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ISSUE 02 November 2013

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NOVEMBER 2013 INSIGHT 2 – The Beguliing Figures Behind S. Korea's Education System 3 – Nollywood and Korean Cinema 5 – Interview: Jennifer Kim

ON LOCATION 7 – Dearest Dongchon

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Captain Morgan's

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Samduk Music Café

MUSIC & ARTS 9 – Making the Music 10 – Bae Sang Min 11 – Hey, Throw the Dart! 13 – Daegu Street Style 15 – Old School: I'm Sorry, I Love You

HEALTHY LIVING 16 – Welcome to Fight Club 17 – Persimmon Muffins Recipe

FOOD & DRINK 19 – Captain Morgan's 21 – Samduk Music Café

COMMUNITY 23 – On the Web: Korean Bookends 25 – Mommy, Where Do Ajummas Come From? 27 – Children With Passionate Hearts 28 – Daegu's Time to Date

CULTURE 29 – Holidays in November 31 – Daegu in October 33 – Language: Lattés & Flirting

PLATFORM 34 – Directory 35 – Staff & Contributors Cover photo by Laura Reynolds

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On the Web: Korean Bookends


INSIGHT

The Beguiling Figures Behind South Korea’s Education System Story by Nathan Ouriach

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ou are probably reading this article after spending your day teaching Korean students the difference between the letter ‘B’ and ‘V’, or keeping them both enthusiastic and sedated at the same time. Maybe you have an EPIK position, or perhaps you are completing the moonlight-shift in a hagwon or for the luckiest of us all, a university job. Nevertheless, we all are all spending our time here as teachers. Curiously for us, two academics, Professor Peter Dolton and Dr Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez have created a comprehensive comparison of the lives of teachers across the world. Despite having hugely different names, these two men have produced a coherent analysis that focuses on: expenditure per student, GDP, graduation rates, professional status, trust, pay, and the desirability of teaching as a vocation. After crushing numbers they have come up with two countries that top this list: Finland and South Korea. Looking at the study impartially we can see that the study - which I will now refer to intimidatingly as “the system” - has some appealing numbers. For instance, South Korea’s public investment in education in relation to the government expenditure is 15.7%, compared alongside the U.S’s 13%. Moreover, South Korea has a 94% graduation rate at high school level which exceeds the U.S’s 76.8%. The numbers continue to beguile when looking at teachers’ salaries across the grid. In the U.K, the average yearly salary for a teacher is $33,377, yet South Korea flings the man wons and surpasses the $40,000 mark. So, that is what a BBC news visitor can read and vicariously experience life inside “the system”. Nonetheless, there are some facts about the educational situation that still bemuse me. Consider the students first. Students typically enter “the system” at the age of three, and con-

tinue until they suddenly succeed in the fields of science or engineering. An archetypal day for a high school student may involve a 9:00am start that listlessly moves on to an academy which folds into a night of study and ramyeon before bed. I once naively told my students once that after my school days I would fall asleep in front of my PS2 with a hot dog whilst listening to Notorious B.I.G. Students here however, often spend up to 15 hours a day in educational institutes in one form or another. Questions need to be asked about whether this is productive, both for their educational and personal prospects in life. Do the statistics actually have any impact on the life of an average Korean, post high school or university? The study also purports to rank a country’s respective ‘faith’ in the education system. Unfortunately for some, South Korea sat alongside Japan with the least. The country’s apparent dissatisfaction may allude to the issues I have previously raised. According to Samsung Economic Research institute in Seoul, 70% of a Korean household’s expenditure goes toward private education. Call it “Education Fever”, “Tiger Moms” or whatever you want, but there is a new culture suffusing the rising superpowers of Asia and it suggests a harrowing future. • South Korea’s public investment in education in relation to the government expenditure is 15.7%, compared alongside the U.S’s 13%. • South Korea has a 94% graduation rate at high school level which exceeds the U.S’s 76.8%. • 70% of a Korean household’s expenditure goes toward private education.


INSIGHT

NOLLYWOOD AND KOREAN C I N E M A

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INSIGHT Korea’s film industry has a long history but only in recent years has it become widely known outside of the peninsula. Story by Kieran Duffy

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ovies such as Oldboy, The Host, and Memories of Murder have proven hugely successful, winning tremendous acclaim from film festivals throughout the world. Many have been the subject of somewhat controversial Hollywood remakes, while director Bong Joon-Ho has made the transition to Hollywood himself, directing the recent movie Snowpiercer. Even North Korean movies appear to be gaining in popularity, with the romantic-comedy Comrade Kim Goes Flying premiering at last year’s Toronto Film Festival. Together with K-Pop and K-Dramas, Korean movies have been a key component of the ‘Korean Wave’ as the nation’s popular culture spreads throughout the wider world. With the Korean film industry being such a success story, it is little surprise that the Nigerian Ambassador to Korea, Desmond Akawor, recently called for greater links between it and the film industry of his own nation, frequently dubbed ‘Nollywood’. In a special piece for The Seoul Times, Ambassador Akawor claims that the growth of Nigeria’s film industry has brought about positive social changes in Nigeria, and given it a greater presence on the world stage. He also believes that collaborations between Korean and Nigerian filmmakers could lead to closer ties between Korea and the continent of Africa as a whole. Nollywood is not well-known outside Africa, but it is in fact one of the largest film industries in the world, second only to India. From humble beginnings in the 1960’s, the industry has

grown into an important part of African popular culture, with Nigerian movies enjoying success in many nations, including Kenya and South Africa. The dialogue of these movies is often in English with the cast drawn from a wide range of African nations, so as to appeal to a wider audience. Budgets are typically quite low and the resulting product is often a straight-to-DVD affair, but the industry’s growth and the increased prosperity of Nigeria show signs of hope for the further spread of Nigerian cinema. Recently, western actors such as Isaiah Washington (US) and Thandie Newton (UK) have starred in Nollywood productions, reflecting the increase in finances. Nigerian filmmakers continue to collaborate with those from other nations; 2012 saw the release of Nigerian-Ukrainian co-production Feathered Dreams. In addition to this, the Nigerian movie Half of a Yellow Sun premiered at a Toronto Film Festival in September, showing that African cinema is receiving greater attention in the wider world. It is easy to be dismissive of Ambassador Akawor’s desire for co-productions between the Korean and Nigerian film industries, especially when Korean cinema has become so widelyknown while Nigerian movies are comparatively obscure. However, the Korean film industry rose to prominence from similar obscurity, and Nollywood movies show increasing signs of popularity outside Africa. Perhaps the novel idea of a Korean-Nigerian co-production would be a worthwhile endeavor for both nations.


