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VISUAL MAGAZINE

MAY / JUNE 2011 LBP 10.000 USD 7

11

MAD MEN HAIDER ACKERMANN PETER MARINO GEORGE CONDO GEORGIA MAY JAGGER RABIH KAYROUZ MARVEL STUDIOS THE FAKE TAN CLUB STREET PHOTOGRAPHY 2012 RUNWAY REPORT

COVER STORY BY ELI REZKALLAH RYAN HOUSSARI AND STEVE KOZMAN.


LINGERIE|SLEEPWEAR City Mall • Dora Kaslik • Main Street

Le Mall • Sin El Fil Beirut • Tayyounneh

lavieenrose.com


CONTENTS

LE MUST NEWSLETTER IK* LIST 038.

048. W HOTEL LONDON 049. HAIDER ACKERMANN 050. MR PORTER 051. HERMÈS HOME

PHOTOGRAPHY TV SERIES 052.

STREET PHOTOGRAPHY

060.

MAD MEN

070. 072. 074. 076. 078.

MUST READ MUST HEAR MUST SEE YOUTUBE LINKS PLAYLIST

080.

MARVEL STUDIOS

088. 096. 100. 106.

CANDY’S CLOSET IK* GIRL CANDY SHOP PLASTIK

109.

MENSWEAR S/S 2011

114.

F/W 2011 - 2012

SPECIAL FEATURE CANDY’S DIARIES KEN-DY FASHION REPORT


700 SQ UA R E M E T E R S O F T R E N DY FA S H I O N

TATEN-MARINA TOWER BUILDINGS-BEHIND THE NEW FOUR SEASONS HOTEL-961 1 365357-961 1 365389


CONTENTS

BEAUTY VISUAL ARTIST INTERVIEW EXPOS 124. 130.

MAKE-UP: THE WARHOL EFFECT REPORT: THE FAKE TAN CLUB

136.

GEORGE CONDO

122. 180.

PETER MARINO RABIH KAYROUZ

186. 187. 188. 189. 190.

UNRAVEL: KNITWEAR IN FASHION ALEXANDER MCQUEEN: SAVAGE BEAUTY SET AMSTERDAM BY DANA LIXENBERG YSL RIVE GAUCHE FIGURES AND FICTIONS: CONTEMPORARY SOUTH AFRICANPHOTOGRAPHY PARIS – DELHI – BOMBAY ROBERTO CAPUCCI: ART INTO FASHION MADAME GRÈS

191. 192. 194.

CINEMA TRAVEL FOOD ICONIK* 194.

ARAB CINEMA

198.

MARRAKECH

202.

PLASTIK* DINNER PARTY: CHEF ELIE NASR

208.

GARBAGE PAIL KIDS


CREDITS

MARKETING MANAGER RANA JAMALEDDINE EDITOR IN CHIEF / CREATIVE DIRECTOR ELI REZKALLAH

NO ONE THREW ME INTO THE WATER, NO ONE TAUGHT ME HOW TO SWIM... I WENT INTO THE POOL AND TAUGHT MYSELF.

FASHION EDITOR RYAN HOUSSARI

MY SKIMPY RED AND BLUE SPEEDOS - I LOVED THEM! I’VE ALWAYS WANTED TO BE THE UNDERWATER SUPERMAN.

MANAGING PARTNER ZEINA ZEIDAN

IN "SOLEMAR"... I WAS TWO YEARS OLD WHEN I GOT THROWN INTO THE POOL WITHOUT ANY INFLATABLE AIDS. AT FIRST I WAS PETRIFIED BUT THEN I STARTED SWIMMING AND WAS HAPPY I COULD DO SO. LATER ON, I BECAME “THE MOST BEAUTIFUL MERMAID,” A SWIMMING CHAMPION, A DIVER AND A WATER POLO PLAYER!

OPERATION MANAGER KINDA MOURANI

DON’T REMEMBER, WAS TOO BUSY WONDERING WHY I AM NOT WEARING A BRA LIKE MOMMY!!!!

IN "SUMMERLAND*"... MY UNCLE THREW ME IN THE POOL TO TEACH ME HOW TO SWIM ON MY OWN... TOUGH LOVE!

ART DIRECTOR STEPHANIE IBRAHIM

I WAS STARING AT MY DAD IN THE POOL, HESITANT AT FIRST, AND THEN I JUMPED ALL OVER HIM. FEAR LASTED ONLY A COUPLE OF MINUTES BEFORE I “SAILED” AHEAD ON MY OWN... I GAVE HIM TROUBLE AFTERWARDS, I DID NOT WANT TO GET OUT OF WATER*.

GRAPHIC DESIGNER TAREK SABBOUH

ELECTRIC ORANGE INFLATABLE ARMBANDS ALL AROUND ME, WATER IN MY LUNGS, AND HEART-BREAKING TEARS IN MY EYES. I ENDED UP GOING TO A SWIMMING SCHOOL - FOR TWO CONSECUTIVE SUMMERS!!!

PRODUCERS HASAN KAMEL SABBAH

I THINK I NEED AN HYPNOSIS SESSION FOR THAT.

MAYA MOUSSA

BEING THROWN INTO THE WATER...WITHOUT FLOATS...WITHOUT WARNING... SOME INCIDENTS ARE BETTER KEPT IN THE PAST.


Bab Idriss, Weygand street, facing Beirut Souks - 01 983 316


CREDITS

CONTRIBUTORS PETER SPEETJENS YASMINE HAWWA STEVE KOZMAN NAJAT SALAME SAMIR DAOU AMIN DAOU FADI NAMMAR JACKSON ALLERS PAUL COCHRANE MEDIA REPRESENTATIVE HITACHI CENTER, JDEIDEH, BEIRUT - LEBANON. Tel: +961 1482325

RESPONSIBLE MANAGER ALBERT CHAMOUN PRINTING DOTS PRINTING PRESS PUBLISHED BY BEYOND PRODUCTION SAL 480 GOURAUD ST - 1104 GEMMAYZE BEIRUT - LEBANON +961 1 576888 - P.O.BOX 17 5009 WWW.BEYOND-PRODUCTION.COM INFO@BEYOND-PRODUCTION.COM

COVER STORY BY: ELI REZKALLAH, RYAN HOUSSARI AND STEVE KOZMAN BEYOND PRODUCTION 2011


WWW.GS.COM.LB

NOT POSING. IT’S JUST THE ’’ WAITING’’ EFFECT. GS


I was in my hotel room in Paris during Fashion Week, when I saw a footage of Lady Gaga opening the Thierry Muglar show on CNN, fittingly cinched somewhere between Seif Al-Islam Gaddafi’s notorious speech and the recent developments on the Libyan frontier. I stood transfixed in front of the TV screen for three minutes, but I didn’t know what news struck me to the core the most. Somewhere in between Gaga and “Gadda” –the former parading her claws on the runway, while the latter self-righteously flaunting his to the whole world – it suddenly hit me that fashion and politics are even more correlated than you could ever imagine. In the past 24 hours, John Galliano’s anti-Semitic proclamations had made it to “breaking news,” and so did Christophe Decarnin’s disappearance at his show for Balmain after allegedly checking himself in to a mental institution. Needless to say, Galliano was dismissed from Dior, and Decarnin from Balmain. It was a “chic” shock – sans the grotesque and bloody package of your average news story - but still has all the ingredients that make it eligible to infiltrate your home and shake your very well being. The fact that such stories warrants that amount of exposure during prime time at a powerful news agency, in the midst of all the turmoil around the world, shows that the word “fashion” is only sugarcoating for a political scheme. The big fashion corporations are playing a game of Monopoly; they are ruthlessly taking acquisition of everything on the board, and they are willing to bend the rules in their conquest. No one cares about the butler in the hotel, or the poor worker on the railroads. They can even take hold of your name. Because fashion as we know it is no longer regarded as a form of fine art; it is a business that has its roots deeply planted in the political mud. Only the pure, creative minds can lift it up. There has been a major shift in the system over the past couple of months alone, yet someday they will hold the system together. But until that day comes, we will have our shares of “chic” shocks.

Mr.B & Candy*


NEWSLETTER

How would you like to venture into a garage turned pop-up shop to customize a 2.55 Chanel bag by a famous artist courtesy of Colette? Launched during Paris Fashion Week, the joint store of these two French giants helped make the absurd look avant-garde. But success is inevitable when the timeless Chanel and modern Colette put their “C” into “cool.”

Known for its successful collaborations, Swatch teamed up with America’s bad boy of fashion, Jeremy Scott, on a limited edition range of watches. Famous for his ability to execute iconic pop designs for Adidas as well as other high street brands, Scott’s acute creative flair and understanding of varied brand identities echo through the designs for the classic Swiss brand. Available in three models at selective Swatch branches and Colette in Paris.

Leopard print… Red leopard print… Red leopard print on Naomi Campbell. Dolce & Gabbana have definitely gone wild for their Animalier eyewear collection. Shot by fashion photography’s darlings, Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott, the ad campaign features the gorgeous supermodel against a Mediterranean background. With an enticing range of colors, Animalier is set to make waves in the luxury market.


The literatis and glitteratis of Beirut City can now mingle over lunch or dinner in one trendy spot! Nestled in Charles Malek Street in Achrafieh, the newly opened State 11 is home to PLASTIK*s exclusive library – a selection of art and design books that have won our stamp of approval and have been previously featured in LE MUST Read section. Sit back and enjoy PLASTIK*’s reading variety, while devouring State 11’s worldclass plates. With books on Yves Saint Laurent, Coco Chanel, and Madonna, there is no more need to worry about a “dining-alone-armor!”

Housed in a 20th century building in the lavish Opera district, the newly refurbished Hotel Banke brings Catalonian charm to the heart of Paris. A new member of the luxury Spanish hotel chain, The Derby Collection, the four-star hotel fuses the avant-garde vision of architects Paul Fresse and Cassien Bernard with a classic belle époque allure. The hotel hosts 93 guestrooms, 2 Spanish restaurants, and a bar featuring a transparent “Ghost” stool courtesy of Phillipe Starck and smoke-blackened wood seats designed by Maarten Baas.

Based on the popular 1994 film Priscilla Queen of the Desert, the Queen of Broadway is a musical adaptation of pure entertainment value. The glitzy London production would not have made it to Broadway in 2011 if it were not for Bette Midler. It is “the” feel good show to watch, one big party set on a theater stage with incredible costumes and pump-up-your-heart disco tunes! This is the journey of three drag queens traveling across Australia and the importance of true friendship beneath all the “sequins.”


Christian Lacroix’s life story has been captured by Camilla Morton as a fashion fairy tale; a magical “once upon a time” that will be the first in a series of designer autobiographies-turned-fairytale stories, all written by Morton and designed by the featured fashion royalty. Illustrated by Mr. Lacroix himself, Christian Lacroix and the Tale of Sleeping Beauty is published by HarperCollins and is sold at Amazon.com.

The Disney Dream Portraits, which launched around four years ago, features celebrities transformed into iconic Disney characters, shot by renowned photographer Annie Leibovitz. The latest three portraits are the only new images since 2009 as well as the first to include famous Disney villains. This year’s big Hollywood names are Olivia Wilde and Alec Baldwin in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Penelope Cruz and Jeff Bridges as Beauty and the Beast, and finally Queen Latifah as Ursula from The Little Mermaid.

Karl Lagerfeld’s dysfunctional relationship with Diet Coke has taken another creative turn. Rumored to have shed 90 pounds following a stewed vegetables and Diet Coke diet, Lagerfeld collaborated with the beverage giant for a second round of limited edition bottle designs, all featuring his distinctive pony-tailed silhouette. The designs were inspired by three marionettes with an ad campaign starring models Coco Rocha, Jeneil Williams and Heidi Mount. The bottles are due to hit stores in June 2011.


With help from Nike, the official sponsor of the national French team, The Away Project opened with the launch of French Football Federation’s (FFF) new Away Kit, Nike’s most environmentally sustainable kit yet. Hosted by Parisian boutique Colette, the unique in-store expo offers limited numbers of iconic items from some of the world’s most elite brands. All items are made exclusively to match the FFF’s mariniere-inspired Away Kit stripes, which were photographed for the first time by Karl Lagerfeld himself.

Hussein Chalayan could very well be a costume designer for futuristic movies who is always on the film set of some far away galaxy. Fortunately, he is a modern fashion designer that brings a touch of timeless practicality to everything he creates and lives on planet earth. This year, he has collaborated with the German sportswear brand Puma for their Spring/Summer 2011 season; Chalayan’s modern signature can be seen in the new outerwear and bag collections.

In 1963, Andy Warhol named one of his most iconic paintings LIZ #5, after the legendary screen siren Elizabeth Taylor, who recently passed away at the age of 79. Depicting the last of Hollywood legends, the stunning painting is estimated at $20-$30 million and will be offered for sale at the Contemporary Art Part 1 auction on May 12 in New York City, as announced by Philips de Pury & Company.

Another elegant campaign lensed by Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott is Talbot’s Spring 2011 collection, featuring the famous American actress, Julianne Moore. Shot in a greenhouse, the ads sensually capture what the 60-year-old brand wants to be currently perceived: “transformed tradition.” Moore’s modern yet ethereal beauty is just the fit for the collection’s soft classical silhouettes that makes Tablot’s traditional essence relevant to today’s confident woman.


44

PLASTIK* NEWSLETTER

The latest collaboration between Reebok and Emporio Armani puts an end to the myth that one has to suffer to be in fashion. Featuring the new EA7 ZigLace for women and EA7 ZigPump for men, the partnership highlights the Zig absorbing technology and incorporates fluidity and functionality with highend style. The new limited edition range is second in line between the sportswear brand and the Italian luxury label; following last winter’s EA7 active wear collection. Available in selective Reebok and Emporio Armani stores worldwide.

The new “piccola principessa” (little princess) of Dolce & Gabbana is non-other than Kylie Minogue. For her global 2011 Les Folies Tour, the fashion duo especially designed an outstanding and flexible stage wardrobe that highlights the Aussie singer’s curves as well as the fashion house’s legendary pieces. Les Folies celebrates the long-term friendship Minogue and the Italian designer duo share, leaving us eager to see a not-to-be missed, pop-fashion heritage display.

Sofia Vergara’s career was launched by Pepsi 20 years ago, and this year, the beverage company has cemented her success. The Modern Family star is the face of 2011’s advertising campaign for the new Diet Pepsi Skinny can, flaunting a blue halter neck while part of her face is concealed under a large blue hat. Even though there have been some allegations of digitally minimizing Vergara’s curves – which she denies –the Colombian star’s complexions set against the iconic blue and red tones ooze timeless glamour.


This one is a bit intense, since it brings together several power names and iconic products to celebrate Ken’s 50th Anniversary. The collaboration sees the hand-crafted American man doll back to its 1960’s classical look and encased in the Japanese iconic Chogokin robot suit, “CHOGO-Ken!” The limited edition collection, of just 25 pieces, is sold exclusively at Colette in Paris and each has AMBUSH’s signature “POW!” as one of its fists. On the second day of celebration, Carri Munden also launched Cassette Playa x Ken collection.

Vogue House hosted the opening of the first Condé Nast shop on George Street, London. Finally, fashion photography lovers can enjoy a selection of 140-something glossy international magazines all in one store. The new Worldwide News store, with its shiny yellow floor offers the latest issues of Italian, Brazilian, Japanese, Greek, Spanish and German Vogue, amongst other titles, all displayed together with screens, books and iPads for a maximum viewing pleasure.

Both redheads, both pro-curves, and instantly recognizable! Dame Vivienne Westwood found in Christina Hendricks, star of the TV series Mad Men, the perfect face for her Get A Life palladium jewellery collection. The campaign images, styled by Westwood herself, show Hendricks with an “Oak Leaf Tiara” and a “Pagan Heart” necklace. Inspired by nature, the limited edition line is crafted from palladium, a naturally white precious metal that sparkles under light and maintains its shape and color over time.


BEAUTY

As the face of Bvlgari’s newest fragrance, Mon Jasmin Noir, Kirsten Dunst is photographed at Villa Ballbianello, in Italy’s Lake Como Region by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott. The Marie Antoinette star finds herself the heroine of yet another magical kingdom, when a 16th century Italian garden is immersed in warm amber light and transformed into an ethereal Mediterranean Eden where lions and princesses coexist. The campaign captures the soft elegance of Bvlgari’s feminine perfume. We cannot wait to discover the new scent, set for worldwide release in April 2011.

It is no secret that 2011 is Tom Ford’s comeback year. The Neroli Portofino collection for bath soap and beauty products are the accessories to take on this summer’s getaway. With its vibrant mixture of citrus, florals and amber, Ford’s bottle of body oil is just the right finish for this exquisite bath collection. The range will be available in the region this August. Let the summer begin!

The full length Dior Addict Lipstick video, directed by Jonas Ackerlund and featuring Kate Moss, is finally out! With the cameras rolling to Duran Duran’s soundtrack, we see Moss at the Spring/Summer 2010 Dior show but we do not see Galliano who is said to have inspired the new fabulous and shiny lipstick line. One thing is for certain, she is indisputably gorgeous and all lipstick devotees will plead her case if the Addict collection sees her back in rehab.


Christmas came early this year and in the shape of a red Sephora box with a “Gleetastic” treatment. Inspired by the Emmy Award-winning, Fox television series Glee, the range of nail polish colors includes a shade for every vocal note, with each shade named after the show’s characters. Now “Gleeks” everywhere will be able to mix’n’match and create a distinctive look with this limited edition range- they can even get their own polka dot nail stickers!

Is it a woman’s dream? A male fantasy? The latest Coco Mademoiselle ad is both. Keira Knightley and the director of Atonement team up again for Chanel and take us on a motorcycle ride through Paris. In this TV spot, the 25-year-old actress dons a cream jumpsuit and seduces the photographer in charge of her photoshoot, only to leave him craving more as she slides out the window while he confidently goes to lock the door. The cat did not get the cream and Knightley drives off with only her perfume bottle close to her heart.

Juicy, sweet and everything nice! No, it is not the “Power Puff” girls, it is the latest Lancome limited edition line of mini Juicy Tubes, designed by famous Japanese visual designer Yayoi Kusama. Pucker up this summer with these eco-friendly packaged, 100% naturally flavored, yummy lip glosses. The design is nature inspired and the formula includes honey and shea butter to nourish and hydrate your lips; whether you choose hazelnut cacao, apricot, honey, raspberry, vanilla or grapefruit.


W HOTEL LONDON HAIDER ACKERMANN MR PORTER HERMÈS HOME


50

W Hotel London

IK* LIST TRAVELN

Situated in London’s busiest entertainment scene and multi-cultural hub, the 40th hotel in the W brand has now opened its doors to visitors for a world of infinite “Wonders.” The W Hotel London has taken over a 10-storey building in Leicester Square at the heart of Soho’s West End, an area that has long attracted tourists from all over the world to its trendy restaurants, grand theaters and bohemian art scene. Developed by McAleer & Rushe, the modern structure has an entire glass façade that changes color depending on the city’s mood, time of day, or events taking place inside the hotel. The hotel marks a new venture in the history of the chain famed for introducing state-of-the-art programming and a buzzing ambience to the hospitality industry. Deriving from the brand’s unique vision, the W London aims to follow in the footsteps of its New York counterpart in leading a cosmopolitan jet-set party scene through hosting an exclusive selection of international restaurants and bars. Aside from being in the epicenter of Asian eateries and thriving nightlife, the W London is home to the hip Wyld bar and the renowned Spice Market, a signature restaurant by Michelin-winning chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten. A day at the hotel’s AWAY spa with full-on body treatments helps you achieve a much-needed detox from the night before. If you fancy a laidback movie night with your friends, you may book the Screening Room for a private 3-D experience with enough seating for 38 guests. Or, you might as well just sit back and unwind in one of its 172 rooms, 17 suites, 3 WOW suites, and Extremely WOW suite. Whatever you may need, whenever the time, the W London team makes sure your “Wish” comes on top of their list.


