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CITY OF PLATTEVILLE NEWSLETTER

Update

FALL 2019 | EDITION 13

Local Veterans Paul Budden and Gary Tuescher, along with others, share their military experiences. See page 10!


ON THE NIGHT SHIFT

Officer Jacob Brown, Sergeant Andrea Droessler and Officer Devin Malott

Outside of the squad car window, it is a bucolic Friday summer night. Families are walking, children are enjoying the last hours of sunlight at the pool and beverages are being shared next to a smoking grill. Inside the squad car, there is a palpable tension. The scanner buzzes with police calls from nearby communities. The officers continually scan the sides of streets for what is new…what is out of place…from the hundreds of other nights they’ve driven the same route. Just minutes earlier, the 7 p.m. shift started with roll call – a formal name for an informal check-in. Officers from the earlier shift run down the daytime calls before heading home for the evening. Tonight’s shift, Sergeant Andrea Droessler, Officer Jake Brown and Officer Devin Malott, discuss issues they are keeping a watchful eye on before heading to their vehicles. At the start of each shift, the officers 2

do a brief check of their vehicles for the supplies they may need. Those supplies include a medical kit, vehicle lockout kit, a shotgun with bean bag rounds, restraints, dog leash, a broom to brush up glass, safety cones, stop sticks and evidence bags. Perhaps the most important piece of equipment is a mounted laptop next to the driver’s seat. While radio is still the primary method of communication, the officers can use computer software to track each other’s movements during the course of the night. Suspected drug houses, road construction and lane closures are also marked. Early in the evening, the officers drive neighborhood streets making their presence known and watching for traffic violations. While Platteville may have a reputation of a tough traffic enforcement town, the reality is that many more warnings than actual tickets are issued. “We try to give people the benefit of the doubt,

to educate before we ticket,” said Brown. Traffic stops allow the officers to make sure that a more serious issue, like driving under the influence, doesn’t exist. All of the officers believe that being a visible presence is a valuable crime deterrent. “When we have known criminals in town, we are aggressive with drive-bys. It makes them uncomfortable and the more uncomfortable they are…the more likely they are to leave,” explained Malott. Early calls during the evening demonstrate the wide range problems the officers are called to solve. Malott fishes out a set of car keys that had fallen down a street grate as the driver exited her car. Brown and Malott assist a Sienna Crest resident who was unable to get up after a fall. Malott is called after a resident catches a stray kitten. The kitten is kenneled with food and water at the Platteville Veterinary Clinic. Droessler opens a


locked car so that keys can be retrieved. On early passes of the local bars, the officers are also keenly aware of how many party buses appear to be in town. On a weekend night, alcohol-fueled behaviors drive a lot of the department’s activity. As the evening progresses, the squads begin to circle more tightly around the downtown area. Brown and Malott leave their vehicles to do compliance checks for underage drinking at around midnight. Getting out of the car allows them to talk with patrons and build relationships that may be useful in the future.

Caledonoa

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Like alcohol, the drug trade causes spikes in police activity. The sale of drugs brings gangs to town and drives a host of related crimes, such as theft, robberies and evictions. A lack of addiction and mental health resources in the area is a significant

challenge for the officers. “We put a band-aid on, but we aren’t equipped to deal with these types of issues,” said Droessler. Droessler has also seen a notable uptick during her 18 years of service in the amount of mediation the department is called to do. “It seems like the younger generation has fewer coping skills. A simple dispute can become domestic with charges filed so fast.”

while still being approachable so that the public is comfortable coming forward with issues.

Understanding psychology - and how to read a situation - is critically important for the officers. New officers have an opportunity to train with three peers so that they can observe how different officers deal with challenging situations. “Keeping calm is something Platteville police do well,” noted Malott, “We will talk to someone for 45 minutes to gain compliance before we move to cuffs.” New officers also need to learn how to balance being predictable and proactive with enforcement,

For all three officers, the night shift is a good match. They enjoy the pace of activity and the type of calls. With that said, Brown is quick to admit that “caffeine is my best friend.”

VERNON

When calls are slower, from 3-5 a.m. or on a weeknight, the officers do security checks, write reports, and test themselves on department policies. According to Brown, there is less down time than people might think: “Traffic is already moving by 4 a.m.”

For Malott, the youth of the department creates a fun, competitive atmosphere that makes it easier to stay engaged during the overnight hours. Brown’s advice to new officers is consistent with that culture: “Stay busy, work hard, be proactive and you will be rewarded.”

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GUEST COLUMN: WHY I’M EXCITED FOR PLATTEVILLE’S FUTURE

Former City Manager Karen Kurt (middle), shares a moment with Carolina Martinez and Carlos Vasquez, owners of Los Amigos

I will leave Platteville soon for a new opportunity closer to my family. I don’t want anyone to think that my departure reflects dissatisfaction. I am very excited for Platteville’s next chapter and I think you should be too! I came to Platteville unsure of what to expect and leave not wanting to let go of the opportunities ahead. Below are my thoughts on Platteville’s unique assets: A Real Downtown. We have a beautiful historic downtown that has critical businesses like a grocery store, hardware store, pharmacy and movie theater. You can still live in downtown and have the majority of your daily needs met without ever hopping in your car. This is increasingly rare. Downtowns are either hollowed out or specialty niches for tourists or boutique shopping. We need to celebrate (and support) ours! A Smorgasboard for Kids. Platteville has a buffet of activities for kids. I would put the programming and 4

education done in this community – whether through our recreation department, the museum, library, Platteville Public Schools or UW-Platteville - up against communities three times our size. Youthful Energy. For most rural communities, the biggest question is how do we attract or retain our youth. Our worry tends to be “how do we manage our youth?” That is a good problem to have. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard people say “I came here for school and then I decided to stay….” These newcomers (whether from Cuba City or the Congo) add a wonderful vibrancy and energy to our community. “Can Do” Spirit. I’m very excited that, thanks to amazing and generous donors, the Legion Park Event Center Committee will be signing a contract to build a new event center. This is just one example of Platteville’s wonderful “can do” spirit that has resulted in

amenities such as the Rountree Branch Trail, furniture and equipment for the new Library, and the Winter Wonderland at Katie’s Garden. We are fortunate to have so many people that are generous with their time, talents and resources. A Unique Setting and History. I’m a midwestern girl and grew up about two hours away. Yet when I come here, I feel like I am worlds away. It’s the beauty of the driftless region and the mining history that makes Platteville so different than the average midwestern town. If you haven’t been in the mine at Mining and Rollo Jamison Museum…you absolutely must go! Every guest that visited me got a tour (and a t-shirt). Their responses were generally “That is so cool” and “I had no idea…” A Diverse and Stable Business Base. We are so fortunate to have two large, stable and reputable employers in UW-Platteville and Southwest Health.


Added to the mix, we have two cheese plants, four larger manufacturing facilities, two call centers, one software company and several large retailers. We are not a one-company town, and that gives us both security and a strong base to build from. The Village Life. Most people have heard the phrase “it takes a village to raise a child.” The same holds true for a City Manager. A few of my villagers include Mary Jo Hennessy (who cared

for my dog as if it were her own), Kevin Garvey (who never once rolled his eyes when I came in to have my tire air pressure checked), the team at Driftless Market (who special ordered my favorite products), the team at Heiser Hardware (list too long to mention – but suffice to say that no one would hire me for my mechanical aptitude) and the team at Los Amigos (everyone of whom seemed to have my order memorized). There are so many more I could mention. Platteville

HAUNTED MINE TOURS – A THRILLING TOUR OF CREEPY LOCAL HISTORY

Experience the dark side of regional history on a candle-lit tour underground at The Mining & Rollo Jamison Museums

Our region is replete with 19th-century ghost stories, many of them passed down by the rowdy, tough, dangerous men whose job it was to mine lead – immigrants from Ireland, Wales, and Cornwall, from Germany and the American South. What more fitting place to experience the spine-tingling chills of ghost stories than 45 feet underground in a real 1845 lead mine at The Mining & Rollo Jamison Museums? The Museums continue the annual tradition of Haunted Mine Tours this fall on Saturday, October 26th, from 6-9 p.m.

