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146.5mm FLAP

148.5mm BACK

Challenge and change in Malawi

Real progress

In Malawi, Plan focuses on health, education, women and children’s rights, and improving incomes so families can meet their basic needs. Most rural Malawians rely on farming, but droughts and floods cause frequent food shortages.

With the support of Plan, children and adults in Malawi are working together to develop their communities and claim their right to a better future. And real progress is being made. Last year, our work included:

Another major challenge is HIV/AIDS, which kills tens of thousands every year. Its impact is devastating, undoing decades of economic progress, reducing life expectancy, and putting extreme pressure on already overburdened health services. Plan runs 18 HIV testing and counselling centres with the Ministry of Health, and provides social care, support and help with ways to make a living for those living with HIV/AIDS. Lillian Okwirry, Plan’s Country Director, says: “Our vision is an environment which meets children’s basic needs, free from abuse, exploitation or neglect. Let’s work together to achieve this.” In this Country Progress Report, we look in detail at one successful project among many that Plan has carried out this year. p Livestock provided by Plan helps to suppleme nt poor farmers’ resources, improving fam ilies’ diet and income

Malawi country facts Population: 13 million

Life expectancy: 40 years

Capital: Lilongwe

People who have adequate sanitation: 61%

UN Human Development Index ranking: 166th (of 177 countries)

• Organising a Children’s Parliament with UNICEF to raise the profile of children’s rights. It was featured on national radio and Plan received a commendation from the President

p The Child

Colours(Prod)

Art (A/D)

Copy (C/W)

Content (Acc.)

Malawi

they can improve their incomes

• Constructing, furnishing and equipping 12 nursery schools.

Plan’s greatest successes come from a joint effort combining the hard work and determination of communities, children, volunteers, staff, and partner organisations. The ongoing support of our sponsors is a vital ingredient, too. It’s their generosity and commitment that allows us to continue to help children in 49 of the poorest countries in the world. So on behalf of the children and communities we work with, thank you to all our sponsors!

MWI

Size (Prod)

n

• Providing 1,168 people in 102 groups with savings and loan schemes so

Plan UKReport on Plan programs in Albania for the year ended June 2007

Any enquiries please contact: Nick Burton. e: nick@bright-uk.com m: 07884 367567. d: 020 7620 8150

child protectio

by HIV/AIDS in drought-hit areas for five months

Children who are malnourished: 22%

0407 100647 PLAN 0407_Malawi 16.11.07 210x443.5mm FOLD TO A5 3 Client proof: 2

ren’s Parliame nt, discussing

• Providing food relief (maize, beans, oil) to 500 vulnerable families affected

(Sources: the UN, the Foreign & Commonwealth Office, UNICEF)

Admagic No: Bright No: Client name: File name: Date: Size: Studio proof:

148.5mm FRONT

Country Progress Report 2007


146.5mm FLAP

148.5mm BACK

Challenge and change in Malawi

Real progress

In Malawi, Plan focuses on health, education, women and children’s rights, and improving incomes so families can meet their basic needs. Most rural Malawians rely on farming, but droughts and floods cause frequent food shortages.

With the support of Plan, children and adults in Malawi are working together to develop their communities and claim their right to a better future. And real progress is being made. Last year, our work included:

Another major challenge is HIV/AIDS, which kills tens of thousands every year. Its impact is devastating, undoing decades of economic progress, reducing life expectancy, and putting extreme pressure on already overburdened health services. Plan runs 18 HIV testing and counselling centres with the Ministry of Health, and provides social care, support and help with ways to make a living for those living with HIV/AIDS. Lillian Okwirry, Plan’s Country Director, says: “Our vision is an environment which meets children’s basic needs, free from abuse, exploitation or neglect. Let’s work together to achieve this.” In this Country Progress Report, we look in detail at one successful project among many that Plan has carried out this year. p Livestock provided by Plan helps to suppleme nt poor farmers’ resources, improving fam ilies’ diet and income

Malawi country facts Population: 13 million

Life expectancy: 40 years

Capital: Lilongwe

People who have adequate sanitation: 61%

UN Human Development Index ranking: 166th (of 177 countries)

• Organising a Children’s Parliament with UNICEF to raise the profile of children’s rights. It was featured on national radio and Plan received a commendation from the President

p The Child

Colours(Prod)

Art (A/D)

Copy (C/W)

Content (Acc.)

