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Catalog 1970 Pacific Lutheran University Bulletin


PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY BULLETIN VOLLJ�'E L MARCH 19j'J NUMGfR 2 , , • -,

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Pacific Lutheran University Bulletin: Announcements for 1970-71 Catalog for 1969-70

Pages

Table of Contents

School Calendar

The Un iversity

Adm issions

Fin ances

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9

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15

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23

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Fi nancial Aid

Student L i fe

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Summer Session

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Late Afternoon and Eveni ng Classes

Academic Procedures

Courses of Instruction

The Register

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35

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45

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Academ ic Organization

Index

6

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61

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189

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214

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Objectives of the University Pacific Lutheran University, born of the Reformation spirit, maintains the privilege of exploration and learning in all areas of the arts, sCiences, and religion. The basic concern of Martin Luther was religious, but his rejection of church tradition as primary authority, and his own free search for religious truth, served in effect to liberate the modern mind in its quest for all truth. The total impact of Luther's stand has permanently shaped the modern world and helped pro­ vide the modern university with its basic methodology. Pacific Lutheran University is a community of professing Christian scholars dedicated to a philosophy of liberal edu­ cation. The major goals of the institution are to inculcate a respect for learning and truth, to free the mind from con­ finements

of

ignorance

and

prejudice,

to

organize

the

powers of clear thought and expression, to preserve and extend knowledge, to help men achieve professional com­ petence, and to establish lifelong habits of study, reflection, and learning. Through an emphasis on the liberating arts, the

University

seeks

to

develop

creative,

reflective,

and

responsible persons. At the same time, the acquisition of specialized information and technical skill is recognized as a condition of successful involvement in the modern world. The University seeks to develop the evaluative and spiritual capacities of the student and to acquaint him honestly with rival claims of the true and the good. It encourages the pur­ suit of rich and ennobling experiences and the development of significant personhood through an appreciation of man's intellectual, artistic, cultural, and natural surroundings. The University

affirms

its

fundamental

obligation

to

confront

liberally educated men with the challenges of Christian faith and to instill in them a true sense of vocation.

L________________ ______ _________________________________


By providing a rich variety of social experiences, Pacific Lutheran University seeks to develop in the student a joy in abundant

living,· a

feeling for

the

welfare

and

personal

integrity of others, good taste, and a sense of social propriety and adequacy. Distinguishing between personal Christian ethics and normal social controls, the University adopts only such rules as seem necessary for the welfare of the educa­ tional community. The physical development of the student is regarded as an integral part of his liberal education. Hence the University encourages participation in physical activities and respect for health and fitness. Professing a concern for the entire nature of man, the faculty of the University encourages wholesome develop­ ment of Christian faith and life by providing opportunities for worship and meditation, offering systematic studies of religion and encouraging free investigation and discussion of basic religious questions.

The

University believes the

essence of Christianity to be personal faith in God as Cre­ ator and Redeemer, and it believes that such faith born of the Holy Spirit generates integrative power capable of guid­ ing men to illuminating perspectives and worthy purposes. The University community confesses the faith that the ulti­ mate meaning and purpose of human life are to be discov­ ered in the person and work of Jesus Christ. As an educational arm of the Church, Pacific Lutheran University provides a locus for the fruitful interplay of Chris­ tian faith and all of human learning and culture, and as such holds it a responsibility to discover, explore, and develop new frontiers. Believing that all truth is God's truth, the Uni­ versity, in achieving its educational and spiritual goals, main­ tains the right and indeed the obligation of faculty and stu­ dents to engage in an unbiased search for truth in all realms.


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School Calendar 1970-71 Summer Session, 1 970

Classes beg i n 7:30 a.m . First te rm ends._ __ Classes begin-2nd t e rm Summer Session closes_____ _ Baccalaureate/Commencement

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Monday, J u n e Tuesday, J u ly _Wednesday, July _Friday, August Friday, August

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15 14 15 14 14

First Semester, 1 970·71

Orientation and Registration Monday, Se ptem ber 7·Wednesday, Se p te m b e r 9 C l asses begin 7 :50 a . m . _ _T h u rsday, Septem ber 1 0 Last date for adding a course T h u rsday, Septe mber 24 Last date for d i scon t i n u i n g a c o u rse without receiving a grade Thursday, October 1 Date for g iv i n g defi ciency grades .._Friday, October 1 6 Homecom i n g Weekend October 23-25 Th u rsday, Novembe r 26 Thanksgiving Day H o l i d ay Tuesday, December 1 5-Friday, December 1 8 Exami nations Semester ends_ _ Friday, December 1 8 ____

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I nterim Period 1 971

Begins_ Ends

.Monday, January 4 Friday, January 29

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Second Semester, 1970·71

Registration. Classes begi n 7 :50 a . m .. Last date for add i n g a course _ Washington's Birthday H oliday Late date for discontin u i n g a c o u rse without receiving a g rade Date fo r giving deficiency g rades M i d -semester break begins 1 0 :00 p . m . M i d-semester break ends 7:50 a . m . _ Examinations _ Semester ends ___ Baccalau reate Service, 1 1 : 0 0 a m _ Commencement, 3 :30 p . m . _

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Wednesday, Feb ruary 3 T h u rsday, February 4 Th u rsday, Feb ruary 18 _ " Mon day, Febru ary 22

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T h u rsday, February 25 Friday, March 1 2 Tuesday, April 6 Wednesday, A p ri l 1 4 _Tuesday, May 1 8·Friday, May 2 1 - Friday, May 2 1 Sunday, May 23 _ �_ Sunday, May 23

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CALENDAR A N D CURRICU LU M

Pac i f i c lutheran U n i versity adopted a new calendar effective i n 1 969. Com足 monly called the 4-1 -4 , the calendar has two fou rteen-week semesters separated by a four-week i n terim. Typical ly. a student e n rolls in t h ree to four cou rses each semester and one in each of at least two interims during his undergrad uate years. Semesters

The new calendar h as provided opportunity for most students to concentrate their efforts on a smaller num ber of study areas in each semester, and for acade m i c u n its of the U n i ve rsity to offer i nstruction in a smaller nu mber of better i nteg rated courses. The cou rses descri bed in t h i s catalog are the result of U n i 足 versity-wide review o f i nstructional objectives a n d practice. I n m a n y i nstances they are markedly d i fferent from those they re p l aced and, in every case, are subject to poss i b l e further revision as the poss i b i l i t i es of the new program are observed. A new general em phasis is g ive n to the p romotion of greater i n itiative on the part of the ind ividual student. Courses have been planned and scheduled with less emphasis upon clock hours to allow students g reater flex i b i l i ty and individ足 uality i n the conduct of the i r stud ies. In the semesters, as well as the i nte rim , students are encou raged to take the ful lest advantage of all learn ing resources available to them under the g u i dance of the faculty. In cou rses i n w h i c h there are fewer formal contact hours. the i nstructors provide for a greater amount of i n formal i ndividual or small g roup contact. Inter i m

The i nte rim provides freedom-freedom for the student to develop h i s inte rests by concentrating on a s i n g l e course and freedom for the faculty to teach in areas and ways not always avai lable d u ring the reg u l a r semester. However. freedom means responsibility. The faculty has developed i magi native concepts and courses and has accepted the challenge to keep them responsive and open-ended. Since i n terim offerings are experimental and plastic, students are expected to a p p roach these courses with open m i nds and a w i l l ingness to give to the course more than is s i m p ly req u i red.


HISTORY Founded in 1 890 by the Rev. Bjug Harstad, Pacific Lutheran U n i versity has occupied the same location since i ts begi n n i n g . A l though named Pac i fic Lutheran U n i versity, t h e institution opened as an academy on October 1 4 , 1 894 and became a j unior college i n 1 9 2 1 . Ten years later, it was organized into a th ree-year normal school, w h i c h became a college of education i n 1 939. In 1 9 41 , sti l l a small and st rugg l i ng i nstitution, it assumed the role of a col lege of l i beral arts. It was known as Pac ific Lutheran Coll ege from 1 9 20 until 1 960, when, because of a restructuring of its organi zation, it again assumed its original name, Pacific Lutheran U n i versity. Two Lutheran i nstitutions have merged wi th the University - Columbia Col l ege of Everett, Washi ngton in 1 920, and Spokane Col lege of Spokane, Washi ngton in 1 930. Beg i n n ing about 1 945, the U n i ve rsity experienced g reat growth, benefiting from dynamic leadersh i p , as well as from factors which led to the expansion of higher education on a national scal e . Today it operates with an academ i c structure embrac i n g Col lege of Arts and Sciences, School of B usi ness A d m i nistration, School of Education, School of Fine A rts, School of Physical Education, and School of N u rs i n g . A Division o f G rad uate Stu d i es offers work lead i n g to the Master's d eg ree in a n u m be r of areas. Eugene Wiegman, who took office Aug ust 1 , 1 969, is the n i n th president of the Un iversity. Robert Mortvedt ( 1 962-69) is p resident emeritus. Other presidents, all deceased, were: Bjug Harstad, 1 890-95, 1 897-98; Ole G ronsberg, 1 895-97; N i l s J. Hong, 1 898-1 9 1 8 ; J o h n U . Xavier (acting). 1 920-21·; O l a J . Ordal, 1 92 1 -28; Osca r A . Ti ngelstad, 1 928-43; Seth C. Eastvold, 1 943-62.

LOCATION Tacoma, Washington, a metropo l i tan area with a popu lation of over 250,000 persons, i s located in the southern reaches of Puget Sound. The Un iversity is in Parkland, one of Tacoma's u n i n corporated s u b u rbs. The campus is seven mi les south of the c i ty center and is adjacent to one of the main arterials, the Mt. Rainier hig hway. Towering mountain peaks flan k the beautifu l natu ra l setting of the Puget Sound country. Hundreds of streams course down to Puget Sound through evergreen forest slopes of the Olympic Mounta ins on the west and the Cascade Range on the east. Scores of lakes dot the area. Com b i ned with its moderate year-round c l i mate, the area is i d eal for a jud i cious mixture of scholarly efforts and outdoor recreations such as boati ng, skiing, swi m m i ng, h i king, fishing and h�nting.

OWNERSHIP AND SUPPORT The U n i versity is owned and operated by Pacific Lutheran U n i versity, I nc., a Washi ngton corporation whose pu rpose is to maintain a C h ristian in stitution o f h g h e r learn i n g . Membership of t h i s corporation coi n c i des w i t h t h e membership of the North Pacific District of the Ameri can Lutheran C h u rch and the membershi p of that portion o f the ALC's Rocky Mountain District whiCh i s located i n Idaho and Montana west of the Continental Divide. The a n n u a l meeting of the corporation i s held i n conju nction with the annual convention of the North Pac i fic District.


Vo ting members i n c lude the mem bers of the Board of Regents, and the pastors and lay delegates of congregations in the constitue nt area. The Un iversity receives regular f i n a n c i a l s u p p o rt from the America n Lutheran Church, the Pacific Northwest Synod of the Lutheran Church i n Americ a and from the Pacific Lutheran University Alumni Association. I n addition to C h u rch assistance, the Un iversity receives considerable support from i n dividuals, organizations and businesses th roughout the nation and world. G OVER N M E NT

The p o l i cy-making and governing body of the University is the Board of Regents. On the basis of recom mendations made by the President, i t charts a cou rse for the development of the total program of the U n iversity and strives to p rovide essen tial funds. The Un iversity corporation's constitution p rovides for 29 regents of whom 25 are elected for th ree-year terms. Fifteen regents represent the North Pacific and Rocky Mountain Districts of the Ame rican Lutheran C h u rc h , six are chosen by the Pacific Northwest Synod of the Lutheran C h u rch in America, three represent the P LU A l u m n i Assoc iation, and three a re chosen at large by the Board of Regents. The P resident of the University and the President of the North Pacific District are regents by vi rtue of thei r position. The student body and the faculty have representatives who meet with the Board . ACCREDITATION AND I NSTITUTIONAL M E M B ERSHIPS

Pacific Lutheran U n i versity i s fully accredited by the Northwest Association of Secondary and Higher Schools as a four-year i nstitution of h i g h e r education and by the Washington State Board of Education for teacher education. The Unive rsity is acc redited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Te acher Education for the preparation of elementary and secondary teachers with the Master's degree as the highest degree a p p roved. The School of N u rsing is accredited by the National League for N u rsing. The Un iversity is app roved by the American Asso c iation of University Women and by the Ameri can Che m i c al Society. The Un iversity is a member of the Associ ation of American Colleges, the Amer足 i can Council on Educati o n , the National Lutheran Educational Conference, the Northwest Association of P rivate Colleges and Un iversities, and the I n dependent Col leges of Wash,ington, I ncorporated. STUDENT BODY

App roximately 4,400 students will be served by the University during the cur足 rent school year and sum mer session. FUll-ti me e n rollment each semester is about 2 , 250. W h i l e the majority of the students come from the State of Washi ngton, over 30 states and several foreign countries are represented. Regard i ng re ligious a f f i l i 足 ati on, a majority a r e of the Lutheran fai th , but s o m e 2 0 oth er church g roups are represented. FACULTY

The University has a f u l l-time teaching faculty of 1 4 2 . There are 40 part-time teachers, most of whom teach i n the late afternoon and evening p rogram and the summer session. Qualities expected of faculty members i n clu de comm i tment


to the Objectives of the Un iversity, deep concern for the ind ividual student, excel­ lent preparation in a recognized grad uate school, and a des i re and an a b i l i ty to teac h . ALU M N I

T h e A l u m n i Association numbers over 7,000 persons, living al l over the world. Members o f the teac h i n g p rofession comprise the largest segment of the alumn i . H u n d reds are engaged i n t h e work of the Church a s pastors, m issionaries, parish workers and other specia lties. PLU a l u m n i serve the i r God, their fellow men and their coun tries in a host of other p rofessi ons and vocations. THE CAMPUS

Beautiful natu ral surroundings b le n ded with modern build i ngs and fac i l i ties c h a racterize the 1 26-acre campus of Pac i f i c Lutheran. Stately Douglas f i r t rees, a variety of bloom i ng and evergreen s h rubs, lush g reen lawns and flower beds set off the b u i ld i ngs and make the campus attractive the year arou n d . Majestic Mt. Rainier, rising to an altitude of 1 4 , 4 1 0 feet about 30 m i les away, dominates the setting. Campus outdoor recreational fac i l i ties i n clude a n i ne-hole, 2,048-yard g o l f c o u rse, ten n is courts, and athletic fields. Most of the U n i versity b u i ld i ngs are located on what is termed the " u pper campus." The "lower campus," below a slight h i l l to the south, is the setting for the ath letic fac i l i ties, residence halls for men, a d i n ing hall and apartments for m a rried students. The main campus i s bo unded by South 1 2 1 st Street on the north and South 1 27th Street on the south, by Park Avenue on the east and South " I " Street on the west. UNIVERSITY B U I L D I N G S Academic

Tacoma-Pierce Ad m i n i stration B u i l d i n g , a two-story steel and concrete struc­ ture, was comp leted in 1 960. I t houses the a d m i n i strative offices of the U n iversity, 21 classrooms, fac u lty offices, studios and master control for closed c i rc u i t tele­ vision, and a c h apel-auditori u m seating 1 75 persons. The Robert A. L. Mortvedt Library i s a m u lti-media learn i n g center contai n i n g over 1 40,000 p u b l ished and recorded i t e m s and provides an o p t i m u m environment of comfort and privacy eventually capable of housing 1 ,000 persons at one time and 500,000 items. This two-story, plus basement, brick stru cture was com­ p l eted in 1 966. Xavier H a l l , built as a l i brary in 1 937 and remodeled in 1 966-67, houses class­ rooms, faculty offices and central services. Ramstad Hall, a th ree-story brick structure, was b u i l t i n 1 947 and added to i n 1 959. I t contains labo ratory, classroom, l i b rary, museum, research a n d office faci lities for the departments of biol ogy, chemistry, and p h ysics. Memorial Gymnas i u m , built i n 1 947, provides classrooms and activity areas for the department of health and physical education, and accommodations for i ntra­ mural and i ntercollegiate athleti cs. There is seating fo r 2,200 spectators in the gymnas i u m .


Eastvold Chapel, completed in 1 952, seats 1 ,238 persons and is used for chapel , concerts, special events and plays. The mu lti-pu rpose structure also contains classrooms, work areas, stage and a radio studio for the department of speech; studios, ensemble practice rooms and in dividual p ractice rooms fo r the depart­ ment of mu sic; a devotional chapel and offices for the student congregati on. The Art B u i l d i ng, a two-story frame bUi l d i ng, contains classrooms, labo ratory and offices for the department of art. I t w i l l be razed d u ring the 1 970-71 sch o o l year. The Swi m m i n g Pool, co m p leted in Apri l , 1 965, has a swi m m i n g area 42 by 75 feet and a divi ng area 30 to 35 feet. Shower, locker a n d dressing rooms are located i n the 1 33 by 1 45 foot structure. The Olson Physical Educati on Auditorium is the center of campus recreati onal activities. Completed i n 1 969 at a cost of $2.2 mi ll ion, the Uni-Turfed auditori um and the Astra-Turfed fieldh ouse provide opport u n ities for p l an ned programs of physical activity and free-time recreation for all students. Handba l l , squash, pad d leball and sau na bathing are but a few of the activities enj oyed by PLU students i n this spacious complex. Additi onal physical education facilities i n c l ude lighted tennis courts, a ni ne­ h o l e golf course and n u merous athletic fields. Service Buildings

The College U n i o n B u i l di ng, completed in 1 955 and added to in 1 959, contains a cafete ria, Ch ris Knutzen Fel l ows h i p H a l l , bookstore, coffee shop, recreational and social l o unges, a small dining room a n d student government offices. I n 1 970-71 it is p l a n n ed to remodel the structure to h o use the School of N u rsing and the Department of Art. A Unive rsity Center is under construction and i t is expected that the $3.3 m i l l i o n stru cture will be ready for use by September, 1 970. Faci lities which this community center will contain i n clude food service, lou nges, meeting rooms, bookstore, bowling alleys, music liste n i n g rooms, game rooms, private d i n i n g rooms, a fellows h i p h a l l , student government offices, snack bar, a n d student publ ication offices. Columbia Center, a two-story frame and masonry structu re completed in 1 962, contains a cafete ria, coffee shop, bakery and pro shop fo r the U n i versity Golf C o u rse. T�e Student Health Center houses offices fo r the University doctors and n u rses, out-pati e n t treatment areas, and beds for day patients. The Warehouse and S h o ps are used for the storage of equipment and the m a i n tenance of the physical plan t . Residence Halls for Men

H. L. Foss Hall, a th ree-story residence for 1 88 students, has 1 6-men living units and is d i vided i n to Nord i c House (north half), and Olym p i c Hou se (south half). H i n derlie Hall , for 1 3 1 students, forms the south side of the hou sing q u ad­ rangle on upper cam pus. Tingelstad Hall, a ni ne-story residence for 392 men, is made u p of four distinct tJouses each having two floors and named as foll ows: Cascade House, floors 2 and 3 ; I vy House, floors 4 and 5; Evergreen House, floors 6 and 7; and A l pine House, floors 8 and 9.


These t h ree men's residence h a l l s are modern b u i l d i ngs and have lounges, study rooms, typ i n g rooms, se lf-service laund ry and TV viewing rooms. The halls are d i vided i n to hous6s. Each house is a cohesive u n it designed to encourage greater part i c i pation in the i n tramural, soci al, recreati onal, and acade m i c programs. Residence Halls for Women

Harstad H a l l , a si x-story solid b r i c k bu i l d i ng completely refurbished in recent years, accommodates 250 students. I t has th ree lou nges, a recreation roo m , self­ service laundry a n d kitc hen facilities. Hong H a l l , fo r 115 students, makes up the east side o f the housing quadrangle and i s c l osest to the heart of t h e campus. Kre i d l e r Hall, fo r 1 26 students, forms the west side o f this quadrang le, and is on the west edge of the campus. Ordal Hall, for 1 84 students, is adjace nt to Stuen Hall and forms the north edge of the quadrangle. J. P. Pfl ueger Hall, for 194 stu dents, is located on lower campus. Stuen H a l l , for 1 09 students, is located d i rectly north of Hon g Hall. The fo u r halls i n the quadrangle and Pflueger Hall are modern th ree-story build­ i ngs each having large l ounges, stUdy lounges, typing rooms, kitche ns, self-service lau n d ries, and other fac i l ities used in c o m m o n . Other Living Units

The President's Residence is located on the co rner of Park Avenue and South 1 23rd Street. Un iversity apartments are two- and t h ree-bedroom one-story frame u n i ts for rental by married students. SPECIAL U NI VERSITY PROGRAMS CHOICE-Center for Human Orga nization in Changing Environments

Early in 1 969 PLU established a researc h-e d ucation-action arm, Center for Human Organization in Chang i n g Envi ron ments. Its acronym, C H O I C E , signals its function and style: to i n i ti ate processes and programs which w i l l enable many segments of an urbanizing society to part i c i pate in making choi ces which may lead to quality of life in the re gion. Funded by a three-year grant from the Board of Col lege Education of the Amer­ i can lutheran C h u r c h , i t serves as t�e University's l i n k with c o m m u n i ty action programs and agencies and plays a major role in the Tacoma Area Col lege Consortium (com prised of Pa c i f i c Lutheran U n iversity, U n i versity of Puget Sound, and Tacoma C o m m u nity Co l l ege). CHOICE provides channels for i n creasing i n volvement by faculty and students i n the community and aids in i mplementing the Un iversity's role as an agent of social cha nge. AMERICAN ECONOMY PROGRAM

The pu rpose of the program is to raise the level of understan d i n g of economic prinCi ples and procedures among teachers and students of the Paci fic Northwest. The program is a Center for E c o n o m i c Education recognized nati onally by the Joint Council on Ec o n o m i c Education and by the Northwest Counci l on Economic Educat i o n . I ts functi ons are:


1) To offer special courses to non-econom ics majors at Pacific Lutheran, espe足 cially to future teachers and to current memb ers of the teachi n g professi on. These cou rses emphesize the role of economics among the so cial sc iences generally a n d its i m portance in all areas of l i fe. 2) To develop, in co operati o n with the school syste ms of this regio n , teac hing plans and aids that fac i l i tate inco rporation of eco n o m i c s i n to existing c u rricula. 3) To provide speaking and consu lting services for c o m m u nity organizations i n terested i n promoting p u b l i c understanding of economi c principl es and issues. 4) To establi sh, in cooperat ion with the Mortvedt Library, a spe c i a l colle ction devoted to the teac h i ng of economi cs. For further i n forma tion o n the Program, please contact its Coord i n ator i n our Department of Economi cs. KPLU-FM

For i n structional pu rposes and as a com m u n i ty se rvice, the University operates a non-commercial, frequency modulation rad io station. It broadcasts on a fre足 quency of 88.5 megacycles with a power of 10 watts under l i cense from the Federal Communic ations C o m m i ssio n . Program m i n g i n cludes materials originating on the campus and from various networks, p r i m a ri ly ed ucational.


Admissions P ac i fi c Lutheran U n i ve rSity a d m i ts qualified students without respect to race, c reed , color, or ethnic ori g i n . The Uni versity a d h e res to the p ractice that every student accepted shall possess the academic and personal traits w h i c h experience has shown will enable him to su cceed in col lege work. I n j u d g i n g the qualifications of appli cants, the Comm ittee on Ad mission s usually adhe res to the fo l l owi ng re quirements : 1)

G raduation from an acc re d i ted h i g h school or evidence of satisfactory work at anoth e r col lege of recognized stand i n g .

2 ) Scholastic ach i evement, a s i n d i cated b y h i g h school g rade point average a n d / or class rank, w h i c h p redi cts a reaso n a b l e chance for success at Pacific Lutheran Un ive rsity. 3)

Satisfactory score on the C o l lege Entrance Examination Board Scholastic Aptitude Test. Scores on this test are n ot required of students transferring from oth e r col leges.

4)

Evi dence of good m o ral character.

RECOMMENDED HIGH SCHOOL COURSE It is reco m m e n d e d , but not required, that the h i g h school c o u rse of an a p p l i ­ c a n t i n c l u d e : English, 4 u n its; eleme ntary algebra, 1 unit; pl ane geometry, 1 u n it; social st u d i es, 2 un its; one fo re ign language, 2 u n its; one laboratory science, 1 u n i t; electives, 5 u n its, i n c l u d i n g typi ng.

ADMISSION PROCEDURES A p p l i cants seeking adm ission should write to the Di rector of Admissions requesting the necessary forms. Students planning to enroll fo r the Fall semester may submit th e i r appli cati ons at any time after December 1 st of the preceding year. The following credentials are req u i red : 1)

FORMAL A P P L ICAT I O N . The standard application form, desi g n ed for Wash­ i ngton institutions of h i g h e r l e a r n i n g is used by Pacific Lutheran U n i v ersity. I t may b e obtained from h i g h school counselors (by Washington a p p l icants) o r by writing the D i rector of Adm issi ons. A fi ftee n-dollar non-refu ndable applica­ tion fee should accompany the application o r be mai led separately. This i s a service fee and is not applied to the student's account. Checks o r mo ney orders should be made payable to Pacific Lutheran U n i ve rsity and sent to the Director of Adm issions.

2) TRANSC R I PT OF CREDIT. High school transcripts m ust i n c l ude all work p u rsued through the final semester of the j u n i o r yea r. Students who have been g ra d u ated p r i o r to s u b mitting their a p p l i cations are req u i red to present com­ ple te academic records. Transc ripts of transfer students must i n c l ude all col lege work completed to date. 3)

REFERENC ES. Two character and academ ic evaluations, prepared by prin­ cipals, cou nselors, pastors, or other q u a l i fied persons, are req ui red. Forms fo r this pu rpose may be obtai ned from the A d m i ssions Office.


4) COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXA M I NAT I O N BOARD TEST. All entering freshmen must submit scores from the Col lege Entrance Exami nation Board Scholastic Aptitude Test. I n fo rmation conce rning this exa m i n ation may be obtained from high school counselors o r from the Col lege Entrance Examination Board, Box 1'025, Berkeley, Cal ifornia 94701 . 5)

PHYSICAL EXA M I NATI O N REPORT. Prior to registra.t ion, each student e n ro l l 足 ing f o r two a n d one-h alf cou rses o r more, m u st s u b m i t , a t his o w n expense and on the form p rovided, a physical examination report acceptable to the Student Health Service of the U n iversity. Until this report is approved, the student is not officially admitted. All fo rei g n students are req u i red to report to the Health Center u pon arrival at the U n i versity for instructions conce rning various tests which may be req u i red.

6) TUITION D EPOSIT. A seventy-live-dol lar advance payment on tuition i s due i m mediately following acceptance, This payment i s cred i ted to the student's account and i s appli cable at the beg i n n i ng of the term for w h i c h the student has been accepted, I f u n foreseen c i rc u mstances necessi tate cancellation of the e n ro l l m e n t reservation, the amount will be refu nded, if the D i rector of Ad missions is notified i n writing prior to May 1 . The final refund date for second semester applitants is January 1 5, Early Decision Policy

Fol lowing comp letion of h i s j u n i o r year i n h i g h school, an applicant who has chosen Pacific Lutheran U n i versity as the institution he wishes to attend, may be provisionally accepted for admission, conti ngent upon satisfactory completion of his high school course, provided h e ran ks i n the upper twenty-five per cent of his class, and otherwise complies with the admission policies of the Un iversity. Early decision candidates should take the College Board SAT before the se n i o r year of h i g h schoo l . Early Admissions Policy

A student, upon recommendation of the high school prinCipal, may be e l i g i ble for early admission to Pacific Luth e ran University, provided :

1) He has completed all graduation requirements, except f u l l residence, and ranks in the u pper ten per cent of his class; 2) He i s assured by his high school ad m i n i stration that h e may obtai n his h i g h school d i ploma upon the satisfactory completion of a specified amount of acceptable college work; 3) He appears to possess the necessary emotional maturity, and 4 ) He otherwise compl ies with the ad m ission policies of the U n i versity. Transfer Students

Students desi ring to transfer from accredited i nsti tutions of collegiate rank must s u b m i t to the Di rector of Admissions: a formal appl ication for admissi on, complete official transcri pts i nc l uding a statement of honorable d i s m i ssa l , recom足 mendations from two references, and a physical exami nation record. 1 ) Cred i t w i l l be g ranted for subjects which meet the req u i re ments for the field of work chosen by the student and for which he has made g rades of not less than "C."


2)

C redit for su bjects in which the stude n t has a grade of "0" w i l l be withheld until he has successfully completed one semester's work at the Unive rsity.

3) C o u rses taken at a junior college are normally transferable if co mpleted wh i l e t h e stu dent is classified as a freshman or sophomore. 4)

In order to be a candidate for a degree, the student must take the f i n a l seven cou rses (28 semester h o u rs) i n residence.

C re d i ts previously earned by trarisfer studen,ts i n unaccredited schools are not transferable at the time of admission. An evaluation of such courses, and a decision relative to th e i r transferabi lity, w i l l be made after the student concerned has been in attend ance at Pac i fic Lutheran U n iversity fo r one semester. Admission of Non-Degree Students

Persons e i g h teen years or older who desi re to enroll in two courses (8 semester h o u rs) or less may be ad mitted as non-deg ree students without s u b m itting appli足 cations for regular status. Credits earned in this manner will be evaluated as to their acceptability if the student, as a result of formal apPli cati on and acceptance, becomes a reg u l a r student; that is, a candidate for a degree. Non-degree students who wish to transfer credits to another institution will be issued transcripts which clearly i n d i cate the non-deg ree status. Re-admission of Former Students

FUll-time students who have not been in attendance for one semester or more may seek re-admiss i on by obtai ning an application for re-e ntrance. Students who have been d ropped for academic or d i scip l inary reasons must also submit a letter of petition for reinstatement. Re-entering students who have attended another col足 lege in the interim m ust request that a transcript be sent from that i nstitution directly to the Di rector of Admissions at Pacific Lutheran University. The residency requirement as stated in No. 4 above for transfer students is also aPPl icable for re-e ntries. Auditors

Students, who are properly regi stered and have paid the required fees, may audit certain courses. Such students are pe rmitted to attend classes but may not participate or receive credit. Laboratory or activity cou rses are not open fo r auditing pu rposes. Admission to the Division of G raduate Stud ies

The procedure for adm ission to the Division of G raduate Studies is outlined in the section Aca demi c Organization. Honors at Entrance

The University confers Honors at Entrance in accordance with the provisions of a coordinated program formu lated by colleges and universities which are mem bers of the College En trance Examination Board. Recognition is g i ven fo r outstanding achievement in high school and in anticipation of superior perform足 ance at the college level . The awards are not made in recognition of financial need and carry no monetary value.


II Advanced Placement Opportunities 1) VIA THE ADVAN CED PLACEM ENT P R O G RAM OF T H E C O L L E G E ENTRAN CE EXA M I N AT I O N BOARD. Students who have received scores of 3, 4, or 5 on C . E . E . B . Advanced Pla cement Ex a m i n ations may be g i ven both advanced pla ce足 ment and cred it toward g raduation. Exact provisions are dependent on the subject matter fie l d , and i n q u i ries are welcomed by the Ad missions Offi ce. 2) VIA LOCAL ADVANCED PLACEMENT EXA M I N AT I O N S . A nu mber of the departments and schools o f the U n iversity offer their students the opportunity of taking placement exami nations so that they may be accu rately advised as to the level at w h i c h they can most advantageously beg i n their col lege studies . W h e n a student receives a s u p e r i o r score on such an exam i nation, and when h i s study of the subject matter was not a necessary part of the course work w h i c h won h i m his high school di pl oma, credi t can be g ranted toward g radu足 ation. Inq u i ries are welcomed by the acade mic deans from those stu dents who might be e l i g i ble for such cred i t .


Finances It is the pol i cy of the University to maintain h i g h educational standards at as low a cost as poss i b l e . The support of the cooperati ng Lutheran c h u rches and friends who contrib ute toward the operation of the school enab les the University to ch arge a lowe r t u i tion rate than would otherwise be possible .

TUITION F u ll-ti me, for the academic year, 2% to 4V. courses ( 1 0-1 7 semester credit h o u rs) in each semester p l us 1 course (4 cred it h o u rs) in ________________ _ _____ $ 1 400.00 the i nterim ________ F U l l-time d u ring either semester plus the in terim ___ _ 865.00 F U l l-ti me either semester without the i n terim ________ ___ _ 700.00 !:xcess cou rses tuiti o n , above 4V. courses per semester, per quarter cou rse _ _______ _ _____ _ ___________ 40 .00 _ Part-time, less than 2V2 cou rses per semester (9 credit h o u rs or fewer), per course (also c h a rged for an i nter i m course if not taken i n conj u n ction with a ful l-time semester) ___ ___ __ _ __ _ _______ 232.00

GENERAL FEES (per semester) General fee, per semester, charged students enrolled in 2% cou rses ( 1 0 h o u rs or more)' ___ __________ _ _ ______ ______ __ $ ( I n cludes support of the following services: Activities of the Associated Students of PLU, accident insurance, Health Service, Student Artist Series, Saga (yearbook), Intercollegi ate Ath letics, and Mu sical Organ izations). University Center const ruction fee, per semester, charged students enrol led i n 2 V2 courses (1 0 hou rs) or more (authorized by Associated Students, PLU) _ __ ___ ________ _ ___ ________

75.00

1 0.00

SPECIAL FEES Audit, if within a total of 4 V. cou rses for a ful l-time student ______ No charge A u d i t , i f beyond a total of 4% cou rses for a fUl l-time student, per quar_ _____ ___ _____ __ _ __ _ _ _ . __ ___________ $ 1 0 .00 ter cou rse Audit, for part-time students, per cou rse______ _ ___ ____ 70.00 Credit for exam in ation (cred i t will be recorded only for fo rmally admitted, 75.00 reg u l ar status students), per course unit of credit soughL ____ _ Late registration (app l i cable on and after the first day of classes) ___ 1 0 .00 _ _ _ _ ____ __ 5.00 Change of registration_ _______ __ _ Breakage t i c ket (chemistry students on ly) ________ _____ _____ _ 1 0 .00 Master's thesis binding charge, per copy ___________ ______ 5.00 _ __ .__ ________ _ _ ____ ___ _______ Placement 1 0 .00 Graduate n u rse exami nation__ __ _ _ _______ _ ____ _ __________ 8.00 1 .00 N u rs i n g , locker fee deposit to be paid i n cli nical area ( refundable) __ ___ Bowling _ _______ 1 0.00 ___ _____ ___ _ _ _ _____ _____ ___ 30.00 Skiing (off-campus) ______ _______ _ _ ________ ________ _ Student parking, academic year permit 1 0.00 _ ___ ____ ___ _____ _ _ 3.00 Student parking, part-time or second car per semester _________ _ ____ _ Student health and accident insu rance (24 hou r, 12 month coverage), optional (fee subject to change by u n de rwriter) _ _ _______ _ 1 9 .50 'Students e n rolled for less than 2V2 cou rses ( 1 0 h o u rs) who have special permis足 sion to reside o n campus are re q u i red to pay the general fees. G raduate students whose classes are p r i m arily after 4 :30 p.m. w i ll not be subject to general fees.


PRIVATE MUSIC FEES F u l l-time students-Mus ic Majors Private i nstruction fee i n c l uding use of practice rooms, per semester $ 50.00 F U l l-time students-Non Music Majors Private i nst ruction, in cluding use of practice room, per semester One t h i rty- m i n ute period per week 70.00 One sixty-mi n u te period per week 1 20.00 Part-ti m e students Private i nstruction including use of practice room , per semester One t h i rty-m i n ute period per week _ _ 95.00 One sixty-min ute period per week_ _ 1 45.00 _____

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_ _ _____ _

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BOARD AND ROOM Room with telephone and board are furnis hed to resident students, per semester, as fol lows:

WOMEN

(1 970-71)

Harstad Hal l , capacity 250 (74x36-i nch beds) Pflueger Hal l , capacity 194 (80x36-inch beds) Hong Hall, capacity 1 26 (74x36-inch beds) Kreidler Hall, capacity 1 26 (74x36-inch beds) Ordal H a l l , capacity 1 8 2 (74x36-i n c h bed s) Stuen H a l l , capacity 1 09 (74x36-inch beds)_

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$ 475.00 475.00 475.00 475.00 475.00 475.00

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MEN

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____________

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(1970-71)

Foss Hal l , capacity 1 84 (80x36-i nch b eds) $ 475.00 Hinderlie Hal l , capacity 1 28 (74x36- i n c h beds) 475.00 _ Tingl estad Hall, capacity 372 (80x36-lnch beds) _ 475.00 Students room ing off campus w i l l be fu rnished board in the U niversity d i n i n g halls a t $285.00 pe r semester. The above rates i n c l u d e t h ree meals per day, i n c l u d i n g a l i g h t buffet on Sunday even i n g . Meals are not served in the d i ni n g halls dur'ing Christmas and Easter vacation. A $30.00 credit w i l l be applied to spring board for students who attend both semeste rs, but do not attend the interi m . ' S i n g l e room occupancy, when available, i s b y special arrangement with t h e Di rector o f H o u s i n g . T h e addi tional ch arge wi l l b e annou nced a t t h e time of registration. _______ __ ____

_ ____

__ _______________ __ __ . _

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' S oard and room rates for other than lull academic year: Fall semester Fall semester and interim___ I nterim only Interim and spring semester Spring only

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___

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$ 475.00 550.00 1 25.00 550.00 475.00

__________ _____ ____________

____________ __ ' _ ___________________


FAM I LY APARTMENTS

Two bedroom (10 u n i ts ) i n clu d i ng water, per month _______________$ T h ree bedroom (4 u n i ts) i n cluding water, per month_____ _ __ _________ Evergreen Court (1 2 apts.) two bed room, i n c l u d i ng a l l util ities , per month Family apartment deposiL _______ ____ _ _ _______ __ _ _ ______ __ _ _

40.00 50.00 85.00 40.00

A deposit of $40.00 must accompany a reservation for fam ily apartments. This deposi t wiH be held by the Univers i ty unti l the occu pant vacates the apartment, or cancels his reservation. One month's advance rent for apartments is req uired.

PAYM E NTS

Semester b i l ls are due and payable at the time of registration un less the optional PLU Budget Plan described below is selected. Students rece iving scholarsh i ps, g rants o r loans must com plete all necessary arrangements we l l i n advance of registration. Students who are sec u ring a loan from financial institutions or agencies (e.g. a federally i nsured bank loan) which may sti l l be pend ing at the time of registration, must have a letter of com mitment from the lend e r acceptable to the University. New students are req u i red to pay a $75.00 deposit on tuition after acceptance and before May 1 . This is not refundable after May 1 or Jan uary 15 for second semester app l i cations. Returning students are req u i red to pay a $75.00 deposit on tuition which is not refundable after May 1 or Jan uary 15 for second semester app l i cations except for those who enter the armed services. The balance of the semester b i l l , after payment of the $75.00 deposit on tuition, less any scholarsh i ps, g rants o r loans, is d u e and payable at the time of registration. An alternative method of meeti n g the total educational costs i s the PLU Budget Plan w h i c h may be elected by a l l full-t i me students. The PLU Budget Plan consi sts of twelve convenient equal monthly payments beginn i ng May 1 0 , 1 970 and con足 cluding April 1 0 , 1 97 1 . Sch olarshi ps, g rants and loans w i l l be deducted in arriving at the balance req u i red to be met i n the e q ual payment plan, but in no case will monthly payments be less than $ 1 00.00. An administrative service charge o f $1 .00 per month is added to each monthly payment. Credit l i fe insurance is provided in the PLU Budget Plan at no additional expense. Although payments beg i n May 1 0, late starters can make up back payments. Complete detai ls, together with examples of how the plan operates, are avai lable from the business office. N o other payment plan for ful l-time students will be accepted i n meeting their bills. Payment i n full by the day of registration or the PLU Budget Plan previously arranged are the only two methods of payment avai lable beginning in 1 970-7 1 . Part-time students must pay at least one-half of the semester b i l l at the time of registrati on, and the balance in two equal installments on Octobe r 1 0 and N ovem ber 10 i n the fall semester, and March 10 and April 10 i n the spring semester. A late charge of 1 % w i l l be made if any payment is not paid when d ue . T h e Unive rsity reserves the r i g h t to withhold statement of honorable dism issal, transcript of records, or d i p loma, unt i l all U n iversity b i l l s have been paid, or unt i l satisfactory arrangements have been made w i t h t h e Busi ness Office. Students


w i l l not be perm i tted to register for a new semester until a l l b i l l s are paid for the p revious term. C redit for future services to be re ndered to the University by the student cannot be used to meet the i n itial payment. Money due for work performed w i l l be g i ven only if the student's account is current. REFUNDS

Partial tuition refund may be made when withdrawal from the Un iversity results from sickness or causes occurring beyond the control of the student. I n no case w i l l fees be refunded. Refund may be made in the following proportions. One week or less . _ _ _ 90% 80% Between one and two weeks Between two and t h ree weeks _ 60% 40% Between three and fou r weeks _ 20% Between four and five weeks _ _ No refund after five weeks. Refunds on rooms w i 'll not be al lowed i n cash. However, i f the student returns within the next two semesters, pro-rata al lowa nce wil l be c redited i n the following propo rtions of occupation d u ring the semester of withdrawa l : 3-4 weeks __ __ _ __ 40% u p t o 2 weeks_ _ _ 80% 2-3 weeks 4-5 weeks _ _ _ ____ 20% _ _ 60% No a l l owance w i l l be credited i f withd rawal occurs after the 5th week. If the student does not return, the al lowance i s forfei ted. Refunds on board will not be made for continuous absences of less than one week and no refund w i l l be made for the first week's absence. A pro-rata refund w i l l be made for necessary withdrawal from the Un iversity. No refund w i l l be made for any U n i versity trips of any kind, such as c h o i r, chorus, band, orchestra, athletics, and so fort h . _

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DEPOSITORY FO R STUDENTS

Students desiring to leave cash in the Busi ness Office may do so. This cash may be d rawn out at the request of the student. PERSONAL PROPERTY

The Un iversity is not responsible for personal property of the students o r the faculty members. The U n i versi ty cannot be held acc ountable for any losses.


Financial Aid Pacific Lutheran University provides financial aid in the form of sc ho l a rsh ip s, g rants, o r talent awards, loans and opportunities fo r part-t i m e employme nt. Any student selected for admission to the University i s e l i g i b l e to receive financial assistance, provided that he dem onstrates a need t h rough i n formation suppl ied on the Col lege Scholarsh i p Service (CSS) Parents' Confidential Statement (PCS). The ap p l i c ant should complete req u i rements for admission and submit a PCS to the approp riate CSS office by Feb rua ry 1 5 . Copies of t h i s form are av a i l a b l e from h i g h school cou n s e l o rs , the CSS or University Financial Aid Office. I t is assumed when req uests for aid are received that the stud e n t 's fi rst choice i s a scholarship or g rant. With this in m i n d , the C o m m i ttee deci des the type of assistance which will be offered. In the majority of cases, a student will be offered a package financial aid p l a n , i n c l u d i ng two or more forms 'of assistance.


Scholarships: Ann ual scholars h i ps range in a m o u n t f rom $ 1 00 to f u l l t u i t i o n , and are g ranted, as far as funds wi l l permit, to potentially o u tstan ding students who are dependent i n large measure u pon the i r own efforts to secu re a college e d u cati o n . The appli足 cant must rank i n the u pper ten per cent of his class and have at least a 3.3 grade point average. Scholastic a b i l i ty m u st be further reflected in the sco res atttained on the Col lege Entrance E xa m i n ation Board Scholastic Aptitude Test, which should be taken in December or Janu ary. Appli cations for renewal of scholarsh i ps m ust be s u b m i tted prior to March 1 . I n add i tion t o its own scholars h i p fund, the U n i ve rsity has a t its d i sposal the fo l l owing restricted scholarship funds which are awarded primarily to those stu足 dents who have completed t h e i r f i rst year: Aid Association for Luthe rans Ludvig and C lara Larson Scholarship M r. and M rs. W. H i l d ing Lindbe rg Scholarsh i p Endowed Scholars h i p Alt rusa Club, Tacoma Ch apter, L u te C l u b Scholars h i p ( s) Scholars h i p Lutheran B rotherh ood Legal Reserve A l u m n i Scholarsh i p Fund Life I n s u rance Co. Scholars h i ps Ameri can Association of Mu Phi Epsilon, Tacoma U n i versity Women Scholarsh i p Professi onal Ch apter, Scho larshi p Helen C l i ft Bell Scholarships P L U Faculty W i ves Sch olarshi p Jorunn Breiland Scholars h i p F u n d Walter Reed N u rsing Scholarsh i p O. A. Brown Fund Women of Rotary Scholars h i p Dr. and Mrs. W. B . B u rns Fund Siq ueland Youth Schol arsh i p , Ida A . Davis Fund Facu lty Memorial Scholarsh i p Fund sponsored b y N o rth Pacific Faith Lutheran C h u rch of Portland District Luther League Social Service Scho larsh i p Fund Scholars h i p Fund of the D i vision of Charities, Rebecca SChoenfeld Gardner and Joseph Gardner Sch o l a rsh i p The American Luth eran Ch u rch O l af Halvorson Scholarsh i p Tacoma Lum bermen's Scholars h i p W. H . Hardtke Se m i nary Student Teagle Foundation Scho larsh i p Fund Rev. and M rs . Halvor Rev. Ka rl Kil ian Memorial Fund Thormodsgard Scholarshi p Tubercu losis Association of Ki nsman Awards Pierce County Scholars h i p Ladies of Kiwanis Award Drs. Larson, Wi cks, Reberger and Women's Auxili ary o f Pie rce County Medical Society Elder Scholarsh i p in Medical Technology Scholars h i p

Talent Awards: A l i m i ted n u mber o f awards are made each year t o needy students in t h e fields of speech, d rama, art, music and ath letics. To be e l igi ble applicants m u st have satisfactory acade m i c records and unusual proficie ncy in one or more of the above fields. Auditions or personal in terviews are usually req ui red o f appli cants.

Grants Students with exceptional financial need , who do not q u a l i fy fo r schol arsh ips, may be awarded g rants u p to f u l l tuition.


Special

Pastors and u n married c h i l d ren of pastors are to be given g rants i n the amount of $ 1 00 for each school year. These grants are to be awarded only d u ri n g the second semester i n attendance and only i f such students receive the main sup足 port of the i r u n iversity expenses from thei r parents and provided that the students are registered for at least two and one-half courses each semester d u ri n g the school year. Recog n ized dependents (not i nc l uding married c h i l d ren) of faculty/staff mem足 bers may receive special grants, the amount to be annou nced at the time of registration. G rants i, n the amount of $25 per semester shall be g i ven to each of two o r more students from the same fam i ly atte n d i n g school at the same time, provided that the main s u p port for both is given by their parents, and p rovided they h ave not received any other Un iversity g rant or award. Married students are also e l i'g i ble to receive this g rant when both are e n rolled as ful l-time students. All grants must be applied lor in the Business Ollice at or following registration and will be credited after eligibility has been established. Student Employment:

Part-time work is avai lable each year for a l i m ited numbe r of students. Jobs a re awarded on the basis of a p p l i cants' quali fications and the n u m be r of vacancies which develop on the campus and i n the adjacent areas. Priority for on-campus work is given to students havi ng f i n ancial nee d . It i s possible for a student to earn $400 o r more d u ring the reg u l a r school year. In most i nstances, students who are sincere i n the i r des i re to work are given the opportunity to do so. Federal Programs:

In addition to the Fi nancial Aid explai ned above, the U n i versity expects to have funds to award from the following Federal P rog ram s : E D UCATIONAL OPPORTUN ITY G RANTS (EOG)-In t h i s program of d i rect g rants the student receives a non-obligat i n g award of funds, based on exceptional financial need and evidence of academic or creative p romise. G rants range from $200 to $ 1 000 a year, but no more than one-half of the total f i n ancial assistance received from all sources may be in the form of an EOG. E l i g i b i lity is determined by Federal guidelines. NAT I ONAL DEFENSE ST UDENT LOAN (N DSL)-The max i m u m loan is $ 1 ,000 per year based on need and other awards granted. No interest accrues and n o payments a re necessary u n t i l n i n e months after recipient ceases to be a student. Repayment period is 10 years at 3 % simple i nterest. A borrower who becomes a f u l l -t i me teacher may request that 1 0 % of his loan be cancelled for each year he teaches, u p to maxi m u m of 50% . Teac h e rs i n schools with a h i g h concentration of pupils from low-income fam i l ies, or who teach handicapped students, may receive 1 00% cancellation at the rate of 1 5% per year. N U R S I N G STUDENT LOAN (NTA) - This loan is s i m i lar to N DSL except can足 cellation i s for those who enter p rofessional n u rsing careers. Sophomores accepted for the School of N u rsing are eligible if fi nancial need exists. N U RSING SCH OLARS H I PS - Scholarsh ips with a max i m u m of $1 ,500 per year are available to students i n the School of N u rsing.


'LAW ENFORCEM ENT EDUCATION PROGRAM - G rants and loans are available to persons presently e m p loyed in law e n forcement or for those plan n i n g to enter this area of work. COLLEGE WO R K-STUDY (CWS) - Work-StudY i s a p rogram of employment in wh ich the student. particularly one from a low-i ncome fam i ly , i s com pen sated for the number of h o u rs h e works. G UARANTEED LOAN PROG RAM (GLP)- The maj o r objective of this p ro g ram, esta b l ished by the Higher Ed ucation Act o f 1 965, is to make a fede rally i n s u red loan ava i l a b l e to any college student who wants one. U n der t h i s p rogram a student may bo rrow from a bank or othe r f i n ancial i n stitution as much as $1,500 a year and not be o b l i gated to begin repaying the loan unti l nine months after he leaves schoo l . The amount of i nterest is determ i ned by the l e n d i n g i nsti tutions and the Federal Gove rnment. For many students the interest w i l l be paid by the Federal Government d u ri n g their col lege careers.

Student Loan Funds The Un iversity ad m i n istration can assist students who are in need of financial assistance t h ro u g h variou s student loan funds. In addition t o the loan p l ans out足 lin ed under "Payments" in thiS cata l o g , the Un iversity has the l o l l owi ng restricted loan fund s from which assistance is available: Alumni Associatio n Loan Fund Marie Huth Loan F u n d Ame rican Lutheran C h u rch Gerhard Ki rkebo M e m o r i a l Loan Women Loan Fund Fund Anton Ande rson Loan Fund Jean ette Olson-Di a n a Paul-Mi riam John S. Baker Loan Fund Stoa Memorial Student Loan Fund J. P. Carlstrom Memorial Loan J. P. Pflueger Student Loan Fund Fund O. J. Stuen Alumni Loan Fund Delta Kappa Gamma Student O . A. l i n g e lstad Loan Fund Loan Fund Women 's C l u b of Tacoma Lily C. Ekern Fund Revo l v i n g Loan Fund


Student Life Pacific Lutheran University provides extensive services to assist students in making their education al experience and personal lives more profitable and satisfy i n g . I n add i tion to provi d i n g an intel lectual envi ronment. the University is sensitive to the need of provid ing suffi cient resources to aid its students in thei r total development. The University conducts and supports n u m erous services and activities which suppl ement the basic course of study. The services described below, w h i c h are co-o rd i n ated by the Vice-President - Student Affairs, have developed over a period of time and exist for the sole pu rpose of serving the student body. POLI CIES GOV E R N I N G C O M M U NITY LIFE

The University admits students with the express understanding that they w i l l cheerfully comply with i t s reg ul ations i n every respect a n d conduct themselves as ladies and gen tlemen. All students a re expected to conform to expected standards of behavi o r which i n c l ude conforming to state and local laws. Any student whose behavior is disho nest, destructive, u n ethical, i m moral, or i n any way reflects unfavorably upon the student body, o r whose con duct i s prejudi足 c i a l to the good name of the University, shall be subject to d i s c i p l i n a ry action which may result i n suspension, d i smissal o r expulsion from the U n i versity. A m o re comprehensive statement of poli cies, rules and regulations i s i n c luded in a separate publication concerned with campus government and conduct. OFFICE OF STUDENT AFFAIRS

The Office of Student Affairs is directly responsible for the o rganization and progra m m i n g of the residence h a l l s and other student l iving arrangements; new student orientati o n ; foreign students; student government, and other student activities. It also offers i ndividual attent ion to problems which a rise i n student l i fe. Students are therefore enc ouraged to contact this office whenever they are concerned about aspects of University l i fe not specifically related to curricular programs. The campus calendar is kept i n t h i s office, and a l l U n i versity events and activities are sc hedu led here. ORIENTATION OF NEW STUDEN'TS

An orientation program to introduce students to U n i versity l i fe is held for a l l n e w students a t the beg i n n i n g of the fall semester. Students take placement tests, familiarize themselves with U n iversity fac i l ities, and become acquainted with fellow students and the faculty. Conferences are arranged with faculty advisers under whose g u i d ance registration is com pleted. CLASS ATTE NDANCE

Reg ular attendance at c l asses is a basic educational policy of Pacific Lutheran University. A student who finds i t necessary to be absent from his classes should make arrangements with the instructor before the absence, or i m medi ately there足 after. In all cases , it is the student's respon s i b i l ity to make up work missed. I f the student is c a reless in regard t o attendance, the instructor may deem i t serious


enough to notify the Office of Student Affairs i n o rder that a remedial action may be taken. Upon re com mendation from the i nstructor, a student may be d ropped from the course.

STUDENT HEALTH CENTER The Student Health Service is establ ished in the Health Cente r where it retains the services o f physi cians and n u rses to aid in the preservation o f the physical welfare of the students. The doctors are in attendance at reg u l a rl y sched uled h o u rs. Consu ltation, advice, and care of common a i l ments are available to a l l memb ers o f the student body carryi n g two and one-half o r more courses. The staff of the Health Center w i l l not make calls to residence halls or to any residence off campus. When c h ronic ailments are discovered, parents or guardians will be notified. The Un iversity can not assume fu rther responsi b i l ity. The University does not provide for extended med ic al care by the Un iversity doctors or examination or treatment by specialists. Every assistance will be give n , h owever, in making arrangements for special medical or s u rgic al care; when practi cal, the student i s u rged to avail h i mself of the services of his family doctor. All new students and returning students or ful l-ti me graduate students, carrying at least 2 '12 cou rses, who have not been in attendance at this i n stitution for one year o r more are req u i red to have a complete physical exam i n ation by thei r home physician as a part of the admission req u i rement. (See Adm issi on.) This examina­ tion report i s kept by the Health Service and i s ava i l able for ready reference by the Un iversity doctor and n u rse. The general fee, which is required of all students registered for 2Y2 cou rses or more, i n c ludes treatment at the Health Center for minor d i sorders and i n cludes l i m i ted accident in surance coverage. The I nsuror's l i a b i l i ty l i mits and benefits are set forth in a brochure explai n i n g the plan and is ava i l able on request o r at the t i me of registrat i o n . All athletes part i c i pating in recognized i ntercol legiate sports are also afforded accident insurance coverage u p to $5,000 for i n j u ries sustai n e d , whether injury occurs dur i n g practice or d u ring competition. HEALTH INSU RANCE. In addition to the accident i nsurance described above, the Un iversity offers a voluntary Accident and Sic kness Medical Expense Plan. The purchase of this plan extends the "on campus" accident coverage to a twenty­ four hour, twelve-month plan and in ad dition provides benefits for sickness. Par­ ticipation in this low cost plan is volu ntary and available d u ring registration only. A broch u re which outl i n es the benefits of the program is sent to new students before registration. Copies are available by writing to the Office o f the Vice­ President - Busi ness and Finance.

COUNSELING AND TESTING CENTER The general p u rpose of the Cou nseling Center is to assist students in coping with the normal developmental problems encountered by most college students i n an i ncreasingly confusing, complex and changing wo rld. Students typically see counselors in making decisions related to adjustments to the U n iversity, to thei r educational plans and to other people. CAREER PLAN N I N G . Most students are u n derstandably uncerta i n of thei r aspir­ ations and goals, and may benefit from an exploratory period p l us the opportunity to engage in a process of realistic self-appraisal with a neutral party. Resources


fo r career counse l i n g i n c lude tests of vocational i n terests, academ ic aptitudes, personality and a file of occupational i n formati o n . EDUCAT I O N A L ADJ U STM ENT. T h e change from h i g h school t o t h e various demand s of the Un iversity i s sometimes a b rupt and d i fficult to make. Coun se l i n g c a n assist students i m p rove study habits, adjust course loads, and overcome fears of tests, instru ctors and competition with other students. PERSONAL COUNSE L I N G . From time to time, students experience more per足 sonal concerns and emotional confli cts which interfere with their academic and soc i a l responsi b i l i ties. Individual or s m a l l g roup counse l ing can h e l p the student understand these and to learn new ways in h a n d l i n g them more effectively. TEST I N G . The Center has a suPply of various tests from which the student may choose in assisti n g with his educ ational and vocational p l a n n i n g . I n addi t i o n , the Center serves as a national testi n g center for several tests which are frequently req ui red for graduate study and carries i n formation regard ing tests for profes足 sional study.

VETERANS AFFAIRS The University is app roved by the Veterans Adm i n istration as an institution of h i g he r education for veterans and invi tes veterans to use its fac ilities in acq u i ring and completi ng thei r education. Forms are available in the Registrar's Office. Students, i n c l u d i n g any new transfer students, who w i l l come under Public Law 634 (O rph ans B i l l ) or the Veterans Readjustment Benefit Act of 1 966 (New G I B i l l), must contact the Veterans Admin istration Regional Office f i rst fo r a certificate of e l i gibility and be g u i ded by them thereafter. This should be done as soon as pos足 sible after acceptance by the University and before arrival on campus. During registration all recipients of aid through the Veterans Administration should f i l l out the Questionnai re p rovided by the Registrar. In order to obtain full subsistence, undergraduate veterans and e l i g i b l e orphans of veterans must carry three c o u rses. Graduate veterans should consult the Registrar concern ing load for fu l l su bsistence, as this may vary. O rphans m ust carry at least one and one-half cou rses to claim subsistence. Veterans who have comp leted l i beral arts c o u rses through USA F I w i l l receive cred i t as recommended by the American Counc i l on Education.

CHAPEL AND CONVOCATION RESPONSIBILITIES Chapel services have long been considered a vital part of the re ligious l i fe and experience of the students and faculty at Pacific Lutheran University. Attendance is on a vol untary basis. Chapel services are held Monday, Wednesday and Friday morni ngs at 9:50 a.m. There i s a convocation on T h u rsdays at the same time and occasionally on Tuesdays.

FOOD SERVICE The students l i ving in residence h a l l s are requ i red to take their meals in one of the d i n i ng halls located on campus. The fee established for food service is based on the fact that not a l l students eat a l l meals; therefore, no deductions are made for students who eat fewer than three meals per day at the University. or who are absent on weekends. A charge is m ad e for guests. Students rooming off campus may board at the University cafeterias on a semester basis.


BOO KSTORE

The U n i versity maintains a book store i n the U n i versity Center for the con­ ven ience of students. The store, ope rated on a strictly cash basis, sells books, stationery, school supp lies and a wide variety of notions. PLAC E M E NT SERVICE

The U n i versity, through the School of Education , maintains a placement service for students entering the teac h i n g profession. A fee o f $ 1 0.00 is c h a rged to cover the cost of records and co rrespondence necessary for placement of graduates receiving the degree of Bachelor o f Arts in Education. An effort is made to place all g raduates, but positions are not guaranteed. The placement service will u pdate and renew credentials upon request. The fee for this service is $5.00. G raduates majoring in other fields are assisted by their respective major pro­ fessors and deans in obtai n i ng posi tions. STU DENT EM PLOYMENT

The University aims to assist worthy and needy students by helping them to find employment. Applications for work should be made to the Student Fi nancial Aid Office after a student has been accepted! for ad m i ssion. Students who w i l l need w o r k should apply early i n t h e s u m m e r because t h e n u m b e r of j o b s avail­ able is l i m i ted. STU D E NT GOVE R N M E NT

Students at Pac i f i c Lutheran U n iversity have an elected student government known as the Associated Students Pacific Lutheran Universi ty. ASPLU deals with concerns of students, partici pates in general Un iversity government and academic policy making and sponsors a wide range of activities, entertainment events and discussion programs. EXTRAC U R RICU LAR ACTIVITIES

In addition to stressing successful academic performance, the Unive rsity chal­ lenges its students to profit by experience in extrac u rricular activities. Here also the student develops his leaders h i p s k i l l s and learns how to work well with his neighbor. Students should not perm i t this type of activity to i nterfere with their reg u l a r acade m i c p u rsuits. A LIST I N G O F STU D ENT ACT I V I T I ES FOLLOWS: General

ASPLU SOCIAL ACT I V I T I ES BOARD-coord inator of all activities. ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS-all full-time women students. GAVEL CLUB-aff i l i ate of national c l u b . I NTERNAT I ONAL STUDENT ORGAN I ZAT I ON-for students from foreign coun­ tries and i n terested American students. M EN'S HOUSE PRESID ENTS ' C O U N C I L-Ho use Presidents of M e n 's Residence Halls. NO RSK-for students interested in Norway. OFF CAMPUS STUDENTS-all students not living i n residence halls. PROPELLER CLUB-for students i n terested in maritime affairs.


STUDENTS FOR B LACK PROG RESS- a l l students i n terested in rei nforcing black consciou sness. YOUNG DEMOCR ATS, COLLEGE RE P U B LICANS, YOUNG A M E R I CANS FOR FRE EDOM-for those inte rested in po l i tical education and partisan activities. Honorary and Service

ALPHA KAPPA PS I -n ational professional business fraternity. ALPHA P H I O M EGA-national service fraternity for u n i versity men interested in Boy Scouts of America. ARETE SOCI ETY-an acade m i c honor society recognizing exce l lent sch ola rship and interest in the l i beral a rts. BLUE KEY-National j u n i o r and sen i o r men's service honorary. I N DEPEND ENT KN I G HTS-service honora ry for sophomore men. SPURS-national service honorary for sophomore women. TASSELS-local h onorary for senior women. USSA C-Un iversity Student Soc ial Action Comm ittee. Athletic

PA C I F I C N O RTHWEST I N TERCOLLEGIATE AT H LETIC CONFERENCE-area organiz ation for i n terco l legiate athleti cs. G I R L S' ROW I N G CLUB-crew rac i n g . JAMAIAKI NS-h i k i n g c l u b . LETT E R M E N ' S C L U B-social organi zati on for m e n w h o have w o n letters i n o n e or more maj o r sports. LUTE VARSITY ROW I N G CLU B-for male students i n terested in crew rac ing. M E N ' S I N TRAM UR ALS-for students wishing to part i c i pate i n l i m i ted but not intercollegi ate sports activities. SCUBA CLU B-for students i nterested in scuba d i v i n g . SEASP R ITES-a club for those interested i n aquatic art. SKI CLUB-for students i n terested i n individual or competitive s k i i n g . Departmental

AMER ICAN C H E M ICAL SOC I ETY STU D E N T AFFI LIATE C HAPTER ART STUDE NTS G U I LD DELTA IOTA CH I-for nursing students. F R E N C H , G E R MAN, NORWEGIAN, SPAN ISH CLUBS MATH EMATICS CLU B P H I C H I THE.TA-a national frate r n i ty for women majoring in busi ness. P H YSICAL EDUCATION CLUB PSYCHOLOGY, SOCI OLOGY AND H I STORY C L U B S STUDENT EDUCAT I O N ASSOC IATION (Rho Lambda Ch i)-Iocal chapter o f Stu足 dent National Educati on Association. Mu sical

C H O I R OF THE WEST -a cappe l l a choir i n terested especially in sacred choral music. MU PHI EPSI LON-local c h a pter of N ational Mu sic Sorority. ORGAN G U I LD-student chapter of American Guild of Orga n i sts. TH E AMBASSADOR QUARTET -a quartet from the m u s i c department.


