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Staying

Healthy WINTER 2017

Page 11 VOL. XVII, NUMBER 52

JANUARY 20, 2017

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7KHVHORFDOQRQSUR½WDJHQFLHV ZLOOEHQH½WIURP\RXUVXSSRUW • Agape Villages Foster Family Agency • Axis Community Health • Hope Hospice • REACH • Sandra J. Wing Healing Therapies Foundation • Senior Support Program of the Tri-Valley ‡6XQ¾RZHU+LOO • Tri-Valley YMCA • ValleyCare Charitable Foundation • Valley Humane Society LEARN MORE ON PAGE 8

5 NEWS

Board offers apology, next steps in superintendent search

5 NEWS

After protests, council sets Owens Drive traffic debate

16 SPORTS

Amador Valley wrestling wins Armijo Invitational


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AROUND PLEASANTON

Pleasanton Real Estate BY JEB BING

Pending Listings in Pleasanton

After 17 years at the helm, it’s time to move on

N

ext week marks the 17th anniversary of the Pleasanton Weekly, and after 17 years at the helm, it’s also a time to say goodbye. Not for good. I’ll still be around, serving as Editor Emeritus in an ongoing advisory capacity to the Weekly and continuing to write this column every other week, starting next week. But as a day job, it’s over. I’m moving on. My family has been lobbying for me to spend more leisure time at home and have already planned a vacation to launch my new status as “relaxed, serene and content.” It will be the first trip in many years where the only thing I write is a postcard to friends back home. You may even see me in a “Take Us Along” feature. I’m sure it will require some rewiring and regrouping to adjust to the day-to-day no deadline situation — newspaperwise, that is. My wife has already handed over a lengthy list of home projects waiting for me. And unfortunately, that list gets longer by the day. So much for the leisure time at home theory. In November 1999, Embarcadero Media, publishers of the Palo Alto Weekly, asked me to become editor of the Pleasanton Weekly, the firm’s fourth weekly and the first in the East Bay. We published our first edition Jan. 28, 2000 and have been going strong ever since, even though Pleasanton’s mayor at the time, the late Ben Tarver, predicted we’d be gone in six months. “There just isn’t any news in Pleasanton,” he said. We proved him wrong, as this 832nd edition shows. This during a time when print media is being challenged by the Internet and electronic and social media for news and advertising. But for local coverage we’ve got them beat. Our non-stop reporting — both in this newspaper and in our online editions — on municipal government, education, healthcare, business, sports and just about every other aspect of community news provides our readers with information they just can’t get elsewhere. We said in our first edition our

goal was to provide the most accurate and consistently reliable news coverage and commentary of interest to all of us who live and work in Pleasanton. Over the last 17 years, that’s been my goal, too. My days in professional journalism go back to the Burlingame Advance-Star, part of the old Peninsula Newspapers, Inc. network and long before Bill Johnson and his Embarcadero Media team started the Palo Alto Weekly. I started as I’m ending, covering city council and school board meetings, first in Burlingame and now, coincidentally, doing much the same as I close out my newspaper career in Pleasanton. I was in journalism long before Burlingame, first with my “Bing Slings” column for the Orange and White, the campus newspaper at the University of Tennessee. I enlisted in the Army and graduated from the Army Language School in Monterey where I and 29 other soldiers learned Korean. The graduating class was ordered to report to Paris, except for me who shipped off to South Korea where I translated business news. But it proved to be another writing opportunity, as I was able to file stories for The Christian Science Monitor. After my discharge from the Army and stint in Burlingame, I took a reporting job with the Chicago Tribune, later becoming Neighborhood News editor in charge of zoned sections covering metropolitan Chicago and northern Indiana. From there, I worked in corporate public relations and speech writing in Washington, D.C. and Pittsburgh, Pa. until moving to Pleasanton. The offer to help start and edit the Pleasanton Weekly has given me the extraordinary chance to combine my years of experience in community journalism with my deep affection for Pleasanton, for which I am grateful. I’ll still be in town, continuing to write the “Around Pleasanton” column and blog. So, goodbye as editor. I’ll still see you in the Weekly, and, of course, all around town. Q

About the Cover The 2016 Pleasanton Weekly Holiday Fund has concluded, with 302 donors contributing $67,746. All funds will be split evenly among 10 nonprofit beneficiaries. To learn more about the nonprofits and to see our list of donors, check out the Holiday Fund section inside, starting on Page 8. Cover design by Kristin Brown. Vol. XVII, Number 52

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Streetwise

ASKED AROUND TOWN

COMMIT TO GET FIT

What is your primary New Year’s resolution this year, and how are you doing with it? Linda Liu Graduate student/piano teacher My big goal for this year is getting as much out of graduate school as possible so that I can help as many people as possible as a counselor/therapist. So far, it is going well and I am enjoying all of my classes.

Emily Scholz

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IT consultant/office manager I really enjoy all of the downtown Pleasanton Wine Strolls and Beer Crawls every year. So this year my resolution was to commit to going to each one of them (there are five) by buying a five-event package deal. I’m really going to try to make them all.

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Join our team! Seeking passionate, experienced journalist

The Pleasanton Weekly is seeking an enthusiastic and talented staff reporter with previous journalism experience working in print and digital news environments. The reporter will cover and edit stories ranging from meetings to breaking news to features for our award-winning print and digital publications. Beyond excellent reporting and writing skills, a bachelor’s degree in journalism or a related field, previous experience in a newsroom setting, demonstrated news judgment and the ability to prioritize tasks and handle stress of daily deadlines and multiple priorities are required. The ability to deliver clean, vibrant copy while working to very tight deadlines is crucial. Photography skills, social media and copy editing experience are a plus. The candidate must also be able to work the required hours, which include some night assignments and occasional weekend hours. This is a full-time position based at our Pleasanton office with benefits including medical/dental, a 401(k) plan, vacation and holiday pay. This is the East Bay Division of Embarcadero Media Group and includes the Pleasanton Weekly, PleasantonWeekly.com and DanvilleSanRamon.com. Send resume and clips that show a variety of work to Gina Channell, publisher, gchannell@embarcaderomediagroup. com, by 8 a.m. Jan. 27. No calls please. EOE.

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Knoble Tankiamco Student I’ve been trying to stick with a Paleo diet. It is a bit difficult and challenging because it requires some planning and I can’t just go out to eat with friends and family. But with a bit of effort, it has been working. So far, so good.

David Aldape Driver My primary resolution for this year is to quit my job and get a new and better one. I made a decision when I first started this job to only do it for five years, so now is the time to move on. It hasn’t happened yet, but it is definitely in the works.

Debbie Benoit Technical writer Well, like a lot of people, I’ve committed to getting more physically fit this year. I’ve been pretty vigilant about attending group workout classes, and I really enjoy them. I find it is easier to stay motivated when you are part of a group, and there is an instructor telling you exactly what to do. —Compiled by Nancy Lewis and Jenny Lyness Have a Streetwise question? Email editor@PleasantonWeekly.com

The local news you care about is one click away. Sign up today at PleasantonWeekly.com Page 4 • January 20, 2017 • Pleasanton Weekly

The Pleasanton Weekly is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 5506 Sunol Blvd., Suite 100, Pleasanton, CA 94566; (925) 600-0840. Mailed at Periodicals Postage Rate, USPS 020407. The Weekly is mailed upon request to homes and apartments in Pleasanton. Print subscriptions for businesses or residents of other communities are $60 per year or $100 for two years. Go toPleasantonWeekly.com to sign up and for more information. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Pleasanton Weekly, 5506 Sunol Blvd., Suite 100, Pleasanton, CA 94566. ©2017 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited.


Newsfront DIGEST Multicultural celebration The Pleasanton community is coming together to present a multicultural celebration tomorrow afternoon at the Amador Theater. Sponsored by the Pleasanton Cultural Arts Council and the Friends of the Pleasanton Library, the event is described as a celebration of the many different cultures represented in Pleasanton, featuring the different song and dance traditions from each of the cultural groups. There is also an Indian culture picture exhibition currently on display at the Pleasanton library, as well as other related library activities and events. The event is set to start at 2 p.m. tomorrow at the Amador Theater, 1155 Santa Rita Road. For more information, contact Yu Tao at 9313410 or ytao@cityofpleasantonca.gov.

School board offers apology, next steps for superintendent search Trustees also name Micaela Ochoa interim superintendent through June 30

T

BY JULIA REIS

he Pleasanton school board took several steps Tuesday night to address the district’s superintendent vacancy, formally naming deputy superintendent of business services Micaela Ochoa as interim superintendent and creating a subcommittee that will vet search firms to recruit a new permanent leader. Board trustees also apologized to the community but offered no new explanation for their unanimous decision to fire Rick Rubino on Jan. 6 after six months as Pleasanton school district superintendent.

The board began its first meeting since firing Rubino with the announcement that it had unanimously approved Ochoa’s appointment in closed session. She was named interim superintendent through June 30. “During her tenure at PUSD (since August 2015), she has worked to improve the district’s long-term fiscal solvency and stability,” Laursen said of Ochoa. “We are delighted to welcome her.” Ochoa’s proposed new contract is set to be presented at the next regular board meeting, Jan. 31. Ochoa had led the district as

“deputy superintendent in charge” since Dec. 19, when the school board placed Rubino on paid administrative leave pending the outcome of an investigation into an undisclosed personnel matter. Trustees subsequently voted to terminate Rubino’s employment contract during a closed-session meeting Jan. 6. Laursen said afterward the board’s decision to fire Rubino without cause “was based on our strong belief that this was not a good fit.” In accordance with his contract, Rubino received a year’s salary — $256,000 — along with health benefits at a maximum cost of $8,400.

FAFSA workshop The Pedrozzi Foundation is hosting a free workshop this Wednesday to provide hands-on help to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Open to all Tri-Valley high school seniors and current college students, the drop-in style workshop is set to run from 6-9 p.m. in the Granada High School library at 400 Wall St. in Livermore. Many colleges require the FAFSA from students of all financial backgrounds for merit based scholarships. Students and at least one parent should create a FSA ID (Federal Student Aid ID) at FSAID.ed.gov prior to attending the workshop. Visit Pedrozzi.org for the full list of information to bring. Q

See SUPERINTENDENT on Page 7

Council to debate Owens Dr. traffic

Speech contest The Pleasanton North Rotary Club recently announced the top finishers of its annual youth speech contest. All five were Foothill High School students and presented their five-minute speeches to club members earlier this month. First-place went to Andy Li, who won the $100 top prize and earned a spot in the regional contest to be held at the Tri-Valley Rotary Club meeting on March 16 at Castlewood Country Club. Li’s winning speech on the 2017 Rotary International theme, “Rotary Serving Humanity,” incorporated Rotary’s “4-Way Test” that serves Rotarians as a guide for everyday living, North Rotary officials said. The other top finishers were Mikayla Tran (second-place, $50 prize) and Samantha Do (third-place, $25 prize), along with participants Justin Huang and Daniel Costa.

District officials have said that an investigation was launched by an independent investigator but not completed. They have declined to comment on why Micaela Ochoa the investigation wasn’t completed or about the personnel matter that led the board to place Rubino on leave. Before opening a board discussion on next steps for hiring permanent

After more protests over road’s narrowing, city sets Feb. 21 public discussion BY JEB BING

January to explore ways to incentive passengers into carpooling to BART stations. Parking has long been a problem for BART commuters, with 99% of passengers driving alone to a station, according to a 2015 BART passenger survey.

Although 10 BART commuters complained to the Pleasanton City Council on Tuesday night about Owens Drive traffic changes, they were told they’d have to wait until Feb. 21 to get a response. Most of the speakers were back for a second time, saying they were exasperated that the council had not put the issue on its agenda since their request to do so in December. Council members are able to discuss items only on the night’s agenda which have been given ample public notice. The complaints stem from the city’s decision to reduce the eastbound lanes of Owens Drive from three lanes to one in front of a new fourstory apartment building soon to be opened at Owens and Willow Road. Owens is one of Pleasanton’s busiest streets when BART commuters leave the BART parking lot. They say there have been major backups because of the one-block bottleneck, which they say they tolerated when construction signs and fencing were there. When the fences came down and new curbing and lane closures showed the street’s narrowing was permanent, the complaints started. “This is absolutely unconscionable,”

See BART on Page 6

See OWENS on Page 7

KRISTEN DEAN

Party time for Amador Valley band Over winter break, the Amador Valley High School marching band traveled to Phoenix to participate in the Fiesta Bowl National Band Championship Field Show and Parade competitions. The 305-member band took home second place in the parade competition and won first in class, overall champion and the auxiliary, percussion and drum major awards.

BART announces local pilot program for guaranteed parking Carpooling riders using Scoop app will have a spot for sure until 10 a.m. at Dublin/Pleasanton station Carpool commuters traveling by BART will have a new option for securing parking at the Dublin/ Pleasanton station at Hacienda by the end of January, BART officials announced Tuesday. In a joint effort between BART, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and Scoop Technologies, beginning on Monday, riders

who carpool to the station and use the Scoop cellphone app will be guaranteed parking spots until 10 a.m. as part of a pilot program to better utilize parking spaces. BART officials said MTC and Scoop, a company that provides users with a flexible way to find a carpool match around the Bay Area, approached the transit agency last

Pleasanton Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 5


NEWSFRONT

DeSaulnier, McNerney to skip Trump presidential inauguration; Swalwell going Schedule of inaugural events included in this report BY PLEASANTON WEEKLY STAFF “The president-elect has yet to demPleasanton’s Congressman Eric onstrate these traits.” Swalwell (D-Dublin) plans to be at “It is with a heavy heart and deep today’s inauguration of President- personal conviction that I have deelect Donald Trump in Washing- cided not to attend the inauguration,” ton, D.C., although Democratic col- added DeSaulnier, whose 11th Conleagues in adjoingressional District ‘The election of Mr. includes Daning districts have said they will ville and Alamo boycott the event. Trump lacks legitimacy in the northern As the recently Tri-Valley. due to Russian selected co-chair This inauguraof the House hacking, which Mr. tion would have Democratic Steerbeen DeSaulnier’s Trump encouraged.’ first as a sitting ing and Policy Committee, Swalmember of ConJerry McNerney, well will be a gress. Instead he Congressman leading Democrat released a stateon issues relying on bipartisan politi- ment last Friday explaining his decical support. sion to boycott and criticizing Trump But second-term U.S. Reps. Mark on a range of issues, including conDeSaulnier (D-Concord) and Jerry flicts of interest, ethics, hostility toMcNerney (D-Stockton) — who ward the press and health insurance each formerly represented Pleasanton repeal. during their political careers — anMcNerney said he plans to stay in nounced they will skip the inaugura- his district “serving my constituents, tion in protest. as I was elected to do.” “Inaugurations are a time for our “The election of Mr. Trump lacks presidents to ignite hope, demon- legitimacy due to Russian hacking, strate humility and espouse faithful- which Mr. Trump encouraged,” Mcness to the principles enumerated in Nerney said. “However, because I the Constitution,” DeSaulnier said. support the peaceful transition of

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4TH • 8 PM At The Amador Theater 1155 Santa Rita Rd., Pleasanton

To benefit Arts in the Pleasanton schools, the Pleasanton Cultural Arts Council presents:

PCAC Classical Benefit Concert:

“Four Hands and a Baton” Featuring internationally acclaimed Schumann Gold Medalist Temirzhan Yerzhanov and Klara Frei, both of the Tchaikovsky Moscow Conservatory, playing four hands piano in concert with the outstanding youth Orchestra Gradus ad Parnassum in their Pleasanton Premiere. Tickets: $20-35

It’s a classy way to start February on a high note — and help “Arts in the schools” as well!