One ghost story follows a disappearance of a secretive miner in Platteville. Another follows a gruesome hanging in Mineral Point. Yet another stems from a baseball gone awry in Linden. Aside from the physical exertion and the risk of ruining your body, mining offered many opportunities for a fast death: Falls down mine shafts, crushing cave-ins, and the risk of being blown to bits by explosives. One story retells a mine cave-in by Shullsburg that left 15 fatherless. When the Cornish miners came to

is still a village. Everyone looks out for everyone else. That is what I will miss most when I leave. Thank you to everyone for your support and kindness during my time here. I will always treasure my Platteville memories. PS: I leave you in good hands. Platteville’s city employees are amazing and dedicated public servants. I was happy to be part of their team. - Karen Kurt, Former City Manager

America in the 1830s to dig the grey gold, they brought with them their belief in the Tommyknocker. These small dwarf-like creatures worked in the mines, tapping away and making strange noises deep in the rocks. They were often heard, but rarely seen. One unlucky miner named Eddie became a target of the Tommyknockers. They drove him crazy, pelting him with stones, stealing his tools, and blowing out his lantern. He couldn’t figure out why the Tommyknockers had singled him out until one day he heard a voice calling to him from the dark opening of a nearby shaft. “Eddie, I want my five dollars!” Besides hearing these stories and others by candle-light on a guided lantern tour underground, visitors can learn their fortune and play Victorian Halloween parlor games above ground at The Mining & Rollo Jamison Museums. The clean-cut friendly ghosts are members of the UW-Platteville Sigma Pi fraternity. We dare you to try out Platteville’s most popular underground Halloween event! The ticket price for Haunted Mine Tours are: Adults $10, Seniors $8.50, and Children 5-17 $5. Tickets sell out fast, so book your Haunted Mine Tour now at www.mining.jamison.museum or calling (608) 348-3301. Find the Museums on Facebook and Instagram. If you are interested in being part of the event behind-the-scenes, give us a call to join our team of talented volunteers. 5


UW-PLATTEVILLE STUDENTS CONTRIBUTE AND GROW THROUGH COMMUNITY SERVICE

Photo by Andy McNeill/UW-Platteville

Student volunteers clean up the Platteville Dog Park during UW-Platteville “Pioneers Pay It Forward” day

Ben Behlke is a new regular observer at the City of Platteville Common Council meetings. Some might also be surprised to learn that he is a sophomore at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville. Behlke was elected President of UW-Platteville’s Student Senate in April 2019. He has made community outreach a top priority in his new role. Originally from Galena, Illinois, Behlke believes that stronger ties between students and the community might lead to long term results. “The more students interact with the community, the more likely they are to stay around once they see what it has to offer.” Behlke’s path to President of the Student Senate started with a class that emphasized community service. At the beginning of his freshman year, Behlke enrolled in a Living Learning Community (LLC). LLCs help new 6

students build relationships while exploring a common interest. The students in Behlke’s LLC participated in volunteer activities at the Platteville Senior Center and Badger Camp. Last spring, they planned their own service-learning trip for spring break to help a horse rescue ranch that provides therapy for individuals with post-traumatic stress syndrome located in Youngstown, Florida. The HOPE (Healing Our Patriots with Equines) Project ranch was severely damaged during Hurricane Michael. “Being able to see the human side of a natural disaster was very powerful. While we weren’t there long, our work had a big impact on the ranch,” said Behlke. The experience was so bonding that four of the trip participants decided to run for the Student Senate executive board along with Behlke.

The University’s Pioneer Involvement Center works to foster the type of experience that Behlke had through several programs. Pioneers Pay it Forward is an annual part of welcome weekend for students. On Labor Day, students can choose to volunteer for four hours of community service. In past years, projects have been completed at Jenor Tower, ManorCare, Katie’s Garden, Stone Cottage, Rountree Branch Trail, City Park, Family Advocates as well as other local locations. “It is an opportunity to get to know the community and to make new friends. They really enjoy it,” said Valerie Wetzel, Assistant Director of the Pioneer Student Center. The Pioneer Involvement Center also hosts a service fair each September that matches local non-profits with students interested in volunteer opportunities. In addition, students


can sign up to receive notifications of any new volunteer requests received by the Center. Area non-profit organizations can solicit student volunteers by contacting the Center at (608) 342-1075. The engagement efforts have led to some big results. For the 2018-19 school year, UW-P students contributed 8,169 volunteer hours. In just a half day, Pioneers Pay it Forward alone netted 143 service hours. The Greek community was particularly active, with 6,434 service hours. Platteville’s Mining and Rollo Jamison Museums have benefited greatly from a volunteer partnership with Sigma Pi Fraternity. Sigma Pi President and history major, Garrison Ledbury completed an internship at the museums in 2017. He offered support from the fraternity, which is required to

complete a certain number of service hours annually, after noticing some of the challenges with the collections area. Since that time, the fraternity has done service days at the Museums during both the spring and fall semesters. Typically, 12-15 members participate. “They help complete what I call ‘epic’ tasks”, explained Mining and Rollo Jamison Museums Director Erik Flesch. “They’ve moved an entire collection of bound newspapers and helped rearrange the attic.” Flesch is quick to add that the fraternity’s contribution extends beyond heavy lifting; members have also helped staff the Museum’s haunted mine tours. “Volunteering at the museum has kind of become our ‘thing’. I expect the relationship will last long after I graduate in December. Our members feel appreciated doing

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the work and it’s fun,” said Ledbury. For Flesch, the value of the partnership extends beyond the work tasks at hand. “The students bring a fresh spirit. They are open-minded and still exploring the world. It is exciting to see the museum through their eyes. Their enthusiasm is contagious.” Ledbury believes his fraternity brothers gain a greater appreciation for the past. “It’s not just a job to us. We are taking care of objects that are important to Platteville’s history.” Behlke knows that volunteer service won’t be part of every student’s experience but he hopes that it is. “You can lead a horse to water but you can’t make them drink. Not every student will get involved or take it seriously, but for those that do…it can be life changing.”

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SAFE ROUTES COMMITTEE FLAGS SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS

Jennifer Ginter-Lyght and her children utilize the pedestrian flags to cross Main Street

Implementation of a Community Safe Routes Committee (CSRC) recommendation recently gained instant attention downtown. Blaze orange flags for pedestrians to hold when crossing Main Street have been installed at Elm, Court, Fourth, and Oak Street intersections. The flags help improve pedestrian visibility for motorists and bicyclists.

Another addition for Main Street safety that involved committee discussion is the computerized portable speed board that reminds motorists of the 15 mph speed limit. The Platteville Police Department received a Wisconsin Department of Transportation grant and combined it with some city funds to purchase the digital speed limit display monitor.

The local idea for the eye-popping flags downtown originated with concerns expressed to committee members and city officials. Public Works Director Howard Crofoot said the Committee received concerns during the past year about near misses between motorists and pedestrians at the corner of Fourth and Main streets. The CSCR, Crofoot, and Police Chief Doug McKinley agreed that pedestrian flags could work.

“Some (motorists) travel significantly over the posted speed limit,” Police Chief Doug McKinley said, “but we already see a lot of compliance on Main Street. The speed board helps us remind drivers in a positive way.” McKinley emphasized that pedestrians also are responsible for safety; They should be in a crosswalk area and clearly make their intention known to motorists that they plan to cross a thoroughfare.

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Heidi Dyas-McBeth, co-owner of the Driftless Market at the corner of Court and Main streets, said she has seen and experienced the safety improvements. Groups of people, especially adults and teenagers accompanying children, frequently use the flags. “Just having the orange pedestrian flags makes it more likely that motorists will stop,” she said. “The flags are eye catching; they stand out to people.” The Platteville Common Council established the CSRC to “formulate a plan that includes safe routes for bicyclists and pedestrians (and accessibility for people with disabilities) to access our schools and churches, parks and recreation areas, and retail shopping areas. The Committee seeks to formulate a well-organized and interconnected


community-wide bike and pedestrian trail system.” Committee members include residents, business owners, the Platteville School District, and the Platteville Community Arboretum. “We take citizen suggestions and upcoming development project plans and make recommendations to the Common Council on ways to make Platteville safer for pedestrians and bicyclists,” said Kristina Fields, chair of the CSRC. Committee accomplishments include completion of a safe routes to school plan, city-wide bicycle route plan, bike parking ordinance and walking school buses for children. Last year, the CSRC advocated for completing a bicyclist/pedestrian connection on Camp Street between Elm and Lancaster streets. After working with local homeowners, the City, and Platteville School District, funding was secured for a sidewalk extension. The project is expected to be completed in the near future.

Safety Education The Platteville Public Library offers resource materials such as Play It Safe by Mercer Mayer and Watch Out! On the Road by Claire Llewellyn to help with youth safety education. The Platteville Police Department offers presentations and refers the public to transportation safety resources. The non-emergency phone number is (608) 348-2313. ing better safety for pedestrians. Her concern centered on high volumes of traffic traveling through the intersection of Water and Madison streets during peak hours, and the fact that some motorists did not yield to students at the crosswalks. The committee worked to install Platteville’s second set of pedestrian flags at the round-about.

The Committee is beginning to examine ways to make it easier and safer for Jenor Towers residents, many who use walkers or motorized wheelchairs, to cross Mineral Street between the apartment building and Jenor Park. The City of Platteville already lowered the speed limit on Mineral Street to 15 mph.

Ginter-Lyght attended a CSRC meeting and then communicated with committee members via follow-up e-mails. “The committee was great to work with and so was Public Works Director Howard Crofoot,” she said. “It’s easy sometimes to be critical of local governments, but a better use of that energy would be getting involved and understanding how decisions are made.”

