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// IN THIS ISSUE >> UP-TO-DATE RESTAURANT LISTINGS ›› SHOVELS & ROPE — LITTLE SEEDS ›› TREVOR ›› PROTIEN BREAD ›› “IT” ›› ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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9 BEER/WINE REVIEWS 10 IN THE KITCHEN

STORIES

4 SHOVELS & ROPE // ALLEN SCULLEY

14 PET PLANET

“It’s often said that Michael Trent and Cary Ann Hearst essentially stumbled into discovering the musical chemistry they show as the duo Shovels & Rope.”

6 WHAT IS HIGH-PROTEIN BREAD—AND SHOULD YOU TRY IT? // DIET & NUTRITION

“Protein may be trendy right now, but it isn’t the only answer for your health, fitness, or weight loss goals. So look beyond labels, marketing claims, and Insta trends before you spend your money or your macros on high-protein bread (or any other buzzy food).”

7 TREVOR // REGGIE ALLEN

“Art imitates life with Trevor, the raunchy, dark comedy by Orange is the New Black writer Nick Jones. Closing out the 2016-2017 season, the production challenges the audience to view the world from the eyes of an eleven-year-old chimpanzee.”

22 COMMUNITY ARTS // KEVIN LEDGEWOOD

“UA Theatre & Dance prepares the Marian Gallaway Theatre to hold the classic Epic play, The Caucasian Chalk Circle by Bertolt Brecht. A deliberate and highly stylized play, The Caucasian Chalk Circle runs October 3-7 at 7:30PM & October 8 at 2:00PM. Two women fight for ownership of a child in the play’s richly plotted structure: a play within a play.”

RESTAURANT GUIDE

15 MOVIE REVIEWS 16 EVENTS 19 DECEMEBER ART NIGHT 20 PUZZLEMANIA / EDITORIAL CARTOON 21 HOROSCOPE

HIGH TIDE SPORTS 23

SABAN WEEKLY PRESS CONFERENCE GARY HARRIS

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F E AT U R E | A L A N S C U L L E Y

Photo Courtesy of Ryan McKellar.

SHOVELS & ROPE // LITTLE SEEDS

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t’s often said that Michael Trent and Cary Ann Hearst essentially stumbled into discovering the musical chemistry they show as the duo Shovels & Rope. In fact, for more than a decade, Trent and Hearst (who married in 2009) had pursued separate careers. Hearst released her first solo CD, “Dust and Bones,” in 2006 and followed that with a 2010 EP, “Are You Ready To Die,” and a second full-length, “Lions And Lambs,” in 2011. Trent, meanwhile, spent years in a band, the Films, until that group split in 2009 and also made a pair of solo albums along the way --– a self-titled effort in 2007 and “The Winner” in 2010. While trying to decide their next moves musically, they started playing shows together around their home town of Charleston, South Carolina and found they liked their scrappy sound as a duo and that they could earn enough money from the shows to make ends meet. But one thing that wasn’t casual about Shovels & Rope was the couple’s decision to get serious about making music and turning their group into a career. “We took a good, hard look at it before we decided to do this thing in the beginning,” said Trent, who joined Hearst for a recent phone interview. “And both of us were like ‘Well, if this gets to be too much, then it’s OK to quit and go do something else.’ We’re like ‘Really, we’re going to be a married couple band? That sounds insane, and it never works.’ But I think just establishing that before we got into all this… “We were real honest about ourselves,” said Hearst, who has a way of completing her husband’s thoughts in ways that are humorous and insightful, as well as succinct. “I think that worked to our advantage,” Trent agreed. “We realized it wasn’t a good idea, and then we did it anyway,” Hearst said. “We were just hoping it works out in the long run.” So far, so good. The couple released “Little Seeds,” their third album of

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original material as Shovels & Rope, last October, and the creative chemistry and spirited personality that has impressed many music critics seems as strong as ever on the new album. And not only are they still happily married, in September 2015 they welcomed their first child, Louisiana Jean, into their family. Their baby daughter joined mom and dad for their first tour in support of “Little Seeds” last fall, and both Hearst and Trent say the dual roles of being parents and touring musicians mixes quite well. “It’s really awesome, actually,” Hearst explained. “We have the convenience of a great crew and a comfortable bus that we can have like a routine, all the things you need to raise a happy kid, except we’re just in a different city every day. The three of us are always together with our nanny, who hangs with the baby while we play. So far so good, and it certainly makes some of the stuff that you got caught up in before kids seem stupid. “It keeps it real. It’s awesome,” Trent said. “We look around at a lot of our friends who have young kids. They’re going to day jobs and they have to work it out and plan child care…We actually feel really, really lucky that we get to spend so much time with her. We’re with her all the time.” Trent and Hearst waited until after Louisiana Jean was born to record “Little Seeds.” Like their previous albums, 2012’s “O’ Be Joyful” and 2014’s “Swimmin’ Time” (as well as the 2015 covers album, “Broken Jukebox Vol. 1”), “Little Seeds” was made at the couple’s home studio. And they quickly found that parenting threw some new twists into the making of the album. “Babies don’t pay attention to schedules,” Hearst said “Newborns don’t care that you have a session scheduled at 10 in the morning.” Trent, who produces the duo’s albums, said fitting work on the album around the demands of parenting took some flexibility. “Michael was really able to keep the

ship afloat, keep us moving, and keep us scheduled and keep us practicing late,” Hearst said. “And he would be totally around for whatever I needed to accomplish. It really was a feat of division of labor.” Trent took the lead when it came to cutting instrumental tracks, often working alone in the studio at the house. But he and Hearst made sure to do their vocals singing together into a single microphone – an approach they’ve used on the other albums. “They come out a little bit better and we’ve been doing it for awhile like that,” Trent said. “We can read each other and follow one another and there’s this push and pull thing that happens that we just do instinctively.” “Little Seeds” retains the rowdy and twangy rock sound of “O’ Be Joyful” and “Swimmin’ Time,” but shows some growth both musically and lyrically. “I think every time we approach a new record, we want to expand the sonic landscape. We just want to try and do some new things, and we’re always learning how to play new instruments,” Trent said. “We like to be able to do a little bit of everything and are always trying to learn and approach a song with a whole new set of ideas that we haven’t done before. That’s always really exciting. So I think we’re stretching out a little bit more on this record and we’ve got a little bit more hair on it.” That follicle growth is most apparent on the impressive opening track, “I Know,” which is arguably the most plugged-in, hard rocking song the duo has recorded, and “Buffalo Nickel,” a stomping, bluesy track. But “Little Seeds” is plenty diverse, with songs that range from the spare balladry of

“St. Anne’s Parade” and “This Ride” to the rollicking country rock of “Botched Execution” to the measured thump of “Johnny Come Outside.” Lyrically, “Little Seeds” moves away somewhat from the story song style featured on the first two albums, adding a more personal and topical dimension to the album. The social commentary is most evident in “BWYR,” a nearly a cappella call for unity whose haunting tone reinforces the gravity of the subject matter (“Black lives, white lives, yellow lives, red/Let’s all come together and share the bread”). Meanwhile, the poignant songs – “Mourning Song” and “Invisible Man” – were inspired by Trent’s father, who is battling Alzheimer’s disease. Trent and Hearst said they plan to play a good number of the new songs in their shows, but fans can expect the tunes to take on different dimensions live. That’s because Trent and Hearst tour as a twosome switching off playing guitars, drums, harmonicas and other instruments, and some songs need re-arranging to work with the limitations of having only two musicians on stage. Trent said they like what the twoperson format does for the songs. “I feel like it keeps it fresh for us, and more fun,” he said. “We have more instruments to pick from now that get thrown into the mix. But you can do a lot with very little to make really interesting arrangements. I think we dig that. “I feel like it’s more of a fun show for the audience to see how we’re going to pull it off,” Trent said.

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NEWS

ADOPT-A-SCHOOL GOLFERS TURN OUT FOR A GREAT CAUSE The Raymond James Team was the overall tourney winner for the second year in a row at the 27th Annual Nucor Steel Tuscaloosa Adopt-A-School Golf Tournament. The team won $500 for their adopted school, Faucett-Vestavia Elementary.  Martin Luther King, Jr. Elementary will receive $500 for having the most golfers (elementary), and Holt High will receive $500 for having the most golfers (secondary). A random drawing was also held including all schools represented and Oak Hill was selected to receive $500.  Additional winning teams / players were: 1st Place Gross Winners - Wes Harbin/Dickey's BBQ Team 2nd Place Net Winners - Burnum-Hahn Team 2nd Place Gross Winners - Brookwood Oil Field Team 3rd Place Net Winners - Tuscaloosa Radio Team 3rd Place Gross Winners - Andrew Kniphfer Agency Team The Putting Contest Winner was Jim Essary, who won $500. The Longest Drive winner, Grant McCabe, won a recliner from Spiller Furniture and Mattress. The Adopt-A-School program would like to thank all of the businesses and organizations who provided support for the Golf Tournament. Without their support, this event would not be possible. Title Sponsor: Nucor Steel Tuscaloosa Eagle Sponsors: Alabama Credit Union, Alabama One Credit Union, Alumni Development & Construction, Bama Concrete, Bearing Service Company, BF Goodrich Tire Manufacturing, Bryant Bank, Burnum-Hahm Exterminators, Inc., Complete Pipeline Services & Supply, McAbee Construction, Inc., McGiffert and Associates, LLC, Perfect Shine, Inc., Rumsey Environmental, and The Westervelt Company Luncheon Sponsor: Core Focus Personnel, LLC Awards Sponsor: Rumsey Environmental Putting Contest Sponsor: Alabama Central Credit Union  Scorecard Sponsor: Rumsey Environmental and Tuscaloosa Radio  Golf Cart Sponsors: Cintas and Joshua J. Swords Attorney at Law  Beverage Cart Sponsor: WVUA23  Closest to Pin Sponsors: Adams Heating & Cooling, Walmart Supercenter Skyland and Ward Scott Architecture  Donors: Adams Beverages, Auntie Anne's Pretzels, Buffalo Rock Company / Pepsi-Cola, Chick-fil-A at Northport and Krispy Kreme  Hole Sponsors: ABC Fire & Equipment Alabama Credit Union Alabama One Credit Union Alabama Public Radio Alumni Development Amason & Associates, Inc. Bama Concrete The Bank of Tuscaloosa division of Synovus Bank Bearing Service Company BF Goodrich Tire Manufacturing Bryant Bank Burnum-Hahn Exterminators, Inc. Campus Collection Complete Pipeline Services & Supply Coppertop Crimson 2 Go

Ellis Architects, Inc. FASTSIGNS of Tuscaloosa FNB of Central Alabama Harrison Construction Company, Inc. Heat Pizza Bar, LLC Hunt Refining Company Innisfree Irish Pub McAbee Construction McGiffert and Associates, LLC Mercedes Benz U.S. International Neel Shaffer, Inc. Nucor Steel Tuscaloosa, Inc. Perfect Shine, Inc. Phifer, Inc. Rex Veron Designs, LLC Riverview Dental Designs Robertson Banking Company Rumsey Environmental Sealy Management Company, Inc. Shelton State Community College Southland International Trucks, Inc. Teklinks The Westervelt Company Tiger-Rock Martial Arts, Northport TTL, Inc. Tuscaloosa Coca-Cola Bottling Company Tuscaloosa Synovus Mortgage Company UA - College of Education Vero Software Walker Associates, Inc. Walmart Supercenter, Skyland Warrior Roofing Manufacturing. Inc. WVUA 23 Attendees also won some fantastic raffle prizes at the event donated by Big Spring Entertainment, BF Goodrich Tires, Buffalo Rock/Pepsi, BURGERFI, Chick-fil-A at Northport, Chick-fil-A Tuscaloosa, Chuck's Fish, Cypress Inn, Glory Bound Gyro Company, Hunt Refining, Jalapeño's Mexican Grill, Jim 'N Nick's, Nucor Steel, Pat's Florist and Gourmet Baskets, Philly Boyz Cheesesteaks, River, Texas Roadhouse, Theatre Tuscaloosa, The Blue Plate, The Levee, The Locker Room, The Pants Store, TTL, Inc., Shrimp Basket, Urban Cookhouse and Wing Zone.

