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PERSPECTIVES

PLANET EARTH CLOTHING CO. | perspectives vol. 001


CLOTHING CO. perspectives | vol. 001

ENJOY / perspectives | vol. 001

Enjoy.

When I was a kid I loved flippin’ through mags and worshipping the pros, their crazy styles, the unattainable lines and tricks. It was like flipping through a comic and checking out the adventures of superheroes. At some point in time this hero worship eventually turned into something better. Over time I realized that the imagery I was drawn to the most didn’t depend on the person being featured as much as it did the perspective chosen by the person behind the lens. It evolved into the appreciation of the experience instead of the individual. It didn’t even have to be a trick at all. Some of them were taken before or even after the action. It’s this sort of appreciation that gave birth to Planet Earth Perspectives. It’s about telling the entire story from beginning to end and gaining a little better understanding of the times, places, people, and events that surround us. Enjoy. - Fank, one of you

Whether it’s a photo that goes beyond the trick to reveal the entire landscape in an epic moment in time or a craftsman’s story of building unique art that changes the way we view our priorities, Planet Earth Perspectives is less about the close ups and more about how everyday life goes down. Most of us don’t view life through a fish-eye lens. So zoom out a bit and broaden your perspective. Whenever you see the Perspectives logo, look for the deeper story, interview or video that follows....


CLOTHING CO. perspectives | vol. 001

PHOTO / perspectives | vol. 001

‘At 53 North Latitude, Ireland is actually pretty temperate compared to 33 degree winter water temps in New Jersey, so we don’t mind the cold, plus there are reefs and very good waves everywhere. We’ve done surf PERSPECTIVES trips to the tropics our whole lives. In Ireland though, there are only a handful of surfers, and they’re unbelievably cool. Plus, you’ve got 13th Century castles right by the ocean, rolling green hills, and world renowned beer. The fact there are waves becomes a bonus, you’re on a great trip either way.’’ - Nick LaVecchia, Photographer


CLOTHING CO. perspectives | vol. 001

PHOTO / perspectives | vol. 001

“You never know what will go down under the bridge on any given day. One of the things I like about shooting at Marginal Way PERSPECTIVES is that you can approximate when it was taken by what’s under construction in the photo. This gap was around for a few months and as far as I know Max was the only one to get a legit backside air over it. Before the channel was poured, with the re-bar all tied, and after a bit of a battle he put it down and closed another chapter of the park. A few days later the channel was concrete and narrower so it can’t be done like this again.’’ - Dan Barnett, Photographer


CLOTHING CO. perspectives | vol. 001

“Each year all Montana snowboarders and skiers are treated to PERSPECTIVES some pre-season man made snow and jibs, compliments of a little place known as Great Divide just outside of Helena. They always throw a big open entry contest and then just let kids get their fix sessioning the line of jibs. The morning after the event we went back up for a few more hours on snow. After finding the contest line to be pretty blown out, we retreated to this patch of snow just at the base. There was something so unique about watching Tyrel and Phil session this dinky little box on a mini patch of snow in a sea of dry ground. It seemed an example of true dedication to one’s passions. Knowing the amazing terrain and snow these guys are privileged to ride each year, yet finding them still stoked to session this. I felt obligated to do my best to document it wholly.’’ - Jeff Hawe, Photographer


CLOTHING CO. perspectives | vol. 001

PERSPECTIVES prsp:

GRAIN SURFBOARDS

Mike LaVecchia and Brad Anderson are a couple of woodworkers living on a farm on the coast of Maine. Unlike the rest of the woodworkers in the area these guys aren’t building furniture, they’re building surfboards. What drove you to start building wooden surfboards? Mike: I knew a little about traditional boat building. Growing up snowboarding and skateboarding, I always knew that surfing was in my future. I think it was a combination of the things that I love which turned me on to wooden boards. So one summer a friend and I decided to build a board for fun. We built 1 or 2, trying different methods, After showing them around, some friends and family said they’d love to have me build them one. We never intended to build a business; we were just building stuff to ride. How did it transition into a business? Mike: N’East magazine did a little story about a couple guys in southern Maine building wooden surfboards. The Associated Press in Portland saw it, and ran their own story on us. About a week before the story came out, Clark Foam closed down and the whole industry was turned upside down wondering what was going to happen. So our story was picked up immediately by newspapers all around the world. We started getting emails from people all over the country and even military guys in Iraq and suddenly overnight we had 6 orders from people in Florida, Hawaii, and all over. Brad came in as co-owner and we were off.