51

Haider Ackermann

Haider Ackermann S/S 2011

IK* LIST FASHION

When Karl Lagerfeld named Haider Ackermann as his potential successor at Chanel, fashion editors everywhere from Shanghai to New York watched the Colombian-born designer with an eagle eye. With the Kaiser’s blessings, Ackermann jumped to the top of fashion hierarchy almost overnight. His latest spring/ summer presentation in Paris was like a symphony that carefully played on the chords of understated seduction. It is as though he delivered exactly what the jaded critics have long missed and awaited since the glory days of Tom Ford – drama! An emotionally charged show accentuated with a collection of high-octane glamour. To Ackermann, fashion is a game of “opposites attract.” Motorbike leather juxtaposed with draped silk gowns, razor-sharp jackets with loose satin folds underneath, and charcoal shades of black contrasting with bright yellows, purples, and reds. As one outfit goes, its alter ego shows up in another. But it is Ackermann’s craftsmanship and old notions of design that made him the latest darling of the fashion world. Like a master of disguise, he drapes in such a way that one wonders whether his clothes are pulled together with some concealed strings or pure gravity. A skill that perhaps flourished over time from training at Antwerp’s Royal Academy and interning at John Galliano back in 1994. Last year, Ackermann added a line for menswear to his modest fashion empire. Despite a bed of roses courtesy of Chanel, he still has a lot more to say. And this is his moment.


52

Fashion – a word that has long struggled to be part of the heterosexual man’s vocabulary – has now given up to its male-friendly cousin. “I think men feel more comfortable with the word style,” says Jeremy Langmead, editor in chief of Mr Porter, the first global on-line shopping destination for men. Following the revolutionary success of Net-A-Porter.com, “e-ntrepreneur” Natalie Massenet has applied her business savvy to the infamously tough market of menswear, making shopping a fun experience to the modern-day dandy. And she knows that it is nearly impossible to join the words “shopping” and “fun” in the same sentence and try to sell it to men. With a click of a button, you can now get the tailor-made suit you have always been dreaming of delivered to your door, without stepping foot in Savile Row. Burberry, Gucci, Ralph Lauren, Dunhill, Valextra, and John Lobb are just a few of the wide range of globally renowned luxury labels offered on the site. Each week, an in-house team of menswear experts and international editors provide online browsers with new contents in style advice, trend highlights, interviews, and videos. And in case you are too busy catching up with the Premiere League, a team of personal shoppers is also available on the site to put together a whole new wardrobe for you. Launched in February, Mr Porter is set to ship to over 170 countries, while maintaining the exceptional customer service at the top of the brand’s ethos. But Massenet has her eyes on another type of clientele. “(Mr Porter) will not only be a grown-up, masculine and accessible retail destination for men,” she says. “It will also be an environment that women will enjoy using, and find inspiring, when shopping for the men in their lives – whether it be a husband, boyfriend, son or friend.” Get your credit cards out, ladies!

Mr Porter

IK* LIST E-COMMERCEN


53

Hermès Home

IK* LIST INTERIOR

In a bid to turn back the clock on Jean Michel Frank’s most iconic works, French luxury house Hermès has collaborated with the family of the deceased furniture designer on a new range of products in home furnishing. Despite leading a tragic life ending with his suicide in 1941, Frank’s signature clean lines and minimalist approach epitomized interior spaces in 1930’s Paris. Since his original pieces are nearly impossible to be found today, Hermès reissued Frank’s timeless designs in efforts to appeal to a new clientele. In a marriage of ethos – Frank’s attention to detail and the luxury craftsmanship of the Hermès brand – the collection features rugs, wallpaper, furnishing textiles, and other home units of lavish yet practical qualities. Frank’s trademark chair with a padded seat has been reinterpreted in oak and calfskin leather, while his famous three-drawer boudoir hosts a swanky goatskin lining. The joint venture has “home” written all over it; from the five generations in the Hermès family tree to the great heritage of the Franks, this is no doubt a “family affair” at its outmost. The Hermès- Jean Michel Frank Home Collection is now displayed at Hermès flagship store in New York’s Madison Avenue.


54

PHOTOGRAPHY

STREET PHOTOGRAPHY

WHILE STREET PHOTOGRAPHY HAS NEVER REALLY GONE, IT SEEMS TO BE EN VOGUE THESE DAYS. BRITAIN THIS YEAR STAGES NO LESS THAN FIVE MAJOR EXHIBITIONS DEDICATED TO THE GENRE, WHICH PROMPTED ONE CRITIC TO SAY “SOMETHING IS VERY CLEARLY IN THE AIR.” FOR THAT REASON, THIS SPECIAL SECTION PRESENTS TO YOU AN INTRODUCTION TO THE GENRE, “LONDON CALLING,” AND A SELECTION OF TEN MASTERS OF THE GENRE.


Š Elliott Erwitt


FASHION TAKEN OFF GUARD

56

PHOTOGRAPHY

It is a hard to define street photography. First of all, it does not simply refer to photos of streets or the outdoors. Street photographers may very well operate in, say, a bar or train. Photography in public spaces would be a better way of putting it, although that is a bit of a tongue breaker, while street photographers could very well operate within a home. They could also do portraits. Then again, street photography is often understood to deal with the real. It documents daily life. That is largely true, given one does not forget that reality lies in the eye of the beholder, and in the hands of the one holding the camera. It is his or her angle that produces a take on reality. Zoom in, zoom out, and the world becomes quite a different place indeed. Also, every viewer will interpret an image in his own way. Hence, the famous American landscape photographer Ansel Adams once said: “There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer.” Nevertheless, one could say that street photography generally deals with seemingly ordinary events, while photo journalism, which shares similarities in technique and approach, primarily focuses on extra-ordinary (news worthy) events such as a flood, a war or electoral campaign. Good street photography, like any good photography, will only make a lasting impression if the image expresses more than just the moment and touches us on a deeper level. The moment should define an era, evoke an emotion, hint at a mystery, or just produce a smile.

Take Robert Doisneau’s image of a couple looking at a painting that is not visible to the viewer. The woman’s expression and gesture signals she is explaining something about the art work to her husband. He seems to be listening, yet his eyes are firmly fixed on the painting next to her, that of a well-shaped nude. It is his eyes, and his eyes only, that make the image. Perhaps the only thing we can say about street photography is that, in contrast to portraiture or fashion photography, it is not staged or orchestrated. Yet even that is not completely true, as some photo journalists admitted to, that at times, they have given “reality” a helping hand. Even Doisneau’s famous Kiss, one of the 20th century’s most iconic images, was not an entirely spontaneous affair. Finally, there is the role of the street photographer who will generally aim to operate unnoticed, candidly, as if just another member of the crowd. To go about unnoticed, Cartier Bresson would wrap his Leica in black tape. It is not for nothing that Joel Meyerowitz and Colin Westerbeck’s 1994 book on the history of street photography was called Bystander. “For the most part,” they write, “the photographers discussed in these pages have tried to work without being noticed they have taken pictures of people who are going about their business unaware of the photographer’s presence. They have made candid pictures of everyday life in the street. That, at its core, is what street photography is.” That sounds straightforward enough, or not? “The street might be a crowded boulevard or a country lane, a park in the city or a boardwalk at the beach, a lively cafe or a deserted hallway in a tenement, or even a subway car or the lobby of a theater,” they continued. “It is any public place where a photographer could take pictures of subjects who were unknown to him and, whenever possible, unconscious of his presence.” Peter Speetjens

At first sight, fashion and street photography could not seem further apart. The latter celebrates the spontaneous and features every day people, while the former stages a scene and does so with the world’s most beautiful people. Yet even here, boundaries are fluid. Richard Avedon, for one, would portray his models in the casual setting of a park or Paris café. Lately, several web blogs have grown popular by presenting fashion in a “street” manner, away from the glitz and glamour.

THE BLOGGERS

© Jack & Jil

“GOOD STREET PHOTOGRAPHY, LIKE ANY GOOD PHOTOGRAPHY, WILL ONLY MAKE A LASTING IMPRESSION IF THE IMAGE EXPRESSES MORE THAN JUST THE MOMENT AND TOUCHES US ON A DEEPER LEVEL.”

© Richard Avedon

STREET PHOTOGRAPHY

Jak & Jil, for example, captures models and fashion insiders off the catwalk. Jak & Jil is in fact one man, the young Toronto-based Tommy Tom, a style watcher with a passion for shoes. “I started taking posed photos but then it became really competitive outside the shows to get someone to stop for you and to make sure the background was nice etc,” he once said. “So I just started snapping away rather than setting up a shot, and found capturing my subjects in motion more interesting.” The Sartorialist has been doing something similar since 2005. He photographs models on the catwalk, their audience, as well as just about anyone and anything stylish he finds on the streets of New York. His street and off-stage images offer a more humane face to the fashion world. “When I worked in the fashion industry, I always felt that there was a disconnect between what I was selling in the showroom and what I was seeing real people, really cool people, wearing in real life,” he wrote on his site. “I thought I could shoot people on the street the way designers looked at people, and get and give inspiration to lots of people. My only strategy when I began was to try and shoot style in a way that I knew most designers hunted for inspiration. Rarely do they look at the whole outfit as a yes or no, but they try and look for the abstract concepts of color, proportion, pattern mixing or mixed genres.”


© Elliott Erwitt

© Norman Parkinson

© William Klein

© Robert Frank

© Norman Parkinson

© Elliott Erwitt


10 STREET PHOTOGRAPHERS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT 1. HENRI CARTIER BRESSON

Known as the father of street photography and photo journalism, Cartier Bresson was a true master who always managed to capture the poetic within the mundane. He traveled all over the world with his 35mm Leica, although some of his most iconic images were simply taken back home in France. Take the man jumping over water or the family picnic along the river. In 1948, he and Robert Capa founded the Magnum photo agency, the most prestigious and exclusive photographers club in the world.

2. AUGUST SANDER

3. WILLIAM KLEIN

Born in 1928, Klein is an American photographer who lived most of his life in Paris. He produced, among many other photos, the amazing image of the young boy who, with a face filled with hatred, points his (toy) gun into Klein’s lens. Most of Klein’s work however, has a more ironic touch. Even his fashion photography. The irony returned in the films he would produce, such as Mr. Freedom and Who Are You, Polly Maggoo?

5. ELLIOTT ERWITT

“For life-like snaps” it reads on Erwitt’s website. Born in Paris in 1928, and a proud Magnum member, Erwitt is a master of his craft. He does everything from landscapes to advertisement and portraits, but is particularly known for his eye for the ironic and absurd. Take his portrait of two English bulldogs, three men in tutus standing at the bar, or that of the old man holding up a sign that calls for women to cover their knees, to the amusement of the crowd around him. Simple, touching, and to the point.

6. LISETTE MODEL

4. ROBERT FRANK

This German photographer aimed to photograph the “man of the 20th century.” “I am not concerned with providing commonplace photographs like those made in the finer large-scale studios of the city, but simple, natural portraits that show the subjects in an environment corresponding to their own individuality,” he said. And so he took his bicycle and pictured people in and around his hometown. His book Face of Our Time saw the light in 1929, but was banned shortly after when the Nazis came to power. Sander’s take on reality did not quite match the Nazis’ belief in racial superiority.

Born in Switzerland, Frank lived most of his life in the US. He shot to fame with his 1950s book The Americans. For two years he traveled through America. He took 28,000 photos, of which eventually 83 were published. The result was direct, hard-hitting, and often hinted at social issues simmering lying underneath the seemingly smooth surface. The American Dream at that time was by and large a whitesonly affair. His book was a rupture with the conventional photography codes of that time. Walter Evans and Garry Winogrand are other greats from the same era.

“Photograph with your guts,” was the famous line Model taught her many students, among whom Diane Arbus, Larry Fink and Bruce Weber. And beware of routine! “Routine makes us blind to the majority of images around us,” she said. Born in Vienna, Model lived most of her life in New York where she became known for her images of jazz musicians, shoppers, and sun worshippers at Coney Island.


9. VIVIAN MAIER

STORY OF A KISS © Robert Doisneau; Kiss by Hotel de Ville.

7. DIANE ARBUS

Vivian Maier is a special case. Her work was largely unknown until 2007 when 26-year-old John Maloof discovered her legacy of hundreds of thousands of photos tucked away in boxes. When Maier was not working as a nanny, she walked the streets of Chicago and New York and took photos of streets, shoppers, kids, maids and the marginalized. A book on her life and work is set to come out this year, and a documentary film next year.

10. MARTIN PARR

A FASHION MOMENT

8. NICK TURPIN

Born in Britain in 1969, Turpin is one of the genre’s leading representatives today. Mainly working in color, he is direct and witty. See for example his photos of two women shaking hands with a painting, the shadow of a plane flying into an airline office, or simply the two construction workers (in uniform) crossing the path of two bankers (in uniform). Turpin is a member of the street photographers collective IN-PUBLIC.

The young lovers were in fact Françoise Delbart and Jacques Carteaud. Doisneau had seen them kissing but did not dare picture them. He was shy. He asked them if they could kiss again and then took the image. In a 2005 interview, Francoise said: “We didn’t mind. We were used to kissing. We were doing it all the time then. Monsieur Doisneau was adorable, very low key, very relaxed.”

One of the few street photographers who almost entirely works in color. British photographer, and Magnum member, Martin Parr relentlessly exposes the not so beautiful side of our modern consumer society. The result is often ironic. Like the best photographers in the genre, Parr has an eye for what most people overlook. So, he pictured (disgusting-looking) British food, beaches, fast food restaurants and the ultra rich. Parr is also a collector of the absurd, such as Saddam Hussein watches and 1950s British postcards. Parr in two words? Subtle irony.

Anna Dello Russo

Arbus is not strictly a street photographer, yet we included her because she focused on a reality people often prefer to ignore. Arbus became famous with her portraits of dwarfs, transvestites, nudists and the mentally handicapped. One famous image shows two twin girls that seem to have just escaped from The Addams Family. Another shows a giant man standing next to his parents who are half his size. Arbus committed suicide at the age of 48. A year later, in 1972, she became the first American photographer featured at the Venice Biennale. In 2006, Nicole Kidman played Arbus in a film on her life.

Robert Doisneau produced one of the most iconic images of the 20th century, Kiss by the Hotel de Ville, showing a young couple in a passionate embrace. The lovers’ identities remained a mystery until 1992. Jean and Denise Lavergne were sure it was them in the picture and promptly sued Doisneau for having taken (and sold!) their portrait without permission. Doisneau had never wanted to say who was in the photo, but in court was forced to reveal the truth.

In a recent statement, Vogue Nippon’s Editorat-large Anna Dello Russo claims that she owes her fame to street-style photographers like Tommy Ton and Scott Schuman. “They made me. They made a new career.”


60

PHOTOGRAPHY

© C Wolfgang Suschitzky, Courtesy Museum of London(1).

STREET PHOTOGRAPHY

LONDON CALLING

Street photography is all en vogue this year in Britain, as no less than five major exhibitions are dedicated to the genre. The Museum of London, for example, hosts a major exhibition featuring the British capital, showing over 200 candid images of everyday life through the ages: from sepia-toned scenes of horse-drawn cabs to 21st century Londoners caught digitally on closed circuit security cameras. London is after all the city with the most CCTV cameras per square meter on earth. “All images contain an element of chance, which is a defining characteristic of street photography,” said the exhibition’s curator. “Whether it is a fleeting expression, a brief encounter or a momentary juxtaposition, every piece has a sense of spontaneity and movement.” The Museum of London exhibition is only one of five venues examining street photography. This year’s FORMAT festival is dedicated to the genre, while the National Portrait Gallery features a retrospective of the work of the London-based German photographer Emil Otto Hoppé (1878 – 1972), who is said to be one of the most important photographers of the early 20th century. The gallery not only shows a selection of his most famous portraits, but also his studies of everyday people, from street musicians and circus performers to bus drivers and postmen, who lived and worked in England between the two great wars. The National Media Museum features Daniel Meadows, one of the founding fathers of the 1970s “new documentary movement.” Paul Trevor’s take on 1970s Liverpool will be on display at the Walker Gallery, while the London Whitechapel Gallery offers a retrospective of Paul Graham, who could be called “a (critical) chronicler of modernity.”


63

TV SERIES MAD MEN

AFTER TRAVELLING BACK TO THE LATE 1950S AND EARLY 60S WITH AMERICAN TELEVISION SERIES MAD MEN, WE ARE LEFT WONDERING IF, IN THE LAST 50 YEARS, MUCH HAS CHANGED EXCEPT THE FASHIONS. PERHAPS TIME TRAVEL IS MERELY A MATTER OF DIFFERENT CULTURES EVOLVING AT VARYING SPEEDS AND CAN BE ACHIEVED IN MUCH SIMPLER WAYS THAN STAR TREK MADE US BELIEVE. WITH A LONG DELAYED SEASON 5 DUE TO AIR IN 2012, WE REVISIT THE MAD MEN WORLD WITH WHAT SANITY IS LEFT.


65

TV SERIES MAD MEN

“TO THE EXCEPTION OF WORKPLACE ALCOHOLISM AND RELUCTANT HOMOSEXUALITY, IT MIGHT AS WELL BE A MODERN DAY BEIRUT. ” Mad Men amassed critical acclaim for its accurate depiction of certain aspects of American culture and society in the early sixties, receiving three consecutive Emmy Awards for Outstanding Drama Series; a first of its kind win for a basic cable series. Indoor chain-smoking, office festive drinking, sexist banter, early signs of feminism, adultery as male entitlement, racism as a given, anti-Semitism as an option and homosexuality peeking through the closet. To the exception of workplace alcoholism and reluctant homosexuality, it might as well be a modern day Beirut. Set in the fictional Sterling Cooper advertising agency on Madison Avenue in New York City, Mad Men is mainly focused on Don Draper (Jon Hamm), the agency’s creative director, and his rich entourage of characters, in and out of the office. Ranging from the weak macho men to the suppressed alpha women, it is a perfect cast of human contradictions interacting with disintegrating order prior to the 1960s sexual and social revolution. One of the most eccentric characters is Bertram “Bert” Cooper (Robert Morse), the senior partner at Sterling Cooper. Even though he is mostly known for walking around the office in his socks due to a fascination with Japanese culture, it is his nonwomanizing ways and intense dislike of smoking, in an era when a cigarette was considered a bodily extension, which truly sets him apart. In the fourth season, it was suggested that Bert, a childless widower, had suffered a war injury that left him, well, ball-less. Mad Men hence leaves us with a not-so-subliminal association between excessive smoking, excessive womanizing and testosterone levels.


