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RENOWNED TERRORIST SUSPECT ARRESTED A spokesperson for South Yorkshire police has informed us that following a series of dawn raids on several houses in the Cudworth area a notorious Yorkshire man has been arrested and is being investigated under the little used "Prevention of Sporting Terrorism Act”. Police were remaining tight lipped about the exact details but were rumoured to have received 44 complaints from suspected victims of the alleged incidents that all happened in the space of 48 hours. One who wished to remain nameless but is widely believed to be the so called “Ginger Avenger" claimed to have been "brutalised beyond belief”. Many of the other victims caught up in what is believed to have been one of the worst sporting atrocities seen in recent years were said to have been so traumatised by events that they would be unwilling to travel into South Yorkshire for years to come. Rumours have been emanating from the region for well over 20 years about a bizarre series of tortures inflicted on victims including "Sid’s Sykehouse slaughter", and the particularly gruesome onslaught on innocent prey known locally simply as "Red line Randleisation”. The accused is expected to be released in the

following hours and is already looking to the future. He is unrepentant about the abuses and says that Randleism is a way of life and is going to continue for as long as there are other unsuspecting victims that need to be punished. He has also taken the opportunity to release details of his impending and soon to be launched website. For training tips, blogs and regular features such as "weak as piss that kid" and "future flandrians" and all the latest news visit www.itwerard.com

SPORTIVE SPECIAL TESTERS WHO HAVE DONE TIME— Wayne’s top 10 Sportives Who’s been locked up for what! BRADLEY JOHNSTON’S SUNTAN SECRETS……. and lots, lots more! S EE

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WARNING—NORTHERNERS MAY CAUSE OFFENCE

MARCH 2009

A quick vote of thanks to everyone who has so far contributed to making Testing Times what it is…..ahem….whatever that may be! It's been quite…urm…interesting so far, and I'm looking forward to whatever else future issues (if there are any) may throw up. First, an update for eleven of 2008's top twelve BBAR riders who may be wondering what happened to the questionnaire we sent out asking them what sized feet they had, what their favourite ice cream flavour was, whether they preferred crunchy peanut butter to smooth, Campag to Shimano, clinchers to tubs…that sort of thing ("Cycling" used to do something similar many moons ago so we thought we'd do it "our" way…bit ambitious I'm afraid!). Well guys…one of your mates has put a spanner in the works by not responding. We had this really nice spreadsheet waiting for the final "return" but despite leaving a number of messages on the good man's mobile we got no response. Grrr.. You know who you are! So all that hard work for nothing! :-( Sorry chaps. (Is it any wonder Cycling Weekly lost interest in time trialling eh?). Will we let that put us off? Of course we won't, because we've received lots of feedback to the first two issues of Testing Times some of which has even been complimentary. To be quite honest here, any feedback is good because it suggests that some people are actually reading it. Regrettably though, it looks like some readers are still missing the point! Cycling Weekly has a circulation of some 27000 and, according to a lot of time triallists, hasn't got it right because they're being overlooked (a view which I tend to support…although it's getting a bit better lately don't you think?). Although Testing Times is still in single figures circulation-wise, we're hoping to double that within 6 months by giving readers a variety of subjects to read about. We know there's a big difference in the age span of potential readers so we're trying to cater for that by providing a range of topics - and by speaking to the different age groups in their own "language"! It's going to be difficult, if not impossible to please all the people all the time,

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Cammish celebrating the “success” of the first two issues of Testing Times. so you'll just have to bear with us and if you find anything particularly offensive then next time round (if there is a next time) just steer clear of us…or the piece penned by the writer who caused offence! Quite frankly, I'm amazed we've got away with it so far though……but we aren't going to go away (not just yet anyway). It's always been billed as "Brighton's Pest and Carpet Bagger's Fanzine" for goodness sake - so lighten up a bit eh? Surely there must be something in it to tickle your fancy… somewhere? Anyway, look on the bright side - it can only get better can't it? Feel free to pick holes in the spelling and grammar by all means, but remember the majority of us are cyclists, not journalists, so try to take it in the spirit it's intended….OK? ;-) (for those of you that are counting….that's number one I believe…although I could be wrong of course). So onwards and upwards…to infinity and beyond and all that (courtesy Buzz Lightyear…naturally)…let's press on. If you're of a nervous disposition or were particularly offended by anything you read in Issues 1 and 2 it might be advisable to hit the "delete" button now.

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THE EASILY OFFENDED SHOULD STOP READING NOW

MARCH 2009

THE ODD BALL RECORD By PETER WHITFIELD

Who remembers Gary Empson? And if you don’t remember him, why not? A young rider full of raw power, new to cycling and full of ambition, he set out in 1991 on a deliberate quest for a slice of sporting immortality. He set his sights on one particular competition record, which he felt would be a landmark in time-trialling history, and he succeeded – he got it. So why is his name not as familiar as those of Engers, Booty or Cammish? Two reasons: the record in question was the “30”, that mysterious distance that now has only around twenty events a year, that has never had a na

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tional championship, but which does have a recognised competition record. No one seems even to know why there is “30” at all: we don’t have a 60 or a 120 do we, although there is a 15 – traditionally seen as a ladies’ event. But mysterious or not, the 30 could obviously be regarded in some ways as an elite event: to the serious tester, beating the hour for a 25 was nothing, but getting close to or beating the hour for a 30, that really would be something special. Engers’s 30 mph 25 in 1978 had pointed the way, and it should only be a matter of time before someone smashed through the hour barrier in the 30. Martin Pyne had come closest in 1981 with a 1:0:11, but 30 events are rare, and the years passed with the record apparently frozen on that mark. This was the record which Empson picked out in 1991 as the one he wanted, and on 7 September 1991, he seized it with dramatic ride of 59:56 in the Leo RC event. So why isn’t Empson much more famous than he is? Almost certainly it’s because he only held the record for thirty minutes: after finishing, he suffered the agonising fate of watching another rider slice a further 34 seconds from his time, and that rider was Eddie Adkins. For Adkins it was an amazing reversal of fortune: thirteen years after breaking competition record in the 25, the being upstaged minutes later by Engers