FOR TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION: Phone: 925.931.4848 Box Office: 4444 Railroad Ave., Pleasanton, CA

FIREHOUSEARTS.ORG/EVENTS Page 6 • January 20, 2017 • Pleasanton Weekly

power and respect the office of the presidency, I will work with the new administration when possible to deliver for my district and move our country forward.” Trump is set to be sworn into office as the 45th U.S. president today after earning 304 electoral votes to Democrat Hillary Clinton’s 227 electoral votes to end a polarizing 2016 presidential campaign season. Clinton outgained Trump by almost 2.9 million votes in the popular vote. The schedule of events for the inauguration was reported as follows: Trump, Vice President-elect Mike Pence and their families are expected to attend services at St. John’s Episcopal Church this morning, just steps from the White House. Afterward, President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama welcome Trump and his wife Melania to the White House for morning tea. The two couples will then travel together to the Capitol by motorcade. 9:30 a.m. EST: The inauguration ceremony begins on the west

Mark DeSaulnier

Jerry McNerney

front of the U.S. Capitol with musical performances. Attendees will include members of Congress, Supreme Court justices, diplomats and the public. Former presidents Jimmy Carter, George W. Bush and Bill Clinton will attend, as will Trump’s election opponent Hillary Clinton. Former president George H.W. Bush is in frail health and will not be present. Sixteen-year-old soprano Jackie Evancho will sing the national anthem. The Rockettes dance troupe will also be performing, at a time yet to be announced. 11:30 a.m.: Opening remarks. Religious leaders will offer the invocation and readings. Pence will be sworn in by Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. Noon: Trump will recite the oath of office, administered by Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts. He

Eric Swalwell

will use president Abraham Lincoln’s inauguration Bible, as well as the Bible that Trump’s mother gave to him at his Sunday school graduation in 1955. Afterward, Trump will deliver his inaugural address. Afterward, in keeping with tradition, Trump and Pence will attend the Congressional Lunch in the Capitol. 3-5 p.m.: Inaugural parade where the newly minted president and vice president make their way 1.5 miles along Pennsylvania Avenue from the Capitol to the White House, trailed by some 8,000 parade participants. 7-11 p.m.: Trump, Pence and their wives will make appearances at three official inaugural balls, two of which will be held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center and the other at the National Building Museum. A number of semi-official and unofficial balls also will take place throughout the city. Q

Tri-Valley Muslim group to host post-inauguration neighbors panel Event tomorrow aims to address misconceptions, find common ground BY JEREMY WALSH

Members of the Tri-Valley’s Muslim community are joining together to present a neighbors panel the day after Inauguration Day aimed at educating people about Islam in the hopes of finding common ground and fostering mutual understanding. This marks the second community panel hosted by the Pleasanton-based Muslim Community Center-East Bay since the election of Republican Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States. “The need for meaningful and personable eyeball-to-eyeball interaction is ever more urgent with the continued discord overseas involving Muslims, the political rhetoric in the

BART Continued from Page 5

Through a grant from the Federal Transit Administration in October, BART was able to move forward with the pilot project, which includes plans to expand the program to more stations in the future. Rob Sadow, Scoop’s CEO, expressed his excitement to be partnering with BART and his high hopes for reducing traffic. “The flexibility of Scoop, combined with the infrastructure of BART, will allow more commuters to share their daily travels and take

2016 presidential election and the spike in Islamophobia at home,” center representative Munir Safi said in a statement. Tomorrow’s panel discussion will feature presentations by five congregation members, average Muslims who will use their personal narrative to explain how Islam provided inner meaning in their lives, according to Safi. The panelist presentations are set to include “Islam 101: Basic Tenets of the Islamic Faith” by Dr. Asad Tarsin, “Addressing Common Misconceptions” by Hina Mukhtar, “Why I’m a Better American as a Muslim” by Sara Kim, “Conversion Story of an American Naval Officer” by Mike

Kim and “Addressing the Elephant in the Room — What Muslims think about ISIS?” by Mahdy Amine. The event is scheduled to run from 12-2:45 p.m. tomorrow at the Muslim Community Center-East Bay at 5724 W. Las Positas Blvd., Suite 300 in Pleasanton. A luncheon will be held from 12-1 p.m. followed by the panel presentations from 1-2 p.m. in the conference room and a question-and-answer session from 2:10-2:45 p.m. Visitors are also invited to observe as parishioners hold a midday prayer in the prayer hall at 12:35 p.m. For more information, visit www. mcceastbay.org. Q

cars off the road,” Sadow said in a statement. Commuters who wish to use the service can download the Scoop application and schedule a ride to the station by 9 p.m. the night before for morning service, or by noon for evening service. Scoop will then notify users shortly after the deadline if they have found a match with one their 55,000 customers. Users can utilize a variety of enhancements with the app, including paying for or receiving money for the carpool, paying for BART parking and indicating

whether or not their vehicle is wheelchair-accessible. BART officials said the service also guarantees a ride home should they be unable to find a match. “The Scoop app is an ideal match to facilitate carpools to and from BART stations because the carpools are easy to arrange and can be verified to ensure compliance,” BART’s department manager for customer access Bob Franklin said in a statement. More information about the pilot program can be found at rideshare.511.org. Q —Jade Atkins, Bay City News


NEWSFRONT

‘Anything Goes’ opens next week at Firehouse Pacific Coast Rep starts the year with Cole Porter classic BY DOLORES FOX CIARDELLI

Pacific Coast Repertory Company kicks off 2017 next weekend with the high-energy, high-seas musical theater romp “Anything Goes” at the Firehouse Arts Center. The song-and-dance-filled Cole

Porter classic includes the songs “It’s De-Lovely,” “Friendship,” “I Get a Kick Out of You,” “All Through the Night,” “You’re the Top,” “Anything Goes,” and more. The story proceeds aboard the SS American, which is sailing between

New York and England with a comically colorful assemblage of passengers: Reno Sweeney, a popular nightclub singer and former evangelist; her pal Billy Crocker, a lovelorn Wall Street broker who has come aboard to try to win the favor of his beloved Hope Harcourt (who is engaged to another passenger, Sir Evelyn Oakleigh); and a second-rate conman named Moonface Martin, aka Public Enemy #13. Crazy antics ensue as Reno and Moonface try to help Billy win the love of his life. The four leads — Joy Sherratt as Reno Sweeney, Christopher Vettel as

Sir Evelyn Oakleigh, Amy Franklin Leonards as Hope Harcourt and Michael Patrick Gaffney as Elisha Whitney — are members of Actors’ Equity Association, the union of professional actors and stage managers. “I am absolutely thrilled to work with this big, professional cast,” director David Judson said. “This show features Broadway National Touring actors and amazing professional dancers — and lots of great tap. And our pro orchestra will be

playing their hearts out.” The shows opens at 8 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 28, and runs through Feb. 12, with performances on Friday and Saturday nights, and matinees Saturdays and Sundays, at the Firehouse. Tickets are $19-$40. Go to www.firehousearts.org, call 9314848 or purchase at the theater box office, 4444 Railroad Ave. An “Inside the Show” discussion with the director and principal actors will take place after the Sunday matinee performance Jan. 29. Q

Board OKs 2017-18 school year calendar Schedule similar to current one, PUSD officials say BY JULIA REIS

Mark your calendars: Monday, Aug. 14 will be the first day of classes for Pleasanton Unified School District students next school year. The Pleasanton school board adopted the 2017-18 school year calendar during its regular meeting Tuesday evening. District officials say it is very similar to this year’s schedule, except for the placement of one staff development day. The 2016-17 calendar represented

OWENS Continued from Page 5

Tom Corbett told the council Tuesday night. “It’s really a mess.” Owens was narrowed to only one lane in front of the new apartment building to allow for diagonal parking in front of the building, where work-live units will be offered. But one speaker said there are only 23 parking spaces there, including two designated for disabled drivers. “That’s 23 parking spaces that are causing hundreds of commuters to be backed up when they’re coming

SUPERINTENDENT Continued from Page 5

new leadership, Laursen said Tuesday she wanted people to understand firing Rubino “was not a hard decision.” “It would have been the easier thing to do to not face your disappointment and make a big decision like this,” Laursen said. “But we were united in believing this was the right thing for Pleasanton Unified and for our students.” During that discussion, board vice president Mark Miller said the board had followed a common process by utilizing a search firm, background checks and community input in selecting Rubino as superintendent last spring. “Having said that, we could have done better,” Miller said. “I apologize to the community for that.” Looking ahead, trustees discussed whether they should utilize a consulting firm again in their search for a new superintendent or handle the

a change for the district, with the school board shifting the start and end of school up by one week and putting first semester high school final exams before winter break instead of after. That decision was made with input from a calendar committee and the roughly 3,600 people who took a district-wide survey about the issue. For next school year, the first semester will again conclude before winter break, on Dec. 22. Schools will be closed for the holidays

between Dec. 25 and Jan. 8. The last day of school will be June 1, 2018. Students will have 180 days of instruction, and there will be 185 teacher work days, according to the calendar. Other notable dates include Thanksgiving break (Nov. 20-24) and spring break (April 2-6, 2018). To view the 2017-18 PUSD calendar, visit www.pleasantonusd. net and click the relevant link under the news tab. Q

home every day,” he said. “It doesn’t make sense.” “This whole design just doesn’t make sense,” BART commuter and Pleasanton resident An Li told the City Council at its December meeting. “I see a long line of cars just waiting (at a traffic light), while the three lanes on the other side of Owens are wide open.” Tuesday night, Julie Testa agreed, urging the council to modify the separated parking area to accommodate reopening at least one more lane on Owens. Dixie Watts, a resident of the

Verona Hills neighborhood, added in her Town Square online comment Tuesday: “This is the biggest mess I have ever seen in a city anywhere. While it was going on, I could not believe what I was seeing. It was a very bad decision. What were you people thinking?” Acting Mayor Jerry Pentin urged those at Tuesday’s meeting to come back on Feb. 21 to hear the city traffic engineer’s report to make their comments again. That meeting will start at 7 p.m. in the City Council chamber in the Pleasanton Civic Center, 200 Old Bernal Ave. Q

process themselves. The district contracted with McPherson & Jacobson LLC to run its search last year at a cost of $28,000 — a recruitment that ultimately led to the appointment of Rubino, who was a sitting superintendent in Butte County. Trustees were in agreement that they did not want to use McPherson & Jacobson’s services again despite a guarantee from the firm that it would conduct a new search at no additional charge if the candidate PUSD chose left within two years. The firm’s owner also offered to personally handle the search in lieu of using the same consultant team, Laursen said. Trustee Jamie Hintzke said she worked closely with the search firm’s consultants as board president at the time, referencing unhappiness and “their unprofessionalism” without going into specifics. “It was completely frustrating,” Hintzke said of her dealings with the consultants. “I don’t think it’s worth

having them make good on their contract.” The board ultimately approved a new request for proposals from search firms and the formation of a superintendent search subcommittee that will vet the firms and provide input into the selection process. The subcommittee will be composed of trustees Valerie Arkin and Steve Maher, three PUSD employees and five community members each chosen by a trustee. The board’s discussion prompted suggestions from several community members about how to proceed with the superintendent search, including Pleasanton California School Employees Association representative Nancy Bronzini. “I respect the decision you had to make, but it came with a very big cost,” said Bronzini, one of about twodozen citizens in attendance Tuesday night. “Every dollar you spend now is not going to be unnoticed — always keep that in mind.” Q

JEB BING

Correction This photo that appeared with a report in last Friday’s paper (“Pleasanton 2017”) showed a private driveway on Old Foothill Road that will be an access point for a new trail to Pleasanton Ridge. The access point will be farther north and is yet to be built. The Pleasanton Weekly regrets the error.

JEB BING

Owens Drive has been narrowed to only one eastbound lane in front of highrise apartment complex to accommodate 23 parking spaces for building’s tenants. BART commuters complain lane reduction is causing major traffic tie-ups.

WEEKLY MEETING NOTICES Planning Commission Wednesday, January 25, 2017 at 7:00 p.m. Council Chamber, 200 Old Bernal Avenue • P16-1900, City of Pleasanton Consider an amendment to the Pleasanton Municipal Code to comply with State legislation for second (accessory) dwelling units.

Energy & Environment Committee Wednesday, January 25, 2017 at 5:00 p.m. Operations Services, 3333 Busch Road, Remillard Room • City Council 2017-2018 Two-Year Work Plan Prioritization • Discuss Extending the Committee on Energy and the Environment’s Term to June 2019 • Review of the 2017 Committee Meeting Schedule To explore more about Pleasanton, visit us at www.cityofpleasantonca.gov Pleasanton Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 7


Thank you for your generosity We have now reached the conclusion of the 2016 Pleasanton Weekly Holiday Fund. Over the course of the campaign, 302 donors have contributed $67,746 to the fund. All of the money raised during the Holiday Fund will be split evenly among our 10 nonprofit beneficiaries, who will be presented with their checks at the Rotary Club of Pleasanton luncheon Feb. 23 at Hap’s Original Restaurant. This final list of contributors includes donations received and reported on or before Jan. 15, 2017.