“MAD MEN LEAVES US WITH A NOTSO-SUBLIMINAL ASSOCIATION BETWEEN EXCESSIVE SMOKING, EXCESSIVE WOMANIZING AND TESTOSTERONE LEVELS.” Flip the coin and one finds Roger Sterling (John Slattery), the other senior partner and the Cooper’s opposite. Notorious for his excesses, he only decides to cut down on women after suffering two related heart attacks, yet he keeps setting the benchmark when it comes to alcohol and cigarettes. A record only challenged by his once protégée

and main protagonist, Draper, to whom he had initially offered a break into the advertising industry. The series imitates life and hence naturally the student surpasses the teacher. Throughout the last four seasons, the cameras focus mostly on Draper’s adventures as he steers his way through numerous female curves and dramatic liaisons, making him the maddest man in Mad Men. Yet, one is left wondering who is madder, Don Draper or his women? Betty – soon to be ex-wife – is meant to be the leading lady of his heart, but their road to relationship oblivion was paved by her husband’s bad intentions. She was willing to attempt to forgive his infidelities due to a third seed of love; however she filed for divorce after Draper’s attempt to bring them closer by confessing he took over his lieutenant’s identity in Korea after the latter’s death in battle. Even though it was an unexpected decision for a married woman with three children during the still conservative years of America’s early 1960s, it seems she was more able to process a devious present over a shadowy past. Clearly, Don is at fault for lying about his past as well as his present, but there is an aloofness about Betty that leaves us confused as to who to favor, especially with Don unfolding from the self-gratifying, emotionally unavailable allmale, into a self-victimizing vulnerable man. Draper’s real name is Dick Whitman; pun

intended or not, one of the rare women he did not sexually conquer and emotionally divide is non-other than his lieutenant’s widow, Anna Draper, who was actually the first person in his life to embrace his dual identity and become a source of emotional support. Another source of platonic, and in this case professional, support is Peggy Olson (Elisabeth Moss), one of his former secretaries who rose to copywriter status on her own merits, by being unattractive and lucky enough to be noticed for her writing assets in a world of eye-catching secretaries. But it was Megan Calvet (Jessica Paré), another of his former secretaries, who hit the jackpot – or some might argue, is the jackpot. The French-Canadian daughter of a McGill university professor, beautiful and intelligent, neither forcefully ambitious nor too pushy, and definitely warm enough to wrap the fourth season with a ring on her finger and a sweet “I love you.” Perhaps his ability to finally open up physically as well as emotionally, to the same woman, is due to losing Anna Draper to cancer and Betty to reality, which created an emotional as well as actual void and hence pushed him to recruit a new candidate; the queen(s) are dead, long live the queen. Or perhaps every amoral New Yorker is crazy enough to attempt a normal healthy relationship at one point or another. Either way, Mad Men is one of the most realistic portrayals of everyday madness which is life, where we are all perpetrators of causality and all its victims. Yasmine Hawwa


Season 4, Episode 7

Season 3, Episode 6

THE SUITCASE

GUY WALKS INTO AN ADVERTISING AGENCY

Season 3, Episode 13

Season 3, Episode 11

SHUT THE DOOR, HAVE A SEAT

THE GYPSY AND THE HOBO

Season 4, Episode 1

Season 1, Episode 12

PUBLIC RELATIONS

NIXON VS. KENNEDY

Season 4, Episode 6

Season 1, Episode 13

WALDORF STORIES

THE WHEEL

Season 2, Episode 13

Season 3, Episode 12

MEDITATIONS IN AN EMERGENCY

THE GROWN UPS


Season 4, Episode 12

Season 2, Episode 8

BLOWING SMOKE

A NIGHT TO REMEMBER

Season 4, Episode 5

Season 4, Episode 4

THE CHRYSANTHEMUM AND THE SWORD

THE REJECTED

Season 4, Episode 8

Season 4, Episode 9

THE SUMMER MAN

THE BEAUTIFUL GIRLS

Season 2, Episode 4

Season 1, Episode 8

THREE SUNDAYS

THE HOBO CODE

Season 3, Episode 7

Season 2, Episode 7

SEVEN TWENTY THREE

THE GOLD VIOLIN


READ YOUTUBE LINKS SEE HEAR PLAYLIST


70

MUST READ

SAVAGE BEAUTY ALEXANDER MCQUEEN Accompanying the Alexander McQueen retrospective currently on display at the New York Metropolitan, Savage Beauty will be released on May 31, 2011. Known as a fashion rebel, Britain’s most famous and influential designer tragically committed suicide last year. His work always aimed at challenging existing conventions. Focusing on some of his most iconic and acclaimed designs, this gorgeous publication examines McQueen’s narrative structures, courage and virtuosity in terms of tailoring and dressmaking, as well as his groundbreaking runway shows. The book also offers in-depth studies of six collections and an interview with Sarah Burton, the late designer’s former right-hand woman.

MM PERSONAL MARILYN MONROE They are regarded as the Dead Sea Scrolls for Marilyn Monroe scholars: two tall filing cabinets that the icon’s former manager, Inez Melson, filled with some 10,000 items as letters, telegrams, clippings, photos, contracts and even receipts, which offers an interesting view on the labels Marilyn used to buy. A selection of the cabinets has now been edited by Lois Banner and photographed by Mark Anderson to produce MM Personal, offering a very accessible and private view on Marilyn’s life and career. Seeing the book’s many photographs, one is reminded of just how photogenic she was. Her poetry is less impressive…


PHOTOGRAPHES A-Z HANS-MICHAEL KOETZLE There are many photography encyclopedias, yet few are as beautiful and complete as this one. Taschen offers an alphabetic and comprehensive overview of the most influential photographers of the 20th century, accompanied by some of their most famous monographs. From the early modernist to today, from Ansel Adams, Manuel Álvarez-Bravo and Nobuyoshi Araki to Robert Capa, Anton Corbijn and Robert Mapplethorpe, the book presents some 400 photographers, not only from North America and Europe, but also from Latin America, Africa, China and Japan, working in fashion, war or fine arts photography.

THE MORNINGDAVID AFTER DREBIN Sexy, urban and cinematic: that sums up the work of young photographer David Drebin, who seems a great fan of Helmut Newton, although he mainly shoots in color. Telling tales of lust and seduction, Drebin creates a world inhabited by gorgeous long-legged ladies against the backdrop of the world’s biggest cities, including New York, Rio, Hong Kong and Paris. The use of color, neon and big city lights adds to the overall sense of sensuality. A 1996 graduate of the Parsons School of Design in New York, David Drebin’s star as an international photographer has risen fast and furiously.


72

MUST HEAR

R.E.M Anyone who thought REM’s days were over, think again. With Collapse Into Now, the American band has issued its best record in a decade, whereby it not surprisingly returned to its roots, a mix of guitarbased up-tempo rock, ballads and, at times, quirky lyrics.

RADIOHEAD Not your usual kind of Radiohead record, but then again, what is your usual kind of Radiohead record? The album is a mix between true songs, like the danceable Lotus Flower, and sound experiments that are less easy to digest. Perhaps no In Rainbows, but definitely worth checking out!

DURAN DURAN The “prettiest boys in rock” are back, slightly older, with their 13th studio album: All You Need Is Now. Following their under-par 2007 Red Carpet Massacre, it is good to hear that producer Mick Ronson made them return to the “Rio” sound that made them world famous.

THE STROKES

LUPE FIASCO

ROXETTE

After a four-year-silence, New York indies The Strokes are back with Angles, a more than decent rock album, melodious, with at times a scent of punk. Weird: vocals and music were recorded separately from each other, as singer Julian Casablanca chose to go into seclusion.

The third studio album by American rapper Lupe Fiasco released in March debuted at No. 1 in the US album charts, yet it is hardly his best. A few good songs, but more mediocre ones, yet what to expect if the artist says he did not want to release the album. The studio did.

The Swedish rockers duo is back with their first album featuring all new material in 10 years, and thank God they are back. The album has received raving reviews and offers 12 snappy upbeat songs with raving guitars and rock’n’roll à la Joan Jett.


KITSUNÉ

GRUFF RHYS

JEFFERSON HACK

Twice a year it is time for Kitsune, as twice a year the French label issues a new compilation with songs from their and other labels. Brought to you former Daftpunk right hand man Gildas Loaëc and Mr. A(ndre), No. 11 offers you the latest in Paris cool.

Third solo album by Super Furry Animals singer Gruff Rhys and arguably his most complete to date. The title indirectly refers to his many days touring the world, a lifestyle reflected in the album which features ballads, samba sounds and a beautiful duet with Sweden’s El Parro Del Mar.

Our favorite Paris store asked Hack, the founder of Dazed & Confused and Another Magazine, to produce a wonderfully off-the-beaten track compilation album featuring among other artists: The Small Faces, Faithfull, James Brown and Bauhaus’ classic Bela Lugosi’s Dead.

MARIANNE FAITHFULL She released her debut single in 1964 and, despite the drug-infected 70s, is still going strong. Her 23rd solo album consists of 8 covers and 4 original songs, is a mix of soul, blues and country and was recorded in New Orleans with a core of famous and local musicians.

VARIOUS ARTISTS The second compilation album and collaboration between the British Fashion Council and Sony Music is compiled by the British designer Matthew Williamson, who brings you a mix of electro-pop, rock and soul. On the menu: Alicia Keys, Empire of The Sun, The Charlatans and much, much more.

CRAZY PENIS The British electronic rockers (today simply known as Crazy P) just released their latest album which is a great, sparkling remix of their 1999 A Nice Hot Bath With. Expect a layered mix of groovy soul, disco and house, and expect to start moving!


74

MUST SEE

INCENDIES DENIS VILLENEUVE

DO IT YOURSELF JEAN-MARIE AND LETMINA SZTALRYD

JULIAN ASSANGE: A MODERN DAY HERO? A.N.OTHER

Great award-winning film based on a Wajdi Mouawad play. Upon the final request of their recently passed away mother, twin siblings Jeanne and Simon travel back to the Middle East to look for the father they thought was dead and the brother they never knew existed. Along the way they will get to know their mother’s past.

Arte continues its exploration of the world of fashion with this documentary on Britain’s Dame Vivienne Westwood, sketching her childhood years, introducing her husband Andreas Kronthaler, activist philosophy and her credo that art and culture are the tools for an “Active Resistance to Propaganda.” Once a punk, always a punk.

Out in May, this long awaited portrait of the man behind Wikileaks promises to answer some questions many people have asked themselves. Not much is known yet about the film, which has given directing credits to “A. N.Other,” while the producer is known as “John Smith.”


PIET MONDRIAN ARTE

HEARTBEATS (LES AMOURS IMAGINAIRES) XAVIER DOLAN

ORGASM INC. LIZ CANNER

Filmed in a replica of his Paris studio, this docufiction film brings Mondrian back to life, retracing his development from an early realist to an increasingly abstract painter, as well as his mystical years and love for dance and jazz. Mondrian died in New York in 1944.

Sweet and amusing Canadian film about two friends, a boy and a girl, who fall in love with the same guy and develop a love triangle. The film is directed by young Xavier Dolan who is the man of the moment in Montreal and, plays one of the main roles.

No, this is not a self-help film, but a both shocking and hilarious documentary à la Food Inc. about a pharmaceutical company developing Viagra for women. Director Liz Canner worked for the firm and portrays a scrupulous medical industry trying to exploit “the ultimate moment” in search of billions.


TANIA SALEH - YA WLED

NOW AT MOMA HAHN-BIN

SOKO - TAKE MY HEART

FASHION POLICE BONUS RIDICULOUS GRAMMY GARB

LUXURY BAGS - PALATINA COLLECTION BY MARK-GIUSTI

BAZ LUHRMANN - EVERYBODY’S FREE

BRITNEY SPEARS HD 1080P “SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE (FULL SHOW 2002)” PART 2

JANUARY RED BY ELY KIM

ANDY WARHOL JAPANESE TDK AD

BRITNEY SPEARS - TILL THE WORLD ENDS

NATALIA KILLS - WONDERLAND (TRAILER)

LA NUIT DE L’HOMME PAR YVES SAINT LAURENT AVEC VINCENT CASSEL

RICO THE ZOMBIE EXCLUSIVE FOOTAGE FROM NIGHTLIFE.CA’S COVER STORY SHOOT

ARMANI CODE WOMAN WITH MEGAN FOX

INCENDIES TRAILER


GARETH PUGH PITTI 2011 - FILM BY RUTH HOGBEN

DIOR ADDICT LIPSTICK STARRING KATE MOSS [ NEW ]

THE BAG GUIDE | NET-A-PORTER.COM

GOLDEN GIRLS - MR. SANDMAN

VANESSA BRUNO MIRACLE

DÉFILÉ DIOR HOMMAGE AUX “PETITES MAINS”

BILL CUNNINGHAM NEW YORK TRAILER

CK ONE JEANS, UNDERWEAR, FRAGRANCE

NATALIE PORTMAN_S MISS DIOR CHÉRIE COMMERCIAL

SEVEN HENRIETTA STREET, A FILM BY KINGA BURZA FOR KATE SPADE NEW YORK

YSL SPRING-SUMMER 2011 CAMPAIGN VIDEO

BILLY ELLIOT EXPRESSING YOURSELF


80

PLAYLIST SERGE YARED

MAN IS A DOUBLE-NATURED ANIMAL AND THAT IS CERTAINLY TRUE FOR INCOMPETENTS FRONT MAN SERGE YARED, WHO IS A HEATING SYSTEMS SALESMAN BY DAY AND A DIE-HARD MUSIC MAN BY NIGHT. IF NOT OUT AND ABOUT WITH THE BAND, WHICH JUST RELEASED THEIR SECOND ALBUM I’M VERY IMPORTANT BACK HOME, HE SPINS HIS RECORDS AT DEMO, LEI OR WALIMAT. HIS PLAYLIST SEEMINGLY MIXES THE IMPOSSIBLE, FROM THE LEGENDARY GERMANY-BASED SOLDIER-ROCKERS THE MONKS TO A CLASSY MARLENE DIETRICH AND HIGH-PACED PUNK BY THE FALL. IF YOU WANT TO KEEP UP WITH THE LOCAL MUSIC SCENE, CHECK OUT SERGE AND FADI TABBAL’S GREEDY EARS SESSIONS AT WALIMAT. MANY A BAND DID THEIR FIRST-EVER PERFORMANCE THERE.


DISCO TEX & THE SEX-O-LETTES

JOHN GRANT

Get Dancing

Queen of Denmark

THE MONKS

THE HOUSEMARTINS

THE PYRAMIDS

HARRY “THE HIPSTER” GIBSON

MARLENE DIETRICH

GEORGES BRASSENS

Boys are Boys

Who Put the Benzedrine in Mrs. Murphy’s Ovaltine?”

THE VASELINES

Son of a Gun

MERCURY DANCE BAND

Happy Hours

Where Have All the Flowers Gone

Si Seulement elle était jolie

SMOKEY ROBINSON

SISTER ROSETTA THARPE

I Gotta Dance to Keep from Crying

JERRY LEE LEWIS

Kai Wawa

Good Golly Miss Molly (Live at the Star Club Hamburg)

DINAH WASHINGTON

STEPHEN JONES

Send me to the ‘lectric Chair

MARIAN ANDERSON

St. Matthew Passion BWV 24 -- Erbarme Dich

Can’t Leave Now

Cured of Sadness

DE LA SOUL

Me, Myself & I (Oblapos Mode)

Up Above my Head (I Hear Music in the Air)

OKKERVIL RIVER Mermaid

NEU!

E-Musik

THE BEATLES

Tell Me Why


Š Captain America


83

SPECIAL FEATURE MARVEL COMICS

WITH THOR AND CAPTAIN AMERICA COMING TO A CINEMA NEAR YOU IN THE UPCOMING MONTHS, HOLLYWOOD OPENS A WHOLE NEW TIN OF SUPERHEROES THAT WILL BE ABLE TO FILL YOUR COMIC BOOK HUNGER FOR DECADES TO COME. WITH THE INTRODUCTION OF THESE CHARACTERS, THE STAGE HAS BEEN SET FOR THE AVENGERS, FEATURING THE WORLD’S LEADING SUPERHERO COLLECTIVE. THE FILM IS DUE TO COME OUT IN 2012. AFTER THAT THE POSSIBILITIES OF MILKING MARVEL’S UNIVERSE ARE SEEMINGLY ENDLESS. AND, AS IF THAT IS NOT ENOUGH, THE NEXT X-MEN WILL BE OUT IN JUNE.


Captain America

“THERE ARE MEN SO GODLIKE, SO EXCEPTIONAL, THAT THEY NATURALLY, BY RIGHT OF THEIR EXTRAORDINARY GIFTS, TRANSCEND ALL MORAL JUDGMENT OR CONSTITUTIONAL CONTROL. THERE IS NO LAW WHICH EMBRACES MEN OF THAT CALIBER. THEY ARE THEMSELVES LAW”

The journey towards a marvellous summer ahead starts in May when the mighty Thor will finally appear in cinema format. Like most of Marvel’s leading heroes he was first introduced in the 1960s, the Golden Age of American comic book art. Yet Thor has a distinct character, as he directly links Marvel Universe to the ancient myths and legends of Scandinavia. Before Christianity had its way, northern Europe was ruled by a pantheon of Gods and half-Gods, much the same way as Greece. In the north, they did not live on Olympus, but in Asgard, and the Upper Lord is not called Zeus but Odin. Different names, but largely the same game of intrigue, love affairs, power struggles and heroism. Really, the divine world seemed so much more interesting before the arrival of the Ten Commandments. The Gods in their heavenly realm were like puppet masters, constantly interfering in Earthly affairs, either to further their own interests or just out of boredom. Reading about the many adventures at Asgard or Olympus is like watching a TV soap series à la Dallas or Dynasty with a touch of violence and the supernatural.

Back to Thor, the son of Odin and Mother Earth Gaia, Prince of Asgard and the Germanic God of Thunder. In Marvel’s adaptation of the deity, and Kenneth Brannagh’s upcoming film, Thor is a blond-haired muscleman armed with a Viking-like helmet and, of course, his mighty hammer Mjollnir, which can only be lifted by the most worthy among men. Thor is a powerful, but reckless warrior. When he foolishly draws Asgard into a war with the Frost Giants, Odin sends him into exile among the humans. Stripped from his memories, Thor becomes Dr. Donald Blake and falls in love with the lovely Jane Foster (Natalie Portman). But their happiness is not to last, as Thor’s past comes to haunt him. While on holiday in Norway, Blake unknowingly enters the cave he was born in and, when he strikes his cane against a boulder, is transformed back into the mighty Thor. Back in New York, he will use his alter ego and hammer to fight crime and evil, much the same way as, say, Batman or Spiderman. A central character in Thor’s life is his (adopted) brother Loki, a jealous, devious and cunning little man, who is always scheming for the downfall of Thor, Earth and Asgard, and who is set to return in many of the future Avengers tales. Thor, the movie, promises to be an epic adventure film, with mighty battles both on earth and in the realm of Asgard. It all depends on the success of this first Thor, if we are to see a sequel, but our hero will in any case return as one of one the main Avengers.


85

SPECIAL FEATURE MARVEL COMICS

as we know however, Cpt. America was not created on request of the authorities or CIA. Still, it remains to be seen if Cpt. America can generate the same success as Batman, Spiderman, Iron Man or Wolverine, which are so far the most popular and successful superheroes on film. The problem is that Cpt. America’s in-your-face stars and stripes may not go down too well in the rest of the world. Furthermore, he lacks the split, troubled nature of Batman and the humor of Iron Man, while the Nazis are perhaps a slightly old fashioned enemy for today’s youth.

Thor

Captain America

Moreover, the charm of Spiderman & Co lies in the fact that their adventures are set in today’s world. In addition to fighting super villains, our heroes will also have to deal with things like jealous girlfriends, bossy bosses and traffic jams. In other words, they are not just super, they are human as well. It remains to be seen if Cpt. America will be able to fit the mold.

The same is true for Captain America. He was first launched as a Marvel character in 1941, shortly after the outbreak of WWII, and so it should not come as a surprise that his first battles mainly involved evil Nazis. Captain America is the alter ego of Steve Rogers, who was a weak sickly young boy who, thanks to a magic serum, is transformed into a super soldier. Wearing a suit in the colors of the American flag, his weapon of choice is not a hammer but an impregnable shield that can also be used as a deadly boomerang.

The Avengers

Impersonated by Chris Evans, who previously played Johnny “The Torch” Thunders in The Fantastic Four, Captain America – The First Avenger will hit the big screen on June 22. Created by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, the strip without a doubt served patriotic ideals. Simon admitted that Cpt. America was a consciously political creation. He and Kirby were repulsed by the Nazis. “The enemy was well organized; we wanted to have our say too,” he said. As far as we know, Cpt. America was their personal initiative, although one never knows. Every country in the world needs its propaganda efforts and the US are no exception. Walt Disney, for example, used to produce cartoons for the American Ministry of Defense, while the American army today is equipped with an arsenal of computer games to attract young men into the army. As far

But, as said, while the film may or may not have the qualities to become a hero on his own, surely Cpt. America has his place among the super hero collective known as The Avengers. First created in the early 60s, The Avengers’ first line-up included Thor, Iron Man, the Hulk, Ant-Man and Wasp. They joined forces to confront Loki, who is yet again on one of his power schemes. When the incredible Hulk leaves the group in a state of rage, Cpt. America joins, as well as the archer Hawkeye. Like in the comic book series, heroes like Iron Man have their own adventures, while they regularly come together in the big happy family of The Avengers to collectively fight the world’s most powerful villains, such as The Skrulls, Baron Zeno or Kang. And with them not only Marvel Universe opens up, introducing countless new superheroes such as Swordsman, Black Panther and Vision, but the universe itself opens up, as many of the super-villains are able to travel in space and time. The first Avengers movie however will not be out in cinema before 2012. But no worries. If you cannot wait that long, the next episode in that other epic Marvel series, X-men, will be released this June to explore the early years of Magneto and Professor X, their fight against Armageddon, and their rift. In short, we have super summer ahead of us, and if Marvel Comics’ archives are anything to go by, light years of many more super heroes to come.


