Page 1

2010-2011

4TH YEAR

Dublin School of Architecture


4TH YEAR 2010-2011

Dublin School of Architecture

Dublin School of Architecture

1

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Contact: Paul Kelly 4th year Module Corordinator Head of School Orna Hanly Dublin School of Architecture Dublin Institute of Technology Bolton Street Dublin 1, Ireland Tel: +353 1 4023690 ww.dublinschoolofarchitecture.com www.dit.ie/architecture/urban-design/ Typeface: Gil Sans + Helvetica Design: Paul Kelly Š Dublin School of Architecture Press. All rights reserved. All information presented in this publication is deemed to be the copyright of the creator or the Dublin School of Architecture, unless stated otherwise.

Dublin School of Architecture

2

4th Year, 2011 -2012


CONTENTS Semester 1 Building Conception to Completion Project No. 1 Brief Project No. 2 Brief Selected Semester 1 Projects Semester 2 Project No. 1 Brief Project No. 2 Brief Selected Smester 2 Projects Class list

Dublin School of Architecture

3

05 07 08 09 10 23 24 26 28 71

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Dublin School of Architecture

4

4th Year, 2011 -2012


SEMESTER 1 Module coordinator Paul Kelly Peter Crowley Emma Geoghean Helen Lamb Brien O’Brien Lenzie O’Sullivan Jim Roche Raul Salgado Martin Spillane Ethna Walls Marcin Wojcik

Dublin School of Architecture

5

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Dublin School of Architecture

6

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Building Conception to Completion

Paul Kelly

The Building Technology Structures (BTS) studio is intended to inspire students to consider their conceptual thinking in the context of the realisation of their Architecture. To determine the value of a theory of architecture one must measure the theoretical intention against the physical realisation. building. As undergraduates, students are challenged to approach their projects through critical theory and implementation. As with any pursuit, it is important to act; architecture demands a theory that develops over a period of time, and although a project can be a useful tool in this development, it ultimately denies the possibility of full assessment until the act of building has been undertaken. The ultimate challenge for a student is to convince. All theory is dependent on action for validation, otherwise it simply remains in realm of a hypothesis. Each student must evolve a personal working method based on the range of interests that engage them. This personal working method will support the development of projects during the design stage and the ultimately inform the intentions associated with construction. Each project should be examined against the initial concept and at each stage decisions are examined in the context of the overall concept. In this context, criticism of a project can be measured against the initial intention. When the concept or thinking behind a building is challenged, then it is imperative that the project is robust and can be explained and —if necessary—defended. The strength of a student’s working method allows for a true, robust defence of the scheme. Just as the projects success can be measured against the concept so to can the validity of any criticism. A student’s work should stand up to scrutiny in the context which it is proposed. The ultimate aim is for the clarity of the concept to be evident at a glance, possessing a formal quality that the viewer can understand. To this end, the choice of materials, their relationship and detailing, are critical. Any mis-judgement at concept development stage has critical consequences for the realisation of the project. To achieve this clarity, the project should operate on the level of the abstract, the viewer responding to the building on an intuitive level. The viewer aspects of the design of the building. The subtle relationship between two panels of stone, for instance, can reinforce or deny an idea about folding, mass or skin. The proper resolution of these seemingly minor matters elevates a building to the level of architecture. To paraphrase Le Corbusier, we must pass from mere construction to architecture to achieve a high aim.

architecture. The work of this studio seeks to produce unique work, modes of composition and aesthetics are eschewed to follow the path of the development of each project. The outcome at the beginning of each design is unknown; the unexpected is welcomed.

Dublin School of Architecture

7

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Project No. 1 Semester 1

1 Material - General Dublin School of Architecture –BArch Programme –Stage 4 Advanced Design Studio – Building DT101- 4 2010– 2011 Version 1.0 2010_09_20 Subject to review The material for this project is subject to change. Any amendments to the brief or the material will be posted on Tuesdays in the studio. Material - Site The site is the designated Fourth year Studio Site Visit _ Material – Programme spaces fabricated from 12mm plywood. The proposed forms will be used to display drawings and support and store models. Each student is required to limit the extent of material they use to one sheet of plywood. Requirements Each student is required to produce an A1 drawing describing their intervention in the space, the required scales range from 1:20 to 1:1. Students are asked to consider the following areas, how can a series of objects occupy space in a meaningful manner. What is the relationship between the limits of the space and the proposed object. Can the object have a utilitarian potential, is their scope for furniture? Students may elect to work in groups of 4 maximum. Submission date Tuesday September 28th, 2010 Concept The driving force behind all the work in this year will be that of a concept. The strength of the idea is of primary concern, this idea should be tested and interrogated using models and drawings. All detailed and material decisions should be examined in the context of reinforcing the conceptual basis of the project. Note. Plywood can be obtained from builders suppliers precut to requested dimensions. Woodworkers supply 12mm ply at 22.22 per sheet and each cut is charged at 1.82 you may choose to cut the material yourself or use another supplier. The details below are intended for your convenience. Woodworkers & Hobbies Supply Cntr. Phone (01) 4901968 Fax (01) 4902639 1-10 Mt. Tallagh Ave. Harolds Cross Rd. D6w

Pk_2010_09_20

Dublin School of Architecture

Project No.01

8

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Project No. 2 Semester 1

1 Material - General Dublin School of Architecture –BArch Programme –Stage 4 Advanced Design Studio – Building DT101- 4 2010– 2011 Version 1.0 2010_09_20 Subject to review The material for this project is subject to change. Any amendments to the brief or the material will be posted on Tuesdays in the studio. Material - Site The site is the stretch of the Broadstone rail line between Broadstone Station and Broombridge. There are 4 potential

Site Visit Date: Tuesday 28th of September 2010 Time: 14.00 Material – Programme The project is to design an mixed use building in close proximity or above to the former railway line. Following last years initial investigation by the 4th year students of the issues of the site. You are asked to consider the following options

1. 2.