photo: nick lavecchia Why wood instead of foam? Brad: Well for thousands of years people were riding heavy solid wood surfboards so it’s nothing new. Around the 1920s this guy named Tom Blake started building wood boards hollow. So instead of weighing 200 lbs they weighed more like 90. They were made of plywood and were basically pointy boxes with square sides. Eventually new materials and technologies employing foam, fiberglass & polyester resins were discovered and that brought even lighter weights and infinite 3D shaping possibilities. We’re just bringing it back to the roots of where wood surfboard construction left off but using new techniques that can produce some of the most advanced shapes ever made. It’s great to close the circle. What makes your boards different from other wood surfboards? Mike: It’s got an internal wooden frame like a wooden boat which the board gets built around, kind of like a rib cage. The big difference is a milling process, we use only about a third of the wood used in other wood boards. Since we build up the blank around the frame, and don’t hollow out huge chunks of solid wood, what goes into the board stays in the board. Most unique is the way we build the rails hollow & lighter than any other wood board process.

photo: nick lavecchia


Are there any environmental benefits to this construction? Brad: It’s still unrealistic to achieve absolute sustainability but we’re far closer than traditional foam board building. First of all we use sustainable-yield local wood. Unlike foam, wood is naturally structural, so we only need one thin glass layer rather than the multiple layers required to give foam strength. That means we use less glass, which takes amazing amounts of energy to produce, and much less resin. The resin we use is also an epoxy instead of polyester so it doesn’t emit volatile greenhouse gases. We’re always experimenting with new potentially green epoxies & cloths. These materials cost a little more and may take a little more time to work with, but obviously it’s worth it to keep finding more ways to impact the ecology less. Is the reduced environmental impact a good part of why people are buying your boards? Brad: Look – there’s no avoiding the fact that everyone is going to have to think more about how we’re going to move forward without slamming the planet with everything we do. That means everyone needs to do things differently. This is just one way for surfers to get closer to doing the right thing. People buying our boards are making that choice. Tell us about the actual business. Brad: We run this place on 100% flex time, as long as people get their work done, it’s all good. So we get people who are fully into what they’re doing. People just want to get involved; we’ve even got people that just donate their time to us. A new friend of ours came in last week and rebuilt the engine in our old truck. He just did it. People are just into what we’re doing. What attracts people to get so involved? Mike: Although we work really hard here pretty much seven days a week, in some ways it’s more of a club than it is a business. We don’t say, ‘‘Shit, we got to build 20 boards this week!’’. The place is partly a hang out, where a group of friends happen to be doing work they want to do. We even offer classes here, where people come in for a week and go home with their own board. That’s sick! Anyone can just come in and make their own board? Mike: Yeah and for locals, we also open the shop 2 days a week during winter, so people can just come in and use all our tools. We want to be part of a community that’s about more than just creating a business. That’s what it’s always been about. If you’re not enjoying it and getting something out of it on a personal level, I don’t really understand why you’d do it. So why do you live in the North East? You’re as far from the So. Cal surfing epicenter as you can get. Brad: Maine is where the wood grows! Seriously though, we’ve never even talked about moving west, Grain just fits into the lives we were already living here. And if our experience is any guide, the decisions that you make for the right reasons just seem to implicitly be good for you. What’s your plans for the future? Brad: Most companies imagine themselves growing right now. We’re a company growing as it needs to. We’ve borrowed almost no money and just have a small line of credit. It’s like instead of going out and getting a mortgage, we’re building a house as we have money to buy the nails, the wood, the siding. It’s growing slowly, that’s an important part of our model’s crawl, walk, run methodology. We don’t follow the traditional model because we want to have fun doing this, and borrowing leads to pressure, and that kind of pressure bleeds the fun right out of everything. Any last thoughts? Mike: This little company is our life and we just want it to be as good as it can be. For us, good isn’t measured by ‘‘how big’’. It’s measured by how fun it is to do and how much people want to be around it, by what level of quality goes out the door, and by our place in our environment and among our community of friends. WATCH THE VIDEO... Planet-Earth-Clothing.com/Perspectives CHECK ‘EM OUT ON-LINE: GrainSurfboards.com

