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spring | summer . 2010 magalog


CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

intro:

welcomE

Spring/Summer 2010. If actions speak louder than words, then Planet Earth has been screaming since we printed our name on that first skate deck back in 1990. Our nearly 20 year history in action sports comes with a deep respect for the welfare of our planet and the environments that support our passions. These personal values have shaped us into the progressive, one-of-a-kind apparel company that we are today. While there is still a long climb ahead toward true sustainability for us all, we continue to do our part with a promise; to shed old habits and adopt new ones, always striving to improve the eco-sensitivity of our products and processes with each new season. Our 2010 Spring/Summer product line is rendered with a fresh style that reflects the tones & textures of our natural and urban environments. Constructed of organic and recycled materials that you can feel as good about buying, as you do wearing. Easy on the eyes, easy on the body, easy on the planet. ‘At 53 North Latitude, Ireland is actually pretty temperate compared to 33 degree winter water temps in PERSPECTIVES New Jersey, so we don’t mind the cold, plus there are reefs and very good waves everywhere. We’ve done surf trips to the tropics our whole lives. In Ireland though, there are only a handful of surfers, and they’re unbelievably cool. Plus, you’ve got 13th Century castles right by the ocean, rolling green hills, and world renowned beer. The fact there are waves becomes a bonus, you’re on a great trip either way.’’ - Nick LaVecchia, Photographer

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Planet Earth. 2010.

want more? check out our book of all Perspectives photos Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

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CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

info:

PERSPECTIVES / spring | summer . 2010

PERSPECTIVES

Perspectives is a series of inspiring real-life stories told by athletes, artists, musicians, & visionaries that share our passion. Whether it’s a photo that goes beyond the trick to reveal the entire landscape in an epic moment in time or a craftsman’s story of building unique art that changes the way we view our priorities, Planet Earth Perspectives is less about the close ups and more about how everyday life goes down. Most of us don’t view life through a fish-eye lens. So zoom out a bit and broaden your perspective. Whenever you see the Perspectives logo, look for the deeper story, interview or video that follows. What circumstances lead Nick LaVecchia to shoot this kid bombing the hill on the right? Read up and find out... VIEW LOTS MORE PERSPECTIVES VIDEOS, INTERVIEWS & PHOTOS ONLINE... Planet-Earth-Clothing.com/Perspectives

“This kid was skating the San Clemente park for a while, then I noticed him hiking the hill behind it. I grabbed my camera to see if I could capture something of him. He hiked all the way to the top and out of view, then 3 minutes later I see him bombing down it, speed ollie over the first little hump, then PERSPECTIVES into the second with a lot of speed. He laid into this slide to check his speed, then pointed it to the bottom, across some dirt and wiped out in the park for the grand finale. Good times.’’ - Nick LaVecchia, Photographer 004

want more? check out our book of all Perspectives photos Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

there’s more vids, photos, and interviews on-line Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

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CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

info:

FRIENDLY INFO / spring | summer . 2010

ORGANIC:COTTON

info:

RECYCLED:P.E.T.

Just because it grows naturally on a plant doesn’t mean it’s grown naturally.

Over 60 billion plastic beverage bottles sold per year, and that’s just in the US.

Cotton, the most valuable non-food agricultural product, has also been referred to as the world’s ‘‘dirtiest’’ crop. $2 billion USD worth of chemicals are sprayed on the world’s cotton crop every year, half of which is considered toxic enough to be classified as hazardous by the World Health Organization. These chemicals pollute the soil, air, and animals as well as the farmers and their families of which 99% are located in developing countries with no bans or restrictions on pesticide use.

One of the most popular types of plastic packaging is made from a plastic called Polyethylene Terephthalate, or ‘‘PET’’ for short. It’s the stuff plastic drink bottles & food jars among other things are made of. There are 9 million tons of PET bottles produced globally each year and growing, yet only 30% are being recycled, leaving 7 million tons to be dumped back into our environment.

With only 0.15% of the world’s cotton today guaranteed to be pesticide free, it’s up to companies and consumers to demand organic cotton. There are farmers who have been growing cotton without harmful chemicals for years with high yields and equal or better quality. Their techniques support healthy ecosystems and often use less water. However, growing organically requires more time, knowledge and skill, thus adding to the cost of the product.