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with his 49:24 ride, he now found himself overshadowing Gary’s ride with his own 30 mph performance, and it was on the very same course as that historic 25, on the A12 in Essex. You could hardly have found two riders more different than Empson and Adkins. Gary was 23 years old, a King’s Lynn man with a skinhead haircut and a wicked Norfolk accent, who was virtually unknown away from the East Anglian roads. He had only been cycling seriously for eighteen months, a former athlete and weightlifter, his was an exciting natural talent. His previous personal best for the 30 was just 1:6:10 (done on a collapsing wheel it’s true) yet he somehow convinced himself that the sub-hour record was his for the taking. How did he come up so quickly in the sport? Part of the answer is that he wrote to Alf Angers asking for advice on how to hit the magic 30 mph target, and Alf sent him detailed training schedules which included intense interval sessions, designed to test the ambitious young rider to his limit. By contrast Adkins was already one of the best-known figures in time-trialling: successor to Engers as national 25 champion, which he won three times running from 1977-79, he was a prolific winner who had ridden with Phil Griffiths in the

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WARNING - BAD SPELING AN GRAMMER

GS Strada squad, and was now part of the all-conquering Manchester Wheelers team. By 1991 he was 42, almost twice Empson’s age, but signs of slowing down, having recorded a 49minute 25 that summer. He had also moved up the distances to such good effect that he had finished second to Cammish in the 1987 BAR. Tough, singleminded and very, very fast, in any race he rode he started among the favourites. He had no thought of a record that day – he was riding as he always rode, simply to satisfy his unquenchable thirst for victories. September 7 was one of those special late-summer timetrialling mornings with the clear air and light wind that promised personal bests, and it did not disappoint: it yielded three competition records and 99 personal bests, counting those of the tandems pairs. Gary was off number 100, Eddie at 130, with Derek Cottington sandwiched between them at 120. The first few miles didn’t go well for Gary – he was nervous and keyed up because his mind was fixed on that record, and as it was such a perfect day he could allow himself no excuses. He struggled to find a rhythm against the slight headwind, felt he was over-revving but didn’t want to change up and blow it. Eventually he settled down and got to the turn, feeling good as he picked up the tailwind. He had no speedo but his father had arranged to give him a check at exactly 25 miles, which he passed a few seconds inside 50 minutes. He was at his maximum but somehow he knew he could hang on, he knew he was going to get there. As soon as he crossed the line he saw from the

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reaction around him that he had done it: 59:56, a new record and a time-trialling landmark. Of course he was elated, but he knew perfectly well that Cottington and Adkins were both hurtling up the road behind him, and Adkins was the one he feared: if anyone was going to push that bar higher it would be him. Cottington finished with 1:1:13 for eventual third place, then the crunch moment came, with Adkins over the line in 59:22, and Gary knew the worst. Eddie hadn’t had a clue that the record was on: a few miles from the finish Bob Downs had been standing by the roadside shouting to him “It’s on!”, and Eddie could only wonder “What’s on, what’s he shouting about?” His concentration shut out everything else ex-

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MARCH 2009

cept driving the pedals round, and like Gary he had no speedo. Afterwards, when they told him his time, and what Gary had done, he went over to commiserate with his younger rival, but by now Gary was relaxed and philosophical. At least he had finished first and got his record: he would always be the first, while if he had been off behind Eddie, he would have been just a footnote in the story. There wasn’t much of a fanfare for the two of them: by the time they got back to the tea-stand everyone seemed to have gone home. “Were you in the race?” asked the tea-lady. “Yes,” replied Eddie, “I broke comp record.” “Ah well, then,” she laughed, “you can have a free

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slice of cake.” So much for making time-trialling history, thought Eddie – a free slice of cake! Sue Wright had set a new women’s record of 1:7:24, and Dave Pitt set a trike record of 1:6:33. Probably the only reason a new tandem record didn’t materialise was that Pete Wells and Nipper Adams had set an outstanding record of 57:21 way back in 1973; this time Manser and Broad put up the fastest time of the day with 58:48, but no new record. So why did it happen that day? Why did the 30 record wait thirteen years after Engers’s 25 ride before it dipped under the hour? There was a one-word answer: tri-bars. This was the first year of their use in time-trials in England, and their effect had already been felt by the whole testing community. The most sensational proof had come as early as June, when Gary Dighton had exploded the 25 record, bringing it down to 48:07, in a race in which no less than five riders went under 50 minutes, one of whom was Eddie Adkins. The year before, Pete Longbottom had sliced just 11 seconds off Engers’s record after it had been on the shelf all those years; now Dighton had carved a full minute and more from Longbottom’s time, and the reason was plain to see. Both Adkins and Empson now say quite openly that they would not have smashed that 30 record without the aerodynamic revolution, and that 1991 marked the arrival of a new era. They were both using rear disk wheels too, but they are both certain that the tri-bars were the crucial factor. Gary’s bike was steel, the frame built by his father, Doug.

