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THE TECHNOLOGY ISSUE

N O 09

mon k i. c om


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the technology issue

WELCOME TO OUR TECHNOLOGY ISSUE! recently, i listened with fascination to the musings of a renowned fashion journalist, reflecting on how her job has changed from the early days of her career. She told me about the time when fashion writers would still be drawing their own sketches at shows. Afterwards, they would order in the outfits they wanted for their next shoot. This was done by fax. The veteran journo recalled the occasion when, after ordering a long red dress that she so vividly remembered from the show, she had to discover that it didn’t actually exist. The whole outfit was a figment of her imagination. To our generation, the mere notion of having to just imagine something (well, anything) that you cannot instantaneously google requires a huge feat of comprehension. It seems as impossible as coming to terms with the idea of infinity or spending a whole day without noticing that you have left your phone at home. Or the thought of ignoring that alert telling you that you have been tagged on Facebook. Never before have we communicated as much as today – never before have we been so statically chained to small rectangular devices while doing so. This issue deals with technology beyond the ever-present aspect of communication, from science and art to music and fashion. After all, if you look at it more closely, we are actually already living inside an incredible science fiction story, complete with genetically modified food, artificial organs, space tourism and the

In action: Editor-in-chief Kira testing for possible risk of vision loss to the model of our scanography editorial. All totally safe!

internet fame of dancing cats. Technology has gone past the point of trying to make human existence simpler or more efficient. It makes our lives better, more exciting and, funnily enough, often more complicated as well. For our Technology Issue we asked techinspired designers like Jeremy Scott or Manish Arora to become inventors themselves. We met extraordinary artists and scientists, who, thanks to the most recent technological developments, have already set up camp in the future. With original Kraftwerk member Karl Bartos, we went on the trail of the origins of electronic music. We have made projections, stared into the microscope, we have scanned, rendered, looped and transformed our way into the future. And eventually we have also tested out what it might be like to survive in the wild without any technology at all. Turns out it works exactly the same way as any advanced tech tool: Without a hitch. As long as you know what you’re doing.


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contributors

bertapfirsich.com

BERTA PFIRSICH

hellotakako.com

OUR TECHNOPHILIAC CONTRIBUTORS ( a n d t h e ro b o t s w e a s ke d t h e m t o d r aw f o r t h i s p ag e )

DANNA TAKAKO in her free time Danna enjoys withdrawing into the world of libraries and antique shops, and then sometimes she releases the party monster that is hidden inside her. This multi-tasking journalist, who interviewed “body architect” Lucy McRae and artist Christine Kim Sun for us, will not allow her expression to be limited to mere words. She has her hands in many different pies, from the installations and performances of her art collective FRE3FALL to the art and music label Earnest Endeavours that she co-founded in London (one of her chosen homes next to NYC and LA). Chained to her laptop by her profession, the born Chicagoan will allow herself at least one “unplugged” day a month. But even if she can't imagine a life without Evernote, Youtube, Google, iWork, Audio Hijack Pro (for recording interviews), Maps app etc., Danna still loves the rawness of the analogue: Vinyl, old cassettes, books, VHS tapes. As she puts it herself, “A needle gliding over a crackly/dusty record is one of the best sounds in the world.”

photo danna takako B E L L A C L A R K E

we’re lucky that Berta Pfirsich, who originally wanted to become a librarian, suddenly gave up on her training and decided to be an artist instead. Or as she would have it: “One day I just lost my mind and founded a band called Der Ventilator.” After this escapade into the world of post-punk noise, she dedicated herself ever more deeply to her greatest passion: Photography. Even as a child she knew that she wanted to be a storyteller, and now she had found the right medium for it. Her pictures have since been published in magazines like Vogue China, Paper Cut and Material Girl, confirming the wisdom of her choice of career. Sometimes Berta wishes she could leave the constant dependence on technology in her life behind and just run off to the hills. So it was fortunate that we chose none other than her to direct her lens on nature in our feature on survival without technology. Fittingly, she didn’t even need a computer to do the job: As a complete analogue freak, there is one moment that this Barcelona-based photographer values more than any other: The surprise of seeing what image will appear as she gently dunks the photo paper into the developer.


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contributors

HVASS & HANNIBAL

hvasshannibal.dk

JULIANE BUCHROITHNER it’s true, we always take the mickey out of Juliane at our lunch breaks between editorial meetings. When the rest of us have already hoovered up our desserts, she will still be chewing on her starter in perfect, appreciative slow food mode (who would even bother to chew in this day and age?). We’re truly sorry about that, and obviously our taunts are nothing but a thin disguise of our envy of that special inner calm of hers. But not allowing yourself to be stressed out by life is also a skill sorely needed when you divide your time between two jobs: When Juliane is not hard at work in our editorial office, she works on theatrical productions, lovingly fashioning costumes and constructing stage sets by hand in painstaking detail. The rest of us, caught up in our online addiction, communicate via chat rather than in person while sitting at adjacent desks. We will never understand how Juliane manages not to hang around on Facebook during office hours. In all the time this has saved her, she seems to have taught herself how to draw robots. How else could she do it so well?

nan na hvass and Sofie Hannibal have known each other since high school. When both of them went to an evening class in design together, it soon became abundantly clear: Sofie was going to ditch her plans of becoming an author or an opera singer, and Nan Na would say goodbye to her projected career as an archaeologist, as they were going to set up their own design studio. Following their studies at the Danish Design School, the two illustrators set up Hvass&Hannibal in Copenhagen. Even if their choice of profession might have changed since their nursery days, they have still kept faith in one shared ambition. Our question what they would have liked to invent as kids received a prompt reply: “A teleportation machine.” Anything you would like to invent today? “Good design. And a teleportation machine.” You can convince yourself of their creativity, their imagination and their humour on pages 60 – 67.


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contents

03 EDITOR‘S LETTER

42 HIGH TECH, LO TECH, NO TECH?

Welcome to our Technology Issue!

Three readers and their favourite tech gadgets

28 STRANG ER THAN PARADISE 04 CONTRIBUTORS Meet writer Danna Takako, photographer Ber ta Pf irsich, illustrators Hvass&Hannibal, editor Juliane Buchroithner and their robot alter egos

Get to know our cover model and creative allrounder Bonnie Strange

Scanography by plastic media

30 SCREEN GAB

10 back to the far future The amazing “body architect” Lucy McRae talks about technology and fashion Photography by Jeannine Tan

46 MFC-J6510DW

Sound artist Christine Sun Kim in a portrait by Danna Takako Photography by Jimmy Fontaine

56 OF MAN M ACHINES AND SOUND MACHINES A condensed history of electronic music

18 DS126204 Photography by Ben Lamberty Styling by Dennis Blys

60 PTZ-630 36 DESIGNING THE FUTURE International fashion designers as inventors: Featuring Jeremy Scott, Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, Manish Arora, Yoshiyuki Miyamae for Issey Miyake and Humberto Leon for Kenzo

The illustrated editorial by Hvass&Hannibal


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contents

84 DF645 Photography by Tom Seelbach Digital imaging by Max Hornäk

102 WHERE TO FIND US All store addresses worldwide

90 THE STORYTELLER BEHIND THE CAMERA Monki TV Creative Director & producer Moira Ganley on her passion for travelling and ocean swimming

104 KEY PIECE COMPENDIUM

68 NP3151WG Photography by Sonja Kranz Styling by Irene Manicone

A handy index of everything you saw and fell in love with

92 CREATING THE THIRD DIMENSION Architect and Monki store designer Sara Otley on her talent for sleeping in

78 TECH HEROINES Introducing A-list contributors and promoters of technological progress in art fashion and design: Joasia Krysa, Cute Circuit and Lauren Indovina

94 THE ULTIMATE SURVIVOR‘S GUIDE Photography by Berta Pfirsich Styling by Jèss Monterde

114 Contacts & Team


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Lucy wears trousers Dar ia , all other items Lucy’s own


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lucy mcrae

Back To The Far Future

the s e lf - t i t le d “b o d y a r c h i t e c t” l u c y m c r ae p iro u e t t e s h e r wa y i n t o a te ch n o lo g y d r iv e n f u t u r e .

text and interview

Danna Takako

photography

Jeannine tan


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lucy mcrae

“i really like happy accidents,” says lucy mcrae. a born australian, lucy creates colourful experimental art that merges science, futurism, technology, sculpture, architecture and fashion design, all with a sense of fantasy and wonder. she seems to view the world through a prism, seeing infinite possibilities.

Lucy’s ideas often test the limits of the human body, whether it is a “swallowable perfume” that is meant to be ingested, or her liquid textile design (1.2 kilometres of transparent plumbing tubing) that came to life in pop starlet Robyn’s video for the song ‘Indestructible’. But no matter how technological or scientific or geeky, her experiments always carry a strong, accessible narrative. This is certainly the common thread running through her multifarious forays into film making, art direction and music video direction (make sure to check out her awesomely kaleidoscopic dance video for Rat Vs Possum’s ‘Fat Monk’). Away from her current home in Amsterdam on a research sabbatical in Melbourne, Lucy took time out to shed some light on the future, immortality, robots and more. She also discussed her latest project, ‘Make Your Maker’, which is set in a surreal lab in the future amongst edible clones.