Gene Poole of Hudson-Poole Jewelers.

Shane Spiller of Spiller Furniture and Mattress.

Dr. Samory Pruitt of the University of Alabama.

Robin Jenkins of the Chamber with the winning Raymond James team.

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>>> H E A LT H | D I E T / N U T R I T I O N

WHAT IS HIGH-PROTEIN BREAD—AND SHOULD YOU TRY IT? CYNTHIA SASS, MPH, RD

You may have seen pics of high-protein bread (or bagels, waffles, or tortillas) popping up on Instagram lately. Highprotein baked goods are really taking off, as the popularity of protein-packed everything (from snack chips to coffee creamer!) reaches a fever pitch. But what is high-protein bread exactly— and should you be adding it to your shopping cart? Here are a few things to know before you try a loaf. Different brands use different sources of protein. Some high-protein breads include the same ingredients typically found in protein powders— such as isolated whey protein, pea protein, soy protein, or egg white protein. Other brands use wheat protein, or vital wheat gluten; while others use ground nuts or pulses, such as almond flour or chickpea flour.

You should always check the ingredients. Because there's no standard formula for high-protein bread, it's important to scan the packaging for things you may want to avoid. For example, many of my clients with inflammatory conditions (like eczema, psoriasis, arthritis, chronic sinusitis, and IBS) avoid gluten, as well as dairy and soy. Other clients are allergic to nuts or eggs. In general, I recommend skipping packaged products made with artificial colors, flavors, preservatives, or "mystery" additives (any ingredients you don't recognize or can't pronounce). High-protein may or may not mean low-carb. It depends on the bread's other ingredients. One product I looked at had a whopping 14 grams of protein. But the first ingredient was whole wheat flour, and each slice packed 12 grams of carbohydrate (which is nearly the same amount in white bread!) with only 2 grams as fiber. Thanks to all the added protein (from added whey and wheat proteins), the bread was higher in calories than traditional whole grain bread, with 50 more calories per slice. Meanwhile a high-protein bagel I reviewed, also with 14 grams of protein, packed 16 grams of carbohydrate—but 14 of those grams came from fiber (meaning a net of 2 grams of carb). That's much different from a regular bagel, which may contain more than 50 grams of carb, just a few grams as fiber, and about 9 grams of protein. How you eat your bread matters. If you enjoy toast with salmon or an egg on top, for example, or you eat it with Greek yogurt, do you really need your bread to pack an extra 14 grams of protein per slice? Probably not.

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Remember, simply adding protein to a food doesn’t make it healthy (much like removing fat from foods didn’t make them good for us, and actually contributed to the obesity epidemic). And keep in mind that it is possible to get too much protein. Excess protein can either prevent weight loss or even lead to weight gain. The bottom line. The wide variation in ingredients and macronutrient content makes it tricky to say whether highprotein bread is worth buying. If you’re trying to eat more protein and curb excess carbs, I recommend focusing on whole foods first. Most of my clients easily meet their protein needs by consuming foods like eggs, seafood, meat, Greek yogurt, and pulses. If you’re vegan, or your protein sources are limited for some reason (maybe due to allergies or food preferences), a protein-packed bread may help you fill the gap. But again, be sure to check the for ingredients you need to avoid, and choose products that are clean and natural. If you’re Paleo or gluten-free, some of the high-protein bread products aren’t for you. Take the high-protein, highfiber bagel I described above: It's low in absorbable carbs, but contains wheat (a no-no for both diets). If you’re a clean eater, you want to avoid any type of bread that’s highly processed, whether it's high-protein or not. Instead, stick with whole food options, like sweet potato toast, or homemade cauliflower “buns.” As long as you’re not grain-free, there are plenty of regular breads made simply with whole grain flour (including gluten-free options), yeast, honey, water, and salt. Finally, if you’re a competitive or professional athlete with protein needs that are higher than the average person, high-protein bread might be something to consider. I work with some athletes who get tired of protein shakes and bars, and can only eat so many eggs or chicken breasts. Just remember quality is king, and strategy is important. Eating protein-rich bread without regard to how the bread was made, or the overall balance of one’s diet isn’t smart nutrition. Protein may be trendy right now, but it isn’t the only answer for your health, fitness, or weight loss goals. So look beyond labels, marketing claims, and Insta trends before you spend your money or your macros on high-protein bread (or any other buzzy food).

>>> B O O K R E V I E W

IMPRINTING THE SOUTH

SOUTHERN PRINTMAKERS AND THEIR IMAGES OF THE REGION, 1920S-1940S BY LYNN BARSTIS WILLIAMS ABOUT THE BOOK

Prints—etchings, woodcuts, linoleum cuts, lithographs, and serigraphs began to flourish as artistic media after World War I due to their affordability and an expanding market of art consumers. The American Scene movement, which arose in the 1920s and surged through the 1930s and 1940s, emphasized regionalism and embraced printmaking in particular as a medium well suited to portraying regional life. The American South became a focus for many artists and gave rise to some of the most aesthetically powerful practitioners of printmaking. In this book, Lynn Barstis Williams outlines the history of printmaking in the South, its rise in popularity, its variations from region to region, the different methods embraced by printmakers, the growth of the print society movement, and the influence of social realism, New Deal art programs, and the Arts and Crafts movement on the aesthetics of southern printmakers. She also reviews the motifs, imagery, and subject matter that predominated in the work of many southern printmakers—the natural world, farms and farmers at work, rural architecture and townscapes, African-American life, religious gatherings, and scenes of leisure and play (hunting, dancing, music-playing). As a finale, the author presents a catalog of 60 entries on printmakers of note, including a biographical sketch, representative sample of their work, and analysis of their imagery. This book accompanies an exhibition entitled Imprinting the South: Works on Paper from the Collection of Lynn Barstis Williams and Stephen J. Goldfarb, scheduled to run from July 21–September 16, 2007 at the Georgia Museum of Art in Athens, and May 23–August 22, 2008, at the Jule Collins Smith Museum at Auburn University.

special collections librarian at Auburn University libraries. She is the compiler of American Printmakers 1880– 1945: An Index to Reproductions and Biocritical Information and the author of articles on a variety of southern printmakers and movements. “An attractive and informative study [with] a wealth of information and good illustrations. . . . This volume focuses sharply on the South. It tells the story of how printmaking evolved in the region and provides a rich body of imagery as well as reference data about individual artists.” —Martha R. Severens, author of The Charleston Renaissance

AUTHORS/EDITORS

Lynn Barstis Williams is an art and The University of Alabama Press is a proud member of the Association of American University Presses. The Press currently publishes 70-75 new titles a year and has over 1,800 titles in print. It is a founding member of the University Press Content Consortium and is at the cutting edge of digital publishing. The Press is the publishing arm of the University of Alabama.

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Photos Courtesy of Steven Ross

TREVOR // THEATRE DOWNTOWN A rt imitates life with Trevor, the raunchy, dark comedy by Orange is the New Black writer Nick Jones. Closing out the 2016-2017 season, the production challenges the audience to view the world from the eyes of an eleven-year-old chimpanzee.

man characters served as the main plot device, which usually rationalized his actions. Interesting enough, select scenes showed conversations completely from the chimpanzee’s perspective. Often to use for comical effect, the barrier also served as the catalyst for the show’s gut-wrenching climax.

that can’t understand her, the actress paired well with Funderburg. Even with limited scenes, actor Chuck Duck rocked the house with his drag queeninspired take on the great Morgan Fairchild, and Catherine Champion wowed with her emotional execution in the play’s last act.

While clever, Trevor has moments where the plot becomes predictable. Granted, that is what happens when the production is semi-biographical. However, that does not detract from the myriad strong performances from the seven-member ensemble.

Whether it was intentional of not, the show ultimately ends on a note befitting of the classic film King Kong. Mirroring the tale of the great fictional Ape, Trevor’s fate was seemingly sealed when protecting the one he loved.

Reminiscent of Rajiv Joseph’s The Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo, the play masterfully utilizes magical realism for dual perspective. While the cast sees our protagonist as a beast, theatre patrons view him as an older Caucasian man.

Funderburg delivered an outstanding performance as the title role, evoking an equal number of chuckles and gasps from the audience. The Theatre Downtown veteran showcased impressive dedication, never breaking from his animal character.

In summation, Theatre Downtown closed their season on a high note. No monkey business!

As the play starts, we meet the titular simian (played by Jared Funderburg) right after he takes his human caretaker Sandra’s (Penny Thomas) car for a joyride in their little suburban residence. Early dialogue with supporting characters suggests that this isn’t his first bit of reckless behavior.

Thomas shined bright as the naïve, yet stern Sandra. Despite sharing lines with a character

Inspired by true events, in which a Connecticut woman’s pet simian ferociously attacked and ripped off her friend’s face, Trevor aimed to give insight on what would make an animal snap. Despite it’s tragic source material, the play is executed in a fashion that borders on the comedic and macabre.

The Birmingham iteration of Trevor was directed by Rhonda Erbrick and stage managed by Kay Thomas. The show ran September 7-23 at Theatre Downtown in Birmingham, Alabama.

Through a series of asides, it is revealed that Trevor is a has-been actor, who’s biggest feat was appearing in a handful of commercials with 90’s sex symbol Morgan Fairchild. While his stardom has fleeted, his narcissistic and aggressive behavior has taken the front seat. Of course, that is due to Sandra’s enabling tendencies and his successful Chimpanzee friend Oliver (Maxx Gunn) constantly haunting him with his prosperity in Hollywood. Lastly, he is an animal and doesn’t know any better. The language barrier between Trevor and the hu-

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>>> R E S TAU R A N T R E V I E W | S H E E N A G R E G G

Photos Courtesy of Sheena Gregg

FIVE TUSCALOOSA // LIVING THAT BRUNCH LIFE

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ccording to Wikipedia, the concept of brunch originated in England in the late 19th century and eventually became popular in the United States in the 1930s. Upon further review, one will learn that brunch is indeed a combination of breakfast and lunch typically eaten during the late morning to early afternoon, about 11am to 3pm and having some type of alcoholic drink involved. Though I feel like the concept of brunch has been well known to me for quite some time, the brunch life has climbed up the social media latter pretty high over the past two years. Travel articles brag about “extreme” bloody Mary’s that go beyond a pickle on a toothpick and instead involve a Big Mac and barbecue rib garnish hanging off the side of the glass. We even see Buzzfeed digital shorts that detail the brunch experience from start to finish. No matter where you look, brunch is that popular girl you’re dying to say that you’ve hung out with.

Enter FIVE Tuscaloosa’s Sunday brunch scene. Live jazz music, chicken and waffles, and a Bloody Mary bar to build your heart’s desires makes FIVE a go-to place for all things brunch. Though I’m a pretty frequent flyer when it comes to FIVE’s dinner, it had been quite a while since experiencing FIVE’s brunch scene. I decided to give their brunch a spin after church on Sunday with my cousin Mackenzie. As an out-of-state student from Michigan, I knew I wanted her to experience all the awesomeness that Tuscaloosa had to offer, especially with the food scene.