“This shot is of Mikey DeTemple who was visiting Maine with Scotty Stopnik to film themselves building wood boards at Grain for the follow up to Mike’s original movie, Picaresque. They were in town for PERSPECTIVES a week to build boards, but spent the whole time running between the shop and beach because there were miraculously good waves every day which just never happens. Class was supposed to start at 7am that first morning, but I called Mike at the shop and told them we’re going surfing instead.” - Nick LaVecchia, Photographer


PHOTO / perspectives | vol. 001

“Behind the skate park in San Clemente, CA there’s this hill that can be more fun than the park itself. You hike up to the PERSPECTIVES top till you’re out of view. Then bombs away, I usually speed ollie the first hump, then carry my speed over the second and lay into a big slide. Then you just point it to the bottom, across some dirt, and wiped out in the skate park for the grand finale. Good times.’’ - Nick LaVecchia, Photographer


CLOTHING CO. perspectives | vol. 001

‘‘The Bowl in Hanalei Bay Hawaii is the most popular surf spot on the North Shore. Locals head out after work for a quick PERSPECTIVES fix and visitors can test their skills on a relatively safe and predictable wave that’s a step up from the bay’s popular shore break. When it’s breaking 3-5 like it was that day, you’ll see all types of surfers of all ages, stand up paddle surfers and occasionally a dugout canoe catching waves out there.’’ - Scott Markewitz, Photographer

PHOTO / perspectives | vol. 001


PHOTO / perspectives | vol. 001

‘‘We were enjoying our last days in North America, skiing the trees in heavy snowfall at Baker. PERSPECTIVES It’s crazy being somewhere for that many days and not seeing what’s around you. Weather was predicting flat light for our last day so that night we celebrated the great trip at a local restaurant. After a few hours of sleep I woke up to my friend screaming “It’s sunny!” so we had to get back up to the mountain to ski something else.’’ - Christian Aslund, Photographer


CLOTHING CO. perspectives | vol. 001

“You never know what will go down under the bridge on any given day. One of the things I like about shooting at Marginal Way is that you can approximate when it was taken by what’s under construction in the photo. This gap was around for a few months and as far as I know Max was the PERSPECTIVES only one to get a legit backside air over it. Before the channel was poured, with the re-bar all tied, and after a bit of a battle he put it down and closed another chapter of the park. A few days later the channel was concrete and narrower so it can’t be done like this again.’’ - Dan Barnett, Photographer

PERSPECTIVES prsp:

MARGINAL WAY

It’s a community of people that have a stake in the park, for the city, and for the skaters of Seattle. We raise the money, we build it, we maintain it, we do everything. It’s a public skatepark, built by the public. When we get a truck of concrete, everyone is ready to build. An interview with Marginal Way Skatepark founders Dan Barnet, Shawn Bishop & Tim Demmon... What drove you to create a skatepark on town property? Knowing that it had happened before in Portland, San Diego and places like that. Those guys looked at the lack of skateable terrain, went out, found derelict property, and built it themselves. The real impetus here was the city was tearing out existing skateparks in Seattle with no plans of replacing them. Why did you build it where you did? We spent a good month trying to find a good location. The spot we found on Marginal Way was city property under an overpass, used as an overflow parking lot by businesses in the area. The reality is though; it wasn’t the kind of place anyone wanted in the area. There were people living in their cars dealing drugs, prostitution… anything we did we figured would be far more positive than anything going on there originally. Despite the fact that what we were doing was illegal, it was illegal in a much more positive way than everything that was already going on down there. What was the first day of construction like? Once we identified the spot we thought, are we going to do this or not? Then we said, we’re going to do this next Sunday! If anyone is going to join us, be there. Tim and I got some materials together, cut some plywood forms ahead of time and showed up. We didn’t know if we were going to get arrested or what, but we got away with it, so it was cool. Throughout that first day 20 some odd people came in and out. Some showed up and gave us $20 and left. Others just dropped off a bag of concrete. Most people wanted to be there, but didn’t really know if we were going to get away with it. A few days later we were skating it. Did you have a plan to build a legit skatepark? I don’t know if we set out to build a giant skate park or not, but we knew it was a possibility. We were just going to take it from there. At that time we just had a small quarter against the overpass wall but we sessioned it for a few months before we built another ramp. How did you know how to build a concrete park? We all saw enough parks built to have an idea of how things went together but one guy Greg was in the concrete union that skated who we couldn’t have started without. He never built a park but at least he knew how concrete worked. So between his knowledge and what we’d seen we were able to figure it out. What was the city’s reaction? Soon after we built the second ramp, the city started poking their nose around and letting us know that they knew what we were up to and if someone didn’t get in touch with them to take responsibility, they were going to tear it all out. At that point, we started with a two prong approach. On one side, we opened communications with the city. On the other side, we created an all out media blitz to get the public on our side. It just seemed like thing to do. We had to go from completely under the radar to on the radar and play the sympathy card… “the city won’t give us anywhere to skate and is going to tear down our only spot.” In my experience, a little shame goes a long way, so we shamed the city to let us keep going. How did the media help you? There was an article in The Stranger (a local Seattle weekly newspaper), and people started rooting us on. There was a really sympathetic article on TV one night so even the way the media was portraying the story was slanted against the city. One of the things we did during media blitz is register Marginal Way Skatepark as www.

