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of Wisconsin, Inc.

Safe Healthy Strong Conference Sponsored by Tashia and John Morgridge

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EMBODY PROGRAMMING PROFESSIONAL TRAINING TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE SCHOOL-BASED EDUCATION PARENT WORKSHOPS YOUTH CLINICS SEX ED TEXTING PROGRAM

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G Safe Healthy Strong Conference Welcome............................................................................. 4 Preconference Session...................................................... 6-7

Main Conference Schedule.............................................. 8-11 Map...................................................................................... 12-13 Using Pronouns Ribbons..................................................... 14

Understanding Gender Identity and Pronouns.................. 16-17 Disability Inclusive Guidelines.............................................. 18

Networking Reception, and Bedtime Stories.................... 20 ED Talks............................................................................... 21 Panel Discussion................................................................. 22

Concurrent Workshop Descriptions................................ 23-34 English Language Workshops.......................................... 36-43 Presenters........................................................................... 45-50 Planning Committee.......................................................... 52 Continuing Education........................................................ 53 About Safe Healthy Strong............................................... 54 Thank you............................................................................ 55 Save the Date...................................................................... 56

Espanol

Program support provided in part by the Federal Title X Program.

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WELCOME Dear Friends, Welcome to Safe Healthy Strong (SHS) 2018 - we are thrilled you are here! Now in its 7th year, SHS organizers have been working for the last year to make your experience valuable, engaging, and sprinkled with fun! Examples of this year’s updates include: •

More workshops in each time slot offer better opportunities to fully engage both with presenters and participants in smaller, more comfortable groups.

Several workshops are being piloted in an expanded, three-hour workshop format so you’ll have time to really dig into topics that challenge you.

Ed Talks returns, and we’ve made room to give presenters a bit more time to explore their topics.

In a world that is increasingly polarized, the need for unbiased, medically accurate, age-appropriate sex and reproductive health education is more important than ever. Over the next few days we’ll have the chance to hear different perspectives on issues that matter to all of us. SHS offers us all a chance to intentionally gather in community and consider how a diversity of viewpoints can influence our work. Thank you for attending our conference and bringing your own unique expertise and experiences into this space. You are what keeps us going! Your willingness to share best practices, discuss needs you’ve identified in your own communities, and your ongoing quest for new information fuels the conference and the work that happens after. We are so grateful for your dedication to this life-changing and life-saving work. Together, we will continue to partner with individuals and communities to be safe, healthy and strong. With admiration,

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The Tool Shed is proud to be a sponsor for SHS 2018. The Tool Shed is an education-based, mission-driven sex toy store in Milwaukee, WI featuring: * Body-safe sex toys & lubes * Welcoming environment * Classes & workshops * Quality toy parties * Private consultation service

The Tool Shed

2427 N Murray Avenue Milwaukee, WI

toolshedtoys.com Bring in this ad to receive

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Offer expires April 30, 2018 5

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PRECONFERENCE SESSION TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2018 Providing Exceptional Sexual Health care & Education for Transgender, Nonbinary, and Gender Nonconforming/Diverse (TNG) People

Transgender, nonbinary, and gender nonconforming/diverse (TNG) people experience significant rejection, discrimination, and even violence when attempting to access primary, specialty, transition-related, and even urgent/emergency health care. Recent research about health care access for TNG people has indicated that nearly 1 in 4 have delayed necessary health care in the last year due to fear of discrimination and 29% have had a health care provider refuse to treat them within the last year. In the sexual health and education fields, providers and educators often have very little information about the sexual health, function, pleasure, and risks of TNG people. This lack of specific information, coupled with limited training about how to competently work with these populations and health systems, insurance, and law/policy that often actively exclude these patients, creates significant barriers to care. This session will focus on the “what” and “how” of providing exceptional sexual health care and education to TNG people, including: • The diversity of transition “paths” and what this can mean for their health • Sexual health, pleasure, function, and risk/outcomes for TNG bodies • TNG-Inclusive and specific sexuality education practices and topics • Concrete recommendations for creating accessible, affordable, affirming, and competent sexual health care and education for TNG people • Assessment of current practices to identify successes, barriers, and opportunities for change • Supported planning to identify and implement impactful practices for TNG sexual health at the individual provider/educator, organizational, and systems levels Attendees will gain the knowledge and skills required to make them and/or their organization a trusted provider for sexual health care to transgender, nonbinary, and gender nonconforming/diverse (TNG) people in their communities and regions.

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Objectives: • Discuss the impacts of non-medical, medical, and surgical transition on the sexual health, pleasure, and functioning of TNG people’s bodies • Identify at least 4 sexual health risks that are increased, decreased, and/or unique to TNG people (as compared to cisgender people) • Describe how to create TNG-inclusive and TNG-specific sexuality education on at least 3 topics • Identify 2-3 personal and 2-3 organizational concrete, impactful practices for creating access to exceptional sexual health care (if a provider) and/or sexuality education (if an educator) for TNG people • Create a specific plan to implement at least 1-2 of these concrete, impactful practices to improve their individual and/or organization practices to provide exceptional sexual health care and/or education for TNG people About the Presenter Jay Botsford (pronouns : ze/zir/zirs or they/them/theirs) is the Program Coordinator for the Transgender Youth Resource Network (TYRN) at UW-Madison and the community-based Wisconsin Transgender Health Coalition (WTHC). Ze works to create health care equity and health justice for transgender, nonbinary, and gender nonconforming/diverse (TNG) people in Wisconsin. Jay has worked with TNG and LGBTQ+ youth and adults in Wisconsin for more than 15 years, providing training/consulting to service providers to improve their competency and capacity to provide inclusive and affirming services and health care, and advocating/organizing for health, equity, and justice for multiple marginalized TNG and LGBTQ+ people and communities.

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MAIN CONFERENCE WORKSHOP SCHEDULE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2018 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Registration and Continental Breakfast {Lobby and Hallway}

9:00 AM – 9:20 AM Welcome and Introductions {Room 7970}

9:30 AM – 11:00 AM CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS: SESSION A A-1 A-2 A-3 A-4 A-5

LGBTQ Love, Acceptance, & Resiliency: A Path to Liberation {7220} Improving Adherence to Colposcopy Recommendations: Recommendations from Interviews with Individuals Advised to Receive Colposcopy {7350} PrEP for HIV Prevention {7240} HPV Education in the Community {7230} La Educación y Prevención Que Ofrecer un Promotor {7330}

11:00 AM – 11:15 AM

Exhibitor/Vendor Area Open

11:15 AM – 12:15 PM

ED Talks {7970}

{Lobby and Hallway}

12:15 PM – 1:00 PM Lunch {Main Dining Room} 1:00 PM – 1:15 PM Exhibitor/Vendor Area Open {Lobby and Hallway}

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1:15 PM – 2:45 PM CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS: SESSION B B-1 B-2

B-3 B-4 B-5

Reproductive Justice 2.0: The Politics of Health Care {7240} Trans & Gender-Diverse Inclusive Sexual & Reproductive Health Care {7220} Linking Families and Teens (LiFT): Using Family Connection and Values to Promote Sexual Health Communication {7230} Centering Race in Sexual Violence Response and Prevention (Part 1 of 2) {7970} Herramientas para Reclutar Poblaciones Claves Dentro de la Comunidad Hispano Hablante {7330}

2:45 PM – 3:15 PM Break Exhibitor/Vendor Area Open {Lobby and Hallway}

3:15 PM – 4:45 PM CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS: SESSION C C-1 C-2 C-3 C-4 C-5

If God Created My Clitoris… Exploring Pleasure Principles and Sex Positivity in the Christian Religion {7240} Hurts So Good: How Pain Disorders Can Affect Sex and Sexuality {7220} Sexuality and Relationship Education for People with Disabilities: An Independent Living Center’s Approach {7330} Centering Race in Sexual Violence Response and Prevention (Part 2 of 2) {7970} Como Podemos Repartir la Información que Obtenemos por Medio de Investigaciones Comunitarias para Obtener el Mejor Impacto {7230}

4:45 PM – 5:00 PM Exhibitor/Vendor Area Open {Lobby and Hallway} 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM Networking Reception {Best Place at the Historic Pabst Brewery} 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM Bedtime Stories {Best Place at the Historic Pabst Brewery} 9

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MAIN CONFERENCE WORKSHOP SCHEDULE THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Registration and Continental Breakfast {Hallway and Lobby}

9:00 AM – 10:30 AM CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS: SESSION D D-1 D-2 D-3 D-4 D-5

On Healing [Black] Church Hurt: Teaching Liberating Sexuality Education in Christian Faith-Based Spaces {7330} Pregnant Pause? Sexuality in the Childbearing Year {7240} Lube: Science and Strategies {7230} The Power of Authentic Conversations in Advocacy {7350} Aceptación LGBTQ+ en Nuestras Familias {7220}

10:30 AM – 10:45 AM Exhibitor/Vendor Area Open {Lobby and Hallway} 10:45 AM – 12:10 PM Panel Discussion: Youth Voices {7970} 12:10 PM - 12:45 PM Lunch {Main Dining Room} 12:45 PM – 1:00 PM Exhibitor/Vendor Area Open {Lobby and Hallway}

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1:00 PM – 2:30 PM CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS: SESSION E E-1 E-2 E-3 E-4 E-5

Let’s Talk About Sex and Faith! (Part 1 of 2) {7330} Centering Youth to Develop and Implement Sexual Health Programs and Campaigns for School and Community Settings {7970} Data and Statistics: Tools for Discrimination {7220} Black Women’s Rape is Still Invisible: The Intersectionality of Being a Woman of Color in White America {7230} Justicia Reproductiva 2.0: Políticas de Salud Pública (Parte 1 de 2) {7240}

2:30 PM – 3:00 PM

Break Exhibitor/Vendor Area Open {Lobby and Hallway}

3:00 PM – 4:30 PM CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS: SESSION F F-1 F-2 F-3 F-4 F-5

Let’s Talk About Sex and Faith! (Part 2 of 2) {7330} Contraception Counseling: How Enthusiasm Can Become Coercion {7230} Navigating Sexual Violence in the Media and in the Community {7970} Scientific Evidence or Freedom of Speech? The Debate Over Requiring Medically-Accurate Information in Centers and Schools {7220} Justicia Reproductiva 2.0: Políticas de Salud Pública (Parte 2 de 2) {7240}

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SAFE HEALTHY STRONG CONFERENCE 2018 MAP

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Using Pronoun Ribbons Pronoun ribbons have been provided for all Safe Healthy Strong conference participants to select from to encourage awareness of the gender diversity. These ribbons may be an abbreviated representation of pronouns, primarily featuring the subject. You may refer to the chart below to see the full extension of pronouns for every sentence type. Please take a moment to select ribbons with your gender pronouns to attach to your name badge. Asking and correctly using someone’s pronouns is one of the most basic ways to show your respect for their gender identity. Subject (1)

Object (2)

Possessive (3)

Possessive Pronoun (4)

Reflexive (5)

she/ella

her

her

hers

herself

he/el

him

his

his

himself

they/elle

them

their

theirs

themself

zi

zir

zir

zirs

zieself

ze

hir

hir

hirs

hirself

xe

xem

xyr

xyrs

xemself

Please note these are not the only pronouns. There are an infinite number of pronouns as new ones emerge in our language. Always ask someone for their pronouns. Someone wearing ‘Ask me’ or ‘Pregúntame’ ribbons is instructing you to ask which pronouns they use. Subject: 1 is/are excited to be at the Safe Healthy Strong conference! Object: I sat with 2 in the last session. Possessive: 3 story at Bedtime Stories was amazing! Possessive Pronoun: This conference bag is 4 . Reflexive: 1 stands up for 5 .