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We arrived at FIVE shortly after 9 a.m. I had originally worried that service wouldn’t start at the restaurant until 10 a.m. but I was pleased to see a few folks already seated at tables with beverages and appetizers once we walked up to the door. We were lucky enough to have great outdoor seating….especially since we all know that the BEST brunch experience often involves some good old fashioned people watching. Though FIVE only has five things to choose from as a menu concept, it’s still pretty difficult to choose a brunch entrée when EVERYTHING sounds amazing. I finally landed on us sharing the beignet appetizer with caramel apple reduction which I thought would be a nice starter prior to me downing the FIVE burrito and Mackenzie having the chicken n’ waffles. Light, fluffy, and a taste of perfection in the caramel sauce, the beignets were the perfect size to indulge without feeling like you went overboard at Café Du Monde. It didn’t take long for my breakfast burrito to arrive. My mouth watered as I noticed the perfectly crispy side hashbrowns and the overpour of salsa and queso on top of my burrito. Less than five seconds later, I perked up as I became aware of the golden fried goodness of Mackenzie’s chicken n’ waffles. Just like the beignets, the burrito, chicken, and waffles did not disappoint. With the live Jazz music started to play in the distance from inside, I knew that this had been the best Sunday decision I’d made in quite some time. Thank you FIVE Tuscaloosa for keeping

the brunch scene alive and thriving in T-town. FIVE Tuscaloosa is located at 2324 6th Street in downtown Tuscaloosa next to Catch 22. Tweet us @ ThePlanetWeekly and let us know

where you are eating! Sheena Gregg, MS, RDN,LD is a registered dietitian and local “Filipino foodie.” Follow her on Twitter @TheThriftyRD

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CLINE REVIEW // OLD VINE ZINFANDEL

IDYLL HOUNDS BREWING COMPANY // DIVIDE AND CONCH’R DOUBLE IPA

C

line Old Vine Zinfandel comes from Sonoma, California, USA, with its fruit grown in Lodi, California.

S

omething that I see a lot of breweries attempt but rarely succeed in is the double IPA. A beer that, to some, sounds like it should increase the bitterness and increase the alcohol. While that may be partially true, you have to find the proper balance to make the beer enjoyable, and that’s where most fail. More times than not, the beer is either too malty for the hop load that’s there, or the beer is just too hoppy and too intense, and then there’s that rare occurrence where the beer is just too boozy and it tastes like you’re drinking liquor. That being said, if you can find that balance between hop, malt, and alcohol, you may have something pretty tasty. Such is the case with a brewery from Santa Rosa Beach, FL called Idyll Hounds Brewing Company. They produce, in my opinion, a perfectly executed double India pale ale called Divide and other beers I’ve had. Conch’r. Here are my thoughts:

According to the wine’s tasting notes, within Lodi there are seven distinct growing areas. Almost all this wine’s grapes came from the Mokelumne River AVA, which is said to be home of the majority of the “old vines.” The grapes for this wine were harvested between August 23rd and September 17th. The wine itself was aged in 35% new French Oak with a medium toast level (which came through in the tasting below) and racked for 6-8 months. Lastly, the winemakers (Charlie and Tom) have stated that this wine can either be enjoyed now or aged for a few years to develop additional character. For more about this wine, check out the Cline Cellars website. Cline Old Vine Zinfandel Wine Review

Idyll Hounds only offers their beers in cans and kegs, which is how it should be in my opinion. So, I poured this beer from the can into a pint glass and immediately noticed a nice orange, rust color with not much light coming through the glass and about a finger width of semi-fluffy, off-white head. There was already a good bit of lacing developing on the sides of the glass as I let the beer sit while I took my photos.

Mouthfeel is on the heavier side, but I expected that from the color and lack of light coming through the glass. This is definitely not a beer I’m trying to drink more than one of at a time, because it does settle in your stomach and get you feelin’ right if you catch my drift. At 8%, this is a beer that deserves to be enjoyed with a meal. I can see this going really well with seafood, poultry, or some nice roasted veggies.

The first thing you notice about this beer is the smell; tons of earthy and citrus aromas as soon as the beer hit the glass. You also can pick up a bit of grapefruit and pine in the aroma too, which is really indicative of most Northwest DIPAs.

I will definitely be picking up more of this beer, and to be honest, it was much better than I was anticipating. I plan on trying more of their beers as soon as I can, because I can only imagine that the quality and technique didn’t stop with this beer. So, as always, if you can find it, drink it. Cheers!

Taste follows the nose for the most part with those same citrus and herbal notes. Up front you get good bit of hop bitterness that changes to an intense grapefruit and orange flavor. Midways through you start to pick up a good bit of sweetness from the malt and that pretty much takes over through the rest of each sip. The finish is dry and still dominated by that malty sweetness, but you do get a bit of that hop bitterness on the back of your tongue and cheeks; this is where the herbal notes along with some tropical fruit that wasn’t in the nose come into play. You get some pine and what, to me, tastes like tobacco in the finishing hop notes. A really complex list of flavors, I know, but it’s not like many

From the bottle: Some of the vines for our Old Vine Zinfandel date back to 1942, making them 70+ years old. They’ve lived a long life, developing character and depth along the way… Sample of Cline Old Vine Zinfandel 2015 received for review purposes. Appearance Cline Old Vine Zinfandel is burgundy in color with a tinge of purple and red raspberry. It’s not overly dark and a fair amount of light shines through. It coats up the glass quite well and leaves legs that are numerous and quick to fall.

red raspberry. Quite lovely. Though jammy, this wine’s flavors were “warm on the palate” to me, versus a heavy dark blend which would be much more soft. While not overly complex in taste, Cline Old Vine Zinfandel gives you a nice clean focused flavor reminiscent of Oregon Pinot Noir. Mouthfeel and Tannins On the palate you get a linen like mouthfeel that’s reasonably smooth. The tannins are present but quite supple. They balance out the wine’s flavor nicely and are noticeable all over the palate. Finish Cline Old Vine Zinfandel is a long finishing red wine and the finish strikes a balance between the flavors and tannins.

Aroma I was immediately drawn to this wine’s soft combination of vanilla and floral aromas. Very enjoyable. There’s also a very slight note of dark chocolate and a hint of cherry. I gave it a strong sniff, but didn’t feel any significant sting of alcohol in my nose. Cline Old Vine Zinfandel alcohol content 14.0% by volume, per the bottle. Taste Tasting this wine revealed flavors of cherry and ripe

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Overall Opinion Overall, well done Cline! I found this Zin to be elegant, balanced and uncomplicated in quality. Cline Old Vine Zinfandel price $10.99 SRP. A great well-under $20 choice in my opinion. Suggested Food Pairing As I was drinking this wine, I kept thinking that Prime Rib would be an excellent pairing choice. Prime Rib (to me) is a more clean tasting beef then say a rib eye or a strip. Given this wine’s elegance and clean flavor, go with a Prime Rib for a nice balanced pairing.

SEPT 20 + OCT 4

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>>> I N T H E K I T C H E N | R AC H E L PA X T O N

THREE PUMPKIN RECIPES FOR FALL Fall is a great time to try out some new pumpkin recipes. There's nothing like the smell of fresh baked pumpkin bread or cookies in the kitchen! You have to give this pumpkin cornbread a try. CRANBERRY PUMPKIN BREAD

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BREAKFAST / LUNCH

Brown Bag 9425 Jones Road | Northport // 333.0970 Its speciality, fried green tomatoes, joins barbecue plates and fish filets on an extended list of meats and vegetables.//Tues 10:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. | Wed-Sat 10:30 a.m. - 7:30 p.m. City Cafe 408 Main Ave | Downtown Northport // 758.9171 Established in 1936. Big on food, low on price. Open for breakfast and lunch. Historic downtown Northport. Closed weekends. Cook Out 100 15th St E, Tuscaloosa Fast-food chain known for its drive-thru BBQ, burgers & more than 40 milkshake flavors.//Thur-Fri 11:00am-4:00am Sat-Wed 11:00am3:00am//www.cookout.com CountryPride Restaurant 3501 Buttermilk Rd // 554.0215 | www.ta.travelcenters.com Breakfast 24 hours. Lunch and Dinner buffet.

2 eggs, beaten slightly 2 cups sugar 1/2 cup vegetable oil 1 cup canned pumpkin 2 1/4 cups flour 1 cup chopped cranberries 1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon salt

Cracker Barrel Old Country Store 4800 Doris Pate Dr | Exit 76 // 562.8282//www.crackerbarrel.com Holler & Dash 1130 University Blvd A-1, Tuscaloosa//752-3310 Sun-Thur 7am–2pm Fri-Sat 7am–9pm Sun 7am-2pm//www.holleranddash.com International House of Pancakes 724 Skyland Blvd // 366.1130 Jack's 1200 Hackberry Lane | Tuscaloosa // 345.1199 Mr. Bill's Family Restaurant 2715 McFarland Blvd | Tuscaloosa // 333.9312

Cooking Instructions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine eggs, sugar, vegetable oil, and pumpkin, mixing well. Combine flour, pumpkin pie spice, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl. Make a well in the center of the batter and add the pumpkin. Stir in cranberries. Spoon batter into 2 greased and floured loaf pans. Bake for 1 hour. PUMPKIN CUPCAKES

Panera Bread 1800 McFarland Blvd *402 | Tuscaloosa // 366.8780 Quick Grill 1208 University Blvd | The Strip | Tuscaloosa // 342.0022 Rama Jama’s 1000 Bryant Dr // 750.0901//Closest restaurant to Bryant-Denny Stadium. Sweet Home Food Bar 2218 University Blvd. | Tuscaloosa // 764-9346 Mon.-Fri. Mon-Sat 9am–9pm Sun- 10am-3pm

3/4 cup melted butter 1 cup sugar 2 eggs 1 1/2 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon 1 cup canned pumpkin

Tropical Smoothie Cafe 1800 McFarland Blvd E, | Tuscaloosa// 331-4070 Casual, health-conscious cafe featuring custom smoothies, sandwiches & wraps. Mon-Thur 6:30am–9:30pm Fri-7am-9pm Sun10:30-8pm T-Town Café 500 14th Street, Tuscaloosa | 759-5559 |www.ttowncafe.com Mon - Fri 6am - 3pm; Sat - Closed; Sun 10:30am - 3pm The Waysider 1512 Greensboro Ave // 345.8239 Open for breakfast and lunch. Smoke free.

MEXICAN

Central Mesa 523-7738// 519 Greensboro Ave, Tuscaloosa Mon-Thur 11am-10pm Friday-Sat 11am-11pm Sunday: 10am-3pm

Cooking Instructions: Combine butter and sugar, beat in eggs 1 at a time, sift in dry ingredients and mix well. Stir in pumpkin. Pour into greased cupcake pans. Bake 15 minutes at 375 degrees. PUMPKIN COOKIES

Chipotle Mexican Grill 1800 McFarland Blvd E | Midtown Village // 391.0140 www.chipotle.com Chuy's 1320 McFarland Blvd E, Tuscaloosa// 349-4947 Sun-Thur 11am-10pm Fri-Sat 11am-11pm | www.chuys.com Don Tono's 2312 4th Street | Temerson Square // 345.9191

2/3 cup vegetable oil 1 cup sugar 1 egg 1 cup cooked pumpkin 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon vanilla 1/2 cup chopped pecan nuts

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SEPT 20 + OCT 4

Pastor's Kitchen 2910 5th St, Northport//553-2320 Mon-Fri 10:30am-2pm, 4:30–9pm Sat 10:30am-8pm Closed Sun Pepito’s (2 locations) 1203 University Blvd | The Strip // 391.9028 1301 McFarland Blvd NE // 391.4861 Taco Mama Tuscaloosa 2104 University Blvd A, Tuscaloosa Mon-Wed 11am–9pm Thur-Sat 11am–10pm Sun 11am–9pm www.tacomamaonline.com

