Issuu on Google+

Pleasanton Weekly

DECK THE HALLS Warm memorable holidays begin with decorations Âť14 WWW.PLEASANTONWEEKLY.COM

6/,8))) .5-"%2s./6%-"%2 

Presenting our

7 20

BUSINESS NEWS TRI-VALLEY LIFE

Arts & Entertainment

NEW SECTIONS

Tri-Valley Heroes

See Page 11

INSIDE THIS WEEK â–  NEWS: Council to vote on downtown guidelines 5 â–  NEWS: Former cop charged with elder abuse 5 â–  LIVING: Home ec teacher has recipe for success 15


COMING SOON!

The new Club One at Pleasanton Join as a CHARTER MEMBER for our best rates!

BE ONE OF THE FIRST

to call Club One at Pleasanton home. Club One at Pleasanton is our neighborhood club that brings together premium group fitness programming typically only found in high-end boutique studios with the exceptional member experience and amenities that we’re known for. Members enjoy all the convenient extras included in membership, so you can focus on you. Get back to what you love with the support and motivation of the industry’s best and a community of like-minded members.

Scan the QR code to join online today at our lowest rate ($20 monthly savings)! Or schedule a sneak peek with our presale office by calling 925/271-0564. > Four dedicated studios: barre, group

fitness, indoor cycling & Pilates > 17,000 sq. ft. of fitness > 2,000 sq. ft. Playcare for infants & kids

up to 12 years old > Certified personal training

> Extensive group fitness schedule: barre,

indoor cycling, yoga & more included with membership > Specialty TRX®, Pilates Reformer

& functional training > The latest cardio & strength

> Staff chiropractor > Family & member lounges > Complimentary WiFi, day lockers, unlimited

towels & toiletries > Ample complimentary parking

training equipment

CLUB ONE AT PLEASANTON s 5860 W. Las Positas Blvd., Pleasanton, CA 94588 s www.ClubOne.com/pleasanton s 925/271-0564 Page 2ÊUÊNovember 23, 2012ÊUÊPleasanton Weekly


AROUND PLEASANTON

GRAHAM-HITCH MORTUARY BY JEB BING

Dignified Care & Compassionate Service Since 1891

Saying goodbye to 2 old friends

Email writing samples and a short bio to editor@pleasantonweekly.com.

CLOCK REPAIR

T

wo news reports in recent days dampened a bit of the holiday spirit in my household where Hostess-brand Twinkies and Ding Dongs used to be a favorite in our younger days. Then I learned that Newsweek, which I carried for years in my college backpack and later my briefcase, is also exiting the market, or at least its print edition is at the end of the year. Perhaps it’s a case of advanced nostalgia, but there’s something sad about seeing old friends disappear. As for Twinkies, the demise of the Hostess products probably has more to do with healthier eating habits today than because of a strike against the company by the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union (a mouthful in itself), which is getting the blame. We haven’t had a Twinkie in our house for years. Still, just as we keep an empty box of Marshall Field’s chocolate mints in the cupboard, a Twinkie or two would be something to treasure if only to show the grandchildren what truly unhealthy (but terribly tasty) treats we used to eat. When the news broke, we dashed over to the Hostess outlet store in Dublin, only to find it closed already. The shelves still marked with Hostess brand price tags at Safeway and Target were also bare. Trying online, we found the demand for Twinkies was especially brisk with, at one time, more than 17,000 active listings for Twinkies and prices varying widely. In the end, we took a pass, leaving the Hostess treats to the memory books. Not so for Newsweek, though. Although my subscription lapsed long ago as the weekly magazine lost its zest for timely global news reports, I wanted a copy for old time’s sake to keep on the shelf along with old copies of publications such as the Christian Science Monitor that also have gone all-digital. There’s a difference between keeping newspapers and magazines compared to storing

Bloggers and freelance writers wanted.

Timely Service

Free Estimates Free Pick-up & Delivery in Tri-Valley

them “in the clouds.� It’s hard to spread a digital publication out on the kitchen counter and leaf through the pages, ads and all. Of course, we all read off our Smartphone, iPad and laptop screens now, including the daily online reports by the Pleasanton Weekly and its sister publications covering Dublin, San Ramon and Danville. It’s just that for a career newspaperman like me, there’s still the leisurely pace a reader finds in the feel and content of a magazine like Newsweek. Both Hostess and Newsweek leave a lot of history -- and employees -- as they go. Roughly 18,500 workers will be out of work when Texas-based Hostess Brands finally shuts down. Investors may buy some of the assets in the coming bankruptcy sale, but Twinkies, Sno Balls and Ding Dongs might be gone. Other iconic brands, such as Wonder Bread and Dolly Madison, may find new bakers to use the popular brand names, but the workforce at Hostess’ wholesale bakeries and its retail outlets are already mostly gone. As one blogger put it, the baker’s union, in refusing to end its strike and accept lower wages and benefits, “gave 18,000 people an opportunity to find another job� in a still troubled economy. Far fewer employees are affected by Newsweek’s decision to end its print edition on Dec. 31. The magazine has lost circulation and reduced staff since restructuring under the ownership of the Washington Post in 2008. It lost $11 million in the first quarter of 2010, alone. Most newspapers and magazines today, including this one, are moving forward with online editions that have broad appeal to the new digital generation. In Newsweek’s case, however, the decision is more of a last gasp, a sad ending for a once-great national magazine. N

About the Cover These community leaders were honored Monday night with the ďŹ rst-ever Tri-Valley Heroes awards presented by the Pleasanton Weekly and its sister online publications — Dublin Tri-Valley Views, San Ramon Express and Danville Express. From left to right, they are Chris Miller, Bob Tucknott, Cynthia Ruzzi, San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District Chief Richard Price, Jeff Seaberg, Cassandra Bankson, Claire Williams, Sandra J. Wing and Darlene Gayler. Photo by Jay Flachsbarth. Design by Trina Cannon. Vol. XIII, Number 45

Advance Planning Made Easy

Byfield’s Clock Shop Call (925) 736-9165

Call Deanna for a FREE consultation. In-home visits available.

See Your Best Look Your Best! Enjoy life with less dependence on contacts or glasses.

4167 First Street, Pleasanton

Call Valley EyeCare Center today to schedule a

925-846-5624

Crematory Privately Owned & Operated

FREE LASIK CONSULTATION Custom Wave Front LASIK And Laser Vision Correction Jonathan Savell M.D. and Michael Gagnon M.D. Experienced Surgeons Stanford Faculty

FD#429

925-460-5000 Pleasanton

The online guide to Pleasanton businesses t.BLFQVSDIBTFT t8SJUFBOESFBESFWJFXT t'JOEEFBMTBOEDPVQPOT t#VZHJGUDFSUJĂśDBUFT t%JTDPWFSMPDBMCVTJOFTTFT When you shop locally, good things happen to make our community stronger: t4BMFTUBYEPMMBSTTUBZJOUIF DPNNVOJUZ t:PVIFMQUPTVTUBJOUIF VOJRVFBOEEJWFSTF CVTJOFTTFTUIBUNBLFPVS TIPQQJOHBSFBTWJCSBOU t:PVSFEVDFZPVSDBSCPO GPPUQSJOU t"OEXIFOZPVTIPQBU MPDBMMZownedCVTJOFTTFT  ZPVBMTPTVQQPSUPVS GSJFOETBOEOFJHICPST XIPBSFSVOOJOHUIFTF CVTJOFTTFT EPOBUJOHUP DPNNVOJUZFWFOUTBOE DBVTFT IJSJOHPVSLJETBOE HFUUJOHJOWPMWFEJONBLJOH 1MFBTBOUPOBCFUUFSQMBDF

Good for Business. Good for You. Good for the Community. Visit ShopPleasanton.com today

925-449-4000 Livermore

www.ValleyEyeCareCenter.com

wellness at your door NEW!

Order Online for

FREE DELIVERY or In-store Pick-up                    (see map online)

(888) 99-Harborside

www.harborsidehealthcenter.com/ep  $$"!*!'"" &!"%e      )# ( Pleasanton WeeklyĂŠUĂŠNovember 23, 2012ĂŠU Page 3


Streetwise

ASKED AT HANDLES

WEEKLY MEETING NOTICES

2012

City Council Special Meeting Tuesday, November 27, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. Council Chamber, 200 Old Bernal Avenue UĂŠ `ÂœÂŤĂŒĂŠ>ĂŠĂ€iĂƒÂœÂ?Ă•ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠiĂƒĂŒ>LÂ?ÂˆĂƒÂ…ÂˆÂ˜}ĂŠwĂ?i`ĂŠ>˜`ĂŠĂ•Â˜ÂˆvÂœĂ€Â“ĂŠĂ€ivĂ•ĂƒiĂŠVÂœÂ?Â?iVĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠ>˜`ĂŠ Ă€iVĂžVÂ?ˆ˜}ĂŠĂƒiĂ€Ă›ÂˆViĂŠĂ€>ĂŒiĂƒĂŠvÂœĂ€ĂŠĂ€iĂƒÂˆ`iÂ˜ĂŒÂˆ>Â?ĂŠ>˜`ĂŠVœ““iĂ€Vˆ>Â?ĂŠVĂ•ĂƒĂŒÂœÂ“iĂ€Ăƒ UĂŠ ÂœÂ˜ĂƒÂˆ`iĂ€ĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠÂˆÂ“ÂŤÂ?i“iÂ˜ĂŒ>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂœÂŤĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂƒĂŠÂœvĂŠi>ĂƒĂ•Ă€iĂŠ**ĂŠÂŤĂ€ÂœĂ›ÂˆĂƒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂƒĂŠĂ€iÂ?>ĂŒi`ĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ `iĂ›iÂ?ÂœÂŤÂ“iÂ˜ĂŒĂŠÂœvĂŠÂ…ÂˆÂ?Â?ĂƒÂˆ`iĂŠ>Ă€i>ĂƒĂŠĂœÂˆĂŒÂ…ÂˆÂ˜ĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ ÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠÂœvĂŠ*Â?i>Ăƒ>Â˜ĂŒÂœÂ˜ UĂŠ *Ă•LÂ?ˆVĂŠi>Ă€ÂˆÂ˜}\ĂŠ*££‡änĂ“{É*£Ó‡äǙn]ĂŠ ÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠÂœvĂŠ*Â?i>Ăƒ>Â˜ĂŒÂœÂ˜ĂŠqĂŠ ÂœÂ˜ĂƒÂˆ`iĂ€ĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ Ă€>vĂŒĂŠ

ÂœĂœÂ˜ĂŒÂœĂœÂ˜ĂŠÂœĂƒÂŤÂˆĂŒ>Â?ÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠĂ•Âˆ`iÂ?ˆ˜iĂƒĂŠvÂœĂ€ĂŠVœ““iĂ€Vˆ>Â?ĂŠLĂ•ĂƒÂˆÂ˜iĂƒĂƒiĂƒĂŠ>˜`ĂŠĂƒÂŤiVˆ>Â?ĂŠ iĂ›iÂ˜ĂŒĂƒĂŠĂœÂˆĂŒÂ…ÂˆÂ˜ĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ ÂœĂœÂ˜ĂŒÂœĂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ÂŤiVˆwVĂŠ*Â?>Â˜ĂŠĂ€i>Ê­ ÂœĂœÂ˜ĂŒÂœĂœÂ˜ÂŽĂŠ>˜`ĂŠĂ€iÂ?>ĂŒi`ĂŠ *Â?i>Ăƒ>Â˜ĂŒÂœÂ˜ĂŠĂ•Â˜ÂˆVÂˆÂŤ>Â?ĂŠ Âœ`iÊ­* ÂŽĂŠ>“i˜`“iÂ˜ĂŒĂƒ]ĂŠÂˆÂ˜VÂ?Ă•`ˆ˜}ĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠVĂ€i>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂœvĂŠ ˜iĂœĂŠÂ…ÂœĂƒÂŤÂˆĂŒ>Â?ÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠ`ÂˆĂƒĂŒĂ€ÂˆVĂŒĂƒĂŠ>˜`ĂŠÂ˜iĂœĂŠÂ…ÂœĂ•Ă€]ĂŠÂ˜ÂœÂˆĂƒi]ĂŠ>˜`ĂŠÂœÂŤiĂ€>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠĂ€iÂľĂ•ÂˆĂ€i“iÂ˜ĂŒĂƒĂŠvÂœĂ€ĂŠ Â…ÂœĂƒÂŤÂˆĂŒ>Â?ÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠĂ•ĂƒiĂƒĂŠ ÂœĂœÂ˜ĂŒÂœĂœÂ˜Ă†ĂŠ>˜`ĂŠ>ĂŠ ÂˆĂŒĂžÂ‡ĂœÂˆ`iĂŠ* ĂŠ>“i˜`“iÂ˜ĂŒĂŠVÂ…>˜}ˆ˜}ĂŠĂœÂ…iÂ˜ĂŠ Ă€iĂƒĂŒ>Ă•Ă€>Â˜ĂŒĂƒĂŠĂƒiĂ€Ă›ÂˆÂ˜}ĂŠ>Â?Vœ…œÂ?ĂŠÂ“Ă•ĂƒĂŒĂŠ>ÂŤÂŤÂ?ÞÊvÂœĂ€ĂŠ>ĂŠ œ˜`ÂˆĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜>Â?ĂŠ1ĂƒiĂŠ*iĂ€Â“ÂˆĂŒ]ĂŠ>˜`ĂŠvÂœĂ€ĂŠ ĂŒÂ…iĂŠÂŤĂ€iÂŤ>Ă€>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂœvĂŠ>ĂŠ i}>ĂŒÂˆĂ›iĂŠ iVÂ?>Ă€>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜

Planning Commission 7i`Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;`>Ă&#x17E;]Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;n]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\ääĂ&#x160;°Â&#x201C;° Council Chamber, 200 Old Bernal Avenue UĂ&#x160; PUD-93, Bruce Myers, Danville School Street Investment Ă&#x160; ÂŤÂŤÂ?Â&#x2C6;V>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;*Â?>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160;1Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; iĂ&#x203A;iÂ?Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;­*1 ÂŽĂ&#x160; iĂ&#x203A;iÂ?Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;*Â?>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>ÂŤÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;>Â?Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;VĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;`iĂ&#x152;>VÂ&#x2026;i`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Â?iÂ&#x2021;v>Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x160;`iĂ&#x203A;iÂ?Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; >ÂŤÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x152;iÂ?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;°Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;>VĂ&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Â?Â&#x153;V>Ă&#x152;i`Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x17E;V>Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;,Â&#x153;>`Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;Ă&#x203A;>V>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; ­* Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;{nĂ&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160;{ÂŽ]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x17E;V>Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;-ÂŤiVÂ&#x2C6;wVĂ&#x160;*Â?>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;i> UĂ&#x160; P12 1693, Arun Pai, General Contractor Ă&#x160; ÂŤÂŤÂ?Â&#x2C6;V>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; iĂ&#x192;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;,iĂ&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x153;Ă&#x160;>ÂŤÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;>Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;VĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>ÂŤÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x152;iÂ?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;{]Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2C6;nĂ&#x160; Ă&#x192;ÂľĂ&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Â?iĂ&#x160;v>Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;ÂŁÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;ÂľĂ&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;>VÂ&#x2026;i`Ă&#x160;}>Ă&#x20AC;>}iĂ&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2C6;äĂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â?LĂ&#x160;,>Â&#x2DC;VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;i]Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;xĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Â?LĂ&#x160;,>Â&#x2DC;VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; UĂ&#x160; P12-1731, Jeff Schroeder, Ponderosa Homes Ă&#x160; 7Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;Ă&#x160;-iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x153;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iViÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;iÂ?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;>ÂŤÂŤÂ?Â&#x2C6;V>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;`iÂ&#x201C;Â&#x153;Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;iĂ?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Â&#x2C6;`iÂ&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;LÂ&#x2C6;Â?iĂ&#x160;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x192;ÂŤ>ViĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;VĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;ÂŁ{Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Â?iĂ&#x160;v>Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Â&#x2C6;`iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x160;`iĂ&#x203A;iÂ?Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; >ÂŤÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x152;iÂ?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;°äÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x160;>VĂ&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Â?Â&#x153;V>Ă&#x152;i`Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;{Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2DC;Â?iĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â?iĂ&#x203A;>Ă&#x20AC;` UĂ&#x160; P12-1744, Dusty Cars/John Omar Suer Ă&#x160; ÂŤÂŤÂ?Â&#x2C6;V>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;>Â?Ă&#x160;1Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160;*iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x152;Â&#x2021;L>Ă&#x192;i`Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;LÂ&#x2C6;Â?iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x192;>Â?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;VÂ?iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;>}iĂ&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;`Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;ÂŤ>ViĂ&#x160;`iĂ&#x192;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x152;i`Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;VÂ?iĂ&#x160;`Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;ÂŤÂ?>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;{Ă&#x160; -Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2DC;Â?iĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â?iĂ&#x203A;>Ă&#x20AC;`]Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; UĂ&#x160; P12-1753, City of Pleasanton Ă&#x160; ÂŤÂŤÂ?Â&#x2C6;V>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;/Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â?iĂ&#x160;ÂŁnĂ&#x160;­<Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}ÂŽĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;*Â?i>Ă&#x192;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x2C6;ÂŤ>Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;`iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;`Â&#x2C6;vĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;>ÂŤĂ&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŁn°änĂ&#x160;­ iwÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;>``Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;>ÂŤĂ&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŁn°£äxĂ&#x160;­ Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;>}iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x160; "ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x160;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;>LÂ?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;ViĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x20AC;`Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2021;L>Ă&#x192;i`Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x2022;VĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;>Â?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Â&#x2C6;`iÂ&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x192; UĂ&#x160; PUD-87, Sares Regis/E&S Ring â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Auf der Maur/Rickenbach Property Ă&#x160; 7Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;Ă&#x160;-iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x153;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iViÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;*Â?>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160;1Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;

