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146.5mm FLAP

148.5mm BACK

Challenge and change in Cambodia

Real progress

Cambodia is a country of contrasts. Although its economy is booming, and industries like tourism and clothing export are growing, the country still remains one of the poorest in south-east Asia.

With the support of Plan, children and adults in Cambodia are working together to develop their communities and claim their right to a better future. And real progress is being made. Last year, our work included:

Plan is working with some of Cambodia’s most vulnerable communities and families to help them to benefit from their country’s progress and secure a better future for their children. Together, we’re protecting their health, improving their access to clean water, investing in quality education and giving families the chance to increase their incomes. The progress of any community is reflected in its children, and Plan is committed to listening to their views and promoting their rights. Violence against children is an issue in Cambodia, so protecting children is a crucial part of Plan’s work. As Pedrito Sandy Fortuna, Country Director for Plan Cambodia explains: “We continuously strive to be vigilant in preventing children from becoming victims of abuse.” In this Country Progress Report, we look at the success Plan is having in encouraging parents to send their children to nursery school – a vital step for better education and health. p Children take part in a lucky dip – one way to make health education fun

Cambodia country facts Capital: Phnom Penh

People without safe drinking water: 65%

UN Human Development Index ranking: 129th (of 177 countries)

Primary-age children out of school: 35%

Percentage of the population who live on less than 50p a day: 34%

(Sources: the UN, the Foreign & Commonwealth Office)

Population: 14 million

• Training over 100 young people in Siem Reap province to provide information to their peers on issues like reproductive health, HIV/AIDS, drugs and alcohol, to help adolescents lead healthier, safer lives

p Plan is ma king safe, clean water available so children do in classrooms n’t have to rel , y on polluted wells or rivers

• Enabling over 800 families to have clean, drinking water all year round by supporting the construction of 82 wells

• Helping children to get the most from their schooling by establishing over 40 study groups in the poorest villages to give extra teaching to pupils needing support to offer training to over 400 teachers, and other education professionals on ways to reduce corporal punishment in schools.

Plan’s greatest successes come from a joint effort combining the hard work and determination of communities, children, volunteers, staff, and partner organisations. The ongoing support of our sponsors is a vital ingredient, too. It’s their generosity and commitment that allows us to continue to help children in 49 of the poorest countries in the world. So on behalf of the children and communities we work with, thank you to all our sponsors! KHM

Any enquiries please contact: Nick Burton. e: nick@bright-uk.com m: 07884 367567. d: 020 7620 8150 Size (Prod)

Colours(Prod)

Art (A/D)

0407 100647 PLAN 0407_Cambodia 12.12.07 210x443.5mm FOLD TO A5 4 Client proof: 2 Copy (C/W)

Content (Acc.)

Cambodia

• Protecting children against violence by working with a partner organisation

Plan UKReport on Plan programs in Albania for the year ended June 2007

Admagic No: Bright No: Client name: File name: Date: Size: Studio proof:

148.5mm FRONT

Country Progress Report 2007


146.5mm FLAP

148.5mm BACK

Challenge and change in Cambodia

Real progress

Cambodia is a country of contrasts. Although its economy is booming, and industries like tourism and clothing export are growing, the country still remains one of the poorest in south-east Asia.

With the support of Plan, children and adults in Cambodia are working together to develop their communities and claim their right to a better future. And real progress is being made. Last year, our work included:

Plan is working with some of Cambodia’s most vulnerable communities and families to help them to benefit from their country’s progress and secure a better future for their children. Together, we’re protecting their health, improving their access to clean water, investing in quality education and giving families the chance to increase their incomes. The progress of any community is reflected in its children, and Plan is committed to listening to their views and promoting their rights. Violence against children is an issue in Cambodia, so protecting children is a crucial part of Plan’s work. As Pedrito Sandy Fortuna, Country Director for Plan Cambodia explains: “We continuously strive to be vigilant in preventing children from becoming victims of abuse.” In this Country Progress Report, we look at the success Plan is having in encouraging parents to send their children to nursery school – a vital step for better education and health. p Children take part in a lucky dip – one way to make health education fun

