges of Wash i ngto n , I n corpo rated , a ne! Wa s h i ngto r] F r iend s o f H ig h er Ed uca t io n .

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photos in " envlrons" section Cour esy of Wash ington State Department of Com merce and Economic Development section I copy led Iting . roger 91 USS, associate publ icatIons edl tor graphic desig n - walt o msic, department of art en dun mire, paul k usche, p l u pho to services photography



1972-1973; 1973-1974 Catalog