The Luas will be implemented in the short term, say the next 5 years. The Luas will not happen allowing the line to be used for another form of public transport / cycleways

Requirements Each student is required to submit an A0 drawing showing the general arrangement of their proposals at 1:200, with part plans, sections and elevations of the a selected part of the building at 1:20. There will also be a requirement for a minimum of three 1:1 details describing a critical aspect of the design that has a direct interface with the scale of the human body. An A3 booklet summarising the project showing the drawings and model photographs will also be required. All of the drawings and photographs and images shall be saved to a DVD, photographs 300dpi Submission date See attached semester planner Concept Students are asked to consider the following areas, How is the concept of a building informed by the choice of material and structure? How much of an impact does or should it make? Is “truth” a valid concept in today s architecture and can or should it be a touchstone for a project. The brief will be developed against the backdrop of the requirements of the Dublin City Council development plan (zoning 10a is assumed across each site) among other criteria of plot ratio, site coverage, public open space, private open space. Each site will have a variety of uses 1. 2. 3. 4.

A large span structure with a community use, a sports hall or a swimming pool an element of housing, student housing, artists residences with a studio, live-work units or social housing Retail where viable.

The driving force for the project will be “The Idea”, a fundamental aspect of design is the concept, this concept is realised in built form and dependent for coherency for all decisions in relation to material choice, structure, environment and ultimately the integration of all of these issues. The success of this project will be the clarity of implementation of the concept for the building, tested against the detailed 1:1 decisions reinforcing the concept.

PK_2010_09_20

Dublin School of Architecture

Project No.02

9

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Dublin School of Architecture

10

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Jamie Conway, Niamh Chambers, Declan Crowley, Emma Forristal Tea House

THE TEAHOUSE. This was conceived in response to the studio furniture project. The program for the brief was open and the concept was to take the existing

The outer passageway denies the user direct access to the inner space and forms a spatial threshold which contains the Tea Station at the end. Through the internal walls, one enters into the internal volume which contains a stair to the upper deck. Conceptually the structure is comprised of a cube within another larger cube. The whole inside of the structure is then lined in butter paper so as to provide spacial autonomy inside and sculptural qualities on the outside, as well as giving the surface a unique animated appearance at night. The intention would be to provide internal lighting and audio to create a unique sensory experience within.

It was stipulated that the spaces be fabricated from plywood and be used to the maximum dimension of a plywood sheet (2440mm). The deck is comprised of members at full length, supported by four structural walls of height 2440mm. The outer walls (of the same dimension) are elevated to +660mm to form a balustrade on the upper level. One member is truncated to form an entrance to the interior.

Dublin School of Architecture

11

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Dublin School of Architecture

12

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Selected Projects

Dublin School of Architecture

13

4th Year, 2011 -2012


STUDENT ACCOMMODATION. The concept for this project is to establish a center or system of trade for Cabra, Phibsbrough, and Glasneven. The site is located between the three districts, which are divided by the Royal Canal and the Great Western railway line. The project’s objectives are to make use of the disused or wasteland areas to the north of the canal by cultivating the land into a series of allotments. These allotments will be allocated to the neighboring communities to encourage a sense of ownership over the area. The surplus food produced from these allotments will be housed and then brought to the south of the canal over a

Dublin School of Architecture

new bridge to St. Bernard park, where the aim is to establish a bimonthly market where trade of all varieties is encouraged. Finally there is a third building, more prominent in scale, which will act as a gateway building between the allotments community districts to hold meetings, preform shows or small productions and hold lectures of community interest. The main aim of this building is to integrate the community with the students of the nearby Grangegorman DIT campus.

14

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Donnchadha Gallagher Community School

Dublin School of Architecture

15

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Eoin Byrne Glass Recycling centre BROOMBRIDGE GLASS RECYCLING. This project looks at how an industrial process might inform an architectural exploration. This new building is a beacon for the more austere and pragmatic economic condition we are faced with. This new facility would engage the public on two levels, by opening its process out to the exterior, and by allowing people to visit and see the workings of the plant. This would encourage people to engage with the idea of waste management and the therefore, this building uses as small a ecological footprint as possible. It engages with Dublin and taller buildings in the future, having accelerated the sprawl into its hinterlands by refusing to engage with high rise buildings. This will also give Broombrige a sense of identity and place within the city that it is currently lacking. The rest of the site is to be occupied by an integrated constructed wetland, that will be used to treat the waste water from the surrounding areas. There is currently one operating very successfully in the nearby Tolka Park, and the Dublin City Council wish to expand their use across the city as a means of treating storm water.

Dublin School of Architecture

16

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Paul Maher Design Centre, Phibsborough

St. Peter’s church, and a lower scale private block which addresses the terraced neighbourhood and Great Western Square. The street facing element, a punctured

this project aims to relate to the surrounding conditions in terms of scale, materiality and function. The Phibsborough design centre comprises workshops, a community arts centre, gallery and live/work units for artists. Conceived as a punctured brick

workshops. In contrast, the rear element is more monolithic in its language to articulate the robust workshop functions. A ground level route is opened between the private and public elements of the building, allowing permeability throughout the site and a public route into the working courtyard. The project aims to build on a cultural and artistic Phibsborough, while providing a community focal point.

Wrapping around a block of terraced houses, a working courtyard is formed. The the building from workshop to gallery. The project is split into two elements: a taller, public block which forms a hard edge to the street and relates to the scale of

Dublin School of Architecture

17

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Niall Howard Botanical Research Facility MT. BERNARD PARK BOTANICAL RESEARCH. This is intended to re-accomodate the existing post-graduate and PhD department of Trinity College Dublin. The facilities currently in Trinity are out of date and the test sites and greenhouses were mostly removed to make way for Trinity Hall’s development. The taxonomy department within botany is currently situated in the national botanical gardens, located ten minutes from this site. The remaining eco-physiological and phenological departments became the programme for this project. The location is ideal, with the National Botanic Gardens of Ireland (NBGI) and the new Luas line only minutes away. The nature of this research facility meshes well with the surrounding domestic environments with its predominantly nocturnal and introverted presence. The driving force behind this project was to continue the bank of the canal and turn the awkward geometry of the site into something that is used throughout the seasons. I wanted to create a faint contact between the researchers and the members of the community, but at no point hinder the research in any way. The natural three and a half metre rise across the site was something I wanted to use to my This divide exists in both plan and section, distinguished by a mirrored courtyard.