skatepark.org. Even though it definitely wasn’t a skatepark, it showed we wanted to make it one, and made people think of it more legitimately. Once we called it a skatepark, it sounded grander than it was. Did you officially get permission to build on city property? Initially their concern was liability but I educated them on the fact that in the state of Washington there was a recreational sports law that says “any public or private entity is not responsible for injuries as a result of recreational activities such as skateboarding etc. on their property.” Seattle has a long history of skateboard advocacy so we worked with those people that were already in with the city and once they realized they were talking with responsible tax paying adults, they were much more open to listen. So we did eventually get a letter of permission from the city to build the park on their property. One of the things we asked them for is mitigating the prostitution and homeless problem. So they gave us a row of jersey barriers to keep people from parking there. The jersey barriers were a skateable feature and later became a foundation to build bigger walls on top of and are still under there. Who’s responsible for building and managing the park today? One of the rad things about Marginal Way is we take credit for getting the ball rolling, but it has since built it’s own community that continues to pick up speed, now with it’s own life force that’s bigger than just us or any one person involved. It’s a community of people built up around the park, that have a stake in the park for the city, the skaters of Seattle and those that want to work to make it bigger and better. We raise the money, we build it, we maintain it, we do everything. It’s a public skatepark, built by the public. How much time & money does it take? It’s not like a public park where an engineer draws it all out and then you build it all at once and it’s done. The fact that each part of each section is built separately at a different point of time, often by different people is what makes skating it so unique. Each section has a different look and feel so the park as a whole is constantly evolving. We’ve been at it for over five years now and spent close to $30,000 to create the 10,000 square feet we’ve got so far. We build it as we can afford to, one concrete truck load at a time. We raise the money by holding events, barbeques, concerts, selling tee shirts, and receiving all size donations online and from companies. It all adds up. One section was paid for by a member of Pearl Jam that skates, another by Redbull when they needed a large flat area to hold a comp and more recently we just finished the shallow bowl thanks to a concrete truck load of cement donated by you guys at Planet Earth Clothing. What’s Marginal Way’s future? Right now we’re still trying to expand into more areas of the parking lot. It’s like an art project. It will probably never be complete. We can always change or redo something or repair a section that can be improved. It’s not like a city skatepark where it’s done. This is going to be forever evolving. What would like to tell other skaters? It’s great in this day and age to create something to the scale of Marginal Way without any city or business or government financial backing. You don’t have to wait for the government to give you a hand out. Anybody can do this. All you have to do is start building and see what happens. Sometimes you’re going to get away with it and if you do get away with it, and build one thing at a time, you’ll have a skatepark. MAKE A DONATION TO HELP BUILD THE PARK! MarginalWaySkatepark.org