INDIVIDUAL Bruce & Cindy Yamamoto ............................ **

Gene Johnson .......................................... $100

The Gee Family Cindy, Bob, Scott & Sam .. $100

Shake Sulikyan ............................................. **

Bob & Marianne Eisberg............................... **

Greg Landrum ......................................... $500

Herbert & Stella Chang ................................ **

Bill & Pat Ruvalcaba.................................. $300

Vince & Sarah Ciccarello .............................. **

Gary & Nancy Harrington ............................. **

Isabel Curry.............................................. $100

Blaise & Amy Lofland ............................... $250

John & Barbara Severini ........................... $300

Dave Cryer ............................................... $100

Ann & Tom Malko .................................... $100

Shirley M. Todd .......................................... $50

The Caldwell Family ..................................... **

Pete & Julie Mason....................................... **

Bobby Jensen ........................................... $250

John & Roxanne Plotts ................................. **

Bill & Dottie Berck .................................... $200

Dean Buchenauer & JoAnn Matone ............. **

David & Wendy Burg................................ $100

Bob & Carol Molinaro ........................... $1,000

Gretchen & John Clatworthy .................... $500

Ronny & Lonnie Shaw .............................. $100

Joe & Sue Silva ............................................. **

Jim & Susan Falls .......................................... **

S. Jensen.................................................. $200

Frank & Muriel Capilla.................................. **

Ann & Don Rathjen ...................................... **

Sue King-Irwin ........................................... $50

Betty Kirvan ............................................. $200

M. C. Chesnut ............................................. **

Bob & Joyce Shapiro ................................ $100

Joe & Kelly Montes .................................. $100

Bob & Kathy Russman .................................. **

Jan & Jourdin Hermann ............................ $150

Norm & Joyce Pacheco ................................. **

Sonal & Ajay Shah........................................ **

Jeff & Jeri Oh ............................................... **

Ilene & Mike Forman ................................ $250

John & Marcia O’Neill .................................. **

Andrew Bailey....................................... $1,000

Rita Rollar ................................................ $100

Carmen L. Merritt ........................................ **

The Ristow Family .................................... $250

Pat & Ran Costello ....................................... **

Carl & Sharrell Michelotti ......................... $100

Glenda Beratlis...................................... $1,000

Rose Liu ..................................................... $50

Marvin Rensink ........................................ $300

Andy & Valerie Poryes .............................. $100

Garrett & Angela Holmes ......................... $100

Mindy & Todd Miller................................. $250

Alan Purves .............................................. $150

Jean Felton .............................................. $500

Bob & Orley Philcox.................................. $250

Terry & Al Exner ........................................... **

Kim & Ron Possehl ................................... $250

Christina Nystrom Mantha ......................... $75

The Banahan Family ................................. $250

Alan & Julia Casamajor ............................ $100

A. Desrosiers ............................................ $100

Curtis Lum ................................................. $50

Carol Guarnaccia ..................................... $100

Ken & Barbara McDonald............................. **

Richard & Gloria Fredette ............................. **

Jennifer, Jonathan & Andrew Pearce ............ **

Mary & Gary Lazarotti .................................. **

Gary Alt ................................................... $200

Michael & Bernie Billen ................................ **

Ed Dantzig ............................................... $250

Chuck & Debbie Uhler ............................. $100

Debi Zentner ................................................ **

Alan & Carol Cohen ................................. $500

Nina Louwaert ............................................. **

Ranjit Mavinkurve & Smita Kasargod ........ $100

William L. & Eleanora Haynes ....................... **

Chris & Linda Coleman ............................ $500

Ron & Kathy Anderson............................. $200

Donna Johnson ........................................ $100

Xiaopei & Andrew Gelb ............................... **

Rick & Dawn Barraza................................ $250

Richard & Poy Chew ................................ $100

Susan Hayes............................................. $150

Lyle Allen ................................................. $200

Dennis C. ................................................. $100

Mr. & Mrs. Harold M. Swanson .................... **

Eric & Lainie Krieger ................................. $500

Sue & Tom Fox ............................................. **

Ravi & Sanjani Ramkissoon ....................... $150

Mike Herman ............................................... **

Tanya Ludden........................................... $200

Helmuth Meissner ........................................ **

Jeff & Linda Roy ......................................... $50

Michael & Christie Underwood ................ $100

Laura Ditto............................................... $100

Yentai & Lijen Lee .................................... $100

The Markel Ohana ................................... $250

Lynn Dantzker .......................................... $200

Sandra Gray ............................................. $250

Rodger & Laura Miller ................................ $50

Kevin Powers ........................................... $250

Margaret Bryant....................................... $100

E. Kerton ..................................................... **

Carlo & Geraldine Vecchiarelli .................. $100

Chris & Sandy Nunn ................................... $50

Randy & Emily Yim ................................... $100

Tim & Teri Bush .......................................... $25

Ed & Vicki Cunniffe .................................. $100

Nancy Page .............................................. $300

Sue Compton .......................................... $200

James Wong ............................................ $200

Frank & Sonia Geasa ................................ $250

Kay Fogarty.............................................. $200

The Sborov Family ........................................ **

Abby, Sam & Ben Miller ............................... ** Lori James Rice ......................................... $100 Rice......................................... Jason Stinebaugh ..................................... $100 Stinebaugh..................................... Wm W. Emery .......................................... $200 Emery.......................................... R. Csencsits & M. Kundmann ................... $100 Roger Emmett .......................................... $500 Emmett..........................................

Page 8 • January 20, 2017 • Pleasanton Weekly


Helping local children and families in need Dave & Roz Gamble ..................................... ** Bob Silva .................................................. $100 Barbara W. Daniels....................................... ** Gladys Pearson .......................................... $50 Bob & Betty Harris.................................... $400 Horace Robert Williams ............................ $300 Gail & Kelly James ...................................... $25

Our fabulous five grandchildren from R & G. Spicka ............................................... ** Ed & Dorothy Ruby and Bill & Helen Henshaw from Tim & Sharyn Henshaw........................ ** Jana Grant from Steve & Jori Grant .......... $100 Trudy Fabian from Lisa Fabian .................. $100 Jameson Lindskog from Chris & Marty Miller ................................. $100

Donald Lewis ........................................... $100

In partnership with:

Evette Wilkes from Richard Wilkes ............. $50

Ernie Shanks from Margaret Shanks ............. **

Anna Mae & James Sweat from Catherine & Manuel Silva ............................................ $100

Steve, Susie & Charlie from Dorothy Irby .... $75

Allan Hillman, Margie & Randy Warner, and Marian & David Hillman from Sharon Hillman ........................................ $150

Owen Saupe from Rebecca Saupe................ **

Bill Haraughty from Anita V. Haraughty ...... $25

Richard, Emily, Tony, Prima & John Morley from Teresa Morley ...................................... **

George & Mary Vranesh from George & Carol Vranesh .......................................... $100

Margaret Souza from Joan Tiefenthaler.... $300

Allan & Lura Nicolas ..................................... ** Susan Astbury .......................................... $100

Michael Page Bacon from Patricia Bacon .. $200

Biscuit from Bernie Thurman .................... $200

Barbara Reasoner ..................................... $500

Mary L. Erickson from A. L. Copher ............ $50

Janeen Brumm ........................................... $50

Jule V. Jensen from Paul E. T. Jensen ........... $50

Grandpa Tom & Grandma Marge from Anne & Kevin Sjodahl .............................. $100

Deborah Tomlin ........................................... **

Xiaofan Han from Xiaojun Mo ..................... **

Christopher Scott ....................................... $50

Michael, Matt & Diane from The Pentin Family ..................................... $250

Diane Davidson ........................................ $100 Steven Manuel ......................................... $400

Jan & Jeb Bing ......................................... $200 Domenic & Edna Rossi ............................. $250 Peggy & Bernie Monahan ........................ $100

Rick Aguiar & George Fargis from Marianne Ottaway ................................... $100

My beloved brother Bob Donnelly & my great niece Aubree Piebes from Kathleen Reinig........................................ $200

Grandpa Ray from Jeff Ulatoski ................ $100 Maurice I. Smith from Carol Smith ............. $50 Sarah Anne Lees from Don & Judy Person.............................................. $100 Mom & Dad from Mike & Kris Harnett ..... $150

Alison K. Pennisi ......................................... **

Bob Chase from Sean Chase ........................ **

Kathi & Phillip Vermont ................................ **

Dee Wilson, Ken Mercer & Jerry Lemm from John P. Ferreri .................................. $300

The Emericks & Groves from Mark & LaRene Kidd......................................................... $250

Albert & Lola Malatesta.............................. $50

Betty Patrick from Joan & Chuck Brown ....... **

Terry Abbey.............................................. $100

Diana Bonanno from Kay & Charles Huff...... **

Charles Sebahar & Charles Jr. from Karen L Sebahar ................................................... $100

Kay King .................................................. $100

Rick Aguiar & George Fargis from Nancy Aguiar Fargis ..................................... **

Kevin & Sandra Ryan ................................ $100

Marilyn Villegas.......................................... $75 Jerry Ulrich ............................................ $1,000 Kumar Venkataraman .............................. $200 Pat Kramm............................................... $100 Steve & Linda Ethier ..................................... **

Chris Beratlis - Vic’s Coffee Shop Guys from Ron Morrow ................................................... $160 John A. Mavridis from Corrine Mavridis........ ** Janet Reichlin from Mike, Lori & Michael Reichlin ....................................... $100

Francis & Evelyn Morgan from Frank & Teresa Morgan ............................................. **

Karl K. Witze ........................................... $500

IN MEMORY OF Our wonderful Grandparents - Roselle Grimes, Claud & Verna Plummer, Fran & Mary Franchuk, Joe & Evelyn Schrick from The Grimes Family.................................... $100

Brad & Jessica LaLuzerne .......................... $500

Lou Lincoln from Barbara & Kevin Brooks ..... **

Peggy J. Karn from Richard W. Karn ......... $200 Richard Brierly from Stephanie Brierly England......................... $100 Tony, Mary & Bill Cano from Barbara Andrews ....................................... $50 Howard Hill from Sally Hill ........................ $100

Dale & Lucille Griffitts from Sharron Morrison ....................................... $25 Joseph A. Behiel from Daniel & Yvonne Cevello ............................................ ** Robert Himsl from Charlotte Himsl ............... ** Marilyn Bowe from Jim Bowe....................... ** Mother Stewart & Mother Lisa ..................... ** Scott Michels from Bruce & Pam Michels ...... ** Ken Mercer from Lance & Juliet Ruckteschler.................................... $200 Rod Bradley from Virginia Bradley ................ ** Doris & Joe Antonini from Carolyn & John Cardinalli ......................................... $200 Diana Bonanno from The Pleasanton-Livermore Junior Women’s Club ............................... $200 Lynne Pruiksma from Colleen Heller ............. ** Ted & Nelle Wells from Bill, Joy & Ryan Wells ............................................... $200 June & Michael Carboni from Richard & Nancy Shockley ............................................ ** AS A GIFT FOR Emma Grace Hurt from Gena, Harold & Wayne Gattin .............................................. **

Carl W. Pretzel from Marilyn Pretzel ............. **

Francis “Dude” Condon from Brenda Lee Condon ................................. $100

Robert & Tina Kahn ................................. $100

Woody Pereira from Silvia Pereira & Family ...................................................... $200

Hathily P. Johnson from Hathi Winston & Jerry Prettyman ........................................ $200

Kathy Narum ........................................... $200

Lee B. Young from Marsha Young ............ $100

John & Ann Garske .................................. $500

Bob Wright from Marilyn Wright ................ $50

SSG John H. Marshall ............................... $100

Betty Dawson from Dan Dawson ................. **

Every dollar donated will go to these 10 local nonprofits:

Clayton Newman & Nancy McGhee ......... $100

Bert Brook from Dee Brook ...................... $200

Heather Summer...................................... $100

Coach Tony Costello from Michael & Cheryl Costello ............................................ **

Agape Villages Foster Family Agency finds stable homes and a loving environment for abused and neglected children throughout 14 counties in Northern California, including here in Alameda County.

BUSINESSES & ORGANIZATIONS Alain Pinel Realtors Tim McGuire Team ................................ $1,000

Nicholas Daniel Lesser from Bruce & Kathleen Lesser ............................................ **

The Price Family .................................... $2,000 M. J. Bedegi ................................................. **

Karen Morliengo, Licensed Marriage Family Therapist, LMFT ................................. ** Pleasanton Pet Sitting ................................ $75 LawTech................................................... $500 Time 4 Order - Professional Organizing .... $100 Esther Yu - 7 Springs Properties, Inc. ..... $1,000 Ritter Investments .................................... $100 California Self-Defense Consultants ............. ** Hacienda Bunco Group .............................. $80 My Buddy’s Bike Shop .............................. $200 Victoria Glenn, Reading Specialist ................ ** Accusplit Make A Difference Programs ..... $200 Genius Screen Norcal ............................... $100 The Christmas Light Pros of Tri-Valley ....... $100

Richard Del Tredici from Judith Del Tredici .. $100 Harvey & Beverly Oberg from Holly & Ed Heuer...................................................... ** Sharon Dirkx ............................................ $100 Ron Silva from Nancy Silva ........................... ** Laurentine Stout from Chris Green ............. $50 Jerry Lemm from Marilyn Lemm ............... $100 Jerry Severin from Charlotte Severin ............. ** Parents Harold & Elise Kolb, Husband Gene Strom & Son Keith Strom from Carol G. Strom ......................................... $500 Elizabeth Ng from Chris & Linda Coleman......................................... $250 Robert & Edna Schmidt from Ken Schmidt ............................................ $100

Pleasanton Newcomers Club ........................ **

Doris Cink & Charles Glass from Vern & Tracy Cink .................................................... **

P-Town Push Rods Car Club .................. $2,000

Dick Waldron from Virginia Waldron ............ **

SafeAmerica Credit Union ........................ $250

Robert Williams from Mavis E. Williams ........ **

Bay East Association of Realtors ............ $4,000

Arleen Neu from La Vern Neu .................. $200

IN HONOR OF The Daggett Children and Grandchildren from Barbara Daggett .................................. ** Bill & Alice Marsh from Bill & Audrey Sears .....**

Gam & Papa Abbott from the Casey Family .. ** Jim Snodgrass from Virginia Snodgrass .... $100 Camille Cannon ........................................... ** James B. Kohnen from Patricia Kohnen .... $250

Alex & Carolyn from Shibin Xie ................ $100 ** Asterisk designates that the donor did not want to publish the amount of the gift.

Axis Community Health is the Tri-Valley’s sole provider of medical and mental health services for individuals and families who have a low income or who are uninsured. It serves more than 14,000 members of our community. Hope Hospice provides ethical hospice care, transition services for those not eligible for hospice, bereavement support for adults and children and end-of-life education to Tri-Valley families, regardless of insurance or income status. REACH (Resources Education Activities Community and Housing for special adults of the Tri-Valley) offers education programs, activities, resources and housing opportunities for adults with developmental disabilities. Sandra J. Wing Healing Therapies Foundation provides local cancer patients with complementary therapies to help alleviate the side effects caused by radiation and chemotherapy. Senior Support Program of the Tri-Valley serves seniors over 60 in the communities of Pleasanton, Livermore, Dublin and Sunol to promote independence, safety and wellbeing, preserve dignity and improve quality of life. Sunflower Hill is working to create a sustainable residential community for individuals with special needs, similar to senior living facilities. Tri-Valley YMCA aims to strengthen the local communities through youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. ValleyCare Charitable Foundation plans to use its contribution from the annual campaign to help fund state-of-the-art health care technology, facilities, various clinical programs and services at Stanford Health Care-ValleyCare. Valley Humane Society rescues and rehabilitates companion animals, champions responsible caretaking, shares pets’ soothing affections with people in need of comfort, and supports and preserves existing pet-guardian relationships.