iĂ&#x203A;iÂ?Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;>ÂŤÂŤÂ?Â&#x2C6;V>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;VĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;{xĂ&#x160;>ÂŤ>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>ÂŤÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x152;iÂ?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x17D;n]Ă&#x2021;nÂŁĂ&#x160;Ă&#x192;ÂľĂ&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x152;>Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x160;ViÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Â?`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;v>ViĂ&#x160; ÂŤ>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}]Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iÂ?>Ă&#x152;i`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â?Â&#x153;V>Ă&#x152;i`Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;ÂŁxäĂ&#x160; iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;>Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;iĂ&#x160;­Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;i>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;>Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;iĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2DC;Â?iĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â?iĂ&#x203A;>Ă&#x20AC;`ÂŽ

Energy & Environment Committee 7i`Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;`>Ă&#x17E;]Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;n]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;x\ääĂ&#x160;°Â&#x201C;° "ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;-iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160;,Â&#x153;>` UĂ&#x160; Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;VĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;*Â?>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;ÂŤÂ?iÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;1ÂŤ`>Ă&#x152;i

Bicycle, Pedestrian & Trails Committee Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x17E;]Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;°Â&#x201C;° -iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â?>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;]Ă&#x160;xĂ&#x17D;xĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160; Â?Ă&#x203A;`° UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;ÂŤÂ?iĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;/Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x160;,iÂŤ>Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;]Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2DC;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;*Â?>ViĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;­ iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x160;/Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2C6;Â?ÂŽ UĂ&#x160; /Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â?iVĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;,iÂŤÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;

East Pleasanton SpeciďŹ c Planning Workshop /Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;`>Ă&#x17E;]Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Â&#x2122;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;°Â&#x201C;°Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â?iÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;ÂŤÂ&#x153;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160;,Â&#x201C;°]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;ääĂ&#x160; iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;°

Commissions and Committees Recruitment The City of Pleasanton invites applications for the following commissions and committees:

Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;6>V>Â&#x2DC;VÂ&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192; VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;6Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;>Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;iiĂ&#x160;qĂ&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x160;6>V>Â&#x2DC;VĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160;vĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;i>VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Â?Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;V>Ă&#x152;i}Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192;\ UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x160;-iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C; UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x160;,i>Â?Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; iĂ&#x203A;iÂ?Â&#x153;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC; UĂ&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;iiÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x2030; Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Â?Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E; UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;>Â&#x2DC;VÂ&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x160;-iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x192; UĂ&#x160; i`Â&#x2C6;V>Â?Ă&#x160;/iVÂ&#x2026;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Â?Â&#x153;}Ă&#x17E; UĂ&#x160; *Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;viĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;>Â?Ă&#x160;-iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C; Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;}Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;iiĂ&#x160;qĂ&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;6>V>Â&#x2DC;VÂ&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192; Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;-iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x160;6>V>Â&#x2DC;VĂ&#x17E; Â&#x2C6;LĂ&#x20AC;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;6>V>Â&#x2DC;VÂ&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192; *Â?>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x160;6>V>Â&#x2DC;VĂ&#x17E; 9Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x160;6>V>Â&#x2DC;VĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160;vĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;i>VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Â?Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;V>Ă&#x152;i}Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192;\ UĂ&#x160; 6Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?>}iĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;-VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2030;-Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;i UĂ&#x160; /Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;``Â?iĂ&#x160;-VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;>`i 9Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;*Â?>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;"Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;iiĂ&#x160;qĂ&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;``Â?iĂ&#x160;-VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160;*>Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;6>V>Â&#x2DC;VĂ&#x17E; Â?>Â&#x201C;i`>Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;ÂľĂ&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;L>Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x160;6>V>Â&#x2DC;VĂ&#x17E;

Help those in need with the

The above represents a sampling of upcoming meeting items. For complete information, please visit www.ci.pleasanton.ca.us/community/calendar Page 4Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;November 23, 2012Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Pleasanton Weekly

Lisa Cole Mom, teacher, and 40th birthday girl It sounds so cliche to say that you are as young as you feel, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m finding that it is true. Turning 40 is less about a number and more about living in the moment, being my best self and having gratitude for the abundance of blessings in my life.

Pleasanton Weekly Holiday Fund Visit PleasantonWeekly.com/ HolidayFund to donate.

On behalf of those who ultimately beneďŹ t from your donation, thank you for your generosity and help.

Lisa Guerrera Teacher on leave, 40-year-old rockstar Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the new 20! I was a little nervous about my 40th birthday, because of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;over-the-hillâ&#x20AC;? mentality. My husband and I turned 40 within a week of each other, and we celebrated with back-to-back trips. We went to Hawaii with our family, and then flew to Cancun with friends, where I proved that I still have it. 40 is just a number.

In partnership with:

Barrie Shaffer Account executive, loving life in her 40s 40 is foxy! Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the best time of my life; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m enjoying my family and friends, and I appreciate things more. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m more confident, and feel younger and healthier than ever.

Looking for furniture, electronics, sporting goods, household items or freebies? Browse classifieds online or place an ad today!

Julie Castillo Teacher, happily approaching the big 4-0 According to Pit Bull, 40 is the new 30. I think women are just coming into their own at 40; they are smart, strong, have dealt with husbands and children, and are simply awesome and beautiful.

Colleen Kinne Teacher; 40, fun and fabulous Forty parties in a year, baby! I just turned 40, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to celebrate all year. I went into it a bit frightened, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been great. I am trying to take better care of myself by eating well and exercising, and in my head and heart I still feel young.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Compiled by Kerry Nally

Applications are available at the City Clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office, 123 Main Street, or on the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s web site at www.cityofpleasantonca.gov For additional information, contact the Office of the City Clerk at (925) 931-5027 Applications must be received no later than 4:00 p.m., Monday, December 3, 2012.

ALL MEETINGS ARE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC AND PUBLIC COMMENT IS WELCOME

What does turning 40 mean to you?

Have a Streetwise question? E-mail editor@PleasantonWeekly.com

fogster.com

The Pleasanton Weekly is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 5506 Sunol Blvd., Suite 100, Pleasanton, CA 94566; (925) 600-0840. Mailed at Periodicals Postage Rate, USPS 020407. The Weekly is mailed upon request to homes and apartments in Pleasanton. Print subscriptions for businesses or residents of other communities are $60 per year or $100 for two years. Go to www.PleasantonWeekly.com to sign up and for more information. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Pleasanton Weekly, 5506 Sunol Blvd., Suite 100, Pleasanton, CA 94566. Š 2012 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited.


Newsfront DIGEST Send us your Santa photos Are your kids planning to visit Santa? If you have a photo you’d like to share, send it to us at dciardelli@pleasantonweekly. com. Please write “Santa photo” in the subject line, and we ask that photos be at least 500K. Also send the names of the children in the photo, the names of the parents, where you ran into Santa, where you live, where the children attend school, and anything else you think might be interesting in the caption. We plan to use the photos in our Dec. 21 issue. And, yes, we are also interested in photos of pets with Santa.

City provides free sandbags

Council to vote on downtown guidelines Tuesday Bars, restaurants could stay open later, offer more entertainment BY JEB BING

The Pleasanton City Council will consider new rules governing entertainment in Pleasanton’s downtown district at a special meeting it has called for next Tuesday. If adopted, the proposed Downtown Hospitality Guidelines will be one of the last actions taken by the current council before two new council members and a new mayor are sworn into office Dec. 4. The council’s action also would wrap up nearly three years of bickering among businesses and regulators over how much more sizzle bars and restaurants should be given to attract late night revelers to the downtown. Up to now, businesses had to seek special use permits to stay open after 10 p.m., often with different decisions and time limits from the regulators. The new guidelines would move permitted operating uses to 11 p.m. with no permit required. The new guidelines call for two new zoning districts: a downtown central core area that mostly fronts on Main Street and a few side streets where

late night entertainment would be allowed, and a transition area where business would still need to seek permits to operate late into the night. Noise limits also would be raised in some areas with more freedom by business owners to monitor noise levels without more strict monitoring equipment. The city Planning Commission approved the new guidelines a week ago. As proposed, the new hour, noise and operation requirements would apply throughout the downtown district from the Arroyo del Valle Main Street bridge on the north to Bernal Avenue on the south. Businesses on both sides of Main Street would be included in the core area with those fronting on Peters Avenue to be part of the transition zone. Although there has been little opposition to the new entertainment guidelines, some whose homes are close to downtown establishments sought assurances that noise levels would stay controlled. The Planning Commission held a public field

With the rainy season upon us, the city of Pleasanton reminds local residents and businesses that free sandbags are available to those concerned about flooding. Residents can pick up free sandbags at the city’s Service Center, 3333 Busch Road in Pleasanton. The sandbags are located in the parking lot under a brown tarp and can be picked up at anytime. The sandbags are not available to contractors seeking sandbags for work sites. City crews cleared culverts and drains ahead of the rainy season, and residents are encouraged to clear leaves from neighborhood drains. Report flooded areas between 7 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. weekdays to the Operations Services Department at 931-5500. Report flooding to the Police Department at 931-5199 on weekends, holidays and between 3:30 p.m. and 7 a.m. weekdays.

Former police officer charged with elder abuse Pleasanton police arrest man; wife turns herself in BY GLENN WOHLTMANN

BART plans for holidays BART is operating longer trains this week the day before Thanksgiving and on Sunday to help passengers get to and from the airports and is significantly increasing the number of seats today, Nov. 23, for shoppers to carry their new purchases onboard. For Christmas travelers, from Saturday, Dec. 22, through Wednesday, Jan. 2, BART will make 475 additional parking spaces available for airport/long term parking reservations. Customers must get to the parking lot before 10 a.m. to be guaranteed a spot. Visit bart.gov/ parking for more information or to make your reservation.

Corrections The Weekly desires to correct all significant errors. To request a correction, call the editor at (925) 600-0840 or e-mail: editor@PleasantonWeekly.com

trip downtown last month with a noise consultant who used a noise meter to record sound levels at such locations as Handles Gastropub on Main Street, Fernando’s Mexican Restaurant on St. Mary Street and at the intersection of St. Mary and Peters Avenue, where a number of homes are located. At each location, the recorded noise levels met the allowable residential noise level requirements, with some exceptions when a car, bus or train passed by. Another concern of both downtown businesses and homeowners dealt with loitering, especially noticed after businesses have closed for the night. The Planning Commission, however, determined that Pleasanton police actively patrol the downtown and effectively deal with loiterers. The new guidelines, if adopted by the council, would lock in the new core and transition zoning districts. New businesses seeking to offer late night entertainment would have to abide by those restrictions in seeking downtown locations. The City Council meeting will start at 7 p.m. Tuesday in the Civic Center, 200 Old Bernal Ave. N

JEB BING

Saying goodbye to Santa are Mayor Jennifer Hosterman and City Council members Cindy McGovern and Matt Sullivan who will step down from their positions due to term limits just four days after this year’s Dec. 1 Holiday parade and tree lighting. Together for the last time are (from left) mayor-elect Jerry Thorne, McGovern, Councilwoman Cheryl Cook-Kallio, Sullivan and Hosterman.

Hometown Holiday parade set for Dec. 1 Tree lighting to follow in front of Museum on Main The city of Pleasanton will host the annual Hometown Holiday Celebration from 5-7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1, on Main Street. The community-based parade will be followed by the lighting of a holiday tree in front of the Museum on Main. High school marching bands will kick off the parade, followed by dozens of holiday inspired entries including the Pleasanton Weekly’s Holiday Fund car, the Centerpointe Presbyterian Church’s men’s club’s Balloon Platoon, a horse-drawn wagon carrying the Pleasanton City Council, hundreds of Cub

Scouts and Brownies, local car clubs and dog clubs, and much more. Main Street will close to traffic at 4 p.m. for the parade. Volunteers are still needed to help with the parade. Those interested can register at www. hometownholiday.com. In the event of rain, a parade cancellation telephone hotline will be implemented and updated each hour after 2:30 p.m. on parade day. The cancellation information phone line is 931-5352. —Jeb Bing

A Pleasanton man and former police officer has been arrested and his wife has surrendered to police in a scam that involved taking advantage of an 82-year-old Pleasanton woman. Matthew Messier, 36, of the 400 block of Neal Street was arrested Friday on charges of grand theft, three counts of attempted grand theft, four counts of elder abuse, one count of forgery, one count of criminal conspiracy, one count of registering a fraudulent document and a count of practicing law without a license. Police say Messier, a former police commander with the Pinole Police Department, used his position of authority to gain the trust of the vicMatthew tim, who put his entire estate Messier under the control of the pair. Messier was still with the Pinole Police Department when the initial complaint surfaced, according to a news release. Messier was arrested at his home Friday morning and booked into Santa Rita Jail. His wife, Elizabeth Regalado, 30, was initially reported at large, but turned herself Elizabeth in at the Hayward Police De- Regalado partment later Friday. Police describe the arrests as the culmination of a months-long investigation that began with a report by Alameda County Adult Protective Services. Pleasanton police Sgt. Kurt Schlehuber said the victim was placed under conservatorship by a public guardian due to the fact she is susceptible to undue influence. A complaint was filed by the Alameda County District Attorney’s office and two warrants were obtained for Messier and Regalado’s arrest. N Pleasanton WeeklyÊUÊNovember 23, 2012ÊU Page 5


NEWS

Lawsuit: Santa Rita Jail discriminates against people with disabilities Jail lacks access to toilets, showers, educational and rehabilitation programs, suit says Advocates for people with disabilities filed a lawsuit last Thursday accusing Alameda County of engaging in systematic discrimination against inmates with disabilities who are incarcerated at the Santa Rita Jail in Dublin. The lawsuit was filed in Alameda County Superior Court and is brought by Legal Services for Prisoners with Children on behalf of themselves and their members and two taxpayers. It alleges that “the

jail’s inhumane conditions and discriminatory treatment of people with disabilities denies these people the basic rights to appropriate facilities for simple human necessities.” The suit says such necessities include toilets and showers and access to educational and rehabilitation programs that can reduce the jail sentences of inmates with disabilities. Disability Rights Advocates attorney Stuart Seaborn, one of the

lawyers representing the plaintiffs, said the suit seeks no monetary damages but aims to compel Alameda County to stop using taxpayer funds to further the allegedly illegal and discriminatory conditions at Santa Rita Jail. Seaborn said the suit alleges that the county has a systemic practice of housing men and women with disabilities at Santa Rita Jail in cells and housing units that lack wheelchair accessible toilets, show-

ers and visiting areas. He said the suit also claims that the jail segregates certain people with disabilities from the general population by housing them in the Outpatient Housing Unit, also known as the infirmary, which operates similar to solitary confinement. Seaborn said conditions at that unit compromise the health and welfare of men and women with disabilities and result in the denial of access to critical rehabilitative

programs, religious services and outdoor exercise. He said that without wheelchairaccessible toilets that have grab bars, people with mobility disabilities cannot transfer themselves from a wheelchair. Alameda County Sheriff’s spokesman Sgt. J.D. Nelson said he couldn’t comment on the suit at this time because the Sheriff’s Office hadn’t seen it yet. —Bay City News Service

