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148.5mm BACK

Challenge and change in Bolivia

Real progress

2007 has been a year of challenges for Bolivia. There has been political violence in the Andean city of Cochabamba, and severe floods in eastern and Amazonian parts of the country, caused by the El Nino phenomenon. In response, Plan stepped up its emergency support to affected communities.

With the support of Plan, children and adults in Bolivia are working together to develop their communities and claim their right to a better future. And real progress is being made. Among other successes, last year we:

Plan is working to help children in 1,081 communities lead happier, healthier lives and reach their full potential. We are concentrating on maternal and child health, education and fighting disease by improving the environment. According to Filipe Sanchez, Plan’s Country Director in Bolivia: “This year, together with the help of our sponsors, we have continued to work to improve the quality of life for the children of Bolivia. We wish to thank you, the sponsor, for your commitment.” This Country Progress Report focuses on just one successful project among many that you have helped make possible.

p Plan is training teac hers to make lessons mor e stimulating and relevant to children

Bolivia country facts Capital: La Paz Population: 9 million

People in rural areas without decent sanitation: 78%

UN Human Development Index ranking: 115th out of 177 countries

Secondary-age children not in school: 44%

Life expectancy: 65 years

(Sources: the UN, the Foreign & Commonwealth Office, UNICEF)

Children under-five who die each year: 17,000

Any enquiries please contact: Nick Burton. e: nick@bright-uk.com m: 07884 367567. d: 020 7620 8150 Size (Prod)

Colours(Prod)

Admagic No: Bright No: Client name: File name: Date: Size: Studio proof: Art (A/D)

• Trained 247 community-based committees, giving them the skills and responsibility to manage, spend and account for funds from Plan

their pupils about sexually transmitted diseases and their prevention

• Rebuilt, repaired or refurnished 76 classrooms, and we have built five playgrounds and three sports pitches

Content (Acc.)

Bolivia

• Over two years, we have trained 870 people on managing a small business and 700 people on improved farming techniques. Over the same period, 4,130 families have increased their incomes.

For Plan, success almost always comes from a joint effort combining the hard work and determination of communities, children, volunteers, staff, and partner organisations. But the ongoing support of our sponsors is a vital ingredient, too. It’s their generosity and commitment that allows us to continue to help children in 49 of the poorest countries in the world. So on behalf of the children and communities we work with, thank you to all our sponsors!

BOL

Copy (C/W)

p Plan is sup porting wome n’s business gro produce jam an ups who d baked good s to boost the families’ incom ir es

• Helped 673 teachers in 47 schools to educate

Plan UK Registered Charity No: 276035

0407 100647 PLAN 0407_Bolivia 02.11.07 210x443.5mm FOLD TO A5 Client proof: 3 4

148.5mm FRONT

Country Progress Report 2007


146.5mm FLAP

148.5mm BACK

Challenge and change in Bolivia

Real progress

2007 has been a year of challenges for Bolivia. There has been political violence in the Andean city of Cochabamba, and severe floods in eastern and Amazonian parts of the country, caused by the El Nino phenomenon. In response, Plan stepped up its emergency support to affected communities.

With the support of Plan, children and adults in Bolivia are working together to develop their communities and claim their right to a better future. And real progress is being made. Among other successes, last year we:

Plan is working to help children in 1,081 communities lead happier, healthier lives and reach their full potential. We are concentrating on maternal and child health, education and fighting disease by improving the environment. According to Filipe Sanchez, Plan’s Country Director in Bolivia: “This year, together with the help of our sponsors, we have continued to work to improve the quality of life for the children of Bolivia. We wish to thank you, the sponsor, for your commitment.” This Country Progress Report focuses on just one successful project among many that you have helped make possible.

p Plan is training teac hers to make lessons mor e stimulating and relevant to children

Bolivia country facts Capital: La Paz Population: 9 million

People in rural areas without decent sanitation: 78%

UN Human Development Index ranking: 115th out of 177 countries

Secondary-age children not in school: 44%

Life expectancy: 65 years

(Sources: the UN, the Foreign & Commonwealth Office, UNICEF)

Children under-five who die each year: 17,000

Any enquiries please contact: Nick Burton. e: nick@bright-uk.com m: 07884 367567. d: 020 7620 8150 Size (Prod)

Colours(Prod)

Admagic No: Bright No: Client name: File name: Date: Size: Studio proof: Art (A/D)

• Trained 247 community-based committees, giving them the skills and responsibility to manage, spend and account for funds from Plan

their pupils about sexually transmitted diseases and their prevention

• Rebuilt, repaired or refurnished 76 classrooms, and we have built five playgrounds and three sports pitches

Content (Acc.)