Respect for parents, and for honorable behavior shall be fostered.

shall never be presented in such a way as to create sympathy for the criminal or promote distrust of the forces of law and justice. If crime is depicted it shall be as a sordid and unpleasant activity. In every instance shall triumph over

The treatment of or words or symbols which have acquired undesirable meanings are forbidden.

stories shall emphasize the value of the home and the

Ridicule or attack on any or racial group is

and the criminal punished for his misdeeds. All scenes of horror, excessive bloodshed, gory or gruesome crimes, lust,

shall not be permitted.

in any form is prohibited, as is indecent or undue exposure.

shall not be treated humorously nor shall be represented as desirable.

are neither to be hinted at or portrayed. Violent love scenes as well as sexual abnormalities are unacceptable.


87

SPECIAL FEATURE MARVEL COMICS

BURN COMICS BURN? “Faster than a speeding bullet, more powerful than a locomotive, and able to leap tall buildings in a single bound,” thus Superman was famously introduced in the late 30s. Superman can be considered the first hero blessed with true superpowers. Before him, there were Tarzan, Flash and Dick Tracy, who all were very strong and smart, yet did not have superpowers.

THE GREEN LANTERN Marvel Comics’ main competitor is DC Comics. Originally founded in 1934, the company created the first ever superhero in 1938: Superman. Other major icons from the DC stall include Batman and The Green Lantern. Played by Ryan Reynolds, the latter is due to hit American movie screens on June 17. With his magic ring, the lantern is a member of an intergalactic squadron that keeps the universe safe from trouble. Meanwhile, Batman, will only return in 2012. The villain? No one knows. Director Chris Nolan said it will not be “The Riddler.” Who then? Hugo Strange? Harley Quinn? Perhaps. The latest news however, is that Bane will appear, as well as Selina Kyle a.k.a. Catwoman.

1926 1895

Amazing Stories appear

Yellow Kid

1931 Dick Tracy

DC Comics’ character was a roaring success and gave rise to a series of superheroes as Batman, The Green Lantern and Cpt. America. Perhaps the 1930s depression and the WWII years had created a climate in which people were keen to read something out of the ordinary and see good beat the hell out of evil. After the war, the superheroes’ popularity gradually diminished, as other comic book genres, such as westerns and horror stories, took over. The 1950s were American comics’ Darkest Hour. While American society was paranoid with all things communist, a psychologist named Fredric Wertham shot to fame by bashing comic books. In his articles and a book called Seduction of the Innocent, he claimed comics had a bad influence on the youth. Reading a comic book would lead to drug abuse, sexual deviancy, rape and crime.

Stores refused to have comic books, other than Walt Disney, on their shelves, while some worried parents organized comic book burnings! It prompted the industry to set up a Comics Code Authority with the aim to regulate the content. In other words: self-censorship – and the main reason why American comics are not (at all) like Japanese anime. But superheroes are not known as such for nothing. Their magical powers allowed them to be reborn with a vengeance in the 1960s, the Golden Age for American comic books. The Fantastic Four in 1961 are widely credited with the sudden resurrection, and like Superman before them they rapidly gave birth to a whole range of new superheroes, including The Hulk, Thor, Spiderman, X-Men and The Avengers. The main novelty about this new generation of superheroes was that they not only had special powers, but they were also very human. Unlike Superman, who was just super in everything, these heroes could fail and had human frailties. Bruce Banner by accident became the Hulk, and Peter Parker really is a shy nerd when he is not wearing his spideroutfit. While the main frames; the comic books remained a spectacular fight with a monster or evil spirit to save the world, it allowed the writers to inject the story with some emotional and moral depth.

1939

1941

1961

1963

1968

1986

1991

Marvel Comics founded

Captain America fights Nazi

The Fantastic Four launched

Spiderman, The Avengers and X-Men

Iron Man

Watchmen

Sin City

The Green Lantern

1934 DC Comics founded

1915

1929

1934

1940

Felix the Cat

Birth of Buck Rogers, Tarzan and Tintin

Flash Gordon

Batman is born

1962

1964

1974

1988

1995

The Incredible Hulk and Thor

Daredevil

Sandman

Hellblazer

Preacher


90

CANDY’S DIARIES S/S 2011


CANDY’S CLOSET IK* GIRL CANDY SHOP PLASTIK


MOROCCANA Etro

Erickson Beamon Nicholas Kirkwood

Etro

tty

a Ge

Talith

Yves Saint Laurent Erickson Beamon Balmain

Dries Van Noten Donna Karan Gucci

Christian Louboutin Sevan Bicakci

Gucci

Join the jet-set of the rich and famous, and escape to the warm climates of Morocco in this season’s hottest ethnic fashions. Since the country became a haunt for Yves Saint Laurent and a major inspiration behind his collections, Moroccan influences have hardly ever left the runways of the biggest designer names. Channel 70’s icon, Talitha Getty’s bohemian style in printed silk kaftans, wide harem pants, chunky beads, and silk turbans. Choose from spice-infused colors at Gucci, Islamic architectural patterns at Celine, or Berber fringing at Roberto Cavalli. Accessorize with golden YSL platforms and a crystal-studded bag from Balmain –guaranteed to “Rock the Kasbah.”

Valentino

Roberto Cavalli

Etro

Celine

Lanvin

Emilio Pucci

Gucci

Etro

Blumarine

Alexander McQueen

Yves Saint Laurent


THAT 70'S SHOW Dior

io 54

Stud

Lanvin

Marc Jacobs

Fendi

Dior Fairo

uz

Lanvin

Take a trip back to the 70s and echo the style of the in-crowd at New York’s iconic Studio 54. American designer Marc Jacobs revisited the freedom decade with a collection of flared pants, midi skirts, and wedge platforms in kitsch neon colors. Play the part of the disco queen in silk jersey jumpsuits from Fendi and Diane Von Furstenberg, or opt for a Woodstock chic look from Emilio Pucci. Go incognito in big shades from Tom Ford and raffia hats from Marc Jacobs, or add a romantic flair with a selection of flower accessories from Lanvin; on the head, neck, or waist – flowers work everywhere!

Fendi

Marc Jacobs

DVF

Marc Jacobs

Marc Jacobs

Emilio Pucci

Salvatore Ferragamo

Marc Jacobs

Dior

Louis Vuitton

Marc Jacobs

Marc Jacobs


CLOCKWORK ORANGE Fendi

ge,

Lanvin

ran ork O ckw 971 lo C 1 A

Jil Sander

Lanvin

Fendi Versace A Clo

ckwo rk 1971 Orange,

Prada Fendi

From neon to blind melon, the color orange turned up everywhere on the spring’s catwalks. Take notes from Stanley Kubrick’s 1962 psychothriller A Clockwork Orange and choose from draped Grecian dresses at Elie Saab, tunics from YSL, or skirts with leather fringing details from Dior. Adorn yourself with the latest accessories from Hermès or Fendi. Leave politics at home, it is purely a “fashion” statement.


CLINICALIA Jil Sander Christian Louboutin

Taher Chemirik

Altuzarra ’s Grey

omy

Anat

Balenciaga Taher Chemirik

Mulberry

Chanel Proenza Schouler Nurs Jack e ie

Celine

Taher Chemirik

Emerge straight from the ER room and help save lives in the season’s clean cuts and minimalist color palette. From New York to Milan, designers reincarnated the wardrobes of Grey’s Anatomy and Nurse Jackie by sexing-up the classic scrubs. Play “doctor” in square-cut tunics from Celine and white crisp blouses from Calvin Klein, or take the role of the naughty nurse in blue mini shifts from Burberry and denim dresses from Stella McCartney. And if anything goes wrong, page Dr. Shepherd.


CIRCUS FREAK Christian Louboutin Marina Calamai

leil

u So

ue D

Cirq

Katerina Psoma

Miu Miu

Tom Binns

Miu Miu

Miu Miu

Katy

Perry

Manish Arora

Join the circus clowns and pull off your best stunts in this season’s psychedelic prints and absurd cuts. From Manish Arora to Jean-Paul Gaultier, “geek chic” lost its cool to “freak chic” – the latest fashion statement to hit the catwalks. Unleash your inner freak in stripes from Moschino and Prada, or layering from London’s hottest new designer Meadham Kirchoff. Mix’n’ match is the only “trick” you need to learn.

Manish Arora

Miu Miu

Balenciaga

Jean-Paul Gaultier

Alexander McQueen

Manish Arora

Prada

Jean-Charles De Castelbajac

Meadham Kirchoff

Moschino

Versace


Jump aboard the Orient Express and adorn yourself with fine tailoring and intricate embroidery from the East. At Louis Vuitton, creative director Marc Jacobs glammed up the chinoiserie look in a collection of sheer lurex dresses and silk cheongsams with sky-high slits, while Haider Ackermann demonstrated his draping savvy in satin silk blouses juxtaposed with structured jackets and karate belts. Turn up the heat with sleek hair, patent leather bags, and cigarette heels.

Gucci

Louis Vuitton

Yves Saint Laurent

Louis Vuitton

Yves Saint Laurent

Louis Vuitton

Haider Ackermann

Carolina Herrera

John Galliano

Carolina Herrera

ORIENTALIA


98

IK* GIRL

GEORGIA MAY JAGGER


Were she not born in the 90s, Georgia May Jagger would have been conceived somewhere between Studio 54 and an Yves Saint Laurent after-show party. Nevertheless, sex, fashion, and rock’n’roll run in her blood like no one’s business. She has the blonde locks and bubbly charm of her Texan mother Jerry Hall, and the plump lips of her Brit father Mick Jagger. But, being the daughter of a supermodel and a gender-bender style God, it is not easy to trace the roots of her fashion sense. “My dad has more sparkly stuff than most men,” says Jagger of Mick’s fearless wardrobe choices. Perhaps the tight flares and pussy bows did not exactly help set an intimidating father figure to Georgia May, her eldest sister Elizabeth, or her brothers James and Gabriel, yet being a rock’n’roll royalty definitely has its perks. At only 16, Georgia May learnt her baby (modeling) steps on the catwalk of Vivienne Westwood. Three years later, she embraced the cover of Vogue and I-D, replaced Kate Moss as the face of Rimmel London, and headed ad campaigns for Hudson Jeans, Versace, and Chanel. Alongside Lara Stone, Lindsey Wixson, and a few others, Geogia May is one of the early leaders of GTM – the Gap Teeth Movement: a breed of supermodels born with a tiny genetic disposition that has recently become the most coveted beauty mark in fashion. “Mum told me the other day that people in America are now having their teeth changed to be more gap-toothed,” says Georgia. “That’s insane! Why would you pay money for this?” But it is this very gap that is paying her good money. Her signature scarlet red lips, smoky eyes, and soft blonde waves made Karl Lagerfeld’s (chrome) heart beat faster; as his muse to last year’s cruise collection for Chanel, she opened the St.Tropez show emerging like a young Brigitte Bardot on a holiday. Today, Georgia May is busy promoting her new denim range for Hudson, with whom she has a £1 million deal for bearing all except for mid-rise jeans in their ad campaigns. The range is inspired by her mother’s early Southern style and her rock upbringing – think Slash from Guns’n’Roses on a Saturday night’s rodeo. But there is a lot going on in Georgia’s mind. “I would like to do all kinds of things: photography and art and designing.” Brains, beauty, and “Jagger” for a last name – this stone* will keep on rolling. Ryan Houssari


COUNTRY GIRL

102

CANDY* SHOP COUNTRY GIRL

2 1 4 3 Leighton Meester in Country Strong

5

7

6

8

9 10

1- Cotton top with embroidery details, Cortefiel. 2- Crochet pumps, Aldo. 3- Flower printed cuff, Cortefiel. 4- Flower printed tote, Aldo. 5- Raffia ctutch, Paule Ka. 6- Crochet top and shorts, Manoush. 7- Raffia hat, Paule Ka. 8- Wedges, Aldo. 9- Flower-printed scarf, Cortefiel. 10- Crochet clutch, Aldo.


KASBAH COOL

103

CANDY* SHOP KASBAH COOL

1 2

3 4

Cynthia Nixon in Sex & The City 2

5 7

6

8 9

10 11 1- Sandals with embroidery details, Aldo. 2- Brocade dress, Monsoon. 3- Beaded cuff, Aldo. 4- Printed skirt, Cortefiel. 5- Earrings, Aldo. 6Beaded necklace, Accessorize. 7- Sandals with scarf tie-knots, Aldo. 8- beaded pouch, Antik Batik. 9- Cotton top with embroidery, Cortefiel. 10- Beaded clutch, Aldo. 11- Embroidered belt, Antik Batik.


WILD WILD WEST

104

CANDY* SHOP WILD WILD WEST

1

2

5

Lauren Hutton

3

4 7

6 8

9

10

1- Printed top, Cortefiel. 2- Leather sandals, Antik Batik. 3- Suede vest, Cortefiel. 4- Denim shorts, Morgan - GS. 5- Denim dress, Monsoon. 6- Necklace, Cortefiel. 7- Sandals, Aldo. 8- Studded bag, Antik Batik. 9- Sunglasses, Aldo. 10- Scarf, Cortefiel.


kahlo kitsch

105

CANDY* SHOP KAHLO KITSCH

1 2

3

4

Frida Kahlo

6

7

5 8

9

10

1- Snake skin bag, Antik Batik. 2- Satin purse, Paule Ka. 3- Multi-colored thongs, La Senza. 4- Earrings, Manoush. 5- Printed scarf, Antik Batik. 6- Printed peep-toe heels, Nine West. 7- Printed silk dress, Manoush. 8. Embroidered clutch, Manoush. 9- Beaded cuff, Antik Batik. 10- Beaded belt, Antik Batik.


CoCo Coquette

106

CANDY* SHOP COCO COQUETTE

3 1

2 4

Blake Lively & Leighton Meester

5

6 8

7 11

9 10 1- Cotton top, Cortefiel. 2- Necklace, Paule Ka. 3- Top, Morgan - GS. 4- Satin bag with leather details, Paule Ka. 5- Cardigan, Cortefiel. 6- Shoes, Cortefiel. 7- Leather belt, Antik Batik. 8- Sunglasses, Aldo. 9- Bra, La Senza. 10- Cotton top, Cortefiel. 11- Bag, Paule Ka.


PLASTIK

DYNASTY BARBIE DOLL

MAC RAINBOW KEYBOARD

MISSONI X ALL STARS CONVERSE (SPRING 2011)

NIXON RUBBER WATCH (SPRING 2011)

LADUREE X NIKE X COLETTE “THE AWAY PROJECT”

RON ENGLISH X ABSOLUT VODKA

DIPTYQUE X SELFRIDGES “MIMOS” CANDLE

DEER DANA X COLETTE T-SHIRTS (KARL & COCO)

MISSONI X HAVAIANAS


CHANEL X COLETTE “GABRIELLE” DOLL HELLO KITTY CHAMGANE

CAVIAR DERICHARDSON PRINTEMPS KASPIA TERRY TOY GIAMBATTISTA VALLI FOR COLETTE

A BATHING APE KAWS KARL LAGERMOUSE BYXTHE HOUSE OF “BABY MILO” MOUSE

YSL MANIFESTO

FIAT X GUCCI

DAFT PUNK X COCA COLA ROB RYAN FOR URBAN OUTFITTERS*

ELEVEN PARIS “LIFE IS A JOKE” T-SHIRT

KARLON FINGER PUPPET PENELOPPE THE COVER OF DEC BY RUBBISH INTERVIEW MAGAZINE

TELEPHOTO FOR IPHONE PENELOPPE ONLENS THE COVER OF DEC BY PHOTOJOJO INTERVIEW MAGAZINE


MENSWEAR S/S 2011


REBEL KEN Louis Vuitton

Dsquared2 Louis Vuitton in ean ause es D C Jam hout A Wit ebel

Prada

R

Dolce & Gabbana

Dsquared2

Dsquared2

Jeremy Scott For Adidas Dsquared2

Jeremy Scott

Make yourself heard and join the nearest political revolt in this season’s street-cool looks. Channel James Dean’s haggard style in Rebel Without A Cause and choose from statement Tees that say it loud and clear from Jeremy Scott and Frankie Morello. Pull off a devil-maycare attitude à la Vivienne Westwood’s runway models, and flaunt the coolest summer accessories in bright, fluorescent colors that will make others think twice before they mess with you.

Frankie Morello

Vivienne Westwood

Jeremy Scott

Frankie Morello

Jeremy Scott

Dsquared2

Michael Bastian

Frankie Morello

Jeremy Scott

Frankie Morello

Christian Louboutin


CAMPING KEN Dsquared2

Dolce & Gabbana

o in ranc es F Jam 7 Hours 12

Burberry Prorsum

Dolce & Gabbana

Louis Vuitton

Dolce & Gabbana

Converse

Geox

Bottega Veneta Louis Vuitton

Go outdoors and embark on a new journey in roadside looks fit for today’s adventurous man. Copy James Franco’s climber cool in 127 Hours and choose from the latest backpacker-inspired collection at Michael Bastian. Get in touch with nature and go for a picnic in ginghamchecked shorts and loafers from D&G, or take a look on the wild side in cargo pants and sandals from Bottega Veneta and Louis Vuitton. Only the brave survive.

Smalto

Bottega Veneta

Louis Vuitton

Bottega Veneta

Marc By Marc Jacbos

Frankie Morello

Michael Bastian

D&G

Ermanno Scervino

Michael Bastian

Louis Vuitton


PANTONE KEN Dolce & Gabbana

Jil Sander

Prada

Prada

Dsquared2

Jil Sander Prada

Resurrect the Pantone color chart and opt for the most vibrant shades in this spring’s color-blocking trend. Jil Sander’s collection of bright pinks, fluorescent yellows, and radiant oranges defined the look of the season. If you ever wanted to wear colored pants and tailored blazers, this is your chance! Choose from bespoke colored tuxes at Tom Ford, or short suits at Thom Browne. A bright new take on the Oxford-smart chic.

Thom Browne

Frankie Morello

Tommy Hilfiger

Dsquared2

Jil Sander

Prada

Tom Ford

Jil Sander

Hugo Boss

Dsquared2

Jil Sander

Givenchy


HI-TECH KEN Jeremy Scott For Linda Farrow

Philip Plein

Ann Demeulmeester

Jeremy Scott For Swatch

iPAD 2 Louis Vuitton

Christian Louboutin

Cor Sine Lab Doli

Dior Homme Givenchy Rick Owens

Jeremy Scott For Adidas

Emporio Armani

Show off your tech-savvy and flaunt this summer’s coolest gadgets, while looking like you have jumped straight out of a sci-fi flick in futuristic cuts and monotone colors. Last season’s Goth chic lost its hype to Freemason-esque looks that echoed on the spring runways of Givenchy, Lanvin, and Emporio Armani. Join The Matrix clan in an all-black outfit and accessorize with the season’s cult accessories from Dior Homme and Balenciaga. And remember, iPAD is so last season!

Comme Des Garcons

Jeremy Scott

Dior Homme

D&G

Chanel

Versace

Thom Browne

Dior Homme

Lanvin

Givenchy

Balmain


116

KEN-DY S/S 2011 REPORT

Yves Saint Laurent

THE MUSE Charlie Chaplin

J. Paul Getty III

NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK

Richard Gere

Darth Vader 3•

1• 4• 2• 5• 1• Simon Nessman 2• Andrej Pejic 3• Marlon Teixeira 4• Ryan Bertroche 5• Evandro Soldati Jean-Paul Gaultier

John Galliano

Gucci

Dsquared2

THE PLAYLIST

Givenchy

THE SHOW

THE STATEMENT TEES 1• Burberry Prorsum 2• Dsquared2 3• Givenchy 4• Lanvin 5• Marc Jacobs 6• Balmain

1• NO MORE I LOVE YOU’S/ ANNIE LENNOX DOLCE & GABBANA 2• ALEJANDRO/ LADY GAGA EMPORIO ARMANI 3• 2046 (O.S.T)/ SHIGERU UMEBAYASHI DIOR HOMME 4• THE LOST BOYS (O.S.T)/ CRY LITTLE SISTER GIVENCHY 5• EXILE ON MAINSTREET/ ROLLING STONES GUCCI 6• BELA LUGOSI’S DEAD/ BAUHAUS PRADA 7• PARIS, TEXAS (O.S.T)/ RY COODER BOTTEGA VENETA

1•

2•

3•

4•

5•

6•

One minute they are astronauts, another they are Oxford boys in pinstriped suits, knee-high socks, and golden lipstick – the models at Thome Browne’s show were a sight for the sore (fashion) eye.