City fights federal lawsuit against Police Department

New apartment complex planned for West Las Positas Boulevard

Cites dozens of questions about circumstances

Affordable housing structure would have 4 stories, 168 units

The city of Pleasanton is asking that a federal lawsuit against the Police Department and one of its officers be dismissed. In a lengthy rebuttal to a recent lawsuit filed by Brian Lancaster, the city names dozens of undocumented claims in the suit, which names the Police Department in general and Officer Tim Martens in particular. Specifically, the request that the lawsuit be dismissed questions claims surrounding a Jan. 16 traffic stop by Martens. “The stop resulted in a search of the Plaintiff’s car, but the complaint does not tell us why,” the dismissal motions states. “This search resulted in contraband being found, but the Complaint

BY JEB BING

does not tell us what, or where. Martens is alleged to have arrested the Plaintiff following this search; but the complaint doesn’t tell us what the Plaintiff was arrested for.” The rebuttal offers a half dozen reasons for the suit to be dismissed, and cites federal and state law, although much of its argument seems to be about gaps in the original suit. The request for dismissal also cites as a precedent a federal ruling stemming from a lawsuit filed by one of the men held in the Guantanamo Bay detention camp. The suit is set for a Dec. 18 hearing in U.S. District Court in San Francisco. —Glenn Wohltmann

B1 transportation sales tax measure loses by fraction of percent

Another in a series of developers interested in building affordable high density apartment complexes in Pleasanton had a favorable reception from the city’s Planning Commission last week in its bid to build a 168-unit, three- and fourstory structure on West Las Positas Boulevard near Stoneridge Drive. Mike Serpa, a consultant with St. Anton Partners, said the Sacramento developer is seeking a permit to build the apartment complex on a 5.6-acre site at 5729 West Las Positas, property that was first developed in 1983 for Hewlett-Packard. The site is a mile from the West Pleasanton BART station and is next to a two-story office building used by the ValleyCare Health System. It is one of nine sites included earlier this year when the City Council rezoned 73 acres in various parts of the city to accommodate high-density housing follow-

ing the settlement of a law suit by Urban Habitat, an Oakland-based affordable housing coalition. The apartment complex would include three residential buildings with a clubhouse, leasing office, swimming pool and even open space for a community vegetable garden. Two U-shaped buildings would be three stories tall with 38 apartment units in each and would front on Las Positas, with a fourstory, 115,000 square-foot building to the rear, overlooking Tassajara Creek and containing 39 units. Serpa said the residential development would accommodate mixed-income groups distributed throughout the complex. Access to the apartments would be off West Las Positas with 268 parking spaces to be provided for tenants and guests. But the chairman of the nearby Verona Homes apartment complex notified the Planning Commission

that his group opposes the “luxury, multifamily community” planned by St. Anton Partners. “Most of us in the Verona complex do not want it to happen,” Robert Plemmons, chairman of the Verona Home Owners Association, stated in a Nov. 5 letter to Associate Planning Director Rosalind Rondash. “When we purchased our homes, we understood (the property) would always be zoned commercial. We understand the owner can do what they want to the property, but we do not have to like it or welcome it.” The Planning Commission, meeting in a workshop format, took no action on the St. Anton Partners plan, which is expected to be heard by the commission officially in December. Serpa said that if the plan gains the approval of both the Planning Commission and then later the City Council, construction could begin next spring. N

TAKE US ALONG

Final count shows measure failed with 66.53% favorable votes, just short of 2/3rds needed Alameda County Registrar David Macdonald reported this week that final results of the Nov. 6 election show that the hotly contested Measure B1 transportation tax lost by a fraction of a percent in a final tally of all votes cast. Macdonald said that the measure received 350,899 Yes votes, or 66.53% of the votes cast on the measure, against 176,504 votes, or 33.47%. The measure needed a two-thirds majority vote to pass, or 66.6%. The measure would have doubled Alameda County’s transportation sales tax to a full 1 cent, adding a half-cent to the earlier voter-approved transportation tax of a half-cent that was approved in 1986. It also would have made the full 1-cent tax permanent with a provision that it would come again before vot-

ers in 20 years, but would require only a majority vote to be continued in perpetuity. It would have raised additional tax revenue to increase spending on roads, freeways, public transit, bicycle and pedestrian improvements and transit-oriented developments, proponents said. Opponents said in their ballot argument that the measure would be “a massive tax increase” that would disproportionately harm working families because a greater percentage of their income goes to sales taxes. Analysts also said that a recount is unlikely since that effort is costly and there’s no clearly identified group, such as a political party or candidate, who would step forward to pay the bill. —Jeb Bing

Page 6ÊUÊNovember 23, 2012ÊUÊPleasanton Weekly

Kiss, anyone? Pleasanton Chamber of Commerce members (l-r) Larry Davis, Judy Davis, Lety Hyde, Ron Hyde, Michelle Oliveira and Karen Carlson pose with their Weekly at the Barney Stone in Ireland.


Business News

Edited by Jeb Bing, jbing@pleasantonweekly.com

Amador Valley High, Fairlands win Lab awards Community gift program totals $100,000 for 2012 Lawrence Livermore National Security, the contract manager for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has announced the recipients for the 2012 LLNS Community gift program that totaled $100,000. LLNS received 66 applications totaling more than $636,000 in requests. Twenty-six applications totaling $100,000 were selected for awards through a committee review process. The majority of these awards serve children in the Tri-Valley area and San Joaquin County, with a focus on science, math education, engineering and cultural arts. “It is our privilege to be able to contribute to the enormously worthwhile efforts of these agencies and their impact in science, education and the arts in the community,” said Parney Albright, LLNS president and LLNL director. “We thank them for their hard work and their dedication in helping the community we share.” Pleasanton’s Amador Valley High School and Fairlands Elementary School were among the award recipients, with two awards also going to Dublin High School and another to Las Positas College.

Amador Valley’s Molecular and Cellular research class was named a recipient for providing students who have excelled in science a forum and equipment to do college-level research. At the same time, the school’s biotechnology class with its Thermal Cycler-Polymerase Chain Reaction was also awarded a grant for offering students exposure to the business and technical aspects of biotechnology while participating in hands-on identification of DNA sequences. Also selected for an award was the Fairlands Elementary School’s PTA for its Outdoor Science Classroom, which provides enrichment opportunities to children through its outdoor science classroom. Las Positas College received an award for promoting a “culture of scientific research in its undergraduate Science Research Poster project that “provides educational opportunities to meet the academic, intellectual, technical, creative and personal development goals of its students.” Dublin High School received two awards and the Dublin School District a third. The high school’s “Construction in Algebra provides

students hands-on experiences that connect pure math to the field of construction through engaging lessons,” the Lab’s review committee said. Its Polymerase Chain Reaction for Research in High School won an award for introducing students to biotechnology, utilizing labs and techniques that can be applied to college and beyond. The school district received an award for its Engineering and Design Academy with a Pathway program of study that promotes STEM (science, technology, engineering and/or mathematics) education to Tri-Valley students with both the academy and its feeder schools. Other recipients of the 2012 LLNS Community gift program were: ■ Faith Network of the East Bay Inc. Science Horizons Program supports the teaching and learning of fourth- and fifth-grade science in the Oakland Unified School District. ■ Give Every Child a Chance, STEM in the After School Program provides assistance/mentoring to children in after-school programs as well as supports activities aimed at improving their confidence and skill level in STEM.

Livermore-Amador Symphony, Livermore-Amador Symphony Orchestra Club at Junction Avenue K-8 School presents musical programs of cultural and educational value for the benefit of the community. ■ Livermore Valley Joint Unified School District, 2012-13 Teaching Opportunities for Partners in Science (TOPS). Program provides hands-on activities for approximately 5,500 elementary and middle school students in science education. Funds will be used to maintain and expand the program. ■ Livermore Valley Joint Unified School District, Granada High School, Bio-Rad Gel Doc EZ System and Electophoresis Supplies designs coursework to give students the needed laboratory skills to prepare them for college or to enter the workforce. ■ Livermore Valley Performing Arts Center, Sponsorship for Professor Smart’s Fun with Physics Show operates a performing arts center that promotes and encourages the presentation and creation of visual and performing arts, including those bringing science to life. ■ San Ramon Valley Unified School District, Summer Engineering Lab ■

offers students enrichment courses during summer, including an engineering lab to explore circuits and electricity. ■ Title VII American Indian Education Program, LVJUSD, “American Indian Education in the 21st Century” Title VII Tutoring Program provides for the educational and culturally related academic needs of students of American Indian heritage in the Livermore Valley. ■ Tri-Valley Haven for Women, TriValley Haven Food Pantry provides essential nourishment by distributing food to Tri-Valley residents in need. ■ Windermere Ranch Middle School, STEM Q&A: K-12 Science Trivia Program encourages students interested in STEM by providing a computerized trivia program rewarding students for correct answers. ■ World of Wonders Science Museum Inc., Outreach Hands-on Educational Programs offers hands-on science exhibits and programs to stimulate the discovery of science for all ages. For more information about the LLNS Community Gift Program, go to the www.llnsllc.com/communityGiving/llnsgift. N

Pleasanton WeeklyÊUÊNovember 23, 2012ÊU Page 7


Opinion LETTERS Growth impacts schools Dear Editor, Please help the community to understand the impacts of unmitigated growth. There is no one standing up for Pleasanton on this. My concern is not affordable housing, it is all of the housing that is forced upon the city without allowing for mitigation. The state school mitigation fee is grossly inadequate for all new construction. Residents should be concerned. Low income housing does not allow Pleasanton to collect adequate fees to mitigate the need for more space in the schools. All Pleasanton schools are already overcrowded so any new growth will dramatically impact the quality of life for existing residents. Pleasanton Unified School District will be coming to the community for a bond as well as a parcel tax to pay for new growth. New growth does not have to be bad if it pays for itself, but this does not and will hurt Pleasanton. Besides the new apartments being built in the Hacienda Business Park, there will be thousands of additional housing units built in what is now being discussed for the Eastside plan. Julie Testa

On high speed rail Dear Editor, With 43 grade crossings and many unprotected trackside sta-

tion platforms, Caltrain tracks are far too dangerous for high speed trains. Better, safer and much less costly would be to have high speed rail Santa Clara via Mulford to Oakland and Sacramento, the route long used by Amtrak. Route Capitol Corridor trains this way also. Grade separate, multi-track and fence this UP line in stages. Add an intermodal transfer station in Oakland, where BART crosses over the UP near I-880 and Seventh Street. (BART trains from there run every few minutes to eight San Francisco and the many other Peninsula and East Bay stations.) Also, we should prioritize BART around the Bay, enlarging it or forming a new five-county agency to complete BART construction now under way to Berryessa in San Jose; re-do planning for extending that line further to Santa Clara; and plan to grade separate and convert Millbrae-Santa Clara Caltrain to BART. A plan balanced among the five counties would also extend BART to the Golden Gate and Carquinez bridges, to Brentwood, and over the Altamont. Adjusted for inflation and the five-county population, a bond issue like that for BART in 1962 per capita would raise about $16 billion today. Robert S. Allen BART Director (1974-88); Retired, SP (now UP) Western Division Engineering/ Operations

YOUR TURN The Pleasanton Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or issues of local interest. Submit letters to the editor of up to 250 words and guest opinion pieces up to 500 words with a short bio to editor@PleasantonWeekly. com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted. Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of permission to the Pleasanton Weekly and Embarcadero Media to also publish it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square. For more information contact Editor Jeb Bing at (925) 600-0840.

HEARING SERVICES A Sound Approach to Hearing Care Most insurance companies accepted, including members of Hill Physicians

Kenneth D. Billheimer, Au.D. Sierra Brower, Au.D. Õ`ˆœœ}ˆÃÌÃÊUʈVi˜Ãi`Êi>Àˆ˜}ʈ`Ê-«iVˆ>ˆÃÌÃ

Jacque Pedraza ˆVi˜Ãi`Êi>Àˆ˜}ʈ`Ê-«iVˆ>ˆÃÌ

Two Locations to Serve You Livermore 925-344-4776 Pleasanton 925-337-8063 1524 Holmes, Bldg. D 4460 Black Avenue, Ste. F

www.pleasantonhearingservices.com Your local professionals, providing high-quality hearing health care to the Tri-Valley area since 1986. Page 8ÊUÊNovember 23, 2012ÊUÊPleasanton Weekly

EDITORIAL

THE OPINION OF THE WEEKLY

Competing for entertainment Congratulations to the Pleasanton Downtown Association and the city’s Economic Vitality Committee for their three years of work in developing new guidelines for making downtown Pleasanton more attractive to nightlife and entertainment. Mired in outdated regulatory rules limiting nighttime operating hours to 10 p.m. without special, costly and time-consuming permits, revelers have increasingly been taking their business and money to nearby communities that seemed more inviting. The new guidelines, which already have the approval of the city’s Planning Commission, are expected to gain another and final OK Tuesday from the Pleasanton City Council. To capitalize on the natural attraction of Pleasanton’s downtown and increase its economic vitality, the PDA launched the Downtown Hospitality Task Force in early 2010. Its mission was to research ways to enhance the experience of visitors to our downtown, to increase the number of patrons and to encourage evening vitality. A Downtown Hospitality Steering Committee was formed and asked to lead the task force through the process of developing a downtown hospitality plan. It noted that a hospitality district is a cheerful place, safe and inviting, with an active street life that welcomes people to shop and visit, and offers attractive private dining and entertainment venues. The steering committee brought together 30 individuals from the different stakeholder groups affected by downtown activity, including restaurant owners, nearby residents, police officers, city planners, property owners, business owners and employees, entertainers and many others. Jim Peters, founder and president of the Responsible Hospitality Institute (RHI), was brought in to develop strategies for moving forward. His is a national organization that advises cities and business districts on creative ways to increase vitality and minimize potentially adverse effects. The demographics are changing in the Tri-Valley with an increased number of people in the bookend generations of Baby Boomers who are now between 46 and 66 and the young adults under 30, the Gen Ys and Millennials, These groups are prime visitors to hospitality districts as they have leisure time and disposable income. When considered from a hospitality perspective, Peters and his RHI organization characterize the users of hospitality services as singles, who are generally young; mingles, which are social groups and clubs, families that desire day and early evening type activities; and jingles, who are business travelers, employees from nearby businesses and empty nesters with available time and money. The hospitality steering committee also addressed job patterns in the Tri-Valley, which today are less confining than traditional 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. schedules. More people here are working part time, flexible hours or telecommuting, giving them more time to go out during the day and later in the evening. Most people today also prefer a hospitality zone that is closer to home so they have less distance to walk or drive to get there. Those looking to move want to live near a place where there’s some local street activity and entertainment as a lifestyle choice. In proposing its new guidelines, the PDA and its steering committee recognized, too, that much like the retail and restaurant sectors, hospitality has become more competitive as cities like ours realize the benefits of supporting safe, inviting public spaces and private venues throughout the day and evening. According to RHI, the most successful cities start with a “how can we help you?” approach to make hospitality work. That’s the essence of the new guidelines for Pleasanton that will make our town a competitive center for daytime and nighttime dining, shopping and entertainment. N

Visit Town Square at PleasantonWeekly.com to comment on the editorial.