PERSPECTIVES / perspectives | vol. 001


CLOTHING CO. perspectives | vol. 001

‘‘We were on an MSP shoot in Haines in February (2008), which was the earliest I’ve ever been to AK. PERSPECTIVES The days were short, but the sun was low in the sky so the light was incredible all day long. We were set up here shooting skiers on a heavily rimed south face that had great powder and really unique features. I was so mesmerized by this big face in front of us that I almost didn’t notice the cool light and lines in the snow around Scott, who was standing about 200 yards away from me. That’s the beauty of Alaska, you can be set up to shoot the most incredible shot you’ve ever seen, and then you turn around to see another equally beautiful shot that you hadn’t noticed before. You have to keep your eyes open to all possibilities.” - Scott Markewitz, Photographer


‘‘We were in the mountains of Dalvik, Iceland. It always has perfect touring access in PERSPECTIVES April and May, but this day the weather turned too snowy and windy to go up. So we drove along the coastline and found this small chute from the road that went down to the Atlantic ocean. We rode it and walked around on the rocks and could see small fishing boats far out in the big waves, trying to pick up nets.’’ - Gosta Fries, Photographer

PHOTO / perspectives | vol. 001


CLOTHING CO. perspectives | vol. 001

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DAVE SEoane

Over the past 20 years, Dave Seoane has gone from influential pro snowboarder during the rise of the sport, to accomplished filmmaker and cinematographer, and now focused on his current passion of creating functional structures, spaces, and furniture that look like nothing ever seen before. Dave’s approach to design is modern, his values are old fashioned and his passion and creativity proves that both are more important than knowledge. We sat down with him this November after a day of snowboarding to get his perspective. How did you get into snowboarding? I grew up in Calaveras County California. I remember being a tiny kid going into a skate shop and seeing these ice blades you could put on your skate trucks. I thought it made sense, it was a good invention I always wanted but never got. In 1983 when I was 15 I bought a Burton Backhill from my friend and went to Bear Valley in northern Cal. but they didn’t allow snowboarding. So that day I went to a tobogganing hill to ride instead. It was a fun challenge to stay on and maneuver but I fell so many times couldn’t walk next day. The next year I went to Iron Mountain ski resort that allowed snowboarding and got into it. I rode a bunch with Damian Sanders who I knew from skateboarding since we were from the same area. How did you end up being a pro snowboarder? My friend was moving to tahoe and I was at a community college so I left school and moved to out there with him. At that time I just went there to snowboard because it was just super fun to do. I eventually lived at Donner Ski Ranch literally at the resort in a room upstairs. I remember riding 30 days straight and if I didn’t have to work in the evening, I’d ride at night too. Around 1989 there was an amateur California contest series that I won and it took off from there. By 1986 more people started making boards and there was actually a shortage of people that actually snowboarded so it was easy to get hooked up. How did you end up on the other side of the film camera? I was riding in some of Fall Line Films movies, “Western Front” and “Snowboarders In Exile”. The first time they did a trip to Chile I couldn’t go because all the spots were taken so they said I can go if I wanted to film so they just threw a film camera right into my hands. I was using a helmet cam a lot, it was easy because I was shooting all my friends I rode with every day and I have a big fat neck so I got a stable shot. I actually took photography in school so I always had and interest in shooting. How did that evolve into producing films? To tell you the truth, just sitting on the chairlift got kind of boring after a while and filming was a new creative outlet for me to experiment with. The first snowboard movie production I did was “Road Kill” in 1993. I came up with the concept and directed and shot it and Fall Line Productions put up the money to produce it. I then branched off to make the Arnet movie “My Way”, “Subject Hakonsen” and eventually “The Shaun White Album”. Now I do film projects outside of snowboarding as well. How did the Terje and Shaun White films come to be? I knew Terje well and got together with Richard Wolcott from volcom and just mapped it out, the 3 of us. Terje and I traveled all over the world for a year. Shawn white album was an other Volcom project but it almost gave me an ulcer because he blew his knee out twice that year so we ended up going to New Zealand for 6 weeks to finish it. Jaime Heinrich saved the film with incredible editing. It’s hard to imagine how you go from film making to furniture making? Traveling around you always see good design and it’s always a challenge to come up with good design that’s timeless. I’m not going to pay anyone to build an idea I have for something, when I can figure out how to build it myself. During that time I always had interest in building stuff with my hands, I just never thought I’d make