Thom Browne S/S 2011

THE COLOR From electric to emerald, all eyes were green with envy on the summer catwalks.

D&G

Iceberg

Gant

Louis Vuitton

Perry Ellis

Chanel

Gant

D&G

Kenzo

Gas Jeans


THE FILMS

THE GOLDEN TICKET

Jeremy Scott for Linda Farrow

Givenchy

Marni

Givenchy

Cor Sine Labe Doli

Death in Venice

THE PRINTS

Givenchy

Christopher Kane Jil Sander

D&G

Dolce & Gabbana

Prada

Jil Sander D&G

TOO COOL FOR SCHOOL Jeremy Scott For Swatch

Rad Hourani

Jeremy Scott for Adidas

Burberry Prorsum

Emporio Armani for Reebok

Jeremy Scott for Linda Farrow

THE HAIR

THE GRAND FINALE

Gel, comb, and a lot of that cocky attitude – grease lightnin’ is back!

With an all-star male models, Dolce and Gabbana’s finale was like the macho version of the “power 4” supermodels on Gianni Versace’s catwalk in 1991.

Acne

Alexander McQueen for Puma

THE COLLABORATION Marc Jacobs’ own tattooist Scott Campbell worked his magic on fine leather bags and silk scarves for Louis Vuitton.

THE TRUNKS

THE PRODIGY

Versace

Dolce & Gabbana

Michael Bastian

Dsquared2

Frankie Morello

Dsquared2

D&G

Mark his name: Rick “Rico” Genest. His body is a work of art and he is already muse to Lady Gaga (of course!) and Thierry Muglar’s creative director, Nicola Formichetti. Take anything you want if you can find one 1mm un-inked spot on this rising model.


118

F/W 2011 2012 REPORT


120

F/W 2011 2012 REPORT

Alexander McQueen

Fendi

Jean-Paul Gaultier

Dior

Donna Karan

Lanvin

Gucci

Prada

60’S MOB WIFE

LONIODN WOENEK

Will Sarah Burton design Kate Middleton’s wedding dress? As London awaits the royal wedding du jour, fashion insiders are gasping on the idea of a future “queen” in McQueen. Watch this space.

FASH 11-2012 F/W 20

MIDDLE-TON AGES Jonathan Saunders

Mary Katrantzou

Erdem

Holly Fulton

PRINTS PLEASE! From china vases to Art Deco cityscapes, a plague of hypnotizing digital prints hit the catwalks at London Fashion Week.


121

F/W 2011 2012 REPORT

Versace

Louis Vuitton

Moschino

Rochas

Oscar de la Renta

Michael Kors

Altuzarra

Burberry Prorsum

BORN IN THE USSR

NYNCWEEK

FASHIO11-2012 F/W 20

Six male models looked Ken-delicious in outfits by CFDA designers at the “Menswear Meets Art” exhibit party at Christie’s. Barbie must be turning in her “pink” grave.

YES, WE KEN

THE WU FACTOR Long evening gowns with come-hither slits and lace masks; Michelle O will be “Wu-ing” the White House crowd this fall.

HEAVEN OR HILL Alexander Wang’s after parties always live up to their hype; this time, Park Avenue Princesses partied the fashion week nights away with a live performance by Lauryn Hill.


122

F/W 2011 2012 REPORT

VIVA FRIDA

MSHIILONAWNEEK

Frida Giannini’s 70’s chiffon dresses in demure tones caught every editor’s eye at Gucci.

2 FA 11-201 F/W 20 60’s shift dresses in many vibrant colors and total monotone looks at Blumarine.

BLUMARINE BLUES

LES MARY JANES And the award for “Most Deceiving Act” of fashion week goes to: Mary Jane tromp l’oeil shoes at Prada (those are built-in leather flesh socks, in case you are wondering.)

SHE SAID, HE SAID Androgyny took turns, one model after the other, on the catwalk of Dolce & Gabbana.

Marc Jacobs

Jason Wu

Chanel

Elie Tahari

Erdem

Emilio Pucci

Bottega Veneta

Monique L’huillier

LACY LUCY

FRONT ROW Katie Holmes might have brought her mom, but Tina Turner brought her killer legs to the front row at Giorgio Armani.


123

F/W 2011 2012 REPORT

PSHAIORN IWSEEK

A GAGA MOMENT

2 FA 11-201 F/W 20

The entire world watched Lady Gaga show her claws in a runway debut for Thierry Mugler.

Salvatore Ferragamo

Dolce & Gabbana

Jil Sander

Giambattista Valli

Balmain

Alexander Wang

Haider Ackermann

Balenciaga

L’ANDROGYNE

THE NO SHOW

SMOKIN' HOT KATE

Creative director Christophe Decarnin makes a disappearing act at the finale of Balmain, troubling Parisians with news about him being institutionalized in a mental hospital. That is what you get for ripping one too-many skinny jeans!

GO, WEST!

GALLIA-NOOOO!

He might have run past the security guards at Vivienne Westwood and Balmain, but when Kanye West showed up un-invited to the Louis Vuitton show, rumor has it he was sent back to his hotel room.

News of Galliano’s dismissal from Dior might have taken all the cream at Paris Fashion Week, but it was the picture of a model bearing a Star of David tattoo (at his own show) that circulated in newspaper columns everywhere.

GOLDEN GIRLS Models at Vivienne Westwood’s show now know what it really feels like to walk on gold.

In a rare catwalk appearance. Kate Moss lights up a cigarette on the Louis Vuitton catwalk.


124

EMERGING FROM ANDY WARHOL’S CIRCLE OF TRUST IN THE 70S, PETER MARINO PUT HIS STAMP ON THE WORLD’S MOST COVETED RETAIL SPACES, INCLUDING THE NEWLY OPENED CHANEL STORE IN BEIRUT’S CENTRAL DISTRICT. THE STARCHITECT TALKS TO PLASTIK* ABOUT HIS LOVE FOR RENAISSANCE SCULPTURES AND HIS IDEAL ESCAPE ON A MOTORBIKE.

Peter Marino

INTERVIEW PETER MARINO


125

INTERVIEW PETER MARINO

In what ways did you engage the historical façade of the space with your vision and the ethos of the Chanel brand? The void and the lantern in the entrance speaks to pointed Middle Eastern arches. What are the three building structures that most caught your attention in Beirut or the Middle East? The Gate – a semi-derelict old open air concrete cinema in Beirut; the new I.M. Pei museum in Doha is impressive for its detail and craftsmanship; the Nouvel project for the Louvre in Abu Dhabi. You are an art collector yourself with a penchant for bronze Baroque and Renaissance sculptures. Is there one particular famous art piece you wish you had in your collection? I’d kill to have any of the four Lespingola sculptures shown at The Met last year: The Death of Dido, Hercules Skinning the Nemean Lion, Hercules Rescuing Prometheus, Hercules Strangling the Serpent.

Chanel boutique, Beirut

Have you ever donated an art piece of your own to a retail space you have designed? No! What projects are you currently working on? Among others: •Céline, Paris and NY •Chanel, Hong Kong and Australia •Dior, Seoul •Loewe, Barcelona, and have just opened Mount Street in London •Louis Vuitton, Singapore and Shanghai •Zegna, Paris •Residential projects in Paris, Milan, NY, Gstaad and Beirut. If you had to run away from the madness of the fashion world and drive around on your bike, where will your destination be? The Rocky Mountains, from Canada to the Grand Canyon.


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BEAUTY THE WARHOL EFFECT

FULL-ON NEON COLORS REIGNED ON THE SPRING/ SUMMER 2011 CATWALKS, WITH RENOWNED MAKE-UP ARTISTS TAKING CUES FROM ANDY WARHOL’S ICONIC SILK-SCREEN PRINTS OF MARILYN MONROE AND ELIZABETH TAYLOR. FROM ELECTRIC ORANGE TO HOT PINK, A RIOT OF ACID TONES STOOD OUT ON THE INTERNATIONAL RUNWAYS AGAINST THE NUDE FACES TO DEFINE THE LOOK OF THE SEASON. AT MARNI, MODELS WORE A BLACK STROKE ON WHITE EYELIDS THAT CONTRASTED WITH THE BRIGHT ORANGE LIPSTICK, WHILE PRADA KEPT IT SIMPLE WITH WINGTIP, METALLIC EYESHADOW AND BARE LIPS. THE DIOR WOMAN EMERGED STRAIGHT FROM THE TROPICS IN FRUITY TONES LIKE PAPAYA AND GRAPE AROUND THE EYES, AND TANGERINE ORANGE ON THE LIPS. MATTE MAGENTA LIPS WERE THE DEFINING TOUCH TO JIL SANDER’S COLOR-BLOCKING COLLECTION, WHILE DIANE VON FURSTENBERG OPTED FOR POP MAKE-UP INSPIRED BY A PORTRAIT OF HER PAINTED BY WARHOL HIMSELF IN THE 70S.


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Volume Glamour Bourjois

Marni

Dior

Prada

YSL

Marilyn by Andy Warhol, 1962

Dolce & Gabbana

Dior Electric Tropics

Dior

Givenchy

MAC

BEAUTY THE WARHOL EFFECT

Mastering this look can be tricky at times; this is why, make sure you base your make-up on a nude tan and turn up the heat in iridescent eyes, bold lips, and come-hither nails - not necessarily altogether!

EYE CANDY The palette used for this season includes blue, green, pink, orange, yellow and red. The eye shadows come in different hues, so go for a shade that suits your complexions and brings out the color of your eyes. Choose from Dior Electric Tropics, Givenchy Acid summer, Dolce & Gabbana’s Italian Summer, or YSL in yellow and blue. Maximize your lashes with Volume Glamour Max mascara from Bourjois, or Volume Million Lashes from L’oreal.


128

BEAUTY THE WARHOL EFFECT

YSL Pur Couture

Lip

Dolce & Gabbana Italian Summer

Jil Sander

Fendi

Fendi

Jil Sander

Gucci

DVF

DVF

Marni

Jil Sander

Jil Sander

Mac VivaGlam

Elizabeth Taylor by Andy Warhol, 1963

Dior Kiss

Service

For your lips, experiment with electric shades of fuchsia, orange, red or pink. Wear your lipgloss in juicy colors from Givenchy Gelee D’interdit or Dior Kiss Collection. Channel the models from the Loewe S/S 2011 catwalk in matte bubble-gum pink and wear mouthwatering pink shades from the new Dior Addict, MAC Viva Glam “Lady Gaga,” or Yves Saint Laurent Rouge Pur Couture. Alternatively, go bold red to capture the Gucci woman of the summer in Chanel Rouge Allure. Here is something to “pout” about!


129

Diane Von Furstenberg by Andy Warhol, 1974

CHEEK

REPUBLIC

Dior Electric Tropics

Givenchy Acid summer

Marc by Marc Jacobs

Givenchy Acid Summer Jil Sander

Dior

Cacharel

Givenchy Blush Gelée

DVF

BEAUTY THE WARHOL EFFECT

To create a perfect sun-kissed glow, dust some peach blush on the upper cheeks or you can even resort to rusty-brown shades to highlight your lips. Colors ranging from light pink to peachy orange give you the wow factor you opt for. Givenchy Blush Gelee is this summer’s must-have in every girl’s tote, while a sprinkle of MAC Maganeta Madness adds a little more va-va-voom to your beach tan.

ORANGE

MEcanique Electric Orange is the latest color craze in make-up. It is a very tricky color that does not go well with pale skin, but once you pick the right shade, you will surely stand out from the crowd (in a good way, of course!) If tangerine with gold shimmer does not suit your skin tone, try to use a matte shade with a cooler base; or, if you do not have an orange shade to start with, opt for an orange blush as an alternative. Nail the look with Aloha polish from Dior Electric Tropics collection, or Givenchy Vernis Please in acid orange.


Š Barbie and Ken (Beyond Production)


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BEAUTY

THE FAKE TAN CLUB

WELCOME TO “THE FAKE TAN CLUB.” WE HAVE REPLACED SUNBATHING WITH “SUNBOOTHING,” BEIRUT WITH ST. BARTS, AND GREEK OIL MAGNATES WITH AMERICAN SOCIALITES AND EUROPEAN FASHION DESIGNERS. THE HEY DAYS OF SUN UV RAYS ARE SO FIVE MINUTES AGO. WE HAVE LOST ALL OUR DIGNITY TO TINTED MOISTURIZERS AND COCONUT SMELLING SPRAY-ONS. AND IF ANYONE MESSES WITH US, WE TELL HIM, “GO FAKE YOURSELF!”


“IT WAS NOT UNTIL COCO CHANEL ACCIDENTALLY GOT SUNBURNT IN THE 20S THAT TANNING BECAME A MUCH SOUGHT-AFTER FASHION STATEMENT.”

Before the Ferrari line up, the GCC license plates and the Dom Perignon-popping nation, there was a time when Beirut’s Sea side was the epicenter of genuine high life in the late 50s. Everyone was a VIP. You could spot Brigitte Bardot soaking up the sun by the pool of the Carlton hotel, Johnny Hallyday sipping mojitos at the St. Georges bar, or Frank Sinatra lunching out at Ain El-Mreisseh’s famous Casablanca. They all left back to their homes with memories of the city under their skin, but right on top, they flaunted an unequaled bronze glow of the Mediterranean sun.

DIOR BRONZE

L’ORÉAL

Self-Tanner Natural Glow

Sublime Bronze Self-Tanning Lotion

DORIANCE DERMO-NUTRITION Autobronzant

By the early 60s, the tanning culture became so big that Coppertone introduced the first sunless alternative in keeping up with the jetsetters’ demand for an all-year-round healthy glow. The lotion was aptly named “Quick Tan” or “QT.” In classic 60’s marketing fashion, the TV commercial featured a larger than life bottle and an overly gay couple tap dancing in a built-up beach set to the catchy tune “You get a quick tan with QT. A double tan, you see. It tans you anytime, rain or shine, when you use, (snap, snap) QT.” Everything about the video screamed fake! But people bought it. In only 4 to 5 hours after applying it on the skin, you could achieve the well-travelled shade without even stepping foot in Beirut or St. Tropez.

CLINIQUE

LANCÔME

Self Sun Body Tinted Lotion

Flash Bronzer Anti-Age


TAN-TASTIC* MOVIE SCENES BRIDE WARS

Starring: Kate Hudson and Anne Hathaway

SEXY BEAST

Starring: Ray Winstone

FRIENDS

Created by David Crane and Marta Kauffman

THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT MARY

“IN HOLLYWOOD, FAKE TANNING IS A RELIGION ON ITS OWN, WITH EVEN MORE CELEBRITY FOLLOWING THAN SCIENTOLOGY.”

Starring: Cameron Diaz and Ben Stiller

WILLY WONKA AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY Starring: Gene Wilder

HANGOVER

Starring: Bradley Cooper

GOING THE DISTANCE Starring: Drew Barrymore

But it was not long before applicants realized that they looked more like Oompa Loompa and less like Jackie O après ski hours. The orange outcome of QT owes itself to dihydroxyacetone (DHA), a coloring chemical derived from plants and used as the main ingredient in fake tan creams until this day. Upon spreading the lotion, DHA interacts with the amino acids of dead skin cells, resulting in a darker shade that lasts for 3 to 10 days, depending on the skin’s exfoliation process. Since the 80s, numerous formulas of DHA-based lotions have been produced to improve the color, odor, and streaking. Nowadays, you may find DHA in concentrations varying from 1% to 15% in many sunless products such as sprays, gels, creams, mousses, airbrushes, and wipes. Another alternative to DHA is a chemical called “canthaxanthin,” found in sunless tanning pills. Once consumed, the pill releases a pigment into the body that gets absorbed by the skin and some internal organs. While recent studies showed that these pills have high risks of hepatitis, they are still very popular among European consumers.

The celebrities’ obsession with a (suspiciously) healthy, golden glow opened the market for even more convenient sunless tanning methods like DIY (do it yourself) booths, tanning salons, and instant tan make-up. Tom Ford is admittedly an addict to Clinique Tinted Moisturizer for Men. Italians designers like Valentino Garavani and Giorgio Armani are devoted habitués to UV sunbeds, while Donatella Versace is rumored to have one in her bedroom. In Hollywood, fake tanning is a religion on its own, with even more celebrity following than Scientology. LA’s socialites Paris Hilton, Nicole Ritchie, and Kim Kardashian are spotted in and out of Mystic Tan salons so often that the paparazzi have permanent camping spots in front of each branch. In fact, Mystic tanning is the latest technology in UV-free tanning and it is operated by a stateof-the-art airbrush that leaves the body with an even tan and little streaking. But most of all, it is quite a swell experience for those who are always on the go. After choosing the shade desired for your skin (ranging from light glow to build dark), you go naked into the booth, where a machine operator voice greets you and guides you through the process. Within a minute, you step out looking like you just came back from a honeymoon in Barbados.


“TODAY, THE TANNING INDUSTRY IS ESTIMATED TO BE WORTH $5 BILLION, WITH AROUND 50,000 OUTLETS FOR TANNING WORLDWIDE.”

Today, the tanning industry is estimated to be worth $5 billion, with around 50,000 outlets for tanning worldwide. But a sun-kissed look has not always been considered a reflection of wealth and beauty. In earlier times, dark complexions were associated with laborers who worked tirelessly under the sun, while the nobles maintained a lighter and paler skin shade. It was not until Coco Chanel accidentally got sunburnt in the 20s that tanning became a much sought-after fashion statement.

From the days of Coco to the times of cocobutter, tanning has evolved in places where “the sun don’t shine” (yes, there too!). With the increasing rates of skin cancer caused by UV radiations from the sun, many go into desperate measures to be a member of the fake tan club. It is an exclusive establishment, a language that the rich and beautiful understand. And there is nothing like the thrill of going out of the tanning booth, bumping into a sickenly pale friend stuck behind an office desk for eternity, and responding to a shower of compliments with, “I was in Barbados, dahling!” The bitter truth is, once you fake it, you go fake all the way. Ryan Houssari

BIOTHERM HOMME

GIORGIO ARMANI

Power Bronze

Skin Minerals For Men Moisturizing Bronzer

JEAN PAUL GAULTIER MONSIEUR Self-Tanning Gel

CLINIQUE

DIOR HOMME

Non-Streak Bronzer

Healthy Look Moisturising Emulsion


AVENUE CHARLES MALEK, ASHRAFIEH, BEIRUT. TEL: +961 1 326 367


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VISUAL ARTIST GEORGE CONDO

MOST PEOPLE WILL ARGUABLY KNOW HIM FOR THE CONTROVERSIAL SERIES OF ALBUM COVERS HE DID FOR BEST SELLING ARTIST KANYE WEST, YET GEORGE CONDO HAS BEEN A DISTINCTIVE VOICE IN AMERICAN ART FOR OVER THREE DECADES. HIS WORK IS A MIXED BAG OF DARK, SURREAL AND EVEN COMIC FANTASIES, WHICH OFTEN MAKES A TONGUE-IN-CHEEK COMMENT ON ART HISTORY AND PAST MASTERS SALVADOR DALI OR PABLO PICASSO.


