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“His speech was able to bring awareness to an overshadowed topic, especially among today’s youth,” said Strall. “He nailed one of the most important aspects of the entire assignment: find something you are passionate about and dig into it further. I’ve never had a seventh grader who felt stronger about the importance of the public library and all the amazing resources it has to offer its communities.” Jerry says there’s a misconception that kids his age don’t use the library anymore. “I would definitely say that is not true,” he says. “We just use it in a different way than the previous generations have and the generations that come after us will continue to use it in a different way. We tend to use the library as a study and workspace and use the computers.” When he’s not reading or doing homework, Jerry enjoys working on the school yearbook and is part of a LEGO robotics club. He isn’t sure exactly what career path he’ll chose as an adult. Jerry can see himself as a writer, journalist, lawyer, or a librarian! And he has an important message for anyone who thinks the Library is obsolete. “It’s continuing to evolve in its own way and the way it serves the community and the children both today and tomorrow,” said Jerry. “It’s a gathering place and it’s a repository that holds much of man’s knowledge. And this important institution is a haven for the perpetually curious and those who love learning.”

THERAPY DOGS AT THE LIBRARY MAKE READING ALOUD EASIER FOR KIDS If you remember anything about learning to read, you might remember how frustrating it can be. That’s where Tales to Tails comes in. Therapy dogs, like Ruby, the standard poodle, visit Library branches and let kids read books to them for practice. A few times a week, Ruby can be spotted at the Madisonville, Pleasant Ridge, St. Bernard, or Walnut Hills branch libraries surrounded by kids petting her and reading books. Ruby’s owner, Janice Kagermeier, knows Ruby’s presence makes a difference for kids learning to read. “It especially helps the kids who are having a bit of a struggle reading,” Kagermeier says. “It helps make them more comfortable and gives them a welcome distraction from the pressure of getting all the words right.” Ruby’s impact on kids was especially clear one recent afternoon at the Pleasant Ridge Branch Library. A fourth-grader was sitting at one of the tables working on homework with an adult and seemed to be getting more and more frustrated as he worked. When they took a break, Kagermeier asked the boy if he would like to read to Ruby. He picked out a book and sat down with Ruby to read, but was having a hard time identifying words. “I think Ruby must have sensed how much he was struggling because at one point she lifted her paw and rested it on his shoulder for a few moments as if to reassure him,” Kagermeier said. “It made the boy smile and broke the ice enough so he relaxed. He seemed to gain a little confidence and read a lot longer than I thought he would.” Kagermeier and Ruby work through Therapy Pets of Greater Cincinnati. You can find the times they, and other Tales to Tails therapy dogs, will be at the Library by visiting the Library events calendar at CincinnatiLibrary.org.

We couldn’t have said it any better.

L I B RA RY L I NKS | S P RIN G 2 0 1 8 / 9

Spring 2018 links  

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Spring 2018 links  

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