FINE DINING

301 Bistro (Was L&N Train Station) 301 Greensboro Ave, Tuscaloosa //764-1395 Casual Dining, Full Bar and Beer Garden Mon-Sat 4–11PM Sun 11am-9pm | www.301bistro.com Cypress Inn 501 Rice Mine Rd // 345.6963 Fax: 345.6997 | www.cypressinnrestaurant.com | 2003 Restaurant of Distinction. Beautiful riverfront location. Steaks, seafood and more with Southern flavor. Wine list, full bar. Specialities of the house include Shrimp Cypress Inn and Smoked Chicken with white barbecue sauce. Kid friendly. Closed Saturday lunch. Happy Hour- Mon-Fri from 4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. featuring 1/2 price appetizers. $2 Domestic Draft Beers and $3 Well cocktails. Evangeline’s 1653 McFarland Blvd. North // 752.0830 Located in the Tuscaloosa Galleria. 2004 West Alabama Tourism Award Winning Restaurant. American Eclectic Cuisine. Lunch: Mon– Fri 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Dinner: Tues–Sat 5 p.m. - until... Fall: Saturday Brunch. FIVE Bar 2324 6th Street. // 205.345.6089 A restaurant/bar based on simplicity. We offer 5 entrees, 5 red wines, 5 white wines, 5 import beers, 5 domestic, and 5 signature cocktails, to go along with our full liquor bar. Dinner: Sunday - Thursday 5-10; Friday and Saturday 5-12 Lunch: Friday and Saturday 11-3; Sunday Jazz Brunch: 10-3// five-bar.com The Side by Side Restaurant 2410 University Blvd. | Embassy Suites | 561-2500 | thesidebysiderestaurant.com River 1650 Jack Warner Pkwy NE, Tuscaloosa//632-3801 Tue,Wed,Thur-11am–2pm, 5:30–9PM Fri-11am–2pm, 5–10pm Sat-10am–1pm, 5–10 Sun-10am–1pm Closed Monday | www. rivertuscaloosa.com JAPANESE Bento Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar 1306 University Blvd // 758.7426 Hokkaido Japanese Restaurant 607 15th Street Open Sunday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Ichiban Japanese Grill & Sushi 502 15th Street // 752.8844 Maki Fresh 759-2555//1530 Mcfarland Blvd N, Tuscaloosa//Mon-Sun 11am–9pm Asian chain serving maki, rice bowls, tempura, sliders & more. Tokyo Japanese Steak & Sushi Bar 6521 Hwy 69 S | Hillcrest Center // 366.1177// Offers steak, seafood, tempura, teriyaki and sushi. Including cooking at your table, if you choose. Sun–Thurs 5 p.m. - 10 p.m. Fri & Sat 5 p.m. - 11 p.m.

El Rincon (2 locations) 1225 University Blvd | Tuscaloosa // 366.0855 1726 McFarland Blvd | Northport // 330.1274

Pokirrito 68 (was Ezell's Southern Food Express) 220 15th St E, Tuscaloosa Sushi Bar

Fernando's Mexican Grill 824 McFarland Blvd E | Northport // 205.331.4587

Rock 'n Roll Sushi 469-9060//2229 University Blvd, Tuscaloosa Mon-Thur 11am-9pm Fri-Sat 11am-10pm Sun 12-9pm

Fuzzy’s Taco Shop 2321 University Blvd, Tuscaloosa//409-8344 Mon-Thur 10am–10pm Fri-Sat 10am–12am Sun 10am-10pm | www.fuzzystacoshop.com

Broadway Pizzeria 2880 Rice Mine Road Northeast Tuscaloosa, // 391.6969

LaGran Fiesta 9770 Hwy 69 S // 345.8871 La Fiesta Mexican Grill 6521 AL-69, Tuscaloosa// 345-8580 Mon-Thur 11am-10pm Fri-Sat 11am-10:30pm Sun 11am-9pm Los Calientes Mexican Grill 3429 McFarland Blvd E // 553.1558

Rachel Paxton is a freelance writer and mom of five. For more recipes, gardening, organizing tips, home decorating, holiday hints, and more, visit Creative Homemaking at http://www.creativehomemaking.com.

Moe’s Southwest Grill (2 locations) 2330 McFarland Blvd E // 342.1487 1130 University Blvd // 752.0234 | moes.com

Kobe Steak House 1800 McFarland Blvd E | Midtown Village // 759-1400//Lunch: 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. | Dinner: 4:30 p.m. - 10 p.m. Sat & Sun 11:30 a.m. - 11 p.m.

Jalapeno’s Mexican Grill 2001 New Watermelon Rd | Northport // 342.3378

Mix oil, sugar, egg, and pumpkin together and add remaining ingredients. Drop by spoonfuls on greased cookie sheet. Bake 10 to 12 minutes at 350 degrees. Makes 3 dozen cookies.

Margarita's Grill 1241 McFarland Blvd E // 343.0300

El Mariachi 3520 McFarland Blvd E |Tuscaloosa // 409-8585

Iguana Grill 1800 McFarland Blvd E | Midtown Village // 752.5895

Cooking Instructions:

3380 McFarland Blvd - Northport//330-0919//www.lostarascos.com

ITALIAN

DePalma’s Italian Cafe 2300 University Blvd, Downtown // 759.1879 Menu ranges from sanwiches to finer pasta dishes and pizza. Varied beer and wine selection. Hours: Mon–Thurs 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. | Fri & Sat 11 a.m. – 11 p.m. | www.depalmascafe.com Little Italy 1130 University Blvd. | Tuscaloosa // 205.345.4343 Mr. G’s 908 McFarland Blvd N | Northport // 339-8505 Olive Garden 2100 McFarland Blvd E // 750-0321 Open daily from 11 a.m. | www.olivegarden.com

CASUAL DINING

La Fiesta Mexican Grill 345-8580//6521 AL-69, Tuscaloosa Mon-Thur 11am-10pm Fri-Sat 11am-10:30pm Sun 11am-9pm

Animal Butter 710-5455// 2217 University Blvd, Tuscaloosa// Tue-Sat 11am–10pm Sun 11am–9pm Monday Closed | www.animalbutterinc.com

Los Tarascos (2 locations) 110 Skyland Blvd E - Tuscaloosa//553-8896 NEW LOCATION

Avenue Pub 405 23rd Avenue // Tuscaloosa

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W H E R E TO E AT I N T U S C A LO O SA

Brunch, lunch, and dinner. Specialty cocktails, local pints, bottled beer, and wine. Mon - Fri. 11 a.m. – 11 p.m., Sat. Noon – 11 p.m., Sun. Noon p.m. – 9 p.m. Big Daddy’s Cafe 514 Greensboro Ave | Downtown Tuscaloosa // 759.9925 The Blue Plate Restaurant (Was Northport Diner) 450 McFarland Blvd, Northport // 462-3626 Buddy’s Ribs & Steaks 2701 Bridge Ave | Northport // 339.4885 Buffalo Wild Wings 2710 McFarland Blvd // 523.0273 Mon–Wed 11 a.m. - midnight | Thurs–Sat 11 a.m. - 2 a.m. Chicken Salad Chick The Shoppes at Midtown & Essex Square, Northport www.chickensaladchick.com Dat's Good 333-4663// 4300 AL-13, Northport Specializes in Catfish, Hot Wings,and BBQ Tue-Sat 10am-9pm Closed Sun & Mon www.facebook.com/DatsGoodBBQ

A wonderful selection of Greek foods SPORTS GRILL Baumhower's Wings of Tuscaloosa (2 Locations) 500 Harper Lee Drive | catering-Pick-up Tuscaloosa //556.5858 4251 Courtney Dr, Tuscaloosa // 556-5658 Always fresh and always fun. Owned by former UA/ Miami Dolphins great Bob Baumhower. Kid Friendly Buffalo Phil’s 1149 University Blvd | The Strip // 758.3318 Sports grille with TVs galore. Diverse beer and wine selection, full bar BurgerFi 1320 McFarland Blvd E #510, Tuscaloosa//759-2510 Stylish, eco-minded chain serving grass-fed beef burgers, plus hot dogs, craft beer & wine. Fri-Sat 10:30am-10:00pm Sun-Thur 10:30am11:00pm | order.burgerfi.com/menu/tuscaloosa Billy's Sports Grill Historic Downtown Northport // 879.2238 Mon through Wed from 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Thurs through Sat from 11 a.m.-10 p.m., and Sun from 10:30 a.m. till 9 p.m. (Sunday Brunch 10:30am-3pm).

Dave’s Dogs 1701 McFarland Blvd E | University Mall // 722.2800

Buffalo Wild Wings 2710 McFarland Blvd. East | Tuscaloosa // 523.0273 Sports grille with TVs galore. Diverse beer and wine, full bar

Five Guys Burgers & Fries 1800 McFarland Blvd E | Midtown Village // 391.0575 www.fiveguys.com

Champs Sports Grille 320 Paul Bryant Drive | inside Four Points Sheraton Hotel // 752.3200 Breakfast and lunch buffets. Sunday brunch 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Freddy's Frozen Custard & Steakburgers//764-9097 315 15th St, Tuscaloosa Fri-Sat 10:30am–11:00pm Sun-Thur 10:30am–10:00pm | www. freddysusa.com

Hooter’s 5025 Oscar Baxter Dr | Next to Jameson Inn // 758.3035 www.hooters.com

Glory Bound Gyro Company 2325 University Blvd // 349-0505 Glory Bound Gyro Company is a unique restaurant that focuses on great food and service in a funky, fun-filled atmosphere. Open MonThu: 11am - 10pm | Fri - Sat: 11am-10pm | Sun: 11 a.m. - 9 p.m.

Innisfree Irish Pub 1925 University Blvd | Tuscaloosa // 345.1199 Mugshots Grill & Bar 511 Greensboro Ave // 391.0572//Great burgers. Full service bar. Open late. | www.mugshotsgrillandbar.com

Hooligan’s 1915 University Blvd // 759.2424 From hamburgers to hummus. Open daily 10 a.m. - 11 p.m.

Walton's 915 Patriot Pkwy, Tuscaloosa//752-1693 Wings and much more Mon-Sat 9am-10pm Closed Sun | waltonstuscaloosa.com

The Kitchen 2322 4th St, Tuscaloosa//331-4731 Tue-Fri 8am–3pm Sat-Sun 9am-9pm Closed Sunday

Wilhagan’s 2209 4th St | Downtown Tuscaloosa // 366.0913

Madear’s 1735 Culver Road // 343.7773 Mon–Fri 6 a.m. - 5 p.m. | 2nd & 3rd Sunday 11 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Wings U 1800 McFarland Blvd East Suite 218 | Pick-up Tuscaloosa // 561.3984 Features the first coal-fired pizza oven in Alabama. Owned by former UA/Miami Dolphins great Bob Baumhower. Completely open concept! www.wingsu.com

Mae's Southern Cafe 710-5488//4419 hwy 43 n suite 5, Northport Tue-Sat 11am–7pm Sun-10:30pm–12am Sun 11am-6pm Mon12AM–8PM

WingZone 1241 McFarland Blvd E | Tuscaloosa // 342.2473

Metro Diner 464-9428//1800 McFarland Blvd E #404 Tuscaloosa Sun-Thur 7am–8pm Fri-Sat 7am–9pm | www.metrodiner.com

Archibald & Woodrow's BBQ 4215 Greensboro Ave | Tuscaloosa // 331.4858 Mon-Sat 10:30 a.m. – 9 p.m. | Sun lunch

Miss Dots 1715 University Blvd, Tuscaloos Mon-Sun 11am-9pm | www.lovemissdots.com

Bama BBQ & Grill 3380 McFarland Blvd | Northport // 333.9816

Mugshots Grill & Bar 511 Greensboro Ave | Downtown Tuscaloosa // 391.0572 Great burgers & sandwiches. Unique setting, full service bar, veggie entrees, kid friendly, and open late | www.mugshotsgrillandbar.com Nothing But Noodles 1320 McFarland Blvd E #530// 349-2900// www.nothingbutnoodles.com Pastas, Salads, Soups, Desserts Fri-Sat 10:30am–10:30pm Sun-Thur 10:30am-9:30pm O’Charley’s 3799 McFarland Blvd // 556.5143 Open daily lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch // www.ocharleys.com Panera Bread 1800 McFarland Blvd E | Midtown Village // 366.8780 www.panerabread.com Quick Grill 1208 University Blvd | The Strip // 342.0022 www.bamaquickgrill.com Ruby Tuesday (2 locations) 6421 Interstate Drive | Cottondale // 633.3939 Just off I-20/59 at exit 77. Near Hampton Inn and Microtel Inn 311 Merchants Walk | Northport // 345.4540 www.rubytuesdays.com Sitar Indian Cuisine 500 15th St // 345-1419 Southern Ale House 1530 McFarland Blvd N//Monday-Thursday 11a.m-9p.m., FridaySaturday 11a.m.-10p.m. Sunday Brunch 11a.m.-2p.m. Southland Restaurant 5388 Skyland Blvd E // 556.3070// Steaks, chops and home-cooked vegetables | Mon–Fri 10:45 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sweet Home Food Bar www.sweethomefoodbaral.com//764-9346 Mon-Sat 9am–9pm Sun- 10am-3pm Taziki's Mediterranean Cafe 1800 McFarland Blvd E, Tuscaloosa// 344-6444 Mon-Sat 11am-9pm Sun 11am-8pm Urban Cookhouse 1490 Northbank Parkway #110, Tuscaloosa// 561-6999//We use the freshest ingredients available with an emphasis on supporting the local farmer Mon-Sun 10am–9pm//www.urbancookhouse.com Zoe’s Kitchen 312 Merchants Walk // 344.4450