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Today Eddie Adkins is still riding, and to date he has notched up the amazing total of 600-plus victories. More recently he’s had worries with his back, but those who know him reckon he’s not finished yet. Gary was in and out of the sport for the next dozen years. He badly wanted to get inside 50 minutes, but never quite made it. After the 30 he rates his best ride as a 25 on the Ranby course in June 2002, when he finished second to Kevin Dawson in a personal best time of 50:10 on a far from brilliant day, with Kevin on 49:50; that was Gary’s first ride of the season! He is just turned 41, so there’s plenty of time for him to be tempted back for one more shot. For the record, Adkins’s 30 time stood for five years before Harry Walker smashed it with a

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MARCH 2009

57:36, using the Obree tuck position. Then in 1998 Matt Illingworth trimmed a few more seconds off, to 57:31, where it stands today. On the tandem, Sean Yates and Vic Haines scorched to a 56:48 in 1998, then Carr and Taylor really got things moving with a 54:33. Jill Reames holds the women’s record with 1:5:05. The 30 may be something of a mystery distance, but there’s no doubt that the sub-hour 30 club is a very, very elite one, with Hutch I believe the only new member to join in the last ten years. So when Empson the young novice picked out this record as his own back in 1991, he was obviously setting himself a massive challenge, and he rose to it magnificently.

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WARMING— http://www.planet-x-warehouse.co.uk/?p=2132

MARCH 2009

COLIN STURGESS 1989 WORLD PROFESSIONAL PURSUIT CHAMPION AND “OLD SKOOL” 10 MILE RECORD HOLDER. The 2009 season has already started and the very first of the events that are going to count towards the Country’s Premier Time Trial Series is rapidly approaching (that’s Planet X’s old skool series by the way!). Bearing in mind we’re offering nice big Brucie bonus’s for the first rider to break either Colin Sturgess’s or Alf Engers’s unofficial old skool records we were (kind of) hoping to track the two men down to have a few words about the Competition. Ian Cammish had managed to get lined up to dine with Alf just before Christmas….the venue being a North London “old boys” gathering at Little Brickendon Golf Club on 15 December. Unfortunately, for the first time in 33 years working for the Civil Service, Cammish’s employers found him something so important to do he couldn’t get away from the office to meet his hero (apparently he found himself spending the afternoon blowing up balloons and putting up the office decorations – not a happy chappy by all accounts!). Completely unphased by this latest knock-back, Cammish says he is going to continue in his quest and hopes to get his man shortly. He’s working on it – don’t worry! In the meantime, and right out of the blue, we’ve stumbled on a real scoop! Testing Times brings you an exclusive interview with ex-world champion Colin Sturgess as he talks about his days in the saddle and in the run up to the start of the old skool series he recalls the day he rode the 18 minute 48 second “10”, old school. TT Hey Colin, great to speak to you how many years is it now since you won the world champs? CS It's 20 years! (Jesus...) although I remember it like it was yesterday. Back then it was rare that anyone from the UK even made it onto the pro scene so winning the worlds was my big breakthrough.

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COLIN - SHORTLY AFTER BREAKING THE “OLD SKOOL” 10 RECORD

TT Where did you win it and in which event? CS Lyon, France... 5000m Professional Individual Pursuit (Yes, that's 5000m, an 'old Skool’ man’s pursuit distance! ha-ha!) TT What do you remember most about you’re cycling career? CS Turning pro in 89... I signed

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a contract just before the 88 Olympics with ADR; I was the youngest pro signing in the world at the time at 19. The jump from amateur to pro was so hard. I remember getting spanked nearly every stage of the Paris-Nice… my first race! TT Sounds like pain but which bit did you enjoy most and

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WARNING—BAD FORM AND OLD AGE CAN LEAD TO A FAILED CAREER IN JOURNALISM

MARCH 2009

which bit did you hate? CS Sounds strange but I really enjoyed my comeback in 1998. I was stronger, wiser, lighter, and harder and it showed in my results. I used to love riding the Kermesse races in Belgium great training for the track. I used to hate cold, wet English training rides! (Who doesn't...?) Coming back from South Africa as a kid and having to adapt to the harsh British climate was no fun. Oddly enough, when I was pro with ADR I used to do really quite well in wet and windy conditions. TT What are you up to now? CS I now work in the wine industry. I was in production (winemaking) for several years but moved more into the sales and marketing area. I run a wine education course for the staff at our winery and restaurant. Perks are excellent!!! TT I admit that your comp record 18m 48 sec “10” was a good ride but how did you think it compares to Ian Cammish's 3.31 “100”? (Another of those sideways Harry Hill TV Burp mischievous winks to the reader ;-) !) CS I am in awe of anyone wanting to ride a hundred! Cammish and I were very different riders indeed and I believe both rides have their merit. I never rode anything longer than a 25 so I can only guess how hard his 3.31 was! Incidentally, I think Cammish was 2nd to me when I did the 18. (Nope! Anthony Stapleton—see later). TT When you did the 18min 48 sec “10”, what do you remember most about the day?

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CS I remember riding over the course beforehand and thinking that if I went out hard I could probably hang on over the last couple of miles as it was gradually downhill, so I warmed up on the rollers like a madman for 45minutes before the start. I only got to the line with 20 seconds or so to spare, shot out of the blocks, kept the gear to about 53x14 and then caned it coming home. I only used the 12 with about a kilometer to go. I recall seeing my Dad jumping up and down just passed the finish line, so I knew I'd done a 19, but had no idea it was comp record and an 18! TT Do you think any of our riders today could match that time? CS I think they certainly should be able to! The progression in training regimes has produced quality riders that pump out amazing times...they should be able to reproduce that on a standard road bike... It will be inter-

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esting to see! TT What do you think about our Olympic champions? CS I am blown away by our Olympic Champions... really impressed by the squad across the board. It is so good to see success at last. I guess in many ways riders like me helped pave the way and it still brings a pang of pride seeing Wiggins or Hoy or Cooke standing on the podium… TT Anyone you would like to say hello to in the UK? CS Yeah, just about everyone! I made some good friends when I was there and I guess living in Aus I've lost touch with many people. This Facebook thing is excellent: I've hooked up with so many people from my past, you included! Ha-ha! TT Did any rider ever have as much wasted talent as Cam-

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WARNING—TIME TRIALLISTS AND BOGGLE HOLE DON’T MIX

MARCH 2009

mish? (Wasted talent…cobblers!! The Sponsor thinks I’m the best thing since sliced bread! Urmm….better make sure he doesn’t read this though.) CS Unfortunately I have seen a lot (far too much) wasted talent over the years... and I include myself in that statement. But circumstances also dictate success and decisions made are just that... I'll leave it there! TT Would you come back and ride a two up with Chris Boardman? CS Er, no! I haven't ridden in anger (or anything else for that matter) since 2000 and I smoke a pack a day now!!! Maybe Boardman could drag me around on a tandem...! WITH THANKS TO RICHARD PRINCE AND HIS FACEBOOK CONNECTIONS!