Bolivia

• Over two years, we have trained 870 people on managing a small business and 700 people on improved farming techniques. Over the same period, 4,130 families have increased their incomes.

For Plan, success almost always comes from a joint effort combining the hard work and determination of communities, children, volunteers, staff, and partner organisations. But the ongoing support of our sponsors is a vital ingredient, too. It’s their generosity and commitment that allows us to continue to help children in 49 of the poorest countries in the world. So on behalf of the children and communities we work with, thank you to all our sponsors!

BOL

Copy (C/W)

p Plan is sup porting wome n’s business gro produce jam an ups who d baked good s to boost the families’ incom ir es

• Helped 673 teachers in 47 schools to educate

Plan UK Registered Charity No: 276035

0407 100647 PLAN 0407_Bolivia 02.11.07 210x443.5mm FOLD TO A5 Client proof: 3 4

148.5mm FRONT

Country Progress Report 2007


148.5mm INSIDE

Happy, healthy mothers In the final months of 2006, the deaths of two pregnant women sparked off a community movement to find ways to improve care during pregnancy. One solution was the creation of eight pregnant women’s centres, where mothers-to-be can find better ways to look after themselves and their babies.

Most of the communities in the region of Icla are remote and inaccessible, especially during the rainy season, when torrential downpours cause landslides and block roads. During the rainy season of 2006, two pregnant women died. One, aged 46, was haemorrhaging blood but was unable to get to the nearest health centre in time. It later emerged that she hadn’t been to her pre-natal check-ups because she wasn’t aware how important they could be. Tragically, she left five orphaned children. At around this time, a second mother – just 24 years old and unmarried – died while pregnant. She had also skipped her pre-natal check-ups, and her relatives had not even been aware of her pregnancy.

Tragedy prompts action A municipal meeting was called. It was attended by all relevant healthcare workers in the area, community leaders, volunteers, mothers and Plan workers. During the assembly, the region’s Chief Medical Officer presented data on local

148.5mm INSIDE

Together, Plan and the community looked for solutions and alternatives, trying to find ways to avoid pregnant mothers dying in the future. Plan suggested a strategy of gathering the names of the pregnant mothers in each community, and, with help from health workers and the entire community, invite them to their local Pregnant Women’s Centre.

“My community is very far from any health centre; it takes a full day’s walk to closest one.”

p At the Pregnant Women’s Centres, mothers learn about childb irth and how to care for their babies

maternal deaths, analysed their causes and asked attendees to reflect on the situation. At the assembly, one community member said: “My community is very far from any health centre; it takes a full day’s walk to get to the closest one. Families really don’t appreciate healthcare and only look for help at the last possible moment. On top of everything else, the road is bad.” Another added: “Families don’t look for the community health worker, so they really do not value their own health.”

At present, there are eight community Pregnant Women’s Centres, with monthly meetings for all the local pregnant women, and even some women who have already had their babies. Healthcare workers share their knowledge and give guidance on the importance of pre-natal check-ups, institutional childbirth, post-natal checkups, newborn care, and danger signs during pregnancy and childbirth. In addition, nutrition for pregnant women is covered, dental check-ups are provided, and the mothers are shown how to make clothes for their babies.

pre-natal check-ups, and with help from my husband and the nurse I planned to have the birth in hospital. I also learned to make clothes for my baby, and now I feel prepared for the little one to come.” Her husband says: “This is the first time my wife will have had a baby in hospital; the three others were born at home with help from my mother. But now I think it’s better to do it in hospital, and so when my wife has pains, I’ll come to the hospital to get an ambulance to take her there from the community.” He’s not the only one. More and more husbands are becoming convinced of the benefits of the pregnancy centres. Now they want their wives to attend monthly meetings, educational sessions and nutrition seminars, all in a place where mothers can talk about their problems with other mothers. Many women from the group have already had their babies and keep coming to the activities at the Centre because they want to keep learning about health issues.