SAGA S I N G E RS-a trio from the music department. THE MADRIGAL S I N G ERS-an o rganization of trained voices singing both sacred and sec ular musi,c. U N I VERSITY C H O RALE-si ngers i nterested in sacred c h oral music and o ratorio. UN I V E RSITY CONCERT BAND-a performing concert o rganization. Variouz members of t h i s g roup also partici pate in the Pep Band w h i c h performs at ath l etic contests. UN IVERSITY ORCH ESTRA-for instrumental ists who are i nterested in o rchestral performance. Religious

STUDENT CONG REGAT I O N - under the lead e rs h i p of the Pastor, Donald W. Taylor, i s an organization designed to promote Ch ristian Life and to train the students for i n formed and active leaders h i p in the c h u r c h . CALL-College affi l i ated Laymen's League. KOINON IA-students interested in c h u rc h vocations. Communication Arts

ALPHA PSI O M EGA-national hono rary d ramat i c fraternity. C U RTA I N CALL CLUB-all students inte rested i n all phases of perform i n g theater. FOREN S I C SQUADS-local organization for area and national competition in debate and individual speaking events. ASPLU SH ORTS, STUDENT TALENT PRODUCTIONS-wee klY programs p re­ sented over KPLU�TV (closed c i rcuit television) for U n i versity commun ity i n formation and entertainment. Open to participation by all students. KPLU-F M-University owned radio broadcasting station. Participation open to all students. PH I B ETA-national fraternity for j u n i o r and se n i o r women. P I KAPPA DELTA-national honorary forensic fraternity. Student Publications

M O O R I N G MAST-weeklY student newspaper. SAGA-U n iversity yearbook. AUTOM OB ILES A N D OTHER VEHICLES

The use and possession of automobiles and other motor veh i cles i n the campus area is a matter of privi lege and not of right. Abuses may res u l t i n revo king such privi leges. All who use an automobile o r other motor veh i cle w h i l e atte n d i n g the Un iversity must register i n the Secu rity Office and purchase a permit which must be placed on the veh i c le as d i rected. SCHEDULING

All soc ial and un iversity activities arranged by departments, campus clubs, or groups of students must be sched u led th rough the University Center office. App roved chape rones are req u i red for a l l scheduled activities held either on or off campus. The sched u l i n g of activities by students is the joint responsi b i l ity of the U n iversity Center D i rector and the Social Activities Board.


PLACE OF RESI D e NCE

Pacific Lutheran is a residential unive rsity. A student not l i v i n g at home with h i s parents, guardian or spouse is required to l i ve in a residence hall on campus un less he i s at least 23 years of age. Each new and re-entering student must f i l l o u t the STUDENT P E RSO N N E L FORM a n d t h e Di rectory and I nformation Card received from the Office of Adm issions. A returning student, one who contin ues without interruption, applies for the next academic year by paying the $75 deposit on tuition and by f i l l i n g out the D i rectory a n d I n formation Card . I f he plans to l i ve i n a residence hall he will be g i ven a Residence H a l l Contract and Agreement form. I f students cannot be accommodated in the residence halls, the University足 not the st uden t makes the necessary provisions for housing. -

ROOM RESE RVATI ONS AND ASSIG NMENTS

Application for a residence hall room by the new or re-entering student i s made o n t h e D i rectory a n d I nformation Card, a s explained above, after admission to the U n i versity has been confi rmed. Priority for c h o i ce o f hall is determined by the date the Student Personnel Form and the Di rectory and Information Card are received, and' by the avai lability of space. After the middle of the spring semester, on days that w i l l be designated, stu足 dents cu rrently enrol led may apply for residence hall accommodati ons for the next acade m i c year. Priority wi l l be g i ven to those who apply at that time and according to the avai labi lit y of space. After that date, all room rese rvations, i n clud足 ing those of new students, will be assigned i n the order or receipt of application. The room reservation will be cancelled automati cally if a student has not arrived by the day classes beg i n for that semester. All room changes must be app roved by the D i rector of Housing. Housing assignments do not conti nue automatically from year to year. The University reserves the ri g h t t o change a student's location or to c l ose a housing u n i t whenever necessary. RESIDENCE HALLS

The University maintains residence h a l l s for students, over w h i c h the Office of Student Affairs h as general supervi s i o n . All students assigned rooms in any of the residence halls are requi red to continue res idence in that hall for the academic year. The residence h al ls open on Su nday of Orientation Week, and close at 9 :00 a.m. the day fol lowing the last scheduled examinati o n . Students are not allowed in the h a l l s in advance of the openi n g date, except by advance arrangements and payment of a spec ial fee. Retu rning students should not return to the campus until the day they are to reg ister, un less they are asked to come early. The residence h a l l s h ave double and tri p l e rooms with a l i m ited n u m ber of single rooms. A l l rooms are provided with single beds, chests of d rawers, study desks, desk lamps, and chai rs. The beds are 80"x36" in size i n Foss, Pflueger and Ti ngelstad H a l l s , and are 74"x36" i n all other h a l ls. Students furnish personal items i n c l u d i n g sheets, pi l l ow cases, p i l l ows, blankets and towels. Draperies are provided in all dormitories except Harstad, which has venetian b linds. Bedspreads w i l l be furnished upon request by the student to his head resident. Approved e lectrical items are radios, record p l ayers, clocks, typewriters, read ing lamps,


h a i r d ryers, shavers, c l i p pe rs and heati n g pads. I rons may be sto red in the rooms but m ust be used o n l y i n the i ro n i n g roo m . Items which are not a l l owed and may not be kept at school are: s u n l a m ps, electric b l a n kets, hot plates, electric heaters and perso nal i ro n i ng boards. Any other electrical items m ust have the approval of the D i recto r of Housing. Occupants are held respo nsible fo r damage to the rooms o r thei r furnish ings. Cost of damages beyond the n o rmal wea r to residence halls, u n less such damage has been identified with an i n d i v i d u a l , w i l l be c h a rged on a p rorated basis among the g roup within the hall. The room s are su bject to i nspection by representatives of the Office of Student Affairs. A final i n spection of each room m ust be made before a student may leave at the end of a semester or at any time that he with足 d raws from the U n i versity. Final checkout from a residence h a l l is com plete only with this i n spection and after the key has been tu rned i n . If there has been any damage fo r which the student i s responsi b l e , an assessment will be made and the student wi I I be c h a rged t h i s amount. H O U S I N G FOR MARRIED STUDENTS

The U n iversity m a i ntains twenty-six apartments on campus for m arried students. Four of them are t h ree-bedroom u n i ts, the rem a i n d e r two-bedroom un its. Each is partially furnished with an electric stove and a heater. A p p l i cations for fam i l y apartments s h o u l d b e m a d e through t h e office of the D i rector of Housi ng. A $40.00 deposit m ust accom pany the a p p l i cation. These a p p l i cations are p rocessed accord足 ing to the date they are received.


Sum mer Session The Summer Session consists of two fou r and one-h alf week terms and begins in the m i d d l e o f June. The cou rses carry reg ular col lege credit and are of the same standard as those given d u ri n g the reg u l a r academic year. The curriculum i s designed for undergraduates wo rking toward a baccalaureate degree, g raduates working toward a master's degree, teacher see king c redenti als, school administrators see king special cou rses, freshmen desiring to i n i tiate college study, and others desi ring special studies offered by the schools and departments o f the U n i versity . Transient students who en roll for the summer session only should submit a letter of academic standing or g i ve other evidence of being p repared for col lege study. A com plete catalog for the summer session i s pri nted each spring. Write to the Di rector of the Summer Session for this publi cation and other i n formation desired.

Late Afternoon and Evening Cl asses To p rovide for the p r ofessional growth and cu ltural e n ri chment of persons u n ab l e to take a reg u l ar, full-t i m e col lege course, the U n i versity conducts a pro足 gram of late afternoon and evening classes. These cou rses are g i ven on campus or i n appropriate off-campus fac i l i ties. A wide variety o f courses i s offered i n the arts and sciences and i n profes足 siona l and g raduate studies. There are spec i a l i zed courses for teachers and school admi n i strators, for persons in business and i nd ustry. The courses are of the same caliber as those offered d u r i n g the reg u l ar session and are open to all who are e l i g i b l e to take col lege work, as well as those who are not e l i g i b l e for reg u l ar admission but who wish to take a course as a non-degree student. A special bulletin is prin ted each semester outlining the offerings, and is avail足 able from The Registrar of the University.


Academic P rocedures R E G I STRATI O N

I n consultation with their faculty advisers students whose appli cations for admission have been approved are offered the opportunity to register by mail. Other students must register on the days desig nated on the school calendar as prin ted on page seven of this catalog. Students who register after the days designated wi l l be charged a late registra­ tion fee. (See section on Finan ce.) Students c u rrently in attendance at the U n i ­ versity s h o u l d register i n advance of e a c h n e w semester. In the spring semester, students who wish to return for the fo l lowing acade m i c year m u s t pre-register by making a $75.00 deposit o n t u i tion. Priority i n room assignments and choice of class offerings will be given to students who pre­ register d u ring designated days which are announced. Students who pre-register after the desig nated days w i l l be accepted accord i n g to the space available i n residence halls and classes. A student i s not offi cially en rolled until his registration has been cl eared by the Busi ness Office and his Place of Residence form has been received by the Office of Student Affairs. ADVANCED PLACEMENTS

See page ( 1 8) CREDIT BY EXAMI N AT I O N

Students a r e permitted, with i n l i mi ts, to secure credit by examination i n l ie u of regular enrollment and class attendance. The maxi m u m a m o u n t of cred it w h i c h m a y be earned i n this way a n d applied toward a bachelor's degree w i l l be deter­ m i ned by the provost in i nd ividual cases. The charge for an examination for cred i t earned in t h i s manner is $75.00 per course. Arrangements for such exam i nations must be made by the student with the department chairman or school d irector and approved by the office of the provos!. Evidence of this approval and of the payment of the fee should be pre­ sented by the student to the professor who wi l l admi nister the e xami nation. C OURSE LOAD

The n o rmal course load for ful l-time students is 3 V4 to 4'/4 courses per semester i n c l u d i n g physical education activity. A normal student load d u ring the I nterim i s one course with a max i m u m o f 1 V4 courses including physical education activity. The m i n i m u m load for a full-time student is 2V2 courses. Only a student with a B (3.0) average or better may register for more than 4 V4 courses per semester without the consent of the office of the provos!. A student engaged i n much outside work for self-support may be restricted to a reduced academic load. I N FOR MAL STUDY

To promote and encou rage liberal learn i n g of all kinds, over and beyond enroll­ ment i n courses lead ing toward formal degrees, Pacific lutheran U niversity offers a variety of opportu n i ties for i nformal study. Among these are :


Guest of the University Status Teachers and officials of other institutions of learn i n g , visiting scholars and artists, and other professi onal persons who wish to use the facilities of the U n i ­ versity f o r in dependent study m a y a p p l y t o the office o f the provost f o r cards designating them as G u ests of the U n i versity. It is understood that such persons, in thei r use o f UniverSity fac i l ities, w i l l defer to the needs of students and fac­ u lty members.

Auditing of Courses To audit a cou rse is to enroll there i n , with the permission of the instructor, on a non-cred i t basis. The Auditor is expected to attend reg u larly, and is encouraged t o partici pate f u l l y in class activities. He i s not held accountable for exami nations or other written work, but is we lcome to s U b m i t such for evaluation. He does not receive a grade , nor may the cou rse be counted toward any degree req u i rement, but i f the i nstructor approves at the end of the c o u rse, it may be entered upon the transcript as an "Audit." A student may, with the approval of the instructor or the department, gain c redit for an aud ited course which he has not p reviously taken for c redit, by passing an exam in ation set by the i nstructor or de partment. The fee for such examination is the difference between the auditing fee and the tuition the student would normally pay for the c o u rse.

Visiting Classes Mem bers of the academic community are encouraged to visit classes and other i nstructional activities of the U n i versity w h i c h interest them, but i n which they are not officially e n ro l led, for whatever length of time they desire. Such visiting is parti cularly recommended as a way to explore fields with which the visitor is unfam i l iar, but which he may want to study for c redit at a later date. No fee is c h a rged for this privi lege-nor i s any cred i t given, since the purpose is the e n c o u r­ agement of learning for its own sake. Because regularly en rol l ed students must be given first consideration, however, persons desiring· to 'v isit classes or oth e r activities a r e req u i re d to as k perm ission o f the i nstructor i n charge. Visi tors are g uests o f the c l asses they attend, and w i l l o f course conduct the mselves accord­ ingly at all times. Members o f the academic community are defi ned as students, auditors, faculty and staff person nel, regents, a l u m n i , guests of the U niversity, and spouses and mature c h i l d ren of these persons.

Graduate Students G raduate students who wish to audit a cou rse which has a l ready been taken for cred it at PLU may do so with the permission of the Dean of G raduat e Stu d ies. The fee for auditing is $30.00 per course.

CHANGES IN REGISTRATION Changes in registration due to confli cts or errors in registration may be made without charge d u ring the first week of the semester. To withd raw from a class and/ o r add a c l ass, the following procedure is to be fOl lowe d : 1)

Obtain the change o f regist rat i o n form from the Registrar.


2)

Obtai n the necessary signatures a n d , if applicable, a withd rawal grade.

3)

If after the first week, pay the $5.00 change of registration fee at the Business Office.

4)

Return the change of registration form to the Registrar.

The student is res ponsible for completing the above steps wi t h i n one week after obta i n i n g the change card. Students withd rawing officiall y from a class after the th i rd week of a semester wi l l receive either a W P (withdrawal with passing) or W E (wi thdrawal with fa i l ure). An unofficial withdrawal from a course w i l l be recorded as E. No student may withdraw during final exa m i n ation week. Certain General Uni versity Req ui rements (see page 43) mu st be comp leted by specified times during any student's deg ree program, and withd rawal from courses meeting such a requirement is not al lowed if this would preclude meeting the requirement on sched u le. WITHD RAWAL F,ROM THE U N I VERSITY

A student wishing to withdraw from the University must obtain a withd rawal card in the Office of the Registrar, c o m plete a withd rawal questi o n n a i re, and obtai n the necessary signatures o n 'them. The student i s entitled t o honorable d i s m i ssal if his record of conduct is sati sfactory and if he has satisfied all financial obli gations. GRADES

The fol l owing final grades are used in jud g i n g the qu ality of a student's work: 4 grade points earned per course, credit given A-Exce llent _3 grade poi nts earned per course, credit g iven 8-Good C-Average 2 grade points earned per course, credit given 1 grade points earned per course, credit g i ven D-Passing E-Failure 0 grade points earned per cou rse, n o credit given WE-W i t h d rawal Fai l u re 0 g rade points earned per course, n o credit g i ven The above course g rades are used i n calcu lating g rade p o i n t average. The course g rades below are not used in calculating g rade poi n t average. H-Honors (Used for courses u n ique to I nterim only) N o grade points earned, cred i t given N o g rade points earned , credit g i ven P-Passing N o grade poi nts earned, no credit g i ven F-Fai l u re I - I nco m plete No g rade points earned, n o credit given I P-In P rogress No grade p o i n ts earned, no credit given AU-Audit No grade poi nts earned, n o credi t given WP-Withdrawal Passing N o g rade points earned, n o cred i t given W M-Medical W i t h d rawal N o grade points earned, n o credit given ____

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I NCOM PLETE GRADE

Special ci rcumstances may warrant the use of the temporary mark "I" (Incom足 plete) to i n d i cate that the student i s d o i ng passing work but has been u n ab l e to complete his work because of ci rcumstances beyond his control. An 'I ncomplete Report Form showing course title and the work that must be com p leted i s


filed with the official g rade sheet for each i n c o m p lete given. In orde r to secure credit, the stud ent m ust convert the i n com plete i n to a passing g rade w i t h i n six weeks of the fol lowi ng semester of residency, unless h e has received an officia l' extension of ti me f rom the office of the provost. I n no case can an incomp lete be converted to a passing g rade after a lapse of two years, regardless of residency. I n comp lete g rades which are not converted by removal are not ch anged to "E" grades and a re not comp uted i n to the g rade point average. M EDICAL WITH DRAWAL

In the case of a student ren d e red incapable of completing a course for medical cause, the office of the provost is autho rized to i nstruct the registrar to ente r a "WM" ( Medical With d rawal) on the t ranscript. The "WM" w i l l not affect the grade point average.

I N' PROGRESS GRADE The temporary grade of " I P " ( I n Prog ress) may b e used to sign ify prog ress i n a cou rse in which the work n o rmally is expected to take more than one semester for completion. The " I P " g rade w i l l carry no cred i t until it i s replaced by a permanent grade upon completion of the work. G RADE P O I NT AVERAGE

The cumu lative g rade point average inc ludes only c redits g ranted for courses taken in residence at PLU, and speci fically excl udes t ransfer, correspondence, and extension courses, and credits by examination. However, honors for g radu足 ation shall be based u pon all work which a p p l ies toward the deg ree. REPEATING O F COURSES

Any cou rse may be repeated by an underg raduate student regardless of the g rade received. The h i g h e r of the two g rades earned will be the g rade used in computing the c u m u lative g rade point average, but c redit will be a l lowed o n l y once toward g raduat i o n . PASS-FAIL OPTI O N FOR U N DERGRADUATE STUDENTS

The pass-fail option is offered so that undergraduate students will explore subject areas outside those of thei r known abilities in their lower d i vision years, or to add a broader range of courses to their u p pe r divi sion p rog ram without forc i n g them to compete with majors who are speci alizing i n those areas of study. 1) The pass-fail option is li mited to a total of four courses and is li mited to no more than two courses pe r calendar yea r. 2)

Courses requi red for graduation i n any deg ree p rogram of the Un iversity w i l l n ot be taken on a pass-fai l basi s. S i m i la rly, courses needed i n the student's major field, except when a fi rst course has been taken p ri o r to declaration of a major, w i l l not be taken on a pass-fail basis.

3)

Pass-fai l g rades will not alter the grade point average, but credits earned w i l l count towards g raduat i o n .

4) T h e pass-fail option m u s t be i n d i cated on the registration card by t h e adviser. A change in the decision regard i n g pass-fail w i l l be subject to the established reg ulations concern i n g ch ange of registration.


5)

6)

Pass-fail students w i l l be responsible fo r all course work and examinations. Only "P" and " F " g rades will be issued and recorded on the transc ri pt. An entire course will not be converted to the pass-fa i l basis by student vote.

7) The "P" (Pass) g rade w i l l be equivalent to a grade o f A, B, C , or D .

EXCLUSIVE PASS-FAIL COURSES Departments or schools are authori zed to offer courses entirely on a pass-fail basis under the fo llowing conditions.

1 ) Cou rses to be taught entirely on a pass-fail basis should p u rsue goals pri­ marily concerned with apprec i ations, value commitments, creative a c h ieve­ ments, or the l i ke , rather than the mastery of read i ly quantifiab le i n formation. Sem i nar, laboratory, pract i c u m , stud io, activity, or interim courses may be exam ples of the kinds of courses here envisioned. 2) Such departmental and school decisions are to be re ported to the provos" for approval. Decisions to offer excl usive pass-fai l courses should be made known to students before they register for them. 3)· Exc l usive pass-fai l cou rses may be used to meet the major o r U n i ve rsity re­ q u i rements provided they have been app roved by the faculty. The taking of exc l u s i ve pass-fai l c o u rses shall in no way affect the studen t 's personal pass­ fail option as described above for u n derg raduate students. 4) The mean i n g the "P" (Pass) and "F" (Fail) grades and thei r use in determin­ ing grade point average w i l l herein be the same as that set forth in the above sect i o n , Pass-fai l option fo r undergraduate students.

MID-SEMESTER GRADES Warn i n g slips are g i ven to any student who is doing "D" or "E" work at the end of the sixth week.

ACADEMIC PROBATION A student is placed on academic p robation if he fai Is to keep his g rade point average (both cumu lati vely and for the i m mediately p reced ing semester) at or above 2.00. Both the student and his parents (if the student is under 21) w i l l receive official notice of s u c h action. Academic probation i s n o t a d i scip l i n a ry measure but an attempt to e n c o u rage the student in the d i rection of i m p roved performance. The probationary student may be advised to reduce either h i s academic o r extra-curricu l a r activities, or both, u n t i l h i s average s h a l l meet the standards i n d i cated above. Any lower division student whose grade point average falls below 2.00 for the first semester o f attendance at the U n i versity s h a l l be warned that his work is unsatisfactory and that if he fai ls to make a cumu lative grade point average of 2 .00 at the end o f the second semester of atten dance, he w i l l be p laced on acade m i c probat i o n . Any student o n probation must m a ke a c u m u lative average of 2.00 by the end of the next semester of atten dance. The student on p robation who fails to show adequate i m p rovement during the following semester will not be allowed to re-reglster u n less, because of extenuat­ ing c i rcumstances, he is reinstated by the Academic Status Committee. He may apply for readmission after the e x p i ration of one semester u n less informed otherwise.


ELIGIBILITY FOR PARTICIPATION IN STUDENT ACTIVITIES 1)

Any reg u l a rl y enrolled, f u l l-time student (2% c o u rses) is e l i g i b l e for participa­ tion ,i n U n i versity activities. 2) L i m i tation of a student's U n i ve rsity activities, based on acade m i c performance, may be set by individual schools, departments o r organ izations. 3) It is the responsibi lity of the student o n acade m i c probation to check with his adviser. A t t h i s t i me , a joint, re al istic, careful assessment of the student's a b i l i ty t o partici pate in activities i s to be made so t h at the student may reason­ ably l i m i t his activities.

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS Students are c lassified as follows: Freshmen: students who have met the entrance requirements. Sophomores: students who have completed six courses and have earned twelve g rade poi nts. Juniors: reg ular students who have fulfil led lower d i vision req u i rements and have comp leted 1 4 courses and have earned 28 g rade points. Seniors: regu l a r students who have c o m pleted 22 cou rses and have earned 44 g rade points.

FOREIGN STUDY OPPORTU NITIES The i nte rest in study a b road has risen considerably d u ri n g the last decade. The U n i ve rsity recog n i zes that mat u re students can benefi t from a well-pl anned and articu l ated experience i n another academic atmosphere. Forei gn language maj o rs i n particular are u rged to consider the possi bil i t i es of an experience abroad , The U n i versity m a kes available foreign study opportuni ties through cooperative ar­ rangements with existin g p rograms, and it is possible for students to part i c i pate in a variety o f foreign study opp ortunities, Broc h u res and other i n formation on study ab road may be obtained from the office of the Foreign Study Adviser, Stu­ dents cu rrently studying abroad , or who have been abroad in the recent past, are pursuing studies in Germany, Aust ria, France and Mexi co under a variety of pro­ grams, some of which are the Goethe-Institut, Central College Programs in Europe, and Le Fran<;ais e n France. As a fi rst step for the student contemplating study abroad, I t i s strongly rec­ ommended that a solid foundation in the language of the parti cular country be acquired. The student is cautioned against beg i n n i ng a foreign study program without first sec u ring advance a p p roval from the Unive rsity. Attendance at a foreign u n i ­ versity i n n o way waives the graduation req u i rements of P a c i f i c Lutheran U n i versity. Prior to embarking on a foreign venture the student should fi le a letter o f i ntent with the c h a i rman of his major department and with the dean of the col lege. This letter should outline i n broad terms what the student p roposes to study, where the studies w i l l be undertaken and the length of time of the proposed studies, as well as how this experience w i l l fit into his own academic plans. On the basis of this i n formation, plus a record of lecture s attended and exa minations com pleted, acade mic cred it wi l l be allowed on the student's t ranscript, but no grade point average w i l l be com puted. The U n i ve rsity reserves the right to req u i re exami nations covering the material studied a b road, i f it seems desirable or necessary.


Upon h i s return from studying abroad, the student w i l l , with the assistance of t h e Chai rman of the Foreign Language Department, prepare a written request for academic credit. If he has pursued his stud ies in several academic areas, he w i l l need the approval of each department concerned . HONORS COURSES

Honors courses are offered by certain departments for students academic abi lity. Freshmen ranking i n the upper ten per cent of their classes a n d making an acceptable score on the college aptitude test fOi consideration. Registration i n honors courses i s by invitation only. for superior students to do independent study and research in their i s available during their junior and senior years.

o f superior high school are eligible Opportunity major field

THE DEANS' LIST

Recognition is given by the U n i versity to students who attain high scholastic a c h ievement. The i r names are p u b l i shed on the Deans' List at the end of each semester. To be e l i gible a student must have a grade point average o f 3.30 or better for the previous semester. APPLI CATI O N FOR GRADUATION

It i s the respons i b i l i ty of the student to file his application for g raduation in the Registrar's Office. Normally t h i s is done p r i o r to o r at the beg i n n i ng of the senior year. Students who plan to transfer c redit back to Pacific Lutheran U n i versity for a degree (3-2 program or 3-1 program) must apply for graduation prior to or during the fi rst semester of the junior year so that any deficien cies will be met before the student leaves campus. A student may work toward more than one bachelor's degree simultaneously and may be awarded both degrees simultaneously, provided that at least 7 additional courses are earned for the second degree. GRADUATION HONORS

Degrees with hon ors of Cum Laude, Magna Cum Laude and Summa Cum Laude are granted to students receiving t h e req u i red cumu lative grade point average. To be e l i g i b l e for these honors a student must have earned an average of 3.30 for Cum Laude, 3.60 for Magna Cum Laude, and 3.90 for Summa Cum Laude. Physical Education activities are not to be inc luded i n the determ i n i n g of honors.


Academic Organization The University is comp rised of these major i nstructional u n i ts : the College of Arts and Sciences, School of Busi ness Admi nistration, School of Ed ucation, Schoo l, of Fine Arts, School of N u rs i n g , School of Physical Education, and Division of Grad uate Studies. G E NERAL U N IVERSITY REQ U I RE M E NTS

To earn a bachelor's deg ree a student must comp lete 32 a p proved courses and maintain a grade point average o f 2.00 over-a l l . Of these courses, a minimum of 10 must be u pper division (300- o r 400-level) and two must be interim cou rses (those n u mbered 300 - 320). At least one interim course must be com pleted i n other than the student's major area of study. Other genera l p o l i cies regard i ng e l i g i b i l ity fo r a bachelor's degree are : (1) Can­ d i d ates must have spent a m i n i mu m of one year i n residence on the campus and have com pleted at least 7 courses d u ri n g the senior year. (2) Non-music majors may count towards g rad uation no more than 2 c o u rse u n its of credit for par­ tici pation in music ensembles. (3) N o more than 6 cou rses of correspondence and / o r extension work may be counted toward a bachelor's degree, and any such c o u rses must be app roved by the Provost. Courses Required i n All Curricula

Relig ion 2 courses (One of these re lig ion courses may be a senior year i nterdisci p l i nary seminar that w i l l help the student to see the relevance of re l i g i ous issues and thought to his major f i e l d of study.) P h i losophy 1 cou rse _ Fine Arts (Art, M usic, Speech , Drama) 1 course History and Literature (including Foreign Literature) 1 course Social SCiences (Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology) 1 c o u rse Natural Sciences and Mathem atics 1 course Health and Physical Education (fo u r V. -course activities) 1 cou rse Eng l i sh Com position (Req u i red if p roficiency is not demonstrated via a sophomore year profic.iency exa m i n ation. C o u rse is advised for fresh­ men having low Eng lish aptitude scores and for students in certain separately described programs.) Credit may be obtained i n these or other course areas by such means as Ad­ vanced P l acement or Credit by Examinati on, i n addition to formal registrati o n . I n each of t h e areas of study, a n u m ber of d ifferent specific courses m a y be used to meet the general req u i rement (see the appropriate specific course listings). _

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Major Areas of Study

Each candidate for a bachelor's degree must complete a major, the detailed req u i rements for which are separately specified by the College of Arts and Sciences and each of the Schools. A major shall i n c l u de a min i m u m of 6 courses. At least 3 of these m ust be taken in the j unior and sen i or years and a m i n i m u m of 2 in resi­ dence on t h i s campus.


College of Arts and Sciences

The College of Arts and Sciences is co m m i tted to the relevancy of l i beral educa足 tion, education that provides values, perspective, and preparation fo r encounter with reality and chan ge . .Its courses serve the central concerns of all educational programs on the ca m p us. In addi tion to supplying most of the courses that meet the General University Requirements, the College ofiers add i tional general education opportu nities and more spe c i a l i zed preparation for service i n many fields of study. The degrees offered are Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. Divisions and Departments

To coordinate the work of the Col lege, its Departments are grouped in these Divisions: 1 ) D I VI S I ON OF H U MAN I T I ES, comprised of the Departments of English, Foreign languages, P h i losophy, and Religion. 2) DIVISION OF NATURAL SC I E N C ES, comprised of the Departments of Bio logy, C h e m i stry, Earth Sciences, Mathematics, and Physics. 3) D I V I S I O N OF SOC IAL SCI ENC ES, com prised of the Departments of Economics, History, Pol i tical Science, Psychology, and Soci ology. General College 01 Arts and Sciences Requirements

All degree candidates in the Col lege of Arts and Sciences must meet, in addi tion to the General University Req u i rements, the req u i re m e n ts of Option I, I I , or I I I a s described be low: I)

Four courses in one foreign language

I I ) Two courses in one foreign language One course i n logic, mathematics or statistics One course in h i story, or one in Eng l ish or language I I I)

One course in his tory, or one in Eng lish or language One cou rse i n soc i a l science, i n cluding geography One cou rse in natural science One cou rse in logic, mathematics, or stati stics No course w i l l be a l l owed to meet both U n i ve rsity req u i rements and Col lege of Arts and Sciences req ui rements, and where possible courses taken to fulfi ll req u i rements s h a l l be i n di fferent areas. For example, a student fulfi l l i n g h i s Uni足 vrsity h i story or l i terature requirement with a course i n h i story, must, if he el ects Option I f , choose a cou rse in E ng l i sh or language to meet the req u i rement of the Col lege of Arts and Sciences. The foreign language req u i rement i n Option I may be satisfied by compl etion of four years of high school study i n one foreign language. If the student has less than four years of successful high school work, placement (and therefore credit) would be on the basis of ex ami nation. All i n coming freshmen planning to continue study of a foreign language begun in h igh school should' take the College Board Place ment Test offered during orientation days. T h i s test is req u i red of all entering freshmen who plan to study German, French, or Spanish. Any continuation of a foreign language should be done i m med i ately and not deferred.


Students presenting 2-3 years of credit from h i g h school and wishing to continue in the same language should register for the second-year course. A student may receive c redit fo r any language cou rse i n which he is placed without regard to high school cred it. Final decision of placement shal l be made by the Department of Fore i g n Languages taking into consideration placement test scores, h i g h school g rades, and o t h e r relevant i n formation avai lable. A student may n o t receive c redit if he voluntarily e lects to take a lower-level cou rse than the one i n wh ich the Department placed h i m . Candidates for t h e B.A. i n Education w h o w i l l b e majoring i n Eng lish are required to f u l f i l l a two-year foreign language requirement or demonstrate equiv­ alent proficiency. The foreign language requirement i n Option II may be satisfied by satisfactory score on a proficiency examination, o r by m o re than two years of high school work in a single language. Two years of work i n the lang uage wi l l meet the requi re­ ment if the g rade p o i nt average for the total u n i ts in that language is 3.00 or above. Major Requirements

A major is a sequence of courses in some one area, usually i n one department. The selection of the major should be made by the end of the sophomore year. The choice must be app roved by the chairman of the d e partment (or the coord i nato r in the case of an i nterdepartmental p rogram l i ke Classics). The n u mber and nature of requi red courses, i n c l u d i n g any i n s u p p o rt i n g subjects, are specified in the section of this catalog devoted to each department o r interdepartmental p rogram. The quality of work must be "C" or better; a course comp leted with a grade of " 0 " m a y be counted toward g raduation b u t n o t toward t h e maj o r . The recognized majors a r e a r t , biology, chemistry, classics, communication arts, economics, English, French, earth sciences, German, physical education, h i story, mathematics, m usic, p h i losophy, p h ysics, political science, psychology, re l ig i o n , t h a n 1 0 c o u rses earned i n one department may be appl ied toward the or's degree i n t h e

O �==-��::-.


General Freshman Course Schedule Students should study carefu l l y the desc ri ptions of any departmental or inter­ departmental programs in which they may wish to major. If they find no more specific sched u l e suggestions, or if they have no tentative major preference, for each semester of thei r fre:lhman year they should select courses on the basis of the general guide below. Either before or im mediately on arrival on campus, a freshman should meet with his adviser andl o r major department chairman to receive specific help in selection of cou rses. Health and Physical Education (P.E. 1 00 should be com­ pleted d u ring the freshman year but may be preceded by a 200-level activities cou rse-any of those n u mbered through 254) _ _ _ _ _________ _ _ ______ _

1'/4 course

Foreign Language, second year course (recommended for those who could continue i n the study of a language that they have already suc cess fu l l y studied for two or th ree years i n high school) o r first year cou rse (for those who have had less or n o study of a foreign lan­ guage i n h i gh school but choose to meet either Option I o r 1 1 ) __ ____________ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ __

1 cou rse

English Composition ( recommended if C E ES verbal score is less than 450) (either semester) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

o o r 1 course

Additional suitable lower division cou rses in re ligion, fine arts , history, l iterature, social or natural sciences, or mathematics. (Wherever possible i t is recom­ mended that a religion c o u rse be inc luded in a stu­ dent's freshman year program.)

x c o u rses To total 3-11 4 courses or, rarely, 4-1 14 cou rses


PROGRAMS FOR CAREERS

Preparation for Engineering

In the be l i e f that an engineering edu cation should in these rapidly c hanging ti mes be of suff i c iently fundamental nature to pe rmit rapid adaptation to new tech n i cal problems and opportunities and of suffici ently l i beral nature to provide awareness of the broad soc ial responsi b i l ities i nvolved, the University offers the fi rst t h ree years of a 3-2 program in engineeri n g . Students spend the t h ree years on this campus studying su bject matter basic to all engineering fie'lds and then transfer to the engi neering school o f their c hoice where their studies continue, concentrated i n a specific area of engineering. Two additional years o f full-time study are normally req u i re d to fulfill the requirements for an engineering degree. At the end of one year of study at the enginee ring school, and the comp letion o f the equivalent of 32 cou rses i n c l u d i ng all Unive rsity a n d COllege of Arts and Sciences General Course req u i rements, students are elig i b le for the B.A. or B.S. degree from Pacific Lutheran University. Students are u rged to formu late plans both with respect to the engineering school they plan to attend and the type of e n g i neering they will study as early as possible i n order that the program at Pacific Lutheran can be coord i n ated with the eng i n ee ring program of their choice. Any student who i s i nte rested in e n g i neering and has been accepted for admis足 sion to the U n i versity may register i n the pre-engi neering courses. To qualify for the 3-2 engineering program, however, he must meet certain spec i f i c req u i rements. Entrance req u i rements: I n order to q u a l i fy without deficiency, entering freshmen must have had four years o f high school mathematics (two years of algebra; geometry and trigonometry) and one year of either physics o r chemi stry. Addi足 tional courses i n mathematics and science are desirable. He must be proficient in the use of the Eng lish language, both reading and writing. and two years o f a foreign language is highly recommended. All pre-engineering students are screened during their sophomore year by a committee from the science faculty and only those who, by their scholastic record, character, and personality, ind icate that they are capable of doing satisfactory work in the e n g i n eering field are accepted for the 3-2 program. To qualify for the 3-2 program students should mainta i n a g rade ,point average of 2.5 or better. Prospective engi nee r i n g students who have defi ciencies from high school sho u ld either ( 1 ) make up such defici encies in summer school before matriculation at the U n i versity, or (2) plan to attend summer school after thei r fresh man year, o r (3) plan to take more than three years to complete their pre-e n g i n ee r i ng program. The program for the f i rst two years is the same for all branches of e n g i neering. Electives for the t h i rd year m ust be chosen to meet the req u i rements for the par足 t i c u l a r eng ineering school and the branch of engineering chosen. Reference should also be made to the p hysics section for more details on the enginee r i ng program.


Suggested pre-engineering c u rricu l u m : Courses Freshman year G . E. 1 51 , 1 52 , Eng. D rawi ng 1 Physics 1 0 1 , Basic Con cepts ___ Phys i cs 253, General Physics __ _ Chemistry 2 Math. 1 5 1 , 1 52 , Analyti c Geometry and Calculus 2 Electives 1 _ ___

_

______

_

__

_

Sophomore year Math. 231 , 332 _ Physics 254_ _ Physics 272 Electives

Courses 2 1 1 3-4

_

_____ _ _ _ _ _ _

__

__

_ _ _ _ __ ___ _ ____ _

_ _ ____

_____ . _ _ _ _ _

Junior year Courses Math. 351 , Applied Math. 1 'Physics 331 , E & M Physics 336, Mechanics Physics 321 , 322, Advanced lab. 1 / 2 Electives _ _ _ _. __ _ _ _ _4-5 _ _ _ _ __

_ _ ___

Preparation for Law

Most law schools req u i re at least th ree years of l i beral arts as a foundation for professional study; however, they regard four years of study in l i beral arts and a Bachelor of Arts deg ree as a better preparation for the study of law. I n add i tion t o meeting the deg ree requi rements, the prospective l a w student is advised to comp lete at least one year of accounting and to i nclude i n h i s program at least one course in economics, h i story, p h i l osophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and speech. The student should plan h i s cou rse according to the req u i rements of the law school i n which h e is interested. The student i n terested in law as a vocation i s urged to register at the Pre-Law Center in the Department o f Political Science. Useful i n formation, such as material on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), i s available. There i s also a c i rc u lating l i brary o f law school b u l letins. In ad d i tion, the student may wish to d iscuss his career plans with D r. Farmer, the pre-law adviser, or with one of the law school professors and deans who visit from time to time. A newsletter, the Pre-Law Advo足 cate, c i rc u l ated by the Center is designed to keep the pre-law student fully i nformed. Preparation for Medicine and Dentistry

Students desiring to ente r the medi cal o r dental professions s h o u l d p l an to devote not less than th ree years and preferably four years of study to secu ring the broad educational backg ro und req u i red. The professional schools in these fields require a thorough preparation i n science. They also recommend extensive study i n othe r areas such as the social sciences and h u m anities. Students are asked to confer with the pre-med i cal advisers in regard to thei r programs. Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental Curriculum

Freshman and sophom ore years: 4" courses per semester Biology 1 51 , 1 52 Chemistry 1 1 5 or 1 31 and 1 42 English composition Foreign Languag e "


Mathematics 133 or equivalent, 1 5 1 (and preferably 1 52) Begin University core requirements B i ology 250, Functional Morphology Chemistry 331 , 3 32 or Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 • • •

Freshmen are advised to take 3V. co urses their first semester. Students who enter the University with two years of a modern language may elect to take a second year course in the same language during their freshman year. They sho uld register for 201, 202.

Junior and senior years: recommended courses listed below sho uld be arranged and scheduled with the aid of the adviser. B i o logy 36 1 , Comparative Anatomy B i ology 364, Verteb rate E m bryology B i ology 41 1 , Histology B i ology 441 , Vertebrate Physiology Chemi stry 321 , Quantitative Analysis Chem istry e lectives

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology

Students who are planning a career as medical technologists in hospitals, physician's offices, or p u b l i c health b u reaus m ust obtain a bache lor's degree in chemistry o r bio logy, and co mplete a twelve-month internship i n an American Med ical Association accredited hospital laboratory. Upon completion of this internsh i p , the student w i l l be e ligi ble to take the examination given by the Board of Registry ot Med ical Technolog ists of the American Society of Clinical Path olo­ gi sts for certification as an MT (ASCP) and to receive a second degree, the B.S. in Medical Technology.

The following courses are req u i red :

115 321 , 331 , 333, •

Chemistry' and 1 42, General co u rses Quantitative Analys i s 3 3 2 , Organic Lecture 334, O rganic Laboratory

B i ology' 1 51 , 152, General courses 201 , Mi cro b i o l ogy 41 1 , H i stology

Refer to the particular department for the remaining courses and requirements for a major in the department.

Mathematics 13 3, College Algebra and Trigonometry

Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 , General cou rse

The following courses are recommended : B i ology Chemistry 331 , Genetics 404. Biochemistry 346, Cell ular Physiology 44 1 , Vertebrate Physiology


Preparation for Parish Work Students desi ring t o enter parish work are encouraged to obtain the broad general ed u cation lead i n g to the Bac helor of Arts degree. Experience reveals that a parish worker i s requested to perform d u ties in more than one fie l d . The respo n s i b i l i ties may be centered in one or more of these major areas: the e d u cat io nal work of the congregation, the g u i d ance of youth activities, home visitation, office and secretarial work, or cond ucting the m usical organi za­ tions in the congregation. Students expecting to enter c h u rch vocations are i nvited to confer with the Chairman of the Department of Religion.

Social Work Program Students planning to p u rsue graduate social work study or to seek e m ployment in social work or the other related hum an services upon completion of the bac­ calaureate degree should work out t he i r program i n consultation with a social worker in the Department o f Soci ology. The social work sequence is open to any student. Majors in sociology, psychol­ ogy or political science are most appropriate. The social work sequence cons ists of Soc i o l ogy 365, So ciol ogy 401 , Social Work 408 and two semesters of Social Work 4 2 1 . This sequence should be preceded by foundation c o u rses i n the human­ ities, natural sciences and social sciences. This w i l l be followed by an appropriate seq uence of supporting courses in economics, political science, psychology and so cio logy. Foundation cou rses and su pporting cou rses should be selected in consultation with a social worker in the Department of Soci o logy. Choice of founda­ tion and su pporting courses i s based on the g u i d e l i nes provided by the C o u n c i l o n S o c i a l Work Ed ucation.

Preparation for Theology As a broad c u l t u ral foundation for the study of theology and entrance into the min istry, a pre-theological student should complete the req u i re m ents fo r a Bachelor of Arts degree. Besides the general degree requirements, the American Association of Theological Schools recommends the following: Eng lish-literature, c o m position, speech and related studies. At least 6 semesters. Hi story-ancient, modern European, and American. At least 3 semesters. P h i l osophy-orientation i n h istory, content, and meth od. At least 3 semesters. Natural Scien ces-preferably physics, chemistry and biology. At least 2 semesters. Social Sciences-psychology, sociology, economics, political science and e d u ­ cation. A t least 6 semesters, i n c l u d i n g a t l e a s t 1 semester o f psychology. Foreign Languages-one or more o f the following linguistic avenues to man's thought and tools o f scholarly researc h : Lati n , G reek, Hebrew, German, Fren c h . Students w h o anticipate post-graduate studies a r e urged to u n de rtake these discipl i nes as early in the i r training as opportunity offers. (At least 4 semesters.) Religi on-a thorough know1edge of the content of the Bible i s i n d ispensable, together with an introd uction to the major re l igious trad itions and theolog i c a l problems in the context of t h e p ri n c i pal aspects o f h u man culture outli ned above. The pre-se m i nary student may we l l seek counsel of the se m i na ry of his choice in order most profitably to use the resources of his col lege. At least 3 semesters.


Of the various possible majors, English, phi losophy and history a re regarded as the most desirable, Other areas are, h owever, acceptable, Practica ll experience may be obtRined through service as an underg raduate i n te rn in a local congregation, A fac ulty adviser will assist the stud ent in the selection of c o u rses necessary to meet the requirements of the theological school of his choice, Pl ease consult the Chai rman of the Department o f Religi on,

School of Business Administration

The professional School of Busine ss Administration provides advice and instruc­ tion related to business careers and management. The program lead i n g to the Bachelor 01 Business Administration degree i n c ludes concentration opportun ities in accounting and systems, fina nce, marketing, and personnel and i ndustrial man­ agement. The Master 01 Business Administration program is focused on the devel­ opment of tech niques and professional skills for general management. Selected courses are offered to students in other fields, especially those majoring in busi­ ness education and the comm u n i cations arts, and for graduate students in the Master 01 Arts programs with approved supporting field in business a d m i n istration,

Preparation for Business While the majority of col lege graduates are employed eve ntually in business or government, a d i versity of preparations may lead to successful ca reers, I n some cases, no background in business is either required or suggested ; in others an un dergraduate or graduate suppo rting field com posed of caref u l ly selected busi­ ness and other courses is recommended, Students interested i n professi onal undergrad uate programs at Paci fic Lutheran Un iversity are fi rst enro l led in the Col lege of Arts and Sciences for at least one year of pre-business stud ies, and may transfer to the School of Busi ness Admin­ istration after a successfully comp leted freshman year. Stnudents considering business studies at the g raduate level, should seek early plan n i ng advice from the School of Busi ness Admin istration fac u lty for appropriate underg ra d u ate curricula available at Paci fic Lutheran Un iversity and other universities. The recommended preparation may i n Clude specific cou rses in business admin istration or an undergraduat e major i n business admin istration. The School o f Business Admin istration's programs are accredited b y the North­ west Asso ciation of Secondary and Higher Schools. It is also affi l i ated with the American Association of Colleg iate Schools of Business as a member of the Asse m b ly of the A.A.C,S.B,; the Northwest Universities' Business Admin istration Conference, the Western Association of G raduate Schools, and the Western Asso­ ciation of Col legiate Schools of Busi ness. For detai ls regarding adm ission req u i rements, degree programs, and c u rricula, 'lee page 72,


School of Education

The School of Education, by uti lizing the resources of the Un iversity, offers both undergraduate and g raduate work to prepare students fo r careers in the teac h ing profession. The undergraduate curricula, leading to the Bachelor of Arts in Education degree, meet the cert i fi cation pattern in the State of Wash i ngto n . In add itio n t o the accreditation o f t h e entire U n i versity b y t h e No rthwest Asso­ ciation of Secondary a n d H igh Schools, the School of Edu cation is accred ited by the Washington State Board of Education and by t h e National Coun c i l for Accredit­ ation of Teacher Education for the preparation 01 e lementary and secondary teachers with the Master of Arts as the hi ghest degree approved. This accredita­ tion g i ves Paci fic Lutheran g raduates reciprocity i n twenty-eight states. Programs fo r the preparation o f school l i b rarians, school nurses, school coun­ selors, adm i n i strators and supervisor personnel are avai lable. The School of Education also offers work toward the conversion, renewal, or reinstatement of teaching certifi cates. For details regarding admission requirements, degree programs, and curri c u l a , see page 95.

School of Fine Arts

The School of Fine Arts com prises t h e Departments of Art, Music and Com­ mu nication Arts, offering a broad cultural education i n the fine arts and special trai n i n g in the f o l lowing areas o f study: sculpture, painting, ceramics, art h istory, graphics, music h i story and l iterature, theory and composi t i o n , sacred music, instrumental o r vocal performance, d rama, speech arts, and te lecommuni cations. The objecti ves of this sch ool are to provide the student speci a l i zed training i n o n e of the f i n e arts ; to provide a cultural background through t h e study of the re lations h i p of all the arts; and to prepare the student fo r the professional appli­ cation of his knowledge and training. Degrees Offered

The School of Fine Arts offers the degrees Bache lor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Music. Candi dates fo r t h e Bachelor of Fine Arts degree must complete both the General U n i versity Req u i rements and the specific req u i rements of the Art o r Comm u n ica­ tion Arts Departments. Candidates for the Bachelor of Music degree m ust comp lete both the spec i f i c cou rses in music and the General University Req u i rements and m u s t m e e t the app roved standards of musiciansh i p . For specific i n formation a n d c u r r i c u l a i n t h e Fine Arts, t u rn to pages 63-66 for Art, pages 1 39-1 51 for Music and pages 86-91 for Communication Arts.


School of Nursing

The School of N u rsing is a professional sc hool which meets the Un iversity req u i rements fo r the degree of Bachelor of Science in N u rsing. It is accredited by the Washington State Board of N u rsing and by the National League for N u rs足 i n g . G radu ates who successfully complete the State Board Exami nations (Reg足 istered N u rse) are q u a l i fied to fi l l fi rst level staff n u rsing positions i n health agencies. For details regardi n g admission requirements, degree p rograms, and cu rricula, see page 1 5 1 .

School of Physical Education

The School of Physical Education comp rises the various programs designed to promote "education th rough the physi cal." A diversified i n structional prog ram足 I n te rcol legiate ath letic competition (Pacific N o rthwest Confe rence) for men in ten sports and wo m e n 's ath letic competition in six sports, an extensive i n t ra m u ral program, and a t i mely c u rriculum for p rofessional preparation in Health, Physical Educat i o n , Recreation and Coaching-all are viewed by the Un iversity as having educational merit and are conducted clearly within the framework of the objec足 tives of the u n i versity. For more i n formation regarding program and curri c u l u m i n physical education see page 1 6 1 .


Division of Graduate Studies Purpose The Division of G radu ate Stud ies is an all-un ive rsity d i vision coord i n ating and i n tegrat i n g the work of the schools and departments which p rovide graduate leve l work. I ts general objective is to f u rth e r the basic objectives of the U n ive rsity by providing g raduate level academic and professional work. Its specific objectives are : ( 1 ) to i n c rease the breadth and depth of u n d e rstan d i n g of the g raduate stu­ dent i n the l i beral arts; (2) to i n c rease the student's knowledge of the research being done i n his f i e l d of conc entrati on and to i n c rease his abi lity to read the professional j o u rnals of his area of i n te rest ; (3) to develop the stude n t 's a b i l ity to do i n dependent study and researc h ; and (4) to prepare students t h rough the upper d i vision and graduate di visi o n , and through the U n iversity's professional schools, to enter i n to a vocation d i rectly, o r to enter other g raduate schools for further advanced study lead i n g to the doctoral degree.

Admission Students h o l d i n g a Bachelo r's degree from an accredited c o l lege or u n i versity who attained an undergraduate scholarsh i p honor-point ratio of 3.0 may b e ad­ m i tted and g ranted regular status i n the D i vision of Grad uate St udies . Students a l ready holding graduate degrees o r students who have done satisfactory g raduate work at another institution m ay be admitted o n reg u l a r status. Those students with an average of less than 3.0 wi l l not be considered for regular status u n t i l they have demonstrated th e i r a b i l i ty to do g rad u ate work by a m i n i m u m of th ree courses ( 1 2 semester h o u rs) work with a grade point average of 3.0 These stu­ dents may be granted provisional status. Students majoring in an area of professi onal education m ust have met a l l req u i rements f o r teac h i ng certification. A p p l i cants for the Master of Busi ness Ad m i nistration degree will be req u i red to take the A d m i ssion Test for G raduate Study in Business. Other test scores m ust be s u b m i tted onl y if they are specifically requested by the Dean of Gradu ate Studies. F u rther supporting evidence in the form of personal recom menda tions w i l l be requested from those persons named b y the a p p l icant on the a p p l i cation form. Students applying for ad m i ssion to graduate study should s u b m i t the comp leted applicatio n b la n k (availa ble from the G raduate Office) plus two offi c i a l copies of transcripts of all previous college work. This should be done before the fi rst semester of registrati o n in g raduate courses. In order to i n s u re cons i d e ration for entrance i n a g iven term a p p l i cations should be made by August 1 5 , Dec e m b e r 15 and May 1 . A ten-d o l l a r n o n -refund­ able application fee should accompany the appli cati o n . This is a service fee and is not applied to the student's account. Checks or money orders s h o u l d be made paya ble to Pac ific Lutheran University and sent to the Dean of G raduate St udi es. Approval of admission to the Division of G raduate Stud ies does not i m ply admis­ sion to candidacy for the degree. Final ad m i ssion approval is determi ned by the Dean of Graduate Studies in consultation with the appropriate Grad u ate Coun­ c i l Comm ittee.


In summary. the fo l l owing items must be on file before an appli cant may be consi dered for admiss i o n : 1)

The c o m p l eted appli cation form.

2)

The $1 0.00 non-refundable appl ication fee.

3)

Two offi c i a l copies of transcripts of a l l previous c o l l ege work.

4)

Test scores when spe c i fi c a l l y requested.

5)

Admission Test fo r Graduate Study i n Business scores (Master of Business A d m i n istration a p p l i cants only).

Interviewing of Applicants Before admission to the graduate program, it is advisable for an a p p l i c a n t to seek an i nterview with a professor i n his subject area. The Division of G raduate Studies will be happy to recommend the appropri ate person.

Classification of Students 1)

Those students ap proved for u n q u a lified admission to graduate study by the i r respective Graduate Counci l C o m m ittees are granted regular status. Students who fail to q u a l i fy for reg u l ar status may be granted provisional status. Students who wish to pursue c o u rse work with n o i n ten tion of q u a l i fying for

2)

an advanced degree, and those who are transient registrants, w i l l be classified as n o n-degree students.

C ange of Status from Provisional to Regular The c h ange o f status from provisional to regular shall be determined under the fol lowing provisions: 1)

Satisfactory " ; ! li l l m e n t of course deficiencies. Satisfactory completion

2)

of three co urses

( 1 2 semester h o u rs)

of

g raduate

work with a grade point average of 3.0 or better. A

letter i n d i cating change of status wi l l be forwarded to the student, with a

copy to h i s adviser.

Master's Degrees Offered MASTER OF ARTS 1)

EDUCATION a)

Elementary o r Secondary School Admin istration ' -The student w h o wishes to q u a l i fy for the provisional o r standard p r i n c i p a l 's credential (elementary or secondary or general) w i l l take a major

in

t h i s field and

complete

cou rses i n a supporting academic area of the U n i versity. Students may major i n this fie l d without q u alifying for a p r i n c i pa l 's credential. b)

School Counselor Program ' - For stud"nts who wish to q u a l i fy as p u b l i c school counselors (elementary a n d seconda ry) or student personnel work足 ers in h i gher educati o n .

c)

E l e m e n t a r y C l assroom T e a c h i n g ' - T h i s program i s designed for students who desire advanced work i n el ementary cl assroom teaching or who wish


to qualify as elementary school supervisors or consu ltants. Along with the major i n this field the student is req u i red to comp lete cou rses i n a sup­ porting acade m i c area. d) Secondary C lassroom Teach i n g ' -This program is for those students who wish to i n c rease thei r preparation for teac h i n g i n an area of social science. 2) HUMANITIES " -This degree p rogram i s designed for li brarians, clergymen, teachers and others who wish to extend and broaden their u nderstan d i n g and appreciation o f the various fields of the h u m an i ties. 3) SOCIAL SCIENCES " -This degree program is designed for person nel workers in i n d ustry, welfare workers, l i b rarians, c lergymen, teachers, and others who wish to extend and broaden their understanding and appreciation of the various fields of the Soc ial Sciences. MASTER O F B U S I N ES S A D M I N ISTRAT I O N " T h i s degree program is designed t o provide a thorough foundation for respon­ sible leadership in business. MASTER OF NATURAL S C I E N C E S ' This degree program i s designed especially f o r teachers who n e e d to extend ' and broaden their k nowledge in the fields of science and mathematics,

Advisers and Advisory Committees

At the time of admission, both reg u lar status students and provisional status students are assigned a major adviser. The total grad u ate program of a reg u l a r status student, i n c l ud i n g approval of the student's research work, i s s u pervised by an advisory comm ittee com posed of a major adviser and two other fac u lty mem­ bers as determined by the chai rman, d i rector, or dean of the departments or schools i n volved and in consultation with the Dean of G raduate Stu d i es. A student may, if 'he wishes, request a specific major adviser.

Approval of Proposed Program

Regular status students m ust have thei r proposed p rograms of cou rses ap­ proved by thei r respective student advisory committees before or d u ring the fi rst semester of registration as a reg u l a r status stud e n t. Minimum Hours Required for the Master's Degree

A m i n i m u m of eight courses (32 semester hours) is req u i red. Transfer of Credit

Two cou rses (eight semester hours) of g raduate work may be taken at another institution and transferred, provided that a p p roval has been given by the student advisory committee . •

Details of these programs may be obtained from the olliee of the Dean of Gradu­ ate Studies.


Standards of Work

The m i n i m u m standard acceptable for regular status students is a g rade point average 01 3.0 in the major field and an overall average of 3.0 in all graduate work. Research Requirements

As an im portant part of his Master's program, the student i s requ i red to p rovide written evidence that he can do independent research. The manner of futfi l l i n g t h i s requirement w i l l b e determined b y each student's advisory committee i n consultation with t h e student, b u t i n any case, the m i n i m u m requirement w i l l be at least the equ ivalent of one course. If a thesis is written, the original and one copy must be submitted to the Office of G raduate Studies for binding. One copy of an y research pape rs subm itted to meet the requirement must be deposited with the Dean of G raduate Studies. The student i s expected also to provide a copy of a thesis or research papers for his research su pervisor. Req u i rements for add i tional copies may be set b y the advisory co mmittee. Examinations

A written comprehensive examination and/or oral examination over the stu­ dent's program of studies, as well as an oral exam i n ation on the thesis or research papers, is req uired. These exam i n ations over the student's program of studies are under the d i rection of the major adviser and/or the advisory committee and must be successfu l l y passed not later than s i x weeks prior to commencement. The oral exa m i n ation over the thesis or research is under the d i rection of the advisory committee and must be completed not later than four weeks prior to commencement.

Time Limit All requirements for the Master's degree must be completed within seven years.

The seven-year period covers all work submi tted for the comp letion of the Mas­ ter's degree regardless of whether the work was taken as provisional status or regular status, as we l l as credi t transferred from another i n stitution, com p rehensive examination, thesis, and final oral exam i n ation.

Residence Requirement

All candi dates for the Master's degree must complete a m i n i m u m of six courses (24 semester hoLl rs) in residence. This req u i rement may be fulfilled by either one full academic year in attendance, three fu l l summers, or the completion of equiv­ alent part-time study.

Courses Acceptable for G raduate Credit

The courses of study are l isted in the General Catalog. Selected courses num­ bered 300, 400, and 500, unless otherwise designated, may be accepted for g rad uate credit. All courses accepted for the master's degree are, however, s u b­ ject to the app roval of the student's adviser and/or advisory committee.


Advi sory Committee

Approval o f deg ree program and subm iss i on o f a copy of that program to the Grad u ate Office

Periodic evaluation and approval N ot later than the last registrat ion dates before the semester in wh i ch student takes his degree

Major adviser

Registrar's Office

Registrar's Office

M aj o r adviser and lor Advisory Committee

Advisory Committee

Graduate Office

Dean of G raduate Studies

Se lection and approval of thesis

Progress reports on thesis or research papers

Registrat i o n for thesis or research papers

Appli cation fo r graduation

Comprehensive written and/or oral exam­ i nation over student's program of studies

Final oral exam i n ation on thesis o r re­ search papers

S u b m i ssion o f thesis or research

Recommendation to the facu lty for the award i ng of the deg ree

Not later t h an t h ree weeks prior t o com­ mencement

Not later than two weeks before commence­ ment

During final year but not later than four weeks before commencement

During final year but not l ater than six weeks before commencement

At the beg i n n i ng of the semester i n which student expects to earn h i s degree

N ot later than the semester before the com­ mencement i n which student takes his degree

Major adviser

Advi sory Co m m i ttee

Approval of each registration

D u ring' the offi cial reg istration dates

During the fi rst semester of reg istration as a regular status student

Before the fi rst semester o f registrati o n as a regular status student

Dean o f G raduate Studies and G rad u ate Counci l Committee

Approval o f admission

Date:

Before the fi rst semester of regist ration as a regular statu s student

Under t,� e Direction of:

Dean of G raduate Studies

Appli cation for adm ission to the Division o f Graduate Studies

Procedures:

S U M MARY OF PROCED U R E S FOR MAST E R ' S D E G R EES


School s and Departments The course req u i rements fo r the College of Arts and Sciences; the School of Busine ss Ad m i n istrat io n ; the School of Educat i o n ; the School of Fine Arts; the School of Physical Educatio n ; and the SChool of N u rsing are l i sted in this section together with the cou rses of instruction for each department and school. While most of t h e courses li sted are given every year, a system of alternating upper divi­ s i o n subjects is practiced in some departments, thereby assuring a broader offering. Courses open to freshman and sophomores are n u m bered 1 0 1 -299 and are considered lower d i vision su bjects. Cou rses open to j u n i o rs and sen i o rs are n u m bered 300-499 and are regarded as upper division subjects. Courses n u m­ bered 500 or above are normally open to graduate students only. U p per d i vision students may be e n rolled in a SOD-level course i f , at the time of registration, they provide written permi ssion from the Chai rman, D i rector, or Dean of the acade m i c u n i t t h a t offers t h e course. I t is und erstood t h a t a n y student g i ven such permis­ sion will have met a l l assumed o r specifically I n d i cated prerequisites and w i l l have an above-average academic record. Courses n u mbered i n t h e 300's and 400's are open both to g raduates and u pper division undergraduates. Such courses may be a part of the g raduate program provided they are not specific req u i re­ ments i n preparation for g raduate study. Upon the approval of his adviser and with the consent of the i ns t ructor, a lower division student may be assigned to an upper d i vision course if the prereq u i S i tes for the course have been met. In such cases cou rses successfu lly comp leted may be counted toward the u n i versity upper d i vision credit requi rements. The U n i versity reserves the right to modify specific course req u i rements, to d i scont i n ue c l asses in which t h e registration is regarded as i n sufficient, and to wi thdraw courses. EXPl.ANATION OF SYMBOLS N u m b er after course title i n d i cates course cred i t given. Un less specified other­ wise, each u n i t has the value of one course c redit (4 semester hours) . Symbols are explai ned as fo l lows: I Course offered first semester I I Course offered second semester I , I I Course offered first and second semester in sequence I I I Course offered either semester S Course offered in the summer aly Course offered alternate years beginning with year listed alS Course offered alternate summers beginning with year listed (G) Course may be used on graduate programs as major


ART

Mr. Schwidder, Chairman, Mr. Achepohl, Mrs. Crockett, Mr. Elwell, Mr. Keyes, Mr. Kittleson, Mr. Roskos

The cou rses of i nstruction offered by t h i s department are designed to: 1) Provide an o p po rtunity for creative expression. 2)

Offer a general p rog ram for the study o f art with i n the framework ot the Li beral A rts.