Right: Colin—(probably not) at the start of his old skool 10 record - photo courtesy Ann (Mum) Sturgess

The event in which Colin recorded 18-48 was the Oundle Velo 10 held on the N1/10 on a Saturday evening in early July 1988. The course was based on the A1 and started from the southern slip road into the village of Sawtry before running straight up the A1 to turn at Norman Cross roundabout. It then retraced down the A1 to finish in a slip road a mile or so north of the start. The road got so busy it has since been widened and upgraded to Motorway standard. The old road is still used quite frequently for both open and club events and is still known as the N1/10 (although it’s not quite as fast now due to the lack of a second carriageway and no wagons – plenty of roundabouts though!). Hutch did 19-43 on it when he won the 2007 National. Both Adrian Collard and Graham Bickle broke the Junior 10 mile record on the original (Sturgess) course.

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Top ten in the event… C Sturgess Team Haverhill 18-48 A Stapleton Leo RC 19-59 M Pyne Poly CC 20-01 I Cammish Manchester Whls 20-14 B Clarke VC Slough 20-23 B Phillips East Grinstead CC 20-26 N Roberts Team Chiltern 20-30 S House Clarence Whls 20-38 P Wass Nottingham Clarion 20-40 S Bray Sheffield Poly 20-41 J Harrison Peterborough CC 20-41

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WARNING—IT’S ALL UPHILL TO BOGGLE-HOLE….AND BACK

MARCH 2009

GAMBLING .. on cleaning A piece of nostalgia from Mick Gambling—first published in Cycling magazine in 1973. It was wet then too!

niscent of the Spanish Inquisition or rucked chamois in a 12hour event. Hot water is preferable, applied with a rag which can later be consigned to the This is the bicycle-cleaning season. dustbin, or placed in a saddleYou only have to go down the road bag of a clubmate against whom for liquorice torpedoes and there is you hold a grudge. (Those who have ridden faster automatically half an hour of wheel and frame qualify). rubbing ahead. Some buffing-up with a towel At the time of writing, just round will set up an extra-ordinary the optimism corner of 1973, my glow, and force the grit so far area has had a long spell without serious rain but has been regularly into the pores it will still be coming out two weeks later. under a shroud of fog. The result is a wet road that sends a up a con- This action is not helped by the tinuous oily black stream of a tena- lower appendages being covered by hair, although experts cious, sticky constitution. on either side may be in conflict At the Christmas ten-mile race, on this technical point. Remove those who rode in shorts finished with black nether limbs, like knob- footwear, because if this substance, now warm and seeping, bly dipsticks. It happened on a gets into cycling shoes, a country road course, free from chemical reaction, as yet unheavy traffic. The glutinous mixknown to science, could blow ture was adhesive on both sides your toes off. and this created a curious leg surface of grit, with the multi-colours Of course, all this unpleasantness can be avoided by wearing of oil catching the light. tapered training trousers of a This unusual effect was enhanced by sporadic spots of manure. (Shall flecked black, white and grey colour. They don’t repel the we call it that?). There are several farms on our course and the “milk nasty fluid but at least it doesn’t walks” provide a truly rural atmos- show. These excellent garments can be safely worn phere. You might even say punthroughout the winter and as the gent. In summer, the dry roads acquire a bouncing rubbery texture gritty, yet malleable, layers increase, they create an insulation of fertilizer (trying to use a differthat could go to the moon. ent word). In winter, the tarmac Alternatively, it can be resupplies a liquid quality “muck”. moved, when required, by sharp (Notice the lowering tone. Will taps of a hammer or by riding have to leave this subject before sinking to unacceptable depths.) It down steps. gels superbly with the greasy stuff We have digressed a little from cleaning bikes, but the legs had already on the legs to form a kind to come first. Just how do you of bitumen upon which you could tackle this “shellac” once it sets grow exotic flowers. on the cycle? To rub this lot off is torture, remi-

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After suffering in the above mentioned race and repairing the fibres with seasonal indulgences, it is usually a week before I visit the bike. It is a sad refugee from warmer months, without mudguards and with best wheels. The frame is covered in a hardened dark slime and needs a paraffin rag to shift the worst. Under the bracket and in the crannies there are lumps of brittle soil, leaves and softer items that resemble nothing and are vaguely disgusting. One wonders whether if this was left to build up, some form of new animal life would arrive. However, you need to be careful what you breed – it might turn on you and come up the tubes. The chain is dappled brown and gives the appearances of great neglect. Spokes are crusty with whitish corrosion that is worse on the alloy rims and positively a brute to remove from the hubs. My time for a bike clean of this magnitude is three hours, and that’s not counting tubulars. The tubs I scrub in the bath, with warm water and some biological, supersoft, rapiddissolve, powerful lather, square deal, speedy action soap powder, from under the sink. That is the aftermath of a tenmile race. It would be quicker to clear up after an avalanche. One last point. I leave someone else to discover the bottom of the bath s gritty – with a tender part of their body.

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WARNING— NO OLYMPIC MEDALS

MARCH 2009

BEN’S BLOG….