The best way to ultimately drive an increase in recycling and post consumer use is to increase the number of ways to use it. At the top of the list today is clothing and carpet, accounting for 54% of post recycled PET use. So the next time you drop that bottle in the recycling bin, you can feel good about supplying a factory with the materials needed to produce your next pair of board shorts . . . or carpet.

In our opinion it’s worth it.

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learn more about the renewable materials in our products Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

learn more about the recycled materials in our products Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

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CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

MENS / spring | summer . 2010

ROBINSON. shirt

100% Organic Cotton, Slim Fit COLORS: natural white SIZES: s - xl

natural white

asphalt

khaki

WILLIAMS. jacket

100% Organic Cotton Ripstop, 3/4 Length Safari Styling, Chest and Hand Pockets COLORS: asphalt SIZES: s - xl

denimish blue

REYNOLDS.short 100% organic cotton

COLORS: khaki, denimish blue SIZES: s - xl

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find a dealer near you Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

009


CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

NEWMAN.tee

100% Organic Cotton COLORS: natural white, taupe SIZES: s - xxl natural white

taupe

NEWMAN.tee

COLOR: natural white

asphalt

pg. 010

GRIFFIN. short COLOR: khaki

pg. 010

khaki

GRIFFIN.short

100% Organic Cotton

COLORS: asphalt, khaki SIZES: s - xl

010

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PERSPECTIVES prsp:

MARGINAL WAY

It’s a community of people that have a stake in the park, for the city, and for the skaters of Seattle. We raise the money, we build it, we maintain it, we do everything. It’s a public skatepark, built by the public. When we get a truck of concrete, everyone is ready to build. An interview with Marginal Way Skatepark founders Dan Barnet, Shawn Bishop & Tim Demmon... What drove you to create a skatepark on town property? Knowing that it had happened before in Portland, San Diego and places like that. Those guys looked at the lack of skateable terrain, went out, found derelict property, and built it themselves. The real impetus here was the city was tearing out existing skateparks in Seattle with no plans of replacing them.

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didn’t really know if we were going to get away with it. A few days later we were skating it. Did you have a plan to build a legit skatepark? I don’t know if we set out to build a giant skate park or not, but we knew it was a possibility. We were just going to take it from there. At that time we just had a small quarter against the overpass wall but we sessioned it for a few months before we built another ramp. How did you know how to build a concrete park? We all saw enough parks built to have an idea of how things went together but one guy Greg was in the concrete union that skated who we couldn’t have started without. He never built a park but at least he knew how concrete worked. So between his knowledge and what we’d seen we were able to figure it out.

Why did you build it where you did? We spent a good month trying to find a good location. The spot we found on Marginal Way was city property under an overpass, used as an overflow parking lot by businesses in the area. The reality is though; it wasn’t the kind of place anyone wanted in the area. There were people living in their cars dealing drugs, prostitution… anything we did we figured would be far more positive than anything going on there originally. Despite the fact that what we were doing was illegal, it was illegal in a much more positive way than everything that was already going on down there.

What was the city’s reaction? Soon after we built the second ramp, the city started poking their nose around and letting us know that they knew what we were up to and if someone didn’t get in touch with them to take responsibility, they were going to tear it all out. At that point, we started with a two prong approach. On one side, we opened communications with the city. On the other side, we created an all out media blitz to get the public on our side. It just seemed like thing to do. We had to go from completely under the radar to on the radar and play the sympathy card… “the city won’t give us anywhere to skate and is going to tear down our only spot.” In my experience, a little shame goes a long way, so we shamed the city to let us keep going.

What was the first day of construction like? Once we identified the spot we thought, are we going to do this or not? Then we said, we’re going to do this next Sunday! If anyone is going to join us, be there. Tim and I got some materials together, cut some plywood forms ahead of time and showed up. We didn’t know if we were going to get arrested or what, but we got away with it, so it was cool. Throughout that first day 20 some odd people came in and out. Some showed up and gave us $20 and left. Others just dropped off a bag of concrete. Most people wanted to be there, but

How did the media help you? There was an article in The Stranger (a local Seattle weekly newspaper), and people started rooting us on. There was a really sympathetic article on TV one night so even the way the media was portraying the story was slanted against the city. One of the things we did during media blitz is register Marginal Way Skatepark as www.skatepark.org. Even though it definitely wasn’t a skatepark, it showed we wanted to make it one, and made people think of it more legitimately. Once we called it a skatepark, it sounded grander than it was.

