Page 1

Global Child THE MAGAZINE OF PLAN IN AUSTRALIA | summer 2013

Women’s business

How a new project in Uganda is breaking cultural taboos and empowering girls and women

The journey of a letter

Why it can take up to six months to hear back from your sponsored child

Hogs and kisses!

From pigs to chickens you’ll find some great gifts in our shop for Valentine’s Day summer 2013

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 1


By Ian Wishart Chief Executive, Plan International Australia

The journey towards gender equality “If girls live lesser lives anywhere, we are diminished everywhere,” said Julia Gillard when she officially launched the inaugural International Day of the Girl Child, on 11 October last year. This momentous day was something that Plan and our supporters had been campaigning for. Fittingly, it was also the day that we launched our 2012 ‘Because I am a Girl’ campaign, promoting universal gender equality and every girls’ right to education.

The Plan story Founded 75 years ago, Plan is one of the oldest and largest children's development organisations in the world with no political or religious agendas. We work at the grassroots to empower communities to overcome poverty so that children have the opportunity to reach their full potential. We encourage children to be actively involved in improving their communities. We unite, empower and inspire people around the globe to champion every child’s right to survive, develop to the fullest, be protected from harmful influences, abuse and exploitation and participate fully in family, cultural and social life. Together with our supporters we can transform the world for children.

Transform the world for children. Front cover: A member of a Girls Children's Council (GCC) at school in Kamuli, Uganda. The Girls Children's Council was created to ensure that girls are treated fairly in schools and have a place to voice their concerns.

Around the world Plan staff and supporters organised events to mark the occasion. In Australia, we held a public event at City Square in Melbourne and although it was the coldest October day on record it didn’t stop many of you

coming along. On page 16 you can read an account of the day from an inspiring member of our Youth Project Team who spoke at the event. I want to thank everyone who got involved – whether you came to our event, one of the Women for Girls lunches, raised your hand on our Facebook app, or signed our petition to end child marriage – thanks to you, politicians, the media, and the general public all stood up and took notice of our fight for gender equality. In this issue of Global Child we take a look at stories of girls and women who are actively taking charge of their lives and inspiring others around them (see Women’s Business on page 12 and Lamana’s Story on page 9).

girls and women rise on the global agenda and I am proud that Plan has been a leader in making this happen but there is still more to do. Thank you to the thousands of you that support our Because I am a Girl campaign and contribute to all of Plan’s work – from child sponsors, to fundraisers, to our new Women for Girls members (page 22). I hope you enjoy this issue of Global Child and I look forward to sharing another big year with you – a year that continues to build on our successes in ensuring all girls and boys access their equal rights to survive, to develop, to be protected and to participate in all aspects of life.

Since I began with Plan in 2001, I have seen gender equality and issues for

Contents Community news

The voice of youth

4 Events and updates

16 A piece of history

Plan in action 8 Lamana’s story 10 Five minutes with … Rohan Kent, Plan’s Disaster Manager 11 Five minutes with … Rebecca Barry, Film Maker 12 Women's business 14 Through the lens

Global Child Summer 2013, Vol.34. Global Child is the magazine of Plan International Australia and is published biannually. Editorial enquiries: editor@plan.org.au Plan International Australia

Global learning

Address: 18/60 City Road, Southbank, Melbourne VIC 3006. Phone: 13 75 26 Fax: 03 9670 1130 Email: info@plan.org.au Web: www.plan.org.au

18 The youth bulge

Supporters in focus 20 The journey of a letter 22 Women for Girls

To support Plan visit www.plan.org.au. Donations to Plan of $2 or more are tax deductible. The opinions expressed are not necessarily those of Plan. © 2012. All material in Global Child is under copyright; however, articles and photographs may be reproduced with permission from Plan. Plan is a signatory to the ACFID Code of Conduct and is a trusted recipient of funding from AusAID – the Australian Government Agency for International Development. Plan International Australia is governed by a Board of Directors comprising: Gerry Hueston (Chair), Julie Hamblin (Deputy Chair), Brian Babington, Michael Corry, Claire Hatton, Julie Hood, Philippa Quinn, Neil Thompson, Anne Trimmer.

This page: A young girl from the H’Mong ethnic minority in Vietnam shows her clean hands. At the end of playing and reading activities, children are taught to always wash their hands to stay healthy.

summer 2013

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 3


By Ian Wishart Chief Executive, Plan International Australia

The journey towards gender equality “If girls live lesser lives anywhere, we are diminished everywhere,” said Julia Gillard when she officially launched the inaugural International Day of the Girl Child, on 11 October last year. This momentous day was something that Plan and our supporters had been campaigning for. Fittingly, it was also the day that we launched our 2012 ‘Because I am a Girl’ campaign, promoting universal gender equality and every girls’ right to education.

The Plan story Founded 75 years ago, Plan is one of the oldest and largest children's development organisations in the world with no political or religious agendas. We work at the grassroots to empower communities to overcome poverty so that children have the opportunity to reach their full potential. We encourage children to be actively involved in improving their communities. We unite, empower and inspire people around the globe to champion every child’s right to survive, develop to the fullest, be protected from harmful influences, abuse and exploitation and participate fully in family, cultural and social life. Together with our supporters we can transform the world for children.

Transform the world for children. Front cover: A member of a Girls Children's Council (GCC) at school in Kamuli, Uganda. The Girls Children's Council was created to ensure that girls are treated fairly in schools and have a place to voice their concerns.

Around the world Plan staff and supporters organised events to mark the occasion. In Australia, we held a public event at City Square in Melbourne and although it was the coldest October day on record it didn’t stop many of you

coming along. On page 16 you can read an account of the day from an inspiring member of our Youth Project Team who spoke at the event. I want to thank everyone who got involved – whether you came to our event, one of the Women for Girls lunches, raised your hand on our Facebook app, or signed our petition to end child marriage – thanks to you, politicians, the media, and the general public all stood up and took notice of our fight for gender equality. In this issue of Global Child we take a look at stories of girls and women who are actively taking charge of their lives and inspiring others around them (see Women’s Business on page 12 and Lamana’s Story on page 9).

girls and women rise on the global agenda and I am proud that Plan has been a leader in making this happen but there is still more to do. Thank you to the thousands of you that support our Because I am a Girl campaign and contribute to all of Plan’s work – from child sponsors, to fundraisers, to our new Women for Girls members (page 22). I hope you enjoy this issue of Global Child and I look forward to sharing another big year with you – a year that continues to build on our successes in ensuring all girls and boys access their equal rights to survive, to develop, to be protected and to participate in all aspects of life.

Since I began with Plan in 2001, I have seen gender equality and issues for

Contents Community news

The voice of youth

4 Events and updates

16 A piece of history

Plan in action 8 Lamana’s story 10 Five minutes with … Rohan Kent, Plan’s Disaster Manager 11 Five minutes with … Rebecca Barry, Film Maker 12 Women's business 14 Through the lens

Global Child Summer 2013, Vol.34. Global Child is the magazine of Plan International Australia and is published biannually. Editorial enquiries: editor@plan.org.au Plan International Australia

Global learning

Address: 18/60 City Road, Southbank, Melbourne VIC 3006. Phone: 13 75 26 Fax: 03 9670 1130 Email: info@plan.org.au Web: www.plan.org.au

18 The youth bulge

Supporters in focus 20 The journey of a letter 22 Women for Girls

To support Plan visit www.plan.org.au. Donations to Plan of $2 or more are tax deductible. The opinions expressed are not necessarily those of Plan. © 2012. All material in Global Child is under copyright; however, articles and photographs may be reproduced with permission from Plan. Plan is a signatory to the ACFID Code of Conduct and is a trusted recipient of funding from AusAID – the Australian Government Agency for International Development. Plan International Australia is governed by a Board of Directors comprising: Gerry Hueston (Chair), Julie Hamblin (Deputy Chair), Brian Babington, Michael Corry, Claire Hatton, Julie Hood, Philippa Quinn, Neil Thompson, Anne Trimmer.

This page: A young girl from the H’Mong ethnic minority in Vietnam shows her clean hands. At the end of playing and reading activities, children are taught to always wash their hands to stay healthy.

summer 2013

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 3


Thanks to your generous donations:

$130,000

thank you!

Community

News

498,842

people raised

their hand on our Facebook app in support of girls’ education. You can too at facebook.com/planaustralia

We were overwhelmed by your support of Stop the Hunger – our campaign to raise awareness and donations for people affected by the food crisis in West Africa.

“It's a day for symbolism – and symbols are important because where our heart and ideals go, our actions will follow. Friends, gender equality is one of the great goals of our time.” Prime Minister Julia Gillard speaks at the official launch of the first International Day of the Girl on 11 October, 2012.

Plan 2.0 Over the past few months Plan has had an online makeover – and we’re looking pretty good (if we do say so ourselves!). Most importantly though, we wanted to improve the way we share the stories of the children, families and communities we work with. And of course, we wanted to make it easier for you to get involved and join conversations that matter. See our revamped website at plan.org.au

65,000 people at risk of starvation received emergency food distributions

69 schools were supported to begin school feeding programs

90,000 litres of water reached refugee camps each day;

along with hygiene kits, latrines and essential medical supplies

Child rights in Australia Approximately 50 million children a year around the world are not registered and some of these children live in Australia. Birth registration is a proof of identity and allows people to claim their basic rights. Getting medical treatment, enrolling at school, inheriting property, preventing child exploitation and finding a job all rely on birth registration.

Around

the world A quick round-up of stories that have caught our attention since the last edition of Global Child. Typhoon Bopha (locally known as Pablo) struck the Philippines on 4 December causing devastating floods and landslides. An estimated 1,046 people died. The Curiosity rover successfully landed on Mars and began sending pictures back to Earth. On 9 October, 15-year-old Malala Yousafzai from Pakistan was shot in the head by Taliban gunmen while returning home from school. The attack received worldwide condemnation.

The world celebrated the first International Day of the Girl on October 11.

From July to September the summer Olympics and Paralympics took place in London.

Barack Obama was re-elected President of the United States of America.

The Dosso region of Niger was devastated by floods that killed 44 people, destroyed more than 14,000 homes and left 176,000 homeless.

Hurricane Sandy devastated part of the Caribbean, Mid-Atlantic and North-eastern United States in late October 2012. 12 October saw the ten-year anniversary of the infamous ‘Bali Bombings’, when 202 people (including 88 Australians) were killed.

Monsoon flooding in Myanmar affected 70,000 people along the Ayeyarwady Delta, forcing 467 schools to close. On 7 November an earthquake in Guatemala affected 1.2 million people, killed more than 50 and damaged over 2,200 homes.