Malawi

they can improve their incomes

• Constructing, furnishing and equipping 12 nursery schools.

Plan’s greatest successes come from a joint effort combining the hard work and determination of communities, children, volunteers, staff, and partner organisations. The ongoing support of our sponsors is a vital ingredient, too. It’s their generosity and commitment that allows us to continue to help children in 49 of the poorest countries in the world. So on behalf of the children and communities we work with, thank you to all our sponsors!

MWI

Size (Prod)

n

• Providing 1,168 people in 102 groups with savings and loan schemes so

Plan UKReport on Plan programs in Albania for the year ended June 2007

Any enquiries please contact: Nick Burton. e: nick@bright-uk.com m: 07884 367567. d: 020 7620 8150

child protectio

by HIV/AIDS in drought-hit areas for five months

Children who are malnourished: 22%

0407 100647 PLAN 0407_Malawi 16.11.07 210x443.5mm FOLD TO A5 3 Client proof: 2

ren’s Parliame nt, discussing

• Providing food relief (maize, beans, oil) to 500 vulnerable families affected

(Sources: the UN, the Foreign & Commonwealth Office, UNICEF)

Admagic No: Bright No: Client name: File name: Date: Size: Studio proof:

148.5mm FRONT

Country Progress Report 2007


148.5mm INSIDE

Water, sanitation and health For Malawi’s children, water, or the lack of it, can have a huge impact on their lives.

A third of people don’t have safe drinking water or adequate sanitation, meaning many children suffer from water-borne diseases. But in the village of Ehlekweni, Northern Malawi, a Plan project has given children safe water and proper sanitation, and helped them to take responsibility for their own health and teach others to do the same. For pupils at Ehlekweni Primary School, a lack of safe water, a shortage of toilets, and poor hygiene was damaging their education as well as their health. Children walked a long way to collect water from the river. In the process, they missed lessons and sometimes whole days of school through illnesses caused by unsafe water and poor sanitation. As well as clean water, basic hygiene is also hugely important in reducing water-borne diseases. We estimate that only 2% of families in the Malawian communities we work with use good hygiene practices including handwashing. So as well as better water and toilets, awareness of the importance of keeping clean is also crucial.

148.5mm INSIDE

The borehole has reduced water-borne diseases, and had a huge impact on daily life, particularly for women, who were responsible for much of the water collection. At the school, 15 toilets were constructed for pupils, with separate facilities for boys and girls, and two staff toilets. All toilets have handwashing facilities.

Children teaching children

p A group of school children run to use the new school toilets. To the right is the old toilet they used

The School’s Headmaster describes how things were: “Children ate food like fruit without washing their hands, and so cases of diarrhoea and dysentery were the order of the day.”

Ringing the changes Now, things are very different. By working together the people of Ehlekweni have changed their children’s health for the better. Plan and the community themselves drilled a borehole, built toilets, and set up committees to promote health in school and look after the new water source.

Getting children to educate their own classmates was crucial to the project’s success. Plan helped set up a Sanitation and Hygiene Committee made up of 10 pupils. Henry, the Committee Secretary, says: “Plan trained us in sanitation and hygiene rules and our main responsibility is to make sure that every pupil follows hygiene rules, takes part in keeping the school clean, and has good toilet habits.” The committee ensures that all classrooms are swept and mopped, toilets are clean and hand-washing facilities have enough water. Committee members demonstrate how to wash hands before eating and after visiting the toilet. Members also reinforce school cleanliness by ensuring there are enough rubbish pits and the school lawns and flower beds are cared for.