watch Marginal Way Perspective videos Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

photo: Josh Malczyk Putting the finishing touches on a truck load of concrete donated by Planet Earth to complete the shallow bowl. Did you officially get permission to build on city property? Initially their concern was liability but I educated them on the fact that in the state of Washington there was a recreational sports law that says “any public or private entity is not responsible for injuries as a result of recreational activities such

as skateboarding etc. on their property.” Seattle has a long history of skateboard advocacy so we worked with those people that were already in with the city and once they realized they were talking with responsible tax paying adults, they were much more open to listen. So we did eventually get a letter of permission from the city to build the park on their

watch Marginal Way Perspective videos Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

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“You never know what will go down under the bridge on any given day. One of the things I like about shooting PERSPECTIVES at Marginal Way is that you can approximate when it was taken by what’s under construction in the photo. This gap was around for a few months and as far as I know Max was the only one to get a legit backside air over it. Before the channel was poured, with the re-bar all tied, and after a bit of a battle he put it down and closed another chapter of the park. A few days later the channel was concrete and narrower so it can’t be done like this again.’’ - Dan Barnett, Photographer

property. One of the things we asked them for is mitigating the prostitution and homeless problem. So they gave us a row of jersey barriers to keep people from parking there. The jersey barriers were a skateable feature and later became a foundation to build bigger walls on top of and are still under there. Who’s responsible for building and managing the park today? One of the rad things about Marginal Way is we take credit for getting the ball rolling, but it has since built it’s own community that continues to pick up speed, now with it’s own life force that’s bigger than just us or any one person involved. It’s a community of people built up around the park, that have a stake in the park for the city, the skaters of Seattle and those that want to work to make it 014

bigger and better. We raise the money, we build it, we maintain it, we do everything. It’s a public skatepark, built by the public. How much time & money does it take? It’s not like a public park where an engineer draws it all out and then you build it all at once and it’s done. The fact that each part of each section is built separately at a different point of time, often by different people is what makes skating it so unique. Each section has a different look and feel so the park as a whole is constantly evolving. We’ve been at it for over five years now and spent close to $30,000 to create the 10,000 square feet we’ve got so far. We build it as we can afford to, one concrete truck load at a time. We raise the money by holding events, barbeques, concerts, selling tee shirts, and receiving all size donations online and from companies. It all

watch Marginal Way Perspective videos Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

adds up. One section was paid for by a member of Pearl Jam that skates, another by Redbull when they needed a large flat area to hold a comp and more recently we just finished the shallow bowl thanks to a concrete truck load of cement donated by you guys at Planet Earth Clothing. What’s Marginal Way’s future? Right now we’re still trying to expand into more areas of the parking lot. It’s like an art project. It will probably never be complete. We can always change or redo something or repair a section that can be improved. It’s not like a city skatepark where it’s done. This is going to be forever evolving.

business or government financial backing. You don’t have to wait for the government to give you a hand out. Anybody can do this. All you have to do is start building and see what happens. Sometimes you’re going to get away with it and if you do get away with it, and build one thing at a time, you’ll have a skatepark. MAKE A DONATION TO HELP BUILD THE PARK! MarginalWaySkatepark.org SIGNUP ONLINE TO WIN A TRIP TO SKATE MARGINAL WAY SKATEPARK… Planet-Earth-Clothing.com/Perspectives

What would like to tell other skaters? It’s great in this day and age to create something to the scale of Marginal Way without any city or watch Marginal Way Perspective videos Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

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MENS / spring | summer . 2010

CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

white

black

CHAVEZ.tee

100% organic cotton COLORS: white, black SIZES: s - xxl

dark chive/awesome green

FREEMAN. boardshort

100% Recycled Polyester PET, Dual Cargo Pockets COLORS: dark chive/awesome green, cave black/asphalt, mossy oak/celery, sky blue/aqua SIZES: 28,29,30,31,32,33,34,36,38

rasta

cave black/ asphalt

sky blue/aqua

mossy oak/celery

HANSEN.tee

100% organic cotton COLORS: rasta SIZES: s - xxl

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find a dealer near you Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