Well just got back from my second race of the season and what a tough course, 368 meters of climbing in just over 22 miles and the downhill bits weren’t easy either due to the bad road surfaces. It was just one of those courses where you just couldn’t get comfy. Getting back late the night before from 10 days snowboarding with a sore knee and bruised coccyx didn’t help much either. I always like to start the season of with some odd length / sporting type event. You get to meet a different crowd of TT’s to the ones you see the rest of the year on the ‘fast’ courses and because of the odd distances you don’t really have to worry about your times so much as you can’t compare them to anything. The fast guys also tend to avoid them so they’re just a nice relaxed way to start the year. It did go a bit wrong this year. The first race I entered Pete Tadros also decided to ride but fortunately I was having a good day and despite being under geared for most of it I managed to win and get a course record in the process so came away quite chuffed with myself. Then yesterday I had the race from hell. I wasn’t feeling great - snowboarding had done more damage to me

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in a week than years of cycling. I hadn’t touched the bike for 10days. It was cold (which I hate) and as I pulled into the HQ I suddenly realized that I had done this course before about 5years ago and a photo came to mind which was taken of me out of the saddle doing about 10 mph up a bl**dy great hill Also, because I had been away I hadn’t seen the start sheet so didn’t know until I looked at it in the HQ that Mike Coyle and Darren Barclay had entered. There goes my plan of taking it steady. So the race started up this hill which took about 4 and a half minutes to climb in 53/21-19, I glanced down at my power which was just depressing and summed up everything really. Then you had about 25mins of long drags and bumpy descents where you where either out of the saddle trying to stay over 20mph or getting shaken to bits at 40mph down hill. After that came the hill in the photo, I think it’s near Cowfold - you go into a village around a couple of bends then the road kicks up. It doesn’t look too bad but I was glad I still had the 39 ring on. It was about now I really had lost the will to live. I still had to get back to the HQ to get the car so I thought I might as well carry on over more climbs, potholes, bumps until the last couple of miles where I actually found a bit of flat road but by that time I was a mess so couldn’t make

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the most of it. I got back to the HQ just about able to walk due to my coccyx, coughing up all sorts of nasty stuff and generally feeling pretty horrible. I looked at the results and had somehow (despite freewheeling for 2 and half minutes and generally having a really nasty time) got another course record. I actually went back outside to check my SRM to make sure they had it right. So it seems that I haven't forgotten how to do it over the winter and in fact I seem to be a bit quicker which is always nice. Now this weekend I have a nice 10 to do - again, another course I don’t know but looking at a map it should be fairly flat so a chance to see what I can do on something a bit more normal. The only thing that worries me is just like the last 2 events I’ve done... there's only about 35 riders up for it. Is there something I should know about it ..like it’s all uphill or something? Anyway I’m off to bed now, to try and recover. I think Monday’s going to be a rest day and might even make Tuesday one too. So I’ll just end by saying you should all do the Sussex CA event next year. They put a lot of effort into the event and need more riders to keep it going. Believe me, after riding the GS.194 the rest of the year will seem easy. They could even make it an ‘Old School’ event as you spend most of it off the tri bars anyway.

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WARNING—HALF-WHEEL WAYNE AT YOUR PERIL

MARCH 2009

TALKING TO…. GLENN LONGLAND By Ralph Dadswell Hi Glenn, and thanks for agreeing to the chat. Let’s kick off with an easy one. Can you tell us what it was like to finish second in the BBAR competition for 5 years on the trot? Well, thanks very much! It certainly wasn’t easy, it’s not great at all, but it kept the challenge up to try to win it. Each time I was second gave me another excuse to go for it. If I had won it first time, then I might then have gone off and done some proper racing instead! I’m happy having done a few years of the BBAR, as I quite enjoyed it. When I did finally crack it in 1986, it was a great feeling. I won it with three personal bests, and I think I had the best 50, 100 and 12 hour rides of the year. At the time, time-trialling was fine. I would’ve liked to have tried for international selection on the road, but it seemed as if southerners didn’t have a chance to get in the GB team….. In the late 1980s, you moved from Time Trialling to doing more Road Racing. Why was that? And did it work for you? The Manx International 1986, was a key ride for me, and it definitely helped with getting me into the Peace Race team. At the time, I was able to do the training for the top road races, and so it fitted together. I had always wanted to do it, and in each of 87, 88 & 89 I rode the Tour of Normandy and the Peace Race. The Tour of Normandy was a bit of a warm up for the Peace Race as it was only 5 or 6 days long. In 1991, you made a return to the BBAR. How did that happen? Things were changing at that time. In 1990 we opened our shop, and shortly after that I got a job at Radford Accountants. While this was good, it meant that I didn’t really have the time for training for the big Road Races. So, in 1991 I de-

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cided to have a proper go at TTs again. In 1986, I had [modestly!] said that I was the only one who could do 300 miles. So I had to do it, didn’t I? I started the 12 hour with my usual 280 mile schedule. It’s better to be ahead of a 280 than behind a 300, isn’t it? I didn’t really know whether I was on for 300 until after I’d finished. It was then that I heard that the last timekeeper was only a few yards short of 300. I’d gone past with less than a minute remaining, but it was