140

VISUAL ARTIST GEORGE CONDO

“HE SYNTHESIZED THESE PAST PICTORIAL LANGUAGES TO CREATE ‘COMPOSITES OF VARIOUS PSYCHOLOGICAL STATES PAINTED IN DIFFERENT WAYS.’ ” “Me chilling on the couch with my Phoenix,” said Kanye West last November, when asked about the original album cover of My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy. And indeed the image shows a (quite monstrous) black man lying on the couch with a beer and a naked, winged and as monstrous female on top. Only one breast is partly visible, yet the image was too suggestive to digest for American retail stores, including Wal-Mart and Apple’s iTunes Music Store. West was forced to opt for something less “explicit.” “It’s a good painting,” Condo told New York Magazine. “She’s a kind of fragment, between a sphinx, a phoenix, a haunting ghost, a harpy. And then Kanye is also in some sort of strange 1970s burned-out back room of a Chicago blues club having a beer – so far away from the real Kanye West that it’s just a scream.” Condo aimed to challenge the star singer by painting him in such an outrageous situation. And it worked. “Kanye said ‘I’m shocked, but I like it, and I gotta go with my gut feeling,’” said Condo, who was absolutely gutted by the retail ban. “The superimposition of people’s perceptions on a cartoon is shocking,” Condo fumed. “What’s happening in their minds should be banned. Not the painting.” It always comes a bit of a shock when America shows off its more conservative, and commercial, face. It is paint on canvas after all, and the image does not even come close to being pornographic. The stores in question

probably could not care less about the image’s artistic or erotic qualities. They just fear negative publicity (or worse: a boycott) by the country’s “true believers” who make up an estimated 25 percent of the population. Thank God Condo produced in fact five album covers, including that of a ballerina in a black tutu, a crowned chopped-off head with a sword in it, and two cubist-like heads. So the first-choice cover was easily replaced by another. Put together, the five album covers offer a good introduction to Condo’s work, which incorporates a vast mix of styles and techniques, from cubist and classic to surreal and cartoonish, often with an ironic undertone. Take his Portrait of a Queen, in which we seem to recognize the British Queen, elegantly dressed with two carrots sticking out of her ears or his Maria Magdalena with huge ears and hanging breasts or his child-unfriendly “clowns” series, which truly combines the comic with the grotesque. Born in 1957, Condo studied art history and music theory before settling in New York in the early 1980s, and where he became part of the blossoming East Village cultural scene, alongside fellow artists Keith Haring, JeanMichel Basquiat and Julian Schnabel. The fact that he studied art history clearly shows in his work, as he loves to implicitly comment on history’s “book of art.” One series from the early 80s, for example, was called Fake Old Masters. Condo often adopts the styles, techniques, and methods of earlier painters and applies them to his own subject matter or, as Condo puts it, he synthesized these past pictorial languages to create “composites of various psychological states painted in different ways.” Some have dubbed him “an artist’s artist.” Currently, the New Museum in New York presents an overview of his prolific career under the title George Condo: Mental States. The retrospective is divided in four sections, each of which examines a particular theme central to his work, while emphasizing his overall tragicomic vision on life. If New York is a bit too far off the beaten track in the coming months, know then that the exhibition is accompanied by a 190-page catalogue and will later this year travel to Rotterdam, London and Frankfurt. Don’t say we didn’t warn you! Peter Speetjens


CREATIVE DIRECTOR ELI REZKALLAH ART DIRECTOR RYAN HOUSSARI PHOTOGRAPHER STEVE KOZMAN MAKE UP NAJAT SALAME HAIR SAMIR DAOU BEYOND PRODUCTION 2011


All models in La Senza underwear


This page: (from left) Top: Le Senza, Bikini bottoms: Melissa Odabash - 2 Pieces, Sunglasses: Stylist’s own, Earrings: Aldo, Bracelet and necklace: Funky Bling - Taten •Top: Manoush, Underwear: La Senza, Sunglasses: Funky Bling - Taten, Earrings and bracelets: Aldo •Tank top: La Senza, Bikini bottoms: Manoush, Sunglasses, bracelet and necklace: Funky Bling - Taten, Earrings: Aldo Opposite page: Top with feather details: Manoush • Bikini bottoms: Manoush • Tank top: La Senza • Bracelets and necklace: Funky Bling - Taten


Bikinis: Melissa Odabash - 2 Pieces.


This page: Bikinis: Blumarine • Earrings and sunglasses: Accessorize Opposite page: Bikini: Manoush • Earrings and sunglasses: Accessorize


Bathing suit: Melissa Odabash - Taten • Necklace: Accessorize • Shoes: Missoni


This page: All outfits by Blumarine • Necklaces: Q-pot - Taten Opposite page: Bikinis: Manoush • Bracelets and necklace: Accessorize


Bathing suit: Emamo - 2 Pieces • Shoes: Nine West


This page: Bathing suit: Melissa Odabash - Taten • Necklace: Accessorize Opposite page: Bikinis: Melissa Odabash - Taten


CREATIVE DIRECTOR ELI REZKALLAH ART DIRECTOR RYAN HOUSSARI PHOTOGRAPHER STEVE KOZMAN MAKE UP NAJAT SALAME HAIR SAMIR DAOU BEYOND PRODUCTION 2011


This page: (from left) Dress: Manish Arora - Taten • Earrings and ring: Disaya - Taten • Dress: Manish Arora - Taten • Earrings and bracelet: Kara Ross - Taten • Necklace: Z’etoile - Taten Opposite page: (from left) Top: Rabih Kayrouz • Skirt: Robert Rodriguez - Boutique 1 • Bracelets: Kara Ross - Taten • Shoes: Christian Louboutin • Red dress: Alexander McQueen • Belt: Rabih Kayrouz • Bracelet: Eddie Borgo - Boutique 1 • Ring: Lara Bohinc - Boutique 1 • Shoes : Christian Louboutin


Shoes: Alexander McQueen • Top: Valentino R.E.D - Taten • Necklace: Z'etoile - Taten • Earrings: Manouk - Taten


Dress: Manish Arora - Taten • Earrings, (left) bracelets, and (right) ring: Kara Ross - Taten • (Right) bracelet: Eddie Bongo - Boutique 1 • (Left) ring: Lara Bohinc - Boutique 1


This page: Shorts: Angel Sanchez - Boutique 1 • Jacket: Rabih Kayrouz • Ring, bracelet and shoes: Alexander McQueen • Earrings: Kara Ross - Taten Opposite page: (from left) Dress : Erdem - Boutique 1 • Ring and earrings: Disaya - Taten • Gold ring: Lara Bohnic - Boutique 1 • Brooch: Yazbukey • Shoes: Nine West • Dress : Preen - Taten • Ring : Kara Ross - Taten • Necklace: Disaya - Taten • Shoes: Baldain - Taten


Yellow dress: Rabih Kayrouz • Bracelet: Kara Ross - Taten • Shoes: Christian Louboutin Blue dress: Jason Wu - Boutique 1 • Bracelet: Kara Ross - Boutique 1 • Shoes: Christian Louboutin


PRODUCTION RYAN HOUSSARI AND ELI REZKALLAH


TOM BINNS

Necklace available at Plum


CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN Shoes


LANVIN Bag

CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN Shoes


LANVIN Shoes


CHANEL

Bag and gloves


LANVIN

Bag and ballerinas


HERMĂˆS

Scarf, wedge-heels and bracelets


BALMAIN

Shoes and crystal-studded cuff


LOUIS VUITTON

Bag, shoes, bracelet and rings


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INTERVIEW RABIH KAYROUZ

RABIH KAYROUZ RECENTLY OPENED A NEW BOUTIQUE IN THE BEIRUT PORT AREA. PLASTIK* SAT DOWN WITH THE CELEBRATED FASHION DESIGNER AND ASKED HIM ABOUT THE LOCATION, HIS EARLIEST FASHION MEMORIES, THE INS AND OUTS OF HIS LATEST COLLECTION, HIS FANTASY OF BEING AN “AESTHETIC DICTATOR,” AND MUCH, MUCH MORE.


WHAT IS PLASTIK* TO YOU? Fun and freedom. FAVORITE VISUAL ARTIST: These kinds of questions are too difficult for someone who is curious. No one at the moment. FAVORITE BOOK: At the moment – Etel Adnan’s Sitt Marie Rose: A Novel.

FAVORITE FILM: Moments again - Luca Guadagnino’s I Am Love.

FAVORITE TV SERIES: None at all - forget TV! FAVORITE DIRECTOR: Wim Wenders, Luc Besson and Fellini.

FAVORITE SINGER: My niece in the shower. MOST PLAYED ON MY IPOD: Too many to list.


There is a high level of craftsmanship in your creations and you’ve been dubbed an “architect of the female body.” Your designs don’t scream, they whisper. What whispers to you in the creative process? I would say that it’s the conveyance of emotion that is most important. This is what I work for. It’s not that I want to play with emotion. But I’m happy to give. And that people see this is important today, because you have plenty of architects and fashion designers. I mean everyone is doing clothes today, from cheap to tacky to very good, everything. And lately, the press has noticed my work in this respect, that I’m bringing emotions forward. In Elle, the reviewer said: “He made us believe that fashion goes with emotion.” What is different about today is the emotions.

Congratulations on the opening of the MRK boutique in the Beirut Port. Why open your ready-to-wear flagship store in an industrial area? Actually, I wanted to be in a place like this. I didn’t want to be downtown and I didn’t want to be in the middle of a neighbourhood like Ashrafieh or Hamra. I had to be in Beirut, and I had to be within walking distance of my Gemmayze workshop. After discovering this place and the neighbourhood, I just couldn’t be elsewhere. For the last few years you’ve showcased your couture and ready-to-wear collections in Paris, but your roots are firmly planted in Beirut. Does the new store reflect your love affair with the city? I wouldn’t imagine opening my first store outside Beirut. You know, I’m not exhibiting couture anymore. I’m doing this one collection that shows couture techniques mixed with ready-towear techniques. This is my new collection. This is my new story actually. And, it is a new story. In Paris I’ve been accepted on the calendar, and have gotten recognition, because of that concept. Today we’re not couture. Couture is only for a select group. Most of the people want to go to a shop and find something perfectly done, hand finished. They want beautiful fabrics, clothes that fit well and give them a unique feeling. Something accessible. Whether or not it’s expensive doesn’t matter. It must be accessible. What is your earliest fashion memory? Is there such a moment? Definitely. My first fashion memory was an Yves Saint-Laurent fashion show. Actually, I don’t remember who was first. But it was either a YSL show or a Yohji Yamamoto show. I had such strong moments with both, and these were the only two designers that marked me. It’s because these two were smart enough to play with real clothes, that weren’t fashion at all, and mix them with emotion.

In Salwa, the spring/ summer 2011 collection, you’ve juxtaposed your signature architectural cuts with fluidity and introduced new pleating techniques. Tell us a bit more about this experiment? I remember everything about this collection. I was really thinking about all this urban work by Yamamoto and YSL, and it led me to ask "what’s the most noble clothing?" In fact, they’re working clothes. The leather butcher’s outfit for example. But I wanted to push it more, and I wanted it to be a fun collection. The name says it: ‘fun.’ You know, sunny, light, something we can enjoy. As for the form, it was a mixture of floating dancers and reptiles. So, a mixture between something very animalistic and something very light. Regarding the pleating, I just wanted to experiment with forms, and have the feel as if the fabric was really inhabited, as if the fabric could move at anytime, or as if the fabric could fold anytime. This is where the pleats came from. You’ve also opted for a fresh, almost flashy color palette, a novelty for MRK. What made you break the silence? I actually did this before in my 2007 collection, which was very loud. I like colors, as I said. I like loud colours. I’m not a big fan of the middle colors – not pastels. I don’t like pastels. I did the recent collection, for example, using powdery colors, powdery pinks and powdery skin colors mixed with very loud and flashy electric colors. Again, it was harkening back to my references to ballet dancers and reptiles. There is a thin line between fashion as an art and fashion as a business. How did you find a middle ground in this time of mass consumption? And do they ever clash? We’ve proven that fashion is not just art. It’s a business at the end of the day, because we are employing lots of people. There are a lot of families living off this business. There are lots of machines – literally – that we have to run. And we have to realize that we are designing things that have to be worn at the end of the day. When we respect these things, we minimize

the clash. And lots of “artists” in the business, such as YSL, succeeded with this model of respect. He created the Rive Gauche (boutique for women), and was the first to create a readyto-wear line in 1968. And of course Yomamoto – if I may reference my two masters again. Both succeeded with this model. Lebanese designers have been very successful lately in the Paris haute couture showrooms. As a mentor of young talent, what do you think is missing for them to outshine others in the world of prêt-a-porter? I don’t think we’re far from this happening. But with ready-to-wear today, the exposure is more difficult, because it requires much more than haute couture. And with the Lebanese, they’ve filled a gap with these haute couture evening gowns and red carpet fashion affairs, which designers in the business don’t really do these days. But ready-to-wear is much more difficult, because there is so much more work to do and there’s so much more competition. I think we need to arrive at creating a singularity, something more unique, something like a “Lebanese School” of fashion,” much like there was the “Belgian School” or “Japanese School.” If we have this then, then we will succeed internationally. In recent years, many entrepreneurs have turned a dormant fashion label with great heritage into a business success story. Would you ever say ‘yes’ to being a creative director of a label? And what fashion house would you like to see evolve? It’s prestigious to do that and, if I were asked to head any big brand, I would definitely consider it. I won’t name them. I’m first of all concentrated on MRK and I’m happy to be independent and not part of any big financial group. There has been a wave of collaborations between designer names and consumer brands. Is there any (future) collaboration bearing your signature? Truthfully, I don’t see myself putting my name on any product. Perhaps if it’s something that will help me develop something interesting in my business, but just like that, I can’t imagine it. If you had to create an MRK wonderland, how would you describe it and who would inhabit it? I thought about this actually. Let’s take Beirut. I would forbid things. I would put very aesthetic, strict rules in appearance. I think I would be an aesthetic dictator, let’s say. I would forbid lots of surgery. I’m not afraid to say it. I would forbid French manicures. You would go to jail if you wore them. Like I said I would be an aesthetic dictator. I don’t mind. I wouldn’t mind if people dressed up in ways in which they wanted to, but some products on the market they would be forbidden from buying. I would give them choice. Not just MRK. I would not veto brands, only certain items.


UNRAVEL: KNITWEAR IN FASHION ALEXANDER MCQUEEN: SAVAGE BEAUTY SET AMSTERDAM BY DANA LIXENBERG YSL RIVE GAUCHE FIGURES AND FICTIONS: CONTEMPORARY SOUTH AFRICAN PHOTOGRAPHY PARIS – DELHI – BOMBAY ROBERTO CAPUCCI: ART INTO FASHION MADAME GRÈS


188

© Tilda Swinton for Sandra Backlund. Published in Another Magazine, Autumn 2009.

EXPOS BELGIUM

UNRAVELING

WHAT: UNRAVEL: KNITWEAR IN FASHION WHERE: ANTWERP FASHION MUSEUM, BELGIUM WHEN: UNTIL AUGUST 14, 2011

Knitting is often associated with the image of a little old lady in a rocking chair who happily spends the last days of her life needling socks and shawls for her grandchildren. And while such little old ladies may still exist, knitting is not just for the old and old fashioned, as proves the exhibition Unravel: Knitwear in Fashion at the Antwerp Fashion Museum. Contrary to what many people believe, knitting and knitwear have never disappeared from the catwalk. A young and upcoming designer like Sweden’s Sandra Backlund seems to do just about everything in wool, while over the years, Alexander McQueen, Martin Margiela, Sonia Rykiel, Vivienne Westwood and Chanel, to name but a few, all created splendid designs using grandma’s needles. In addition to Backlund, Kevin Kramp is another young designer to showcase some of his work at the Antwerp Fashion Museum. According to the show’s curator, his men’s

knitwear “combines exaggerated, bold, soft and beautifully refreshing shapes in a wide range of colors, stitch techniques and jacquard patterns.” The exhibition aims to question today’s stereotypes regarding the ancient technique, and show that tricot or knitwear has been a source of inspiration for fashion designers and the clothing industry for centuries. Through the confrontation of historic and modern pieces, it also shows the many different knitting techniques that exist. The show pays a special homage to Belgian designer Ann Salens, who became famous in the 1970s with her extremely colorful knitted dresses. The tribute consists of a series of installations of contemporary knitwear created by three Antwerp-based designers. The museum furthermore pays attention to the history of knitting machines, the first of which

was developed as early as 1598 in England, and the use of wool and knitwear in lingerie and sports clothing. Last but not least, a special room is dedicated to the 20s and 30s, when wool and knitwear became extremely popular, especially among women. The two decades between the Great Wars were a period of change, in which many women fought for more social, economic and political liberty. Within that climate the dress code changed. This “new woman” wanted to move more freely, and wool and knitwear were the perfect “medium.” The pullover, for example, became a hit among women form all social backgrounds. Two designers played a pivotal rule: Jean Patou and Elsa Schiaparelli. Oh, and let’s not forget Mademoiselle Chanel. She was not the first to use jersey in her dresses, but played an important role in bridging the gap between the “code sportive” and haute couture, and in 1917 introduced the iconic blouse "Le Marinière."


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© Alexander McQueen (British, 1969-2010) Ensemble, Plato’s Atlantis, Spring/Summer 2010 Photography by Sølve Sundsbø courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

EXPOS NEW YORK

FASHION HOOLIGAN

WHAT: ALEXANDER MCQUEEN: SAVAGE BEAUTY WHERE: METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, NEW YORK WHEN: FROM MAY 4 - JULY 31, 2011

“Alexander McQueen was best known for his astonishing and extravagant runway presentations, which were given dramatic scenarios and narrative structures that suggested avant-garde installation and performance art,” said Andrew Bolton, Curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute. “His fashions were an outlet for his emotions, an expression of the deepest, often darkest, aspects of his imagination. He was a true romantic in the Byronic sense of the word – he channeled the sublime.” The retrospective displays some 100 examples of McQueen’s designs drawn primarily from the Alexander McQueen Archive in London, the Givenchy Archive in Paris, as well as private collections. Some of his signature designs

include the bumster trouser, the kimono jacket, and the Origami frock coat. If you are not able to make it to New York before July 31, no need to worry, a book under the same title, Savage Beauty, is due to appear later this year. The exhibition covers McQueen’s entire career, from his 1992 debut to his final show at the London Fashion Week, which took place just days after his tragic death on February 11, 2010. Lee Alexander McQueen was only 40 years old. He always had an eye for big drama, even in death. Devastated by the death of his mother Joyce, he took an overdose of pills and drugs and hung himself with his favorite brown belt, leaving a note saying: “Look after my dogs, sorry, I love you, Lee.”

Having been crowned British Designer of the Year four times and International Designer of the Year in 2003, McQueen is arguably Britain’s most successful designer. Known as a “fashion hooligan” and rebel, he just loved making noise. He was a fashion “lad,” even though he was openly gay from an early age. In 1996, he succeeded John Galliano as head designer at Givenchy and started his new job by stating that the fashion house’s founding founder was “insignificant.” McQueen was known for his loud and overthe-top runway shows. He once decorated the catwalk with stuffed animals, named one collection Highland Rape, and was the first to feature double amputee Aimee Mullins as a model on the runway. That he was far ahead of his time may be illustrated by his Bumster collection, which triggered the rage in low-cut jeans.


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© Hotel The Globe, Kamer 301, 2010 (c) Dana Lixenberg.

EXPOS AMSTERDAM

UNSEEN AMSTERDAM

WHAT: SET AMSTERDAM BY DANA LIXENBERG WHERE: FOAM, AMSTERDAM WHEN: FROM MARCH 25 - MAY 29, 2011

In Set Amsterdam, Dana Lixenberg portrays the Dutch capital in a curious and unusual series of landscapes and interiors. None of the cliché images one might expect appear. No romantic 17th century mansions and canals, no red light district or coffee shops. And there are no people. Not a soul! While Lixenberg is internationally renowned for her portraits, she captured Amsterdam in what seems a series of films sets, hence the exhibition’s title. Lixenberg was inspired to create these photographs after being commissioned to create a series of actors’ portraits for a Dutch TV-series called A’dam E.v.a., which examines individual lives in the city of Amsterdam.