Dublin School of Architecture

18

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Shane Morgan Micro Brewery

MICRO-BREWERY. Perched on the edge of an old rail line, the site abuts a crossroads of the consistently busy North Circular Road and the sunken, disused Great Western Railway. With the re-integration of the LUAS tramline along this marshy, scenic route, an urban environment is created. The site itself is surrounded by typically lower density housing. Sandwiched between Cabra and Phibsborough Village, there are very few public destinations in the area. The main use of the area is to get through it to somewhere else. A decision was made to create a public plaza in the heart of the site, allowing moments of rest within these busy corridors. Pedestrian route-ways were created joining the North Circular Road with Cabra Road, allowing a more generous entrance to the newly installed light rail. For the site itself, a recessed frontage coupled with an active growth buffer softens the noises of these to allow for that moment of rest, or at least a calm before it begins plaza, giving glimpses of itself to elevated positions. Holding onto the ideals of the lifeline’s caretakers, the micro-brewery utilises artisan craft, local skill sets and natural ingredients. It comes from a rich tradition of brewing within Dublin City and part of a renewal of interest in the advantages of agricultural responsibilty.

Dublin School of Architecture

19

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Simon Harrington Market Place

MT. BERNARD PARK. A New Linear Park connects the Fassaugh Road with the new Luas station at Broombridge. Existing routes are maintained and new ones provide additional connections to and from a new community facility. The park is imagined as a series of planted strata that cover the existing feral landscape. Walkways and bike paths cut across the green areas and open up new vistas. The planting is in the form of additional trees, new reed beds for the existing canal, meadow areas and wild berry hedges. A community building rises up from the park and reconnects the landscape back to the surrounding neighbourhoods. The brick the landscape. The variety of functions allows different age groups and users to be involved in community activities. The building is envisaged as a place for people to meet collectively and exchange ideas while learning from one another.

Dublin School of Architecture

20

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Luke Gleeson Physicality Building

PHYSICALITY BUILDING. This design used the context to become a node of wanted to assemble them in a different way, to create novel and impressive spatial conditions. The structural approach was generated by stacking the spaces on top of one another. Changing rooms and spaces that require less height (and smaller spans) were grouped together to create bridges that span the larger spaces of the main hall and swimming pool.

The brief of a sports and physical activity building was chosen as the ideal brief, considering the possibilities of a site adjoining a public park. The building became the division between traditional recreational Mount Bernard park to the south east

Dublin School of Architecture

21

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Dublin School of Architecture

22

4th Year, 2011 -2012


SEMESTER 2 Module coordinator Ethna Walls Peter Crowley Emma Geoghean Paul Kelly Helen Lamb Brien O’Brien Lenzie O’Sullivan Jim Roche Raul Salgado Martin Spillane Marcin Wojcik

Dublin School of Architecture

23

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Project No. 1 Semester 2

Architectural Design Studio. V111 ( ESM) 2011 Project 1 - Semester 2 Date: 31.1.11 Town 2011 – Study of a framework for town living in the 21st, Century. “ One building standing alone in the countryside is experienced as a work of architecture, but bring half a dozen buildings together and an art other than architecture is made possible. Several things begin to happen in the group which would be impossible for the isolated building.” Gordon Cullen “Concise Townscape”

Image – Francis Tibbauds – People Friendly Spaces.

Introduction: Ireland is one of the few countries in Europe that was not conquered by the Romans. It has a very unique character having been inhabited by the Celts, Vikings, Normans etc. The influence of this rich history is best seen in the development of our towns. The origin, function and reason for being can be quite varied, yet this is not evident from the similarity in housing developments which have sprung up in our towns over the past decade. Some towns developed around a port, river, monastic settlement or demesne. Other towns became centres for trade and became vibrant market towns. Most towns in Ireland have a very unique character, yet some towns have evolved from the expansion of original villages. The function of many towns have changed over time but this has not been evident from recent mundane, soulless development, which in many cases have been built on the fringes of our towns, independent of the framework of the original town. Victor Gruen the American Architect / Planner stated as far back as 1969 : “ By detaching our houses from each other, by isolating them from their neighbours, we have detached ourselves also from human experiences, we have isolated ourselves from our fellow men…. In as much as we are living in a middle – class society, we acquire only middling – sized space and build on it middling houses with middling gardens. In spite of this, we insist on sealing ourselves off hermetically, and in doing so we are losing some elementary advantages.” Victor Gruen 1969 “ The Heart of Our Cities.”

Project: You are asked to analyse an existing town from the list given in the enclosed brief with a view to developing a framework for 21st. century living. The towns of Kilcock and Abbeyleix have been chosen for this purpose. Kilcock has experienced extensive growth since it was by- passed over the past twenty years, while Abbeyleix is a town due to expand further from the opening up of a recent by- pass. The town should be analysed to understand how it has evolved over time, to enable you to select and design your proposal to satisfy the brief. An analysis of Place, Environment ( both natural and built) and Community is necessary to reach an understanding of the specific “genius loci” offered by the town. A list of headings have been suggested for this purpose. A low energy sustainable solution is imperative, this will help to strengthen the urban fabric and improve the quality of living for all concerned. ( See attached stage 1 brief, ref. R.I.A.I. brief.)

Aim of Project. To satisfy Aims in R.I.A.I. brief and attached Semester guideline document, also to To emphasise the need to establish a hierarchy when dealing with an open brief.