Jennifer Ginter-Lyght is one resident who contacted the committee seek-

Anyone with suggestions for improving pedestrian or bicycling conditions

in Platteville can contact the Community Safe Routes Committee members listed on the City’s website at www.platteville.org or Community Development Specialist Katherine Westaby at (608) 348-9741, extension 2231, or westabyk@platteville.org. Residents who are interested in serving on one of the City’s boards, commissions or committees can find more information and an application on the City’s website at www.platteville.org. Opportunities exist on the Board of Appeals; Commission on Aging; Historic Preservation Commission; Parks, Forestry & Recreation Committee; Redevelopment Authority Board and Police & Fire Commission just to name a few. No experience required. The City of Platteville would like to thank Community Safe Routes member Dave Ralph for this story.

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Veteran Feature

LOCAL VETERANS SHARE THEIR EXPERIENCES

In honor of the upcoming Veterans Day holiday (November 11), a few local veterans were invited to share about their experiences serving our country and a memory they have from that time.

Dave Jones

I was drafted by the United States Army in October of 1963 and began my service at Fort Gordon, Georgia. Following basic training, I was stationed at Fort Lewis in Seattle, Washington. During my time at Fort Lewis, I was assigned to the 20th Artillery Honest John Rocket Battalion. I remained there until my discharge in October of 1965. While stationed in Fort Lewis in August of 1965, our unit was assigned to the Watts riot control in Los Angeles. The Watts riots took place in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles from August 11 to 16, 1965. The riots started after Marquette Frye, an African-American motorist on parole for robbery, was pulled over for reckless driving and arrested. After Frye’s arrest, his mother and brother were viscously beaten and arrested as well. This enraged the community. As the death tolls rose, 13,900 guardsmen poured into Watts, along with nearly 2,000 LAPD officers and sheriff’s deputies. We were sent through three days of intensive riot control training and were within two hours of boarding the plane for Los Angeles when curfews went into effect and the riots calmed down.

Dave Jones - Army In March of 1967, I was assigned to the 389th Engineer Battalion in Dubuque, Iowa. I was discharged from military duty in September 1969 with the rank of Staff Sergeant.

Gene Weber

My initial US Army draft induction date was July 27, 1968 – right after college graduation and the day of my wedding to my wife, Jan. Our local Grant County Draft Board was kind enough to defer it until December 6th, 1968. We were 22 years old at the time. Anti-war protests peaked that year and many local friends encouraged us to move to Canada. Although we were not proponents of the Vietnam War, we supported our country and knew we fully intended to raise our eventual children in the USA. So, you served because it was the right thing to do for family and country. After basic training in Fort Campbell, Ky, we went to Fort Bliss Air Defense School in El Paso, Texas until December 1969. Jan supported us as a Legal Secretary for El Paso Natural Gas while I rose in rank to a Specialist E5. After moving Jan home to her parents, I went to Vietnam in January 1970, first to Cameron Bay, then Phu Cat as part of the 7th Battalion 15th Field Artillery unit protecting our Air Base there. In March 1970, our unit Gene (and Jan) Weber - Army moved to Ahn Khe in the Central Highlands to protect the 4th Infantry’s 18-mile parameter as they prepared for the May 1970 invasion of Cambodia. After they left Ahn Khe in May, security was enhanced (meaning guard duty every other night in addition to the day job) as Ahn Khe became a Viet Cong target. One night, our helicopter pad of over 200 helicopters went up in flames, a $200 million loss, only 200 yards from our billets. That led to a little white lie letter to Jan sharing with her that it had happened but far away from my location as she had heard about it on the news. Jan was expecting our first son in June and was already dealing with the stress of many continually asking why we were not smart enough to move to Canada versus “supporting that terrible war!” Our son, Brian, was born in June and I completed my Vietnam tour of duty in September 1970. When separating from the US Army in Fort Lewis, Washington, we were advised to wear civilian clothes home to avoid protester abuse and never to talk about being in Vietnam. And we simply did not. Life went on as if it never happened. We did not join the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) or the American Legion until later. Many years later, in 2009, when the Vietnam Moving Wall came to Platteville, we were talked into marching in the parade. To our mutual great surprise, lifelong friend Gary Tuescher and I were marching together sharing “We had no idea you had been to Vietnam.” We simply had never talked about it. The question still comes today: “If you had it to do over again, would you have gone to Canada?” With three wonderful sons having the opportunity to grow up in what they, and we, consider “the dream world of Platteville” and to go on to lead wonderful, giving lives with their families; Platteville continually growing and doing great things for it’s people; Jan and I knew then, and know now, we made the right decision for family and country. 10


Paul Budden

I joined the Wisconsin Army National Guard in June of 1970. Went to basic training and Advanced Individual Training at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. I was part of the 229th Engineer Co Det-1 here in Platteville. I would serve for just under 23 years and reach the rank of 1st Sgt-E8. I had six overseas deployments for training including 3 trips to Panama, 2 trips to Germany, and 1 trip to Wales, United Kingdom.

Paul Budden - Army

I had one combat deployment to support Operation Desert Storm in 1990. A notable moment in my career was during this time when the Commander and myself received orders to meet with a three-star general in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. We were given a mission to prepare a battle plan using some of our military assets for a high priority mission. This was a top-secret mission to be implemented only if we received a predetermined coded message. We prepared the plan, including assigning personnel. The mission would have certainly placed those soldiers in harms way. It was a long day, and even longer night, waiting for that coded message to arrive, but it never came. The Commander and I made a pact never to disclose the names listed on that battle plan. 29 years later, that pact is still intact. I retired in 1993.

Kecia King

Prior to the military, I was a school bus and tour bus operator in Los Angeles, California. I never imagined the military being part of my life until I was offered a ride in a C-130 military transport aircraft and fell in love with the ride and the dream of being a world traveler and national defender. This began my journey as an Airman. I entered the Air Force in April 1995 and began my basic training at Lackland Air Force Base (AFB) in San Antonio, Texas. Following basic training, I began technical training as an Aircraft Fuel Systems Maintenance Apprentice at Sheppard AFB in August 1995. I worked on some of the biggest and smallest aircraft in the Air Force’s inventory. After five years, I took advantage of an opportunity to expand my career as a Personnel Specialist, and completed more training at Keesler AFB in July 2000. I completed my Air Force career in this field. I was first assigned as an Aircraft Fuel System Maintenance Specialist at Edwards AFB in California. My most memorable moment in the Air Force was at this base on March 31, 1996, as I watched the Space Shuttle Atlantis land on our runway and then be shuttled via piggy back to the Kennedy Space Center on a NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. What a day in Kecia King - Air Force history for me! Following Edwards AFB, I completed a three-year tour in Misawa Air Base, Japan, where I met and married my husband, Frank, and gave birth to my daughter Jemilah. We then moved to Fairchild Air Force Base in Spokane, Washington, where I gave birth to my son, Osaze. I have also been assigned to Osan Air Base in Republic of Korea, and Andersen AFB in the U.S. Territory of Guam, finishing my Air Force career with the Air Force Space Command at Peterson AFB in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Throughout my career, I have been on two combat deployments: one to Saudi Arabia in support of Operation Southern Watch and one to Baghdad, Iraq in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. After 22 years of service, I was officially relieved of my Air Force duties and retired as a Master Sergeant on November 1, 2017. As I look back, I am very happy that I accepted the opportunity to join the Air Force. My family and I had to endure many days, months, and even years apart. But, if ever asked if I would make this choice again, undoubtedly, I say “Yes”. All of the friends and families I have met and built, and all of the lives I helped to defend, made it all worth it. I continue to be an “American Airman. Wingman, Leader, Warrior”.

Gary Tuescher

I was drafted into the Army in March of 1966. I was sent to Fort Leonard Wood for basic and advanced training and, in September of 1966, was sent to Vietnam. I was in Vietnam until September of 1967. During that year almost 10,000 American soldiers were killed. Most were only 19 or 20 years old. Because of where I was assigned, I was not nearly as much in harms way. I was lucky and got to come home and live another 50 plus years that those 10,000 soldiers did not. Because of my job in Vietnam, I would daily read the names of the soldiers that had been killed. I still think of those soldiers every day and weep for them often. Today I belong to the Military Honor Guard that provides military rites for veterans’ funerals. I am also a member of the American Legion, the VFW and the Veterans Honor Roll Association. The Veterans Honor Roll Association’s mission is to remember and honor veterans from Platteville who have honorably served or are serving in the military. Platteville citizens do not have to be a veteran to join the Veterans Honor Roll Association.