Pleasanton Weekly PUBLISHER Gina Channell-Allen, Ext. 119 EDITORIAL Editor Jeb Bing, Ext. 118 Managing Editor Dolores Fox Ciardelli, Ext. 111 Online/Community Editor Jessica Lipsky, Ext. 229 Reporter Glenn Wohltmann, Ext. 121 Contributors Jay Flachsbarth Jerri Pantages Long Kerry Nally ART & PRODUCTION Lead Designer Katrina Cannon, Ext. 130 Designers Lili Cao, Ext. 120 Kristin Herman, Ext. 114 ADVERTISING Account Executives Carol Cano, Ext. 226 Karen Klein, Ext. 122 Real Estate Sales Dana Santos, Ext. 110 Ad Services Cammie Clark, Ext. 116 BUSINESS Business Associate Lisa Oefelein, Ext. 126 Circulation Director Bob Lampkin, Ext. 141 Front Office Coordinator Kathy Martin, Ext. 124 HOW TO REACH THE WEEKLY Phone: (925) 600-0840 Fax: (925) 600-9559 Editorial e-mail: editor@PleasantonWeekly.com calendar@PleasantonWeekly.com Display Sales e-mail: sales@PleasantonWeekly.com Classifieds Sales e-mail: ads@PleasantonWeekly.com Circulation e-mail: circulation@ PleasantonWeekly.com

The Pleasanton Weekly is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 5506 Sunol Blvd., Suite 100, Pleasanton, CA 94566; (925) 600-0840. Mailed at Periodicals Postage Rate, USPS 020407. The Pleasanton Weekly is mailed upon request to homes and apartments in Pleasanton. Community support of the Pleasanton Weekly is welcomed and encouraged through memberships at levels of $5, $8 or $10 per month through automatic credit card charges. Print subscriptions for businesses or residents of other communities are $60 per year or $100 for two years. Go to www.PleasantonWeekly.com to sign up and for more information. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Pleasanton Weekly, 5506 Sunol Blvd., Suite 100, Pleasanton, CA 94566. © 2012 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited.


Pleasanton WeeklyÊUÊNovember 23, 2012ÊU Page 9


Community Pulse â&#x2014;? Transitions

POLICE BULLETIN & LOG â&#x2014;? OBITUARIES â&#x2014;? BIRTHS & WEDDINGS

POLICE BULLETIN

POLICE REPORT The Pleasanton Police Department made the following information available.

Trio plunders Via Peralta home Three men are believed to be responsible for a Nov. 13 daytime burglary at a home on Via Peralta. According to one of the homeowners, neighbors spotted two men outside the home between 9 and 10 a.m. The pair apparently entered the back yard of the home, entered the garage through a back door and opened the garage door for a third man who was driving a truck. The three then closed the garage door and entered the home through its connection with the garage. The trio stole almost all of the electronics in the house: TVs, laptops, two gaming systems and all the games. They removed a pillow sham from the bed and loaded it up with all the homeownersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; jewelry. The homeowner said they must have been startled, because they left abruptly, leaving a computer partially removed. They also left a duffel bag containing a number of items in the garage. A neighbor saw the garage door open at about 10 a.m.

In police reports: UĂ&#x160;/Â&#x2026;Ă&#x20AC;iiĂ&#x160;Â&#x2026;>Â&#x2DC;`}Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x203A;>Â?Ă&#x2022;i`Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;fĂ&#x2021;]äääĂ&#x160; were stolen from a home in the 500 block of San Miguel Court between 8 and 11:30 a.m. Nov. ÂŁx°Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x17D;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;fĂ&#x2021;ääĂ&#x160;Â?>ÂŤĂ&#x152;Â&#x153;ÂŤ]Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x160; f{ääĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;*Â&#x153;`Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;VÂ&#x2026;]Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x160; f{ääĂ&#x160; }>Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x160; VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â?i]Ă&#x160; fĂ&#x17D;ääĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;`iÂ&#x153;Ă&#x160; }>Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x192;]Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x160; fĂ&#x201C;ääĂ&#x160;/6]Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;f£ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;`iÂ&#x153;Ă&#x160;ÂŤÂ?>Ă&#x17E;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; fxäĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; 6 Ă&#x160; Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192;°Ă&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;

made through an unlocked sliding glass door. UĂ&#x160; Â?Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;âÂ&#x153;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;}Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;`]Ă&#x160; {x]Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; ">Â&#x17D;land, was arrested at Penneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the 1500 block of Stoneridge Mall Road for shoplifting two watches Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;>Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; fxĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; ÂŤÂ&#x153;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x192;sion of burglary tools, and for having wire cutters. Police also confiscated nine caps worth a total Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;f{x°Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;}Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x160;>Â?Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;>`Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;viÂ?Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; warrant out for his arrest from the Â?>Â&#x201C;i`>Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; -Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;vv½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; "vvÂ&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x160; for a prior shoplifting. UĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x2026;>iÂ?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;LĂ&#x17E;]Ă&#x160;{ä]Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Â?>Â&#x201C;i`>Ă&#x160; Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;i`Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; >LÂ&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; £ä\{{Ă&#x160; °Â&#x201C;°Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;°Ă&#x160; ÂŁĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; ,Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;iÂ?Ă&#x160; in the 800 block of Main Street for felony fraud for attempting to pass seven counterfeit travelers VÂ&#x2026;iVÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; f£ääĂ&#x160; >ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;iVi°Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;LĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160; was arrested for entering the hotel with the intent to pass the checks, Â?i>`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;}Â?>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x2026;>Ă&#x20AC;}i°Ă&#x160;iĂ&#x160; also had an outstanding warrant for forgery. UĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;>Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x160;Â?VÂ&#x153;Ă&#x192;LÂ&#x2C6;>]Ă&#x160;{ÂŁ]Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; iĂ&#x153;ark was arrested on a felony warrant at about 3:05 a.m. at the intersection of Black Avenue and Â&#x153;ÂŤĂ&#x17E;>Ă&#x20AC;`Ă&#x160; ,Â&#x153;>`Ă&#x160; vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; ÂŤÂ&#x153;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; a controlled substance for sale and transporting a controlled substance. Alcosbia was wanted on a warrant from the Alameda County -Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;vv½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;"vvÂ&#x2C6;Vi° UĂ&#x160; Ă&#x160; `Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x2DC;>Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x2021;äääĂ&#x160; LÂ?Â&#x153;VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;ViĂ&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;i`Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;ÂŤiÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; >LÂ&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; fnääĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; miscellaneous tools were taken in a Nov. 18 burglary. Under the law, those arrested are considered innocent until convicted.

Cops seek stabbing suspect Man stabbed in chest at Las Ventanas apartment complex BY GLENN WOHLTMANN

Pleasanton police have identified a suspect in a Wednesday night Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>LLÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; 6iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; >ÂŤ>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;ments in the 3800 block of Vineyard Avenue. The stabbing victim has identified the man who stabbed him as iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160;-iĂ&#x20AC;ÂŤ>]Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17E;i>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2021;Â&#x153;Â?`Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;ÂŤ>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160; Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; vĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;i]Ă&#x160; >VVÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; a police news report. The report was forwarded to the Â?>Â&#x201C;i`>Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x17E;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; "vvÂ&#x2C6;Vi]Ă&#x160; Ă&#x153;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160; VÂ&#x2026;>Ă&#x20AC;}i`Ă&#x160; -iĂ&#x20AC;ÂŤ>Ă&#x160; Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; one count of attempted murder. A no-bail warrant has been issued for Serpaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arrest. Police arrived on the scene at about 9 p.m. Wednesday after receiving several 911 calls about a stabbing at the complex. Ă&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;iÂŤÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x2C6;V>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; men began arguing with each other >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;i`Ă&#x160; vÂ&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}°Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; course of the fight the suspect produced a knife and stabbed the victim once in the chest, then fled on foot.

Ă&#x160; /Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;]Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;äÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17E;i>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2021;Â&#x153;Â?`Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Â&#x2C6;`iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;]Ă&#x160; Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;>Â&#x17D;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; `iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Medical Center for the treatment of his injury, which is non-life threatening. Ă&#x160; -iĂ&#x20AC;ÂŤ>Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;`iĂ&#x192;VĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Li`Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;ÂŤ>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160; male adult with black hair and brown eyes, approximately 5 feet 11 inches tall and about 180 pounds. iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x153;i>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; a black shirt or jacket and blue jeans. While police say the two men Jesse Serpa knew each other, they have not been able to determine what led to the fight. Police were still searching for Serpa as of Tuesday. Anyone with information regarding this investigation or the Â?Â&#x153;V>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160; -iĂ&#x20AC;ÂŤ>Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; iÂ&#x2DC;VÂ&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;aged to call the Pleasanton Police

iÂŤ>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x17D;ÂŁÂ&#x2021;x£ää°Ă&#x160; N

Page 10Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;November 23, 2012Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Pleasanton Weekly

Nov. 14 Theft â&#x2013;  9:05 a.m. in the 7300 block of Foothill Road; fraud â&#x2013;  10:24 a.m. in the 4100 block of Moller Drive; fraud â&#x2013;  6:39 p.m. in the 6200 block of Hopyard Road; auto theft Vandalism â&#x2013;  9:47 a.m. at the intersection of Oak Creek Drive and Foothill Road Drug/alcohol violations â&#x2013;  6:42 a.m. in the 7300 block of Tulipwood Circle; possession of methamphetamine, paraphernalia possession â&#x2013;  11:47 a.m. in the 5800 block of Owens Court; public drunkenness

Nov. 15 Theft â&#x2013;  2:10 p.m. in the 7200 block of Valley View Court; fraud â&#x2013;  5:34 p.m. in the 1000 block of Stoneridge Mall Road; auto theft Burglary â&#x2013;  11:40 a.m. in the 500 block of San Miguel Court Auto burglary â&#x2013;  1:58 p.m. in the 3800 block of Vineyard Avenue Battery â&#x2013;  8:58 p.m. in the 3800 block of Stone Pointe Way Vandalism â&#x2013;  10:07 a.m. in the 500 block of

OBITUARIES PAID OBITUARIES

Sharry Bautista Dec. 25, 1942-Nov. 10, 2012 Sharry Bautista passed away on Nov. 10, 2012. She was born on Dec. 25, 1942 in Valentine, Nebraska to Joy and Orville Greene. Her sister Donna was born 3 years later. Sharry married her former husband in 1961 and had 2 daughters, Kelly and Stacy. She was very active in her community for many years: serving 14 years on the Castro Valley Board of Fire Commissioners, volunteering at Laurel Grove Hospital, serving as Auxiliary president for 2 years and serving 1 year on the Alameda County Grand Jury. In 1987 she met and married the love of her life, Joe Bautista. They moved to Pleasanton in 2000 into a home that Joe built. They loved to travel, especially cruising. They had been on 25 cruises, visited more than 80 countries, 6 continents, and had

Kottinger Drive â&#x2013;  11:09 a.m. at the intersection of Valley Avenue and Paseo Santa Cruz Public drunkenness â&#x2013;  10:33 p.m. in the 5200 block of Hopyard Road â&#x2013;  11:12 p.m. in the 1800 block of Santa Rita Road

Nov. 16 Felony shoplifting â&#x2013;  3:23 p.m. in the 1500 block of Stoneridge Mall Road Vandalism â&#x2013;  10:13 a.m. in the 6700 block of Hansen Drive Public drunkenness â&#x2013;  6:46 p.m. in the 3300 block of Harpers Ferry Court

Nov. 17 Fraud â&#x2013;  10:44 p.m. in the 800 block of Main Street Burglary â&#x2013;  5:50 p.m. in the 4500 Rosewood Drive Vandalism â&#x2013;  6:06 a.m. in the 5500 block Springhouse Drive Alcohol violations â&#x2013;  1:39 a.m. at the intersection of Pleasanton Avenue and St. Mary Street; DUI â&#x2013;  2:02 a.m. in the 1800 block of Santa Rita Road; public drunkenness

Nov. 18

â&#x2013;  5:58

p.m. in the 4700 block of Willow Road; theft from structure â&#x2013;  9:06 p.m. in the 2500 block of Santa Rita Road; bicycle theft Burglary â&#x2013;  10:48 p.m. in the 7000 block of Commerce Drive Vandalism â&#x2013;  4:45 a.m. in the first block of California Avenue Alcohol violations â&#x2013;  12:55 a.m. in the 4100 block of Hopyard Road; public drunkenness â&#x2013;  2:02 a.m. at the intersection of Santa Rita Road and Stoneridge Drive; DUI

Nov. 19 Theft â&#x2013;  7:40 a.m. in the 4400 block of Black Avenue Burglary â&#x2013;  8:32 a.m. in the 1000 block of Serpentine Lane 43035 Auto burglary â&#x2013;  10:53 p.m. in the 4700 block of Willow Road 43130 Vandalism â&#x2013;  10:41 a.m. in the 5800 block of Parkside Avenue â&#x2013;  12:10 p.m. in the 4300 block of Black Avenue â&#x2013;  12:33 p.m. in the 600 block of Junipero Street Public drunkenness â&#x2013;  7:48 a.m. in the 5500 block of Springdale Avenue

Theft planned to go Antarctica in Feb. They belonged to Castlewood Country Club where she played golf. She also had a great passion for gardening and spent many hours nurturing the plants in her yard. One of her favorite times of the year was football season where she would attend Raiders home games and watch the Nebraska Cornhuskers play college football. Sharry loved her family and her step family. She is survived by her loving husband, Joe; 2 daughters, Stacy (Darryl) Chambers and Kelly (Perry) Johnson. She also leaves her 5 grandchildren, two great grandchildren, 2 nieces; as well as her step children; Jim (Lori) Bautista, Steve Bautista, and Joy (Tony) Littman, 5 step-grandchildren and 5 step greatgrandchildren. Preceding her in death are her mother, father and sister. Please join our family for a Celebration of Life at Castlewood Country Club, Pleasanton, Nov. 25, 2-4 p.m. Sharry requests that donations be made to Hope Hospice, ARF, SPCA, or any animal shelter.

Robert Walter Decker May 26, 1950-Oct. 21, 2012 Bob Decker passed away unexpectedly at home in Pleasanton, Calif. of heart failure on October 21, 2012. Born in Pittsburg,

Penn., Bobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family moved to the Bay Area in 1959 and he was a resident of Pleasanton for the last 35 years. He worked in the grocery business for 40 years, the last 25 at Sara Lee. Bob is survived by his wife Janice, son Stephen of Livermore, son Kristopher (Jennifer) of Castro Valley, sister Arlene (Gene) of Reno, Nev., brother-in-law Mark Anderson of Alexandria, Va. and granddaughter Hailey Decker. He is preceded in death by his parents Florian and Herman Decker, mother-in-law Marilyn Anderson, and father-in-law Harry Anderson. He enjoyed many outdoor activities, but his latest passion was duck hunting with his long time friend Alex. A celebration of his life will be held on Monday, November 26th, 5 p.m. at St. Elizabeth Seton, 4001 Stoneridge Dr., Pleasanton. Donations can be made to the American Heart Association or a charity of your choice.