Henry says: “I am very proud to be part of Ehlekweni Primary School because we have all the facilities we need for hygiene, water and sanitation.” Now pupils have clean, safe water, good toilets and a school environment that helps them to learn. Enrolment has increased significantly, fewer children suffer from water borne diseases, and pupils take what they’ve learned home with them, making sure that they and their families practise good hygiene habits too.

Showing the way forward

146.5mm INSIDE

Ehlekweni is a great example of how communities themselves can change their children’s lives through their own commitment. Now the children can take pride in their school and concentrate on the education that is so vital for their future. The Ehlekweni project is part of Plan’s programme to make sure children and their families have safe drinking water all year round, as well as the information and facilities they need for safe hygiene. We support the construction and renovation of wells and boreholes, and train community

water committees in water management and hygiene. And we work in schools like Ehlekweni to make sure that children learn about hygiene and then tell their families.

Now the children can take pride in their school and concentrate on the education that is so vital for their future. Some names have been changed for privacy and child protection reasons.

Perhaps most importantly, pupils have gained confidence in making their opinions heard. Through the Sanitation and Hygiene Committee they have a say in the way that decisions are made: any health-related decision that the school makes takes into account the Committee’s views.

“I am very proud to be part of Ehlekweni Primary School because we have all the facilities we need for hygiene, water and sanitation.”

p Children enjoying clean and

potable water at a community boreh

ole


148.5mm INSIDE

Water, sanitation and health For Malawi’s children, water, or the lack of it, can have a huge impact on their lives.

A third of people don’t have safe drinking water or adequate sanitation, meaning many children suffer from water-borne diseases. But in the village of Ehlekweni, Northern Malawi, a Plan project has given children safe water and proper sanitation, and helped them to take responsibility for their own health and teach others to do the same. For pupils at Ehlekweni Primary School, a lack of safe water, a shortage of toilets, and poor hygiene was damaging their education as well as their health. Children walked a long way to collect water from the river. In the process, they missed lessons and sometimes whole days of school through illnesses caused by unsafe water and poor sanitation. As well as clean water, basic hygiene is also hugely important in reducing water-borne diseases. We estimate that only 2% of families in the Malawian communities we work with use good hygiene practices including handwashing. So as well as better water and toilets, awareness of the importance of keeping clean is also crucial.

148.5mm INSIDE

The borehole has reduced water-borne diseases, and had a huge impact on daily life, particularly for women, who were responsible for much of the water collection. At the school, 15 toilets were constructed for pupils, with separate facilities for boys and girls, and two staff toilets. All toilets have handwashing facilities.

Children teaching children

p A group of school children run to use the new school toilets. To the right is the old toilet they used

The School’s Headmaster describes how things were: “Children ate food like fruit without washing their hands, and so cases of diarrhoea and dysentery were the order of the day.”

Ringing the changes Now, things are very different. By working together the people of Ehlekweni have changed their children’s health for the better. Plan and the community themselves drilled a borehole, built toilets, and set up committees to promote health in school and look after the new water source.

Getting children to educate their own classmates was crucial to the project’s success. Plan helped set up a Sanitation and Hygiene Committee made up of 10 pupils. Henry, the Committee Secretary, says: “Plan trained us in sanitation and hygiene rules and our main responsibility is to make sure that every pupil follows hygiene rules, takes part in keeping the school clean, and has good toilet habits.” The committee ensures that all classrooms are swept and mopped, toilets are clean and hand-washing facilities have enough water. Committee members demonstrate how to wash hands before eating and after visiting the toilet. Members also reinforce school cleanliness by ensuring there are enough rubbish pits and the school lawns and flower beds are cared for.