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WARNING—DON”T TURN NORTH OFF THE A170 AT SNAINTON

enough. What did you think about Kevin Dawson’s rides? Kevin did a good ride for his first 12, and I knew that I had to go over 290 to beat him in the BBAR. I think it was 294 that I had to do. But then I was told during the 12 hour that he’d improved his 50 that morning, and I think my target went up to 296! As it happened, I improved my 50 a few weeks later, but the pressure was certainly on at the time! And that gave you a second BBAR win. Did it feel as good as the first one? Sure, it felt good, but the difference in 1991 was winning the BBAR Team as well. I’ve always been a team man, and so was really pleased to win it. I suppose the only disappointment was missing out on improving our 12 hour team record. We got it in 1986, and really should’ve added a few more miles in 1991, but couldn’t get the right riders in the right place. You had been racing tandems for a while, and took the 25 record in 1991 as well as grabbing the BBAR. How did the 25 go? I can’t really remember much about the ride. I was riding with Nev Stroud, as usual. We didn’t know we were on for the record, we were just racing. I know it was a rescheduled race because of a rainstorm on the original day. Ray Hughes and Ben Edwards also beat the record that night, but then we came in a few seconds quicker with 47.19. We then started seeing you riding a most unconventional tandem. What was that about? Oh, the Forward Stoker Tandem. So, the person on the back is the one facing forwards, and the stoker is in front, but facing backwards. So, on the back, I was doing the steering, the gears and the brakes. The bloke on front faces backwards, with his head down. But even like that, you can’t see the front wheel, so I would steer by lining up the crack in Nev’s bum with where I wanted the wheel to be. The first ride was on the Q10/19 (not with Nev at this point), and taking it down the gift hill was really something! It’s a strange set-up, because you can talk to the other rider.

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MARCH 2009

Could even give him a kiss, but I never tried it! We were then given a new model with a different design, and it was a bit longer. We raced it at Eastway, and had a go at the lap

record. Unfortunately we had mechanical problems – the chain came off in full view of the crowd. What was frustrating was that the owner/inventor would let anyone else touch the bike, and so is was hard to get things changed. After a few more tries, including a session when we were televised at Herne Hill, I decided to move on. It’s a pity, because I liked riding it, and was a bit fed up when the RTTC (as was) banned it. Part of the problem was that there was so much secrecy around it. Anyway, onto more normal stuff. You were also spotted riding a tricycle in the early 90s. Tell us about getting the 10 record. Taking 40 seconds off the record was an amazing chunk, and of course it lasted 19 years before it was shaved last summer by Carl Saint. Well, I was on a borrowed trike, a fairly old one. I put some quite light wheels on it, changed the chainset, removed the front lamp bracket, and off I went. I remember going around the turn & seeing someone go off on the wrong exit. It was just a good day on a good course. It must be one of my top two or three 10s, because I was really up for it. We got the team record that day as well, which finished it off really well. In 1992 we took the individual and team records for 25 and 50. I’m pleased that the 50 record has managed to stand up, even though the 10 and 25 have now moved on. Don’t forget that the 10

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WARNING—BRADLEY JOHNSTON’S SUN TAN CONTENT

MARCH 2009

record was before tribars, disks etc were allowed. During the 90s, you also made several RRA record attempts, resulting in 5 records. Which of those gave you the most satisfaction? My favourite ride was the London to York & 12 hours. I got out of London okay, but then I got lost twice before getting to York. I thought I was going quite well, there were odd moments when I struggled, but mostly I was flying along. I remember in the last mile I had to climb off and run for a short period, to avoid a big junction, and then jump back on to sprint for the York finish. That was 200 miles in 7h 29m, and then I had to carry on for the 12 hour. I just went for it, as I didn’t know the roads. I remember riding on Newcastle’s version of the M25 with some very dodgy slip roads where you had to ride in the middle lane while all the cars dodged around you. And this was going uphill as well, so it was a bit scary. But when I got to the top, it was 285 miles done with 1 hour still to go. I just sprinted, without thinking about anything else. In the end it was nearly 310 miles when time ran out near Alnwick. The ride was a big deal to me, because 12 hours is my thing. Bob Addy really should’ve had the 12 record when he did London to York, but apparently he decided that he would just go for the place-to-place. I should also mention that there had been a couple of unsuccessful London-York attempts made in the 90s, and so I was very keen to show that it could be done!

For years, you were ahead of the market in that you used a saddle with a large hole cut in it. I believe that particular sensitive problem has been fixed now, but injuries and ailments do seem to have kept you away from racing much in recent years. How are things looking for 2009? Are you fit and well? Well, I’m just trying to get some miles in. I’d like to ride the Championship 12 this year, but I’ve had so many injuries lately that it’s hard to know what’s going to happen. A hamstring problem affected last year, and I couldn’t do anything for several months. If I can stay free of injuries, I really hope to ride the 12. But who knows? And finally, do you expect to ride any of the Old Skool series of races? I’m sure you’ll have a suitable bike somewhere in your infamously organised garage! Yes, I would like to ride one or two. It’ll be a bit of a laugh, and should be interesting to see how well we go. I’ve got a bike in the garage – all I need is a back wheel, and perhaps a new chain. It’s got a 24” front wheel, so I’ll look the part. Thanks very much Glenn, and we look forward to seeing you later in the year – particularly on your “funny bike”!

How do you feel about the End to End? You were ready to go on several occasions, but first the weather and then the fuel strike meant that you never actually got to the start line. Yes, people keep bringing it up that I never did it. It’s a pity. I really was ready to go, but it doesn’t make sense to start without the right weather. These days, I think the aches and pains would be too much for me. Being out there for 44 hours is asking a lot. But I do see it as one of the few things that I wanted to do but somehow didn’t. Actually it’s the only thing that really got away. But you can’t do everything, and I’m pleased to have won the 50, the 100, the 12, the 24 & the BBAR. Has anyone else done that?