Emily Hirst from Bill & Fran Hirst ............... $100

Pleasanton Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 9


Community Pulse POLICE BULLETIN Pleasanton Police Department announces 3 promotions Pleasanton Police Chief Dave Spiller promoted two officers and one lieutenant at a badge-pinning and oath-of-office ceremony in the City Council chamber last week. Lt. Jeffrey Bretzing was promoted to the rank of police captain, filling the vacancy created when Capt. Eric Finn retired in October. Capt. Bretzing began his law enforcement career with the Pleasanton Police Department in 1987, when he joined the force as a community service officer. He attended the Santa Rosa Police Academy and then worked as a patrol officer with the Hayward Police Department for three years before returning to Pleasanton in 1992. Over the span of a decade, Bretzing served as a field training officer, motorcycle riding instructor, detective and crisis negotiator. In 2002 he was promoted to sergeant and served as a patrol supervisor and code enforcement officer for four years. Bretzing was moved up to the rank of lieutenant in 2008. Capt. Bretzing earned a bachelor’s degree in management and a master’s degree in organizational

leadership from Saint Mary’s College. He is also a graduate of the FBI National Academy, the Leadership Pleasanton program and the Sherman Block Supervisor Leadership Institute. The department also promoted officers Steve Ayers and Chris Niederhaus to the rank of police sergeant. Sgt. Ayers was hired by the Pleasanton Police Department in 2007. He joined the traffic unit and has served as a motorcycle officer since 2013. He is a member of the East County Tactical Team and also serves as a field training officer, volunteer program adviser and Peer Support Team member. Ayers has a Bachelor of Science in chemistry from University of California, Berkeley. Sgt. Niederhaus has been with the department since 2005, serving in a variety of assignments, including detective, field training officer and motorcycle officer. He is also a board member for the Pleasanton Police Officers Association. Niederhaus attended Diablo Valley College and the Union Institute and University, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice administration.

In other police news • Two veteran employees of the East Bay Regional Park District Police Department have been honored for their service.

A Home Improvement Show for the East Bay!

Patrol officer Ryland MacFadyen received the award for Officer of the Year. His work was lauded by district Police Chief Tim Anderson. “Officer MacFadyen is a real trooper, dedicated to both the police profession and to serving the community,” Anderson said. MacFadyen, who lives in Oakland, has been with the district since 2010. As a patrol officer, he patrols district facilities throughout Alameda and Contra Costa counties. He also spearheaded an effort to donate bicycles to East Oakland nonprofit Cycles for Change after hearing that they had a number of bicycles stolen, according to park district officials. Dispatcher Janet Severin received the award for Dispatcher of the Year. Park district police Capt. Anthony Ciaburro praised Severin’s ability to handle multiple tasks with precision. “Janet effortlessly transitions from a 9-1-1 call taker to a radio channel operator and then a records manager. This is in addition to her daily supervisory duties,” Ciaburro said. Severin, a resident of Castro Valley, has been with the district since 2004. As a dispatcher, she answers 9-1-1 calls, dispatches police and fire crews, assists the public and monitors other law enforcement agencies’ radio channels, among other duties, according to officials. The East Bay Regional Park District’s law enforcement staff patrols 65 parks and 1,250 miles of trails in Alameda and Contra Costa

PPD

New Pleasanton police Capt. Jeffrey Bretzing (center) was promoted from lieutenant during a badge-pinning and oath-of-office ceremony last week.

counties. • A 23-year-old man who was wanted on suspicion of attempted murder after a shooting earlier this month during an apparent drug transaction in Livermore has turned himself in, police said. Robert Delarosa, a transient, surrendered himself into custody at the Santa Rita Jail Jan. 8, according to police. Officers had been seeking Delarosa in connection with a shooting that occurred Jan. 3 near Highland Street and Valley View Way, which left a 28-yearold Concord man in critical condition. Detectives determined the victim had arrived at a parking lot on North Livermore Avenue to participate in a drug transaction with Delarosa and two other men, identified as Blake Wayne Hansen, 25,

of Concord, and Alexander James Diaz, 23, of Salida in Stanislaus County, according to police. When the victim got into a vehicle with the trio, they all left the parking lot together. Soon after, however, the victim was shot once he was inside the vehicle. The victim was then pushed out of the car, and Hansen, Diaz and Delarosa then fled the area, police said. Officers located Hansen in Concord a few hours later and arrested him on suspicion of attempted murder and robbery. They found Diaz the following day and arrested him on suspicion of robbery. Delarosa has been arrested and booked on suspicion of attempted murder and robbery, according to police. Q —Julia Reis and Bay City News Service

POLICE REPORT The Pleasanton Police Department made the following information available.

Jan. 14

Sunday, February 12, 2017 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Danville Community Center 420 Front Street, Danville

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Weapons violation Q 8:51 p.m. on the 5300 block of Hopyard Road Drug violation Q 12:22 a.m. on the 1200 block of Orloff Drive Theft Q 8:41 a.m. on the 7900 block of Stoneridge Drive Q 10:22 a.m., 3900 block of Vineyard Avenue; theft from auto Q 1:07 p.m. on the 5500 block of Springhouse Drive

Join Horticulturalist Extraordinaire, Lita Gates, for an informative, free class on pruning, general care and pest control. All Classes will be held on Saturdays and start at 11 AM. No registration is necessary but let us know if you are planning to attend one or all. Classes will be held in our outdoor patio. Dress warmly. • Saturday, January 21 • Saturday, January 28 How to Prune Japanese Maples How to Prune Citrus 2016

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Page 10 • January 20, 2017 • Pleasanton Weekly

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Q 4:02

p.m. on the 2300 block of Stoneridge Drive Q 9:56 p.m. on the 5100 block of Hopyard Road Q 10:18 p.m., 1000 block of Stoneridge Mall Road; auto theft Warrant arrest Q 10:20 p.m. on the 3100 block of Bernal Avenue Fraud Q 6:54 p.m. on the 2200 block of Stoneridge Mall Road

Jan. 13 DUI Q 11:26 p.m. on the 800 block of Main Street Sex offenses Q 10:30 p.m. on Santa Rita Road Commercial burglary Q 8:37 a.m. on the 4700 block of Hopyard Road Q 9:40 a.m. on the 5300 block of Hopyard Road Drug violation Q 2:50 a.m. on the 3700 block of Hopyard Road

Jan. 12 Alcohol violation Q 10:56 p.m. on the 1800 block of Santa Rita Road Theft Q 4:25 p.m. on the 800 block of Bonita Avenue Q 6 p.m. on the 4000 block of Sherry Court Burglary Q 1:23 p.m. on the 7000 block of Johnson Drive

DUI Q 1:42

a.m. on the 3500 block of Touriga Drive

Jan. 11 Fraud Q 6:34 p.m. on the 5600 block of Belleza Drive Criminal threats Q 6:12 p.m. on the 5000 block of Hillcrest Way Domestic battery Q 2:38 p.m. on Owens Drive Burglary Q 3:33 a.m. on the 3900 block of Vineyard Avenue Theft Q 5:27 a.m., 11900 block of Dublin Canyon Road; theft from auto Q 6:37 a.m., 11900 block of Dublin Canyon Road; theft from auto Q 8:09 a.m., 11900 block of Dublin Canyon Road; theft from auto Q 9:04 a.m., 4700 block of Willow Road; theft from structure Q 11:01 a.m. on the 6500 block of Arlington Drive Shoplifting Q 11:51 a.m. on the 5500 block of Springdale Avenue Q 12:11 p.m. on the 1300 block of Stoneridge Mall Road Q 2:14 p.m. on the 1400 block of Stoneridge Mall Road

Jan. 10 Drug violation Q 10:51 p.m. at Santa Rita Road and Sutter Gate Avenue Fraud Q 3:58 p.m. on the 3800 block of Picard Avenue


A SPECIAL SECTION BY THE PLEASANTON WEEKLY

Staying

Healthy

Inside:

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WINTER 2017

Sick of being

sick?

Tips to getting better and kicking that cold to the curb

From obligations at work to errands and chores and making time for family and friends — your plate is fuller than ever and, unfortunately, getting sick can throw a major wrench into your marathon of activities and greatly hamper your productivity. Despite how frustrating it can be, your busy life doesn’t come to a halt when you’re sick. That’s why you need to do everything you can to start feeling better faster so you don’t fall too far behind. Take these five steps to help you get back to conquering your full to-do list in no time.

Get plenty of sleep With all of the hustle and bustle of your day, taking the time for sleep may seem impossible, but an established sleep schedule is one of the most important things you can do

to support your health. Getting eight hours of sleep is always optimal especially when sick; however sickness can often disrupt our sleep. To help combat symptoms like sinus pressure or a stuffed nose from keeping you up, you can make easy changes like propping yourself up in bed and moisturizing the air with a humidifier or vaporizer. You may find you breathe — and sleep — easier.

head and neck, you’re generally still healthy enough to exercise. Nevertheless, consider a lighter workout to get the benefits of exercise without putting too much stress on your already-suffering body. A brisk walk for 30 to 45 minutes each day while sick is recommended to help you recover. However, be sure to dress appropriately for the climate.

Combat your worst symptoms

We all know about the benefits of getting plenty of Vitamin C when sick, but you can also complement its effects by increasing your intake of Vitamins A, E and B6, as well as iron and zinc to help you recover faster. These helpful nutrients can be found in fruits and veggies, like sweet potatoes and carrots, whole grains and lean meats or fish,

When your cold and flu symptoms become too much, get some real relief. The best plan of action? Turn to your pharmacist for expert advice and medicine recommendations.

Don’t be afraid to exercise If your symptoms are primarily in your

County health officials warn

flu activity

widespread in Bay Area Urge residents to get vaccine as influenza season peaks in winter BY PLEASANTON WEEKLY STAFF

Alameda and Contra Costa health officials joined colleagues across the North Bay this month in urging residents to get vaccinated for influenza as the flu has reached “widespread levels� in California and areas with the most flu activity in the state include the Bay Area. Throughout the Bay Area, public health

officials are urging everyone over 6 months of age to get vaccinated. The officials have said this year’s vaccine is effective since it protects against the season’s most active strains. “Influenza vaccination is a safe and effective way to protect you and your family from the flu,� said Contra Costa Health Officer Dr. William Walker. “It’s not too late to get vaccinated.�

Binge on super foods

Flu cases peak in December through February and may continue into May in the U.S., according to public health officials. The people most vulnerable are those 65 years old and older, children 5 years old and younger, pregnant women and people with some medical conditions such as asthma, heart disease and weakened immune systems. Flu symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches and fatigue, county officials said. Medical providers may prescribe antiviral medications that reduce the severity and duration of illness. Antibiotics are not effective against the flu, officials said. Vaccinations are available at pharmacies, doctor’s offices and some employers offer vaccinations. In addition to getting the vaccine, county

so don’t be afraid to add more of these foods to your diet when you don’t feel well.

Drink up Water, broth or herbal tea — the more hydrated you stay, the better. Fluids not only soothe your throat, but they also ward off dehydration, thin your mucus and help your body systems function adequately — which, in turn, helps your immune system function at its best. With that said, not all drinks are created equal; stay away from caffeinated or alcoholic drinks. These beverages will actually increase dehydration, not relieve it. Being sick can be painful enough without the fear of missing out on important activities, so follow these tips to get back on your feet as fast as possible. Q —BPT health officials recommend people take steps to protect themselves and others from the flu: • Cover your cough and sneezes with a tissue. • If you do not have a tissue, cough into your elbow. • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth. • Wash your hands often and thoroughly with soap and warm water or an alcoholbased hand sanitizer. • Stay home when you are sick, and stay home until you have been symptom-free for 24 hours. California Department of Public Health officials said as of Jan. 7 there have been nine flu deaths in the state. None have been reported in Alameda County. For more information on flu prevention, visit the Alameda County Public Health Department website at www.acphd.org. Q Editor’s note: Information from the Bay City News Service was used in this report. Pleasanton Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 11


STAYING HEALTHY — WINTER 2017

Sanie Zehra, MD

Board Certified in Family Medicine Board Certified in Geriatrics Medicine

10 smart swaps to make baking and cooking healthier Healthy cooking: Ingredient substitutions and smart food swaps Creamy sauces, cookies, casseroles and cakes — as temperatures drop, it’s natural to crave favorite comfort foods. However, it’s easy to overindulge on rich dishes and decadent desserts, especially if you’re hosting a gathering of friends and family. How can you enjoy amazing foods while bumping up the health quotient? “Remember, when you’re cooking or baking, you’re in control. With a few smart ingredient substitutions and food swaps, you and your guests can enjoy favorite dishes and get more vitamins and nutrients,� registered dietitian Lyssie Lakatos said. She and Tammy Lakatos Shames, also a dietitian, are known as the “The Nutrition Twins.� Together, they share their favorite strategies for cooking healthier, including clever ingredient swaps you won’t even detect in the finished dish. Eggs: When baking, eggs are a common ingredient, but not all eggs are created equal. Look for eggs that are locally sourced and come from hens fed an all-vegetarian diet consisting of healthy grains, canola oil and supplements like alfalfa and vitamin E, such as Eggland’s Best. Sour cream: Swap full-fat sour cream for plain Greek yogurt in recipes, dips, sauces and garnishes. Plain Greek yogurt tastes surprisingly similar to sour cream but

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STAYING HEALTHY — WINTER 2017

Stop waking up exhausted

It’s no secret that finding time for the recommended eight hours of sleep is easier said than done. More often than not, your time asleep is limited by your busy schedule. If you are lucky enough to squeeze in a full eight hours of shuteye, you are still not guaranteed to wake up feeling refreshed. While some responsibilities are hard to shake, setting yourself up with the right routine can vastly improve your quality of sleep and combat the issues keeping you up at night.

Lighten up If it’s never light in your bedroom, you may be confusing your body’s circadian clock. The circadian clock regulates how alert you are due to the light and darkness in an environment. If you keep your bedroom dark during the day or use black-out curtains, this can act as a signal to your body that it should be asleep. Swap out your curtains for a lighter color or keep your shades partially open — natural sunlight in your room can help you wake up in the morning.

Improve quality of sleep to wake up refreshed Tune out

Everyone’s guilty of binge-watching their favorite TV shows from time to time. While you may satisfy your curiosity by catching the ending of your favorite series, you may not be so happy when you wake up groggy after staying up too late. Set an alarm for 30 minutes before you want to go to sleep and when the alarm goes off, turn off your TV and get ready for bed. Limiting screen time before you fall asleep can also avoid disrupting your body’s level of melatonin, which controls sleep cycles.

If you snooze, you lose Hitting the snooze button even once in the morning can make you feel groggy throughout the day. By hitting snooze, you are prompting your body to start another stage in your sleep cycle without giving it enough time to fully recover. Try downloading an app with a smart alarm to make sure that you are waking up during a lighter stage of your sleep cycle.

Out with the old

Cut the caffeine

Approximately half (49%) of Americans have had their mattress for five years or more, and while people struggle with sleep for a variety of reasons, their mattress could be keeping them from getting a good night’s sleep. A quality mattress, such as Beautyrest Platinum Hybrid Mattress, can give you the support you need to wake up feeling refreshed.

While there is nothing quite like coffee for an afternoon pick-me-up, having caffeine after 2 p.m. can impact both your sleep quality and quantity. Instead of having a cup after lunch, take your coffee break earlier in the day or consider switching to decaf. Q —Family Features

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Pleasanton Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 13


STAYING HEALTHY — WINTER 2017

COOK

This year can mean a healthier you

Continued from Page 12

Tips to start and maintain an improved lifestyle While many of us feel inspired to make goals each year to improve our health, happiness and well-being, we often find the changes hard to sustain, and sometimes end up reverting back to old practices. Check out these tips for starting and maintaining a healthier lifestyle.