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Embody staff thank

Tashia and John Morgridge for sponsoring the Safe Healthy Strong Conference

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Understanding Gender Identity and Pronouns Gender is usually assigned when a baby is born, based on the genitals they appear to have. A baby with a penis and testicles is called a boy; a baby with labia and vulva/vagina is called a girl. A baby with genitals that do not appear to be typical in development as a penis or vulva may be called intersex and their gender not yet determined. In fact, the genders of all of these babies, no matter which reproductive body parts are visible, are not assignable by adults. This is because gender Identity is a person’s innermost concept of self as man, woman, a blend of both or neither. It is how individuals perceive themselves and what they call themselves. Gender identity can be the same or different from one’s sex assigned at birth. If gender identity matches with that assigned at birth based on reproductive body parts, that person is considered cisgender. If gender identity is different than what was assigned at birth, that person may consider themselves to be transgender, genderqueer, non-binary or have some other identity. Genderqueer, also termed non-binary, is a catch-all category for gender identities that are not exclusively represented as men or women—they are i‌dentities which are outside the gender binary and our learned assumptions about someone’s gender. Genderqueer people may express a combination of masculinity and femininity, fluidly changing, or neither, in their gender expression. Gender identity is not fixed and can change just as people often do. The truth is you can’t know what someone’s pronouns are by looking at them. Even if you think that a person is presenting as a man or woman, this does not mean they use the pronouns you may think to identify them. Gender neutral/gender inclusive pronouns like “they/them/theirs” are considered polite when you don’t know what someone’s pronouns are. It is best to ask for a person’s pronouns, just as you might ask someone’s name when meeting them for the first time. It is also appropriate to converse without the use of pronouns or using gender neutral ones. Knowing someone’s pronouns can be personal, and it is often unfortunately tasked to transgender individuals to divulge their pronouns which can uncomfortable, embarrassing or even unsafe. Learning to be comfortable not knowing someone’s pronouns is a sign of respect when conversing. Because Safe Healthy Strong is offering workshops in two different languages, we have done our best to be inclusive of both English and Spanish in our pronoun ribbons. Some gender neutral/gender inclusive pronouns are not easily translated in other languages. Spanish often uses binary/gendered language, in which words and objects are identified as masculine or feminine, and a neutral identity can be challenging to translate. This is similar in English for occupations that have been traditionally gendered, like actor vs actress, alderman vs alderwoman, waiter/waitress, midwives, etc. Where gender neutral language can be imperfect, gender neutrality is sometimes described using traditionally masculine terms. While there are challenges in expressing gender diversity in the Spanish language, it is also true that there are many different ways that gender is expressed beyond pronouns.

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Mistakes happen and It’s okay! Everyone slips up from time to time. The best thing to do if you use the wrong pronoun for someone is to say something right away, like “Sorry, I meant (insert pronoun).” If you realize your mistake after the fact, apologize in private and move on. It can be tempting to go on and on about how bad you feel that you messed up or how hard it is for you to get it right. Please don’t! It is inappropriate and makes the person who was misgendered feel awkward and responsible for comforting you, which is absolutely not their job. Though pronouns represent an important and ever-expanding sense of who we are, they are only one method among many we can use to truly get know one another. For more information, please visit: https://uwm.edu/lgbtrc/support/gender-pronouns/

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Disability Inclusive Guidelines To encourage disability awareness and inclusiveness among conference participants, we are asking that attendees consider the following: 1. Disability comes in many forms — those that are visible and those that are invisible. Be aware of this as you are discoursing about disability. Assume nothing. 2. Be inclusive of those living with chronic health issues; these individuals are often excluded from the disability community. 3. Be aware that mental health disability is also part of the disability community. 4. Consider using the stairs - particularly during high traffic times - and give priority to those with mobility issues and/or other chronic health issues that may make climbing stairs difficult, dangerous, and/or impossible. 5. Think about environmental barriers and participate in addressing those barriers. For example, when you move in and out of sessions, move chairs back in place to avoid creating obstacles in walkways and thoroughfares. 6. Engage in dialogue and actively problem-solve disability-related barriers. We want the opportunity to act on your concerns, criticisms, and your ideas to fix, address, and correct any barriers. 7. Be mindful of seats that provide clear view of presenters for lip reading and for people with visual impairments. We will generally ask that the first and second row of assemblies and/or small breakouts be made available to those needing this access. Please make room for service animal seating in the aisles or the front row. 8. If you are presenting in a small breakout room and a wireless microphone has been placed in the room, PLEASE USE THE MICROPHONE. Asking without the microphone, 'is my voice loud enough?' assumes someone with a hearing impairment would be comfortable saying so in a group. If there is a microphone in your room, it is for everyone speaking to be able to hear each other. 9. Please avoid use of perfumes and fragranced personal care products. Ingredients in many fragrances and scents are known to irritate the respiratory tract, nervous system, and eyes; and trigger allergies and other severe health reactions. In the case of asthma and epilepsy, reactions triggered by exposure to scented products can be life-threatening. (https://ww.pdx.edu/hr/fragrance-free-value-statement)

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Storytelling Event

Wednesday, March 21, 2018 6 PM

Come listen as remarkable storytellers share their experiences in the field of sexual health and education. It is an evening filled with true, personal stories which may entertain, surprise, or warm your heart. Join us for the Networking Reception starting at 5:00 PM

Best Place

at the Historic Pabst Brewery 901 West Juneau Avenue 19

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21 NETWORKING RECEPTION 5:00 – 6:00 PM This special “after hours” event convenes conference participants who are interested in renewing old connections and making new ones. Mix and mingle as you join colleagues and meet Embody staff in a casual setting. It’s a great opportunity to finish the discussions started during the day, exchange ideas, share stories, and develop new collaborations. Come for the networking, and stay for Bedtime Stories! BEDTIME STORIES 6:00 – 8:00 PM Embody presents its 5th annual storytelling event, Bedtime Stories. Casual and open to conference participants as well as people from the community, you’ll be entertained, challenged and motivated as people share their true stories of sexual health and personal experiences. Come to listen, or sign up to tell your own story! Refreshments will be provided. Drinks are available for purchase. This event is open to the public.

Best Place at the Historic Pabst Brewery, 901 West Juneau Avenue Directions:

901 W. Juneau Avenue is only 1.1 miles from the conference center. Drive time approximately 6 minutes. 1. Starting at 161 W Wisconsin Ave, head west on W Wisconsin Ave toward N 2nd St (away from the river) 0.3 mi. 2. Turn right onto N 6th St (Just past whole block of Wisconsin Center, Hilton City Center Hotel will be on the left side) 0.5 mi. 3. Turn left onto W Winnebago St (after construction for new basketball arena, but before 94/43 hwy entrances) 436 ft. 4. At the traffic circle, take the 2nd exit onto W Juneau Ave. Best Place is on the left (just past 9th St). Parking is metered street parking or available in the paid parking structure with an entrance on 9th Street.

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ED TALKS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21 11:15 AM – 12:15 PM {7970}

Put on Your Thinking Cap! SHS Ed Talks are short, energizing speeches designed to create interest in new topics, motivate listeners to learn more, or challenge ideas previously taken for granted. Each year SHS organizers invite a variety of people to share their ideas, research, and experiences in the communities they serve. Speakers use a short, 5 – 7 minute format to touch on important ideas and concepts that focus on ways to keep individuals and communities safe, healthy, and strong. The speakers you will hear during Ed Talks may explore research, program innovations, and health education tailored for diverse audiences. So sit back and get ready to learn a little bit about a lot of topics related to sexual and reproductive health!

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PANEL DISCUSSION THURSDAY, MARCH 22 10:45 AM – 12:10 PM {7970} Youth Voices Too often, programs, education, and services developed to help youth stay healthy and make positive decisions about sexuality and reproductive health are developed and delivered by adults without consulting young people about their thoughts; however, research shows that including youth in the conversation helps our work be more impactful. By inviting young people to consistently be the center of the conversation regarding their sexual and reproductive health, we can create effective and engaging programming, helping us to develop curricula, interventions, and protocols that respect youth experiences and needs as well as their voices. Join us at the for the panel discussion as we lift the voices of young people discussing sexuality and reproductive health education. Young people from youth-serving organizations and communities throughout Wisconsin will share their unique and important perspectives regarding this work. Conference participants will also have an opportunity to ask questions during the panel discussion.

Panelists will explore different issues, which may include: · Do you feel like you have a voice in your health care? · What, for you, would make health care more youth friendly? · What barriers do you see? · What suggestions can you offer adults, health care practitioners, or organizations that want to more effectively reach youth?

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SESSION A WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21 9:30 – 11:00 AM

A-1 LGBTQ Love, Acceptance, & Resiliency: A Path to Liberation (Kathy Flores, Diverse and Resilient) This workshop will update participants about violence facing LGBTQ individuals, including intimate partner/dating, sexual, hookup and community/hate based violence. Participants will learn about what the data collected at PrideFests throughout Wisconsin regarding alcohol and drug issues and intimate partner and sexual violence tells us about an individual’s ability to stay safe. Participants will learn about safety plans and get tips for working with patients who identify as LGBTQ. Most importantly, we will discuss how love and acceptance will lead to our liberation and ending violence. Participants will be introduced to our new music and outdoor visual campaign through a multi-media presentation featuring Milwaukee’s Lex Allen. {7220} A-2 Improving Adherence to Colposcopy Recommendations: Recommendations from Interviews with Individuals Advised to Receive Colposcopy (Maria Barker, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin; Melissa DeNomie, Medical College of Wisconsin; Leslie Ruffalo, Medical College of Wisconsin) Despite the effectiveness of cervical cancer screening, women often fail to obtain recommended colposcopies, a critical step in cancer screening/prevention. The issue is complicated by ethnic disparities in cervical cancer prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment and survival. To better understand this topic, researchers partnered with Planned Parenthood and a family medicine clinic to conduct interviews to explore colposcopy barriers and facilitators. Presenters will share interview results, focusing on findings that might improve the way attendees communicate with their own clients about HPV, colposcopy, and cervical cancer screening. {7350}

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A-3 PrEP for HIV Prevention (Ruthie Burich-Weatherly, Riverside Consulting, LLC) PrEP for HIV prevention is a new and emerging biomedical intervention that is gaining steam in the Midwest. Approved in 2012 by the FDA, PrEP gives an individual increased control over their ability to prevent HIV acquisition. This workshop will help attendees understand the history of PrEP development, who benefits from PrEP, how to get PrEP and ongoing CDC health care recommendations for individuals taking PrEP. This presentation will discuss both provider tools on how to manage PrEP patients as well as PrEP adherence skills for those taking or considering initiating PrEP. {7240} A-4 HPV Education in the Community (Jennifer Balistreri and Cathy Schulz, Aurora Cancer Care) This workshop provides basic information about HPV education and describes how to approach younger generations regarding this topic. The presenters will review connection between HPV and cervical cancers of the head and neck as well as vaginal and anal cancers. They will share best practices they have used when educating high school students about this important topic, and will share some of the anonymous questions and concerns posed by students in their workshops. They will also examine barriers to obtaining parental support and access to the vaccine. Workshop participants will receive printed resources for discussion and education, and an outlined curriculum guide. {7230} A-5 La Educación y Prevención que Ofrecer un Promotor (Maria de los Angeles Soria Rodriguez, Promotora de Salud Independiente) Este taller informativo le dará una vista real a las necesidades de comunidades Hispana hablantes del estado de Wisconsin, con énfasis en las poblaciones que viven en Milwaukee, Waukesha y Racine. Es importante reconocer las necesidades de nuestra gente para educarnos sobre que son las preocupaciones reales que viven y proporcionarles la información que necesitan para apoyar en su desarrolla personal para vivir una vida plena, saludable y exitosa. {7330}