146.5mm INSIDE

According to recent statistics, the project has increased the number of pre-natal check-ups by more than a third, and the number of childbirths taking place in hospital has increased by almost half. When the community presented information on increased coverage to a meeting of outside officials and community members, attendees from other municipalities were doubtful of the results, because this area has traditionally had the lowest coverage rates.

Now pre-natal check-ups are up by more than a third, and the number of births in hospital has increased by almost half. Since that meeting, healthcare workers have been busy following up with checks on the wellbeing of pregnant women in Icla. In some cases, these workers are men, and they help with making baby clothes and other activities, like cake baking.

But doubts turned to congratulations when one health worker presented a monitoring notebook that proved the results and many representatives from other municipalities talked about the potential benefits of extending the project to their areas.

We’re delighted to say that to date this year, there have been no maternal deaths reported in any of the communities of Icla. Some names have been changed for child protection and privacy reasons

Learning and preparation One pregnant woman came to the Centre with her husband and decided to have the baby in hospital. She says: “I’m very happy that I came to the Pregnancy Centre. I learned a lot about

p Mothers are shown how to

make clothes for their babies


148.5mm INSIDE

Happy, healthy mothers In the final months of 2006, the deaths of two pregnant women sparked off a community movement to find ways to improve care during pregnancy. One solution was the creation of eight pregnant women’s centres, where mothers-to-be can find better ways to look after themselves and their babies.

Most of the communities in the region of Icla are remote and inaccessible, especially during the rainy season, when torrential downpours cause landslides and block roads. During the rainy season of 2006, two pregnant women died. One, aged 46, was haemorrhaging blood but was unable to get to the nearest health centre in time. It later emerged that she hadn’t been to her pre-natal check-ups because she wasn’t aware how important they could be. Tragically, she left five orphaned children. At around this time, a second mother – just 24 years old and unmarried – died while pregnant. She had also skipped her pre-natal check-ups, and her relatives had not even been aware of her pregnancy.

Tragedy prompts action A municipal meeting was called. It was attended by all relevant healthcare workers in the area, community leaders, volunteers, mothers and Plan workers. During the assembly, the region’s Chief Medical Officer presented data on local

148.5mm INSIDE

Together, Plan and the community looked for solutions and alternatives, trying to find ways to avoid pregnant mothers dying in the future. Plan suggested a strategy of gathering the names of the pregnant mothers in each community, and, with help from health workers and the entire community, invite them to their local Pregnant Women’s Centre.

“My community is very far from any health centre; it takes a full day’s walk to closest one.”

p At the Pregnant Women’s Centres, mothers learn about childb irth and how to care for their babies

maternal deaths, analysed their causes and asked attendees to reflect on the situation. At the assembly, one community member said: “My community is very far from any health centre; it takes a full day’s walk to get to the closest one. Families really don’t appreciate healthcare and only look for help at the last possible moment. On top of everything else, the road is bad.” Another added: “Families don’t look for the community health worker, so they really do not value their own health.”

At present, there are eight community Pregnant Women’s Centres, with monthly meetings for all the local pregnant women, and even some women who have already had their babies. Healthcare workers share their knowledge and give guidance on the importance of pre-natal check-ups, institutional childbirth, post-natal checkups, newborn care, and danger signs during pregnancy and childbirth. In addition, nutrition for pregnant women is covered, dental check-ups are provided, and the mothers are shown how to make clothes for their babies.

pre-natal check-ups, and with help from my husband and the nurse I planned to have the birth in hospital. I also learned to make clothes for my baby, and now I feel prepared for the little one to come.” Her husband says: “This is the first time my wife will have had a baby in hospital; the three others were born at home with help from my mother. But now I think it’s better to do it in hospital, and so when my wife has pains, I’ll come to the hospital to get an ambulance to take her there from the community.” He’s not the only one. More and more husbands are becoming convinced of the benefits of the pregnancy centres. Now they want their wives to attend monthly meetings, educational sessions and nutrition seminars, all in a place where mothers can talk about their problems with other mothers. Many women from the group have already had their babies and keep coming to the activities at the Centre because they want to keep learning about health issues.