_ Why do you use video as a medium? Is it something you have always been drawn to? I first found film when I was making some liquid experiments on the body.

"In this hypermodern world we are expected to perform like a superhuman species. I think it is important to shut down, turn off, go offline and resist what technology provides."


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lucy mcrae

photo RO B YN B o d yT a l k , J o h a n R e n c k

I covered a friend with thousands of Q-tips and sprayed her body with food dye, filming her skin changing colour. Before this I had worked with photography with Bart Hess, so film was a natural progression and a way to capture movement on the body. _ After 14 years as a classical ballet dancer, you must be fascinated by movement. Exactly. It’s an instinctive thing. When I’m on set I tend to choreograph the way my materials are dissected or move across a scene in the same way that I direct dancers in a routine. Some things come naturally to me because of my background. I use my camera like a microscope viewing my work through its frame. And by capturing the movement, I can replay it, archive it, and see how it can be improved or how it behaves. A friend recently said, ‘You are immortalising your work by documenting it on film.’ I had never thought of it like that before! In my recent film ‘Make Your Maker’ I sculpted body parts out of jelly. When they sit outside the fridge for a couple of days they go mouldy. They have to be thrown away. They die. But if I capture them on film, this sense of an unending occurs. There is an interesting relationship between immortality and things decaying, or going mouldy, sweating or melting. _ Is immortality as a whole something that you are interested in? Your recent work has involved the idea of cloning. I think there is a personal issue there that I am still discovering. Something that is lurking in the background, very deep, in my body. I remember listening to a documentary about a utopian technologist and his fascination with prolonging life and wanting to be able to reprogramme biology to stop the ageing process. I have more of a biological interest in questions like: How can technology evolve the body? It’s about giving the body a new programme or a new definition. My project ‘Swallow-able Perfume’ redefines the body in a way. The perfume works from the inside out. A fragrance is released through the skin’s surface, so the body becomes an atomizer, like a spray. For me it becomes really fascinating when the body begins to merge with some of the things we use externally. I am currently working with an underwater artist called Sarah Jane Pell, who is doing research with astronauts. She is looking at how the body behaves underwater, as these conditions are very similar to the way a body behaves in space. It’s important that we understand how the body will need to perform in zero gravity, as space travel is fast becoming the norm. Sarah and I were shooting a film yesterday for the 2040 Luna Olympics, a new game performed in neutral buoyancy, a swimming pool. She is

interested in the way the body becomes porous underwater and how information will not only be communicated verbally, visually or through sound, but through the body itself. Especially the skin will become a means of transmitting information. Another topic I am researching at the moment is neuroplasticity: How can the brain forge new ways of reprogramming our behaviour? It is believed that the brain is not hardwired after all. Scientists are working with patients known

Lucy Mc Rae’s cover ar twork for Robyn’s album “Body Talk”

as ‘Wobblers’ who have serious problems with their inner ear balance and cannot walk without assistance. By placing a series of tiny electrodes on the tongue, you can assist the brain to teach the patient to walk again. _ Are you aware of the effect technology has on your own body and mind? Personally, I have to exercise and do all sorts of things to reset my body every day, like a computer reboots its hard drive. In this hypermodern world we are expected


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lucy mcrae

Discover Lucy McRae's music video for Rat Vs Possum's song 'Fat Monk' by scanning the QR code

to perform like a superhuman species. I think it is important to shut down, turn off, go offline and resist what technology provides. It takes a lot of discipline. It’s almost as if you have an avatar, and you have yourself. And sometimes we need to step out of our own bodies, take a break and become that avatar. _ Earlier you mentioned an utopian technologist, and this made me wonder: What are your utopian ideas for the future? What would you like to see happen, with or without technology? I do think that we are going to swallow technology in the future, and this is going to have all kinds of different impacts, whether cosmetic, medicinal or in fashion. My idea of the future is constantly shifting, determined by the incredible

who we are around and what our other influences are. _ In a recent interview you described a contraption for gymnasts that vibrates when their posture is incorrect. It is an interesting example of how technology can be used to perfect our bodies. I was reading about the concept of the Performance Plateau. What happens when Usain Bolt can’t run any faster, and no one else can naturally run faster than him? Oscar Pistorius, the amazing South African athlete who competed in the Olympics wearing prosthetics, is a great example of the body merging with the machine. Are people going to start mutating, cutting off their arms and legs to merge skin with robot in order to become even faster? Maybe that is a sci-fi concept, but it’s interesting to think about speed, performance, elitism and competition. _What can you tell us about robots? I was recently told at SCI-Arc (Southern California Institute of Architecture) in L.A. that robots are going to become domestic products in the next two to three years. Automation is really important. I wanted to do the Monki photo shoot in the robot house located in this brand new building called the Design Hub at the School of Architecture and Design in Melbourne. The skin of the building is kinetic, depending upon where the sun is coming from. Layers of the building rotate to let more or less sun in, according to the time of day. Walking through the building, I cannot help but imagine it as a set for a film. There are all these amazing long corridors, soundproof rooms and doors that are seven meters tall, with mechanisms on the outside. The whole skin of the building is moving. I am really interested in what our lives will be like in thirty years’ time. When I walk through a building like this, I do feel that it fuels my imagination for understanding how things might be in the future.

people I meet, what I am reading or the things I produce. When a jellyfish moves through the water, its movements depend on its environment, such as a fish passing by or the pull of the tide. It is influenced by its surroundings. I have recently read an article, ‘The Unbearable Automaticity Of Being’, which throws up this discussion: Are we making decisions by ourselves, or is everything we do based on our surroundings? I think it is a combination of both, but I also think it is very much based on where we live,

_What technology can you personally not live without? My electric toothbrush and my camera. I don’t have a Facebook account, I shy away from social media, which I think is the extension of technology. I use it as a tool, but it’s not the driving force behind what I do. I am more interested in watching ingredients diffuse in the kitchen or seeing how the light shines through the glass on a wet mirror. Those fascinating physical phenomena are what excites me. Technology is a way of enabling and documenting those fascinations.

Find out more about Lucy McRae on lucymcrae.net


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the echo vamper

Lucy wears dress Je nna


MONKI.COM Monki.com, the sequel—coming so on. Bigger, b et ter (yep) and ab ove all with a new responsive design that makes it easy to check out the fashion, the inspiration and to get yourself a treat or two on your smar tphone. More Monki to the p eople! Mo nk i.com , the seq uel — c om i n g s o on . B ig g er, b et ter (yep ) a n d a b ove al l with a new resp onsi ve d esig n t h a t m a kes it e a sy to ch e ck out t h e fas h i o n , th e insp ira tion a nd to get yourself a t re a t or t wo on your sm a r t ph o n e .

M ore M on ki to t h e p e op le!


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D E N N I S B LY S hair

HAUKE KRAUSE Klaus Stiegemeyer make-up

H E L G E B R A N S C H E I DT K l a u s S t i e g e m e y e r u s i n g p r o d u c t s f r o m C h a n e l s p r i n g /s u m m e r c o l l e c t i o n 2 0 1 3 mode l

B O N N I E ST R A N G E


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k n i t t ed t op Br it a Int ar sia belt L e ila sk i rt Mar y n l ac e dr ess L ola soc k s L eo ra shoes Faid a


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ta n k t op Nina dr ess Dag ny l eor a Sock s shoes L ollo


bl ac k si ngl e t Lisa w h i t e si ngl e t Sanna l eg gi ngs Ad dison so c k s L eo ra


bl a zer Sara bl ouse Sa skia soc k s L eo ra shoes L ollo


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stranger than paradise

STRANGER THAN PARADISE s he is li ke an i n v i s i b le f o rc e , a g r av it a t i o n a l f i e ld t h at m a g ica l ly at t rac t s e v e r yo n e a ro u nd h e r : m e e t o u r c ov e r m o d e l b o n n i e s t ran g e .

February 2013

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stranger than paradise

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being able to do a lot, and wanting to do it too, can be something of a curse. While society will usually not turn up its nose at career choices like becoming an actress, a singer or a DJ, young women working in more than one creative field are often eyed with scepticism. “It-girl” is what the press calls all those that cannot be squeezed into a pigeonhole. Thus the really talented ones among them are soon filed under the same bracket as those pointless society girls that are regularly built up and knocked down by the sensation-hungry tabloids. For those who can sing and DJ as well as run a successful blog, being lumped in with the it-girls can be especially dangerous. Too many of them perish in hot waters like a twitchy lobster. And then there are some who refuse to be fazed by any of it and use the attention they have gained to show what they really have to offer. One of the latter kind is Bonnie Strange, 26-year-old Russian-born and German-raised designer, photographer, model, musician and party organiser. Our shoot with Bonnie is scheduled for the day before the start of Berlin Fashion Week. This is probably her most overbooked and stressful week of the whole season, even though she has decided not to book any parties or shows for her own fashion label the shit this time. For the past year, Bonnie has been running the label and the associated the shit shop in Berlin together with her friend, tattoo artist Laura Cherrygrove (portrayed in our last issue). Like so many of Bonnie’s ventures, what was planned as a small collection and a pop-up store has turned into a runaway success. All over Berlin you can see her signature T-shirts and sweaters emblazoned with memorable slogans. Not many people know that after she had finished school Bonnie took an apprenticeship as a tailor.