Gary Tuescher - Army

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Charlie, Dick and Wes Hartig recently visited the Platteville Hartig Drug location

Business Spotlight When newly appointed Hartig Drug Chief Executive Officer, Charlie Hartig, sat down for his 53818 Update interview, he started by immediately apologizing for his tired appearance. He had been up multiple times with his four-month old twins. “They had been sleeping through the night all week and then…” he said with a pause, “… we had a setback.” You don’t have to talk with Charlie long to know that family is an important part of his life and part of the Hartig Drug legacy. The pharmacy chain was started by his great grandfather Albert James (AJ) in 1904. His father, Dick Hartig, joined the business in 1973 and ultimately grew operations from five stores to 21 retail locations. All of the stores 12

NEW HARTIG DRUG CEO CARRIES ON FAMILY TRADITION are within two hours of Dubuque. In addition to the Platteville location on the corner of Pine and Chestnut Streets, there are Wisconsin Hartig Drug stores in Darlington, Fennimore, Lancaster and Prairie Du Chien. Both Charlie and his brother, Wes, pursued education and career opportunities that would meld with the family business if the opportunity became available. “I think we both wanted to put ourselves in a position where it was an option,” he explained. Charlie’s path included a Pharmacy degree from Drake University and a law degree from St. Louis University. Prior to assuming the CEO role, he was Vice-President/General Counsel for Hartig Drug and before that Senior Legal Counsel for CVS.

Working in a smaller, more-nimble environment has been a huge plus, as far as Charlie is concerned, but he also recognizes the extra responsibility involved. “You can change things without the layers of the bureaucracy in corporate environments, but you also have to understand that your decisions can have a big impact on your employees and customers.” Adding value for employees is one of Charlie’s top concerns given the tight labor market in the tri-state area. Hartig Drug employs 235 full-time employees and around 205 part-time employees across its locations. “We want to retain great people. When someone leaves, the first thing we want to know is: why?” Leadership is also focusing


Growing the number of store locations is something that the Hartig family considers very carefully. “We want to be sure our model can be successful,” he noted. The most common growth scenario for the company has been an independent pharmacist looking to sell their business. That was the case in Platteville when Hartig Drug acquired Berg Pharmacy in 2003. The store moved from MacGregor Plaza to its current location in December of 2010. “We know that pharmacies are incredibly important to town vitality. I often get calls from mayors asking if we would consider opening in their community. Unfortunately, it isn’t always viable.”

Charlie doesn’t shy away from hands-on store experience. Customers would probably be surprised to learn that about 10% of the time, he is working as a pharmacist at one of their store locations. He recently spent a day in Platteville to cover a funeral leave. The work gives him an opportunity to meet employees and customers, and to see operations first-hand. That knowledge helps guide the decisions he makes. “We are always trying to up our game, both in terms of customer service and our work environment.” According to Charlie, the recent Library Block project across the street has had a positive impact on sales. He expects a similar positive impact from the Ruxton apartment building. “Any time you add residents downtown, it is good for retail.”

Platteville pharmacist Dan Mattingly enjoys the customer mix at their location, “It is a good mix of local residents and college students.” He is also appreciative of the customer-service orientation of the company. For Mattingly, the company’s culture reflects its owners, “Dick Hartig is so personable. He can talk with anyone off the street. It amazes me. I see the same quality in his son.” Community is just as important as family for the Hartigs. “We are a real family that sits around a table at night. We subscribe to many of the local newspapers.” Charlie said, “We want people to know that we appreciate their patronage and our dollars stay right here in the tri-state area, whether in the form of employee compensation or reinvestment into our stores. This is our home.”

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LEGION PARK UPDATE With a recent commitment from the Common Council, the Legion Park Event Center Committee will be able to sign contracts and begin construction of the new event center following this year’s Dairy Days’ celebration. The Council approved an additional $100,000 towards the project, which would come from Park Impact Fees and the Orlo Clayton Trust. The new event center will be available to rent starting in the summer of 2020 and feature 6,000 square feet of event space, storage, bathrooms, and a kitchen. According to the Committee’s Fundraising Chairperson, Vince Graney, “The pieces of this project are really starting to come together”. Lifeline Audio Visual Technologies

recently agreed to donate $10,000 towards the purchase and installation of an audio system for the event center. According to their President, Scott Wright, “The event center is a real community project, we’ve seen many others doing their part and we wanted to help too.” This donation will provide the event center with 12 pendant ceiling speakers which can broadcast microphones or play background music throughout the event space. The Committee was able to locate commercial equipment that was previously utilized by Benvenuto’s/ Parkway Grill and purchase a grill, griddle, oven and chef base refrigerator. These will be installed in the center’s kitchen under a new 13-foot

ventilation hood. By purchasing used equipment, the committee was able to outfit the kitchen for less than the cost of the new hood and equip the event center to host fundraisers events. While funding has now exceeded the cost of the base event center building, additional donations are still being requested to help pay for additional amenities such as epoxy floors, tables and chairs, accent stonework, and a divider wall, which could allow multiple groups to utilize the event center at the same time. If you would like to donate to the event center, please send checks to Inspiring Community, INC. PO Box 503 Platteville, WI 53818 and note “Event Center” on the memo line.

PLATTEVILLE INCUBATOR OFFERS BUSINESS EXPANSION OPPORTUNITY The Platteville Business Incubator has successfully launched 48 local businesses and yours could be next. • Do you have an existing business that is outgrowing its current setting and needs more space? • Have you always wanted to be your own boss? • Are you amazing at what you do, but don’t have the background to be a well-rounded business owner?

Name: Jerica Schultz

Name: Kelli Mueller

The Incubator provides affordable office and industrial suites ranging from 150 to 5,000 square feet, plus the coaching and mentorship you need to be successful. This is your chance to join the 16 other like-minded entrepreneurial businesses already at the Incubator to experience how this dynamic community can help you Name: Name: reach your goals. Elizabeth Lavin Alex Gagliano

Position: Telecommunicator

Position: Library Outreach Coordinator

Position: Code Enforcement Officer

Joined: May 2019

Joined: June 2019

Joined: July 2019

NEW FACES AND PROMOTIONS

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Position: Telecommunicator Promoted to full-time in July 2019

Check us out online at pbii.org or call (608) 348-2758 to arrange a tour of our facility at 52 Means Drive, Platteville.


COMMON COUNCIL SEEKS APPLICANTS TO FILL VACANT SEAT

ELECTION INSPECTORS WANTED FOR 2020-2021 ELECTION TERM

The Common Council is seeking applicants to fill the At-large Alderperson seat vacated by Cena Sharp, who resigned from her position on July 11. The successful applicant will serve the remainder of the term which expires in April 2021. To apply, interested individuals should submit a one-page letter of interest answering the following questions to cityclerk@platteville.org by August 23:

The City of Platteville is looking for outgoing, friendly people who would like to join an amazing team assisting voters during the absentee voting period, prior to and at the polls on Election Day. Training is provided and you can choose your availability for each Election. Positions are available for seated or standing work.

• Describe your qualifications for serving on the Common Council, • Describe what you like best about Platteville,

• Describe the area or improvements you would focus on if appointed, and

• Describe what characteristics you believe are important to be an effective member of the Common Council. Interviews with the Common Council will be held the evening of September 3. Candidates are invited to make a five-minute presentation for the interview, followed by answering 5-10 minutes of questions from the Council. Appointment by the Council is planned for September 10, with new member swearing-in and orientation at the September 24 meeting. Candidates must be 18 years of age or older and reside within the City limits.

Job Duties can include: registering new voters, poll list check in, issuing ballots, counting ballots, etc. Job Requirements: outstanding customer service, detail orientated, good penmanship, ability to sit or stand for extended periods of time. Polls are open from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm. This is a paid position at $9/hr. Election Inspector interest forms are available on the City’s website at www.platteville.org or you can pick up an application in the Clerk’s Office at City Hall. Contact the Clerk by email: cityclerk@platteville.org or by phone: (608) 348-1823 for further information.

FALL CLEAN-UP

LEAF PICK-UP

SNOW REMOVAL

PARKING

The City of Platteville annual Fall City-wide Clean-up will be held on Monday, October 7 and Tuesday, October 8, with pick up the same day as your normal garbage collection.

Leaf pick-up will take place from the middle of October to the middle of November, or until snow covers the leaves. Please place leaves in a pile next to the curb, but not in the street.

The municipal ordinance states that all sidewalks shall be cleared of snow and ice within thirty-six hours after a snowfall. If neglected, the City may order them to be cleared at the owner’s expense.

From November 15 to April 1 between 2 a.m. and 6 a.m., winter parking regulations are enforced. Some streets are considered emergency routes and are listed as no-parking, and other streets are listed as alternate side parking. Cul-de-sac parking is also restricted. If you have questions about the specific streets involved, visit platteville.org/parking or call the Platteville Police Department at 348-2313.

COMMON COUNCIL BEGINS SEARCH FOR NEW CITY MANAGER Platteville’s Common Council has engaged Public Administration Associates (PAA) to facilitate the search for a new city manager. PAA is a Wisconsin-based consulting firm specializing in local government recruitment and management studies. Recruitment will start in August with the goal of having a new city manager on board by the end of the year. Council President Barb Daus encourages residents with ideas for the selection process to contact her or any member of the common council. Contact information can be found at www.platteville.org/council.

