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Film & sheet extrusion

Additions across the board Asian film processors are offered a choice of sustainable resins while films are layering up and in China, at the upcoming Chinaplas exhibition in Guangzhou, visitors will be able to view new technology from the West. Roll out of sustainable products Melbourne-based manufacturer Stellar Films has released a new range of sustainable films for the personal care and medical products industry. It is using Cardia Bioplastics’s Biohybrid patented technology, which says its bio-resins are used in a broad range of applications like flexible film, injection moulding, blow moulding, foam, extrusion and coating uses. Stellar Films’s personal care films is using Cardia's Biohybrid technology

To expand its presence in the region, Cardia has appointed Wesco, a joint venture with South African petrochemical company Sasol, as its distributor in China. The products will be supplied from Cardia’s purpose-built facility in Nanjing. Cardia was established in Australia in 2002 as Biograde and has its headquarters and research centre in Melbourne. It also recently launched a range of certified compostable bags, for sale in Australia and New Zealand. Carbon dioxide is transformed into a polypropylene carbonate and blended with starch using the company’s new technology to produce its bio-resin for the bags, which are compliant with global standards and certified to the US ASTM D6400; European EN13432 and Australian AS4736. Another company that is keen to sell its bio-resin to the plastic bag market is Indonesian masterbatch supplier PT Inter Aneka Lestari Kimia. Established in 1990, the company specialises in producing masterbatches and polymer compounds. Its factory is located in the province of Banten, on a 35,000 sq m site. Herman Moeliana, a major shareholder as well as President of the company, says that the company’s biodegradable Enviplast resin is produced mainly from tapioca starch, a derivative of vegetable oil and other ingredients derived from “abundant natural resources”. When asked about the benefits, he explains, “It dissolves instantly in hot water, softens in cold water and leaves only a small amount of ash when burnt. Based on experiments we have conducted, when a plastic bag made of Enviplast is buried in soil, it will almost disappear in three to six months, depending on soil conditions, like the water

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PRA

MAY 2011

content, amount of organisms and microorganisms present in the soil.” And though Enviplast has not yet been certified in accordance t o EN 1 3 4 3 2 , t h e c o m p a n y ’s preliminary pilot testing has shown that it is fully biodegradable. “Enviplast, being in the same product catagory as PLA, is more economical and cheaper than Herman Moeliana of PLA,” adds Moeliana, explaining Aneka is promoting that as a biodegradable resin it the company’s leaves no hazardous residue and is Enviplast resin. cost effective compared to resins He adds, “We are under the existing similar product confident that classifications. Enviplast will be a reasonable Meanwhile, US company Dow alternative for Chemical is on a road show in Asia most shopping bag to introduce its Elite Advanced applications that Technology (AT) PE resins, with a currently use PE.” key factor of sustainability driving the new launch. Developed after years of research, the resins are a proprietary and patent-pending postmetallocene technology built on Dow’s Insite technology. The company says that the mLLDPE resins are able to improve performances of sealant, stretch wrap and stretch hood films. Included in the range is the XUS 59999.15 P, which offers lower back pressure and power consumption and bubble stability and is targeted at vertical-form-fill-seal (VFFS) bags. Another grade, XUS 59999.06 P, stretches the performance of stretch wrap film. It is designed specifically to be used in downgauged machine wrap films, with a distinctive combination of stretch properties, in particular to high-on pallet puncture resistance. The third resin, XUS 59999.02 P, is for stretch hood films. With its benefits of toughness, elastic recovery, holding force and optics, it is targeted at the industrial and consumer packaging market segment. With clean running and low die build-up, the resin is also used as a core in combination with Dow’s Attane NG 4701G ultra-low density PE resins, offering elasticity and tear resistance. The company says that this resin could potentially result in savings compared to ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), which has lower tear and toughness but higher density. For example, Dow says its new resin has lower film weight for the same cross sectional area yielding more packaged pallets per roll when compared to EVA. In addition, the insensitivity of the film to orientation conditions allows for a larger die to increase output with the same film.

PRA May 2011  

Plastics and Rubber Asia May 2011 Electronic Issue

PRA May 2011  

Plastics and Rubber Asia May 2011 Electronic Issue