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SESSION B WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21 1:15 – 2:45 PM B-1 Reproductive Justice 2.0: The Politics of Health care (Amy Perez, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) Participants in this workshop will develop a deeper understanding of the Reproductive Justice framework, which encompasses a wide range of issues including reproductive freedom, immigration, gender expression, sexual education, and bodily autonomy. Shape your own understanding of how to apply the Reproductive Justice lens in your work. Using the Reproductive Justice lens allows individuals to make connections between people and communities affected by reproductive oppression. The use of storytelling will be considered as a tool to change culture and public narrative. {7240} B-2 Trans & Gender-Diverse Inclusive Sexual & Reproductive Health Care (Jay Botsford, The Wisconsin Trans Health Coalition; Diane Love, Public Health Madison and Dane County) This workshop is intended for sexual health care providers to improve the sexual and reproductive health care of trans and gender diverse (TGD) clients. In this workshop, we’ll share our process for creating a sexual health clinic environment that is welcoming and inclusive of trans and gender diverse clients. The Wisconsin Trans Health Coalition created and delivered a 3-part curriculum for our public health department staff. We’ll share lessons learned, our vision of best practices, and some ideas for implementing a more TGD-inclusive environment tailored to your health center. {7220}

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B-3 Linking Families and Teens (LiFT): Using Family Connection and Values to Promote Sexual Health Communication (Nicole Mortenson and Isabella Stokes, Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and Hawaiian Islands) Teens share that caregivers are major influences on healthy decision making. This workshop will focus on LiFT, a program that encourages families to discuss existing value systems and strengthen communication. Family connection helps teens achieve their goals, avoid unwanted pregnancies and STIs, and reduce drug use and depression. By the end of the workshop, participants will understand the family connection framework and how to apply it and gain skills to frame sexual education in a way that is inclusive of all value systems in the room, including faith, while encouraging family communication around sexuality. {7230} B-4 Centering Race in Sexual Violence Response and Prevention (Part 1 of 2) (Jessi Corcoran and Nestic Morris, Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault) Through intensive technical assistance from the Women of Color Network, Inc., the Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault has taken its first steps towards becoming an anti-racist organization. WCASA has chosen to intentionally center women of color in our work – but why, and what does that look like? Join us for an in-depth workshop that will help to explain how racial oppression is connected to sexual violence; how white folks can be better aspiring allies in their personal and professional lives; and what WCASA is doing to center race in the office and in the sexual violence movement in Wisconsin. (This is a 180 minute workshop. Part 2 will begin at 3:15 PM.) {7970} B-5 Herramientas Para Reclutar Poblaciones Claves Dentro de la Comunidad Hispano Hablante (Yuly Sánchez, Consultante Independiente) Esta presentación cubre métodos y consideraciones útiles para reclutar poblaciones claves de la comunidad. Específicamente, toca temas como el abordaje de participantes, sostenimiento de tema, conocimiento de la población, como establecer confianza con la comunidad, y donde conseguir las poblaciones claves. {7330}

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SESSION C

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21 3:15 – 4:45 PM C-1 If God Created My Clitoris… Exploring Pleasure Principles and Sex Positivity in the Christian Religion (Brittany Broaddus-Smith, The Intimacy Firm) This workshop is designed to empower individuals to embrace sexuality as a natural and healthy part of life, even in Christianity. It will address myths and truths as relates to relationships, acceptable sex acts and pleasure principles. Participants will be encouraged to engage in activities around the idea that pleasurable sex isn’t just permitted but promoted. The aim is to empower participants to challenge systemic teachings that perpetuate oppressive narratives and resulting risky sexual behaviors, discuss bodily autonomy as granted by the sacred text, and script the future discovery, embracing and navigation of physically, mentally and spiritually healthy sexuality. {7240} C-2 Hurts So Good: How Pain Disorders Can Affect Sex and Sexuality (Kirsten Schultz, Chronic Sex) Having sex when you’re disabled or chronically ill isn’t easy. There are many factors to take into consideration, hurdles to fight, and a lot of emotional issues that being ill can bring. This presentation will address those and more! Sexuality and pain disorders will be discussed at length, making it perfect for patients, partners, educators, advocates, or health care professionals. Attendees will participate in an active discussion and come away with a better understanding of how pain affects sexuality, ways to offer support and guidance to those in pain, and more. {7220}

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C-3 Sexuality and Relationship Education for People with Disabilities: an Independent Living Center’s Approach (Grant Heffelfinger and Kristin Stern, IndependenceFirst) Folks with disabilities are often pulled out of their health class in school to get assistance in other subjects. This has left many with disabilities to find their own way to educate themselves on sex and sexuality. There are a number of misconceptions and myths around people with disabilities and sex. In this workshop, we will deconstruct those myths and show how one Independent Living Center is offering comprehensive sex education to youth with disabilities. This workshop will discuss the history of people with disabilities, the disability rights movement, and how that has shaped attitudes and stereotypes of people with disabilities with regards to sex and sexuality. {7330} C-4 Centering Race in Sexual Violence Response and Prevention (Part 2 of 2) (Jessi Corcoran and Nestic Morris, Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault) (This workshop continues Session B-4) Through intensive technical assistance from the Women of Color Network, Inc., the Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault has taken its first steps towards becoming an anti-racist organization. WCASA has chosen to intentionally center women of color in our work – but why, and what does that look like? Join us for an in-depth workshop that will help to explain how racial oppression is connected to sexual violence; how white folks can be better aspiring allies in their personal and professional lives; and what WCASA is doing to center race in the office and in the sexual violence movement in Wisconsin. {7970} C-5 Como Podemos Repartir la Informacion que Obtenemos por Medio de Investigaciones Comunitarias para Obtener el Mejor Impacto (Maria Barker, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) Muchos de nosotros quienes trabajamos en la comunidad hacemos esta labor porque nos apasiona trabajar con el pueblo. Hay muchas maneras que utilizamos para capacitarnos y para compartir la información que obtenemos. Una de esas maneras es Communitity Participatory Research, por su nombre en inglés y en español se traduce a, Investigación Participativa por Comunidades. Este taller le ofrecerá la oportunidad de aprender sobre como el Colegio de Medicina de WI usa esta manera de hacer investigaciones y como utilizamos esta teoría para saber más sobre porque si o no mujeres escogen seguir la recomendación de su médico, de hacerse el seguimiento medico de colposcopia. Compartiremos lo que las mujeres dijeron acerca que las motiva y cuáles son las barreras para cumplir o no con este seguimiento recomendado. {7230}

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SESSION D

THURSDAY, MARCH 22 9:00 – 10:30 AM D-1 On Healing [Black] Church Hurt: Teaching Liberating Sexuality Education in Christian Faith-Based Spaces (Jocelyn Mason-Saffold, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) Women—particularly women of color—are disproportionately affected by lack of bodily autonomy as it relates to sexual and sexually-related emotional health in staggering numbers in Christian/western faith-based spaces. With large numbers of People of Color moving away from Christianity and organized religion altogether due to instances of shame, trauma, lack of inclusivity, and representation, it is time to reshape the discussion of sexuality within the faith many of our nearest ancestors held so dear. This interactive workshop gives participants the opportunity to share dialogue and approaches to facilitate comprehensive sexuality education to youth and adult Christian faith-based audiences in anti-shaming, sexually inclusive ways. The group will explore how to collaborate on ways the [Black] church can be proactive in creating safe spaces for healthy sex dialogue. {7330} D-2 Pregnant Pause? Sexuality in the Childbearing Year (Lucky Tomaszek, The Tool Shed) This session will explore sexuality during the childbearing year through two different lenses. We’ll talk about the anatomical and hormonal changes that take place throughout those 12-ish months. We’ll also review the results of an informal survey on birth and sexuality to see how parents feel about their own sexuality following childbirth. This session will also briefly discuss sexual dysfunction, some solutions, and when to refer for more extensive care. {7240}

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D-3 Lube: Science and Strategies (Genevive Bern, Planned Parenthood of the Heartland) During this workshop, participants will explore how sexual lubricants (lube) work, what lube ingredients are not body-friendly, and new approaches to lube education. The first half of the presentation provides up-to-date scientific information about types of lube: oil, hybrid water, and silicone-based. The second half of the presentation is interactive, focusing on strategies health educators can use to understand and remember pertinent lube information and to educate on lube in an unbiased, research-informed manner. Participants will have the opportunity to reflect on current teaching methods and practice their newly learned approaches to lube education. {7230} D-4 The Power of Authentic Conversations in Advocacy (Monica Sundal, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) Communication is the foundation for successful relationships and advocacy. Based on psychological understanding of how humans change, we will explore ways to focus on listening and empathy skills, check out assumptions, and meet people where they are to have productive conversations about emotionally-complex issues. This workshop will provide an introduction to a conversational approach to advocacy that asks us to change ourselves first before we can reach others. {7350} D-5 Aceptaciรณn LGBTQ+ en Nuestras Familias (Christine Neumann-Ortiz, Voces de la Frontera y Livia Rowell-Ortiz, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) Todos han conocido a alguien LGBQT+ aunque lo sepan o no. Para muchos las mรกs importantes relaciones son en la familias sea por sangre o creados. En este taller tendremos un espacio de confianza para explorar y aceptar nuestras familias LGBTQ+ para mantener familias fuertes. {7220}

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SESSION E THURSDAY, MARCH 22 1:00 – 2:30 PM E-1 Let’s Talk About Sex and Faith! (Part 1 of 2) (Lacette Cross, Will You Be Whole) Sex and faith are two of the hardest topics to talk about. And yet we still find ourselves needing to discover safe, healthy and productive ways to have the conversation. This workshop will equip participants with the tools they need to be the sexual resource in a spiritual space and a spiritual resource in a sexual space. Participants will define key terms relevant to the sex and faith intersection, explore sexuality messages received from spiritual belief systems and create a sex and faith lesson activity that can be used in their own context. The workshop is open to people of all faith backgrounds, including persons who do not identify with a faith but have an understanding and respect for spirituality. (This is a 180 minute workshop. Part 2 will begin at 3:00 PM.) {7330} E-2 Centering Youth to Develop and Implement Sexual Health Programs and Campaigns for School and Community Settings (Beth Tadesse and B. Deonn Strathman, Planned Parenthood of Illinois) This workshop provides an overview of the development and implementation of Planned Parenthood of Illinois’ two adolescent sexual health prevention programs that address STI disparities and access to birth control by leveraging both education and medical services: Chicago Healthy Adolescent and Teens (CHAT) and the My Body. My Story campaign. It will highlight the importance of innovative models of service delivery, community collaboration, and importance of centering the youth voice in development of all materials. {7970}

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E-3 Data and Statistics: Tools for Discrimination (Mia Noel, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) Data and Statistics can further marginalize groups already suffering from the societal impacts of discrimination. Sexual health educators have a role in advocating with and for the marginalized groups in their community. This presentation will address the use of data and statistics from the perspective of groups that are often inappropriately discussed in public health. There will be the opportunity to analyze some of the troublesome aspects of data and statistics and participants will establish clear guidelines on how to conscientiously present data to increase individual efficacy, mitigate the effects of discrimination and advocate for systemic change. {7220} E-4 Black Women’s Rape is Still Invisible: The Intersectionality of Being a Woman of Color in White America (Quenesha Watson, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) Sexual violence impacts women everyday across the globe. In America, women of color face rape in combination with other oppressions as a result of their race, gender, and other factors at the same time. Those simultaneous marginalizations further increase the oppression they face. Often these women suffer in silence and rarely receive justice. The criminal justice system neglects these women and the violence they endure. There is also a rape kit backlog that spans across the nation. In this workshop, participants will explore the experience of rape for women of color through testimonials, statistics, public perception and political commentary. In addition, there will be deeper explanation of the legal, societal, and historical impacts of rape for women of color. {7230} E-5 Justicia Reproductiva 2.0: Políticas de Salud Publica (Parte 1 de 2) (Amy Perez, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) Desarrolle una comprensión más profunda del marco de la salud reproductiva. El marco de la Justicia Reproductiva abarca una gran variedad de temas que incluyen la libertad reproductiva, inmigración, expresión de género, educación sexual y autonomía corporal. Forme su propia guía para aplicar sus conocimientos de justicia reproductiva en su trabajo. Usar sus conocimientos en el ámbito de la justicia reproductiva le permitirá establecer un vínculo entre los individuos y comunidades afectadas por la opresión reproductiva. Además, aprenderá a contar su propia historia y usarla como herramienta para cambiar la cultura popular. (Este taller es de 180 minutos y se presentará en dos partes. Parte dos empezará a las 3 PM.) {7240}