3)

Offer specialized study in stud i o and art h i story areas for professionally o r i ented students.

4)

Provide a p rogram of i nstruction in preparation tor the teac h i n g of art o n the ele mentary and secondary levels.

The Department reserves the right to reta i n , exhi bit, and reprod u ce student work s u b m i tted tor cred i t in any of its cou rses or programs. BACHELOR O F A RTS Deg ree Req u i rements for a major in A rt are a m i n i m u m ot seven co urses i n A rt inc l u d i n g : A r t 1 1 0 , 1 60, 235, 330 o r 350, 365, 370 a n d an add i ti onal cou rse in Art H i story. A maxi m u m of ten cou rses m ay be appl ied toward this degree. Cand idates for this deg ree are registe red i n the College of A rts and Sci ences and m ust com plete all req u i rements ot that col lege. BAC H ELOR O F ARTS IN EDUCAT I O N major req u i rements are l i sted below. Can d i d ates for this degree m ust also meet special req u i rements descri bed in the School o f Education section i n this catalog. Senior High School Preparation: 11 V2 c o u rses. Teach ing Major: 1 1 '12 courses. Required: Art 1 1 0, 1 60, 235, 260, 330 or 350, 365, 370, 440, two additional c o u rses in art history, and electives to com plete req u i rements. Junior High School Preparation: Teaching Major: 7 V. courses. Required: Art 1 1 0, 1 60 , 235, 330 o r 350, 365, 440, and electives to com p lete req u i rements. Te a c h i n g M i n o r : 5 cou rses. Required: Art 1 1 0 , 1 60, 235, 330 o r 350, and 365. Elementary School Preparation: Teach i n g Maj o r : 6 c o u rses. Required: 1 1 0, 1 60, 235, 340 and two c o u rses trom the tollowi n g : Art 330, 350, 365 o r 370. Tea c h i n g M i no r : 3 courses in the area as determined by the School at Edu足 cati on.


BACHELOR OF F I N E ARTS Degree Req u i re m ents, for a major in Art, are four­ teen courses in Art, i n c l u d i n g : Art 1 1 0, 1 60, 235, 260, 330 or 350, 365, 370, t h ree additional c o u rses i n art h istory, one of which may be Art 380, and e l ectives i n area of emphasis to comp lete requi rements. Candi dates may elect an e m phasis i n P i ctorial Design (Drawing, Painting and Printmaki ng) , Materials Design (Sculpture , Cerami cs, G lass and Metals). Mu lti-Media, o r Art H istory. One-man o r G roup Exh ibi tions will be req u i red of all candida tes in studio a reas, as facilities permit. A l l g raduates are expected to be represented in the departmental col lection. Work will be selected by the A rt Fac u l ty, usually d u ring the senio r year. Candi dates for this degree are registered in the School o f Fine Arts and m ust complete a l l requirements of that school . Foreign language is not req u i red in programs with a studio emphasis. Read ing knowledge of French and / o r German is req u i red fo r prog rams in Art History. Because of the flex i b i l i ty of the Art Prog ram, no specific schedu le of cou rses i s suggested and each candidate may work out an individual program o f studies with his adviser. However, the following is recom mended of all stu­ dents: Art 1 1 0 , 1 60 and 235 should be taken, in the freshman year. One semester o f A rt 260 s h o u l d be taken d u ring the freshman or sophomore year. For the stu­ dents with an a rt h istory emphasis, the A rt History seq uence should be started d u ring the freshman or sophomore year and no later than the f i rst semester o f t h e j u n i o r year f o r a l l ot h e rs. 300 level cou rses may b e taken a t any time d u ring the fou r-year p rogram, p rovid i ng p rereq ui sites are met where appropriate. 1 1 0 THE V I SUAL ARTS An i n trod u ctory c o u rse in the study of man's expression in the several med i a of t h e visual a rts, with spec i a l em phasis on contemporary development. I I I 1 60 P I CTORIAL DESIGN In trod uction to the media o f d rawing with em phasis on design and composi ­ tion. A systematic series of exercises structured to develop observati o n , perception a n d d raftsmansh i p , w i l l b e combi ned w i t h a study o f historical and c u r rent techniques. I I I 235 MATERIALS D ES I G N I n t roduction t o various materi als a n d tech ni ques a n d their in fluence o n th ree­ di mensional fo rm. Parti c u l a r emphasis on development of visual awareness t h rough expe rime nta l use of clay, wood, plastics and other media. ,I 1 1 260 L I F E DRAW I N G An exploration i n m u lti-media o f studied fo rm. A student m a y register for t h i s course f o r two semesters. Prere q u i site: A rt 1 60 or consent o f i nstructor. I I 330 CERA M I CS Te chniq ues of shaping forms for decorative, expressive and fun ctional use by han d b u i lt and wheel t h rown methods. Study inc ludes p reparation of clay bod ies, oxides and gl aze formations, as well as the h istory of ceramic a rt. A student may register for this co urse for three semesters. Prerequisite: A rt 235 or consent o f inst ructor. 'I I I


340 T H E VISUAL ARTS A N D EDUCAT I O N A course i n a r t educatio n theory designed for those w h o intend t o teach i n the elementary schoo l . A p p ropriate projects i n d rawing, design a n d construc足 tion are co mbi ned with an i ntroduction to art history. I 1 '1 350 SCULPT U R E A study o f v i s u a l expression i n, th ree di mensional forms w i t h the several scul ptural media and techniq ues of modeling, carving and construction. A student may register for this course for th ree semesters. I I I 365 PA I N T I N G A study o f painting med ia and tec h n i q u es w i t h emphasis on deve lopment of an i nd i v i d u a l i zed approach to visual expression. A student may register for this cou rse for three semesters. Prereq u i site: Art 1 60. I I I 370 P R I NTMAK I N G A study i n g raphic art with t h e several media of printmaking i n c l u d i ng wood足 cut, seriograph, etch ing and intag l i o . I n c l uded w i l l be an exam i n ation of the tech n iques of the old masters and contemporary printm akers. A student may register for this course for two semesters. Prerequisite : Art 1 60. I I I 380 I MAGERY A N D SYMBOLISM A study of the symbo l i c , pictorial and plastic expressions of man from the perspective of their p h i losophical and theological i m p l i cations. Emphasis on the origin and development of forms and the i r infl uence on modern c h u rc h a n d society. I I 382 ANCIENT ART The study of prehistoric and primitive art; the art and arc h i tecture of Egypt, the Near East and Aegean areas; the development of the classical style i n G reece and t h e Roman E m p i re . I a l y 1 971 -72 383 M E D I EVAL ART The study of Early C h ristian, Byzan tine, Romanesque and Gothic development in the art and architectufe of the Middle Ages. II aly 1 97 1 -72 384 RENAI SSANCE ART The study of the art and a rc h i tecture of the fi fteenth and sixteenth centuries in Italy, Flanders, France and Germany. I aly 1 970-71 385 BAROQU E AND ROCOCO ART Devel opment of the Baroque style in European art and architecture from the end of the sixteenth century through the Rococo pe riod. II aly 1 970-71 440 S E M I NA R IN SECONDARY ART EDUCAT I O N A study o f t h e approach to teaching in t h e secondary school w i t h presenta足 tions and di scussions on various appropri ate media. I I 488 N I N ETEENTH AND TWENTIETH CENTURY ART A study of the art and architecture of the Romantic, Realist and I m p ressionist


periods with movements in the twenti et h century such as, Fauvism, Cubism, Expressionism, Surrea l i s m and other styles o f major conseq uence. I I 492 ST U D I O PROJ ECTS A tu torial c o u rse with i n d i vidual i n vestigati o n in the area of e m phasis fo r maj o r students only. Students m u st register in a re g u l a rly scheduled sect i o n of an appro priate course and s u b m i t a project thesis in writi ng to the i nstruct o r and t h e chairman o f t h e department within o n e week o f t h e start o f the semester to receive cred it for this work. A student may register for this course for two semesters. Prereq u isite: Se n i o r standing and consent of the i n structor and chairman of the department. I II 497 RESEARCH I N ART H I STORY A tutorial course with i n d i vidual research i n to a particular period or area of art h i story for major students only. A written o u t l i n e of p roposed thes is mu st be submitted to the i n structor and the c h a i rm an of the department w i t h i n o n e wee k of the start of the semester to receive c re d i t f o r this w o r k . Copies of final papers sha l l be filed with the Department. Prereq uisite: Se nior stand­ i n g and conse n t o f the i n structor and chairman o f the department. I I I 597 R ESEARCH For t h ose Master of Arts cand idates who elect to write a research paper in Art. Candid ates w i l l be requi red to review their research papers before the G raduate C o m m i ttee. I I I Interim Courses Offered i n 1 970:

302 308 31 3 318 31 9 490 495

TH� FORM OF TH E HOUSE I M P RESS I O N I S M AND T H E ARTS (ART/ M U S I C) WORKSHOP IN G LASS BLOW I N G THE ART OF T H E S I XT I ES ST U D I O P R OJ ECTS IN A R C H ITECTURAL SCULPTURE STU D I O PROJ ECTS S E M I NAR IN ART H I STORY

B I O LOGY

Mr. Knudsen, Chairman, Mr. Bohannon, Mrs. Creso, Mr. Gee, Mr. Heyer, Mrs. Jensen, Mr. Leraas, Mr. Ostenson, Mrs. Sorenson

The core o f instruction in b i o logy gives each stud e n t a well-rounded back­ ground i n the principl es and objectives of modern b i ology and a deeper appreci­ ation o f the meani ng and ram i f i cations of l i fe. P rograms are designed to provide the student with the foundation necessary to enter a variety o f careers, i nc l ud i n g those stem m i n g from graduate studies, tea c h i n g , med i ci n e , dentistry, vete r i n a ry medicine, medical tec h n o logy, p u b l i c health, m i crobiology, entomology, forestry, fisheries, w i l d l i fe b i ology and related fields. Prospective fres hman students may obtain i n formation concerning the selec­ tion o f cou rses for the i r fi rst fall semester to i n s u re that the course load is t a i l o red to their needs and abili ty. Write to the science sec retary or the b i o logy chai rman.


The heart of the b i o l ogy program consists of a core of seven c o u rses: Fresh­ man year-Organ ismal Bi ology, Cel l B i ology; Sophomore year-Fu nctional Morph­ o l ogy, Developmental Biol ogy ; J u n i o r year-Genetics, Ce l l u lar Physiology; Sen i o r year-Ecology. THE BAC H ELOR OF ARTS D EG R E E consists of the seven-cou rse bi ology c o re , but one m a y substitute an app roved b i o logy elective f o r one c o r e course i n both the sophom ore and j u n i o r years. Req u i red s u p p o rting cou rses are Engl ish Com­ positi o n , foreign lang uage (Option I or I I ) , a yea r of chemistry and Mathematics 1 33 or its equivalent. Strongly recommended are Chemistry 331 , 332 and Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 . T H E BAC HELOR O F S C I E N C E D EG R E E consists of t e n courses i n b i ology : the core plus t h ree electives. Required supporti n g courses are English Composi­ tion, foreign language (Option I o r II only) . Chem istry t h rough at least 332, a year of physics, and mathematics th rough 1 51 . A maxi mum of ten cou rses in b i o logy may be counted for graduati o n . B I O LOGY C U R R I C U L U M i'OR T H E BAC H ELOR O F SC I EN C E D E G R E E T h e fo l l owi ng is a m o d e l p rogram which will b e tailored to m e e t t h e needs of each student: FRESH MAN YEA R : Organismal Biology, Cell Bio logy; Chem istry 1 1 5 or 1 3 1 and 1 42. Students entering with two yea rs of a modern foreign lang uage may elect to continue that language using Option I or I I , see page 44. A new language s h o u l d be deferred until the sophomore or j u n i o r year. Students without the equ iva­ lent of Math 1 33 should take t h i s d u ri n g the freshman year. ( Math 1 5 1 may be deferred to the sophomore or j un i o r year.) Complete sched ule with E n g l i sh Com­ position or U n i versity core courses, see page 43; and one P.E. activity ( V. ) . Fall semester, 3 V. courses; spri n g , 4 courses. SO P H O M O R E YEA R : Functional Morphology and Developmental Bi ology (Embry­ ology or new c o u rse now u nder study) ; Chemistry 331 , 332 or Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 (defer one until the j u n i o r year) ; Unive rsity core c o u rses, a n d / o r mathematics or foreign language to rou n d out p ro g ram ; P.E. V4 . Four c o u rses each semester. J U N IOR YEA R : Genetics and Cellular Physiology; C h e m i stry 331 , 332 o r Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 . Math 1 5 1 s h o u l d be comp leted by this time. U n i ve rsity core courses a n d / o r a bi ology elective ; P.E. v. . SEN I O R YEA R : Ecology and 2 or 3 b i o l ogy e lectives, other science electives ; U n iversity core c o u rses or electives; P.E. v. . BACH ELOR OF ARTS I N EDUCAT ION major requ i rements are listed below. Candidates for this degree must also meet spec ial requirements described i n the School o f Education section i n this catalog. Senior High School Preparation: 11 c o u rses. Teach i ng Major: 7 c o u rses Required: Bi ology 1 5 1 , 1 52 and 5 c o u rses in b i o logy of which at least 3 must be upper d i vi s i o n . Required supporting courses: Chemistry 1 1 5 or 1 31 , 1 4 2 , Mathematics 1 33. Electives from the fo l l owi ng : Earth Sciences 1 3 1 , 1 3 2 ; Chemistry 33 1 , 332; Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 , 2 1 1 .


Junior High School Preparation:

Tea c h i n g Major: 6-7 courses. Required: Biology 1 51 , 1 52 and 5 courses in b i ology approved by the de­ partment. Required supporting courses; Chemistry 1 1 5 o r 1 3 1 , 1 42, Mathematics 1 33. Recommended : Physics 1 0 1 , 2 1 1 or Earth Sciences 1 3 1 , 1 32 . Teac h i n g M i n o r : 5 courses. Required: 5 courses chosen in b i o l ogy; Earth Sciences 1 3 1 . Elementary School Preparation:

Tea c h i n g major: 6 courses. Required: B i o l ogy 1 5 1 , 1 52. Required supporting courses: ChemistrY 1 1 5 or 1 3 1 , 1 4 2 . Teaching M i nor: 3 courses. Required: 3 courses i n the area, to be determined i n consultation with the School of Education.

1 1 1 B I OLOGY A N D M O D E R N MAN An in-depth coverage of selected topics that relate to modern man's h i story and future, his art and his well-being : the environment, reprod uction a n d populations, heredity and e v o l u t i o n , b i ological controls. While designed for those i n the l i beral arts, students wishing to major i n b i o l ogy may sUbstitute this course for B i o logy 1 5 1 . T h ree lectures, one lab discussion, and one laborato ry per week. I I I 1 5 1 O R G A N I S MAL B I OLOGY An i ntroduction to the h i gher levels of biological o rgan izat i o n i n which organ­ isms are discussed i n relation to their ecology, adaptation, evolution, physi­ ology, reproductive patterns and c l assification. Required of all biology majors. T h ree h o u rs o f lecture, one 3-hour laboratory and one 1 - h o u r discussionl lab­ i n trod uction period per week. Prerequisites: High sch ool chemistry and co­ registration i n Chemistry 1 03 , 1 1 5 o r 1 3 1 or consent of department chairman . 1 52 CELL B I OLOGY An i ntrod uction to the cellu lar and molecular levels of biologi cal organiza­ tion i nc l u d i n g discussions of cell ultra-structure and physi o l ogy, energy trans­ duction, molecular genetics and biochemical development. Required of a l l biology majors. Three hours o f lecture, o n e 3-hour laborato ry a n d o n e 1 -h o u r discussion l l ab-i ntroduction p e r i o d pe r wee k. Prerequisites: B i o l ogy 1 51 a n d co-registration i n Chemistry, or consent of department chairman. 1 4 1 , 1 42 G E N E RA L BOTANY (1 , 1) A survey of the plant ki ngdom and structures, and a study of l i fe history and ecology of plants. Lectures, labo ratory and field trips. S 1 6 1 , 1 62 H U MAN ANATOMY A N D PHYSIOLOGY (1 , 1 ) A study o f the structure and function o f the hu man body. I n the fall semester, w h i c h deals primarily with anatomy, the laboratory i n cludes an extensive dissection of the cat, and other mammalian organs; the spring semester is


pri marily p h ysio logy and its laboratories ,include extensive experimental work. M ust be taken i n sequence. T h ree lectures, two laboratories and one d iscussion per week. I, I I 201 M I C R O B I O LOGY I n trod uction to growth, control, physio logy, isolation, and identification of m i c roorgan isms. Two lectures and two laboratories per week. Prereq u i sites: Two c o u rses i n b i o l ogy and one course il n chem istry, or by consent of the i nstructor. I 222 CONSE:RVAT ION OF NATURAL RESO U RCES (112) A su rvey of the pri n c i p les and problems of p u b l i c and private stewa rdsh i p of our resources with special reference to the Pacific Northwest. 235 B I OLOGY OF THE SEASHORE A study of the natural history of the marine fau na of Puget S o u n d . The course i s especially useful for teac hers of science at elementary and j u n ior h i g h levels. N o t to be counted toward a maior i n bi ology . Lectures, laboratory, and field trips. S 250 F U NCTIONAL M O RPHO LOGY The study of selected plant and animal morpho-types to em phasize the vital role of the i r structure in maintaining the living, state; and, to provide a basic body of knowledge to su pport the b i o l ogy core . Three lectures and two 2-h o u r laboratories p e r week. Prereq uisite: B i o logy 1 52. I 321 ORN ITHOLOGY ( V2 ) A study o f the b i rds, with em phasis o n local kinds. Designed for students with a h o b by i nterest i n b i rds as well as for advanced students in b i o logy. Two lectu res and one laboratory period or field trip pe r week. Prereq u isite: Biology 1 52 or consent of i n structor. 324 NATURAL H I STORY OF VERTEB RATES Classificati on, natural history and economic i m portance of the vertebrates with the exception of b i rds. Lectures, laboratory studies and field collections. Th ree lectures and two labo ratory periods per week. Prereq uisite : Bi ology 1 52. a/y 331 G E N ETICS A study of the chemical nature of the gene, mechanisms and reg u lation of genetic express i o n , variations i n c h romosomal structure and n u m ber, and population genetics. Th ree lectu res and one 3-hour laboratory per week. Prereq u isite: Biology 346 and one course in organ i c chem istry, or by consent of i n structor. I I 340 SYST E MAT I C BOTANY Historical su rvey of classification systems; the use of taxonomic keys in the identi fication of plants. Two lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Prereq uisite: B i ology 1 52. I I


I

346 CELLULAR PHYSIO LOGY Functional organization and physicochemical properties of ce lls. Topics in­ clude ultrastructure, membrane pe rmea b i l i ty and transport phen omena, bio­ electric phen omena, mechanics of cell d i vision and the cell in re lation to its i mmed iate environment. T h ree lectures, one 4-hour laboratory, and one dis­ cussion per week. Prerequisite: Bio logy 1 52 and C h e m istry 331 , 332. I 351 NATURAL H I STORY OF THE PAC I FI C NORTHWEST ( 1 V2 ) An extensive field and laboratory course covering major phases of the natural history of the region. Designed as a workshop in outdoor education especially for teachers o f science at elementary and j u n i o r h i g h levels. Lectures, labora­ tory studies, and field work. Not to be counted toward a major or graduate credit in biology. P rerequisite: Consent of instructor. S 361 C O M PARATIVE ANATOMY A comparative study of vertebrates with d i ssection of representative forms. Three lectu res and two laboratory periods per week. Prereq uisite: Bi ology 1 52 . " 364 VERTEBRATE E M B RYOLOGY The development of the vertebrate embryo from the germ ce l l t h rough the embryo logical states until birth. Three lectures and two labo ratory periods per week. Prerequisite: Biology 1 52 . 3 7 1 PARASITOLOGY A study of the morphology, l i fe histories and host-parasite relationships of t h e common varieties of parasites of vertebrates with e m phasis on those of man. Th ree lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: Biology 1 52. I a/y 1 970-71 372 GEN ERAL ENTO MOLOGY C lassifi cation and natural history of insects with a strong emphasis on laboratory and field studies and collections. Th ree lectures and two labora­ tory periods per week. Prerequisite: B i o logy 1 52. I I a/y 1 9 7 1 -72 380 B I O LOGY TEACH I N G RESOURCES Methods, m aterials and resources for preparing lect u res, laboratories, special studies, and field work in all major facets of bio logy. Designed for a l l levels of teach ing. Lectures, labs and special preparations required. Prerequisite: Bio logy 1 52 or consent of i n structor. 384 B I OLOG I CAL LITERATURE A N D RESEARCH (112 ) Designed t o teach the use o f l i brary resources for literature searching, i n clud­ i n g ind i ces, journals, abstracts, and reviews; to prepare a research prospectus and write an acceptable journal article in an area o f student interest. 41 1 H I STOLOGY A m i c roscopic study of the normal tissues and organs of vertebrates. Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: Biology 1 5 2 .


424 ECOLOGY A study of plants and a n i mals in relation to the i r envi ronment. Th ree lectu res and two laborato ry periods per week. P rerequisite: Bi ology 1 52 . 4 2 5 B I O LO G I CAL OCEANOGRAPHY The study o f the ocean as an environment for plant and ani mal life. The course i n c l udes studies o f waves, c u rrents , tides and other physi cal factors of the ocean , and studies of natural l i fe zones of the ocean along w i th thei r p hysical and! biological aspects, their fau na and f l o ra, and adaptations of the biota to the zone. Lectures, laboratory, and field trips. Prereq uisite: One year of b iology. 441 VERTEBRATE PHYS I O LOGY Study of the functi ons of p r i n c i pal verteb rate organ systems with emphasis on homeostatic re lationsh i ps. Laboratory work i s done enti rely by student part i c i pation and i n c l udes experiments i n c i rculation, e l ectrocardiography, endocrine function, respiration, sensory mechan isms, body fluid chemistry, temperature reg u l ation and an introduction to a n i m a l s u rgery. T h ree lectures and one 4-hour labo ratory per week. Prereq uisites: Bi ology 1 52 and Chem istry 331 , 332. Cellular Physio logy is strong ly recommended. 444 PLANT PHYS I O LOGY A study of plant g rowth from seed to f l ower. Topics i n clude: seed germin足 ation, water relations, respi ration, g rowth, g rowth reg ulalors, photosynthesis and other l ight effects on plant l i fe cyc les. Th ree lectures and one 4-hour laboratory per week. Prereq u i site s : Bio logy 1 52 and C h e m i stry 331 , 332. Cellular Physiology is recommended. 490 SE M I NA R ( V4 - V2 ) Se lected topics in bi ology based on literature and / o r original research. Open to j u n i o rs and sen i o rs majoring i n bi ology. I I I 491 , 492 I N DEPEN DENT STUDY ( V4 - V2 ) I n vestigations or research in areas of special interest not covered by reg ular c o u rses. Open to q u a l i fied students majoring i n biology. Prereq uisite: A b ri e f written proposal, a n d consent of a faculty leader a n d t h e chairman. Students s h ould obtain forms from the science secretary well i n advance o f registration. 597, 598 GRAD UATE RESEARCH (V2 - 1 ) Interim courses offered in 1 970:

301 MAN 'S FUTU R E ON EARTH 306 PLANtS AND MAN 309 H U MAN REPROD UCTION 312 GEN I C BALANCE AND C H RO MOSO M E CONSTITUT I O N I N H U MANS 313 HORMON ES, ALCOHOL AND DRUGS (BI OLOGY/ C H E M I STRY) 497 I N DE P E N D ENT STUDY


B U S I N E SS AD M I N I STRAT I O N

M r . King, Dean, M r . Baty, M r . Cubbage, Mr. Hutcheon, Mr. Lauer, Mr. Martilla, Mr. McMaster, Mr. Peterson, Mr. Stintzi, Mr. Zulaul, assisted by Mr. Hildahl, Mr. Jensen, Mr. Polley, Mrs. Seger

PU RPOSES AND EDUCATIONAL P O L I C I E S The m a i n pu rpose of the School of Busi ness Admi nistration is to provide professional bus i n ess c u r ricul a of high quality to help the Schoo l ' s g raduates to become enlig htened leaders in responsible positions in busi ness, educati o n , and government. Combined with studies to meet the general University requi rements and we ll chosen selections of elective courses from other d i s c i p l i nes, these curricula are designed to g i ve a modern backg round for the competent executive or staff specialist. This backg ro und incl udes a fundamental base of values, and a deep apprec iation o f the service opportun i ties and obl igations i n a changi ng soc ia l , po l i t i c al and econo m i c envi ronment for busi ness. I n addition to ana lytical tech n i q ues and knowledge of i nformation systems, t h o rough understan ding of decisive and sensitive decision-making i n complex busi ness organizations is i n cluded. To serve this pu rpose as well as poss i b le, the School of Busi ness Administration has chosen to serve the campus and the business communi ties with comp act and d e l i berately l i mited instructional programs. They are i n tended for capable young men and women and seasoned executives with practical experience. To supple足 ment this unusually rich educational environment, the rising competence of the busi ness facu lty is further strengthened by research and consu lting activ ities l i m i ted to this p u rpose. Classes are s m a l l enough to meet the educational objectives o f both the reg ular and the special or I nterim courses. The educational policies emphasize relatively independent l i b rary and field studies to supplement the reg ular assign足 ments i n readings and exercises; active exchange of d i verse views i n small g roups and i n class d i scussions i s encou raged to develop an i n c reasingly effective and sophisti cated an alysis of busi ness cases and problems in the field. B U S I N ESS ADVISORY BOARD Edwi n S. Coombs, Jr., President, Sicks' Rainier Brewing Company, Seattle, Wash i ngton Kenneth W. H u l tg ren, Treasurer, Weyerhaeuser Company, Tacoma, Was h i ngton Stanley M, Little, J r " D i rector of Industrial and P u b l i c Relations, Boeing Company, Seattle, Was h i ngton A.E. Saunders, President, Puget So und National Bank, Ta coma, Wash ington George Wade, President, Brady I n ternati onal Lumber Company, Seattle, Wash i n gton B U S I N ESS CAREERS The majority of col lege g raduates are eventually emp loyed i,n business or gov足 ernment, and a diversity of preparations may lead to successful careers. In some cases, no background in busi ness is either req u i red or suggested. In others, an und ergraduate or graduate supporting field composed of care f u l ly selected b usi-


ness and other cou rses is re commended. Students i n te rested i n u n de rg raduate b u s i n ess ad m i n istration programs at Paci fic Lutheran Un iversity are e n rol led in the C o l lege o f Arts and S c i e n ces for at least one year of p re-business stud i es and may then transfer to the Sch o o l of Busi ness Ad m i n i strat i o n after a successfu l l y c o m p leted fres h m an year. Students considering b u s i ness stu d i es at the g raduate level should seek early p l an n i n g advice from the School o f Busi ness Ad m i n i stration fac u l ty fo r ap p ro足 p ri ate u n d e rg raduate c u r r i c u l a . The recom mended p re paration may i n c l ude specific cou rses in busi ness ad m i n i stration o r an und ergrad uate m aj o r i n b u s i n ess ad m i n istrati o n . ADM ISS I ON Students are admi tted to the School of Busi ness Ad m i n i stration by e i th e r of two basic p rocesses: G raduate students are ad m i tted when they meet the req u i rements specified in the p roced u res o f the Division of G raduate Studi es. Undergrad uate students are admitted u pon successful comp letion of at least six cou rses in arts and sciences with a c u m u lative g rade point average of 2.0 o r above, and decl aration of busi ness ad m i n i strati on a s a m aj o r i n t h e registration p rocess. T ransfer students are expected to have mai ntai ned the g rade point aver足 age of 2.0 m i n i m u m separately in both b usi ness and non-busi ness c o u rses. Ass i g n ment of a b u s i n ess faculty adv i se r i s req u i red. DEGREE REQU I R E M ENTS The deg ree req u i reme nts for the MASTER OF B U S I N ESS ADM I N ISTRAT I O N degree a r e specified i n the proced u res of the Division of G raduate Studies. The BACH ELOR OF B U S I N ESS A D M I N I STRAT I O N deg ree req u i res the comple足 tion of at least t h i rty-two cou rses (or equ ivalent) with an over-all g rade point average of 2.0 or above. 1)

Spec i f i c requ i rements i n c l uded a re : a. A t least sixteen cou rses outside t h e Sc hool o f Busi ness A d m i n i stration fields ; b. Cou rses taken to meet all general University requirements; c. At least ten c o u rses (at least five m u st be taken at Paci fic Lutheran U n i 足 versity) i n busi ness ad m i n istration (eq u ivalencies t o be determ i ned by the student's adviser i n the School of Business A d m i nistration) with a g rade point average of 2.0 m i n i m u m : ( 1 ) B A 281 , F i nancial Accounting; (2) BA 282 , Accou nting I n fo rmation Systems; (3) BA 290 , Law and Society; (4) BA 350, I n d ustrial Management; (5) BA 364, Managerial F i n ance; (6) BA 370, Market i n g Syste ms; (7) BA 455, B u s i ness P o l i c y ( 8 ) Th ree u p p e r d i vision courses.


d. Three courses i n economi cs, i n c l u d i n g the followi n g or equ ivalent: ( 1 ) Econ. 1 50, P ri n c i p les of Econ omi cs; (2) Econ . 481 , Statistical Methods; (3) One upper di vision econom i cs course. e. At least one cou rse i n mathematics i n cl u d i n g the fol lowing o r e q uivalen t : M a t h . 1 27, Fin ite Mathematics, o r Math . 1 51 , Calculus. f. At least one cou rse i n human relations to include the fo l l owi n g or othe r appropriate elective i n h u m an relati ons: BA 453, Personnel and I n dustrial Relations; or Psych. 330 Social Psychol足 ogy., or Soc. 275, G roup Behavior. ..

2) A group of se lected courses outside the School of Busi ness Admi nistration as part of the thirty-two course m i n i m u m fo r the degree described above. I n selecting these su ppo rting cou rses the student shou ld consider career plans and objectives, and: a. Review ski l l s i n oral and written rhetoric and c o m m u n icati ons. Consider足 ation should be given to such courses as CA 1 23, Fundamentals of O ral C o m m u n i cati o n . b. Because busi ness activities c a n i n c rease or m i n i m i ze social a n d economic problems, consider ta king such courses as P h i l os. 324, Social Phi losophy, or Eco n . 434, Govern ment and Busin ess. The degree req u i rements for the BACHELOR O F ARTS IN EDUCATION are speci足 fied i n the School of Education section of the catalog . However, ad vising for busi足 ness teac hing careers in secondary schools is performed i n the School of Business A d m i nistrati on. Students who wish to prepare to teach business subjects should consult with the Coordi nator of the Business Education cu rri c u l u m i n the School of Busi ness Administration before completing the registration process.


Pictorial Desig n Composi tion Social Issues Ju daeo Ch ristian Life and Thou g h t

Financial Acco u n t i n g Law and Society Statistical Methods Elective Non-Busi ness I nterim Elective

N o n-Busi ness I n terim E lective

Interim

BA 455

Senior Year

BA 350 BA 370

Junior Year

Busi ness Policy Elective Elective

I n dustrial Management Ma rketing Systems Business Elective Elective Interim Elective

Students should sched u l e four V. courses in PE acti vities du ring fi rst two years.

8A 281 B A 290 Eco n . 481

Sophom ore Year

A rt 1 60 English 1 01 Soc. 1 01 R e I . 1 03

Freshman Year

Fall Semester

Religion

BA 364 Eco n . 434

BA 282 E n g l . 230 P h i l . 201 Soc. 275

Econ. 1 50 Math. 1 27 C.A. 1 23

I n terd i sc i p l i n a ry Se minar Busi ness E lective E l ective

Managerial Fi nance Govern ment and Busi ness B usi ness E路lective

Accou nting I n fo. Systems I n tro. to Contemp. Lit. P r i n c i ples of P h i loso phy G roup Behavior

P ri n c i p les of Economics F i n i te Mathematics Fund. of Oral Commun ication

Spring Semester

SA M P L E M I N I M U M P R O G RAM F O R T H E BACHELOR OF B US I N ESS AD M I N I STRAT I O N D E G R E E


SCHOOL OF BUSI NESS ADM I NISTRATION COURSES

Lower division courses (numbered 1 00 - 299) are avai lable to all students. Upper division courses (numbered 300 - 499) are open primarily to students who have been a d m i tted to the School of Busi ness Admi n i stra tion. G raduate level courses ( n u m be red 500 - 599) are reserved for students in the Master of Busi ness Admini strat i o n program and those students i n other g raduate prog rams who have an approved supporting field in business. Consent of the Dean 01 the School of B usiness A d m i n istration is requi red for other stude nts. The m i d d l e digit o f the cou rse n u m be r i n d icates field o f concentrati o n : 4-Courses lor busi ness ed ucation a n d ge neral service 5-Courses in personnel and in dustrial management 6-Courses i n f i n ance and related s u bjects 7-Courses in marketing and distri bution 8-Cou rses i n ac counting and i n formation systems 9-Speciali zed and pred om i n anlly ind ependent studies 24 1 B U S I N ESS COMMUN ICATIONS Deve lopment of appl ied writing s k i l l s and tec h n iques in busi ness communi ca足 tions. I n cluded are letters 01 i n q u i ry, o rders and acknowledgments, sales and promotional c o m m u n i cations, claims and adjustments c o rrespondence, cred i t and col lections lette rs, briefing and busi ness reports, resumes, and appl ication leiters. Req u i red lor busi ness education majors. 243 FA M I LY F I N ANC IAL PLAN N I N G Consumer saving and spe n d i n g problem analysis and plan n i n g te c h n i q ues with e m phasis on i n te l l igent buying and budgeting, estate and tax plan n i n g , i n s u rance a n d i n vestment programs, and ret i rement p l a n n i n g . Consideration 01 ethical issues in govern m e n t and business Irom the poi n t of view of the consumer. Consumer o rganization and i nlluence i n the areas 01 finance, marketi n g , and pro duction. Req u i red lor business education majors. 281 F I N ANCIAL ACCO U N T I N G An int rod uction to acc o u n t i n g concepts pri n c i p l es. Preparation and analysis, 01 fina ncial reports. Re q u i red lor b u siness and busi ness education majors. 282 ACCOUNT I N G I N FORMAT ION SYSTE MS I n troduction to management i n lormation systems. Em phasis on the analysis and interpretation 01 accounting and econo m i c data and t h e i r use in planning and' control. Req u i red lor busi ness major3. Prereq u i site: BA 281 , o r a com足 plete c o u rse in accou n t i ng princi ples. 290 LAW AND SOCI ETY A study 01 the legal system in the United States, and the regulation 01 relation 足 sh ips between i n dividual c itizens, g roups, and the gove rnmental agencies and b ranches. Review 01 the rights and o b ligations of individual c i t i zens and corporat ions, ad m i n i strative law, and the procedu res and practices 01 the c o u rts i n a modern society. Req u i red lor busi ness majors.


340 BUSI N E SS EDUCAT ION Fi rst part i n c l udes the objectives of h i g h school business programs, the busi ness curri c u l u m , layo u t and fac i l ities pla n n i n g , the evaluation o f busi ness teachers and competence for busi ness occupations. Also inc luded is the exam i nation of informa tion resou rces and c u rrent thought in busi ness edu足 cation. The second part of the course concentrates on the appl ication of research findi ngs and psychological p r i n c i p les to the tea c h i n g of typew riting and bookkeeping in secondary schools. Req u i red for busi ness education majors. Prerequisites: Advanced Typing and SA 281 or e q u i valent. 350 I N D U ST RIAL MANAG E M ENT A critical exam i nation of the princi ples and processes of administration in ind ust rial and othe r org anizations. Management tech n i q u es and the functi ons of p l a n n i n g , organ i z i n g , d i re ct i o n , and control are d i scussed from both the classical and the behavioral pOints of view. I n trod uction to case analysis and problem-so lving tec hniq ues. Req u i red for business majors. 364 MANA G E R I A L F I N ANCE Concent rated study o f the tools o f financial analysis: Funds and cash flows, c ri t i ca l analysis of finan c i a l' statements and other financial i n formati on, techniques and financial plann i ng and budgeti ng, and the concepts related to capital expen diture budgeti ng, and the cost of capital. An i n t roduction to financial strategies and decisio n-making for financi n g , expansion, and d i v idend po l i ci es. Req u i red for busi ness majors. Prerequ isites: Economics 1 50 and 481 , and SA 282, or equivalent. 365 REAL ESTATE Study of land use p l a n n i n g and commercial deve lopment of 'land. The focus i s on demand factors, government control i n zoning and reg u lation, and real estate i n vestment analysis. 366 R I S K AND I N SURANCE MANAGEMENT An i n t ro d u ction to the p r i n c i p les o f risk and insurance management. Analytical review o f main functions and in sti t u t i ons of the i n s u rance busi ness. 370 MARKETI N G SYSTEMS The flows of goods and services in the economy; econ omic and' behavioral approaches t o the analysis o f demand ; the role of the marketing function in a busi ness firm; dete r m i n ation of the marketing m i x-prod uct policy, pricing, channels of dist r i bution, and marketing commun ications. Requi red for business majors. 381 I NT E R M E D I ATE ACCO UNTING Concentrated study of the valuation theories for assets and liabi l i t ies. Analysis of related effects on i ncome determination. Prereq uisite: BA 281 , or a comp lete c o u rse i n accounting principl es. 383 I N CO M E TAXAT ION Comprehensive study of i n come tax concepts, reg u lations, and tax planning


p r i n c i p les. Emphasis on i nd i vi d u al and corpo rate in come taxation. Prerequ i 足 site: BA 281 , o r e q u ivalent. 385 COST ACCO U N T I N G Basic and' advanced concepts o f costs i n developing i n formation f o r manage足 ment use in the determi nation of i n come, evaluation of capital investment alternatives, and the measurement of performance. Prereq uisite: BA 282. 387 DATA PROCE SS I N G SYSTEMS A computer laboratory oriented course which i n c ludes basic prog ram and system analysis and flow charting, i ntensive study of prog ra m m i ng languages with em phasis on FORTRAN, and the development of a working knowledge with computer hardware and software systems. Prereq u isite : BA 282, or permission of the i nstructor. 441 TEACH I N G SEC R ETARIAL SUBJECTS ( V2 ) The application of research fi n d i ngs and psychological p r i n c i p les to the teaching of shorthand, office practice, and related subjects in secondary schools. Intended for busi ness education majors. Prerequisites: Advanced Shorthand, Advanced Typewri ting, BA 2 41 , and BA 340 o r equivalent. 442 TEAC H I N G G EN E RAL BUS I N ESS SUBJ ECTS ( 'h ) The appl ication o f rese arch findi ngs and psychological princi ples t o the teaching of general business, consumer economics, economics, busi ness law, busi ness mathematics, and busi ness com m u n i cations subjects in sec足 ondary SChools. Pren;quisites: BA 2 4 1 , 243, 290 o r 495, 340, Economics 1 50 , o r consent o f t h e instructor. 443 I N F O RMATION PROCES S I N G I n trod uction t o i n formation a n d data processing systems, and related u s e of information processi n g eq u i pment: d u p l i cati ng, copying. and audio-visual processes, mechani cal calculating equipment, electro n i c data processing e q u i pment. and d i c tati n g and transc ribing eq u i p ment. Normal ly offered d u ring the I nteri m session. Designed for business ed ucation majors and students with an i nterest in office functions. 450 MANUFACTUR I N G MANAGEMENT Principles of scientific management; planning products, physical fac i l ities, eq u i pment and materials for prod uction; methods and techniques of super足 vision and control of personne l ; prod uction contro l ; pu rchasing and inventory management. The course i n c l udes supervised student projects and major case studies. Prereq u i site: BA 350, or equivalent. 453 PER SON N E L AND I N D U ST RIAL RELATI O N S Detailed examina tion o f behavioral processes o f ind ivid uals a n d groups i n business organizations. Emphasis on policy issues and specific problems i n managing h uman resources with focus o n modern practices of ind ustrial relations and personnel management in i n d ustrial and other organizations. Prereq uisite: BA 350, or equivalent.


455 B U S I N ESS P O L I CY Formu lation of polic ies to i ntegrate all functions of business. Soc i a l , ethical, re l i g i ous, economic, ed ucational and i nternational i m pl i cations in the fo rmu足 lation of business poli cies and objecti ves. Incl udes com prehe nsive case analyses. Req u i re d for business majors. P rereq u i site: Seni o r stand i n g with thorough knowledge of busi ness functions, or the consent of the instructor. 461 F I NA N C I A L ANALYSI S Study o f financial poli cies and the analytical framework for suppliers and users of private i n d ustrial capital. Intensive stud ies of selected companies and ind ustries. Prereq uisite: BA 364. or permission of the instructor. W i l l be first offered 1 97 1 -72. 464 F I NA N C I A L MANAGEMENT Pro b lems of working capital management, planning the financial structure, issue of new sec u rities , and major fi nancial pol icies. I n tensive and extensive use of cases and advanced readings. Prereq uisite: BA 364, or equ ivalent. W i l l b e f i rst offered 1 97 1 -72 . 470 MARKET I N G MANAGEMENT Analytical approaches for the sol ution of marketing prob lems; developing marketing strateg ies; planning and administering comprehensive marketi ng programs; evaluation and control of marketing operations. P rerequisite : BA 370, or equiv alent. 471 MARKET I N G RESEARCH A N D C O N S U M E R B E HAVI O R Te c h n i q ues a n d uses o f marketing research i n t h e business decision-making process. Emphasis is placed on research desi g n , various survey methods, research i nstruments, and sam p l i ng plans as they relate to marketing con足 sumer products and services in a changing environment. Conte m porary behaviora l science concepts to be exami ned and inc orporated in selected marketing projects. Prerequ isite: BA 370, and Eco n o m i cs 481 , or equivalent. 472 ADVERT I S I N G AND SALES MANAGEMENT Role of advertising and personal se lling i n the marketing prog ram; analysis of market targets; developing market potentials; media se lecti o n ; desi g n i n g the promotional messag e ; evaluation a n d control of t h e prom otional m i x . Prereq uisite: B A 3 7 0 , o r equ ivalent, or permission of t h e i nstructor. 473 I N DUST R I A L MARKET I N G AND P U RCHASING Analysis of the ind ustrial buying and sel l i n g process, p u rc h as i ng policies and proced u res; selection of sou rces of supply; contract analysis and negotiation ; marketing problems of manufacturers of ind ustrial goods; developing and i m plementing i n d u strial marketing strategies. Prerequ isite: BA 350, and 370, or equivalent. 482 ADVANCED ACCOU N T I N G Comprehensive study o f accounting f o r corporations, i n cluding t h e account足 ing aspects of consolidations and mergers, and partnerships, treatment of i n comp lete data; specialized accou nting concepts related to funds and cash


flows, statement analysis, and accounting for estate and trusts. Prereq uisite: BA 381 , or equivalent. 484 AUDITING The princip les and proced u res of auditing as they apply to the major balance sheet and i n come accounts, generally accepted auditing standards used by CPA'S; professional ethi cs. Prerequisite: BA 482, or equi valent. 488 SYSTEMS ANALYSIS A N D D E S I G N Compute r oriented l a boratory study o f system design a n d analysis. Emphasis o n systems docum entation, the auditing of computerized systems, the use of mathematical models in systems and simul ation techniq ues. Prereq uisite: BA 387, o r equ ivalent. 490 S E M I N A R Seminar o n specifically selected topics in business. Offered o n demand. Prereq u i s i t e : Consent of the i nstructor. 491 D I R ECTED STUDY I n d i vid ual studies, read i ngs on selected topics approved and supervised by the i n structor. P rereq uisite: Consent of the in structor. 495 B U S I N ESS LAW Proced u res, contracts, agency, negotiable i nstruments, busi ness organizations, property, trusts and w i l ls, transportation, insurance and employment. 550 O R GAN I ZATIONAL E N V I R O N M ENT The science and art of management is explored with special emphasis on the contri butions from i ndustri a l psychology and soc io logy. This course is centered on external and i n ternal social and economic environment changes as related to pla n n i n g , and on the study of g roups and work teams as related to the functions of d i recting and contro l l i n g . Major case stud ies are i n cluded. Req u i red for a l l M . B.A. cand idates. Prereq uisite: BA 350, or eq u i valent. 551 S E M I N A R I N I N D U ST R I A L MANAGEM ENT I n tensive analysis and development o f solutions for operational management. Emphasis i s on the relationship of production to other functions and external factors. Case studies of modern techn i ques and methodo logies as applied in selected situations and industries, i n c l u d i n g the use of q u antitative models, systems design and the use of computers. Req u i red for all M.B.A. candi dates. Prerequisites: BA 350, 550, and a wor king knowledge of q uantitative methods. 555 B U S I N ESS STRATEGY AND POL ICY Advanced read ings and case studies in management functions of plann ing, organization and control. Req u i red for a l l M. B.A. candidates. Prereq uisite: Thorough graduate level knowledge o f analytical methods and fun ctional fields of business management, last semester standing i n the M . B .A. program. 564 SEM I N A R I N F I NANCIAL MANAGEM ENT Management's role in framing the financial poli cies of the f i r m . Case studies i n the dete rmi nation of needs, sou rces and uses of funds; the development


of finan c i a l structu res, evaluation of alternative financial plans and alloca足 tion of funds wit h i n the firm, and the control of fi nancial resources. Requi red for all M . B .A. candidates. Prerequisite : BA 364, 550, 582, or e q u i valent. 570 S E M I N A R I N MARKET I N G MANA G E M ENT Study and analysis of marketi ng management policies and programs. Emphasis i s on the i n te rrelated elem ents of the ma rketing mix and the re lationsh ip of m a r ke ting with other internal functi ons; as well as the changing social e n vi ron ment, innovation, and modern marketing ph ilosoph ies. Required for all M.B.A . candidates. Prereq uisites: Strong background in econom ics and BA 370 or equivalent. 581 S E M I N A R IN F I NA N C I A L ACCOUNT I N G TH EORY A c ritical exa m i n ation of advanced accounting concepts and standa rds. I n tensive study of the current problems and contemporary trends reflected in accounting literature. Course designed for professional accountants. Prerequisite: BA 482, or equivalent, o r consent of the instructor. 582 ACCOU NTI N G I N FO R MAT I O N AND CONTROL A study of the applications of accounting information, services, and systems in the solutio n of manage ment problems in business. Requi red for all M.B.A. candidates. Students excused from this course are expected to com plete BA 581 or some other advanced accoun ting studies. Prerequisite: BA 281 , or e q u i valent. 590 SPECIAL S E M I N A R Sem inar o n specifi ca l l y selected advanced topics i n business. Offered on demand. Pre req u isite: Consent of the i nstructor. 591 I N DEPEN DENT STUDY I n d i v i d u a l read ing and studies of selected topi cs. M i n i m u m supervision after initial planning of student's work. Prerequisite: Consent of the i nstructor. 596 RESEARCH COLLOQ U I U M Supervised individual intensive study o f either t h e case col lection process and prob lem solving approaches (com pletion of case rese arch, including a comprehensive commentary and l i terature sum mary, acceptable for i nc l usion in the Interco l l egiate Case Clearing House B i b l i ography) , or a formal research study for a thesis. Regi stration for a m i n i mum of one semester i s required for all M .B .A. students. P re req uisite: Last semester standing in the M . B.A. program.

Interim courses offered in 1 970: 243 FA M I LY F I N A N C I A L PLAN N I N G 290 LAW A N D SOCI ETY 3 1 0 TH E B U S I N ESSMA N : FOLKLORE AND REALITY 490 S E M I N A R : EQUI PM ENT LABORATORY FOR B U S I N E SS TEACH ERS 499 D I RECTED STUDY 595 R E SEARCH COLLOQU I U M


CHEMISTRY

Mr. Giddings, Chairman, (and Chairman, Division 01 Natural Sciences), Mr. Anderson, Mr. Callett, Mr. Huestis, Mr. Nesset, Mr. Olsen, Mr. Tobiason

The cou rses offered by the Oepartment of Chemi stry are based on funda mental p r i nci ples of chemistry, mathemati cs, and physics, since modern c h emical train足 ing and practice i s marked l y dependent on knowledge of these other a reas also . The cou rses, curri c u l u m , faculty, and fac i l it ies of the department are app roved by the American Chemical Society. Graduates com pleti ng the prescribed program will be certified as having met requ i rements of the American Chemical Society for entry into the chem i cal professi o n . A major f u l f i l l i n g t h e req u i rements of t h e BACH ELOR O F ARTS degree consists o f Chem i stry 1 1 5 or 1 3 1 ; 1 4 2 ; 321 ; 331 , 332, 333, 334; 341 , 342, 343. Prereq u i sites for these courses incl ude a m i n i m u m of two c o u rses i n physics, and mathematics through 1 52 (second semester ca l c u l u s) . Students completing t h i s program may continue i n to graduate study i n che m i stry, but preferably should comp lete ad d i 足 tion al cou rses f r o m t h e B a c h e l o r of Science curricu l u m . Add i t i o nal cou rses i n m athematics, physics, a n d in some cases biology are a l so recom mended. The foreign language req u i rements of the College of Arts and Sciences sh ould be fulfi l led under Option I by the study of German, req u i red for American Chemic al Soci ety cer ti ficati on. R u ssian or French are acceptable substitutes for the Bachelor of Scienc e degree; with pe rm i ssion o f the department, Option II may be accepted for the Bachelor of Arts degree. SUGGESTED P R OGRAM FOR BAC H E LOR OF SC I EN C E IN C H E M I'STRY' Freshman Year C h e m i stry 1 1 5 or 1 3 1 Chemi stry 1 42 E n g l i sh 1 0 1 German 1 0 1 , 1 0 2 Mathematics 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 Physical Education Elective' .

Courses 1

_

_______

_

Sophomore Year Courses 2V2 C h e m i stry 33 1 , 333; 332, 334 Physics 1 0 1 1 1 Physi c s 253 German 201 , 202 2 Religion 1 03 or 203 Physical Education '/2 _

_____

_

_

.. _ _ _

____

2 2 V4

_

_

___ .

_

1 8 8%

Courses Junior Year C h e m i st ry 321 2 V2 C h e m i stry 34 1 , 343; 342, 344 1 Physics 254 Physical Education V4 3 Elective' __ _

___ _ _

_

_ __ _

Senior Year Chemistry 497 C h e m i stry Elective (401 , 404, 422, or 432)J . _ Elective' _

Courses 1

___ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 6

____

8 7% ' Opportunities lor exemption or advanced placement may be available in English, German, Mathematics, and Physics. In many cases courses may be taken in years other than those indicated.


2Elective courses must include those needed to complete the General University requirements in Fine Arts, History or Literature, Philosophy, Social Science, and the second course in Religion, as well as required Interim experiences. 'To receive American Chemical Society certification, a student must complete Chemistry 422, 432, and an additional upper division course in chemistry, mathe足 matics, or physics. Although no more than 10 courses in chemistry may be applied toward the 32 course graduation requirement, the research requirement may be met with a half course during the academic year or by a summer experience with足 out academic credit. In some cases students earning American Chemical Society certification will need more than a total of 32 courses to the extent that Chemistry course credit exceeds 10 courses.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCAT I O N major requirements are listed below. Can d i dates for this degree must also meet special requirements described in the School of Education section i n this cata log. Senior High School Preparation : 113,{, courses Teaching Major: 73,{, courses consisting of Chemistry 1 1 5 (or 1 3 1 ) , 1 42 , 321 , 331 , 332, 333, 334, 341 , 342, and 343. Prereq u i sites: Physics 1 01 , 1 02 or 253 ; Mathematics 1 5 1 , 1 52. Junior High School Preparation: Teaching Major: same as for sen ior level above. Teach i ng M i n o r : 5% cou rses consisting of ChemistrY 1 1 5 (or 1 3 1 ) , 1 42, 32 1 , 331 , 332, 333, 334. Prereq uisite: Mathematics 1 33 or equivalent. Elementary School Preparation: Teac h i n g Major: 6 c o u rses. Req u i re d : 4 approved courses in chemistry and two additional courses to be determi ned in consultation with the School of Education. Teaching Minor: Three courses to be dete rmi ned i n consultation with the School of Educati o n . 1 03 I N TRODUCT I O N TO BIOCHEM ISTRY A survey o f genera l , organ ic, and biochem istry pe rtinent to chemical processes in the h u man org anism. S u i table for l i beral arts students, n u rsing students, and prospective teachers. N o prerequisites. I 1 04 G E N ERAL I N O RGANIC C H E M I STRY Basic aspects of chemi cal bonding and descriptive i n organic chemistry; chemical aspects of env i ron mental p o l l u ti o n . No prerequisites; may fo l low Chem istry 1 03 or 1 15 for students desi ring a second cou rse in chemistry. I I 1 1 5 G EN ERAL C H E M I STRY The structure o f matter, ato m i c and molecular theory, quantitative relation足 ships. Sui table for science majors and others. Prereq u isite or coreq uisite: Mathematics 1 33. I 1 3 1 P R I N C I P LES OF C H E M I STRY An honors level course in che mical theory using el omentary calculus, replac足 ing Chem istry 1 1 5 for selected students. Prereq uisite : high school chemistry. Corequisite: Mathematics 1 5 1 . I


1 32 P R ESENTAT I O N OF EX P E R I M ENTAL WORK ( V• • '12 , or 1 ) An honors c o u rse i n chemica l labo ratory p racti ces involving individual p rojects su pervised by fa cu lty members. oral and w ritten reports. Prereq ui site: one co u rse in col le ge chemistry and i nvitation o f the department. 1 42 SYSTEMATIC I N ORG A N I C C H E M I STRY Study of the elements g ro u ped accord i n g to the periodic table, chemical equi l i b r i u m , rad i ochemistry and i n o rganic q u a l itative analysis. P rereq uisite: Chemistry 1 03 and 1 04 , o r H5, or 1 3 1 . " 321 QUANT ITATIVE ANALYS IS Chemical methods of quantitative analysis, i n c l u d i n g volumetric, g rav i metric. and selected i nstrumental methods. P rereq uisite: Chem istry 1 42 ; Mathematics 133. I 331 , 332 O R GA N I C C H E M I STRY (1 , 1 ) A n i n terpretation o f properties and reactions o f a l i phatic and aromatic com­ pounds o n the basis of current c h e m i c a l theory. P rereq uisite: Chemistry 1 03 and 1 04 , or 1 1 5, or 1 3 1 . C o requisite: Chem istry 333, 334. I. " 333, 334 ORG A N I C C H E M ISTRY LABORATORY (V" V4 ) Conventional and modern tec h n i q u es o f synthesis, separation, reactions, and analysis of organic compounds. M ust accompany Chemi stry 331 , 332. I, . " 34 1 , 342 PHYSICAL C H E M I STRY (1 , 1 ) Study of relati onsh i p between structure. energ y content, and physical and c h e m i c a l properties of chemical systems. Prere qu isite: Chemistry 1 1 5 or 1 31 ; Mathematics 1 52 ; Physics 1 02 o r 25 1 . I , " 343, 344 PHYSICAL C H E M ISTRY LABORATORY (V. , V. ) Methods and in terpretation of measurement and calcu lation of physical and chemical p roperties. One semester of laboratory is req u i red for the B.A. deg ree; both semesters for the B.S. d e g ree. Corequ isite o r p re requisite: Che mistry 34 1 , 342. I , " 401 O R G A N I C QUAL ITATIVE ANALYSI S Study of methods f o r t h e isolation a n d identification o f organ i c compounds, i n c l u d i n g modern spectroph otometri c and c h romatog raph i c tec hniq ues; systematic proce du res fo r searching the chem i cal l i teratu re . Prereq u i site: Chem istry 332 and 334. I 404 B I O C H E M I STRY Study of the chemistry of bi ological systems, i n c l u d i n g laboratory methods. Prereq u isite: Chem istry 332 and 334. " 422 ADVANCED I N ORGAN I C C H E M I STRY A study of modern i n o rgan i c theory 'i n c l u d i n g atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends, and coordination compounds; advanced labo ratory tech­ n iques for i n o rganic synthesis. P re requisite o r coreq u isite: Chemistry 342 and 344 . "


432 I N STRUM ENTAL ANALYSIS Theory and praclice of i n strumental methods for c h emical analysis and molecular structure dete rm i nation. Prereq u isite: Chem istry 321 , 341 , 343 ; Chemistry 342 and 344 are either prerequisite or coreq u isite. I I 491 I N DEPEN DENT STUDY (V4 , V> o r 1 ) Li brary and/or laboratory study of topics not i n c l uded i n regularly offered courses. Proposed p roject must be approved by the chai rman of the de part足 ment and supervisory responsibi l ity accepted by an i n structor. May be taken more than once. I I I 497 RESEARCH ( V> or 1 ) Experimental or theoret ic al investigation comprising previously u n p u b l ished work. Open to upper d i vision students with the conse n t of the chairman of the department. May be taken more than once. I II 597, 598 G RADUATE RESEARCH ( V2 to 1) Open to master's degree candi dates only. P rerequ i site: Consent of the chair足 man of the department. Interim courses offered in

1 970:'

1 3 2 PR ESENTAT I O N O F EXP E R I M ENTAL W O R K 3 0 3 H U MA N I T I ES O F SCIENCE (CH E M I STRY/ PHYSI CS) 31 3 H O R M O N ES, ALCOHOL AND DRUGS ( B I OLOGY/ C H E M I STRY) 3 1 7 ENVIRON MENTAL DYNA MICS ( C H E M I STRY/ G E N ERAL SC I EN C E) 31 9 APPLICATI ONS OF RA D I O I SOTOPES (C H E M I STRY/PHYSI CS) 441 I N DEPENDEN T STUDY 451 RESEARCH


CLASSICS Mr. Carleton, assisted by various member of the Departments of Foreign Languages, History, Philosophy, and Religion The above departments c o o p e rate in offering a classics area major. T h i s inter足 departmental maj o r req u i res completion of twelve cou rses selected from the list below in consultation with the program coord i n ator, M r . Carleton . F o r a d m i n i s足 trative pu rposes the classics area major is a program of the Department of F o re i g n Languages, b u t the professors who teach the courses b e l o w share i n the conduct of a l l aspects of t h e program such as p l a n n i n g , evaluati n g, and ad vising. T h e foundation of a l l majors i s a l a n g u age program in L ati n and / o r Gree k : Latin

1 0 1 , 102

Latin

201 , 202

Greek H J 1 , 102

Elementary I n termediate E l e mentary

Greek 201 , 202

Inte rmediate

G reek 42 1 , 422

Masterpieces of Greek Literature

The balance of a maj o r i s derived from these c o u rses : History 32 1 , 322

H i story of the A n c i e n t World

Phi losophy 331

A n c i e n t G reek P h i losophy

Religion 203

B i b l i cal Literature

R e l i g i o n 327

Ancient C h u rch H i story

Re l i g i o n 4 2 1

Old Testament Studies

Religion 422

New Testament Studies

I nd e pendent Study courses Selected I n t erim cou rses F U rther descri pt i o n of the above cou rses may be

found

in

the parts of the

catalog devoted to each department.

COMMU NICATION ARTS Mr. Karl, Chairman, Mr. Arnold, Mr. Doughty, Mr. Nordholm, Mrs. Revis; assisted by Mr. Utzinger

8 8 c o u rses in d rama, or 8 c o u rses c o m b i n i n g the three

Candiates for the BACHELOR OF ARTS D E G R E E may c o m p l ete a major with cou rses in p u b l i c address, or

areas of the d e p a rtme nt-pu b l i c address, d rama and broadcasti n g . A l l s t u d e n t s m a j o r i n g i n the field wi l l partici pate i n some phase o f d ramatic, forensic, a n d b roadcasting' co-c u rr i c u l a r activities. P u b l i c Address major:

Eight

courses, o f which

C o m m u n i c ation Arts

1 23

is

required. The remainder of the c o u rses will be selected in consultation with the adviser. Suggested c o u rse s c h ed u l e : 227, 327, 333, 335, 344, and at

least two

add i t i o n a l cou rses i n the department. D rama major: Eight

c o u rses, of which

C o m m u nication Arts 1 23 i s required.

The rema i n d e r o f the c o u rses wi l l be selected in consultation with the adviser. Sug-


.,

gested course schedule: 24 1 , 250, 354, 363, and t h ree additional c o u rses in the d rama area. Students i nte rested i n broadcasting should i n addition to Communication Arts 1 23 take 24 1 , 275, 374, and four add itional Commun ication, Arts courses, to be se'lected in consultati o n with the adviser. Supporting work in related departments is recom mended. Can d i d ates for the BAC HELOR O F F I N E ARTS DEGREE will be req u i red to take 13 c o u rses i n the department, i n c l u d i n g Fundamentals of Oral Com m u n i cati on 1 23. The rem a i n i n g 12 c o u rses w i H be selected i n consultation with the adviser. The se足 lected course structure w i l l vary with the area of the department to be emphasized. Suggested courses for d rama emphasis (should be taken as c l ose to seq uence as possi ble) : 24 1 , 250, 344, 351 , 352, 354, 363, 374 plus two d ramatic l i terature courses and two elective c o u rses. Suggested courses for public address emphas i s : 227, 232, 327, 333, 335, 336, 344. The balance of the c o u rses w i l l be selected together with the adviser. Suggested c o u rses for broadcasting emphasis: 24 1 , 271 , 275, 344, 374. The bal足 ance of the c o u rses wi l l be selected together with the adviser. These should i n clude some courses i n related departments. BACHELOR O F ARTS I N E D U CATION major requirements are l i sted below . Candi dates for t h i s degree m u s t also m e e t special requirements described i n t h e School of Educat i o n section i n this catalog. Senior High School Preparation: 11 courses Teach i n g Major: 6 to 8 c o u rses. Required: 4 c o u rses: Communi cat i o n Arts 1 23, 227 or 250, 24 1 and 4 04 , plus 3 to 5 cou rses i n consultation with the maj o r advise r. Suggested supporting courses: One of the foll owing : 1 ) 4 to 5 c o u rses in English approved by the major adviser; or 2) 4 to 5 c o u rses i n a modern or classical language. Junior High School Preparation: Teac h i n g Maj o r : 6 to 7 c o u rses. Required: 3 c o u rses : Communication Arts 1 23, 227 or 250 and 241 , p l us 2 additional c o u rses in C o m m u n ication Arts. Additional 2 to 3 courses to be determi ned in consultation with the Department and the School ot Educati o n . Teac h i n g M i n o r : 4 to 5 c o u rses. Required: Comm unication Arts 1 23 and 241 , plus 2 to 3 c o u rses ot electives. Elementary School Preparation: Teac h i n g Major. 6 courses. Required: C o m m u n i cation Arts 1 23 and 402, plus 2 courses in Communica足 tion Arts and 2 courses in English. Teac h i n g M i n o r : 3 c o u rses to be determined i n consu ltation with the School of Educati on.