S EE

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WARNING—IT DOESN’T GET ANY BETTER THAN THIS

MARCH

2009

DARRYL WEBSTER …… GETTING GOING! After 17 years out, getting going is proving rather difficult. Pre Christmas I had a period of being really keen despite the freezing weather but then along came Satan, I mean Santa, to get in the way. Then my back started playing up and ever since it’s been a struggle to get back in to riding regularly. To this end I decided it was time to get modernised and, after a couple of visits to local bike shops to get an idea of what modern bikes are about and a couple of questions on the Time Trial Forum, a few E Mails to Planet X resulted in my ordering two new Planet X Carbon bikes in Barbie Doll Pink, a road bike and TT bike. They've done me a cracking deal but, on my insistence the bikes were paid for. I felt I didn't want the obligation that came with loan bikes though I must admit my pocket would have been happy. So “paid for” bikes it was, the first time since 1977 when I took a silver medal to Jeff Hooper in the GHS Schoolboy 10. I've been as excited as a puppy while waiting for them. At the time of writing, the said bikes had just arrived and socks tucked into jeans, I've had a little scoot up and down the road ..and I'm quite gob smacked. The responsiveness is amazing and I cant wait to get some good rides in. Me thinks this is just what I

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needed to do get that enthusiasm going. Both bikes are the standard off the peg “Ultegra” models retailing at not a lot over a grand. Before I go on, I should say my current bikes are all mid 80`s specs and almost all the innovation since has passed me by in either blissful ignorance or indifference. So rather than having benefitted from all the small improvements along the way I'm getting ‘em all in one go....and don't I need ‘em!. A full report on the bikes and comparison with my 80`s machines next issue. As yet almost all my contact with the sport since resuming an interest has been via internet forums, and I'm pleased to say I've made contact with several old associates, both competitors and training pals so hi to the Walsall Heavies and to the various individuals who've got in touch, you know who you are. I'm an opinionated bugger to say the least. This has resulted in some oft heated debates but so far no blood has been spilt (well none of mine, can’t talk for others!). I feel I've made more friends than enemies though but as usual enemies are more vociferous......but then I ain't exactly slow at giving it back....often with icing on top but I hope no one’s been personally offended (well not too much). With the new season starting to get into

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swing and better weather making me training that little more likely I suspect my spent time on forums will reduce somewhat as I'm sure for many others it might too...but what a great way to get you through those winter months. News that Sky is to back a BC team to compete in the Pro Tour events with Tour de France participation its major goal has been met by a rather mixed response. Almost all are behind the idea but a rather surprising amount of criticism has expressed about the fact that Sky are the backers - mine included. Some fear they will do the same with cycling as they've done with football, over priced it and taken it away from free accessibility on TV. Whether that turns out to be the case or not remains to be seen but my attitude to Murdock's “Evil Empire” is keep well away. If you value democracy you'll know why. Anyway good readers, that's your lot from me this month, it’s a bit brief but the Editor (Sir to55er to most of you) is on my case and needs it a bit smartish . (note to self : must try harder).

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WARNING—WE MIGHT BE DOING A FOURTH ISSUE

MARCH 2009

SO WHO’S DOING WHAT? THE ED SAYS: This job has it's perks you know! We often get letters or emails that bring smiles to our faces (which brightens our day) and it's easy enough letting you in on it all simply by changing the names … a bit…or elaborating somewhat! A recent communiqué leads me to ask just when did training for British time trialling become a matter of national secrecy? I know Hutch has always been highly guarded as to what his SRM tells him but it appears to be catching! In Ishoo Too of Testing Times we gave an insight into two rider's training regimes (Craig Simpson’s and Joel Wainman’s) just to show the two extremes to which you can go… depending on which way you are inclined. It would have been nice to have taken this a bit further by inviting more big hitters to open up a bit and let us all know what training suits them - well everyone's different aren't they so not a problem surely? Wrong! One rider we approached (not Hutch….we'll be asking him soon though ;-) ) reckons "everyone I've looked to for advice has told me I'd be an idiot to reveal anything about what I do - (apparently) it's the result of a lot of hard work and research. I can't ignore them". Humph! He could have made it up - like wot we do half the time! Plenty more fish in the sea though! Fatbaz1 (Barry Charlton - Lyme RC) - he of the superfast 100 last year - is a thoroughly good egg and has

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been far more obliging. He has this to offer:

Barry Charlton Age 43

running training and modified it to suit the bike. Some good advice I got early on in my running career, from a coach who was old school, said keep it simple and low tech, no heart monitors etc. Listen to what your bodies telling you and if you get tired take a few days rest. Its not rocket science. Tough the winter I train easy with a tempo ride on Sundays if the weather is ok, then add a turbo session in January until March. March onwards I increase the miles and then start doing some intervals always on the rollers, most of which last 2 hours. November to March

“I hated sport at school as it was all football and having two left feet didn't help, so I was the one stuck in goal. Found out early on I was a good runner when the police were giving chase but didn't start racing until I was 17, in the marathon boom of the 80's. Progressing onto the track, getting picked to represent Britain in France and Germany on several occasions. After eighteen years gave Idahoan a go, entering five and winning four before drifting into time trialling at the age of 35. Listened to a few riders training schedules but used my years of

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Saturday A free day doing approx 30-50 miles Sunday 10 miles warming up on rollers meet some riders and do 50 miles tempo at 23mph on rolling roads, then warm down for 20 miles easy. Monday Easy 50 miles around 17mph Tuesday Same as Monday Wednesday Turbo session warm up 10 miles, then do a pyramid of 10 mins then 2 mins

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WARNING—OLD SKOOL SERIES APPROACHING

MARCH 2009

recovery, 9 mins then 2 mins recovery, 8 mins then 2 mins recovery and so on until you 1 min. Thursday Easy ride no set distance Friday 50 mile relaxed at 20mph with approx 5 mile warm down.” All done on this little “beauty” see right! One of the more “experienced / mature” team members of Planet X is also prepared to chip in. Here’s what he has to say. “One person's type of training doesn't necessarily suit the next guy and I've found the same thing doesn't even suit the same person year after year..after year…after year… so there's nothing to lose is there? (In any event it's too late in the training year to start cribbing anyone else's training …the season's almost here!!) :-) Basically then….from the end of last season…21 miles each way to work and back five days a week, come rain or shine. Same route every day - the object being to get there and back as quickly as possible without too much pain…so nice and steady. No intervals - no sprints - no pulse monitor - no power meter - nothing other than a fairly hard 70 minutes or so effort two times a day! Up until a couple of weeks before Christmas I'd probably do 2 or 3 hours each Saturday and Sunday morning + another 35 to 40 mins loosening up in the afternoons. At the end of December I usually have a couple of weeks off work because I don't like riding in the dark on roads full of drunken motorists on their way