Baby steps Many people start a new year hoping to improve their fitness routines and eating habits, and quickly become discouraged when results aren’t immediate. Instead of canceling your new gym membership and opting for a box of chocolates by Valentine’s Day, set achievable and realistic goals to stay on track. If losing weight is the objective, aim for 10 pounds instead of 50. If you succeed at losing the first 10, celebrate and make a new goal. Instead of adopting an extreme diet, cut back on one snack a day or incorporate a smoothie as a healthy meal replacement. Use ingredients like fresh fruit, dark leafy greens, flax or chia seeds — even savory vegetables like beets — the possibilities are endless.

Fuel up to get fit Sticking to fitness goals takes the right

fuel. Eating whole foods instead of processed foods will give you more and longer-lasting energy. Plus, a whole-food diet is more simple and sustainable than restrictive calorie counting or elimination diets. Powering your body with snacks like lowfat yogurt topped with granola, fresh hummus and whole-grain pita, or an apple and peanut butter, will carry your body through a workout and help you feel fuller longer. To make delicious homemade nut butter, throw three cups of roasted, unsalted peanuts or cashews into a high-powered blender like a Vitamix machine and blend for a minute or so. The result is a gooey, good-for-you treat that will provide ample energy for healthy pursuits. While grocery shopping, stick to the outer perimeter of the store and pick up nutrientrich and versatile ingredients like avocados, chickpeas, bananas, nuts and spinach, that can stand alone or be mixed into everything from healthy salads to frozen desserts.

Indulge your sweet tooth Being healthy and eating whole foods doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice your sweet tooth. Before you plunge into a tub of cookie

STATEPOINT

Whip up a simple sorbet to indulge your sweet tooth healthfully.

dough, consider other ways to curb cravings. Make your own, customized whole-food ice cream without artificial colors, flavors or preservatives using a blender. Varieties like apple pie and spiced strawberry will delight without guilt. Or try a simple sorbet: Blend two peeled oranges, two tablespoons sugar and four cups of ice. Use a blender with special settings for this purpose. Looking for something that feels even more decadent? Find recipes like chocolate hazelnut spread and more at vitamix.com/ Find-Recipes. For a healthier new year, focus on small, attainable goals, and use whole foods to get creative with your diet. Q —StatePoint

moist and delicious. Bacon: Bacon adds flavor to any dish, but a ton of fat. To get the flavor-boost of bacon without the excess fat, try using Canadian bacon, lean prosciutto or turkey bacon. Whether beside scrambled eggs for breakfast or crumbled into a casserole, these tasty alternatives will satisfy. Salt: Use less salt and add herbs to recipes to get succulent flavor. Whether fresh or dried, herbs satisfy the palate and add beauty to any dish. Have fun mixing and matching herbs to customize a recipe perfectly to your taste. Sugar: All those amazing glazes and desserts require sugar, but you need not rely solely on refined white sugar. For baked goods, lessen sugar and add vanilla or cinnamon to intensify sweetness. For glazes, try alternatives like maple syrup or fruit purees. Breading: Classic comfort foods often require breading. For a healthy alternative to traditional white bread crumbs, try wholegrain bread crumbs, rolled oats or crushed bran cereal (or a mixture of them all). Flour: Rather than using entirely all-purpose refined white flour for recipes, try swapping half of the amount with whole-wheat flour. You’ll still get the desired consistency out of baked goods, but you’ll be eating more whole grains. Lettuce: Iceberg lettuce is a popular option for salads and recipes, but to get more important vitamins (and more flavor), use arugula, collard greens, spinach, kale or watercress instead. Insider tip: Try buying a bag of mixed greens to enjoy a variety of nutrient-dense alternatives. Q —BPT

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Opinion Pleasanton Weekly PUBLISHER Gina Channell, Ext. 119 EDITORIAL Editor Jeb Bing, Ext. 118 Tri Valley Life Editor Dolores Fox Ciardelli Associate Editor Jeremy Walsh, Ext. 111 Staff Reporter Julia Reis, Ext. 121 Contributors Cathy Jetter, Dennis Miller (sports), Mike Sedlak, Jenny Lyness, Nancy Lewis ART & PRODUCTION Marketing and Creative Director Shannon Corey Design and Production Manager Kristin Brown Designers Linda Atilano, Diane Haas, Rosanna Kuruppu, Paul Llewellyn, Doug Young ADVERTISING Account Executive Karen Klein, Ext. 122 Real Estate Sales Carol Cano, Ext. 226 BUSINESS Business Associate Lisa Oefelein, Ext. 126 Circulation Director Tatjana Pitts, Ext. 141 Front Office Coordinator Sierra Rhodes, Ext. 124 HOW TO REACH THE WEEKLY Phone: (925) 600-0840 Fax: (925) 600-9559 Editorial email: editor@PleasantonWeekly.com calendar@PleasantonWeekly.com Display Sales email: sales@PleasantonWeekly.com Classifieds Sales email: ads@PleasantonWeekly.com Circulation email: circulation@ PleasantonWeekly.com

The Pleasanton Weekly is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 5506 Sunol Blvd., Suite 100, Pleasanton, CA 94566; (925) 600-0840. Mailed at Periodicals Postage Rate, USPS 020407. The Pleasanton Weekly is mailed upon request to homes and apartments in Pleasanton. Community support of the Pleasanton Weekly is welcomed and encouraged through memberships at levels of $5, $8 or $10 per month through automatic credit card charges. Print subscriptions for businesses or residents of other communities are $60 per year or $100 for two years. Go to www.PleasantonWeekly. com to sign up and for more information. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Pleasanton Weekly, 5506 Sunol Blvd., Suite 100, Pleasanton, CA 94566. © 2017 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited.

EDITORIAL

THE OPINION OF THE WEEKLY

Dr. King’s birthday: Better late than never

T

he Tri-Valley YMCA will hold its 17th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. fellowship breakfast Monday, with former Dublin Mayor Tim Sbranti as host. Sbranti is now deputy chief of staff to Congressman Eric Swalwell (D-Dublin). The breakfast observance at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in Pleasanton comes a week later than the national holiday. Experience early on showed the Y that breakfasts dedicated to the good JEB BING work of the slain civil rights leadRetired PUSD administrator Jim er draw better attendance when Hansen will receive a Dr. Martin they’re not held on a three-day Luther King Jr. Legacy Award on holiday weekend. Monday. And the Y was not alone in adjusting its celebration of King’s life to meet the schedules of interested participants. Since schools were also closed for the holiday, teachers made classroom presentations before or after, talking to their students about King’s good works on behalf of African-Americans and his historic “I Have a Dream” speech in 1963. The keynote speaker at Monday’s observance will be Kenneth G. Cooper, executive director of the Las Positas College Foundation. Cooper, who holds a Bachelor of Arts in African American and African studies from the University of California at Davis, had been director of the Cosumnes River College Foundation in Sacramento for eight years. He led a capital campaign that raised $1 million in contributions, the largest ever to the college. Cooper is a member of the Network of California Community College Foundations, the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education and is a Senior Fellow in the American Leadership Forum, Mountain Valley chapter. While at the college, he also served as a site and education director for the Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Sacramento. The theme of this year’s annual breakfast — and Cooper’s remarks — is “Educating for the Future.” As part of the breakfast, the Y will present one of its 2017 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Legacy Awards to Jim Hansen, retired administrator and last year’s interim superintendent in the Pleasanton Unified School District. Hansen, the former principal at Amador Valley High School and before that at Harvest Park Middle School, was asked to take a one-year leave from his retirement to fill the temporary role last summer after then-superintendent Parvin Ahmadi took the same job in Castro Valley. Also receiving the Y’s Legacy Award will be the Children’s Emergency Food Bank and the staff of the Livermore Valley Joint Unified School District’s Child Welfare Program. The food bank, based in Dublin, began its operation in 1966 with volunteers from the Dublin Junior Women’s Club, Valley Christian Church, Murray Elementary School, Nielsen Elementary School and John Knox Presbyterian Church gathering and distributing food baskets at Christmas. This tradition continues today with the food bank distributing food to those in need Monday through Friday. The staff of the Livermore school district’s Child Welfare Program is responsible for acting as liaison to the district and local social services and city, county and other legal agencies. It assists in the compliance and enforcement of state child welfare and attendance laws; assists students, parents and school staff in efforts to improve school attendance and excessive tardiness; and promotes student success, working closely with the administration, teachers, support staff, students and parents/guardians. To be a part of Monday’s event, which starts at 7:30 a.m., call the Tri-Valley Y at 263-4444 or send an email to kdulka@ymcaeastbay.org. The Tri-Valley Y is located at 5000 Pleasanton Ave., Suite 220. Q

Visit Town Square at PleasantonWeekly.com to comment on the editorial.

LETTERS City must correct Owens Drive mistake Dear Editor, I too had presumed that the closure of two lanes on Owens Drive was only temporary. No clear-thinking person would ever design, approve or build an intentional roadblock in the middle of a major thoroughfare in our city, would they? But now I find they did. Our City Council approved closing down two of the three lanes, simply to allow a few parking spaces in front of this apartment building. Leading up to this bottleneck, drivers are constantly maneuvering from the left and right to get in the one lane continuing on Owens Drive. A very dangerous and frustrating experience. This absolutely has to be corrected and very quickly. One of the original council members who approved this boondoggle is still sitting on the council and should take the lead in restoring the three lanes. Mayor Jerry Thorne has continuously sided with contractors to the detriment of Pleasanton residents and now must take responsibility for this major mistake and fix it. Surely he realizes by now that traffic flow is one of the primary concerns of voters in our town. This is the most outlandish and absurd action ever taken by these so-called leaders of our city. They must correct it immediately. —Leon Fenton

Drivers must slow down on Niles Canyon Dear Editor, The problem with Niles Canyon Road isn’t that it’s too narrow — it’s that drivers won’t slow down. They expect to drive 80 mph through the canyon like they do on the freeway. They pay no attention to the road or conditions. Some have no idea how to drive a narrow, winding, low-speed road. Slowing down seems to be “dirty words.” If one does slow down to meet road conditions, cars behind toot, give the “one-finger salute,” try to crawl through the exhaust pipe or figure out how to get by such as driving over your car roof. Not every road is meant to be driven at 80. Or 65. Or 55. Or 45. Commercials show vehicles going 80 down narrow, windy roads and so everyone thinks they can do it too. When someone gets killed, they scream about the road being “dangerous,” “too narrow,” etc. Instead of better seat belts, air bags and Wi-fi connections, automakers should build a computerized car that “reads” the road driving conditions. If the driver goes to fast, the car slows down itself, regardless how much the driver rants, raves and tries to drive faster. Obeying speed limits seems to have gone out the car window before a driver hits a tree, goes over the edge or runs into a rock wall. Niles Canyon has become a race/

challenge course for drivers. Don’t widen the road. Don’t put in a barrier. Put in automatic “speed reader” cameras at each end of Niles Canyon. It will register a license number when one drives by at one end. Then re-register that number when the driver leaves. If the driver has driven faster than posted speed, he gets a ticket in the mail. Or better yet, a couple of motorcycle cops should be at each end issuing tickets to drivers. —Bonnie Davis

Recent Editorial on firing of PUSD superintendent Dear Editor, Thank you very much for your Editorial last week regarding the termination of Superintendent Rick Rubino. As a Pleasanton resident for 31 years with three children who have attended Pleasanton schools from elementary through high school, I can only say I am glad they have graduated and have moved on. All of my children were wellprepared for their college experiences and much of that credit goes to the fine education they received here in Pleasanton. Recent staff turnover is undoubtedly detracting from the education of today’s Pleasanton students. Hopefully the dedicated Pleasanton teachers will step up and continue to teach their students with excellence in spite of turmoil in the upper ranks. I am appalled at the turnover of teachers, staff and administrators and the lack of transparency by the school board. I can only imagine how much it has cost taxpayers to pay off the principals and superintendents who were “so carefully chosen” and then terminated. I look forward to continued inquiry into this most recent termination. As a taxpayer, I believe we have a right to know how our tax dollars are being spent and misspent. —Steve Chew

Thinking of moving out of Pleasanton Dear Editor, The “Pleasanton Building Boom” is one of the main reasons my husband and I have been considering a move. When we first came here 26 years ago, Pleasanton was a charming town with friendly neighbors, minimal traffic and views of neighboring hills. Now, every spare corner of land is being developed with huge apartment and commercial complexes, and according to last week’s cover story, this trend is going to continue. The local hills are now covered with hundreds of houses, many of the quaint local joints have folded and been replaced with national chains, and traffic pervades our once-free-flowing town. I am glad my kids grew up here, but Pleasanton is not the same place, and I am ready to find “greener pastures.” —Penelope Clark

Pleasanton Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 15


Sports Callippe Preserve retains environmental quality designation City golf course is ‘Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary’ Pleasanton’s Callippe Preserve Golf Course recently retained its status as a “Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary,” a designation offered through the Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Program for Golf Courses, a program of Audubon International. The 18-hole municipal golf course in southern Pleasanton originally received the recognition in 2006 and has undergone a recertification process every three years to maintain the designation, according to city officials. To qualify, a golf course must demonstrate a high degree of environmental quality in a variety of areas, including environmental planning, wildlife and habitat management, outreach and education, chemical use reduction

and safety, water conservation and water quality management, city officials said. “Being certified as an Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary is a genuine honor since we are only one of 68 courses in California to hold this honor,” Eric Thompson, Callippe Preserve’s general manager, said in a statement. “We’re very proud to be recognized not only as a great place to play a round of golf, but also as a great place to get out and enjoy nature and wildlife, such as the red-tailed hawk, which can be seen here at Callippe,” Thompson added. Callippe Preserve is located at 8500 Clubhouse Drive, just off Westbridge Lane in southern Pleasanton. Q —Jeremy Walsh

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Amador Valley wrestling wins Armijo Invitational Foothill girls basketball sweeps Livermore schools last week The Amador Valley wrestling team began its defense of back-to-back East Bay Athletic League titles last week with a 57-22 thumping on Jan. 11. Notable wins included Donovan Lucente, Tyler Bonitz, Gabe Alviar, Tyler Kline, Cameron Ghoddoucy, Jake Perlman and Alex Crepeau. Then on Saturday, the Dons headed up to Fairfield for the 46th Annual Armijo Invitational Tournament. In addition to Armijo, this tough tourney included the likes of Vacaville, Wood and De La Salle. Behind a great team effort and some gutsy individual performances, Amador Valley came away with a first-place finish, ahead of second place De La Salle. Lucente (106 pounds), Lucas Sira (138), Ghoddoucy (160), Perlman (182) and Crepeau (285) all brought home individual wins for the Dons. Alviar (132) finished second, with Bonitz (126) and Kline (145) finishing third. In other wrestling action, the Foothill Falcons sent 13 junior varsity wrestlers to the 2017 Joe Camillari Memorial Tournament at Granada on Saturday and came back with 10 top-three finishes. First-place winners were Miguel Lopez, Riley Purnell and Jack Madden. Alex Nielsen, Matan Shtepel and Samuel Wade finished second. Navid Tehranian, Gabriel Bongiorno. Alex Mercado and Blake Bettencourt were third-place finishers. The Foothill varsity sent four wrestlers to the Clayton Valley Invitational, with all placing. Cody Jensen (junior) in second at 152 pounds and James

TIM PERLMAN

The winning Amador Valley wrestling team celebrates after capturing the 46th Annual Armijo Invitational Tournament.