Like the rest of us gadget junkies, she could not spend a day without her iPhone, personally taking care of all of her accounts in spite of an exploding number of friends and followers on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook, resulting in a constantly rising pressure to communicate. Especially on Facebook, this can be quite a work-intensive task. Instead of getting herself an official profile for fans, she prefers to keep a personal account that allows people to add her as a friend. Which means that due to the limited number of possible friends, she now has to oversee four different profiles at once. Crossing over links between Bonnie Strange A and Bonnie Strange B might well feel a little schizophrenic at times. When we ask her about her plans for the next months, Bonnie just laughs. “To be honest, I only have an overview of what will happen next week at most, and that’s when I will be in the recording studio.” She will not be drawn on what we can expect, but Bonnie’s fans are already very excited, because she hasn’t had a new release in a while. “Neonlights” by her fantastic eighties-inspired girl band The Rio Girls might not have been a huge commercial success, but it definitely found its way into the hearts of her fans, not least because of her self-styled video that can only be called an aesthetic masterpiece. The group, consisting of Bonnie and two other models, disbanded in 2011 after putting out just two singles.

Next to her duties as a designer, her multiple modelling and TV jobs, collaboration requests from all sorts of labels that come in daily, and her recent musical plans, there remains little time for the profession that Bonnie held before the media discovered her: Photography. Her portfolio, which hasn’t been updated for some time, is full of striking fashion shots and extraordinary portraits, just like Bonnie herself: Expressive, colourful and strong. At the end of our shoot, when we ask Bonnie if she sometimes considers spending some time offline and without gadgets, her reply is vehemently negative: That wouldn’t be her thing at all. And why should it? The girl is clearly electric.


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christine sun kim

Screen Gab

bo r n witho u t t h e s e n s e o f hearing, new york artist christine s u n k im m a ke s t h e wo rld s o u n d d if f e r e n t. h e r u n c o m p ro m i s i n g a r t a n d m u si c al c o m p o s i t i o n s br id g e the g a p b e t w e e n t h e he a r in g a n d t h e d e a f , as w e ll a s sp o k e n a n d v i s u a l la n g u ag e s .

text and interview

Danna Takako

photography

jimmy fontaine


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christine sun kim

deaf sound artist christine sun kim depends on technology and creativity for all her interactions with the outside world. she calls it “unlearning sound etiquette.” her creative use of technology doesn’t just help her

I first met Christine in the West Village after weeks of emails about an art project we were planning together. I waited in the middle of a noise cyclone: Cars screeching past, taxis honking, stilettos echoing, loud New Yorkers yelling, laughing, coughing. A large brass band also happened to be playing on the sidewalk.

communicate, but also to express

she works in. in her bold concept art and daring performances she aims to question, contextualise and visualise the sense that we so often take for granted.

Christine walked past me, looking around with wide, focused eyes. I tapped on her shoulder and showed her my phone. I had written “I’m Danna!” on the screen. Her face lit up and she rummaged through her bag to pull out her iPad. Using a touch-based writing app called Penultimate, she wrote with her finger, “Nice to finally meet!” “Can you feel that?” I scribbled on her screen, drawing an arrow that pointed at the brass band. She nodded, pointed to the tuba player and tapped her breastbone. “My chest is hollow,” she wrote back. We walked to an Indian restaurant, where she ordered a curry via an app called Big Words on her iPhone. Then she used Penultimate to draw an explanatory

photo T H e S e L B y P R e S S

her art through the various mediums

sketch of a “virtual treasure hunt” that she had performed with a piano-playing collaborator, using Google Maps, Skype, Adobe Connect, image sonification software and haptic cues. Since our first meeting, the two of us have spent many nights together in noisy restaurants with her iPad between our plates, daydreaming about projects, discussing the challenges of being an artist in today’s world, and drawing pictures of handsome men at tables nearby.


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christine sun kim

Check out the video vimeo.com/31083172

_ What was the first medium you worked in? Do you remember some of your earlier experiments in art? I used to paint and draw for years, but I found myself inhabiting other people’s voices on my paper. It felt as if I couldn’t find my own voice. I ended up facing an existential crisis with my brushes and nearly quit art. I was horribly depressed and tricked myself into believing that art had abandoned me. In 2008, my friend urged me to join her in a month-long residency in Berlin. I thought to myself, “I have nothing to lose,” and off I went. I happened to come across a bunch of empty gallery spaces, and I was told that they were mostly filled with sounds. Something about that just got to me. I realised that I wanted to learn about the concept behind each sound project and how one could actually overcome the need to hear it to experience it. I bought pigment powder in all kinds of different colours and had a friend say something loud enough to blow powder onto paper to produce a loose imprint of her voice. It also looked as if she had done a line of pink coke. That was my very first experiment, long before I started using real sound equipment.

"i USeD To PainT anD DRaW foR yeaRS, BUT i foUnD mySeLf inHaBiTinG oTHeR PeoPLe'S VoiCeS on my PaPeR"

_ Which of your projects have helped you identify with sound the most? I always find that non-sonic scores and transcripts resonate with me the most. They are conceptual and systematic drawings. I understand that we are all hardwired to communicate in vocal languages, and I’ve always thought that scores and transcripts cannot fully capture the entirety of one note, word or sound, much like visual languages on paper. I have been exploring, espousing, employing various notational elements from information systems such as sign language glossaries and musical symbols to open up a new space for my own visual language. I’d like to create the most appropriate syntax to occupy both space and time. _ How do you use technology in your dayto-day activities? I am a frequent user of Video Relay Service (VRS). Basically, I log in to iChat, send a phone number I need to call, and I get connected to a sign language interpreter who translates for me. I make phone calls several times per day, so that's one technology I cannot live without. The more technology I have


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christine sun kim

Scan the QR code using any free scan app to see a video of Christine Sun Kim's work, by The Selby for Nowness.com

surrounding me, the less suffocated I feel in terms of communication. Those technological advancements can really reduce communication gaps. However, none of the videos on sites like Youtube or NYT.com are captioned. That’s why I’m a huge fan of TED.com and Hulu.com

of my life. I have virtually no taste in music. I only associate music or bands with who I’ve met in person or the way they present themselves in the media. When I was a sophomore in college, Marilyn Manson was in town and told how visually and intellectually striking he is in his performances. I probably hung out with the wrong crowd. Out of curiosity, I bought a ticket and went with some friends. As soon as Manson showed up on the stage, goths

_ What other technology do you use for communication? In an ideal situation everyone would be armed with a laptop at all times. I position two laptops next to each other, open TextEdit on both, hit Apple+T, format the type to Helvetica, set the letter size to 64, and voila! You have two voices typing away. It's less hassle than taking turns on one laptop. Otherwise I use the Big Words app (on iPhone and iPad) for my daily orders and cab rides: “Cappuccino with skimmed milk,” “Old-fashioned, make it strong,” “Is it refundable?,” “Take me to Canal and Lafayette,” and “Can I have a sample of that?” I also use the Penultimate app on iPad with anyone who wants to be able to handwrite or draw. _ How did you communicate with nonsigners in the past? This old-fashioned method can never go wrong: Paper and pen. Although my rapid thoughts do not flow well through that method. I’ve become much more accustomed to typing. I’ve noticed that being able to use technology puts much less pressure on non-signers to learning sign language, which puts everyone at ease in social situations. However, if they end up learning some, that is the surest way for me to fall in love! _ How did you make the transition into art education? It was mostly because I recognised my own struggle to find my place in the art community, so I figured that teaching art might be a good way to start. Being an educator at the Whitney Museum helped polish up my knowledge of contemporary art. The more involved I am with my own art, the more I want to bring a better understanding of contemporary art to the deaf community. Hence the video project at the museum: Go to whitney.org/ vlogs and click “Watch the vlogs”. _ I remember watching you when we were dancing in a club together and wondering how it felt for you. Can you remember your first concert experience? Despite the fact that I grew up close to Anaheim, California, where live shows and concerts were constantly happening, I’d never been to one for the first 19 years

Christine wears skirt Fiona

began to squash me like I was a soda can about to be flattened. There was this huge guy with his hands up in the air, his right sweaty armpit was literally rubbing on the left side of my face. I got three pimples the next day. A friend and I had to hold on to each other to stay together while crowd surfers collided with our heads. Their greasy and rottenmayo-scented long hair clung to me throughout the whole concert. The final straw was when Manson demanded that we spit at him, so it was raining cats and dogs where I stood. That was my first and last concert in years.