Henry says: “I am very proud to be part of Ehlekweni Primary School because we have all the facilities we need for hygiene, water and sanitation.” Now pupils have clean, safe water, good toilets and a school environment that helps them to learn. Enrolment has increased significantly, fewer children suffer from water borne diseases, and pupils take what they’ve learned home with them, making sure that they and their families practise good hygiene habits too.

Showing the way forward

146.5mm INSIDE

Ehlekweni is a great example of how communities themselves can change their children’s lives through their own commitment. Now the children can take pride in their school and concentrate on the education that is so vital for their future. The Ehlekweni project is part of Plan’s programme to make sure children and their families have safe drinking water all year round, as well as the information and facilities they need for safe hygiene. We support the construction and renovation of wells and boreholes, and train community

water committees in water management and hygiene. And we work in schools like Ehlekweni to make sure that children learn about hygiene and then tell their families.

Now the children can take pride in their school and concentrate on the education that is so vital for their future. Some names have been changed for privacy and child protection reasons.

Perhaps most importantly, pupils have gained confidence in making their opinions heard. Through the Sanitation and Hygiene Committee they have a say in the way that decisions are made: any health-related decision that the school makes takes into account the Committee’s views.

“I am very proud to be part of Ehlekweni Primary School because we have all the facilities we need for hygiene, water and sanitation.”

p Children enjoying clean and

potable water at a community boreh

ole


148.5mm INSIDE

Water, sanitation and health For Malawi’s children, water, or the lack of it, can have a huge impact on their lives.

A third of people don’t have safe drinking water or adequate sanitation, meaning many children suffer from water-borne diseases. But in the village of Ehlekweni, Northern Malawi, a Plan project has given children safe water and proper sanitation, and helped them to take responsibility for their own health and teach others to do the same. For pupils at Ehlekweni Primary School, a lack of safe water, a shortage of toilets, and poor hygiene was damaging their education as well as their health. Children walked a long way to collect water from the river. In the process, they missed lessons and sometimes whole days of school through illnesses caused by unsafe water and poor sanitation. As well as clean water, basic hygiene is also hugely important in reducing water-borne diseases. We estimate that only 2% of families in the Malawian communities we work with use good hygiene practices including handwashing. So as well as better water and toilets, awareness of the importance of keeping clean is also crucial.

148.5mm INSIDE

The borehole has reduced water-borne diseases, and had a huge impact on daily life, particularly for women, who were responsible for much of the water collection. At the school, 15 toilets were constructed for pupils, with separate facilities for boys and girls, and two staff toilets. All toilets have handwashing facilities.

Children teaching children

p A group of school children run to use the new school toilets. To the right is the old toilet they used

The School’s Headmaster describes how things were: “Children ate food like fruit without washing their hands, and so cases of diarrhoea and dysentery were the order of the day.”

Ringing the changes Now, things are very different. By working together the people of Ehlekweni have changed their children’s health for the better. Plan and the community themselves drilled a borehole, built toilets, and set up committees to promote health in school and look after the new water source.

Getting children to educate their own classmates was crucial to the project’s success. Plan helped set up a Sanitation and Hygiene Committee made up of 10 pupils. Henry, the Committee Secretary, says: “Plan trained us in sanitation and hygiene rules and our main responsibility is to make sure that every pupil follows hygiene rules, takes part in keeping the school clean, and has good toilet habits.” The committee ensures that all classrooms are swept and mopped, toilets are clean and hand-washing facilities have enough water. Committee members demonstrate how to wash hands before eating and after visiting the toilet. Members also reinforce school cleanliness by ensuring there are enough rubbish pits and the school lawns and flower beds are cared for.

Henry says: “I am very proud to be part of Ehlekweni Primary School because we have all the facilities we need for hygiene, water and sanitation.” Now pupils have clean, safe water, good toilets and a school environment that helps them to learn. Enrolment has increased significantly, fewer children suffer from water borne diseases, and pupils take what they’ve learned home with them, making sure that they and their families practise good hygiene habits too.