Parisi (freshman) in second at 160 pounds were among the top Foothill finishers. Justin Phillips (second/120) and Carter Pierce (second/220) were the other Foothill wrestlers that took part.

Girls basketball Foothill took a pair of wins last week, beating the two Livermore schools. On Jan. 10, the Falcons beat Livermore 45-38 thanks to a huge game from Vanessa Esomonu. A force underneath, Esomonu hauled in 20 rebounds, had 13 points and three assists. Hope Alley and Audrey Goodman each contributed nine points. Then last Friday, the Falcons completed their perfect week with a 60-45 win over Granada. The Falcons distributed the ball well, with four players scoring in double digits. Goodman had 15 points with Madison Baxter, Esomonu and Alley getting 10 each. Baxter and Esomonu each had six assists.

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FOOTHILL GIRLS BASKETBALL

Audrey Goodman scores for Foothill in its 60-45 win over Granada last week. Goodman finished with a team-high 15 points.

Boys basketball Foothill split a pair of games last week, beating Livermore earlier in the week before dropping a tough one to Granada to end the week. In the 49-32 win over the Cowboys, Devin Powell led the way with 15 points. Rod Allen added 11 points, and Will Lewis chipped in eight for the Falcons. The 57-52 loss to Granada was a frustrating one as the Falcons rallied in the fourth quarter to make it a close game, but ultimately foul trouble scuttled their chances. Lewis and Allen each had 13 to lead the offensive effort. JT McDermott added nine points for the Falcons.

Girls soccer Foothill traveled to Dougherty Valley and came away with a solid 3-1 win last week. Scoring came from both Tami Kwong and Kira Broacha in the first half. The lead grew to 3-0 when Ariana Nino finished off a pass from Taylor Noval midway through the second half. Dougherty Valley finally turned a set piece into a score late in the match when a shot just outside the box somehow sliced through the Falcon wall and into the corner of the net. Foothill entertained Amador in a makeup match from earlier in the week, falling for the first time in nine games this season by a 1-0 final. The first half was an even tug-ofwar between the crosstown rivals with the only shot on target coming from the Falcons. As the match moved to the final few minutes, the Falcons seemed to tire a bit, and in a split second, a quick counter caught the Falcons short on the back end resulting in a finish for Amador. Q


Calendar

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN OUR COMMUNIT Y

PET OF THE WEEK Fun Floyd “Pretty Boy” Floyd has much more to offer than just a cute and fluffy face. This 1-year-old feline has a trick up his sleeve. Floyd will use his wit, charm and playfulness to steal your love. He’s a natural class clown whose devious pranks will warm your heart. Floyd is available for adoption at Valley Humane Society, 3670 Nevada St. in Pleasanton. For more info, visit www.valleyhumane.org or call 426-8656. VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY/K. JACOBY

Date Theatre PACIFIC N AME OF COAST EVENTR:EPERTORY Description THEATRE and P times, etc ‘A forNYTHING the event. RESENTS GOES’ Pacific Coast Repertory Theatre will NAME OF EVENT: Description and present the high-energy, high-seas times, etc for the event. musical romp “Anything Goes” at 8 p.m. Fridays, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturdays, and 2 p.m. Sundays, Jan. 28-Feb. 12 at the Firehouse Arts Center. Cole Porter is the LISTING BOLDHit : Calendartext songs include paragraph tag.“It’s De-Lovely,” “Friendship,” “I Get A Kick Out LISTING BOLD: Calendartext is the Of You,” “All Through The Night,” paragraph tag. “Anything Goes,” You’re The Top” and many more. Tickets are $19$40. Call 931-4848 or go to www. firehousearts.org.

Calendarhead

at the Club, 7050 Johnson Drive. Join for an inspirational morning as we celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. With keynote speaker Kenneth G. Cooper, Executive Director of the Las Positas College Foundation, and host Tim Sbranti. Go to ymcaeastbay.org for price and registration.

T’s Comedy Club, 5014 Hopyard Road. Cost is $20 donation to Alamo Women’s Club. Dinner and beverages may be purchased, two item minimum. All ticket proceeds go to the philanthropic organizations AWC supports. Contact sandsmckae@comcast.net.

Lessons & Classes WRITE ESSAY TO APPLY FOR SCHOLARSHIP TO ENTER APRIL 22 WRITERS’ CONFERENCE FOR FREE Write a short 100-150 word essay about how you would benefit from attending a writing conference. Submit your writing by Feb. 1 and you may get a chance to attend a writing conference for free on April 22 in Pleasanton. There will be one adult and one student scholarship. Students must have a student ID and be aged 14-22. Email submissions to conference@trivalleywriters.org. Scholarship winners will be notified before Feb. 12.

CHAMPION OF CHANGE GracielaTiscareno-Sato, recognized by the White House as a “Champion of Change, Woman Veteran Leader,” was a child of immigrants who funded her education by entering the US Air Force ROTC Prog. She will speak at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 28, at Lynnewood Methodist Church, 4444 Black Ave. Sponsored by L-P-D Branch AAUW. Go to www.aauw-lpd.org.

PERSONAL TECHNOLOGY USER GROUP The PT Users Group meets at 10 a.m. on the fourth Thursday of the month at the Pleasanton Senior Center. The usual format is 2-3 presentations by various presenters. Topics include internet use, email, photos, security, help with Windows 7/8/10, smartphones, tablets. Cost is $2-$2.50. Call 931-5365.

NOAH ARONSON IN CONCERT: MUSIC FOR MIND, BODY & SOUL Jewish singer/songwriter Noah Aronson will perform on Saturday, Jan. 28 at Congregation Beth Emek, 3400 Nevada Court. Noah has achieved widespread acclaim for his energy, his catchy melodies, and his sensitive interpretation of Jewish prayer. Doors open at 7 p.m., Havdalah and concert at 7:30 p.m. General seating $18, $20 at the door. Reserved seating $40, Event Supporter $72. Contact 931-1055 or bethemek@bethemek.org. Go to http://noaharonson.bpt.me/.

KEEPING YOUR ‘I’ ON THE IEP Learn the top critical things you can do to improve your child’s special education program with “Keeping Your ‘I’ On the IEP” from 7-9 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 2 at the Harvest Park Middle School multipurpose room, 4900 Valley Ave. To register for this free event, go to http:// tinyurl.com/2017FebSNC. If you have any questions about this event or how to register, email snc@ pleasantonpta.org. To request a sign (ASL) or spoken language interpreter, please email snc@ pleasantonpta.org by Jan. 26.

Health & Wellness

WINTER VOICES: VOICES IN HARMONY AND SOME FRIENDS OF MINE “Voices in Harmony” will sing hits from the American Songbook and share their mastery of barbershop harmony at 7:30 p.m.on Saturday, Feb. 4 at St. Augustine Church, 3999 Bernal Ave. The award-winning male a cappella chorus has won championships and competitions. “Some Friends of Mine” will join the fun. Donation suggested $15 for adults, $10 for students. Go to www.catholicsofpleasanton.org.

Fundraisers

Concerts

Talks & Lectures DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. FELLOWSHIP BREAKFAST Come to the 17th annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Fellowship Breakfast from 7:30-9:30 a.m. on Monday, Jan. 23 at DoubleTree by Hilton Pleasanton

PLEASANTON LIONS CLUB ANNUAL CRAB FEED Celebrate all that is good about our community! Join together to enjoy a feast of crab, pasta, and salad from 5-10:30 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 21 at the Alameda County Fairgrounds. With dancing, a no-host bar, casino tables, and auction. Tickets are $60. Proceeds will benefit local community service organizations and families in need. For tickets or more information call Steve Grimes at 484-3524 or Greg Aynesworth at 336-6069. A FUN-FILLED EVENING OF STANDUP COMEDY Local comedians Stacey Gustafson and Regina Stoops are hilarious and will make everyone laugh as they share their lives as women, wives and moms. Come join for laughs and to support a good cause: doors open at 6:30 p.m., show starts at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 24 at Tommy

EAST BAY ESSENTIAL TREMOR SUPPORT GROUP If you have recently been diagnosed with ET or would like to learn more about this common movement disorder in a safe and supportive environment, please join us from 10 a.m.-noon on the third Saturday of each month, in the Blackhawk A and B conference rooms at San Ramon Regional Medical Center, 6001 Norris Canyon Road, San Ramon. Contact 487-5706 or eastbayet@comcast. net. Go to www.eastbayet.com.

O

POST CALENDAR ITEMS AT PLEASANTONWEEKLY.COM

LAUGHTER IS MEDICINE Did you know laughter has proven to reduce stress, relieve pain, energize the body and even possibly heal diseases? Local standup comedian and author, Margaret Zhao, will teach how to discover your own sense of humor and benefit from laughter. Regina Stoops will also give a short standup segment. This is an event by Sandra J. Wing Healing Therapies Foundation Education series at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 4 at Alain Pinel Realtors, 900 Main St., Suite 101. Go to www. healingtherapiesfoundation.org/.

Seniors PEDDLER SHOPPE AT THE SENIOR CENTER The Peddler Shoppe in the lobby of the Pleasanton Senior Center, 5353 Sunol Blvd., offers the handmade wares of talented local senior artisans. It’s a great place to buy gifts. The Shoppe is staffed by volunteers and is open to the public 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Go to www. pleasantonpeddlershoppe.com. BALLROOM DESSERT DANCE The National Charity League will host a free “Great Gatsby” themed Ballroom Dance for seniors from 7-9 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 21 at the Pleasanton Senior Center. Enjoy an evening of dancing, great music and light refreshments. Please register by calling 931-5365. Registration will close at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 20.

Religion & Spirituality PROGRESSIVE CHRISTIAN WORSHIP Lynnewood United Methodist Church at 4444 Black Ave. offers a friendly congregation where all are welcome. Sunday morning services are at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Childcare provided at both services, and Sunday school is at 10:30 a.m.. Children’s choir is at 11:40 a.m.-12:10 p.m.. At 5:30 p.m. on Sundays the church offers an informal service called “Come

As You Are” with music, prayer, and discussion. Contact Rev. Heather Hammer at 846-0221 or office@lynnewood.org. Go to www. lynnewood.org. SUNDAY SERVICES AT UNITY OF TRI-VALLEY Unity of Tri-Valley is a welcoming spiritual community for people of all faiths and backgrounds. We are a positive path for spiritual living. Whoever you are and wherever you are on your spiritual journey, you are welcome here. Children’s program available. Ongoing groups and activities. Join Reverend Micah Murdock, minister, at 10 a.m. every week for Sunday services at Unity of Tri-Valley, 7567 Amador Valley Blvd., Suite 108, Dublin. Call 829-2733 or go to www.trivalleyunity.org. EXPLORE YOUR SPIRITUALITY Invite 2.0 is to help explore the big questions and to find a deeper sense of your spiritual side. Is there something bigger out there? Is something missing? Join from 7:309 p.m. Wednesdays, now through Feb. 22 at St. Elizabeth Seton Church, 4001 Stoneridge Drive. Visit invite2.org.

Community Groups TRI VALLEY SUPPORT GROUP FOR FIBROMYALGIA, LUPUS AND ALL FORMS OF ARTHRITIS This group meets from 6:30-8 p.m. on the fourth Monday of every month at the Groves at Dublin Ranch in the Clubhouse, 3115 Finnian Way, Dublin. It hosts special speakers like doctors or specialists. For more information, call JoAnne at 875-0960. PLEASANTON COMMUNITY TOASTMASTERS: GUESTS WELCOME Learn more about public speaking in a fun-filled and supporting environment at 7:30 p.m. every Tuesday at the Highland Oaks Recreation Center, 4530 Sandalwood Drive. Enjoy improving your leadership skills, building confidence and meeting new friends. Go to pleasantontoastmasters.com.

TAKE US ALONG Cruisin’ the Riviera: Doreen and Tommy Colombo, Susan and Bob Scott, and Don and Jenny Underwood — all of Pleasanton — enjoyed the Pleasanton Weekly during their Princess Cruise to the Mexican Riviera. To submit your “Take Us Along” entry, email your photograph to srhodes@ pleasantonweekly.com. Be sure to identify who is in the photo (names listed from left to right), the location, the date and any relevant details about where you took your Weekly. Pleasanton Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 17


fogster.com THE TRI-VALLEY’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEB SITE Fogster.com offers FREE • postings online and the opportunity for your ad to appear in print to more than 80,000 readers. You can log on to fogster.com 24/7, and your online ad starts immediately. Some ads require payment.

Bulletin Board

Mind & Body

115 Announcements

417 Groups

PREGNANT? Considering adoption? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 1-877-879-4709 (Cal-SCAN)

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PREGNANT? Considering adoption? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877-362-2401

425 Health Services

140 Lost & Found DID YOU KNOW 7 IN 10 Americans or 158 million U.S. Adults read content from newspaper media each week? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN)

For Sale 201 Autos/Trucks/ Parts JAGUAR 2000 xj8 L Sedan 4-Door,$ 2630,4-WD,Cassette Player,CD Player,Leather Seats,Sunroof. Call me: 209-425-2754

202 Vehicles Wanted DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT to Heritage for the Blind. FREE 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care of. Call 800-731-5042 (Cal-SCAN) GET CASH FOR CARS/TRUCKS!!! All Makes/Models 2000-2016! Top $$$ Paid! Any Condition! Used or wrecked. Running or Not. Free Towing! Call For Offer: 1-888-417-9150. (Cal-SCAN) Got an older car, boat or RV? Do the humane thing. Donate it to the Humane Society. Call 1-800-743-1482 (Cal-SCAN)

210 Garage/Estate Sales Switch to DIRECTV. Lock in 2-Year Price Guarantee ($50/month) w/AT&T Wireless. Over 145 Channels PLUS Popular Movie Networks for Three Months, No Cost! Call 1-800-385-9017 (Cal-SCAN)

245 Miscellaneous DISH TV - BEST DEAL EVER! Only $39.99/mo. Plus $14.99/mo. Internet (where avail.) FREE Streaming. FREE Install (up to 6 rooms.) FREE HD-DVR. Call 1-800-357-0810 (Cal-SCAN) HOME BREAK-INS take less than 60 SECONDS. Don’t wait! Protect your family, your home, your assets NOW for as little as 70¢ a day! Call 855-404-7601 (Cal-SCAN) Protect your home with fully customizable security and 24/7 monitoring right from your smartphone. Receive up to $1500 in equipment, free (restrictions apply). Call 1-800-918-4119 (Cal-SCAN) Safe Step Walk-In Tub! Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch StepIn. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 800-799-4811 for $750 Off. (Cal-SCAN) SAWMILLS From only $4397.00- MAKE and SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills. com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N (Cal-SCAN)

Kid’s Stuff 345 Tutoring/Lessons Mathematics Tutoring & Test Preparation For immediate improvement, please contact us at 925-425-7099 or www.mtpca.net.