Her work on the series guided Lixenberg to locations she had never seen or imagined, including a former bomb shelter, a Ghanaian church, a morgue, Amsterdam’s garbage incinerator and the Schiphol Airport fire brigade’s practicing area. In Set Amsterdam, only traces of human activity hint at inhabitants. The absence of people forces the viewer to focus on the spaces themselves – spaces the viewer normally would not bother looking at and, like Lixenberg, arguably was unaware they even existed. In terms of style however, the series is not as far removed from her previous work as may seem at first sight. Using a large-format camera and a tripod, her approach is direct,

sober, and deceivingly casual. Nothing is made more beautiful than it “really” is. In a way, Lixenberg could be called a quite “Protestant” photographer, although she does cherish a love for big contrasts. Set Amsterdam is reminiscent of Lixenberg’s landscapes in The Last Days of Shishmaref, a tiny village in Alaska that, as a consequence of global warming, is gradually being comsumed by the sea. Born in Amsterdam in 1964, it is the first time Lixenberg photographed her home city, which she left for New York in 1990. Meanwhile, she is today arguably more famous in the Big Apple than in her native city.


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© Fondation Pierre Bergé - Yves Saint Laurent / 5, avenue Marceau / 75116 Paris.

EXPOS PARIS

RIVE GAUCHE CHIC

WHAT: YSL RIVE GAUCHE WHERE: FONDATION PIERRE BERGÉ – YSL, PARIS WHEN: UNTIL JULY 17, 2011

The 15th exhibition at the Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent Foundation in Paris is dedicated to the latter’s famous prêt-à-porter brand Saint Laurent Rive Gauche. Nearly seventy of the master’s designs will be on display in the exhibition space on avenue Marceau. The gallery has been totally revamped into the decor of the first Saint Laurent Rive Gauche boutique on the Rue de Tournon, which opened in September 1966 with Catherine Deneuve as special guest of honor. The timing and launch of the “other” YSL line must be seen within the context of the roaring 60s, the days of the sexual revolution, longer and longer hair, students mounting the May 68 barricades and the overall decline of traditional authority. Of course, these were also the days, in which women wanted to have their say on things. No more would they ask their father’s permission to go out, demonstrate, or go to work.

And YSL wanted to support these increasingly independent women. And he wanted to dress them! His prêt-a-porter was born out of his desire to dress as many women as possible. He was simply no longer content with dressing the rich. And so, only five years after he established his fashion house, YSL became the first designer to launch a prêt-a-porter label under his own name. According to Pierre Bergé, YSL’s decision to do so was “a political act with a social aim.” It was a political act, in the sense that YSL brought fashion out of the upper circles down to the street into the social realm. Some people have claimed that Chanel led the first revolution by forgetting about the corset and dressing women in pants, while YSL led the second turnabout by “sliding the suit of the shoulders of men onto those of women in the form of Le Smoking.”

Unlike what most people expected, YSL did not make cheaper, simpler versions of his haute couture collection. No, he created a complete new line. “I want to break away from the idea that haute couture is the sole image of fashion. Fashion is what can be worn. This is the main square, not a closed circle,” he once said. Naturally, to create fashion for the masses, he had to take into consideration the limits and possibilities of the industrial production process. In that sense, YSL also revolutionized fashion making. With the help of the machine, YSL helped create the modern woman by dressing her in sailor’s jackets, safari suits, trench coats, leather belts and leggings: playful, practical and sensuous.


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© Pieter and Maryna Vermeulen with Timana Phosiwa by Pieter Hugo.

EXPOS LONDON

THE NEW SOUTH AFRICA

WHAT: FIGURES AND FICTIONS: CONTEMPORARY SOUTH AFRICAN PHOTOGRAPHY WHERE: V&A MUSEUM, LONDON WHEN: FROM APRIL 12 - JULY 17, 2011

The new South Africa, as seen through the lens of 17 contemporary photographers from the former Apartheid state, takes center stage at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London from April 17 onward. Figures & Fictions zooms in on the vibrant and sophisticated photographic culture that has emerged in Africa’s southernmost tip and explores the “new” country in terms of race, gender, class and politics. As varied as the country itself, so the styles and subject matter on display differ greatly, yet the new South Africa is arguably best summed up by Pieter Hugo’s seemingly simple portrait of Pieter and Maryna Vermeulen with a tiny black boy named Timana Phosiwa. It is a portrait that is at once real and romantic. The elderly couple, whose names indicate they are descendants of the Dutch farmers

who once introduced Apartheid, is not very beautiful, and yet there is something very beautiful and touching about them, their openness and vulnerability. He is dressed in shorts and has a prosthetic leg, and has put a loving arm around her shoulder. She pushes back the years with her smile and carefully holds the little boy, who is the only one properly dressed. Yet, perhaps what “makes” the photo most of all is their eyes, two pairs of bright blue eyes that seem to shine thanks to that little bundle of happiness stuck between them. Not everything on display is of the romantic kind. Several photographers, for example, focus on new urban dress codes and subcultures, while Graeme Willems’ Springfontein is a wonderful example of what good street photography is all about: a great snapshot that

brings life and color to what seems an ordinary scene in this small farming town: a boy’s laugh in a public phone booth surrounded by bits and pieces of everyday life, with which the viewer can create his own story. The word “figures” in the exhibition’s title refers first of all to the people on display, through whom we explore and challenge present day and past archetypes in this beautiful country. The word “fictions” refers to the fact that, no matter how “real” the photo, it always depicts a reality filtered by the lens and view point of the creator, and that of the viewer …


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© Devi and the Sink, 2004. Collection Ms L. Drake-Brockman. Courtesy Vadehra Art Gallery.

EXPOS PARIS

AN INDIAN SUMMER IN PARIS

WHAT: PARIS – DELHI – BOMBAY WHERE: CENTRE GEORGE POMPIDOU, PARIS WHEN: FROM MAY 25 - SEPT. 19, 2011

The world, and especially the West, has long cherished a deep fascination for ancient India, which from a strictly Orientalist point of view is arguably the most “other” civilisation on earth. With is its myriad of Gods and half-Gods, its philosophy and spirituality, its striking discrepancies in rich and poor, its caste system, as well as its rapid economic development as a global powerhouse, India simply does not stop to amaze us. This summer, the Centre Pompidou in Paris will offer a very Indian summer, as more than fifty French and Indian artists cast a light on the profound changes the vast country under the Himalayas is going through, looking at such issues as politics, religion, identity, sexuality, women’s rights and urban development. Some of the artists, including Sophie Calles, ORLAN, Subodh Gupta, Bharti Kher and Sunil

Gupta have been asked to produce works especially for this unique event.

produced a Koons-ish series of photographic stills known as the Hijra Fantasy series.

“More than an exhibition about Indian society seen through contemporary art, it’s about cultural globalisation,” said Sébastien Gravier. “The Centre Pompidou has the ambition to build bridges between these two cultures and, therefore, activate cultural exchanges.”

A "Hijra" is a man born in a woman’s body. He dresses and acts like a woman, sometimes going so far as surgery. Records of such people go way back and there is even a temple in India devoted to them, as they are thought to belong to a third sex and are believed to have special powers. Anyone who ever traveled in India will remember the groups of loud she-males who sing and dance around you in exchange for a few rupees.

Hot on the heels of its economic development, India has an exciting and rapidly expanding art scene that, directly or indirectly, can draw inspiration from thousands of years of Indian art and craftsmanship – a seemingly bottomless pool of wisdom and beauty, which does not mean however that modern Indian art is by definition traditional. Atul Dodiya, for example, uses a mix of religious and commercial imagery to depict a critical view on scenes from a marriage. Tejal Shah

As said, Western artists too drink from the Indian well. The French photographers duo Pierre et Gilles, for one, have long been admirers of Indian culture. Inspired by the traditional Indian pictures of Gods and Goddesses, they for example produced a famous variation on the Holy Family with Nina Hagen as a kind of Indian Maria.


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© Nove Gonne (Nine Skirts), 1956, By Roberto Ca­pucci (Italian, b. 1930). Sala Bianca Palazzo Pitti Florence. Sculpture-dress, ‘bello’ red silk taf­feta, overlapping elements on the skirt. Claudia Primangeli / L.e C. Service.

EXPOS PHILADELPHIA

FASHION FOR ETERNITY

WHAT: ROBERTO CAPUCCI: ART INTO FASHION WHERE: PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART WHEN: MARCH 16 - JUNE 5, 2011

Roberto Capucci is more than a fashion designer. He is more like an architect or sculptor of cloth and color, who is revered by fellow designers for his innovative use of form and silhouette. Take his 1978 Colonna piece, which is based on Greek columns, his legendary sculpture dresses, his flower dresses or the iconic 1956 Nine Dresses, which were inspired by the rings produced by a stone thrown in a pond. For the first time ever in the US, the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA), with the support of the Fondazione Roberto Capucci in Florence, has brought together over 80 of his works, as well as dozens of sketches, drawings, film clips and historical photographs. “For Capucci, the act of creation is a complete sensory experience,” said the PMA curator. “He

has described it as an assault – of art, beauty, color, emotion, music, nature, poetry.” Born in Rome in 1930, Capucci studied at the Accademia delle Belle Arti and worked with designer Emilio Schuberth before opening his first couture salon in 1950 at the tender age of twenty. Only six years later, the international press dubbed him as Italy’s number one fashion designer. In 1962, he moved to Paris where he did both classic and experimental collections using stones and plastic. He returned to his hometown in 1968, where he continued his work as a couturier and artist. Capucci caught the eye and praise of leading designers such as Christian Dior at an early age, while contemporary designers such as Ralph Rucci continue to admire his dedication to purity and art.

“Nature is my mentor,” Capucci once said. “In my garden, quietly watching with a childlike sense of fantasy, has helped to instill in me a sense of balance and a constant search for perfection, proportion, harmony.” His runway shows were always held in complete silence and were as such far removed from the buzz of today’s fashion world. Also, he never did duplications. Either the dress fitted the client or not, in which case she should simply buy another dress. In 1980, he withdrew from the formal fashion world to instead present a single collection dedicated to different cities such as Florence, Tokyo, Berlin, Vienna and Milan, where they were displayed in museums rather than at runways. And that is arguably where they belong. Capucci did not so much design dresses for everyday wear. Capucci sculpted an oeuvre for eternity.


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Boris Lipnitzki, 1933. Essayage d’un modèle Alix Barton sur mannequin par Mademoiselle Alix. © Boris Lipnitzki / Roger-Viollet

EXPOS PARIS

FULL OF GRÈS

WHAT: MADAME GRÈS WHERE: BOURDELLE MUSEUM, PARIS WHEN: UNTIL JULY 24, 2011

What’s in a name? Known as the “grande dame of haute couture,” Madame Grès was born in 1903 as Germaine Émilie Krebs, while in 1934 she opened her first fashion business under the name Alix Barton. In 1942, she opened Maison Grès, which over the years earned a well-deserved reputation for grace, class and sophistication. The name “Grès” by the way is said to be a partial anagram of her name and that of her husband, Russian painter Serge Czerefkov. As a child, young Germaine had actually wanted to become a sculptress, yet that was regarded “not done” for a lady and wellrespected member of the Paris bourgeoisie. A family friend encouraged her to become an apprentice in his fashion house, which she entered in 1930. All her life, Madame Grès would repeat her now famous phrase: “I wanted to become a sculptress. To me, it is the same thing to work with cloth or stone.”

Success came quickly for the young and upcoming designer. Her third collection, launched in the mid 30s, was the first to combine silk jerseys with classic evening gowns. The jerseys would eventually become known as “Alix jerseys.” Gres always loved to travel, first to Greece and Rome, then to Egypt and North Africa, and later to India. She would incorporate part of what she encountered on her journeys in her designs. For example, her “Arabian gown” consisted of a harem-style trouser skirt. Maison Grès designed tailored suits in wools and leather, but became especially famous for its exquisite gowns, which were worn by such Goddesses as Marlene Dietrich, Greta Garbo, Jacqueline Kennedy and Dolores. Madame Grès was renowned for approaching each dress as a piece of art that was perfectly tailored to enhance and conceal where needed.

Many of her dresses add a Hellenistic touch to them and indeed it was partly her aim to transform a woman into a divine being Aphrodite. Madame Grès was also renowned for being the last among the grand fashion houses to introduce a ready-to-wear line, which she once to referred to as “prostitution.” In 1958, Madame Grès traveled to India to study textiles and upon her return launched a whole line of India-flavored designs. She also launched a perfume line. Yet towards the 80s, her business faltered and was bought by Bernard Tapie. That did not help and the firm was sold again, first to Estorel, then to a Japanese investor. So far, the fashion house has never been revived. Madame Grès’ reputation and signature designs however live on, certainly in the first few months of 2011, as the Bourdelle Museum in Paris has organized the first ever retrospective dedicated to her work. Some 80 of her most famous designs are on display.


Š Divine Intervention


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CINEMA ARAB CINEMA

THE TATE MODERN IN LONDON LAST MONTH CELEBRATED A SELECTION OF THE BEST IN EXPERIMENTAL ARAB CINEMA SINCE THE LATE 1960S, PROVING THE REGION HAS A LOT MORE TO OFFER THAN EGYPTIAN COMEDIES. LEBANON WAS WELL REPRESENTED WITH A HANDFUL OF FILMS, INCLUDING A PERFECT DAY, THE MAKING OF WHICH IS ITSELF WORTH A FILM AND A TRIBUTE TO THE AMAZING POWER OF CELLULOID.


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Making this sequence proved difficult, as Lebanese actors are superstitious about playing dead people. After all, you never know! Instead, the directors found a family willing to provide them with a portrait of their beloved “Antoine.” They decided to help, as they thought it might help the case of the some 17,000 people who went missing during Lebanon’s Civil war. And thus it was done. All seemed perfect, until the film’s premiere in 2006. The day after, the directors received a phone call from a utterly distressed “Aida,” who demanded the newspaper fragment to be removed from the film. She turned out to be Antoine’s second wife, who almost fainted when she suddenly saw her late husband’s face on screen. What’s more, in an incredible run of fate, the date the filmmakers had put on the (fake) newspaper article announcing Antoine’s disappearance, turned out to be the exact same date as Aida and Antoine got married! “I was sitting in my seat watching the film when I suddenly saw Antoine before me,” Aida told the filmmakers. “Antoine was looking at me and saying: ‘Aida, save me. I don’t know what I’m doing in this film, save me!’”

Perfect Day

If the following anecdote does not illustrate the power of film and the scarily thin line between fact and fiction, then what does? In A Perfect Day, which portrays a mother and son trying to come to grips with the loss of their disappeared husband and father, Lebanese filmmakers Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige showed a (fake) old newspaper clipping with a head shot of the main character at the time he vanished.

Perfect Day

CINEMA ARAB CINEMA

The festival offered an overview of experimental Arab cinema since the 1960s. The program varied from acclaimed masterpieces to rare and recently rediscovered films from countries such as Lebanon, Egypt, Algeria, Iraq, Syria and Palestine. The festival aimed “to map the intangible connections within the largely unknown heritage of personal, artistic and experimental cinema from the Arab world.”

Omar Amiralay

After long and difficult negotiations, Aida and the director couple reached a compromise: Antoine would be removed from all Lebanese film screenings, but could remain as a fictional character abroad. Seeing this incredible story, it should not come as a surprise that Joreige and Hadjithomas turned it into a lectureperformance called Save Me, Aida, which they last staged at the London Tate Modern during the Mapping Subjectivity festival in March.


Ghassan Salhab, 1958

The first, a thriller, gained critical acclaim due to the director interrupting the fiction film with interviews with the actors relating their own experiences during the Civil War. The second film beautifully mixes and explores private and national histories, as 1958 marks both the day of the director’s birth and the outbreak of Civil War in Lebanon. Palestinian filmmaker Elie Suleiman too was present with two films: his debut, Chronicle of a Disappearance, and his widely celebrated Divine Intervention, which has become a landmark Arab film thanks to the use of wit and fantasy sequences in dealing with the harsh reality of the Israeli occupation of the West Bank.

The program was actually an initiative from the Museum of Modern Art in New York, where the films have been screened over a period of three years. When Hadjithomas and Joreige performed Save Me, Aida there last year, reality had one more surprise in store. During the question hour after their performance, a woman took the microphone and told them Antoine had been her cousin. She had seen the film and “suddenly there he was,” adding it had been very difficult for her to focus on the rest of the film.

Several Syrian films were screened, among which two of the great Omar Amiralay. Arguably the country’s most influential filmmaker, Amiralay sadly died on February 5. His 1981 tragicomic movie The Misfortunes of Some is set in a war-struck Beirut and shows the travels and travails of Hajj Ali, who runs a taxi company and funeral home. In the one he transports the city’s living, in the other its dead. The second is a documentary on women and gender issues in Egypt.

Hadjithomas and Joreige's A Perfect Day and Save Me, Aida were not the only Lebanese contributions to Mapping Subjectivity. Their films The Lost Film and Ashes also were part of the program. Ghassan Salhab completed the Lebanese contingent with two films Fantom Beirut (1996) and his most recent 1958.

The festival could have programmed several more of his works, especially Everyday Life in a Syrian Village (1974) and A Flood in Baath Country (2003), but well, then the festival would have become too much of a tribute to the late Amiralay. I am sure though, that tribute will follow one day soon.

Of course, several Egyptian films were part of the program, among which The Mummy, which is regarded as the most influential of Egyptian auteur movies and credited with helping to define the origins of Egyptian national identity. The story sketches a deadly moral dilemma inside the Horbat tribe living at the site of the legendary cache of royal mummies at Deir AlBahari. The original print was restored to its stunning original beauty by the World Cinema Foundation. The festival also screened several Algerian and Moroccan films, among which the recent Cracks by Hicham Ayouch. Made in 2010, the film wrote headlines thanks to its daring style, approach and subject matter, which see three broken lives intertwine, as they search for love in Tangier. Finally, the award-winning 2008 Iraqi documentary Life After the Fall by Kasim Abid deserves a mention. Abid returns to his native country after a 30-year absence and is greeted by jubilant family members, as they have high hopes for the post-Saddam future. Over the course of four years however, hopes are dashed and despair sets in as he and his family watch how foreign promises are broken, and violence and vigilantism unfold in Baghdad. His film is a touching and at times shocking portrait proving that fact and fiction are not opposites, but just two ways of telling a tale, either of which have the ability to evoke beauty, thoughts and emotions, and as such produce truly great cinema.


TIME STANDS STILL IN MARRAKECH, THEY SAY, AND SOME THINGS SEEM NOT TO HAVE CHANGED SINCE MOROCCO’S SOUTHERN CAPITAL LAY AT THE HEART OF AN EMPIRE STRETCHING FROM NIGER TO SPAIN. SNAKE HANDLERS, STORY TELLERS AND PALM READERS STILL TRY TO PLEASE THE CROWDS AT DJEMAA EL FNA, THE LARGE SQUARE AND MAIN ENTRY TO THE LARGE REDWALLED MEDINA. EVERY NOW AND THEN A BOY PASSES BY, HISSING “HASHISH, HASHISH?” STREET VENDORS SELL FIGS AND FRESH DATES, WHILE THE SMELLS OF COUSCOUS AND KEBAB MIX WITH THOSE OF MORE OBSCURE DELICACIES SNAIL SOUP AND ROASTED SHEEP HEAD. THE FEAST OF THE SENSES IS COMPLETED BY THE INFECTIOUS RHYTHMS OF THE GNAOUA, THE WHITEGOWNED PERCUSSIONISTS THOUGHT TO BE DESCENDANTS OF THE AFRICAN TRADERS WHO ONCE DECIDED TO STAY IN “THE ROSE AMIDST THE PALMS.”