INSIGHT

Long Distance Story by June Leffler Photograph provided by Jennifer Kim

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ong distance relationships are something that many ex-pats experience while living in Korea. It’s not easy, but some couples, like Jennifer Kim and her boyfriend, John, are able to navigate the ups and downs of an LDR successfully during their time apart. Jennifer gave details on how to make a year in a long distance relationship not only tolerable, but totally rewarding. Why did you come to Korea? I had gotten my master’s in education, and I was sub teaching, but I needed a steady income and experience. I looked for options and found EPIK, which I was also curious about because I’m half Korean. Did you have any concerns about how coming to Korea would affect both you, and your relationship? Will he break up with me? Am I going to change? I didn’t want to be the person that came here two months and headed home. It’s actually easier being away from him now. The trust is there, and I know I’ll see him again.

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What’s your communication like? When we chat we talk about our routine like we would if I were at home. It’s important to talk about things other couples would when they get home from work. How does the LDR affect your life in Korea? I wish he was here to experience it. Work is my comfort here. It’s what I came here to do, and it’s made me a better teacher. John has his career worked out, and I needed to come here and work on mine. If you have a bad day at work it’s going to affect the relationship, and before I cam here I was tired of coming home to John and talking about how bad my day was. Is the separation harder for you or him? Him. He’s living in our apartment, which has memories of me. Our pictures are up, my stuff’s there. I just have my suitcases; it’s easier for me to not think about it, because there aren’t constant reminders everywhere. How do you break the time up between seeing or talking to John?

He visited me in the summer, and we’re going to Thailand in January. That breaks time up; I can count down the days until our vacation. Doing things that just make me feel good; re-watching Seinfeld, exercise, watching movies, and reading books you haven’t had time to get around to. Living here I have more freedom to do things I wanted to do at home, but I was just too busy. How was seeing him over vacation? When we saw each other, it was like things never changed. You pick up where you left off. We went to Hong Kong and Tokyo. You can tell if your relationship will be long lasting if you can survive a twoweek trip, especially when you haven’t seen each other in six months. It really solidified the relationship. Why is this experience worth it? Teaching. Moving wasn’t my first option, but I realize it’s something a lot of people aren’t able to experience. I’ve realized the things I took for granted. The experience was rewarding, but would I do the LDR again? No.


INSIGHT

Relationships


ON LOCATION

Dearest Dongchon

When you think of duck boat rides, carnival games, and fun fair rides on a beautiful afternoon, the first thing that comes to mind is usually Suseong Lake. No doubt that it definitely boasts all these things, but for those living off the red line, or for those looking for a change from the usual Suseong Lake scene, I have two words for you: Mangu Park (망우공원). Story and photography by Winnie Ku

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ocated in Dongchon-dong, just three stops away from the craziness of Dongdaegu Station, there exists a Suseong Lake-esque place; duck boats, strolls along the water, carnival games, fun fair rides, picnics, you name it. But in addition to all of this, and the beautiful greenery that comes with Mangu Park, you can also find pieces of history scattered around in the form of monuments dedicated to the memories of Korean soldiers, a cultural exhibit with ancient war artifacts inside, and statues proudly commemorating notable figures in Korean history. All this whilst being in the midst of a beautiful, yet tranquil park with the added bonus of carnival games and rides nearby. Win, win? I think so! Back home in the Western part of the world, carnival games and rides are only something that can be seen during special events or fes-

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tivals, and always for a limited time. Something I’ve grown to love about Korea is the mentality of ‘why have fun fairs on for a short time, when you can have them on year round’! Mangu Park is no exception to this, with your usual dart-throw balloon pop games, shooting games, mini-roller coaster, merry-go-round, pirate ship ride, and a variety of other children’s amusement park rides. The rides may be for the younger generation, but the conveniently placed batting cages, air hockey tables, basketball shootout stations, and air soft gun/archery range definitely makes up for it! And for the measly price of 3,000 won for 10 rounds of shots, who could go wrong? Just a walk around the corner from the fun fair stands the monument for the Movement of Independence (항일독립운동). Having seen such monuments in Seoul at the War Memorial of Ko-


ON LOCATION

rea, I was surprised to find that a relatively quiet, and unbeknownst to me, pocket of Daegu could have so much history in it. An impressively tall monument, it is surrounded by all the names of the soldiers who fought and died during the Japanese invasion of Korea from 1592-1598. Nearby, the Chung-Ui Dan Exhibition Hall (충의 단 전시관) also welcomes visitors to Mangu Park and encourages them to learn more about the history of the Japanese invasion of Korea in the late 1500s. Ancient tools and artifacts from that time period can be found inside. Not too far from the exhibition hall stands the statue of General Gwak Jae-U, who organized a civil troop to fight against the Japanese army. One of the most interesting features of the park for me, though, is the massive Yeongnamjeilgwan Gate (영남제일관), which overlooks

the Geumho River. Impossible to miss, the gate is symbolic of one of the four original gates to Daegu city. Having been demolished in 1906 at the beginning of Japanese colonization, the Yeongnamjeilgwan Gate was rebuilt in 1980 at its current location. Though a smaller version of the original gate, it is still an impressive structure, and one that was both fascinating to learn about and a pleasant surprise to find during what was meant to be an ordinary stroll in the park. So the next time you’re looking for an afternoon out, immerse yourself in the beauty, culture, and history that is Mangu Park! A scenic and cultural experience away from all the traffic and noise of Daegu, it was a Saturday afternoon well-spent!


MUSIC & ARTS

Making The Music You’ve moved to a new country, you’ve made new friends, you’ve done the ‘drink too much for the first month (maybe year)’ thing, and started that blog you’ll forget about come December. Now what? Story and photography by Ali Safavi

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ow it’s time to think about what kind of life you want to lead here in the Apple City. Sure you might only be here for a year, but that can be a very long time if you spend it waiting for the weekend, those few and far between national holidays, or your handful of paid days off. Refreshing the Air Asia website looking for cheap flights to Thailand, Cambodia, and China is a great way to keep your wanderlust satisfied, but you’ve done the travelling part! You’re here already! What better way to experience a culture than to get involved and do something whilst you’re here? Of course, there are many things you can do, but why not start a band? Live the rock’n’roll dream for a short while. As many of you may have already discovered, more often than not your responsibilities are minimal,