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SESSION F THURSDAY, MARCH 22 3:00 – 4:30 PM F-1 Let’s Talk About Sex and Faith! (Part 2 of 2) (Lacette Cross, Will You Be Whole) (This workshop continues session E-1) Sex and faith are two of the hardest topics to talk about. And yet we still find ourselves needing to discover safe, healthy and productive ways to have the conversation. This workshop will equip participants with the tools they need to be the sexual resource in a spiritual space and a spiritual resource in a sexual space. Participants will define key terms relevant to the sex and faith intersection, explore sexuality messages received from spiritual belief systems and create a sex and faith lesson activity that can be used in their own context. The workshop is open to people of all faith backgrounds, including persons who do not identify with a faith but have an understanding and respect for spirituality. {7330} F-2 Contraception Counseling: How Enthusiasm Can Become Coercion (Seema Menon, The Medical College of Wisconsin and Kristina Kaljo, The Medical College of Wisconsin) The association between contraception access, pregnancy planning, and healthy pregnancy outcomes has generated a great deal of enthusiasm in increasing the use of effective methods, particularly the implant and intrauterine device. This workshop focuses on developing contraception counseling skills that allows for the dissemination of accurate contraception knowledge while helping health care workers eliminate elements of coercion. The audience will be asked to participate in activities that highlight the difficulty of balancing enthusiasm with influence pertaining to contraception counseling. {7230}

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F-3 Navigating Sexual Violence in the Media and in the Community (Jennifer Garcia and Nicky Glaser, Aurora Healing and Advocacy Services) The #metoo movement brought to light the fact that many people have been impacted by sexual violence throughout their lifetime. The presence of sexual violence in the media has led to triggered victims, increased disclosures, and challenging conversations. Attendees of this workshop will review sexual violence and neurobiology of trauma, along with how to engage in conversation, how to build a mental health first aid kit, and how to have an impact on those around you. {7970} F-4 Scientific Evidence or Freedom of Speech? The Debate Over Requiring Medically-Accurate Information in Centers and Schools (Hannah Feinstein, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) This workshop will discuss an ever-present debate: should non-medical spaces be required to give medically-accurate information or should they be allowed to choose based on freedom of speech? Both arguments in this debate will be detailed, including potential legal hurdles they may encounter. Crisis Pregnancy Centers and school sex education policies will be examined, and how they could be affected by potential legal action. This workshop hopes to raise awareness of this conflict, educate on the effects health care providers and educators may see in their spaces, and what can be done to potentially impact a resolution to this debate. {7220} F- 5 Justicia 2.0: Políticas de Salud Pública (Parte 2 de 2) (Amy Perez, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) (Este taller es continuación de sesión E-5) Desarrolle una comprensión más profunda del marco de la salud reproductiva. El marco de la Justicia Reproductiva abarca una gran variedad de temas que incluyen la libertad reproductiva, inmigración, expresión de género, educación sexual y autonomía corporal. Forme su propia guía para aplicar sus conocimientos de justicia reproductiva en su trabajo. Usar sus conocimientos en el ámbito de la justicia reproductiva le permitirá establecer un vínculo entre los individuos y comunidades afectadas por la opresión reproductiva. Además, aprenderá a contar su propia historia y usarla como herramienta para cambiar la cultura popular. {7240}

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YOUTH TEXT LINE could my gf be pregnant how will I know when Im ready 2 have sex?

Is it normal for 1 breast 2 be bigger than the other?

How can I come out 2 my mom?

the condom broke last nite. now what do I do??

Participants text “safersex� to 69866 and receive an answer within 24 hours. Trained health educators respond to questions about sex, sexuality, and relationships with unbiased, medically-accurate information, without judgment for young people.

ppwi.org/text 35

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE WORKSHOPS Black Women’s Rape is Still Invisible: The Intersectionality of Being a Woman of Color in White America (Quenesha Watson, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) Sexual violence impacts women every day across the globe. In America, women of color face rape in combination with other oppressions as a result of their race, gender, and other factors at the same time. Those simultaneous oppressions further increase the marginalizations they face. Often these women suffer in silence and rarely receive justice. The criminal justice system neglects these women and the violence they endure. There is also a rape kit backlog that spans across the nation. In this workshop, participants will explore the experience of rape for women of color through testimonials, statistics, public perception and political commentary. In addition, there will be deeper explanation of the legal, societal, and historical impacts of rape for women of color. (Session E-4) Centering Race in Sexual Violence Response and Prevention (Jessi Corcoran and Nestic Morris, Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault) Through intensive technical assistance from the Women of Color Network, Inc., the Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault has taken its first steps towards becoming an anti-racist organization. WCASA has chosen to intentionally center women of color in our work – but why, and what does that look like? Join us for an in-depth workshop that will help to explain how racial oppression is connected to sexual violence; how white folks can be better aspiring allies in their personal and professional lives; and what WCASA is doing to center race in the office and in the sexual violence movement in Wisconsin. (This is a two-part session.)

(Sessions B-4 and C-4)

Centering Youth to Develop and Implement Sexual Health Programs and Campaigns for School and Community Settings (Beth Tadesse and B. Deonn Strathman, Planned Parenthood of Illinois) This workshop provides an overview of the development and implementation of Planned Parenthood of Illinois’ two adolescent sexual health prevention programs that address STI disparities and access to birth control by leveraging both education and medical services: Chicago Healthy Adolescent and Teens (CHAT) and the My Body. My Story campaign. It will highlight the importance of innovative models of service delivery, community collaboration, and importance of centering the youth voice in development of all materials. (Session E-2)

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PS

Contraception Counseling: How Enthusiasm Can Become Coercion (Seema Menon, The Medical College of Wisconsin and Kristina Kaljo, The Medical College of Wisconsin) The association between contraception access, pregnancy planning, and healthy pregnancy outcomes has generated a great deal of enthusiasm in increasing the use of effective methods, particularly the implant and intrauterine device. This workshop focuses on developing contraception counseling skills that allows for the dissemination of accurate contraception knowledge while helping health care workers eliminate elements of coercion. The audience will be asked to participate in activities that highlight the difficulty of balancing enthusiasm with influence pertaining to contraception counseling. (Session F-2) Data and Statistics: Tools for Discrimination (Mia Noel, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) Data and Statistics can further marginalize groups already suffering from the societal impacts of discrimination. Sexual health educators have a role in advocating with and for the marginalized groups in their community. This presentation will address the use of data and statistics from the perspective of groups that are often inappropriately discussed in public health. There will be the opportunity to analyze some of the troublesome aspects of data and statistics and participants will establish clear guidelines on how to conscientiously present data to increase individual efficacy, mitigate the effects of discrimination and advocate for systemic change. (Session E-3) HPV Education in the Community (Jennifer Balistreri and Cathy Schulz, Aurora Cancer Care) This workshop provides basic information about HPV education and describes how to approach younger generations regarding this topic. The presenters will review connection between HPV and cervical cancers of the head and neck as well as vaginal and anal cancers. They will share best practices they have used when educating high school students about this important topic, and will share some of the anonymous questions and concerns posed by students in their workshops. They will also examine barriers to obtaining parental support and access to the vaccine. Workshop participants will receive printed resources for discussion and education and an outlined curriculum guide. (Session A-4)

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE WORKSHOPS Hurts so Good: How Pain Disorders Can Affect Sex and Sexuality (Kirsten Schultz, Chronic Sex) Having sex when you’re disabled or chronically ill isn’t easy. There are many factors to take into consideration, hurdles to fight, and a lot of emotional issues that being ill can bring. This presentation will address those and more! Sexuality and pain disorders will be discussed at length, making it perfect for patients, partners, educators, advocates, or health care professionals. Attendees will participate in an active discussion and come away with a better understanding of how pain affects sexuality, ways to offer support and guidance to those in pain, and more.

(Session C-2)

If God Created My Clitoris…Exploring Pleasure Principles and Sex Positivity in the Christian Religion (Brittany Broaddus-Smith, The Intimacy Firm) This workshop is designed to empower individuals to embrace sexuality as a natural and healthy part of life even in Christianity. It will address myths and truths as relates to relationships, acceptable sex acts and pleasure principles. Participants will be encouraged to engage in activities around the idea that pleasurable sex isn’t just permitted but promoted. The aim is to empower participants to challenge systemic teachings that perpetuate oppressive narratives and resulting risky sexual behaviors, discuss bodily autonomy as granted by the sacred text, and script the future discovery, embracing and navigation of physically, mentally and spiritually healthy sexuality. (Session C-1) Improving Adherence to Colposcopy Recommendations: Recommendations From Interviews with Individuals Advised to Receive Colposcopy (Maria Barker, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, Melissa DeNomie, Medical College of Wisconsin, Leslie Ruffalo, Medical College of Wisconsin) Despite the effectiveness of cervical cancer screening, women often fail to obtain recommended colposcopies, a critical step in cancer screening/prevention. The issue is complicated by ethnic disparities in cervical cancer prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment and survival. To better understand the topic, researchers partnered with Planned Parenthood and a family medicine clinic to conduct interviews to explore colposcopy barriers and facilitators. Presenters will share interview results, focusing on findings that might improve the way attendees communicate with their own clients about HPV, colposcopy, and cervical cancer screening.

(Session A-2)

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PS

Let’s Talk About Sex and Faith! (Lacette Cross, Will You Be Whole) Sex and faith are two of the hardest topics to talk about. And yet we still find ourselves needing to discover safe, healthy and productive ways to have the conversation. This workshop will equip participants with the tools they need to be the sexual resource in a spiritual space and a spiritual resource in a sexual space. Participants will define key terms relevant to the sex and faith intersection, explore sexuality messages received from spiritual belief systems and create a sex and faith lesson activity that can be used in their own context. The workshop is open to people of all faith backgrounds, including persons who do not identify with a faith but have an understanding and respect for spirituality. (This is a twopart session.) (Sessions E-1 and F-1) LGBTQ Love, Acceptance & Reliliency: A Path to Liberation (Kathy Flores, Diverse and Resilient) This workshop will update participants about violence facing LGBTQ individuals, including intimate partner/dating, sexual, hookup and community/hate based violence. Participants will learn about what the data collected at PrideFests throughout Wisconsin regarding alcohol and drug issues and intimate partner and sexual violence tells us about an individual’s ability to stay safe. Participants will learn about safety plans and tips in working with patients who identify as LGBTQ. Most importantly, we will discuss how love and acceptance will lead to our liberation and ending violence. Participants will be introduced to our new music and outdoor visual campaign through a multi-media presentation featuring Milwaukee’s Lex Allen. (Session A-1) Linking Families and Teens (LiFT): Using Family Connection and Values to Promote Sexual Health Communication (Nicole Mortenson and Isabella Stokes, Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and Hawaiian Islands) Teens share that caregivers are major influences on healthy decision making. This workshop will focus on LiFT, a program that encourages families to discuss existing values systems and strengthens communication. Family connection helps teens achieve their goals, avoid unwanted pregnancies and STIs, and reduces drug use and depression. By the end of the workshop, participants will understand the family connection framework and how to apply it and gain skills to frame sexual education in a way that is inclusive of all values systems in the room, including faith, while encouraging family communication around sexuality.