BARBEQUE

CRAFT BEER | WINE | BARCADE | GROWLERS

Dickey's BBQ (3 locations) 9770 Alabama 69; Midtown; and 13544 Hwy 43 North at Rose Blvd. in Northport. Texas Barbecue. | 344.6500 1800 McFarland Blvd, Midtown Village, Tuscaloosa. | 758-1133 | 13544 Hwy 43 North, Winn Dixie Shopping Center, Northport. | 330-1147 Dreamland (2 locations) 5535 15th Ave | Tuscaloosa // 758.8135 101 Bridge Ave | Northport // 343.6677 The legend. On game day, get there early if you want to make kickoff. Seating is limited. Hours: Mon–Sat 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sun 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. Full Moon BBQ 1434 McFarland Blvd E, Tuscaloosa// 366-3555 (sports Grill) Mon-Thur 10am–9pm Fri-Sat 10am–10pm Sun 11am-9pm Hick’s BBQ 4400 Fayette Hwy // 339.3678 // Tues–Sat 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Jim 'N Nick's Bar-B-Q 469-2060//305 21st Ave, Tuscaloosa Sun-Thur 11am-9pm Fri-Sat 9am-10pm | www.facebook.com/ JNNTuscaloosa Hoo's Q 345-6400 101 15th St E, Tuscaloosa//Mon-Sun 10am-9pm | www.hoosbbq.com Moe's Original BBQ 2101 University Blvd. // 752.3616 Mon–Sat 11am - 10pm | Bar service Mon-Sat 2am and Fri -3am | Kitchen closes at 10pm Pottery Grill (2 locations) Highway 11 | Cottondale // 554.1815 3420 Alabama 69 | Northport // 333.5848 Menu: thepotterygrill.com Tee’s Ribs and Thangs 1702 10th Avenue // 366.9974 |11 a.m. - 10 p.m. daily STEAKS Logan’s Roadhouse 1511 Skyland Blvd | next to Sams // 349.3554 Steaks, ribs and spirits Longhorn Steakhouse 1800 McFarland Blvd E | Midtown Village // 345-8244 #412 Nick's In the Sticks 4018 Culver Rd | Tuscaloosa // 758.9316 A long-time Tuscaloosa tradition. Good steaks at a reasonable price Try a Nicodemus if you have a designated driver. Outback Steakhouse 5001 Oscar Baxter Dr // 759.9000

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SEPT 20 + OCT 4

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>>> RESTAURANTS |

W H E R E TO E AT I N T U S C A LO O S A (CO N T.)

R. Davidson Chophouse 2330 4th St. /Downtown Tuscaloosa/ 205.614.8782 Reservations are available online at rdchophouse.com or by phone. Hours - Tues–Fri. Lunch – 11:00am – 2:00pm; Cocktail Hour – 4:00pm; Dinner – 5:00pm - untill. Saturday: Lunch – 11:00am 4:00pm; Cocktail Hour – 4:00pm; Dinner – 5:00pm - until. Sunday Brunch: 10:00am - until Texas Roadhouse 1363 McFarland Blvd E, Tuscaloosa// 759-2596 // Fri-Sat 11am–11pm Sun-11am-10pm Mon-Thur 3pm-10pm www.texasroadhouse.com 43 Prime Steakhouse 13620 Highway 43 N Northport// 331-5800 Monday-Thursday 4:30-9 Friday-Saturday 11-10 Closed Sunday

SEAFOOD

Chuck’s Fish 508 Greensboro Ave | Downtown Tuscaloosa // 248.9370 Monday - Thursday 5-10 p.m. and Friday - Saturday 5-11 p.m. Steak, seafood, & sushi specialities. Daily specials. Red Lobster 2620 McFarland Blvd. | Tuscaloosa // 205.553.8810 Sun-Thurs 11AM-10PM//Fri & Sat 11AM-11PM Reservations Accepted | Take-Out Available Private Dining Area Available for Advanced Booking (Lunch Specials Available Mon-Fri 11AM-3PM) Shrimp Basket 3249 McFarland Blvd E, Tuscaloosa//469-9786 Mon-Fri 10:30am–9pm | www.shrimpbasket.com Catfish Heaven 2502 21st St, Tuscaloosa// 752-7222 Mon-Sat 11am-7:30pm Closed Sun Steamers on The Strip 1301 University Blvd, Tuscaloosa//750-0203 Mon-Sat 11am-8pm Sun 11am-5pm | www.steamersonthestrip.net The Levee Bar and Grill 1 Bridge Ave | Northport // 632.3136 Casual riverfront dining Hours: Mon-Thurs 11 AM-9 PM, Fri-Sat 11 AM-10 PM, Sun 10:30 AM-3 PM (Happy Hour Mon-Thurs 2 PM-6 PM) | leveebarandgrill.com

CHINESE

Buffet City 1747 Skyland Blvd E // 553.3308 All you can eat buffet. Open 7 days a week. Chang’s Chinese Restaurant 1825 McFarland Blvd N // 391.9131 China Fun 2600 University Blvd | Alberta City // 553.2435 Chongwah Express 1425 McFarland Boulevard, Northport. 333-1088 Hot Wok Express 6571 Alabama 69, Tuscaloosa// 758-0148 | Mon-Sat 10:30am–8pm

Subs n' You 2427 University Blvd. | Tuscaloosa // 205.758.0088 Roly Poly Sandwiches 2300 4th Street | Tuscaloosa // 366.1222 The Pita Pit 1207 University Blvd | The Strip // 345.9606 Hours: Mon–Sat 10:30 a.m. - 3 a.m. | Sun 11:30 a.m. - midnight Pyros Fire Fresh Pizza 1320 McFarland Blvd E #270, Tuscaloosa//248-7343 Mon-Fri 10:30am-10pm | www.pyrospizza.com

DELICATESSEN

Honeybaked Ham Company 421 15th St. E // 345.5508 //www.honeybaked.com Jason’s Deli 2300 McFarland Blvd // 752.6192 www.jasonsdeli.com Located in the Meadowbrook Shopping Center Jimmy John’s (3 locations) 1400 University Blvd | The Strip // 366.3699 1875 McFarland Blvd N | Northport // 752.7714 815 Lurleen B. Wallace S | Tuscaloosa // 722.2268 Delivery 7 days a week. www.jimmyjohns.com Manna Grocery & Deli 2300 McFarland Blvd E | Tuscaloosa // 752.9955 McAlister’s Deli (2 locations) 101 15th St | Tuscaloosa // 758.0039 3021 Tyler Dr | Northport // 330.7940 Sandwiches, salads and spuds www.mcalistersdeli.com Momma Goldberg’s Deli 409 23rd Ave // 345.5501 | www.mommagoldbergs.com Newk’s Express Cafe 205 University Blvd. East // 758.2455// www.newkscafe.com Sun–Wed 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. | Thurs–Sat 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. Schlotsky’s Deli 405 15th St. E // 759.1975 // schlotskys.com Which Wich University Blvd.// Downtown Tuscaloosa // Mon – Sat 10:30 – 9 // Sunday 11 – 7 // Fresh ingredients, great sandwiches. 764.1673

ASIAN CUISINE

Ruan Thai 1407 University Blvd // 391.9973 | ruanthaituscaloosa.com Lunch: Mon–Sat 11 a.m. -2 p.m. Dinner: Mon–Thurs 5 p.m. - 10 p.m. Fri & Sat 5 p.m. -10pm | Sun 11 a.m. -3 p.m. Surin of Thailand 1402 University Blvd // 752.7970 Open daily. Lunch: 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Dinner: 5 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. | www.surinofthailand.com

Mr. Chen's Authentic Chinese Cooking & Oriental Market 514 14th St. | In the Oz Music shopping center // 343.6889 // Open Sun - Thu 11am - 9pm, Fri & Sat 11am - 9:30pm

COFFEE SHOP Barnes & Noble 1800 McFarland Blvd E | Tuscaloosa // 349.6366

New China Fun 4213 University Blvd E, Tuscaloosa//553-2435 Mon-Thur 11am–9:30pm Fri-Sat 11am–10:30pm Sun 12–9:30PM

Five Java Coffee, fresh juices, smoothies and treats from Mary's Cakes. Open Monday - Saturday at 7am; 9am on Sundays

Panda Express 636 15th St E// 343-6888 Fri-Sat 10:30am-10:00pm Sun-11:00am-9:00pm Mon-Thur 10:30am-9:30pm | www.pandaexpress.com

Heritage House 700 Towncenter | Northport // 758.0042 Open Mon-Fri 7 a.m. – 6 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Peking Chinese Restaurant 1816 McFarland | Northport // 333.0361 Open 7 days a week. Super lunch and dinner buffet. Hours: Sun–Thurs 11 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. | Fri & Sat 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Swen Chinese Restaurant 1130 University Blvd | The Strip // 391.9887 Trey Yuen 4200 McFarland Blvd E // 752.0088

PIZZA AND SUBS

A Taste Of Chicago 1700 Greensboro Avenue 205-342-DOGS Mon. - Thurs. 10 a.m. - 9 p.m.; Fri. - Sat. 10 a.m. - 10 p.m. Italian Beef Sandwiches, Chicago Rib Tips, and Chicago Style Pizza.

Krispy Kreme Doughnut 1400 McFarland Blvd // 758.6913 //www.krispykreme.com Starbucks (2 locations) 1800 McFarland Blvd E | Midtown Village // 343.2468 1901 13th Ave East | Inside Super Target // 462.1064 | starbucks.com

DESSERTS

Celebrations Bakery, Inc. 1832 McFarland Blvd N | Northport // 339.3221 Dunkin' Donuts 2520 Stillman Blvd. |Tuscaloosa// 349.3400 McCorvey Dr. | Tuscaloosa // 348.4041 | www.dunkindonuts.com Frutta Bowls 752-3293//2531 University Blvd Suite 110 Mon-Sun 7am–9pm | www.fruttabowls.com

California Underground 13552 Highway 43, Northport | 339.8660

Mary's Cakes & Pastries 412 22nd Avenue | behind Opus | Northport // 345.8610 www.maryscakesandpastries.com//Mon–Fri 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. | Sat 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Chuck E. Cheese's Midtown Village, 500, Tuscaloosa St//979-3420 Mon-Thur 11am-9pm Fri-11am-10pm Sat-9am-10pm

Smoothie King (2 locations) 415 15th Street | Tuscaloosa // 349.1721 1403 University Blvd | Tuscaloosa // 462.3664

Firehouse Subs 1130 University Blvd | Tuscaloosa // 248.0680

TCBY (2 Locations) 2304 Mcfarland Blbd | Meadowbrook Shopping Center // 349.4661 2 Mcfarland Blvd | Northport | Essex Shopping Center // 758.6855

Hungry Howie’s (4 locations) 1105 Southview Ln | South Tuscaloosa // 345.6000 1844 McFarland Blvd | Northport // 333.2633 1211 University Blvd | Tuscaloosa | The Strip // 366.1500 4851 Rice Mine Rd | Northriver/Holt // 345.3737 Little Caesars Pizza 1414 10th Ave // 366.2220 | www.littlecaesars.com (Second location) 5980 Old Greensboro Rd, Tuscaloosa// 331-8150

SEPT 20 + OCT 4

Marco’s Pizza 1021 McFarland Blvd, Northport// 330-4555 Mon-Thur 11am–10pm Fri-Sat 11am–11pm Sun 3–10PM | http://www.marcos.com

Lee Palace 6521 Highway 69 S // 391.9990 / Open daily 11 a.m. - 10 p.m.