photo: bud fawcett - sugar bowl ca, 1993 a profession of it. I started making stuff for trade or sell it at super good prices to people I know. It’s not until the last couple of years that I did it more seriously. I’ll never stop filming its good work, and a great way to stay creative, and great to have a balance of the two. How did you learn to be so crafty working with wood and metal? At one point I had a job out of high school with an older guy that was a stone carver. He taught me a lot and is now a well known sculpture down in Napa doing big bronze sculptures. I looked up to the fact that he created a job for himself. It’s always nice to work with metal but metal is really cold. I’m not an incredible wood craftsman but I can put wood and metal together to compliment each other, so two OK’s make one alright, haha. What inspired you to make furniture? I don’t have a fine arts degree. I can’t make a sculpture with meaning, so it’s better to do creative stuff that is utilitarian. My first piece of furniture was actually this three legged chair called the Tripodious Maximous. I found a big radius pipe in a scrap yard while living in Truckee who’s curve looked like a perfect seat. So I took it home and it needed some legs. So I grabbed some steel snow stakes that were stuck in the ground and made them into legs, it was real rough. I later found out that for some reason three legged chairs are an insult to furniture design. I had thought I hit the nail on the head with that one. Your furniture is super unique, what influences the look? I try to create clean simple designs that are timeless, that you can’t put into any time era. I had a friend that was a metal craftsman that could build anything out of steel, really clean, he was a big inspiration. So I try to make steel look super clean. If you don’t do it right, it looks like rusty old scrap art. There are also a lot of people that paint designs on wooden furniture and then clear coat it. I was thinking about how people fill in knots with epoxy, so then thought why not use color epoxy, then why not cut designs into the wood and fill them with epoxy and then sand it smooth after. I honestly feel like I’m barely scratching the surface though right now. Honestly I feel like furniture is still a hobby for me.

photo: kerry rowe - dave’s workshop, 2009

The wood looks amazing, what is it? I like working with Walnut because it’s a really unique looking hard wood. It costs me a little more time to work with it, but the final version is solid and will be around forever. I never use plywood veneer, the biggest thing is I’m not using wood from oversees or with chemicals, it comes from your backyard. I have a really good supplier locally in Portland, “Goby Walnut”. All of their lumber comes from the surrounding areas and is salvage or hazard wood making it Eco Friendly. They even run their delivery truck runs on bio-diesel, look them up online. A lot of the trees are even cut down from within the city limits because the trees get huge and overgrow sidewalks or become a hazard to houses or roads. The Wood is just from old dead trees looking to be showcased for another term. Being an entrepreneur you must have some philosophies on work I think there are so many people that get jobs to pay their credit card bills, everyone needs to work but if you’re not doing what you really enjoy I feel bad for you. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not some stuck up rich kid, since I was a kid I’ve done plenty of shitty jobs, washing dishes, butchering chickens. It’s just important to realize that you don’t have to do the same thing for the rest of your life. If you focus 100%, you’re going to exceed. What do you think of snowboarding these days? Lots of cloning, I always see it now with an outside perspective and get turned off, then I see pros and they blown me away and I’m impressed. Sometimes I forget how fun it is till your out riding deep snow with your buddies. Once you’re doing that, it’s a priceless experience and I remember again that it’s such a great sport. Back in the day when we were doing it, every 3 weeks someone was doing something new to out do the other, the learning curve was so sky high. Now it’s so maxed out you have to do the impossible to stand out. What’s cool too is literally today were were riding at Mammoth and hooked up with friends. Some people were skiers and we were all having great time. Back in the day it was like racism between snowboarders and skiers. What motivates you to continually push yourself? I know it’s always critical to be around solid creative humans. It lessons the drama