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and free-time is abundant. If you’ve ever thought about learning an instrument, now is probably the best time, especially if teaching is not going to be your thing long-term. If you play an instrument already, then trust me, you can start a band and be playing for live audiences within a month. It doesn’t even have to be a runof-the-mill covers band; you can actually write your own music and play it to people. Imagine that! Daegu’s music scene may be small, but there is a crowd here wanting to hear new music, both recorded and live. There are other local bands, both Korean and not, looking for new acts to share the stage and make music with. Being in a band doesn’t mean you can’t explore Korea or travel to other countries, and it certainly doesn’t mean you can’t spend Sundays hun-

gover in bed. In fact, it could even help with those things. Even if you can’t play an instrument that doesn’t mean you can’t start something. Your place of work probably has a mass of shaky jangly things you can borrow to make noise with. Not everyone in the Polyphonic Spree has critically acclaimed musical ability, I’m sure, and everyone (well, almost everyone) loves a shambolic multi-headed band that looks like they’re having the best time on stage. Don’t come to South Korea and look for ways to spend your time doing nothing - you can live without Netflix for a while, trust me. Instead, find like-minded people, get down to a practice room, make some noise, and play a show. Who knows? You might actually discover more about South Korea whilst you’re at it.


MUSIC & ARTS PRACTICE ROOMS: »» Daegu Music Garage: Formerly ‘Horus Music Garage’, they have two practice spaces, a small cheap one and the venue’s stage, priced at 10,000W/12,000W per hour respectively. I recommend practicing here if you are just starting out. »» Jeil Music Academy: A plusher practice room with discounts for advanced booking/payment. Located halfway between Banwoldang and Jungangro stations, Jeil has one big room with everything you could need, and a few smaller rooms for drumming and piano practice. »» Dongseongro Guitar Gyoshil: Again, right in the heart of downtown, underneath and next to Jeng-iy bar (conveniently the perfect place for a post-practice drink). All the

best dirty rock/punk bands practice here. 10,000W an hour. INSTRUMENTS: »» The Internet: Check out the Daegu Facebook groups and Waygook.org for people selling instruments before leaving. You’ll mainly find guitars and amps here though. Perhaps a bass or a few pedals too. »» Myeongdeok: Music shops are spread throughout the city, but the largest collection can be found here. Go to the subway stop and from Exit 4 walk until you hit the first big crossroad. There are musical instrument shops galore on both sides, mostly new, but you can haggle for a discount, if you are lucky.

Bae Sang Min Story by Ali Safavi

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f you’ve just joined us in Daegu you might not know who The March Kings are. They have been quiet for a short while recording an album, but for a few years they were one of the best bands playing live in underground Korea, an energetic post-punk band minus the pretension and plus the actual songs. In October, bass player Bae Sang-Min sadly took his own life. Although I rarely spoke to him, as he was always the quiet one, I felt like I had

an in with his aura. He was the coolest man in the room, and the boy also had awesome dance skills to boot.He always brought his shiny red Rickenbacker along for the ride. His bass lines were simple and unfussy yet full of melody and a drive that pushed his band’s songs onwards. His absence will be felt in the band. Our thoughts are with his family and friends. He will be dearly missed. RIP Joonpei.


MUSIC & ARTS

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MUSIC & ARTS

Hey, Throw The Dart! Story by Laura Reynolds Image provided by D’art

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ovember 9th will see an exciting, multileveled event take place across Daegu. D’art (Daegu Art) will be comprised of three events and will give those taking part the opportunity to explore their creative side with like-minded people within the city. Are you the type of person who is willing to throw yourself into the art and culture surrounding you? Then read on for details about the events and how you can take part. Music If you are a skilled musician, aspiring Bon Jovi, or simply enjoy good music, then this event is for you. Taking place on the street, those of a musical mind will put together a performance to remember. Practices are being held from the end of October to plan the performance, however if you are reading this in early November and wish to take part, that’s no problem! D’art needs musicians who are able to play guitar and ukulele in particular, so give them a shout if any of these are your specialty! Art Daegu has numerous open air galleries in the form of street art to brighten its citizen’s day. Following this trend, D’art will be holding a mural painting session at Kyungbuk National University (West Gate) at 4pm. All the art supplies you will

need to express your image will be provided, so no need to worry about dragging your paints and brushes around the city. Even if you’re not the best artist, the work of everyone involved will come together to make something amazing, so don’t be shy about your abilities Bike Riding For those fitness fanatics among us and those who are looking to stave away the guaranteed winter weight from eating too many roadside purchased hotteoks, enjoy a bike ride throughout Daegu and its surrounding area. All you need for this event is your own bike, a helmet, and the drive to complete the route. Starting from Suseong at 11:00 am and arriving at West Gate in time for the music and art, it’s a great way to get into the spirit of D’art and make some new friends prior to the festival itself. For more information, please visit the D’art Facebook page: www.facebook.com/ttdart For more specific information about an individual event, you can contact them through the Facebook page or the following organizers Music: Dustin 010-3445-5882 Art: Park So Hyun 010-2885-1814 Bike Riding: Tae Joon Byun 010-6848-2527


MUSIC & ARTS

Daegu Street Style Interview by 손민지 Photography by Matthew Stroud

Kim Su-Hyeon

Park Jun-Hyeon

Age 22 Fashion Style Minimal Look Shopping Spots Select shop DOOTA (in Dong-dae Mun) and second-hand clothing stores. Bottom J Brand (250,000 KRW) Shoes Bensimon (70,000 KRW)

Age 20 Fashion Style Retro Fashion Shopping Spots Internet Shopping Malls Outer Hang Ten (60,000 KRW) Bottom Basic House (60,000 KRW) Shoes Hopkins (80,000 KRW)

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MUSIC & ARTS

Kwon Hyeong-Joo

Seo Yoon-Jeong

Age 20 Fashion Style Vintage Girlish Look Shopping Spots Imported clothes shop and Road shop Onepiece Second-hand store (20,000 KRW) Shoes G-market (30,000 KRW)

Fashion Style Leopard Fashion Shopping Spots Internet shopping malls and Road shop Shoes Forever21 (40,000 KRW)