We are pleased to announce that Plan will once again be supporting the Human Rights Arts and Film Festival (HRAFF), which will take place from May to June. For a fortnight in Melbourne, and three weeks across the country, HRAFF will exhibit a selection of contemporary cinema, music and fine art. In its sixth year, HRAFF continues to provide a shared site whereby artists, human rights organisations and the Australian public are united by their desire to contribute to social change. Stay tuned to facebook.com/planaustralia for movie updates and ticket give aways closer to the date. For festival info visit hraff.org.au

It’s for this reason that in 2012, Plan partnered with the Castan Centre for Human Rights Law at Monash University and six other organisations to begin a research project called ‘Closing the Gap on Indigenous Birth Registration’ – aiming to understand the causes and consequences for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island peoples whose births have not been registered. Focusing on child rights within Australia is a first for Plan. To find out more about this project you can read an interview with Dr Paula Gerber, deputy Director at Castan Centre for Human Rights Law at plan.org.au


Thanks to your generous donations:

$130,000

thank you!

Community

News

498,842

people raised

their hand on our Facebook app in support of girls’ education. You can too at facebook.com/planaustralia

We were overwhelmed by your support of Stop the Hunger – our campaign to raise awareness and donations for people affected by the food crisis in West Africa.

“It's a day for symbolism – and symbols are important because where our heart and ideals go, our actions will follow. Friends, gender equality is one of the great goals of our time.” Prime Minister Julia Gillard speaks at the official launch of the first International Day of the Girl on 11 October, 2012.

Plan 2.0 Over the past few months Plan has had an online makeover – and we’re looking pretty good (if we do say so ourselves!). Most importantly though, we wanted to improve the way we share the stories of the children, families and communities we work with. And of course, we wanted to make it easier for you to get involved and join conversations that matter. See our revamped website at plan.org.au

65,000 people at risk of starvation received emergency food distributions

69 schools were supported to begin school feeding programs

90,000 litres of water reached refugee camps each day;

along with hygiene kits, latrines and essential medical supplies

Child rights in Australia Approximately 50 million children a year around the world are not registered and some of these children live in Australia. Birth registration is a proof of identity and allows people to claim their basic rights. Getting medical treatment, enrolling at school, inheriting property, preventing child exploitation and finding a job all rely on birth registration.

Around

the world A quick round-up of stories that have caught our attention since the last edition of Global Child. Typhoon Bopha (locally known as Pablo) struck the Philippines on 4 December causing devastating floods and landslides. An estimated 1,046 people died. The Curiosity rover successfully landed on Mars and began sending pictures back to Earth. On 9 October, 15-year-old Malala Yousafzai from Pakistan was shot in the head by Taliban gunmen while returning home from school. The attack received worldwide condemnation.

The world celebrated the first International Day of the Girl on October 11.

From July to September the summer Olympics and Paralympics took place in London.

Barack Obama was re-elected President of the United States of America.

The Dosso region of Niger was devastated by floods that killed 44 people, destroyed more than 14,000 homes and left 176,000 homeless.

Hurricane Sandy devastated part of the Caribbean, Mid-Atlantic and North-eastern United States in late October 2012. 12 October saw the ten-year anniversary of the infamous ‘Bali Bombings’, when 202 people (including 88 Australians) were killed.

Monsoon flooding in Myanmar affected 70,000 people along the Ayeyarwady Delta, forcing 467 schools to close. On 7 November an earthquake in Guatemala affected 1.2 million people, killed more than 50 and damaged over 2,200 homes.

We are pleased to announce that Plan will once again be supporting the Human Rights Arts and Film Festival (HRAFF), which will take place from May to June. For a fortnight in Melbourne, and three weeks across the country, HRAFF will exhibit a selection of contemporary cinema, music and fine art. In its sixth year, HRAFF continues to provide a shared site whereby artists, human rights organisations and the Australian public are united by their desire to contribute to social change. Stay tuned to facebook.com/planaustralia for movie updates and ticket give aways closer to the date. For festival info visit hraff.org.au

It’s for this reason that in 2012, Plan partnered with the Castan Centre for Human Rights Law at Monash University and six other organisations to begin a research project called ‘Closing the Gap on Indigenous Birth Registration’ – aiming to understand the causes and consequences for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island peoples whose births have not been registered. Focusing on child rights within Australia is a first for Plan. To find out more about this project you can read an interview with Dr Paula Gerber, deputy Director at Castan Centre for Human Rights Law at plan.org.au


Say

Community

News

Give more than your heart away this Valentine’s Day

what?

Surprise your loved one this Valentine’s Day with a Gift of Hope from Plan.

We love hearing from Plan supporters on our social media channels – here are a few stories that recently caught our attention.

Gifts of Hope are items needed by the communities we work with and give children and their families a real and lasting way out of poverty. Your loved one will your generosity!

Facebook

Gifts start from $20 for 5 chickens, so jump online today at plan.org.au/shop

Tonight I realised it is exactly twelve months ago I was on a plane headed for Nepal to trek with a group of strangers! I had raised $11,000 for Plan in Australia and was leaving my family to go into the unknown. A life changing experience, with life long memories. (little luv)

Dates for your

Just had the most wonderful hour with Rebecca from Plan who knocked on my door. Her honesty and emotion was wonderful. We are proud to announce that we have added Ana from Honduras to our family. Now she can remain with her parents in her community. Looking forward to her letters. (Trudi Rodwell)

calendar 21 February International Mother Tongue Day

Twitter

8 March

World Water Day

Since October 2012 we have been collecting names of Australians who object to child marriage and in March we will deliver these to Australia’s Foreign Minister Bob Carr. There’s still time to add your name at becauseiamagirl.com.au and champion an end to child marriage at home and abroad.

So impressed @JuliaGillard raise her hands for girls rights around the world as part of @PlanAustralia for #DayOfTheGirl (@LeonjWard)

1-7 April National Youth Week 21 May

Annual Report

Hot off

12 June World Day Against Child Labour

the press

20 June World Refugee Day plan international australia

9 August

annual report 2012

International Day of the World's Indigenous People

annual report 2012

plan international australia

year at a glance We scaled up our AusAIDANCP funded program portfolio, increasing the number of development projects from 29 to 35, and receiving an increase in our AusAID funding subsidy from $4.1 million to $5.1 million.

Our 2011 Because I am a Girl report was launched in Canberra with The Hon. Kevin Rudd and a very special guest – Rubi Begum, a 16-year-old girl from Bangladesh who is a survivor of child marriage and a beneficiary of Plan’s programs.

5-year strategy

2011 august

our vision

october

december

Plan’s vision is of a world in which all children realise their full potential in societies that respect people’s rights and dignity. We completed our AusAIDfunded Civil Society Water, Sanitation & Hygiene Plan’sour lobbying at the mission program across seven Commonwealth Heads of We strive to achieve lasting improvements in the quality of life of children in developing countries developing countries, with Government Meeting (CHOGM) through a process that unites people across cultures and adds meaning and valuethe to their lives by: following outcomes over directly led to the recognition 18 needs months: »» enabling children, their families and their communities to meet their basic and to of early and forced child marriage

Cover photo: A woman with increase their ability to participateWe in and benefit from their societies in the outcomes statement and the began a new initiative 78,527 additional a baby on her back in Benin encouragement»»offostering all Mums for Change, relationships to increasecalled understanding and unity among peoples of different harvests crops in a field. people now have

which saw 300 mothers’ groups from around Australia

access to safe water

Our Chief Executive, Ian Wishart spent three days on the street with our faceto-face fundraising team to experience firsthand the work they do to encourage Australians to support Plan.

january

Our From Cup to Crop appeal raised over $400,000 to help Plan deliver much needed food aid in Cambodia, Zimbabwe and Ethiopia.

2012

ABN 49 004 875 807

refers to Plan International Australia. The terms ‘Plan’ and ‘Plan International’ refer to the global organisation of which Plan International Australia is a part. Please see page 10 for further information on our global network.

flood-affected districts and has strong theyour mobile device over 1. Download a free code reader 2. aOpen thefocus app.on ending 3. Hold practice open defecation in rural communities. It also app onto yourofmobile device theaims code until it scans. to build sanitation markets, so that low-income consumers can (for example, QR Reader). build themselves a durable and long-lasting toilet. You will automatically be taken to the content on your mobile device.

raised $40,000

april

Annual Report 2012 Cover Foldout.indd 1

30/10/2012 3:13:11 PM

Plan International Australia is focussed on increased transparency for all our stakeholders through our Annual Report. With this in mind, we are using the Global Reporting Initiative as a guide to our improvements.

Plan International Australia is honoured to have Her Excellency, Ms Quentin Bryce AC, Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia as our Patron. We give special thanks for her support and endorsement of Women for Girls.

june

Plan International Australia was a top 10 finalist in the 2011 PwC Transparency Awards > $30 million category for our 2011 Annual Report.

top10

More than $46,000 was raised by a group of adventurers who took part in an Inspired Adventures trek to Mount Kilimanjaro.

na i s l

By the end of the financial year we exceeded some key financial targets:

75 years

» Our Major Gifts target was exceeded by $2 million.

Plan International celebrated its 75th anniversary. Around the world Plan staff, children, partners and local communities celebrated with the world’s biggest children’s birthday party. Here in Australia we celebrated by recognising our supporters through a ‘thank you’ video and social media campaign, and highlighting the importance of birth registration for all children – every child’s right to a birthday! 2011

Annual Report 2012 Cover Foldout.indd 2

global reporting initiative

2012

» The number of new regular givers attracted to Plan grew by over 41%, from 9,089 to 12,888.

m

Plan 18/60 City Road, Southbank VIC 3006 GPO Box 2818, Melbourne VIC 3001 Tel: 13 75 26 Fax: +61 (3) 9670 1130 Email: info@plan.org.au

Plan International Australia is a member of its professional peak body the Australian Council for International Development (ACFID). We are a signatory to its code of conduct that covers the presentation of annual reports.

our patron

february Long-term Plan supporter Ricardo Galvani and a group of 20 friends toured Australia in their classic XK and E-type Jaguars and raised $40,000 to support Plan’s work.

Whether your business is large or small, Plan’s approach is the same: to create mutually beneficial partnerships that make business sense – and a positive difference to children's lives.

acfid

$2

13 75 26 WWW.PLAN.ORG.AU

Annual Effectiveness Review

may

march

Opposite page: Children ride »» promoting of children. of human rights. the rights and interestssign up to participate in child bicycles to school in Siem violation Reap, sponsorship and connect with Cambodia.