Cambodia country facts Capital: Phnom Penh

People without safe drinking water: 65%

UN Human Development Index ranking: 129th (of 177 countries)

Primary-age children out of school: 35%

Percentage of the population who live on less than 50p a day: 34%

(Sources: the UN, the Foreign & Commonwealth Office)

Population: 14 million

• Training over 100 young people in Siem Reap province to provide information to their peers on issues like reproductive health, HIV/AIDS, drugs and alcohol, to help adolescents lead healthier, safer lives

p Plan is ma king safe, clean water available so children do in classrooms n’t have to rel , y on polluted wells or rivers

• Enabling over 800 families to have clean, drinking water all year round by supporting the construction of 82 wells

• Helping children to get the most from their schooling by establishing over 40 study groups in the poorest villages to give extra teaching to pupils needing support to offer training to over 400 teachers, and other education professionals on ways to reduce corporal punishment in schools.

Plan’s greatest successes come from a joint effort combining the hard work and determination of communities, children, volunteers, staff, and partner organisations. The ongoing support of our sponsors is a vital ingredient, too. It’s their generosity and commitment that allows us to continue to help children in 49 of the poorest countries in the world. So on behalf of the children and communities we work with, thank you to all our sponsors! KHM

Any enquiries please contact: Nick Burton. e: nick@bright-uk.com m: 07884 367567. d: 020 7620 8150 Size (Prod)

Colours(Prod)

Art (A/D)

0407 100647 PLAN 0407_Cambodia 12.12.07 210x443.5mm FOLD TO A5 4 Client proof: 2 Copy (C/W)

Content (Acc.)

Cambodia

• Protecting children against violence by working with a partner organisation

Plan UKReport on Plan programs in Albania for the year ended June 2007

Admagic No: Bright No: Client name: File name: Date: Size: Studio proof:

148.5mm FRONT

Country Progress Report 2007


148.5mm INSIDE

148.5mm INSIDE

Investing in children Seyha is very proud of her daughter. “She does not depend on her elder brother and sisters to do anything for her because she always proves that she can do it by herself,” she says. Her little girl’s newfound independence is part and parcel of growing up, but it’s also thanks to the village nursery school she attends every morning. Here, she plays with her friends, sings, draws pictures and learns the basics of reading and maths. It’s a good foundation for school life, and Seyha knows how rare it is to have such an opportunity. She and her family live in a remote part of the province of Siem Reap, in north-west Cambodia, and here, as in most of the country, nursery schools are scarce. Only 13% of Cambodia’s three- to five-year-olds go to nursery, and most of these live in the cities. There are other, more urgent reasons why children in Siem Reap are not at nursery. Many families here struggle to survive in absolute poverty. While parents toil in the rice fields, older children take care of younger siblings, and no one gets to devote much time to education.

repercussions for their children. Not only does it mean they’re less likely to support their children’s education, but it has health impacts, too. Malnutrition and stunted growth are common, for example, because parents have no knowledge of how to keep their children healthy with a good diet and proper healthcare.

Preparing for life

p Nursery pupils perform a

Plan knew that young children in Siem Reap deserved the chance of a better start in life. So we joined with a local partner organisation, Krousar Yoeung, to set up community nursery schools in 11 remote villages across the province. play

The value of investing in children’s early years is not widely appreciated either. One village chief in Siem Reap, remembers that nursery education did not exist when he was a child. Many parents do not understand how paying attention to a child’s welfare and development right from the start can pay dividends later on. Often, mothers and fathers did not finish school themselves. Sadly, their lack of education can have serious

Every weekday morning, the schools run two sessions catering for a total of more than 500 children. Saly, who is one of them, explains what happens: “I can play a lot of games. I learn the alphabet, I sing, dance and listen to stories from the teacher.” While she has fun, Saly is also being prepared for life. The nurseries are part of a wider programme that Plan and local families are working on called Early Childhood Care and Development. This is based on the idea that very young children do best when all their

needs – be they physical, social or emotional – are fully taken into account.