MUSIC & ARTS

Old School I’m Sorry, I Love You (미안하다 사랑하다) Story by Jasetyn Hatcher

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any modern Korean dramas are based around the unfortunate circumstances of the Manic Pixie Dream Girl (MPDG). The bubbly, hard working, seldom sad, slightly bumbling, girl-woman never stops smiling and has simple dreams. These are the kinds of dramas that make me want to throw things at the screen. A lot of Korean dramas also have the tendency to carry on a few episodes too long. This often results in the climax occurring two episodes early, leaving those final episodes to resolve every inconsequential issue within the story. Ten years ago, one drama shattered all the happy endings and cookie cutter characters of the typical modern drama. Mianhada, Saranghada (I’m Sorry, I Love You) doesn’t break every mold of course. There are characters that have been done before in Korean television, and though at first glance, these protagonists might appear familiar, and the pacing of the drama customary, in actuality the characters and the conclusion are fragmented, and leave the viewer feeling a surprising level of emotion. The female lead, Eun Chae (Im Soo Jung), is almost the opposite of the MPDG. She might be bumbling and quirky, but she’s also sullen, lonely, and often despairing as she comes to terms with a love that will forever go unrequited. Moo Hyuk (So Ji Sub), a twice-orphaned, hardened scam artist, showcases just how complex the human need for acceptance can be. The supporting cast of Audrey (Lee Hye Young) and Choi Yoon

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(Jung Kyung Ho) are the ‘perfect’ Korean mother and son. However Audrey is vulnerable; she was taken advantage of at a very young age and is unable to cope with her past, which eventually comes back to haunt both her and her son. The stories are wound together like a web. It’s impossible to convey the plot without spoiling it. This drama is definitely not without its faults, however, particularly as it pertains to dealing with certain culturally taboo material. For instance, the writer (Lee Kyung Hee) portrays an unwed mother as intellectually stunted, as if to explain her predicament. There is also a palpable level of patriarchy. The females in the story, more often than not, are subject to the consequences of poor decision-making not only on account of themselves, but their male counterparts. I’m Sorry, I Love You. Its meaning is perhaps purposely ambiguous: I’m sorry that I love you, I’m sorry but I love you, I’m sorry and I love you. Is Eun Chae sorry that she loves someone who will never reciprocate? Is Moo Hyuk sorry because he has wronged someone who loves him? Will Choi Yoon learn how to say these words? Does anyone receive true fulfillment in the end? You’ll have to watch to find out.


HEALTHY LIVING

Welcome to Fight Club The first rule of Fight Club is that you don't talk about Fight Club. Everyone knows that but sometimes rules are made to be broken. Story by Louisa Kouzapas Photography by Eden Juscelino

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o, Fight Club is an elitist group full of beefed up meatheads, right? WRONG. Absolutely anyone can join: male, female, or any other species. Maybe you’re an experienced martial artist, or maybe you just like the look of some of those Kung Fu ass-whooping moves you’ve seen in the movies. In fact, all you need is a little warrior spirit to be made MORE than welcome with this great bunch of people. This is a group with a single focus: to share, teach, and learn from each other the techniques of martial arts in a welcoming fashion. The group has people from different martial arts backgrounds: Muay Thai, Wrestling, MMA, Jujitzu and Boxing. They’re the self-proclaimed Martial Arts Avengers of Daegu! If you’re a beginner, then it is a great and relaxed way to explore different styles before committing to your niche. Don’t worry, you won’t be sucker punched into the unknown on arrival, as the Facebook group will keep you updated on who is in charge and what the focus is for each session. So what’s the catch? While they don’t enforce the eighth rule of the Fight Club movie (if it’s your

first time at Fight Club then you must fight), they do have a live sparring session. Sparring is vital to learning martial arts: didn’t you watch the Rocky montages like the rest of us? Nick and Fish, two of the leaders at Fight Club have also designed and led a three-week women’s self-defense seminar, which focuses on empowering women to get out of difficult situations using martial arts practice. If this is something you might be interested in doing then contact them. If they have enough interest, they’ll look at running the course again within the next few months. So whether you have a ton of experience or you just want to head down to watch a session they’ll be glad to have you. Fight Club meets on Saturday mornings near Jukjeon subway station. As an added bonus your first session at Fight Club is completely free. Now isn’t that nice of them? https://www.facebook.com/ groups/10327573481


HEALTHY LIVING

Fall in Love with Persimmons Story and photography by Erica Berry

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have made the ultimate discovery - a fruit that tastes like chocolate. OK, so maybe not exactly like chocolate, but its pretty close. The name even has the word chocolate in it. So, what’s the fuss all about? It’s the Chocolate Persimmon. Like all great discoveries, there is a story behind how I came to find this tasty fruit. Fall is one of my all-time favorite seasons. Sweaters and sandals, shorts and jackets. It’s like a mix of year round fashion. But what really gets me going is the produce, especially persimmons! They’re sweet. They’re crunchy. They’re juicy. They’re perfect. Being as obsessed with persimmons as I am, as soon as I saw them at the market I had to stop and buy a bag. I picked up 8 wonderfully orange persimmons for 3,000 won and before I could walk away I found myself biting into the delicious fruit. Ugh. Delicious fruit? Wait. It was not the same persimmon I remembered. The inside was brown and mushy. I immediately spat it out and turned to the produce lady with a look of absolute disgust. Was she selling me rotten fruit? Did she think I was some silly foreigner who didn’t know what a persimmon was? As I stood there with seemingly rotten persimmon juice running down my hand, she looked utterly confused as to why I was unhappy with my purchase. She even ate one of the rotting fruits herself to prove they were edible and perfectly fine. I still didn’t believe her, so I made her give me my money back. Once I got home, I Googled (as I always do),

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“What does the inside of a persimmon look like?” I came to find out there are actually several types of persimmons. Who knew? To keep it simple we’ll focus on two kinds you can find in Korea. The crunchy, apple-like fruit I know and love are called Fuya, and the softer variety I most recently came across is known as the Chocolate Persimmon, fabled to possess subtle notes of chocolate flavor. Upon reading the word chocolate, I knew I needed those persimmons. With no shame in my game, I went back and re-bought my bag of mushy persimmons, plus a bag of Fuyas for baking! Just to make sure I was getting the right fruit, I took a bite of the deceiving little morsel and sure thing, it was delicious. I could even taste a hint of chocolate! The market lady thought I was silly. I knew I was silly. But whatever, I got my two bags of persimmons and now I have these delicious Fuya Persimmon Muffins, too. Before you head off to the market, here’s a quick tip for buying persimmons… Both the varieties of persimmon look very similar: squat and tomato shaped. However, the chocolate persimmon has a deeper orange color and will feel a bit mushy. Paired with a napkin, it’s the perfect sweet fall snack! For baking I suggest using the Fuya (the harder variety) because it adds a little crunch and holds a better texture than the Chocolate Persimmon. To ask for a persimmon by name try 단감 or dan gam. Just do a touch test to make sure you’re getting the kind you’re after.