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TRAVEL MARRAKECH

“MARRAKECH BECAME WHAT IT STILL IS TODAY: A MIXED ARAB AND BERBER CITY SET TO AN AFRICAN PULSE.� There are many cities in the world, such as Naples, Rome and Varanasi that claim to be must sees at least once before dying. Marrakech is another that deserves to make that claim. Situated at the foot of the Atlas Mountains, Marrakech was founded in 1071 by Youssef ibn Tachfine. Spurred on by his faith, Tachfine and his warriors conquered most of Morocco and parts of Spain, thus establishing the Almovarid Empire. The former garrison post of Marrakech became its capital and reached the zenith of its power in the 16th and 17th century, when Ahmad al Mansour took Timbuktu and thus controlled the lucrative caravan routes that reached far beyond the Sahara sand dunes. Fuelled by the riches of the ancient trade routes, Marrakech became what it still is today: a mixed Arab and Berber city set to an African pulse. It must have been quite a sight for the traders to reach the red city. At the Djemaa El Fna, they unloaded their goods which were then transported by cart and donkey into the myriad alleyways that make up the old city. Within the Medina, which was declared a Unesco World Heritage Site in 1982, camels and donkeys have largely made way for a fleet of mopeds and mini-vans. Tourists are at times so numerous that one has to wait in line to take a photo of the richly decorated madrassa, while one can enjoy tourist guides explaining things in four languages simultaneously. Still, outside the souks and main tourist highlights, it is still easy enough to find some quiet time and a touch of Marrakech as it has been for nearly a 1,000 years. The traditional Marrakech home, known as "riad", is a walled house or palace set around an inner garden and courtyard. While French designer Yves Saint Laurent bought his as early as the mid-60s, most Europeans and Arabs only started buying theirs in the mid-1990s. Today these gems are worth a fortune, while some were turned into hotels and guesthouses. If you have the chance, do treat yourself to a bit of riad luxury! The old Medina lies surrounded by new Marrakech, a pink-colored city of tree-lined boulevards, Parisstyled coffee shops, gyms, spas, hotels of all starvarieties, and night clubs where one can dance till the early hours. Old Marrakech may have kept its old-world charm, yet new Marrakech offers you all the 21st century pleasures and comforts you can imagine. Yes, Marrakech is magic, in many ways.


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Missoni S/S 11

Gucci S/S 11 Emilio Pucci S/S 11

Roberto Cavalli S/S 11

Emilio Pucci S/S 11 Blumarine S/S 11

Yves Saint Laurent in Marrakech

TRAVEL MARRAKECH

IN FASHION

YSL 1989

At Gucci, Frida Giannini displayed the Sophisticated Seduction collection, a great mix of exotic colors infused with traditional Moroccan embellishments. A fellow Italian, Roberto Cavalli, highlighted the Berber culture with a look that encompasses lace and peasantry, intricate leather weaving, loose transparency and the finest embroidery. Even at YSL, creative director Stefano Pilati reinterpreted the jumpsuit with a traditional Moroccan touch, while Phoebe Philo at Celine showcased prints inspired by the city’s Islamic interiors.

Talitha Getty in Marrakech, Vogue 1970

The energy, beauty and spirit of Marrakech are all conveyed on the summer catwalks of some of the world’s biggest designers. As an hommage to Saint Laurent’s love affair with Marrakech, designers reworked his iconic designs and prompted a major runway trend for the season.


STAY

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TRAVEL MARRAKECH

• La Mamounia

Avenue Bab Jdid (Tel: +212 524 388 600)

• The Baglioni Hotel

Rue Amizmiz (Tel. +212 524 39 09 30)

• Palais Rhoul & Spa

Route de Fes, Dar Tounsi (Tel: +212 524 329 494)

EAT

IN FILM Fashion is not the only creative industry mesmerized by the beauty of Marrakech. Its climate, exotic landscapes, as well as the support of the Moroccan government, made it a prime location for film producers. Casablanca, Alexander, The Exorcist, Hideous Kinky, and most recently, Sex and the City 2 have all been partly filmed in Marrakech, even if no credit was given to the location. The most common film sites include the towering Atlas Mountains with their beautiful landscapes and serene atmosphere, the traditional souks and the ancient medina that contains several historical landmarks. Due to the surge in the movie making business, the city has been playing host to the annual International Film Festival of Marrakech since 2000.

• Le Marrakchi

52 Rue des Banques (Tel: + 212 524 443 377)

• Le Foundouk

Souk Hal Fassi, Medina (Tel: +212 524 378 190)

• Le Comptoir

Rue Ahmed Chaouqi (Tel: +212 024 437 702)

• Akkal

Sidi Ghanem, Route de Safi (Tel: +212 524 335 938)

Alexander

SHOP

• Gueliz Souk

Gueliz Quarter

• La Porte D’or

Souk Semmarine

• Djemaa El-Fna Medina Quarter

• Yahya Création Gallery

61 Rue de Yougoslavie, Guéliz (Tel : +212 244 227 76)

• Majorelle Gardens

Avenue Yacoub el Mansour, Safi Boulevard

Sex and The City 2

VISIT

GETTING THERE

•Visas: Required for all Lebanese passport holders. •Currency: 1 USD = 7.84 MAD (Moroccan Dirham) •Time Difference: standard GMT all year round. •Advice: When in Marrakech, never drink water out of tap.


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FOOD DINNER PARTY

PLASTIK* DINNER PARTY

Chef Elie Nasr and his dream guests*

Born in Beirut, chef Elie Nasr started cooking at the age of 19. His latest coup is presented in fusion dishes for the newly opened State11 – a New York-style eatery and coffee shop with a laid-back ambience in the heart of Acharfieh, Beirut. STATE 11 offers an effortless yet scrumptious variety of dishes, from mouth-watering burgers (served with a shot of milkshake- the genuine American way!) to delightful steak platters, not to mention their signature salad bar – all set in one trendy, easy-dining spot.

When asked to pick five celebrities for his dream dinner party, chef Elie did not hesitate to bring together Hollywood royalties and sports beaus on one table. His dinner selection is based on State11’s specialties that are, at the same time, easy to make at home.

ON WHAT BASIS DID YOU CHOOSE YOUR GUESTS? I wanted beautiful celebrities to mingle with each other. HOW WOULD YOU DO THE SEATING? Round table, free seating.

THE GUEST LIST

WHAT IS ON THE DINNER MENU? A selection of STATE11 specialties.

• ANGELINA JOLIE • JENNIFER LOPEZ • DEMI MOORE • CATHERINE ZETA JONES • PETTER SOLEBERG • DAVID BECKHAM

ANY ENTERTAINMENT? I’ll leave it up to Demi.


GOAT CHEESE SALAD

FETTUCINI ALFREDO

DEVIL'S ADVOCATE CHICKEN

ELDER FLOWER COLLINS


FETTUCINI ALFREDO

GOAT CHEESE SALAD

Ingredients: 

Preparation:

Ingredients: 

Preparation:

100g fettucini 50g white fresh mushroom 120g fresh cream 1 shot white wine parmesan  olive oil salt and pepper

•Boil the pasta for 5 minutes •Cut mushroom and fry it in olive oil for 3 minutes •Add one shot of white wine to the mushroom and let it evaporate •Add fresh cream, salt and pepper •Add the mix to the fettucini

60g goat cheese  40g lollo rosso 40g lollo bianco 20g cherry tomato chives balsamic vinegar sauce 1/2 piece of gelatine 2 eggs 100g flour 100g bread crumbs

•Place the goat cheese in a bain marie •Add the gelatine •Remove the mix and keep until it cools down •Cut the goat cheese into squares •Place in fridge •Once you remove it, dip it in flour, eggs and crumbs, then deep fry it •Place the lollo rosso and lollo bianco into a plate •Add the fried cheese on top •Add bread crumbs, cherry tomatoes and balsamic sauce

Once you turn off the fire, sprinkle some parmesan cheese *You can also add grilled chicken breast to your pasta

ELDER FLOWER COLLINS

DEVIL'S ADVOCATE CHICKEN

Ingredients: 

Preparation:

Ingredients: 

Preparation:

5cl gin 2cl elder flower  3cl sugar water 1cl orange juice 3cl fresh lemon juice 1cl soda jelly beans

•Shake all ingredients then serve in a long glass half-filled with ice •Top with soda •Garnish with jelly beans

500g chicken breast 20g dijon mustard 10g mustard à l’ancienne 250g fresh cream potato green beans rosemary  olive oil bread crumbs

•Cut the chicken breast in half and spread dijon mustard on one side, add crumbs then place in oven for 20 minutes •Cut the potatoes into wedges and deep fry them •Cook the green beans in a frying pan •Add olive oil and rosemary  Sauce: Mix fresh cream and mustard à l’ancienne and boil for 5 to 6 minutes


ADDRESs book

CHLOE 2 PIECES

Rue du Liban Yared Bldg., Tabaris Beirut, Lebanon +961 3 744 144

ACCESSORIZE

Kaslik Main Street +961 1 884 770 Ext:245 City Mall Level 1 +961 1 884 770 Ext:246 Beirut Mall Ground Floor +961 1 884 770 Ext:247 Abc Achrafieh Level 2 +961 1 884 770 Ext:248 Verdun 732 Ground Floor +961 1 884 770 Ext:249 Boulevard Zahle +961 1 884 770 Ext:251 Le Mall Ground Floor +961 1 884 770 Ext:252 Beirut Souks, Level 1 +961 1 884 770 Ext:255

AÏSHTI

BALENCIAGA

Beirut Souks Fakhry Bay Street Beirut Central district, Lebanon +961 1 991 111 Ext: 570

BALMAIN

Palladium 2 – Park Avenue Mina El Hosn, Beirut Central District , Lebanon +961 1 986 502

BASIL SODA

Horch Tabet - Dimitri Hayek street – Facing Noura Castle – Basil Soda Bldg – GF Beirut, Lebanon +961 1 511 775

BEYOND PRODUCTION 480 Gouraud St/ Gemmayze Beirut +961 1 576 888 fax: +961 1 446 941

BOUTIQUE 1

71, El-Moutrane Street, Downtown Beirut +961 1 991 111

2 Park Avenue Beirut central district +961 1 981 666 +961 1 981 660

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

BUDDHA BAR

136, Allenby Street, Downtown Beirut +961 1 970 349 +961 1 992 424

ALDO

Kaslik Main Street +961 1 884 770 Ext:230 City Mall Level 1 +961 1 884 770 Ext:231 Beirut Mall Ground Floor +961 1 884 770 Ext:232 Abc Achrafieh Level 1 +961 1 884 770 Ext:233 Verdun 732 Ground Floor +961 1 884 770 Ext:234 Hamra Main Street +961 1 884 770 Ext:235 Boulevard Zahle +961 1 884 770 Ext:236 Le Mall Level 2, Sin el Fil +961 1 884 770 Ext:237 Tripoli Main Street +961 1 884 770 Ext:385 Beirut Souks, Boustros Street +961 1 884 770 Ext:238

ALDO ACCESSORIES Beirut Mall L0 +961 1 884 770 Ext:306 City Mall L1 +961 1 884 770 Ext:307

ANNE KLEIN

Le Mall L2 +961 1 884 770 Ext:370 Abc Dbayeh L1 +961 1 884 770 Ext:371

Osseily Bldg, Riad El Soloh Street Down Town +961 1 993 199 +961 1 332 632

BURBERRY

Allenby Street Beirut Souks Beirut Central District, Lebanon +961 1 991 111 Ext: 455

BLUMARINE

2, Park Avenue, Downtown +961 1 974 749

BOTTEGA VENETA

Allenby Street, Beirut Souks Beirut Central District, Lebanon +961 1 991 111 Ext: 565

CHANEL

1 Rue Foch Beirut, Lebanon +961 1999 139 Abc Achrafieh Level 0 +961 1 202 175

CELINE

141, El-Moutrane Street, Downtown Beirut Lebanon +961 1 991 111 Ext: 250

CHARLES & KEITH Hamra, main street +961 1 884 770 Ext: 405

Beirut Souks Fakhry Bay Street, Beirut Central District Beirut, Lebanon +961 1 991 111 Ext: 580

CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN Fakhry Bey Street Beirut Souks, Downtown Beirut, Lebanon +961 1 970 625

CORTEFIEL

Abc Achrafieh L1 +961 1 884 770 Ext:345 Kaslik Main Street +961 1 884 770 Ext:346 Beirut Souks, L1 +961 1 884 770 Ext:347

COSTA BLANCA

City Mall Level 1 +961 1 884 770 Ext: 430 Kaslik Main Street +961 1 884 770 Ext: 431

DIOR

131, El-Moutrane Street, Downtown Beirut +961 1 991 111 Ext: 592

DOLCE&GABBANA 146 El Moutrane Street Downtown Beirut, Lebanon +961 1 991 111 Ext: 555

ELIE SAAB

Elie Saab bldg, Beirut Beirut Central District 202145516 P.O.BOX. 11-3293 +961 1 981 982/3

FENDI

145 Abdel Malak Street, Downtown Beirut, Lebanon +961 1 991 111 Ext: 550

FITNESS ZONE Hamra Taj Tower +961 1 751 666

FRONT ROW

147 Zaghloul Street, Downtown Beirut, Lebanon +961 1 999 877

GS STORES

GS, ABC Mall Ashrafieh, +961 1 200 851 GS , Galaxy Center, Chiah +961 1 546 015 GS, Dbayeh highway, Victoria Center, +961 4 419 282 GS, Verdun, Dunes Center, +961 1 791 910 GS, Tripoli El Mina Street, +961 6 437 837 GS, Hamra, Makdessi Street, +961 1 746 398 GS, Saida Mall, Saida East Boulevard, +961 7 755 428


GUCCI

141, El-Moutrane Street, Downtown Beirut, Lebanon +961 1 991 111 Ext: 200

HERMÈS

LOUIS VUITTON

Liban 103 Allenby Streetbeirut Beirut Souks- Lebanon +961 1 966 810

MANOUSH

Beirut Bab Idriss Centre-ville +961 1 999 710 +961 1 999 711

Bab Idriss Weygand Street Facing Beirut Souks Semiramis bldg +961 1 983 316

ISABEL MARANT

MARC JACOBS

Palladium 2 – Park Avenue Mina El Hosn, Beirut Central District, Lebanon +961 1 986 503 +961 1 986 504

LADURÉE

128 Foch street Beirut, Lebanon +961 1 992 722

LANVIN

Palladium, Park Mina El Hosn, Beirut, Central District Lebanon +961 1 986 501

LA SENZA

Kaslik Main Street +961 1 884 770 Ext:200 Abc Dbayeh Level 1 +961 1 884 770 Ext:201 City Mall Level 1 +961 1 884 770 Ext:202 Beirut Mall Level 1 +961 1 884 770 Ext:203 Abc Achrafieh Level 2 +961 1 884 770 Ext:204 Galaxy Mall, Ground floor, Chiah +961 1 884 770 Ext:205 Hamra Main Street +961 1 884 770 Ext:206 Amarat Chalhoub , Zalka +961 1 884 770 Ext:207 Verdun 730 Ground Floor +961 1 884 770 Ext:208 Boulevard Zahle +961 1 884 770 Ext:209 Le Mall Level 2, Sin el Fil +961 1 884 770 Ext:210 Tripoli Main Street +961 1 884 770 Ext:385 Beirut Souks, Souk el Jamil +961 1 884 770 Ext:211

LA VIE EN ROSE

Beirut Mall Level 1 +961 1 884 770 Ext:325 Kaslik Main Street +961 1 884 770 Ext:326 Le Mall Level 2, Sin el Fil +961 1 884 770 Ext:327 Abc Dbayeh Level 1 +961 1 884 770 Ext:328 City mall +961 1 884 770 Ext: 328

LE MALL

Horsh Tabet roundabout Sin El Fil, Beirut, Lebanon +961 1 485 185

137 El Moutrane Street Downtown Beirut Lebanon +961 1 991 111 Ext:148

MISSONI

2 Park Avenue, Downtown +961 1 981 661

MISS SIXTY

Beirut Central District, Beyhum Street +961 1 990 022 ABC Dbayeh +961 4 416 000 Ext: 2025

MONSOON

Abc Achrafieh L2 +961 1 884 770 Ext:254 Beirut Souks, Down Town +961 1 884 770 Ext:256

MRK BOUTIQUE

Fayad Building, Darwish Haddad Street Marfaa, Beirut Lebanon +961 1 444 221

NINE WEST

Kaslik Main Street +961 1 884 770 Ext:215 Abc Dbayeh Level 1 +961 1 884 770 Ext:216 City Mall Level 1 +961 1 884 770 Ext:217 Galaxy Mall, L0, Chiah +961 1 884 770 Ext:218 Abc Achrafieh Level 1 +961 1 884 770 Ext:219 Beirut Mall L0 +961 1 884 770 Ext:220 Verdun 732 L0 +961 1 884 770Ext:221 Hamra Main Street +961 1 884 770 Ext:222 Zalka Amarat Chalhoub +961 1 884 770 Ext:223 Boulevard Zahle +961 1 884 770 Ext:224 Le Mall L2, +961 1 884 770 Ext:225 Tripoli Main Street +961 1 884 770 Ext:385

NOODLES KITCHEN Abc Achrafieh L3 +961 1 212 888 Ext:1319 +961 3 137 171

PLUM

Berytus Bldg. Corner of Park Avenue & Avenue Francaise, Beirut Lebanon +961 1 976 565

ROBERTO CAVALLI

El Moutrane Street, Down Town Beirut Lebanon +961 1 991 111

STATE 11

Avenue Charles Malek Beirut, Ashrafieh Lebanon +961 1 326 367

STELLA MCCARTNEY Souks Fakhry Bay Street Beirut Central District Lebanon +961 1 991 111

STEVE MADDEN

Le Mall Level 2, Sin el Fil +961 1 884 770 Ext:260

TATEN

Marina Towers Project Marina Garden Building Minet Al Hosn, Beirut Lebanon +961 1 365 357 +961 1 365 387

TOM FORD

Karagulla Building, Downtown, Beirut, Lebanon +961 1 993 060

WOMEN’S SECRET Abc Dbayeh Level 1 +961 1 884 770 Ext:275 Abc Achrafieh Level 2 +961 1 884 770 Ext:276

YVES SAINT LAURENT Beirut Souks Fakhry Bay Street Beirut Central district Lebanon +961 1 991 111 Ext: 562


210

ICONIK* GARBAGE PAIL KIDS

When The Garbage Pail Kids hit the American market in 1985, I was one. By the time they reached Beirut, I was around 8. At that age, kids are still too young to sneak out, watch horror movies, skip school, fist fight or tell off the teacher. The only available “pushing the limits” adrenaline rush was The Garbage Pail Kids, which my mom fondly remembers – perhaps in comparison to other listed options – that hideous set of cards, mainly about toilet dysfunctions, depicting unreal and gross looking children. Was it triggered by one adult’s view on growing up or on kids themselves? After all, not everyone likes kids and not all kids are likeable. One theory is it was a reaction to The Cabbage Patch Kids, a series of dolls that looked like nothing, yet somehow had become something. Their bland expression and lack of particular attractiveness could have enchained a “I really want to throw you in the trash before my kid returns from school” reaction. Every card was a guaranteed “ewww” whereby eyes got wider at first, as you took in the new visual, only for the pupils to directly retract once the brain stretched and registered the new dimension of nastiness. Gigantic zits filled with so much puss they were about to self-pop, the boy with half his skull ripped off because of a shaving accident, the binge-eating blabber with vomit coming out of her mouth as she is cooking or talking on the phone, or the farter whose brain explodes from letting go the (nuclear) act of nature. I apologize for my language but thought this more descriptive than “Windy Mindy” or “Schizo Fran”. It took every little kid’s nightmare of possible teenage embarrassments – multiplied by A Lot – and kids just loved it. They loved the pink wrapper, the excitement of ripping it, the anticipation, and the shock factor, all that just could not get somewhere else. I liked those cards, and I guess many other people did so too. For even though they stopped making them in 1988, they would still be in the market for years to come, and today they are collectors’ items with their own fan base and a value that can reach up to 125$ for a complete series and up to 700$ for an unopened box. In Lebanon, the cards were part of the 1990s. So when I think Garbage Pail Kids, I think Beavis and Butthead and Mad Magazine, the epitome of American humor. And, yes, there was of course Nirvana. Some adults thought the phenomenon predicted the end of society and some fought really hard to stop the cards’ from being turned into a cartoon series for American TV. I guess they had not foreseen the recent developments in the Middle East. But Mad Magazine did so. Their 1986 September Garbage Pail Kids issue was iconic. Their strange boy mascot, Alfred E. Neuman, took the front cover as usual, this time as Nauseating Neuman, while the back cover featured nine Garbage Pail Adults drawings. Wacky Kaddafi is definitely my favorite at this point in time.


Hamra - Main Street

charleskeith.com


Plastik 11