Pearl Garden 2719 Lurleen Wallace Blvd | Northport // 339.0880

12

Little Italy 1130 University Blvd. // 345.4354

Yogurt In Love Patriot Center 7402 Highway 69 South//764.9173 Monday-Thursday 11 a.m. - 9 p.m., Friday & Saturday 11 a.m.-10 pm. Yogurt Mountain 1800 McFarland Blvd E | Midtown Village // 342.1484 Mon–Thurs 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. | Fri & Sat 11 a.m. - midnight

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>>> PET PLANET

DRYFUS // SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

F

PANSY // CUTE CALICO

P

un, happy, loving: this all describes Dryfus, a 10-month to 1-year-old male schnauzer/lab mix. Dryfus is very unique with his scruffy, black wiry coat with some white markings. He has a body like a lean lab, weighing about 40 pounds, and he should not get much bigger than this.

ansy is a gorgeous young adult female Calico cat. Pansy can be bashful when meeting new people, but she is a gentle, sweet, and affectionate girl. She has the typical reserved, introverted Calico personality, with a strong will to bond to her close companions. Pansy's hobbies include climbing just to see how high she can go, as well as finding comfy places to hide in. Pansy hopes to find a new home with a lot of love. Pansy is negative for FIV and FeLK, is current on vaccinations, and is spayed. If this beautiful girl sounds like the perfect addition for your family, please visit our adoption center during Saturday open hours or contact us to meet Pansy.

Dryfus is such a friendly, social, playful pup. He does get excited and has lots of puppy-like energy. He loves to play with toys and would make a great workout partner. Dryfus seems to play well with other dogs and walks pretty well on a leash. He should be fine with children ages 8 and over, but not younger because he is still a bit jumpy. Dryfus may be too active for an apartment and he will require a fenced-in yard if left unattended at all outside. He will not want to be an outside-only dog - likes to be with his people! We have started on his crate training.

If you are interested in giving DRYFUS or PANSY the forever homes they want and deserve, visit the Humane Society of West Alabama at http://www. humanesocietyofwa.org or call us at (205)-554-0011.

Dryfus is up-to-date on his vet care, is neutered, is heartworm negative, and is microchipped. He is on heartworm and flea/tick prevention. Come meet this cool dog and be ready to smile and have some fun! Please call 205-554-0011 or visit humanesocietyofwa.org to request an appointment to meet our available animals.

The Humane Society of West Alabama is in need of volunteers for both the cat and dog facilities. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer please contact our volunteer coordinator at volunteerhswa@gmail.com or go ahead and download a volunteer application from www.humanesocietyofwa.org/formsinfo.html and send to the same email.

VOLUNTEER

// IN THIS ISSUE >> UP-TO-DATE RESTAURANT LISTINGS ›› HALL & OATS AT THE TUSCALOOSA AMPHITHEATRE ›› BETTY WHO ›› SUGAR SUGAR ›› ONCE UPON A TIME IN VENICE ›› ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Turning point domestic violence and sexual assault services center and the Board of Directors are excited to announce the new Executive Committee at its annual meeting. The annual meeting starts at 6:30pm at the First United Methodist Church and features awards, a chance to meet the new committee members and exciting guest speakers on February 27, 2017. A few words of welcome are planned by local officials including, Chief Tommy Reese of Demopolis, Dr. Mallory of

at the

Shelton, board members and others. In recognition of Turning Point,

TUSCALOOSA AMPHITHEATRE

September 26th

the West Alabama areas domestic violence/sexual assault agency, >>> VISIT US ON THE WEB @ THEPLANETWEEKLY.COM

SEPT 6 + SEPT 20

1

Next Issue // October 4

Advertising Deadline: Friday, September 29 205-523-4668//205-792-7239

theplanetweekly.com 14

SEPT 20 + OCT 4

issuu.com/planetweekly

is inviting all citizens, social groups and other non-profits to join with them in this annual event to thank them for their continued support. Our goal is to create a conglomerate displaying the strength gained by joining together. We are asking individuals and various groups and members to join us and continue a commitment to ensure that all lives are lived free of violence and abuse,? said Amy Gundlach-Foster, Executive Director of Turning Point.

>>> PLANETWEEKLY • TUSCALOOSA'S SOURCE FOR ENTERTAINMENT, MUSIC, SPORTS & THE ARTS


>>> M O V I E R E V I E W S | V A N R O B E R T S

IT // YOU'LL FLOAT TOO

★★

OU T OF 4

T

he best horror movies rely on subtlety to scare the shenanigans out of you. The worst bombard you with CGI galore, and the fiendish monster’s arrival is often heralded by ear-shattering, high-decibel blasts of either music or sound effects. “Mama” director Andy Muschietti’s adaptation of Stephen King’s 1986 bestseller “It” qualifies as half-baked hokum with its mischievous but demonic clown and all the standard-issue shivers that ensue. Muschietti goes for the gullet every time he wants audiences to scream like bloody maniacs in this tiresome, overwrought, 135-minute marathon. Indeed, the movie bristles with heavy-handed homages to 80’s movies, including earlier King adaptations, such as “Stand by Me” and “The Shining,” when it isn’t reminiscent of Richard Donner’s “The Goonies” (1985). The blood, gore, and violence is enough to justify its tame R-rating, but “It” never repels you with offensive sights that would generate nightmares. Interestingly, “Nightmare on Elm Street” (1984) appeared two years before King’s bestseller was published. The “Nightmare” influence on King is obvious, and the ghoulish clown Pennywise behaves like Freddie Kruger with his razor-tipped gloves. Freddie preyed on his victims while they slept and sabotaged their dreams, while Pennywise preys on them while they are fully awake. The problem is that only children can see Pennywise and the horror that he unleashes. Meantime, a collection of youngsters, nicknamed ‘The Losers Club,’ who constitute an ensemble protagonist, is the best thing about “It.” Although they are adolescent, they are not only believable but also charismatic in their aim to destroy Pennywise. Each kid differs from the other so they are a miscellaneous group. Furthermore, the predicaments that they plunge themselves into are exciting until the cretinous clown rears his ugly head. The actors and actress that portray this motley crew deliver credible performances. Indeed, this youthful group hurl themselves heart and soul into tracking down the wicked clown who has been killing children. “It” unfolds during a thunderous storm in October 1988 as an older brother, Bill Denbrough (Jaeden Lieberher of “Aloha”), fashions a boat out of paper and wax paste for his younger sibling Georgie (newcomer Jackson Robert

Scott) to sail in the gutter. Georgie is having the time of his life when his boat flounders in a storm drain. Miraculously, a guy dressed as a clown, Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård of “Atomic Blonde”) catches the boat. Georgie reaches out to retrieve it, but the clown tears off his forearm and then hauls him into the sewer. Georgie’s mysterious vanishing act fuels rumors about a serial killer who slays kids. Bill and his playmates: motor-mouthed Richie Tozier (Finn Wolfhard of Netflix’s “Stranger Things”), germophobic hypochondriac Eddie Kaspbrak (Jack Dylan Grazer of “Tales of Halloween”), Jewish-raised Stanley Iris (Wyatt Oleff of “Guardians of the Galaxy”) befriend a chubby kid, Ben Hanscom (Jeremy Ray Taylor of “Ant-Man”), who has spent his summer investigating a recurring serial killer in Derry, Maine, that strikes every twenty-seven years. Bill, Richie, Eddie, and Stanley meet Ben after he escapes from the clutches of a trio of bullies led by a sadistic, switchblade-wielding Henry Bowers (Nicolas Hamilton of “Captain Fantastic”) who carves the letter H into Ben’s soft, flabby belly. Ben becomes fast friends with Eddie and company, and later they rescue Mike Hanlon (Chosen Jacobs of “Cops and Robbers”) from Henry and his hooligans. Each kid suffers from a ghastly encounter with Pennywise the Clown. The guys accept Beverly Marsh (Sophia Lillis of “A Midsummer Night's Dream”) into their group, and they set out to destroy the horrific Pennywise. Inevitably, Muschietti and scenarists Chase Palmer, Cary Fukunaga, and Gary Dauterman have taken liberties

with King’s thousand page-plus epic novel. For the record, Fukunaga wrote the film “Beast of No Nations” about child soldiers fighting a war in an anonymous African nation, while Dauberman penned the infinitely superior horror prequel “Annabelle Creation.” Whittling the characters down strictly to kids confronting their fears instead of kids as well as adults qualifies as their first editorial decision. The film’s stellar box office success has guaranteed a sequel which had been hinted at from the start. If you stick around for the closing credits, you’ll see that the film’s title has been modified to “It—Chapter One.’’ Comparatively, the flashback-riddled 1990 television miniseries chronicled ‘The Losers Club’ as both adolescents and adults. Muschietti and his writers have cut the adult counterparts of Eddie

and company. Second, they have altered the setting from the 1950s in both the novel and miniseries to the late 1980s. Third, they have swapped around two characters. Instead of Mike Hanlon, Ben has become the group historian who spends his summer in the Derry Library learning about the town’s tragic history. In both the novel and the miniseries, Mike Hanlon handled that task. Moreover, Mike was a grown-up when he delved into Derry’s past. Fifth, King’s novel loosened a monster mash of evil fiends. Not only did Pennywise the Dancing Clown frighten the kids, but also The Mummy, a Werewolf, a “Creature from the Black Lagoon” gill-man, and Frankenstein’s creation got in on the fun. For the sake of simplicity, Muschietti has focused primarily on Pennywise and dropped the other monsters. Furthermore, the kids don’t launch silver slugs from slingshots to vanquish their foe in the film. Instead, Mike packs a bolt gun designed to kill animals at his grandfather’s farm. Those who have read the novel know that after the Losers Club defeated Pennywise, they got themselves hopelessly lost in the sewer. Beverly decided in the best interests of the group to have an orgy so the guys could come to grips with their hysteria and find their way out of the underground network of sewer lines. Clearly, this scene was left out for obvious reasons. Indeed, “It” received an R-rating, but the orgy that Beverly orchestrated in the novel was taboo. Altogether, if you want to scream your lungs out every time that Pennywise makes a startling entrance, “It” is your dish of mindless gobbledygook.