1 23 F U N DAM ENTALS OF ORAL C O M M U N I CAT ION Foundation course deal i n g with basic elements of the speech situation, i nvolv足 i ng ski l ls of the v i s i b le and aud i b l e approaches, as we l l as conce n t ration on content. Extensive platform work. I I I


1 25, 225, 325, 425 FORENSICS ( V. ) O n e year's competition ,i n i n terco l l egiate forensics d u ring t h e co rres ponding academic year. " 1 6 1 I NTRODUCT I O N TO THE T H EATR E An i n trod uction t o t h e theatre a s a fine art and its contribution t o the c u l t u re of a people. The correlation between the playwright, des i g n e r , acto r , di rector, and t h e i r i n fluence in re lation to one another. I 226 PARLIAM ENTARY LAW (V2 ) A study o f parliamentary law based u pon Robert's R u les of Order. P ractical work p redominates. Des ig ned pri marily to aid those who d o o r w i l l belong to organizations. " 227 A R G U M ENTATION A N D D E BATE Argumentatio n , evidence, proof and the adaptation and appli cation of argu足 ment to various types of o ral c o m m u n i cation. The forms of debate and their preparation and presentation are i m p o rtant c o u rse consi derations. I 232 CONTEMPORARY ORAL D I SCOURSE A study of the sign i fi cance of rhetoric (i.e., "the process of adjusting ideas to people and people to ideas") d u ring vari ous stages of Western c u l t u re from the classical period to the p resent. Special attention is g i ven to the rhetoric of such contemporary issues as war, poverty, re l i g i o n , and civil rights. I n dependent investigation , along with classroom reports and discus足 sion, is e m p h asized. " 241 I NTERP R ET I V E R EA D I N G An i n troduction to t h e a r t of read i n g literature aloud t o an audience, t o i n terpreting i t experientially, logically and emotionally, I n d i vi d ual and g roup read i n g s . I " 250 F U N DA M ENTALS OF ACT I N G An i n t roduction t o t h e w o r k of the actor, h i s natural a n d learned s k i l ls, with exercises i n memory, imagi nation and obse rvati on, using i m p rovisations and scenes from m odern plays. To i n c l ude the theory and p ractice o f stage make- u p . I 271 BROADCAST M E D IA-MAN AND SOCI ETY A study of the h i stori cal, phi loso p h ical, and sociological aspects of the media and its i m pact on man and society. Lecture and laboratory. I 275 RADIO PRODUCTION A study of the elements of rad i o production i n c l u d i n g analysis o f program des i g n , writi n g for radio, and production tools and tech niques. Lecture and laboratory. Extensive use of KPLU-FM studi o faci lities and equi pment. I 327 EXTE M PORAN EOUS SPEA K I N G Platform w o r k pred o m i nates. Speci a l emphasis g i v e n to the study of gath-


e ring mate rial, methods 01 preparation, and delivery. Prerequisite: 1 23 o r consent 01 department. I 333 R H ETO R I C AND R H ETO R I CAL C R I T I C I S M A study 01 t h e deve lopment 01 rhetorical theory l r o m Corax t o modern ti mes with an em phasis on G reek and Roman contributions. A su rvey 01 the theories 01 trad itional and contemporary critics with parti c u l ar e m phasis on the ap足 proach to, methods 01, and standards lor evaluation 01 rheto r i cal disc o u rse . I 335 A M ER I CAN P U B L I C ADD RESS A c ritical study 01 selected American speeches, speakers, and controversy lrom Jonathan Edwards to the present. Emphasis on methods and styles lor effectiveness studied against a background 01 the speakers and the issues 01 the i r ti mes. I 336 P E RSUAS I O N A study 01 t h e decision-making p rocess i n contem porary society. Emphasis o n analysis o f methods i n a p pealing t o h u m a n motivations a n d t h e i r a p p l i cation in actual platform experience. I I 344 ADVANCED I NTERP R ETAT I O N Spec ial p rojects a n d class exe rcises d i rected toward p rogram p l a n n i n g . Deve lopment of ski l l and c o m m u n i cativeness i n read i n g a l o u d . Deve lopment of the art of making l i teratu re l i ve . Prereq u i site : 241 . I I 351 STAGE TECH N O LOGY Basic theory and practice of techni cal aspects of set b u i ld i n g , costume con足 stru ction, l i g h t i n g , and thei r asse m b l i n g , handling and management lor the stage. I 352 SCEN I C DESIGN The deve lopment of artistic and tec h n ical abi l i ties i n the com plete design of scenery, l i g h t i n g , and costumes for plays of a l l periods. Assign ment covers various styles and periods as we l l as the preparation of models, renderi ngs, working d rawings and scen i c painting and stage p l a n n i n g . I I

I

I

354 PLAY D I R ECTION A study o f the role o f the d i rector, histori cally and critically, and an i n troduc足 tion to the art of play d i recting. Each student will d i rect and produce a one-act play, accom panied by an an notated d i rector's script, and a theoretical/ prac足 tical analysis. II a/y 1 9 7 1 -72. 363 H I STORY O F THE THEATRE A study of the theatre and d rama in representative societies, includ ing early G reece and Rome, Asia, Renaissance and modern E u rope, A m e rica, and others, with e m p hasis on i nd i vidual research and parti c i pati on . I a/y 1 97 1 -72. 374 TELEV I S I O N PRODUCTION A study of the elements of television p roduction, i n c l u d i ng an analysis 01 p ro-

I


gram desi g n , writing for television, and prod uction tools and tec h n i q ues. Lecture and labo ratory. Extensive use of KPL U-TV studio fac i l i ties and eq u i p ­ ment. I I 380 SPEECH S C I E N C E A N D PATHOLOGY P ractical study of anatomy, p h ysiology and physics involved in the speech process. The study of phonetics and the production of all sounds in the Eng­ lish language. Basic princi ples and therapy of speech correcti o n . Remed i a l proced u res designed for arti c u l ation, v o i c e , stutte ring, and lang uage dis­ orders, The re habilitation of the brain damaged and cleft pal ate handi­ capped. " 402 SPEECH IN T H E E L E M ENTARY CLASSROOM ( Vz ) A su rvey of speech problem s and opportu nities which confront the teacher in the classroom, grades one th rough eight. " 404 SPEECH IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL ( Vz ) Curri c u l u m constructi o n , speech phi losophy for the teacher. Co-curricular activities : ad m i n i stration of d rama, radio and forensic activities. 1 1 450 C H I LD R E N ' S THEATRE WORKSHOP Practical formal d ramatics for teachers from kindergarten through high sc h o o l . A complete three-act play o r its e q u i valent will be produced. The students wi l l be i n volved in d i recti ng, stage management, lighting and a l l o t h e r phases of prod ucti o n . S 459 S U M M E R DRAMA W O R KSHOP The summer d rama workshop will consist of one session of i n tensive work i n d rama. Acting, stage management, l i g h ti ng i nstruction, and all other phases of p roduction. S 474 I N STRUCT IONAL TECHNOLOGY AND T H E CLASSROO M TEACHER ( Vz ) A course designed to acquaint the c l assroom teacher with television as a techno logical tool for teac h i n g . I n cl uded w i l l be the general criteri a for tech­ nol ogy i n teac h i n g and the specific criteria for the use of television as a tea ching tool. 1 1 478 S U M M ER TELEVISION WORKSHOP A practical and in tensive study of the creative and prod uction tec h n i q ues of television prog,rammi ng. The course is designed for the mature student. It w i l l feature extensive use of KPLU-TV stud i o fac i l ities a n d equi pment. S 491 SPECIAL STU D I E S IN C O M M U N I CATION ARTS ( Y4 ) 492 SPECIAL STU D I ES I N C O M M U N I CATION ARTS ( Vz ) 493 SPECIAL STU D I ES I N C O M M U N ICAT I ON ARTS ( 1 ) 596 R ESEARCH I N COM M U N ICAT I ON ARTS ( V4 ) 597 R E SEARCH I N COM MU N I CATION ARTS ( Vz ) 598 RESEARCH I N C O M M U N I CAT ION ARTS ( 1 )


Interim courses offered in 1 970: 310 THE EFF ECT OF MASS C O M M U N I CATI ONS MEDIA ON SOCI ETY 3 1 4 CREATIVE TH EATER IN TH E URBAN ENVI RON MENT 3 1 5 N EW YO R K C ITY THEATER EXPER I E N C E 31'8 TE LEV I S I O N A N D C H I L DREN'S THEATER

EARTH SCIENCES

Mr. Ostenson, Chairman, Mr. Fisk, Mr. Huestis, Mr. Lowes

Studies i n Earth Sciences deal with the natural physical envi ronment, rang ing from planetary science and the u n i verse to conside rati on of the earth's crust, the conti nents and ocean basi ns and thei r m u t ual i n ter-rela tionships. Courses i n clude st udies i n geology, ocean ography, astronomy, meteorology and geography with e m p h asis on the relat ionsh i p between mankind and the natural environment. Cou rses of study may be arranged to prepare students for careers in any of the basic fields. I n add i t i o n , inte r-departmental prog rams can provide m o re speciali zed background for g raduate work in such fields as geophysics or geochemistry. The offe rin gs are parti cula rly suited to students p lanning teach ing careers in earth science at the various school levels. BACHELOR O F ARTS deg ree major req ui rements consist of a m i n i m u m of six c o u rses supported by two cou rses i n each of two other natu ral science fields. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCAT ION major req u i reme nts in Earth Sciences are l i sted below. Candi dates fo r this degree m ust also meet spec ial req u i rements described in the School of Education section in this catalog. Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses Teaching Major: 1 1 cou rses Required: ES 1 3 1 , 1 32 , 323, 324, 360 or 365, 49 1 , 492. Required supporting courses: Mathema tics 1 51 : Chemistry 1 1 5 or 1 3 1 , 1 4 2 , Physics 1 01 , 1 02. Suggested supporting courses: Biology 1 5 1 , 1 52 and additional cou rses in chemistry and physics. Junior High School Prep aration: Teach i ng Major: 7 cou rses Required: ES 1 3 1 , 1 32 , 323, 324, 360 or 365. Required supporting courses: C h e m i stry 1 1 5 or 1 3 1 , 1 42 . Suggested supporting courses: Mathematics 1 5 1 ; Bio logy 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 . Teaching M i no r : 4 - 5 cou rses i n e a r t h a n d physi cal sciences. Elementary School Preparatio n: Teaching Major: 6 cou rses Prerequisite: Trigonometry and h i g h school bio logy. Required: ES 1 3 1 , 1 32 , 323, 324 , 360 or 365. Required supporting courses: Chem istry 1 1 5 or 1 3 1 , 1 42. Teaching Minor: 3 courses in earth and physical scien ces.


1 01 WORLD GEOGRAPHY Patterns o f physical, c l imati c and ecological features on the earth and their relations to man. I. 1 2 2 INTRODUCT I O N TO PHYS ICAL S C I E N C E A course which considers t h e p h y s i c a l nature of t h e Earth b y integrating the sciences of chemi stry,

geology,

meteorology and

physics to a study

of the Earth, its materials, processes, history and environment. The course is primarily i n tended for students with no previous background in chemistry, geology o r physics. Th ree lectu res and one laboratory period per week. I 1 3 1 P H Y S I CAL GEOLOGY A study of rocks, minerals, and the physiographic features of the su rface of the eart h . Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period

(or field

trip) a week. Formerly Geology 1 0 1 . I 1 3 2 H I STORICAL GEOLOGY A continuation o f Geology 1 3 1 . A study of sedimentary rocks, fossils, and earth history. Th ree

lectures and

one three-hour laboratory

(or

field

trip)

a week. Formerly Geology 1 02. " 1 36 D E SC R I PT I V E ASTRONOMY Topics covered incl ude the moon , the solar system, coordinate systems for locating stellar objects, characteristics of stars. 202 G EN ERAL OCEANOGRAPHY A descriptive course designed to give a broad background. Emphasis is on relationships chemical,

between

oceanography

and

other

fields

covering

physical,

b i o l ogi cal, c l i matic and geological aspects of the sea. Lectures,

laboratory and field trips.

"

222 CONSERVATION OF NATURAL R ESOURCES ( '/2 ) See B i o l ogy 222. 323 M I N E RALOGY Fundamental

principles

of

crystallography

and

mineralogy, studying

both

ore and rock forming minerals. Two lectu res and one two-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisites: ES missi on.

131

and

high school

chem istry or per足

I

324 PETROLOGY Origin, occurrence and classification of the m o re common rocks: emphasis on hand specimen identification. Prerequisites: ES 1 3 1 o r permission. " 351

NATURAL H I STORY OF T H E PAC I F I C NORTHWEST ( 1 '/2 ) See Biology 35 1 .

360 G EOLOGY O F WESTERN WAS H I N GTON A study of the minerals, rocks and geological history of the area between the COlumbia Plateau and the Pacific Ocean. Lectures, labo ratory sessions and

field

trips.

permission. S

Prerequisite:

one

year

of

college

labo ratory

SCience

or


365 GLACIAL G EOLOGY O F WASH I N GTON A study of glacial ice, g l acial deposits, and land forms resu lting from the Pleistocene g l aciation in Wash i ngton. Lectures, laboratory sessions, and field tri ps. Prereq u isite: one year of college laborato ry science or pe rmission . S 425 B I OLOGI CAL OCEANOGRAPHY See B i o logy 425. 491 , 492 I N DEPENDENT STUDY ( % - 1 ) Interim course offered i n 1 970:

302 STRUCTU R E AND TECTON I CS O F THE WESTERN CORDI LLERA (GEOLOGY F I E L D T R I P SOUTHWESTERN U N ITED STATES) 31 7 ENVIRON M ENTAL DYNA M I C S ( B I O / C H E M / G E N ERAL SCIENCE)

ECONOM ICS

Mr. Enderby, Mr. Genda, Mr. Holman, Mr. Je ns e n

The c o u rses in econom i cs are designed ( 1 ) to offer to all students an oppor­ tunity to acq u i re a general understan d i ng of the pri vate and p u b l i c sectors of the U n i ted States economy so that they may be more enlightened c i tizens, (2) to pro­ vide the necessary general econ o m i c background for students majoring i n Busi ness Administrati on and for students plan n i ng to teach in the Social Sciences or in Business Education, and (3) to provide the necessary background for students plann ing g raduate study i n economics. A major i n economics shall consist of a m i n i m u m of eight cou rses i n c l u d i n g Econ o m i cs 1 50, 351 , 352, 481 , a n d 486, a n d Busi ness Ad m i n i stration 21 1 . T h e re mai n i ng two courses t o meet t h e m i n i mal req u i rements may be selected from any of the additional upper d ivision courses offered by the Department of Eco­ n o m i cs. Students contemplating g raduate study in economics are stro n g l y advised (though not req u i red) to i n clude Mathematics 1 51 , 1 52, 231 , and 332 in their total program of study. 1 50 P R I N C I PLES O F ECON O M I CS A c o u rse designed to i n t roduce the student to the scope and sequence of the discipline of econom i cs, dealing d u ring the semester with both M i c ro- and Macro-Economics. This course is designed for anyone interested i n develop­ ing the ski lls of analytical thought and learning more about the n ature of the Ameri can Econo m i c Syste m . No prereq uisi te. 290 S E M I NAR ( V. to 1 ) Se m i n ars o n spec i fi cally selected topics i n econom i cs w i l l be offered as c i r­ cumstances warrant. P rereq uisite: Consent of i n structor. 321 LABOR P ROBLEMS A study of the h i story, nature and treatment of labor problems i n the U n i ted States. Among the topics d i scussed are emp loyment and unemployment; wage problems; col lective bargai n i ng ; u n i ons and e m p loyer assoc iations; i n d ustrial u n rest and con f l i ct. No p rerequ isite. II a/y 1 970-7 1 .


331

INTERNATIONAL TRADE Regional

and

i n ternational

specialization,

com parative costs,

i n ternational

payments, and exchange rates. National p o l i c i e s to promote or restrict trade. Busi ness practice in

international trade and i nvestment. Prereq uisite: Eco

nomics 1 50. I 351

I N T E R M E D IATE MACRO ECO N O M I C ANALYS I S Macro-eco n o m i cs a t t h e intermedi ate leve l . National i n come accounting a n d determ ination i n c l u d i n g p o l i c y i m p l i cations w i l h i n the institutional framework of the U. S. economy. Prereq u i site: Eco n o m i cs 1 50 . I

352 I NTER MEDIATE M I C R O ECON O M I C ANALYS I S M i c ro-econ o m i cs a t the intermediate leve l . The theory o f consumer behavior. Product and factor prices under conditions of monopoly, competiti o n , 'and i n termediate ma rkets. Welfare econ o m i cs . Prereq uisite: Econ o m i cs 1 50 . I I 3 6 1 M O N EY A N D B A N K I N G T h e nature a n d functions o f money. Cred i t institutions. T h e relations h i p o f money a n d b a n k deposits t o t h e national economy. Prereq u i s ite : Economics 1 50 . II a/y 1 97 1 -7 2 . 3 6 2 P U B L I C F I NA N C E P u b l i c taxation a n d expenditure at t h e federal, state a n d local levels. Types of taxes and expen d i t u res. The budget. The p u b l i c debt, Fiscal control of the busi ness cycle. Prereq u i site: Econ o m i c s 1 50. I I a/y 1 970-7 1 . 434 GOVE R N M ENT A N D B U S I N ESS A study of the relationship of government and busi ness i n the United States

with special attention to governmental regulation of business. No prerequisite. I I a/y 1 97 1 -72. 481 STAT ISTICAL METHODS Descriptive

statistics:

measures

of

posi tion,

d i s persi o n ,

and

proportions.

I n ferential statistics: estimation and the testing o f hypotheses by parametric and nonparametric tec h n i q ues. Regression and correlation analysis. I 486 READI NGS I N T H E EVOLUTION

II

OF ECON O M I C THOUGHT

A s u rvey of the development of economic thought from ancient to modern times with e m p h asis on the period from Adam Smith to J. M . I<eynes. This period i n cludes : the c l assical economists, the s o c i a l i sts. the marginal ists, the neo-classical eco n o m i sts, and the Keynesians. No prerequisite. I I 490 S E M I N A R ( V4

to 1 )

Seminars o n spe c i f i c a l l y selected topics i n economics w i l l b e offered as c i rc u mstances warrant. Prereq u i si te : Consent of the i n structor. 4 9 1 , 492, 493 I N DEPEN DENT STUDY (짜4 to 1 ) Consent o f the instructor req u ired .


504 MANAG E R IAL ECO N O M I C S Develops t h e a b i l i ty to apply basic economic concepts to policy formation and operating decisions with special reference to such prob lems as cost, demand , pricing, and investment. P rerequ isite : Economics 1 50. I 543 QUANTITATIVE M ETHODS Develops the abi l ity to apply the concepts of probab i l ity, sam p l i n g , and statist i cal decision theory to problems faced by management. P re requisite: Permission of the i nstructor, Econ o m i cs 481 . " 591 , 592, 593 I N D EPENDENT STUDY ( V4 to 1 ) 599 THESIS ( V4 to 1 ) Interim courses offered i n 1 970:

303 ADVERTI S I N G AND T H E CONSUMER 304 ECO N O M I CS O F U R BAN TRANSPORTAT I O N AND H O U S I N G R E N EWAL 305 C O M PARATIVE ECO N O M I C SYSTEMS 306 ANALYSI S O F B U S I N ESS DATA 498 I N DEPEN DENT STUDY

EDUCATI O N

Mr. Johnston, Dean, Mr. Beal, Mr. Hagen, Mr. Jorgenson, Mr. Leasure, Mrs. Mathers, Mr. Moe, Mrs. Napjus, Mr. Nelson, Miss Orvik, Mr. Pederson, Mr. Petty, Mr. Stein, Miss Williamson; assisted by Mr. Bertness, Mr. Breckenridge, Mr. Davidson, Mr. Dorothy, Mr. Ehlers, Mr. Fulkerson, Mr. Gray. Mrs. Hams, Mr. Hokenstad, Mr. Holden, Mrs. Keblbek, Mrs. Lauer, Mrs. Nok/eberg, Mr. Wa/bruch, Mr. Warren, Mr. Zalloroni Purpose

The general p u rpose of the School of Education is to contri b ute to the devel足 opment of professional elementary and secondary school personnel with 'Ii beral and scientific education i ntegrated w.ithin a Ch ristian frame of reference. The School regards itse l f as shari n g this pu rpose, as well as the means and responsi bi l 足 i t y for atta i n i n g it, w i t h t h e University a s a w h o l e a n d w i t h each activity of the U n i versity as set forth in the statement of its p h i l osophy. Desi rable understand足 i ngs, a b i l i ties, and attitudes are as follows : Understandings of the obl igations of the teac h i n g p rofession to guide c h i l d ren and youth i n the p u rsuit of knowledge and skills, to help them to become happy, useful, and self-supporting citizens, and to prepare them in the ways of democracy. Understandings o f the economi c , political, social, psycholog i cal, and philosop h ical aspects o f education.


Understandings of and abil ity to function in the roles of the teacher as a d i rector of learni n g , a counselor and gu idance worker, a mediator of the c u l ture, a link with the commun ity, a member of a school staff, and a member of the profession, Understandings of research techn i q ues and abil ity to use them, Attitudes conducive to conscientious professional work and carefu l l y planned experimentation. Attitudes cond u c i ve to continuous and ends.

evaluation and revision o f means

Admission

Students anticipating careers i n education take two years of basic general edu足 cation i n the Col lege of Arts and Sciences. I n the sophomore year the student is e l ig i b l e t o register for Education 201 and will at that time make appli cation for ad m i ssion to the School of Educatio n . Students w i l l become cand i d ates f o r t h e Bachelor o f Arts i n Edu cation degree when they have met the fo l l owing requirements: 1)

Have earned a c u m ulative g rade point average of 2.25 after completion of Education 201 and prior to admission to the professi onal sequence courses. Students must have C o r better grades i n English 1 0 1 and in Psych o logy 1 0 1 or Sociology 1 0 1 .

2)

Have comp leted Commu n i cation Arts 1 23 or demonstrated prof i c iency.

3)

Have ideals and personality q ual ities which make for successful teac h i ng.

4)

Have a clearly defined purpose or goal.

5)

Have selected a preferred level of preparation and the area or areas of con足 centration to be followed .

6)

Have com pleted satisfactor i l y the screening program.

7)

Have received approval d u ring an individual conference with representatives of the School of Education. The cand i d ate i s required to mai ntain these standards in order to retain h is standing in the School of Education. Students who have taken the Bachel or's degree at Pacific Lutheran or at another in stitution who contemp late meeting certification requirements are expected to meet the same req uirements for admissi on. These students are advised to begin with the summer session. The certific.ation sequence w i l l n o rm a l l y req u i re a sum足 mer session and two semesters, or three semesters. Curriculum Requirements

In addition to the general Uni versity courses required in a l l curri c u l a, certain specific requirements in general education mu st be met. 1)

History 351 , Pacific Northwest, requi red of all elementary teacher candidates, and all secondary candi dates with a major or minor i n a social science.

2)

Geography 101 i s required of all elem entary teacher candidates.

3)

Prospective elementary teachers usually meet the science general education requrement by completing Biology 1 1 1 , or other life science, and Science 1 22.


A year cou rse in one labo ratory scie nce may be substituted by those who have adequate high school backg rou nd i n the other scien ces. 4)

A student m ust demonstrate com petence i n speech by achieving a satisfactory score on a p roficiency test given by the Commun ication Arts Department, or by completing C o m m u n i c ation Arts 1 23 .

5 ) Physical Education 295, School Health, i s req u i red o f a l l teacher can d i d ates. CERTIFICATION

G u i d e l i nes for the preparation and certificati on of teachers have been estab足 lished by the State Board of Ed ucation. The reco mme nded program pattern i n clud es: b road l i beral educati o n , 3 5 per cent; subject m atter spe c i a l i zation, 35 per cent; professional study, 20 per cent; and el ectives, 10 per cent. The fou r-year c u r r i c u l u m leads to the Bachelor of Arts in Education degree and to the provisional certificate, an i n itial l i cense to tea c h , issued for a period of th ree years. The begin n i n g tea cher 'las had preparation and supervised experi足 ences with students o n the vari ous levels. Each te acher prepares speci fically to teach at one leve l . Pacific Lutheran U n i ve rsity reco m mends the ca n d i d ate for the fi rst teac h i n g position on the basis of his preparat i o n . Authorization l o r elementary teaching req u i res student teac hing i n the ele足

mentary schoo l , t h ree courses o f professionalized subject matter, and nine c o u rses of su bject matter special izat i o n . Authorization lor secondary teaching requires stu dent teach i n g i n the secondary sc hool and eleven to twelve cou rses of subject matter spec i a l i zation in a pproved teac h i ng areas. Authorization lo r e lem e ntary and secondary teaching requi res stud ent teach i n g

at b o t h of these levels. Students who e lect to change levels w i l l be expected to meet the m i n i m u m requirements as given above for the new leve l . Any teach er may comp lete h i s preparation for a new level d u ring the fifth year of college. Fifth Year and Standard Certification

The fifth year of teacher ed ucation is to fol low a period of one year of initial teaching experience. The student m u st com plete a minimum of two cou rses appl icable toward the fifth year, before the beg i n n i n g of the fourt h year of teach i n g . Seven and one-half courses m ust be comple ted before beg i n n i ng the sixth year of teac h i n g . T h e student m a y choose t h e institution i n which he wishes to t a k e his advanced work as fol lows: 1)

I f he chooses to work at Pacific Lutheran U n i ve rsity, o r any oth e r of the teacher education i n stituti ons i n this state, that i nstitution shall be responsi ble for recom mending him for the Standard Certificate upon successful com pletion of the fifth year program.

2)

I f the Pacific Lutheran U n i versity graduate wishes to undertake the fifth year i n an out-of -state institution, Pacific Lutheran University w i l l be resp onsible for rec ommending h i m for the Standard Certifi cate. The student must secure general approval of his p l an from the U n i versity in advance.


There are f o u r provisions governing tne fifth year pattern of work, accord ing to State Board reg ulations: 1)

The fifth col lege year must i n clude a m i n i m u m of 30 semester hours (seven and one-h alf courses) of which at least fifly per cent mu st be up per division and / o r g raduate courses.

2)

No more than e i g h t semester h o u rs o f extension and/or correspondence study may be approved as a part o f the 30 semester hours (seven and one-half courses) i n the student's fifth year program.

3)

Pacific Lutheran U n i versity grad uates mu st take sixteen semester hours (fo u r courses) of t h e fifth col lege year i n residence. A transfer student who wishes to be re com mended by Pacific Lutheran University m ust take a m i n i m u m of 20 semester h o u rs (five courses) i n residence.

4)

The student may take 20 of the required 30 semester h o u rs prior to or d u r i n g the f i r s t year o f te aching experience w i t h p r i o r permission of the S c h o o l o f Education.

Following are re q u i re ments and proced u res for the approval of fi fth year pro­ grams of work at Pacific Lutheran U n i versity: 1)

Specific course req ui rements are: (a) Education 467, Evalua tion o r its equ ivalent. (Educ ation 473, Paren t-Tea cher Conference may be used by elementary teachers.) (b) Education 463, Guid ance in the El ementary School o r Education 465 Guid­ ance i n the Secondary S c h o o l .

2)

Any courses re c o m mended fo r t h e individ u a l student p r i o r t o the granting o f the Bachelor's degree m ust be taken. These m a y b e recommended by either the area adviser or the School of Educati o n .

3 ) Courses taken s h o u l d strengthen areas of concentration a n d bui Id stronger general education background as wel l as f i l l needs in the profess i onal f i e l d . This program o f studies Is t o be selected by the student w i t h t h e guid ance of those who have worked with him du ring his period of i n itial teach in g and the advisers at the re commend i n g instituti ons. 4)

The student secures approval of the reco m mending i n stituti on for work taken elsewhere before the work is begun.

Some of the work taken during the fifth year may also apply toward the Master of Arts degree for those who meet the requi rements. A student must not plan that these two curri cula shall c o i n c i d e . The program as set up for the fifth year s h a l l t a k e precedence a n d m u st be finis hed first. Principa l ' s Credentials '

The candidate fo r the p r i n ci pal's c redentials w i l l be guided by the f o l l owi n g : 1)

He m u s t meet graduate standards for t h e Master's degree.

2)

He m ust work toward the provi si,onal p r i ncipal 's credentials at his ch osen leve l. To receive this it is required that he have comp leted work fo r h i s Stand­ ard Te aching Certi ficate plu s six semester hours (one and one-half courses.)

3)

He mu st complete experience and study requirements fo r the Standard Prin-

Details of the program are available at the School of Education upon request.


c i pal's Credential at h i s chosen leve l . To receive t h i s he needs to have ( 1 ) had administ rative experience (2) earned a mi nim u m 0\ eight more semester hours, and (3) earned his Master o f Arts degree. Students who i n tend to work toward the Master of Arts degree in the field of educ ation must apply for ad mission to the Graduate D i vision and meet the requ i re ­ ments ouUi ned b y t h a t Division. Candidates s h O U l d s e e t h e course re q u i rements as set forth i n the Master of Arts b rochure . " Certification Requirements for School Nurses

P rov isional Certiricate: 1)

Registered n u rse licensed i n the State of Washington, and

2)

Bac helor's degree i n a program accredited (or approved) for fi rst-level posi­ tion s in p u b l i c health n u rs i n g , or Certifi cate i n P u b l i c Health N u rsing (or equivalent) with three years o f suc­ cessful supervised experience i n a public health program w h i c h i n c ludes expe rience in school n u rsing.

3)

Comp letion of a m i n i m u m of ten semester hours (two and one-half cou rses) o f professional education c o u rses including practice teachi n g or directed labora­ tory experiences in a school situation.

Standard Certificate: 1)

Two years of successful experience in school n u rsing as a school n u rse under the P rovisional Certificate, and

2)

Master's deg ree with a major i n school n u rsing o r its equivalent i n Public Health N u rsing.

Professional Education Courses for School Nu rse Certificate

P rofessional educational courses recommended for meeting the requirement of a minimum of 10 semester h o u rs (two and one-half cou rses) are as fol lows: Education 201 - Learner and Society or ____________ ___________ 1 cou rse Education 321 -Human Deve lopment (must i n c l u de p u b l i c school observations) ____ _______ _ ____ __ _ course Education 463-Guidance i n the Elementary School or__________ _ Soci ology 450-Social I n stitutions or_ ______ _ ___________ ____ _ Education 465- G u idance in the Secondary School_ ________ ____

c o u rse cou rse c o u rse

Education 552-P u b l i c School Admin lstration ______ _ . . _ __ ______ _ 'Y4 cou rse Education 575-Mental Health or_ _ _ _ __ ___ _______ __ _ __ V2 course Education 585-C omparative Education _ ____ ___ ___________ V2 course Laboratory experien ces in a school situation w i l l be provided on an i n d i vidual basis. Preparation of School Librarians (Learning Resources Specialist)

Students i n terested i n preparing for the responsi bil ity of admin istration o f a school l i b rary may meet suggested standards through the fo'liowing program : 1)

• •

Book and media selection Education 455-lnstructional Materials Available at the office 01 the Dean 01 Graduate Studies upon request.


Education 450-Storytel l i ng English 323-Ch i l d ren's Literature 2}

Catalogi n g Education 453-Processing School Li brary Materials

3}

Reference Education 452-Basic Reference Materials

4}

Medi a uti lization and production Education 454-Selection of Learning Resource Materials Education 457-Workshop in Preparation and Util ization of Instructional Materials

5}

Cu rricu l u m Education SaO-Cu rri c u l u m Deve lopment

6} Admin istration Education 451 -Administration of the School Library PROFESSIONAL COU RSES-Bachelor of Arts in Education Requirements

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Education 201-Learner and Society

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course

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This course may be taken duri ng the sophomore year or later. 2}

Professional Core Curric ulum:

The following courses are to be com pleted after admission to the SChoo l : Education 322-Methods a n d Observation (Pri mary Level) o r Education 323-Methods and Observati on (U pper Elementary Level) or Education 423-General Methods (Secondary Level) _

1

cou rse

1 .1

course course

1

course '12 course

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Education 325-Teac h i n g of Read i n g (Elementary Level) or Education 420-Teach i n g of Reading (Secondary Level)

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Education 430-Stude nt Teaching (Primary Level) or_ Education 432-Student Teaching ( U p per Elementary Level) or Education 434-Student Teaching (Secondary Level) ____

Education 435-Professional Seminar (Req u i red for students enrolled in Education 430 or 432) __ďż˝ _ _ _ _ _

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2'/2 courses 2'12 courses 2 courses V2 course

1 t o 1 V2 courses 3} Professional Electives (Secondary) __ _ Subject area methods Gu idance Student teaching (alternate level) Students wishing to qualify for certification on both the elementary and secondary levels should meet the major and m i n o r requirements for the other leve l . Students must have C, o r better, grades i n Engl ish 101 a n d Psychology 101 , or Sociology 1 0 1 . The student may count only C or better grades toward a major, minor, or professiona l education courses. __

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Laboratory Experience

Students have the opportunity to study the social, emotion a l , physical, and i ntel lectual g rowth patterns of schoo l-age chi ldren and youth throughout thei r

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pre-service years. An u n d e rstand i n g of the learning process as rel ated to g rowth and development is em phas i zed. This is done through reg u l a r course work, demonstration, observat i o n , and partici pation with c h i l d ren in thei r activities both i n and out of schoo l . The fol l owing are specific req u i rements in the area of laboratory experi e n c e : ( a ) September Experience During at least one September following the successful complet i on of Education 201 , Lea rner and Society, and prior to Student Teac h.ing, the student is req u i red to observe and to part i c i pate In activities d u ring the ope n i n g days (preferably two weeks) of school. This September Experience may be either I n his home town or in the local area. P l ans and defi n i te assign ments m ust be app roved by the School of Education before the end of the preceding sp ring semester. (b) Student Teaching A successful experience in student teac hing is vital to the student's career. I t is therefore recommended that the student carry not more than four courses d u ring his student teac hing semester. I t Is also expected that outside work or college activity will be kept to a minim um . Exceptions to these recommendations are a l l owed only by special permissi o n . PROFESSIO NALIZED S U BJECT MATTER Elementary School Teaching

I n the area of Professionalized Subject Matter a minimum of 3 courses is re­ q u i red from the following cou rses : Art ' 340 Art in the Elementary School ( V2 c o u rse) Commu n i cation Arts 402 Speech i n the Elementary Classroom Education '325 The Teaching of Read ing 455 I nstructional Materials ' 326 The Teaching of Arithmetic (Prereq uisite: Math 323) 4 1 0 Science in the Elementary School " 4 1 2 Social Studies i n the Elementary School " 408 Language Arts in the Elementary School 457 Preparation and U t i l ization of I nstru ctional Materials (¥4 ) " 483 Pri mary Read i n g 579 Diagnosis o f Read ing Prob lems English 323 C h i l d re n 's Literature Music ' 340 M usic i n the Eleme ntary School Physical Education 322 Physical Edu cation i n the Elementary School • Required 01 all elementary teacher candidates. " Open to student teachers or experienced teachers only.


ACADEMIC PREPARATI O N Teaching Areas

1)

Busi ness Educati on.

2)

Fine Arts-art or music.

3) Physical Education.

4)

Lan g u age Arts-i n c l u d i n g English (composition, l i terature), foreign language, communi cation arts (including d rama), and journal i s m .

5)

Science and Mathematics-i n c l u d i n g biolog i cal a n d physical sciences a n d mathematics.

6)

Social Sciences-i n c l u d i n g hi story, sociology, political science, economics, geography, and psychology.

Preparation for Senior High School Teaching: 11' to 1 2 Courses

A student preparing fo r sen i o r high school teac h i n g m u st complete approxi­ mately 1 1 courses in the acade m i c area i n which he plans to teach. This norm a l ly consists of a teaching maj or of 6 to 8 courses of study i n one department, sup­ ported by 4 to 5 cou rses i n related departments. A student, with the app roval of his academic adviser, may elect to complete a departmental m i n o r of 4 to 5 courses in anothe r a rea a p p l i cable to teac h i n g in the sen i o r h i g h school. I n either case, the adviser from the major area will assist the student i n planning h i s program. Teaching majors are offered in the following fie lds: art, biology, business edu­ cation, chemistry, communication arts, English, Fren c h , German, physical educa­ tion, h i story, mathematics, music, physics, politi cal science, science (general and earth sciences), soc ial sciences, sociology. and Spanish. Preparation lor Junior High School Teaching: 1 1 t o 1 2 Courses

A student preparing for j u n ior h i g h school teaching normally m ust comp lete a teaching major of 6 to 8 cou rses and a minor of 4 to 5 courses i n anothe r area. Students plan n i n g to teach o n the junior high school level should confer with the School of Education regard i n g combi nations of teac h i n g fields which would be most a p propri ate. An adviser from the major area will assist the student i n planning his program. Teaching maj ors and m i nors are offered i n the general a reas of fine a rts, physical education, language a rts (including English, journalism, communication arts, German, French, and Spanish), science (including biology, chemistry, physics, general science, and earth sciences) and mathematics, and social sciences. Preparation lor Elementary School Teaching: 1 2 Courses

A student p reparing for elementary school teaching normally must complete 6 courses in a major teaching area, and two area m i n o rs consisting of 3 courses each. One of the m i nors must be in p rofessionalized subject matter; and one i n a teac h i n g field other than that covered i n the 6-course concentration. In general, the teach ing major (6 courses) for elementary school teachers fol­ lows the teaching major required for junior high teaching. The courses i n Cluded in the two m i n o rs are to be determined i n consultation with the School of Education.


Art

Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 112 courses Teac h i n g Major: 1 1 V2 courses Required: Art 1 1 0, 1 60, 235, 260, 330 or 350, 365, 370, 440, two additional courses i n art h istory, and electives to complete requirements. Junior High School Preparation: Teac h i n g Major: 7 V2 courses Required: Art 1 1 0 , 1 60, 235, 330 o r 350, 365, 440, and electives to complete requirements. Teaching M i nor: 5 c o u rses Required: Art 1 1 0, 1 60, 235, 330 or 350, and 365. Elementary School Preparation: Teaching Major: 6 cou rses Required: 1 1 0, 1 60. 235, 340 and two courses from the followi ng: Art 330, 350, 365 or 370. Teaching M i nor: 3 courses i n the area as determ ined by the School of Education. Biology

Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses Teac h i ng Major: 7 courses Required: Bi ology 1 51 , 1 52 and 5 courses i n bi ology of w h i ch at least 3 must be upper division. Required supporting courses: Chem istry 1 1 5 o r 1 31 , 1 42 , Mathematics 1 33. Electives from the followi n g : Earth Sciences 1 3 1 , 1 32 ; Chemistry 33 1 , 332 ; Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 , 2 1 1 . Junior High School Preparation: Teach i ng Major: 6-7 c o u rses Required: B i o logy 1 5 1 , 1 52 and 5 c o u rses i n bi ology approved by the de足 partment. Required supporting courses: Chemistry 1 1 5 or 1 31 , 1 42 , Mathematics 1 33 . Recommended: Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 , 2 1 1 or Earth Sciences 1 31 , 1 32 . Teaching M i nor: 5 cou rses Required: 3-4 c o u rses chosen in b i o l ogy; Earth Sciences 1 3 1 . Elementary School Preparation: Teaching Major: 6 courses Required: Biology 1 51 , 1 52 . Required supporting courses: Chemistry 1 1 5 o r 1 31 , 1 42 . Teac h i ng M i nor: 3 c o u rses Required: 3 cou rses i n the area, to be dete rmined i n consu ltation with the School of Educati on. Business Education

Senior High Sch ool Preparation: 1 2 courses Required: Econom i cs 1 50 ; Busine.ss Ad m i n i stration 241 , 243, 281 , 290 o r 495, 340, 387 or 488, 441 o r 442, 443 and V2 course i n Advanced Typewriti ng. Also elect one cou rse from Busi ness Administration 350, 364 o r 370. Choose one


area of emphasis from Accou n t i n g : Busi ness A d m i n istration 381 plus one upper di vision accounting course; or Economics: Econom ics 351 p l us one upper d i vision economics cou rse ; or Shorthan d : One year of advanced shorth and. It is strongly recommended that any of the following courses not taken d u r足 ing the four-year program be i n c l uded in the fifth year progra m : Busi ness Admi ni stration 350, 364, 370, 387 and 488. Typewriting and shorthand courses are not offered on the campus; how足 ever, these courses may be taken to meet deg ree req u i rements at Fort Steila足 coom Com m u n i ty Col lege for transfer cred i t any t i me du ring the four-year degree program. Chemistry

Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 3;4 courses Tea c h i n g Maj o r : 73;4 courses consisting of C h e m istry 1 1 5 (or 1 3 1 ) , 142, 321 , 33 1 , 332, 333, 334, 34 1 , 342, and 343. Prerequisites: P h ysics 1 0 1 , 1 02 or 253; Mathematics 1 5 1 , 1 52 . Junior High School Preparation: Tea c h i n g Major: same as for sen i o r level above. Teac h i n g Minor: 5V2 cou rses consisting of Chemistry 1 1 5 (or 1 3 1 ) , 1 42, 321 , 33 1 , 332, 333, 334. Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 33 or equivalent. Elementary School Preparation: Teac h i n g Major: 6 courses Required: 4 app roved courses In chemistry and two additional courses to be determi ned in consultation with the School of Education. Teaching M i n or: Three cou rses to be determi ned i n consultation with the School o f Education. Communication Arts

Senior High School Preparation: 11 courses Teac h ing Major: 6 to 8 cou rses Required: 4 c o u rses : Comm unicatio n Arts 1 23, 227 or 250, 241 and 404, plus 3 to 5 courses i n consu ltation with the major adviser. Suggested supporting courses: One of the fol lowing: 4 to 5 courses i n English approved by t h e major adviser; o r 4 t o 5 courses in a modern o r c lassical language. Junior High School Preparation: Teaching Major: 6 to 7 courses Required: 3 courses: Com m u n i cation Arts 1 23, 227 or 250, and 241 , plus 2 additional courses in Co m m u n i cation Arts. Additional 2 to 3 courses to be determi ned in consu ltation with the Department and the School of Education. Te aching Mi nor: 4 to 5 cou rses Required: Com m u n i cation Arts 1 23 and 24 1 , plus 2 to 3 cou rses of e lectives. Elementary School Preparation: Teaching Major: 6 courses Required: Comm u n ication Arts 1 2 3 and 402, plus 2 courses in Commun ication Arts and 2 cou rses in English.


Teaching M i n o r : 3 c o u rses to be determined in consu ltation with the School o f Education and the Department of Communication Arts. Earth Sciences

See Science (General) English

Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses Teac h i n g Maj o r: 8 cou rses Required: E n g l i sh 241 , 251 , 252 and 383. Electives to total 8 cou rses in add i 足 tion to E n g l i s h 1 0 1 ; a t least four cou rses m u s t be upper d i vision. Distribution requirement: one course i n the nature and development of lan足 guage (382, 400 o r 403) ; and Advanced Composition 2 1 8, o r proficiency as dete r m i ned by the English Department. All majors must present two years o f one fore i g n language a t the col lege leve l , o r s h o w equivalent proficiency. Junior High School Preparation: Teac h i n g Major: 8 cou rses Required: Eight cou rses in the department as l i sted u n d e r sen i o r h i g h prepar足 ati on above, i n c l u d i n g distri bution req u i rement and two years o f foreign language or eq u ivalent p roficiency. Elemenfary School Preparation: Teac h i n g Concentration : 6 courses Required: 4 cou rses in the department as l i sted u n d e r sen i o r h i g h preparation above, and two additional courses to be selected i n consu ltation with the School of Educati o n . Teac h i n g M i n o r : 3 cou rses Required: Th ree c o u rses in the area, to be determined in consultation with the School o f Education . French

Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses Teaching Major: 8 c o u rses Required: F rench 201 , 202, 32 1 , 351 , 352, 445 and th ree add itional courses. 445 may count i n either education or French, but not i n both. Suggested supporting courses: 3 c o u rses in communication arts, English or another foreign language. Junior High School Preparation: Teac h i n g M aj o r : 7 cou rses Required: As l i sted above for sen i o r h i g h preparati o n . Su pporting cou rses chosen in consu ltation with maj o r adviser. Teach ing M i n o r : 4 - 5 approved cou rses i n F rench. Elementary School Preparation: TeaC h i n g M a j o r : 6 cou rses Required: Five approved courses in French and one additional course to be selected i n consultation with the department and the School o f Education . Teaching M i n o r : 3 cou rses Required: T h ree approved courses in French to be determined in consu ltation with the School of Educati o n .


German

Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses Teach i n g Major: 8 c o u rses Required: German 201 . 202. 321 . 35 1 . 352. 445 and th ree additional c o u rses. 445 may count in either education o r F re n c h . but not in both. Suggested supporting courses: 3 cou rses i n commun ication arts, English or another foreign language. Junior High School Preparation: Teac h i n g M aj o r : 7 cou rses Required: As listed above. for sen i o r h i g h p reparati on. Su pporti ng c o u rses chosen in consu ltati on with major adviser. Teac h i n g M i n o r : 4 - 5 c o u rses Required: 4 - 5 approved cou rses i n German. Elementary School Preparation: Teaching Major: 6 c o u rses Required: Five app roved c o u rses i n Ge rman and one additional c o u rse to be selected In consu ltation with the department and the School of Education. Teach i n g M i n o r : 3 c o u rses Required: Th ree approved courses in German to be determ ined i n consultation with the School of Educati on. History

Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses Teach i n g M aj o r : 8 c o u rses Required: H i story 1 07 , 1 08. two of 251 , 252 and 253. 351 p l u s 3 c o u rses in h i story. Suggested supporting courses: 3 c o u rses selected from economics. geography. political science . psychology and sociology. Language Arts

Junior High School Preparation: Teac h i n g Concentration (Major) : 8 c o u rses Required: English 21 8 ; e i t h e r E n g l i s h 403 or L i n g u istics 400; one u p pe r-d ivi足 sion l i t e ra t u re c o u rse i n addition to the c o u rse taken to meet the gene ral edu足 cation req u i reme n t ; Comm u n i cation Arts 24 1 or 327 or 336 and 404; Education 444 and th ree other c o u rses in English. j o u rn a l i s m , commun ication arts or foreign language beyond the f reshman leve l . At least two of these t h ree c o u rses m ust be in the same d i s c i p l i n e . and one of the th ree must be u ppe r division. Teac h i n g Concentration ( M i n or) : 4 cou rses Required: Fo u r c o u rses se lected from offeri ngs in Eng l i s h . j o u rnalism , com足 m u n i cation arts. o r foreign l ang uage beyond the freshman level. English 218 is required. Elementary Preparation: Teac h i ng Concent ration (Major) : 6 courses Required: English 21 8. e i t h e r English 403 or L i n g u i stics 400. Engl ish 323. either Comm u n i c ati on Arts 241 or Commun ication Arts 327 or 336 and 402;


and two other cou rses selected from one of the followi ng d iscipl i nes: English , communic ation arts, o r foreign language beyond the fresh man leve l . One of these courses m u st be upper divisi on. Teac h i n g Concentration ( M i n o r) : 3 courses Required: T h ree courses selected from offerings in English , jou rnalism , com ­ mun ication arts, or foreign lang uage beyond the freshman leve l . English 2 1 8 i s req u i red . Mathematics

Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 c ourses Teac h i n g Major: 7 cou rses i n add ition to Math 446. Prerequisites: Math 1 33 or equi valent. Required: Math 1·51 , 1 52 , 23 1 , 433, 446 ; 321 or 434 or 455; one additional up per division course. Suggested supporting courses: 2 course in chem istry or p h ysics and two additional sc ience cou rses. Junior High School Preparation: Teac h i n g Maj or: 6 cou rses Prerequisites: Math 1 33 or e q u i valent. Required: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52, 231 , 433, 446. Teaching M i n or: 4 cou rses i n add i tion to Math 446. Prerequisite: Math 1 33 or equivalent. Required: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52 ; 1 27 o r 231 ; 446, 433 or 321 . Elementary School Preparation: Teac h i n g Maj o r : 4 courses in add ition to Math 323 and Math 324 or 321 . Prerequisite: Math 1 33 or equi valent. Required: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52 ; 1 27 o r 321 or 433; plus mathematics electives. Teac h i n g M i n o r : 2 mathematics cou rses in addition to Math 323, and Math 324 or 321 , to be determined in consu ltation with the School of Education and the Department of Mathematics. 'Music

Senior High School Preparation: • •

• •

Emphasis on C h o ral Musi c-Teac h i n g Major: 1 4 V2 cou rses. Prerequisite: Music Theory 1 23, or equivalent. Required: Music 50, 1 24, 2 1 1 , 212, 223, 224, 323, 325, 340, 442, 445, 447. Two cou rses of private voice lessons, one-half cou rse of pri vate piano lessons and two courses o f Literature and Performance. One c o u rse of music electives is also req u i redl . Emp hasis on Sacred C h o ral Musi c-Teac h i n g Major: 1 4 V, cou rses. Prerequisite: Music Theory 1 23 , or equivalent. Required: Music 50, 1 24, 21 1 , 2 1 2 , 223, 224, 323, 339, 340, 367, 368, 445, 447. Two cou rses of pri vate instruction must be earned i n the major performance medium (voice or piano and / o r organ) and one-half cou rse must be earned i n the minor performance medium (voice or piano and/or o rgan). Two cou rses of Lite rature and Performance are also req u i red .


" " Emp hasis on Inslrumental Musi c-Teaching Maj o r : 1 4 V2 cou rses. Prerequisite: Mu si,c Theory 1 2 3, or equivalent. Required: Music 50, 1 24, 1 4 1 , 142, 21 1 , 2 1 2 , 223, 224, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 323, 325, 326, 339 , 445, 447. Two courses of privale instruction must be earned on the student's major instru ment plus one-h alf cou rse of piano. Two cou rses of c redit m u st be earned in Literature and Performance. Junior High School Preparation: Teaching Major: 7 courses Prerequisite: Music 1 23 , o r equivalent. Required: Music 50, 1 24, 21 1 , 2 1 2 , 339, 340, 445. One-half course of private piano, one-ha lf course of a secondary instrument or voice, one course of Lit. and Perform. and one-half course of music electives are also req u i red. Teac h i n g Min or: 5 courses Required: Music 1 20, 339, 341 p l us one-half course of private piano and one­ h a l f course of private instruction i n voice or secondary instrument. One course of Lit. and Perform. and V2 course of e lectives in music are also req u i red. Elementary School Preparation: Teac h i ng Major: 6 courses Required: Music 1 20, 339, 341 plus one- h a l f course of pri vate piano and one­ h a l f course of private voice. One cou rse of music ensemble and one and one-half courses of e lectives in music are also req u i red. Teac hing Mino r: 3 courses Required: 3 courses in the Music Department, to be determined i n consulta­ tion with the Department of Music and the School of Education. " See the Department of Music Handbook for further details concerning program. " " Students desiring certification as a secondary teacher will do their student teach­ ing on the secondary level. Students desiring certification as an elementary teacher will do their student teaching on the elementary level. Students desiring certification as a K-1 2 teacher will do their student teaching on both elementary and secondary level. Physical Education

Senior High School Preparation: 11 courses Teaching Major: 1 1 courses Six req u i red courses: PE 277, Scientific Foundations of Physical Educati on; two p rofess i onal activ. ities courses; PE 481 ; Physiolog i cal Basis for Motor Performance; P E 482, Biomechanics of Hu man Motion; and either PE 322, Physical Education for the Elementary Scho o l ; or, Pe 328. C u rr i c u l u m Development and A d m i n­ istration. Three cou rses elected f rom among cou rses n u m b e red 300 - 400 offered in the School of Physical Educati on. Bio logy 1 6 1 ( H u man Anatomy) and Biology 1 62 (Human Physiology). Partici pation in at least one intercol legiate or extra m u ral sport. One ac tivity elective ( V. course) i n Aquatics.


Junior High School Preparation: Teaching Major: 7 c o u rses Required: 6 c o u rses as listed for sen i o r h i g h major plus one elective from among physical ed ucation c o u rses numbered 300 - 400, Teac h i n g Mi nor: F o u r cou rses are req u i red : P E 277, Scientific Fou ndations of Physical Education; PE 286, Professional Activities-Gymnastics and Dance; PE 284 or 288, Professional Activities-Team Sports; and P E 482, Bi omechan ics of Human Moti on, or P E 481 , Physi ological Basis 'or Motor Performance, Elementary School Preparation: Teac hing Maj o r : Six courses are requ i re d : PE 277, Scientific Fou ndations o f Physical Education ; P E 3 2 2 , Physical Education for t h e Elementary Schoo l ; P E 286, P rofessional Activiti es-Gymnastics and Dance; P E 284 o r P E 288, Pro足 'essi onal Activities-Team Sports; and two cou rses selected from among the physical education c o u rses n u m be red 300 - 400, Teac h i n g M i n o r : The foll owing cou rses are req u i red : P E 277, Foundations 0' Physical Education ; PE 322, Physical Education fo r the Elementary School; P E 286, Professional Activities-Gymnastics and Dance; and , P E 284 o r 288, P rofessional Activiti es-Team Sports, Special Secondary Programs: Athletic Coaching Minor: Three req u i red courses: P E 277, Scientific Foun da足 tions of Physical Education; P E 482, B i omechan i cs 0' Human Motion; PE 481 , Physiological Basis fo r Motor Performance; and two elective "one-hall" cou rses 'rom among the fol lowing: P E 371 , Coaching Theory-Footbal l ; P E 370, Coaching Theory-Basketbal l ; P E 372, Coac h i n g Theo ry-Track and Field ; PE 373, Coac h i ng Theo ry-Basebal l ; P E 374, Coac h i n g Theo ry-Wrest l i n g ; P E 361 , Coach i n g Practi cum; and part i c i pati on in at least one in tercollegiate or extra足 m u ral sport. Health Minor: The following cou rses are required : P E 295, School Hea l t h ; PE 324, Personal Health, P E 326, Commun ity Health, Bi ology 1 6 1 , H uman An atomy; Biology 1 62, Human P h ysiology, Physics

Senior High School Preparation: 11 courses Teac hing Major: 7'12 courses Required: Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02, 21 1 , 253, 254 , 272, 32 1 , 322 and 355, Required supporting courses: One additional course i n chemistry; Mathe足 matics 151 , 1 52 , Additional suggested co u rses: P h ysics 331 , 336, Junior High School Preparation: Teaching Major: 6 '/2 courses, Required: Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02, 21 1 , 253, 254, 272, 321 and 322 , Political Science

Senior High School Preparation: 11 courses (in the Social Sciences) Teaching Maj o r : 7 cou rses ( i n Political Science) Required: Political Science 1 01 , 2 51 , 331 , plus four add itional elective courses, Suggested supporting courses: Economics 1 50 ; Geography 1 0 1 ; History 251 , 252, 253, 351 ; Psychology 1 0 1 ; Sociology 1 0 1 ,


Science (General) Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses General Science Teaching Major: 11 courses Required: Bi ology 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 ; Chemistry 1 1 5 or 1 3 1 , 1 4 2 ; Physics 1,01 , 1 02 ; E S 1 3 1 , 1 32 ; Mathematics 1 33, 1 5 1 .

Earth Sciences Teac h i n g Major: 11 courses Required: ES 131 , 1 32, 323, 324, 360 or 365, 491 , 492. Required supporting courses: Mathematics 1 51 , Chemistry 1 1 5 or 1 3 1 , 1 42; Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02. Suggested supporting courses: Biology 1 51 , 1 52 and additional courses in chemistry and physics. Junior High School Preparation:

General Science Teach i ng Maj o r: 6 7 courses Req uired: B i ology 1 51 and 152 or B i ology 1 1 1 ; Chem istry 1 1 5, or 1 3 1 , 1 42 ; Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 ; Mathematics 1 33 ; E S 1 3 1 . Teach i ng M i n o r : 4-5 courses Cou rses selected and total courses s u bject to approval of science departments and wi l l vary depen d i n g upon high school background of the i n d i v i d ual student. -

Earth Sciences Teaching Major: 7 cou rses Required: ES 1 3 1 , 1 32 , 323, 324, 360 or 365. Required supporting courses: Chem istry 1 1 5 or 1 3 1 , 1 42 . Suggested supporting courses: Mathematics 1 51 ; Bi ology 1 5 1 , 1 52 . Teaching M i nor: 4 t o 5 courses in earth and physical sciences. Elementary School Preparation:

General Science Teaching Major: 6 courses In dividual programs to be pl anned by the Science Department in consulta足 tion with the School of Educati on. Teaching Min or: 3 courses Required: Three courses in the area, courses to be determined in consultation with the School of Educati on. Earth Sciences Teaching Maj or: 6 courses Prerequisite: Trigonometry and high school b i o logy. Required: ES 1 3 1 , 1 32, 323, 324, 360 or 365. Required supporting courses: Chemistry 1 1 5 or 1 31 , 1 42 . Teaching M i n or: 3 courses i n earth and physical sciences.

Social Science 1 1 courses Teaching Majo r: 11 courses Required: Two cou rses selected from History 251 , 252 and 253; Hi story 351 ;

Senior High School Preparation:


and eight cou rses selected from geography, economi cs, p o l i tical science, psyc ho logy and sociology. Junior High School Preparation: Teaching Maj o r : 6 cou rses Required: Two cou rses selected from Histo�y 251 , 252 and 253 ; History 351 ; and three cou rses selected from other social sciences. Teaching Minor: 5 cou rses Required: Two cou rses selected from History 251 , 252 and 253; History 35 1 ; and two c o u rses selected from other social sciences. Elementary School Preparation: Teaching Maj o r : 6 c o u rses Required: Two c o u rses selected from History 251 , 252 and 253 ; H istory 351 ; and three courses selected from other social scien ces. Teac h i n g M i n o r : 3 cou rses to be determ i ne d in consu ltation with the School of Educati o n . Sociology

Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses Teac hing Maj or: 1 1 courses Required: Soc iolog y 1 01 , 445, 490, four electives in sociology; and four cou rses d i stributed over t h ree areas of other social sciences. Spanish

Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses Teach ing Major: 8 cou rses Required: Spanish 20 1 , 202, 321 , 351 , 352, 445 and t h ree add iti onal courses. 445 may count in either education or foreign languages, but not In both. Suggested supporting courses: 3 cou rses in commu nication arts, Eng l i sh or another foreign language. Junior High School Preparation: Teach i n g Maj o r : 7 cou rses as listed above for senior h i g h preparation. Supporting cou rses to be chosen in consultation with major adviser. Teac h i n g M i n o r : 4 - 5 approved courses i n Spanish. Elementary School Preparation: Teac h i n g Major: 6 cou rses Required: Five approved cou rses in Spanish and one add i tio nal course to be selected in consu ltation with the department and the School of Educat i o n . Teac hing M i n o r : 3 approved courses i n Spanish to b e dete rm i n ed in con­ SUltation with the School of Educati o n .


Elementary Education Program

Courses Required

General Education (Includes Core) Requirements ___

Phi losophy _ Religion (One may be the Se n i o r Se m i n a r in Religi on ) Music 341 Art 340 C o m m u n i cation Arts 1 23 History or Literature Science (One l i fe, one physical) _____ M ath 323 P h ysical Education ( f o u r % -c o u rse activities) School Health 295 Social Science (Geog. 1 0 1 , His!. 351 , Psych. 1 0 1 or Soc. 1 0 1 ) ___ English 1 01 (Proficie ncy exam for no c redit or course for c redit) 1 4 Y2 _

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Teaching Minor-3 crses. p ossible (minimum of 1 crs. upper divis.)

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Y2

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'/2 3 (1) ( 1 5'/2 )

Electives

Professional Sub;ect Matter Minor-3 full courses Education 326 Te aching of Math Education 325 Te aching of Reading, Elementary__ Art & Music ( I n c luded in Art 340 & Music 34 1 ) Education Electives: Select from the following__ _____ _ Communic ation Arts 402, Education 408, 4 1 0 , 412, 457, 483, 579, English 323, Health & P . E . 322 ___

2

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Teaching Ma;or-6 courses (2 courses upper division)

1 2

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(1 ) 1

Professional Sequence

Ed ucation 201 Learner and Society Education 322 or 323 Methods & Observatlons _ September Experience Student Teaching Education 430 or 432 _ P rofessional Sem ina r Education 435 (with student teaching) Alternate Level Student Tchng. Ed. 437 (optional-Interim) _

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1 1 o 2Y2 '/2 (1 ) 5 (6)


Secondary Education Program

Courses Required

General University Core Requirements

_ ____ _______ _ P h i losophy _____________ Religion (One of these may be the Sen i o r Semin ar) ____ _____ _ ___ Fine Arts (Art, M us i c , Speech, D rama)____ _ ________ _ ___ H i story or Lite rature ( I nc l u d i n g Foreign Literature) _ ___ Nat u ral Science or Mathematics _____ ___________ ______ _ ___ Soc. Scien ces (Psychology 1 01 or Soci o l ogy 1 01 ) _____________ _ ___ Physi cal Ed u cation (fo u r V4 -cou rse activities) _ _ _ _______ ___ Eng. Compo (Profici ency exam for no cred i t or course for credit) ___

___

General Education Requirements-Secondary Program Academic Requirements: ___ School Health 295 ____ ______ _ ___ Communication Arts 1 23 _______________

1 2

V2 1

Professional Requirements: New Program-6 courses

___ Lea rner and Society 201 (or H u man Dev. 321 for those who have had I n t ro. to Ed.) _ _____ _ ______ _______ _ ___ Professional Semester: 420, 423, 434 ____ __ ______ __ ___ ___September Ex perience (Prior to Professional Semester) _ _ _ ____ ___ Education Elective: Alternate Level 436 ( I nte rim) ( 1 ) __ _ I nterim Othe r Senior High School Teaching Concentration- I I Courses

Junior High School Teaching Concentration 7 courses

3V2 0 1 V2

Teaching Minor 4 courses

U p p e r Division 1 0 cou rses M i n i m u m___ _ _ . _


201' LEA R N E R AND SOC I ETY : G ROWTH AND DEVELO P M ENT ( 1 ) Orientation t o schools i n contemporary society. I n tegrated study o f h u man develop ment i n relationsh i p to i nd i viduals and g roups i n ed ucati onal sett i n g . Two lectures a n d o n e sem i n a r each week. P u b l i c school observation req u i red weekly. Students wi l l be responsible for their own transportation to the public schools. P rereq uisite: Psychology 101 or Sociology 1 0 1 . 321 H U MAN DEVELO P M ENT ( 1 ) A study of the emot i o n a l , social, inte l lectual, and physiological development of the h u man o rganism from i n fancy thro u g h adolesce nce. Two lectures and one seminar each week. Two-hour p u b l i c school observation req u i red weekly, to be i nd i vidually assigned. Students w i l l be responsible fo r thei r own trans足 portation to the p u b l i c schools. Pre req uisite: Psychology 1 01 or Socio logy 1 0 1 a n d official admittance t o t h e School of Education. T h i s c o u rse is designed for u p per d i vision transfer students who have had I ntrod uction to Educat i o n . 322 G EN E R A L M ETHODS-P R I MARY ( 1 ) A study o f the process and content o f teach i n g i n g rades K through 3 with observation and part i c i pation i n p u b l i c schools. P rerequ isite: Educat i o n 201 or Education 321 . 323 G EN E RA L M ETHODS-UPPER ELEMENTARY ( 1 ) A study of t h e p rocess and content o f teac h i n g i n g rades 4 t h rough 6 with observation and part i c i pation i n p u b l i c schools. P rereq uisite: Education 201 o r Education 32 1 . 325 THE TEACH I N G OF READING-ELEM ENTARY ( 1 ) A su rvey o f teac h i ng read i ng i n the elementary g rades, i n c l u d i ng t h e p rograms in the newer approaches. Materials, methods, tec h n i q ues, proced u res and some d i agnosis of read i n g d i fficu lties. Prereq uisite: Education 201 . I II S 326 T H E TEACH I N G OF ARITH M ET I C (V2 - 1 ) A n over-all study o f the basic mathematical skills and abilities needed b y the teacher i n the e lementary school. Recent developments and materials are considere d . Prereq u isite: Math 323 or consent of instructor. I II S 401 WORKSHOPS (V. - 1 ) Workshops i n special fields for varying periods o f time. (G) 408 LAN G UAGE ARTS I N THE ELEM ENTARY SCHOOL ( V2 ) A c o u rse designed to g ive the elementary teacher, g rades one t h rough six. an understan d i n g of how to teach the language arts i n a functional manner. The areas covered and skills stud i ed will be i n the fields of read ing, w ri t i n g , gram mar and usage, penman s h i p , spe l l ing, speaking, l i sten i n g , voca b u l a ry b u i ld i n g . Open to experienced teachers or student teachers only. 410 SC I EN C E I N THE ELEM ENTARY SCHOOL (V2 ) A c o u rse designed to acq uaint the student with the objectives, mate rials, and methods of teac h i n g science i n an i nteg rated p rogram .