Former City Manager Karen Kurt resigned on August 14 to take a new role as Executive Director for the East Central Iowa Council of Governments in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Administration Director Nicola Maurer will serve as acting city manager until a replacement is found. 15


events CALENDAR OF

Fall 2019

SEPTEMBER

Aug 31st-2nd UW-P Welcome Weekend 6th-8th 22nd Annual Historic Re-enactment (Mound View Park) 73rd Annual Dairy Days Celebration (Legion Park) Parade down

Main St. on Sept. 7th at 9:30 a.m.

11th 9/11 Remembrance Program (Firefighter Memorial in City Park) 6:00 p.m. 12th Performing Arts Series: Acoustic Eidolon (UW-P Center for

the Arts) 7:00 p.m. For a complete list of performances at the Center for the Arts, visit uwplatt.edu or @UWPCFA on Facebook

14th Fall Harvest Table Dinner (Digman Grain Farms) 5:00 p.m. 27th Platteville High School Homecoming Parade down Main St.

OCTOBER 7th-8th

Fall Clean Up Pick up will be the

6th-12th

Fire Prevention Week

16

at 2:00 p.m., Football Game at 7:00 p.m.

same day as your normal garbage collection. Have items to curb by 7:00 a.m.

7th Fire Department Open House 6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Everyone is welcome! 19th UW-P Homecoming Homecoming

Hustle 5K/3K Registration at 7:15 a.m., Parade at 10:00 a.m., Football Game at 2:00 p.m., Lighting of the “M” at 9:00 p.m.

26th

Sweet Treats on Main (Main St. from

Haunted Mine Tour (Mining & Rollo

Library to Museums) 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. Jamison Museums) 6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

31st Halloween Trick or Treating 4:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

NOVEMBER

8th-9th, Tri-State Homeschool Program 14th-16th Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (City Auditorium) 9th Dawn of the Red Arrow Film Screening (Millennium Cinema) 10:00 a.m. 23rd Small Business Saturday Support your local small businesses! Dec 6th-7th Katie’s Garden Winter Wonderland Santa Visit Dec 7th Holiday Stroll & Craft Fair (City Hall

and Main Street) 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.


Family All Ages

Platteville’s Annual Historic Re-enactment celebrates its 23rd year in 2019. Photo by John Urness

Driftless Star Party

Platteville Historic Re-enactment

DATE: Friday, August 23 TIME: 8:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. COST: $10/adult, $5/youth 6-17, free/5 and under LOCATION: The Mining & Rollo Jamison Museums REGISTRATION: Visit www.mining.jamison.museum

DATE: Friday, September 6 - Sunday, September 8 TIME: Friday 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (School Day) Saturday 11:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Sunday 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. COST: FREE, donations welcome LOCATION: Mound View Park REGISTRATION: No registration required for public; schools call (608) 348-8888 to pre-register

Join experienced stargazer and astronomy educator John Heasley from Driftless Stargazing at the Museum campus to learn about the night sky and connect with the cosmos. Binoculars and telescopes will be provided. If skies are too cloudy for outdoor stargazing, there will be an indoor program “Seize the Night” at the Museum.

Sensory Saturday

Drop by the library for some hands-on sensory fun! DAY: First Saturday of the month TIME: 10:00 a.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

Playpalooza!

Toys, puppets, puzzles & more for young children and an adult. DAY: Second Saturday of the month TIME: 10:00 a.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

Come and enjoy history brought to life! Re-enactors represent early Native Americans, fur traders, and pioneers, all dressed and living as they would have hundreds of years ago.

Let’s Pretend @ the Library!

Enjoy a variety of dramatic play experiences at the library. DAYS: Last two weeks of each month TIME: During regular library hours COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

Legos at the Library

Be creative with Legos & other building blocks. DATE: Third Saturday of the month TIME: 2:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

Family Continued

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Family continued

S.T.E.A.M. Saturdays

Sweet Treats on Main - Library

DATE: Fourth Saturday of the month TIME: 2:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

DATE: Saturday, October 26 TIME: 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

A different science, technology, engineering, art or math activity will be offered each month.

Food For Fines

Erase your library fines and support the Platteville Food Pantry. For every item you bring in for the Food Pantry (food and non-food items accepted), we’ll waive $1.00 of your fines. We can’t take expired items, home-made items, or fresh food. Non-glass containers are preferred. Lost fines and damaged fees cannot be waived through Food for Fines. DATE: Monday, September 9 - Sunday, September 22 TIME: During regular library hours COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

Costume Swap

Bring in your old child-sized costumes, any clean costumes in good condition will be accepted. If you donate a costume, you get an early bird shopper ticket and are able to shop on September 28 from 9 a.m.- 11 a.m. Everyone else is welcome to “shop” from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. COSTUME DROP OFF: September 23 - September 26 TIME: During regular library hours SWAP DATE: Saturday, September 28 TIME: 11:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

Drive-in Movie

Design your own car from a box - the perfect location to sit and snack on popcorn for a drive-in movie. Feel free to bring your own snack. All children must be accompanied by an adult. DATE: Friday, October 4 TIME: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: Begins September 16 until full Visit plattevillepubliclibrary.org/signup

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The library will be participating with activities and treats for this Main Street Program.

Sweet Treats on Main - Museums

Take a break from candy collecting with a train ride at the Mining and Rollo Jamison Museums. DATE: Saturday, October 26 TIME: 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: The Mining and Rollo Jamison Museums REGISTRATION: No registration required

Dinovember

Stomp by for dinosaur fun! DATE: Friday, November 1 TIME: 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

Indoor Park (Drop-in)

Join our staff for this free program where we provide a safe indoor space to play. Sports equipment will be available to checkout at the event. Children under the age of 9 must be accompanied by a responsible guardian 16 years of age or older. DAY: Saturdays, November 2 - March 28 TIME: 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Westview School REGISTRATION: No registration required

Haunted Mine Tour

You are invited to a night of terror! Descend deep into the mine for a lantern lit tour. Learn about regional historical truths that are stranger than fiction. See page XX for more details! DATE: Saturday, October 26 TIME: 6:00 p.m. COST: $10/adult, $8.50/seniors, $5/youth, free/5 and under LOCATION: The Mining and Rollo Jamison Museums REGISTRATION: Visit http://mining.jamison.museum


Pre-K

4 & Under

A library patron enjoying one of the rewards for reading 1,000 books before Kindergarten.

Soccer

Fall Soccer is for soccer players from Pre-K to 3rd grade. The focus of the program will be introducing and refining skills through fun games, drills, and actual games. GRADE: Pre-K (3 & 4) DAY: Thursdays, September 5 - October 10 TIME: 4:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. COST: $15 Resident/$30 Non-resident LOCATION: Legion Park REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Friday, August 30

Dance: Ballet and Beyond

An introduction to ballet plus development of balance, body control, and coordination that can be practical for other physical activities. GRADE: Pre-K (3 & 4) DAY: Tuesdays, September 10 - October 15 TIME: 5:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. COST: $25 Resident/$45 Non-resident LOCATION: Armory REGISTRATION: Open until full

Introduction to Sports

Try out multiple sports without having to commit to a full season. Sports may include baseball, basketball, football, soccer, tennis and volleyball. GRADE: Pre-K (3 & 4) DAY: Mondays, September 9 - October 14 TIME: 5:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. COST: $15 Resident/$30 Non-resident LOCATION: Armory REGISTRATION: Open until full

Infant/Toddler Storytime

Stories, songs, games & other activities for babies and toddlers. AGE: 6-35 months and an adult DAY: TBD TIME: TBD COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: Begins September 3 until full

Preschool Storytime

Stories, songs, games & other activities for preschoolers. AGE: 3-6 DAY: TBD TIME: TBD COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: Begins September 3 until full (recommended)

1,000 Books Before Kindergarten Party

The goal is to read 1,000 books before your child starts Kindergarten. With every book that you read together, you are launching your child’s learning – and learning begins long before kindergarten. When you’ve reached 500 and 1,000 books there will be a special prize! Whether you already are doing the program or want to join, you are invited to this party. AGE: Under 5 and an adult DATE: Sunday, October 13 TIME: 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

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Children 12 & Under

All participants in NFL Flag Football will receive a replica jersey from the NFL.

NFL Flag Football

Introduction to Sports

COST: $35 Resident/$55 Non-resident LOCATION: Legion Park REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Friday, August 9

COST: $15 Resident/$30 Non-resident LOCATION: Armory REGISTRATION: Open until full

This league provides participants an exciting opportunity to engage in non-contact action while learning the fundamentals of football. Includes a replica NFL jersey.

GRADE: 1st - 2nd 3rd - 4th

DAY: Tue. Tue.

DATE: Aug. 27 - Oct. 15 Aug. 27 - Oct. 15

TIME: 5:30-6:15 p.m. 6:30-7:15 p.m.