Find out more about Christine Sun Kim on christinesunkim.com


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the echo vamper


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designing the future

DESIGNING THE FUTURE if t h e ava n t g a rd e o f fa s hi o n t ri e d t h e i r h an d a t b e i n g i n v e n t o r s

the here and now is not their time. great international fashion designers always live in the tomorrow. not only is it their job to foresee what will be needed and wanted in half a year or even a year’s time. they are also the ones who actively shape the face of the future. in this sense, the

professional

pioneers

of

the

fashion world are predestined to be inventors. we asked some of the most exciting free thinkers of the trade to answer the following question for us:

_ If anything you could imagine was possible – which technological device or invention is interviews by n o r a b a l d e n w e g


37

designing the future

M A N I S H

A R O R A

portrait photo C H r I STI a n l a r TI l l oT

fashion designer

If anything you could imagine was possible – which technological device or invention is urgently missing from your life?

I wish I could send people or things as fast as I can send emails right now. It would be like science ďŹ ction teleportation.


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designing the future

Y O S H I Y U K I

M I Y A M A E

head designer of womenswear, issey miyake

portrait photo K o H I d e n a K a S H I M a runway photo F r e d e r I Q U e d U M o U l I n

“In my dreams I would have a Wherever Door, a door that leads to any place you could wish to visit. I prefer to meet people in person rather than communicate by telephone or SMS, so in that sense, a door like that would be a really rewarding experience. It actually appears as a magical device in the famous Japanese cartoon Doraemon, in which a cat robot coming from the 22nd century brings along a variety of unique technological devices from the future, including a time machine and a Wherever Door.�


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designing the future

H U M B E R T O

L E O N

co-creative director, kenzo

portrait photo r o e e T H r I d g e

I’m obsessed with hovercrafts, so I could use a bike that can hover over cities. I wish there was a way to float across all of the traffic, the people and trucks delivering things, so you don’t have to wait everywhere all the time. It would look very sleek and blend in with the environment and the city – I mean as normal as a floating bicycle could look...

Kenzo’s creative director duo Humber to Leon and Carol Lim


40

designing the future

J E A N - C H A R L E S D E

C A S T E L B A J A C

portrait photo l e C a M r o M a I n

fashion designer

JC DE CASTELBAJAC “In a world that is so rapidly changing, I’d like to go back to basics: - carrier pigeons to send messages to my love - a bottle and an ocean to believe that there is no fate in life - lemon juice as an invisible ink to write to phantoms”


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designing the future

J E R E M Y

S C O T T

fashion designer

“I could use a machine that could produce temporary clones of myself to cope with all the work before fashion weeks!�


O

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high tech, low tech, no tech

N A M E / A G E / O C C U PA TI O N Siri Sofia Fagerudd / 17 / student, part-time model and actress

I LIVE IN Vaasa, Finland

I LOVE playing the piano, drawing, photography and acting

MY PL ACE ONLINE On Instagram: sirisofiaa

_ What is your favourite technological device? Definitely my iPod Shuffle. It’s so handy. I use it when running, painting and writing, and there’s probably no kind of music you wouldn’t find on it. Whenever I’m feeling blue as a result of bad hair days combined with social pressure, I turn to music. It’s my best form of therapy. Add tea for maximum effect. _ If you had the technical knowledge and skills, what would you like to invent? I’m a hopeless Doctor Who fan, so I would try to invent a time machine. Or a potion that reduces social awkwardness.

_ What does technology mean to you? Tools that help us achieve certain goals or make our daily lives better. Simply stuff that makes life easier. _Which animated movie or computer game character would you like to be? Probably Puss in Boots from Shrek, the most badass kitten ever. I would love to be able to win conflicts just by looking people in the eye. _ What makes you happy? My family and friends mean the world to me, spending time with them always cheers me up!


44

high tech, low tech, no tech

N A M E / A G E / O C C U PA TI O N Astrid Rabus / 37 / illustrator

I LIVE IN Oberreichenbach (near Nuremberg), Germany

I LOVE building cruel monsters out of Lego with my two sons and drawing cute things

MY PL ACE ONLINE astridrabus.de and astridrabus.blogspot.de

_ Your favourite technological device? My Wacom Cintiq Pen Display. _What does technology mean to you? First of all it means fun to me. Lots of possibilities for a new kind of creativity. Time-saving is not to be underestimated either, especially when you are doing what you love professionally. Technology in general has become a big part of our lives today. If you use it thoughtfully, it can make life more playful and easier. _ If you had the technical knowledge and skills, what would you like to invent? I would

love to have a button that I could press to travel everywhere I want in the blink of an eye. Because I don’t enjoy flying. _ Which animated movie or computer game character would you like to be? I liked Rapunzel from the Disney movie Tangled. Having blonde magic hair and ending up as a real princess seems pretty perfect to me. _ What makes you happy? Having my little family around me and the possibility to follow my passion for drawing and make a living out of it.


45

high tech, low tech, no tech

_ What is your favourite technological device? That would probably be my iPhone, but since I don’t really like technology I much prefer my favourite non-technological device, my drawing book. _ What does technology mean to you? Technology is stupid! I am used to it, I have grown up with all these different devices, but somehow it makes me anxious. One day technology itself will probably use humankind and animals as slaves, because all the phones, computers, robots and so on will start to think by themselves and not listen to our commands. Moreover, you don’t need technology to live. Then again, even though

I sometimes wish I could change my iPhone into some really old Nokia that can only call and text, in fact I couldn’t really do it because I’m already addicted to my iPhone. _ If you had the technical knowledge and skills, what would you like to invent? I’ve never thought about that, but I would probably build a time machine. Definitely! _ Which animated movie or computer game character would you like to be? I’d be Shrek! Or Donkey! Damn it, I just love love love this film! _ Something you could not live without? Love, peace and flower power.

N A M E / A G E / O C C U PA TI O N Lisa Omran / 16 / student

I LIVE IN Vienna, Austria

I LOVE reading, drawing, fencing, writing and most of all snowboarding. And of course going out with my friends. Party hard!


by

p l a sti c m e d i a us i ng a

s c a no g r a p h y & p roduc t ion

K i r a St a c h o w its c h

plastic media

hair and make-up

Pa t r i c k G l a t t h a a r

p roduc t ion a s s i s t a n t

S a r a h M e ut e r mode l

C o s i m a Te m p o m o d e l s


jersey jacket Filippa necklace L a shy earring Nella ring Kit t e n


blouse L aura necklace Fay ring Fay


blouse Car r y earring with flower F le ur earring Viv v i sunglasses Lilly


blouse Marcella necklace L o v isa bracelet Radha


jersey jacket Filippa jumper Tr udy necklace F le ur earring Mar ina


shirt Car r ie grid bracelet Kikki bracelet with pearls St efani sunglasses Eve r y n


coat Sandy sunglasses Lilly necklace L a shy


blouse Sa skia ring with cat ears Kit t e n ring with chunky copper-and-gunmetal cross P im necklace with wooden sticks Van essa necklace with wooden jewel Fiona


56


57

of man machines and sound machines

OF MAN MACHINES AND SOUND MACHINES text

ralf krämer illustrations

joachim sperl

as a m embe r o f world -fa m o u s electro nic mu sic pi o n e e r s k raftw er k he c o-w rote the ir b iggest hit "the m od e l ". now karl bartos i nt rod uce s u s t o t he hid d e n pot entia l o f t he pow e r sock et a n d a cond ense d hist ory o f electro nic mu sic.

Electronic music is everywhere. As a musical genre it might still be considered left field, but in fact electronically produced music surrounds us like the proverbial soundcloud. Even the human voice, that most versatile of musical instruments, will nowadays most likely be perfectly processed by autotune before reaching our ears through speakers. In essence, the ringtone on any mobile phone is electronic music. But electronic music isn’t just everywhere: “It is everywhere at the same time,” says Karl Bartos. It's Monday January 29, and Bartos, a renowned musician, producer and DJ, who became a legend in his own right as a member of Kraftwerk from 1975 to 1990, sits in his Düsseldorf office,

opposite yours truly at my desk in Berlin. Via Skype. This is the beautiful new “Computer World” predicted in the title of Kraftwerk’s eighth album 32 years ago. “Of course, the process of musical composition always contains all times,” Bartos declares, before expanding on his somewhat abstract statement: “Every note that you play consists of what you have learnt before, what you are playing that very second, and what you expect from the future.” These “sonic biographies”, as Bartos calls them, are now simultaneously present in the cloud of electronic music. This is how electronic music dissolves the hierarchical relationship between different levels of time, as well as, sometimes, the boundaries between technology and its philosophical perception. The merging of the past and the present becomes miraculously palpable in Karl Bartos’ most recent work. “Off The Record” is based on a recent revisitation of unfinished songs, musical fragments that Bartos has collected since the mid 1970s. While working on the global hit “The Model” with his then band mates Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider, he programmed the very beat on his drum machine that is now resurfacing on “Vox Humana”, a track from his new album. But then the idea of the album as such seems like an anachronism from analogue days. Clearly, “Off The Record” is a title that sends out two signals at once. First, that this is


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of man machines and sound machines

something that was not meant for your ears originally. But also that the time of the classic album has gone. Then again, this doesn’t preclude Bartos from returning to the album format, even the invention of the record on his reflective stroll through the history of electronic music. “If there is somebody whose influence on electronic music is not properly

its practical application, the theremin became even more important as an inspiration for a young New York science student by the name of Robert Moog, who was going to build the first synthesizer in the 1950s. The successors of Moog’s synthesizers can be heard on albums from the Beatles to Kraftwerk and might well be the most influential instruments of electronic music. But

“If there is somebody whose influence on electronic music is not properly acknowledged, it has to be Thomas Alva Edison.”

while Moog was still exploring new possibilities on a technical level, the German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen managed to make the big musical leap.

