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[Free and download] The Turning

The Turning Francine Prose ePub | *DOC | audiobook | ebooks | Download PDF

#2196317 in Books 2012-09-25 2012-09-25Original language:EnglishPDF # 1 8.25 x .89 x 5.50l, .75 #File Name: 0061999660256 pages | File size: 19.Mb Francine Prose : The Turning before purchasing it in order to gage whether or not it would be worth my time, and all praised The Turning: 0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. RE-TELLING of the turn of the screwBy sarah_saysDespite the low ratings, I still wanted to give this book a try because Turn of the Screw by Henry James is one of my favorite stories that I have read thus far. The Turning, I want to say is a sort of re-telling of James' work, but set in a modern era. I also really like that the protagonist, Jack, is male compared to James' story with the female governess. With just that simple change, I already knew that this story might bring something different to the table. Although it wasn't as creepy as the


original, I still found myself compel by the story and by Jack. I really felt as if I was with him on that isolated island, and there were moments where I imagined myself being in his shoes and it made me a bit nervous to be honest. He's a pretty brave kid.I do admit that Jack does not write like a normal sixteen year old guy (I think he was sixteen or seventeen). He writes more like an adult, but I didn't mind that at all. I also liked that this was an epistolary novel, it made the story telling more personal I think.That ending, just like James' work, left me in chills. I love a good mystery, just like the next reader but I especially love a book where the mystery still lives on even after I close the book.Definitely recommend!0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. An Okay ReadBy Shawna C.This book was interesting but the end, to me, could have been better written. I enjoyed the visual imagery of the writing but I was expecting a bit more.0 of 2 people found the following review helpful. Wow, this was really bad.By RobI don't normally review books for , but in this case I'm making an exception. I don't think I've ever read a book by a respected author that was so poorly written. Perhaps Prose tossed this off thinking it was "just" for teens, and she didn't need to worry about things like characterization, motivation, logic, or creating a credible voice for her narrator. The writing is flat almost to the point of amateurish. Crappy-first-draft level writing. The takeoff on A Turn of the Screw, while seemingly inspired, is so poorly executed and so lacking in suspense or credibility, it's almost laughable. And the epostilary structure simply does not work at all. Tragic disappointment and complete condescension to teen readers who deserve so much better than this. Read the original masterpiece by Henry James, and steer clear of this hack job. A dark house.An isolated island.Strange dreams and even stranger visions . . . Jack is spending the summer on a private island far from modern conveniences. No Wi-Fi, no cell service, no one else on the island but a housekeeper and the two very peculiar children in his care. The first time Jack sees the huge black mansion atop a windswept hill, he senses something cold, something more sinister than even the dark house itself.Soon, he feels terribly isolated and alone. Yet he is not alone. The house has visitorspeering in the windows, staring from across the shore. But why doesn't anyone else see them . . . and what do they want? As secrets are revealed and darker truths surface, Jack desperately struggles to maintain a grip on reality. He knows what he sees, and he isn't crazy. . . . Or is he?From nationally acclaimed author Francine Prose comes a mind-bending story that will leave you realizing how subtle the lines that separate reality, imagination, and insanity really are. From School Library JournalGr 7 Up-An updated version of Henry James's The Turn of the Screw. Jack is separated from his girlfriend by her disapproving father, who arranges a summer job for the boy babysitting two orphaned children, Miles and Flora, on an isolated island. The story is narrated by Jack in a series of letters to Sophie that relate the increasingly odd happenings: people appear that no one else can see, Jack hears vague rumors of a strange death on the island last year, and the two children appear to be hiding secrets of their own. From the housekeeper, Jack learns of the previous nanny, Lucy, and her lover, Norris-now deceased-whose ghosts may be haunting the area. Prose includes all the elements of the Gothic ghost story as she masterfully establishes a brooding, dark tone: a cavernous mansion, a mysteriously locked room, eerily well-behaved children. At times, the epistolary format stretches credulity (such as Jack still writing after he breaks up with Sophie). However, letters that end on cliff-hangers heighten the suspense and keep the narrative moving at a breakneck pace. Though the ambiguous conclusion is spooky, readers will likely find the twist at the end of Adele Griffin's Tighter (Knopf, 2011), based on the same source material, far more satisfying. As with James's original story, Prose effectively establishes the protagonist as an unreliable narrator, though the voice of Griffin's wayward teenager is more convincing. Still, this is a gripping page-turner that even reluctant readers will have trouble putting down.-Mahnaz Dar, School Library Journal(c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.About the AuthorFrancine Prose is the author of twenty works of fiction. Her novel A Changed Man won the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, and Blue Angel was a finalist for the National Book Award. Her most recent works of nonfiction include the highly acclaimed Anne Frank: The Book, The Life, The Afterlife, and the New York Times bestseller Reading Like a Writer. The recipient of numerous grants and honors, including a Guggenheim and a Fulbright, a Director's Fellow at the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, Prose is a former president of PEN American Center, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Her most recent book is Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932. She lives in New York City.

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