146.5mm INSIDE

According to recent statistics, the project has increased the number of pre-natal check-ups by more than a third, and the number of childbirths taking place in hospital has increased by almost half. When the community presented information on increased coverage to a meeting of outside officials and community members, attendees from other municipalities were doubtful of the results, because this area has traditionally had the lowest coverage rates.

Now pre-natal check-ups are up by more than a third, and the number of births in hospital has increased by almost half. Since that meeting, healthcare workers have been busy following up with checks on the wellbeing of pregnant women in Icla. In some cases, these workers are men, and they help with making baby clothes and other activities, like cake baking.

But doubts turned to congratulations when one health worker presented a monitoring notebook that proved the results and many representatives from other municipalities talked about the potential benefits of extending the project to their areas.

We’re delighted to say that to date this year, there have been no maternal deaths reported in any of the communities of Icla. Some names have been changed for child protection and privacy reasons

Learning and preparation One pregnant woman came to the Centre with her husband and decided to have the baby in hospital. She says: “I’m very happy that I came to the Pregnancy Centre. I learned a lot about

p Mothers are shown how to

make clothes for their babies


148.5mm INSIDE

Happy, healthy mothers In the final months of 2006, the deaths of two pregnant women sparked off a community movement to find ways to improve care during pregnancy. One solution was the creation of eight pregnant women’s centres, where mothers-to-be can find better ways to look after themselves and their babies.

Most of the communities in the region of Icla are remote and inaccessible, especially during the rainy season, when torrential downpours cause landslides and block roads. During the rainy season of 2006, two pregnant women died. One, aged 46, was haemorrhaging blood but was unable to get to the nearest health centre in time. It later emerged that she hadn’t been to her pre-natal check-ups because she wasn’t aware how important they could be. Tragically, she left five orphaned children. At around this time, a second mother – just 24 years old and unmarried – died while pregnant. She had also skipped her pre-natal check-ups, and her relatives had not even been aware of her pregnancy.

Tragedy prompts action A municipal meeting was called. It was attended by all relevant healthcare workers in the area, community leaders, volunteers, mothers and Plan workers. During the assembly, the region’s Chief Medical Officer presented data on local

148.5mm INSIDE

Together, Plan and the community looked for solutions and alternatives, trying to find ways to avoid pregnant mothers dying in the future. Plan suggested a strategy of gathering the names of the pregnant mothers in each community, and, with help from health workers and the entire community, invite them to their local Pregnant Women’s Centre.

“My community is very far from any health centre; it takes a full day’s walk to closest one.”

p At the Pregnant Women’s Centres, mothers learn about childb irth and how to care for their babies

maternal deaths, analysed their causes and asked attendees to reflect on the situation. At the assembly, one community member said: “My community is very far from any health centre; it takes a full day’s walk to get to the closest one. Families really don’t appreciate healthcare and only look for help at the last possible moment. On top of everything else, the road is bad.” Another added: “Families don’t look for the community health worker, so they really do not value their own health.”

At present, there are eight community Pregnant Women’s Centres, with monthly meetings for all the local pregnant women, and even some women who have already had their babies. Healthcare workers share their knowledge and give guidance on the importance of pre-natal check-ups, institutional childbirth, post-natal checkups, newborn care, and danger signs during pregnancy and childbirth. In addition, nutrition for pregnant women is covered, dental check-ups are provided, and the mothers are shown how to make clothes for their babies.

pre-natal check-ups, and with help from my husband and the nurse I planned to have the birth in hospital. I also learned to make clothes for my baby, and now I feel prepared for the little one to come.” Her husband says: “This is the first time my wife will have had a baby in hospital; the three others were born at home with help from my mother. But now I think it’s better to do it in hospital, and so when my wife has pains, I’ll come to the hospital to get an ambulance to take her there from the community.” He’s not the only one. More and more husbands are becoming convinced of the benefits of the pregnancy centres. Now they want their wives to attend monthly meetings, educational sessions and nutrition seminars, all in a place where mothers can talk about their problems with other mothers. Many women from the group have already had their babies and keep coming to the activities at the Centre because they want to keep learning about health issues.