Try out multiple sports without committing to a full season. Sports may include baseball, basketball, football, soccer, tennis and volleyball.

GRADE: Pre-K(5)- K 1st - 3rd

DAY: Mon. Mon.

DATE: Sept. 9 - Oct. 14 Sept. 9 - Oct. 14

Soccer

Dance: Ballet and Beyond

COST: $15 Resident/$30 Non-resident LOCATION: Legion Park REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Friday, August 30

COST: $25 Resident/$45 Non-resident LOCATION: Armory REGISTRATION: Open until full

Fall Soccer is for soccer players from Pre-K to 3rd grade. The focus of the program will be introducing and refining skills through fun games, drills, and actual games.

GRADE: DAY: K - 1st (U7) Thu. 2nd - 3rd (U9) Thu.

DATE: Sept. 5 - Oct. 10 Sept. 5 - Oct. 10

TIME: 4:30-5:00 p.m. 5:00-5:30 p.m.

Elementary Early Release Activities Video games, crafts, food, and more!

AGE: 7 years and up DAY: Every Wednesday during the school year TIME: 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required 20

TIME: 5:00-5:30 p.m. 5:45-6:15 p.m.

An introduction to ballet plus development of balance, body control, and coordination that can be practical for other physical activities.

GRADE: Pre-K(5)- K 1st - 3rd

DAY: DATE: Tue. Sept. 10 - Oct. 15 Tue. Sept. 10 - Oct. 15

TIME: 5:45-6:15 p.m. 6:30-7:00 p.m.

Hide and Seek

Children ages 7-11 are invited to sign up to play this schoolyard favorite in the dark at the library! AGE: 7-11 years DATE: Friday, November 15 TIME: 6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: Begins October 14 until full Visit plattevillepubliclibrary.org/signup


Belmont/Platteville Wrestling Club

This program is available for children in Pre-K - 8th grade. Informational meetings will be held in Platteville on October 28 and in Belmont on November 4. For additional information please contact Molly Weigel at (608) 778-6550 or via email at mollydroessler@hotmail.com. DATE 1: Monday, October 28 LOCATION 1: Westview Elementary School Cafeteria 1201 Camp Street, Platteville, WI 53818

DATE 2: Monday, November 4 LOCATION 2: Belmont High School Wrestling Room 646 E. Liberty Street, Belmont, WI 53510 GRADE: Pre-K - 8th grade TIME: 6:00 p.m.

Let’s Get Cooking

Part of the Healthy Kid’s Program at the Platteville Public Library. Children ages 7-11 are encouraged to come be creative while learning how to make nutritious snacks. AGE: 7-11 years DATE: Wednesday, November 27 TIME: 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: Begins October 14 until full Visit plattevillepubliclibrary.org/signup

Borrow. Earn. At a cooperative like Dupaco, you’re not just a member, you’re an owner. Active participation powers the credit union—you share in the success. The more you use Dupaco, the more you’re thanked with extra cash dividends.

Earn up to $60 in Thank Use for interest paid on your loans. Learn how at dupaco.com/ThankUse.

To earn Thank Use in the Borrow category, member must meet campaign eligibility requirements and have paid a minimum of $100 in total interest on qualifying loans (auto, recreational vehicle, personal, home equity, and/or mortgage) from 01/01/19–09/30/19.

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Teen and

Adult

Trying new projects at the library’s monthly teen and adult “Make it Monday”.

Teen Early Release Activities

Video games, crafts, food, and more! AGE: 12 years and up DAY: Every Wednesday during the school year TIME: 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

Teen Book Club

Pick up a copy of the current book at the library and come to our monthly meetings. New readers welcome! AGE: Teens (grade 7 -12) DATE: Second Tuesday of the month TIME: 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

Bring Your Own Craft Night

Join us for some crafting, conversation, and cookies at the library. You bring your own project, we’ll bring refreshments. All kinds of craft projects welcome. AGE: Teens (grade 7 and up) and Adults DAY: Third Monday of the month TIME: 6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

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Make it Monday: Pet Presents

This month’s projects will be beloved by your furry and feathered friends. AGE: Teens (grade 7 and up) and Adults DATE: Monday, September 9 TIME: 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: Begins August 12 until full Visit plattevillepubliclibrary.org/signup

Downton Abbey Tea & Trivia

Join us for fancy tea, an edible craft, and trivia in celebration of the new Downton Abbey film. AGE: Teens (13 and up) and Adults DATE: Sunday, September 15 TIME: 2:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

Free Movie Monday

The Platteville Public Library shows classic or new films once a month. Movie popcorn is provided or bring in your own favorite movie watching snack. AGE: Teens (13 and up) and Adults DATE: Monday, September 23 TIME: 5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required


Cookbook Challenge and Potluck

Make it Monday: Napkin Folding

AGE: Teens (13 and up) and Adults DATE: Sunday, October 6 TIME: 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

AGE: Teens (grade 7 and up) and Adults DATE: Monday, November 4 TIME: 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: Begins October 14 until full Visit plattevillepubliclibrary.org/signup

Make it Monday: Thrift Store Monster Art

Ridge Stories with Gary Jones

Check out a cookbook and try a new recipe. Bring the result in for a potluck and an opportunity to swap cookbook and recipe recommendations with other participants.

Transform an old art print into a haunting scene.

AGE: Teens (grade 7 and up) and Adults DATE: Monday, October 14 TIME: 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: Begins September 9 until full Visit plattevillepubliclibrary.org/signup

Flapper Fashion

Leslie Bellais speaks about “Flapper Fashion.” Leslie is the former Curator of Social History at the Wisconsin Historical Society and specializes in 19th century women’s clothing and the history of clothing, textiles, quilts, dolls, and toys. AGE: Teens (grade 7 and up) and Adults DATE: Sunday, October 20 TIME: 2:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

Free Movie Monday

The Platteville Public Library shows classic or new films once a month. Movie popcorn is provided or bring in your own favorite movie watching snack. AGE: Teens (13 and up) and Adults DATE: Monday, October 21 TIME: 5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

UFOs in Wisconsin: Watch the Skies

Researcher, author, and lecturer Chad Lewis returns to Platteville to share Wisconsin’s rich history of UFO and alien encounters. Hear about mysterious objects in the sky and face-to-face meetings with unearthly creatures. AGE: Teens (grade 7 and up) and Adults DATE: Sunday, November 3 TIME: 2:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

Set an Instagram-worthy Thanksgiving table after you learn new napkin folds.

Local Wisconsin author, Gary Jones, will speak about his new book, Ridge Stories: Herding Hens, Powdering Pigs, and Other Recollections from a Boyhood in the Driftless, published this year by the Wisconsin Historical Society Press. Gary has written for several Milwaukee and Door County publications and has taught at UW-Platteville. Come enjoy the stories! AGE: Teens (grade 7 and up) and Adults DATE: Thursday, November 7 TIME: 4:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

Dawn of the Red Arrow Film Screening

The film presents the history of the Wisconsin National Guard and its experience in WWI. Platteville resident General Scott Cairy played a key role in forming the Wisconsin National Guard 32nd Division. Visit the film’s website or watch the trailer on YouTube. Movie package ($7.50) includes: film screening, popcorn, and soda; all proceeds from sales of this special package go to the Friends of the Mining & Rollo Jamison Museums. DATE: Saturday, November 9 TIME: 10:00 a.m. COST: $7.50 LOCATION: Millennium Cinema REGISTRATION: Visit www.mining.jamison.museum

Free Movie Monday

The Platteville Public Library shows classic or new films once a month. Movie popcorn is provided or bring in your own favorite movie watching snack. AGE: Teens (13 and up) and Adults DATE: Monday, November 18 TIME: 5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

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Adults

18 & Older

Drop in at the Armory year-round for a pickup game of Coed Pickleball.

Men’s Basketball (Drop-in)

Science Fiction Book Club

AGE: 18 or older DAY: Wednesdays, November 6 - March 25 TIME: 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. COST: $30 Resident / $45 Non-resident DROP-IN COST: $3 Resident / $5 Non-resident LOCATION: High School, South Gym REGISTRATION: No registration required

TITLE: The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet, by Becky Chambers DATE: Thursday, September 5

Coed Pickleball (Drop-in)

AGE: 18 or older TIME: 6:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

An open gym opportunity for those interested in playing basketball.

Pickleball is a racquet sport that combines elements of tennis and ping-pong. There are two ongoing seasons, April through September and October through March. AGE: 18 or older DAY: Tuesdays and Thursdays TIME: 8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. COST: $30 Resident / $45 Non-resident DROP-IN COST: $3 Resident / $5 Non-resident LOCATION: Armory REGISTRATION: No registration required

Microsoft Word: Resumes

Learn how to edit a resume by moving text, changing fonts, bulleting lists, making columns, and adding formatting. This is an introduction to Microsoft Word. AGE: 18 or older DATE: Tuesday, September 17 TIME: 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: Begins August 13 until full Visit plattevillepubliclibrary.org/signup 24

Join us to discuss a mix of recent and classic Science Fiction novels.