017


CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

MENS / spring | summer . 2010

black

FLEMMING.tee

100% Organic Cotton COLORS: black, fern SIZES: s - xxl

fern

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cave black

MARSHALL. boardshort

100% Recycled Polyester PET, Dual Cargo Pockets COLORS: cave black, dark chive, mossy oak, sky blue SIZES: 28,29,30,31,32,33,34,36,38

dark chive

mossy oak

sky blue

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019


‘‘It was February 12th and we were having a full-on blizzard along the New England coast. The air was a brisk 25˙ with winds ripping out of the NE and water temps hovering around 35˙, my favorite. I walked PERSPECTIVES down to the beach to find long-time York, Maine local Chris Wilson shoveling out his dad’s driveway in his wetsuit . . . Only in Maine. Maybe he was trying to work up some body heat? Chris paddled out and surfed alone for two hours, catching as many waves as he could before his body shut down. I only lasted about 20 minutes shooting from the road before my camera battery was drained. By the time I left, Chris’ footprints were no where to be found.’’ -- Photographer, Nick LaVecchia 020

want more? check out our book of all Perspectives photos Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

there’s more vids, photos, and interviews on-line Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

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CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

MENS / spring | summer . 2010

BENNETT. tee

100% Organic Cotton COLORS: faded khaki, neutral grey SIZES: s - xxl faded khaki

neutral grey

mossy oak / bleached aqua / black

khaki/green

PATTERSON. shirt

100% Organic Cotton, Slim Fit, Dual Pockets COLORS: khaki/green, blue/khaki SIZES: s - xl

blue/khaki

CRAWFORD. boardshort

100% Recycled Polyester PET, Single Cargo Pocket COLORS: mossy oak/bleached aqua/black, faded green/mossy oak/awesome green SIZES: 28,29,30,31,32,33,34,36,38 022

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faded green / mossy oak / awesome green

find a dealer near you Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

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CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

CALLAHAN. tee COLOR: black

pg. 024 black

CALLAHAN.tee

100% Organic Cotton COLORS: black, white SIZES: s - xxl

white

024

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MARSHALL. boarshort

COLOR: cave black

pg. 019


CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

MENS / spring | summer . 2010

pale green

faded khaki

HARRISON.tee

026

HAMILTON. shirt

100% Organic Cotton COLORS: faded khaki, black SIZES: s - xxl

100% Organic Cotton, Regular Fit, Single Pocket COLORS: pale green, pale blue SIZES: s - xl

black

pale blue

find a dealer near you Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

find a dealer near you Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

027


CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

MENS / spring | summer . 2010

army black

JOHNSTON. hat

100% organic cotton twill COLORS: army, black SIZES: one size fits most

stone

PARKER.shirt

100% Organic Cotton, Slim Fit, Dual Pockets COLORS: stone, mid blue, natural white SIZES: s - xl

mid blue

faded khaki

natural white olive

FULLER.tee

100% organic cotton COLORS: faded khaki, olive SIZES: s - xxl

028

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find a dealer near you Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

029


CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

PERSPECTIVES / spring | summer . 2010

‘‘There are these pieces of an old runway for some reason piled up at the BMX park so we poured a little concrete to form a transition on one piece. It was just a different feature to skate in our small town of Bozeman, MT. It’s somewhat gnarly with all the re-bar and jagged concrete edges PERSPECTIVES but a fun challenge. We laid down a bunch of old wood for the run in and started the session. My buddy Rob Murdock put up a smooth frontside rock on this one.’’ - Jeff Hawe, Photographer 030

want more? check out our book of all Perspectives photos Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

there’s more vids, photos, and interviews on-line Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

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CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

MENS / spring | summer . 2010

black blue dobby stripe

ANDERSON.shirt

100% Organic Cotton, Regular Fit COLORS: blue dobby stripe SIZES: s - xl

MUSCAT. tee

100% Organic Cotton COLORS: black, red SIZES: s - xxl

red

032

find a dealer near you Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

find a dealer near you Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

033


MENS / spring | summer . 2010

tomato

BARNETT.tee

100% Organic Cotton COLORS: tomato, charcoal SIZES: s - xxl

charcoal “This was the first time we skated the new section. It was a few days after the pour and we wanted to see how it was going to work out. Our friends at Planet Earth donated the concrete so I figured I’d get some shots for them. Max took a few to get used to the new PERSPECTIVES lines but had no problems putting down some tricks for the camera. He’s always good for that. I’d say the new section worked out just fine.” - Dan Barnett, Photographer 034

want more? check out our book of all Perspectives photos Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