279,317 additional people now have access other groups through a new We commenced a 3-month to basic sanitation online community. This reportappeal sets out to Plan raise funds for the International Australia's progress worsening drought crisis in digital codes towards our vision and mission 144 additional Africa. appeal raised between 1 East July 201 1 and The 30 June Throughout this report you will notice visual codes on some pages. schools with water, 2012. We have to thisfrom the Plan in These Australia Pakistan entered into an US$8 million overreferred $1 million areand digital gateways to extra information and content about Plan. sanitation or handperiod as '2012'. In this report, the UNICEF ‘Rural Sanitation in Flood Affected Districts’ Project. Australian public. informal name 'Plan in Australia’ washing facilities All youThe have to do to view this content is: project targets 7 million people in 5000 villages across 17

Our second Annual Effectiveness Review was published, providing a frank and detailed analysis of our programming work and a detailed companion document to this Annual Report.

fi

Commonwealth states to and countries cultures take action to prevent this

accreditation Plan is currently fully accredited and a trusted recipient of funds from AusAID, the Australian Government’s Agency for International Development responsible for managing the Australian Government’s official overseas aid program.

We officially launched the new 5-year strategy for Plan in Australia, outlining our The report, titled ‘So, What aspiration to be a leading about Boys? ’ outlines why girls child rights agency in are fighting a losing battle for our Australia. story gender equality if boys and men don’t join the cause. Plan International is one of the oldest and largest children’s development organisations in the world. We work with communities in 50 developing countries and raise funds to support our work inseptember 21 countries, such as Australia. By actively involving children, and working at a grassroots november level with no religious or political agenda, we unite and inspire people around the globe to transform the world for children.

july

We committed to undertaking a Gender Equality Self Assessment in line with the Plan International Gender Equality policy. A survey was sent out to all staff to get a comprehensive picture of staff perspectives on gender equality in Plan in Australia. It will be followed up by a document analysis to validate responses in FY13 and inform a gender action plan.

May 2012 saw the embedding of the Employee Value Proposition into our work. The new Employee Engagement survey was introduced and some first steps were taken toward defining our Culture and Values with a Board and Senior Management Team focus group.

Well, start here. Plan is developing a new curriculum resource for educators of 14 –16 year olds. Better yet, this 12-unit resource (with session plans, fact booklets and more) will be free to download from our website! If you would like to be involved in testing the resource or would like more information, please contact Plan's Youth Participation Advisor, Victoria Kahla at victoria.kahla@plan.org.au

A positive partnership

Plan’s 2012 Annual Report is now available with updates on our performance in 2011-2012. You can view the report at plan.org.au or send an email to info@plan.org.au if you would like a printed copy.

t

World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development

Want to teach your students about international development, but don’t know where to start?

Every year 10 million girls are forced or coerced into marriage before they reach 18 – that’s one every three seconds.

Just sent our first letter to the child we sponsor with @PlanAustralia I'm amazed at the journey it will take, maybe donkey, to get to him! (@RedheadEdition)

22 March

this one’s for you!

or forever hold your peace

@PlanAustralia Just bought my 2 sisters a pig each for XmasThey'll be pleased they're going to a Cambodian family, not into their backyards (@mullup)

International Women’s Day

Teachers,

Speak now...

By partnering with Plan you can motivate and inspire your staff, demonstrate corporate social responsibility to your customers, reduce your tax bill, and build your reputation as a business that cares about children.

This publication has been printed on ecoStar, a FSC Recycled certified paper made carbon neutral (CN), and manufactured from 100% post consumer recycled paper in a process chlorine free environment and under an ISO 14001 EMS. Production of this publication has been carbon offset retiring 2,035 kgs of CO2. This publication is fully recyclable, please dispose of wisely.

Here are a couple of ways your business can partner with Plan: 30/10/2012 3:13:07 PM

»

Find out more at plan.org.au/corporate

Business child sponsorship is a unique

and personal way for a business to make a difference in the life of a child, their family and community. Child sponsorship will engage your employees by allowing them to see firsthand the difference sponsorship makes – through writing letters to and possibly visiting your sponsored child.

Workplace Giving is an easy process that allows staff to make monthly donations direct from their pay. Better yet, businesses can choose to match these donations, meaning contributions go twice as far. Staff can choose to Sponsor a Child or become a Girls Champion.

WORKPLACE

GIVING with Plan International Australia


Say

Community

News

Give more than your heart away this Valentine’s Day

what?

Surprise your loved one this Valentine’s Day with a Gift of Hope from Plan.

We love hearing from Plan supporters on our social media channels – here are a few stories that recently caught our attention.

Gifts of Hope are items needed by the communities we work with and give children and their families a real and lasting way out of poverty. Your loved one will your generosity!

Facebook

Gifts start from $20 for 5 chickens, so jump online today at plan.org.au/shop

Tonight I realised it is exactly twelve months ago I was on a plane headed for Nepal to trek with a group of strangers! I had raised $11,000 for Plan in Australia and was leaving my family to go into the unknown. A life changing experience, with life long memories. (little luv)

Dates for your

Just had the most wonderful hour with Rebecca from Plan who knocked on my door. Her honesty and emotion was wonderful. We are proud to announce that we have added Ana from Honduras to our family. Now she can remain with her parents in her community. Looking forward to her letters. (Trudi Rodwell)

calendar 21 February International Mother Tongue Day

Twitter

8 March

World Water Day

Since October 2012 we have been collecting names of Australians who object to child marriage and in March we will deliver these to Australia’s Foreign Minister Bob Carr. There’s still time to add your name at becauseiamagirl.com.au and champion an end to child marriage at home and abroad.

So impressed @JuliaGillard raise her hands for girls rights around the world as part of @PlanAustralia for #DayOfTheGirl (@LeonjWard)

1-7 April National Youth Week 21 May

Annual Report

Hot off

12 June World Day Against Child Labour

the press

20 June World Refugee Day plan international australia

9 August

annual report 2012

International Day of the World's Indigenous People

annual report 2012

plan international australia

year at a glance We scaled up our AusAIDANCP funded program portfolio, increasing the number of development projects from 29 to 35, and receiving an increase in our AusAID funding subsidy from $4.1 million to $5.1 million.

Our 2011 Because I am a Girl report was launched in Canberra with The Hon. Kevin Rudd and a very special guest – Rubi Begum, a 16-year-old girl from Bangladesh who is a survivor of child marriage and a beneficiary of Plan’s programs.

5-year strategy

2011 august

our vision

october

december

Plan’s vision is of a world in which all children realise their full potential in societies that respect people’s rights and dignity. We completed our AusAIDfunded Civil Society Water, Sanitation & Hygiene Plan’sour lobbying at the mission program across seven Commonwealth Heads of We strive to achieve lasting improvements in the quality of life of children in developing countries developing countries, with Government Meeting (CHOGM) through a process that unites people across cultures and adds meaning and valuethe to their lives by: following outcomes over directly led to the recognition 18 needs months: »» enabling children, their families and their communities to meet their basic and to of early and forced child marriage

Cover photo: A woman with increase their ability to participateWe in and benefit from their societies in the outcomes statement and the began a new initiative 78,527 additional a baby on her back in Benin encouragement»»offostering all Mums for Change, relationships to increasecalled understanding and unity among peoples of different harvests crops in a field. people now have

which saw 300 mothers’ groups from around Australia

access to safe water

Our Chief Executive, Ian Wishart spent three days on the street with our faceto-face fundraising team to experience firsthand the work they do to encourage Australians to support Plan.

january

Our From Cup to Crop appeal raised over $400,000 to help Plan deliver much needed food aid in Cambodia, Zimbabwe and Ethiopia.

2012

ABN 49 004 875 807

refers to Plan International Australia. The terms ‘Plan’ and ‘Plan International’ refer to the global organisation of which Plan International Australia is a part. Please see page 10 for further information on our global network.

flood-affected districts and has strong theyour mobile device over 1. Download a free code reader 2. aOpen thefocus app.on ending 3. Hold practice open defecation in rural communities. It also app onto yourofmobile device theaims code until it scans. to build sanitation markets, so that low-income consumers can (for example, QR Reader). build themselves a durable and long-lasting toilet. You will automatically be taken to the content on your mobile device.

raised $40,000

april

Annual Report 2012 Cover Foldout.indd 1

30/10/2012 3:13:11 PM

Plan International Australia is focussed on increased transparency for all our stakeholders through our Annual Report. With this in mind, we are using the Global Reporting Initiative as a guide to our improvements.

Plan International Australia is honoured to have Her Excellency, Ms Quentin Bryce AC, Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia as our Patron. We give special thanks for her support and endorsement of Women for Girls.

june

Plan International Australia was a top 10 finalist in the 2011 PwC Transparency Awards > $30 million category for our 2011 Annual Report.

top10

More than $46,000 was raised by a group of adventurers who took part in an Inspired Adventures trek to Mount Kilimanjaro.

na i s l

By the end of the financial year we exceeded some key financial targets:

75 years

» Our Major Gifts target was exceeded by $2 million.

Plan International celebrated its 75th anniversary. Around the world Plan staff, children, partners and local communities celebrated with the world’s biggest children’s birthday party. Here in Australia we celebrated by recognising our supporters through a ‘thank you’ video and social media campaign, and highlighting the importance of birth registration for all children – every child’s right to a birthday! 2011

Annual Report 2012 Cover Foldout.indd 2

global reporting initiative

2012

» The number of new regular givers attracted to Plan grew by over 41%, from 9,089 to 12,888.

m

Plan 18/60 City Road, Southbank VIC 3006 GPO Box 2818, Melbourne VIC 3001 Tel: 13 75 26 Fax: +61 (3) 9670 1130 Email: info@plan.org.au

Plan International Australia is a member of its professional peak body the Australian Council for International Development (ACFID). We are a signatory to its code of conduct that covers the presentation of annual reports.

our patron

february Long-term Plan supporter Ricardo Galvani and a group of 20 friends toured Australia in their classic XK and E-type Jaguars and raised $40,000 to support Plan’s work.

Whether your business is large or small, Plan’s approach is the same: to create mutually beneficial partnerships that make business sense – and a positive difference to children's lives.

acfid

$2

13 75 26 WWW.PLAN.ORG.AU

Annual Effectiveness Review

may

march

Opposite page: Children ride »» promoting of children. of human rights. the rights and interestssign up to participate in child bicycles to school in Siem violation Reap, sponsorship and connect with Cambodia.