Showing the way forward

146.5mm INSIDE

Ehlekweni is a great example of how communities themselves can change their children’s lives through their own commitment. Now the children can take pride in their school and concentrate on the education that is so vital for their future. The Ehlekweni project is part of Plan’s programme to make sure children and their families have safe drinking water all year round, as well as the information and facilities they need for safe hygiene. We support the construction and renovation of wells and boreholes, and train community

water committees in water management and hygiene. And we work in schools like Ehlekweni to make sure that children learn about hygiene and then tell their families.

Now the children can take pride in their school and concentrate on the education that is so vital for their future. Some names have been changed for privacy and child protection reasons.

Perhaps most importantly, pupils have gained confidence in making their opinions heard. Through the Sanitation and Hygiene Committee they have a say in the way that decisions are made: any health-related decision that the school makes takes into account the Committee’s views.

“I am very proud to be part of Ehlekweni Primary School because we have all the facilities we need for hygiene, water and sanitation.”

p Children enjoying clean and

potable water at a community boreh

ole


146.5mm FLAP

148.5mm BACK

Challenge and change in Malawi

Real progress

In Malawi, Plan focuses on health, education, women and children’s rights, and improving incomes so families can meet their basic needs. Most rural Malawians rely on farming, but droughts and floods cause frequent food shortages.

With the support of Plan, children and adults in Malawi are working together to develop their communities and claim their right to a better future. And real progress is being made. Last year, our work included:

Another major challenge is HIV/AIDS, which kills tens of thousands every year. Its impact is devastating, undoing decades of economic progress, reducing life expectancy, and putting extreme pressure on already overburdened health services. Plan runs 18 HIV testing and counselling centres with the Ministry of Health, and provides social care, support and help with ways to make a living for those living with HIV/AIDS. Lillian Okwirry, Plan’s Country Director, says: “Our vision is an environment which meets children’s basic needs, free from abuse, exploitation or neglect. Let’s work together to achieve this.” In this Country Progress Report, we look in detail at one successful project among many that Plan has carried out this year. p Livestock provided by Plan helps to suppleme nt poor farmers’ resources, improving fam ilies’ diet and income

Malawi country facts Population: 13 million

Life expectancy: 40 years

Capital: Lilongwe

People who have adequate sanitation: 61%

UN Human Development Index ranking: 166th (of 177 countries)

• Organising a Children’s Parliament with UNICEF to raise the profile of children’s rights. It was featured on national radio and Plan received a commendation from the President

p The Child

Colours(Prod)

Art (A/D)

Copy (C/W)

Content (Acc.)

Malawi

they can improve their incomes

• Constructing, furnishing and equipping 12 nursery schools.

Plan’s greatest successes come from a joint effort combining the hard work and determination of communities, children, volunteers, staff, and partner organisations. The ongoing support of our sponsors is a vital ingredient, too. It’s their generosity and commitment that allows us to continue to help children in 49 of the poorest countries in the world. So on behalf of the children and communities we work with, thank you to all our sponsors!

MWI

Size (Prod)

n

• Providing 1,168 people in 102 groups with savings and loan schemes so

Plan UKReport on Plan programs in Albania for the year ended June 2007

Any enquiries please contact: Nick Burton. e: nick@bright-uk.com m: 07884 367567. d: 020 7620 8150

child protectio

by HIV/AIDS in drought-hit areas for five months

Children who are malnourished: 22%

0407 100647 PLAN 0407_Malawi 16.11.07 210x443.5mm FOLD TO A5 3 Client proof: 2

ren’s Parliame nt, discussing

• Providing food relief (maize, beans, oil) to 500 vulnerable families affected

(Sources: the UN, the Foreign & Commonwealth Office, UNICEF)

Admagic No: Bright No: Client name: File name: Date: Size: Studio proof:

148.5mm FRONT

Country Progress Report 2007


Plan Malawi Annual Program Report 2007