(Session B-3)

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE WORKSHOPS Lube: Science and Strategies (Genevive Bern, Planned Parenthood of the Heartland) During this workshop, participants will explore how sexual lubricants (lube) work, what lube ingredients are not body-friendly, and new approaches to lube education. The first half of the presentation provides up-to-date scientific information about four types of lube: oil, hybrid water, and silicone-based. The second half of the presentation is interactive, focusing on strategies health educators can use to understand AND remember pertinent lube information and to educate on lube in an unbiased, research-informed manner. Participants will have the opportunity to reflect on current teaching methods and practice their newly learned approaches to lube education. (Session D-3) Navigating Sexual Violence in the Media and in that Community (Jennifer Garcia and Nicky Glaser, Aurora Healing and Advocacy Services) The #metoo movement brought to light the fact that many people have been impacted by sexual violence throughout their lifetime. The presence of sexual violence in the media has led to triggered victims, increased disclosures, and challenging conversations. Attendees of this workshop will review sexual violence and neurobiology of trauma, along with how to engage in conversation, how to build a mental health first aid kit, and how to have an impact on those around them. (Session F-3) On Healing [Black] Church Hurt: Teaching Liberating Sexuality Education in Christian Faith-Based Spaces (Jocelyn Mason-Saffold, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) Women, most specifically women of color, are disproportionately affected by lack of bodily autonomy as it relates to sexual and sexually-related emotional health in staggering numbers in Christian/western faith-based spaces. With large numbers of People of Color moving away from Christianity and organized religion altogether due to instances of shame, trauma, lack of inclusivity, and representation, it is time to reshape the discussion of sexuality within the faith many of our nearest ancestors held so dear. This interactive workshop gives participants the opportunity to share dialogue and approaches to facilitate comprehensive sexuality education to youth and adult Christian faith-based audiences in anti-shaming, sexually inclusive ways. The group will explore how to collaborate on ways the [Black] church can be proactive in creating safe spaces for healthy sex dialogue. (Session D-1)

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PS

The Power of Authentic Conversations in Advocacy (Monica Sundal, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) Communication is the foundation for successful relationships and advocacy. Based on psychological understanding of how humans change, we will explore ways to focus on listening and empathy skills, check out assumptions, and meet people where they are to have productive conversations about emotionally-complex issues. This workshop will provide an introduction to a conversational approach to advocacy that asks us to change ourselves first before we can reach others. (Session D-4) Pregnant Pause? Sexuality in the Childbearing Year (Lucky Tomaszek, The Tool Shed) This session will explore sexuality during the childbearing year through two different lenses. We’ll talk about the anatomical and hormonal changes that take place throughout those 12-ish months. We’ll also review the results of an informal survey on birth and sexuality to see how parents feel about their own sexuality following childbirth. This session will also briefly discuss sexual dysfunction, some solutions, and when to refer for more extensive care. Participants will receive two handouts. One will be a guide to all of the hormones discussed in the session. The other will be a summary of the responses to an informal survey conducted on this topic. (Session D-2) PrEP for HIV Prevention (Ruthie Burich-Weatherly, Riverside Consulting, LLC) PrEP for HIV prevention is a new and emerging biomedical intervention that is gaining steam in the Midwest. Approved in 2012 by the FDA, PrEP gives an individual increased control over their ability to prevent HIV acquisition. This workshop will help attendees understand the history of PrEP development, who benefits from PrEP, how to get PrEP and ongoing CDC health care recommendations for individuals taking PrEP. This presentation will discuss both Provider tools on how to manage PrEP patients as well as PrEP adherence skills for those taking or considering initiating PrEP. (Session A-3)

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE WORKSHOPS Reproductive Justice 2.0: The Politics of Health Care (Amy Perez, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) Participants in this workshop will develop a deeper understanding of the Reproductive Justice framework, which encompasses a wide range of issues including reproductive freedom, immigration, gender expression, sexual education and bodily autonomy. Shape your own understanding of how to apply the Reproductive Justice lens in your work. Using the Reproductive Justice lens allows individuals to make connections between people and communities affected by reproductive oppression. The use of storytelling will be considered as a tool to change culture and public narrative. (Session B-1) Scientific Evidence or Freedom of Speech? The Debate Over Requiring Medically-Accurate Information in Centers and Schools (Hannah Feinstein, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) This workshop will discuss an ever-present debate: should non-medical spaces be required to give medically-accurate information or should they be allowed to choose based on freedom of speech? Both arguments in this debate will be detailed, including potential legal hurdles they may encounter. Crisis Pregnancy Centers and school sex education policies will be examined, and how they could be affected by potential legal action. This workshop hopes to raise awareness of this conflict, educate on the effects health care providers and educators may see in their spaces, and what can be done to potentially impact a resolution to this debate. (Session F-4) Sexuality and Relationship Education for People with Disabilities: An Independent Living Center’s Approach (Grant Heffelfinger and Kristin Stern, IndependenceFirst) Folks with disabilities are often pulled out of their health class in school to get assistance in other subjects. This has left many with disabilities to find their own way to educate themselves on sex and sexuality. There are a number of misconceptions and myths around people with disabilities and sex. In this workshop, we will deconstruct those myths and show how one Independent Living Center is offering comprehensive sex education to youth with disabilities. This workshop will discuss the history of people with disabilities, the disability rights movement, and how that has shaped attitudes and stereotypes of people with disabilities with regards to sex and sexuality. (Session C-3)

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PS

Trans & Gender-Diverse Inclusive Sexual & Reproductive Health Care (Jay Botsford, Wisconsin Trans Health Coalition and Diane Love, Public Health Madison and Dane County) This workshop is intended for sexual health care providers to improve the sexual and reproductive health care of trans and gender diverse (TGD) clients. In this workshop, we’ll share our process for creating a sexual health clinic environment that is welcoming and inclusive of trans and gender diverse clients. The Wisconsin Trans Health Coalition created and delivered a 3-part curriculum for our public health department staff. We’ll share lessons learned, our vision of best practices, and some ideas for implementing a more TGD-inclusive environment tailored to your health center.

(Session B-2)

Thank you to conference sponsor:

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If you are between the ages of 15 and 24 and speak both Spanish and English, YOU could help answer these questions for youth in Milwaukee and beyond. If interested please apply to become a Youth Health Educator for Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin!

Apply to become a Youth Health Educator by contacting: Jocelyn Mason-Saffold Youth Programs Coordinator Jocelyn.Mason-Saffold@ppwi.org (414) 289-3753 44 SHSProgramBooklet2018.indd 44

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PRESENTERS Jennifer Jarvey Balistreri, MS, is the Community Impact Coordinator Senior for the Aurora Cancer Care system clinical program. Jennifer has partnered with content experts and community outreach caregivers to create, implement and sustain an HPV educational program for the youth of Milwaukee communities. Jennifer is a passionate advocate for women’s rights, LGBTQ+ rights, and reducing barriers to health care and education for the under-served populations of the urban Milwaukee area. (HPV Education in the Community) Maria Barker is Multicultural Programs Manager for Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin. She is a bilingual (Spanish/English) sexuality educator who facilitates reproductive health education. She is recognized for training/using lay community workers (“Promotores de Salud”) to reach the Latino community. (Improving Adherence to Colposcopy Recommendations: Recommendations from Interviews with Individuals Advised To Receive Colposcopy) Genevieve Bern is a health educator at Planned Parenthood of the Heartland in Cedar Rapids, IA. Prior to this, Genevieve did peer education at Hamline University in St. Paul, MN. Genevieve will be leaving the field this summer to start medical school. (Lube: Science and Strategies) Jay Botsford (pronouns: ze/zir/zirs or they/them/theirs) is the Program Coordinator for the Wisconsin Transgender Health Coalition (WTHC). Jay works to create health care equity and health justice for transgender, nonbinary, genderqueer, and gender nonconforming (trans) people and communities in Wisconsin. Ze has worked with transgender and LGBTQ+ youth and adults in WI for more than 15 years (Providing Exceptional Sexual Health care & Education for Transgender, Nonbinary, And Gender Nonconforming/Diverse (TNG) People; Trans and Gender Diverse Inclusive Sexual and Reproductive Health Care) Brittany Broaddus-Smith, MSW, LSW, is currently completing a MEd in Human Sexuality Studies. At the intersection of sexuality and faith, Brittany provides comprehensive sexuality education and counseling using evidenced-based practices filtered through the Word of God. (If God Created My Clitoris… Exploring Pleasure Principles and Sex Positivity in the Christian Religion)

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PRESENTERS Ruthie Burich-Weatherly is a Public Health Consultant specializing in HIV Prevention and PrEP education for consumers, medical providers and the general community. Through Riverside Consulting LLC in Milwaukee, she provides opportunities for all communities to learn about new and developing HIV prevention methods and advocates for increased use of novel approaches to prevention. (PrEP for HIV Prevention) Jessi Corcoran, MPH, CHES, is the Prevention Coordinator at the Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault. She has nine years of experience in the anti-sexual violence movement and is passionate about integrating social justice activism into the public health approach. (Centering Race in Sexual Violence Responses and Prevention) Rev. Lacette Cross is the founder of Will You Be Whole in Richmond, VA, that talks sex and faith for wholeness with Black women and those who love them. She is an experienced facilitator on topics related to sexuality and spirituality. (Let’s Talk About Sex and Faith!) Melissa DeNomie is a research coordinator at Medical College of Wisconsin where she coordinates community-engaged research projects aimed at understanding/addressing health disparities. She is also a doctoral student at UW-Milwaukee studying community-engaged research and Critical Race Theory. (Improving Adherence to Colposcopy Recommendations: Recommendations from Interviews with Individuals Advised to Receive Colposcopy) Hannah Feinstein is a Youth Health Educator at Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin. She is extremely passionate about reproductive health education. While she has jumped out of a plane before, Hannah spends most of her free time on the ground watching hockey. (Scientific Evidence or Freedom of Speech? The Debate over Requiring Medically-Accurate Information in Centers And Schools) Kathy Flores is the Wisconsin LGBTQ Anti-Violence Manager for Diverse & Resilient and a board member of Planned Parenthood Wisconsin. Kathy has been working in movements to end violence against POC & LGBTQ individuals for over two decades. (LGBTQ Love, Acceptance and Resiliency) 46

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Jennifer Garcia, MSW, APSW, is a Healing Counselor at Aurora Healing & Advocacy Services in Milwaukee, WI, who serves victims of sexual and domestic violence by providing trauma informed crisis stabilization, advocacy, safety planning and counseling. (Navigating Sexual Violence in the Media and In the Community) Nicky Glaser serves as the Volunteer Coordinator at Aurora Healing & Advocacy Services. She is responsible for the effective and efficient operation of the center’s volunteer hotline services, and works to recruit, screen, train and manage volunteers. (Navigating Sexual Violence in the Media and In the Community) Grant Heffelfinger is a Youth Leadership Coordinator at IndependenceFirst. He organizes annual Youth Leadership Summits for high school students with disabilities and facilitates workshops, presentations, and Independent Living Skills classes on sexuality, relationships, independent living and disability history. Grant serves on the Association of Programs for Rural Independent Living (APRIL) Youth Executive Committee. Grant has a passion that is in line with the Independent Living Philosophy and continues to advocate for his community. (Sexuality and Relationship Education for People with Disabilities) Kristina Kaljo, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor and Co-Director for the ThirdYear Obstetrics/Gynecology Clerkship at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Kristina’s professional experience includes medical school curriculum design, preparing educators with a culturally responsive framework, and youth-participatory action research. (Contraception Counseling: How Enthusiasm Can Become Coercion) Diana Love (Pronouns:She/Her/Hers) has been a public health nurse for 16 years. She works in both reproductive and sexual health and immunization programs. She is also part of the PHMCD (Public Health Madison and Dane County) Health and Racial Equity team. (Trans and Gender Diverse Inclusive Sexual and Reproductive Health Care) Jocelyn Mason-Saffold is the Youth Programs Coordinator for Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin. Her passion lies in making sure people have accurate information regarding all facets of their health to make the best, informed decisions for themselves. She works with youth to foster and empower their confidence and self-worth, and facilitates programming about the importance of health at community organizations in and outside of Milwaukee. Jocelyn also partners with faith communities to find ways to discuss faith, sexuality, and health. (On Healing [Black] Church Hurt: Teaching Liberating Sexuality Education in Christian Faith Based Spaces) 47