279,317 additional people now have access other groups through a new We commenced a 3-month to basic sanitation online community. This reportappeal sets out to Plan raise funds for the International Australia's progress worsening drought crisis in digital codes towards our vision and mission 144 additional Africa. appeal raised between 1 East July 201 1 and The 30 June Throughout this report you will notice visual codes on some pages. schools with water, 2012. We have to thisfrom the Plan in These Australia Pakistan entered into an US$8 million overreferred $1 million areand digital gateways to extra information and content about Plan. sanitation or handperiod as '2012'. In this report, the UNICEF ‘Rural Sanitation in Flood Affected Districts’ Project. Australian public. informal name 'Plan in Australia’ washing facilities All youThe have to do to view this content is: project targets 7 million people in 5000 villages across 17

Our second Annual Effectiveness Review was published, providing a frank and detailed analysis of our programming work and a detailed companion document to this Annual Report.

fi

Commonwealth states to and countries cultures take action to prevent this

accreditation Plan is currently fully accredited and a trusted recipient of funds from AusAID, the Australian Government’s Agency for International Development responsible for managing the Australian Government’s official overseas aid program.

We officially launched the new 5-year strategy for Plan in Australia, outlining our The report, titled ‘So, What aspiration to be a leading about Boys? ’ outlines why girls child rights agency in are fighting a losing battle for our Australia. story gender equality if boys and men don’t join the cause. Plan International is one of the oldest and largest children’s development organisations in the world. We work with communities in 50 developing countries and raise funds to support our work inseptember 21 countries, such as Australia. By actively involving children, and working at a grassroots november level with no religious or political agenda, we unite and inspire people around the globe to transform the world for children.

july

We committed to undertaking a Gender Equality Self Assessment in line with the Plan International Gender Equality policy. A survey was sent out to all staff to get a comprehensive picture of staff perspectives on gender equality in Plan in Australia. It will be followed up by a document analysis to validate responses in FY13 and inform a gender action plan.

May 2012 saw the embedding of the Employee Value Proposition into our work. The new Employee Engagement survey was introduced and some first steps were taken toward defining our Culture and Values with a Board and Senior Management Team focus group.

Well, start here. Plan is developing a new curriculum resource for educators of 14 –16 year olds. Better yet, this 12-unit resource (with session plans, fact booklets and more) will be free to download from our website! If you would like to be involved in testing the resource or would like more information, please contact Plan's Youth Participation Advisor, Victoria Kahla at victoria.kahla@plan.org.au

A positive partnership

Plan’s 2012 Annual Report is now available with updates on our performance in 2011-2012. You can view the report at plan.org.au or send an email to info@plan.org.au if you would like a printed copy.

t

World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development

Want to teach your students about international development, but don’t know where to start?

Every year 10 million girls are forced or coerced into marriage before they reach 18 – that’s one every three seconds.

Just sent our first letter to the child we sponsor with @PlanAustralia I'm amazed at the journey it will take, maybe donkey, to get to him! (@RedheadEdition)

22 March

this one’s for you!

or forever hold your peace

@PlanAustralia Just bought my 2 sisters a pig each for XmasThey'll be pleased they're going to a Cambodian family, not into their backyards (@mullup)

International Women’s Day

Teachers,

Speak now...

By partnering with Plan you can motivate and inspire your staff, demonstrate corporate social responsibility to your customers, reduce your tax bill, and build your reputation as a business that cares about children.

This publication has been printed on ecoStar, a FSC Recycled certified paper made carbon neutral (CN), and manufactured from 100% post consumer recycled paper in a process chlorine free environment and under an ISO 14001 EMS. Production of this publication has been carbon offset retiring 2,035 kgs of CO2. This publication is fully recyclable, please dispose of wisely.

Here are a couple of ways your business can partner with Plan: 30/10/2012 3:13:07 PM

»

Find out more at plan.org.au/corporate

Business child sponsorship is a unique

and personal way for a business to make a difference in the life of a child, their family and community. Child sponsorship will engage your employees by allowing them to see firsthand the difference sponsorship makes – through writing letters to and possibly visiting your sponsored child.

Workplace Giving is an easy process that allows staff to make monthly donations direct from their pay. Better yet, businesses can choose to match these donations, meaning contributions go twice as far. Staff can choose to Sponsor a Child or become a Girls Champion.

WORKPLACE

GIVING with Plan International Australia


PLAN in ACTION

Lamana with her family in their home in Yaounde, Cameroon.

T

wo years ago Lamana made a decision.

As dawn was breaking early one morning, she gathered her belongings and walked out the front door, leaving her husband behind. Her body was wounded with bruises and cuts from a beating she had received the previous night. Her husband had threatened her with a knife and she feared for her life. This situation wasn’t uncommon in her marriage – she was often beaten and raped for refusing sex or simply leaving the house – but her decision to leave was. She walked to her parents’ house and when they opened the door she demanded to come home. She was 15 years old. Lamana is one of an estimated ten million girls worldwide who will marry each year before they are 18. Some as young as eight years old. These girls are not physically or emotionally ready to become wives and mothers and face risks such as complications during childbirth, contracting HIV/AIDS and, as in Lamana’s case, are at risk of violence, abuse and exploitation. Often these girls are forced into marriages against their will, with men who are much older than they are, and who often they don’t even know. “I felt very uncomfortable when it was announced the day of my wedding – very closed … I wanted to kill myself. I was thinking ‘how can I invite my friends to a forced marriage?’ I refused all of the ceremonies because I didn’t want to be a part of that,” says Lamana who is now 17.

“Within the family, the man is at the top … when you talk about gender equality to a person that has not had a certain level of education, the person doesn’t understand it. It seems like you’re trying to let him know that his subordinate is supposed to be his equal, and he doesn’t take it,” he says.

Lamana has also been given the opportunity to attend college, where she is not only completing a Computer Science degree but gaining confidence at the same time.

Lamana’s world is one that is very hard for those of us living outside its context to comprehend. In her community, a deprived area of Cameroon’s capital city Yaoundé, females are seen as second-class citizens and exist only to marry and bear children. Only 42% of school-aged children are effectively attending school and most parents are illiterate and attach very little importance to girls’ education. When Lamana arrived home to her parents that fateful morning she had to fight to be allowed to stay. “My father and brothers were trying to put pressure on me to go back because it was looking like a disgrace for my family”, she said.

story

as Lamana’s father don’t think what they are doing is wrong – they are simply doing things the way they have always been done.

Yet it is against this backdrop that things are starting to change. Through a new project called Girl Child Education, Lamana and thousands of girls like her are discovering the importance of education and learning that they have rights – equal to their brothers.

When Lamana speaks you can’t help but listen. Her physical appearance is arresting – she is tall and gentle, with long ballerina-like limbs and large almond eyes. Yet it’s her inner strength and bravery in telling her story that hold you in anticipation for each of her softly spoken words.

Lamana’s

Photos by: Igor Sapina Opposite page and this page.

Lamana’s journey does not end with her. After seeing his daughter’s progress, Lamana’s father, who was responsible for arranging her marriage two years earlier, has changed his attitudes – not just toward her but her younger sister. “My father is always reminding us … don’t think about marriage, think about going to school and about your education. My father’s dream is now for his daughters to finish school and get jobs,” she says.

“But I refused and stood my ground – I would not go back to the marriage because it was dangerous.”

Two years ago Lamana made a decision that changed her life forever. She has shown that with the right opportunities younger generations can play a large part in the development of their communities. Hers is one story but the message is universal – give a girl access to an equal education and you not only empower her, but her family and her community.

Jasmine Stefane from Plan Cameroon explains that men such

Above all else, it’s her human right.

get involved Find out more about Plan’s gender equality campaign at: becauseiamagirl.com.au

For a young girl in Cameroon, ‘growing up’ comes far too early, writes Sinead Blessing. summer 2013

Watch a short film of Lamana’s story at: becauseiamagirl.com.au

Tell us what you think about Lamana’s story and gender equality at: facebook.com/ becauseiamagirl.au

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 9


PLAN in ACTION

Lamana with her family in their home in Yaounde, Cameroon.

T

wo years ago Lamana made a decision.

As dawn was breaking early one morning, she gathered her belongings and walked out the front door, leaving her husband behind. Her body was wounded with bruises and cuts from a beating she had received the previous night. Her husband had threatened her with a knife and she feared for her life. This situation wasn’t uncommon in her marriage – she was often beaten and raped for refusing sex or simply leaving the house – but her decision to leave was. She walked to her parents’ house and when they opened the door she demanded to come home. She was 15 years old. Lamana is one of an estimated ten million girls worldwide who will marry each year before they are 18. Some as young as eight years old. These girls are not physically or emotionally ready to become wives and mothers and face risks such as complications during childbirth, contracting HIV/AIDS and, as in Lamana’s case, are at risk of violence, abuse and exploitation. Often these girls are forced into marriages against their will, with men who are much older than they are, and who often they don’t even know. “I felt very uncomfortable when it was announced the day of my wedding – very closed … I wanted to kill myself. I was thinking ‘how can I invite my friends to a forced marriage?’ I refused all of the ceremonies because I didn’t want to be a part of that,” says Lamana who is now 17.

“Within the family, the man is at the top … when you talk about gender equality to a person that has not had a certain level of education, the person doesn’t understand it. It seems like you’re trying to let him know that his subordinate is supposed to be his equal, and he doesn’t take it,” he says.

Lamana has also been given the opportunity to attend college, where she is not only completing a Computer Science degree but gaining confidence at the same time.

Lamana’s world is one that is very hard for those of us living outside its context to comprehend. In her community, a deprived area of Cameroon’s capital city Yaoundé, females are seen as second-class citizens and exist only to marry and bear children. Only 42% of school-aged children are effectively attending school and most parents are illiterate and attach very little importance to girls’ education. When Lamana arrived home to her parents that fateful morning she had to fight to be allowed to stay. “My father and brothers were trying to put pressure on me to go back because it was looking like a disgrace for my family”, she said.

story

as Lamana’s father don’t think what they are doing is wrong – they are simply doing things the way they have always been done.

Yet it is against this backdrop that things are starting to change. Through a new project called Girl Child Education, Lamana and thousands of girls like her are discovering the importance of education and learning that they have rights – equal to their brothers.

When Lamana speaks you can’t help but listen. Her physical appearance is arresting – she is tall and gentle, with long ballerina-like limbs and large almond eyes. Yet it’s her inner strength and bravery in telling her story that hold you in anticipation for each of her softly spoken words.

Lamana’s

Photos by: Igor Sapina Opposite page and this page.

Lamana’s journey does not end with her. After seeing his daughter’s progress, Lamana’s father, who was responsible for arranging her marriage two years earlier, has changed his attitudes – not just toward her but her younger sister. “My father is always reminding us … don’t think about marriage, think about going to school and about your education. My father’s dream is now for his daughters to finish school and get jobs,” she says.

“But I refused and stood my ground – I would not go back to the marriage because it was dangerous.”

Two years ago Lamana made a decision that changed her life forever. She has shown that with the right opportunities younger generations can play a large part in the development of their communities. Hers is one story but the message is universal – give a girl access to an equal education and you not only empower her, but her family and her community.