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035


CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

MENS / spring | summer . 2010

pale blue

COLLINS. shirt

036

charcoal

BENSON. tee

100% Organic Cotton, Regular Fit, Dual Pockets COLORS: pale blue, pale green SIZES: s - xl

100% Organic Cotton COLORS: charcoal, black SIZES: s - xxl

pale green

black

find a dealer near you Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

find a dealer near you Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

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CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

MENS / spring | summer . 2010

SANDERS. shirt COLOR: denim

pg. 039

GRIFFIN.short COLOR: khaki

pg. 011

sand

SANDERS.shirt

100% Organic Cotton, Regular Fit COLORS: sand, denim SIZES: s - xl

denim

038

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find a dealer near you Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

039


PERSPECTIVES prsp:

GRAIN SURFBOARDS

Mike LaVecchia and Brad Anderson are a couple of woodworkers living on a farm on the coast of Maine. Unlike the rest of the woodworkers in the area these guys aren’t building furniture, they’re building surfboards. What drove you to start building wooden surfboards? Mike: I knew a little about traditional boat building. Growing up snowboarding and skateboarding, I always knew that surfing was in my future. I think it was a combination of the things that I love which turned me on to wooden boards. So one summer a friend and I decided to build a board for fun. We built 1 or 2, trying different methods, After showing them around, some friends and family said they’d love to have me build them one. We never intended to build a business; we were just building stuff to ride.

of where wood surfboard construction left off but using new techniques that can produce some of the most advanced shapes ever made. It’s great to close the circle. What makes your boards different from other wood surfboards? Mike: It’s got an internal wooden frame like a wooden boat which the board gets built around, kind of like a rib cage. The big difference is a milling process, we use only about a third of the wood used in other wood boards. Since we build up the blank around the frame, and don’t hollow out huge chunks of solid wood, what goes into the board stays

How did it transition into a business? Mike: N’East magazine did a little story about a couple guys in southern Maine building wooden surfboards. The Associated Press in Portland saw it, and ran their own story on us. About a week before the story came out, Clark Foam closed down and the whole industry was turned upside down wondering what was going to happen. So our story was picked up immediately by newspapers all around the world. We started getting emails from people all over the country and even military guys in Iraq and suddenly overnight we had 6 orders from people in Florida, Hawaii, and all over. Brad came in as co-owner and we were off. Why wood instead of foam? Brad: Well for thousands of years people were riding heavy solid wood surfboards so it’s nothing new. Around the 1920s this guy named Tom Blake started building wood boards hollow. So instead of weighing 200 lbs they weighed more like 90. They were made of plywood and were basically pointy boxes with square sides. Eventually new materials and technologies employing foam, fiberglass & polyester resins were discovered and that brought even lighter weights and infinite 3D shaping possibilities. We’re just bringing it back to the roots 040

photo: Nick LaVecchia in the board. Most unique is the way we build the rails hollow & lighter than any other wood board process. Are there any environmental benefits to this construction? Brad: It’s still unrealistic to achieve absolute sustainability but we’re far closer than traditional foam board building. First of all we use

watch Grain Surfboards Perspective videos Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

photo: Nick LaVecchia sustainable-yield local wood. Unlike foam, wood is naturally structural, so we only need one thin glass layer rather than the multiple layers required to give foam strength. That means we use less glass, which takes amazing amounts of energy to produce, and much less resin. The resin we use is also an epoxy instead of polyester so it doesn’t emit volatile greenhouse gases. We’re always experimenting with new potentially green epoxies

& cloths. These materials cost a little more and may take a little more time to work with, but obviously it’s worth it to keep finding more ways to impact the ecology less. Is the reduced environmental impact a good part of why people are buying your boards? Brad: Look – there’s no avoiding the fact that everyone is going to have to think more about how

watch Grain Surfboards Perspective videos Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