6

Dublin School of Architecture

24

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Project No. 1 Semester 2 TOWN 2011

Travelling scholarship

Introduction Following on from the RURAL 2010 Travelling Scholarship, this year the brief proposed for the competition will seek to explore the issue of small town settlements nationally. The manner in which these towns has expanded over the past ten years is currently the subject of much debate and has raised justifiable concerns in respect of the quality of in dividual developments and the social issues that have arisen as a result. This year the Travelling Scholarship aims to explore how to approach new residential developments within towns and also to develop a strategy for correcting or improving poor developments. It also seeks to focus debate on how town living and the expansion of smaller towns could best be handled in the future, taking reference from nationally and internationally successful examples.

Site Given the geographical spread of the architectural schools around the country we feel there is an opportunity to select a number of sites nationally. Satellite towns located within the commuter belt of larger urban settlements have been identified. A choice of towns is listed below with the main selection criteria being that they have a population of between 1,500 and 5,000 and that they are located close to larger urban settlements or along national primary Routes. Within Northern Ireland larger settlements have been selected due to different development patterns around Belfast. Latitude is given to the schools to select towns from the list below and indicated on the adjoining map and are as follows: Abbeyleix, Abbeyfeale, Athenry, Athboy, Ballaghaderreen, Bandon, Boyle, Cahir, Callan, Comber, Croom, Dromore, Dunshaughlin, Ferbane, Ferns, Holywood, Kanturk, Kilcock, Kilcoole, Lifford, Lismore, Loughrea, Macroom, Midleton, Monasterevan, Newmarket-on-Fergus, New Ross, Tyrrellspass, Sixmilebridge, Whiteabbey, Yougal.

Brief With a view to opening up the scope and in order to embrace the aspiration of the brief to propose a new framework for town living in the 21st century, the students are asked to select a town with a recent residential development, the quality of which they believe could be improved, could be better integrated into the existing town fabric or could be better supported with facilities to promote more sustainable ways of living in that town. Students proposals should include a response to the following considerations : Propose interventions which would support better ways of living in the town giving consideration to movement patterns, open space, community facilities etc. Propose patterns for future development of residential accommodation in the town, whether it be expansion of recent developments or development elsewhere in the town Develop one element which supports/illustrates possibilities for new ways of living in the town either residential or community element. Residential The scale and number of residential units provided is dependant on the Town and Site selected by the individual student. The brief is for a development of mixed residential units. The only stipulation is that the design of the individual units must be in compliance with the requ irements of the Department of the Environment housing guidelines. Innovation of design within the living units is encouraged while at the same time maintaining a sense of balance in terms of the economic viability within this sector.

Dublin School of Architecture Community

25

4th Year, 2011 -2012 Page 1 of 2


Project No. 1 Semester 2 In addition to the residential element of the brief a local/ community facility may also be considered. The accommodation to be provided within this local centre is flexible and the students have discretion in the selection of the facilities to be provided. The scale of the communal facilities should reflect the requirements of both the development itself and the facilities already existing withi n the town. Uses considered as acceptable include the following; 1. 2. 3. 4.

Local shop Crèche Live/work units Community building e.g library, youth club, hall.

Environment Consideration must be given to environmental concerns, both in terms of sustainability of design - energy consumption, orientation, passive solar gain, method of construction etc as well as the natural environment of the development. Particular attention should be given to the accessibility and use of shared open space as well as to the private open space afforded to each of the residential units paying due attention to orientation and sunlight. Conclusion TOWN 2011 is seen as the next step in an overall study of a framework for living in the 21 st century and we are looking at how you, the students, think it can be best achieved. Submission and Assessment Assessment The assessment of individual designs will take into consideration the aspects of the project selected by the student . Each submission is required to address in detail at least one of the following issues while demonstrating an awareness of all aspect affecting their submission. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Site selection and integration within the local town Site strategy Home designs community buildings

Submission 1. 2. 3.

4. 5. 6. 7.

Competitors should submit a MAXIMUM of 3 no. A1 sheets. High resolution PDF’s and jpegs or tiffs of your submission MUST be included on a separate CD with your entry number printed clearly on the CD. This is to allow publication of the projects in paper and web format The submission should include drawings sufficient to explain the scheme as well as Plans, sections, elevations etc, Site layout, Landscaping Proposals, Structural Concept, Utilisation of Daylight and Passive Ventilation/Thermal Strategies, and an illustration of detail element in 3D that evokes the feeling of the design. This could be an integration of sustainable systems, passive solar strategy etc. Models of buildings may NOT be submitted. However competitors are encouraged to use study models to examine the volume and massing of the building in its context. Photographs of these models may be submitted as part of the presentation. 3d movies of your proposal may be submitted on the CD The Assessors would welcome three dimensional drawings, sketches or photographs of models which may be included on the panels at the discretion of the competitor. A short report NO MORE than 200 words which explain the design intention is mandatory and it must be included as part of the submission and is to be incorporated on the A1 sheets or attached separately to the rear and text in word or PDF format must be included on the CD. Remember that the submissions will be transported to the RIAI, and stored prior to adjudication, following which they will be exhibited Therefore, please note the following: Sheets should be mounted on lightweight board or card Models may NOT be submitted. Boards should be flat with no raised or three dimensional element Boards should not be covered with glass, plexiglass or any other especially heavy or fragile material Registration number should be marked clearly on the top right corner of each A1 sheet

Entries must be submitted by 5.00 Wednesday 20 th April 2011 to the RIAI, 8 Merrion Square, Dublin 8.

Dublin School of Architecture

26

4th Year, 2011 -2012 Page 2 of 2


Project No. 2 Semester 2

Dublin School of Architecture - Barch Programme D.I.T. Bolton St. Stage 4 Advanced Design Studio Architectural Design Studio. ADS V111 ( ESM) 2011 Project 2, Workshop “ Performance “ 8th. April 2011 WORKSHOP WITH GAVIN GREEN, CHARCOAL BLUE THEATRE CONSULTANTANT.

Models from Renzo Piano Workshop.