Presenting our Tri-Valley Heroes Families, supporters jam Hilton for presentations by Pleasanton Weekly, online publications BY JEB BING

The Pleasanton Weekly and its sister online publications â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dublin Tri-Valley Views, San Ramon Express and Danville Express â&#x20AC;&#x201D; presented their first-ever Tri-Valley Heroes awards Monday night at the Pleasanton Hilton Hotel as nearly 100 family members and community supporters cheered those receiving the special honors. Gina Channell-Allen, president of Embarcadero Mediaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s East Bay division and publisher of the Pleasanton Weekly, said the awards were a salute to the community members â&#x20AC;&#x153;whose dedication to bettering the lives of local residents has helped make the Tri-Valley the special place it is today.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;After fielding over 75 nominations, our panel of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;heroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; judges bestowed awards in eight separate categories,â&#x20AC;? Channell-Allen said. The Tri-Valley Heroes 2012 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lifetime Achievementâ&#x20AC;? award went to Robert â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bobâ&#x20AC;? Tucknott of Pleasanton, a well-known Rotarian who has served as a community leader and past captain of the Alameda County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Air Squadron helping support law enforcement. He also is a pilot with Angel Flight, which arranges free air transportation via private aircraft for those in medical and financial need so they can travel to access healthcare. Others honored at the Tuesday night ceremony, by category, were:

UĂ&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;i\Ă&#x160; ivvĂ&#x160; -i>LiĂ&#x20AC;}]Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?iĂ&#x160; pĂ&#x160; VĂ&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;]Ă&#x160; `Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;iVĂ&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; and childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theater teacher. UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; -ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;\Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?iĂ&#x20AC;]Ă&#x160; *Â?i>Ă&#x192;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; pĂ&#x160; *Â?i>Ă&#x192;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Military Families founder and veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; advocate. UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;>}i\Ă&#x160; ->Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x160; °Ă&#x160; 7Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}]Ă&#x160; *Â?i>Ă&#x192;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; pĂ&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;->Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x160;°Ă&#x160;7Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;i>Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;/Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x20AC;>ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;]Ă&#x160; which offers support to Tri-Valley cancer residents. UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Â?Ă&#x160; -Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x153;>Ă&#x20AC;`Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤ\Ă&#x160; -Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;>LÂ?iĂ&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;i>Ă&#x160; pĂ&#x160; Encourages sustainable programs that support a healthy quality of life and a strong local economy. UĂ&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;\Ă&#x160;->Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;,>Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;6>Â?Â?iĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;iVĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;pĂ&#x160; Conceived of and piloted the PulsePoint cell phone application, which alerts CPR-trained residents when a person is suffering from sudden cardiac arrest nearby. UĂ&#x160; ,Â&#x153;Â?iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;`iÂ?\Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;Â&#x17D;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;]Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?iĂ&#x160; pĂ&#x160; -iĂ&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;iÂ?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; LĂ&#x2022;Â?lied as a child because of her extreme cystic acne, and now a professional model, Bankson is helping others who suffer from acne to look their best. UĂ&#x160; ,Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; -Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x20AC;\Ă&#x160; Â?>Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160; 7Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?Â&#x2C6;>Â&#x201C;Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160; *Â?i>Ă&#x192;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; pĂ&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;i>Ă&#x152;i`Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Read-to-a-Teen program, in which teen volunteers help young students become more confident in their reading ability and build comprehension skills. Two Heroes will be profiled each Friday, Nov. 23 to Dec. 14, in the Pleasanton Weekly and Embarcaderoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s online publications serving Danville, Dublin and San Ramon.

Thank you to our Heroes Sponsors A special thanks to all our Supporters and Partners. We appreciate your support. You are a true believer in the value of public art. Since the conception of the Harrington Art Partnership in 2010, 12 pieces of public art have been installed in Pleasanton, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pleasanton Public Art Walkâ&#x20AC;? brochure created, 8 monthly Pleasanton Art Walks given, and a new Harrington Art Partnership website created. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fabulous! Your continued support and the support of so many new art lovers, will make 2013 an even more successful year for the Harrington Art Partnership. Thank you again for all you have done. The Public Art Collection of Pleasanton is ever expanding. All Supporters can become a Partner. Visit www.harringtonartpartnership.org

Gary & Nancy Harrington Sponsor, Arts & Culture award Pleasanton WeeklyĂ&#x160;UĂ&#x160;November 23, 2012Ă&#x160;U Page 11


Your Hero of the Tri-Valley

CHRIS MILLER

Community Spirit by Jeb Bing

I

SHERRY WIGGINS

Chris Miller joins veterans in parade on Main Street Nov. 4.

▲ Hero FYI ▲ Miller and his wife Marty have three sons. Christian, 41, lives in Carmichael and is a project manager with ATT Wireless. Another son Jason, 38, a Reservist at a unit at Travis AFB with 19 years of service, works in Information Technology at Cummings West in Hayward. A third son Mike also is a Reservist in the 301st Airlift Squadron at Travis and is a firefighter/ paramedic with the Foster City Fire Department. ▲ Miller’s most recent contribution was to help in the Pleasanton Military Families’ Christmas Pack Out to Pleasanton troops deployed in Afghanistan last weekend, where 260 boxes filled with non-perishable foods and personal necessities were packed, sealed and sent to those in the combat zones. ▲ Miller flew U.S. Army helicopters in Vietnam in 1963-64, finished his service in 1965 and moved to San Francisco where he flew commercial helicopters from 19651976.

Page 12ÊUÊNovember 23, 2012ÊUÊPleasanton Weekly

▲ While a commercial helicopter pilot, he regularly saw returning Vietnam War veterans as they came through SFO being treated “awfully and with disrespect” by their fellow American citizens, prompting him to vow to never let that happen again if the U.S. engages in combat. ▲ He organized the Tri-Valley’s welcome home parade in Hacienda Business Park when the Gulf War. ▲ He co-founded the Pleasanton Military Families organization to help those with sons, daughters, husbands and wives serving in harm’s way, packing kits filled with supplies needed by those in the field, sending letters and building new and what have become lifelong friendships. ▲ Miller’s yellow banners fly on Pleasanton’s Main Street, which he updates regularly and clusters in family groups, with brothers, husbands, wives, and others grouped around the same pole. He personally delivers banners to the families of soldiers no longer in combat, a personal touch that is the hallmark of his service. N

f you’ve noticed the yellow banners on Main Street or joined with hundreds of others in welcoming Pleasanton military men and women back home from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, then you must know Chris Miller, a retired lieutenant colonel in the Army, a Realtor in Pleasanton and the man behind all this patriotism. Miller was born on the Fourth of July and it seems like destiny that he’s become a super patriot for his country and in the city of Pleasanton where he’s also known as a veterans’ veteran. Pleasanton Weekly’s “Man of the Year” in 2009 and the recipient of awards from military and community organizations, Miller is now being honored with the 2012 Tri-Valley Heroes Community Spirit Award by the Pleasanton Weekly. A veteran of the early days of the Vietnam War, Miller later flew commercial helicopters out of San Francisco for 11 years. He regularly saw returning Vietnam War veterans as they came through SFO and also back to the Bay Area and saw them treated “awfully and with disrespect” by their fellow American citizens. At that time, he made a mental note that if American armed forces personnel were ever sent off to combat again, he would do all in his power to see that they, and their families, were respected and comforted while they were serving in harm’s way and then to make sure that they were honored and appreciated when they came home. After the first Gulf War occurred, Miller, with the help of Marine mom Alice Johnston, formed and co-chaired the first Pleasanton Military Families Support Group in 1991. The organization held meetings Tuesday nights at Johnston’s home and when the local troops came home, they welcomed them on the court where the Johnstons lived with cheering, flag-waving crowds Vietnam veterans never saw. Civic and city leaders joined in, and Miller was given permission to post American flags and yellow streamers on Main Street light poles, with each streamer listing the name, rank and branch of service of someone in the military serving in the war zones. As a result of the organized and popular tributes, the entire TriValley turned out for a welcome home parade in Hacienda Business Park when the Gulf War ended. After the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, and with the Operation Enduring Freedom (Afghanistan) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (Iraq) wars under way, Miller started up the Pleasanton Military Families again in 2003 and it’s been going ever since. It was tough at first as a large number from Pleasanton volunteered to serve, including many right out of high school, and the PMF took on increased responsibilities for maintaining contact with those in remote battlefields and their concerned families here at home. The group now consists of about 180 families, meeting once a month and also responsible for welcome home events, where soldiers return to their hometown amidst a motorcycle convoy, flag waving, and friends, family and neighbors. Miller continues to work with the group in comforting those with sons, daughters, husbands and wives still serving, packing kits filled with supplies needed by those in the field, sending letters and building new and what have become lifelong friendships. Miller’s activities are not limited to love for country and support of the military. He is active in the Rotary Club of Pleasanton, several veterans groups and is a fixture at high school sports games and the Pleasanton Farmers Market. Miller met his wife Marty, in San Francisco and the two have lived in Pleasanton since 1971. They have three sons, Christian, Jason and Mike. Although Miller has stepped down as chairman of Pleasanton Military Families, he continues to take responsibility for the Yellow Banner Project on Main Street. In addition to updating ranks and replacing weathered banners, Miller personally delivers banners to the families of soldiers no longer in combat. It’s this kind of personal touch that is the hallmark of Miller’s service in the community. “It was never too much for him to make that phone call or just go over,” said Pat Frizzell, who now co-chairs the Pleasanton Military Families group. “Those are the things that just come natural. He never looks for the praise. He just does it because it is the right thing to do. When you have a passion for things, which he certainly does, that’s what you do.” N


Your Hero of the Tri-Valley

JEFF SEABERG

Arts & Culture Award

presented by Harrington Art Partnership by Dolores Fox Ciardelli

J

COURTESY JEFF SEABERG

Actor, writer, producer and teacher Jeff Seaberg has been assisted at KAOS Camp and Theatre Performance Workshop during the last seven years by Stephanie Lauck.

▲ Hero FYI ▲ Jeff Seaberg’s earliest dramatic role came as a young boy at his parents’ cocktail parties where he would circulate with a tray, dramatically posing the question: “Would you like an hors d’oeuvres?” ▲ He was voted Class Clown in the eighth grade. ▲ He played Riff in “West Side Story” at this high school; he later directed the musical in Alameda. ▲ He received a prestigious Shellie Award as best actor in 1992 for his rendition of Bill Snibson in the Diablo Light Opera Company’s “Me and my Girl,” a role he’s done five times with four different theater groups.

▲ His original children’s plays include fairytales in his Granny’s Bedtime Stories; his “Captain Cool and the Righteous Dudes” series tells tales of superheroes. ▲ Seaberg says it isn’t easy being an actor. “Theater people have to wear their hearts on their sleeves, from high to low, and be convincing — while being even-keeled in life,” he said. “That’s why a lot of actors are basket cases.” ▲ What touches Seaberg most is when he is making a curtain call and the audience rises to its feet to applaud. “It almost moves me to tears,” he said.

eff Seaberg loves live theater — the chemical reaction when you put actors and an audience together. The Danville actor definitely elicits a reaction onstage, whether he’s the Broadway scam artist in the title role of “The Producers,” as he was with Pleasanton’s Tri-Valley Repertory Theater, or performing in Danville’s zany cabaret comedy, “Wigged Out.” “I was bit by the stage bug at age 15,” said Seaberg, 54, “and have not sought out the cure.” But it’s in his role as a teacher that he is making even a greater difference in the Tri-Valley. When the Town of Danville was looking for someone to create a children’s theater program 10 years ago, he jumped at the chance. “I put together a proposal and have been doing it since 2003,” he said. KAOS (Kids Acting On Stage) drama camp for ages 7-14 runs for three two-week sessions in the summer, each ending with a production and a mini-movie. This year had its highest enrollment at 150. “We had 50 kids per session maximum, split into groups,” he said. “One week of camp is at Hap Magee Ranch, then we’re at the Village Theater. And the first week we do a mini-movie.” His after-school program, Theatre Performance Workshop, is also in its 10th year. “It’s not a star-making program, it’s an experiential program,” Seaberg said. “It covers the nuts and bolts involved in putting a production together — auditioning, rehearsing and performing.” He noted that the class teaches life skills, including the ability to speak in public. It’s a safe place for shy children to come out of their shell. Other students are already outgoing and charismatic; they learn discipline. Now his theater group is preparing for a holiday production, written by Seaberg, “A Very Jingle Town Christmas,” which will play at the Village Theater, 233 Front St. in Danville, on Dec. 14-16. “It’s called a world premiere,” Seaberg said with a laugh. “There are some Christmas carols, some bravely doing solos.” He writes and publishes such plays as an inexpensive resource for other after-school programs, and said he’s improved his skills Gary & Nancy Harrington at populating his stories with interesting characters and dialog as well as good plots. “I appreciate existentialism but I like to know the journey is going to be completed,” he says. “I have 20-30 characters with a journey.” He tries to strike a balance with all these activities. “I love to perform, I love teaching and working with the kids, and directing and being involved with productions,” he said. Seaberg majored in theater and English at North Central College in Naperville, Ill., plus earned a teaching credential. By the age of 30 he’d migrated to the Bay Area to pursue his love of theater and teaching. He made a name for himself locally when he landed a role in “Reel Blondes,” and directed it as “Wigged Out” for 13 seasons. “Reel Blondes” was revived in the spring and preparations for the 2013 season are under way. “Three or four of us do most of writing,” Seaberg said. “We come up with a gazzilion ideas, then thin it down to a million, then take out ones that aren’t that funny.” But first Seaberg will have a leading role in Pleasanton at its Hometown Holiday Celebration on Dec. 1 as Santa Claus, which he says lets him feel “the rush of being a superstar.” “It’s really cool, but I can’t take it lightly,” Seaberg said. “I’m on my best behavior with the kids.” Seaberg recalls a crossroads in his life in 2003. Goodspeed theater in Connecticut, where many Broadway professionals got their start, called him for an audition. But the performance dates interfered with the children’s program he’d just proposed for the Town of Danville so he cancelled the audition. “I cancelled the audition,” he said. “My friend was aghast.” “It was a fork in the road but I knew I was right,” he added. “I’ve been very, very content with that decision. My life has been impacted, and hundreds of kids were equally impacted.” N Pleasanton WeeklyÊUÊNovember 23, 2012ÊU Page 13


Deck the Halls Make your decorations special this year Reflect your personal taste and style on your tree, mantle and more BY DOLORES FOX CIARDELLI

Where does one begin to decorate for the holidays when we have so many choices at our fingertips? Not only do downtown specialty shops and department stores offer Santas, snowmen, stars, trees and all the glitters and glistens, even grocery stores and gas station shops have something to offer. Maybe this year it’s time to take advantage of the wide range of selections and do something different. If you usually just decorate a tree with your beloved old ornaments, try changing it up, or add decorations to the mantle, the coffee table or elsewhere. Although traditions are important at this time of year, it’s also the time to try something new — if it works, make it a tradition, too. Holiday decorations don’t just arrive on the scene via Santa and his elves. Merchandizers comb the

world all year for new tips and techniques to deck the halls and trim the perfect tree. “So many people settle for simply hanging ornaments on their trees, but there is so much more you can do by adding fillers that really reflect your own personal taste and style,” said John Griffith, a merchandiser for Replacements Ltd. “Mixing in ribbon, fabrics, florals, feathers and other natural elements create flair and personality. Adding extra flourishes in the right places can make the difference between a pretty tree and an extraordinary tree.” Griffith says the hot colors for holiday 2012 range from soft pastels to rich jewel tones. Popular ornaments this season reflect the Victorian era, with glittering gemstones and rhinestones being extremely popular. Don’t be afraid to forgo the tra-

ARA

Fashion tree branches to create decorative swags.

Christmas Is Here!

20F%F O

MAS IST E R H C IS ALL CHAND ay, d R ME y, Satur a Frid unday nly. S 5o 11/2 3 11/2

670 Main Street Downtown Pleasanton 925.462.0814 Page 14ÊUÊNovember 23, 2012ÊUÊPleasanton Weekly

s Ornaments

s Christmas Decor

s Candles

s Brighton Jewelry

s Potpourri

sGift Certificates

Clover Creek Gifts & Home Accents

2011


Deck the Halls ditional tree topper, he advises. Instead, consider using twigs or other natural elements arranged out of the top of your tree. Griffith has even strategically placed a tree beneath a chandelier for extra glow. If you want to add another, smaller tree, try a corner tree or the flatter profile tree. Or, Griffith suggests, you may want to go in an entirely different direction. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am into repurposing and recycling, so I took the branches of an old artificial tree and wired them together to create swags, and then decorated those with combinations of fabrics, bows and ornaments,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can hang swags on a mantel or place them on top of a door frame. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a fun family project, and you can even create them with different color stories or themes for each room in your home.â&#x20AC;? Tree ornaments are a subject in themselves, and the options are endless. Many people collect their ornaments for years, and viewing their trees is a trip down memory lane. Some friends have annual

ornament exchanges, resulting in eclectic collections. Ornaments can be gathered around the world to reflect different cultures; a treeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decorations may stick to materials such as all wood, colors such as red or gold, or a theme such as angels or snowmen or even animals of Africa. In the 1950s it was de rigueur for Christmas trees to be decorated with fragile red balls, fat teardrop-shaped colored lights and silvery icicles to reflect it all. The next trend was to provide illumination with a spotlight with a color wheel trained on the tree. Then along came flocked trees, and those with metal branches. Now, most popular for their ease and practicality, are the artificial trees with build-in lights that fold up like umbrellas. From olde worlde decorations to sleek and modern, the important thing is to have fun with the season and make your home comfortably festive in a way that fits yourself and your family. N

DOLORES FOX CIARDELLI

This family of snowmen at Clover Creek downtown would brighten any home for the holidays.