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PRESENTERS Seema Menon is on the OB/GYN faculty at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Seema’s work focuses on the unique gynecologic needs of the pediatric/adolescent population. (Contraception Counseling: How Enthusiasm Can Become Coercion) Nestic Morris is the Outreach Coordinator at the Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault (WCASA). Her work at includes: culturally specific outreach, rebuilding and creating new relationships, and anti-oppression and intersectionality as it relates Black sexual assault survivors presentations. (Centering Race in Sexual Violence Responses and Prevention) Nicole Mortenson is a Community Educator at Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and Hawaiian Islands. She earned a B.A. in Human Development and a B.A. in Spanish Language at Washington State University. She served in the Peace Corps as a Maternal and Child Health Volunteer. (Linking Families and Teens (LiFT): Using Family Connection and Values to Promote Sexual Health Communication) Christine Neumann-Ortiz is the founding Executive Director of Voces de la Frontera. Ms. Neumann-Ortiz is recognized as a national leader in the immigrant rights movement. Through her leadership, Voces has grown from a small, grassroots worker center to a state and national leader in the immigrant rights movement. (Aceptación LGBTQ+ en Nuestras Familias) Mia Noel lives and works in Milwaukee. She graduated from Marlboro College in Marlboro, VT. Her background includes experience in public health, education, film, and volunteer work with area nonprofits. She has worked with youth and young adults for more than 14 years. Mia is currently the Community Outreach Coordinator for Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin. (Data and Statistics: Tools for Discrimination) Amy Perez is a young queer activist from Madison, WI. She graduated from Madison College with a degree in Science and Engineering. As an undergrad, Amy received the President’s service award in recognition for 200+ hours of volunteer service for Planned Parenthood. Upon graduation, she started working at Planned Parenthood of WI as a medical assistant. Amy has devoted her life to serving and empowering underserved and marginalized communities. (Reproductive Justice 2.0: The Politics of Health Care; Justicia Reproductiva 2.0: Políticas de Salud Pública) 48

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Livia Rowell-Ortiz, a board member of Genderqueer Milwaukee, works to expand the ways we think about and relate to gender in our communities. She does this by creating space for discussions around gender that are grounded in social justice and advocates for the adoption of practices that advance our rights on the local level. (Aceptación LGBTQ+ en Nuestras Familias) Leslie Ruffalo, PhD, MS, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Dr. Ruffalo’s research focuses on using community-based research methods to investigate health disparities within communities across Wisconsin. (Improving Adherence to Colposcopy Recommendations: Recommendations from Interviews with Individuals Advised to Receive Colposcopy) Cathy Schulz, NP, is a surgical oncology nurse practitioner at Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center and an instructor with the Alverno College Nursing Program. Cathy serves on the Milwaukee Metro Aurora Cancer Care Community Outreach Committee and regularly donates her time to volunteer in Milwaukee communities. Cathy has been a champion provider for the HPV education program for Milwaukee youth for over a year and is a content expert for colorectal cancer and HPV education. (HPV Education in the Community) Kirsten Schultz is a genderfluid and disabled sex educator. She works most closely with patients living with chronic illness or disability, helping them to rediscover their lives – especially when it comes to self-care, pleasure, and love. (Hurts So Good: How Pain Disorders Can Affect Sex and Sexuality) Kristin Stern has worked at IndependenceFirst for 17 years. As a Youth Leadership Specialist, she is responsible for educating Milwaukee area youth with disabilities in the areas of sexuality, healthy and safe relationships, and independent living skills. She is passionate about empowering youth to become strong self-advocates. Kristin has a BS in Psychology from UW-River Falls and a Masters in Rehabilitation Psychology from UW-Madison. (Sexuality and Relationship Education for People with Disabilities: an Independent Living Center’s Approach) Isabella Stokes is a Community Educator at Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and Hawaiian Islands. She graduated with her B.S. in Public Health from the University of Washington and got her start in health education working with other students as a peer health educator. (Linking Families and Teens (LiFT): Using Family Connection and Values to Promote Sexual Health Communication) 49

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B. Deonn Strathman is the Director of Community Engagement and Adolescent Health Initiatives for Planned Parenthood of Illinois. Deonn’s career in sexual health has included direct service in health clinics and mobile testing units, education in schools and community organizations, as well as advocacy through outreach and grassroots organizing. Currently Deonn’s focus has been increasing outreach, education, and health care access to youth and underserved communities. (Centering Youth to Develop and Implement Sexual Health Programs and Campaigns for School and Community Settings) Monica Sundal is the Project Coordinator for the conversational approach program at Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin. She trains staff, supporters, and outside partners in this work. (The Power of Authentic Conversations in Advocacy) Beth Tadesse, MPH, is the Program Manager for Planned Parenthood of Illinois’ adolescent sexual health programming. Having earned her Master of Public Health from Tulane University’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, she works to improve reproductive health services for young people and eliminate the barriers they face in obtaining contraception and avoiding unintended pregnancy. (Centering Youth to Develop and Implement Sexual Health Programs and Campaigns for School and Community Settings) Lucky Tomaszek is the education coordinator at The Tool Shed, an education-based, mission-driven sex toy store. She writes “MKE SEX” (published at milwaukeerecord.com) and is a homebirth midwife serving Southeast Wisconsin. (Pregnant Pause? Sexuality in the Childbearing Year) Quenesha Watson is a high school senior at Golda Meir High School in Milwaukee. She is a Youth Health Educator at Planned Parenthood of WI who enjoys empowering youth about their sexuality and behaviors. She is currently researching African-American women’s experience with rape in comparison with Caucasian women for her AP Research class. When completed she will graduate with two diplomas and many college credits. (Black Women’s Rape is Still Invisible: The Intersectionality of Being a Woman of Color in White America)

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EmbodyCurriculum Curriculum Embody Topics available for Presentation by Embody Staff. Session 1 – Values and Sexuality

Module Goals: Identify the different aspects of life that are impacted by sexuality. Identify and analyze values.

Session 2 – Sexuality and Identity

Module Goals: Explain how biological sex differs from gender identity. Discuss gender norms and roles, relevant terms, and myths in sexual orientation.

Session 3 – Healthy Relationships I

Module Goals: Discuss similarities and differences between various types of relationships. Identify differences between healthy and unhealthy relationships.

Session 4 – Healthy Relationships II

Module Goals: Demonstrate negotiation skills and practice communication styles. Explain the importance of consent in every sexual relationship.

Session 5 – Anatomy

Module Goals: Identify the wide range of “normal” anatomy, including main internal reproductive organs and external genitalia. Discuss when pregnancy can occur and the body parts essential to the process.

Session 6 – Contraception

Module Goals: Compare effectiveness, demonstrate perfect vs. typical use, and learn communication skills around birth control methods and accessing health care.

Session 7 – STI Prevention

Module Goals: Describe how to locate and use effective prevention methods, discuss importance of early detection and describe general symptoms of STIs. Explain the steps a person should take if they suspect they might have an STI.

Session 8 – Reproductive Life Planning

Module Goals: Analyze how an unplanned pregnancy or STI may impact life goals. Explain how to communicate your plan with partners and health care providers. Think about the importance of having a plan and why Reproductive Life Plans can change throughout life. To book an education facilitator for your group or class, or for content questions, please visit ppwi.org/Embody

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PLANNING COMMITTEE

CO

SHS 2018 organizers would like to recognize the individuals who took the time to review workshop content within the context of their respective fields. Because of their work, we are able to ensure that the information presented during Safe Healthy Strong 2018 is up-to-date, relevant, and appropriate. We thank them for their continued support of continuing education for professionals within the fields of sexual and reproductive health and education.

CONTINUING EDUCATION CONTENT PLANNERS Jamie Kuhn, MSSW Social Work CE Planner Public Affairs Specialist Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin Meghan Benson, MPH, CHES CHES/MCHES CE Planner Director of Education Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin The organizers would also like to give a shout out to Embody staff. Without their vision, project management skills, and photocopying prowess this event would not happen. Rosario Angulo – Bilingual Community Health Educator Maria Barker – Multicultural Programs Manager Meghan Benson – Director of Community Education Anne Brosowsky-Roth – Community Education and Training Specialist Margo DeNuccio – Community Outreach Coordinator Hannah Feinstein – Youth Health Educator Molly Lancelot – Community Education Manager Jocelyn Mason-Saffold - Youth Programs Coordinator Mia Noel – Community Outreach Coordinator Livia Rowell-Oritz - Public Ally Rebekah Salonen – Youth Health Educator and Community Education Intern Quenesha Watson – Youth Health Educator

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CONTINUING EDUCATION Social Workers The National Association of Social Workers – Wisconsin Chapter has approved the Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin program, Safe Healthy Strong on March 20-22, 2018 for up to 15.5 continuing education hours. Certified Health Education Specialists / Masters Certified Health Education Specialists Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, Inc. is a designated provider of continuing education hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. Safe, Healthy Strong 2018 on March 20-22, 2018 is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 15.5 total Category 1 continuing education contact hours.

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ABOUT SAFE HEALTHY STRONG Scent-Safer Policy: Embody strives to make its events as accessible as possible. To provide a space in which everyone is safe, healthy, and able to fully participate, a scent-safer policy is in effect. We request that participants refrain from the following before or during the event: smoking; wearing colognes, perfumes, body/ deodorant sprays, aftershave, or scented/essential oils; applying scented products (like lotions, hand sanitizers, soaps, and hair products) during the event; and using scented (especially “scent-boosted”) laundry detergents, fabric softeners or dryer sheets. For more information about being scent-free, ideas for scent-free alternatives to your products, and why this is important to the health of our communities, please visit: http://thinkbeforeyoustink.com/howtogofragrancefree.html and https:// www.brownstargirl.org/blog/fragrance-free-femme-of-colour-realness-draft-15. Photo Release: Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin asked all participants to sign a photo release during registration. These photos may be used in promotional materials or other materials created by Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin in the future. Your photo will only be used in these materials if you have signed the release. Inclusive Restrooms: Restrooms in the main hall have been designated inclusive during the conference. During the conference, please assume that whoever is in the restroom has the right to be there. Gender Pronouns: As you signed in to Safe Healthy Strong 2018 you were asked to select ribbons with your gender pronouns to attach to your name badge. Please take a moment attach your ribbon to your own name badge and to check other participants’ gender pronouns and use them as listed. Lactation/Quiet Room: {Room 7030} near the elevator and UWM registration desk is a lactation/quiet room. Access to a refrigerator is available for conference participants who are nursing or pumping. The refrigerator may accessed in the Conference Services Offices {room 7101}. Parking Validation: The Conference Center provides all guests a parking discount for those who park in the Grand Avenue Structure. Please bring your parking gate ticket to the 7th Floor UWM Reception Desk near the elevators to have it validated before leaving. The validation entitles you to the special UWM rate of $6/day, regardless of the day of the week, time of day or length of stay (except overnight parking). 54

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Thank you to our generous partners who make the Safe Healthy Strong Conference possible!

Tashia and John Morgridge

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SAVE THE DATE

SAFE HEALTHY STRONG 2019 MARCH 19-21, 2019

MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN ppwi.org/safehealthystrong SHSProgramBooklet2018.indd 56

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NOTES

NOTAS SHSProgramBooklet2018_notes.indd 1

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of Wisconsin, Inc.

Seguro Sano Fuerte Conferencia Patrocinado por Tashia y John Morgridge

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Seguro Sano Fuerte Conferencia Bienvenidas y Bienvenidos............................................... 3

Horario de los Talleres en la Conferencia Principal....... 4-7 Uso de cintas con pronombres........................................ 8 Identidad de Género y Uso de Pronombres Neutrales/de

Género Inclusivos................................................................. 10-11

Directrices inclusivas sobre discapacidad...................... 12

Talleres en Español............................................................ 13-14 Presentadores..................................................................... 15-16 Acerca de Safe Healthy Strong........................................ 17 Aparta la Fecha.................................................................. 18

English

2

Program support provided in part by the Federal Title X Program.