Jasmine Stefane from Plan Cameroon explains that men such

Above all else, it’s her human right.

get involved Find out more about Plan’s gender equality campaign at: becauseiamagirl.com.au

For a young girl in Cameroon, ‘growing up’ comes far too early, writes Sinead Blessing. summer 2013

Watch a short film of Lamana’s story at: becauseiamagirl.com.au

Tell us what you think about Lamana’s story and gender equality at: facebook.com/ becauseiamagirl.au

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 9


PLAN in ACTION

Boys in their classroom in Myanmar look at an educational poster that teaches them how to stay safe in times of disasters.

Habiba, 17, from Cameroon is one of the girls featured in I am a Girl.

Plan has been assisting I am a Girl which is set to launch in June this year.

Five minutes with … Rohan Kent, Plan’s Disaster RISK Manager, talks about 4CA — our MULTI-COUNTRY Climate Change project.

What does 4CA stand for? Child-Centered Climate Change Adaptation.

That’s a long name – what does it mean? Basically, this project supports communities to adapt, prepare for, and respond to the increasing effects of disasters (with a specific focus on climate change related disasters) and makes sure children and young people are involved at every level.

Why is this something Plan needs to focus on? Climate change adaptation is a new and dynamic area for not only Plan but many international organisations. As the climate changes we are seeing an increase in the number of natural disasters around the world – and this is most prominent in developing countries; in communities that Plan works with. Of course, you can’t stop these disasters from happening, but what you can do is help communities prepare appropriately and improve their ability to withstand the effects. At Plan we believe it is vital that children and young people are involved in this planning, not just because they make up such a large percentage of their communities, but because they are often the most vulnerable in times of disaster and have a

rebecca barry, film maker, discusses her new film, i am a girl.

right to have their views respected. Children have important contributions to make and they should be recognised and valued.

Why do you think it’s important? Plan is an agency dedicated to child rights. Boys and girls have the right to learn and be in a position where they can act on issues that will affect them now and in the future. This project supports this, and will hopefully help communities to become more resilient to the changing environment around them.

How can people find out more about what is happening? People can read more about the project and ongoing updates at plan.org.au. Plan is also a co-founding member of the Children in a Changing Climate Coalition, which continues to promote all of these things I have mentioned. Find out more at childreninachangingclimate.org.

This project is funded by the Australian Government, primarily through the AusAID Humanitarian Partnership Agreement.

Can you tell us about your new film I am a Girl? There is a group of people in the world today who are more persecuted than anyone else, but they are not political or religious activists. They are girls. Being born a girl means you are more likely to be subjected to violence, disease, poverty and disadvantage than any other group on the planet. I am a Girl is a feature length documentary film that follows the stories of six girls from different countries as they reach their coming of age. It aims to reveal what it means to grow up female in the 21st century.

Why did you decide to make the film? Three years ago I was lucky enough to survive a tsunami whilst on holiday in Samoa. While this event was the most frightening and levelling experience of my life, along with it came a realisation that we don’t always have control over our lives or the outcomes of a situation.  Upon reflection, it seems that many, if not most girls in the world today, live with this feeling every day.  Not long after this occurred, I was moved to tears when I read a magazine article about the plight of girls around the globe. It seems that despite technological advances and an abundance of wealth, we live in a world that openly discriminates against

summer 2013

To stay updated on the launch date, tickets and film information visit www.iamagirl.com.au and stay tuned to facebook.com/ planaustralia

girls, subjecting them to the most incomprehensible violence, abuse and deprivation of liberties. I decided I had to make a film that would reach out to a broader audience; that would inform and at the same time give people the opportunity to connect with these issues through film.

Have you achieved what you had hoped with the stories? Yes. My vision for I am a Girl was simple – to weave a universal

story through the voices of girls in different locations around the world dealing with their own unique challenges. Each story has been approached as a portrait, poignant in its simplicity.  Whether it’s a story of abuse, neglect, optimism or hope, each story follows the daily toil from sunrise to sunset.

What impact has making the film had on you? Making this film has been an incredible experience. Not just meeting the girls but having their trust and having the privilege of telling their stories. And also being able to capture the imagination and dedication of the individuals and organisations who made it all possible.

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 11


PLAN in ACTION

Boys in their classroom in Myanmar look at an educational poster that teaches them how to stay safe in times of disasters.

Habiba, 17, from Cameroon is one of the girls featured in I am a Girl.

Plan has been assisting I am a Girl which is set to launch in June this year.

Five minutes with … Rohan Kent, Plan’s Disaster RISK Manager, talks about 4CA — our MULTI-COUNTRY Climate Change project.

What does 4CA stand for? Child-Centered Climate Change Adaptation.

That’s a long name – what does it mean? Basically, this project supports communities to adapt, prepare for, and respond to the increasing effects of disasters (with a specific focus on climate change related disasters) and makes sure children and young people are involved at every level.

Why is this something Plan needs to focus on? Climate change adaptation is a new and dynamic area for not only Plan but many international organisations. As the climate changes we are seeing an increase in the number of natural disasters around the world – and this is most prominent in developing countries; in communities that Plan works with. Of course, you can’t stop these disasters from happening, but what you can do is help communities prepare appropriately and improve their ability to withstand the effects. At Plan we believe it is vital that children and young people are involved in this planning, not just because they make up such a large percentage of their communities, but because they are often the most vulnerable in times of disaster and have a

rebecca barry, film maker, discusses her new film, i am a girl.

right to have their views respected. Children have important contributions to make and they should be recognised and valued.

Why do you think it’s important? Plan is an agency dedicated to child rights. Boys and girls have the right to learn and be in a position where they can act on issues that will affect them now and in the future. This project supports this, and will hopefully help communities to become more resilient to the changing environment around them.

How can people find out more about what is happening? People can read more about the project and ongoing updates at plan.org.au. Plan is also a co-founding member of the Children in a Changing Climate Coalition, which continues to promote all of these things I have mentioned. Find out more at childreninachangingclimate.org.

This project is funded by the Australian Government, primarily through the AusAID Humanitarian Partnership Agreement.

Can you tell us about your new film I am a Girl? There is a group of people in the world today who are more persecuted than anyone else, but they are not political or religious activists. They are girls. Being born a girl means you are more likely to be subjected to violence, disease, poverty and disadvantage than any other group on the planet. I am a Girl is a feature length documentary film that follows the stories of six girls from different countries as they reach their coming of age. It aims to reveal what it means to grow up female in the 21st century.

Why did you decide to make the film? Three years ago I was lucky enough to survive a tsunami whilst on holiday in Samoa. While this event was the most frightening and levelling experience of my life, along with it came a realisation that we don’t always have control over our lives or the outcomes of a situation.  Upon reflection, it seems that many, if not most girls in the world today, live with this feeling every day.  Not long after this occurred, I was moved to tears when I read a magazine article about the plight of girls around the globe. It seems that despite technological advances and an abundance of wealth, we live in a world that openly discriminates against

summer 2013

To stay updated on the launch date, tickets and film information visit www.iamagirl.com.au and stay tuned to facebook.com/ planaustralia

girls, subjecting them to the most incomprehensible violence, abuse and deprivation of liberties. I decided I had to make a film that would reach out to a broader audience; that would inform and at the same time give people the opportunity to connect with these issues through film.

Have you achieved what you had hoped with the stories? Yes. My vision for I am a Girl was simple – to weave a universal

story through the voices of girls in different locations around the world dealing with their own unique challenges. Each story has been approached as a portrait, poignant in its simplicity.  Whether it’s a story of abuse, neglect, optimism or hope, each story follows the daily toil from sunrise to sunset.

What impact has making the film had on you? Making this film has been an incredible experience. Not just meeting the girls but having their trust and having the privilege of telling their stories. And also being able to capture the imagination and dedication of the individuals and organisations who made it all possible.

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 11


PLAN in ACTION

Contributions from the group form a social fund that can be used for special occasions and emergencies.

Krissy with members of the VSLA group.

Jane Nyaketcho, the program manager in Uganda demonstrates how to use the Afri Pads.

Women’s business

Plan International staff Sharon and Judith (back row) with members of the VSLA group.

Plan’s Krissy Nicholson gives a first-hand account of a new menstrual hygiene project in Uganda.

I

was as high as a kite and my smile as wide as Africa when I recently returned from the green, rocky district of Tororo in eastern Uganda.

When I started with Plan early last year, I was most excited about a menstrual hygiene program that I was to manage. One – because it was taking me back to Uganda, which has been like home since I lived there a few years ago. And two – because it’s an innovative program that will help around 100,000 women and girls to remain in school and generate an income. After visiting the program, meeting the women involved and working with the team in Tororo, I realised just how much this new project is helping. I will never again take for granted my ability to buy pads and tampons, knowing that 1 in 10 African girls drop out of school as a result of poor menstrual hygiene and lack of sanitary products. Girls are forced to use everything from banana leaves to old rags, have no place to wash at school, and often face embarrassing accidents which usually results in them skipping school. Through this new program, Plan is working to educate girls, teachers and the broader community on menstrual hygiene. We want to break down cultural taboos about girls being ‘unclean’ during this time, as well as support wider education on puberty and sexual and reproductive health. To do this we have partnered with a social business called AfriPads. In 2009 a young Canadian couple developed

a corrugated iron roof, rather than the traditional round mud brick and straw huts that were a quarter of the size.

re-usable, washable cloth pads that were appropriate for the African context – great for the girls and great for the environment. Another element of our program involves income generating activities through Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLAs). These are groups of up to 30 people – mainly women – who are trained by Plan in business skills and operate much like a bank. Plan's strategy is to involve these groups to purchase the AfriPads at a subsidised price for them to sell and generate additional income. I spent some time with a VSLA called ‘Tamamadongo Group’, which translates to ‘trying to develop literacy’. Sitting with them, I watched in amazement as a sturdy grey metal box was brought out and four locks were taken off. Four keys were held by different members of the group to ensure security. From the box was pulled a series of record books for individuals to record their savings, and a general ledger book meticulously detailed with the loans and savings made over the three year period this group has been active. Next came four Tupperware containers with blue lids (just like the ones I bring my salad in to work) labelled: loans, savings, fines and social fund. Each member took turns in adding to her savings or paying back her loan. Aged from 25 to 76, the women here all have a story to tell.

Another woman who introduced herself as Florence raised her hand and spoke: “I am a single mother and with the extra money, I am able to stand in my home like a man” she said, with her head held high. My feminist sensibilities kicked in as I asked: “don’t you mean like a strong woman?” “No,” she replied as the rest of the group watched. “With the power of a man. I have control of everything in the house and am able to manage now.” Single women are often the most vulnerable in a community as they don’t have the social standing, rights or income capability of a man, therefore for these women, it was the highest of achievements. “We were really sleeping, but now we have woken up due to the support of Plan” said Mary, the Chair of the group.