Malnutrition and stunted growth are common, because parents have no knowledge of how to keep their children healthy with a good diet and proper healthcare. In Siem Reap, nurseries are not just a place where children learn the basics for school. Their diet and wellbeing are equally important. That’s why a significant part of the nursery school programme involves teaching for parents. In their spare time, they are learning about their responsibilities towards their children: how to encourage their development through games, for example, and how to protect their health by preparing nutritious food and keeping their homes clean and sanitary. Changkes is a young mother, and never misses a session. She explains: “I am afraid of missing out on valuable information. I realise now how important it is to eat vegetables to prevent diseases; I didn’t have any idea about this before, until I attended the training. I also started teaching my children in the evening before bedtime.”

146.5mm INSIDE

Involvement brings results Involving the local community in their nursery school has been a key goal for Plan. Experience has taught us that local people want to feel part of their community’s progress and to have a real say in how they grow in the future. When they get involved, the p Parenting education for comm unity members is important so that results are better too, because mothers and fathers know the best ways to support their children they have a degree of local knowledge and commitment which no outside scared of studying at school. Every agency can match. morning most of them followed their In Siem Reap, parents have been so parents to the forest or rice fields,” impressed with their training that some says one parent and school committee have donated funds and firewood to their member. “Most of the children are now nursery so the children can have a cooked very brave and smart. They dare to talk breakfast of rice and fish each day. and express their ideas when asked.”

“Most of the children are now very brave and smart. They dare to talk and express their ideas when asked.” They are equally impressed with the changes they are seeing in their children. “Before the establishment of the nursery school, most children under eight years old in my village were

This new generation of confident children already has the building blocks for a productive life at school, and in the future. Later, as the kids grow up, the whole community will feel the benefit of investing in their children’s early years. Some names have been changed for privacy and child protection reasons.


148.5mm INSIDE

148.5mm INSIDE

Investing in children Seyha is very proud of her daughter. “She does not depend on her elder brother and sisters to do anything for her because she always proves that she can do it by herself,” she says. Her little girl’s newfound independence is part and parcel of growing up, but it’s also thanks to the village nursery school she attends every morning. Here, she plays with her friends, sings, draws pictures and learns the basics of reading and maths. It’s a good foundation for school life, and Seyha knows how rare it is to have such an opportunity. She and her family live in a remote part of the province of Siem Reap, in north-west Cambodia, and here, as in most of the country, nursery schools are scarce. Only 13% of Cambodia’s three- to five-year-olds go to nursery, and most of these live in the cities. There are other, more urgent reasons why children in Siem Reap are not at nursery. Many families here struggle to survive in absolute poverty. While parents toil in the rice fields, older children take care of younger siblings, and no one gets to devote much time to education.

repercussions for their children. Not only does it mean they’re less likely to support their children’s education, but it has health impacts, too. Malnutrition and stunted growth are common, for example, because parents have no knowledge of how to keep their children healthy with a good diet and proper healthcare.

Preparing for life

p Nursery pupils perform a

Plan knew that young children in Siem Reap deserved the chance of a better start in life. So we joined with a local partner organisation, Krousar Yoeung, to set up community nursery schools in 11 remote villages across the province. play

The value of investing in children’s early years is not widely appreciated either. One village chief in Siem Reap, remembers that nursery education did not exist when he was a child. Many parents do not understand how paying attention to a child’s welfare and development right from the start can pay dividends later on. Often, mothers and fathers did not finish school themselves. Sadly, their lack of education can have serious

Every weekday morning, the schools run two sessions catering for a total of more than 500 children. Saly, who is one of them, explains what happens: “I can play a lot of games. I learn the alphabet, I sing, dance and listen to stories from the teacher.” While she has fun, Saly is also being prepared for life. The nurseries are part of a wider programme that Plan and local families are working on called Early Childhood Care and Development. This is based on the idea that very young children do best when all their

needs – be they physical, social or emotional – are fully taken into account.

Malnutrition and stunted growth are common, because parents have no knowledge of how to keep their children healthy with a good diet and proper healthcare. In Siem Reap, nurseries are not just a place where children learn the basics for school. Their diet and wellbeing are equally important. That’s why a significant part of the nursery school programme involves teaching for parents. In their spare time, they are learning about their responsibilities towards their children: how to encourage their development through games, for example, and how to protect their health by preparing nutritious food and keeping their homes clean and sanitary. Changkes is a young mother, and never misses a session. She explains: “I am afraid of missing out on valuable information. I realise now how important it is to eat vegetables to prevent diseases; I didn’t have any idea about this before, until I attended the training. I also started teaching my children in the evening before bedtime.”