He shaped music histor y by shaping Kraf twerk’s “The Model”: Karl Bar tos

acknowledged, it has to be Thomas Alva Edison,” Bartos says, “With his phonograph he made the recording and reproduction of acoustic events possible. That was in 1877. All that follows builds on Edison.” Three quarters of a century had to pass, the destructive power of two world wars pounding the emerging modern world to a soundtrack of primitive marching bands and classical orchestral pathos, until a new musical world could finally come into being. In 1919 the theremin was unveiled as an early musical instrument that allowed an electromagnetic field be-tween two antennae to be manipulated by hand, amplified by a valve oscillator and transmitted through a loudspeaker. But apart from

Stockhausen had studied music in Cologne until 1951. He was taught by Oliver Messiaen, a church musician and classical composer, who also belonged to the circles around a new genre called Musique Concrète, a new musical vision that had been brought to life in 1949 by the engineer and broadcast technician Pierre Schaeffer. The basic idea was a reorganisation of everyday and electronic noises according to musical parameters, a principle that would be applied decades later in sampling, which became one of the defining stylistic devices of hip hop. From the mid-1950s onward, Karlheinz Stockhausen created seminal works such as “Gesang der Jünglinge” and “Hymnen” in his “Studio für elektronische Musik” in Cologne, giving equal importance to voices and regular instruments as well as noises, sounds and notes created by electronic means while breaking the formal limitations of classical structures. The groundwork for electronic music was laid, and Stockhausen himself became a star. A collection of cuts from his works came out on a Greatest Hits double LP, and Rolling Stone magazine dedicated an

in-depth portrait to him in 1971. It was not least Stockhausen's music that Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider were listening to back in Düsseldorf before they formed their band Kraftwerk in 1970. “I once got to meet Stockhausen in person,” Karl Bartos remembers. “That was in 2001 when he won the Polar Music Prize, the unofficial Nobel Prize for music. Together with Robert Moog, by the way.” Bartos was allowed to attend the rehearsals for the following concert. “It was fascinating to see how Stockhausen organised sound in a room,” he enthuses, “Even the positioning of the speakers was part of the music. When Stockhausen placed them, it was a matter of a few centimetres.” From the early 1970s and onwards, developments in the world of electronic music centred mainly on refinement of what had already been achieved and, not least, its commercially driven popularisation. The techno movement, electronic music as a socio-cultural phenomenon, is of no interest to Bartos “at all.” He would rather explore combined worlds of sounds and images. In the near future Bartos will launch “Off The Record” at London’s Rough Trade East as a film installation. And yet Karl Bartos, who celebrated his 60th birthday last year, is still fascinated by the idea of making music by the most rudimentary means, short-circuiting the early days of electronic music with the present. “All you need is a power socket,” he laughs, “and an old valve radio from the rubbish dump. Maybe an old record player. If you experiment around with that, there are still lots of possibilities.”

photo karl bartos k a tj a r u g e

"... She's a model and she's looking good" – Take a look at the video using a QR code scan app


59 43


by

H VA S S & H A N N I B A L us i ng a

i l l us t r a t ion

H VA S S & H A N N I B A L pa t t e r ns

MONKI

a r t w or k b a s e d on p ho t o g r a p h s b y h a ns k rus e


by

SONJA KRANZ us i ng a

p ho t o g r a p h y

SONJA KRANZ s t y l i ng

IRENE MANICONE hair

SONGEI HONG make-up

URIM ROH

s t y l i ng a s s i s t a n t

FA B I O M E R C H E

m a k e-up assista n t

YUMI NOH

mode l s

K IT TY A N D C A S S I E S e l e c t


C a ssie wea r s jac k e t Liv bl ouse Co r n elia bi k i n i h igh wa is t Gunnel Soc k s Limi K it t y wea r s k n i t Ur sula t rouser s P lim I n pr ojec t ion C a ssie wea r s dr ess G e rda


C a ssie wea r s sh i rt Car r ie t rouser s Dar ia soc k s Limi


K it t y wea r s l ac e t op Je mim a sk i rt Danni shoes Cara C a ssie wea r s dr ess Fe y shoes Vanja soc k s Naomi


K it t y wea r s bl ouse Anja t rouser s D it a soc k s Naomi


C a ssie wea r s bl ouse Car r ie t rouser s Dar ia Soc k s Limi I n pr ojec t ion C a ssie wea r s bl ouse St ina sk i rt Annik a


K it t y wea r s bl ouse St ina t rouser s D it a So c k s Naomi I n projec t ion K it t y wea r s k n i t t ed t op Pam sk i rt Mimmi h e a rt t igh t Lina


I n projec t ion K it t y wea r s l ac e t op Je mimia sk i rt Danni C a ssie wea r s jac k e t Liv bl ouse Cor n elia bi k i n i h igh wa is t Gunn el soc k s Limi I n pr ojec t ion C a ssie wea r s dr ess Fe y


I n projec t ion C a ssie wea r s bl ouse Co r n elia sk i rt L o va C a ssie wea r s sh i rt Car r ie t rouser s Dar ia soc k s Limi


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tech heroines

SOULFUL ANIMATION m a k in g m u s i c v i d e o s f o r t h e l ik e s o f j u s t i n t i m b e rla ke o r the r av e o n e t t e s , lau r e n i n d ov i n a o nly ne e d e d t wo t h i n g s : h e r im a g in at i o n an d a c o m p u t e r .

_ How did you decide on specialising in directing and designing film? I had a college professor who recognised that all of my 2D work was narrative based. My interpretation of everything had a story, from the image of the woman on the raisin box to a leaf I found in the fall. I made puppets and gave performances that had dark narratives and twisted endings. This professor suggested I major in film. I had never thought about it before, but it made complete sense.

anima, the soul, is literally part of the name of her profession, but it is also what Lauren Indovina puts into all of her work. This New York City-based American artist, who currently works as a director and designer for the film and animation studio PSYOP, brings characters to life right at her desk. She is something of a virtual sculptor in a limitless digital world. As amazing as her work on Timberlake's “Lovesounds” or The Raveonettes' “Black and White” and “Heart of Stone” may be, it is only when a shiver runs down your spine as you watch one of her breathtaking prize-winning ads, such as the one for a brand of fruit yoghurt (!), that you properly realise: Lauren Indovina's work doesn't just have soul, it speaks directly to ours.

_ What role does technology play in your life? I work at a production company that is completely digital: The bulk of our team is a hybrid of visual artists, who work digitally, and computer scientists. Personally, technology allows me to explore with no limitations and take risks that I couldn’t take otherwise. As an art student at Rhode Island School of Design, I realised how limited I made myself because materials were so expensive. In the digital era, I can take as many risks as I want with no fear. I can rip apart a composition, alter colour quickly, the possibilities are endless. _ Which technological invention could you not live without? A nice sized, colour calibrated monitor, a Wacom tablet and Wacom pen with a gritty nib, and a camera to take pictures of source elements with.

_ Is there anything you would have liked to invent when you were a kid? How to make imaginary friends less imaginary. _ Anything you would like to invent today? I have this dream of creating a genre for girls of all ages from thirteen onward. It sounds vague, but as a girl I always struggled with insecurity. In the most basic sense, I had everything going for me: My health, great parents, solid education. But the most primal parts of me were raging insecurities that brought out the worst in me for most of my young adult life. I'd love to create a platform or genre for girls like me, pretty much every girl, who are insecure and just need to figure out their passion, so they can apply themselves and feel strong.

_ Who inspires you? I’m inspired by directors with particular visions. As a young child to me this director was naturally Tim Burton. Beetlejuice was my bible, Lydia my reason for knowing that being a little dark and a little offbeat was cool and okay. As a young adult, my interests spanned into directors with broader visions: Lars Von Trier, Sofia Coppola, Stanley Kubrick. I recently watched Pina by Wim Wenders, and I think it is possibly the most beautiful film I have ever seen: Fashion, art, passion, fragility, and strength. _ How do you spend your rare free time? I love taking photographs that I can source from and create new imagery. What I mean by this is that I love taking a photograph and breaking the proportions of the human or altering a landscape so that it becomes more surreal and emotive. I usually do this using Photoshop. For me, this process feels like sculpting from a live action image: I find a form within a human proportion that's interesting and compelling and delve into it. Imperfections, large noses, funny shaped heads intrigue me. Egon Schiele and Gustav Klimt are my art icons.


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80

tech heroines

CURATOR OF THE INVISIBLE the imm a t e r al, t h e d i g i t al, the v is i o n ary – j o a s i a kry s a m ake s i t all v i s i b le .

