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controlled science or detest its bias against natural healing. •Stop resenting the existence of money and feeling guilty about making any. •Develop a personal code of honor/ethics, and live by it. •If we don’t accept direction and discipline from “superiors,” then it is all the more important we be self-directed, and disciplined in the pursuit of our aims. •Working without imposed form or protocol, means we must ourselves create form for purpose, and avoid the dreadful, nebulous, amorphous “it’s all good” mush.

Herbal Professionalism At Its Best

Many of the potential negatives associated with professionalism can be eliminated, lessened, remediated or compensated for if professionals and their organizations are diligent and make the effort. Mountain Rose Herbs is an example of a company that functions in a highly professional manner, with qualified and often accredited staff. They are a commercial seller of bulk herbs and more, and yet the plants they work with do not feel commercialized so much as valued... and shared. Their need to make profits does not prevent them from making conservation and environmental issues, cultural sensitivity, fair trade policies and education their priority when decision making.

•Take great care as to what we commit to, and then keep our commitments (“in a professional manner”!) •Categorize priorities and schedule hours. •Insist on either not-so-highly paid work that feeds our souls and serves our purpose, or else better paid work that bankrolls our real work, our off hours medicine making or book writing. •Function in a professional environment sometimes, whether we like it or not.

I’ll include a list here of guidelines and things to watch for the professional herbalist, with none more important than putting core values at the heart and forefront of all one does. As Bevin Clare explains: “In herbalism, firmly evaluating and establishing your embodied values is the first step to becoming a professional. What is a core value for you which cannot shift, and what is part of your image which can adapt and change? These values for herbalists are typically larger than the self, they involve the health of the planet, the plants, the wider herb community, access to plants, etc as well as many other more personal and individually oriented values.  You may find that parts of who you are can adapt to help those around you to feel more

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