TITLE: The Left Hand of Darkness, by Ursula K. LeGuin DATE: Thursday, October 3 TITLE: The Just City, by Jo Walton DATE: Thursday, November 7

Job Seeker and Unemployment Assistance

Get one-on-one help finding work, planning your career, dealing with job loss, or finding resources for your family. Fennimore Job Center staff will be on-site to help you at the Platteville Public Library. Job Center staff will meet with attendees one-on-one, by appointment, for one hour. AGE: 18 or older DATE: Fridays: September 13, October 11, November 8 TIME: 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. (four one-hour appointment slots available) COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library Large Study Room REGISTRATION: Call (608) 348-7441 extension 4, or make an appointment at plattevillepubliclibrary.org/signup


Women’s Volleyball

Introduction to Excel II

We are currently seeking teams interested in playing Women’s Volleyball. If you would like to register a team, please pick up a registration packet at the Recreation Office. AGE: 18 or older COST: $175 per team LOCATION: Armory and Middle School REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Friday, August 30 DAY: Mon. Mon.

AGE: 18 or older DATE: Tuesday, October 1 TIME: 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: Begins August 13 until full Visit plattevillepubliclibrary.org/signup

DATE: TIME: Mid Sept. - Mid Mar. Evenings Mid Sept. - Mid Mar. Evenings

Coed Volleyball (Drop-in)

An open gym for those interested in playing volleyball.

Library Book Club

We read discussion-worthy fiction and nonfiction. Pick up a copy of the current book at the library and come to our monthly meetings. Check the event calendar for upcoming titles. New readers are welcome! TITLE: The Library Book, by Susan Orlean DATE: Tuesday, September 17 TITLE: There, There by Tommy Orange DATE: Tuesday, October 15

Introduction to Excel III

Learn how to add more complex formulas and use functions. We will also briefly look at making mailing labels.

TITLE: Being Mortal, by Atul Gawande DATE: Tuesday, November 19

AGE: 18 or older DATE: Tuesday, October 8 TIME: 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: Begins August 13 until full Visit plattevillepubliclibrary.org/signup

AGE: 18 or older TIME: 6:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required

Introduction to Excel I

Learn how to edit a basic spreadsheet, enter data, add simple formulas, and adjust the formatting to make a spreadsheet more readable.

Introduction to Excel IV

AGE: 18 or older DATE: Tuesday, September 24 TIME: 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: Begins August 13 until full Visit plattevillepubliclibrary.org/signup

SMILE

AGE: 18 or older DAY: Wednesdays, November 6 - March 25 TIME: 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. COST: $30 Resident / $45 Non-resident DROP-IN COST: $3 Resident / $5 Non-resident LOCATION: High School, North Gym REGISTRATION: No registration required

IT'S FREE!

We will explore additional functions of Excel, including pivot tables and IF statements. AGE: 18 or older DATE: Tuesday, October 15 TIME: 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: Begins August 13 until full Visit plattevillepubliclibrary.org/signup

NEW

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Learn how to create a basic spreadsheet, add formulas, sort data, and highlight results.

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Adults Continued

Google Docs and Drive I: Create a Document

Coed Soccer (Drop-in)

AGE: 18 or older DATE: Tuesday, October 22 TIME: 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: Begins September 23 until full Visit plattevillepubliclibrary.org/signup

AGE: 18 or older DAY: Sundays, November 3 - March 29 TIME: 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. COST: $30 Resident / $45 Non-resident DROP-IN COST: $3 Resident / $5 Non-resident LOCATION: Middle School REGISTRATION: No registration required

Google Docs and Drive II: Learn to Share

Beyond Google Docs and Drive

AGE: 18 or older DATE: Tuesday, October 29 TIME: 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: Begins September 23 until full Visit plattevillepubliclibrary.org/signup

AGE: 18 or older DATE: Tuesday, November 5 TIME: 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: Begins September 23 until full Visit plattevillepubliclibrary.org/signup

Small Business Bingo

Getting Started with Canva

Explore unique functions of Google Docs and learn how to create documents. Google Docs is a free, web-based office software suite that specializes in collaboration.

Learn how to share and collaborate on Google Docs files and how to organize files in Google Drive. Previous experience creating Google Docs is encouraged.

Celebrate Small Business Saturday by visiting local businesses in November. Pick up a Small Business Bingo card at the library starting November 1 and return it on November 30 to be entered in a prize drawing. AGE: 18 or older DATE: Friday, November 1 - Saturday, November 30 TIME: At your convenience COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required Pick up bingo card at the library

Friends of the Mining & Rollo Jamison Museums Annual Meeting and Women’s Suffrage Presentation

Join the Friends for their annual meeting followed by a special program honoring the 100th Anniversary of Women’s Suffrage with hors d’oeuvres, live music, and presentations by area experts. The event is FREE, and is for members only! Not a member? Join or renew today at http://mining.jamison.museum/members. AGE: 18 or older DATE: Saturday, November 2 TIME: 4:00 p.m. COST: FREE (Museum members only) LOCATION: The Mining & Rollo Jamison Museums REGISTRATION: Visit www.mining.jamison.museum 26

An open gym opportunity for those interested in playing soccer. The structure will be determined by the participants each week.

After mastering Google Docs, see what else the Google Suite has to offer. We’ll look at Google Sheets, Google Forms, and Google Slides.

Canva is a free, online program that allows you to create posters, cards, graphics for social media posts, and more. Learn how to use text boxes, shapes, and clip art to create graphics from scratch or using Canva’s preset options. AGE: 18 or older DATE: Tuesday, November 12 TIME: 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: Begins September 23 until full Visit plattevillepubliclibrary.org/signup

OverDrive E-books and Audiobooks Drop-in Workshop

With OverDrive access through Wisconsin’s Digital Library, you can download free audiobooks and e-books to a variety of devices, including iPads, Kindles, computers, mp3 players, and smartphones. Bring your device and your library card to learn how to download items at this hands-on workshop. AGE: 18 or older DATE: Tuesday, November 19 TIME: 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: Platteville Public Library REGISTRATION: No registration required


Platteville Free Methodist Church

350 E. Furnace St. • 608-348-4800 www.plattevillefreemethodist.org Pastor Jeff Suits Sunday School: 9:30am Sunday Service: 10:30am Wednesday Awana Clubs and Youth Group: 6:30pm

Lutheran Church of Peace 1345 N. Water St. 608-348-3166 admin@lutheranchurchofpeace.org www.lutheranchurchofpeace.org Pastor Jeffrey Pedersen Saturday Service: 6pm Sunday Service: 9am

IN PLATTEVILLE

608-348-4279 75 N. Bonson St. (City Hall Auditorium) Pastor Matt Wunderlin pastor@rollinghillschurch.com www.rollinghillschurch.com Sunday Service: 10am

St. Mary Parish Platteville

130 W. Cedar St. • 608-496-1058 info@saintmaryplatteville.com Weekday Services: Monday-Friday: 8am except Wednesday 8:15am Saturday Services: Latin 8am & English 4pm Sunday Services: 9am & Hispanic Noon

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

First English Lutheran Church

215 W. Pine St. • 608-348-3022 www.felcplatteville.org felcoffice@centurytel.net Sunday Services: 8am & 10:30am Sunday School: 9:15am (Sept.-May) See our website or Facebook page for more info.

Platteville United Methodist Church

1065 Lancaster St. • 608-348-9508 Rev. Brenda Whitford churchoffice@plattevilleumc.org www.plattevilleumc.org Sunday Services: 8:30am Traditional Service 11am Contemporary Service

Apostles Lutheran Church (LCMS)

6732 Hwy. 81 N • 608-348-9901 www.alcplatteville.wordpress.com alc.platteville@gmail.com Pastor Reeder Sunday Divine Service: 8:30am Wednesday Bible Study: 6:30pm Jesus Christ alone is Savior!

Crossroads <> John 3:30 Ministries 130 W. Dewey St. • 608-732-4377 crossroads.ministering@gmail.com www.crossroads-ministries.org Pastor Brian Chapman Saturday Service: 10am (Various Locations) Wednesday Bible Study: 6pm Call for details or visit our Website.

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Rolling Hills Church

220 Broadway St. • 608-349-6776 www.stpaulsplatteville.org Sunday Service: 9:15am Bible Class & Sunday School: 10:30am

Calvary Baptist Church

902 Golfview Dr. • 608-348-9970 www.cbcplatteville.com • Pastor Dave Barna Sunday School: 9:45am Sunday Service: 10:45am & 6:30pm Wednesday: King’s Kids: 6:30pm TRAC Teens: 7pm Bible Study: 7pm

Community Church 300 Pioneer Rd. East 608-348-7330 www.cefcplatteville.org Pastor Larry Lloyd Sunday Worship Service: 10am Sunday Community Kids Program: 10am

Trinity Episcopal Church 250 Market St. 608-348-6402 www.trinityparish.wordpress.com trinitychurch@centurytel.net Sunday Service: 10:30am Ecumenical Taizé Service: 5:30pm (1st Wednesday of each month)

Westview Methodist Church 770 W. Madison St. 608-348-3310 Pastor Paul Glendenning www.westviewmethodist.com Sunday Worship Service: 10:30am

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50 Plus

Active Aging

Join us for frequent day trips to musicals, historical sites, shopping and more!