146.5mm INSIDE

According to recent statistics, the project has increased the number of pre-natal check-ups by more than a third, and the number of childbirths taking place in hospital has increased by almost half. When the community presented information on increased coverage to a meeting of outside officials and community members, attendees from other municipalities were doubtful of the results, because this area has traditionally had the lowest coverage rates.

Now pre-natal check-ups are up by more than a third, and the number of births in hospital has increased by almost half. Since that meeting, healthcare workers have been busy following up with checks on the wellbeing of pregnant women in Icla. In some cases, these workers are men, and they help with making baby clothes and other activities, like cake baking.

But doubts turned to congratulations when one health worker presented a monitoring notebook that proved the results and many representatives from other municipalities talked about the potential benefits of extending the project to their areas.

We’re delighted to say that to date this year, there have been no maternal deaths reported in any of the communities of Icla. Some names have been changed for child protection and privacy reasons

Learning and preparation One pregnant woman came to the Centre with her husband and decided to have the baby in hospital. She says: “I’m very happy that I came to the Pregnancy Centre. I learned a lot about

p Mothers are shown how to

make clothes for their babies


146.5mm FLAP

148.5mm BACK

Challenge and change in Bolivia

Real progress

2007 has been a year of challenges for Bolivia. There has been political violence in the Andean city of Cochabamba, and severe floods in eastern and Amazonian parts of the country, caused by the El Nino phenomenon. In response, Plan stepped up its emergency support to affected communities.

With the support of Plan, children and adults in Bolivia are working together to develop their communities and claim their right to a better future. And real progress is being made. Among other successes, last year we:

Plan is working to help children in 1,081 communities lead happier, healthier lives and reach their full potential. We are concentrating on maternal and child health, education and fighting disease by improving the environment. According to Filipe Sanchez, Plan’s Country Director in Bolivia: “This year, together with the help of our sponsors, we have continued to work to improve the quality of life for the children of Bolivia. We wish to thank you, the sponsor, for your commitment.” This Country Progress Report focuses on just one successful project among many that you have helped make possible.

p Plan is training teac hers to make lessons mor e stimulating and relevant to children

Bolivia country facts Capital: La Paz Population: 9 million

People in rural areas without decent sanitation: 78%

UN Human Development Index ranking: 115th out of 177 countries

Secondary-age children not in school: 44%

Life expectancy: 65 years

(Sources: the UN, the Foreign & Commonwealth Office, UNICEF)

Children under-five who die each year: 17,000

Any enquiries please contact: Nick Burton. e: nick@bright-uk.com m: 07884 367567. d: 020 7620 8150 Size (Prod)

Colours(Prod)

Admagic No: Bright No: Client name: File name: Date: Size: Studio proof: Art (A/D)

• Trained 247 community-based committees, giving them the skills and responsibility to manage, spend and account for funds from Plan

their pupils about sexually transmitted diseases and their prevention

• Rebuilt, repaired or refurnished 76 classrooms, and we have built five playgrounds and three sports pitches

Content (Acc.)

Bolivia

• Over two years, we have trained 870 people on managing a small business and 700 people on improved farming techniques. Over the same period, 4,130 families have increased their incomes.

For Plan, success almost always comes from a joint effort combining the hard work and determination of communities, children, volunteers, staff, and partner organisations. But the ongoing support of our sponsors is a vital ingredient, too. It’s their generosity and commitment that allows us to continue to help children in 49 of the poorest countries in the world. So on behalf of the children and communities we work with, thank you to all our sponsors!

BOL

Copy (C/W)

p Plan is sup porting wome n’s business gro produce jam an ups who d baked good s to boost the families’ incom ir es

• Helped 673 teachers in 47 schools to educate

Plan UK Registered Charity No: 276035

0407 100647 PLAN 0407_Bolivia 02.11.07 210x443.5mm FOLD TO A5 Client proof: 3 4

148.5mm FRONT

Country Progress Report 2007


Plan Bolivia Annual Program Report 2007