041


we’re going to move forward without slamming the planet with everything we do. That means everyone needs to do things differently. This is just one way for surfers to get closer to doing the right thing. People buying our boards are making that choice. Tell us about the actual business. Brad: We run this place on 100% flex time, as long as people get their work done, it’s all good. So we get people who are fully into what they’re doing. People just want to get involved; we’ve even got people that just donate their time to us. A new friend of ours came in last week and rebuilt the engine in our old truck. He just did it. People are just into what we’re doing. What attracts people to get so involved? Mike: Although we work really hard here pretty much seven days a week, in some ways it’s more of a club than it is a business. We don’t say, ‘‘Shit, we got to build 20 boards this week!’’. The place is partly a hang out, where a group of friends happen to be doing work they want to do. We even offer classes here, where people come in for a week and go home with their own board. That’s sick! Anyone can just come in and make their own board? Mike: Yeah and for locals, we also open the shop 2 days a week during winter, so people can just come in and use all our tools. We want to be part of a community that’s about more than just creating a business. That’s what it’s always been about. If you’re not enjoying it and getting something out of it on a personal level, I don’t really understand why you’d do it. So why do you live in the North East? You’re as far from the So. Cal surfing epicenter as you can get. Brad: Maine is where the wood grows! Seriously though, we’ve never even talked about moving west, Grain just fits into the lives we were already living here. And if our experience is any guide, the decisions that you make for the right reasons just seem to implicitly be good for you. What’s your plans for the future? Brad: Most companies imagine themselves growing right now. We’re a company growing as it needs to. We’ve borrowed almost no money and just have a small line of credit. It’s like instead of going out and getting a mortgage, we’re building a house as we have money to buy the nails, the wood, the siding. It’s growing slowly, that’s an important part of our model’s crawl, walk, run methodology. We don’t follow the traditional 042

model because we want to have fun doing this, and borrowing leads to pressure, and that kind of pressure bleeds the fun right out of everything. Any last thoughts? Mike: This little company is our life and we just want it to be as good as it can be. For us, good isn’t measured by ‘‘how big’’. It’s measured by how fun it is to do and how much people want to be around it, by what level of quality goes out the door, and by our place in our environment and among our community of friends.

“This shot is of Mikey DeTemple who was visiting Maine with Scotty Stopnik to film themselves building PERSPECTIVES wood boards at Grain for the follow up to Mike’s original movie, Picaresque. They were in town for a week to build boards, but spent the whole time running between the shop and beach because there were miraculously good waves every day which just never happens. Class was supposed to start at 7am that first morning, but I called Mike at the shop and told them we’re going surfing instead.” - Nick LaVecchia, Photographer

SIGNUP ONLINE TO WIN A GRAIN SURFBOARD!... Planet-Earth-Clothing.com/Perspectives

watch Grain Surfboards Perspective videos Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

there’s more vids, photos, and interviews on-line Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

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CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

seafoam

MILLER.tee

100% Organic Cottons COLORS: seafoam, cloud SIZES: xs - xl

cloud

MILLER. tee

KIMMEL. boardshort

pg. 044

pg. 047

COLOR: cloud

044

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COLOR: chocolate


CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

WOMENS / spring | summer . 2010

chocolate

COOPER.tee

046

chocolate

KIMMEL. boardshort

100% Organic Cotton COLORS: chocolate, white SIZES: xs - xl

100% Recycled Polyester PET, 2.5� Inseam COLORS: chocolate, aqua SIZES: 1,3,5,7,9,11

white

aqua

find a dealer near you Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

find a dealer near you Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

047


CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

PERSPECTIVES / spring | summer . 2010

‘‘The Bowl in Hanalei Bay Hawaii is the most popular surf spot on the North Shore. Locals head out after work for a quick fix and visitors can test their skills on a relatively safe and predictable wave that’s a step up from the bay’s popular shore break. When it’s breaking PERSPECTIVES 3-5 like it was that day, you’ll see all types of surfers of all ages, stand up paddle surfers and occasionally a dugout canoe catching waves out there.’’ - Scott Markewitz, Photographer 048

want more? check out our book of all Perspectives photos Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

there’s more vids, photos, and interviews on-line Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