HEALTHY LIVING

Fuya Persimmon Muffins Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 12 minutes Total Time: 22 minutes Difficulty: Moderate Kitchen Gear: • Muffin Tin • Toaster Oven (or conventional oven) Ingredients: • 2 cups almond meal (available at HomePlus and iHerb, or if you have a blender, make your own!) • tsp salt • tsp baking soda • 1 tsp cinnamon • 1 cup chopped Fuya persimmons cup chopped walnuts (or chocolate • chips!) • 3 eggs • 2 Tbsp honey (sub maple syrup or agave) • 2 Tbsp oil (vegetable, butter, coconut or olive oil) • 1 tsp apple cider vinegar (or lemon juice) • tsp vanilla (optional)

Directions: 1. Preheat toaster oven to 177° C. 2. Line your muffin pan with liners or grease them well. 3. Mix the dry ingredients together (almond meal, salt, baking soda and cinnamon). 4. In a separate bowl, whisk the wet ingredients together (honey, oil, almond extract, egg, and water). 5. Mix the wet ingredients into the dry using a fork until you achieve an even consistency. If the texture is too dry, add small amounts of water at a time until it is sticky. 6. Add the walnuts then persimmons and stir together. 7. Spoon batter evenly into muffin tin. 8. Bake for 10-12 minutes or until set at the centers and golden brown at the edges. Keep an eye on them or they will burn! Let cool for at least 5 minutes, then ENJOY! For mini muffins: Cook for only 5-7 minutes. For persimmon loaf: Spoon the mixture into a greased bread pan and bake for about 15 minutes, depending on the size of your pan. When the center is set, remove and let cool.


FOOD & DRINK

Captain Morgan’s Story and photography by Tania Vincent Translation by 윤순희

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s the nights get colder and the A.C is finally turned off, you might start feeling those familiar cravings for good old-fashioned comfort food. If this is the case, then the place to be is Captain Morgan’s located in downtown Daegu. Near Banwoldang exit 10 and located down a side street, what you may think is only a car park at first glance is actually this friendly and inviting pub. This is one place that offers all the comforts of home. If you know any Brits, or are a Brit yourself, then this place will seem familiar. It actually has earned its ‘pub’ status and is reminiscent of an English pub you’d find hidden along a small village road. It has good wine, friendly staff, and a large selection of beers. Even an elusive German Dunkle beer can be found here. Although the menu is a little pricey, it is food you would struggle to find in your every day Daegu restaurant, so if you are craving some

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‘Bangers & Mash’, you might be willing to pay a little extra. The same goes for the drinks. A pint of German beer will set you back 10,000won, but this is the very high end of the scale, and there are also cheaper alternatives if you just want your average Korean beer. You might also be surprised that the wine is delicious and well priced. As for the food, the fish and chips come highly recommended, especially since they actually provide you with vinegar to enjoy your meal in the authentic British fashion. Even the mayonnaise is delicious in this place (and tastes fantastically homemade). Captain Morgan’s would be the perfect first stop on a night out, a great place for a date with its low lighting and romantic 1950’s inspired music, or the place to head for a catch up over a bottle of wine. It isn’t very large inside, so it will fill up quickly on weekends and Friday nights but the limited seating only adds to the intimate and enjoyable atmosphere.


FOOD & DRINK 차가운 바람에 몸이 점점 움츠려 드는 이 맘 때면 누 구나 한번쯤 예전부터 즐겨 먹던 음식에 대한 향 수가 솟아나기도 한다. 만일 그렇다면, 대구 시내에 위치한 Captain Morgan’s이 바로 그러한 향수를 충 족시켜 줄 수 있는 장소가 될 것이다. Captain Morgan’s는 반월당 지하철역 10번 출구 로 나와 근처 골목길로 조금 걸어 가면 만날 수 있 다. 처음 얼핏 봤을 때에는 마치 주차장이 아닌가 하 고 생각할 수도 있지만, 그 곳이 당신이 찾던 친근하 면서도 고향의 맛과 분위기를 느끼게 해 주는 바로 그 “pub”이다. 만약 당신이 영국인들을 알고 있거나, 아님 본인 이 바로 영국인이라면, 이 장소는 무척 친근하게 다 가올 것 같다. 이 곳은 실제로도 영국풍 Pub으로서 그 명성을 얻고 있으며 마치 영국의 어느 작은 마 을 길을 따라 마주치는 전통적인 영국풍 Pub를 연 상하게 해 준다. 좋은 와인과 친절한 종업원들, 그 리고 다양한 종류의 맥주들을 만날 수 있으며, 심지 어 흔히 볼 수 없는 독일식 Dunkle beer 까지도 맛 볼 수 있다. 비록 이 곳의 메뉴들이 다소 비싸긴 하지만, 이 Pub에선 당신이 늘 찾기 원했던 바로 그런 음식들을 즐길 수 있다. 만약 ‘Banger& Mash”(소시지와 으깬 감자)가 먹고 싶다면, 약간의 추가지출이 필요하다.

음료들 또한 마찬가지이다. 가장 비싼 독일 맥주 는 한 잔 값이 약 10,000원 정도이다. 하지만 일반 적인 한국 맥주들을 원한다면 좀 더 저렴한 가격으 로 다양한 맥주들을 즐길 수 있다. 그리고 또한 풍 미가 좋고 가격도 적당한 와인들을 제공하고 있다는 사실도 놀랍다. 음식으로 말하자면, Fish and Chips를 추천할 수 있겠는데 특히 식초를 곁들임으로 인해 진정한 영 국식 fish and chips를 즐길 수 있다. 또한 마요네이 즈도 정말 맛있는데 그 맛이 일반 시장에서 쉽게 구 할 수 있는 것들과는 달리 정성 가득한 가정식 마요 네이즈 같다. Captain Morgan’s 는 아마 여러분의 저녁 시간을 위한 훌륭한 장소가 될 것이다. 특히 분위기 있는 조 명과 1950년대의 낭만적인 음악들로 채워진 이곳 은 데이트를 위한 최적의 장소이며 혹은 와인 잔을 앞에 두고 오랜 만에 만난 친구들과 정담을 나눌 수 있는 곳으로도 추천한다. 한 가지 짚고 넘어 갈 것 은, 이 곳의 내부가 사실 그렇게 크지 않아 주말이나 금요일 밤이면 금방 자리들이 채워 지곤 한다. 하지 만 오히려 이렇게 제한된 좌석 규모가 좀 더 친밀하 고 즐거운 분위기를 연출한다 생각한다.