Three lovely homes located in the Val Vista neighborhood

?Q^QZQ /M^Q

Elderly Board & Care Homes Registered Nurse Owned & Administrated

Family owned since 1996 r 4DIFEVMFEBDUJWJUJFT r IPVSDBSFBOETVQFSWJTJPO r %PDUPSIPNFWJTJUTPOSFRVFTU r Ä&#x2030;SFFOVUSJUJPVTNFBMTEBJMZ  QMVTTOBDLT r .BOBHFNFEJDBUJPO

#ľġĹ&#x192;Ĺ&#x201A;$Ĺ&#x2030;

r 4QFDJBMEJFU XIFO  QSFTDSJCFECZQIZTJDJBO r $PNGPSUBCMFBOETFDVSF  MJWJOHFOWJSPONFOU r )PTQJDFDBSF r %FNFOUJBDBSF

%Ĺ&#x192;Ĺ&#x2021;Ĺ ÄľĹ&#x201A;3ĸ

925.872.6056

E-mail: serenecare@comcast.net

www.SereneResidentialCare.com $"-ĽġĚĹ&#x201A;Ĺ&#x2C6;Äš  

#ÄšĹ&#x201A;Ĺ&#x201A;ÄšĹ&#x2021;$Ĺ&#x2030;

Pleasanton WeeklyĂ&#x160;UĂ&#x160;November 23, 2012Ă&#x160;U Page 15


Deck the Halls $

Bring Home the Holidays

.00

The Pleasanton Weekly Holiday issues will feature articles dedicated to helping you make the holidays a sweet and joyous time full of fun, family and friends.

Join the "Preserve Club" and you receive all the beneďŹ ts: Two free rounds of golf that you can use anytime. (Cart Included) $10 off our "rack rate" on weekends. $5 off our "rack rate" on weekdays. One hour early twilight rates, seven days a week. Five free large range buckets. 20% off non-sale merchandise items. 10% off restaurant purchases.

Now open to Ladies, Seniors & Callippe Club! You can receive your discount of $10 and $5 during regular tournament play.

A Great Christmas Gift

November 30 - Holiday Happenings - Family and friends enjoy outings together

THIS PROGRAM WILL BE ON SALE STARTING NOV. 15TH, 2012 AND THE MEMBERSHIP WILL BE GOOD THROUGH DEC. 31, 2013. See any golf shop staff member for additional details and to sign up.

  sWWWPLAYCALLIPPECOM

( (

December 7 - All that Glitters - Light up your holidays December 14 - Holiday Magic - Young eyes sparkle with excitement December 21 - Peace and Joy - Special holiday memories December 28 - Ring in 2013

To advertise, call (925) 600-0840

The Gift that says I love you

              #' '  %  $ -  !        %

   3:98       +:46,5::*7:6:

( /322 !  $# #  !   " #! )  "   % ) Page 16Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;November 23, 2012Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Pleasanton Weekly

###) " !)  


Deck the Halls

Welcome guests with a holiday wreathe The front door is often the focal point of a house and the welcoming committee to guests as they approach your home. A great addition to any door is a beautiful wreath — either decorative or seasonal — to greet your guests and neighbors. Wreaths have been around a long time and were used in ancient Greece in harvest rituals. In ancient Rome the wreath was a sign of victory. They were also used by pre-Christian Germanic people who would gather wreaths of evergreen and light fires to remind them of the hope of the approaching light of spring. By the 16th century, Christians were using the wreath to celebrate Advent and their hope in Christ, the everlasting light. The traditional Advent wreath has four candles nestled in a circle of evergreens with another candle in the middle. They are lit each week of December leading up to Christmas, lighting the inside candle on Christmas Eve. But for the last century, “wreath” has come to mean a ring of evergreens with a big red ribbon hung on the front door at Christmastime. Swags of greenery are also traditional. Although a lot of readymade wreaths are available for sale, it’s easy and fun to create a unique one for your front door. Visit a hobby shop for inspiration and raw materials. You can buy a basic circle and decorate it with almost anything —

40% - 80% OFF YOUR HOLIDAY GIFTS

CHRISTMAS TRIM LIQUIDATION SALE!

ribbons, tree ornaments, greenery from your own garden, cutout snowflakes, pinecones, corks or candy canes. The list is endless. Artificial greenery gets more realistic looking each year as do pine sprays to provide the aroma. Don’t forget to put a big bow on the wreath as the finishing touch. The color — whether red, white or gold — can pull it all together.

You can’t go wrong with an old-fashioned evergreen wreath. The only problem is, they may not stay fresh throughout the entire season. Add a few pinecones and a big red bow and visitors will enter into the spirit of the season even as they approach your home. N

Christmas Lights Installation of all types of lights Set up & take down ,OWPRICEGUARANTEEs)NSURED"ONDED

20% OFF

for first time customers with this coupon

Call Jason 510.329.5091 www.valleygreenlandscaping.com

ONLY!

AY 3 DAYS D I R F K C BLA FRIDAY Y SATURDA

LE! S%A OFF 20

X* & PAY NO SALES TA

OR

SUNDAY

S TAX PAY NO SEEAFOLRE48 MONTHS

& INTEREST FR

1,000’S OF ORNAMENTS FROM KURT S ADLER

BUY 1, GET ONE FREE! 6 Pc. Leather Match Reclining Chaise Sectional Includes LAF Press Back Chaise, Armless Chair, Armless Recliner, Console, Wedge & RAF Recliner

$

2599

Huge savings on Christmas trim, decor, trees, lights, wrap, bags, etc. Rick bought out the largest Christmas store in SF last year at pennies on the $$$.

SAVE NOW! $

5

OFF

Any purchase over $30

62” TV Stand $ TV & ACCESSORIES NOT INCLUDED

219

2 Pc. Chaise $ Sectional Reversible

699

Dual Reclining $ Sofa

499

Reclining Loveseat Available

Valid until Nov. 30, 2012. May not be used with other offers. Sale & clearance items do not qualify. Coupons may only be used for future purchases. PW-1102

www.rickspicks.biz Danville • 375 Hartz Avenue • 925.837.DEAL (3325) Pleasanton • 719 Main Street • 925.426.SAVE (7283)

6189 Preston Avenue, Livermore | 925-243-1376

www.prestigefurniture.net Mon - Fri 10am-8pm Sat 10am-7pm Sun 11am-6pm *Minimum purchase of $1,000 to qualify for paying no sales tax offers or extended financing offer. Does not apply to previous purchases, floor samples, layaways, Prestige Furniture online prices & clearance items. Some items used for representational purposes only. We reserve the right to correct printed errors. Financed prices slightly different. Sale ends 11/25/2012.

Pleasanton WeeklyÊUÊNovember 23, 2012ÊU Page 17


Deck the Halls

Smuin’s ‘Christmas Ballet’ is this weekend Santa and sweets to follow matinee performance of sass and sizzle Acclaimed dance company Smuin Ballet’s annual holiday extravaganza, “The Christmas Ballet,” will feature three world premiere works when it opens with three performances this weekend at the Bankhead Theater in Livermore starting tonight. The Tri-Valley is the first stop for this Bay Area favorite, a dazzling combination of classical ballet and rollicking character numbers filled with all the sass and sizzle that has made San Francisco’s Smuin Ballet famous. After the matinee performance tomorrow,

Smuin’s special “Santa’s Sweets” program will offer an extra treat for young people with Santa Claus waiting to greet members of the audience with complimentary sweets. The evening performances will begin at 7:30 p.m. tonight and tomorrow. The Saturday matinee is at 2 p.m. Tickets for all performances are $14 for students and range from $43 to $63 for adults. Go to www.bankheadtheater.org or call 373-6800. “The Christmas Ballet” was introduced in 1995 and is split into two halves, Clas-

TREAT YOURSELF TO A LITTLE EUROPEAN PAMPERING Must be state resident. See center for details.

Complimentary wax for first time guests.

europeanwax waxcenter.com

PLEASANTON / 925 484 2900 6770 Bernal Ave., Suite # 430 / Pleasanton, CA 94566 In the Safeway shopping center

sical Christmas and Cool Christmas. Music from traditional Bach and sacred carols, to klezmer, gospel, holiday standards and even a touch of Elvis, accompanies dances that range from classical ballet to true Broadway tapping. The 2012 edition will debut three world premiere works including one for Classical Christmas, choreographed by Smuin artist Jane Rehm and set to the Canadian Brass version of “Here We Come-a-Wassailing.” Cool Christmas will feature “All I Want for Christmas,” choreographed by former Smuin artist Darren Anderson, and “No Christmas for Me,” set to music by Malaysian singersongwriter Zee Avi. In addition to the new works, the 2012 edition of “The Christmas Ballet” will welcome the return of past favorites plus a piece choreographed by the late Michael Smuin to a majestic classical recording of “Ave Maria.”

Smuin Ballet, which combines classical with contemporary, will include Classical Christmas, at left, and Cool Christmas, above, in “The Christmas Ballet.”

Dancer and choreographer Michael Smuin formed Smuin Ballet in 1994, combining classical and contemporary dance elements. The Smuin Ballet will return to the Bankhead Theater in March with “The Best of Smuin Ballet.” N

WHERE WILL YOU SHOP SMALL? 3,‹+<)305 3 0 ‹ = 5 (

5

NOV 24

‹:(59( ;65 4 6 (5

69,‹73 4 9 ,( , = 0 : 3

+ FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO

VisitTriValley.com Page 18ÊUÊNovember 23, 2012ÊUÊPleasanton Weekly

california


HOLIDAY FUND

Open Heart Kitchen feeds hungry Need for meals in Tri-Valley is up 15% over last year BY DOLORES FOX CIARDELLI

All the talk is turkey these days at Open Heart Kitchen, which provides fresh hot meals in the Tri-Valley every weekday. “Now through Dec. 25 we need frozen turkeys,” reads a plea on its website. “Lots and lots and lots of turkeys!” Open Heart Kitchen needs one thousand turkeys for the holidays as it continues serving free hot meals five days a week to individuals and families in need. It depends on food and cash donations from individuals and campaigns such as the Holiday Fund. “We survive just by the generosity of the community,” said Executive Director Linda McKeever. The Holiday Fund money goes directly to the programs, which served 237,000 meals in 2011, including hot meals alternating at sites in Pleasanton, Dublin and Livermore five days a week and meals for low-income seniors at Ridge View Commons on Case Avenue in Pleasanton. “This year we’re already at that number,” McKeever said. “We’re looking at a growth of 15%.” And this is after a surge during the last two years due to bad economic times. In 2010, Open Heart Kitchen served just under 217,000 meals, while in 2007, it served 161,000 meals. McKeever said they have also seen a greater need for their children’s box lunch program, which provides weekend meals for low-income children at their school sites. “We just started in the Pleasanton schools last year, and we will be adding more within the next month or so,” said McKeever. “We give them nutritious lunches for the weekend, and we also include younger siblings.” “We also are seeing an increase in the seniors’ need,” she added. “We now have a new program in Dublin where we deliver box lunches for low income seniors. And also we see more seniors at both meal programs. It’s a little harder for seniors to make ends meet right now.” Open Heart Kitchen serves anyone who walks in the door -- no questions, no qualifying -- and everyone is welcome. There is a form, which is voluntary, so Open Heart Kitchen can know who it is serving. “Our guests are incredibly helpful with all of the process,” McKeever said. “It does help us to fill out the form, and they know that.” The guests can eat their meals at the tables set up by the volunteers or they can take their meals to go. “A lot of times one family member can come and get meals for the entire family, maybe they have someone working part-time,” McKeever said. “Our goal is to make sure the whole family is fed.” Guests include low-income families struggling to make ends meet; the unemployed and underemployed; seniors on fixed incomes; and the homeless. Open Heart Kitchen serves as their safety net. Meals are planned weeks ahead of time by a nutritionist, each with protein, starch, vegetable, green salad, fruit salad, bread, milk, coffee, tea

The following agencies will be supported by the Holiday Fund. Scheduled to receive 75% are: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Receiving the other 25% are:

Axis Community Health Open Heart Kitchen Pleasanton Partnerships in Education (PPIE) Foundation Valley Humane Society ValleyCare Health System Hope Hospice

■ ■

■ ■

Pleasanton Cultural Arts Council REACH (Resources Education Activities Community and Housing) for special adults of the Tri-Valley Sandra J. Wing Healing Therapies Foundation Senior Support Program of the Tri-Valley

Pleasanton Weekly Holiday Fund Donor Remittance Form SUE EVANS PHOTOGRAPHY.

Open Heart Kitchen has an enthusiastic corps of volunteers that shop, cook and serve meals, plus clean up afterward.

or juice and dessert. The food is prepared by volunteers, who do all the shopping, cooking, serving and cleanup. They must also be prepared to switch gears at a moment’s notice as sites can serve anywhere from 200 to 700 meals per day. Large donations of perishables can change the menu at the last minute. “We’re predominately a volunteer organization and we’re very, very community friendly,” McKeever said. “A lot of people in the community are involved on the volunteer side and helping us do anything.” Volunteers range from individuals to those who join with others from their school, community and church. Some groups of friends come to help with a lunch. Open Heart Kitchen also works with Alameda County Community Food Bank, Axis Community Health and other community groups whose aim is to promote nutrition and feed those in need. Still there is always a need for volunteers, especially after the holiday season and throughout the year. “People are still hungry in the summertime,” McKeever noted. Last week Tri-Valley food pantries opened their new refrigeration and freezer storage, just in time to accommodate turkeys donated for the region’s hungry this holiday season. The new refrigeration/storage unit was made possible through a collaboration of corporate, government and local nonprofit agencies, McKeever said, plus the city of Pleasanton is providing a secure and centrally located site for the storage unit. Learn more at ww.openheartkitchen.org or call 580-1616. N

Enclosed is a donation of: $__________________________ Name: __________________________________________________________________ Business Name: ___________________________________________________________ (Only required if business name is to be listed as donor in the paper) Address: _________________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip: ___________________________________________________________ Email: ___________________________________________________________________ Phone: __________________________________________________________________ QCredit Card (MC, VISA, or AMEX): _________________________________________

Expires:

/

Signature: ______________________________________

I wish to designate my contribution as follows (select one): Q In my name as shown above

-ORQ In honor of:

Q In memory of:

Q In the name of business above Q As a gift for:

_____________________________________________________________________ (Name of Person) The Pleasanton Weekly Holiday Fund is a donor advised fund of Silicon Valley Community Foundation, a 501(c)(3) charitable organization. A contribution to this fund allows your donation to be tax deductible to the fullest extent of the law. All donors and their gift amounts will be published in the Pleasanton Weekly unless the boxes below are checked. Q I wish to contribute anonymously. Q Please withhold the amount of my contribution.

Dinner is served

Make checks payable to Silicon Valley Community Foundation and send to:

■ Mondays, 4-6 p.m.: Crosswinds Church, 6444 Sierra Court, Dublin ■ Tuesdays, Wednesdays, noon-6 p.m.: Asbury United Methodist Church, 4743 East Ave., Livermore ■ Thursdays, 4-6 p.m.: Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 460 N. Livermore Ave. ■ Friday, 4-6 p.m.: Trinity Lutheran Church, 1225 Hopyard Road ■ Seniors (62-plus): Ridgeview Commons Senior Center, 5200 Case Ave., Pleasanton, 4-6 p.m. every weekday. Optional donation of $3.