>>> VISIT US ON THE WEB @ THEPLANETWEEKLY.COM

SEPT 20 + OCT 4

15


>>> E V E N T S FRIDAY, SEP 22 The Actor's Charitable Theatre Presents: Disaster! WHEN: 7:30pm -11:59pm COST: $12, 18, 20 WHERE: Bama Theatre PHONE: (205) 758-5195 DESCRIPTION: Disaster The Musical - It’s 1979, and New York's hottest A-listers are lining up for the opening of a floating casino and discotheque. Also attending is a faded disco star, a sexy nightclub singer with her eleven-year-old twins, a disaster expert, a feminist reporter, an older couple with a secret, a pair of young guys who are looking for ladies, an untrustworthy businessman and a nun with a gambling addiction. FRIDAY, SEP 22 Buy For Rise WHEN: 5:00pm – 8:00pm COST: Free WHERE: Rise Center PHONE: (205) 348-7931 DESCRIPTION: The BUY for RISE Charity Sale is a two day sale including new, high end merchandise from local businesses. Merchandise is sold at 75% off the item's lowest price on the first day of the sale. All proceeds directly benefit RISE Center. RISE Center is designed to serve young children with special needs, along with their traditional learner peers, from birth to five years of age. Thanks to the donations of local businesses and community supporters RISE continues to be able to offer services to families who have children with special needs at no cost to the family. FRIDAY, SEP 22 – NOV 3 HAUNTED TUSCALOOSA TOURS WHEN: 7:00pm – 10:00pm COST: Ranges from $15 to $35 WHERE: Drish House DESCRIPTION: Experience Tuscaloosa's haunted locations in a whole new way! Your 1.5-hour journey begins at the historic Drish House, recently ranked the most haunted house in Alabama. The haunted history tour continues to several area locations where you can enjoy hair-raising tales and learn about Tuscaloosa's dark history. Book your adventure today! FRIDAY, SEP 22 – OCT 1 The 39 Steps//THEATRE TUSCALOOSA WHEN: 7:00pm – 11:00pm COST: $14, 17, 19 WHERE: The Bean Brown Theatre DESCRIPTION: Mix a Hitchcock masterpiece with a juicy spy novel, add a dash of Monty Python, and you have The 39 Steps, a fast-paced whodunit! This twotime Tony and Drama Desk Award-winning treat-of-a-mystery is packed with nonstop laughs, over 150 zany characters, an on-stage plane crash, handcuffs, missing fingers, and some good old-fashioned romance! It's fun for ages 11 and up. SATURDAY, SEP 23 AUTHOR MEET & GREET: Martin Wilson WHEN: 10:30am – 1:30pm COST: Free WHERE: Ernest & Hadley Booksellers DESCRIPTION: Come meet YA author and Tuscaloosa native, Martin Wilson, as he introduces his new book: We Now Return to Regular Life. The Face on the Milk Carton meets The Impossible Knife of Memory in this ripped-from-the-headlines novel that explores the power of being an ally--and a friend--when a kidnapped boy returns to his hometown, Tuscaloosa. SATURDAY, SEP 23 AUTHOR MEET & GREET: KATIE LAMAR JACKSON WHEN: 5:30pm – 7:30pm COST: Free WHERE: Ernest & Hadley Booksellers DESCRIPTION: Come meet UA Press author Katie Lamar Jackson as she

16

SEPT 20 + OCT 4

introduces her new book: A Movement of the People, how a grassroots movement led primarily by women shaped Alabama?s environmental consciousness. SUNDAY, SEP 24 Druid City Music Hall presents Band of Horses WHEN: 7:00pm – 12:00pm COST: $32.50 WHERE: Druid City Music Hall DESCRIPTION: Band of Horses is an American rock band formed in 2004 in Seattle by Ben Bridwell. The band has released five studio albums, the most successful of which is 2010's Grammynominated Infinite Arms. Band of Horses' latest studio album, Why Are You OK, was released in June 2016. MONDAY, SEP 25 THE MAJESTY OF BEETHOVEN presented by Tuscaloosa Symphony Orchestra WHEN:7:00pm – 11:00pm COST: ?? WHERE: Mooday Concert Hall DESCRIPTION: This all orchestral program features the Tuscaloosa Symphony Orchestra musicians in two great works by Beethoven, one of the pillars of our art form and one of the most widely known classical composers. Symphony No. 4 will charm you with its wit, grace, and evergreen freshness. Symphony No. 7 is a force of nature with its irrepressible sweep, pure joy, and power. This program will take you to the summit of the art form of classical music. BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 4 BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 7 Cheers 'n Chat will begin at 6:00 p.m. in the Choral Opera Room. TUESDAY, SEP 26 Tuscaloosa Amphitheater to host Hall & Oates and St. Paul & the Broken Bones WHEN: 7:00pm- 11:30pm COST: $49 - $115 WHERE: Tuscaloosa Amphitheater DESCRIPTION: Red Mountain Entertainment is pleased to announce DARYL HALL & JOHN OATES with special guest ST. PAUL & THE BROKEN BONES coming to Tuscaloosa Amphitheater on September 26th! Tickets go on sale, June 23rd at 10am through Ticketmaster or at the Tuscaloosa Amphitheater box office. THURSDAY, SEP 21 – NOV 16 Homegrown Alabama Farmer's Market WHEN: 3.00pm – 6:00pm COST: Free WHERE: Canterbury Episcopal Church DESCRIPTION: Homegrown Alabama is The University of Alabama's student-run farmer's market. It is held on the lawn of Canterbury Espiscopal Chapel from 3-6 every Thursday, April through November. Vendors from all over the state come every week to sell their goods, which include loads of produce, jams, honey, eggs, meats, and home-baked treats. The market also features live music from local musicians. FRIDAY, OCT 6 – OCT 8 Tuscaloosa Children's Theatre Presents Aladdin, Jr. WHEN: 7:00pm – 3.00pm COST: $10 - $20 WHERE: The Bama Theatre DESCRIPTION: Based on the iconic animated film, with an Academy Awardwinning score, Disney’s Aladdin Jr. is sure to send audiences soaring on a flying carpet ride filled with romance and adventure. When the street urchin, Aladdin, vies for the attention of the beautiful princess, Jasmine, he uses a genie's magic power to become a prince in order to marry her. Iago, Jafar, the Genie and more are here in Disney’s Aladdin JR., a musical adventure filled with magic, mayhem and the power of love.

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SEPT 20 + OCT 4

17


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>>> MEET & GREET | E R N E S T & H A D L E Y B O O K S E L L E R S AUTHOR MEET & GREET: JOHN SLEDGE ·

Monday, September 18, 2017

·

5:30 - 7:30pm

·

Ernest & Hadley Booksellers

AUTHOR MEET & GREET: CHRIS MCLLWAIN ·

Monday, October 9, 2017

·

5:30 - 7:30pm

Come meet UA Press author John Sledge as he introduces his new book: These Rugged Days, an accessibly written and dramatic account of Alabama’s role in the Civil War.

· Ernest & Hadley Booksellers Come meet UA Press author Christopher Mcllwain as he introduces his new book: 1865 Alabama, a detailed history of a vitally important year in Alabama history.

AUTHOR MEET & GREET: MARTIN WILSON

AUTHOR MEET & GREET: ERICHA NIX

·

Saturday, September 23, 2017

·

Monday, October 16, 2017

·

10:30am - 1:30pm

·

5:30 - 7:30pm

·

Ernest & Hadley Booksellers

·

Ernest & Hadley Booksellers

Come meet YA author and Tuscaloosa native, Martin Wilson, as he introduces his new book: We Now Return to Regular Life. The Face on the Milk Carton meets The Impossible Knife of Memory in this ripped-from-the-headlines novel that explores the power of being an ally-and a friend--when a kidnapped boy returns to his hometown, Tuscaloosa. AUTHOR MEET & GREET: KATIE LAMAR JACKSON

Come meet UA Press author Ericha Nix as she introduces her new book: Alabama Wildlife, Volume 5 which collects the most recent findings of virtually all experts in the field as of 2012, when the Third Alabama Nongame Wildlife Conference was convened at Auburn University. AUTHOR MEET & GREET: MARTIN OLLIFF ·

Monday, October 23, 2017

·

Monday, September 25, 2017

·

5:30 - 7:30pm

·

5:30 - 7:30pm

·

Ernest & Hadley Booksellers

·

Ernest & Hadley Booksellers

Come meet UA Press author Martin Olliff as he introduces his new book: Getting Out of the Mud in which he recounts the history of the Good Roads Movement that arose in progressive-era Alabama, how it used the power of the state to achieve its objectives of improving market roads for farmers and highways for automobilists, and how state and federal highway administrations replaced the Good Roads Movement.

Come meet UA Press author Katie Lamar Jackson as she introduces her new book: A Movement of the People, how a grassroots movement led primarily by women shaped Alabama’s environmental consciousness.

>>> R OA D T R I P D I R E C T O RY Travel the South's best venues. Visit their website for ticket info and more. Acoustic Café 2758 County Hwy 9 205.647.3237

Fox Theatre 660 Peachtree St NE 404.881.2100

Montgomery Performing Arts Center 201 Tallapoosa St 334.481.5100

Von Braun Center 700 Monroe St SW 256.551.2345

Amphitheater at the Wharf 23101 Canal Rd 251.224.1020

The Hangout 251.948.3030 thehangout1.com

The Nick 2514 10th Ave S 205.252.3831

WorkPlay 500 23rd St S 205.380.4082

Bridgestone Arena 501 Broadway 615.770.2000

Marathon Music Works 1402 Clinton St 615.891.1781

Sloss Furnaces 20 32nd St N 205.324.1911

Zydeco 2001 15th Ave S 205.933.1032

Centennial Olympic Park 265 Park Ave W NW 404.223.4412

Minglewood Hall 1555 Madison Ave 901.312.6058

Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre 2200 Encore Pkwy 404.733.5010 >>> VISIT US ON THE WEB @ THEPLANETWEEKLY.COM

SEPT 20 + OCT 4

19


>>> PUZZLEMANIA | C R O S S W O R D P U Z Z L E

Across 1. Tanning oil figs. 5. "The Angel of Darkness" author Carr 10. Cross-country camper, for short 14. Rochester's beloved 15. Pleasant scent 16. White House worker 17. It's better when it's smooth 19. Sent a dupe email to 20. Erich Weiss on stage 21. African charger 22. Science lab glassware 26. Supplement 30. "That's too bad..." 34. "___ Love Me?" ("Dirty Dancing" tune) 35. Pollute 36. No vote 37. Poor quality imitation 39. San ___, Calif. 42. Devout, in Italian 43. Marked, as a pirate map 47. Foot the bill 48. 1970 Led Zeppelin song 51. Keep one's ___ the ground 52. Raymond Burr TV series 54. Roo's mom in "Winnie-the-Pooh" 57. Pivot 62. Chilly, in Cadiz 63. Trailer 66. Prof.'s employer 67. Cantilevered window 68. Third afterthought in a letter, shortly 69. Fair to middling 70. Worthless material 71. Give some lip

SOLUTION FOR PUZZLEMANIA CROSSWORD ON PAGE 21

20

SEPT 20 + OCT 4

Down 1. Brother of Abel 2. Prefix with mania or technics 3. Herr's other half 4. Post 5. "Deathtrap" star Michael 6. Recording ___ 7. French law 8. Punk music genre 9. "___the bomb" 10. Jennifer's "Friends" role 11. Part of a Latin trio 12. Apple of temptation site 13. Decorate anew 18. Not participate 21. President after U.S.G. 23. "Little ____ Late" (Pat Benatar tune) 24. New Zealand bird 25. Far from fetching 26. Highly proficient 27. Ill-fated liner Andrea ___ 28. Physicist Freeman 29. ____ tee (just right) 31. Below the surface 32. Stone weight 33. Site of a noted environmental treaty 38. Round number 40. "Remington ___" (Pierce Brosnan series) 41. A Gershwin 44. Vote, perhaps 45. Navy rank (abbr.) 46. Idolizes 49. "American ___" (Gere film) 50. Pitching stat 53. Takes the edge off 54. Colonel Sanders' fast-food restaurants 55. Buck ending 56. Zips 58. Golden State highway cops 59. ____ vieja 60. Lineup card recipients 61. Soldiers' meal 63. The ____ Squad" 64. Hockey legend Bobby 65. Premed topic

>>> PUZZLEMANIA| S U D O K U

It's easy to play Sudoku! Simply fill every column, row and 3x3 box so they contain every number between 1 and 9. The game is easy to play but difficult to master! Solution Page 21