As the meeting closed, the items placed carefully back in the box and the four locks secured, the women stood and with a shrill high pitch call ‘Yy Yy Yy Yy Yy Yy Yy Yy Yy Yy’, and their hands clapping, they started to sing and dance for us. The energy was high, their faces were beaming and it really was a celebration of their success. My hips started wiggling and my hands started to clap. I was pulled in by the joyous occasion and soon we were dancing and singing together. I was in my element. Back in Uganda, dancing with a community! As our car pulled away, I was overwhelmed with joy and wonder of how women with so little in the way of possessions and money can achieve so much. The menstrual hygiene program will take groups like this to another level so that women can build better lives for themselves and their communities. What a privilege to be a part of this program. I really do have the best job in the world!

find out more For updates on this project stay tuned to: plan.org.au

Find out more about Afripads on their website: afripads.com

Watch a great video about AfriPads: www. vimeo.com/14683119

“With the money I saved, I built my house” said a woman named Christine, patting the walls of the house we were sitting next to. It was the biggest house in the village with bricks and

summer 2013

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 13


PLAN in ACTION

Contributions from the group form a social fund that can be used for special occasions and emergencies.

Krissy with members of the VSLA group.

Jane Nyaketcho, the program manager in Uganda demonstrates how to use the Afri Pads.

Women’s business

Plan International staff Sharon and Judith (back row) with members of the VSLA group.

Plan’s Krissy Nicholson gives a first-hand account of a new menstrual hygiene project in Uganda.

I

was as high as a kite and my smile as wide as Africa when I recently returned from the green, rocky district of Tororo in eastern Uganda.

When I started with Plan early last year, I was most excited about a menstrual hygiene program that I was to manage. One – because it was taking me back to Uganda, which has been like home since I lived there a few years ago. And two – because it’s an innovative program that will help around 100,000 women and girls to remain in school and generate an income. After visiting the program, meeting the women involved and working with the team in Tororo, I realised just how much this new project is helping. I will never again take for granted my ability to buy pads and tampons, knowing that 1 in 10 African girls drop out of school as a result of poor menstrual hygiene and lack of sanitary products. Girls are forced to use everything from banana leaves to old rags, have no place to wash at school, and often face embarrassing accidents which usually results in them skipping school. Through this new program, Plan is working to educate girls, teachers and the broader community on menstrual hygiene. We want to break down cultural taboos about girls being ‘unclean’ during this time, as well as support wider education on puberty and sexual and reproductive health. To do this we have partnered with a social business called AfriPads. In 2009 a young Canadian couple developed

a corrugated iron roof, rather than the traditional round mud brick and straw huts that were a quarter of the size.

re-usable, washable cloth pads that were appropriate for the African context – great for the girls and great for the environment. Another element of our program involves income generating activities through Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLAs). These are groups of up to 30 people – mainly women – who are trained by Plan in business skills and operate much like a bank. Plan's strategy is to involve these groups to purchase the AfriPads at a subsidised price for them to sell and generate additional income. I spent some time with a VSLA called ‘Tamamadongo Group’, which translates to ‘trying to develop literacy’. Sitting with them, I watched in amazement as a sturdy grey metal box was brought out and four locks were taken off. Four keys were held by different members of the group to ensure security. From the box was pulled a series of record books for individuals to record their savings, and a general ledger book meticulously detailed with the loans and savings made over the three year period this group has been active. Next came four Tupperware containers with blue lids (just like the ones I bring my salad in to work) labelled: loans, savings, fines and social fund. Each member took turns in adding to her savings or paying back her loan. Aged from 25 to 76, the women here all have a story to tell.

Another woman who introduced herself as Florence raised her hand and spoke: “I am a single mother and with the extra money, I am able to stand in my home like a man” she said, with her head held high. My feminist sensibilities kicked in as I asked: “don’t you mean like a strong woman?” “No,” she replied as the rest of the group watched. “With the power of a man. I have control of everything in the house and am able to manage now.” Single women are often the most vulnerable in a community as they don’t have the social standing, rights or income capability of a man, therefore for these women, it was the highest of achievements. “We were really sleeping, but now we have woken up due to the support of Plan” said Mary, the Chair of the group.

As the meeting closed, the items placed carefully back in the box and the four locks secured, the women stood and with a shrill high pitch call ‘Yy Yy Yy Yy Yy Yy Yy Yy Yy Yy’, and their hands clapping, they started to sing and dance for us. The energy was high, their faces were beaming and it really was a celebration of their success. My hips started wiggling and my hands started to clap. I was pulled in by the joyous occasion and soon we were dancing and singing together. I was in my element. Back in Uganda, dancing with a community! As our car pulled away, I was overwhelmed with joy and wonder of how women with so little in the way of possessions and money can achieve so much. The menstrual hygiene program will take groups like this to another level so that women can build better lives for themselves and their communities. What a privilege to be a part of this program. I really do have the best job in the world!

find out more For updates on this project stay tuned to: plan.org.au

Find out more about Afripads on their website: afripads.com

Watch a great video about AfriPads: www. vimeo.com/14683119

“With the money I saved, I built my house” said a woman named Christine, patting the walls of the house we were sitting next to. It was the biggest house in the village with bricks and

summer 2013

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 13


PLAN in ACTION

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

Through the lens Captured moments from Plan-supported communities in Asia in 2012.

1. Plan interns read a sponsor’s letter to a sponsored child.

Since 2009, Plan Laos has implemented an internship project. Interns are employed for three years and gain skills to help them find future employment.

2. Rujina, 16, with her son at their home in Bangladesh.

Rujina got married at 12, and had her son at 14. She loved attending school and still speaks fondly of her time there but had to stop her education for her role as a mother and housekeeper. Child marriage and early motherhood are prevalent problems in Bangladesh.

3. Children play in the grounds of a preschool built and run with Plan's support in Timor-Leste.

At present, only 70% of children in Timor-Leste go to school and only half of them are still there by grade three. To address this, Plan is supporting communities to build preschools as well as training volunteers in teaching skills, so remote communities are able to run the schools themselves.

4. A young girl from the H’Mong ethnic minority in Vietnam

shows her clean hands. At the end of playing and reading activities, children are taught to always wash their hands to stay healthy.

5. Seven-year-old Kintan is a student at a Plan-supported

school in Indonesia. She has been diagnosed with attention deficiency disorder and needs intensive guidance to stay focused. Plan supports inclusive education for all children and promotes the importance of ensuring those most vulnerable – such as children living with a disability – have equal access to rights.

them accountable for their own development and helps them make decisions and find solutions despite their limited resources.

7. A pregnant woman receives a check up from a midwife

trained by Plan. Childbirth has been perilous for so long in Cambodia that rural Cambodians refer to it as “crossing the river,” a phrase that resonates with the uncertainties involved. Plan Cambodia supports community health volunteers and trains traditional midwives to lower the uncertainties during delivery.

8. American actress and Plan ambassador Marcia Cross

visited India to raise awareness for our ‘Because I am a Girl’ campaign. “I’m thrilled to support Plan’s Because I am a Girl initiative. I recently took an amazing trip to India to see firsthand how Plan is helping to strengthen communities through programs that focus on empowering girls,” she said.

9. Children demonstrate their skills on a balance beam at a

school in Sri Lanka. In this community Plan has introduced an early learning toolkit for teachers which has had a positive impact on the quality of preschool teaching and quality of care provided to children.

10. A woman attends a Plan-supported parenting group in Indonesia with her child.

These parenting groups are run by facilitators that have been trained by Plan. The groups generally meet in the local community health centre and aim to help parents gain knowledge and practical skills to improve child health, learning and protection in the home and wider community.

6. Ngung, 10, a sponsored child studies at her house in

Vietnam. Ngung’s community is benefitting from Plan’s Pro-Poor Participatory Development project. This project provides communities with knowledge and skills to make

If you enjoy reading micro-stories just like these you can join our Facebook community at facebook.com/planaustralia

summer 2013

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 15


PLAN in ACTION

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

Through the lens Captured moments from Plan-supported communities in Asia in 2012.

1. Plan interns read a sponsor’s letter to a sponsored child.

Since 2009, Plan Laos has implemented an internship project. Interns are employed for three years and gain skills to help them find future employment.

2. Rujina, 16, with her son at their home in Bangladesh.

Rujina got married at 12, and had her son at 14. She loved attending school and still speaks fondly of her time there but had to stop her education for her role as a mother and housekeeper. Child marriage and early motherhood are prevalent problems in Bangladesh.

3. Children play in the grounds of a preschool built and run with Plan's support in Timor-Leste.

At present, only 70% of children in Timor-Leste go to school and only half of them are still there by grade three. To address this, Plan is supporting communities to build preschools as well as training volunteers in teaching skills, so remote communities are able to run the schools themselves.

4. A young girl from the H’Mong ethnic minority in Vietnam

shows her clean hands. At the end of playing and reading activities, children are taught to always wash their hands to stay healthy.

5. Seven-year-old Kintan is a student at a Plan-supported

school in Indonesia. She has been diagnosed with attention deficiency disorder and needs intensive guidance to stay focused. Plan supports inclusive education for all children and promotes the importance of ensuring those most vulnerable – such as children living with a disability – have equal access to rights.

them accountable for their own development and helps them make decisions and find solutions despite their limited resources.

7. A pregnant woman receives a check up from a midwife

trained by Plan. Childbirth has been perilous for so long in Cambodia that rural Cambodians refer to it as “crossing the river,” a phrase that resonates with the uncertainties involved. Plan Cambodia supports community health volunteers and trains traditional midwives to lower the uncertainties during delivery.

8. American actress and Plan ambassador Marcia Cross

visited India to raise awareness for our ‘Because I am a Girl’ campaign. “I’m thrilled to support Plan’s Because I am a Girl initiative. I recently took an amazing trip to India to see firsthand how Plan is helping to strengthen communities through programs that focus on empowering girls,” she said.

9. Children demonstrate their skills on a balance beam at a

school in Sri Lanka. In this community Plan has introduced an early learning toolkit for teachers which has had a positive impact on the quality of preschool teaching and quality of care provided to children.

10. A woman attends a Plan-supported parenting group in Indonesia with her child.

These parenting groups are run by facilitators that have been trained by Plan. The groups generally meet in the local community health centre and aim to help parents gain knowledge and practical skills to improve child health, learning and protection in the home and wider community.