PROGRAMME : 11.00 a.m. Studio 11.15 a.m Lecture 12.30 a.m. Workshop 1.30 a.m. Lunch break.

Students divided up into groups for day session. Lecture by Gavin Green on Music performance, Acoustics, Case Studies. All students to develop an aspect of their work further. Models, Drgs. Group 1 discussion - 12.30a.m. with Gavin Green Group 2 discussion - 1.00p.m.

2.00p.m. Workshop Cont. Group 3 discussion Group 4 discussion Group 5 discussion Group 6 discussion

4.00p.m. Break.

4.15p.m. – 5.00p.m.

-

2.00p.m.. with Gavin Green 2.30p.m.. 3.00p.m. 3.30p.m.

Crit with Gavin Green.

WORKSHOP: All students are expected to have work completed in advance of Workshop, this includes : (1) 1: 200 scale model and drawings prepared for Review 1 (2) 1: 50 min. part sectional model of your performance space. All models to incorporate your thinking on lighting, ventilation, cooling, acoustics, structure and materials as an integral part of your design concept. 12.30 – 4.00p.m. all students are expected to advance the design of their performance space based on the talk by Gavin Green, by enlarging part of their scheme, detailing an aspect further etc. Your 1: 50 pre prepared model will probably inform you to what area you need to expand on. Crit: Students will present their work – models / drgs. at 4.00p.m. for Crit. Assessment – 20% ESM. Studio Staff:

Dublin School of Architecture

Ethna Walls, Paul Kelly, Jim Roche, Marcin Wojcek ,Gavin Buggy, Brian O`Brian, Peter Crowley, Emma Geoghegan, Helen Lamb, Lenzie O`Sullivan, Raul Salgado, Martin Spillane.

27

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Project No. 2 Semester 2

Dublin School of Architecture - Barch Programme D.I.T. Bolton St. Stage 4 Advanced Design Studio Architectural Design Studio. ADS V111 ( ESM) 2011 Project 2, Semester 2 “ Performance “ 21st. Mar. 2011 Introduction. “In the early stages a composer`s invention seldom flows freely. The control of melodic, rhythemic and harmonic factors impedes the spontaneous conception of musical ideas. It is possible to stimulate the inventive faculties and acquire technical facility by making a great many sketches of phrases based on a predetermined harmony. At first, such attempts may be stiff and awkward, but with patience, the co-ordination of the various elements will rapidly become smoother, until real fluency and even expressiveness is attained. “ Schoenberg. A 1970 “Fundamentals of Musical Composition” Faber & Faber

The design process involved in musical composition described by Schoenberg can be compared to the design process involved for a large scale complex building. It is difficult to comprehend the site, scale, spatial requirements, structure, materials, light, acoustical qualities, services etc.initially all at once and create a strong concept with functionality and beauty combined, “ a great many sketches” as Schoenberg describes are necessary “ until real fluency and even expressiveness is attained.”

Lecture Theatre, Otaneimi, Aalto.

Project : The Royal Irish Academy of Music ( RIAM) have a distinguished history for more than 160 years in Ireland, in promoting excellence in music, in composition and particularly in the field of ” performance “The Conservatory are at present looking at the possibility of expanding their facilities to serve the 1,300 plus student body . ( See attached from RIAM.) You are asked to design a new School of Music for the RIAM with a particular emphasis on “ Performance” The focal point of the school will be a specially designed performance space for full scale operatic performances, along with all the other spaces facilities necessary to nurture and promote such excellence. This project is about integrated holistic design, like the design of a musical instrument, every element should have a purpose and by their combination produce a beautiful piece of Architecture. The design must allow for versatility and flexibility where required and be economical in terms of space, material use and preferably cost. Reynar Banham stated in 1969 “ .. It will often prove that drawing a blind over a window, or actuating some other equally simple control, is all that is required. In the right circumstances, a truly sophisticated approach to the man / environment system may involve no complex mechanisms ……. “ Sophistication is not necessarily the product of highly developed machinery, nor intensive capital investment. It is more a way of using available equipment and resources with cunning and intelligence:” Banham, R 1984,“ The Architecture of the Well – tempered Environment.

Dublin School of Architecture

28

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Brian Jordan Remnants of a Half Acre

REMNANTS OF A HALF ACRE. At the time of its foundation as a market town for the De Vesci Estate, tenants were given a home with a half acre of land to the rear and an acre for use elsewhere. From this it has developed in a linear fashion along its main axes with recent housing developments being built at the periphery of the town. As a result, vast amounts of space are left as backlands behind the hard edge of the main street due to the dense grain of the urban fabric. This proposal intends to explore these backlands which mainly remain unused and to create a third dimension to the town behind the main street, a new layer which will create public spaces and new routes around the town. The centre of the town

Dublin School of Architecture

would be sustainably developed to a suitable density with housing, buildings for the townspeople and the encouragement of small, local industry. This particular proposal includes: a theatre space seating 160 people, a cinema screen and a meeting room for the community. Housing has been introduced as three family homes and two smaller homes with dedicated studio spaces. The long-term vision of this proposal is that it can be expanded upon when required, with an emphasis on linking with the existing estates. It could also be applied to other parts of Abbeyleix or, in fact, other towns in Ireland where this dense grain pattern and backlands exist.

29

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Dublin School of Architecture

30

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Brian Jordan Remnants of a Half Acre

Dublin School of Architecture

31

4th Year, 2011 -2012


ABBEYLEIX BOG. The town of Abbeyleix can be characterised by its unique planned form and its relationship with Abbeyleix House, designed in 1773 by James Wyatt for John II, Viscount de Vesci. In many cases, the back of the town’s buildings meet farmland in a direct manner and this relationship between agrarian land and the built environment becomes an interesting condition, which repeats itself. Dense woodlands offer a different type of boundary to the town while providing hidden trails for more adventurous walkers. Another type of landscape emerges alongside

Dublin School of Architecture

these woodlands. A hundred hectare bog lies to the south of the town. Killamuck Bog is the most south-eastern raised bog in county Laois. The land was given to the community of Abbeyleix by Bord na Mona. This proposal examines the potential resources of the bog and offers a solution which would connect this landscape to the town, educating both locals and visitors about the rich biodiversity and promoting eco-tourism.