4 1 2 SOCIAL STU D I ES IN THE ELEM ENTARY SCHOOL ( Y2 ) A course designed t o acquaint the student with objectives, materials, and methods of teach i n g the soc i a l studies i n an integrated program. Open to experienced teachers Or student teachers only. 420 THE TEACHING OF READING-SECON DARY ('h ) " 'ilu\\le':! C)I \eaci\i(\\:l leauim� i(\ \i\e 'ilecC)(\ual':! 'ilci\C)C)\ , i(\c\uui(\� a\\e(\\iC)(\ \C) the developmental

reading programs. Materials, methods, techniques, pro­

cedu res and some observation and d i agnosis of reading d i f ficul ties. Pre­ req uisite: Education 201 . 423 GENERAL METHODS-SECONDARY ( 1 ) A study o f cur ri c u l u m , materials, and methods of te aching a t t h e h i g h school level. Observations in actual school situations fol lowed by discussion. Pre­ req uisite : Education 201 or E d u cation 321 . 430 STUDENT TEA C H I N G - P R I MARY ( 2 Y2 ) Te aching i n the public schools under the d i rection and supervision o f class­ room teachers an d u niversity teachers. Prereq uisite: E d u cation 201 or Educa­ tion 321 , Education 322 and Education 325.

I

I

432 STUDENT TEACH I NG-UPPER ELEM ENTARY (2Y2 ) (Same a s above except Educat i o n 323 for Education 322). 434 STUDENT TEAC H I NG-SECONDARY (2) Teach i n g in t h e public schools under the d i rection and supervision of class­ room teachers and u n i versity teachers. Prereq uisite: Education 201 or 32 1 , Coreq uisite: Education 420, and Education 423. 435 PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR ( Y2 ) (To be taken concurrently with Education 430 o r Education 432). Designed to provide oppor t uni ti es lor students to share experiences with an exchange of ideas on p u pi l behavior and cu rricu l u m practices; and to project ways and means of improving teac h i n g perfo rmance. 436 ALTERNATE LEVEL STUDENT TEAC H I N G -ELEM ENTARY ( 1 ) A course designed to give some knOWledge, understanding, and study of chil­ dr en 'ilu'oiec\ matte! lield'il, a(\u ma\elia\'iI i (\ \i\e s\uue(\\' s a\\ema\e \eaci\i(\� ,

level p l us student te aching on that level . Students w h o h ave compl eted sec­ ondary preferred level student teach i n g should enroll in this course. 437 ALTERNATE LEVEL STUDENT TEACHI NG-SECONDARY (1 ) A course designed to give some knowledge, underst anding, and study of chi ldren, subject matter fields, and materials in the student's alternate teach­ ing level p l us student teach i n g on that level. Students who have completed elementary preferred level student teaching should en rol l in this course. 440-448 SPEC I F I C METHODS I N TEA C H I N G SECONDARY SCHOOL SUBJ ECTS (y2 ) Studies o f t h e cu rricu lum, methods, and materi a l s o f i nstruction i n the various

.1


fields of the secondary school c u rric u l u m . These courses are offered by de足 partments o f the University as indi cated and may be taken fo r graduate cred it. 440 ART I N THE SECON DARY SCHOOL ( V2 ) See Art 440. 441 B U SIN ESS E D UCATION IN THE SECON DARY SCHOOL ( V2 ) (SEC R ETA R IA L SUBJECTS) See B usiness Admin istration 44 1 . 442 B U S I N ESS EDUCATION 'I N T H E SECON DARY SCHOOL (V2 ) (GEN ERAL BUSI N ESS & ECO N O M I CS) See B usiness A d m i n i stration 442. 443 C H E M I STRY IN THE SECON DARY SCHOOL ( V2 ) 444 E N G L ISH I N TH E SECONDARY SC H O O L ( V2 ) 4 4 5 METHODS I N TEAC H I N G FOREIGN LANGU AGES ( 112 ) A study o f the theory and techniques o f foreign language teac h i n g , with special problems applicable to the student's major language. Special emphasis on aud io-l i n g ual tec hniq ues. (G) 446 MATH EMAT I CS I N THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (V2 ) 447 SCIENCE I N THE SECON DARY SC H O O L ( V2 ) 448 SOC I A L ST U D I ES I N TH E SECONDARY SCHOOL ( '12 ) 451 A D M I N I STRATION O F TH E SCHOOL L I B RARY (V2 ) Organization and ad ministration o f t h e school l i brary i n t h e eleme ntary school. (G) 452 BASIC R EF E R E N C E MATERIALS ( V2 ) A n i ntrod uction to those se rvices o f a school l i b rarian related t o the p resenta足 tion of the materials, book and nonbook, which form the sources of reference for the informational function of the l i brary. (G) 453 PROCESS I N G SCH O O L L I B RARY MAT E R I A LS ( V2 ) Simpl ified proced u res for the classification, cataloging, and tec h n i cal process足 ing of school l i brary materials. (G) 454 SELECTION OF L EA R N I N G RESO U R C E MATERI ALS (V2 ) Criteria, professional literature, and tec h n i q ues of evaluation of l i b rary mate足 rials are stressed (print and non-print materi a ls) . The ind ivid ual l i brari a n ' s responsi bility to faculty, to student, and to the general p u b l i c is defined in the i m portant role of material's selection officer. (G) 455 I N STRUCTIONAL MATER IALS ( V2 ) A survey o f audio and visual materials a n d aids, their use, organization, and a d m i n istrat ion in the schoo l . (G)


457 PR EPARATION AND UT I L I ZATI ON OF I N STRUCTIONAL MATE R I A LS ('Y4 ) A course designed to h e l p the individual partic ipant become fam i l i a r with the production and use of a variety of i nstructional materials, flat pictures, ch arts, maps, and the 35mm camera . Participants will produce items useful in instruc­ tion. A $1 0.00 lab fee w i l l be c h a rged'. (G) 461

GROUP PROC ESS AND THE I N D I VI DUAL (V2 ) A h u man interaction laboratory to fac i l itate the exp loration of the self concept th rough the mechanisms of i n terpersonal i n teractions and feedback. Emp hasis will be placed on the acquisition of skill in self-exploration, role identification, and c l i m ate making. (G)

463 GU I DANCE I N THE E L E M ENTARY SC HOOL (y2 ) A n i n t roduction to the concept o f elementary school g u i dance and the role of gu idance services to pupils, teachers, admin istrators, and parents. (G) 465 G U I DANCE I N THE SECONDARY SCHOOL ( Y2 ) A n introduction to some o f the major orientation t o guid ance and to study how these aspects can be translated into an operational program in the school setting. (G) 466 I NT R O D UCTION · TO STU D ENT PERSONNEL SERVICES ( y2 ) An overview o f student personnel services offered by college and u n iver­ sities; fam i l i arization with literature in the field; exposure to local service ag en cies and student government. (G) 467 EVALUAT I O N ( Y2 ) Evaluation of the outcomes o f school experiences. Problems that arise in con nection with development, organization, and administration of tests (both standardized and teacher made) wi l l be stud ied. Required of all fifth year students. Prereq u isite: Studen t teach i n g or teaching experience. (G) 468 EDUCATIONAL PSYC H OLOGY (1) Princi ples and research in h u man learning and their i m p l i cations for c u r­ ri c u l u m and i,nstructi o n . (G) 469 VOCATIONAL AND EDUCAT I ONAL G U I DANCE (V2 ) This cou rse is for M.A. students i n Counse l i n g and Guid ance to study voca­ tional theories and occu pational choices. Emp hasis is also placed upon the sources, analysis, and computerized i n formational banks of occupational materials. (G) 473 PARENT-TEA C H E R CONFERENCE (y2 ) A study o f the p r i n c i ples and tech n i q ues o f parent-teacher conferences. Pro­ cedures for i n trod u c i n g a parent-teacher conference program to the school and comm u n i ty. Evaluation of various grad i n g systems. Open only to experi­ enced teachers and stud ents who have completed or are taking student tea c h i n g . (G) 481 STAT ISTICAL METHODS (1 ) See Psychology 481 . (G)


482 K I N D ERGARTEN (V2 ) A study o f the kindergarten child and his adjustment p roblems. Special emphasis on activities and procedures fo r his development. (G) 483 PRI MARY READ I N G (V2 ) A study o f the materials and methods o f t h e modern primary read ing program and its relation to other activi ties. Open to experienced teachers only. (G) 485 THE G I FTED C H I L D (V2 ) A study o f the gifted child, his characteristics and problems, and school pro足 ced u res designed to furt h e r development. (G) 488 READ I N G CENTER WORKSHOP ( V2 ) C l i n ical study o f read ing problems a n d suggested corrective measures. To be taken concu rrently with Education 489. Open t o experienced' teachers on ly. S (G) 489 D I R ECTED TEAC H I N G IN READ ING CENTERS ( 1 ) D i rected observation a n d teaching i n s u m m e r remedial classes i n p u b l i c schools. T o b e taken concu rrently with Education 488. O p e n to experienced teachers only. S (G) 496 LABORATORY WORKSHOP ( 1 ) A practical course using children of e lemen tary age in a classroom situation working out a specific problem. P rovision w i l l be made for some active par足 t i c i pation of the university students. A conference with the instructor o r the Dean of the School of Educ ation will be req u i red before registration can be completed. (G) 497 SPECIAL P ROJECT ( V. - 1 ) Students who wish to do individual study and research on educational prob足 lems o r add itional labo ratory experience in public school classrooms may d o so with special permission of the Dean of the School of Education. (G) 501 WORKSHOPS ( V. - 1) G raduate workshops in special fields for varying lengths of t i m e . 545 METHODS AND T E C H N I Q U E S OF RESEARCH (112) Seminar i n soc ial science research methods and techniques with i l l ustrations d rawn pri marily from the fields of education and psychology; se condarily from such fields as sociology, history, and political science. Practice i n design足 ing a feasi ble research project i n the student's area of interest. Requi red for Master of Arts cand idates, and should be taken early in the deg ree program to provide background for fulfi l l i n g the research req u i rement. Prerequisite: Adm ittance to the graduate prog ram . 550 SCHOOL FINANCE (V2 ) Local, state, and federal contributions t o schoo l finance, its p h i l osophy and deve lopment. Special emphasis on the development and administration of a schoo l budget. II a/y 1 970


552 P U B L I C SCHOOL A D M I N ISTRAT I ON (3M Adm i nistration and supervision of school personnel, plant, and program; the structure and organization of the s c h o o l system . Prerequisite: Teac h i n g experi­ ence o r by special permission of the Dean of Sc hool of Educat i o n . 5 5 4 H I G H S C H O O L ORGAN IZAT I ON A N D A D M I N ISTRATION ( V2 ) CUrrent viewpoint and issues i n planning and o rganizing the h i g h sc h o o l cur­ riculum, schedule making, extra-curric u l a r activ i t i es, teachers' meeti ngs, pupil accounting and contro l , f i n ance and reports. P rerequisite: Educa­ tion 552. 555 A D M I N ISTRAT ION AND SUPERVISION WORKSHOP ( 1 ) T h e projects discussed wi l l be derived ch iefly from the i n terests a n d needs of the students. Typical projects are curriculum planning and adjustment i n line with present needs, p u b l i c relation programs, personnel em ployment and i n -service tra i n i n g , a n d financing b u i l d i n g and educational programs. Prerequisite: One course i n ad m i nistration and/ o r superv i s i o n . 558 A D M I N I STRATIVE INTERNSHIP (V2 - 1 ) I nterns h i p i n school admin istration planned with the School of Education i n cooperation w i t h selected s c h o o l admin istrators. P rerequisite : Course work i n school ad m i n istration and ad mission to graduate prog ra m . 560 CONT I N U I N G P RACT I C U M ( 1 ) A practicum experience conducted i n a s m a l l group setting to help the stu­ dent in the school counseling and student perso nnel programs integ rate the cognitive and affective learnings from other cou rses and counse l i n g experi­ ences into an i nd ividual ized cou nseling model. Students e n ro l led in the School Counselor and Student Personnel programs are re q u i red to register for this c o u rse when they have been admitted to the Division of Graduate Studies for the Master of Arts deg ree i n Educati on with major in School Coun­ se l i ng o r Student Personnel Work. A student will register only once, but w i l l b e requi red t o partici pate e a c h semester he is enrolled f o r one o r more classes until completion of his program. Students e n rol led in Practicum and Field Work (Education 570, 572) will not be re q u i red to participate. 561 COUNS E L I N G TH EORY AND PRACT I C E ( 1 ) A c o u rse designed t o acquaint the student with t h e various theories a n d tec h ­ n i q u es of counse l i n g . There will be opportunity for simu lated i nterviews and some role playing i n connection with the develo pment of the theories and the tech niques. Prereq u isite: Psychology 450. 563 PRACT I C U M IN G R OUP PROCESS AND LEADERSH I P ( V2 ) A hu man interaction (sensitivity) laboratory designed to explore interpersonal operations in groups and to facil i tate the development of self insight . Em phasis is g i ven to the development of ski l l in diagnosing individual, g roup, and org anizational behavior patterns and infl uences. Prerequisite : Education 461 .

I


I

565

I

570

( V2 )

SEM I N A R : NO N-TEST APPRA ISAL

The assessment o f personal c h aracteristics a n d behavioral patterns i n order t o better u n d e rstand the i nd i v i d u a l . N o n-test data w i l l be util ized ( i . e . socio­ metric scales, case studies, autobiographies, i n terviews, etc.) PHACT I C U M A N D F I EL D WORK IN

C O U N S E L I N G A N D G U I DA N C E

(1)

T h i s c u l m i nating prac t i c u m experience u t i l i zes t h e theory, ski l ls, a n d tech­ n i q ues previously learned i n counseling and g u id a n c e . This lield experience conducted

in

the

ences working

I

public

with

schools

gives

the student a variety

ind ividual students and,

g r o u p s of students. The

pract i c u m w i l l ,

in

where

many

possible.

cases, be

of

experi­

with

several

one

semester

long but may be extended through two semesters.

571

(1)

H I STORY A N D P H I LOSOPHY OF H I G H E R E D UCAT I O N

H i storical perspective and current status; development o f functions and struc­ tures;

issues in

c u rr i c u l u m ;

p h i losophy of ad m i n i strati o n ; case studies of

ad m i n istrative problems.

572

PRACT I C U M I N STUDENT PERSO N N E L WORK Supervised c o l l e g i ate experience

in

(1)

residence h a l l s , a d m i nistrative

offices,

service agencies, research o n project associated with practi c u m .

573

STUDENT P E R S O N N E L W O R K IN H I G H E R EDUCAT I O N

(1)

An analysis o f student personnel services i n h ig h e r e d u cati o n ; u s e of per­ s o n n e l data; co-curri cular activities; student we lfare ;

contemporary

trends

in c o u n s e l i n g problems related to student l i fe .

575

M E N TAL H EALTH

( V2 )

A study o f the basic p r i n c iples o f mental health as they relate to i n terper­ sonal relationships.

578

B E H A V I O R A N D LEARN I N G PROBLEMS O F STUDENTS

(' h )

A c o u rse designed to explore emotional problems w h i c h affect t h e learn i n g o f students. The scope w i l l

cover p r o b l e m s faced b y e l e m e ntary and sec­

ondary p u p i l s , taki ng into account factors outside the schoo l w h i c h i n f l uence motivation towards learn i n g . The student taking t h e course will consi d e r the problems w h i c h cause h i m di fficulty in his own learni n g s i t u a t i o n .

579

D IA G N O S I S A N D R E M EDIATION I N R EA D I N G

( V2 )

A study o f causative factors relating to read i n g d i fficul ties, with some oppor­ t u nity to apply

remediation tec h n i q ues. Open

to teachers c u rrently

in the

c l assroom, o r with tea c h i n g experience.

580

C U R R I C U L U M DEVELOPMENT A study of types of c u r r i c u l u m organization and programs a n d tec h n i ques of c u r r i c u l u m development with a view o f preparing

the student for h i s own

work on c u rr i c u l u m problems. I

583

READ I N G S

IN E D U CAT I O NAL ISSU�S A N D P R O B L E MS

( V. - 1 )

Students who desire to pursue a special line of i n d i v i d u a l read i n g , i n vest i -


gat i o n , or research may do so fo r c redit, rece iving h e l p and g u i d ance from the fac u l ty member best q u a l i fied to assi st in the particular prob l e m . C redit w i l l vary with the a m o u n t of work done. 585 COMPARAT I VE EDUCAT I O N (V, ) Comparison and i n vestigation of certain material and c u l t u ral systems of education t h roughout the world. 587 H I STORY O F EDUCAT ION (V2 ) G reat ed ucators, ed ucati o n a l theo ries, antiqu ity to the p resent.

and

e d u cat ional

systems

from

589 PHI LOSOPHY OF EDUC AT I O N (:v4 ) P h i l osop h i c a l and theoretical fo un dati ons of educ ati o n . 5 9 0 G RADUATE S E M I NAR (0) A workshop for all Master of Arts candi dates in the School of Ed ucati o n , this semi n ar p rovides a forum f o r e x c h a n g e of resea rch ideas and problems. Candidates shou l d register for this se m i n a r fo r assistance i n f u l fi l l i n g the research req u i rement. N o c o u rse credit is given, n o r i s tuition assessed . 596 RESEARCH STU D I ES IN E DUCAT ION ( V4 ) For those Master o f Arts candi dates w h o elect t o write two research papers in stead of writing a thesis. (One research pape r may be in the can didate's m i nor field under the su pervision of the m i n o r adviser.) The candidate w i l l b e req u i red t o review his research papers before his G rad uate Committee. 597 R ES EARCH ST U D I ES I N E DUCATION ( V2 ) (See Education 596) 599 T H E S I S (3/4 - 1 ) For those Master of Arts candi dates who elect to w rite a thesis i n stead of writing two resea rch papers. The thesis prob lem w i l l be cho sen from the candidate's major area of concentration and m ust be a p p roved by his G radua te Comm ittee. The cand idate wi l l be expected to defend h i s thesis i n a final oral exami natio n co nducted by h i s Comm ittee. Interim courses offered in

1 970:

305 EDUCATIONAL ISSUES AND I N N OVAT I O N S I N E L E M ENTARY SCHOOLS 306 TEACH I N G EXPER I ENCES I N THE U R BA N CLASSROOM 307 S E M I N A R IN THE ANALYS I S OF TEAC H I N G 308 R EA D I N G I NSTRUCT I O N F O R TH E C U LTU RALLY D I F FERENT 310 I N VOLVEMENT IN A THE RAPEUT I C C O M M U N IITY 318 I N DEPEN DENT STU D I ES IN U R BA N POTENT IALS 438 PR EPARATION AN D UTI L I ZATION OF I N STRUCT I O N A L MATER IALS 461 C U R R I C U L U M , M ETHODS, AND ST UD ENT TEAC H I N G (ALTERNATE LEVEL) 465 SPECIAL PROJECT

I


ENGLISH Mr. Reigstad, Chairman (and Chairman, Division

of Humanities), Mr. Benton,

Miss Blomquist, Mrs. Johnson, Mr. Jones, Mr. Klopsch, Miss Knudson;

Objectives

assisted by Mrs. Williams

The cou rses i n English are designed to help students ach ieve competence i n w r i t i n g , d i 3cernment i� readi n g , appreciation of h u m a n experience a n d aesthetic v a l ues, and understa n d i n g of the processes of both c r i t i cal and creative expres­ sion.. Although students en rolled i n the English program represent widely varying professi onal i n terests, one of the bas i c concerns of the faculty is working with prospective teachers, incl u d i ng those preparing for g raduate study lead i n g to col lege teach i n g . The general U n i versity requirement i n l i te rature or history c a n be met by taki n g, any course except 1 0 1 , 2 1 8, 400, and 403. :Requirements for Major

For the major in English, eight courses are required, not i n c l u d i n g Com posi­ tion 1 0 1 . Of these eight, at least fou r mu st be upper-d ivisi on. All majors, i nclud­ ing those enrol led i n the School of Education, mu st present two years of one foreign lang uage at the college level, o r show equivalent proficien cy. The following courses are req u i red of all Engl ish majors: I n troduction to American Literature (241 ) ; Introduction to English Literature: Beginni ngs to 1 750 (251 ) ; I n troduction to English Literat u re : After 1 7 50 (252); and Shakespeare (383) . BAC H ELOR OF ARTS I N EDUCATION major requ i rements are listed below. Candi dates for t h i s deg ree must also meet speci a l requi rements described in the School of Education section i n this catalog . Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses Teac h i n g Major: 8 courses Required: English 241 , 251 , 252 and 383. E l ecti ves to total 8 courses i n addition t o English 1 0 1 ; a t least four cou rses must be upper divisio n . Distribution requirement: o n e cou rse i n the nature a n d devel opment of lan­ guage (382, 400 or 403 ) ; and Advanced Compos i t i on 2 1 8 , or proficiency as determined by the English Department. All majors mu st present two years of one foreign language at the col lege level, or show equiv alent proficiency. Junior High School Preparation:

Teaching Major: 8 cou rses Required: Eight cou rses i n the department as listed under senior high prepara­ tion above, i n c l u d i n g d i stribution requi rement and two years of foreign lan­ g u age or equivalent proficiency. Elementary School Preparation:

Teaching Concentratio n : 6 c o u rses Required: 4 cou rses i n the department as l i sted under sen ior h i g h preparation above, and two addi tional cou rses to be selected i n consultation with t h e S c h o o l of Ed ucation. Teac h i n g M i n or: 3 courses Required: Three courses in the area, to be determined in consultati on with t h e School of Educati on.


1 0 1 COMPOSITION A course i ntended to help students develop the abi l i ty to think and write acc u rately and effectively. I n c ludes the read i n g and analysis o f i magi native l i terature o r essays and the writing of compositions. I I I 2 1 7 SHORT STORY A study of themes and tec h n i q ues i n short fiction. I I 2 1 8 ADVAN C E D C O M POSITION Requi red of English majors en rol led i n the School of Education ( u n less ex足 empted by English C( epartment). A study of rhetorical p r i n c i ples. I I 230 I NTRODUCTION TO CONTEM PORARY L ITERATU R E A study of selected contemporary works-ch iefly American, English, or Con足 tinental-si nce World War I I . I I I 231 MASTER P I EC ES O F E U R O P EAN LITERATU R E Representative works of the l i terature of Western E u rope, especially c lassical and med ieval. I 241 I NTRODUCTION TO A M E R I CAN LITERATU R E Req u i red of all Eng l i s h majors. A su rvey o f major authors from Edward Taylor to Stephen Crane. I 251 I NTRODUCTION TO E N G L I SH L ITERATU R E : BEGI N N I N G S TO 1 750 Req u i red of a l l English majors. An i ntrodu ctory course i r) English liter足 ature. I 252 I NTRODUCTION TO E N G L ISH LITE RATU R E : AFTER 1 750 Req u i red of all English majors. A su rvey mainly of the n i neteenth and twen足 tieth centuries. I I 323 C H I L D R E N ' S L ITERATU R E A study of c h i l d re n 's literature a s a r i c h col lection i n itse l f a n d a s a g u i d e to book selection in the p u b l i c schools. I I 349 MODERN POETRY Poetry, especially American and English, s i n ce World War I. I I 351 MODERN DRAMA Selected plays representing the development of d rama from real ism to the theatre of the abs u rd . I 358 E N G L I S H LITERATU R E : THE NOVEL A study of major novels selected to represent main developments from the eig hteenth century to the p resent. II a/y 1 971 -72. 382 E N G L I S H L I TERAT U R E : CHAUCER Especially The Canterbury Tales. I n c ludes study of the development of the English language. I


383 E N G L I SH LIT ERAT U R E : SHAKESPEAR E Requi red o f a l l English majors. Study of ten t o twelve representative plays. 388 ENGLISH LITERATURE: SEVENTEENTH CENTURY Donne, Mi lton, and t h e i r contem poraries. I I 389 ENGLISH LITER ATURE: E I G HTEENTH CENTURY Swi ft , Pope, Johnson, and their contem poraries. II aly 1 970-71 . 390 E N G L I SH L ITERAT U R E : N I N ET E ENTH CENTURY A study of representative works from the Romantic and Victorian periods. 400 L I N G U I STICS See foreign languages. 403 MODERN E N G L I S H G RA M MA R A stud y of modern English grammar utilizing the approaches of t h e th ree major theories : t raditional, structural, and t ransformational. 441 THE AMER I CAN RENAI SSANCE, 1 830-1 870 Transcendentalists, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Dicki nson ; Poe. Hawthorne, Melville. II 442 A M E R I CAN LITERATU R E : REALISM AN D NATURAL I S M , 1 870-1920 Howells, Mark Twain, James ; Crane, N o rris. London, Dreiser; Robinson , < Frost. I

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443 A M E R ICAN LITERAT U R E S I N C E 1 920 Emphasis on t h e novel up to 1 950. I I 491 I N D EPEN DENT READ I N G A N D RESEARCH (V2 ) Designed t o enable senior majors who plan t o d o graduate work i n English to round out their background with an i ntensive, planned course of read足 in g. I I I 597 G RA D UATE RESEARCH I II Interim courses offered in 1 970:

31 1 CANADIAN LITERATURE 312 LITERATURE OF B LACK A M E R I CANS 313 E N G L I SH PROSE F I CTION 314 CREATIVE WRIT I N G : POETRY 315 ST U D I ES IN FOLK LITERATURE 316 THE AGE OF BEN JONSON 31 7 FAUL KNER AND WAR R E N 497 MAJOR CONFERENCE


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F O R E I G N LANGUAGES

Mrs, Swenson, Chairman, Mr, Blubaugh, Mr, Carleton, Mrs, Faye, Mrs, Monroe, Mr, Petersen, Mr, Spangler, Mr, Toven, Mr, Webster, Mrs, Wolter; assisted by Miss Christensen, Mr, Conant, Mrs, Culver, Mrs, Durham, Mrs. Payne, Mrs. Purvis .

Objectives

The study ot fore i g n languages h as become a necessity in the present-day world, One of the most urgently needed elements in our c h angin g society is the ability to c o m m u n i c ate effectively and pu rposefully with other peoples; the i n volve足 ment in foreign lang u age learning i s a key to providing t h a t understanding, Through the medium of a foreign lang uage, the student aug ments h i s understanding of past and present contri butions of other peoples in the areas of c i v i l i zati on, h i story, l i ter足 ature, and the arts and sciences. Students preparing to enter g rad u ate school are advised to prepare themse lves in at least two modern languages, Placement

All new students who wish to continue a language in w h i c h they have had previous experience w i l l be req u i red to take a language placement test. This p l acement test wi l l be adm i n i stered by the D i rector of Testing and wi l l n o rmally be g i ven d u ring the new student o rientation days, O n the basis of this test, the student will be pl aced i n the language course which will correspond to h i s pro足 ficiency, N o cred i t w i : 1 be a l l owed' if a student elects to enro l l in a lang uage c o u rse w h i c h is at a leve l below that in w h i c h h e is placed, Students who have taken the "Wash ington Foreign Language P l ace ment Test" o r the CEEB need not take the language placemen: test at Pacific Lutheran University, The Language Laboratory

The language laboratory provides regular practice in l i stening to good models of foreign speech and a l a rge amount of i m i tation and repetitive d r i l l . Listening practice is i n t ended to lead progressively toward the ability to express one's thoughts i n conversation with pronun ciation, in tonat i o n , and use of g rammatical forms acceptable to the educated native speaker, La'boratory experience is requi red as a regular part o f all language courses at the elementary and i nter足 med iate levels. Requi rements for a Major

A major in any language w i l l consist of eight courses, i n c l ud i ng the 201 , 202 sequence of the i n termediate lang uage c o u rse, The ele mentary sequence 1 0 1 , 1 02 wi ll not count in determ i n i n g the major, The major req u i rements in a l l lang u ages will be 321 (Civ i l i zation and C u l t u re) and 351 , 352 (Com pos ition and Conversation), BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION major req u i rements are listed below, Can d i dates for this degree m u st also meet special req u i rements described i n the School of Education section i n this catal o g ,


French

Senior High School Preparation : 1 1 courses Teac hing Major: 8 courses Required: French 201 , 202, 32 1 , 351 , 352, 445 and three add itional courses. 445 may count in either edu cation or Fre n c h , but not in both. Suggested supporting courses: 3 courses i n speech, 'Eng lish or another for足 eign language. Junior High School Preparation: Teaching Major: 7 courses Required: As listed above for senior high preparation. Supporting courses chosen in consultation with major adviser. Teaching M i nor: 4 - 5 approved cou rses in French. Elementary School Preparation: Teaching Major: 6 courses Required: Five app roved cou rses in F rench and one add itional course to be selected in consu ltation with the department and the School of Educati on. Teac hing M i nor: 3 cou rses Required: Three approved courses in F rench to be dete rmi ned in consu ltation with the School of Edu cation. German

Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 c ourses Teac hing Major: 8 courses Required: German 201 , 202, 321 , 351 , 352, 445 and three add i t i onal courses. 445 may count i n either education or German, but not in both . Suggested supporting courses: 3 c o u rses in speech, English or another for足 eign language.

Junior High School Preparation: Teaching Major: 7 courses Required: As listed above for senior high preparation,. Supporting courses chosen in consu l tation with major adviser. Teac hing M i nor: 4 - 5 courses Required: 4 - 5 approved courses in Ge rman. Elementary School Preparation : Teaching Major: 6 courses Required: Five approved courses i n German and one add itional course to be selected i n consultation with the department and the School of Education. Teac hing Minor: 3 courses Required: Three approved courses in German to be determined in consultation with the School o f Education. Spanish

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Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses Teaching Major: 8 courses Required: Spanish 201 , 202, 321 , 351 , 352, 445 and three additional courses. 445 may count in either education or to re ig n languages, but not i n both. Suggested supporting courses: 3 course in speech, E n g l i sh or another tor足 eign language.

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Junior High School Preparation: Teac hing Major: 7 c o u rses as l isted above for sen i o r high preparation. Supporting courses to be c hosen i n consu ltation with maj o r adviser. Teaching Minor: 4 - 5 approved courses in Spanish. Elementary School Preparation: Teaching Major: 6 cou rses Required: Five approved courses in Spanish and one additio nal cou rse to be selected i n consultation with the department and the School of Education. Teaching Minor: 3 approved courses i n Spanish to be determined in con足 su ltation with the School of Education. Linguistics

400 STRUCTURAL L I N G U I ST I CS An introduction to the study of the nature of language. Basic principles and tec h n iq ues of descriptive lang uage analysis. Practice in the elementary application of l i n g u i stic analysis to selected materials. No prerequisites. I I French

1 01 , 102 E LEM ENTARY FRENCH ( 1 , 1 ) Essentials of pronunciation, i n tonation, and structure. Development of basic s k i l l s in l i ste n i n g , speaking, reading, and w r i t i n g . Oral and written exercises. Laboratory attendance req u i red. I, I I 20 1' , 202 INTERMED IATE FRENCH (1 , 1 ) Continued practice in lis ten i ng and speaking. Readings based on selections that reflect the cultural heritage as well as contem porary materials that are of inte rest to the college student. Laboratory attendance requ i red. I , II 321 C I V I L I ZAT ION AND C U LTU R E A contrastive study of life a n d attitudes in present-day France a s reflected i n cu rrent l ite rature, period icals, television, and fi lms. Written compositions and oral reports. Conducted in F rench. Prerequisite: French 202. I 351 , 352 C O M POSIT I ON AND CONVERSATION (1 , 1 ) Advanced grammar, stylistics, composition, conversation, and phonetics. Written compositions based on the culture and civil ization of France. Conver足 sation based on topics of current inte rest. Conducted in Fre n c h . Prereq llisite: French 202. I , I I 421 , 422 MASTERPI ECES O F FRENCH L I TERATU R E ( 1 , 1 ) Read i n g and analysis o f works o f representative authors o f t h e major periods from the Middle Ages th rough the nineteenth century. A study of the style and structure and of the moral and artistic intentions of such authors as Rabelais, Montaigne, Moliere, Corne i l le , Pascal, Voltaire, Rousseau, Hugo, and Baudelai re. Conducted in F re n c h . Alte rnates with French 43 1 , 432. Pre足 re quisite: French 202. I , I I

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I 431 , 432 TWENTIETH CEN TURY FRENCH LITER ATU R E ( 1 , 1 ) A survey o f major writers o f the twentieth century, emphasizing the period since World War I I . Cond�cted in Fren c h . Alternates with French 421 , 422. Pre­ req uisite: French 202. I, I I 442 H I STORY OF ROMANCE LA NGUAGES An exami nation o f the h i sto rica l development of the Romance Languages with reference to the languages of today. Same as Spanish 442. Given i n altern ate years. I I 445 METH ODOLOGY O F TEAC H I N G FOR EIGN LANGUAGES (V2 ) A study o f the theory and tech n iq ues o f fo reign language teac h i n g , with special problems applicable to the student's major lan guage. Particular emphasis o n audio-l i ngual tec h n iques. 491 , 492 I N D EP E N DENT STUDY ( V,

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597, 598 G RADUATE RESEARCH (V2 - 1 )

German

1 0 1 , 1 02 ELEM ENTARY G E R MAN ( 1 , 1 ) Esse ntials of pronunci at i o n , intona tion, a n d structure . Development of basic s k i l l s i n listening, speaking, read i n g , and writing. Oral and written exercises. Laboratory attendance req u i red. I, I I 201 , 20� I NT E R M EDIATE G E R MAN ( 1 , 1 ) Con t i n ued practice i n listening and speaki ng. Readi n'gs based o n selections that reflect the cu ltural herit age as well as contemporary materials that are of i n terest to the col lege student. Laboratory attendance required. I, I I 321 C I V I L I ZATION A N D CULTU RE An exami nation of the hi storical and artistic ele ments that have sh aped Ger­ man culture from the beg inni ngs to the p resent. Special e m p h asis on those forces w h i c h have influenced American l i fe and c u l ture. Conducted in Ger­ man. Prereq uisite: German 202. I 351 , 352 COMP OS ITION AND CONVERSATION ( 1 , 1 ) Add i t i o n al p ractice in the development o f t h e basic l anguage s k i l l s with em phasis on the f i n e r poi nts of structure, style, and good taste. Com po sitions and conversations based on topics of c u r rent i n terest. Conducted in Ger­ man. Prerequisite: German 202. I, I I 421 , 422 MASTERPIECES OF G E R M AN L ITERATURE (1 , 1 ) S u rvey o f the major l i terary works, i n all genres, from the early period to about 1 900. An exam i n ation o f the forces w h i c h have produced the l i terature. How to under stand and appreciate literature as a work of art. Conducted in German. Alternates with German 431 , 432. Prereq uisite: German 202. I , I I

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431 , 432 TWENTI ETH CENTURY G E R MA N LITERAT U R E (1 , 1 ) Su rvey of the maj or l i terary works of t h e present t i me with emphasis on the last decade. A l l l i terary forms considered. Conducted in German . Alternates with German 421 , 422. Prerequisite: German 202. I , I I

442 H I STORY O F T H E GER MAN LANGUAGE An examinat i o n of t h e h i storical development of the German language with reference to the language of today. Conducted i n German. Gi ven in alternate years. Prereq uisite: German 202. I I

445 M ETHODOLOGY O F TEAC H I N G FOREIGN LAN G UA G ES ( V2 ) A study o f t h e theory and tech n i q ues of foreign language teachi n g , with spe足 cial problems applicable to the stude nt's major language. Part i c u l a r e m phasis on audio-l i ngual tec h n i q ues.

491 , 492 I N DEPENDENT STUDY (V2 - 1 ) 597, 598 GRAD UATE RESEARCH ( V2

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Greek Cu rrently offered cooperatively with the U n i versity of Puget Sound on our campus.

1 0 1 , 1 02 ELEM ENTARY G R E E K (1 , 1 ) A n introduction to the bas i c elements of G reek thought a n d forms o f expres足 sio n , with g rammatical ana lysis and translation. I, I I

201 , 202 I NT E R M E D IATE G R EEK ( 1 , 1 ) Selected koine read ings from Hellen istic Greek literature, with major emphasis on the New Testament. I, I I

421 , 422 MASTERPI ECES O F G R E E K LITERATU R E (1 , 1 ) linguistic, h istorical, a n d theological study of selected Hellenistic documents. Ava i lable through consultation with the department. Prereq u i s i te : Greek 202. I, I I

49 1 , 492 I N DEPEN DENT STUDY ( '12

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Japanese C u rrently offered cooperatively with t h e U n i versity of Puget Sou n d on their campus.

1 0 1 , 1 02 ELEM ENTARY JAPANESE (1 , 11) Introducti on into pronu n c iation, conversati o n , construction patterns, grammar, and kana syllabaries. I, I I

20 1 , 202 I NT E R M EDIATE JAPANESE (1 , 1 ) Introduction t o character writing. Read i n g , writing, and translation of mod足 ern Japanese. I, I I


Latin

1 01 , 1 02 ELEM ENTARY LATIN (1 , 1 ) Exercises i n g ra m m a r and syntax; vocabu l ary build i n g ; reading 01 selected materi als. I, I I 201 , 202 I NT E R M ED IATE LAT I N (1 , 1 ) Review o f structure; continued vocabulary b u i l d i n g ; reading o f texts of liter­ ary merit. I, 1' 1 491 , 492 I N DEPENDENT ST UDY ( Y2 - 1 ) Norwegian

1 0 1 , 1 02 ELEM ENTARY N O RWEGIAN (1 , 1 ) Essentials o f pron u n c i ation, intonation, and structure. Deve lopment o f basic s k i l ls in l iste n i n g , spea k i n g , read ing, and writing. Oral and written exercises. Laboratory attendance req u i red. I, I I 201 , 202 INTERMEDIATE N O RWEGIAN (1 , 1 ) Conti n ued practice i n l isten i n g and speaking. Read ings based o n selections that reflect the cu ltu ral heritage as well as contempo rary materials that are of i n terest to the col lege student. Laboratory attendance req u i red. I, I I 321 C I V I LIZAT I O N A N D C U LT U R E An exam i nation of the h istorical a n d artistic elements that h a v e shaped Scand i n avian c u lture from the beg i n n ings to the present. Spec i a l emphasis on those forces which have i n fluenced Ameri can l ife and cu lture. I 491 , 492 I N DEPENDENT STUDY (V2 - 1 ) Russian

Currently offered cooperatively with the University of Puget Sound on th e i r campus. 1 0 1 , 1 02 E L E M ENTARY RUSSIAN (1 , 1 ) Essentials o f Russian grammar, o ra l a n d written practice, a n d te aching of graded texts. I, I I 20 1 , 202 I N T E R M E D IATE RUSSIAN (1 , 1 ) Read i n g o f suitable texts, review o f g ram mar, oral a n d written composition . I , I I Spanish

1 0 1 , 1 02 E L E M ENTARY SPA N ISH ( 1 , 1 ) Essentials of pron u n c iation, intonation, and structure. Development o f basic skills i n l iste n i n g , speaking, read ing. and writing. O ral and written exercises. Laboratory attendance req u i red. I, I I 201 , 202 I N T E R M E D I ATE SPAN I SH ( 1 , 1 ) Contin ued practice i n l i stening and speaking. Readings based o n selections that reflect the c u l tural heritage as well as contemporary materials that are of i n t e rest to the col lege student. Laboratory att�ndance re q u i red. I , I I 3 2 1 C I V I L I ZAT I O N AN D C U LTURE An exa mi nation of the h istorical and artistic elements that have shaped

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Spanish thought and behavior from the beginni ngs to the present. Special emphasis on those forces w h i ch have i n fluenced' American l i fe and culture . Conducted in Spanish. Prereq uisite : Spanish 202. I

351 , 352 COM POSITION AND CONVERSATION (1 , 1 ) Topics o f cu rrent i n terest are used a s a basis for the improvement o f oral and written expression . Conducted i n Spanish. P rerequisite: Spanish 202. I, " 421 , 422 MASTERPIE CES OF SPAN ISH LITERATURE ( 1 , 1 ) Survey of t h e major literary works, i n a l l genres, from the early period t o about 1 900. An examination of the forces that have produced the l i terature. How to understand and appreciate literature as a work of art. Conducted in Span ish. Alte rnates with Spanish 431 , 432. Prerequisite Spanish 202. I, " 43 1 , 432 TWENTIETH CENTURY SPA N I S H L ITERATURE (1 , 1 ) Su rvey of the major literary works o f the present time with emphasis o n the last decade. Both Spanish and Latin American authors w i l l be considered. Condu cted in Spa n i sh. Alternates with Spa n i sh 4 2 1 , 422. Prerequisite: Span­ ish 202. I, I I 442 H I STORY O F ROMANCE LANGUAGES An examination of the h istorical development o f the Romance languages with reference to the languages o f today. Same as French 442. G i ven in alternate years. II 445 METHODOLOGY O F TEAC H I NG FOREIGN LANGUAGES (V2 ) A study o f the theory and techniques o f foreign language teach ing, with �pecial problems applicable to the student's major language. Particular emphasis on audio-lingual tec h n iques. 491 , 492 I N D EPEN DENT STUDY (V2 - 1 ) Interim Courses offered in 1 970:

313 RUSSIAN THOUGHT 314 COMPARATIVE DRAMAS OF BUCHNER, HAUPTMANN, I BSEN, STR I N D B E H G , TSCHEKOV AND O ' N E I L 3 1 5 CONTEMPORARY G ERMAN WR ITERS 317 R EADING FRENCH 316 CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY 320 LE FRANCAIS EN FRANCE 497 I N D EPEND ENT STUDY

G ENERAL ENGINEERING Mr.

Schmid

1 5 1 , 152 E N G I N E E R I N G DRAW I N G AND DESC R I PT IVE G EO M ETRY (V2 , V2 ) I, "


HISTORY

Mr. Schnackenberg, Chairman, Mr. Akre, Mr. Martinson, Mr. Nordquist, Mr. Ristuben; assisted by Mr. McLaughlin

The purpose of the study of history is to inform the student of man's words and deeds that have shaped the world's cultu res, movements, institutions, and c i v i l i za­ tions. As such, it seeks to build a fund of useful i n formation, sharpen the criti cal faculties of the mind with respect to materials and methods, t rain the i nt e llect, d is c i p l i n e the memory, an d probe for those values that point the way toward ulti mate meaning for modern man's search for libe rty and security. A BACHELOR OF ARTS major comprises 8 cou rses including History 1 07, 1 08 and two of the following three courses: 251 , 252, 253. Admission: D u ri n g the second semester of the sophomore yellr, a student intending to major i n history leading to the Bac h elor of Arts degree should fill o u t an ap p l i c ation which is ava i lable i n the department office. II accepted, the student will be assigned to a member of the h i story faculty who w i l l serve as h i s adviser. English Proficiency: Prior to the Thanksgiving recess of the j u nior year, a his­ tory major m ust attai n a satisfactory score on an exam i nation i n English pro­ ficiency. Arrangements for taking the exa m i nation should be made in the office of the D i rector o t Test ing. Senior Seminar: I n eithe r the fi rst or second semester o f the senior year, a his­ tory major mu st enroll in one semi n a r (either American o r Europe an). Examination: Before the end of March of the senior year, each grad uating h is­ tory major mu�t take an exami n ation, usually oral, covering the work in the field of h istory. Arrangements will be made by the department chai rman. G raduate students desiring to p u rsue the Master of Arts programs with major studies in the field of history should consult The G raduate B u l leti n , Division of Graduate Studies. Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts i n Education degree who are planning to teach in the secondary schools in the field o f h i story must meet the requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, except i n foreign languages, and of the Depart­ ment of History. Foreign language study is, however, strongly reco m mended. BACHELOR O F ARTS I N ED UCATION major requirements are l i sted below. Can­ d idates for t h i s degree must also meet speci a l requirements described in the School o f Education section i n this catalog. Senior High School Preparetion: 11 courses Teaching Major: 8 courses Required: H i story 1 0 7, 1 0 8 ; two of 251 , 252 and 253; 351 plus 3 courses i n h i story. Suggested supporting courses: 3 courses selected from econ omics, geography, politi cal science, psychology and sociology. 1 0 7, 1 08 H I STORY OF C I VILIZATION An i n t roduction to history emphasizing understanding and analysis of the i n stitutions and ideas of selected civil izations. Mesopota mia, Egypt, the Hebrews, G reece, Rome, the rise of Christian i ty, and Europe in the Middle


Ages are dealt with in the f i rst semester; Eu rope from the Renaissance to the present in the second. Lect u res, discussions and selected research and writing. I I I 251 COLONIAL A M E R I CAN H I STORY The origin and development of the American nation from colonial ti mes to the 1 790's. Emphasis upon the growth of colonial inst i t u t i o ns and their rela足 tionships to the British i m perial system. 252 N I N ETEENTH CENTURY A M E R ICAN H I STORY A study of the Un ited States from the early nat i onal period to the 1 890's. Emphasis upon the i nterplay between changing historical conditions and various groups in society, i n c l u d i n g mi norities. 253 TWENTIETH CENTURY A M E R I CAN H I STORY A study of the major trends and events in domestic and foreign affairs since 1 900. Such important themes as affluence, u rban g rowth, and social contrasts will be discussed. 321 , 322 H I STORY O F THE A N C I ENT WORLD A study of the ancient Mediterranean world. The civil izations of G reece and Rome. Prereq uisite: Consent of instructor. I I I 325 T H E M I D DLE AGES A study of the h istory of Europe from the disintegration of the Roman Empire to 1 450. Extensive read i n g and research in selected medieval materials. Prerequisite: 1 07 , 1 08 or consent of i nstructor. 326 RENAI SSANCE AND REFO R MATION An i ntensive study of the late fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Selected read足 ing and research. Pre req uisite: 1 07, 1 08 or consent of i nstructor. 328 EARLY MODERN EURO PEAN H I STORY Readings, research and discussions i n E u ropean developments beg i nning with the advent of modern science and statecraft. The enli ghtenment, the revolutio ns, the Napoleonic era to 1 8 1 5. Prereq uisite: 1 07 , 1 08 o r consent of i nstructor. 329 RECENT AND CONTEMPORARY EUROPE Read ings, research and discussions i n the majo r themes of European and world development since 1 81 5 . Prereq uisite: 1 07, 1 08 or conse nt of instructor. 331 , 332 E N G LA N D A study of the political, social, econom i c , legal a n d cu ltural developments i n the B ritish Isles. Prerequisite : 1 0 7, 1 08 o r consent of instructor. I I I 333 RUSSIA A s u rvey o f the g rowth of Russia from the earl iest t i mes. The col lapse of Czarism, the rise of commu nism, present world relations. Prerequisite: 1 07, 1 08 or consent of instructor. 337 MODERN LATIN A M E R ICA The origin and development of Latin America from the i ndependence period t o the present. Emphasis upon Mexico, Braz i l , Argentina and i n ter-American relations. Prereq uisite: Any two courses from 1 07, 1 08 , 251 , 252, 253, or consent of instructor.


340 FAR EASTERN H I STORY A s u rvey 01 Far Eastern l i fe and thought from ancient ti mes. Em phasis upon China, Japan and I n d i a . Prereq uisite : consent 01 instructor. 351 THE PAC I F I C NO RTHWEST An inte rpretative h istory of the Pacilic No rthwest within the context of the Ameri can West: soc i a l , econ o m i c , and political developments which rellect both regio nal and national characteristics. 356 A M E R ICAN D I PLOMAT IC HISTORY A study of the factors and polici es of American di plomacy; isolation, neutral足 ity, the Mon roe Doctrine , world power. Prerequisite: Two courses frof11 25 1 , 252, 253 o r consent 01 instructor. 421 H I STORY O F I D EAS: EU ROPEAN C I VILIZATION An advanced study 01 lead i n g ideas developed in western c i v i lization since the d i sintegration of Rome. Prereq uisite: consent of instructor. 451 AMER ICAN CONSTITUTIONAL H I STORY The development of the const i tution from colon ial ti mes. Prerequ isite : con足 sent 01 instructor. 461 H I STORY OF THE A M E R I CAN FRONTIER A study 01 the principal types of " f rontiers" that c h a racterized the westward movement, espe c i a l l y in the ni neteenth century. Prereq uisite : any two cou rses from 25 1 , 252, 253 or consent of i ns t ructor. 471 H I STORY OF A M ER I CAN THOUGHT AND C U LTU RE A study of the various di mensions of American social and i n t e l lectual history. Emphasis upon ideas as they relate to h istori cal periods, and ethnic g roups. Prereq u i s i te : any two cou rses from 25 1 , 252, 253 or consent of instructor. 494 S E M I N A R I N A M E R I CAN H I STORY 495 S E M I NAR IN EUROPEAN H I STORY 502 H I STORIOGRAPH Y AND B I BLIOGRAPHY 596 GRADUATE R ESEARCH 599 T H E S I S Interim courses offered in 1 9 70:

304 PAC I F I C NORTHWEST H ISTORY: D I RECTED RESEARCH 305 A M E R I CAN WEST: THE NAT IONAL PARK SYSTEM (DEATH VALLEY TOUR) 3 1 2 RENAISSANCE (TOUR IN ITALY)


J O U R NALISM

Mr. Eyres, Mr. Nesvig 203 J O U R N A L I S M (V2 ) A study of the tec h n i ques of reporting as they apply to news and feature writ足 i n g ; emphasis upon the daily press and its re lations to the reader.

204 J O U R N A L I S M (V2 ) Editing of local and wi re copy with emphasis upon e l i m i nation o f l i be l and i m provement of writing ski l ls ; head l i n e writing; handling of photographs; makeup. 208 EDITORIAL CONFERENCE (V. - 1 ) Provides opportunity for the publi cation staff to do practical research work on journalistic problems. Open to advanced students in journalism with consent of the instructor. I I I


MATHEMATICS

Mr. Herzog, Chairman, Mr. Batker, Mr. Coats, Mr. Fisk, Mr. Johnson, Mr. Peterson; assisted by Mrs. Herzog and Mr. Running

Mathematics has permeated almost every aspect of our modern society. This i s reflected not on ly th rough the recent scientific and tec h n ological i n formation explosion, b u t also t h rough its ever i n c reasing use in such areas as busi ness, economics, govern ment and the social scienc es. The Mathematics Department is the refore c o m m i t ted and its c u rri c u l u m is designed to (1) offer a l l students an oppo rtu n i ty to stu dy mathemati cs, (2) provide the mathematics for those students who need it as a tool in busi ness or the natu ral or soc ial sciences, (3) instruct the prospective teac h e r in those subjects which he will need to master i n orde r to be able to teach mathematics adequately hi mself, (4) p repare the student for a career in mathematics, and (5) provide the student with the background necessary for g radu ate study in mathematics. During the sophomore year, a student i n tending to earn a Bachelor o f Arts or a Bachel or of Sci ence degree with a major in mathematics should complete an appli cation form which is avai lable from the departmental sec retary. If accepted by the department, the student w i l l be assigned to an adviser on the mathematics fac u lty. Req u i rements for the BACHELOR OF ARTS degree with a maj o r in mathematics shall consist of a m i n i m u m of 7 courses in mathematics numbered above 1 50 i n c l u d i n g Math 332 and at least 3 u p per division mathematics courses selected from Math 433, 434, 455, 456. (Students p l a n n i n g to do graduate work in mathe足 matics should defi nitely com p lete all four of these c o u rses.) Two courses in physics are strongly recomme nded . Requi rements for the BAC H ELOR OF S C I EN C E degree with a major in mathe足 matics sha l l co ns.ist of 1 0 c o u rses in mathematics i n c l u d i n g Math 332 and at least 5 u p per division mathe matics courses. At least 3 of the u p per d i vision c o u rses must come from Math 433, 434 , 455, 456. (Students planning to do graduate work i n mathematics s h o u l d defi n i tely comp lete a l l four o f these c o u rses.) Two c o u rses in p h ysics are re q u i red . Mathematical Physics 456 may be substituted for one course of u p per d i vision mathematics. BACHELOR OF ARTS I N ED UCATION maj or req ui rements are listed below. Can足 did ates for this degree m ust a l so meet spe c i a l req u i rements described i n the School of Educ ation section in this catalog.


Senior High School Preparation:

Teaching Major: 7 courses in addition to Math 446 Prerequisite: Math 1 33 or equivalent. Required: Math 1 51 , 1 52 , 231 , 433, 446; 321 o r 434 or 455; one additional upper division course, Suggested supporting courses: 2 courses i n che mistry o r physics and two add itional science courses, Junior High School Preparation:

Teaching Major: 6 cou rses Math ďż˝ 33 or equivalent. Required: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52 , 231 , 433, 446, Teaching Minor: 4 courses in addition to Math 446. Prerequisite: Math 1 33 or e q u i valent. Required: Math 1 51 , 1 52 ; 1 27 or 231 ; 446, 433 o r 321 . Prerequisite:

Elementary School Preparation:

Teaching Major: 4 cou rses in addition to Math 323 and Math 324 or 321 . Prerequisite: Math 1 33 or equivalent. Required: Math 1 51 , 1 52 , 127 or 321 or 433; plus mathematics electi ves. Teaching Minor: 2 mathematics courses in addition to Math 323, and Math 324 or 321 , to be determined i n consultation with the School of Education and the Department of Mathematics. Grad u ate Students desiring to p u rsue a course of study lead i ng to a MASTER OF NATURAL SC I EN C E degree with a major in mathematics should consu l t The G rad u ­ ate Bu lletin, Division of G raduate Studies.


A Typical Curriculum in Mathematics Freshman Year

Sophomore Year

Courses

Engl ish 1 0 1 , Composition __ J Mathematics 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 Analytic Geometry and Calculus __ _ Rel igion req u i remenL_ _ _ _ _ PE Activity _ _ _ _ Physics 1 0 1 , 253 __ _____ __ Electives (Social Science, Fine Arts or H i story and Literature) _

2 2

2 1 R e l i gion

_

V2

_

2

1 -2

requiremenL _ _ _ _ _ _ PE Acti vity__ _ __ ______ _ _ _ _ Electives (Social Science, Fine Arts or H i story and Literatu re) ___ ___ ___ _ Electives ____ _

___

Senior Year

Courses

? Foreign Language ___ Philosophy requiremenL Mathematics ___ _ Electives _

_

2

V2

1 -2 1 -2

7 V2 -8V2

7 V2 -8V2 Junior Year

Courses

2 Foreign Language _ _ _____ _ _ _ Mathematics 231 , 332 _ ___ _

1

1

Courses

Mathematics _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 2 - 3 Electives _____ _______ _ 5 - 6

2-3 2-3 7-8

7-8

1 See Page 43 for General University requirements. 'See Page

44 for College of Arts and Sciences requirements.

JStudents not qualifying for Math andlor

1 5 1 upon entrance should register lor Math 91

1 33 and then take both Mathematics 152 and 231 in the lirst semester 01

the sophomore year.

091 I NT E R M ED IATE ALGE BRA-(no credit) A thorough review of fi rst year h i g h school algebra and continuation beyond quadratics. Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra. I 1 27 F I N I T E MATHEMATICS Truth tables, modulo systems, ele mentary probability, Boolean Algebra, matrices, l i near programming. Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry. I I I 1 33 COLLEGE ALG EBRA A N D TRIGONO METRY Sets, progressions, binomial theorem, complex n u m bers, theory of equa足 tions, determinants, radian measure, solution of acute and oblique triangles, inverse functions, graphing, identities. Prerequisite: 2 years of high school algebra or permission of instructor. I I I 1 5 1 ANALYTIC G EO M ETRY A N D CALCULUS An introduction to analytic geometry, functions, l i m i ts, derivati ves and in足 tegrals with appl ications. Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra, trigonometry, or Mathematics 1 33 or the equivalent. I I I 1 52 ANALYT I C G EO METRY A N D CALCULUS I ntegration, appl ications and tec h n i ques of integration, transcendental fu nc足 tions, polar coordinates, i m p roper i ntegrals, L'Hospital'S Rule, elementary d i fferential equations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 51 . I I I


1 99 D I R ECTED R EA D I N G (V. - V2 ) Supervised study o f topics selected to meet the i nd i vidual's needs o r i n ter­ ests. I n tended primarily for students awarded advanced placement. Admission o n l y by departmental i n vitati o n . 2 3 1 L I N EAR ALGEBRA A N D CA LCULUS An i n t roduction to l i near algebra, vectors, matrices and determi nants; d i ffer­ ential equations, solid analytic geometry. I n t roduction to m u ltivariable cal­ c u l us. Prereq uisite: Math 1 52 or consent of chairman of the department. I I I 321 G E O M ETRY A su rvey of the foundations of geometry and of basic theory i n the areas of E u c l i dean, projective, and non-Eucl idean geometry. Prereq uisite: Mathematics 23 1 or consent of i nstructor. I a/y 1 970-71 323 M O D E R N ELEM ENTARY MATHEMATICS An i n troduction to the mathematical concepts underlying the trad itional com­ putational tech n i ques, and offe ri n g a systematic analysis of arithmetic and an i n t u itive app roach to algebra and geometry. I n tended p ri ma r i ly for ele­ mentary teachers. Acceptable for elementary teacher preparation only. Must be taken before Education 326. Prereq uisite: Consent of i n st ructor. I II S 324 G E O M ETRY FOR THE ELEM ENTARY SCHOOL TEAC H ER (V2 ) Designed t o help students review elementary geometry from a mature point of view using modern vocabulary and notat i o n , and to understand the i m p o r­ tance of measu rement, observat i o n , intuition, and i nd u ctive reasoning, as useful techniques in d i scove ri n g , learn i n g , and teaching elementary geometry. Acceptable for elementary teacher p reparation only. Prereq u isite: Math 323. I I 332 M U LT I D I M EN S IONAL CALC ULUS A contin uation of the m u ltiva riable calculus concepts i n t roduced i n Math 231 . Partial d i fferentiation and d i fferential equations, Ii�e i ntegrals, Green's the­ ore m , i n f i n ite series. Prereq uisite: Mathematics 231 . I I 341 MATHEMATICAL STAT I ST I CS Elementary p ro b a b i l i ty theory, discrete and continuous d i stri b u t i o n functions, i ntrod uction to sam p l i n g theory and hypothesis testi n g . Prereq uisite: Mathe­ matics 1 52 . II a/y 1 970-71 351 A P P L I E D MATHEMAT I CS Topics i n c l ude ord i n a ry d i fferential equations ( i n c l u d i n g series solutions), the Laplace transform, partial d i fferential equations, orthogonal functions. Prereq uisite : Mathematics 332. I 433, 434 M O D E R N ALGEBRA ( 1 , 1 ) Topics i n c l ude l i near a l ge b ra , g roups, rings, modules, fields, field extensions. Prereq uisites: Mathematics 231 . 433 offered fi rst semester every year ; 434 offered I I a/y 1 97 1 -72. 446 MATHEMAT I CS I N THE SECON DARY SCHOOL ( V2 ) Emphasis o n the basic concepts o f mathematics, i nc l uding the p ri n c i p les of n u mber, operation , relation and p roof, postu lational systems of Euclidean geometry, and present methods and materials i n teac h i n g secondary school


mathematics. Prerequ isite : Mathematics 231 instructor. I

or equivalent and consent of

455, 456 MAT H E MAT I CAL ANALYSI S ( 1 , 1 ) A rigorous and extended treatment o f topics introduced i n elementary cal足 cu l us. Prerequisite: Mathematics 332. 455 offered first semester every year; 456 offered I I a / y 1 970-71 . 460 ELEM ENTARY TOPOLOGY An i n troduction to poin t-set topology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. II a/y 1 971 -72 490 SEM INAR (V. - 1 ) Open to advanced students with consent of the chai rman of the department. 491 , 492 IN DEPENDENT STUDY ( V. - 1 ) Open to advanced students with consent of the c h a i rman of the depart足 ment. I I I 597, 598 G RADUATE RESEARCH ( V. - 1 ) Open to Master's degree candi dates only. Pre req uisite: Consent of the chair足 man of the department. I I I Interim courses offered i n 1 9 70:

303 H U MAN I T I E S OF SCI ENCE (CHEM ISTRY/ MATHE MAT I C S/ PHYSICS) 307 I N TRODUCTION TO T H E STYLE AND SUBSTANCE OF MODERN MATHEMATICS 308 I NT E R D I S C I P L I NARY MAT HEMAT I C S 309 MATHEMATICAL RESEARCH

MUSIC

Mr. Skones, Chairman, Mr. Dahl, Mr. Gilbertson, Miss King, Mr. Knapp, Mr. Kracht, Mr. Meyer, Mr. Robbins, Mr. Sare; assisted by Mr. Crockett, Mrs. Evans, Mr. Harmic, Mrs. Hopp, Mrs. Knapp, Mr. Locke, Mr. Newnham, Mrs. Swisher, Mrs. Thompson, Mrs. Tremaine

Requi rements for a major in music for the BACH ELOR OF ARTS degree shall consist of Music 50, 1 23, 1 24 , 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , 223, 224, 323 plus one course ot Literature and Performance and two courses of private lessons i n c l u d i n g one- h a l f courses of private piano. All music majors are requi red to register tor Music 5 0 , Student Rec i tal, each semester in attendance. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION maj o r requirements are listed below. Can足 did ates tor this degree mu st also meet special req u i rements described i n the School of Ed ucation section in this catalog. More com plete deta i l s concerning all music c u rricula may be found i n the Department of Music Hand book. Senior High School Preparation

" Emphasis on Choral Music Teac h i n g Major: 1 4 V2 courses.