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11

14 16

¡BIENVENIDAS Y BIENVENIDOS! Querida Comunidad, ¡Bienvenidas y Bienvenidos a nuestra séptima conferencia Safe Healthy Strong 2018, donde por segunda vez les presentamos nuestro programa para la comunidad Hispano parlante, CCmáS; Cuidándonos Creceremos más Sanos! ¡Estamos muy agradecidos de que estén aquí! Este año, nuevamente hemos reclutado personalidades de distintas áreas del conocimiento humano, enfocado en la metodología e información más reciente en el área de Justicia Reproductiva, que compartirán sus experiencias profesionales, para que ustedes obtengan conocimientos actualizados, que les ayudarán a mejorar la calidad del apoyo que les brindan a sus audiencias. Nuestras enseñanzas se basan en la Educación Popular; siempre incluyendo el conocimiento de la gente y las experiencias del pueblo para que juntos determinemos la dirección del trabajo que se necesita. Juntos, seguiremos evolucionando en nuestro trabajo hacia la meta compartida de: Asegurar que toda persona tenga lo que necesita para sentirse segura, sana y fuerte. Nos alegra que estés aquí. Gracias por venir y, de nuevo BIENVENIDAS Y BIENVENIDOS a Safe Healthy Strong 2018. Atentamente,

Maria Barker Gerente de Programas Multiculturales

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HORARIO DE LOS TALLERES EN LA CONFERENCIA PRINCIPAL MIERCOLES, 21 DE MARZO, 2018 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Registración y desayuno continental {Pasillo Principal}

9:00 AM – 9:20 AM Welcome and Introductions {Cuarto 7970}

9:30 AM – 11:00 AM TALLERES SIMULTÁNEOS: SESIÓN A A-1 A-2 A-3 A-4 A-5

LGBTQ Love, Acceptance, & Resiliency: A Path to Liberation {7220} Improving Adherence to Colposcopy Recommendations: Recommendations from Interviews with Individuals Advised to Receive Colposcopy {7350} PrEP for HIV Prevention {7240} HPV Education in the Community {7230} La Educación y Prevención Que Ofrecer un Promotor {7330}

11:00 AM – 11:15 AM 11:15 AM – 12:15 PM

Exhibiciones/Area de Ventas

{Pasillo Principal}

ED Talks {7970}

12:15 PM – 1:00 PM Almuerzo {Comedor Principal} 1:00 PM – 1:15 PM

Exhibiciones/Area de Ventas {Pasillo Principal}

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1:15 PM – 2:45 PM TALLERES SIMULTÁNEOS: SESIÓN B B-1 B-2

B-3 B-4 B-5

Reproductive Justice 2.0: The Politics of Health Care {7240} Trans & Gender-Diverse Inclusive Sexual & Reproductive Health Care {7220} Linking Families and Teens (LiFT): Using Family Connection and Values to Promote Sexual Health Communication {7230} Centering Race in Sexual Violence Response and Prevention (Part 1 of 2) {7970} Herramientas para Reclutar Poblaciones Claves Dentro de la Comunidad Hispano Hablante {7330}

2:45 PM – 3:15 PM Descanso Exhibiciones/Area de Ventas {Pasillo Principal}

3:15 PM – 4:45 PM TALLERES SIMULTÁNEOS: SESIÓN C C-1 C-2 C-3 C-4 C-5

If God Created My Clitoris… Exploring Pleasure Principles and Sex Positivity in the Christian Religion {7240} Hurts So Good: How Pain Disorders Can Affect Sex and Sexuality {7220} Sexuality and Relationship Education for People with Disabilities: An Independent Living Center’s Approach {7330} Centering Race in Sexual Violence Response and Prevention (Part 2 of 2) {7970} Como Podemos Repartir la Información que Obtenemos por Medio de Investigaciones Comunitarias para Obtener el Mejor Impacto {7230}

4:45 PM – 5:00 PM

Exhibiciones/Area de Ventas

{Pasillo Principal}

5:00 PM – 6:00 PM Recepción {Best Place at the Historic Pabst Brewery} 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM ¡Cuentame un Cuento! {Best Place at the Historic Pabst Brewery} 5

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HORARIO DE LOS TALLERES EN LA CONFERENCIA PRINCIPAL JUEVES, 22 DE MARZO, 2018 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Registración y desayuno continental {Pasillo Principal}

9:00 AM – 10:30 AM TALLERES SIMULTÁNEOS: SESIÓN D D-1 D-2 D-3 D-4 D-5

On Healing [Black] Church Hurt: Teaching Liberating Sexuality Education in Christian Faith-Based Spaces {7330} Pregnant Pause? Sexuality in the Childbearing Year {7240} Lube: Science and Strategies {7230} The Power of Authentic Conversations in Advocacy {7350} Aceptación LGBTQ+ en Nuestras Familias {7220}

10:30 AM – 10:45 AM

Exhibiciones/Area de Ventas

{Pasillo Principal}

10:45 AM – 12:10 PM Escuchando las Voces de los Jóvenes, Una Discusión con Líderes Juveniles {7970} 12:10 PM - 12:45 PM Almuerzo {Main Dining Room} 12:45 PM – 1:00 PM Area de Expositores/Vendedores abierto {Lobby and Hallway}

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1:00 PM – 2:30 PM CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS: SESIÓN E E-1 E-2 E-3 E-4 E-5

Let’s Talk About Sex and Faith! (Part 1 of 2) {7330} Centering Youth to Develop and Implement Sexual Health Programs and Campaigns for School and Community Settings {7970} Data and Statistics: Tools for Discrimination {7220} Black Women’s Rape is Still Invisible: The Intersectionality of Being a Woman of Color in White America {7230} Justicia Reproductiva 2.0: Políticas de Salud Pública (Parte 1 de 2) {7240}

2:30 PM – 3:00 PM Descanso Exhibiciones/Area de Ventas {Pasillo Principal}

3:00 PM – 4:30 PM CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS: SESIÓN F F-1 F-2 F-3 F-4 F-5

Let’s Talk About Sex and Faith! (Part 2 of 2) {7330} Contraception Counseling: How Enthusiasm Can Become Coercion {7230} Navigating Sexual Violence in the Media and in the Community {7970} Scientific Evidence or Freedom of Speech? The Debate Over Requiring Medically-Accurate Information in Centers and Schools {7220} Justicia Reproductiva 2.0: Políticas de Salud Pública (Parte 2 de 2) {7240}

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Uso de Cintas con Pronombres Safe Healthy Strong ha proporcionado cintas con pronombres a todos los participantes de la conferencia para que elijan a fin de generar conciencia sobre la diversidad de género. Estas cintas pueden ser una representación abreviada de pronombres, principalmente que indiquen el sujeto. Puede consultar el siguiente cuadro para ver la extensión completa de pronombres para cada tipo de oración. Tómese un momento para seleccionar las cintas con sus pronombres de género y colocarlas en su credencial de identificación. Preguntar y usar correctamente los pronombres de una persona es una de las formas más básicas de mostrar respeto por su identidad de género. Sujeto (1)

Objeto (2)

Posesivo (3)

Pronombre posesivo (4)

Reflexivo (5)

she/ella

her

her

hers

herself

he/el

him

his

his

himself

they/elle

them

their

theirs

themself

zi

zir

zir

zirs

zieself

ze

hir

hir

hirs

hirself

xe

xem

xyr

xyrs

xemself

Tenga en cuenta que estos no son los únicos pronombres. Existe una cantidad infinita de pronombres ya que siempre surgen nuevos en nuestro idioma. Siempre pregunte por sus pronombres a una persona. Sujeto: 1 iestá/n emocionado/s de estar en la conferencia de Safe Healthy Strong! Objeto: Me senté con 2 en la última sesión. Posesivo: ¡La historia de 3 en Bedtime Stories fue increíble! Pronombre posesivo: Esta bolsa que nos dieron en la conferencia es de 4 . Reflexivo: 1 se alza en defensa de 5 .

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Por los últimos 10 años, Planned Parenthood de WI exitosamente a capacitado a miembros de la comunidad para que sean

PROMOTORES DE SALUD

y proveen información sobre la sexualidad, que es culturalmente apropiada, a familias en su comunidad. Este programa ha desarrallado un currículo en español que se llama CCmáS. Para más información sobre este programa, comuníqarse con Maria Barker (414) 289-3788 maria.barker@ppwi.org 9

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Identidad de Género y Uso de Pronombres Neutrales/ de Género Inclusivos El género generalmente se asigna cuando nace un bebé, según los genitales que tiene. Un bebé con pene y testículos se llama nene, un bebé con labios vaginales y vulva/vagina se llama nena. Un bebé con genitales que no resultan ser típicos en el desarrollo como pene o vulva pueden llamarse intersexo y su género no está determinado aún. De hecho, los géneros de todos estos bebés, independientemente de qué partes del cuerpo reproductivas sean visibles, no son asignables por los adultos. Esto es porque la identidad de género es el concepto más íntimo de uno mismo como hombre, mujer, una combinación de ambos o ninguno de ellos. Es cómo los individuos se perciben a sí mismos y cómo se llaman a sí mismos. La identidad de género puede ser la misma o diferente del sexo asignado a una persona en el momento de su nacimiento. Si la identidad de género concuerda con la asignada al momento del nacimiento, según la parte del cuerpo reproductiva, esa persona es considerada cisgénero. Si la identidad de género no concuerda con la asignada al momento del nacimiento, esa persona generalmente es considerada transgénero, genderqueer, no-binario u otras etiquetas que pueden elegir para sí mismos. Genderqueer, también llamado no-binario, es una categoría multicontenido de las identidades de género que no son exclusivamente representadas como hombres o mujeres— son identidades que están fuera del binarismo de género y nuestras suposiciones adquiridas sobre el género de alguien. La gente genderqueer puede expresar una combinación de masculinidad y femineidad, que cambian fluidamente, o ninguno, en su expresión de género. La identidad de género no es algo fijo y puede cambiar al igual que la gente generalmente cambia. La realidad es que usted no puede saber cuáles son los pronombres de una persona con solo mirarla y haciendo un juicio como generalmente nos enseñan. Aunque crea que sabe que una persona se presenta como hombre o como mujer, esto no significa que usan los pronombres que usted cree que los identifican. Los pronombres neutrales/de género inclusivos como “They/Them/Theirs” generalmente son considerados respetuosos si usted no sabe cuáles son los pronombres de esa persona. Es mejor preguntar los pronombres de una persona, al igual que pregunta su nombre cuando recién conoce a alguien. A veces, también puede ser adecuado conversar sin el uso de pronombres o usando pronombres neutrales de género—conocer los pronombres de alguien puede ser personal, y generalmente se les asigna la tarea desafortunada a los individuos transgéneros de divulgarlo, así que aprender a sentirse cómodo al no conocer los pronombres de alguien también puede ser un signo de respeto al conversar. Como Safe Healthy Strong es una conferencia que lleva a cabo talleres en dos idiomas diferentes, hemos hecho todo lo posible para incluir tanto el inglés como el español en nuestras cintas con pronombres. Algunos pronombres neutrales/de género inclusivos no se traducen fácilmente al español cuando fueron desarrollados en inglés.