Once in England, I also tried Politics and International Relations, which was great as I got introduced to thinking in systems and power relations, something that has been present in my work ever since. This was at the core of my publication “Curating Immateriality”, and recent curatorial projects like the one for dOCUMENTA (13) last summer in Kassel.

any attempt to describe all the different aspects of Joasia Krysa’s work will will result in more questions than it will answer. What is a “digital curator”? What are the tasks undertaken by her association of curators and researchers interested in algorithmic culture? We have met the celebrated author and current director of the Danish Kunsthal Aarhus, found out how she got the idea of categorising technology and what exciting fields a failed actor can end up in. _ Why Technology? It is central to my life and work as it is the subject of both. I am continually intrigued by the way technology has become embedded in our lives, how we coexist with it, how it extends our power to think and act in the world. I am reminded of a quote that goes something like “Technology is neither good nor bad, nor is it neutral”. _ When did you realise you had what it takes to be a great curator? I always felt a deep need for structure and organisation, arranging items into lists and schedules, as well as arranging ideas and people. You might call it management or say that I am a control freak. And there has always been an entrepreneurial spirit, too. I remember spending long wasteful hours of maths classes at school training my hand to do glamorous signatures and then

offering them to my class mates for competitive prices with the view that, once I had become really famous, these would be worth a fortune. When you combine all these obsessions you end up with something close to what curating is essentially about. _ What did you want to be when you were young? Is there any connection to your job today? I wanted to be an actress – what a silly idea – but luckily failed my exams. My parents really wanted me to be a doctor or a lawyer. I was quite stubborn, and in the end they gave up. I also studied Cultural Theory at Wroclaw University where I got interested in the field of New Media and started project management for a major biennale in Wroclaw. Finally, I was offered a British Council grant to study Curating at Goldsmiths College in London.

_ Is there anything you would have liked to invent when you were a child? I am always very inspired by the English writer, mathematician, and mother of three children Ada Lovelace. She created the foundations of modern computing in the 1830s, some hundred years prior to Alan Turing, before dying at the age of 37. As as a young child she was preoccupied with dreams of inventing a method of flying and writing a book of Flyology. I love this fragment from one of her letters: “As soon as I have brought flying to perfection, I have got a scheme about a steam engine which, if ever I effect it, will be more wonderful than either steam packets or steam carragies. It is to make a thing in the form of a horse with the steam engine in the inside so contrived as to move an immense pair of wings, fixed on the outside of the horse, in such a manner as to carry it up into the air while a person sits on its back.” Sadly, I can’t say anything similar about myself. As a child I was more into exploring than inventing.


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tech heroines

MICRO ELECTRONICS TO MAJOR EFFECT

competition for the smartphone has finally arrived. Say hello to “smart fabrics”, “interactive fashion” and “wearable technology”. Thanks to CuteCircuit, the London-based label of designer duo Francesca Rosella and Ryan Genz, these notions no longer stand for absurd intellectual games but for actual clothes hanging in the wardrobes of Kate Perry or Bono Vox. Fluorescent LED robes and cocktail dresses displaying live Twitter feeds might not be everyone's kind of thing, but even the least narcissistic among us could not fail to be fascinated by innovations such as CuteCircuit’s “Hug Shirt”: Two shirts that can transmit an embrace from one to the other across any conceivable distance. At times technology will actually bring people closer together, sometimes even (if only virtually) skin to skin. _ What role does technology play in your life? Technology mediates the way we interact with each other. Twitter and other social media are increasingly affecting our daily lives, and we believe that we are at the beginning of a natural process. We imagine that in the future we are not going to need all the little electronic boxes that we carry with us today such as mobiles, cameras and other devices. Garments with embedded technology will become the interface between us and others. Garments already connect us to the people around us, so it is a natural progression.

opposite side of the world is incredible. The Hug Shirt, which received an award as one of the Best Inventions of the Year by Time Magazine, has invisible sensors able to recreate the sensation of touch, warmth and emotion of a hug and to send hugs to a distant loved one.

_ Do you ever wish you lived in the good old analogue days? I am not sure I would like it there for too long. We love the idea of communicating over long distances, of connecting people who are far away from each other, both culturally and physically. Analogue is not dead. Fabric is analogue. People are analogue. All the funny things you loved about the good old analogue days are still here, but now they have digital superpowers! _ Which technological invention could you not live without? We love apps like Twitter and Instagram that allow you to be always connected with your loved ones and friends, giving them snapshots of your life. This increasing connection between all of us, the possibility of reaching people on the

_ What do you love most about what you do? We design bespoke garments for the singer Katy Perry, including the red carpet look she wore to the annual MET Gala in New York and an amazing catsuit that she wore on American Idol. We also designed the video jackets that the rock band U2 wore on their recent 360° Tour. Most recently, we designed the world’s first Twitter dress worn by Nicole Scherzinger at a launch event in London. How could you possibly not love this job? _ Who inspires you? The spirit of Coco Chanel truly inspires us. This woman single-handedly changed and revolutionised the fashion industry in the 1920s, introducing innovations that at the time were considered outrageous, exactly like our garments today. Every time there is a change in any field people are always intent on dismissing it. It happened with computers, cars, mobile phones. Innovating is like jumping from an aeroplane and starting to sew the parachute while going down. It is this feeling of free fall that makes us come up with great ideas.

photo by k a ty- p e r r y. n e t

f r a nce s c a ro s e lla a n d ry a n g e n z a ka c u t e c i rc u i t d e al i n bo th the f u t u re o f fa s h i o n a n d the fa s h i o n o f t h e f u t u r e .


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by

to m s e e l b a c h a n d m a x h o r n ä k us i ng a

p ho t o g r a p h y

To m S e e l b a c h s t y l i ng

r it a h ö n n i n g art

g o e r l a c h - a rt. d e r e t ouc h

ma x hornäk assista n ts

T h o m a s I m k a m p, L i n d a P l a g m a n n


shoes Vanja bag Unnur cap Alic ia


bag Roxanne clutch Pe r nille c a se Pabla Spec t acle


clutch Minna necklace with leaves Fay necklace with wooden pendant Fiona necklace with silver hands T helm a ring P im


bag Sonya scarves Car r ie


bag Roxanne hat Ina scarf T he rese


90

the storyteller behind the camera

THE STORYTELLER BEHIND THE CAMERA m o n k i t v c re at i v e d i re c t o r & p ro d u c e r m o i r a g a n le y a n d h e r p as s i o n f o r f i lm a nd o c e an s w i m m i n g .

Moving from New Zealand to Sweden is an extraordinary decision to take. Luckily, Moira Ganley is an extraordinary young woman who does not shy away from adventures in the pursuit of her passion for the moving picture. This is how she ended up turning her inside knowledge of digital media and her love for telling stories into a profession as creative director and producer for Monki TV. The big move worked out fine for her then. Except that Moira’s dream of taking a daily morning swim could not be as enjoyably realised in Sweden as it might have been back home. _ What is it that fascinates you about film? Storytelling is fascinating, the power of a good story. Through film, a story can be told in so many different ways, depending on how it is structured, the subjects, the cinematography, the sound and the editing. In terms of production, it’s a dynamic jigsaw puzzle waiting to be put together at the beginning of each project, according to what each client wants. Film can be anything: informational, inspirational, or simply entertainment. And whether short or long, a film that has a good story is one that is shared. _ Filming for Monki TV, do you recall a particularly memorable episode?

A recent funny moment while filming at an airport was when Monki TV presenter Klara lay down on the luggage belt very casually while it was moving and did her introduction for the London episode. Everyone thought she was mad. She is! (laughs) Working with Monki girls Klara Grape & Sara Boork on the Monki TV episodes was really inspiring and opened up the world of film to me. _ Who or what inspires you? I get a lot of inspiration from my relationships with others, and I especially gain a lot of energy from the genuine connection I establish with certain people.


91 the storyteller behind the camera

It’s that love from those who are close to me that gives me strength and inspiration. I am attracted to kind, energetic and driven people. And I’m inspired by life in general. There are so many ups and downs that it’s simply unpredictable. Everyone I’ve met, young or old, has had a unique story to tell that has somehow left an impression on me. _ What do you love to do in your free time? If I have a free weekend or some time off, I love to get away and see something new. I’m from New Zealand, which is very isolated at the bottom of the Pacific, so when I was still living there, I could only get as far as another town or city within a few hours. But now that I’m based in Stockholm I have countless sights to see. A flight to a new country might only take an hour or two. It’s amazing! I love Europe – so much culture, history, language and romance! I want to absorb it all. _ What are you really good at? I’m really good at scheduling. I think

it’s important to work in a spontaneous, organic and fun way with others, but at the same time I love being organised. Since I’m currently starting a video production company in Stockholm called Flip-Flop Interactive, it’s a necessity. _ What makes you smile? Someone smiling at me, a good story, sunshine, a nice glass of wine, dancing – lots of things! Those rare personalities that have the ability to be really silly, but to be themselves, and to have a good laugh. _ What do you dream of doing when you’re old and grey? I dream of being able to wake up and swim in the ocean every morning! Bliss.