32

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Simon Harrington Abbeylix Bog

Dublin School of Architecture

33

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Dublin School of Architecture

34

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Jamie Conway An Urban Living Room Abbeylix Abbeyleix is a town richly endowed with heritage and architectural harmony.

self organisation. The following proposal seeks to create a new typology, an urban ‘Living Room’ containing space for childcare, a park for recreation, a reading and dining room, and a town meeting room. The siting for this building is such that it re-enforces the strong existing route going north-south linking the north and south churches, the town square, the main street, the hall, the GAA grounds, the tennis grounds and the primary school. The external expression is of local stone with a substantial insulating layer and a fair-face concrete inner layer. The roofs are bronze which catch water used for the day to day requirements of the building.

one can see that the town has become stagnant through neglect both in terms of the town. In recent years, the town has experienced some growth, although has been spared the relentless expansion of some other towns in Dublin’s catchment area. They have little architectural consideration and are not informed by the built heritage of the town or its layout. Currently the town under-utilises its vast potential (historical, recreational and sport) due to the lack of local discussion, debate and

Dublin School of Architecture

35

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Dublin School of Architecture

36

4th Year, 2011 -2012


James Brown Sustainability Research Centre, Abbeylix ABBEYLEIX. The idea of this project is the typology of a typical Irish town. Through a series of strategic planning decisions, a pattern of development is established

Future residential development to be in the form of terraced housing behind the existing core buildings. The parklands are designed with the aim of indicating the

aim is to integrate the estates at the periphery into the town, encouraging the “untapped� populations to use the town on a more regular basis. This involves the establishment of a network of pedestrian pathways through parklands, offering an alternative to the car biased entry roads, and the thickening of the complexity

the existing hedgerows are maintained and the park will be planted with high and low native trees and shrubs. At the nodal point of the routes is a square, which leads to the heart of the town, the market square. The square is enclosed by two bed live-work units to the south, and a sustainability research centre to the north, with a passage through the building to the parklands beyond.

be provided between the blocks, and the new buildings will face the green areas.

Dublin School of Architecture

37

4th Year, 2011 -2012


KILCOCK LANEWAYS. “Work is something you do, not something you travel to�. This project seeks to improve the lives of the inhabitants of Kilcock by breaking down barriers and improving permeability to the town. By identifying the physical barriers including tall estate walls, blank gable walls and dead ends, nodes were established that could be used to link disjointed areas and provide much needed community facilities. These hubs of community activity are linked by a series of new mews lanes that allow the existing inhabitants to increase their living/working space

Dublin School of Architecture

and use their back gardens more effectively. The mews developments densify the area and increase diversity by encouraging residents to live and work at home. easier for disabled people to work. The community facilities can support these businesses and provide larger facilities such as conference rooms, function rooms and research facilities.

38

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Anna Pierce Working Mews Laneways, Kilcock

Dublin School of Architecture

39

4th Year, 2011 -2012


ABBEYLEIX BIOETHANOL PLANT. Unused farmland has become a problem in Ireland. EU incentives mean that farmers are encouraged to not farm their land. The result is large areas of land that are declining in agricultural use. If bureaucracy is ignored, local farmland could be used to provide for and sustain a town. The town’s landscape and countryside would become a positive structuring and generative tool, food miles would disappear, and the town could become totally can be readopted and an agricultural focus reinstated. Buildings with an agricultural and/or residential function are proposed to act as catalysts, offering society an opportunity to reconnect with the land. Organised in a radial pattern, the farmland

located between the main street and the peripheral housing estates will become working farms, creating new plot lines and pedestrian routes in the landscape and reinforcing movement towards the town centre. A bio-ethanol plant is introduced to

Dublin School of Architecture

40

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Paul Maher Bioethanol Plant, Abbeyleix

Dublin School of Architecture

41

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Simon Harrington Royal Irish Academy of Music

Royal Irish Academy of Music The Royal Irish Academy of Music required a new building to house a complex accommodation on a compact site. This proposal celebrates the traditional form of a terraced performance space and expresses this form while creating an activated central courtyard. A large piece of glass separates an inner communal area for students of music to meet, socialize and exchange ideas from an outer courtyard space. This paved landscape offers both students and visitors to the school to listen to music in an alternative exterior space on warm summer evenings. This external plaza explores brick construction by integrating lighting, furniture, planting and fenestration into a folded brick landscape. The meeting point of this brick sculpture and school is imagined as a fracture which allows natural daylight to the music theory and practice spaces below. The different faculties that make up the school are housed around this central courtyard space. In this way, all classrooms, rehearsal spaces and library receive natural light from more than one orientation, resulting in animated and inspirational learning environments for students playing a variety of instruments. A series of hollows puncture the brick building creating external garden spaces; these places are imagined as small social spaces and are intended to create unpredictable meeting spaces between students from different faculties. This thinking aided in the organization of the building with stairways and small niche spaces in circulation areas providing informal social spaces for a constant exchange of ideas between students and staff.

AA

AA

site plan 1:1000

view of common area with external plaza space in background

Dublin School of Architecture

42

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Anna Pierce Royal Irish Academy of Music ROYAL IRISH ACADEMY OF MUSIC. “Architecture as a Musical Instrument”. This project seeks to explore architecture through the medium of music and sound. The building becomes a musical instrument, an instrument of parts. Each sound is stacked ‘vents’. The vertical voids inbetween these stacked ‘instruments’ act as a buffer, yet they also combine individual sounds. These void spaces refract the music so that it echoes and chimes through the building and it becomes alive with music.