Pleasanton Weekly Holiday Fund c/o Silicon Valley Community Foundation 2440 West El Camino Real, Suite 300 Mountain View, California 94040 Credit card gifts may be made at: www.siliconvalleycf.org/pleasantonweeklyholidayfund

Pleasanton Weekly PRI NT & ON LI NE

Pleasanton WeeklyÊUÊNovember 23, 2012ÊU Page 19


TriValley Life

PEOPLE AND LIFESTYLES IN OUR COMMUNITY

WHAT’S HAPPENING AROUND THE VALLEY — MUSIC, THEATER, ART, MOVIES AND MORE

Food networking Home ec teacher feasts on sharing culinary skills BY GLENN WOHLTMANN

For most of Pleasanton, Village High School home economics teacher Kit Little’s reputation precedes her. Anyone who’s tasted the food she and her classes create knows why. Little has been slowly and quietly building her own food network, using a simple recipe. “I don’t do any advertising or marketing other than good food at a reasonable price and having standards that shine,” Little said.

She’s also got a knack for networking, building relationships with everyone from Terra Bella Family Farm and other vendors to those who hire her and her students to cater their events, like the Rotary Club of Pleasanton. The home ec teacher was honored — again — by the Pleasanton School Board at its latest meeting. That’s the latest in a long series of awards that began in 1976, when she won Home Economics Student Teacher of the Year from San Jose State University for her work at Foothill High School. She went on to win both district Teacher of the Year in 1995 and Alameda County Teacher of the Year in 1996. Despite winning the San Jose State award, Little wasn’t hired at Foothill

ON THE TOWN AMERICAN Eddie Papa’s American Hangout 4889 Hopyard Road, Pleasanton, 469-6266. Winner of The Pleasanton Weekly’s Reader Choice Awards for “Best American Food,” “Best Meal under $20” and “Best Kid Friendly Restaurant,” Eddie Papa’s American Hangout celebrates the regional food and beverage cultures of America. Bring the whole family to enjoy iconic dishes from across the United States, Old World Hospitality, and hand crafted artisan cocktails. www.eddiepapas.com.

that first year, losing out to a teacher with more experience. The school was brand new at the time and out of 28 places she’d considered, it was the place she wanted to work. “I was distraught,” she recalled. But she did land a fulltime job with Dublin High, which was part of the Pleasanton district then, in 1978. By 1979, she was teaching home ec at Foothill. Little has been at Village for 11 years, but she said she was dubious when first invited to move to the district’s alternative high school. Foothill’s assistant principal Sheila Flynn was moving into the principal’s job and wanted Little to move her program there. “I’d never seen Village and didn’t think I wanted to work there,” Little said. She was willing to listen, though, and went on a tour led by Flynn. “What did it was a student I’d had at Foothill that I’d tried everything with and just couldn’t reach. I walked into class and she was smiling and she was interacting, and I said, ‘This could be the place,’” Little said. She was unhappy with what the district had planned for Village’s home economics space, however, and spent the weekend drawing plans on graph paper. After a meeting with district officials that began a bit contentiously, those officials agreed with her. Little said the space was built “exactly according to that graph paper.” She teaches two catering classes that operate Village Catering, the school’s in-house business that gives students real world experience; two classes called Good Eats, which focus on preparing meals that are “nutri-

tious and delicious”; and a fifth class, which is work experience. Although Little offers her students from Village opportunities to get jobs in the food service industry — she has job postings on a wall of her classroom — only a half-dozen or so have made that their careers. That’s OK with her. She recognizes that the business is a tough one requiring people to work long hours including nights, weekends and holidays. “What I think is more important is to teach transferable skills. Lots of people get the wrong idea from the Food Network,” Little said. “I see the food as a vehicle for what I teach: organization, time management, teamwork, problem solving. All those transferable skills are really important.”

Fundraisers

Holiday

HOLIDAY FOOD DRIVE Pleasanton CPA firm, JL Consulting, is coordinating a holiday food drive to benefit people in need served by the Alameda County Community Food Bank. Donations of nutritious nonperishable foods can be dropped off 9 a.m.-5 p.m. now through Friday, Dec. 14, at 1024 Serpentine Lane, Suite 105. Call 846-1859 or email info@jlcpa.net. TOY DRIVE FOR CHILDREN FIGHTING CANCER Downtown Pleasantonbased Wealth Management Associates is collecting new, unwrapped toys, books, games and art supplies for The Nicholas Colby Fund through Wednesday, Dec. 19 (http://www.nicholascolbyfund. org/Home/tabid/2285/Default. aspx). Donations can be made at the WMA offices, 400 Main St., #200, 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. For details, call Erin Haubner at 4626007.

Page 20ÊUÊNovember 23, 2012ÊUÊPleasanton Weekly

Little runs a tight ship. Last week, while preparing Village High’s annual turkey feast — an annual meal served to all Village students, and for some, the only Thanksgiving they’ll have, according to Little — student and adult volunteers listened to an impromptu homily about safety. “These knives were sharpened this morning,” she told the dozen or so volunteers.

‘HOLIDAY SONGS OF JOY’ Valley Concert Chorale will present “Holiday Songs of Joy” at 3 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 2, at Trinity Lutheran Church, 1225 Hopyard Road. Joining the Chorale is the Tri-Valley’s Cantabella Children’s Chorus. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door; high school and college students, $10; free for children under 12. For tickets, call 866-4003 or visit www.valleyconcertchorale.org. HOLIDAY TEDDY BEAR TEA FEATURING THE SNOW FAERIE Soroptimist International of Pleasanton Dublin is hosting a Holiday Teddy Bear Tea Party from 2-3:30 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 1, at the Highland Oaks Clubhouse, 4530 Sandalwood Dr. Girls should bring their favorite teddy bear to enjoy a lovely tea party with holiday treats. And all the way from the North Pole, The Snow Faerie is planning a special visit to delight

GLENN WOHLTMANN

Clockwise from above: Kit Little instructs a team of volunteers who came to slice birds for Village High’s annual turkey feast; a quesadilla platter, and chocolate strawberries, both made by Village Catering.

That didn’t stop a couple of minor cuts, which were quickly patched up and covered by plastic gloves. Village Catering is gearing up to do the Pleasanton Rotary’s annual holiday party. Last year, after hearing the Rotarians laughing and singing, one of her students approached her and asked if that was what adult parties were like. When she said it was, that student said he couldn’t wait to be an adult. And, after spending 14 hours on their feet, another student told Little that she felt “exhilarated.” “’I’m always so hard on myself to do a good job,’” Little said the student told her. “’We did a good job.’” The Rotarians have decided to donate $1,800 to replace an industrial dishwasher. Little is now considering another big move. The bakery that provides bread for Terra Bella Family Farm recently went out of business and the owner approached Village asking if Little would be willing to take on the task of baking for the farm’s weekly distribution to its members. She and her students just might rise to that opportunity. N you with her special magic and sing along. Cost: age 10 to adult, $20; and 5-9 years, $15. Visit www.sipleasantondublin.org. SEND THEM ‘HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS’ All the cats and dogs at the Valley Humane Society, 3570 Nevada St., want to be home with YOU for the holidays. Find yourself a warm and fuzzy critter to snuggle with and enjoy discounted adoption fees. “Home for the Holidays” runs through the month of December, during normal adoption hours. Closed Tuesday, Dec. 25. For details, call 426-8656 or visit www.valleyhumane.org.

Lectures

TRI-VALLEY GRANT APPLICATION WORKSHOPS Livermore and Pleasanton will co-sponsor two application workshops for several 2013-14 grant programs, including Housing and Human Services (Pleasanton and Livermore), and Youth/Civic

Special Awards and Accomplishments 1976 San Jose State University Home Economics Student Teacher of the Year 1995 Teacher of the Year, Pleasanton Unified School District 1996 Teacher of the Year, Alameda County 1996 CA Department of Education, Selected One of Top 10 Teachers in California 2000 National Leavey Award for Private Enterprise Education 2006 Community of Character Award, 2006 (City of Pleasanton & Chamber of Commerce) 2007 Food Service and Hospitality Exemplary Program, Continuation Educators Association 2008 Dream, Dare, Do Award (Home Economics Teachers of California) 2012 Tri-Valley YMCA Martin Luther King Legacy Award 2012 PUSD Certificate of Recognition for the Village Catering Program Arts (Pleasanton). The first workshop is 10 a.m.-noon, Tuesday, Dec. 4, at the Pleasanton City Council Chamber, 200 Old Bernal Ave. The second workshop is 2-4 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 6, at the Livermore City Council Chamber, 3575 Pacific Ave., Livermore. To RSVP, contact Terry Snyder at 931-5343 or tsnyder@ cityofpleasantonca.gov.

Live Music

LIVERMORE-AMADOR SYMPHONY ‘CELEBRATING 50 SEASONS’ Dr. Arthur Barnes and the LivermoreAmador Symphony opens its Golden Season - the 50th - with music from Darter and Brahms that powerfully celebrates the orchestra’s half-century of musical achievement. The music begins at 8 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 1, at Bankhead Theater, 2400 First St., Livermore. Tickets are $10-$29. Call 373-6800 or visit www.mylvpac.com.


fogster.com

THE TRI-VALLEY’S CLASSIFIEDS WEB SITE

PLACE AN AD IN FOGSTER

AT&T U-verse for just $29/mo! BUNDLE & SAVE with AT&T Internet+Phone+TV and get a FREE pre-paid Visa Card! (select plans). Hurry, call now! 800-319-3280. (CalSCAN)

PLACE AN AD

ONLINE

fogster.com

E-MAIL

ads@fogster.com

BULLETIN BOARD

Cable TV-Internet-Phone Save! Packages start at $89.99/mo (for 12 months.) Options from ALL major service providers. Call Acceller today to learn more! CALL 1-888-8977650. (Cal-SCAN)

115 Announcements

DirecTV for $29.99/mo for 24 months. Over 140 channels. FREE HD-DVR Upgrade! FREE NFL Sunday Ticket w/CHOICE Package! Call TODAY for details 1-888721-2794. (Cal-SCAN)

P HONE

(925) 600-0840 Fogster.com is a unique Web site offering postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and an opportunity for your ad to appear in the Pleasanton Weekly. Now you can log on to fogster.com, day or night and get your ad started immediately online. So, the next time you have an item to sell, barter, give away or buy, get the perfect combination: print ads in your local newspapers, reaching more than 35,000 readers, and unlimited Web postings reaching hundreds of thousands additional people!

INDEX N BULLETIN

BOARD 100-155 N FOR SALE 200-270 N KIDS STUFF 330-355 NJ OBS 510-585 NB USINESS SERVICES 600-690 NH OME SERVICES 700-799 NFOR RENT/ FOR SALE REAL ESTATE 801-860 NPUBLIC/ LEGAL NOTICES 995-997 The publisher waives any and all claims or consequential damages due to errors. Embarcadero Publishing Co. cannot assume responsibility for the claims or performance of its advertisers. Embarcadero Publishing Co. reserves the right to refuse, edit or reclassify any ad solely at its discretion without prior notice.

Highspeed Internet everywhere by satellite! Speeds up to 12mbps! (200x faster than dial-up.) Starting at $49.95/mo. CALL NOW & GO FAST! 1-888-718-6268. (Cal-SCAN) New Years Eve San Ramon Marriott Call 800-838-3006 www.PGuild.com

130 Classes & Instruction Attend College Online 100%. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, *Web. Job placement assistance. Computer avai able. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 888-210-5162 www.CenturaOnline.com (Cal-SCAN) Aviation Maintenance Tech Airline Careers begin here ÔøΩ” FAA approved training. Financial assistance available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-3382. (Cal-SCAN)

SOLD

FOR SALE 201 Autos/Trucks/ Parts

MIND & BODY 425 Health Services Diabetics with Medicare Get a FREE Talking Meter and diabetic testing supplies at No Cost, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, this meter eliminates painful finger pricking! Call 888-781-9376. (Cal-SCAN) Female Hair Loss Over 30 Million Women Suffer From Hair Loss! Do you? If So We Have a Solution! CALL KERANIQUE TO FIND OUT MORE 888-690-0395. (Cal-SCAN) Medical Alert for Seniors 24/7 monitoring. FREE Equipment. FREE Shipping. Nationwide Service. $29.95/Month CALL Medical Guardian Today 866-944-5935. (Cal-SCAN) Sleep Apnea Sufferers Get Free CPAP Replacement Supplies at No Cost, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, prevent red skin sores and bacterial infection! Call 888-699-7660. (Cal-SCAN)

Help Wanted!!! Make $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-usa.com (AAN CAN) NEW inventions and Product IDEAS WANTED! Free info & confidential consultation on your idea at DAVISON. Call toll free at 1-800-428-5116 Today. Fee-based service. Corner Bakery Café NOW HIRING! NOW HIRING FOR A CORNER BAKERY CAFÉ DECEMBER GRAND OPENING!! Buon Hospitality is opening its first Corner Bakery Café new location in Pleasanton, CA! We are hiring for all positions, including Cashiers, Kitchen Staff, Line Cooks, Catering Drivers, and more! Corner Bakery Café opened its first location in 1991 and now operates 124 locations across the country. Known for its innovative menu featuring a wide variety of egg scramblers and oatmeal for breakfast, flavorful sandwiches and signature panini, homemade soups, signature salads, fresh baked goods and an extensive catering menu, CORNER BAKERY CAFÉ has been delighting guests nationwide with fresh, made-to-order meals in a welcoming and cozy atmosphere for 20 years. We are looking for people who have a passion for food, retail and customer service! Our ideal candidate will be a self-starter, motivated, dependable, and have the ability to work in a fastpaced environment. To be successful in this position, you must have strong communication, interpersonal, and customer service skills. Restaurant/food service experience preferred. Under the supervision of a focused and driven management team, you will have many opportunities for career advancement! Buon Hospitality employees receive outstanding benefits, training and development! To apply, go to our website www. Work4PCandF.com or call 1-855-4-PCFJobs! If you have a love for the restaurant industry and customer service, this could be the career for you! *Resumes submitted through this ad will not be considered* Buon Hospitality is an EOE (Equal Opportunity Employer).

BUSINESS SERVICES EMPLOYMENT Vintage RV 1967 Columbus Cruiser 30ft. all electric interior motorhome. Original cabinetry and dinette, new carpeting and drapes. Exterior repainted. Many updates, meticulous maintenance with receipts available. See at www.1967classiccustommotorhome. com. mscully@vbbn.com

202 Vehicles Wanted CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) Donate Your Car, Truck, Boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 888-9026851. (Cal-SCAN)

215 Collectibles & Antiques ANTIQUE RESTORATION “A Labor of Love” Impeccable Quality Integrity of Workmanship 925-462-0383 or 925-216-7976 All inclusive License #042392

245 Miscellaneous

ONLINE - fogster.com E-MAIL - ads@fogster.com PHONE - (925) 600-0840

560 Employment Information $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) AIRLINE CAREERS Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified ÔøΩ” Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www. CenturaOnline.com (AAN CAN) Driver: Choose Hometime $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months and 12 months.$0.03 Quarterly Bonus. Requires 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com Drivers: 12 Needed Apply Now! T 5% Pay & Late Model Equip. Guaranteed Home for Xmas, Need CDL Class A Driving Exp. 877258-8782 www.addrivers. com (Cal-SCAN) EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film - Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week Lower Tuition for 2012 AwardMakeupSchool.com

615 Computers My Computer Works Computer problems? Viruses, spyware, email, printer issues, bad internet co nections - FIX IT NOW! Professional, U.S.- based technicians. $25 off service. Call for immediate help. 1-888-865-0271 (Cal-SCAN)

624 Financial Credit Card Debt Cut payments by up to half. Stop creditors from calling. 888-416-2691. (Cal-SCAN) Reverse Mortgage? Ever Consider a Reverse Mortgage? At least 62 years old? Stay in your home & increase cash flow! Safe and Effective! Call Now for your free DVD! Call Now 888-698-3165. (Cal-SCAN)

645 Office/Home Business Services Classified Advertising The business that considers itself immune to advertising, finds itself immune to business. Reach Californias with a Classified ad in almost every county! Over 270 newspapers! Combo~California Daily and Weekly Networks. Free Brochures. elizabeth cnpa.com or (916)288-6019. (CalSCAN) Classified Advertising Advertise in 240 California newspapers for one low cost. Your 25 word classified ad will reach over 6 million+ Californians. For brochure call Elizabeth (916)288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) Did You Know that Ten Million adults tweeted in the past month, while 164 million read a newspaper in print or online in the past week?