I


Music Theory 1 23 , or equivalent. Music 50, 1 24 , 21 1 , 2 1 2 , 223, 224, 323, 325, 339, 340, 442, 445, 447. Two courses of private voice lessons, one-half course of private piano l essons and two courses of Literat u re and Performance. One c o u rse of music electives is also req u i red.

Prerequisite: Required:

" Emphasis on Sacred C h oral Mus i c Teac h i n g M a j o r : 1 4\12 courses. Prerequisite: Music Theory 1 23 , or equ ivalent. Required: Music 50, 1 24, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , 223, 224, 323, 339, 340, 367, 368, 445, 447. Two cou rses ot private in struction must be earned in the major performance med i u m (voice or piano a n d / o r organ) and one-half course must be earned in the m i n o r performance med i um (voice or piano and/ or orga n ) . Two c o u rses of Literature and Performance are also req u i red. " Emphasis on I n strumental Music Te aching Major: 1 4 \!2 c o u rses. Prerequisite: Music Theory 1 23, or equivalent. Required: Music 50, 1 24 , 1 4 1 , 1 42 , 21 1 , 21 2, 223, 224, 243, 244, 245, 246 , 247, 323, 325, 326, 339, 445, 447. Two cou rses of private i nst ruction must be earned on the student's major i nstrument plus one- h a l f c o u rse of piano. Two courses of cred i t m ust be earned in Literature and Performance. Junior High School Preparation

Teac h i n g Major: 7 courses. Prerequisite: Music 1 23 , or equiva l e n t. Required: M usic 50, 1 24, 21 1 , 2 1 2 , 339, 340, 445. One-h a l f course ot private piano, one-half c o u rse o f a secondary instrument o r voice, one c o u rse of L i terature and Performance and one-half c o u rse of m usic electives are also required. Teaching M i n o r : 5 cou rses. Required: M usic 1 20 , 339, 341 plus one-h alf course ot private piano and one­ half c o u rse o f pri vate instruction in voice or secondary in strument. One cou rse of Literature and Pertormance and one-half c o u rse of electives in mu sic are also requ i red. Elementary School Preparation

Teaching Maj o r : 6 c o u rses. Required: Music 1 20 , 339, 341 plus one-half c o u rse of private piano and one­ half c o u rse o f private voice. One c o u rse of mu sic ense m b l e and one and one­ half cou rse o f electives in music are also req u i red. Teach ing M i n o r : 3 c o u rses. Required: 3 courses in the Mu sic Department, t o be determi ned in consu lta­ tion with the Department of Music and the School of Education. \'

' Students desi ring certification as a secondary music teacher will do their student teaching on the secondary level. Students desiring certification as an elementary music teacher will do their stu­ dent teaching on the elementary level. Students desiring certilication as a K

- 12 music teacher will do their student

teaching on both elementary and secondary level.


The BACHELOR OF M U S I C c u rricu l u m is designed for the student who i n tends to become a professional musician and/or to enter g raduate school. The deg ree is offered with a maj o r in (a) orchestral i nstrument performance, (b) organ perform足 ance, (c) p i ano performance, (d) vocal performance, (e) c h u rch music, (f) theory and composi tion. REQU I R E M IONTS F O R T H E BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE A . ORCHE STRAL I N STR UME NT PERFORMANCE Freshman Year

Music 50, Student Recital __ __ ____________________ 0 _ _______ 2 Music 1 23, 1 24, Theory _________ _ _ Private Lessons-major instrument_ _ _ _______ ________ Li teratu re and Performance (ense m b le) ___ ______ __________ ____ _ V2 Soc ial Science req u i remenL_ ______ ___________ ___ _ 1 Religion requiremenL_ _ _______ __ __________ _ 1 English Composition requirement or profici ency _ _ ._ _ _ __ ________ __ _ P.E. requirement _______ _______ __ _ ______ Y2 ' I n terim elective _ _ __________ ________ ____ _ __ _____ 1

6 Sophomore Year Music 50, Student Recital ____ ____________ _ _ ___ _ _ _ _____ _ Music 223, 224, Theory ____ _____ ___ __ ____ _ _ _ _ ______ Private Lessons-major i nstrumenL_ _______ ______ _____ Private Lessons-Piano _____ _____ _____ __ __ _ _______ _________ Literature and Performance ___ _______ __ ___ __ ___ _ _ ____ Science o r Mathematics requiremenL _ ____________ _ ___ _ English Literature or History req u i remenL ___________ ______ _ P.E. req u i rement . _______ ____ _____ __ __ _ ' Elective ____ _____________________ _ ' Interim elective_____ _ _ _ _ _ _ ______ ____ __ ______ _ _______

0 2 1

V2 V2 1

Y2 V2 1 8

Junior Year

Music 50, Student Recital _ ____ ____ __ _________ _ _____ __ _ Mu sic 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , History of Music. ________ ___ _______ Mu sic 323, Contem porary Tech n iq ues .. _ _ _ __ __ __ _______________ _ M usic 324, Contrapuntal Writi ng___ _ _____ _________ ____ Private Lessons-major instrumenL _____ _________ _ _ Literature and Performance__ _ __ __ _ ____ __ ___ ______ ____ _ ____ Music 325, 326, Orchestration _ _ _______________________ ' Elective ________ ' I nterim elective

0 2

1

V2 1

V2 1

6 ' 2 V2 courses of Music Electives are required.


Senior Year Music 50, Student Recital _ ___ ______ ______ . _____ __ _ . _ _ _ _ _ ____ M usic 339, Basic Conducting _ ____ _ __ _____ __ ___ _______ . __ M usic 423, Advanced Form and Analysis _ ____________________ " Pri vate Lessons-major i nstrumenL _ _ ________ _ _____ ____ __ _ Literature and Performance _ __ _______________________ Phi losophy requ i remenL _____ __ ___________ ____ ______ __ __ _ R e l i g i o n req u i remenL __ _ _ __________________ ___ ___ _ _ ' Elective _________ _ __ ___ ____ ___ __ ________ ___ __ ' I n te ri m elective _ _ _ _ _ _ _. __ _ _________ _______ ____ ___ _ ' 2 V2 courses of Music Electives are required. "Full Senior Recital Required.

0

V2 1

V2 1 2

8

B. ORGAN PERFORMANCE Freshman Year _ __________________ Music 50, Student Recital ___ Music 1 23, 1 24, Theory _ __ ___ _ _____ _____________ ___ Private Lessons-Organ _ _ __ ______ _ ___ _ ____ __ _ __ ____________ L i terature and Performance (ensemble) ____ ______ __ _ __ __ _ Social Science req u i remenL ____________ Religion req ui remenL __ ____ ___ _ ___________ __ _. _____ _ _ _ _ _. _ English Composition req u i rement o r proficiency _ _________ _ P.E. requ i rement _______ ___ _ __ _ _ _ __ ____ __ __ ' I nterim elective _ _ ____ _____ ________ _____________ ____

0 2 1

V2 1

V2 1

8 Sophomore Year 0 Music 50, Student Recital _____ __ __ ______ _ __ ________ ______ Music 223, 224, Theory ____ ___ __ __ ___ _____ ______ __ __ ___ __ 2 Private Lessons-Organ _______ _ __________ ______ 1 L i terature and Performance __ __ __ _ __________ __ __ __________ _ V2 Science and Mathematics req u i remenL _______ ____ ___________ __ 1 Engl ish Literat u re or History req u i rement __ _____________ _ P.E. Requirement _ __ __ __ _ __ __ _ __ __ _____ _ ______ ___ _ V2 ' E lective ______ ___ _ ____ __ __ _ _ _ . ______ __________ _____ 1 ' I nterim elective _______ _ __ __ _____ ____ ____ _ __ _ _ 8 Junior Year Music 50, Student Rec i tal _ __ _ __ _______ _ ____ Music 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , H istory of Music __ _ ___ _ ___ _ __ __ ___ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ __ _ __ Music 323, Contempo rary Techniques ___ ______ __ __ _____ Music 324, Contrapuntal Writi n g _ _ _ _ _ _ _______ ___ _ ____ Music 367, Hymnology and Sacred Literature _______ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ Private Lessons-Organ __ __ _ _ __________ ___ ____ ____ ____ __. ________ _ ' I n terim elective_____ _______ ___

' V2 course of Music Elective is required.

0 2 1 1 1 2

8


Senior Year

Music 50, Student Recital Music 339, Basic Conducting ____ Music 364, Hi story of Organ Building o r Music 443, Organ Repertoire a n d I m p rovisation _ Music 368, Worship a n d Liturgy Music 423, Advanced Form and Ana lysis " Private Lessons-Organ ' I nterim elective P h i l osophy requi rement Religion requirement ' V2 course of Music Elective is required. Full Senior Recital required. _

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2 1 1 1 8

C. PIANO PERFOR MANCE Freshman Year

Music 50, Student Recita l _ Music 1 23, 1 24, Theory _ P rivate Lesso ns-Piano Literature and Performance (ensemb le) _ _ Social Science requiremenL________ Relig ion req u i rement Eng li sh Composition req u i rement or proficiency P.E. req u i rement ' I nterim elective __

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0_ _ _ _ _ _ _

° 2 1 V2

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1

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V2

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1

8 Sophomore Year

Music 50, Student Recital Music 223, 224, Theory_ P rivate Lessons-Piano Literature and Performance _ Science or Mathematics req u i remenL English Lite rature or History requiremenL P.E. req u i rement ' Elective ' I nterim elective _ ___ _ _ _

_

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'12

________________

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° 2 1

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1

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'12

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1

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8 Junior Year

Music Music Music Music

50, Student Recital 21 1 , 2 1 2 , History of Mu sic 323, Contem porary Te c h n i q ues 324, Contrapu ntal Writi n g_

' 2 V4 courses

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_

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_

01

Music Electives are required.

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_

° 2 1


Music 336, Two Piano Ensemble o r Music 337, Accompanying Private Lessons-Piano ' Elective ' I nte ri m elective

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_

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_

V4 2 OJ., 1 8

Senior Year

Music 50, Student RecitaL Music 363, H i story of Piano Literature Music 423, Advanced Form and Analysis__ Music 441 , Keyboard Pedagogy " Private Lessons-Piano Philosophy requirement Religion requirement ' E lective ' Interim elective 2 1'4 courses of Music Electives are required .

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V2 1

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V2

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2 1 1 1 1 8

. . Full Senior Recital required.

D. VOCAL PERFOR MAN C E Freshman Year

Music 50, Student Recital Music 1 23, 1 24, Theory Private Lessons-Voi ce Literature and Performance (ensemble) Social Science requiremenL Religion requirement English Composition req u i rement or proficiency P.E. req u i rement ' I nte rim elective _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

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_

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_

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째 2 1

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V2 1 1

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V2

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1 8

Sophomore Year

Music 50, Student RecitaL Music 223, 224, Theory Private Lessons-Voice P rivate Lessons-Piano Literature and Performance _ _ Science or Mathematics requiremen L English Literature or History requirement P .. E. requi rement ' Elective ' I nterim elective

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V2 V2 1

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_

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' 1 course of Music Elective is required_

0 2 1

V2 V2 1 8


Junior Year Music SO, Student RecitaL Music 21 1 , 2 1 2 , History of Music Music 323, Contemporary Techn iques Music 324, Contrapuntal Writing Music 339, Basic Conducting Music 365, Vocal Literature Private Lessons-Voice Private Lessons-Piano Literature and Performance ' I nteri m elective __ ___ _ _

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a 2 1

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1 8

Senior Year

Music SO, Student Recital Music 423, Advanced Form and Analysis _ M us i c 435, Opera Workshop Music 442, Vocal Pedagogy " Private Lessons-Voice Literature and Performance P h i l osophy requirement Religion req u i rement ' Elective ' I nterim e l ective " 1 course of Music Elective is required. " , Full Senior Recital required.

___ _____ ___ _ _ _ _ _

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__

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V2

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a

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1 Y2

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_ __ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ _ , ____ _ __

1 1 1 1 8

E. CHU RCH MUSIC Freshman Year Music SO, Student Recital Music 1 23, 1 24, Theory Private Lessons-Organ Private 'lesso ns-Voice Literature and Performance (ensemble) Soc ial Science req u i rement Religion requirement English Com position requ i rement or proficiency _ P . E . requi rement ' I nterim elective

____ _ ______ _ _______ _ ____ _ _ _ _ _

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a 2 V2 V2 V2 . 1

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V2

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1 8

Sophomore Year

M usic SO, Student Recital Music 223, 224 , Theory Pri vate Lessons-Organ Private Lessons-Voice _ Literature and Performance

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__

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_

_ __ _ _ _ __ _ _

" 1 \12 courses of Music Electives are required.

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a 2 Y2 V2


Science or Mathematics requirement __________ __ _______ _ _ _ ____ _ Engl ish Li terature or History requi remenL ___ _ _____ _______ __ _ P.E. req u i rement _ _ _ __ __ __________ __________ __ _ _ V2 " E lective _ ___ __ _ __ _______________ _____ ___ ___ __ _ _ 1 " I nterim elective _ ________ _ ____ ___ ___ _ _ _ ____ _ ____ ____ ____ 1 8 Junior Year Music 50, Student Recital ____ ______ _ ____________ Music 21 1 , 2 1 2 , H istory of Music ___________ ___ __ _ _ ____ _ __ Music 323, Contemporary Techn iques __________ _ __ __ _______ _ Music 324, Contrapuntal Writing _ _ _ ____________ ________ Music 339, Basic Cond ucting _ __ _ __ ___________ ___ __________ Music 367, Hymnology and Sacred Literature __ ____ _ __ ______ Private Lessons-Organ or Voice _ _ _ __ _ ____________ ______ _____ _ Literature and Performance _____ _____ ______________ ____ __ _ _ __ - I nterim elective ___ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____ _ ______ _______

0 2

1 V2 1

V2 1 8

Senior Year Music 50, Student RecitaL ____ _ _ _ __________ _____ __ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ _ Music 368, Worship and Liturgy __ _ _ __ ____ _____ ____ _____ ___ _ Music 423, Advanced Form and Analysis __ _ _ _ ____ _ ____ _ _ _ Music 445, Advanced Conducting___ ___________________ _______ " " Private Lessons-O rgan or Voice ____ _______ _ ___ _ __ _________ Literature and Performance _ _ ________ ___ _____ ________ __ • _ Phi losophy requirement __________• _ _ ____ ___ ______ ___ ____ Religion requi rement _______ __ ___ ______________ _ _ _ _ __ ______ " Elective _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________ _ _ ___ ___________________ _ - I nterim elective ______ ___ _ _ _ _ _ ____ _______ ____ __ _ _______ - 1 V2 courses of Music Electives are required. " Full Senior Recital required.

0

V2 1

V2 1 1 1 1 8

F. TH EORY AND COMPOSITION Freshman Year Music 50, Student RecitaL ____ _ _ _ ______ _ __ ____ __ _ __ _ _ __ __ _ • ____ Music 1 23, 1 24 , Theory _ ___ __ _ __ _ ____ ___ ___ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ ______ _ Private Lessons-major i nstrumenL _ _________ _____ _______ _ Private Lessons-Piano __ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _________ _____ _ _ _ _. _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ Literature and Performance (ensemble) __ __ ______________ Social Science requirement____ _ ___ __ __ _ _______________ Religion req u i rement __ __ ___ ___________ _ ______ _ ________ __ _ Engl ish Composition req u i rement or proficiency __ _ _______ ___ _ P.E. req u i rement _____________ " Interi m elective _______ _______ ___ _ ____________ __ __ _____ _ _

0 2

V2 V2 V2 1

V. 1 8


Sophomore Year Music 50, Student Recital _ __ _____ ____ _ ______ ______ .. Music 223, 224, Theory _____. ________ __________ __ ___ Music 227, Composition ___ __ _ ___ _ __ _______ __ ___ _ _ _ __ Private Lessons-maj o r instrumenL____ ____ _____ ___ _ _ ___ __ _ __ _ Private Lessons-Piano __ _ ___ _ _ __ _ _________________ ___ _ Literat u re and Performance__ _ ___ ______ _ __ ______ _____ _ Science or Mathematics req u i remenL _ __ __ ___ _ _______ Eng l is h Literature or History requiremenL ___________ _ ________ _ P.E. req u i rement _ ______ ___________ __ " E'lective ___ _______ ______ __ ____ _ _ ________ _______ __ _ " I nteri m e l ective _ ._ ____ ___ ________ ________ _______ __

0 2 Y2 V2 V2 V2 1 V2 V2 1 B

Junior Year Music 50, Student Recital __ _ _ __ _____ ___ _______ _ ___ ___ _ _ Music 21 1 , 21 2, History of Music _____ _ __ ___ _ _ _____ _____ ____ Music 323, Contemporary Tec h niques __ _ _ ________________ _ Music 324, Contrapuntal Writing _ _ ___ _ _ _____ ______ ______ _ _ _ _ Music 325, 326, Orchestration ____ _ _ _. __ _ ___ _ ďż˝ _____ _ ___ __ Music 327, Composition _ _ _ ___ _ _______ ____ _ ______ ____ Music 339, Basic Conducting ___ __ _ _ __ ___ ___ _________ _ ____ Private Lessons-major instrumenL _ _______ _ ____________ ___ _ ______ _______ ________ __ _ " I nterim elective _ _______ __

0 2

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1 1 V2 Y2 1 B

Senior Year M u s i c 50, Student Recital ____ ___________ __ __ __ __ _ . _______ Music 423, Advanced Form and Analysis ______ _ ___ _____ _ _ __ M u s i c 427, Composition _ __ __ __ _ ___ _ ____ ___ _ _ ________ __ ____ _ _ Private Lessons-major inst rume nt _______ ____ __ _ ___ ____ Phi losophy requirement _ ____ _ _ _ _ ____ _________ ________ ______ Religion req u i rement __ ___ __ __ _ ____ _____ _ ______ __ _ " Elective _ __ _ ________ _ ____________________ __ _ .. _______ " I nterim elective _______ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ _ _ ____________ _____ _ __

__

0

_

___

ďż˝

_

2 V2 1 1 1 V2 1 B

50 STUDENT RECITAL (no credit) Weekly student recitals. Regi stration and attendance req u i red of all music majors regardless of curriculum. Music majors expected to perform i n recital once each semester. I I I 1 2 0 M U S I C SURVEY (1 ) An i n t roduction to the music l i terature of Western Civ i l i zation t h rough the study of the form and meaning of musical masterpieces. A course designed to enhance the enjoyment of music. Not open to music majors. I I I " I lI2 courses of Music Electives are required.


1 23 THEORY ( 1 ) A study of the fund amentals and notation o f music through elementary part writing. Practical appli cation through keyboard, sightsinging, and ear train足 ing. I 1 24 THEO R Y ( 1 ) Continued study of part writing, modu lation, and ear t ra i n i n g . Introductory work in analysis. I I

Literature and Performance 1 30. 430 C H O I R OF THE WEST ( 114 ) AUditions are held a t the beg i n n i n g of each fall semester. Singing o f both sacred and sec u l a r music, with and without accompani ment. I I I 1 3 1 , 431 UN IVERS ITY CH ORALE ( V. ) Auditions are held a t the beg i n n i n g o f each fall semester. Singing of both sacred and secular music, with and without accompaniment. I I I 1 32, 432 M A D R I GAL S I N G E RS A N D VOCAL ENSE M B L E ( 114 ) Membersh i p determined b y aUditions. Singing o f both sacred and secu l a r music. I I I 1 33, 433 UN IVERS ITY BAND ( 114 ) Membersh i p determined b y auditions.

II

1 34, 434 UN IVERSITY ORCHESTRA ( 114 ) Membership determined b y auditi ons.

"

1 35, 435 CHAMBER ENSEMBLE ( V. ) Prerequisite: Consent o f I nstructor. I I I 1 36, 436 TWO PIANO ENSEMBLE ( '14 ) Two piano and piano d u et l iterature from all periods w i l l be studied . Open to pianists who are music majors and non-musi c majors. 13 7, 437 ACCOMPANYING ( 114 ) A course designed t o assist the pianist i n gaining experience and knowledge in accompan ying. The literat u re w i l l be taken from all periods of music h i story. 1 4 1 , 1 4 2 ST R I N G S ( V. , 114 ) Instrumental laboratory. Two hours per week. I I I a/y 1 97 1 -72

Private Instruction 1 50, 450 P I A N O ( V. - 1 ) 1 5 1 , 451 ORGAN (V. - 1 ) 1 52, 452 VOICE (114 - 1 ) 1 53, 453 V I O L I N , VI OLA ( V. - 1 ) 1 54, 454 C E LLO ( 114 - 1 ) 1 55, 455 WOODW I N D S ( 114 - 1 ) 1 56, 456 BRASS (V. - 1 ) 1 57, 457 PERCUSSION ( V. - 1 )


21 1 , 2 1 2 H I STORY OF M U S I C ( 1 , 1) A study of the deve l o pment of music from ancient civil i zations to modern ti mes. Prerequ isite: Music 1 24, or consent o f i n structor. I, I I 223, 224 THEORY ( 1 , 1 ) Completed study i n traditional harmony and ear t raining. I n t roduction t o counterpo i n t and composit i o n . Practical application o f harm o n i c practices t h rough analysis, writing, keyboard and ear t ra i n i n g . I , I I 227, 427 CO MPOSITION (V. - 1 ) A systematic approach to the craft of contem porary musical com posi t i o n . C reate, notate, a n d perform works f o r solo, small and large ensembles. May be repeated for add i tional credit. 243, 244 WOODW I N D S I N STRU MENTAL LABORATORY ( V. , V4 ) Practical experience i n the methods and problems of teaching and playing woodw i n d i nstruments. I , II aly 1 970-71 245, 246 BRASS INSTRUM ENTAL LABO RATORY (V. , V. ) Practical experience i n the methods and problems o f teaching and playing brass instruments. I, II a l y 1 971 -72 247 PERCUSSION LABORATORY (V4 ) Practical experience i n the methods and problems o f teac h i ng and playing percussion instru ments. I aly 1 9 70-71 323 CONTEMPO RARY TEC H N I Q U ES, ANALYSIS AND LITE RATU R E ( 1 ) Study of twentieth-century music through analysis, literature, a n d w ri t i n g . Emphasis o n compositional teChniques, e a r l y developments and cu rrent trends. I 324 CONTRAPUNTAL W R I TING, FORM, ANALYSIS A N D L ITERATU R E ( 1 ) Review o f non-harm o n i c tones; melody writing; species counterpoint; two and t h ree-part invention; fug ue; forms; l i stening; melodic and harmonic di cta足 ti('n. I I 325, 326 ORCH ESTRATION (V2 , V2 ) Study of instruments a s t o the i r range, transposition, sound, tech n i cal a b i li t i es , l i m i tations, and notation. Scoring a n d arranging for instruments i n conven足 ti onal and u n i q u e g ro u p ings. I, II aly 1 970-71 339 BASIC CONDUCT I N G (V2 ) A basic cou rse i n the teCh nique of reading and conducting scores; practice i n conducting, both instrumental and vocal. I I I 340 MUSIC I N THE E L E M ENTARY SCHOOL ( V2 ) Techniques and proced u res for the m u si c program o f the first six g rades. The rote so ng, c h i ld voice, rhythm activities, Kodaly method, and the l i ke . Pre足 requisite: Music 1 23 or equivalent background musi c . I I I 341 MUSIC SKI LLS A N D METHODS FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS (1 ) A study of the rudi ments of m u s i c , i n c l u d i ng rhythms, sight reading, elementary keyboard experience and creative music, together with te chniques and pro足 cedu res fo r the music program o f the first six g rades. I I I

I


363 H I STORY OF P I ANO LITERATU R E AND P E R FO R MANCE ( V2 ) Representative compositions from all periods o f piano literature wi ll be stud ied. Open to music majors and non-music majors. a/y 1 970-71 364 H I STORY OF ORGAN B U I LD I N G ( % ) A study o f the primary h istoric and contem po rary trad itions o f organ b u i ld i n g a s these relate to a rationale f o r t o n a l desi g n , acoustics, architecture and playing mechanisms. Basic tec h n i q ues for t u n i n g and mai ntenance are to be considered together with exam inations of several organs and two organ b u i ld足 i n g shops. Adm ission by pe rmission of i n structor. a/y I n te rim 1 972 365 VOCAL LITERATU R E ( V2 ) A study o f solo vocal literature from antiquity t h rough the present. I n -class performance will be emphasized. I a/y 1 970-71 367 HYMNOLOGY AND SAC R E D MUSIC LITERATU R E ( 1 ) A n h istorical study o f C h ristian hymnody with a n analysis o f its poetry and music. An analysis of the princi ples underlying effective wors h i p music and a survey o f outstand i n g anthem, cantata, and oratorio literature. I I 368 WORSH I P AND LITURGY ( 1 ) The nature and scope o f C h ristian worsh i p. The history o f the main l i t u rgies beg i n n i ng with temple and synagogue, Eastern Orthodox, Roman Cath o l i c , Lutheran, Calvi nist a n d A n g l i c a n . Special reference to the Lutheran l i t u rgy. I 423 ADVANC E D F O R M AND ANALYSIS ( 1 ) Harmo n i c and structural analysis o f literature from Classical through Con足 tem porary periods. Prerequisite: M usic 224. I 435 OPERA W O R KSHOP (V4 - 1 ) Stage production of operas. Prerequ i site: Consent of I nstructor. 441 KEYBOARD PEDAGOGY (% - 'Y4 ) A course designed for those desiring to teach beg i n n i n g and advanced piano and organ students. Lectures, read i n g s and discussion on teaching tech n i q ues w i l l be covered. In addition there wi l l be the chance for practical appli cation. 442 VOCAL P EDAGOGY ( V2 ) Discussion o f how to approach the teaching o f vocal technique c learly and concisely and how best to commun icate with the student, basing the approach upon the physiological and acoustical laws that govern S i n g i n g . Read ing and comparing texts on vocal prod uction. I n-class demonstrations and a project in student teac h i n g . Discussion of diction, phonetics, i nterpretation, etc. I I 443 ORGAN R E PERTO I R E AND I MP ROVISAT I O N ( V2 ) A survey o f organ literature and its re lationship to traditions o f organ design and stylistic performance. Basic techniques i n practical i mprovisation at the keyboard, with special e m phasis on li turgical hymn tune i m provisation for i ntroductions, interludes and free accompan i ments. Admission by permission o f i nstructor. (Limit 1 0) . a/y 1 971 -72 445 ADVAN C E D C O N D U CT I N G , TEC H N I Q U ES AND MATERI ALS ( V2 ) A study o f literature with emphasis upon its teaching and conducting problems. Prerequisite: Music 339. I


447 M U S I C IN THE SEC O N DARY SC HOOL ( V2 ) The organ ization and adm inistration o f the secondary school music pro足 g ram. I 491 , 492 I N DEPENDENT STUDY (V.

-

1)

590 G RA D UATE SEMINAR ( V4 - 1 ) Offered on demand. Interim courses offered in

1 970:

301 M U S I C LITERATU R E A N D CONCERTS 302 LIVING C H U R CH M U SIC 303 EXP E R I M ENTAL COMPOSITION FOR N O N - M U S I C MAJORS 304 ACOUSTICS O F MUSIC (MUSIC/PH YSI CS) 307 FROM JAZZ TO ROCK 308 I M PRESS I O N I SM AND TH E ARTS (ART/ M U S I C ) 3 1 7 I NTENSIVE P E R FO R MANCE ST U D I ES 3 1 8 OPERA W O R KSHOP

NURSING Miss Stucke, Director, Mrs. Andersen, Mrs. Cone, Mrs. Coutu, Mrs. Easterwood, Miss Fletcher, Mrs. Jacobson, Mrs. Jewell, Mrs. Leake, Mrs. Lee, Mrs. Olson, Miss Peterson; assisted by Mrs. Bergerson, Mrs. Haughee, Mrs. Hemmen, Mrs. Nielsen, Mrs. Ramos

Phi losophy and Pu rpose

The School of N u rsing supports the p h i losophy of Paci fic L u theran U n i versity and within this C h ristian frame of reference accepts the chal lenge of educating professional n u rses who recognize and partici pate in the respons i b i l ities and opportun i ties for service i n n u rsing. The School recognizes that its functions are teac h i n g , service and research. In accepting this c h a l l enge the faculty acknowl足 edges its responsi b i l i ty for promoting high q u a l i ty professional n u rsing service for pe ople i n the hospital, home and community. The School of N u rsing fac u l ty accepts the fo l l owing princi ples: 1 ) Education is an ongoing process i n which the i n d i vidual acqui res knowledge, examines attitudes, and f u rther develops a set of val ues, learning to act upon these for the betterment of self and society. I n this educational process the student i n c reases h i s capacity to relate to mankind by means of a coU rse of action i n which he g rows, develops ski l ls and finds expression for c reativity, all of Which w i l l enable him t o prog ress toward f u t u re self-rea lization in be足 coming a responsible member of soci ety. 2)

Lea rning occurs when there are behavioral changes resu lting from experience and when that behavior contin ues. Each person approaches learning tasks in his own way and responds to the total situation as a whole person. There are levels of learn ing each of which b u i lds up on the other in the fo l lowing sequence: awareness, knowledge, unde rstanding, apprec iation, application of princi ples and teac h i ng of princi ples.


3)

N u rsing as a p rofession should be concerned i ntellectual, soc ial and spi ritua l health o f the t h e refore t o g u ide its students in developing acq u i ri n g the knowledge and skills necessary needs of the i ndividual.

with the physical, emotional , individua l . The School strives a sense of responsi b i l ity for to h e l p meet the total health

4) Emotional, i ntel lectual, social, c u ltu ral and spiritual g rowth are essential to the e n ri c hment of one's own l i fe and to the optimum devel opment of one's abil ity to help others. The preparation of the p rofessional n u rse provides for g rowth through the use of the various d i sc i p l i nes o f the University. The p ro­ fessional curri c u l u m provides education in relevant fields of learn i n g arranged in a logical sequence. 5) The C h ristian University has a d isti n ct advantage in offering t h i s type of total e d u cation and carries a respo nsi b i l ity t o prepare individuals interested in serving God and fetlowmen through the practice of professional n u rsing. The aim of the School o f N u rsing is to develop responsible persons able to recognize and partici pate i n the challenges and opportunities for conscientious service to their commun ities . Necessary tools are p rovided for functioning as staff nurses, for developi ng the com petencies basic to advancing to positions req u i ring leaders h i p skil ls, and for acq ui ring a foundation for graduate study. Objectives

In kee p i n g with the philosophy of m i n istering to the total n u rsing needs of the i n dividual, the School of Nursing assists the student: 1) To acquire knowledge essential to fu nction as a professional n u rse. 2) To develop an a b i l ity to function effectively as a professional n u rse. 3) To develop attitudes w h i c h w i l l foster continuing professional and personal g rowt h . 4) To recognize her responsi b i l ity a s a citizen. 5) To uti l ize a l i be ra l education i n provi d i n g d i mension to personal and profes­ sional experience and as a foundation for professional cou rses. Health

The n u rsing student is responsible for maintaining her own health and is a teacher of health. Physical exam i n ati ons, X-rays and i m m u n i zations are req u i red prior to adm ission to the c l i n ical areas and period i c a l ly thereafter, and are the responsi b i l ity o f the students. Students s h o u l d carry personal health i n surance. Special Fees

In addition to reg u l a r University costs, students are to p rovide their own trans­ portation between the U n iversity campus and the c l i n ical laboratory areas. Stu­ dents are usually able to estab lish car pools in the sophomore and j u n i o r years. D u ring the senior year each student must have access to a car for individual use. Students are expected to carry professional liability i nsu rance d u ring their sopho­ more, j u n i o r and seni o r years. T h i s i s available under a g ro u p p lan at nominal cost to the student. Health examination fees and student uni forms (approximately $70.00) are the responsi b i l ity of the student.


The Nursing Program

This program is planned for high school g raduates and may be comp leted in four academic years by students who meet the School re q u i rements. Through this program o f general an d professi o n a l education, students prepare themselves for beg inning positions in professi onal n u rsing and for continuing t he i r education at the graduate leve l . Admission a n d Curriculum Requi rements

I n addition to the requirements for admission to the U n i versity, the School of N u rsing requi res a one unit course in biology and a one unit cou rse in chem­ istry. Deficiencies will need to be removed prior to e n roll ing in the professional n u rsing program. To be approved by the faculty of the SChool of N u rsin9' for e n rollment in the c l i n ical n u rsing cou rses which begin in the sophomore year, the student must give evidence of physi cal, emotional and intel lectual aptitude for n u rsing, and must have a cumu lative grade poi nt average of 2.0 for her co llege c o u rse. She must also have a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course req ui red for the program as indicated in the course outline. Standards req u i red for admission must be maintained th roughout the program if the candi date is to retain her standing i n the Schoo l . A candi date w h o has attended some other insti tution, i n c l u d ing graduati on from an approved school o f n u rsing, may receive cred it toward a degree in n u rsing provided she meets the general requ i rements for admissio n to the School of N u rsing. Transferable c redits from another institution of higher learn­ ing will be evaluated o n an i n dividual basis. The g raduate n u rse applicant may receive credit for her earlier education by exami n ati on of nursing and related courses i n accordance with the Advanced Placement policy of the U n iversity. She w i l l fol low the c u r riculum outli ned for tme BaC helor of Science in N u rsing i n regard to course req U i rements, sequence o f cou rses, and prereq uisites. The School of N u rsing fac u l ty reserves the right to request the withd rawal of a n u rsing student who fa i ls to demonstrate competency, or who fa ils to main­ tain professional conduct. Resources, Facilities and Services

To provide the best learning experience in the various c l i n i c a l fields under the d i rect supervision of its faculty members, the School utilizes the hospitals and health agencies i n the i m mediate viCin ity, in c l u d i ng their l i b raries and cl ass­ rooms. Clinical labo ratory learning is di rected by reg u lar U n i versity faculty mem­ bers in the fol lowing health agencies. GOOD SAMARITAN HOSPITAL, Puyallup, Washington (96 beds) P a u l Tes low, M . H .A., Admin istrator Virg i nia Peterson, R . N . , D i rector of N u rsing Service LAKEWOOD G E N E RAL HOSPITAL ( 1 00 beds) Harry Sanislo, Administrator Walter W i l h e l m , B.A., Assistant Admin istrator O rpha J . Lucas, -R.N., Di rector of Nursing


MAD IGAN GENERAL HOSPITAL (536 beds) B ri g . General John Boyd Coates, J r . , M . D . , Hospital Commander Colonel Margaret E. Hu ghes, R . N . , B.S., A . N . C . , Chiel N u rse MAPLE LANE SCHOOL FOR G I RLS, Central i a, Washington ( 1 50 beds) Edna Good rich, Superi n tendent Richard Ba rrett, Assistant Superintendent MARY B R I DG E C H I L D R E N ' S HOSPITAL (68 beds) Karen Lynch, R . N . , B.S.N., D i rector 01 Nursing Service and Acting Administrato r PUGET SOUND GEN ERAL HOSP ITAL (287 beds) Robert Holmen, M.H.A., Admin istrator Helen Col l i ns , R . N . , B.S., M.S., D i recto r 01 N u rsing ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL (250 beds) Sister Mary Colma, R . N . , O.S.S., Adm i n istrator Sylvia Ames, R.N., B .S., M . N . , D i rector, School 01 N u rsing TACOMA G E NERAL HOSPITAL (263 beds) Walter H u ber, B.B.A., Admin istrator Bess M. Piggott, B.S., M . N . , MA, D i rector 01 N u rsing Educatio n Betty Hollman , R . N . , B.S.N., D i recto r 0 1 N u rsing Service TACOMA-P IERCE COUNTY H EALTH DEPARTMENT Paul M c N u tt, M.D., D i rector 01 Health Edith Mitche l l , R.N., B.S., C h i el 01 N u rsing Di vision VETERANS A D M I N ISTRAT I O N HOSPITAL American Lake, Washington (904 beds) Thomas March, M . D . , Hospital D i rector F l o rence M . Naske, R . N . , B . S . , Chiel, N u rsing Service Anna Hei nzelmann, R . N . , B . S . , Associate C h iel, Nursing Service lor Edu cation C U R R I C U L U M FOR BACHELOR OF S C I E N C E IN N U R S I N G Firsl Year

I nterim Cou rse . 1 Elective

' En g . 1 01 (Composition) -(student may be ex足 empt on basis 01 pro足 lic iency) 1 BioI. 1 61 (Hum an Anatomy) ____ ___ _ 1 Chem. 1 03 (Organi c Chemistry) _ 'P sych . 1 0 1 (General Psychol ogy) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 P.E. Activity _ _ _ _ _ _ '14 4 '14 ' May be taken either semester " May be taken any tim e.

01

the year.

Religion 1 03 (J udaeoCh ristian L i le and Thought) _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 B i o i . 162 (Human Physiol ogy) _ _ _ _ _ 1 , . Fine Arts elective 1 Soc. 1 0 1 (Social _ _ _1 Issues) ___ '14 P. E. Activity


..

Second Year B i o I . 201 ( M i crobi ology) _ _ _ __ _ _ _ 1 Nsg. 251 ( Mental Health) _ _ _ _ __ V2 Nsg. 252 (Nsg. Techniques) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ V2 Nsg. 253 ( Disease Entities) _ __ _ _ _ __ _ 1 . , Eng. Lit. or H i story elective _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 P.E. Activity _ _____ _ %

Nsg. 254 (Pa­ tient Health Teaching) _ _ 1

3-4%

4% Third Year • Nsg. 371 , 372 (Psyc h . Nsg.) _ __ __ _2 " Ph i losophy elective _ _ 1 Psych. 335 (Chi ldhood and Adolescence) _ 1

Optional Elective ___ 0-1

' Nsg . 36 1 , 362, 363 ( MCN) _ _ _ _ _ 3 ' ReI. elective ( U . D . o r Senior Semi nar) _ _ _ 1

0-1

4

4 Fourth Year Neg. 4 1 0A (Trends) . _ V2 ' Nsg. 450, 451 (Selected C l i nical Problems) _ _ 2 ' N sg. 452 (Leadership)_1

Soc. 445 (Fami ly) o r 325 ( M i n o rities) _ _ _ 1 Nsg. 255 (Surgical I ntervention) _ _ _ _ _ 1 Nsg. 256 (Rehab. Nsg.) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 " Optional elective _ _ _ _ 0-1 P.E. Activity ___ _ _ _ _ %

I nterim Course Elective

Nsg. 4 1 0 B (Trends) _ _ V2 ' N sg. 445 (Community Health) _ _ _ _ V2 ' Nsg. 446 (Community Nursing) _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 " O ptional elective _ _ _ _ 0-1 " Optional elective _ _ _ _ 0-1 2-4

' May be taken either semester of the year. • • May be taken any time.

251 M ENTAL HEALTH (V2 ) A study of major concepts of mental health. Emphasis is placed on formation of the se l f concept and other concepts related to effective i nterpersonal rela­ tionsh i ps. Two hours of class per week, plus assignments in relati onship to c l i n i cal practice. Prerequisites: Sociology 1 01 and Psychology 1 01 . I 252 N U RS I N G TECH N I QUES ( V2 ) An i ntroductory course to practical aspects o f nursing. The course combi nes the practice of basic nursing techniques and the scienti f i c princi ples under­ lying these tech n i q ues. Two hours of c lass and one c l i n i cal laboratory period per week. Prereq uisite or c u rrent registration in Biology 201 . I


253 D I SEASE ENT I T I E S ( 1 ) A study of common d i seases affecting adults. The course emphasis is on etio logical, pa thoph ysiol og ical and therapeutic reg i m es. Five hours per week. Prerequ isites: B i ology 1 6 1 , 162 and Chemis try 1 03. I 254 PAT I E NT HEALTH TEACH I N G ( 1 ) A study of t h e princi ples of teac h i n g a n d learn ing a s related t o health needs of the patient. I n concurrent gu ided learning experiences, the princip les of te aching and learning are uti li zed by the student along with problem solving and critical thinking in assessment, judgment and plan ning for patient teach­ i n g . Laboratory and c l i nical experiences in a variety of settings provide oppor­ tunities for student application of princi ples and development of basic teaching s k i l ls. Prerequisites: Nursing 251 , 252, 253. I nteri m. 255 S U R G I CAL I NTERVENTION (1) A patient-centered study of the nursing care req u i red for patients having surgical i n terventi o n . Cl i n ical experience i n cludes a l l areas of s u rgical care, pre-operative preparation, n u rsing te c h n i q ues in the operating room, recovery room and post-operative care. T h ree h o u rs of class and two c l i ni c a l laboratory periods per week. Prereq u i site: N u rs i ng 254. I I 256 R E H A B I LITAT I O N N U R S I N G ( 1 ) A patient-centered study of various types o f n u rsing problems common to patients in need of re h a b i l i tati on. Students are g i ven an opportunity to analyze these problems, develop ability to make decisions about n u rsing care and gain some experience in ad mini stering the n u rsing care i n volved. Three hours of class and' two c l i n i cal laboratory periods per week. Prereq u i site: N u rsing 254. I I 361 , 362, 363 MATERNAL-C H I LD N U RS I NG (3) A study of the essential knowledge and understanding which w i l l enable the student to g i ve inte l l igent care to families d u ring the c h i ld-bearing and c h i l d ­ rearing processes. Aspects o f h e a l t h promotion a n d care of the sick are i ncluded. Experience i n cludes observation and care of mothers and c h i l d ren in hospital wards, c l i n ics and related community agencies. Six clin i cal laboratory periods and nine h o u rs of c l ass pe r week. Prerequ isites: N u rs i n g 254, 255, 256, a n d previous or concurre n t registration in Psyc h . 335 or Educa­ tion 201 or 321 and Soc. 445 or 325. I I I 371 , 372 PSYC H I AT R I C N U R S I N G (2) A study of major concepts of mental health and psych iatric n u rsing as they relate to the n u rse in the total therapeutic mi lieu of psychiatric patients. Guid ­ ance is g i ven in understanding personal needs and behavior patterns of adjustment. Four hours of c l ass and six c l inical laboratory periods per week. Prereq uisites: Nursing 254, 255, 256. Both courses are offered each semester. 41 0 TRENDS I N N U R S I N G ( 1 ) A study of t h e forces a n d issues which i n fluence n u rsing today, i n c l u d i n g its profess ional he ritage, the nursing organizations, emp loyment opportunities, and problems and responsi b i l ities in professional nursing. Among the prob-


lems d i scussed are preparation fo r n u rsing, economic security, legislation, organizational structure, roles of the professional n u rse, continued education and professional g rowth, and the future of n u rsing. Prerequis ite: Senior stand­ ing and previous or concu rrent registration i n Psych. 243A. H a l f o f the course wi l l be offered each semester. 445 FUN DAMENTALS O F CO M M U N ITY HEALTH ( Y2 ) A study of t h e community f o r t h e pu rpose of identifying development, trends, organization and administration of health services. I n c l udes approaches used to promote health and prevent d i sease, and methods uti lized to identi fy, analyze and cope with commun ity health needs. Open to majors and non­ maj o rs who have had Bio logy 201 or equ i valent. I I I 446 C O M M U N ITY N U R S I N G ( 1 ) G u ided experiences i n g i v i n g n u rsing care i n t h e home a n d commu nity with emphasis on the role of the n u rse i n working with patients and fam i l i es, and the utilization of health and welfare resources. P rerequisite: Se n i o r stan d i n g , N u rsing 3 6 3 , 3 7 2 a n d previous or concu rrent registration i n N u rsing 4 4 5 . I I I 450 SEL ECTED CLI N I CAL PROBLEMS I (1) A study of selected c l i nical problems in the n u rsing care of medical-surgical patients. Among the p ro b lems d i scussed are n u rsing assessment, criteria for determ i n i n g priority of patient needs, princi ples for p l a n n i n g n u rsing care for groups of patients, emergency and resuscitative n u rsing measures, and c u r­ rent trends in community and hospital planning for emergency nursing activ­ ities . Th ree hours of class and i n d i vi dually arranged laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: Sen i o r stand ing and N u rsing 363 and 372. I II 451 SELECTED CLIN ICAL PROBLEMS II ( 1 ) A study of selected c l i n i cal problems in the n u rsing care o f medical-surgical patients, i n c l u d i n g acutely i l l patients and patients with complex nursing needs. Students will be introduced to some of the new parameters i n n u rsing. F o u r h o u rs of class and three c l i nical laboratory periods as arranged, per week. Prerequ isites: Se n i o r standing, N u rsing 363 and 372, and p ri o r to con­ c u rrent registration i n N u rsing 450. I II 452 N U R S I N G LEAD ERSH I P (1 ) A study of n u rs i ng team leadersh i p with emphasis on identifying princi p les of leadersh i p in n u rsing. Discussion w i l l also include util ization of n u rsing person­ n e l , in-service education, the i nterd iscipli nary health team, and the bas i c concepts a n d princi ples of n u rsing management. Two h o u rs of c l ass a n d t h ree c l i n i ca l laboratory periods as arranged, per week. Prerequi s i tes: Senior standing, N u rs i n g 363 and 372, and concurrent registration i n N u rsing 451 . I I I 49 1 , 492 I N DEPEN D ENT STUDY ( V. - 1 ) Prereq uisite: Permission of the D i rector. Interim courses offered in 197 0 :

254 PATIENT HEALTH TEAC H I N G 362 MATERNAL-C H I L D N U RSING


PHILOSO P HY

Mr. Arbaugh, Chairman, Mr. Huber, Mr. Simmonds; assisted by Mr. Saibel

Philosophy is the o ldest of all acad e m i c d iscipli nes and the parent su bject from which today's vari ety of arts and sciences has emerged. Characte ristic topics of concern are the extent and l i mits of knowle dge; moral, esthetic and rel igious values; man 's nature and p l ace i n the u n i verse; and the u l t i mate nature of re al ity. More gene ral ly phi losophy seeks a critical and systemat i c analysis of basic issues in all fields, and an objective and u n i fied view of the totality of expe rience. A study of the field is i n tended to acquaint the student with major ri val world views and value systems, past and present, to encou rage in him the habit of analytic and systematic thought, and to help him "to see life critically , appreciatively and whole." Cou rses i n the department are desi gned to meet the needs of a variety of stu足 dents: ( 1 ) those who desire some knowledge of p h i losophy as a basic ele ment in a l i beral educati o n ; (2) those who wish to p u rsue some special in terest in, for example, ethi cs, science, re l i g i o n , the h istory of thought, o r the ideas of par足 t i c u l a r men or peoples; (3) those who wish to develop an understanding of phi lo足 sophy to s u p p o rt thei r work in other fields, e.g. literature, h i story, or the sciences; (4) those who plan to use a major in phi losophy as a preparation for graduate study in another field, e.g. theology or law; (5) those who plan to do graduate work in phi losophy itse lf, usually with the i n tention of teac h i n g in the field. Students i n tending t o major in p h i losophy m ust annou n ce their intention to do so to the department. A major i n the department consists of a mi n i m u m of six courses i n c l ud i n g P h i losophy 233, and any t h ree of the followi ng : 331 , 332, 333, 334, 335. I n addition to cou rse req u i rements, all majors m ust (1) complete a p resc ri bed read ing program (described in a special broch u re avai lable from the department), and (2) take a departmental examination before be g i n n i n g their final semester in residence. Consultation with departmental faculty is important in planning a mean i n g f u l major program and should be sought at as early a time as poss i b le. The Uni versity req u i remen t of one course in p h i loso p h y may be satisfied b y any cou rse offered by the department except Philosophy 233. The initial c o u rse in the s u bject for lower division students is customari l,y P h i loso phy 201 . However, this is not a prerequisite for other c o u rses, and students with spec i a l interests or preparation are encou raged to consider others and , if desi red, to counsel with mem bers of the department. 201 P R I N C I P LES OF P H I LOSOPHY An introd u ction to a variety o f perennial p h i losoph i c a l issues, intel lectual systems and thinkers. Such topics as the nature of knowledge, the function of science, esthetic values, the good life, re ligion and knowledge of God, and h uman nature and its social i m p l i cations are discussed. The course is designed to introduce to the student the habit of critical and systemati c phi losoph ical think ing about all issues. I I I


221 ETH I CAL THEORY A study of the major moral systems of Western c i v i l ization. I n tensi ve exam­ i n ation o f some conte m po rary moral theories and the pri nci ples of C h ris­ tian ethi cs. I 233 LOG I C An exa m i nation o f t h e princi p les o f argument and proof, i n c l u d i n g t h e funda­ mentals of deductive, inductive, and sym b o l i c logic. Study of the n at u re and functions o f l a n g u age, of problems i n semantics, and of the phi losophy of l o g i c . I I 324 SOC I A L P H I LOSOPHY An examination o f the p h i losophica l issues associ ated with the various types of h u man i n teracti o n . Su bjects discussed i n c l ude the nature o f m a n , the nature of the good l i fe , ethical theories, and the p h i l osophical foundations and prob­ lems of political. legal, eco n o m i c and other SOCial i nstitutions. I I 331 H ELLEN I C P H I LOSOPHY A study of the natu re and development of p h i losophic thought and method i n the G reek and Roman world from the P resocratic period to the end of the t h i rd century A. D. Special emphasis i s g i ven to the p h i l o so ph ies of Plato and A ristotle. I 332 CHR ISTIAN PHI LOSOPHY I N THE M I DDLE AGES A su rvey of the deve lopment of p h i l osophy from Aug usti n e to Ockham. Scrutiny of the sources and nature of the Thomistic synthesis, and the reac tion to i t i n the work of Duns Scotus and Wi l l i a m Ockham. I 333 RATIONALISM A N D T H E ENLIGHTEN MENT The nature and development of p h i l osophic thought and method from the seventeenth through the eighteenth centu ries. Parti c u l a r emp h asis is placed on the p h i l osophical systems of Descartes, Spinoza, Lei bniz, Locke, Berkeley, H u m e and Kent. II 334 N I N ETEENTH CENTURY THOUG HT-THE AGE OF I D EOLOGY A study of ni neteenth century p h i l osophy with attention to the deve l opment o f such recent ideo log ies as ideal i s m , posi tivism, l i beral ism, di alectical mate­ rialism, and existential ism. Prominent t h i n kers dealt with i n c l ud e Hege l, Schopen hauer, N i etzsche, Marx, Kie rkegaard, M i l l and James. Time is spent i n read i n g and discussion of selected classic works o f the period. II 335 CONTEMPORARY P H I LOSOPHY A systematic exam ination of the major p h i losophi cal issues and methods i n the twentieth century. Top ics treated may i n c l ude empiricism, in strumentalism, process philosophy, existentialism, and analysis, as developed by Ayer, R us­ sel l , Dewey, Whi tehead, Sartre, and Wi ttgenstein. I I 36 1 O R I ENTAL T H O U G H T An i n t rod uction to t h e major phi losophic systems of I n d i a , C h i n a , a n d Japan. Some attention is also paid to the closely related l i terature, rel i g i o n , and general c u l t u re o f the Orient. Offered on occasion d u ri n g the i n teri m .

I I


4111 P H I LOSOPHY OF R E L I G I O N A n exam i n ation a n d evaluation o f class ical a n d contemporary views of tradi足 tional problems i, n re l i g i o n : the existence o f God, rel i gious experience, revela足 tion, i m m o rtal i ty and others. An acquaintance with the p ri n cipal tenets and the wo rld view of the Ch ristian re l i g i o n is assum ed. I I I 4 1 4 K I ERKEGAARD A N D EXISTENT I A L I S M An intensive s t u d y of the thoughts, writi ngs, a n d l i fe of o n e o f the modern world 's most i n fl uential theologians and p h i loso phers . Some d i scussion of later devel opments i n p h i losoph ical existentialism. I a/y 1 97 1 -72 422 THEO RY OF VA LUE A n investigation of the nature o f h u man values with special attention given to contemporary d i scuss ions concern i n g the subjective or objective, abso l ute or relative character of such values as the good and the right, the beautifu l , a n d t h e ho ly. T h e origin of val ues, thei r p l ace in a w o r l d of fact, man 's knowledge of them, and the c h aracter and use of the lang uage of evaluation are topics for consideration. O ffered on occasion d u ring the i n te r i m . 4 2 4 P H I LOSOPHY OF SCIENCE A N D THEORY O F KNOWLEDGE A major portion of the c o u rse is devoted to a careful examination of the genera l c h aracter, fundamental concepts, methods, and sign ifi cance o f mod足 ern scien ce. Some attention is devoted to specific areas of sCienc e-physical, biological, so c i a l , to the i m p l i cations of science for ethical, esthe tic, and re l i giOUS values, and to a more general d i scussion of the nature and l i mits of h u m an knowledge. I a / y 1 970-71 427 BOOKS, I D EAS AND MEN : S E M I N A R IN P H I LOSOPHY A read ing and d i scussi on c o u rse cond ucted by one o r more fac ulty members. Designed to p rovide the student with the opportunity to read i m portant selected works i n p h i losophy, to hear and reflect on d i fferent interpretations of the ideas i nvolved, and to partici pate actively in analysis and argument. Works studied may be on any of a n u m ber of announced topi cs-ethics, esthetics, r e l i g i o n , knowledge, sCience, his tory of ideas, etc. Offered on occasion d u ring the i n teri m . 491 , 4 92 I N D EPENDENT READ I N G A N D RESEARCH ( V. - V2 ) Permission of department req u i red. I I I Interim courses offered i n

1 970:

308 SOCRATIC PARADOXES A N D THE GREEK M I N D 3 1 6 M A N A N D H I S VALUES I N CLASS I CAL A N D RENAI SSANCE THOUGHT (TO U R , G R E EC E A N D ITALY)


I


PHYSICAL EDUCATION Dr. Olson, Director, Mr. Broeker, Mr. Carlson, Mr. Hoseth, Mr. Lundgaard, Miss Officer, Mrs. Phillips; assisted by Mr. Benson, Mrs. LeRoy, Mr. Seaman, Mr. Souza, Mrs. Sterling, Mrs. Templin

The School of Physical Education seeks to ( 1 ) provide students with an under足 standing of the role of physical activity as an essential element of modern living, (2) encou rage a self-evaluation of p resent and potential physical fi tness needs and status, (3) p rovide opport u n ities for the acquisition of s k i l l s and knowledge i n a variety of leisure-time physical activities, (4) provide an outlet for deve lopment and maintenance of personal functional fitness, and (5) to prepare prospective leaders for the professi ons of Physical Educati o n , Health, Recreation and Ath letics. The School of Physical Education offers programs (1) fo r students planning teaching careers in elementary or secondary physical education and health, (2) fo r students planning to coach interscholastic athleti cs, (3) for students plan足 n i ng careers i n recreation, physical therapy and corrective therapy and (4) for stu足 dents who simply des i re to p u rsue physical edu cation as an avocation. Students are encou raged to comp lete the g raduation req u i rement in physical education (4 one-quarter cou rses) d u ring the freshmen and sophomore years. Eight one-q uarter activity courses may be counted toward g raduation. Students are e n c o u raged to elect a va riety of act VI lies a t appropri ate ski l l levels (beginner, i n termediate and advance d ) . Most physical edu cation acti vities a r e offered o n a co-ed ucational basis. BACHELOR OF ARTIS IN EDUCATION major requirements are l i sted below. Cand idates for this degree must also meet special req u i rements described in the School of Education section in this catalog. Senior High School Preparation:

Physical Education Major: 1 1 cou rses Teac hing Majo r : 1 1 cou rses 1 . Six req u i red cou rses: PE 277, Scienti fic Foun dations of Physical Educati o n ; two professional activities c o u rses; PE 481 , Physiological Basis fo r Motor Performance; PE 482, Biomechanics of H u man M otion ; and either PE 322, Physical Edu足 cation for the Elementary School; or, PE 328, C u rr i c u l u m Development and Ad ministrati o n . 2. Th ree courses elected from among cou rses numbered 300-400 offered i n t h e School o f Physical Education. 3.

Bio logy 1 61 ( H u ma n Anatomy) and Bio logy 1 62 (Human Physio logy).

4 . Participation in at least one intercol legiate or extramural sport. 5.

One activity e lective (V4 c o u rse) in Aquatics.

Junior High School Preparation

Teach i n g Maj o r : 7 cou rses Required: The six cou rses req ui red for the se n i o r h i g h major plus one elective from among physical edu cation courses n u mbered 300-400.


Teac h i n g M i n o r : Fo u r cou rses are re quire d : PE 277, Scienti fic Foundations of Physical Education; PE 286 Professional Activities-Gymnastics and Dance; P E 284 or 288, P rofessi onal Activities-Team Sports; and PE 482, Bio mechanics of H u man Motion, or, PE 481 , Physiological Basis for Motor Performance. Elementary School Preparation

Teac h i n g Major: S i x courses are req u i red : PE 277, Scientific Foundations of Physical Educati o n ; PE 322, Physi cal Education for the Elementary School; PE 286, P rofessional Activities-Gymnastics and Dance; PE 284 o r 288, Profes­ sional Acti vities-Team Sports; and two cou rses selected from among the physical education courses n u m be red 300-400. Teaching M i n o r : The fol lowing cou rses are req u i red : PE 277, Foundations of Physical Educat i o n ; PE 322, Physical Education for the Elementary School ; PE 286, Professional Activities-Gymnastics and Dance; and, PE 284 or 288, P rofessional Activities-Team Spo rts. Special Secondary Programs

Athletic Coaching Minor: The req ui rements for the Athletic Coac h i ng Minor i n c l u d e :

1. T h ree req u i red cou rses: PE 277, Scientific Foundations of Physical Education; PE 482, Bio­ mechanics of Human Motio n ; P E 481 , Physiological Basis for Motor Perfo rmance; and 2 . Two elective "one-half" cou rses from among the fol low i n g : PE 371 , Coac h i n g Theory - Football; PE 3 7 0 , Coach i n g Theory - Basket­ ball; PE 372, Coac h i n g Theory - Track and Field ; PE 373, Coaching Theory ­ Base bal l ; PE 374, Coac h i n g Theory - Wrestl i n g ; PE 361 , Coac hing Practi c u m ; and 3 . Particip ation i n at least one i ntercol l e g i ate o r extramu ral spo rt. Health M i n o r : T h e following courses a r e req u i red: PE 295, School Heal th ; PE 324, Personal Health; PE 326, Co m m u n i ty Health ; Bi o logy 1 6 1 , H u man Anatomy; Biology 1 62, H u m an Physiology.