Dublin School of Architecture

43

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Dublin School of Architecture

44

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Donnchadha Gallagher Royal Irish Academy of Music

Dublin School of Architecture

45

4th Year, 2011 -2012


school performance public

4 7

6 5

3

Site Plan scale 1:1000 2

8 9

1

-

-

A

Ground Floor Plan scale 1:400

A

Dublin School of Architecture

46

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Olivia Hillary Royal Irish Academy of Music

ROYAL IRISH ACADEMY OF MUSIC. The brief for the new school of section the school has three levels of occupancy: group music below ground, tuition spaces above ground and individual practice spaces in the roofscape. The larger ensemble spaces are below ground in a concrete piece that slides under Thomas Street and below the central courtyard. Above ground, light wells take the place of the original shop windows, allowing passers-by a glimpse of the world below.

the school—private school spaces and public performance areas. Dublin’s Thomas Street is in the heart of one of Dublin’s oldest quarters, the Liberties. This area is characterised by a small-scale urban grain and a medieval street layout. Thomas Street is lined by a facade of small shop fronts with residential overhead. These facades engage with the street, while the residential area overhead is a private

Dublin School of Architecture

47

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Dublin School of Architecture

48

4th Year, 2011 -2012


1

Olivia Hilary Royal Irish Academy of Music

Research Topic

-

-

Plan level 4 scale 1:400

scale 1:200

2

Building Servicing Studies

Aerial view

Roofscape

3

06.05.11 04:30

South-facing facade

-

06.05.11 08:00

4

06.05.11 12:00

06.05.11 02:00

06.05.11 16:00

06.05.11 17:00

-

Roof structure

RIAM Music School

Dublin School of Architecture

49

Project 2b

Olivia Hillery DT101/4

18.05.11

4th Year, 2011 -2012


1 2 3

3

1 2

performance space organisation

1 Public entrance/ lobby 2 Atrium/circulation space 3 School entrance

circulation diagram

site map

ground oor plan

third oor plan

cross section

long section

atrium space

thomas street view

Dublin School of Architecture

50

atrium space

4th Year, 2011 -2012


cross section

long section site map

Paul Maher Royal Irish Academy of Music

atrium space

ground oor plan

thomas street view

atrium space

cross section

Dublin School of Architecture

51

4th Year, 2011 -2012


3.

Roof terrace, allowing access for staff, students and guests throughout the course of the day, giving views back east to the city.

Skylight at top of Fly Tower, allowing natural, Northern light for performers during daytime rehearsals, with screens/ blinds to minimise varying conditions for performance

adjustable tonal qualities and

5.

6

2.

21

18

21

18

4. Theatre Section 1. Front of House 2. Concert Hall 3. Roof Terrace 4. Opera Hall 5. Fly Tower 6. Stage 7. Understage Mechanical 8. Orchestra Pit 9. Recital Room 10. Plant Room

1.

6.

7.

10.

Plant Room located near theatres to facilitate heat management, air quality and ventilation changes with ease, while minimising duct work.

9.

8.

Bleacher seating in Recital Hall, to allow for re-arrangement of space to facilitate any use. Possible use for Black Box Theatre, workshops.

Adjustable mechanical supports for stage and orchestra pit allowing for variations.

1m

2m

5m

10m

Royal Irish Academy of Music

Theatre Model 1:50

Thom

as St

reet

14 15 10 1

4

3

2

11

13

11

St. Catherine’s Lane

West

10

11 13 1 11

7

13 11

12 11 C

5 8

9

8

Swan Alley

9

Exploded Axonometric Diagram

Dublin School of Architecture

Ground Floor Plan

52

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Shane Morgan Royal Irish Academy of Music ROYAL IRISH ACADEMY OF MUSIC. The concept of this project came about after looking at the grain patterns and plot sizes of the existing fabric. The

In the main music halls, construction build-up consists of eco-cem reinforced concrete to minimise vibration resonance with partial timber slat cladding. The timber gives a warm tone, while dividing the space, both visually and acoustically. Externally the building is clad in an extruded aluminium mesh. This wraps over the opes, offering privacy without restricting light. The aluminium is from recycled sources, regaining up to 94% of the embodied energy. It contrasts with the warmer, more mellow quality of the interior timbers. An investigation of the

soaked in rich history. To minimise the impact of a large, dense structure in the environs, the plot sizes were maintained to keep the rhythm of the street. areas of programme. Large voids have been removed from the bars, creating spaces that allow for student interaction and playing. The voids contain planting and small trees to create visual connections between the structures.

Theatre Model 1:50

Dublin School of Architecture

53

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Dublin School of Architecture

54

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Shane Morgan Royal Irish Academy of Music

Dublin School of Architecture

55

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Bush Hammered Concrete w/ Crushed Silver Granite Aggregate, flat finish at joint.

Double Glazed Windows 1050mm by 3000mm Inclined to eachother, zig-zag.

ROYAL IRISH ACADEMY OF MUSIC. The idea behind this project is the retention of the four existing buildings on Thomas Street, one of the oldest parts of Dublin City. An Sligh Mhor was an ancient route to the city and forms a major axis in the present day structure in the form of this street. A building of Catherine’s Church. The facade of the new building on Thomas Street is informed by the existing street condition. An indent on the facade keeps the shape of the footpath and is seen as a natural point at which the footpath widens, where the entrance is located. Clients interested in a ‘chance encounter’ would be able to use the building. I also wanted to explore the idea of large circulation spaces in the form of stepped platforms into the ground. By creating a division of musical change how the public engaged with the building from the street for passing through or for performances. The route would be through, not around the building.

Box Office Douglas Fir

Sandstone Brass Guardrail

Granite

Dublin School of Architecture

56

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Brian Jordan Royal Irish Academy of Music

Bush Hammered Concrete w/ Crushed Silver Granite Aggregate, flat finish at joint.

Double Glazed Windows 1050mm by 3000mm Inclined to eachother, zig-zag.