6. Ngung, 10, a sponsored child studies at her house in

Vietnam. Ngung’s community is benefitting from Plan’s Pro-Poor Participatory Development project. This project provides communities with knowledge and skills to make

If you enjoy reading micro-stories just like these you can join our Facebook community at facebook.com/planaustralia

summer 2013

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 15


The

Voice

of Youth

A part of

history

The crowd at Plan’s International Day of the Girl event on October 11 in Melbourne raise their hands in support of girls' education.

Liz Wright, one of the brilliant minds behind Plan’s Youth Project Team, reflects on the inaugural International Day of the Girl.

T

he following is a scenario that I often wonder about. Would a 10-year-old girl who is pulled out of school know why her brothers continue to wake up early, put on a uniform, and go to school and she doesn’t? Would her mother and father tell her or would she have to guess? Would she wonder to herself: why am I different? What’s wrong with me?

On the day I spoke about the importance of education. Any barriers that I have overcome are nothing compared to the one in three girls globally who is denied an education – through poverty, discrimination and violence. Every day young girls are taken out of school, forced into marriage and subjected to violence.

Around the world 75 million girls are denied an education and often those girls will watch their brothers go to school. While I feel so lucky to live in a great country like Australia, I don’t want to be complacent. We have to use our freedom and privileges to see how we can assist those less equipped to deal with their challenges.

My education is allowing me to reach and achieve my goals. Largely because of my studies I have the freedom and confidence to make a difference in this world. Education opens doors and it has the key to unlock the potential inside everyone.

Until last year 11 October never held any significance for me. It was just a regular date on the calendar that signalled the impending stress of end of year exams. However last year was made very special, when after hard campaigning by Plan and other supporting organisations, the United Nations declared 11 October 2012 as the inaugural ‘International Day of the Girl’. I was fortunate enough to be given the exciting honour of speaking at an event at City Square in Melbourne on 11 October, hosted by Imogen Bailey, on behalf of Plan and our Youth Project Team.

Despite having the spotlight shining momentarily on me, 11 October wasn’t about me. The day, its message and its significance is bigger than me and bigger than Plan. I was just lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time. This is for all the girls around the world who are not in a position to use their voice or whose voices go unheard. Young girls like Malala from Pakistan who are targeted for their activism and opinions. This is for you. I want to thank Plan for providing the platform and the opportunity to speak at such a historic event. 11 October is now an important day in my life. If you are female, or if you have a sister, a mother, a daughter, wife or girlfriend – then I hope it will now be an important day in your life too.

Want more? Find out more about Plan’s Youth Project Team at: plan.org.au/ youth Actress Imogen Bailey and Youth Project Team member Liz Wright at Plan’s International Day of the Girl event on October 11 in Melbourne.

summer 2013

View a video from the International Day of the Girl event in City Square at: plan.org.au

What did 11 October mean to you? We’d love to hear at: facebook. com/planaustralia

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 17


The

Voice

of Youth

A part of

history

The crowd at Plan’s International Day of the Girl event on October 11 in Melbourne raise their hands in support of girls' education.

Liz Wright, one of the brilliant minds behind Plan’s Youth Project Team, reflects on the inaugural International Day of the Girl.

T

he following is a scenario that I often wonder about. Would a 10-year-old girl who is pulled out of school know why her brothers continue to wake up early, put on a uniform, and go to school and she doesn’t? Would her mother and father tell her or would she have to guess? Would she wonder to herself: why am I different? What’s wrong with me?

On the day I spoke about the importance of education. Any barriers that I have overcome are nothing compared to the one in three girls globally who is denied an education – through poverty, discrimination and violence. Every day young girls are taken out of school, forced into marriage and subjected to violence.

Around the world 75 million girls are denied an education and often those girls will watch their brothers go to school. While I feel so lucky to live in a great country like Australia, I don’t want to be complacent. We have to use our freedom and privileges to see how we can assist those less equipped to deal with their challenges.

My education is allowing me to reach and achieve my goals. Largely because of my studies I have the freedom and confidence to make a difference in this world. Education opens doors and it has the key to unlock the potential inside everyone.

Until last year 11 October never held any significance for me. It was just a regular date on the calendar that signalled the impending stress of end of year exams. However last year was made very special, when after hard campaigning by Plan and other supporting organisations, the United Nations declared 11 October 2012 as the inaugural ‘International Day of the Girl’. I was fortunate enough to be given the exciting honour of speaking at an event at City Square in Melbourne on 11 October, hosted by Imogen Bailey, on behalf of Plan and our Youth Project Team.

Despite having the spotlight shining momentarily on me, 11 October wasn’t about me. The day, its message and its significance is bigger than me and bigger than Plan. I was just lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time. This is for all the girls around the world who are not in a position to use their voice or whose voices go unheard. Young girls like Malala from Pakistan who are targeted for their activism and opinions. This is for you. I want to thank Plan for providing the platform and the opportunity to speak at such a historic event. 11 October is now an important day in my life. If you are female, or if you have a sister, a mother, a daughter, wife or girlfriend – then I hope it will now be an important day in your life too.

Want more? Find out more about Plan’s Youth Project Team at: plan.org.au/ youth Actress Imogen Bailey and Youth Project Team member Liz Wright at Plan’s International Day of the Girl event on October 11 in Melbourne.

summer 2013

View a video from the International Day of the Girl event in City Square at: plan.org.au

What did 11 October mean to you? We’d love to hear at: facebook. com/planaustralia

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 17


GLOBAL

Quick facts

learning

In 2009, there were 1.2 billion young people aged 10–19 in the world (18 per cent of world population). The number of young people in the world has more than doubled since 1950. The vast majority of young people – 88 per cent – live in developing countries. More than half the world’s young people live in either the South Asia or the East Asia and Pacific region. The country with the largest population of young people is India (243 million).

The youth

bulge Amalia Fawcett, Plan’s Senior Child Rights Specialist takes a closer look at ‘the youth bulge’.

What’s the situation? Children and young people make up 50% of the world’s population. And of the 1.2 billion people globally aged 15–24, around 1 billion live in developing countries. This is known as the youth bulge. The youth bulge is often seen as a negative issue. It looms on the horizon as a problem no one quite knows how to deal with and is most pronounced in Asia, the Pacific and Africa – the poorest regions in the world. Large numbers of young people have been linked to high unemployment, civil unrest and political protest, as well as issues such as teen pregnancy, homelessness and HIV.

A new perspective Let’s look at this issue in a new way. Instead of viewing the youth bulge as a problem, we can harness the power of the younger population and improve access to quality education and employment opportunities. Through this, economic activity and stability in these low income communities can be greatly improved. According to Justin Yifu Lin, the former World Bank Chief Economist, if a high number of young people have access

Young people learn skills at a radio station as a part of Plan’s Youth Livelihoods Program in Timor-Leste.

So, it’s important that organisations like Plan effectively involve young people in all aspects of development to make improvements more sustainable.

The community elder from El Salvador said: “the children and youth of the community are so awesome! For example, last year there was a landslide and we couldn’t get out of the area, so [the children and youth] had the idea that everybody had to do a human chain, and we were able to move all the rocks from one side of the village to the other, like ants ... the adults wouldn’t have had that idea.”

The research

What’s the future?

to employment, then the number of dependent people in a country will decrease and result in what is known as a ‘population dividend’.

In 2009, Plan and World Vision researched this issue in relation to preparing for and responding to disasters and published a report called Children on the Frontline. What this research found was that children and young people are often excluded from the activities that contribute to building the resilience of their local communities. But it also found that increasingly, there are innovative projects happening that utilise the fresh perspectives of young people. These include youth-led projects, where young people tackle their reality in ways that may have previously been overlooked – either by community leaders or even development agencies.

clear argument to make in favour of increasing their involvement in the development of their communities – they are 50% of the world’s population. Plan is joining with ChildFund, Australian National University and other members of the Child Rights Working Group to put together an event in early February 2013. It’s called ‘Reframing the Youth Bulge, from Problem to Solution’ will discuss this issue and what it means to our work.

Apart from their fundamental right to participation and development, children and young people also have another

Want more? Download a copy of the report Children on the Frontline from childreninachangingclimate.org

For example, the enthusiasm and creativity of young people was identified by a community elder in El Salvador, with regards to children’s important role in preparing for and responding to disasters. summer 2013

Visit plan.org.au for more information and updates on what Plan is doing

Like our facebook.com/ planaustralia page and post a question or join a discussion

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 19


GLOBAL

Quick facts

learning

In 2009, there were 1.2 billion young people aged 10–19 in the world (18 per cent of world population). The number of young people in the world has more than doubled since 1950. The vast majority of young people – 88 per cent – live in developing countries. More than half the world’s young people live in either the South Asia or the East Asia and Pacific region. The country with the largest population of young people is India (243 million).

The youth

bulge Amalia Fawcett, Plan’s Senior Child Rights Specialist takes a closer look at ‘the youth bulge’.

What’s the situation? Children and young people make up 50% of the world’s population. And of the 1.2 billion people globally aged 15–24, around 1 billion live in developing countries. This is known as the youth bulge. The youth bulge is often seen as a negative issue. It looms on the horizon as a problem no one quite knows how to deal with and is most pronounced in Asia, the Pacific and Africa – the poorest regions in the world. Large numbers of young people have been linked to high unemployment, civil unrest and political protest, as well as issues such as teen pregnancy, homelessness and HIV.

A new perspective Let’s look at this issue in a new way. Instead of viewing the youth bulge as a problem, we can harness the power of the younger population and improve access to quality education and employment opportunities. Through this, economic activity and stability in these low income communities can be greatly improved. According to Justin Yifu Lin, the former World Bank Chief Economist, if a high number of young people have access

Young people learn skills at a radio station as a part of Plan’s Youth Livelihoods Program in Timor-Leste.

So, it’s important that organisations like Plan effectively involve young people in all aspects of development to make improvements more sustainable.

The community elder from El Salvador said: “the children and youth of the community are so awesome! For example, last year there was a landslide and we couldn’t get out of the area, so [the children and youth] had the idea that everybody had to do a human chain, and we were able to move all the rocks from one side of the village to the other, like ants ... the adults wouldn’t have had that idea.”

The research

What’s the future?

to employment, then the number of dependent people in a country will decrease and result in what is known as a ‘population dividend’.

In 2009, Plan and World Vision researched this issue in relation to preparing for and responding to disasters and published a report called Children on the Frontline. What this research found was that children and young people are often excluded from the activities that contribute to building the resilience of their local communities. But it also found that increasingly, there are innovative projects happening that utilise the fresh perspectives of young people. These include youth-led projects, where young people tackle their reality in ways that may have previously been overlooked – either by community leaders or even development agencies.

clear argument to make in favour of increasing their involvement in the development of their communities – they are 50% of the world’s population. Plan is joining with ChildFund, Australian National University and other members of the Child Rights Working Group to put together an event in early February 2013. It’s called ‘Reframing the Youth Bulge, from Problem to Solution’ will discuss this issue and what it means to our work.