FOOD & DRINK

Samduk Music Café Story by Maxwell Shellabarger Translation by 윤순희 Photography by Matthew Stroud

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aving lived in Daegu for a little over a year now, I have been to the “foreign” bars probably more than my fair share. That being said, I am constantly on the lookout for something a little different. So, when I found 음악 까페 (Samduk Music Cafe), I was quite pleased with my discovery. This spot is easy to miss; it’s tiny and hidden behind a pull down metal door during the day. It’s worth a visit if you are looking for something that still feels like your local pub but is not one of your usual haunts. The walls are lined with what looks like hundreds of albums on vinyl, and the music played is a mix unlike any I have heard elsewhere in town. It’s a mix of excellent, old school tracks, from classic western to Korean artists. The general setup of the bar is basically like any other bottle bar you will find in this country; you select the beers you wish to drink, hang on to the bottles, and pay at the end of your time there. What separates this place from other, similar establishments is the unrivalled selection, and the general

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atmosphere of the bar as a whole. The music, coupled with the dive-y ambiance I find so welcoming, makes this place one that I will certainly make a regular watering hole. It is not for everyone, though. It is absolutely tiny. There are only four or five tables, each with four or five chairs, so do not expect to come here with a massive group. Furthermore, while I find it charming, it is not half as fancy as anywhere else I have been here in Korea. Moral of the story, don’t bring a huge group of tuxedoed individuals expecting bottle service and club tunes. Do bring a small group of friends looking to sip excellent beers and listen to choice cuts on vinyl. As for finding it: take exit 10 of Banwoldang. Turn right. Walk up this street for about two blocks. Turn right after Café Bonita. It will be on your right. Look for the orange sign.


FOOD & DRINK

약 일년 남짓 대구에서 지내 오면서, 나는 외국인 전 용 bar를 자주 찾아 가곤 했다. 이렇듯 외국인 전용 bar를 가면서도 늘 좀 더 색다른 곳을 끊임없이 찾 아왔다. 그러던 중, 삼덕음악까페를 발견하게 되었 고, 이 곳을 알게 되었다는 사실은 나에게 무척 큰 즐거움이 되었다. 사실 이 곳은 크기도 작을 뿐만 아니라, 낮 동안에 는 가게 앞 문이 내려져 있어, 찾기가 쉽지 않다. 하 지만 우리 지역의 pub이면서도 늘 다니던 친숙한 장 소가 아닌 색다른 어떤 곳을 찾는 사람들에겐 추천 해보고 싶다. bar 안의 내부 벽은 마치 수백 장의 레 코드 앨범들이 줄지어 있는 것 같고, 흘러나오는 음 악 역시 이제껏 가 본 여느 bar에서 들어 본 것들과 는 사뭇 다르다. 서양 클래식 음악부터 한국 음악에 이르기까지 그곳의 선곡은 아주 다양하다. 이 bar는 기본적으로 한국에서 흔히 볼 수 있는 bar와 같아, 손님이 마시고 싶은 맥주를 고르고, 맥 주를 마시고 나갈 때 계산을 하면 된다. 하지만 이 곳을 다른 bar들과 확연히 구별 되게 해 주는 점이 있는데, 그것은 바로 굉장히 다양한 맥주들을 구비 하고 있다는 점과 이 곳이 주는 전반적인 분위기에 있다. 최신 유행을 따르지 않는, 어쩌면 다소 세련되지 않은 실내 분위기는 이 bar를 오히려 더욱 따뜻한 곳 으로 느끼게 해 준다. 이러한 분위기와 더불어 이 공 간을 가득 채우고 있는 음악도 이 곳을 앞으로도 더 욱더 찾아 오고 싶은 장소로 만들어 준다. 그런데 이러한 장점에도 불구하고 어쨌든 이 곳 은 모든 이들을 위한 곳은 아니다. 왜냐하면 장소가 매우 좁다. Bar 내부에는 오직 4-5개 정도의 테이블 이 있고, 각 테이블마다 4-5개 정도의 의자들이 놓 여져 있을 뿐이다. 그러니 가급적 많은 사람들과 이

곳을 방문하는 것은 좋은 생각이 아닌 듯 하다. 나에 겐 이 곳이 무척 매혹적인 곳으로 여겨 지긴 하지만, 만약 턱시도를 입은 멋진 이들과, 매너 있는 서비스, 그리고 클럽음악을 꿈꾸는 분들은 fancy한 한국의 다른 술집을 추천한다. 오히려 이 곳은, 좋은 맥주 와 더불어 레코드 판에서 흘러 나오는 멋진 음악들 을 감상하기 좋아하는 몇 명의 친구들을 데려가기에 더없이 좋은 곳이다. 찾아가는 길은 다음과 같다. 지하철 반월당 역 10 번 출구로 나와 우회전 한 후, 약 두 블록 정도 길을 따라 걸어 간다. Café Bonita(커피숍 보니타)를 지 나자 마자 바로 우회전 하면, 당신의 오른편에 오렌 지 간판의 삼덕음악까페를 만나게 될것이다.


COMMUNITY

ON THE WEB:

Korean Bookends

Korean Bookends blogger, Stephen Schuit, first embarked on his journey to Korea in the 1970s as a Peace Corp volunteer at Keimyung Christian College. Schuit’s long-term relationship with the ROK, historical knowledge, and socio-cultural commentary definitely make Korean Bookends a worth-while read. Story by Monique Dean Photographs supplied by Stephen Schuit

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orean Bookends blogger, Stephen Schuit, first embarked on his journey to Korea in the 1970s as a Peace Corp volunteer at Keimyung Christian College. Armed with a Kodak camera and immense curiosity, he documented the everyday life of Koreans. These images vividly capture a nation that was in the midst of the social, economic, and cultural transformation to the Korea we all know now. Schuit’s long-term relationship with the ROK, historical knowledge,

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and socio-cultural commentary definitely make Korean Bookends a worth-while read. Korea is probably one of the most rapidly developing countries in the world and the strides they have made over the last few decades have been quite remarkable. When you stepped back on Korean soil, what changes struck you the most? I was struck by the changes in technology, such as the high-tech video billboards that Seoul was displaying in 1988. I hadn’t seen them in the States at that time. Upon returning to Daegu in 2012, I was impressed by the sophistication of the subway systems and the comprehensiveness of the wider transportation system. On a more social level, I couldn’t help but be surprised by the amount of physical contact between college and even high school students. In the 70’s you would never publicly see couples even holding hands except, of course, men and women friends holding hands with members of the same sex.