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>>> HOROSCOPES | W E E K L Y O V E R V I E W There’s a lively emphasis on having fun and getting out and about, which can be very good for you. And with Venus, your personal planet, moving into this same zone on Tuesday, romance may be in the cards. This could be the time to rekindle the spark of love with that special person. Enjoying hobbies and creative activities can also leave you feeling upbeat and restored. On Friday, the sun moves into Libra and your lifestyle sector, which could encourage you to get organized. This week, you may feel moved to beautify your place and find ways to brighten it up in general. And with ideas from magazines or your own imagination, you can have a lot of fun with DIY and craft projects. In fact, the new moon in this same zone on Tuesday could coincide with a decision to make a fresh start, perhaps by introducing a pet or moving to a new home. As of Friday, leisure and pleasure options are firmly on the agenda. This can be an excellent week for networking and connecting with like-minded others. If you’re eager to promote a project, a marketing plan can help. If you want to make new connections on social media, getting up to speed here can be very positive. But as the glowing sun moves into Libra and your home and family sector on Friday, it might be time to step back a little and enjoy some extra nurturing and pampering if possible. This week brings an opportunity for a new beginning. You might be ready to start a savings plan, pay off a debt, or perhaps commit to earning more. This lunar phase can set you on track if you make a firm intention on or after September 19. On Friday, there’s a shift as the cheery sun moves into your sector of communication for a four-week stay. This can be an opportunity to connect with likeminded people and expand your networking options. The coming weeks can be an opportunity to relax and treat yourself to some healthful pampering sessions that can help you feel restored. However, with a complex blend of energies also showing up this week, you might need to be firm with someone who drains your vitality. Setting firm boundaries could be essential to keeping things in check. Finally, the sun’s move into your financial sector on Friday could see you taking stock of your resources. You might be more connected to your thoughts, feelings, and intuition over the weeks ahead. And with delightful Venus, your guide planet, in this secluded sector, you might feel like keeping to yourself. Time out for reflection can be good for you now, as it might enable you to gain clarity regarding an issue that has confused you for some time. Once the sun enters your sign on Friday, you might be ready to bring some of your dreams and visions to life. With lovely Venus active in your social sector, there may be some romantic possibilities in the cards. You might enjoy all kinds of social events, club meetings, or community activities, and this can be the perfect time to connect with others and make new friends. At the same time, someone may not be as perfect as they seem to be. You could become great friends, but it would help to be realistic about their positive traits as well as flaws.

There’s a focus on your sector of goals and ambitions this week. A new moon in this zone early on indicates an opportunity could represent a fresh start for you. You could impress all the right people with a proactive stance, charm, and willingness to go the extra mile for others. But make room for social events, as your social life could have extra sparkle over the coming weeks. The chance to get to know someone better could lead to a supportive new friendship. Being willing to move outside your comfort zone can allow you to sample some wonderful opportunities, but it’s easier said than done. With feisty Mars in your sector of travel and exploration, you’ll have the courage if you can be willing to take the first step. On another note, if you decide to take advantage of someone’s suggestion, make sure it’s reliable. Misinformation could be a problem over the coming days. As of Friday, your ambitious side can come to the fore. The potential for inner transformation is strong now. You may feel called to explore issues that have been holding you back. This is all good, as by gently unpicking and working with intense feelings, things can begin to ease and you’ll be able to release this matter. From Friday, you might also seek lighter and brighter options in the form of a short break or a trip to a place you find inspiring. Enjoying a new experience would also appeal to you.

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With a powerful emphasis on your relationships zone, you may find yourself thrown together with others in a way that allows for new insights and possibilities. Collaborating with key people or teaming up to complete a project can work very well, and it’s certainly better than trying to accomplish something alone. There is also a deeper focus showing up as the sun moves into a more intense sector of your chart, encouraging you to acknowledge and embrace issues that are ready to be healed. The focus on your sector of lifestyle and wellness is particularly strong this week, and this could lead to a chance to explore new ways to enable you to feel fit and fabulous. However, if you’re searching for information to help you in this regard, be sure that it comes from reliable sources. Determined though you may be to go it alone, you might find that the help of an expert or personal trainer enables you to get off to a positive start.

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SEPT 20 + OCT 4

21


>>> C O M M U N I T Y A R T S | KEVIN LEDGEWOOD

UA THEATRE & DANCE QUESTIONS EVERYTHING WITH THE CAUCASIAN CHALK CIRCLE UA

Theatre & Dance prepares the Marian Gallaway Theatre to hold the classic Epic play, The Caucasian Chalk Circle by Bertolt Brecht. A deliberate and highly stylized play, The Caucasian Chalk Circle runs October 3-7 at 7:30PM & October 8 at 2:00PM. Two women fight for ownership of a child in the play’s richly plotted structure: a play within a play. Written in 1944 after Brecht fled Germany for the United States, the play was first performed at Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota. “Maybe it’s because of that” said Director Annie Levy, “That it feels right to continue to explore this text in an academic environment.”

Brecht makes it easy to explore his complex themes through the style he created: Epic Theatre. According to Levy, “One of the tenets of Epic Theatre is that we examine the action presented on the stage critically. If we listen to the words that the character of the Singer sings, we go into each episode of the play knowing what the outcome will be. This allows us the opportunity to examine how the characters’ actions get them to that ending.” “This play (and this production) doesn’t want to exist in the styles of realism or naturalism that the audience might be used to.” Levy

adds, referring to the normal style of presenting a play as a slice of real life. “My hope is that the audience will embrace the play for what it is: A highly theatrical exploration of the question of ownership (in all of it’s manifestations). We don’t think about who owns what and why anymore in our society. What if we started to again?” “A key piece of text in the play is when the character of Azdak says: ‘... and there is nothing more seductive than a question.’ Brecht is a political writer and he uses myth and allegory to get his politics across.” Levy said, referring to the rascal judge presiding over the main conflict. “However, no matter where each individual audience members’ politics lie, this play reflects a desire to live in a world where we are constantly asking questions: Why are things the way they are? Is this the best way for a society to be? What matters most to me? We seem to be living in a world right now where those questions are being asked since we no longer seem satisfied with the answers.” Tickets are $20 for adults, $17 for faculty/staff/seniors, and $14 for students. They are available in Rowand-Johnson Hall at the ticket office in the front lobby, by phone at (205) 348-3400 or online at ua.tix. com. For a full performance and event calendar, more information, and to sign up for a free newsletter, visit http://theatre.ua.edu.

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>>> H I G H T I D E S P O R T S | GARY HARRIS

COACH SABAN'S MONDAY PRESS CONFERENCE

O

pening statement: Overall, I'm pleased with the progress that we've made as a team through the first three games. I think that sometimes you lose sight of the fact that we're 3-0. We have improved in a lot of areas of our team and we will continue to focus on the technical aspects of what we need to do to improve in some other areas, get some mistakes and mental errors corrected, and continue to try to develop players so that they have a better opportunity of being successful in whatever we have to defend or whatever we have to attack on offense or whatever we have to play against on special teams. We had some players that played really well in this game. Jalen (Hurts), Damien Harris, Bradley Bozeman, Bo Scarbrough on offense. Keith Holcomb, Levi Wallace, Da'Ron Payne on defense. Special teams, J.K. (Scott), Mack Wilson, Andy (Pappanastos) all did a good job. From an injury standpoint, I don't know what the status of these guys will be. We'll see how they progress throughout the week. Rashaan Evans and Anfernee Jennings and Dylan Moses all return to practice today. Miller Forristall (ACL) is out. What we thought was the case after the game is the case and he will need surgery. We certainly look forward to the SEC. This is our opener on the road against a very good Vanderbilt team, who, as you all know, just beat (Kansas) State, who is a ranked team. They are 3-0. They have a lot of starters back, nine on offense, seven on defense. Their defense leads the nation in scoring defense. Kyle Shurmur is the leading passing efficiency quarterback in our league. They do a great job in terms of their coaching in how they attack people, how they play offense and defense. Very sound. Very well coached in all areas. Very balanced in terms of runpass. They have three receivers that all pretty much share in how the ball is spread around. This is a very good overall team and probably a team that deserves to be in the top 25. On Vanderbilt's DL lining up in odd fronts: I think most of the stuff they do that is exotic is on loose play downs. I think what they're trying to do is create issues in the offensive line. All offensive linemen want to know is, who are the four down and the Mike. That's who we have to block. So when they're doing these kinds of things it makes it much more difficult to ID the front and know who to block. So it's creating confusion to some degree, but also they do a good job from the schematic standpoint of being able to attack you out of those things and get pressure. They've got some really good players to do it. On the defensive players' having a "players only" meeting today: I think it's really up to the players, but I also think that every player has to look at what they have to do to try to improve and get better. I think that everybody can contribute in a more positive way by just a little bit better execution. The effort was good in the game. The toughness was good in the game. And really for three quarters of the game, we played pretty well against a pretty good offensive team. We just didn't finish the game like we needed to. I don't think anybody needs to be panicking. I think the leadership on the team is making an attempt to affect other

players maybe to prepare a little bit better, eliminate some of the mental errors, play together as a unit, communicate a little better. These are all things that the coaches will certainly emphasize to the players to help them play little better. It's our responsibility to get that across. But we don't want these things to be like feel-good meetings, where everybody feels good when they leave, but they were concerned when they started. It could be good or bad, depending on the way it's handled. On third down defense: We didn't do very well on third down. We didn't get off the field on third down. We actually had three penalties that gave them first downs on third down in really critical situations in critical drives in the fourth quarter. So we need to do a better job in those areas. I think we are very capable of doing that and we will continue to work on that. On whether Vanderbilt looks like a mature team on tape: Oh yeah. No question. They do a great job of executing on both sides of the ball. And I think the results that they've put in so far this season certainly bear that out. The quarterback is a really good player. He's very efficient in what he does in their offense, run and pass. They make some explosive plays. They run the ball effectively. They're physical. Same way on defense. There's no question about the buy-in to the program and the job that he's (head coach Derek Mason) done there. On the impact Rashaan Evans, Anfernee Jennings and Dylan Moses could have on the defense: That remains to be seen. First of all, we don't know how healthy those guys are going to be and how fast they will get up to speed. We won't know that till later in the week in terms of how we see their rehab is going. (We will) try to make a decision on how we can use them in the game and how effective they can be. On how effective the corner blitzes have been: We got pressure a couple of times last week. The ball came out quick on screens and so forth and we missed some tackles. So we need to clean some of those things up, but all in all we have not gotten the kind of pressure on the quarterback and affected the quarterback the way we wanted to, regardless of who is blitzing. We've seen a whole lot of screens to try to slow us down. I think we'll just have to play those plays and continue to be aggressive and try to affect the quarterback. I think that's really, really important when you play against a good passing quarterback, which is certainly going to be the case this week.

On whether Saban is comfortable with the secondary, or could there be some shuffling: I'm pleased with where are right now. Hootie's played really well. Ronnie (Harrison) has played well. The two corners have been ok so far. We're comfortable with (Minkah Fitzpatick) where he's played. This team (Vanderbilt) will be in a lot more regular this week. Probably about eighty percent of the time in regular downs, which we haven't played against much. So (Minkah) will be back to safety for the most part in that part of the game. On the ball security and decision making of Jalen Hurts: He's done a good job so far. I think his production has improved in every game. His efficiency has improved every game. He would be the first to tell you that there's things he could work on, like every player on our team. We're certainly going to help him try to do that so he can continue to develop and progress and be even more efficient in what he does. We harp on ball security. The first thing we do in practice every day is ball security drills. We include him in those drills. And he has done a much better job of taking care of the football. And we have done a really good job of that on offense as a whole. On the progress of Andy Pappanastos on field goals: I think he's done a nice job. We (J.K. Scott) missed a long one. J.K. hit it well. I was hopeful that we would get an opportunity so that J.K. would get a chance to kick. I'm pleased with it so far. He's (Pappanastos) done a good job. He's done an especially good job in the area inside the 42-yardline, 42-yard field goals, which is kind of what our expectation is for him. I think he's done a really good job so far. On Vandy RB Ralph Webb: He's a good player. They do a good job of running the ball. They're physical on the offensive line. He's a really good downhill runner. He's physical. These guys play hard. He runs with a lot of toughness and tenacity. I think he's really good player. On Vandy's defense: I haven't watched their defense a whole lot, just in one game. But they've done an outstanding job. To give up 95 yards a game passing is pretty good, regardless of what the competition is. They've played extremely well. They've done a good job of affecting the quarterback as well.

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