Page 1

(Download ebook) The Eternal Smile: Three Stories

The Eternal Smile: Three Stories Gene Luen Yang ebooks | Download PDF | *ePub | DOC | audiobook

#782295 in Books Yang, Gene Luen/ Kim, Derek Kirk (ILT) 2009-04-27 2009-04-28Original language:EnglishPDF # 1 8.40 x 11.56 x 6.10l, .88 #File Name: 1596431563170 pages | File size: 74.Mb Gene Luen Yang : The Eternal Smile: Three Stories before purchasing it in order to gage whether or not it would be worth my time, and all praised The Eternal Smile: Three Stories: 0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. 3 Tales for a mature audienceBy brittanyThe stories are well written and drawn. I was hoping to use this in my classroom but the stories are a little to racey0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. Lovely life lessons with a hidden meaning that makes the ...By Lynn LeLovely life lessons with a hidden meaning that makes the reader explore more of the wise sayings within this comical tale0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. What graphic novels could beBy ShagbarkThree great, moving short stories. Artwork is fine, though honestly I don't care much about artwork. Plot, theme, and character is what I like; and all 3 stories deliver. All 3 have a twist ending. Not a shocking, Shyamalan-style twist; just something that makes the story


make more sense, and have more importance. Gene Luen Yang is the National Ambassador for Young People's Literature and is a MacArthur Fellow, a recipient of what's popularly known as the MacArthur "Genius" Grant.A fantastical adventure through the worlds we live in and the worlds we create. From two masters of the graphic novel--Gene Luen Yang (American Born Chinese) and Derek Kirk Kim (Same Difference and Other Stories)--come three magical tales.The story of a prince who defeats his greatest enemy only to discover that maybe his world is not what it had seemed.The story of a frog who finds that just being a frog might be the way to go.The story of a women who receives an e-mail from Prince Henry of Nigeria asking for a loan to help save his family and gives it to him. With vivid artwork and moving writing, Derek Kirk Kim and Gene Luen Yang test the boundaries between fantasy and reality, exploring the ways that the world of the imagination can affect real life. The Eternal Smile is the winner of the 2010 Eisner Award for Best Short Story. .com Book Description From two masters of the graphic novel--Gene Luen Yang (American Born Chinese) and Derek Kirk Kim (Same Difference and Other Stories) come fantastical adventures through the worlds we live in and the worlds we create: the story of a prince who defeats his greatest enemy only to discover that maybe his world is not what it had seemed; the story of a frog who finds that just being a frog might be the way to go; and the story of a woman who receives an email from Prince Henry of Nigeria asking for a loan to help save his family. With vivid artwork and moving writing, Derek Kirk Kim and Gene Luen Yang test the boundaries between fantasy and reality, exploring the ways that the world of the imagination can affect real life. Three Short Stories from The Eternal Smile Each pair of panels below belongs to one of the three stories in the book: "Duncan's Kingdom," "Gran'pa Greenbax and the Eternal Smile," and "Urgent Request." Click on each panel to enlarge [pdf]. Prince Duncan goes on a quest to avengethe king's murder and marry the princess. Grandpa Greenbax the frog sees whatlooks like a smile in the sky and hopesit will answer his prayers. Janet's ho-hum life gets interesting after she receives an email from a Nigerian prince. From Publishers WeeklyStarred . This collaboration between multiple-award winners Yang (American Born Chinese) and Kim (Same Difference and Other Stories) is an eagerly awaited event that actually pays off. Yang writes and Kim illustrates in a medley of different styles united by meticulous detail, almost throwaway beauty and riveting storytelling. All three stories deal with levels of fantasy and how humans use it to escape or transcend everyday tedium and suffering. In Duncan's Kingdom, a fairy tale about a brave youth, beautiful princess and dastardly frog king is played out; the fantasy is so note perfect that the truth of the situation comes as a shock. In The Eternal Smile, Gran'pa Greenbax is an avaricious frog whose moneymaking schemes are first boosted then dashed by the appearance of a mysterious, peaceful smile in the sky. Riffing off classic Disney comic books and evangelical clichs, it's a sharp satire far more complex than it first appears. In Urgent Request, Janet, a schlumpy drone at a tech company, answer a Nigerian scam e-mail to liven up her drab life. However, her motives are not as they originally appear. Shattering the borders between our real and fantasy lives, these bold, masterfully crafted fables have real staying power. (Apr.) Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.From School Library JournalStarred . Grade 9 UpYang and Kim are expert storytellers and work well together here to present three tales with fablelike takeaways. Duncan seems to be a hero story set in a lush medieval Europe, with the titular character embarking on an iconic quest to win the hand of the fair ladyexcept for odd visual details that crop up, such as the frumpy and definitely modern woman holding her bespectacled head in her hands and the apparently magic Snappy Cola bottle. The turn from fantasy to Duncan's reality is made smoothly and doesn't ask readers to appreciate its cleverness so much as to recognize how fantasy can, indeed, aid real healing. The volume's title story starts off as a riff on capitalism and religious gullibility involving talking frogs and then makes a hairpin turn with the revelation that a broadcast tycoon has blended America's tastes for Saturday morning cartoons and reality shows. In Urgent Request, a contemporary cubicle inhabitant allows herself to fall for the fraudulent Nigerian royalty email plea for cash, but thereby gains the strength she needs to confront her abusive boss. Artwork in each of the stories is stylistically different and wholly appropriate to the theme of the specific tale. Smart teens will enjoy this thoroughly and will push it into friends'and hopefully even adults'hands for discussions around topics ranging from political insights to how narrative creates personal identity.Francisca Goldsmith, Halifax Public Libraries, Nova Scotia Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

THE-ETERNAL-SMILE-THREE-STORIES  

THE-ETERNAL-SMILE-THREE-STORIES-BOOK

THE-ETERNAL-SMILE-THREE-STORIES  

THE-ETERNAL-SMILE-THREE-STORIES-BOOK

Advertisement