ELIMINATE CELLULITE and Inches in weeks! All natural. Odor free. Works for men or women. Free month supply on select packages. Order now! 844-703-9774. (Cal-SCAN) Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain? Get a pain-relieving brace — little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients Call Health Hotline Now! 1-800-796-5091 (Cal-SCAN) MAKE THE CALL to Start Getting Clean Today. Free 24/7 Helpline for alcohol and drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call Now: 855-732-4139 (AAN CAN) OXYGEN - Anytime. Anywhere. No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The All-New Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 844-359-3976. (Cal-SCAN)

440 Massage Therapy EVERY BUSINESS has a story to tell! Get your message out with California’s PRMedia Release -the only Press Release Service operated by the press to get press! For more info contact Cecelia @ 916-288-6011 or http://prmediarelease.com/california (Cal-SCAN)

Live Sign Person HAVE FUN EARNING EXTRA MONEY ON THE WEEKENDS! Have some fun and work off your energy or show off your moves! Are you Available Saturday’s and Sunday’s from 11am to 4pm? Are you dependable? Do you like being outside and are energetic? If so then we have the perfect job for you! We pay $17.00 an hour. Immediate opening! Job entails displaying a directional arrow in a high energy fashion to direct customers to our client’s location. The dress code is Neat and Clean! Khaki or plain light pants or light colored Shorts or long sleeve polo or button up shirt. Work hours are 4-6 hours on Saturday and Sunday, rain or shine (hours are subject to change). Please call and leave your NAME, PHONE NUMBER and WHICH CITY YOU LIVE IN and when is the best time to reach you. 1-800-350-3916

Business Services 601 Accounting/ Bookkeeping NEED HELP WITH QUICKBOOKS? Over 21 years experience in all aspects of bookkeeping. No job too big or too small. Call Linda at 925-918-2233.

604 Adult Care Offered A PLACE FOR MOM The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted,local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1-800-550-4822. (Cal-SCAN)

624 Financial

Jobs 500 Help Wanted Sales Representative California Trade Association located in Sacramento is seeking someone with strong knowledge for Advertising, print, digital and social media solutions, great with detail, an amazing attitude, and a passion for selling content and integrated partnerships. 3-5 years experience a plus. We offer a competitive base salary, commission and bonus plan, along with great benefit package. Email Resume and Salary History to jobs@ cnpa.com. EOE (Cal-SCAN) Cognitive Training Assistant Cognitive training assistant for middle aged lady to remain on schedule 4-6 hours per week 30 min-1 hr in her home. Must be mature & solution-oriented, & interest in neuroscience & cognitive development. Primary task: engage with client in brain training goals & find ways to motivate consistent accomplishment. Also occasionally driving client to local appointments & errands - which could be with use of their car. Recompense: $10/ hour to start. Requirements: driver’s license. If good match, more time per week and/ or additional responsibility potentially may be arranged. Reply to: Bill Williams Email: wlwilliams6182@gmail.com Phone: 510-220-4909. ENGINEERING Workday, Inc. has the following employment opportunities in Pleasanton, CA: Software Application Engineer position (SAESC-CA): Analyze, design, build, debug, and deliver software enhancements and new products. Senior Associate Product Engineer position (APDSW-CA): Become a product owner and subject matter expert by researching, summarizing, and prioritizing customer business requirements. Send your resume (must reference job title and job code) to Workday, Inc., Attn: Human Resources, 6230 Stoneridge Mall Road, Pleasanton, CA 94588

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Page 18 • January 20, 2017 • Pleasanton Weekly

Do You Owe Over $10K to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Call now 855-993-5796 (Cal-SCAN) SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY benefits. Unable to work? Denied benefits? We Can Help! WIN or Pay Nothing! Contact Bill Gordon & Associates at 1-800-966-1904 to start your application today! (Cal-SCAN)

Real Estate 809 Shared Housing/ Rooms ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com! (AAN CAN)

850 Acreage/Lots/ Storage N. Arizona Wilderness Ranch $236 MONTH - Quiet and secluded 37 acre off the grid self-sufficiency ranch bordering 640 wooded acres of State Trust lands at cool clear 6,200™ elevation. Minutes from historic pioneer town and fishing lake. True wilderness with free roaming wildlife, no urban noise and dark sky nights. Blend of evergreen woodlands & grassy meadows with sweeping views across surrounding uninhabited wilderness mountains and valleys. Abundant groundwater, rich loam garden soil and maintained road access. Camping and RV use ok. $27,500, $2,750 dn. with no qualifying seller financing. FREE BROCHURE with additional property descriptions, prices, photos, topo map, weather chart, area info. 1st United Realty 800.966.6690. (Cal-SCAN) Boat Storage Wanted Boat Storage wanted in Dublin, San Ramon, Sunol, or Pleasanton, in extra warehouse space, garage space, or space at a house. The boat on trailer is 32 feet long and 10 feet wide. I live in Pleasanton. Steve (925) 963-2518.

855 Real Estate Services

Health and Dental Insurance Lowest Prices. We have the best rates from top companies! Call Now! 888-989-4807. (Cal-SCAN)

DID YOU KNOW Information is power and content is King? Do you need timely access to public notices and remain relevant in today’s highly competitive market? Gain an edge with California Newspaper Publishers Association new innovative website capublicnotice.com and check out the Smart Search Feature. For more information call Cecelia @ (916) 288-6011 or www.capublicnotice.com (Cal-SCAN)

640 Legal Services

Tuesday 17th 2017f January 2017 11:59:00 PM

636 Insurance

DID YOU KNOW Information is power and content is King? Do you need timely access to public notices and remain relevant in today’s hostile business climate? Gain the edge with California Newspaper Publishers Association new innovative website capublicnotice.com and check out the FREE One-Month Trial Smart Search Feature. For more information call Cecelia @ (916) 288-6011 or www.capublicnotice.com (Cal-SCAN) Xarelto users have you had complications due to internal bleeding (after January 2012)? If so, you MAY be due financial compensation. If you don’t have an attorney, CALL Injuryfone today! 1-800-425-4701. (Cal-SCAN)

Home Services 751 General Contracting A NOTICE TO READERS: It is illegal for an unlicensed person to perform contracting work on any project valued at $500.00 or more in labor and materials. State law also requires that contractors include their license numbers on all advertising. Check your contractor’s status at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB (2752). Unlicensed persons taking jobs that total less than $500.00 must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

Legal Notices 995 Fictitious Name Statement SECRET GARDEN SPA FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 525625 The following person(s) doing business as: SECRET GARDEN SPA, 4713 FIRST ST., SUITE 252, PLEASANTON, CA 94566, is hereby registered by the following owner(s): Sujung Kim, 890 Davis St., Apt. 205, San Leandro, CA 94577. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. Signature of Registrant: Sujung Kim. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda on 12/19/2016. (Pleasanton Weekly, Dec. 30; 2016; Jan. 6, 13, 20; 2017) SUNSHINE PHOTO BOOTH FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 525022 The following person(s) doing business as: SUNSHINE PHOTO BOOTH, 161 SIERRAWOOD AVE., HAYWARD, CA 94544, is hereby registered by the following owner(s): Michael Chand, 161 Sierrawood Ave., Hayward, CA 94544. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. Signature of Registrant: Michael Chand. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda on 11/29/2016. (Pleasanton Weekly, Dec. 30; 2016; Jan. 6, 13, 20; 2017)

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 494887 The following person(s) has/have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name(s). The information given below is as it appeared on the fictitious business statement that was filed at the County Clerk-Recorder’s Office. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME(S): THE SIGNWORKS, 46 TRAYNOR STREET #7, HAYWARD, CA 94544 FILED IN ALAMEDA COUNTY ON: 08/13/2014 UNDER FILE NO. 494887 REGISTRANT’S NAME(S): BARRY QURAISHI, 3827 VINE STREET, PLEASANTON, CA 94566 THIS BUSINESS WAS CONDUCTED BY an Individual. Signature of Registrant: Barry Quraishi. This statement was filed with the County Clerk Recorder of Alameda County on Dec. 20, 2016. (Pleasanton Weekly, Jan. 6, 13, 20, 27; 2017) YOU & ME BEAUTY STUDIO FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 525867 The following person(s) doing business as: YOU & ME BEAUTY STUDIO, 4625 1ST STREET, SUITE #225, PLEASANTON, CA 94566, is hereby registered by the following owner(s): SHONIK CONSULTING INC., 741 S. TRADITION STREET, MOUNTAIN HOUSE, CA 95391. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. Signature of Registrant: Shoba Machani, CEO. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda on 12/28/2016. (Pleasanton Weekly, Jan. 6, 13, 20, 27; 2017) KING DESIGN ASSOCIATES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 525524 The following person(s) doing business as: KING DESIGN ASSOCIATES, 1724 BEACHWOOD WAY, PLEASANTON, CA 94566, is hereby registered by the following owner(s): Yvonne Marie King, 1724 Beachwood Way, Pleasanton, CA 94566. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein 01/24/2012. Signature of Registrant: Yvonne King. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda on 12/15/2016. (Pleasanton Weekly, Jan. 6, 13, 20, 27; 2017) BETA MEDICAL FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 525517 The following person(s) doing business as: BETA MEDICAL, 1724 BEACHWOOD WAY, PLEASANTON, CA 94566, is hereby registered by the following owner(s): David Allen King, 1724 Beachwood Way, Pleasanton, CA 94566. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein 01/24/2012. Signature of Registrant: David A. King. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda on 12/15/2016. (Pleasanton Weekly, Jan. 6, 13, 20, 27; 2017) TACTICAL GRANTS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 525506 The following person(s) doing business as: TACTICAL GRANTS, 573 MALBEC COURT, PLEASANTON, CA 94566, is hereby registered by the following owner(s): Susan Alison Campbell, 573 Malbec Court, Pleasanton, CA 94566. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. Signature of Registrant: Susan Alison Campbell. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda on 12/15/2016. (Pleasanton Weekly, Jan. 6, 13, 20, 27; 2017) STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 496705 The following person(s) has/have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name(s). The information given below is as it appeared on the fictitious business statement that was filed at the County Clerk-Recorder’s Office. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME(S): NATURAL SPINAL CARE, 7450 SAN RAMON ROAD, DUBLIN, CA 94568 FILED IN ALAMEDA COUNTY ON: 10/01/2014 UNDER FILE NO. 496705 REGISTRANT’S NAME(S): Jeffrey Layne, 22 Tweed Lane, Danville, CA 94526. Signature of Registrant: Jeffrey Layne. This statement was filed with the County Clerk Recorder of Alameda County on Dec. 19, 2016. (Pleasanton Weekly, Jan. 20, 27, Feb. 3, 10; 2017) NATURAL SPINAL CARE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 525617 The following person(s) doing business as: NATURAL SPINAL CARE, 7450 SAN RAMON ROAD, DUBLIN, CA 94568, is hereby registered by the following

owner(s): Yang DC Chiropractic PC, 7450 San Ramon Road, Dublin, CA 94568. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. Signature of Registrant: Jim Yang, CEO, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda on 12/19/2016. (Pleasanton Weekly, Jan. 20, 27, Feb. 3, 10; 2017)

997 All Other Legals SUMMONS (FAMILY LAW) NOTICE TO RESPONDENT (Aviso al Demandado): DAVID ADSETT You are being sued. Lo estan demandando. PETITIONER’S NAME IS: (El nombre del demandante es): SHARON SABONIS Case Number: HF16832126 (Numero del Caso) You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. Tiene 30 DIAS CORRIDOS despues de haber recibido la entrega legal de esta Citacion y Peticion, para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL-120 o FL-123) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal de una copia al demandante. Una carta o llamada telefonica no basta para protegerlo. Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede dar ordenes que afecten su matrimonio o pareja de hecho, sus bienes y la custodia de sus hijos. La corte tambien le puede ordenar que pague manutencion, y honorarios y costos legales. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario un formulario de exencion de cuotas. Si desea obtener asesoramiento legal, pongase en contacto de inmediato con un abogado. Puede obtener informacion para encontrar a un abogado en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California(www.sucorte.ca.gov), en el sitio Web de los Servicios Legales de California (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org) o poniendose en contacto con el colegio de abogados de su condado. NOTICE: The restraining orders on page 2 are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. AVISO: Las ordenes de restriccion que figuran en la pagina 2 valen para ambos conyuges o pareja de hecho hasta que se despida la peticion, se emita un fallo o la corte de otras ordenes. Cualquier autoridad de la ley que haya recibido o visto una copia de estas ordenes puede hacerlas acatar en cualquier lugar de California. 1. The name and address of the court are: (El nombre y direccion de la corte son): SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF ALAMEDA 24405 AMADOR STREET HAYWARD, CA 94544 2. The name, address, and telephone number of petitioner’s attorney, or petitioner without an attorney, are: (El nombre, direccion y numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante si no tiene abogado, son): JOHN T CHAMBERLIN 699 PETERS AVENUE, SUITE C PLEASANTON, CA 94566 (925)485-9666 Date (Fecha): SEPT. 22, 2016 Clerk, by (secretario, por) JAMIE HARRIS, Deputy (Asistente) (seal) NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: AVISO A LA PERSONA QUE RECIBIO LA ENTREGA: Esta entrega se realiza You are served as an individual. (Pleasanton Weekly, Jan. 20, 27, Feb. 3, 10; 2017)

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Real Estate The two locations impacting real estate activity in 2017 ‘We may be looking at a pretty decent, positive year for real estate sales in Pleasanton’ BY DAVID C. STARK

It’s common knowledge that location is the most important element in real estate. When predicting what 2017 holds for home buyers and sellers, two locations in particular are key: Pleasanton itself and Washington, D.C. Starting with Pleasanton, housing options will change dramatically in the next 12 months as several hundred apartments and approximately 200 condominiums and townhomes will come on the market. William Dorelich, 2017 president of the Bay East Association of Realtors, predicts more renters shouldn’t change the home ownership landscape — for now. “I don’t think they’re going to impact the resale market because this is a different demographic coming into the market both in terms of age and income,� he said. “It’s a good demographic. They want to put down roots. Probably in a two- to five-year timeframe, I think you’re going to see a lot of those people moving into apartments move into a purchase situation.� The ownership units coming on the market are different from the single-family detached homes that make up the majority of Pleasanton’s existing housing stock. They’re either condominiums or townhomes built at a higher density than most Pleasanton neighborhoods. “They are going to have an impact on the resale market absolutely because there will be some alternatives,� Doerlich said. “Within the emerging millennial homeownership market, one of the things they look for is a turn-key property; they’re not the typical suburban baby boomer who’s doing yardwork and remodeling on the weekends.� Doerlich said he sees these new homes in Pleasanton meaning more choices but having little impact on the price of existing homes. “I don’t think we’re looking at driving prices down because the prices of the new homes are equivalent to what’s on the market,� he added. The second location that could impact local real estate is Washington D.C., where decisions about interest rates could reverberate 3,000 miles away here in Pleasanton.