COMMUNITY

While reading your blog, I can’t help but feel the passion and admiration you have for the Korean culture. For some expats in Korea, as the years go by, their enthusiasm for the culture tends to wane, and they may become complacent. How do you think one can continue to make the most of their experience in Korea? Candidly, I was quite bitter when I left Korea in 1975 after living and teaching here for sev-

eral years. So, I am well aware of that dynamic. In those years, there were few expats here who were not U.S. soldiers. I had grown weary of the staring and comments from young Koreans who at that time were taken aback by my beard. Those were the days, of course, before e-mails and Skype and other tools we take for granted today. It took nearly 2-months to send a letter home and get a return response. There were no western style toilets, no beds, heating was poor, and there was no unheated potable water. I was simply exhausted both physically and psychologically. I would encourage expats here today to remain humble and curious. As one of my college students once remarked to me, “Professor, how could your major be American History? American history,” he continued, “is only 200 years old. Korean history is five-thousand years old. That is a major.” To read more about Stephen and his experiences, check out: koreanbookends.blogspot. com


COMMUNITY

Mommy, Where Do Ajummas Come From? Story by Kaleena Quarles Illustrations by Stephen Elliott

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oreans have a saying that there are three sexes: men, women, and ajummas. It’s not a hard claim to believe when you see a middle-aged woman strutting down the street in her hiking vest, floral print leggings, and studded black heels, with her purple-streaked permed hair flying wildly from behind her oversized visor brim. As she coughs up a loud and obnoxious spit and gives a maniacal cackle, you can’t help but pause to gape a little and wonder, what IS that? I occasionally find myself pondering at what point a woman becomes an Ajumma. Is it a

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gradual transformation like a caterpillar to a butterfly, or does she just wake up one day and — BOOM — she’s hatched into an Ajumma? When I was a kid, I read a book about how the adults were allowing their children to be kidnapped and sent off to have their minds ‘reformatted’ and then be returned to society as mindless, perfectly behaved robotic beings. Though we know they aren’t necessarily returning with good behavior, could it be that once they reach a certain age, the women in Korea are sent off to an Ajumma Factory where they are outfitted in ridiculous attire and taught that they no longer


insisted on escorting me on the walk all the way home, or the time she felt the need to explain how to get naked and bathe in the jimjilbang. I’ve come to understand that these women ultimately mean well, even if I may never understand why they do the things they do. Regardless of whether you love them, hate them, or maybe a little of both, Korea would not be the same without the Ajummas in their large-brimmed visor hats. And while I appreciate the Ajumma’s presence in her multi-patterned splendor, I will forever wonder how she came to be. Be sure to check out Kaleena's blog at kaleenaskaleidoscope. com

xpat Diaries

have to follow the rules of society? Because they certainly don’t seem to think the rules pertain to them. There I am, queuing up nicely and politely in a store, and as I walk up to the counter to make my purchase, a sneaky Ajumma jabs me with her elbow and slips in front of me without a second glance. On buses, I can’t count the amount of times I have been shushed for quietly talking to the person beside me; Ajummas, however, can rock onto the bus three sheets to the wind and stumble about, shouting and knocking into people, laughing so hysterically that they are buckled over in tears. Last week, an Ajumma sitting on the bus poked my rear with her bony little finger and shoved me out of the way before I could move aside for her. But as I stood there fuming, she turned to me and pointed at her seat, waving aside the man gunning for it. She made sure I got her seat, and gave a satisfied chuckle as I hesitantly sat down. On the walk home, I stopped in the market for some apples and an Ajumma gave me a toothless grin and insisted I take extra fruit. I suddenly realized that The Ajumma actually isn’t all bad. I thought back on all the times an Ajumma had gone out of her way to help me find a place or tried her best to speak to me in broken English. There was the time she

Expat Diaries

COMMUNITY


COMMUNITY

Children With Passionate Hearts Story by 여두원 Photograph provided by Children With Passionate Hearts

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hildren With Passionate Hearts is a community center for children who are unable to afford after-school private tutoring. Founded by Jung Yup Han, the center is open Monday through Saturday. Here children can come after their regular school hours and receive the care and tutoring that their parents may be unable to provide. Based on the parents’ salary level, the children admitted into the community center are often those from working class, or single parent families. Similar to daycare centers found in the Western world, Children With Passionate Hearts, provides an all-round education and level of care while the child is unable to be at home with their parents. Prior to opening the center, Yup Han was an academy owner, but after experiencing this lifestyle and spending time with the students, he thought about changing the direction of his career. With the help of numerous financial supporters, he successfully opened the center two years ago and has enabled it to grow into a well-established organization, along with the help of dedicated volunteers. However, despite the center doing well, the concept of day care is still a foreign idea to many Koreans. Yup Han’s main goal is to raise aware-

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ness about the center and encourage more willing people to give their time for the cause. Currently the limitation for students is set at 9, but due to high demand, there are 12 students attending during the week. Yup Han is in desperate need of more volunteers, as the majority of volunteers are university students, and though they are passionate about the cause, they cannot commit to regular working hours. Education and the quality of children’s lives is a high-profile topic in South Korea at the moment. Yup Han hopes that more time can be spent promoting centers such as Children With Passionate Hearts, and he encourages likeminded individuals to reconsider their opinion on pressuring overworked children, particularly from lower income-families, to live beyond their means and abilities in regards to education.


COMMUNITY

Daegu's Time to Date Story and image provided by Daegu's Time to Give

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ttention all Casanovas and Casanovaettes! Sadly, it’s that time of year again. Time for your under floor heating to be turned up high, for the thermal vests to be layered up, for you to feel the cold with nobody to hold. The local orange shop lady sadly tilts her head as your order your takeaway jiggae for one, and you spend your afternoons staring with envious eyes at the couple in the coffee shop wearing matching duck jumpers. But don’t fear the lonely winter months any longer, because Daegu’s Time To Give is presenting its 4th event of romance and uncensored passion: Daegu’s Time To Date! Open to everyone, it costs 10,000 won to take part (includes a free shot). Simply send an email to daegustimetogive@gmail. com with your name and phone number, then head on down to MF on November 16th for the fun!


CULTURE Although our host country doesn’t celebrate any national holidays during November, expats from multiple countries will celebrate their home countries’ holidays this month as the days get colder.