and forces you to excel. If someone you know makes something so incredible I think about how in a closet competitive manner I can out do them or top that, not “oh man I missed the boat.” I think it’s critical to build goals and challenge your self. No one is going to come knocking on your door and hand things to you. I see artist kids make a couple of pieces and expect people to hand them money, but if you build consistency and you’re passionate about it, and don’t care about anything except what you’re working on, eventually people will find you. I’m all about letting your work speak for you. What’s your future looking like? I don’t have my life planned out 20 yrs from now, even when younger. I remember when I was 18 and just graduated high school, my mom said, “what are you going to do?”. I said, “I’m doing it”. I had a huge vert skate ramp in my backyard and just skated every day all day. I knew I didn’t want to ever work for anybody, not that I wanted to be a bum, but it was just that making money wasn’t my priority. I didn’t grow up wealthy so it was easy to live slim. Right now I have more direction, a good solid game plan, it actually just hit me in the last four or five months. Before that I was just experimenting. In the next year I want to get to a point that I have some solid stock pieces that people can count on buying but still keep them hand produced. Where can people buy or check out your furniture? Currently I do made-to-order custom furniture and fixtures out of my shop in Portland Oregon. I did a bunch of interior work at Nemo Design upstairs from me, they’re a graphics and marketing company that are a creative machine. I also did the inside of “Heart Coffee and Roasters” coffee shop. They just came out of no where and are already known as the best coffee in Portland. It is owned by by pro snowboarder Willie Yli-Luoma who’s a perfectionist. He had a bunch of design concepts and I worked with him to fine tune and build a bunch of features. CHECK OUT DAVE’S WORK AT: davidpaulseoane.com and cinemaseoane.com


CLOTHING CO. perspectives | vol. 001

PHOTO / perspectives | vol. 001

‘‘We were in the mountains of Dalvik, Iceland. It always has perfect touring access in PERSPECTIVES April and May, but this day the weather turned too snowy and windy to go up. So we drove along the coastline and found this small chute from the road that went down to the Atlantic ocean. We rode it and walked around on the rocks and could see small fishing boats far out in the big waves, trying to pick up nets.’’ - Gosta Fries, Photographer


PHOTO / perspectives | vol. 001

‘‘Some friends from home joined me for a week during my one PERSPECTIVES month stay in AK at SEABA. For years they’ve seen my photos of the skiing we’ve done and wanted to experience it. This day it was partly cloudy so we had low expectations of getting any skiing in at all. We headed over to Old Faithful, named because it always comes through with the good weather, today was one of those days.’’ - Will Wissman, Photographer


CLOTHING CO. perspectives | vol. 001

PHOTO / perspectives | vol. 001

“It was a classic Northwest September day and my buddy Casey Savage was up from Portland for a weekend PERSPECTIVES trip out to the coast. As he sat there waiting for a set a heavy fog drifted through. He looked so diehard out there alone squinting through the soup looking for any glimpse of the next wave. Eventually another set rolled in and the weather cleared up but this image is one of my favorites from the trip.� - fank209, Designer


CLOTHING CO. perspectives | vol. 001

PHOTO / perspectives | vol. 001

‘‘There are these pieces of an old runway for some reason piled up at the BMX park so PERSPECTIVES we poured a little concrete to form a transition on one piece. It was just a different feature to skate in our small town of Bozeman, MT. It’s somewhat gnarly with all the re-bar and jagged concrete edges but a fun challenge. We laid down a bunch of old wood for the run in and started the session. My buddy Rob Murdock put up a smooth frontside rock on this one.’’ - Jeff Hawe, Photographer


CLOTHING CO. perspectives | vol. 001

‘‘It was February 12th and we were having a full-on blizzard along the New England coast. The air PERSPECTIVES was a brisk 25˙ with winds ripping out of the NE and water temps hovering around 35˙, my favorite. I walked down to the beach to find long-time York, Maine local Chris Wilson shoveling out his dad’s driveway in his wetsuit . . . Only in Maine. Maybe he was trying to work up some body heat? Chris paddled out and surfed alone for two hours, catching as many waves as he could before his body shut down. I only lasted about 20 minutes shooting from the road before my camera battery was drained. By the time I left, Chris’ footprints were no where to be found.’’ - Photographer, Nick LaVecchia

PHOTO / perspectives | vol. 001


CLOTHING CO. perspectives | vol. 001

PHOTO / perspectives | vol. 001

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Thanks. Special thanks to the fellow photographers, filmers, skaters, shreds, inventors, innovators, and generally good people out there that are constantly creating fresh new perspectives of this life around us. If you’d like to contribute to a future Perspectives please contact us at: info@planet-earth-clothing.com.

Cheers.

1, Brooklands Moons Moat Drive Redditch B98 9DW UK +44 1527 405410 sales@k2-uk.co.uk www.planet-earth-clothing.com


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Planet Earth Perspectives Photo Book vol 1