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home from office parties. I'd have a bit of a blitz over the two weeks probably getting in about 1000 miles…all steady miles on winter bike complete with heavy clinchers, mudguards etc at 19.5+ mph av. Even into the new year my mid week rides don't alter but the ones at the weekend have gradually got longer and harder (fuelled by the knowledge Joel's been knocking out some epics!!). Routine got hampered a bit due to the snow but if I haven't been able to get out on the road I've used the turbo instead” . There…that wasn't too hard was it? Other members of the Planet X team are jostling forward to make their highly effective methods of training known to the reader. One highly respected rider swears by a good solid diet of Harry Ramsden's Cod and Chips with several servings of his Mum's bread and butter pudding to follow -

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all washed down with copious amounts of Tetley's Bitter. He has a different bike for every day of the week but only goes out when the sun shines and he's guaranteed a tail wind all the way round his favourite training circuit which bypasses all the highest and hardest peaks in the Sheffield area. He is a slave to the "resting up" regime and prefers to let his mouth, rather than his legs, do the talking. There's no doubting his exceptional ability to talk a good race and if world championships were won on that alone, no-one could touch him. More secrets to follow in the next issue! We're trying to catch up and have a few words with Wayne and Planet X's new signing Bradley "madkeen" Johnston for some tips! (If it's to be done on a ride, we're going to ask very short questions which require long answers).

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WARNING — WELL...THIS IS YOUR LAST ONE!

MARCH 2009

TURNING TO THE NEXT PAGE, OR FAILING TO HIT THE DELETE BUTTON NOW, CAN SERIOUSLY EFFECT YOUR HEALTH AND THAT OF OTHERS AROUND YOU. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!

YOU DON'T HAVE TO GO ANY FURTHER! IF YOU ARE OF A NERVOUS DISPOSITION AND / OR ARE EASILY OFFENDED YOU ARE RECOMMENDED TO TEAR, OR CUT, ALONG THE DOTTED LINES AND THOUGHTFULLY DISPOSE OF THE FOLLOWING PAGE (S). HAVING SAID ALL THAT, AND GIVEN ALL APPROPRIATE WARNINGS, "NOB OFF...THE BACK”S CONTRIBUTION MUST NOW SURELY BE DESTINED TO BECOME THE MOST READ "PIECE" OF THIS ISSUE. YOU DON'T HAVE TO READ IT…..BUT NO DOUBT CURIOSITY WILL TAKE THE BETTER OF YOU! YOU'VE BEEN WARNED SO DON'T COMPLAIN. OK?

S EE

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wARNING - REFERENCES TO WET DREAMS AND DAMP SHEETS

MARCH 2009

NOB OFF …THE BACK .

ZMA—to give us Oldies that little extra! Something out there that is relatively cheap legal to take & best for old codgers like me over 40! Of course it’s always recommended to see your GP before embarking on any supplement – but to be honest how many of us really have the time to go to do this in the hectic pace of life when losing ones job is more important? ZMA is a blend of Zinc, Magnesium and vitamin B6. Should we Testers use it? Well now..! ZMA can be used by all athletes wanting to gain lean muscle size and strength, including bodybuilders, rugby players, sprinters and endurance athletes, such as runners, porn stars, cyclists and triathletes, helping prevent the drop in testosterone levels linked with lots of high volume training. That was the “jackanory” on a bottle of ZMA that I tried out How should the likes of us use it? For best results, 3 capsules on an empty stomach 30-60 minutes before bedtime. Also take this 2hrs after any calcium intake as its effects will be very much diminished & you’ll be wasting your hard earned dosh in these Testing Times. Ladies you only need 2 capsules.

S EE

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breeze with the heat). What results should I expect? Expect an increase in muscle growth, gains in strength, greater feelings of determination, focus, drive, & an overall improvement in well-being. Enhanced performance in the bedroom... now you’re talking when you ask your lovely wife to get out the Latex / PVC gear…!! Dreaming of winning that event or indulging in that fantasy you’ve yet carried out... then this supplement is for you! Also helps in that deep sleep you may crave when you have newborns with enhanced, wild & weirdly vivid dreams that you actually remember. It’s a great side effect believe me on some of the dreams I have had!

Most noticeable was the great restful deep sleeps you get & the fantastic vivid or wet dreams that you remember when you wake up & the feeling of a slightly damp bed sheet down below!!! Added bonus is enhanced prolonged sexual activity which any wife appreciates when her partner is away for 4 months at a time………! Available at any good Pharmacy, GNC store or online if your techie minded & trust the Internet. Did you know ZMA was developed by Victor Conte, founder and director of BALCO Laboratories!!

As for help in Time Trialling I’d be interested to hear any stories for those who try it as I believe it works. What it did or did not do to me. My personal experience with using this has been: muscles toned & a lot firmer (including the reproducing apparatus!) over a period of 3-4 weeks. Strength gains in terms of my weight sessions were more on doing higher reps, more sets with less of a resting period in between sets. On the bike I noticed I could keep up a higher cadence for longer periods in the stifling Saudi heat in the low 40’s when out training for 40-60 minutes (believe me that’s all you need in this heat which resembles your Hoover hair dryer in terms of

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Sir Nob of Two Ghiblis Urm..thanks Nob ...I think I'll stick to my standard homegrown meat and two veg thanks! ….Ed at heart, general bottle-washer, tea boy etc.

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The Testing Times - March 2009