146.5mm INSIDE

Involvement brings results Involving the local community in their nursery school has been a key goal for Plan. Experience has taught us that local people want to feel part of their community’s progress and to have a real say in how they grow in the future. When they get involved, the p Parenting education for comm unity members is important so that results are better too, because mothers and fathers know the best ways to support their children they have a degree of local knowledge and commitment which no outside scared of studying at school. Every agency can match. morning most of them followed their In Siem Reap, parents have been so parents to the forest or rice fields,” impressed with their training that some says one parent and school committee have donated funds and firewood to their member. “Most of the children are now nursery so the children can have a cooked very brave and smart. They dare to talk breakfast of rice and fish each day. and express their ideas when asked.”

“Most of the children are now very brave and smart. They dare to talk and express their ideas when asked.” They are equally impressed with the changes they are seeing in their children. “Before the establishment of the nursery school, most children under eight years old in my village were

This new generation of confident children already has the building blocks for a productive life at school, and in the future. Later, as the kids grow up, the whole community will feel the benefit of investing in their children’s early years. Some names have been changed for privacy and child protection reasons.


148.5mm INSIDE

148.5mm INSIDE

Investing in children Seyha is very proud of her daughter. “She does not depend on her elder brother and sisters to do anything for her because she always proves that she can do it by herself,” she says. Her little girl’s newfound independence is part and parcel of growing up, but it’s also thanks to the village nursery school she attends every morning. Here, she plays with her friends, sings, draws pictures and learns the basics of reading and maths. It’s a good foundation for school life, and Seyha knows how rare it is to have such an opportunity. She and her family live in a remote part of the province of Siem Reap, in north-west Cambodia, and here, as in most of the country, nursery schools are scarce. Only 13% of Cambodia’s three- to five-year-olds go to nursery, and most of these live in the cities. There are other, more urgent reasons why children in Siem Reap are not at nursery. Many families here struggle to survive in absolute poverty. While parents toil in the rice fields, older children take care of younger siblings, and no one gets to devote much time to education.

repercussions for their children. Not only does it mean they’re less likely to support their children’s education, but it has health impacts, too. Malnutrition and stunted growth are common, for example, because parents have no knowledge of how to keep their children healthy with a good diet and proper healthcare.

Preparing for life

p Nursery pupils perform a

Plan knew that young children in Siem Reap deserved the chance of a better start in life. So we joined with a local partner organisation, Krousar Yoeung, to set up community nursery schools in 11 remote villages across the province. play

The value of investing in children’s early years is not widely appreciated either. One village chief in Siem Reap, remembers that nursery education did not exist when he was a child. Many parents do not understand how paying attention to a child’s welfare and development right from the start can pay dividends later on. Often, mothers and fathers did not finish school themselves. Sadly, their lack of education can have serious

Every weekday morning, the schools run two sessions catering for a total of more than 500 children. Saly, who is one of them, explains what happens: “I can play a lot of games. I learn the alphabet, I sing, dance and listen to stories from the teacher.” While she has fun, Saly is also being prepared for life. The nurseries are part of a wider programme that Plan and local families are working on called Early Childhood Care and Development. This is based on the idea that very young children do best when all their

needs – be they physical, social or emotional – are fully taken into account.

Malnutrition and stunted growth are common, because parents have no knowledge of how to keep their children healthy with a good diet and proper healthcare. In Siem Reap, nurseries are not just a place where children learn the basics for school. Their diet and wellbeing are equally important. That’s why a significant part of the nursery school programme involves teaching for parents. In their spare time, they are learning about their responsibilities towards their children: how to encourage their development through games, for example, and how to protect their health by preparing nutritious food and keeping their homes clean and sanitary. Changkes is a young mother, and never misses a session. She explains: “I am afraid of missing out on valuable information. I realise now how important it is to eat vegetables to prevent diseases; I didn’t have any idea about this before, until I attended the training. I also started teaching my children in the evening before bedtime.”