Grant County Nutrition Program 60

+

Hot, nutritious, affordable meals for those 60 and older. AGE: 60 and older DAY: Monday through Friday TIME: 11:30 a.m. COST: $3.50 per meal LOCATION: O.E. Gray or Home Delivery (must meet criteria). REGISTRATION: Call the ADRC at (608) 723-6113 +

Cardio Studio 50

Keep your heart healthy all year long on our cardio exercise equipment. AGE: 50 and older DAY: Monday through Friday TIME: Always available during business hours COST: Donations appreciated LOCATION: O.E. Gray, Room 12 REGISTRATION: Talk to Jon or Jill 348-9934

Yoga & Strength Training 50

+

Improve your balance and flexibility with low-impact exercises led by physical education instructor Eileen McCartney. AGE: 50 and older DAY: Monday and Wednesday TIME: 8:15 a.m. - 9:15 a.m. COST: Donations appreciated LOCATION: PEAK Program at O.E. Gray REGISTRATION: No registration required 28

Reading Club

We’ll talk about what we’ve been reading, give book recommendations, and catch up over coffee. Bring your library card to check out large print books after. AGE: 55 and older DAY: First Wednesday of the month TIME: 10:00 a.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: PEAK Program at O.E. Gray REGISTRATION: No registration required + Ask a Pharmacist with Bryant Schobert 50 from Southwest Health

Discuss a different medical topic each month. AGE: 50 and older DAY: Third Monday of the month TIME: 10:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: PEAK Program at O.E. Gray REGISTRATION: No registration required

Free Bingo 50+

Win fun prizes from our fantastic sponsors. AGE: 50 and older DAY: Last Wednesday of the month TIME: 12:30 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: PEAK Program at O.E. Gray REGISTRATION: No registration required


HLAA Hearing Loss Support Group All ages

Do you have hearing loss? Join us! The SW Wisconsin Hearing Loss Association of America chapter offers support, resources, education, and more. AGE: All ages welcome DATE: Last Wednesday of the month TIME: 10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: O.E. Gray Community Learning Center REGISTRATION: No registration required Call Mike at (608) 778-6723 for more information

+ Confucius Institute Art & Culture 50

Cards 50

Join instructors from UW-Platteville’s Confucius Institute for a series of classes on traditional Chinese calligraphy, painting, art, and Tai Chi.

Play your favorite games every week. Make sure to call ahead to sign up. AGE: 50 and older COST: $1 entry fee LOCATION: O.E. Gray REGISTRATION: Call 348-9934 to sign up

AGE: 50 and older DATE: Fridays - October 11, November 8, December 6 TIME: 10:00 a.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: PEAK Program at O.E. Gray REGISTRATION: Call Jill at (608) 348-9934 or email peak@platteville.org

TIME: 12:10 p.m. 12:30 p.m. 12:30 p.m. 12:30 p.m. 12:30 p.m.

Day Trip to Fireside Theater 50+

Ralphie wants only one thing for Christmas: An Official Red Ryder Carbine-Action 200-shot Range Model Air Rifle. A Christmas Story The Musical, based on the classic 1983 movie, is the hilarious account of Ralphie’s desperate quest to ensure that this perfect of gifts ends up under his Christmas tree.

Platteville Area Senior Support (PASS) All ages Brat Sale Fundraiser Support our seniors! All proceeds support senior citizens in the greater Platteville area.

AGE: 50 and older DATE: Thursday, December 5 TIME: Depart Platteville Wal-Mart at TBD COST: $109 per person LOCATION: Fireside Theater, Fort Atkinson, WI REGISTRATION: Call Jill at (608) 348-9934 or email peak@platteville.org

AGE: All ages welcome DATE: Saturday, September 21 TIME: 10:30 a.m. until sell out COST: See sale for details LOCATION: O.E. Gray Community Learning Center REGISTRATION: No registration required

Tire Repair

“We Can Do That!’’

Duane Schuler, Owner

www.clarebank.com

Shop: (608) 348-5456 Cell: (608) 778-0625

BLOOMINGTON (608) 994-2741

KIELER (608) 568-3106

MUSCODA (608) 739-3148

Tire sales & service • On the farm tire repair

BOSCOBEL (608) 375-4182

MONTFORT (608) 943-6304

PLATTEVILLE (608) 348-2727

6934 Hwy. 81 W., Platteville, WI www.deweystirerepair.net

FENNIMORE (608) 822-3521

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Auto • Truck • Farm Implement

FDIC Insured

SHULLSBURG (608) 965-4401

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DAY: Mondays Mondays Thursdays Thursdays Fridays

Join Outreach Specialist Heather Moore to learn how to make the holidays meaningful for loved ones with Alzheimer’s and dementia. AGE: All ages welcome DATE: Thursday, October 17 TIME: 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. COST: FREE LOCATION: O.E. Gray Community Learning Center REGISTRATION: No registration required

+

GAME: Bridge Smear Euchre 500 Cribbage

Making Holidays Meaningful – All ages Alzheimer’s & Dementia Alliance

29


Ready to Register?

See each category for specific program registration deadlines.

Recreation

Library Platteville Public Library 225 West Main Street plattevillepubliclibrary.org Register for library programs at plattevillepubliclibrary.org/signup or by phone: (608) 348-7441

Museum The Mining & Rollo Jamison Museums 405 East Main Street www.mining.jamison.museum Register for museum programs at mining.jamison.museum or by phone: (608) 348-3301

+

50

50 Plus

Platteville Senior Center Located in O.E. Gray 155 Lewis Street Register at the Senior Center or by phone: (608) 348-9934

30

Platteville Parks and Recreation 75 North Bonson Street Register at Parks & Recreation Office in City Hall, on ActiveNet.com or by phone: (608) 348-9741 ext. 2238 How Do I Register? Register online by following the ActiveNet link at www.platteville.org/recreation. If this is your first time using ActiveNet, you will need to create an account. Once your account has been approved, you will receive a confirmation email providing instructions on activating your account. Please allow at least one business day for this to occur. Once activated, you may register for programming online using a credit card. Transaction fees are collected by ActiveNet for all online payments. We can also assist with the registration process in the Recreation Office at 75 N. Bonson Street, Platteville, WI 53818. Our office is open Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. We can help create an a account, register for programs, and collect payments in the form of cash, check or credit card. Age Guidelines When registering for youth programming, use the current school grade. When between grades in the summer, use the grade the participant will be entering in the fall. Programming listed as Pre-K is open to children age 3 and 4. Children must be toilet trained or in pull-ups. If a child is in pull-ups, the parent or caregiver must stay at the location for the duration of the program. Residency Requirement RESIDENT (R): A resident resides within the City of Platteville and pays property tax to the City of Platteville. NON-RESIDENT (Non): A non-resident resides outside the City of Platteville and/or does not pay property tax to the City of Platteville. Non-residents can include residents living in the Township of Platteville and Platteville School District. Refund Policy All fees are due at the time of registration. No refunds are issued unless a program is completely canceled. Recreation Department Check out ourThe Facebook Page will make a reasonable effort to reschedule make-up programming; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Platteville Senior Centerâ&#x20AC;? however, this may not always be possible. No partial refunds will be for up to the minute program listings. issued.


Welcome Home Dr. Kueter.

He served his country in remarkable ways. Now he's back... to serve us here at home with the same dedication, respect, integrity, and compassion. Born and raised in Platteville, Jeffrey Kueter, MD, brings his patients more than 20 years of exceptional experience, including in-person care for three U.S. Presidents and their families and soldiers of all stripes.

See more about Dr. Kueter at southwesthealth.org

His incredible career of caring hasn't changed who he is. It's revealed who he is. Now accepting new patients. Call 348-4330.

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Proudly Serving the Platteville Area.

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Partnering with patients and families to improve quality of life DANE JEFFERSON throughout serious illness

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1155 N. Elm Street, Platteville Janesville (608) 348-4797WALWORTH | agrace.org ROCK

WINNEBAGO BOONE Rockford

MCHENRY

Profile for City of Platteville, Wisconsin

"53818 Update" Fall 2019 City of Platteville Newsletter  

The quarterly City of Platteville, Wisconsin Newsletter, the "53818 Update" Fall 2019, Edition 13

"53818 Update" Fall 2019 City of Platteville Newsletter  

The quarterly City of Platteville, Wisconsin Newsletter, the "53818 Update" Fall 2019, Edition 13

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