Mike Jacinto, a past president of the Bay East Association of Realtors said, “Whenever you have a movement in interest rates — and in this case, up — you’re going to have a certain segment of home buyers drop off because, mathematically, they may not be able to qualify because of the increase in the monthly payment, in general.� However, in Pleasanton, where the median sales price for a single-family detached home consistently topped $1 million during 2016, Jacinto said, “Buyers are not going to be impacted as much here.� Jacinto continued, “When you look at the profile of a home buyer here in Pleasanton and a movement up of between $150 to $220 a month, that’s not a significant impact dollar-wise to their overall qualifying budget. I don’t think you’re going to see much of a drop of in demand by buyers in Pleasanton.� While rising interest rates may not dampen demand, Jacinto said there could still be changes: “What you may find is rather than having 10 or 12 buyers bidding on a property, you may have a half a dozen.� Asked if higher rates may temper values rising as much as they have over the last couple of years, Jacinto said, “Perhaps. But we’re still looking at 2017 as being 4% to 5% higher in value compared to last year.� Another effect of rising interest rates on Pleasanton home sales may be seen in homes staying on the market a bit longer and, possibly, prices being negotiated a bit differently than they were six months ago. Jacinto said many buyers anticipated rising interest rates and are taking them in stride. He emphasized that buyers need to quantify the actual impact higher rates will have on their mortgage payment rather than just worry about rising rates in general. “If you don’t understand or don’t have numbers about how rates will hit your pocketbook, then all of a sudden you become more of a skeptic and you may say ‘Well, that’s too much of a rise in rates and I’ll just maybe save up or look somewhere else or See FORECAST on Page 20

Tri-Valley

Real Estate Directory

OPEN HOME GUIDE AND REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

PLEASANTON WEEKLY OPEN HOMES THIS WEEKEND For an online version with mapping or to list your open home go to: www.PleasantonWeekly.com/real_estate

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3 BEDROOMS 857 North L St. Sat/Sun 1-4 Coldwell Banker

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5 BEDROOMS 1513 Aria Court $1,175,000 Sun 1-4 Cindy & Gene Williams 918-2045

2 BEDROOMS 2291 Segundo Court #3 Sat/Sun 2-4 Joyce Jones

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3 BEDROOMS 6822 Siesta Court Call for price Sun 2-4 Dave & Sue Flashberger 463-0436

SALES AT A GLANCE This week’s data represents homes sold during Nov. 29-Dec. 30

Pleasanton (Nov. 29-Dec. 9) Total sales reported: 31 Lowest sale reported: $341,000 Highest sale reported: $2,600,000 Average sales reported: $1,056,129

Livermore (Nov. 29-Dec. 9) Total sales reported: 44 Lowest sale reported: $295,000 Highest sale reported: $1,488,000 Average sales reported: $742,693

San Ramon (Dec. 22-30) Total sales reported: 22 Lowest sale reported: $235,000 Highest sale reported: $2,025,000 Average sales reported: $782,091

Dublin (Nov. 29-Dec. 9) Total sales reported: 26 Lowest sale reported: $532,000 Highest sale reported: $1,321,000 Average sales reported: $832,250

Source: California REsource

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Pleasanton Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 19


REAL ESTATE

HOME SALES This week’s data represents homes sold during Nov. 29-Dec. 9

Pleasanton 6085 Allbrook Circle J. & R. Acosta to S. Venkata for $880,000 1477 Brookline Loop A. & Y. Walton to K. & C. May for $1,550,000 2754 Calle De La Loma Espiritu Trust to S. Martha for $1,365,000 1618 Calle Santa Anna J. & A. Bowen to Dunn Trust for $649,000 7690 Canyon Meadow Circle #C A. Yee to C. Tsen for $412,000 7 Castlewood Drive Schunck Trust to A. Haggag for $1,360,000 2692 Corte Elena Mockel Trust to B. & W. Shriber for $925,000 1587 East Gate Way Young Trust to R. Ng for $1,325,000 4112 Foothill Road GMWJ Limited to I. & S. Osman for $975,000 1432 Freeman Lane R. & K. Cushing to Vu Trust for $1,199,000 1335 Germano Way Nobel Management to J. Lu for $2,600,000 1038 Gray Fox Circle Randall Trust to Wallace Trust for $2,160,000 1463 Groth Circle Filbert Trust to B. & M. Locus for $710,000 4767 Harrison Street Collopy Trust to S. Braich for $850,000 7814 Knollbrook Drive Roszell Trust to B. & Z. Li for $955,000 457 Kottinger Drive J. & N. Lowe to T. Wang for $1,425,000 1550 Lexington Lane Civic Gateway to B. Lu for $1,293,000 3272 Melanie Circle W. & R. Dee to Z. Cao for $1,039,500 4855 Merganser Court Kelly Trust to S. Jenkins for $897,000 2625 Monarda Court Brosdal Trust to Z. & Y. Xu for $1,030,000 4324 Muirwood Drive C. Ling to V. Dessai for $860,000

5175 Northway Road K. & J. Hess to R. Niu for $975,000 1308 Rhone Place Bommarito Trust to B. Pearce for $1,937,000 482 Rose Avenue Pedraza Trust to A. & S. Pedraza for $450,000 2572 Sanderling Drive S. Jenkins to M. Namazi for $1,138,000 3399 Smoketree Commons Drive A. Tarzian to J. & L. Shannon for $455,000 4848 Treewood Court D. Zadwick to M. & A. Marsh for $893,000 7234 Valley View Court R. & K. Watkins to M. Ukidave for $715,000 3847 Vineyard Avenue #A J. Gonzalez to N. Hughes for $350,000 3847 Vineyard Avenue #E K. Poon to L. Kislaya for $341,000 2392 Willet Way Mcquade Trust to P. & S. Kamali for $1,026,500

Dublin 6836 Amador Valley Boulevard Leong Trust to D. & M. Kathan for $692,500 6871 Baird Street Pulte Home to K. & J. Hoskere for $1,130,000 6879 Baird Street Pulte Home to A. & E. Malcampo for $1,072,000 7508 Bonniewood Lane M. & A. Marsh to P. Acharya for $793,000 3337 Bramante Lane S. Nagarathinam to S. Ravulakollu for $843,000 2513 Brandini Drive T. Norman to B. & V. Neel for $1,321,000 4441 Brannigan Street B. Fong to D. Ng for $661,000 4815 Brannigan Street P. Rashidi to J. Daswani for $763,000 3679 Brodie Way A. Mah to C. & H. Kao for $1,010,000 3357 Central Parkway L. Siow to R. Aston for $890,000 3385 Dublin Boulevard #124 B. & V. Neel to J. Patel for $575,000 Source: California REsource

Why your attic is key to roof check-ups All the recent rain is a reminder that the health of your home’s roof is important. It’s also important for energy efficiency. But it is not necessary to climb a ladder 25 feet or so into the sky to check on the condition of your roof. That’s where your attic comes in. According to Jason Joplin, program manager of the Center for the Advancement of Roofing Excellence, that space probably being used mainly for storage can substitute, as a fallback, for the eyeball roof check normally recommended to be done every pre-winter and spring. “Roofs actually create an insulated barrier that helps trap heat inside, and most attic spaces are located right below them,â€? Joplin said. “That makes them perfect for spotting potential problem areas and damage without worrying about falling off a ladder.â€? Here’s what to look for: • Water leaks. On a rainy day, shine a

flashlight up in the attic to check not only for dripping water and condensation, but also for water stains on the ceiling, walls and floors. All signal that water is finding its way beneath the roof’s shingles or behind its flashings. • Ventilation. “Think of the attic as the lungs of the house,â€? Joplin advised. “It has to be able to breathe in order to function properly.â€? Which is to say, vents stuffed with debris need to be cleared. • Animal damage. To avoid the havoc refugeseeking birds, bats, squirrels and raccoons can create, warning bells should sound — followed by a call to a pest-control professional — if you spot any telltale signs such as nests, droppings and gnawed wood, wires or insulations. • Structural problems. The mere hint of a sagging roof could indicate potential structural weakness requiring professional repair. Q —NewsUSA

FORECAST

could be poised, and maybe an increase in interest rates does push some people off the fence — both home buyers and home sellers — that maybe now is the time to make that move. And if I don’t make that move what might happen if in a year from now interest rates are higher?� Jacinto concluded his prediction for 2017 with, “I actually think that we may be looking at a pretty decent, positive year for real estate sales in Pleasanton.� Q Editor’s note: David C. Stark is the public affairs director for the Bay East Association of Realtors, based in Pleasanton.

Continued from Page 19

I’ll rent.’ But once you quantify, then you see how a payment fits into your budget. A buyer may not like it, but it will still fit into their budget,� he said. Increasing interest rates may be getting lots of attention nationwide, but Jacinto said local factors are more important. “It all comes down to inventory and it has for the last number of years,� Jacinto said. “I don’t think anything is different but I do think that we

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Pleasanton Market Update Activity Picking Up While December was a typiPleasanton Market At A Glance cally slow month for PleasDecember 2016 anton, there are signs that things will pick up during the first quarter of the New Year. There is optimism that the economy will pick up and consumer confidence is rising. Interest rate increases appear to be on the horizon, which could force some buyers out of the market but a strengthening economy could offset that. Inventory has been the biggest constraint in the market for the past five year and there are no indications that that will change in the short term. Fewer homes were for sale at the end of December than at any time since December 2013. Sales continue to be dragged down by a shortage of inventory. Prices softened in December, in spite of the short supply. That is unlikely to be the case for long, as there is still strong demand for housing. 24 properties were actively listed at the end of December, down from 44 at the end of November and 36 a year ago. December’s inventory represented only a 0.8 month supply, compared to 1.0 month at the end of November and 1.3 months at the end of December 2015. Pending sales dipped 24%, from 42 in November to 32 in December. That was still more than went pending ...

Go to www.680homes.com to read the rest of this article. Pleasanton Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 21


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©2017 Coldwell Banker. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company and Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office is Owned by a Subsidiary of NRT LLC. This information was supplied by Seller and/or other sources. Broker has not and will not verify this information and assumes no legal responsibility for its accuracy. Buyers should investigate these issues to their own satisfaction. Real Estate Licensees affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are Independent Contractor Sales Associates and are not employees of NRT LLC., Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC or Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. CalBRE License #01908304.

©2013 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office is Owned by a Subsidiary of NRT LLC. BRE License #01908304.

Pleasanton Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 23


Happy New Year ~ The Flashberger Group ~ 2017 is Going to be Another Great Year for Real Estate! JUST SOLD!

PREMIERE OPEN HOUSE SUN. 2-4PM

6822 Siesta Court, Pleasanton Simply lovely one level home with 3 bdrms, 2 baths and a beautifully remodeled kitchen! Priced in the mid $800,000’s

DIY DREAM HOME!

2945 Amoroso Court, Pleasanton Beautiful Vintage Heights Custom home with 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths and over 3000 sq ft. Beautiful granite kitchen and cozy family room. $1,461,800

ANOTHER SALE PENDING

COMING SOON!

217 Wild Flower Court, Pleasanton Wonderful Vintage Hills II Home 4 BD/2.5 BA, over 1900 sq ft. Bring your paint Beautifully updated. New interior and exterior paint, brush and hammer for instant sweat equity. Shown GEVTIXERH[SSH¾SSVMRK9THEXIHOMXGLIR[UYEVX^ by appt. Priced in the low $800,000’s counters. New master bathroom! Beautiful views!

COMING SOON!

COMING SOON!

COMING SOON IN DUBLIN!

REALTORS®, GRI, CRS, SRES Beautiful Birdland Home 5 bedrooms + a bonus room. Beautiful backyard paradise with sparkling pool, arbor and outdoor kitchen. 10,000 sq ft lot. High $1,200,000’s

1513 ARIA CT., LIVERMORE

Coming Soon in Foxbrough Estates 6379 Dana Court, Pleasanton Fabulous custom home with 5 BD/4.5 BA and over Wonderful one level home on a quiet court. 3 BD/2 4200 sq ft on an expansive parcel with beautiful BA. Dual pane windows, new exterior paint, updated views and a sparkling pool. 3 car garage. granite kitchen, remodeled baths! Low $800,000’s

SOLD!

OPEN SUNDAY 1-4

Desirable Prima Neighborhood, South Livermore! 3837 sq. ft., 5 bedrooms, 4 full baths, 15k sq. ft. lot in great court location! OFFERED AT $1,175,000

Super clean one level home with 4 bdrms, 2 baths. Spacious family room and kitchen. Wonderful court location. Priced in the low $700,000’s

SOLD!

925.463.0436 www.SoldInAFlash.com

LOVE it or LIST it Darby Group Full Service Professional Real Estate Team

1832 RAILROAD AVENUE, LIVERMORE

4804 MAUREEN CIRCLE, LIVERMORE

Lovely 2 bed/2 bath condo with Great Price - Ready to move 2 car oversized tandem garage. in. Built 1994. Nearly 1800 sq/ft Like new built in 2014. space on 1 level.

Offering the following services: • Top of the line listing service • Property management • Property renovations including kitchen, bath and full house remodel services

Darla Harman Cindy and Gene Williams REALTORS® BRE LIC # 01370076 and 00607511

925.918.2045 www.WilliamsReGroup.com

WHY BUY WITH KW? We love helping buyers ½RHXLIMVHVIEQLSQI8LEX´W why we work with each client individually, taking the time to understand their unique lifestyles, needs and wishes. Contact us at 925.397.4200 XS½RHSYXLS[[IGERLIPT]SY

925.382.6767

David Darby

www.DarlaHarman.com Homes@DarlaHarman.com REALTOR® LIC # 01230013

REALTOR® LIC # 01842223 RE

Wishing you good times, good cheer, and a memorable new year. We want to thank you for your business, loyalty, and support in 2016. We hope to see you again in 2017!

Happy New Year from the KW family to yours!

925.858.4910 www.ddarbygroup.com w

'32+6%890%8-32783

KELLER WILLIAMS TRI VALLEY *36&)-2+

#1 IN MARKET SHARE FOR ALL OF 2016!

BECOME PART OF SOMETHING BIGGER

JENNIFER HAUS

Keller Williams Realty is a company that changes lives. Contact me about a career with KW.

Team Leader 925.628.4077 Jennifer.Haus@kw.com

5994 W. Las Positas, Suite 101, Pleasanton | 459 Main St., Pleasanton | 660 Main St., Pleasanton | 2300 First St., Suite 316, Livermore | Broker License #01395362 Page 24 • January 20, 2017 • Pleasanton Weekly

Pleasanton Weekly January 20, 2017  
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