Display Business Card Ad Many a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising Mark Twain. Advertise your business card sized ad in 140 California newspapers for one low cost. Reach over 3 million+ Californians. Free brochure elizabeth@cnpa.com (916)2886019. (Cal-SCAN)

825 Homes/Condos for Sale Oceanfront Condos Luxury 2BR/2BA was $850k now $399,900 Resort Spa Restaurant Golf Marina www.MarinSemiahmoo.com 1-888-996-2746 x5464. (Cal-SCAN)

850 Acreage/Lots/ Storage

HOME SERVICES 751 General Contracting NOTICE TO READERS >It is illegal for an unlicensed person to perform contracting work on any project valued at $500.00 or more in labor and materials. State law also requires that contractors include their license numbers on all advertising. Check your contractor’s status at www.cslb. ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB (2752). Unlicensed persons taking jobs that total less than $500.00 must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the Contractors State License Board A NOTICE TO READERS: It is illegal for an unlicensed person to perform contracting work on any project valued at $500.00 or more in labor and materials. State law also requires that contractors include their license numbers on all adverti ing. Check your contractor’s status at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB (2752). Unlicensed persons taking jobs that total less than $500.00 must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

REAL ESTATE 809 Shared Housing/ Rooms ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

20 ACRES FREE Buy 40-Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $168/ month. Money back guarantee. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches. com (AAN CAN) Texas Hill Country Land Bargain! 8.4 Acres - just $99,900 Huge live oak trees, 30 mile views, in heart of Texas Wine Country. Close to medical. Low taxes (ag exempt). Utilities included. Buy now- build later. Lowest financing in history! Call now 800-511-2430, x 440.

LEGALS 995 Fictitious Name Statement FOUNDATION REPAIR OF CA FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 471427 The following person(s) doing business as: Foundation Repair of CA, 2174 Rheem Dr., Ste. A, Pleasanton, CA 94588, is hereby registered by the following owner(s): SMP Construction & Maintenance, Inc., 2174 Rheem Dr., Ste. A, Pleasanton, CA 94588. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on June 1, 2012. Signature of Registrant(s): Mark Phelps. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda on Oct. 31, 2012. Pleasanton Weekly. Published Nov. 16, 23, 30 and Dec. 7, 2012.

TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS GO TO FOGSTER.COM

PET OF THE WEEK Twinkle, Twinkle Twinkle is a 2-yearold, domestic longhair, white and brown tabby female. “Twinkle’s name really matches her personality,” say the volunteers at the East Bay SPCA’s Dublin Adoption Center. “She is a little gem with beautiful markings, big soulful eyes and lovely spirit. She is a true love bug who is happy to be stroked while she purrs or kneads in your lap. If you are looking for a cat that enjoys togetherness, come meet Twinkle.” The center is located at 4651 Gleason Drive in Dublin. To see other animals available for adoption, visit www.eastbayspca.org or call 479-9670. Pleasanton WeeklyÊUÊNovember 23, 2012ÊU Page 21


Real Estate

OPEN HOME GUIDE AND REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

57% of homes on market now getting multiple offers High demand, shortage of homes making California housing more competitive BY JEB BING

Favorable home prices and recordlow interest rates, combined with high demand and a severe shortage of available housing, have created a highly competitive housing market in California with nearly six in ten home sales receiving multiple offers. In its “2012 Annual Housing Market Survey,” the California Association of Realtors reports that 57% of home sales received multiple offers in 2012, the highest in at least the past 12 years. Each home received an average of 4.2 offers, up from 3.5 offers in 2011. Lower priced homes, typically real estate-owned (REO) or short sales, attracted more multiple offers than equity sales. Seven of 10 REO sales and short sales received multiple offers, while only half of equity sales received more than one offer. “Well-qualified buyers are recognizing the once-in-a-generation opportunity to purchase a home in California and are jumping into the market,” said CAR President LeFrancis Arnold. “However, the fierce market conditions have forced many buyers

to compete with all-cash offers and investors, setting off multiple offers and bidding wars, making it even more difficult for first-time buyers to become homeowners,” he added. The competitive housing environment led to more properties being sold at or above the list price, with 41% of homes selling without a markdown from the asking price, the highest since 2005 and up from a long-run average of 32%. Additionally, homes sold faster in 2012, with equity sales selling in 32 days compared with 67 days in 2011. REOs took 30 days to sell compared with 50 days in 2011, and short sales took 90 days compared with 141 days in 2011, reflecting the still-difficult process. Other key findings from CAR’s “2012 Annual Housing Market Survey” include: ■ Nearly one-third (30%) of all home buyers paid with all cash in 2012, more than triple what it was in 2001, when nearly 9% of buyers paid all cash. ■ Demand for investment properties and second homes remained strong in 2012. Sixteen percent of sales were to investors, and 7% were to

buyers who purchased a second or vacation home. The remaining 77% purchased the home as a primary residence. ■ International buyers made up 5.8% of sales in 2012, relatively unchanged from 5.7% in 2011. Buyers from China, Canada, India and Mexico made up the vast majority of international buyers at 39.1%, 13%, 8.7%, and 8.7%, respectively. ■ While still below the long-run average of 39%, the share of first-time buyers rose from 34.2% in 2011 to 35.8% in 2012, thanks to improved housing affordability resulting from low interest rates and affordable home prices. ■ First-time buyers were attracted to distressed properties because of their lower price point. Forty percent of all first-time buyers bought either an REO or short sale in 2012, down from 44.3 in 2011. The decrease was primarily due to a shortage of inventory of distressed properties. ■ Reflecting tighter lending standards, very few home buyers have a second mortgage. The share of home sales with a second mortgage has fallen dramatically from a high of 43.4% in 2006 to 1.8% in 2012. N

HOME SALES This week’s data represents homes sold during October 2012

Dublin 8098 Brittany Drive J. & T. Petero to P. Balakrishnan for $790,000 11598 Estrella Court K. Tipton to E. Ricci for $585,000 3616 Finnian Way A. Chan to T. & H. Van for $370,000 6020 Hillbrook Place F. Montifar to T. Tramblie for $480,000 4978 Houlton Court P. & M. Bamford to J. & C. Levalley for $731,000 3374 Monaghan Street P. Messier to A. Singh for $350,000 4793 Perugia Street Sorrento at Dublin Ranch to S. & C. McRee for $562,500 4837 Perugia Street Sorrento at Dublin Ranch to N. Chan for $447,500 4436 Roscommon Way HPROF Limited to K. Chitrapu for $722,000 4866 Shelton Street M. Milz to L. Ruan for $690,000

Livermore 5403 Carnegie Loop J. Grammatica to B. & G. Williams for $765,000 1446 Chateau Common #204 L. Dagosta to L. Abad for $157,500 1887 Corte Cava S. & M. Hashimy to A. & J. Liu for $363,500 5726 Edelweiss Way B. & G. Williams to Bauer Trust for $596,000 523 Heligan Lane #4 T. Vargas to D. & C. McLaughlin for $512,000 290 Jami Court W. & M. James to J. Choate for $510,000 1141 Meadow Drive S. & K. Kanaparthy to Y. Hu for $370,000 1879 Meadow Glen Drive F. Dickey to R. Bozinoski for $565,000 950 Norfolk Road E. Corsi to S. Moppin for $381,500 See SALES on Page 23

Page 22ÊUÊNovember 23, 2012ÊUÊPleasanton Weekly


REAL ESTATE

OPEN HOMES THIS WEEKEND

Recently Sold Homes

Pleasanton 5 BEDROOMS

3273 Novara Way Sun 1-4

Fabulous Properties

SALES Continued from Page 22 258 North M Street Desai Trust to A. Jain for $200,000 1828 Pepperwood Common JP Morgan Chase Bank to B. Ghafoor for $440,000 2192 Percheron Road A. & D. Dieckmann to B. Fletcher for $440,000 3943 Stanford Way L. Perez to M. & L. Hughes for $299,000 907 Via Seville P. Nunes to J. Long for $415,000

Pleasanton 2158 Arroyo Court Ann Apartments to P. Wong for $228,000 5090 Blackbird Way Kelley Trust to S. & S. Stenning for $737,000 4368 Diavila Avenue K. & C. Resinger to S. Kesavalu for $625,000 3019 East Ruby Hill Drive C. & E. Beltran to M. & J. Lau for $1,435,000

Represented Buyer!

$2,925,000 980-0273

4275 Holland Drive A. & M. Amiri to F. Sandico for $530,000 4697 Klamath Court Furrer Trust to Y. Zhang for $695,000 3364 Ledgestone Court Nicholas Trust to I. Harrosh for $1,655,000 5419 Montalvo Court Reichling Trust to D. & A. Johnson for $490,000 6785 Paseo Catalina T. Loo to V. & N. Divakar for $710,000 3541 Pimlico Drive D. Timblin to J. Jose for $549,000 2461 Romano Circle Bklg Trust to S. Prathnadi for $1,209,500 2730 Spinosa Court A. & Y. Sudra to C. Yan for $710,000 2308 Via Espada Goon Trust to C. Pang for $752,000 3837 Vineyard Avenue #B Federal Home Loan Mortgage to Y. Mino for $100,000 4862 Woodthrush Road Cummings-Davidian Trust to D. & M. Cavander for $795,000 Source: California REsource

4246 Remillard Ct., Pleasanton $1,324,000

2541 Corte Bella, Pleasanton $1,086,000

4014 Jackie Ct., Pleasanton $560,000

168 Gillette Place, Livermore $346,000

The Real Estate Market is continually changing, now more than ever it is important to contact a professional Realtor. If you or someone you know is thinking of buying or selling a property, I would be happy to provide them with my personal and professional service.

Wishing you all a wonderful Holiday Season

Anni Hagfeldt

Visit pleasantonweekly.com/ realestate for sales information, current listings and open homes.

925.519.3534 anni@apr.com | annihagfeldt.com

“I work for you…it’s that simple!”

For marketing opportunities call Dana Santos at 600-0840, x110.

apr.com | PLEASANTON 900 Main Street 925.251.1111

Sold

147 Ramona Road, Danville

Sold

1063 Crellin Road, Pleasanton

Sale Pending

Stunning, brand new custom home on a quiet street, yet just blocks from Danville’s charming downtown. Huge lot, gorgeous hardwood floors, incredible chef’s kitchen. Represented Buyer. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths. Sold for $1,130,000.

Beautiful home in Vintage Hills. Private yard with pool and spa, vaulted ceilings, light and bright home with 2 master suites, including 1 on the main level. Represented Buyer. Sold for $720,000.

80 Cherry Street, Chico Darling income property, across the street from the Chico State campus. Ideal for the parent investor. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath. Offered at $200,000. Representing buyer.

Sold

Sale Pending

861 Chateli Court, Pleasanton Gorgeous tri-level on a court in the desirable Vintage Hills neighborhood. Large private yard with a pool, gleaming hard wood floors, remodeled kitchen and baths. 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Sold for $800,000.

762 Bonita Avenue, Pleasanton Completely remodeled beauty in Pleasanton Heights. Wood floors throughout, gorgeous kitchen and baths, sparkling pool and spa. Pending with multiple offers. 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Offered at $819,000.

Inventory in the Tri-Valley is extremely low, and there are plenty of motivated buyers. Multiple offers are once again becoming the norm. If you are considering selling your home, give me a call for a free, no obligation market analysis.

Sylvia Desin Direct: 925.621.4070 Cell: 925.413.1912 sdesin@apr.com DRE# 01280640

apr.com | PLEASANTON 900 Main Street 925.251.1111 Pleasanton WeeklyÊUÊNovember 23, 2012ÊU Page 23


2012

2011

#1 OfďŹ ce in Pleasanton in Volume and Sales

2010

3 years in a row!

!"# ##    

Understated elegance and breathtaking views from this custom home in Grey Eagle Estates. 4 bedrooms, 2 dens and a media room that could also be a wonderful in law set up or guest quarters. Grand marble foyer entrance with old world woodwork and dramatic spiral staircase. Large gourmet granite kitchen with stainless steel appliances and stunning hardwood ďŹ&#x201A;oors! Offered at $1,690,000 4 Grey Eagle Court, Pleasanton

REALTORSÂŽ, GRI, CRS, SRES

925.463.0436 www.SoldinaFlash.com

Personalized service is always in season Now is the time to explore your real estate options. Let me put my knowledge to work for you today.

Cristin Kiper Sanchez 925.580.7719 DRE #01479197

cristin@sanchmail.com | www.teamsanch.com

#  ' ##   %$ $ $# %" %"  "  &  '  "$   $#$ "  

Ingrid Wetmore, Natalie Kruger & Lisa Sterling-Sanchez

Melissa Pederson

Keller Williams Tri-Valley Realty

REALTORÂŽ DRE # 01002251 925.397.4326 melissapedersonhomes@gmail.com www.melissapederson.com

925.918.0986 | 925.847.5377 | 925.980.9265 DRE 00923379, 01187582, 01012330

Pending

PENDING!

89 Terra Way, South Livermore Great home for entertaining! 3325 sq ft, four bedrooms plus loft (5th bedroom option), gourmet kitchen, tons of upgrades, 3-car garage, low-maintenance backyard and courtyard. Offered at $875,000

4444 Foothill Road, Pleasanton Short sale. 4 BR and 2.5 BA. 3507 +/- sq. ft. Absolutely stunning! Completely rebuilt in 2005, this custom, single story home offers a view from every window, including Mt. Diablo and the surrounding hills. Beautifully updated throughout with fantastic gourmet kitchen. Huge 2.26 +/- acre lot includes an entertainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s backyard with pool and spa. Offered at $1,650,000

DeAnna Armario

Cindy and Gene Williams

REALTORÂŽ DRE # 01363180 925.260.2220 www.armariohomes.com

REALTORSÂŽ DRE # 01370076 and 00607511 925.918.2045 www.williamsteam.net

Open Sun 1-4

MULTIPLE OFFERS AND SOLD IN ONE WEEKEND!

4571 Mohr Avenue Gorgeous remodeled home! All the bells and whistles! Just move in! Offered at $699,000

1817 Spumante Place, Pleasanton Exquisite French country estate on a one of a kind lot in Ruby Hill w/5 BD, 4.5 BA, 6,374 sq. ft. The gourmet kitchen features top of the line appliances, granite counters, maple cabinets & hickory ďŹ&#x201A;oors. Spectacular view lot w/black bottom pool, rock waterfall and spa. Offered at $2,600,000

831 Bricco Court, Ruby Hill Mediterranean elegance with expansive, main level casual living areas open to one another, incl. a huge kitchen. Formal living room with coffered ceiling, cast-stone ďŹ replace, built-in cabinetry and faux wall ďŹ nish. Lower level built to entertain pool table & movie theatre, wine cellar and more. $3,499,000 www.831BriccoCourt.com

Gail Boal

Uwe Maercz

REALTORÂŽDRE # 01276455 925.577.5787 www.gailboal.com

REALTORÂŽ DRE # 01390383 925.360.8758 www.realestatebyuwe.com

3273 Novara Way - Pleasanton (Ruby Hill) 5 bed/4 full and 2 half bath, 7800 sq. ft. Grand French Estate on .6 acre lot. Exquisite details include Brazilian Cherry and French Limestone ďŹ&#x201A;oors, beautiful gourmet kitchen, crown molding and wainscoting. Golf course view and rose gardens. Offered at $2,925,000

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re grateful for all those special people and times that have touched a place in our hearts â&#x20AC;&#x201D; thank you for selecting us as your real estate professional. We value and appreciate the relationships weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve built. From our family to yours, may this Thanksgiving & holiday season be one that memories are made of! 5994 W. Las Positas, Suite 101, Pleasanton | www.KWTrivalley.com | 459 Main Street, Pleasanton Broker License #01395362


Pleasanton Weekly 11.23.2012 - Section 1