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CULTURE

Holidays in November Story by Adam Fletcher

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n stark contrast to October, a month containing three days of national celebration in Korea (Armed Forces Day, National Foundation Day, and Hanguel Proclamation Day), November arrives with the cold weather of winter, and continues uninterrupted throughout. Having enjoyed the aforementioned days of rest, for the citizens of Daegu, the arrival of November signals the need to prepare for winter; put away the thin, summer clothes and research recipes for your favorite soups. For the Canadian contingent of Daegu, their national day of Thanksgiving was celebrated on the 14th October, with many of them Skyping home, celebrating together or hunting down anyone willing to cook a traditional Turkey dinner. Many of my friends, myself included, were lucky enough to celebrate that special day at Buy The Book café. Sandy, the Canadian owner, cooked us up a wonderful platter of turkey, mashed potatoes, macaroni and cheese, and more to tickle our taste buds. We were then blown away by her pumpkin pie! November sees the American portion of Daegu get their chance to celebrate their Thanksgiving day. This falls on Thursday 28th. I am sure that there will be wild celebrations around Korea, especially in Daegu, Seoul, and Busan, places with high American representation in the foreign community. For American visitors, students, teachers, and the military, this will be a day of celebration. Thanksgiving is traditionally celebrated with the whole family getting together for a big meal, mirroring the ‘First Thanksgiving’ believed to have taken place in 1621 by the Na-

tive Americans and the settlers from England. Thanksgiving Day is the busiest day for traveling in the USA, with many people flying, driving and commuting to be at home with their families. This is very much like the Chuseok (추석) festival in South Korea. Despite the on-going tradition for over 200 years, it wasn’t until 1864 that Thanksgiving Day was declared a National Holiday, by then President Abraham Lincoln. As the Canadians and Americans are able to celebrate togetherness, giving thanks and harmony, people in England will be celebrating a holiday on November the 5th by burning effigies of a 17th Century plotter who had attempted to murder King James I. Bonfire Night, or ‘Guy Fawkes Night’, is celebrated on the 5th November each year in the UK. At night, people gather in local parks, fields, and pub gardens to stand around a giant fire, eat warm food and, watch fireworks. Guy Fawkes was a member of a group of people who wanted to blow up the Houses of Parliament with the King inside. The group stored barrels of gunpowder under Parliament and planned to set them alight on 5th November 1605, the State Opening of Parliament, but someone warned King James of this and the group was discovered. Guy Fawkes was arrested while he was guarding the gunpowder, and later tortured and sentenced to hanging, though he died before he was hung. Bonfire Night is now seen as a chance to enjoy a night-time of fireworks, warm fires, toffee-covered apples, and cinder-toffee candy with friends and loved ones.


Bongmu Park - Richarquis de Sade

DAEGU IN

View from Novotel - Tania Vincent

Brianne Ketteman

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Jeff Freeman


CULTURE

OCTOBER

Zombie Walk - Jeff Freeman

Tom Rogers

Apsan Viewing Point - Ali Safavi


CULTURE

Frothy Lattés and Flirting Story by Abbey Kaye Ritter

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o the ecstasy of caffeine-loving expats, Korea is littered with coffee shops. These roasted bean-scented hangouts are the perfect place to make new Korean friends. However, sometimes we don’t want to keep these meetings platonic. Flirt your way to a fling over lattés, or 라떼 / 라테 (la-tae), by using a few quick tips and expressions. When saying 라떼, remember that the Korean “ㄹ” resembles most closely a cross between the English “L” and “R.” To achieve this sound, you must start with the tip of your tongue curled up toward the back of your mouth, just touching the roof. This is dissimilar to “L,” for which the tip of the tongue is pressed toward the front of the mouth, behind your teeth. If you practice this out loud, you’ll notice a significant difference in sound between the “ㄹ” and both the “L” and “R.” Once mastering the art of the “ㄹ,” do you see a cute guy or girl? Step up and say, “안녕하세 요” (an-nyeong-ha-sae-yo, hello). If your hello is returned, ask, “혹시 라떼 좋아하세요?” (hoksi la-tae joh-ah-ha-sae-yo, do you like lattes?).

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For the traditional folks out there, coffee is “커 피” (koh-pi) and Americano is “아메리카노” (ahmae-ri-cah-no). Remember, when saying “아메 리카노,” the “R” in the romanized spelling of the

Korean word is not pronounced like a traditional English “R”! If the person doesn’t like your drink of choice, don’t give up. Perk up your K-Pop inspired 애교 (ae-gyo, cutesy behavior) and say, “커피 한진 한면서 이야기해요” (koh-pi han-jan han-myeon-seuh ee-yah-gi-hae-yo, let’s have a coffee and talk about it)! When you’re not so bold as to ask someone if they like your favorite drink, you can make a more subtle maneuver, “저~ 옆에 앉아도 되나 요?” (jeoh -- yeop-ea anja-do dae-nah-yo, hey -can I sit next to you?). Sidle up next to your new coffee shop buddy and bat those eyelashes.


DIRECTORY MUSIC & ARTS

FOOD & DRINK

Daegu Music Garage

Captain Morgan’s

facebook.com/HorusMusicGarage

053-291-7837

대구 중구 삼덕동1가 18-1번지 3층

대구 중구 삼덕동 1가 40-8

Jeil Music Academy

Samduk Music Café

053-423-1160

COMMUNITY

Dongseongro Guitar Gyoshil

Children With Passionate Hearts

010-5737-2848

053-201-0072 prefader@naver.com

대구 중구 남일동(동성로 버거킹옆골목) 85,86번 지 3,4층

대구 중구 동성로3가 7-3

대구 중구 공평로8길

대구시 달성군 다사읍 매곡리 삼산타운


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Translators Photographers & Illustrators

Laura Reynolds 강지은

Brianne Ketteman Karen Melton & Lauren Jarman Adam Fletcher, Abbey Kaye Ritter, Ali Safavi, Erica Berry, Jasetyn Hatcher, June Leffler, Kaleena Quarles, Kieran Duffy, Laura Reynolds, Louisa Kouzapas, Maxwell Shellabarger, Monique Dean, Nathan Ouriach, Tania Vincent, Winnie Ku, 손민지, 여두원 윤순희

Ali Safavi, Brianne Ketteman, Eden Juscelino, Jeff Freeman, Laura Reynolds, Matthew Stroud, Richaquis de Sade, Stephen Elliot, Tania Vincent, Tom Rogers

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

H

aving survived what feels like the longest October to ever come around, here at Platform we welcome the arrival of November with open arms! Now is the time to explore new areas of Daegu while enjoying the the beautiful autumn foliage, spend evenings catching up with friends over holiday themed beverages, and figure out how to use the ondol properly....once and for all! Hopefully after reading our second issue, you are armed with ways to get through the approaching winter, whatever your interests may be. Start a band, bake some delicious muffins, learn the true rules of Fight Club, or visit the hidden treasure that is Dongchon Park. Either way, we hope you enjoy November in Daegu as much as we plan to! Laura Reynolds

facebook.com/platformdaegu platformdaegu@gmail.com

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PF November 2013

November 2013  

Platform Daegu Issue 02 facebook.com/platformdaegu

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