Moira’s place online moiraganley.com


92

creating the third dimension

CREATING THE THIRD DIMENSION a rchi t e c t a n d m o n d e sig ne r s ara o t le y ta l e n t s : L i ke t h e s le e p i n g i n

ki s t o r e h as m a n y o n e f o r .

It starts off as an idea that becomes a drawing that eventually turns into a miraculous, increasingly complex computer-designed structure. Sarah Otley loves every little step of the creative process, but to her that moment when a real building that will be a proper home grows out of the two-, then virtually three-dimensional model remains, quite literally, uplifting. The young New Zealand architect, who is currently channelling her creativity into Monki’s international store designs, tells us why Italian cheese and baby pandas can be enough to make her happy. _ What do you love about being an architect? The constant fusion of analytical thinking and the imaginative exploration of the question ‘What if?’. There is so much variation in this job: Sketching, inventing, calculating, measuring, visiting the site, prototyping, collaborating with manufacturers, building relationships with clients, all the while forging the way with my brilliant colleagues. And then there is the satisfaction of using 2D drawings, a few emails and some phone calls to create an actual inhabitable environment. Being an architect is not about working fixed hours, instead there is inspiration all round, all the time and in many forms. Architecture follows me on holiday and constantly begs for my attention. It is the best travel companion. _ If you could design your dream place, what would it look like? The location would have to have some

water nearby, either a loud crashing New Zealand black surf beach or a tepid tropical lagoon. Raw, reused and local materials that respond to inhabitation would tell the story of a simple life lived at the beach, exposed to the elements. Soft fabrics would be hung all around to pick up the breezes and scents that occupy the space. There would be open, communal spaces for friends to linger and dark nooks to retire to for privacy and reprieve from the sun. _ Who or what inspires you? Smart creative women who stick to their guns and make the world work for them. Friends building houses, writing books, creating films, knitting scarves, making mozzarella. Art gallery gift stores and Italian cheese counters. Dress up parties. And people running.


75 creating the third dimension

_ What makes you smile? I smile a lot, at many things. At old friends, bad jokes, the view from an aeroplane, baby pandas, sparklers, friends’ fat babies, cheese, South Side cocktails, beach frisbee on a windy day, squeezing into a hammock with two of my best friends, Pictionary, coconut gelato, Korean spas, Turkish baths, Pulp perfume by Byredo, whitebait, karaoke, imitating New Zealand accents, scallops, breakfast burritos, surprises, being twirled around on the dance floor, floating, coriander, the smell of lilies, papaya with lime.

_ What do you love to do when you’re not at work? The hours that I clock up at work feed the regular deposits to my private ‘See the whole world’ fund. Travel is my biggest addiction, and I’m slowly working my way through Europe and Asia. I take a lot of photos and collect illustrations and graphic design from every place I go for my analogue wall blog. I stick it all on my wall. This year it has to be Iceland and Portugal. Not all those who wander are lost… _ What are you really good at? Sleeping, sleeping in, sleep talking, snoozing, dreaming. Long, deep slumber through ten alarms and cracking thunderstorms, on planes and trains. It’s a gift.

_ What do you dream of doing when you’re old and grey? I think I might draw all day and all night, probably giant blotchy, inky, messy portraits.

Sarah’s place online sarahotley.com


94

into the wild

den i m sh i rt Pe nny so c k s Polly

THE ULTIMATE SURVIVOR’S GUIDE it is hard to imagine, but apparently, there are people who can get by in the wild without a compass app or gps. ever since watching moonrise kingdom, we could not dream of anything more exciting than roaming through the woods and over meadows in the company of our sweetheart armed with nothing but a telescope and a useless small suitcase. so here is our manual for a tech-free adventure out in the wild.

p ho t o g r a p h y

b e rt a p f i r s i c h s t y l i ng

jèss monterde Helmut&Co make-up

m e r it x e l l s e va mode l

núria Blow Models


95

fi n d c a tc h

su ngl a sses Hope c oat U lr ik e

a n d fi s h

In order to be able to catch fish, first you have to know where to find them. In general they like to spend their time under stones or close to steep banks. In warm weather they can be found in deeper, cooler waters, while during cold spells they prefer the clemency of the shallows. They also like to feed on berries and insects in the vicinity of overhanging bushes and trees. A trap to catch fish with is easily built. First you cut off the neck of plastic bottle. Take the detached neck and cut off the top, then turn it around, insert it into the bottle, so that the narrow end faces the bottom and glue together. Put bait and small stones (as a weight) into the bottle, tie a thread around it, lower the trap into the river and wait for a few hours.


96

into the wild

the s e a lwa y s to

h at Jane sh i rt Emm a

are saf e

eat

Boletus

Blueber r y

nav i g a t i o n c i t y

f o r

k i d s Hazelnut

When the sun is shining you only need know that it rises in the East and sets in the West. In order to find North more quickly you could also put a stick in the ground and mark the end of its shadow four times in half hour intervals. Connect the dots to form a line. North lies at a right angle to that line. In the dark a clear night sky will provide a reliable pointer in the shape of Polaris (the North Star), an especially bright star that you can find by looking at the Plough (or Big Dipper). Draw an imaginary line between the two stars that are furthest away from its handle. Elongate this line by by five times the distance between the two stars to locate the North Star.


97

m ake an d

a

ke e p

f i r e wa r m

Those who know how to identify flint stones at least stand a small chance of success in making a fire. At first you should get plenty of tinder ready, be it wood dust, dry grass or cotton. Then collect pieces of dry wood in different sizes and arrange in a cone shape on a flat and firm surface. Create sparks by hitting the flint with a steel blade. Once the cinder is glowing, gently blow air onto the ember and feed with wood. When the flame has grown big enough, place it onto the prepared wood heap. People who wear glasses or carry a looking glass in their pocket will achieve their aim more quickly by focusing sunlight onto a tinder nest. If the fire does not warm you enough, you can try to pad out your clothes with dry leaves.

bl ouse Fee k n i t Annie dr ess Camille


98

de n i m c oat Camilla den i m v es t Johanna dr ess Camille


99

into the wild

fi n d a n d

wa te r fo o d

Some people believe that you can trace water with the help of a dowsing road. To do this you have to splice a short thin willow branch to create a Y-shape and keep it in place with strips of bark. Hold the rod in both hands as you walk around. Where it twitches, you will find water. Those of a less superstitious nature can also dig for water in damp meadows, dried-up river beds or places with strong green vegetation.

If you have been unlucky trying to catch fish or hunting with your bow and arrows, nature will still provide plenty of plants, berries and nuts for your nutrition such as stinging nettles, brambles or walnuts. In case you are not so knowledgable about fruit, watch the birds to see what they eat. Their diet is usually also fit for human consumption. Apart from that you can test an unknown plant’s edibility by placing a small amount on a part of your body and waiting for a few hours. If there are no complaints, try to ingest in small amounts to ascertain the plant is edible. Keep away from mushrooms, as the risk of poisoning is too high for the unexperienced eater. Grilled insects are also a good source of food, except those that have powdery wings, are red in colour or hairy caterpillars.

If you should pass a field with goats or cows on it, this is how you make them part with some of their fresh milk: Press two teats between thumb and forefinger where they join the udder and form a fist with around them with your remaining fingers. Massage both teats alternately until the udder has been milked dry.

si ngl e t Fredr ik a pl a s t ic j e a ns Sally


100

ta nc el dr ess L alee n

ma k e a n d

a

bow

a r row s

Flexible wood such as oak and birch is especially suitable for making a bow and arrows. You will need a branch that is about 1,5m long and 3cm thick, as well as a few branches of 30cm length and a diameter of 1cm for your arrows. First cut a 2cm deep groove at each end of the bow, then tie loops at both ends of a thread that is 90cm long and hook them into the prepared grooves. In order to make the arrows fly well, you will have to remove the bark, sharpen them at the tip and cut a groove into the other end. For that almost authentic Native American finish all you have to do is stick on some feathers and put on some face paint!