Apart from their fundamental right to participation and development, children and young people also have another

Want more? Download a copy of the report Children on the Frontline from childreninachangingclimate.org

For example, the enthusiasm and creativity of young people was identified by a community elder in El Salvador, with regards to children’s important role in preparing for and responding to disasters. summer 2013

Visit plan.org.au for more information and updates on what Plan is doing

Like our facebook.com/ planaustralia page and post a question or join a discussion

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 19


supporters in focus

“In my

Air mail

personal

experience, I feel from letters, boys and girls feel the support that someone out there cares about their lives, and at the same time it encourages them to continue with their dream to become a better person in the future.”

The colourful journey of a letter to a sponsored child.

Sharing letters with your sponsored child can be a wonderful and enriching experience – a cultural exchange across language, race and history. However, as many of our sponsors know, once a letter is sent to a sponsored child it can take a long time to hear back. So, why the wait? Join us on a letter’s journey to find out.

During the rainy season entire communities may be unreachable because of landslides, over-flowing rivers and flooded roads – just like these pictures from Liberia.

Diego Morales, Sponsorship Communication Specialist at Plan in El Salvador

Don’t forget! At Plan we promote and protect the best interests of all children in the communities we work with. For this reason, sending individual gifts is no longer part of the sponsorship program.

It arrives!

3rd

Your house k ee

ee

w

T AR ST 1

week 6

stop we

ek

5

k

w

w

ee

k

2

1st

melbourne head office Your letter arrives at our head office in Melbourne. When it gets here it is registered, the content is checked and it’s sent on its way to your sponsored child’s country.

sto

p

k4

e we

d

2n

country head office Second stop is the country head office where your letter can be one of about 1,000 that arrive each week. Every letter needs to be registered and then translated into the national language. Some sponsored children speak local dialects that are different to the national language, which can mean the letter will have to be translated again. Once the letter is ready, it needs to be sent to the field office – which is closer to your sponsored child’s community.

7

wee

k8

week

local field office When your letter arrives at the local field office a community volunteer will take the letter to your sponsored child – this travel can involve aeroplane, car, motorbike, bicycle, boat, walking, and even donkey!

9

ek

10

e

w

f dest inal inat ion

p o t s

week 3

If this is the first time you have communicated with your sponsored child, the chance is high that this is the first time they have ever received a letter or had contact with someone in another country.

in g n be gai a

the return journey begins The community volunteer will return to the sponsored child to collect a response. If your sponsored child can’t yet write then a community volunteer will spend time with them to draft the letter for them.

This part of the journey can be a challenge! As there are no postal services in the rural areas where Plan works, your letter will be delivered by a Plan staff member. Many Plansupported communities can be days of travel away from the main office where your letter is originally translated. summer 2013

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 21


supporters in focus

“In my

Air mail

personal

experience, I feel from letters, boys and girls feel the support that someone out there cares about their lives, and at the same time it encourages them to continue with their dream to become a better person in the future.”

The colourful journey of a letter to a sponsored child.

Sharing letters with your sponsored child can be a wonderful and enriching experience – a cultural exchange across language, race and history. However, as many of our sponsors know, once a letter is sent to a sponsored child it can take a long time to hear back. So, why the wait? Join us on a letter’s journey to find out.

During the rainy season entire communities may be unreachable because of landslides, over-flowing rivers and flooded roads – just like these pictures from Liberia.

Diego Morales, Sponsorship Communication Specialist at Plan in El Salvador

Don’t forget! At Plan we promote and protect the best interests of all children in the communities we work with. For this reason, sending individual gifts is no longer part of the sponsorship program.

It arrives!

3rd

Your house k ee

ee

w

T AR ST 1

week 6

stop we

ek

5

k

w

w

ee

k

2

1st

melbourne head office Your letter arrives at our head office in Melbourne. When it gets here it is registered, the content is checked and it’s sent on its way to your sponsored child’s country.

sto

p

k4

e we

d

2n

country head office Second stop is the country head office where your letter can be one of about 1,000 that arrive each week. Every letter needs to be registered and then translated into the national language. Some sponsored children speak local dialects that are different to the national language, which can mean the letter will have to be translated again. Once the letter is ready, it needs to be sent to the field office – which is closer to your sponsored child’s community.

7

wee

k8

week

local field office When your letter arrives at the local field office a community volunteer will take the letter to your sponsored child – this travel can involve aeroplane, car, motorbike, bicycle, boat, walking, and even donkey!

9

ek

10

e

w

f dest inal inat ion

p o t s

week 3

If this is the first time you have communicated with your sponsored child, the chance is high that this is the first time they have ever received a letter or had contact with someone in another country.

in g n be gai a

the return journey begins The community volunteer will return to the sponsored child to collect a response. If your sponsored child can’t yet write then a community volunteer will spend time with them to draft the letter for them.

This part of the journey can be a challenge! As there are no postal services in the rural areas where Plan works, your letter will be delivered by a Plan staff member. Many Plansupported communities can be days of travel away from the main office where your letter is originally translated. summer 2013

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 21


supporters in focus

Women

for Girls Harnessing the power of passionate women to create change.

Plan's Executive Manager, Susanne Legena, leads people to raise their hand in support of girl's education at a Plan event on International Day of the Girl.

E

very day, millions of girls around the world face endless barriers to reaching their full potential. Because they are girls, they are more likely to suffer malnutrition, be forced into child marriage, be subjected to gender-based violence, or be sold into the sex trade.

»» Invitations to special networking events

For the last few years Plan has been campaigning to bring an end to gender inequality through ‘Because I am a Girl’. And now our campaign is getting a whole lot bigger.

»» Membership to Plan’s online community

Enter in Women for Girls.

»» Invitation to our annual celebration on International Day of the Girl

»» Subscription to our supporter magazine, Global Child »» Regular updates on how your contribution is helping. To find out more or to join the movement, visit womenforgirls.com.au

What is it? ‘Women for Girls’ is a movement of passionate women from around Australia who are coming together to support Plan’s work to empower girls and, in the process, empower each other. Whether you’re an individual, group of women, or a women’s network, Women for Girl’s provides an opportunity for you to invest in impactful programs that support girls to access their rights. The movement is driven by the belief that by empowering girls we can work to reduce poverty and create a brighter future for this generation and the next.

Women for Girls does this by: »» raising funds for Plan’s sustainable projects in 50 developing countries, to empower girls and help them realise their rights.

»» raising awareness of the unique challenges facing women and girls – both in Australia and around the world.

»» meeting with other like-minded women to connect on common issues of interest.

Want to join Women for Girls? Through a monthly donation of $45 you can become a Women for Girls member. When you sign up you will receive:

Success story ‘Women for Girls - Adelaide’ are a group of passionate, committed women who came together four years ago to support Plan’s development work. They do this by holding events with their networks to raise awareness of issues they feel passionate about and to raise funds. Along the way they’ve gained a deeper understanding of the issues affecting children living in poverty around the world, and discovered the power they have as a group to effect real and positive change. As a result of their efforts, more than $45,000 has been raised in support of Plan’s project to create opportunities for poor families in Cambodia. To help these families develop sustainable incomes, Plan has provided them with the training and materials they need to make a living through vegetable growing, basket-making and raising livestock. More than 600 families have benefited from the project to date.

This publication has been printed by an ISO 14001 environmental management system (EMS) and ISO 9001 quality management system (QMS) certified printer using vegetable based inks and a 100% alcohol free printing process. It is manufactured using an independently audited carbon neutral process. The paper is ecoStar, a FSC® Recycled certified paper made carbon neutral (CN), manufactured from 100% post consumer recycled paper in a process chlorine free environment and under an ISO 14001 EMS. This publication is fully recyclable, please dispose of wisely.

summer 2013

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 23


supporters in focus

Women

for Girls Harnessing the power of passionate women to create change.

Plan's Executive Manager, Susanne Legena, leads people to raise their hand in support of girl's education at a Plan event on International Day of the Girl.

E

very day, millions of girls around the world face endless barriers to reaching their full potential. Because they are girls, they are more likely to suffer malnutrition, be forced into child marriage, be subjected to gender-based violence, or be sold into the sex trade.

»» Invitations to special networking events

For the last few years Plan has been campaigning to bring an end to gender inequality through ‘Because I am a Girl’. And now our campaign is getting a whole lot bigger.

»» Membership to Plan’s online community

Enter in Women for Girls.

»» Invitation to our annual celebration on International Day of the Girl

»» Subscription to our supporter magazine, Global Child »» Regular updates on how your contribution is helping. To find out more or to join the movement, visit womenforgirls.com.au

What is it? ‘Women for Girls’ is a movement of passionate women from around Australia who are coming together to support Plan’s work to empower girls and, in the process, empower each other. Whether you’re an individual, group of women, or a women’s network, Women for Girl’s provides an opportunity for you to invest in impactful programs that support girls to access their rights. The movement is driven by the belief that by empowering girls we can work to reduce poverty and create a brighter future for this generation and the next.

Women for Girls does this by: »» raising funds for Plan’s sustainable projects in 50 developing countries, to empower girls and help them realise their rights.

»» raising awareness of the unique challenges facing women and girls – both in Australia and around the world.

»» meeting with other like-minded women to connect on common issues of interest.

Want to join Women for Girls? Through a monthly donation of $45 you can become a Women for Girls member. When you sign up you will receive:

Success story ‘Women for Girls - Adelaide’ are a group of passionate, committed women who came together four years ago to support Plan’s development work. They do this by holding events with their networks to raise awareness of issues they feel passionate about and to raise funds. Along the way they’ve gained a deeper understanding of the issues affecting children living in poverty around the world, and discovered the power they have as a group to effect real and positive change. As a result of their efforts, more than $45,000 has been raised in support of Plan’s project to create opportunities for poor families in Cambodia. To help these families develop sustainable incomes, Plan has provided them with the training and materials they need to make a living through vegetable growing, basket-making and raising livestock. More than 600 families have benefited from the project to date.

This publication has been printed by an ISO 14001 environmental management system (EMS) and ISO 9001 quality management system (QMS) certified printer using vegetable based inks and a 100% alcohol free printing process. It is manufactured using an independently audited carbon neutral process. The paper is ecoStar, a FSC® Recycled certified paper made carbon neutral (CN), manufactured from 100% post consumer recycled paper in a process chlorine free environment and under an ISO 14001 EMS. This publication is fully recyclable, please dispose of wisely.

summer 2013

The Magazine of Plan in Australia Global Child 23


Global Child Summer 2013  

Plan International Australia's Global Child magazine, summer 2013 edition

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