146.5mm INSIDE

Involvement brings results Involving the local community in their nursery school has been a key goal for Plan. Experience has taught us that local people want to feel part of their community’s progress and to have a real say in how they grow in the future. When they get involved, the p Parenting education for comm unity members is important so that results are better too, because mothers and fathers know the best ways to support their children they have a degree of local knowledge and commitment which no outside scared of studying at school. Every agency can match. morning most of them followed their In Siem Reap, parents have been so parents to the forest or rice fields,” impressed with their training that some says one parent and school committee have donated funds and firewood to their member. “Most of the children are now nursery so the children can have a cooked very brave and smart. They dare to talk breakfast of rice and fish each day. and express their ideas when asked.”

“Most of the children are now very brave and smart. They dare to talk and express their ideas when asked.” They are equally impressed with the changes they are seeing in their children. “Before the establishment of the nursery school, most children under eight years old in my village were

This new generation of confident children already has the building blocks for a productive life at school, and in the future. Later, as the kids grow up, the whole community will feel the benefit of investing in their children’s early years. Some names have been changed for privacy and child protection reasons.


146.5mm FLAP

148.5mm BACK

Challenge and change in Cambodia

Real progress

Cambodia is a country of contrasts. Although its economy is booming, and industries like tourism and clothing export are growing, the country still remains one of the poorest in south-east Asia.

With the support of Plan, children and adults in Cambodia are working together to develop their communities and claim their right to a better future. And real progress is being made. Last year, our work included:

Plan is working with some of Cambodia’s most vulnerable communities and families to help them to benefit from their country’s progress and secure a better future for their children. Together, we’re protecting their health, improving their access to clean water, investing in quality education and giving families the chance to increase their incomes. The progress of any community is reflected in its children, and Plan is committed to listening to their views and promoting their rights. Violence against children is an issue in Cambodia, so protecting children is a crucial part of Plan’s work. As Pedrito Sandy Fortuna, Country Director for Plan Cambodia explains: “We continuously strive to be vigilant in preventing children from becoming victims of abuse.” In this Country Progress Report, we look at the success Plan is having in encouraging parents to send their children to nursery school – a vital step for better education and health. p Children take part in a lucky dip – one way to make health education fun

Cambodia country facts Capital: Phnom Penh

People without safe drinking water: 65%

UN Human Development Index ranking: 129th (of 177 countries)

Primary-age children out of school: 35%

Percentage of the population who live on less than 50p a day: 34%

(Sources: the UN, the Foreign & Commonwealth Office)

Population: 14 million

• Training over 100 young people in Siem Reap province to provide information to their peers on issues like reproductive health, HIV/AIDS, drugs and alcohol, to help adolescents lead healthier, safer lives

p Plan is ma king safe, clean water available so children do in classrooms n’t have to rel , y on polluted wells or rivers

• Enabling over 800 families to have clean, drinking water all year round by supporting the construction of 82 wells

• Helping children to get the most from their schooling by establishing over 40 study groups in the poorest villages to give extra teaching to pupils needing support to offer training to over 400 teachers, and other education professionals on ways to reduce corporal punishment in schools.

Plan’s greatest successes come from a joint effort combining the hard work and determination of communities, children, volunteers, staff, and partner organisations. The ongoing support of our sponsors is a vital ingredient, too. It’s their generosity and commitment that allows us to continue to help children in 49 of the poorest countries in the world. So on behalf of the children and communities we work with, thank you to all our sponsors! KHM

Any enquiries please contact: Nick Burton. e: nick@bright-uk.com m: 07884 367567. d: 020 7620 8150 Size (Prod)

Colours(Prod)

Art (A/D)

0407 100647 PLAN 0407_Cambodia 12.12.07 210x443.5mm FOLD TO A5 4 Client proof: 2 Copy (C/W)

Content (Acc.)

Cambodia

• Protecting children against violence by working with a partner organisation

Plan UKReport on Plan programs in Albania for the year ended June 2007

Admagic No: Bright No: Client name: File name: Date: Size: Studio proof:

148.5mm FRONT

Country Progress Report 2007


Plan Cambodia Annual Program Report 2007