PHYSICAL E D U CATION ACTIVITIES PROGRAM

The physical education g raduation req u i rement may be satisfied by successfu lly completing (A) Physical Educ ation 1 00 - Orientation to Physical Education , and (B) three additional activity courses (one-q u a rter c o u rses). 1 00 O R I ENTATION TO PHYSI CAL EDUCATION (V. ) Designed to i n form students of the need fo r a functional and personally­ designed p rog ram of physical activity. Attempts are made to assess physical condition and s k i l l s and to recommend speci f i c programs for mai ntaing and i m p roving physical health. Should be taken as a f resh man. I "


200-260 PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTI V I T I E S E a c h activity cou rse is V4 course c r e d i t . U n less specifically designated ( M-Men or W-Wo men) each course is avai lable to men and women. Classes meet twi c e wee kly. T h ree electives f r o m the subsequent l i s t a r e req ui red for g rad uat i o n . 200-229 I N D I V I DUAL A N D DUAL ACT I V I T I ES ( V4 ) 201 (Beg i n n i ng Gol f), 202 ( I ntermed i ate and Advanced Golf), 203 (Archery), 204 (Bow l i ng ) , 205 (Beg i n n i ng Bad m i nton and Ten n i s ) , 206 ( I ntermed i ate and Advanced Bad m i nton and Ten n i s) , 207 (Gymnasti cs) , 208 (Ski i ng), 2 1 0W (Slim足 nastics), 222M (Hand bal l , Squash and Pad d l e bal l ) , 223W )Squash and Paddle足 ball), 227M (Weight Trai n i ng), 228 (Bas i c M ountai nee r i n g ) , 229 (Equitati o n ) . 230-239 AQUATICS ( V4 ) 230 (Beg i n n i n g Swi m m i ng), 231 (I ntermedi ate Sw i mming ) , 232 (Advanced Swi m m i n g ) , 234 (Sen i o r Life Savi ng), 235 (Water Safety I nstruction), 236 (Syn足 C h ronized Swi m m i n g ) , 237 (Skin and Scuba Divi n g ) . 240-249 RHYT H M S ( V4 ) 240 (Folk and Social Dance), 241 (Modern Dance). 250-259 ATH LET I C GAMES ( V4 ) 251' (Vo l leyball and Field Hoc key-W), 252 (Basketba l l and Softball-W), 253 (Speed ball and Vol leyball-M), 254, Basketball and Softball-M). PROFESSIONAL PHYSICAL E D U CATION PROGRAM

277 SC I E N T I FI C FOUNDATIONS OF PHYS ICAL EDUCAT I O N T h e a i ms and objectives o f modern p hysical educati o n , t h e relati o n s h i p o f physical education to educati o n , a n d the biol ogical, sociological, psyc h o log足 i cal and mec h an i ca l p r i n c i ples u nderlying p h ysical education and athletics. I 284 PROFESS I O NAL ACT I V I T I ES, TEA M SPORTS FOR M E N Practical experiences i n plan n i n g , teac h i ng, and eval uating the followi ng activities : basket ball, volleyba l l , soccer, speed b a l l , trac k and field, wrest l i n g , t o u c h footbal l , softball. a/y I I 285 P R O F ESSIONAL ACTI VITI ES, I N D I V I D UAL AND DUAL SPORTS Practical experiences in p l an n i n g , teac h i n g , and evaluating the following activities : tennis, badminton, archery, g o l f and bowling. I 286 PRO FESS IONAL ACT I V I T I ES, GYM NAST I C S AND DANCE Practical experiences in p l a n n i n g , tea c h i n g and eval uati ng gymnastics and dance. " 288 P R O F ES S I O NAL ACT IVIT I ES, TEA M SPORTS FOR WOMEN Practical experien ces in plan n i n g , teac h i n g and evaluating the following activities: basketba l l , field h o c key, soccer, speedba l l , volleybal l , softball, and track and field. a/y " 292 F I R ST A I D ( V2 ) This course meets the req u i rements for the American Red Cross Standard and Advanced Cards. a/y I


295 SCHOOL H EALTH (V2 ) Presentation and d i scuss ion o f health concepts that relate to the total school health program, including instruction, services, and environment. Designed to identify the relationshi p between health and all levels of educati o n . Requi re­ ment for students en rolled in the teacher education c u r ri c u l u m . I I I 322 PHYSICAL EDUCAT I O N I N THE ELEM ENTARY SCHOOL (V2 - 1 ) The organization and ad m i nistration o f a developmental physical education program for g rades K - 6. A large repertoire of activities are presented. Seq ue n ­ tial a n d progressive prog ra m m i n g is emphasized. Prereq u isite: P E 2 7 7 . I

I

324 P E R SONAL HEALTH Em phasis on ,the practical application of personal health knowledge to daily living and a ,foundation for understanding the "why" of health behavior. a / y I I 326 C O M M U N I,TY HEALTH A study of the organ izations associated with p u b l i c health and thei r i m p l i ca­ tions to the health probl ems i n a co m m u n i ty. 328 C U R R I C U L U M DEVELO P M ENT AND AD M I N I STRATI ON Prob lems related to orga n i zation and ad m i n istration of school ( g rades 7 - 1 2) physical education and ath letics. Princi ples of c u rr i c u l u m development and implementation are e m phasized. Prereq u i s i te : P E 277. a/y I I 330 RECREAT I ONAL LEAD E R S H I P A c o u rse designed to develop skills in organ izing, supervis i n g , a n d ad m i n­ istering recreation p rograms for the school or commun ity. I 362 RHYTH MS AND DANCE I n c l udes the h i storical backgrou nd, estab l i shment and cond uct of a dance prog ram , teaching tec h n ique and accompan i ment, plan n i ng and presentation of various dances. Em phasis on modern dance tec h n iques. a/y I 360, 361 PRACT I C U M IN TEACH I N G AND COAC H I N G (V2 , V2 ) I n volves student-assistant coach i n g teac h i n g experiences in planning and cond ucting intercollegiate athletics and physi cal education instruction. Stu­ dents w i l l work under d i rect s u pervision of the head coach or physical educa­ tion instru ctor. Prereq u isite: Departmental approval, one c o u rse p rofessional activities. I I I 370-375 COAC H I N G TH EORY-(Each theory cou rse V2 credit) A study of the techniques, systems, tra i n i ng methods, strategy and psychology of coac h i n g . Each theory cou rse carries V2 cou rse c red it. 370 (Coac h i ng Theory-Basketb a l l ) , 371 (Coac h i ng Theory-Footba l l ) , 372 (Coac h i n g Theory­ Track and Field), 373 (Coac h i ng Theory-Basebal l ) , 374 (Coac h i ng Theory­ Wrest l i n g ) . I U 391 , 392 C O R R ECTIVE THERAPY (1 , 1 ) A corrective therapy c l i n i cal tra i n i n g program i n c l u d i n g lecture, laboratory, experiences and c l i n i cal pract i ces. P rerequisite: Departmental approval. ( Maxi­ mum e n rol l ment-5) . I I I

I

I

I

I

I


480 H I STORY AND PHI LOSOPHY OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION The deve lopment of physical e d u cation from ancient c u l t u res through modern ti mes. In terpretation and a p p l i cation of histo rical, p h i losophical, and psy足 cholog ical bases of physical education. Special attention to p resent trends i n physical edu cati o n . Prereq u isite: PE 277. aly I I 481 PHYS I O L O G I CAL BAS I S F O R MOTOR PERFOR MANCE I n c ludes an investi gation of the scientific basis for training and the physiolog足 ica l effects of exercise on the human body. Preventive and t h e rapeutic aspects of athletic i n j u ries are presented. Prereq u i site: PE 277. Also re commended : Bi ology 1 62. I 482 B I O M ECHAN ICS OF H U MAN MOTION A study o f the ki nesiological and mechan i c a l aspects of human movement. Analysis of various physical education and athletic activities are made. Pre足 req u isite: PE 277. Also recom mended : B i o l ogy 1 61 . I I 597 G RADUATE RESEARCH ( '12 - 1 ) Open to graduate students whose m i n o r is in the field of physi cal educat i on ; with approval of department chai rman. I I I S Interim courses offered

- 1 970:

31 1 C O M M U N ITY HEALTH R ESOURCES 497 I N D EPENDENT ST UDY-INTERN PROGRAMS a. Therapeutic Recreation I n ternsh i p b . Recreation In ternsh i p c. Co rrective Therapy Intern s h i p d . O rientation t o Therapy Programs

PHYSICS Mr.

Nomes, Chairman, Mr. Adams, Mr. Jacobs, Mr. Tang

Physics is the fundamental natu ral science because i t deals with the basi c features of the world such as energy, time, space, motion, matter, and charge. Some of these features can be found in every event occurring in nature and all science i nterprets its observations i n terms of them. Modern physics i s a part of the phi loso p h i ca l revo l u tion that i s slowly permeating our c u l t u re , a c u l t u re that is resh aping the relationsh i p between man and the u n ive rse that su rrounds him. T h e beg i n n i ng cou rses i n physics are a contri buting p a r t o f t h e liberal arts emphasis of the C o l lege of Arts and Scienc es. They emphasize the basic con足 cepts of science in order to g i ve a g reater appre c i ation of the nature and behavi or of space and matter in w h i c h h u man beings are totally im mersed. These courses have a p rereq u i site of o n l y h i g h school algebra. C o u rses in physics are desi gned to meet the needs of a variety o f students: (1) t hose desi ring to meet the u n i versity science req u i rement; (2) those desiring to support majors i n mathematics, c h e m i stry and biology; (3) those i n the 3-2


engineering prog ram (see page 47) ; (4) those preparing for careers in teac h i n g ; and (5) those majoring i n physics. Students with a major in physics may ch oose to do g raduate study in physics, astronomy, astrophysics, appl ied mathematics, chemic al physics, biophysics, oceanography, geophysics, and all branches of engi neeri ng. A maj or i n physics fulfi l l i n g the BAC H E LOR O F S C I E N C E degree consists of ten courses i n c l u d i n g Basic Concepts (Physics 1 01 ) , General Physics (Physics 253254), C i rc u i ts and I nstrumentation (Physics 2 7 2 ) , Electromagnetic Theory (Physics 33 1 ) , Mechan ic s (Physics 336), Introduction to Quantum Mechan ic s (Physics 401 ) . Advanced Modern Physics (Physics 406), Mathematical Physics (Physics 456) and one course in advanced laboratory a nd / o r resea r c h . Physics majors (B.S.) are req u i red to take two c o u rses i n chem istry i n c l ud i ng one course i n physical chem istry (Chemistry 341 ) . Parti ci pation i n o n e o f the ongoing research projects is encou raged . When a student shows the a b i l i ty to profit from i n d ependent research he may be i n vited to partici pate. Students in this program are not req u i red to fulfi l l the reg u lar laboratory requirements, and will earn the same number of academic c redits. The courses for a B.S. maj o r i n physics w i l l normally be taken in the seq uence shown below:

â&#x20AC;˘

RECO M M E N D E D PHYSICS C O U RSE SCHEDULE FOR B .S. DEGREE Freshman Year

semester Basic Concepts (Phy. 1 0 1 ) Math. 1 5 1 _ ____ _

Course

1 st

_

1

_

1

_

2nd semester C o u rse Genera l Physics (Phy. 253) __ __ 1 1 Math. 1 52 __

_

_

_ _ ____

Sophomore Year 1 st

semester General Physics (Phy. 254) Math. 231

______ ________ _

Course 1 1

_

Cou rse 2nd semester Ci rcuits and Instrumentation (Phy. 272) _ ___ 1 Math . 332 __ _ _ ___ _ __ 1 _ __ _ _ _

_

Junior Year 1 st

semeste r Electromagnetic Theory (Phy. 331 ) Math. 351 ___ _ _ Physical Chemistry (Chem 34 1 ) Advanced laboratory (Phy. 321 ) __ _ _ __

_

_ _ _ _

__ _. _ _ _

_

Course

Course 2nd semester 1 Mechan ic s (Phy. 336) Advanced laboratory (Phy. 322) v. ____

_ __

1

__ _ _

â&#x20AC;˘

_1

V.

______ _ _

Senior Year 1 st

semester In tro. to Quantum Mechanics (Phy. 40 1 ) Advanced l a b . (Phy. 4 2 1 ) or Research (Phy. 497)

____________

Cou rse __

1

V4

2nd semester Advanced Modern Physics (Phy. 406) _ Mathematical Physics (Phy. 456) Advanced lab. (Phy. 422) or Research (Phy. 498)

C o u rse

_ _ _ _ _ ____ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

___

1

'14


The p rogram for engine ers in the 3-2 program (see page 48) w i l l norma lly follow the program for B . S. p h ysics majors through the j u n i o r year. Any courses ne cessary to meet special req u i rements of certain engineering schools w i l l be offered as i n dependent study. A major in physics fulfil l i n g the BAC HE LOR OF A RTS degree consists of a m i n i 足 mum o f 7V2 courses i n c l u d i ng V2 course i n advanced labo ratory a n d / o r researc h . T h e cou rses for a B.A. major i n p h ysics w i l l n o rm ally b e taken in t h e sequence shown below: RECOMMENDED PHYSICS C O U RSE SCHEDULE FO R B .A. DEGREE Freshman Year 1 st semester Basic Concepts (Phy. 1 0 1 ) Math. 1 33 Sophomore Year 1 st semester Modern Physics (Phy. 2 1 1 ) Math . 1 52 Junior Year 1 st semester Gen eral Physics (Phy. 254) Math. 332 _ Senior Year 1 st semester E & M (Phy. 331 ) Advanced lab. (Phy. 321 ) __ _

Course .1 1

_ ___

_

_

_

_

Course .... 1 1

_

Course 1

__

_

_ _

__

______

2 n d semester General Physics (Phy. 253) Math. 231 _ __ _ _

Course 1 1

_ _____

_ ____

Course 1 1

___

__

_ __ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

2nd semester C i rcuits and Instrumentation (Phy. 272)

Course

2 n d semester Mech anics ( P h y . 336) _ Advanced lab. (Phy. 322)

Course 1 Yo

__ _

______

____

2nd semester Discovery Physics (Phy. 1 02) Math . 1 5 1 _ _

Course 1 '/4

____

_

_ _

__

____

__

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCAT I O N major req u i rements are l isted below. Candid ates for this degree must also meet special requirements described i n the Scho ol of Education section in this catalog. The Department of Physics offers a special course sequence for students p re足 paring for careers in teac h i n g . It is recog n i zed that the needs of physics and science teachers have become signif icantly d i fferent from those of p h ysics majors preparing for graduate stud ies. Students need no extensive prior work in science or mathemati cs. This p rogram will prepare a teacher i n the two related fields of p hysics and mathematics. This combi nation g i ves a teacher the best preparation for professional g rowth and hopefu l l y a l i fe-long career i n teaching_ Students may take additional upper d i vision courses in p h ysics and mathematics to fu l fi l l the Washi ngton State fifth year req u i rements and m ay apply these cou rses towards an advanced degree in teac h i n g . Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses Teach ing Major: 7V2 courses Required: Physics 1 0 1 , 1 0 2, 2 1 1 , 253, 254, 272, 321 , 322 and 355. Required supporting courses: One additional course i n chemistry; Mathe足 m atics 1 5 1 , 1 5 2. Addition al suggested courses : Physics 331 , 336. Junior High School Preparation: Teac h i n g Major: 6V2 courses Required: Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 , 21 1 , 253, 254, 272, 321 and 322.


C U R R I C U L U M IN PHYSICS FOR TEAC H E R P R EPARAT I O N Freshman Year 1 st semester C o u rse Basic Concepts (Phy. 1 0 1 ) _ _ _ __ 1 Math. 1 33 _ ______ _ _ ___ 1

2nd semester Cou rse Discovery P h ys i cs (Phy. 1 02} ______ 1 Math. 1 51 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1

Sophom ore Year

1 st semester Modern Physics (Phy. 2 1 1 ) Math . 1 52 ______

C o u rse 1 _1

2nd semester General Physics (Phy. 253)

Cou rse 1

Junior Year 1 st semester Course General P hysics (Phy. 254) ___ _ _ 1

2nd semester C i rc u its and I nstrumentation (Phy. 272) ___ _ _ ______ _

C o u rse

Senior Year 1 st semester Course Teach i n g of P h ys i cs (Phy. 355} _ _ _ _1 E & M (Phy. 331 ) _ 1 Advanced l a b . Phy. 3 2 1 } Y4

2nd semester Mechanics (Phy. 336} _ __ Advanced l a b . (Phy. 322)

Course 1 Y4

_

____ _

1 0 1 BASIC CONC EPTS O F PHYS I CS A cou rse i l l ustrati ng the i n te l lectual i m portance and excitement o f physics for both n o n -scie n ce majors and aspiring physi c i sts. The cou rse will deal with character o f physical laws ; relationship between physics and other fields; conservation pri n ci ples, mathematical p h i l oso phy; ato m i c pictu re of nature; con cepts o f relativity, and of quantum mechanics. The mate rial w i l l be descri bed i n general terms; no mathematics other than ele mentary algebra w i l l be used. No laboratory. Prereq u i si t e : None. 1 02 D I SCOVERY PHYSICS T h i s is a labo ratory-orientated cou rse fo r non-majors. A se lection of experi足 ments i n mechani cs, heat, sound, electricity, o ptics and modern physics w i l l be performed. These expe riments are desi gned t o e m phasize fundamental principles which are d iscussed i n the lecture period prior to the laboratory. Each student i s expected to formu late h i s own c o n c l usi ons from the data obtai ned in the laboratory. These conclusions are then discussed i n the rec itation period. Prerequ isite: Physics 1 0 1 . 2 1 1 DESC R I PT I VE MODERN PHYSICS A cou rse i n ele mentary modern physics. I n tended primari ly for the h i g h school teacher prog rams, b u t designed a l s o f o r biology, chemistry and geology maj o rs who want to know m o re about atom i c and n u clear physics, Topics i n c l ude rad iation laws, rad i ation effects o n living orga n i sm s, natural and arti ficial radioactivity, structure of solids, Bohr and Rutherford theo ry of the atom, X-rays, g a m m a rays, beta emission, a l p h a em issi o n , el ementary particles, cosmic rays, particle accelerators, lasers, em ission and absorption spectra. I n cl udes laboratory. Prereq uisite: Col lege algebra and Physics 1 0 1 a n d 1 02 o r equivalent.

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253, 254 G EN ERA L PHYSICS ( 1 , 1 ) A course p resenting a u n i fied view of physics, i n c l u d i n g topics i n mech a n i cs, m o l e c u l a r physics, wave motion, l i g h t , electromagneti s m . The use of the di gita l c o m p uter wi ll be taught concu rrently and used in the lectu re and the accompanying laboratory. Prereq u isite : Calculus 1 5 1 or consent of i n structor. 272 ELECT R I CA L C I RC U ITS AND I N STR U M ENTATION An i n troducti on to electronic devices and the i r a p p l i cati on starting with basic A-C and D-C circuit analysis. It i n c l udes the p hysics of transistors and vac u u m tubes a n d t h e an alysis o f ci rcuits conta i n i n g these devices. App lications in­ clude A-C and D-C a m p l i fiers, power s u p p l ies, analog and dig ital comp uters. I n clud es labo ratory. Prereq u i site: Physics 253, 254 or consent of i nstructor. 331 ELECTROMAGNET I C T H EORY This is a course i n electrostatics, d i p ole fields, field s i n die lectric materials, electro m agnetic i n du ction, magnetic p roperties of matter, gene ration and p ropagation of electromag netic waves with an e m phasis on the re lationship with physical optics. Coreq u i s ite: Math. 332. Prereq u i site: Physics 253, 254. 336 MECHA N I C S A study o f t h e funda mental p r i n c i p l e s o f mechanics, e m p h asizes t h e mathe­ matical fo rmulation of physical problems, motion of particles in one, two or t h ree d i mensions, motions of systems of particles, dynamics and statics of rig id bodies, moving coordi nate syste ms, Lagrange's equations and H a m i l ­ to n i an formu lation of mechanics. Prereq u i site: Concu rrent registration in Math . 332. 321 , 322 ADVANCED LABORATORY ( V4 'h ) A c o u rse demonstrating funda mental p r i n c i p les of physics by experi mental tec h n iq ues. Students perform experi m ents in modern and classical physics fam i l iarizing themselves with the modern meas u ri n g tools of the scientist . T h i s course requires knowledge of the u s e of the d i g i tal com p u ter. -

355 TEAC H I N G OF PHYSICS A c o u rse for the study of new deve lopments i n h i g h school and j u n i o r high school curric u l u m , teaching tec hni ques and teac h i n g media i n the p h ysical sciences. May be counted towards a degree o n l y for students re ceiving certifi­ cation as teachers. 382 RAD I O I SOTOPE TECH N OLOGY This c o u rse deals with the characteristics of nucl ear radiation detection and measu rement methods and equipment, theory of n uclear d i s i ntegrations and appli cation to p roblems i n p h ysics and c h e m i stry. Prereq u isite: Physics 1 02 or equivalent. 401 I NTRODUCT I O N TO QUANTUM MECHAN I C S A study of the fun damental p ri n c i p les of q u a n t u m mechanics i n c l u d i n g the origin of q u antum theory, particles and waves, S c h riidin ger equation , motion of partic les i n one d i mensi o n , u n certainty p r i n c i p l e , wave mechan i c a l treat­ ment of the harm o n i c osc i l l ator, properties of wave functions, perturbation theory of non -degenerate and degene rate syste m s , the excl usion princi ple,


I many electron systems, coll ision problems, angular momentum and electron spi n , Zeeman effect and Stark effect, hydrogen fine structure and hype rfi ne structure, and quantum n u mber and the periodic table. 406 ADVANCED MODE RN PHYSICS A study of the appli cation of q uantum mechan ics i n c l u d i n g X-ray spectra, molecular bin ding, molecu lar rotation and v i brati o n , speci fic heat o f a d i atomi c gas, specific heat of solids, the free-electron theory of metals, the band theory of solid s, n u c lear reactions, rad ioactivi ty, nuclear models, n u clear forces, neutron production and n u c lear fission, part i c l e accel'e rators and nuc lear reactors, h i g h energy physi cs, strong and weak interactions, pions, m u ons, leptons and hadrons. 421 , 422 ADVANCED LABORATORY (V,

-

V2 )

456 MATHEMATICAL PHYS I C S A study of bou ndary v a l u e prob lems, spec ial functions, matrices a n d tensors, probab l i l ity theory, eigenva lue p rob lems, complex variables, contour integra足 tion and the i r applications in physics. 49 1 , 492 I N DEPEN DENT STUDY ( V. - 1 ) B y consent o f chai rman of department. 497, 498 R ESEARCH (V, - 1) By consent of chai rman of department. 597, 598 G RADUATE R ESEARCH ( V. - 1) Open to master's degree candid ates o n ly . Interim courses offered in 1 970:

301 MATH EMATICS FOR SCI ENTI STS 303 H U MA N I T I ES OF S C I E N C E (CHEM ISTRY/ MATHEMATICS/ PHYSI CS) 304 ACOUSTICS OF M U SIC ( M USIC/ PHYSI CS) 3 1 9 APP L ICAT I O N S OF RAD I O I SOTOPES ( C H E M I STRY/ PHYSICS) POLITICAL SCIENCE

Mr. Farmer, Chairman, Mr. Culver, Mr. Lowe, Mr. Mork, Mr. Ulbricht; assisted by Mr. Bricker, Mr. Eriksson and Mr. Wiegman

The study of political science trains the student for the exercise of his rights and d uties as a citizen by giving h i m a better understan ding of our democ ratic political processes and of conflicting political systems. A BACHELOR O F ARTS major in political science shall consist of a m i n i m u m of 7 courses i n c l u d i ng Politi cal Science 1 0 1 , 251 , 325, and 326. Students majoring i n political science m u st have the i r registration approved by the chai rman of the department each semester. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCAT I ON maj o r req u i rements are listed below. Can足 didates for this degree must also meet special req u i rements described i n the School of Education section i n this catalog.

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1 1 courses (in the Social Sciences) Teach ing Major: 7 courses (in Political Science) Required: P o l itical Science 1 01 , 251 , 33 1 , p l us four ad di tional elective courses. Suggested supporting courses: Econom ics 1 50 ; Geography 1 01 ; History 25 1 , 252, 253, 351 : Psychology 1 01 ; Soci ology 1 0 1 .

Senior High School Preparation:

Students wishing to prepare themselves specifically for career possi b i l i ties i n state and local government may e n ro l l i n the UR BAN AFFA I RS PROGRAM. For certi fication, successful completion of the fol lowing courses is req u i red : Political Science 1 0 1 , 251 , 325, 326, 354 o r 3 5 6 , 457 and 4 5 8 ; Eco n o m i cs 1 50 and 3 6 2 ; and Sociology 1 01 and 325. Political Science 1 01 is the p rereq u i s i te for a l l other cou rses i n the department. 101

I NTRODUCT I O N TO POL ITICAL S C I E N C E This course d e a l s w i t h the s c o p e and method and t h e vocabu lary of political science , political behavior, a n d governmental organization. I t is also designed to i n t roduce the student to problems of political theory and to fam i l i arize h i m with t h e comparative method of studying pol i tical institutions.

251

A M E R I CAN NATI O NAL GOVERN M ENT A study of the American nati o n a l government i n c l u d i n g the federal constitution and the di stribution of govern mental powers. Su rvey of structure and pro足 cedure of national government with spec ial attention to practical operation and contemporary reforms. I I I

325

H I STORY O F POL I T I CAL THOUGHT This c o u rse traces the development of thought concern i n g the nature and rol e of the state from ancient to modern ti mes. I

326

RECENT P O L I T I CAL THOUGHT A critical exami n ation of the major ph i l osophies of the modern world; Democ足 racy, conservatism, capitalism, socialism, anarcho-sy n d i calism, communism, raci a l and political elitism, nationalism, liberal ism, Ch ristian i ty. Contemporary problems. I I

331'

I N T ERNATIONAL RELAT I O N S This i n troductory course deals w i t h the scope a n d methods, concepts, a n d the vocabul ary of i n ternational re lations. Su rvey of t h e foreign policy of t h e maj or world powers and contemporary i n ternati onal problems. I

336

I NTERNATIONAL ORGAN I ZAT ION A N D LAW A study of the U n i ted' Nations and its agencies, and other international organ足 izations which attempt to deal effectively with the problems of the world com足 mu nity. The nature, historical devel opment, and pri n c i p les of i n ternational law. I I

354

A M E R I CAN STATE A N D LOCAL GOVER N M ENT A com parative study of state and local government in the United States with special attention to the Paci fic N o rthwest area. II a/y 1 970-71

356

PROBLEMS IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT A detai led study of the problems created by urbanization and reg i onal growth and the attempts of government to solve them. II a/y 1 971 -72


361 AM E R I CAN POLITICAL PARTIE S Party history and organizations; nomi nations and elections; campaigns and conventions; e lectoral problems and a d m i n i stration; bossism i n l ocal politics; pressure g roups; platforms. I aly 1 9 70-71 364 THE LEGI SLATIVE PROCESS A study of the theory, org an izatio n, and proce d u re of legislative bodies in the United States with special attention to the contemporary Congress and Wash­ in gton state legislature . I I aly 1 970-71 434 GOVERN MENT AND B U S I N ESS See Economics 434. 451 AMER ICAN CONSTITUT IONAL H I STORY See H istory 45 1 . 454 A M E R ICAN CONSTITUT IONAL LAW An exami nation of signi ficant constit utional issues in the l i g h t of the con­ te mporary interpretations of the Constitution of the U n i ted States: C h u rch­ state re lations, civil r i g h ts, tree speech, due process of 'law, rea pportion­ ment. I I 457 P R I N C I PLES O F P U B L I C A D M I N ISTRATION The art and science of management applied to the affai rs of state; natu re of human behavior i n organ izations; administrative law and q uasi-j ud i cial prac­ tices; civi l se rvice; budget and fiscal contro l ; centralizati o n ; coordi nat i o n ; i n tegration i n adm i n i st rative areas. I 458 I NTERNSH I P IN P U B L I C A D M I N I STRAT I O N An i ntern ship with a department of local or state government p l a n n e d a n d supe rvised j o i n t l y b y the supervising government official a n d a faculty member of the Department of Political Science. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. I I I 464 I NTER N S H I P I N THE LEG ISLATIVE PROCJ;SS An internsh i p with a member of the Was h i ngton State Leg i slature planned and supervised jointly by the legislator and a political science faculty mem­ ber. Prerequisite: Consent of i nstructor. II aly 1 9 70-71 481 STATISTICAL METHODS See Ec onomic s 481 . 483 POLIT ICAL SYSTEMS OF THE BRITISH COM MONWEALTH A comparative analysis of contem porary governmental and political i n stitu­ tions o f the U n i ted Kingdom. Canada and, other states of the Briti sh Com­ monwealth. I aly 1 97 1 -72 484 SOV I E'i P O L I T I CAL SYSTEM An analysis of the pol i tical system of the U n i o n of Soviet Socialist Republics with s pe C i a l attention to ideology. the role of the Commu nist Party, the nature of the consti tution. adm inistrative agencies. and nati onality policy. II, aly 19 71 -72 497, 498 I N D E P E N D ENT R EA D I N G A N D RESEARCH ( '/4 - 1 ) Prerequisite: Consent of chai rman of department. I I I


597, 598

G R A D UA T E R ES E A R C H ( V.

I n di v i d u a l

research

1)

-

project f o r a n M . A . c a n d i date w i t h a m i n o r i n

s c i en c e . P rereq u i s i te : Consent of department. I

p o l i ti c a l

II

Interim courses offered in 1·970: 282

C O M P AR A T I V E GOVE R N M ENT

310

POL I T I CA L LIFE I N WAS H I N G T O N , D . C.

31 1

U R B A N A N D R E G I O N A L P LA N N I N G

312

U N IT E D N A T I O N S S E M I N A R

PSYCHOLOGY Mr. Bexton, Chairman, Mr. Adachi, Mr. Holmberg, Mr. Nolph, Mr. Severtson; assisted by Mr. Berlness, Mr. Minetti and Mrs. Webster C o u rses i n t h i s department a i m at prov i d i n g the student

with an u n d e rsta n d ­

i ng at psychology as a s c i e n t i t i c s t u d y o f b e h av i o r a n d expe rience. T h e m a j o r provi des a backgro u n d

preparation

for

a profes s i o n a l

career i n

psy c h o l o g y o r

f o r a related vocation. Professional careers i n psychol ogy i n c l u d e : c o l lege ,teac h i ng , resear c h , c l i n i c a l psyc h o logy. e m p l oy m e n t i n

pu b l i c s c h o o l systems,

ernment a g e n c i e s . These careers usually

b u si ness, i n dustry a n d gov­

req u i re at least the Master's degree;

s o m e req u i re the P h . D . degree. I n p reparation for this g raduate w o r k the student s h o u l d take s u p p o r t i n g courses i n areas s u c h as bio logy.

mathematics,

p h i los­

ophy a n d s o c i o l o g y . P ro f i c i e n c y s h o u l d also be acq u i red in a m o dern l a n g uage s u c h as French or German. Related vocat i o ns i n which a psy c h o logy maj o r is useful a r e : s o c i a l work, the m i n i s t r y , parish A major i n

work,

med i ci n e , n u rs i n g ,

psy c h o l ogy w i l l

Ihe freshman year; o n e o t

421 ;

include:

340

or

410;

business

a d m i n istrat i o n a n d

P Sy c h o l o g y Psychology

101 460 ;

4 9 0 ; a n d two a d d i ti o n a l f u l l c o u rses 500 leve l ; a course in Statistical Methods i s 221 may not be c o u nted i n the major.

Psychology

below the

110

and

All

m a j o rs

m u st have thei r

p rog rams

app roved

and one

teach i n g .

2 4 3 , preferably o f 330, 335, 420

taken f r o m

in or

those offered

also req u i re d . Psychology

each

semester

by

the

de­

partment. M aj o rs i na t i o n

in

the

Department

d u ri n g t h e

first

of

P s y c h o l ogy

semester

of

their

will

write

seni o r

year.

a c o m p re h e n s i ve Readi n g

or

exam­

other

work

d u ri n g t h e s e n i o r y e a r i nte r i m w i l l be d i rected t o w a r d m a k i n g u p f o r a n y defi ci­ enc ies

and

in

p reparation

for

a

com prehensive

examination

during

the

final

semester.

101

I N T R O D U C T I O N TO P S Y C H O LOGY A general i n t rod u c t i o n to

the s c i e n t i f i c study

of behav i o r. Topics

covered

w i l l i n c l u d e s c i e n t i f i c m e t h o d s for s t u d y i n g the behavi o r of l i v i n g o rg a n i s m s , p ro b l ems

such

as

and adjustment. I

m otivat i o n ,

" S

learn i ng,

e m o t i on ,

i ntel l i gence,

personal ity


1 1 0 'STUDY S K I L L S (V2 ) Designed to assist the student to i m prove his reading skills and deve l o p other tech niques f o r m o r e effective study. Class w o r k is supplem ented b y i n d i v i d u a l counse l i n g and special trai n i n g i n readi ng s k i l l s . No p rereq u i s i te. I II 221 T H E PSY C H O LOGY O F ADJUSTMENT (V2 ) The p roblems of personal adjustment i n Psy c h o l ogy 1 0 1 . I I I

everyday

living.

Prereq uis ite :

243 SC I EN T I F I C METHODS ( V2 - 1 ) Basic experi mental and, research design with speci fic a p p l i cations t o sensory and perceptual processes. Lecture and laboratory sessions. Prerequ i site: Psychology 1 0 1 . 330 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY A study of research findings concern ing the i nteraction between groups and the individual. Attitudes, val ues, role behavior, and related topics will be exam i ned i n the l i ght of i nterpersonal relations and g roup processes. Pre足 re q u isite: Psychology 1 0 1 .

I

I

335 T H E C H I LDHOOD AND ADOLESC ENCE The develo pment of the i ndividual from conception through adolescence with emphasis on the genesis of behav i o r and its development th rough factors such as learn i n g and social i n fluence . Prereq uisite: Psychology 1 0 1 . 340 T H E B I OLOGY O F BEHAV I O R (V2 - 1 ) A study of the re lationsh i p between anatomy and physiology and behavi or. Lecture and laboratory sessions. (Lecture part may be taken as a half足 cou rse.) Prerequisite: Psychol ogy 243.

I

401 THE PSYCHOLOGY O F IN FANCY ( V2 ) An advanced study of the physical, intellectual, emotional and social devel足 opment of the i ndividual from p re-natal period up to adolescence. Special attention will be given to problems of behavior and adjustment. Prereq u i s i te : Two o r m o re cou rses i n psychology beyond' 1 01 .

,I

405 ADOLESCENT PSYC H O LOGY (V損 An advanced course dea l i n g with physical deve l o pment, mental traits, soc i al c h aracteristics and i n terests of adolescents. Adjustments in home, school and commu n ity. Prereq uisite : Psychology 1 0 1 and one of Ed ucation 32 1 , Psychology 335 o r 401 . 4 1 0 EMOTION AND MOTIVAT I O N ( V2 - 1 ) The general characteristics of emotion and motivation and their role i n determi n i ng behavior. Lecture a n d labo ratory sessions. (Lecture part may be taken as a half-course) . Prerequ isite: Psychology 101 and 243. 420 PSYC H O LOGY O F PERSONALITY A su rvey of the app roaches to the study of personali ty, c u rre nt theories of the dynamics and the development of person al ity, research on the causes of individual differences i n personality, personality change and tec h n i ques of measuring pe rsonality. Prerequisites: Psychology 1 01 and at least one full cou rse i n psychology beyond the 200 level .


421 B E HAVIOR D I SORDERS A study 01 the etiology and treatment of behavior disorders. Prerequ i si te : Psychology 4 2 0 or consent o f department. 450 PSYCH OLOGICAL TEST I N G A su rvey of t h e field o f standardized tests. E m p h asis wi l l be given to meth­ ods o f development, stan dardization, the l i m i tations, and in terpretations of tests. Prere q u i s i tes : Psycholo gy 243 or a cou rse in stati stics, and two courses in psychology beyond the 200 leve l . 460 T H E EXP E R I M E NTAL PSY C H O LOGY O F LEA R N I N G Experi mental studies a n d theories o f learn i n g . Lecture and laboratory sessions. Prere q u i site: At least th ree fu l l courses in psychology i n c l ud i n g 243. 481 STAT ISTI CAL METHODS The use and i n terpretation of ele mentary statistical tech n i q u es; g raph i c repre­ sentat i o n ; measu res of central tendency; s i m ple corre l ation analysis, sampling theory, i n ferential and non-parametric statistics. 490 H I STORY A N D SYSTEMS I N PSYCHOLOGY A sem i nar in the h i stori cal development of psychology with special consider­ ation of cu rrent trends. For maj o rs in thei r final year or g raduate students. Others by consent of department on ly.

491 I N D E P E N D ENT STUDY (1/4 - Y2 ) These c redits are designed to provide the senior or g raduate student with an opportu nity to c a r ry out, under supervision, a reading program o r research project of special i n te rest. Pre requisite: Consent of the department. I " 492 See 491 . 493 See 49 1 . 5 1 5 PSYC H O LO G I CAL ASSESSMENT The theory and p ractice 01 i ntel lectual and personality assess ment. For the former part, tests such as the Stanfo rd - B i n et , the Wech sler P reschool and Pri m a ry Scale of I n te l l igence, the Wec h s l e r I nte l l igence Scale for Chi l d re n , a n d t h e Wechsler A d u l t I n te l l i ge n ce Scale w i l l be stu d i e d ; for t h e latter, self­ report. tests such as the MMPI and projective methods. Prereq u is i te : Psychol­ ogy 450, and 420 or 421 . 540 C O U N S E L I N G T H EO RY AN D PRACT I C E A course designed to acquaint t h e student w i t h theories a n d tech n i q ues o f counse l i n g . P re requisite: Psychology 450. 570 PRACT I C U M I N COUNSE L I N G AND TEST I N G Supervised practice u s i n g the tech n i q ues o f evaluation a n d counse l i n g . T h i s cou rse i s not t o be t a k e n a s p a r t of the reg u l a r maste r's progra m w i t h a m a j o r in psyc ho logy, u n l ess the student h a s completed at least e l even courses credits i n psychology, four of w h i c h a re fo r graduate credit. Prerequisite: Psychology 450 and 540. 577 SUPERVI SED F I ELD WORK The student is placed i n a job situation to work under the supervi sion of a qu a l ified counselor o r psychologist. Prereq u i site: P racticum 570.


590 S E M I N A R : PSYC H OLOGY OF LEA R N I N G A seminar i n princi p l es a n d applic ations o f learning with emphasis o n cu rrent develop ments. Prere q u i site s : T h ree o r more cou rses in psychology above the 200 level, o r perm i ss i on of the department. 596 I N D EP E N D E N T RESEARCH ( V4 - 1 ) Su pervised i ndependent study to cover i m portant areas of psyc hol ogy w h i c h a r e no t otherwise provided f o r . Pre req u i site: Consent of t h e department. 597 See 596. 599 THESIS AN D T H ES I S SEM I N AR The thesis p roblem w i l l be ch osen from the candidate's major area of con足 centration and m ust be app roved by his Grad uate Co m m i ttee. The cand idate w i l l be expected to defend h i s thesis in a final oral exam i n ation conducted by his Committee. W h i l e reg istered for the thesis and u n t i l i t i s comp leted, the student is req u i red to attend the thesis sem i n a r . I 1'1 S Interim courses offered in 1 970:

301 DEVELOPMENT O F READ I N G SKI LLS 305 S E M I NAR IN C U R R ENT DEVELOPM ENTS IN PSYC H O LOGY 310 I N VO LV E M E NT I N A T H ERAPEUT I C C O M M U N ITY (ED UCAT I O N / PSYCHOLOGY) 314 THE C U LTURE OF POVERTY (PSYCHOLOG Y/SO C I O LOGY) 316 B LACK C U LT U R E (PSYC HOLOGY/SOCI OLOGY)

319 I N DEPEN D EN T STU D I ES

RELIGION

Mr. Eklund, Chairman, Mr. Christopherson, Mr. Govig, Mr. Knutson, Mr. Petersen; assisted by Father Matthew, Mr. Reeck

The department offers a cu rri culum designed to i n troduce the student to the phenomena of re l i gion with particular emphasis upon the Judaeo-Ch ristian tradi足 tions. Study of relig ion i s part of the General U n i versity R e q u i rements. Two courses are req u i red for g rad uation for students ente r i n g as freshmen or sopho足 m o res. Religion 1 03 or 203 shall be taken before the end o f the sophomore year. The second course may be the other lower-d ivision cou rse, an up per div ision course, or the senior seminar. T ransfer students entering as j u n i ors or sen i o rs are req u i red to take one course. R e l i g i o n 1 03 or 203 (or e q u i val ents for transfer students) are the assumed p reparation fo r all other courses in re l i g ion . Maj o r : 6 courses. Maj o rs should plan t he i r program early with fac u l ty m em b e rs of the department. Closely related courses taught in other departments may be considered to apply toward the major in consultation with the staff.

1 03 J U DAEO-C H R I STIAN L I FE AND T H O U G HT A study of B i b l i cal, h i storical, and theological foundations with reference to contemporary re l i g i ous issues.


203

B I BLICAL LITERATURE A study of l i terary, ,h i s t o r i ca l , and re l i gi o u s d i me n s i o n s of t h e S i b l e i n c l u d i n g perspective on contempo rary r e l i g i o u s pro b l e m s .

325

C H R I S T I A N E D U CA T I O N T h e o l o g i c a l , psyc h o l og i c a l a n d p h i :oso p h i c al f o u n d a t i o n s fo r t h e ed ucati o n a l m i n istry of the C h u rc h , a n d to m e e t the n e e d s of s t u d e n ts w h o wish to relate the stu d y of r e l i g i o n t o req u i s i t e : Psychology

327

t h e d i s c i p l i n es of

psychology and e d u c a t i o n .

Pre足

101.

ANC I ENT C H U R C H H I STORY T h e o ri g i n s ,

thought

and

exp a n s i on

of

the

C h ristian

Church,

rise

of

the

Papacy, expansion i n Eu rope and g rowth of C h ristian i nv o l vement i n c u ltu re, t o the e n d of t h e Papacy of G regory I

328

(604).

I

a/y

1 9 7 1 -72

M O D E R N C H U R C H H I STORY

( 1 648),

Be g i n n i n g w i t h t h e Peace of Wes t p h a l i a f a i t h with

i n te r a c t i o n of t h e C h ri s t i an

modern p o l i t i c s , science and p h i losophy, e x p a n s i o n i n t h e world,

m o d e r n movements .

331

WORLD RELIGIONS H i story,

b e liefs

a n d practices

of

living

r e l i g i ons

of

the

world :

Hinduism,

B u d d h i s m , C h i nese rel i gi o n , J ud a i s m , Is l a m , w i t h references t o C h r i s t i anity. Lec t u res, c l ass reports and d i sc u ss i o n s .

341

I

A M E R I C A N C H U RC H E S A s t u d y of the developmen t a n d trends of Ch r i s t i an i ty i n of America.

421

t h e U n i ted States

I

O L D TESTA M E N T STU D I ES Major a re a s of O l d Testament inqu i ry, s u c h as A rchaeology and the

Prophets,

or

t h e W i s d om

Li terature.

Prereq u i s i t e :

Religion

the

203

B i ble, or

its

equivalent.

422

N EW TESTA M E N T STU D I ES M a j o r areas of N e w Testament i n q u i ry, s u c h as the I n t e rtestamental, Syn o p t i c , J o h an n i n e , o r P a u l i n e l i terat u re. Prereq u i s i t e : R e l i g i on

423

203

o r i t s equivalent.

T H E L I F E OF J ESUS A study of t h e four gospels w i th e m p h asis u pon t h e l i fe and teac h i ng s o f Jesus a n d w i th a c o n s i d e r a t i o n o f t h e l i terary and h i st o r i c a l aspects o f t h ese w r i t i n g s .

430

C H R I ST I AN T H O U G HT A N D T H E M O D E R N C O N S C I O USNESS A c o n si d e ra t i o n of peren n i a l t h e o l o g i c a l pro b l e ms s u c h as m a n , fai t h , world, h i story, G o d , C h rist, S p i ri t , C h u rc h , with a focus u p o n c o n t e m p o rary t h e o l ogy a n d its responses to recent un derst a n d i n g s of man and his w o rl d .

432

C H R I S T I A N C LA S S I C S Read i n g s a n d d i sc u s s i on of g reat Ch ristian l i teratu re-devo t i on , b i og ra p h y, the足 ology, poetry; Augustine, T h o m a s a Kem p i s , Dan te, L u t h e r, C a l v i n , Pas c a l , Wes足 ley, Kierkegaard, and o t h e rs; g ro u p core p l u s s e m i n a r reports. I I a/y

436

1 970-71

C H R I ST I A N I TY A N D THE ARTS An

i n ve s t i g a t i o n

of

the

rel a t i o ns h i p

t re n d s in literat u re and the f i n e arts.

between

t h e o l ogy

and

c o n t e m p o rary


490 SEN I O R S E M I N A R A variety of subjects such a s h u m a n sexuality, science and re l i g i o n , l i t e rature and religion are taught by the department of re l i g i o n togethe r with other departments and schools o f the U n i versity. 491 , 492 I N DEPEN DENT STUDY Permission of the department i s req u i red . Interim courses offered in 1 970: 306 C H R I STIAN ITY A N D THE ARTS

309 MAN : R E L I G I O U S AND H U MAN 310 SECULA R I ZAT ION A N D C H R ISTIAN THO U G HT 31 1 THE C HURCH'S U R BA N POTENTIAL 312 THE ECUMENICAL MOVEMIONT

Reserve Officer Training Corps Program (Air Force) (Aerospace Studies)

Mr. Phillips, Mr. Hunter, Mr. Eliason

Students e n ro l led at Pac i f i c Lutheran University who have been selected for the A i r Force ROTC Two-Year Commission Program, and transferees qual i f i ed for e n try i n to the Ai r Force ROTC P rofessional Officers Course may e n r o l l in A i r Force ROTC Aerospace Studies cou rses a t t h e U n i ve rs i ty o f Puget Sound. A p p l i 足 c a t i o n s f o r t h i s program a r e n o r m a l l y accepted from sophomore students d u ring the Fall Semester preceding the expected date of entry into the Professional Offi足 cers C o u rse. Selection for the c o u rs e i s on a competitive best-q u a l i fied bas i s . Purpose

The pu rpose of the A i r Force ROTC-Aerospace Studies Prog ram i s to select and educate young col lege men as future officers of the U . S. Ai r Force. The p rogram p repares poten tial career officers for m i l itary service i n the U . S. Air Force. Suc足 cessful comp letion of th i s program leads to a c o m m i ssion as a second l i e utenant in the U . S. Ai r Force upon g rad uation from Pacific Lutheran U n i versity. Curriculum

1 ) The curri c u l u m i s d i v i ded i nto two c o u rses : The s i x-week Field Trai n i ng Course, and the Professional Officers Course. The s i x-week Field T ra i n i ng Course is conducted d u ri n g the sum mer o n ly at an A i r Force Base. The Profess ional Officers C o u rse is a study of s u bjects related to deve lopment of aerospace power, management of A i r Force resources, and m i l itary service. Classes are conducted four h o u rs per week each semester of the junior and sen i o r years on the campus of the U n i ve rsity of Puget Sound, Tacoma, Wash i ngton. Suc足 cessful com pletion o f the s i x-week Field Trai n i n g C o u rse i s a pre req u i site to e n ro l l m e n t i n the P rofess ional Officers Course. 2) Two-year c o m m i s si o n i n g program a. Summer before j u n i o r yea r : AS 3 2 5 Six-Week Field T ra i n i ng ___________ ____________

_ __ 1 cou rse


b.

J u n i o r year (Profess i o n a l Officers Course) : AS 330 Growth and Development of Aerospace Power

_ _ _ __ __ _

__

1 c o u rse

AS 335 G rowth and Development of Aerospace Power

cou rse

Sen i o r year ( Professi onal Officers Course ) : _ _ _ _ __ _

1 c o u rse

_ _ ___ _ __ __ _ _ _

1 course

A S 430 A i r Force Leaders h i p a n d ManagemenL . AS 435 A i r Force Leadership a n d Manage m e n t

_

Admissions and Procedures 1)

Each student accepted i n to the Professi o n a l Officers Course m u s t : a.

H a v e satisfactori l y completed

the

prereq u i site f i e l d

trai n i n g

o r general

m i l i tary courses. b.

Have two acade m i c years rem a i n i ng of either undergraduate or graduate study.

c.

Successful l y complete A i r Force officer q u a l i f ications testing and medical eval u at i o n .

d.

H a v e a g r a d u a t i o n d a t e prior to r e a c h i n g 26'12 years of a g e i f q u alified for f l i g h t trai n i n g or 30 years of age if q u a l i fied fo r other than f l i ght tra i n i ng .

e.

En list i n t h e A i r Force Reserve a n d agree to attend a n d faith f u l l y p u rsue the prescribed co u rse of i n struction .

2)

Students accepted i n to the Professi o n a l Officers C o u rse receive $50.00 each

3)

Students a r e furnished u n i forms a n d textbooks for Aerospace Studies Courses.

month in non-taxable subsistence a l l owance for the two yea rs o f their trai n i n g .

4)

A free f l i g h t instruction program is avai lable for students q u a l i fied for pi lot trai n i n g . This t r a i n i n g may lead to FAA private pi lot certification.

5)

Add i tional i n formation about the A i r Force ROTC-Aerospace Studies program may be obtained by writing the Professor of Aerospace Studies, U n i versity of Puget Sou n d , Tacoma, Wash i ngton 984 1 6.

Course Descriptions 325 F I ELD TRA I N I N G ( S U M M E R O N LY)

(1)

A s i x week trai n i n g program c o n d u cted a t a n A i r Force Base. Course i n c l udes A i r Force officer orientat i o n , Air Force

organization

and function, m i li tary

trai n i n g, and flying i nd o c t r i n at i o n . T h i s course is a prereq u isite fo r entry i n to Professional Officer Courses (300 and 400 series). 330, 335 G R OWTH A N D DEVELOPMENT O F AEROSPACE POWER ( 1 , 1 ) A

survey

course

con c e r n i n g

the

development

concepts of ai rpower, a n d the future of the study of

astronautics,

characteristics of space

space operations, ve h i cles.

C o u rse

of

airpower,

e m p loyment

manned ai rcraft. C o u rse i n c ludes and operating

also

i n c l u des

p r i n C i ples and

development

and

execution of tra i n i n g activities for the cadet corps. (I, I I ) 430, 435 A I R F O R C E LEADERSH I P A N D MANA G E M ENT

(1 , 1 )

A study o f profess i o n a l i s m , leadership and management at the j u n i o r officer level in t h e U.S. Air Force. Cadets i n this course p l an , organize, direct, and control the m i l i tary trai n i n g program of the Cadet Corps. I , I I


I J


SOCIOLOGY

Mr. Schiller, Chairman, (and Chairman, Division

01 Social Sciences),

Mr. W. Gilbertson, Mr. Jobst, Mr. Lonborg, Mr. Menzel, Mr. Oberholtzer; assisted by Mr. Adams, Mr. Green and Mr. Patti

Sociology studies t h e development, organization and behavior of human groups. It seeks to understand and explain the uniformities and processes of social behavior and the natu re and relationsh i p of g roups and inst i tutions; to help stu­ dents understand thei r own and other cultures; to sti m u l ate critical and construc­ tive attitudes toward soc i a l change; a n d to provide a sound basis for intel ligent c i tizensh i p . A major i n t h e Department o f Sociology provides background for activities i n t h e following fields: ( 1 ) advanced research a n d teac h i ng in sociology; ( 2 ) soc i a l work, welfare adm i n i stration, nursing, commu n ity organization a n d comm unity p l a n n i n g ; (3) the mi nistry, parish work and related re ligious activities; (4) the teaching of social studies; (5) c r i m i nology, probation and parole, corrections, min ority relations, international relation s h i ps, p u b l i c ad m i n i stration, law and group leaders h i p ; (6) and other fields concerned with pl ural relations h i ps. The Department of Sociology houses courses constituti n g the social work sequence. I t holds constituent members h i p i n the Cou n c i l on Social Work Educa­ tion which i n d i cates approval of the program. Students plan n i n g to follow the social work program should consult with one of t h e social workers on the staff of the Department of Sociology. The social work program is described more fully on another page of the catalog. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCAT I O N maj or requirements are l i s ted below. Can­ d i d ates for this degree must also meet special requi rements described i n the School of Education section i n this catalog. 11 courses Teaching Major: 1 1 courses Required: Soci o l ogy 1 0 1 , 445, 490, and fou r electives i n Sociology; and four cou rses distri buted over three areas of the other social sciences.

Senior High School Preparation:

BACHELOR OF ARTS M AJOR: Major: A m i n i m um of 7 cou rses, i n cluding Sociology 1 0 1 , 461 and 490. T h e rem a i n i n g 4 courses should be chosen i n consultation w i t h t h e department. Courses i n anthropology and social work, though housed i n the Department of Sociology, do not count toward a major i n sociology. Norma l l y Sociology 1 0 1 i s a prereq uisite for all sociology courses. Cou rses are open to challenge by examination. 1 0 1 SOCIAL ISSUES Th rough an an alysi s of several major social issues, students are introduced to the bas i c concepts, scope and meth odology of sociology. A major goal is to help students develop a soci ological perspective of social relation­ s h ips. I /I


275 GROUP BEHAVIOR Study 01 the effects 01 social interaction u p on individual behavior; col lective attitudes and behavior as products 01 g roup expe rience; analysis 01 lash i o n , lads, c rowds, mobs, publics , social movements; t h e significance 0 1 social control in society and the various methods used by individuals and groups to control others. I 325 M I N O R I T I E S T h e h i story, nature a n d concerns 01 m i n o rity g ro u p s i n American society are examined. Major em phasis is given to the processes 01 i nteraction between m i n o rity-majority groups; an alysis 01 population composition and movement as" it relates to min ority-majority re latio nships w i l l also be considered. 338 DEVIANT B E HAVIOR The process 01 deviance and soc i a l control w i l l be exami ned with atten tion being g i ve n to specilic lorms 01 youth and a d u l t be havior such as j uvenile deli nquency, whi te-c ollar crime, d rug addiction, homosexuality, mental i l lness and abort i o n . I I 341 G E N E R A L ANTHROPO LOGY Elements 01 General A n t h ropology, with emphasis on the develop ment 01 man, and his social organization. Comparative study 01 cultures 01 con足 temporary societies with em phasis on t h e i r institutional relationships. Signili足 cance 01 cultu ral conligurations on individual personal ity. May not count toward major. I 365 SOCIAL INTERVENTION Various ways in which society may i ntervene in. reso l v i n g undesirable social conditions and p ro b lems are analyzed. Theoretical loundations 0 1 intervention p h i l osophy and processes are examined. 401 SOCI OLOGY OF SOC I A L WELFARE The history 01 how societies have deli ned social and personal needs and have sought so l utions is presented. Concepts 01 c u l t u re and social institu足 tions lorm the basis 01 theoretical analysis. A more i n tensive analysis 01 con足 tempo rary welfare structures is provided. 408 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE An understand ing and appreciation 01 the prolession 0 1 social work w i t h i n the g roup 01 helping prolessions a n d the general l i e l d 01 s o c i a l welfare i s provided. The knowledge base, p r i n c i ples, methods and values generic t o soc i a l w o r k practice w i l l be p resented. Special emphasis w i l l b e placed upon i nterviewing. Participant observation 01 p roble m-so lving structures and pro cess wi ll be provided. Permission 01 i n st ructor required. May not count toward major. I I 421 F I ELD EXP E R I EN C E Students are g i ve n an opport u n i ty t o lunction, w i t h adequate supervision within a n agency or instituti o n . During a st ructural field experience, students w i l l i ntegrate and apply knowledge, theory and u n derstanding Irom content areas in t h e i r loundation courses and the social welfare seq uence; develop some 01 the techniques and s k i l l s common to practice i n the social welfare


field. Integration of theory and practice will be g uided th rough a weekly seminar. Permission of the instructor required. May not count toward major. I I I 430 T H E C O M M U N ITY Organization and ac tivity of urban and rural society with specific reference to the integration of the i r basic cult ural institutions i n meeting the total needs of society; and the process of urban-rural i nterpenetration. I I 445 T H E F A M I LY A conceptual analysis of the fam i l y as an instit ution. C ross-cultural exa m i n足 ation of family life, h istorical treatment of t h e western family and a con足 tem porary analysis of the American family as a social system i n its develop足 mental stages and in its relationship to other i nstitutions form the matrix of such an an3lysis. I 450 SOC IAL INSTITUT I O N S A n analysis o f the o r i g i n s a n d development o f m a j o r institutions (economic, educational, fam i l i a l , political and re l i g ious) ; an i n vestigation of institutional change both evolutionary and revolutionary. I I 461 SOCIOLOGI CAL THOUGHT The deve lopment of sociological thought from Comte to the present. 481 STAT ISTICAL METHODS See Psychology 481 . 490 S E M I NA R - R ESEARCH An i ntroduction to sociological research methods. Types of research and the i r bas i c methodology are examined and i l l ustrated. I I 491 I N D E P EN D ENT STUDY Perm ission of department required. 495 R EA D I N G S S E M I N A R Permission o f department req u i red . 590 G RADUATE S E M I NAR (During 1 969-70 seminars i n corrections and probation a n d parole were offered.) 595 G RADUATE READ I N G S 597 G RAD UATE RESEARCH SpecifiC research is c h osen with the approval of the student's Graduate Committee. Interim Courses Offered in 1 970:

302 THE H ELP I N G SERVICES 314 T H E CULTURE O F POVE RTY (PSYCHOLOGY/ SOC I O LOGY) 3 1 5 I N D EP EN D ENT STUDY 316 BLACK C U LT U R E (PSYCHOLOGY/SOCIO LOGY) 3 1 8 I N D EPEN DENT STU D I ES IN U R BAN POTENTIALS (EDUCATI ON/ SOCIOLOGY)


I

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The Register The Board of Regents EX-OFFIC I O : Represents Dr. A. G. Fjellman, 5519 Phinney Avenue N., Seattle, Washington 98103 LCA Dr. Eugene W. Wiegman, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, Wash. 98447_PLU Dr. Clarence Solberg, 2007 Third Ave., Seattle, Washington 9812L ALC ____

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TERM EXPIRES 1 970: Dr. Paul Bondo, 1 1 723 E. Bingham Ave., Tacoma, Washington 98446 ALC Mr. Donald E. Cornell, 1 01 9 E. 9th Street, Port Angeles, Wash. 98362 - - A LC Mr. Ronald E. Douglass, 1 2 1 2 F Street S.E., Auburn, Wash. 98002 LCA Rev. Frank L. Ericksen, P. O. Box 1 1 0, Issaquah, Wash. 9802L ALC Mr. Carl T. Fynboe, 1 1 023 Gravelly Lake Dr. S.w., Tacoma, Wash. 98499_ Alumni Rev. David Getzendaner, 2324 Lombard Ave., Everett, Wash. 9820L LCA Mrs. J. L. Moilien, 2137 N.E. Schuyler, Portland, Oregon 9721 2 _ ALC Rev. Karl Ufer, P. O. Box 465, Pullman, Washington 99163 ALC Mr. Michael Dederer, 1 008 Western Ave., Seattle Wash. 98104 Regent-at-Iarge _ __ _ _

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TERM EXPIRES 1 971 : Mrs. Alfred Aus, 500 S.W. Fifth Ave., Portland, Oregon 97204 Alumni Rev. Theodore P. Brueckner, 1 0390 S.W. Canyon Road, Beaverton, Oregon 97005 ALC Mr. John R. Bustad, 1 020 Riverside Drive, Mt. Vernon, Wash. 98273 LCA Mr. Chester Hansen, 125 Niemi Road, Longview, Washington 98632 ALC Rev. Glen Husby, 202 Brooks Street, Missoula, Montana 59801 ALC Dr. Eric Paulson, S. 3712 Gandy, Spokane, Washington 99203 ALC Mr. Conrad Peterson, 31 1 0 Olympic Blvd. West, Tacoma, Wash. 98466 LCA Mr. Gerald E. Schimke, 2247 Prescott Ave. S.W., Seattle, Wash. 98126 ALC Mr. Norman Lorentzsen, 675 I vy Falls Court, SI. Paul, Minn. 551 1 8 Regent-at-Iarge _

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TERM EXPIRES 1 972: Mr. Thomas W. Anderson, 7525 Hegra Road, Tacoma, Wash. 98465 Dr. Carl Bennett, 31 1 5 W. Canal Drive, Kennewick, Wash. 99336 ALC Dr. Kenneth Erickson, 1 975 Potter, Eugene, Oregon 97403 LCA Mr. Galven Irby, 6025 N.E. Garfield Ave., Portland, Oregon 9721 L _ ALC Mr. Melvin Knudson, 6928-10Oth SI. S.w., Tacoma, Wash. 98499 ALC Mr. Victor Knutzen, 2649 South 304th, Federal Way, Wash. 98002 Alumni Rev. Philip Natwick, 1857 Potter, Eugene, O regon 97403 ALC Mr. John Nelson, 2227 West Raye St., Seattle, Wash. 98199 LCA Rev. E. Duane Tollefson, 1501 Jefferson, Wenatchee, Wash. 9880L ALC Mr. Howard O. Scott, 1 1 61 1 Woodbine Lane, S.W. Regent-at-Iarge Tacoma, Wash. 98499 Faculty Representative to the Board: C. E. Huber; Alternate-Wm. P. Giddings Student Representative to the Board: Barney Petersen; Alternate- Bruce Bjerke __ _ ____

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ADVISORY: CHAIRMAN, COMMITIEE ON HI GHER EDUCATION Rev. P. Ivar Pihl, 435 N.W. 2 1 st, Corvallis, Oregon 97330 Rev. Lloyd Roholt, 3910 Lake Road, Milwaukie, Oregon 97222 __

LCA ALC

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Church Officials American Lutheran Church General

D r. Fredrik A. Schiotz, President, 422 S. Fifth St., Min neapo l i s , Rev. David W . Preus, Vice-President, 422 S . Fifth St., Minn eapolis, M r. N . B u rdette Nelson, Treasurer, 422 S . Fi fth St., Mi nneapolis, Mr. Arnold M i c kelson, Secretary, 422 S. Fifth St., Minneap olis ,

Minn. Minn. Minn. Minn.

554 1 5 554 1 5 554 1 5 554 1 5

North Pacific District

Dr. Clarence Solberg , President, 2007 Third Avenue, Seattle, Wash. 98 1 2 1 Rev. Judson L. Crary, Admi nistrative Assistant, 2007 Thi rd Avenue, Seattle, Washington 981 21 D r. L. V. R i eke, C h u rch Counc i l Representative, 5525 60th Avenue N . E., Seattle, Washington 981 05 Board of College Education

Mr. Charles Bruning, 1 009 W. Fourth, Mo rris, M i n n . R e v . Marcus G ravd a l , 2525 S. Mai n, S i o u x F a l l s , S. Oak. D r. Leonard Haas, 1 23 Roosevelt Ave., Eau C l a i re , Wis. Rev. Harold B. Kildahl, 51 5 Walders St., Min ot, N . D . Rev. Roald A. Kindem, 9 1 8 Garf i e l d , Albert L e a , M i n n . M r . Paul C. Larsen, 813 2 n d Ave. W . , Di ckinson, N. D . Rev. J o h n N. Parbst, 3 7 4 1 1 7th Ave. S., Minneapol i s, M i n n . M r . Edward A. Sagebiel, Seg u i n , Tex. Rev. Erling H. Wold, 723 Reeves Dr., G rand Forks, N. D. Lutheran Church in America, Pacific Northwest Synod

D r. A. G. Fjel l man, President, 551 9 Phi nney Ave. No .. Seattle, Wash. 98103 M r. Gordon J. Storaasl i , Assistant to the P resident, 5519 Phinney Ave. No., Seattle, Wash. 98103 The Pacific Northwest Synod of the Lutheran Church in America has accepted Pacific Lutheran U n iversity as one of the i nsti tutions of h i gher education which it end orses and supports. The Synod has representation o n the University's Board of Regents, but does not share ownersh i p of the institution. Representing Boards of College Education

Rev. C l ifford M . J o hnson, Acting D i rector, Board of College Education, The American Lutheran Ch urch Dr. Louis T. Almen, Executive Secretary, Board o f Col lege Education and Chu rch Vocations, Lutheran Church in America


Alumni Board

President, Dr. M. Roy Schwarz '58, Seattle, Wash i n g ton ( 1 9 7 1 ) Vice President, D r. J . Raymond Tobiason, J r. '51 , Puya l l u p , Was h i ngton ( 1 9 7 1 ) Secretary- Treasurer and Director o f Alumni Relations, J o n B . Olson '62, Tacoma , Was h i ngton (Ex-officio).

Rev. Edgar Larson '57 Corval l i s , Oregon Suzie Nelson '55 Tacoma, Was h i ngton

TERM EXPI RES SEPT., 1 970 Duane Berentson '51 B u r l i n g ton, Was h i ngton Lucile Larson '56 Tacoma, Was h i ngton Robert E . Ross '54 Tacoma, Was h i ngton Malcolm L. Soine '52 ! Tacoma, Was h i ngton

TERM EXP I R ES SEPT., 1 9 72 J e rry Dodgen '64 Colfax, Washington Chuck Geldaker '53 West L i n n , Oregon Curtis Hovland '57 Seattle, Washi ngton Mrs. Betty Ke ith '53 Seattle, Washington Dr. Roy Vi rak '52 Tacom a, Washington

T E R M EXPIRES SEPT 1 971 Rev. P h i l i p Falk '50 Reardan, Wash i ngton Rev. Robert Ke ller '55 Olym p i a , Wash i ngton ..