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Directrices Inclusivas Sobre Discapacidad Para generar conciencia sobre discapacidad e inclusión entre los participantes de la conferencia, pedimos que los asistentes consideren lo siguiente: 1. La discapacidad se presenta de muchas formas: algunas que son visibles y otras que son invisibles. Tenga en cuenta eso ya que usted disertará sobre discapacidad. ¡No asuma! 2. Sea inclusivo con la gente que tiene problemas de salud crónicos; estas personas generalmente son excluidas de la comunidad de discapacidad. 3. Tenga en cuenta que la discapacidad por salud mental también es considerada parte de la comunidad de discapacidad. 4. Considere usar las escaleras - especialmente durante los horarios de mayor tránsito - y dé prioridad a las personas con problemas de movilidad y/u otros problemas de salud crónicos que pueden hacer que subir las escaleras les resulte difícil, peligroso, y/o imposible. 5. Considere los obstáculos ambientales y participe en corregir esos obstáculos. Por ejemplo, cuando entra y sale de las sesiones, coloque las sillas nuevamente en su lugar para evitar generar obstáculos en los senderos y pasos. 6. Entable un diálogo y aporte soluciones activamente para los obstáculos relacionados con la discapacidad. Queremos la oportunidad de actuar respecto de sus inquietudes, críticas, y sus ideas para arreglar, tratar, y corregir los obstáculos. 7. Sea consciente de los asientos que brindan una vista clara a los presentadores para leer los labios y para la gente con problemas visuales. Generalmente pediremos que la primera y segunda fila de las reuniones y/o grupos de trabajo pequeños queden disponibles para las personas que necesitan este acceso. Deje lugar para los animales de servicio en los pasillos o la primera fila. 8. Si usted se presenta en una sala con grupos de trabajo pequeños y se ha colocado un micrófono inalámbrico en la sala, por favor use el micrófono. Preguntar “¿me oyen bien?” sin el micrófono, asume que una persona con un problema de audición se sentiría cómoda diciéndolo en un grupo. Si hay un micrófono en la sala, es para que todos los que hablan puedan escucharse mutuamente. 9. Evite el uso de perfumes y productos de cuidado personal con fragancias. “Los ingredientes de muchas fragancias y esencias irritan el tracto respiratorio, el sistema nervioso, y los ojos; disminuyen la inmunidad a enfermedades; y generan alergias y otras reacciones severas para la salud. En el caso de asma y epilepsia, las reacciones generadas por la exposición a productos aromáticos puede poner en riesgo la vida”. (Portland University, https://ww.pdx.edu/hr/fragrance-free-value-statement)

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TALLERES EN ESPAÑOL Aceptación LGBTQ+ en Nuestras Familias (Christine Neumann-Ortiz, Voces de la Frontera; Liva Rowell-Ortiz, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) Todos han conocido a alguien LGBQT+ aunque lo sepan o no. Para muchos las más importantes relaciones son en la familia sea por sangre o creados. En este taller tendremos un espacio de confianza para explorar y aceptar nuestras familias LGBTQ+ y mantener familias fuertes.

(Sesión D-5)

La Educación y Prevención que Ofrecer un Promotor (Maria de los Angeles Soria Rodriguez, Promotora de Salud Independiente) Este taller informativo la dará una vista real a las necesidades de comunidades Hispana hablantes del estado de Wisconsin, con énfasis en las poblaciones que viven en Milwaukee, Waukesha y Racine. Es importante reconocer las necesidades de nuestra gente para educarnos sobre que son las preocupaciones reales que viven y proporcionarles la información que necesitan para apoyar en su desarrolla personal para vivir una vida plena, saludable y exitosa. (Sesión A-5) Como Podemos Repartir la Información que Obtenemos por Medio de Investigaciones Comunitarias para Obtener el Mejor Impacto (Maria Barker, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) Muchos de nosotros quienes trabajamos en la comunidad hacemos esta labor porque nos apasiona trabajar con el pueblo. Hay muchas maneras que utilizamos para capacitarnos y para compartir la información que obtenemos. Una de esas maneras es Community Participatory Research, por su nombre en inglés y en español se traduce a, Investigación Participativa por Comunidades. Este taller le ofrecerá la oportunidad de aprender sobre como el Colegio de Medicina de WI usa esta manera de hacer investigaciones y como utilizamos esta teoría para saber más sobre porque si o no mujeres escogen seguir la recomendación de su médico, de hacerse el seguimiento médico de colposcopia. Compartiremos lo que las mujeres dijeron acerca que las motiva y cuáles son las barreras para cumplir o no con este seguimiento recomendado. (Sesión C-5)

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Herramientas para Reclutar Poblaciones Claves Dentro de la Comunidad Hispano Hablante (Yuly Sánchez, Consultante Independiente) Esta presentación cubre métodos y consideraciones útiles para reclutar poblaciones claves de la comunidad. Específicamente, toca temas como el abordaje de participantes, sostenimiento de tema, conocimiento de la población, como establecer confianza con la comunidad, y donde conseguir las poblaciones claves. (Sesión B-5) Justicia Reproductiva 2.0: Políticas de Salud Pública (Amy Perez, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin) Desarrolle una comprensión más profunda del marco de la salud reproductiva. El marco de la Justicia Reproductiva abarca una gran variedad de temas que incluyen la libertad reproductiva, inmigración, expresión de género, educación sexual y autonomía corporal. Forme su propia guía para aplicar sus conocimientos de justicia reproductiva en su trabajo. Usar sus conocimientos en el ámbito de la justicia reproductiva le permitirá establecer un vínculo entre los individuos y comunidades afectadas por la opresión reproductiva. Además, aprenderá a contar su propia historia y usarla como herramienta para cambiar la cultura popular. (Sesiones E-5 y F-5)

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PRESENTADORES Maria Barker es Administradora de Programas Multiculturales de Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin. Es educadora bilingüe (español/inglés) de sexualidad que facilita la educación sobre salud reproductiva. Es reconocida por capacitar “Promotores de Salud” para trabajar con la comunidad latina. (Como Podemos Repartir la Información que Obtenemos por Medio de Investigaciones Comunitarias para Obtener el Mejor Impacto)

Christine Neumann-Ortiz es Directora Ejecutiva fundadora de Voces de la Frontera. La Sra. Neumann-Ortiz es reconocida como líder nacional en el movimiento de derechos de los inmigrantes. A través de su liderazgo, Voces ha pasado de ser un centro básico y pequeño de trabajadores a líder estatal y nacional en el movimiento de derechos de los inmigrantes. (Aceptación LGBTQ+ en Nuestras Familias)

Amy Perez es una joven activista “queer” de Madison, WI. Se graduó en Madison College y obtuvo un título de Ciencias e Ingeniería. Como estudiante de grado, Amy recibió el Premio al Servicio del Presidente en reconocimiento de las más de 200 horas de servicio de voluntariado para Planned Parenthood of WI. Al graduarse, comenzó a trabajar en Planned Parenthood of WI como asistente médico. Amy ha dedicado su vida a servir y empoderar a las comunidades postergadas y marginadas. (Justicia Reproductiva 2.0: Políticas de Salud Pública)

Maria de los Angeles Soria Rodriguez es promotora de Salud Independiente con experiencia de más de diez años como promotora. Angeles nació y vivió en México pero desde el 2004 vive en Milwaukee apoyando a la comunidad Latina. Angeles se ha capacitado como promotora de salud por medio de varias organizaciones en las cuales tiene el placer de seguir apoyando a través de facilitar varios currículos educativos por todo Wisconsin. (La Educación y Prevención que Ofrecer un Promotor) Livia Rowell-Ortiz, miembro de la junta de Genderqueer Milwaukee,

trabaja para ampliar las formas en que pensamos sobre el género y como nos relacionamos con el género en nuestras comunidades. Lo hace mediante la creación de espacios para debates sobre género que se basan en la justicia social y aboga por la adopción de prácticas que promueven nuestros derechos en el ámbito local. (Aceptación LGBTQ+ en Nuestras

Familias)

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Yuly Sánchez es un promotor de salud con 4 años de experiencia en el

campo. Recibió su entrenamiento la Clínica de Familia La Romana, ubicada en República Dominicana, por organizaciones como el Ministerio de Salud Pública, USAID, Planned Parenthood, y la Universidad de Columbia en Nueva York. Su trabajo consistió en reclutar poblaciones claves, hacerles pruebas de infecciones de transmisión sexual y VIH, dar consejería de esas pruebas, darles seguimiento y acompañamiento, proveer educación sobre la salud sexual, y promocionar la salud del hombre.

(Herramientas para Reclutar Poblaciones Claves Dentro de la Comunidad Hispano Hablante)

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ACERCA DE SAFE HEALTHY STRONG Política sobre aromas: Embody se esfuerza para que sus eventos sean lo más accesibles posible. Existe una política libre de aromas para Safe Healthy Strong 2018. Pedimos a los participantes que restrinjan su uso de productos aromáticos (tales como perfumes, jabones, gel de ducha, champú y desodorantes) durante este evento. Así el espacio de la conferencia será accesible y cómodo para personas con la enfermedad de las sensibilidades químicas múltiples (SQM) y/o enfermedad ambiental (EA). Gracias. Autorización de divulgación de fotos: Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin solicitó a todos los participantes que firmen una autorización de divulgación de fotos durante la inscripción. Estas fotos pueden usarse en materiales de promoción u otros materiales creados por Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin en el futuro. Su foto solo se usará en estos materiales si usted ha firmado la autorización. Baños inclusivos: Hay baños oficiales designados como inclusivos justo después de la sala 7040. Durante la conferencia, asuma que la persona que está en el baño tiene derecho a estar allí. Pronombres de género: Cuando se registró en Safe Healthy Strong 2018 se le solicitó que seleccione cintas con sus pronombres de género para colocar en su credencial de identificación. Tómese un momento para colocar su cinta en su propia credencial de identificación y revise los pronombres de género de otros participantes y úselos según se indica. Sala para Amamantar/ Espacio de silencio {Sala 7030}, cerca del elevador y área de registración para UWM, es espacio para amamantar o tomar tiempo de silencio. Participantes de la conferencia quienes estén amamantando y necesiten acceso a un refrigerador, está disponible en la {sala 7101}. Validación del estacionamiento: El Centro de Conferencias proporciona a todos los invitados un descuento para estacionamiento para los que estacionen en Grand Avenue Structure. Traiga su tique de estacionamiento a la Mesa de Recepciones de UWM del 7º piso cerca de los elevadores para que se lo validen antes de irse. La validación le concede una tarifa especial de $6 por día, independientemente del día de la semana, horario del día o duración de la estadía (salvo estacionamiento nocturno). 17

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El español generalmente usa un lenguaje binario por género, donde las palabras y los objetos son identificados como masculinos o femeninos y una identidad neutral puede ser difícil de traducir. Esto es similar en inglés en algunos casos de ocupaciones que han sido tradicionalmente por género, por ejemplo: actor v. actriz, consejal v. consejala, mozo/moza, parteras, etc., donde el lenguaje neutral de género puede ser imperfecto, y la neutralidad de género a veces se interpreta usando tradicionalmente términos masculinos. Si bien pueden presentarse dificultades para expresar la diversidad de género en el idioma español; en verdad hay muchas representaciones diferentes y únicas de género que se expresan de otras formas y no solo como pronombres. Los pronombres representan un sentido importante y en constante expansión de quiénes somos, pero son solo un método entre muchos para conocerse verdaderamente uno al otro. P.D. Se cometen errores ¡Está bien! Todos nos equivocamos de vez en cuando. Lo mejor que se puede hacer si usa un pronombre incorrecto para alguien es decir algo enseguida, como “Lo siento, quise decir (indicar pronombre)”. Si se da cuenta del error a posteriori, pida disculpas y continúe. Puede ser tentador hablar sin parar sobre lo mal que se siente por haberse equivocado o lo difícil que es para usted hacerlo bien. ¡No lo haga! Es inadecuado y hace que la persona cuyo género fue malinterpretado se sienta incómoda y responsable de consolarlo, que por supuesto no es su tarea. Para obtener más información, visite: https://www.plannedparenthood.org/es/temas-de-salud/orientacion-sexual-y-genero http://www.sophiagubb.com/construyendo-un-genero-neutro-en-espanol-para-una-lengua-feminista-igualitaria-e-inclusiva/

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APARTA LA FECHA

SEGURO SANO FUERTE 2019 19-21 DE MARZO, 2019

MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN ppwi.org/safehealthystrong SHSProgramBooklet2018_spanish.indd 18

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NOTES

NOTAS SHSProgramBooklet2018_notes.indd 2

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Profile for Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin

Safe Healthy Strong 2018 Conference Booklet  

Safe Healthy Strong 2018 Conference Booklet