Box Office Douglas Fir

Sandstone Brass Guardrail

Granite

Dublin School of Architecture

57

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Dublin School of Architecture

58

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Brian Jordan Royal Irish Academy of Music

60’

Dublin School of Architecture

59

4th Year, 2011 -2012


COURTYARD MUSIC. This project began from an idea about a split circulation between students of the RIAM and the public coming to watch performances. Layout is generated to maximise the required sound levels and light intensities for certain types of rooms. Smaller practice room, not in use during the day, buffer the sound from the peripheral large tutorial rooms and the corridors and atrium. Natural stack ventilation is expressed in the faรงade through a series of expressed ducts. Each room is looked at as an autonomous bock where some protrude out

Dublin School of Architecture

and some recess back in to create an undulated skin structure and allow visual connections between rooms. A large exposed stairs draws the attention of the public to the school of music and to the large internal atrium seen from the street. As one descends under the arch in the stairs you enter into the foyer for assembly before concerts. It is a cast concrete structure and timber lining with air cavities required.

60

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Grace Counihan Royal Irish Academy of Music

Dublin School of Architecture

61

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Dublin School of Architecture

62

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Jamie Conway Royal Irish Academy of Music

ROYAL IRISH ACADEMY OF MUSIC. The building takes its form from the site boundary with the theatre placed centrally, embedded within the structure and encased by the remainder of the program. The theatre mass is contained between

students is through the southern courtyard. Sound and its proliferation throughout the common spaces establishes an internal metal structure of seven sound networks contained within the supporting beam section and allows highly controlled ventilation and soundscapes to be introduced to the rooms through an internal perforated oak lining. This network also penetrates the roof to become a ventilation stack, sucking air in and forcing stale air out through fenestration.

access is through a northern courtyard addressing Thomas Street and the school’s academic presence forms part of the streetscape and access for services and

Dublin School of Architecture

63

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Dublin School of Architecture

64

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Jamie Conway Royal Irish Academy of Music

Dublin School of Architecture

65

4th Year, 2011 -2012


G

0

ROYAL IRISH ACADEMY OF MUSIC. This building comprises the majority of the school program for the RIAM. In it, is housed tuition, rehearsal and accompanying ensemble rooms for string, brass, vocal and keyboard musicians. It is a very simple structure that is based on a modular framework derived from the space required to house instruments of this nature. The facade takes this modular framework and embellishes it further. The vertical structural lines become hidden amongst a “serialist� arrangement of vertical elements. The aim of this was simply to create

Dublin School of Architecture

an abstract composition that was decentralised and that played with the idea of repetition and the contrast of the horizontal and the vertical. The smaller of the two auxiliary buildings comprises additional program for the school of the RIAM. In it is housed tuition and accompanying rehearsal rooms for wind and percussion. It is the facade works along the same basis.

66

4th Year, 2011 -2012

2

5


Robert Chapman Royal Irish Academy of Music

Second Building

-1

G

This building, the smaller of the two auxiliary buildings, comprises additional program for the school of the RIAM. In it, is housed tuition and accompanying rehearsal rooms for wind and percussion. It is the same structural and modular framework used in the first building. Additionally, the facade works along the sam basis.

1 Wind Tuion Room 2 Wind Rehearsal Room 3 Unisex Toilets

1 Wind Tuion Room 2 Wind Rehearsal Room 3 Unisex Toilets 4 Reception

1 1 Percussion Room 2 Office 3 Unisex Toilets

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

3

1

3

-1

2

1

1

1

Robert Chapman DT101 4 Dublin School of Architecture

0

67

2

5

10

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Dublin School of Architecture

68

4th Year, 2011 -2012


James Brown Royal Irish Academy of Music THE ROYAL IRISH ACADEMY OF MUSIC. Two scales of typology border a busy street, a school of music, and several performance spaces. The main opera hall is situated against Thomas Street to the north, creating an entrance below an overhang, and affording the school quieter spaces behind. A second entrance, to the west, offers a view up through an atrium, to most of the school. These two typologies are brought together in the atrium space in the heart of the building, where a cafe, bar and student common areas offer an intermediate atmosphere, between the school and the performance spaces. Users can experience the depth of the building and, with this, it’s various musical and educational functions: the making of music. Visitors are drawn to this area below the atrium via a stairs, which then leads on to the opera hall. The chamber music hall is adjacent, and there is a service area which serves both these performance spaces, and the hall for the symphony orchestra. A break between the black concrete envelope of the opera this, the structural module of the school building is continued across, where there are more educational facilities. An 18th century research room is in the Victorian building to the west, itself connected back to the RIAM internally.

Dublin School of Architecture

69

4th Year, 2011 -2012


Dublin School of Architecture

70

4th Year, 2011 -2012


4TH YEAR Sarah Baranowski Klara Bindl Bernard N. Brennan James R. Browne Ciaran J. Byrne Eoin Byrne Margaux Calvet Amy Catsinas Niamh Chambers Robert Chapman Kevin Coffey Jamie Conway Anna Corbetta Declan Crowley Josephine Flahive Emma Forristal Donnchadha Gallagher Luke Gleeson Simon Harrington Edwyn J. Hickey Olivia Hillery Niall Howard Ruth Hynes Boris Ikeda David Ivers Brian Jordan Jan Kaplan Laura Kenny Claire Kilty Maria B. Larkin Bryan Ledger Nicole Maass Paul Maher Sophia Martinez Courtney Mc Donnell Daniela Mest Shane A. Morgan Grainne Ni Chuanachain David O’Brien Mary O’Brien Alen O’Farrell Saran H O’Rourke James M. O’Toole Anna Pierce Egle Pruckute Michele Realis Luc Jimmy Roelofs Adrian Rooney Emmet Smith Elaine Wynne

GUEST CRITICS Gavin Green Gary Lysaght Michael McGarry John Parker Niall Rowan

Dublin School of Architecture

71

4th Year, 2011 -2012


4TH YEAR

Dublin School of Architecture

2010-2011

Dublin School of Architecture

72

4th Year, 2011 -2012


4th Year 2010-2011  

Summary document of 4th year students' projects from the Dublin School of Architecture

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you