101

into the wild

Elk

Coyote

Crow

k n i t Annie dr ess Camille

Racoon

sh i rt Emm a


102 where to find us

S we de n

jönköping

uppsala

stockholm

Östra Storgatan 32 0046 3612 6203

Kungsängsgatan 6 0046 1860 1120

Götgatan 19 0046 8640 0841 Götgatan 78 (Skrapan) 0046 8640 1575 Sergelgatan 16-18 0046 8508 90702 Hamngatan 37 (Gallerian) Butik 0046 8208 530

göteborg

kalmar

västerås

Storgatan 23 0046 4804 93085

Vasagatan 25 0046 2113 6670

karlstad

växjö

Drottninggatan 18 0046 5421 0250

Storgatan 10 0046 4707 64499

kista

örebro

Kista Galleria (Skärholmen) 0046 8750 9720

Kungsgatan 16-22 (Gallerian Vågen) 0046 019 123 301

Södra Larmgatan 11 0046 3171 18550 Östra Larmgatan 11 (Kompassen) 0046 3115 3805 Postgatan 26-32 (Femmanhuset) 0046 3133 99628 Frölunda Torg 0046 3145 5164

STORE ADDRESSES malmö Storgatan 20 0046 40611 4650 Södra Vallgatan 5 0046 4097 0367 Fredsgatan 12 0046 4018 3930

eskilstuna Kungsgatan 24 0046 1613 0695

halmstad Köpmansgatan 2 0046 3512 4950

linköping

östersund

Nygatan 21B 0046 1313 3770

Prästgatan 47 0046 063 518 725

luleå

Skärholmen

Storgatan 36-38 0046 9201 3001

Byholmsgången 1-3 0046 08-710 21 50

norrköping Drottninggatan 59 0046 1110 1315

D e n m a rk

sundsvall

københavn

Gesällvägen 1 0046 6052 5575

Købmagergade 3 0045 3312 8363

umeå

Fisketorvet Shopping Centret 0045 3312 5333

Renmarkstorget 12 0046 9012 6640


103 where to find us

Arne Jacobsens Allé 12 0045 3262 4252

No r wa y

Frederiksbergsgade 34 0045 3537 6438

Bogstadveien 4 0047 2259 0900

lyngby

Karl Johansgt.15 0047 2241 1709

Lyngby Storcenter 40 0045 4587 6535

hil lerød Slotsgade 9B 0045 4826 1392

oslo

Vitaminveien 7-9 (Storo Shopping) 0047 2279 5560

bergen Olav Kyrresgate 1 0047 5530 3990

Leipzig Höfe am Brühl (EG) Richerd Wagner Platz 1. 0049 34196283821

kristiansand Markensgate 19 0047 3812 4900

stavanger Klubbgaten 11 0047 5154 8047

Trondheim

fr a n c e Paris Opening spring 2013

F i n l a n d

Kongensgate 8 (Mercursenteret)

helsinki

Tromsø

Aleksanterinkatu 48 0035 8542 28800

Karlsøyveien 12 0047 77 75 35 90

N e th e rl a n d s amsterdam Kalverstraat 176 0031 206 232 937

rotterdam Binnenwegplein 64-66 0031 102 019 759

Mannerheimintie 20A 0035 8954 228200

h o ng

ko ng

hong kong Argyle Street 8 (Langham Place) 00852 8523 5858026

ch i n a

Utrecht

Ningbo

Steenweg 38 0031 302 311 050

No.288 Qian Hu Bei Road (In City Plaza) Yin Zhou District

Shenyang

U n it ed K ing d o m London Carnaby Street 37 0044 2072 870620

århus Guldsmedsgade 10 0045 8613 0605 Clemenstorv 10 0045 8617 2320

ålborg Nytorv 27 lejemål 26 (Friis center) 0045 9812 1912

Ger m a n y Berlin

No. 128, Zhongjie Road (Plaza 66) Shenhe District

Kunming No. 1079, Beijing Road (VC Park)

Chengdou No. 1700, Tianfu Avenue North (New Century Global Center)

Shenzhen Longgang Vanke Suqare, Longxiang Avenue (Vanke), Longgang District

Opening spring 2013

hamburg Mönckebergstraße 22 0049 4027 169740

odense

essen

W e bsh o p

Vestergade 51 0045 6612 0512

Limbecker Platz City Centrum 0049 2011 7895054

www.monki.com/shop


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05.

01. Megan Knitted Top 45 eur 02. Rory Knitted Top 30 eur 03. Romola Knitted Top Lurex 45 eur 04. Annie Knitted Top 30 eur 05. Pirjo Knitted Jumper 30 eur

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04.

12. 13. 14. 15.

Lova Tee 20 eur Lerima Top 8 eur Lea Jacket 65 eur Katja jacket 55 eur

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05.

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108 index


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07.

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14.

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20.

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26.

25.

27. Liv Jacket 55 eur 28. Melody Cardigan 45 eur 29. Fay Dress 35 eur 30. Dotte Skirt 15 eur 31. Lova Skirt 25 eur 32. Maryn Skirt 45 eur 33. Danni Skirt 40 eur

33.

32.

31.

30.

34. Mella Bra 15 eur 35. Mella Highwaist 8 eur 36. Alena Sock 8 eur 37. Marion Sunglasses 10 eur 38. Jane Hat 20 eur 39. Payton Clutch 30 eur 40. Anya Swimsuit 30 eur 41. Antonia Earrings 6 eur 42. Daria Tote Bag 10 eur 43. Sandy Necklace 10 eur

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109 index


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13.

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110 index


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05.

04.

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10.

09.

11. Jenny Tee 20 eur 12. Lerima Top 8 eur 13. Aida Singlet 6 eur 14. Renee Tunic 30 eur 15. Annie Knitted Top 30 eur 16. Aletta Top 25 eur

16.

15.

17. Storm Trousers 40 eur 18. Milla Trousers 30 eur 19. Brita Knitted Top Print 25 eur 20. Brita Knitted Top Print 25 eur

20.

19.

21. Anja Blouse 35 eur 22. Nadia Top 10 eur 23. Nadia Top 10eur 24. Miracle Purse 8 eur 25. Cissi Socks 5 eur 26. Alicia Cap 15 eur

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112 index


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05.

04.

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11.

10.

12. O.2 45 eur 13. N.1 35 eur 14. I.1 45 eur 15. Kathleen Jacket 55 eur 16. Liv Jacket 55 eur 17. Katja Jacket 55 eur

17.

16.

15.

18. Daria Trouser 30 eur 19. Milla Trousers 30 eur 20. Sally Splash Jeans 55 eur 21. M.1 35 eur 22. O.1 45 eur

22.

21.

23. Lilli Tee 15 eur 24. Dolly Top 15 eur 25. Lerima Top 8 eur 26. Karin Tee 15 eur 27. Nina Organza Jacket 40 eur 28. Nina Suede Jacket 120 eur 29. Johanna Denim Vest 30 eur

29.

28.

27.

30. Mella Highwaist 8 eur 31. Mella Bra 15 eur 32. Miracle Purse 8 eur 33. Hope Sunglasses 10 eur 34. Polly Sock Imoo 3 eur 35. Paola Ring 8 eur 36. Kitten Ring 6 eur 37. Birgit Bag 35 eur 38. Almira Bag Loveisnot 8 eur 39. Carrie Scarf 20 eur

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114

contacts & team

THE TECHNOLOGY ISSUE

p u bl i sh e r

N O 09

plastic media / plasticmedia.eu 3£

editor in chief K i r a St a c h o w its c h publishing director Cl e m e n s St e i n m ü ll e r art direction D a n i e l a B i ly senior editor J u l i a n e B u c h r o it h n e r music editor M a r i a G r a ff contributoring editors N o r a B a ld e n w e g , P i a B i r k , S u s a n n e

the technology issue

mon k i.c om

mon k i.c om

n o 09

p ho t o g r a p h y B e n L a m b e rty K l a u s S t i e g e m e y e r s t y l i ng D e n n i s B ly s hair Hauke Krause Klaus Stiegemeyer m a k e - u p H e l g e B r a n s c h e i dt

Klaus Stiegemeyer using products from Chanel S/S 2013

F i r z i n g e r , D a n n a T a k a k o , R a lf K r ä m e r , S a r a h M e ut e r , F i l i p pa Ul r i c h

mode l b o n n i e st r a n g e

graphic design D a n i e l a B i ly, B e r it R a n s m ay r , a n n e m a r i e s a u e r b i e r illustration K a t h a r i n a H üt t l e r , H va ss & H a n n i b a l , j o a c h i m s p e r l photography editorials S o n j a K r a n z , B e n L a m b e rty,

ta n k t op Nina dr ess Dag ny so c k s L eo ra shoes L ollo

B e rt a Pf i r s i c h , To m S e e lb a c h , translation and proofreading R o b e rt R oti f e r “T he best way to predict the future is to invent it.” (Computer pioneer Alan Kay)

monki monki.com / facebook.com/monki art direction S a r a H e r n á n d e z , J o n a s N o r d i n project management El e o n o r e N y g å r ds project co-ordination M a l i n Wa hlb e r g graphic design and illustration Ell e n B e r g g r e n ,

Sara Hernández, Jonas Nordin fashion direction A n n i k a U r b a n sd ot t e r s t y l i ng S a r a B o o r k copywriting K a js a Sti ll e r

Que sti on s ? F e e db a c k ? we're looking forward to your message!

m a ga z i ne @ mon k i. c om

wanna be facebook-friends? visit us at

fa c e bo o k .com/ mon k i interns M o l u n a , K i m o m o , M o n o k o m i , Ok i , M o z i k , Ik m o , I m o o , M o o p,

Mokonoki, Kyo

MEDIA

EVENTS

Monki Magazine is published by plastic media, Schottenfeldgasse 76, 1070 Vienna, Austria, on behalf of Monki, a part of the H&M group, registered office Mäster Samuelsgatan, Stockholm, Sweden. Printed by agensketterl Druckerei GmbH, 3001 Mauerbach, Austria. Distributed by COMAG, Middlesex UB7 7QE, UK, Phone: +44 1895 433600.


the technology issue

mon k i. c om

n o 09


MONKI No 09 Spring/Summer 2013 The Technology Issue