049


CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

WOMENS / spring | summer . 2010

white

LINDSEY.hoodie COLOR: coral pink

pg. 051

LINDSEY.hoodie

100% Organic Cotton Ripstop with Lycra Blend COLORS: white, coral pink SIZES: xs - xl

coral pink

050

find a dealer near you Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

find a dealer near you Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

051


CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

WOMENS / spring | summer . 2010

aqua

MEYERS.boardshort

100% Recycled Polyester PET, 5” Inseam COLORS: aqua, orchid SIZES: 1,3,5,7,9,11

orchid

052

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awesome green

WILKINSON.boardshort

100% Recycled Polyester PET, 11” Inseam COLORS: awesome green, aqua, cave black, orchid SIZES: 1,3,5,7,9,11

aqua

cave black

orchid

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053


WOMENS / spring | summer . 2010

khaki

PRESTON. short

100% Organic Cotton Ripstop, 11� Inseam COLORS: khaki, asphalt SIZES: 1,3,5,7,9,11

asphalt

PRESTON.short

LINDSEY. hoodie

pg. 055

pg. 051

COLOR: khaki

COLOR: coral pink

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055


CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

PERSPECTIVES

056

PERSPECTIVES / spring | summer . 2010

‘This is of Sam Boardman, a local guy here in York. I took that photo in May at Sam’s favorite wave, where he grew up surfing. Knee high or double overhead and stormy, Sam is out there enjoying every minute of it. And yes, we do still wear hoods in May here in Maine. The ocean is barely in the low 50’s.’’ - Nick LaVecchia, Photographer

want more? check out our book of all Perspectives photos Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

there’s more vids, photos, and interviews on-line Planet-Earth-Clothing.com

057


CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

WOMENS / spring | summer . 2010

FARRELL.short COLOR: charcoal

pg. 058

charcoal

FARRELL.short

100% Organic Cotton Ripstop, 2.5� Inseam COLORS: charcoal, aqua SIZES: 1,3,5,7,9,11

aqua

058

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059


CLOTHING CO. spring | summer . 2010

MORGAN.tee

COLOR: rasberry jam

pg. 060

FARRELL. short

COLOR: charcoal

pg. 058

rasberry jam

MORGAN.tee

100% Organic Cotton COLORS: rasberry jam, deep aqua SIZES: xs - xl

deep aqua

060

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SIZING / spring | summer . 2010

SIZING CHART / BODY MEASUREMENTS MEN’S ANALOG SIZE NUMERIC SIZE CHEST NECK SLEEVE WAIST

XS S M L 28-29  32-34 35-36 34-36 36-38 39-41 42-44 13.5-14 14-14.5 15-15.5 16-16.5 31 1/2 31 1/2 33 1/2 34 1/2 28-29 30-31 32-34 35-37

XL 38 45-47 17-17.5 35 1/2 38-40

XXL 40 48-50 18-18.5 36 1/2 41-43

XXXL 42 51-53 19-19.5 37 1/2 44-46

M 8 36 29 39

L 10 37 30 40

L-XL 12 38 31 41

WOMEN’S ANALOG SIZE NUMERIC SIZE CHEST NATURAL WAIST HIP

XS 0 32 25 35

XS-S 2 33 26 36

S 4 34 27 37

M 6 35 28 38

XL 14 40 32 43

Planet Earth sets high standards to ensure forestry is practiced in an environmentally responsible, socially beneficial and economically viable manner. This copy of the Planet Earth magalog was printed on paper from well-managed forests which meets EPA guidelines that recommend use of recovered fibers for coated papers. Inks used contain a blend of soy base. Our printer meets or exceeds all federal Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) standards and is a certified member of both the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI). WHEN YOU ARE DONE WITH THIS PIECE PLEASE PASS IT ON TO A FRIEND, OR RECYCLE IT. WE CAN ALL HAVE A BETTER WORLD IF WE CHOOSE IT TOGETHER.

“It was a classic Northwest September day and my buddy Casey Savage was up from Portland for a weekend trip out to the coast. As he sat there waiting for a set a heavy fog drifted through. He looked so diehard out there alone squinting through the soup looking PERSPECTIVES for any glimpse of the next wave. Eventually another set rolled in and the weather cleared up but this image is one of my favorites from the trip.” - fank209, Designer 062

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thanks.

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063


USA

4201 6th Avenue S Seattle, WA 98108 TF: 888 317 1018 T: 206 805 4844 F: 206 805 4810 info@planet-earth-clothing.com CANADA

1 Westside Drive Unit #7 Toronto, ON M9C 1B2, Canada TF. 877 393 5953 T. 416 679 1216 F. 416 679 1218 EUROPE

Seeshaupter Strasse 62 Penzberg 82377, Germany T. +49 8856 901 0 F. 49 8856 901 101 info@earthproducts.de UK

1, Brooklands Moons Moat Drive Redditch B98 9DW UK +44 1527 405410 sales@k2-uk.co.uk


2010 Summer Magalog