REPR ESE NTAT I V ES TO T H E U N I VERS ITY BOARD OF R E G ENTS Carl T. Fynboe '49 , Taco ma, Wash ington (1 970) Est h e r Aus '32, Portland, Oregon ( 1 9 7 1 ) Victor F. Knutzen '36, Federal Way, Washington (1 972) M E M B ER-AT-LAR G E Wil fred E . Utzinger '54 , S a n Anselmo, California President, Golden Gate C h apter (1 970)

Ex Offic i o J i m Hu shagen ' 7 0 Senior Class President Robert N istad '53 Seattle, Was h i ngton Past President (1 970)

Administrative and Other Officers - 1 969-70

President

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Eugene W. Wiegman Lu c i lle G . G i roux

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Admin istrative AssistanL Office of the Provost Provost Adm i n istrative Assistant Dean of G raduate and Summer Studies__ Dean of the Col lege of Arts and Sciences C h a i rm a n , Division of H u man ities Chairman, Division of N at u ral Sciences C h a i rman, D i vision of Social Sciences Dean of the Sch ool of Busi ness A d m i n i stration Dean of the School of Education __ __ Teacher Placement D i rector D i rector, School of Fine Arts

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Vacant Sue C. Pokela _ Ri chard D. Moe Charles D . Anderson Paul M . Reigstad W i l l i a m P. G i d d i ngs Johannes A. Schiller Gundar J . King Kenneth A. Johnston Arne K. Pederson R i c h a rd D. Moe

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D i rector, School of Nursing D i rector, School of Physical Education

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D i rector o f Admissions Assistant D i rector o f Admissions and Financial Aids Officer Assistant Di rector o f Admissions . Admissions Counselor D i rector o f B roadcast Services and Instructional Materials Production Librarian Reference Librarian Registrar_ Assistant Registrar

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Doris G. Stucke David M . Olson

James Van Beek

Ronald C. Coltom Mark E. Andersen . Albert Perry __

J udd C . Doughty Frank H . Haley M i ri am Beckman Charles T. Nelson Loleta G . Espeseth

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Business Administration Vice P resident-Business and Finance Controller Business Manager_ P l a n t Manager Manager of the Bookstore D i rector o f Food Service_ Assistant D i rector of Food Service D i rector o f Data Processing Operations Manager

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A. Dean Buchanan Betty G j u rash Howard L. Ved e l l James B. P h i l l i ps Doris M cCarty Edith Dougherty Mary Hegtvedt Dwight Z u l a u f Norman Nesting

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Development Vice President for DevelopmenL Associate in Deve lopmenL

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Clayton B. Peterson A rt h u r O. Pede rsen

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University Relations Vice President-University Relati ons D i rector o f Alumni Relations News B u reau C h i e f Photographer

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Student Personnel Service Vice President-Student Affairs _ Dean o f Men Assistant Dean of Men Dean of Women Assistant Dean of Women D i rector o f Counseling and Testing Service D i rector o f Housing D i rector o f U n iversity Cente r _ _. Psychometris'- _____ _ Act i n g D i rector, Health Services Chief N u rse _

M i lton L. Nesvig Jon B. Olson James L. Peterson Kenneth D u n m i re

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Daniel R. Leasure P h i l i p E. Beal B. Lance H u rt __ Margaret D. Wickstrom Mary Lee Webb . Sei ichi Adachi Leighland Johnson Marvin Swenson Gary M i netti Paul Bondo, M . D . Gladys Bergum

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Student Congregation U n i ve rsity Chaplain Associate Pastor

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. Donald W. Taylor Morris V. Dalton

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Faculty揃

- 1 969-70

EUGENE W. W I E G MA N , 1 969President

B.S., Concord i a Col lege, River Forest, I I I . , 19 53 ; M .S., Ed.D., U n i versity of Kansas, 1 956, 1 962. KEITH ACHEPOHL, 1 969Artist-in-Residence, Assistant Professor of Art

B.A., ,Knox Col l ege, 1 956; M.F.A., U n i versity of Iowa, 1 960. S E I I C H I ADACHI , 1 967Assistant Professor of Psychology and Education, Director of Counseling and Testing Service

B/A., Jamestown C o l lege, 1 946; B.D., McCormick Seminary, 1 951 ; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers Col lege, Columbia University, 1 957, 1 960. HARRY S. ADAMS, 1 947-51 , 1 962Associate Professor of Physics

B .S., M.S., Kansas State U n i versity, 1 94 5, 1 9 4 7 ; P h . D . , U n i versity of M i nne足 sota, 1 962. E LV I N MART I N A K R E , 1 937Associate Professor 01 History B.A., Concordia Col lege (Moorhead, M i n n .). 1 928; M.A .. U n i versity of Washing足 ton, 1 94 1 ; f u rther graduate study, U n i versity of Wash i ngton, U n i versity of Oslo, Exeter Col lege , Oxford U n i versity. B O N N I E M. ANDERSEN, 1 968Instructor in Nursing

B.S.N., Pacif i c Lutheran U n i versity, 1 966; M.N., U n i versity of Washingto n , 1 968. CHARLES DEAN A N D ERSON, 1 959Professor of Chemistry, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

B.A., St. O laf College, 1 952; A . M . , Ph.D., Harvard U n i versity, 1 954, 1 959. GEORGE EVANS ARBAUGH, 1 959Professor of Philosophy

B.A., Augustana College (Rock Island), 1 955; M.A., P h . D . , U n i versity of Iowa, 1 958, 1 959. R I CHARD E . ARNOLD, 1 968Assistant Professor 01 Speech B .A., U n i ve rsity of Washi ngto n , 1 956 ; M.A., Tufts U n iversity, 1 966 ; further study, Columbia U n i versity, U n i o n Theological Semin ary. t K E N N ETH EDWARD BATKER, 1 966Assistant Professor of Mathematics

B.A., Wartburg Col lege, 1 957; M.A., U n i versity of Colorado, 1 961 ; furt h e r g radu足 ate study, U n iversity of Oregon and U n i versity o f Colorado. fOn leave,

1969-70.


DAN I E L R. BATY, 1 968Instructor in Business Administration (Acco unting & Business Law) B.A., University of Washington, 1965; J . D . , Harvard University, 1 968; C.P.A., State of Washington. P H I L I P E. B EAL, 1 968Assistant Professor of Education, Dean of Men A . B . , Cornell University, 1 957; M.A., Northwestern University, 1 961 ; P h . D . , U n i 足 versity of Oregon, 1 965. PAUL F. BENTON, 1969Assistant Profess or of English B.A., Whi tworth Col lege, 1 9 65 ; graduate study Pri nceton University. W. HAROLD BEXTON, 1 965Professor of Psychology B.A., Mc Master University, 1 935 ; M.A., U n i versity of Saskatchewan, 1 950; P h . D . , M c G i l l Unive rsity, 1 953. G RACE E LEAN O R B LO M Q U I ST, 1 939Associate Professor of English B.A., Concord i a Co llege (Moorhead, M i n n .), 1934; M.A., Syracuse University, 1 939; further graduate study, Un iversity of M i n nesota, Goethe U n i versity. G LENN L. B LUBAUGH, 1 969Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages (German) B.A., Washington State U n i ve rsity, 1 953 ; M.A., University of Connecticut, 1 963. RANDOLPH F. BOHA N N O N , 1 969Assistant Professor of Biology B.A., St. Olaf Col lege, 1 965; P h . D . , Purdue University, 1 969. H ERMAN JOSEPH BROEKER, 1 966Assistant Professor of Physical Education, Assistant Director of Athletics, Coach of Baseball. B.A., M.S., Washi ngton State Un iversity, 1 965, 1 967. ROY E. CARLSON , 1 962Assistant Professor of Physical Education, Coach of Fo otball and Wrestling B.S., U n i versity of Washington, 1 948; M.S., Washington State U n i versity, 1 962. SAM UEL B . B. CARLETON, 1 969Instructor in Foreign Languages (Greek) B.A., Un iversity of the South, 1959; M.A., Johns Hopkins U n i versity, 1 96 1 ; furthe r graduate study, U n i ve rsity of Texas. D UANE S. CATLETI, 1 968Assistant Professor of Chemistry B.A., Nebraska Wesleyan Unive rsity, 1 963; P h . D . , Iowa State U n iversity, 1 967. KEN N ETH E U G E N E C H R I STOPHERSON, 1 958Assistant Professor of Religion B.A., Augustana College, 1 946; B .Th., Luther Theological Semin ary, 1 950; gradu足 ate study, U niversity 01 Olso, U n i versity 01 M innesota.


GARY L. COATS, 1 968Instructor in Mathematics

B.S., Portland State College, 1 963 ; M.A., University 01 New Mexico, 1 965; lurther g raduate study, Un iversity 01 New Mexi co. OOROTHY TOLLEFSON CONE, 1 96 1 Assistant Professor o f Nursing

B.S.N., M . Ed., Un iversity 01 Min nesota, 1 956, 1 9 59. MARGARET M. COUTU, 1 969Instructor in Nursing

B.S., College 01 G reat Falls, 1 961 ; M.Ed., Colorado State University, 1 966. I R ENE O. C R ESO, 1 955-56, 1 968Assistant Professor of Biology

B.S., M.S., Un iversity of Puget Sound, 1 942, 1 947. M A R I LYN KAY CROCKETT, 1 969Instructor in Art

A.B., Monmouth College, 1 963 ; M.F.A., University of C h i cago , 1967; further study at U niversity o f I l l inois and Art Institute of Ch icago. KENN ETH W. CU BBAGE, 1 968Associate Professor of Business Administration (Accounting and Finance)

B . B .A . , Un iversity of Was h i ngton, 1 952; M.B.A., Un iversity of Washington, 1 957; D.B.A., University of Colorado, 1 968 ; C.P.A., State of Washington. LOWELL WATSON CULVER, 1 964Associate Professor of Political Science

B.A., San Diego State College, 1 954; M.A., University of California, 1 957; P h . D . , University of Southern California, 1 967. DAVID P. DAHL, 1 969Assistant Professor of Music

B.A., Paci fic Lutheran U n i versity, 1960 ; M,A., University of Was hington, 1 962. JUDD C. DOUGHTY, 1 962Assistant Professor of Communication Arts, Director of Broadcast Services and Instructional Materials Production

B.A., M.A., Pacific Lutheran University, 1 955, 1 964. BEVERLY P. EASTERWOOD, 1 969Instructor in Nursing

'B.S., Adelphi Un iversity, 1 963. E M M ET E. E K L U N D , 1 964Associate Professor of Religion

B.A., Bethany Col lege, 1 94 1 ; B.D., Augustana Sem i n ary, 1 94 5 ; M.A., Unive rsit of C h i c ago, 1 958; Ph.D., Boston University, 1 964. " GEORGE ROBERT ELWELL, 1 959Assistant Professor of Art

B .A., Youngstown Un iversity, 1 949; M.A., New York University, 1 955. " On leave,

1969-70.


MARSHALL B. ENDERBY, 1 969Instructor in Economics B.A., Reed Col lege, 1 967; M.A., University of Washington, 1 969. DONALD RAYMOND FARMER, 1 955Professor of Political Science B.S. Ed., Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1 944, 1954. LOUISE S. FAYE, 1 969Associate Professor of Foreign Languages (Spanish) B.A., M.A., Florida State University, 1949, 1 951 ; Ph.D., University of North Caro足 lina, 1 958. ROBERT S. FISK, 1 968Instructor in Mathematics B.S., Unive rsity of Wyoming, 1960; M.S., Unive rsity of Wyoming, 1 962; further graduate study, University of Arizona. O M . JOSEP H I N E FLETCHER, 1 963Assistant Professor of Nursing B.S.N., North Park College, 1 960; M.S., DePaul Unive rsity, 1963. ARTHUR GEE, 1 968Assistant Professor of Biology B.S., P u rdue University, 1 962; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University, 1 964, 1969. RONALD W. GENDA, 1 967Assistant Professor of Economics, Coordinator, American Economy Program B.S.Ed., Ball State University, 1 965; M.A., Purdue University, 1 967. WILLIAM P. G I DDINGS, 1 962Professor of Chemistry, Chairman of the Division of Natural Sciences B.A., DePauw University, 1954; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard Unive rsity, 1 956, 1959. GORDON O. G I LBERTSON, 1 954Associate Professor of Music B.A., Concordia Col lege (Moorhead, Minn.), 1 937; M . M . , No rthwestern Unive rsity, 1 942; further graduate study, University of Colorado, University of Washington. WILLIAM G I LBERTSON, 1 968Assistant Professor of Sociology B.A., University of Puget Sound, 1 954; M.S.W., University of Washington, 1956. STEWART D. GOVIG, 1 958-60, 1 961Associate Professor of Religion B.A.,

51. Olaf Col lege, 1 948; B.Th., Luther Theological Seminary, 1 952; M.Th.,

Pri nceton Theological Semi nary, 1954; Ph.D., New York University, 1 966 . ARNOLD JASPER HAGEN, 1 955Professor of Education B.A., Concordia Col lege (Moo rhead, Minn.), 1 931 ; M.Ed., University of Montana, 1 941 ; Ed.D., University of Oregon, 1 955. o

On leave,

1969-70.


JOHN O. HERZOG,

1967Associate Professor of Mathematics B.A., Concordia Col lege (Moorhead, M i n n . ) , Nebraska,

1957 ; M.A., P h . D . , University of

1 959, 1 963.

WI LLIAM RONALD HEYER,

1 970Assistant Professor of Biology B.A., Pacilic Lutheran University, lornia,

1 963; M.S., Ph.D., University of Southern Cali­

1 965, 1 968.

l. HOLMAN, 1 967Assistant Professor of Economics B.A., SI. Martin's College, 1 962; M.A., University 01 Washington, 1 965; further

GARY

g raduate study, University

01

Washington.

BRANTON K. HOLMBERG,

1 964Assistant Professor of Psychology B.A.,

M.Ed., Central

study, University

01

Washington State College,

1 962, 1 964; lurther g raduate

Idaho.

PAUL E. HOSETH,

1 968Instructor irr Physical Education

B.A., Concordia College (Moorhead, Minn.), versity,

1966; M.S., South Dakota State Uni­

1967.

CURTIS E. H U B ER,

1 964Professor of Philosophy B.A., B.D., Concord i a Seminary, sin,

1 950, 1 953; M.A., P h . D . , University 01 Wiscon­

1958, 1 962.

LAURENCE D . HU ESTIS,

1 96 1 Associate Professor o f Chemistry B.S., Ph.D., University

01

Calilornia,

1956, 1 960.

WILLIAM R. HUTCHEON, J R.,

1 967Assistant Professor of Business Administration (Marketing & Industrial Management) B.S., University of Rhode Island, 1 953; M.B.A., D.B.A., University of Washing­ ton, 1 963, 1 969.

CLARENCE G . JACOBS,

1 969Assistant Professor of Physics B.A., Concordia Col lege (Moorhead, Minn.).

sota,

1 964; M.S., University of Minne­

1 968; Ph.D., University 01 Iowa, 1 969.

LOIS 'ELAM JACOBSON,

1 966-

Instructor in Nursing B.S., Un iversity of Washington,

1 959; M.S.N'., University 01 Washington, 1 969.

JO ANN JENSEN,

1 967Associate Professor of Biology A.B., Pacilic Lutheran University,

1 954; M.A., University of Southern California, 1 957; P h . D . , Iowa State Un iversity, 1 961 .


ROBERT J. JENSE N , 1 968Instructor in Economics B.A., Dana Col lege, 1 964 ; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1 967; further grad uate study, U niversity of Nebraska. JOANN A . J EW E L L , 1 969Instructor in Nursing B.S.N., South Dakota State University, 1 967; M. S., University of Cal ifornia, 1 968. R I CHARD J. JOBST, 1 967Assistant Professor of Sociology B.A., University of San Francisco, 1 964 ; M.A., University of California, 1 967. LUCILLE MARGUER ITE J O H N SO N , 1 953Associate Professor of English B.A., Concordia College (Moorhead, M i n n . ) , 1 940; M.A . , Wash i ngton State Uni足 versity, 1 943; Ed.D. ( R h etoric), University ot Montana, 1 967. WILLIAM L. JOHNSON, 1 969Associate Professor of Mathematics B.A., Reed College, 1 960; M . A . , P h . D . , University ot California at Los Angeles, 1 963, 1 964. KENN ETH A . J O H NSTON, 1 964Professor of Education, Dean of the School of Education B.A., Western Washington State Col lege, 1 947; M.A., Stanford Un iversity, 1 9 53 ; Ed.D., Washington State U niversity, 1 964. RICHARD P. J O N ES , 1 969Instructor in English B.A., Harvard, 1 964; M.A., M. F.A., Un iversity of Massachusetts, 1 969. RONA L D D . JORGENSON, 1 968Assistant Professor of Education B.A., Gustavus Adolph us College, 1 960; M.Ed., South Dakota State Un iversity, 1 965; E d . D . , Ball State Un iversity, 1 968. THEODO R E OSCAR HENRY KARL, 1 940-42, 1 948Professor of Communication Arts B.A., M .A., G ustavus Adolphus Col lege, 1 934, 1 936; f u rther g raduate study, Uni足 versity of Southern California, Stanford University. DAV I D T . KEYES, 1 969Instructor in Art B.F.A., University of Arizona, 1 964 ; M .A., O h i o State University, 1 966; further study at Arizona State U n i versity. G U N DA R JULIAN K I N G , 1 960Professor of Business Administration, (Marketing & Industrial Management), Dean of the School of Business Administration B.B .A., University of Oregon, 1 956; M.B.A., Ph . D . , Stanford University, 1 958, 1 963. VIVIAN C . K I N G , 1 969Instructor in Music B.M., U n iversity of Oregon, 1 966; M . M . , University ot Southern California, 1969.


' LARS EVERETT KITTLESON, 1 956Assistant Professor of Art B.S., U n i versity of Wisconsin in M i lwau kee, 1 950; M .S., U n i versity of Wiscons i n , 1 95 1 ; M . F .A., U n iversity of Southern Cal i fornia, 1 955. RAY M O N D A. KLOPSCH, 1 953Associate Professor of English B.S., I l l i nois I nstitute of Tec h n o l'ogy, 1 949; M.A., P h . D . , U n i versity of I l l i nois, 1 950, 1 962. CALV I N H. KNAPP, 1 960Associate Professor of Music B.S., M . S . , J u i l i i a rd School of M us i c , 1 949, 1 950; graduate study, Columbia U n iversity, Paci f i c Lutheran U n iversity, U n iversity of Puget So u n d , U n i versity o f Washi ngton. J E N S WERNER KNUDSEN, 1 957Professor of Biology B .A . , Pacific Lutheran U n iversity, 1 95 2 ; M .S., P h . D . , California, 1 954, 1 957.

University of Southern

A N N E E L I S E KNUDSON, 1 946Associate Professor of English B.A., Aug ustana Co l lege, 1 928; M .A., Washington State U n i versity, 1 936; further g raduate study, U n i versity of Washington, Washington State University, Uni足 versity of Ca l i fornia, University o f Lond o n , B readloaf School of English. DAV I D R . KNUTSON, 1 969Assistant Professor of Religion B .A., Pacific Lutheran U n iversity, 1 958; B.D., Luther Theological Sem i n a ry, 1 962; M .A., U n i versity o f C h i cago Divin ity School, 1 966 ; f u rther study, U n iversity of C h i cago. J E RRY D . KRACHT 1 967-68, 1 969Assistant Professor of Music B . M . , M .A., M . F.A., U n iversity of I owa, 1 963, 1 965, 1 967; f u rther g raduate study, University of Iowa. ANTHONY J . LAUER, 1 969Assistant Professor of Business Administration (Business Law & Industrial Management) J . D . , Loyola U n iversity, 1 95 5 ; M . B.A., Paci f i c Lutheran U n iversity, 1 969. PENNY Y. LEAKE, 1 969Instructor in Nursing B . S . N . , Pacific Lutheran U n i versity, 1 968. DAN I EL IR. LEASURE, 1 966Professor of Education, Vice President - Student Affairs B .A., Westm i nste r Col lege , 1 958; M .Ed., E d . D . , Pennsylvan i a State Un iversity, 1 960, 1 9 6 1 . ' On leave, 1969-70.


A N N D. LEE, 1 969Instructor in Nursing B .S.N., Montana State Un iversity, 1 958; M.A., Pacific Lutheran University, 1 969. tHAROLD J. LERAAS, 1 935-42, 1 947Professor'of Biology A.B., Luther C o l l ege, 1 930 ; M . S . , P h . D . , D.D .S., Ulliversity of Mich igan, 1 932, 1 935, 1 946. R I C HARD H . LON B O R G , 1 969Assistant Professor of Sociology B.A., SI. Marti n 's College, 1 964; M.S.W., University of Was h i ngton, 1 966. JOSEPH LOWE, 1 968Assistant Professor of Political Science B.S., Central Mi l i tary Academy, China, 1 938; B.A., Un iversity of Washi ngton, 1 952 ; M.A., U n iversity o f Was h i ngton, 1 953 ; M. L.S., Un iversity of C a l i fo r n i a, 1 965; further g raduate study, Un iversity of Washi ngton. B R IAN E . LOWES, 1 968Instructor in Geology B.S., Un iversity of London, 1 957; M.S., Queens U n iversity, 1 963; further graduate study, Un iversity of Washington. G E N E CARROLL LUN DGAARD, 1 958Assistant Professor of Physical Education, Coach of Basketball B.A.Ed., Paci fi c Lutheran Un iversity, 1 95 1 ; M.S., U n i versity of Washington, 1 964. JOHN A. MARTI LLA, 1 969Associate Professor of Business Administration (Marketing and Industrial Management) B. B.A., Paci fi c Lutheran Un iversity, 1 963; M.B.A . , D.B.A., University of Oreg o n , 1 966, 1 969. ART H U R DAVID MARTINSON, 1 966Assistant Professor of History B.A., Pac i fi c Lutheran University, 1 957; M .A . , Ph.D., Washi ngton State Un iversity, 1 96 1 , 1 966. M A RJ O R I E MATH ERS, 1 964-1966; 1 968Assistant Professor of Education B.A., M.A . , Central Washi ngton State College, 1 953, 1 961 . KEITH WENDELL M c MASTER, 1 967Assistant Professor of Business Adm inistration (Marketing and Industrial Management) B.B.A., University of Wash in gton, 1 964; M . B.A., University of Oregon, 1 965. R O B E RT K. MENZEL, 1 969Assistant Professor of Sociology, Director of CHOICE (Center for Human Organ足 ization in a Changing Environm ent) B.A., B.D., Concordia Seminary, 1 94 1 , 1 954 ; M.S.T., Pa cific Lutheran Theologi cal Seminary, 1 963; furthe r grad uate study at Concord i a Semi nary, SI. Louis and Oregon State System o f H i gher Education. t On leave, fall semester, 1969.

I


--

--- --------j

LAW R E N C E J. M EYER, 1 969Associate Professor 0/ Music B . A., C o l o rado State Col lege, 1 954; M . M . , University of Oregon, 1 955; Ed.D., Colorado State College, 1 964. R I CHARD D . MOE. 1 965Professor 0/ Education, Dean 0/ Graduate and Summer Studies; Director, School 0/ Fine A rts B .A . , Concord i a Col lege ( Moorhead , M i n n .). 1 951 ; M . Ed., Ed.D., Un iversity of Col orado, 1 953, 1 96 2 . KATHA R I N E EDBROOKE MONROE, 1 967Assistant Professor 0/ Foreign Languages (French) B.A., London University, 1 93 2 ; M .A., Middlebury College, Vermont, French 1 942, Engl ish 1 951 ; further g raduate study, Col u m bia University a n d Ohio State University. ERLING O. M O R K , 1 970Assistant Professor 0/ Political Science B.S., Wash ington State University, 1 957. ALICE J A M ES NAPJUS, 1 963Assistant Professor 0/ Education B.A" M.A., Univers i ty o f Wash ington, 1 956, 1 965. C HA R LES

T.

N ELSO N , 1 967-

Instructor in Edu cation, Registrar

B.S., Education, General Beadle State College, S. Dakota, 1 963; M .A., Adams State Col lege, Col orado, 1 964. B U RTON L. N ESSET, 1 967Assistant Professor 0/ Chemistry B.A., SI. Olaf Col lege, 1 957; M.S., P h . D . , Purd u e U n i ve rsity, 1 960, 1 96 2 . M I LTON LUTHER N ESVIG, 1 947-51 , 1 953Assistant Professor 0/ English; Vice President-University Relations Graduate, Pacific Lutheran University, 1 935; B.A., SI. Olaf Col lege, 1 937 ; Cando The o l . , Luther Theological Seminary, 1 942; M.A., U n i versity of M i n n esota, 1 94 7 . J ESSE D. NOLPH, 1 968A ssistant Professor 0/ Psychology B.A., George Was h i ngton U n i versity, 1 96 4 ; graduate study, Cornell U n i versity. E R I C N O R D H O LM, 1 955Assistant Professor 0/ Communication Arts B.F.A., A rt I nstit ute of Chicago, 1 951 ; graduate study. I n d i ana Un iversity. P H I L I P AKERSON N O R DQU I ST, 1 963Associate Professor 0/ History B.A., Pacific Lutheran U n i versity, 1 956; M .A., P h . D . , University of Wash in g足 ton, 1 960, 1 964.


S H E R MAN BER DEEN N O R N ES, 1 959-61 , 1 965Associate Professor of Physics B.A., Concordia College (Moorhead, Minn.). 1 95 1 ; M.S., University of North Dakota, 1 956; Ph.D., Washington State University, 1 965. W. DWIGHT OBERH OLTZER, 1 969Assistant Professor of Sociology A.B., Wittenberg University, 1 961 ; B.D., Lutheran School of Theology at Chi足 cago, 1 965; Ph.D., Grad uate Theo logical Union , Berkeley, California, 1 969. SARA A. O F F I C E R , 1 967Assistant Professor 0/ Physical Education B.S., Oregon State University, 1 956; M.S., I ndiana University, 1 965. ROB E RT CARL OLSEN, 1 947Professor 0/ Chemistry B.S., P h . D . , Mich igan State University, 1 931 , 1 936.

DAVID M . OLSON, 1 966Associate Professor 0/ Physical Education, Director 0/ the School 01 Physical Education and Athletic Director B.A., Concordia Coll ege (Moorhead, M i n n . ) , 1956; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1 957 ; P h . D ., University of Iowa, 1 966. L I N DA N ELSON OLSON, 1 967Ass istant Professor 01 Nursing R . N . , B.S.N., M . N . , University of Washington, 1 956, 1 959, 1 964. FLORENCE A. ORVIK , 1 967Assistant Professor 0/ Education B.S., Moorhead State College, 1 953; lege, 1 961 .

M.A.,

Eastern Washington State

Col足

B U RTON THOMAS OSTE NSON, 1 947Professor 0/ Biology B.A., Luther College, 1 932; M.S., Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1 934, 1 947. ARNE KENN ETH P EDERSON, 1 956Associate Professor 0/ Education, Director 0/ Teacher Placement B.A.Ed., B.Ed., M .A., Pacific Lutheran University, 1 949, 1 953, 1 956; further gradu足 ate study, University of Washington. JOHN E . PETERSEN, 1 967Assistant Prolessor 0/ Religion B.A., 51. Olaf College, 1 956; B . D . , Luther Seminary, 51. P a u l , 1 963; M. A., New York U n i versity, 1 965; further g radu ate study, New York University. CHAR LES ARTHUR P ETERSO N , 1 959Associate Professor 01 Business Administration (Accounting and Business Education) B . S., Kansas State Teachers College, 1 951 ; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1 9 5 2 ; P h . D . , University o f Minnesota, 1 966. GARY D. PET ERSON, 1 967Instructor in Mathematics B.S., Iowa State Unive rsity, 1 960; M. S., Western Washington State College, 1 967.


WI L MA E. PETERSON, 1 965Assistant Professor of Nursing B.S., U n iversity of Saskatchewan, 1 947; M.S., Boston University. 1 953. R O D N EY W. PETTY. 1 969Assistant Professor of Education B . S . , M.S., Oregon College of Education, 1 955, 1 957; D.Ed., U n i versity of Ore­ gon, 1 964. CAROLYN M. P H I LLI PS. 1 968Instructor in Physical Education A.B .. H u m boldt State College, 1 961 ; M . S . , U n i versity ot Washi ngton, 1 964. PA U L MATTHEW REIGSTAD , 1 947-48, 1 958Prolessor 01 Englis h, Chairman of the Division of Humanities B .A., SI. Olaf Col lege , 1 943; M .A., Ph.D., U n i versity of New Mexico, 1 956. 1 958. M I C K EY R . R E V I S , 1 968Instructor in Comm unication Arts B .A . , Aust i n State College. 1 965 ; M .A .. Kansas University, 1 966. PETER JOHN R I STU B E N . 1 960-66, 1 968-69 Associate Prolessor of History B.A., Concord i a Col lege (Moorhead . M i n n . ) . 1 955; M .A .. U n i versity ot South Dakota, 1 957; P h . D . , University of O klahoma, 1 964. DAVI D P. ROBBIN S. 1 969Instructor in Music B . M . , University of Michigan. 1 968. G EO R G E ROSKOS, 1 950Associate Professor 01 Art B . S . Art Ed., Youngstown University, 1 949; M.A. University ot Iowa, 1 950. WI LLIAM B. SARE, 1 968Instructor in Music B . M .. I nd iana U n iversily, 1 967; M . M . , I ndiana University, 1 969. J O HAN N ES AUG UST SCHI LLER, 1 958Professor of Sociology, Chairman of the Division of Social Sciences B.A., Capital University. 1 945; Cando Theo l . , Evangelical Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1 947; M.A., University of Kansas, 1 959; Ph.D . . Un iversity of Wash­ ington, 1 967. WALT.ER CHARLES SCHNACKEN BERG, 1 942-44, 1 952Professor of History G raduale, Pac ific Lutheran College. 1 937; A.B., SI. Olaf Col lege. 1 939; A . M ., Gonzaga U niversity. 1 947; Ph.D .. Washington Siale University, 1 950. ERNST C. SCHWIDDER, 1 967Associate Professor of Art B .A . , M.F .A., Un iversity o f Washington. 1 953, 1 955. S . ERVING SEVERTSON, 1 966Associate Professor of Psychology B.A .. Pac i fi c Lutheran University. 1 955; B . D., Luther Theolog i cal Seminary , 1 959; M.A . , Un iversity of Wyoming. 1 960; Ph.D . • Un iversity of Utah, 1 966.


KENT C. SI MMONDS, 1 968Assistant Professor of Philosophy

B.A., Lewis and Clark College, 1 961 ; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1 969. MAURICE H. SKONES, 1 964Associate Professor 0/ Music, Director 0/ Choral Music

B.A., Concordia College (Moorhead, Minn.). 1948; M.M.Ed., Montana State Uni­ versity, 1957; further graduate study, Un iversity of Arizona and University of Washington. RUTH M. SORENSON, 1 968Instructor in Biology

B.A., University of Colorado, 1 962; M. A., University of Colorado, 1 967; further graduate study, University of Washington. ' CARL D. SPANGLER, 1 96 1 -62, 1 963Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages (French)

A.B., Grove City College, 1 958; M.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1 961 ; further graduate study, Pennsylvania State University and University of Minnesota. LYNN S. STEIN, 1 96 1 Professor 0/ Education

B.A., North Dakota State Teachers College, 1 937; M.A., University of Montana, 1 952; Ed.D., Montana State University, 1 961 . ' VERNON L. STiNTZI , 1 964Assistan/ Professor 0/ Business Administration (Marketing and Industrial Management)

B.A., Coe College, 1937; M.B.A., Arizona State University, 1964; D.B.A., Uni­ versity of Washington, 1970. DORIS G. STUCKE, 1 967Professor 0/ Nursing; Director 0/ the School 0/ Nursing

B.S., American Uni versity, D.C., 1949; M.Ed., University of Minnesota, 1956 ; Ed.D., Teachers College, COlumbia University, 1967. RODNEY SWENSON, 1 968Associate Professor 0/ Foreign Languages (German)

B.S., Bemidji State College, 1952; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1 956; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1967. KWONG-TIN TAN G, 1 967Associate Professor 0/ Physics

B.S., M.A., University of Wash ington, 1 958, 1 959; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1 965. FREDERI C K L. TOBIASON, 1 966Associate Professor 0/ Chemistry

B.A., Pacific Lutheran University, 1958; Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1 963. AU DUN TRYGGE TOVEN, 1 967Instructor in Foreign Languages (Norwegian)

University of Oslo, 1964; M.A., University of Washington, 1967. · On leave, 1969-70.


PAUL WOLFGANG U L B R I CHT, 1 967-

Assistant Professor of Political Science B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University

01 Washington,

1 959, 1 960, 1965.

PAUL M. WEBSTER, 1 969-

Instructor in Foreign Languages (German) B.A .• M.A., University

01

Calitornia, 1964, 1 967.

MARGARET D. WICKSTROM, 1 951 -

Assistant Professor of Religion, Dean of Women B.A., Augustana College, 1937; M.R.E., The Biblical Seminary ot New York, 1 95 1 . JANE WILLIAMSON, 1 964-

Professor of Education B.S. in

Ed.,

Un iversity ot

Maryland, 1943;

M.A.,

New York Un iversity,

1 947;

Ed.D., Colorado State College, 1 959. MARY J. WOLTER, 1 969-

Instructor in Foreign Languages (French)

01

B.A .• Monterey I nstitute

Foreign Studies, 1 967.

DWIGHT J U DSON ZULAUF, 1 949-53, 1 959-

Professor of Business Administration (Accounting and Finance) B.S., Un iversity versity

01

01

Oregon, 1948;

M.S., Columbia U n i versity, 1 949; Ph.D., Uni­

Minnesota, 1 965.

Lecturers, Associate Lecturers and Assistant Lecturers W I LL I A M T. ADAMS B.A., M.A., University M I CHAEL

L

01

Colorado, 1 957. Lecturer in Sociology.

BENSON

B.A., Pacilic Un iversity, 1969. Assistant Lecturer in Physical Education. LOIS M . BERGERSON

01

B.S.N., Loyola University, 1 946; M.N., University

Washington, 1 952. Assistant

Lecturer in N u rsing. HENRY J. BERTNESS B.A., Augsburg College, 1 947; M.A., University versity

01

01

Minnesota, 1948; Ph.D., Uni­

Min nesota, 1 955. Lecturer in Education and Psychology.

EUGENE H . BRECKEN RIDGE B.S.,

West Virginia State Col lege, 1934; M.E., Whitworth, 1949; D.H.L, Whit­

worth, 1 969. Associate Lecturer in Education. ARNOLD J. B R I CKER B.A., Pacilic Lutheran University, 1956; M.A., University

01

Washington, 1 962.

Lecturer in Political Science. NADIA M. CHRISTENSEN B.A., Augsburg College, 1959; M.A., University ate study, Un iversity

01

01

Minnesota, 1 964 ; lurther gradu­

Washington. Assistant Lecturer in Norwegian.

JOHN K . CONANT B.S., University

01

Minnesota; M . A., Mexico City College, 1953; MAT., Colorado

State College, 1 963. Associate Lecturer in Spanish.


RUSSELL W. C R OC KETT B.A., M . M us., U n i versity of I d aho, 1 96 1 , 1 966. Assistant Lecturer in Music. ANKE L. C U LVER Kiel Teacher's College, Germany, 1 958; g raduate study at Pacific Lutheran Uni足 versity. Assistant Lecturer i n German. THOMAS G . DAVIDSON B.E., U n iversity of Puget Sound, 1 957. Assistant Lecturer in Education. E DW I N E. DOROTHY B.A., Paci fic Lutheran University, 1 950; MA, University of Wash ington, 1 959. Associate Lectu re r i n Education. KARIN H . D U RHAM B.Ed., U n iversity of British Colu mbia, 1 963; M .A., Un iversity of Washi n gton , 1 966. Assistant Lecturer in German. WAYNE H. EH LERS B.A.A.S., and B A E d . , Western Washington State College, 1 960 ; M.L., U n iversity of Denver, 1 967. Assistant Lecturer in Educat i o n . JOHN V . E R I KSSON B . B.A., M . B.A., Sam Houston State College, 1 963, 1 966. Associate Lecturer i n Political Science. J E R RY S. EVANS B.A.Mus., BAEd., U n iversity of Washingt o n . Assistant Lect u rer i n Music. JOHN G . EYRES B.A., M .A., Central Washi ngton State College, 1 952, 1 9 59. Associate Lectu rer in Journalism. RUSS E L L D . FU LKERSON B.A., Western Washington State Col lege, 1 952 . Assistant Lecturer i n Education . HAROL D F. G RAY B.A., Paci fic Luthera n U n iversity, 1 944; B.Ed., M.A., U n iversity of Puget Sound, 1 946, 1 950. Lecturer in Educat i o n . ROBERT G R E E N B.S., M.S.W., U n iversity o f U t a h , 1 958, 1 969. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Sociology. EDWARD H A R M I C B.A., Paci fic Luth eran U n iversity, 1 962; M . Mus., U n i ve rsity of Arizona. 1 969. Assistant Lecturer in Music. VIVIAN HARNS B.S., M.S., Wash ington State Un iversity, Education.

1 950, 1 952. Assistant Lecturer in

NANCY HAUGHEE B .S.N .. Paci fic Lutheran U n iversity, 1 969. Assistant C l i n ical I nstructor i n N u rsi n g . T H E R ESA E . H E M M EN B.S., Un iversity of Minnesota, 1 945. Assistant Lecturer in N u rsing. MARGARET A. H E R ZOG B.A., William Jewe l ' Col lege, 1 957; M.A., Un iversity of Nebraska, 1 959. Associate Lecturer in Mathematics.


R I CHARD N. H I LDAHL B . B.A., Pacific Lutheran Un iversity, 1 965 ; M . B.A., Un iversity of Oregon, 1966; C. P .A . , State of Wash ingto n . Associate Lecturer i n Busi ness Admin istration (Accounting and Finance). ALAN J . HOKENSTAD B.A., Pac i f i c Lutheran U n i ve rsity, 1 964 ; M . Ed., Central Washington State Col lege, 1 969. Assistant Lecturer in Educati o n . L E O N A R D W. H O L D E N B.S., M . A . , U n i versity of Mi nnesota, 1 944, 1 947, E d . D . , Stan ford U n i versity, 1 959. Lecturer in Education. I R E N E HOPP B.A., Un iversity of Puget Sound , 1 947. Ass istant Lecturer in Music. MARGAR ET A. KEBLBEK B .A., Western WaSh i n g ton Col lege of Educat i o n ; M .A . , Central Washington Col足 lege o f Educati o n . Associate Lecturer i n Education. SANDRA B . KNAPP B .S.M., M.S.M., J u i l l i a rd School of Music. Assistant Lecturer in Music. LILL IAN W . LA UER B.A., M.J . , Un iversity o f Cal i fornia, 1954, 1 9 59; Ph.D., Stanford University, 1 966. Associate Lecturer in Education. DEANNE LeROY, 1 969B.A., Un iversity of Pugel Sou n d , 1 964. Assistant Lecturer in Physical Educati on. DAV I D W. LOCI(E 8 . M . , SI. Olaf Col lege, 1 965; M . M . , Northwestern U n i versity, 1 967; Teac hing Cer足 t i fi c ate, U n i versity of Wash i n gton, 1 968. Assistant Lecturer i n Music. TOM L. McLAUGH L I N B . A . , Paci f i c Lutheran U n iversity, 1 960; M .A . , U n iversity of Wash i ngto n ; Ph.D., Washington State U n iversity. Associate Lecturer i n History. F R E D E R I C K L. N EWNHAM G raduate, Royal Academy of M u sic, Lon don, 1 925; Teacher's Tra i n i n g Certi ficate, U n i versity of Lo ndon, 1 92 5 ; Asso ci ate, Royal Col lege of Music, Lo ndon, 1 928; Licentiate, Associate, Fel low, Royal Academy of Music, London, 1 929 , 1 934 , 1 962. Professor Emeritus and Lecturer i n M u s i c . BON ITA N I ELSEN B . S . N . , Pacific Lutheran Unive rsity, 1 96 1 . Assistant Cl i n i c al I n structor in N u rsing. NAN G . NOKLEBERG B.A., University of Wash ington , 1 953. Assistant Lecturer in Educati o n . R I N O PATTI P h . D . , Soc ial Work, Un iversity of Washi ngto n . U n iversity Lecturer in Sociology. B EVERLY JANE PAYNE B.A., M.A., U n i versity of Wash ington, 1 963, 1 966. Assistant Lecturer in FrenCh. ROY J . P O L LEY B.A., M . B .A., University of Puget Sound, 1 9 59, 1964 ; C.P.A., State of Wash i n gton. Associate Lecturer in Busi ness Ad m i n istration (Accounting and Fi nance).


G A I L PURVIS A.B., Willa mette University, 1963; MA, Midd lebury College, 1 964. Assistant Lecturer in Frenc h , JUDITH W. RAMOS B.S.N., Pacific Lutheran University, 1 968. Assistant C l i n i cal In structor in N u rsing. JOSEF E M I L RUNNING B , A . , S I . O l a f College, 1 9 1 6 ; M . A . , U n iversity 01 M i n nesota, 1 941 . Assistant Pro足 fessor Emeritus and Associate Lecturer in Mathematics. BERNARD L. SA I B E L B . A . , University of M i n nesota, 1 931 ; M.A., P h . D . , Ha rvard University, 1 934, 1 935. Adjunct Professor of P h i l osophy. ROBERT E. S C H M I D B . A . , U n i ve rsity of Puget Sound, 1 932. Lecturer in General Engineering. KATHAR I N E R. SEGER B . S . , U n i versity o f Nebraska, 1,959. Assistant Lec turer in Busi ness Adm i nislration (Secretarial Scien ces). LO U I S J. SOUZA B.S., M.S., Springfield Col lege Assistant Lecturer in Physical Education. KIM STERl i N G B.A., S a n Francisco State College, 1 965. Assistant Lecturer in Physical Education. G L ORIA W. SWI S H E R B . A . , Uni ve rsity of Washington, 1 956 ; M . A . , M i lls College, 1 958; P h . D .. Eastman School o f Music, 1 960. Assistant Lectu re r in Music. PHYLLIS TEMP LIN B.A., Pacific Lutheran U n i versity, 1 959; M.S., O regon State University, 1 968. Associate Lecturer in Physical Education. MARY H ELEN THOMPSON B.M., Obe r l i n Col lege, 1 940. Assistant Lecturer in Music. A N N E . TREMA I N E B . M . , U n i versity of O regon, 1 95 1 . Assistant Lecturer i n Music. VERNON A . UTZI N G ER B.A., N o rth Central Coll ege, 1 922; M.A., N o rthwestern U niversity, 1 929; Ph.D., U n i versity of Southern California, 1 952. Professm Emeritus and Lecturer in Com m u n i cation Arts. WALTER WA LBRUCH B A Ed., University of Washington, 1 954 ; Equivalent of M .A . from U W . , WW,S.C., U . P . S. and W.S.U. Associate Lecturer i n Educati o n . RAY WAR R E N B.A., U n i versity of Puget Sound, 1 930 ; M,A .. University of Was h i ngton, 1 937. Lecturer in Education. MARY MARGARET WEBSTER B.A., Carleton College, 1 962; M.A., C.P hil., Un iversity of California at Los Angeles, 1 965, 1 967. Assistant Lecturer in Psych ology.


BARBARA W I LLIAMS B.A., Pacific Lutheran University, 1 961 ; M .A., University of Nebraska, Assistant Lecturer in Eng lish.

1 963.

CHA R LES M . ZAFFORON I B A , Central Washington State Col lege, 1 954 ; M .A., Columbia Un iversity, 1 960. Associate Lecturer in Education. Library

FRANK HA M I LTON HALEY, 1 95 1 Librarian B.A., W i l l amette Un iversity, 1 935; B.D., Drew Un iversity, 1 945; A.B.L.S., Uni­ versity of Washington, 1 950. Further graduate study, D rew Unive rsity, Un iversity of Camb ridge, University of Zurich. M I R I A M RUTH BECKMAN, 1 964Natural and Social Sciences Librarian B.A., University of Puget Sound, 1 928; M.A., Boston University, 1 933; M .Libr., Un iversity o f Washington, 1 964. Teacher Corps Team Leaders

HARRY C. E R BELE B.S.Ed., Valley City State Teachers College, 1 959 ; further study at U niversity o f Wyoming, University o f I l l i n ois, Pacific Lutheran Unive rsity. HOWARD WESLEY JEANBLAN C B.A., Northern I llinois University, 1 956; M.A. Teacher's College, Columbia Uni­ versity, 1 960; further study at Pacific Lutheran Un iversity and Oregon State U n i versity. RUTH LYN C H J EF F R I E S B . S . , Fayetteville State Teacher's College, 1 942; M.S.P.H., N o rth Carolina Col­ lege at D u rham, 1 949. ROBERT � R EYNOLDS B.S. Ed . , Valley City State Teachers College, 1 961 ; further study at the Un iversity of Puget Sound, Oregon State Un iversity, Portland State Un iversity. R ITA ROSEMAHY ROLLER B.C.S., M.E., Seattle Un iversity, 1 954, 1 966; f u rther study at U n i versity of Puget Sound. DELORES I R ENE S I LAS B.S., Tuskegee I nstitute, 1 948 ; M .Ed., University of Arizona, 1 962. E M E RITI J . E. DAN I ELSON, 1 960, Director Emeritus 0/ Admissions, 1 969

B.S.E., M .S.E., Un iversity of No rt h Dakota, 1 929, 1937. P H I L I P ENOCH HAUGE, 1 920, Professor Emeritus 0/ Education, 1 968 B.A., SI. Olaf, 1 920; M A , P h . D . , Un iversity of Washington, 1 924, 1 942; L.L. D . , Pac i f i c Lutheran University, 1 960. OLA F M ELVI N JORDAHL, 1 940, Professor Emeritus 0/ Physics, 1 969 A.B., Luther College, 1 925; M .S., U n i versity of Pittsb u rg h , 1 927; P h . D . , Unive rsity of Wiscons i n , 1 933.


E R I C H CARL KNORR, 1 949, Professor Emeritus of Soci ology, 1 969 G raduate, SI. Paul Luther Col lege, 1 9 2 1 ; Cando Theol., St. Paul Luther Se m i n a ry, 1 924; B.A., M.A., Wash i ngton State U n i versity, 1 9 29, 1 930; P h . D . , University of Washi ngton, 1 946. OTT I L I E ELISE LITTLE, 1 946-51 , 19 52, Professor of Emeritus of German, 1 966 A . B ., U n i ve rsity of I l l i nois, 1 923; M .A . , Uni versity of Wash ington, 1 92 6 ; Ph.D., Hanseatic Unive rsity, Ham b u rg , Ge rmany, 1 937. G U N N A R JOHANN ES M A L M I N , 1 937, Professor Emeritus of Music, Latin and Nor­ wegian, 1 969

B.A., Luther Col lege, 1 923; B . M . , SI. Olal Col lege, 1 925; M . Mus., U n i v e rsity of Mi chigan, 1 94 0 ; further g raduate study, Unive rsity of Southern California, U n i ­ versity of O s l o . E L I N E K R A A B E L M O R K E N , 1 953, Associate Professor Emeritus of Nursing, 1 967 B .A., SI. O lal C o l l ege, 1928; R . N . , Emanuel Hospital Sc hool 01 N u rsing, 1 93 1 ; M . N . , University 01 Wash i ngton, 1 962. ROBE RT A . L . M O RTVEDT, 1 962, President Emeritus, 1 969 A . B . , SI. Olal Col lege, 1 924; A.M., Ph.D., Ha rvard U n i ve rsity , 1 930, 1 934; LL.D., Pacilic LtJtheran U n i ve rsity, Aug ustana College, 1 961 ; LiIt.D., Wagner Col­ lege, 1 962, F R E D E R I C K LA UREN C E N EWNHAM, 1 950, Professor Emeritus of Music, 1 969 G raduate, Royal Academy of Music, London, 1 92 5 ; Te acher's Trai n i n g Certificate, U n i versity 01 London, 1 925; Associate, Royal College of Music, London, 1 928; Licentiate, Associate, Fellow, Royal Academy 01 Music, London, 1 929, 1 934, 1 96 2 . MAG N U S N O DTVEDT, 1 947, Professor Emeritus of History, 1 963 B .A . , SI. O lal C o l lege, 1 9 1 7 ; A.M., COlumbia U n i ve rsity, 1 920; B.Th ., Luther Theological Sem i n a ry , 1 925; T h . M . , Princetot"] Theological Seminary, 1 928; P h . D . , U n i ve rsity 0 1 Ch icago, 1 950 . ANDE RS W I L L I A M RAMSTAD, 1 925, Professor Emeritus of Ch emistry, 1 961 B . .f,., SI. Olaf Col lege, 1 9 1 4 ; Cando Theol., Luther Theological Sem i nary, 1 9 1 8 ; M .S., U n i versity o f Washington, 1 936 ; further g rad u ate study, University of Wash­ tington ; L . H . D . , Luther Col lege, 1 960. H E R B ERT ROB ERT RANSON, 1 940, Professor Emeritus of English, 1 968 B.A., M .A., U n i v e rsity of Kansas, 1 924, 1 926; P h . D . , Un ive rsity of Wash ing­ ton, 1 936. KELMER N E LSON ROE, 1 947, Associate Professor Emeritus of Religion, Greek, 1 967

B A , Luther Col lege, 1 925 ; B .Th., Luther Theolog ical Se m i n ary, 1928; M .Th., Princeton Theological' Sem i n a ry, 1 929. JOSEF E M I L R U N N I N G , 1 948, Assistant Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, 1 961 B.A., St. O l a l Co llege, 1 9 1 6 ; M.A., University of M i n nesota, 1 941 . VERNON ALFRED UTZ I N G E R , 1 950-53, 1 957, Professor Emeritus of Speech, 1 969 B.A., North Central Col lege, 1 9 22; M.A., No rthwestern U n i versity, 1 929 ; P h . D . , U n i v e rsity o f Southern C a l i fornia, 1 952. PAUL G. VIGN ESS, 1 956, Associate Professor Emeritus of Religion and His­ tory, 1 965

B .A . , SI. Olaf College, 1 9 1 8 ; M.A., P h . D . , Stanlord University, 1 924 , 1 930.


Faculty Standing Committees

- 1 969-70

The fi rst-named member of each committee is the chairman. The President is a n ex-offi cio member of all committees. A D M I SS I O N S : Severtson, Stucke, Tobiason Advisory: Leasure, Van Beek, Moe, C. Anderson ARTIST SERIES: Nordq uist, Karl, Dah l , 5 students (one of whom is chai rman) Advisory: Moe, Skones , Swenson AT HLET I C S : Doughty, K l o psch, Marti lla Advisory: Buchanan, Nord q u ist, D. Olson, Moe COMM ITTEE ON C O M M ITT EES: Herzog, Huber, Monroe E D U CATIONAL POLI C I ES: Nordquist, Adams, Cone, Farmer, L. Olsol1, Swenson Advisory: C. Anderson, Moe FACU LTY W E L FA R E : Culver, Lowes, Ostenson F I NANCIAL ASSISTANCE: G. Peterso n , Cub bage, Nesset Advisory: Buchanan, Van Beek, R . Coltom C O M M ITTEE TO PR OMOTE GRAD UATE STU D Y : Tobiason, G. King, Stein Advisory: C . Anderson, Moe LECTU R E AND CONVOCAT I O N : Pederson, Christopherson , Meyer Advisory: Leasure, Dalton, Moe, Taylor, 2 students L I BRARY: Martinson, L. Johnson, Schwidder Advisory: Haley, C. Anderson, Moe P U B L ICAT I O N S : King, Monroe, Simmonds Advisory: C . Anderson, Moe, Nesvig RANK A N D TENURE: Johnson, Hube r, H uestis, Knapp, C. Peterson, Schnacken berg berg Advisory: C. Anderson, Moe R E L I G I O U S ACTIVIT I E S : J. Petersen, Adach i , Arbaugh Advisory: E k l u n d , C. Anderson, Moe, Taylor SOC I A L : L . Olso n , Broeker, A. Knudson, Toven Advisory: Dougherty STANDAR DS: R. O lsen, Eklund, Schwidder, W i l l iamson, Zulauf Advisory: Leasure, Wickstrom, Beal STUDENT ACAD E M I C STAT U S : L. Joh nson, G i d d i n gs, Holmberg , U l b richt Advisory: Buchanan, C . Anderson, Moe, Wickstrom, Beal, Nelson

Sorenson,

STUDENT ACTIVIT I ES AND WELFAR E : Doughty, H utcheon, Officer, 2 students Advisory: Leasure, Wickstrom, Beal ST UDENT PUBL ICAT I O N S : Fisk, Schnackenberg, Sim monds, 4 students (one of whom is chai rman) Advisory: ASP LU President, Nesvig, Editors and Faculty Advisers of SAGA and M M and all student public ations.


Statistical Summary ENROLLMENT - 1 968-69 Graduates Seniors Juniors Sophomores Freshmen Specials Auditors

Men

_____ . . . _ _____ _ ____

__

____

___

_

__

___

_

_____

_ _ _ ___________

Women

Total

328

229

1 87

1 77

364

261

242

503

557

245

314

559

268

398

666

10

14

24

2

7

9

Total Regular School Year 1 ,301 Summer Session Enrollment, 1 968_ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ 587

1 ,381

2,682

1 ,041

1 ,628

Total Students Counted Twice_

__

______ . _ . _ _ ___ ____ _

____

_____

______

_ ____ _ ____ _ __ _ ____

__ _

_____

___________

___

_

__

ENROLLMENT Graduates Seni ors Juniors Sophomores Feshmen Specials Auditors

-

_

_

______ __ _

1 ,888

2,422

4,31 0

___ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

1 26

1 87

31 3

1 ,762

2,235

3,997

Men

Women

Total

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ __

Net Total

_

__ .. _ _ _ _ __ ___

Fall 1 969

_ ____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ ____ _ _ _

___

_ __ _ _ _ __

_

_ _ ______ _____ _ _ __ _

__

_ ___ _

_

_____ __

___

330

227

557

273

243

516

256

267

523

233

280

513

281

431

712

_ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ __ _____ _

2

8

10

_ __ ____ __ __ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ ___

4

4

8

1 ,379

1 ,460

2,839

485

702

1 , 1 87

____________

Total Fall 1 969

_ . _ _ ____

_

Summer Session Enrollment, 1 969

______

_ _ __

_____

_

)


RELIGIOUS AFFILIATIONS - Fall 1 969 Lutheran

Missouri

The ALC

__

LCA

__

__

_1 ,049 262

____ _

__

_

_____

136 41

__ _

Unclassified

__

_ _ ____

1 ,488

_ _____

1 ,351

Total Lutherans

_

Other Denominations Presbyterian Methodist Catholic

__

________ ______

Baptist

_ _ __ _____ _ _ __

_

_

_ _ __

affil iations

No affi liation

_ ___ _ __

_

Congregational Other

___

____ _______

Episcopalian

_

_ _ _

_ __ _____

__

100 83 68 61 57 22 758 202

Total _ GRAND TOTAL

GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS Washington Oregon

_

California Montana Idaho

_

_ _

____________

_

__________

____________

Minnesota Hawaii

__

_

__

Colorado

__________ _

N e w York I llinois

__________

________________

______________ _

Arizona

_ ___________ _

_. _

New Jersey Virginia

_

_

_

.

___

_

_

_

_ _ _ _________ _

New Mexico __

___________

__ _

_

_

_________

Florida Indiana

___ _

_________

Michigan Kansas

_______

___

North Dakota

Ohio

_______

__________ _ _

Alaska

Utah

1 ,951 288 218 _ 94 _ _ 43 _ 38 37 22 _____ 20 14 12 10 9 8 _ 6 6 _ 5 5 _ 4 _ 4 ____ 3 3 _

_____________

_

__

Maryland

__

South Dakota Texas

_ _ _ _ __ __ _ _ _

_

_

_ _ __ _ __ __ _ _

Louisiana

__

Nebraska

__

Oklahoma Wyoming

__________

_______ _ _ _

___

Wisconsin Iowa

__

_ _ __ __ _ _

_________

__ ______ _____ __

District of Columbia Missouri Nevada

____

_ _ _ __ _

_

_ _ _ _ 0 _ _ __

Hong Kong

_

_

__

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ __

5 4

._

______ _ _

_ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ __

Saudi Arabia Sweden

_

______________ _

Rhode Island

Kenya

_

__ _

North Carolina Canada

_

_ ___ __

_

_

3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2

__ _ _ _

___________ _

_ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ _

_

_________________

_

__ _ _ _ __ __

Total

____________

2,839


J

I ndex

Academic O rganization __________ 45 41 Academic Probation _____ _ ____ Academic Proced u res _ 37 Accreditation _ __ __ ___ __ . __ .. .... ___ .._ 1 0 Activities _ ___ _ _ __ _ _____ 30 Athletic _ _ ______ ___ ___ ___ 31 C o m m u n i cation A rts ________ _ 32 31 Departmental ___ __ __ _ ______ General ______________________ 30 Hono rary _ __ _________________ 31 Musical _ _ ________ _______ 31 P u b l i cations __________ __ _ 32 Religious _ _ __ _______ _ _ _ 32 _1 9 1 Ad min ist rative Officers 15 Adm issions ___ Advanced P l acement Program ___ 1 8 Audit ors ________________ 1 7 Early Decision Policy ___ __ _____ _ 1 6 Early Admissions Policy _ __ ____ 1 6 G raduate Studies __ _ ______ ___ 56 Proced u res _____________ ______ 1 5 Re-ad missio n o f Former Students __ 1 7 17 N on-degree Students ___ Transfer Students _ ____________ 1 6 Advanced Placement P rogram __ _ _. 1 8 A i r Force Reserve Officers Training Program _. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 82 Alumni Asso c i ation _ _____ _ 1 1 , 1 9 1 Americ an Economy Program ___ __ 1 3 Art B u i ld i ng ____ __ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ 1 2 Arts and Sciences, College oL ___ _ 46 _ _____ _ _ 3 1 Ath letics _ Aud i t i n g of Courses ____________ 1 7 , 38 Automobi les and other Motor 32 Veh i c les _______ _ _ Board and Room _. _ __ â&#x20AC;˘ _______ 2 0 Board of College Education _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 190 Board of Regents _ _____ _ _ _ 1 89 ___ ____ 30 Book Store_ Build ings, U n iversity _ _______ _ 1 1 - 1 3 Busi ness Administration, School of ______ _ __ _ _ 53, 71

Calendar ____ __ _ _ _______ 6, 7, 8 Campus __ â&#x20AC;˘ _______________ . __ 11 Center, U n iversity_ ___ __ _______ 1 2 Certifi cation __ _____ ____ _ _ __ 96 Changes in Registration __________ 38 C H O I C E-Center for Human O rganization i n Chang ing Environments ____ 13 C h u rch Offi cials ___ ____ _ _ 1 90 29 Chapel Responsi b i l i t i es____ Classi fication of Students_ _ ____ 42 Coffee Shops ____________ ___ 29 C o l lege Entrance Examination 16 Board Tests _________________ _ Col lege o f A rts and Sciences _____ 46 Col lege Union B u i l d i n g _ _ _____ 1 2 Columbia Cente r _ __ _ __________ _ _ _ 1 2 C o m m u n i ty Life ______ ____ __ _ _ _ 27 Counseling and Testing Services _ _ 28 C o u rse Load _ _ _ _ .. _ _ _ _ _ _ _____ 37, 46 Cou rses of 'I nstruction _______ 61 - 1 31 62 A rt _ __________ _ Biology _______ ._ .. __ _ __ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ 65 Busi ness Administration ____ 7 1 Chemi stry _______ ________ _ 8 1 C l assics ____ ___ __ _ _ . __ . 85 Communi cation A rts _ __ _______ _ 85 Earth Sciences ___________ _ 90 Economics ____________________ 92 Educati on _ ____ _____ _______ 94 Eng l ish ___ __ _ ___________ _ _1 2 1 Foreign Languages ______________ 1 25 French _ _ _______ _____ _ 1 27 German _____ _______ __ __ _ _ 1 28 G reek ____________________ 1 29 Japanese _____ ________ ___ 1 29 Lati n _ _ _________________ __ _ 1 30 Linguistics _____ ___ _____ __ 1 27 N o rwegian _ _ __ __ _ _ ______ _ 1 30 Russian _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ __ ____ _ 1 30 Spanish __ 1 30 Gene ral Engi neering ___ _ __ _ 1 3 1 Geography (see Earth Scien ces) _ _ 91 Geo l ogy (see Earth Sciences) _____ 91


History Journ a l i s m Mathematics Music N u rsing P h i losophy Physical Education Physics _ Po l i t i cal Science Psychology Religion Rese rve Officer Tra i n i n g C o rps Scie nce (see Earth Sciences) Soci ology Cred i t by Examination ___

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Geograp h i cal Distribution Government of the University Grade Poi nts G rades G raduate Studies, Division 01. G raduation Hon ors G rad uation Req u i rements Also, see the Col leges and Schools Grants Guest of the University Status Gymnasium ___

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Health Center Health and Medi cal Service Health I nsurance History of the University__ Honors Courses Honors at Entrance Housing H u m a n i ties , D i vision 01. _

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Pacific N o rthwest Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 31 Parish Work _ 52 Pass-Fail Option _ AO, 4 1 _ Payments 21 Physical Educati o n , School of 55, 1 65 Physical Examination _ _ __ 16 Place of Rosidence _ _ 33 Placement Se rvi c e _ _ _ 30 Pre-P rofessional Programs Pre-Dental _____ 50 Pre-Engineering 49 Pre-Law _ _ 50 Pre- Medi cine 50 P re-Theology _ 52 Princi pal 's Credentials 97 Prog rams for Careers _____ 49 __

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Radio Station _ __ _ _ 14 Ramstad Hall _ __ _ _ _ _ 11 Re-Ad m ission o f Former Students 17 Refunds _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ 22 Regi ster, The _ 1 89 Registration ___ _ _ _ 37 Religious Affil iation _ _________ 213 Repeating o f Cou rses _ 40 Requi rements, Entrance 1 5, 1 6 Req u i rements, G raduation _ 45 Reserve Officer Training Corps _ 1 82 Residence Halls 1 2, 1 3 , 33 Room Reservations and Assignments _ 33 _

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School of Education School of Fine Arts _ School of N u rs i n g __ _ School of Physical Education Science Hall_ Social Work Soc ial Sciences, D i vision of_ Standard Certification Statistical Sum mary Student Affairs Student Body_ St udent Congregation __ Student Loan Funds Student O rganizations Stu dent P u b l i cations Student Teac h i n g S u m m e r Session Swi m m i ng Pool Sym bols _ _

54, 94 54 5 5, 1 54 55, 1 65 11 52 46 96 212 27 1 0, 3 0 ____ 3 2 26 _30-32 32 1 01 35 12 61

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Table o f Contents _ 3 Tacoma-Pierce Admin istration B u i ld i n g _ _ 11 Talent Awards__ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ _ _ 24 Teacher Education _ 94 - 1 20 Testing Service _ __ ____ _ 28 Transfer Students _ _ _ 16 Tuition 19

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Warehouse and Shops _ Withdrawal from Course L

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1970-71 Catalog